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Full text of "The people's guide, a business, political and religious directory of Johnson Co., Ind. together with a collection of very important documents and statistics connected with our moral, political and scientific history; also, a historical sketch of Johnson County and a brief history of each township"

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977.201 
J63p 
1437130 



M. L 



GENEALOGY 



COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02322 4899 



THE 



PEOPLE'S GUIDE 



A BUSINESS, POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS 



Dire ctory of Johnson Co. , Ind. 



TOGETHER WITH A COLLECTION OF VERY IMPORTANT 

DOCUMENTS AND STATISTICS CONNECTED 

WITH OUR MORAL, POLITICAL 

AND SCIENTIFIC 

HISTORYj 



V 



ALSO, A 



Historical Sketch of Johnson County, 



BRIEF HISTORY OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



By CLINE & McHAFFIE. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS PRINTING AND PUBLISHING HOUSE. 
I8 74 . 



Entered according to the act of Congress, in the year 1874, in the office of the Librarian oi 
Congress at Washington, D. C, by Cline & mcnAFFiE. 



1437130 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



IN CONGRESS, TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1776. 

Agreeably to the order of the day, the Congress resolved 
itself into a committee of the whole, to take into their further 
consideration the Declaration ; and, after some time, the Pres- 
ident resumed the chair, and Mr. Harrison reported that the 
committee had agreed to a declaration, which they desired 
him to report. ( The committee consisted of Jefferson, Frank- 
lin, John Adams, Sherman, and R. R. Livingston.) 

The Declaration being read, was agreed to, as follows : 

A DECLARATION 

BY THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 
IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED. 

When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary 
for one people to dissolve the political bands which have con- 
nected them with another, and to assume among the powers 
of the earth the separate and equal station to which the laws 
of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect 
for the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare 
the causes which impel them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are 
created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain inalienable rights ; that among these are life, liberty, 
and the pursuit of happiness. That, to secure these rights, 
governments are instituted among men, deriving their just 
powers from the consent of the governed; that, whenever any 
form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is 
the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute 
a new government, laying its foundation on such principle!, 

(3; 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem 
most likely to effect their 6afety and happiness. Prudence, 
indeed, will dictate that governments long established should 
not be changed for light and transient causes ; and, accordingly, 
all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to 
suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by 
abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invari- 
ably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under 
absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw 
off such government, and to provide new guards for their future 
security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these colo- 
nies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to 
alter their former systems of government. The history of the 
present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries 
and usurpations, all having, in direct object, the establishment 
of an absolute tyranny over these States. To prove this, let 
facts be submitted to a candid world: 

He has refused his assent to laws the most wholesome and 
necessary for the public good. 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass laws of immediate 
and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation 
till his assent should be obtained ; anil, when so suspended, he 
has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people unless those people would relinquish 
the right of representation in the legislature — a right inestim- 
able to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, 
uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of thsir public 
records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance 
with his measures. 

He has dissolved representative hou es repeatedly for oppos- 
ing, with manly firmness, his invasions on the rights of the 
people. 

He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, to 
cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative powers, 
mcapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large 
for their exercise, the State remaining, in the meantime, ex- 



DECLARATION OP INDEPENDENCE. 



posed to all the danger of invasion from without, and convul- 
sions within. 

lie has endeavored to prevent the population of these 
States ; for that purpose, obstructing the laws for naturaliza- 
tion of foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their 
emigration hither, and raising the conditions of new appro- 
priations of lands. 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by refus- 
ing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers. 

He has made judges dependent on his will alone for the 
tenure of their offices and the amount and payment of their 
salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither 
swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their sub- 
stances. 

He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies, 
without the consent of our legislature. 

He has affected to render the military independent of, and 
superior to, the civil power. 

He has combined, with others, to subject us to a jurisdiction 
foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; 
giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation : 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us; 

For protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment, for 
any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of 
these States ; 

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world ; 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent; 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of trial by 
jury. 

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses. 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a neigh- 
boring province, establishing therein an arbitary government, 
and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render it at once an ex- 
ample and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute 
rule into these colonies ; 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valuable 



6 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

laws, and altering, fundamentally, the powers of our govern- 
ments ; 

For suspending our own legislature, and declaring them- 
selves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases 
whatsoever. 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out of 
his protection, and waging war against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coast, burnt our 
towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is, at this time, transporting large armies of foreign mer- 
cenaries to complete the works of death, desolation, and ty- 
ranny, already begun, with circumstances of cruelty and per- 
fidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally 
unworthy the head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on the 
high seas, to bear arms against their country, to become the 
executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves 
by their hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the 
merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is an 
undistinguished destruction, of all ages, sexes, and conditions. 

In every stage of these oppressions, we have petitioned for 
redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated petitions have 
been answered only by repeated injury. A prince, whose 
character is thus marked by every act which may define a ty- 
rant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been wanting in attention to our British breth- 
ren. We have warned them, from time to time, of attempts 
made by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdic- 
tion over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances 
of our emigralion and settlement here. We have appealed 
to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured 
them, by the ties of our common kindred, to disavow these 
usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections 
and c )rrespondence. They, too, have been deaf to the voice 
of justice and consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce 
in the necessity, which denounces our separation, and hold 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



them, as we hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war — in 
peace, friends. 

We, therefore, the representatives of the UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA, in GENERAL CONGRESS assembled, ap- 
pealing to the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude 
of our intentions, do, in the name, and by the authority of the 
good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, 
That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, 
Free and Independent States ; that they are absolved from all 
allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connec- 
tions between them and the State of Great Britain, is, and 
ought to be, totally dissolved ; and that, as FREE AND 
INDEPENDENT STATES, they have full power to levy 
war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, 
and to do all other acts and things which INDEPENDENT 
STATES may of right do. And for the support of this Declara- 
tion, with a firm reliance on the protection of DIVINE PROV- 
IDENCE, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our 
fortunes, and our sacred honor. 

The foregoing Declaration was, by order of Congress, en- 
grossed, and signed by the following members : 

JOHN HANCOCK. 

New Hampshire. Rhode Island. 

JOSIAH BARTLETT. STEPHEN HOPKINS. 

WILLIAM WHIPPLE, WILLIAM ELLERY, 
MATTHEW THORNTON. 

Massachusetts Bay. New York. 

SAMUEL ADAMS, WILLIAM FLOYD, 

JOHN ADAMS, PHILIP LIVINGSTON, 

ROBERT TREAT PAYNE, FRANCIS LEWIS, 

ELBRIDGE GERRY. LEWIS MORRIS. 

Connecticut. New Jersey. 

ROGER SHERMAN, RICHARD STOCKTON, 

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON, JOHN W1THERSP00N, 

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, FRANCIS HOPKINSON, 

OLIVER WOLCOTT. JOHN HART, 

ABRAHAM CLARK. 



DECLARATION OP INDEPENDENCE. 



Pennsylvania. 

ROBERT MORRIS, 
BENJAMIN RUSH, 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, 
JOHN MORTON, 
GEORGE CLYMER, 
JAMES SMITH, 
GEORGE TAYLOR, 
JAMES WILSON, 
GEORGE ROSS. 



Virginia. 

GEORGE WYTHE, 
RICHARD HENRY LEE, 
THOMAS JEFFERSON, 
BENJAMIN HARRISON, 
THOMAS NELSON, Jun., 
FRANCIS LIGHTFOOT LEE, 
CARTER BRAXTON. 



Delaware. 

3-ffiSAR RODNEY, 
GEORGE READ, 
THOMAS M'KEEN. 

Maryland. 

SAMUEL CHASE, 
WILLIAM PACA, 
THOMAS STONE, 
CHARLES CARROLL, of Cai^n. 

Georgia. 

BUTTON GWINNETT, 
LYMAN HALL, 
GEORGE WALTON. 



North Carolina. 

WILLIAM HOOPER, 
JOSEPH HEWE8, 
JOHN PENN. 

South Carolina. 

EDWARD RUTLEDGE, 
THOMAS HAYWARD, Jun., 
THOMAS LYNCH, Jun., 
ARTHUR MIDDLETON. 



coosrsTiTTJTionsr 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



We, the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect 
Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the 
common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings 
of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this 
Constitution for fche United States of America. 

ARTICLE I. 

Section 1. All the legislative powers herein granted shall 
be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall con- 
sist of a Senate and House of Representatives. 

Sec. ?. The House of Representatives shall be composed 
of members chosen every second year by the people of the 
several States ; and the electors in each State shall have the 
qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous 
branch of the State Legislature. 

No person shall be a Representative who shall not have at- 
tained to the aq;e of twenty-five years, and been seven years a 
citizen of th» United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among 
the several States which may be included within this Union, 
according to their respective numbers, which shall be deter- 
mined by adding to the whole number of free persons, includ- 
ing those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding 
Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. The actual 
enumeration shall be made within three years after the first 
meeting of tbe Congress of the United States, and within 

(9) 



10 CONSTITUTION OP THE 

every subsequent term often years, in such manner as they shall 
by law direct. The number of Representatives shall not ex- 
ceed one for every thirty thousand, but each State shall have 
at least one Representative ; and until such enumeration shall 
be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to 
choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Provi- 
dence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six, New 
Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, 
Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and 
Georgia three. 

When vacancies happen in the representation from any 
State, the Executive authority thereof shall issue Writs of 
Election to fill such vacancies. 

The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and 
other officers ; and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 
Sec. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed 
of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature 
thereof, for six years ; and each Senator shall have one vote. 
Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence 
of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may 
be into three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of 
the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of 
the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one- 
third may be chosen every second year ; and if vacancies hap- 
pen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the 
Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make 
temporary appointments until the next meeting of the Legis- 
lature, which shall then fill such vacancies. 

No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to 
the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the 
United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabi- 
tant of that State for which he shall be cbosen. 

The Vice President of the United States shall be President 
of the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally 
divided. 

The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a Pres- 
ident pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or 
when he shall exercise the office of President of the United 
States. 



UNITED STATES. 11 



The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeach- 
ments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath 
or affirmation. When the President of the United States is 
being tried, the Chief Justice shall preside ; and no person 
shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of 
the members present. 

Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and 
enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United 
States; but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable 
and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment, 
according to law. 

Sec. 4. The times, places, and manner of holding elections 
for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each 
State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may, at any 
time, by law make or alter such regulations, except as the 
places of choosing Senators. 

The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sec. 5. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, re- 
turns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority 
of each shall constitute a quorum to do business ; but a smaller 
number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner 
and under such penalties as each House may provide. 

Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and with the con- 
currence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as 
may, in their judgment, require secrecy; and the yeas and 
nays of the members of either House on any question shall, 
at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, with- 
out the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, 
nor to any other place than that in which the two Houses shall 
be sitting. 

Sec. 6. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a 
compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law and 



12 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



paid out of the treasury of the United States. They shall in 
all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be 
privileged from arrest during their attendance at the session 
of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from 
the same ; and for any speech or debate in either House, they 
shall not be questioned in any other place. 

No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been cre- 
ated, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased 
during such time, and no person holding any office under the 
United States shall be a member of either House during his 
continuance in office. 

Sec 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or 
concur with amendments as on other bills. 

Every bill which shall have passed the House of Represen- 
tatives and the Senate, shall, before it becomes a law, be pre- 
sented to the President of the United States : If he approve, 
he shall sign it ; but if not, he shall return it, with his objec- 
tions, to that House in which it shall have originated, who 
shall enter the objections at large on their Journal, and pro- 
ceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration, two- thirds 
of that House shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, to- 
gether with the objections, to the other House, by which it 
shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds 
of that House, it shall become a law. But in all such cases 
the votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and 
nays, and the names of persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten 
days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed 
it, unless the Congress, by their adjournment, prevent its re- 
turn, in which case it shall not be a law. 

Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of 
the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary 
(except on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to 
the President of the United States ; and before the same shall 
take effect, shall be approved by him ; or, being disapproved 
by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the Senate and 



UNITED STATES. 18 



House of Representatives, according to the rules and limita- 
tions prescribed in the case of a bill. 

Sec. 8. The Congress shall have power — 

To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay 
the debts and provide for the common defense and general 
welfare of the United States: but all Duties, Imposts and Ex- 
cises shall be uniform throughout the United States ; 

To borrow money on the credit of the United States; 

To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the 
several States, and with the Indian tribes; 

To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform 
laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United 
Slates; 

To coin money, regulate the value thereof and of foreign 
coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures ; 

To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securi- 
ties and current coin of the United States; 

To establish post-offices and post roads ; 

To promote (he progress of science and useful arts, by secur- 
ing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive 
right to their respective writings and discoveries; 

To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court; 

To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the 
high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and 
make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money 
to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; 

To provide and maintain a navy; 

To make rules for the government and regulation of the 
lind and naval forces; 

To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; 

To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the mili- 
tia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the Slates re- 
spectively the appointment of the officers, and the authority 
of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed 
by Congress; 

To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatsoever, 
over such district (not exceeding ten milo3 square) as may. 



14 CONSTITUTION OF TMB 

by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, 
become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and 
to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the 
consent of the Legislature of the State in which the same shall 
be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dock-yards, 
and other needful buildings ; and 

To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other 
powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the 
United States, or in any department or officer thereof. 

Sec. 9. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall 
not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thous- 
and eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed 
on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

The privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless when, in cases of rebellion or invasion, the 
public safety may require it. 

No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

No capitation, or other direct tax 6hall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed 
to be taken. 

No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any 
State. 

No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one State over those of another; 
nor shall vessels bound to or from one State, be obliged to 
enter, clear, or pay duties in another. 

No money shall be drawn from the treasury but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law ; and a regular state- 
ment and account of the receipts and expenditures of all pub- 
lic money shall be published from time to time. 

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States : 
And no person holding any office of profit or trust under them 
shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any pres- 
ent, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any 
king, prince, or foreign State. 

Sec. 10. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or 
confederation : grant letters of marque or reprisal ; coin 
money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and sil- 
ver coin a tender in payment of debts ; pass any bill of at- 



UNITED STATES. 15 



tainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of 
contracts, or grant any title of nobility. 

No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any 
imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be 
absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws ; and the 
net produce of all duties and imposts, laid by any State on im- 
ports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of the 
United States ; and all such laws shall be subject to the revis- 
ion and control of the Congress. 

No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any 
duty of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, 
enter into any agreement or compact with another State, or 
with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually in- 
vaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section 1. The Executive Power shall be vested in a Pres- 
ident of the United States of America. He shall hold his of- 
fice during the term of four years, and, together with the Vice- 
President, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows : 

Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to the number 
of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be 
entitled in the Congress ; but no Senator or Representative, or 
person holding an office of trust or profit under the United 
States, shall be appointed an elector. 

[The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote 
by ballot for two persons — of one at least shall not be an in- 
habitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall 
make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of 
votes for each ; which list they shall sign and certify, and 
transmit, sealed, to the seat of the Government of the United 
States, directed to the President of the Senate. The Presi- 
dent of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and 
House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the 
votes shall then be counted. The person having the greatest 
number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a 
majority of the whole number of electors appointed ; and if 
there be more than one who have such majority, and have an 
equal number of votes, then the House of Representatives 
shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President \ 



16 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest 
on the list the said House shall, in like manner, choose the 
President. But, in choosing the President, the votes shall be 
taken by States, the representation from each Si ate having 
one vote. A quorum for this purpose shall consist of a mem- 
ber or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority 
of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, 
after the choice of the President, the person having tiie great- 
est number of votes of the electors shall be > he Vice President. 
But if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, 
the Senate shall choose from them by ballot the Vice-Presi- 
dent.*] 

The Congress may determine the time of choosing the elec- 
tors, and the day on which they shall give their votes ; which 
day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

No person, except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, 
shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any 
person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty-live years, and been fourteen years a resi- 
dent within the United States. 

In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his 
death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and 
duties of the said officfc, the same shall devolve on I he Vice 
President; and the Congress may by law provide for the oase 
of removal, death, resignation, or inability, both of I he Presi- 
dent and Vice President, declaring what officer shall then act 
as President; and such officer shall act accordingly until the 
disability be removed, or a President shall be elected. 

The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services 
a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor dimin- 
ished during the period for which he shall have been elected ; 
and he shall not receive within that period any other emolu- 
ment from the United Suites, or any of them. 

Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take 
the following oath or affirmation : 

'I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the 
office of President of the United States, and will, to the beet of my abili- 
ity, preserve, pro'.ecfc, and defend the Constitution of the United Sates." 

Sec. 2. The President shall be Commander in Chief of the 

* This clause has been repealed and annulled by the 12th amendment. 



UNITED STATES. 17 



Army and Navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several States when called into the actual service of the 
United States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of the 
principal officer in each of the Executive Departments upon 
any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices; 
and he shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for 
offenses against the United States, except in cases of impeach- 
ment. 

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent 
of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the 
Senate present concur ; and he shall nominate, and by and 
with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint Em- 
bassadors, other Public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the 
Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States 
whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, 
and which shall be established; but the Congress may by law 
vest the appointment of such inferior officers as they think 
proper in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the 
Heads of Departments. 

The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that 
may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting com- 
missions, which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

Sec. 3. He shall, from time to time, give to the Congress 
information of the state of the Union, and recommend to their 
consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and 
expedient ; he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both 
Houses, or either of them; and, in case of disagreement be- 
tween them with respect to the time of adjournment, he 
may adjourn them to such time as he shall think proper; he 
Shall receive Embassadors and other public Ministers ; he 
shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, and shall 
commission all the officers of the United States. 

Sec. 4. The President, Vice-President, and all Civil Officers 
of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeach- 
ment for, and conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high 
Crimes and Misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 1. The judicial power of the United States shall be 
Tested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as 
2 



18 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. 
The Judges, both of the Supreme and inferior courts, shall 
hold their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated 
times, receive for their services a compensation, which shall 
not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in Law 
and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the 
United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, 
under their authority; to all cases affecting Embassadors, 
other public Ministers and Consuls ; to all cases of admiralty 
and maritime jurisdiction ; to controversies to which the 
United States shall be a party ; to controversies between two 
or more States ; between a State and citizens of another 
State ; between citizens of different States ; between citizens 
of the same State claiming lands under grants of different 
States ; and between a State, or the citizens thereof, and for- 
eign States, citizens or subjects. 

"in all cases affecting Embassadors, other public Ministers 
and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the 
Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In' all the 
other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have 
appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such ex- 
ceptions and under such regulations as the Congress shall 
make. 

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of Impeachment, 
shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the State 
where the said crimes shall have been committed ; but when 
not committed within any State, the trial shall be at such 
place or places as the Congress may by law have directed. 

Sec 3. Treason against the United States shall consist only* 
in levying war against them, or adhering to their enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted 
of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the 
same overt act, or on confession in open Court. 

The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment 
of treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work corruption 
of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person 
attainted. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each State 
to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every 



UNITED STATES. 19 



other State. And the Congress may by general laws pre- 
scribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceed- 
ings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all 
privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 

A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in 
another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority of 
the State from which be fled, be delivered up, to be removed 
to the State having jurisdiction of the crime. 

No person held to service or labor in one State, under the 
laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of 
any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such ser- 
vice or labor, but shall be delivered up on claim of the party 
to whom such service or labor may be due. 

Sec. 3. New States may be admitted by the Congress into 
this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected 
within the jurisdiction of any other State ; nor any State be 
formed by the junction of two or more States or parts of 
States without the consent of the Legislatures of the States 
concerned, as well as of the Congress. 

The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this 
Constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims 
of the United States, or any particular State. 

Sec. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in 
this Union a republican form of Government, and shall pro- 
tect each of them against invasion ; and on application of the 
Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature can 
not be convened), against domestic violence. 

article v. 

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both Houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to the Consti- 
tution, or, on the application of the Legislatures of two-thirds 
of the several States, shall call a convention for proposing 
amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid to all in- 
tents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified 
by the Legislatures of three-fourths of the several States, or 
by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the 



20 CONSTITUTION OF THE 



other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress ; 
Provided, That no amendment which may be made prior to 
the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any 
manner affect the first and fourth classes in the ninth section 
of the first article ; and that no State, without its consent, 
shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

All debts contracted and engagements entered into before 
the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the 
United States, under this Constitution, as under the Confeder- 
ation. 

This Constitution and the laws of the United States which 
shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or 
which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, 
shall be the supreme law of the land; and the Judges in 
every State shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitu- 
tion or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding. 

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and 
the members of the several State Legislatures, and all execu- 
tive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the 
several States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to sup- 
port this Constitution ; but no religious test shall ever be re- 
quired as a qualification to any office or public trust under the 
United States. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this Constitution between 
the States so ratifying the same. 

Done in convention, by the unanimous consent of the States 
present, the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of 
the Independence of the United States of America the 
twelfth. In Witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed 
our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, 

Pres't and Deputy from Virginia. 

2fcw Hampshire. 
JOHN LANODON, NICHOLAS OILMAN. 



UNITED STATES. 



21 



Massachusetts. 
NATHANIEL GORHAM, RUFUS KING. 

Connecticut. 
WM. SAML. JOHNSON, ROGER SHERMAN. 

New York. 
ALEXANDER HAMILTON. 



WIL. LIVINGSTON, 
WM. PATERSON, 



B. FRANKLIN, 
ROBT. MORRIS, 
THO. FITZSIMONS, 
JAMES WILSON, 

GEO. READ, 
JOHN DICKINSON, 
JACO. BROOM, 



JAMES M* HENRY, 
DANL. CARROLL, 

JOHN BLAIR, 



New Jersey. 

DAVID BREARLEY, 
JONA. DAYTON. 

Pennsylvania. 

THOMAS MIFFLIN, 
GEO CLYMER, 
JARED INGERSOLL, 
GOUV. MORRIS. 



Delaware. 



GUNNING BEDFORD, JR. 
RICHARD BASSETT. 



Maryland. 



DAN. of ST. THOS. JENIFER 



Virginia. 



JAMES MADISON, JR. 



North Carolina. 
WM. BLOUNT, RICH'D DOBBS SPAIGHT. 

HU. WILLIAMSON, 

South Carolina. 
J. RUTLEDGE, CHARLES C. PINCKNEY. 

CHARLES PINCKNEY, PIERCE BUTLER. 



WILLIAM FEW, 
Attest : 



Georgia. 

ABR. BALDWIN. 

WILLIAM JACKSON, Secretary. 



22 CONSTITUTION OP THE 

ARTICLES. 

In addition to, and amendment of, the Constitution of the United StateB 
of America, proposed by Congress, and ratified by the Legislatures of 
the several States, pursuant to the fifth article of the original Consti- 
tution. 

ARTICLE I. 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of 
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging 
the freedom of speech or of the press ; or the right of the peo- 
ple peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government 
for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE II. 

A well-regulated Militia being necessary to the security of 
a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms 
shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house, 
without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a 
manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seiz- 
ures, shall not be violated, and no warrant shall issue but 
upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and 
particularly describing the place to be searched, and the per- 
sons or things to be seized. 

ARTICLE V. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise 
infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a 
Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, 
or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or pub- 
lic danger ; nor shall any person be subject for the same 
offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall 
be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against 
himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without 



UNITED STATES. 



due process of law ; nor shall private property be taken for 
public use without just compensation. 

ARTICLE VI. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the 
State and district wherein the crime shall have been commit- 
ted, which district shall have been previously ascertained by 
law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusa- 
tion to be confronted with the witnesses against him ; to have 
compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and 
to have the assistance of counsel for his defense. 

ARTICLE VII. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy 
shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be 
preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re- 
examined in any Court of the United States, than according 
to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines 
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

ARTICLE IX. 

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights, shall 
not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the 
people. 

article x. 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Con- 
stitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to 
the States respectively, or to the people. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be con- 
strued to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or 
prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of 
another State, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign State. 



24 CONSTITUTION OF THE 



ARTICLE XII. 

The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote 
by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at 
least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with them- 
selves ; they shall name in their ballot the person voted for 
as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as 
Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all per- 
sons voted for as President, and all persons voted for as Vice- 
President, and of the number of votes for each, which 
lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat 
of government of ,the United States, directed to the President 
of the Senate : — The President of the Senate shall, in presence 
of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the cer- 
tificates, and the votes shall then be counted ; The person 
having the greatest number of votes for President shall be 
the President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers, 
not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as Presi- 
dent, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately 
by ballot the President. But in choosing the President, the 
votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each 
State having one ; a quorum for this shall consist of a member 
or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of 
all the States shall be necessary to a choice. And if the 
House of Representatives shall not choose a President, when- 
ever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the 
fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President 
shall act as President, as in the case of the death or other 
constitutional disability of the President. The person having 
the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the 
Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed ; and if no person have a ma- 
joaity, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the 
Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the pur- 
pose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Sen- 
ators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary 
to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the 
office of President, shall be eligible to that of Vice-President 
of the United States. 



UNITED STATES. 25 



ARTICLE xni. 

" Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, ex- 
cept as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have 
been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or 
any place subject to their jurisdiction. 

" Section 2. Congress shall v A ave powssr to enforce this Ar- 
ticle by appropriate legislation, approved February 1, 2863." 



The Constitution was adopted on the 17th of September 
1787, by the convention appointed in pursuance of the Resolu- 
tion of the Congress of the Confederation, of the 21st Febru- 
ary, 1787, and ratified by the conventions of the several States, 
as follows : 

By Convention of Delaware 7th December, 1787 

" " Pennsylvania 12th December, 1787 

" " New Jersey 18th December, 1787 

" " Georgia 2d January, 1788 

" " Connecticut 9th January, 1788 

" " Massachusetts 6th February, 1788 

" " Maryland 28th April, 1788 

" " South Carolina 28th May, 1788 

" " New Hampshire 21st Juney 1788 

" " Virginia 26th June, 1788 

New York 26th July, 1788 

" " North Carolina 21st November, 1789 

" " Rhode Island .29th May, 1790 



The first ten of the Amendments were proposed on the 25th 
of September, 1789, and ratified by the constitutional number 
of States on the 15th December, 1791 ; the eleventh, on the 8th 
of January, 1798 ; and the twelfth, on the 25th September, 
1804 ; and the thirteenth, on the , 186 — . 



GJOIsrSTITUTTIOU 

OP THE 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



-:o: 



PEEAMBLE. 

To the end, that justice be established, public order maintained, and 
liberty perpetuated; We the People of the State of Indiana, grateful 
to Almighty God for the free exercise of the right to choose our own 
form of government, do ordain this Constitution. 

ARTICLE I. 

BILL OP RIGHTS. 

Section 1. We declare, That all men are created equal ; 
that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalien- 
able rights ; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit 
of happiness; that all power is inherent in the people; and 
that all free governments are, and of right ought to be, 
founded on their authority, and instituted for their peace, 
safety, and well being. For the advancement of these ends, 
the People have, at all times, an indefeasible right to alter 
and reform their government. 

Sec. 2. All men shall be secured in their natural right to 
worship Almighty God, according to the dictates of their owd 
consciences. 

Sec. 3. No law shall, in any case whatever, control the free 
exercise and enjoyment of religious opinions, or interfere with 
the rights of conscience. 

Sec. 4. No preference shall be given, by law, to any creed, 
religious society, or mode of worship ; and no man shall be 
compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, 
or to maintain any ministrv, against his consent. 

(2G) 



STATE OP INDIANA. 27 



Sec. 5. No religious test shall be required, as a qualification 
for any cfllce of trust or profit. 

Sec. 6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, for the 
benefit of any religious or theological institution. 

Sec. 7. No person shall be rendered incompetent as a wit- 
ness, in consequence of his opinions on matters of religion. 

Sec. 8. The mode of administering an oath or affirmation, 
shall be such as may be most consistent with, and binding 
upon, the conscience of the person to whom such oath or 
affirmation may be administered. 

Sec. 9. No law shall be passed, restraining the free inter- 
change of thought and opinion, or restricting the right to 
speak, write, or print freely, on any subject whatever; but for 
the abuse of that right every person shall be responsible. 

Sec. 10. In all prosecutions for libel, the truth of the mat- 
ters alleged to be libelous may be given in justification. 

Sec. 11. The right of the people to be secure in their per- 
sons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable search 
or seizure, shall not be violated ; and no warrant shall issue, 
but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, 
and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the 
person or thing to be seized. 

Sec. 12. All courts shall be open; and every man, for 
injury done to him in his person, property or reputation, shall 
have remedy by due course of law. Justice shall be admin- 
istered freely, and without purchase ; completely, and without 
denial ; speedily, and without delay. 

Sec. 13. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall have 
the right to a public trial, by an impartial jury, in the county 
in which the offense shall have been committed ; to be heard 
by himself and counsel ; to demand the nature and cause of 
the accusation against him, and to have a copy thereof; to 
meet the witnesses face to face, and to have compulsory pro- 
cess for obtaining witnesses in his favor. 

Sec. 14. No person shall be put in jeopardy twice for the 
same offense. No person, in any criminal prosecution, shall 
be compelled to testify against himself. 

Sec. 15. No person arrested, or confined in jail, shall be 
treated with unnecessary rigor. 

Sec. 16. Excessive bail shall not be required. Excessive 
fines shall not be imposed. Cruel and unusual punishment 



28 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



shall not be inflicted. All penalties shall be proportioned to 
the nature of the offense. 

Sec. 17. Offenses, other than murder or treason, shall be 
bailable by sufficient sureties. Murder or treason shall not 
be bailable, when the proof is evident, or the presumption 
strong. 

Sec. 18. The penal code shall be founded on the principles 
of reformation, and not of vindictive justice. 

Sec. 19. In all criminal cases whatever, the jury shall have 
the right to determine the law and the facts. 

Sec. 20. In all civil cases, the right of trial by jury shall 
remain inviolate. 

Sec. 21. No man's particular services shall be demanded 
without just compensation. No man's property shall be taken 
by law, without just compensation; nor, except in case of the 
State, without such compensation first assessed and tendered. 

See. 22. The privilege of the debtor to enjoy the necessary 
comforts of life, shall be recognized by wholesome laws, ex- 
empting a reasonable amount of property from seizure or sale 
for the payment of any debt or liability hereafter contracted; 
and there shall be no imprisonment for debt, except in case 
of fraud. 

Sec. 23. The General Assembly shall not grant to any citi- 
zen, or class of citizens, privileges or immunities which, upon 
the same terms, shall not equally belong to all citizens. 

Sec. 24. No ex-post-facto law, or law impairing the obliga- 
tion of contracts, shall ever be passed. 

Sec. 25. No law shall be passed, the taking effect of which 
shall be made to depend upon any authority, except as pro- 
vided in this Constitution. 

Sec. 26. The operation of the laws shall never be suspend- 
ed, except by the authority of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 27. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not 
be suspended, except in case of rebellion or invasion; and 
then, only if the public safety demand it. 

Sec. 28. Treason against the State shall consist only in 
levying war against it, and in giving aid and comfort to its 
enemies. 

Sec. 29. No person shall be convicted of treason, except on 
the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or upon 
his confession in open court. 



STATE OP INDIANA. 29 



Sec. SO. No conviction shall work corruption of blood, or 
forfeiture of estate. 

Sec. 31. No law shall restrain any of the inhabitants of the 
State from assembling together in a peaceable manner, to 
consult for their common good; nor from instructing their 
representatives ; nor from applying to the General Assembly 
for redress of grievances. 

Sec. 32. The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the 
defense of themselves and the State. 

Sec. 33. The military shall be kept in strict subordination 
to the civil power. 

Sec. 34. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in 
any house, without the consent of the owner; nor, in time of 
war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 35. The General Assembly shall not grant any title of 
nobility, nor confer hereditary distinctions. 

Sec. 36. Emigration from the State shall not be prohibited. 

Sec. 37. There shall be neither slavery, nor involuntary 
servitude, within the State, otherwise than for the punishment 
of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted. 
No indenture of any Negro or Mulatto, made and executed 
out of the bounds of the State, shall be valid within the State. 

AKTICLE II. 

SUFFRAGE AND ELECTION. 

Sec. 1. All elections shall be free and equal. 

Sec. 2. In all elections, not otherwise provided for by this 
Constitution, every white male citizen of the United States, 
of the age of twenty-one years and upwards, who shall have 
resided in the State during the six months immediately pre- 
ceding such election; and every white male, of foreign birth, 
of the age of twenty-one years and upwards, who shall have 
resided in the United States one year, and shall have resided 
in this State during the six months immediately preceding 
such election, and shall have declared his intention to become 
a citizen of the United States, conformably to the laws of the 
United States on the subject of naturalization, shall be enti- 
tled to vote in the township or precinct where he may reside. 

Sec. 3. No soldier, seaman, or marine, in the army or navy 
of the United States, or of their allies, shall be deemed to 



30 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



have acquired a residence within the State, in consequence 
of having been stationod within the same ; nor shall any such 
soldier, seaman, or marine have the right to vote. 

Sec. 4. No person shall be deemed to have lost his resi- 
dence in the State by reason of his absence, either on busi- 
ness of this State or of the United States. 

Sec. 5. No Negro or Mulatto shall have the right of suf- 
frage. 

Sec. 6. Every person shall be disqualified from holding of- 
fice during the term for which he may have been elected, who 
shall have given or offered a bribe, threat, or reward to pro- 
cure his election. 

Sec. 7. Every person who shall give or accept a challenge 
to fight a duel, or who shall knowingly carry to another per. 
son such challenge, or who shall agree to go out of the State 
to fight a duel, shall be ineligible to any office of trust or 
profit. 

Sec. 8. The General Assembly shall have power to deprive 
of the right of suffrage, and to render ineligible, any person 
convicted of an infamous crime. 

Sec. 9. No person holding a lucrative office or appointment 
under the United States, or under this State, shall be eligible 
to a seat in the General Assembly ; nor shall any person hold 
more than one lucrative office at the same time, except as in 
this Constitution expressly permitted : Provided, that officers 
in the militia, to which there is attached no annual salary, and 
the office of Deputy Postmaster, where the compensation does 
not exceed ninety dollars per annum, shall not be deemed lu- 
crative : And provided, also, that counties containing less 
than one thousand polls, may confer the office of Clerk, Re- 
corder, and Auditor, or any two of said offices, upon the same 
person. 

See. 10. No person who may hereafter be a collector or 
holder of public moneys, shall be eligible to any office of 
trust or profit, until he shall have accounted for, and paid over, 
according to law, all sums for which he may be liable. 

Sec. 11. In all cases in which it is provided that an office 
shall not be filled by the same person more than a certain 
number of years continuously, an appointment pro tempore, 
shall not be reckoned a part of that term. 

Sec. 12. In all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of 



STATE OF INDIANA. 81 



the peace, electors shall be free from arrest, in going to elec- 
tions, during their attendance there, and in returning from the 
same. 

Sec. 13. All elections by the people shall be by ballot; and 
all elections by the General Assembly, or by either branch 
thereof, shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 14. All general elections shall be held on the second 
Tuesday in October. 

ARTICLE III. 

DISTRIBUTION OF POWERS. 

Section 1. The powers of the Government are divided into 
three separate departments ; the Legislative, the Executive, 
including the Administrative, and the Judicial; and no per- 
son, charged with official duties under one of these depart- 
ments, shall exercise any of the functions of another, except 
as in this Constitution expressly provided. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

Section 1. The Legislative authority of the State shall be 
vested in the General Assembly, which shall consist of a Sen- 
ate and a House of Representatives. The style of every law 
shall be: "Be it enacted by the General Assembly oi the 
State of Indiana ; : ' and no law shall be enacted except by bill. 

Sec. 2. The Senate shall not exceed fifty, nor the House of 
Representatives one hundred members; and they shall be 
chosen by the electors of the respective counties or districts, 
into which the State may, from time to time, be divided. 

Sec. 3. Senators shall be elected for the term of four years 
and Representatives for the term of two years, from the day 
next after their general election : Provided, however, that the 
Senators elect, at the second meeting ot the General Assem- 
bly under this Constitution, shall be divided, by lot into two 
equal classes, as nearly as may be ; and the seats of Senators 
of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of two 
years, and those of tho second class at the expiration of four 
years; so that one-half as nearly as possible, shall be chosen 
biennially forever thereafter. And in case of increase in the 
number of Senators, they shall be annexed, by lot, to one or 



32 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



the other of the two classes, as to keep them as nearly equal 
as practicable. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall, at its second session 
after the adoption of this Constitution, and every six years 
thereafter, cause an enumeration to be made of all the white 
male inhabitants over the age of twenty-one years. 

Sec. 5. The number of Senators and Representatives shall, 
at the session next following each period of making such 
enumeration, be fixed by law, and apportioned among the sev- 
eral counties, according to the number of white male inhabi- 
tants above twenty-one years of age in each: Provided, that 
the first and second election of members of the General As- 
sembly under this Constitution shall be according to tho ap- 
portionment last made by the General Assembly, before the 
adoption of this Constitution. 

Sec. 6. A senatorial or representative district, where more 
than one county shall constitute a district, shall be composed 
of contiguous counties ; and no county for senatorial appor- 
tionment shall ever be divided. 

Sec. 7. No person shall be a senator or a representative 
who at the time of his election is not a citizen of the United 
States ; nor any one who has not been, for two years next pre- 
ceding his election, an inhabitant of this State, and, for one 
year next preceding his election, an inhabitant of the county 
or district whence he may be chosen. Senators shall be at 
least twenty-five, and Representatives at least twenty-one 
years of age. 

Sec. 8. Senators and Representatives, in all cases except 
treason, felony, and breach of the peace, shall be privileged 
from arrest during the session of the General Assembly, and 
in going to and returning from the same, and shall not be sub- 
ject to any civil process during the session of the General 
Assembly, nor during the fifteen days next before the com- 
mencement thereof. For any speech or debate in either house, 
a member shall not be questioned in any other place. 

Sec. 9. The session of the General Assembly shall be held 
biennially at the capital of the State, commencing on the 
Thursday next after the first Monday of January, in the year 
one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three, and on the same 
day of every second year thereafter, unless a different day or 
pla -e shall have been appointed by law. But if, in the 



STATE OP INDIANA. S3 



opinion of the Governor, the public welfare shall require it, 
he may, at any time, by proclamation, call a special session. 

Sec. 10. Each house when assembled shall choose its own 
officers ("the President of the Senate excepted), judge of the 
elections, qualifications, and returns of its own members, de- 
termine its rules of proceeding, and sit upon its own adjourn- 
ment. But neither house shall, without the consent of the 
other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any place 
other than that in which it may be sitting. 

Sec. 11. Two-thirds of each house shall constitute a quorum 
to do business, but a smaller number may meet, adjourn from 
day to day, and compel the attendance of absent members. 
A quorum being in attendance, if either house fail to effect an 
organization within the first five days thereafter, the members 
of the house so failing shall be entitled to no compensation 
from the end of the said five days, until an organization shall 
have been effected. 

Sec. 12. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, 
and publish the same. The yeas and nays, on any question, 
shall, at the request of any two members, be entered, together 
with the names of the members demanding the same, on the 
journal : Provided, that on a motion to adjourn, it shall reqiure 
one-tenth of the members present to ordar the yeas and nays. 

Sec. 13. The doors of each house, and of committees of the 
whole, shall be kept open, except in 6uch cases, as, in the 
opinion of either house, may require secrecy. 

Sec. 14. Either house may punish its members for disor- 
derly behavior, and may, with the concurrence of two-thirds, 
expel a member; but not a second time for the same cause. 

Sec. 15. Either house, during its session, may punish by 
imprisonment, any person not a member, who shall have been 
guilty of disrespect to the house, by disorderly or contempt- 
uous behavior in its presence; but such imprisonment shall not 
at any time exceed twenty-four hours. 

Sen. 16. Each house shall have all powers necessary for a 
branch of the legislative department of a free and indepen- 
dent State. 

Sec. 17. Bills may originate in either house, but may be 
amended or rejected in the other, except that bills for raising 
revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives. 



34 CONSTITUTION OP THE 

Sec. 18. Every bill shall be read, by sections, on three sev- 
eral days, in each house; unless, in case of emergency, two- 
thirds of the house where such bill may be depending shall,, 
by a vote of yeas and nays, deem it expedient to dispense with 
this rule; but the reading of a bill by sections, on its final 
passage, shall, in no case, be dispensed with; and the vote on 
the passage of every bill or joint resolution shall be taken by 
yeas and nays. 

Sec. 19. Every act shall embrace but one subject and mat- 
ters properly connected therewith ; which subject shall be 
expressed in the title. But if any subject shall be embraced 
in an act which shall not be expressed in the title, such act 
shall be void only as to so much thereof as shall not be ex- 
pressed in the title. 

Sec. 20. Every act and joint resolution shall be plainly 
worded, avoiding, as far as practicable, the use of technical 
terms. 

Sec. 21. No act shall ever be revised or amended by mere 
reference to its title; but the act revised, or section amended, 
shall be set forth and published at full length. 

Sec. 22. The General Assembly shall not pass local or spe- 
cial laws, in any of the following enumerated cases, that is to 
say: 

Regulating the jurisdiction and duties of justices of the 
peace and of constables; 

For the punishment of crimes and misdemeanors ; 

Regulating the practice in courts of justice; 

Providing for changing the venue in civil and criminal 
cases; 

Granting divorces ; 

Changing the names of persons ; 

For laying out, opening and working on, highways, and for 
the election or appointment of supervisors ; 

Vacating roads, town plats, streets, alleys, and public 
squares ; 

Summoning and empanneling grand and petit juries, and 
providing for their compensation ; 

Regulating the election of county and township officers, 
and their compensation ; 

For the assessment and collection of taxes for State, county, 
township, or road purposes j 



STATE OF INDIANA. 35 



Providing for supporting common schools, and the preserva- 
tion of school funds ; - - 
In relation to fees or salaries ; JL\io r JLoU 

In relation to interest on money; 

Providing for opening and conducting elections of Sfea^, 
county, or township officers, and designating the places of 
voting; 

Providing for the sale of real estate belonging to minors or 
other persons laboring under legal disabilities, by executors, 
administrators, guardians, or trustees. 

Sec. 23. In all the cases enumerated in the preceding sec- 
tion, and in all other cases where a general law can be made 
applicable, all laws shall be general, and of uniform operation 
throughout the State. 

Sec. 21. Provisions may be made, by general law, for bring- 
ing suit against the State, as to all liabilities originating after 
the adoption of this Constitution ; but no special act author- 
izing such suit to be brought, or making compensation to any 
person claiming damages against the State, shall ever be 
passed. 

Sec. 25. A majority of all the members elected to each 
house, shall be necessary to pass every bill or joint resolution ; 
and all bills and joint resolutions so passed, shall be signed by 
the presiding officers of the respective houses. 

Sec. 26. Any member of either house shall have the right 
to protest, and to have his protest, with his reasons for dissent, 
entered on the journal. 

Sec. 27. Every statute shall be a public law, unless other- 
wise declared in the statute itself. 

Sec. 28. No act shall take effect, until the same shall have 
been published and circulated in the several counties of this 
State, by authority, except in case of emergency ; which emer- 
gency shall be declared in the preamble, or in the body of the 
law. 

Sec. 29. The members of the General Assembly shall re- 
ceive for their services, a compensation, to be fixed bylaw; 
but no increase of compensation shall take effect during the 
session at which such increase may be made. No session of 
the General Assembly, except the first under this Constitu- 
tion, shall extend beyond the term of sixty-one days, nor any 
special session beyond the term of forty days. 



CONSTITUTION OP THE 



Sec. 30. No Senator or Representative shall, during the 
term for which he may have been elected, be eligible to any 
office, the election to which is vested in the General Assem- 
bly ; nor shall he be appointed to any civil office of profit, 
which shall have been created, or the emoluments of which 
have been increased, during such term; but this latter provis- 
ion shall not be construed to apply to any office elective by 
the people. 

ARTICLE V 

EXECUTIVE. 

Section 1. The executive power of the State shall be vested 
in a Governor. He shall hold his office during four years, and 
shall not be eligible more than four years in any period of 
eight years. 

Sec. 2. There shall be a Lieutenant-Governor, who shall 
hold his office during four years. 

Sec. 3. The Governor and Lieutenant-Governor shall be 
elected at the times and places of choosing members of the 
General Assembly. 

Sec. 4. In voting for Governor and Lieutenant-Governor 
the electors shall designate for whom they vote as Governor, 
and for whom as Lieutenant-Governor. The returns of every 
election for Governor and Lieutenant-Governor shall be 
sealed up and transmitted to the seat of Government, directed 
to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, who shall 
open and publish them in the presence of both Houses of the 
General Assembly. 

Sec. 5. The person, respectively, having the highest num- 
ber of votes for Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, shall be 
elected ; but in case two or more persons shall have an equal, 
and the highest, number of votes for either office, the General 
Assembly shall, by joint vote, forthwith proceed to elect one 
of the said persons Governor or Lieutenant, as the case 
may be. 

Sec. 6. Contested elections for Governor or Lieutenant- 
Governor, shall be determined by the General Assembly, in 
such manner as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 7. No person shall be eligible to the office of Gover- 
nor or Lieutenant-Governor, who shall not have been five 
fears a citizen of the United States, and also a resident of the 



STATE OF INDIANA. 37 



State of Indiana during the five years next preceding his elec- 
tion, nor shall any person be eligible to either of the said 
offices, who shall not have attained the age of thirty years. 

Sec. 8. No member of Congress, or person holding any 
office under the United States or under this State, shall fill 
the office of Governor or Lieutenant-Governor. 

See. 9. The official term of the Governor and Lieutenant- 
Governor shall commence on the second Monday of January, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three ; and 
on the same day every fourth year thereafter. 

Sec. 10. In case of the removal of the Governor from office, 
or of his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the du- 
ties of the office, the same shall devolve on the Lieutenant- 
Governor ; and the General Assembly shall, by law, provide 
for the case of removal from office, death, resignation, or ina- 
bility, both of the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, declar- 
ing what officer shall then act as Governor; and such officer 
shall act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a 
Governor be elected. 

Sec. 11. Whenever the Lieutenant-Governor shall act as 
Governor, or shall be unable to attend as President of the 
Senate, the Senate shall elect one of its own members as 
President for the occasion. 

Sec. 12. The Governor shall be commander-in-chief of the 
military and naval forces, and may call out such forces to exe- 
cute the laws, or to suppress insurrection or to repel invasion. 

Sec. 13. He shall from time to time, give to the General 
Assembly information touching the condition of the State, 
and recommend such measures as he shall judge to be ex- 
pedient. 

Sec. 14. Every bill which shall have passed the General 
Assembly, shall be presented to the Governor; if he approve, 
he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with his objec- 
tions, to the house in which it shall have originated ; which 
house shall enter the objections, at large, upon its journals, 
and proceed to reconsider the bill. If, after such reconsidera- 
tion, a majority of all the members elected to that house, shall 
agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, with the Governor's 
objections, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be 
reconsidered ; and, if approved by a majority of all the mem- 
bers elected to that house, it shall be a law. If any bill shall 



38 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



not be returned by the Governor within three days, Sundays 
excepted, after it shall have been presented to him, it shall be 
a law, without his signature, unless the general adjournment 
shall prevent its return ; in which case it shall be a law, unless 
the Governor, within five days next after such adjournment, 
shall file such bill, with his objections thereto, in the office of 
Secretary of State ; who shall lay the same before the General 
Assembly, at its next session, in like manner as if it had been 
returned by the Governor. But no bill shall be presented to 
the Governor, within two days next previous to the final ad- 
journment of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 15. The Governor shall transact all necessary business 
with the officers of the government, and may require informa- 
tion, in writing, from the officers of the administrative depart- 
ment, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respec- 
tive offices. 

Sec. 16. He shall take care that the laws be faithfully exe- 
cuted. 

Sec. 17. He shall have the power to grant reprieves, com- 
mutations, and pardons, after conviction, for all offenses, except 
treason and cases of impeachment, subject to such regulations 
as may be provided by law. Upon conviction for treason, he 
shall have power to suspend the execution of the sentence, 
until the case shall be reported to the General Assembly, at 
its next meeting; when the General Assembly shall either 
grant a pardon, commute the sentence, direct the execution 
of a sentence, or grant a further reprieve. He shall have 
power to remit fines and forfeitures, under such regulations as 
may be prescribed by law ; and shall report to the General 
Assembly, at its next meeting, each case of reprieve, commu- 
tation, or pardon granted, and also the names of all persons in 
whose favor remission of fines and forfeitures shall have been 
made, and the several amounts remitted : Provided, however^ 
that the General Assembly may, by law, constitute a council, 
to be composed of officers of State, without whose advice and 
consent the Governor shall not have power to grant pardons, 
in any case, except such as may, by law, be left to his sole 
power. 

Sec. 18. When, during a recess of the General Assembly, a 
vacancy shall happen in anv office, the appointment to which 
is vested in the General Assembly ; or when, at any time, a 



STATE OP INDIANA. 39 



vacancy shall have occurred in any other State office, or in the 
office of judge of any court; the Governor shall fill such va- 
cancy by appointment, which shall expire when a successor 
shall have been elected and qualified. 

Sec. 19. He shall issue writs of election, to fill such vacan- 
cies as may have occurred in the General Assembly. 

Sec. 20. Should the seat of government become dangerous 
from disease, or a common enemy, he may convene the Gen- 
eral Assembly at any other place. 

Sec. 21. The Lieutenant Governor shall, by virtue of his 
office, be President of the Senate; have a right, when in com- 
mittee of the whole, to join in debate, and to vote on all sub- 
jects; and, whenever the Senate shall be equally divided, he 
shall give the casting vote. 

Sec. 22. The Governor shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor 
diminished during the term for which he shall have been 
elected. 

Sec. 23. The Lieutenant Governor, while he shall act as 
President of the Senate, shall receive for his services the same 
compensation as the Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives ; and any person acting as Governor, shall receive the 
compensation attached to the office of Governor. 

Sec. 24. Neither the Governor nor the Lieutenant Gover- 
nor shall be eligible to any other office, during the term for 
which he shall have been elected. 

ARTICLE VI. 

ADMINISTRATIVE. 

Section 1. There shall be elected by the voters of the State 
an Auditor, a Treasurer of State, who shall, severally, hold 
their offices for two years. They shall perform such duties, as 
may be enjoined by law; and no person shall be eligible to 
either of said offices, more than four years in any period of six 
years. 

Sec. 2. There shall be elected, in each county, by the 
voters thereof, at the time of holding general elections, a 
clerk of the circuit court, auditor, recorder, treasurer, sheriff, 
coroner, and surveyor. The clerk, auditor, and recorder shall 
continue in office four years ; and no person shall be eligible 
to the office of clerk, recorder, or auditor, mora than eigh/ - 



40 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



years, in any period of twelve years. The treasurer, sheirff, 
coroner, and surveyor, shall continue in office two \ears ; and 
no person shall be eligible to the office of treasurer or sheriff 
more than four years in any period of six years. 

