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Full text of "The Pennsylvania magazine of history and biography"

HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO PRESS 









OR 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 



Vol. XXVIII. 



PHILADELPHIA : 

PUBLICATION FUND OF 

THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 

No. 1300 LOCUST STREET. 
1904. 



F 



K1.5JO& 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME XXVIII. 



PAQK 

The Manufacture of Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 

By James M. Swank 1 

Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, of the Second Continental 

Artillery, 1779. By Hon. Thomas R. Bard. (Concluded.) . 12 
Selected Letters from the Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, of 

Philadelphia, 1739-1742. ( Concluded . ) 26 

Pennsylvania Soldiers of the Revolution entitled to Depreciation 

Pay. (Concluded.) ........ 45, 201 

Penn's Proposals for a Second Settlement in the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. (Facsimile.) . .60 

Francis Campbell. By Charles II. Browning 62 

Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller, of Ephrata . . 71 

The Furniture of our Ancestors 78, 190 

Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 172(M775. (Con- 
cluded.) 84,218,346,470 

Notes and Queries 101, 236, 375, 508 

Book Notices . . .- 123, 254, 383, 510 

Sketch of John Inskeep, Mayor, and President of the Insurance 
Company of North America, Philadelphia. By H. E. Wallace, 

Jr. (Portrait.) 129 

Letters of Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

By Horace W. Sellers . : . . . . . 136,295,403 
List of Perm Manuscripts. (Forbes Collection.) .... 155 
Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. By Lothrop Withington. 

( Continued. ) 169, 456 

The Alaska Adjudication. By Thomas Willing Balch . . .176 
Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal from Philadelphia to Kentucky, 1787- 

1788. By Samud P. Cochran . . . . . . .182 

Alexander Lawson. By Townsend Ward 204 

Marriage Licenses of Caroline County, Maryland, 1774-1815. By 

Henry Dwmes Cranor . . ... . . 209, 320, 428 

Two Letters of Charles Carroll of Carrollton 216 

George Washington in Pennsylvania. By Hon. Samuel W. Penny- 
packer 257 

(Hi) 



iv Contents of Volume XX VII I. 

PAGE 

A Great Philadelphia!! : Robert Morris. By Dr. Ellis Paxson Ober- 

holtzer. (Portrait.) 273 

The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family and Edward 
Shippen, of Philadelphia. By Thomas Willing Balch. (Por- 
trait.) 385 

Engraved Works of David Edwin. (Not mentioned in Mr. Hilde- 

burn's List. ) By Mantle Fielding 420 

Officers of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania .... 513 

Index . 517 



THE 

PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 

OP 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 

VOL. XXYI1I. 1904. No. 1. 



THE MANUFACTUEE OF IEON AND STEEL EAILS 
IN WESTEEN PENNSYLVANIA. 

BY JAMES M. SWANK. 

This country leads all other countries in the produc- 
tion of iron and steel. This prominence in the manufac- 
ture of these products is only in part due to the bounty 
of nature in providing liberal supplies of the raw materials 
that are needed ; it is largely the result of friendly legis- 
lation by the General Government: first, in more firmly 
establishing in 1861 the protective tariff policy, which has 
since been effectively maintained with but brief interrup- 
tions, and, second, in adopting in 1850 and in subsequently 
maintaining the policy of liberal grants of public lands to 
railroad companies. Through the operation of the protect- 
ive policy the home market has been largely preserved 
for the home producers of iron and steel, and through the 
operation of the land-grant system, supplemented by the 
homestead policy, which first became effective in 1862, 
during the civil war, thousands of miles of railroad have 
been built in the Western States and Territories that would 
not otherwise have been built. "With the building of these 
roads and of other railroads in the Eastern, Middle, and 

VOL. XXVIII. 1 ( 1 ) 



2 Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 

Southern States the population of all sections of the coun- 
try has been greatly increased, the consumption of iron 
and steel and of other manufactured products has been 
greatly enlarged, vast mineral resources have been dis- 
covered and developed, and the whole country has been 
phenomenally enriched. Thousands of new farms have 
been opened, our agricultural products have been many 
times multiplied, and both home and foreign markets for 
the sale of our surplus crops and of all other products of 
the farm, the forest, the fishery, the mine, and the factory 
have been quickly and cheaply reached. 

It is the exact truth to say that many of these rail- 
roads could not have been built if our protective tariff 
policy had not built up our iron-rail industry in the third 
quarter of the nineteenth century and our steel-rail indus- 
try in the fourth quarter. Until we began to make our 
own iron rails and afterwards our own steel rails foreign 
manufacturers charged us excessive prices for such rails as 
we could afford to buy. Both of the rail industries men- 
tioned had at the first to struggle for their very existence 
against foreign competition, the early duties on foreign iron 
rails and afterwards on foreign steel rails not being suffi- 
ciently protective, but in the end the control of the home 
market was gained, the production of rails increased enor- 
mously, and the prices of both iron and steel rails to rail- 
road companies were steadily reduced. Before we began to 
make our own steel rails English manufacturers charged 
us more than three times as much per ton for the steel rails 
we bought from them as American manufacturers have since 
charged for millions of tons. These millions of tons have 
also been sold at lower prices than were previously charged 
for iron rails, either of home or foreign manufacture. 

The resisting and wearing qualities of a steel rail being 
far superior to those of an iron rail, it is capable of support- 
ing a much heavier weight of cars, locomotives, freight, and 
passengers, and it permits trains to be moved at much 
higher speed ; hence the carrying capacity of our railroads 



Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 3 

has been increased many times, while the cost of operating 
them per ton of freight or per passenger has been greatly- 
reduced. The life of a steel rail, notwithstanding the greater 
service it is called on to perform, being many times greater 
than that of an iron rail, the cost to our railroad companies 
for track renewals is many times less than if iron rails were 
still used. The immense agricultural crops of the country 
in the last thirty or thirty-five years, if they had been pro- 
duced, never could have been transported to either home 
or foreign markets if only iron rails had been continued in 
use. The attempt to transport them upon iron rails, even 
with lighter cars and locomotives than are now used, would 
have so worn out the rails that the tracks would have been 
constantly torn up for repairs, and this condition would 
have resulted in a continual interruption to all traffic, while 
the heavy cars and locomotives of the present day could not 
have been used at all. 

In ten years after we began the manufacture of steel rails 
in commercial quantities, which was in 1867, the charge for 
transporting a bushel of wheat by railroad from Chicago 
to New York was reduced from 44.2 cents a bushel to 20.3 
cents, and it has since been further reduced to 8.75 cents. 
In 1860, with only iron rails, the charge for moving a ton 
of freight one mile on the New York Central Railroad 
was 2.065 cents; in 1870, after we had commenced to use 
steel rails, the charge was reduced to 1.884 cents ; in 1880, 
when steel rails were in more general use on our trunk 
railroads, the charge was further reduced to 8.79 mills, 
and in 1901 it was still further reduced to 7.4 mills. In 
the decade from 1870 to 1880 the charge for transporting 
a barrel of flour from Chicago to New York by rail fell 
from $1.60 to 86 cents. In 1903 the freight rate over the 
Pennsylvania Railroad system in car-load lots from Chicago 
to New York was 36 cents per barrel. 

But for our cheap steel rails flour and meat, lumber and 
coal, and numerous other heavy products could not have 
been cheaply distributed to consumers, the necessaries of 



4 Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 

life would have been largely enhanced in price through the 
high cost of transportation, and the whole country would 
have had a much less rapid growth than it has experienced. 

The benefits which this country has derived from cheap 
steel rails of home manufacture are so numerous and enter 
so largely into the daily life of all our people that they have 
ceased to excite special comment, like the natural blessings 
of light, air, and water. 

In the manufacture of iron rails Western Pennsylvania 
was prominent in the early days of American railroads. 
At Brady's Bend, on the Allegheny River, in Armstrong 
County, the Great Western Iron Works, embracing four 
furnaces and a rolling mill, were commenced in 1840 by 
the Great Western Iron Company, composed of Philander 
Raymond and others. The rolling mill was built in 1841 
to roll bar iron, but it afterwards rolled iron rails, which 
were at first only flat bars, with holes for spikes countersunk 
in the upper surface, and in 1846 and afterwards it rolled 
T rails. In 1856 it made 7,533 tons of rails. It was one 
of the first mills in the country to roll T rails, our first rails 
of this pattern having been rolled in 1844 at the Mount 
Savage Rolling Mill, in Maryland. The Brady's Bend mill 
continued to make rails until after the close of the civil 
war. In October, 1873, it ceased operations. Shipments 
of rails were made by the Allegheny River. In 1849 the 
Great Western Iron Company failed and the Brady's Bend 
Iron Company took its place. The mill and the furnaces 
have long been abandoned and have gone to decay. In 
the Eailway Age, of Chicago, for April 3, 1903, there ap- 
peared the following interesting reminiscence of the Brady's 
Bend enterprise, contributed by Mr. G. W. P. Atkinson. 

The Allegheny Valley Eailroad in 1865 operated only 44 miles from 
Pittsburgh to Kittanning. It is now part of the Pennsylvania system. 
At that time steamers ran up the Allegheny River from Pittsburgh to 
Franklin when there was water enough. There was a rail mill at 
Brady's Bend in 1865, with which the writer was connected, and which 
during the war made a great deal of railroad iron. William B. Ogden, 



Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 5 

Chicago's first mayor, was president of it, and the writer had charge 
of its sales. If the river was not navigable for steamers we had to 
take the stage from the Kittanning end of the Allegheny Valley Eailroad 
to Brady's Bend, and a tough ride it was. The writer and William 
B. Ogden made the trip several times together. Rails were shipped 
by river in barges to Pittsburgh or Cincinnati. In the fall of 1865 the 
writer shipped 2,000 tons of rails for the Nashville and Chattanooga 
Railroad (which was run by the government during the war) from the 
Brady's Bend mill in barges down the Allegheny and the Ohio Rivers 
and up the Cumberland River to Nashville. It took about six weeks 
to reach Nashville. As one passes East Brady Station to-day on the 
Allegheny Valley Railroad the tall stack of the rolling mill is visible 
on the opposite side of the river, all that is left of the once busy town of 
Brady's Bend, with 3,000 people. [The stack was torn down in 1903.] 

In 1853 the Cambria Iron Works were built at Johns- 
town, in Cambria County, by the Cambria Iron Com- 
pany, expressly to roll T rails, George S. King being the 
leading member of the company and the originator of the 
enterprise. Within a year the works were making rails. 
Several charcoal and coke furnaces were connected with 
these works. In 1856, under new management, they made 
13,206 tons of rails, and their production was afterwards 
increased. For almost twenty-nine years, beginning with 
1855, Daniel J. Morrell, who died in 1885, was the suc- 
cessful general manager of these works. In 1871, through 
his persistent advocacy of steel rails, their manufacture 
was added to that of iron rails, in which branch of the 
steel industry these works have ever since been prominent. 
John Fritz, the distinguished engineer, is entitled to the 
credit of having made the manufacture of iron rails at 
these works a conspicuous success, accomplished chiefly 
through his introduction of three-high rolls in 1857; while 
his brother, George Fritz, also distinguished as an engineer, 
successfully superintended the introduction at the same 
works of the Bessemer process and the' manufacture of 
Bessemer steel rails. In 1898 the works were leased to the 
Cambria Steel Company, which now operates them. 

In 1865 the Superior Iron Company built the Superior 



6 Iron and Steel Hails in Western Pennsylvania. 

Rolling Mill at Manchester, in Allegheny County, to make 
iron rails. Connected with this mill were two coke furnaces, 
built in 1863. The company operated the works until Sep- 
tember, 1867, when they were leased by Springer Harbaugh. 
On January 1, 1870, Harbaugh, Mathias & Owens took pos- 
session as owners, and on August 1, 1874, they failed, when 
the manufacture of rails was abandoned. The works them- 
selves have long been abandoned A few other iron-rail 
mills in Western Pennsylvania, including those which were 
equipped for the manufacture only of mine rails and other 
light rails, need not be mentioned. Of these mills those 
which made rails of heavy sections never at any time pro- 
duced any considerable tonnage. It is a noteworthy fact that 
Allegheny County, with all its enterprise in the manufacture 
of iron and steel, did not begin to make rails of heavy sec- 
tions until the Superior Rolling Mill was built in 1865. 

Iron rails are not now made in Western Pennsylvania, 
except occasionally a very few tons of light rails for lum- 
ber and mine roads. 

The Bessemer process for the manufacture of steel, which 
has given us the steel rail, dates from 1855, in which 
year Henry Bessemer, of England, obtained his first pat- 
ent for this process. Other patents followed in 1856, but 
the important invention was not perfected until 1857, in 
which year Robert Forester Mushet, also of England, added 
his essential spiegeleisen improvement. In 1856 Mr. Besse- 
mer obtained patents in this country for his invention, 
but he was immediately confronted by a claim of priority 
of invention preferred by William Kelly, of Eddyville, 
Kentucky, but a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which 
claim was approved by the Commissioner of Patents. Ex- 
periments were made with Mr. Kelly's process at the 
Cambria Iron Works in 1857 and 1858, and in September, 
1864, steel was successfully made by this process at experi- 
mental works which were erected at Wyandotte, Michigan, 
by the Kelly Pneumatic Process Company, of which Daniel 
J. Morrell, of Johnstown, and William M. Lyon and James 






Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 7 

Park, Jr., of Pittsburgh, as well as Mr. Kelly, all Western 
Pennsylvanians, were members. Success, however, was at- 
tained only by the use of the Mushet improvement, the con- 
trol of which for this country the company had secured. 
In February, 1865, the firm of Winslow, Griswold & Holley 
was successful at Troy, New York, in making steel by the 
Bessemer process with the Mushet improvement, the firm 
having obtained the control for this country of the Besse- 
mer patents but not the right to use the Mushet improve- 
ment. In 1866 the ownership of all the above patents 
was consolidated, and soon afterwards the manufacture of 
Bessemer steel in this country in commercial quantities was 
commenced. At first and for many years afterwards only 
rails were made from Bessemer steel, and to-day nearly all 
the rails that are in use in this country were so made. 

Steel rails have almost entirely supplanted iron rails on 
American railroads. Poor's Manual of the Railroads of the 
United States for 1901 contains a statement which shows 
the number of miles of steam railroad track, exclusive ot 
elevated city passenger railway tracks, that were laid 
with iron and steel rails respectively in each year from 
1880 to 1901. In 1880 there were 81,967 miles laid with 
iron rails and 33,680 miles, or 29.1 per cent, laid with steel 
rails. In 1901 there were 19,181 miles laid with iron rails 
and 246,811 miles, or 92.7 per cent, laid with steel rails. 
In both years side tracks and double tracks are included. 
The length of the steam railroads completed in the United 
States at the close of 1901, without regard to the number 
of their tracks, and excluding all elevated city passenger 
railways, was 198,787 miles. 

Much of the progress of this country in the manufacture 
of Bessemer steel rails has been due to the enterprise dis- 
played by Andrew Carnegie at the Edgar Thomson Steel 
"Works, at Braddock, near Pittsburgh, the site of Braddock's 
defeat in 1755, the construction of which works was un- 
dertaken in 1873 and completed in 1875 by a company of 
which Mr. Carnegie was the leading spirit and of which 



8 Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 

his brother, Thomas M. Carnegie, who died in 1886, was a 
member. Andrew Carnegie was the leading stockholder in 
the company. These works were built expressly to make 
Bessemer steel rails. The first Edgar Thomson steel rail 
was rolled on September 1, 1875. At first only a Bessemer 
plant and a rolling mill were built, but in 1879 the erec- 
tion of large blast furnaces was commenced. Until these 
furnaces were built the Edgar Thomson steel plant was 
largely supplied with pig iron from the two near-by Lucy 
Furnaces, built respectively in 1872 and 1877, and owned 
in 1875 and subsequently by Carnegie Brothers & Co. 

From year to year Mr. Carnegie steadily increased the 
capacity of the Edgar Thomson Works and thus cheap- 
ened the cost of producing rails. From the first he had 
unbounded faith in the future of the steel rail ; he knew 
that its general substitution for the iron rail on American 
railroads was sure to come at an early day. He foresaw 
this evolution and fully prepared for it when experienced 
manufacturers and even many railroad officials continued 
to praise the iron rail. Hence, when others were timid or 
neglectful of their opportunities, he introduced at the Edgar 
Thomson Works from time to time the best and most 
economical methods of manufacture ; the blast furnaces at 
these works were the best in the country, the Bessemer 
converters were the largest, and the rail mill was the swift- 
est; so that, when an extraordinary demand for steel rails 
would come, as it often did come, he was fully prepared 
to meet it and at a lower cost than that of his competi- 
tors. He had business foresight in an eminent degree ; he 
had unfaltering courage ; and more than all his cotempo- 
raries he believed in tearing out and making a scrap heap 
of even modern machinery when better could be found. 
The best engineering talent in the country was engaged to 
bring the Edgar Thomson Works up to the highest possible 
state of efficiency. 

These characteristics were again illustrated when Mr. 
Carnegie and his partners in the firm of Carnegie, Phipps 



Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 9 

& Co. succeeded to the ownership of the Homestead Steel 
Works in 1883, and again in 1890 when Carnegie Brothers 
& Co., then operating the Edgar Thomson Works, succeeded 
to the ownership of the Duquesne Steel Works, with the 
result that steel in other forms than rails has been greatly 
cheapened to all consumers. This lowering of prices was 
accomplished through the use of the best mechanical appli- 
ances and the production of the largest possible tonnage. 
At the Edgar Thomson Works Mr. Carnegie set the pace 
for a large annual tonnage of steel rails, and this policy was 
afterwards applied to the production of pig iron and other 
products. His American competitors were soon compelled 
to abandon their conservative ideas and to enlarge the 
capacity and increase the efficiency of their works. And 
he has compelled Europe to revise in a large measure its 
metallurgical practice and also to cheapen its prices for 
all steel products. It has freely copied the devices and 
processes which his engineers, with his encouragement, had 
introduced or perfected. Of the engineers referred to, Mr. 
Carnegie's first superintendent at the Edgar Thomson Steel 
Works, Captain William R. Jones, whose tragic death oc- 
curred in 1889, is entitled to special mention. To these 
engineers and to his "young partners" Mr. Carnegie has 
always acknowledged that he was under great obligations. 

Mr. Carnegie's distinguished and remarkable career as 
an iron and steel manufacturer, which conspicuously began 
on the threshold of the fourth quarter of the nineteenth 
century, when the Edgar Thomson Works were first put in 
operation, although he had previously been identified with 
our iron industry, may be said to have ended immediately 
after the close of the century, in February, 1901, when he 
transferred the ownership of all the iron and steel proper- 
ties and auxiliary enterprises in which he had a control- 
ling proprietary interest to the United States Steel Corpo- 
ration. Soon afterwards, in 1902, he was chosen president 
of the Iron and Steel Institute, whose membership is not 
restricted by political or geographical lines, but which has 



10 Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 

its home in Great Britain, and he presided over its deliber- 
ations at the spring and autumn sessions of 1903, at Lon- 
don and Barrow respectively, on each occasion delivering an 
address. Mr. Carnegie was the first American to receive 
this honor. No higher honor can be conferred upon any 
iron and steel manufacturer, wherever his home may be, 
than to be elected to the presidency of the Iron and Steel 
Institute. 

The great success of the Edgar Thomson Steel Works 
and of other Bessemer steel plants in the United States 
led to the erection in Allegheny County of two competing 
steel works, noticed above : the Homestead Steel Works, 
which were completed and put in operation in 1881, and 
the Duquesne Steel Works, which were undertaken in 1886 
and put in operation in 1889. Both these works were 
built to make Bessemer steel, but, while the Homestead 
Works were erected to make miscellaneous steel products, 
including rails, the Duquesne Works were built to make 
rails only. The Homestead Works rolled their first steel 
rail on August 9, 1881, and the Duquesne Works rolled 
their first steel rail in March, 1889. Down to their 
absorption by Carnegie, Phipps & Co. in 1883 the Home- 
stead Works rolled in all about 125,000 tons of rails, and 
down to their absorption by Carnegie Brothers & Co. in 
1890 the Duquesne Works rolled in all about the same 
number of tons, all, or nearly all, of the rails rolled by 
both works being of heavy sections. Since the changes 
in ownership above noted these works have not made 
many rails. The Homestead Works have not made any 
rails since 1894 and the Duquesne Works have not made 
any since 1892. The Homestead Works were built by the 
Pittsburgh Bessemer Steel Company and the Duquesne 
Works by the Allegheny Bessemer Steel Company. 

The prominence of Western Pennsylvania in the manu- 
facture of steel rails to-day is best shown by a reference 
to the statistical record. In 1902 the whole country made 
2,935,392 tons of Bessemer steel rails, and of this large 



Iron and Steel Rails in Western Pennsylvania. 11 

production Western Pennsylvania made 950,266 tons, or 
nearly one-third of the country's total production. This 
large tonnage was almost entirely rolled at the two works 
above mentioned, the Edgar Thomson and the Cambria 
Works, operated respectively by the Carnegie Steel Com- 
pany and the Cambria Steel Company, less than three 
thousand tons having been rolled by the Jones & Laughlin 
Steel Company, which has never made the manufacture of 
rails a leading specialty. 

The first thirty-foot rails ever rolled in this country are 
claimed to have been rolled at the Cambria Iron Works in 
1855. These rails were perfectly made, but there being no 
demand for them they were used in the company's tracks. 
In 1876 these works rolled the largest aggregate tonnage 
of rails that had been rolled in one year by one mill in this 
country up to that time. Their production of rails in that 
year was 103,743 net tons, of which 47,643 tons were iron 
rails and 56,100 tons were steel rails. 

The first sixty-foot rails ever rolled in this country were 
rolled at the Edgar Thomson Steel Works in the fall of 
1875 and were made of steel. At the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion at Philadelphia in 1876 the Edgar Thomson Steel 
Company exhibited a steel rail which at that time was the 
longest steel rail that had ever been rolled. It was 120 feet 
long and weighed 62 pounds to the yard. 



12 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 



JOURNAL OF LIEUTENANT ROBEET PARKER, OF 
THE SECOND CONTINENTAL ARTILLERY, 1779. 

CONTRIBUTED BY HON. THOMAS R. BARD. 

(Concluded from Vol. XXVII. page 420.) 

September 7th. Marched at 9 o'clock, the land low & 
very rich, the woods open. Arrived at the outlet of the 
lake, about 3 o'clock, P. M. Here we waited until 5 giving 
time for Gen. Hand & Maxwell to arrive at the Town of 
Canadesaga, which they did by a circuitous march & by dif- 
ferent Route, judging the enemy were still in possession of 
it two pieces of cannon were kept in the rear lest an 
attack should be made on that quarter; we then crossed the 
outlet which was about 40 yards wide & proceeded round 
to the N.Yr. Corner our march was detained until dark 
when we were oblidged to drag our pieces over Logs, 
Morasses &c, and arrived at the town about 10 o'clock, 
where the rest of the army were encamped Canaugoe is 
situated about two miles from the lake (& three from the 
outlet) on a rising piece of ground & contained about fifty 
houses. It appears to be a very old settlement, there are 
a great number of apple & peach trees here, which we cut 
down & destroyed a great quantity of corn was also de- 
stroyed. This lake is called Seneca Lake, & is about 36 
miles long & from 3 to 6 wide Exceedingly beautiful & 
affords the most delightful prospect. The banks in many 
places are high, but without rocks, the land on each side 
rising gradually & exceeding fertile on all sides. At about 
8 miles distance on the East side lies the Cayuga Lake, 
nearly parallel, of the same dimensions, tho' not quite so 
beautiful. The waters of the Seneca lake, falling into the 
Cayuga, about two miles, above the outlet afterwards makes 
part of the Trois Reveres or Three Rivers The land be- 



Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 13 

tween these lakes near the head is pretty high, but falls 
gradually towards the outlet into a flat & low Country all 
the way intersperced with purling streams and well calcu- 
lated for every species of Agriculture & no doubt but it will 
one day become no inconsiderable part of the western em- 
pire Dist. to-day 13 miles 

September 8th. Lay by a Detachment was sent about 6 
miles up the Seneca Lake, where they destroyed a town of 
about twenty houses. Likewise a number of fruit trees & 
a great quantity of corn, in the evening another detach- 
ment was sent to assist in destroying the corn &c 

September 9th. This morning all the sick & invalids were 
sent back to the garrison at Tioga Marched at 12 o'clock, 
the road continued good and pretty clear for 3 miles then 
we entered into a very thick and deep swamp that con- 
tinued the remainder of the day. Encamped on an emi- 
nence, that was clear of timber & filled with high grass 
Dist. 7 miles 

September 10th. Marched at 9 o'clock, the swamp con- 
tinued for 5 miles further, then we entered into an open 
country, that was free from timber & plenty of grass next 
we came to the side of a lake that appeared to be 10 or 12 
miles long & 1J wide but very shallow we then proceeded 
along the east side of it, about a mile to the N. end where 
we crossed the outlet that made a considerable brook 
about from this outlet we entered the Town of Yeruneu- 
daga which contained about thirty Houses, very good and 
lately built these we immediately burnt & then encamped 
about a mile from there near several cornfields, which we 
likewise destroyed Dist. 12 miles. 

September llth. Marched at 6 o'clock, the land low but 
very thick of young timber for 3 miles. Then we asscended 
some rising ground that was clear of timber in many 
places & full of grass passed several deep hollows, next we 
descended a long hill, passed through a meadow & crossed 
a brook which we supposed came out of a lake at some dis- 
tance on our left, the land continued pretty clear. Arrived 



14 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 

at Kannanyayen about 4 o'clock. There was an old town 
that contained a number of houses. This place is situated 
on a large plain between two lakes here was also a num- 
ber of fruit trees & a large cornfield Dist. 13J miles. 

September 12th. Rain in the morning prevented our 
marching until 1 2 we then drew 4 days provision & leaving 
one piece of artillery, all our Baggage, pack horses, 
drivers & Invalids proceeded. Crossed the outlet of a lake 
that appeared to be about 5 miles long & | broad; en- 
camped at sunset in the woods, dist. 10 miles. 

September 13th. Marched at 6 o'clock, the morning very 
cold, in about 3 miles we arrived at a small Town, situated 
in a large plain called Egitsa, here was a great quantity of 
corn &c At this place we halted until 10, in order to de- 
stroy the corn & build a bridge over a brook & morass about 
half a mile in front & otherwise impassible, previous to 
which Lieut. Boyd (of the Rifle corps) was detached with 
25 men to a town about 6 miles further, where he arrived 
about daylight this morning here he killed & scalped an 
Indian & wounded another then returned towards camp, 
after having made all the discoveries he could. After they 
had travelled about 2 miles they agreed to lay by & wait 
the arrival of the army, but in the meantime sent two of 
the party to carry the Intelligence to the General. After 
the men had travelled about a mile, they saw Indians on 
the path before them, upon w^hich they immediately retired 
back to their main body, they then all set out in order to 
return to the main army & if possible to come across the five 
Indians ; after they had got within about a [?] of the army 
they saw another Indian, whom they killed & scalped like- 
wise, but before done, they were all at once surrounded by 
a large body of Indians Eleven of the party have returned, 
Lieut. Boyd with the remainder have not yet returned, & it 
is to be feared have fell a sacrifice to their barbarity Upon 
hearing the firing the light Infantry were immediately or- 
dered to reinforce ; after this the bridge being completed 
the army marched over the morass & asscended a very high 



Journal of Lieutenant Robwt Parker, 1779. 15 

hill. Just as our advance parties & Right flank were at the 
top of the hill, they discovered the Indians retreating, 
which they did with such precipitation as to leave the 
greatest part of their knapsacks & baggage behind, which 
fell into the hands of our men On this hill we found the 
bodies of four of our men, that had been butchered by the 
enemy. McLodge, the Surveyor, & his party having ad- 
vanced some distance in front of the army were fired at & 
one of the party shot through the body, who died the next 
morning. We then proceeded on through an exceeding 
high country to Cassawalaughlin about 6 miles ; on our 
arrival there we expected to meet the enemy. Accordingly 
we drew up in front of the town with our artillery where 
we halted some time, expecting to see the enemy with our 
right & left wings on the flanks & after some time advanced 
into the town, which we found evacuated ; fired three can- 
non, pitched our tents & lay till morning dist. 9 miles. 

September 14-th. Got up at 3 o'clock & lay upon our arms 
until day in order to prevent a surprize. Large parties were 
detached to cut down the corn &c. Marched at 12 o'clock, 
crossed a large brook near the town, then entered into a 
most beautiful & extensive plain, which afforded an un- 
bounded prospect ; here was almost a perfect level & nothing 
to obstruct the sight but a few spreading Oaks beautifully 
Intersperced & plenty of grass that grew spontaneous on 
every part & full six feet high. This plain is called the 
great Genesee plains & where we cross it was about 3 miles 
wide & runs to a great length. Near the west side runs the 
Seneca River about 80 yards wide & is a most beautiful 
plain. We then crossed it & proceeded by a !N". course to 
the Genesee Town, which is about 3 miles down the river, 
& entered it about 5 o'clock ; found it also evacuated. This 
town is situated near the river on a large fruitful plain & 
contained about eighty houses, some of which were very 
good. At this place we found the bodies of Lieut. Boyd 
and another, (mentioned yesterday) in a putrified & man- 
gled condition. Lieut. Boyd was found with his head cut 



16 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 

off & skinned all over, his eyes torn out, his nails pulled 
off, his body bruised & beat all over, & every other cruelty 
exercised upon him that malice & savage barbarity could 
invent, some of which are too shocking to relate. The 
greatest part of their cruelties appears to have been com- 
mitted upon him while he was alive, in order to heighten 
his misery & satisfy their revenge. Thus died a good citi- 
zen, an agreeable friend & a gallant soldier Inspired with 
every Heroe's virtue he fell a victim to their savage bar- 
barity in defence of the injured rights of mankind. At 
dark he was inter'd with the Honors of war &c. Dist. to- 
day, 5 miles. 

September 15th. At 6 o'clock the whole army was ordered 
to destroy the corn, which grew in amazing quantities in 
this place, with almost every kind of vegetables which we 
entirely destroyed, first by collecting it & carrying it to the 
Houses, which we filled & then set on fire, & gathering large 
quantities of wood, mixed the corn with it in a pile & burnt 
it to ashes. At 12 we finished the destruction of the corn 
& likewise the business of the Expedition, when receiving 
the General's thanks, we set out on our return. At 3 we 
began our march almost in the same order reversed that 
we advanced in when repassing the river at same place we 
passed it the day before, entered on the plain and encamped 
on the Little Genesee. 

September 16th. Thus had we advanced 140 miles in the 
Enemy's country from Tioga and carried fire, sword and 
destruction in every part, that we could possibly find out or 
approach, in the prosecution of which, we had to encounter 
many and almost insurmountable difficulties, such as forcing 
a march all the way, cutting a Road for the Artillery, in 
many places a continued swamp for several miles, want ot 
provisions, hard marches, and fatigue. 

But here let us leave the busy army for a moment and 
suffer our imaginations to Run at large through these de- 
lightful wilds, & figure to ourselves the opening prospects 
of future greatness which we may reasonably suppose is not 



Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 17 

far distant, & that we may yet behold with a pleasing admi- 
ration those deserts that have so long been the habitation of 
beasts of prey & a safe asylum for our savage enemies, con- 
verted into fruitful fields, covered with all the richest pro- 
d'uctions of agriculture, amply rewarding the industrious 
husbandman by a golden harvest; the spacious plains 
abounding with flocks & herds to supply his necessary 
wants. These Lakes & Rivers that have for ages past 
rolled in sacred silence along their wonted course, unknown 
to Christian nations, produce spacious cities & guilded spires, 
rising on their banks, affording a safe retreat for the vir- 
tuous few that disdains to live in affluence at the expense 
of their liberties. The fish too, that have so long enjoyed 
a peaceful habitation in these transparent regions, may yet 
become subservient to the inhabitants of this delightful 
country. 

Large detachments were sent out early this morning to 
destroy the remainder of the corn. Marched at 12 o'clock, 
Repassed the Little Genesee River, where we halted until 
the whole army crossed, then proceeding by the same route 
we had advanced, found the bodies of 14 of the party men- 
tioned the 13th inst. They were all found, tomahawked 
scalped & butchered in the most cruel manner ; buried them, 
halted at Egitsa (mentioned the 13th), to destroy the re- 
mainder of the corn, encamped there &c. 

September 17th. Marched at 6 o'clock, passed the en- 
campment & lake mentioned the 12th Inst., Arrived at 
Kennagaugus, where we found our baggage & provisions 
safe, which gave us great satisfaction, as we were under ap- 
prehensions that the enemy might take advantage of the 
weakness of the garrison & attempt to take possession of it, 
encamped there. 

September 18th. The General ordered us to be up at 5 but 
the great deficiency of Pack horses prevented our marching 
until 7, met by two Indians from Fort Schuyler, passed 
Keunandaga & encamped on the bank of the lake men- 
tioned on the llth inst. 

VOL. XXVIII. 2 



18 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 

September 19th. Marched at 9, passed the encampment 
of the 9th & the swamp, encamped at Canasago about sun- 
set Dist. 16 miles. This day we were met by three men, 
who came express from Tioga, with dispatches for the 
General, they likewise gave acc'ts that there was plenty of 
provisions at that place, & that they had sent a quantity up 
the River as far as ISTewtown. 

September 20th. A detachment of 100 men & the com- 
mand being ordered to force a march to Fort Schuyler, I 
agreed to go with them & accordingly we set out at 3 o'clock 
P.M., leaving the army encamped passed the end of the 
Seneca Lake to the outlet at the place we had crossed as we 
advanced, then proceeding down the river encamped at 
Scharoyos. This has been an Indian village & contained 
about twenty houses, which were burnt previous to our 
coming by a detachment of the army, it is situated on the 
bank of the Seneca outlet which at this place forms a beau- 
tiful River of about 50 yards wide. Here we got plenty of 
vegetables of almost every kind, potatoes in particular, & as 
we had now plenty of fresh beef & flour with us, we made 
an elegant repast, such as for a long time before we had 
been strangers to. About dark Coll. Butler arrived with a 
detachment of 600 men on an Expedition against the 
Cayuga settlements dist. 9 miles. 

September 21st. Marched at sunrise, the country open & 
free from hills & withal very fertile for 6 miles then we 
crossed some low land & deep swamps, arrived at the 
Cayuga lake, 10 o'clock, dist. 10 miles. Crossed the 
mouth of the lake, which was about 400 yards wide & in 
most places 4 feet deep with, at least, a foot of mud in the 
bottom, then proceeding about a mile up the lake struck 
off near a T. E. corner. The country continued open for 
10 miles & the timber chiefly oak, then we entered thick 
beech and Elm land, crossed the outlet of it & encamped 
on the bank. This lake is about a mile & a half in width 
and the length uncertain, some say 30 miles, there is a 
beautiful beach here of a great extent, the outlet forms a 



Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 19 

considerable stream of a gentle descent. Dist. to-day 30 
miles. 

September %2d. Marched at sunrise. The land & timber 
the same as yesterday. Arrived at the outlet of a lake, 
that appeared nearly of the same dimensions of the Wasco, 
halted a few minutes & then descended into a very deep 
valley, where there was a considerable brook, then as- 
cended a very high hill, & the land & woods nearly the 
same as before. Arrived at Onandaga about sunset ; this was 
the capital of the Onandaga nation & was destroyed last 
Spring by a detachment of our army from Fort Schuyler, 
under the command of Coll. Vanschaick Dist. 30 miles. 

September 23d. Marched a little after sunrise, crossed the 
Onandaga River & ascended the hill ; The woods continued 
open for five miles. Our advance parties discovered two 
Indians on the path before them, who immediately fled & 
left one of their packs. The woods then was thick, & the 
land very good in most places & filled with a number of 
crystal rivulets, halted at Sunken Spring in the road. 
Arrived at Canaseraga, a handsome village & Capital of the 
Tuscarora Tribe The Inhabitants appear very hospitable A 
presented us with boiled corn & eels, with every other 
thing their town afforded, they likewise congratulated us 
on the success of our arms & insisted on our tarrying with 
them all night. After staying with them sometime, we 
marched about six miles further & encamped in an old 
field. Dist. 31 miles. 

September 24-th. Marched at sunrise, the land very good. 
Arrived at the Oneida Castle, about 9 o'clock, the inhab- 
itants received us very kindly, made a genteel apology for 
their not being apprised of our coming and also congratu- 
lated us on our success. Halted a short time & then marched 
for Fort Schuyler, where we arrived at 3 o'clock, met with 
a genteel reception from the garrisons dist. 26 miles. This 
is a regular work with four Bastions, in which are several 
pieces of cannon, is beautifully situated about 400 yards 
from the Mohawk River on the west side, the wall is high, 



20 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 

the ditch wide & well picketed, a strong gate & draw-bridge 
with one sally port, it was built by Stanwix, last war, but 
is now greatly improved & has changed its name to Fort 
Schuyler, famous for the noble defence that was made in it 
by Col. Gansewoort in 1777. At present it is garrisoned 
by the First N". York Regt. under the command of Col. Van 
Dyke. 

September 25th. Marched at 4 o'clock P.M., having de- 
tached an officer with some men in two batteaux, which 
contained our baggage and provisions, with orders to meet 
us in the evening at our encampment. The roads muddy, 
passed the place where Gen. Herkimer's battle happened ; 
the skulls & bones of many of the unfortunate victims are 
still to be found. Encamped at Arisca the extreme dry 
season prevented our boats from arriving. Rain in the 
evening dist. 8 miles. 

September 26th. Marched before sunrise. Crossed the 
River at old Fort Schuyler, dist. 8 miles, then we arrived 
near Germantown here was the first inhabitants we had 
seen for three months the people very inhospitable ar- 
rived at Fort Dayton on the beautiful German Flats then 
proceeded over the River to Fort Hackeman (about a 
mile), where we were well received by Colonel Van Rensse- 
lear, Comd. of the Garrisons, where we tarried all night. 

September 27th. Marched at 9 o'clock, (having previously 
detached some men in batteaux to carry off the remainder 
of the Mohawk tribe that lived on Schohare Creek), sent 
our baggage in batteaux. Crossed the River at Col. Clock's, 
a little rain, lodged at Col. Wormwood's. 

September 28th. Rain in the morning. Marched at 8 
o'clock. Arrived at the old Fort at Johnston Hall at sunset, 
dist. 26 miles. 

September 29th. Marched at 8 o'clock Arrived at Schan- 
ectady at 1 o'clock Arrived in Albany at dark, very dirty 
and tired, dist. 39 miles. 

Remained in Albany until the 7th of October, when we 
shipped our Baggage on board a sloop bound for New 



Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 21 

Windsor, then set out in company with Capt. Machin 
Rode to Conines, where we lodged, dist. 20 miles. 

October 8th. Continued our journey, arrived in Esopus at 
sunset, from there we went to " Green Hill" where we 
lodged dist. 44 miles. 

October 9th. Lay by to day Treated very politely by the 
family. 

October 10th. Set out this morning towards New Wind- 
sor, parted with Capt. Machin, arrived at Little Britain. 

October llth. Set out for New Windsor, where I met 
some gentlemen of our party, with whom I went for orders 
to Head Quarters at West Point. Returned in the evening, 
hard rain. 

October 12th. Encamped with the detachment of artillery 
that was encamped there, who treated me very politely. 

October 15th. Saw several Gentlemen from Gen. Sulli- 
van's Army. 

October 16th 17th. Nothing material happened. 

October 18th. Went to the Park at Chester, staid there 
two days & then returned. 

October 27th. Nothing worthy of notice happened until 
the 27th, when I went to West Point, where I saw a number 
of old acquaintances, staid there two days & then returned. 

October 30th. Received a number of letters from several 
gentlemen arrived from different parts Ordered to hold 
ourselves in readiness to join our corps. 

October 81st. Waited for further orders. 

November 7th. Set out for New Windsor with our 
baggage, in company with Capt. Machin & St. Cebra (the 
detachment from the York line having marched the day 
before to join the western army in the Clove), lodged in 
the Clove. Met Capt. Porter who informed us the army 
had marched for Pompton. 

November 8th. Marched at 9 o'clock, lodged near Ring- 
wood, dist. 22 miles. 

November 9th. Marched at 10, arrived at Pompton about 
1 o'clock P.M., where we found the army. 



22 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 

November 10th. Lay by; in the afternoon we shifted 
our ground & encamped in the woods, very cold in the 
evening. 

November 12th. The army put on half allowance of flour. 

November 15th. Capt. McClure arrived from Head Quar- 
ters. 

Received at Pompton of Lieut. Robt. Parker, our pay for 
the months of May, June, July & August last : 

Michal Royall, Sergt. . . 40 dolls 

Archd. McFair, Sergt. . 40 " 

John Kelly, Bomb'r, . 36 " 

John Johnston, "... 36 " 

John McGregor, Sergt. . .40 " 

Arthur Gillas, . . . . 33 1/3 " 

George Stewart, ... 33 1/3 " 

Saml. Laughlan, . . .33 1/3 " 

lac. Bennington, . . .33 1/3 " 

Jas. Ryburn, . . . . 33 1/3 " 

John Mark, . . . .33 1/3 " 

Robert Jeff, . . . . 33 1/3 

Alex. Martin, . . . . 33 1/3 " 

Reuben Benjon, . . .33 1/3 " 

Benj. Phipps, . . . . 33 1/3 " 

Jas. Wilson, . . . . 33 1/3 " 

John Dunn, . . . . 33 1/3 " 

Received at Pompton of Lieut. Parker, the sums annexed 
to our names as part of our pay & subsistence for the 
months of May June July & August last : 

Andrew Porter, Capt. Art'y, . . .348 2/3 
Jas. McClure, Capt. Lieut. Art'y, . .207 2/3 

Ezra Patterson, 207 2/3 

Ezekiel Howell, 207 2/3 

Robt. Parker, Lieut. . . . . 207 2/3 

November 17th. Capt. Porter returned from Head Quar- 
ters. 



Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 23 

November 19th. Capt. Porter set out for Philadelphia; 
ordered to hold ourselves in readiness to march. 

November 22d. No flour to be had for the Troops. 

November 24-th. Marched at 2 o'clock. Encamped on 
Pompton plains, near the Church, dist. 6 miles. 

November 25th. Marched at 8 o'clock. The roads very 
bad & the weather cold, encamped near Hanover, dist. 14 
miles. 

November 26th. I went to Morris Town ; about 11 o'clock 
it began to snow & continued all day, at night it cleared up 
very cold. 

November 30th. The First Maryland Brigade arrived 
to day. 

December 1st. His Excellency arrived at Morristown to 
day; very severe storm of hail & snow all day. 

December 3d. This morning we marched through Mor- 
ristown & encamped near Kembles. Great part of the Army 
arrived to day. 

December %.ih. Marched back within two miles of Morris- 
town & encamped there; the army continued to move to 
their ground. 

December 5th. Snow all day and the weather very cold. 

December 6th. Marched this morning to Morristown & 
joined the Grand Park, which lay about a mile west of that 
place encamped there, the snow knee deep & the weather 
very cold. 

HEAD QUARTERS NEW WINDSOR 

Jan'y 1st 1781 

The non Commissioned Officers & Matrosses of the Inde- 
pendent Companies of Artillery, lately commanded by 
Capt. Coran, are to be added to, & incorporated with the 
company lately commanded by Capt. Porter now in the 2d 
Reg't of Artillery And the non Commissioned Officers & 
Matrosses of the Company Commanded by Capt. Freeman, 
are to be added to & incorporated with Capt. Simonds' 
Company in said Reg't. Capt Porter's and Capt Simonds' 
Companies are to be levelled with the men of the two com- 



24 Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 

panies which are incorporated with them & being raised by 
Pennsylvania, are to be added to Coll. Proctor's Reg't of 
Artillery. 

The Officers of the two Companies com'd. by Capt. Por- 
ter & Capt. Simonds, are to be arraingned in Col. Proctor's 
Regt. agreeable to the rank they now hold. 

Cornwallis' Soliloquy. 1 

Indulgent Fortune, by whose hand, 
I've led my chosen British band 
To conquest, through all war's alarms, 
And victory, hovering round my arms ; 
Of my success, Great Britain rung, 
And echoed with the feats I'd done, 
Ambitious, whou'd excel in praise 
They offer up their tuneful lays. 

Successive I had roll'd along 
While British bards repeat the song 
But wild ambition fired my breast, 
And dreams of honor broke my rest ; 
With pompous speech & great parade, 
Some converts to my arms I made 
But dire distress I kept for those 
Who dare my vig'rous arms oppose. 

But now, alas I all joys are fled, 
And laurel wreaths that crowned my head, 
Their native hue have quickly lost, 
While I'm on Fortune's billows tossed ; 
York's narrow sphere points to my bounds 
Contracted lines describe my rounds, 
United arms my works oppose 
While raging fire my bosom glows. 

Mark ! how in circling eddies rise, 
The smoke sulphurious to the skies, 
Hark ! how the cannon shakes the pole 
And speaks loud terror to my soul ; 



1 Composed by Lieutenant Kobert Parker, who witnessed the surrender 
of Cornwallis' s army to the American army. 



Journal of Lieutenant Robert Parker, 1779. 25 

See yonder shot spread carnage round, 
And angry shells tear up the ground, 
Bellona's thunder sounds afar, 
Ye Gods ! are these the scenes of war ? 

Such toils as these I can't endure, 
My cause no longer is secure, 
I' 11 straight resign my tarnished arms, 
Nor wait another night's alarms ; 
Safe from the terrors of a storm, 
Or fierce assault of rising morn, 
Quickly embark for Albion's shore 
Nor ever dream of conquest more. 



26 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hochley, 1739-174.2. 



SELECTED LETTERS FROM THE LETTER-BOOK OF 
RICHARD HOCKLEY, OF PHILADELPHIA, 1739-1742. 

(Concluded from Vol. XXVII. page 435.) 

PHILADA July 9 th 1742 

M K Tno 8 HYAM 
SIR 

This is to desire you will insure on the Value of 350 
this Currancey for some flower that will be Shipt in a few 
days on board y e Snow George Cap' Joseph Falkner bound 
to Jamaica on Acco* of the Proprietors. The Vessel I expect 
will Sail y* Latter end of this month, at Farthest. 

I reced a Letter last week from John Watson who in- 
form's me has remitted Some Small matter to you on my 
acco* last Februa 7 and expected to remitt the Ballance in a 
Short time due to me from him, whatever you may receive 
from him on my acco* which will be but trifling I must begg 
you will pay unto Mess Dawson & Samuel without any 
further order as I am indebted to them for Goods & please 
to favour me with an ace* of it. We have the Greatest 
Crop this year that has Ever been known and Abundance 
of the old Crop Left so that 'tis expected wheat and flower 
will be very low this Fall, wheat at Present is at 4 S. 
Flower at 11/6 as theres a Little Demand for it in Jamaica 
and Little brought to Town it being now the heighth of the 
harvest, but when thats over it will fall very Considerably 
whenever there's a prospect of Advantage in making any 
remittances in our Produce on the Proprietors ace* I hope 
you will keep M r Lardner or my Self advis'd of it, Ex- 
change is now at 60 and 65. I hope this will find you 
with M Hyam and your family in perfect Health to whom 
please to pay my Compliments. I have sent M ri Hyam two 
Dryed rattle Snakes pack'd up in a box sent to the Pro- 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-1742. 27 

prietor with Some things belonging to him which I begg 
her acceptance off they are Very Scarce at present y e Season 
for them being not yet Come in, they must be pounded in a 
morter & you may mix them Either with wine or Rum, 
Shaking it two or three times a day for four or five days 
together then tis fit for use. She is already acquainted 
with their Valuable Qalitys. I am with regard S r y r Ob d 
Humb* Servant 

RICH D HOCKLEY. 

PHILAD* July 10 th 1742 
THO" PENN ESQ" 

D* SIR 

Above is copy of my last and on y* 5 th Instant reced your 
very kind letter which gave me great pleasure and am very 
glad to hear of M ri Penns recovery and of y a health of the 
rest of the Family which Ace* will be always most pleasing 
of any I can hear from England. I have wrote you several 
letters by different conveyances since my Arrival, I am in 
some doubt whether too many or not shou'd they all come 
to hand and have given you an Ace* what success I have 
hitherto had and what appears in view to come, Since I 
wrote y e above letter I have not sold any thing at all, and 
y e being confined from morning- 'till night without having 
any thing to do, you may imagine can't but be a disagrea- 
ble Life ; and am resolv'd not to be out of the way, that I 
mayn't blame my self for want of attendance, I lodge at 
your house w th M r Lardner and gett a sight of him once 
or twice in a Week as it happens to fall out. I board at 
M rs Ellis's & keep Store in y' Water Street under Charles 
Willings but what with one disappointment or other I 
don't enjoy life with any sort of satisfaction but only endure 
it, the Ace* you give of my brother Tom is but what I 
dreaded to hear and makes me more uneasy than I can ex- 
press my self, but as you are still so good as to turn your 
thoughts on him a smart chide from you would I hope have 
a good Effect. I must have some body or other to be with 



28 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockky, 1739-1742. 

me in y* Store for I can never hold this way of Life long, 
and plainly see I shall never be able to make any great 
hand of selling European goods nor any quantity, so that I 
am doubtfull whether I cou'd keep him employed, I shoud 
be glad to have him over here, but whether or not your 
thoughts of placing him in Lisbon wou'd not be more to 
his advantage than any he can reap from me I shall entirely 
leave to your Self, and as I am very sensible you will en- 
deavour to do y' best for him, your determination will I 
assure you Sir be perfectly agreable to me. Cap* Wright 
poor man dyed on his Passage hither and ten of the Pala- 
tines with y' same disorder as y' Palatines brought in last 
year, and infected y* whole ships Company, on her arrival 
the Governour order'd y e Ship below Wicaco to be ex- 
amin'd by a Doctor, they are all pretty well recover'd but 
some very weak still, this Ship has brought a vast quantity 
of Goods, and how they will vend them I can't conceive 
unless at little more than y' first Cost, I thank you for get- 
ting y* Bill Accepted I wrote to y' Gentlemen about it on 
my arrival I have sent you nine rattle snakes I gott of an 
Indian trader with five more of your own that was in y' 
Closett pack't up in a Box w th y" Model of a Ship you de- 
sired M r Lardner to send you, two of y* Snakes I must beg 
as a favour you will be pleased to send to M ri Hyam 
which I promised her. 

I have given James your directions about the Garden and 
he will observe them and has promised me he will give you 
an Ace* of what is done by letter, and y e Ginseng shall 
be sent if 'tis possible to be had, I have told my Sister 
about her spelling and she has promised to mend and is 
a little ashamed of her self but as you have been so kind 
as to mention it in so affectionate a manner she says, she is 
indispensibly bound to obey your orders and y e next letter 
will be more intelligible. The Indians have reced their 
Goods and y* Conferences had with them concerning y e re- 
newing of y e Chain and their friendly promises to stand by 
us and give us Notice when occasion offers of what y* 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-1742. 29 

French are doing, has been very satisfactory to the Gov- 
ernour, and they are well pleased, but as you will have a 
more particular account of it from the Governour and M r 
Peters I need say no more, the Guns and Cloth are sold 
and carried to y e proper Ace** as order'd. I hope Sir you 
will be so good as to favour me with a Line and let me 
know what letters you receive from me, and be so kind as 
to give me your opinion freely on any thing that I have 
wrote to you about, for your friendly advice will be of great 
Service to me, I realy am a good deal confused and can't 
for my life help it, I'm afraid you can't be expected here so 
soon as you intended from what M r Peters has told me you 
wrote to him, and if you knew how acceptable a line from 
you is to me, I shall not be disappointed of having an 
Ace 4 of your wellfare from under your own hand. 

I have wrote to M r Hyam for Insurance on three hundred 
& fifty Pounds this Currency which I am going to ship for 
your Ace* in Flour to Jamaica and in all probability will 
make a fine remittance 'tis to be consigned to M r Edwards 
who goes in y e Vessell and I am very certain he will not 
omitt making the remittance by the first opportunity after 
his Arrival. I am with an unfeigned regard 

Hon d Sir 

Your most aff* & obliged Fr d 
and hum Serv' 

R. H. 



PHILADA July 13 th 1742 

THO S PENN ESQ R 
D B Sm 

The preceeding is coppy of what I wrote you three days 
ago, and send this Via Liverpool. I can't help mentioning 
my brother Tom again, I shou'd be very glad to have him 
over if I can manage him, and will take as much pains with 
him as 'tis possible, but am anxious whether he will do so 
well with me, as with a Stranger, however I shall leave it 



30 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-1742. 

intirely to you as I wrote before. M r Peters has given you 
a full Ace* of what has been done in the Indian Affair, 
they are still in town, and the Country has made a present 
to them of three hundred Pounds, and all sides seem to be 
very well satisfied which is very lucky at this juncture, 
the Grapes at Springetsbury is intirely demolish'd and can't 
conceive the meaning of it, the Orange trees some of them 
are full of little flatt Insects, and James does not know what 
to do with them, y e trees on each side y" long walk wants to 
be shrowded very much, and hope you'l order it to be done 
in y f fall. 

Dear Sir my best Wishes for your health and success in 
your Affairs are frequently repeated, that you may be able to 
come over in the time you proposed (for I am very certain 
you are much wanted here) and with satisfaction to your- 
self in every respect. I am as always 

Hon d Sir 

Yours most affect' 7 

R. H. 

PHILADA July 24 th 1742 

THO S PENN ESQ 
HON D SIR 

Above is copy of my last to you Via Liverpool, since 
which I have shipt to Jamaica 409 Casks of Flour amount 5 
to 423.1.0 which in all probability will come to a very 
good markett. I wish the Vessell had been intirely loaden 
on your Account, but M r Plumsted is very timorous for y* 
reasons I mentioned to you in some of my former Letters, 
the Harvest is all gott in exceedingly well and the greatest 
cropp that has been known, so that Wheat & Flour is ex- 
pected to be very low this Fall unless some considerable 
orders shoud be sent from home for Exportation, but as 
they have had a fine harvest in England perhaps that 
mayn't be y* Case and then I believe we shall be able to 
ship it off much cheaper from hence. I can't help inform- 
ing you Sir how I go on and hope you'l not think it trouble- 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-174%. 31 

some as there's realy some necessity for it. I have not sold 
any thing to speak on for this month past and sitt several 
days together without having one Person to ask a question, 
that in short I am almost dull & stupid, the vast quantity of 
Goods and number of hands they are in makes every one 
feel y* Effects of it in some shape or other and when there's 
so great plenty and variety the People will not buy but just 
as they want to be supply'd and where a shop keeper used 
to lay out one hundred Pounds at a time they don't now 
ten. M r Jn White has sent over a very considerable Cargo 
to Mess Hamilton & Coleman to the Astonishment of all 
his Friends, and y* Gentlemen themselves 'tis true they will 
draw Commissions let them be sold never so low, and I 
cou'd at this time buy four hundred pounds Sterling worth 
of Goods at 5 p Cent less than they cost in England and 
they must be sold and will be at vendue in a few days 
from this. S r you may judge what a prospect I have before 
me and I am sure no honest Factor wou'd advise any of 
their Employers to send any more Goods yet awhile, and 
know this to be the case of several here who have wrote 
to several of their correspondents not to send them any 
more Goods 'till they give them encouragem* and should 
not things take a turn a different way I don't know what I 
must do, and indeed I am differently circumstanced from 
others who are old Traders and have a regular sett of Cus- 
tomers though I have used all the means that's possible to 
invite People to my Store and do assure you not one Quaker 
comes anear me that's worth dealing with, and you can't 
conceive the difficulty that attends selling a few Goods for 
now Storekeeping is downright pedling & I have heard sev- 
eral of y' Principle traders say that if it was not for Ship 
building & house building that they cou'd not vend the 
quantity they used to do, and if they complain well may I, 
for I never cou'd meet with greater discouragem* than at 
present. I must now trouble you about M r Vickris's affair 
w th Tunnecliff he has sold part of y" Land to a person that 
sold it to a third and y e poor Man has paid in Money & 



32 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1789-171$. 

bond two hundred Pounds & y e Person to whom he paid the 
Money is not able to make him restitution. M r Langhorne 
drew y" Conveyances & W m Peters tells me they are badly 
done & M r Langhorne said he woud write to you about a 
Claim that Tunnecliff has to 1000 Acres to know if you 
wou'd let that be appropriated on vacant land belonging to 
you equal to y e Value of Tunnecliffs place, this will be in- 
tirely in your breast & M r Vickris's & shoud be glad you 
wou'd be pleased to mention it to him. I don't write to 
him by this conveyance having already wrote twice to him 
since my Arrival & have nothing to communicate to him 
at present but shall write him in y e Fall as I expect to 
remitt him y e ballance due for y e Land sold by Robinsons 
Mill, I have heard of no purchasers for his other Lands as 
yet and indeed it will be a hard matter to gett Money for it 
immediately upon y e Sale for money is very scarce and 
there's not currency enough for y e People's necessary occa- 
sions for since they lower'd the Pennys several thousands 
of Pounds have been sent to New York as they pass there 
twelve to ye Shilling to purchase Goods withall so that we 
have lost so much running Cash in reality. I have sent M r 
Freames silver laced Furniture to Jamaica & wrote to Cap* 
M c Knight about Cagers Note whom I hear is dead but 
expect to be serv'd in the affair by Cap* M c Knight as he is 
paymaster to y e Northern Forces, my brother Sam is not 
yet gone to York he writes to you by this Conveyance & 
will give y* reason for it. I have wrote you several long 
letters and am concern'd they are such complaining ones 
and shall think y e time long untill I have answers to them, 
but I think you wou'd excuse them if you cou'd realy know 
y e Scituation I am in at present and y e just cause of com- 
plaint in being disappointed in my first outsett in this Way 
and not having it in my Power to do the thing that's right, 
and that I have no Person in y e world to complain to but 
your self and 'tis with great reluctance least I shou'd tire 
you quite out. 

Be pleased Sir to give my humble respects to M r Jn 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-1742. 33 

Penn M rl Freame & M r Rich* Penn and his Family and 
believe me to be with the greatest affection 

D'Sir 
Your most obliged Fr d & h Serv* 

RICH D HOCKLBY. 

PHILAD* Aug 22 nd 1742 
THO" BISHOP YICKRIS ESQ. 



Since my Arrival I have wrote to you three different 
ways which hope have come to your hand, and in my last 
advised you, that I expected soon to send you an Ace* 
Sales and ballance for y* Land, sold in Roxbury township 
which I now do, and inclosed is Robert Strettle's draught 
on Geo. Fitzgerald & Cornp 7 for 70.17. St which ballances 
y* Ace* as you will see by the Ace* inclosed. I have not 
yet reced all ye money, but have advanced forty pounds 
this Currency in order to close ye Account and as I thought 
it might be acceptable to you, for y" Person who remains 
indebted cannot discharge it till the Fall Fair which is y* 
middle of November next and then often happens, that we 
cant make remittances 'till y' next spring. I have not as 
yet had any offers for your other Lands as y* Country 
People have been busy about their harvest and now 'tis seed 
time so that they don't come to town but in the Fall I hope 
to have some Persons make application for them, the 500 
Acres in right of Roger Drew is not yet laid out though 
the Surveyors have orders from y 6 Proprietor for y* Execu- 
tion of it, and have spoke to several of them desireing their 
Care in finding out a good peice which will be done as it 
was M r Penns particular order that it shoud. I am a little 
at a loss what to do with Tunnecliff who is seated on 400 
& odd Acres of your Land, he has sold part of it to a 
person that sold it to a third and he has paid two hundred 
pounds for it and y* Seller is not worth one shilling now, so 
that y' poor Man & his Family who purchased it will be 
intirely ruined shou'd you insist on that Tract. Tunne- 
VOL. xxvni. 3 



34 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hochley, 17 89-17 W. 

cliff has a right to 1000 Acres which he told y e Lawyer I 
sent to him, he woud make over to you, and I believe 
wou'd be most to your Interest if M r Penn will order it to 
be laid out in a good place which I make no doubt he will, 
I wrote to him on y 8 6 th Instant Via Cork and desired him 
to speak to you concerning it, so that you both may come to 
a resolution that by the next ship I may know what to do in 
y e affair and if you approve of the proposition, to gett M r 
Penn to write very particularly about it to M r Peters his 
Secretary that necessary orders may be given and y e Affair 
finish'd with dispatch. I hope Sir this Ace* Sales of your 
Land will give you satisfaction for I am very sure no other 
Persons wou'd have given any thing like the Sum but those 
who were seated on it & had land adjoyning to it, W m Rit- 
tenhausen is the person that still owes 40 and by agree- 
ment was to pay no Interest, Michael & Peter Ruyter are 
the Persons from whom I reced part of the money that 
purchased this Bill and in order to induce them to pay it 
directly I offer'd to forgive them y' Interest which was but 
48/ this currency that I might not miss this opportunity of 
sending it home, and as they had frequently complained of 
their hard bargain, the other money was reced before and 
sent you before my Arrival here. I have no agreable News 
to write you from this part of the world, as our Flee! in 
the West Indies seems to be in a Lethargy and you in 
Europe the only active People from whom we expect ex- 
traordinary matters. Georgia is attack'd by the Spaniards 
and twelve hundred of their Men landed on Cumberland 
Harbour, and 'tis fear'd they will take it, but we have had 
no News from thence since y* first, but wait with impa- 
tience to hear how it will go with them, and no doubt this 
is old news to you. In this place we are in the disposition 
as when I left it, or rather worse for the Spirit of Party, 
Equivocation and Lying seems to have gain'd strength by 
their being long accustomed to it, and ye Breach between 
y e Gov r & Assembly I am afraid will never be closed till 
either the one or other of them are removed, you are 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 17 89-17 b. 35 



sensible I believe from whence our discord arises, and am 
afraid we are too much of y" disposition of the Froggs in 
y e Fable that pray'd to Jupiter for a King. Be pleased Sir 
to pay my Compliments to my Friends in Bristol and 
wishing this may meet you in Health am with much 
Esteem 

D'Sir 

Your obliged Fr d & hum. Serv* 

R. H. 

PHILAD* 9 br 18 th 1742. 
HONOURED SIR 

The proceeding is copy of my Last to you Via Cork since 
which I reced your kind Letter of the 6 th of Sept r & am Glad 
you are returned in health from your Journey & as that was 
wrote chiefly to make me more Easy I can't find words to 
Express the Greatfull Sentiments of my heart for your 
Goodness & though you blame me for my Uneasiness and 
think I had done pretty well considering the Short time of 
my arrivall, yet I assure you Sir what I have done since is but 
triffling & as I wrote you then the Greatest Sale was on the 
opening of a Cargo & had I not been Carefull in Choise of 
it as to quality & next Packages I shou'd have fared much 
worse, & notwithstanding all my Diligence, I have gott 
Severall things that will Stick Long on my hands, your 
unlimmitted Orders for flaxseed came too Late to gett any 
Quantity and it was gott up to Seven Shillings, had it been 
not so I cou'd not have complyed w th your orders as M r 
Lardner very Justly had Engaged all the money he had or 
cou'd gett for Bills of Exchange by M r Plumsteds direction 
which he has done at a very low advance. I have reced a 
Letter from M r Edwards in Jamaica by whom I sent 409 
bb" Flour on your Joint Ace* it bears a tolerable price 25/ 
from 30/ a barrel but y' Sale is Slow it Stands you in about 
18/ a barrel, as he is a Skillfull Industrious young man & 
well acquainted with that Island I know he will peak him- 
self on doing the best he can as he knows 'tis on your 



36 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1789-174.8. 

account. Cap* Budden & Cap* Elvis in the Constantine sails 
much about the same time. I have sent by the former a 
dozen Rattle Snakes, some Gensing & Seneca Rattle Snake 
root for you with the Coppys of M Penn's & M r Freame's 
pictures with the owl they are allowed to be exceeding Good 
coppys & according to my Judgment they are the best I 
ever saw of Hesseliu's Painting, by the Latter I have sent 
six Rattle Snakes & some more gensing with four wild 
Turkey's 3 hens & a cock w th a large pott of preserved 
Ginger which I luckily met with the other day for you. I 
have made all the enquiry I possibly cou'd for Snakes and 
cou'd not for my life get more, Hams are very Scarce & not 
to be had & we have little Porke in the Country this year. 
M r Peters gott six from M r Allen & sent them by Cap* Davis 
for you but through mistake the captain gave them to M r 
Aliens correspondents in London. I have done all I pos- 
sibly can to procure you Bear Hams but am yet unsuccessfull. 
In my last I gave you a just ace* of that unhappy fray that 
happened on y" 1 st of October but not so full a one as I 
intend to do when I shall have the pleasure of seeing you 
in Person, since which I have been called before the As- 
sembly with many others, but as I was fearfull what use 
they might make of what I cou'd say on the .occation I took 
great care of what I said for we were all on our qualifica- 
tions they wanted much to know what I had Heard in 
private Conversation relating to it in answer to which I 
told them as I was acquainted with both Party's which 
gave me a Good deal of Uneasiness y* it was not totally 
Extinguish'd I thought it not Just in me to relate any 
thing I heard in the Houses of my friends & on my Qualifi- 
cation Shou'd only relate what I personally saw transacted 
this I cou'd not refuse them & took M r Plumsteds advice 
about it. I was desired to Sign a Petition by M r Pember- 
ton to the house request 8 them to examine who were the 
abettors of the Riot but I told him as I was no party Body 
I desired to be excused, he used many arguments but in 
Vain & thought by this I shou'd escape, but was at last 



Letters from Letter-Book of Eichard Hockley, 17 89-17 J^. 3 7 

obliged to go though they sent their Serjant at arms three 
times for me before I wou'd I must confess I was horridly 
confused when I found I was obliged to go, pluck'd up 
Courage & disappointed them much, notwithstanding Isaac 
Norris, Sam 1 Blunston & James Morris got up three several 
times to desire the Speaker to ask me several Impertinent 
questions as I thought, the former in his Sly artfull manner 
said y* I ought to declare to the House what I had Heard 
in conversation in honour to clear up the Characters if I 
cou'd of some Gentlemen they had reason to Suspect. I 
told I look'd upon the action with as much abhorrence as 
they cou'd & consequently ought to be very cautious whom 
we Suspected without just foundation, that whilst he & my 
Self kept our Suspicions to ourselves no Gentleman's 
Character cou'd Suffer, made them a Low bow & march'd 
off, they have sent four Citations to Mess Plumsted, Allen, 
Taylor, and Turner to appear before them if they please to 
clear up their Conduct w* h they have reason to Suspect from 
some Depositions they have taken, they make very light of 
it & what they intend to do I make no doubt but one or 
other of them will acquaint you with it. M r Peters I 
know writes you a very long Letter w th a particular ace* of 
all Publick Bussiness worth your notice as does M r Lardner. 
James has wrote to you about his affairs & has sent you by 
the Constantine all you wrote for. I have Sent you 8 doz n of 
oranges & Leamons from Springettsbury pack'd up in a Box 
directed for you. M r Lardner & James were afraid they 
wou'd not keep, however I have run the risque, the Gov- 
ernour has had a doz n Already & am afraid the Trees have 
been Pilfer'd. They are in very good order, & every thing 
Else except the fences round Springettsbury & am Sorry to 
find Jacob not the Person I cou'd wish & think him blame 
worthy in Several respects, all your Negroes are well I have 
provided 'em with a few things & assure none but what is 
absolutely necessary. Cap* Stevenson is not yet arrived & 
our weather is very cold so that I am afraid poor Tom will 
be pinch'd with the cold. 



38 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-174.2. 

Be pleased to pay my true regards to Mess Penns I have 
wrote to M ri Freame and wishing you a Merry Xtmas & 
many happy Years & I am 

Sent a Coppy of this by Cap* Budden. 

P.S. M M Steel has gott the Goods and Given Bond, the 
volume of Prideaux's History is in your Closett. 

PHIL ADA Nov r 1 st 1742 

THO S PENN ESQ R 
D E & HON D SIR 

I have reced both your kind and Affect** Letters which 
gave me great pleasure, as they brought me an Account of 
your Wellfare with that of your worthy Familys, your 
Journey into the North I hope has been agreable and wish 
every thing may be conducive to give you pleasure when 
your troublesome Affairs doth not require your immediate 
attendance and flatter myself with hopes, they are by this 
time finish'd agreable to your wishes, and with great truth 
can say nothing else can give me greater pleasure. When 
I mentioned M r Kinseys uneasiness I knew it was without 
foundation but thought it my duty to let you know, the 
Affair has been finished a long while of which M r Peters 
has wrote you very particularly about. M r Kinsey has paid 
the money to M r Lardner due from the Assembly notwithst 8 
you left no particular order for it to be reced. Flaxseed 
was at 5/ when I reced your orders & is now sold at 6/2 and 
I suppose will reach 7/ before they've done y 9 first price 
exceeded what I gave when I bought last, so have bought 
none, I reced a letter from John Barclay that gives but a 
poor account of our Commoditys except Flaxseed and there 
was no price sett there being none to sell, swingled Flax as 
Im inform'd by all the Dutch is never brought to town to 
sell, and they tell me such a quantity as 3 or 400 is not to 
be had, unless notice is given to the people before hand and 
then it must be gott from a number of People as they use 
great quantitys themselves, as to Potash I wou'd have com- 
plyed with your orders but old & young M r pemberton told 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-174.2. 39 

me they had made several tryals and it wou'd never answer, 
M r Armstrong from Bellfast has sent to them two Casks of 
potash for a sample one of them is for you & they say we 
cannot make that sort for want of some ingredient not yet 
found out, M r Rogers's receipt I left with you as he was on 
the Spott and I coming away, but as Sam Carpenter is now 
here I have talk'd with him on y* Affair and he assures me 
he never charged any Commiss n on that note left in Rogers's 
hands and that he ought to receive Commiss ni for paying it 
to you, when the Rum arrives from Jamaica I shall take 
particular care of it. As to the things belonging to James 
he will take care about, there's no turkeys at Springetsbury 
but I have had the good luck to gett four of the wild breed 
which Cap* Elvis Master of the Constantine has promised 
to take particular care of, what rattle Snakes I can possibly 
gett I will send by him, he will sail in about ten days, as 
to Ginseng I know not what to say about. M p Lardner has 
wrote to M r Cookson & Smout, & it seems a difficulty to 
get any thing like the quantity tis grown quite out of date 
& scarcely ever mentioned, Nanny sent to M Freame a 
large pott of Ginger by Cap* Davis she believes 20 lb but I 
have order'd 12 lb more notwiths d from Barbadoes. Bills of 
Exchange are now at 50 per Cent but M r Lardner is advised 
not to buy yet, expecting they will be still lower, as to my 
own Affairs, they are not so well as I cou'd wish, but think 
I have done better than I expected considering the very 
dull times and such vast quantitys of Woolens & Linnens 
imported from Ireland, and have wrote to my Corre- 
spondents for some things in the Spring that I must have if 
I intend to sell what remains on hand which is a consider- 
able part for notwithst* trade is so dull I see no way to 
mend myself but by involving myself still more which I 
know you will think a paradox, coud I receive my money 
in any reasonable time I should think myself pretty well 
off, and hope I shall have some instructions from you about 
selling my Land & Lott, or else I shall not be able in any 
reasonable time to discharge yours and M r Fells Debt. 



40 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-174%. 

Tho" Merriott desired me to write to you about the Ferry 
y" lease expiring sometime next Spring he is willing to give 
ten pounds a year for it, one Walton wants it and M r Lard- 
ner tells me he believes he can gett twenty pounds a year 
for it. M r Merriot says he is well provided with Servants 
& Boats & has been at a considerable expence for them, I 
gave him my promise I wou'd mention it to you and hope 
you'l excuse my freedom, as I coud not refuse him this 
favour. I am now agoing to enter on a Subject w th some 
reluctancy as I know the relation of it cannot be agreable 
to you, and as I know you will have some account of it 
from other hands soften'd and glossed over I thought it my 
duty to inform you of the real truth without prejudice to 
either party, the Law for chusing inspectors by the Consta- 
bles in the different Wards being elaps'd, and the Partys 
not agreeing amongst themselves, tho that of the Gov- 
ernours made some fair Offers to the other, the Inspectors 
were to be chosen the old way, of that by view, on the day 
of Election a great number of Dutch appear'd for the 
Quakers, said not to be properly qualified they carried all 
the Inspectors to a man, upon this a number of Sailors in 
all I believe sixty came up to the Markett Street with Clubs 
in their hands knock'd down all that stood in their way or 
did not fly before them and blood flew plentifully about. 
M r Morris as a Magistrate went to command peace, and he 
was knock'd down had two severe Wounds on his head & 
had he not crept under the stalls I believe he would have 
been kill'd, old M r Pemberton had several smart blows that 
lamed his hand for sometime, Tom Lloyd, young Fish- 
bourne, Rakestraw, Shad the barber and one Evans of North 
Wales an old Quaker of upwards of 60 years were all 
knock'd down and the last has lost his Senses as I am in- 
formed by the wounds he reced on his head, and number 
of other persons to me unknown shared the same Fate, 
I never saw such havock in my life before the Streets & 
Court house Stairs were clear' d in a few Minutes, and none 
but the Sailors crying out down with the plain Coats & 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1789-174.%. 41 

broad Brims then they took up great Stones & Bricks from 
the Lott you sold by the Meeting where the people had 
begun to build and broke the Court house Windows all to 
pieces and those that were in the house gott several Smart 
blows, at last the Dutch and other Country people being 
inraged return'd in a Body with Clubbs, and the Dutch 
were for getting guns but were prevented drove the Sailors 
before them they took to the Shipping and with the assist- 
ance of M r Lawrence who was very active and Charles 
Willing they took 40 of them and sent 'em to Goal, old 
Sam 1 Preston would have been certainly killed had it not 
been for Cap* Harry Hodge who fended off the blow and 
gott much hurt himself and I can't help making the same 
observation that some others have done, that not one 
Magistrate of the Governours appointment Stirr'd one inch 
to oppose the rioters but walk'd off the ground this gives 
the people an opportunity and they publickly said that M r 
Plumsted M r Allen and others of the Governours friends 
were at the bottom of all this though I believe unjustly 
accused, M r Allen woud certainly have gott into the house 
had this Affair not happened he had 336 Votes notwithst* 
and none of his friends voted for him in the town & Benj n 
Shomaker said numbers came & alter'd their ticketts in his 
house & Rob* Moore told me above 300 ticketts had his 
name dash'd out in his Shop, I realy pitty M r Allen he has 
suffer'd much as to popularity, these things I assure you 
Sir has occasioned me many a tear, for I can't help say 
though I have no judgment in Politicks that such proceed- 
ings as these shou'd be guarded against and can say nothing 
in favour of the other side who to gain their point have 
told many scandalous lyes & used many vile Insinuations 
of which no doubt you will have some ace* of, but I realy 
look upon this to be an attack upon the Liberty of the 
province in general notwithstanding acted by a particular 
party who think they are doing their Country a piece of 
Service, when I have an opportunity of seeing you I shall 
be more particular and perhaps (with truth) can give you 



42 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-1742. 

such an Account as you little expect to hear, through the 
whole I have kept myself perfectly cool and was at neither 
of their Meetings in order to pitch upon representatives, 
and have had a good many hard things said on me upon 
the occasion, but I was fully determined to have nothing to 
do with them as I was informed by some of the Gov rs 
friends what was intended & the consequences I dreaded 
have happen'd, I must inform you they are not residents in 
this place, but well esteemed by all the Gentlemen and 
frequently at the Governours, and though both the Gov- 
ernour and y 9 other Gentlemen of the place might have 
been ignorant of this Affair, or that it wou'd not come to 
such a heighth yet I cant see how they can escape the Cen- 
sure of the People in general as you know and are sensible 
they were not on any good terms before. I don't blame 
either y* Gov r or his friends but if please God I live to see 
you I will tell you the whole I know of the Matter, Cap* 
Redmond who is one supposed to sett the people on, is a 
strict roman Catholick publickly professes his religion and 
is often at the Governours club, we have two Priests in 
town beside the old one, and two young German Jesuits 
that live in Conestogoe one I have been in company with, 
they won't have it here that they are priests, I know it for 
a Certainty for my friend M r Ryan as you was pleased to 
call him told me so, and am complaisant to those people 
and in time shall make a good Jesuit myself, there's two 
familys arrived from the West Indies said to be of very 
good fortunes, I am sure they make an appearance as if 
they had, and Ryan told me twelve more substantial 
Familys were expected next Summer from the "West 
Indies, and other places, but the latter I cou'd not gett out 
of him though if possible I will, I was told they grew a 
little insolent at their Chappell and assure you a young 
gentleman of my acquaintance a Stranger from Carolina 
told me he went there and they insisted on his kneeling 
down at the Elevation of the host, and as he wanted to see 
the Ceremonys he complyed with it, I went after this my self 



Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockky, 1739-1742. 43 

with young M r Willing to see how they wou'd behave, but 
as they knew me we were had into one of the uppermost 
Seats, I see their Congregation is greatly increased they have 
built an handsome pulpit and have a crimson Velvet cushion 
& Cloth w th gold fringe, I thought I wou'd just drop this 
hint to you for they are become a great Bugg bear to several 
people, and whether or no tis true policy to suffer these 
people to go on and flourish in the manner they do if it 
coud be prevented, when I was there two Priests officiated 
and a third was in the inner room where we satt with 
sliding shutters that look'd into the Chappel. Dear Sir I 
believe I need not make any apology for my giving you 
these hints nor repeat the obligations I am under to inforce 
my sincerity and truth, for if I know my own heart your 
Interest with that of your familys is become inseperable 
with my own, and my affection for you cannot be shewn in 
any other way, than by giving you a just and true ace' of 
what comes under my knowledge relating to your family 
during your absence, and am well convinced from some 
hints that has been dropt if one of the family was to govern 
it would be more agreable to the people and things would 
go on in a smoother Channel, for Government though in a 
high Sphere may be compared to a family, which cannot 
live in Unity, unless some small failures are overlooked and 
winked at, for Love covers a multitude of faults, but when 
there's no true regard I am afraid there's no true forgive- 
ness, and however the Interest of the Country may be cryed 
up I wish self Interest mayn't be at the bottom. I have 
lately seen a book called M rs Rowesworks Friendship in 
Death with letters Moral & Entertaining, the Stile is Ele- 
gant and some of the Subjects Noble and well worth pe- 
rusing according to the little taste I have for reading I shall 
be obliged to you for it and woud not have given you this 
trouble coud I have sent to any one else that knows anything 
of books. My true regards wait on M r J. Penn M Freame 
& her little ones M r Penn & his family and am D r & Hon d Sir 

Your most Aff" & obliged &c. 



44 Letters from Letter-Book of Richard Hockley, 1739-174-2. 

PHILAD* Nov r 20 th 1742 
MY DEAR MASTER FREAME 

I coud not be easy without giving you the trouble of a 
few Lines in Order to bear me in your remembrance, & 
what Shall I say to a young Gentleman of your Age, having 
no business to write you ab*, & my affairs have taken up 
my time so much that I know little about your young ac- 
quaintance, and as to other Persons in your knowledge I 
shall refer you to your Mama's Letter. 

I hope you will bear with me if I take upon me to give 
you a little advice in the best manner I am capable, & that 
is as you are at y e same School w th your Cozen Jackey Penn 
& will I hope have the same Education you will on your 
part endeavour to Live in Strict Unity & Friendship w tb 
him & desire a Spirit of Emulation may arise in your Breast 
to equal him in all his Study's & Exercises. I have a very 
great regard to you Both as Descendants of a Worthy 
Honourable Family to whom I am under the greatest Obli- 
gations & hope you will Both Endeavour to imitate their 
Worthy Examples, but you must claim a greater Share of 
my Affections as I have pass'd away a many pleasing 
Hours in your Innocent company, & I cant bear to think 
that you Shou'd be Eclips'd in any one Virtue or Qualifica- 
tion that becomes a Gentleman & a Descendant of the 
Family to which you belong. Be pleased to give my 
humb* Service to your little Cozens & a thousand Kisses to 
Dear Miss Phil whom I can truly say I much Long to see, 
my Sister Joyns w th me in wishing you many happy years 
& a merry Xtmas, I suppose you will keep it at Happy 
Feens, & cou'd I gett Pacoletts Horse I Shou'd intrude as 
one of your Company, when you have leisure I shall take 
it very Kind if you will please favour me w th a line & if 
you can think of any thing from this part of the world 
that will be agreable to you write to me for it with* any sort 
of Ceremony & you will oblige me, who am with great 
Esteem D r master 

Yours &c. 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 45 



PENNSYLVANIA SOLDIERS OF THE REVOLUTION 
ENTITLED TO DEPRECIATION PAY. 

(Continued from Vol. XXVII. page 471.) 

Monies paid by John Nicholson, Comptroller General, on account 
of Depreciation of Pay of the Pennsylvania Line. 

1782. 

Matthew Bennett, Lieut. Flying Camp 
Daniel Godshalk, private Second Regiment 
Thomas Slattery. " Eleventh " 
Charles Deckery, drummer " " 

John Crawford, Lieut. Flying Camp 
Christopher New, private Second Regiment 
John Craig, Lieut. Flying Camp 
Robert Sample, Capt. Tenth Regiment 
John Helm, " Fifth " 

John Johnston, Adjutant Flying Camp 
Henry Tritt, private Seventh Regiment 
Huronimus Bridgham, private Tenth Regiment 
Daniel Brodhead Jr., Capt. Third " 
Thomas Collins, Serg* Third Regiment 
James "Wilson, Matross Artillery Artificers 
David Son, private First Regiment 
John Notestein, " Second " 

James Winter, " Eleventh " 
Simon Traynor, " Second " 

Michael Dinger, " Third " 

John Guthrie, Ensign Eighth " 

Peter Hackenbergh, Ensign Flying Camp 
Joseph Welsh, Lieut. " 

John M c Kee, private Eighth Regiment 

Benjamin Kinnard, " Third " 
Patrick Campbell, " " " 



46 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depredation Pay. 

"William Cummins, Matross Capt. Coren's Co. 

Peter Kollhoffer, Musician Proctor's Artillery 

John Parke, Lieut. Second Regiment 

Robert Robinson, Surgeon's Mate Flying Camp 

Daniel MIntire, private Second Regiment 

James Edgar, " " 

George Richardson, Matross Artillery Artificers 

John Murphy, private Second Regiment 

Israel Austin, " Eleventh " 

Thomas Glewa, " Fifth 

Christian Byerly, 

John Harris, private Third " 

James Richards, Serg* Fourth " 

Abraham Casserie, private Tenth " 

John Bugh, " First " 

Adam Musquetness, 

Joseph Murphy, 

Abraham Wood, " Eleventh " 

Michael Ring, 

Nathaniel Irish, Captain of Artillery 

James Martin, private Second Regiment 

Jacob Snell, gunner Proctor's Artillery 

Solomon Townsend, private Tenth Regiment 

James Scott, Matross Artillery Artificers 

John Vaughan, private Tenth Regiment 

William Barrett, " Third " 

John Walker, " Fifth " 

John Mapsham, " " " 

Robert Campbell, Capt. Invalid " 

James Thompson, 

Duncan M c Kinley, private Third Regiment 

Alexander Williams, " Ninth " 

John Gordon, Adj* Lee's Legion 

John Tool, private Third " 

James Byrnes, Corp 1 Eleventh " 

Samuel Porter, private Third " 

Jacob Warner, gunner Artillery Artificers 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depredation Pay. 47 

Christopher Patterson, private Third Regiment 
Christopher Mingle, " Fifth 

Michael Regan, " Second " 

William Stevenson, " Eleventh " 

Alexander Gerre, " Fifth " 

Daniel Armstrong, " Third " 

David Einfightcr, Matross Artillery Artificers 

January, 1783. 

Thomas Jenny, Lieut. Fifth Regiment 

Daniel Brodhead, Colonel Eighth Regiment 

Jacob Shively, private Second " 

Edward Thomas, dragoon Cavalry " 

Joseph Quality, Lieut, of Navy 

Alexander Benstead, Paymaster Tenth " 

John Green, Ensign of Militia 

John Priestly, Capt. Fifth Regiment 

Jedidiah Lippincott, private Third Regiment 

John Richardson, Capt. Fifth " 

John Thompson, Ensign of Militia 

Thomas Jones, Serg* Fourth Regiment 

William Heilbert, Matross Artillery Artificers. 

Christopher Stewart, Lieut. Col. Third Regiment 

John Nice, Capt. Sixth Regiment 

John King, Corp 1 Fifth " 

Abner Everett, Lieut. Flying Camp 

Jacob Abraham Crape, private Fifth Regiment 

Jeremiah Talbot, Major Sixth " 

James Morgan, Serg* Fifth " 

Asher Carter, Lieut, of Militia 

William Maypowder, private Eleventh Regiment 

John Beatty, Major Fifth " 

John Holliday, Lieut. Flying Camp 

Daniel Topham, Capt. Thirteenth Regiment 

John Johnston, Adj* Flying Camp 

Thomas Murray, private First Regiment 

William Douglass, " Eleventh " 



48 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 

James Q-. Heron, Capt. Hazen'e Regiment 
James Leech, private Second " 

Samuel Smiley, " Fifth " 

John Cobea, Capt. Second " 

Matthew Jones, private Fifth " 

James McFarlane, Lieut. Flying Camp 
Jeremiah Jackson, Capt Eleventh " 
Joseph Lyons, private Third " 

John Chigney, " Fourth " 

William Fowler, " Sixth " 

Robert Cochran, " Fifth " 

Christian Linn, " Tenth " 

Christopher Berntheisel, private Tenth Regiment 
Henry Hargood, private German Regiment 
John Stone, " Eleventh 

John MBride, " Tenth " 

John Stoy, Capt. Second " 

Joseph Knowles, private Eleventh " 
John Berntheisel, " Fifth " 

William MFarlane, Capt Flying Camp 
Stout Branson, private Second Regiment 
Conrad Shire, " Third 

John Klinger, Corp 1 " " 

Peter Paull, Ensign Flying Camp 
Hugh Quea, Corp 1 " 

James Buchanan, Serg* Third Regiment 
William Prosser, " Fourth " 
Andrew Rourke, " 

William Williams, Matross Artillery Artificers 
Peter Felix, private First Regiment 
Samuel Hunter, Corp 1 Fourth " 

John Adams, private " " 

William Hastings, private Eleventh Regiment 
William Falconer, Corp 1 Sixth " 

William Byrnes, Serg* Eleventh " 
William Houston, Tenth " 

George Williams, private " " 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 49 

Daniel Connell, Serg* Eleventh Regiment 

James Halfpenny, private German " 

James Moore, Major First " 

William Entrichen, late private Seventh Regiment 

Alexander King, Corp 1 Fourth Regiment 

Matthew Hamilton, " " " 

John Smith, private Tenth " 

John MElhatton, Capt, Flying Camp 

James Borass, private Sixth Regiment 

William Welsh, " Fourth 

John Marr, " Third " 

John C. Latour, Lieut. Capt. Schott's Company 

Daniel Brodhead, Colonel 

John Cobea, Capt. Second Regiment 

John Stoy, " " " 

Levi Griffith, Lieut. Fifth " 

Jonathan Hatton, private First " 

Henry Piercy, Lieut. Second " 

John MClellan, Capt. First " 

Edward Crawford, Lieut. " " 

Caleb North, Lieut. Col. Second " 

Gibb Jones, Capt. Artillery 

Samuel Wharton, private Second " 

John Mackey, Corp 1 Fourth " 

Jeremiah Freeman, Captain of Artillery 

Gibb Jones, " " 

John Minor, 

Robert Nelson, Matross Artillery Artificers 

John M c Clellan, drummer Third Regiment 

John Kerney, private " " 

John Boyd, " Capt. Wallacejs Co. Flying Camp 

Barnabas Kain, " " 

Ignatius Keating, Matross Artillery 

William Jefferies, private Second Regiment 

Samuel MElhatton, Ensign Flying Camp 

William Tenant, private Fifth Regiment 

William Kirkpatrick, Corp 1 Third Regiment 

VOL. XXVIII. 4 



50 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 

Isaac Broom, Serg* Fourth Regiment 

John Creiger, private Third " 

George Dolling, Serg* Coren's Company 

James Yanosten, " Artillery 

George Stewart, private Tenth Regiment 

John M c Kown, " Second " 

John Forger, " Eleventh " 

Andrew Mullan, " Third " 

Robert Wilson, " " " 

Morgan Connor, Lieut. Col. Seventh Regiment 

Peter Doyle, private Sixth " 

John Ford, " Third 

Charles Miller, " Fourth 

John MGregor, Serg* Artillery 

Archibald M'JSTair, 

William Marnes, private Second Regiment 

William Neice, " Fifth " 

Christian Moyer, " First " 

John Reece, " Third " 

George M c Cord, " Fifth " 

Samuel Blackburne, private First " 

John M c Cullough, 

James Campbell, private Fourth " 

Andrew Hoge, " Tenth " 

Timothy Burns, " Third " 

Philip Jones, " Second " 

John Marshall, Corp 1 Artillery Artificers 

George Brice, private Fifth Regiment 

Laban Bowgar, " Fourth " 

George Biddleson, private Second Regiment 

John Hutchinson, " Fourth " 

George Campbell, " Third " 

David Hall, Fifth 

Benjamin Stagg, 

John Johnston, 

James Greer, private Flying Camp 

George Donnelly, Serg* Fourth Regiment 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 51 

James Paulhill, Serg* Artillery Artificers 
Adam Coogler, Dragoon Lee's Legion 
Patrick Cohen, Matross Artillery Artificers 
Thomas Vernon, private Sixth Regiment 
Luke Harper, " Ninth " 

Geo. Will MXN"ott, farrier Penna. Cavalry 
Peter Rice, private Second Regiment 
Robert Bready, Serg* Fifth " 
James Arthurs, private Third Regiment 
Peter Sides, 

Jacob Dovenberger, private Tenth Regiment 
Thomas Collins, " Third 

John Graham, 

Samuel MEllhatten, Lieut. Flying Camp 
Adam Shaffer, private " 

Gottlieb Hetlinger, private " 

George Foster, " Eleventh Regiment 

Joseph Lewis, 

Jacob Steinebagh, " Second " 

John Armstrong, Serg* First " 

Richard Hutchinson, private Eleventh " 
William Johnston, fifer Second " 
Patrick Donahue, 

Matt. Weidman, Lieut. Atlee's Regiment 
John Rose, Matross Artillery Artificers 
Cornelius Gwyer, private Third Regiment 
Benjamin Ashton, " Second " 

William Hanna, Corp 1 " " 

John Ryan, private Seventh " 

George Helm, " Second " 

William Barber, " " " 

Peter Dick, 

Edward Stone, " " " 

John Dougherty, " " " 

James MIntire, " Fourth " 

Joseph Fletcher, Bombardier Artillery 
Ludwig Doamoen, private Tenth " 



52 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 

Sylvanus Brown, private Fourth Regiment 

"William Bowman, " Second " 

Thomas Dougherty, " Magaw's " 

Jacob Doughty, Corp 1 " " 

John MHroy, private Second " 

Peter M c Bride, " First " 

Barney Hasson, " Second " 

Henry Weiss, " " " 

Bernard Dougherty, " Fifth " 

John M c Griff, Serg 4 Ninth 

Hugh Barnet, Corp 1 Hazen's " 

John Newman, Serg* Sixth " 
Samuel Fisher, Capt. Militia 

John English, private Second " 

Anthony Holman, " Ninth " 
William Gray, dec'd, his widow 

William Douglass, private Tenth " 

John Craven, " Fifth 

John Stout, " Second " 

Thomas Leister, " " " 

James Ashton, Serg* Ninth " 
Charles Lewis, Dragoon 

Martin Heydler, private German " 
Jacob Fegan, Matross Artillery " 

Andrew McKinney, " " Artificers 

John Kincade, " " " 

John Thomas, " " " 

Jacob Stone, " " " 

John Baker, " " " 

Michael Joyce, " " " 

Jacob Peters, " " " 

Patrick Deady, private Second Regiment 
Robert M c Donald, Fifth " 

John Albert, " Cadwalader's " 

Thomas Alexander, Bom. Artillery Artificers 

John Himebright, private Fifth Regiment 
Morris Casey, " Hazen's " 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 53 

John M c Glaughlan, 

"William Killan, Matross Artillery Artificers 
John Sullivan, private Eleventh Regiment 
James Bell, " " " 

Edward Denny, Serg* " " 

Thomas Connor, " " 

David Alsbaugh, private Second " 

Michael Hess, " German " 

James Carter, Matross Artillery " 
Adam Garlick, " " Artificers 

Michael Goodman, " " " 

William Simms, " " " 

Yost Berger, private First Regiment 

James Robinson, Corp 1 Eleventh " 
Caspar Wagoner, private German " 
Patrick Lafferty, " Tenth " 

Richard Colgan, " " 

James M c Castillon, " " 

William Rodman, " Ninth " 
Matthew Horner, " Second " 
John Hart, Drum Major German " 
Robert Fleming, private Fifth " 

Henry Shoub, " German " 

Thomas Vaughan, " First " 

John M c Quade, " Second " 

Philip Saverman, " German " 

Roger Stayner, Capt. Second " 
John Abbott, private " " 

William Bonfar, " Tenth " 

Edward M c Kellen, " Seventh " 

James Dunavon, " " " 

William Roarke, " 
Alexander Varner, " Fifth " 

Matthew Irvine, Surgeon Lee's Legion 
Archibald Gordon, private Eleventh " 
John Earhart, " Tenth " 

John Plass, " 



54 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 

Henry Swetrgay, private German Regiment 

Andrew Travis, " Second " 

Robert Coile, Third " 

George Whibble, " Second " 

John Anderson, " Sixth " 

John Grosgill, " Eleventh " 

Thomas Fletcher, First " 

Thomas Gilkey, " Tenth " 

Patrick Higgins, " German " 

John Smith, Second " 

Matthew Lyon, [?] " First " 

Mark Bingley Worrell, Sergt Invalid " 
Geo. Jacob Grinder, Dragoon Lee's Legion 

(To the foregoing officers and soldiers 8112.10.0 was 
paid on account.) 



Paid by order of the Council on account of Bounties granted to 
the Pennsylvania Line, per Resolution of General Assembly 
March 8, 1781. 

June-November, 1783. 

Dennis Morarity, private First Regiment 
John Blakeney, " Second " 

William N"icholsen, 

Matthew Organ, " First " 

Hugh Stewart, " " " 

Christopher Hight, " " 

William Reed, " " " 

Robert Wilson, " Hazen's " 

William Murray, Corporal 
John Donavan, private Third Regiment 
Thomas Kelly, per A. M c Lean Esq. 
James Devett, private First Regiment 
Patrick Leonard, " Artillery 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 55 



Account of Cash paid to the officers and soldiers of the First 
Pennsylvania Regiment at York Town in part of their pay. 

Paid Archibald M'Lean Esq r for the purpose of paying 
the residue of the Gratuity and Bounty money, on account. 



Capt. John Davis 

" Jacob Stahe 

" John Marshall (3d) 

" E. Burke 

" John Steel 

" John M c Clellan 

" Ebenezer Carson 

" William Wilson 

Lieut. James Campbell 
" James Milligan (4th) 

Surgeon John B. Rodgers 
Q. M. Serg' David Marshall 



Lieut. James MFarlane 

" William MDowell 

" Robert Martin 

" Francis White 

" Andrew Johnston 

" Joseph Collier 

" Edward Crawford 

" Michael Everly 

" Robert Alison 

" William M c Curdy 

" William Feltman 

Surg. Mate John Rague 



Drummers. 

William Mitchell George M'Gihigan 

Jacob Tanner 

Fifers. 

Fife Major William Ferguson 
Robert Campbell Andrew Bird 



Sergeants. 



John Griffey 
George Dalton 
Patrick Preston 
Thomas Welsh 
John Winn 
Thomas Burns 
Thomas Fanning 
William Douglas 



James Berry 
Nicholas Burney 
Michael Lochery 
Simon Digby 
Daniel Humphreys 
Jeremiah Connell 
Thomas Scotland 
William Broadley 
Andrew Sands 



56 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 



Corporals 
Adam Rupert 
Hugh Grier 
"William Greenhill 
John Gower 

Privates. 
Edward O'Neil 
John M c Cartney 
Thomas Shehon 
Samuel Gorman 
Barney Rudey 
Philip Nagle 
James M c Credy 
Richard Francis 
Abraham Gerhart 
William M c Connell 
Philip Mandeville 
Hugh Henderson 
John M c Nair 
Thomas Hamilton 
James O'Neal 
Matthew Hughes 
Thomas Collins 
Edward Lardner 
James Brown 
Felix M c Glaughlin 
Martin Reynolds 
Edward Beeby 
Michael Ealey 
Thomas Rush 
Patrick Connelly 
John Ward 
Henry M'Cartney 
Christopher Finnegan 
Thomas Brown 
Abraham Boyd 
Thomas Moore 



George Lindersmith 
Edward Blake 
Barney M c Guire 



Thomas Rock 
Joseph Johnston 
Isaac MIlholse 
Timothy Dunovon 
Matthew Dougherty 
Michael Kildea 
Felix M c Carty 
Philip Henry 
Richard Collier 
Richard Jameson 
James Filgate 
Robert M c Gee 
Aaron Penton 
James Siggersoll 
Stephen Cook 
George Wasselman 
Henry Mooney 
Isaac Willis 
Thomas Hervey 
Isaiah M c Cord 
Charles Boyles 
Thomas Boyd 
James Coulter 
Roger Casey 
James MKinzey 
Murdoch Patterson 
Edward Kelly 
Samuel Harmar 
Jonathan Hutton 
George Branigen 
Christian Reiley 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 57 



Samuel Kline 
Thomas Hamilton Jr 
John M'Carron 
Robert Squires 
William Sparrow 
David MCarter 
Daniel Campbell 
Roger Griffin 
Mathias Croat 
Mark M c Cord 
James M c Clane 
William Fitzpatrick 
William Morris 
Daniel Quinn 
Charles Irwin 
Samuel Lyles 
John Reynolds 
Jacob Okerman 
Nicholas Guiger 
Michael Gamble 
John Dunovon 
John Jameson 
Samuel Fox 
William Fox 
Arnold Peters 
Francis Enos 
John Moast 

Col. Thomas 



Daniel M c Mullen 
Peter Lesk 
Robert Stubbs 
William Mullen 
Joseph Blancher 
Matthew Campbell 
James Moon 
Patrick Quinn 
Roger Leonard 
Thomas Stewart 
John Vernon 
Robert Stanford 
James Leamey 
Hugo Bradley 
Timothy Winters 
Michael Eirech 
John Simpson 
Baltzer Wilhelm 
John Reeh 
John Ward 
Thomas Mortimore 
John Sigafus 
John Miller 
Christian Manning 
James Gibbons 
Philip Cook 
Joseph Moast 
Robinson 



Account of Monies paid to the Officers and Privates of the Penn- 
sylvania Line at Philadelphia in part of the Depreciation 
due from the State agreeable to an order of the Council of 
the 24. th April 1781. 

Major Gen. Arthur St. Clair 

Brig. Gen. Anthony Wayne 

Major Benjamin Fishbourne A. D. C. 

Major James Gibbons A. D. C. 

Capt. Matthew MConnell 



58 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 

Colonels. 

Josiah Harmar Walter Stewart 

Richard Humpton 

Majors. 

James Moore, First James Hamilton, Second 

Evan Edwards, Eleventh 

Captains. 

"William Van Leer, Fifth John Bankson, Second 

John Pearson, Second John Patterson, " 

Benj. Bartholomew, Fifth Samuel Talbot, " 

Stephen Stevenson, Ninth Matthew M c Connell, Invalid 

Lieutenants. 

Andrew Lytle, Fifth "William Moore, Second 

J. F. MPherson, Sixth Henry Piercey, " 

Joseph Banks, First Jas. Morris Jones, " 

Peter Summers, Fourth James Whitehead, " 
Geo. North, Q. M., Fifth 

Sergeants. 

Joseph Dunlap, Second Thomas Kennedy, Second 
Hugh Mulhollan, " George Goznall, " 

Privates. 

Daniel Netherhouse, Second David Griffey, Tenth 

Thomas Tull, " Rudolph Brookhouse,Tenth 

Michael Seman, " Jeremiah Murray, " 

Philip Springer, " Philip Keppo, Second 

David Bollard, " Henry Hamilton, " 

Henry Guess, " Baltzar Barge, u 

George Albertson, " William Judges, " 

Moses Moreland, " John Hitchins, " 

James Morrison, " John Engle, " 

Nicholas Stover, " Abraham Price, " 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 59 

Rodger Kennan, Second Patrick Kelly, Second 
Thomas Smith, " John Campbell, " 

John Weidman, " John Leonard, *< 

George Dicks, " Thomas Kelly, First 

William Warner " 

John St. John, drummer, Second 

(To be continued.) 



60 Perm's Proposals for a Second Settlement in Pennsylvania. 



PENN'S PEOPOSALS FOE A SECOND SETTLEMENT IN 
THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

The frontispiece to the present number of THE PENNSYL- 
VANIA MAGAZINE is a facsimile of the original broadside, 
" Some Proposals for a Second Settlement in the Province 
of Pennsylvania," in the collections of the American Philo- 
sophical Society of Philadelphia, and is among the rarest 
connected with the early history of the Province. 

Less than a decade after Penn had laid out his city on the 
Delaware, the success of his improvement and the current 
of emigration which was fast entering the Province induced 
him to select the site for a new city on the east bank of the 
Susquehanna River, near where the Conestoga Creek flows 
into it. To bring this projected " Second Settlement" to the 
attention of the public, Penn employed Andrew Sowle, in 
1690, to print his " Proposals," in which he sets forth the 
great advantages of his Province in location, " the known 
Goodness of the Soyle," that nature was prolific in vege- 
table life ; that in its forests grew many valuable woods ; 
that game of all kinds abounded ; that fish of divers sorts 
filled the streams; that the most liberal terms would be 
given to all purchasers of land, which would "be clear of 
all Indian pretentious ;" that the new city would become a 
great centre of Indian traffic and commercial activity, and 
that roads and waterways were projected to connect the 
Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. " And further, I do 
promise to agree with every Purchaser that shall be willing 
to treat with me between this and next Spring, upon all 
such reasonable conditions, as shall be thought necessary 
for their accommodation, intending, if God please, to return 
with what speed I can, and my Family with me, in order to 
our future residence." 



Penn's Proposals for a Second Settlement in Pennsylvania. 61 

Perm, with his family, did visit the Province, but nine 
years after the date of his " Proposals," and he had long 
before known of the failure of his proposed " Second Settle- 
ment" on the banks of the Susquehanna. 

The town of Lancaster, however, at a later period, be- 
came an important centre of Indian traffic and commercial 
activity, due to the enterprise of its inhabitants and the 
merchants of the capital of the Province. 



62 Francis Campbell. 



FEANCIS CAMPBELL. 

BY CHARLES H. BROWNING. 

Francis Campbell was one of the many interesting pio- 
neers of the Cumberland Valley of whom no sketch has 
been written. It is not known where he came from, nor is 
his parentage known, 1 Dr. Egle's " Campbell Pedigree," in 
his " Pennsylvania Genealogies," to the contrary notwith- 
standing. 2 

Mr. Campbell seems to have had a good education, to 
have been a man of culture and refinement, and certainly 
was a ready and forcible writer, judging from his letters to 
the Provincial Council. Primarily he was a merchant or 
general-store keeper, filled with honor several offices of 
trust, and was highly respected by his neighbors. He was 
prominent in Presbyterian Church affairs of his neighbor- 
hood, for in May, 1765, "Francis Gamble" (his will is 
signed " Fra. Campble") was one of the guarantors of the 
salary of the minister, Mr. Cooper, of the Middle Spring 

1 Dr. Egle has stated that he was born in 1737. This date is certainly 
incorrect, as " Francis Campble" was a taxable in 1750, and had before 
been a leader in the meetings called to protest against the removal of 
the county court-house from Shippensburg to Carlisle. Dr. Egle also 
places him as a son of John Campbell, an Episcopalian minister, who 
died at York, Penna., in 1764, son of John Campbell, who was buried 
in the Derry churchyard, "d. 20 Feb. 1734, aged 79 years." The 
only P. E. minister named "John Campbell" who lived in York died 
in 1819, his son "Francis" was born in 1787, and this minister 
was, anyway, the son of the Francis of whom I write, and not his 
father. 

*" Joseph Cammil" was one of the unlicensed traders in Lancaster 
County, 10th August, 1748, and at this date received his license as Indian 
trader. (Penna. Arch., II. 14.) In September, 1754, " Joseph Campbell" 
was killed by an Indian named Israel, near Parnall's Knob, at the 
house of Anthony Tomson. He may have been the Indian trader. 
(Penna. Arch., II. 173, letter of George Croghan.) 



Francis Campbell. 63 

Presbyterian Church ; and two years subsequently lot "No. 
59, in Shippensburg, was conveyed in trust to him by Ed- 
ward Shippen, for a Presbyterian church, at the yearly 
rental of one penny sterling. In 1768 a log cabin was 
erected on this lot for the use of the Presbyterians, the 
first " church" in the town. Previous to this the Presby- 
terians had worshipped at the Middle Spring Church, a log 
cabin erected in 1738 in Hopewell Township, adjoining 
Shippensburg, of which Francis Campbell was an elder. 
He had a farm of two hundred and severity acres there, 
which he had purchased in June, 1753, from Samuel Cul- 
bertson, yeoman. In 1767/8 a tract of land in Hopewell 
Township, called Mount Hope, was sold by the State to 
Francis Campbell and others, trustees for the Middle Spring 
Presbyterian Church. This tract was patented in 1790 by 
these trustees, and in 1793 was deeded to the church at 
Middle Spring. 

In this connection the correspondence about Mr. Camp- 
bell between the Governors of Maryland and Pennsylvania 
is singular and interesting. In 1750 "Francis Campbell, 
of Shippensburg," was licensed to trade with the Indians, 
and in July, 1754, he was among the signers of a petition 
to Governor Hamilton about protection from the Indians ; 
yet in this year the Governor of Maryland suggested that 
Mr. Campbell was not to be trusted in intercourse with the 
Indians, as he was dangerous as a Roman Catholic. 

In 1754, December 27, Governor Sharpe, of Maryland, 
wrote to the Pennsylvania Governor: 

"As the conduct and behaviour of that Mr. Croghan . . . was 
represented to me in no favorable light, I cannot help taking the lib- 
erty to mention some things that have been said of him. ... It 
has been asserted that he is a Roman Catholic, and that one Campbell, 
a person of the same persuation, generally resides at his house ; that 
several circumstances afford room to suspect that this Campbell paid a 
visit sometime since to the French fort, but, indeed, I should not have 
given much credit to such a story as this without it had been supported 
by stronger proofs than were offered to me had not the behaviour of Mr. 



64 Francis Campbell. 

Croghan in opening a letter of the greatest importance . . . which 
was not directed to him . . . did not make me a little suspicious 
of his integrity and fidelity." 

This suggests that Mr. Campbell, being a Roman Catho- 
lic, was likely to sympathize with the French and Indians, 
and not, therefore, fit for an Indian agency. In replying 
to the Maryland Governor's complaint, the Governor of 
Pennsylvania stated, January 7, 1754/5, that Mr. Croghan 
had never been deemed a Roman Catholic; but that he 
was educated in or came from Dublin, and " I observe 
what you say of William Croghan, ... at present I have 
no one to enquire of as to the truth of the particulars men- 
tioned in yours, . . . but Mr. Peters . . . informs me that 
there is one Francis Campbell, a store-keeper at Shippens- 
burg, who was bred for the church, as he has heard, among 
the Roman Catholics, but he has the character of an 
honest, inoffensive man, and it is not likely that he either 
concerns himself with the French, or can be the person 
mentioned (by you) to reside at Auchquick." He further 
said that he thought the " Campbell" alluded to by Gov- 
ernor Sharpe was " an old man, one of the lowest sort of 
Indian traders, who is often with the Indians, and has 
been mentioned under the name of Joseph Campbell, as 
a suspected person, for his leanings towards the French, 
by Mr. Croghan at a meeting of the Commissioners at 
Carlisle." 1 

1 In a memorial to Governor Shute, of Massachusetts Bay Colony, from 
the Scotch Presbyterians, residents in the north of Ireland, dated 26th 
March, 1718, they stated their inclination to remove themselves to New 
England, as colonists, on satisfactory terms. But they did not, and 
subsequently many of these memorialists among them, George, James, 
and William Campbell came to Penn's Colony, and took up land in 
that part of Chester County which in 1729 became Lancaster County. 
Families of the name of Campbell are found located, in early Colonial 
days, in the dozen counties erected out of the original Chester County. 
Of these early pioneers : 

1720. Patrick Campbell took up land in Conestoga or Donegal 
Township, and was connected with the Derry church, 1724 ; and, 1729, 



Francis Campbell. 65 

Because of Mr. Peters's statement it has always been 
supposed by his descendants that Francis Campbell was 

on the erection of Lancaster County, was the first constable of Donegal 
Township and also its first assessor. He d. in 1735. 

1720. Samuel Campbell was a land-owner in the Scotch settlement 
in the northern part of New London Township. 

1720. John Campbell petitioned the Board of Property for a grant of 
one hundred acres in New Castle County. 

1724. Robert Campbell was one of the earliest members of the Derry 
church. In its graveyard is a stone to John Campbell, d. 20th February, 
1734, aged seventy-nine. He is supposed to have come over from Ire- 
land in 1726, and is thought to have removed to Shippensburg ; and 
that Joseph and William Campbell, who bought lots Nos. 77 and 116 
there, were his brothers ; and two other brothers, Robert and Dugal, 
removed to Orange County, Va. ; and that of his children, Alexander 
and James were warrantees for two hundred and three hundred acres in 
1733-37 in Derry Township, and Patrick, Robert, and David went to St. 
Mark's Parish, Orange County, Va., 1732-41, and subsequently Patrick 
settled in Augusta County, Va. The information, on traditions con- 
cerning the connection of the Virginia Campbells with those of early 
Pennsylvania, is vague. However, there is a sheriff's writ, dated 19th No- 
vember, 1746, for the arrest, for a debt of 146, of "Andrew Campbell, late 
of your [Lancaster] County, yeoman, otherwise called Andrew Campbell 
of Orange County, in the Colony of Virginia, yeoman ;" and another writ, 
dated 5th November, 1758, to arrest John Campbell, late of Lancaster 
County, yeoman, to answer Redman Conyngham, administrator of the 
estate of John Henderson, deceased ; and another, 4th May, 1759, to arrest 
James Campbell, yeoman, late of Lancaster County, for a debt. As 
these debtors departed for Virginia, these writs may be of genealogi- 
cal use. 

1734. Patrick Campbell, aged twenty, and John Campbell, aged 
twenty, came over in the ship " Hope," and took the oath of allegiance. 
Bernard Campbell also came in this ship from Rotterdam. 

1735. Warrant for land iu Lancaster County issued to Andrew 
Campbell. He lived in Salsbury Township. Will proved 1st July, 1752. 

1736. Warrant for land in Lancaster County to John Campbell. 
He d. intestate in Londonderry Township, 1775. 

1738. William Campbell was a warrantee for the land on which 
the Mercersburg Presbyterian church was built. 

1738. Warrant to William Campbell and John Biddle for a square 
of ground in Philadelphia. 

1737-9. David Campbell was a warrantee for four hundred acres in 
Derry Township. 

VOL. XXVIII. 5 



66 Francis Campbell. 

originally a Eoman Catholic, and because of the influence 
about him and for business reasons he became a Pres- 
byterian, but the Roman Catholics of the Valley still 
cite him as always one of their faith. (See article on 
the Roman Catholic Church at Carlisle, in the maga- 
zine of the Catholic Historical Society, Philadelphia.) 
Mr. Peters may have been misinformed, yet what he 
stated suggests that Mr. Campbell may have come to 
the Valley from the Roman Catholic congregation of 
Maryland. 

Surely the evidence in the Pennsylvania Archives is 
against " Mr. Francis Campbell" ever sympathizing with 
the Indians. Under date of 14th November, 1755, he wrote 
from Shippensburg a letter to the Governor, who laid it 
before the Provincial Council, as to the Indians in his 
neighborhood, and was in Captain Culbertson's rifle com- 
pany of Shippensburg men at the memorable engage- 
ment with the Indians at Sideling Hill, in April, 1756, and 
was wounded. Under date of 17th April, 1756, he sent 
the fullest descriptive report of this affair to the Provincial 
Council, which Scott gives in full in his " History of Cum- 
berland County," p. 250. 

That he was a reliable trader with the Indians is also in 
evidence in the Pennsylvania Archives. At the Provincial 
Council meeting, 26th April, 1758, " a recommendation by 
the Commissioners, under the Act for preventing abuses in 
the Indian trade, by John Carson," it was recommended 
that Francis Campbell or Nathaniel Holland be agent at 
Fort Augusta (Sunbury), and to be commissioned accord- 
ingly. This was favorably considered, " and Francis Camp- 
bell is approved of and appointed to be Indian agent at 
Fort Augusta, and to be commissioned accordingly." But 
a Council minute, 5th June, 1758, says, Francis Campbell 
having declined to accept the commission, Mr. Holland 
was appointed. 

On 17th October, 1764, the Governor appointed Mr. 
Campbell a member of the Cumberland County Board of 



Francis Campbell. 67 

Justices, and in 1769 he was reappointed. It is said that 
he was also the County Surveyor for several years. 

According to two deeds, in 1753 Mr. Campbell was 
both a storekeeper and an " inn-holder" in Shippensburg. 
On his decease he was succeeded in the store by his sons 
Ebenezer and Francis. Mr. Campbell was one of the earli- 
est land-property holders in and about Shippensburg, 
holding town lots upon " permits" from Edward Shippen, 
the lord of the manor, for which, in 1763, he passed deeds 
to Mr. Campbell for town lots Nos. 3, 4, 12, 13, and 14, 
with the annual quit-rent clause. It is rather singular, but 
the usual records of such information reveal nothing of the 
movements or whereabouts or opinions or actions of Mr. 
Francis Campbell during the years of our struggle for in- 
dependence. Excepting that in October, 1775, he wrote to 
the Council from Shippensburg about local Indians, he is 
not heard of during these stirring times. But he had one 
son, Robert, killed in 1779, and another, Francis, a private 
in Captain Wilson's company, Sixth Battalion Pennsylvania 
Line. Francis Campbell, Sr., made his will at Shippens- 
burg, 8th August, 1790, which was probated and recorded 
at Carlisle, 9th March, 1791. He bequeathed land in Ship- 
pensburg and in Hopewell Township, called " the Forest," 
and tracts near Fort Littleton and elsewhere, his wife 
Elizabeth to have legal share and to continue " her resi- 
dence in the mansion house on the Middle Spring planta- 
tion during her natural life or her second marriage," which 
shows Mr. Campbell to have been generous and unselfish 
with his wife, who was a young woman. This was his 
second wife. When or where he married either wife is 
unknown. 

By his first wife Mr. Campbell had two sons, John and 
Robert. 

1. Rev. John Campbell, D.D., b. 1752. He was educated 
at Princeton, ordained in England, and m. at Hartford, while 
rector of All Saints Church there, the mayor of the city's 
daughter, Catherine Cutler. On 6th July, 1784, he became 



68 Francis Campbell. 

the rector of St. John's P. E. Church, at York, Penna. The 
York County Academy, at York, was built through his 
efforts, as he travelled over many States in 1785-87 solicit- 
ing contributions of money for this institution, which was 
attached to his church. In 1789 he removed to Carlisle, 
Penna., as rector of the P. E. Church; then the Academy 
at York began to fail, and in 1797 its property was surren- 
dered to the State, and 1st March, 1799, it was chartered 
and endowed, and one of its first trustees under the char- 
ter was James Campbell, lawyer, a son of Mr. Campbell, 
of Shippensburg. (See Glossbrenner's " History of York 
County.") 

Rev. John Campbell remained as rector at Carlisle till his 
decease, when he was interred in the Watts 'family burial- 
lot there, with the following inscription on his tombstone : 

" Sacred to the Memory of Rev. John Campbell, D.D., 
who departed this life May 16, 1819, in his 67th year; 
more than thirty years Pastor of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in Carlisle." 

He was a very large man, " tall and portly, with a florid 
complexion. His discourses were well written and deliv- 
ered with power." 

2. Captain Robert Campbell. He first enlisted as a private 
in the company of Captain Peebles, in Cumberland County, 
in 1776, and became third lieutenant in it: On April 8, 1777, 
he was commissioned first lieutenant in the Second Canadian 
Regiment, or " Congress's Own," Colonel Moses Hazen, 
and was in General Sullivan's Staten Island expedition, where 
he lost an arm and was taken prisoner, August 22, 1777, 
but rejoined his regiment on August 5, 1778, and on Janu- 
ary 1, 1779, was transferred to the Invalid Regiment at 
Philadelphia. He took an active part in trying to suppress 
the militia riots in Philadelphia, and, while defending his 
friend James Wilson from a mob of soldiers that sur- 
rounded Wilson's residence at Third and Walnut Streets, 
he was killed, October 4, 1779. He had been married only 
a few days before. 



Francis Campbell. 69 

Of the issue of Rev. Dr. Campbell : 

I. Elizabeth, m. June 26, 1817, Colonel Washington Lee, 
of Harrisburg, Penna., and Natchez, Miss., a son of Captain 
Andrew Lee, of the Continental army, and had: James, 
Parker, and Francis. 

II. Frances, m. James Armstrong, of "Williamsport, 
Penna., and had William H. 

IH. Jane, d. unm. 

IV. Francis Caldwell, lawyer, b. York, April 18, 1787, d. 
Williamsport, April 21, 1867; m., May, 1816, Jane Hep- 
burn, 1795-1867. Issue (see Meginniss's " Historical Jour- 
nal," II. 250, and Meginniss's " Biographies"). 

Y. Richard (?). 

Mr. Francis Campbell, Sr., of Shippensburg, m., sec- 
ondly, Elizabeth, daughter of John Parker, of Carlisle, 
1716-1785, by his wife Margaret McClure (see " Parker," 
in Dr. Egle's " Pennsylvania Genealogies"), and had by 
her: 

I. Francis, Jr., merchant, d. in 1808 at Shippensburg, 
intestate. He m. Sarah, who survived him, daughter of 
Stephen Duncan, of Carlisle, and had issue : 'Francis, d. 
unm. at Chillicothe, Ohio ; Daniel Duncan ; Elizabeth ; Mary 
Ann, m. at Harrisburg, 1816, Charles S. Carson; Ellen 
Duncan, m. William McClure; James Parker, b. 1806, d. 
Cincinnati, 1849, m. Harriet, daughter of Daniel Drake, 
M.D., of Cincinnati, and had Frank D., James P., and 
Nellie; Samuel Duncan, d. Chillicothe, Ohio. Issue: Mrs. 
Clark Story and Mrs. James Quinn, of Chillicothe. 

IE. Ebenezer, merchant at Shippensburg, Strasburg, 
Washington, in Penna., and Portsmouth, Ohio. He m. 
Eleanor or Ellen, daughter of Captain Samuel McCune, 
farmer, of Hopewell Township, and had issue: Elizabeth, 
d. unm. ; Ellen, m. James H. Lea, Philadelphia ; and Mary 
Barr, m. Samuel Ogden, and had : George C., of Covington, 
Ky., and Mrs. Laura Louise Whaling, of Cincinnati. 

IH. Nancy, m. Robert Tate. Issue. 

IV. James, lawyer, of York, Penna., and Natchez, Miss., 



70 Francis Campbell. 

1807. He m. Cassandana, daughter of General Henry Miller, 
of the Pennsylvania Line, Continental army, and had : 
Sarah, d. num.; Henry McConnell, d. num.; and Juliana 
Watts, d. unm. 

V. Parker, a lawyer, of Washington, Penna., d. July 30, 
1824. He m. Elizabeth Calhoun, of Chambersburg, who d. 
at Natchez in 1846, and had: Nancy, m. Samuel Lyon; 
Elizabeth, m. (1) William Chambers, of Chambersburg, m. 
(2) John S. Brady, of Washington, Penna. ; Eleanor, m. John 
Ritchie; Francis, d. wwn.~1844; John, d. unm.; Parker, of 
Richmond, Va., 1815-1880. Issue. 

VI. Elizabeth,,d. unm. after 1821. 
VH. George, living 1790. 

These, his children, are all named in the will of " Francis 
Campble," the elder. 



Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter MUler. 71 



LETTEES OF CHEISTOPHEE MAESHALL TO PETEE 
MILLEE, OF EPHEATA. 

[The following letters of Christopher Marshall, the well-known 
diarist, to Peter Miller, the head of the Ephrata Community, have 
been selected from the Letter- Book of the former in the library of The 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania.] 

PHILAD. Augs' 10 th 1773. 

PETER MILLER. 
WORTHY FRIEND. 

I am just favoured with thy friendly Epistle, and thank- 
fully receive thy kind salutation of Love and Respect, the 
which with grateful returns y* flows from a heart of y* sin- 
cerely wishes thy welfare, I greet thee. 

Thou has now been so kind as to inform me y* thou had 
printed the Father's discourses & has sent them for sale to 
M r Reinholds unto who I immediately went & found them 
there, but in the dutch Language, the which I hope will be 
of service to those who are acquainted with y* Dialect. But 
thine and thy Father's Friends & welwishers amongst thy 
English Friends will be unprovided, but yet I shall be 
pleased to find y* those writtings will be received & have a 
hearty reception amongst our Dutch Brethren. 

Thou observes y* as for myself y* I have the most of them 
already translated into English, for these gift and the trouble 
in translating I look upon myself to be largely endebted to 
thee for, and were the translation completed it would con- 
siderably add to my debt, but be thou assured that I find 
in myself a free & hearty disposition fully to discharge what 
may be adequate to the trouble when I am called upon and 
will faithfully and with alacrity do it. 

Thou says thou could send me good Tydings concerning 
the House of Zion but at that time thou forbore, But had 
thou done it, I am sure it might have been agreeable, as 



72 Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller. 

every account from the true watchmen y* wait on the Walls 
of Zion (one at which I presume thou art) would be very 
agreeable to me. 

I sincerely salute thee, remaining thine & thy Brethren's 
affectionate friend to serve when capable, 

CHRISTOPHER MARSHALL. 
To be Forwarded pr the Favour 
of Friend Reinhold to Ephrata. 



Aug. 8 th 1774 
MUCH ESTEEMED PETER MILLER. 

I greet thee with the salutation of peace and kiss of 
Charity, and was it not that I was sensibly convinced of 
the love and respect thou bears towards all that love our 
Lord Jesus Christ, I could not expect thy favorable corre- 
spondance. 

Just as I received thy epistle there was a vessel going for 
England by which I dispatched thine, and when an answer 
is reed by me I shall readily communicate unto thee I 
take kindly thy sentiment respecting of my house being 
still as an assylum for all indegent cast off (as thou says 
thou saw Peter Barker there) I could wish that I could 
make it more so, notwithstanding the ill treatment, by ap- 
probious language I have mett with upon that account. 
Yet nevertheless I hope that no discouragments in that 
way, will have force enough to prevent me. But on the 
other hand, that both my Heart & House I pray be kept 
wide open, for the reception and comfort of all those, whom 
the self righteouse Bigot, Scribe, and Pharisees of our age, 
may reject, banish, and contemn, as unworthy of (their 
Heaven) their notice and regard. 

Thy Kuminating, as thou says, upon thy return home, on 
the kindnesses thou and company had received in Philad, 
was I presume the sheaff of peace, as a reward for thy 
labour in complying with preforming that friendly visit, for 
notwithstanding the great quantity of Chaffe visible in our 
streets, yet there is some powerful weighty wheat that is 



Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller. 73 

covered in that heap which the great Lord will gather in 
his own time into his Garner. Thine and Brothers jour- 
ney towards Pittsburgh, I presume proved for the present 
abortive, by your being stopped at Bedford through the 
disturbance of the Indians. I hope that your return back 
was agreeable to the mind of our great Master, in whose 
blessed hands is enclosed the times and Seasons, and order 
of the ages in the disposal of events, and who also told his 
disciples that they should hear of Wars and rumours of 
Wars, that Nation should rise against Nation, the Father 
against the son, and the son against the Father all these 
are the begining of Sorrows. 

Now my good Friend are not these times already arrived, 
have we not only heard of Wars, famine, and dessolation in 
divers places, but are not these times allready begun in these 
the Brittish Colonies, the once (and y* not long since) the 
land of Peace and Plenty, but now 0, Sorrowfully Altered 
is not War declared against us, by our parents, and in Con- 
sequence of that, have they not only sent a large Arma- 
ment both by sea and by land, and therewith taken pos- 
session of our sister Colonies by taking away her trade, 
Spoiled her Commerce and whatever else they have thought 
proper. And what more, why they utter and pronounce 
threats of distinction unto all that oppose their unjust 
proceedings. 

Bro. Sam'l Eckerline I am informed was in town, about 
two weeks past, but he never so much as oncet called to 
see me, his reasons for so doing is best known to himself, 
as I have done him no diskindness except as I have done 
unto thee used great freedom, for which I crave thy in- 
dulgence, when thou sees him and its agreeable to thee, 
please present my love to him and Zekiel I wish thee now 
strength, and ability to preform effectually the superscrip- 
tion on the Stone that is to be erected to the Memory of 
our worthy friend and Elder Brother Friedsam Gottrecht, 
who I hope is at rest in his Paradisical Mansion My kind 
and affectionate Love, Greeting unto thee, to Brother Obed 



74 Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller. 

unto all the other Brethren and Sisters in your family In 
which salutation my wife joins me ! 
To Peter Miller CHRISTOPHER MARSHALL 

at Ephrata pr favour of 

Adam Kimmel 

PETER MLLLER PHILAD Decembr. 26 th 1776 

RESPECTED FRIEND. 

Thou may think of the old proverb, " out of sight, out 
of mind," but this has not been my case of which I think 
thou will be convinced when I have informed thee of the 
painful Exercises I am and have been engaged in from the 
5 th inst. that is at the request of the Council of Safety, I 
accepted to call on some of my fellow citizens as many as I 
thought convenient to assist me in taking care of the dis- 
tressed and sick soldiers as they come into town, provide 
for them such necessaries as could be procured & convenient 
for them in their unhappy grevious condition of which no 
idea thou can form will come up to their Distresses and was 
occasioned wholly through the Cruel and most barbarous 
severity inflicted on them whilst Prisoners under General 
Howe and his associates, of which some Hundreds are 
already dead & others dying daily notwithstanding all the 
assistance afforded them 

They say that, for the first four days no subsistance of 
any kind was allowed them, shut up in Nasty filthy places 
& y* in such numbers y* it was a wonder that any escaped 
an affection, when supplyed it was with short allowance 
of extremely bad bread and raw pickeled pork this from 
their appearance is not exaggerated the objects speak for 
themselves skins covered with filth and lice covering a 
parcel of bones with scarcely raggs sufficient to hide their 
nakedness, Nature so emaciated that in some hundreds of 
them there is hardly enough abel to hand the others a drink 
of water Thus I have give thee but a feint sketch of 
their deplorable circumstances and in order in some degree 
with some more of my neighbours are we daily employed 



Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller. 75 

in order if possible to mitigate their sufferings, and by 
proper methods are striving to preserve as many of their 
lives as possibly by the help of good nourishment and 
Physick properly applyed, of which we use our best en- 
deavours and skill daily, I hope now thou art convinced 
that I have been fully imployed and that it was no remiss- 
ness on me y* prevented me from writing, and altho' I have 
taken this opertunity yet my poor family is not forgotten, 
for which reason I must beg thy excuse for not giving thee 
a detail of other publick occurrences amongst us at this 
time. When opertunity presents and I find freedom, I 
shall not be backward in giving thee my genuine senti- 
ments on what appears to me to be worthy thy notice and 
regard. 

In the Interim please to accept of my best wishes for 
thine and familys prosperity and without mentioning of 
particulars give my kind respects unto all inquiring friends. 
I remain thy ready friend to serve when capable 
rp o CHRISTOPHER MARSHALL 

Peter Miller 

at Ephrata. 

-r, , , LANCASTEB, Oct 30 th 1777 

To PETER MILLER 

RESPECTED FRIEND, 

I am at a loss how to answer thy polite friendly letter so 
as to convince thee how much I value and Esteem thy 
friendship, yet if I should Miscarry in the Orthygraphy or 
stile, I hope it shall not be in the sincerity of my affection 
towards thee & thine 

The gloomy aspect that our publick affairs bears at pres- 
ent is very discouraging, yet I leave the Event to him who 
I trust will give success to the honest Endeavours of the 
true friends of America, who are labouring to reform those 
abuses & put an end to those vices which now distract her. 
I for my own part am for a general regulation of prices to 
take place and not a paultry partial one such as has been 
just published by the President and Council, the which I 



76 Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller. 

fear will only alarm the Country Farmers, whereas if a 
general regulation thro' out all the states were entered into 
and a stipulated price fixed on all goods in a due propor- 
tion, the Country Farmers could have no more cause to 
complain than the City Merchant or Tradesmen, for here 
would be a mutual compact between all the sober thinking 
part of the Communion, and this and only this I presume 
will unite the honest hearted in the bands of Love and 
Unity and thereby prevent the Villian and Traytor to his 
Country from making any further inroads into our Consti- 
tution by his speciouse pretentions how that trade ungov- 
erned will allways regulate itself, this is a doctrine I have 
long opposed, because from experience I am convinced it 
will never answer the purpose, please but to turn back thy 
eyes to the late Committee of Inspection and Observation 
in Philad., who while they settled general prices on most 
of the necessarys of life the forestallers and extortioners 
were kept within bounds the poor were defended from 
oppression of the Rich Merchant" & y* by a sett of men in 
that body, Notwithstanding the great force y* was used, 
and at last got that body dissolved, which like a damm 
been broke let in such an inundation of rapine and ex- 
tortion & which is still increasing amongst us, that we are 
if not timely prevented, on the brink of utter ruin and 
distruction Under such unhappy prejudices and fatal 

mistakes we stand over united with a sett of Tories 

inimical to the freedom of America, at same time his 
weakness in the Essential parts of government united to a 

sett called who knowledge in state affairs, is the 

Narrow Monopolizing Views. of short Sighted Merchants 
cloathed with power by y 8 influence of some great names 
by the people appointed to sit in Committee, by these are 

the rules laid down which govern our present and 

thereby they rush headlong into things they least under- 
stand and to think that if they publish by an order 

any scheme thus fabricated with their own narrow views, it 
must be obeyed by all the For how dare any com- 



Letters of Christopher Marshall to Peter Miller. 77 

mon man think to withstand the force of such order 
Established by their power and authority but happily for 
us that there is yet remaining some men of sense, knowl- 
edge, and experience who from the Love they owe to their 
Country, Zeal for its welfare, stems in some degree the 
torrent of Vanity & Ignorance, and who will not be brow- 
beat by men of their cast, let them be ever so self exalted, 
therefore my good friend be not surprised when you read 

sundry orders that are published under the signature 

of of and yet are never carried into Execution, 

for its no wonder now, why the Mennoists join with the 
other County farmers in opposing of such partial regula- 
tions, when at the same time the Merchants, Trades-men 
Tavern-Keepers &c are left at their full liberty to charge 
what prices they are pleased to ask 

Thus I have gave thee a short sketch from which thou 
may please to form a Judgment of reasons why there is 
such a variety of different sentiments at present amongst 
us, and when they may subside is hard for me to say but 
thus much I may say, that while men of preverse and un- 
godly tempers are at the helm, and men of base characters 
who will not stick for to curse and defame our Constitution 
and the Makers of it, men who can leave the business of 

the to associate, carouse, & drink to excess, give up 

Strong Forts and run away from our Enemies, Yet these 
with sundry other gross enormities are the practices of a 
certain set of men, I say while this is the case what can 
ensue but blunder upon blunder, confusion upon confusion, 
therefore Let us with Hearts and Hands utterly oppose and 
renounce familiarity, union or communion with them and 
their pernicious Tenets and practices. 

And here I conclude after wishing thee every blessing 
may attend thee and thine, and subscribe thy friend to 
serve when capable, / 

CHRISTOPHER MARSHALL. 
To Peter Miller, 

at Ephrata. 



78 The Furniture of Our Ancestors. 



THE FUENITUEE OF OUE ANCESTOES. 

[Among the " Lehman Papers" of The Historical Society of Pennsyl- 
vania is a catalogue of the cabinetware manufactured by Benjamin 
Lehman, in the year 1786, from which has been selected the various 
styles of desks, bookcases, chests of drawers, chairs, sofas, settees, 
tables, sideboards, clothes-presses, corner cupboards, clock-cases, bed- 
steads, and fire-screens, with their prices in mahogany and walnut, 
the first column being for the former, the second for the latter.] 

Desks. 

Desk, winged 10. 10. 0.0 

do scolloped drawers below and shell drawers 

above 13.10.0 9.10.0 

do columns, drawers, and sliding prospects . 13. 0.0 9. 0.0 

do column drawers 12.10.0 8.10.0 

do two rows scolloped drawers . . . 11. 5.0 8. 0.0 

do prospect and swell brackets . . .11. 0.0 7.10.0 

do without prospect and straight brackets . 10. 0.0 7. 0.0 
(Add for quarter columns 10 shillings.) 

Book Cases. 
Book Case with scroll pediment, head and doors 

panneled 12. 0.0 9. 0.0 

do dentels and fret . . . 7. 0.0 5. 0.0 
do square head, pannels or sash doors 

with sliding shelves only . . 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 
do pilch pediment without dentels or fret 

and plain balls . . . . 7.10.0 5. 0.0 

do dentels, fret and shield . . . 10. 0.0 7. 0.0 

do arch doors 10.10.0 7.10.0 

do scolloped doors . . . . 11. 0.0 8. 0.0 

do Chinese doors . . . . .12. 0.0 9. 0.0 

do scroll pediment head, Chinese doors . 13. 0.0 10. 0.0 

(Add for quarter columns 20 shillings. The above doors without 

glazing, covered work not to exceed 20 shillings.) 

High Chest of Drawers. 

Chest on a frame, head and corners, plain feet . 13. 0.0 9. 0.0 
A table to suit 4.10.0 2. 5.0 



The Furniture of Our Ancestors. 79 

Chest, Cheston chest and swell' d brackets . ,.13.0.0 9.0.0 

Table to suit 5. 0.0 3. 5.0 

do Drawers and frame claw feet and quarter 

columns . . ; .. . . . 15. 0.0 11. 0.0 

Table to suit . ... .- ; ''. 5. 0.0 3.15.0 

do drawers Cheston chest and swelled brackets 15. 0.0 10.10.0 

Table to suit . . '. . . 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 
do drawers pilch pediment, head square cor- 
ners, plain feet without dentels or fret, 

plain ball . 'V . . . . 16.0.0 11.10.0 

Table to suit . ; . . . . 4. 0.0 2.15.0 

do drawers, Cheston chest . . . . 16. 0.0 11.10.0 

Table to suit with straight back . . 5. 0.0 3. 0.0 

do drawers with quarter columns . . . 17. 0.0 12.10.0 

Table to suit 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 

do drawers on frame and claw feet . . 17. 0.0 13. 0.0 

Table to suit . . . . . 5. 0.0 3. 5.0 

do drawers with dentels, fret and shield . 19. 0.0 14. 0.0 

Table to suit 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 

do drawers Cheston chest . . . . 20. 0.0 15. 0.0 

Table to suit . . . . . . 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 

do Cheston frame, claw feet, leaves on knees, 

shell drawers on frame . . . . 20. 0.0 15. 0.0 

Table to suit 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 

do drawers scroll pediment, head carved, work 

not to exceed 3.10 . . . .21. 0.0 16. 0.0 

Table to suit . . . . .6. 0.0 4. 0.0 

do drawers, Cheston chest, a table . .21. 0.0 16. 0.0 
(Add for a desk drawer to any of the above 3.) 

Low Chest of Drawers. 

Chest of drawers, with three long and five small . 4.10.0 

do four long, five small ..... 5. 0.0 

do on frame 18 in. high without a drawer . 5.10.0 

Chairs with Crooked Legs. 

Chair, with plain feet and banister, leather seat . 1.14.0 1. 5.0 

do arm . ... . . " . 2.18.0 2. 5.0 

do without banister .'".'. . . 1.16.0 1. 7.0 

Chairs. 

Chairs, arm . . . . . . 3. 0.0 2.12.0 

do claw feet . . . .'' . '. 2. 0.0 1.10.0 

do arm 3. 3.0 2.13.0 



80 The Furniture of Our Ancestors. 

Chairs, shells on knees and front rail . . . 2. 3.0 1.13.0 

do arm 3. 7.6 2.16.0 

do leaves on knees 2. 6.0 1.15.0 

do arm 3.11.0 2.18.0 

do fluting or ogee backs .... 2.10.0 1.15.0 
(For relieving the banisters add according to worth of them for ex- 
traordinary carved work add in proportion for damask bottoms add 2/, 
for hair 3/6 add to any arm chair made for a close stool with a cover 

&c 7/6.) 

Chairs, Marlborough Feet. 

Chairs, plain open banisters with bases or brackets, 

leather seats 1.12.0 1. 5.0 

do arm do 2.18.0 2. 5.0 

do fluted or ogee backs, bases and brackets . 2. 5.0 1.15.0 

do arm do 

(Add for relieving the banister and for damask or hair seats, or close 
as in crooked leg chairs any chair as above stuffed over the rails and 
brass rails added 8/ for fluted or ogee back, add to Journeyman.) 

Corner Chairs for Close Stools. 

Corner Chair, plain feet and banister . . . 2.10.0 2. 0.10 

do claw feet, open banister . . . 3.10.0 2.15. 

do upper part legs crooked work . . 3.15.0 3. 0. 

Easy Chairs. 
Easy Chair, frame plain, feet and knees without 

castors 2.10.0 2. 5.0 

do claw feet. . . . . . 2.15.0 2.10.0 

do claw feet, leaves on knees . . . 3. 5.0 3. 0.0 

do Marlborough feet, bases and brackets 2.10.0 2. 5.0 

Sofas, Marlborough Feet. 

Sofa, plain feet and rails, without castors . . 4.10.0 4. 0.0 

do bases and brackets 5. 0.0 4.10.0 

do fret on feet 7.10.0 7. 0.0 

do fret on feet and rails, carved mouldings . 10.10.0 9.10.0 

Sofas with Crooked Legs. 

Sofa, plain feet and knees without castors . . 5. 0.0 4.10.0 

do claw feet 5.10.0 5. 0.0 

Sofas. 

Sofa, leaves on knees (add 10/ for castors) . . 6.10.0 6. 0.0 

do carved mouldings 7.10.0 7. 0.0 



The Furniture of Our Ancestors. 81 

Settees. 

Settees, plain crooked legs, feet and banisters, with- 
out castors ; hair or damask seats . 6.10.0 5. 0.0 
do Marlborough with bases and brackets cut 

through banisters . . .. . 6.10.0 5. 0.0 

do claw feet and knees carved . . . 8. 0.0 5.15.0 

do fluted or ogee backs . . . . 8.10.8 6. 5.0 

Add for carved mouldings 20/. 

Couches with Crooked Legs. 

Couch frame, plain knees feet and banisters with- 
out bottoms or castors .... 4.10.0 3. 0.0 
do with claw feet and open banister . . 5. 5.0 3.15.0 
do with leaves on the knees .... 6. 0.0 4.10.0 
do with fluted or ogee backs . . . 6. 5.0 4.15.0 

Couches. 
Couches, with Marlborough feet without bases or 

brackets 4.10.0 3. 0.0 

do with bases and brackets . . . 5. 0.0 3.10.0 

do with fluted or ogee backs ... 5. 5.0 3.15.0 

Add for carved mouldings 20/. 

Dining Tables. 
Dining Table, plain feet crooked or Marlborough 

with bases 3 ft. in bed . . 3. 5.0 1.17.6 

do 3 ft. 6 in. . ,,,.. ... 4. 0.0 2. 5.0 

do 4ft. ....... 4.10.0 2.15.0 

do 4 ft. 6 in 5. 0.0 3.10.0 

do 5 ft. 6 in. with six legs . . 8.0.0 4.10.0 
For tables with claw feet add 2/6 per claw ; tables with straight legs 
without bases, deduct 5/. 

Card Tables with Crooked Legs. 

Card Tables, with plain feet and knees . . 3.10.0 2. 5.0 
do with claw feet . . . 4. 0.0 2.15.0 

do with carved knees and mouldings . 5. 0.0 3.15.0 

Add for covering without finding the cloth 7/6. 

Card Tables with Marlborough Feet. 
Card Table, with a drawer, without bases or brack- 
ets 3. 0.0 2. 0.0 

do with bases and brackets . . . , 3.10.0 2. 5.0 

do with carved mouldings . . . 4. 0.0 2.15.0 

VOL. XXVIII. 6 



82 The Furniture of Our Ancestors. 

Card Tables with round Corners. 

Card Tables, claw feet, plain knees . . . 5. 0.0 
do lined with green cloth . . . 6.10.0 
do leaves on knees and carved mouldings 8. 0. 
do with carved rails 10. 0.0 



Pembroke or Breakfast Tables, 

Breakfast Tables, plain . . . . . 2.15.0 1.15.0 

do with drawer . . . . 3. 0.0 2. 0.0 

do with bases and brackets . . 3. 5.0 2. 5.0 

do with plain stretcher . . 3.10.0 2.10.0 
do with open stretcher and low 

drawers . . . 4. 0.0 3. 0.0 

do with crooked legs and plain feet 8. 5.0 2. 5.0 

Corner Tables. 
Corner Tables, with crooked legs or Marlborough 

feet, with bases 3 ft. square . 3.10.0 2.10.0 
do claw feet 4.10.0 3. 0.0 

Tea Tables. 

Tea Tables, plain top and feet .... 2.15.0 1.15.0 

do with claw feet 3. 5.0 2. 5.0 

do leaves on knees . . . . 4. 0.0 2.15.0 

do scolloped top and carved pillar . 5.15.0 

Side Board Tables. 
Side Board Table, with bases and brackets, 6 ft. 

by 2 ft. 6 in. . . . 5. 0.0 3. 0.0 

do 5 ft. by 2 ft. 6 in. . . . 5.0.0 2.10.0 

do 4 ft. by 2 ft. 6 in. ... 3. 5.0 2. 0.0 

Add for carved mouldings 2/ per foot ; for fret round the rails 5/ per 

foot. 

Tea Kettle Stands. 

Tea Kettle Stand, with gallery top, plain feet . 2.10.0 
do claw feet, leaves on knees 

carved and fluted, pillar 
with turned banister . . 3.10.0 
Basin Stand, with 3 pillars and 2 drawers . . 2.10.0 
do square and 2 drawers . . . 1.10.0 



I he Furniture of Our Ancestors. 83 

Commode Dressing Tables. 

Commode Dressing Table, with 4 long drawers, 

without a dressing 
drawer . . 14. 0.0 

Add for a dressing drawer 30 @ 40/. 

Writing Tables. 
Writing Table, with one top to raise on the side 

only, front to draw out . . 7. 0.0 
do with one top to raise on both sides 

do with 2 tops to raise on both sides 7.10.0 5.10.0 

work on the drawers excluded . 8. 0.0 6. 0.0 

Bureau Tables. 

Bureau Table, with Prospect door and square cor- 
ners 7.10.0 6. 0.0 

do with quarter columns . . . 8.10.0 7. 0.0 

(To be continued.) 



84 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 





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Joseph Wharton, Jun r 


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Joseph Leigh 
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John McLease 
Eichard Eisley 
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James Loughead 
both of Philadelphia 


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all of Philadelphia 



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1726-1775. Continued, 


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of Philadelphia 


Joseph Adams 
of Philadelphia 


Hamilton Pringle 
John Dickson 


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Rob' Montgomery 
of Philadelphia 


Reese Meredith 


of Philadelphia 
Joseph Saunders 
Hugh Hartshorne 


William Hartshorne 


all of Pennsylvani 
Pattison Hartshorne 


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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 89 





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F PHILADELPH 


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Anthony Stocker 
John Willcocks 


William Gordon 
all of Philadelphi 
Thomas Sampson 


of Philadelphia 
Jonathan Dawes 


William Shipley, J r 
Jonathan Eumford, 


all of Wilmingtoi 
William Allibone 


John Heaton 


both of Philadelp 


William Glenholme 
Andrew Orr 


both of Philadelp 
William Beath 
George Anderson 
both of Newry 
James McEvers 
Cha" McEvers 


William Bayard 
Miles Sherbrook 
all of New York 


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Registers far the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 93 



Bo 



a 



a 


O 



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,4 

OH 



Province of Massachu- 20 
hour, New setts Bay 


Philadelphia 90 






.2 


Philadelphia 20 






Kensington, Pennsylvania 15 


Dorchester County, Mary- 30 
land 


[. Philadelphia 5 


.2 


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cr 


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Jersey 
Lancelot Cowper 
of Bristol 


8 

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Henry Drinker 


13 
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James Knewstub 


gj 
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William Lyons 
of Philadelphia 


Richard Mason 
of Philadelphia 


Anthony Marshall 
of Philadelphia 


Samuel Mifflin, Es 


Jeremiah Holden 
both of Philade] 























d 








1 

1 








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94 fiftijp Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



O 

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726-1 775. Continued. 


1 i 

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1 Q 
J o 
v ^^ tt 

1 * 

s ^ PH 

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Broadkill, Sussex County, 
on Delaware 
, on 


Wilmington 


Beaufort, North Carolina 


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Philadelphia 




Philadelphia 




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t c^ ^ 
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John Smith 
of Wilmingto: 


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02 ^ 

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g- - 
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of Philadelph 
William Harry 


of Philadelph 


Thomas Fisher 
Samuel Fisher 


Joshua Fisher 
Thomas Penrose 
all of Philade 


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Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 95 



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96 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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Province of N 


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Benjamin Pyne 
of Philadelphi 


Daniel Massey 


02 

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of Philadelphi 
Hugh Wright 
of Philadelphi 
John Hamilton 


a British subje 
Honduras 


William Caldwel 
of the Kingdo: 
And w Caldwell 


of Philadelphi 
Thomas Lake 


of Philadelphi 


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Abraham Mason 
Sam 1 Wright 


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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 97 



O 
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<N 00 








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VOL. XXVIII. 7 



O O 



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98 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



tO 




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>-> 






William Caldwell 


of the Kingdom 
Andrew Caldwell 


of Philadelphia 
Stephen Moylan 
of Philadelphia 


Eobert Hutchins 


Anth. J. Stocker 


John Wilcocks 
both of Philadel 


| 


of Philadelphia 


Eobert Montgomei 
of Philadelphia 


Charles Massey 
Samuel Massey 


both of Philadel 
Joseph Pemberton 
Thomas Guy 
both of Philadel 
Benj n Swett, Jun r 
of New Jersey 










03 
















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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 99 



O US 
CO t- 



b 

eg 

R h.a 

5* ^ 

l*j? 

P -2 a 
J* & a 

P-" $ o 
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100 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



75 









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Continu 


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Thom 



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Notes and Queries. 101 

NOTES AND QUERIES. 

flotes. 

SHOT AND SHELL FOR THE CONTINENTAL ARMY. The following 
items have been extracted from the account of George Ege & Co. , Mary 
Ann Furnace, with the United States. 

1780 

Nov. 14 To 867, 10 inch Shells J ^^ &() 2200<15>2 

" 843, 24 pd Shot) 

"2137, 18 pd " 127.15.0.6. 25. 693.16.4 

" 289, 12 pd " j 

" Hauling (the above) to Baltimore 54.10. 

N. B. 26-10 in. Shells which did not stand proof are not admitted in 
the above account. 

Payment of bill was made by William Thome, Paymaster, and 
Samuel Hodgdon, C. G. M. S. 

April 3, 1783. 

LETTER OF EEV. ELIAS KEACH TO MRS. MARY HELM. 

From my studdy at 
-,., T. T ff Christeena Creek this 

MRS. MARY HELM 24* day of August 1696 

DEAREST LADIE 

My boldness in Rushing these Rude and unpolished lines into your 
Heroick & most Excelent Presence, doth cause me to suspect your 
amazement & may justly cause you to suspect my unmannerliness ; or 
that either my wisdom is narrow in bredth or my Education short in 
length, or at least you may imagine my Comprehension ; to be like unto 
a half moon not of ability to incompass that most excellent Jewell & 
Ornament of Humanity called Moddesty ; if you have not forgot my 
ingenteele cariage towards you when I saw you last & first. But Lady 
let me crave the mantle of your Virtue the which noble & generouse 
favour will hide my naked & deformed fault, altho: it seems to be a 
renewed boldness to require such an incomparable favour from your 
tender heart from whom I have deserved so litle Kindness Mrs. Mary ; 
Soloman says Childhood & Youth are vanity ; & if so, you cannot ex- 
pect that in my youth, which the gray hairs of our Age, (or at least of 
our wooden world) cannot afford ; it is a common saying & a true, love 
is stronger than death & it is as true a proverb where Love cannot go, it 
will creep you know Dear Lady ; that the higher the sun riseth by de- 
grees from the East the more Influence hath the power & heat of its 
beams upon the Earth, so ever since I saw the sun-rise of your comly 
& gracious presence the sun beams of your countenance & your discreet 
& virtuous behaviour, hath by degrees wroat such a virtuouse heat & such 
Ammorouse Effects in my disconsolate heart ; that that which I must at 
present disclose in words, in your graciouse presence ; I am forct (altho 
far distant from you) to discover in Ink & paper ; trusting in God that 
this may be a Key to open the door of your virtuous & tender heart 



102 Notes and Queries. 

against the time I do appear in person, Dear Mistress ; let me most sub- 
missively crave this favour of you amongst the rest of your generossi- 
ties, that you would not in the least Imagin that I have any Bye Ends 
or reserves in writing these few lines to you ; But that I mean virtu- 
ously truly and sincerely upon the word of a Christian ; & the main 
scope & intent of this Letter, is only & alone to discover unto you those 
Amorouse impressions of a Virtuous Love which hath taken root or is 
Allready ingraflled in my heart ; who have listed myself under the 
Banner of your Love, provided I can by any means gain the honour to 
induce you to Acknowledg & account me your most Obligeing SER- 
VANT ; who have already Devoted you to be the MISTRESS of my most 
Amorouse & Virtuouse Affections ; I must need say this is not a com- 
mon practice of mine to write Letters of this nature ; But Love hath 
made that proper which is not common ; Mrs. Mary If I had foreseen 
when I saw you what I have since experienced I would have foreshown 
a more Ample and courteous behaviour than I then did ; through 
my stupidity & dullness the reason I then could not tell ; But the 
effects I now know & shall be carefull & industrous to improve, not to 
your disadvantage & I am perswaded to my exceeding comfort & con- 
tentment ; as for my person you have in a measure seen it & as for my 
practice you do in a measure know it as for my parts the Effects of my 
Conversation will shew it ; I know it is folly to speak in my own 
Praise, seeing I have learnt this Lesson Long Ago wise is that man that 
speaks few words in his own praise ; again as for a Portion ; I would 
have you have as favourable a construction concerning me as I have 
concerning you, which is this Pure Righteousness & [torn] exceeds a 
portion with a wife (so also in a Husband) Againe as for my Parents, I 
am obliged By the Law of god to Honour them, & thus I say in short 
(first) they are of no mean family ; (secondly) they are of no mean 
Learning & (thirdly) they are of no mean account and note in the 
World tho : they are not of y e world But the truth & certainty of this I 
Leave to be proved ; By Severall of no mean note in this Province & 
the next & thus dear Mistress, have I [iorw] & the inward fruits of 
a virtuous and cordiall intent & candid Resolution, not be destitute 
of hope that the Silver Streams of my Dearest Affections and faithfull 
Love ; will be willingly received into the Mill Pond of your tender 
Virgin Heart ; By your hailing up the flood-gate of your Virtuous 
Love & Affections ; which will consequently turn the wheeles of your 
Gracious will & understanding to receive the golden graines or Effects 
of my Steedfast Love and unering Affection which will be in Loyall re- 
spective & Obligeing Service so Long as Life shall last & such a thrice 
Happy Conjunction ; may induce Many to bring Bags of golden graines 
of Rejoycing to our Mill & River of joy & contentment & we ourselves 
will sing ye EPITHALMY, this is the Earnest (yet Languishing) Desire 
of his Soul, who hath sent his heart with his Letter ; and Remains 
your Cordiall friend earnest suitor faithfull Lover & Most Obligeing 
Servant, 

ELIAS KEACH pastor & 

Minister in Newcastle 

County. 

GENEALOGICAL NOTES OF THE ROSE FAMILY OF IRELAND AND 
AMERICA. The following short diary and genealogical records of the 



Notes and Queries. 103 

Rose family have been copied from a small vellum-bound volume, 
formerly the property of Thomas Rose. 

Left Dublin 25 th Feb. 1746 ; made y e Land Wed. 3 d April ; got in y 
Bay Thursday [illegible]. Came along side of Philadelphia Sat. 11 th 
facing the great and main St. called Market street. Went on shore 
directly and found Mr. George Miller, by whom I was handsomely 
rec'd. and entertained. Set out for Burlington the Tuesday following, 
being y e 14th. Arrived there in the evening, met with a brotherly, 
friendly reception. Matilda, bro. Joseph's eldest daughter was born at 
Burlington, in New Jersey, the third of November 1741, $ an hour 
after 10 at night and Baptized by the Rev. Mr. David Cowell, the 5 th 
7ber 1744. Sarah Ann Ursula Rose, 2 d daughter to brother Joseph, 
was born 27 th May 1744. Mr. Bliss at Bordentown. 

174fi January 23. This day I entered the 47 th year of my age, 
being 46 years old. It is the most melancholy birthday y' I remember, 
being worse y n a prisoner at large, confined to my Bro. Joseph's house 
at Burlington, New Jersey, in America ; not having handled one single 
Penny since the 4th day of November last, and y' was a Shilling bill, 
having no acquaintances nor no friend of no sort. 

February 7 to 9 th . A great frost and y e 9th a deep Snow. 
William Rose and Sarah Crutchly alias Chapman, were married in 
St. John's Church, Dublin [Ireland] March 27 th 1694. He died 
January 8 th 173J set 68; she died 27 th lOber 1728, set 53. Mrs Grace 
Chapman, mother of above Sarah, died 25 th lOber 1698. 

Sarah Rose, daughter to the above, was born between 5 and 6 in the 
morning, being Friday, March 13 th 169f. She married 8 th July 1732, 
the Rev. David Syme, Minister of the Gospel, in the town of Cather- 
loch. When I left their house, which was February 7 th 174, she had 
living isssue : 

Sarah Syme, born 8*' 1 1783, 

Ann Syme, born March y e 27 th 1735, 

Ann Rose, was born May 14 th 1698, and married y e 30 th of June 1716, 
to M r Josiah Jackson of Glassceily ; and died y e 21" August 1733, and 
left seven children : 

Grace, 

Ann, 

Susannah, 

Sarah, 

Josiah, 

Samuel, 

Katherine, 
whereof Ann and Samuel are since dead. 

William Rose, was born June 22 d 1700, and died 1 year and 4 months 
old. 

Thomas Rose, was born at 2 in the morning January 23 d 170J. 
John Rose, was born February 14 th 170|. Died on Good Friday 
1730, at Philadelphia. 

Joseph Rose, born about 9 on Saturday night, April 8 th 1704. Left 
Dublin August 21 st 1729, and arrived at Philadelphia 21" 9ber following. 
Married Mrs. Ursula Wood, relict Abraham Wood, and had by her 

Matilda, born November 3 d 1741, at Burlington N. J. 

Sarah Ann Ursula, born May 27 th 1744. 



104 Notes and Queries. 

Joseph Rose died at Lancaster, Penna., February 14 th 1776. He was 
admitted to Supreme Court, April 26 th , 1750. [His wife died in 1794.] 

Benjamin Rose, was born July 25 th 1705, at 6 Wednesday night. 
Catherine Rose, was born June 27 th 1707, died set 2 years 6 months. 
Grace Rose, was born January 23 d 1708, died young. 
William Rose, was bora September 9 th 1713, died 1716. 

Catherine Rose, was born March 24 th 1714 [?]. Married June 29 th 
1732, James Wall, of Knockrigg, County Wicklow. When I left her 
house February 11 th 174f, she had the following children living: 
James, 
Pierce, 
Ann, 

Oliver Cromwell, 
Lydia. 

Nathaniel Rose, was born April 21" 1715 ; died in 5 months. 
Samuel Rose, was born October 2 d 1717, about 5 p.m. 

LETTERS TO JAMES HUNTER, MERCHANT, STRAWBERRY ALLEY, 
PHILADELPHIA, from correspondents in England and Ireland, relating 
to American affairs. 

LEEDS, 1 st March, 1766. 
SIR, 

We have the pleasure to inform you that our O. D. is just return'd 
from London where he has been attending Parliament to solicit a Repeal 
of the Stamp Act, & it is with the Highest satisfaction that we can now 
inform you, that the same has pass'd the House of Commons by a 
Majority of 108. We hope, & indeed have no doubt but it will pass 
the House of Lords too, & very probably the next week will bring you 
such Tidings. We can assure you, that your Friends on this side of 
the water have used all their Influence to procure a Repeal of this Act, 
which we hope will entirely appease the minds of our American Brethren, 
& restore that Friendship & Harmony which has so long subsisted be- 
twixt them & their Mother Country, & that thenceforward it will be 
the study of each of us, to render this our natural alliance mutual ad- 
vantageous to each other, to promote which, (as Individuals in the 
Commonwealth) we shall always endeavour either in a publick or private 
capacity, & beg you'll believe us to be with a Tender of our best 
Services, 

Sir, 
Your most H'ble Serv ts 

RAYNER DAWSON & Co. 

BELFAST 30 th Aug* 1774. 
DEAR SIR. 

The people in America must be in great confusion now on Ace* of the 
Boston Port Bill. I sincerely wish the Americans may make a steady 
firm & unanimous stand for their Libertys, & get the better of a cor- 
rupt Tyranical Ministry. It is generally thought here that you must 
& will soon submit, what a cursed Law Lord N & his Parlia- 
ment made in establishing Popery in Canada. I suppose if occasion for 
them they are to be put the Bostonians in the Inquisition. I wish we 
had no Parliament in this country, they are just so many tools in the 



Notes and Queries. 105 

hands of the Ministry to beggar this poor Country. I hope if you come 
to Resolutions not to export goods, you will allow poor Ireland some 
Flaxseed, or they wont be able to pay their passages to go to you. 

Yours Sincerely, 

SAMUEL BROWN. 

CORK, 20 th March 1775. 

SIR, 

We see no manner of appearance of Great Britain settling matters to 
the satisfaction of the Americans, but on the contrary they are passing 
more severe Acts of Parliament every day, & how those disagreeable 
disputes will end is hard to determine. We wish they were well over. 
A regiment of Light Horse & three of Foot are now here waiting to 
embark for Boston, for which purpose the Transports are expected 
every day from England. 

Your most obedient Servants 

LAWTON & BROWNE. 

BELFAST 2<> Nov 1775 

DEAR SIR. 

I am just returned from England, and was sorry to find the Principal 
part of the People there against the Americans. Since I left that we 
have the King's Speech. Nothing but submission on your side or you 
must be subdued if Foreign Troops should be employ 'd on the Bloody 
errand. They have put a Mr. Seyers and some others in the Tower for 
Treasonable Correspondence with you. The prospect is Dismal ; God 
send a Happy and speedy Reconcilliation. I refer you for news to the 
different papers. 

I am most sincerely your 

Assured Friend, 

SAMUEL BROWN. 

PALATINES. From a list of Palatines sold on the ship "Crawford," 
Captain Charles Smith, at Philadelphia, October 23, 1773, it appears 
that Adam Eckhart paid the passage money of Philip Kaas, from Hol- 
land, 28.18.10; and October 10, 1772, John Boyd paid the passage 
money for Johann Martin Furni and family, whose daughter bound her- 
self to said Boyd in consideration, 30, on ship "Minerva," Captain 
Johnston. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, ITEMS, 1688-1698 (originals 
in Recorder's office, Woodbury). 

1* Of 1" M 1687/8 

I Elizabeth fFrampton Relict Widow of William fframpton Deceased 
doe testifie and Declare that to My Certain Knowledge Samuell Coles of 
West Jersie Did sell to my said husband a bill of Exchange & y l he was 
to be paid for It In Rum, but my said husband after he had keept y e s d 
bill a Considerible time not haveing Rum to pay, Returned the s d bill 
With a valuable Consideration to take y e s d bill 

ELIZ. FFRAMPTON 
Attested befor me the day 
aboue Written 

JOHN SHILLSON 



106 Notes and Queries. 

the 1" of the 10 th mth 1693 

wee the Grand Jury for the County of Glocester doe present Richard 
Whiticar for that about fifteen months ago hee sould one bottell of Rum 
to the Indians contrary to the Lawes of this province. 

JOHN WOOD foreman 

AND R ROBESON, you stand Indicted by y e name of And r Robeson of 
y* Township of Greenwich in y e County of Glocester and province 
of west Jarsy ffor that y s d And r Robeson On or about y e first day of 
September Ano dom 1698 at y e town of Glocester in y e Province aboues d 
as well as at seuerall other places dayes and times before or since Con- 
trary to y e due allegance and fidelity, and Intending or Imagining to 
rnoue Discord sedition and Dysention amongst his majesties liege people 
within y e County aboues d , and y e Gouerment of y e s d prouince as at p r sent 
Established Designing to bring into Dislike Hatred and Dissesteem of 
your owne preverse malice and Euill Intent Did there utter speake 
and say seuerall Contemptuose Speeches threatning words Dangerouse 
and menaceing Language, and other Enormities or misdemeanors Com- 
itted in Contempt of y e Gouerment abouesaid against y e peace of our 
Lord y e King and of his Lawes Contrary to y e Lawes of this province, 
and to y e 111 Example and Encouragement of others in y e like Case 
offending &c. 

We the grand Jury for our Lord the King do find this to be a true 
bill signed by our forman JOHN RAMBO 

The above was evidently Andrew Robeson the younger (nephew of 
Andrew Robeson who died in Philadelphia, 1694). He was a justice 
in Gloucester County in 1687-88 ; a member of the Assembly for 
Gloucester, 1692-97 ; and a Chief-Justice of Pennsylvania, 1693-99. 
He removed to Philadelphia, where he was living in 1702, and later to 
Amity Township, Philadelphia (now Berks) County, where he was inter- 
ested in iron industries. He died February 19, 1719-20, aged sixty-six 
years, and is buried at St. Gabriel's Church, Douglassville, Berks County, 
Pennsylvania. From the high positions of trust held by Andrew Robeson 
after this time (1698) it is evident that this indictment was simply from 
political differences of opinion. WILLIAM M. MEBVINE. 

DEDICATION OF THE MEMOBIAL TO GENERAL AGNEW AND LIEU- 
TENANT-COLONEL BIRD, OF THE BRITISH ARMY. On Sunday after- 
noon, October 4, 1903, there was dedicated with appropriate cere- 
monies in the de Benneville Cemetery, on the Old York Road, at 
Branchtown, a beautiful marble memorial to Brigadier-General James 
Tanner Agnew and Lieutenant-Colonel John Bird, of the British army, 
who died at Germantown October 4, 1777. The bodies of these offi- 
cers were first buried in the "Lower Burial-Ground," on Germantown 
Avenue, but at the request of Sir William Howe, and with the consent 
of Dr. George de Benneville, were reinterred in the northeast corner of 
the de Benneville Cemetery, about the time that the British army 
was withdrawn from its advanced lines to nearer Philadelphia. By 
the recent extension of North Broad Street, a part of the eastern end 
of the burial-ground was encroached upon, necessitating the disinterment 
of some of the dead, among the number the bodies of the two British 
officers, whose remains were reverently collected, placed in a new casket, 
and reinterred under the north wall of the western part of the cemetery. 



Notes and Queries. 107 

The project of erecting a memorial over the remains of these brave 
officers strongly appealed to His Britannic Majesty's consul, Wilfred 
Powell, Esq., and Mrs. Anna de Benneville Mears, a great-grand- 
daughter of Dr. de Benneville. With the approval and aid of His 
Majesty's government, the beautiful memorial was erected. The one 
hundred and twenty-sixth anniversary of the battle of Germantown 
was an ideal autumn day and singularly fitting for the historic occa- 
sion. When the invited guests had assembled around the memorial 
stone, Consul Powell delivered the dedicatory address, in which he 
reviewed the chain of events that led up to the consummation of the 
memorial project, and paid a gracious tribute to the heroic virtues of the 
two officers, after which the Rev. Frederick Dunham Ward, of St. 
Clement's Protestant Episcopal Church, read the prayers for such oc- 
casions. Among those present were representatives of The Pennsylva- 
nia Society of Sons of the Revolution and The Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. 

The inscription on the memorial reads as follows : 

I. H. S. 
Here Lie The Remains 

Of 
General James Tanner Agnew 

A British Officer 

Who Was Killed At Germantown 
On The 4th of October, 1777. 

And Of 
Lieutenant-Colonel John Bird 

A British Officer 

Who Died In Germantown On or 

About The 4th of October, 1777. 

The Bodies of The Above Officers 

Were Removed From The Lower Burial 

Ground, Germantown, By The Order 

Of General Howe And Placed In This 

Cemetery With The Consent of 

Doctor George De Benneville 

In May 1778. 

Requiescat In Pace. 

This Stone Was Erected 

To Their Memory By 
His Britannic Majesty's 

Government, 
October 4th 1903. 

LETTER OF LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ELIJAH CLARK TO HIS SON 
LARDNER CLARK (original in the Recorder's office, Woodbury, N. J., 
and contributed by William M. Mervine). 

HAD FD May 17"> 1782 

D R SON 

Agrable to you r request by Elish, Your Boy is sent to You : Sorry I 
am to part with Him, but much more so that you are necessitated to Sel 
him. I presume you know not what other Shift to make or you wo d 
not do it, you know I have nothing in my power In the mony way at 



108 Notes and Queries. 

present, the boy is much afected at leaving the House and being Sold 
out of the famely ; indeed all the famely Seem more affected than usual 
on Such ocasions, can* you lett your Brig, at a rate that wo d do 
that you might be able to keep your Boy 

Your Mama or my Selfe had concluded to go to town tomorrow but I 
believe we Shan'. She is unwell, If you want to com out Mrs Albert- 
son is in town with whom you can get a ride out. Jube (?) went to 
Market for us. 

Love yo r 

ELIJAH CLAKK 

LETTER OF JOSEPH HUNTER, OF CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA, TO 
HIS COUSIN, JAMES HUNTER, OF PHILADELPHIA, RELATING TO IN- 
DIAN DEPREDATIONS. 

CARLISLE, 24 th July 1768 

COUSIN JAMES. 
SIR. 

Since my last four people hath been kill'd and scalp' d about 4 miles 
from Shippensburg one Pommery's wife after being scalp' d was carried 
home alive, but is since dead she was big with child. The people 
here are in the utmost Consternation, what will be the event of these 
things. The Indians seem to be spirited up by reason of their success, 
as little opposition hath been made to oppose their cruel proceedings. 

Its true we cannot complain of the Assembly because they comply' d 
to such measures as the Governor thought necessary for our Preserva- 
tion, but the way they have fall n on to raise the men will not answer 
the end for the men that had a mind to 'list will not take 1/6 p day, 
which continues only the time of Harvest or perhaps a month longer, 
when they can have 2/6 p day without any risque of their lives. And 
as for Sherman Valley, people that one would think was truly interested 
to go will not but would rather loose their Crops than be under the com- 
mand of an officer ; so that from these considerations you may judge 
the defenceless state we are in. 

If the Assembly and Governor had thought prudent to enlist the men 
a year and given bounty money together with 10. p scalp, the war I 
dare venture to say would be sooner at an end, and I am fully con- 
vinced less expense to the Province. For by all appearances it will be 
a long and tedious War, and if our Troops that are on their way to 
Fort Pitt should have the misfortune to be defeated (which God forbid 
they should), you may judge yourself what will be the consequences, 
and especially from the divisions that take place among us, which is an 
unhappy Omen of farther calamity if the Crops over the hills cannot be 
saved the loss according to a moderate computation is no less than one 
million bushels of Grain, and all those People in the utmost Distress. 
For my own part I am at a loss what to do, I have six small helpless 
children, and are in one of the Frontier Houses in Town, and yet I 
could this day with the greatest cheerfulness go to the field of Battle if 
I thought I could lend the least aid to secure that invaluable privi- 
ledge, viz. Civil and Religious Liberty which is the noblest enjoyment 
this side Heaven. 

Yesterday a very surprising child came into the World, in this 
Town ; its head was plainly scalp' d and the visible mark of a Tomahawk 
cut in its skull it died about half an hour after it was born. A great 
many people went to see it, but was denied the priviledge. Various are 






Notes and Queries. 109 

the interpretations of this phenonoma ; for my part I take no notice of 
any such thing, all I want is to endeavour to put ourselves as profest 
Christians that ought to act the prudent part in a proper posture of 
defence and act like men. We keep watch every night and are making 
a fort with redouts around the Town. I think if I had the least aid I 
could make my house with 50 men act against 500 Indians, because of 
its advantageous situation and good water. By this time I have tried 
your patience with so long an epistle, but I am sure it is a true one. 
I remain with due esteem, 

Your assured friend, 

JOSEPH HUNTER. 

N. B. Upon receipt of this let me know if the Assembly has 
fallen upon any other method of raising the men, because I can assure 
you, there are very few that will enlist there were no less than 15 or 
20 men from these parts all good woodsmen that could live in the woods 
like Indians, would have been out before now if there was encourage- 
ment, and that not all [torn] say 500 would have been at some of their 
Towns, which is the only way to come up with Indians. 

ISRAEL PEMBERTON'S EXPERIENCE WITH HIS TUTOR, FRANCIS 
DANIEL PASTORIUS. 

In 1698 Israel Pemberton, then about thirteen years of age, had a 
difficulty with one of his school-masters, which he relates as follows : 

About the 10 th day of the 4 month 1698, Francis Daniel Pas- 
torus, a German, one of the school -masters of Philadelphia took occa- 
sion (upon a small difference that did arrise between me and another 
scholar) to beate me very much with a thick stick upon my head untill 
the blood came out & also on my armes untill the Blood started through 
the skin & both were so swelled that the swelling was to be seen so that 
it caused my cloths to stand out & the flesh was bruised that it turned 
black & yellow & green my father coming to town on the 13 th day of 
the 5 th mo : & my sister acquainting him how I had been used took 
me away from ye school the 14 th day of the 5 th mo : & the 15 th day sent 
me into the country from which I writ the following epistle. 

Ye 22< day of ye 5th 1698. 
mo 

DEARE MASTER, 

Tho: Meakin Lest through mistake the Abuse I received at the 
schol being noised abroad should be taken to be thee I made bold to 
write these few lines for the clearing of thee thy Instructions were so 
mild and gentle as that I never Received one blow or stripe from thy 
hand during my stay there tho my dullness at times might have given 
thee occasion for if I wanted Information with boldness I cold come to 
thee being always friendly Received but from another I always found 
Rough answers where I quickly left to trouble him not finding the kind- 
ness as from thee & indeed what he did for me from first to last is to be 
seen in that little Lattin book I writ at his first coming which I have 
forgot at school behind me if thou would be pleased to send it by some 
of the boatmen to be left at Sam' 1 Jenings when thou meets with it I 
shall take it a kindness I do say it was not my intent to have let it be 
known but the anguish of the blows & being inwardly opprest with 
griefe to think how I was used without having the liberty to speak one 



110 Notes and Queries. 

word in my own defence did so chainge my countenance that my sister 
presently perceived it who was restles untill I had discovered the occasion 
who rested not there but would see and when she saw was allso so 
greived that she would shew me to some others tho I endeavoured 
much to diswade her but she would not but did cause me to be seen by 
Hannah Carpenter and Thomas Whartons wife but contrary to my mind 
tho he never shewed any respect to me as a scholar but still frowned 
upon me, the rason I know not for I never Intended to vex him and 
therefore never made use of him and thou being out of school he took 
that oppertunity so to thrach me and I observed that he generally shewed 
his disposition more when thou was out of school for whilest thou was 
in he seldom went into those extrames as at other times this is only 
private to thyself for I desire not to Injure him I would willingly have 
stayd Longer at the School but my sister haveing told my father how 
things were and the tokens of his correction still remaining upon me 
tho about five weeks since, and are still to be seen and so sore as that I 
cannot endure anything to press against it he would not heare me tho 
I desired it but I will forbare to say any more about it lest I should too 
far sterr up what I would have at an end but I love thee and desire to 
be with thee and to spend the rest of my schooling under thee ; but 
whether it may be so or no I know not yet I desire it with my love end 
these few lines who am thy scholar 

I. P. 

I cannot but sorrow at times to think of my removal and the occa- 
sion of it for I long to be with thee againe tho somtimes I smile to 
myself to think how I told my father when first I saw him I doubted he 
would prove an angry master he asked me why so I told him I thought 
so by his nose he called me a prating boy but I find I had some skill for 
he has since confirmed it to me with a wittness as if he loved me 
its more then I know because he never shewed me any of it however I 
love him & desire thee to remember my love to him if thou please : I 
am afraid I am overbold therefore crave thy excuse & so farewell dear 
master. 

AN INTERESTING DEPOSITION. 
RICHARD DENNIS "1 In the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. 

On Rule td take the Depositions of Witnesses 
vs > to be read on the Trial in case of Death, Ab- 

sence or other legal Disabilities &c on One Day's 
CHARLES WHARTON J Notice. 

Benjamin Philips of Southwark Ship Carpenter being duly sworn on 
the Holy Evangeles deposeth and saith, that he is under a Contract to 
go to Blackbird Creek in the County of New Castle in Delaware to re- 
pair a Vessel and expects to depart in a few days and that he shall not 
return till sometime next Spring. And this Dep* being produced and 
examined as a Witness on the part of the Defend' in the above Cause 
upon his Oath saith that he served his Apprenticeship with Richard 
Dennis the Pltff. and lived and work'd with him from the Year 1772 to 
1777, that he remembers a ship that was building in the said Dennis's 
Yard for Charles Wharton that she was set up on his own account and 
lay a long time, perhaps a Year before she was sold ; her Frames were 
up and she was part timbered when Captain Bulkeley undertook the 
Oversight of her, this Dep* never heard that she was altered in her Di- 



Notes and Queries. Ill 

mansions after being first put up. This Dep' was never absent from his 
Master's Yard during his Apprenticeship, except when he went to see 
his Mother, which was about once a Year at Christmass, about three 
weeks that he absented himself without leave, about two months in the 
summer of 1777 when he serv'd in the Militia at Billingsport and was 
discharged and returned home before the British Army landed at Elk, 
and about three weeks that he was in New Castle County cutting Tim- 
ber for his master immediately before he was drafted into the Militia. 
This Dep' work'd at the said Ship with the other hands and well remem- 
bers that at the Time the Roebuck came into the River the Ship's Bot- 
tom was planked up to the Wales and caulk'd and the Wales caulk' d, 
her lower Deck was laid but not caulk'd except the Sperketing seam, her 
upper works were part plank'd on the outside but no cieling nor Clamps 
on the inside, the half Timbers were in and the Quarter Deck staunchions, 
the Rudder was hung, the stern was not plank'd up, no Bowsprit nor 
upper Deck Beams in ; in this Situation she was when there was some 
talk of launching a number of Thomas Penrose's hands having assisted 
for some Weeks, but no launching stuff was prepared except some Cross 
ways that were put under her ; and all talk of launching was dropped, 
but this Dep' knows not the reason, when she was watered one Plank 
was found wormeaten and taken out and another Plank put in, but she 
never was recaulked, then all Hands left off work & never work'd more 
upon her ; that during the same time that this ship was on the Stocks 
Richard Dennis had constant Employment for his Hands in building a 
Brig for a french Gentleman named Mamazure, and repairing of Old 
Vessels, so that they never worked upon the Ship but when other work 
was slack and then only the Apprentices were employ' d on her, with 
the Foreman to instruct them but no other Journeymen that this Dep' 
remembers ; that in the Summer 1777 before Mamazure's New Brig 
was set up they raised on a Prize Schooner for Mamazure, and there was 
so little Plank in the Yard that they were obliged to take the Stages that 
surrounded the Ship down to use for the Schooner's Deck and upper- 
works to make her into a Brig ; most of the Ship Carpenters were em- 
ploy'd in building Ships of War, so that Dennis's Yard and People 
were almost wholly taken up in repairing Vessels, some of which Dep' 
remembers viz. Sheathing a Ship that came in with Salt, a Sloop be- 
longing to M r Skinner, the above Schooner for M r Mamazure a Schooner 
of Col. Thees hailed up, lengthend and raised to a Double Deck Brig, 
the Sloop Sachem a Prize taken by Capt. Barry, the Brig General Put- 
nam R Prize taken by the Wasp raised on and converted into a Privateer 
another Prize Brig for Mamazure, and about Six times as many that he 
cannot remember so as to be constantly employed in old Work from the 
beginning of the Disturbances till the Battle of Brandywine with a very 
few intervals during which his Apprentices and the Foreman were em- 
ployed on the New Ship, but the Journeymen were discharged when 
there were no Vessels repairing and this Dep* believes that no work 
was done on the Ship by hired hands except the Foreman for a consid- 
erable time before and none after the Roebuck came up the River, ex- 
cept when Thomas Penrose's Hands were hired to prepare her for launch- 
ing as aforesaid and indeed there was so great a run of old Work during 
all that time that very little was done to the Ship. That John Dennis, 
Son of the Pltff. worked as a Foreman in the Yard when the Ship was 
first set up & for some time after, but took a Commission in the Army 



112 Notes and Queries. 

as Ensign, when the British Army was coming thro' Jersey towards 
Philadelphia, he had quitted work and gone to Brunswick and New 
York some Months before that time and returned once and work'd now 
& then a day or two, but not regularly as before and after he took the 
Commission he never work'd a day in the Yard, till after the British 
Army evacuated the City. Joseph Marsh was the first Foreman after 
John Dennis went away and after he went away Conrad Lutz and Jon- 
athan Grice acted as Foremen. A few days before the Battle of Brandy- 
wine this Dep 4 was sent with some other Hands to bring a Raft of Plank 
from Manto Creek in Jersey and returned the day after the battle, every 
thing was in Confusion, the Journeymen were discharged from the Yard, 
and some of the Apprentices were employ 'd about the Bridges at Schuyl- 
kill, Richard Dennis & Col. Marsh hired a Flat to take their Goods and 
part of their Families into Jersey and Dep' was sent Avith the Flat to 
Manto Creek where R. Dennis & Col. Marsh and their Wives met him 
and when the Goods were landed & put into a House of one Jessop, R. 
Dennis told Dep' he had now no House nor home and therefore Dep' 
must shift for himself, whereupon Dep* went to his Father's near Mar- 
cus Hook and never saw R. Dennis more for near Seven Years Dep 4 
being at Sea most part of that time. When he returned he went to see 
his old master who behaved very kindly and talk'd to him about the 
Ship and desired Dep' to recollect what he could about her and call & 
see him again, Some time after he sent for Dep* and talk'd a great deal 
about the Ship, told him she was burnt and that there would be a Dis- 
pute about her & wanted Dep 4 to be a Witness, Dep 4 said he would tes- 
tify what was honest and just, he then read a long Paper which he said 
was his Son John Dennis's Testimony, which Contained to this effect, 
that there was a great deal of Timber and Stuff provided and laid by in 
the Yard to finish the Ship, that Charles Wharton would not let him 
use it for any other purpose, that when he was about to work on the Ship 
and finish her Charles Wharton would come and forbid him & when 
he was repairing Privateers and doing Public Work C. Wharton would 
come and insist on his quitting it to finish the Ship, and would talk 
about the Americans burning the Ship, but that he was not afraid of the 
English, and a good deal more of the like, after this in a few days R. 
Dennis sent his Son Barney with a Paper nearly to the same effect to 
this Dep' and another to John Anderson formerly an Apprentice of 
Tho" Pen rose's and who had work'd on the Ship about the time the Roe- 
buck came up the River, requesting them to sign it, this Dep* kept his 
Paper several days to consider what to do with it, as it contained some 
things that he knew were false and some things that he knew nothing 
about, Barney Dennis called twice for it and Dep' told him when he 
had done with it it should be returned, in the meantime he saw John 
Anderson & read the Paper left with him, they both concluded that there 
were many Falsehoods in it, and they each scratched out what they knew 
to be false, and what they knew nothing about, both agreeing in every 
thing except one Fact, the Papers set forth that the lower Deck was 
caulk'd which this Dep' thought was not true & scratched it out and 
Anderson thought it might be true and left it in, both of them returned 
the Papers so scratched as to leave very little of what was in them and 
this Dep 4 told Barney Dennis when he delivered it that if he was call'd 
before a Court he would tell the Truth, but he would not sign anything. 
This Deponent is very certain that R. Dennis fcad not provided Timber, 



Notes and Queries. 113 

Beams, Knees nor Plank for the purpose of finishing the Ship, for that 
what Materials he had of those kinds he had in the Yard were brought 
there expressly for the Brig he was building for Mamazure and Old 
Work and they were so scarce of Timber that he was obliged to send 
Four or Five Apprentices to the Country to cut it to go on with the Brig. 
This Dep' remembers well that when John Dennis accepted a Commis- 
sion in the Army his Father was so displeased at him that he forbid him 
the House and told this Dep* that he had nothing to do with him for 
he had taken a Commission, that he disowned him, and John Dennis in 
the absence of his Father severely whipp'd this Deponent because he 
would not go out in the Militia, for which this Dep* left home and went 
to his Father's and B. Dennis was much displeased with his Son for 
whipping him. 

[Signed] BENJAMIN PHILLIPS 
Sworn and subscribed the 16th 

day of December 1790 in the 

Presence of Plaintiff and De- 

fendant before 

[Signed] 



PENN PAPERS. CORRECTION. The letters written by William Penn 
to Hannah Callowhill before their marriage, which are printed on pages 
296 to 304 of Vol. XXVII. of THE PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE OF HIS- 
TORY AND BIOGRAPHY, as also the three touching little notes printed 
on page 372 of the same volume, written by him to his three young chil- 
dren by his first marriage, when he was on the eve of sailing upon his 
first voyage to Pennsylvania, were purchased, in an exceedingly inter- 
esting collection of manuscripts, by The Historical Society of Pennsyl- 
vania in December, 1882, from Colonel Stewart Forbes, the next of kin 
and administrator in England of the estate of the Rev. Thomas Gordon 
Penn, the last of the family bearing the name of the Founder. The 
lot has been designated by the Society the " Penn-Forbes Papers." 

WM. BROOKE RAWLE. 

LETTER OF ANTHONY SHARP, OF DUBLIN, IRELAND, TO THOMAS 
SHARP, OF NEW JERSEY, 1694, addressed 

To Thomas Sharp | at his House att Newtowne | on Jersey Side | 

oposide Neare to Philadelphia. 
R Turner Philadelphia | thos with | Newtowne in New 

West Jersie. 
The original is in the Recorder's office, Woodbury, New Jersey. 

7 
DUBLIN y 11 of ~ Q 1694 

To COZEN THO SHARP 

My Deare Loue is to thee & thy wife & Children hopeing of yo r well 
fare every way as blessed be y e Lord I my wife & 6 children Are wele 
thy father & mother prety wele but Anthony gone to England for his 
health, & Elizabeth with him, my Love to Coz W m & Anthony theyre 
Mothers Love to them John & Sarah Wele, And for my Lande I would 
have thee take up as much as possible & set it off Let W m & Anthony 
haue a good Farme & Reasonable & I shalbe kind to them beside Let 
me know whats deue I leaue it to thee to Incouridge them, when 
thou writes Let me know what Lande thou dweles on & the 2 what 

VOL. XXVIII. 8 



114 Notes and Queries. 

more thee hath 3 how much Catle & what sworts : 4 how many Chil- 
dren 5 how much lande thou hast Taken up for me y* Layes wast 6 
what thou can sele my Land for p r acre & what Lande in East Jersie 
is worth p r acre, treading is dull here at p r sent, hut I haue built up my 
house in y e Queens County y l was burnt in y e late troubles & Have 
Stock y* Lande being one thousand Acres It has been y e great Mercy 
of the Lord that Soe preserved us in these warrs Thou never gaue me 
accompt of the mony I ordered thee to Receiue of W m Beat & the Ex- 
change of it, Thy iFather Liues Neare As he did, & keeps A little 
Tread. I am glad thou sticks to ffds & y e Antient Truth & way of God, 
& be not concerned in differences As Litle as posable but be as much as 
may be At peace with all & in Cleanness & Rightiousness Truth Justice 
Mercy & humileity, & the Blessing from Aboue & beneath thou & thine 
wilt haue apart in from y e God of o 1 Mercy 6 to whom I comitt Thee & 
thine & Rem thy 

Lo uncle ANTH Y SHARP 

On the reverse of the foregoing letter the following memoranda is 
written : 

24th Ballinger purchased of Walter Humphrye Deed bare Date the 
5 th of 8 th m 1695 Walter Humphrys Purchased of John Harriss Deed 
bares Date the 4 & 5 th of the 11 th m 1681 John Harris with Tho 
Gerish & Hennery Gerish purchased of Tho Hootten as by Deeds of 
lease & Release baring date the first & second dayes of the 4 th m 
1677 Thomas Hooten purchased of Edward billing and trustees as by 
deeds of lease & Release baring Date the 5 th & 16 Dayes of y e 9 th m 
1676. 

WILLIAM M. MERVINE. 

LETTER OF LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ISRAEL SHREVE, OF THE SECOND 
NEW JERSEY INFANTRY, 1776. The following letter of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Israel Shreve, addressed to his brother-in-law, Thomas Curtis, 
is contributed by Dr. William S. Long, of Haddonfield, N. J. At 
the date of this letter Colonel Shreve was attached to the Second New 
Jersey Infantry, and when it was disbanded in December he recruited 
the Second Battalion of Second Establishment, of which he was com- 
missioned colonel. He served with credit and was wounded at Brandy- 
wine, but, owing to his corpulency (he weighed three hundred and 
twenty pounds, and no horse was able to carry him faster than a walk), 
in 1781 he was compelled to resign. A biographical sketch of Colonel 
Shreve was read before The Historical Society of Pennsylvania Sep- 
tember 12, 1853. 

MOUNT INDEPENDANCE OPPOSATE 

TICONDEROGA 26th. Aug. 1776. 
DEAR BROTHER 

Although I have not Receiv'd a Letter from you nor either of my 
Brothers or Sisters this campain, I think it my Duty to Write to my 
friends and Relations. I mean in the first place to Give a Short Ac- 
count of the State of the Works & army here ; our Regment is In- 
camped on a mountain Near a part of the Lake Called South Bay lead- 
ing from Ticonderoga to Skainsborough, about one mile from the point 
opposate to Ticonderoga where the Lake is about a Quarter of a mile 
from point to point ; across this point we have thrown up a Beautiful 
Strong Breastwork or Lines, mounting 25 peaces of Cannon from 6 to 



Notes and Queries. 115 

32 pounders. One hundred yards Back of this Line on a high hill is 
Building a half-moon Battery which overlooks the Lake and all the 
Land around within Cannon-shot, where the Enemy Can possably 
Land or Get possession of. On the Ticonderoga side the old French 
Lines is neatly Repaired and finished much stronger than ever they 
were before, three Redouts Building between the Lines and the point 
to prevent the Enemy from Landing within the Lines. We have a 
small fleet on the Lake consisting of one Sloop 12 Guns, [do. 8 guns 

Schooner] 10 Guns, one 8 guns, one Do : 6 guns, Gund[olas] 

3 guns each, Several more on the Stocks. I have not had the Returns 
of the army for 10 or 12 Days, but am Confident the Army Consists of 
upward 12 thousand [?], two Reg'ts, more Expected from Boston 
every day. 

On our Side there is four Brigades, as follows Viz. the first Com- 
manded by General Arnold, Consisting of Colonels Graton, Bond, Por- 
ter, and Burrel's Rigments ; the Second, Commanded by General Read, 
Consisting of Colonels Reid, Patterson, Waits and [?], the third by 
Colonel Stark, consisting of Colonels Stark's, Poor's, Maxwell's and two 
other newcomers, their Colonels I do not know, three Companies of 
Artillery Viz. Bedloe's, Steven's & Biglow's; in all 17 Rigments and 
three Companies of Artillery on our side. On Ticonderoga side, the 
fourth Commanded by General Saint Clair Consisting of St. Glair's, De- 
haas', Wind's, Hartley's and Waines; the 5th & 6th. Regt's. commanded 
by General B- Consisting of between 4 & 5 thousand straping Yan- 
kees, Just Come from Boston Government ; the 7 Brigade commanded 
by General Waterberry at Skanesborough, to be here in a few Days, of 
2 Rigments from Conecticut, the Regiments not full. provisions 
plenty, Good pork & fresh Beef, Bread. No Sauce for the men. Col. 
Maxwell and myself each purchased a Cow which Gives us plenty of 
Milk, our Captain has 2 more, pasture plenty ; there is three Scotch 
farms within about 1J miles of us, where we Git some few peas, potatoes 
and Roasting Ears of Corn these Articles a Rarity among us. Good 
West India Rum here is 6/ [?] New England Do. [12/0 or 16/], Brandy 
18/, Gin 22/ Wine that is Madairy 30/ p Gallon, Chocolate 2/6, Loaf 
Sugar 5/6, Brown Do : 1/6, Gammons 1/3, Cheese 2/6, Candles 2/6, and 
hard Soap 2/0 pr pound. 

If you had all the Cheese here you make in one Season, you might 
sell it at 2/6 York in 10 days for cash. 

A few Days ago I set down and calculated the cost of Transporting 
Cheese from your house to this place, provided the North River was 
Clear, and I think It would not Cost a penny half penny p. pound. 
Now Reckon the profit I would Advise you to keep this years Cheese 
over Winter and try it next Campain as I make no doubt but a Large 
Army will be kept here next Campain when you would clear 1/6 p 
pound that is 75. for every thousand Weightnow throw away one 
third for Risks and Accidents. Bring 6000 Weight, the Clear proffits 
would amount to three Hundred pounds of New Jersey, this may all be 
Depended upon and I Believe that Quantity might be sold here at 
this time in one Week for Cash, a Number of Setlers will make Small 
fortunes here^his Campaign, Shugars, Chocolate, Coffee, Pepper, Shoes, 
Shirts fit for officers, Stockings, Do. Dimity or any thing fit for officers 
summer Vests & Breeches would answer Extremely Well the time to 
Come would be Just after harvest or a month sooner only that would 



116 Notes and Queries. 

not [torn] by this time the officers Stores is Gone. I have give half a 
Dollar a Quart for Common Good Cider Vinagar and Glad to get it to ; 
no more. But my Love .to your Wife and family Brothers & Sisters 
and all old friends. I am in Good health and hope you and yours are 
the same, I am with Great Respect 

your friend and Brother 

ISRAEL SHREVE. 

LETTER OF NATHANIEL COFFIN, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. In 
the Collection of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania there are 
numerous letters of Nathaniel Coffin, who was connected with the Cus- 
tom service at Boston, of which the following interesting one, although 
without date, was probably written in 1764. 

DEAR SIR, 

Two extraordinary things have occurred since you left us, which I 
shall give you a detail of. The haste I am in will excuse the manner 
in which I do it. Mr. Fenton having been reported the author of the 
Dialogue, Mr. Murray wrote him & insisted upon his either owning or 
disowning it. Fenton in his answer termed this demand insolent & 
refused to comply with it. Many Billets passed, in some of which Mr. 
Murray challenged Fenton, but before this Matter was brought to an 
issue, Mr. Flucker gave Mr. Murray leave to charge Mr. Temple with 
being the author, he having as he said full proof of it. Mr. Murray 
acquaints Temple with this in a Billet & tells him he shou'd first attack 
him in the publick print* with fairness and candor & after that treat 
him as he deserved. Temple ab' Sunsett meets Flucker in the Town 
House, asked him whether he had asserted that he was the Author of 
the Dialogue, & before he had Time to receive an answer, he laid his 
Cane over Flucker' s Head, & as Flucker says put his Hand to his 
Sword. Flucker return' d this insult with several Blows when the By- 
standers as usual interfered & prevented anything further. 

Temple then went to Mr. Murrays, met him at the Door & asked him 
whether he had wrote him a Billet signed Jam' Murray & upon his 
answering in the affirmative, "Take that you Dog" giving his answer 
to the Billet, and at the same time discharging a Volley of oaths & 
abusive Language tweeked him by the Nose. General MKay has since 
interposed in Fen ton's affair, he sent for Murray & Fenton, read their 
Letters, charged Murray with indiscretion & advised him to his asking 
Fen ton's pardon, which advice he complied with and thus that affair 
ended. 

Bob Temple has been with the General & has declared his Brother 
was not the Author. 

How the Matter will end betwixt Murray & Temple is uncertain, the 
Nature of the Dispute being entirely changed by the personal abuse 
given Murray & Great pains has been taken by old Capt. Erving to 
bring on an accommodation betwixt Flucker & Temple which Flucker 
will not listen to and still insists that he has sufficient proof. 

The other remarkable, relates to our Friend Ainslie from whom I 
received last Wednesday Morning a Note desiring me to come down to 
him immediately. I made all the Haste I could & found him in the 
Hands of an officer at the Suit of Mr. Williams the inspector for 2600 
S. money the Wine affair with which you are acquainted. He desired 
me to read the writ & asked what was to be done. I answered there 



Notes and Queries. 117 

was no other alternative than Bail or going to Jayle. I obviated any 
application on that Head to myself by acquainting him that I had given 
the strongest assurance to my Security to you, that I would not embar- 
rass myself in this or any other way. 

He then desired me to go to Mr. Paxton, by whom after relating the 
Circumstances, I was answered that he could do nothing in his private 
capacity, but advised to call upon Mr. Birch the Chairman, who an- 
swered much in the same way, but said he would endeavor to get the 
Board together the next Day, which had adjourned from Tuesday to the 
Monday following, & advised me in the meantime to get the Solicitor to 
draw up a state of his Case. When I returned to Mr. Ainslie I urged 
the officer to stay with him till the Board cou'd get together which he 
refused to do saying, he would not stay for a Guinea an Hour. I then 
proposed to go & look for Security, which Ainslie wou'd not suffer me 
to do, but possitively insisted on going to Jail, whither I convey 'd him 
in a Chaise. 

The Board did not meet 'till Fryday. There was but four of 
them. Mr. Halton being prevented from coming to Town by the bad- 
ness of the weather. Two viz. Mr. Birch & Mr. Paxton were for the 
Boards ordering him to be bail'd, the other two were for taking further 
Time & Robinson proposed to take Mr. Auchmuty's advice whose 
opinion was that the Board should order him bailed. These are now 
upon the affair & I am in Hopes poor Ainslie will be liberated from a 
loathsome prison in a few Hours. 

His Friends have taken every Method to make it sit easy upon him. 
He has had a large Levee every day, & among them some very agree- 
able Ladies. I think it Lucky that he did not procure private Bail as 
it might have prevented the Board interfering. 

I am very busy making a large Remittance of 10,000 Str. p. the 
Rippon in which is included 3500 the residue of the last order. 

Mrs. Coffin & all the Family are in statu quo. We have been as 
Melancholly as Cats since you left us. Every Body send regards to 
you. I am 

Your very affectionate 

NATH. COFFIN 

The Board have this minute order 'd Bail 

BICENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY OF THE "FALCKNER SWAMP" 
LUTHERAN CONGREGATION. On November 28 and 29, 1903, the bi- 
centennial anniversary of the Lutheran congregation in New Hanover 
(Falckner Swamp), Montgomery County, Rev. J. J. Kline, Ph.D., 
pastor, was celebrated with appropriate ceremonies. Among the 
speakers were the Revs. F. J. F. Schantz, D.D., U. S. G. Bertolet, 
I. B. Kurtz, Professor G. F. Spieker, D.D., W. B. Fox, Professor H. N. 
Fegely, D.D., W. O. Fegely, and Dr. J. F. Sachse. The Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania was represented by its Librarian. The present 
church edifice was built in 1767, and is the fourth used since the organ- 
ization of the congregation. 

"PENNYPACKER'S MILLS," on the Perkiomen, is believed to be the 
only head-quarters of Washington during the Revolutionary War which 
remains in the name of the family who owned it at that period. On 
November 16, 1903, William D. Hunsicker, while digging a drain be- 



118 Notes and Queries. 

tween the house and the barn, forty-five yards from the house, found 
a five-pound iron cannon-ball, rusty and encysted two feet under ground. 

WISTAR ASSOCIATION. In the collections of The Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania is the printed arrangements of the Association for the 
winter of 1831-1832, which reads : 

ARRANGEMENTS 

FOR 
THE WISTAR ASSOCIATION FOR 1831, 1832. 

Members and the Day Appropriated for each. 

1831. October 8. P. S. Duponceau. 

15. Mathew Carey. 

22. Vacant. 

29. Dr. Eobert Hare. 
Nov. 5. Dr. Thomas Harris. 

12. William Meredith. 

19. Joseph Hopkinson. 

26. Dr. William Gibson. 
Dec. 3. J. K. Kane. 

10. Thomas Biddle. 

17. Kobert Walsh. 

24. Dr. John K. Mitchell. 
31. William Strickland. 

1832. Jan. 7. Dr. William P. Dewees. 

14. Dr. R. La Roche. 
21. Dr. William Homer. 
28. J. P. Wetherill. 
Feb. 4. Isaac Lea. 

11. C. C. Biddle. 

18. William M'llvaine. 

25. John Vaughan. 
March 8. Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. 

10. Dr. Charles D. Meigs. 

REGULATIONS. 

If the evening fixed for any member is wished to be changed by him, 
he is to make an arrangement with some other member to exchange 
with him, whose turn he is then to take. 

Not more than twenty citizens can be invited by the members at 
whose house the meeting is held. 

Any strangers, but no citizens, can be introduced by the other 
members. 

At supper, Beef, Ham, Turkey, or Chickens, Stewed Oysters and 
Chicken Salad may be introduced, but no Coffee, Tea, Cakes or Ice 
Creams. No refreshment of any sort introduced before supper. 

The members to be early and punctual in their attendance. 

JOHN WALKER. Dr. Egle has a pedigree of John Walker, of North- 
umberland County, Pennsylvania, in "Notes and Queries," 3d ser., I. 
357, 4th ser., I. 130, which places him as the son of James Walker, d. 
Paxtang Township, will proved November 10, 1784, and to them is 
given a long pedigree. 



Notes and Queries. 119 

But as said James Walker and his second wife, Barbara McArthur, 
were married January 25, 1776 (Paxtang and Deny Records), and 
John Walker was killed in 1782, described as " an old man," and had a son 
born in 1758, who had a son born in 1787, he could not have been of 
the lineage Dr. Egle gave him. It is true that James and Barbara 
Walker had a son "John," but he was alive in 1784, a minor, ac- 
cording to his father's will. So he could not have been the John mur- 
dered in 1782, as stated in the "Notes and Queries." 

This John Walker was the old gentleman who was murdered by 
Indians on August 8, 1782, while on a visit to the home of Major 
John Lee, who resided where the town of Winfield, in Union County, 
now stands. An account of this Indian raid may be found in Megin- 
niss's "History of the West Branch Valley," pages 273, 361, and 
Linn's "Annals of the Buffalo Valley," written up from a letter from 
Colonel Butler, August 25, 1782, to Colonel Magaw, at Carlisle, and 
discovered among the latter's papers, and a letter dated Fort Augusta, 
August 13, 1782, in the Pennsylvania Gazette, August 28. Mr. Walker 
resided at the mouth of Pine Creek, on the West Branch. He had 
nine children by his wife Jean, who was accidentally killed in May, 
1788, daughter of Benjamin Powell. Of these : 

1. Benjamin Walker, b. October, 1758; d. La Porte, Indiana, 1846; 
m. March, 1784, Ann Crawford, d. 1836, and had ten children. 

2. William Walker, d. Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, 1789. He 
had John and William, of Vigo County, Indiana, 1820. 

3. Henry Walker, alive September 26, 1796. 

4. Joseph Walker, alive February 4, 1793. 

5. John Walker, alive August 30, 1791. 

6. Samuel Walker, alive August 30, 1791. 

7. Jean Walker, alive August 20, 1791. 

8. Sarah Walker, d. after 1810. She was the eldest daughter, according 
to a deed of 1794, and probably the eldest child. She m. William Morri- 
son, Jr., 1747-1810 (see "Morrison Family History"), and had issue. 

9. (Name unknown. Mr. Walker's estate was administered Septem- 
ber 13, 1782, by his widow Jean and son Benjamin Walker, and was 
divided into nine-ninths. Eight of these parts are accounted for by 
the children named above. The other ninth may have been for the 
widow or for another child.) As to how the Walker boys avenged their 
father's murder, see Meginniss's "Historical Journal," II. 90, 114, and 
Court Records of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

C. H. BROWNING. 

REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONS. Mr. William M. Mervine sends us the 
following Revolutionary pension records, from minutes of the Orphans' 
Courts of several counties of Pennsylvania and Maryland : 

PENNSYLVANIA. Robert Me Williams in Captain Arthur Tagerts Com- 
pany of Northumberland county Militia, killed on or near the 12th of 
December 1777, near Gulph Mill, in Philadelphia county, in an action 
with the British, when the British tried to surprise Brigadier General 
Patten [?]. Robert McWilliams was under command of John Chattam. 

Timothy Lennington, Sergeant in Second Battalion of Pennsylvania 
Militia, Commanded by Colonel James Murray, wounded badly llth of 
December 1777, Battle of the Gulph. Certificate by Benjamin Alison, 
Surgeon, Captain Cookson Long's Company. 



120 Notes and Queries. 

Charles Clark, First Lieutenant in Captain Arthur Taggarts Com- 
pany of Northumberland county Militia, in detachment commanded by 
James Morrow Esquire, wounded at Gulph Mills. * 

Mark Bingley }Vorrell, private in Eleventh Pennsylvania ; 40 yrs of 
age, wounded October 4, 1777, at Battle of Germantown." 

Hon. James Irvine, late a Brig. General in Pennsylvania Militia, in 
engagement at Chestnut Hill December 5, 1777, wounded etc., was 
captured and was exchanged Sept. 3, 1781. 3 

Nathaniel Little, late a Sergeant in Captain David McQueens Com- 
pany in the Fourth Battalion Lancaster County Militia, who was killed 
in an engagement with the British Army in December 1777 near Chest- 
nut Hill. 4 

MARYLAND. Michael Qrosh who lost his life in the Militia service, 
as by certificate of Col. Baker, setting forth that the said Michael Grosh 
was a Lieutenant and was killed in the Engagement at German Town. 5 

John Stresner, Private, Seventh Maryland Regiment, wounded at 
German Town. 6 

Major James Cox of the Baltimore Town Battalion of Militia, who 
was killed in an engagement with the Enemy October 4, 1777, at Ger- 
man Town in Pennsylvania, being then in the Service of the U. S. T 

PAMPHLETS. Commencing the collection and preservation of pam- 
phlets, I affix the succeeding extract from MYLES DAVIES. Icon Libel- 
lorum, 1715. "From pamphlets may be learned the genius of the age, 
the debates of the learned, the bevues of government, & mistakes of the 
courtiers. Pamphlets furnish beaus with their airs ; coquettes with their 
charms. Pamphlets are as modish ornaments to gentlewomen's toilets, 
as to gentlemen's pockets : they carry reputation of learning & wit to 
all that make them their companions ; the poor find their account in 
stall-keeping and hawking them : the rich find in them their shortest 
way to the secrets of church and state. In short, with pamphlets, the 
booksellers adorn the gaiety of shop gazing. Hence accrues to grocers, 
apothecaries & chandlers, good furniture & supplies to necessary retreats. 
In pamphlets, lawyers meet with their chicanery, physicians with their 
cant, divines with their shibboleth. Pamphlets become more and more 
daily amusements to the curious, idle, & inquisitive ; pastime to gallants 
& coquettes; chat to the talkative; catchwords to informers ; fuel to 
the envious ; poison to the unfortunate ; balsam to the wounded ; em- 
ployment to the lazy, & fabulous materials to romancers & novelists." 

FOUR PORTRAITS PRESENTED TO THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF 
PENNSYLVANIA. At the Stated Meeting of the Society held November 
9, 1903, the following four portraits in oil were presented. 

' PHILADELPHIA CLUB, November 5, 1903. 

To THE PRESIDENT OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

DEAR SIR, I have the pleasure of presenting through you to The 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania a portrait of Washington, painted 

1 Orphans' Court Docket No. 1, pages 12, 27, and 40, Sunbury, Northumberland 
County, Pennsylvania. 

2 Ibid. Philadelphia, Docket No. 13, page 137, November 14, 1785. 

page 117, September 30, 1785. 

Lancaster County, Docket of 1786, September Term. 
Frederick County, Maryland, Minute-Book No. 1, April Term, 1784. 
Minute-Book No. 2, April Term, 1786. 
* Ibid. Baltimore County, Maryland, Minute-Book No. 2, page 14. 



* Ibid. 
6 Ibid. 



Notes and Queries. 121 

in oil by Gilbert Stuart. It originally belonged to Mr. Gilbert Robert- 
son, who was the British consul in Philadelphia from the year 1818 
until his death in 1836. It then passed to his step-daughter, my 
mother, Juliana Matilda Gouverneur, wife of the late Francis liawle 
Wharton, Esq. ; from her to my sister, Alida Gouverneur Wharton, wife 
of the late John T. Montgomery, Esq., and from her by bequest to me. 
In presenting this valuable portrait to your Society, I trust that it will 
be carefully preserved upon the walls of one of its fire-proof rooms. 

With the assurance of my high regard and best wishes for the con- 
tinued prosperity of your esteemed institution, believe me, 

Yours very respectfully, 

FRANCIS R. WHARTON. 

The above portrait is mentioned in Mason's "Life and Works of 
Gilbert Stuart," page 106. 

A portrait of the late John William Wallace, LL.D., President of 
the Society from 1868 to 1884, was presented by his grandsons, Willing 
and Arthur R. Spencer. The Hon. Hampton L. Carson, Attorney- 
General of the Commonwealth, made the presentation address on behalf 
of the donors. 

Mr. William H. Jordan presented portraits of Hon. Henry M. Hoyt 
and Hon. Robert E. Pattison, former Governors of the Commonwealth. 

The Society now possesses portraits of Washington painted by Stuart, 
Peale, Wertmueller, Wright, and Polk. 



(Queried. 

HON. WILLIAM BLADEN, born February 27, 1672, at Steeton, York- 
shire, England, died August 9, 1718, at Annapolis, Maryland. He was 
the son of Nathaniel Bladen, of Hemsworth, Yorkshire, and Lincoln's 
Inn, London, barrister-at-law, by his wife Isabella, daughter of Sir 
William Fairfax, of Steeton Castle, Yorkshire. (He was a general in 
the Parliamentary army and cousin to Sir Thomas Fairfax.) William 
Bladen took an active part in the public affairs of Maryland. As early 
as June 7, 1692, the House awarded him 1600 Ibs. of Tobacco for his 
allowance as Clerk ; October 24 the Council allowed in the Levy 
4000 Ibs. of Tobacco for his services in transcribing copies of the 
Laws, and April 8, 1693, he and two others were appointed deputies to 
apprehend Colonel Peter Sager and Thomas Smith, of Talbot County, for 
conspiracy. From the Calendar of Maryland State Papers we find that he 
also filled the following offices : 1695, Clerk of the House of Burgesses ; 
1697, Register for the Eastern and Western Shore ; 1697-98, again Clerk 
of the House ; 1698, Surveyor and Deputy Collector ; 1698-1700, Naval 
Officer and Surveyor of the Port of Annapolis; and in 1701, Secretary 
of the Province. On May 8, 1702, William Dent, Attorney-General, 
declining longer service, William Bladen was nominated, and October, 
1703, he was Clerk of the Council. In 1704 he was a vestryman of 
St. Anne's Church, Annapolis, an office which at this date was clothed 
with certain powers in administering the Ecclesiastical Laws. At the 
date of his death he was Commissary -General of the Province (i.e., 
Chief-Justice of Surrogate Court). 

Up to the year 1696 Maryland had no Public Printer, but in October 



122 Notes and Queries. 

William Bladen, Clerk of the upper House, petitioned the Assembly to 
establish the office, offering to procure the necessary press and material, 
should he be appointed. The petition was approved and the outfit 
imported, and in 1700 the Governor and Council recommended to the 
lower House that all blanks for writs and other legal documents be 
printed by Bladen, who also printed the laws then in force. The new 
State-House was erected under contract by Bladen (who had erected all 
the other public buildings), at a cost not to exceed 1000 sterling. 

William Bladen married, first, Letitia, daughter of Judge Dudley 
Loftus, Vicar-General of Ireland. (It is certain that at the time of his 
death the name of his wife was Anna, as is attested by a deed from 
him and his wife to Colonel Thomas Addison, dated July 17, 1718.) 
His children were : 

Thomas, born February 23, 1698 ; Governor of Maryland 1742-47. 
He and Lord Baltimore married sisters, daughters of Sir Theodore 
Janssen. 

Christopher, Ensign in Colonel Fielding's Eegiment of Foot. 

William, in 1741 Naval Officer at Annapolis. 

Martin, of Wegan, Lancastershire, England. 

Anne, who married Hon. Benjamin Tasker, of Maryland. 

Priscilla, who married, about 1725, Hon. Robert Carter, of " Nom- 
inay Hall," Westmoreland County, Virginia. She was the mother 
of Hon. Robert Carter, "the Councillor." 

In the church-yard of St. Anne's, at Annapolis, is an altar tomb 
erected to the memory of Hon. William Bladen, upon which, beautifully 
carved, is his coat armor : Gu. three Chevs, Ar. Crest a winged griffin 
on a ducal coronet, holding in his mouth an arrow. 

Information is requested as to the maiden name and parentage of 
Anna, second wife of Hon. William Bladen. 

FRANCIS M. HUTCHINSON. 

SHANNON. Thomas Shannon, of Sadsbury Township, Lancaster 
County, Pennsylvania, in his will dated April 4, 1737, mentions his 
wife Agnes, and John, one of his sons. A John Shannon (presumably 
the above) died prior to 1768, for his son John, in January, petitioned 
the Orphans' Court for a division of his father's estate, who had died 
intestate, leaving a widow and eleven children. The maiden name of 
the widow was Sarah Keid. When and where was Thomas Shannon 
born, where did he come from to Sadsbury Township, what was the 
surname of his wife Agnes, and when was their son John born ? 

John and Sarah (Reid) Shannon had, among other children, a son 
Thomas, who married Polly Reid and settled in Kentucky. When 
and where was Thomas born and where did he die ? Did he serve 
during the Revolution? When was Polly Reid born, where did she 
die, and who were her parents ? M. F. B. 

JOHN FOXCROFT, DEPUTY POSTMASTER-GENERAL OF THE COLONIES. 
So little is known of Foxcroft, beyond the facts of his office-holding 
and that his wife was a daughter of Franklin, that the following extracts 
from letters of James Parker to Franklin, printed in the last volume 
(xvi.) of Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, are con- 
tributed as a supplement to Goddard's screed against Foxcroft in the 
October number of THE PENNA. MAG. (page 501). 



Notes and Queries. 123 

Jan. 14, 1765. "Mr. Foxcroft is not come from Virginia yet." 

May 29, 1765. "Mr. Foxcroft being momentarily expected at 
Philada." 

June 14, 1765. "Mr. Foxcroft is now here . . . just come and 
busy putting his House in order." 

Can any one add the date of his death and where buried? 

CHARLES HENRY HART. 

PORTRAIT OF GUSTAVUS CONYNGHAM, BY KEMBRANDT PEALE. 
Gustavus Conyngham, captain in the navy of the United States, 1777, 
a character no less interesting than Paul Jones and not a whit less im- 
portant measured by his service to the Colonies, but far less well known, 
has recently been made the subject of an historical monograph by 
Charles Henry Jones, published by the Sons of the Revolution, and of 
a valuable article by James Barnes, in the Outlook, entitled ' ' The 
Story of the Lost Commission." Both are illustrated by reproductions 
of contemporary caricatures of Conyngham, and it may not be known 
that his portrait was painted by Rembrandt Peale. This note is in- 
serted as a search-warrant for that portrait. Who has it and where 
is it? 

CHARLES HENRY HART. 

DEWEES KOSTER BOEHM. Cornelius Dewees, who married Mar- 
garet Koster, had children baptized at Skippack, Philadelphia (Mont- 
gomery) County, Pa., in 1710-11, and Cornelius Dewees Cooper, of 
Whitemarsh Township, Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., 
married Maria Philippina Boehm, daughter of the Rev. John Philip 
Boehm. In 1745 they owned land on the Skippack, and in 1751 
resided in Gloucester County, New Jersey. What relationship, if any, 
existed between the above-named Dewees? Who were the children of 
each? Any information concerning these and their antecedents and 
descendants, and concerning the family of Koster will be appreciated by 

ETHAN ALLEN WEAVER. 

LOCK Box 713, PHILADELPHIA. 

CALEB LOWNES. Can any of your readers inform me whether 
C. Lownes, who engraved "A New Plan of Boston Harbor," etc., 
which appears in the Pennsylvania Magazine for June, 1775, is the same 
person as Caleb Lownes, the author of ' ' Account of the Gaol and Peni- 
tentiary House of Philadelphia, and of the Interior Management thereof. 
Philadelphia, 1793," and "An account of the Alteration and Present 
State of the Penal Laws of Pennsylvania. Boston, 1799" ? 

CHARLES HENRY HART. 



JBooh IRottces. 

MINUTES AND LETTERS OF THE C<ETUS OF THE GERMAN REFORMED 
CONGREGATIONS IN PENNSYLVANIA 1747-1792, TOGETHER 
WITH THREE PRELIMINARY REPORTS OF REV. JOHN PHILIP 
BOEHM, 1734-1744. Edited by Rev. J. I. Good, D.D., and Rev. 
W. J. Hinke. Philadelphia, 1903. 8vo, pp. 463. 
The documents published in this volume have been collected in 

Holland and America, and are all that remain of the official papers of 



124 Notes and Queries. 

the Ccetus of the German Reformed congregations in Pennsylvania 
between 1747 and 1792. They give us important data relating to the 
activity of its ministers, and throw considerable light upon the religious, 
social, and political life of the members of the church. As a contribu- 
tion to the religious history of the State they are valuable and in- 
structive. The first German Reformed congregation organized in the 
Province was at Goshenhoppen, by the Rev. Henry Goetschy, who also 
itinerated through the district of country now comprised in the counties 
of Montgomery, Chester, Berks, Lehigh, and Lebanon. Well-known 
ministers were Revs. George Michael Weiss, John Bartholomew Rueger, 
and John Peter Miller, who had been students at Heidelberg ; but the 
latter, after a service of about five years at Tulpehocken, united with 
the Seventh-Day Baptists at Ephrata. The Rev. John Philip Boehm 
was evidently the first to introduce "gemeinschaftliche Kirche" (a 
church held jointly by two denominations), which are still to be met 
with in rural districts. A number of his reports, 1734-1744, contain 
many facts which will prove of general interest. The collection of 
these documents has been attended by considerable labor and expense, 
and we are indebted to the zeal and liberality of Rev. J. I. Good, 
D.D., assisted by Rev. Professor W. J. Hinke, for their being made 
accessible to the public. 

THE PHILADELPHIA NATIONAL BANK. A CENTURY'S RECORD, 1803- 

1903. By A Stockholder. 8vo, pp. 220. 

The Philadelphia Bank originated at a meeting held in the office 
of that distinguished merchant and citizen, John Welsh, in August, 
1803, and on September 9 its doors were opened for the transaction ot 
business, on the south side of Chestnut Street, between Third Street 
and Hudson's Alley. From here it removed to the -Gothic building 
on Fourth Street, below Chestnut, next to the southwest corner of 
Fourth and Chestnut Streets, and since 1859 it has continued business 
in the present banking-house on Chestnut Street, opposite the United 
States Custom-House. For a century, therefore, the- bank has been 
located in the vicinity of Fourth and Chestnut Streets, and during that 
long period it has had but seven presidents. The history of the bank 
(its growth and connections with the great events that have made up 
the financial history of the nation, State, and city) has been traced 
with care, and it begins its second century with the best wishes of its 
friends and patrons and the confidence of the entire community. As 
a contribution to our local history it is also most acceptable. The book 
is liberally illustrated, well printed,- and attractively bound. 

ROBERT MORRIS, PATRIOT AND FINANCIER. By Ellis Paxson Ober- 
holtzer, Ph.D. The Macmillan Company, New York, 1903. 
Large 12mo. $3,00, net. Illustrated. 

This is a biography of one of the great men of the Revolution and the 
early days of the United States, and is of more than ordinary interest 
and importance. It is, for the most part, founded on the new material 
derived from the Morris manuscripts recently acquired by the Library 
of Congress, comprising, among others, his diary covering his entire term 
as Superintendent of Finance, and private and official letter-books 
down to 1798. Dr. Oberholtzer has also devoted much time to col- 
lecting information from other sources, and his biography of the man, 



Notes and Queries. 125 

whose splendid services to his country through its financial straits are a 
matter of history, will arouse fresh interest. Robert Morris has here- 
tofore been allowed to suffer undeserved neglect by historians and biog- 
raphers. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

Vol. II. No. 3. 1903. 8vo, pp. 200. 

This volume is made up of the Register of St. Mary's Church, Bur- 
lington, New Jersey, 1703-1836; Inscriptions in Saint Paul's Church 
and Church-yard, Philadelphia, with a Plan of the Church-yard (the 
congregation was organized in June of 1760) ; Inscriptions in the 
Church-yard of the Church of the Epiphany, at the corner of Fifteenth 
and Chestnut Streets. The property was sold, and in the winter of 
1894-95 the bodies were removed. The eleventh annual report, with a 
list of the officers and a very full index of names, completes another 
valuable contribution to local history and genealogy through the medium 
of this Society. 

PARTIAL GENEALOGY OF THE SELLERS AND WAMPOLE FAMILIES OF 
PENNSYLVANIA. By Edwin Jaquett Sellers. Philadelphia, 1903. 
8vo, pp. 139. Illustrated. Edition 150 copies. 
As the title indicates, we are given genealogies of the compiler's 
family, prepared with the same care and systematic arrangement which 
are found in his other works. The biographical matter relating to the 
late David Wampole Sellers, Esq. , is a worthy memorial to an eminent 
citizen and one of the leaders of the Philadelphia bar. The work is 
well printed and bound. 

STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF THE FEDERAL CONVENTION OF 1787, 
by Professor John Franklin Jameson, of the University of Chicago, re- 
printed from the Report of the American Historical Association for 
1902, has been received. The following is a list of the papers com- 
prising the series : Letters from the Federal Convention ; Letters not 
heretofore printed ; List of Letters in Print ; the Text of the Virginia 
Plan ; the Text of the Pinckney Plan ; the Text of the New Jersey 
Plan ; the Text of Hamilton's Plan ; the Wilson Drafts for the Com- 
mittee of Detail ; Members who did not sign ; the Action of the States ; 
Journals and Debates of the State Conventions. The annotations are 
valuable to all interested in the subject, and have been prepared with 
the care and research for which the author enjoys so distinguished a 
reputation. 

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & Co. are issuing, in illustrated form, a large 
paper edition of John Fiske's "Dutch and Quaker Colonies," which 
will commend itself to book-lovers and collectors. The edition is 
limited. 

WYOMING COMMEMORATIVE ASSOCIATION. We have received the 
Report of the Proceedings of the Wyoming Commemorative Association 
on the occasion of the one hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
battle and massacre of Wyoming, held July 3, 1903. The commemora- 
tive address was made by William Elliot Griffis, D.D., L.H.D., of 
Ithaca, New York : ' ' The History and Mythology of Sullivan's Expedi- 



126 -Notes and Queries. 

tion." The expedition of General Sullivan into Central and Western 
New York to destroy the power of the Iroquois confederacy, in 1779, 
was authorized by Congress and planned by Washington. Its impor- 
tance and influence were recognized at the time, for it paralyzed the 
Indians and stopped flank and rear attacks on Washington's army. 