Sec. 3. Such other county and township officers as may be 
necessary, shall be elected, or appointed,' in such manner as 
may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 4. No person shall be elected, or appointed as a county 
officer, who shall not be an elector of the county; nor any one 
who shall not have been an inhabitant thereof duriDg one 
year next preceding his appointment, if the county shall have 
been so long organized, but if the county shall not have been 
so long organized, then within the limits of the county or 
counties, out of which the same shall have been taken. 

Sec. 5. The Governor, and the Secretary, Auditor, and 
Treasurer of State shall, severally, reside and keep the public 
records, books and papers, in any manner relating to their re- 
spective offices, at the seat of government. 

Sec. 6. All county, township, and town officers shall reside 
within their respective counties, townships, and towns ; and 
shall keep their respective offices at such places therein, and 
perform such duties, as may be directed by law. 

Sec. 7. All State officers shall, for crime, incapacity, or 
negligence, be liable to be removed from office, either by im- 
peachment by the House of Representatives, to be tried by 
the Senate, or by a joint resolution of the General Assembly; 
two-thirds of the members elected to each branch voting, in 
either case, therefor. 

Sec. 8. All State, county, township, and town officers, may 
be impeached, or removed from office, in such manner as may 
be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 9. Vacancies in county, township, and town offices 
shall be filled in such manner as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 10. The General Assembly may confer upon the boards 
doing county business in the several counties, powers of a lo- 
cal administrative character. 



STATU OF INDIANA. 41 



ARTICLE VII. 

JUDICIAL 

Section 1. The Judicial power of the State shall be vested 
in a Supreme Court, in Circuit Courts, and in such inferior 
Courts as the General Assembly may establish. 

Sec. 2. The Supreme Court shall consist of not less than 
three, nor more than live Judges; a majority of whom shall 
form a quorum. They shall hold their offices for six years, if 
they so long behave well. 

Sec. 3. The State shall be divided into as many districts as 
there are judges of the Supreme Court; and such districts 
shall be formed of contiguous territory, as nearly equal in pop- 
ulation, as, without dividing a county, the same can be made. 
One of said judges shall be elected from each district, and re- 
side therein; but said judge shall be elected by the electors 
of the State at large. 

Sec. 4. The Supreme Court shall have jurisdiction, co-ex- 
tensive with the limits of the State, in appeals and writs of 
error, under such regulations and restrictions as may be pre- 
scribed by law. It shall also have such original jurisdiction 
as the General Assembly may confer. 

Sec. 5. The Supreme Court shall, upon the decision of 
©very case, give a statement in writing of each question aris- 
ing in the record of such case, and the dicision of the court 
thereon. 

Sec. 6. The General Assembly shall provide, by law, for 
the speedy publication of the decisions of the Supreme Court, 
made under this Constitution; but no judge shall be allowed 
to report such decisions. 

Sec. 7. There shall be elected by the voters of the State, a 
Clerk of the Supreme Court, who shall hold his office four 
years, and whose duties shall be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 8. The circuit courts shall each consist of one judge, 
and shall have such civil and criminal jurisdiction as may be 
prescribed by law. 

Sec. 9. The State shall from time to time, be divided into 
judicial circuits; and a judge for each circuit shall be elected 
by the voters thereof. He shall reside within the circuit, and 
shall hold his office for the term of six years, if he so long 
behave well. 



42 CONSTITUTION OF THE 

Sec. 10. The General Assembly may provide by law, that 
the judge of one circuit may hold the courts of another circuit, 
in cases of necessity or convenience; and in case of temporary 
inability of any judge, from sickness or other cause, to hold 
the courts in his circuit, provision may be made, by law, for 
holding such courts. 

Sec. 1 1. There shall be elected in each judicial circuit, by 
the voters thereof, a prosecuting attorney, who shall hold his 
office for two years. 

Sec. 12. Any judge or prosecuting attorney, who shall 
have been convicted of corruption or other high crime, may, 
on information in the name of the State, be removed from of- 
fice by the Supreme Court, or in such other manner as may 
be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 13. The judges of the Supreme Court and circuit 
courts shall, at stated times, receive a compensation, which 
shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 14. A conpetent number of justices of the peace shall 
be elected, by the voters in each township in the several 
counties. They shall continue in office four years, and their 
powers and duties shall be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 15. All judicial officers shall be conservators of the 
peace in their respective jurisdictions. 

Sec. 16. No person elected to any judicial office, shall, dur- 
ing the term for which he shall have been elected, be eligible 
to any office of trust or profit, under the State, other than a 
judicial office. 

Sec. 17. The General Assembly may modify, or abolish, the 
grand jury system. 

Sec. 18. All criminal prosecutions shall be carried on in 
the name, and by the authority of the State ; and the style of 
all process shall be: "The State of Indiana." 

Sec. 19. Tribunals of conciliation may be established, with 
such powers and duties as shall be prescribed by law ; or the 
powers and duties of the same may be conferred upon other 
courts of justice; but such tribunals or other courts, when 
sitting as such, shall have no power to render judgment to be 
obligatory on the parties, unless they voluntarily submit their 
matter? of difference, and agree to abide the judgment of 
euch tribunal or court. 

Sec. 20. The General Assembly, at its first session after the 



BTATE OF INDIANA. 43 



adoption of this Constitution, shall provide for the appoint- 
ment ©f three commissioners, whose duty it shall be to revise, 
simplify, and abridge the rules, practice, pleadings, and forms 
of the courts of justice. And they shall provide for abolish- 
ing the distinct forms of action at law, now in use , and that 
justice shall be administered in a uniform mode of pleading, 
without distinction between law and equity. And the Gen- 
eral Assembly may, also, make it the duty of said commis- 
sioners to reduce into a systematic code, the general statute 
law of the State ; and said commissioners shall report the re- 
sult of their labors to the General Assembly, with such 
recommendations and suggestions, as to abridgment and 
amendment, as to said commissioners, may seem necessary or 
proper. Provision shall be made, by law, for filling vacancies, 
regulating the tenure of ofiice and the compensation of said 
^commissioners. 

Sec. 21. Every person of good moral character, being a 
voter, shall be entitled to admission to practice law in all 
•courts of justice. 

AETICLE VIII. 

EDUCATION. 

Section 1. Knowledge and learning, generally diffused 
throughout a community, being essential to the preservation 
of a free government, it shall be the duty of the General 
Assembly to encourage, by all suitable means, moral intel- 
lectual, scientific, and agricultural improvement; to provide, 
hy law, for a general and uniform system of common schools, 
wherein tuition shall be without charge, and equally open 
to all. 

Sec. 2. The common school fund shall consist of the con- 
gressional township fund, and the lands belonging thereto ; 

The surplus revenue fund ; 

The saline fund and the lands belonging thereto ; 

The bank tax fund, and the funds arising from the one hun- 
dred and fourteenth section of the charter of the State Bank 
of Indiana ; 

The fund to be derived from the sale of county seminaries, 
and the moneys and property heretofore held for such semina- 
ries; from the fines assessed for breaches of the penal laws of 
the State ; and from all forfeitures which may accrue ; 



44 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



All lands and other estate which shall escheat to the State, 
for want of heirs or kindred entitled to the inheritance ; 

All lands that have been, or may hereafter be, granted to 
the State, where no special purpose is expressed in the grant, 
and the proceeds of the sales thereof; including the proceeds 
of the sales of the Swamp Lands, granted to the State of 
Indiana by the act of Congress of the 28th of September, 
1850, after deducting the expenses of selecting and draining 
the same ; 

Taxes on the property of corporations, that may be assessed 
by the General Assembly for common school purposes. 

Sec. 3. The principal of the common school fund shall re- 
main a perpetual fund, which may be increased, but shall 
never be diminished; and the income thereof shall be invio- 
lably appropriated to the support of common schools, and to 
no other purpose whatever. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall invest, in some safe 
and profitable manner, all such portions of the common 
school fund as have not heretofore been entrusted to the sev- 
eral counties ; and shall make provision, by law, for the distri- 
bution among the several counties of the interest thereof. 

Sec. 5. If any county shall fail to demand its proportion of 
such interest for common school purposes, the same shall be 
reinvested for the benefit of such county. 

Sec. 6. The several counties shall be held liable for the 
preservation of so much of the said fund as may be intrusted 
to them, and for the payment of the annual interest thereon. 

Sec. 7. All trust funds held by the State shall remain invio- 
late, and be faithfully, and exclusively applied to the purpose 
for which the trust was created. 

Sec. 8. The General Assembly shall provide for the elec- 
tion, by the voters of the State, of a State Superintendent of 
Public Instructi m, who shall hold his office for two years, and 
whose duties an 1 compensation shall be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IX. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the General Assembly to 
provide by law for the support of Institututions for the edu- 
cation of the Deaf and Dumb, and of the Blind ; and also for 
the treatment of the Insane. 



STATE OP INDIANA. 45 



Sec. 2. The General Assembly shall provide Houses of 
Refuge for the correction and reformation of juvenile offenders. 

Sec. 3. The county boards shall have power to provide 
farms, as an asylum for those persons who, by reason of age, 
infirmity or other misfortune, have claims upon the sympa- 
thies and aid of society. 

ARTICLE X. 

FINANCE. 

Section 1. The General Assembly shall provide by law for 
a uniform and equal rate of assessment and taxation ; and 
shall prescribe such regulations as shall secure a just valua- 
tion for taxation of all property, both real and personal, ex- 
cepting such only for municipal, educational, literary, scien- 
tific, religious or charitable purposes, as may be specially 
exempted by law. 

Sec. 2. All the revenues derived from the sale of any of 
the public works belonging to the State, and from the net an- 
nual income thereof, and any surplus that may at any time re- 
main in the treasury, derived from taxation for general State 
purposes, after the payment of the ordinary expenses of the 
government, and of the interest on bonds of the State, other 
than bank bonds, shall be annually applied, under the direc- 
tion of the General Assembly, to the payment of the principal 
of the public debt. 

Sec. 3. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but in 
pursuance of appropriations made by law. 

Sec. 4. An accurate statement of the receipts and expend- 
itures of the public money, shall be published with the laws 
of each regular session of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 5. No law shall authorize any debt to be contract- 
ed, on behalf of the State, except in the following cases : 
To meet casual deficits in the revenue ; to pay the interest on 
the State Debt ; to repel invasion, suppress insurrection, or if 
hostilities be threatened, provide for the pmblic defense. 

Sec. 6. No county shall subscribe for stock in any incorpo- 
rated company, unless the same be paid for at the time of 
such subscription ; nor shall any county loan its credit to any 
incorporated company, nor borrow money for the purpose of 
taking stock in any such company ; nor shall the General 
Assembly ever, on behalf of the State, assume the debts of 



46 CONSTITUTION OF THE 



any county, city, town, or township, nor of any corporation 
whatever. 

ARTICLE XI. 

CORPORATIONS . 

Section 1. The General Assembly shall not have power to 
establish, or incorporate, any bank or banking company, or 
moneyed institution, for the porpose of issuing bills of credit, 
or bills payable to order or bearer, except under the condi- 
tions prescribed in this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. No banks shall be established otherwise than under 
a general banking law, except as provided in the fourth sec- 
tion of this article. 

Sec. 3. If the General Assembly shall enact a general 
banking law, such law shall provide for the registry and 
countersigning, by an officer of State, of all paper credit de- 
signed to be circulated as money ; and ample collateral se- 
curity, readily convertible into specie, for the redemption of 
the same in gold or silver, shall be required; which collateral 
security shall be under the control of the proper officer or 
officers of State. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly may also charter a bank 
with branches, without collateral security, as required in the 
preceding section. 

Sec. 5. If the General Assembly shall establish a bank 
with branches, the branches shall be mutually responsible 
for each other's liabilities, upon all paper credit issued as 
money. 

Sec. 6. The stockholders in every bank, or banking com- 
pany, shall be individually responsible to an amount over and 
above their stock, equal to their respective shares of stock, 
for all debts or liabilities of said bank or banking company. 

Sec. 7. All bills or notes issued as money, shall be, at all 
times, redeemable in gold or silver ; and no law shall be 
passed, sanctioning, directly or indirectly, the suspension, by 
any bank or banking company, of specie payments. 

Sec. 8. Holders of bank notes shall be entitled, in case of 
insolvency, to preference of payment over all other creditors. 

Sec. 9. No bank shall receive, directly or indirectly, a 
greater rate of interest than shall be allowed, by law, to indi- 
viduals loaning money. 



STATE OF INDIANA. 47 



Sec. 10. Every bank or banking company shall be required 
to cease all banking operations within twenty years from the 
time of its organization, and promptly thereafter to close its 
business. 

Sec. 11. The General Assembly is not prohibited from in- 
vesting the Trust Funds in a bank with branches ; but in case 
of such investment, the safety of the same shall be guaran- 
teed by unquestionable security. 

Sec. 12. The State shall not be a stockholder in any bank 
after the expiration of the present bank charter ; nor shall 
the credit of the State ever be given, or loaned, in aid of any 
person, association or corporation ; nor shall the State here- 
after become a stockholder in any corporation or association. 

Sec. 13. Corporations, other than banking, shall not be cre- 
ated by special act, but may be formed under general laws. 

Sec. 14. Dues from corporations, other than banking, shall 
be secured by such individual liability of the corporators, or 
other means, as may be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE XII. 

MILITIA. 

Section 1. The militia shall consist of all able-bodied 
white male persons, between the ages of eighteen and forty- 
five years, except such as may be exempted by the laws of 
the United States, or of this State ; and shall be organized, 
officered, armed, equipped, and trained, in such manner as may 
be provided by law. 

Sec. 2. The Governor shall appoint the Adjutant, Quarter- 
master and Commissary Generals. 

Sec. 3. All militia ofiicers shall be commissioned by the 
Governor, and shall hold their offices not longer than six years. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall determine the method 
of dividing the militia into divisions, brigades, regiments, 
batalions and companies, and fix the rank of all staff ofiicers. 

Sec. 5. The militia may be divided into classes of sedentary 
and active militia, in such manner as shall be prescribed by 
law. 

Sec. 6. No person conscientiously opposed to bearing arms 
shall be compelled to do militia duty ; but such person shall 
pay an equivalent for exemption; the amount to be pre- 
scribed by law. 



48 CONSTITUTION OP THE 

ARTICLE XIII. 

NEGROES AND MULATTOES. 

Sec. 1. No Negro or Mulatto shall come into, or settle in, 
the State, after the adoption of this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. All contracts made with any Negro or Mulatto 
coming into the State, contrary to the provisions of the fore- 
going section, shall be void ; and any person who shall employ 
such Negro or Mulatto, or otherwise encourage him to remain 
in the State, shall be fined in any sum not less than ten dol- 
lars, nor more than five hundred dollars. 

Sec. 3. All fines which may be collected for a violation of 
the provisions of this article, or of any law which may here- 
after be passed for the purpose of carrying the same into exe- 
cution, shall be set apart and appropriated for the colonization 
of such Negroes and Mulattoes, and their descendants, as may 
be in the State at the adoption of this Constitution, and may 
be willing to emigrate. 

Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall pass laws to carry oat 
the provisions of this article. 

ARTICLE XIV. 

BOUNDARIES 

Section 1. In order that the boundaries of the State may 
be known and established, it is hereby ordained and declared, 
that the State of Indiana is bounded, on the east, by the me- 
ridian line which lorms the western boundary of the State of 
Ohio ; on the south, by the Ohio River, from the mouth of the 
Great Miami River to the mouth of the Wabash River; on 
the west, by a line drawn along the middle of the Wabash 
River, from its mouih to a point where adua north line, drawn 
from the town of Vincennes, would last touch the north-west- 
ern shore of said Wabash River; and, thence, by a due north 
line, until the same shall intersect an east and west line, drawn 
through a point ten miles north of the southern extreme of 
Lake Michigan ; on the north, by said east and west line, until 
the same shall intersect the first mentioned meridian line, 
which forms the western boundary of the State of Ohio. 

Sec. 2. The State of Indiana shall possess jurisdiction and 
sovereignty co extensive with the boundaries declared in the 
preceding section; and shall have concurrent jurisdiction, in 



STATE OP INDIANA. 49 



civil and criminal cases, with the State of Kentucky on the 
Ohio River, and with the State of Illinois on the Wabash River, 
so far as said rivers form the common boundary between this 
State and said States respectively. 

ARTICLE XV. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Section 1. All officers whose appointment is not otherwise 
provided for in this Constitution, shall be chosen in such man- 
ner as now is, or hereafter may be, prescribed by law. 

Sec. 2. When the duration of any office is not provided for 
by this Constitution, it may be declared by law ; and, if not so 
declored, such office shall be held daring the pleasure of the 
authority making the appointment. But the General Assem- 
bly shall not create any office, the tenure of which shall be 
longer than four years. 

Sec. 3. Whenever it is provided in this Constitution, or in 
any law which may be hereafter passed, that any officer other 
than a member of the General Assembly, shall hold his office 
for any given term, the same shall be construed to mean, that 
such officer shall hold his office for such term, and until his 
successor shall have been elected and qualified. 

Sec. 4 Every person elected or appointed to any office 
under this Constitution shall, before entering on the duties 
thereof, take an oath or affirmation, to support the Constitu- 
tion of this State, and of the United States, and also an oath 
of office. 

Sec. 5. There shall be a seal of State kept by the Governor 
for official purposes, which shall be called the seal of the 
State of Indiana. 

Sec. 6. All commissions shall issue in the name of the 
State, shall be signed by the Governor, sealed with the State 
seal, and attested by the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 7. No county shall be reduced to an area less than 
four hundred square miles ; nor shall any county under that 
area be further reduced. 

Sec. 8. No lottery shall be authorized ; nor shall the sale 
of lottery tickets be allowed. 

Sec. 9. The following grounds, owned by the State in Indi- 
anapolis, namely : the State House Square, the Governor's 
4 



50 CONSTITUTION OP THE 



Circle, and so much of out-lot numbered one hundred and 
forty-seven, as lies uorth of the arm of the Central Canal, shall 
not be sold or leased* 

Sec. 10. It shall be the duty of the General Assembly to 
provide for the permanent enclosure and preservation of the 
Tippecanoe Battle Ground. 

ARTICLE XVI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section 1. Any amendment or amendments to this Consti- 
tution may be proposed in either branch of the General As- 
sembly, and if the same shall be agreed to by a majority of 
the members elected to each of the two houses, such proposed 
amendment or amendments, shall with the yeas and nays 
thereon, be entered on their journals, and referred to the Gen- 
eral Assembly to be chosen at the next general election ; and 
if in the General Assembly so next chosen, such proposed 
amendment or amendments shall be agreed to by a majority 
of all the members elected to each house, then it shall be the 
duty of the General Assembly to submit such amendment or 
amendments to the electors of the State ; and if a majority of 
said electors shall ratify the same, such amendment or 
amendments shall become a part of this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. If two or more amendments shall be submitted at 
the same time, they shall be submitted in such manner that 
the electors shall vote for or against each of such amendments 
separately ; and while an amendment or amendments which 
shall have been agreed upon by one General Assembly shall 
be awaiting the action of a succeeding General Assembly, or 
of the electors, no additional amendment or amendments 
shall be proposed. 

SCHEDULE. 

This Constitution, if adopted, shall take effect on the first 
day of November, in the year one thousand eight hundred 
and fifty-one, and shall supersede the Constitution adopted in 
the year one thousand eight hundred and sixteen. That no 
inconvenience may arise from the change in the government, 
it is hereby ordained as follows : — 

First. All laws now in force, and not inconsistent with this 



STATE OP INDIANA. 51 



Constitution, shall remain in force, until they shall expire or 
be repealed. 

Second. All indictments, prosecutions, suits, pleas, plaints, 
and other proceedings, pending in any of the Courts, shall be 
prosecuted to final judgment and execution ; and all appeals, 
writs of error, certiorari, and injunctions, shall be carried on 
in the several Courts, in the same manner as is now provided 
by law. 

Third. All fines, penalties, and forfeitures, due or accruing 
to the State, or to any county therein, shall inure to the State, 
or to such county, in the manner prescribed by law. All 
bonds executed to the Slate, or to any officer, in his official 
capacity, shall remain in force and inure to the use of those 
concerned. 

fourth. All acts of incorporation for municipal purposes 
shall continue in force under this Constitution, until such 
time as the General Assembly shall, in its discretion, modify 
or repeal the same. 

Fifth. The Governor, at the expiration of the present 
official term, shall continue to act until his successor shall 
have been sworn into office. 

Sixth. There shall be a session of the General Assembly, 
commencing on the first Monday of December, in the year 
one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one. 

Seventh. Senators now in office and holding over, under the 
existing Constitution, and such as may be elected at the next 
general election, and the Representatives then elected, shall 
continue in office until the first general election under this 
Constitution. 

Eighth, The first general election under this Constitution, 
shall be held in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty- 
two. 

Ninth. The first election for Governor, Lieutenant Gover- 
nor, Judges of the Supreme Courts and Circuit Courts, Clerk 
of the Supreme Court, Prosecuting Attorney, Secretary, Audi- 
tor, and Treasurer of State, and State Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction, under this Constitution, shall be held at the 
general election in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-two; and such of said officers as may be in office, when 
this Constitution shall go into effect, shall continue in their 



62 CONSTITUTION OF THE 



respective offices, until their successors shall have been 
elected and qualified. 

Tenth. Every person elected by popular vote, and now in 
any office which is continued by this Constitution, and every 
person who shall be so elected to any such office before the 
taking effect of this Constitution, (except as in this Constitu- 
tion otherwise provided,) shall continue in office until the 
term for which such person has been, or may be, elected, shall 
expire : Provided, That no such person shall continue in of- 
fice after the taking effect of this Constitution, for a longer 
period than the term of such office in this Constitution pre- 
scribed. 

Eleventh. On the taking effect of this Constitution, all of- 
ficers thereby continued in office, shall, before proceeding in 
the further discharge of their duties, take an oath, or affirma- 
tion, to support this Constitution. 

Twelfth. All vacancies that may occur in existing offices, 
prior to the first general election under this Constitution, shall 
be filled in the manner now prescribed by law. 

Thirteenth. At the time of submitting this Constitution to 
the electors for their approval or disapproval, the article 
numbered thirteen, in relation to Negroes and Mulattoes, 
shall be submitted as a distinct proposition, in the following 
form: "Exclusion and Colonization of Negroes and Mulat- 
toes," "Aye" or "No." And if a majority of the votes cast 
shall be in favor of said article, then the same shall form a 
part of this Constitution ; otherwise, it shall be void, and form 
no part thereof. 

Fourteenth. No Article or Section of this Constitution 
shall be submitted, as a distinct proposition, to a vote of the 
electors, otherwise than as herein provided. 

Fifteenth. Whenever a portion of the citizens of the 
counties of Perry and Spencer shall deem it expedient to 
form, of the contiguous territory of said counties, a new 
county, it shall be the duty of those interested in the organi- 
zation of such new county, to lay off the same by proper 
metes and bounds, of equal portions as nearly as practicable, 
not to exceed one-third of the territory of each of said coun- 
ties. The proposal to create such new county shall be sub- 
mitted to the voters of said counties, at a general election, in 
such manner as shall be prescribed by law. And if a majority 



STATE OF INDIANA. 53 



of all the votes given at said election shall be in favor of the 
organization of said new county, it shall be the duty of the 
General Assembly to organize the same out of the territory 
thus designated. 

Sixteenth. The General Assembly may alter or amend the 
charter of Olarksville, and make such regulations as may be 
necessary for carrying into effect the objects contemplated in 
granting the same ; and the funds belonging to said town shall 
be applied according to the intention of the grantor. 

Done in Convention, at Indianapolis, the tenth day of Feb- 
ruary, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-one ; and of the Independence of the United State, the 
seventy-fifth. 

GEORGE WHITFIELD CARR, 

President, and Delegate from the County of Lawrence. 
Attest: Wm. H. English, 

Principal Secretary. 

George L. Sites, 

Herman G. Barkwell, \ Assistant Secretaries. 

Robert M. Evans, 



-I 



EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. 



Whereas, On the twenty-second day of September, in the 
year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, 
a proclamation was issued by the President of the United 
States, containing among other things the following, to-wit : 

That, on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord, 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held 
as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the 
people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United 
States, shall be then, henceforth and forever free, and the 
Executive Government of the United States, including the 
military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and 
maintain the freedom of such persons, or any of them, in any 
efforts they may make for their actual freedom. 

That the Executive will, on the first day of January afore- 
said, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of 
States, if any, in which the people therein respectively shall 
then be in rebellion against the United States, and the fact 
that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be in 
good faith represented in the Congress of the United States by 
members chosen thereto, at elections wherein a majority of 
the qualified voters of such States shall have participated, 
shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be 
deemed conclusive that such State and the people thereof are 
not then in rebellion against the United States. 

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the 
United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, 
in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and 
Government of the United States, and as a fit necessary war 
measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of 
January, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, 
publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days 

(54) 



EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. 65 



from the day of the first above-mentioned order, and desig- 
nate, as the States and parts of States wherein the people 
thereof respectively are this day in rebellion againt the 
United States, the following to-wit : Arkansas, Texas, Louisi- 
ana, except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jeffer- 
son, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, 
Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin and Orleans, in- 
cluding the city of New Orleans. Mississippi, Alabama, Flor- 
ida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, 
except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, 
and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton. 
Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including 
the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and which excepted 
parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation 
were not issued. 

And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, 
I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within 
said designated States and parts of States are, and hencefor- 
ward, shall be free ; and that the Executive Government of the 
United States, including the military and naval authorities there- 
of, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. 

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free 
to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defense ; 
and I recommend to them that, in all cases, when allowed, 
they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. 

And I further declare and make known that such persons of 
suitable condition will be received into the armed service of 
the United States, to garrison forts, positions, stations, and 
other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. 

And upon this, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, 
warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I in- 
voke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious 
favor of Almighty God. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused 
the seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, 

r^^ in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
-JsealI an d sixty-three, and of the Independence of the Unit- 

^v^^' ed States of America the eighty-seventh. 

By the President: Abraham Lincoln. 

William H. Seward, Secretary of State. 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



PLATFORM OF THE BRECKINRIDGE PARTY OF 1860. 

Resolved, That the platform adopted by the Democratic 
party at Cincinnati be affirmed, with the following explana- 
tory resolutions : 

1. That the government of a territory organized by an act 
of Congress is provisional and temporary, and during its exis- 
tence all citizens of the United States have an equal right to 
settle with their property in the territory, without their rights, 
either in person or property, being destroyed by congressional 
or territorial legislation. 

2. That it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its 
departments, to protect the rights of persons and property in 
the territories, and wherever else its constitutional authority 
extends. 

3. That when the settlers in a territory, having an adequate 
population, form a State Constitution, the right of sovereignty 
commences, and being consummated by their admission into 
the Union, they stand on an equality with the people of other 
States, and a State thus organized ought to be admitted into 
the Federal Union, whether its constitution prohibits or rec- 
ognizes the institution of slavery. 

4. That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisi- 
tion of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves 
and just to Spain, at the earliest practicable moment. 

5. That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the 
faithful execution of the Fugitive Slave Law are hostile in 
character, subversive of the Constitution, and revolutionary 
in their effect. 

6. That the Democracy of the United States recognize it as 
an imperative duty of the government to protect the natural- 

(56) 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 67 

ized citizen in all his rights, whether in home or in foreign 
lands, to the same extent as its native born citizens. 

Whereas, One of the greatest necessities of the age, in a 
political, commercial, postal, and military point of view, is a 
epeedy communication between the Pacific and Atlantic 
coasts ; therefore, be it resolved, 

7. That the National Democratic party do hereby pledge 
themselves to use every means in their power to secure the 
passage of some bill, to the extent of the Constitutional au- 
thority by Congress, for the construction of a railroad to the 
Pacific Ocean at the earliest practicable moment. 



PLATFORM OF THE DOUGLAS PARTY OF 1860. 

Resolved, That we, the Democracy of the Union in Conven- 
tion assembled, hereby declare our affirmation of the resolu- 
tions unanimously adopted and declared as a platform of prin- 
ciples by the Democratic Convention at Cincinnati, in the 
year 1856, believing that Democratic principles are unchanga- 
ble in their nature when applied to the same subject matter, 
and we recommend as our only further resolutions the follow- 
ing: 

That inasmuch as differences of opinion exist in the Demo- 
cratic party as to the nature and extent of the powers of a 
Territorial Legislature, and as to the powers and duties of Con- 
gress, under the Constitution of the United States, over the 
institution of slavery in the territories ; 

Resolved, That the Democratic party will abide by the de- 
cision of the Supreme Court of the United States over the in- 
stitution of slavery in the territories. 

Resolved^ That it is the duty of the United States to afford 
ample and complete protection to all its citizens, at home or 
abroad, and whether native or foreign born. 

Resolved, That one of the necessities of the age, in a mili- 
tary, commercial, and postal point of view, is a speedy com- 
munication between the Atlantic and Pacific States, and the 
Democratic party pledge such constitutional enactment as 
will insure the construction of a railroad to the Pacific coast 
at the earliest practical period. 



5$ POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

Resolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of the ac- 
quisition of the Island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be hon- 
orable to ourselves and just to Spain. 

Resolved, That the enactments of State Legislatures to de- 
feat the faithful execution of the Fugitive Slave Law are hos- 
tile in character, subversive to the Constitution, and revolu- 
tionary in their effect. 

Resolved^ That it is in accordance with the Cincinnati Plat- 
form, that during the existence of Territorial Governments, 
the measure of restriction, whatever it may be, imposed by 
the Federal Constitution on the power of the Territorial Leg- 
islature over the subject of the domestic relations, as the same 
has been or shall hereafter be decided by the Supreme Court 
of the United States, should be respected by all good citizens, 
and enforced with promptness and fidelity by every branch of 
the General Government. 



THE REPUBLICAN PLATFORM OF 1860. 

Resolved, That we, the delegated representatives of the Re- 
publican electors of the United States, in Convention assem- 
bled, in the discharge of the duty we owe to our constituents 
and our country, unite in the following resolutions: 

1. That the history of the nation during the last four years 
has fully established the propriety and necessity of the organ- 
ization and perpetuation of the Republican party, and that the 
causes which called it into existence are permanent in their 
nature, and now, more than ever, demand its peaceful and 
constitutional triumph. 

2. That the maintenance of the principles promulgated in 
the Declaration of Independence, and embodied in the Federal 
Constitution, that " all men are created equal ; that they are 
endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, 
among which are those of life, liberty and the pursuit of happi- 
ness, and that Governments are instituted among men to 
secure the enjoyment of these rights, deriving their just power 
from the consent of the governed "—are essential to the pres- 
ervation of our republican institutions, and that the Federal 
Constitution, the rights of the States, and the union of the 
States, must and shall be preserved. 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



3. That to the union of the States this nation owes its unpre- 
cedented increase in population, its surprising developments 
of material resources ; its rapid augmentation of wealth ; its 
happiness at home and its honor abroad; and we hold in 
abhorrence all schemes for disunion, come from whatever 
source they may ; and we congratulate the country that no 
Republican member of Congress has uttered or countenanced 
the threats of disunion as often made by the Democratic mem- 
bers of Congress, without rebuke and with applause from their 
political associates ; and we denounce those threats of disunion 
in case of a popular overthrow of their ascendency, as denying 
the vital principles of a free Government, and as an avowal of 
contemplated treason which it is the imperative duty of an 
indignant people sternly to rebuke and forever silence. 

4. That the maintenance inviolate, of the rights of the 
States, and especially of each State, to order and control its 
own domestic institutions according to its own judgment ex- 
clusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the 
perfection and endurance of our political fabric depends ; and 
we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil 
of any State or Territory, no matter under what pretext, as one 
of the gravest of crimes. 

5. That the present Democratic Administration has far ex- 
ceeded our worst apprehensions in the measureless subserviency 
to the exactions of a sectional interest, as especially evinced 
in its desperate exertions to force the infamous Lecompton 
Constitution upon the protesting people of Kansas, construing 
the relation between master and servant to involve an unqual- 
ified property in persons ; in its attempted enforcement every 
where, on land and sea, through the intervention of Congress 
and of the Federal Courts, of the extreme pretensions of a 
purely local interest ; and in its general and unvarying abuse 
of the power entrusted to it by a confiding people. 

6. That the people justly view with alarm the reckless ex- 
travagance which pervades every department of the Federal 
Government. That a return to right economy and accounta- 
bility is indispensible to arrest the plunder of the public 
treasury by favored partisans, while the recent startling devel- 
opments of frauds and corruption at the Federal metropolis 
show that ^n entire change of administration is imperatively 
demanded. 



60 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

7. That the new dogma that the Constitution of its own 
force carries slavery into any or all the Territories of the 
United States, is a dangerous political heresy, at variance with 
the explicit provisions of that instrument itself, with cotempo- 
raneous exposition, and with legislative and judicial prece- 
dents, that it is revolutionary in its tendency and subversive 
of the peace and harmony of the country. 

S. That the nominal condition of all the territory of the 
United States is that of freedom ; that as our Republican fath- 
ers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national terri- 
tory, ordained that no person should be deprived of life, liberty 
or property without due process of law, it becomes our duty 
by legislation, whenever such legislation is necessary, to 
maintain this provision of the Constitution against all attempts 
to violate it; and we deny the authority of Congress, or a Ter- 
ritorial Legislature, or of any individual, to give legal existence 
to slavery in any Territory of the United States. 

9. That we brand the recent re-opening of the African Slave 
Trade, under the cover of our national flag, aided by perver- 
sions of judicial power, as a crime against humanity, and a 
burning shame to our country and age; and we call upon 
Congress to take prompt and efficient measures for the total 
and final suppression of that exercrable traffic. 

10. That in the recent vetoes by their Federal Governors 
of the acts of the Legislatures of Kansas and Nebraska, pro- 
hibiting slavery in these Territories, we find a practical 
illustration of the boasted Democratic principles of non-inter- 
vention and Popular Sovereignty, embodied in the Kansas- 
Nebraska bill, and a demonstration of the deception and fraud 
involved therein. 

11. That Kansas should, of right, be immediately admitted 
as a State under the Constitution recently formed and adopted 
by her people, and accepted by the House of Representatives. 

12. That while providing revenue for the support of the 
General Government, by duties upon imports, sound policy 
requires such an adjustment of these imports as to encourage 
the development of the industrial interests of the whole 
country, and we commend that policy of National Exchange 
which secures to the working men liberal wages, agriculture 
remunerative prices, to merchants and manufacturers an ade- 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 61 

quate reward for their skill, labor and enterprise, and to the 
nation commercial prosperity and independence. 

13. That we protest against any sale or alienation to others 
of the public lands held by actual settlers, and against any 
view of the free homestead policy, which regards the settlers 
as paupers or suppliants for public bounty, and we demand 
the passage by Congress of the complete and satisfactory 
homestead measure which has already passed the House. 

14. That the National Republican party is opposed to any 
change in our naturalization laws, or any State Legislation, by 
which the rights of citizenship hitherto accorded to immigrants 
from foreign lands shall be abridged or impaired, and in favor 
of giving a full and efficient protection to the rights of all 
classes of citizens, whether native or naturalized, both at 
home and abroad. 

15. That appropriations by Congress for river and harbor 
improvements of a national character, is required for the ac- 
commodation and security of an existing commerce, or au- 
thorized by the Constitution and justified by the obligation 
of the Government to protect the lives and property of its 
citizens. 

16. That a railroad to the Pacific ocean is imperatively de- 
manded by the interests of the whole country ; and that the 
Federal Government ought to render immediate and efficient 
aid in its construction, and that preliminary thereto, a daily 
overland mail should be promptly established. 

17. Finally, having thus set forth our distinctive principles 
and views, we invite the co-operation of all citizens, however 
differing in other questions, who substantially agree with us, 
in their affirmance and support. 



PLATFORM OF THE NATIONAL CONSTITUTIONAL PARTY OP 

1860. 

The Union, the Constitution and the Laws. 



62 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

UNION PLATFORM, ADOPTED AT BALTIMORE, JUNE 8, 1864. 

Resolved, That it is the highest duty of every American 
citizen to maintain against all its enemies, the integrity of the 
Union, and the paramount authority of the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, and that, laying all political opin- 
ions aside, we pledge ourselves, as Union men, animated by a 
common sentiment, and aiming at a common object, to do 
everything in our power to aid the Government in quelling, 
by force of arms, the rebellion now raging against its author- 
ity, and bringing to the punishment due to their crimes, the 
rebels and traitors arrayed against it. 

Resolved, That we approve the determination of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States not to compromise with rebels 
or to offer any terms of peace, except such as may be based 
upon an unconditional surrender of their hostility, &c, and a 
return to their just allegiance to the Constitution and laws of 
the United States, and that we call upon the Government to 
maintain this position, and to prosecute the war with the ut- 
most possible vigor to the complete suppression of the rebel- 
lion, in full reliance upon the self-sacrifices, the patriotism, 
the heroic valor, and the undying devotion of the American 
people to their country and its free institutions. 

Resolved, That slavery was the cause, and now constitutes 
the strength of the rebellion, and that as it must be always 
and everywhere hostile to the principles of Republican Gov- 
ernments, justice and the national safety demand its utter and 
complete extirpation from the soil of the Republic, and that 
we uphold and maintain the acts and proclamations by which 
the Government, in its own defence, has aimed a death blow 
at this gigantic evil. We are in favor, furthermore, of such 
an amendment to the Constitution, to be made by the people 
in conformity with its provisions, as shall terminate and for- 
ever prohibit the existence of slavery within the limits of the 
jurisdiction of the United States. 

Resolved, That the thanks of the American people are due 
to the soldiers and sailors of the army and navy, who have 
periled their lives in defence of their country, and in vindi- 
cation of the honor of the flag; that the nation owes them 
some permanent recognition of their patriotism and their 
valor, and ample and permanent provision for those of their 
survivors who have received disabling and honorable wounds 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



in the service of their country, and that the memories of those 
who have fallen in its defense, shall be held in grateful and 
everlasting remembrance. 

Resolved, That we approve and applaud the political wis- 
dom, the unselfish patriotism and unswerving fidelity to the 
Constitution and the principles of American Kberty with 
which Abraham Lincoln has discharged, under circumstances 
of unparalelled difficuly, the great duties and responsibilities 
of the Presidential office; that we approve and endorse, as 
demanded by the emergency and essential to the preservation 
of the nation, and as within the Constitution, the measures 
and acts which he has adopted to defend the nation against its 
open and secret foes; especially the Proclamation of Emanci- 
pation, and the employment, as Union soldiers, of men hereto- 
fore held in slavery, and that we have full confidence in his 
determination to carry these and all other Constitutional 
measures, essential to the salvation of the country, into full 
and complete effect. 

Resolved, That we deem it essential to the general welfare, 
that harmony should prevail in the national councils, and we 
regard as worthy of public confidence and official trust those 
only who cordially endorse the principles proclaimed in these 
resolutions, and which should characterize the administration 
of the Government. 

Resolved, That the Government owes to all men employed 
in its armies, without distinction of color, the full protection of 
the laws of war, and any violation of these laws and of the 
usages of civilized nations in the time of war, by the rebels 
now in arms, should be made the subject of full and prompt 
redress. 

Resolved, That the foreign immigration, which in the past 
has added so much to the wealth and development of resources 
and increase of power to this nation, the asylum of the oppress- 
ed of all nations, should be fostered and encouraged by a 
liberal and just policy. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of the speedy construction of 
the railroad to the Pacific. 

Resolved, That the national faith is pledged for the redemp- 
tion of the public debt and must be kept inviolate ; and that 
for this purpose we recommend economy and rigid responsi- 
bilities in the public expenditures, and a vigorous and just 



64 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

system of taxation ; that it is the duty of every loyal State to 
sustain the use of the national currency. 

Resolved, That we approve the position taken by the Gov- 
ernment, that the people of the United States can never regard 
with indifference the attempt of European power to overthrow 
by force, or to supplant by fraud, the institutions of any Re- 
publican government on the Western Continent, and that they 
will view with extreme jealousy, as menacing to the peace and 
independence of this our country, the efforts of any such power 
to obtain new footholds for monarchial governments sustained 
by a foreign military force in near proximity to the United 
States. 



FREMONT PLATFORM, ADOPTED AT CLEVELAND, MAY 31, 1864. 

1. That the Federal Union must be preserved. 

2. That the Constitution and laws of the United States 
must be observed and obeyed. 

3. That the rebellion must be suppressed by the force of 
arms, and without compromise. 

4. That the rights of Free Speech, Free Press, and the 
Habeas Corpus must be held inviolate, save in districts where 
martial law has been proclaimed. 

5. That the rebellion has destroyed slavery, and the Fed- 
eral Constitution should be amended to prohibit its re-estab- 
lishment. 

6. That the right for asylum, except for crime, and subject 
to law, is a recognized principle — a principle of American lib- 
erty ; that any violation of it must not be overlooked, and 
must not go unrebuked. 

7. That the National policy known as the Monroe doctrine 
has become a recognized principle, and that the establishment 
of an anti- republican form of government on this continent by 
a foreign power can not be tolerated. 

8. That the gratitude and support of the nation is due to 
the faithful soldiers, and the earnest leaders of the Union army 
and navy, for their heroic achievements and valor in defense 
of our imperiled country and of civil liberty. 

9. That the one term policy for the Presidency adopted by 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 65 



the people is strengthened by the existing crisis, and shall be 
maintained by constitutional amendments. 

10. That the Constitution shall be so amended that the 
President and Vice President shall be elected by a direct vote 
of the people. 

11. That the reconstruction of the rebellious States belongs 
to the people through their representatives in Congress, and 
not to the Executive. 

12. That the confiscation of the lands of the rebels and 
their distribution among the soldiers and actual settlers is a 
measure of justice ; that integrity and economy are demanded 
at all times in the measures of the government, and that now 
the want of this is criminal. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM OF 1864. 

Resolved^ That in the future, as in the past, we will adhere 
with unswerving fidelity to the Union under the Constitution 
as the only solid foundation of our strength, security and hap. 
pines3 as a people, and as a framework of government equally 
conducive to the welfare and prosperity of all the States, both 
Northern and Southern. 

Resolved, That this Convention does explicitly declare, as 
the sense of the American people, that after four years of fail- 
ure to restore the Union by experiment of war, during which, 
under the pretence of military necessity or war power higher 
than the Constitution, the Constitution itself has been disre- 
garded in every part, and public liberty and private right alike 
trodden down, and the material prosperity of the country es- 
sentially impaired, justice, humanity, liberty and the public 
welfaro demand that immediate efforts bo made for a cessation 
of hostilities with a view to an ultimate convention of the 
States, or other peaceable means, to the end that at the earli- 
est practical moment peace may be restored on the basis of 
the Federal Union of the States. 

Resolved, That the direct interference of the military au- 
thorities of the United States in the recent elections held in 
Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri and Delaware was a shameful 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



violation of the Constitution, and a repetition of such acts in 
the approaching election will be held as revolutionary, and re- 
sisted with all the means and power under our control. 

Resolved, That the aim and object of the Democratic party 
is to preserve the Federal Union and the rights of the States 
unimpaired, and they hereby declare that they consider that 
the administrative usurpation of extraordinary and dangerous 
powers not granted by the Constitution, the subversion of the 
civil by military law in States not in insurrection, the arbi- 
trary military arrest, imprisonment, trial and sentence of 
American citizens in States where the civil law exists in full 
force, the suppression of freedom of speech and of the press, 
the denial of the right of asylum, the open and avowed right 
of disregard of State rights, the employment of unusual test 
oaths, and the interference with, and denial of the right of the 
people to bear arms in their defense, is calculated to prevent 
a restoration of the Union and a perpetuation of the Govern- 
ment deriving its just powers from the consent of the gov- 
erned. 

Resolved, That the shameful disregard of the Administra- 
tion to its duty in respect to our fellow- citizens who now are, 
and long have been, prisoners of war in a suffering condition, 
deserves the severest reprobation on the score alike of public 
policy and common humanity. 

Resolved, That the sympathy of the Democratic party is 
heartily and earnestly extended to the soldiery of our army 
and sailors of our navy who are and have been in the field and 
on the sea, under the flag of their country, and in the event 
of its attaining power, they will receive all the care, protec- 
tion and regard that the brave soldiers and sailors of the Re- 
public have so nobly earned. 



THE CHICAGO PLATFORM, 1868. 

The following is the platform as adopted: 

The National Republican Party of the United States, as- 
sembled in National Convention, in the city of Chicago, on 
the 20th day of May, 1838, make the following declaration of 
principles : 

1. We congratulate the country on the assured success of 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 67 

the reconstruction policy of Congress, as evinced by the 
adoption, in the majority of the S ates lately in rebellion, of 
constitutions securing equal civil raid political rights to all; 
and it is the duty of the Government to sustain those consti- 
tutions and to prevent the people of such States from being 
remitted to a state of anarchy. 

2. The guarantee by Congress of equal suffrage to all loyal 
men at the South was demanded by every consideration of 
public safety, of gratitude, and of justice, and must be main- 
tained, while the question of suffrage in all the loyal States 
properly belongs to the people of those States. 

3. We denounce all forms of repudiation as a national 
crime, and the national honor requires the payment of the 
public indebtedness in the utrnobt good faith to all creditors 
at home and abroad, not only according to the letter but the 
spirit of the laws under which it was contracted. 

4. It is due to the labor of the nation that taxation should 
be equalized and reduced as rapidly as the national faith will 
permit. 

5. The national debt, contracted as it has been for the 
preservation of the Union for all time to come, should be ex- 
tended over a fair period for redemption; and it is the duty of 
Congress to reduce the rate of interest thereon whenever it 
can be honestly done. 

6. That the best policy to diminish our burden of debt is 
to so improve our credit that capitalists will seek to loan us 
money at lower rates of interest than we now pay, and must 
continue to pay, so long as repudiation, partial or total, open 
or covert, is threatened or suspected. 

7. The Government of the United States should be admin- 
istered with the strictest economy, and the corruptions which 
have been so shamefully nursed and fostered by Andrew 
Johnson call loudly for radical reform. 

8. We professedly deplore the untimely and tragic death 
of Abraham Lincoln, and regret the accession of Andrew 
Johsson to the Presidency, who has acted treacherously to 
the people who elected him, and the cause he was pledged to 
support — who has usurped high legislative and judicial func- 
tions — who has refused to execute the laws — who has used his 
high office to induce other officers to ignore and violate the 
laws — who has employed his executive powers to render inse- 



68 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



cure the property, the peace, liberty, and life of the citizen — 
who has abused the pardoning power — who has denounced 
the National Legislature as unconstitutional — persistently and 
corruptly resisted, by every measure in his power, every 
proper attempt at the reconstruction of the States lately in 
rebellion — who has perverted the public patronage into an 
engine of wholesale corruption, and who has been justly im- 
peached for high crimes and misdemeanors, and properly pro- 
nounced guilty thereof by the vote of thirty-five Senators. 

9. The doctrine of Great Britain and other European Pow- 
ers, that because a man is once a subject he is always so, 
must be resisted at every hazard by the United States as a 
relic of the feudal times, not authorized by the law of nations, 
and at war with our national honor and independence. Nat- 
uralized citizens are entitled to be protected in all their 
rights of citizenship as though they were native born ; and 
no citizen of the United States, native or naturalized, must 
be liable to arrest and imprisonment by any foreign power for 
acts done or words spoken in this country; and if so arrested 
and imprisoned it is the duty of the Government to interfere 
in his behalf. 

10. Of all who were faithful in the trials of the late war 
there were none entitled to more especial honor than the 
brave soldiers and seamen who endured the hardships of cam- 
paign and cruise, and imperiled their lives in the service of 
the country. The bounties and pensions provided by the laws 
for these brave defenders of the nation are obligations never 
to be forgotten. The widows and orphans of the gallant 
dead are the wards of the people, a sacred legacy bequeathed 
to the nation's protecting care. 

11. Foreign emigration, which in the past has added go 
much to the wealth, development, and resources and increase 
of power to this nation, the asylum of the oppressed of all 
nations, should be fostered and encouraged by a liberal and 
just policy. 

12. This Convention declares itself in sympathy with all 
the oppressed people which are struggling for their rights. 

The following resolutions were also adopted unanimously, 
and are added to the declaration of principles : 

Resolved, That we highly commend the spirit of magnan- 
imity and forgiveness with which the men who have served in 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



the rebellion, but now frankly and honestly co-operate with 
us in restoring the peace of the country and reconstructing 
the Southern State governments upon the basis of impartial 
justice and equal rights, are received back into the com- 
munion of the loyal people. And we favor the removal of 
the disqualifications and restrictions placed upon the late 
rebels in the same measure as the spirit of loyalty will direct, 
and as may be consistent with the safety of the loyal people. 
Resolved, That we recognize the great principles laid down 
in the immortal Declaration of Independence as the true 
foundation of Democratic government ; and we hail with 
gladness every effort toward making these principles a living 
reality on every inch of American soil. 



DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM OF 1868. . • 

The Democratic party, in National Convention assembled, 
reposing its trust in the intelligence, patriotism, and discrimi- 
nating justice of the people, standing upon the Constitution as 
the foundation and limitation of the powers of the Government 
and the guarantee of the liberties of the citizen, and recog- 
nizing the questions of slavery andsecession as having been set- 
tled for all time to come by the war or the voluntary action of 
the Southern States in Constitutional Conventions assembled, 
and never to be revived or re-agitated, do, with the return of 
peace, demand: 

1. The immediate restoration of all the States to their 
rights in the Union under the Constitution of the civil Gov- 
ernment and in the American people. 

2. Amnesty for all past political offenses ; the regulation of 
the elective franchise in the States by their citizens. 

3. Payment of the public debt of the United States as rap- 
idly as practicable, all money drawn from the people by taxa- 
tion, except so much as is requisite for the necessities of the 
Government economically administered being honestly ap- 
plied to such payment, and where the obligations of the Gov- 
ernment do not expressly state upon their face or the law 
under which they were issued does not provide that they shall 
be paid in coin they ought, in right and justice, be paid in the 
lawful money of the United States. 



'<0 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

4. Equal taxation of every species of property according 
to the value ; reducing Government bonds and other public 
securities. 

5. One currency for the Government and the people, the 
laborer and the office-holder, pensioner and the soldier, the 
producer and the bondholder. 

6. Economy in the administration oi the Government; the 
reduction of the standing army and navy; the abolition of the 
Freedmen's Bureau, and all political instrumentalities de- 
signed to secure negro supremacy; simplification of the system 
and discontinuance of inquisitorial modes of assessing and 
collecting internal revenue, that the burden of taxation may 
be equalized and lessened, and the credit of the Government 
and the currency made good ; the repeal of all enactments for 
enrolling the State militia into a national force in time of 
peace ; and a tariff for revenue upon foreign imports and such 
equal taxation under the internal revenue laws as will afford 
incidental protection to domestic manufactures as well, with- 
out impairing the revenue, impose the least burden upon and 
best promote and encourage the great industrial interests of 
the country. 

7. Reform of abuses in the Administration ; the expulsion 
of corrupt men from office ; the abrogation of useless offices ; 
the restoration of the rightful authority to and the independ- 
ence of the Executive and Judicial Departments of the Gov- 
ernment; the subordination of the military to the civil power, 
to the end that the usurpation of Congress and the despotism 
of the sword may cease. 