A HISTORY or WILKESBARRE, LUZERNE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, 
from its first beginnings to the present time, including chapters of newly 
discovered early Wyoming Valley history, together with many bio- 
graphical sketches and much genealogical data, by Oscar J. Harvey, 
A.M., has just come from the press. It is illustrated with maps, por- 
traits, original drawings, facsimiles, and contemporary views. 

THE LIFE OF HORACE BINNEY, WITH SELECTIONS FROM HIS LET- 
TERS. By Charles Chauncey Binney. Philadelphia, 1903. 8vo, 
pp. 460. Illustrated. 

The latest permanently valuable contribution to historical biography 
is that of the eminent lawyer, Horace Binney. He was born in Phila- 
delphia, January 4, 1780, his father, Dr. Barnabas Binney, being a 
distinguished surgeon in the hospital service during the Revolution. 
After graduating from Harvard in 1797, he read law with Jared Inger- 
soll, and was admitted to the bar in 1800, when little more than twenty 
years of age. In 1806 he was elected a member of the Legislature, but 
a year later resumed the active practice of his profession, and before 
1814 prepared six volumes of decisions of the Supreme Court of Penn- 
sylvania. In 1832 he was elected a member of the twenty-third Con- 
gress on the anti-Jackson ticket, and declined a re-election. After 
spending a year of travel in Europe, in 1837 he returned home and 
thereafter refused all professional engagements in the courts, confining 
himself to office practice, giving opinions on land titles, on trusts, on 
commercial questions, and on other abstruse subjects in every depart- 
ment of the law. His letters show how strenuously he labored for the 
preservation of the Union, and although he never expected to live to 
see the end of the conflict, his confidence in the result never wavered. 
In early life he had acquired the art and habit of study and a love for it 
which never abated, and the activity of his mind remained undi- 
minished until his death in 1875. Mr. Binney 's eminence as a lawyer 
and a churchman, the high place he held in the public esteem, and 
the remarkable influence he wielded, made him a recognized leader 
in his community. The following are some of the titles of his con- 
tributions to our legal and historical literature : 

Eulogium on William Tilghman, 1827; Speech at anti-Jackson 
Meeting at the State-House, October 20, 1832; Speech on Removal of 
Deposits, 1834 ; Speech on the Contested Election of Letcher and 
Moore, 1834; Eulogy on Life and Character of John Marshall, 1835; 
Opinion as to Trusts under Girard's Will, 1838 ; Review of the Opinion 
of the Court that the Act of March 21, 1772, entitled "An Act for 
Prevention of Frauds and Perjuries," does not apply to Trust or Equita- 
ble Estates, 1848; Correspondence and Remarks in regard to Bishop 
Doane's Signature of Name of Horace Binney as Subscriber to New 
Church Edifice in Burlington, 1849; Fundamental By-Laws and Tables 
of Rates for Revisionary Annuities and Endowments by Corporations for 
Relief of Widows and Children of Clergymen of Protestant Episcopal 



Notes and Queries. 127 

Church, 1851 ; Address at the Centennial Meeting of the Philadelphia 
Contributionship for Insurance of Houses from Loss by Fire, 1852 ; 
Reply to Part of the Report of the New Jersey Diocesan Convention on 
the Case of Bishop Doane, 1852 ; The Case of Rt. Rev. Henry U. On- 
derdonk, D.D., stated and considered with Reference to his Continued 
Suspension, 1853 ; The Alienegense of W. S. under the Present Natural- 
ization Laws, 1853 ; Obituary of Horace Binney Wallace, 1853 ; Re- 
marks of Bar of Philadelphia on Deaths of Charles Chauncey and John 
Sergeant, 1853 ; Opinion of Horace Binney upon the Jurisdiction of 
the Coroner, 1853 ; Reply to Bishop Meade's Second Pamphlet and to 
Bishop Hopkins's Letter on the Case of Bishop Onderdonk, 1854; A 
Review of Bishop Meade's Counter-Statement of the Case of Bishop 
Onderdonk, 1854 ; The Law of Suspension of the Clergy in the Primi- 
tive, 1855, and Supplement, 1855; Sketch of Bushrod Washington, 
1858 ; An Inquiry into the Formation of Washington's Farewell Ad- 
dress, 1859; Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus under the Con- 
stitution, 1862; Second Part, 1862; Third Part, 1865; The Leaders 
of the Old Bar of Philadelphia, 1866. 

The book is from the press of the J. B. Lippincott Company, and is 
beautifully printed. 

WILLIAM PEPPER, M.D., LL.D. (1843-1898), ELEVENTH PROVOST 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. By Francis Newton 
Thorpe, Ph.D. Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1903. 
8vo, over 500 pages. Illustrated. $3.50, net. 

Dr. William Pepper, as one of the most widely known educators and 
able men of affairs in this country during the last twenty years, furnishes 
in his life and achievements a subject of more than usual biographical 
interest. His character and example were both distinctly stimulating, 
and this story of his life makes broad appeal to those instincts and am- 
bitions which are pre-eminently the possession of the best type of suc- 
cessful Americans. The biographer, Professor Francis Newton Thorpe, 
for many years a member of the faculty of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, enjoyed the confidence and friendship of Dr. Pepper. Knowing 
the relations which had long existed between the two men, Dr. Pepper's 
family placed his private papers in Professor Thorpe's hands ; the result 
is this fitting memorial to the distinguished physician, educator, and 
citizen whose life it records. 

Dr. Pepper died in California in July, 1898. His services and his 
reputation as a physician became world-wide before he was forty-five 
years of age. As provost of the University of Pennsylvania he trans- 
formed that venerable school into an institution of national reputation 
and influence. He entered the college as a freshman in 1858, and con- 
tinued in the University as student, professor in medicine, and provost 
just forty years. In education, in civic affairs, in archaeology, in the com- 
mercial museums, in University Extension, in the Free Public Library, 
he inaugurated and directed vast interests, the value of which to the 
public increases with the years. 

But, after all, it is the heroism, the personal character, which interests 
us most deeply. Few men have possessed the graces and charm of 
manner which distinguished Dr. Pepper. Deeply busied as he was 
with a multiplicity of interests, a vast private practice, the inaugura- 
tion and direction of many public works, nothing that he touched or 



128 Notes and Queries. 

created or gave new life to can be so interesting as the man himself. 
His life reveals Dr. Pepper the man. It portrays him in his habits as 
he was in the city of his birth and of his work. 

A HISTORY OF BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA, 1741-1892. By Rt. 

Rev. J. Mortimer Levering. Bethlehem, 1903. Times Publishing 

Company. 

A sesquicentennial edition of the history of this old Moravian town 
has just been issued, containing 825 pages of letter-press, reproductions 
of letters and documents of Colonial and Revolutionary periods, and 
numerous half-tone illustrations of rare, quaint, and interesting views. 

A NEW DISCOVERY OF A VAST COUNTRY IN AMERICA. By Father 
Louis Hennepin. With Introduction, Notes, and an Analytical 
Index by Reuben Gold Thwaites. 2 vols., 8vo. Chicago, A. C. 
McClurg & Company. Illustrations and Maps. $6.00, net. 
These volumes of Friar Hennepin, the Recollect missionary, describ- 
ing his travels in North America over two centuries ago, have always 
been the subject of controversy, largely through his claim of priority 
over La Salle in exploring the river Mississippi to its mouth, whereas it 
is now well established that our friar's trip was up that river, from the 
mouth of the Illinois to the Falls of St. Anthony. From his youth 
Hennepin was possessed of a passion for worldly adventure, and, not- 
withstanding his work is filled with exaggerations and self-glorifica- 
tions, yet he was enterprising and courageous, possessed powers of keen 
observation, and his geographical and ethnographical descriptions are 
so valuable a contribution to the sources of American history that they 
deserve study. 

Undoubtedly this is one of the most interesting and valuable reprints 
made in many years, and the introduction by Mr. Thwaites, whose 
eminence as an authority on all matters connected with the history of 
the West is so well known, is a fitting prelude to the friar's narratives 
of exploration and adventure. The editor has also added many val- 
uable notes, and Mr. Paltsits contributes a new bibliography of Hen- 
nepin. The title-pages of the original edition and the illustrations and 
maps are given in facsimile. The work is an exact reprint of the Lon- 
don edition of 1698, and has been printed on extra quality soft-laid 
paper from large, clear type, admirably adapted to its character. In 
addition to the library edition, a limited numbered special large paper 
edition has been made. 



THE 

PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 

OP 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 

VOL. XXYI1L 1904. No. 2. 



SKETCH OF JOHN INSKEEP, MAYOR, AND PRESI- 
DENT OF THE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH 
AMERICA, PHILADELPHIA. 

BY HENRY EDWARD WALLACE, JR. 

John Inskeep, the second son of Abraham and Sarah 
(Ward) Inskeep, was born January 29, 1757, on the original 
family homestead near Marlton, New Jersey. He was 
descended from the Inskeeps of Staffordshire, England. 
His grandfather, John Inskeep, emigrated to America in 
the spring of 1708, with his wife Mary, his sons John, 
James, and Joseph, his daughter Mary, and his sister Ann. 
Abraham, a fourth son, and the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in New Jersey. The pioneer of the 
family was a man of means and education, and in 1713 was 
commissioned a justice of the peace, and a judge in 1724, 
which latter office he held until 1729, the year of his death. 1 

Abraham Inskeep, the youngest son of Judge John 
Inskeep, inherited from his father, and by the subsequent 
death of his brother Joseph, 2 the original homestead, where 
he carried on his business of blacksmith and wheelwright, 

1 Court Records, Woodbury, N. J. 

2 New Jersey Wills, Lib. 8, 362. 

VOL. xxviii. 9 ( 129 ) 



130 Sketch of John Inskeep. 

and died in 1780, leaving for distribution an estate of 
15,999.05 N". J. cy. 1 The family were attached to the 
Church of England, and assisted in the establishment of 
the churches of that faith in old Gloucester County. 

The education of John Inskeep was probably received at 
the school of John Campbell, who was established in his 
scholastic labors at Marlton. Whether or not John Inskeep 
was taught a trade, research has failed to reveal, but he 
doubtless spent many of his boyhood hours in the shop of 
his father, where his eldest brother Abraham, later a judge 
for Gloucester County, served his apprenticeship. 

As John Inskeep approached manhood the pro-Revolu- 
tionary discussion increased with his increasing years and 
burst into active hostilities before he reached his twenty- 
first. Filled with patriotic ardor, he decided to take an 
active part in the struggle, and such was his father's position 
and influence in the community that, when in his nineteenth 
year, he was commissioned a lieutenant 2 in the Second Bat- 
talion of Gloucester County militia, under Captain Joseph 
Matlack. This command was authorized by Act of Pro- 
vincial Congress, in the summer of 1776, for the protection 
of Burlington and Gloucester Counties. He served five 
months and twelve days. He enlisted again in December 
of the same year, and for two months and eight days served 
as a private in Colonel Benjamin Randolph's command. 
At the expiration of this term of service he again enlisted 
and served as quartermaster of Colonel Hillman's command 
for six months and two days. Three other terms of service 
followed (October and December, 1777, and April, 1778), 
being almost nine months, during which period he served 
as commissary, and his final enlistment was in January, 
1780, when he again served as commissary for nearly four 
months. He took part in the battle of Princeton and other 
engagements, but his principal service was in those depart- 
ments which required the executive ability he was so well 

1 New Jersey Wills, Lib. 21, 293. 

2 Stryker also gives him the rank of captain of this company. 



Sketch of John Inskeep. 131 

endowed with, and which he showed to such a marked 
degree in his subsequent business and political career in 
Philadelphia. 1 

It was during his services in the Revolutionary struggle 
that he was married, at Gloucester, New Jersey, to Sarah 
Hulings, but at what period he removed to Philadelphia is 
not known, nor is his first venture in business; it was, 
however, after his father's estate was settled in May, 1780, 
and his last service in the army had expired. In 1785 he 
became proprietor of the George Tavern, at the southwest 
corner of Second and Mulberry (Arch) Streets, the starting- 
point of the New York stage, which " sets off precisely at 
half-past 8 o'clock in the morning, and on Saturday at 
6 o'clock, and arrives at New York the succeeding day by 
1 o'clock." 

In 1794 he re-entered the mercantile business as a china 
and glassware merchant at No. 31 South Second Street, and 
in 1799 began his public career as an alderman in place of 
John Barclay, 2 and, by virtue of this office, was a member 
of the Mayor's Court, established by the Constitution of 
1789 and abolished by Act of Assembly of March 19, 1838. 

On October 21, 1800, John Inskeep was elected mayor 
of the city by the Councils, after Robert Wharton, who had 
been re-elected, declined to accept the office. During his 
incumbency of this office the city made great strides in 
progress and improvements, and almost the first official act 
of the new mayor was the laying of the foundation-stone, 
on October 23, of the first bridge across the Schuylkill, at 
Market Street, which was being built by the Permanent 
Bridge and Ferry Company, incorporated April 27, 1798. 
In November of the same year was put into operation the 
new method of computation in dollars and cents, instead of, 
as hitherto, in pounds, shillings, and pence. Another move- 
ment for the advancement of the mercantile interests of the 
city was the organization in January, 1801, of the Chamber 
of Commerce, with Thomas Fitzsimons, president ; John 
1 Pension Records. * Martin's Bench and Bar. 



132 Sketch of John Inskeep. 

Craig and Philip Mecklin, vice-presidents; and Robert 
Smith, secretary. The early meetings of the organization, 
of which the mayor was a member, were held at the City 
Tavern. 

In January also the Centre Square engine for the newly 
perfected water supply was put in motion, the mayor and 
members of the two Councils attending the ceremonies. 
By the close of the year the new works supplied sixty-three 
houses, four breweries, one sugar refinery, and thirty-seven 
hydrants. 

Other permanent and public benefactions were the incor- 
poration of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and PerMomen 
Turnpike Company; the first public baths, owned by M. 
Simon, on Third Street, above Arch ; the beginning of the 
Navy- Yard in South wark ; the occupation of its new build- 
ing by the Bank of Pennsylvania ; the incorporation of the 
Philadelphia Society for the Free Instruction of Indigent 
Boys, made possible by a bequest of $8000 under the will 
of Christopher Ludwig ; and the organization of the Phila- 
delphia Premium Society, instituted for the purpose of 
fostering American industry by giving premiums for im- 
provements in arts and manufactures. 

In the political world, the election of Jefferson, and his 
inauguration, were celebrated with parades, public dinners, 
and ox-roasts. The making of local nominations by ward 
committees in conference or convention may be noted. One 
party adopted this plan in June, and the Federal Repub- 
licans at a meeting held at Dunwoody's Tavern, October 6, 
of which John Inskeep was chairman and Charles Chauncey 
secretary. A new election district Schuylkill was erected 
from Blockley and Kingsessing, and the city and county of 
Philadelphia and county of Delaware made one district, to 
choose four State Senators, Philadelphia sending five and 
the county six Representatives to the Assembly. 

During John Inskeep's first term as mayor he was elected 
one of the trustees of the Mutual Assurance Company for 
the Insurance of Houses from Loss by Fire, and this marks 



Sketch of John Inskeep. 133 

the beginning of his connection in that line of business 
with his mercantile pursuits. His first term as mayor 
expired October 20, 1801, when he resumed the active 
management of his business. 

The following year, 1802, he was elected a director of the 
Insurance Company of North America, and re-elected a 
trustee of the Mutual Assurance Company ; both positions 
he retained until his death. At the same time he continued 
his business as a china and glassware merchant, which he 
did not altogether relinquish until the year after his second 
term as mayor. 

His withdrawal from public life was of short duration, 
for on May 21, 1802, he was commissioned one of the As- 
sociate Judges of the Common Pleas. The duties of this 
office he performed until his resignation, March 1, 1805. 
The most interesting of his official acts in his judicial 
capacity was the issuance of a writ of habeas corpus at the 
instance of Isaac T. Hopper, in behalf of the Abolition 
Society, for a slave named " Ben," the property of the elder 
Pierce Butler, a Senator from South Carolina, who was 
then living in Philadelphia. When the case came before 
Judge Inskeep, Mr. Butler said that the man who served 
the writ must be either deaf or crazy. "Ah," said the 
Court, with a smile, " you don't know Mr. Hopper as well 
as we do." The decision was against Butler, who fought 
the case for more than two years afterwards, only to have 
the opinion of the lower court affirmed. 

On Tuesday, October 15, 1805, John Inskeep was again 
elected mayor by the Councils, polling 23 votes to 2 for 
Matthew Lawler, his opponent. When he entered on the 
duties of his office Southwark was just mastering another 
epidemic of yellow fever, which had begun the previous 
July, and the mayor's office was removed to the former 
aldermen's room in the City Hall. In December an ordi- 
nance was passed increasing the mayor's salary from $1000 
to $2000 per annum, to commence from the beginning of 
his term. 



134 Sketch of John Inskeep. 

National politics was in a quiescent state, but patriotic 
feeling was greatly aroused over the successful outcome of 
the Tripolitan war ; public dinners to General Eaton, Cap- 
tain Stephen Decatur, and other officers were the order of 
the day. 

Local partisan politics was the cause of a " tempest in a 
teapot" over the renting of two of the city wharves. Some 
of the newspapers accused the mayor of corrupt methods 
in their lease, and he finally addressed a letter to Councils 
setting forth the charges and his answer, backed by affidavits 
of those present at all the transactions. 

A practical reorganization of the Fire Department was 
effected both in apportioning sites for the homes for the 
companies and in the system of alarms, brought about by a 
continuous agitation on the part of the citizens. This, 
however, did not prevent one of the most destructive fires 
the city had experienced, which occurred on Friday, May 9, 
the fire starting in a wooden building back of Dock Street, 
near the Banks of the United States and Pennsylvania, 
and destroying twenty-two houses and damaging ten others. 
A number of people were killed and forty-two families 
rendered destitute. A town meeting, over which John 
Inskeep presided, appointed committees to solicit subscrip- 
tions for the relief of the sufferers, and over $3000 were 
distributed to them. 

Among the prominent citizens who died were Robert 
Morris, Chief-Justice Edward Shippen, and Charles Pettit. 
The latter was president of the Insurance Company of 
North America, and John Inskeep was elected by the Board 
of Directors to fill the vacancy. His second term as mayor 
expired October 21, 1806, and with it his political life as an 
office-holder. 

His entire time was now given to the affairs of the insur- 
ance company, and his conduct of its business was so suc- 
cessful that in July, 1824, the Board of Directors voted him 
a set of silver plate valued at $500, as an acknowledgment 
of his services in procuring the reimbursement of the claims 



Sketch of John Inskeep. 135 

under the Spanish treaty, which netted to the stockholder* 
a dividend of sixty per cent. 

In 1831 failing health caused him to withdraw from busi- 
ness, and he also resigned the presidency of the insurance 
company, the directors at the time voting him an annuity 
" until otherwise ordered," which was terminated by his 
death on Thursday, December 18, 1834. 

His funeral services were held from the house of his son- 
in-law, Samuel Brooks, and his body was interred in Christ 
Church burying-ground at Fifth and Arch Streets, of which 
church he had long been an active member. 

In his will, dated December 16, 1833, he directs that his 
plate be divided equally between his four surviving children, 
Abraham H., Abigail Bradford, Eliza Brooks, and Ann 
Inskeep ; that his widow, Sarah, is to receive the income of 
his estate for life, and then to be divided among his four 
children, with a married woman's trust for Abigail, and her 
share after her death to her two daughters Caroline and 
Mary. His son-in-law Samuel Brooks and grandson Charles 
8. Bradford were appointed executors. 

His only other child John had died in New Orleans 
in 1820. In 1812 he had purchased a partnership in the 
book-publishing business of Samuel F. Bradford, his son-in- 
law, for this son, which was continued until 1816. They 
kept a large bookselling establishment on the west side of 
Third Street, below Market, and among the works they 
published were Rees's " Cyclopaedia" and Porter's " Cruise 
of the Essex." John, Jr., afterwards entered the ministry, 
and died from the prevailing (at that time) malignant fever 
at New Orleans. 



136 1 homos Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 



LETTEES OF THOMAS JEFFEESON TO CHAELES 
WILLSON PEALE, 1796-1825. 

BY HORACE W. SELLERS. 

MONTICELLO, June 5th, 1796. 
DEAR SIR : 

I have received a proposition from Europe which may 
perhaps be turned to account for the enlargement of your 
Museum. The hereditary prince of Parma, a young man 
of letters, is 22 years of age, lately married to a daughter of 
the K. of Spain, is desirous of augmenting his cabinet of 
natural history by an addition of all the American subjects 
of the 3 departments of nature, and will give those of 
Europe which can be procured or of which he has duplicates 
in exchange perhaps it would suit you to enter into this 
kind of commerce if so, be so good as to inform me by 
letter how far you would choose to enter into the exchange : 
I defer writing my answer to him until I hear from you 
the intervention of the Spanish minister at Philadelphia 
would sometimes perhaps be used ; sometimes perhaps my 
own ; and shipments could be made to and from Genoa & 
Leghorn. I am with great esteem, Dear Sir, 

Your friend & servant, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, February 21st, 1801. 
DEAR SIR : 

I have to thank you for a copy of your introductory lecture 
received some time since, & not before acknowledged for 
want of time. I have read it with great pleasure, and 
lament that while I have been so near to your valuable col- 
lection, occupations much less pleasing to me have always 
put it out of my power to avail myself of it. May I ask the 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 137 

favor of you to present my request to your son that he would 
be so good as to make a copy of the portrait he took of me, 
and of same size ? It is intended for a friend who has ex- 
pressed a wish for it ; and when ready I will give directions 
to whom it shall be delivered if he will be so good as to 
drop me a line mentioning it and the price. I am with 
great and affectionate esteem, Dear Sir 

Your friend & servant, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

P.S. Only the inner frame will be necessary. 

0. W. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, July 29th, 1801. 
DEAR SIR : 

I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of June 
29th and July 25th to congratulate you on the prospect you 
have of obtaining a complete skeleton of the great incog- 
nitum, and the world on there being a person at the critical 
moment of the discovery who has zeal enough to devote 
himself to the recovery of these great animal monuments. 
Mr. Smith, the Secretary of the Navy will give orders im- 
mediately on the Navy agent at New York to lend you a 
pump. The same gentleman acting in the war-office instead 
of General Dearbourne who is absent, will give an order to 
General Irvine at Philadelphia to lend you a couple of 
tents. It has been a great mortification to me to find myself 
in such a state as to be unable to come forward and assist 
you in resources for this enterprise ; but the outfit of my 
office has been so amazingly heavy as to place me under 
greater pecuniary restraints for a while than I ever experi- 
enced. I trust they will not continue so long but that I shall 
be able to throw in my contribution before you will cease 
to want it. I set out tomorrow morning for Monticello to 
pass there the months of August and September. Whenever 
your skeleton is mounted, I will certainly pay it a visit. 
Accept assurances of my great esteem and attachment. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE. 



138 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

WASHINGTON, January 16th, 1802. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received last night your favor of the 12th instant. No 
person on earth can entertain a higher idea than I do of the 
value of your collection nor give you more credit for the 
unwearied perseverance and skill with which you have 
prosecuted it, and I very much wish it could be made public 
property, but as to the question whether I think that the U. 
S. would encourage or provide for the establishment of your 
Museum here ? I must not suffer my partiality to it to ex- 
cite false expectations in you, which might eventually be 
disappointed. You know that one of the great questions 
which has decided political opinion in this country is whether 
Congress is authorized by the constitution to apply the public 
money to any but the purposes specially enumerated in the 
constitution ? those who hold them to the enumeration, 
have always denied that Congress has any power to establish 
a National Academy. Some who are of this opinion, still 
wish Congress had power to favor science, and that an 
amendment should be proposed to the constitution, giving 
them such power specifically, if there were an union of 
opinion that Congress already possessed the right, I am 
persuaded the purchase of your Museum would be the first 
object on which it would be exercised, but I believe the 
opinion of a want of power to be that of the majority of the 
legislature. 

I have for a considerable time been meditating a plan of 
a general university for the state of Virginia, on the most 
extensive and liberal scale that our circumstances would call 
for and our faculties meet were this established, I should 
have made your Museum an object of the establishment, but 
the moment is not arrived for proposing this with a hope of 
success. I imagine therefore the legislature of your own 
state furnishes at present the best prospect. I am much 
pleased at the success which has attended your labors on 
the Mammoth. I understand you have not the frontal 
bone, if this be so, I have heard of one in the western 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 139 

country which I could and would get for you, on this I 
need your information. I shall certainly pay your labors a 
visit, but when, heaven knows. Accept my friendly saluta- 
tion and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

CHARLES "W. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, May 5th, 1802. 
DEAR SIR : 

I am this moment setting out on a short visit to Monti- 
cello, but a thought coming into my head which may be 
useful to your son who is carrying the Mammoth to Europe, 
I take time to hint it to you. My knowledge of the scene 
he will be on enables me to suggest what might not occur 
to him a stranger. When in a great City he will find persons 
of every degree of wealth, to jumble all these into a room to- 
gether I know from experience is very painful to the decent 
part of them, who would be glad to see a thing often, & 
would not regard paying every time but that they revolt at 
being mixed with pickpockets, chimney sweeps etc. Set 
three different divisions of the day therefore at three differ- 
ent prices, selecting for the highest when the beau monde 
can most conveniently attend ; the 2nd price when merchants 
and respectable citizens have most leisure, and the residue 
for the lower description. A few attending at the highest 
price will countervail many of the lowest and be more agree- 
able to themselves and to him. I hope and believe you will 
make a fortune by the exhibition of that one, and that when 
tired of shewing it you will sell it there for another fortune. 
No body wishes it more sincerely than I do. Accept my 
assurances of this and my great esteem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 3rd, 1802. 
DEAR SIR : 

Immediately on the receipt of your favor of Oct. 28th, 
I wrote to a friend of mine, Mr. Michael Bowyer, who owns 
and resides at the Sweet Springs, on the subject of the bones 
you mention as lately found in a cave of Greenbriar county, 



140 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

and which are probably of the Megalonyx. I observed to 
him that I had learned that the finder was preparing to send 
them to you; that if that was done, it was all that was 
desired, but if not done I begged he would procure & pack 
them securely in a box, and forward them by water, to wit, 
down James River to Messrs. Gibson & Jefferson merchants 
at Richmond, whom I would instruct to pay all expenses 
and forward the box on to you in Philadelphia. This I am 
in hopes will secure them to you, and I am happy in every 
occasion wherein I can render you a service. The newly 
found half head of the Mammoth being under the view of 
Doctor Samuel Brown, cannot be placed in a better channel. 

I am happy to hear of your son's safe arrival in London ; 
the first moments are always the most difficult, but I have 
no doubt the first information you shall receive after the 
exhibition shall be opened, will be as favorable as you can 
expect. In the meantime let us omit no opportunity of 
completing the skeleton you possess. Perhaps it would not 
be amiss to publish a list of the bones you already have, 
and of those wanting as far as may be presumed of an 
animal whose structure we do not yet actually and fully 
know. 

Accept assurances of my great esteem and best wishes, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. C. W. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 7th. 
DEAR SIR: 

Your favor of December 23rd was duly received, and I 
am in hopes the Polygraph got safe to hand & that you 
found it in good condition except so much as concerned the 
writing of the upper part of the page. I believe I men- 
tioned to you in a former letter that if the one of yours 
with which I am now writing was not for your own use, I 
should be contented to retain it instead of mine, paying 
whatever it will cost to put mine into as perfectly good 
condition but this is as you please. I send a draught for 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 141 

the fund of my grandson. I mentioned to you formerly 
that I had left to his father to furnish his clothing & pocket 
money ; this was merely because were he disposed to go 
too far in these, I had rather the restraint should move 
from his father than myself, but the moderation he has 
proved, and the disposition to devote himself to his stud- 
ies rather than to frequent dissipated or expensive company, 
renders all distinction of funds in future unnecessary, & 
particularly that those I furnish will be open to all his 
wants. I salute with friendship and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
C. W. PEALB. 

WASHINGTON, February 27th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR : 

Mr. Latrobe promised a few days ago to write to you to 
have me furnished with a polygraph of two pens, and that 
his experience would enable him to give some directions 
about it which would be useful. He was to desire particu- 
larly that there should be a drawer in each end, without any 
partitions in the drawers, because I would have them made 
here to suit my own convenience. I should also prefer the 
fountain ink-pots by which I mean those made thus [design] 
their best size is of about If in. diameter or square. 

Mr. Latrobe informs me you have one of Brunelle's poly- 
graphs procured by your son Rembrandt while in London. 
I am afraid I shall be thought unreasonable in asking your 
permission to see it here, and yet I am persuaded that if 
packed in an external box and directed to me it would come 
by the stage in perfect safety, & especially if under the care 
of some person who should be coming here. Trial alone 
can enable one to estimate new and curious inventions. 
Perhaps you can also inform me what such an one costs in 
London should I like it well enough to send for one, and to 
whom I should address myself there. If you can venture 
yours here, it shall be returned at any date you fix and 
under my guarantee as to loss or injury coming & going. 



142 Thomas Je/erson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

Accept my friendly salutations and assurances of great es- 
teem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, Mar. 1, 1804. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received last night your favor of the 26th and thank you 
for the pen accompanying it, which seems to perform well. 
I had written to you on the 27th ult. on the subject of the 
Polygraph. The reduction of the size which you propose 
for a future trial would certainly be a great improvement, 
its present great bulk being disagreeable. I observe too 
that after one has adjusted the pens by the gage, one of them 
will require to be a little moved by trial to make them write 
with equal strength, this being to be done by moving the pen 
by hand in its sheath, it is pushed or pulled too much and is 
deranged. Were there still an interior sheath for the pen 
which screwed by a few threads only into the present sheath 
which would then be the middle one a single turn or half 
turn would adjust it perfectly, and the pen and two screwed 
sheaths be still withdrawn from the outer one for mending 
as easily as at present, but you will probably think of a better 
way. I sincerely wish you success in the new institution 
you now meditate as well as in everything else you undertake. 
By the immense collection of treasures contained in your 
Museum you have deserved well of your country, and laid 
a foundation for their ever cherishing your memory. Accept 
my friendly salutations and assurances of great esteem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
CHARLES W. PEALE, ESQ. 

Thomas Jefferson presents his salutations to Mr. Peale. 
He received last night his favor of the 5th. He will leave 
this place for Monticello a fortnight hence, and will be ab- 
sent 5 or 6 weeks, which he mentions now because as the 
Polygraphs will arrive after his departure his acknowledg- 
ment of their reception and his return of Brunelle's cannot 
be till his return to this place in May. 

WASHINGTON, March 9th, 1804. 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1885. 143 

WASHINGTON, March 30th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

Tomorrow I set out for Monticello, and very fortunately 
I received last night the two polygraphs. This morning I 
tried them. I was charmed with the ingenuity and beauti- 
ful workmanship of Brunell's, and proportionally mortified 
on trial to find I could not produce a copy of a single letter 
distinct, although I perfectly understood the action of all 
its parts, and saw that there was nothing deranged in the 
least except perhaps that the pen frames did not hang ex- 
actly in the same vertical. I gave it up therefore as a beau- 
tiful bagatelle, and I have repacked it, and with the one 
which Mr. Latrobe lent me have desired Mr. Barnes, my 
agent here, to send them by the first safe vessel to Phila- 
delphia, paying their freight here. To him also be so good 
as to address a note of the cost of the one of yours which 
you have sent me, and he will immediately remit it. With 
this one I am now writing. I find it considerably improved 
on that of Mr. Latrobe ; but it is exceedingly stiff'; I am 
afraid to attempt to remedy this by loosening the screws at 
the joints. Indeed I suspect the stiffness proceeds from the 
great strength of the long spiral cord. The greatest desider- 
atum in it is the adjusting screw, for after setting the pens 
by the gage, they still want a hair's breadth adjustment 
which it is difficult to make by the hand. Brunell's has 
that screw. I like your idea of making them not to shut 
up as a box, but to lie in one piece on the table and have 
a movable lid to cover it, the gallows being fixed. I think 
in this way it might be reduced 4 inches one way and 6 or 
8 I. the other. The great surface it occupies is very objec- 
tionable, as the smallness of Brunell's is one of its beauties. 
Should any other criticisms on it occur on further trial I 
will communicate them according to your desire, it being 
easier to object than solve. Accept my salutations & best 
wishes. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 



144 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

MONTICELLO, April 23rd, 1804. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your Polygraph gave me so much satisfaction that I 
thought it worth while to bestow some time in contriving 
one entirely suited to my own convenience. It was there- 
fore the subject of my meditations on the road, and on my 
arrival here I made the drawings which I now send you. I 
have adopted your idea of having it in the form of a desk 
to sit on one's writing table, and not that of a box to shut 
up. I have reduced the size, by getting rid of all useless 
space, which was chiefly the margins on the outside of the 
machinery; but as I had not yours present, it is possible 
the reduction especially in the north and south dimension, 
may be greater than can be admitted without reducing the 
size of the parallelograms, on the space they work in, neither 
of which would I venture to do, lest it might injure the 
action of the machinery, for I well know that hypothesis is 
one thing and experience another. If therefore I have not 
given as much field for the parallelograms to move on, as 
they have in yours, my drawings must be altered in that 
particular. As I know the principal defect in yours is the 
liableness of the writing bed under the brass frame, to warp, 
I have here suggested a method of guarding against that, 
without resorting to slate. In this I have very considerable 
faith; but these triangular boards, with the necessary 
breadth of the drawer (from which not an hair's breadth 
can be spared) by pinching the two side pieces in two, leave 
not, I am afraid, a sufficient bond between the fore and the 
aft part. The bottom board to be sure offers a considerable 
means of binding them together ; so would the top board 
which forms the bed under the parallelograms, if clamped 
to the triangular boards with thin plates of iron screwed on. 
It would be important in this case that the grain of the top 
and bottom boards should run north and south. Should 
this not be a strong enough connection, then by letting the 
triangular board opposite the separation of the drawers run 
through to the back it might form the spine and main 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1895. 145 

strength of the whole machine, and would only add one 
inch to the dimension from east to west, making it 20 in. 
instead of 23 in. Should I also have made it so short from 
north to south (to wit 23 in.) as not to leave as much room 
for the play of the parallelograms as yours have, BO that it 
may be necessary to enlarge it in that direction, then, by 
keeping the breadth and height of the drawers to what I have 
drawn them, the side pieces will not be so nearly pinched 
in two and will be considerable strengthners of the junction 
of the fore and aft parts. In some, or all of these ways, or 
better which will occur to yourself or your workman, this 
difficulty may be perhaps got over. Instead of the cover 
sliding over the machinery in a semicircle as you propose 
which including unnecessary space would look too bulky, I 
have proposed a light cover to take off and on, which you 
will see described. The screw for adjusting one of the pens, 
(the right hand one which is most convenient for the copy- 
ing one) to a hair's breadth after it has been generally ad- 
justed by the gage, is indispensable. It will only require 3 
tubes one within the other, instead of the 2 you use. The 
outer one you know is fixed to the machinery, and the one 
within that holds the pen and lets it turn to its proper 
square for writing, but an inner one still might be inserted 
in this and have a few threads of a screw to adjust it to a 
hair's breadth, the pen being held in this inner one. In this 
case by turning the inmost tube within the middle one the 
pen would be raised or depressed by the thread of the screw, 
and by turning the middle one within the other one, it would 
be placed square with the line of writing. The outer fixed 
tube would of course have to be enlarged. 

As you were so kind as to say that when you should 
have made one on the improved plan, you would exchange 
it for the box one which you sent me, I have now to ask 
the favor of you to have one made immediately on the 
plan I have proposed, and forwarded to me at Washington 
by water. I desired Mr. Barnes to inquire of you the price 
of the former, and remit you the money which I hope he 
VOL. xjtvin. 10 



146 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

has done. Accept my friendly salutations and assurances 
of great esteem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

WASHINGTON, May 21st, 1804. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received last night your favor of the 19th and am sorry 
you have paid so much respect to my dimensions as to 
puzzle yourself with them, and still more to alter the 
writing machinery. They were meant to be entirely sub- 
ject to your correction, and they are still so. I made the 
drawing from memory, and have seen since I returned here 
and have had a polygraph under my eye that I had not left 
room enough for the horizontal rhombuses to move on. 
Whether they will perform their functions equally well if 
made only rhomboidal you will be able to judge, and to 
yourself I leave it entirely. As soon as the desk is ready I 
shall be glad to receive it, because, after trial, I shall wish 
a second and perhaps a third to be sent to Monticello in 
time to meet me there by the latter end of July. The 
danger of dislocating the machinery by the jolting of the 
stage will render a conveyance hither by water safest. 
Accept my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

P.S. Would it not be worth while to endeavor to provide 
a regulator for the degree of tension and resistance which the 
long wire cord or spiral spring shall give, so as to adapt it 
to the writer's particular hand, whether strong or weak. It 
is a too great degree of resistance of this spring in the 
polygraph I now use, which makes it very fatiguing to the 
hand, and gives a cramped and disguised appearance to the 
writing. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

WASHINGTON, June 14th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

I send you by this post the drawings for another Poly- 
graph desk. I take for its foundation that I am now 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 147 

writing on, which is indeed very nearly perfect. Wherever 
therefore I have not proposed an alteration, I wish the new 
one to be exactly as the old. I adopt exactly the same 
length and breadth of desk. The position of the writing 
machinery is left precisely the same, & the machinery 
itself. The changes are as follows : 1 the inkholders are 
moved a little higher up, and placed in a tray. 2 the 
desk is considerably shallower ; this is an essential change 
for the better. 3 the drawers are consequently shallower, 
and that for the spare ink pot and pens is independent of 
the paper drawer. 4 the ledge or rule for holding a book 
is fixed more out of the way. 5 I propose that all the locks 
shall open with the same key. Having a good desk before 
my eyes I have been able to draw the improved one without 
risking any imperfection, & would therefore now pray that 
the cabinet work may be done to a hair's breadth according 
to my drawing. Of yourself personally I have one favor 
to ask, which is to be so good as to see to the perfect 
adjustment of the pens and writing machinery, as on that 
depends the whole value of the machine, and the one now 
desired being to go into the country where we have no 
workmen, any defect or failure in it will be irremediable. 
When done I will pray you to have it well packed in a box 
perfectly watertight (as it will be exposed in an open boat 
many days going up the river) and direct it to me to the 
care of Messrs. Gibson & Jefferson, merchants, Richmond, 
shipping it for that place, and advising me of it, & to 
be done with as little delay as possible, that it may arrive 
at Monticello by the time I get there myself. I should be 
glad to have, in addition to the steel pens, cases for common 
pens which are best when one wishes to write fairer than 
common. Accept my friendly salutations and assurances 

of great esteem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

P.S. After trial of the one now desired, I shall proba- 
bly have occasion for one or two more. 
C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 



148 1 homos Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

WASHINGTON, June 20th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR 

I enclose you two essays of Mr. Burwell at my profile. 
I also enclose you the receipt of Capt. Ellwood fgr your 
Polygraph he sails this day besides that the small round 
inkpot of If diam. or square one of 1J I. and only 1 
I. deep, necessary for perfecting your machine, you will find 
it necessary to throw away the common stopper which rises 
| i. above the top of the pot, and to substitute a cork with 
a thin plate of brass and ring on the top, lying level with 
that, thus [design] the ring falling down on the top of 
the cork. You will perceive that the steel pen with which 
I write this, sheds its ink too fast. How shall I repair it 
when it gets out of order? Should you find the small 
black ink pots above described, or glass ones, I should be 
glad of a set for this polygraph by any safe opportunity. 
Accept my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

MONTICELLO, Aug. 19th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

I received two days ago the polygraph lately sent me. It 
arrived in good order except that the forked spiral spring 
which suspends the bar with the friction cylinder was 
broken. In attempting to connect it again by links it 
broke repeatedly, and tho' I succeeded at last so as to use 
it, yet it is become so short as to perform its functions 
poorly. Perhaps you could send me a new spring (for 
that portion only) by post, protecting it between two slips 
of wood or pasteboard ; the post is but 4 days from Phila- 
delphia here. 

On 5 months full trial of the Polygraph with two pens, I 
can now conscientiously declare it a most precious invention. 
Its superiority over the copying press is so decided that I 
have entirely laid aside that. I only lament it had not 
been invented 30 years sooner. I lament nothing more 
than the not having been able to preserve copies of my 
letters during the war, which to me would now have 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 149 

been a consoling possession. The alterations in the two 
polygraphs made for me are solid improvements ; and 
liking as I do to write with a quill pen rather than a steel 
one, I -value the last pencases you sent me because they 
admit by their screws so delicate an adjustment. As the 
quill pen requires to be kept in the ink, I add a latch 
behind the left standard, 3| in. long, which turns down in 
front of the top of the pen, & holds it perpendicular in the 
ink socket. "Without this the pen hangs by its point which 
crooks too much to be used. Instead too of the two large 
pannels of the cover being of mahogany, I substitute wire 
netting, which equally protects the machinery, and at the 
same time admits air and light. It is not in my power to 
inform you of the places from which the minerals came 
which I sent you, because I have forgotten the name of the 
gentleman who sent them, and therefore cannot turn to his 
letter, if ever I should recollect it, or otherwise accidentally 
find his letter, I will send it to you. Accept my friendly 
salutations and assurances of great esteem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, September 15th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your letter containing the spiral spring was received in 
due time. A mode of constructing your polygraph which 
might render it more profitable occurred to me, and as it 
took me less time to give verbal directions to my workmen 
for a model, than to make a drawing for you, I have had a 
model made which I send you by this post. It is of half 
size in all its dimensions, whence you will see that in full 
size it will not be larger than a very moderate portfolio. 
Whether any or all its parts may be of any use, you will 
judge. I was not satisfied whether the admitting the North 
side to have a sidelong motion, preserving its parallelism, 
and also a north and south motion, might not be found use- 
ful, and therefore the interior hole in the brass is made. It 



150 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

will require inkpots with effective stoppers for traveling, 
which are easily made. 

If the publication of the six lines of my letter of Aug. 
19th will be of service to you, certainly they are at your 
service, but as they were hastily and carelessly written be so 
good as to strike out " I only lament etc" to " possession," 
and insert instead of it, " I only regret it had not been in- 
vented 30 years sooner, as it would have enabled me to pre- 
serve copies of my letters during the war, which to me 
would now have been a consoling possession." Let me 
know whether the idea of the model answers and accept 
my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

ME. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, October 6th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

Your favor of September 23rd was received on my 
arrival here, and I have no doubt that between yourself 
and Mr. Hawkins the polygraph will be rendered perfect. 
For the one I have at Monticello you were so kind as to 
send me a pair of brass pen-cases with the screw top and 
for receiving the small bit of a quill pen, which I found so 
much better suited to my hand writing and so easily sus- 
ceptible of nice adjustment, that I preferred them to all 
others and find myself obliged to ask you for a pair for the 
polygraph I have here. Although I presume the fixed 
tube for receiving the pen-case is exactly alike in all the 
instruments, yet I inclose a wooden pin exactly fitting mine 
for greater security. It is better the pencase should be too 
large than too small for the tube because in the former case 
it is easily rubbed down. I salute you with friendship & 
respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, October 13, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

I have duly received your favor of the 8th, which excites 
a great curiosity in me to see Mr. Hawkins' polygraph, and 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 151 

as you say you are sending one to the Secretary of State, 
which I know to be for his office, for it was on my recom- 
mendation, I will ask the favor of you to address it to me, 
that I may have an opportunity of seeing and trying it. 
It shall then be delivered to its address, and in the mean- 
time will put me in possession of an estimate of Hawkins' 
improvements. 

I salute you with friendship and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

The two polygraphs you sent by the stage arrived in 
perfect order. The improvement in the writing apparatus 
is indeed precious. I find the pen now as light as a free 
pen. I immediately delivered to Mr. Madison the largest, 
with which he is well pleased, and I retain the smaller and 
more portable one. It pleases me extremely, and I do not 
know that I could desire an addition to it, but your screw 
pens. I do not think their weight would be objectionable, 
and to a person who writes with a fine pointed pen, a fre- 
quent adjustment is indispensable, and inconvenient without 
the screw. I am very apprehensive that the two boards, 
with all the care you can employ, will warp and defeat the 
accuracy of the copying pen. I have now packed up the 
one you brought here for me, and I should have sent it by 
the stage, but that we hourly expect a Philadelphia vessel 
here which is to return immediately & would certainly carry 
it more safely. However, as it is very securely packed, if 
she does not arrive immediately, I will send it by the stage. 
In the meantime I will keep and use the portable one, and 
should it be proof against warping, I would prefer keeping 
it, as I am persuaded that on the return of mine Mr. Beckley 
will be glad to receive it, that being the identical one he saw 
and was pleased with. 

I must now ask the favor of you to furnish me with one 
for a friend in Europe to whom I wish to present it (Mr. 



162 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Wilson Peale, 1796-1825. 

Volney) to be made in your neatest style, and in the por- 
table form I am now using, to wit, Hawkins'. I think it 
would be better to equip it with a pair of screw pen-cases, 
and a pair of those which take in the whole quill, that he 
may suit himself. When ready, be so good as to notify 
me, without sending it on, as I may perhaps find an oppor- 
tunity at Philadelphia of shipping it for France. Let me 
know at the same time what should be paid you for the 
exchange of the present polygraphs which I shall cheer- 
fully remit with the price of the one to be now made. 
Accept my affectionate salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 17, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

I received last night your favor of the 14th. I continue 
extremely satisfied with the facility of writing with the 
new Polygraph. Mr. Hawkins' box may be considerably 
improved in its form. Instead of having it in the form 

Fig. 1, the upper bed should on 
the hinge side, be beveled off 
at a.b. through its whole length 
(from west to east). Then 
when you wish to use it, not 
for copying, but as a common 
writing desk, the gallows re- 
mains in its horizontal posi- 
tion as a protection to the ma- 
chinery and is more out of 

your way, & the lid opens before you and presents an 
inclined plane for writing on with a free pen as in Fig. 2. 
When you want to copy it lies as in Fig. 3. In this case 
the long linked hinges must be left off. Indeed they are 
always useless and in the way. If the one you are making 
for me isn't too far advanced, I should like to have it 
made in this way. I have taken off the long hinges of 
the one I have, and unscrewed the other hinges from the 




I homos Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 153 

lid, and without beveling it, have used & continue to use it 
in the way I propose, & find it much more agreeable when 
I am not using the copying machinery, which is full half 
my time ; so that I recommend this on experience. Accept 
affectionate salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 



r 



P.S. I think it would be handsomer and take less room 
on the table to have no projection of either the lid or 
bottom, but to make it as a box with straight ends, & sides, 
except one beveled off as Fig. 4, and so would prefer mine. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

WASHINGTON, November 28th, 1804. 
DEAR SIR: 

Passing as I do the active hours of my life in my study, 
I have found it essential to bring all the implements I use 
there within the narrowest compass possible, & in no case to 
lose a single inch of space which can be made to hold any- 
thing. Hence everything is placed within my reach without 
getting out of my chair. On this principle I approve of 
the two drawers to the Polygraph proposed in your letter 
of the 25th. I observe in fact that in the one I am now 
writing with there may be in the west end a drawer of lOf 
in. square outside measure, and in the north east corner 
another of 12f in. by 6 in. which would hold paper, pens, 
penknife, pencils, scissors, etc. etc. and that the notch they 
would require in the gallows would probably not injure it. 
I have no hesitation therefore at approving it. The brass 
handles on the gallows had better be left off, and the brass 
grooves on the desk for the brass ruler to slide in. The 
ruler laid on the paper when you copy is as effectual & 
more convenient, & the grooves are in the way when you 



154 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

use it as a common writing desk, without copying. Accept 
my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

P.S. Since writing my letter of this morning it has 
occurred to me as better not to cut the gallows in order to 
let the drawers come through them, but to let them lie 
entirely within them, & draw out only when the gallows are 
lifted up. This would lessen the size of the drawers one 
way three quarters of an inch. T. J. 

(To be continued.) 



List of Penn Manuscripts. 165 



LIST OF PENN MANUSCEIPTS 

Purchased by The Historical Society of Pennsylvania De- 
cember 27, 1882, from Colonel Stewart Forbes, adminis- 
trator in England of the Estate of Thomas Gordon Penn, 
deceased, and designated the " Penn Manuscripts, Forbes 
Collection." They have since been repaired, mounted, and 
arranged by the Society, and bound in order as follows : 

Journals of Admiral Sir Wm. Penn of Service in the Irish 
Fleet from 12 Oct. 1644 to 17 Sept. 1647. Fol. 184 pp. 
Autog. In separate volume. 

VOLUME I. 

PAGE 

1. Instructions of Robert Blake, John Desbrowe & William 

Penn, Admiralles and Generalls &c. for the Better 
ordringe of the Fleet in Saylenge (During the First 
Dutch War 1653). Fol. 5 pp. Autog. 

2. Inventory of Sir Wm. Penn's Goods & Chattells, 19 

Sept, 1670. Long fol. 3 pp. 

Letters of Sir Wm. Penn. 

3. To his son Wm. Penn 8 Jan. 1666. Fol. 1 p. L. s. 

4. " " 6 April 1667. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

5. " " 9 " Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

6. " " 21 May " " " A. L. s. 

7. " " 29 April 1670. 8vo " A. L. s. 

Letters to Sir Wm. Penn. 

8. From Duke of Ormond 29 May 1666. Fol. 1 p. L. s. 

(Desiring him to resign the command of his Com- 
pany of Foot at Kinsale in favor of his son Wm. 
Penn.) 

9. From Lord Peterboro no date. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 
9. " " " " 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 



156 List of Perm Manuscripts. 



PAfiB 



10. Draft of Wm. Perm's Instructions to Lieut. Gov. Black- 

well 25 9 m. 1689. London. For the Government 
of the Province. (Penn's signature and alterations.) 

11. King James II Order to the Bishops for absolution of 

persons engaged in the late Rebellion. 18 Apl. 
1685. Fol. 1 p. Signed by L u Sunderland. 

12. Commission from "Wm. Penn to Robert Turner, John 

Goodson, Sam'l Jennings and Lasy Cock to act as 
Commissioners of Property. 22 5 m. 1692. (In hand- 
writing of Wm. Penn.) Fol. 1 p. Copy. 

13-14. Original Draft of "Wm. Penn's Instrument of Sur- 
render to the Queen of the Government of Pennsyl- 
vania to be enrolled in Chancery. Large fol. 1 p. 
and fol. 1 p. 

15. Report 13 Feb. 1710/11 from the Lords of Trade to 

the Queen upon Wm. Penn's Memorial to Surrender 
his Proprietary of the Government of Pennsylvania. 
(An exhibit in the case of Hannah Penn v. Springett 
Penn.) Fol. 6 pp. Copy. 

16. Address of The Kings of the Indians to the King and 

Parliament. (In handwriting of James Logan, and 
signed by the Six Kings.) N"o date. Large fol. 1 p. 

17. Lease 16 July 1703 Wm. Penn and Wm. Penn junr. to 

Daniel Phillips et al. of the Pallace of Pennsbury for 
500 yrs as security for debt of 1500. Executed only 
by W. P. jr. Vellum 1 sheet. 

18. Covenant of Indemnity 20 Nov. 1707. Wm. Penn to 

Harbert Springett. Signed by W. P. Fol. 1 p. 

19. Bond 10 Aug. 1699 Wm. Penn to James St. Amand 

for 133. Signed by W. P. Fol. 1 p. 

20. Deed of Assignment 19 July 1710 James St. Amand 

to Thos. Callowhill of certain obligations of Wm. 
Penn. Signed by St. Amand and Wm. Penn and 
witnessed by Wm. Penn junior. Parch. 1 sheet. 



List of Penn Manuscripts. 157 

PAGE 

21. Bond 20 July 1699 Wm. Penn to Thos. Callowhill to 

settle 1500 within 6 years on his children by his 
wife Hannah should he have any. Signed by Wm. 
Penn. 

22. Assignment 7 Dec. 1705 Wm. Penn to Thos. Callow- 

hill of certain securities in satisfaction of his bond of 
20 July 1699. Signed by W. P. Atl. fol. 1 sheet. 

23-26. Four papers relating to the Assignment of certain 
Government Annuities by Wm. Penn to Thos. Cal- 
lowhill 29 Jan. 1706. Endorsed by W. P. " Assign- 
mt. & Bond to Sat. Callowhill for ye poor children." 

27. Copy of will of Wm. Penn 1712. Fol. 3 pp. 

28. Another copy " " " 

29. Release Wm. Penn & Hannah his wife 18 Aug. 1716 

to Moses Beranger. Executed only by H. P. Parch. 
1 sheet. 

30. Acknowledgment of Indebtedness 31 Mch 1718 Han- 

nah Penn to John Wren 80. Signed by H. P. 
Fol. 1 p. 

31. Case of Mrs. Hannah Penn and Opinion thereon of Sir 

Edw. Northey 11 Dec. 1718. Fol. 3 pp. (Opinion 
and signature in Sir Edw. Northey's handwriting.) 

32. Warrant of Attorney 28 Nov. 1721 Mary Penn, Wm. 

& Letitia Aubrey, Aubrey & Gulielma Maria Thomas 
to Ferdinando John Paris to appear for them in the 
case of Penn v. Penn. In Exch. 8vo. 1 p. L. s. 

33. Affidavit of Springett Penn 3 Feb. 1725 as to Title 

Deeds of the Three Lower Counties upon Delaware. 
Fol. 1 p. 

34. Case of John Thomas and Richard Penn Esqs. and 

State of Title in relation to their Agreement and 
Settlement between themselves and for their respec- 
tive widows and children of Pennsylvania and the 
Three Lower Counties. Fol. 12 pp. 



158 List of Penn Manuscripts. 



PAGE 



35. Articles of Agreement (counterpart) 7 Jan. 1725 

Springett Penn and Hannah Penn, that during the 
legal contest as to the validity of the "Will of Win. 
Penn their joint appointment of Patrick Gordon as 
Governor of Pennsylvania shall not prejudice the 
rights of either party. Executed by H. P. Parch. 
1 sheet. 

36. Letter of Attorney 7 Jan. 1725 Springett Penn Heir at 

law to his brother Win. Penn to enable him to obtain 
the King's assent and approbation of Patrick Gordon 
as Lieut. Governor. Parch. 1 sheet. 

37-38. Letter of Substitution of Attorney 2 Feb. 1725 an- 
nexed to last mentioned Letter of Attorney Wm. 
Penn to Perdinando John Paris (Agent of S. P. for 
Penna.) substituting him as Attorney for the pur- 
pose of obtaining the Royal Assent above mentioned 
and Affirmation of Thomas Penn 2 Feb. 1725 prov- 
ing the execution of both the Letters of Attorney. 
Fol. 2 pp. 

39. Commission 6 Apl 1745 John, Thomas and Richard 

Penn, Proprietaries, to James Logan to sell lands in 
Pennsylvania in case of death or going out of office 
of Lieut. Gov. Thomas. Parch. 1 sheet. D. s. 

40. Warrant 6 Apl 1745 John, Thomas and Richard Penn, 

Proprietaries, to the Keeper of the Great Seal of the 
Province to affix the Great Seal to the above Com- 
mission to James Logan to grant lands. Parch. 1 
sm. sheet. D. s. 

41. Copy of Deed 23 Sept. 1731 Wm. Penn, Heir at law 

&c. to John, Thomas and Richard Penn of the Soil 
and Powers of Government of Pennsylvania. Fol. 
16pp. 

42. List of Grants, Deeds and Papers in possession of 

Thomas Penn. Fol. 7 pp. 

43. Memorandum book of Thomas Penn. Sm. 8vo 36 pp. 



List of Perm Manuscripts. 159 

PAGE 

43. Copy of Report of the Committee of the House of Com- 

mons appointed 23 Mch 1698 relating to the debt 
settled upon the excise. 4o 6 pp. 

44. Mem. of a Clause to be inserted in ye Act agst Papists 

in Favour of Dissenters. 8vo 1 p. 

45. Arguments presented to the King to pardon ye persons 

and give ye estates of ye Rebells in ye West to their 
Relations being very miserably poore & distressed. 
(In handwriting of "Wm. Penn.) Fol. 1 p. N. d. 

46. Some Remarks on a Paper intituled A Seasonable Ad- 

vertisemt. to ye Freemen of this Province &c. dated 
Philadelphia ye 4 4 mo. 1689. Fol. 3 pp. 

Letters from William Penn. 

47. To those persons in Maryland yt he did believe did be- 

long to Pennsyl. London. 16 7 m. 1680. Copy. 
Fol. 2 pp. 

48. To The Kings of the Indians in Pennsylvania. London 

18 8 mo. 1681. Draft with alterations by W. P. 
Fol. 2 pp. 

49. To Lord Nottingham 31 5 m. 1690 offering to surren- 

der. Copy. Fol. 1 p. 

50. To same 12 4m. 1692. A. L. s. 8vo 3 pp. 

51. To ye magistrates of Gloucester 3 11 m. 1694/5. Copy. 

Fol. 1 p. 

52. To ye Lords Justices of Ireland 15m. 1698. 4o 4 pp. 

53. A Book of Letters and some Papers given forth at sev- 

erall times [when] required of the lord & otherwise 
in real & a good understanding of ye truth, wether 
to friends, Rulers [of the] People, or any perticuler 
persons, by me William Penn from ye 7th month in 
the year 1667. Fol. 42 pp. (Inner upper corner 
torn off all through one inch at top by three inches 
long.) 



160 List of Perm Manuscripts. 

Family Letters. 

PAGE 

54. William Penn to his father, Admiral Sir Wm. Penn, 6 

May 1665. Fol. 2 pp. A. L. s. 

55. Three notes on one page "Wm. Penn to his children 

Springet, Lo3titia and Bille, 19 6 m. 1682. 3 signa- 
tures. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

56. Wm. Penn to Anna Callowhill 28 4 m. 1695. 4o 3 pp. 

A. L. s. (with receipt how to dry apples, paires, 
plums). 

57. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

10 7 m. 1695. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

58. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

17 10 m. 1695. 4o 4 pp. A. L. s. 

59. Wm. Penn to Thomas Callowhill, with letter to Hannah 

Callowhill annexed 2 11 m. 1695. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

60. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

14 11 m. 1695. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

61. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

19 11 m. 1695. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

62. Wm. Penn to Thomas Callowhill 30 11 m. 1695. 4o 

2 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

63. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

112m. 1695. 8vo7pp. A. L. s. 

64. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

5 12 m. 1695. 4o 5 pp. A. L. s. 

65. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

11 12 m. 1695. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

66. Wm. Penn to Hannah Callowhill, afterwards his wife, 

14 12 m. 1695. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

67. Hannah Penn to Wm. Penn 13 8br 1703. 8vo 2 pp. 

A. L. s. Init. 

68. Wm. Penn to his wife Hannah Penn 25 4 m. 1709. 

Sm. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 



List of Perm Manuscripts. 161 

PAGE 

69. Wm. Penn to his wife Hannah Penn 95m. 1709. 8vo 

2 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

70. Wm. Penn to Thomas Callowhill 14 5 m. 1709. 8vo 

3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

71. Wm. Penn to his wife Hannah Penn 24 10 m. 1709. 

4o 3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

72. Wm. Penn to his wife Hannah Penn 17 11 m. 1709. 

4o 5 pp. A. L. No sig. 

73. Wm. Penn to his wife Hannah Penn 19 11 m. 1709/10. 

4o 4 pp. A. L. Incomp. 

73. Wm. Penn to his wife Hannah Penn 7 12 m. 1709/10. 

16m. 3 pp. A. L. s. Init. 

74. Wm. Penn to Thomas Callowhill 7 llm. 1709. 8vo 

2 pp. A. L. s. To one of his children. 

75. Wm. Penn to Thomas Callowhill 22 8 m. 1709. 4o 

2 pp. A. L. s. To one of his children. 

76. Hannah Penn to John Penn, her son, 18 1 m. 1722/3. 

8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

77. Hannah Penn to John Penn, her son (end), 10 Mch 

1722/3. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

78. Hannah Penn to John Penn, her son (end), 30 Mch 

1730. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

79. Hannah Penn to John Penn, her son, no date. 4o 1 p. 

A. L. s. 

80. Hannah Penn to Sir Wm. Keith, Depy. Gov., 86m. 

1718 announcing death of her husband. Fol. 1 p. 
(?) Copy. 

81. Hannah Penn to Sir Wm. Keith, Depy. Gov., 20 6 m. 

1719. Fol. 2 pp. Copy. 

82. Springett Penn to his uncle John Penn 22 1 m. 1716/17. 

Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

83. Margaret Penn to her brother John Penn 4 Apl 1722. 

4o 1 p. A. L. s. 
VOL. xxvm. 11 



162 List of Penn Manuscripts. 

VOLUME n. 

PACK 

1. Lcetitia Penn to Hannah Callowhill 

12 10 m. 1695. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 
(Congratulatory on their new relations to each other.) 

2. Mrs. Margaret Lowther to her brother Wm. Penn 

I Jan. 1695. 4o 4 pp. A. L. 

Imp. 

3. Mrs. Margaret Lowther to her brother "Wm. Penn 

II July 1696. 4o 4pp. A. L. s. 

4. Anthony Lowther to his bro-in-law Wm. Penn 

18 Oct. 1675. 4o 2pp. A. L. s. 

5. Robert Lowther to his cousin Springett Penn 

no date. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

5. S. Wall to Coz Hannah Penn 

25 Mch 1714. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

Letters to William Penn. 

6. From Lords of Trade 13 Feb. 1695/6. Fol. 2 pp. Copy. 

7. " Committee of the 

Assembly 79m. 1696. Fol. 3 pp. Copy. 

8. " Earl of Arran 10 Aug. 1684. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

9. " " 13 Nov. 1694. 8vo 4 pp. A. L. s. 

Init. 

10. " " 4 Sept. 1696. 8vo4pp.A. L. 

No sig. 

11. " " 22 Sept. 1696. 8vo 3 pp. A. L. 

No sig. 

12. " " no date. Copy. 

13. " Lord Baltimore 11 lOr 1676. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

14. " R. Barclay 61m. 1673. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

15. " 20 5 m. 1676. Copy. 

16. " " last of 11 m. 1679. Copy. 
16. " " 25 1 m. 1681. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

Init. 



List of Penn Manuscripts. 163 

PAGE 

17. From R. Barclay 26 2 m. 1681. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

Init. 

18. " " 17 10 m. 1681. Copy. 

19. " R. Barclay junior 72m. 1695. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

20. " " 20 2 m. 1696. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

21. " Lord Bellomont 2 June 1698. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. 

22. " " 2 Jan. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

23. " " 30 Jan. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. 

24. " " 14 Feb. 4o Ip. A.L.S. 
26. " " no date. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

26. " " no date. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

27. " " no date. 4o Ip. A. L. s. 

30. " Lady Berkley 13 8 m. 1685. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

31. " Lord Broghill 27 Apl 1675. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

32. " " 7 July 1678. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

33. " " July. 8volp. A.L.S. 

34. " Duke of Buck- 

ingham 4 Dec. 1686. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

35. " Duke of Buck- 

ingham 22 Feb. 1686/7. Fol. 2 pp. A. L. s. 

36. " Duke of Buck- 

ingham 4 Mch 1686. Fol. 4 pp. A. L. s. 

37. " Lord Carington 20 Aug. 1688. Svolp. A.L.S. 

38. " Lord Clarendon no date. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 
38. " " no date. 8vo 1 p. A. L. 8. 
89. " Richard Creed to 

W. P. and 

others 8 6m. 1679. Fol. Ip. A.L.S. 

40. " Lord Cornbury 6 lObr 1701. 4o Ip. A.L.S. 

41. " Lady Cul- -\ 

T TH f joint 16 Dec. 1703. 4o 1 p. No sie. 
Lady Fair- I 

fax 



164 List of Penn Manuscripts. 

PAGE 

42. From Lord Dartmouth 

for the Queen 15 Feb. 1710/11. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

43. " Lord Effingham 9 July 1689. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

44. " Bishop of Ely 7 Mch 1687. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

45. " 24 Oct. 1688. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

46. " " 21 June 1690. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

47. " " 1 Oct. 1690. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

48. " H. Fetherly (or Everly) 

19 July 1678. A. L. s. 

49. " George Fox per Thos. Lower 

286m. 1674. Fol. 2pp. 

(Also letter of Thos. Lower annexed.) Amanuensis. 

50. From George Fox per T. L. 

10 8 m. 1674. Fol. 1 p. 
(Postscript by T. L.) 

51. From George Fox 25 9 m. 1674. Fol. 1 p. 

52. From George Fox, Declaration instead of the Oath of 

Allegiance (copy), with letter (T. L. handwriting) 

11 11 m. 1674. Fol. 2 pp. A. L. s. 

Init. 

53. From George Fox 30 7 m. 1675. Fol. 2 pp. 

54. " 243m. Fol. 1 p. L.S. Init 

55. " " 5 llm. 1689. 8vo 2pp. 

55. " " no date. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

56. " Margaret Fox 26 4 m. 1675. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

Init. 

57. " " 137m. 1675. Fol. Ip. 

58. " T. L. handwriting 

11 10 m. 1677. Fol. 1 p. 

59. " Lord Gallway 11 June 1698. 8vo 1 p. L. s. 

60. " " 28 Apl 1710. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

61. " Lord Godolphin 14 Sept. 1708. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 



List of Perm Manuscripts. 165 

MM 

62. From John Gratton 20 5 m. 1693. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

Init. 

63. " " 2 11 m. 1693. 8vo 3 pp. A. L. s. 

Init. 

63. " " 9 m. 1693. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. 

Init. 

64. " Chief Justice J. Holt 

23 May 1701. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

65. " Comtesse de Homes (French) 

14 7br 1677. 16mo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

65. " John Jones 4 Jan. 1699/1700. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

With Inventory for a public house annexed 

4o 3 pp. Aut. 

66. " Lord Leyonbergh 25 May 1686. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

67. " Lord Limerick 25 Jan. 1708/9. 8vo 4 pp. L. s. 

and A. P. s. 

68. " Le Prince de Mario Plabi (French) 

11 Sept. 1702. 8vo 3 pp. A. L. s. 

68. " Lord Manchester (interview with King) 

16 Feb. 1702. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

69. H. May 7 June 1698. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

70. " Henry More (?) to W.P. (?) (religious disquisition) 

22 May 1675. Fol. 16 pp. L. s. 
and A. P. s. 

71. " Earl of Monmouth 16 Nov. 1695. 8vo 2pp. A. L. s. 

71. " " no date. 16mo 1 p. A. L. s. 

72. " Marquis of Normanby 

17 July 1698. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

73. " Sir Heneage Finch (afterwards Marquis of Not- 

tingham Lord Chanr.) 

no date. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

74. " 2d Lord Chanr (his son) 

19 Aug. 1702. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

75. " Sir John Pelham M. P. 

25 July 1679. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 



166 List of Perm Manuscripts. 

PAGE 

76. From Lord Peterborough 

(end) 1697. 16mo 1 p. A. L. s. 

76. " Lord Peterborough 

3 Oct. 1702. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

77. " Lord Peterborough 

6 Oct. 1702. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

77. " Lord Peterborough 

no date. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

78. " Lord Peterborough 

29 Nov. 1705. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

79. " Lord Poulett 22 Apl 1699. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

80. " " 27 May 1706. 4o 3 pp. A. L. s. 

80. " " 15 July. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

81. Lord Powis 25 Oct. 1697. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

82. " Lady Eanalough no date. 8vo 1 p. By 

amanuensis. 

83. " Lord Rodes Oct. 17, 1693. 4o 4 pp. A. L. s. 

84. Lady Rodes 5 Feb. 1685. Fol. 2 pp. A. L. s. 

85. " 5 Mch 1685. Fol. 3 pp. A. L. s. 

86. " " 3 May 1686. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

86. " " 18 May 1686. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

87. " E. Rosse (?) to W. P. 

26 Aug. 1698. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. s. 

88. " Lord Sunderland 30 Aug. 1698. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

88. " " 25 Oct. 8vo 2 pp. A. L. 

No sig. 

89. " Henry Sydney (afterwards Lord Romney) 

13 Aug. 1686. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

89. " 19 Jan. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

90. " " 29 June 1687. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

91. " " 17 Sept. 1687. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

92. " " 19 Oct. 1687. 4o 2 pp. A. L. 

No sig. 



List of Perm Manuscripts. 167 

PAGE 

93. From Henry Sydney (afterwards Lord Romney) 

21 Aug. 1688. 4o 2 pp. A. L. 

NO Big. 

94. " " 21 May. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

95. " " 10 July. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

96. " Lord Scarbrough 

21 July 1702. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

97. " Duke of Shrewsbury 

13 Apl 1689. Fol. 2 pp. A. L. s. 

98. " Duke of Shrewsbury (By the King's command) 

6 Oct. 1696. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

99. " Duke of Shrewsbury 

2 Apl 1707. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 
99. " Duke of Shrewsbury 

7 Apl 1707. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

100. " Earl of Tyrconnell 

16 June 1688. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

101. " Edmond Waller 31 3m. 1698. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

102. " Marquis of Winchester 

" Lord Gallway joint 11 June 1698. 4o 1 p. 

Aut. L. (Gallway) s. 

Letters to Hannah Penn. 

103. " Henry Goldney 19 1 m 1716. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

103. " Sir Wm. Keith, Dep. Gov. 

24 Sept. 1717. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

104. " Anne Murray 10 Oct. 1717. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

105. " Robt. Assheton 5 Nov. 1718. 4o 1 p. A. L. s. 

Miscellaneous Letters. 

106. " Lord Baltemore to Dirk Burk (his London 

Agent) 7 Nov. 1683. Fol. 4 pp. Copy. 

107. " Lord Baltemore to Dirk Burk (his London 

Agent) 7 Dec. 1683. Fol. 4 pp. Copy. 



168 List of Penn Manuscripts. 

PAGE 

108. From R. Barclay to Thos. Zachary 

26 5 m. 1685. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. In. 

109. " George Fox to Hellen Dundas 

19 9 m. 1676. Fol. 1 p. (?) Copy. 

110. " George Fox to All Friends everywhere &c. 

11 11 m. 1669. Fol. 2 pp. Copy. 

111. " George Fox to Friends 

no date. Fol. 2 pp. Copy. 

112. " George Fox to Earl of Pembroke 

" Edward Burrough to Sir Henry Vane M. P. 

no date. Fol. 4 pp. Copies. 

113. Letter from Amsterdam to George Fox 

7 10 m. 1685. Fol. 1 p. No sig. 

114. John Gary to George Fox 

21 4 m. 1674. Fol. 3 pp. A. L. s. 

115. John Grattan to Friends 

26 3 m. 1691. 8vo 1 p. A. L. s. 

116. John Grattan to Jo Naughton & Jo Field 

26 3 m. 1691. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

117. John Grattan to Henry Gouldney 

23 5 m. 1691. Fol. 1 p. A. L. s. 

118. John Grattan to Henry Gouldney for G. "W. 

20 4 m. 1693. Fol. 3 pp. A. L. s. 

119. John Grattan to Henry Gouldney 

33m. 1694. 4o 2 pp. A. L. s. 

119. John Grattan to Jas. Dickinson 

5 11 m. 1694. 8vo 3 pp. A. L. s. 

120. J. Springett to Grimbole Paunceforte 

7 Sept. 1706. 

With copy of Wm. Penn's statement as to his last 
interview with Philip Ford prior to embarking for 
Penna. 1699. Fol. 2 pp. A. L. s. 

James Logan to Yearly Meeting at Phila. 

22 Sept. 1764. Fol. 4pp. Printed. 
(As to the right to bear arms in self-defence.) 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 169 



PENNSYLVANIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

BY LOTHROP WITHINGTON. 

[The following matter concerning Pennsylvania families (taken from 
the registers of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury and other English 
records) is partly from my own notes and partly expanded from the un- 
published notes of Mr. Henry Fitzgilbert Waters, now in my charge. 
It is on similar lines to contributions being made to the New York, 
Virginia, South Carolina, Maryland, Delaware, and other historical 
societies, and (for Northern New England) to the Essex Institute. The 
notes of Mr. Waters, not elsewhere printed, are being issued alphabeti- 
cally in the Genealogical Quarterly Magazine. For an account of the 
work of Mr. Waters and myself in England, see the Virginia Historical 
Magazine for January, 1903, page 291. 

LOTHROP WITHINGTON. 
30 LITTLE RUSSELL STREET, W. C., LONDON.] 

WILLIAM AUBREY, of London, gent. Will 4 May 1731 ; 
proved 7 March 1731/2. To my nephew William Penn Esq. 
and to his heirs 5000 acres of unserveyed land in Pensil- 
vania, being part of 25000 acres appointed by my father 
William Penn senior Esq deceased, to me and my wife as 
a moiety of 50000 acres appointed to my wife's late mother 
deceased. To my wife Letitia, the daughter of the said 
William Penn the elder deceased, and to her heirs, the 
manor of Faggs in Pensilvania being about 5000 acres ot 
land. I also give to the said Letitia and her heirs all lands 
in Pensilvania which are deficient in my patents for the 
mannours of Mountjoy and Steyning. Residuary legatee 
and executrix: the said Letitia my wife. Witnesses: 
John Page, Mary Wells, Jane Adamson. I desire my 
nephew William Penn to be assisting to my wife. Codicil 
8 May 1731. To Ann Aubrey my sister in law 40 for the 
benefit and exclusive use of her daughter Elianor without 
her husband, and to my nephew Thomas Aubrey 100. 

Bedford, 62. 



170 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

JAMES ABERCROMBIE of the City of Philadelphia, mariner. 
Will 11 December 1758; proved 23 July 1761. Executors: 
friends Charles Stedman, Alexander Stedman, and Samuel 
McCall junior of the City of Philadelphia. To my dear 
wife Margaret Abercrombie 1000, money of Pennsylvania. 
Residuary legatee : my son James, and in, case of his death 
without issue, then to my brother David Abercrombie, my 
sister Jannet Abercrombie, and to John Stedman the son 
of my friend Alexander Stedman. Witnesses: Robt. 
Harper, Johan George Waine. Proved by William BTeates, 
attorney of Charles and Alexander Stedman and Samuell 
McCall the younger, executors, now residing respectively 
at Philadelphia. Cheslyn, 239. 

EDWARD BRADLEY of the City of Philadelphia in the 
province ot Pennsylvania, glazier. Will 22 March 1743/4 ; 
proved 8 November 1746. Executors: wife Esther and my 
friends Ebenezer Kinnersley and Thomas Leach, both of 
the said city, shopkeepers, for my estate in Pennsylvania 
and elsewhere (Great Britain excepted). I release the said 
Ebenezer Kinnersley of his debt of 30. To the said 
Thomas Leach 30. To my said wife Esther all my negroe 
slaves, viz. York, Daphne, and the child Gin, with all my 
plate, household furniture, and 700, also the money that 
become due to me for the land lately sold to William Hour 
&c. and all my right to the stable which I took of Thomas 
Howard. I give to my said wife Esther my messuage in 
Front Street in the said city between the messuage of 
Robert Strettle and George Shed and all those yearly rent 
charges in or near Elbow Lane purchased of Joshua Car- 
penter amounting to the yearly sum of 12.8.4. The rest 
of all my lands to be sold and out of the money there shall 
be paid 100 a piece to my brothers Thomas Bradley and 
Joseph Bradley and my sister Ann Shepherd, and next the 
sum of 30 a piece to my two nephews, viz. Edward 
Shepherd, my said sister's son, and William Bradley, the 
son of my brother Joseph, which two nephews I nominate 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 171 

executors for my estate in Great Britain. Residuary legatee : 
wife Esther. Witnesses : P r Turner, C. Brocden, Robt. 
Strettle. Proved by Edward Shepherd with power reserved 
&c. Edmonds, 318. 

JAMES THOMAS, late of Philadelphia, but in parish of St. 
Margaret, Lothbury, London, bachelor, deceased. Will 22 
4 th month 1706 ; proved 11 February 1711/2. Brother Micah 
Thomas and his children 30. Brother Gabriel Thomas 
besides what he oweth me 20. Sister Mary Snead and her 
children 20. Sister Rachel Wharton and to be at her 
dispose 40. Uncle James Thomas 20 a year during his 
life. My cosins or nieces Elizabeth, Mary, and Rachell 
Williams each of them 50 after the decease of my aforesaid 
uncle James Thomas. My nephew the brother of said 
Williams if living 50. My cousins the children of 
Thomas Wharton and sister Rachell his wife, after &c &c, 
20 each. Executors 50 as followeth, to Edward Shippen 
senior, and his grandchildren Edward and Elizabeth 
Shippen 20 and 30 between Samuel Preston and his 
daughters Margaret and Hannah. Poor of Philadelphia 
remainder of my estate after decease of aforesaid uncle, 
that is the yearly interest of the remainder as aforesaid and 
that forever. The aforesaid Edward Shippen and Samuel 
Preston of Philadelphia, merchants, executors. Witnesses : 
Philip Russuel, Walton Ruling, Jonathan Baily, Morris 
Edwards. Proved at Sussex on Delaware Bay on 7 th day 
of 9 month called November 1710. By testimony of Jona- 
than Baily and Philip Russell. Administration granted to 
John Askew, attorney for Samuel Preston, residing in Phil- 
adelphia. Barnes, 38. 

JOHN PROBERTS, late of Philadelphia in America, belong- 
ing to the merchant ship " Alexander" but deceased in St. 
Thomas's Hospital, South wark. Administration 15 No- 
vember 1742 to William Play tor, attorney of Grace Proberts 
the relict now residing at Philadelphia. 

Admon. Act Book, 



172 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

SOPHIA ROBERTS late of Pensilvania in parts beyond 
seas, spinster, deceased. Administration 18 November 
1731 to her sister Rebecca Roberts, spinster, Anne Roberts 
the mother first renouncing. 

Ditto, 1731. 

RICHARD SANGER late of Philadelphia in America, bache- 
lor, deceased. Administration 13 May 1737 to his sister 
and next of kin Deborah wife of Jonathan Colman. 

Ditto, 1737. 

JOHN SMITH late at Pennsylvania deceased. Administra- 
tion 22 February 1688/9 to "William Wright during absence 
of Jane Smith the relict now living in Scotland. 

Ditto, 1689, folio 28. 

HENRY SMITH late of Pensilvania in West Indies, bache- 
lor, deceased. Administration 25 May 1703 to John 
Adams principal creditor. 

Ditto, 1703, folio 93. 

PATIENT USHER late of Philadelphia in Pensilvania Forth 
America, widow, deceased. Administration 29 April 1749 
to Elias Bland, attorney of Margaret Kearsley formerly 
Brand (wife of John Kearsley) niece of the defunct, and 
now residing in Pensilvania. Ditto, 174-9. 

WILLIAM RABLY late of Philadelphia in the province of 
Pensilvania in America deceased upon the high seas. 
Administration 18 February 1730/1 to Richard Deeble 
principal creditor, John Rably and Mary Rably spinster, 
brother and sister of the defunct first renouncing. 

Ditto, 1731. 

WARWICK HELE late of Pensilvania, widower, deceased. 
Administration 1 March 1710/11 to Michael Hammons prin- 
cipal creditor. Ditto, 1711, folio 50. 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 173 

WILLIAM KINNBRSLEY late of Philadelphia in Pensil- 
vania in America, bachelor, deceased. Administration 12 
April 1714 to his nephew (ex fratre) William Kinnersley, 
Richard Kinnersley the brother and Hannah Fencott wife 
of William Fencott, sister of the defunct first renouncing. 

Ditto, 17 14, folio 74. 

JOHN SWIFT junior late of Philadelphia in Pensilvania 
deceased. Administration 20 January 1713/4 to Hannah 
Winbolt widow, sister of Elizabeth Swift the relict now at 
Philadelphia. Ditto, 1714, folio 7. 

DOROTHY ALLFORD late of Pensilvania, spinster, deceased. 
Administration 3 November 1718 to her sister Mary Little 
als Allford wife of Joseph Little. 

Ditto, 1718, folio 43. 

BENJAMIN ACROD, late of St. John Hackney, Middlesex, 
but in Pennsylvania, deceased. Administration 4 July 
1684 to his relict Sara Acrod, which grant was revoked on 
proof of a will in December following. 

Admon. Act Book, 1684- 

JONATHAN BRAND late of Philadelphia in Pensilvania, 
widower, deceased. Administration 14 February 1748/9 to 
his son Thomas Brand. Ditto, 1749. 

ROBERT BRETT late at Pensylvania deceased. Adminis- 
tration 11 September 1701 to Roger Brett, Attorney for the 
relict Mary Tudor als Brett now at New York. 

Ditto, 1701, folio 157. 

JOHN CRAVEN late of Philadelphia in Transilvania [sic], 
widower, deceased. Administration 21 February 1704/5 to 
Edward Ridsdale guardian of Mary, Jane, and William In- 
man, minors, grandchildren of the said defunct, Dorothy 
Inman, spinster, also a grandchild, first renouncing. 

Ditto, 17 05, folio 39. 

GEORGE ELLICE late of the Town of Philadelphia in Pen- 
sylvania, bachelor, deceased. Administration 24 January 



174 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

1753 to the Rev. John Black, Clerk, Attorney of William 
Ellice, brother of the defunct, now residing in North Britain. 

Ditto, 1753. 

EDWARD GUY 01 Appleby in Westmoreland, but late of 
Philadelphia beyond the seas. Administration 1698 to his 
eon John. [Edward, son of Edward Guy, of Appleby in 
Westmoreland, matriculated 30 4, 1624, aged 15, at Queen's 
College, Oxford. M.A. 1634. Vicar of St. Lawrence, Ap- 
pleby, 1636.] Ditto, 1698. 

WALTER GROOMBRIDGB late of Philadelphia beyond seas, 
widower, deceased. Administration 18 July 1710 to John 
Norton and Henry Daniel guardians of Jane Groombridge, 
a minor daughter and only child of the deceased. 

Ditto, 17 10, folio 138. 

MARY HASLEHURST late of Philadelphia in Pensilvania, 
widow, deceased on the High Seas. Administration 17 
January 1735/6 to her mother Mary Mecham. 

Ditto, 1735. 

GEORGE HEAD late of Philadelphia, bachelor, but deceased 
at Charles Town in South Carolina. Administration 25 No- 
vember 1734 to his brother Thomas Head, Rowland Head 
the father renouncing. Ditto, 1734- 

WILLIAM HIQGS, late of Pennsylvania in parts beyond 
the seas, bachelor, deceased. Administration 17 October 
1709 to his brother John Higgs. 

Ditto, 1709, folio W6. 

WILLIAM JONES late of Philadelphia in the province oi 
Pensilvania, bachelor, deceased. Administration 30 May 
1735 to his sister Mary Jones, spinster. Ditto, 1735. 

THOMAS LANGHORNE late at Pensilvania. Administration 
30 December 1689 to Seth Flower principal creditor. 

Ditto, 1689, folio 209. 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 175 

SARAH LEA formerly Brown (Wife of William Lea) late 
of the City of Philadelphia in America, deceased. Ad- 
ministration 3 October 1749 to her son William Lea, her 
husband William Lea dying without taking administration. 

Ditto, 1749. 

JOHN LILLYSTONE late of 8t Andrew Holborn, London, 
and of Philadelphia in America, bachelor, deceased in ship 
" Rowser." Administration 7 June 1751 to his mother 
Hannah Lillystone widow. Ditto, 1751. 

WILLIAM MAIDEN late of the City of Philadelphia, bach- 
elor, deceased. Administration 30 April 1756 to William 
Bruce, attorney of John Maiden the father now residing in 
Dundee, Scotland. Ditto, 1756. 

DIONYSIUS MERRICK late at Le Hokills in Pensilvania be- 
yond seas, bachelor, deceased. Administration 14 Novem- 
ber 1702 to Richard Chope principal creditor. 

Ditto, 1702, folio 216. 

RICHARD METCALFE late of Lewis in Pensylvania, widower, 
deceased. Administration 8 July 1763 to his daughter 
Elizabeth Metcalfe, spinster. Ditto, 1768. 

ANNE MORREY late of the City of Philadelphia in Pen- 
sylvania in America deceased. Administration 8 March 
1748/9 to her husband Richard Morrey. Ditto, 174.9. 

SARAH MORREY late of the City and County of Philadel- 
phia in the province of Pensylvania, widow, deceased. 
Administration 12 November 1756 to John Strettell, attor- 
ney of her son Stephen Williams now residing at Philadel- 
phia. Ditto, 1756. 

MATTHEW PAYNE late of Pensylvania, widdower. Ad- 
ministration 4 October 1686 to his son Edmund Payne. 

Ditto, 1686, folio 154. 
(To be continued.) 



176 The, Alaska Adjudication. 



THE ALASKA ADJUDICATION. 

BY THOMAS WILLING BALCH. 

By the Convention that was signed at Washington on 
January 24, 1903, between the Secretary of State, Mr. John 
Hay, and the late British ambassador, Sir Michael Herbert, 
which subsequently, on February 11, 1903, became, upon its 
ratification by the United States Senate, a treaty, the Ameri- 
can and the British governments made provision to submit 
the difference of opinion over the proper way of running 
the eastern frontier of the Alaskan lisifrre to a Joint Com- 
mission. The tribunal that this treaty set up was not, as is 
popularly supposed, a Court of Arbitration, but a Court of 
Adjudication. For this tribunal was composed of an equal 
number of jurists, three chosen from each side from among 
their own citizens. None of the members of the tribunal 
was a citizen of a neutral country, and there was not upon 
it an odd judge, thereby securing the certainty of a ma- 
jority vote, and so a final decision upon every point that 
was submitted for adjudication. From the first negotiations 
at Quebec in August, 1898, over this Alaskan question, the 
Canadians aimed to have the question passed upon by an 
unequal number of jurists. They hoped to play off the 
abrogation of the Clayton-Bulwer treaty against the sub- 
mission of the Alaska frontier to an International Court of 
Arbitration. If it had been a moral certainty that such an 
international court, whether composed of members of the 
Hague Tribunal or of other learned jurists, would have 
decided the controversy on the merits of the evidence alow, 
this country could very properly have referred the case to 
such a court for settlement. But, unfortunately, ever since 
ICmeric Cruce, 1 of Paris, first promulgated in 1623 the idea 

1 "Lea Origines du Droit International," par Ernest Nys, Bruxelles, 
1894, p. 397. 

"Emeric Cruc6," by Thomas Willing Balch, Philadelphia, 1900, 
pp. 24-37. 



The Alaska Adjudication. 177 

of an International Court of Arbitration, until now, the 
numerous judgments handed down by international tribu- 
nals have proved the frailty of human nature, and shown 
the desire of the arbitrators to split the difference of the 
issues involved, and in some cases their purpose to inject 
even diplomatic considerations into the decisions. The 
cause of International Arbitration has made great progress 
since Cruce launched his plan upon the world, but it should 
not be forgotten that a recourse to International Arbitration, 
taking account of human nature, is not as yet possible in 
all cases. Our government acted wisely in referring the 
question of the Alaska frontier to a Court of Adjudication 
rather than to a Court of Arbitration. 

The question submitted to the Alaska Adjudication Board 
was the correct explanation of a part of the Anglo-Russian 
Treaty, which was signed at Saint Petersburg, February 
16/28, 1825, by Count Nesselrode, M. de Poletica, and Sir 
Stratford Canning. 1 By that treaty Russia and England 
agreed upon a line of demarcation to separate their re- 
spective North American possessions. 

The treaty provided that this frontier should be drawn 
from the Arctic Ocean, along the meridian of one hundred 
and forty-one degrees west longitude from Greenwich to 
Mount Saint Elias, and then was to follow the crest of the 
mountains running parallel to the coast, to the head of the 
Portland Channel, and down that sinuosity to the ocean in 
fifty-four degrees forty minutes north latitude. But if at 
any point the crest of the mountains proved to be at a 
greater distance than ten marine leagues from the shore, 
then the frontier should run parallel to the sinuosities of the 
coast at a distance of ten marine leagues inland, but never 
farther than that from the shore. 

The United States, on the one hand, maintained that this 
treaty gave to Russia, and consequently to themselves, 
since the United States had bought, in 1867, chiefly by the 

1 "The Alaska Frontier," by Thomas Willing Balch, Philadelphia, 
1903, pp. 6-8. 

VOL. ZZYIU. 12 



178 The, Alaska Adjudication. 

efforts of "William H. Seward and Charles Sumner, Russian 
America with all the rights of Russia, an unbroken listere 
or strip of territory on the mainland from Mount Saint 
Elias at about sixty degrees north to the opening of the 
Portland Channel into the ocean at Dixon Entrance at fifty- 
four degrees forty minutes, of sufficient width to entirely 
cut off the British empire from tide-water north of fifty- 
four forty. Canada, on the other hand, contended that the 
true interpretation of the treaty of 1825 gave a frontier line 
that, skipping from the tops of mountains close to the sea, 
cut across the sinuosities such as the Lynn Canal and Taku 
Inlet, instead of passing inland around them, thus giving to 
Canada harbors upon the upper reaches of those sinuosities. 

The decree of the Adjudication Board in the main con- 
firms the rights of the United States. Still, in some of the 
details the treaty is in favor of Canada. The chief point at 
issue was whether Canada should have one or more outlets 
upon tide-water on the Lynn Canal or any of the other 
sinuosities that cut into the lisi&re. That important question 
is now settled definitely against Canada by the judgment of 
Lord Alverstone, Lord Chief Justice of England, who 
voted with the three American Commissioners, thus insuring 
to the United States a continuous unbroken Ksi&re on the 
mainland above the Portland Channel. Lord Alverstone 
showed by his vote that he was convinced by the over- 
whelming mass and force of the evidence. 

When it is remembered that the claims of Canada rested 
upon no evidence whatever, it is perfectly clear that she 
made substantial gains by the award; it was in truth a 
diplomatic compromise. In some places, as, for example, 
on the StiMne River, the eastern frontier of the lisidre was 
brought by the award too near to tide-water, all of which 
redounds to the advantage of Canada. In addition, brushing 
aside that well-recognized rule of International Law known 
as the lhalweg 1 that since Grotius has obtained in finding 

1 " Principes du Droit des Gens," par Alphonse Eivier, Paris, 1896, 
Vol. I. pp. 167, 168. 



The Alaska Adjudication. 179 

the water boundary between two neighboring states; the 
charts of the British Admiralty, and consequently the 
British government itself; and official Canadian maps; the 
Adjudication Board, the three Americans concurring, gave 
to Canada Pearse and Wales Islands, which rightfully 
belonged to the United States. 

At first sight the possession of these two islands by 
Canada seems of small importance. But their geographical 
position, immediately facing Port Simpson, gives them, 
although the United States retains the two small outward 
islands of Kannaghunut and Sitklan, an important strategic 
value, for Port Simpson will become the natural Pacific ter- 
minus of the new Canadian transcontinental railroad. 
Canada, with Pearse and "Wales Islands in her possession, 
will have the strategic control of Portland Channel, and 
can, of course, build at Port Simpson another naval strong- 
hold like Halifax on the Atlantic and Esquimalt on the 
Pacific, and from it menace our developing trade across the 
Pacific with Alaska and Asia. 

In giving up Pearse and "Wales Islands to Canada, the 
American Commissioners were anxious apparently to soothe 
Canada as much as possible. But when they let her have 
these two islands, they might just as well have given up 
Sitklan and Kannaghunut Islands, for, as the London Times 
justly remarked on October 27, 1903, the " two latter islands 
have together an area of some eight square miles only and 
are in themselves of no importance whatever. It has been 
suggested, however, that they hold the command of Port 

' ' Halleck's International Law, " third edition, revised by Sir Sheraton 
Baker, Bart., of Lincoln's Inn, and Barrister-at-Law, London, 1893, 
Vol. I. p. 171. 

"Das Moderne Volkerrecht der Civilisirten Staten als Rechtsbuch 
Dargestellt," von Dr. J. C. Bluntuchli, Nordlingen, 1878, sections 298, 
301, and 303. 

Concerning the historic development of the rule of the Thalweg, see 
the article of Judge Ernest Nys, of Brussels, in the "Revue de Droit 
International" (Brussels, 1901, p. 75), entitled "Rivieres et fleuves 
frontidres La Ligne Mediaue et le Thalweg un Aperu historique." 



180 The Alaska Adjudication. 

Simpson. ... A glance at the map will show that this is 
not the case. Sitklan Island is distant some fifteen miles from 
the port, whereas Wales Island extends some five miles nearer 
to it and, being situated on the flank of a line drawn from Port 
Simpson to Sitklan, would effectually neutralize any strategic 
importance which the latter island would possess. As regards 
vessels sailing from Port Simpson in the direction of Asia, 
which would pass north of Dundas Island, this island, which 
is British, commands the passage, and the two islands awarded 
to the United States confer on them no advantage which they 
did not have already by their possession of Cape Fox. The 
channel north of the two islands (Sitklan and Kannaghunut), 
which is commanded by them and by the other side of the 
channel, ha no commercial importance; all traffic passes 
along the broader channel to the south of Wales Island." 

The Alaska frontier question, had our Congress in the 
past heeded the sage advice, first of President Grant in 
1872, and then of President Cleveland in 1885, could have 
been settled quietly without engendering any of the bitter- 
ness that has since been aroused over it in Canada, and 
without giving up Pearse and Wales Islands. But now that 
this dangerous frontier question, which should never have 
been brought forward in the manner that it was, is in a 
large measure out of the way, let us hope sincerely that 
both the United States and the Canadian governments will 
bring about a commercial rapprochement always a solid 
bond of peace between the two countries, and thus aid to 
establish an entente cordiale between them. And towards 
this end the sooner negotiations are carried on directly 
between Washington and Ottawa, instead of by the round- 
about and cumbersome way of Downing Street, the better 
as Monsieur Henri Bourassa, a grandson of Papineau, the 
leader of the French Canadians in 1837, clearly and forcibly 
showed in a notable speech on October 23, 1903, in the 
Parliament of the Dominion of Canada * for the derelop- 

1 " House of Commons Debates," Third Session, Ninth Parliament, 
Vol. XXXVI., October 23, 1903. 



The Alaska Adjudication. 181 

ment and maintenance of cordial relations between the two 
nations. As all the chief political men of Canada, both 
English and French, agree with Monsieur Bourassa in this, 
probably one of the results of the Alaska frontier decision 
will be that Canada will have, before many years are past, 
her own representative agent at "Washington. And the 
more we Americans and by Americans are meant all who 
live in the New World from the North Pole to Cape Horn 
can live on friendly terms with one another the better 
for all concerned. 

Compare also "Henri Bourassa, M.P., Grande- Bretagne et Canada 
Questions Actuelles ; Conference au Theatre National Francais, Mon- 
tr6al, Le 20 Octobre, 1901," Montreal, Imprimerie du Pionnier, 33-35 
rue St. Gabriel. 



182 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 



MRS. MARY DEWEES'S JOURNAL FROM PHILADEL- 
PHIA TO KENTUCKY, 1787-1788. 

CONTRIBUTED BY SAMUEL P. COCHEAN. 

September 27th, 1787. Left Philadelphia about five o'clock 
in the afternoon and tore ourselves from a number of dear 
friends that assembled to take a last farewell before we set 
off for Kentucky. Made our first stage 6 miles from the 
City, being very sick the greatest part of the way. 

September 28th. We left the sign of the Lamb at half 
past six A. M. and proceeded to Col. "Webster's, 7 miles, 
where we breakfasted, and then set off for the United States, 
which we reached at 5 o'clock P. M., and put up for the 
night on account of my sickness which was excessive, being 
obliged to go to Bed immediately. 

September 29th. Left the United States and arrived at the 
Waggon 40 miles from Philadelphia, that place which con- 
tains so many valued friends. Sister and the Children very 
hearty, the Children very diverting to all but poor Maria, 
who was sick as it was possible to be. We took up our 
lodging at the Compass. 

September SOth. Left the Compass and reached the Hat 
at 10 o'clock A. M., much better than I was. Lost all the 
fine prospects the first day owing to my sickness, which was 
excessive, being obliged to be led from the Waggon to the 
bed and from the bed to the Waggon. 

October 1st. Crossed the Conestogo, a good deal uneasie 
for fear my sickness should return, the Conestogo is a 
beautiful creek with fine prospects around it. After refresh- 
ing ourselves we took a walk up the Creek and I think I 
never saw a more beautiful prospect. You can't imagine 
how I long'd for you my friends to join our little Party and 
to be partakers of the Beauties of Nature that now sur- 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 183 

rounded us. We are seated beneath the shade of inter- 
mingling trees, that grow reeling o'er the creek and entirely 
shade us from the noonday sun. Several since I sat here 
have crossed, some on horse back others in boats, whilest a 
fall of water at a little distance adds dignity to the scene 
and renders it quite romantic. As the sun was setting we 
rode through Lancaster, a Beautiful inland town, with some 
Elegant Houses in it. I was quite delighted with the view 
we have from the Corner of the street where the prison 
stands of the Upper part of the town, which at once pre- 
sents to your sight a sudden rise with houses, trees, and 
gardens, on either side, that has a very pleasant effect. 

October %d. Tho' but a few days since my friends con- 
cluded I could not reach Kentucky, will you believe me 
when I tell you I am setting on the Bank of the Susque- 
hanah, and can take my bit of ham and Biscuit with any 
of them. 

" Returning health has made the face of nature gay, 
Given beauty to the sun and pleasure to the day." 

Just cross'd the river in company with Mrs. Parr and her 
daughter; not the least sick. What gratitude is owing 
from me to the great Author of nature, who in so short a 
time has restored me from a state of Languishment and 
Misery to the most enviable health. 

October 3d. Passed through York Town, a pretty little 
town, and lodged about a mile from that place. 

October 4ih. This day we rode through Abbotstown, a 
trifling place ; find the roads much better from Lancaster 
upwards than from Philadelphia to Lancaster. Reached 
Hunterstown, 113 miles, expect to-morrow to cross the 
South Mountain ; weather exceedingly pleasant. 

October 5th. Left Hunters Town and proceeded to the 
Mountain, which we began to climb about 10 o'clock, 
sometimes riding sometimes walking ; find the roads much 
better in places than we expected ; tho' in others excessive 
Stony the length which is ten miles renders it very tedious. 



184 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

Oblidgenly favored with good weather. "We have halted 
on the top of the Mountain to refresh ourselves and horses. 
This afternoon descended the west side, find it much worse 
than the last side, the road in places for a mile in length so 
very stony that you can scarce see the earth between ; tho' 
at other places beautifully watered by fine springs. Took 
up our lodging at the foot of the Mountain, the people very 
civil, the house right Kentucky. 

October 6th. Left the foot of the Mountain, crossed the 
Falling Spring and proceeded to Chambersburgh, a hand- 
some little Town with some pretty stone and brick Build- 
ings in it. After passing the Town we crossed the Falling 
Spring again, one of the finest Springs in this part of the 
world, by which several mills in this neighborhood are 
turned. Obliged to stop sooner than usual, one of our horses 
being Lame, find the people a good deal shy, at first, but 
after a little while very sociable and Obliging ; treated with 
some very fine Apples which begin to grow very scarce with 
us. I am much afraid we shall be like the Children of 
Israel long for the garlick and onions that your city 
abounds with. 

October 7th. Set off for the North Mountain, which we 
find so bad we are Obliged to foot it up, and could compair 
ourselves to nothing but a parcel of goats climbing up some 
of the "Welch Mountains that I have read of. Sally very 
desirous to know whether this Mountain is not the one 
that's in Mr. Adgate's song. Find this the most fatiguing 
days Journey we have had, the roads so very bad and so 
very steep, that the horses seem ready to fall backwards. 
In many places, you would be surprised to see the Children, 
Jumping and Skiping, sometimes quite out of sight, some- 
times on horseback sometimes in the "Waggon, so you see 
we have variety, tho' sometimes would very willingly dis- 
pence with some of it. Believe me my dear friends, the 
sight of a log house on these Mountains after a fatiguing 
days Journey affords more real pleasure than all the magnifi- 
cent buildings your city contains. Took up our lodging at 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 185 

the foot of the Mountain and met with very good enter- 
tainment. 

October 8th. Left the foot of the mountain and crossed 
Scrub hill, which is very bad indeed. I had like to forgot 
to tell you, I have lost my Children, don't be concerned for 
the loss, for they are still in the family ; the Inhabitants of 
this Country are so cruel as to deprive me of them, but they 
were kind enough to give them to Sister Rees, and I am a 
Miss from Philadelphia. You may rest Assured I don't 
take the trouble to undeceive them, unless Sally (as she 
often does) Crys out where's my Mar. The Children are 
very hearty and bear fatigue much better than we do, tho' 
I think we all do wonderfull. You would be astonished to 
see the roads we have come, some of which seems impassible. 
Rachel mostly passes half the day in Spelling, and Sally in 
Singing ; every house we stop at she inquires if it is not a 
Kentucky house, and seldom leaves it 'till she informs them 
she is a Kentucky Lady. 

October 9th. Crossed Sidling hill and were the greatest 
part of the day in preforming the Journey, the roads being 
so excessive Steep, sidling and Stony, that it seemed impos- 
sible to get along. We were obliged to walk the greatest 
part of the way up, tho' not without company ; there was 
five waggons with us all the morning to different parts. 
This night our difficulties began ; we were obliged to put 
up at a Cabin at the foot of the hill, perhaps a dozen logs 
upon one another, with a few slabs for a roof, and the earth 
for a floor, and a Wooden Chimney Constituted this ex- 
traordinary Ordinary. The people very kind but amazing 
dirty. There was between twenty and thirty of us ; all lay 
on the floor, except Mrs. Rees, the Children and your Maria, 
who by our dress or address or perhaps both, were favored 
with a bed, and I Assure you that we thought ourselves 
lucky to escape being fleaed alive. 

October 10th. After Breakfasting at this clean house, set 
off for Bedford. On our way crossed the Juniata, passed 
through Bedford, a small country town, some parts of the 



186 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

road very bad and some of it very pleasant. For a con- 
siderable distance, we travelled along the Juniata, which I 
thought very pretty. We put up at a house where we were 
not made very welcome, but like travellers we learned to 
pass a few sour looks unoticed. 

October llth. Set off for the Alleghany Mountains, which 
we began to ascend in the afternoon ; found it as good as 
any part of our Journey. "We ascend in the waggon, not 
without fear and trembling, I assure you. We got about 
six miles and fell in with a French Gentleman and his family 
going to Pittsburgh ; we all put up at a little hut on the 
Mountain, which was so small that we prefferred lodging in 
our waggon to be crowded with Frenchmen and negroes on 
an earthen floor. 

October 12th. And pretty comfortably arrived at the top 
of the Cloud cap't Alleghany. It was really awfully pleas- 
ing to behold the clouds arising between the mountains at 
a distance ; the day being drisly and the air very heavy, 
rendered the clouds so low that we could scarce see fifty 
yards before us. This Evening got off the Mountain, it 
being twenty miles across. We passed through Burlain, a 
small town ; as the Election was held at this place, we could 
not be accomodated ; proceeded to a Dutch house in the 
Glades, where we were kindly entertained. 

October 13th. Proceeded to Laurel Creek and Ascended 
the hill. I think this and many more of the scenes we have 
passed through, we have seen Nature display'd in her 
greatest undress, at other times we have seen her dress'd 
Beautiful, beyond expression. The road excessive bad, 
some of the Land fine, The Timber Excellent, and grows 
to an Amazing heighth, the Generality of it from 50 to 
60 feet high. The day by reason of the Badness of the 
roads, could not reach a stage, the hill being 20 miles 
across and our horses a good deal tired. We in Company 
with another waggon were obliged to Encamp in the woods, 
after a Suitable place, at a Convenient distance from a run 
of water was found, a level piece of ground was pitched upon 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 187 

for our encampment. Our men went to give refreshment 
to the Horses, we Females having had a good fire made up, 
set about preparing Supper, which consisted of an Excellent 
dish of Coffee, having milk with us, those who chose had a 
dish of cold ham and pickled beets with the addition of 
Bread, Butter, Biscuit and Cheese, made up our repast. 
After supper, Sister, the Children, and myself took up our 
lodging in the waggon, the men with their Blankets laid 
down at the fire side. The wind being high with some 
rain, disturbed our repose until near daylight, when we 
could have enjoyed a comfortable nap, had we not been 
obliged to rise and prepare breakfast, which we did on 

October 14th. Set out for Chesnut Ridge, horrid roads 
and the stoniest land in the world I believe; every few 
hundred yards, rocks big enough to build a small house 
upon. We arrived at Chenys Mill towards the middle of 
the day and parted with our Company. Chenys mill is a 
beautiful situation, or else the scarcity of such places makes 
us think it more so than it really is. "We were overtaken 
by a family who was going our way, which renders it more 
Agreeable travelling than by ourselves. I think by this 
time we may call ourselves Mountain proof. At the close 
of the day, we arrived at a house and thought it prudent to 
put up for the night. The people are Scotch-Irish, exceed- 
ingly kind but surprisingly dirty, we concluded (as the 
Company that was with us made up 18 besides the family) 
to lodge in our waggon which we did. It rained very hard 
in the night, but we laid pretty comfortably. 

October 15th. After Breakfast we sat off for Miller-Town. 
You would be surprised to see the number of pack horses 
which travel these roads, ten or twelve in a drove. In 
going up the North mountain, Betsy took it into her head 
to ride a horse back, and Daddy undertook to escort her 
on his. In a narrow path, at the edge of a very steep place, 
they met with a company of packers, when her horse took 
it into his noddle not to stir one foot, but stood and received 
a thump behind from every pack that pass'd, and whilst 



188 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

Betsy was in a state of the greatest trepidation, expect- 
ing every moment to be thrown from her horse, her 
Gallant instead of flying to her assistance stood laughing 
ready to kill himself at the fun ; but the poor girl really 
looked pitiable. We put up at a poor little Cabin, the peo- 
ple very kind, which compensates for every Inconvenience. 

October 16th. Mr. Dewees and my brother rode about 
13 miles to McKee's ferry to see how the waters are, as we 
are apprehensive they are too low to go down the river. 
The weather still fine. 

October 17th. Left our little Cabin and proceeded to 
McKee's ferry, where we staid two days in a little hut, not 
half so good as the little building at the upper end of your 
garden, and thought ourselves happy to meet with so com- 
fortable a dwelling. 

October 18th. Our boat being ready, we set off for the 
river and arrived there at 12 o'clock and went on board 
immediately. She lay just below the mouth of the 
Youghiogeny which empties into the Monongahela. At 
2 o'clock we push'd down the river very slowly; intend 
stopping at Fort Pitt, where we expect to meet the waggon 
with the rest of our Goods. Our Boat resembles Noah's 
Ark not a little. At Sun Set got fast on Braddock's upper 
ford, where we staid all that night and 'till 10 o'clock the 
next day. 

October 19th. "With the assistance of some people that 
was coming up in a flat we got off. The water very low. 
I am much afraid we shall have a tedious passage. Our 
boat is 40 foot long; our room 16 by 12 with a Comfortable 
fire place ; our Bed room partitioned off with blankets, and 
far preferable to the Cabins we met with after we crossed the 
mountains. We are clear of fleas, which I assure you is a 
great relief, for we were almost devoured when on Shore. 
The Monongahela, with the many colored woods on each 
side, is Beautiful, and in the Spring must be delightful. 
We are now longing for rain as much as we dreaded it on 
the Land, for it is impossible to get down until the water 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 189 

raises. "We live entirely Independant, and with that there is 
a pleasure which Dependants can never be partakers of. 
We are all very hearty, nor have I had the least sign of 
Sickness since I came on board. May I ever retain a grate- 
full sense of the Obligation due to the great Creator for his 
amazing goodness to me, especially, who had every reason 
from the first of the Journey to fear quite the reverse. About 
3 o'clock we passed the field (just about Turtle Creek) 
where Braddock fought his famous battle with the French 
and Indians, and soon after got fast on the lower ford, but 
by the agility of our men soon got off. The river about a 
Quarter of a mile across. Sammy and Johnny gone ashore 
for milk. 

October 20th. Rose as soon as our men had prepared a 
good fire, got Breakfast, and Mr. Dewees set off for McKee's, 
where we left the horses on account of the waters being 
low; expect to reach Pittsburgh to-night. Just opposite 
the hill where General Grant fought his battle with the 
French and Indians who were in possession of fort Pitt at 
that time. As the sun was setting had in sight the Coal 
Hill and ferry house opposite Pittsburgh ; this hill is amaz- 
ing huge and affords a vast deal more coal than can be con- 
sumed in that place ; what a valuable acquisition it would 
be near your City. 

October 21st. "We are now laying about a mile from Pitts- 
burgh, and have received several invitations to come on 
shore. We have declined all, as the trunks with our clothes 
is not come up, and we in our travelling dress, not fit to 
make our appearance in that gay place. Just received an 
invitation from the French Lady we travelled part of the 
way with to come up. Mr. Tilton calPd on us with Mrs. 
Tilton's Compliments, would be happy to have us to tea; 
he left and three French gentlemen and an Englishman 
came on board and expressed a great deal of pleasure to 
see us so comfortably situated. In the afternoon Mr. and 
Mrs. O'Harra waited on us and insisted on our going to 
their house, which in Compliance to their several invitations 



190 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

we were obliged to accept, and find them very polite and 
agreeable ; we staid and Supp'd with them, nor would they 
suffer us to go on board while we Continued at this place. 

October 2%d. Mrs. O'Harra waited on us to Mrs. Tilton's, 
to Mrs. Nancarrow's and Mrs. Odderong's, and engaged to 
tea with Mrs. Tilton. Col. Butler and his lady waited on 
us to the Boat, was much delighted with our Cabin, took a 
bit of Biscuit and Cheese with a glass of wine and then 
returned to dine at Capt. O'Harra's. Spent the afternoon 
at Mrs. Tilton's with a roomfull of Company, and received 
several invitations to spend our time with the Ladys at Pitt. 
Called on Mrs. Butler and saw a very handsome parlour, 
elegantly papered and well furnished, it appeared more 
like Philadelphia than any I have seen since I left that 
place. 

October 23d. Drank tea at the French ladys with several 
ladys and gentlemen of this place. 

October 24th. The Town all in arms, a report prevailed 
that a party of Indians within twenty miles, coming to 
attack the Town. The drums beating to Arms, with the 
Militia collecting from every part of the Town, has I assure 
you a very disagreeable appearance. 