8. Equal rights and protection for naturalized and native 
born citizens at home and abroad ; the assertion of American 
nationality, which will command the respect of foreign powers 
furnish an example and encouragement to people struggling 
for national integrity, constitutional liberty, and individual 
rights ; and the maintenance of the rights of naturalized citi- 
zens against the absolute doctrine of immutable allegiance 
and the claims of foreign powers to punish them for alleged 
crimes committed beyond their jurisdiction. In demanding 
these measures and reforms, we airaign the radical party for 
its disregard of right and the unparalleled oppression and 
tyranny which have marked its career, after the most solemn 
and unanimous pledge of both houses of Congress to prose- 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 71 

cute the war exclusively for the maintenance of the Govern- 
ment and the preservation of the Union under the Constitu- 
tion. It has repeatedly violated that most sacred pledge 
under which was rallied that noble volunteer army which car- 
ried our flag to victory. Instead of restoring the Union it has, 
so far as it is in its power, dissolved it, and subjected ten States 
in time of peace to military despotism and negro supremacy. 
It has nullified there the right of trial by jury ; it has abolished 
the writ of habeas corpus, that most sacred writ of liberty ; it 
has overthrown the freedom of speech and of the press ; it has 
substituted arbitrary seizures and arrests, military trials, se- 
cret star chambers, and inquisitions for constitutional tribu- 
nals; it has disregarded, in time of peace, the right of the 
people to be free from search and seizure ; it has entered the 
post-office and telegraph office, and even the private rooms of 
individuals and seized there their private papers and letters, 
without any specification or notice of affidavit, as required by 
the organic law. It has converted the American Capitol into 
a bastile; it has established a system of spies and official espion- 
age to which the constitutional monarchies of Europe 
never dare to resort. It has abolished the right of appeal on 
important constitutional questions to the supreme judicial 
tribunals, and threatens to curtail or destroy its original juris- 
diction, which is irrevocably vested by the Constitution ; while 
the learned Chief Justice has been subjected to the most atro- 
cious calumnies merely because he would not prostitute his 
high office to the support of the false and partisan charges 
against the President. Its corruption and extravagance have 
exceeded anything known in history, and by its frauds and 
monopolies it has nearly doubled the burden of the debt cre- 
ated during the war. It has stripped the President of his 
Constitutional power of appointment even of his own Cabinet. 
Under its repeated assaults the pillars of the Government are 
rocking to their base; and should it succeed in November 
next, and inaugurate its President, we will meet as a subjected 
and conquered people amid the ruins of liberty and the scat- 
tered fragments of the Constitution; and we do declare and 
resolve that ever since the people of the United States threw 
off all subjection to the British crown, the privilege and trust 
of suffrage have belonged to the several States, and have been 
granted, regulated, and controlled exclusively by the political 



72 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

power of each State respectively, and any attempt by Con- 
gress, on any pretext whatever, to deprive any State of this 
right, or interfere with this exercise, is a flagrant usurpation 
of power which can find no warrant in the Constitution, and 
if sanctioned by the people will subvert our form of Govern- 
ment, and can only end in a single, centralized and consolidated 
Government, in which the separate existence of the States will 
be entirely absorbed, and an unqualified despotism then be 
established in place of a Federal Union of coequal States, and 
that we regard the reconstruction acts so called of Congress 
such usurpations and unconstitutional, revolutionary and void ; 
that our soldiers and sailors who carried the flag of our country 
to victory against a most gallant and determined foe must ever 
be gratefully remembered, and all the guarantees given in 
their favor must be faithfully carried into execution; that the 
public lands should be distributed widely among the people 
and should be disposed of either under the pre-emption of the 
homestead lands and sold in reasonable quantities, and to none 
but actual occupants, at the price established by the Govern- 
ment. When the grants of the public lands may be allowed 
necessary for the encouragement of important public improve- 
ments, the proceeds of the sale of such lands, and not the 
lands themselves, should be so applied ; that the President of 
the United States, Andrew Johnson, exercising the power of 
his high office in resisting the aggressions of Congress on the 
constitutional rights of the States and the people, is entitled 
to the gratitude of the whole American people, and on behalf 
of the Democratic party, we tender him our thanks for his 
patriotic efforts in that regard. 

Upon this platform the Democratic party appeal to every 
patriot, including all the conservative element, and all who 
desire to support the Constitution and restore the Union, for- 
getting all past differences of opinion, to unite with us in the 
present great struggle for the liberties of the people ; and that 
to all such, to whatever party they may have heretofore be- 
longed, we extend the right hand of fellowship, and hail all 
such co-operating with us as friends and brothers. 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 73 



KEPUBLICAN PLATFORM, 1872. 

The Republican party of the United States, assembled in 
national convention in the city of Philadelphia on the 5th and 
6th days of June, 1872, again declares its faith, appeals to its 
history, and announces its position upon the questions before 
the country: 

1. During eleven years of supremacy it has accepted with 
grand courage the solemn duties of the time. It suppressed 
a gigantic rebellion, emancipated four millions of slaves, de- 
creed the equal citizenship of all, and established universal 
suffrage. Exhibiting unparalelled magnanimity, it criminally 
punished no man for political offenses, and warmly welcomed 
all who proved loyalty by obeying the laws and dealing justly 
with their neighbors. It has steadily decreased with firm 
hand the resultant disorders of a great war, and initiated a 
wise and humane policy toward the Indians. The Pacific rail- 
road and similar vast enterprises have been generously aided 
and successfully conducted, the public lands freely given to 
actual settlers, immigration protected and encouraged, and a 
full acknowledgement of the naturalized citizen's rights se- 
cured from European Powers. A unifo'rm national currency 
has been provided, repudiation frowned down, the national 
credit sustained under the most extraordinary burdens, and new 
bonds negotiated at lower rates. The revenues have been care- 
fully collected and honestly applied. Despite annual large 
reductions of the rates of taxation, the public debt has been re- 
duced during General Grant's Presidency at the rate of a hun- 
dred millions a year, great financial crises have been avoided, 
and peace and plenty prevail throughout the land. Menacing 
foreign difficulties have been peacefully and honorably com- 
posed, and the honor and power of the nation kept in high 
respect throughout the world. This glorious record of the 
past is the party's best pledge for the future. We believe 
the people will not intrust the Government to any party or 
combination of men composed chiefly of those who have re- 
sisted every step of this benificent progress. 

2. The recent amendments to the national Constitution 
should be cordially sustained because they are right, not 



74 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

merely tolerated because they are law, and should be carried 
out according to their spirit by appropriate legislation, the 
enforcement of which can safely be intrusted only to the 
party that secured those amendments. 

3. Complete liberty and exact equality in the enjoyment 
of all civil, political and public rights should be established 
and effectually maintained throughout the Union by efficient 
and appropriate State and Federal legislation. Neither the 
law nor its administration should admit any discrimination in 
respect of citizens by reason of race, creed, color, or previous 
condition of servitude. 

4. The national Government should seek to maintain hon- 
orable peace with all nation , protecting its citizens every- 
where and sympathizing with all peoples who strive for greater 
liberty. 

5. Any system of the civil service under which the subor- 
dinate positions of the government are considered rewards for 
mere party zeal is fatally demoralizing, and we therefore favor 
a reform of the system by laws which shall abolish the evils 
of patronage and make honesty, efficiency, and fidelity the 
essential qualifications for public positions, without creating a 
life tenure of office. 

6. We are opposed to further grants of the public lands to 
corporations and monopolies, and demand that the national 
domain be set apart for free homes for the people. 

7. The annual revenue, after paying current expenditures, 
pensions, and the interest on the public debt, should furnish 
a moderate balance for the reduction of the principal, and 
that revenue, except so much as may be derived from a tax 
upon tobacco and liquors, should be raised by duties upon im- 
portations, the details of which should be so adjusted as to 
aid in securing remunerative wages to labor, and promote the 
industries, prosperity, and growth of the whole country. 

8. We hold in undying honor the soldiers and sailors whose 
valor saved the Union. Their pensions are a sacred debt of 
the nation, and the widows and orphans of those who died for 
their country are entitled to the care of a generous and grate- 
ful people. We favor such additional legislation as will ex- 
tend the bounty of the Government to all our soldiers and 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 75 

sailors who were honorably discharged, and who in the line 
of duty became disabled, without regard to the length of ser- 
vice or the cause of such discharge. 

9. The doctrine of Great Britain and other European Pow- 
ers concerning allegiance — "once a subject always a subject" 
— having at last through the efforts of the Republican party 
been abandoned, and the American idea of the individual's 
right to transfer allegiance having been accepted by Euro- 
pean nations, it is the duty of our Government to guard with 
jealous care the rights of adopted citizens against the assump- 
tion of unauthorized claims by their former Governments, 
and we urge continued careful encouragement and protec- 
tion of voluntary immigration. 

10. The franking privilege ought to be abolished, and the 
way prepared for a speedy reduction in the rates of postage. 

11 Among the questions which press for attention is that 
which concerns the relations of capital and labor, and the 
Republican party recognizes the duty of so shaping legis- 
lation as to secure full protection an.d the amplest field for 
capital, and for labor, the creator of capital, the largest oppor- 
tunities and a just share of the mutual profits of these two 
great servants of civilization. 

12. We hold that Congress and the President have only 
fulfilled an imperative duty in their measures for the sup- 
pression of violent and treasonable organizations in certain 
lately rebellious regions, and for the protection of the ballot- 
box; and therefore they are entitled to the thanks of the 
nation. 

13. We denounce repudiation of the public debt, in any 
form or disguise as a national crime. We witness with pride 
the reduction of the principal of the debt, and the rates of in- 
terest upon the balance, and confidently expect that our ex- 
cellent national currency will be perfected by a speedy re- 
sumption of specie payment. 

14. The Republican party is mindful of its obligations to 
the loyal women of America for their noble devotion to the 
cause of freedom. Their admission to wider fields of useful- 
ness is viewed with satisfaction ; and the honest demand of 



76 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



any class of citizens for additional rights should be treated 
with respectful consideration. 

15. We heartily approve the action of Congress in extend- 
ing amnesty to those lately in rebellion, and rejoice in the 
growth of peace and fraternal feeling throughout the land. 

16. The Republican party proposes to respect the rights 
reserved by the people to themselves as carefully as the 
powers delegated by them to the State and to the Federal 
Government. It disapproves of the resort to unconstitutional 
laws for the purpose of removing evils, by interference with 
rights not surrendered by the people to either the State or na- 
tional Government. 

17. It is the duty of the General Government to adopt such 
measures as may tend to encourage and restore American 
commerce and ship-building. 

18. We believe that the modest patriotism, the earnest pur- 
pose, the sound judgment, the practical wisdom, the incor- 
ruptible integrity, and the illustrious services of Ulysses S. 
Grant have commended him to the heart of the American 
people, and with him at our head we start to day upon a new 
march to victory. 

19.- Henry Wilson, nominated for the Vice- Presidency, 
known to the whole land from the early days of the great 
struggle for liberty as an indefatigable laborer in all cam- 
paigns, an incorruptible legislator and representative man of 
American institutions, is worthy to associate with our great 
leader and share the honors which we pledge our best efforts 
to bestow upon them. 



NATIONAL LIBERAL REPUBLICAN CONVENTION, 1872. 
ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The Administration now in power has rendered itself guilty 
of wanton disregard of the laws of the land, and of usurping 
powers not granted by the Constitution ; it has acted as if the 
laws had binding force only for those who are governed, and 
not for those who govern. It has thus struck a blow at the 
fundamental principles of constitutional government and the 
liberties of the citizen. 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 77 



The President of the United States has openly used the 
powers and opportunities of his high office for the promotion 
of personal ends. 

He has kept notoriously corrupt and unworthy men in 
places of power and responsibility, to the detriment of the 
public interest. 

He has used the public service of the Government as a 
machinery of corruption and personal influence, and has inter- 
fered with tyrannical arrogance in the political affairs of 
States and municipalities. 

He has rewarded with influential and lucrative offices men 
who had acquired his favor by valuable presents, thus stimu 
lating the demoralization of our political life by his conspicu- 
ous example. 

He has shown himself deplorably unequal to the task im- 
posed upon him by the necessities of the country, and culpa- 
bly careless of the responsibilities of his high office. 

The partizans of the Administration, assuming to be the 
Republican party and controlling its organization, have at- 
tempted to justify such wrongs and palliate such abuses to 
tho end of maintaining partisan ascendency. 

They have stood in the way of necessary investigations and 
indispensable reforms, pretending that no serious fault could 
be found with the present administration of public affairs, 
thus seeking to blind the eyes of the people. 

They have kept alive the passions and resentment of the 
late civil war, to use them for their own advantage , they 
have resorted to arbitrary measures in direct conflict with the 
organic law, instead of appealing to the better instincts and 
latent patriotism of the Southern people by restoring to them 
these rights, the enjoyment of which is indispensable to a 
successful administration of their local affairs, and would tend 
to revive a patriotic and hopeful natioual feeling. 

They have degraded themselves and the name of their party, 
once justly entitled to the confidence of the nation, by a base 
sycophancy to the dispenser of executive power and patron- 
age, unworthy of republican freemen ; they have sought to 
silence the voice of just criticism, and stifle the moral sense 
of the people, and to subjugate public opinion by tyrannical 
party discipline. 
They are striving to maintain themselves in authority for 



78 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 

selfish ends by an unscrupulous use of the power which right- 
fully belongs to the people, and should be employed only in 
the service of the country. 

Believing that an organization thus led and controlled can 
no longer be of service to the best interests of the Republic, 
we have resolved to make an independent appeal to the sober 
judgment, conscience, and patriotism of the American people. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

We, the Liberal Republicans of the United States, in 
National Convention assembled at Cincinnati, proclaim the 
following principles as essential to just government: 

1. We recognize the equality of all men before the law, 
and hold that it is the duty of government, in its dealings 
with the people, to mete out equal and exact justice to all, of 
whatever nativity, race, color, or persuasion, religious or 
political. 

2. We pledge ourselves to maintain the Union of these 
States, emancipation and enfranchisement, and to oppose any 
re-opening of the questions settled by the thirteenth, four- 
teenth, and fifteenth amendments of the Constitution. 

3. We demand the immediate and absolute removal of all 
disabilities imposed on account of the rebellion, which was 
finally subdued seven years ago, believing that universal am- 
nesty will result in complete pacification in all sections of 
the country. 

4. Local self-government, with impartial suffrage, will guard 
the rights of all citizens more securely than any centralized 
power. The public welfare requires the supremacy of the civil 
over the military authority, and the freedom of person under 
the protection of the habeas corpus. We demand for the indi- 
vidual the largest liberty consistent with public order, for the 
State self-government, and for the nation a return to the 
methods of peace and the constitutional limitations of power. 

5. The civil service of the Government has become a mere 
instrument of partisan tyranny and personal ambition, and an 
object of selfish greed. It is a scandal and reproach upon free 
institutions, and breeds a demoralization dangerous to the 
perpetuity of republican government. We therefore regard 
a thorough reform of the civil service as one of the most press- 
ing necessities of the hour ; that honesty, capacity, and fidelity 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 79 



constitute the only valid claims to public employment ; that 
the offices of the Government cease to be a matter of arbitrary 
favoritism and patronage, and that public station shall become 
again a post of honor. To this end it is imperatively required 
that no President shall be a candidate for re election. 

6. We demand a system of Federal taxation which shall 
not unnecessarily interfere with the industry of the people, 
and which shall provide the means necessary to pay the ex- 
penses of the Government, economically administered, the 
pensions, the interest on the public debt, and a moderate 
reduction annually of the principal thereof; and recognizing 
that there are in our midst honest but irreconcilable differ- 
ences of opinion with regard to the respective systems of 
protection and free trade, we remit the discussion of the sub- 
ject to the people in their congressional districts and the 
decision of Congress thereon, wholly free from executive inter- 
ference or dictation. 

7. The public credit must be sacredly maintained, and we 
denounce repudiation in every form and guise. 

8. A speedy return to specie payments is demanded alike 
by the highest considerations of commercial morality and 
honest government. 

9. We remember with gratitude the heroism and sacrifices 
of the soldiers and sailors of the Republic, and no act of ours 
shall ever detract from their justly earned fame or the full 
rewards of their patriotism. 

10. We are opposed to all further grants of lands to rail- 
roads or other corporations. The public domain should be 
held sacred to actual settlers. 

11. We hold that is the duty of the Government in its inter- 
course with foreign nations to cultivate the friendships of 
peace by treating with all on fair and equal terms, regarding 
it alike dishonorable either to demand what is not right or 
submit to what is wrong. 

12. For the promotion and success of these vital principles 
and the support of the candidates nominated by this conven- 
tion we invite and cordially welcome the co-operalion of all 
patriotic citizens, without regard to previous poliUcal affili- 
ations. 



80 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, 1872. 

We, the Democratic electors of the United States in Con- 
vention assembled, do present the following principles, 
already adopted at Cincinnati, as essential to just government. 

1. "We recognize the equality of all men before the law, 
and hold that it is the duty of Government in its dealings 
with the people to mete out equal and exact justice to all, of 
whatever nativity, race, color, or persuasion, religious or 
political. 

2. We pledge ourselves to maintain the union of these 
States, emancipation, and enfranchisement, and to oppose any 
re-opening of the questions settled by the thirteenth, four- 
teenth and fifteenth amendments to the Constitution. 

3. We demand the immediate and absolute removal of all 
disabilities imposed on account of the rebellion, which was 
finally subdued seven years ago, believing that universal am- 
nesty will result in complete pacification in all sections of 
the country. 

4. Local self-government, with impartial suffrage, will 
guard the rights of all citizens more securely than any cen- 
tralized power. The public welfare requires the supremacy of 
the civil over the military authority, and freedom of person 
under the protection of the habeas corpus. We demand for 
the individual the largest liberty consistent wi.h public 
order; for the State self-government, and for the nation a re- 
turn to the methods of peace and the constitutional limita- 
tions of power. 

5. The civil service of the Government has become a mere 
instrument of partisan tyranny and personal ambition, and 
an object of selfish greed. It is a scandal and reproach upon 
free institutions and breeds a demoralization dangerous to 
the perpetuity of republican government. We therefore re- 
gard a thorough reform of the civil service as one ot the most 
pressing necessities of the hour; that honesty, capacity, and 
fidelity constitute the only valid claim to public employ- 
ment; that the offices of the government cease to be a mat- 
ter of arbitrary favoritism and patronage, and that public 
6tation become again a post of honor. To this end it \s im- 
peratively required that no President shall be a candidate lor 
re-election. 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 81 

6. We demand a system of Federal taxation which shall 
not unnecessarily interfere with the industry of the people, 
and which shall provide the means necessary to pay the ex- 
penses of the Government, economically administered, the 
pensions, the interest on the public debt, and a moderate re- 
duction annually of the principal thereof; and recognizing 
that there are in our midst honest but irreconcilable differ- 
ences of opinion with regard to the respective systems of 
protection and free trade, we remit the discussion of the sub- 
ject to the people in their Congressional districts, and to the 
decision of the Congress thereon, wholly free from executive 
interference or dictation. 

7. The public credit must be sacredly maintained, and we 
denounce repudiation in every form and guise. 

8. A speedy return to specie payment is demanded alike 
by the highest considerations of commercial morality and 
honest government. 

9. We remember with gratitude the heroism and sacrifices 
of the soldiers and sailors of the Republic, and no act of ours 
shall ever detract from their justly earned fame for the full 
reward of their patriotism. 

10. We are opposed to all further grains of lands to rail- 
roads or other corporations. The public domain should be 
held sacred to actual settlers. 

11. Wo hold that it is the duty of the Government in its 
intercourse with foreign nations to cultivate the friendships 
of peace, by treating with all on fair and equal terms, regard- 
ing it alike dishonorable either to demand what is not right 
or to submit to what is wrong. 

12. For the promotion and success of these vital princi- 
ples, and the support of the candidates nominated by this 
convention, we invito and cordially welcome the co-operation 
of all patriotic citizens, without regard to previous political 
affiliations. 



NATIONAL LABOR REFORM CONVENTION, 1872. 

We bold that all political power is inherent iu the people, 
and free government founded on their authority and estab- 
lished for their benefit ; that all citizens are equal in political 

6 



POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



rights, entitled to the largest religious and political liberty 
compatible with the good order of society, as also the use and 
enjoyment of the fruits of their labor and talents ; and no man 
or set of men is entitled to exclusive separable endowments 
and privileges, or immunities from the Government, but in 
consideration of public services; and any laws destructive of 
these fundamental principles are without moral binding force, 
and should be repealed. And believing that all the evils re- 
sulting from unjust legislation now affecting the industrial 
classes can be removed by the adoption of the principle con- 
tained in the following declaration : Therefore, 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the Government to estab- 
lish a just standard of distribution of capital and labor by 
providing a purely national circulating medium, based on the 
faith and resources of the nation, issued directly to the people 
without the intervention of any system of banking corpora- 
tions, which money shall be legal tender in the payment of all 
debts, public and private, and interchangeable at the option 
of the holder for Government bonds bearing a rate of interest 
not to exceed 3-G5 per cent., subject to future legislation by 
Congress. 

2. That the national debt should be paid in good faith, ac- 
cording to the original contract, at the earliest option of the 
Government, without mortgaging the property of the people 
or the future exigencies of labor to enrich a few capitalists at 
home and abroad. 

3. That justice demands that the burden of Government 
should be so adjusted as to bear equally on all classes, and 
that the exemption from taxation of Government bonds bear- 
ing extravagant rates of interest is a violation of all just prin- 
ciples of revenue laws. 

4. That the public lands of the United States belong to the 
people and should not be sold to individuals nor granted to 
corporations, but should be held as a sacred trust for the ben- 
efit of the people, and should be granted to landless settlers 
only, in amounts not exceeding one hundred and sixty acres 
of land. 

5. That Congress should modify the tariff so as to admit 
free such articles of common use as we can neither produce 
nor grow, and lay duties for revenue mainly upon articles of 
luxury and upon such articles of manufacture as will, we hav- 



POLITICAL PLATFOKMS. 83 

ing the raw materials, assist in further developing the re- 
sources of the country. 

6. That the presence in our country of Chinese laborers, 
imported by capitalists in lr.rge numbers for servile use, is an 
evil, entailing want and its attendant train of misery and crime 
on all classes of the American people, and should be prohib- 
ited by legislation. 

7. That we ask for the enactment of a law by which all 
mechanics and day-laborers employed by or on behalf of the 
Government, whether directly or indirectly, through persons, 
firms, or corporations, contracting with the State, shall conform 
to the reduced standard of eight hours a day, recently adopted 
by Congress for national employes, and also for an amendment 
to the acts of incorporation for cities and towns by which all 
laborers and mechanics employed at their expense shall con- 
form to the same number of hours. 

8. That the enlightened spirit of the age demands the abo- 
lition of the system of contract labor in our prisons and other 
reformatory institutions. 

9. That the protection of life, liberty, and property are the 
three cardinal principles of Government, and the first two are 
more sacred than the latter; therefore money needed for 
prosecuting wars should, as it is required, be assessed and col- 
lected from the wealthy of the country, and not entailed as a 
burden on posterity. 

10. That it is the duty of the Government to exercise its 
power over railroads and telegraph corporations, that they 
shall not in any case be privileged to exact such rates of 
freight, transportation, or charges, by whatever name, as may 
bear unduly or unequally upon the producer or consumer. 

11. That there should be such a reform in the civil service 
of the national Government as will remove it beyond all part- 
isan influence, and place it in the charge and under the direc- 
tion of intelligent and competent business men. 

12. That as both history and experience teaches us that 
power ever seeks to perpetuate itself by every and all means, 
and that its prolonged possession in the hands of one person 
is always dangerous to the interests of a free people, and 
believing that the spirit of our organic laws and the stability 
and safety of our free institutions are best obeyed on the one 



84 POLITICAL PLATFORMS. 



hand, and secured on the other, by a regular constitutional 
change in the chief of the country at each election : therefore, 
we are in favor of limiting the occupancy of the presidential 
chair to one term. 

13. That we are in favor of granting general amnesty and 
restoring the Union at once on the basis of equality of rights 
and privileges to all, the impartial administration of justice 
being the only true bond of union to bind the States together 
and restore the Government of the people. 

14. That we demand the subjection of the military to the 
civil authorities, and the confinement of its operations to 
national purposes alone. 

15. That we deem it expedient for Congress to supervise 
the patent laws, so as to give labor more fully the benefit of 
its own ideas and inventions. 

16. That fitness, and not political or personal considera- 
tions, should be the cnly recommendation to public cffice, 
either appointive or elective, and any and all laws looking to 
the establishment of this principle are heartily approved. 



THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 



AN ACT to regulate the sale of intoxicating liquors; to provide against 
evils resulting from any 6ale thereof; to furnish remedies for damages 
suffered by any person in consequence of such sale; prescribing penal 
ties; to repeal all laws contravening tke provisions of this act, and 
declaring an emergency. 

[Approved February 27, 1873.] 

Section 1. Be it enacted ly the General Assembly of the 
State of Indiana, That it shall be unlawful for any person or 
persons, by himself or agent, to sell, barter, or give away for 
any purpose of gain, to any person whomsoever, any intoxi- 
cating liquors to be drunk in, upon, or about the building or 
premises where the liquor is sold, bartered, or given away, or 
in any room, building, or premises adjoining to or connected 
with the place where the liquor is sold, bartered, or given 
away for the purpose of gain, until such person or persons 
shall have obtained a permit therefor from the board of com- 
missioners of the county where he resides, as hereinafter 
provided. 

Sec. 2. Any person desiring a permit to sell intoxicating 
liquors to be drunk on the premises, shall file in the office of 
the auditor of the proper county, not less than twenty days 
before the first day of the term of any regular session of the 
board of commissioners of such county, a petition in writing, 
stating therein the building or number, street, ward or town- 
ship wherein the permission is asked to be granted, praying 
for such permit, and certifying that the applicant is a resident 
voter of such county, and a citizen of the State of Indiana, and 
that he is a proper person to have and receive such permit ; 
which petition shall be signed by the applicant, and also by a 
majority of the legal voters resident in the ward, if it be in a 

(85) 



86 THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 

city or town, if it be in an incorporated town, or township 
wherein the applicant proposes to sell intoxicating liquors ; 
such petition shall be kept on file by the auditor until the 
next ensuing regular session of the board of commissioners, 
when it shall be presented to the board for their action. The 
board shall examine such petition, and if satisfied the same is 
in proper form, and that it has been signed as hereinbefore 
required, shall direct a permit to be issued under the hand 
and seal of said auditor, and delivered to the person named in 
such permit, upon his complying with the provisions of this 
act and paying the costs of filing and recording said petition 
and costs of issuing said permit. 

Sec. 3. Before the granting of a permit by trie board of 
commissioners, the applicant shall cause to be executed and 
properly acknowledged before an officer authorized to take 
acknowledgment of deeds, a bond payable to the State of 
Indiana, in the sum of three thousand dollars, with good free- 
hold security thereon of not less than two persons, to be ap- 
proved by the board of commissioners, and conditioned for the 
payment of any and all fines, penalties and forfeitures incurred 
by reason of the violation of any of the provisions of tins act; 
and conditioned further, that the principal and sureties therein 
named shall be jointly and severally liable, and shall pay to 
any person or persons, any and all damages which shall in any 
manner be suftered by or inflicted upon any such person or 
persons, either in person or property, or means of support, by 
reason of any sale or sales of intoxicating liquors to any person, 
by the person receiving such permit or by any of his agents 
or employees. Separate suits may be brought on said bond 
by the person or persons injured, but the aggregate amount 
recovered thereon shall not exceed the said sum of three 
thousand dollars, and in case the amount of said bond shall be 
exhausted by recoveries thereon, a new bond in the same pen- 
alty and with like sureties shall be filed within ten days, and 
in default thereof said permit shall be deemed to be revoked. 
Such bond, after its approval by the board of commissioners, 
shall be filed in the office of the auditor of the county, and 
6hall be recorded by such auditor forthwith in a book prepared 
for that purpose, and shall there remain for the use of the 



THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 87 

State of Indiana, and for the use of any person or persons 
suffering any damage as hereinbefore set forth. Such bond 
may be sued and recovered upon in any court having civil 
jurisdiction in the counly (except justices' courts) by or for 
the use of any person or persons, or their legal representatives, 
who may be injured or damaged by reason of any sale or sales 
of intoxicating liquors by the person receiving the permit or 
by any of his agents or employees. The record of the bond 
or a copy thereof, duly certified by such auditor, shall be 
admissible in evidence in any suit on such bond, and shall 
have the same force and effect as the original bond would 
have if offered in evidence. 

Sec. 4. The whole number of votes cast for candidates for 
Congress at the last preceding Congressional election in the 
township, and the whole number of votes cast for councilman 
or trustee in any ward or town, at the last preceding munici- 
pal election in any city or town in which the applicant for 
permit desires to sell said intoxicating liquors, shall be 
deemed to be the whole number of legal voters of such ward, 
town or township, a majority of whose names shall be signed 
to the petition of such applicant ; and it is further provided, 
that any person not a legal voter in said ward, town or town- 
ship, who shall sign said petition, or any person who signs the 
name of any person other than himself, without the permis- 
sion previously obtained of said person to so sign his name, 
shall be fined not less than fifty nor more than one hundred 
dollars for each signature so made. 

Sec. 5. No permit, as herein provided for, shall be granted 
for a longer or shorter time than one year. It shall be the 
duty of the Auditor of the county to furnish the person to 
whom such permit is granted, a copy of the order of the Com- 
missioners granting the permit, which copy shall show in con- 
spicuous letters the date of the commencement of such 
permit, and of its expiration ; and it is further provided. 
That such copy of the order of the Commissioners, certified 
by the Auditor, shall be hungup in a conspicuous place in the 
room where said liquor is sold, where the same may at all 
times be seen and read by any person desiring so to do. 
Should any person holding a permit be convicted of a viola- 
tion of any of the provisions of this act, such conviction shall 



THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 



work a forfeiture of his permit, and of all rights thereunder; 
and no permit shall thereafter be granted to such person be- 
fore the expiration of five years from the date of such con- 
viction. 

Sec. 6. It shall be unlawful for any person, by himself, or 
agent, to sell, barter, or give intoxicating liquors to any 
minor, or to any person intoxicated, or to any person who is 
in the habit of getting intoxicated. 

Sec. 7. All places where intoxicating liquor is sold in viola- 
tion of this act, shall be taken, held, and declared to be com- 
mon nuisances; all rooms, taverns, eating-houses, bazaars, 
restaurants, drug stores, groceries, coffee-houses, cellars, or 
other places of public resort, where intoxicating liquors are 
sold in violation of this act, shall be shut up and abated as 
public nuisances, upon conviction of the keeper thereof, who 
shall be punished as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 8. Any person or persons who shall by the sale of in- 
toxicating liquor, with or without permit, cause the intoxica- 
tion, in whole or in part, of any other person, shall be liable 
for and be compelled to pay a reasonable compensation to any 
person who may take charge of and provide for such intoxi- 
cated person, for every day he or she is so cared for, which 
sum may be recovered in an action of debt before any court 
having competent jurisdiction. 

Sec. 9. It shall be unlawful for any person to get intoxica- 
ted. A person found in a state of intoxication shall upon con- 
viction thereof, be fined in the sum of five dollars. Any 
person convicted of intoxication shall be required upon the 
trial to designate the person or persons from whom the liquor 
in whole or in part was obtained. In default of so designa- 
ting such person, he or she shall in addition to the fine above 
mentioned, and as a part of his or her punishment for the 
offense, be imprisoned in the county jail not less than one 
day nor more than ten days, at the discretion of the court. 

Sec. 10. A permit granted under this act shall not author- 
ize the person so receiving it to sell intoxicating liquors on 
Sunday, nor upon the day of any State, county, township, or 
municipal election, in the township, town or city where the 
same may be held; nor upon Christmas day, nor upon the 
Fourth of July, nor upon any Thanksgiving day, nor upon any 
public holiday, nor between nine o clock P. M. and six o'clock 



THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 89 

A. m.; and any and all sales made on any such day, or after 
nine o'clock on any evening, are hereby declared to be un- 
lawful, and upon conviction thereof, the person so selling 
shall be fined not less than five dollars nor more than twenty- 
five dollars for each sale made in violation of this section. 

Sec. 11. The bartering or giving away of intoxicating li- 
quors, or other shift or device to evade the provisions of this 
act, by any person or persons keeping liquors for sale, or by 
his agent or employee, at the place where the same are kept 
for sale, shall be deemed and held to be an unlawful selling 
or giving away for the purpose of gain within the provisions 
of this act. 

Sec. 12. In addition to the remedy and right of action pro- 
vided for in section eight of this act, every husband, wife, 
child, parent, guardian, employer, or other person who shall 
be injured in person or property, or means of support, by any 
intoxicated person, or in consequence of the intoxication, 
habitual or otherwise, of any person, shall have a right of ac- 
tion in his or her name, severally or jointly, against any per- 
son or persons who shall, by selling, bartering, or giving away 
intoxicating liquors have caused the intoxication, in whole or 
in part, of such person, and any person or persons owning, 
renting, leasing or permitting the occupation of any building 
or premises, and having knowledge that intoxicating liquor is 
to be sold therein, or having leased the same for other pur- 
poses, shall knowingly permit therein the sale of intoxicating 
liquor, or who having been informed that intoxicating liquor 
is sold therein that has caused, in whole or in part, the intoxi- 
cation of any person, who shall not immediately, after being 
so informed, take legal steps in good faith to dispossess said 
tenant or lessee, shall be liable jointly with the person selling, 
bartering or giving away intoxicating liquor as aforesaid, to 
any person or persons injured, for all damages, and for exem- 
plary damages ; Provided, however, that execution on any 
such judgment shall first be levied on the property of the per- 
son selling, bartering or giving away such liquor, and in the 
event of a failure or insufficiency of such property to satisfy 
the judgment, then of the property of the other defendants, 
A married woman shall have the same right to bring suit and 
to control the same, and the ammount recovered as a femme 
sole, and all damages recovered by a minor under this act 



90 THE BAXTER LIQUOK LAW. 

shall be paid either to such minor or to his or her parent, 
guardian or next friend, as the court shall direct. The unlaw- 
ful sale or giving away of intoxicating liquor shall work a for- 
feiture of all rights of the lessee or tenant under any lease or 
contract of rent, upon the premises where such unlawful sale, 
bartering or giving away shall take place. All suits for dam- 
ages under this act may be by any appropriate action in any 
of the courts in this State having competent jurisdiction. 
All judgments recovered under the provisions of this act may 
be enforced without any relief or benefit from the valuation 
or appraisement laws. 

Sec. 13. In all cases where husband, wife, parent, child or 
guardian shall have a right of action as provided in section 
twelve of this act, and shall fail or refuse to prosecute the 
same, and in all cases where such intoxicated person has 
neither husband, wife, parent, child or guardian, the township 
trustee or other officer having charge of the poor of the town- 
ship where such intoxicated person resides, shall have a right 
of action as provided in said section twelve, and it is hereby 
made the duty of such officer to prosecute all such actions in 
the name of such township. All money collected upon such 
judgments, after deducting therefrom all costs and charges 
against such township occasioned thereby, shall be paid by 
the township trustee, or other officer, into the treasury of the 
county for the benefit of the poor of such county; provided 
that the name of any husband, wife, parent, child or guardian, 
upon proper petition therefore before final judgment, may be 
substituted for the name of the township, but such person so 
substituted shall have no power to dismiss such action, or 
compromise the same in any manner, except by permission of 
the court. 

Sec. 14. For every violation of the provisions of the first 
and sixth sections of this act, the person so offending shall 
forfeit and pay a fine of not less than ten dollars nor more than 
fifty dollars, or be imprisoned in the jail of the county not 
less than ten nor more than thirty days. For every violation 
of the provisions of the seventh section of this act, any per- 
son convicted as the keeper of any of the places therein de- 
clared to be nuisances, shall forfeit and pay a fine of not less 
than twenty nor more than fifty dollars, and such place or 
places, so kept by such person so convicted, shall be shut up 



THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 91 

and abated as a common nuisance by the order of the court 
before which such conviction may be had as a further punish- 
ment, and such order shall be a part of the judgment of con- 
viction. 

Sec. 15. For the payment of all fines, costs and damages 
assessed or adjudged against any person or persons in conse- 
quence of the sale of intoxicating liquors as provided for in 
this act, the real estate and personal property of such person 
or persons, of every kind, shall be liable, and such fines, costs 
and damages shall be a lien upon such real estate until paid. 

Sec. 16. The penalties and provisions made in the four- 
teenth section of this act may be enforced by indictment in 
any court of record having criminal jurisdiction; and all pecu- 
niary fines or penalties provided for in any of the sections of 
this act, except the eighth and twelfth, may be enforced and 
prosecuted for before any justice of the peace of the proper 
county, in an action of debt, in the name of the State of In- 
diana as plaintiff; and in case of conviction, the offender 
shall stand committed to the jail of the county until judg- 
ment and costs are fully paid, and the magistrate or court in 
which the conviction is had, shall issue a writ of capias ad 
satisfaciendum therefor. Justices of the peace shall have 
jurisdiction of all actions arising under the eighth and 
twelfth sections of this act, when the amount in controversy 
does not exceed two hundred dollars, such actions to be pros-, 
ecuted in the name of the party injured or entitled to the 
debt or damages provided for in said eighth and twelfth sec- 
tions. 

Sec. 17. It shall be unlawful for any person to buy for or 
furnish to any person who is at the time intoxicated, or in 
the habit of getting intoxicated, or to buy for or furnish to 
any minor, to be drunk by such minor, any intoxicating liquor. 
Any person or persons violating this section shall be fined not 
less than five dollars nor more than fifty dollars. 

Sec. 18. In all prosecutions under this act, by indictment 
or otherwise, it shall not be necessary to state the kind of 
liquor sold, or to describe the place where sold, and it shall 
not be necessary to state the name of the person to whom 
6old. In all cases, the person or persons to whom intoxica- 
ting liquors shall be sold in violation of this act, shall be com- 



92 THE BAXTER LIQUOR LAW. 

petent witnesses to prove such facts or any others tending 
thereto. 

Sec. 19. The following form of complaint shall be sufficient 
in criminal proceedings before justices of the peace or mayors, 
under this act when applicable, but may be varied to suit the 
nature of the case, namely : 

State op Indiana, County, ss. Before me, A. 

B., a justice of the peace of said county, (or mayor of, &c, as 
the case may be), personally came C. D., who, being duly 
sworn according to law, deposeth and saith that on or about 
the day of , in the year , at the 

county aforesaid, E. F. did sell intoxicating liquors to one G. 
H. to be drunk in the place where sold, (or to G. H., a minor, 
&c.,) or to a person intoxicated, or in the habit of getting in- 
toxicated, as the case may be, where intoxicating liquors are 
sold in violation of law, and further saith not. 

(Signed) C. D. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this day of 

A.D., 

Sec. 20. All laws and parts of laws conflicting with this 
act, or with any of the provisions of this act, be and the same 
are hereby repealed ; but nothing in this act shall be so con- 
strued as to prohibit the common councils of cities and the 
boards of trustees of incorporated towns, from demanding and 
enforcing a fee for permit, from all keepers of coffee houses, 
saloons, or other places where intoxicating liquor is sold and 
drunk within the limits of their respective corporations. 

Sec. 21. It is hereby declared that an emergeny exists for 
the immediate taking effect of this act, it shall, therefore, be 
in force from and after its passage, except in so far as relates 
to those who hold a license under the existing laws of the 
State. This act shall apply to such as now have license imme- 
diately after the expiration thereof. 



GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



-:o:- 



" It is not easy to give an accurate and comprehensive defi- 
nition of the science of geology. It is, indeed, not so much 
one science, as the application of all the physical sciences to 
the examination of the structure of the earth, the investiga- 
tion of the processes concerned in the production of that 
structure, and the history of their action. That this large 
view of geology is not only a true but a necessary one, is 
shown by the fact, that it was not until considerable advances 
had been made in all the physical sciences which relate di- 
rectly to the earth, that geology could begin to exist in any 
worthy form. It was not until the chemist was able to explain 
the nature of the mineral substances of which rocks are com- 
posed ; not till the geographer and meteorologist had explored 
the surface of the earth, and taught us the extent of land and 
water, and the powers of winds, currents, rains, glaciers, earth- 
quakes and volcanoes ; not until the naturalist had classified, 
named, aod described the greater part of existing animals and 
plants, and explained their anatomical structure, and the laws 
of their distribution in space;— that the geologist could, with 
any chance of arriving at sure and definite results, commence 
his researches into the structure and composition of rocks and 
the causes which produced them, or utilize his discoveries of 
the remains of animals and plants that are inclosed in them. 
He could not until then discriminate with certainty batween 
igneous and aqueous rocks, between living and extinct ani- 
mals, and was, therefore, unable to lay down any one of the foun- 
dations on which his own science was to rest." — Encyclopedia 
Britannica, Sih edition, vol. xv. 

If there is any one fact which the study of geology teaches 
more unmistakably than another, it is, that the matter com- 
posing the crust of the earth, from the time when it was first 
called into existence by the Hat of the Creator to the present, 
has been subjected to an endless cycle of mutations. There 

(93) 



94 GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



may have been periods of comparative rest and quiescen- e, 
but none of perfect stagnation and stability ; so that the pres- 
ent condition and configuration of the earth's surface may be 
considered as the last result of a series of cosmical changes, 
which commenced with the dawn of creation, and are con- 
tinuing on into the future. 

"Had the exterior crust of the earth been subjected to no 
modifying causes, the world would have presented the same 
appearance now as at the time of its creation. The distribu- 
tion of land and sea would have remained the same ; there 
would have been the same surface arrangement of hill, valley 
and plain, and the same unvarying aspects of animal and veg- 
etable existence. Under such circumstances, geology, instead 
of striving to present a consecutive history of change and 
progress, would have been limited to a mere description of 
permanently enduring appearances. The case, however, is 
widely different." There is no part of the present land-surface 
of the globe which has not at some time been covered by the 
ocean, while much of the present sea bottom has been in turn 
dry land. Many of the loftiest and most extensive ranges of 
mountains upon the globe — the Alps, the Andes, and the 
Himalayas — are of comparatively recent elevation (recent as 
compared with the White Mountains of New England, or the 
Appalachian chain of the Atlantic States); while the com- 
mencement of the existence of every animal and vegetable 
species at present found upon the earth was long subsequent 
to the existence of the myriad organisms, whose remains are 
now found fossil beneath its surface. 

The agencies which have produced, and are still tending to 
produce, changes in the constitution and structure of our 
planet, may be classified as follows : 1. Igneous agencies, or 
such as manifest themselves in connection with some deep- 
seated source of heat in the interior of the globe. 2. Aque- 
ous, or those arising from the action of the water. 3. Atmos- 
pheric, or those operating through the medium of the atmos- 
phere. 4. Organic, or those depending on animal and 
vegetable growth. 5. Chemical, or those resulting from the 
chemical action of substances on each other. — Wells 1 Illus- 
trated Geology. 



GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 95 



THE TEMPERATURE OF THE EARTH. 

The following are some of the observations made most re- 
cently on this subject: In England, observations have beeD 
made in the vertical shafts of two very deep coal mines, viz., 
at Monkwearmouth, which is 1800 feet deep, and Dunkinfield r 
which is upwards of 2000 feet deep, and in both cases the ob- 
servations were made while the workmen were sinking the 
shafts, and with every precaution against the influence of any 
extraneous causes. The former gave an increase of 1 deg. of 
Fahrenheit for every sixty feet of depth, and the latter 1 deg. 
for about every seventy feet. The artesian well of Grenelle 
(Paris), is 1800 feet deep; observations made by Arago, during 
the boring, showed that the average increase of temperature 
in this was 1 deg. for sixty feet. At MordoriF, Luxemburg, the 
depth of the artesian well is 2400 feet, and the increase in 
temperature 1 deg. for every fifty-seven feet. At the artesian 
well of New Seltzwork, in Westphalia, the depth is 2100 feet,, 
and the increase 1 deg. for every fifty-five feet. At Louisville, 
Ky.,the depth of an artesian well, finished in 1859, is 2086 feet 
deep, and the average increase is 1 deg. for every sixty-seven 
feet below the first ninety feet from the surface. In the silver 
mine of Guanaxato, Mexico, 1713 feet deep, the increase is 1 
deg. for every forty-five feet. In the coal mines of Eastern 
Virginia, the increase is about 1 deg. for every sixty feet. 

VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS. 

One or two remarkable instances of volcanic eruptions may 
be briefly noticed. First, for duration and force we may refer 
to that which took place in the island of Sumbawa (one of the 
Bunda Islands lying east of Java), in the year 1815. It com- 
menced on the 5th of April, and did not entirely cease until 
July. Its influence (i. e. shocks, and the noise of the explo- 
sions) was perceptible over an area 1,800 miles in diameter,, 
while within the range of its more immediate vicinity, embrac- 
ing a space of 400 miles, its effects were most terrific. In Java, 
300 miles distant, it seemed to be awfully present. The sky 
was overcast at noon day with clouds of ashes, which the light 
of the sun was unable to penetrate, and fields, streets, and 
houses were covered with ashes to the depth of several inches. 
At Sumbawa itself, .immense columns of flame appeared to 
burst forth from the top of the volcano, Tombora, and in a 



96 GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



6hort time the whole mountain appeared like a mass of liquid 
fire, which gradually extended in every direction. As the 
eruption continued, a darkness supervened, so profound as to 
obscure even the light of the flames; showers of stones and 
ashes fell continuously over the whole island ; the sea rose 
twelve feet higher than it had ever been known to do before; 
and finally a whirlwind ensued, which tore up the largest trees, 
and carried them into the air, together with men, horses, cat- 
tle, and whatever else came within its influence. Of 12,000 
inhabitants in the vicinity only six are believed to have es- 
caped, and of some entire villages not even a vestige remained. 
In 1772, the Papandayang, one of the loftiest volcanic moun- 
tains in Java, after a short but severe eruption, suddenly fell 
in and disappeared in the earth, carrying with it about ninety 
square miles of territory. Forty villages were engulfed, or 
covered with ejected matter, at the same time, and nearly 
3,000 persons perished. — Weils* Illustrated Geology- 

DESCRIPTIONS OF AN EARTHQUAKE. 

"A powerful eatbquake," says Mr. Darwin, "at once destroys 
the oldest associations ; tho world, the very emblem of all that 
is solid, has moved beneath our feet like a crust over a fluid; 
one second of time has conveyed to the mind a strange idea of 
insecurity, which hours of reflection would never have created." 

"To man," says Ilumbolt, "the earthquake conveys an idea 
of some universal and unlimited <langer. We may flee-from 
the crater of a volcano in active eruption, or from a locality 
threatened by the approach of a lava stream; but in an earth- 
quake, direct our flight whithersoever we will, we still feel as 
though we trod upon the very focus of destruction. Every 
sound — the faintest motion in the air — arrests our attention, 
and we no longer trust the ground on which we stand. Ani- 
mals, especially dogs and swine, participate in the same anxious 
disquietude ; and even crocodiles, in the rivers of South Amer- 
ica, which at other times are dumb, have been observed to 
quit the water and run, with loud cries, into the adjacent 
forests." 

AQUEOUS AND ATMOSPHERIC AGENCIES. 

The aqueous and atmospheric agencies most prominently 
concerned in producing geological changes, are rains, and the 



GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 97 



gasses and moisture of the atmosphere, winds, ice, and snow, 
springs, rivers, waves, tides, and oceanic currents. 

The operation of water, acting mechanically, is, under all 
circumstances, to wear down the higher portions of the earth's 
crust, and transport the materials to lower localities — an ac- 
tion which obviously tends to reduce the whole surface to a 
smooth and uniform level. On the other hand, the operations 
of igneous agents — volcanoes, earthquakes, etc. — by breaking 
up and elevating the crust of the earth, tend to counteract the 
equalizing action of water and to produce that diversity of- 
surface which is indispensable to variety in both the vegetable 
and animal kingdoms. These two forees, therefore — the aque- 
ous and the igneous — may be considered as antagonistic to 
each other, and to them may be ascribed the principal modifi- 
cations which have taken place, and are still taking place, in 
the crust of the globe. — WeWs Illustrated Geology 

CORAL REEFS. 

"The ocean," says Mr. Darwin, ''throwing its breakers on 
the outer shore, appears an invincible enemy, yet we see it re- 
sisted, and even conquered, by means which at first seem weak 
and inefficient. No periods of repose are granted, and the 
heavy swell caused by J he steady action of the trade wind 
never ceases. The breakers exceed in violence those of our 
temperate regions ; and it is impossible to behold ihem with- 
out feeling a conviction that rocks of granite or quartz would 
ultimately be demolished by such irresistable iorces. Yet 
these low coral islands stand and are victorious, for here 
another power, antagonistic to the former, takes part in the 
contest. The organic forces separate the atoms of carbonate 
of lime, one by one, from the foaming breakers, and unite 
them into a symmetrical structure ; myriads of architects are 
at work day and night, month after rnomh, and we see their 
soft and gelatinous bodies, through the agency of the vital 
laws, conquering the great mechanical power of the waves of 
the ocean, which neither the art of man nor the mechanical 
works of nature could successfully resist." The animals which 
produce coral are very simple, and resemble plants both in 
their figures and colors. 
7 



93 GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



THE FIEST FORMED STRATIFIED ROCKS. 

The adoption of the theory, that our earth was once in a 
state of entire molten fluidity, involves the existence of a sub- 
sequent period, when its primeval crust had sufficiently cooled 
down to allow of the condensation of watery vapor and of the 
existence of a sea upon its surface. Whenever this happened, 
the eroding and destructive action of water must have imme- 
diately manifested itself, while the particles of the consolida- 
ted igneous crust, worn off by the action of waves, tides, and 
currents, and deposited as sediments, would naturally produce 
stratified formations. 

The internal heat of the earth at that period, however, must 
have continued to act with great intensity near the surface, 
and the strata first deposited, consequently, were, in all prob- 
ability, soon greatly metamorphosed, i. 0., remelted dowp to 
form igneous rocks, or converted into hard crystalline .semi- 
igneous rocks, that retained, in part, their original lines of 
stratification. 

Whether any of these first formed stratified rocks are in ex- 
istence, and open to our inspection, it is impossible to affirm. 
Some geologists incline to the opinion that thej were entirely 
remelted, and are now represented by the older or funda- 
mental granites, which, in some instances, appear to have an 
obscurely stratified structure. 

Be this as it may, it is, however, a matter of fact, that the 
oldest rocks of which wa have any knowledge, which exhibit 
evidence of a sedimentary origin, appear to have been formed 
under conditions analogous to those above supposed. Thus, 
they are all more or less crystalline and indurated ; their lines 
of stratification are indistinct, and often altogether oblitera- 
ted; and their whole aspect is very different from what is 
usually ascribed to rocks deposited in water. — Wells' Illustra- 
ted Geology. 

FORMATION OF COAL. 

It is now universally admitted by geologists, that coal is a 
mass of compressed, altered, and mineralized vegetation, just 
as sandstone is consolidated sand, and the slate and shale con. 
solidated clay or mud. 

The evidence upon which the belief is founded may be 
briefly stated, as follows : 

1st. The enormous profusion of fossil plants, in the form of 



GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



impressions of leaves, trunks, branches, and barks of trees, 
found in immediate connection with coal seams. 2d. Coal is 
composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, the same ele- 
ments (though differing in proportion) which enter into the 
composition of plants. 3d. The substance of coal, when ex- 
amined under the microscope, affords unmistakable evidence 
of a vegetable (cellular) structure. 4th. All the stages of 
gradation between perfect wood and perfect coal may be 
traced with the greatest certainty. 

But granting the vegetable origin of coal, the question im- 
mediately suggests itself: Under what circumstances could 
so great an amount of vegetable matter have ever accumu- 
lated ? — the magnitude of which may be realized in a degree, 
from the asserted fact " that all the forests of the United 
States, if gathered into one heap, would fail to furnish the ma- 
terials of a single coal seam equal to that of Pittsburg, Penn." 

Furthermore, coal is found stratified, laminated, and ex- 
tended, in horizontal beds, which often cover very large areas, 
with a nearly constant thickness — the great Pittsburg coal 
seam, above referred to for example, having a nearly uniform 
thickness of from eight to twelve feet, and is estimated to 
have once covered a surface of 90,000 square miles. Coal, 
moreover, is ordinarily encased between beds of shale or 
sandstone, which bear evident proof of having been slowly 
deposited in quiet waters. In some coal fields, as many as 
seventy seams of coal, varying in thickness from a few inches 
to four, six, eight, ten, twelve, and twenty feet, occur thus in- 
terstratified with shales and sandstones ; and yet, notwith- 
standing these frequent alternations of material, the purity of 
the coal is such, that it rarely contains any considerable ad- 
mixture of mud, sand, or other foreign mineral substances. 

In explanation of these phenomena, various hypotheses 
have been suggested, but the general opinion of the best ge- 
ologists of the present day is, that the vegetable matter con- 
stituting coal, must, in the main, have grown and accumu- 
lated in immense jungles and peat mosses for many years ; 
that the land must have then sunk, and become the basin of a 
lake or estuary, into which rivers carried mud and sand ; these 
covering the vegetable matter, gradually consolidated into 
shales and sandstones, while the vegetable matter itself un- 
derwent the process of mineralization, and was converted into 



100 GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



coal. This being done, it is supposed that the area of deposit 
was again elevated, so as to become once more the scene of 
luxuriant v°getation ; then again submerged, and overlaid by- 
new depr A sandstone and shale ; then once more elevated 
and cov with plants, and again submerged; and these al- 

ternaf of submergence and elevations are presumed to 

have ax place as often as there are beds of coal in any par* 
ticular coal field. — WelVs Illustrated Geology. 

CLIMATIC CONDITIONS OF THE CARBONIFEROUS ERA. 

There is one circumstance in connection with the formation 
of coal which has given rise to a vast amount of ingenious 
speculation and hypotheses, viz : the apparent sameness of 
external conditions over such extensive areas of the earth as 
are now occupied by our known coal fields. Thus, the same 
gigantic ferns and club-mosses are found alike in the coal 
fields of America, Europe, Melville Island, Greenland, and 
Australia — regions widely separated, and at once tropical, 
temperate, and frigid. To acffount for this luxuriance and 
homogeneity of vegetable growth various causes have been 
suggested, as the earth's central heat, a change in the earth's 
axis, a larger percentage of carbonic acid in the atmosphere, 
the planetary system moving through warmer regions of space^ 
and the like ; but thus far geologists have arrived at no definite 
conclusions on the subject. 

Deposits of carbonaceous matter have occurred at almost 
every period of the earth's historv, as is evidenced by the fact 
that thin seams of coal are found in almost all the geological 
systems ; but the coal beds which admit of economical work- 
ing are almost exclusively confined to the carboniferous sys- 
tem. The only exceptions are a few coal fields belonging to 
the Oolitic or Jurassic system, which, in Virginia and some 
other localities, admit of profitable mining. It seems, there- 
fore, certain, that whatever may have been the conditions 
which allowed of so abundant a terrestrial vegetation at this 
particular epoch of the earth's history, those conditions ceased 
about the time when the era of the Carboniferous system ter- 
minated. A high temperature was evidently not one of these 
conditions, for there are evidences of it afterwards ; and some 
authorities incline to the belief that the superabundance of 
carbonic acid gas, which is supposed to have existed during 



GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



this era, was expended before its close. "There can be no 
doubt that the infusion of a large amount of this gas into the 
atmosphere at the present day would be attended by precisely 
the same circumstances as in the time of the coal epoch. The 
higher forms of animal life would not have a place on earth. 
Vegetation would be enormous; and coal strata would be 
formed from the vast accumulations of woody matter, which 
would gather in every favorable locality." 

DISTRIBUTION OF COAL. 

Coal is very widely distributed over the world, although 
some countries are more highly favored than others. Avail- 
able coal fields occur in Great Britain ; in Spain, France, Bel- 
gium and Middle Europe; in India, China and Japan ; in the 
islands of the Indian Archipelago ; in Australia and New 
Zealand ; in South America, Chili and Peru ; in Greenland, 
Melville Island and in British America. But nowhere is the 
coal formation more extensively displayed than in the United 
States, and nowhere are its beds of greater thickness, more 
convenient for working, or of more valuable quality. 

The eastern half of the continent of North America exhibits 
five great coal fields, extending from Newfoundland to Arkan- 
sas : 1. The first, or most eastern, is that of the British Prov- 
inces, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick. Its 
area is probably about 9,000 square miles, though only one 
tenth of this surface appears to be underlaid by productive 
coal seams. 2. The second, or Great Appalachian coal field, 
extends from Pennsylvania and Ohio to near Tuscaloosa, in 
the interior of Alabama. It is about 875 miles long, and is es- 
timated to contain 70,000 square miles. 3. A third, and 
smaller coal field, occupies the center of the State of Michi- 
gan ; it covers an area of about 15,000 square miles, but is not 
very productive. 4. A fourth great coal field is situated in 
the States of Kentucky, Indiana and Illionois. Its area is es- 
timated at 50,000 square miles. 5. The fifth, and most western, 
occurs in Iowa, Missouri and Arkansas, and occupies an area 
of about 57,000 square miles. Besides these great deposits, 
coal is also found in New England, Kansas, Nebraska, and 
Texas. 

The aggregate space underlaid by the coal fields of North 
America amounts to at least 200,000 square miles, or to more 



102 GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 



than twenty times the area which includes all the known coal 
deposits of Europe. — Wells* Geology. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

The number of species of animals that now inhabit the globe 
is about 250,000. The number of fossil species of animals and 
plants cannot be reliably estimated, but it is safe to say that 
the number of the different extinct species that have been 
found in fossil state exceeds many times the number of all the 
different species now living. 

Geologists claim four distinct periods or ages of the earth's 
history. Beginning at the oldest, they are called or named, 
First, the Azoic period, or period deficient of the evidence 
of life ; Second, Paleozoic, or period of ancient life ; Third, the 
Mesozoic, or period of middle life ; Fourth > or last period, 
called Cainozoic. This period includes the Post Tertiary, or 
recent system of rocks or period of recent life. 

A picture of the Azoic period has thus been imagined by 
Hugh Miller. "During the early part of the Azoic period we 
may imagine," he says, " a dark atmosphere of steam and va- 
por, which, for age after age conceals the face of the sun, and 
through which the moon or stars never penetrates; oceans of 
thermal waters, heated in a thousand centers to the boiling 
point ; low, half molten islands, dim through the fog and scarce 
more fixed than waves themselves, that heave and tremble 
under the impulsions of the igneous agencies ; roaring geysers 
that ever and anon throw up their intermittent jets of boiling 
fluid, vapor and thick steam, from these tremulous lands ; and 
in the dim outskirts of the scene, the red gleam of fire shot 
forth from yawning cracks and deep chasms. Such would 
be the probable state of things among the times of the earlier 
gneiss and mica-chist deposits — times buried deep in that 
chaotic night which must have continued to exist for, may 
hap, many ages after that beginning of things in which God 
created the heavens and the earth." 

At length, however, as the earth's surface gradually cooled 
down and the enveloping waters sunk to a lower temperature, 
let us suppose during the latter times of the mica-schist and 
the earlier times of the clay slate, the steam atmosphere would 
become less dense and thick, and finally the rays of the sun 
would struggle through it ; at first doubtful and diffused, form- 



GEOLOGICAL ITEMS. 108 



ing a faint twilight, but gradually strengthening, as the later 
ages of the slate formation passed away, until at the close of 
the great primary period day and night — the one still dim and 
grey, the other wrapped in the pall of darkness — would suc- 
ceed each other as now, as the earth revolved on its axis. 

The number of active volcanoes on our globe are about 275 
Humboldt suggests the idea that volcanoes are merely venta 
located above some far extended subterranean crack or fissure 
in the crust of the earth, through which the molten matter of 
the interior escapes to the surface. 

The falls of Niagara are 150 feet in height, and the average 
amount of water passing over each minute is estimated at 
670,000 tons. This water, by its abrading power, has undoubtr 
edly excavated for itself the gorge or channel — seven miles 
long, 200 feet deep, and 1,200 to 2,000 feet wide— which now 
intervenes between the falls and Lake Ontario. The minimum 
time required to wear through this space has been estimated 
by Sir Charles Lyell, at 35,000 years.— WelVs Illustrated Geol. 

STRATIFIED ROCKS. 

The stratified rocks of Great Britain have been studied more 
than any other of the earth, and as the result of these investi- 
gations it has been found that the extinct mammalia, found in 
fossiliferous rocks, is more numerous by half than all the 
species now existing; and of molluscs, the fossil species nine 
times as numerous as the living species ; the fossil fish five 
times, the reptiles ten times, and the radiate fourteen times. 

The geologist finds no trace of that golden age of the world 
of which the poets delighted to sing, when all creatures lived 
together in peace, and wars and bloodshed were unknown. 
Ever since animal life began on our planet, there existed, in 
all departments of being, carniverous classes, who could not 
live but by the death of their neighbors ; and who were armed, 
in consequence, for their destruction, like the butcher with 
his axe and knife, and the angler with his hook and spear. 

In Europe, the caverns or caves that have been discovered, 
have contained the remains or skeletons of a great many of 
the different species of animals that now inhabit the earth, 
and of others that are now extinct. For instance, the bones 
and skeletons of the mammoth are found in great numbers; 
also of the mastadon, the epoch of the mastadon, in .a geolog- 
ical sense, is very recent. Some think that the mammoths 
and mastadons did not become entirely extinct in this country 
until after the advent of man. Sir Charles Lyell is of the 
opinion that the period of the extinction of the mastadon, 
although recent, must have been many thousand years ago. 



PHILOSOPHY. 



No two particles of matter can occupy the same space at the 
same time. 

All bodies weigh heaviest at the earth's surface. A body 
that weighs 10 pounds at the earth's surface will weigh but 
2% pounds 4,000 miles high. 

Take two cog-wheels of the same size; let one stand still 
put the cogs together and put the other in motion, and when 
it has made one-half revolution around the standing wheel it 
will have made a full revolution on its own center, notwith- 
standing only one-half of the cogs of its own surface has 
touched the standing wheel. 

The atmosphere is the lightest in wet, rainy weather ; yet 
we find people very often who think different. The medium 
pressure of the atmosphere is about fifteen pounds to the 
square inch, but this is not always the case. Tlie pressure 
will vary in the same locality, and sometimes be greater or 
less. The medium bight that atmospheric pressure will raise 
water is about 33 feet; but this calculation only holds good at 
the level of the sea, because as we ascend from the sea level 
the pressure becomes less; hence, our calculations for raising 
water by atmospheric pressure must be governed by the pres- 
sure that atmosphere has at the hight of the position above 
the sea level. Illustration : At sea level atmospheric pressure 
fifteen pounds to the square inch ; one mile above sea level, 
about 12£ pounds ; two miles above, 10 pounds ; three miles, 
7J pounds ; consequently, on an elevation three miles high, 
water cannot be raised but about 1G£ feet by the weight of 
the air. 

The top or upper part of a wagon wheel passes through a 
greater amount of space in a given time when running than 
the bottom ; or, in other words, runs the fastest. 

(104) 



PHILOSOPHY. 105 



The piston rod of a steam engine make3 two complete stops at 
ever} T revolution of the crank attached to the end of the pitman. 

Horse Power. — The average power of a horse is sufficient to 
raise a weight of about 23,000 pounds one foot per minute, but 
when calculating the horse power of a steam engine it is esti- 
tmated at 33,000 pounds. It then follows that a ten horse 
powers team engine is, in fact, about equal to fourteen average 
horses. 

Power of Steam. — One cubic foot of water converted iuto 
steam will raise the enormous weight of three and a half mil- 
lion pounds one foot, or seven hundred pounds one. mile high. 

All bodies or particles of matter fall to the eath by the at- 
traction of gravity, and their speed is in proportion to their 
density ; but take away the resisting force of the atmosphere, 
then a cork or feather will fall as fast as a bullet. 

Resultant motion may be illustrated by holding a ball or 
weight in your hand and dropping it from the top of your head 
while running, you will find that you cannot run fast enough 
to overtake the ball before it strikes the ground. 

A ball may be shot from a cannon from the top of a tower 
on a horizontal plain, and another dropped from the mouth of 
the cannon at the same time, and they will both strike the 
earth at the same time, provided the surface be horizontal 
with the cannon. , 

Lever power is almost indispensable, or in other words, 
without it we could scarcely do anything; yet to take in con- 
sideration distance and speed, there is not a particle of power 
gained by a lever. Illustration : Suppose a lever 20 feet long, 
the fulcrum 2 feet from one end of the lever, 10 pounds on the 
long end of the lever is equal to 100 pounds on the short end ; 
but to raise the J 00 pounds one foot the ten pounds passes 
through 10 feet of space, consequently it travels ten times as 
fast as the 100 pounds, so all that is gained in power is lost in 
speed and distance ; because if both ends of the lever was of 
the same length while one end of the lever was passing 
through ten feet of space the other end would pass through 
the same ten feet ; and ten pounds would raise ten pounds ten 
feet high, or ten times as high as the ten pounds on the long 
end of the lever would raise the 100 pounds on the short end. 



SKETCHES OF ASTRONOMY. 



-jo;- 



OBIGHS" OF THE SOLAE SYSTEM. 

Many theories have been propounded at different periods 
of the history of astronomy, respecting the original formation 
of our Solar System, as well as all other suns and systems, 
which it has pleased the great creator of all things to call 
into existence, but no one has gained so great favor or excited 
so violent opposition, as the theory first proposed by Sir Wil- 
liam Herschel, and afterwards more especially applied by the 
celebrated La Place to the formation of the solar system. 

This theory may be thus stated :— In the beginning all the 
matter composing the sun, planets, and satellites was diffused 
through space, in a state of exceedingly minute division, the 
ultimate particles being held asunder by the repulsion of 
heat. In process of time, under the action of gravitation, tin 
mass assumed a round or globular shape, and the particles 
tending to the centre of gravity, a motion of rotation on an 
axis would commence. The gi?eat mass, now gradually cool- 
ing and condensing, must increase its rotary motion, thereby 
increasing the centrifugal force at the equator of the revolv- 
ing mass, until, finally, a ring of matter is actually detached 
from the equator, and is left revolving in space by the shrink- 
ing away from it, of the interior mass. If now we follow this 
isolated ring of matter, we find every reason to believe that 
its particles will gradually coalesce into a globular form, and 
in turn form satellites, as it was itself formed. It is unneces- 
sary to pursue the reasoning further, for the same laws which 
produce one planet from the equator of the central revolving 
mass, may produce many — until finally, the process is ended 
by a partial solidification of the central mass, so great, that 
gravity aided by the attraction of cohesion, is more than suf 
ficient to resist the action of the centrifugal force, and no fur 
ther cha?nge occurs. 

(106) 



SKETCHES OP ASTRONOMY. 107 

It has been urged in favor of this theory, that it accounts 
for the striking peculiarities which are found in the organiza- 
tion of the solar system. That the rings of Saturn are positive 
proofs of the truth of the theory, they having cooled and con- 
densed without breaking. That the individuals constituting 
a system thus produced, must revolve and rotate as do the 
planets and satellites, and in orbits of the precise figure and 
position, as those occupied by the planets. It accounts for 
the rotation of the sun on its axis, and presents a solution of 
the strange appearance connected with the sun called the 
Zodiacal Light. It goes further and accounts for the forma- 
tion of single, double, and multiple suns and stars — and by the 
remains of chaotic matter in the interstics between the stars, 
and which are finally drawn to some particular sun, whose in- 
fluence in the end preponderates, accounts for the comets 
which enter our system from every region in space. 

In support of this theory it has been urged that the comets, 
in their organization, presents us with specimens of this finely 
divided nebulous or chaotic matter — and that the telescope 
reveals cloudy patches of light of indefinite extent, scattered 
throughout space, which give evidence of being yet unformed 
and chaotic. That many stars are found in which the bright 
nucleus or centre is surrounded by a halo or haze of nebulous 
light, and that round nebulous bodies are seen with the teles- 
cope, of an extent vastly greater than would fill the entire 
space encircled by the enormous orbit of the planet La 
Verrier, or having a diameter greater than 7,000 millions of 
miles. 

Such are a few of the arguments in support of this most ex- 
traordinary theory. We now present the objections which 
have been most strongly insisted on. The retrogade motions 
of the satellites of Herschel, and their great inclination to 
the plane of the ecliptic can not be accounted for by this 
theory. That computation shows that no atmosphere of con- 
densed nebulous matter can extend to so great a distance from 
the sun, as does the matter composing the Zodiacal Light, and, 
finally, that the nebulous matter in the heavens will ulti- 
mately be resolved into immense congeries and clusters of 
stars, whose great distance has hitherto defied the power of 
the best instruments. 

In reply to the first objection, the friends of the theory doubt 



J 08 SKETCHES OP ASTRONOMY. 

the facts with reference to the satellites of Herschel. They 
reply that the matter composing the Zodiacal Light being in 
the nature of cometary matter, is thrown to a greater distance 
from the sun than gravity would warrant, by that power resid- 
ing in the sun which is able on the approach of comets to 
project those enormous trains of light, which sometimes render 
them so wonderful. As to the last objection, it is urged that 
although many nebulas will doubtless be resolved into stars, 
by using more powerful telescopes, yet that these same teles- 
copes will reveal more new nebulae which cannot be resolved, 
than they will resolve — and as to the existence of nebulous 
matter, it is perfectly demonstrated by the physical organiza- 
tion of comets, and the existence of nebulous stars. 

Such was the state of the Astronomical argument, when 
Lord Rosse's Great Reflector was first applied to the explora- 
tion of the distant regions of space. In a religious point of 
view, this theory had excited no small amount of discussion, 
in consequence of its supposed Atheistical tendencies. The 
friends of the theory contend that it was no more Atheistical 
to admit the formation of the universe bylaw, than to acknowl- 
edge that it is now sustained by laws. Indeed since we must 
go to the first great cause for matter in its chaotic state, as 
well as for the laws which govern matter, that this theory gave 
to us a grander view of the omniscience and omnipotence of 
God than could be obtained from any other source. In fine, 
that it harmonized with the declaration of scripture, which 
tells us that "In the beginning God created the heavens and 
the earth, and the earth was without form and void" If the 
earth came into existence in its present condition, then it had 
form and was not void. Hence, this first grand declaration of 
the inspired writer must refer to the formation of the matter 
of which the heavens and earth were afterwards formed. Some 
went so far as to trace out dimly a full account of this theory 
in the order of creation, as laid down in Gensis. 

Let us now proceed to the discoveries of Lord Rosse, and their 
influence on this greatly disputed theory. The space penetrat- 
ing power of his six feet reflector is much greater than that 
of Sir William Herschel's great telescope, and it was anti- 
cipated that many nebulae which were unresolved into clusters 
of stars by Hershel, would yield under the greater power and 
light of Lord Rosse's telescope. This has proved to be the 



SKETCHES OF ASTRONOMY. 109 

fact. Very many nebulae have been removed from their old 
places, and must hereafter figure among the clusters, while we 
are informed that many yet remain, even of the old nebulae, 
which defy the power of the monster telescope. 

The most remarkable object which has been resolved by 
Lord Rosse, is the great nebula in Orion, one of the most 
extraordiuary objects in the heavens. Its size is enormous, 
and its figure very extraordinary. In certain parts adjoining 
the nebula the heavens are jet black, either from contrast or by 
the vacuity of these regions. Two immense spurs of light are 
6een to project from the principal mass of the nebula, and to 
extend to a most extraordinary distance. This will be better 
understood, by remembering that at the distance at which this 
nebula is removed from us, the entire diameter of the earth's 
orbit, 190 millions of miles, is an invisable point, less than one 
second, while this nebula extends to many thousands of times 
this distance, and more probably to many millions of times. 

Several stars have been found, and are visible on the nebula, 
but have hitherto been regarded as being between the eye of 
the observer and this remote object. Sir William Herschel 
was unable to resolve this mysterious body, and yet the nebula 
gave indications of being of the resolvable kind by its irreg- 
ular and curdled appearance under high powers. Several 
years since Dr. J. Lamont, of Munich, after a rigid scrutiny, of 
this nebula with his great Refractor, pronounced a portion of 
it to be composed of minute stellar points, and predicted its 
final perfect resolution into stars by greater power. This pre- 
diction has been fully verified, for Lord Rosse's great Reflector 
has solved the mystery, and filled this extraordinary object 
with the "jewelry of stars." 

But the question recurs, what have the defenders of the 
nebular theory lost, or its enemies gained by this interesting 
discovery? We are all liable to reach conclusions too hastily, 
and to join issue on false points. If the nebular theory depen- 
ded for its existance upon the irresolvability of the nebula in 
Orion, then indeed has the theory been entirely exploded. 
But this is not the fact. No one has asserted that the 
great nebula in Orion was nebulous matter, and if it were not, 
then none existed. Such an issue would have been a false one, 
bad it been made. 

The theory has neither lost nor gained by the discoveries 



110 SKETCHES OP ASTRONOMY. 

thus far made; what time may develope it is impossible to 
say. In case certain data can be obtained, which appear to be 
accessible, then indeed may we demonstrate its Iruth or false- 
hood, by mathematical investigation. Until then, the safer 
plan is neither to adopt nor reject, but investigate until abso- 
lute truth shall reward our long continued labor, and reveal 
the mystery of the organization of that stupendous system, ot 
which our humble planet forms an insignificant part. — Smith's 
Astronomy. 

The sun is the center of the solar system, around which all 
other planets belonging to our universe revolve. The names 
of all the primary planets that have been discovered that con- 
stitute the solar system, are the Sun, Mercury, Venus, the 
Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Herschel, Uranus, Neptune, and 
twenty-three asteroids, or small planets. The approximate 
distance each of the large planets travel in making one revo- 
lution around the sun is about as follows : 

Mercury, number of miles 220,000,000 

" 403,000,000 

" 570,000,000 

" 852,000,000 

" 2,910,000,000 

" 5,340,000.000 

■ 10,800,000,000 

" 17,100,000,000 

COMETS. 

Very little is known of the physical nature of comets. 
They are thought by some astronomers to be about as dense 
as smoke. They are bodies that revolve around the sun in 
very elongated orbits, and some astronomers think that the 
greater number visit our system but once, and then fly off in 
nearly straight lines, and go to revolve around other suns in 
the far-off distant heavens. The length of the tail of a comet, 
as measured by astronomers, seem almost incredible. 

Comet of 1680, length of the tail 123,000,000 miles. 

Do. 1744, " " 35,000,000 " 

Do. 1769, " " 48,000,000 " 

Do. 1811, " " 130,000 000 " 

Do. 1843, " " 130,000,000 " 

The sun is 1,384,472 times as large as the earth ; Jupiter is 
1,280 times larger than the earth, and Saturn 1,000 times. 



Venus, 


<< <i 


Earth, 


(■ a 


Mars, 


ii ii 


Jupiter, 


ii (i 


Saturn, 


ii a 


Herschel, 


ii ii 


La Vomer 


ii i. 



SKETCHES OF ASTRONOMY. Ill 



DIRECTIONS FOR FINDING THE NORTH STAR, AT ANY TIME. 

Every pupil should be instructed in the manner of pointing 
out the North Star at any time of the night. If they are ena- 
bled to do this at any time, it will assist them in making other 
important observations, as well as being of use on many occa- 
sions which occur in the life of every man. Many persons 
have been lost in a prairie or other unfrequented places, when 
if they had been able to have told the points of the compass 
they could have extricated themselves from their lost situa- 
tion. This may be done in a very easy manner. There i3 
hardly a child of ten years of age who cannot at any time of 
night point out the stars in the Great Bear which form what is 
called the Great Dipper. Now if an imaginary line be drawn 
through the two stars which form the front edge of the Dipper, 
from the bottom towards the top, and continued about 20 de- 
grees, it will pass very near the North Star — so near that it 
cannot be mistaken, there being no other stars of that magni- 
tude near it. It should be borne in mind that this rule holds 
good in whatever position the Dipper may be at the time. — 
Smith's Illustrated Astronomy. 

ECLIPSES. 

Eclipses are among the most interesting phenomena pre- 
sented to us by the heavenly bodies. In all ages, when an 
eclipse has taken place, it has excited the profound attention 
of the learned, and the fears and superstitions of the ignorant. 
The causes of eclipses before the seventeenth century were 
known only to a few, and they generally took advantage of 
this knowledge to impose upon the credulity of the ignorant 
by pretending that they were inspired by the Gods. Among 
the ancient nations, the Chaldeans were the foremost in their 
observations of the phenomena of the heavens ; perhaps this 
was owing in some measure to their occupation ; they being 
shepherds were obliged to watch their flocks by night to pro- 
tect them from the wild beasts which were at that time num- 
erous. Men under such circumstances would naturally be 
led to watch closely the movements of the heavenly bodies, 
and more especially so, for in the earlier periods of the world 
they had no correct mode of reckoning time in order to deter- 
mine the seasons or the proper seed time and harvest. 

Eclipses attracted the particular attention of the Chaldeans, 



r 



112 SKETCHES OF ASTRONOMY. 

and by a series of observations extended through several cen- 
turies, they discovered a very important fact relating to 
eclipses, although they did not understand the cause. 

By comparing the records which had been made for a great 
length of time, they found that a certain period of time elapsed 
between eclipses of the same kind and magnitude; that is, if 
18 years, 11 days, 7 hours and 43 minutes, were added to the 
time of the happening of any eclipse, it would show the time 
of the return of the same eclipse ; the only differences would 
be that it would not happen at the same time in the day and 
it would be a little greater or less than the previous eclipse — 
thus they were able to predict eclipses with sufficient accu- 
racy to answer their designs upon the ignorant without under- 
standing the laws by which these periodical returns were 
produced. 

To explain this briefly, it must be remembered that the 
moon's orbit makes an angle with the plane of the earth's or- 
bit of 5£ deg.; these two points where the moon's orbit cuts 
the plane of the earth's orbit, are called nodes. Now we will 
suppose that on any day at noon it is new moon, and the moon 
is just 16 deg. from her descending node, the shadow of the 
moon would just touch the earth at the north pole ; in 223 lu- 
nations, or 18 years, 11 days, 7 hours, 43 minutes thereafter, 
the moon would come nearly to the same position as it was at 
the beginning, consequently there would be another small 
eclipse of the sun, and at the expiration af every 223 lunations 
it would return, and at each return the moon's shadow would 
pass across the earth a little more to the south until the 
ec'ipse had appeared about 77 times, when it would pass off 
at the south pole, occupying a period of 1,388 years : The same 
period would not commence again until the expiration of 12,- 
4H2 years. Each eclipse which takes place during any year, be- 
longs to a separate and similar period. Those periods of 
eclipses which come in at the moon's ascending node, first 
come on to the earth at the south pole, and at each return the 
moon's shadow parses across the earth more to the north, and 
airer appearing about 77 times, they finally leave the earth at 
the north pole. — Smith's Astronomy. 



SKETCHES OP ASTRONOMY. 113 

IMMENSITY OF SPACE. 

Great is the immensity of space. Light travels at the rate 
of one hundred and ninety-two thousand miles per second 
and yet at this great speed it would take it over thirty million 
years to come from some of the far off nebulas to the earth. 
Some ideas of the immensity of space may be gathered by 
the calculation of the distance that light would travel in thirty 
millions of years, and then supposing that the distance ascer- 
tained by the calculation, was to the remaining distance as 
one drop of water is to the ocean. In all probability the most 
powerful telescope has only brought to view a small portion 
of creation. 

The nearest fixed stars, according to the best astronomical 
calculation, 20,G0O,G0O,00O,C0O of miles from the earth. To 
assist the mind of the reader to get some idea of the immensity 
of this distance, I have taken the pains to make the following 
calculation: Suppose that when the Lord past sentence upon 
Cain for killing his brother, that he had banished him to the 
nearest fixed star, and had caused a whirlwind or some other 
power to have taken him at the rate of one thousand miles an 
hour day and night from that time till now, counting the time 
past six thousand years, at 360 days travel to the year, he 
would have traveled at the end of the six thousand years only 
one 3.80th part of the distance, and at the same rate of speed 
at the end of two million years from this time he would not 
reach his destination, but would yet be one trillion three hun- 
dred and eighty-two billion four hundred million miles from 
his future home, or place of banishment. So you see that after 
two million and six thousand years travel at the enormous 
spetd of one thousand miles an hour, leaves a distance yet 
untraveled equal to about fifty -five miilion times the distance 
of Cook's voyage around the earth. 



PAY OF GOVERNMENT OFFICERS. 



8,000 00 
8,000 00 
8,000 00 


5,000 00 
6,500 00 
6,000 00 


num 17,500 00 


12,000 00 
10,000 00 


7,000 00 



President of the United States per annum, $50,000 00 

Vice-President " 

Cabinet Officers each " 

Speaker of the House of Representatives " 

Members of Congress " 

Chief Justice of the United States " 

Associate Justices " 

MINISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTIES. 

In Great Britain or France per annum 

In Russia, Spain, Prussia, Austria, Italy, China, 
Mexico or Brazil " 

In Chili or Peru " 

In Nicaragua " 

In Portugal, Belgium, Netherlands, Denmark, 
Sweden, Switzerland, Hawaiian Islands, Ecua- 
dor, Argentine Confederation, Venezuela and 
all other foreign countries " " 

WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Lieutenant-General per month 

Major-General " " 

Brigadier-General '• " 

Adjutant General " annum 

Surgeon-General " " 

Paymaster General " " 

Commissary-General " " 

Surgeon-General " month 

OFFICERS OF INFANTRY AND ARTILLERY. 

Colonel per month 

Lieutenant-Colonel " " 

Major " " 

Captain " " 

First Lieutenant " " 

Second Lieutenant " " 

Brevet Second Lieutenant " " 

ORDNANCE AND TOPOGRAPHICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Ordnance per month 407 50 

Colonel " " 221 00 

Lieutenant-Colonel " " 21100 

Major " " 187 00 

Captain , " " 129 00 

First Lieutenant " " 112 83 

Second Lieut " " 112 83 

Brevet Second Lieutenant " " 112 83 

(114) 



7,500 00 



720 00 

445 00 

2C9 50 

3,950 00 

3,594 00 

2,740 00 

2,552 00 

299 50 

194 00 
170 00 
151 00 
118 50 
103 50 
103 50 
103 50 



RELIGIOUS. 



The number of Protestants of the world, according to the statistics of 
all nations, is about as follows : 

United States 83,000,000 

Great Britain and Ireland 25,000,000 

Asia and Armenia 5,000,000 

British America and West Indies 4,000,000 

France, Belgium and Holland 5,000,000 

South America 1,500,000 

Sweden, Norway and Denmark 7,600,000 

The German Empire 25,000,000 

Throughout the rest of the world 13,000^)00 

Total 121.000,000 

Or about one in every fourteen of the inhabitants of the world are 
Protestants. Of this number there is about one in every four identified 
with or members of the different Protestant churches of the world. It 
then follows that the entire membership of all the Protestant churches 
of the world amounts to one in fifty -six of the inhabitants. 

The number of Roman Catholics (approximately correct) is as follows: 

United States 3,500,000 

Great Britain and Ireland 6,000,000 

Russia 7,200,000 

South America 21,000,000 

France 36,000,000 

Austria and Venetia 28,000,000 

Spain 17,000,000 

Other parts of the world 60,000,000 

Total 200,900,000 

Pagans, or those who worshipped idols, or created things or beings 
they number near three- fourths of the entire inhabitants of the earth. 
They number at present about 1,000,000,000. This includes the Moham- 
medans, tho Buddhists and the Mormons, or Latter Day Saints. Of this 
number there is to be found in the United States, of Mormons, 75,000. 
And strange as it may seem, we have about 60,000 Heathen idol worship- 

(115) 






116 RELIGIOUS. 



pers, who have hegan erecting their temples on American coil. There ii 
one in San Francisco, California, and I understand one is being erected 
at Denver City, Colorado. 

The number of church edifices and value of church property of the 
principal religious organizations in the United States, are as follows ; 

NAME. CHURCHES. VALUE. 

Baptist (regular) 12,857 $39,229,221 

Baptist (other) 1,105 2,378,977 

Christian 2,822 6,425,137 

Congregational 2,715 25,069,098 

Episcopal 2,601 36,514,549 

Evangelical Association 641 2,301,050 

Friends 662 3,939,500 

Jews 152 5,155,234 

Lutheran 2,776 14,917,747 

Methodist 21,337 69,854,121 

Moravian 67 709,100 

Mormon 171 650,750 

Swedenborgian 61 869,700 

Presbyterian (regular) 5,683 47,828,732 

Presbyterian (other) 1,388 5,436,524 

Dutch Reform 468 10,359,255 

Late German Reform 1,145 5;775,215 

Roman Catholic 3,806 60,985,566 

Second Advent 140 300,240 

Shakers 18 80,900 

Spiritualist 22 100,150 

Unitarian 310 6,282,075 

United Brethren 937 1,819,810 

Universalist 602 5,692,325 

Unknown (union) 552 905,295 

Unknown Local Missions 27 687,800 

Total 63,082 $354,483,581 



STATISTICAL. 



POPULATION OF EACH STATE. 



Alabama 996,992 

Arkansas 484,471 

California 560,247 

Connecticut 537,454 

Delaware 125,015 

Florida 187,748 

Georgia 1,184,109 

Illinois 2,539,891 

Indiana 1,680,637 

Iowa 1,194,020 

Kansas 364,399 

Kentucky 1,321,011 

Louisiana 726,915 

Maine 626,915 

Maryland 780,894 

Massachusetts 1,457,351 

Michigan 1,184,059 

Minnesota 459,706 

Mississippi 827,922 



Missouri 1,721,295 

Nebraska 122,993 

Nevada 42,491 

New Hampshire 318,300 

New Jersey 906,095 

New York 4,382,759 

North Carolina 1,071,361 

Ohio 2,665,260 

Oregon 90,923 

Pennsylvania 3,521,951 

Ehode Island 217,353 

South Carolina 705,606 

Tennessee 1,258,520 

Texas 818,579 

Vermont 330,551 

Virginia 1,225,163 

West Virginia 442,014 

Wisconsin 1,054,670 



Total. 



.38,115,641 



POPULATION OF THE TERRITORIES. 



Arizona 9,658 

Colorado 39,864 

Dakota 14,181 

District of Columbia 131,700 

Idaho 14,999 

Montana 20,595 



New Mexico 91,874 

Utah 86,786 

Washington 29 955 

Wyoming 9,118 



Total 442,730 



POPULATION OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIES 

w^ w York, N. Y 942,292 

Philadelphia, Pa.... 674,022 

Brooklyn, N. Y 396,099 

St. Louis, Mo 310,864 



Charleston, S. C 48,956 

Indianapolis, Ind 80,244 

Troy, N. Y 40,465 

Syracuse, N. Y £3,051 

(117) 



118 



STATISTICAL. 



POWIL1.TI0K OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIES — CONTINUED: 



Chicago, 111 298,977 

Baltimore, Md 267,354 

Boston, Mass 250,526 

Cincinnati, Ohio 216,239 

New Orleans, La 191,418 

San Francisco, Cal 149,473 

Buffalo, N. Y 117,714 

Washington, D. C 109,199 

Newark, N. J 105,059 

Louisville, Ky 100,753 

Cleveland, Ohio 92,829 

Pittsburgh, Pa 86,076 

Jersey City, N.J 82,546 

Detroit, Mich 79,577 

Milwaukee, Wis 71,440 

Albany, N. Y 69,422 

Providence, R. 1 68,904 

Rochester, N. Y 62,386 

Allegheny, Pa 53,180 

Richmond, Va 51.038 

New Haven, Conn 50,840 

The number of all the male citizens 
the United States and Territories, 
Census : 

Alabama.. 202,046 

Arizona 3,397 

Arkansas 100,043 

California 145,802 

Colorado 15,515 

Connecticut 127,499 

Dakota 5,234 

Delaware 28,207 

District of Columbia 31,622 

Florida 38,854 

Georgia 234,919 

Idaho 5,557 

Illinois 542,843 

Indiana 376,780 

Iowa 255,802 

Kansas 99,065 

Kentucky „ 282,305 

Louisiana,.. 159,201 

Maine „„.. 153,160 

Maryland 169,845 



Worcester, Mass... 41,105 

Lowell, Mass 40,928 

Memphis, Tenn 40,226 

Cambridge, Mass 39,634 

Hartford, Conn 37,180 

Scranton, Pa 35,092 

Reading, Pa 33,630 

Patterson, N. J 33,579 

Kansas City, Mo 32,260 

Mobile, Ala 32,034 

Toledo, Ohio 31,584 

Portland, Me 31,413 

Columbus, Ohio 31,274 

Wilmington, Del 30,841 

Dayton, Ohio 30,473 

Lawrence, Mass 28.921 

Utica, N. Y 28,804 

Charlestown, Mass 28,323 

Savannah, Ga 28,235 

Lynn, Mass 28,233 

Fall River, Mass 26,766 

over the age of twenty- one years in 
as shown by the statistics of the last 

Missouri 380,235 

Montana 11,523 

Nebraska 36,169 

Nevada 18,652 

New Hampshire 83,361 

New Jersey 194,109 

New Mexico 22,442 

New York 981,587 

North Carolina 214,224 

Ohio 592,350 

Oregon 24,608 

Pennsylvania 776,345 

Rhode Island 43,996 

South Carolina 146.614 

Tennessee 259,016 

Texas 169,215 

Utah 10,147 

Vermont 74,867 

Virginia 266,680 

Washington 7,902 



STATISTICAL. 119 



NUMBER MALE CITIZENS, etc. — COTINTJED: 

Massachusetts 312,770 West Virginia 93,435 

Michigan 274,459 Wisconsin 203,077 

Minnesota 75,274 Wyoming 5,297 

Mississippi 169,737 

Total 8,425,941 

By the above the full amount of the vote of each State is shown, and 
as the vote for President in 1872 was not a strict party vote, we will give 
the vote for President in 1868, as polled for Grant and Seymour, as w« 
think this more satisfactory. 

VOTE OP EACH STATE OF THE UNION. 

Rep. Dem. 

Alabama 76,366 72,086 

Arkansas 22,152 19,078 

California 54,592 54,078 

Connecticut 50,996 47,951 

Delaware 7,623 10,980 

Florida (By Legislature.) 

Georgia 57,134 102,822 

Illinois 250,293 *199,143 

Indiana 176,552 166,980 

Iowa 120,399 74,040 

Kansas 31,046 14,019 

Kentucky 39,569 115,889 

Louisiana 33,263 ' 80,225 

Maine 70,426 42,396 

Maryland 30,438 62,357 

Massachusetts 136,437 59,408 

Michigan 128,550 97,069 

Minnesota 43,542 28,072 

Mississippi (No vote.) 

Missouri 85,671 59,878 

Nebraska 9,729 5,439 

Nevada 6,480 5,218 

New Hampshire 38,191 31,224 

New Jersey 80,121 83,001 

New York 419,883 429,883 

North Carolina 96,226 84,090 

Ohio 280,828 238,700 

Oregon 10,961 11,125 

Pennsylvania 342,280 313,382 

Rhode Island 12,903 6,548 

South Carolina 62,301 45,237 

Tennessee , 56,757 26,31i 

Texas (No vote.) 



120 



STATISTICAL. 



VOTE OP EACH STATE OP THE UNION — CONTINUED. 

Vermont 44,167 

Virginia (No vote.) 

West Virginia 29,025 

Wisconsin 108,857 



12,045 

20,306 
84,710 



Total 3,012,188 2,703,590 

POPULATION OP INDIANA BY COUNTIES, 1870. 



Adams 11,382 

Allen 43,494 

Bartholomew 21,131 

Benton 5,G15 

Blackford 6,272 

Boone 22,593 

Brown 8,681 

Carroll 16,152 

Cass 24,193 

Clarke 24,770 

Clay 19,084 

Clinton 17,330 

Crawford 9,851 

Daviess 16.747 

Dearborn « 24,116 

Decatur 19,053 

DeKalb 17,167 

Delaware 19,030 

Dubois.! 12,597 

Elkhart 26,026 

Fayette 10,476 

Floyd 23,300 

Fountain 16,389 

Franklin 20,223 

Fulton 12,726 

Gibson 17,371 

Grant 18,487 

Greene 19,514 

Hamilton , 20,882 

Hancock 15,123 

Harrison 19,913 

Hendricks 20,277 

Henry 22,986 

Howard 15,847 

Huntington 12,036 

Jackson __ 18,974 

Jasper 6,354 



Madison 22,770 

Marion 71,939 

Marshal 20,211 

Martin 11,103 

Miami 21,052 

Monroe 14,168 

Montgomery , 23,765 

Morgan 17,528 

Newton 5,829 

Noble 20,389 

Ohio 5,837 

Orange 13,497 

Owen 16,137 

Park 18,166 

Perry 14,801 

Pike 13,779 

Porter 13,942 

Posey 19,185 

Pulaski 7,801 

Putnam 21,514 

Randolph 22,862 

Ripley 20,977 

Rush 17,626 

Scott „,... 7,823 

Shelby 21,892 

Spencer 17,998 

Starke 3,888 

Steuben 12,854 

St. Joseph 25,322 

Sullivan 18,453 

Switzerland 12,134 

Tippecanoe 33,515 

Tipton 11,953 

Union 6,341 

Vanderburg 33,145 

Vermillion ^....^. 10,840 

Vigo 33,549 



STATISTICAL. 121 



?OPCLATION CF INDIANA BY COtTOTIES — CONTINUED. 

Jay .... 15,000 Wabash 21,305 

Jefferson 29,741 Warren 10,204 

Jennings 16,218 Warrick 17,653 

Johnson 18,366 Washington 18,495 

Knox 21,562 Wayne 34,048 

Kosciusko 23,531 Wells 13,585 

LaGrange 14,148 White 10,554 

Lake 12,339 Whitley 14,399 

LaPorte 27,062 

Lawrence 14,628 Total 1,680,637 

INDIANA TOWNS THAT HAVE 500, OE OVEB, INHABITANTS. 

Decatur, Adams county 858 

New Uaven, Allen county 912 

Ft. Wayne, Allen county 17,718 

Monroeville, Allen county 630 

Columbus, Bartholomew county 3,359 

Hope, Bartholomew county 765 

Oxford, Benton county 519 

Hartford, Blackford county 878 

Lebanon, Boone county 1,572 

Zionsville, Boone county 956 

Jamestown, Boone county , .„ 603 

Thorntown, Boone county 1,526 

Delphi, Carroll county 1,614 

Browntown, Cass county 903 

Logansport, Cass county , 8,950 

West Logan, Cass county 978 

Charleston, Clarke county 2,204 

Jeffersonville, Clarke county 7,254 

Brazil, Clay county 2,186 

Staunton, Clay county 587 

Knightsville, Clay county 1,071 

Harmony, Clay county 597 

Bowling Green, Clay county 606 

Frankfort, Clinton county 1,300 

Leavenworth, Crawford county 567 

Washington, Daviess county 2,901 

Aurora, Dearborn county 3,304 

Cochran, Dearborn county 675 

Lawrenceburg, Dearborn county 3,159 

Moore's Hill, Dearborn county 617 

Waterloo, DeKalb county 1,259 

Auburn, DeKalb county 677 

Muncie, Delaware county 2,992 



122 STATISTICAL. 



IKDIANA TO WHS, ETC. — OONTDOTE». 

Jasper, Dubois county 547 

Elkhart, Elkhart county 3.265 

Goshen, Elkhart county 3,133 

Bristol, Elkhart county 681 

Connersville, Fayette county 2,496 

New Albany, Floyd county 15,396 

Attica, Fountain county 2,273 

Covington, Fountain county 1,888 

Laurel, Franklin county 741 

Eochester, Fulton county 1,528 

Owensville, Gibson county 522 

Princeton, Gibson county 1,847 

Patoka, Gibson county 844 

Marion, Grant county 1,658 

Jonesboro, Grant county 581 

Bloomfield, Green county 656 

Westfield, Hamilton county 608 

Noblesville, Hamilton county 1,435 

Greenfield, Hancock county 1,203 

Corydon, Harrison county 747 

Danville, Hendricks county 1,080 

Plainfield, Hendricks county 795 

Brownsburg, Hendricks county 551 

Middletown, Henry county 711 

Knightstown, Henry county 1,528 

Kokomo, Howard county 2,177 

Roanoke, Huntington county 627 

Brownstown, Jackson county 572 

Seymour, Jackson county 2,372 

Rensselaer, Jasper county 617 

Hanover, Jefferson county 564 

North Madison, Jefferson county 1,007 

Madison, Jefferson county 10,709 

North Vernon, Jennings county 1,758 

Vernon, Jennings county 673 

Edinburg, Johnson county 1,799 

Franklin City 2,707 

Vincennes, Knox county 5,440 

Pierceton, Kosciusko county 1,063 

LaGrange, LaGrange county 1,038 

LaPorte, LaPorte county 6,581 

Michigan City, LaPorte county 3,985 

Westville City, LaPorie county 640 

Mitchell, Lawrence county 1,087 



STATISTICAL. 123 



INDIANA TOWNS, ETC. — CONTINUED. 

Anderson, Madison county m 3,126 

Pendleton, Madison county 675 

Bourborn, Marshall county 874 

Plymouth, Marshall county 2,482 

Shoals, Martin county 512 

Loogootee, Martin county 748 

P6vu, Miami county 3,61? 

Bloomington, Monroe county 1,030 

Ladoga, Montgomery county 878 

Crawfordsville, Montgomery county 3,701 

Mooresville, Morgan county 1.229 

Martinsville, Morgan county 1,131 

Kentland, Newton county 802 

Kendallville, Noble county 2,164 

Ligonier, Noble county 1,514 

Rising Sun, Ohiocounty 1,760 

Orleans, Orange county 905 

Paoli, Orange county 628 

Spencer, Owen county 971 

Gosport, Owen county 860 

Eockville, Park county 1,187 

Montezuma, Park, county 624 

Cannelton, Perry county 2,481 

Tell City, Perry county 1,660 

Petersburg, Pike county 923 

Valparaiso, Porter county * 2,765 

Mount Vernon, Posey county 2,880 

New Harmony, Posey county 836 

Winnamack, Pulaski county 906 

Oreencastle, Putnam county 3,227 

Eidgeville, Randolph county 716 

Farmland, Randolph county 532 

Union City, Randolph county 1,439 

Winchester, Randolph county 1,456 

Versails, Ripley county 500 

Rushville, Rush county 1,696 

Shelbyville, Shelby county 2,731 

Rockport, Spencer county ;. 1,720 

Angola, Steuben county 1,072 

Mishawaka, St. Joseph county 2,617 

South Bend, St. Joseph county , 7,206 

Sullivan, Sullivan county 1,396 

Lafayette, Tippecanoe county 13,516 

Tipton, Tipton county 892 



124 STATISTICAL. 



INDIANA TOWNS, ETC. — CONTINUED. 

Liberty, Union county „ 700 

Evansville, Vanderburgh county 21,830 

Clinton, Vermillion county 564 

Perrysville, Vermillion county 690 

Terre Haute, Vigo county 16,103 

Lagro, Wabash county 519 

Wabash City, Wabash county 2,881 

Williamsport, Warren county 988 

Booneville, Warrick county 1,039 

Newburg, Warrick county 1,464 

Salem, Washington county 1,294 

Centreville, Wayne county 1,077 

East Germantown, Wayne county 536 

Hagerstown, Wayne county 833 

Bichmond, Wayne county 9,445 

Milton, Wayne county 823 

Blufilown, Wells county ; 1,138 

Monticello, White county „^ 887 

Columbia, Whitley county... „ „.., 1,633 



' 



SABBATH SCHOOLS. 



-:o: 



The first Sabbath School that we have been able to find a 
record of, was established in the year 1769 in the town of Wy- 
curnbe, England, by a young Methodist lady by the name of 
Hannah Ball. A few years after this another young lady who 
afterwards became the wife of Samuel Bradburn, suggested 
the idea of Sabbath Schools to Robert Rakes. He being a 
man of quick perception and great energy saw at once the ad- 
vantages to be gained by schools of this kind. He immedi- 
ately set to work and organized a school in the city of Glou- 
cester, England, and through his labors and influence other 
cities of that country were induced to establish Sabbath 
Schools and work for the Sunday School interest. 

The first Sabbath School established in the United States 
was organized by Bishop Asbury, in the year 1786, in Hanover 
County, Va., at the house of Mr. Thomas Cranshaw. The pro- 
gress of Sabbath Schools in the United States until about the 
year 1830, was rather slow, as bat few of the Christian denom- 
inations up to that time had become interested in the Sunday 
School cause. Bat one by one, the different organizations of 
Christians have gradually adopted the institution of Sabbath 
Schools, till now, the popular method of all churches for the 
religious training of the young is the Sunday School. Now, in 
every land and nation, where Christian people reside, the 
Sabbath School cause is advancing. 

The organization of Sabbath Schools, 

Remember one and all, 
Was first established in Wycumbe, 

By Miss Hannah Ball. 

After this Miss Bradburn 

Suggested to Robert Rakes 
To organize a Sabbath School, 

And helped him set the stakes. 

(125) 



126 SABBATH SCHOOLS. 



They organized in Gloucester, 

The banner they unfurled, 
The fame and name of which has spread. 

Almost throughout the world. 

The honor due to Kobert Rakes, 
Miss Bradburn and Miss Ball. 

Should not be given to Eobert Rakes, 
But given to them all. 

For the institution of Sabbath Schools, 

The honor is duo Miss Ball. 
To her for lighting up the lamp, 

We give the honor all. 

Miss Bradburn she is worthy of 

Our honor, love, and praise, 
For her suggestions, and her work, 

In keeping up the blaze. 

And to Robert Rakes is due 
The honor of school extension, 

For adding fuel to the light, 
And widening its dimension. 