October 25th. Left our hospitable friends Capt. O'Harra 
and Lady not without regret, as their polite and friendly 
Entertainment demands our utmost gratitude ; they waited 
on us to the boat where we parted forever. Was much dis- 
appointed in sending our letters as the man that was to carry 
them set off before the Messenger got back from the Boat. 
About 11 o'clock A. M. drop'd down the Ohio, and at the 
distance of a mile and a half had a full view of Capt. 
O'Harra's Summer house which Stands on the banks of the 
Alleghany river, which runs about a hundred yards from 
the bottom of their garden. It is the finest situation that 
I ever Saw ; they live at the upper end, or rather out of the 
Town, their house in the midst of an Orchard of 60 acres, 
the only one in that place, from the front of which they 
have a full view of the Monongahela, and the Ohio rivers ; 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 191 

it is impossible for the most lively imagination to paint a 
situation and prospects more delightful. At the close of the 
day got to the lower point of McKee's Island, where we 
came to anchor under a large rock nearly 60 feet high 
having the appearance of just falling in the water ; on one 
side in a large smooth place are engraved a number of names 
among which are your Eliza's and Maria's. 

October 26th and 27th. Staid at McKee's island waiting 
for water, which is too low to go down. Took a walk up 
the hill from which we have a fine prospect of both 
sides of the Island, and saw an Indian grave with three 
others, on the top of the hill, likewise the remains of an old 
entrenchment that was thrown up ye last Indian war. Saw 
three boats full of troops going up to Pittsburgh, we suppose 
they are going up for provisions for the garrison below. 

October 28th. Mr. Dewees and Mr. Shelby went up to 
Pitts ; am in hopes they will bring some intelligence of the 
warriors that went out against the Indians. 

October 29th. Still continue at the Island waiting for 
water ; had the pleasure of two ladys company from the 
Island, who gave us an invitation to visit them. Had a very 
stormy night and a snow of two or three inches. 

October 30th. The weather much in our favour, it rained 
all day. Sewing and reading, and when the weather is fine 
walking, are the amusements we enjoy. The gentlemen 
pass their time in hunting deer, turkeys, ducks, and every 
other kind of wild fowl, with which this country abounds. 
A beautiful doe had the assurance the other day to come 
half way down the hill and give a peep at us, but our 
hunters being out escaped being taken ; fishing makes up 
part of their amusement. 

October 81st. Still in hopes of the waters raising, as we 
had snow again this morning and a prospect of rain ; this 
the most tedious part of our Journey as we still continue in 
one place. 

November 1st. The weather clear and cold and no pros- 
pect of the water raising. Am little apprehensive we shall 



192 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

have to winter among the rocks. You can't imagine 
how I want to see you all, often do I indulge myself in 
fancy's eye at looking at my dear friends in their several 
families and wish to be a partaker of their happiness. Eliza 
too, I long to know how she behaves in her new depart- 
ment; I suppose she often bridles when she looks at my 
Harriet to think she has got the whip hand of her. 

November 2d. "Went over to the Island to see our new 
acquaintance, and they insisted on our repeating our visits. 
While we staid a man came in that was wounded by the 
Indians a few days ago about 20 miles from Pitt. A party 
of Traders were surprised by them in the night, but got off 
without any but a little Blood by one who had been wounded 
in the head with a tomahawk. 

November 3d. Received a visit from three French gentle- 
men who came to dine with us on board the boat. 

November 4th. To-day the two Mr. "Williams came to in- 
vite us to their house, a mile from this place, promising to 
furnish us with horses and saddles ; but we declined accepting 
their invitation, choosing rather to continue where we are 
'till we go down the river. 

November 5th. Mrs. Hamilton and Miss Conrad, from the 
Island, called on us to take a walk up the hill to gather 
grapes, which we got a great abundance of. 

November 6th. Brother and Mr. Shelby (one of our pas- 
sengers) went up to Pitt to procure some necessarys for us. 

November 7th. Dined on an Excellent pike, had the com- 
pany of the three French gentlemen before mentioned to 
dine with us ; who came to invite us to a Ball held at Col. 
Butler's where thirty ladys and gentlemen were to assemble 
for that purpose. It is hardly worth while to say we de- 
clined going, as it was out of our power to dress fit at this 
time, to attend such an Entertainment or else (you know) 
should be happy to do ourselves the honour. 

November 8th. Had several gentlemen to dine on board 
the Ark, expecting a fire hunt of some deer, which keep 
about 200 yards from our boat, on a very high hill, but a 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 193 

shower of rain in the night disappointed them, rendering the 
brush and leaves too wet for that purpose. They passed the 
day in Squirrel hunting, and fishing for pike, this being 
the season for them. I saw one to-day weighing 30 weight, 
the most beautiful fish I ever saw. 

November 9th. Paid a second visit to the Island, which 
keeps us in hopes of rain. 

November 10th. From the 10th to the 18th of November, 
we passed our time in visiting, and receiving visits on board 
our boat, when we bid adeau to the Island friends and pushed 
down the Ohio. Saw a small Kentucky Boat go down yes- 
terday, which induced us to set off as the water has risen 
but very little, but still continues to rise slowly. Passed 
fort Mclntosh P.M. and got fast for a minute on one of the 
ripples. 

November 19th. Passed Backer's fort about 10 o'clock 
A.M., and proceeded down the Ohio ; a very beautiful river ; 
passed Yellow which runs near the Indian shore. The 
country very hilly on both sides of the river, in places a 
half a mile wide, in other places much narrower, so near we 
are to the Indian Country and yet think ourselves pretty safe. 
The wind blowing very hard and being contrary, obliged us 
to put on shore 65 miles below Pittsburgh, and the boat 
tossing about a good deal occasioned one to feel a little 
quamish. Betsy Rees was so sick she was obliged to go to 
bed ; what strange reverses there are in life. The children 
are very hearty and one now is playing with Daddy on the 
shore. "We passed fort Steuben and the Mingo Bottom in 
the night. "We should have got up to see the fort, but the 
watch told us we could see nothing as it was cloudy. The 
barking of the dogs at the fort, the howling of wolves, and 
the yelling of the hunters on the opposite shore, was a little 
alarming at first, but we soon got reconciled to it. 

November 20th. Just as the day broke, got aground on a 
Sand bar, at the Beach Bottom. Just at that time, a small 
Kentucky Boat that was ashore, endeavored to alarm us by 
fireing of a gun and accosting us in the Indian tongue, but 

VOL. XXVIII. 13 



194 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

our people could just discern the boat, which quieted our 
fears. At sunrise we passed by Norris Town, on the Indian 
shore, a clever little situation, with ten cabins plascidly situ- 
ated. Saw another Kentucky Boat, and passed by Wheeling, 
a place where a Fort was kept and attacked last war. 'Tis 
pleasantly situated on a hill. There was a boat and a good 
many people waiting to go down the river. An excessive 
hard gale of wind obliged us to put to shore. After the wind 
abated, we again put out in the channel and were obliged 
again by a fresh gale to put to shore on the Indian coast, 
which caused some disagreeable sensations, as it is not long 
since the Indians have done some mischief hereabouts. 
After the wind lulled, they thought proper to put out again, 
tho' it still continued to rain very hard, which made it very 
dark and disagreeable, as it was impossible to discern where 
the rocks and ripples lay ; but notwithstanding all the ob- 
structions we have met with, have gone at the rate of fifty 
miles in the twenty four hours. Nor have I felt the least 
sickness since the first gale, tho' we have been tossed about 
at an amazing rate. My brother has just come off the watch 
and tells us we are again anchored, tho' on the opposite 
shore. The weather being too bad to proceed, we laid all 
night ashore. It still continued very stormy ; many large 
trees blew down on the bank ; we expected every moment 
the boat would leave her anchor. 

November 21st. The wind still blowing very hard, we 
staid 'till one o'clock, when we again put out, but made but 
little progress, the wind still ahead. Some of our people 
went ashore and brought a fine wild Turkey. Just passed 
Grave Creek 12 miles below Wheeling; at dark passed 
Cappatana Creek, and in the night passed Fishing Creek. 

November %2d. About 10 o'clock A.M. passed Fish Creek, 
being the largest one we have passed. There is a beautiful 
level Bottom on each side which, with the hills on hills, 
which seem to surround it, must render it truly delightful 
in the summer season, when the woods are cloathed in their 
freshest verdure. About 12 o'clock got into the Long 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 195 

Reach, it being 15 miles long, ten out 01 which you may 
see straight forwards, without the interruption of shore 
bends, which are very frequent in this river. The diversity 
of Mountains and Valleys ; and the Creeks that empty into 
the Ohio on both sides, with a variety of beautiful Islands 
in the river, renders it one of the most beautiful rivers in 
the World. 

November 23d. The weather hazy but calm. Call'd up 
by the watch about 5 o'clock A.M.,to look at fort Muskin- 
gum, but it being hazy could discover nothing but the lights 
at the fort, and a vast body of cleared land. At daybreak 
was agreeably serenaded by the drums and fifes at the fort 
beating and playing the Revele. It sounded very pleasing, 
tho at a Considerable distance. At 10 o'clock we got to the 
Little Kanawa; halfpast one got to Little Hockhocking 
river ; and at 4 we passed the Big Hockhocking ; a little 
before dark got opposite Flyn's old Station, a clever little 
place on the bank of the river, with a large corn field on 
each side. At dark came to Bellwell, a place founded by 
Mr. Tilton, late of Philadelphia. 'Tis the most delightful 
situation I have seen on the Ohio ; there are about a dozen 
snug little Cabins built on the bank, in which families re- 
side, with each a field of corn and a garden, with a small 
fort to defend them from the Savages. This settlement 
began about 2 years ago, distant from Fort Pitt 220 miles, 
on the Virginia shore. 

November 24-th. Rose about 6 o'clock to look at Latorch 
Falls, which are very rapid. In the last 24 hours have come 
seventy miles ; had the pleasure of seeing a doe and a beau- 
tiful little fawn on the Indian shore, at too great a distance 
to shoot at. The variety of deer, ducks, turkeys and geese, 
with which this country abounds, keeps us always on the 
look out, and adds much to the beauty of the scenes around 
us. Between the hours of six and eleven, we have seen 
twelve deer, some feeding in the green patches that are on 
the Bottoms, some drinking at the river side, while others 
at the sight of us bound through the woods with amazing 



196 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

swiftness. As we rose from dinner we got to Campaign 
Creek, the place that General Lewes cross'd when he went 
against the Indians, this last war. Just after dark came to 
Point Pleasant ; the moon shining very bright gave us an 
imperfect view of the beauties of this place. "Pis built on 
the banks of the Ohio, and at the point of Kanawa River. 
At the point stands the fort, which, in the time of the 
American war, was attacked by the Indians, but was de- 
fended, and they driven off across the river by Genl. Lewes, 
who owns a vast tract of land at this place. There are 12 or 
15 houses, besides the fort, and a good deal of cleared Land 
about it. The last 24 hours brought us 85 miles further on 
our voyage. 

November 25th. At 6 o'clock A.M. got to the Guyandot 
river, but not being called up, lost the sight of it. You 
can't imagine how much I regret the time lost in sleep ; it 
deprives me of seeing so many of the beauties of nature. 
Just as we were going to breakfast we came to a small river 
call'd by the Indians Quindot; at 9 o'clock came to Tweel pool 
river, and soon after to Big Sandy Creek, on the other side 
of which the Kentucky lands begin. At 3 o'clock passed 
little Sandy river 30 miles Below big Sandy. Came to the 
Scioto in the Evening. Came 100 miles this day. 

November 26th. At 4 o'clock A.M. woke up by a hard gale 
of wind, which continued until breakfast time, when we had 
both wind and tide in our favour. At \ past 9 we came to 
the Three Islands 12 miles from Limestone ; at \ past one 
hove in sight of Limestone ; at 3 o'clock landed safe at that 
place, where we found six boats. The place very indifferent, 
the landing the best on the river ; there are at this time 
about 100 people on the bank looking at us and enquiring 
for their friends. We have been nine days coming from 
McKee's Island, three miles below Pittsburgh. 

November 27th. As soon as it was light my brother set 
oft for Lexington without company, which is far from safe, 
so great was his anxiety to see his family. 

November 28th. Left Limestone at 9 o'clock there being 



Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 197 

30 odd boats at the Landing, the chief of which arrived since 
yesterday 3 o'clock. We got to a little town calPd "Wash- 
ington in the evening, where we stayed and lodged at Mr. 
"Wood's from Philadelphia. 

November 29th. "We left "Washington before light, and 
got to Mary's Lick at 12 o'clock; left there and reached the 
North Fork where we encamped, being 15 or 20 in Com- 
pany. "We made our bed at the fire, the night being very 
cold, and the howling of the wolves, together with its being 
the most dangerous part of the road, kept us from enjoying 
much repose that night. 

November 29th. Set out at daylight for the Blue Licks, 
which we reached at 12 o'clock ; took a walk to look at the 
salt works which were a great curiosity to us. We travelled 
about seven miles further, and took up our lodging for that 
night. 

November 80th. Was agreeably surprised by the company 
of Mr. Rees and Mr. Merrel, who came out to meet us, but 
having taken a wrong road, missed us the evening before. 
We reached Grant's Station that night, where we lodged, 
and on the first of December arrived at Lexington, being 
escorted there by Mr. Gordon and Lady, who came out to 
Bryan's Station to meet us. We were politely received and 
welcomed by Mrs. Coburn. We all stay'd at my brother's 
'till the llth December, when Betsy Rees left us to begin 
house keeping, her house not being ready before. 

January 1st, 1788. We still continue at my brother's and 
have altered our determination of going to Buckeye farm, 
and mean to go down to South Elkhorn as soon as the place 
is ready. Since I have been here, I have been visited by 
the genteel people in the place, and received several invita- 
tions, both in town and Country. The society in this place is 
very agreeable, and I flatter myself I shall see many happy 
days in this country. Lexington is a clever little town with 
a court-house and jail and some pretty good buildings in it, 
chiefly log. My abode I have not seen yet ; a description 
of which you shall have by and by. 



198 Mrs. Mary Dewees's Journal, 1787-1788. 

January 29th. I have this day reached South Elkhorn 
and am much pleased with it. 'Tis a snug little Cabin about 
9 miles from Lexington, on a pretty ascent, surrounded by 
sugar trees; a beautiful pond a little distance from the 
house, with an excellent spring not far from the door. I 
can assure you I have enjoyed more happiness the few days 
I have been here than I have experienced these four or five 
years past. I have my little family together and am in full 
expectations of seeing better days. 

M. D. 



7 he Furniture of Our Ancestors. 199 



THE FURNITURE OF OUR ANCESTORS. 
(Concluded from page 83.) 

China Tables. 

China Tables, plain legs, 3 ft. long, bases, 

brackets, fret top . . . 4.10.0 

do fret frame . . . 8. 0.0 3.10.0 

fire Screen*. 

Fire Screen, plain feet 1.15.0 1.5.0 

do claw feet 2. 2.6 1.12.6 

Dumb Waiters. 

Dumb Waiter, 4 tops, plain feet . . . 5. 0.0 

do claw feet 5.10.0 

do leaves on knees . . . 6. 0.0 

Clothes Presses. 

Clothes Presses, in 2 parts ; upper part 4 ft. 
square, door hung with rule 
joints and sliding shelves ; 
lower part 3 drawers, inside 
work Red Cedar . . 15. 0.0 11. 0.0 
do one part without drawers . 12. 0.0 8. 0.0 

(Add for pilch pediments, dentels, fret and shield 6.0.0) 

Corner Cupboards. 
Corner Cupboards, in 2 parts, 7 ft. high, square 

head and straight pan nels . 9.10.0 6.10.0 

do with common sash doors . 9.10.0 6.10.0 

do with square head, dentels, fret 

and pannel doors . . 10.10.0 7.10.0 

do pediment head, dentels, cor- 

nice fret, shield, roses and 
blazes, plain pannel doors . 15. 0.0 10.10.6 

do with Chinese doors . . 15.10.0 11.10.0 

Cradle. 
Cradle, plain without carving .... 2.15.0 1.10. 



200 The Furniture of Our Ancestors. 

Clock Gases. 

Clock Cases, square head and corners . . 6. 0.0 4. 0.0 
do scroll pediment head, without dentel 

or carved corners . . . 8. 0.0 5. 0.0 

do column corners . . , 10. 0.0 7. 0.0 

do fret, dentels, shield, roses . . 12. 0.0 9. 0.0 

Bedsteads. 
Bedsteads, low posts, 2 posts Mahogany, claw feet, 

plain knees . . . . . 2. 5.0 

do high posts, all Poplar stained except 

feet, posts of Mahogany, claw feet, 

plain knees . . . . 4. 0.0 

do Mahogany, claw feet, plain knees . 7. 0.0 

do knees, fluted pillars, part carved . 10. 0.0 

do Gothic pillars and fret on feet . . 10.10.0 
do Mahogany Field Bed with canopy 

rails 6. 0.0 



China Trays. 

China Trays, fret 18 x 24 in. . . .' . 1.15.0 

Trays for pewter 18x24 in 1. 0.0 

do for knives and forks 15x9 . . . 0.10.0 

Tea Boards. 
Tea Boards, scolloped @ 15 d per in. 

do plain turned 15 @ 22 in. @ 6d per in. 
Decanter Stands, lined, 5/ per pair. 

Night Table. 
Night Table, plain 4. 0.0 3. 5.0 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 201 



PENNSYLVANIA SOLDIBES OF THE KEVOLUTION 
ENTITLED TO DEPEECIATION PAY. 

(Concluded from page 59.) 

Accounts of Monies paid the Officers $ privates of the Second 
Penna. Regiment at Downingstown, April 88, 1781, being 
the $d part of the Depreciation due them respectively. 

Specie. 

Benj. Perry, Surgeon 233. 0.0 

Capt. Joseph McClellan 171.10.0 

" Alexander Walker ..... 157. 0.0 

Lieut. John Strieker . . . : . . . 100.15.0 

" Henry D. Purcell 100. 0.0 

Lieut. Col. Caleb North 248.15.0 

Lieut. Enos Reeves . . . . . . 110. 5.0 

William Phraner, Serg* 40.15.0 

Stephen Louden, Corp 1 32.10.0 

James Allison, private 27.10.0 

William Powers, " 29.10.0 

JohnKeaton, 27.15.0 

Matthew Jerney, "..... 19. 5.0 

Robert Hanna, " . . . . . 27.15.0 

Patrick Cross, " 29.10.0 

Philip Boyle, 17.10.0 

Valentine Miller, " 19.10.0 

Lieut. John Bell Tilden 23.15.0 

John Farmer, private .... 29.10.0 

William Williams, "... . . , . 25.15.0 

Michael Kurtz, " . . . , . , 20.15.0 

William Murren, Lieut. & Q. M. . .. , 44.15.0 

Alexander Burke, private .... 29.10.0 

William Peterson, " , . -. , 21. 5.0 

John Sullivan, " . . : , , 30. 5.0 



202 Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depreciation Pay. 

Specie. 

Thomas Gilby, private 29.10.0 

Arthur Stewart, " 30.10.0 

David Crowley, " . . . . r 29.10.0 

John M'Cloud, 28. 0.0 

Thomas Madden, " 29.10.0 

David Hanna, " 19. 5.0 

Mathias Reinhart, 30.10.0 

William Laidley, " 29.10.0 

William Rule, " 20. 5.0 

Conrad Miller, " 19.15.0 

James Farewell, " 27. 0.0 

Henry Harpole, " 28. 5.0 

John Kelly, 29.10.0 

James Neill, Serg* 41.10.0 

Peter Moyer, private 27. 5.0 

John Smith, 20.15.0 

John Gilbert, 27.15.0 

Robert Harris, Surgeon's Mate . . . 139. 5.0 

Jesse Moore, Fifer 32.10.0 

James Moore, private ..... 29.10.0 

John Moore, Drummer ..... 28.15.0 

Samuel Le Count, private . . . . 18. 5.0 

Peter Gabriel, Serg* 42.10.0 

William Murray, Fifer 19. 5.0 

Thomas Wallace, Q. M. Serg* . . . 41.15.0 

Edward Steen, Drummer . . . . 29. 5.0 

Philip Kease 29.10.0 

John Dallop, Serg* 43. 0.0 

William Herring, Drum Major , . . 39. 5.0 

Samuel Walker, Drummer .... 21. 5.0 

Barnet Kenney, Serg* . . . . . 41. 5.0 

Isaac Garrison, Drummer .... 10.15.0 

Mathias Vantdruff, private . . . . 18.15.0 

John Johnston, Serg* 41.10.0 

Joseph Dailey, " . . . . 28.15.0 

James Williamson, Fife Major . . . 36. 5.0 
Israel Shraeder, Serg* . . . J 9. 5.0 



Pennsylvania Soldiers entitled to Depredation Pay. 203 

Specie. 

John Clack, private '..' . . 17.10.0 

William MDonald, Serg' .... 29.10.0 

Philip Smith, private 27. 5.0 

Peter Gable, " ..... 29.10.0 

John Close, Serg* 32. 0.0 

Christopher O'Neal, private .... 17.15.0 

Thomas Malson, .... 19.10.0 

Thomas Armstrong, " .... 21.15.0 

Andrew Ralston, Serg* 40.10.0 

Christian Becker, private .... 29.10.0 

William Johnston, Corp 1 .... 30.10.0 

Peter Hoggan, private 32. 0.0 

Rodger Moore, Serg* 41.10.0 

James Porter, " 30.10.0 

Daniel Johnston, private . . ... 29.10.0 

George Linn, " .... 29.10.0 

Rohert Fausett, Serg* 32.10.0 

Samuel Allen, private .... 29.10.0 

Benjamin Clifton, " .... 29.10.0 

Jacob Waggoner, " .... 27. 5.0 

Robert Naggington, " .... 29.10.0 

John Anquitin, " .... 22.10.0 

Charles Carter, .... 29.10.0 

Benjamin Tagg, " .... 20. 5.0 

Archibald Murphy, Serg* . . . . 41.10.0 

Hugh Turk, private 28. 0.0 

Evan Holt, Drummer 20.15.0 

Eli Fielding, private 10. 5.0 

Thomas Garvin, Serg* 32.15.0 



3600. 0.0 

Advanced James Moore Esquire for the pur- 
pose of paying off the Bounty to those troops 
about to march . . 300. 0.0 



3900. 0.0 



204 Alexander Lawson. 



ALEXANDER LAWSON. 

BT TOWNSEND WARD. 

[Bead before The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, January 14, 1878.] 

Line engraving, which it is feared may before long become 
a lost art, was introduced into Philadelphia about the close 
of the last century. Among the first of such engravers was 
one who taught himself the art even while he supported 
himself by it. Nothing, therefore, can be more proper than 
to give some account of one whose earnest labors in the face 
of great difficulties were crowned with considerable success. 

Alexander Lawson was born on the 19th of December, 
1772, in the village of Ravenstruthers, in Lanarkshire, Scot- 
land, on the farm where his ancestors had lived for three 
hundred years. His family were Calvinists, and, although 
not conforming to their views in after-life, his whole career 
was marked by the elevated morality and rigid integrity of 
his early training. 

He says, " Trifling circumstances gave me an early love 
for prints, and my schoolmaster drawing a little, though he 
gave me no instruction in it, increased my fondness, so that 
my books had as many houses, trees and birds in them as 
sums." 

He was left an orphan at the age of fifteen, and went to 
Liverpool with the intention of entering into mercantile life 
with an elder brother already established there. A distaste 
for the pursuit soon led him to abandon the effort, for he 
writes, 

"I went to Manchester, in England, when sixteen. A print store 
was near us, where some of the first prints were kept, and my intimacy 
with a bookseller, who showed me all the best works with engravings, 
caused me to become enthusiastically attached to the art. 

" I read all the books on art I could meet with, but they were of little 
use. My first efforts at engraving were made on smooth half-pennies 



Alexander Lawson. 205 

with the point of my penknife, and at this I became pretty expert. I 
soon after obtained a graver, which was made by a blacksmith from my 
description of the instrument, as I understood it to be, from a figure I 
found in a book. We made a clumsy affair of it, and it worked very 
stiffly, but it was a step forward. 

" When in the country, where I often was, I used to amuse myself 01 
an evening in ornamenting the pewter tankard out of which I drank my 
ale. A gentleman who called on me about three years ago (after I had 
been thirty -six years in America) told me that when in the West Biding 
of Yorkshire, while putting up at an inn, he happened to mention that 
he was going to the United States, and the landlord immediately brought 
forward a tankard of my ornamenting, which he said he had preserved 
carefully ever since I was at hii house, and intended to do so as long as 
he lived. 

" I bought a graver at last. I had points made for etching, and tried 
that. I then got a mezzotinto tool and tried that mode of engraving. I 
tried everything, and did nothing well, for want of a little instruction." * 

The French style ol engraving was always the subject 01 
Mr. Lawson's admiration, and imbued with a strong sym- 
pathy for the revolutionary struggle then in progress, for 
what he vainly hoped would secure liberty in France, he 
determined, at twenty years of age, to seek his fortune in 
that country. As a passage could not be obtained from 
England to France, he sailed for the United States and landed 
at Baltimore on the 14th of July, 1794, after a passage of 
six weeks, " where," said he, " I found such perfect freedom 
as soon cooled my ardour for fighting in France." Remain- 
ing but one week in Baltimore, where there was no engraver, 
he came to Philadelphia, and for two years was associated 
with Thackara & Valance. After separating from them his 
first works of merit were four plates for Thomson's 
" Seasons." "When Joel Barlow saw them he expressed a 
regret that the " Columbiad" had not been illustrated at 
home. 

Some time in the year 1798 Mr. Lawson formed a 
friendship for his fellow-Scotchman, Alexander "Wilson, for 
whose work on ornithology, and its continuation by Charles 

1 Dunlap's "History of the Bise and Progress of the Arte of Design in 
the United States," I. 433. 



206 Alexander Lawson. 

Lucien Bonaparte, he engraved all the best plates. His 
work on Wilson's birds was a labor of love. He did it 
" for the honor of the old country, and his compensation 
was at the rate of one dollar a day," thus honorably con- 
necting himself with the progress of natural history in this 
country. Into this branch of art, in which he took great 
delight, he carried the strong love of truth that characterized 
him, either refusing to follow any draughtsman whose works 
were not correct, or drawing them himself from the subject 
on the copper. 

In Wilson's " Ornithology" most of the birds were en- 
graved from a spirited outline by Wilson or from the stuffed 
or fresh-killed specimens with which that naturalist con- 
stantly supplied him. The plates for Lewis and Clarke's 
" Travels" were engraved by him, and also those for the con- 
tinuation of Wilson by Charles Lucien Bonaparte. Then 
came those for Haldeman's " Conchology," and for that ot 
Dr. Amos Binney. In the two latter works the drawings 
were made by one of Mr. Lawson's daughters, who inherited 
his delicacy of eye and hand. Four exquisite plates of 
animals, engraved for the late George Ord, have never yet 
been given to the world. Among the better-known products 
of his graver are a "Washington," after Stuart; "Robert 
Burns," after Nasmyth ; " Mrs. Susannah Poulson," after 
James Peale ; " Perry's Victory on Lake Erie," after Birch ; 
" McDonough's Victory on Lake Champlain," after Krim- 
mel ; " McPherson's Blues Taking Leave," after Barralet ; 
" My Uncle Toby and the Widow Wadman," after Leslie ; 
" The Painter's Study" and " The Raffle," after Mount; " The 
Snare," after Chapman ; " The Happy Family," after Krim- 
mel ; " Past, Present, and Future," three female figures ol 
much beauty ; " Election Day in Philadelphia, a Scene in 
Front of the State-House," after Erimmel. This plate was 
left unfinished, and three impressions only were taken from 
it, one of which is in the collection of the Historical Society. 

A large collection of Mr. Lawson's engravings has been 
placed in the library of the Academy of Natural Sciences of 



Alexander Lawson. 207 

this city. They cover a term of fifty-three years, and, even 
to those who were acquainted with his untiring industry, 
the number of them and the variety of their subjects will 
excite astonishment. And yet even this collection does not 
include, except in an illustration or two, a class of engravings, 
such as maps, of which he made many, and representations, 
for scientific purposes, of objects done only in outline. 
Taking them altogether, their number, variety, spirit, and 
finish, we must look upon their author (for so we may in 
some sense call him) as one of the remarkable engravers ot 
our country. 

But it was not alone in this country that he is thus es- 
teemed. Mr. George Ord wrote to him from Paris on the 
27th of June, 1829, " When lately in London I had the 
satisfaction of seeing for a few moments Bonaparte's third 
volume, and observed there is no falling off in the beauty 
and correctness of the plates. Were I to relate to you all 
that they say in London in commendation of your admirable 
work, I should put your modesty to the blush. Let it suffice 
to declare there is but one opinion among those competent 
to decide in matters of the kind. I have even heard some 
express wonder how such effect could be produced, and 
venture an opinion that this effect superseded colors in 
many instances, especially in some grouse where sober tints 
do not require the addition of color." Again, on the 25th 
of June, 1830, he writes, " I had with me a proof of your 
* Elk and Ground Hog,' * Lizards,' and the last Hawk' 
of Wilson, all of which I presented to Dr. Leech, of the 
Zoological department of the British Museum. There were 
several naturalists present, and they all viewed your * Elk 
and Ground Hog' with astonishment. They united in de- 
claring that such work could not be produced in England. 
I asked whether or not Scott was equal to the task. They 
replied that Scott and Milton could produce fine pictures, 
but not such representations of nature. This is a feather in 
your cap, my friend." 

The remarks of Mr. Ord do not seem too flattering when 



208 Alexander Lawson. 

we find that Charles Lucien Bonaparte, the Prince of Musig- 
nano, writes to Mr. Lawson from Rome on the 2d of July, 
1830, as follows : " "Were you to hear what all the Italian 
artists are saying of your engravings, and especially the 
celebrated Titi (of whom I shall send you some works by 
the first opportunity, that you may judge of the value of 
his compliments), it is then you would be really proud." 

In personal appearance Mr. Lawson was like many of his 
race, tall and commanding. Endowed with superior mental 
powers, he was a great reader, and became familiar with the 
best writers in our language and with the history of art 
throughout the world. His nature was kindly and genial, 
and he was the life of the social circle. On the 6th of June, 
1805, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Scaife, a native of 
Cumberland, England, who had come to Philadelphia five 
years previously. He pursued his art until within ten days 
of his death, which occurred here on the 22d of August, 
1846, in his seventy-third year. An only son, who became 
a good artist under his father's instructions, survived him 
only a few years. Two ef his daughters are yet living. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 209 



MAREIAGE LICENSES OF CAEOLINE COUNTY, MAEY- 
LAND, 1774-1815. 

CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY DOWNE8 CRANOR. 

[Caroline County, Maryland, was formed in 1774 from parts of the 
counties of Dorchester and Queen Anne. The licenses have been copied 
from the records in the office of the Clerk of the Court of the county, 
and but one year (1776) is missing. No attempt has been made to 
correct the spelling of any of the names, some of which are almost 
undecipherable on the record. From 1774 to 1804 the license fee was 
one pound, and subsequently four dollars.] 



April 6. John Pritchett Fisher and Ruth Thomas. 
11. Solomon Brady and Margaret Bailey. 
27. John Lucas and - Morgan. 
John Cooper and Eliza Lucas. 
May 6. Edward Minnier and Priscilla Collison. 

20. Jacob Wootters and Mary Jump. 
Joshua "Willis and Deborah Greehawk. 

22. James Wainwright and Elizb th Berry. 

25. William Williams and - Merrick, Queen 

Ann Co. 
June 1. Thomas Orrell and Sarah Sommers. 

Nathan Downes and Ann Cooper. 
14. Tobias Burk and Sarah Stainer. 

21. Joseph Ward and Lydia Jones. 
William Banning and Rebecca Cheez. 

July 7. Hebijah - and - Walker, of Queen 

Ann Co. 

August 3. Solomon Wilson and Hannah Bett or Belt. 
Washington Gibson, of Talbot Co., and 

Rebecca Brutt, of same. 
MacCabee Alford and Rachel Bozman. 

VOL. XXVIII. 14 



210 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 17 7^-18 15. 

August 14. "William Parrish and Rachel Harwood. 

16. Richard Dudley and Mary Manship. 

17. Samuel Fountain and Fountain. 

John Culbreth and Sarah Bradley. 
Capt. Samuel Nicholson and Pr. Force. 

24. William Clayton and Sarah Yanderford, of 

Queen Ann Co. 

25. Thomas Parratt Roe and Jane Clark, of 

Talbot Co. 
29. John Price or Rice and Elizabeth Clark, of 

Talbot Co. 
Nathan Nickerson and Mable Grace, of 

Caroline Co. 

September 4. Park Webb and Mary Fountain, of Dorches- 
ter Co. 
6. Bozman Harwood and Ann Harwood, of 

Dorchester Co. 
8. Carter Cochran and Rebecca Clough, of 

Talbot Co. 

10. James Snitch and Rebecca Flaharty. 
14. William Chilton and Rebecca Talbot. 

Gaily Lane and Araminta Dial. 
16. Ezekiel Smith and Ann Jacobs. 
20. Jonas Jones and Eliza Sill. 

28. John Frantum and Eliza Hopkins Shanna- 

han, of Talbot Co. 

29. Daniel Skinner and Mary Casson. 
October 3. Robert Hopkins and Dorcas Hooper. 

John Porter and Lydia Kinnannon. 
16. John Gregory and Ann Armstrong. 

James Gregory and Eliza Bush. 
19. Daniel Hart and Sarah Lockerman. 
25. James Ayres and Ann Griffin, of Talbot Co. 
29. Timothy Price and Ann Dudley, do. 
31. Hezekiah Coxill and Eliza Carter. 
November 5. William Price and Mary Birkham. 
December 3. Moses Butler and Elonor Plumer. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 211 

Received by William Richardson, Deputy Clerk, and dis- 
posed of as follows, to wit. 

December James Russmer and Ann Martindale. 

12. "William Batchelor and Margaret McCan. 
20. John Willoughby and Ann Walker. 

1775. 

January 28. Levin Blades and Betsey Newman. 

Daniel Polk and Margaret Miller White. 
Perdue Martindale and Anna Andrew. 
Curtis Jacobs and Polly Cannon. 
Joseph Bradley and Betsey Richards. 
Risdon Fisher and Mary Parker. 
Zepheniah Polk and Lucretia Cawsey. 
Joseph Frantom and Mary Ann Gam or. 

Charles Doffin and Bozman. 

John Marshall and Sherwood. 

James Merrick and Tilpha Quarternnis. 
Thomas Hancock and Cleia Morris. 
William Owens and Elizabeth Meffin. 
Edward Smith and Elizabeth Baxter. 
John Kirby and Sarah Kirby. 
Archibald Smith and Sarah McCullum. 
Thomas Robinson and Sarah Tool. 
Elijah Charles and Hebe Moore. 

Received by William Richardson, Deputy Clerk, 24 Mar- 
riage Licenses, and disposed of in the manner following. 

William MMahon and Catharine Mifflin. 
James Porter and Sophia Parmarr. 
August 9. Francis Claymore and Nancy Cleft. 

Nicholas Groldsborough and Rebecca Myers. 
Robert Lloyd Nicols and Susanna Chamber- 
lane. 

William Colescott and Mary Wheatley. 
Richard Boswell and Mary Davis. 
Abnor Roe and Julia Sylvester. 



212 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

August 9. Robert Nutter and Sarah Bagwell. 
John Stevens and Ann Anderson. 
Matthew Pawson and Mary Caulk. 
Joseph Daffin and Eleonar Ennals. 
"William Jacobs and Elizabeth Bowdle. 
Richard Stanford and Hester Ann Russnur. 
Parker Selby and Priscilla Fountain. 
James Summers and Abisha French. 
Richard Lockerman and Mary Darden. 
Thomas Smith and Deborah Pratt. 
John Anderson and Elizabeth Horney. 
Richard Thomas and Rhoda Porter. 
Richard Kennard and Anne Carroll. 
James Barnulle Jr. and Sarah Charshe. 
John Reynolds and Elizabeth Pennington. 
October 30. To 24 Marriage Licenses received by him and 

disposed of, viz. 

Moses Floyd and Drucilla Rumbly. 
John Roberts and Mary Horney. 
William Dudley and Sarah Nicols. 
James Boon and Mary Toolson. 
George Stevens and Sarah Bayley. 
Ambrose Goslin and Elizabeth Brown. 
John Cheever and Sarah Chalaghane. 
Skinner Newman and Mary Bozman. 
Woolman Emerson and Esther MGregory. 
John O'Bryan and Sarah MGinney. 
"William Coplen and Elizabeth Shaw. 
Robert Hardcastle and Mary Sylvester. 
James Barwick and Rebecca Roberts. 
Christopher Driver and Sarah Ringgold. 
John Oram and Mary Marshall. 
Robert Ethernson and Rachel Santee. 
James Truit and Sarah Williams. 
Henry Mason and Esther Baggs. 
John Tull and Catherine Merrell. 
John Chelcott and Eliza Hill. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 213 

October 30. John Staut and Mary Carter. 

Samuel Thomas and Margaret Oldham. 
Shadrach Liden and Rebekah Fogwell. 
John Keets and Ann Chalaghand. 

.7777. 

May . Joshua Chipley and Mary Hunter. 

June 12. William Garey and Henny Garland. 

27. "William Martindale and Esther Baynard. 

28. Jethro Virison and Mary Ann Leverton. 
July 17. James Shields and Tarman. 

18. Oliver Hackett Jr. and Ann Wilson. 

21. James Fisher and Mary Holson. 
23. John Plummer and Sarah Phillips. 

August 9. George Downes and Ann Hall. 

22. John Malcolm and Mary Lawrence. 

25. James Higgins and Hannah Jarmen. 

26. James Sullivane and Margaret Wheatley. 
October 26. Elijah Taylor and Ann Griffith. 

29. James Scott and Ann Shaw. 
November 12. Jadwin Montague and Henrietta Hynson. 

18. John Cohee and Celia Clark. 

December 8. William Dowins and Rachel Dawson. 

21. Richard Oxenham and Elizabeth Rathall. 

23. William Tull and Mary Grace. 
31. George Turner and Smith. 

1778. 

January 2. Thomas Hughlett and Rebekah Mason. 

4. John Ireland and Ann Alford. 

9. William Goult and Saphira Baynard. 

10. Samuel Shelton Stop and Margaret Douglass. 

14. Isaac Jump and Sarah Leverton. 

16. John Mitchell and Sarah Scott. 

18. William Bullin and Elizabeth Barmooll. 

21. Nathan Madden and Ann Hutton. 

23. Andrew Price and Prudence White. 



214 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 

January 26. Joseph Boone and Rebekah Cox. 

27. Nicholas Wood and Ann Clark. 
30. Robert Jones and Deborah Downes. 

February 3. John Molony and Eleonar Anthony. 

4. James Fisher and Mce Turner. 

10. Thomas Roe and Mary Baggs. 

11. Jacob Jump and Mary Leverton. 
13. Littleton Berry and Mary Towers. 
15. David Craig and Ann Merchant. 

23. James Larey and Elizabeth Morgan. 
" James Slemarr and Mary Exbanks. 

24. James Harris and Katharine Dodd. 

25. James Barwick and Cordelia Hynson. 
" William Whiteley and Sarah Baynard. 

March 7. Samuel Fountain and Elizabeth Purnell. 

22. Nathaniel Potter and Jane Douglass. 

April 1. Solomon Barwick and Ross Lawful. 

19. John Allen and Rebeckah Smith. 
25. Robert Waddell and Elizabeth Ball. 

29. George Plowman and Elizabeth Millington. 
Christopher Jump and Hannah Wootters. 

May 11. Vincent Pinkind and Rebekah Young. 

12. Richard Browning and Rebekah Camp. 

15. James Matthews and Alice Faulkner. 

20. Thomas Larrimore and Rebekah Frampton. 
Archibald Jackson and Susannah Jackson. 

30. George Bell and Elizabeth Pinkerton. 
June 3. John Jones and Elizabeth Roberts. 

7. John Erichston and Hannah Hollis. 

12. John Trimbly and Rachel James. 

July 6. John Payne and Elizabeth Parker. 

16. Richard Ozmont Jr. and Elizabeth La- 

compte. 

Benjamin Kelly and Leveniah Johnson. 
24. John Merrick and China Dixon. 

28. Charles Manship and Ann Bland. 
Aaron Manship and Sarah Bland. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 216 

August 6. Richard Smith and Sarah Banning. 
10. George Bright and Rachel Chapman. 

12. James Billing and Tilley Blades. 
September 1. Luke Andrew and Mary Rowins. 

James Blades and Sidney Jordan. 
9. James Hambleton and Elizabeth Dawson. 
14. Jacob Wootters and Mary Warner. 

21. Benthal Stevens and Mary Newells. 

22. Raleigh Marshall and Mary Barwick. 
26. John Sylvester and Elizabeth Fisher. 

28. "William Smith and Ann Green. 

29. John Robinson and Amelia Sullivane. 
October 2. Perry Garmon and Esther Andrew. 

7. Thomas Smith and Katharine Price. 

13. Shadrick Willis and Ann Wright. 
Elijah Griffith and Nice Dawson. 
Reuben Connerly and Rebekah Pritchett. 

19. Thomas Strangham and Ann Harrington. 

November 2. Daniel Sawdon and Eliz* Broadaway. 

Henry Clift and Eliz* Cronnoon. 

3. Daniel Edgall and Mary Lowe. 

17. William Keete and Mary Jump. 

18. Thomas Casson and Martha Baynard. 

23. Richard Powell and Ann Kinnamon. 
26. Thomas Ozment and Rachel Sylvester. 

30. Purnell Sylvester and H. Evans. 
December 4. James Boggs and Ann Mason. 

16. Anne Cohee and Sarah Sprouse. 

21. William Loveday and Eliza Dudley. 

22. John Bell and Ann Ganatt. 

31. Henry James and Jane Clark. 

(To be continued.) 



216 Two Letters of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. 



TWO LETTEES OF CHAELES CAEEOLL OF 
CAEEOLLTON. 

[Dreer Collection of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania.] 

DOOHORAGEN, 22 d Octo. 1777 
DEAR SIR, 

Yesterday we rec d the glorious news of the taking Bur- 
goyne & his whole army prisoners of war I sincerely con- 
gratulate you on this important event, I hope it will be fol- 
lowed by the defeat of Howe at least by a disgraceful & precip- 
itate retreat from the city of Ph* & State of Pensylvania. 

I write this letter to request the favor of you to obtain 
from the board of war two weavers from among the british 
prisoners; I would prefer british workmen on account ot 
language & superior skill to Hessians, but rather than not 
get weavers I must take Hessians or else my poor slaves 
must go naked this winter Mr. Atlee can inform you 
whether there are such workmen among the prisoners at 
Lancaster or Lebanon, for altho' the most of them have 
been removed, it is most probable some of them have re- 
mained behind I must entreat you, Sir, to exert yourself 
in rendering me this essential piece of service. My father 
would pay them 3 a month apiece ; they will be well fed & 
will live in a wholesome country & so remote that they will 
not be able easily to make their escape, if they should at- 
tempt it. I hope General Washington will soon give us a 
fresh supply of prisoners, and from these perhaps you will 
be able to select the weavers, if not from those already in 
our possession. The weavers we want are such as have 
been used to weaving coarse linens & woollens. I beg my 
compliments to Mrs. Peters and remain 
Dr. Sir, 

Yr most hum. Ser't, 

CH. CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. 

P.S. Please to acknowledge the receipt of this letter & 
let me know whether there is any prospect of obtaining soon 
the weavers ; if they are to be had I will send for them ; 



Two Letters of Charles Carroll of CarroUton. 217 

one, if two cannot be had, will be better than none, please 
to direct to me at Annapolis as I shall be there in a few 
days attending our Assembly. 
To RICHARD PETERS, ESQUIRE 

Secretary to the board ot war 

At York 

Pensylvania. 

DOUGHORAGEN 22 d Aug. 1806 
D SIR 

I reed this forenoon y r letter 01 the 13 th instant, I will 
speak to my manager & to my clerk & prevail upon them 
to vote for you & Col. Mercer, and to obtain as many votes 
for you both as electors of the Senate in this neighborhood 
as their influence & exertions can procure, but all I fear 
without success You shall also have my vote The people 
are not as yet made to feel the evils in store for them, 
of which the weak measures of the ruling faction have laid 
the foundation. It is probable peace between England & 
France will be made in the course of this year unless death 
should rid England of Fox the leading minister. 

In 12 months from the definitive treaty of peace between 
those countries, the Emperor of the French & King ot 
Italy & indeed of almost the whole European continent will 
demand the cession from us of Louisiana, and in 12 months 
more from the demand made he will get possession of it. 
What is to prevent him ? We are totally unprepared for war 
and likely to continue so. The conduct of the Executive 
respecting Miranda's expedition, which was known to them & 
underhandedly encouraged, will afibrd Napoleon ample cause 
for justifying his demand, & if refused, of resorting to force. 

Thus we shall lose both land & money. 

I remain with respect and regard 
Dear Sir 

Yr most hum. Serv* 

CH. CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. 

To HORATIO RIDOUT, ESQ B 

White Hall. 



218 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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of Philadelphia 


William Holland 
William Robarts 
both of Sussex Co. 


aware 
Vincent Gilpin 
Joseph Shallcross 
Catharine Johnson 


all of Wilmington 
Reese Meredith 


of Philadelphia 
William Hiorn 
of Bristol 


Edward Forrest 


Andrew Morrogh 


Patrick James Morro 


Dennis Connell 
Andrew Morrony 
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Stephen Moylan 
Nicholas Bodkin 


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1, 1726-1775. Continued. 


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of Philadelphia 
Richard Dennis 
Richard Bulkely 
both of Philade 


Mess Parr & Bui 
of Lisbon 
Jeremiah Bowen 


Aaron Cresse 
both of Coha 
Jersey 
Archibald McTagi 
of Philadelphia 
Jonas Matson 


William Owen 
Anthony Stocker 
of Philadelphia 
Jonathan Hunn 
Owen Williams 


both of Kent 
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Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 235 



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236 Notes and Queries. 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 
Mote*. 

SALARIES AND SOME EXPENSES OF THE ASSEMBLY OF PENNSYL- 
VANIA, 1756. The following are some of the "Incidental Charges" 
allowed by the Assembly in 1756 : 

To the Honourable W m Denny Esq by order of Assembly . 600. 0. 

To W m Allen, Esq. Chief Justice of the Supream Court . 200.0.0 

To Lawrence Growdon, Esq. Second Judge of Do . . . 60. 0. 

To Caleb Copeland, Esq. Third Judge of Do . . . 60. 0. 

To Rich'd Peters, Esq. as Clerk of the Councill . . 15. 0. 

To Chas. Brockden, his acc't as Master of the Rolls . . 11.13.11 

To Benj. Franklin, his account for printing votes &c. . 201. 4. 3 

To Hannah Boyd, her acc't, for Ind n Expenses . . . 22.19.10 

To Mary Jones, her acc't for the Entertainment . . 127. 0. 

To William Franklin for expenses paid by him for Do . 1. 5. 

To Samuel Kirk, his salary as Sergeant at Arms . . 8. 0. 

To Rich'd Hockley, his acc't, for Affixing the Great Seal . 9. 15. 

To David Edwards for brushes, cleaning the House &c. . 7.16. 6 
To W m Franklin for Postage of Publick Letters to Gov r 

Morris 20. 0. 

To Do. for postage of Publick Letters to Gov r Denny . 18. 8 
To Benj n Franklin for Establishing a Post between Win- 
chester & Phil* the Charge being agreed to be paid 
for by a Resolve of the house ; & for Postage of Let- 
ters to the army under Gen' 1 Braddock . . . 210.13. 9 
To David Edwards for his Attendance as Doorkeeper 121 

days @ 4/p. day 24. 4. 

To Charles Stow for summoning eighty eight Councills @ 

2/6 each 11. 0. 

To W m Franklin his acc't for Postage of Publick Letters to 

the Secretary 10. 0. 

PETITION OF OWNERS OF LANDS IN THE "NECK" TO RESTRAIN 
SWINE FROM RUNNING AT LARGE, 1703. 
To the Generall Assembly of the Province of Pensilvania now Sitting 

at Philadelphia, The Petition of several Inhabitants of the City & 

County of Philadelphia, 
humbly Sheweth 

That Whereas your Petitioners being Owners of Lands in the Neck 
between Delaware & Skoolkill below Philadelphia, And being Desirous 
to Clear Drain & Make other Improvements on Meadow Ground & 
Marshes ; Are Greatly Discouraged and hindered by reason of Swine 
Running at large And Breaking into Your Petitioners' Improvements, 
To their Great Damage and Ruin of their Labours, 

Therefore your Petitioners Do humbly Desire That a Law be Made 



Notes and Queries. 237 

either to Prohibit Swine to Run at large in the said Neck Or Else to 

Oblige the Owners of them to Ring and Yoke them Under such Penalties 

as you in your Wisdom shall see meet ; 

And your Petitioners as in Duty bound shall allways Desire your 

Prosperity &c. 

Will : Trent, 
W m Carter, 
Tho : Masters, 
A. Morris, 
John Thomas, 

[1703-5.] 

LETTER OF THOMAS LLOYD TO HIS WIFE, 1678. 
DEAR & LO : WIFE 

Since my last writing I enjoyd pretty good health excepting 3 or 4 
days of a Troublesome Cold, w h I blesse the Lord by Care & warme 
Cloathing, I have indifferently escaped. We have had a mighty restor- 
ing & establishing Time. A great many of the Chiefest y 1 absented 
themselves from friends, & were gone into a separation, were to the 
great Joy of our hearts restored, & more preparing to Come in ; It is 
very well with us through the goodnesse of the lord, & his prisoner 
doth appear to the great refreshm' of our hearts ; and I have a seale in 
my heart that it is well with thee & friends I can say litle of our 
Coming downe as yet till after next 3 d day, but I suppose ab' 10 dayes 
hence, If the lord continues us health we may set hence homewards. 
Thou may hear my minde further by my next writing The lord p r serve 
thee & me in his love & fear, y* in the meantime we be satisfyd ; & 
rejoyce in the worke of the lord in each particular when we come 
together ; G. F. & A. Parkers dear love is to thee & the rest of friends ; 
my dear love is to thy selfe, Sister lloyd, Dear A : & S : Rich : Evan ; 
peggie & the rest of friends : Bettie Evans is very well ; Griffith, Cat- 
ties father, I thinke is n* in the City. My dear Children with thy 
selfe & the rest, I comend to the tender protection of our heavenly 
father ; I rest 

Thy Tmely lo : Husband 

THOMAS LLOYD. 

London the 9 th day at ) 
night being the 9 th day V 
of this instant 11 th m* ) 

[1677 or 1678.1 

Addressed 

These 

For my dear & loving Wife 

Mary lloyd at Coed Cowryd 

near Welshpoole in Montgomeryshire 

North Wales. 
(p. post Salop.) 

LETTER OF MARTHA FISHER, FIRST QUAKER PREACHER IN 
AMERICA, TO MARGARET Fox. 

Deare freind Margaret Fox, to whom is my love in the Lord I 
Recived tow Lectors from thee and I had answered the last but I did 
stay to have betor nuse then yet I have to send thee but need say 
but Leettill becaus frends douth take care to send thee word but thy 



238 Notes and Queries. 

deare husband has been had to and againe severall times by the 
keeperes of the prison for the next day after thy sone Lower went out 
of London it being the last day of the tearme the judges sent for 
thy husband to the same place he was befor and thay gave the sen- 
tence that he was to goe downe to Woster which cannot be Eevocked 
but all the favor that can be shewed to him is that he may gow downe at 
his owne Leasuer and to be there at the Sises which is the 2 day of the 
2 month at Woster but thay sent for him in great hast from Kinston 
to have him goe then deare Margaret my deare love is to thy chillderen 
and to thomas Lower and all freinds heare there love is to thec and we 
are fellowfeeling of thy sorow noe more but my love. 

MARTHA FISHER. 

the 7 day of the 

1 month 1673, London : 

PENN MANUSCRIPTS. The originals of the following letters of 
Letitia Penn, Lady Juliana Penn, and Anne Penn are in the Etting 
Collection of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania : 

Letitia Penn to Hannah Fishborn. 

WOK : ye-18-6-1702. 
mo 

DEAR HANNAH. 

I hope thou wilt excuse my silence since it has been for want of 
oppertunity since I knew what to call thee or how to express myself; 
and now readily accept this to salut & desier for thee all y e happiness 
y* state can afford, and dout not but in order to it thou hast y e principal 
Verbe a very honest and good Companion I should have tooke kindly 
a few lines by this bearer and hope thou wilt some time or other favour 
me so far. this may tell thee through Mercy wee are all well and with 
my Brother and Sister att poor Worminghurst y* I have so often told 
thee of ; theire Children are fine forward Children & tho' I say it very 
handsome to : y e boy Like my father as can be, & the gurl not unlike, 
they designe over in y e Spring & y n I shall have a great loss, but not to 
carry both y e Children ; I am very sencesible of how I am in debpt to thee 
for all thy kindness and shall be glad if att any tune I can be servicable 
on this side of y e water, I am shure none shall be more ready y n her y* 
is with kind Love to thy good parents to whom I lye under deep obli- 
gations & pray give it also to thy husband with thy sweet self. 
Thy affectionate & engaged friend 

L. PENN. 

Pray remember me kindly to thy brothers & Cousins & All y e Hos- 
kinses. 

Lady Juliana Penn to Dr. William Smith. 
SIR, 

This is the first & surest opportunity w ch has offer' d since I was 
favor'd with yours of the 22 a of Jan ry and which I make use of to 
thank you for it, & for y r very obliging and kind expressions towards 
my Family. We have pass'd several months in anxiety ab 1 yourself, & 
all our Friends in America. The hearing from them, when it can be, 
is a very great satisfaction, tho' the information we gain of the dis- 
tresses incident to so much confusion, is very greivous to learn. Yr 
Promise of another Letter with the friendly design of making it longer, 
& fuller, obliges me extremely, & I shall wait impatiently for its arrival. 

You desired me in a former Letter to look amongst the Papers in my 



Notes and Queries. 239 

Hands, to find some you left with M r Penn in the year 1764 relating to 
the business which brought you to England, and I have the pleasure to 
tell you, I believe I have found them, they shall be safe till I hear 
farther from you about them. 

I delivered your message to M r Eich' d Penn who will be very happy 
to hear from you. He and all his family are in good health. With 
my best wishes for the happy event of Peace, and success of the Com- 
missioners ; & for yours & your family's health & wellfare, I shall 
conclude this. Being Sir, Your much Oblig'd 

Humble Serv't 

JULIANA PENN. 

SPRING GARDEN, April 10, 1778. 
Rev. Dr. Smith. 

Anne Penn ( Wife of John Penn) to Dr. Parke. 
(Received August 7, 1780.) 

Sunday, half after eleven. 
SIR, 

Mr. Penn has slept pretty well but thinks he was feverish last night 
& that he has continued so ever since. He judges from his hands being 
rather warmer than usual & his having no appetite but a constant desire 
to drink, & tho' he does not feel very ill, he is by no means so well as he 
expected to be today. 

He is therefore apprehensive that his disorder may turn out a remit- 
ting fever rather than an intermittent, & would be glad to know whether 
he should continue taking the Bark while he thinks himself not quite 
free from a fever & whether you think anything else would be proper 
for him. He is desirous of knowing whether he may eat grapes with- 
out the skins, or watermelon. 

I am sir 
Yr humble Servant 

ANNE PENN. 

Upon the whole I am pretty much as I was last night when you left 
me being then, I think, a little feverish. J. P. 

Mr. Penn has taken in all 6 doses of Bark & is now going to take 
another dose. 

LANCASTER COUNTY MILITIA, 1807. The militia of Lancaster 
County, composed of two brigades, which formed the 4th Division, 
consisted of the following regiments : 

First Brigade. 1st Kegiment, Lt.-Col. Thomas ; 2d Eegiment, Lt.- 
Col. Wright; 3d Kegiment, Lt.-Col. Eeam ; 4th Eegiment, Lt.-Col. 
Ensminger, and Troop of Horse, Capt. Henderson. John Light, Bri- 
gade Inspector. 

Second Brigade. 34th Eegiment, Col. Strickler ; 60th Eegiment, 
Lt.-Col. Boal; 98th Eegiment, Lt.-Col. Boyd ; 104th Eegiment, Lt.- 
Col. Long. Amos Slay maker, Brigade Inspector. J. 

A NEW JERSEY EEFUGEE. The following letter of David Anderson 
to Josiah Foster, Burlington, New Jersey, is in the Foster-Clement 
Collection of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania : 
SIR, 

Job Atkinson is now at Eeece Prices and may be taken if you think 
it needful as he Apprehends no Danger of any Person taking notice of 



240 Notes and Queries. 

him. Least you should be unacquainted with the Circumstance it is 
that he has been under Arms with the Refugees some time at Egg Har- 
bour. I have been informed that he engaged with them at Henry 
Shinns And that Marmaduke Fort saw him List, and that David 
Cavalier and Joseph Addams seen him under Arms. Either of them 
will I expect be sufficient and may be had if you think it worth your 
Notice. 

I am Sir with Eespect 

Your most Humble Serv' 

DAVID ANDERSON 

EVESHAM June 26, 1782. 

LETTER OF JAMES NAYLER TO GEORGE Fox. 

Dare Brother the intents of malitious men towards thee I have 
long time felt in my soule & I can truely say have beene opressed with 
it, And when I heard that thou was in prison it smote at my life, & 
went through my soule as a wounding weapon, And being that day 
going to a Gen* 11 Meeteing at Pomfrit, It was laid on me to hast to Lon- 
don, so I went on from thence to Balby, & was at y e departing & burying 
of Tho : Aldam my dear brother & thence to London where I now am, & 
in y* will of god I desire to be found, And somewhat of his mind in 
my comeing I have scene, & have peace in it blessed be god for ever- 
more, And my heart is with thee to y e strength I have in y e Lord & in 
his power, I am somewhat refreshed ag* all that man intends ag* thee, 
even god Almighty & his eternall power is over all blessed for ever 
Amen. J. N. 

(Endorsed) For G. F. 
these. 

WOOD STOVES OF 1816. 

PHILADELPHIA Dec. 1816. 

MR. J. FOSTER 

Bought of Fougeray & Schreiner, 

One Stove (which is warranted to stand fire until the first day of 
June next, when the cracked plate, if any, is to be returned : in 
default of which the claim is forfeited,) for $20.- 

Received Payment 

FOUGERAY & SCHREINER 
NO 97 & 99 North Second-street. 

LETTER OF REV. FRANCIS ALISON, 1776. 

PHILADA Sept y 22* 1776. 
COZEN ROB T ALISON 

It gives me pleasure to hear from you, & I have tried to write you, 
as oft as I had an opportunity. I might have spoken to President 
Handcocks Secretary, to inform me when expresses go from this place to 
Ticonderoga, but this I did not think of. I received a letter from y e 
River Sorrel from you, after y e defeat at y e three rivers ; another since y* 
was long by y* way, informing me of y r difficulties till you got to Ticon- 
deroga, I had one about y e latter end of July, informing me of y e pro- 
digious rains you had & one since dated August y e 27 th with a letter 
from y r Brother, which I sent him. I wrote you a long letter by Dr. 
Stringer & sent you enclosed a newspaper & then I gave you an 
account of the family. My wife came from New London yesterday ; 



Notes and Queries. 241 

your mother & all friends are well. Frank was out with y e Battalion as 
Physician & Surgeon, & lay at Blazing Star in Jersey, opposite to 
Staten Island, two months, & is returned ; his wife was deliverd of a 
daughter in his absence ; he was offerd a Surgeons Place in the flying 
camp, but I think he will not accept of it. I am sorry for y e distresses 
of y r camp. I think due attention was never paid to that department. 
Mease & Caldwell have their store filld with shirts, shoes, & every 
thing your army wants, for clothing, but Blankets, and if your officers 
would jointly represent your distresses to y e Congress, I doubt not but 
they would releive them. I long to see y u , which will be in November. 
If you enlist again, I wish you could tell me if it be possible to get 
you a Captains Commission ; I was at M r Jenkins, but did not see him, 
but was told at his house he will not go back. I will write you again 
by Major Woods of this City, who has sent off his baggage last week : 
let me know if there be any place y* you desire that I can ask for you, 
& to whom I should apply. We are grieved for y e loss of New York 
almost without resistence, I doubt not but they will [torn] better for 
y e time to come. I wish you all happiness & am with great respect & 
Esteem Y r Uncle & friend to serve you 

FRA : ALISON. 

BRITISH MEN-OF-WAR IN THE DELAWARE, 1813 (extracted from 
a letter of Richard Sheppard, dated Greenwich, N. J., 4 mo. 21, 
1813). 

"The communication by water is quite at an end, the British having 
taken possession of the Delaware as high as this. Since last Seventh 
day, they have done us no injury on shore, but take every kind of water 
craft they can come at, several belonging to our creek. They send 
word on shore they will do us no injury, and we have faith in their pro- 
fessions to us to feel no uneasiness." 

LETTER OF GENERAL GREENE TO GOVERNOR THOMAS JEFFERSON, 
1781. 

CAMP ON PKDEK 

January 1* 1781 
SIR, 

This will be handed your Excellency by Cap' Watts who is ordered to 
Virginia to recruit for the first Regiment of Light Dragoons. Cavalry 
is of great importance to the service in this department and I must beg 
your Excellency to give every aid in your power to fill the Regiment 
as soon as possible and that immediate measures may be taken for com- 
pleating the compliment of horse required of your State for the first and 
third Regiments. It will promote the service and give great security 
to the Army, if all the Dragoons are picked men, and natives of 
America ; as foreigners frequently desert, and give intelligence to the 
Enemy in an unfavourable moment and generally carry off with them a 
very valuable horse with all the accoutrements. For these and many 
other reasons which might be mentioned I am clearly of opinion that 
none but natives ought to be in the Cavalry and even then ought to be 
of the better order of men, as so much frequently depends upon the 
information of a single dragoon. 

I pursuade myself this business is of such importance as this Army is 
very weak in Cavalry and the enemy greatly reinforced, that your Excel- 

VOL. XXVIII. 16 



242 Notes and Queries. 

lency will give the business all the dispatch that the nature of it will 
admit. 

Your Col White will furnish your Excellency with a return of the 
strength of the Regiment am with great respect 
Your Excellency's 

Most obed 1 

Humble Serv 1 

NATH GREENE 

KING JAMES II. PROCLAIMED AT PHILADELPHIA 1685. 
PENNSILVANIA : 

By the President and Councill 

These are to give Generall Notice, That our Present Soveraign^King 
James the Second, will be Published in the Front Street upon Delaware 
River, Over against the Governours Gate to Morrow Morning at the 
Ninth hour upon the Wringing of the Bell 

Signed by Order 

Richard Ingelo 

01. Concill 
Philadelphia the 
llth 3d Month 1685. 

[James II. Proclaimed. Original draft from which the Sheriff read, 
in Collection of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania.] 

PHILADELPHIA the 12* of the 3 mo. 1685 
PENNSILVANIA. 

We the president & the provincial Counsell accompanied w th the 
representatives of the freemen in Assembly & divers magistrates officers 
& other persons of note do in duty & in concurrance w th our neighbour- 
ing provinces sollemnly publish & declare that James duke of york & 
albany by the decease of our late soveraigne Charles the 2 Dd is now 
becomn our lawfull leige lord & king James the 2 nd of England Scotland 
franc & Ireland & amongst other of his dominions in America of this 
Provinc of Pennsylvania & its Territory king to whome we acknowledg 
faithfull & constant obedienc hartily wishing him a happy raigne in 
health peace & prosperity 
And so god save the king 

Tho Loyd president 

Tho : Holmes Peter Aldricks 

Christo Taylor Willm Darvall 

Phinehas Pemberton Luke Watson 

Willm Frampton Jon : Roades 

Willm Southerbe Ed. Green 

Jon. Simpcock 
Jon. Cann 
Willm Wood 
Tho : Janney 
Jon : Barns 

Rich d Ingelo 

Clark Counsell. 

SOME PHILADELPHIA COUNTY FARMERS SEND RELIEF TO THE 
POOR OF BOSTON, 1775. 

We the Subscribers do hereby Promise to pay Samuel Potts Henry 
Deringer and John Brooke or Either of them the Several Sums of money 



Notes and Queries. 243 

or Quantities of Wheat or Flour by us Subscribed and Set opposite our 
names to be by them sent to Philadelphia and put into the hands of 
Edward Milner who is one of the Persons appointed to Receive and 
Transmit the same to Boston to be given to the Poor people of that Town 
who are immediate Sufferers by means of the Port being Shutt up. 
May 15* 1775. 

David Jack hatt zwey bushel Korn geben. 

James Herbel ein bushel und halb Korn. 

Petter Steltz paid to John Brooke 15s. 

Lenhart Walter 1 bushel waytzen und ein halb bushel. 

Georg [?] Graff 2 bushel waytzen. 

Jacob Benter 2 bushel waytzen. 

Michael Kortz 2 bushel Korn, noch nicht gebracht. 

Bastian Aygelberger [Egelberger ? ] 5s. 

Christian Kortz 2 bushel waytzen. 

Bastian reifschneider 2 bushel waytzen. 

Adam Wartman 2 bushel Korn. 

Philib Jacob Schmidt ein bushel Korn. 

Joseph Kolb ein bushel Korn. 

Michael Brand 10 s. 

Georg Borckhart hatt 5 bushel Korn geben. 

Philip Weickel ein bushel waytzen. 

Philip Han hatt 5 bushel waytzen. 

Michael Krebs 3 bushel waytzen. 

Lenhard Dotter 3 bushel waytzen. 

Moses Bonder 3 bushel waytzen. 

Georg Adam Egolt 2 bushel waytzen. 

Adam Krebs 2 bushel waytzen. 

Jost Biting ein hundert waytzen mehl. 

Bastian Buger 3 bushel waytzen. 

Lenhard Herdelein ein bushel waytzen. 

Jacob Huver 2 bushel waytzen. 

Paul Lintzebigel zwey bushel Korn. 

Herr Pfare bomb 15s. 

Georg Schlumecker 3 bushel waytzen. 

Matheis Holebach 15s. 

Hans Schmidt 2 bushel waytzen. 

Heinrich Schneider 5 bushel Korn. 

Lewis Jorger 3 bushel waytzen. 

Adam Libegutt 2 bushel waytzen. 

(On back.) 
Juley26">1775. 

Hab ich bezalt an Hans Brucks zwey pfundt funf schiling vor die 
bostonner. 

LETTER OF GENERAL HENRY KNOX TO GENERAL WILLIAM 
IRVINE, 1786. 

WAK OFFICE March 25>> 1786 
DEAR SIR 

I reed your favor of the l rt inst by Major Craig, for which I beg you 
to accept my thanks. 

When the person whom you expect, shall return from Detroit, I 
shall be much obliged to you, for any communication, which you may 



244 Notes and Queries. 

think necessary for me to be acquainted with. Major Ancram as you 
suggested, actually commands at the post. 

There have not lately been any packets arrived from England, there- 
fore we are not well advised of the designs of the British respecting the 
delivery of the posts ; but there are rumors, that Sir Guy Carleton will 
certainly come out to Canada with great powers, in which case, it is im- 
probable they will relinquish their present positions on the Lakes. I 
have communicated with Major Craig on the subject you communicated 
to him. He will let you know the probable destination of the troops 
the ensuing year, which however is not so conclusive, but that it may 
not be varied according to circumstances. 

I shall be happy at all times to receive your opinions of the western 
country. My only object is so to dispose of the forces of the public as 
shall best serve its interests. 

There appears to be a general disposition rising through the United 
States to strengthen the Federal government. All the states (but this) 
have passed the impost, and it must ultimately be the case here, altho' 
it is not probable it will be accomplished this session. The proposition 
of Virginia for a federal convention, respecting the investment of Con- 
gress with the powers of regulating trade, are generally approved, and 
will probably be acceded to by all the states. 

Captain Freeman who was in the artillery, son of your friend in 
Qubec, is in this city, about to apply to Congress for relief, concerning 
the money advanced by his father. There have not been nine states 
(since the new Congress ought to have been formed) on the first Monday 
in Nov, until yesterday. This has retarded his business, but he will 
now proceed and it is probable may accomplish his object. 

I am dear sir 

With great respect 

Your humble serv* 

H KNOX 
GENL WM IRVINE 

Carlisle Pa 

Freeman Sr advanced money to the American Prisoners taken at 
Trois Eivieres, when Gen 1 Thompson was captured. 

MATRIMONIAL. 
REV. MR. WILEY. 

Sir, I request you to come to my father's House at the Noreast cor- 
ner of 4 and Chesnut Street for the purpose to marry Miss Nancey Bell 
and I together, By that lawfull institution Handed Down to us from 
posterity By the command of God. 

Yours Respectfully 

HARVEY PARKHILL 
Half past 7 o'cl tomorow P. M. 
Dec. 7th 

LETTERS OF WILLARD AND J. W. GIBBS TO PETER VERSTILLE, 
HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, 1777 (contributed by Mr. Horace W. 

Sellers). 

CAMP AT WHITE PLAINS 13 th Nov. 1777. 

DEAR SIR, 

An opportunity offering of writing to Hartford I have taken the 
liberty to trouble you with a little Business which I have there, not 



Notes and Queries. 245 

doubting y r readiness to oblige in doing it, as my Brother Willard with 
whom I left my affairs has I suppose before this set out for the South- 
ward : expecting to have seen him again in a few days when we parted 
at Fish Kill, I did not ask him about my Mare, which I left with M r Will 
Hooker to pasture & as the Season is now far advanced, wish you wou'd 
make some enquiry about her. if Willard has not got her taken care 
of, wou'd be much oblig'd to you to procure some place for to keep her 
3 or 4 Weeks to Hay, or perhaps not so long as I expect to be at Hart- 
ford or to send for her in a short Time ; Capt. Wadsworth perhaps 
wou'd oblige me so much as to keep her a short time, at whose Service 
she may be if he has occasion to use her ; likewise wou'd be much 
oblig'd if you wou'd supply me with ab* 40 Dollars on Willard' s 
Account, and I will see you repaid shortly. 

I shou'd not presume to ask these favors, did I know who my Brother 
has left his affairs with, but as I do not, hope you will excuse the 
liberty I have taken. 

We are now about 12 Miles from the Enemy, but whether we shall 
advance any nigher till something is done towards Philad* is uncertain, 
shou'd Howe meet with the fate of the "Gov r of Fort William" I 
doubt not we shall be in possession of New York. 

Billy is well & is now improving this opportunity of writing, please 
to make my respects to Mrs. Verstille & Compliments to all friends, 
am Sir, with esteem 

Your humble Servant 

WILL GIBBS 
WHITEPLAINS 15 Nov* 1777. 

SIB, 

Since the Letter was wrote I have heard Capt Bulkley is coming on 
soon, wou'd be much oblig'd if you wou'd let me hear from you by 
him. W. G. 

EABTON Novem' 22, 1777. 
D* SIR 

We this Evening were favor' d with your's of the 17 th Inst. & thank 
you for the early advices you have given us respecting our Business. 

By a Fishkill paper of Thursday last observe that no Flour sho d be 
exported out of the State without the special Licence of the Court, 
which Licence will be difficult for us to obtain & the Penalty for the 
Nonobservance of that Order is too great to run the Hazard of sending 
the Flour along without one, on this and other considerations we think 
it w d be most adviseable for us not to have the Sugar bro* on to North 
River & should the Teams not have left Hartford before this reaches 
you wish you would omit sending the Sugar on, and store it in some 
safe & private Place for the present, as we shall make Enquiry at 
Lancaster & see what it will fetch there & sho d there be no Prospect of 
an immediate Sale of it there for a good price, believe we shall request 
you to sell it in Hartford, wish you would write us by the Eeturn of 
this Post directed for us at Lancaster where we shall make our next 
Quarters as we purpose leaving this in a few Days, as we would wish to 
know the most that Sugars of that quality will fetch in Hartford, but 
sho d they remain stored any considerable Time hope the reasons set 
forth in M r B's Letters will be sufficient to prevent any Danger of 
having them seised for the State of Connecticut, wish you would like- 
wise advise us of the Prices of West India Goods, Indigo, Tobacco & 



246 Notes and Queries. 

Peice Goods. Our best Kespects to M" Verstille, Miss Betsy & all 
other Friends in Behalf of M r Bromfield & myself am Sir 

your Friend & very hum le Se' 

J. W. GIBBS 
SUNDAY MORNING. 

P.S. By an Express just arrived from our Camp we hear that there 
was a most tremendous Cannonade last Thursday at Bed Bank. Lord 
Cornwallis crossed the Delaware with three thousand & General Wilson 
with two thousand & attack'd the Fort on Red Bank last Thursday in 
consequence of which General Greens Division passed the Delaware to 
reinforce our Troops & Gen 1 Huntingdon went over with his Brigade 
as a further Reinforcement. The galleys have all come up the River 12 
mile above Philad" a further Cannonade was heard on Fryday by 
which we may conclude that the Enemy did not succeed on Thursday 
we every Moment expect to hear something decisive from that Quarter 
& I sincerely wish it may terminate in our Favor the Post just going 
off prevents my being more particular. 

Yours &c. 

J. W. GIBBS. 

PEALE PORTRAITS. The following list of portraits painted by 
Charles Willson Peale has been compiled from a memorandum-book 
of the artist by Mr. Horace W. Sellers : 

1778. 
Major Rogers, a small whole length . . . . . $140 

Mr. Lawrence, in miniature . . . . $100 

Mr. Morris, do .... $100 

Mr. Gouv r Morris, do .... $100 

Col. Basset, do .... $100 

Col. Ballister, do .... $100 

Mr. Custis, do . . . . $100 

Col. Baylor, do .... $100 

Mr. John Baker of N. H. do .... $120 

Capt. Medicia, do . . . . $120 

Mr. Blair, do .... $120 

Mrs. Brown, do . . . . $120 

("Commenced after going gunning with Col. Ramsey.") 
Major Franks, do .... $75 

("Painted last Spring at Valley Forge.") 
Mons. Doree, do 

Dr. Peters, copy for Mrs. Ferguson, do .... $152 

Mr. Young two half lengths, to begin immediately after the picture of 

Gen. Washington is finished. 
Mrs. Brown, in miniature. 

1779. 

Copy of Gen 1 Washington for Mons. Gerard. 
Capt. Farris, of Light Horse of Germantown, a miniature. 
Gen 1 St Clair, a miniature. 
Mr. Duer and Lady Kitty's pictures . , . , ...... 15 Gui. 

Baron Steuben, his picture . . . . -.. . 10 " 
Baron deKalb " t . . ' . . v 10 " 

Baron de Kalb, a copy . . , ... v . . ^ -., 6 " 



Notes and Queries. 247 

Gen 1 Washington, for a miniature copy of his picture, sent to his sister 

in Virginia. 
(Gave the copy of Gen 1 Washington's miniature, with the Gen u letter to 

his sister at Fredericksburg, to Mr. Sheaf who is setting out for 

that place.) 

Marquis de la Fayette, portrait for Gen. Washington. 
Mr. Duer and Lady Kitty's miniatures. 
Mr. Hall's picture, alterations to. 
Mr. Harris's picture by Pine, painted epaulet in it. 

Painted the Eagle in Col. & Gen. Williams' pictures. 

Mr. Charles Macubbin's portrait. 
Mrs. Hutchinson's miniature. 

At Baltimore August SO to November 3. 

Mr. Richard Gittings, K.C. size. 

Mr. & Mrs. Johnson, head size. 

Mr. Ronaldo Johnson, miniature. 

Mr. & Mrs. Laming, in one piece. 

Mr. W m Smith & Gen. Williams' son, quarter size. 

Mrs. Culbreath, head size. 

Mr. J. Carroll, miniature. 



Copy of Gen 1 Washington. 
Bishop White, portrait. 

1795. 

Alexander Robinson and Angelica (Peale) his wife, in one piece. 
Copy of ditto 

1798. 

Mr. James DePeyster and lady, miniature, $35. ea. 

do do portraits of same, $40. ea. 

Sophia DePeyster, their daughter. 
Copy of portraits of Aunt Nancy DePeyster's parents ; original by a 

Frenchman, about 1768. 
Mr. John DePeyster, portrait. 
Mrs. do do 

Major Stagg's father, do 
Mrs. Gerard DePeyster. 
Mr. & Mrs. William DePeyster. 
Mrs. Peale. 
John DePeyster. 
Mrs. Cammin, miniature. 

' ' do copy. 
Mrs. Cammin. 



1778. Oct. 16. Began a drawing in order to make a mezzotinto of Gen 1 

Washington ; got a plate of Mr. Brook's, and in pay I am to give 

him 20 of the prints in the first 100 struck off. 
Nov. 16. Began to print off the small plate of Gen 1 Washington, and 

continued in the same business all day, and found myself at night 

very unwell. 



248 Notes and Queries. 

Portraits of Oen 1 Washington presented. 
French Ambassador, 
Major Fooks or Merrald, 
Mr. Kittenhouse, 
Mr. Paine, 

Mr. Laurens, president of Congress, 
Mr. McAllister, 
Mr. Dunlap, 
Mr. Davidson, 
Mrs. Jane Brewer, 
Mrs. Rogers. 

Prints of Oen 1 Washington disposed of. 
Left for sale at Mr. Dunlap' s, 2 dozen. 



Mr. McAllister' 
Mr. Juznee, 
Mr. Merrald, 
Mr. Davidson, 
Dr 


8,1 

1 

4 
2 

1 T)lfl 



< 
i 
< 

tp 


Col. Bull, 
Annapolis, 


-L 1 ' * * 

2 ' 
2 ' 


Lv. 



DILLWYN GENEALOGICAL NOTES. Extracted from Genealogical 
Memoranda of the Ancestors of William and Sarah Dillwyn and their 
families, compiled in 1809 by W. Dillwyn and copied by I. N. D. in 
1825, with a few additions. 

William Dillwyn and Sarah Fuller, of West Chillington, in Sussex, 
were among the earliest settlers of Philadelphia. They had one son and 
two daughters, of whom only the son, John, survived minority. 

John Dillwyn married, first, Mercy Pierce. Their issue was Mary, 
who died in minority, and Sarah, born 9 th month, 1720, who in 1751 
married Thomas Davis, of Philadelphia. Thomas Davis was from New 
Penrith, in Cumberland. He died 11 th month 25, 1757, without issue. 
John Dillwyn married, second, Susanna Painter. He was born in 1693, 
and died 7 th month 19, 1748. Susanna was born 1 st month, 1712, and 
died 6 th month 1, 1784. They were married in Philadelphia 12 th month 
7, 1733. Of their twelve children but four survived infancy, namely : 
George, b. 2 26, 1738 ; m., 1759, Sarah, dau. of Eichard Hill, of 
Madeira, and had no issue. George was a minister of the Society 
of Friends, and resided in Burlington, New Jersey. 
Lydia, b. 7 21, 1740 ; d. 8 6, 1753. 

William, b. 10 2, 1743 ; m. 5 19, 1768, Sarah Logan, dau. of John 
Smith, of Burlington, who died 4 23, 1769, leaving issue a daughter 
Susannah, b. 3 31, 1769 ; m. 4 16, 1795; Samuel, son of Samuel 
Emlen, of Philadelphia, who was born at Bristol, England, 9 4, 
1766, where his mother died the 11 th , and was buried the 18 th of 1 st 
month, 1767 ; Samuel Emlen, ST., b. at Philadelphia 3 15, 1729/30 ; 
m. Elizabeth Ward, of Philadelphia. The father and son were in 
England 1784/5. 

Ann, b. 2 4, 1746 ; m. 10 th month, 1785, John Cox, whose first wife 
was Hannah, the 2nd daughter of John Smith, who left him a 
daughter, married 1 st month, 1804, to Dr. David. John and Ann 
Cox had issue one daughter, Susanna, b. 7 th month, 1788 ; m. 10 
20, 1808, Dr. Joseph Parrish, of Philadelphia. 



Notes and Queries. 249 

The said William Dillwyn married, secondly, 11 27, 1777, Sarah, 
the only daughter of Lewis and Edith Weston, of London, who was 
born in London 3 20, 1751. They had issue sons and daughters, 
namely : 

Lewis Weston, b. 8 21, 1778; m., 7 13, 1807, Mary, dau. of John 
Llewellyn, of Penllyne, in Glamorganshire. They had issue three 
sons and three daughters, viz. : Fanny Llewellyn, b. 5 19, 1808 ; 
John, b. 1 12, 1810; William, b. 7 11, 1812; d. 427,1819; 
Lewis Llewellyn, M. P., b. 5 19, 1814 ; Mary, b. 3 8, 1816 ; Sarah 
Llewellyn, b. 8 9, 1818. 

John Crook, b. 7 18, 1780 ; d. 6 5, 1781. 

Judith Nichols, b. 8 26, 1781 ; m. Paul Benan, of Tottenham. 

Ann, b. 9 11, 1783; m., 9 27, 1810, R. Dykes Alexander, of Ips- 
wich, in Suffolk. 

Lydia, b. 4 11, 1785 ; m., 4 th mo., 1823, Dr. John Sims, of London. 

George, b. 3 14, 1790. 

William Dillwyn, the second of the name in America, and compiler 
of the above memoranda, was the son of John Dillwyn, of Philadelphia, 
who, dying of yellow fever in 1748, when his children were young, the 
time and place of birth of his father are not known. He may have 
been a native of Brecknockshire, in South Wales. 

Sarah Fuller's mother having died, her father married a second wife, 
who, after his death, married John Barnes, one of the early settlers of 
Pennsylvania, who at his decease gave most of his property to his nomi- 
nal daughter. 

John Dillwyn, the compiler's father, was born and died in Phila- 
delphia. His widow married, 10 th month, 1756, Peter Worrell, of Lan- 
caster, where they lived from 1759 to 1763, when they removed to Bur- 
lington, West New Jersey, where they both died, she, 6 1, 1784 ; he, 
3 23, 1786. 

Until the autumn of 1763 I resided in Pennsylvania, and afterward 
in New Jersey, with the exception of a journey to New England in 
1764, and two voyages to South Carolina in 1773 and 1774. I then, in 
the 5 th month, embarked at Philadelphia for Bristol, and in the 11 th 
month, 1775, returned to Burlington, during the hostilities which ter- 
minated in the independence of my native country. 

In the 5 th month, 1777, after passing both the hostile armies with a 
flag of truce, I embarked at New York and returned via Cork, Swansea 
and Bristol to London, since which time I have been an English resi- 
dent. 

Samuel and Susanna Emleii lived at West Hill, Burlington, New 
Jersey, in a house afterward occupied by Richard Smith, a cousin of S. 
E. and later by Eliza K., widow of Joseph Gurney, of Norwich, Eng- 
land. 

CHARLES WILLSON PEALE, in his autobiographical notes, mentions a 
number of incidents which occurred while he was ' ' Commissioner to 
seize the personal effects of Traitors" (appointed October 21, 1777). 
The following are interesting : 

"He was appointed by the Counsil of Safety for Pennsylvania (then 
resident at Lancaster) one of the agents to secure the property of such 
citizens as had joined the British interests and were Proclaimed by a 
Particular act of the Government. Mr. Sharpe Delany and Mr. Robert 



250 Notes and Queries. 

Smith were the others in appointment ; Mr. Delany declined accept- 
ing of the office. The spring following, frequent accounts concurred to 
the belief that the British would evacuate the City, and about a week 
before the evacuation took place, Peale had a conversation with Genl. 
Arnold, (he was then painting his likeness in miniature), about the 
Enemy leaving the City, and Peale told the General that he intended to 
ride into the City as soon as the British should leave it. This the 
General said should not be done as he was determined to prevent any 
persons from going in, which he said he could do by his being appointed 
the Commanding officer to take possession of the City and all the stores 
belonging to the enemy. Peale remonstrated against such an order, 
which would prevent many persons from seeing their families from 
whom they had separated themselves so long. The General seemed deter- 
mined in his resolution and Peale went immediately to wait on General 
Washington expecting that he had sufficient interest there to obtain a 
pass into the City. The General was engaged in business and Peale 
told Col. Tilghman (the General's Aid) what had passed between him 
and Gen'l. Arnold. Col. Tilghman seemed much surprised that Gen'l. 
Arnold should undertake such a measure, and promised Peale a pass at 
any time he should call, after the evacuation had taken place. Perhaps 
this intimation given in Gen'l. Washington's family may have prevented 
Gen'l. Arnold's attempting such a measure. 

"As soon as the evacuation was known to have taken place, Peale 
obtained his pass, altho' there was no occasion for him to have taken 
that trouble, as free ingress was permitted to every one. As soon as he 
could secure a house to bring his family to, he removed into the City, 
and afterwards began to execute the very disagreeable office of Agent 
for securing and selling the confiscated estates. 

"The first object on entering on this business was to make a trouble- 
some undertaking as easy as possible by beginning with the property 
of those who were of the most consideration among those named in the 
Proclamation of the President and Counsil. The Agents accordingly 
went to Mrs. Galloway, who had remained in Mr. Galloway's House in 
Market Street. They gave her notice that they would call the next day 
and take possession of Mr. Galloway's property, but when they came to 
the house at the appointed hour, they found all the doors and windows 
secured and no admittance allowed. The Agents expecting that oppo- 
sition would be made, had taken the opinion of the Attorney General, 
who advised them to use force if they should be opposed in the execu- 
tion of their office. Therefore on finding the House barred against them, 
they began to break open the back door, and while they were about this 
business, the Honorable the Executive Counsil sent for them. After 
the Agents had acquainted the Counsil with the manner in which they 
had begun this business, and that they acted by the advice of the 
Attorney General, the Hon'ble the Executive Counsil desired them to 
proceed to take Possession by force. 

" When they had forced the doors and got into the House, they found 
that Mr. Boudinot was there as Counsel employed by Mrs. Galloway. 
He produced an Instrument in writing and said that he intended to 
prosecute the Agents for the forcible entry which they had made. The 
Agents' reply was that they were willing to abide by the Consequences, 
as they had not acted without advice. 

" Mrs. Galloway did not seem disposed to leave the House altho' she 



Notes and Queries. 251 

had her friends ready to receive her. Peale went to Gen'l. Arnold and 
borrowed his carriage and when it came to the door he took Mrs. Gallo- 
way by the hand and conducted her to the charriot. 1 

" The same sort of business they were likely to have met with at Mrs. 
Shoemaker's, but on that occasion Mr. Boudinot agreed to give peace- 
able possession on the morning following, which terms were accepted by 
the Agents, as they wished to make things as easy as they could for 
those whose misfortune it was to come within their notice." 

PIKE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, MARRIAGES, 1808-1809. Mr. 
Frank Farnsworth Starr, Middletown, Connecticut, contributes the 
following marriage records from the docket of Squire John Brink, of 
Milford, Pa. : 

John Westbrook to Sarah Brodhead, Febry 14, 1808. Pd. $2. 

Jacob Helms to Permelia Eidgway, June 26, 1808. Pd. $1. 

John Lattimore to Dorothy V. Etten, July 10, 1808. Pd. $1. 

Daniel Brink to Elizabeth Barnes, November 6, 1808. 

John McKane to Lucrecy Peach, November 10, 1808. Pd. $2. 

Jesse Welles to Catharine Cox, June 11, 1809. Pd. $1. 

DEWEES GENEALOGICAL NOTES. The dates of birth and death of 
Samuel and Mary (Coburn) Dewees are unknown to me. I have been 
told that they were buried in the old Baptist church-yard on West Short 
Street, Lexington, Kentucky, from which all the bodies were removed 
some years ago, and the early records of the congregation are not pre- 
served. The records of Fayette and Woodford Counties fail to show any 
will or deed executed by William Dewees. Mrs. Dewees was a sister of 
Judge John Coburn, of the Federal Court of Kentucky. Their children 
were : 
Rachel, m. John Wilson, of Washington, Kentucky, and had issue : 

John S., b. April 28, 1812; d. September 4, 1890, at Clifton, Ken- 
tucky. 

Mary, d. unmarried. 

Basil Duke, m., first, Ryland, of Missouri ; second, 

Young. 

Farmer, d. unmarried. 

Sallie, m. Thomas Duke. 

Eliza, d. young. 
Sallie, m. Robert Taylor, of Washington, Kentucky, and had issue : 

James, m. Fanny Browning. 

Jane, m. Charles Marshall, Fleming County, Kentucky. 
Farmer, b. October 18, 1791 ; d. July 28, 1869 ; m. Mary Ann Holmes. 
John Coburn, b. July 4, 1797 ; d. November 26, 1877 ; m., December 
26, 1820, Mary Bayless, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth 
(Wood) Bayless, and had issue : 

Mary, m. Samuel B. Poyntz, of Maysville, Kentucky. 

Elizabeth Bayless, d. an infant. 

Anna, d. young. 

Elizabeth, d. unmarried. 

1 Mrs. Elizabeth Drinker, in her Journal, records : 

" 1778, July 25. They have taken an account yesterday or ye day before of Joseph 
Galloway's and Sammy Shoemaker's property, with design to confiscate." 

" August 20. Grace Galloway turned out of her house this forenoon, and a Spanish 
officer put in." 



252 Notes and Queries. 

Anna Maria, d. an infant. 

Samuella Tannehill (usually called Ella), m. Colonel John C. 

Cochran. 

Catherine Little, m. Lieutenant Oliver Hazard Perry Taylor 
U. S. A., who was killed by Indians near Fort Walla Walla, 
May 16, 1858. 
Maria Cobournetta, m., first, Samuel E. Frazee ; second, Daniel R. 

Clark. 

Rachel Wilson, d. an infant. 

Sarah Taylor, m. John M. Duke, of Maysville, Kentucky. 
Eliza, m. Wilkins Tannehill, of Nashville, Tennessee, and had issue : 
Mary, m. William T. Berry. 

Wilkins, Jr., m. 

Anne, m. William Bayless. 
Eliza, m. Albert Gleaves. 

Samuella, m. Abernathy. 

The Dewees plantation was located on the South Elkhorn Creek, nine 
miles from Lexington, Kentucky. There are a large number of the 
descendants, through the female lines, scattered through the Western 
States, and these genealogical names have been prepared with a view to 
assist them. SAMUEL P. COCHRAN. 

DALLAS, TEXAS. 

OLD BILL OF LADIKG. We are indebted to Mr. W. M. Mervine for 
the following copy of an old bill of lading, and sailing instructions, to be 
found in volume of " Early Records, 1714," Clerk's Office, New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey, page 420. 

AMBOY August, 13 th : 1714. 
CAPT : KINION 

You are hereby ordered to sett Sail forth-with (wind & weather per- 
mitting) for North Carolina where please God we hope you will safe 
arrive, there you are to dispose with ye Cargoe Consigned to you with 
All ye dispatch possible & make returns In such Comodities as you will 
think best & most to our Advantage, returning Directly for this Port, so 
wee heartily wish you A good Voyage & Conclude 

Your friends & serv t 

JOHN STEVENS, 
ANDREW ROBESON, 
JOHN PARKER. 

Shiped by ye Grace of God In good order & well conditioned In ye 
Sloope called ye Ursula, whereof is master under God for this present 
Voyage M r Roger Kenyon & now riding At Anchor In ye Harbour of 
Amboy & by Gods Grace bound for North Carolina (to say) Sundry 
goods & Merchandise Amounting to As p r : Invoycs, one Hundred & 
one pound Eleven shillings & three pence, three farthing being three 
seavenths on Accpt & Risce of ye s d Master two seavenths on Accpt & 
Risqe of John Stevens & two seavenths on Accpt & Risqe of John Par- 
ker & is to be delivered At ye Afores d Port In ye Like good order & 
well Condition, unto ye s d Master, freight Already paid ye danger of ye 
Seas only Excepted, In witness whereof ye Master of ye s d Sloop hath 
Affirmed to three Bills of Lading All of this Tenor & date ye one of 
which being Accomplished ye other to stand Voyd, dated In Amboy 
ye 13th of August 1714. ROGER KENYON. 



Notes and Queries. 253 

EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF A PHILADELPHIA MERCHANT. The 
first school I attended was Peter Widdows, on Front Street, near Arch ; 
the second, Mr. Maison. Among my companions were Henry Baker, 
William Warren, Henry Warren, Charles Potts, Percival Potts, Henry 
Ervin, Jacob Lex, and Levi Hollinsworth. I was then sent [1822] to 
the Moravian school, Nazareth Hall, where I remained two years and 
six months. My classmate, Andrew A. Humphreys, was admitted to 
West Point Academy. At Sanderson's school I attended in the years 
1825-1826, and among the scholars I recall Charles Buck, William 
Wall, Samuel Bradford, George Hall, William Wallace, Montgomery 
Lewis, Lucas Burke, Henry Cadwalader, and George Chapman. My 
fifth school was the High School of the Franklin Institute. In the class 
were Samuel Bradford, George Hall, Henry Cadwalader, Edward Tilgh- 
man, Benjamin Ingersoll, C. Muhlenberg, Edward David, Cornelius 
Crosby, John Caldwell, John M. Harper, Thomas White, Edward Le- 
lar, John L. Wilson, Samuel Sitgreaves, Stephen Leonard, Charles 
Horner, William Patterson, William Rawle, Francis Huger, John 
Biddle, Edward Wain, William MMurtrie, George and Hasel Wilson, 
Joseph Paul, John Warder, John Bispham, William Stockton, and 
others. I took lessons in French, German, and Spanish. 

1829, March 1. Delaware river frozen over ; many people on the ice. 

July 25. Saturday morning at 2 o'clock my father's old friend, John 
R. Baker, departed this life. 

July 186. I set out for Baltimore and Washington, at the latter place 
put up at Gadsby's Hotel. Called on President Jackson, visited the 
Capitol, navy yard, patent office, and other buildings. Returned to 
Baltimore and made a trip to Annapolis. At Ellicott's Mills I saw about 
800 feet of the Baltimore and Ohio rail road just finished. Returned 
home via York and Lancaster, after an absence of near three weeks. 

1850, June 17. Visited Mauch Chunk and the coal beds ; rode on the 
railway with Mr. White, the manager of the company, and a large party 
of gentlemen. 

1851, February 11. Walk across the Delaware on the ice; many 
sleighs carrying passengers over. 

LETTER OF ELIAS BOUDINOT TO MRS. FERGUSON, IN THE DREER 
COLLECTION. 

PHILADELPHIA, March 6, 1779. 
MY DEAR MADAM 

Your obliging Favour of Monday last came safe to hand, for which I 
hope to make my acknowledgments in person about the middle of next 
week, but cannot think of giving you the Trouble of sending the Car- 
riage to this distance, if my health should permit, can get a Friend's 
Horse which William can bring back on the next day. 

I am thoroughly convinced of the hospitality of Graeme Park, and 
can assure my valuable Friend that there is not a spot in Pennsylvania 
that will be more agreeable to me, even if Things there were as de- 
ranged as many narrow minds might wish them to be I have the 
greatest confidence that the Pleasure I shall enjoy in the agreeable soci- 
ety of that rural seat will greatly facilitate my returning Health and 
yield me more real satisfaction than can be found amidst the bustle & 
confusion of this divided city. 

My best wishes attend you and Miss Stedman, from whose vivacity & 



254 Notes and Queries. 

Judgment I promise myself great advantage in point of Spirits, as well 
as Health. 

I have not been inattentive to your affairs here, and am happy to find 
that your publication has had the most happy effect on the minds of 
many People ; altho' I cannot yet learn that any thing conclusive is 
agreed on perhaps by the time I pay you the intended visit, I may 
know more of the matter. 

I am with great Sincerity and Esteem 

Dear Madam 

Yours very Aff" T 

ELIAS BOUDINOT. 
MRS. FERGUSON 

GRAEME PARK. 



Queries. 

VICKERS. Thomas and Esther Vickers, of Shrewsbury, New Jersey, 
had four sons, one of whom was Abraham, born 9 mo. 11, 1690/1. He 
purchased a farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in 1726, and died 

there 1767. His wife was Mary . Her maiden name is wanted, 

and also the place and date of her marriage. 

Abraham and Mary Vickers had four sons and four daughters ; one 

of the former, Peter, married Ann . What was Ann's maiden 

name, where was she married, and in what year? Their daughter Mary 
married Moses Coates in 1777, at East Cain Meeting, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania. 

CHARLES MARSHALL. 



JSooh notices. 

HISTORY OF THE PENROSE FAMILY OF PHILADELPHIA. By Josiah 
Granville Leach, LL.B. Philadelphia, 1903. 8vo, pp. 163. 
Illustrated. Published for private circulation. 

Bartholomew Penrose, the founder of the Penrose family of Phila- 
delphia, was a native of England, and engaged with a brother at Bristol, 
Gloucestershire, in the ship-building business prior to his coming to the 
Province of Pennsylvania, about the year 1700. Soon after becoming 
a resident of Philadelphia, he purchased a property at what is now 
Delaware Avenue and Market Street, and commenced the building of 
vessels, in some of which he was part owner, and continued in the busi- 
ness until his death in 1711. In 1703 he married Esther, daughter of 
Toby Leech, one of the large landed proprietors of the province. For 
upwards of a century some of his descendants were actively identified 
with the business, building vessels for both the merchant and naval ser- 
vices. Among other descendants may be noted Col. Joseph Penrose, 
of the Pennsylvania Continental Line ; Hon. Clement Biddle Penrose, 
and his son, Hon. Charles Bingham Penrose, a Commissioner of the 
Louisiana Territory and a prominent member of the Assembly of Penn- 
sylvania ; Major .Tames W. Penrose, U. S. A., who served with dis- 
tinction in the war with Mexico ; Medical Director Thomas N. Penrose, 
U. S. N., who was attached to Farragut's fleet at New Orleans and 
Vicksburg ; Col. William McF. Penrose, of the Pennsylvania Reserves, 



Notes and Queries. 255 

during the Civil War ; Dr. Richard A. F. Penrose, the distinguished 
physician and Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Chil- 
dren of the University of Pennsylvania, and his son, Hon. Boies Penrose, 
United States Senator from Pennsylvania ; Hon. Clement B. Penrose, 
the jurist and judge of the Orphans' Court of Philadelphia ; Col. 
Charles B. Penrose, who served with distinction during the Civil War, 
and later in the regular army ; and Gen. William H. Penrose, U. S. A., 
whose distinguished services in the Civil War gained him six brevets. 
Through the female lines we find the names of Shoemaker, Mather, 
Wayne, Robinson, Bingham, Mcllvaine, Perkins, Biddle, and others. 
As a history of the family the records are complete and accurate, 
evincing the usual careful labors of the compiler. The book is printed 
on heavy paper, with broad margins, the illustrations are numerous and 
the head- and tail-pieces are from original designs, and this beautiful 
volume reflects much credit on all concerned in its production. 

A NEW HISTORY OF PENNSYLVANIA. The Pennsylvania Society of 
New York announces that in connection with the forthcoming Year- 
Book which will contain a full record of the Society's work in the 
year 1903 it will publish a history of Pennsylvania, entitled " Penn- 
sylvania : A Primer, " by Barr Ferree, the Secretary of the Society. 

This Primer has been prepared to present, in the most concise form 
possible, the essential facts of Pennsylvania history. Intended to serve 
as a summary of Pennsylvania affairs, available for the busy man 
searching for facts only, the text is arranged in paragraphs, which, in 
their turn, are gathered into related chapters. It is an elementary text- 
book, arranged on a new and original plan which adds to its usefulness 
to the student and the reader. 

It aims to present all the leading and essential facts in Pennsylvania 
history, and includes information on many points not to be found in 
other elementary works. The Chronological Summary alone contains 
more than four hundred entries. 

The illustrations, which form an important feature, will consist of 
reproductions of maps, fac-similes, autographs, and similar historical 
material. It is the only general text-book of Pennsylvania history in 
which the illustrations are entirely of historical documents. 



CONOOOCHEAGUE GENEALOGIES. MISSING BRANCHES OF OUR 

OLDEST FAMILY. By G. O. Seilhamer. Chambersburg, Pa., 
1904. 8vo, pp. 28. 

Mr. G. O. Seilhamer, well known as a journalist and author, has 
made a long and careful study of the early Conococheague families, and 
has nearly ready for the press a series of genealogies. The first under 
the caption of ' ' Missing Branches of our Oldest Family ;" the Cham- 
bers Family, to the genealogy of which two important branches have 
been restored; "The Bard and Allied Families," the "McDowell 
Family," and the "Speer and Morrow Families" are to follow. 

The Conococheague Valley, as the whole of Franklin County may fitly 
be called, is rich in genealogical and biographical history. It is the birth- 
place of one President of the United States (James Buchanan) and of the 
mother of another (Benjamin Harrison), and a Governor of the Com- 
monwealth (Findlay). It produced many more distinguished men. 



256 Notes and Queries. 

ST. MEMIN PORTRAITS. Dr. William J. Campbell, the well-known 
bookseller of Philadelphia, is writing an elaborate work on St. Memin 
portraits. It will be in eight volumes, with more than eight hundred 
engraved portraits, each on a separate page. 

The basis of the book will be the famous "Collection" of seven hun- 
dred and sixty-one proofs made by the artist himself, which has recently 
come into Dr. Campbell's possession. 

The Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Library of Congress, both 01 
which have extensive collections, are cooperating with him, giving him 
the free use of any portraits that they possess which are not in his own 
collection. It will be a favor to him if any of our readers who have 
information either biographical or genealogical about any portrait that 
St. Memin made, or any information as to the present whereabouts of 
any original crayons, coppers or engravings, will communicate with 
him. 

His address is 1218 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. Due credit will 
be given in the book for all information received. 

TRANSACTIONS OF THE MORAVIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Vol. 
VII., Part II., contains two historical papers of interest: "Notes on 
the Family of William Parsons," sometime Surveyor-General of Penn- 
sylvania and founder of Easton, and " Wechquetank," an Indian mis- 
sion in the present Monroe County, 1760-1763 ; the former by the Et. 
Kev. J. M. Levering, the latter by the Kev. Eugene Leibert. 

THE DOTTERER FAMILY. A large 8vo volume of nearly 200 pages, 
bound in black cloth, with a portrait of the author as a frontispiece. 
The edition is limited. Price $2. 50 per copy, postpaid. Address, 
Mrs. Henry S. Dotterer, 1605 North Thirteenth Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

George Philip Dodderer, the founder, came to America at least as 
early as the year 1722. He was a worthy representative of that hardy 
German stock which by ita unflagging industry and sterling integrity 
contributed greatly to the growth and permanency of the colony planted 
by Penn. The work contains the records of the first three generations 
and the names of the fourth. In addition to the Dotterer family, the 
collateral lines, embracing the Markley, Schwenck, Antis (Antes), Zim- 
merman, Jund (Yount, Yundt), Pannebecker, Fischer, Hummel, 
Krause, Dewees, Kurr, Troxell, Heebner, Eeiff, Yost, Bitting, Guisbert, 
Nyce, Dildine, Wartman, Weidner, and Welker families, are also traced. 
Snyder, Latrobe, Dukehart, and many others appear in the manuscript 
record. Several pages are devoted to researches of the family name in 
Europe. A biographical sketch of the author has been added. The 
manuscript of the Dotterer family from the fourth generation to the 
present time can be consulted at the rooms of The Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, Thirteenth and Locust Streets, Philadelphia, where it has 
been deposited. 



THE 

PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 

OF 

, HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 

YOL. XXVIII. 1904. No. 3. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON IN PENNSYLVANIA. 

BY HON. SAMUEL W. PENNTPACKER, LL.D. 

[Washington's birthday has been celebrated at the University of 
Pennsylvania as "University Day" for more than a century, and in 
1826 was formally set apart in the University Calendar as one of the 
annual observances of the University. The following oration was de- 
livered by Hon. Samuel W. Pennypacker, Governor of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania, on "University Day," 1904, at the American 
Academy of Music.] 

We meet under the auspices of that University which, in 
its plan of organization, in its teachings of medicine and 
law,. and in recent years in its archaeological investigations 
of Eastern civilizations, has led all others upon the conti- 
nent; and we meet upon the anniversary of the birth of 
the great Virginian, the fame of whose deeds, at once a 
beacon and an example for mankind, has reached to the 
confines of the earth and will continue to the limits of 
time. Are the careers of those men who have seemingly 
fashioned the institutions of a nation and moulded the des- 
tinies of a race the outcome of exceptional capabilities and 
characteristics, not bestowed upon their fellows, or are the 
results due to the favorable conditions existing at the time 
VOL. xxvin. 17 (257) 



258 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

the successful efforts were made ? Did Alexander of Ma- 
cedon and Charlemagne found empires through the exer- 
cise of their own unusual power of will and gifts of intelli- 
gence, or were they but the manifestations of a force which 
made the Greeks, in the one case, and the Germans, in the 
other, see that if great ends were to be accomplished there 
must be a subordination of the lesser states surrounding 
them and a combination of the strength of all, a force 
which impelled them forward irresistibly ? Is not this a 
force common to all mankind, which has builded up the 
British Empire and is even now building up America, indi- 
cating itself in the movements of trade and transportation, 
as well as in those of government ? Would the Reforma- 
tion have come in its own good time had there been no 
Martin Luther ? Had Napoleon been killed upon the 
bridge of Lodi, would the French Revolution have followed 
its own appointed channels nevertheless ? Is Darwin cor- 
rect when he attributes even the slow formation of indi- 
vidual and race character to the nature of the environ- 
ment ? Perhaps a safe position to assume would be that in 
the conduct of revolutions against long-established and 
seemingly overwhelming power, in the creation and de- 
velopment of new governments, and in the efforts to amelio- 
rate the conditions of the masses of humanity, if success 
is to be attained, there must be the underlying currents 
which make it possible, as well as the leader of rare skill 
and intelligence, possessing the capacity to direct them. If 
this be true, then it may be of service to call attention, 
as has never been done before, to the field whereon the 
achievements of George Washington were accomplished 
and to the surroundings wherein his faculties were exer- 
cised, if not developed, and the energies of his public 
career were expended. 

In the year 1753 the two most powerful nations of Eu- 
rope, England and France, which had long been ene- 
mies and rivals, were again upon the verge of a struggle. 
The declaration of war was not made until three years 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 259 

later, but the mutterings and rumblings were being heard, 
the preliminaries were being arranged, and all men knew 
that the outbreak could not be long postponed. It was a 
great stake for which the combatants were about to strip, 
the possession of a continent destined ere long to support a 
people among the foremost upon the earth. Man pro- 
poses, but the gods dispose. When Wolfe died as he 
clutched his victory at Quebec, there was weeping and 
wailing in every household in the American Colonies. 
Little did they who lamented think how different might 
have been their fate if that energetic spirit, instead of the 
dilatory Howe, had confronted them at Brandywine, Ger- 
mantown, and Valley Forge. Never did it occur to either 
of the contestants while they were pampering the savages 
and gathering the cannon, nor when they were ready for 
the encounter, that no matter which of them should prove 
the stronger or more valiant, the reward should go to 
neither; that in the end his most Christian Majesty of 
France must be obeisant and the King of England must 
submit to an underling in one of the camps. The English 
Colonies were along the coast. The French were enclosing 
them with a series of forts intended to run up the St. Law- 
rence, thence to the Ohio and to the mouth of the Missis- 
sippi. In a sense it may be said that the right of the 
French line was at New Orleans, the left at Quebec, and 
the centre at the junction of the Allegheny and Mononga- 
hela Rivers, where Fort Duquesne was erected in 1754, in 
the western part of Pennsylvania. What a series of events 
had their beginning when George Washington came to 
Pennsylvania in 1753 ! The unheeding world might well 
have listened. A young man, in his twenty-second year, 
of limited education and narrow reading, tall and well 
made, precise and prim in his methods, stiff in his manners 
and chirography ; with an instinct of thrift which led him 
to manage farms and raise horses, to seek in his love af- 
fairs, whether with maid or widow, for a woman " wi' lots 
o' munny laaid by, and a nicetish bit of land," and enabled 



260 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

him to accumulate one of the largest fortunes of his time ; 
but ever a gentleman ; whose youth had been devoted to 
fox-hunting and athletic sports, and who since he was six- 
teen had been surveying lands in the valleys of Virginia, 
left the narrow confines of his early associations and took 
his first step into the outer and larger world. Governor 
Dinwiddie, of Virginia, sent him with a little force of seven 
men to the French commander in Western Pennsylvania 
to protest against the building of forts and the occupancy 
of the land. Starting on the 15th of November, 1753, 
through the forests primeval, in the winter, surrounded by 
and often confronted with the savages, fired at by a treach- 
erous Indian guide, rafting on the partly frozen rivers, he 
found his way to the site of Pittsburg and to a fort fifteen 
miles south of Lake Erie. It was a successful journey. 
He delivered his message and returned on the 16th of 
January, 1754, to Williamsburg, with the answer of the 
commandant and with much knowledge of the country and 
of the armament and garrisons of the forts. As a result 
he was appointed lieutenant-colonel. 

At the head of one hundred and fifty men, accompanied 
by Jacob Van Braam, a Dutchman, one of his former attend- 
ants, who at an earlier time had taught him the drill, he, on 
April 2, 1754, started again for Pennsylvania. On the 25th 
he had reached the Great Meadows, in the neighborhood ot 
the present Uniontown, in Fayette County. There he learned 
that a body of the French were in the vicinity. Supported 
by friendly Indians and led by Scaryooyadi, a Delaware, to 
the French camp, through the darkness, he made an attack 
in the early morning. For fifteen minutes the rifles re- 
sounded and the balls whistled. Of the provincial troops 
three were wounded and one was killed. Of the French 
one was wounded and ten were killed, including Jumon- 
ville, their leader, and twenty-one were captured. Only 
one, a Canadian, escaped. And so it came about that the 
opening battle in that struggle of tremendous import, which 
was to determine that the vast continent of America should 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 261 

belong to the countrymen of Hermann and not to those of 
Varus, was fought by George Washington upon the soil of 
Pennsylvania. 

The victory was won. The prisoners were hurried away 
to Virginia. But fortune does not extend her favors to 
any man for long. The career of Washington, like that of 
most men, was a series of successes and reverses. 

"To all earthly men, 

In spite of right and wrong and love and hate, 
One day shall come the turn of luckless fate." 