VALUABLE RECIPES. 



For Gleaning Silverware^ and /or Silvering Copper. — One- 
fourth ounce crystal nitrate of silver, one-half ounce cream 
of tartar, one-fourth ounce of common salt; pulverize all to a 
fine powder together, bottle it up and it is ready for use. Ap- 
ply with a woolen rag, wetting the rag so as the powder will 
stick to it. 

For Distemper in Horses. — Ground ginger, two ounces; 
flour of sulphur, two ounces; copperas, two ounces; Spanish 
brown, two ounces; saltpeter, one-half ounce; mix thoroughly* 
Give a tablespoonful once a day in bran mash. Keep the ani- 
mal warm and dry, with light exercise. 

Whitewash for Out Poors. — Take good white unslacked 
lime, one peck; salt, one quart; two pounds Spanish whiting; 
one gallon good flour paste ; first slack the lime in hot water ; 
be sure to put enough on to keep the lime from burning; then 
add while warm the salt and Spanish white, and then the 
paste ; let stand over night. It is better to have it warm while 
applying it. 

For Removing Paint irom Glass. — Baking soda and warm 
water. 

Antidote for Poison. — Give sweet oil in large doses. 

For Worms in Children. — Santenine, nine grains; calomel, 
six grains; white sugur, eighteen grains ; mix well ; make in 
six powders for a child two years old, and give one before 
each meal for two days ; work off with oil. 

For Removing Grease Spots From Cloth. — Soda, two 
drachms; borax, one drachm ; dissolve it together in one ounce 
of hot water, then add one ounce of alcouol. Shake it well 
and apply with woolen rag or brush, rubbing briskly. 

(127) 



128 VALUABLE EECIPES. 



To Get Rid of Little Ants. — Use salt and water freely 
where they infest. 

Washing Fluid. — Borax, one pound; soda, one pound ; dis- 
solve in two gallons of hot water. Put the clothes in the tub, 
cover them with water containing a half gallon of the fluid, 
and let stand over night. 

For Toothache, Headache, Neuralgia, and Rheumatic 
Pains. — Make a liniment of the following preparations: 
One ounce of tincture of Amonia, one oun^e tincture of cam- 
phor, one ounce oil of organum, one-half ounce oil of cedar, 
one ounce oil of hemlock, and one quart linseed oil ; mix all 
together, put it in a bottle and shake well. Directions for 
using. Apply the liniment freely to the affected parts, and 
rub and bathe it as often as three or four times daily. For the 
toothaehe, put a little on a piece of cotton, and put it in the 
tooth, and rub it on the jaw of the patient. I have found this 
to be one of the best liniments in use. 

For Guts and Bruises on Man or Beast — Take two ounces 
tincture of camphor, two ounces linseed oil, one ounce of tur- 
pentine ; mix all together, and apply to the affected parts. 

For Pickling Beef. — To 100 pounds of beef take one gal- 
lon of salt, three-fourths of a pound of sugar, three ounces 
black pepper ground; add together, put all in a kettle con- 
taining three gallons of water ; boil slowly, and skim occa- 
sionally. Pack the beef in tight tubs, and cover with the 
brine. 



DIRECTORY 



OF 



JOHNSON COUNTY 



FOR 1874. 



PREFACE. 



It has been a custom for many generations for those who 
present a new work to the public to preface it with some re- 
marks in reference to the object sought. Our object in pre- 
senting this work to the people of Johnson county is to give 
them as complete a history of the county as can be gathered at 
this time, showing the date of the county's organization, who 
it was first settled by, who are the living pioneers at this date, 
the progress the county has made in the way of manufactories 
and agriculture, showing her moral and educational standing by 
reporting the number of her churches, school houses and Sab- 
bath schools ; also, to give the native State, date of birth, date 
of settlement in the county, and post office address of the prin- 
cipal men in the county, besides a body of statistical matter, 
making this work very valuable as a reference book. A work 
of this kind must be of incalculable value to the young and 
rising generation, and will be highly prized by them in coming 
years. There may be some mistakes in names and dates, but 
we have used every precaution to avoid them. It is, perhaps, 
nearly impossible to make a directory without mistakes ; yet 
they will be found not to impair the value of this work. Strange 
as it may seem, our agents sometimes find men who refuse to 
give their names or any other information, a few do not remem- 
ber the date of birth and settlement, while a few are not able 



132 PREFACE. 

to spell their own names correctly, so that, with our own mis- 
takes, it is surprising that the work is as correct as it is. 

We desire here to return our thanks to the citizens of John- 
son county generally for the courteousness shown our agents 
while canvassing the county. The genial and intelligent county 
officers have our hearty good wishes for the gentlemanly man- 
ner in which they received and assisted ourselves and agents in 
gathering matter for this work. To Judge Banta and W. T. 
Stott do we return our most sincere thanks for historical facts 
furnished by them. M. & R. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



SETTLEMENT AND ORGANIZATION 



JOHNSON COUNTY 



Johnson County is bounded on the north by Marion, on the 
east by Shelby, on the south by Bartholomew and Brown, and 
on the west by Morgan. It is twenty miles from north to south 
and eighteen from east to west, and contains three hundred and 
twenty square miles. White River touches upon its north-west 
corner, cutting off a fraction over one hundred acres, while Blue 
River cuts off of the south-east corner a little over thirteen hun- 
dred. As these rivers flow in a south-west course to the Wabash, 
it will be seen that the water shed of the county with reference 
to the Wabash, faces the south-west. The plateau or "divide" 
lying between the White and Blue Rivers, instead of lying par- 
allel to these streams, runs nearly north and south, dividing the 
county into two unequal parts, the larger containing about two- 
thirds of the county, draining into the Blue, while the rain-fall 
from the other third finds its way into the White River. 

The surface of the county is generally quite level. At Nine- 
veh (Williamsport), however, which is located a half mile east 
of the north and south axial line, and a mile north of the south 
boundary, a range of hills sweeps up from the south, and thence 
bearing off in a north-west course, it extends to the western boun- 



134 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



dary of the county, while it intersects at a point about six miles 
north of the south-west corner ; and from thence the course is 
northerly until it reaches the bluffs of White River, where it may 
be said to terminate. This range of hills, or line of broken land, 
as it may with more propriety be termed, after it leaves Nineveh 
marks in part the northern boundary of that hill region of the 
State which culminates in the high hills of the Salt Creek region 
in Brown and the lower counties. All territory within Johnson 
county south and west of this range is broken land, and it is es- 
timated that the area covered by "broken land " includes about 
thirty-six square miles, or in round numbers about one-tenth of 
the whole. But it is only "broken land" when compared with 
the rest of the county, for there is but little if any of it that is 
not susceptible of profitable cultivation. The remainder of the 
county ranges from a dead level through an undulating to a 
slightly rolling surface, and may be classed in the catalogue of 
level lands. 

At the time the county was settled it was covered by a dense 
growth of timber, of the beech, sugar, maple, ash, oak, poplar, 
buckeye, linden, wild cherry and elm. A dense undergrowth 
of spice prevailed throughout. The level lands were inundated 
more than half the year. The forests were filled with the trunks 
of prostrate trees ; some newly fallen, some sunk half their depth 
in the oozy soil, and these lying in every direction, closed the 
drains till there was scarcely any escape for the flood, save by 
the slow process of evaporation and percolation. 

In 1818 the Indian title was extinguished to the Johnson 
county lands, and in the same year Jacob Whitzel, a resident of 
Franklin county, caused a "trail" to be cut from that place to the 
bluffs of White River. This passed through the northern por- 
tion of Johnson county, and was the first path cut through her 
forests. In 1820 the Indians abandoned the country according 
to treaty stipulation, and the same year the lands of the county 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 1 35 



were thrown into the market. In March of this year John 
Campbell, a Tennessean, built a cabin a half mile south of the 
present site of Edinburgh, into which he moved with his wife and 
four little children. About the same time Abraham Sells, an 
Ohioan, entered the county by the way of "Whitzel's trace," and 
located at the mouth of Pleasant Run, and there built a cabin. 
It is not altogether certain which was the first settler, Campbell 
or Sells, but the evidence points to the former as entitled to that 
honor. 

Elizabeth Campbell, born on February 10, 182 1, is believed 
to have been the first white child born within the present limits 
of the county. She certainly was the first in the Blue River 
bottoms. 

Following John Campbell soon came Joseph Bishop, Simon 
Shaffer, George Cutsinger, Samuel Herriott, William Williams, 
Joseph Townsend, Arthur Robinson, William R. Hensley, Wil- 
liam Foster, William Hunt, Joshua Palmer, Israel Watts, Thomas 
Doane, Jesse Wells, Isaac Marshall, the Webbs, Davisons, 
Adamses, Thompsons, Joneses and others, and by August of 
1823, thirty-seven votes were cast in Blue River township. 

Very soon after Sells built his cabin at the mouth of Pleasant 
Run, Thomas Lome, George Doty, James Ritchey, Daniel Boaz, 
Judoe Franklin Hardin, John Wishard, Robert Wishard, the 
Tresslars, Smiths and others, followed after, and by the time of 
the election, three years after, thirty-five votes were cast in White 
River township. 

In 1 82 1 Robert Worl settled Nineveh township. He was 
soon followed by Benjamin Crews, William Strain, Joab Wood- 
ruff, George Blankenship, Philip Ware, Daniel Trout, Henry 
Mussulman, James Jacobs, John S. Miller. Eight votes were 
cast in this township in 1823. 

In the same year, 1821, William and David Burkhart settled 
in Franklin township ; and they were soon followed by Levi 



I36 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Moore, Joseph Young, John Smiley, Elisha Adams, Daniel 
Prichard, Col. Simon Covert, George King, David W. McCas- 
lin, Isaac Voris, Robert Gilcrees, and others. 
* In the same year Nathaniel Bell built a cabin in Pleasant 
township, and Daniel Loper in Clark. Bell built the first mill 
in the county ; he was soon followed by the Smocks, the Brew- 
ers, the Wishards, and others. 

In 1825 Richardson Hensly hacked a path. into the township, 
which afterwards took his name, and was soon followed by the 
Carls, Sturgeons, Ragsdales, Terh unes, McNutts, Bridges, Mus- 
sulmans, Voris, and others. 

In 1826, Mrs. Utterback, a widow with eight sons, moved 
into Union township. She was soon followed by Johnson Watts, 
Josiah Simpson, George and Philip Kepheart, Jesse Harris, Geo. 
Kerlin, Samuel Winchester, Jacob Banta, Peter Voris, Jesse and 
Joseph Young, Garret Ditmars, Aaron Monfort, Gideon Drake, 
David and George W. Demaree, Daniel Cline, Jacob Wyrick, 
Willis and Wesley Deer, Isaac Vannuys, Andrew Carnine, Pe- 
ter Vandiver, Jacob Cox, Peter Bergen, John Shuck, and others. 

In 1822, the county was organized and named in honor of 
John Johnson, a Judge of the Supreme Court. In August, 
1823, the first election was held within the county, at which 
Israel Watts and Daniel Boaz were elected associate judges, 
Samuel Herriott to the office of clerk, William Shaffer to that 
of recorder, and William Freeman, John S. Miller, and James 
Ritchey, commissioners ; John Smiley was serving as sheriff by 
previous appointment. 

JOHNSON COUNTY IN 1 874. 

Fifty-two years ago Johnson county was organized. At that 
time it was an absolute wilderness. The heavy forest trees and 
thick growth of underbrush with twining vines, darkened the 
earth. Only here and there the rays of the sun ever reached it. 
The heavens were shut out from the eye of man ; the darkness, 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 137 



moaning winds, and cries of wild beasts created within the pio- 
neer's breast a feeling of desolation and apprehension, The land 
was filled with wild beasts, and in the night-time could be heard 
the startling screech of the night-owl, shrieks of panthers, wail- 
ing of wild-cats, howling of wolves, and the mournful cry of the 
whip-poor-will. Indeed, none but strong constitutions and stout 
hearts dared to contend with primitive nature. At that time 
Johnson county had no fields, no roads, no church houses, no 
school houses, no railroads, no mills, and scarcely any people. 
In 1874 she has large fields containing thousands of acres of 
cleared land, valued at about ten million dollars, hundreds of 
miles of roads, many of them graveled, at a cost of over two 
thousand dollars per mile, streams well bridged with durable 
material. Each township is well supplied with church houses, 
generally first-class buildings. 

There are within her borders nearly one hundred school 
houses, valued at about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 
She has two railroads, crossing the county in different directions, 
and a population of about twenty thousand inhabitants. She 
has about seven thousand horses, over eight hundred mules, 
nearly five thousand milch cows, over fourteen thousand sheep, 
and about thirty-five thousand hogs, valued altogether at about 
one million five hundred thousand dollars. The total value of 
live stock and agricultural products is not much short of two and 
a half million dollars. 

The county has over two hundred manufacturing establish- 
ments, forty steam engines, ten water wheels, and employs 
nearly one thousand men. Her manufactured products amount 
to more than one million five hundred thousand dollars. 

The county is dotted all over with beautiful villages, while 
among them are several towns grown to the dimensions of cities. 
Greenwood, in the north part of the county, is a thriving town 
of several hundred inhabitants. Edinburgh, located in the 



I38 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



southeast corner of the county, is a handsome, enterprising 
manufacturing city. It contains many splendid business blocks 
and beautiful residences. The city is situated on Blue River, a 
stream of great value in consequence of its utility in propelling 
machinery. The city has several manufacturing establishments, 
and a graded school, furnishing employment to many men, and 
educational facilities to nearly seven hundred children. 

The Blue River Grape-Sugar Works, at Edinburgh, established 
in 1873, manufactures over a half million pounds annually. The 
Blue River Starch Works, established in 1868, by Tilford & Co., 
does a business of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars per 
year. It consumes annually 1 50,000 bushels of corn, and twelve 
hundred tons of coal. Besides these there are other manufac- 
turing establishments of importance. 

Next comes the beautiful city of Franklin, county seat of 
Johnson county. It is situated a little to the east and south of 
the center of the county, on as rich a spot of earth as can be 
found in the State. Franklin is situated in the forks of Hurri- 
cane and Young's Creeks, two small streams which make a junc- 
tion at the southern part of the city. The ground upon which 
Franklin is built is mostly level. The outskirts, however, are 
rolling, and, where improved by fine residences and domestic 
shrubbery, are simply magnificently beautiful, and in summer 
season would charm the intellect of any man or woman who 
possessed the least spark of admiration for artistic and natural 
splendor. Years ago we used to live in this beautiful little city, 
and since that time, whenever we visit the place, we feel as if 
we had entered into a sort of paradise. The side-walks of the 
city are lined with beautiful shade trees, which lend an enchant- 
ing attractiveness to the- city during the summer months that is 
almost picturesque. The streets are broad and well laid out. 

There is one thing about Franklin that struck us as being 
worthy of mention, and that is, that it has fewer vacant lots, in 
proportion to its population, than any other town of like size 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 139 



known to us. The inhabitants number about 3300, while the 
town plats show the number of lots to be about 700 ; however, 
some of the citizens live on ground not recognized as platted lots. 
The average price of vacant lots is said to be about $200 each. 
This is a very reasonable price for property in a place so beau- 
tiful. 

Franklin is benefited by two railroads passing directly through 
its corporation (see township history.) The business of Frank- 
lin is in a healthy condition ; all classes seem to be possessed of 
a spirit of enterprise, and are moving ahead with energy and 
perseverance. 

The city contains many splendid business blocks and superb 
residences. 

The most unfortunate thing to the city, is, that but one hotel 
is kept in the place. We are of the opinion that it would surely 
be to the city's advantage if it could have another hotel, where 
the public could be accommodated respectably and at reason- 
able prices. Then the competition between the two would hold 
in check any disposition on the part of either to neglect or over- 
charge their customers. 

Franklin has two printing offices. The Franklin Jeffersonian 
was established in 1852. It is edited and published by Harvey 
C. Allison, who has had control of the paper for the last seven- 
teen years. The paper is Republican in politics, though read 
by many citizens of the opposite party. It is devoted largely 
to home news. The subscription price of the Jeffersonian is 
$2 per annum. 

The Franklin Herald is edited by M. R. Slater, and is a live 
paper, devoted principally to domestic news ; yet it is Demo- 
cratic in politics, and fearlessly opposes all seeming wrongs. 

The city of Franklin has two school houses ; one of them is 
a splendid building. They are valued at about $60,000. 

The Johnson county officers for 1874 are, Isaac M. Thompson, 
Clerk ; George Cutsinger, Treasurer ; Edward N. Woollen, Au- 



140 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



ditor ; Jacob Peggs, Recorder ; Robert Gillaspy, Sheriff; James 
F. Wiley, John Kerlin, and Warren Coiman, Commissioners. 

The court house in Franklin is not as good as may be found 
in some other county seats ; but the ground is beautifully shaded 
with young and thrifty forest trees. 

FRANKLIN COLLEGE. 

Franklin College was founded in the year 1834, as a "Baptist 
Manual Labor Institute." In that far-back time the students 
built huts of logs for places of study, and chopped cord-wood 
to meet the necessary expenses to which they were subject. 
Many of them did their own cooking and washing; and we can 
attest that their festal boards were not burdened with the great- 
est of plenty, nor with "sweetmeats" of the land. We have 
seen some of the students of this institution sit down to their 
meals with nothing before them but corn bread, molasses and 
water. In the early struggles of the school, its friends gave 
freely of their penury for its support. 

The institution was changed to a College in 1844, with Rev. 
George C. Chandler as president. About the year 1855 a nomi- 
nal endowment of $60,000 was raised, but from many combin- 
ing causes not half the amount was ever realized. 

In 1853, Rev. Silas Bailey, D. D., was elected president, and 
remained in office till 1862, when physical prostration compelled 
him to resign. At this time most of the students had either 
gone, or were preparing to go, to the war, and but little disposi 
tion was manifested, on the part of the young men left at home, 
to enter into a course of study, and so the College was obliged 
to suspend. It kept at work, however, till the very last. For 
several weeks before the suspension there were but two students 
in the institution, and they were both lame 

In 1869, the Board again resumed control, and raised an en- 
dowment equal to about $25,000. The old scholarships were to 
be honored. A large outlay was necessary for repairs, and the 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. I4 1 



income did not equal the expenses ; so, under the presidency of 
Rev. H. L. Wayland, D. D., the College suspended again. But 
the Baptists of the State were not willing that the institution 
should go down, and in less than six months a new organization 
was formed, and an endowment subscription of almost $50,000 
is now secured free of all debt. 

College Buildings. 
There are two buildings, which are intended to be the wings 
of a magnificent center building when the whole is completed. 
The two wings are each 84 by 40 feet and three stories high, 
furnishing chapel, society halls, reading-room, library and reci- 
tation rooms, besides accommodations for ninety students. The 
buildings are now in good repair, and make an attractive home 
for those who occupy them. 

Furniture. 
Each room is furnished with a stove, bedstead, table and two 

chairs. 

Library and Apparatus. 

The College Library contains a large number of valuable 
works. The laboratory is furnished with a very respectable 
supply of philosophical and chemical apparatus, which is regu- 
larly used for the purposes of illustration. 

The Campus 
Embraces twelve acres of ground,, with just enough diversity of 
surface for beauty and convenience ; is pleasantly shaded with 
forest trees, and being separated by a small stream from the 
principal part of the city, is so secluded as to be decidedly in- 
viting to the youth who wishes to apply himself to earnest study. 

The Faculty 

Consists of Rev. W. T. Stott, A. M., President, Professor of 
Moral and Intellectual Philosophy; Miss R. J. Thompson, M. A., 
Professor of Mathematics ; J. W. Moncrief, A. B., Tutor in Pre- 



I4 2 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



paratory Department; E. S. Hopkins, A. B., Instructor in 
Latin and Natural Science; Mrs. Bell R. Stott, Teacher in 
Painting and Drawing. 

About one thousand students have been under instruction in 
Franklin College ; many of them are in honored and influential 
places both in and out of this State. 

The course of instruction in this Institution is up to the stand- 
ard of other Western Colleges. 

The Baptists of this State, in common with the Baptists of the 
whole country, are entering upon the Centennial movement with 
high hopes of raising a liberal, solid endowment by the National 
Centennial, July 4th, 1876. 

The Franklin College property is said to be worth about 
$65,000. 

JOHNSON COUNTY ITEMS. 

Samuel C. Dunn is the present Township Trustee. Mr. Abram 
D. Whitesides was elected Trustee in 1867, and held the office 
five years. To him belongs the honor of pulling down the old 
school houses, and erecting good substantial brick ones. 

It is said that Mr. Robert Hamilton laid out and sold more 
town lots in Franklin than any other man, and that he is still 
offering lots at reasonable prices. 

We are told that the first court held in Johnson county was at 
John Smiley's mill. Also, that the first marriage license was 
issued to Aaron Harris and Phebe Baker. 

Thomas Chinaweth was about the first Post Master in Frank- 
lin. George King burnt the first brick. Rev. Mr. Hill was the 
first Presbyterian minister, and Rev. Mr. Monfort the second. 

The first jail was made of hewed logs, fastened together with 
wooden pins. 

The city of Franklin is a zealous temperance town. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 143 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 



Franklin Township is located in the central part of the 
county and bounded as follows : On the north by Pleasant and 
Clark townships ; on the east by Shelby county ; on the south 
by Blue River and Nineveh townships; and on the west by 
Union. 

The township is watered by a small portion of White River, 
Sugar, Young's, Hurricane, Moose and Indian Creeks. 

The surface is generally level, and the soil consists of a black 
loam, interspersed with spots of white clay. It is well adapted 
to cultivation, and amply rewards the farmer for his toil. The 
model farm of this township is situated two and one-half miles 
west of Franklin, and is owned and farmed by Mr. C. L. Dit- 
mars. 

The facilities for transportation are excellent, two railroads 
forming a junction at Franklin and crossing the township at 
nearly right angles to each other ; and the numerous county 
roads, which are kept in fine condition, make this township one 
of the most inviting in the county. The society is good, the 
people generally being kind, generous and sincere. 

Churches are numerous and well attended, showing the peo- 
ple to be earnest and devoted Christians. 

There are seventeen school houses in the township, all built 
of brick, and worth about $25,000. The number of scholars is 
about one thousand eight hundred. 

The township trustee is S. C. Dunn. 

The vote of the township, Republican 664; Democratic 5 38. 



144 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



This part of the county will be noticed more fully in the his- 
torical sketch of the county given in this book. 

The following names are those of some of the old settlers still 
living in Franklin township : 

James M. Alexander, Milton Wheat, Middleton Waldron, 
Samuel Wheaton, I. Voris, Simeon Van Arsdall, John Vandi- 
vier, O. H. P. Smiley, C. Swift, Gideon Sthephens, John M. 
Smiley, B. B. Ransdell, Evan Peggs, Jacob Peggs, G. M. Over- 
street, James McCaslin, J. H. McClelan, A. Lagrange, John 
Leach, J. D. Jones, D. P. Jones, L. N. Hendricks, John High, 
Joseph Hunt, R. Hamilton, James Forsyth, and others. 

Franklin boasted of not having a saloon within the corpora- 
tion. We will be very much mistaken if the devil don't slyly 
set up a few for gentlemen to tipple at while the Good Templars 
are sleeping. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

M. E. Church, Franklin ; Rev. A. N. Marlott, pastor ; mem- 
bership, 225; I. J. Armstrong, Sabbath school superintendent; 
average attendance at school about 155 ; number of teachers, 16; 
value of church property, $25,000. 

Missionary Baptist Church, Franklin ; Rev. L. Robinson, pas- 
tor; organized about the year 1837; membership, 200; S. C. 
Brown, Sabbath school superintendent; average attendance at 
school, 125; number of teachers, 15 ; value of church property, 
$3, 000. 

Second Regular Baptist Church (African), Franklin ; Rev. 
Mr. Singleton, pastor; membership, 20; H. Elsey, Sabbath 
school superintendent; average attendance at school, 20; value 
of church property, $750. 

Christian Church, Franklin; Rev. Mr. Land, pastor. We 
were not able to get a more extended history of this church, 
and we presume the purity of doctrine taught and its wholesome 
influence will be none the less in consequence thereof. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 145 



Hurricane Baptist Church, located four miles northeast of 
Franklin; Rev. Mr. Elgin, pastor; membership, 85; Sabbath 
school superintendent, W. W. McCaslin ; value of church prop- 
erty, #600 ; average attendance at Sabbath school, 60. 

First Mount Pleasant Baptist Church; four miles west of 
Franklin ; Rev. R. M. Parks, pastor ; membership, 64 ; George 
Byers, Sabbath school superintendent ; average attendance at 
school, 25 ; value of church property, $500. 

Methodist Union Church, Jollity ; Rev. S. , pastor ; mem- 
bership, 100; James Shipp, Sabbath school superintendent; 
average attendance at school, 50 ; value of church property, 
l5,OOa 

Shiloh Presbyterian Church ; three miles southeast of Frank- 
lin ; Rev. W. D. Hawkins, pastor ; membership not given ; Sab- 
bath school superintendent, Noah Parmer ; average attendance 
at school, 36; value of church property, $1,000. 

Hopewell Presbyterian Church ; Rev. L. E. Barr, pastor ; 
membership, 210; H. C. Lyster, Sabbath school superintend- 
ent ; average attendance at school, 100 ; value of church prop- 
erty, $8,000. 

Christian Chapel, three and one-half miles south of Franklin; 
Rev. Peter Baker, pastor ; membership, 40. 

Roman Catholic Church; Franklin ; Rev. Victor Schnell, pas- 
tor; organized about 1869; membership, 25; number of scholars, 
15 ; number of teachers, 2; value of church property, $1,000. 

SECRET ORGANIZATIONS. 

Franklin Lodge, No. 107, F. and A. M.; I. J. Armstrong, 
W. M.; F. J. Pusey, S. W.; R. S. Thompson, J. W.; office of 
S. D. vacant; James L. Davis, J. D.; E. W. Taylor, Secretary; 
R. T. Taylor, Treasurer; membership, 150; value of Lodge 
property, $5,000. 

10 



I46 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Johnson Lodge, No. j6, I. O. O. F. ; membership, 95 ; John 
Ragsdale, N. G.; John Johnson, V. G. ; S. C. Brown, Secretary, 
S. P. Oyler, Treasurer ; value of Lodge property and moneys, 
$4,000. 

Franklin Lodge, I. O. O. F., not in running order. 

Hesperian Lodge, No. 12, Knights of Pythias; Franklin; 
H. C. Allison, C. C. ; A. D. Whitesides, V. C. ; C. B. Caddy, 
Prelate; W. B. Ellis, P. C.; A. G. Hicks, M. of A.; B. M. Hol- 
man, K. of R. and S.; W. R. Conner, M. of F.; S. W. Leiper, 
I. G. ; C. Smith, O. G. This Lodge was instituted November 
23, 1 87 1. Its present membership is about 75. This order has 
one among the finest Lodge rooms in the State. Value of Lodge 
property, moneys, etc., about $2000. 

Ancient Order of Foresters, Franklin. Membership, 30. 
P. J. Salmons, Chief Ranger. 

Second Degree Ancient Shepherds. P. J. Salmons, Pastor. 
Value of Lodge property, $150. 

Sugar Creek Grange, No. 1306. Organized February 2, 
1874; membership, 64; James R. McConnell, Master; D. S. 
Groos, Overseer ; James H. Kelly, Steward; Rev. John Stewart, 
Chaplain; W. J. Allison, Lecturer; John Fisher, Treasurer; 
Wm. Conway, Secretary; W. J. Mavity, Gate-keeper; J. S. 
Webb, Assistant Steward ; Miss Anna Kelley, Ceres ; Mrs. 
Hannah McConnell, Pomona; Miss E. E.Fisher, Flora; Mrs. 
Nora Martin, Assistant Steward ; value of Lodge property, $50. 

Hopewell Lodge, Patrons of Husbandry; membership, 85; 
Master, John H Vannyce ; value of Lodge property, $7$. 

Grange No. 706; organized 1873; W. T. Hougham, Master; 
J. T. Hendricks, Secretary; membership, 84; value of Lodge 
property, $80. 

DIKECTORY OF FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 

ALLISON, H. C; editor Franklin Jeffersonian; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. I47 



Allison, John A.; dry goods clerk; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1832. Rep. Presbyterian. 

ALEXANDER, JAMES M.; farmer; I m s Franklin. Born 
in Tenn. 1818; settled in J. C. 1827. Dem. Universalist. 

Alexander, Thos. H. ; farmer; 2 m s e Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1832. Rep. Cumberland Presby. 

Abbett, L. O.; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1853. Objects to peo- 
ple knowing his political and religious views. 

Adams, Samuel; farmer; 2^ m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1846. Rep. Presbyterian. 

ADAMS, JAMES A.; farmer; 2*m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1834. Rep. Protestant. 

Adams, M. D.; farmer; 1 m s e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1839. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Alexander, M. G. ; dealer in agricultural implements; Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1832; settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Meth. 

Abbett, J. W.; firm of Abbett & Johnson, dry goods and gro- 
ceries; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1821; settled in J. C. 1835. 
Dem. Neutral. 

Adams, L.; farmer; 1 m n w Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1812; 
settled in B. C. 1840. Rep. Universalist. 

Adams, Charles; farmer; 1 m s Franklin. Born in Ohio 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Protestant. 

ALEXANDER, JAMES P.; farmer; 2 m s Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1844. Dem. Universalist. 

Alexander, S. ; farmer; 3 J m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1838. 
Rep. Cumberland Presbyterian. 



I48 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Alderson, J. W.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Mo. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Aten, Abram; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1826; settled 
in J. C. 1832. Rep. Methodist. 

Adams, W. B.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. Rep. 
Baptist. 

Aplegate, John; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Abbett, Andrew J.; farmer; 2mne Amity. Born in Ind. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Protestant. 

ADAMS, J. H.; physician and surgeon; Amity. Born in Ind. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Protestant. 

ADAMS, MRS. MARY; farmer; fmn Amity. Born in Ky. 
1815; settled in J. C. 1837. Presbyterian. 

Adams, Geo. C; farmer; 3 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1806; 
settled in J. C. 1820. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Adams, Lloyd; farmer; fmn Amity. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Atkinson, D. G.; shoemaker; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841 ; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Methodist. 



BROWN, JAMES M.; farmer; 1 m n Amity. Born in Ind. 
1843; settled in J. C. about 1849. Rep. Miss. Baptist. 

Brown, Peter; farmer; 4 mse Franklin. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1849. Rep. Protestant. 

Beeson, Isaac; retired farmer; 5 m n Edinburgh. Born in N. 
C. 1 801; settled in J. C. about 1824. Dem. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 49 

Beeson, Isaac R.; farmer; 5 m n Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Beeson, Dillard; farmer; 5 m n Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Brockman, John; farmer; 5 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

BYFIELD, WHITCOMB; farmer; % m n Urmayville. Born 
in Ind. 1843; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Bogart, Henry; wagonmaker ; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1852. 

Bergen, D. D. ; carpenter and builder; Franklin. Born in J.C. 
1 83 1. Rep. Protestant. 

Bice, J. B.; carriage-maker; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1838; set- 
tled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

BESS, JOHN ; proprietor hotel; Franklin. Born in J. 0.1853- 
Democrat. 

Batcher, Henry; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1822; settled 
in J. C. 1856. Rep. Methodist. 

BOBBINS, WM.; superintendent water station; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1842. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Baldwin, A.; retired merchant; Franklin Born in N. J. 1803; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Christian. 

Branham, James; engineer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841; set- 
tled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Christian. 

Brown, W. S.; undertaker; Franklin. Born in N. J. 1822; set- 
tled in J. C. 1855. R ep. Methodist. 



IIJO JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Bannister, W. H.; house, sign and ornamental painter; Frank- 
lin. Born in Ohio 185 1; settled in J. C. 1873. Liberal. 
Free Thinker. 

Bryan, D. B.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1827; settled in 
J. C. 1864. Dem. Missionary Baptist. 

Beard, Mrs. Mary J.; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1822; settled in 
J. C. 1842. Missionary Baptist. 

Barnett, John S. ; bridge builder; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. Protestant. 

BEESON, MARTIN ; farmer; 1 % m n Jollity. Born in Ind. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Methodist. 

BROWN, J. H.; farmer; 1 m n Amity. Born in N. C. 1831; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Missionary Baptist. 

Bergen, A.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 18; settled in J. 
C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Buck, Sender; night watchman ; Franklin. Born in Germany, 
1825; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Butheford, L. J.; peddler; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1840; settled 
in J. C. 1872. Rep. Christian. 

Bale, G. W.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. Rep. 
Universalist. 

Bowen. J. W.; coal and lime dealer ; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1835; settled in J. C. 1842. Rep. Methodist. 

Bartlett, W. H.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1820; settled 
in J. C. 1822. Dem. Protestant. 

Bronson, Dwight; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1833; settled 
in J. C. 1869. Rep. Christian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 151 



Bronson, Charles; retired farmer; I m w Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1825; settled in J. C. 1870. Christian. 

Bright, John; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1873. Republican. Granger. 

Bool, Brainard; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Republican. Presbyterian. 

Bennie, Wm. M.; farmer; 4 m n e. Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1837. Democrat. Baptist. 

Bogart, Joseph; retired farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Republican. Presbyterian. 

BELLMORE, W. H.; drayman; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1856. Democrat. Christian. 

Burkhart, F. L. ; ice merchant; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Democrat. Protestant. 

BULLOCK, JOHN F.; marshal and bricklayer; Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1832; settled in J. C. 1869. Republican. 
Christian. 

Buckingham, W. J.; school teacher; Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1849; settled in J. C. 1871. Democrat. Protestant. 

Bergen, J. P.; blacksmith; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1833. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Brewer, B. E.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Presbyterian. 

Brown, J. L.; farmer; 7 m n w Franklin. Born in Va. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1839. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Banta, Samuel; farmer; $% m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1831; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Presbyterian. 



152 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Bryant, B.; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; settled 
in J. C. 1832. Rep. Methodist. 

BRANHAM, DAVIS ; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1833; settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Protestant. 

Bennett, Even; retired farmer; 3 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1794. Dem. Baptist. 

Bennett, John E.; farmer; 2 J m n e Franklin. Born in J. C 
1843. Dem. Baptist. 

Brown, J. M.; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Rep. Granger. 

Bane, R. L.; retired farmer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1804; set- 
tled in J. C. 1859. Rep. Presbyterian. 

BISHOP, H. J.; watchmaker and jeweler; Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1829; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Christian. 

Beall, John; hardware merchant; Franklin; firm of Alexander & 
Beall. Born in Ohio 1825; settled in J. C. i860. 

Beard, John; general trader; Franklin. Born in j. C. 1842. 
Rep. M. Baptist. 

BLIZARD, J. L.; firm of Blizard & Sons; grocers and bakers; 
Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. 
Methodist. 

BLIZARD, A. A.; firm of Blizard & Sons; grocers and bakers; 
Franklin. Born in Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. 
Methodist. 

BROWN, S. C; books, stationery, wall paper and picture 
frames; Franklin. Born in N. C. 1841 ; settled in J. C. 
i860. Rep. M. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 



Baldwin, J. H.; boot and shoe dealer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1822; settled in J. C. 1872. -Neutral. 

Bannister, S. L. ; fashionable boot maker; Franklin. Born in 
Ohio 1824; settled in J. C. 1874. Methodist. 

BLIZARD, S. W.; firm of Blizard & Sons, grocers and bakers; 
Franklin. Born in Ky. 1819; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Babb, G. W.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1848; settled 
in J. C 1874. Rep. Presbyterian. 

BANTA, D. D.; Judge Sixteenth Circuit; Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1833. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Bowman, D. R.; tailor; Franklin. Born in Md. 1824; settled 
in J. C. 1867. Rep. Lutheran. 

Bone, R. L. ; agent agricultural implements; Franklin. Born 
in Ohio 1840; settled in J. C. 1859. Rep. Presbyterian. 

BRONSON, GEO. E. ; retired from business ; Franklin. Born 
in Ohio 1823; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Christian. 

Berry, Wm. H.; farmer; 1 J m n Franklin. Born in Ohio 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1839. Republican. Methodist. 

Barrett, John; farmer and gardener; Franklin. Born in Va. 
1807; settled in J. C. 1874. Democrat. Methodist. 

Buttram, T. H.; farmer; ^ m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. 
Democrat. Methodist. 

BYERS, HENRY S., Jr.; farmer; i£ m s w Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1841. Republican. Christian. 

Bennett, J. M.; farmer; i|ms Franklin. Born in Arkansas 
1843; settled in J. C. 1865. Democrat. Protestant. 



154 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Brumit, S. ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Tenn. 1832; settled 
in J. C. 1 86 1. Republican. Presbyterian. 

BANTA, JOHN E.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1845. Granger. Presbyterian. 

BANTA, P. J.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Banta, D. B. ; student of theology; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1847. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Banta, G. C; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. Presbyterian. 

Banta, John P.; was one of the first settlers; settled in 1828. A 
life-long Democrat, and member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Bond, William; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in Ireland 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Brown, R. T. ; pastor of Christian Union Church ; 4 m s w 
Franklin. 

Byers, H. S., Sr.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1823; 
settled in J. C. 1825. Rep. Protestant. 

Byers, Robert M.; farmer; 3I m sw Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1845. R e P- Protestant. 

Byers, George; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Rep. M. Baptist. 

BRIDGES, GEO. T.; farmer; 2 m n e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1 83 1. Dem. Christian. 

BRONSON, CHARLES; real estate owner and money lender; 
Franklin. Born in Ohio 1825; settled in J. C. 1869. Non- 
political. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. I 55 



Branigin, Thomas; farmer and stock trader; 5|msw Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1825; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. Christian. 

Brown, Nichols; butcher; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1836; settled 
in J. C. 1862. Dem. Methodist. 

Burnett, H.; railroad contractor; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Protestant. 

Ballenger, Harvey; baker and grocer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1870. Republican. Methodist. 

BALDWIN & PAYNE; proprietors flouring mills, and grain 
dealers; Franklin. 

Brewer, Marshal; farmer; 5 J m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1849. Republican. Presbyterian. 

Bundy, Wm.; carpenter; 1 m s e Needham. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Republican. Christian. 

BOWER, JACOB; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in N. C. 
1809; settled in J. C. 1848. Liberal. Universalist. 



CUTSINGER, GEORGE ; farmer, Treasurer and Collector ot 
Johnson Co. Born in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Crom, James; butcher; Franklin. Born in Va. 1831; settled in 
J. C. 183 1. Dem. Methodist. 

Cole, C. M.; wagon and carriage maker ; Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1846. Dem. Protestant. 

Clark, Frank; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Dem. Protestant. 

CREASEY, G. G.; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Methodist. 



156 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Clark, W. T. ; clerk in liquor store ; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. Protestant. 

Christy, Walter ; barber and hair dresser ; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Methodist. 

Christy, Theodore; barber and hair dresser; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1845; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Methodist. 

CASSELMAN, SAMUEL; barber; Franklin. Born in Pa. 
1839; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Protestant. 

Caddy, C. B.; printer; Franklin. Born in D. C. 1847; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

Carnine, A. N.; carriage shop; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 183 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Clark, Mich.; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 12; settled in 
J. C. 1872. Rep. Baptist. 

Cadwallader, S. ; baker; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1840; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Rep. Christian. 

CAVANAUGH, W. H.; turner and machinist; Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1842; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Casey, James; laborer; Franklin. Born in Canada West 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Catholic. 

COVERT, I. I.; saw mill and lumber dealer; Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1823; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Covert, James V.; farmer; 6 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1 821; settled in J. C. 1825. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Covert, John R.; farmer; 3I m 11 w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Presbyterian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 157 

COVERT, JAMES E.; farmer; 3|mnw Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1853. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Covert, Sim. ; retired carpenter and farmer; 3^ m n w Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1792; settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Presbyte- 
rian. Mr. C. helped to cut a road through Franklin, where 
the public square now stands. 

Canary, Wm. M.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1845. Democrat. Baptist. 

Canary, J. H.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Democrat. Baptist. 

Carson, John; dealer in dry goods, hats, caps and notions; 
Franklin. Born in Ky. 1835; settled in J. C. 1846. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

CLARK, L. H.; artist; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. Neu- 
tral. Methodist. 

Conner, Wm. M.; tobacconist; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Republican. Protestant. 

COLTON, A. B.; foundry and machinist; Franklin. Born in 
Mass. 1830; settled in J. C. 1861. Indpt. Episcopal. 

Chambers, C. G.; railroader; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1846; set- 
tled in J. C. 1866. Republican. Methodist. 

COFFELT, W. A. ; stencil cutter and artist ; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1850. Rep. Protestant. 

Clem, S. H.; Post Master; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Cole, Pleasant ; farmer ; 1 m e Needham Station. Born in Ky. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. M. Baptist. 



I58 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Conger, Rolla P.; miller; 5^ m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Cox, S. W. ; teamster; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1862. Rep. Protestant. 

Cox, D. D.; farmer; Amity. Born in Ohio 1833; settled in J. 
C. 1862. Dem. Protestant. 

Cutsinger, Geo.; farmer; y 2 m s Amity. Born in Ind. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Protestant. 

CUTSINGER, E.; farmer; y 2 m s Amity. Born in Ind. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Protestant. 

CRABTREE, JAMES ; farmer; 1 m n w Franklin. Born in 
Tenn. 1843; settled in J. C. 1S71. Rep. Baptist. 

Covert; S. H.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Chambers, David; farmer; 3^ m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1833. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Cloud, John; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in Tenn. 1837; set- 
tled in J. C 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

Chamberlain, F. M.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Baptist. 

Campbell, T. J.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Tenn. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Baptist inclined. 

Craig, J.; ditcher; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in Ireland 1824; set- 
tled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Protestant. 

Cole, Charley; wagon and carriage maker; Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1846. Democrat. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. I 59 



Clark, C. B. ; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1845; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Democrat. Protestant. 

Cox, Samuel; butcher; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1862. Republican. 

Crow, Edward; farmer; Franklin. Born in Va. 1824; settled in 
J. C. 1840. Republican. Presbyterian. 

Cooper, P. A.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1848; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 

COFFELT, JOHN; farmer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Crowell, Wm. C. ; cooper; Franklin. Born in N. J. 1829; set- 
tled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Combs, Stephen; farmer; 4m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Combs, J. A.; farmer; 5 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1797; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Christian. 

COVERT, B. V.; farmer; 5 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Presbyterian. 

COVERT, J. C; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1823; 
settled in B. C. 1825 or '26. Rep. Methodist. 

Coal, Robert; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; set 
tied in J. C. 1867. Dem. Protestant. 

Coons, G. C; farmer; 3J m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Baptist. 

CLARK, WILLIAM ; miller, and proprietor of the Mt. Pleas- 
ant Water Power Flouring Mills; 3 m e Franklin. Born in. 
N. J. 1841; settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Episcopal. 



l60 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Coffett, Amanda J.; farmer; %_ m n w Amity. Born in N. C. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1857. M. Baptist. 

Camel, J. E. ; farmer; Franklin. Born in N. C. 1850; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Dem. Christian. 

Crane, J. P.; farmer; 4m se Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Dem. Protestant. 

CONWAY, WILLIAM; farmer; % m w Needham Station. 
Born in Ind. 1831; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Prot. 

Cornell, L. L. ; farm laborer; % m w Needham Station. Born 
in N. Y. 1851; settled in J. C. 1871. Liberal Rep. M. 
Baptist. 

CANARY, P. A.; attorney; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Rep. Protestant. 



Dunn, Rease; butcher; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; settled 
in J. C. 1855. Rep. Protestant. 

Dennis, W.; farmer; 1 m w Franklin, Born in Ky. 1824; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 87 1. Rep. Protestant. 

Davis, John; farmer; 3 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1813; set- 
tled in J. C. 1824. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Dungan, S. W. ; farmer and stock trader; 3 J m n Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1837. Rep. Methodist. 

Dennis, B. H.; farmer; i^mw Franklin. Born in Ky. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

Davis, Absalom; sexton; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1809; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Rep. Christian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. l6l 



DIXON, FRANKLIN; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Protestant 

Dolph, E. L.; minister M. E. church; Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1826; settled in J. C. 1873. 

Dunlap, J. A.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Tenn. 181 1; settled 
in J. C. 1833. Rep. Baptist. 

Davis, W. A.; gardener; Franklin. Born in Ind. 18 14; settled 
in J. C. 1866. Rep. Baptist. 

Drake, W.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1834. Dem. 
Methodist. 

Dickson, B. F.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1821; set- 
tled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Baptist. 

Dunlap, J. H.; plasterer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Dunlap, S. L.; plasterer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1851. Rep. 
Protestant. 

Dunn, Samuel; township trustee; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Presbyterian. 

DAUGHARTY, VIRGINIA; Franklin. Born in Va. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Christian. 

DAVIS, A.; physician and surgeon; Needham Station. Born 
in J. C. 1837. Dem. Latitudinarian. 

DAVIS, S. M.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Protestant. 

DUNHAM, WM.; farmer; Amity. Born in Ky. 1838; settled 
in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 

11 



1 62 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Dooley, Newton; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 15; 
settled in J. C 1872. Rep. M. Baptist. 

DEVORE, GEORGE; farmer; y/ 2 m s e Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1841. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Devore, David; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1837. 

Rep. Protestant. 

• 

Deich, Samuel ; horse, carriage and buggy dealer ; Franklin. 

Born in France, 181 1; settled in J. C. 1840. Liberal Dem. 

Jew. 

Demoree, Peter; contractor and builder; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1819; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Davis, J. L. ; harness maker; firm of Shafer & Davis; Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Meth. 

Dunlap, J. C; grocer and baker; firm of Dunlap & Bro.; Frank- 
lin. 

Dunlap, W. L.; grocer and baker; firm of Dunlap & Bro.; 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. Rep. Methodist. 

Dill, P. M.; clerk and student ; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Free Thinker. 

Donnell, John H.; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in 
N.J. 1822; settled in J. C. 1855. Re P- Methodist. 

Dunn, James W. ; contractor; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1845; set- 
tled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Old School Presbyterian. 

DITMARS, C. L.; model farmer; 2|mw Franklin. Born in 
N. J. 1825; settled in J. C. 1836. Liberal Rep. Presby. 

Demott, J. J.; farmer; 5! m w Franklin. Born in Ky.; settled 
in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 63 



Dunlap, Mrs. E.; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in N. C. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1839. Methodist. 

Dunlap, J. C; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; set- 
tled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Protestant. 

Ditmars, Win,; farmer; 1 m s Franklin. Born in N. J. 18 13; 
settled in J. C. 1837. R- e P- Protestant. 

DlTMORE, J. T.; farmer; i£ m s Franklin. Born in N. J. 
183-; settled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Protestant. 

Ditmars, R. V.; dry goods, notions, hats and caps, also wool 
dealer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1835; settled in J. C. 1836. 
Republican. Prohibitionist. Protestant. 

Davis, Dan. C; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Donahey, W. H.; Assistant Attorney General; Franklin. Born 
in Ohio 1827; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Baptist. 

Demorn, S. W. ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1847; se *- 
tled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Protestant. 

DEMPSA, SILAS; engineer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Protestant. 

Drake, Josiah; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1828; settled 
in J. C. 1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Dunlap, J. M.; railroad agent, and grain, coal and building ma- 
terial dealer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1844; settled in J. C. 
185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Dawson, E.; farmer; 3J m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Dem. Neutral. 

Dawson, Geo.; farmer; 6 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Mixed. Not any. 



164 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Dawson, Alex.; farmer; 3 J m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Dem. Neutral. 

Dunlap, James; retired; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Ohio 1802; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

DUNLAP, M. M.; school boy; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
i860. Catecumical. Presbyterian. 

Ditmars, P.; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in N.J. 1823; set- 
tled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Presbyterian. 

DOLLINS, WM.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1842. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Dunn & Wheat; merchant tailors and clothiers; Franklin. 

Duckworth, Wm.; farmer; 4^ m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1827. Dem. Protestant. 

Doan, Wm.; farmer; 1^ m n e Amity. Born in J. C. 1826. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Devore, Thurit; retired farmer; 3 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1803; settled in J. C. about 1836. Rep. C. Presbyterian. 

Devore, Clay; farmer; 3 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Dunn, O. C; merchant tailor; Franklin. Born in Ind. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Presbyterian. 

DUNN & WHEAT ; dealers in clothing and gents' furnishing 
goods; Franklin. 



Elsey, Jordan; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1835; settled in 
J. C. 1866. Rep. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 65 

Eversole, J. H.; firm of Fisk & Eversole; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Protestant. 

ELGY, JOSEPH; physician; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

Eaton, J. F.; farmer; i|mne Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Dem. Baptist. 

English, M. G.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Christian. 

Edleman, Wm.; farmer; 1 m n Amity. Born in Tenn. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Protestant. 

Ellis, W. B.; retired merchant; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Rep. Protestant. 

Ernest, H.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1828; settled in 
J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

Eagles, F. W.; plasterer; Franklin. Born in N. J. 185 1; set- 
tled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 

Ecols, Jacob; 1 m w Franklin. Born in Va. 1801; settled in 
J. C. 1868. Rep. Baptist. 

Enise, Walker; farmer; ^ m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1807; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Methodist. 

Elapyander, Jane; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1824; settled 
in J. C. 1834. Presbyterian. 

Ernist, David; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in Va. 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. Baptist. 

Eldrich, Silvester; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in 111. 1852- 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Protestant. 



1 66 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



FLINN, THOMAS ; farmer; 2 m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Christian. 

Featherngill, D. F.; farmer; 4m sw Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Christian. 

FEATHERNGILL, JOHN H.; farmer, pork packer and mem- 
ber of Davies Co. Coal Company 54ms Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1822; settled in J. C. 1829. Rep. Christian. 

FORSYTH, JAMES ; retired farmer; 2 m n e Trafalgar. Born 
in Ky. 1813; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Fosett, John; barber; Franklin. Born in Md. 1836; settled in 
J. C. 1853. R ep. Methodist. 

FRAME, CHARLES H.; watch maker and jeweler; also 
dealer in clocks and watches; Franklin. Born in Germany 
1837; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Protestant. 

Freeman, Ellenor T. ; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; settled in 
J. C. 1865. Presbyterian. 

FISHER, WILLIAM ; farmer; \ m s Urmayville. Born in J. 
C. 1849. Granger. Protestant. 

FISHER, JACOB; farmer; % m s Urmayville. Born in N. C. 
1802; settled in J. C. 1829. Granger. Universalist. 

Frosh, Hilb.; grocery clerk; Franklin. Born in Prussia 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Presbyterian. 

Foley, Jeremiah; boot and shoemaker; Franklin. Born in Ire- 
land 1830; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Catholic. 

Fesler, J. R.; stock trader; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1835; set " 
tied in J. C. 1864. Rep. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 67 



FRAD Y, A. B. ; foreman saw mill ; Franklin. Born in N. C. 
183 1; settled in J. C. 1832. Liberal Rep. Methodist. 

Fisk, H. D.; firm of Fisk & Eversole; Franklin. Born in N. 
Y. 1813; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Christian. 

Fleming, J. R.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; set- 
tled in J. C. i860. Dem. Baptist. 