It was rumored that Contrecoeur was at Fort Duquesne 
with a force of one thousand French and many Indians, 
and the young colonel was in trouble. On May 31 he 
wrote, " We expect every hour to be attacked by a su- 
perior force." He threw up intrenchments one hundred 
feet square and built a palisade with a trench outside, 
which, because there had been a scarcity of provisions, he 
called Fort Necessity. The site is along the bank of a 
little stream flowing through the centre of a meadow two 
hundred and fifty yards wide, set at a considerable eleva- 
tion among the hills. All that remains now is a slight ac- 
cumulation of earth where the lines of the fort ran and a 
large stone with a square hole cut in it for a corner post ; 
but what there is ought to be carefully preserved by the 
State. He received a reinforcement which increased his 
strength to three hundred men, and he talked about exert- 
ing " our noble courage with spirit." Later there came 
one hundred more men from South Carolina. He ad- 
vanced thirteen miles farther in the direction of Fort Du- 
quesne, and then, learning that the French were strong in 
numbers and coming to meet him, he retreated, July 1, to 
Fort Necessity. Thither he was followed by five hundred 
French and several hundred Indians. All through the day 
of July 3 the firing was kept up around the fort, those 
within being huddled together in danger and discomfort, 
until twelve had been killed and forty-three wounded. 
The next morning, July 4, at Philadelphia, Vicksburg, 



262 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

and Gettysburg a fateful day in American history, Wash- 
ington, having signed papers of capitulation, marched forth 
with his troops. He abandoned a large flag and surren- 
dered the fort. He was permitted to take the military 
stores, except the artillery. He agreed to return the pris- 
oners he had captured and sent to Virginia ; but, worst of 
all, the papers he signed referred to " I 'assassinat du Sieur 
de Jumonville." Our historians have been prone to throw 
the blame for this language upon the imperfect translation 
of Van Braam ; but since the French " assassinat" and the 
English " assassination" are substantially the same word, 
sufficient to attract the attention of the most unlearned, 
the explanation fails to satisfy. The affair, as is apt to be 
the case when the foe gains the glory and the field, be- 
came the subject of much animadversion. Horace Walpole 
called him a "brave braggart." Dinwiddie reduced his rank 
to that of captain, and found reasons for declining to return 
the prisoners. Thereupon Washington resigned from the 
service, went back to Mount Vernon, and his ambition to 
hold a commission in the English army was never gratified. 
The following year Braddock disembarked and encamped 
his army at Alexandria. Washington offered his services 
as an aide, and his experience with the French and the In- 
dians and his knowledge of the country wherein the ad- 
vance was to be made rendered them of the utmost value. 
It was the first army thoroughly drilled, equipped, and 
appointed he had ever seen. On that fatal battle-field 
near Pittsburg, now covered by the mills of the United 
States Steel Corporation (tempora mutantur et nos in illis 
mutamur), where Braddock was killed, where eight 
hundred and fifty-five French and Indians completely 
routed three thousand disciplined English soldiers, he did 
doughty and valiant deeds. It has been described as " the 
most extraordinary victory ever obtained and the furthest 
flight ever made;" but in the battle he had two horses 
killed under him, and out of it he came with four bullet 
holes through his coat. There are prophets among other 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 263 

peoples than Israel. Samuel Davies, on the 17th of Au- 
gust, 1755, preached a sermon at Hanover, in Virginia, 
wherein, with less plaint than Jeremiah and clearer vision 
than Isaiah, he exclaimed, " That heroic youth, Colonel 
Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has 
hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some impor- 
tant service to his country." 

Fortune took another turn. For these two defeats there 
soon came compensation. "With a regiment of Virginians, 
in 1758, he took part in the expedition of General John 
Forbes, whose bones now lie in Christ Churchyard in 
Philadelphia, and at the head of his men and the army, on 
the 25th of November, marched into Fort Duquesne. The 
magazine had been exploded. The fort had been set on 
fire. The French had taken bateaux and departed. Their 
influence along the Ohio River had been broken. The In- 
dians who had been their allies sought the favor of the 
English. And George Washington had completed the 
military training which was to fit him to become the suc- 
cessful leader in the eight years' struggle of the people of 
the American Colonies for independence. 

He resigned his commission and hastened to Virginia. 
Six weeks later on the 6th of January, 1759 he married 
Martha Custis, a widow, who was the fortunate possessor 
of a hundred thousand dollars. He was elected to the 
House of Burgesses, and for the next fifteen years, in the 
quiet and retirement of Mount Vernon, lived a barren and 
uneventful life, with no ambition save the pleasure of ac- 
cumulation ; no exhilaration greater than the chase of the 
fox, and no anxiety except for the care of his herds of cat- 
tle. How bare and barren the life was can be seen from 
these extracts, showing with what his thoughts were occu- 
pied, covering a month in his manuscript journal for 1767 : 

"July: 

" 14 Finish'd my wheat Harvest. 

"16 began to cut my Timothy Meadow, which had stood too long. 

"25 finish'd Ditto. 



264 George 'Washington in Pennsylvania. 

"25 Sowed turnep seed from Colonel Fairfax's, in sheep pens, at 
the House. 

" 25 Sowed Winter do. from Colo. Lee's, in the neck. 

" 27 began to sow wheat at the Mill with the early white Wheat, 
w'ch grew at Muddyhole. 

" 28 began to sow wheat at Muddyhole with the mixed wheat that 
grew there ; also began to sow wheat at Doag Eun, of the red chaff, 
from home ; also sowed summer Turnep below Garden. 

"29 Sowed Colonel Fairfax's kind in flax ground joining sheep pens." 

A new epoch dawned, and again George Washington 
came to Pennsylvania. A crisis big with fatality and 
freighted with the hopes of the future was approaching. 
The Stamp Act had been passed, and after a storm of rep- 
robation had been repealed; non-importation resolutions 
had been promulgated from the Pennsylvania State-House, 
soon to be known as Independence Hall, ringing with a 
bell which is only torn from it by sacrilege ; John Dickin- 
son had written those Farmer's letters wherein was ex- 
pounded the creed of the Colonies ; the tea ships had been 
driven from the Delaware River, and an act of Parliament 
had closed the port of Boston, when the first Congress 
was called to meet in Carpenters' Hall, on Chestnut Street 
below Fourth, in the city of Philadelphia, on September 5, 

1774. Washington appeared as a delegate. What part he 
bore in its deliberations it is difficult to tell. But he wrote 
to a friend upon the subject of independence, " I am well 
satisfied that no such thing is desired by any thinking man 
in all North America." It was a time of stirring events 
and rapid movements, but men held fast to the old moor- 
ings so long as they could. A few months later the mus- 
kets began to rattle at Lexington, and on the 15th of June, 

1775, the second Continental Congress, to which he was a 
delegate, assembled in the State-House. One of their first 
acts was to determine " that a general be appointed to com- 
mand all the continental forces raised or to be raised in the 
defense of American liberty," and by a unanimous vote, in 
that famed Pennsylvania hall, the heaviest responsibility 
which had ever fallen to the lot of an American was im- 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 265 

posed upon George Washington. The next day, in the 
same place, declaring, " I feel great distress from a con- 
sciousness that my abilities and military experience may 
not be equal to the extensive and important trust," and 
that " no pecuniary compensation could have tempted me 
to accept this arduous employment," declining the sum 
which had been fixed for his salary, with modest words and 
with a serious sense of the difficulties he was about to en- 
counter, he assumed that responsibility and started forth, 
like Moses of old, to lead his people through the Red Sea 
of war and the wilderness of uncertainty and suffering. 
Unlike the prophet and law-giver of Israel, and unlike his 
own prototype, William of Orange, he was destined not 
only to see from afar, but to enter into the land of promise 
and safety. The war upon which he then embarked was 
to endure through eight weary years. Philadelphia was 
then not only the chief city of the Colonies, the centre of 
science, art, literature, and population, but the seat of the 
revolutionary government and the place where the Conti- 
nental Congresses held their sessions. It was believed by 
the Revolutionists that the retention of the possession of the 
city was essential to the success of their cause. The Royal- 
ists believed that if it could be captured the war would be 
speedily terminated and the rebellion end in an early disso- 
lution. A few opening and indecisive contests of arms oc- 
curred in Massachusetts ; but the struggle ere long drifted 
to the shores of the Delaware, and the Continental army 
never thereafter was farther east than the Hudson. In the 
course of the war nine battles were fought by the army 
under the personal command of Washington, and, with the 
exception of Long Island, which was an unrelieved disaster, 
and Yorktown, where it was uncertain whether the laurels 
ought to cluster about the French fleet or the American 
land forces, all of them Trenton, Princeton, Brandy wine, 
Warren Tavern, Germantown, White Marsh, and Mon- 
mouth were conflicts the purpose of which was to control 
or defend, to secure or retain, the city of Philadelphia. 



266 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

At Brandywine there was presented to him the great 
opportunity of his military career when the enemy, of their 
own motion, brought about the situation which it was the 
object of the tactics of Napoleon to secure, and divided their 
forces in front of him. At Warren Tavern his plans were 
thwarted and his opportunities and advantages lost through 
what the lawyer calls the act of God. At Trenton and 
Germantown he displayed not only the courage and resolu- 
tion bred in his Saxon fibre, but that other quality, more 
often found in the Celt, " I'audace, toujours I'audace." At 
White Marsh he boldly approached to within a few miles of 
the en^tny, who then held the city, defeated attacks upon 
his right, left, and centre, compelling Howe to withdraw 
discomfited, and won, though with small loss, his greatest 
tactical success. The issues of the Revolutionary War 
were determined, however, not by the effective handling of 
large armies with consummate skill, not by the exercise of 
that military genius which enabled a Marlborough, a Fred- 
erick, or a Bonaparte to see just when and where to strike 
to the best advantage, but by that tireless tenacity of pur- 
pose which, through success or disaster, never flagged, and, 
whatever fate might have in store, refused to be overcome. 
All the poets who have sung their verse, all the historians 
who have written their books, whatever students may have 
investigated, and whatever orators may have spoken agree 
in the conclusion that such tenacity was best exemplified at 
the close of a lost campaign, with a weakened and dwin- 
dling army, through the sufferings of a severe winter upon 
the hills of Valley Forge. Wherever the story is read, 
wherever the tale is told, the pluck and persistence amid 
misfortune and disheartening want exhibited at this Penn- 
sylvania hamlet along the banks of the Schuylkill have 
come to be the type and symbol of the Revolutionary War 
and to represent the supreme effort and the unconquerable 
fortitude of the American soldier. 

In a German almanac printed in the town of Lancaster 
in the latter part of the year 1778 Washington was first 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 267 

called " the Father of his Country." It was at once a 
truthful and a prophetic designation, in accord with passing 
and coming events, and soon accepted by all of the people. 
At the close of the war he returned to Mount Yernon, to 
his negroes, corn, wheat, and tobacco, to his horses and his 
hounds, the latter a present from Lafayette, again be- 
came, in the language of the Rev. Thomas Coke, " quite the 
plain country gentleman," and, if we may rely upon the 
journal of John Hunter, he "sent the bottle about pretty 
freely after dinner" and " got quite merry." 

The war would have been an utter failure if it had only 
resulted in a severance of the ties which connected us with 
Great Britain and if it had left the Colonies discordant, jeal- 
ous, and each pursuing its own selfish interests, under the 
ineffective government established by the Articles of Con- 
federation. The work of destruction had been successful 
and complete, but the constructive and more difficult task 
of welding the discordant elements into a vital and 
effective organism remained. All of the South American 
states succeeded in throwing off the control of Spain, and 
even Hayti became independent ; but what gift to mankind 
has come of it ? Upon the sea of human affairs a nation 
was to be launched, with the prospect of large proportions 
and unlimited growth, and again George Washington came 
to Pennsylvania. In the definite movement leading up to 
the formation of the government of the United States of 
America, as we know it to-day, no New England State had 
any participation. Delegates from New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Virginia met at Annapo- 
lis, in the State of Maryland, on the llth of September, 
1786, and, after consultation, urged the necessity of a revi- 
sion of the existing system, and recommended the calling 
of a convention, with sufficient power, to meet in Philadel- 
phia on the second Monday of May in 1787. Emerson 
has well said that " all martyrdoms looked mean when they 
were suffered," and that " when the gods come among men 
they are not known." He might have added that the im- 



268 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

portance of the supreme events in the advancement of the 
human race has seldom been recognized by contemporaries. 
Even Shakespeare died without any conception of what he 
had achieved and without any foretaste of his future fame. 
At the State-House, on May 14, 1787, at the opening of 
the convention, delegates appeared only from Virginia and 
Pennsylvania. Eleven days later Washington was elected 
to preside by the votes of these States and those of Dela- 
ware and New Jersey, and at the end of two weeks no 
others were yet represented. "What the members kept 
steadily in view throughout all of their deliberations, ac- 
cording to "Washington, was " the consolidation of our 
Union." Of how they succeeded the world has no need to 
be told. From that box, drawn, as it were, by unwitting 
fishermen out of the sea of uncertainties and perplexities, 
came forth a genie whose stride is from ocean to ocean ; 
whose locks, shaken upon one side by Eurus, on the other 
by Zephyr, darken the skies ; and whose voice is heard in 
far Cathay and beyond Ultima Thule. There was difficulty 
about the adoption of the Constitution. Opposition was 
manifested everywhere ; on the part of men like Patrick 
Henry, of Virginia, and Elbridge Gerry, of Massachusetts, 
it was decided, and in some instances intense. One of the 
New England States held aloof for three years. But in 
three months on the 1st of January, 1788 Washington 
was able to write, "Pennsylvania, Delaware and New 
Jersey have already decided in its favor." After the voice 
of this State had been heard and its great influence had 
been exerted the result was no longer doubtful, and he 
cheerfully continued, " There is the greatest prospect of its 
being adopted by the people." 

After having been elected President of the nation he had 
done so much to create, he spent the whole of his two 
terms, with the exception of a year in New York, in the 
city of Philadelphia. For ten years this patriotic city, 
without compensation of any kind, furnished a home to the 
government of the United States. The building at the 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 269 

southeast corner of Sixth and Chestnut Streets was given 
up to the use of the Senate and House, and became Con- 
gress Hall. The Supreme Court met in the building at 
the southwest corner of Fifth and Chestnut Streets. For 
seven years Washington lived in a large double brick 
building on the south side of Market Street, sixty feet east 
of Sixth, which had been the headquarters of Howe. To 
the east was a yard with shade-trees, and along the front of 
this yard ran a brick wall seven feet high. Next door to 
him dwelt a hairdresser. All of the important events of 
his administration the establishment of the Mint ; the wars 
conducted by St. Clair, Harmar, and Wayne against the 
Indians; the Whiskey Insurrection, which took him through 
Carlisle again to Western Pennsylvania, after a long ab- 
sence ; the troubles over Genet and Jay's treaty with Great 
Britain occurred during his residence here. He had a 
pew in Christ Church. He became a member of the 
American Philosophical Society, and was present at its ser- 
vices upon the deaths of Benjamin Franklin and David Rit- 
tenhouse. He attended the theatre in Southwark, seeing 
the play, " The Young Quaker ; or, the Fair Philadel- 
phian," and Rickett's Circus, and he took part in the 
dancing assemblies. He and Governor Mifflin saw the 
Frenchman Blanchard make the first balloon ascension in 
America, January 9, 1793, amid much tumult and eclat. 
Blanchard was described as " Impavidus sortem non timet 
Icariam." The magistrates of the city gave him the use ot 
the court-yard of the prison, and the roar of artillery an- 
nounced to the people the moment of departure. Wash- 
ington placed in his hands a passport which, with a pleasing 
uncertainty befitting the occasion, was directed " to all to 
whom these presents shall come," and authorized him " to 
pass in such direction and to descend in such place as cir- 
cumstances may render most convenient." He started at 
nine minutes after ten, on a clear morning ; sailed over the 
Delaware and frightened a flock of pigeons and a Jersey 
farmer near Gloucester, where he landed. He prevailed 



270 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

upon the latter to come to his help by the offer of one of 
the six bottles of wine with which Dr. Caspar Wistar had 
provided him. Jonathan Penrose, Robert Wharton, and 
six other Philadelphians chased after him on horseback 
and escorted him back to the President, to whom he pre- 
sented his respects and colors. 

Washington had sixteen stalls in his stable, generally 
full, and was a hard driver, upon one occasion foundering 
five horses. He wore false teeth, in part carved from the 
tusk of a hippopotamus. The Stuart portrait, which has 
come in time to be the accepted delineation of his features, 
was painted at the southeast corner of Fifth and Chestnut 
Streets. Every Tuesday he gave levees, and on New 
Year's Day served punch and cake. Once he picked the 
sugar-plums from the cake and sent them to " Master 
John," later in life to be famous as the Old Man Eloquent. 
When James Wilson, Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
United States, opened the law school of this University 
and, in the true sense, began legal education in this coun- 
try, December 15, 1790, it was in the presence of George 
and Martha Washington. One hundred and ten years ago 
to-day, at the hour of noon, aye, this very hour, the fac- 
ulty of the University of Pennsylvania, in company with 
the heads of department, the members of the Congress, and 
the Governor of the Commonwealth, in person offered their 
congratulations. He had a green parchment pocket-book ; 
he kept it in a hair trunk, and he tied his keys together 
with a twine string. In this city he wrote his farewell ad- 
dress, and here he was described as " first in war, first in 
peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen." He left 
Philadelphia March 9, 1797, and less than three years later 
he was dead. 

The cloth is woven. The story is told. Through no ac- 
cident was it brought about that Washington, though he 
was born and died in Virginia, spent in such great part his 
military and official life in this State. The cause was like 
that which took Napoleon from Ajaccio to Paris, Shake- 



George Washington in Pennsylvania. 271 

speare from Stratford to London, and Franklin from Bos- 
ton to Philadelphia. " Every ship," wrote Emerson, " is a 
romantic object except that we sail in." Self-respect is a 
saving grace in the state as well as in the individual. Pa- 
triotism, like charity and all the other virtues, begins at the 
hearth-stone. When the Shunammite woman was urged to 
come to the court of Solomon, her answer was, " I dwell 
among mine own people." After the earliest of the great 
and good men of the Aryan race, he whom we call Cyrus, 
five centuries and a half before Christ, had overcome all of 
his enemies and had founded the most extensive empire the 
world had known up to that time, he inscribed over the 
gateway of his palace only the simple words, " I am Ku- 
rush the King, the Akhsemenian." There is need of more 
of that spirit in Pennsylvania. We too lightly forget our 
achievements ; we are too ready to desert our heroes ; we 
are too willing to leave our rulers unsupported ; we read 
with too little indignation the uncanny and untrue tales 
told by our rivals elsewhere and repeated and reprinted by 
the unfaithful at home. Of all existing agencies this insti- 
tution of learning, with its host of alumni and students de- 
voted to it, to its interests, and to the Commonwealth, ap- 
pears to be doing the most effective service in the way of 
cultivating a more correct tone and a more elevated senti- 
ment. To a great extent the future hope of the Common- 
wealth depends upon you, young men of the University, 
and upon your efforts. Go forth, then, to fill your chosen 
spheres. Let it not be said of you, as was said of one of 
the Lord Chancellors of England, that if he had known a 
little about law he would have known a little about every- 
thing. Be earnest and thorough. If your field be the law, 
follow the example and study the work of Gibson and 
Sharswood. If it be medicine, you have before you the 
careers and the labors of Rush, Gross, Agnew, and Pepper. 
If it be science, to whom can you turn with more confi- 
dence than to Rittenhouse, Leidy, Audubon, and Cope ? 
If you wish to store your minds with the facts of the past, 



272 George Washington in Pennsylvania. 

read the histories of Lea and McMaster ; and if you need 
mental relaxation, you will find no romance more worthy 
of your attention than " Nick of the Woods," " The Story 
of Kennett," " The "Wagoner of the Alleghanies," and 
" Hugh Wynne." As you go along through life, sing with 
emotion your song of " The Pennsylvania Girl" and shout 

with vigor your 

" 'Bah, 'rah, 'rah, 
Pennsylvania !" 

that all may not only hear, but learn to appreciate and to 
admire. Benjamin West, of Delaware County, when he 
became President of the Royal Academy, reached the high- 
est position which could then be attained by any artist. In 
his " Death of Wolfe" he overthrew the conventions and 
revolutionized the methods of his profession. It is not too 
much to assert that in his " Penn's Treaty with the In- 
dians" he fastened upon the attention of mankind the most 
distinctive event in the early history of the Colonies. See 
to it that amid the fads of modern art he is not belittled 
and discarded. Your soldier, George Gordon Meade, not 
only won the most important battle of recent times, but in 
doing so he determined the destinies of the nation and in- 
fluenced human affairs for all the ages to come. Cherish 
and extend his fame as your precious heritage. On brass, 
marble, and granite preserve the memory of his deeds. 
Give due praise to the accomplishment of others, but do 
not overlook the worth and achievements of the earnest 
men who have gone from your own doorsteps. Scorn all 
cant, falsehood, and sensationalism. And when by zeal 
and application you have secured in life the rewards for 
which you have striven, do not forget how much of your 
success is due to the training and discipline conferred upon 
you by your venerable and honored alma mater, the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, and to the example of the long line ot 
distinguished men who in the past have been the recipients 
of her benefits and been nurtured at her bosom. 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 273 



A GEEAT PHILADELPHIAN: ROBEET MOEEIS. 

BY DR. ELLIS PAXSON OBERHOLTZEB. 

In the past few years the nation has sought to satisfy its 
curiosity regarding almost all of the leaders who in the time of 
the republic's first days of stress contributed to the upbuild- 
ing of our great political establishment. Our devotion to 
the memory of this or that Revolutionary patriot has been 
indicated in biography and romance, and monuments to 
"Washington, Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson, and Madison 
dot the land, testifying in some way to a disproof of the old 
maxim that republics are lacking in gratitude. Indeed, we 
have got down to secondary characters in our desire to 
memorialize the services of men who labored in behalf of 
American independence ; yet I have been astonished in the 
course of my studies of the past year or two to discover 
how very little the people know, or seemingly have hitherto 
cared to know, of that splendid servant of the thirteen 
States, their financier, the Philadelphia merchant prince, 
Robert Morris, whom a great European historian told us 
long enough ago for the fact to have sunk into our minds 
by this time, is entitled to equal place beside Washington 
and Franklin as one of the real saviours of the American 
cause. What Washington achieved upon the battle-field in 
gaining military victories, Franklin at European courts in 
winning foreign sympathy, interest, and support, Morris 
achieved in the Office of Finance in Philadelphia in finding 
the money and credit with which to prosecute the war to a 
successful termination. No one of these three men could 
have gone far without the cooperation of the other two, and 
yet scarcely any recognition has ever been accorded the 
third member of the group, the Philadelphia financier. 

I entered a prominent book-shop in a large city some 
time ago to ask for a biograjjiy of Robert Morris. I met 

VOL. XXVIII. 18 



274 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

the gentleman whose duty it is to superintend the business 
of the house. 

"Oh, yes, I know," he answered; " Robert Morris, the 
great physician." 

In the city in which he lived for nearly sixty years, 
achieved all his triumphs and suffered his gigantic defeats, 
or practically from the time he came to this country from 
Liverpool to join his father, who was a tobacco factor in 
Oxford, Maryland, the sum of popular knowledge about 
Morris is that he died in a debtor's prison a most persistent 
piece of misinformation and that he built a marble house in 
Chestnut Street which he could not complete, long known 
as Morris's " Folly." " The Hills on Schuylkill," the 
beautiful country home at which Robert Morris dispensed 
his lavish hospitality to Washington, Lafayette, Jefferson, 
Jay, and all the principal patriots of the period, is in disre- 
pair in Fairmount Park, being hired out to-day by the city 
to a restaurant keeper, and there is no suitable public 
memorial in Philadelphia to one of the greatest men which 
it contributed to the American Revolution outside the hearts 
of his descendants and a dwindling number of old citizens 
taught by their fathers to revere his name. 

Plainly the principal reason for this is to be found in the 
fact that the indispensable value of Mr. Morris's services to 
the government during the war was obscured by his colos- 
sal misfortunes in later life, brought on by speculation in 
virgin lands in Pennsylvania, New York, the South, and in 
the new Washington city, which left him and vast numbers 
of other people much the poorer pecuniarily. For long the 
memory of bankruptcy, sheriff's writs, more than three 
years in a public prison, and unpaid debts aggregating 
millions of dollars could not be effaced, even though it was 
quite clear to every sober mind that no craft or dishonesty 
marked Morris's actions, and that he himself suffered vastly 
more by the failure of his ambitious plans to fructify than 
any of his trustful friends or creditors. The American 
people, if they shall come to appreciate the magnitude of the 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 275 

financier's services in behalf of the young nation and the 
purity of his purposes, even after his over-sanguine nature 
had involved him hopelessly in business disaster, will not be 
disposed to-day to grudge him the grateful recognition they 
have accorded other great characters in the republic's history. 

It is true, too, that we have not known Morris largely 
because of the loss of his diaries and letter-books and their 
inaccessibility to the public after they were finally discov- 
ered it is said, in France by General John Meredith Read, 
one time our minister to Greece. The romantic and mys- 
terious history of the sixteen great leather-bound books 
may never be told how they reached Europe and through 
what various adventures they passed before they came into 
General Read's hands. In his custody they were safe, 
although not immediately useful to students ; and only since 
they have been acquired by the Library of Congress, at his 
death, has the material been at hand for a satisfactory study 
of Morris's public and private career. For several periods 
of his life the information is still scant, and so methodical a 
man, given to recording all his movements in writing, even 
when imprisonment stared him in the face, and in the prison- 
house itself, should have left as complete a transcript of his 
correspondence for the remaining years, were the records 
preserved, or, being saved, could they by any chance be dis- 
covered among the archives transmitted to his descendants. 
However, no essential period in his career remains to be 
illumined by the documents, and we are now able to pro- 
cure a view of a great and generous character whom every 
school-boy might well study as an inspiring type in Amer- 
ican statesmanship. 

Mr. Morris was born in Liverpool, England, in 1734. 
He reached America when he was a lad of about thirteen 
years of age. His father, also Robert Morris, had preceded 
him as the American agent of a firm of English tobacco 
merchants, and the boy, left at home with a grandmother, of 
whose kindnesses he was afterwards often heard to speak, was 
consigned to the charge of a captain of one of the tobacco 



276 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

ships for the voyage across the sea. Robert Morris, Sr., 
who resided in Oxford, Maryland, contrary to a rather 
common supposition, if not wealthy, was in no true sense 
of the word a poor man. The son was put to school in 
Maryland and later in Philadelphia, whither he came in 
a short time to remain until his death. Here he was com- 
mended to the care of Robert Greenway, who in a little 
while, upon his father's decease, which resulted from injuries 
sustained by a shot prematurely discharged by a gunner on 
a tobacco ship in Oxford harbor, became his guardian. The 
surgery of the time was so wretched that the wound, though 
it would now be considered slight, quickly developed symp- 
toms of blood-poisoning, and before the boy could reach 
Maryland his father was dead and buried in White Marsh 
Church-yard in Talbot County, where these lines were placed 

upon the tomb : 

IN MEMORY OF 

EGBERT MORRIS, A NATIVE OF LIVERPOOL IK GREAT BRITAIN, 
LATE MERCHANT OF OXFORD, 

IN THIS PROVINCE. 

Punctual Integrity influenced his dealings. 
Principals of honor governed his actions. 
With an uncommon degree of Sincerity, 
He despised Artifice and Dissimulation. 
His Friendship was firm, candid and valuable. 
His Charity frequent, secret and well adapted. 
His Zeal for the Publicke good active and useful. 
His Hospitality was enhanced by his Conversation, 
Seasoned with cheerful wit and a sound judgment, 
A Salute from the canon of a ship, 
The wad fracturing his arm 
Was the signal by which he departed, 
Greatly lamented as he was esteemed, 
In the fortieth year of his age. 
On the twelfth day of July 
MDCCL. 

The boy was now in a new world without known kin and 
practically friendless. With an inheritance, the residue of 
an estate reduced by numerous small bequests, and his native 
business acumen, which proved to be exceptional from the 



A Great Philadelphia^, : Robert Morris. 277 

moment it was called into play, he was compelled to choose 
an occupation. He early entered the employ of Charles 
"Willing, who in two or three years, desiring to escape further 
active part in his business and perceiving young Morris's 
value to the firm, suggested a partnership with his son 
Thomas. Thus was established the mercantile house of 
"Willing & Morris, for more than thirty years the largest 
importing and exporting concern in Philadelphia and one 
of the richest and most enterprising in the American Col- 
onies. Their ships carried merchandise to and from all 
countries, and it was no idle boast when Mr. Morris re- 
marked, in reviewing his unusual life, as the twilight shades 
settled about him, " I have owned more ships than any man 
in America." His vessels under sail in the same sea would 
have comprised a great fleet, and their operations early gave 
him command of an ample fortune. He and his partner 
were accounted wealthy men long before the outbreak of 
the Revolution, and, in identifying themselves actively with 
that movement, were valued accessions to the patriot ranks 
in Philadelphia, where so many citizens of substance were 
still openly avowing their sympathies for Great Britain. 

It called for some sacrifice and renunciation on the part 
of an Englishman who, with affectionate feeling in the 
shadow of his years, still spoke of his native country as 
" dear old England," and a merchant though this view is 
contrary to some extant accounts who had much to lose by 
a war between Great Britain and her Colonies, to ally himself 
prominently with the revolutionaries, or, as we say more 
reverently, the American patriots. Mr. Morris acted with 
boldness and decision in this matter as in all others which 
ever in his life arose and called for a choice of alternatives. 
He was one of the committee of Philadelphians who in 
1765 visited John Hughes, appointed upon Franklin's rec- 
ommendation to sell the odious stamps, and secured from 
that officer, who at the time was in bed with a grave illness, 
a pledge that he would not be an instrument to collect this 
tax from his unwilling fellow-citizens. 



278 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

Morris was early sent to the Continental Congress by the 
Pennsylvania Legislature, where his counsels were strongly 
against a complete rupture with Great Britain. He voted 
against the Declaration of Independence as untimely and 
as likely to defeat that object which the "Whigs of America 
so zealously desired to attain. Of all the members of the 
Pennsylvania delegation who voted adversely upon the ques- 
tion of separation from England, he alone commanded pop- 
ular confidence sufficiently to be returned to Congress at 
the next ensuing election, and, once embarked for the war, 
he was a most uncompromising advocate of its prosecution 
by every measure which would clear the country of British 
troops and establish America's independence. 

He was at once engaged in service of the greatest impor- 
tance. One of the unhappiest periods of the war a crisis 
it was difficult to survive was experienced in the winter of 
1776-77 when Washington was operating around Trenton, 
Howe threatened Philadelphia, and Congress had fled to 
Baltimore, leaving Morris at the head of a committee in the 
capital of the war-torn Colonies, to hurry forward the work 
upon uncompleted ships at the Delaware yards and, if pos- 
sible, send them to sea before the British should descend 
upon the city. Morris, in truth, was that committee. With 
the loyal support of his friend John Hancock, then Presi- 
dent of Congress, another capable business man who under- 
stood the impracticability of too much consultation and 
discussion when great objects were to be attained, he was 
for the time being the entire American government on its 
civil side. Whatever he may have done in strengthening 
the defences of the city, in arranging, with his exceptional 
experience as a shipmaster, for the quick despatch of the 
fleet down the bay to safety in the open sea, in directing 
the citizens as they departed with their movable goods to 
places of refuge in Lancaster, York, and other parts of the 
State, it is not easily conceivable that any smaller character 
could have secured upon a few hours' notice, on his private 
credit, the sum of fifty thousand dollars to forward the oper- 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 279 

ations of General Washington. That it was this money, pro- 
cured by Mr. Morris's single-handed exertions, which induced 
the troops, whose time of enlistment had expired with the 
year, to continue in the service, and which enabled the 
Commander-in-Chief a second time to steal up behind the 
British and Hessian forces near Trenton and administer the 
defeat that effectually protected Philadelphia from occupa- 
tion by the enemy during that winter, may readily be 
demonstrated. This service Washington never forgot, nor 
should any American of this day value less the title to na- 
tional gratitude won by Mr. Morris on this historic occasion. 
The winters at Trenton and Valley Forge ended, no other 
season was gloomier or more critical than 1781, when, after 
five years of more or less unfruitful struggle, the public 
credit was entirely exhausted. The Continental currency 
had come to have so little value that it was used to plaster 
the walls of barber shops and to kindle fires under offensive 
Tory gentlemen. France had declared that she would 
supply no more money to her American allies. The 
American Whigs of most talent and ability, who, when the 
war began, had come forward generously to offer their 
services to their country, had left the national council halls 
to resume the direction of their private affairs, long sorely 
neglected. The sessions of the Continental Congress were 
slimly attended by men of no great degree of attainment, 
and their acts commanded little public confidence. It 
was at this juncture that Robert Morris appeared, being 
again called to the head of the government, to occupy a 
new office especially created to tempt him back into the 
public line, the Superintendent of the United States 
Finances. A single official was now to take the place of 
the old Treasury Board, whose members consumed their 
energies in the fruitless discussion of questions which 
they but imperfectly understood, powerless to enforce 
their numerous resolves. Not content with any partial 
authority, Morris absorbed several other offices and made 
himself at once the head of the Marine and Commissary 



280 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

Departments. Indeed, as the unfriendly Governor Reed 
observed, " he exercised the powers really of the three 
great departments [War, Foreign Affairs, and Finance] , and 
Congress have only to give their fiat to his mandates." 
Once more he bore almost the entire responsibility of 
government upon his own shoulders. The War Department 
had no more important task than to secure pay and sub- 
sistence for the troops, and the Foreign Office had no duty 
to perform so necessary as the work of extorting money from 
European governments. Morris took all these lines of 
business into his own hands, visited Washington's camp ; 
coaxed from the States, under threat of military seizure, 
food for the soldiers and horses that were soon put in mo- 
tion in New York for the descent upon Yorktown, borrow- 
ing the money from Rochambeau to pay the mutinous 
troops who, unpaid, would not go farther south than the 
Head of Elk; drew bills upon Franklin at Paris, Jay at 
Madrid, and John Adams at the Hague, and sent them 
skurrying to public and private treasuries to find the money 
to prevent the dishonor of protest; conveyed specie from 
Boston by ox-train to fill the tills of the new Bank of North 
America; issued his own notes in anticipation of the col- 
lection of taxes in the impotent States; sold tobacco in 
Europe, despatched his agents to the Carolinas for indigo 
and skins, and sent ships to Cuba with flour to be disposed 
of for cash to the Governor of Havana. From May, 1781, 
when the credit of Congress was at the lowest ebb, until 
November, 1784, when peace was assured and the army 
had been disbanded, Morris administered the Office of 
Finance with a hand as successful as it was imperial. His 
justification was found in the triumph of his daring policies ; 
in the lifelong and warm friendships of General Washing- 
ton, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Gouverneur Morris, 
and the entire Federalist element; in the respect of the 
people at large, who revered his name and who sent him 
to the Constitutional Convention and later to the Senate 
of the United States from Pennsylvania to serve for six 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 281 

years as the principal pillar of Washington's administra- 
tion. 

It is in the manuscript books which Congress has lately 
acquired from General Read's library that we find the first 
intelligible account of these remarkable transactions. The 
last three years of the war are decidedly the most important 
of the seven, and the man who was the most powerful in- 
fluence in civil administration in that period relates in a 
diary, with entries covering his entire term of oflice, and in 
letters to generals, governors, congressmen, ambassadors, 
bankers, and treasury agents, the whole story of the meas- 
ures taken to bring the war to a happy end and compel 
England to relinquish further claim to the disposal of the 
lives and liberties of her American colonists. 

It is not only to the bare, cold details of the life of a 
faithful officer that we are introduced by a study of Mr. 
Morris's writings. We also receive glimpses of a character 
which was large, generous, and lovable, one that each man 
and woman of us would recognize wherever we should 
meet its like, for honesty and worth, His enemies were 
malignant, and pursued him relentlessly until the end of 
his political career; but to all of them his effective re- 
sponse was faithful service and an indifferent attitude in the 
face of insult, except when he was most deeply stung by 
their unjust aspersions upon his morals as a public officer. 
This disdainful manner while under attack is illustrated in 
his letter to Mr. Comfort Sands in 1782. To that gentle- 
man Mr. Morris wrote, 

"As to what you tell me of reports circulating to my 
prejudice, depend on it they give me no kind of concern. 
All my transactions are open, and I expect to give my 
country the pleasure of seeing that the expenditures are far 
more moderate than they have reason to expect. In the 
meantime any abuse or misrepresentation which particular 
persons may indulge themselves in I consider as the neces- 
sary trappings of office, and if they can obtain forgiveness 
from their country they will always have mine most freely." 



282 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

Another time he wrote, 

" I am not ignorant that many people employ themselves 
in defaming men whom they do not know and measures 
which they do not understand. To such illiberal charac- 
ters the best answer is to act well." 

But under some particularly vicious attacks Morris was 
far less equable. A Mr. Pierce called at the Office of Fi- 
nance to say that some officers of the Pennsylvania line 
were publicly declaring that they had been paid in notes 
which were not of face value. The Superintendent, ac- 
cording to the allegation, had directed a broker to buy up 
the paper as soon as the necessities of the soldiers required 
them to part with it, and by this process thirty thousand 
dollars had been gained by the United States, or by per- 
sons privy to the transaction. Upon hearing this report 
Mr. Morris wrote in his Diary, 

" I requested him [Pierce] to wait on those officers and 
urge them to search into the bottom of any information 
they had on that subject and pursue every trace they could 
find leading to such transactions, in order that they may 
prove my guilt or innocence, and I promised that if I ever 
did buy one single note, either for public or private ac- 
count, either directly by myself or by means of others, I 
will agree to sacrifice everything that is dear and valuable 
to man. Never was a more malignant and false slander 
invented." 

Of all the public men of the time there was none above 
the rank of his colleague in the United States Senate, "Wil- 
liam Maclay, of Harrisburg, Thomas Paine, and Arthur Lee 
to question his devotion and integrity. James Madison 
was not of Robert Morris's political faith; but while in 
Congress in 1782 he wrote to Edmund Randolph, 

" My charity, I own, cannot invent an excuse for the pre- 
pense malice with which the character and services of this 
gentleman are murdered. I am persuaded that he ac- 
cepted his offices from motives which were honorable and 
patriotic. I have seen no proof of misfeasance. I have 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 283 

heard of many charges which were palpably erroneous. I 
have known others somewhat suspicious vanish on exami- 
nation. Every member in Congress must be sensible of 
the benefit which has accrued to the public from his ad- 
ministration, no intelligent man out of Congress can be 
altogether insensible of it." 

No one then was, and it is strange that any since should 
have been unmindful of his great services to the coun- 
try, not only in lending his personal credit and financial 
skill, but also in steadfastly upholding the dignity of ofiice 
by his private entertainments at his city and country 
homes at a time when the prestige of the Colonies was 
at a low ebb in the sight of the French and the Dutch, 
from whom we were seeking large loans of money ; in the 
sight, too, of Americans, who would have thought him a 
much less potent person had he enjoyed his wealth less 
showily. 

That he later miscalculated the momentum of the eco- 
nomic prosperity of the republic he had done so much to 
found, and overlooked the dire consequences of the Napo- 
leonic wars, was no more than a misfortune brought on by 
his bold and optimistic nature. That he should have gone 
down under a great part of New York State ; seven thou- 
sand two hundred and thirty-four building lots in the new 
District of Columbia ; two or three million acres of land in 
Pennsylvania, now productive of large quantities of coal 
and petroleum ; six million acres in Virginia, Georgia, the 
Carolinas, and Kentucky ; and two or three of the finest 
mansions ever up to that time erected on the American 
continent, is less a reflection upon the man than upon the 
singular state of the times. It would probably have oc- 
curred to few men with the ability to accumulate this great 
amount of property at a few cents per acre that a time 
might come when it could not be sold or mortgaged some- 
where in the money centres of Europe or America for a 
sufficient sum to pay the interest charges and the taxes. 
That it would have inestimable value before many years 



284 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

should elapse needed no rare gift of foresight. Yet this 
unexpected time did arrive and very soon when no con- 
ceivable endeavor that he, his sons, and his other agents 
were able to put forth could save him from the rapid and 
complete dissolution of his fortune. Everything must go 
to satisfy his creditors ; and they were still clamorous for 
millions more, when the harsh bankruptcy laws were called 
upon by some of the more implacable of his enemies, who 
cared not for his public services or the true worth of his 
character, though his accounts with them were relatively 
small, and who sent him to prison, where he languished for 
three years, six months, and ten days. 

That I may not be suspected of undeserved eulogies or 
too appreciative a view of his services, it will be well to 
give a few extracts from Mr. Morris's Diary and Letter- 
Books, which it is proposed soon to edit and put into print. 
His writings are interesting on three accounts, independent 
of the great importance of the matters and the period to 
which they relate : (1) because he was a patriotic and forceful 
man ; (2) because he possessed a literary style ; and (3) be- 
cause of his unfailing sense of humor, even under circum- 
stances most adverse. 

Some extracts from his writings will prove the first of 
these points and indicate Mr. Morris's patriotism. The 
following entry is made in his Diary for September 1, 2, 
3, 4, and 5, 1781: 

" His Excellency, the Commander-in-Chief, having re- 
peatedly urged both by letter and in conversation the 
necessity of paying a month's pay to the detachment of 
troops marching to the southward under command of 
Major General Lincoln and my funds and resources being 
at this time totally inadequate to make that advance and at 
the same time answer the various calls and demands that 
are indispensable, I made application to his Ex. Count de 
Rochambeau for a loan of 20,000 hard dollars for such 
time as his military chest could without inconvenience 
spare that sum, promising repayment at the time they 



A Great Philadelphia^, : Robert Morris. 285 

should fix. I was desired to meet the count at his Excel- 
lency the Chevalier de la Luzerne's house which I did on 
Wednesday the 5th inst. when I met the said minister, 
Count de Rochambeau and General Chastellux. They in- 
formed me of their strong desire to comply with my re- 
quest but that their treasury was at present not well filled 
considering the daily drains from it and that although they 
had money arrived at Boston it would require six or eight 
weeks to get it from thence, that although they expected 
money by the fleet of Compte de Grasse yet it was not 
then arrived and of course that supply less certain than the 

other, that the Intendant and the Treasurer were set 

out for the Head of Elk and their consent was necessary. 
However they concluded this subject with requesting that I 
would ride down to Chester where we should overtake 
these gentlemen and if it were possible on consideration of 
all circumstances they would supply the money I required, 
His Excellency General Washington being extremely de- 
sirous that the troops should receive three months pay as 
great symptoms of discontent had appeared on their pass- 
ing through the city without it. This affair being consid- 
ered of great importance I desired Mr. Gouverneur Morris 
my assistant to accompany me, on account of his speaking 
fluently the French language. We set out at three o'clock 
for Chester and on the road met an express from his Ex- 
cellency General Washington who had left us in the morn- 
ing to join his troops at the Head of Elk with the agreeable 
news of the safe arrival of Count de Grasse and his fleet in 
Chesapeake. This news I received with infinite satisfaction 
on every account and amongst the rest one reason was the 
facility it would give the French Treasury in complying 
with my views and this I found was actually the case, as his 
Excellency Count de Rochambeau very readily agreed at 
Chester to supply at the Head of Elk 20,000 hard dollars 
to such person as I should appoint to receive the same, I 
engaging to replace the same sum in their Treasury by the 
first day of October next which I agreed to and after dis- 



286 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

patching some advices to the Commander-in-Chief and to 
Mr. Ridley of Baltimore I returned to this city about twelve 
oclock having been impeded iu my journey by meeting the 
last division of the French Army, their artillery and bag- 
gage on the road. ... In the conference with his Ex. 
Count de Rochambeau and General Chastellux they asked 
whether if upon any occasion their treasury should stand 
in need of temporary aids I thought they could pro- 
cure such loans in this city. I answered that money is 
very scarce, that the people who have property generally 
keep it employed and that no certain dependence can be 
placed on any given sums, but that I knew the people to be 
very generally disposed to assist our generous allies and 
should such occasion offer I was certain, they would exert 
themselves. As to my own part they might on every occa- 
sion command my utmost services, assistance and exertions, 
both as a public officer and as an individual." 

On November 3, 1781, Mr. Morris writes in his Diary, 
" This day on the invitation of his Excellency the Min- 
ister of France I attended at the Romish Church a te deum 
sung on the account of the capture of Lord Cornwallis and 
his army. Soon after arrived the colors taken by his Ex- 
cellency General Washington with that army which were 
brought by Colonel Humphrys to Chester, there met by 
Colonel Tilghman and thence conducted hither by these two 
aide-de-camps of the general. The city troop of light horse 
went out to meet them and became the standard bearers as 
twenty four gentlemen privates in that corps carried each ot 
them one of the colors displayed, the American and French 
flags preceding the captured trophies which were conducted 
down Market Street to the Coffee House, thence down 
Front to Chestnut Street and up that to the State House 
where they were laid at the feet of Congress who were sit- 
ting, and many of the members tell me that instead of view- 
ing the transaction as a meer matter of joyful ceremony 
which they expected to do they instantly felt themselves 
impressed with ideas of the most solemn and awful nature. 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 287 

It brought to their minds the distresses our country has 
been exposed to, the calamities we have repeatedly suffered, 
the perilous situation which our affairs have almost always 
been in, and they could not but recollect the threats of Lord 
North that he would bring America to his feet on uncondi- 
tional terms of submission. But Glory be unto thee, Oh 
Lord God, who hath vouchsafed to rescue from slavery and 
from death these thy servants." 

On June 6, 1782, Mr. Morris writes, 

" Colonel Pope of Delaware state pressed me for an ad- 
vance of money to enable that state to fit out the schooner 
they have built for the defence of their river craft, so that 
the people may bring their produce to the Philadelphia mar- 
ket for sale and thereby become able to pay taxes in specie. 
Governor Dickinson sent this gentleman to me and offers 
himself to become security for the money. I desired Colo- 
nel Pope to call again at four o'clock but in the meantime 
revolving this thing in my mind I thought it improper to 
make the advance as Superintendent of Finance as other 
states would claim similar aid. Therefore I concluded to 
lend Governor Dickinson 1000 of my private funds, taking 
his bond for the same." 

For July 4, 1783, this insertion appears in the Diary : 

" This being the anniversary of that auspicious day on 
which the Declaration of the Independence of the United 
States was made I came to the office in the forenoon but 
dismissed the clerks from service that they might enjoy the 
day in the manner most agreeable to themselves. Finding 
on my return from Princetown that no public entertainment 
was provided for this day I invited a company of forty gen- 
tlemen consisting of foreigners, military and civil officers 
and citizens and spent the afternoon and evening in great 
festivity and mirth." 

A letter written by Robert Morris from the Office of 
Finance on August 22, 1781, just prior to the advance upon 
Yorktown, to the Governors of New Jersey and Delaware, 
runs as follows : 



288 A Great Philadelphia^ : Robert Morris. 

" Sir : I have in a former letter forwarded to your Excel- 
lency an account of the specific supplies which Congress 
had demanded from your state. It now becomes my duty 
again to press for a compliance with those demands. The 
exigencies of the service require immediate attention. We 
are on the eve of the most active operations and should 
they be in any wise retarded by the want of necessary sup- 
plies the most unhappy consequences may follow. Those 
who may be justly chargeable with neglect will have to 
answer for it to their country, their allies, to the present 
generation and to posterity. I hope, entreat, expect the 
utmost possible efforts on the part of your state ; and con- 
fide in your Excellency's prudence and vigor to render 
those efforts effectual. 

" I beg to know most speedily, Sir, what supplies are col- 
lected and at what places ; as also the times and places at 
which the remainder is to be expected. I cannot express 
to you my solicitude on this occasion. My declaration to 
Congress when I entered upon my office will prevent the 
blame of ill accidents from lighting upon me even if I were 
less attentive than I am : but it is impossible not to feel 
most deeply on occasions where the greatest objects may be 
impaired or destroyed by indolence or neglect. I must 
therefore again reiterate my requests, and while I assure you 
that nothing but the urgency of our affairs would render me 
thus importunate, I must also assure you that while those 
affairs continue so urgent I must continue to importune. 
With all possible respect etc." 

On May 16, 1782, Morris wrote what was probably the 
most vigorous of his official communications, but, uncer- 
tain in his own mind as to the advisability of sending it, 
since disclosure of the deplorable state of the Revolutionary 
finances might very likely give comfort to the enemy, it was 
submitted to a committee of Congress. This body of men 
recommended that the letter be withheld, and proposed 
instead personal interviews managed in privacy. This 
famous letter concluded as follows : 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 289 

" Now, Sir, should the army disband and should scenes 
of distress and horror be reiterated and accumulated, I 
again repeat that I am guiltless ; the fault is in the states. 
They have been deaf to the calls of Congress, to the 
clamors of the public creditors, to the just demands of a 
suffering army, and even to the reproaches of the enemy, 
who scoffingly declare that the American army is fed, paid 
and clothed by France. That assertion so dishonorable to 
America was true, but the kindness of France has its 
bounds, and our army, unfed, unpaid and unclothed will 
have to subsist itself or disband itself. 

" This language may appear extraordinary, but at a 
future day when my transactions shall be laid bare to pub- 
lic view it will be justified. This language may not consist 
with the ideas of dignity which some men entertain. But, 
Sir, dignity is in duty and in virtue, not in the sound ot 
swelling expressions. Congress may dismiss their servants 
and the states may dismiss their Congress, but it is by rec- 
titude alone that man can be respectable. I have early de- 
clared our situation as far as prudence would permit, and I 
am now compelled to transgress the bounds of prudence by 
being forced to declare that unless vigorous exertions are 
made to put money into the Treasury we must be ruined. 
I have borne with delays and disappointments as long as I 
could, and nothing but hard necessity would have wrung 
from me the sentiments which I have now expressed. I 
have the honor to be your most obedient and humble 
servant, 

"ROBERT MORRIS." 

In addition to being a very fluent, prolific, and strong 
writer, Mr. Morris possessed a literary style which will cause 
his work, when it is better known, to take a place beside the 
writings of the other leading founders of this government. 
A few extracts taken at random may be convincing : 

" Men are less ashamed to do wrong than vexed to be 
told of it." 

VOL. XXVIII. 19 



290 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

" We are not to expect perfect institutions from human 
wisdom and must therefore console ourselves with the deter- 
mination to reform errors as soon as experience points out 
the necessity for and the means of amendment. A whole 
people seldom continue long in error." 

" Difficulties are always to be distinguished from possi- 
bilities. After endeavoring by your utmost exertions to 
surmount them you will be able to determine which of them 
are insurmountable." 

" Confidence is the source of credit and credit is the soul 
of all pecuniary operations." 

" Men are more apt to trust one whom they can call to 
account than three who do not hold themselves accountable 
or three-and-thirty who may appoint those three." 

" I only wish that every member of every legislature on 
the continent were as much teased, harassed and tormented 
to do what the legislatures alone can do as I am to do what 
I alone cannot do." 

" The moral causes that may procrastinate or precipitate 
events are hidden from mortal view. But it is within the 
bounds of human knowledge to determine that all earthly 
things have some limits which it is imprudent to exceed, 
others which it is dangerous to exceed, and some which can 
never be exceeded." 

Morris's sense of humor was well developed. The shafts 
of his satire were pointed and unerring. In his Diary such 
entries as the following frequently appear : 

" Today I had various fruitless applications made me for 
money." 

" To my great surprise there was no application for money 
this day." 

" I told him he must rub through another month." 

" Exceedingly teased this day with a variety of fruitless 
applications." 

" I insisted that he shall not come here to take up any 
more of my time so improperly." 

" Colonel Pickering called for money. His wants are 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 291 

most pressing and equalled by nothing but the poverty of 
the Treasury. I have however granted him a warrant on 
Mr. Hillegas for 800 dollars." 

" I sent for Mr. T. Edison in consequence of a melancholy 
letter to George Bond Esq., Deputy Secretary to Congress 
and which was sent to me by Charles Thompson Esq. I 
gave Mr. Edison my opinion that he was too expensive for 
his circumstances and that Congress do not mean to support 
extravagance although they are disposed to reward in rea- 
son and moderation those who rendered public service." 

In January, 1784, Mr. Morris wrote to two majors, one 
captain, and a lieutenant who had united in an impudent 
round robin : 



" GENTLEMEN : I have received this morning your applica- 
tion. I make the earliest answer to it. You demand 
instant payment. I have no money to pay you with. 
" Your most obedient and humble servant, 

"ROBERT MORRIS." 

An outrageous bore who came to the Office of Finance 
with a perpetual-motion machine "went away convinced 
that his discoveries were very defective." 

This brave life went out sadly and pathetically, despite 
the fortitude and good-humor which the financier sought to 
command as the sheriff's officers in 1798 came to his beau- 
tiful home at " The Hills" to take him into custody. To 
Henry Sheaff, in response to a very urgent dun, he wrote in 
January of that year, 

" If it be possible for me to get the aid you ask for in 
your letter of the 22d I will do it. I wish you would not 
write to me in such terms as you do. You wound me to 
the soul, and if that does you any good I will submit 
patiently, but if it does not ease you why wound me deeply 
when my most ardent wish is to relieve you ? But what 
can I do immured here without access to mankind and I 



292 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

expect soon to be immured in a worse place. Wherever I 
may be I shall think of and strive to relieve you." 

On the 16th of February he wrote to his unfortunate 
partner, John Nicholson, 

" If writing notes could relieve me you would do it 
sooner than any man in the world, but all you have said in 
these now before me, numbers 5 to 9 inclusive, amounts 
when summed up to nothing. My money is gone. My 
furniture is to be sold. I am to go to prison and my family 
to starve. Good Night." 

But even after the prison doors closed behind him, 
Morris's sense of humor did not desert him. To John 
Nicholson he wrote in February, 1798, immediately after 
he reached the debtors' apartments in Prune, now Locust 
Street : 

" My confinement has so far been attended with disagree- 
able and uncomfortable circumstances, for having no par- 
ticular place allotted for me I feel myself an intruder in 
every place into which I go. I sleep in another person's 
bed. I occupy other people's rooms, and if I attempt to sit 
down to write, it is at the interruption and inconvenience 
of some one who has acquired a prior right to the place. I 
am trying daily to get a room for a high rent and now have 
a prospect of succeeding. I now am writing in the room 
which is the best in this house and hope to have compleat 
possession in a day or two. Then I can set up a bed and 
introduce such furniture and conveniences as will make me 
comfortable. When that is done my situation may be sup- 
portable until such time as a change can be effected. But 
this place ought to be avoided by all that can possibly keep 
out of it. I know you will use every effort to that effect 
and I hope to God you may succeed, but I doubt it." 

He wrote again to Nicholson soon after his confinement 
began, " Adieu, I am called to dinner, by which you may 
learn that we eat even here." 

Nevertheless, he was allowed many liberties not com- 
patible with prison life to-day. He might receive visitors, 



A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 293 

no very valuable privilege, since it opened the way to his 
still importunate creditors. He might, under some circum- 
stances, walk abroad, and the inmates dined companion- 
ably together, as will appear from this letter to Joseph 
Higbee of March 6, 1798 : 

" DEAR SIR : If you please our mess wish to be supplied 
with wine from the pipe out of which the demijohn was 
filled yesterday. May I request that you will direct your 
cooper to stir it down this morning so that it may as soon 
as possible be fit for use. A quart of milk poured in at the 
bung and then well stirred with a stick that will reach the 
bottom will do the business. I formerly used a hoop pole 
slit at the lower end and worked it about in the pipe in all 
directions about ten or fifteen minutes and the business was 
done. Excuse this trouble. I hope to do more for you 
before I die. Yours sincerely, 

" ROBERT MORRIS." 

To John Nicholson he wrote, still continuing his corre- 
spondence on business affairs, " I enclose herein a tickler 
[a note due or soon to fall due] from your dearly beloved 
friend Aaron Burr Esq., keeping the fellow to it addressed 
to myself. What a blessed plight these notes have reduced 
us to." And again, " Alas poor Washington ! How much 
we overrated thy square feet when marching over thy ave- 
nues and streets." 

It is often said that for his countrymen to have permitted 
the State of Pennsylvania to inflict such a penalty upon one 
who a few years before had been the most honored and dis- 
tinguished of all its patriots, except Franklin, was a great 
national disgrace. General Washington plainly regarded 
the event in this light, or he scarcely would have visited his 
old friend and military coadjutor in the prison-house. 
Thomas Jefferson, although a political adversary, must 
have been of a similar opinion, else he would not have ex- 
pressed a desire that Morris should be freed to become Sec- 
retary of the Navy in his Cabinet. Nor can more than a 



294 A Great Philadelphian : Robert Morris. 

few of the people of Philadelphia have considered such 
treatment deserved or just, when a large body of mechanics 
offered to contribute their savings to a fund to release the 
Revolutionary financier from his confinement, which became 
the more irksome through the ravages of the fatal fever 
that swept the city during these years. 

It must be remembered, however, that the law of that 
day in all the States prescribed imprisonment as the 
eventual penalty for the man who could not pay his debts, 
and Morris's were so enormous certainly not short of three 
millions of dollars that no one person or body of persons 
at that unhappy season could well have assembled enough 
money for his ransom. The disgrace is ours of a later time 
that in the one hundred years which have passed since his 
death we have permitted his memory to be obscured by this 
one unfortunate event, know even his name so imper- 
fectly that it is unrecognizable to very many otherwise 
well-educated people, and as yet have given it no place, 
so far as I am informed, upon a statue or other worthy 
public monument anywhere in the republic. 

One century is gone, but the neglect can be atoned for 
in the coming century, and should soon be atoned for, 
if we would be honest to ourselves and just to the 
memory of one of our greatest benefactors. Particularly 
is it incumbent upon Philadelphians, since he was one 
of them, although with a title to consideration that over- 
laps one city's confines, to see to it very promptly that 
his important services are suitably commemorated. "We 
can read his terse and sprightly writings. We can, I 
hope, erect a monument to him in Fairmount Park, and it 
would be peculiarly fitting could his old mansion on Lemon 
Hill be converted into a memorial to serve as a reminder 
to the crowds that unwittingly sit upon its balconies or 
in the shade of its walls or surrounding trees that here 
for long resided one of the greatest of our patriots, a pure- 
minded, untiring servant of the American republic in its 
crucial years. 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 295 



LETTBKS OF THOMAS JEFFEESON TO CHAELES 
WILLSON PEALE, 1796-1825. 

BY HORACE W. SELLERS. 

(Continued from page 154.) 

MONTICELLO, April 5th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR: 

Your 8 vo. Polygraph arrived at Washington just in 
time for me to bring it on here, where I have used it and 
still use it constantly. Although the machinery will re- 
quire your rectification to make it quite a good one, yet it 
is sufficient to show that the reduction of size is not only 
practicable, but useful in proportion to its reduction, for 
those who travel. I have therefore bestowed some atten- 
tion on it, and being here amidst my workmen, I have had 
a model made, by which it appears that for the sized paper 
on which I now write (5 by 8 in.) the horizontal rhomboids 
will work perfectly, and shut up within the internal dimen- 
sions of 11 by 7 in. & if half inch stuff be sufficient the ex- 
ternal dimensions will be 12 by 8. The one I now write 
with is near 15 by 11 in. I cannot say how the vertical 
machinery may answer, but I see no difficulty in shorten- 
ing the sides of the rhomboids there. I shall carry both 
this Polygraph and my model to Washington, & forward 
them thence to you by the stage ; praying you instead of 
the one returned, to make me one as near to my own 
model as you can. 

The former desk polygraph which you made for my use 
at this place I shall send hence by water to Philadelphia, 
according to your request, to have the machinery reformed 
to the new manner. As one is wanting for the office of 



296 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

the President's Secretary I think to appropriate this to that 
purpose, and will direct Mr. Claxton who has the pur- 
chasing of furniture for the President's house, to pay for it. 
Of course the payment I made for it some time ago may be 
considered as the price of the new portable one I now 
desire for my own private use. 
Accept my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 



MONTICELLO, April 9th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

My letter of the 5th had been written but not sent off 
when I received yours of March 30th with the new penbar. 
This finds me so near my departure for "Washington that 
all is now hurry. I have not time therefore to change the 
penbars for trying the Diagonal writing, & I should not be 
without fear of deranging the machine, & losing the use of 
it while I yet stay and while I have much to write. I have 
no doubt however from what I see as well as from your in- 
formation that the medium sized polygraph (such as I now 
write with) may be made to write on either 4to or 8 vo. 
paper, but while one is at their stationary post, the large 
size is most convenient, & for traveling the minimum is all 
important. I adhere therefore to the model I shall forward 
you for my traveling Polygraph. I find no inconvenience 
in using the 8 vo. paper in ordinary, and if one has to write 
to a punctilious correspondent, who might consider his dig- 
nity implicated in the size of the paper on which he is ad- 
dressed, one may write on 8 vo. paper on a 4to sheet as I 
do now, which leaves a good margin for dignity. The desk- 
polygraph shall be sent by water. The one I now write on, 
with my model I will carry on to "Washington & forward 
thence by the stage. The new penbar shall be returned 
with the one or the other as I find it pack best. Accept 
my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 297 

WASHINGTON, April 20th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR: 

According to my letter of the 5th from Monticello, I 
sent the desk-polygraph by water via Richmond, addressed 
to you; & brought with me your 8 vo. one, & my model 
which are now sent to the stage office to be forwarded. In 
making one for me according to my model, I leave to your- 
self entirely the thickness of the stuff, so that whatever that 
is more than half an inch, will be added to the dimensions : 
and so indeed is everything else about it left to you, because 
my model is but theory and you have to decide on^the prac- 
ticability. As it is intended to be carried backward and 
forward on my journeys to and from Monticello, every half 
inch of unnecessary size is sensible in stowing it away. On 
remounting the Desk Polygraph, I would not wish the ver- 
tical Rhomboids to be lowered, & consequently shortened 
in order to pass under the cover ; because that shortening 
contracts the sphere of its action, & I would rather use it 
without a cover, or make the whole front of the cover open 
back, if necessary. It might seem as well that I should 
take at once the one you remounted here for Mr. Beckley, 
but the drawers etc. of that are not as convenient, and the 
openwise cover, which I have, was made to fit that forwarded 
to you, and does not fit this one. I have suspended seek- 
ing an opportunity of sending Yolney's Polygraph in ex- 
pectation of your going. Should that be uncertain or at a 
distance be so good as to inform me and I will seek some 
other opportunity. Accept my friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

WASHINGTON, April 27th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR: 

Your favor of the 23rd is received. I think the improve- 
ment by your son of lengthening the pen-bar to the left is 
an excellent one. By lessening the breadth of the rhom- 
boids or parallels it lessens the projection of their corners 
when folded up, and of course permits a shortening of the 



298 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Pcale, 1796-1825. 

polygraph from east to west. I think it will enable you 
to reduce that dimension to 16 in. in the clear (being the 
double breadth of letter paper) and 10 in. from north to 
south in the clear, and such a reduction is really important 
even for those not meant to be carried about. The one I am 
writing with, though a most excellent one, is inconvenient 
from its occupying so great a space on a table, to wit 22 by 32 
in., when by the new improvement 17-1/2 by 24-1/2 would 
do, which is but 2/3 of the area. I think you will find on trial 
that 2 vertical rhomboids of 5 in. each will command the 
whole page in my model, and shut up within the space be- 
cause the gallows a.b. being 8 in. in the clear, and the paper 
board a.c. the same, the line B.C. is but 8-3/4 in. and requires 
2 rhomboids of 5 in. only, which will certainly shut up on 
the north board a.d. because 3 five inch rhomboids do that 
in the model. I think therefore that 5 in. rhomboids will 
command the whole of the south board, & shut up on the 
north one, but still this is theory, while you will be con- 
trolled by the law of practice. I have, since my return, 
thoroughly tried the desk polygraph you left here ; it does 
not at all command the page. I do not wonder at Mr. 
Beckley's returning it, & think it would not be for your in- 
terest to sell it till you have had it in your own hands. I 
will therefore have a box made for it, & will forward it to 
you by water with the box of minerals. The Polygraph for 
Mr. Volney must be reserved for some vessel bound to 
Havre, that it may get to Paris by water. Accept affection- 
ate salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALB. 

WASHINGTON, May 5th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

By Captain Hand who sailed four days ago I sent the 
desk polygraph you left here, and the box of minerals 
freight paid here. In the former box is a book for Mr. 
Vaughan. With the minerals was a list of those furnished 
by Mr. King, but there were some sent me by Captain Lewis 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 299 

which you will find described in the inclosed list from him. 
The more I reflect on the improvement of your son by pro- 
jecting the pen-bar of the Polygraph to the left, the more I 
perceive its value in reducing the breadth of the rhomboids 
so that they will shut up in a box of exactly double the size 
of the paper you mean to write on, and I hope to hear soon 
that you find from experience that this important reduction 
of size may be made; for after all, experience must decide. 
A favorable opportunity occurred yesterday of convincing 
Mr. Smith, Secretary of the Navy, of the utility of your 
Polygraph. He determined immediately to write to you 
for one for his private use while at Baltimore. Accept my 
friendly salutations & best wishes. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

C. "W. PEALE, ESQ. 

WASHINGTON, June 9th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR: 

The 8 vo. Polygraph arrived in good condition, and gives 
me entire satisfaction. Your son's improvement of throw- 
ing the pen to the left gives me the command of the 4to page, 
as you see by this letter written with the 8vo. machine, and 
when I have written down the page as far as it commands, 
by taking a reef in the top, that is, by giving the letter the 
first fold it is to have when folded up, it brings up the bot- 
tom of the letter within the command of the pens. The desk 
Polygraph from Monticello was delayed by the way by an 
accident. It went from Richmond sometime ago so that 
you have received it before now. Pray call on Mr. Clax- 
ton for payment while in Philadelphia, which he is in- 
structed to answer. Send it by water if you please. 

Having determined never while in oifice to accept presents 
beyond a book or things of mere trifling value, I am some- 
times placed in an embarrassing dilemma by persons whom 
a rejection would offend. In these cases I resort to counter 
presents. Your polygraph, from its rarity & utility offers 
a handsome instrument of retribution to certain characters. 
I have now such a case on hand, and must therefore ask 



300 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

you to make me one immediately of the box (not desk) 
form but not larger than the desk ones you made for me, 
as they gave full command of the 4to page, and all beyond 
that is useless. Let it be of fine wood and completely fin- 
ished and furnished, and send it by the stage if you think it 
may come safely by that. 

I omitted to observe above that the taking a reef in the 
paper is less troublesome than the diagonal process. The 
next is the line after which it becomes necessary, conse- 
quently it is necessary only when your letter extends to this 
part of the page. Accept friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

P.S. As long as the port of Havre is blockaded I shall 
not send Volney's Polygraph, unless by a Government ves- 
sel, and as this is the place from which they go, I will ask 
the favor of you to forward it there by water with the desk 
polygraph. 

A leaf of what Wedgewood calls duplicate paper. I 
know not why, as it is that to which the Style or Tracer is 
immediately applied. It appears to be slightly touched with 
oil or wax, being transparent thin, & a little yellowish. 
This is the copy retained and is so peculiar that it must be 
obtained from the author. It is said to become unfit for use 
if much exposed to air. 

A leaf of carbonated paper blacked on both sides, as pol- 
ished & fine in its appearance as satin. It is directed to be 
kept from the air when not in use, to be handled delicately, 
& probably soon wears out, either by the constant pressure 
of the style, or exhaustion of the coloring matter. There 
come about 10 or 12 leaves of this with the apparatus. 

A sheet of letter paper, being the missive or that which 
is to be sent. The directions say this should not be hot- 
pressed nor highly sized; but I find the hot-press paper 
bought here answers as well as the proper paper sent with 
the Stylograph. 

The tablet being a plate of metal highly polished and 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 301 

varnished black. Its use is to give firm resistance to the 
pressure of the style. 

WASHINGTON, June 19th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your favors of the 13th & 15th are received. If I rightly 
understand them, you have in hand one Polygraph 17-5/8 in. 
by 11-5/8 in. and another of 16 by 11, both of which will 
write to the bottom of a 4 to. sheet. The larger one is that 
which will suit best as a present for my friend, and there- 
fore I will ask you to send on that. 

The smaller one of 16 by 11 I observe is only 1-3/8 longer 
than my 8 vo. one & of the same width, for mine is 14-5/8 by 
11. Its writing to the bottom of a 4to page is an ample 
compensation for the 1-3/8 in. additional length, because the 
taking a reef in the sheet & having to replace the paper as 
must be done with mine in writing a quarto page, gives 
some trouble. If I had not been so humored by you 
already as to be ashamed, I should propose the receiving 
that in exchange for my small one, and paying any differ- 
ence which might compensate the trouble. I placed a 
standing order at the stage office which they promised to ob- 
serve, to charge to me the stage-portage, going and coming, 
on all these machines, which I hope they do, but which, as 
they choose to bring in their bill but once a quarter may 
sometimes be unattended to by them, & escape my knowl- 
edge. I pray you always to inform the office there that 
they will receive their pay here. 

Accept affectionate salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, July 12th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

The polygraphs for Mr. Yolney, Commodore Preble and 
the President's Secretary have been all received in good 
order and are found good. The portable one for myself is 
also received, and is approved in every respect except per- 
haps in one part, on which I have not had trial enough to 



302 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

decide. It seems to copy the first 4 or 5 lines of the page 
with defects of nearly half the lines : sometimes however 
it has not done that. Being within two days of my depart- 
ure for Monticello I have packed it up, and am in hopes 
that a little use of it there will bring it to, or enable me to 
find some remedy for the defect. I enclose you a draught 
of the U. S. bank here on that in Philadelphia for 60 dol- 
lars in payment. Time permits me only to add my friendly 
salutations & assurances of great esteem and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, October 6th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

Tour favor of Sep. 14th was received in due time, and 
my small Polygraph continuing impracticable for the first 
half dozen lines, though perfect as to the rest, I have 
brought it on here to be forwarded to you for correction. 
Its size is perfect, and the best possible, not having a hair's 
breadth too much or too little. I should prefer however 
the double spring for holding the paper in place, as more 
convenient. You will also perceive that one of the pen 
cases has exfoliated so as not to hold the nib well. I will 
pray you to make the writing machinery perfect, that con- 
stituting the comfort of the machine. As Capt. Elwood is 
expected here in a day or two, and is careful, I will send it 
by him. 

I am thankful to Mr. Hawkins for being mindful of me 
and sending me one of his portable polygraphs, though I 
doubt the possibility of making the whole pen as convenient 
as the movable point, from the difficulties of adjusting a 
screw to it, and of leaving the pens in the inkholder when the 
machine is shut up, yet I adhere to the scripture maxim of 
"proving all things and holding fast to that which is 
good." I shall therefore be glad to see Mr. Hawkins' new 
contrivance. 

I arrived here two days ago, and found the articles 
which had been forwarded by Captain Lewis. There is a 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 303 

box of minerals which he particularly desired should go to 
the Philosophical Society. There are some articles which I 
shall keep for an Indian Hall I am forming at Monticello, 
e. g. horns, dressed skins, utensils etc. and I am now pack- 
ing up for you the following articles : 

2 skins of the white hare 

2 skeletons of Do 

A skeleton of the small or burrowing wolf of the prai- 
ries 

A male & female Blaiveau or burrowing dog of the prai- 
ries with the skeleton of the female. 

13 red fox skins 

Skins of the male & female antelope with their skeletons 

2 skins of the burrowing squirrel of the prairies 

A living burrowing squirrel of the prairies 

A living Magpie 

A dead one preserved. These are the descriptive words 
of Capt. Lewis: The Blaiveau is the badger; it is the 
first time it has been found out of Europe ; the burrowing 
squirrel is a species of Marmotte. 

I have some doubts whether Capt. Lewis has not mis- 
taken the roe for the antelope, because I have received 
from him a pair of horns which I am confident are of the 
Roe (though I never before supposed the animal to be in 
America) and no antelope horns came. These you know 
are hollow, annulated and single. Those of the roe are 
bony, solid and branching. I hope you will have the 
skeletons well examined to settle this point. You will re- 
ceive them in great disorder as they came here, having 
been unpacked in several places on the road, & unpacked 
again here before I returned, so they have probably gotten 
mixed. Capt. Carmack who sets out for Philadelphia 3 or 
4 days hence will take charge of the bag of skins & the 
marmot, I am much afraid of the season of torpidity 
coming on him before you get him ; he is a most harmless 
& tame creature. You will do well to watch Capt. Car- 
mack's arrival at the stage office, that no risks from curi- 



304 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

osity may happen to him between his arrival & your getting 
him. The other articles shall all go by Capt. Elwood. 
Accept affectionate salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

WASHINGTON, October 9th, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

Capt. Cormac's departure is deferred, and Capt. Elwood 
not yet arrived, of course I cannot yet announce to you the 
departure of any of the objects destined for you. By the 
former will go the marmotte and a bag of skins : by the 
latter a large box of skins, skeletons and horns for you, a 
small box of minerals for the P. Society, a cage with a 
magpie and a box with the Polygraph. When I wrote you 
on the 6th I had not examined the box containing the 
skins & skeletons of the antelope, which was then in a situ- 
ation difficult to come at, and having seen no antelope 
horns, I had too hastily supposed those of the roe belonged 
to the skins & skeletons called antelopes. On examining 
these I found the bony prominence to the cranium on 
which the horn is fixed, & afterwards 2 pr. of the horns 
themselves. These sufficiently prove that the animal is of 
the antelope family & of the chamois branch of it. This is 
strengthened by the dressed skin which is softer, and 
stronger in its texture than any chamois I have seen. I 
have put a pair of horns into the box for you. I have also 
put into it a pair of the horns of the unknown ram. 
Judging from these alone I should suppose the animal to 
be a variety of the Ovis Ammon of Linnaeus the Moufflon 
of the French. The pair of horns which I retain have the 
bony prominence of the skull left in them ; with this they 
weigh each 6-1/2 Ibs. The new animals therefore for 
which we are already indebted to Capt. Lewis are 1 the 
Ovis Ammon, 2 the black tailed deer, 3 the Roe, 4 the 
Badger, 5 the Marmotte, 6 the Red fox qu ? 7 the white 
weasel qu ? 8 the Magpie, 9 the Prairie Hen. This last did 
not come. I am told it resembles the guinea hen. He 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 305 

speaks also of a burrowing wolf, a brown or yellow bear, a 
Loup-cervier, the skins of which not having come we know 
not what they are. Accept affectionate salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, October 21st, 1805. 
DEAR SIR : 

The day before yesterday I sent to Alexandria 

1. A large box containing skins, skeletons & horns. 

1 small box containing the Polygraph. 

1 Do with minerals for the Phil. Society to be presented 
in Capt. Lewis's name. 

A cage with a living magpie. 

These were delivered to Capt. Elwood as you will see by 
the enclosed receipt and the freight paid. He promised he 
would sail yesterday and I hope you will receive them in 
good order. The undressed skins arrived here full of 
worms. I fear you will be puzzled to put them into form. 

Accept friendly salutations. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, January 1st, 1806. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received your letter of November 28th and the appa- 
ratus for carrying Mr. Hawkins' pen case, but I have tried 
an expedient which I think is better, that is to make the 
movable pen case longer that it may receive a longer nib 
and have more spring. They hold the nib as firmly as 
possible, and they unite the advantages of your adjusting 
screw, and the being left in the ink holder while the Poly- 
graph is shut up ; the last two advantages are indispensible 
with me. I send you a model of the case and of the nibs. 

I think I sent you Capt. Lewis' original catalogue of the 
articles he had forwarded to me. I retained no copy of it, 
and having occasion to turn to it would thank you for it. 

We have to make up some presents for Tripoli, & being 
desirous to compose it as much as we can of things rare, 

VOL. XXVIII. 20 



306 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

the produce of our own country, I propose to make the 
Polygraph an article. We want three of them, one for the 
Bey, one for his Secretary of State and one for the Ambas- 
sador here, but they must be entirely mounted in silver ; 
that is to say everything which is brass in your ordinary 
ones, must be of silver. Each polygraph should also be put 
into a neat strong packing case with hinges lock and key, 
but above all things I would wish you not only to have every 
thing solidly made, but also to try each of them yourself 
and see that they write in perfection, because in Tripoli 
they have no artist who can put them to rights. They are 
to be addressed to the Secretary of State here, & the bills 
sent to him for payment. Accept my friendly salutations & 
assurances of great esteem. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

P.S. Fix pen cases like the one I send ; a quill makes 2 
nibs, or if large 4. The mahogany inkstands as well as out 
should be fine, perhaps solid instead of veneered. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, June 19th, 1806. 
DEAR SIR: 

I am persuaded I shall be pleased with Mr. Hawkins' 
portable Polygraph, because of its small size, and its simpli- 
fication by omitting one of the horizontal parallelograms, the 
stays or suspenders, & probably the vertical parallelograms & 
gallows, for I see no use for the last two if the suspender be 
omitted. The pencases I shall be able to have arranged to 
my mind by an excellent workman here. I should have 
better liked it as an exchange for the portable one I have, 
two being unnecessary, & having already indulged myself 
considerably in this favorite machine; and still indeed 
having to call for one for a friend who has sent me a 
present, which as I cannot reject, I must make a counter- 
present. However your affairs and Mr. Hawkins' being in 
no wise blended, be so good as to inform me of the price 
I must remit him for this, and send the machine to rne by 
the stage. Inform me also if you please, of the addition 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 307 

which would be made to the price of the one which I have 
to call for for my friend, by having the pen-arms and pen- 
cases of silver. 

Filing away your letter of the 12th inst. presented to my 
view that of Apr. 5th, which I had received a little before 
my departure for Monticello, had inadvertently omitted to 
take with me for answer, & therefore has laid unobserved till 
this accident brings it under my eye. I therefore now return 
you the drawing it had covered for my inspection, and which 
seems to be admirably done : and I add, in answer to another 
part of the same letter, that I shall cheerfully contribute my 
mite to your Academy of fine arts by enclosing you SOD. 
at my next pay-day (early in July) as I devote one day in 
every month to the expediting & adjusting all my pecuniary 
concerns. Accept my friendly salutations & best wishes. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

WASHINGTON, June 27th, 1806. 
DEAR SIR : 

Yours of the 22nd is received, and at the same time Mr. 
Hawkins' small polygraph, with which indeed I am charmed 
on account of its small size. The drawing the paper up to 
the pen is a beautiful contrivance, & I do not see why it 
might not be used in all the Polygraphs to reduce their size. 
I shall have the improvement of screw-pencases &c. put to this 
of Mr. Hawkins ; but I find your idea excellent ' of moving 
the inkpots nearer to the paper, by means of moving paral- 
lels, bringing them as low as the catch or lock that fastens 
the paper.' In truth the dip of the pen in Mr. Hawkins is 
very uneasy & strains the machinery. I presume your 
moving parallels for the inkpots will be in brass. Can you 
not then send me a set which I may screw on here ? I 
should be very glad to obtain that convenience. 

If I judge rightly from your letter, you can add Mr. Haw- 
kins' sliding apparatus to the Polygraphs already made. If 
so I shall very likely send you my small one from Monti- 



308 I homos Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

cello to reform. It will be near a month however before I 
go there. I salute you with friendship and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

Size of the ink 
pot in the small 
portable Poly- 
graph of Mr. Haw- 
kins. 

WASHINGTON, November 22nd, 1806. 
DEAR SIR: 

I received your letter of July 2nd in due time, and soon 
after that the apparatus for making the inkpots in Mr. Haw- 
kins' polygraph movable, so as to render the dip easy, but 
in the meantime I had thought of a contrivance which I had 
executed at Monticello, and which a three months use has 
proved to be as perfect as it is simple. Each inkpot is set 
in a square saucer of very thin brass 1/4 Inch deep, from one 
corner of which, (the left front corner) projects an ear 



through which and the wood a rivet passes thus : 
when turned out it is thus 




a quarter of a turn brings the inkpot out by its whole diam- 
eter, which makes the dip perfectly easy. "When done, you 
push it back again and shut up the machine. 

I formerly troubled you with the small polygraph you 
made for me in order to get its parallels rectified, because 
from some cause which I cannot discover the half dozen 
lines at the top of the copy are an illegible scribble, while 
in every other part of the page it performs perfectly well. 
It still has that defect as you will perceive by writing half a 
dozen lines at the top of the paper in a small light charac- 
ter. Its size is so exactly what I prefer, that if I could get 
this defect removed, I should value it more than anyone I 
have ever tried. But I apprehend some defect in the par- 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 309 

allels so radical as to admit of no amendment but by a new 
set, the expense of which I will gladly incur, and therefore 
send it to you by the stage. I by no means wish to have a 
sliding plate put into it on Mr. Hawkins' plan; because 
where the size is such as to permit a command of the whole 
page, it is much better as this is. I shall also be glad to 
have silver penarms and pen cases put to it, but with the 
adjusting screw without which all these instruments are use- 
less to me. I was obliged to have them put to the small 
polygraph which Mr. Hawkins sent me, and with which 
this letter is written. As soon as you shall at your own 
convenience have rectified this machine, be so good as to 
return it by the stage with the cost of alteration and it shall 
be remitted. 

I have a shade in profile of a very dear friend deceased 
(Judge Dyke) whose portrait was never taken. It is a com- 
plete whole length of about 6 or 8 in. length. Does your art 
afford any means of copying it exactly and at the same time 
giving it such tints, by Indian ink or otherwise as would 
make it more worthy of preservation. My idea is that per- 
haps it could be made to wear the appearance of a print, 
exhibiting like that the muscles, features etc., but perhaps 
that could not be done by guess so as to preserve the resem- 
blance. 

Accept my friendly salutations and assurances of great 

esteem. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

% 

WASHINGTON, December 21st, 1806. 
DEAR SIR: 

I have safely received my Polygraph, with which I am 
now writing, and find it to answer well everywhere except 
a small place in the N. "W. corner, which is of little con- 
sequence. In fact none of them probably can be perfect in 
every point of the whole field which their dimensions can 
cover. I now enclose you the 10D. for the silver pens, & 
am sorry you did not enable me to judge of the cost of the 
new machinery & other trouble, which I meant always & 



310 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

wished to pay. If you will do this in your next letter it 
shall be immediately remitted, together with whatever is 
due for the profile of my friend Mr. Dythe. Altho' shewing 
rather too fleshy a face, yet it is well like him, & far more 
valuable than the black original. I do not wonder at your 
not making money by the Polygraphs when you do so 
much about them for nothing. I expect Capt. Lewis here 
today or tomorrow. I presume that after a while he will 
go on to Philadelphia and carry some of his new acquisi- 
tions. Having proposed to Congress the subject of a Na- 
tional University, should they come into it it will be no 
small part of the gratification I shall receive from it, that 
the means will be furnished of making your Museum a 
national establishment. Accept my friendly salutations & 
assurances of great esteem. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, February 12th, 1807. 
DEAR SIR: 

Nothing would be wanting to fill up the measure of dis- 
satisfaction with my present situation, but to see my friends 
adopt a stile of formality & distance towards me. Be as- 
sured that your communications are always welcome, & the 
more so when the most frank. I shall make a proper 
use of that in your letter received last night. I will thank 
you to procure for me a pair of the inkholders of 3/4 in. 
square, and another of those 1 inch square which you are 
so kind as to mention as now to be had in Philadelphia, 
and note their cost, which I will find the means of re- 
placing. I presume Capt. Lewis will leave this about the 
close of the session of Congress. Accept my friendly 
salutations and assurances of great esteem and respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, March 29th, 1807. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your favor of the 12th is duly received, and I have no 
doubt the idea you suggest is perfectly sound that the 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 311 

glasses of spectacles should perfectly accord with one 
another. The surfaces of every lens for a spectacle should 
be a portion of that of a sphere, and not only should the 
two convexities correspond in position, but also with the 
lines of vision from the two eyes. My improvements in 
spectacles have been trifling, being confined merely to size 
and form. I have adopted Dr. Franklin's plan of half 
glasses of different focal distances with great advantage. I 
shall leave this place within a week for Monticello. Cap- 
tain Lewis will set out about the same time for Philadelphia. 
By him I will send the small reimbursement of $2.05 for 
the inkholders. Accept affectionate salutations. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, Sept. 24th, 1807. 
DEAR SIR: 

I am to return you a thousand & a thousand thanks for 
your letter of Aug. 30th & particularly your kind offer to 
receive my grandson into your family. I consider him as 
thereby placed in the best school of morality & good habits 
which could have been found for him, & secured against the 
only fears we entertained for him in your city. On the 
subject of his habits & dispositions, they are exactly what 
you would wish, and as to wine, which you particularly 
mention, he never sees a drop but on the Sundays on which 
he visits me. It was much the wish both of Mr. Randolph 
& myself that he should have gone to Philadelphia this 
autumn, & it had been decided on, but Mr. Ogilvie his pres- 
ent tutor has been so earnest in his entreaties to keep him 
another year that it has been consented to, in the expectation 
that he will in the course of it, so improve his foundation 
in Latin & French (which are not sufficient) that he will be 
able to profit more then of the advantages offered by Phila- 
delphia. I enclose you the letter of Mr. Ogilvie which over- 
came our wishes, as it may strengthen the assurances which 
I had given as to the dispositions of my grandson. Have 
you heard of the newly invented Stylograph ? I know 



312 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

nothing of it but what is contained in the inclosed paper, 
which I will thank you to return me. A friend has been so 
kind as to send me one of the machines which I have not 
yet seen, but shall meet it at Washington on the 3rd prox. 
I thank you for dressing the Argali head for me. I have 
not yet received it, but may expect it soon. I salute you 
with great friendship and respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, October 5th, 1807. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received last night yours of the 2nd. On my arrival 
here on the 3rd I found the Stylograph with which I now 
write. You have rightly conjectured its principle. The 
impression both on the missive & copy retained is from a 
paper blacked on both sides, perhaps with coal, as they call 
it carbonated paper. The method is so new to me that I 
am as yet awkward with it. It is not pleasant in its use, 
and I think will not take the place of the Polygraph. 
Where I want but one copy, which is 99 times in an hundred, 
I shall use the Polygraph, and reserve the Stylograph for 
cases where more than one copy is wanting, tho I have not 
yet tried it in that way. The style I now write with is of 
glass brought to a point like a pencil. I enclose you de- 
scriptions of the apparatus, & put together on leaves in the 
order arranged when used. I send you also a specimen of 
the duplicate paper & of the copy it retains. 

I salute you with great and affectionate esteem. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

Written with the Stylograph. 

WASHINGTON, November 5th, 1807. 
DEAR SIR : 

I have received from Captain Pike two cubs of the Grisly 
bear taken on the Rio Bravo. They were taken when too 
young to eat without being fed, have been ever since with 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 313 

the men on their journey, generally at large in their camp 
and perfectly gentle. They are now in a cage and appear 
quite good humored. They are male and female. They 
would certainly be more in the way of extending informa- 
tion if exhibited in your Museum to its numerous visitors. 
If they would be acceptable to you I would send them on 
by the first vessel. Capt. Hand is either here now or hourly 
expected, so that if you could determine me by the return 
of post, affirmatively, they might go in his vessel. They 
are fed almost entirely on Indian bread. Further trial of 
the Stylograph convinces me it can never take the place of 
the Polygraph but with travelers, as it is so much more 
portable. The fetid smell of the copying paper would 
render a room pestiferous if filled with presses of such 
papers. I salute you affectionately. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, January 6th, 1808. 
DEAR SIR: 

The bears went from this place in good health about a 
fortnight ago, and I hope are with you by this time. This 
is the first moment I have had as much leisure as to notify 
you of it. They were in a cage which they had out-grown, 
& suffered a little for it. I had them in larger quarters till 
their departure. They are perfectly gentle knowing no 
other benefactor than man from the time of their birth. I 
salute you with great friendship. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, February 6th, 1808. 
DEAR SIR : 

I enclose you Capt. Pike's account of the two bears. I 
put them together while here in a place 10 f. square. For 
the first day they worried one another very much with 
play, but after that they played at times but were extremely 
happy together. When separated & put into their small 
cage again, one became almost furious, indeed one is much 
crosser than the other, but I do not think they have any 



314 Thomas Je/erson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

idea of hurting any one. They know no benefactor but 
man. I salute you with affection & respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, August 24th, 1808. 
DEAR SIR : 

It was the wish of Mr. Randolph and myself the last 
summer to send his son T. Jefferson Randolph to Philadel- 
phia to attend lectures in those branches of science which 
cannot be so advantageously taught anywhere else in 
America. These are Natural History with the advantage 
of your Museum, botany aided by Mr. Hamilton's Garden, 
and Anatomy with the benefit of actual dissections. We 
did not propose he should stay to learn there what can be 
as well learnt in other places, because we do not suppose 
city-habits are those which make people either the happiest 
or most useful who are to live in the country. We mean 
therefore that he shall pass but one season there. I wrote 
on this subject to Doctors Wistar & Barton, and from the 
former I learned that you would be so kind as to take Jef- 
ferson as a boarder in your family, which you afterwards 
confirmed to me yourself in a letter. But we were con- 
strained to defer our purpose a year, by the earnest solicita- 
tions of Mr. Ogilvie, his tutor, who was anxious in the ex- 
treme to keep him another year. I now propose to carry 
him on with me the first of October to "Washington, from 
thence he will go on to Philadelphia, in the hope that he 
will find you still in the friendly disposition to receive him. 
Certainly in your house I shall consider him as safe mor- 
ally & physically as in the house of his own father ; and I 
believe I can answer to you for regular orderly & docile 
conduct on his part. His character & dispositions I will 
pray you to ask from Mr. Ogilvie his late tutor who either 
is or soon will be with you to make some stay, as he has 
had better opportunities than myself of knowing his char- 
acter intimately. My wish will be that he shall be solely 
occupied with his studies, not that he should be at all im- 
mersed in the society, & still less in the amusements & 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 315 

other abstractions of the place-. He is still of the age 
(about 15) accustomed to restraint, & being extremely good 
humored, is quite pliant to advice. Having been at home 
3 or 4 months I have feared he was becoming less eager in 
study than he had been, and acquiring a disposition to in- 
dolence. I hope this will be quickly overcome by the in- 
teresting views of science which will be presented to his 
mind. I trouble you with this detail at present in order to 
renew the expressions of my wishes that you may still find 
it convenient to receive him, and that he might not come 
upon you unexpectedly, & without time to notify me, if any 
circumstance, for our misfortune, should have rendered it 
less convenient for you now than it would have been the 
last year. In this case great as my regret would be, I 
would certainly not propose to encroach on your conven- 
ience. I salute you with constant attachment & respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

WASHINGTON, October 12th, 1808. 
DEAR SIR : 

My grandson, Thos. Jefferson Randolph is now here, and 
will leave this place so as to be in Philadelphia on Tuesday 
the 18th. He will immediately repair to the quarters you 
are so kind as to offer him. I have arranged with his father 
to supply all his expenses, except for clothes and pocket 
money. These were excepted merely because, although I 
have entire confidence in his prudence and governableness, 
yet in case the temptations of the place should get the bet- 
ter of his resolution, I thought he would more readily ac- 
quiesce in the restraints dictated by a father. I take the 
liberty therefore of enclosing you a draught on the bank of 
the U. S. for 100D. as a deposit for his expenses, which I 
hope you will be so good as to dispense for him. He is to 
attend immediately the lectures in Anatomy, Natural His- 
tory & Surgery. The ticket for the 1st is 20D, for the 2nd 
$12.00, & the 3rd 10D, in all 42D, and he will have imme- 
diate occasion to buy Bell's Anatomy, which will perhaps 
cost 12 or 15D. I will take care to renew his fund the first 



316 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

week of every month regularly. He will commence with the 
Professor of Botany in April. We propose him to finish 
with that so that he will stay with you only to the last of 
June. I very much flatter myself you will find him a hope- 
ful and amiable subject. 

I shall certainly be glad to avail myself of your improve- 
ment in the pen bar of the polygraph, but I cannot spare 
mine till I leave this in March. I will then send it to you, 
& the rather as it will not copy at all the upper half dozen 
lines of the page. I am obliged to begin by placing my 
paper half way down. Perhaps you may be able to help 
this. I find the Stylograph useful on the road, because it 
takes no more room than an 8 vo. pamphlet ; but entirely 
inconvenient and disagreeable for the general use of the 
Study. I salute you with affectionate respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

November 15th, 1808. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your favor of the 14th received. The circumstance 
which has guided us in fixing on the subjects of study for 
our grandson has been the exclusive possession of Philadel- 
phia of your Museum, the anatomical dissections, & Mr. 
Hamilton's garden, and the surgical operations at the hos- 
pital. I thought these would fill up his whole time ; but as 
it is thought they will leave him time to attend the chemi- 
cal lectures also I would have him do it. It is not the ex- 
pense of money but of time I attend to, as he has but one 
season to stay in Philadelphia. I press him much after 
hearing a lecture to commit it to writing in substance. I 
deprecate his getting into company lest this should be neg- 
lected. The less he goes out the better. Since you are so 
kind as to propose to send me a polygraph to use, that I 
may forward mine to you, I will thankfully accept of it. 
Mine is become so troublesome and unmanageable that I 
am at times almost tempted to throw it by. I send you the 
copy made of this letter by which you may judge. To 
write the first line legibly requires a change of point to 3/4 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 317 

of an inch in one of the pens, and in every line it is re- 
quired to touch the adjusting screw two or three times to 
copy the whole line legibly. You will be so good as to put 
to it the improvement in the pen arm which you mentioned 
if on longer experience you have found it best. Mr. Gil- 
pin's improvement would not be of avail to me. I congrat- 
ulate you on the return of your son, and doubt not his 
improvements to have been satisfactory to you as well as 
himself. I salute you with esteem. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

WASHINGTON, January 15th, 1809. 
DEAR SIR: 

I take up my pen to inform you that the box with the 
vase & bridle bit arrived safely last night, & to save the 
trouble of the search you propose to make in yours of the 
10th you therein say that ' when my Polygraph is done you 
shall leave it to my choice to take either one or the other.' 
This, my dear Sir, will be putting my delicacy to severe 
trial. I find the one I am now writing with, in size, in 
accommodations, & in goodness, everything I could wish. 
About to retire to a situation where I shall have no chance 
of getting one rectified which gets amiss, it is all important 
to have a sound one. The use of the polygraph has spoiled 
me for the old copying-press, the copies of which are hardly 
ever legible, and as to the Stylograph, besides the disagree- 
ableness of writing with a hard point on a hard surface, the 
smell of the paper is so fetid, that one could not stay in a 
room where there was much of it. I could not now there- 
fore, live without the Polygraph. In such a situation noth- 
ing could withhold my preference of the one I am now 
writing with, but the apprehension that you had a personal 
attachment to it to which no difference of price for repairs 
or alterations &c would be equivalent, to such a considera- 
tion certainly everything on my part would yield at once. 
I have lately seen Molina's account of Chili, in which, cor- 
recting Buffon's classification of the wooly animals, he 
speaks of one, the Chilihueco, or Chili Sheep, which may 



318 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

possibly be the same with the fleecy goat of Gov. Lewi's. 
I salute you with affection & respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

WASHIHGTON, March 10th, 1809. 
MY DEAR SIR : 

Being just on the eve of my departure for Monticello I 
must write you a short letter returning you a thousand 
thanks for the portrait of my grandson, which is indeed 
inimitably done. I do not know whether age impairs the 
faculties of your art, but I am sure it would do honor to 
any period of life. It will be a treasure to his parents, and 
not less so to me. As he wished to see them & had a 
month to spare, he sat out two or three days ago for Monti- 
cello; and will be with you again before the commence- 
ment of the botanical lectures. I now enclose you an order 
of the bank of the U. S. here on that at Philadelphia for 
an hundred & fifty dollars, which I imagine will carry 
him through that course of lecture, when he will return 
home. I believe you never ramble for the purposes of look- 
ing out subjects for your Museum. Were a ramble to lead 
you to Monticello, we should all receive you with open 
arms & hearts. God bless you & give you many & happy 
years. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, May 5th, 1809. 
DEAR SIR: 

Your favor of April 3rd came to hand on the 23rd of 
April. I have no doubt that the marked differences be- 
tween the elephant & our colossal animal entitle him 
to a distinct appellation. One of those differences, & a 
striking one, is in the protuberances on the grinding surface 
of the teeth, somewhat in the shape of the mamma mastos, 
or breast of a woman, which has induced Cuvier to call it 
the Mastodonte, or bubby-toothed ; which name perhaps 
may be as good as any other, & worthy of adoption, as it is 
more important that all should agree in giving the same 
name to the same thing, than that it should be the very 



Thomas Jefferson to C harks Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 319 

best which might be given. I am afraid we shall lose Mr. 
Rembrandt Peale as we have lost all our great painters 
because we are not rich enough to bid against other nations 
for their services. I have communicated to my grandson 
our consent to his attending Mr. Godon's lectures in miner- 
alogy till the botanical course ends, after which he is to 
return home. I am totally occupied without doors, & en- 
joying a species of happiness I never before knew, that of 
doing whatever hits the humor of the moment without 
responsibility or injury to any one. Letter writing having 
ceased to be a business, is very much neglected, and the 
exercises of the farm & garden engross nearly my whole 
time. I salute you with constant affection & respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, August 22nd, 1809. 
DEAR SIR: 

I have been for sometime endeavoring to procure bills of 
some bank in Philadelphia to enable me to remit you the 
balance of $49. 5-1/2 due you on account of my grandson. 
Finding there is little hope of this, I have this day enclosed 
to my friend Mr. Barnes of Georgetown, bills of that place, 
and prayed him to exchange them for a draught of the 
Washington bank on that of the U. S. at Philadelphia in 
your favor, which you will probably receive a day or two 
after the receipt of this. I have now to thank you for all 
your kindnesses and those of your family to my grandson ; 
and at the same time to convey to you the expressions ot 
his gratitude and affectionate remembrance. He speaks of 
yourself, Mrs. Peale & the family always as of his own 
parents & family. He waits until the frosts set in to go into 
our lower country to commence his course of Mathematics 
& Natural Philosophy. I cannot describe to you the hope 
& comfort I derive from his good dispositions & understand- 
ing. Ever affectionately yours, 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

(To be continued.) 



320 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771p-1815. 



MAREIAGE LICENSES OF CAROLINE COUNTY, MARY- 
LAND, 1774-1815. 

CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY DOWNES CRANOR. 

(Continued from page 215.) 

1779. 

January 11. Nicholas Stubbs and Keziah Busick. 

18. Benjamin Faulker and Eliz* Narvell. 

19. Isaac Nicols and Mary Dean. 
February 1. John Barnes and Sarah Chance. 

3. Allen Thomas and Rhoda Thomas. 

5. Benjamin M c Kees and Sarah Slaughter. 

6. "William Handley and Deborah Harney. 
9. William Frazier and Henrietta Johnson. 

15. Edward Pritchett and Priscilla Minner. 

18. James Gray and Rhoda Dean. 

19. Thomas Orrell and Eliz & Rumbley. 
22. Win. Nemar Jr. and Sarah Walker. 
22. William Walker Jr. and Mary Thomas. 
27. James Cochlin and Eliz* Thompson. 

March 2. Levin Parkinson and Rachel Ferriss. 
12. Benjamin Haynes and Sarah Permarr. 
15. Sol. Cahall and Rachel Jones. 
April 10. John Yalliant Jr. and Eliza Lowrey. 
14. Charles Walker and Sussanna Price. 

14. John Clemments and Rebekah Rogers. 
19. Wm. Walker and Eliz a Green. 

May 17. Nathan Manship and Eleanora Andrews. 

31. John Barrwick and Rachel Webber. 
June 3. Robt. Thomas and Eleanor Alford. 
3. Robert Wilson and Eliz a Pritchett. 

7. Mark Andrews and Ann Manning. 

15. Thomas Chance and Mary Richardson. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 321 

June 15. Thomas Chance and Rebecca Price. 

15. Nicholas Harrison and Margaret Graham. 
29. Tho* Marine and Tamsey Noble. 

July 9. John Fields and Esther Meekins. 

12. James Bell and Marg* Willoughby. 

13. Levi Plummer and Margaret Purnell. 

21. John Ervine and Mary Wadman. 
August 6. John Carter and Lydia Hubbert. 

8. William Gall and Mary Scott. 
11. Jeoffrey Horney and Lucretia Scott. 

18. John Wootters and Eliz a All. 

23. Daniel Crowem Jr. and Rachel Adams. 
25. Uriah Mathews and Polly Lee. 
September 7. Tilghman Blades and Ann Lawfull. 

16. Vincent Lowe Price and Eliz a Garey. 

19. William Anthony and Eliz* Haddaway. 

20. Abram Evitt and Mary Stevens. 

29. Nicholas Price and Frances Harris. 
October 15. James Baggs and Nancy Mason. 

16. John Nucomb and Mary Swift. 
November 2. Rob* Pwym and Margaret Reynolds. 
2. James Hobbs and Rachel Reynolds. 
5. Michael Smith and Elizabeth Harris. 
18. John Baker and Sarah Broadaway. 

22. Rich d Lockerman and Ann Wood. 
December 3. William Perry and Elizabeth Porter. 

10. William Elliott and Sarah Robinson. 
10. Parish Garner and Ann Elliott. 
20. Samuel Douglass and Mary Nevens. 
28. Henry Powell and Dorothy Holland. 

30. Nath 1 Cooper and Nancy Needels. 

31. Levin Noble and Ann Ward. 
31. Roger Scully and Rachel Harris. 

1780. 

January 8. Hynson Glanding and Mary Gannon. 
10. David Richards and Tamsey Eaton. 

VOL. XXVIII. 21 



322 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

January 15. Joseph Durdan and Elizabeth Dickinson. 

19. Greenberry Mathews and Ann Monticue. 
February 2. William Love and Elizabeth Parratt 

James Camper and Sarah Batcheldor. 
William Talboy and Elizabeth Scott. 

7. Charles Scoudrick and Rebekah Wright. 

8. John Robinson and Elizabeth Thorman. 

9. James Black Jr. and Tacy Oldfield. 
12. Samuel Casson and Rebekah Worrell. 

20. Nicholas Bright and Ann Anthony. 

21. John Harrison and Elizabeth Seth. 
March 8. Omderton Blades and Sarah Bowdle. 

28. Nicholas Dyall and Mary Dean. 

29. Thomas Leverton and Lydia Calston. 
29. Isaac Parlett and Jane Hamilton. 

April 5. Joseph Stack and Elizabeth Banning. 

20. William Fisher and Susannah Webster. 
May 9. Thomas Banning and Mary White. 
27. Jesse Yinson and Sarah Meredith. 
June 21. Roger Fountain and Mary Eaton. 
July 17. Mathew Derochbonne and Sarah Wootters. 

19. Richard Lyden and Martha Hooper. 
August 8. Thomas Mathews and Mary Ann Jackson. 

9. Massey Fountain and Henrietta Hicks. 
19. Timothy Lane Price and Sarah Parratt. 
31. Philemon Downes and Elizabeth Tillotson. 
31. Thomas Smith and Nancy White. 
September 2. William Jackson and Tryphenia Garrett. 
4. Hezekiah Talmon and Ann Story. 

11. John Smith and Elonor Anthony. 

12. Arthur Clark and Mary Farrowfield. 

22. Abner Clemmons and Margaret Morgan. 
27. Nathan Gladston and Ann Hobbs. 

October 17. Henry Martindale and Nancy Nicols. 

George Euberts and Rebecca Herrington. 
James Eubanks and Margt. Herrington. 
Abel Chilton and Mary Swann. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 323 

October 18. Thomas Hall and Naomi Hammond. 

John Corn and Tamsey Rowin. 
19. Harrison Monticue and Nancy Lemarr. 
John Spurrey and Elizabeth Everett. 
James Fountain and Elenor Bell. 

27. Richard Warner and Mary Jones. 

28. Solomon Carter and Rhoda Webster. 
George Morgan and Africa Towers. 

November 9. Job Garrett and Priscilla Hignett. 

13. Greenbury Mathews and Sarah Pratt. 

19. Nath 1 Harrington and Lydia Nicols. 

20. Archibald Jackson and Sukey Reed. 
25. Ezekel Dean and Diana Bell. 

December 3. William Hutton Jr. and Catharine Jackson. 

4. John Morgan and Sarah Chaffinch. 

5. Philip Walker and Margaret Dickinson. 
8. Henry Willis and Ann Connerlyd. 

13. Nehemiah Cooper and Elizabeth Morgan. 
17. Benjamin Huggins and Sarah Plummer. 

19. William Webb and Comfort Holson. 

20. Rizdon Bozman and Henrietta Alford. 

1781. 

January 3. Clousberry Matthews and Mary Slaughter. 

3. Thomas Burk and Elizabeth Turner. 
10. Robert Walker and Sarah Lemarr. 
10. James Cahall and Nelly Dawson. 
13. Benjamin Sutton and Rhode Toottle. 

23. John Salisbury and Lydia Homey. 

25. Edmund Blades and Mary Bownes. 

29. Charles Nenderford and Sarah Moodsley. 

30. John Warren and Ann Western. 
February 1. Jacob Wildgoose and Sarah Blades. 

3. John Carpender and Mary Lawrence. 

24. Richard Roe and Sally Glanding. 

26. Richard Mitchell and Sarah Carter. 
March 5. John Stevens Jr. and Elizabeth Andrews. 



324 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 

March 6. Solomon Morgan and Alice Holdbrook. 
13. Isaac Bradley and Elizabeth. Casson. 

16. David Melvill and Sarah Medford. 
20. James Morgan and Justina Cremeen. 

April 26. Thomas Turner and Ann Andrew. 
May 15. Thomas Cooper Jr. and Elizabeth Colston. 

17. James Morris and Rebecca Barnett. 
29. Ralph Green and Mary Gambell. 

June 9. Valentine Green and Jane Sylvester. 
11. John Hardcastle and Jane Potter. 

18. Samuel Southray and Hannah Blades. 

20. Batchelor Chance Jr. and Nancy Dunning. 
" "William Fountain and Elizabeth Satterfield. 

21. Robert Orrell and Margaret Bayley. 

22. John Cooper Jr. and Rachel Conner. 
26. David "Webber and Mary Andrew. 

July 16. John Foster Leverton and Hannah Wilson. 

24. John Ryall and Mary Davis. 
October 2. James Culbreth and Sarah Covington. 

20. Richard Willoughby and Elizabeth Law- 
rence. 
November 1. Solomon Scott and Elizabeth Baggs. 

26. Charles Lemarr and Mary Jump. 
December 16. James Jones and Susannah Jones. 

20. Christopher Wilson and Sarah Dixon. 

21. Andrew Bush and Elizabeth Sparklin. 

1782. 

January 11. Shadrach Dyall and Nancy Horney. 

21. Richard Cooper and Sarah Alford. 
February 7. Edward Carter and Mary Webb. 

24. Thomas J. Condrick and Margaret Monuett. 
March 23. William Cecil and Rhoda Skinner. 
April 9. Robert Bell and Mary Fountain. 

13. John Pippen and Hetty Thornton. 
May 22. W m Robinson and Marg* Driver. 
June 19. Jacob Jump and Lucretia Reed. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Cb., Maryland, 1774.-1815. 325 

June 29. "W m Andrew and Rachel Pronce. 
July 16. John Derochbound and Mary Boone. 
August 21. Richard Wootters and Mary Price. 
September 10. Henry Turner Jr. and Sarah Blades. 

12. Allemby Jump and Nancy Hardcastle. 
October 26. John Gibson and Mary Massey. 
November 4. James Stafford and Esther Andrews. 
December 28. Wm. Meads Satterfield and Ann Dukes. 

29. Joseph Bell and Margaret Sewell. 

1783. 

January 1. Kerrington Sylvester and Sophia Mason. 
4. Mathews Garrett and Mary Mason. 

20. Ho well Kenton and Elizabeth Downes. 

21. Nathan Harrington and Mary Moborough. 
February 26. Richard Mason Jr. and Rebekah Hardcastle. 

May 12. Thos. White Meeds and Mary Cooper. 

21. John Green and Elizabeth Phillips. 
June 5. Samuel Ball and Lydia Kerap. 

John Kemp and Ruth Ball. 

25. Wm. Fountain and Margaret Morgan. 
July 18. John Russum and Tryphena Sylvester. 

August 11. Robert Williams and Ann Clark. 
September 16. Andrew Satterfield and Deborah Stevens. 
October 6. Garcy Leverton and Mary Spemcer. 

10. William Bell Jr. and Margaret Talbott. 
10. James Overstock and Elizabeth Perry. 
November 12. Samuel Sparklin and Tarn sey Andrew. 
17. Baptist Davis and Ann Genn. 
20. Joseph Parratt and Julia Thomas. 

26. James Parratt and Sarah Hutchings. 
December 13. John King and Ann Smith. 

Richard Willis and Elizabeth Greenbaugh. 

15. Charles Critchett and Margaret Webb. 
William Coursey Jr. and Mary Thomas. 

16. Francis Rowins and Elizabeth Lord. 

22. Richard Kinnard and Elizabeth Stanton. 

30. Nathan Hill and Rachel Lewis. 



326 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 



January 14. John Clark and Martha Lyden. 

17. Henry Dickinson and Anna Hirdman. 
24. Thomas Blades and Keziah Cremeen. 

April 6. Thomas Harrington and Rebekah Slaughter. 

19. John Diggin and Tamsey Thomas. 

28. James Hambleton and Dorothy Ozwell. 
May 26. Nathan Smith and Elizabeth Keen. 
June 11. James Hardcastle and Sarah Parratt. 

27. Zadoc Harvey and Elizabeth Faston. 
July 1 7. Jacob Lockerman and Elizabeth Clark. 
August 17. Philip Larcy and Priscilla Lecompt. 

19. William Walter and Nancy Driver. 

30. Thomas Baynard Jr. and Rebeckah Sang- 

ston. 
October 19. Mathew Chilton and Hannah Wootters. 

20. James Ratcliff and Mary Alls. 
November 2. George Nelson and Margaret Stradley. 

16. Thomas Tootle and Sarah Brown. 

19. William Cannon and Henrietta Wheatley. 
Solomon Jump and Sarah Cannon. 
Noah Mason and Izabel Hunter. 

178$. 

January 3. William Mason and Nancy Baggs. 

20. John Fisher and Katharine Holt. 
27. Abner Clements and Lydia Stewart. 

February 2. Jonathan Gary and Sousana Dickinson. 