Farley, J.; hod carrier; Franklin. Born in Dublin 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Catholic. 

Freeman, J. B.; farmer; 2\ m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Rep. Baptist. 

Freeman, Charles; farmer; 2^ m n Franklin. Born in N. J. 
1808; settled in J. C. 1837. Granger. 

Fisher, W. H., Jr.; farmer; 1^ m s Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Fisher, W. H.; farmer; i|ms Whiteland. Born in Ky. 18 13; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Presbyterian. 

FOSETT & CHRISTY ; barbers and hair dressers; Franklin. 

Fisk & Eversole ; eclectic physicians and surgeons; Franklin. 

Fisher, R. W.; farmer; 1 m s Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Fisher, Henry; merchant and deputy Post Master; Urmyville. 
Born in J. C. 1830. Dem. Protestant. 

Fisher, John; farmer; 1 m n w Urmayville. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Granger. M. Baptist. 



l68 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Gibson, James; boot and shoemaker; Franklin. Born in Pa. 
1852; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Protestant. 

Garie, Imlack E.; painter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Rep. Protestant. 

Greene, G. S. ; stone cutter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

GITHENS, THOMAS E.; engineer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Baptist. 

GIBBS, JOHN; brick moulder; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Methodist. 

Griffith, G. F.; tinner; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1846; settled in 
J. C. 1870. Rep. Protestant. 

Gilchrist, Geo. W. ; firm of Luyster & Gilchrist; merchant tail- 
ors and dealers in boots and shoes; Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

GREGG, WILLIAM ; retired farmer ; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1 8 10; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Goodman, Henry; teamster; Franklin. Born in Tenn. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Garshwiler, G. F. ; farmer ; 5 m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1836. Dem. Christian. 

Greaham, J. H.; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Good, James; farmer; 1 m s e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1830. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Good, D. H.; farmer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 69 



Graves, Louis; janitor public school ; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 
1815 ; settled in J. C. 1851. Dem. Methodist. 

Graves, G. H.; coach painter; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1847; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Baptist. 

Graves, Mon.; boot and shoemaker; Franklin. Born in Mass 
1828; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Philanthropic. 

Gibson, H. J.; foreman in A. Freeman's harness and saddle 
shop; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. 1831. 
Dem. Liberal. 

GILASPY, ROBERT; sheriff; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1827. 
Dem. Protestant. 

GOLDEN, JAMES ; house painter and paper hanger; 6 m n w 
Franklin. Born in Ind. 1844; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Gross, H. W.; farmer; 2 m n e Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1841. 
Dem. Christian. 

Goss, Wra.; farmer; 4 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 87 1. Rep. Protestant. 

GREEN, F. M.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Baptist. 

Gribben, W. P.; farmer; 1 m n Amity. Born in Ky. 1823; 
settled in J. C. 1831. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Gribben, John; retired farmer; 1 m n Amity. Born in Ky. 
1796; settled in J. C. 183 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

GROSS, DAVID S. ; farmer; % m w Needham Station. Born 
in N. C. 1 841; settled in J. C. 1850. Granger. Meth. 



170 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Hazlett, Wm.; teamster; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. Rep. 
Protestant. 

Hunt, Jas. S.; farmer; 3 J m e Franklin. Born in E. Tenn. 
1831; settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Hendricks, E. M.; cripple; 5 m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Hendricks, J. M.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 183 1. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Harris, Geo. T.; farmer; 8 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Protestant. 

HENDRICKS, S. B.; farmer; 3 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1834. Rep. M. Baptist. 

HENDRICKS, T. H.; farmer; 3 m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1839. Granger. Protestant. 

HENDRICKS, JOHN G.; farmer and carpenter; 3! m e Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1841. Granger. Protestant. 

Harris, Geo.; farmer; 3 m e Franklin. Born in Va. 1805; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

Howell, H.; farmer; 8 m n e Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

HARMON, ISAAC; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1822; settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Methodist. 

HOUGH AM, WM. T.; farmer; 2|mse Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1825; settled in J. C. 1831. Granger. Protestant. 

•Homllel, A.; farmer; 2 m s e Urmayville. Born in Va. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. I7I 



Hunter, A. B.; attorney; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; settled 
in J. C. 1840. Rep. Protestant. 

Hamilton, R. M.; druggist; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Protestant 

Hoyt, David; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1820; settled in 
J. C. 1852. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Henshaw, C. E.; miller; Franklin. Born in Va. 1849; settled 
in J. C. i860. Rep. Protestant. 

HUNT, JEFFERSON; teamster; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1856. Dem. Protestant. 

Hodge, Samuel ; day laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Protestant. 

Higgins, R. E.; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
18 16; settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Methodist. 

Halstead. E. O.; brick maker and general builder; Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1834; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Presb. 

Hemhill, David; teamster; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Hagen, G. W. L.; ice dealer; Franklin. Born in Mass. 1805; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Protestant. 

HALL, W. C; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in 
1832; settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Liberal. 

Hopper, J. B.; stock trader; Franklin. Born in Ky. 183 1; set- 
tled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 

Herriott, John; retired farmer; Franklin. Born in Penn. 1801; 
settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Presbyterian. 



I7 2 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Hougham, Eli; farmer; 2 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1823; set- 
tled in J. C. 1832. Rep. Regular Baptist. 

HICKS, A. I.; photographer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Neutral. Christian. 

Halstead, F. J.; brick maker; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Hoyt, Wm.; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; settled in 
J. C. 1852. Neutral. Protestant. 

HAMILTON, DUKE; City Treasurer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1808; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Christian. 

HARRIS, T. W.; plasterer; Franklin. Born in Pa. 183 1; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

Hunt, Joseph; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1805; settled in 
J. C. 1824. Dem. M. Baptist. When Mr. Hunt came 
to Johnson county the court house was a log structure 20 
by 30 feet, covered with shaved poplar shingles; the court 
room was up stairs, and the stairs were made of two long 
poles planked over like a slanting bridge floor. 

Hall, James T. ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in N. C. 18 12; set- 
tled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Baptist. 

Hyder, John; laborer; Franklin. Born in Germany 1808; set- 
tled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Presbyterian. Second German 
who settled in Franklin. 

HIGH, J. W.; firm of High & Son; planing and saw mills; 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. Presbyterian. 

High, John; firm of High & Son; planing and saw mills; Frank- 
lin. Born in N. C. 18 12; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. 
Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 173 

Halstead, T. T.; brick mason; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1813; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Prohibition. Church of God. 

Hamilton, R.; trader; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. Rep. 
Baptist. 

Hutchison, A. W.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Methodist. 

Hutchison, J. W.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1838; set- 
tled in J. C. i860. Rep. Methodist. 

Hanley, P. ; section man; Franklin. Born in Ireland. Catholic. 

Heinken, S. P.; retired; Franklin. Born in England 1802; set- 
tled in J. C. 1852. Liberal Rep. Free Church. 

Hirwin, Geo.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1805; 
settled in J. C. 1850. 

Hendricks, E.; farmer; 2]/ 2 m s Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

Henderson, H. D.; farmer; 4^ m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
183 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Hunter, J. H.; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Rep. Christian. 

HARDIN, THOMAS; deputy clerk of Johnson county court; 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant. 

Hite, John A.; buggy maker; Franklin. Born in Germany 
1 841; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Haylett, Matthew; livery, sale and feed stable; Franklin. Born 
in Ireland 1824; settled in J. C. 1852. Liberal Rep. 
Presbyterian. 



174 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



HALFAKER, P. C; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Rep. Protestant. 

HEINEKEN, MRS. C; millinery and fancy goods ; Franklin. 
Presbyterian. 

Hord, H. W.; farmer; 2 x / 2 m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 185 1 ; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Henderson, J. S.; farmer and stock trader; 4^ m w Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1839. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Henderson, Robert E.; horse trader; 2 m n w Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1835. Rep. Protestant. 

Herriott, E. M.; farmer; 1% m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Hoglan, Samuel; farmer; i|ms Franklin. Born in Ind. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Christian. 

Hite, Samuel; farmer; 1 J m s w Franklin. Born in Tenn. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Baptist. 

Holmes & Rogers; dealers in dry goods and notions ; Franklin. 

Holmes, J.; merchant; Franklin. Born in Ind. 18 19; settled in 
J. C. 1857. Re P- Christian. 

Holmes, Chas. H.; clerk in dry goods store; Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1849; settled in J. C. 1857. Rep. Protestant. 

HAMILTON, W. A.; agricultural store, all kinds of farm ma- 
chines and implements; agent for American Express Co. ; 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

HUBER & SONS; manufacturers of and dealers in all kinds of 
furniture and Huber's Patent Extension Table; Franklin. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 175 

Huber, Fredolin; dealer in furniture; Franklin. Born in Ger- 
many 1822; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. 

Huber, Frederick; furniture dealer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1850; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. 

HERRIOTT, G. F.; pork packer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1840. Rep. Protestant. 

Holman, B. M. ; secretary B. and M. Association; Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1850. Dem. Protestant. 

Harrell, John; teamster; Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 14; settled 
in J. C. 1832. Dem. Baptist. 

Huffman, S. E.; dress-maker; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Methodist. 

HARDIMAN, J.; carriage trimmer; Franklin. Born in Ireland 
1839; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Protestant. 

Hutchison, J. W.; traveling agent; Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1838; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Methodist. 

Hardin, Geo.; day laborer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Christian. 

Huber, I.; furniture dealer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1856; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Catholic. 

Huber, John; furniture dealer ; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1854; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Catholic. 

Hay, F. M.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1844; settled in 
J. C. i860. Rep. Christian. 

HOUGHAM, W. T., Jr.; county surveyor; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1844. Dem. R. Baptist. 



176 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Halstead, T. T.; bricklayer; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 18 13; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Christian. 

HILL, W. H.; day laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; set- 
tled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Protestant. 

Hysell, G. W.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1841; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 

Haymaker, E. P.; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in Va. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Henderson, H. O.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. Presbyterian. . 

Huffman, P.; farmer; 6|m nw Franklin. Born in Ky. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Henderson, Robert; horse dealer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in J. 
C. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Hughes, D. V.; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 12; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Protestant. 

Henderson, James; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1822. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Hunt, Shelby; farmer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1834. Dem. 
Protestant. 

HUNT, NATHAN R.; farmer; 4fme Franklin. Born in E. 
Tenn. 1825; settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Hayes, I. W.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1832; set- 
tled in J. C. about i860. Protestant. 

HENDRICKS, L. N,; farmer; 3^ m s e Franklin. Born 
in 1803; settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Predestinarian 
Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 177 

HENDRICKS, LAWRENCE; farmer; 2^ m s e Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1852. Rep. Baptist. 

Henderson, Lewis N.; farmer; i 1 /, m n e Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Hall, Franklin; farmer; 2|mw Franklin. Born in Ky. 1829; 
settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Hicks, Henry T.; farmer; 2 J m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Baptist. 

Hicks, Samuel M.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1813; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Baptist. 

Hathrington, H. J.; merchant at leisure; Franklin. Born in 
Va. 1838; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Methodist. 



Israel, Pleas. ; millwright; Franklin. Born in Mo. 1834; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Dem. Methodist. 

Itcentheiser, H.; laborer; Franklin. Born in Germany, 181 5 ; 
settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Idner, G. W.; floriculturist, gardner and nurseryman; Franklin. 
Born in Ohio 1848; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Meth. 

Isonn, J. A.; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; settled in 
J. C. 1865. Dem. Methodist. 

Israel, F. M.; engineer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1831. Dem. 
Protestant. 

ISRAEL, W. W. ; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. Granger. Protestant. 
12 



I78 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



JOHNSON, RICHARD M.; attorney at law; Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1845; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Universalist. 

Jackson, Hillis; farmer; Hopewell; 3 m w Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1832; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Christian. 

Johnson, A. J.; farmer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. Rep. 
Baptist. 

Jeffery, R. T.; farmer; 5 m w Franklin. Born in Pa. 1837; set- 
tled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Presbyterian. 

JONES, WM. C; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1844. Rep. Christian. 

Jameson I.; farmer; 2 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1831; set- 
tled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Christian. 

Jones, D. P.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in Va. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. Protestant. 

JOHNSON, C. C; stock dealer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1800; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Methodist. 

Jackson, N. W.; butcher; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; settled 
in J. C. 1862. Dem. Christian. 

Johns, Wm. F. ; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Granger. Baptist. 

JOHNSON, R. J.; barber and manufacturer of hair restorer; 
Franklin. Born in Ohio 1833; settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Johnson, Q. A.; dealer in dry goods and groceries; Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1828; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Christian. 

Johnson, Nathaniel; farmer; 2 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1843. Rep. M. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 79 



JONES, J. D.; furniture dealer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1799; 
settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Christian. Mr. Jones cast a 
vote at the first election held in this county. There were 
but forty-four votes cast, and Mr. Jones is the only one of 
these voters now living. The territory on which Franklin 
now stands was then covered with spice brush and wild pea 
vines. 

Jordan, Joshua P.; miller; Franklin. Born in Ohio 18 19; set- 
tled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

Jones, Frank; dry goods clerk; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849. 

Jones, J. G. ; dry goods, groceries and general store; Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1824; settled in J. C. 183 1. Rep. 

JACKSON, WM.; planing machinist; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Protestant. 

Jones, W. J.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1859. Temperance man. Christian. 

Jackson, J.; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1850; settled in J. 
C. 1868. Rep. Protestant. 

Johnson, H. C; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Protestant. 

JACOBS & POTTENGER; livery, sale and feed stable; Franklin. 

JACOBS, J. M.; firm of Jacobs & Pottenger; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

JOHNSON, SIMEON C; farmer; 1% m s e Franklin. Born 
in Ohio 1815; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

JORDAN, OSCAR; farmer; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1854; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Protestant. 



l80 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Jones, W. W.; stock dealer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1820; set- 
tled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

Jones, B. G.; sawyer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. Dem. 
Christian. 

Jackson, Reubin; farmer; Franklin. Born in N. C. 1824; settled 
in J. C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Jefry, T. A.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1838; settled in J. 
C. 1838. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Jones, Wm. C. ; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Rep. Christian. 



King, H. W.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1845; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Dem. Protestant. 

KEITH, HENRY; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1827; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Methodist. 

KEITH, DANIEL; farmer; i|m n Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1834; settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. Protestant. 

Kerlin, Joseph; farmer; lyi m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1831. Granger. Protestant. 

Kemphill, Joseph; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in 1823* 
settled in J. C. 1833. Dem. Baptist. 

Kelly, J. S. ; tile manufacturer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in Ind.; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Keay, D. H.; butcher; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1848; settled in 
J. C. 1856. Dem. Baptist. 

Kloer, Ernst ; confectionery and restaurant; Franklin. Born in 
Germany 1850; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. l8l 

KLOER, THEODORE, restaurant and confectionery store; 
Franklin. Born in Germany 1848 ; settled in J. C. 1872. 
Rep. Protestant. 

KLOER, THEODORE H. & BRO.; confectionery, ice-cream, 
soda water, cigars and tobacco, restaurant and billiard hall; 
under Odd Fellows' Hall, Franklin. 

Keneaster, Henry; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Va. 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Universalist. 

KILLINGER, JACOB; brick moulder; Franklin. Born in 
Pa. 1828; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Presbyterian. 

KELLY, T. J.; farmer; 1 mnw Franklin. Born in Ind. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Kiser, J.; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 1805; settled 
in J. C. 1859. Dem. Universalist. 

Kemper, John; farmer; 5 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Christian. 

KELLY, ZACH. F.; farmer; 3 m n e Trafalgar. Born while 
his parents were moving from Mo. to Ky., in the State of 
111. 185 1; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

Kerr, Wm. H.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1847; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Rep. Christian. 

Kennedy, Wm. M.; blacksmith and wagonmaker; Amity. 
Born in Tenn. 1837; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Prot. 

Kenton, H. S. ; carpenter; Needham Station. Born in Ohio 
1839; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Latitudinarian. 

KELLY, JAMES H.; farmer; 2)/ 2 m n e Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1838; settled in J. C. 1841. Granger. Presbyterian. 



1 82 JOHNSON COUNT\. 



Kelly, H. M.; farmer; ^ m w Urmayville. Born in Ind. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1841. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Knobe, L. M.; groceries and confectioneries; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1839; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Methodist. 

Kelly, John; blind; Franklin. Born in Ireland 1825; settled in 
J. C. 1869. Dem. Catholic. 

KASTNER, CHARLES; farmer; Franklin. Born in Germany 
1824; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Protestant. 

KENNEDY, JAMES H.; farmer; 1 m s Amity. Born in J. C. 
1852. Dem. Protestant. 

KENNEDY, JOHN; farmer; 1 m s Amity. Born in East 
Tenn. 1829; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Protestant. 



LEGAN, SHADERICK; farmer and carpenter; 1 m s e Frank- 
lin. Born in Ky. 1832; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. 
Methodist. 

Lagrange, Peter; grocer; firm of Lagrange Bros.; Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1849. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lake, J. E.; bridge carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Protestant. 

Lagrange, I. N.; firm of Lagrange Bro.; Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1845. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Loyd, Wm.; millman; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; settled in 
J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 

Luyster, H. H.; clothing, boot and shoe store; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1832. Rep. Presbyterian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 83 



Lane, Wm. E.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Del. 1832; settled 
in J. C. 1872. Liberal Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lamaster, W. H.; dealer in staves, heading and timber; Frank- 
lin. Born in Ind. 1840; settled in J. C. 1873 Rep. 
Universalist. 

Leiper, S. W.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1827; settled 
in J. C. 1869. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Lane, J. P.; stone cutter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1844; settled 
in J. C. 1869. Dem. Protestant. 

Leach, John ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 17; settled 
in B. C. 1826. Dem. R. Baptist. 

Larkin, Michael ; railroader; Franklin. Born in Ireland 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Catholic. 

Lagrange, A. B. ; druggist, firm of Payne & Lagrange ; Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1842. Rep. Presbyterian. 

LAMBERTSON, SAMUEL; tailor; Franklin. Born in Pa. 
1815; settled in J. C. 1839. Re P- M - Baptist. 

Leiper, W. B. ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1821; settled 
in J. C. 1867. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lewis, D.; head sawyer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1831; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Rep. Christian. 

List, Albert; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lagrange, Peter D.; farmer, 3^ mnw Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1802; settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Presbyterian. 

LAGRANGE, WILLIAM H.; farmer; 3^ m n w Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1841. Rep. Presbyterian. 



184 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Lagrange, A.; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Bom in Ky. 18 10; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Presbyterian. 

List, T. C; farmer; 3^ m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1833. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

Leach, W. T.; farmer and tile maker; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1842. Dem. Granger. 

Lagrange, S. M.; student; 2J m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1851. 

Lagrange, D. C; farmer; 2\ m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Presbyterian. 

List, T. ; retired farmer; 2\ m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1796; 
settled in J. C 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lowe, D. S. ; farmer; 5 m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. Christian. 

List, T. W. Jr.; farmer; 5 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lagrange, I. C; farmer; 3I m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
183 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lee, Martin; farmer; 3^ m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Protestant. 

Lee, James ; restaurant and confectionery ; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1847 ; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Protestant. 

LAW, GEO. W.; wholesale and retail liquor dealer; Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1833; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Prot. 

LIPPERD, C. C. ; dry goods, notions and groceries ; Amity. 
Born in Ind. 1833 ; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Prot. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 85 



McLaughlin, W. H.; lumber dealer ; Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1833; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Moore, T. H.; painter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1848; settled 
in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

Martin, S. W.; musician; Franklin. Born in 111. 1839; settled 
in J. C. 1865. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McCASLIN, WM.; Vice President First National Bank; Frank- 
lin. Born in Ky. 18 17; settled in J. C. 1829. Rep. Prot. 

McCollough, W. B.; dealer in drugs, books and stationery; 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Martin, John D. ; dealer in boots and shoes ; Franklin. Born 
inlnd. 1853; settled in J. C 1865. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Martin, John S.; cigar manufacturer ; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
185 1. Dem. Protestant. 

Martin, Wm. D.; schoolteacher; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. Protestant. 

Moorhouse, H. B.; brick mason; Franklin. Born in Germany 
1812; settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Presbyterian. 

McCLELAN, J. H.; agent J. M. & I. R. R.; Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1818; settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Methodist. 

McClelan, Samuel; telegrapher; Franklin. Born in J. C 1849. 
Dem. Protestant. 

McClelan, John; machinist; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1830; set- 
tled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Protestant. 

Miller, N.; fence builder; Franklin. Born in Germany 18 19; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Presbyterian. 



1 86 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Moris, C. M.; teamster; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1830, settled 
in J. C. 1873. Dem. Methodist. 

McClellan, J. F.; retired merchant; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Presbyterian. 

McILVAIN, HIRAM; night watchman; Franklin. Born in 
Ohio 1828; settled in J. C. 1841. Dem. Protestant. 

McCough, John; retired farmer; Franklin. BorninTenn. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Mcllvain, A. M.; engineer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1835; set- 
tled in J. C. 1841. Rep. Methodist. 

McCaslin, W.; farmer; 3^ m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Mitchell, Thomas J.; farmer; 2| m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1810; settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. Baptist. 

Mitchell, J. L. ; farmer; 2 x / 2 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1 
Granger. Baptist. 

McCracin, Hue; bricklayer; 3 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Martin, A.; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ireland 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Liberal. Presbyterian. 

McCaslin, David; farmer; 1^ m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1839. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McCaslin, W.; farmer; 2 x / 2 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Moore, E. R. ; dealer in boots and shoes; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1827; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Protestant. 

McClalin, Miss J. B.; millinery and notions; Franklin. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 87 



Maiden, Pres.; wholesale liquor dealer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 

Marlatt, A. N.; pastor M. E. church; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1835; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Prohibitionist. 

Mabrey, Al.; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in N. C. 1849; set " 
tied in J. C. 1869. Rep. Methodist. 

MILLER, R. M.; attorney at law; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Moore, Squire; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1 8 14; settled in 
J. C. 1869. Rep. Baptist. 

McCalip, Hugh; minister Missionary Baptist Church; Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1835; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. 

McClanahan, J. H.; trader; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1846; set- 
tled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McCLAIN, W. C; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Martin, J. O.; dentist; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1821; settled in 
J. C. 1852. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McEntire, James ; laborer ; Franklin. Born in Mo. 1 844 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Protestant. 

Maray, John; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ireland 1824; settled 
in J. C. 1855. Dem. Catholic. 

Mangun, G. S. ; marble dealer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1825 ; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McLaughlin, Isaac ; life insurance agent ; Franklin. Born in 
Ohio 1837; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Methodist. 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Moore, A.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1824; settled in J. 
C. 1870. Rep. Protestant. 

Myers, J. G.; farmer; 1 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841 ; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

McCaslin, John; farmer; 2 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1825. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

McOUISTON, JOHN; farmer; 4 m n w Franklin. Born in 
Scotland 1842; settled in J. C. 1857. R- e P- Presbyterian. 

Mathes, W. J.; livery stable and dry goods; Franklin. Born in 
Va. 1818; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Methodist. 

McCaslin, A.; farmer; if rr. s Franklin. Born in Ky. 1818; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McCaslin, Alex.; retired farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1801; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Mullikin, Ff. P.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Rep. Christian. 

May, Mrs. Nancy; farmer; 3|m s Franklin. Born in Ky. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1832. Neutral. 

McQUIN, S. P.; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Dem. Baptist. 

McCaslin, G. E. ; farmer; 2|ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Moore, A. J.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; set_ 
tled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Christian. 

McQuin, John; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 12; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Regular Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 89 



Magill, J. H.; farmer; 5 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Granger. Presbyterian. 

McDonald, K.; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1827. Dem. Baptist. 

McKINNEY, R. T.; farmer and traveling agent; 3 J m n e Tra- 
falgar. Born in Ky. 1844; settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. 
Baptist. 

Mullindore, Wm.; farmer; 3 J m s Franklin. Born in Ind. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Christian. 

McGrath, Thomas; farmer; 3^ m e Franklin. Born in Ireland 
1842; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Protestant. 

McCASLIN, JAMES; retired farmer; 2\ m s w Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1800; settled in J. C. 1829. Rep. Presb. 

McCLAIN, S. B.; carpenter and builder; Needham Station. 
Born in Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Latitu- 
dinarian. 

McClain, J. A.; farmer; 3 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Miller, J. W.; farmer; 3^ m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. M. Baptist. 

McCLAIN, MATHIAS ; farmer ; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1830. Granger. Protestant. 

MAPPIN, J. M.; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841 ; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Protestant. 

McCLAIN, JACOB L.; farmer; 1% m s e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1825; settled in J. C. 1829. Granger. Methodist. 



I9O JOHNSON COUNTY. 



McClain, John L. ; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Granger. Presbyterian. 

McCullough, Frank; marble cutter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1853. Rep. Protestant. 

McClain, J. D.; dealer in dry goods and groceries; Needham 
Station. Born in Tenn. 1829; settled in J. C. 1836. 

MATHEWS, JOHN L.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Protestant. 

McCLAIN, ALEXANDER; farmer; 3 J m s e Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1835; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Methodist. 

Morrison, O. M.; farmer; ij m s e Franklin. Born in Pa. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Rep. Protestant. 

Morrison, John; farmer; 1 J m s e Franklin. Born in Pa. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Re P- M - Baptist. 

McLEAN, JESSE C; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1845. Dem. Protestant. 

McCracken, Hugh; brick mason; 1^ m n e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1820; settled in J. C. 1849; Rep. Presbyterian. 

McKinney, Wm.; farmer; %, m w Jollity. Born in Ind. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Protestant. 

McKinney, James; farmer; Amity. Born in Ky. 1848; settled 
in J. C. 1854. Dem. Protestant. 

McBride, Theophilus; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in N. 
C. 1834; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Baptist. 

McGavock, J. W. ; farmer; 1 m s Urmayville. Born in Va. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. I9I 

Moorehouse, John G. ; tailor; Franklin. Born in Germany 18 15; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Lutheran. 

Mitchell, Thos. J., Jr. ; stonecutter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1843. Dem. Baptist. 



NEEDHAM, W. H.; farmer and grain dealer; Necdham Sta- 
tion. Born in J. C. 1839. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Neal, J. A.; farmer and carpenter; 3 m e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1840; settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Christian. 

Nash, Samuel; farmer; 1 m n Amity. Born in Ky. 1821; set 
tied in J. C. about 1854. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Norris, T. H.; wool carder; Franklin. Born in 1836. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Naylor, A. R. ; Presbyterian minister; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1812; settled in J. C. 1872. 

NEAL, W. M.; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Baptist. 



OWENS, JAMES; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1833. Granger. M. Baptist. 

OWENS, GEORGE ; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in J.C. 
1833. Granger. Protestant. 

OYLER, S. P.; attorney; Franklin. Born in England 18 19; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Universalist. 

Overbay, D. L. ; boot and shoemaker ; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Presbyterian. 



I92 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



OVERSTREET, GEO. M.; butcher; firm of Wilson & Over- 
street; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1853; settled in J. C. 1868. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Oliver, John; farmer; 3 mn w Franklin. Born in Ireland 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Protestant. 

Omallay, Thos. ; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ireland 1824; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 87 1. Dem. Catholic. 

Overstreet, G. M., Jr.; attorney at law; Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1842. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Overstreet, G. M., Sen.; attorney at law; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1 8 19; settled in J. C. 1834. R- e P- Presbyterian. 

O'Leary, John; laborer; Amity. Born in Ireland 1837; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 

Owens, Wm.; farmer; 3^mne Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 



PEGGS, JACOB; County Recorder; Franklin; Born in Pa. 
1794; settled in J. C. about 1834. Dem. Christian. 

Pettiford, J. W.; barber; Franklin. Born in 111. 1837; settled 
in J. C. 1866. Radical. Methodist. 

Payne, Leland; miller and grain dealer; Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1818; settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Christian. 

PALMER, NOAH; farmer; 2| m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1840. Rep. Christian. 

PATTERSON, JAMES K.; farmer; % m w Urmayville. Born 
in Ind. 1835; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Methodist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 93 



Patterson, James J.; farmer and mechanic; x / 2 m w Urmayville. 
Born in Ind. 1849; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Presby. 

Patterson, M. T.; farmer; \ m w Urmayville. Born in J. C. 
1852. Rep. Presbyterian. 

POTTENGER, JOHN; firm of Jacobs & Pottenger; Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1845; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Prot. 

PEGGS, EVAN; farmer; i|se Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Protestant. 

Peggs, John; farmer; \\ m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Dem. Protestant. 

PRUITT, W. N.; farmer; i|mse Amity. Born in Ind. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Protestant. 

PATTERSON, WM. M.; farmer; % m n w Urmayville. Born 
in J. C. 1837. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Parr. R. S.; farmer; 2 m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1834. Rep. 
C. Presbyterian. 

Payne, Geo. M.; retired farmer; Franklin. Born in Conn. 1791; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Christian. 

PAYNE, P. W.; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in 
Ohio 1832; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Protestant. 

Pettit, S. R.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; settled 
in J. C. 1852. Dem. Christian. 

PERRY, R.; farmer; 5 m s e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

Parker, Wm.; farmer; 5 m s e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 

13 



194 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Pinner, D. D.; farmer; Amity. Born in N. C. 1829; settled in 
J. C. 1869. Dem. Protestant. 

Patterson, J. D.; farmer; 1 m n w Urmayville. Born in J. C. 
1843. Granger. Protestant. 

Patterson, R. H.; farmer; 1 m n w Urmayville. Born in J. C. 
1833. Granger. Presbyterian. 

PATTERSON, F. H.; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1840. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Patterson, Thos.; retired farmer; 3 m n e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1801; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. Presbyterian. 

POSTON, C. W. ; insurance agent and Mayor; Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1838; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Christian. 

PARSON, W.; brick mason; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

Patterson, C; engineer; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1842; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Dem. Methodist. 

Poulter, M. D.; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1841 ; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Pool, James; gate-keeper; 1 m s Franklin. Born in Ind. 1818; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Protestant. 

Partwood, Dan. ; farm hand ; 3 m s Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1849; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. 

Powell, R. C; carpenter; 2|msw Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Lutheran. 

Pettey, E.; farmer; 2^ m s Franklin. Born in Ky. 1801; set- 
tled in J. C. 1852. Dem. R. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. ig$ 



Parrish, T. J.; hardware clerk; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Peter, S. B. ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 18 19; settled in 
J. C. 1855. R e P- Christian. 

PARKS, R. M.; Baptist minister; Franklin. Born in Ind. 181 5; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Anti-slavery Dem. 

PELFREE, JOSEPH; stone cutter and brick layer; Franklin. 
Born in S. C. 1839; settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Chris. 

Phillips, Richard; Franklin. Born in England 18 19; set- 
tled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Protestant. 

Piker, W. E. ; miller; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; settled in 
J. C. 185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Peters, W. I.; miller; Franklin. Born in N. J. 183 1; settled in 
J. C. 1 861. Rep. Baptist. 

Powel, John; farmer; 2|mn Franklin. Born in Ky. 1846; set- 
tled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant. 

PARSONS, T. J.; farmer; % m n Franklin. Born in Va. 
1 8 19; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Baptist. 

PUSAY, F. J.; painter; Franklin. Born in England 1833; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Protestant. 

Pool, F. A.; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in Pa. 18 13; set- 
tled in J. C. 1846. Rep. Granger. 

Prichard, W. L; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1825. 
Rep. Christian. 

Phillips, Otto; carriage trimmer; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Protestant. 



I96 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



RAIRDON, J. A.; miller; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1850; set- 
tled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Christian. 

Runkle, William; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Va. 18 12; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Universalist. 

Roseberry, J. M.; book agent; Franklin. Born in Ind. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Christian. 

Randall, E. P. ; dealer in furniture and carpets; Franklin. Born 
in Ohio 1838; settled in J. C. 1852. Liberal. Presbyterian. 

Roberts, J. S.; carpenter and joiner; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Christian. 

RAIRDON, GEORGE; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1856; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Christian. 

Ragsdale, Jane; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1821; settled in J. C. 
1869. M. Baptist. 

Reeves, O. C; dry goods man ; Franklin. Born in Vt. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Protestant. 

Richey, Tapley ; farmer ; 2 m w Needham Station. Born in 
Ind. 1852; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Protestant. 

Reinier, Wm.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ohio 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Protestant. 

Ransdall, J. W.; retired; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

ROTEN, B. E.; farmer; j£ m n Amity. Born in N. C. 1847; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Richardson, J. D.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. Christian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 97 



Robbins, Ralph; shoemaker; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1870. Rep. 

Rand, J. D. ; school teacher; Franklin; Born in Mass. 18 — ; 
settled in J. C. i860. Rep. Baptist. 

Reid, George; weaver; Franklin. Born in Scotland 1832; set- 
tled in J. C. 187 1. Rep. Methodist. 

ROBISON, MANUAL; drayman; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Protestant. 

Robbinson, John; laborer; 1 m w Franklin. Born in Pa. 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 

Robins, A.; farmer; i| mw Franklin. Born in Ky. 1825; set- 
tled in J. C. 1844. Rep. Protestant. 

Rynerson, John; farmer; 2 J m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849; 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Rimper, J. J.; farmer; 3^ m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Rep. Protestant. 

ROBERTS, WM.; farmer; 1% m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1 8 17; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. Methodist. 

REED, WILL.; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Baptist. 

Robison, Nathan; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1803; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Dem. Protestant. 

RANSDELL, PETE; firm of Ransdell & Co.; pump makers; 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Rose, W. J.; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1820; settled 
in J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 



I98 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



RYNERSON, WM. F.; wagonmaker; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Protestant. 

Richardson, N.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Rep. Christian. 

Ransdell, J. W.; pump maker; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Roberts, R. A.; tail sawyer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Runnels, M. T.; homeopathic physician and surgeon; Franklin. 
Born in Ohio 1848; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Cong. 

RANSDELL, W. P. ; farmer; 3 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1804; settled in J. C. 1833. Dem. Baptist. 

Ransdell, Zach. ; farmer; 3 m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Baptist. 

Ransdell, B. B.; farmer; 1% m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1810; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Rep. Protestant. 

Robison, Taylor; farmer; ^ m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Protestant. 

Rutherford, S. M.; farmer; 2 ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1833. Rep. Protestant. 

RECORDS, F. S.; farmer; 3^ m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Christian. 

Reed, J. D.; farmer; 5 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1839; set 
tied in J. C. 1864. Rep. Protestant. 

Riggs, R. ; farmer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born in Iowa 1849; set- 
tled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Christian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1 99 



Records, W. W.; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in Ind. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 

RICHARDSON, G. W.; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Protestant. 

Riggs, J. R.; tile manufacturer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born in 
Iowa 1847; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Protestant. 

Rig^s, H. L. ; tile manufacturer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born in 
Iowa 1851; settled in J. C. 1851. Rep. Protestant. 

RANSDELL, N. M.; farmer; 5 m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1829; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Christian. 

ROGERS, J. M.; merchant; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1839; set " 
tied in J. C. 1859. Rep. Protestant. 

Rairdon, J. O.; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. Rep. Protestant. 

Ragsdale, O. G.; express agent; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1847; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Baptist. 

RAGSDALE, J. W. ; deputy treasurer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1849; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Baptist. 

Ruffin, M. A.; merchant; 3 m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Richardson, J. C; farmer; 3|mse Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1851; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Baptist. 

ROSE, W. H.; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Baptist. 

Redman, L. F.; farmer; 3 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Protestant. 



200 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Robbins, Andrew; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; set- 
tled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

RYNERSON, JAMES; Portrait Painter; Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1824; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Christian persua- 
sion. Mr. R. first gave attention to portrait painting in 
1873. His previous life was devoted to the science of 
mechanics. 



Sirvice, Henry; boot and shoe manufacturer; Franklin. Born 
in Ireland about 1822, Dem. Protestant. 



L 



Smith, W. H.; proprietor billiard hall ; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1839; settled in J. C. 1848. Liberal. Baptist. 

STEELE, N. S.; agent for the Singer Manuf'g Co.; Franklin. 
Born in Va. 1845; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Prot. 

Strahmeier, Wm.; proprietor of the Ricketts House; Franklin. 
Born in Germany 1822; settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. 
Protestant. 

Smiley, W. B.; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1858. Liberal. 

SMILEY, WM. H.; miller, and proprietor of Smiley's flouring 
> and saw mills; 5 mse Franklin. Born in J. C. 1828. 
Rep. Protestant. 

SMILEY, JOHN M.; farmer ; 5 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1810; settled in J. C. 1822. Rep. Protestant. 

Smiley, John; farmer; 5 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Rep. Protestant. 

SMILEY, CLARK; shoemaker; i|mne Amity. Born in J. 
C. 1828. Rep. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 201 



Smiley, W.; deaf and dumb; i|m ne Amity. Born in J. C. 
1835. Rep. Protestant. 

Stafford, Wm. ; farmer; Amity. Born in J. C. 1833. Rep. Prot. 

SMILEY, W. C; farmer; 5 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Schmith, Joseph; salesman; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1853; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. 

Spear, K.; tanner; Franklin. Born in 1829; settled in J. C. 
1874. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Stephens, Gideon; farmer; if m e Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1813; settled in J. C. 1823. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Swift, E.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. Dem. 
Baptist. 

Swift, Wm.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Shaffer, T.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. Rep. 
Christian. 

SELLERS, N.; farmer; 3 J m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Christian. 

Sellers, John; farmer; 3 J m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Rep. Christian. 

Sandfur, Martin; farmer; 2\ m e Franklin. Born in Iowa 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Protestant. 

Scott, Robert; farmer; 5^ m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1864. 

SMILEY, W.; farmer; 5 m se Franklin. Born in J. C. 1853. 
Rep. Protestant. 



202 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Suttle, James; brickmason ; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. Protestant. 

SMALL, WM.; carpenter and millwright; 3^ m w Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1824; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Presby. 

Summit, Geo. W.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

Short, Sam.; farmer; 5 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1847; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Smith, D.; farmer; 1 m s Whiteland. Born in Ireland 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Shepherd, W.; farmer; 2 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. United Brethren. 

SWIFT, DAVE; farmer; 2^ m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Swift, C; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in Tenn. 18 14; settled 
in J. C. 1829. Dem. Baptist. 

SEBASTIAN, J. C; dealer in dry goods, hats, caps, and 
notions; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1828; settled in J. C. 1867. 
Rep. Universalist. 

Stoll, Michael; carpenter; Franklin. Born in France 1829; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 87 1. Dem. Catholic. 

Straw, John; stone cutter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1869. Dem. Liberal. 

Shafer, A.; harness maker; firm of Shafer & Davis; Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1842. Rep. Presbyterian. 

SALMON, P. J.; sup't gasworks; Franklin. Born in Ireland 
1846; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Catholic. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 203 



Smiley, O. H. P.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1820; settled 
in J. C. 1822. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Stewart, Thomas; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849; se ^- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Dem. 

Simons, J. B. ; farmer; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1838; settled in 
J. C. 1850. Dem. Protestant. 

Spears, J. C; stock trader; ^ m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 
183 1. Rep. Protestant. 

Swan, Thomas; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; settled 
in J. C. 1852. Rep. Methodist. 

SWINDLE, ELISHA; farmer; 3^ m n Franklin. Born in 
Tenn. 1845; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

Shipman, J. L. ; farmer; 2|mw Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Protestant. 

SLATER, M. R.; editor Franklin Herald; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Liberal. 

Sloan, J. W.; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

Slaughter, J. C; day laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 185 1 ; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Protestant. 

STRICKLER, J. W.; dealer in staple and fancy groceries, teas, 
fruits and vegetables; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Protestant. 

Sandfur, W. C; attorney; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Slater, W. B.; painter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1833; settled 
in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 



204 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Smith, D. M.; general house work; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Presbyterian. 

Sherman, G. L.; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1842; settled 
in J. C. 1867. Dem. Methodist. 

Sexson, Allen; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 17; settled in 
J. C. 1873. Rep. Baptist. 

Sandfur, J. T.; farmer; 7 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1827; 
settled in J. C 1869. Rep. Methodist. 

SHEPHERD, A. D.; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1827; settled in J. C. i860. Rep. Christian. 

STEWART, JOHN; farmer; % m s Needham Station. Born 
in Pa. 1 821; settled in J. C. 1839. R- e P- Methodist. 

Snow, F. ; saddler and harness maker; Franklin. Born in Va. 
1834; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant 

Smith, J. H.; dealer in boots, shoes, hats, caps, and millinery 
goods; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1836; settled in J. C. 1867. 

Spurrier, D.; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1833; settled in 
J. C. 1867. Rep. Methodist. 

Smith, B. R.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1846; settled 
in J. C. 1871. Dem. 



Traub, John; laborer; Franklin. Born in Germany 1837; set- 
tled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Catholic. 

TERHUNE, RALPH ; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ohio 1824; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem Protestant. 

Tucker, D. C. ; stave factory; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Rep. Christian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 205 

Terhune, William; head sawyer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Tapp, S. M.; teamster; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. Dem. 
Protestant. 

Tuley, G. M.; constable; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1833. Rep. 
Methodist. 

Trone, L. A.; moulder; Franklin. Born in Pa. 1844; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Rep. Protestant. 

TAYLOR, R. T. ; cashier First National Bank; Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1 84 1. Changeable. Protestant. 

TAYLOR, E. W.; ass't cashier First National Bank; Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1846. Rep. Protestant. 

TAGGART, W. H.; dealer in hardware, cutlery, and stoves; 
Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. 
Protestant. 

TERRILL, E. S. ; grain and coal dealer; Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1816; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Protestant. 

Terhune, Andrew; painter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1833; set- 
tled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Protestant. 

TUNGET, JAMES; farmer; $% m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1849; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Protestant. 

Taylor, J. W. ; retired farmer; 2% m n Amity. Born in N. J. 
1810; settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Methodist. 

Thompson, P. M.; farmer; 3^mse Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1828. Granger. Presbyterian. 

TILSON, MORELL; farmer; 2|mne Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1853. Rep. Protestant. 



206 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



TILSON, JAMES; farmer and trader; 2^ m n e Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 183 1. Granger. Protestant. 

TURNER, ALEX.; carriage and buggy mfr. ; Franklin. Born 
in N. C. 1833; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. M. Baptist. 

THOMAS, CHAS. H.; barber; Franklin. Born in Ala. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

Turpin, Enoch; butcher and farmer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Christian. 

Thompson, R. S.; blacksmith; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836; 
settled in Franklin 1858. Dem. Baptist. 

Tarllar, G. H.; student; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

TOTTEN, FREEMAN; farmer; 4! m n w Franklin. Born in 
N. J. 18 10; settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Protestant. 

Terhune, Wm. A.; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Trout, A.; farmer; 2 m n Franklin. Born in Va. 1812; settled 
in J. C. 1832. Rep. Methodist. 

Tilson, J. T.; farmer; 4m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Rep. Baptist. 

Tetrick, W. H.; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Rep. Protestant. 

TAGGART, ROBERT; physician and surgeon. Born in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 1818; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Presby. 

Terpin, James; carder; West Franklin. Born in Ky.; settled in 
J. C. 1863. Dem. Christian. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 20/ 

Terrill, G. P.; farmer; i|mn Franklin. Born in Ohio 1841^ 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Presbyterian. 

TERRILL, J. H.; farmer; i|mn Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1847; settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Tutt, W. H.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1829; settled 
in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

TrefBich, A.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Germany 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Townsend, H.; farmer; 5 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Rep. Christian. 

Terhune, F.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Methodist. 

TERHUNE, E.; school-boy; 2% m s w Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 

TERHUNE, MISS MATTIE; farmer's daughter; 2^ m s w 
Franklin. Born in Ky. 1855; settled in J. C. 1855. Tem- 
perance. Methodist. 

Terhune, Wtn.; farmer; 2 J m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1807; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Protestant. 

Taylor, C. O.; whitewasher and cook; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Taylor, Wm.; whitewasher; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1838; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Methodist. 



UTTER, JAMES; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1 83 1. Dem. Protestant. 



208 JOHNSON COUNT\. 



UTTER, H.; farmer; 2 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1838. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

UTTER, D. J.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Utter, Zim; farmer; 2msw Franklin. Born in J. C. 1851. 
Dem. Protestant. 

UTTER, S. N.; farmer; 2 m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1855. 
Dem. Baptist. 



VANNUYS, J. D.; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1845. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Voris, C. H.; dry goods clerk; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

VAWTER, DAVID G.; merchant and President of Gas Co.; 
Franklin. Born in Ind. 1824; settled in J. C. 1855. 

VAWTER, JOHN T.; banker and pork packer; Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1830; settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Christian. 

Vandegriff, David; farmer; 4 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Granger. M. Baptist. 

Vaught, A. J.; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in Va. 18 16; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Methodist. 

Voris, W. D.; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. 

Voris, G. W.; Superintendent of B. and M. Association; Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Vandegriff, E.J. ; retired farmer; Franklin. Born in N. C. 18 18; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 200, 

Vannis, J. H.; farmer; 3 J m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Voorhis, A. C; retired farmer; 5 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1809; settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Presbyterian. 

VANNIS, I. N.; farmer; 6 m n w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1831. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Verbrych, Samuel; farmer; 6 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. United Brethren. 

VERBRYCH, WM.; farmer; 5 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1835; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Protestant. 

Voris, H. P.; farmer; 4m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Dem. Presbyterian. 

Vanarsdoff, C; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Protestant. 

Vanarsdoff, E.; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1834; set- 
tled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

VEST, ALLEN; carpenter; i| mn Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1836; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

Vaught, George; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Vandivier, Strother; stock dealer; 2 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1812; settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. Christian. 

Vandivier, Wm. G.; farmer; 2 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1850. Dem. Baptist. 

Vandivier, John; farmer; 4 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Dem. Christian. 

14 



2IO JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Vandivier, Josephs.; farmer; 5 mn Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1821; settled in J. C. 1827. Dem. Protestant. 

Vandivier, J. W.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. Christian. 

Vest, A.; saw milling-; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1855; settled in 
J. C. 1867. Rep. Protestant. 

Voris, W. D. ; carpenter; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

VORIS, A. A.; farmer; 5I mnw Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1846. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Voris, Mrs. D. J.; farmer; 2^ m s w Whiteland. Born in Ohio 
1828; settled in J. C. 1838. Methodist. 

Vanarsdall, J. C; plasterer; 3 m s w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Voris, I.; retired farmer; 4 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1804; 
settled in J. C. 1822. Rep. Presbyterian. 

VORIS, JAMES W. ; farmer; 4 m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1845. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Vanarsdall, Sim. ; 4 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1 799; settled 
in J. C. 1827. Dem. Methodist. 

Vanarsdall, A., Jr.; farmer; 4 m n w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1839. Rep. Presbyterian. 

VANNUYS, GEO.; farmer; 3^ m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Vanarsdall, A., Sen.; retired blacksmith; 2 m n Franklin. Born 
in N. J. 1799; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 211 



Van Mays, John H.; farmer; 3^ m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Presbyterian. 

VAN MAYS, S.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1803; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Rep. Presbyterian. Mr. Van Mays 
has lived 45 years on the same farm. 

Van Mays, G. L.; farmer; 4 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. Presbyterian. ' p 

Van Mays, J. L. ; farmer; 4. m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1841. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

VAN MAYS, C. D. ; farmer; 3^ m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Vest, John; farmer and carpenter; 3 m w Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1805; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Vest, A.; farmer; 3 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1845; settled 
in J. C. 1872. Rep. Methodist. 

Vandivier, I. N.; farmer; 2m sw Franklin. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Dem. Christian. 

VANDIVIERE, WM. S.; farmer and trader; 3 \ m s w Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1840. Granger. Dem. Protestant. 



WILSON, W. V.; stock trader; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1874. 

WEBB, WM. A.; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1 821; settled in J. C. 1837. R- e P- Christian. 

WEBB, JOHN R.; engineer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1841. Rep. Christian. 



212 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Webb, C. F.; dealer in boots and shoes; Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1839; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Webb, A. F.; schoolteacher; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Williams, James; farmer ; 3 m e Whiteland. Born in Tenn. 
1811; settled in J. C. 1837. Rep. Christian. 

Willson, Isaac; cooper; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1810; settled in 
J. C. 1842. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Walker, M.; cooper; Franklin. Born in Md. 183 1 ; settled in 
J. C. 1856. Rep. Christian. 

West, R. C; brick moulder; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Dem. Christian. 

WHITLOCK, GEORGE C; veterinary surgeon; Franklin. 
Born in Ohio 1815; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Methodist. 

WOOD, T. B.; Postmaster; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1840; set- 
tled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Protestant. 

WHITE, ISAAC M.; dealer in dry goods and groceries; Need- 
ham Station. Born in J. C. 1840. Rep. Methodist. 

WHEATON, SAMUEL; farmer; 6 m e Franklin. Born in 
Ohio 1821; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. Protestant. 

Wheaton, Perry; farmer; 5 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Wiles, F.; blacksmith; Needham Station. Born in Mo. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. Protestant. 

Wooley, John; farmer; ^ m e Amity. Born in Ky. 1843; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Protestant. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 213 



Williver, M.; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in Ohio 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Granger. Protestant. 

WEBB, J. S.; farmer; 1 m s Urmayville. Born in Ind. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Granger. M. Baptist. 

Williams, Smith; farmer; 2 m n e Franklin. Born in Ohio 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Wild, Charles; blacksmith; Urmayville. Born in France 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1866. 

Wilson, S. A.; Deputy Recorder; Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Woollen, Edward N.; Auditor of Johnson county; Franklin. 
Born in Md. 1841; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Indpt. 

Ware, J. W.; farmer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. Dem. 
Protestant. 

Weekly, Matthew; farmer; 6 me Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Williams, Henry; farmer; 5 m e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Protestant. 

WALDREN, MIDLETON; farmer; 3^ m s e Franklin. Born 
in Tenn. 18 13; settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Waggoner, Wm.; farmer; 3 J m s e Franklin. Born in Ind. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Winkler, Bathel; farmer; 3 m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. Christian. 

Wallace, James; gardner; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1832; settled 
in J. C. 1858. Dem. Methodist. 



214 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



WADE, A.; farmer and carpenter; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

WADE, A. Z.; minister M. E. church; Franklin. Born in Ft. 
Covington 1836; settled in J. C. 1872. 

Waldin, D, D. ; farmer; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1838. Dem. 
Protestant. 

Williams, J. D.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 18 12; settled 
in J. C. 1850. Rep. Granger. 

Waldin, F.; painter; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1847; settled in 
J. C. 1859. Rep. Christian. 

WHITESIDES, A. T.; assessor; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Re P- Methodist. 

Williams, J. H.; bridge builder and carpenter; Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1843; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Protestant. 

WRIGHT, WM.; farmer; 4m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Walden, J. A.; carpenter; 2|mn Franklin. Born in Ky. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Christian. 

Williams, I.; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1846; settled in 
J. C. 1870. Dem. Protestant. 

WHITESIDES, JOHN; farmer; 3 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1816; settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Whitesides, J. C; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 — ; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 215 



WILLIAMS, G. W.; wagon maker; 4J m n e Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1844; settled in J. C. 1849. ^- e P- Methodist. 

Weaver, Horace; farmer; 2% m s w Franklin. Born in Vt. 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1842. Rep. Christian. 

WOOD, R. C; druggist; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. Re P- 
Presbyterian. 

Wright, J. R.; farmer; 2|me Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Christian. 

Whelan, Thomas; stair builder; Franklin. Born in N. Y. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Neutral. 

Williams, J. H.; bridge carpenter; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Protestant. 

WATSON, B.; day laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1854; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Methodist. 

WILLIAMS, GREEN; farmer; Franklin. Born in Ga. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Baptist. 

White, J. L.; attorney at law; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. Swedenborgian. 

Wallace, B.; physician and surgeon; Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1836; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Baptist. 

Williams, John; whitewasher and paper hanger; Franklin. Born 
in Md. 1843; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Baptist. 

Wheat, Milton; farmer; 2 m w Franklin. Born in Va. 1808; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 



2l6 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Wright, J. F.; farmer; 2 \ m s w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Dem. Presbyterian. 

WINKLER, A. D.; farmer; 2ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1852; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Christian. 

Williams, J.; farmer; 2|ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 1800; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 84 1. Rep. Universalist. 

Williams, Benj.; farmer; 2*^ m s Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Rep. Universalist. 

Weaver, Horace; farmer; 2|ms Franklin. Born in Vt. 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Wriker, Wm,; saw and planing mill. Born in Ky. 1828; set- 
tled in J. C. 184 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

WINKLER, G. A.; farmer; 2 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Christian. 

Winkler, J. R.; farmer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

White, J. D.; farmer; 3 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Protestant. 



Younce, W. H.; clerk firm of Vaughter & Gilchrist; Franklin. 
Born in N. C. 1842; settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Meth. 

YOUNG, G. H.; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ky. 1836; settled 
in J. C. 1872. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Yelton, W. B.; farmer; 3^ m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. M. Baptist. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 217 



YELTON, JOHN H. ; farmer ; 3 m e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Yager, J. F.; farmer; 3 m n Franklin. Born in Ky. 1829; set- 
tled in J. C. 1843. Dem. Christian. 

YASTE, G. W.; farmer; 2^ m s w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1854; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Protestant. 



2l8 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 



Clark Township is the northeast corner township ; it is five 
by seven miles, lays in a square, and contains thirty-five square 
miles. It is bounded on the north by Marion county ; on the 
east by Shelby county; on the west by Pleasant township; and 
on the south by Franklin township. 

The surface of Clark township is from a level to hilly ; much 
of it is extremely well adapted to grain raising and grazing pur- 
poses. It is well timbered with a good quality of timber. 

The township is watered by a branch of Little Sugar Creek, 
and a small stream called Hurricane Creek. 

The public roads are kept in good order. There are about 
eight miles of gravel roads, built at a cost of about $2,000 per 
mile. 

Clarksburg is the only town in Clark township, and contains 
a population of over one hundred inhabitants. Its people are a 
live, sensitive, energetic class, and take pride in the welfare of 
the township and country generally. The C. and M. R. R. 
touches its southeast corner, while the railroad running from 
Indianapolis to Greensburg runs near its northeast corner. 

The township is well improved. The fine, nicely arranged 
farms and handsome residences attest to the industry and artistic 
intelligence of its citizens. They sow, reap, eat and sleep con- 
tentedly, knowing that by so doing they are fulfilling the legiti- 
mate destiny of man on earth. The people of Clark township 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 2 1 9 



are affable, kind and generous, and take considerable interest in 
the educational and moral training of her rising generation. 

They are supplied with nine school houses, valued at about 
#12,000. 

The population of the township is said to be about 1,600. 

The voting population is 320; Republican, 165; Democratic, 
155. James Williams is the present Township Trustee. 

Among the early settlers still living are : Robert Richey, John 
Ballard, H. V. Brown, Alex. Wilson, Alex. Raines, James Al- 
lison, J. E. Carson, James Williams, Jackson Williams, Oliver 
Harbent, Jacob Halfaker, Charles Dungan, G. W. Eastburn, 
and others. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

M. E. Church ; located in the south part of the township ; 
Rev. H. M. Boyer, pastor ; membership, about 65 ; W. W. Mc- 
Caslin, Sabbath school superintendent ; average attendance, 50 ; 
value of church property, #500. 

Rock Lane M. E. Church ; Revs. H. Reat and S. A. Bright, 
pastors ; membership, about 49 ; Geo. Hughes, Sabbath school 
superintendent ; average attendance, 30. This church house 
was erected in the year 1872, and dedicated June 7th, 1873 5 
value of church property, #2100. 

Clarksburg Christian Church ; Rev. W. K. Couch, pastor ; 
membership, about 225 ; J. H. Halfaker, Sabbath school super- 
intendent ; average attendance at school, 60 ; value of church 
property, #3500. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Rock Lane Grange, No. 707 ; James T. Grubbs, Master ; Jas. 
H. Halfaker, Secretary ; membership, about 60. This Grange 
was organized Dec. 2d, 1873 ; value of Lodge property, #75. 



220 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



DIRECTORY OF CLARK TOWNSHIP. 

Allison, James; farmer; 2|mn Needham Station. Born in Pa. 
1796; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. Protestant. 

Alexander, F. M.; plasterer; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Rep. Christian. 

Adair, Samuel; farmer; 3 m s w Acton. Born in Ky. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Protestant. 



Beard, John W.; farmer; 1 m n w Needham Station. Born in 
Ind. 18 13; settled in J. C. 1841. Rep. Protestant. 

BALLARD, JOHN; farmer and carpenter; 7 m n e Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1832; settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Methodist. 

Brown, H. V.; farmer; 7^ m n e Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1828. Granger. M. Baptist. 

Banta, James H.; farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1835. Rep. Presbyterian in belief. 

Billingsly, Samuel; not at home, so our agent could not get any 
information concerning his age, settlement, etc. 

Banta, W. R.; retired farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. 
C; date not given. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Bahling, C; farmer; 2 m e Whiteland. Born in Germany 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Methodist. 

BALLARD, TAYLOR; farmer, 6 m n e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1804; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Methodist. 

Bredell, G. W.; farmer; 10 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Granger. M. Baptist. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 221 



CARVER, SOCRATES ; farmer ; 6 m n e Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1835. Dem. Universalist. 

Clarke, S. A.; farmer; ^ m s Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 1822. 
Rep. Christian. 

Caplinger, G. W. ; farmer; J m w Rock Lane. Born in 1843 J 
settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Christian. 

Caplinger, G.; farmer; x / 2 m w Rock Lane. Born in 1848; set- 
tled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Christian. 

Caplinger, Thomas J.; farmer; \\ m w Rock Lane. Born in 
1850; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Christian. 

The above three named persons are probably of the same 
family, and were all born outside of Johnson county, but from 
some cause not known to us, they have not given the place of 
their birth. The cause of this refusal is doubtless legitimate ; 
our agent gives no reasons. 

Coyl, James; farmer; 3 m n Needham Station. Born in Ireland 
1824; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

CLARK, THOMAS L.; farmer; 2ms Acton. Born in Ind. 
1832; settled in J. C. about 1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Craig, Henry; farmer; 3 m s w Acton. Born in Ky. 1832; set- 
tled in J. C. 1852. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Cutsinger, Alexander; farmer; 2\ m n w Needham Station. 
Born in Ind. 1845; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Meth. 

CUTSINGER, SAMUEL; farmer; 2% m n w Needham Sta- 
tion. Born in Ind. 185 1; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 
Methodist. 

Caplinger, G. J.; farmer; ^ m w Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 
1852. Dem. Christian. 



222 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Carson, J. E. ; farmer; retired on account of disability. Born in 
Tenn. 1808; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Methodist. Mr. 
Carson's P. O. address is not given, but we presume it is 
Needham Station. 

COMMINGORE, J. S.; farmer; 5 m e Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1820; settled in J. C. Dem. Methodist. 

Curry, John; farmer; 4 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Christian. 

Campbell, James; farmer; 4 m s w Acton. Born in Ireland 
1821; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Catholic. 



DAKE, FREDERICK; farmer; 1% ms Acton. Born in Ohio 
1826; settled in J. C. 1857. Methodist. 

Davis, John W.; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Indpt. Methodist. 

DUNLAP, A.; farmer and poultry dealer; 6 m n e Franklin. 
Born in Ohio 1833; settled in J. C. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Draper, O. H.; farmer and stock raiser; 4 m n e Whiteland. 
Born in Ind. 1828; settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Christian. 

Duggan, Patrick; farmer; 3 J m s Acton. Born in Ireland about 
1822; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Catholic. 

Duggan, Michael; school teacher; 3^ms Acton. Born in Ind. 
1852; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Catholic. 

Dougherty, Jacob; farmer; i& m s Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 

1853. Methodist. 

Dunlavy, Daniel W.; farmer, teacher; 6 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in Ind. 1840; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Protestant. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 223 



DUNLAVY, FRANCIS; farmer; 6 m n e Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1803; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Methodist. 

Dungan, Charles; farmer; yi m n w Rock Lane. Born in Va. 
1798; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Christian. 



Eastburn, R.; farmer; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1838. Rep. 
Christian. 

ELDER, W. H.; farmer; 1 m e Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Eastburn, G. W.; farmer; 4 m e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Christian. 



FITZPATRICK, R. L.; farmer; 6\ m n e Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1837. Re P- Methodist. 

Foster, E. ; merchant; *4 mw Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Rep. Protestant. 

FOSTER, GEORGE ; Rock Lane. Gone from home. 

Fitzpatrick, James R. ; farmer ; 2 m n e Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1837; settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Baptist. 

Farley, Benjamin ; farmer; 2^ m s e Acton. Born in Ind. 1838; 
settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Methodist. 



Glass, James; farmer and basket maker; 3 m n Needham Sta- 
tion. Born in Ky. 1822; settled in J. C. 1837. R e P- Bap- 
tist in belief. 



224 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



GLASS, JOHN; farmer; 3 m n Needham Station. Born in Ky. 
1833; settled in J. C. 1837. Rep. Methodist. 

Grubbs, James T.; farmer; 2 m n w Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Methodist. 

GABBLE, S. S.; blacksmith; Rock Lane. Born in La. 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1870. No politics. Christian. 

GRIFFITH, C. L.; farmer; 3I m e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1851; settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

GRIFFITH, WILLIAM; farmer; 3^ m e Greenwood. Born 
in Ky. 1805; settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Baptist. 

Griffith, Presley R.; farmer; 4^ m s e Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1842; settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

Glass, George; farmer; 3 m n Needham Station. Born in Ky. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. M. Baptist 

GIBSON, ALEXANDER ; farmer ; 4J m s Acton. Born in 
Va. 1834; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Grubbs, W. B.; physician and surgeon; Rock Lane. Born in 
Ky. 1831; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Methodist. 



Halfacre, Mrs. Ruth; settled in J. C. 18 19; is still living in good 
health, and says there is not a gray hair on her head. Our 
agent does not inform us as to whether she is a married 
lady, old maid or widow. We rather suspect she is a 
widow. 

HARBERT, OLIVER; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in 
Pa. 1806; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Christian. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 225 



Hughes, George; merchant; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Dem. Methodist. 

HARBERT, S. B.; school teacher; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Christian. 

Halfacre, Jacob; farmer; 1 m n Rock Lane. Born in Va. 1802; 
settled in J. C. 1837. Rep. Christian. 

HARBERT, OLIVER, Jr.; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in J. C. 1854. Protestant. 

Hendrickson, H.; farmer; 3^mswActon. Born in Ind. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Believes the Christian doc- 
trines to be nearest the truth. 

Hendrickson, Jacob ; farmer ; 3|msw Acton. Born in Ind. 
1829; settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Christian in belief. 

HARBERT, P. J.; farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1845. Rep. Christian. 

Harbert, M. A.; farmer; 4 m n e ^Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1843. Rep. Christian. 

HARBERT, JOHN ; retired farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in Pa. 1799. Date of settlement in J. C. not given. Rep. 
Christian. 

Halfacre, J. H.; farmer; 1 J m n Rock Lane. Born in Ind. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1837. R- e P- Christian. 



Johnson, Thomas H.; engineer; 3 m n Needham Station. Born 
in Ky. 1840; settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Christian in 
belief. 

15 



226 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Jones, N. H.; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in Va. 1830; set- 
tled in J. C. 1857. Re P- Methodist. 



KELLY, SAMUEL M.; farmer; 7 m n e Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1842. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Kinnick, S. E.; farmer; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1848. Rep. 
Christian. 

Kinnick, James W.; carpenter; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Rep. Christian. 

KNAPP, MILTON; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. G 
1833. Re P- Methodist. 

Kinnick, W. F. ; farmer; 4)^ m e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1822. Date of settlement not given. Rep. Protestant. 



MeClain, Moses; farmer; i|m sw Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 
1807; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Methodist. 

McNutt, C. M.; farmer; 1 m n Rock Lane. Born in Ind. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1853. Granger. Presbyterian. 

MeClain, James; farmer; Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 18 10. Date 
of settlement in J. C. not known. Dem. Christian. 

McNUTT, JOHN; farmer; 5 m w Acton. Born in Ohio 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Baptist. 

Miller, Henry; farmer; 2^ m s Acton. Born in Ind. 1826; set- 
tled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Protestant. 

MAILIN, J. D.; farmer; 2 m s w Acton. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Rep. Protestant. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 227 



Myers, Geo. S.; farmer; i| m e Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 1818; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Christian. 

MAGILL, WILLIAM; farmer; i|ranw Urmayville. Born in 
J. C. 1833. Rep. Methodist. 

McClain, Samuel ; farmer ; 7 m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1825; settled in J. C. about 1835. Dem. Methodist. 

McCARTNEY, J.; farmer; 4 m s w Brookneld. Born in Ky. 
1808; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Protestant. 

Miller, John; farmer; 2ms Acton. Born in Pa. 1802; settled 
in J. C. 1854. Dem. Methodist in faith. 

Myers, John P.; farmer; i|me Rock Lane. Born in Ind. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Christian. 

McCLAIN, J. F.; farmer; i| m s Clarksburg. Born in Ind. 
183 1; date of settlement in J. C. not given. Dem. 

Mavity, U.; farmer; 2|mnw Urmayville. Born in Ind. 1842; 
settled in J. C. about 1858. Rep. Christian. 

McClain, Thomas; farmer; J m s Rock Lane. Our agent could 
not see this man. 



Nolin, J. D.; farmer; ^ m n Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Christian. 

Nolin, G.; farmer; y 2 m w Rock Lane. Could not be seen by 
our agent. 



Overstreet; J. H.; farmer; 1 m s Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 18 15; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. M. Baptist. 



228 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



OVERSTREET, W.; farmer; i m s Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 
1845; settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Christian. 



Patterson, W. H.; farmer; 2 m n Urmayville. Born in Ind. 
1827; settled in J. C. about 1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

PATTERSON, JOHN R.; farmer; 2|mn Urmayville. Born 
in Ind. 1825; settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Parmer, James; farmer; east of Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Granger. Christian. 

Patterson, Thomas H.; farmer; 1^2 m n w Urmayville. Born 
in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 



RITCHEY, ROBERT; farmer; 2 m n e Needham Station. 
Born in Ky. 1820; settled in J. C. 1827. Dem. Meth. 

Rogers, William; farmer; 2^ m n Needham Station. Born in 
J. C. 1853. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Raines, Alexander; farmer; 2 m n w Needham Station. Born 
in Va. 1820; settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Presbyterian. 

ROUSE, ROBERT; farmer; 1 m n Rock Lane. Born in Ind. 
185 1. Rep. Christian. 

Rouse, George; farmer; 3ms Acton. Born in Ind. 1849; set- 
tled in J. C. 1857. Rep. Protestant. 

Ransdal, Mrs. Susan; farmer; 8 m n e Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1 841; settled in J. C. 1855. Protestant. 

ROBISON, THOMAS M.; farmer; 5 m e Greenwood. Born 
in J. C. 1834. Rep. Christian. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 22Q, 



Snow, Jonathan; retired farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in N. 
C. 1799; settled in J. C. 1862. Liberal. Methodist. 

Springer, J. C. ; saw-milling and dealer in lumber; 3 m n Need- 
ham Station. Born in J. C. 1838. Rep. Methodist. 

SPENCER, O.; farmer; 3 m n Needham Station. Born in J. 
C. 1835. Rep. Christian in belief. 

Smith, J. W.; carpenter; 4 m s w Acton. Born in Ind. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Protestant. 

Speagle, John L. ; farmer; 5 m s w Brookfield. Born in Ind. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Protestant. 

SMITHEY, JAMES H.; farmer; 6 m n e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1848; settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Stowers, A. J.; laborer; \y 2 m s Rock Lane. Born in Ind. 
1847; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Protestant. 

Stowers, A. J.; farmer; i 1 /^ m s Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 
1844. Dem. Protestant. 

STOWERS, MARION ; farmer; 5 m s e Greenwood. Born in 
J. C. 1843. Rep. Protestant. 

Smallwood, Wm.; farmer; 4ms Acton. Born in Ky. 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

SMITH, J. M.; farmer; 4! m s Acton. Born in Ky. 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1866. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Stevens, Robert; farmer; 1 m e Rock Lane. Born in Ind. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 



Turman, William R. ; farmer ; 3 \ m s e Rock Lane. Born in 
J. C. 1849. Dem. Christian. 



230 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



TILSON, JAMES C; farmer; 4^ m n e Franklin. Born in 
Va. 1 8 14; settled in J. C. 1840. Granger. Baptist. 

Tilson, D. T.; farmer; 4^ m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Granger. Baptist. 

TURMAN, JOHN W.; farmer; i|mse Rock Lane. Born. in 
Ohio 1822; settled in J. C. 1838. Granger. Protestant. 

Tilson, Lemuel; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1833. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Tilson, John; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. M. Baptist. 



Vaught, Mrs. Mary; farmer; ijmn Urmayville. Born in Ky. 
1822; settled in J. C. 1839. Methodist. 

Vaught, G. W.; farmer; i£ m n Urmayville. Born in J. C. 1853. 
Rep. Protestant. 

VONTALGE, HENRY; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1838; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Lutheran. 



Wilson, James H.; saw milling; Rock Lane. Born in Ky. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. Methodist. 

Wilson, Samuel M.; engineer; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1833. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Wright, F. E.; farmer; Rock Lane. Born in N. C. 1841; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. 

Williams, James; farmer and township trustee; 3J m n e White- 
land. Born in Tenn. 181 1; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. 
Christian. 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 23 I 



Williams, Jackson; farmer; 5 m n e Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1815; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Methodist. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN L.; farmer; i|mnw Rock Lane. Born 
in Ky. 1847; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Christian. 

WILLIAMSON, JOHN H.; farmer; i|ran Needham Station. 
Born in Ky. 1849; settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Reform 
Church. 

WAINSCOTT, F. M.; farmer; 2|mnw Urmayville. Born in 
Ky. 1841; settled in J. C. 1852. M. Baptist. 

WILLIAMS, RUFUS ; farmer ; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in 
J. C. 1837. Dem - Methodist. 

Williams, H. J.; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1848. Rep. Christian. 

Wood worth, T.; farmer; 7 m n Franklin. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

Wilson, Alexander; retired wheelwright; Rock Lane. Born in 
Pa. 1800; settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Wilson, Wm. C; saw milling; Rock Lane. Born in J. C. 1829. 
Dem. Presbyterian. 



232 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHP 



Pleasant Township is located on the north line of the county, 
about midway from east to west, and contains thirty-five square 
miles. The surface is generally level and gently undulating, 
with occasionally some hilly land ; all of it, however, is suscep- 
tible of a high state of cultivation. The soil is rich, and produces 
abundantly of all the grains, grasses, vegetables and fruits com- 
mon to the climate. 

The township is watered by several branches of Young's 
Creek, which are small and only profitable for stock water and 
drainage. 

The J., M. & I. Railroad runs through the township from north 
to south, striking very nearly its center, and affords ample means 
for transporting all the products of the township. 

Whiteland is situated in the south part, and is a thriving little 
village, with a population of about two hundred and seventy-five. 

Worthsville, near the center of the township, is a small place 
containing a population of industrious and intelligent people. 

Greenwood, in the northern part of the township, is the prin- 
cipal town in Pleasant township. It contains quite a number of 
good buildings, and its citizens are energetic, clever, and of 
good report. 

The public roads, bridges and school houses are kept in 
good repair. Individual improvements go to show that the 
people are enterprising and intelligent. Many good farms and 
well-constructed houses and barns may be seen throughout the 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 233 



entire township. The people generally are sociable and well 
disposed toward strangers who come among them for legitimate 
purposes. 

Among the early settlers still living in Pleasant township are 
George W. Lyons, R. R. Lyons, Henry Lyons, David Brewer, 
Daniel Brewer, Isaac Banta, A. Brunnemer, John Tracy, C. H. 
Springer, A. C. Woods, J. D. Wilson, Robert Wishard, Thomas 
Walker, John McCool, A. C. Graham, H. R. Comingore, 
Rev. Irvin Cox, Merideth Cox, Daniel Covert, James W. Park, 
William Pierce, C. A. B. Van Arsdall, J. J. Davis, J. M. Jones, 
Robert Lyons, Sen., and W. A. Woods. 

The Smock family settled in this township in the year 1823, 
and were from Mercer county, Ky. Rev. George Bush preached 
the first sermon in the neighborhood of the Smock family, at 
the house of John C. Smock. It was of the Presbyterian faith. 

Isaac Smock was the first Justice of the Peace and Postmas- 
ter, in the vicinity of Greenwood. 

The first church-house was built about one-half a mile north 
of where Greenwood now stands ; it was erected by the Presby- 
terians. 

The first settled minister was Rev. Wm. Woods. 

The first school house built in the township was near Green- 
wood. 

The first couple married were Ephraim K. Robinson and a 
Miss Alexander. 

Pleasant township has thirteen school houses, valued at 
#13.200. 

John Tracy, of Whiteland, is the present Township Trustee. 

The vote of the township is 500. Democratic, 275 ; Repub- 
lican, 225. 



234 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

Presbyterian Church, Whiteland; Rev. John B. Logan, pas- 
tor; membership, 172; A. Boone, Sabbath school superintend- 
ent ; average attendance at school, 80 ; value of church property, 
$4>5QO. 

Presbyterian Church, Greenwood; Rev. A. Dunn, pastor; 
membership, 180; A. C. Woods, Sabbath school superintendent; 
average attendance at school, 100; value of church property, 

#5,000. 

M. E. Church, Greenwood; Rev. D. C. Benjamin, pastor; 
membership, "jj; Wm. H. Bishop, Sabbath school superintend- 
ent ; average attendance at school, 95; value of church property, 

$2, 500. 

Missionary Baptist Church, Greenwood; Rev. E. S. Riley, 
pastor ; membership, about 80; M. J. Scott, Sabbath school su- 
perintendent; average attendance, 80; value of church property, 
$4,000. 

Christian Church, Greenwood; Rev. W. R. Couch, pastor. 

Glade M. E. Church, four miles south-east of Greenwood; Rev. 
David Benjamin, pastor ; membership, 64 ; J. R. Copeland, 
Sabbath school superintendent ; average attendance at school, 
about 65 ; value of church property, $1600. 

Pleasant Grove M. E. Church, two miles west of Whiteland ; 
membership, 28; value of church property, $1000. 

Honey Creek United Brethren Church, situated on the east 
line of White River Township, near its center from north to 
south ; Rev. W. C. Day, pastor ; membership, 95 ; Levi N. 
Jones, Sabbath school superintendent ; average attendance at 
school, 50; value of church property $1600. This Sabbath 
school was organized about the year 1842, and is said to be the 
oldest in the county. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 235 



SECRET ORGANIZATIONS. 

Greenwood Lodge, No. 182, F. and A. M.; membership, 78; 
James H. Colley, W. M.; John W. Herron, S. W.; James H. 
Morgan, J. W.; Dudley Peek, Secretary; H. Lewis, Treasurer; 
George Sourwine, Tyler; value of Lodge property, $1500. 

Greenwood Lodge, No. 198, I. O. O. F. ; membership, 38; 
value of Lodge property, $825. 

Whiteland Grange, No. 578 ; Rev. J. G. Williamson, Master; 
A. Boone, Secretary ; membership, 82 ; value of Lodge pro- 
perty, $75. 

DIRECTORY OF PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 

Alderson, John; farmer; 1 m s w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1853. Presbyterian. 

ADAMS, GEORGE W.; farmer; f m s Whiteland. Born in 
J. C. 1838. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Alexander, S. V.; farmer; 3 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1844. Rep. United Brethren. 

ANDERSON, TAYLOR ; engineer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. 

Allen, J. S.; farmer; 3 J m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 1853; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. 

Allen, Wilson; farmer; 3^ m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1816; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. 

Allen, G. M.; farmer; 3 J m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1852; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. 

Alexander, James T.; carpenter; Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1842. Dem. Protestant. 



236 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Branaman, William; farmer; Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Protestant. 

Branaman, Robert; farmer and teamster; Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1 8 17; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Protestant. 

Browning, Mrs. Elizabeth; farmer; 3 m n w Greenwood. Born 
in Ky. 18 16; settled in J. C. 1844. Christian. 

Brown, John F. ; farmer; 1 m n Whiteland. Born in Va. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Protestant. 

Brewer, Samuel E.; saw milling; 2 m n e Whiteland.. Born in 
J. C. 1842. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Brooks, Wm. H.; farmer; 5% m n e Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Methodist. 

Bonner, Henry; farmer; 3^ m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Methodist. 

Brown, John S.; farmer; 1 m w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Presbyterian in faith. 

Baker, W. J.; farmer; 1 m n e Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. United Brethren. 

BROWN, RANDOLPH; farmer and mechanic; 1% m n e 
Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1807; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. 

BROWN, P. F.; farmer; 1^ m n e Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1833; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Methodist. 

Bishop, Jacob; merchant; Greenwood. Born in Va. 1806; set- 
tled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Methodist. 

Brewer, H.; druggist; Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1844. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 237 



Bishop, W. H.; school teacher; Greenwood. Born in Va. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Indpt. Methodist. 

BROOKS, J. R.; farmer; 3^ m n e Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1854; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Methodist. 

Blake, D. V.; farmer; 2 m e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Rep. Christian. 

Blake, William ; farmer and stock trader ; 2 m e Greenwood. 
Born in N. J. 18 19; settled in J. C. 1847. Rep. Christ. 

BLAKE, M. H.; stock trader; 2 m e Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1845 ; settled in J. C. 1847. R- e P- Christian. 

Blake, George A.; farmer; 2 m e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1852. Rep. Christian. 

Benjamin, Rev. D. C; preacher of the gospel; Greenwood. 
Born in Ohio 1830; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Meth. 

BREWER, G. C; farmer; 1 m n Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

BLACKWELL, A. C. ; farmer; i^m n Greenwood. Born in 
Tenn. 1838; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

Brewer, H.; farmer; if m n w Greenwood. Gone from home 
and could not be seen. 

Brewer, M.; farmer; if m n w Greenwood. Could not be 
seen. 

Boaz, J. M.; farmer; i£ m s Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Dem. Christian. 

Bagby, Sarah; farmer; 2^msw Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1832; settled in j. C. 1853. Christian. 



238 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



BURTON, P. D. ; farmer; 3 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1843. Dem. 

Brackett, John; farmer; 2^msw Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1819; settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. 

Burkhart, Willis; claims to be good at all kinds of business, and 
ready for anything and everything; 2 m s w Greenwood. 
Born in J. C. 1853. Dem. Belongs to no church. 

BOONE, A.; farmer; % m e Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Beebe, James ; physician and surgeon; Whiteland. Born in 
Ohio 1827; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Thinks the Meth- 
odist doctrine is nearest the teachings of the Bible. Then 
why not prove your faith by your works ? 

BREWER, D.; farmer; % m w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Brewer, Edgar; farmer; 2 m s w Whiteland; residence in Frank- 
lin township. Born in J. C. 1850. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Brown, David; farmer; 1^ m n e Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1848; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Presbyterian in faith. 
Prove your faith by your works. 

BROWN, S. ; farmer; 2 m n w Whiteland. Born in Va. about 
1821; settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Brewer, Daniel; farmer; 1 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1835. Dem. Presbyterian. 

BREWER, David ; farmer; 2 m s w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1812; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Brown, John B.; farmer; 4 m n Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 239 



Banta, Isaac ; farmer; raiser of small grains and vegetables ; 2\ 
m w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1823; settled in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. Presbyterian in faith. 

BROOKS, W. A. ; farmer ; 2|mse Greenwood. Born in N. 
Y. 1822; settled in J. C. 1855. Granger. M. Baptist. 

Brooks, H. W.; farmer and tile manufacturer; 4^- m n e White- 
land. Born in Ind. 1851; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. 
Christian. 

Brown, A. S. ; farmer; 2 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Dem. Presbyterian in belief. 

BURKHART, A.; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Believes the United 
Brethren faith and practice to be nearest the teachings of 
Christ. Then why not go with them? 

Brunnemer, A.; farmer; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in Va. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1831. Rep. Methodist. 

BRUNEMER, G. L. ; farmer; 1 % m w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. i860. Rep. Methodist. 

Bennett, G. W.; painter and cooper; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1823; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Liberal. That, we 
presume, means that this old gentleman really don't care 
whether the devil belongs to the church, or the church to 
the devil ; or in other words, he is willing that all shall be 
saved or all lost; he seems liberal enough to compromise 
the matter in any way to suit anybody. 

Brennemer, D.; farmer; 4 m s e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1859. Re P- Methodist. 

Bynum, Wade; farmer; 3ms Greenwood. Born in N. C. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 



24O JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Burks, George L.; farmer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1819; set- 
tled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Presbyterian. 



Crawford, Daniel; gardener; i^m n Whiteland. Born in Va. 
18 1 5; settled in J. C. about 1840. Rep. Methodist. 

Cuningham, J. T.; farmer; 1 ^ m s w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

CUNINGHAM, W. F.; farmer; 1% m s w Whiteland. Born 
in Ky. 1846; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Presbyterian 
in faith. 

Caplinger, John; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Presbyterian. 

CLODFELTER, L. L.; farmer; 3|mse Greenwood. Born in 
N. C. 1852; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. 

Carson, Isaac N.; harness and saddlemaker; Greenwood. Born 
in Ind. 1815; settled in J. C. 1847. Rep. Presbyterian. 

CARLISLE, WILLIAM; grocer; Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1845; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 

CLARK, G. M. D.; blacksmith; Greenwood. Born in Va. 
1845 I settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Cleary, W. P.; farmer; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. United Brethren. 

Combs, J. G.; farmer; 1 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Rep. Presbyterian. 

Carder, J. W.; farmer; 2 m w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Dem. Methodist. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 24I 

Carson, John T. ; farmer and plasterer; 2\ m n e Whiteland. 
Born in Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Presb. 

Carson, Daniel C; farmer; 2}^mne Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1825; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Copeland, Rodney ; farmer ; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in Va. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

Covert, J. C. ; farmer; \yi m s e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1828. Rep. Presbyterian. 

COUCH, REV. W. R.; preacher of the gospel; 2|rae Green- 
wood. Born in 111. 1839; set tled in J. C. 1872. Prohibition. 
Christian. 

Carson, William M.; farmer; 2 m e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1844. Rep. Presbyterian. 

CARSON, JOHN; farmer; i|me Greenwood. Born in Tenn. 
1 8 16; date of settlement not known. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Carney, E.; farmer; fme Greenwood. Born in Pa. 1825 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1874. Dem. R. Baptist. 

Chapman, H. C. ; tinner; 1 m w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Presbyterian. 

CROCKETT, J. D.; farmer; fmsw Greenwood. Born in Va. 
1849; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Has faith in the Chris- 
tian doctrine, as expounded by Alexander Campbell. 

CORNELIUS, S. J.; farmer; 1^ m s w Greenwood. Born in 
N. C. 1849; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Methodist in 
faith. 

Commingore, H. R. ; farmer; 1 m s w Greenwood. Born in Pa. 
1793; settled in J. C. 1833. 
16 



242 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Cornelius, Eugene; farmer and huckster; 2 m s w Greenwood. 
Born in N. C. 1837; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Meth- 
odist in faith. 

COX, JAMES M.; farmer; 3^ m s w Greenwood. Born in J. 
C. 1848. Rep. United Brethren. 

COX, REV. IRVIN; minister of the gospel; 3 m s w Green • 
wood. Born in Ohio 1824; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. 
United Brethren. 

Cox, Merideth; farmer; 3^ m s w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1829; settled in J. C. about 1830. Rep. United Breth. 

Clark, James, farmer; 1% m ne Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

COVERT, G. W.; physician and surgeon; Whiteland. Born in 
J. C. 1833. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Covert, Daniel; retired cabinetmaker; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1799; settled in J. C. 1825. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Cuningham, T. J.; farmer; 1 m s w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Carter, James H.; farmer; ii m n Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1850. Christian. Can't tell where 
to find the right place in politics — mixed. 

CRAWFORD, ROBERT; farmer; 4 m n w Whiteland. Born 
in Va. 1825; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Granger. Meth. 

Coons, James; farmer; 3^ m n e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1850. Dem. Protestant. 

Conner, P.; laborer; Franklin. Born in Ind. 1846; settled in 
J. C. 1868. Dem. Protestant. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 243 



Dolen, J. W.; cooper; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1847; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Rep. 

DOLEN, REV. O. W.; retired Universalist minister; White- 
land. Born in Ohio 1808; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. 

Dunn, W. H.; farmer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1813; settled 
in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

DORRELL, JOSEPH ; farmer ; 1 m n w Whiteland. Born in 
J. C. 1836. Granger. United Brethren. 

DOWNEY, JAMES ; farmer ; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born in 
N. Y. City 1849; settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. 

David, S.; fence builder; Greenwood. Born in Va. 18 14; set- 
tled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Christian. 

Dorrell, Daniel ; farmer ; 3 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Dorrell, Jacob; retired farmer; w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1 80 1; date of settlement not known. Dem. Protestant. 

DORRELL, P.; farmer; 4 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1833. 

Draper, Thomas M.; farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. 
C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Dobbins, Robert B.; retired farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in S. C. 1805; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Doyle, Samuel; farmer; 3J m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 

Doyle, J.; farmer; 3! m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 



244 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Demaree, William W.; farmer; 2y 2 m w Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. about 1832. Rep. Presbyterian. 

DUNN, REV. A.; minister of the gospel; Greenwood. Born 
in Pa. 1828; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Drury, Harvey; farmer; 2% miles s w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1823; settled in J. C. 1870. Christian in belief, and should 
be in practice. 

Davis, J. J.; farmer; 3ms Greenwood. Born in Va. 1824; set- 
tled in J. C. 1828. United Brethren. 

DICKSON, F.; proprietor flouring mills; Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 185 1; settled in J. C. about 1869. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Dolen, L. B.; saw milling; Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1835; set " 
tied in J. C. 1865. Rep. Methodist. 

Dolen, William H.; cooper; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1847; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Methodist in faith. 



Eccles, D. P.; farmer and carpenter; 2^4 m w Whiteland. Born 
in Ind. 1830; settled in J. C 1868. Rep. 

Eastburn, W. H.; farmer; i|m e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1846. Rep. Christian. 

EMBREE, WILLIAM ; farmer; | m e Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1845; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Presbyterian in 
faith. 

Eccles, G. D.; farmer; 1 m s Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Eldridge, H. M.; laborer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1858. Dem. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 245 



ETCHISON, A. E.; teamster; Greenwood. Born in N. C. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Neutral. Protestant. 

Etchison, D. M.; plasterer and brick mason; Greenwood. Born 
in N. C. 1846; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Protestant. 



FINNEY, L. A.; farmer; 3! m s e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Freeland, William; farmer; 1 y 2 m e Greenwood. Born in Tenn. 
1834; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. 

FITZPATRICK, SALEM ; farmer; 2 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in Ky. 1831; settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Finney, John; farmer; 2|mne Whiteland. Born in Ind. 18 18; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. M. Baptist. 

FURGASON, WILLIAM; farmer; 3 J m n e Greenwood. 
Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Christian, 

Foster, David N.; farmer; i|mne Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1843. Rep. 

Findley, James; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Gone from home, 
and could not be seen. 

Foster, J. M.; farmer; 3I mse Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Prot. 



GOOD, JAMES; farmer; 2J m s e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1830. Dem. Methodist. 

Gregg, C. M. ; farmer and teacher; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in 
Ind. 185 1 ; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. 



246 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



GRAHAM, A. C; Post Master, Express Agent and Justice of 
the Peace; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 181 1; settled in J. C. 
1832. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Grimes, Saloman; blind; post office Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1825; settled in J. C. 1849. R- e P- 

GREEN, TRAVIS; farmer; z% m n e Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1825; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Grop, Jacob; farmer; 2\ m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
18 14; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. 

GREGG, IRA T.; farmer; 3^ m s w Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1828; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Methodist. 

GREGG, AARON S.; farmer; 3^ m s w Greenwood. Born 
in Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Methodist. 

Gibson, John; farmer; 2 m s e Smith's Valley. Born in Ind. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

Griffith, James; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1807; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Presbyterian. 

GREENE, M. P.; farmer; 3^ m n e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1854. Rep. Presbyterian. 

GREENE, MRS. ELLEN J.; farmer; y/ 2 m n e Whiteland. 
Born in Tenn. 1829; settled in J. C. 1831. Presbyterian. 

GROOS, L. C; farmer and carpenter; 3! m s e Greenwood. 
Born in N. C. 1839; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Prot. 

GLASS, WILLIAM H.; farmer; 2 m s Greenwood. Born in 
N. Y. 1840; settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Protestant. 

GLASS, JOHN A.; farmer; 2ms Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1847. Dem. Methodist. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 247 



Greene, James; farmer; 3^ m n e Greenwood. Born in Tenn. 
1822; settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. M. Baptist. 

GREGG, SAMUEL; farmer; 3^ m n e Greenwood. Born in 
N. J. 1820; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Christian. 



HILL, L.; retired farmer; 2ms Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1803; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Hill, Simeon; farmer; 2ms Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1831; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Christian. 

HUNGATE, T.; farmer; 2\ m s Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Hankins, George; farmer; 3 m n w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1841; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Methodist. 

Hinehahn, T.; farmer and ditcher; 1 \ m n e Whiteland. Born 
in Ireland 1822; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Catholic. 

HARMON, JOHN C; farmer; 3^ m s e Greenwood. Born 
in Ky. 18 19; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. 

Hunter, J. M.; farmer; \ m e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1835. 

Hinkle, Alonzo N.; laborer; Greenwood. Born in Mich. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Protestant. 

HOLLOW AY, ARMSTED ; brick-maker; Greenwood. Born 
in N. C. 1818; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

Hornbuckle, George ; farmer ; 2 m w Greenwood. Born in N. 
C. 1811; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Methodist. 

Hardin, Franklin; 2ms Glenn's Valley. Born in Ky. 18 10; 
settled in J. C. 1825. Dem. Presbyterian. 



248 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



HORNBUCKLE, GEORGE H.; farmer and student; 2m w 
Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1855 ; settled in J. C. 1868. 
Protestant. 

Hardin, Granville; blacksmith ; Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 
1 84 1. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Hover, Andrew; laborer; J m e Smith's Valley. Born in N.C. 
18 1 8; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Methodist. 

Hamilton, Alexander; farmer; 2 m n e Whiteland. Born in 
Ohio 1832; settled in J. C. 1851. Rep. Methodist. 

Henry, J. N.; farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born in Tenn. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Protestant. 

HEAD, BENJAMIN; farmer; 2 m n e Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Protestant. 

HANES, ELI W.; farmer; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born in N. 
C. 1834; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Methodist. 

Hester, S. W.; carpenter; 3I m ne Greenwood. Born in N. 
C. 1833; settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Christian. 

Harmon, James; farmer; if me Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1820; settled in J. C. 18 — . Rep. Christian. 

HARMON, E. W.; farmer; i|me Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1848; date of settlement not known. Rep. 

Hubbell, Samuel ; farmer; i| me Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1799; settled in J. C. 1843. Rep. Christian. 

HUNTER, J. M.; farmer; ^ m e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
181 1 ; date of settlement not given. Dem. M. Baptist in 
belief; will soon be old enough to begin to practice what 
he believes. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 249 



Howard, T. H.; blacksmith; \y 2 m n w Greenwood. Born in 
Mass. 1 801; settled in J. C. 1849. Rep. M. Baptist. Mr. 
Howard and wife have lived with each other for more than 
fifty years, and don't even think of being divorced yet. 

Howard, James M.; farmer; 1^ m n w Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1840; settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. Universalist. 

Harmon, George; runs heading machine; Greenwood. Date of 
birth and settlement not given. Rep. Christian 

Herren, T. W ; plasterer; \ m n Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1834; settled in J. C. 1869. R- e P- Methodist. 

Henry, Samuel; farmer; 1 m s Greenwood. Born in Va. 1809; 
settled in J. C 1830. Old Jackson Democrat. Presbyte- 
rian in faith, but not quite old enough yet to prove his faith 
by his works. 

HENRY, W. H.; farmer; 1 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1846. Dem. Presbyterian in faith. 

Henry, R. G.; farmer; i|msw Greenwood. Born in Va. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1837. Dem. Presbyterian in belief. 

Hughey, James A.; farmer; 3 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1833; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Hungate, T. B.; farmer; 2ms Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Hopkins, T. R.; carpenter, contractor and builder; Greenwood. 
Born in Ohio 1843; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Univers. 



Inman, M. R. ; deaf and dumb; boot and shoemaker; Greenwood. 
Born in Tenn. 1832; settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. Baptist. 



2 SO JOHNSON COUNTY. 



JELF & SMITHEY; merchants; keep a good assortment of 
goods, such as dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, hats, 
caps and all other articles usually kept in a well ordered 
store. 

JONES, WILLIAM J.; farmer; 3^ m n w Whiteland. Born 
in J. C. 1847. Rep. Methodist in belief. Young man, if 
you believe that the Methodist teachings are in accordance 
with Divine revelation, you would do well to prove your 
faith by works, and to begin now. The devil may work at 
you until he destroys the little faith you have, unless you 
begin to fight him in your early days. 

Johnson, G. ; merchant; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1819; settled 
in J. C. 1847. M. Baptist. 

JUSTICE, M. L.; butcher; Greenwood. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Republican. 

JONES, J. M.; farmer; 4^ m s w Greenwood. Born in Va. 
1823; settled in J. C. 1831. Rep. United Brethren. 

JONES, JOHN W.; farmer; 4^ m s w Greenwood. Born in 
J. C. 1852. Rep. United Brethren. 

JENNINGS, ROBERT; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 181 5; settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Protestant. 

Justice, Sylvester; farmer; 1 \ m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. Date of settlement not known. Rep. 
Protestant. 

JESTICE, DAVID; farmer; 1^ me Greenwood. Born in N. 
C. 1809; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. M. Baptist in faith. 

Jestice, S. H.; farmer; ij m e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. M. Baptist in belief. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 25 I 



Justus, W. L.; telegraph operator and freight agent by profes- 
sion; ^mn Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1835. Christian 
in faith. 

JENKINS, W.; farmer; i£ m s Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Methodist proclivities. 

Jones, L. W. ; farmer; 3 m s w Greenwood. Born in Va. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. United Brethren. 

Jones, J. L.; farmer; 3^ m s Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1847. R- e P- United Brethren. 

JELF, I. L.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1825; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Dem. M. Baptist. 



Kinnick, William; farmer; 2\ m e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Methodist in belief. 

KINETT, JAMES; cooper; Greenwood. Born in Ohio 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Presbyterian in faith. 

Kinnick, James T.; farmer; ij^mne Whiteland. Born in J. 
C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Kinnick, John A.; farmer; 3 m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1816; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. 

Kinnick, Demsey; farmer; 4 m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Methodist. 



Law, W. ; stock tender; 2ms Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. 

Law, W. W.; farmer; 2\ m s w Greenwood. Born in Ky. about 
1826; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Christian. 



252 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



LAW, DAVID; farmer; 2^ m s w" Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1845; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Predestinarian. lam 
the Lord, and there is none else ; there is no God besides 
me. I form the light and create the darkness : I make 
peace and create evil : I, the Lord, do all these things. 
Rejoice in that which I create. — Isaiah. 

Lacy, E. P.; teacher and printer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 185 1; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Believes that the Presbyterian 
doctrine is nearest the truth. 

Langston, I.; unable to work; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Lampton, B. F.; carpenter; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1841; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Presbyterian. 

LANGSTON, ISAIAH; farmer; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Lyons, Robert, Sen.; retired farmer; 2 m w Greenwood. Born 
in Pa. 1792; settled in J. C. 1825. Dem. Protestant. 

Laclair, Joseph; farmer and carpenter; )(mne Smith's Valley. 
Born in Canada 1839; settled in J. C. 1866. Neutral. M. 
Baptist. 

Logan, Royal; farmer; i£ m ne Whiteland. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Dem. Protestant. 

LEMON, JOHN; farmer; 2 m s e Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1841; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. M. Baptist. 

LOGAN, REV. JNO. B.; minister of the gospel; Whiteland. 
Born in Va. 1818; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Presby. 

Loomis, E.; carpenter; Greenwood. Born in Mich. 1850; set- 
tled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Mixed. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 253 



LYONS, GEORGE W.; farmer; I m n e Greenwood. Born in 
Ohio 181 5; settled in J. C. 1829. United Brethren in belief. 

Lyons, R. R.; farmer; 1 m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 18 19; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. Christian. 

Lyons, Henry; farmer; 1 m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1829. 

Lyons, John J.; farmer; 1 m n e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1839. Dem. Christian. 

LYONS, ISAAC; farmer; 1 m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1808; settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. Presbyterian in belief. 

Lemasters, Wm.; farmer; 1 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1 83 1. Dem. Presbyterian. 



MAXFIELD, S. V.; firm of Maxfield & Brother; tile manufac- 
turers; Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1848; settled in J. C. 
1862. Dem. 

McCammon, John; laborer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 185 1; set- 
tled in J. C. 18—. Dem. 

MOORE, J. W.; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1837; settled in J. 
C. 1869. Rep. Christian. 

McClain, John W.; laborer; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Dem. Presbyterian. 

McClain, John -S.; laborer; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1851. 
Rep. Methodist. 

McCammon, Joseph; laborer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. 



254 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Myers, Charles H.; farmer; l / 2 m w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1828; settled in J. C. about 1848. Rep. 

McCool, William H.; farmer; 1 m n Greenwood. Born in J. 
C. 1842. Rep. Presbyterian in faith. 

MOODY, E. T.; teamster; Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Rep. Christian. 

McCool, Robert; farmer; 1 m w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1853. 

McCool, John; farmer and carpenter ; 1 m w Greenwood. Born 
in Pa. 1817; settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. Methodist. 

MAXFIELD, W. B.; tile manufacturer; Whiteland. Born in 
Ohio 1843; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Presbyterian. 

MAXFIELD & BROTHER ; manufacturers of all sizes of tile 
ing, and will sell at low prices for cash ; farmers are respect- 
fully invited to call and examine their stock. 

MILLER, ABRAHAM; physician and surgeon; Whiteland. 
Born in Ky. 1834; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Presb. 

MURPHEY, G. E.; farmer; % m s Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
183 1. Rep. Presbyterian in principle. 

McClain, J. C; farmer; 3I m e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Methodist in faith. 

MYERS, JACOB; farmer; 3 m e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1851. Rep. Christian. 

Myers, J. G.; farmer; 3 m e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1851. Rep. Christian. 

McGee, William; runs express wagon; Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1833; settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 255 



McALPIN, ROBERT H.; harness and saddle merchant; Green- 
wood. Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. 
Temperance. M. Baptist. 

Manning, Robert; carpenter; Greenwood. Born in Ohio 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. 

McClain, John L. ; retired farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1804; settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. Methodist. 

McCLAIN, THOMAS H.; farmer; 3 m n e Whiteland. Born 
in J. C. 1854. Dem. Methodist. 

McClelland, Wm.; retired farmer; 2% m s e Greenwood. Born 
in Pa. 1788; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Presbyterian. 

McGee, P. D.; plasterer; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1854. Rep. Presbyterian. 

McClain, W. H.; farmer; 4J m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1839; settled in J. C. about i860. Dem. Methodist. 

McALPIN, JOHN C; barber and confectioner; Greenwood. 
Born in J. C. 1849. ^- e P- M. Baptist. 

McCOOL, JAMES M.; clerk; Greenwood. Born in J.C.1851. 

Neutral. Methodist. 

Morris, A. R.; carpenter and teamster; Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1828; settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

McCOOL, JOHNT.; brick moulder; Greenwood. Born in J. 
C. 1843. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Myers, H. A. ; farmer; 1 m s w Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. United Brethren. 

McCLELLAN, GEORGE W. ; farmer; 3 J m s e Greenwood. 
Born in J. C. 1835. Dem. Protestant. 



256 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Noble, John; farmer; ^ m n Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. 

Noble, George T. ; farmer; ^ m n Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1801; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

NOBLE, REV. SAMUEL C; preacher of the gospel and hor- 
ticulturist; f mn Greenwood. Born in Ky. 183 1 ; settled 
in J. C. 1834. Rep. 

NOBLE, N. E. ; merchant; deals in dry goods, groceries, glass- 
ware, queensware, crockery, hats, caps, boots, shoes, and 
notions of various kinds; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

Noble, T. B. ; physician and surgeon ; Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 



Oakley, Wm. A.; farmer; 5 y 2 m s e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Christian. 

ORME, A. J.; farmer and stock dealer; \\ m n w Greenwood. 
Born in Ind. 1829; settled in J. C. 1829, at the age of about 
four weeks. Dem. Methodist. 

Oldaker, George; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 18 16; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Christian. 

OLDAKER, T. C; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1849. Rep. Christian. 

Orme, Nicholas; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Dem. Protestant. 



PIERCE, W. D.; carpenter; Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 257 



PEGGS, J. H.; patentee excelsior hog trap; Greenwood. Born 
in Ky. 1842; settled in J. C. 1846. Dem. Protestant. 

PEEK, DUDLEY; undertaker and manufacturer of all kinds of 
picture frames; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1845; settled in 
J. C. 1857. Dem. Protestant. 

PETTIT, HENRY; butcher ; firm of Pettit & Justice ; Green- 
wood. Born in Ky. 1849; settled in J. C. 1852. Indpt. 
M. Baptist. 

Pullen, J.; farmer; Greenwood. Born in Ohio 185 1; settled in 
J. C. 1866. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Pate, Edward H.; carpenter, and boot and shoemaker; Green- 
wood. Born in N. C. 1830; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. 
Christian. 

Presser, John M.; farmer and stock trader; 1 m s Glenn's Val- 
ley. Born in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Paddack, L. S. ; farmer; if m s Glenn's Valley. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Protestant. 

Paddack, John; farmer; 2| ms Glenn's Valley. Born in Ohio 
1823; settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 

Pierce, R.; 3 m w Greenwood. Could not be seen on account 
of absence from home. 

PARK, JAMES H.; farmer; 2 m n e Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1831; settled in J. C. 1851. Dem. Methodist. 

Park, A. Q.; farmer; $% m e Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1834. 

Peggs, Joseph; farmer and tile manufacturer; 2.\ m e Greenwood. 
Born in Ky. 1807; settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. Granger. 