8. George Wilson and Sally Cooper. 

22. Ezekel Hunter Jr. and Prudence Boone. 

23. Peter Chance and Rebecca Boone. 
March 6. John Harrison and Elizth. Scissarson. 

9. Eliza [?] Clark and Elizabeth Robinson. 
12. Samuel Denny and Anna Montecue. 
16. Thomas Roe and Tilly Porter. 

18. Giles Hicks and Margaret Chalmers. 
April 26. Thomson Wootters and Elizabeth Jarman. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 327 

May 3. Richard Swift and Sarah Reynolds. 

30. John Blades and Lucretia Turner. 

June 7. Thomas Purnell and Katharine Hargidine. 

14. Charles Baker and Frances Willis. 
July 14. Henry Calston and Rebecca Mason. 

15. Levin Thomas and Elizabeth Ganze. 

16. Edwin Lunceford and Sarah Kelley. 
29. Robert Sherwin and Mary Mobray. 

August 17. Aaron Lewis and Sapphira Griffith. 

18. Thomas Lewis Jr. and Rebecca Griffith. 
23. Richard Perry and Deborah Sitterson. 

26. William Dail and Nancy Barnes. 
September 21. Samuel Darggins and Ann Johnston. 

October 5. Mathias Freeman and Juliet Dudley. 

11. James Johnson and Elizabeth Russum. 
November 25. Alexander M'Connell and Dorothy Le 

Compte. 
December 9. William Purnell Jr. and Elizabeth Cooper. 

27. John Townsend and Sarah Slaughter. 

" James Fleharty and Susannah Hopkins. 

28. James Wilson and Sarah Cooper. 

1786. 

January 9. William Kelley and Roxanna Wing. 

18. Griffith Callahan and Ann Wood. 

19. Olive [?] Jump and Mary Wootters. 
26. Samuel Sylvester and Sarah Phillips. 

31. Isaac Baggs and Elizabeth Clark. 
March 12. Wm. Everingham and Elizabeth Willis. 

April 19. Stephen Cooper and Priscilla Scott. 
May 15. James Cohlins and Sarah Perry. 
16. Andrew Jump and Letitia Boon. 

20. George Townsend and Margaret Bell. 
June 19. John Robertson and Margaret Stevens. 

23. Josiah Leach and Alice Parratt. 
July 8. James Mathews and Margaret Oram. 

15. Solomon Colbourn and Rebecca Coursey. 



328 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

December 18. Nathan Sewell and Elizabeth Norris. 
22. Charles Manship and Mary Keene. 
" Edward Dudley and Rebecca Colston. 

27. Giles Hiche and Mary Colston. 

28. Daniel Jones and Clean Cannon. 

1787. 

January 9. William Kirby and Sarah Haddaway. 
16. John Freeman and Margaret Clark. 

27. Benjamin Boone and Ann Hall. 

29. Daniel Valliant and Elizabeth Alford. 
February 8. Elijah Andrews and Mary Noble. 

16. John Crennen and Rebecca Lynch. 

18. James Aaron and Grace Wildgood. 
March 12. Ellis Thomas and Mary Harris. 

15. Henry Dickinson and Deborah Perry. 

19. John Royall and Ann Evans. 

21. John Slaughter and Elizabeth Hynson. 
April 5. Thomas Hitchings and Fanny Reynolds. 
6. James Jump and Elizabeth Ridgaway. 

16. William Parker and Elizabeth Nicols. 
May 8. Henry Covington and Susanna Boone. 
June 20. James Hardcastle and Elizabeth Baggs. 
July 14. John Cooper and Sarah Cooper. 

17. James Love and Rebecca Eagle. 

25. Robert Sylvester and Rebecca Boone. 
August 11. James Turner and Ann Elliott. 

28. James Cohee and Mary Brice. 
September 5. Samuel Collins and Deborah Satterfield. 

25. Francis Elliott and Elizabeth Orrell. 

26. William Ryon and Sarah Alford. 
October 9. James Slaughter and Priscilla Harrington. 

November 3. James Grayless and Elizabeth Wheatley. 

12. Benoin Sherwin and Ann Stradley. 

13. Richard Collison and Penelope Bush. 
19. Solomon Brown and Ann Boon. 

24. Isaac Nicols and Celia Wright. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 329 

November 28. Caleb Kerby and Margaret Shields. 
December 1. Robert Hardcastle and Susanah Garey. 
8. James Leverton and Lydia Kenton. 

1788. 

January 22. Richard Willis and Bethany Gwoty. 
February 2. Jacob Seth and Ann Pennington. 

7. Thos. Whadman and Henrietta Yoe. 
10. William Sherwood and Sarah Mitchell. 
April 3. Richard Andrew and Mary Hill. 
June 10. Aaron Hardcastle and Arabella Stokely. 

13. James Munnett and Mary Kenderdine. 
" James Sleete and Ann Manship. 

14. James Harrington and Ann M c Kinny. 

27. William Harper and Amelia Holden. 
July 26. Jacob Boon and Catharine Whitby. 

August 1. John Roe and Elizabeth Rawley. 

5. Noah Mason and Nancy Jackson. 

6. Mathew Jones and Sarah White. 

7. Edward Andrew and Prudence Walker. 
16. Richard Clarkson and Priscilla Brown. 
25. Owen Connelly and Elizabeth Layton. 

" Jonathan Hughey and Ann Robinson. 
31. John Barcross and Sarah Hayes. 
September 3. Jacob Andrew and Priscilla Law. 
October 21. Robert Dixon and Ann Andrew. 

28. Rizdon Fountain and Rachel Saulsbury. 
November 8. Henry Downes and Margaret Green. 

12. James Towers Jr. and Mary Hobbs. 
" James Towers and Tamsey Bland. 

15. Perry Sutton and Nancy Dawson. 
18. James Cheezum and Nancy Tottel. 
20. Burton Loftis and Sussana Baynard. 
28. Richard Start and Ann Harris. 

1789. 

February 8. Elijah Williamson and Lely Wheatley. 
24. Benjamin Jackson and Rebecca Parrott. 



330 Marriage Licenses oj Caroline Co., Maryland, 177 -18 15. 

March 9. William Lane and Sarah George. 
11. Perry Young and Rachel Stack. 
13. Henry Kemp and Mary Lay ton. 
18. Josiah Starling and Amelia Nicols. 
30. Levin Noble and Mary White Ward. 
April 12. John Scott and Ann Talboy. 
May 29. William Vaulx and Mary Tumpillian. 
30. Alexander Talson and Rebecca Boon. 
June 19. John Shepherd and Fanny Foster. 
July 14. Robert Postlethwaite and Nancy Kenton. 

27. James Meredith and Anna Statia Ewing. 

28. Thos. Baynard and Elizabeth Slaughter. 

29. Robt. Edge and Mary Pynfield. 
August 5. John Flowers and Elizabeth Clank. 

11. James Kenton and Sarah Micton. 
15. Ralph Colscott and Mary Swiggett. 

18. James Swann and Lydia Faulkner. 
24. Francis Sellers and Elizabeth Downes. 
29. John Harrison and Esther Blades. 

September 8. James Fountain and Margaret Saulsbury. 

12. Jonathan Stevens and Frances Hignitt. 
15. Daniel Herring and Rachel Cohee. 

19. John Willoughby and Celia Connelly. 
" James Faulker and Sophia Minner. 

29. Wm. Wheatley and Sidney Glandon. 
October 3. Charles Blair and Ann Stevens. 

" John Merchant and Phener Jackson. 
9. James Purnell and Elizabeth Neal. 
" Daniel Dawson and Ann Willis. 
" Daniel Bell and Ann Coulbourn. 
November 2. Thomas Slaughter and Mary Kelly. 

13. John Brown and Fanney Coursey. 
19. George Martin and Elizabeth Nicole. 
29. James Beaver and Ann Hughes. 

December 2. John Minner Jr. and Elizabeth Nunam. 
24. William Clift and Elizabeth Broadway. 
28. Joshua Lucas and Deborah Willis. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 331 

1790. 

January 5. Peter Collison and Sarah Johnson. 
14. Luke Andrew and Rhody Blades. 
16. Thomas White Brown and Lucretia Cannon. 
30. Abraham Ross and Elizabeth Green. 
February 2. Thomas Baxter and Mary Hughes. 
3. Philip Thomas and Sarah James. 

16. John Quinn and Elizabeth Townsend. 
March 2. Jeremiah Montigue and Elizabeth Clough. 

3. Noah Dawson and Margaret Andrew. 

5. John Martindale and Mary Manship. 

13. William Harrison and Penelope Collison. 

19. Emory Craynor and Susannah Lyon. 
23. George Garey and May Andrew. 

April 2. Perry Ward Stewart and Mary Manship. 
" John Salterfield and Sarah Williams. 
7. Robert Boon and Sarah Hunter. 

10. Thomas Bright and Nelly Robinson. 

17. Risdon Cooper and Elizabeth Mace. 

21. Peter Taylor Causey and Elizabeth Wilson. 

22. John Lucas and Rebecca Cooper. 
May 3. Jesse Grayless and Sarah Andrew. 

11. Purnell Jump and Elizabeth Broadaway. 

12. John Green and Sarah Smith. 

17. Bernnett Wherrett and Rebecca Scott. 

18. William Diggins and Margaret Chairs. 
25. Abraham Ray and Nancy Travers. 

June 7. William Richardson Jr. and Elizabeth Dick- 
inson. 
July 9. Richard Wilcott and Rebecca Cheezam. 

20. Elsbury Burt and Sarah Hutchings. 
25. Ezekel Hunter and Sarah Sylvester. 

27. John Hutchings and Fanny Harrington. 
August 3. Elijah Pitsham and Elizabeth Swift. 

5. John Waddell and Elizabeth Wright. 
12. Jonathan Conner and Delia Crickett. 
17. David Webber and Catharine Isgate. 



332 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

August 20. Hugh Lindsey and Mary Caulk. 
September 3. Vincent Pinkine and Catharine Cooper. 

John Lucas and Caroline Scott. 
October 1. John Fleharty and Esther Hopkins. 

21. Samuel Johnson and Hannah Jackson. 
November 2. John Bradley and Rebecca Jump. 

5. John Jump and Henrietta Lee. 

6. David Jones and Tamsey Connerty. 

10. Levin Claudge and Rachel Jump. 
Benjamin Linthicum and Rebecca Dixon. 

11. Timothy Plummer and Sarah Vickers. 
John Bowdle and Mary Towers. 

12. Isaac Purnill and Patty Sylvester. 
December 10. William Andrew and Margaret Beauchamp. 

13. Joseph Crockett and Rebecca Blades. 

14. Thomas Swift and Sarah Mason. 

15. William Jacobs and Mary Dawson. 

22. James Chairs Webb and Nancy Hicals. 

1791. 

January 1. William Gibson and Elizabeth Sangston. 

2. Joseph Stack and Rebecca Lewis. 

3. James Sisk and Mary Bowdle. 

4. Henry Mason and Mary Clark. 
Archibald Flemming and Sarah Wilson. 

11. Alexander Forsyth and Margaret Smith. 

14. Henry Turner Jr. and Rebecca Eaton. 
18. John Adams and Mary Russom. 

Joshua Temple and Nancy Wilson. 
27. John Morgan and Sarah Clift. 
31. William Bright and Elizabeth Shephard. 
February 4. Jacob Watkins and Elizabeth Hobbs. 

7. William Shaw and Polly Sylvester. 

8. William Craflbrd and Ann Harbert. 

12. Henry Casson and Polly Nabb. 
12. Joseph Bowdel and Polly Blades. 

15. John Fountain Jr. and Deborah Fountain. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 333 

February 23. Saml. Willoughby and Amelia Howard. 
March. 3. Alexander and Nancy Price. 

6. Woolman Hughey and Polly Johnson. 

7. John Seth and Nancy Meredith. 

8. John Martindale and Margaret Saulsbury. 
15. John Dodd and Polly Jump. 

22. Thomas Clen Denning and Hannah Burt. 
31. Thomas Katts and Polly Waddell. 

April 6. Caleb Bouvier and Sidney Harrington. 

28. William Dail and Mary Eaton. 

May 3. Joseph Dixon and Ann With. 

5. Peter Edmordson and Elizabeth Driver. 

23. James Dudley and Mary Burton. 
June 1. Daniel Keene and Margaret Bill. 

11. John Dickinson and Ann Walker. 
30. Nehemiah Townsend and Winifred Foun- 
tain. 
July 8. Nichalson Harrison and Hester Hall. 

17. Thos. Frampton and Elizabeth Kelly. 

21. Joshua Hobbs and Rhody Cranmer. 

27. William All and Isabel Boon. 

30. Samuel Lecompte and Sarah Benney. 
August 3. Benjamin Jump and Sidney Carter. 

6. Daniel Hobbs and Elizabeth White. 
November 17. Robert Walker and Margaret Valliant. 

18. Levin Hicks and Elizabeth Stewart. 

20. Tristram Wright and Elizabeth Waddell. 

22. Samuel Chatman and Sarah Nunam. 

23. Nehemiah Andrew and Anna Davis. 

28. Emanuel Crayner and Susannah Wadman. 
December 18. Acquilla Jackson and Penelope Biscow. 

20. John Watkins and Elizabeth Ruhard. 

1792. 

January 3. Thomas Cooper and Elizabeth Whirritt. 
Elijah Satterfield and Elizabeth Dukes. 
William Dukes and Lydia Harris. 



334 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-18 15. 

January 4. James Anderson and Celia Harris. 
9. Thomas Smith and Rhody Cooper. 
17. Barnett M'Combs and Sarah Sunarr. 

20. Solomon Downes Cranor and Elizabeth 

Morriston. 

26. Richard Harrington and Rebecca Harring- 
ton. 
February 14. Levin Saulsbury and Mary Cremun. 

15. James Ewing and Elizabeth Griffith. 

" James Peters and Sarah Hignult. 

21. James "Whiteley and Rebecca Culbreth. 
" Solomon Atkinson and Mary Kenton. 

March 8. Aaron Dut and Ann Dawson. 

22. John Hendsley and Sarah Clark. 
April 3. Daniel Holbrook and Rebecca Towers. 

4. Solomon Wilson and Elizabeth Craynor. 

25. Zadwick Lain and Amelia Gray. 

May 19. Solomon Richardson and Mary Moberry. 
June 1. James Waddell and Mary Saulsbury. 

5. Zebulon Dixon and Nancy Garrett. 
Jonathan Wilson and Mary Saulsbury. 
James Wheatley and . 

19. David Webber and Mary Ann Wootters. 

26. Henry Garmon and Sarah Bush. 
Nehemiah Draper and Sidney Barwick. 

July 24. Richard Martindale and Sarah Martindale. 
Thomas Harvey and Nelly Beadley. 

27. William Wadman and Nancy Craynor. 
31. Henry Baggs and Elizabeth Roe. 

August 7. Isaac Boon and Ann Boon. 

21. William Clough and Elizabeth Monticue. 

Isaac Merrick and Rachel Sylvester. 
29. George Collins and Nice Hubbert. 
September 15. Aaron Dawley and Nancy Purnell. 

25. Levin Charles and Henrietta Thaughley. 

Henry Kenton and Lydia Downes. 
October 17. Owen McQuality and Jane Harris. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 17741815. 335 

October 27. John Jones and Sarah Caulk. 
November 13. James Wilson and Elizabeth Hardcastle. 

James Boon and Sarah Boon. 
December 8. James Plummer and Letitia Clift. 
14. Nathan Jones and Rebecca Swift. 

Dovington Chane and Esther Gosling. 
18. William Mobrary and Ehoda Ross. 

John Carter Jr. and Lavinia Rumbley. 
20. Robinson Morriston and Ann Hignutt. 
22. Joseph Fleharty and Margaret Cook. 
Thomas Truman and Sarah Kinimint. 
25. Robert Meredith and Nancy Chance. 

1793. 

January 3. Jacob Covey and Mary Camper. 

22. James Coarsey and Rebecca Harper. 

29. Edward White 3rd and Elizabeth Fountain. 

30. William Walker and Rebecca Crunan. 
February 7. Stephen Theodore Johnson and Mary Clarke. 

12. John Ball and Fanny Vinson. 
March 23. Solomon Brown and Parthema Furnis. 
Noah Jackson and Elizabeth Smith. 

23. Levin Tute and Deborah Eaton. 
May 2. Israel Knotts and Sarah Martindall. 

17. Richard Ridgeway and Henny Townsend. 

20. Aaron Manship and Nancy Mathews. 
28. Samuel Barren and Marthy Cox. 

William Casson and Letitia Swift. 
30. Henry Stewart and Sarah Foster. 
June 4. Elisha Chaffinch and Mary Craynor. 

12. Henry Willis and Rhody Batchelor. 

21. Richard Pearson and Deborah Hopkins. 
July 20. Mathias Clifton and Eliza Blunt. 

23. Thomas Stewart and Polly Collinson. 

24. Greenberry Banning and Nancy Clarke. 
August 9. Saml. Fountain and Sarah Lawrence. 

13. Richard Swift and Rachel Smith. 



336 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 

August 14. Solomon Clarke and Sarah Swift. 

20. Thomas Winchester and Nancy Priort. 
September 27. Thomas Mason and Eliza Saven. 
November 19. William Potter and Ann Richardson. 

22. Roger Malock and Sarah Dill. 

26. John Cheshire and Rachel Martindall. 
December 16. Thomas Webster and Sarah Smith. 

18. Nicholas Linch and Mary Ruse. 

20. Thomas Bartlett and Mary Thomas. 

21. Cornelius Johnson and Sarah Brannock. 
William Wheeler and Mary Lyden. 

24. Christopher Pratt and Rebecca Trunen. 

26. Edward Perry and Elizabeth Walker. 
30. Joseph Rogers and Frances Smith. 

30. Levin Grossman and Sarah Collins. 

31. Nathaniel Stafford and Sarah Hobbs. 

1794. 

January 6. Benedict Nunam and Rachel Benson. 

14. Thomas Carslake and Margaret Luse. 

15. John Harris and Seina Willis. 

21. Isaac Munnitt and Rebecca Chilton. 
February 1. David Dean and Elizabeth Moore. 

5. Ephraim Grayless and Peggy Wheatley. 

11. Robert Sylvester and Frances Boon. 
Philip Porter and Rebecca Glass. 

12. James Draper and Levis White. 
20. John Claredge and Rachel Smith. 

22. Benjamin Todd and Mary Harvey. 

25. Henry Rhodes and Rachel Simmons. 

27. William Waddell and Nancy Cheezum. 
March 1. Henry Nicols 3rd. and Margaret Keene. 

11. Andrew Kinneman and Christian Keene. 
20. William Colston and Mary Debilbiss. 
April 17. John Sylvester and Prudence Sundick. 
25. Daniel Baynard and Nancy Parrott. 
William Starkey and Deborah Gibson. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co.j Maryland, 177^-1815. 337 

June 5. William Hignutt and Ann Dillon. 

11. William Taylor and Elizabeth Faulkner. 

16. John Knus and Sarah Sumners. 

17. John Shepperd and Sarah Eaton. 

20. Robert Hefferson and Judith Pennarr. 
July 19. Charles Sebudrach and Sarah Cocklin. 

21. John Fluharty and Eliza Valiant. 
Samuel Emerson and Ann Anderson. 

23. Wm. Kirkman and Eliza Spurry. 

26. Vincent Taylor and Elizabeth Martindall. 

Thomas Andran and Heziah Blades. 
August 1. William Faris and Luvenah Alford. 
13. John Ward and Sarah Grayloss. 

19. John Peters and Mary Hignutt. 
Mathew Smith and Eliza Ewing. 
Joseph Mann and Eliza Blades. 

20. John A Sangston and Mary Kenton. 
September 5. Solomon Diggins and Rachel Condon. 

8. Thomas Towers and Esther Collins. 

Ja 8 Minner and Darkey Faulkner. 
November 17. John Green and Elizabeth Smill. 

28. Wm. Ryon Jr. and Nancy Graham. 
December 2. John Grigg and Cynthia Minner. 

18. Wm. Reeves and Mary Taylor. 

23. William Travers and Jann Haslett. 
81. Thomas Griffith and Darkey Eaton. 

1795. 

January 3. James M'Knitt and Julia Robinson. 

8. James Wiltegott and Nancy Flaharty. 
" Thos. Waddell and Sarah Batchelor. 
13. William Priest and Naomi Carmine. 
William Harper and Sarah Carmine. 

29. Samuel Elliott and Hannah Clark. 
February 14. Jas. Anderson and Nancy Jackson. 

April 4. William Ross and Margaret Kelley. 
June 18. John Diggins and Elizabeth Cooper. 
VOL. xxviu. 22 



338 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 

June 20. Thomas Tylor and Mary Alford. 

22. Amos Warren and Wealthy Baynord. 
July 4. Thomas Hawkins and Ada Borjan. 

17. Robt. Beau champ and Mary Wilson. 

29. Thomas Berry and Jaminah Pratt. 
August 5. Richard Dove and Esther Chilcut. 

13. Joshua Cooper and Lydia Clark. 
15. JSTehemiah Andrew and Phreba Sutton. 
William Keene and Rebecca Floyd. 

20. William Webb and Rachel Digging. 
James Bell and Isabella Jump. 

John Hughbanks and Esther Ridgeway. 
Levin Clark and Elizabeth Nice. 
Henry Garey and Abigail Chilton. 
September 7. Sol. Hubbert and Africa Russnur. 

30. Cain Davis and Mary Carter. 

October 28. Tarn Cerlan D. Sangston and Mary Stevens. 

November 17. Daniel Morgan and Sarah Towers. 
Edward Carter Sr. and Lela Jones. 

24. James Stewart and Esther Pratt. 

28. Callahan Jones and Rebecca Carmine. 

December 2. Thomas Carmine and Lovey Harris. 

9. Wm. Hardcastle and Mary Jump. 

15. Wm. Towers and Celia Russell. 

15. Rigby Thomas and Delilah Barnett. 

19. Thomas Meeds and Mary Swift. 

22. Aaron Chance and Sarah Love. - 

1796. 

January 11. David Waddell and Elizabeth Brannock. 
12. Geo. Thompson and Henny Kenton. 

19. Levi Dukes and Deborah Saulsbury. 

21. Jonathan Beck and Rebecca Nicol. 

22. Daniel Wooters and Elizabeth Wooters. 
February 2. Robert Pearce and Sarah Hardcastle. 

9. Alum Parker and Rhody Willis. 

20. Thos. Beauchamp and Mary Todd. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 339 

February 23. Ezekiel Murdock and Rutha Ireland. 

Robt. Hefferson and Letitia Porter. 
March 5. William Slaughter and Susannah Rhodes. 
7. James Swiggett and Ann Harrington. 

15. Tilghman Chance and Ann Harper. 
30. Thomas Priest and Aisey Jump. 

John Murphy and Susannah Slaughter. 
April 14. Robert Williams and Mary Stunnors. 

16. Absalom Tribitt and Ann Draper. 
May 17. Henry Dean and Tamsey Covey. 

25. Mark Foster and Eleoner Cole. 
30. Andrew MCollorton and Mary Vanly. 
June 22. William Shehan and Sarah Sylvestor. 

25. David Sylvestor and Elinor Tarrorsfold. 
July 19. Asa Brady and Nancy Hollingsworth. 

August 6. John Orom and Mary Edgell. 

10. Andrew Baggs and Henrietta Mason. 
13. David Sisk and Elizabeth Foster. 

16. Thomas Cooper and Rebecca Nobb. 
Jeremiah Vinson and Prudence Hunter. 

30. Mel von Andrews and Celia Andrew. 

31. John A. Sangston and Rachel Sharp. 
September 6. Richard Warner and Parthy Nelson. 

S. Talbott and Ann Postlethwaite. 
24. Thomas Carmine and Susannah Andrew. 
Thomas Monticue and Hannah Dodd. 

26. Joseph Wright and Anna Hatia Meredith. 
26. Jacob Numar and Nancy Cotrile. 

October 10. Nathan Whitby and Mary Fountaine. 

11. Peter Chance and Elenor Farrfield. 
Harrison Montigue and Triphemia Foun- 
tain. 

12. Anderson Porter and Bershiba Jester. 
15. Robt. Hardcastle Jr. and Sarah Baynord. 
26. John Billitor and Margaret Fountain. 

November 8. Shelby Jump and Elizabeth Jump. 
December 3. Elijah Cromcan and Ann Dawson. 



840 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

December 10. David Wilson and Mary Williams. 

13. William Humble and Margaret Perry. 

27. William Warren and Lovie Draper. 

28. Levin Swiggett and Peggy Forsythe. 

1797. 

January 3. James Dixon and Henrietta Vinson. 
James Herring and Cynthia Chance. 

5. Philip Rhodes and Mary Cony. 
William Boone and Elizabeth Driver. 

9. John Monticue and Rachel Roe. 
17. Joa. C. Willowby and Sophia Beauchamp. 

23. Levin Hobbs and Sarah Roe. 

31. William Young and Mary Dewoohburne. 
February 3. Amos Hollingsworth and Lucretia Bradley. 

6. Amasa Robinson and Mary Nicols Douglass. 

7. Edward Price and Mary George. 
Andrew Price and Sarah Brine. 

21. Wm. MComakin and Mary Robinson. 

22. Joshua Soward and Robena Johnson. 
Stephen Trusty and Alice Carnoy. 
Nehemiah Saulsbury and Sarah Koons. 

March 11. Stephen Lucas and Elizabeth Gibson. 

29. John Scribner and Robena Collins. 
April 4. John Ireland and Esther Johnson. 

Daniel Swiggett and Sallie Clarke. 
May 2. P. Martindall and Elizabeth Orton. 

4. Thomas Daffin and Rebecca Dickinson. 

24. Nehemiah Riley and Susanna White. 
26. Thomas Orem and Julia Taylor. 

30. Josiah Genn and Rachel Hardcastle. 

31. Thomas Jump and Nancy King. 
June 13. Nicholas Loveday and Mary Shirwood. 

24. William Miller and Ann Manship. 

26. Philemon Spencer and Nancy Baggs. 

27. Joshua Craynor and Rhoda Eaton. 
July 4. John Nabb and Susanna Jaickson. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 341 

July 12. Charles Citizen and Sarah Tholley. 
16. Richard Small and Letty Ross. 

30. William Swift and Addah Swift. 
August 1. Nathan Hunter and Susanna Cox. 

10. John Stanton and Elizabeth Connolly. 
16. Peter Mathews and Ann M c Gram. 
28. John Faiross and Nancy Blades. 

31. George Bland and Elizabeth Caulk. 
September 1. Horatio Sharpe and Prissilla Pritchett. 

25. Johnson Hobbs and Sarah Griffith. 
October 2. Pritchett Ross and Rhoda Wright. 

9. Waitman Gaslin and Margaret Causey. 
24. Peter Sharpe and Elizabeth Fountain. 
27. Joseph Eaton and Rachel Prouce. 

Book No. 3. 

November 1. Henry Harrington and Nancy Catrap. 

4. Caleb Clarke and Prudence Taylor. 

8. Francis Davis and Elizabeth Genn. 

22. Solomon Cannon and Rebecca Mason. 

27. James Jakes and Elizabeth Webber. 

December 11. Abidnigo Bodfield and Nancy Chilton. 

12. Peter Hardcastle and Mary Baynard. 

16. John Rumble and Parentha Blades. 

19. Samuel Alford and Barsheba Kelly. 
" Manapy Koon and Elenor Stewart. 

20. Zackariah Gowty and Lucretia Andrew. 
27. Robt. M c Pherson and Mary Walker. 
27. James Smith and Minty Russell. 

1798. 

January 2. Philemon Harrington and Lydia Parrott. 

3. Cain Davis and Nancy Stubbs. 

6. Able Griffith and Allopia Andrews. 

8. Isaiah Blades and Ritta Connerly. 

9. Jonathan Stewart and Margaret Walker. 

11. Robert Sylvester and Sidney Jump. 



842 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^1815. 

January 11. Purnell Sylvester and Esther Jump. 
12. John Barwick and Deborah Roe. 
16. Moses Boon and Polly Sylvester. 

23. Thos. Coursey and Margaret Sylvester. 
25. Thos. Wootters and Dorothy Williams. 
29. Charles Dean and Sarah Turner. 

31. Daniel Dukes and Sarah Evitts. 
February 3. Levin Blades and Rosannah Kelley. 
22. James Yinson and Rebeccah Henly. 
27. Jeremiah Nicols and Kitty Andrews. 

Levin Williams and Sarah Wright. 
March 5. Joshua Listor and Barbary Kid. 

7. Henry Hill and Mary Girrald. 
. 15. Peter Rich and Prudence Lane. 
22. Alex. Maxwell Jr. and Eliza Gibson. 

27. William Young and Eliza Loveday. 
April 13. Richard Harrington and Mary Casson. 

18. Charles White and Margaret Fiddeman. 
May 8. James Henigatt and Remis Fountain. 

15. Noah Mason and Margaret Bell. 
June 2. William Todd and Nancy Griffith. 

12. William Prusk and Nancy Merrick. 

13. Nicholas Benson and Mary Kinnamont. 

15. Richard Griffith and Lydia . 

16. Owen Cooper and Lydia Dwiggins. 
25. Nehemiah Causey and Ann Pitisy. 

July 3. Seth Hill Evitts and Rebecca Wilson. 
20. Lemuel Cahee and Rachel Hargadine. 

24. Robinson Stevens and Jane Collins. 

25. Samuel Davidson and Deborah Ross. 

28. Nicholas Hopkins and Rebecca Perry. 
August 2. Cyrus Bell and Sarah Dawson. 

6, William Collision and Sarah Stevens. 

. 30. John Wright and Ann Webb. 

September 3. Marmaduke Spencer and Sarah Sieth. 

14. Ross Thompson and Polly Dudley. 
William Dillahay and Ada Harris. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 343 

September 24. George Newtner and Mary Swift. 

29. Richard Handcock and Rebecca Finder. 
October 1. Peter "Wright and Esther Ross. 

George Sewell and Nancy Hopkins. 

3. "William Berridge and Sarah Piterkin. 

4. Thomas Baker and Rebecca Andrews. 

16. Thomas Gannon and Sarah Harper. 

17. Thomas Pearson and Peggy Lane. 

23. James "Webber and Mary Farrowfield. 

24. Owen Boon and Elizabeth Robinson. 

27. Cornelius Towers and Elizabeth Carmine. 
" Nathan Bourke and Sarah Noling. 

November 5. Edward Swift and Hannah Boon. 
13. Thomas Bartlett and Biddy Prince. 
19. "William Black and Elizabeth Lyon. 

28. "William Harris and Elizabeth Carter. 
December 4. John Towers and Elizabeth Stubbs. 

6. Thomas Jewell and Terressa Jester. 

18. Samuel Culbreth and Susannah Smothers. 

19. James Ward and Lucretia Dawson. 

19. James Breeding and Anna Gibson. 

20. James Hunter and Deborah Harvey. 
26. John Gary and Hester Whitby. 

28. Thomas Bartlete and Mary Eaton. 
31. James Jones and Rachel Clarke. 

1799. 

January 4. Peter Jump and Mary Jump. 

" John Lane and Elizabeth Manship. 
" Thomas "Withgatt and Elizabeth Orem. 
8. William Young and Henrietta Montigue. 

Andrew Beachamp and Fanny Eaton. 

Isaac Lee and Ann Stidham. 

15. John Knots and Cynthia Gouty. 

" "William A. Cooper and Ann George. 

16. Thomas Kidd and Lydia Manship. 

22. James Hubbard and Charlotte Breeding. 



344 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177 -18 15. 

January 22. Thomas Wing and Sarah Duhadaway. 

" Jesse Turner and Elizabeth Ewing. 
23. James Harrison and Alice Delahay. 

William Emerson and Dorothy Waddell. 
28. Solomon Minner and Rebecca Herd. 
John Richardson and Susan Ewing. 
February 1. William Gray and Nancy Jump. 
" Moses Cohe and Sarah Maltee. 
4. William Manship and Nancy Thorp. 
6. Arthur Travers and Nancy Rich. 

11. James Barwick and Nancy Roe. 
13. Thos. Hardcastle and Sarah Pearce. 
19. Wm. Satterfield and Elizabeth Mark. 

" Andrew Peters and Mary Ann Breeding. 

26. James Price and Ann Kenton. 
William B. Whitby and Sarah Boon. 

March 6. William Loftas and Elizabeth Mounticue. 

12. Isaac Chance and Sarah Chance. 
Flemming and Araminta Willis. 

13. Nathan Russell and Nancy Sparkes. 
21. George Price and Nancy Dwiggins. 

27. James Russum and Deborah Plummer. 
April 9. Edward Fountain and Fanny Bent. 

19. Sewell Handy and Harriott Hutchings. 
23. William Bradley and Esther Cooper. 
30. Robert Marshall and Nancy Cohee. 

May 13. Solomon Bartlett and Mary Nunam. 
June 1. Joseph Price and Sarah Bordley. 
21. John Blunt and Sarah Malony. 

25. Zebulon Hopkins and Sarah Barwick. 

26. William Hopkins and Anna Lyden. 

27. John Eagle and Sarah Townsend. 
July 4. Turburt Kern and Hester Hynson. 

20. Clemont Wheelen and Peggy Starky. 

26. James Corrie and Mary Downes. 

27. Edgar Andrew and Anna Wright. 
August 4. Edward Barwick and Sarah Jump. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774.-1815. 345 

August 14. Benjamin Roe and Betsy Bodfield. 
26. Robert Peters and Tamsey Eaton. 
" Richard Lyden and Betsey Fountain. 
September 3. James Stevans and Mary Dillon. 

24. Zebedee Whiteley and Esther Wright. 
" William Lucas and Sarah Hubbard. 
26. Anderton Carmine and Elizabeth Fisher. 

October 2. John Russam and Ann . 

17. John Smoot and Elizabeth Douglass. 
21. John Moore and Sarah Fleharty. 
November 7. John M. Beath and Elizabeth Whiteley. 

9. Emory Sylvester and Tilly Blunt. 
December 2. Francis Mastin and Rebecca Farrele. 
3. Nicholas Stubbs and Nancy Pattison. 
10. James Thowley and Mary Porter. 
12. Joseph Cromean and Polly Malcom. 

16. Cain Andrew and Sarah Willis. 

17. Elijah Strodley and Lydia Minner. 
23. Solomon Swanu and Sarah Teat. 

Jabez Caldwell and Sarah Hardcastle. 
Thomas Saulsbury and Nancy Downes. 

(To be continued.) 



346 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



s 

o3 
O 



d" 

w 

PH 

i 

i 
W 

PH 

^ 
O 

S 

O 
PH 



Philadelp 



PH 

1 



PH 



a 



PH 



g 



M o 

EH 2, 





03 



cS 

3 






03 




oS 








DO 




rPn 


o< 


3 




2 




oS 




.2 ^ 


Joseph Pennell 
Charles Moore 


both of Philade 
George Gibson 


Thomas Whitlock 
both of Philade 


James Mease 
Matthew Mease 


John Mease 
William Miller 


all of Philadelp 
Thomas Rodgers 


Thomas Wharton 


Anthony Stocker 
all of Philadelp 


8 

"bfl 
G 
M < 

13 
d 
S 

S3 
00 


'3 

g 

bO ^ 

o 'o 

ll 

"S 


8 

q 

CD 

a, 
c 




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1 s 

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s o 

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I- 8 

HS 






















G 




d 


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cS 

a 


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o 








2 










1 




j_^ 


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bo 











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2 




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H3 






p 




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3 




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1 I 




s 




'a! 


a 




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a 






a 




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a 


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3 

G 
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o 



W 



G 
03 

fc 



o 

1 



G 

i 
I 

G 
DQ 



CC 

Q 



G 
^ 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 347 



<N 



O 
t- 



-a 

.1-1 O> 

P TJ 

& i 

^ fi 



bO O 

S 13 
S 



a 



pq 



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H ^ 



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La <u ^3 o 

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H> O W s 

T3 -S nt) o "^ 

oj OQ oj > 

^ . ^3 ^5 P: 

-a q ^ ^ w 

PH g PH P" cs 

5 ^ S | 

^ J 

! 1-5 H 






s 







s 
S 

03 
O2 



c 

1 

a 
& 

s 






2 



CQ 



cc 

S3 

p 


I 



o 

a 

i 

ft 
s 



OS 



CQ 



PQ 



j^ 

i-s 



(M 
>^ 



ti 

s 



<M 

bb 



tub 
3 

<j 



CC 



348 Skip Registers far the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



30 



IA, 1726-1775. Continued. 


JTfere&tittt 
Kingston, Province 
Massachusetts Bay 
Salem, New Jersey 

>hia 
Pennsylvania 


^ 

1 
5z; 

CM 
O 



Q 
B 

I 

.2 
A 


Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 


M 


HM 


P< 






PHILADELP] 


Oj - "^ ** 

i 1.113 -S 

1 ? - ^ -=> 

3aBa> r p)L,rpk^W 

*lwl 

I'llHl 


J^ 


S 'w 


1 


fc 


W CO H W 


W 


4$ 


P) 













S 


o S 






1 


o 


g 




rt 


u 




M ns g 


T3 


. ^H 


rt 






a 

03 


1 

c3 


S 


W 


I 1 ^ 

* ^ a 


W 


S 


3 


^ 


>> g 

a S s 


[3 

S 


"13 

55 


^= 


1 


S J S 

W H ^ 


S 


CQ 


I 



Philadelph 



H a 

- 



2 
2 
& 



e 



.2 

lllllf 
s S s .s a I 

a ^H *-! fe -^ 

1 1 i-s 
1| 1^1 

Hj H CQ <J 



1 -S 



- 

OQ 






-c 

K 



1 



,0 

GO 



8 
o 



OQ 



c 





CQ 
oo 



PQ 

D 



. 
4 
CQ 



OQ 



* 

1 



"S 
O 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 349 






l 
5 

"2 

I 


QQ 



O 




00 

g^l 




^_4 


o t~ 

CO CO 


S 


10 
<M 






tl_ 1 


CM i 


lM 




2 


3 O 03 


03 


O 




K 


,fij 


J 






if 


03 > Q 


^> 


<O >t 




i 


OQ d 





I A 


Philadelphia 


ll 
|.a 


^! 00 
^ 

V 

<<-i - 73 

|5. J 
9 ** Cj 

> no ^D 

9 -dj ,, 

fl JS -3 2 

1 1 1 1 I 

oo J.H ^ ? 

^ 


Wilmington, Co 
New Castle o 


ware 
Hanover, Provi 
Massachusetts 




1 










*QQ 

55 




1 






2 ^ 


d 

03 


c, 1 ^ 




Peter Long 
both of Virginia 
Peter Chevalier 
John Chevalier 


both of Philadelp 
Edward Forrest 
a British subject 


j2 .2 m 
S p^ *i-| 

a 3 .2 ^ a J41 

'Sx^ ..M o3 oj Q_2rhts 

Jfi-g^-asl^SH 
3^0 JS3i.ll 

^"S"! o go | 

513 


William Pyle 
all of Wilmingtoi 
Jonathan Eumford, 
of Wilmington 


Charles Jenkins 






p. 




ofi 


OQ 




o 


. 


a 


.S 


8 


S 


a .9 




M 


1 


3 


o ^ 

S 


i 


1 


a 


8 


-s ^f 


3 




m 


Bj 


d 


.2 A 


1 


B 


3jj 





9 





a 


& 


H 


1 1 


S 


6 


E 

V 


1 















a 




2 


rt 





B 










S 


^ 


5^ 






S 




-3 


o 


d 




h 




i 







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d 
o 
o 


s 


1 


1 


1 1 


o 

n 




Eo 


CO 


^ 


co \a 


00 


t. 


<M 




N 






4 


15 


-g 13 


1 


o 


o 





O O 


c 


fc 



350 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



[A, 1726-1775. Continued. 


TFAre 6wi Ton* 

Colony of Ehode Island 80 






co 

a 
I 

a> 
fc 


hia 

Gloucester, New Jersey 100 


.2 
13 


the King- 
Philadelphia 40 
hia 


M 

3 
rt 
<u 

T3 




Philadelphia 150 






M 








PH 




d ^ S? 


5 








S 


F PHILADELP: 


Owners 
Matthias Aspden 


of Philadelphia 


Thomas Penrose 
Isaac Penrose 


both of Philade 
John McNeile 


John Tolbert 
both of Philade 
John McAllister 


of Bally Castle i 
dom of Irelac 
Daniel Eobinson 
Joseph Blewer 
both of Philade 


5 

M 
o 
ri 

03 

M 

^ 

'S 
'3 

03 

ft 


of S Carolina 


Donald Malcom 


Edward Nivinson 


both of the Isl 
Jamaica 
Samuel Howell 
of Philadelphia 


o 
























H 



























0> 






g 
















PH 


ff T3 







o 




<o 












W 

W 


5 TJ 

s ? 




1 


"e3 

a 




s 






1 






H 







e 

bfl 


8 




A 






IB 






tf 


J 




<u 


1 




i 






rO 






g 


O 




o 


"* 




Hj 










"" 


1 


















3 






^H 








.S 
















OQ 






'O 


'<-[ 




p | 






^ 




' 


1 


4j 




a 
a 


J& 




2 






fcfi 








S 




o 


'w 




i 






~ 






* 


* -a 

03 




1- 

c 

O 


1 




1 






1 






3 

02 


13 




** 

*n 


13 




S 






^3 








GO 




CQ 


02 




PQ 






02 







o 

^ 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 351 



02 



OS 

a 



Pi 



00 Ss 
<-. 3 
& 



2* 



c 

Hj . 

I a 



OH 

13 



2 

I "2 



S3 3 <Jj 

fjjlii 

O W H J rt tC x 

^ 15*5? 
tl'-ttvlJ 

II 1 '^ I o 
<1 CQ 3 P3 



C 



bO oJ S 

3 ^ -fl 

Oi P* 

Q -^ 

^ S rS 



- * JS 

t? 3 3 9 .2 



a 6 ^ 



S^gw 



M 



f 



^P 





S - 

Hj 



3 

j P^ 
oj *., 
O o 



oj 

.3 fl a 

"S =* " 

^ ^ 1 c 

,so||| 
^ a PI ^ g 

g< '3 %_ 'TJ O 

i i j^ 

r" 'S> 3 rfl 



C 
B 



o O O 

a a 



3 

a 


W 



W 

a 
^ 
o 



o 

o 
S 



B 

Q 



O 



d 
O 
o 



I 



oj 
02 

g 

E 

> 9 

o 



02 



"bo 

c 

M 



t 

CQ 
O 



352 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 





e 




u5 




O 


o 








5 * 




l-H 







w 








e- 1-1 


i 1 






fl 


rH 








4| 




S3 


















i i 












^ 


1 tf? 




a 












s 


O o 
















8 

s 

g 


*> Cu 


.5 

* <^ 







5 


03 

3 






a 
i 


-1 s 


S 'I 

9] 


a r 

44 




3 1 
*3 


PH 

1 






o 
t^ 
t 


r 


Oj i i 

S 


d 
6 

M 




AH 


S 

AH 






^H 
<i 




&0 








T3 






(M 




.S 








1 






I-H 


o 


"i 








E 






F PHILADELPHIA, 


O 
=8 

-2 

S ,o 

i U 

1 .9 1 
S ^p^ 

W 
<u 2 
So 9 

J^ 
og 


British merchants r< 
at Eotterdam 
Robert Morris 
Thomas Willing 
both of Philadelphia 
Thomas Arnott 
Joseph Huddle 
Philip Moore 


04 

03 
111 


^ 

a 




<- 
G 

CD 


"o 


James Thompson 
Andrew Gregg 
William McKean 


all of Londonderry, ] 
Andrew Caldwell 
of Philadelphia 
James Blair 


George Fullerton 


both of Philadelphia 


O 


















s 










T3 


d 


















o 


i 






AH 

W 

W 


h i 

I 


o 

8 


S 




1 




3 
N 






H 
1 


a 

o 
M 

H 


1 


ID 

I 






1 


d 

S 






03 






K 












W 






S 






QJO 






H 




.3 









tU) 






a 




1 








S 






H 


1 


g, 


I 













P5 




a 


el 







fc. 








A 


r- -h> 







fl 


Ji 






HH 


i 





Q 




V 


M 






W 


&i 


P< * 






&l 


&i 






02 


Id 


AH 






IS 


i 








02 


02 


Eo 




02 


02 








t. 


t- 


o> 




j.. 


(M 










TH 


r-( 




> i 


C^ 








g 


















55 8 





g 




j| 


g 








Q 


Q 


Q 




p 


P 







SMp Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 353 



O 00 

CO <M CO 



O 

os 



t^ 

O < !> 

00 



.2 



Q fc Q 



PH 



PH 



03 



j S E j 

b> " c3 " ~ 



o> ID 

T3 S T3 

03 a) oj 

3 fl fe i 

' 3 

PH 



I s i 

< -^ 

8 o .o 

H PH 



4 

<U 
g 



a 

OH 

-i 

O) CS 

B fe ^3 
IP 

^^ 

ill 

l-s^ 

fi <J 



a 
o 
02 

=8 
.2 8 

*:! 

^^35- 

r3 n3 M 
M o3 S3 
^ ^3 PH 

CD ,4 

s * 1 

&H 1 

i 



S^ o 



c3 
| 

"13 



BN s 

3 s fr 



^s 



02 



b^ 

*"* *^ -- 

" g^ 

_ t-c 'TJ 

IHl 

^ a 



S * fl 

-^ x> > -S 



31 



(C 



O 
o o d 

,*EW 

e 



PH 



o J^ 



O 



_ M 
o o 

1-9 Hi 



a os 

1-9 PH 



I 



a 
'I 



3 
o 



PH 






J3 

I 1 

r^ S 

^ 02 



i 

C3 

I 



w 

c 

^3 
S 



! 



I 



O 

PH 






02 02 PH 



I 



'C 
PH 



1 



02 



3 



o o o 

P O <U 0) 

P Q Q 

VOL. xxviii. 23 



id 



I I 



354 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 







O 




10 


o 


10 




W5 


o 


o 


o 






O 




04 


OS 


* 




CO 


OS 


rH 


(N 














IM 

























































44 


J4 














S 


>> 






h 
O 


h 











e 

53 




.9 


oj 

W 






>H 


tH 


-3 










1 




P 


5 






1 


^ 

0) 


1 

6 


1 
fe 


T5 


'S 3 

W 




c* 

f o3 
Q 

d 
o 




g 
a 

.9 


PH 

a~ 

05 

_Q 


-*-* 



O3 

^ 



rt 


- 
O 

1 


2 
12 

OH 
'S 
^ 




* 

m 

Q 

a 


K 

IM 
o 

V 

E 
PI 


1 

irf 

t~ 
t^ 




1 

}Zi 




E 

1 


'53 

1 

0) 

W 


I 

s 


1 


a 
a 

c3 





PH 


'? 
2 

PH 


| 

i 


2 
























C4 
























t- 
t-i 
























3 












4 












F PHILADELPH 


Owners 
John Slayton 
Terence Fitzpatrick 
both of Halifax 


John Mullowny 
Purnell Johnston 


C$ 

.2 
1 
a 

ll 

9 "- 
- 

1-5 


^ i 

O ^Pn 
fl 1 ^J ^1 g 

ll Ilil i 

1 "1 J % fi S i 

6 ^iaS:^ 
illllli 

to *C "i "- 1 55 w >i-c 

& ^ 




Reese Meredith 
of Philadelphia 


Thomas Lake 
of Philadelphia 


Charles Hart 
of Philadelphia 


John Grigg 
of Connecticut 



























H 





























>. 

d 




a 
3 

m 


5 






02 

a 

.2 


0) 

3 






PH 


i 


1 




A 


j& 

^ 


rix 









5 





W 
W 
H 

PH 

g 


i 


3 
S 
a 

1 




O 

H 

'S 

o 

*H 

S3 

PH 




2 

9 

1 
1 




Samuel W: 


William G 


Charles Hi 


1 
| 

(O 

M 


CO 




















b 




PG 


















t 







W 




ha 




i i 


fl 








" 


"OT 




1 

o 


^2 


n 
1 




"a? 
| 


i 






e 
6 




-d 

(I) 


s 

bo 


K 


H 


1 


^ 




PH 


8 


^ 




M 


CO 




^ 




1 


O 




CO 


* 


9 




O 




M 


CO 


PH 




3 




* 

a 





rj d> 

O * 


4 




fl 


1 


1 












a 





O 


pL| 







_ 





o 


CO 




o 

,a 


& 


O 


r^pi 


O 




1 


.P 


I 


o 

^4 








02 




1 


PH 


53 




o 
CO 


M 


8 


9 
CO 






CO 




00 


eo 


OS 




t- 


cq 


c5 


^ 




^ 








^ 


o ^ 


>-H 


,d 


^ 


^ 






^ 








y 


^ cj 


f^. 

^N. 


g 


QJ 


j3 


:3 







G 







c 


^ eS 






S3 


| 


PH 






i-s 






^ 


m 




S 


^ 


S 


<< 



^> Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 355 




r!- 



03 S 

1 I 

-3 O 



Ph 



ph 
ohn 



a .2 


.2 ,2 ^ 'S 

0) C O> o3 

a ft ft s 

I &&g 
5 M M 

00 bfr 

a d :=5 

CD a) oS 



an 



I B 

ft ' 
ft ^ ^ 



on 
hia 



kies 
hia 



* Jw *ifll 



^ 02 







Hi Hi W W 



a <g & 

^ fw 

1=1 *H 

^3 O g ^S O 

o o o 

H O ^ 



8 il-9l 



Jeremi 
of P 



s 



o 

c 

I 



42 



e3 
P 

ft 
O 



to 

a 

g 



I 

Pi 



I 



! 



r^ 

w 

a 



Szi 
ft 



53 



Su 



O 

s 



ol 
o 

d 

o 

ft 



1 



W 
& 



ft 
CC 



CO 



O 






V 

I 

a 



d 
a *-i 
^ O 



bC 



O2 



a> 

! 
I 



ft 



U 



ft * 



356 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



2 u~ 



[726-1775. Continued. 


Where built 
Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 


Bermuda 
New York 


-s 

bfi 

C 


A Prize taken by His Maj 
Iphia esty's ship Enterprize 
New Jersey 


_. fl 

a> 

IS 2 

_> fe 


4 


f 




'S g 

SIS 
<-! 


a 


g CJ 

13 
J? Q 


F PHILADELPH] 


Owners 
James Montgomery 
of Philadelphia 
Jacob West 
of New Castle Co 


Martin West 
of Philadelphia 
Thomas Smith 
of Philadelphia 
Samuel Smith 


of London 
Richard Brew 
a British subject r 
Anamabo, in A 
James Searle 


of Philadelphia 
Robert Smith 
sail maker, of Ph 
James Latimer 


of New Port, C 
New Castle on '. 
John McCallmont 
Elias Boys 
Mess" Samuel Purvi; 















H 













P5 


o 

g 


M 




w 






JP ^ 


$} 




1 






S PI S 


r^> ** 




0) 3 




W 

B 


SI * 

to .3 


o P5 
o 




1 1 

9 




I 


"^3 

1 * 
^9 r^ 


8 ^ 

CQ 




1 1 





a 



*" rS 

PH CQ 



z 



8. 

I 

I 

CQ 



1 

s 



CQ 




Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 357 



40 



30 



o o 

Tt< 



a 

I? 
B 



Dartmouth, 

Massachu 



5 

w 



525 



OS 

a 



sS 




5 



'& I 



adelphia 



- 



9 

o 

C 
, 

sl 

1 

sj 

Is 

o o 
O fc 



c 

I. 





S:3 
^ -3 -a 

J15* 

Si*] 

H^ ^ H 



^fl - 



.a 

^ S 83 

JM 

.^*^ 



.2 
aL 



Q 

-2 

o j 



omas 
all o 



^s a 



lit 

^^ S 2 i 

^j 'O 

K aPll 

*H 3 ^ ^_ ^ m 

" 3?! s?; 
o a *s J 



- 

cc 




Ge 



-d o o 
H HS tf 









s 

1 



a 
i 
2 

PQ 



^ o 

II 



Kebecca 



OQ 
oo 



S3 
S 

I-J 



,3 
03 

a 

W 
a< 



GO 




cl 

s 



02 



I 

.s* 

03 



s 
.! 

w 

Oi - 
O bO 

,2 'S 

02 CQ 



358 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 




00 



O 
CO 



.2 

i 



8 fr 
Spl 



I fr 



Si a 

"^ .1 -3 






PH 



II 

,11 ** 



PH 






PH <u 

>, .S .2 

O> r> ^3 jfl prt 

3 S A & 

<3 ^3 si, 'w * 

g> J jg -2 

a> ^ ^3 p3 

fc W PH PH 



e 



Pledger 
Caldw 
Wills 



T3 

rt ,5 
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Aip Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 359 



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360 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 361 



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362 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



o 

03 



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Where built 
hu Ayres Kensington, Pennsylvai 
cer 


Philadelphia 
ia 


Province of Georgia 


Philadelphia 




Philadelphia 




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Massachusetts Bay 

Lynn, Province of Mass 
chusetts Bay 
Piscataqua 


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F PHILADELP 


Owners 
Mess" Emanuel & 
Samuel & Joshua 


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lilif il 

2 S ! * 5 i - 

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Henry Laurens 
of South Carolii 


William Fisher 
of Philadelphia 
Benjamin Loxley 


of Philadelphia 


Joseph Wharton, 


of Philadelphia 


Thomas Alexande: 


of Philadelphia 
George Kennedy 
William Marshall 


Joseph Donaldson 


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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 363 



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of Philadelphia 


Robert Morris 
Thomas Willing 


both of Philad 
Miles Sherbrooke 


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Peter Creighton 
Blair McClenachs 


of Philadelphi 


Samuel Jackson 
Samuel Inglis 


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Thomas Yorke 
Philip Moore 


Samuel Mifflin 
all of Philadel 


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364 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 





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F PHILADELPHIA 


Owners 

Simon Sherlock 


Edward Bingley 


Mess" Nash, Eddowes 
of London 


Conyngham & Nesbit 


Daniel Williams & So 
Miles & Wister 
Joseph Swift 
Mease & Caldwell 


Hubley & Graff 
Thomas & George Mif 
Carson & Barclay 
all of Philadelphia 
William Mitchell 


George Mead 
of Philadelphia 
Thomas Fitz Simmons 


Peter Chevalier 


of Philadelphia 
John Chevalier 


William Smith 
of Philadelphia 


O 
























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Ship Registers far the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 365 



1 



03 

3 

0, 



a 



- 



John Steinmetz 
Henry Keppele, S r 
both of Philadelphia 


John Jones 
of Philadelphia 


James Loughead 
William Duncan 


David Duncan 
both of Philadelphia 


David McCullough 
John Dickson 


3 

bS 
1 * 
& I 

" e* 

1 

OD 


Joseph Donaldson 
both of Philadelphia 


John Pringle 
Thomas Smith 


of Philadelphia 
William Hartshorn 


John Harper 
both of Philadelphia 


Moore Furman 
of Philadelphia 


William Cox 
Townsend White 



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366 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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both of Philad 
James Green 
Thomas Wiley 


Alexander Stewa 
Charles McHerri 


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Ship Registers far the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 367 



o 
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II 



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368 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



A, 1726-1775. Continued. 


TTAere&tntt 


Philadelphia 


Broadkiln on Delaw! 


1 

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5Z5 

8 

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Pennsylvania 


Kensington, Pa. 
Lna 
Pennsylvania 






Connecticut 


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w 


John Ross 
of Philadelphia 


Rouse Harrison 


Joseph Carson 
John Patterson 
both of Philade 


John Wilson 
James Ash 
of Philadelphia 
Richard Inkson 


S 3 
a S 

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^ ^ 5T* O o3 *3 
C3 "*"^ CC 7Y") O j-^i CO 

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rfl 00 .1-1 OS 'C O S 
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George Fullerton 


1 

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William Cox 
Moore Furman 


both of Philade] 
John Gensell 

























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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 369 



o 

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VOL. xxvin. 24 



bO bO 

fl fl 

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370 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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& 




William Straker 


of Philadelphia 
James Budden 


Thomas Wharton 


of Philadelphia 


Anthony Stocker 
James Grasberry 


Andrew Hodge 
Andrew May 
both of Philadel 


John Bayard 
William Coxe 
Moore Furman 


both of Philadel 
Anthony Richardsc 
of London 


James Scott 
John Watlington 






d 










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v 




















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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 371 



10 
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372 ^i> Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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Philadelphia 


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Philadelphia 




Philadelphia 


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F PHILADELPH] 


Owneri 

Samuel Fisher 
Joseph Donaldson 


John Pringle 
all of Philadelphi 


Leonard Hammond 


Thomas Denton 
Bichard Inkson 


James Ash 
all of Philadelphi 
Thomas Yorke 


of Philadelphia 
Charles Lowe 


William Harvey 


James Craig 
William Miller 


both of Philadelp 
William Morrell 


Jacob Bright 
Christopher Pechin 
both of Philadelp 


Matthias Aspden 
of Philadelphia 


O 
























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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 373 



10 

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Buchanan 
am Stewart 


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374 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



TTAere bufl 
ton, Pa, 



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Notes and Queries. 375 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 

flotes. 
LETTER OF GOVERNOR JOHN PENN. 

RAMSG ATE, Sep r 23 d 1788 

DEAR SIR 

A ship bound from Amsterdam to Philadelphia having put in here, 
from the Downs in distress, gives me an opportunity of writing you a 
few lines to ask you how you do, & I hope my letter will find you well. 
We have been here a fortnight for the sake of Sea Bathing & Peggy 
Allen who is a pretty genteel girl is with us. Mr. & Mrs. Delanoey & 
their family are here also. The view of the coast of France & the 
Downs where there are always a great many vessels, & a number con- 
tinually going to & coming from London make it veiy amusing & the 
country about Ramsgate is very pleasant where we often take airings in 
the morning & sometimes go to Margate which is only four miles from 
hence. I generally take a walk every morning to the harbour which 
puts me in mind of our travels along the wharves at Phil* & though I 
do not see quite as many sail as there, yet by turning my eye to the 
Downs I am amply rewarded by a prodigious number that lay at anchor 
there. The Island of Thanet in which this place is situated likewise 
affords great amusement for an antiquary, there being several spots in it 
famous for the battles that were fought between the Danes & Saxons & 
the remains of a Koman Castle near Sandwich about six miles from 
hence, which was the station of Julius Caesar's ships when he invaded 
Britain. But as your new Government must now take place, undoubt- 
edly your country will far surpass this, as the arts & Sciences & every- 
thing that is polite & elegant will find place amongst you & this poor 
little spot will have nothing but to envy your growing greatness ; 
though I cannot find anybody who trouble themselves much more 
about you than if you did not exist & in general it is thought America 
is no great loss to this Country. The account of your grand Procession 
headed by Major Pancake afforded matter of ridicule & Laughter to 
many people in this small though great Island & notwithstanding you 
are so very high there I find you are considered in a very low light 
here. However I wish the country well & shall be happy to hear of 
the good effects this new Plan of Government may produce amongst 
you & if by this means you can place men of honor & sense at the head 
of your particular Governments, you may in time retrieve your lost 
credit & reputation in Europe, which I am sorry to say is at present 
very low indeed. Mrs. Penn has just received a letter from Peggy 
which she will answer soon & begs her love to her & all the family. I 
beg also to be remembered to all the family and am 

Dear Sir 

Yours affectionately 

JOHN PENN 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL CULBERTSON, 1776. Among the Family Papers 
of Mr. Samuel Rea is the following bill of his great-grandfather, Cap- 



376 Notes and Queries. 

tain Samuel Culbertson, of Fifth Battalion Cumberland County Associ- 
ators, Colonel James Armstrong : 



THE HoNBi'E CONTINENTAL CONGRESS 
' To RICH JACOBS, Dr. 

To 44 meals Dyet for my Company of the fifth 
Battalion of malitia off Cumberland County, on 
their march To Trenton certified $ 

SAM L CULBERTSON, Capt. 

ROBERT BELL'S BOOK-STORE was located at the southeast corner ot 
Third and Pear Streets. The building was taken down in 1842. It 
had formerly been occupied by the Union Library Company. Bell was 
a Scotchman, sold books and held book auctions ; he also kept a circu- 
lating library, "where sentimentalists, whether ladies or gentlemen 
may become readers by subscribing for one month, or three months, 
or by agreement for a single book." On his sign he announced "Jew- 
els and Diamonds for Sentimentalists." The building later came into 
possession of the Corporation of Christ Church, and was occupied for 
school purposes. X. 

THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA. The frontispiece 
of the present number of THE PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE or HISTORY 
AND BIOGRAPHY represents the "Assembly Hall" of The Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania just before the improvements now in progress 
were commenced. 

On Tuesday afternoon May 24, 1904, his Excellency S. W. Penny- 
packer, Governor of the Commonwealth and President of The Historical 
Society, in the presence of a large number of ladies and gentlemen, 
members of the Society and invited guests, broke ground for the new 
fire-proof building of the Society. Hon. Wayne McVeagh, ex- United 
States Attorney-General, acted as chairman, and Hon. John Weaver, 
Mayor of Philadelphia, Major W. H. Lambert, and William Drayton, 
Esq., made remarks. At the conclusion of the ceremonies a luncheon 
was served. The Building Committee consists of John F. Lewis, Esq., 
Chairman, Hon. S. W. Pennypacker, Hon. James T. Mitchell, Colonel 
William Brooke Rawle, Major W. H. Lambert, Colonel John P. Nich- 
olson, Edward Robins, and William Drayton. 

LETTER OF COLONEL RICHARD BUTLER, OF THE PENNSYLVANIA 
LINE. The original of the following interesting letter is in the 
Archive Department of the State Library, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania : 

CAMP VALLEY FORGE, 26th. March 1778. 

SIR 

It is with pain I sit down to address your Excellency at a time that I 
am Sencible your mind is taken up in the many Calls of Your Country 
that demand your Care & Particular Attention but I think I should be 
wanting in the trust you have reposed in me, were I to neglect leting 
you know the wants of the Regt. I have the honr. to Command in the 
Service of ye States ; I find Sir that the men are good and Can be much 
depended on as brave Soldiers, and that nothing but their Naked Sittu- 



Notes and Queries. 377 

ation induces any of them to Leave me, the want of Cloathing is the 
first thing that makes A Soldier think little of himself, the want of Pay, 
& Provissions Irregularly serv'd. will make him Uneasy, but that is not 
the Case with these, (they are well paid & fed,) therefore I think had I 
Cloathing for them I would Venture to Vouch for their Conduct both 
as to their bravery & fidelity, and am Certain it would be very Condu- 
cive to their health. I am Sorry to Inform your Excellency that there 
has not been A blanket to five men through the whole winter, and the 
Chief of them but one Shirt, and many none, (Indeed I may almost say 
with Sir John Falstaff one & a half to A Compy.) this your Excellency 
may depend is the case, but I will do my Endeavour to keep them to- 
gether, and nurse them as well as I Can, in hopes your Excellency and 
the Supreme Council will afford me Relief as soon as Possible, Shall 
hope the honor of a line on the Subject as it will give great weight to 
my Assertions of speedy Relief 

I Remain With the Most Profound Respect 

Your Excellencys most Obedt. & very Humble 
Servt. 

RICHD. BUTLER Col 9th. P. Regt. 

His EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR WHARTON. 



ROBERT PROUD, THE TUTOR AND HISTOBIAN. The following bio- 
graphical notes of Robert Proud, the author of "History of Pennsylva- 
nia," are extracted from the Bucks County Patriot of 1826 : 

4 ' Robert Proud I was well acquainted with, for more than the last 
thirty years of his life ; and am, perhaps, one of the only persons now 
living to whom he related his biography. He was a large, majestic 
English gentleman, always neatly dressed in their mode : he wore a 
large grey wig, and a hat half sprung. He had received a collegiate 
education in the languages, mathematics and medicine, and began life 
with flattering expectations. But, as he expressed it, the wind always 
blew in his face that he failed in business and was disappointed in 
love. Mortified, he determined to turn his back upon the world, and 
having but his learning to depend on for bread, and always of a serious 
turn of mind, he resolved to join the Quakers and emigrate to Penn- 
sylvania. In Philadelphia, for thirty years, he taught in the Friends' 
Latin and Greek School. From old wounds learning to guard against 
the shafts of Cupid, he never married. . . . 

" Robert Proud was supposed to have injured his health by too sed- 
entary a life in his school and collecting the material for his history. 
He was advised to resign his school and take more exercise and fresh 
air, and his history was written after life declined. ..." 



PRIVATE THOMAS BOYD'S ACCOUNT OF HIS SUFFERINGS WHILE 
A PRISONER OF WAR IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 1776. Boyd 
enlisted in the company of Captain Gilbert Gibbs (William Wallace 
was then second lieutenant), Eighth Battalion Chester County Asso- 
ciators, Colonel Patterson Bell, and was captured at Fort Washington. 
The original manuscript, in the handwriting of Rev. John Carmichael, 
was presented to The Historical Society of Pennsylvania by Simon 
Gratz, Esq. 



378 Notes and Queries. 

Thomas Boyd of the Township of West Cain in the County of 
Chester in Pennsylvania, Freeholder, having from a Sincere regard to 
the interest of America entered himself a private Soldier in Captain 
Wallace's Company of the Flying Camp and having the misfortune of 
being made a prisoner with the rest of our Troops that were taken at Fort 
Washington ; & being now called to evidence on Solemn oath what 
treatment he & the rest of his fellow prisoners received from the Enemy 
while in their power in New York doth say as folio weth. 

That early on the fatal Saturday they were taken prisoners they eat 
their Breakfast and from that time until the Tuesday following about 
eleven o'clock A.M. neither himself or any of his fellow prisoners to 
his knowledge received the least crum of any kind of sort to put in their 
mouths from the Enemy. That they were of prisoners put in one 
Church, to the best of his Judgment between Six & Seven hundred ; that 
at the time above said they received three Days Rations their bread 
was in his opinion the dirty crumbs & Sweepings of old mouldy biscuits ; 
about three pints of which, or six biscuits if they received their bread 
in whole biscuits with about four ounces of beef or pork a pint of 
good peas, one ounce of butter a gill of rice this was their Starving 
all of allowances per man for three days that once they were served 
with good biscuit and once with good loaf to raise their apitite to Starve 
with the keener sensation of hunger that they were obliged to do with 
their wretched allowance four days instead of three, being always cheated 
one day of any rations each time. That when in this Starving condi- 
tion they were allowed no Straw or hay to lay on or any fuel to warm 
them or cook their meat, but one cart load of wood per week for them 
all. That the English officers Sensible of our extreme necessity came 
into the Church to 'list such as Soldiers into bloody Howe's barbarous 
Army. 

But the officers of the Tyrant not meeting with the success they ex- 
pected their after usage if possible was more barbarous. That for using 
some boards of the floor of the Church for fuel they were barbarously 
flogged, that to increase their wretchedness they were not allowed a 
proper place to ease nature that now the officers as before read Howe's 
proclimation preferred pardon & protection and ready money to 'list in 
their diabolical Service. We were vexed to see any so dastardly as to 
accept the offer as some mean Souls did, but thanks to Heaven the bulk 
of us chose to perish rather than prostitute our conscience in the Service 
of the Emissary of the Prince of Darkness. 

That now the prisoners dying in great numbers every day and a 
certain Sergeant of the English Army coming to take every morning 
the number of the dead the past 24 hours would as the number was 
given reply very cheerfully, "Very well, good riddance of so many 
Rebels hoped in that manner to be soon rid of them." That some 
were carried away, and one in particular thrown with the dead in the 
pit before he was dead. 

This Deponent firmly believes that as they were put into that Church 
in the same wretched Situation they were taken prisoners without their 
blankets or any part of their baggage or clothes or linens to change 
them, and then meeting such unheard of barbarous usage, those who 
died there and since, which is alas the most of them perished with cold 
and hunger. 



Notes and Queries. 379 

LETTER OF KEY. FRANCIS ALISON, 1776. 

PHILAD A August y 20, 1776. 
COZEN KOBERT 

I received yours dated at Ty July y e 30 th by Dr. Stringer, but had not 
y e pleasure of yours of y e fourth of July by Lieutenent Bartielson, nor 
do I know where he lives. I was from y e first to y e fourteenth of August 
in New London, y r mother & brother & friends there are all well ; she 
lives where you left her, & they are provided pretty well in hay for their 
Cattle this approaching winter. Benjamin must be with you before 
this conies to hand, as he is appointed Surgeon [torn] Battalion & 
Frank is now with a Battalion of the Militia from New London porn] 
their Physician & Surgeon, & lies at y e new blazing star at Staten 
Island, [torn] sent you a News paper, but the news are hurdly worth 
y r notice, they are [torn] changing, & still fresh news destroy y e taste of 
what we had last. We have a Conv[en]tion of about 90 persons elected 
out of every county in y e Province to form a new constitution. They 
have formd a bill of Eights ; that is in y e main pretty well ; but they 
seem hardly equal to y e Task to form a new plan of Government. 
Nothing is yet determin'd finally, but the assembly is to make all laws 
without any check from y e Governor & counsel ; They propose to have 
a Counsil to be chosen yearly and a Governor or a president, who shall 
execute the laws and appoint all officers, magistrates, Judges &c, & 
these shall continue no longer than five years without a new appoint- 
ment ; These are some of the outlines, & some are for laying aside all 
our present laws, & making a few plain simple easy ones ; others are for 
keeping the present laws, with some alterations ; They are mostly 
honest well meaning Country men, who are employed ; but intirely un- 
acquainted with such high matters. Our fears & prayers & our whole 
attention is to our army at New York. The Militia of this Province & 
Maryland are marching well armd, & with great spirits to New York, 
& Jersey ; but are raw & undisciplined, & too rash & self confident, & 
secure, for which I fear that they will suffer. 

I am sorry for y r hard campaine, but hope y* you will wether it, & y r 
Military skill & reputation will rise in proportion to y r dangers & suffer- 
ings. I am glad y* you were advanced to be a lieutenant, & would 
rejoice to hear y* you were a Cap* if I can serve you this way, depend 
on it. I do not expect y* you can be recalled till y r time be up, & if after 
this, if you can serve to advantage elsewhere, I wish you would do it. 
You will now get fresh provisions & better fare & I hope [torn] all 
recover your health & spirits. Blaney Alison is mate in a [torn] ; & 
John Alison y r Uncle John's son is gone in a Maryland Battalion, [torn] 
York, so that many of my friends are in y e contest, I pray God to pre- 
serve [torn] Your aunt & cousins Join in love to you, which please to 
accept from y r friend & Uncle 

FRA: ALISON. 

SOCIETY OF UNITED BOWMEN. The United States Gazette of Sep- 
tember 10, 1835, contains the following account of an anniversary cele- 
bration by the United Bowmen : 

Yesterday was the anniversary of the company of "UNITED BOW- 
MEN," which holds its charter from the ancient company in England, 
that traces its line of existence almost to the merry days of the hero of 
Sherwood forest. 



380 Notes and Queries. 

According to the custom of the company, cards of invitation were 
issued, and between 3 and 4 o'clock, the guests assembled to the number 
of about twelve hundred, at the elegant seat of Mr. NORRIS, on Turner's 
Lane. Nearly two hundred carriages were ranged along the lane, and 
in the extensive avenue to the mansion. 

From the east side of the extensive lawn in front of the house, was 
separated by extended lines, an area about fifty yards wide by one hun- 
dred and twenty long, for the exercises of the Bowmen. Midway on 
the east side of the area, was erected a very handsome marquee, in which 
was Johnson's admirable band of music. Opposite that tent, on the 
west side of the area, was a table most tastefully decorated, upon which 
were placed the premiums ; and without the line, on the north and the 
west side, were seats for the ladies, who watched with earnestness the 
movements of the archers. Among the company were representations 
of all the liberal professions, and all classes of citizens who had leisure 
and taste for such enjoyment. Some of the young ladies and gentlemen 
kindly gave up their places of advantage to their seniors, and we wished 
them pleasant strolls as they paired off along the delightful walks of the 
place. How thoughtful thus to give place to the old. 

The gentlemen of the Company wore their uniform, which consisted 
of green frock coats, trimmed with gold, with an arrow on their collars, 
white pantaloons and green caps ; pendant to a black leathern girdle 
were the appliances of their craft. Their bows were truly beautiful, 
and the arrows were of the most approved shape and finish. The targets 
were placed near each extremity of the area, the sporting distance being 
eighty yards. The company was divided into two classes each class 
was ranged near its own target, and one member of each stepped for- 
ward, and both discharged their arrows at the opposite targets ; these 
then stepped aside and another two came forward and thus till all had 
discharged their arrows. Near each target shot at stood a neatly dressed 
lad, with silk flags in his hat, and as an arrow struck the target, he 
waved a flag of the color of the circle hit. The bowmen would march, 
to the sound of music, in file to the opposite extremity, gather up their 
arrows, and the captain of the target, Mr. Krumbhaar, mark upon a 
card the number which the members had gained. The centre, or gold 
spot counting nine and each ring counting two less, as one receded from 
the centre. The two lads, with their flags, moved always towards the 
target opposite the bowmen. Whenever an arrow struck the centre or 
gold spot, the band gave a flourish with their trumpets. 

As time for closing the contest drew near, it was evident that the 
ladies had taken an interest in the proceedings, and they were anxious 
to learn the result to know who were to receive the splendid premiums. 
The contest was close, and the difference between the few who gained 
and the many who missed, was very small. 

The first premium was the companies' "bowl" a massive silver 
vessel, weighing 150 ounces, bearing various devices and inscriptions, 
and receiving from each yearly holder some additional ornament. This 
is held for one year only. The other premiums are retained by the 
winners. 

The second premium was a handsome silver arrow, to bear the winner's 
name, date, and the inscription, SECUNDUS HOC CONTENTUS ABITO. 

The third motto [sic] was a handsome silver wassail cup, the stem 
representing a quiver. 



Notes and Queries. 381 

When the tally card was reckoned up, the premiums were thus 
awarded by the captain of the target, with a suitable address. 

FIRST PREMIUM, the Company's bowl, to FRANKLIN PEALE 37 
shots, counting 144. 

SECOND PREMIUM to S. P. GRIFFITTS, JR. 33 shots, counting 129. 

THIRD PREMIUM to W. H. W. DARLEY. This premium is given 
for the arrow placed nearest to the centre of the target without any 
reference to the number previously gained. It was obtained by Mr. D, 
at the last shot in the afternoon. 

The company was delighted with the place and the means of enjoy- 
ment ; and when some observed, that in a single round there had been 
several misses, we heard a young lady archly observe, that there were 
more "misses" than hits. She did less than justice to the fair part of 
the company. We are too old to talk about such things, but we have 
good reason to believe that the united company were not the only bow- 
men of the afternoon. 

We are sure that we express the feelings of the very numerous and 
highly respectable guests, when we refer with grateful pleasure to the 
liberal courtesy of the United Bowmen, and to their arrangements for 
the entire accommodation of those who witnessed their elegant and 
healthful exercises. 

EXTRACTS FROM THE ORDERLY-BOOK OF LIEUTENANT WILLIAM 
TORRY, SECOND MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY, 1779. Captain A. A. 
Folsom, of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, 
Massachusetts, contributes the following Orders relative to Pennsylvania 
officers, extracted from the Orderly-Book of Lieutenant Torry. William 
Torry was born October 30, 1751, at Plymouth, and died October 22, 
1828, at Hanover. Twenty-three of his Orderly-Books, when he was 
adjutant of the Second Massachusetts Infantry, have been preserved, 
and are owned by his grandson Benjamin B. Torry, of Boston. 

HEAD QUARTERS Sept. 21" 1779. 

The General C. Martial whereof Colonel Putnam is President is 
dissolved & another Ordered to set tomorrow morn'g Nine O Clock, for 
the Tryal of all Persons that shall be brought before them. Colo. Brad- 
ford to Preside. Pens* Connecticut and Mary d Line give each a Lieut. 
Colo, or Major and two Captains, and the Garrison three Cap u for 
Members. 

At the G. C. Martial whereof Colo. Putnam was President Colo. 
Bich d Butler was Try'd upon the following charges. I 1 ' for Endeavor- 
ing to Excite the Soldiers of Cap* Ashmead's Compr to Mutiny by 
ordering the Non Com 4 officers Not to obey any Orders of his (Cap* 
Ashmead's) 2 d for treating Cap* Ashmead in an unprecedented and un- 
officer-like Manner by refusing him Liberty to wait on Gen 1 Wayne to 
complain of 111 treatment, and seek redress, and sending him under 
Guard, from the Light Inf y Camp to West Point, after having received 
Colo. Stewart's Orders, to go to the Light Inf y and take the Com d of his 
(Capt. Ashmead's) Company. 

The Court are of Opinion that Colo. Butler is Not Guilty of the first 
Charge, they do acquit him of refusing Cap* Ashmead Liberty to wait 
on Gen 1 Wayne, to complain of 111 treatment, and seek redress. They 
are of opinion that Colo. Butler, was not Justifiable in sending Cap* 



382 Notes and Queries. 

Ashmead from the Light Inf y to West Point, being a breach of Article 
5 th Section 18 th of the Articles of War, and do Sentence Him to be rep- 
remanded by the Comd 8 Officer of the Light Infantry. 

The Command 1 " in Chief approves the Sentence, and directs it to be 
carried into Execution, at the same time he thinks Colo. Butler's 
conduct Blameable in not admitting Capt. Ashmead to see Gen 1 Wayne, 
unless he would engage to comply with a condition, which Colo. Butler 
had the Right to annex. Nor was there any Need of such a Condition, 
as there were always Proper means of enforcing discipline, if Cap* 
Ashmead after applying to Gen 1 Wayne had Persisted in refractory Be- 
haviour to Prevent any misunderstanding in future. 

HEAD QUARTERS, 18 th Oct. 1779. 

Parole, Sullivan. C Sign, Success Seneca. 

Brigadier tomorrow, Gen. Irvine. 

The Commander in Chief is Happy in the Opportunity of Congratu- 
lating the Army, on the further Success, by advices just received. Col 
Broadhead with the Continental Troops under his command, and a body 
of Militia, and Volunteers, has penetrated about 180 Miles into the 
Indian Country, lying on the Allegheny river, burnt Ten of the Muncey 
and Seneca Towns in that Quarter, containing 165 Houses, destroyed all 
their Fields of Corn, computed to Comprehend 500 acres ; obliging the 
Savages to flee before him with the greatest Precipitation, and to 
leave behind them many Skins and other articles of value. The only 
opposition the Savages ventur'd to give our Troops on this occasion, was 
near Cusenshing about 40 of their Warriors on their way to commit 
Barbarities on our frontier Settlers, were met there by Lieut. Harden of 
the 8 th Penna. Reg' at the Head of one of our advanced Parties com- 
posed of 23 Men of which eight were of our Friends of the Delaware 
Nation, who immediately attacked the Savages and put them to route 
with the loss of five killed on the spot and all of their Canoes, Blankets, 
Shirts, and Provisions, of which (as is usual for them when going into 
action), they had divested themselves, and also of several Arms two of 
our Men and one of our Delaware friends very slightly wounded in the 
action, which was the only damage we Sustained in the Enterprise. 

The activity, Perseverance, and Firmness, which marked the Conduct 
of Colo. Broadhead, and that of all the Officers, and men of every 
description in the Expedition, do them the greatest honor and their 
Services justly Intitle them to the thanks, and to this Testimonial of 
the Gen 1 " acknowledgments. 

LETTER OF GENERAL ANTHONY WAYNE TO JOHN ARMSTRONG 
ESQ. (contributed by Frederick Schober). 

HEADQUARTERS GREENVILLE 15 th May, 1794. 

DEAR SIR. 

I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 26 th ultimo, 
which I should have done sooner but for want of time. I sincerely 
wish that you had continued in the service of the United States, be- 
cause I have always entertained a high opinion of your military abilities 
even when a subaltern in the late war. 

At and before the time of your resignation [obliterated] Majority, 
on the 27 th of November 1792, vice Major Beatty, which vacancy was 



Notes and Queries. 383 

to have been filled by you, "if acquitted," but as you were in arrest, 
no nomination was made by the President. 

How far, or whether your resignation (under the then existing circum- 
stances) will operate in any degree against your receiving the pay and 
emoluments of a Major, from that day until the day of your resignation, 
I am not competent to judge, that business can only be determined at 
the War Office, where I must beg leave to refer you. The Secretary 
of War is in possession of the proceedings of your Court Martial, to- 
gether with the copies of all such letters as passed between you and 
General Wilkinson, upon that occasion, copies of which were also 
transmitted to me by that General at the same time. 

Were I to hazard a conjecture, there will not be a war with Britain, 
nor do I at present, know of any intention of withdrawing the Army 
from this country, but the contrary. 

I am with esteem 

Your most obedient 
and very 

Humble Servant 

ANT Y WAYNE. 
JOHN ARMSTRONG ESQ. 

JSoofc notices. 

A HISTORY OF BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA, 1741-1892, WITH 
SOME ACCOUNT OF ITS FOUNDERS AND THEIR EARLY ACTIVITY 
IN AMERICA. By Rt. Rev. J. Mortimer Levering. Bethlehem, 
1903. 8vo, 809 pp. 

A history of Bethlehem must necessarily include that of the 
Moravian Church [Unitas Fratrum] in Pennsylvania ; and now, after 
years of much fanciful and erroneous writing has been indulged in, 
relating to that church and its principal seat in America, we have at 
last an adequate presentation of the subject. The reverend author 
spent many years of diligent research in the archives of his church, 
which abound in a wealth of original documentary material, and his 
recognized ability and learning, with the strict accuracy for which his 
writings are notable, make him the best fitted to undertake the work. 
Each chapter has peculiar points of merit, and the work will long 
remain the standard, as it is the first authoritative consideration of the 
history of the Moravians in Pennsylvania. The volume is well printed 
and liberally illustrated, most of them reproductions of rare paintings 
and drawings, and, what the usefulness of a book depends in a large 
degree upon, is well indexed. 

THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, edited by Francis Trevelyan Miller. 
The " Indian number" of this enterprising quarterly, with its art cover 
and lavishly illustrated, contains many articles of graphical and histori- 
cal worth. "The First American : the Indian," by Mrs. Sara Thomson 
Kinney, president of the Connecticut Indian Association ; " The Pass- 
ing of the Red Man," by Herbert Randall ; " The Broadening Influences 
in American Education," by Dr. C. H. Smith, of Yale ; "The Birth- 
place of American Democracy," by Mrs. John Marshall Holcombe ; and 
" Winsted," by Robert S. Hulbert and Edward B. Eaton, are of espe- 
cial interest. 



384 Notes and Queries. 

THE ISSUE. By George Morgan. J. B. Lippincott Co. Illustrated. 

Price, $1.50. 

George Morgan has successfully interwoven history and romance in 
his latest novel "The Issue." Covering a period of about thirty years, 
perhaps the most important of our country's existence, his vivid pic- 
tures stop at the bloody crisis of Gettysburg. Mr. Morgan introduces 
a comprehensive array of types characteristic of this era, among whom 
mingle the historical forms of Webster and Clay, of Lincoln, Lee, and 
the other great men who helped make events. The book is especially 
valuable in enabling us, of another century, to look back at our country- 
men of several generations ago and see them, portrayed with great 
accuracy, under conditions so different from the present. 

THE YOUTH OF WASHINGTON. In the April number of The Century 
Magazine, Dr. S. Weir Mitchell contributes the first instalment of hia 
serial, "The Youth of Washington," told in the form of an autobiogra- 
phy. This unique study, combining the interest of historical fact with 
that of fiction, leads us to imagine Washington in his old age recording 
the incidents of his early life. It will attract much attention and be 
widely read. 

PROCEEDINGS AND COLLECTIONS OF THE WYOMING HISTORICAL AND 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. Vol. VIII. Wilkesbarre, 1904. 8vo, 
329 pp. Illustrated. Price, $5. 

The publications of this Society generally contain papers that cover the 
double field of its researches, history and geology. Those of Professor 
Peck, of Lafayette College, Dr. Frederick Corss, and Rev. David Craft 
are very valuable and interesting. There are, however, two elaborate 
historical papers deserving of special notice : " Count Zinzendorf and the 
Moravian and Indian Occupancy of the Wyoming Valley, 1742-1763," 
by Dr. F. C. Johnson; and "The Reminiscences of David Hayfield 
Conyngham, 1750-1834," by Rev. Horace E. Hayden. 

The history of the Moravian mission among the Indians of the Wyo- 
ming Valley is exhaustively treated by Dr. Johnson, who had access to 
the numerous official diaries of the missionaries in the Moravian archives 
at Bethlehem. When these missionaries entered the valley the Indians 
were rapidly disappearing, but they remained faithful to the remnant who 
were to be found there up to the date of the death of Teedyuscung. 
"The Reminiscences of David Hayfield Conyngham," who was a son of 
Redmond Conyngham, the distinguished merchant of Philadelphia, are 
recorded in most interesting fashion, and are rendered doubly valuable 
by being profusely annotated by Mr. Hayden with rich historical data. 

All the papers are liberally illustrated, and the make-up of the vol- 
ume highly commendable. 

THE BARONY OF THE ROSE. AN HISTORICAL MONOGRAPH. By Grace 
Stuart Reid. 4to, 58 pp. For sale by G. S. Reid, 781 Park Ave- 
nue, New York City. Price, $1.25. 

This readable book gives an interesting history of the picturesque 
Moravian town of Nazareth, Pennsylvania ; its investiture with the right 
of court baron and rental of a June rose ; its ancient buildings, and the 
polity and customs of the Moravians. The book is the outcome of much 
research among various original sources, and tales from the unwritten 
annals of the town have been introduced. Thirty-two illustrations add 
interest to the text. The book is well printed and attractively bound. 




COL. JOSEPH SHIPPEN. 




THE 

PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 

OF 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 

VOL. XXYI1I. 1904. No. 4. 



THE ENGLISH ANCESTOKS OF THE SHIPPEN FAMILY 
AND EDWAKD SHIPPEN, OF PHILADELPHIA. 

BY THOMAS WILLING BALCH. 

Among those who in the second part of the seventeenth 
century left England for the New World, not to escape po- 
litical or religious persecution, but to better their fortune, 
was Edward Shippen, of Methley, in the West Riding of 
Yorkshire. 1 

In the month of September, 1902, the writer of this paper, 
after visiting the College of Arms in London and collecting 
the information in the collections there concerning the 
Shippen family of Yorkshire, went to Methley. 

When " Letters and Papers relating chiefly to the Pro- 
vincial History of Pennsylvania, with Some Notices of the 
Writer," 2 by Thomas Balch, were privately printed in 1855, 

I In collecting some of the information embodied in this paper the 
writer received most courteous aid from the Kev. Henry Armstrong 
Hall, Eector of Methley, and also from Dr. John Woolf Jordan, Li- 
brarian of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

II In preparing this article free use has been made of ' ' Letters and 
Papers," etc., which were printed in 1855 at the request of The Histori- 

VOL. xxvin. 25 ( 385 ) 



386 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

Mr. Balch was not able to state, from the then accessible in- 
formation, from what place in Yorkshire Edward Shippen, 
the founder of the family in America, had come, nor who 
his mother was, nor anything further of his father than 
that his name was William. It was known from deeds in 
this country that Edward Shippen was born in the year 
1639. In the " Memoirs" of James Logan, Edward Ship- 
pen is made to say that " Alethey" was, at the time of his 
birth, the residence of his father. This, however, was " pre- 
sumed to be a misprint, or an error of the copyist, there 
being no such place, as far as ascertained." * Nor could it 
be said with certainty in 1855 whether the Shippens were 
of English origin or whether they had emigrated to York- 
shire from the Netherlands, and in the "Letters and 
Papers" the then available evidence as to the original 
nationality of the family, whether of English or Dutch ori- 
gin, was merely marshalled. 

To-day, with the additional facts that have become acces- 
sible in the course of half a century, it can be stated, as it 
could not in 1855, that the Shippens were of English ori- 
gin, and did not come into Yorkshire over the North Sea 
from the Low Countries during the persecutions of the 
Duke of Alva. 

There is a family tradition, confirmed by a letter of Ed- 
ward Shippen, " of Lancaster," written in 1741, 2 that the 

cal Society of Pennsylvania. Owing to the great quantity of letters in 
that work written by or to members of the Shippen family, it has been 
spoken of often as "The Shippen Papers." 

1 "Letters and Papers," etc., p. vi. 

1 This letter of Edward Shippen, " of Lancaster," is dated from Ches- 
ter, Pennsylvania. 

" DEAR SIB : 

" If you should happen to see Mr. Ralph Peters, be pleased to ask 
him whether he can put me in a way to dispossess my Cousin Margaret 
Jeykil (formerly Shippen) of a Small Estate in Hillam at Yorkshire 
(which I have been told has been in our Family five hundred years). It 
is a Copy hold. I have heard it yields ten or fifteen pounds per an. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 387 

Shippens were settled at Hillam, a hamlet in the ancient 
parish of Monk Fryston, in Yorkshire, as early as the thir- 
teenth century. There is nothing farther known to prove 
this tradition, and it may be true. In any case, at the dawn 
of the Reformation the Shippens were established at Hil- 
lam, in the parish of Monk Fryston. The Rev. Henry 
Armstrong Hall, rector of Methley, one of the neighboring 
parishes to that of Monk Fryston, writes, 

"The order of Thomas Cromwell, for keeping parish registers, was 
promulgated in 1537, and the registers of Monk Fryston commenced in 
1538 ; so near the commencement as September of the following year 



My Grandfather [Edward Shippen the emigrant] who reaped the benefit 
of it many years, Gave it by will to my Uncle Edwd Shippen & told 
him at the time of making his will if it was not for the aversion he 
always had to entailing Estates, he would entail Hillam Estate on his 
family. Some Short time afterwards my Uncle died & leaving but one 
child & heir viz : The above mentioned Margaret gave it by will to 
my father J. S. & the male heirs of his body. 

"My Uncle Thomas Story in England not knowing I imagine of the 
devise of my uncle but hearing of his Death took the trouble upon him 
to get my Said Cousin entred Tenant ; as soon as my father heard of this 
he wrote to Tho. Story & told him exactly how the thing was, upon 
which Tho. Story wrote him an answer & let him know that as Margt 
Shippen was a near relation he might be contented to let her have the 
benefit of it for a while as her mother was poor, & the Child had nothing 
left her that she could then command but Sayes he you may have the pos- 
session at any time on paying a fine of five pounds & producing the will. 
And about two years ago I Sent my Grandfathers & my Uncle's will to 
Mr Peters with the Mayors & Notary Publicks Seal. If you can Serve 
me in thi affair you will do me a Singular favour I heartily wish you 
a good Voyage & am 

"Dear Sir 

"Your Sincere friend 

" & humble Servt 
4 EDWI> SHIPPEN 

"P.S. 

"I would Sell Said Estate 
for one hundred & fifty pounds 
Sterling without Charge E S 
" Chester the 9th 7br 1741" 



388 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

(1539) there is the entry, ' Jenet Shippen christined the XXIIth day,' 
and between this date and 1678 there are about forty Shippen entries, 
the latest of which are in 1622-3 and 16245. There were Shippens, 
however, in many of the villages adjacent to Monk Fryston, and to this 
day there is a farm-house called Shippen in the parish of Barwick-in- 
Elmet, 1 six or seven miles to the northwest of Monk Fryston. The 
word 'shippen' is in every-day use in agricultural Yorkshire, at the 
present time, and denotes a partly covered cattle-yard, and there are 
persons bearing the name Shippen still to be found in Leeds and the 
neighborhood. 

"Monk Fryston is in the West Eiding of Yorkshire, and lies about 
thirteen miles southeast of Leeds and fifteen miles south of York. Here 
William Shippen the father of the emigrant appears to have been 
born about the year 1600, but by some mischance his name is not to be 
found in the Monk Fryston registers. What is certain is that he mi- 
grated to Methley, the 'Alethey' above mentioned, a village about 
seven miles to the west of Monk Fryston, and that there, on July 16, 
1626, he married Mary Nunnes or Nuns." 

William Shippen, in his new home at Methley, became 
a man of local prominence, for in 1642 he was overseer of 
the poor, and in 1654 overseer of highways. He died in 
1681 at Stockport in Cheshire, where he was living with 
his son William. His wife, Mary Nunes, the daughter of 
John Nunes, of a substantial yeoman family, long estab- 
lished at Methley, and of Effam Crosfeld, his wife, was bap- 
tized at Methley on October 11, 1592, and buried there May 
25, 1672. John Nunes and Effam Crosfeld were married 
at Methley October 17, 1584. William Shippen himself 
spent his declining years with his son William, rector of 
Stockport, and died there in 1681. William and Mary 
(Nunes) Shippen had six children, all born at Methley : 

Robert Shippen, baptized May 20, 1627. 

Mary Shippen, " June 24, 1629. 

Ann Shippen, " November 21, 1630. 

Dorathe Shippen, " February 9, 1631. 

William Shippen, July 2, 1637. 

Edward Shippen, " March 5, 1639. 

1 Elmet or Elmete was the great forest which in Saxon days stretched 
across mid- Yorkshire. Leeds, Barwick, Sherburn, and probably Monk 
Fryston were all Tillages in the forest. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 389 

Of these, Robert, Ann, and Dorathe died young at 
Methley, and Mary married, in 1663, William Chapman, of 
the neighboring town of Normanton. Of the two remaining 
children, "William remained in England and Edward came 
to America. 

I. William Shippen, baptized at Methley July 2, 1637; 
studied and graduated at University College, Oxford, re- 
ceiving his B.A. in 1656 and his M.A. in 1659. " He was 
afterwards Proctor of the University, 1664, and at length 
Rector of Stockport in Cheshire ; and author of * The 
Christian's Triumph over Death/ a sermon preached at the 
funeral of Richard Leigh, Esq. He is D.D., not of this 
University, if I mistake not, but by diploma of Dr. Wm. 
Sancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury." 

He died in 1693, and was buried under the chancel ot 
the church. The Rev. William Shippen had four sons : 

1. Edward Shippen, born in 1671, M.A. and M.D., 
Brasenose College, Oxford, who subsequently succeeded 
his brother Robert as Professor of Music at Gresham Col- 
lege. He was a physician, and is supposed to have married 
Frances, daughter of Peter Leigh, of Lynne. 1 

2. William Shippen, born in 1673 and died in 1743; he 
was buried in St. Andrew's Church, Holborn, London. 
Educated at Westminster and Brasenose College, Oxford, 
he was called to the Bar from the Middle Temple in 1693. 
He sat in five Parliaments from 1716 to his death in 1743. 
He was the incorruptible leader of the Jacobites. In his 
speeches he spoke his mind clearly and fearlessly, and to 
such purpose that on one occasion, for reflecting on the 
policy of the King, he was confined in the Tower of London. 
It was of him that Pope wrote, 

" I love to pour out all myself, as plain 
As downright Shippen, or as old Montaigne." 



1 Burke' s "Landed Gentry," London, 1850. See under Tatton, of 
Withenshaw, p. 1355. 



390 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

Lord Dover, in his edition of the letters of Sir Horace 
Walpole, brother of Sir Robert Walpole, 1 says of Shippen, 

" 'Honest Will Shippen,' as he was called, or 'Downright Shippen,' 
as Pope terms him, was a zealous Jacobite member of Parliament, 
possessed of considerable talents, and a vehement opposer of Sir Robert 
Walpole' s government. He, however, did justice to that able Minister, 
for he was accustomed to say, ' Robin and I are honest men ; but as for 
those fellows in long perriwigs,' (meaning the Tories of the day) ' they 
only want to get into office themselves.' He was the author of a satiri- 
cal poem, entitled 'Faction Displayed,' which possesses considerable 
merit." 

Sir Robert Walpole said of Shippen, " Some are cor- 
rupt, but I will tell you of one who is not; Shippen ia 
not." 2 

On one occasion the Prince of Wales, to show his satis- 
faction with a speech of Shippen, sent the sturdy Jacobite 
leader, by General Churchhill, Groom of his Bedchamber, 
a thousand pounds sterling, which Shippen refused. 3 

William Shippen married Frances Stote, daughter of 
Sir Richard Stote. 4 Of Shippen and his wife Lord Mahon 
says, 5 

1 " Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Oxford, to Sir Horace Mann," 
edited by Lord Dover, London, 1833, Vol. I. p. 45, note. 

In a letter dated at Somerset House, December 10, 1741, Sir Horace 
Walpole writes to Sir Horace Mann, 

" On Tuesday we had the Speech ; there were great differences among 
the party ; the Jacobites, with Shippen and Lord Somerset [afterwards 
fourth Duke of Beaufort] at their head, were for a division, Pulteney 
and the Patriots against one ; the ill-success in the House of Lords had 
frightened them : we had no division, but a very warm battle between 
SirR. [Walpole] and Pulteney." 

' "Walpoliana," Vol. I. p. 38. 

"A Century of Anecdote from 1760 to 1860," by John Timbs, 
London, 1864, p. 127. 

4 Burke' s "Landed Gentry," London, 1850. See under Bewicke, of 
Close House, p. 92. 

5 ' ' The History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace 
of Versailles, 1713-1783," by Lord Mahon, Boston, 1853, Vol. 
III. p. 30. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 391 

"Shippen, whom the public voice still proclaimed as the great leader 
of the Jacobites, was thought by them so weak as to be left out of all 
their consultations. Shippen, at this time, was sixty-eight, and his en- 
ergy, perhaps, much impaired. But, as it seems to me, even his earlier 
reputation grew much more from his courage, his incorruptibility, his 
good humored frankness of purpose, than from any superior eloquence 
or talent. Horace Walpole, the younger, describes his speeches as spir- 
ited in sentiment, but generally uttered in a low tone of voice, with too 
great rapidity and with his glove held before his mouth certainly not 
the portrait of a great orator! It is said that he had some skill in 
poetry, yet it does not seem that he was known or prized by any emi- 
nent men without the House of Commons. His father was Rector of 
Stockport, and his paternal inheritance had been small ; he acquired, 
however, an ample fortune by marriage. His wife was extremely pe- 
nurious, and, as a relation gently expressed it, ' with a peculiarity of 
temper, and unwilling to mix in society ; she was much noticed by Queen 
Caroline, but steadily declined all connection with the Court. Shippen 
himself, like Pulteney, was not free from the odious taint of avarice ; 
when not attending Parliament, he lived chiefly in a hired house on 
Richmond Hill, and it is remarkable, that neither of these distinguished 
politicians, though each wealthy, possessed that chief pride and delight 
of an English gentleman a country seat.' " 

Apropos of this view of Lord Mahon, we find in " Let- 
ters and Papers" this criticism r 1 

"Whether or not, Lord Mahon, who claims to present a fair and im- 
partial narrative to his readers, has done full justice to Shippen, may 
be a question. That Shippen possessed, in a high degree, all the vir- 
tues ascribed to him by the historian, is, of course, unquestionable. 
The courage and integrity which animated him in such dangerous and 
agitated times, were truly noble ; such as neither danger could daunt, 
nor temptation undermine, nor discouragement diminish. With what 
a fine spirit does he protest against a standing army, though his earnest 
efforts against ' a burden heavy and dangerous to the people' had so 
often failed. ' Sir ; I now stand up to make my anniversary oration 
against a standing army. I have made one and twenty already, of 
which fifteen have never been seconded, and this will probably be the 
sixteenth.' Not the lesa, though, was he bound to do his duty. 

"But courage, integrity and good temper, though sufficient to render 
him a prominent actor amongst the Jacobites, were not enough to con- 

1 Page x. et seq. 



392 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

stitute him their leader in a body like the House of Commons ; that too, 
during a long service of many years, with such men as Walpole, Pulte- 
ney, Stanhope, Barnard, as associates and antagonists. He must have 
had, as the debates fully show, both the sagacity and the eloquence of 
an accomplished statesman. 

"Perhaps Lord Mahon's judgment was warped by the fact, that 
Shippen was at the head of the commission appointed to examine and 
sift General Stanhope's accounts, as Envoy and as Commander-in- 
Chief. However candid or correct his recital may be as to other mat- 
ters, it loses those characteristics whenever the individual or the sub- 
ject touches the house of Stanhope or the American Revolution. His 
partiality for his family is a weakness excusable in the eyes of many, 
and harmless, except where it presents his story to the injury of others. 
Such is the case as to the character which he has drawn of this ' Parlia- 
ment man ;' and though not disposed to use his own words, and say 
' that it implies not merely literary failure, but moral guilt ;' we may 
at least protest against the manner in which he appears to ' lower the 
fame of a political adversary. ' " 

Shippen's character and conduct are well illustrated in 
the report of the proceedings in Parliament, when he was 
sent to the Tower. 

"In this speech, Mr. Shippen overshot himself so far in his expres- 
sions, as to give too much advantage against him, to such as perhaps 
were not over-backward to lay hold of it : His words that gave the of- 
fence were to the following purpose, ' That the second paragraph of the 
King's speech seemed rather to be calculated for the meridian of Germany, 
than Great Britain ; and that 'twas a great misfortune, that the King wax 
a Stranger to our language and constitution. ' These expressions gave 
offence to several members, and in particular to Mr. Lechmcre, who 
having taken them down in writing, urged, ' That those words were a 
scandalous invective against the King's person and government, of 
which the hfcuse ought to shew the highest resentment, and therefore 
moved, That the member who spoke those offensive words should be 
sent to the Tower.' Mr. Lechmere was seconded by Mr. Cowper, 
brother of the Lord Chancellor, and back'd by Sir Joseph Jekyll, and 
Borne others : Upon which Mr. Eobert Walpole said, ' That if the worda 
in question were spoken by the member on whom they were charged, 
the Tower was too light a punishment for his rashness ; but as what he 
had said in the heat of his debate might have been misunderstood, he 
was for allowing him the liberty of explaining himself.' Mr. Snell, 
Mr. Hutchinson, and some other gentlemen, spoke also in behalf of Mr. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 393 

Shippen, intending, chiefly, to give him an opportunity of retracting 
or excusing what he had said ; which Mr. Shippen not thinking proper 
to do, several speeches were made upon the question, Whether the 
words taken down in writing were the same as he had spoken ? A gen- 
tleman having suggested, That there was no precedent of a censure 
passed on a member of the house, for words spoken in a Committee, Sir 
Charles Hotham produced instances of the contrary ; and, on the other 
hand, Mr. Shippen having maintained what he had advanced, it was, at 
last, resolved by a majority of 196 votes against about 100, That the 
words taken down in writing were spoken by Mr. Shippen. It was 
then about nine o'clock in the evening, and it being moved and carried, 
That the Chairman leave the chair ; Mr. Speaker resumed his place, 
and Mr. Farrer reported from the said Committee, 'That exceptions 
having been taken to some words spoken in the Committee, by William 
Shippen, Esq., a member of the house, the Committee, had directed him 
to report the words to the house.' Which being done accordingly, and 
candles ordered to be brought in, Mr. Shippen was heard in his place, 
and then withdrew. After this it was moved, that the question might 
be put, 'That the words spoken by William Shippen, Esq., (a member 
of this house) are highly dishonorable to, and unjustly reflecting on his 
Majesty's person and government.' Which occasioned a debate that 
lasted 'till past 11 o'clock ; when the question being put, was carried in 
the affirmative by 175 voices against 81 ; and thereupon ordered, ' That 
William Shippen, Eq., be, for the aid offence, committed prisoner to 
his Majesty's Tower of London, and that Mr. Speaker do issue his war- 
rant accordingly.' " ' 

Of a speech by Shippen in the Commons (1720) the 
Countess of Cowper writes in her diary, 

"Shippen upbraided Walpole terribly in Debate with having chid 
the Committee of Supply for fear of such an indiscreet method as this 
to raise Money, and now with moving and helping the Court to it in 
this manner. He spoke long, and very well the better for being in the 
Eight." 2 

Something of his political views are expressed in the fol- 
lowing speech in the House of Commons : 

1 "Debates in Parliament, 1717-21" (December 4, 1717), p. 20. 

1 "Diary of Mary Countess Cowper, Lady of the Bedchamber to the 
Princess of Wales, 1714-1720," London, John Murray, 1854 ; May 
6, 1720, p. 160. 



394 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

"For my part I am not ashamed nor afraid to affirm, that thirty 
years have made no change in any of my political opinions ; I am now 
grown old in this house, but that experience which is the consequence 
of age has only confirmed the principles with which I enter'd it many 
years ago ; time has verified the predictions which I formerly utter'd, 
and I have seen my conjectures ripen'd into knowledge. I should be 
therefore without excuse, if either terror could affright, or the hope of 
advantage allure me from the declaration of my opinions ; opinions, 
which I was not deterred from asserting, when the prospect of a longer 
life than I can now expect might have added to the temptations of ambi- 
tion, or aggravated the terrors of poverty and disgrace ; opinions, for 
which I would willingly have suffered the severest censures, even when 
I had espoused them only in compliance with reason, without the infal- 
lible certainty of experience. Of truth it has been always observed, Sir, 
that every day adds to its establishment, and that falsehoods, however 
specious, however supported by power, or established by confederacies, 
are unable to stand before the stroke of time : Against the inconven- 
iences and vexations of long life, may be set the pleasure of discovering 
truth, perhaps the only pleasure that age affords. Nor is it a slight 
satisfaction to a man not utterly infatuated or depraved, to find opportu- 
nities of rectifying his notions, and regulating his conduct by new lights. 
But much greater is the happiness of that man, to whom every day 
brings a new proof of the reasonableness of his former determinations, 
and who finds, by the most unerring test, that his life has been spent in 
promotion of doctrines beneficial to mankind. This, Sir, is the happi- 
ness which I now enjoy, and for which those who never shall attain it, 
must look for an equivalent in lucrative employment, honorary titles, 
pompous equipages, and splendid palaces. These, Sir, are the advan- 
tages which are to be gained by a seasonable variation of principles, and 
by a ready compliance with the prevailing fashion of opinions ; advan- 
tages, which I indeed cannot envy, when they are purchased at so high a 
price." 1 

3. Robert Shippen, born in 1675. He received his M.A. 
July 22, 1693, was Fellow of Brasenose, and Professor of 
Music at Gresham College; he held several preferments. 
In 1710 he became Principal of Brasenose, and in 1718 
Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University. He is buried in 
Brasenose Chapel, where there is his bust and an epitaph 
in Latin by Dr. Frewin, of which the following is a free 
translation : 

1 "Debates in Parliament, 1741-2," pp. 102, J r ~. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 395 

' ' Robert Shippen, Professor of Sacred Theology 

Who amongst the Mertonians 
Well Versed in the knowledge of Literature 

And the rules of Philosophy 
Was first a Fellow of this College 
Afterwards for Thirty Five Years 

Warden 

Meanwhile five times vice-Chancellor of the University. 

A man, if ever such there was, 

Prompt, diligent and faithful 

In promoting the interests & advantage of his friends 

Careful, expert and unwearied 
In enlarging the revenue & emoluments of the College 

Watchful, bold and resolute 
In maintaining and defending the rights & privileges of the University. 

Died 24 November A.D. 1745 Aged 70 years. 
Most deeply lamented by his friends, the College and the University." 



' ' William Seyborne Esquire 

A nephew by a sister 

To his greatly revered Uncle 

And who honored him living and dead, 

Hath erected 
This memorial of his love and duty." 

The tablet is about eight feet in length, surmounted with 
a bust of Robert Shippen, terminating with the shield of 
the Shippen coat of arms. There appears to have been a 
certain degree of intimacy between Robert and his Ameri- 
can cousin, Joseph. His book-plate is preserved in the 
American branch of the family (see opposite page). 1 

4. John Shippen, baptized by his father at Stockport, 
July 5, 1678. He was a merchant in Spain and British 
consul at Lisbon; died unmarried in September, 1747; 
and is buried in St. Andrew's, Holborn, London. 

5. The Rev. William Shippen also had a daughter named 
Anne ; for Edward Willes, one of the Judges of the Court 

1 There is also a copy in The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 



396 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family . 

of King's Bench in 1767, married Anne Taylor, daughter 
of Anne, sister of William Shippen, M. P. 1 

II. Edward Shippen, the emigrant, was baptized on March 
5, 1639, at Methley, not far from the manufacturing city of 
Leeds; the Loidis-in-Elmet of Saxon days, now the sixth 
city of the United Kingdom, with a population of nearly 
half a million. The name Methley probably originally 
meant the middle pasture land between the rivers Calder 
and Aire. To-day Methley Church is almost, with the ex- 
ception of the steeple, which is an eighteenth-century addi- 
tion, as it was when Edward Shippen lived at Methley. 
He came over to America and settled in Boston in 1668. 
There he engaged in mercantile pursuits with much success, 
as it appears that, upon his removal to Philadelphia, some 
twenty-five years later, he was computed to be worth at least 
ten thousand pounds sterling, a sum by no means incon- 
siderable in those days, particularly in a new country. In 
1669 he was a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, showing that he was still at that time 
a member of the Protestant Church of England. Two 
years later he married Elizabeth Lybrand, a Quakeress; 
this marriage led him to become a Quaker. Owing to his 
new religion, he was subjected to severe persecution. In 
1677 he was twice " publickly whipped." In various ways 
he was subjected to great annoyance, until finally, about 
1693-4, Edward Shippen decided to take refuge in Penn- 
sylvania. 

It would seem to have taken him about a year to perfect 
the disposal of his estate in Boston and transfer it to Philadel- 
phia. In this latter city his wealth, his fine personal ap- 
pearance, his house on Second Street, styled " a princely 
mansion," his talents, and his high character speedily ob- 
tained for him such position and influence that on July 9, 
1695, he was elected Speaker of the Assembly; in 1699 he 

1 Burke' s "Landed Gentry," London, 1850. See under Willes of 
Astrop House, p. 1592. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 397 

was made Chief-Justice ; l and on October 25, 1701, "William 
Penn named him in the Charter as the mayor of the city 
of Philadelphia. 

"Penn, as is well known, gaye the most anxious consideration to 
his selection of officers to govern the new city. 2 He thoroughly ap- 
preciated the importance of a correct choice. It was, to borrow a 
military phrase, the base-line of his operations. The success of his 
whole enterprise turned upon it ; the consciousness of which, apart from 
any other motives, political or philanthropic, was sufficient to stimulate 
him to the utmost caution and deliberation in his choice of incumbents. 
In Shippen he found a man of courage, energy, integrity, intelligence, 
and sagacity; whose unspotted moral character was ample earnest to 
the citizens that the executive power would be exercised with the 
strictest justice and fidelity ; whose active business habits and bravery 
equally assured them of the chief magistrate's resolution and prompt- 
ness, whilst hii high social position gave dignity to the office.' ' 

From 1702 to 1704 Edward Shippen was President of 
the Governor's Council, and for about six months, when 
there was no Governor in the Province, he was acting 
Governor. In 1704 he contracted his third marriage, 
which led to his separation from the Society of Friends. 
After that, apparently, he retired from public life, except 
that he continued to advise upon public affairs, as is shown 
by Penn's letter, dated 24th 5th month, 1712, where Ed- 
ward Shippen is addressed, in connection with Isaac Morris, 
Thomas Story, and others. Edward Shippen died at Phila- 
delphia October 2, 1712. 

"No one could wish to detract in the slightest degree from Penn's 
merits ; but we are taught to render ' honor to whom honor is due.' 8 In 
doing so, we must needs say that a great, if not the greatest, portion 
of the glory of building up the Commonwealth which was ' founded 
by deeds of peace' is due to Shippen, Norris, and Logan, and men like 
them ; the men who, here, in the new country itself, fostered commerce, 
developed the resources of the Province, set the best of examples, by 

1 "Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series," Vol. IX. (1879) p. 629. 
1 " Letters and Papers," etc., p. xvii. 
1 " Ibid., p. xviii. 



398 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

disdaining no proper toil in their respective vocations, yet neglected 
not the refinements and graces of letters and polite society." 

Edward Shippen married in 1671 his first wife, Elizabeth 
Lybrand, of Boston ; they had eight children, from whom 
are descended the Shippen family in America. 

He married at Newport, Rhode Island, in 1690, his 
second wife, Rebecca Richardson, widow of Francis Rich- 
ardson, of New York. They had a daughter, Elizabeth, 
born in 1691, who died the following year, about which 
time Mrs. Shippen also died. 

Edward Shippen married in 1704 his third wife, Elizabeth 
James, widow of Thomas James, of Bristol, England (her 
maiden name was Wilcox) ; they had 

John Shippen, who died an infant. 
William Shippen, who died in 1731, about twenty- 
five years of age. 

Among the descendants of Edward Shippen and his first 
wife, Elizabeth Lybrand, many reached to positions of in- 
fluence and distinction both under the Colonial and the 
State governments. In 1727 their son Joseph Shippen 
joined Franklin in founding the Junto, 1 " for mutual in- 

1 The association consisted of Benjamin Franklin, Joseph Shippen, 
Hugh Roberts, William Coleman, Philip Syng, Enoch Flower, Joseph 
Wharton, William Griffiths, Luke Morris, Joseph Turner, Joseph Trot- 
ter, Samuel Jervis, Samuel Ehodes, Joseph Brintnall, Nicholas Scull, 
William Parson, and Thomas Godfrey. Hazard's "Register," Vol. 
XV. p. 184. See also Sparks's "Franklin," Vol. I. p. 83. 

Joseph Shippen married Abigail Grosse, of Huguenot descent, at 
Boston, July 28, 1702. She died at Philadelphia June 28, 1716. 
Their children were : 

1. Edward, born in Boston, July 9, 1703, known as " of Lancaster. " 

2. Elizabeth, born in Philadelphia, and died young. 

3. Joseph, born in Philadelphia, known in the family as " Gentle- 
man Joe." 

4. William, died young. 

5. Anne, born August 5, 1710, married Charles Willings. 

6. William, born October 1, 1712, known as Dr. William Shippen, 
the Elder. 

7. Elizabeth, born September 28, 1714, and died young. 



The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 399 

formation and the promotion of the public good." It was 
the forerunner of our now numerous learned societies, such 
as The Historical Society of Pennsylvania (1822) and the 
American Philosophical Society (1743). Of the emigrant's 
grandsons, Edward Shippen, designated as " of Lancaster," 
to distinguish him from others of the same name, was much 
esteemed and respected throughout the Province. Among 
his other services to the community may be mentioned that 
he " laid out" Shippensburg, and that in 1744 he was elected 
mayor of the city of Philadelphia. He was also one of the 
founders, in 1746, of the College of New Jersey, now Prince- 
ton University, and for twenty years was one of its trustees. 
He served as a county judge both under the Provincial and 
the State governments, subscribed to the University of 
Pennsylvania, and was an accomplished French scholar, a 
rare thing in those days. He was elected a member of the 
American Philosophical Society, March 8, 1768. Of his 
sons, one, Edward Shippen, who was also a member of the 
Philosophical Society, became in 1791 a Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of Pennsylvania, and afterwards, in 1799, by 
appointment of Governor McKean, Chief- Justice of the Com- 
monwealth. Another son, Joseph Shippen, who graduated 
at Princeton in 1753, rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel 
in the Provincial army. As such he took part in General 
Forbes's expedition that captured Fort Duquesne. After 
the troops were disbanded he visited Europe, and on his 
return was made Secretary of the Province. He took an 
interest in the fine arts, was elected, January 19, 1768, a 
member of the American Philosophical Society, and was 
one of the gentlemen who aided Benjamin West to visit and 
study in Europe. On June 16, 1786, he was appointed 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Lancaster County. 1 
And, en passant, it is worth remembering, for the truth 
of history, that the Chief-Justice's two daughters, Margaret, 
known as " Pretty Peggy," and her sister Sarah, were not 

^'Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series," Vol. III. (1875) p. 
738. 



400 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

present at the much-talked-of Meschianza Ball. The young 
ladies were invited, their names were on the programme, 
and their dresses were actually prepared, but at the last 
moment their father refused his consent to their appearing 
at the dance, and although they were in a " dancing fury," 
they spent the night in tears in their own room in the big 
brick house on Fourth Street. 1 

Another Joseph Shippen, a brother of Edward Shippen, 
" of Lancaster," was a subscriber to the First Philadelphia 
Assembly dances in 1748. 2 Owing to the gay, luxurious 
life that he led, and which, as appears from his brother's 
letters, wasted his patrimony, he was known in the family 
by the name of " Gentleman Joe." 

Another grandson of the emigrant who gained distinction 
was William Shippen, generally known as Dr. William 
Shippen, the Elder. He was born at Philadelphia October 1, 
1712, and died there November 4, 1801. He inherited his 
father's desire to explore the domains of physical science, 
and no doubt the Junto had its influence in shaping his 
course in life. Conscious of the deficiencies for medical 
education in America, and animated by a patriotic desire 
to remedy them, Dr. Shippen trained his son, known as Dr. 
"William Shippen, the Younger, for that profession, sent him 
to Europe for further study, and on his return (1762) en- 
couraged him to commence a series of lectures on anatomy 
in one of the large rooms of the State-House. Dr. William 

1 On this point see "The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and 
Biography," Vol. III. (1879) p. 366, note 2; "Two or Three Old 
Letters;" "The Pennsylvania Magazine," etc., Vol. XXIII. (1899) 
p. 187. Miss Elizabeth Footman, then a girl of only sixteen, and 
on intimate terms with the Misses Shippen, and who afterwards married 
their brother Edward, said repeatedly in after-life that of her own 
knowledge she knew that Margaret and Sarah Shippen were not at the 
fte, but spent the night as described above. 

* The assemblies were first given in 1748 under the management of 
four directors : John Swift, who was also the secretary and treasurer ; 
John Inglis, John Wallace, and Lynford Lardner. Swift and Lardner 
were born in England, and Inglis and Wallace in Scotland. 



The English Ancestors of tlie Shippen Family. 401 

Shippen, the Elder, and Dr. William Shippen, the Younger, 
were both elected at the same time in November, 176Y, 
members of the American Philosophical Society. Dr. 
Shippen, the Elder, was elected on November 20, 1778, by 
the Assembly of Pennsylvania, a member of the Continental 
Congress. 1 At the end of the year, November 13, 1779, he 
was re-elected. An examination of the records shows that 
Dr. Shippen, in spite of hia advanced years, was steadily at his 
post, and that his vote and conduct were those of an honest, 
intelligent, high-minded, patriotic gentleman, who thought 
only of his country's welfare. Dr. Shippen, the Elder, was 
also a vice-president of the American Philosophical Society, 
one of the first physicians to the Pennsylvania Hospital, 2 
and one of the founders of the Second Presbyterian Church, 
and a member of it for nearly sixty years. 3 

1 By some strange perversity which seems to attend the various 
members of the Shippen family, Dr. Willia^ Shippen, the Younger (the 
son), has been substituted by some writers for Dr. William Shippen, the 
Elder (the father), as a member of the Continental Congress. The 
"Journals of Congress" prove that it was the elder Dr. Shippen that 
sat in the Continental Congress. 

" Wednesday, November 25, 1778. 

"Mr. Roberdeau, Mr. Clingan and Mr. Searle, three delegates from 
Pennsylvania, attended, and produced the credentials of the delegates 
of the state, which were read, and are as follows : 

" ' In general Assembly of Pennsylvania, Friday, November 20, 1778. 

" ' The order of the day being called for and read, the house proceeded 
by ballot to the election of delegates in Congress for the ensuing year, 
when the following gentlemen were chosen, viz. Daniel Roberdeau, 
William Clingan, Edward Biddle, John Armstrong, William Shippen, 
the elder, Samuel Atlee, and James Searle, Esq.'" "Journals of 
Congresi : containing their Proceedings from January 1, 1778, to Jan- 
uary 1, 1779," Vol. IV. p. 485. 

1 "The Early History of Medicine in Philadelphia," by George W. 
Norris, M.D., Philadelphia, 1886, p. 21. 

8 In reference to the religious belief of the Shippens, see a letter of 
Edward Burd to William Rawle, dated at Philadelphia, December 17, 
1825, from which it appears that some of the Shippens were Quakers, 
others Episcopalians, and the rest Presbyterians. THE PENNSYLVANIA 
MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY, Vol. XXIII. (1899) p. 202. 
VOL. xxvui. 26 



402 The English Ancestors of the Shippen Family. 

The name of Shippen is woven in the history of Phila- 
delphia. Almost at once upon Edward Shippen's arrival 
in this city, seeking a refuge from religious oppression in 
Massachusetts, he took a leading and influential part in the 
public affairs of the town; and in subsequent years the 
family bore an important role in shaping the development 
of the city. The mayors it has given to Philadelphia set 
a high standard of honor in that office. Not long since an 
honorable bearer of the name went to his long rest. The 
present Bainbridge Street formerly was called Shippen 
Street. Without disturbing this memorial to the memory 
of a gallant officer who a century ago helped forward the 
commercial freedom of the high seas and also proved inci- 
dentally that the United States were a world power at that 
time, a fact which in the last few years seems to have been 
forgotten, may it not be suggested that it would be ap- 
propriate for the present city fathers to perpetuate the name 
of the mayor named by William Penn in the City Charter 
of 1701 in one of the new avenues or boulevards with which 
it is proposed to encircle and beautify the greater city of 
the future ? 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 403 



LETTEES OF THOMAS JEFFEESON TO CHAELES 
WILLSON PEALE, 1796-1825. 

BY HORACE W. SELLERS. 

(Concluded from page 319.) 

MONTICELLO, April 17th, 1813. 
DEAR SIB : 

I have long owed you a letter for your favor of Aug. 19th, 
when I received eight days ago that of March 2nd, 1812, a 
slip of the pen, I suppose, for 1813, and the pamphlet accom- 
panying it strengthens the supposition. I thank you for the 
pamphlet, it is full of good sense & wholesome advice, and I 
am making all my grandchildren married and unmarried 
read it, and the story of farmer Jenkins will I hope remain 
in their minds through life. Both of your letters are on 
the subject of your agricultural occupations, and both prove 
the ardor with which you are pursuing them, but when I 
observe that you take an active part in the bodily labor of 
the farm, your zeal and age give me uneasiness for the 
result. 

Your position that a small farm, well worked and well 
manned, will produce more than a larger one ill-tended, is 
undoubtedly true in a certain degree. There are extremes 
in this as well as in all other cases. The true medium may 
really be considered and stated as a mathematical problem. 
" Given the quantum of labor within our command, and land 
ad libitum offering its spontaneous contributions : Required 
the proportion in which these two elements should be em- 
ployed to produce a Maximum ?" It is a difficult problem, 
varying probably in every country according to the relative 
value of land and labor. The spontaneous energies of the 
earth are a gift of nature, but they require the labor of man 
to direct their operation, and the question is, so to husband 
his labor as to turn the greatest quantity of this useful 



404 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

action of the earth to his benefit. Ploughing deep, your 
recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every- 
thing good in farming. The plough is to the farmer what 
the wand is to the Sorcerer. Its effect is really like sorcery. 
In the country wherein I live we have discovered a new use 
for it, equal in value almost to its services before known. 
Our country is hilly, and we have been in the habit of 
ploughing in strait rows, whether up and down hill, in 
oblique lines, or however they led ; and our soil was all 
rapidly running into the rivers. We now plough hori- 
zontally following the curvations of the hills and hollows, 
on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. 
Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain 
the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing 
plant, instead of running off into the streams. In a farm 
horizontally and deeply ploughed, scarcely an ounce of soil 
is now carried off from it. In point of beauty nothing can 
exceed that of the waving lines & rows winding along the 
face of the hills and valleys. The horses draw much easier 
on the dead level, and it is in fact a conversion of hilly 
jgrounds into a plain. The improvement of our soil from 
this cause, the last half dozen years, strikes everyone with 
wonder. For this improvement we are indebted to my son- 
jn-law, Mr. Randolph, the best farmer, I believe, in the 
United States, and who has taught us to make more than 
two blades of corn to grow where only one grew before. If 
your farm is hilly, let me beseech you to make a trial of this 
method. To direct the plough horizontally we take a rafter 
level of this form A boy of 13 or 14 is able to 
work it round the hill ; a still smaller one with 
a little trough marking the points traced by the 
feet of the level. The plough follows running 
through these marks. The leveler having completed one 
level line through the field, moves with his level 30 or 40 
yards up or down the hill, and runs another which is 
marked in like manner & traced by the plough. And having 
thus run what may be called guide furrows every 30 or 40 




Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 405 

yards through the field the ploughman runs the furrows of 
the intervals parallel to these in proportion. However as 
the declivity of the hill varies in different parts of the line, 
the guide furrows will approach or recede from each other 
in different parts of the line, and the parallel furrows will 
at length touch in one part, when far asunder in others, 
leaving unploughed gores between them. These gores we 
plough separately. They occasion short rows & turnings, 
which are a little inconvenient, but not materially so. I pray 
you to try this Recipe for hilly grounds. You will say with 
me ' probatum et', and I shall have the happiness of being 
some use to you, and through your example to your neigh- 
bors, and of adding something solid to the assurances of my 
great esteem and respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

WASHINGTON, May 15th. 
DEAR Sir: 

I arrived here the night before last, and yesterday re- 
ceived from the post office your favor of April 29th, with 
others which had been accumulating there for me. I hasten 
to answer it in order that the polygraph desk you have in 
hand for me may have the benefit of the improvements you 
mention, to wit : 

The screw to move the stay pen. 

The improvements in the pen-bar. 

Hawkins' improvement by a stay to govern the horizontal 
machinery and the consequent improvement of the sup- 
porting springs attached to an extra piece. 

The bar instead of the brass frame, & the heavy ruler, 
the brass frame being a great obstacle to using the desk for 
ordinary writing. 

And the brass pins instead of two colours of cloth. 

My suggestion as to the manner of making the solid bed 
was meant to be submitted entirely to yourself & your cab- 
inet maker, and so also was the size, as I had made my 
drawing from memory only, not having one of your poly- 
graphs before me. 



406 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

I shall be glad to receive the desk as soon as possible, the 
one I now use being considerably faulty. I am entirely 
against the folding into the form of a writing box, because 
it increases the size, and the hinges are an eye sore and in 
the way. As soon as I get one quite to my mind I shall 
probably desire one or two more, and perhaps recommend 
them to the offices. Mr. Barnes tells me you have not yet 
informed him of the price to be remitted. He will forward 
it the moment you will be so kind as to name it either to 
him or myself. Accept my friendly salutations. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

It is long, my dear sir, since we have exchanged a letter. 
Our former correspondence had always some little matter 
of business interspersed, but this being at an end, I shall 
still be anxious to hear from you sometimes, and to know 
that you are well and happy. I know indeed that your 
system is that of contentment under any situation. I have 
heard that you have retired from the city to a farm, and 
that you give your whole time to that. Does not the Mu- 
seum suffer ? And is the farm as interesting ? Here, as you 
know, we are all farmers, but not in a pleasing style. We 
have so little labor in proportion to our land, that although 
perhaps we make more profit from the same labor we can- 
not give to our grounds that style of beauty which satisfies 
the eye of the amateur. Our rotations are corn, wheat & 
clover, or corn, wheat, clover and clover, or wheat, corn, 
wheat, clover and clover, preceding the clover by a plais- 
tering, but some, instead of clover, substitute mere rest, and 
all are slovenly enough. We are adding the care of Merino 
sheep. I have often thought that if heaven had given me 
choice of my position and calling, it should have been on a 
rich spot of earth, well watered, and near a good market 
for the productions of the garden. No occupation is so 
delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no 
culture comparable to that of the garden. Such a variety 
of subjects, someone always coming to perfection, the fail- 
ure of one thing repaired by the success of another, & 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 407 

instead of one harvest a continued one through the year. 
Under a total want of demand, except for our family table, 
I am still devoted to the garden, but though an old man 
I arn but a young gardener. Your application to whatever 
you are engaged in I know to be incessant, but Sundays 
and rainy days are always days of writing for the farmer. 
Think of me sometimes when you have your pen in hand, 
and give me information of your health and occupations ; 
and be always assured of my great esteem & respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, June 13th, 1815. 
DEAR SIR: 

In your favor of May 2nd you ask my advice on the best 
mode of selling your Museum, on which however I really 
am not qualified to advise. This depends entirely on the 
genius and habits of those among whom you live, with 
which you are so much better acquainted. I wish first it 
may be disposed of the most to your advantage, and 2nd 
that it may not be separated. If profit be regarded, the 
purchaser must keep it in Philadelphia, where alone the 
number and taste of the inhabitants can ensure its mainte- 
nance. It will be yet sometime (perhaps a month) before 
my workmen will be free to make the plough I shall send 
you. You will be at perfect liberty to use the form of the 
mould board, as all the world is, having never thought of 
monopolizing by patent any useful idea which happens to 
offer itself to me : and the permission to do this is doing a 
great deal more harm than good. There is a late instance 
in this state of a rascal going through every part of it, and 
swindling the mill owners, under a patent of 2 years old 
only, out of 20,OOOD. for the use of winged-gudgeons which 
they have had in their mills for 20 years, everyone prefer- 
ing to pay 10D. unjustly rather than to be dragged into a 
federal court 1, 2 or 300 miles distant. I think the corn- 
sheller you describe with two cylinders is exactly the one 
made in a neighboring county where they are sold at 20D. 



408 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

1 propose to take some opportunity of seeing how it 
performs. The reason of the derangement of machines 
with wooden cylinders of any length is the springing 
of the timber, to which white oak has a peculiar dispo- 
sition. For that reason we prefer pine as the least apt to 
spring. You once told me of what wood you made the 
bars of the pen-frame in the Polygraph, as springing less 
than any other wood, and I have often wished to recollect it 
but cannot. We give up here the cleaning of clover seed, 
because it comes up so much more certainly when sown in 
the husk, 7 bushels of which is more easily obtained for the 
acre than the 3 pints of clean seed, which the sowing box 
requires. We use the machine you describe for crushing 
corn-cobs, & for which Oliver Evans has obtained a patent, 
altho' to my knowledge the same machine has been made 
by a smith in Georgetown these 16 years for crushing plais- 
ter, and he made one for me 12 years ago, long before 
Evans' patent. The only difference is that he fixes his hori- 
zontally and Evans vertically, yet I chose to pay Evans' 
patent price for one rather than be involved in a law suit of 

2 or 300D. cost. We are now afraid to use our ploughs, 
every part of which has been patented, although used ever 
since the fabulous days of Ceres. On the subject of the 
spinning Jenny, which I so much prefer to the Arkwright 
machines, for simplicity, ease of repair, cheapness of ma- 
terial and work, your neighbor Dr. Allison of Burlington 
has made a beautiful improvement by a very simple addi- 
tion for the preparatory operation of roving. These are 
much the best machines for family and country use. For 
fulling in our families we use the simplest thing in the 
world. We make a bench of the widest plank we can get, 
say half a yard wide at least, of thick and heavy stuff. We 
cut notches cross wise of that 2 in. long and 1 in. deep, the 
perpendicular side of the notch fronting the middle one from 
both ends. On that we lay a 4 in. board 6 ft. long, with a 
pin for a handle in each end, and notched as the under one. 
A board is nailed on each side of the under one, to keep the 




Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 409 

upper in place as it is shoved backward and forward and the 
cloth properly moistened is laid between them. 2 hands 
full 20 yards in two hours. 
Our threshing machines are 
universally in England fixed 
with Dutch fans for winnow- 
ing, but not with us be- 
cause we thrash immediately 
after harvest to prevent wea- 
vil, and were our grain then 
laid up in bulk without the 

chaff in it, it would heat and rot. Ever and affectionately 
yours, THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MONTICELLO, August 17th, 1816. 
DEAR SIR : 

In yours of July 7th you informed me you had found a 
young watchmaker of good character disposed to come here, 
who had taken time to consider of it. Hearing nothing 
further of him, & being now within a fortnight of departure 
to Bedford where I shall be 6 weeks I am anxious to know 
of a certainty, because were he to come during my absence 
he might not find the same facilities for first establishment 
as were I here. I have a good deal also which might employ 
his days until work should come in. I am sorry to be 
troublesome to you, but rely on your often experienced 
goodness for apology. Ever and affectionately yours 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALB. 

MONTICELLO, December 24th, 1816. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received in October a letter from Mr. Mcllhenny, whom 
you were so kind as to recommend as a watchmaker, in- 
forming me he would come on to establish himself at Char- 
lottesville as soon as he could hear from me. I was just 
about setting out on a journey to Bedford, and answered 
him therefore by advising him to postpone his coming till 
my return. He did so and arrived in Charlottesville by the 



410 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

stage on Wednesday last. Thursday was rainy. On Friday 
he came here, I kept him all night, and on Saturday morn- 
ing went with him to Charlottesville, presented and recom- 
mended him to the principal persons there, procured him a 
shop in the very best and most public position, undertook 
to the landlord for his year's rent and board, and assuring 
him of all other necessary aid until he could stand on his 
own legs, I left him in Charlottesville, on his promise to 
come to Monticello Monday morning to repair 3 or 4 clocks 
& as many watches which we had needing it, while his land- 
lord would be fitting up the room for him. On Sunday 
morning without a word of explanation, as far as I have 
learnt, to any body, he got into the stage with all his bag- 
gage, and went off. I can conjecture no cause for this. A 
watchmaker in Stanton (40 miles above this) who had 
received some work from this quarter, heard that I was 
procuring a person of that trade to come here. Mr. McD- 
henny coming thro' Stanton called at that watchmaker's 
(Logan) and Logan discovered that he was the person. He 
instantly put one of his men into the same stage which 
brought Mcllhenny, who on his arrival in Charlottesville 
engaged a house, but the remoteness of this and the entire 
patronage of the place which I had insured to Mcllhenny, 
with his excellent stand left him nothing to fear from that 
competition. I have thought it best to state these things 
to you lest his friends might think I had not fulfilled my 
proffers of aid to him, or discouragement be produced to 
any other real master of the business who might be dis- 
posed to come and relieve us from the bungler whom this 
incident has brought upon us. It is an excellent stand for 
a sober, correct and good workman. I am not the less 
thankful to you for the trouble you were so kind as to take 
in relieving our wants. Something erratic and feeble in the 
texture of this young man's mind will I suspect prevent his 
becoming stationary and industrious anywhere. I salute 
you with affection and respect. 

Tnos. JEFFERSON. 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Wdlson Penh, 1796-1825. 411 

MONTICELLO, March 15th, 1817. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your favor of February 28th came to hand yesterday 
evening only. Mr. Mcllhenny is right in saying he left a 
letter for me, but I did not get it till a month after he went 
away. However all is well. We have had the good fortune 
to get a Swiss from Newschatel, inferior I think to no watch- 
maker I have ever known, sober, industrious and moderate. 
He brought me recommendations from Doctor Patterson & 
Mr. Harlaer. He completely knocks down the opposition 
bungler who came from Stanton to contest the ground with 
Mr. Mcllhenny, gets more work than he can do, and sells 
more watches than he could have done in Philadelphia. 
Brought up among the mountains of Switzerland he is de- 
lighted with ours. I admire you in the variety of vocations 
to which you can give your attention. I cannot do this. I 
wish to be always reading, and am vexed with everything 
which takes me from it. With respect to my letters to you 
mentioning some agricultural practices, make what use you 
please of them, only not giving my name. This would draw 
letters upon me, which are the affliction of my life by the 
drudgery they subject me to in writing answers. We have 
sometimes practised the feeding with our corn-stalks. We 
chop them in a trough with a hatchet, which is a guillotine, 
you know, worked by hand. I doubt if the descending force 
added by the arm to the gravity of the hatchet is as labo- 
rious as would be the lifting power exercised to raise a guil- 
lotine of such weight as that its gravity alone should pro- 
duce the same effect. But trial alone can prove this, as 
everything else in life, and as it has proved to me the value 
of your friendship and produced for it the sincere return of 
mine. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

MONTICELLO, February 18th, 1818. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your favor of January 15th is received, and I am in- 
debted to you for others ; but the torpitude of increasing 



412 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

years, added to a stiffening wrist making writing a slow 
and painful operation, makes me a slow correspondent. I 
promised you a plough so long ago I dare say you have for- 
gotten it, but I have this day sent it to Richmond to be for- 
warded to you. I claim nothing in it but the mould board. 
As it has never been in the ground, it will probably, as all 
other new ploughs, need some little rectification, to make 
it perform its functions. You ask my opinion of a new in- 
vention of spectacles. I never heard of them before and 
am at a loss to understand how those of 3 ft. focus can be 
made conveniently to direct the operations of the human 
hand which with difficulty can be extended to that distance. 
However the invention answers an useful purpose, if it adds 
to your amusement, and I rejoice to learn that new im- 
provements in your art increase your attachment to it ; for 
one of the evils of age is the loss of interest in most of 
those employments which in earlier life constituted our 
happiness. I am sorry to learn that you have still difficul- 
ties on the subject of your Museum. This ought not to be 
so, and the functionaries of your government ought to 
understand how much they are indebted to you for this 
great ornament to your City and State. My great enjoy- 
ment is reading, but an oppressive correspondence rarely 
permits me to look into a book. "Wishing you many years 
of good health and of life busied to your mind, I salute 
you with affection and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

POPLAR FOREST, NEAR LYNCHBURG, August 7th, 1819. 
MY GOOD FRIEND : 

Passing considerable portions of my time at this place, 
I keep for use here the portable Polygraph which Mr. 
Hawkins was so kind as to send me, but I have had the 
misfortune to break one of its ink glasses, which suspends 
its use, as no such thing can be gotten here, and to whom 
can I apply to replace it but to a friend in small things as 
well as great. Without apology therefore I enclose you the 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Wttlson Peak, 1796-1825. 413 

gauge of my glass, and pray you to procure one for me. I 
think it may be so securely packed in paste board as not to 
be in danger of being broken -in the mail. Address it to 
me, if you please, at Monticello, where I shall be before it 
can come to me. For such a trifle I will say nothing about 
repayment, and yet if ever I can find means to remit such 
a fraction, it shall be done. I salute you with constant and 
affectionate esteem and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, April 22nd, 1820. 

I thank you dear sir for the razor strap you have been 
so kind as to send me, which is the more acceptable as I am 
but a poor barber. I shall immediately avail myself of its 
abridgement of labor in razor strapping. With respect to 
the plough, your observations are entirely just, as I know 
by my own experience. The first ploughs I made were 9 
in. longer, and so effectual in their functions and so easy to 
govern that when once entered and in motion, I have made 
the ploughman let go the handle, and the plough has gone 
on for some steps as steadily, and as even as a boat on the 
water. But at that time, 30 years ago, the passion of this 
state was for light ploughs, and I yielded to the cry for 
shortening them. Do not therefore, dear Sir, take the 
trouble of sending me one, for besides my having in my 
family workmen well skilled in making them, I have in 
fact resigned all business of this kind to my grandson, your 
old acquaintance, who is among the most industrious and 
best farmers of our state. Although my ill health and my 
physician forbid my approach to the writing table, I break 
through their injunctions to acknowledge your letter and to 
renew the assurances of my constant friendship and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MONTICELLO, Aug. 26th, 1820. 
DEAR SIR : 

I ought sooner to have thanked you for your sketch of 
the Court of death, which we have all contemplated with 



414 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

great approbation of the composition and design. It pre- 
sents to the eye more morality than many written volumes 
and with impressions much more durable and indelible. I 
have been sensible that the Scriptural paintings in the 
Catholic Churches produce deeper impressions on the peo- 
ple generally than they receive from reading the books 
themselves, with much more good to others. I hope Mr. 
Rembrandt Peale will receive for himself not only the future 
fame he is destined to acquire, but immediate and just 
compensation and comfort for the present, for I sincerely 
wish prosperity and happiness to you and all yours. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE, ESQ. 

MONTICELLO, December 28th, 1820. 
DEAR SIR: 

'Nothing is troublesome which we do willingly' is an 
excellent apophthegm, and which can be applied to no mind 
more truly than yours. On this ground I am sure you will 
be so good as to exchange the pair of ink-glasses you sent 
me, & which the furnisher will doubtless exchange. They 
are a little too large to enter the sockets of the polygraph I 
keep in Bedford, as I found on a late visit to that place. I 
return them to you in a box of wood, in the bottom of 
which I have had a mortise made of the true size. Glasses 
which will enter that freely will exactly answer. Knowing 
the friendly interest you take in my health, I will add that 
it is not quite confirmed, but is improving slowly. My 
stiffening wrist in the meantime gets worse, & will ere long 
deprive me quite of the use of the pen. Ever and affec- 
tionately yours, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, October 23rd, 1822. 
DEAR SIR: 

I could never be a day without thinking of you, were it 
only for my daily labors at the Polygraph for which I am 
indebted to you. It is indeed an excellent one, and after 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 415 

12 or 14 years of hard service it has failed in nothing except 
the spiral springs of silver wire which suspend the pen 
frame. These are all but disabled, and my fingers are too 
clumsy to venture to rectify them, were they susceptible of 
it. I am tempted to ask you if you have ever thought of 
trying a cord of elastic gum. If this would answer, its 
simplicity would admit any bungler to prepare and apply it. 

It is right for old friends, now and then to ask each 
other how they do ? The question is short and will give 
little trouble either to ask or answer. I ask it therefore, 
observing in exchange that my own health is tolerably good, 
but that I am too weak to walk further than my garden 
without suffering, altho' I ride without fatigue 6 or 8 miles 
every day, and sometimes 20. I salute you with constant 
and affectionate friendship and respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, February 26th, 1823. 
DEAR SIR : 

Your favor of the 8th has been received with the Poly- 
graph wire you were so kind as to send me. Your friendly 
attentions to my little wants kindle the most lively senti- 
ments of thankfulness in me. The breaking of an ink- 
glass, the derangement of a wire, which cannot be supplied 
in a country situation like ours, would render an instrument 
of cost and of incalculable value entirely useless ; as both 
of my Polygraphs would have been, but for your kind atten- 
tions. 

It must be a circumstance of vast comfort to you to be 
blest with sons capable of maintaining such an establishment 
as you have effected. It has been a wonderful accomplish- 
ment, is an honor to the U.S. and merits their patronage. 

The fractured bone of my arm is well reunited, but my 
hand and fingers are in discouraging condition, rendered 
entirely useless by a dull oedematous swelling, which has at 
one time been threatening, and altho' better is still obsti- 
nate. It is more than three months since the accident, and 



416 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825. 

yet it indicates no definite term. This misfortune with the 
crippled state of my right hand also renders me very help- 
less, and all but incapable of writing. Ever and affec- 
tionately yours, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 



MONTICELLO, July 18th, 1824. 
DEAR SIR : 

I do not wonder that visitors to your Museum come from 
afar. If not equal to some in Europe it possesses much 
which they have not. Of the advantage of Mr. Waterton's 
mode of preserving animal subjects with sublimate instead 
of arsenic you are the best judge. I greatly wish success 
to Rembrandt in his new enterprise of the equestrian por- 
trait of General Washington. He is no doubt however aware 
of the partialities of the public functionaries to economy 
and that with some it is the first object. He may meet dis- 
appointment at that market, but at that of the world I pre- 
sume he is safe. Among your greatest happinesses must be 
the possession of such sons, so devoted to the arts of taste 
as well as of use, and so successful in them, and the con- 
tinuance in the same powers at an age so advanced as yours 
is a blessing indeed. My eyes are good, also. I use spec- 
tacles only at night; and I am particularly happy at not 
needing your teeth of porcelain. I have lost one only by 
age, the rest continuing sound. I ride every day from 3 or 
4 to 8 or 10 miles without fatigue, but I am little able to 
walk, and never further than my garden. I should indeed 
have been happy to have received the visit you meditated in 
the spring. Yet in the fall it will be more gratifying to you, 
in so much as our central and principal building will be 
more advanced, that which is to unite all into one whole, 
and give it the unity, the want of which has hitherto lessened 
its impression. We shall want a fresco painted for one of 
the apartments, which however is not yet ready and perhaps 
may not be until the next year. I asked, by way of post- 
script in a letter to Mr. Yaughan whether there is such an 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 417 

artist in the U.S. His answer leaves it doubtful, and our 
job is too small to think of inviting one from Italy where 
they are as plenty as oil painters with us. Your letters give 
me a great pleasure, altho my difficulties of writing do not 
always permit me to count letter for letter. I do not the 
less preserve you ever & constantly in my affections and 
great respect. 

THOS. JEFFERSON. 

C. W. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, September 15th, 1825. 
DEAR SIR : 

I received yesterday, and with great pleasure, your favor 
of the 10th, informing me of your good health, which I 
hope may long continue. For 7 years past mine has been 
sensibly declining, and latterly is quite broken down. I 
have now been confined to the house, and chiefly to my 
couch, for 4 months, by a derangement of the urinary 
system, which as yet exhibits no prospect of a definite ter- 
mination. I think your resignation to your sons of the 
care of your Museum, as you propose, entirely wise; it is 
now some years since I turned over to my grandson all my 
worldly affairs. Without this indeed I could not have car- 
ried on those of our University. For the last 7 years they 
have occupied the whole of my time ; and so far the insti- 
tution promises all the success I could have expected. We 
have as yet been only six months in operation, and have 110 
students ; and at our next commencement the numbers will 
be beyond the extent of our accommodations. We have 
great reason to be pleased so far with their order and dili- 
gence, which I think will continue. A visit from you, 
making Monticello your headquarters, would give me great 
pleasure, and the more should my health improve, so as to 
enable me to accompany you. Your new arrangement with 
your sons will I hope give you leisure for it. 

The excellent Polygraph you furnished me with 16 or 18 
years ago has continued to perform its functions well till 
within a 12 month past. By the mere wearing of its joints, as 
VOL. xxvni. 27 



418 Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 

I suppose, it became at last so rickety that I was obliged to 
give it up ; and believing nobody but yourself could put it 
to rights, I have held it up for a safe hand to whom I could 
trust its transportation to you. Such an one now occurs, 
by Mr. Heiskell, a merchant, and neighbor of mine, who 
sets out for Philadelphia by the stage about the 20th to 
procure his annual supply of merchandise. He will deliver 
it to you on his arrival in Philadelphia and if you could 
immediately take it in hand, it may be ready in time for his 
bringing it back. He will also pay you the expense of 
repairs, and of several little things, as spiral chains, inkpots 
etc, which you have been heretofore so kind as to furnish 
me for my polygraphs. The beautiful little portable one 
which Mr. Hawkins sent me is now in a similar rickety 
condition, and I am sorry that, being at a distant place, 
where I have kept it for use, I cannot send it by this favor- 
able opportunity. I shall have it brought here and forward 
it to you by some future conveyance. During the 12 months 
that the one now sent has been disabled, I have had double 
drudgery to perform in writing, which has been very oppres- 
sive, and now, I hope will be relieved. 

Accept the assurance of my affectionate attachment and 

respect. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

MONTICELLO, December 4th, 1825. 
DEAR SIR : 

Mr. Heiskill delivered my Polygraph safe and in good 
condition, and when I consider how much time and labor it 
has saved me since his return I look back with regret to 
that which I have lost by the want of it a year or two. The 
gold pens write charmingly as free pens, and I use them for 
my common writing in preference to the quill, but when 
applied to the polygraph I find that they make the shank 
of the copying pen so long as to wabble and be unsteady. 
I return therefore to the old pen point as best. But why 
not make these of gold also, and save the everlasting 
trouble of mending the peris ? As I see no reason to doubt 



Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peak, 1796-1825. 419 

the preference of the golden point, I have cut two of quill 
which exactly suit and fit between the two leaves of the nib 
of my pen-tube. I shall be very glad if your artist will 
make me a pair of gold points of the same length, breadth, 
thickness and form, very exactly. The pen-tube itself having 
its screw so worn as no longer to command motion in the 
pen, I am obliged to send it to you, for we have no body here 
who can do anything of the kind. Whether the old thread 
can be cut deeper or a new screw must be made you will be 
best judge. I have stuck one of my model points into the nib 
of this, and the other is detached. In making a remittance to 
Mr. Vaughan of a fractional sum there will be a fractional 
balance of 3 or 4 D. over which I pray him to pay over to 
you to cover these little jobs, and the sooner you can send 
me the tube and points by mail, the sooner I can resume 
the use of my polygraph. 

On the loth inst. I shall have an opportunity by a student 
of our University returning to Philadelphia for the vacation, 
to send you my other Polygraph, which needs a little recti- 
fication only. God bless you and long preserve a life past 
in doing so many kindnesses to your friends. My health is 
improving, and I am now able to get on my horse again. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
MR. PEALE. 

MONTICELLO, Dec. 28, 1825. 
DEAR SIR : 

In mine of the 1st I mentioned that I would send my 
other Polygraph by Mr. Millar of Germantown a student of 
ours who would return after vacation. I did so and he 
promised to call on you with it on his arrival in Philadel- 
phia, which would be about the 20th. Since that I have had 
full trial of my gold pen points which I received safely in 
yours of the 9th. They answer so perfectly and so much 
better than anything else which I have tried that I will pray 
you to put the same kind into the one you have in hand. 
Ever and affectionately 

Yours, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON. 



420 Engraved Works of David Edwin. 

ENGRAYED WOKKS OF DAVID EDWIN. 

(Not mentioned in Mr. Hildeburn' s List.) 

BY MANTLE FIELDING. 

[THE PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY 
published in 1894 a most interesting list of engravings by David Edwin, 
compiled by Mr. Charles E. Hildeburn. Since that time a number of 
portraits have been found, and it is hoped that the following additions, 
together with a list of subject prints, will be of interest to the collectors 
of the works of David Edwin.] 

JOSEPH ADDISON. 

Full bust, head to left, (under) Edwin sc. Addison. 
Published by R. Johnson ; 1805. H. 3.2/16". Oval. (The 
Poetical Works of Joseph Addison 16 Philadelphia. 1805.) 

ALEXANDER IST. EMPEROR OF RUSSIA. 
Bust, in uniform, cocked hat, to right (under) D. Edwin 
sc. Alexander 1st. Emperor of Russia. Vig. in rectangle. 
H. 4.9/16" W. 3.7/16". 
I. As described. 
II. (above) Farrand, Mallory & Co. Boston. 



BAINBRIDGE. 

Commodore W m Bainbridge of the United States Navy. 
(" of the United States Navy" in open letters.) H. 3.3/4" 
W. 3.1/8". Stuart pinx. Edwin sc. 

JOHN BERNARD. 
(Not fully noted in Hildeburn.) 

Full bust, head slightly to left, (under) T. B. Freeman 
excudit/ D. Edwin Sc/ Mr. Bernard, Comedian/ Phila. 
Published by T. B. Freeman May 1st 1796./ Oval. Line 
border. H. 6" W. 4.12/16". 

NOTE. Hildeburn mentions having seen only one print of this por- 
trait, and that an imperfect one, cut close, in Philips's collection in the 



Engraved Works of David Edwin. 421 

Academy of Fine Arts. A perfect impression with full margin is in 
collection of portraits, Ridgway Branch of Philadelphia Library, 
Philadelphia. 

D? BLACKMORE. 

Full bust, in robes, with wig. Head to right, nearly full 
face. Oval. H. 3.1/16" W. 2.8/16". (under) D. Edwin. 
fc. Df Blackmore. Published by R. Johnson. 

EDM? BURKE. 

Right Hon b ! e Edrn? Burke. (under) D. Edwin fc. 
Three quarters to left, with spectacles. Oval. H. 3.3/16" 
W. 2.12/16". 

ROBERT BURNS. 

Full bust, head to right, body to left, (under) Edwin 
BC. Oval. H. 2.3/4" W. 2.1/8". Oval. 

ADAM CLARK. 

Full bust, with cocked hat. Head to left, nearly full face. 
Oval. H. 3.3/8" W. 2/11/16". (under) Edwin sc. Adam 
Clark, L.L.D. 

JOHN CRAWFORD. 

Bust, head to right, (under) The late John Crawford 
M.D./R.D.G.M. of Masons in Maryland./ D. Edwin sc/. En- 
graved agreeably to a resolution of Cassia Lodge, No. 45, 
as a tribute of personal/ regard & of respect, for the many 
virtues that adorn his character./ H. 3.2/16" W. 2.8/16". 
Oval. 

DUFF AS HAMLET. 



Williams del* Edwin & Boyd sc. Bust to right, head 
to left. Vig. H. 3.5/16" W. 3". (Polyanthos August 
1812.) 

PETER FRANCISCO. 

This representation of Peter Francisco's gallant action 
with nine of Tarleton's Cavalry, in sight of four hundred 
men, which took place in Amelia Co. Virginia in 1781, is 
respectfully inscribed to him by James Webster and James 



422 Engraved Works of David Edwin. 

Warrell. Designed by Warrell, Drawn by Barralet. En- 
graved by D. Edwin, Rectangle. H. 20" W. 25.7/8" 
Published December V 1814. 

D? FRANKLIN AGED 84. 

Full bust, head to left, with spectacles. Oval. H. 2.1/2" 
W. 2". (under) C. W. Peale Pinx. D. Edwin sc. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM III. AND HIS WIFE. 

Frederick William III, King of Prussia and Louisa 
Augustina Wilhelmina Amelia of Mecklenbourg Strelitz 
his Wife. Busts, profiles to left (under) D. Edwin sc. Oval 
in rectangle. H. 4.7/16" W. 3.3/8". 

I. As described. 

II. (above) Farrand, Mallory & Co. Boston. 

Published in " Ladie's & Gentlemen's Cabinet of Extracts, 
or Mirror of Wonder, and Amusements being Choice Selec- 
tions in Nature & Art." Boston. Published by J. Teal, 
(quarto.) 

SOLOMON GESSNER. 

Bust, in profile, to right, (under) D. Edwin fcf Gess- 
ner. Publish'd by J. Savage Jan? I 8 . 1 1802. H. 4" W. 
3.1/8". Oval. 

JOHN HAWKESWORTH. 

Full bust, head to right, (under) D. Edwin fc : John 
Hawkesworth L L D. H. 3.6/16" W. 2.11/16". Oval. 
I. As described. 
II. Modern restrike. 

HENRY IV. 

Bust, to left. Oval, (over print)/ Parsons' Genuine 
Edition of Hume's England./ (under) /Engrav'd by 
Edwin, from an Original Painting./ Henry IV./ Engraved 
for J. Parsons, 21, Paternoster Row, August 17. 1793./ 
I. As described. 

II. First and last lines erased. 



Engraved Works of David Edwin. 423 

HOMER. 

Bust, on engraved title. The Analectic Magazine Vol- 
ume III Philadelphia. Published by M. Thomas, N? 52 
Chestnut St. 1814 (under) C. R. Leslie Del. Edwin sc. 
Over the bust " Sparsas Colligere Frondes." Vig. H. 
2.7/8" W. 4.3/8". 

MARIE ANTOINETTE. 

Louis XVI/ and/ Marie Antoinette/ Engrav'd by D. 
Edwin from the original just Pub* at Paris./ Publish'd by 
GK G. J. and J. Robinson Paternoster Row. Full busts, in 
double circle, 2.3/8" within rectangle 4.1/8" x 2.9/16". 

LUTHER MARTIN. 

Bust, to right, (under) Edwin sc. H. 3" 2.7/16". 
I. As described. 
n. Luther Martin (fac-simile) added. A Modern Restrike. 

SULIMAN MELLIMELNI. 

Bust, with high fez, to left, (under) Edwin Sc. H. 
3.5/16" W. 2.11/16". 
I. As described. 
n. Before Edwin Sc." 

HARRIET ATWOOD NEWELL. 

Nearly half length, to right, (under) "W. Doyle pinx' 
D. Edwin sc. M 1 ? Harriet Newell. Published by Samuel 
T. Armstrong Printer and Bookseller N? 50 Cornhill Bos- 
ton. H. 3.5/16" W. 2.10/16". Oval. 

I. As described in Hildeburn. 

II. " Published by Samuel T. Armstrong Printer and 
Bookseller N? 50 Cornhill Boston." erased and 
the following substituted : " M Harriet Newell./ 
Wife of the Rev. Samuel Newell, died at Port/ 
Louis in the Isle of France, Nov. SO*. 11 1812 in the 
20*/ year of her age, having accompanied her 
husband in/ the benevolent attempt to preach 
Christ to the Heathen." 



424 Engraved Works of David Edwin. 

BRIG? GEN^ PIKE. 

Late of the United States Army./ Fell at the Capture 
of York on Lake Ontario. Half length uniform to right. 
Rectangle. Peale pinxt. D. Edwin. H. 4.15/16" W. 
3.15/16". 

PLUTARCH. 

Bust, in profile, to right (under) D : Edwin fc. H. 
3.6/16" W. 2.12/16". 

"W. SHAKSPEARE. 

Bust, to right, (under) D. Edwin sc./ W. Shakspeare/ 
Oval. H. 4" W. 3.3/16"./ Monroe & Francis Third 
Edition./ (Shakspeare "Works. 9 Vols 12? Boston, 1810.) 

JOHN WALKER. 

Full bust, to left, (under) Edwin Sc. John Walker. 
Engraved for D. Mallory & C? Boston. H. 3.6/16" W. 
2.9/16". Oval. 

I. As described in Hildeburn. 
II. " Engraved for D. Mallory & C Boston." erased. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON. 

Bust to right, profile. Circle. Obverse of a medal in- 
scribed " G. Washington Pres. Unit. Sta." on same plate, 
the reverse inscribed, " Commiss Resigned : Presidency 
Relinq. 1797" Diameter 1.10/16". 

NOTE. This print is ascribed to Edwin by Mr. Chas. H. Hart. 



SUBJECT PRINTS. 
CAIN AND ABEL. 

(above) The/ Death of Abel/ In Five Books,/ From the/ 
German of Gessner,/ Harrison Junf Sculp*/ With/ New Idyls./ 
Philadelphia:/ Printed by ThofL.Plowm an./ 1802./ Cain 
standing with club in attitude of striking Abel kneeling, 



Engraved Works of David Edwin. 425 

surrounded by clouds, figure in back-ground, (under) D. 
Edwin fc* H. 3.11/16" W. 3.14/16". 

ELECTRICITY. 

Configurations made by means of electricity H. 9" W. 
8" (under) D. Edwin Sc. 

THE CREATION OF EVE. 

Adam and Eve; figures surrounded by rocks; clouds 
above; Adam reclines against boulder, Eve with arms 
stretched above to light in clouds, stands or leans beside 
him. Rectangle. H. 5.3/4" W. 3.14/16". Right cor- 
ner. D. Edwin sc. 

SCULPTURE PLATE I./ 

Drawn by H. Howard. Engraved by D. Edwin./ From 
an Antique Marble Group of Cupid & Psyche in the Capi- 
tol./ Rectangle. H. 8.7/8" W. 6". 

PSYCHE. 

Frontispiece/ (Octagon, with kneeling Psyche putting 
arrows in quiver.) D. Edwin sc./ "Then kneeling down," 
etc. etc., 5 lines Pub. by Belcher & Armstrong N". 70 State 
Street, Boston 1808. 

THE SEASONS. 

The Seasons, by James Thompson. (Frontpiece) Female 
figures draped in the position of flying ; below the earth 
surrounded by clouds over which they are spreading a 
cloak. H. 1.1/8" W. 2.1/4". Singleton, del. Vig. Balti- 
more. Published by F. Lucas, jun. 

THE VIRGIN MARY & CHILD. 

Raphael Pinxt. D. Edwin sc. (Engraved for Collin's 
Quarto Bible. Third edition, 1814.) Rectangle. H. 
5.7/16." W. 4.5/16". Relettered for Fourth Edition 
1816. Edwin & Maverick sc. Also in Paul Wright's 
Life of Christ. 4 Schenectady 1814. 



426 Engraved Works of David Edwin. 

THE DARLING ASLEEP. .' 

Vignette of female seated with moon-faced infant on her 
lap. 8 lines, (under) D. Edwin. 
I. As described. 

II. " D. Edwin" erased and "Engraved for the Casket," 
etc. added. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

Ancient Musical Instruments. Plate I. (8 figures.) D. 
Edwin sc. 

ANATOMICAL PLATES. 

Anatomy of the Head and Viscera. (2 plates on one sheet.) 
Plate III C. Bell. del. D. Edwin sc. Plate VII. C. Bell 
del. D. Edwin sc. 

Anatomy of the Heart. Plate I. Fig. 1. Fig. 2. C. Bell 
del. D. Edwin sculp. 

Anatomy of the Head and Neck. Plate III. C. Bell del. 
D. Edwin sc. 

Anatomy of the Head. Plate IV. Fig. 1. Section of 
Head. Fig. 2. Arteries. C. Bell. D. Edwin sculp. 

Anatomy of the Brain. Plate V. C. Bell del. D. Edwin 
sculp. 

Anatomy of the Arm and Shoulder. Plate VI. C. Bell 
del. D. Edwin. 

Anatomy of the Hand. Additional plate VI. C. Cheyne 
del. D. Edwin sculp. 

Anatomy of the Viscera. Plate VII. C. Bell del. D. 
Edwin sculp. 

Anatomy of the Arteries and Trunk. Plate VEIL C. Bell 
D. Edwin sculp. 

Anatomy of the Leg Anterior. Plate IX. C. Bell del. 
D. Edwin sculp. 

Anatomy of the Leg Posterior. Plate X. C. Bell del. D. 
Edwin sculp. 



Engraved Works of David Edwin. 427 

PRAYER BOOK FRONTISPIECE. 

Engraved title with vignette. Edwin sc. to Book of 
Common Prayer, Philadelphia, 1812. 

THE PORTFOLIO. 

Vol. II. (Frontpiece.) Child lightly draped, crowned 
with flowers. D. Edwin sc. H. 2.3/8" W. 2.1/2". Pub- 
lished by Bradford & Inskeep, Philadelphia, and Inskeep 
& Bradford, New York. 

Vol. 4. (Frontpiece.) Female figure, seated with 
Cupids. Vignette. Philadelphia. Published by Bradford 
& Inskeep and Inskeep & Bradford, New York. 

Vol. 5. (Frontpiece.) Nude child as Bachanti, reclin- 
ing against tiger, crowned with vines. D. Edwin sc. 
H. 2.1/8" W. 4.1/8" Philadelphia. Published by Brad- 
ford & Inskeep and Inskeep & Bradford, New York 1811. 

Vol. 6. (Frontpiece.) Angel, with lyre, foot resting 
on top of globe. Edwin sc. H. 2.11/16" W. 2" Phila- 
delphia. Published by Bradford & Inskeep and Inskeep & 
Bradford, New York 1811. 

Vol. 7. (Frontpiece.) Group, Female figures with 
cupids sacrificing to the graces. Edwin sc. H. 2.3/4" 
W. 3.3/4" Philadelphia. Published by Bradford & Ins- 
keep and Inskeep & Bradford, New York 1813. 

INFANCY OF THE SCOTTISH Music 

Oval, Shepard & Shepardess with dog, landscape back- 
ground, (under) Cosway R. A. Pinxt D. Edwin Sculpt 
(four lines) 

"He tun'd his pipe & reed sae sweet, 
The birds stood list'ning by ; 
Ev'n the dull cattle stood & gaz'd, 
Charm' d wi his melody." 
(over) 

Infancy of the Scottish Music H. 4.3/16" W. 6.2/16" 
borderline 2/16" 



428 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 



MAEEIAGE LICENSES OF CAROLINE COUNTY, MARY- 
LAND, 1774-1815. 

CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY DOWNES CRANOR. 

(Concluded from page 345.) 

1800. 

January 1. William Ross and Ann Causey. 
Thomas Harding and Bethany 



Egdell Scondrach and Sally Edgell. 
14. Thomas Reynolds and Frances Smith. 

16. W m . Vickers and Ritty Pritchett. 
18. Jeremiah Rhodes and Sarah Cooper. 
22. Andrew Covey and Sarah Morgan. 

24. Robert Jordan and Dorcas Hopkins. 
February 8. John Hancock and Sally Boon. 

17. Henry Coursey and Rachel Merrick. 
March 18. William Elliott and Rebecca Banoick. 

Daniel Stevens and Juliana Waddell. 

25. John Lee and Nancy Boon. 

April 7. Joshua Lucas and Elizabeth Valliant. 

29. Stephen Lucas and Leah Lecompte. 
May 1. James Harris and Lovey Parker. 

13. John Cooper and Lydia Cooper. 
" Thomas Garrett and Nancy Frampton. 

17. William Plummer and Rebecca Booker. 

20. John Corrie and Rachel . 

June 16. Hezekiah Satterfield and Peggy Diggins. 

22. George Price and Nancy Williamson. 
July 29. Thomas Jones and Ann Hollingsworth. 

30. Levin Wright and Mary Ward. 
August 2. John Cooper and Sarah Smith. 

20. Samuel Lyons and Dorcas Craynor. 

26. Miles Hearnes and Sarah Glandon. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 429 

September 3. Robert Stewart and Nancy Chance. 
11. Charles Case and Precilla Mereditts. 

22. Joseph Vickers and Betsy Davis. 

23. Josiah Genn and Margaret Barker. 
October 28. Andrew Oram and Elizabeth . 

November 4. John Clough and Hannah Prate. 

8. Peregrine Byard and Arabella Hardcastle. 

11. Elijah Barwick and Ann Evitts. 

12. Giles Hicks and Nancy Fountaine. 
15. Joseph Talbot and Elizabeth Mason. 
29. John Clark and Christiana O'Donald. 
29. Solomon Brown and Hester Boon. 

December 3. Nathaniel Sitterfield and Nisah Cahall. 
8. Peter Thilcute and Polly Dean. 

12. Paul Connaway and Priscilla Gauslin. 

13. Edmond Farrele and Elizabeth Winchester. 
17. John Council and Patty Clemants. 

20. John Ashland and Elizabeth Welsh. 

22. White B. Smith and Airey Brown. 

24. John Street and Mary Herrin. 

29. Joseph W. Cerod and Rachel Birth. 

1801. 

January 3. Thomas Fountain and Mary Manship. 
3. Levi Burt and Sally Swift. 
6. Ephraim Faulkner and Esther Harrowfield. 
6. Garritson Waddle and Elizabeth Fisher. 

^^ 

11. Peter Hubbord and Mary Collins. 

12. John Martindale and Charlotte Montague. 
17. James Black and Rachel Swift. 

23. Sanders Griffin and Mary Sherman. 

24. James Nicols and Elizabeth Blades. 
24. James Wilson and Lydia Baynard, 
27. Henry Garey and Hannah Sylvester. 

30. Neils Neall and Lydia . 

February 3. William Dillin and Nancy Morgan. 

" Nathan Plumer [ ?] and Sarah Boon. 



430 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 

February 4. Alex. Able and Rebecca Reed. 

12. James Price and Mary Richardson. 

24. Elbert Downes and Ann Chilcott. 

28. John Dougherty and Prudence Fountain. 

March 10. Stanton Carroll and Sarah Manship. 

14. Anderton Blades and Randle Towers. 

April 1. William Cafran and Milly Snil. 

9. Griffith Cooper and Sophia Favour. 

May 2. William Hall and Livisy Slaughter. 

4. Charles Rouse and Nancy Butler. 

21. Lewis Rhodes and Fanny Orrell. 

25. Samuel Lecompte and Polly Price. 

" Noble Vickers and Rebecca Plummer. 
June 2. Nathl. Perry and Sarah Harper. 

3. Christopher Swift and Francy Rolph. 

Solomon Robinson and Sophia C. Denny. 
9. Levi Dukes and Nancy Alcock. 

William MNeese and Lydia Hopkins. 
19. Thomas Mumfert and Elizabeth Lunarr. 
23. William Williams and Sarah Mason. 

26. Archibald Cohn and Triphenia Morgan. 
" William Faulkner and Prudence Towers. 

27. Charles Critchett and Ann Manship. 
July 11. James Colescott and Polly Davis. 

16. Elijah Phillips and Betsy Dial. 
James Dickinson and Letitia Price. 

21. John Saulsbury and Elizabeth Sharpe. 
23. Andrew Hall and Sarah Meeds. 
August 1. Joshua Craynor and Naomi Vain. 

17. Daniel Voshell and Elizabeth Williams. 
" Jonathan Jacobs and Sarah Wright. 

19. Samuel Wooters and Sally Cartrope. 

20. William Connoly and Mary Jackson. 
25. John Cooper and Margaret Valliant. 

" Philemon Spencer and Eliza Boutle. 
September 5. Thomas Boush and Eliza . 

13. Nathaniel Ellsbury and Margarette Smith. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Mart/land, 177^-1815. 431 

September 16. Thomas Coursey and Mary Boon. 

Thomas Duhadaway and Mary Wright. 

20. William B. Smith and Downes. 

25. Cloudsbury Williamson and Polly Scott. 
29. Abner Roe and Mary Irwin. 

" Christopher Driver and Polly Glann. 
October 2. Nathan Cooper and Anna Stewart. 

7. Resdon Fountaine and Elizabeth . 

27. Thos. Brannock and Nancy Brannock. 

" Shadriack Cooper and Rachel Shery. 
November 3. Isaac Doram and Charlotte Henry. 
7. Thomas Hooper and Jane Burgess. 

16. Thomas Hicks and Eliza Alcock. 

17. John Boon and Peggy Mason. 
December 10. James Clements and Mary Johnson. 

19. Henry Williams and Lydia Cray nor. 

21. Joshua Cooper and Ann Wilson. 
27. William Priest and Betsy Dick. 

31. William Bourke and Elizabeth Gray. 

1802. 

January 4. Aaron Griffith and Nancy Collision. 
5. James Caulk and Sarah Clough. 

Daniel W. Dickinson and Ann Richardson. 
12. William Roe and Patty Brades. 
17. John Sullivan and Rebecca Hubbart. 

19. Asbury Upaton and Nancy Hurd. 

21. Joseph W. Walls and Rebecca George. 

23. Vachel Keene and Sarah Fauntleroy. 
" Shadrach Dean and Rebecca Ruse. 

" Thomas King and Eliza. Lawrence. 

26. Peter Eaton and Rebecca Willis. 
February 9. Robert Roe and Nancy Coxselle. 

16. Richard Whitby and Darkey Boon. 

20. John Wilson and Margaret Russell. 

" Samuel Hardcastle and Francina Fall. 

24. Thomas Andrew and Amelia Dilton. 



432 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177 Jf. 1815. 

March 3. William Kelly and Elizabeth Willis. 

" William Faulkner and Sally Gibson. 

3. John Williams and Susannah Thomas. 
9. John Gibson and Elizabeth Whitby. 

14. John C. Lewis and Mary Ruver. 
17. Robert Jarman and Elizabeth Genn. 
30. John Camper and Polly Dean. 

April 8. Aaron Dut and Anna Simpson. 

21. William Downes and Mary Saulsbury, at 

Cambridge. 

May 11. James Boon and Sarah Caramine. 

25. Andrew Chilton and Catharine Davis. 

28. Thomas Bright and Jane Robinson. 

June 5. James Barwick and . 

15. Burton Faulkner and Elizabeth Barker. 
July 6. Elisha Burt and Catharine Smootters. 

" James Polwell and Sarah Bush. 

" James Coursey and Rebecca Jackson. 

10. John Ruth and Ann Seth. 

14. Andrew Sullivane and Kitty Tims. 

19. William Council and Polly Ewing. 

20. John Satterfield and Ann Parkinson. 

" William Brown and Margaret Longfellow. 

28. Thomas Wherrett and Rebecca Covey. 

August 16. John Barker and Celia Andrews. 

17. Tilghman Andrew and Rebecca Currie. 

18. Thomas Diggins and Wealthy Warner. 

21. John Hunnsay and Charlotte . 

25. William Warner and Polly Diggins. 

27. William Boon and Rebecca Saulsbury. 
" William Saulsbury and Tamsey Dodd. 

28. James Plumer and Eliza Taylor. 

" James Griffith and Mariaim Morris. 
September 2. Tilghman Warner and Rhoda Stevens. 

4. William Bonner and Charity Willis. 

27. James Stranghan and Priscilla Slaughter. 
October 19. S. Wootten and Levice Wright. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Mart/land, 177^-1815. 433 

October 26. Peter Richardson and Nancy Mowbray. 

November 5. Joel Clements and Margaret Roe. 

" Richard Swift and Minty Baggs. 

" Neal Rhodes and Higmitt. 

18. Thos. Saulsbury and Nancy Downes. 

December 1. Athel Stewart and Sarah Dudley. 

" Henry Harris and Rebecca Downes. 

20. Thomas Chambers and Elizabeth Priest. 

21. Dennis Eaton and Mary Chilcutt. 

22. Nathan Barwick and Mary Kinnerront. 

23. Noah Slaughter and Esther Keon. 

" Henry Banberry and Eliza Malcolm. 

30. William Colscott and Eliza Miller. 

31. James Clements and Anna Swift. 

1803. 

January 7. John Longfellow and Jane Walker. 

7. William Stevens and Letta G-owtee. 
17. James Byrn and Henrietta Meeds. 
25. Henry Jones and Eliza Taylor. 

February 1. William Dut and Ann Lay ton. 

2. Washington Young and Ann . 

8. Alex. Challslum and Rebecca Whitby. 

11. Solomon Dean and Eliza Stevens. 
March 3. Nathan Bradley and Winnifred Willis. 

8. John Morriston and Lydia Frampton. 
April 1. Rebecca Clements and Tamza Morris. 
7. William Jump and Ann Price. 

12. Samuel Booker and Leah Coper. 
20. John Doe and Sarah Roe. 

27. Ebraham Jump and Lidney Carter. 
May 3. Samuel Emerson and Mary Butler. 
11. William Steel and Maria Price. 
17. Brownell Melvin and Margaret Craddock. 

20. M Collison and Sarah Cade. 

June 6. George Hall and Mary Steedham. 
7. John Cahall and Margaret Shaw. 
VOL. xxvin. 28 



434 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 

June 11. Samuel Garner and Mary Baker. 

18. Alexander Talson and Sallie Councill. 

21. William Kelley and Rachel Leverton. 
July 5. Stephen Sheiron and Sidney Williamson. 

26. Nass Roe and Lydia Whittington. 

28. Jesse Founder and Margaret Eagle. 

" William Gavin and Margaret Stevens. 
August 13. Charles Morgan and Stirling Andrew. 

24. Olive [?] Saulsbury and Charlotte Griffin. 
31. Thomas Willis and Launtia Willis. 
September 3. James M. Broom and Ann Driver. 

15. Elisha Milford and Celia Willis. 

20. Henry Swiggett and Henrietta Mitchell. 

" John Boon and Priscilla Fountain. 
October 6. Thomas Smith and Charlotte Blunts. 

8. Nathan Russell and Elizabeth Sparks. 
11. John Thomas and Mizza Lloyd. 

11. Isaac Anderson and Mary Smith. 

18. William Thowley and Sarah Sylvester. 

29. Nathan Shawmhawn and Frances Nicols. 
November 8. Charley Prin and Deborah Hunter. 

9. John Martin and Nany Eaton. 

11. James Baueker and Hiphena Thomas. 
11. Edward Holbrook and Mabel Boon. 

16. Stephen Stanford and Henrietta Clark. 
" William Reese and Sarah Sharpe. 

22. Richard Wilson and Sophia Satterfield. 
26. Channy Ridgaway and Eliza th Carty. 

28. Edward Barwick and Sarah Hubbard. 

29. William Oxenham and Fanny Price. 
December 6. John Collscott and Sarah Stevens. 

7. Curtis Connelly and Sarah Carmine. 

13. Mordicaw and Elizth. Oram. 

15. Stephen Rynor and Anna Casson. 

20. Fountain and Sally May. 

" William Towers and Margaret Wooters. 

20. Thomas Turpin and Sarah Richardson. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 435 

December 21. William Smith and Sarah. Dean. 
Thomas Hurd and Marry Harris. 

22. Thos. Carpenter and Deborah Kinnamon. 

24. Lodman Shields and Rachel George. 

28. Philip Russom and Nanny Knatts. 

30. Joseph Newham and Naomy Andrew. 

1804. 

January 5. James Newnoe and Christianna Brown. 

12. James Caulk and Rebecca Keene. 

26. Joseph Durdon and Susan Sangston. 

31. Abner Roe and Elizabeth Satterfield. 
" Levy Russom and Cynthia Knotts. 

February 4. John Wootters and Fanny Willis. 

Daniel Swiggett and Elizabeth Mathews. 
6. Tristram Carman and Jenny Dawson. 

8. Daniel Bartlett and Trippinah Cohie. 
u William Jones and Jane Roe. 

March 5. George Ringgold and Sarah Ratcliff. 
10. Edward Carter and Nanny Whitby. 

13. Henry Casson and Addah Swift. 

16. Isaac Pool and Lydia Wright. 

17. Thomas Chambers and Polly Faulkner. 
19. Stephen Wing and Esther Nash. 

27. John Clements and Rachel Newell. 

29. Henry Thawley and Sarah Hunter. 

April 5. James Edmondson and Sophia C. Robinson. 

9. Robert Roun and Sarah Seword. 

10. Edward Thowley and Nancy Ringgold. 

17. Henry Mason and Nanny Johnson. 
21. John Dean and Margaret Kinnamont. 

25. Nathan Satterfield and Peggy Rudd. 
May 29. James Gray and Charlotte Hudson. 

June 5. Nathan Baynord and Sarah . 

13. James and Sarah Lee. 

18. Clement Todd and Darkas Fountain. 

23. John Williams and Rubecah Tamson. 



436 .Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 

June 25. Thomas MGuire and Channy Carman. 
26. Nath 1 Satterfield and Elizth. Cahalle. 
" James Morgan and Mary Andrew. 
July 14. John Ross and Pheby Boon. 

24. John Smith and Rhoda Perry. 

" Thomas Beal and Hannah Swift. 

25. Jacob Hickman and Britania Eaton. 

30. James Wheatley and Elizth. Morton. 

31. John Pritchett and Rachel Spencer. 
August 11. Wm. D. Glover and Sally Byor. 

18. James Harvey and Nanny Johnson. 
" Daniel Lyon and Fanny Camper. 

28. Henry Martindall and Nany Dwoaikbure. 
September 1. John Kinnamon and Mary Webber. 

15. Thomas Connolly and Lydia Harvey. 

18. William Parratt and Anna Kirby. 

21. William Willoughby and Esther Hopkins. 

29. Joseph Dean and Nany Cop . 

October 3. Lawrence Porter and Margaret Morgan. 

" Joshua Williams and Margaret Thorp. 

23. Samuel Mason and Margaret Clarke. 

24. Beauchamp Eaton and Margaret Stubbs. 
November 6. Anderson Porter and Jane Ewing. 

" Allen Wood and Fanny Warren. 
12. Andrew Lord and Margaret Collins. 
21. Samuel Black and Grace Darem. 
29. Thos. Richardson and Sarah Denny. 
December 11. Andrew Fountain and Elizabeth Moore. 
18. Joseph Coxe and Priscilla Roe. 

" Joseph Wood and Rachel Plummer. 
31. Shadrick Chilcutt and Elizabeth Blades. 

" Thomas Ruse and Margaret Andrew. 

1805. 

January 1. Martain Alford and Britanna Pritchett. 
2. William Slaughter and Prudence Taylor. 
5. Emory Russell and Ann Morgan. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 437 

January 8. Selte Sprouce and Lucretia Turner. 
February 1. William Jackson and Rebecca Faulkner. 
" Alexander Griffith and Mary Collison. 
5. Hugh Valliant and Helender Taylor. 

11. James MComb and Elizabeth Lindere. 

12. James Sharwood and Nanny Tailor. 

16. Emory Satterfield and Elizabeth Colgan. 

26. Fredk. Halbrook and Rachel Craynor. 
March 1. John Stevens and Elizabeth Willis. 

8. William Coursey and Sarah Jones. 

April 20. Henry Nicholson 3rd and Elizabeth Sellers. 

May 7. Samuel Coursey and Rebina Kirby. 

25. Thomas Connor and Rhoda Eaton. 

25. William Higniett and Sarah Peters. 

30. Benjamin Kemp and Sally Price. 

June 17. Thomas Thawley and Nancy King. 

22. John White and Levey Wingate. 

25. William Thawley and Nanny Jump. 
July 9. Thomas Valliant Jr. and Anna Tarton. 

11. John Green and Mary Swan. 

21. Henry Meeds and Martha Ashford. 

23. James Thawley and Rebina Boon. 

27. Thomas Kemp and Ann Prouse. 

30. Levin Wingate and Margaret Meeds. 
August 3. William Cannon and Milliy Emory. 

7. Richard Saulsbury and Rachel Smith. 
14. William Fountain and Ann Cooper. 

17. Benjamin Atwell and Rebina Soward. 

28. Francis Elliott and Sarah Wirthgolt. 

29. Elijah Russell Jr. and Ann Talboy. 
September 3. David Roe and Nanny Wilson. 

11. Andrew Manship and Margaret Russell. 

23. Thomas Plummer and Margaret Holland. 

24. Joseph Carmine and Elizabeth Fitzpatrick. 

26. John Barns and Eleanor Warren. 
October 14. Warner Busteed and Sarah Bell. 

17. Caleb Connelly and Polly Blades. 



438 Marriage Licenses of Caroline, Co., Maryland, 177^-18 15. 

October 24. Reuben Vane and Rhoda Bitlitor. 
November 30. Henry Austin and Rachel Young. 
Robert Cade and Ann Austin. 
Mathew Traverse and Sally Poh. 
Andrew Collison and Nelly Stubbs. 
Mathew Saulsbury and Elizabeth George. 
December 9. James Ruh and Ararninta Hard. 

16. John Malony and Elizabeth Charles. 
21. Solomon Carter and Sarah Puraelle. 
25. John Jackson and Mary Ann Webber. 

28. Samuel Denny and Rebecca Thawley. 
31. Thomas Binding and Sophia Harvey. 
" James Wheeler and Frances Willis. 

" Simeon Johnson and Rebecca Rouse. 

1806. 

January 11. George Graham and Henrietta Willis. 

15. Joseph Newman and Ann Willoughby. 

20. John Delanaway and Mary Jones. 

23. John Beauchamp and Mary Driver. 

" Thomas Smith and Charlotte Martindall. 

29. Peter Chilcutt and Elizabeth Smith. 
February 4. Edward Price and Margaret Casson. 

6. Thomas Cooper and Rebecca Bell. 
11. William Andrew and Rebecca Harris. 
13. William Harris and Lucretia Ward. 
March 7. Moses Craynor and Nancy Seneca. 

8. Thomas Sylvester and Margaret Stradley. 
10. Charles Hubbard and Ruth Lawler. 
13. William P. Rolph and Sarah Nawlee. 
15. Acquilla Vinson and Nancy Vinson. 

18. Jacob Carmeau and Susan Orum. 

19. John Dute and Rachel Simpson. 
27. James Clements Jr. and Mary Roe. 

April 3. William Poor and Nanny Barker. 

4. Moses Hopkins and Sarah Plummer. 
10. Thomas Jenkins and Mary Pigg. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 439 

April 19. Jeremiah Rhodes and Elizabeth Orrell. 

25. John Dean and Amelia Nicols. 

26. Shadrach Glanding and Alice Barwick. 
29. "Williams Summers and Dolly Fab. 

May 19. Robt. Hutchinson and Keziah Partridge. 
24. Ambrose Hobbs and Elizabeth Cannon. 

27. Stephen Lewis and Margaret Ruband. 
June 7. Elijah Morris and Martha Morgan. 

10. David Smith and Celia Swiggett. 

21. Peter Eaton and Rachel Eaton. 
July 19. Jesse Leverton and Mary Eaton. 

22. Abner Leah and Mary Chairs. 
August 2. Garretson Blades and Ann Mitchell. 

9. Charles Mittle and Lydia Swann. 

19. Richard Price and Isabella Austin. 

20. Vinson Emerson and Mary Austin. 

26. Thomas Larimore and Mary Blades. 

27. Samuel Cradock and Nanny Baynord. 
September 6. William Fisher and Keziah Boon. 

9. Samuel Denny and Sarah Jones. 

16. Noah Eaton and Nancy Scadrick. 
" Edgell Scondrach and Ann Pirt. 

17. Mathew Hardcastle and Polly Willis. 

26. Andrew Bawning and Sally Bowdle. 

27. Sullivane Bell and Rachel Jump. 
October 14. Walter Jenkins and Elenor Valliant. 

15. Richard Philips and Javenty Pratty. 
" Thomas Swann and Sarah Roe. 
November 5. George Reed and Mary Harrington. 

7. Bruffett Vinson and Ann Roe. 

8. Henry Costen and Ann O'Bryan. 
15. William Jester and Nancy Coursey. 

" Daniel Bartlett and Elizabeth Harris. 
27. William Cahall and Elizabeth Cox. 

Nathan Jones and Sarah Swift. 
December 2. John M c Combs and Cynthia Ridgaway. 

11. Andrew Reed and Elenor Causey. 



440 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 

December 13. William Burtt and Mary Pippin. 

" Noah Swift and Elizabeth Meredith. 

16. Curtis Eaton and Lavica Connelly. 

20. Benjamin MNeese and Mary Faulkner. 
23. Ephraim Greenhawk and Lydia Taylor. 

25. Daniel Anthony and Abigail Garey. 

26. Jesse Blades and Elizabeth Thomas. 

27. Nathaniel Thomas and Elizabeth Cavender. 
31. William Cahall Jr. and Frances Roe. 

1807. 

January 8. Richard Hudson and Elizabeth Dillen. 

10. Thomas Turner and Sally Sparklin. 

13. William Gardner and Naney Young. 

14. James Sweedlin and Sophia Porter. 
27. Jonathan Eaton and Mary Stubbs. 

29. Brumovell Millven and Margaret P. Wilson. 
" William G. Smith and Nancy Dawson. 
February 6. Zechariah Goutee and Mary Stevens. 
14. Joseph Frampton and Peggy Garner. 

17. Samuel Thawley and Elizabeth Elliott. 

27. John Berry and Ann Kelly. 

March 3. Thomas Seymore and Mary Ann Turner. 

3. Henry Austin and Mary Warner. 

4. Richard Keene and Henrietta Boon. 
Richard Stubbs and Roda Hall. 

21. Andrew Morgan and Mary Morrison. 
25. Nathan Hobbs and Anna Dillen. 

28. Henry Dean and Ann Blades. 

" Jesse Wood and Elizth. Butler. 
April 1. Charles Dean and Prudence Ruh. 

2. John Harrington and Sarah Countess. 
9. Thomas Jaikson and Mary Dawson. 

11. John Jaikson and Rachel Russum. 
25. Jacob Diel and Margaret Critchett. 

" Samuel Crayner and Ann Pearce. 

29. Bennett Wherrett and Peggy Saulsbury. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 441 

May 2. Isaac Swan and Nancy Chance. 

19. John Cox and Izabella Harrington. 

June 2. Joseph Boon and Tilly Mason. 

11. James Keene and Eliza Ann Lucindy 

Carney. 

16. David Neal and Elizabeth Kelley. 

July 1. Caleb Smith and Comfort Russell. 

8. Saulsbury Cannon and Ann Critchett. 

21. Thomas Wibber and Nancy Garrett. 

29. William Milson and Thisay Pippin. 

30. Curtis Beauchamp and Nancy Clarke. 

31. John Pennington and Eliza Mumford. 
August 6. James Lane and Relena Slaughter. 

" Thomas Hill and Charlotte Smith. 

11. Daniel Young and Sarah Cheiznon. 

" Anaren Willoughby and Hersey Jenkins. 

12. Charles Hubbard and Rebena Anthony. 

14. Thomas Bradly and Rebena Baynord. 

15. Major Bradley and Sophia Caldwell. 
25. Curtis Dean and Keziah Williams. 

" John Plummer and Mary Turner. 
29. George Brownie and Sarah Pritchett. 

" Levin Eaton and Mary Cockrin. 
September 1. Henry Bolton and Mary Holmer. 
" Solomon Dean and Lilly Dill. 

29. Samuel Mathews and Nancy Roe. 
October 22. James Sangston and Sarah Stevens. 

23. Capy Pritchett and Lydia Willoughby. 

7. James Greenlee and Esther Willoughby. 
10. Richard Mason and Sarah Scott. 

16. Zachariah Winwright and Nelley Davis. 
23. Timothy Caldwell and Nancy Williams. 
28. Thomas Sylvester and Rachel Hopkins. 

December 8. Gilbert Scott and Ann Roe. 

14. Joshua Wright and Nancy Hutchinson. 
19. John Shanks and Lydia Baynard. 

30. Isaac Nicols and Elizabeth Fountain. 




442 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 

1808. 

January 2. Eli Sharklin and Nancy Nicols. 

5. John Williamson and Britannae Todd. 

6. Thomas Orem and Rachel Brown. 

12. Nathan Grayless and Sarah Evitt. 

13. John P. Price and Mary Davis. 

19. James S. Colscott and Lucretia Hardesty. 
23. Michael Bateman and Sarah Merrick. 

" John Saulsbury and Margaret Manship. 
February 1. James Pearce and Ann Green. 

9. "William Sewell and Lucretia Cannon. 

13. Gilden Hughcall and Mary Wilson. 

22. Gilbert Faulkner and Elizabeth Dill. 

25. William Chilton and Nancy Postlethwaite. 

25. Jonathan Grault and Lydia Knotts. 
March 7. Andrew Fountain and Nancy Fountain. 

8. Thomas Hubbard and Mary Lyons. 
" William Connolly and Sophia Eaton. 

23. William Burton and Susan Wright. 
27. Nathan Slaughter and Celey Bartlett. 

April 2. Henry Grayham and Elizabeth Smith. 

9. John Chilcutt and Ann Bouse. 

9. Isaac Bayley and Mary Fountain. 
Daniel Webster and Elizabeth Wilson. 

19. Saml. Pinfield and Sarah Hye. 

26. Josiah Ginn and Margaret Newcomb. 
May 3. Peter Wilson and Ann Roe. 

10. William Gardner and Rebecca Carpenter. 

20. Jesse Eaton and Peggy Bartlett. 

27. William Green and Rita Rigby. 

29. Stephen Lucas and Sally Keene. 
June 11. Daniel Smithe and Elizabeth Price. 

14. Samuel Carter and Nancy Croney. 

17. William Lowe and Rebecca Wolcott. 

18. Lloyd Lord and Elizabeth Knotts. 
July 12. Absalom Meredith and Margaret Hines. 

30. Tilghman Todd and Mary Fountain. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 17 7^-18 15. 443 

August 6. Robert Jones and Elizabeth Willis. 

11. Benjamin Faulker and Nancy Clough. 

13. Ambrose Hobbs and Nancy Stevens. 
15. John Comica and Ann Baynard. 

September 3. Edward Street and Sarah Barnes. 

6. Daniel Stevens and Nancy Cannon. 
u James Gray and Nancy Sherman. 

10. Joseph Kidd and Elizabeth Morris. 
20. James Bartlett and Mary Roe. 

29. John Saulsbury and Margaret Virden. 
October 3. James Wright of John and Mary Kelley. 

10. Andrew Beuchamp and Nancy Andrew. 

15. Staten Berry and Nancy Morriston. 

" Pierre W. Stewart and Sarah Carroll. 

" John Baynard and Rachel Harris. 

22. Aaron Duke and Rebecca Blades. 

November 12. James Butler and Mary Smith. 

14. Levin Charles and Mary Hurd. 

16. Henry Covington and Ann Fisher. 
December 8. John Pronce and Elizabeth Johnson. 

13. Henry Friend and Mary Aldridge. 
16. Casson Fountain and Martha Fisher. 
28. James Harrison and Nancy Martindale. 

30. Michael Hubbard and Rhoda Sullivan. 

31. Peter Pinfield and Mary Harris. 

1809. 

January 2. Levi Chance and Sally Roe. 

3. John Andrew and Tamsey Andrew. 

4. George Collison and Sally Lyden. 

7. John Graham and Anna Ritta Dawson. 
7. Thomas Kirby and Britanne Morgan. 
9. James Nooner and Lydia Morriston. 

12. James Allen and Elizabeth Powell. 
19. Solomon Clifte and Anne Clarke. 
24. John Handy and Rebecca Nicols. 

" Henry Pearce and Townsend. 



444 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177 4.- 1815. 

January 25. Joseph Clarke and Mary Hudson. 
February 1. John Biley and Nancy Hudson. 

Arthur Willis and Nancy "Wright. 
9. Henry "Willoughby and Philadelphia Will- 
oughby. 

20. Levin Willoughby and Darcos Stuart. 

21. Nathan Shaunahan and Esther Brooks. 

27. Collison Pritchett and Nancy Peters. 

28. Austin Foster and Henny Stokes. 

28. Nathan Monticue and Elizabeth Boon. 
March 14. William Whiteley and Elizabeth Baynord. 

14. James Johnson and Nancy Whiteley. 
14. Henry Austin and Elizabeth Austin. 
21. Parrott Roe and Rebecca Roe. 
April 1. Azle Stevens and Nancy Andrew. 

4. William Fountain and Sarah Barton. 

17. Ezekiel Gullitt and Lucretia Jump. 

18. William Wheatley and Bath. Chance. 

24. Eli Connelly and Margaret Johnson. 
May 4. Levin Stack and Sally Brown. 

8. Thomas Vinson and Margaret Stokes. 

19. John Burnett and Sally Neall. 

20. John Barrott and Polly Kurd. 
31. William Hooper and Sally Clark. 

June 8. Levi Russom and Sally Bradley. 

" James Pearce and Elizabeth Colston. 
14. Richard Cantwell and Levisa Andrew. 

21. Samuel Lucas and Ann M c Cormick. 
July 16. William Rich and Henrietta Glover. 

17. William Aarons and Rebecca Holland. 

18. Gibson Andrew and Rebecca Townsend. 

22. Christopher Smith and Polly Caulk. 

25. William Polk and Livinia Causey. 

29. William Wales and Elizabeth Dawson. 
August 4. Charles Clayton and Hannah Chambers. 

8. Benjamin Hall and Betsey Binding. 

9. William Pratt and Mary Carmean. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774. 1815. 446 

August 17. Henry Jaques and Sarah Hopkins. 
19. Nathan Corkin and Rebecca Willis. 

22. Peter Hinsley and Rebecca Chambers. 
26. George Newlee and Hannah Burte. 

30. Washington Adams and Jane Wolford. 
" Evans Price and Susan Burton. 

September 4. James Manlove and Jane Turner. 

5. James Barwick and Anna Price. 

6. William Roe and Sally Pearce. 

13. George Bozman and Nancy Sharpe. 

25. Weedon Thawley and Mary Whittington. 

October 4. David Anthony and Nancy Alls. 

6. Jesse Hubbard and Elizabeth Kelly. 

9. Abner Roe and Nancy Harris. 

10. Charles Jewell and Elth. Erwin. 

13. Samuel Parker and Elizabeth Nobll. 

31. Pennell Emerson and Hannah Turner. 
November 2. Thomas Pearson and Ann Anthony. 

16. Thomas Willis and Lovey Cranor. 

23. Benson Dill and Polly Kinney. 
December 2. Richard Swift and Sarah Brown. 

6. Garman Cade and Nancy Dulaney. 

19. Gove Smith and Rosannah Lewis. 

20. William Jewell and Sarah Jewell. 
23. Charles Gielding and Elizabeth Swift. 

1810. 

January 16. Andrew Sheppard and Nelly Pritchett. 

25. Edward Flinn and Nancy Saulsbury. 

30. Tilghman Connelly and Ann Satterfield. 
February 8. Richard Gore and Ann Barwick. 
9. Isaac Robinson and Sarah Wing. 

12. William T. Clarke and Rachel Boon. 

14. Edward Gibson and Louisa Parkinson. 

17. John B. Smith and Polly Fountain. 

20. Jacob Derochbrane and Polly Welsh. 

21. Fountain Collison and Elizabeth Draper. 



446 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 

March 6. Solomon Kenton and Margaret Hambleton. 

16. Henry Fisher and Rebecca Kelly. 
May 2. Levin Stevens and Polly Rich. 
June 6. William Raynard and Polly Warren. 

12. Stephen Dawley and Nancy Everingham. 
23. Emanuel Swift and Elizabeth Jump. 

25. Thomas Kinsley and Eleoner Sylvester. 

30. Abraham Thompson and Margaret Plummer. 
July 2. Henry Emory and Henrietta M. Blake. 
12. James Roe and Mary Mood. 
" Isaac Smith and Sally Laverton. 
27. Ezekiel Trice and Elizabeth Chilcut. 
August 4. Nathan Brown and Nelly Johnson. 

" Thomas Culbreth and Ann Hardcastle. 

16. Solomon Wooters and Elizabeth Ross. 

27. Jeremiah Beauchamp and Sally Chilcutt. 

29. John MDaniel and Mary Cornelius. 
September 21. Thomas Genn and Nancy Bradley. 

" David Neale and Celia Collins. 
October 13. Thamas Black and Elizabeth Brown. 

30. Jonas Farrowfield and Elizabeth Price. 
November 14. Joseph Miller and Elizabeth Baynord. 

17. John Lane and Elizabeth Isgitt. 
December 4. Nimrod Andrew and Nancy Collins. 

15. Daniel Cheezum and Sarah Walker. 
" Edward Todd and Elizabeth Sullevane. 
20. John Clements and Nancy Milburn. 

26. William Manship and Ann Plummer. 

28. John A. Batchelder and Lucy Harding. 

29. Peter Covey and Peggie Eaton. * 

1811. 

January 2. David Harrington and Elizabeth Catrip. 

11. John Poor and Nancy Genn. 

15. Edward I. Wilson and Henrietta Brooke. 

" James Le Compte and Elizabeth Le Compte. 

23. Garretson Reese and Deborah Willoughby. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 447 

January 24. Jeremiah Vinson and Elizabeth Johnson. 
25. Samuel Andrew and Lesha Carroll. 

28. Isaac Ridout and Sarah Mattee. 

29. James Meloney and Mary Williams. 
February 8. Charles Stokes and Ann Leach. 

18. Mathew Stokes and Elizabeth Jones. 

21. Anthony Ross and Elizabeth Richardson. 
28. Benjamin Roe and Angeline Briley. 
March 12. James Wootter and Sarah Vincent. 
" John Fisher and Tamsey Peters. 
" Peter Jump and Rachel Austin. 

19. John Hynson and Sally Jones. 

19. Thomas Boyce and Sarah Johnson. 
April 4. James Horney and Mary Keene. 

5. Daniel Caulk and Priscilla Roe. 

16. Richard Wilson and Ann Matilda Cole. 

20. Jeremiah Rhoads and Rachel Seth. 
25. Jeremiah Marriss and Sarah Clarke. 

May 4. Levin Hicks and Elizabeth Loveday. 

14. Nicholas W. Dorsey and Elizabeth Strangton. 
June 6. David Sylvester and Mary Clements. 

6. Robert Stevens and Hester Driver. 

18. William Turner and Ann Dudley. 
July 8. Levin Wert and Sarah Dean. 

9. Andrew Clarke and Lydia Bartoe. 

19. William Adams and Julianna Blunt. 
23. Jesse Collins and Peggy Andrew. 

27. Nicholas Millington and Lucretia Blades. 
August 14. Thomas Bending and Lotty Stokes. 

15. Thomas Duhadaway and Rebecca Faulkner. 

17. James Caulk and Mary Hayes. 

21. Elijah Blades and Polly Bowdle. 

22. Joseph Harrison and Peggy Emerson. 

27. Robert Fountain and Jane Clendening. 

28. Peter Chance and Ann Webber. 
September 5. Abraham Trice and Sally W. Clayland. 

19. Joseph Anthony and Nancy Turner. 



448 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-1815. 

September 23. William Colston and Deborah Barwick. 
24. Nathan Grayless and Charlotte Johnson. 
26. William Faulkner and Delia Moore. 
26. Daniel Helms and Lehaner Haddox. 

26. John Lister and Mary Kidden. 
October 5. Thomas Wood and Kezia Morgan. 

8. John Perry and Fanny Lucas. 

10. Charles Tildon and Sally Townsend. 

22. Sylvester Cannon and Kitty Davis. 

28. Levin Watkins and Milly Andrew. 
" Richard Andrew and Mary Story. 

November 20. Jeremiah Jefteries and Amelia Wainwright. 

27. Jacob Gordon and Susan Kemp. 

29. John Sterling and Sophia Smith. 

30. John Newman and Patty Jewell. 
December 7. William Orrell and Mary Hardcastle. 

17. Noah Chance and Polly Thawley of Edward. 
21. Ephraim Draper and Mary Cooper. 

27. Thomas Dunawin and Polly Anderson. 

31. William Nicols and Elizabeth Dawson. 

1818. 

January 2. John Wilson and Mary Moore. 

3. Garretson Turner and Sally Gowty. 

11. William Millington and Ann Knotts. 

18. Southy Prewett and Rachel Kelly. 
24. Thomas Vandyke and Sally Hooper. 

February 1. Mathew Harding and Polly Wheatley. 
5. Elijah Chance and Rebecca Vaulk. 

23. Giles Haky and Henrietta Fountain. 
26. Peter Morgan and Rachel Cockein. 

March 4. Thomas Walker and Rebecca Cox. 

9. Daniel Brown and Lavinia Stevens. 
10. Abel Griffith and Mary Stevens. 
26. John Collison and Elizabeth Butler. 
31. John Seth and Nancy MGinnis. 

April 11. George Prouse and Ann Satterfield. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177^-18 15. 449 

April 15. Daniel Anthony and Sally Faulkner. 
22. James Sangston and Ann Robinson. 

24. Solomon Pippin and Fanny Brown. 
May 5. William Waddell and Nancy Davis. 

" Nehemiah Allen and Henry Jewell. 

" Samuel Chance and Ann Pinfield. 

7. William Alford and Ann Crawford. 

18. George Andrew and Elizabeth Morgan. 

21. William Sewell and Lovey Carmine. 

July 2. Robert Porter and Ann Cradock. 

21. Henry Jump and Marice Parrott. 

25. John Irvine and Elizabeth Hughes. 
28. Andrew Baggs and Fanny Strangton. 

" Mier Cahill and Elizabeth Briley. 

30. Robert Sylvester and Mary Duhaniel. 

August 4. Richard Harrington and Elizabeth Faulkner. 

6. Jesse Connelly and Sophia Thomas. 

20. Samuel Mackey and Mary Crawford. 

28. Samuel Satterfield and Sarah Willis. 
September 5. Henry Willis and Sarah Porter. 

12. William Faulkner and Peggy Melville. 

17. Warren Dawson and Nancy Griffith. 

25. Emory Willis and Margt. Fornerder. 

26. Andrew Price and Rebecca Clarke. 

29. Richard Willoughby and Deborah Lawrence. 
October 7. Elisha Draper and Ann Collison. 

15. Abraham Pritchett and Rodoh Kelley. 
20. Nathan Todd and Polly Fountain. 

November 13. William Oldfield and Rebecca Cahall. 

14. George Spurry and Adolpha Stokes. 

" Richard Willoughby and Tamsey Gray. 

18. James Ridgeway and Nancy Jump. 

19. Brannock Smith and Peggy Esbary. 
25. Short Willis and Polly Griffith. 

December 15. Risdon Smith and Mary Robinson. 

" John Morgan and Lucretia Whemett. 

16. William Kelley and Rachel Ward. 
VOL. xxvin. 29 



450 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

December 16. "William Grayley and Elizabeth Hughey. 
26. Jonathan Butler and Ann Bush. 
29. Foster Boon and Rebecca Countiss. 
29. John Dupee and Nancy Lane. 



1813. 

January 2. Clement Hubbard and Sally Eaton. 

7. James Orrell and Elizabeth Orrell. 

11. Nathan Jump and Elizabeth Sylvester. 

12. Edward Pritchett and Nancy Wheeler. 

13. Solomon Twiford and Catharine Boon. 

14. Samuel Gelin and Fanny Barcus. 
16. Nathaniel Talbot and Rachel Hall. 

27. William Stubbs and Elizabeth Conaway. 
February 3. David Harrington and Sarah Faulkner. 

6. Samuel Paine and Elizabeth Brown. 
13. Seth Russom and Mary Phillips. 

15. Elijah Fisher and Ann Scott. 

18. James H. Fleharty and Nancy Saunders. 
22. James Hubbard and Ann Cortin. 
March 2. David Roe and Elizabeth Pippin. 

" Samuel Milbourn and Sarah Pippin. 

" James Banning and Polly Brown. 
18. William Wright and Rebecca Dukes. 
20. John Eaton and Rebecca Hicks. 
30. John Godwin and Elizabeth Hall. 

Francis H. Hally and Elizabeth Taylor. 
April 3. Henry Thawley and Sarah Chippey. 

3. Emanuel Cranor and Polly Wodman. 

5. Watson Fountain and Elizabeth Barwick. 

5. William Green and Mary MCarty. 

6. Joseph Bell and Fanny Le Compte. 

8. George Millington and Ann Scott. 
20. William Keene and Allenora Pratt. 
29. Athel Stewart and Margaret Dudley. 

June 1. Atwell Chance and Susan Baynord. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 451 

June 5. Robert Wootters and Mary Warner. 

15. Jesse Blades and Nancy Walker. 

23. Charley Grayless and Margaret Lucas. 

July 17. John Lane and Elizabeth Cotner. 

20. Thomas Clendening and Letitia West. 
August 25. Lewis Willis and Elenor Dillon. 

" George Newlee and Mary Burt. 
September 4. Richardson Stubbs and Esther Watkins. 

8. Nathan Jones and Rebecca Rich. 

9. William Haghlett and Many Richards. 
" James Pearce and Mary Roberts. 

15. James Perry and Charity Carlile. 

17. Levin Murphy and Hannah Taylor. 

22. Thomas Wainwright and Rebecca Bordey. 

23. William Morgan and Elizabeth Taylor. 

27. Thomas Corkin and Elizabeth Snow. 
October 7. Jonathan Porter and Nancy Russom. 

9. George Dill and Nancy Barney. 
12. John Emory and Caroline 

28. William Wootters and Levice Mathers. 
" Richard Skinner and Sophia Sudler. 

November 2. Samuel Talbott and Anne Manship. 
" Purnell Fisher and Mary Wheeler. 
3. William Mittle and Peggy Andrew. 

9. Fountain and Sally Hall. 

" John Gainer and Henrietta Ross. 
25. Philip Le Compte and Peggy Willoughby. 
December 14. John Stevens and Nancy Andrew. 
14. Richard Andrew and Sally Turner. 

16. George Manship and Mary Steel. 

18. John Clark and Elizabeth Barcus. 

21. Andrew K. Russell and Catharine Whiteley. 

22. Thomas Anderson and Elizabeth Dawson. 

23. John Gill and Elizabeth Shaw. 

24. Abel Gouty and Elizabeth Wheelton. 

29. John Hutson and Elizabeth Wilk. 
31. John Handcock and Susan Green. 



452 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774--1815. 

1814-. 

January 6. William Oxenham and Hester Jump. 

12. Curtis Towers and Elizabeth Russell. 
18. Samuel Roe and Elizabeth Leath. 
22. Joseph Harrison and Mary Melony. 
24. Ezekiel Cooper and Louisa Baggs. 
31. Horatio Sharpe and Sarah Carroll. 

February 1. Elijah Higinett and Sally Vincent. 
8. John Taylor and Elizabeth Jones. 
" Richard Gore and Fanny Wood. 

14. John Clarke and Ruth Vinson. 

15. Thomas Priest and Elizabeth Bradly. 
March 3. Alex. C. Fiynn and Sarah Holmes. 

15. Seth Godwin and Ann Harrington. 

22. Peter Todd and Rebecca Dean. 
April 16. John Barces and Fanny Pratt. 

" John Simpson and Wilheminah Griffin. 
May . Noah Black and Margaret Keets. 

21. George Dawson and Rebecca Haddon. 

24. Bowdle Blades and Rhoby Tunely. 

31. Samuel Faulkner and Elizabeth MNeth. 
" Caleb Dehortz and Ann Price. 
June 7. Thomas Postlethwait and Henrietta P. Hard- 
castle. 
18. James Carty and Sally Walker. 

23. Abraham Griffith and Mary Manship. 
27. James Seavy and Caroline Mathews. 

29. Greenbury Sullivan and Elizabeth Garey. 
July 22. Nathaniel Thomas and Mary Baynord. 

25. Thomas Fountain and Mariah Coursey. 
August 6. Noble Andrew and Ann Willes. 

8. James Hughes and Margaret Satterfield. 

8. John Fleharty and Fanny Harris. 
10. John Parkinson and Lydia Clarke. 
15. William Stewart and Mary Steel. 
September 3. William Wheatley and Frances Newman. 

13. Thomas Breeding and Elizabeth Dukes. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1774-1815. 453 

September 14. Peter Chance and Elizabeth Greenhock. 

16. John Hatchings and Lydia Hughes. 
October 19. Richard Flowers and Celia Blades. 

24. William Stevens and Ebey Andrews. 

26. George Prewitt and Mary Hordikin. 
November 15. Joseph Crumpton and Ann Dillon. 

" Isaac Clements and Nancy Burtt. 
December 1. Gideon Cooper and Mary Greenell. 

5. Thomas Council and Susan Williams. 

8. John Prouse and Sally Lord. 

10. Daniel Fountain and Margt. Quality. 
" Cretchu Lord and Lydia Harrington. 

17. Elijah Lyons and Sally Sullivan. 

" Levin Blades and Margaret Willis. 

20. Richard Lemar and Mary Williams. 
22. John Warner and Dorcas Carmean. 
24. Edward White and Elizabeth Hubbard. 

27. William Choffinch and Dorcus Manship. 
31. Thomas Williams and Elizabeth Chipman. 

" Allen Connelly and Margaret Davis. 
" William Covey and Amelcka Covey. 

1815. 

January 3. Absalom Adams and Mary Bartlitt. 
" Henry Carmean and Maria Walcott. 

4. Joseph Price and Sally Russom. 

5. Thomas M'Crakin and Fanny Strahan. 

9. Baynard Harris and Sarah Baily. 

11. John Hubbard and Ann Kelly. 

12. Vinson Morris and Sarah Stewart. 
16. Andrew Barton and Deliza Kelly. 

18. John Cheezum and Mary North. 

21. Samuel Lucas and Maria B. Manship. 
24. William Hurd and Elizabeth Rich. 

February 2. Elijah Blades and Mary Dodd. 

2. Henry Collins and Mary Cranor. 
" Daniel Helm and Dorcas Lyons. 



454 Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 1771^-1815. 

February 18. .Aaron Wilson and Sarah Gill. 
March 9. David M. Man and Lucy Choflmch. 

11. Robert Bishop and Elizabeth Millington. 

26. Solomon Brown and Henrietta Smith. 
29. William Parrott and Eliza Chance. 

April 26. Charles Price and Margaret Forman. 

May 8. Aaron Lister and Nancy Warren. 

10. Stephen Sanford and Rachel Sheppord. 

25. Peter Holding and Mary Pearse. 

June 1. Thomas Wadman and Margaret Saulsbury. 

5. James Townsend and Deborah Connelly. 

6. William Wright of Caleb and Elonor Dukes. 
8. Merchant Cooper and Margaret Plummer. 

13. Perry Pippin and Mary Newlee. 
17. James Collins and Mary Adams. 

" Isaac Hyatt and Ann W. Dickinson. 

19. James Pearce and Harriet Charles. 

27. Ennalls Collins and Mahala Harding. 
29. Samuel Thayrp and Viney. Wright. 

July 4. Nathan Grayless and Sarah Le Compte. 

6. Henry Meeds and Ann Blunt. 

8. William Collins and Mary Wilkinson. 

15. Isaac Cox and Sarah . 

17. James Coalston and Frances E. Hardcastle. 

20. William Miller and Rachel Coursey. 
August 9. James Gray and Mehaley Hubbord. 

14. William Keetes and Sarah King. 

15. Samuel Trewitt and Ann Money. 

20. Joseph P. W. Richardson and Lucy B. 

Potter. 

23. Abner Roe and Elizabeth Miller. 
" William Christopher and Mary Eaton. 
31. John Harris and Sarah Stack. 
September 1. Joshua Boon and Rebecco Bradley. 

5. Thomas Burchenal and Juliana Errickson. 

12. William Gibson and Isabella Watkins. 

13. Henry Willoughby and Elizabeth Casson. 



Marriage Licenses of Caroline Co., Maryland, 177 4- 1815. 455 

September 22. Edmond H. Owens and Margretta Turner. 
26. James Faulkner and Ann Collins. 

28. Nimrod Barwick and Nancy Webb. 
October 6. Thomas Connelly and Sarah Davis. 

7. Elijah Fisher and Kelly Brown. 
24. Charles Willis and Nancy Steel. 
November 16. William T. Coursey and Priscilla Sharp. 
20. Henry B. Hooper and Maria Jefferies. 

29. William Jewell and Susan Erwin. 
December 9. John Roe and Ann Barwick. 

12. John Beauchamp and Mary Andrew. 

" Thomas Camper and Levica Rowens. 

" John Miller and Mary Kidd. 
14. Brison Gill and Ann Fountain. 



456 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 



PENNSYLVANIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

BY LOTHROP WITHINGTON, 30 LITTLE RUSSELL STREET, W. C., LONDON. 
(Including " Gleanings" by Henry F. Waters, not before printed.) 

(Continued from page 175.) 

JOHN PENNINGTON, Amersham "Woodside, Bucks, Gentle- 
man. Will 31 May 1708 ; proved 2 June 1710. To Brother 
Daniell Wharley and Thomas Ellwood of Coleshill in parish 
of Amersham, county Hertford, messuage " Beale house" 
where I dwell in said parish of Amersham, alsoe " Wallnutt- 
tree Farme" (137 acres) in Westbeer and Sturrey, Kent, 
alsoe " Palme-Tree Farme" (20 acres) in ditto, alsoe " Good- 
neston Farme" (160 acres) in Goodnestone, Feversham, and 
Graveney, Kent, Alsoe " Ewell Farme" in Feversham, Good- 
nestone, Herne Hill, and Graveney, Kent, some of them or 
one of them in Kent in occupation of James Compers, all in 
trust, to pay debts &c. then to use of my Neice Mary Pen- 
nington for 99 years if she soe long live, then to her issue, 
in default to my nephew Isaac Pennington and his issue, 
in default Wallnut Tree and Palme Tree Farms to my 
said [sic] sister Mary Wharley, and rest of said messuages 
to my Nephew William Penn for 99 years if he soe long 
live, and then to his issue, in default to my Neice Letitia 
Aubrey and issue, then to said sister Mary Wharley &c. &c. 
Executors, if brother Edward Pennington die, discharged 
of all debts due. To nephew Isaac Pennington my silver 
cup with an handle and the Cypher of my name engraven, 
alsoe Silver Pottinger with my coate of armes thereon. To 
nephew Daniell Wharley Silver Bason. To Nephew Isaac 
Wharley silver cann with my armes thereon. To Nephew 
Henry Wharley largest Silver Sugar Box. To Nephew Ed- 
ward Wharley Silver Pottinger with cypher of my name. 
To neice Mary Pennington my Two Ear'd Silver cup and 
second beste Suite of Damaske. Rest of plate and house- 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 457 

hold goods to sister Mary Wharley. My body I desire In- 
terred in Burying Ground at New Jourdaines in Parrish 
called St. Giles Chalfont, County of Bucks, near my dear 
and loving Father and Mother. To poor for Bread 10, 
one half to St. Giles Chalfont and one half to the part of 
Amersham which lies in said county of Bucks. To Wil- 
liam Grimsdale of St. Peters Chalfont, Bucks, Maltster, and 
William Russell of St. Giles Chalfont, yeoman, 10 to be 
disposed of by them and executors. To man servant all 
woollen apparell; to maid all wearing Linnen. To said 
Nephews Daniel, Isaac, Henry, and Edward Wharley 50 a 
peece at 21. To nephew Isaac Pennington ditto. Execu- 
tors: brother Daniell Wharley, and said Thomas Ellwood. 
Witnesses : Harb* Springett, John Page, Joseph David. 17 
August 1708, Neither executor to be answerable for acts of 
other. Witnesses : Ann Cockersall, John Page, Codicil 2 d 
day of the Month called May 1710, John Pennington of 
Hamlett of Woodside parish of Agmundesham, Bucks, 
Gent. Aunt Judith Molineux being dead, executors to raise 
1000 out of Goudestown, and pay 400 to nephew Isaac 
Pennington in West New Jersey in America (son of brother 
Edward Pennington) and 200 each to nephews Daniel 
Wharley and Isaac Wharley and 100 each to Henry Whar- 
ley and Edward Wharley &c. Witnesses : Timothy Wing- 
field, Richard Boveingden, Stephen Salter. Codicil 5 of 
month called May 1710. To neice Mary Pennington rent 
charges of 30 a year &c. To two servants Adam Sharp 
my man and Anne Cockersall 10 each. To friend Thomas 
El wood all Books, Manuscripts &c. Witnesses : John Hill, 
Richard Boveingden, Stephen Salter. Smith, 



WILLIAM PENNINGTON of London, merchant. Will 4 
January 1688/9; proved 15 April 1689. To sisters Abi- 
gail Corbet, Bridget Moore, and Judith Mollineux 100 
each. To nephew William Pennington 200. To nephews 
John and Edward Pennington and Neice Mary Wharley 
100 each. To Elizabeth Massey Spinster with whom I 



458 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

dwell all plate household goods &c. To Rebecca Zachary, 
widow, late wife of Thomas Zachary, and Ann Buller, widow, 
and Mary Williamson, widow, 10 each. To Francis Smart- 
font of London, Silver Wyer Drawer, 100. To former 
servant Arthur Robinson 500 peices of Eight or 4000 Ryalls 
plate old Spanish Coine. To former Servant John Peachy 
50. Residue to nephew Daniell Wharley of George Yard, 
Lumbard Street, woollen Draper, executor. To Nicholas 
Gould of Dorchester and Richard Onslow and John Gray 
merchants 10 each. Witnesses: William Cumberland, 
William Cumberland, junior. Ent, 53. 

JOSHUA HOLLAND, St. Paul Shadwell, Middlesex, Mariner. 
Will 17 May 1690; proved 26 May 1690. To servant 
maid Sarah Wilkinson lease of Lower most tenement in the 
alley at King Dauid Fort in Shadwell, paying ground rent 
of 5s per annum to my Sonn John Holland now in America, 
and proportional part toward clearing the dreine. To said 
sonne John Holland remaining four messuages att King 
Dauid Fort, seruant maid Sarah Wilkinson to take rents 
&c. till John Arrive in England. If John die before he 
arrive, then the tenements to my two sons Thanks Holland 
and Francis Jackson. To sons John Holland, Thanks 
Holland, and Francis Jackson 200 each. To my daugh- 
ter Elizabeth now in Pensilvania 150. To granddaughter 
Mary Slany 50 at 21 or marriage &c. Rest to sons 
Thanks Holland and Francis Jackson, executors. Wit- 
nesses : Mcholas Manstell, Ann Pritchard, Thomas Quilter, 
Proved by Thanks Holland, reserving to other executor 
Francis Jackson, Dyke, 78. 

ALEXANDER PARKER of George Yard, Lumbard street, 
Citty of London, Haberdasher of small wares. Will 6 day 
of the Moneth called March, 1st year of Reigne of King 
William over England, &c., 1688/9 ; proved 5 April 1689. 
To daughter Anna Parker all goods in her possession. To 
my executrixes all reall Estate in England and in the 
province of Pensilvania to be sold, and money added to 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 459 

personal estate. Debts being paid, overplus to be divided 
amonge my other five children, viz : Mary Parker, Ellen 
Parker, Elizabeth Parker, Alexander Parker, and John 
Parker. Executrixes : Daughter in law Prudence Wager 
and Daughter Mary Parker. Witnesses: Thomas How- 
kins, Cha : Fox, Edmund Cox. Codicill 6 March (so called), 
1688/9. Trusty and beloved freinds William Crouch. Wil- 
liam Ingram, Dan 11 Wharley, Hen : Goldney to be over- 
seers. And further my faithfull and welbeloved freindes 
Geo : Fox, Francis Camfeild, Wm. Mead, Jno : Osgood, 
Tho : Greene, Jno : Etteridge, Walter Meers, Wm. Shewen, 
Tho : Harbe, Gilbert Latey, Charles Bathurst, Wm. Macket, 
Edw'd Man, Steven Cripp, James Packer, Geo : Whitehead, 
all of London and Middlesex, also Charles Hartford, Rich d 
Snead, Tho : Callawhill, Charles Jones, Sen', Charles Jones, 
Junior, of Bristoll, also Michael Jones of London be con- 
cerned for my children by their Christian advice. Also 
my youngest eon John Parker be taken care of, executrixes 
and overseers to make what provision the Estate will beare 
for him in particular, he having no Legacy left him by his 
Grandfather Wm. Goodson deceased. Sealed 8th of first 
month called March 1688/9. I desire Sarah Matthewes and 
Mary Wasse to be added to their Assistance. Witnesses : 
Cha : Fox, Rob* Bicknell, Edmund Cox. Ent, 53. 

HENRY WHEARLEY, Island of Barbadoes, merchant. Will 
22 Thirdmonth called &ay, 1685, 1st King James II; 
proved 14 November 1685. To wife Sarah Whearley one-third 
of estate in this Island and elsewhere in lieu of dower, and 
after her decease her third to brother 'Daniel Whearley of 
Lond. Also to wife furniture in her chambers and 100. 
To Brother Abraham Whearley now in Pensilvania 70 
forthwith, also debt of about 32 he owes, and also 100 
more if he happen to be much in want or stand in need, 
provided he become sober and deserving, which I leave to 
discretion of my Executors (Brother Daniell being one) to 
judge. To sister Anne Phillipps, wife of George Phillipps 



460 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

of Lond, 100. To Brother Daniell Whearley copyhold 
tenement called " Chelmesford" in Hunsden, Herts, of 
which a surrender was made 3 September 1674, also free- 
hold in Hunsdon in occupation of Henry Whearley, Hus- 
bandman, and all rest of estate. Executor : Brother Daniel 
Whearley. Executor in trust in England: Capt. Willm. 
Walker of Lond, Ironmonger. Executors in trust in this 
Island : Wm. Bicknell, merchant, and Captain Win. 
Dymmock, who are empowered to dispose of goods, Negro 
Slaves &c. Witnesses : Tho : Bread, Jno : Sumers, Valentin 
Tregenard, Richard Vaux. A true coppy of will proved in 
Barbadoes, attested 11 November 1687 by Jno : Whetstone, 
Dep ty Ser 7 . Proved in Prerogative Court of Canterbury by 
brother Daniell Whearley, executor, 26 April 1689. 

Ent, 55. 

JOHN JONES of Philadelphia, province of Pensilvania, 
merchant. Will 4 July 1721; proved 11 December 1723. 
Debts being paid, all residue of estate in Dominion of 
Wales or other part of Great Britten or elsewhere to wife 
Joane Joanes, but Friends Mr. John Lloyd of Ragat and 
Robert price of Cefn reeg authorized to sell any part of 
estate in Wales if necessary. Executrix : wife Joane. Wit- 
nesses Jno : Cadwalader, Edward Roberts, Pet : Evans. 
Philad: 17 January 1722/3, affirmation of John Cadwalade 
[sic] and Edward Roberts, being of people called Quakers. 

Richmond, 260. 

MATTHEW PAYNE late of Pennsylvania, widdower. Ad- 
ministration 4 October 1686 to his son Edmund Payne. 

Admon. Act Book 1686, folio 154- 

WILLIAM HAYNESWORTH, St. Andrewes, Holborne, Citti- 
zen and Shipwright of London. Will 3 November 1682 ; 
proved 28 November 1682. To wife Jane Haynesworth 
my messuage with Bowling Green and Bowling Bare in St. 
Andrewes Holborne, Middlesex, paying 15 to my brother 
in law William Penn for use of my brother Charles 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 461 

Haynesworth and during rest of lease while Charles 
Haynesworth is unmarried Allow his meate and drink, 
lodging, &c. reversions of estate to said brother Charles 
Haynesworth, then to brother in law William Penn paying 
15 yearly viz : to my nephew Samuel Haynesworth son 
of brother Samuell Haynesworth, Sarah Penn daughter of 
brother in law William Penn and William Gearing son of 
John Gearing, deceased, late brother of said wife, 5 each. 
To brother Samuell Haynesworth, brother in law William 
Penn and friend Doctor Abraham Hargrave, and friend 
William Stephen each 10s for rings. Rest to wife Jane 
Haynesworth, but at her decease to brother Charles Haynes- 
worth two silver Tankards of 8 and 5 value, to brother 
in law William Penn great ditto of 12, and to wife's sister 
Mary Gearing ditto of 5. Executrix : wife Jane Haynes- 
worth, and after her death brother in law William Penn. 
Witnesses : George Emmerton, John Brampton, Rich. Mal- 
laber. Proved by executrix. Cottk, 131. 

ROBERT CARSON of City of Philadelphia in North America, 
Merchant, now residing at Strabane in Ireland. Will 10 May 
1783 ; proved 20 September 1784. To brother in law Thomas 
Higgins of Head Elk in Maryland in North America and 
William Lecky of City of Derry, Alderman, all Lands 
in Strabane, county Tyrone, Ireland, in trust, to suffer my 
Mother Barbara Carson to take profitte for life, then to 
Nephew Samuel Carson Higgins, son of aforesaid Thomas 
Higgins by my late sister Nichola Carson, and if he die, to 
said Thomas Higgins, then to said William Lecky of said 
City, alderman. Executors: said William Lecky and 
Thomas Higgins. Signed at Londonderry. Witnesses : 
John Coningham, Arch d Boyd, John Clark. Proved by 
William Lecky, executor, in Prerogative Court of Ireland 
31 August 1784, reserving to Thomas Higgins. [Extracted 
from the Registry of H. M's Court of Prerogative in Ire- 
land.] 

Rockingham, 



462 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

JAMES TRENT of Towne of Invernes, Shire of Murry, 
Kingdom of Scotland, merchant, at present in Province of 
Pensilvania. Will 30 October 1697 ; proved 1 November 
1698. To brother William Trent of Philadelphia, merchant, 
all goods, money, plate, stock in shipping &c. and more 
particularly one eighth of Ship Charles and her serials (?) 
and cargo (whereof Edward Burwash is comander) and also 
money, goods &c. in hands of Thomas Footts of London, 
merchant, Patrick Footts of Edinburgh, Kingdom of Scot- 
land, Merchant, or David Amya of Gettingburgh in King- 
dom of Sweedland, merchant. Executor : Brother William 
Trent. Sworn upon oath 29 July 1698 before William 
Markham, Esq., Lieutenant Governor of the Province, and 
ordinary, by Wm. Trent, executor, and John Farmer, John 
Moore, and Rebeckah Moore, witnesses. Proved by execu- 
tor. Lort, 



JOHN ECKLEY of the Lee, parish of Kimbelton, county 
Hereford, and now of Town and county of Haverford West, 
merchant. Will 17 July 1686; proved 1 February 1698/9. 
To brother in law John Vaston of Doclop, Herefordshire, 
yeoman, 5 to be guardian over my son John Eckley. To 
said son John Eckley 50 lent to George Phillips of Lawton, 
parish of Kingsland, deceased, on mortgage, and all goods 
at the Lee at 21, he to combine lease to John Howies of 
Rowdenham, county Hereford, or else 50 to executor and 
all goods to mother in law Mary Prichard of Almely. To 
brother in law Sampson Lloyd of the Lee 5. To poore of 
Kimbelton 5 to be distributed by said brother in law John 
Vaston and Sampson Lloyd. To faithful friend William 
Bach of Town of Leominster, county Hereford, gent, one 
Guinea. To the poor of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania 10 
of that country's money. To now wife Sarah Eckley mes- 
suage where I dwell and also messuage wherein Morgan 
Cornock and Thomas Williams dwell on West side of 
Bridgestreet in Haverford West and all my lot of land on 
front of Scolkill River in Philadelphia aforesaid together 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 463 

with the dwelling house thereupon erected and built. And 
all my Lott of Land w th thappurtenances in the Second 
Street in Philadelphia together with the houses thereon 
erected and built and my plantation adjoining township of 
Radnor in Pennsylvania, and all other lands in Pennsylvania, 
and also " Great Fernocks" in Rudbaxton, county Pem- 
broke, in possession of Richard Sparkes. Also to wife 50 
lent on mortgage to Jonathan Rawlings of Broadwood, 
county Hereford, and 10 payable from Jo n Vaston, late of 
Worcester, Tanner, and rest of estate in Haverford West, 
Pennsylvania &c. Witnesses : Roger Pri chard, John Hardy- 
man, Thos. Evans. 1 February 1690 administration to 
Jacob Lewis, Peregrin Musgrave, and Richard Stafford, 
junior, for Sara Eckley, deceased, while living relict, execu- 
trix, and residuary legatee named in the will of John 
Eckley late of Philadelphia in the Province of Pensilvania 
deceased, &c. Pett, 22. 

RICHARD HOSKINS of the Province of Pensilvania in 
America, Merchant, now resident at London. Will 4 May 
1700; proved 20 March 1700/1. To sonn Aurelius Hos- 
kins all messuages, lands, &c. in Pensilvania. To four 
daughters Martha, Mercy, Mary, and Anne Hoskins four 
bedds and late wife's and daughter's weareing apparell and 
such Lynnen &c. as executors in Pensilvania direct. Rest 
of estate in Pensilvania to sonn Aurelius Hoskins. To 
friends Phillip Collins, Planter, and John Groves, merchant, 
both of Island of Barbadoes, all estate in said Island, as 
executors in trust to sell same, and deducting 7 per cent 
for pains and 50 Barbados money for Dr. Thomas Loore 
my Phisitian for extraordinary pains in my sickness in Lon- 
don, sending same to friend Edward Shippen and Samuel 
Carpenter at Pensilvania. To friend Theorder Eccleston 
executor in trust for in and near London, all stock in Lon- 
don, to shipp same to Edward Shippen and Samuel Carpen- 
ter at Pennsilvania. Edward Shippen and Samuel Carpenter 
to pay 100 Barbadoes money to sonn Aurelius Hoskins and 



464 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

30 to friend David Lloyd for great care and paines in edu- 
cating said sonn, and said Edward Shippen and Samuel 
Carpenter to employ remainder with advice of said David 
Lloyd for advancement of four daughters Martha, Mercy, 
Mary, and Anne Hoskins. Executors : Edward Shippen, 
Samuel Carpenter, David Lloyd. Witnesses: John Ellis, 
Charles Owen, John Booker. Proved by Theorder Eccle- 
ston, executor in London, reserving to Philip Collins and 
John Groves for Barbadoes and to Edward Shippen, Samuel 
Carpenter, and David Lloyd for Pensilvania. Dyer, 88. 

ZACHARIAH RICHARDSON. Will 21 December 1735; 
proved 23 February 1735/6. London. God be Glorified 
forever. To be Interred in ye Dear Friends Burial Ground. 
To my Loving wife desiring she may fix her heart upon the 
more durable Thing than any Injoyment here all estate 
and for debts all costs due me in Chancery Suit Obtained 
against Andrew Hamilton of Philadelphia. When wife is 
possessed of estate in Philadelphia to give to my four sisters 
5 each. Executors : Wife Rebecca Richardson and friend 
Thomas Bincks. Witnesses : Sam. Binks, Nathaniel Reed. 
Codicil 26 December 1735. Friend John Warner also ex- 
ecutor. Witnesses : John Warriner, Eliza. Clark. 

Derby, 4.1. 

WILLIAM ROYDON, Citizen and Grocer of London. Will 
20 May 1692; proved 3 January 1695/6. To brother 
Robert Roydon of Whitham, Eessex, Maltster, 50. To 
three neeces Elizabeth, Ann, and Margaret, daughters of 
Sister Elizabeth Wright late of Totham, Essex, deceased, 
20 each. To Erne, wife of Richard Crews of St. George, 
Southwarke, Careman 10. To John Tizacke of City of 
London, Merchant, 10. To loving friends and Trustees 
Andrew Robinson and William Cooper of West New 
Jersie in America for care of my estate there 5 apiece. 
To Brother Robert Roydon all estate in West New Jersie, 
Pensilvany in America, or in England. Executor : John 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 465 

Tizack. Witnesses : Joseph Stevens, Richard Maynwaring, 
Step. Holland. [Late of Philadelphia in Province of Pen- 
silvania, deceased. Probate Act Book.] Bond, 147. 

JOHN PACKER, of Moorton, parish of Thornbury, Glouces- 
tershire, yeoman. Will 25 of month called March 1726 ; 
proved 5 April 1750. To cousin Edward Gregory son of 
William Gregory of Gaunts Ircott, parish of Almonds- 
bury, county Gloucester, yeoman, by Mary his late wife de- 
ceased, all lands in Thornbury, paying 20 yearly to my 
Brother William Packer for life, and 20 to John Greg- 
ory another son, and 50 to Martha Gregory, daughter 
of said William Gregory and Mary his late wife, and if 
either die before 21 to the survivors, also 5 apeece to 
cousins Daniel Weare and John Weare, and cousins William 
Roach the younger and Israel Roach, sons of cousin Wil- 
liam Roach of the City of Bristol, Tyler. To John Bren- 
ton, son of William Brenton and Jane his wife of 
Birmingham in the province of Pensilvania in America 
one moyety of all my lands in said province of Pensilvania, 
paying to the brothers of said John Brenton 10 apeece 
of that country money. To Mary Wyeth, daughter of 
John Wyeth of Birmingham aforesaid, 100 acres of my 
land in pensilvania. To said William Brenton and Joseph 
Brenton his son all my lands in Kennett Township in said 
province of Pensilvania in trust for such poor people called 
Quakers as belong to the Monthly Meeting of said people 
called Quakers at Concord in said province of pensilvania. 
To poor Friends called Quakers belonging to Monthly Meet- 
ing of Thornbury 5 out of lands. To said William Greg- 
ory and Thomas Allway of Thornbury, mercer, 10 each 
to act as trustees of Edward Gregory. Rest to brother 
William Parker [sic]. Executors: William Gregory and 
Thomas Allway. Witnesses : Bowy Clarke, William Bur- 
ton, Mary Edwards. Administration of John Packer late 
of Morton, parish of Thornbury, county Gloucester, but at 
Pensilvania beyond the seas, Batchelor, deceased, to Isaac 

VOL. XXVIII. 30 



466 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

Roach cousin german and next of kin, William Gregory and 
Thomas Allman, executors, and brother William Packer, 
residuary legatee, dying in lifetime of testator. 

Greenly, 



PETER WALTER of High Littleton, Somerset, clothyer. 
Will 24 8th month called October 1700; proved 5 Decem- 
ber 1700. To wife Mary 60 already paid by William 
Reeve of Winscum and 100 and her goods before marriage 
&c. To daughter Christian Walter 8 yearly for life out of 
lands in Midsomernorton &c. To my six grandchildren in 
Pennsylvania 5 apiece on their father's acquittance. To 
grandchildren Elizabeth Walter, Mary Walter, and Kath- 
erine Walter, daughters of Son Peter Walter 10 each at 
21. To John Cowling of Stanton drew and John Hipsley of 
Chew magna 5 for the people called Quakers in County 
Somersett. Having brought up granddaughter Sarah 
Walter and granddaughter Deborah Walter (now wife of 
Thomas Marsh) they to release claim on lands in Midsomer 
Norton &c. &c. To son Peter Walter land in Midsomer- 
norton &c. Executors: John Cowling of Stanton drew, 
John Hipsley of Chew magna, and Joseph Hull of Brad- 
ford Wilts. Witnesses : Wm. Reeve, Thomas Beene, Jona- 
than Tyler. Proved on affirmation of John Cowling, John 
Hipsley, and Joseph Hull. Noel, 186. 

LAWRENCE GROWDON, St. Merryn, Cornwall, pewterer, 
being an aged man. Will 5 March 1707/8; proved 26 Oc- 
tober 1708. To my son Joseph Growden of the Province 
of Pensilvania, all my Title in one propriety or manner 
of Land within the province of Pensilvania (except 3000 
acres thereof) for life with power to lease for 99 years or 
two or three lives. To Grand Son Lawrence Growdon the 
3000 acres aforesaid in Pensilvania and after death of his 
father all the propriety in said province of Pensylvania. 
Trustees for Lawrence during his minority: William 
Hooper of Padstow, John Peter of St. Minver, Thomas 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 467 

Leverton of St. Merryn and John Crocker of Liskeard, 
with power to depute to two or more friends of ours in 
said province of Pensylvaoia to act as Trustees &c. To 
grandson Lawrence Growdon my Number of years in 
Moyety or halfendale of the Barton of Trevase in parish of 
St. Merryn, but if he die, to his brother Joseph Growdon, 
and if he die, to my grand daughter Jenepher Hooper, 
now wife of William Hooper aforesaid. To said grand 
daughter Jenepher Hooper Corners Tenement (held of 
Joseph Saule, Esq) in St. Austell for two years, also 50. 
To William Hooper, who married my grand daughter 
Jenepher aforesaid, my Barton of Treveglas in St. Merryn, 
paying to Thomas Leverton or Frances his now wife yearly 
for seven years One Hogshead of good Cyder, if any be 
made of the Orchard in said Barton. To Martha Hooper, 
Jenepher Hooper, and Elizabeth Hooper, daughters of said 
William Hooper, 100 each, and to Grace Hooper, an- 
other daughter, 50, all at 21. To Joan Trefage of St. 
Austell 20. To kinswoman Mary Growdon, daughter of 
William Growdon of Sherbrooke, Devon, 50 To John 
Peter of St. Minver and Richard Hutchins Jun. of St. 
Austell 5 to be distributed at Two Quarterly Meetings to 
poore Friends, Members of Tregangees Meeting, also 5 
for rebuilding Walls of our Burying place at Tregangees. 
To Frances, now wife of Thomas Leverton aforesaid, one 
broad piece of good gold. To Elizabeth Body, or by what 
name she be now called, daughter of Andrew Evans of St. 
Ewe 5. To Judith Slade, late of Truro one Guinea of 
gold. To Lawrence Growdon, son of Lawrence Growdon 
late of Whithall 20s. when out of apprentize. To Thomas 
Browne a Blind Man of Minchinet 40s. To each servant 
20s. To servant John Ivie 5, and to servant Jane Martyn 
3. Rest to grandson Lawrence Growdon, son of Joseph 
Growdon of Pensilvania, executor. Trustees to act during 
minority. Witnesses : Thomas Eplet, John Bulson, John 
George, Jane Martyn. Proved by oath of William Hooper 
and Thomas Leverton and John Crocker, by affirmations 



468 Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 

by act of Parliament, reserving to John Peter. Proved 7 
February 1715/16 by Lawrence Growdon, executor, now of 
age. Barrett, 



JOHN HACKETT of Pensilvania. Will 27 March 1721; 
proved 25 February 1730/1. " In case I dye this voyage I 
give and bequeath to sister Mary Bolter 5, to Brother 
Thomas Bolter 5, to Brother Thomas Hackett 5, and 
what remains of my Estate I give and bequeath to my Father 
John Hackett of the city Worcester." Administration of 
John Hackett late of Pensilvania in America, bachelor, 
deceased, with will annexed, by affirmation according to 
manner of Pensilvania, to brother Thomas Hackett, father 
Thomas Hackett residuary legatee [no executor being 
named] being also deceased. Isham, 87. 

DAVID OWEN of St. James, Westminster, gent. Will 21 
July 1763; proved 12 June 1767. To Griffith Edwards of 
Little Wyld Street in parish of St. Giles in the fields, Mid- 
dlesex, Taylor, and Nephew George Morgan of Brecknock, 
county Brecknock, South Wales, Gentleman, all Ready 
Money, Government Securities, or Parliamentary Funds in 
trust to pay debts and legacies and rest to be divided to 
Brothers John Morgan and George Morgan of Neavern, 
county Pembroke, and Jacob Morgan of Haverfordwest, 
smith, and their children and children of late sister Catha- 
rine Phillips, sister Martha Roberts and children, sister 
Mary - and children, sister Elizabeth Aynon and chil- 
dren, and said nephew George Morgan, to children at 21 &c. 
To nephew George Morgan apparel, lynen, and silver watch. 
To Mrs. Margaret Dodd of parish of St. James 100 and 
my silver pint mugg. To children of late brother Thomas 
Morgan of Pennsylvania 40, but if only one 20 &c. Ex- 
ecutors : Griffith Edwards and George Morgan. Witnesses : 
Edw. Inge, Wm. Inge. Legard, 236. 

CHRISTOPHER CROW of London, Barber Surgeon. Will 
5 August 1724; proved 3 September 1724. Unto my 



Pennsylvania Gleanings in England. 469 

nephew John Crow twenty Pensilvania Shares which I 
purchased of Thomas Story. To niece Elizabeth Crow 
500 at marriage or 21. To my father Christopher Crow 
10 per annum for life. To Thomas Browne of Long 
Alley, Dyer, 20 for the use of Friends Workhouse. To 
John Bell of Lombard street 10 to put out two boys 
belonging to the Bull and Mouth monthly meeting. To 
niece Elizabeth Bonnell 100 at marriage or 21. To Daniel 
Phillips, M.D., executor, 50 guineas. Rest to sister Mary 
Crow. Witnesses : James Kent, James Burton, John Bell. 

Bolton, 204. 

WILLIAM FRENCH of Kingston upon Thames. Will 22 
July 1739; proved 11 May 1744. To wife, executrix, all 
goods, paying to son and daughter William and Sarah 
French at 15 10 each. " Item I will and bequeave to my 
Brother Cherry John French after my Decease (that is now 
in pensilvania) the sum of seven pounds if Lawfully 
demanded by him by his letter of Attorney." Witnesses : 
William Browne, John Harris, Wm. Tattinshall. Proved 
by Alice French widow and executrix. 

Commissary of Surrey, register Cheslyn (17404-6), no folios. 

THOMAS NEW of Bristol in Great Britain, now residing in 
City of Philadelphia in Province of Pensilvania, marriner. 
Will 30 May, 1728; proved 11 January 1731/2. All goods 
and lands to dear and loving wife Elizabeth and child (if 
borne alive) wherewith she is supposed to be enseint. 
Executor of estate in Pensilvania and East and West New 
Jersey: Friend William Attwood of Philadelphia, Mer- 
chant. Executor of estate in Bristol and other parts of the 
world (Pensilvania and East and West New Jersey ex- 
cepted) : wife Elizabeth. Witnesses : John White, John 
Smith, Charles Brockden, Joseph Breintnall. Proved by 
Elizabeth Reynolds als New (now wife of Joseph Reynolds) 
executor for Bristol and all the earth except Pensilvania 
and East and West New Jersey. 

(To be continued.) 



470 Ship Registers for the Part of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 





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William MacMui 
John Ross 


Joseph Wilson 


Thomas Salter 


of Philadelphi 
Stacy Hepburn 
Philip Moore 


of Philadelphi 


William Downes 


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F PHILADELPHIA 


Owners 
Eobert Threlfal 
David Anderson 


both of Grenadoes 
Charles Lowe 
Alexander Mills 
Eeese Meredith 


George Clymer 
Samuel Meredith 
John Tolly 
Thomas Yorke 
of Philadelphia 


Benjamin Gibbs 


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Charles Lowe 


Thomas Dewick 
William Kerlin 


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James Goulder 


of New Jersey 
Thomas Campbell 
John Armstrong 
James Lecky 


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of Philadelphia 
Joseph Donaldson 
John Fassett 


Richard S. Smith 


Samuel Murdoch 
Thomas Murdoch 


John Wilcocks 
of Philadelphia 


William Duncan 
David Duncan 


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Ship Registers for the Part of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 481 







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482 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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Jonathan Penrose 


Thomas Willing 
Robert Morris 


Thomas Morris 
all of Philadelp 


Thomas Willing 
Robert Morris 


Thomas Morris 
William Coxe 


Moore Furman 
both of Philade 


Joseph Wilson 
of Philadelphia 


Thomas Yorke 
of Philadelphia 


Hezekiah William 


Andrew Gregg 
James Thompson 
of Londonderry 
Andrew Caldwell 
















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Thomas Fitzsim 
of Philadelph 


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Thomas Harper 


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Joseph Bennett 


Robert Shewell, 


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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 485 



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486 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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HE PORT OF PHILADELPHIA, 1 726-1775. Continued. 


Masters Owneri Where built 

d Hammond Leonard Hammond Philadelphia 
Thomas Mason 
John Patton 
der Cain John Armstrong Philadelphia 
of the City of Dublin 
Andrew Caldwell 
Velsh Tobias Rudolph Province of Massachu 
James Robinson setts Bay 
I Stansbury Joseph Whitall Philadelphia 
of Philadelphia 
hields Hilary Baker, Jr. Wilmington 
William Sheaff 


John Shields 
5 Jenkins Charles Jenkins Philadelphia 
Ihatham Andrew Hodge Philadelphia 
John Bayard 


William Hodge, Jr. 
. Covell Samuel Penrose Philadelphia 
Isaac Penrose 
ir Hood Thomas Clifford Philadelphia 
Thomas Clifford, Jr. 
John Clifford 


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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 487 



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488 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



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Philip Roche 
of Limerick 


Isaac Hazlehurst 
Matthias Aspden 


Stacy Hepburn 
John Duffield 


to 

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David Beveridge 


John Duffield 


James Stirling 
of Wallworth 


James Mitchel 
of Londonderrj 
Thomas Barclay 
Conolly McCausls 


Charles Lyon 
Edward Batcheloi 


Thomas Assheton 


Moses Franks 
of London 


David Franks 


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Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 489 



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490 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



*., 1726-1775. Continued. 


Where built . 

York, Province of Massa 
chusetts Bay 
1 Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 


en 


County of Philadelphia 
North Carolina 


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Hezekiah Williams 


Alexander Rutherf 




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of Philadelphia 
Thomas Fitz Simm 


Ralph Moore 
Foster McConnell 


Joshua Maddox W: 


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Thomas Mason 
George Moore 
both of Philadel] 
John Patton 
Isaac Morrogh 
of Indian River 


John Franklin 
Charles Berat 


Francis C. Hasencl 


of Philadelphia 
Stacy Hepburn 



























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Ship Registers for the Part of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 491 



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James Stiles 
Joseph Donaldson 
Alexander Kidd 


j= 

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8 

8 

oJ 
HT> 


of Philadelphia 
Richard Inkson 


li 

PH O 

I*"! 

S 8 

l"i 1} 


William Neate 
of London 


3 a 

r3 a> 

S 1 

an ro 

S W 

=: 

SP-3 

So 


OH 
13 ** 
fg !-S 

3 -S 

^1| 

" W a 

rj <B 83 
f f S 

^ 8^ 

O H 


David Beveridge 
Peter Chevalier 


Joseph Bullock 
John Chevalier 


Daniel Badger 
John Dilworth 


Neil Malcolm 
William Neate 


both of London 
Joseph Wharton, Ji 



I 

G 



HH 
' 



W 



M S 
-a 3 
s 



? li 






S ' -5 

Qj S O> 



a s s 
I a a 

^ 






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1 

^ 



I 

o 

-a 



i 

w 



02 



2 

o 



H 
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- 




^ ^ 

W 02 02 



B || 

III 

2 *M *^ 

^ ^ 3 

OQ W 02 



5 _g 

W fl 

*H O 



oil 
&2 02 02 



OO O> rH 



CO CO 00 



oo 







m 



m 



<& <O 

02 O3 



* &* S) 
02 02 02 



02 O O 



492 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1786-1775. 



<S oS 
$ 58 


TJ 

5 s 


S S 


$ rO 

1 i i 


M 

^ 


.S *S S a <=* 

3 ^,5 ^ "3s 


1 i e 3 


* jg ^ 5 


x} < 


B O " 


0) 5 


9 M 9 "33 


i >- 


5 C3 W 


'O t 


3 g W Hj ^3 


'. * > -g j ; 

J S 3 


2 2| | g | 




' PH 


PH 


H K ft PH 


2 








<N 

rH 








4 


at 






L_j 


o 






S 3 

HH ^- cS TH a) 

Q i -a n * 

3 * 8 | * S fi fc 

tn l"^^? P 

: iJ J |W 

g Hj S Hs <j 


S S a ^ * 

is s i.:- jsijii % 

% d a -=> <o o -^ ^o^nfl ^3 
^o^'^ r S-S o-SS o3a) 'S 

; 5 1 9 1 1 * ^Pi^^o l 

*-iS < 52^'fliS2 T5 p O5S5S l 5ify'^ 

.oSLJfSpnB, 53 ^SoScs^PHCLi 

ll^l^ll IJlI-sj? 

1 I I 1 1 SS^^sl 4 


H 






ns 


P5 


rQ 




i 


9 t 

PH eo ( 

W 1 I 

B l f 



fe 


Robert Lightbo 


at 

% ' 1 

1 d 





<D ^ 

r 1 

5 Si 
3 1^ ?& 

A ?s 

^ r^ S 

W 1-5 fe O 


H 






1 


CO 






^ _ *J\ 


HH p: 


\ 


32 


OH 


S a " 




^ 


^ a 


S I | > 


OS 

bo t 


>> W co 

w2 7! 2 


& 5 ^ 


qj <a go 

1 W? Cb PH 


w g 


ii - fit X 

bO OH hO 2 OH bD 


CO 


> 'C 


3 c 


> -c -a -s -c 


CO PH 


CO 53 W CO CO W 


ir 

r- 


> eo 

4 rH 


O r- 
r-l O 


H C^ ^^ O5 O5 
J rH rH <?q <M 


"8 "S 


o t 


j "S "S "S "S 


O O 


O O O O GO 



Ship Registers for the Part of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 493 



o o o o 

O *O i I O 
<N i ( <M 



O 
05 



rt 

2 
ft 



eS e8 

-2 -9 

ft ft 



.2 



Jj 
% 



OH 




O 
o 

I 



el 

^2 S 

g p 3 fe 

OQ ^5 *o 

3 III 

4 O r H 

HH HS HS pSH 



I 





PH 



. 
O 



* ^ 



PQ 



CC 

O 






ja ^3 ^s 

02 02 02 02 



02 



I 



I 



> > > bO 
O O O SS 



494 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



, 1726-1775. Continued. 


3 ^ 

fe 


Pennsylvania 


a 

Philadelphia 
Connecticut 


Province of East Florida 
Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 


i 

4* 


d 






d 

I-H 






1 


F PHILADELPH 


Oumert 

Edward Batchelor 
of Newburn 


Thomas Assheton 
Richard Lushingtor 
John James 
James Nelson 


all of South Caro 
William Sykes 
Blair McClenachan 
John Brown 


of Philadelphia 
Samuel Penrose 
James Willson 
James Ringgold 


of Maryland 
Lambert Wickes 
Samuel Smith 


g 

> -T^ .2 
g !^-3 

"S 3 J5 a 

T3 !2 hO ^ 

^I1 S 1 

s 

















H 


c 















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43 


s 








PM 


CD 

1 & 


cf 


11 


O -1-H 


r-j 




H 


I 


Jl^. 


o <o 


rH ^" 


r c4 




B 


1 | 


TS 


H M 
fi -3 


<*? J 


-3 




I 


f 

PQ 


1 


*1 

o w 

W P 


11 

^ 



do 




1 


- 




44 








i 


W 


g 


8 








O 


a b* 


5 


H 


i-C 






H 


O 


8 





EH 


o3 







u. S 

R 


ii 


-a s 


? 








3 


rl QJ 

o ^ 


^ 

P ^5 


Q} n> 

o 


A 






A 


IP J^ 


.*rsp 




o 






i 


i 


co PQ 


II 


EC 






IO 


os 

T 1 


CO l^ 


to o 


CO 

l-H 






^ > 


^ 


o 5 


o o 


o 






o 


O 


<JJ Q^ 


4) D 








5zi 


fc 


Q Q 


P P 


p 





Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 495 



o 

CO 



o 

g 



g 



o 

00 



.2 

a 
1 



I 















2 








-3 





8 




4: 

be 


03 






^M 

& 








M 

00 _ 


r-H 

2 ^ 


Peter January 
of Philadelphi 
James Giles 


b 

1 

fc 
*., 




David McCullou: 
Daniel Robinson 


of Philadelphi 
Henry Lisle 


Thomas Willing 
Robert Morris 


Thomas Morris 
John Wharton 


3 

1 9 .S 

^^ O O F-5 

f^i H <D ,Q 

,_ -FH h-3 2 

^ OD O 

_ a S . 
^5 S a ^a 
88 -o 1 
S ^ 


Joseph Willson 
Townsend Whit( 


William Coxe 
John White 


a-r 
!S 

rfl ^ 

O c3 


Christopher Mar 
Charles Marshal] 


Wilkinson Timn 
Benjamin Marsh 


41 

























I 





















1 




^0 












^^ 









1 




s 




1 




^ 




I 


i 




1* 


H 
d 




g 




) 




M 




s 






E 


I 




I 




I 




1 




1 


M 

F 




1 


13 

? i 

^ 





I 



a 



I 



u 



PQ 



496 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1786-1775. 



Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 




1 

1 

3 


f 


5 

jO, 


Barbadoes 






Philadelphia 


1 


a 

O 

d 
i 

1 








o3 







"3 

rfl 




- S 




.2 




.2 


Simon Taylor 
of Jamaica 


ft 

P 3 
^ 

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fl rd 

- , o 

<1 H-5 


of Philadelph: 
William Duncar 


Joshua Maddox 


Thomas Willing 


cS 

S3 

g PH 

^-s 
e ^ 

I 1 


Thomas Morris 
Henry Rider 


Thomas Ashetor 
Edward Batchel 


Thomas Bramall 


Benjamin Gibbs 
of Philadelph 


Is 
i- 

a A 

cS O 
H^ Hj 


of Philadelph 
Richard Ham 














c 

d 














O 




-u> 






1 












j 


O 




feO 







c 
o 






fj 


a 




o> 


1 

m 

W 





S 






& 

fli 






1 

O 


w 
s 




i 


d 




s 


rg 











3 


03 




o 






2 


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9 






P 


.S 




X 


o 




c3 


o3 




o3 






03 


A? 





m 



I 

02 



J2 
C 




1 



B 

CQ 



t 



02 



g 

o 

I 

cc 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 497 



o 
o 



o 
o 
cs 




s 



I 

H~ .a .2 

,3 ^ si 

.HpjS 3 

W PH P-i 



.3 






Andrew Caldwell 


Clement Sewell 


Samuel Johnson 
of Philadelphi 


James Stewart 
James France 


Thomas Fell 
Samuel Carson 


Robert Dinwiddii 
Robert Crawford 


James King 
Alexander Browi 


all of Glasgow 
Andrew Troop 
William Smith 


John Wilcocks 
Moses Franks 


of London 
David Franks 


Jacob Winey 
James Budden 


William Straker 
all of Philadel 



f 

s 



W 3 

a a 
.2 . s 

II 



a 
1 

1-5 



- 



o 



2 



I 



- 





f$ t ^_ 

02 02 



~ = - ~ 

o) c a 

&4 r^i ^^ LI 

VOL. xxvin. 32 



bp _ft ,ft 

W 02 02 
1 I 

a 9 fd 

w w gj 

<5 <^ PH 



o 

1 

_ft 

02 
O 

rH 

3 



498 Ship Registers far the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 






2 O 
S 00 



I 






00 

% % 

0) Q3 G> QQ 



05 03 

II 



fl W 

fl -^ 



73 



1 




as 

I 














ca 








PH 




r 1 "^ 


>- 








.5 




. 


.3 rt - 


S 03 


>F PHILADEL 


Owner* 
Thomas Barclay 


William Mitchel 
both of Phila< 


<D 
| 


grf 

6 13 

_ S 

i i 

PH ZC 


Joshua Fisher 
Thomas Fisher 


- - 
o> o> 

A rd 
03 CO 

S S 

N nd 

O) H 

-s 
3 S 


Edward Hare 


A. Buckle Boyd 
of Philadelph: 
Kobert Bullock 
Edward Yorke 


Blair McClenach 
Anthony Stockei 


of Philadelphi 
Thomas Whartoi 


Conrad Vandenv 
of Philadelphi 
John Lockhart 


O 

























o 
O 

1 

CM 



I 

tn 
1 



$ 



^ 
S 



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TH .S 



a 
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pH _u 03 

, .FH hri 

"^ 03 " 

S rt 8 

te 2 cJ 
4-^ -^ H 



a 



I S 



o 

EQ 



W OQ 



H 'S '* 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 499 




-T o> pa 4r 



. 

s 



























a 




Eichard Eundle 


e 

fl 
^ f 


H9 

MO ,jg 


Eobert White 
Smith Fosset 


Arthur Culnan 


of Cork 
Holton Johnston 


John Morton 
Josiah Hewes 


Stephen Shewell 


Joseph Shewell 


Thomas Saltar 


John Campbell 
John Kepper 
Alexander Morris 


Gabriel Wood 
all of Greenock 
John Mathie 
Eichard Eundle 












a 


1 
















ci 


b 


c 


3 














M 
o 

6 


M 

i 


8 

S3 

Tl 


B 

a 

P^ 


9 



8 

1 


1 


'a 




o 




1 


| 


B 

05 

,0 

( 


1 


Alexam 


Eobert 


Si 


a 
| 

'o 

W 


Eandal 


| 

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$ 

a 


a 

i 

1-5 


1 


s 

is 








" 

8 




f 
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a 

c 




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13 


1 




fl 


13 

. 


4 


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1 





i 


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CO 




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03 
fi 


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OH 


1 


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& 


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Q 




ooner 


<u 

1 

Of 


^ 


1 


| 

CO 


1 


i 


'C 
pq 


1 

CO 


3 

DQ 


1 




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CO 


CO 


1 


TH 


H 


CO 


V 


<o 



1 1 


(0 

r-i 


T-H 




T-I 

iH 


00 

T 1 


os 

rH 


03 


5? 


03 


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>. 


0? 


5? 


^ 




0? 


0? 


03 




s 


S 




S 


m 


ji 


^ 




m 


s 


3 



500 /^i]p Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



fe .. 





o 




fl d 
42 
bo ""35 
d t-i 



K! 

o 

p-l 






03 
2 



S 



d 'S 

W 'O 



George Moren 
William Fullerton 


William Redwood 


Benjamin Burkett 


Valentine Wightma] 
Robert Brisson 


Jeremiah Warder, 


Jeremiah Warder, J 


John Warder 
James Stuart 


Foster McConnell 
Charles Wharton 


of Philadelphia 
Joy Castle 
John Reynell 
of Philadelphia 
Samuel Coates 




a 
s 

1 

s 

03 

Ha 


of London Derry 
James McCay 
Thomas Saltar 


Michael Dawson 


















,0 










^ 






03 






d 


a 






d 




_&/j 




d 


3 




d 


S 


o 
o 


^ 


a 


o 

re 


'S 
o 

b 
g 

W 


Valentine W 


S 


O 

i 

1 

4> 

& 

I 



^5 

fl 

& 



O 




d 
> 

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4d 
w 

'I 
PH 


d 
3 & 

O i i 
to 

S 

9 ^ 

oj O 

lj h^ 


William Wil 


i 


Perkins Alle: 


t- 
03 
Q 

r i5 

03 

^a 
o 

i 














03 
fc 


| 








t. 


o> 






>s 


>-, 




g 









"S 


bi) 


d 









H 




d 

CsJ 


E 


E 


2 


o 






>, 




J 


rl 






. a, 


1 


1 







1 


"S 




h 

D 

d 


SJ 

d 




-2 1 

0> 

pq 


a ^ 
T^ " f-1 

P-i O 


1 


w 


o 


S 
s 


o 1 


0, 

o 




o 
o 


o 
o 




"bfl 


*bO*&0 


.1? 


_QH 


0* 





o 

53 


02 




o 
OQ 


02 




pq 


*fl 'C 
pq pq 


pq 


CO 


02 


03 


CO 


05 




W 


1^ 




b 


Oi OS 


l-H 


(M 


CO 


co 




r-l 




<N 






IM 


<M <N 


CO 






T 1 























<x> 


0> 


^> 


t*~ 




^% 


t*^ 




^> 


* ^* 


^> 


d 




d 


1 


5 




S 


3 




3 


a a 





1-5 


1-5 


3 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 501 



o 
o 

<M 



O 
t^ 



O O O o 



1 1 

2 3 

5? & 

PH PH 



8 

fl 



S 
PM 



tt 

* o 






i 



IB lit I 


pH 

O 


| 


1 " II 

.^ ^5 KJ Q} ^ o3 


51 

a 

S3 


j3 *H g '2 s s 
S 03 >r ^ 
^ O P 


'3 '3 

3^ 




. i 

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W ^ 

wl 



s * & 
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02 






<O t- OJ 
i-t i-H i I 

O fl? 

fl fl a 
333 



sa 

SOQ 


S O 

O H 



I 

4 

o 

O 0) 

w 7, 

02 02 



<u o> 

PI a 





Meares 



1 






? 

Oi 

a 



aa 




-S 

OQ CQ 02 OQ 



O <O (M 
CO (N 



O . i , i 
*-J 1-5 Hj H> 



502 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



o 

Ci 



"d "Tj 
fl d ,g 

III 

:3 

O) <B ji 
**& 



I 



rt 

S 



bo 



a 
akm 



Andrew C 
Henry O 
James 






OQ 



"K s 

O ^j 



fc AH 



O> rt 

x a 

o el 

-5 1-5 






i- 

a 









a 

r^ 



11 

O u 

13 



a 



r 

O W 



2 2 o 


2 2 OH 



I 

i 

a. 
1 



1 



a 



00 



pq 

e<) 



PQ M 

t* QO 



^ 



53 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 503 



o 

O 



O 
05 



o 
t- 



M 
h 
O 



2 >-> rrt 

H 3 

5 ^ 9 

O O .4 

O O PW 



= 
ct 

To 



I 
fc 



1 
s 

" 

Q 




s 



PH 



CJ )H 0) 

g|| 

?Si3fl 







fl -s 




a i 

^ S oo 
^ JS - 

II ^ 
n 2 
C 



^ 



! 





M 

o 
O 



rt 
PH 



W 



J 



Si rjj 5 

1^1 



t - 

-t 
ftl I 

III 

CO CO CO 



i 

S 

* 

QQ 



PH 



II 

CO CO 



(2 



o 

d 

CO 



>. 2 

| 

fc fe 



<u d? _2 



g 

o 

o . 

-a ^a . 

o o ^a 

CO CO GO 





O CL, 



g 
a 



O5 



00 



^ 

3 



1-5 



s 

1-5 1-5 



bo 

S3 



bb bfl 

^ " -2 

-< 1-5 <j 



bO 



504 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



_g 


<D 






1 


.T ^ 
^ 


a 


Q .2 




o Sj 






b 


o ft 


$ 


bfl PH 
fl U 




. 


| 


1 ^ 




f 








i 








& 








03 




4 




'w 

ft 




1 




d 
o 


a r? 


' 1 


1 


.-a x 
a | 

CO 

* 
o> o 

W 


James Woods 
Robert Patterso 
of Londondei 
John Durry 


I jf 1 

o o o. 

, H rH ^, 

W a i2 

| a o g 




"S 




h 


I 


1 


b 


be 3 






M 




^ 




a 


S 


% 


c 


ft 


PH a 




1 


| 


>-< -2 

Is 




2 






c 


^Pn 






I 


ft 


<C 

8 


^ a 




5 

a 


* 

PH 


CO O 




O 


*bfl 


*bO PH 




1 


1 


SI 




* 





<N <M 


^ 








>H 


bb 


bb 


bb bb 



Ifl 




S 






li- 



02 CO 

rH US 



^H g> 
<u "^ 

00 -^ 



Ship Registers far the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 505 



fl S 
'? -S -3 
|*| 

Pi PH 




Q 

a 
o 



- 

o 

5 






a 










^ 










&. 






0> 


- 




O 




cT 




, 1 




M 

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1 


orge Moore 
of London 


*"d 

be J> 

1 

I 3 
a g 


3 

15 
5 

i. 





M 
1 

|> 

^ 



_= 



5 



fe 

1 

ja 

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of London 


5 



ks 

^s 

9 


a 


>, 

s 



w 

$ 

s 


r o 

s. 

1 

o 

a 

^ 


!-i 



I 

a 

-=5 


1 

s 
15 

X! 

1 


C3 

S 

PH 

M 



13 


O 


p 


1 





s 




' 


i 
^ 




1-5 


O 
1-5 


-5 





,2 

1 
O 

a 

oS 
3 



chard 
n Sh 



Ri 



i 

3 
S 

I 

o 



OH 

a 

s 

o 

^ 
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s, 

a 

- 
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a 





l 

o 

s 

T3 

I 

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3 



M .b 



o 

a 
x 






co co 



OH 
O 



CO 

C5 



1 

3 

m 





1 

M 



CO CO 



-u -w 
C^ Q> 

CO CO 






a 

6 

CO 



g- 

CO 



- 
O 



506 



Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



o 
o 



o 

CO 



<u 





a 






S 


-S rQ 


*.. O 


, 




S 


^ 1 


O pj 


.S d 


jj 


"^ 


^ C3 


^* O 


A J 


|S 


5. 

a 


^ ** 03 


d 
QJ CQ fcX) 

d 


'o M 


1 


i 


w "3 


S CQ ! ( 


^ -S 




i 

id 


1 f 


| | | 




1 


t^ 


* > 


PH ^ 


.PH PH 


S 


3 










T-H 







5 


. 


F PHILADELPH 


Chwicrs 

Thomas Yorke 
of Philadelphia 
Richard Stanbury 


George Meade 
of Philadelphia 
Thomas Fitz Simmo 
Elias Boys 
Ferguson Mcllvaine 


both of Philadelp 
Robert Bridges 
Dougal MacGregor 
Robert Campbell 
George Latimer 
of New Castle 
Ralph Walker 


Thomas Kain 
John Littler 
Jacob Balderson 
Jonathan Rumford, 
Aaron Musgrave 
Jacob Harman 
Mordecai Lewis 













H 


. 




o 




P^ 


{LI 




bO 


O5 




j3 








O 


,5 


-73 


^j . 


S 


PH 




1 a 


^|j QJ 


^. 


H 


1 -e 

5 S OQ 


1) 2 


O i M 

OJ P""j 


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508 Notes and Queries. 



NOTES AND QUEEIES. 

Hotes. 
LETTER OF JOSIAH W. GIBBS TO MRS. PERRY, 1784. 

PHILAD A 16* October 1784. 

DEAR MRS. PERRY 

The bearer my honor' d friend Solomon Meers sets of for your Coun- 
try on the Morrow Surrounded as I am with Bussiness perplex' d as I 
am with the multiplicity of occurrences I must devote two Minutes to 
inform of our Welfare. Betsy & Billy are both tolerable well except 
the latter she has (poor little Lark) the hooping Cough but thro' the 
Blessing of Heaven not bad. Mrs. Gibbs is very well & all join in 
Love to you & Miss Nancy Perry. I wish we could take a Tour to your 
delightful Village, free from the Noise & Bustle of a Town, we could 
enjoy the pleasure of Eetirement & of seeing our Friends, but this we 
must postpone for the present. 

Inclosed is Invo'. & Bill of Lading for Sundry Merchandize ship't on 
Board the Sloop Seaflower Cap* Treat am* 106.3.3 which is passed to 
your Debit. I am sorry that we could not supply you with all the Ar- 
ticles in your Memorandum, but our Goods are not all come in, hope 
these sent will answer & would recommend your selling for a small 
profit, as we can at any time supply you with more & shall think my- 
self happy if I can render you any Service. With much Esteem I am 

Your friend & Ser* 

JOSIAH W. GIBBS. 

A FARCE, BY HON. WILLIAM ELLERY, OF EHODE ISLAND, found 
among his papers, and a copy made for the use of THE PENNSYLVANIA 
MAGAZINE, by Miss Henrietta Ellery. 

A FAECE. 

The Theatre represents the Eobin Hood Society in their hall, the 
President sitting under a canopy. 

SCENE. 

Pomposo, Glorioso, Whiggo. 
Pomposo rises and addresses himself to the President. 

I rise, Sir, to propose a plan 
Of vast importance to each State, 
I'm sure 'twill suit us to a man 
And not excite the least debate. 
In dirty chairs too long we've sat, 
Too long on naked floors we've stood, 
I cannot think of this or that 
But boiling choler fires my blood. 



Notes and Queries. 509 

No great distinction, Sir, besides 
Marks as it ought, each patriot sage, 
Great evils, Sir, that State betides 
Where dressed alike is prince and page. 
Let chairs be bought of costly wood, 
The bottoms stuff' d with down of geese 
How can we feel in proper mood 
Unless we sit at perfect ease ? 
Let carpet Gobelin o'erspread, 
And hide the knotty, homely floor, 
Let Freedom's Cap, adorn each head 
And flowing robes make cits adore 
Our dignities. Alas ! too long 
We've passed unnoticed through the street, 
Or when we've mingled with the throng 
Not one our noble selves would greet. 

Glorioso seconds the motion. 

I second, Sir, my worthy friend, 
And these amendments pray for 
That members each have paper, 
Sand, pen, ink, wax and wafer. 
I move besides to fix the rank 

Of least some awkward wight 

When makes the dinner frank 

Instead of left should take the right. 
Or in procession thrust his nose 
Proudly before his noble betters, 
Or dare his body interpose 
Sages among renowned for letters. 
To members title I propose 
To give of Excellency, 
Or somewhat which they may suppose 
As well will suit the proudest fancy. 
For President is placed far 
By title proud, above his peers. 
Such marked distinction I abhor. 
Members ! I wish you'd lend your ears 
To this and every mention' d head. 
I burn t' advance to highest pitch 
And make our glory widely spread 
As far as Fame her flight can stretch. 

Pomposo seconds ye amendment. 
Whiggo. 

Could flowing robes make language flow 
Or Caps of Freedom sense impart, 
Carpet's gay tints make fancy glow 
Or cushioned chairs improve the heart ; 
Could titles high exalt the soul 
To form some wise, some great design ; 
Could rank the passions' rage control 
And make confederate orders shine 



510 Notes and Queries. 

All might agree with hand and heart 

To urge and push these motions through ; 

But, Sir, we know pomp can't impart 

Good sense, or give finance a sous. 

Besides, what would our cits opine 

Who think we ardent lust for power ? 

Trust me they'd lash in keenest lines 

And all their vengence on us pour. 

In vain you'd quote old Greece and Rome, 

And talk of lictors, aye and fasces ; 

They'd tell you, Sirs, pray look at home 

Nor sequents be like servile asses ; 

Let motions and amendments all 

Sink in commitment's deepest pit ; 

None for report will on them call 

'Till lose all sense and wit. 

They were committed. 

FINIS. 

THE EARL OF RANFURLY, Governor of New Zealand, and his Private 
Secretary, Major Dudley Alexander, both descendants of William Penn, 
visited The Historical Society of Pennsylvania on August 17, 1904, and 
examined the Penn manuscripts and relics. 

PATRICK SULLIVAN, who enlisted in Captain Michael Doudel's com- 
pany of riflemen from York County June 25, 1775, served throughout 
the war for independence. After his term of enlistment expired in the 
First Battalion of Riflemen, Colonel William Thompson, he re-enlisted 
for two years from July 1, 1776, in Captain James Grier's company, 
First Pennsylvania Continental Line. At the battle of Germantown he 
was wounded in the leg, and discharged in 1778. In a few months he 
again enlisted, this time in the Second Pennsylvania Continental Line, 
and at the siege of Yorktown was wounded in the groin. He was dis- 
charged from the Continental army in 1783, and later became a pen- 
sioner. This sturdy veteran's last service was under Wayne in his 
campaign against the Indians in 1794, after which he became a resident 
of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

3Boofe notices. 

LETTERS AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE ALASKA FRONTIER. Edited 
by Edwin Swift Balch, A.B. (Harvard). Philadelphia. Press of 
Allen, Lane & Scott, 1904. 

In this work the editor has collected a number of newspaper edito- 
rials and items and some letters relating to the Alaska boundary 
question. 

YEAR-BOOK OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY, 1904. New York. 

8vo, 95 and 256 pp. 

Again this annual makes its appearance, compiled by the master hand 
of the Secretary of the Society. The lists of officers, members, and 
reports for the past year are followed by a special contribution by Mr. 
Ferree, entitled "Pennsylvania : A Primer," which presents in concise 



Notes and Queries. 511 

form the essential facts of Pennsylvania history. Intended to serve as 
a summary of Pennsylvania affairs, available for the busy man search- 
ing for facts only, the narrative form has been abandoned and the text 
arranged in paragraphs, which in their turn are gathered together into 
related chapters. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon Mr. Ferree 
for his valuable compilation. The work is copiously illustrated, which 
adds interest to the text, and is well indexed. Reprints of the ' ' Primer' ' 
have been made, and may be purchased of the compiler at 7 Warren 
Street, New York City. 

THE HISTORY AND ROSTER or THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF'S GUARD, 

OTHERWISE KNOWN AS WASHINGTON'S LlFE-GUARD. By C. E. 

Godfrey. 8vo, 302 pp. Illustrated. Price, $5. Stevenson-Smith 

Co., Washington, D. C. 

The history of the Guard dates from its formation at Cambridge, 
Mass., March 12, 1776, until it was mustered out on Constitution 
Island, opposite West Point, N. Y., December 20, 1783. Of the 339 
officers and men, 81 were from Massachusetts, 49 from New Hamp- 
shire, 8 from Rhode Island, 31 from Connecticut, 9 from New York, 
18 from New Jersey, 41 from Pennsylvania, 7 from Maryland, 67 from 
Virginia, 11 from North Carolina, and 17 unknown. The records of 
the officers and men show when and where they entered the service, 
rank, company and regiment, when transferred to the Guard, the 
battles in which they participated, casualties, and continuity of service. 
The appendix contains the journal of Elijah Fisher. Among the illus- 
trations are the Muster-Roil of the Infantry Guard, the first Pay-Roll 
of the Cavalry Guard, the flag of the Guard, and fac-simile signatures 
of the officers and men. 

A SCHOOL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. By William H. Mace. 

New York. Rand, McNally & Co. 465 pp. 

Professor Mace states in his preface that elementary text-books on 
history should be so simple and transparent in style that the child can 
come into immediate possession of the meaning without overcoming 
obstacles in the shape of strange words and involved sentences, and that 
to impress great historical scenes upon the mind of the young is as im- 
portant as to paint them on canvas. His school history, therefore, is 
well conceived and the conception has been admirably carried out. The 
illustrations are meritorious and profuse, and the work is well printed 
and produced. 

THE POUND AND KESTER FAMILIES. By John E. Hunt. Chicago, 

1904. 8vo, 628 pp. 

This work contains an account of the ancestry of both the Pound and 
Kester families, running back prior to 1685, and a genealogical account 
of the descendants of the two common ancestors, John Pound and 
William Kester. A sketch of the Kester family, by William F. Kester, 
and a description of a trip down the Ohio River on a flat-boat in 1786, 
by Joseph Listen, are interesting additions. John Pound was an early 
settler of Piscataway, New Jersey, where he died in 1690. Where he 
came from or the date when he settled in New Jersey has not been de- 
termined. The ancestors of the Kiisters came from Crefeld, Germany, 
and were among the early settlers of Germantown. The compiler has 



512 Notes and Queries. 

expended much labor upon the records and displayed ability in the sys- 
tematic arrangement of the material. A full index of names will prove 
useful for those wishing information about the descendants of the two 
families. The price of the work is $3. 50 per copy, postage paid, and 
it may be obtained of John E. Hunt, Esq., 97 Clark Street, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

THE SCHWENKFELDERS IN PENNSYLVANIA : AN HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

By Howard Wiegner Kriebel. Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1904. 

8vo, 246 pp. 

This historical sketch of the Schwenkfelders is the latest contribution 
published by the Pennsylvania German Society to the history of the 
early German Protestant denominations, which found in Pennsylvania 
the religious toleration denied them in their native land. Their founder, 
Caspar Schwenkfeld von Ossing, was a Silesian nobleman of liberal 
education and well read in the classics, and a contemporary of Luther. 
The movements of the Beformation attracted his attention ; but, differing 
in some points from Luther and others on the doctrine of the Holy 
Communion, all connection with them was severed. Nevertheless, 
Schwenkfeld gained many adherents, wrote numerous learned treatises, 
and after many trials died at Ulm in 1562. His followers, owing to 
repeated persecutions between 1590 and 1720, finally left their homes 
and sought shelter in Saxony, where they remained unmolested until 
1733, when the Saxon government withdrew its protection. In May of 
1734 forty families, led by George Wiegner, left the estate of Count 
Zinzendorf, and in September arrived at Philadelphia, having dropped 
the plan of settling in Georgia, and found homes principally in what 
are now the counties of Montgomery, Berks, Bucks, and Lehigh. Their 
first minister was George Weiss, who died in 1760. The author of this 
valuable work has had in its preparation access to original material and 
gives us a careful and straightforward history of his people and their 
labors in Pennsylvania. The make-up of the volume is attractive and 
the numerous illustrations are unusually interesting. 



Officers of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 513 



OFFICERS 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



PRESIDENT. 
HON. SAMUEL WHITAKEK PENNYPACKER. 

HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT. 
HON. CRAIG BIDDLE. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

HENRY CHARLES LEA, WILLIAM BROOKE RAWLE, 

HON. JAMES T. MITCHELL, GEORGE HARRISON FISHER, 

HON. CHARLEMAGNE TOWER, HON. HAMPTON L. CARSON. 

RECORDING SECRETARY. 
THOMAS WILLING BALCH. 

S 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 

JOHN BACH MCMASTER. 

TREASURER. 
FRANCIS HOWARD WILLIAMS. 

AUDITOR. 

RICHARD McCALL CADWALADER. 
VOL. xxvni. 33 



514 Officers of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

CURATOR. 
GREGORY B. KEEN. 

LIBRARIAN. 

JOHN W. JORDAN. 

ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN. 
MAY ATHERTON LEACH. 

HISTORIOGRAPHER. 
J. GRANVILLE LEACH. 

COUNCILLORS. 

JOHN C. BROWNE, WILLIAM DRAYTON, 

WILLIAM G. THOMAS, HON. WILLIAM POTTER, 

JOHN B. GEST, SAMUEL CASTNER, JR., 

WILLIAM H. LAMBERT, JOHN F. LEWIS, 

CHARLES MORTON SMITH, EDWARD ROBINS, 

SIMON GRATZ, ISRAEL W. MORRIS. 

The Council of the Society is composed of the President, Vice- 
Presidents, Eecording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer, 
Auditor, and the twelve Councillors. Hon. James T. Mitchell is Presi- 
dent and Gregory B. Keen is Secretary of the Council. 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLICATION FUND. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, HON. JAMES T. MITCHELL, 

SIMON GRATZ. 
(JOHN W. JORDAN, Editor of Publications.) 

TRUSTEES OF THE BINDING FUND. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, HON. JAMES T. MITCHELL, 

SIMON GRATZ. 



Officers of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 515 

TRUSTEES OF THE LIBRARY FUND. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, JOHN BACH MCMASTER, 

GREGORY B. KEEN. 



TRUSTEES OF THE GILPIN LIBRARY. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, GEORGE HARRISON FISHER, 

WILLIAM BROOKE RAWLE, HENRY CHARLES LEA, 

SIMON GRATZ. 



TRUSTEES OF THE ENDOWMENT FUND AND 
MISCELLANEOUS TRUSTS FUND. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, HON. HAMPTON L. CARSON, 

RICHARD M. CADWALADER. 



TRUSTEES OF THE FERDINAND J. DREER COL- 
LECTION OF MANUSCRIPTS. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, WILLIAM BROOKE RAWLE, 

HON. HAMPTON L. CARSON, GREGORY B. KEEN, 

EDWIN GREBLE DREER. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL 
STUDY ENCOURAGEMENT FUND. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, WILLIAM BROOKE RAWLE, 

GREGORY B. KEEN. 



TRUSTEES OF THE BUILDING FUND. 

HON. S. W. PENNYPACKER, WILLIAM BROOKE RAWLE, 

JOHN F. LEWIS. 



516 Officers of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

STATED MEETINGS. 

January 9, 1905. May 8, 1905. 

March 13, 1905. November 13, 1905. 

January 8, 1906. 



Annual membership $5.00 

Life membership ...... 50.00 

Publication Fund, life subscription . . . 25.00 
Pennsylvania Magazine, per annum (to non-sub- 
scribers to the Publication Fund) . . .3.00 

Payments may be made to the Curator at the Hall, 1300 Locust 
Street, or to the Collector. 



INDEX. 



(Family surnames of value in genealogical research are printed in CAPITALS; names of 

places in italics.) 



ABERCROMBIE, David, 170 
ABBRCROMBIE, James, extract from 

will of, 170 ; mentioned, 170 
ABERCROMBIE, Margaret, 170 
ACROD, Benjamin, extract from will 

of, 173 

ACROD, Sara, 173 
ADAMS, John, 172 
Agnew, Gen. James Tanner, memorial 

to, 106 
Alaska Adjudication, The, by Thomas 

Willing Balch, 176 
Alison, Rev. Francis, to Robert Alison, 

240, 379 
Alison, Robert, Rev. Francis Alison to, 

240, 379 

Allegheny Valley Railroad, 4, 5 
ALLFORD, Dorothy, extract from will 

of, 173 

ALLFORD, Mary, 173 
ALLMAN, Thomas, 466 
ALLWAY, Thomas, 465 
American Philosophical Society, 303, 

399, 401 

AMYA, David, 462 

Anderson, David, to Josiah Foster, 239 
ARMSTRONG, Frances, 69 
ARMSTRONG, James, 69 
ARMSTRONG, William H., 69 
Armstrong, John, Gen. Anthony Wayne 

to 382 

ASKEW, John, 171 
Assembly of Pennsylvania, Salaries 

and Some Expenses of the, 236 
ATTWOOD, William, 469 
AUBREY, Ann, 169 
AUBREY, Elianor, 169 
AUBREY, Letitia, 169, 456 
AUBREY, Thomas, 169 
AUBREY, William, extract from will 

of. 169 
AYNON, Elizabeth, 468 

BACH, William, 462 

Balnbridge Street, formerly Shippen 

Street, 402 
Balch, Thomas Willing, The Alaska 

Adjudication by, 176 ; The English 



Ancestors of the Shippen Family 
and Edward Shippen of Philadel- 
phia, by, 385 

Bank of Pennsylvania, new building 
of, 132 

Barclay, John, succeeded as alderman 
by John Inskeep, 131 

Bard, Hon. Thomas R., contributes 
Journal of Lieut. Robert Parker, 
1779, 12 

BATHURST, Charles, 459 

BELL, John, 469 

Bell, Robert, Bookstore of, 376 

Bessemer Steel Company, 10 

BICKNELL, William, 460 

Biddle, John, 65 

Bill of lading, 1714, New Brunswick, 
N. J., 252 

BINCKS, Thomas, 464 

BINKS, Samuel, 464 

Bird, Lieut.-Col. John, memorial to, 
106 

BLACK, Rev. John, 173 

BLADEN, 121 

Blanchard, balloon ascension of in 
Philadelphia, 269 

BLAND, Ellas, 172 

BODY, Elizabeth, 467 

BOEHM, 123 

BOLTER, Mary, 468 

BOLTER, Thomas, 468 

BONNELL, Elizabeth, 469 

Boston, some Philadelphia County 
farmers send relief to poor of, 242 

Boudinot, Ellas, to Mrs. Elizabeth Fer- 
guson, 253 

Boyd, Thomas, account of sufferings of, 
while prisoner in New York City, 
377, 378 

Boyd, Lieut. Thomas, leads a detach- 
ment against the Indians, 14 ; 
death of, 15 

Braddock, Gen. Edward, disembarks 
at Alexandria, 262 ; defeat and 
death of, 262 

Braddock's Field, 189 

BRADFORD, Abigail, 135 

BRADFORD, Caroline, 135 

517 



518 



Index. 



BRADFORD, Charles S., 135 

BRADFORD, Mary, 135 

BRADFORD, Samuel F., 135 

Bradford, Charles S., executor of John 
Inskeep, 135 

Bradford, Samuel F., book-publishing 
business of, 135 

BRADLEY, Edward, extract from will 
of, 170 

BRADLEY, Esther, 170, 171 

BRADLEY, Joseph, 170 

BRADLEY, Thomas, 170 

BRADLEY, William, 170 

BRADY, Elizabeth, 70 

BRADY, John S., 70 

Brady's Bend Iron Company, 4 

BRAND, Jonathan, extract from will 
of, 173 

BRAND, Margaret, 172 

BRAND, Thomas, 173 

Brandywine, Battle of, 265, 266 

BRENTON, Jane, 465 

BRENTON, John, 465 

BRENTON, Joseph, 465 

BRETT, Mary, 173 

BRETT, Robert, extract from will of, 
173 

BRETT, Roger, 173 

Brink, Squire John, Pike County, 
Pennsylvania, marriages, 1808-1809, 
from docket of, 251 

British men-of-war in the Delaware, 
1813, 241 

Brodhead, Col. Daniel, receives con- 
gratulations for conduct in expedi- 
tion against the Indians, 382 

BROOKS, Eliza, 135 

BROOKS, Samuel, 135 

Brooks, Samuel, funeral services of 
John Inskeep at house of, 135 ; ex- 
ecutor of John Inskeep, 135 

BROWN, Sarah, 175 

Brown, Samuel, to James Hunter, 104, 
105 

BROWNE, Thomas, 467, 469 

Browning, Charles H., sketch of Fran- 
cis Campbell by, 62 

BRUCE, William, 175 

BULLER, Ann, 458 
Burgoyne, Gen. John, surrender of, 
Charles Carroll writes to Richard 
Peters regarding, 216 
BURWASH, Edward, 462 
Butler, Pierce, Isaac T. Hopper vs., 

133 

Butler, Col. Richard, to Gov. Wharton 

concerning the needs of his regiment 

at Valley Forge, 376 ; trial of before 

Court-martial, 1779, 381 

Butler, Col. William, 18 



CADWALADER, John, 460 

CALHOUN, Elizabeth, 70 

CALLOWHILL, Thomas, 459 

Cambria Iron Works, 5, 11 

Cambria Steel Company, 11 

CAMFEILD, Francis, 459 

Cammil, Joseph, Indian trader, 62, 64 

CAMPBELL, 62 

CAMPBELL, Cassandana, 70 

CAMPBELL, Catherine, 67 

CAMPBELL, Daniel Duncan, 69 

CAMPBELL, Ebenezer, 69 

CAMPBELL, Eleanor or Ellen, 69, 70 

CAMPBELL, Elizabeth, 69, 70 

CAMPBELL, Ellen Duncan, 69 

CAMPBELL, Frances, 69 

CAMPBELL, Francis, 69, 70 

CAMPBELL, Francis Caldwell, 69 

CAMPBELL, Frank D., 69 

CAMPBELL, George, 70 

CAMPBELL, Harriet, 69 

CAMPBELL, Henry McConnell, 70 

CAMPBELL, James, 69 

CAMPBELL, James P., 69 

CAMPBELL, James Parker, 69 

CAMPBELL, Jane, 69 

CAMPBELL, John, 70 ; Rev. John, 67 

CAMPBELL, Juliana Watts, 70 

CAMPBELL, Mary Ann, 69 

CAMPBELL, Mary Barr, 69 

CAMPBELL, Nancy, 69, 70 

CAMPBELL, Nellie, 69 

CAMPBELL, Parker, 70 

CAMPBELL, Richard (?), 69 

CAMPBELL, Capt. Robert, 68 

CAMPBELL, Samuel Duncan, 69 

CAMPBELL, Sarah, 69, 70 

Campbell, Andrew, 65 

Campbell, Bernard, 65 

Campbell, David, 65 

Campbell, Francis, sketch of, by 
Charles H. Browning, 62 ; pioneer 
of the Cumberland Valley, 62 ; par- 
entage of, not known, 62 ; member 
of Middle Spring Presbyterian 
Church, 62, 63 ; rents lot for Ship- 
pensburg Presbyterian Church, 63 ; 
Intercourse of, with the Indians, 63 ; 
suspected of being a Roman Cath- 
olic, 63, 64, 66; suspected of sym- 
pathizing with the Indians, 63, 64 ; 
Indian agent at Fort Augusta, 66 ; 
member Cumberland County Board 
of Justices, 66 ; County Surveyor, 
67 ; property-holder In Shippens- 
burg, 67; will of, 67 

Campbell, George, settles In Pennsyl- 
vania, 64 

Campbell, James, settles In Pennsyl- 
vania, 64 



Index. 



519 



Campbell, John, school of, 130 

Campbell, John, 65 ; Rev. John, sketch 
of, 67 

Campbell, Joseph. See Cammll. 

Campbell, Patrick, 64, 65 

Campbell, Robert, 65 ; Capt. Robert, 
sketch of, 68 

Campbell, Samuel, 65 

Campbell, William, settles in Pennsyl- 
vania, 64 ; mentioned, 65 

Canadesaga, 12 

Canasago, 18 

Canaseraga, 19 

Caroline County, Maryland, Marriage 
Licenses of, 1774-1815, 209, 320, 428 

Carnegie, Andrew, 7, 8, 9, 10 

Carnegie Steel Company, 11 

CARPENTER, Joshua, 170 

CARPENTER, Samuel, 463, 464 

Carroll, Charles, of Carrollton, Two 
Letters of, 216, 217; to Richard 
Peters, 216 ; to Horatio Ridout, 217 

CARSON, Barbara, 461 

CARSON, Charles S., 69 

CARSON, Mary Ann, 69 

CARSON, Nichola, 461 

CHAMBERS, Elizabeth, 70 

CHAMBERS, William, 70 

Chester, Artillery Park at, 21 

CHOPE, Richard, 175 

City Tavern, meetings of Chamber of 
Commerce held In, 132 

Clark, Lieut. Charles, 120 

Clark, Lieut.-Col. Elijah, to Lardner 
Clark, 107 

Clark, Lardner, Lieut.-Col. Elijah 
Clark to, 107 

Clock, Col. , 20 

Cochran, Samuel P., contributes Mrs. 
Mary Dewees' Journal from Phila- 
delphia to Kentucky, 1787-1788, 182 

COCKERSALL, Anne, 457 

Coffin, Nathaniel, letter of, 116 

COLLINS, Philip, 464 

COLMAN, Deborah, 172 

COLMAN, Jonathan, 172 

Commerce, Chamber of, Philadelphia, 
organization of, 131 

COMPERS, James, 456 

Constitution of the U. S., opposition 
to, 268 ; adoption of by Pennsylva- 
nia, Delaware, and New Jersey, 268 

Continental Army, Shot and Shell for, 
101 

Conyngham, Gustavus, portrait of, by 
Rembrandt Peale, 123 

COOPER, William, 464 

CORBET, Abigail, 457 

Coren, Capt. Isaac, 23 

CORNOCK, Morgan, 462 



" Cornwallis' Soliloquy," 24 

COWLING, John, 466 

Cowper, Mary, Countess, writes con- 
cerning William Shippen, 393 

Cox, Maj. James, 120 

Cranor, Henry Downes, contributes 
Marriage Licenses of Caroline 
County, Maryland, 1774-1815, 209, 
320, 428 

CRAVEN, John, extract from will of, 
173 

CREWS, Erne, 464 

CREWS, Richard, 464 

CRIPP, Steven, 459 

CROCKER, John, 467 

Croghan, William, and Francis Camp- 
bell, opinion of Gov. Sharpe regard- 
Ing, 63, 64 

CROSFELD, Effam, 388 

CROUCH, William, 459 

CROW, Christopher, 469 

CROW, Elizabeth, 469 

CROW, Mary, 469 

CROW, John, 469 

Culbertson, Capt. Samuel, bill of Con- 
tinental Congress, 376 

Currency, change in, 131 

CUTLER, Catherine, 67 

DANIEL, Henry, 174 

Davies, Samuel, prophecy of, concern- 
Ing Washington, 263 

DEEBLE, Richard, 172 

Delaware, adoption of the Constitu- 
tion by, 268 

Dennis, Richard, vs. Charles Wharton, 
110 

Depreciation Pay, Pennsylvania Sol- 
diers of the Revolution entitled to, 
45, 201 

DEWEES, 123, 251 

Dewees. Mrs. Mary, Journal of, from 
Philadelphia to Kentucky, 1787- 
1738, contributed by Samuel P. 
Cochran, 182 ; breakfasts at Col. 
Webster's, 182 ; crosses the Con- 
estoga, 182 ; arrives at Lancaster, 
183 ; describes journey across the 
Allegheny Mountains, 186 ; arrives 
at Pittsburgh, 189 ; and party enter- 
tained by Capt. and Mrs. O'Harra, 
189, 190 ; arrives at McKee's 
Island, 191 ; describes journey down 
the Ohio from McKee's Island to 
Limestone, 193-196 ; arrives at 
Point Pleasant, 196 ; arrives at 
Limestone, 196 ; arrives at Lexing- 
ton, 197 

DILLWYN, 248, 249 

Dlnwiddie, Gov. Robert, sends Wash- 



520 



Index. 



Ington to Pennsylvania, 260 ; men- 
tioned, 262 

DODD, Margaret, 468 

DRAKE, Harriet, 69 

Drayton, William, attends " breaking 
ground" for new building, Histori- 
cal Society of Pennsylvania, 376 ; 
member of Building Committee of 
same, 376 

Duquesne Steel Works, 10 

DUNCAN, Sarah, 69 

Dunwoody's Tavern, Federal Repub- 
licans hold a meeting at, 132 

DYMMOCK, Capt. William, 460 

ECCLESTON, Theodore, 463, 464 

ECKLEY, John, 462, 463 

ECKLEY, Sarah, 462, 463 

Edgar Thomson Steel Works, 7, 8, 9, 
10, 11 

EDWARDS, Griffith, 468 

Edwin, David, Engraved Works of 
(not in Hildeburn's list), by Mantle 
Fielding, 420 

Ege, George & Co., shot and shell 
manufactured by, for Continental 
Army, 101 

Ellery, Miss Henrietta, 508 

Ellery, Hon. William, Farce by, 508 

ELLICE, George, extract from will of, 
173 

ELLICE, William, 173 

ELLWOOD, ELWOOD, Thomas, 456, 
457 

England, Pennsylvania Gleanings in, 
by Lothrop Wlthington, 169, 456 

English Ancestors of the Shippen Fam- 
ily and Edward Shippen, of Phila- 
delphia, by Thomas Willing Balch, 
385 

Engraved Works of David Edwin (not 
in Hildeburn's list), by Mantle 
Fielding, 420-427 

Esopus, 21 

ETTERIDGE, Jno., 459 

EVANS, Andrew, 467 

" Falckner Swamp" Lutheran Congre- 
gation, Bicentennial Anniversary of, 
117 

FARMER, John, 462 

FENCOTT, Hannah, 173 

FENCOTT, William, 173 

Ferguson, Mrs. Elizabeth, Ellas Bou- 
dinot to, 253 

Fielding, Mantle, Engraved Works of 
David Edwin (not in Hildeburn's 
list), by, 420 

Fire Department, Philadelphia, reor- 
ganization of, 134 



Fishborn, Hannah, Letitia Penn to, 
238 

Fisher, Martha, First Quaker Preacher 
in America, to Margaret Fox, 237 

FLOWER, Seth, 174 

FOOTMAN, Elizabeth, 400 

FOOTTS, Patrick, 462 

FOOTTS, Thomas, 462 

Forbes, Col. Stewart, Penn Manu- 
scripts purchased from, 155 

Forbes Collection, Penn Manuscripts, 
List of, 155 

Fort Dayton, 20 

Fort Duquesne, capture of, 263 ; men- 
tioned, 259, 261 

Fort Hackeman, 20 

Fort Pitt, 188 

Fort Schuyler, 17-20 

Foster, Josiah, David Anderson to, 
239 ; Fougeray and Schreiner to, 
240 

Fougeray and Schreiner to Josiah Fos- 
ter, 240 

FOX, George, 459 

Fox, George, James Nayler to, 240 

Fox, Margaret, Martha Fisher to, 237 

Foxcroft, John, 123 

Freame, Thomas, Richard Hockley to, 
44 

Freeman, Capt. Jeremiah, 23 

FRENCH, Alice, 469 

FRENCH, Cherry John, 469 

FRENCH, Sarah, 469 

FRENCH, William, 469 

Furniture of Our Ancestors, The, 78, 
199 

Gansewoort, Col. Peter, 20 

GEARING, John, 461 

GEARING, Mary, 461 

GEARING, William, 461 

George Tavern, John Inskeep proprie- 
tor of, 131 

German Flats, 20 

Germantown, Battle of, 265, 266 

Gibbs, Josiah W., to Mrs. Perry, 1784, 
508 

Gibbs, Willard, to Peter Verstille, 244 

Gloucester County, New Jersey Items, 
1688-1698, 105, 106 

GOLDNEY, Hen., 459 

GOODSON, William, 459 

GOULD, Nicholas, 458 

GRAY, John, 458 

Great Genesee Plains, 15 

Great Western Iron Works, 4 

GREENE, Tho., 459 

Greene, Gen. Nathaniel, to Gov. 
Thomas Jefferson requesting his aid 
in recruiting troops in Virginia, 241 



Index. 



521 



Greenway, Robert, guardian of Robert 

Morris, 276 

GREGORY, Edward, 465 
GREGORY, John, 465 
GREGORY, Martha, 465 
GREGORY, Mary, 465 
GREGORY, William, 465, 466 
GRIMSDALE, William, 457 
GROOMBRIDGE, Jane, 174 
GROOMBRIDGE, Walter, extract from 

will of, 174 

Grosh, Lieut. Michael, 120 
GROSSE, Abigail, 398 
GROVES, John, 463, 464 
GROWDON, Jenepher, 467 
GROWDON, Joseph, 466, 467 
GROWDON, Lawrence, 466-468 
GROWDON, Mary, 467 
GROWDON, William, 467 
GUY, Edward, extract from will of, 

174; mentioned, 173 
GUY, John, 173 

HACKETT, John, 463 
HACKETT, Thomas, 468 
Hall, Rev. Henry Armstrong writes 
regarding Shippen entries at Monk 
Fryston, 387 ; mentioned, 385 
HAMILTON, Andrew, 464 
Hamilton, Gov. Andrew, 63 
HAMMONS, Michael, 172 
Hand, Gen. Edward and Gen. Max- 
well arrive at Canadesaga, 12 
HARBE, Thomas, 459 
HARGRAVE, Dr. Abraham, 461 
HARTFORD, Charles, 459 
HASLEHURST, Mary, extract from 

will of, 174 

HAYNESWORTH, Charles, 461 
HAYNESWORTH, Jane, 460, 461 
HAYNESWORTH, Samuel, 461 
HEAD, George, extract from will of, 

174 

HEAD, Rowland, 174 
HEAD, Thomas, 174 
HELE, Warwick, extract from will of, 

172 
Helm, Mrs. Mary, Rev. Ellas Keach to, 

101 

HEPBURN, Jane, 69 
Herkimer, Gen. Nicholas, 20 
HIGGINS, Samuel Carson, 461 
HIGGINS, Thomas, 461 
HIGGS, John, 174 
HIGGS, William, extract from will of, 

174 
Hillam, Yorkshire, English home of 

the Shippens, 386-388 
Hillman, Col. Josiah, 130 
HIPSLEY, John, 466 



Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 
ground broken for new fire-proof 
building of, 376 ; Building Commit- 
tee, 376 ; Officers of, 513 ; stated 
meetings, 516 ; mentioned, 399 

Hockley, Richard, Letters from Let- 
ter-Book of, 26 

HOLLAND, Elizabeth, 458 

HOLLAND, John, 458 

HOLLAND, Joshua, extract from will 
of, 458 

HOLLAND, Thanks, 458 

Homestead Steel Works, 9, 10 

Hopper, Isaac T., vs. Pierce Butler, 
133 

HOOPER, Elizabeth, 467 

HOOPER, Grace, 467 

HOOPER, Jenepher, 467 

HOOPER, Martha, 467 

HOOPER, William, 466, 467 

HOSKINS, Anne, 463, 464 

HOSKINS, Aurelius, 463 

HOSKINS, Martha, 463, 464 

HOSKINS, Mary, 463, 464 

HOSKINS, Mercy, 463, 464 

HOUR, William, 170 

HOWARD, Thomas, 170 

Howell, Ezeklel, 22 

Hoyt, Hon. Henry M., portrait of, pre- 
sented to Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania, 121 

Hughes, John, appointed to sell 

stamps, 277 

HULINGS, Sarah, 131 

HULL, Joseph, 466 

Hunter, James, letters to, from corre- 
spondents in England and Ireland, 
104 ; Joseph Hunter of Carlisle to, 
108 

Hunter, Joseph, of Carlisle, to James 
Hunter, relating to Indian Depre- 
dations, 108 

HUTCHINS, Richard, Jr., 467 

Hyam, Thomas, Richard Hockley to, 
26 

Indian Depredations, Joseph Hunter 

to James Hunter, relating to, 108 
Inglis, John, 400 
INGRAM, William, 459 
INMAN, Dorothy, 173 
INMAN, Jane, 173 
INMAN, Mary, 173 
INMAN, William, 173 
INSKEEP, Abraham, 129 
INSKEEP, Abraham H., 135 
INSKEEP, Ann, 129, 135 
INSKEEP, James, 129 
INSKEEP, John, 129, 135 
INSKEEP, Joseph, 12y 



522 



Index. 



INSKEEP, Mary, 129 

INSKEEP, Sarah, 131, 135 

INSKEEP, Sarah (Ward), 129 

Inskeep, Abraham, sketch of, 129 ; 
judge, 130 

Inskeep, John, emigrates to New Jer- 
sey, 129 ; justice of the peace and 
judge, 129 

Inskeep, John, Mayor and President of 
the Insurance Co. of North Amer- 
ica, Sketch of, by Henry Edward 
Wallace, Jr., 129 ; education of, 130 ; 
military service of, 130 ; marries 
Sarah Hulings, 131 ; removes to 
Philadelphia, 131 ; business career 
of, 131-135 ; succeeds John Barclay 
as alderman, 131 ; elected mayor of 
Philadelphia, 131 ; lays foundation 
stone of first bridge across the 
Schuylkill, 131 ; progress of the city 
under, 131, 132, 134 ; political 
changes in Philadelphia during 
terms of, 132, 134 ; trustee, Mutual 
Assurance Co., 132, 133 ; director 
Insurance Co. of North America, 
133 ; Judge of Common Pleas, 133 ; 
re-elected mayor, 133 ; death of, 
135 ; will of, 135 

Insurance Co. of North America, John 
Inskeep director of, 133 ; president 
of, 134, 135 

Iron and Steel Institute, 9, 10 

Iron and Steel Rails, Manufacture of, 
in Western Pennsylvania, 1 

Irvine, Hon. James, 120 

Irvine, Gen. William, Gen. Henry 
Knox to, 243 

IVIE, John, 467 

JACKSON, Francis, 458 

James II. Proclaimed at Philadelphia, 
1685, 242 

JAMES, Elizabeth, 398 

Jefferson, Thomas, Letters of, to 
Charles Willson Peale, 1796-1825, 
136, 295, 403 ; portrait of, by Rem- 
brandt Peale, 137 ; first mentions 
polygraph, 140 ; Gen. Nathaniel 
Greene to, requesting his aid in re- 
cruiting troops in Virginia, 241 ; 
desires release of Robert Morris, 
293 ; sends Peale contributions for 
his museum, 303-305, 313 ; writes 
concerning improvements in spec- 
tacles, 311, 412 ; writes to Peale 
regarding farming, 403-407 

JEYKIL, Margaret, 386, 387 

JONES, Charles, Sr., and Jr., 459 

JONES, Joan, Joane, 460 

JONES, Mary, 174 



JONES, Michael, 459 

JONES, William, extract from will of, 
174 

Jordan, William H., presents portraits 
to Historical Society of Pennsylva- 
nia, 121 

Journal of Lieut. Robert Parker, 1779, 
contributed by Hon. Thomas R. 
Bard, 12 

Keach, Rev. Elias, to Mrs. Mary Helm, 

101 

KEARSLEY, John, 172 
KEARSLEY, Margaret, 172 
KINNERSLEY, Ebenezer, 170 
KINNERSLEf, Richard, 173 
KINNERSLEY, William, extract from 

will of, 173 
Knox, Gen. Henry, to Gen. William 

Irvine, 243 
KOSTER, 123 

Lambert, Maj. William H., attends 
" breaking ground" for new building. 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 
376 ; member Building Committee 
of same, 376 

Lancaster County Militia, 1807, 239 

LANGHORNE, Thomas, extract from 
will of, 174 

Lardner, Lynford, 400 

LATEY, Gilbert, 459 

Lawler, Matthew, Political opponent 
of John Inskeep, 133 

LAWSON, Alexander, 208 

LAWSON, Elizabeth, 208 

Lawson, Alexander, by Townsend 
Ward, 204 ; early life of, 204 ; 
early efforts of, as an engraver, 204, 
205 ; arrives in Philadelphia, 205 ; 
friendship of for Alexander Wilson, 
205 ; engraves plates for Wilson's 
" Ornithology," 206 ; engravings 
by, 205-207; George Ord to, 207; 
Charles Lucien Bonaparte to, 208 ; 
marries Elizabeth Scaife, 208 ; 
death of, 208 

Lawton & Browne, to James Hunter, 
105 

LEA, Ellen, 69 

LEA, James H., 69 

LEA, Sarah, extract from will of, 175 

LEA, William, 175 

LEACH, Thomas, 170 

LECKY, William, 461 

LEE, Andrew, 69 

LEE, Elizabeth, 61) 

LEE, Francis, 69 

LEE, James, 69 



Index. 



LEE, Parker, 69 

LEE, Col. Washington, 69 

Lehman, Benjamin, catalogue of cabi- 
net-ware manufactured by, 1786, 78, 
199 

LEIGH, Frances, 389 

Lemon Hill, residence of Robert Mor- 
ris, 274, 293 

Lennington, Sergt. Timothy, 119 

LEVERTON, Frances, 467 

LEWIS, Jacob, 463 

LEVERTON, Thomas, 467 

Lewis, John F., chairman Building 
Committee, Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, 376 

LILLYSTONE, Hannah, 175 

LILLYSTONE, John, extract from will 
of, 175 

Line engraving introduced into Phila- 
delphia, 204 

LITTLE, Joseph, 173 

LITTLE, Mary, 173 

Little, Sergeant Nathaniel, 120 

Little Britain, 21 

Little Oenesee River, 16, 17 

LLOYD, David, 464 

LLOYD, John, 460 

LLOYD, Sampson, 462 

Lloyd, Mary, Thomas Lloyd to, 1768, 
237 

Lloyd, Thomas, to Mary Lloyd, 1768, 
237 

Logan, James 386, 397 

LOORE, Dr. Thomas, 463 

Lownes, Caleb, 123 

Lucy Furnaces, 8 

Ludwlg, Christopher, bequest of, 132 

LYBRAND, Elizabeth, 396, 398 

LYON, Nancy, 70 

LYON, Samuel, 70 

McCALL, Samuel, Jr., 170 

McCLURE, Ellen Duncan, 69 

McCMJRE, William, 69 

McClure, Capt. James, 22 

McCUNE, Eleanor or Ellen, 69 

Machin, Capt. Thomas, 21 

MACKET, William, 459 

McVeagh, Hon. Wayne, attends 
" breaking ground" for new build- 
ing, Historical Society of Pennsyl- 
vania, 376 

McWllllams, Capt. Robert, 119 

MAIDEN, John, 175 

MAIDEN, William, extract from will 
of, 175 

MAN, Edward, 459 

Manufacture of Iron and Steel Rails 
in Western Pennsylvania, by James 
M. Swank, 1 



Market Street Bridge, foundation- 
stone laid by Mayor Inskeep, 131 

Markham, William, 462 

Marlton, New Jersey, homestead of 
Inskeep family at, 129 

Marriage Licenses of Caroline County, 
Maryland, 1774-1815, contributed by 
Henry Downes Cranor, 209, 320, 423 

MARSH, Deborah, 466 

MARSH, Thomas, 466 

Marshall, Christopher, Letters of, to 
Peter Miller, of Ephrata, 71 

MARTYN, Jane, 467 

Maryland, notes from pension records 
of, 120 

MASSEY, Elizabeth, 457 

Matlack, Capt. Joseph, 130 

MATTHEWES, Sarah, 459 

Maxwell, Gen. William, and Gen. Hand 
arrive at Canadesaga, 12 

MEAD, William, 459 

Meakln, Thomas, Israel Pemberton to, 
109 

MECHAM, Mary, 174 

MEERS, Walter, 459 

Memorial to Gen. Agnew and Lieut. - 
Col. John Bird, Dedication of, 106 

MERRICK, Dionysius, extract from 
will of, 175 

METCALFE, Elizabeth, 175 

METCALFE, Richard, extract from 
will of, 175 

Methley, birthplace of Edward Ship- 
pen, 385, 388, 396 

Militia of Lancaster County, 1807, 239 

MILLER, Cassandana, 70 

Miller, Peter, of Ephrata, Letters of 
Christopher Marshall to, 71 

MOLINEUX, Mollineux, Judith, 457 

MOORE, Bridget, 457 

MOORE, John, 462 

MOORE. Rebeckah, 462 

MORGAN, George, 468 

MORGAN, Jacob, 468 

MORGAN, John, 468 

MORGAN, Thomas, 468 

MORREY, Anne, extract from will of, 
175 

MORREY, Richard, 175 

MORREY, Sarah, extract from will of, 
175 

MORRIS, Robert, 275 

Morris, Robert, Sr., arrives In Amer- 
ica, 275 ; death of, 276 ; epitaph 
of, 276 

Morris, Robert, A Great Philadelphlan, 
by Dr. Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer, 
273 ; early life of, 275 ; early busi- 
ness career of, 277 ; one of commit- 
tee opposing Stamp Act, 277 ; dele- 



524 



Index. 



gate to Continental Congress, 278 ; 
in charge of affairs in Philadelphia, 
1776-77, 278 ; procures money to 
forward the war, 278, 279 ; ap- 
pointed Superintendent of U. S. 
Finances, 279 ; letter-books and diary 
of, 281 ; description of character 
of, 281; to Comfort Sands, 281; 
false reports circulated about char- 
acter of, 282, 283; James Madison 
writes concerning, 282 ; loses for- 
tune, 233, 284 ; extracts from let- 
ter-books and diary of, 284-293 ; 
receives loan from Count de Roch- 
ambeau, 280, 284-286 ; describes 
celebration in Philadelphia of cap- 
ture of Cornwallis, 286 ; celebrates 
anniversary of Declaration of In- 
dependence, 287 ; to Governors of 
New Jersey and Delaware asking 
for supplies, 287, 288; letter dis- 
closing the true state of finances, 
288, 289; letters from, while In 
prison, 291-293 ; mentioned, 134 

Morristown, Gen. Washington arrives 
at, 23 

Mount Savage Rolling Mill, Md., 4 

MUSGRAVB, Peregrin, 463 

Mutual Assurance Co., John Inskeep, 
trustee of, 132-135 

Navy- Yard, Southwark, 132 

Nayler, James, to George Fox, 240 

NEATES, William, 170 

NEW, Elizabeth, 469 

New Brunswick, bill of lading, 1714, 
252 

New Jersey, adoption of the Consti- 
tution by, 268 

Newtown, 18 

New Windsor, 21 

Nicholson, John, moneys paid by, on 
account of Depreciation Pay of the 
Pennsylvania Line, 45 

Nicholson, Col. John P., member Build- 
ing Committee, Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania, 376 

Norris, Isaac, 397 

NORTON, John, 174 

Notes and Queries, 101, 236, 375, 508 

NUNES, Effam, 388 

NUNES, John, 338 

NUNES, Mary, 388 

Oberholtzer, Dr. Ellis Paxson, A Great 
Philadelphian : Robert Morris, 273 

OGDEN, George C., 69 
OGDEN, Laura Louise, 69 
OGDEN, Mary Barr, 69 



OGDEN, Samuel, 69 

O'Harra, Capt. James, and wife enter- 
tain Mr. Dewees and party, 189, 190 

Ohio River, Mary Dewees describes 
journey from McKee's Island to 
Limestone in 1787, 193-196 

Onandaga, 19 

Oneida Castle, 19 

ONSLOW, Richard, 458 

Orderly-Book of Lieut. William Torry, 
extracts from, 381 

OSGOOD, Jno., 459 

PACKER, James, 459 

PACKER, Jonn, 465 

PACKER, William, 465, 466 

Palatines, 105 

Parke, Dr., Anne Penn to, 239 

PARKER, Alexander, extract from 
will of, 458 ; mentioned, 459 

PARKER, Anna, 458 

PARKER, Elizabeth, 69, 459 

PARKER, Ellen, 459 

PARKER, John, 459 

PARKER, Mary, 459 

Parker, Lieut. Robert, Journal of, 
1779, contributed by Hon. Thomas 
R. Bard, 12 ; mentioned, 22 

Parkhill, Harvey, to Rev. Samuel B. 
Wylie, 244 

Pastorius, Francis Daniel, 109 

Patterson, Ezra, 22 

Pattison, Hon. Robert E., portrait of, 
presented to Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, 121 

PAYNE, Edmund, 175, 460 

PAYNE, Matthew, extract from will 
of, 175 

PEACHY, John, 458 

Peale, Charles Willson, Letters of 
Thomas Jefferson to, 1796-1825, 136, 
295, 403 ; museum and collections 
of, 136-140, 142, 304, 310, 318, 416 ; 
retires to a farm, 406 ; list of por- 
traits painted by, compiled by Hor- 
ace W. Sellers, 246 ; " Commis- 
sioner to seize personal effects of 
Traitors," 249 

Peale, Rembrandt, portrait of Gus- 
tavus Conyngham by, 123 ; portrait 
of Thomas Jefferson by, 137 ; eques- 
trian portrait of Washington by, 416 

Pemberton, Israel, experience of, with 
Francis Daniel Pastorius, 109 ; to 
Thomas Meakin, 109 

PENN, Letitia, 169 

PENN, Sarah, 461 

PENN, William, 169, 456, 460, 461; 
William Sr., 169 

Penn, Anne, to Dr. Parke, 239 



Index. 



525 



Penn, GOT. John, letter of, 375 

Penn, Lady Juliana, to Dr. William 
Smith, 238 

Penn, Letitia, to Hannah Fishborn, 
238 

Penn, Thomas, Richard Hockley to, 
27, 29, 30, 38 

Penn, Thomas Gordon, Penn Manu- 
scripts purchased from Estate of, 
155 

Penn, William, Proposals of, for a 
Second Settlement in the Province 
of Pennsylvania, 60 

Penn Manuscripts, Forbes Collection, 
List of, 155 

Penn Papers, note on, 113 

PENNINGTON, Edward, 456, 457 

PENNINGTON, Isaac, 456, 457 

PENNINGTON, John, extract from 
will of, 456 ; mentioned, 457 

PENNINGTON, Mary, 456, 457 

PENNINGTON, William, extract from 
will of, 457 

Pennsylvania, soldiers of the Revolu- 
tion entitled to Depreciation Pay, 
45, 201 ; Penn's Proposals for a 
Second Settlement in the Province 
of, 60 ; notes from pension records 
of, 119 ; Bank of, new building of, 
132 ; Gleanings in England by 
Lothrop Withington, 169, 456; sal- 
aries and some expenses of the As- 
sembly of, 1756, 236 ; Pike County 
marriages, 1808-1809, 251 ; George 
Washington in, by Hon. Samuel W. 
Pennypacker, 257 ; adoption of the 
Constitution by, 268 ; Hospital, 401 

Pennypacker, Hon. Samuel W., George 
Washington in Pennsylvania by, 
257 ; breaks ground for new fire- 
proof building, Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, 376 ; member of 
Building Committee of same, 376 

Pennypacker 3 s Mills, 117 

Perry, Mrs. Josiah W. Gibbs to, 1784, 
508 

PETER, John, 466-468 

Peters, Richard, character of Francis 
Campbell described by, 64 ; Charles 
Carroll, of Carrollton, to, 216 

Petition of Owners of Lands in the 
" Neck" to restrain Swine from run- 
ning at large, 1703, 236 

Pettit, Charles, 134 

Philadelphia, Richard Hockley's ac- 
count of election riots in, 40 ; Ship 
Registers for Port of, 1726-1775, 86, 
218, 346, 470 ; Premium Society, 
132 ; political changes in, 132, 134 ; 
progress of, during term of Mayor 



Inskeep, 131, 132 ; Society for Free 
Instruction of Indigent Boys, 132 ; 
Germantown and Perkiomen Turn- 
pike Company, 132 ; Centre Square 
engine for water supply, 132 ; re- 
organization of flre department, 
134 ; fire in, and subscriptions for 
relief of sufferers, 134 ; petition of 
owners of land in the " Neck" to 
restrain swine from running at 
large, 1703, 236 ; Proclamation of 
James II., read at, 1685, 242 ; ex- 
tracts from the diary of a merchant 
of, 253 ; metropolis of the Colonies 
and military centre of the Revolu- 
tion, 265 ; residence of President 
Washington in, 268 ; seat of gov- 
ernment, 267, 268 ; Assembly's 
dances, Joseph Shippen subscriber 
to, 400 

Philadelphia County, some farmers of, 
send relief to the poor of Boston, 
242 

PHILLIPPS, Anne, 459 

PHILLIPPS, George, 459, 462 

PHILLIPS, Catharine, 468 

PHILLIPS, Daniel, M.D., 469 

Pike County, Pennsylvania, marriages, 
1808-1809, 251 

Pittsburgh, Mr. Dewees and party ar- 
rive at, 189 ; mentioned, 191 

PLANTER, Philip Collins, 463 

PLAYTOR, William, 171 

Polygraph first mentioned in letters of 
Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson 
Peale, 140 

Pompton, 21, 22 

Porter, Capt. Andrew, 21-24 

PRESTON, Hannah, 171 

PRESTON, Margaret, 171 

PRESTON, Samuel, 171 

PRICE, Robert, 460 

Prichard, Mary, 462 

PROBERTS, Grace, 171 

PROBERTS, John, extract from will 
of, 171 

Proctor, Col. Thomas, 24 

Proud, Robert, biographical notes of, 
377 

Public baths, first in Philadelphia, 132 

QUINN, Mrs. James, 69 

RABLY, John, 172 
RABLY, Mary, 172 
RARLY, William, extract from will of, 

172 

Randolph, Col. Benjamin, 130 
Randolph, Thomas Jefferson, attends 



526 



Index. 



lectures In Philadelphia and lives 
with Charles Willson Peale, 314- 
316, 319 ; portrait of, by Peale, 318 

Rattlesnakes, dried, shipped by Rich- 
ard Hockley, 26, 28, 36, 39 

Rawle, Col. William Brooke, member 
Building Committee, Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania, 376 ; men- 
tioned, 113 

RAWLINGS, Jonathan, 463 

Rayner, Dawson & Co., to James 
Hunter, 104 

REED, Nathaniel, 464 

REEVE, William, 466 

Revolutionary Pensions, 119 

REYNOLDS, Elizabeth, 469 

REYNOLDS, Joseph, 469 

RICHARDSON, Rebecca, 398, 464 

Ridout, Horatio, Charles Carroll, of 
Carrollton, to, 217 

RIDSDALE, Edward, 173 

RINGWOOD, 21 

Riots in Philadelphia, 40, 42 

RITCHIE, Eleanor, 70 

RITCHIE, John, 70 

ROACH, Isaac, 465 

ROACH, Israel, 465 

ROACH, William, 465 

ROBERTS, Anne, 172 

ROBERTS, Edward, 460 

ROBERTS, Martha, 468 

ROBERTS, Rebecca, 172 

ROBERTS, Sophia, extract from will 
of, 172 

Robins, Edward, member Building 
Committee, Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, 376 

ROBINSON, Andrew, 464 

ROBINSON, Arthur, 458 

Rochambeau, Count de, advances 
money to Robert Morris for the 
army, 280, 284-286 

Roman Catholics in Philadelphia, 42 

ROSE, 102 

ROWLES, John, 462 

ROYDON, Robert, 464 

RUSSELL, Philip, 171 

RUSSELL, William, 457 



SANGER, Richard, extract from will 
of, 172 

SAULE, Joseph, 467 

SCAIPE, Elizabeth, 208 

Sellers, Horace W., contributes Letters 
of Thomas Jefferson to Charles Will- 
son Peale, 1796-1825, 136, 295, 403 ; 
list of portraits painted by Charles 
Willson Peale, compiled by, 246 

SHANNON, 122 



SHARP, Adam, 457 

Sharp, Anthony, to Thomas Sharp, 
113 

Sharp, Thomas, Anthony Sharp to, 
113 

Sharp, Gov. Horatio, quoted in regard 
to William Croghan and Francis 
Campbell, 63, 64 

SHED, George, 170 

SHEPHERD, Ann, 170 

SHEPHERD, Edward, 170, 171 

Sheppard, Richard, writes concerning 
British fleet at Greenwich, N. J., 
241 

SHEWEN, William, 459 

Ship Registers for Port of Philadel- 
phia, 1726-1775, 86, 218, 346, 470 

SHIPPEN, Abigail, 398 

SHIPPEN, Ann, Anne, 388, 389, 396, 
398 

SHIPPEN, Dorathe, 388, 389 

SHIPPEN, Edward (emigrant), 387- 
389, 396, 398 

SHIPPEN, Edward (of Lancaster), 
398, 400 

SHIPPEN, Edward, 171, 387, 389, 399, 
400, 463, 464 

SHIPPEN, Elizabeth, 171, 396, 398, 
400 

SHIPPEN, Frances, 389, 390 

SHIPPEN, Jenet, 388 

SHIPPEN, John, 395, 398 

SHIPPEN, Joseph, 395, 398, 399, 400 

SHIPPEN, Margaret, 386, 387, 399 

SHIPPEN, Mary, 388 

SHIPPEN, Rebecca, 398 

SHIPPEN, Robert, 388, 389, 394 

SHIPPEN, Sarah, 399 

SHIPPEN, William, 388, 389, 396, 
398 ; Rev. William, 388, 389 ; Dr. 
William (the elder), 398, 400; Dr. 
William (the younger), 400 

Shippen, Edward, resident of Methley, 
385, 396 ; son of William Shippen 
and Mary Nunes, 388, 389 ; sketch 
of, 396-398; arrives In Boston, 
1668, 396 ; marries Elizabeth Ly- 
brand, 396, 398 ; takes refuge in 
Pennsylvania, and resides In Phila- 
delphia, 396; mayor of Philadel- 
phia, 397 ; public offices held by, 
397 ; marries Rebecca Richardson, 
398 ; marries Elizabeth James, 398 ; 
children of, 398 ; mentioned, 134 

Shippen, Edward (of Lancaster), let- 
ter of, concerning estate In Hillam, 
Yorkshire, 386 ; sketch of, 399 ; 
Edward (son of Edward of Lancas- 
ter), sketch of, 399; Edward (son 
of Rev. William), sketch of, 389 



Index. 



527 



Shippen, John (son of Rev. William), 

sketch of, 395 

Shippen, Joseph, with Franklin founds 
the Junto, 398 ; (" Gentleman Joe"), 
sketch of, 400 ; Joseph (son of Ed- 
ward, of Lancaster), sketch of, 399 
Shippen, Robert (son of Rev. Wil- 
liam), sketch of, 394 
Shippen, William, sketch of, 388; 
marries Mary Nunes, 388 ; dies in 
Stockport, 388; children of, 388 
Shippen, Dr. William (the elder), 
sketch of, 400, 401; (the younger), 
400, 401 

Shippen, Rev. William (son of Wil- 
liam), sketch of, 389; children of, 
389-396 

Shippen, William, sketch of, 389-394 ; 
member of Parliament, 1716-1743, 
389 ; leader of the Jacobites, 389 ; 
confined in Tower of London, 389 ; 
opposition of Sir Robert Walpole, 
390 ; opinion of Lord Mahon re- 
garding, 391 ; same criticised, 391 ; 
report of proceedings in Parlia- 
ment when sent to Tower, 392 ; 
speeches of, In House of Commons, 
393, 394 

Shippen Family, The English Ances- 
tors of, and Edward Shippen, of 
Philadelphia, by Thomas Willing 
Balch, 285 

Shippen Street changed to Bainbridge 
Street, 402 

Shreve, Lieut.-Col. Israel, letter of, 
114 

Simonds, Capt. James, 23, 24 

SLADE, Judith, 467 

SLANY, Mary, 458 

SMARTFONT, Francis, 458 

SMITH, Henry, extract from will of, 
172 

SMITH, Jane, 172 

SMITH, John, extract from will of, 
172 

Smith, Dr. William, Lady Juliana 
Penn to, 238 

SNEAD, Mary, 171 

SNEAD, Richard, 459 

Southwark Navy- Yard. 132 ; yellow 
fever in, 133 

SPARKES, Richard, 463 

Springetsbury, fruit crop at, a failure 
in 1742, 30 

STAFFORD, Richard, Jr., 463 

Stanwix, Gen. John, 20 

STEDMAN, Alexander, 170 

STEDMAN, Charles, 170 

STEDMAN, John, 170 

STEPHEN, William, 461 



Stockport, 388, 389 

STORY, Mrs. Clark, 69 

STORY, Thomas, 387, 469 

Story, Thomas, 387, 397 

STOTE, Frances, 390 

Stresner, John, 120 

STRETTELL, John, 175 

STRETTLE, Robert, 170 

Sullivan, Gen. John, 21 

Superior Iron Company, 5 

Swank, James M., Manufacture of Iron 
and Steel Rails in Western Penn- 
sylvania, by, 1 

SWIFT, Elizabeth, 173 

SWIFT, John, Jun., extract from will 
of, 173 

Swift, John, 400 

Tate, Nancy, 69 

TATE, Robert, 69 

TAYLOR, Anne, 396 

THOMAS, Gabriel, 171 

THOMAS, James, extract from will of, 

171 

THOMAS, Micah, 171 
Tioga, 13, 16, 18 
TIZACKE, John, 464 
Torry, Lieut. William, Extracts from 

Orderly-Book of, 381 
TREFAGE, Joan, 467 
TRENT, William, 462 
Trenton, Battle of, 265, 266 
TUDOR, Mary, 173 

United Bowmen, Anniversary celebra- 
tion of Society of, 379 
United States Steel Corporation, 9 
USHER, Patient, extract from will of, 
172 

Valley Forge, Col. Richard Butler to 
Gov. Wharton, concerning needs of 
his regiment at, 376 

Van Braam, Jacob, accompanies Wash- 
ington to ir-ennsylvania, 260 ; men- 
tioned, 262 

Van Dyke, Col. Cornelius, 20 

Van Rensselear, Col. Killian, 20 

Vanschaick, Col. Gozen, 19 

VASTON, John, 462, 463 

Verstille, Peter, Willard Gibbs to, 244 ; 
J. W. Gibbs to, 245 

VICKERS, 254 

Vickris, Bishop Thomas, Richard 
Hockley to, 33 

WALKER, 118 
Wager, Prudence, 459 
WALKER, Capt. William, 460 



528 



Index. 



Wallace, Henry Edward, Jr., Sketch 
of John Inskeep, Mayor, and Presi- 
dent of the Insurance Co. of North 
America, by, 129 

Wallace, John, 400 

Wallace, John William, portrait of, 
presented to Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, 121 

WALTER, Christian, 466 

WALTER, Deborah, 466 

WALTER, Elizabeth, 466 

WALTER, Katherine, 466 

WALTER, Mary, 466 

WALTER, Peter, 466 

WALTER, Sarah, 466 

Ward, Townsend, Sketch of Alexander 
Lawson by, 204 

WARNER, John, 464 

Warren Tavern, Battle of, 265, 266 

Washington, George, portrait of, pre- 
sented to The Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, 121 ; in Pennsylva- 
nia, by Hon. Samuel W. Penny- 
packer, 257 ; early life of, 259 ; 
sent by Gov. Dinwiddle to Pennsyl- 
vania, 260 ; appointed lieutenant- 
colonel, 260 ; defeated at Fort Ne- 
cessity, 261, 262 ; resigns his ap- 
pointment in the army, 262 ; enters 
Braddock's army, 262 ; prophecy of 
Samuel Davies concerning, 263 ; 
takes Fort Duquesne, 263 ; life of, 
at Mount Vernon, 263, 267 ; dele- 
gate to First and Second Conti- 
nental Congresses, 263 ; elected 
commander-in-chief of the army, 
264 ; battles under personal com- 
mand of, 265 ; at Valley Forge, 
266 ; first called the " Father of 
his Country," 267 ; president of the 
Constitutional Convention, 268 ; re- 
sides in Philadelphia, 268 ; resi- 
dence of, 269 ; witnesses Blanch- 
ard's balloon ascension, 269; life 
of, as President, in Philadelphia, 
270 ; receives financial support for 
army, from Robert Morris, 278, 279, 
285 ; lifelong friend of Robert Mor- 
ris, 280 ; regards Robert Morris' 
imprisonment as a disgrace, 293 

WASSE, Mary, 459 

Water supply in Philadelphia, Centre 
Square engine for, 132 

Wayne, Gen. Anthony, to John Arm- 
strong, 382 

WEARE, Daniel, 465 

WEARE, John, 465 

Weaver, Hon. John, 376 

West Point, Head-quarters at, 21 



WHALING, Laura Louise, 69 

WHARLEY, Daniel, 456-459 

WHARLEY, Edward, 456, 457 

WHARLEY, Henry, 456, 457 

WHARLEY, Isaac, 456, 457 

WHARLEY, Mary, 456, 457 

WHARTON, Rachel, 171 

WHARTON, Thomas, 171 

Wharton, Charles, Richard Dennis vs., 
110 

Wharton, Francis R., presents portrait 
of Washington to Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania, 121 

Wharton, Robert, succeeded as mayor 
by John Inskeep, 131 

Wharton, Gov. Thomas, Col. Richard 
Butler to, concerning needs of his 
regiment at Valley Forge, 376 

WHEARLEY, Abraham, 459 

WHEARLEY, Daniel, 459, 460 

WHEARLEY, Henry, 460 

WHEARLEY, Sarah, 459 

Wheat crop abundant In 1742, 26, 30 

WHETSTONE, John, 460 

White Marsh, Battle of, 265, 266 

WHITEHEAD, George, 459 

WILCOX, Elizabeth, 398 

WILKINSON, Sarah, 458 

WILLES, Anne, 396 

WILLES, Edward, 396 

WILLIAMS, Elizabeth, 171 

WILLIAMS, Mary, 171 

WILLIAMS, Rachell, 171 

WILLIAMS, Stephen, 175 

WILLIAMS, Thomas, 462 

WILLIAMSON, Mary, 458 

Willing, Charles, employs Robert Mor- 
ris, 277 

Willing and Morris, 277 

WILLINGS, Anne, 398 

WILLINGS, Charles, 398 

WINBOLT, Hannah, 173 

Wistar Association, 118 

Withington, Lothrop, Pennsylvania 
Gleanings in England, by, 169, 456 

Wood Stoves of 1816, 240 

Wormwood, Col., 20 

Worrell, Mark Bingley, 120 

WRIGHT, Ann, 464 

WRIGHT, Elizabeth, 464 

WRIGHT, Margaret, 464 

WRIGHT, William, 172 

WYETH, John, 465 

WYETH, Mary, 465 

Wylie, Rev. Samuel ti., Harvey Park- 
hill to, 244 

ZACHARY, Rebecca, 457 
ZACHARY, Thomas, 458 



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