17 



258 JOHNSON COUNTY, 



POLK, JAMES M.; farmer; % m e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Christian. 

Pearce, J. S. ; agent for sale of pumps; iy£ m w Greenwood. 
Born in Tenn. 1845; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

POWERS, J. H.; farmer; 13^ m w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1818; settled in J. C. 1868. No politics. Orthodox. 

Parsell, John; farmer; x / 2 m n Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Printz, P.; laborer; 1 m w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 

Powers, I. H.; farmer; 1 m w Greenwood. Not at home; could 
not be seen. 

Park, James W.; farmer; 2|msw Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
18 16; settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Presbyterian. 

PEARSON, MARTIN; farmer; 3 m s w Greenwood. Born in 
Ohio 1825; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. United Brethren. 

Pierce, Wm.; farmer; 2^ m n Whiteland. Born in Va. 1804; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. Protestant. 

Pierce, David; trader; 2^ m n Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Dem. 

PERRY, T.; blacksmith; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1837; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Presbyterian in opinion. 

Perrine, J. W.; cooper; Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1829; settled 
in J. C. 1871. Rep. Methodist in opinion. 

PERRINE, O. D.; engineer; Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1853; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 2$9 



Pearson, J. C. ; farmer; I m n Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. New Light. 

Poor, J. A.; farmer; 3 m n w Whiteland. Born in Ind. Dem. 
United Brethren. 

Pierce, Mrs. Amanda; farmer; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in Va. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1844. United Brethren. 

POWELL, J.; farmer and trader; i|mw Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1832; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Methodist. 

Powell, J. W.; farmer; \y 2 m w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Methodist. 

Powell, James; farmer; 1^ mw Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1854; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Methodist. 

PERKINS, G.; rough carpenter; \y 2 m w Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1838; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 

Parkhurst, Thomas; laborer; 1 m w Whiteland. Born in Tenn. 
1830; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. 



Robins, Daniel; farmer; 2 m s e Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Presbyterian. 

ROBISON, GEORGE W.; farmer and teacher; i£- m e Green- 
wood. Born in J. C. 1850. Rep. Christian. 

Robison, Alexander ; farmer ; 1 \ m e Greenwood. Born in J. 
C. 1830. Rep. Christian. 

Roberts, J. J.; retired boatman; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1830, 
settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 

Robinson, M. C; laborer; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 



260 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Richardson, William G.; laborer; Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

Roads, John L. ; farmer; 1^ m s e Glenn's Valley. Born in J. 
C. 1837. Dem. Methodist. 



Srriithey, Richard; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1854; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. United Brethren in 
faith. 

Scott, A.; farmer; 4 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Dem. United Brethren. 

Smith, Wm. T.; farmer; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Smith, J. P.; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Gone from home, and 
could not be seen. Rep. Methodist. 

Shutters, David H.; farmer; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Believes the Methodist 
doctrines to be in accordance with the teachings of the 
Scriptures. If this man really believes that the Scriptures 
teach men to be Christians, and himself especially to be a 
Methodist, why does he not fall into the ranks before he 
gets past the age of proscription ? By all means let him go 
into the volunteer service. 

Springer, A. D.; engineer; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Simes, James; carpenter; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1820; set- 
tled in J. C. 1856. Dem. 

Shutters, M.; farmer; 2\ m w Whiteland. Born in Va. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. United Brethren. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 26 1 



SMITHEY, JOHN F.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1843; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Smithey, L. W. ; farmer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1847; settled 
in J. C. 1869. Dem. M. Baptist in faith. 

Smithey, T. G.; farmer; ^ m e Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Believer in the Presbyterian 
doctrines. 

SHUTTERS, JOHN T.; farmer; 3 m n w Whiteland. Born in 
Ind. 1843; settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Almost persuaded 
to be a Christian. 

Spillman, G.; farmer; ^ m w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. Presbyterian. 

SPILLMAN, S.; farmer; fmn Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Speas, John; farmer; 3ms Greenwood. Born in N. C. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

SPEAS, P. I.j farmer; 3ms Greenwood. Born in N. C. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Methodist inclination. 

Stewart, James R. ; farmer ; 2{ m n Whiteland. Born in Va. 
1816; settled in J. C. 1837. Dem. 

Stewart, George; farmer ; 2.\ m n Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1842. Dem. Christian. 

STONE, C. S. ; carriage and buggy maker ; Whiteland. Born 
in Ind. 1*847; settled in J. C. 1859. R e P- United Breth. 

SHORT, JAMES ; farmer ; % m s Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 



262 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Smith, I. F.; farmer; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1853. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Smith, J. A.; farmer; 2 m w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Smith, E.; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1840; set- 
tled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian in belief. 

SMITH, E. C; carpenter; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1831; set- 
tled in J. C. 1851. Dem. Inclined to the Presbyterian 
faith. 

Shortridge, George; farmer; 1 m n Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1852. Rep. Christian. 

SHORTRIDGE, JOHN; farmer; 1 m n Greenwood. Born in 
In'd. 1 8 18; settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Christian. 

Smith, J. W.; farmer; 2 m n w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1840. 
This man seems to have no idea of the necessity of taking 
an interest in political affairs. 

Sharp, A. G. ; carpenter; i|msw Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1833. Dem. 

SEFTON, P.; farmer; 3 m s e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 1834; 
settled in J. C. about 1854. Dem. Christian. 

Simpson, David; farmer; 3^ m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1851. Rep. Methodist. 

Simpson, John; farmer; 3^ m n e Greenwood. Gone from 
home, and could not be seen. 

SCOTT, M. J.; artist and dentist; Greenwood. Born in N. Y. 
1844; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. M Baptist. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 263 



Shryock, H.; Postmaster and tailor; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

Sowerwine, George; blacksmith; Greenwood. Born in Pa. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Shryock, George W.; railroader; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1851; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Christian. 

Sanders, Henry; farmer ; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1825; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. United Brethren. 

SMITH, CHARLES ; plasterer ; 2 m w Greenwood. Born in 
Ohio 1 841; settled in J. C. 187 1. Dem. United Breth. 

Sutton, John ; farmer ; 1 m s Glenn's Valley. Born in J. C. 
1829. Rep. Protestant. 

SEDUM, DANIEL; farmer; £ m n w Smith's Valley. Born 
in Ind. 1851; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Protestant. 

Sutton, Israel; merchant; Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 1848. 
M. Baptist. 

Sedum, Matthew ; farmer ; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1826; settled in J. C; date of settlement not given. Dem. 
United Brethren. 

Stone, E. ; retired farmer; 4^ m s w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1810; settled in J. C. 1859. United Brethren. 

Stone, H.; farmer; 6| m n w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Rep. Protestant. 

SHEEK, L. W.; farmer; 2 m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Methodist. 

Stewart, James; farmer; 2 m s e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Protestant. 



264 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Sheek, Mrs. Sarah; farmer; 2|mse Greenwood. Born in N. 
C. 1820; settled in J. C. 1851. Methodist. 

Smith, J. M.; farmer; 3 m n e Greenwood. Born in La. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

SCOTT, M. J.; artist, dentist, and patentee of Scott's flexible 
rubber hood and nozzle; should be in the hands of every 
picture artist. 

Stuart, William P.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Business men often refuse to give their political and religi- 
ous views ; so also are politicians inclined to refuse. The 
business man refuses because he fears his trade might suffer 
otherwise; the politician fears lest the opposition may be- 
come the stronger. 

Smith, Robert R. ; merchant; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Rep. Methodist. 

SMITH, STUART & TRACY; dealers in dry goods, groceries, 
hardware, queensware, boots, shoes, hats, caps, socks, neck- 
ties, penknives, pins, needles, thread, buttons, and every 
other thing usually kept in a well selected assortment of 
goods for the country trade; Whiteland. 

Smith, J. P.; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Springer, C. H.; dealer in drugs and medicines; Whiteland. 
Born in Ky. 18 12; settled in J. C. 1824. Rep. Methodist. 



TILSON, D. A.; farmer; 2\ m s e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
181; 1. Dem. M. Baptist in faith. Young man, your faith 
is of no consequence unless you prove it by your works. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 265 



Thompson, J. C; toll-gate keeper; y 2 m w Whiteland. Born 
in Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. 

Truman, W. C; farmer; \\ m s Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Christian. 

Tracy, M. J.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1832. Rep. 

THOMPSON, JOHN C; farmer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
182 1; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Tingle, J.; farmer; 23^ m s e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Tracy, F. J., teacher; y 2 m n Whiteland. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Dem. Christian in faith. 

TRACY, JOHN ; farmer and Township Trustee; 1 m n White- 
land. Born in Ky. 1807; settled in J. C. 1829. Granger. 
Christian. 

Trout, S. A.; farmer; 2 m n Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1842. 
Dem. 

Trout, David; farmer; 1 m n w Whiteland. Born in Va. 1828. 
Dem. 

TROUT, JOSIAH ; farmer ; 3 \ m s e Greenwood. Born in 
Va. 1826; settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. 

Turner, John; retired farmer ; \ m w Greenwood. Born in Pa 
1805; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. 

Thompkins, W. H.; miller; Greenwood. Born in N. Y. 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Protestant. 



Varner, T. H.; painter; Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1866. Rep. Presbyterian. 



266 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



VORHIES, JACOB A.; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Born in 
J. C. 185 1. Dem. Believes the Presbyterian doctrines. 

Vorhies, A. W.; farmer; 3 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1835. Dem. Methodist. 

Vorhies, A.; farmer; 3 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. C, time 
not known. Dem. Methodist. 

VAUGHT, DAVID; farmer; 4 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. 
C. 1845. Dem. United Brethren, 

VORHIES, JOHN; farmer; 3J m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1834; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Christian. 

Vandyke, Dominicus; farmer; 3 m n e Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 18 18; settled in J. C. 1847. R- e P- Christian. 

Vorhies, David ; farmer ; 1 J m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

VISE, R. M. J.; farmer; 2 m e Glenn's Valley. Born in Ind. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Methodist. 

Vise, Jackson; farmer; 2 m e Glenn's Valley. Gone from home 
and could not be seen by our agent. 

VORHIES, ISAAC N.; farmer; 2 m e Glenn's Valley. Born 
in J. C. 1842. Dem. Methodist. 

VORIS, WILLIAM H.; farmer; 2^ m n e Greenwood. Born 
in J. C. 1847. Rep. Christian. 

Van Arsdall, C. A. B. ; farmer and stock raiser; if m w White- 
land. Born in Ky. 1823 ; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. 
Presbyterian. 

VAN ARSDALL, C; farmer; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Presbyterian. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 267 



VARNER, JACOB ; farmer; y 2 m s w Whiteland. Born in 
Ohio 1813; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Presbyterian. 

VARNER, J. B.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in Ohio 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. 

VARNER & SON; dealers in dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes 
and harness; Whiteland. 

VARNER, JOHN F.; stock trader; Whiteland. Born in Ohio 
1840; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Voris, John J.; farmer; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1830. Dem. 
Believes the Presbyterian doctrines, but does not prove them 
by thorough practice. 



WILSON, A.; blacksmith; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1852; set- 
tled in J. C. 1867. Dem. 

Wilson, T.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1846. Dem. 
Presbyterian. 

Williamson, Rev. J G. ; retired minister; is now a horticulturist; 
Whiteland. Born in Ky. 18 13; settled in J. C. 1870. Old 
prohibitionist. Granger. Presbyterian. 

WHEELEN, SAMUEL; medical student; Whiteland. Born 
in Ind. 1853. Presbyterian. 

Wood, James; laborer; 1 m n Whiteland. Born in Ind. 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Wood, Jesse; laborer; 1 m n Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1808; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. 

WILSON, JOSEPH, C.; farmer; 3 \ m w Whiteland. Born in 
Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. 



268 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



WALKER, THOMAS; boot and shoemaker; Whiteland. 
Born in Term. 1801; settled in J. C. 1826. Liberal. Meth- 
odist. Mr. Walker came to the Territory of Indiana in the 
year 18 16, when the section of country where Johnson 
county now is belonged to the Indians. Mr. Walker is 
quite old, and yet he is giving half his political liberties to 
his enemies, by acknowledging himself a Liberal Repub- 
lican. 

WHITE, JACOB B.; merchant; Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
183 1. Rep. Methodist in principle. Mr. White deals in 
groceries, hardware, queensware, brooms, tubs, buckets, 
salt, cigars, tobacco, dried fruit, molasses, and notions gen- 
erally, and will sell as low as any other responsible house. 
Call on him. 

Woods, George W.; cooper and carpenter; i|mw Whiteland. 
Born in Ky. 1849; settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Presb. 

Wishard, John M. ; farmer; 2 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 
1835. Rep. Universalist. 

WISHARD, ROBERT; farmer; 2 m s w Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1803; settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Methodist in prin- 
ciple, and surely is old enough to be one in practice. Mr. 
Wishard was one of the very first settlers in Pleasant town- 
ship, and endured all the hardships of a pioneer life. He 
has cleared the heavy timber off of 175 acres of land, and 
now has a fine farm. 

Whitaker, Nimrod ; farmer; 2 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
about 1837; date of settlement not known. Dem. 

WHITAKER, WILLIAM ; farmer; 2§ m s Greenwood. Born 
in J. C. 1840. Christian in principle. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 269 



Woods, Andrew; carpenter; i ]/ 2 m n Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. 

Wiley, M. D.; farmer and teacher; 2 m e Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. 

WOODS, A. C; farmer; i| m n Greenwood. Born in Tenn. 
1821; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Wilson, Samuel; farmer; \\ m n w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
185 1; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. 

Williams, A.; proprietor heading factory; Greenwood. Born 
in Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Christian. 

WHITENACK, SAMUEL D.; farmer; \\ m s w Greenwood. 
Not at home, and could not be seen. 

Wishard, J. M.; physician and surgeon; Greenwood. Born in 
J. C. 1828. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Whitenack, D. S. ; farmer and teacher; \\ m s Greenwood. 
Born in J. C. 1837. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Williams, James T. ; farmer; 1 m e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
1 840. Rep. 

WILSON, GEORGE; farmer; 2]/ 2 m s e Greenwood. Born in 
J. C. 1845. Dem. Methodist. 

Wiley, J. F.; farmer and county commissioner; 2 m e Green- 
wood. Born in Ind. 1821 ; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. 
Christian. 

WILSON, JAMES E.; farmer and carpenter; 25^ m s e Green- 
wood. Born in J. C. 1843. Dem. Methodist. 

WILSON, THOMAS H.; farmer; 2^ m s e Greenwood. Born 
in J. C. 1841. Dem. Methodist in faith. 



270 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Wilson, G.; farmer; 2|mse Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. Believes the doctrine taught by the Christian Church 
to be orthodox. 

WILSON, J. D.; farmer; 2^ m e Greenwood. Born in N. C. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. M. Baptist in faith. 

Wilson, Jonathan ; farmer ; 3 J m w Whiteland. Born in Ky. 
1 8 18; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. United Brethren. 

Waggoner, James N.; proprietor hotel; Greenwood. Born in 
Ky. 1823; settled in J. C. 1842. Rep. M. Baptist. 

WILSON, D.; telegraph operator and freight agent; Green- 
wood. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. Presbyterian in prin- 
ciple. 

Wyrick, H.; farmer; 3 m n w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1827. 
Dem. Christian. 

Wallace, Joseph; farmer ; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1844; settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. 

WEST, JOHN ; farmer ; 3^ m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1817; settled in J. C. 1837. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Williams, James W.; farmer; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1841; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. 

Woods, H. C; teacher of vocal and instrumental music; Green- 
wood. Born in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

WATSON, WM.W.; carriage manufacturer; Greenwood. Born 
in Ohio 1817; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Protestant. 

White, George T.; blacksmith; Greenwood. Born in Ohio 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Neutral. Methodist. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 27 1 



Watson, A. M.; carriage and wagon manufacturer; Greenwood. 
Born in Ohio 1841; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Methodist. 

Wilson, William M.; wagon maker; Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Presbyterian. 

WHITEN ACK, J. H.; physician and surgeon; Greenwood. 
Born in Ky. 1848; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Presby. 

Wyrick, David; farmer; 1 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Warren, Mrs. Eliza; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1844; settled in J. C. 1866. Protestant. 

WOODS, W. A.; farmer; 1% m w Greenwood. Born in East 
Tenn. 1824; settled in J. C. 1831. Rep. Presbyterian. 

WOODS, JOHN H.; farmer; 1 m n w Whiteland. Born in 
Ky. 1848; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Protestant. 

Wheelen, William; carpenter; 2 m n e Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Williams, Joel; farmer; 4 m n e Whiteland. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Rep. Methodist. » 

WHEATCRAFT, H. H.; farmer; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born 
in Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Wheatcraft, Mrs. Sophia; farmer; 2 m n e Greenwood. Born 
in Me. 18 13; settled in J. C. 1850. United Brethren. 

Wallace, Thomas; farmer; 2\ m n e Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1804; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Wallace, William T. ; farmer; 2m n e Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1837; settled in j. C. 1872. Rep. M. Baptist. 



272 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



WHEATCRAFT, HARMAN ; farmer ; 3 m n e Greenwood. 
Born in Ohio 1835; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Prot. 



YASTE, LEONARD; farmer; 1 m w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1826; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Presbyterian. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 273 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHP. 



White River Township, situated in the northwest corner of 
the county, is the largest in the county except one. It contains 
forty-eight square miles. A great part of the land lays rolling 
and gently undulating ; a small portion is quite hilly, while an- 
other small part is level. 

The soil is generally very rich, and produces corn, wheat, rye, 
oats, potatoes, fruits, vegetables, and in fact all temperate zone 
products. 

The township is well supplied with running streams. White 
River runs across the northwest corner; Honey Creek runs 
across the entire township from its southeast corner, and emp- 
ties into White River; Pleasant Run waters the northeast part, 
while Bluff Creek runs through the northwestern portion of the 
township. These streams are generally small, with the excep- 
tion of White River, which, however, is of no vital importance 
to the welfare of the people in White River township, except as 
a main channel for draining the country. 

The public improvements are excellently good. Bridges, 
roads and school houses are well cared for. There are two 
gravel roads completed, and several others in progress. 

Individual improvements will compare favorably with other 
parts of the country. A great many fine, well regulated farms, 
and handsome residences, with capacious barns, adorn the sur- 
face of White River township. 
18 



274 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



The towns are generally small, but are made up of healthy, 
enterprising citizens. The people through the entire township 
are intelligent, generous and hospitable. 

They are well supplied with educational facilities, having 
eleven school houses, valued at about $6,000. 

J. B. Dresslar is Township Trustee. 

The people are also well supplied with church houses, and 
seem to take a strong interest in the moral welfare of the com- 
munity. 

The township has two flourishing Grange organizations, which 
are doing all that can be done toward bettering the condition of 
the farming class. 

The vote of this township is about 422 ; Democratic, 292 ; 
Republican, 130. 

Among the early settlers now living in White River township 
are : Lan. Robards, B. Reynolds, M. S. Robinson, Wm. A. 
Robinson, Samuel Doty, Jos. M. Shufflebarger, Jacob Sutton, 
H. Sanders, Joseph Smith, Thomas Sells, John Robe, John 
Taylor, Shelby Fullen, Samuel Turner, J. M. Lyons, H. S. - 
Lyons, A. W. Vorhies, Levi Groseclose, J. M. Boaz, John 
Byers, H. J. Tresslar, and others. 

The Doty family settled in White River township in the year 
1822. They came through from North Bend, in the State of 
Ohio, and went into the township on " Whitzel's Trace." This 
family appears to have consisted of three brothers and two sis- 
ters, who came into the country late in the spring ; at least, 
there were but the five ; three brothers and two sisters, who 
came out on the first journey. On account of the lateness of 
the season two of the brothers went back to Ohio, probably to 
get provisions and bring over more of their people. One brother 
and the two sisters remained in White River township, and 
while George Doty — for that was his name — killed wild game to • 
supply their wants, the two girls, Mary and Sarah, cleared a 
small patch of ground and raised a little corn. For nearly three 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 275 

months they lived on milk thickened with a little flour, with 
occasionally a steak of venison. It is said that these girls were 
very much annoyed by rattlesnakes coming under the cabin floor 
and protruding their heads up through the crevices between the 
puncheons. They were attracted by the odor of cooked milk 
and flour. These unwelcome visitors were dispatched by the 
girls with a stout stick or handspike. 

Peter Baker and George Doty got out the logs for the first 
hewed-log house in the township. The first church house was 
built near the " bluffs," and the first pastor was William Irvin, 
of the Baptist order. The church house was a double building, 
having a cross partition, and was made of hewn logs. The first 
school was in one of the rooms of the church. The first Meth- 
odist ministers who preached in White River Township were, 
Eli Farmer, J. Scott, and Jacob Brummell. 1 The first white 
child born in the township was Samuel E. Wishard, son of John 
Wishard. The first mill was a "horse-mill," built by John 
Cagley. The first lumber was sawed with a "whip-saw." The 
first orchard was planted by Andrew Brown. The first death 
was a man by the name of Warner. There were no coffins, nor 
lumber to make one ; so the neighbors cut down a tree and dug 
out a trough in which to place the remains of Mr. Warner. 
They then dug a grave with an old ax and hoe, in which they 
buried the body. Perhaps the soul of this man Warner never 
knew of the manner of his burial, and even if it did, what effect 
could it have on his future happiness ? We presume that if the 
silly world of wealthy beings who spend millions to adorn little 
spots of earth where dead bodies lay, could only remember that 
in Christ all were made alive, and that there is now no more 
death, they would turn and bestow their wealth upon poor, suf- 
fering, living humanity. The soul of man goes to that home, 
prepared for it by the Great Architect of the Universe, and 
can not lay smouldering in the dust of earth. 

The first land cleared in White River township is now known 






276 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



as the "Doty Hill." In an early day, when the earth was 
covered with large forest trees, it was the custom to cut out the 
smaller ones and girdle the large ones. After being girdled 
awhile, the bark would slip off and leave many of them quite 
smooth, so that in "roasting ear" time the squirrels would 
come into the field, when the boys would frighten them off, and 
in their efforts to climb the trees many were captured. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

Christian Church, Bargersville ; Rev. William Sellars, pastor ; 
membership, 75 ; A. S. Deen, Sabbath school superintendent ; 
average attendance, 60; value of church property, $500. 

M. E. Church, three-quarters of a mile north-east of Bluff 
Creek; Rev. G. Heavenridge, pastor; membership, 100; Orin 
Bailiff, Sabbath school superintendent ; attendance at school, 
about 65 ; value of church property, $1,500. 

Bluff Christian Church, two miles north-west of Bluff Creek ; 
Revs. J. M. Hyatt and J. H. Henry, pastors ; membership about 
85; James M. Jacobs, Sabbath school superintendent; average 
attendance at school, 50; value of church property, $1,000; Sab- 
bath school in a flourishing condition. 

SECRET ORGANIZATIONS. 

Bluff Creek Grange, No. 340; William C. Bice, Master; C. R. 
McColum, Secretary ; membership, 70. This Grange is in a 
flourishing condition. 

There is one other Grange in this township, which is said to 
be doing well. There are also other churches which our agent 
was not able to report specifically, but we learn that White 
River township, in the way of intelligence and morals, is inferior 
to none in the county. They have plenty of church houses, 
school houses, and Lodge rooms, and they seem to be proud of 
them, as well they may be, for in them our young Americans 
are to be reared up to a noble stand-point of freedom and intel- 
ligence. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 2J 

DIRECTORY OF WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 

Allen, Charlotte; farmer; 2^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in Ky. 
1817; settled in J. C. 1869. M. Baptist. 

ALLEN, J. H.; house painter; 2^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in 
Ky. 185 1 ; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. 

Admire, Henry; farmer; 2^ m w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Protestant. 

Alexander, Thomas H.; farmer; P. O. Franklin. BorninTenn. 
1828; settled in J. C. 1832. Rep. C. Presbyterian. 



Boaz, J. M.; 3 m s e Waverly. Born in Va. 181 5*; settled in 
J. C. 1821. 

BOAZ, W. T.; 4 m s e Waverley. Born in Ind. 1849; settled 
in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Methodist. Resides in Union town- 
ship. 

Byers, John ; farmer; 5 mse Waverley. Born in Ky. 18 16; 
settled in J. C. 1824. Rep. Christian. 

BROWN, GRANVILLE ; farmer ;2|ms Bluff Creek. Born 
in Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Brown, Mrs. S. A.; 2| ms Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 1806; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Methodist. 

Boaz, Mrs. Lydia ; 1% m w Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 1799; 
settled in J. C. 1824. Christian. 

Brunnemer, Isaac; farmer; ly? m w Bluff Creek. Born in J.C. 
1836. Dem. Protestant. 

BICE, W. C; physician and surgeon; 2j4 m e Bluff Creek. 
Born in Ky. 1836; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Christian. 



278 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



BROWNING, ALBERT; farmer; if m s e Smith's Valley. 
Born in Mo. 1845; settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. Christian 
in belief. 

Bariger, G. W.; farmer; 1 m e Smith's Valley. Born in Va. 
1813; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. M. Baptist. 

BAUGH, J. T.; farmer; 2.\ m w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. United Brethren. 

Bailiff, O.; farmer; 1 m n Bluff Creek. Born in Ohio 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

Brown, James; farmer; 2 m n e Waverly. Born in Ind. 1838; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Friend. 

Berry, J. M.; farmer; y 2 m s Smith's Valley. Born in Ind. 
1836; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. M. Baptist. 

BROWN, N. L.; farmer; \\ m n w Bluff Creek. Born in Ind. 
1838; settled in J. C. i860. Rep. 

Brunnemer, L. C; farmer; ^mse Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1838. Rep. 

BROWN, J. H.; farmer; Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1822. 
Rep. Christian. 

Brunnemer, Samuel; farmer; ^ m n e Bluff Creek. Born in J. 
C. 1836. Rep. 

Bratton, John; teamster; 4 m n e Bluff Creek. Born in 111. 
1835; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Methodist. 

BURKHART, G. W.; farmer and broom manufacturer; 3^ m 
n Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. 

Browning, J. E.; farmer; 2 J m w Greenwood. Born in Mo. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Christian. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 279 

Bishop, Louis; farmer; ^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1856. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Bishop, Abraham; farmer; ^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 
1795; settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Methodist. 



Carter, James A.; farmer ; 3 J m w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
1834; settled in J. C. 1841. Rep. 

CARTER, VALENTINE ; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born 
in J. C. 1850. Rep. 

CARDER, W. A.; contractor and builder; 1^ m w Green- 
wood. Born in J. C. 183 1. Dem. 

Craig, Samuel ; farmer; 1^ m s Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1828. Protestant. 

Church, Mrs. M. J.; 3 m s e Bluff Creek. Born in N. C. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Methodist. 

Cleveland, G. W.; farmer; 1 J m n w Bargersville. Born in Mo. 
1819; settled in J. C. 1872. Granger. R. Baptist. 

Cunningham, James W.; farmer; 1 m w Bluff Creek. Born in 
Ohio 1842; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Christian. 

Carper, C. J.; carpenter; i|mne Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Presbyterian. 

CLORE, JOHN; farmer; 6| mnw Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1850. In favor of reform. Christian. 

Clore, Wm. R.; student preparing for teaching; 6J m n w 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1852. Christian. 

Collins, James; farmer; 13^ m n e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1826. Dem. 



280 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Chamness, Thomas; farmer; 2 m e Bluff Creek. Born in Ind. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. 

Church, R.; farmer; 1 m s e Smith's* Valley. Born in N. C. 
1817; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Methodist. 

Cormican, John; farmer; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ohio 
18 19; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Christian in belief. 

CLARK, WILLIAM T; blacksmith; Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 
1841; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Christian. 



Dresslar, S. K.; farmer; 1 m n e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C; 
date not known. Dem. 

Doty, Alford; farmer; 1 m s Smith's Valley. Born in Ind. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1846. Dem. M. Baptist. 

DAVIS, J. G. ; farmer; ^ m w Bargersville. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Christian. 

Davenport, Stephen P.; employe on farm; 2 m e Smith's Val- 
ley. Born in N. C. 1849; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. 

Denny, Thomas; farmer; y 2 m w Smith's Valley. Born in Ohio 
1835; settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. 

Desslar, P.; farmer; ij m s w Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Dreslar, P.; farmer; 1% m s w Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Rep. Methodist. 

DOTY, JOSHUA ; farmer; 1 % m n e Bluff Creek. Born in J. 
C. 185 1. Dem. Methodist. 

Doty, Wm.; farmer; 3 m e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Dem. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 28 1 

DORREL, SAMUEL ; farmer; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in 
J. C. 1840. Dem. United Brethren. 

Dorrel, William; farmer ; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 

1847. Dem. 

Dresslar, J. B.; farmer and Township Trustee; i|mse Smith's 
Valley. Born in J. C. 1834. Dem. Methodist. 

DUNCAN, J. W. ; farmer; i|mne Waverley. Born in N.C. 
1829; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Duncan, John W. ; farmer; ifmne Waverley. Born in Ind. 
185 1; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Dresslar, A. K.; farmer; 1 m n e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C, 
date not known. Dem. 

Doty, Samuel; retired farmer; 3 m n Bargersville. Born in Va. 
1804; settled in J. C. 1823. No political or religious pref- 
erences. There are two spheres for the spirit of man to 
float in ; an upper and a lower one. He who makes choice 
of the upper can see the handiwork of God in all his crea- 
« tion ; he is ready to thank him for all the blessings bestowed 
upon the human race ; while the individual who is so unfor- 
tunate as to get into the lower strata can see no beauty in 
nature, can feel no sympathy for his fellows ; has no religi- 
ous preferences ; has no love for his Creator ; no thanks to 
offer. 

Doty, Alexander; farmer; 3 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 

1848. Rep. Granger. United Brethren. 

Demott, George M.; farmer; 7 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1839; settled in J. C. 1841. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Doty, William, Sen.; farmer; i£ m e Bluff Creek. Born in Ohio 
1822; settled in J. C. 1822. Dem. Methodist. * 



282 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Doty, M.; farmer; I m e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. 

Dohoney, Samuel H.; farmer; 2ms Bluff Creek. Born in Ind. 
1845; settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Christian. 

DOTY, ROBERT; farmer; ijme Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1846. Dem. United Brethren. 

Doty, Christian; farmer; ^ m n e Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1833. Dem. Protestant. 



Etter, W. W.; farmer; ^ m n e Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1828. Granger. Christian. 



Fleener, C. A.; farmer; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ind. 
1852; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Methodist. 

Fullen, W. K.; farmer; 1^ m s w Smith's Valley. Born in J. 
C. 1848. Dem. Christian. 

FRY, J. M. W.; farmer; 1 m s w Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 
1823; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. 

FANSLER, CHARLES ; farmer; 2ms Glenn's Valley. Born 
in Ind. 1855; settled in J. C. 1872. 

FANSLER, RICHARD; farmer; 2 m s Glenn's Valley. Born 
in Ind. 1854; settled in J. C. 1872. 

FULLEN, SHELBY; farmer; if m s e Smith's Valley. Born 
in Ind. 1819; settled in J. C. 1824. Rep. United Brethren 
in Christ. 

French, Samuel M.; farmer; 3 m s e Waverley. Born in Ind. 
1844; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Methodist. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 283 

Gunsaulus, J. R.; employe on farm; ^ m w Bargersville. Born 
in Ohio 1823; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Christian. 

GRIMES, JOHN W.; shoemaker; Smith's Valley. Born in N. 
C. 1827; settled in J. C. 1866. Neutral. Methodist. 

Grimes, Nathan; farmer; Smith's Valley. Born in N. C. 1854; 
settled in J. C. 1866. No politics or religion. 

Glassburn, David; farmer; 2 m n w Bargersville. Born in Va. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1836. Granger. Protestant. 

Groseclose, Levi; farmer; 1 % m n w Bargersville. Born in Va. 
1 8 18; settled in j. C. 1826. Granger. Protestant. 

Garner, J. M.; retired mechanic; Bluff Creek. Born in Ohio 
1809; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Methodist. 



Hilderbrand, David J.; farmer; 3f mse Waverley. Born in 
Ind. 1835; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Protestant. 

HUMPHREYS, JOHN S.; farmer; 2 m se Bluff Creek. Born 
in Tenn. 1844; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Christian. 

Haymaker, William, and Doaty refused to give names, ages, etc. 
They are said to be men who were not able to comprehend 
the necessity of the citizens of a county becoming acquainted 
with its history. We have discovered that many assuming 
gentlemen are not disposed to assist in the advancement of 
knowledge. They may be found 1 m s e Bluff Creek. 

Hardin, John; 1% m e Bluff Creek. Born in J.C. 1838. Dem. 
Protestant. 

Henderson, J. L. ; farmer; 3I m w Whiteland. Born in J. C. 
18 28. Rep. Presbyterian. 



284 JOHNSON COUNTY, 



HOYT, B. ; farmer; i^ m n Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. United Brethren. 

Harrell, James M.; farmer; 2|mn Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1840. Granger. United Brethren. 

HULETT, H.; farmer; 5 m e Waverly. Born in Ind. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Christian. 

Hulett, A.; farmer; 5 m e Waverly. Born in Ind. 1853; set- 
tled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Christian. 



JACOBS, JAMES M.; farmer; 1 mn Bluff Creek. Born in 
Ohio 1831; settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Christian. 

Jacobs, Mrs. M. A.; i£ m n w Bargersville. Born in Ky. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Baptist. 

Jacobs, P. D. ; farmer; \y 2 m n w Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1852. Dem. Protestant. 

JACOBS, B.; farmer; 1% m n w Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1856. Dem. Protestant. 

Jacobs, Jackson; farmer; ^ m n w Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1850. Dem. Protestant. 



Keesling, G.; blacksmith; 3^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 
1844; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. 

KING, J. W.; farmer; \]/ 2 m s w Smith's Valley. Born in J. 
C. 1859. 

Kegley, Mrs. Jane E.; farmer; 3 J m n w Bargersville. Born in 
Ohio 1819; settled in J. C. 1823. Lutheran. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 285 

KEGLEY, JOHN L.; physician and surgeon; 3^ mnw Bar- 
gersville. Born in J. C. 1840. Indpt. Protestant. 



Lowe, Mrs. Harriet; farmer; 1^ m n e Bluff Creek. Born in 
Ohio 181 1; settled in J. C. 1830. Methodist. Mrs. Lowe 
has lived forty-three years on the same farm she now occu- 
pies. 

Lowe, Jefferson; farmer; i|mne Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1834. Rep. Methodist. 

LANDERS, R. R. ; farmer; 6 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1 8 14; settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Lyons, Mrs. M.; farmer; 2*4 m w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1859. Presbyterian. 

LYONS, J. M.; farmer; 2^ m n w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1825. Dem. 

Lyons, Thomas E.; farmer; 2|mnw Greenwood. Born in J. 
C. 1849. Dem. 

Lyons, Abraham; farmer; 2^m nw Greenwood. Born in J. 
C. 1853. Dem. 

LYONS, H. S. ; farmer; 2^ m n w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 
1813; settled in J. C. 1825. Dem. 

Lyons, Benjamin F.; farmer; 2^ m n w Greenwood. Born in 
J. C. 185 1. Dem. 

Lamasters, Mrs. Margaret; farmer; i|rae Bluff Creek. Born 
in Ind. 1823; settled in J. C. 1845. Protestant. 



286 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



McClain, J.; farmer; Whiteland. Born in Ky. 1827; settled in 
J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

Mourhous, J.; farmer; 1 m n Bargersville. Born in Ky. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. Granger. Christian in faith. 

MONTGOMERY, S. S.; engineer; 2 m n Bargersville. Born 
in Ohio 1849; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. 

Miller, H.; farmer; 1% m s e Smith's Valley. Born in N. C 
1844; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

MOODY, CHARLES; blacksmith; Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1843. Rep. 

Miller, John; farmer; |mne Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Rep. Methodist. 

Myers, Mrs. J.; ij m s e Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 1829; set- 
tled in J. C. 1830. Methodist. 

Miller, William; farmer; \ m e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1842. Rep. Methodist. 

McCOLBOURN, C. B.; farmer; 2mnw Bargersville. Born 
in Pa. 1836; settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. Christian. 



Plummer, J.; farmer; \ m w Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1819; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. 

Purden, James; farmer; post office; Whiteland. Born in 111. 
1845; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

Park, John; farmer; 2|mn Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Dem. Christian in faith. 

PADDOCK, JOHN W.; farmer; ifmne Bluff Creek. Born 
in J. C. 1853. Dem. Christian in belief. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 287 

Palmer, Robert; farmer; ij m n e Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 
1845; settled in J. C. 1865. Wants honest men in office. 
Methodist. 

Paddack, D.; farmer and stock raiser; 1 m s w Smith's Valley. 
Born in Ohio 1825; settled in J. C. 1845. No politics. 
Christian. 

PAYNER, THOMAS; employe on farm; i|me Smith's Val- 
ley. Born in Ind. 1854; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Meth. 



Quenett, Alexander; farmer; £ m s Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 
1848. Neutral. 



Rivers, Thomas M.; farmer; J m n Bargersville. Born in Ky. 
1822; settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. 

Rush, H. F.; farmer; 2\ m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1853. 
Dem. United Brethren. 

RYKER, JAMES S.; farmer; 3 m w Whiteland. Born in Ind. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Baptist in belief. 

Ryker, J. W.; farmer; 1 m n Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Robards, W. E.; laborer; 1 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1848. Dem. Christian. 

ROBARDS, LAN.; farmer and stock trader; 1 m n Bargers- 
ville. Born in Ind. 1826; settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. 
Granger. Christian. 

Rush, Joseph; farmer; 3 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Dem. United Brethren. 



288 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Rush, John; farmer; 2|mn Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1841. 
Dem. United Brethren. 

Reynolds, B.; farmer; ^ m n w Bluff Creek. Born in N. J. 
1807; settled in J. C. 1288. Rep. Methodist. Mr. Reyn- 
olds has lived 40 years on the same farm. Perhaps there 
are few men who can comprehend the stupendous greatness 
of the Universe, and but few who are able to measure the 
dimensions of our little earth ; and still fewer who can not 
measure with his eye of knowledge more than the dimen- 
sions of one hundred and sixty acres of land. 

Robinson, W. C. ; farmer; % m s Smith's Valley. Born in In- 
dianapolis, Ind., 1849; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. 

Robinson, M. S.; farmer; % m s Smith's Valley. Born in 18 18; 
settled in J. C. 1832. Rep. Methodist. 

Robinson, William A.; farmer and brick manufacturer; % m s 
Smith's Valley. Born in Va. 1825 ; settled in J. C. 1832. 
Dem. 

Repass, J. L.; farmer and fine stock breeder; 3^ m e Bluff 
Creek. Born in Va. 1840; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. 

ROBE, JOHN; farmer; 4 m s w Greenwood. Born in Ireland 
1802; settled in J. C. 1834. Indpt. Methodist. 



SMITH, JOSEPH; retired farmer; 3 m n w Greenwood. Born 
in Ind. 18 13; settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. Methodist. 

Sells, Thomas; farmer; 2% m n e Smith's Valley. Born in Va. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1821. Rep. Universalist. 

SURFACE, GEORGE; blacksmith; 3 m n w Greenwood. 
Born in J. C. 1836. Dem. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 289 

Sutton, James; farmer and trader; Smith's Valley. Gone from 
home and could not be seen. 

Stephens, Gideon; farmer. Born in Tenn. 1813; settled in J. C. 
1823. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Stone, William P.; farmer; 5 m seWaverley. Born in Va. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

Sedam, C; farmer; 5 m s w Greenwood. Born in N. J. 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. United Brethren. 

SUTTON, J. W. ; farmer; 1 m. s Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 
1 841. Rep. United Brethren. 

Shufflebarger, John M.; farmer; 2 m s e Bluff Creek. Born in 
J. C. 1845. Wants honest men in office, irrespective of 
party. Methodist. 

Shufflebarger, E. S.; farmer; \ x / 2 m n e Bluff Creek. Born in 
J. C. 185 1. Dem. Methodist. 

SHUFFLEBARGER, JAMES M.; farmer; 1% m n e Bluff 
Creek. Born in Va. 18 18; settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. 
Methodist. 

Surface, Mrs. L.; farmer; 1 m n Bluff Creek. Born in Ohio 
1822; settled in J. C. 1834. Christian. 

Scott, N.; farmer; 2 m n Bargersville. Born in Va. 1821; date 
of settlement not given. Rep. United Brethren. 

SMITH, ROBERT; farmer; 1 % m e Bluff Creek. Born in Ky. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. 

Smith, I. W. ; farmer; if m s e Smith's Valley. Born in Va. 
1835; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. United Brethren. 

19 



29O JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Sellers, R.; farmer; 3 m s e Smith's Valley. Born in Pa. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. 

SURFACE, H. J.; farmer; i| me Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 

1833. Dem. Methodist in belief. 

Surface, M.; farmer; 1^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Democrat. 

Scott, James; farmer; 4|m s w Greenwood. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Rep. United Brethren. 

Sutton, Jacob ; farmer ; 1 m n w Bluff Creek. Born in Ohio 
1802; settled in J. C. 1825. Rep. Christian. 

SUTTON, P. D. ; farmer; \y 2 m n e Waverley. Born in J. C. 
1846. Rep. Christian. 

Sedam, H.; farmer; 1^ m s w Smith's Valley. Born in N. J. 
18 12; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Christian. 

Sedam, Alexander ; farmer ; \ m s Smith's Valley. Born in 
1843; native place and date of settlement not known. 

Sutton, Daniel; farmer; ^ m s Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 

1834. Rep. Methodist. 

Sutton, William S. ; farmer; y 2 m s Smith's Valley. Born in J. 
C. 1852. 

STONE, F.; farmer; 1 m s e Smith's Valley. Born in Ind. 1843; 
date of settlement not given. Rep. 

SANDERS, H.; farmer, raiser and dealer in improved stock of 
horses; 1 m e Smith's Valley. Born in N. C. 1818; settled 
in J. C. 1820. Liberal Dem. Christian in belief. Mr. San- 
ders was one among the very first settlers in Johnson county. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 2gi 

Sanders, L. S.; farmer; I m e Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 
1847. Liberal Dem. M. Baptist in belief. 

Stewart, J. H.; farmer; 3|m n Bargersville. Born in Ky. 18 16; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. 

SELLS, MRS. CATHARINE; farmer; ii m e Smith's Valley. 
Born in Va. 181 1; settled in J. C. 1830. Methodist. 

Sells, Loyd; farmer; i£ m e Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 1 841. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Sells, Martin; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Dem. 



SHUFFLEBARGER, B. G.; farmer and stock trader; 2 m s e 
Waverly. Born in J. C. 1833. Dem. Protestant. 

Shuffiebarger; John A.; farmer; 2 m s e Waverly. Born in J. 
C. 1846. Dem. Protestant. 

Shuffiebarger, Floyd; carpenter; Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Protestant. 



TITUS, WILLIAM R.; proprietor saw mill, and lumber dealer; 
2 m n Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1846. Dem. 

Teet, John; farmer; 1 m s w Smith's Valley. Born in Md. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. 

Taylor, John; retired farmer; 2% m e Waverley. Born in Va. 
1795; settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Methodist. 

TAYLOR, HENRY B.; farmer; 2\ m e Waverley. Born in 
J. C. 1839. Rep. Methodist 



292 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Tresslar, Jacob; farmer; ^ m w Bluff Creek. Gone from home, 
and could not be seen. 

Thompson, Greenberry; farmer; 3 m w Greenwood. Born in 
Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1874. Methodist. 

Turner, Samuel; retired farmer; 2\ m n w Greenwood. Born 
in Pa. 1791; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. 

Throckmorton, Joseph H.; farmer ; 4J m s e Waverley. Born 
in J. C. 1836. Rep. Christian. 

TRESSLAR, W. H.; farmer; 2^ m s Bluff Creek. Born in 
J. C. 1840. Granger. Protestant. 

Tresslar, H. J.; farmer; ^ me Bluff Creek. Born in Va. 18 10; 
settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Christian. 



Utterback, Isaac ; farmer ; 1 y 2 m s e Smith's Valley. Born in 
J. C. 1849. Dem - M - Baptist 



VAUGHT, REUBEN; farmer; 4^ m s w Greenwood. Born 
in J. C. 1843. R e P- 

VORHIES, A. W.; farmer; if m s Glenn's Valley. Born in 
Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. 1828. Granger. Presbyterian. 



Wheat, Taylor; farmer; 7 m n w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1847; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

WATSON, WILLIAM P.; farmer; 2 m s e Smith's Valley. 
Born in Ohio 1847; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. M. Bap- 
tist in faith. 



WHITE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 293 

Waddle, L. H.; farmer; 43^ m s w Greenwood. Born in Va. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. United Brethren. 

Wyrick, E. W. ; merchant and farmer; Bluff Creek. Born in 
Va. 1829; settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. Christian. 

Wentz, M.; farmer; 3^ m s Bluff Creek. Born in Pa. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1842. Rep. Christian. 



Zaring, L. B.; farmer; 2^ m e Bluff Creek. Born in Ky. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Christian. 

ZARING, L.; farmer; 1 ms Smith's Valley. Born in Ky. 1808; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 

Zaring, Alexander; farmer; 1 m s Smith's Valley. Born in Ky. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1853. Methodist. 

ZARING, JOHN ; farmer; 3 m n Bargersville. Born in Ky. 
1838; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. United Brethren. 



294 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 



Union is the middle township on the west line of the county. 
It is six miles square, and contains 23,040 acres of land. Union 
township is considerably broken, although but little of it is waste 
and. It is better adapted to grazing purposes than for any 
other. It is watered by the head branches of Stotts' Creek and 
Clear Creek. The former waters the northern, and the latter 
the southern part. 

Union Village is the only town in the township, and has a 
population of about 100. Its inhabitants are social and enter- 
prising. The population of the entire township is about 1600. 
The voting population is about 320, being largely Democratic. 

There are ten school houses in the township, valued at $6000. 
Willis Deer, Trustee. There are also about ten miles of gravel 
road, built at a cost of over $2000 per mile. The public pro- 
perty is in good condition. 

Individual improvements are equally as good as any other 
section of the county with like advantages. The people are 
generally accommodating, and eager to advance in knowledge 
and comfort. 

The following are the names of some of the early settlers still 
living in Union township: E. W. Wyrick, Willis Deer, Mr. 
Henderson, Samuel Throckmorton, Cornelius Lyster, J. W. Riv- 
ers, John Kerlin, Garret Vandiver, Peter Vandiver, Jas. H. Van- 
diver, Wm. T. Vandiver, Samuel Dillman, S. T. Riggs, Charles 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 295 



A. Smith, Joseph Young, Mrs. Mary Utterback, Henry Utter- 
back, Ephraim Etter, Henry Pruner, and others. 

Madison Vandiver built the first dry goods store in Union 
township. The currency mostly used in that day and place was 
the skins of deer and coons. The old store-house is still stand- 
ing, and is eighteen by twenty-four feet. 

John Vandiver built one among the first grist mills in the 
township. It was built on Stotts' Creek. This creek took its 
name from a man by the name of Stotts, who was one of the 
early settlers in the township. 

The first school was organized by John Shuck. Rev. Benja- 
min Jacobs used to preach in this township, and then coon and 
fox hunt after services. He was not of the kid-glove aristocracy 
stock. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

Shiloh Presbyterian Church ; nine miles west of Franklin ; 
Rev. M. M. Lawson, pastor; membership about 56. G. W. 
Demaree, Sabbath school superintendent; average attendance, 
30; value of church property, $2,000. 

Stotts' Creek Sabbath school, at School House No. 6 ; T. A. 
Cole, superintendent; average attendance, 45. 

Predestinarian Baptist Church ; two and a half miles north of 
Trafalgar; membership, 11. This church house was built about 
the year 1844. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Violet Grange, No. 1 360, Patrons of Husbandry ; membership 
about 46; R. P. Hamilton, Secretary; value of property, $50. 

Reliance Grange, No. 681 ; G. W. Demaree, Master; Samuel 
Harris, Secretary; membership, about 75 ; value of Lodge pro- 
perty, $50. 



296 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



DIRECTORY OF UNION TOWNSHIP. 



Ashley, John R.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828; 
settled in J. C. about 1853. Dem. Christian. 



BRIDGMAN WILLIAM ; farmer ; 8 m w Franklin. Born in 
Va. 1825; settled in J. C. 1840. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Boaz, M. C. ; farmer; 8 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Rep. Christian. 

BLACKWELL, JOHN H.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1836; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. Christian. 

Barger, James F. ; wagon and carriage manufacturer ; Bargers- 
ville. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

Barger, George T.; blacksmith; Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1853. Dem. Protestant. 

BAKER, HENRY; farmer; Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Christian. 

Boles, William; farmer; 2 m s w Union Village; P. O. Frank- 
lin. Born in N. C. 18 10; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. 
Christian. 

BROWN, JOHN J.; farmer; 4J m w Union Village; P. Office, 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1831. Granger. 

Brown, G. M.; retired farmer; 2 J m s w Union Village; P. O., 
Franklin. Born in Ky. 1810; settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. 

Methodist. 

BARNETT, JOHN W.; teamster; 3^ m w Union Village; P. 
O., Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. Dem. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 297 



Brown, Jesse; farmer; 3|msw Union Village; P. O., Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 185 1; settled in J. C. 1862. Granger. Chris. 

BADGLEY, JAMES K.; farmer; 3 m s w Union Village; P. 
O., Franklin. Born in Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. 1866. 
Dem. Christian. 

Baker, J.; farmer; 11 m w Franklin. Born in J.C. 1851. Dem. 
Methodist. 

BARNETT, GEORGE; blacksmith; 8 m w Franklin. Born in 
Ohio 1841; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. United Brethren. 

Boles, Joseph; farmer; 2 m s w Union Villlage; P. O., Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1844. Granger. Christian. 

BURKHART, SIMEON; farmer; 8 mw Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1830. Dem. Universalist. 

Baker, Charles H.; farmer; ^4 m e Smith's Valley. Born in 
Europe 1829; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. 

BARGER, JAMES M.; farmer; 1 m e Smith's Valley. Bom 
in Ind. 1841; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. United Breth. 



CHAPPLE, SAMUEL A. ; farmer; io# m w Franklin. Born 
in J. C. 1847. Dem. Christian. 

Core, Jacob ; farmer; 8 mw Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Christian. 

Clark, J. W.; farmer; 3 J m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Dem. 

CARMAN, THOMAS H.; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1807; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. R. Baptist. 



298 JOHNSON COUNT\. 



Church, George W. ; farmer; i| m w Bargersville. Born in N. 
C 1841; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Methodist. 

Chappie, Vinton J.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1845; settled in J. C. 1846. Granger. Christian. 

Canary, P. A.; attorney at law; Franklin. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Cole, Thomas A.; farmer; 4 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1846. Dem. Christian. 

Clenn, Francis M.; farmer; 3 m s w Union Village. Born in J. 
C. 1836. Dem. 

Cook, George; farmer; 3 m n w Union Village. Born in Ky. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1856. Granger. 

Carnine, Nicholas; farmer; 2.\ m s Bargersville. Born in Ind. 
1825; settled in J. C. about 1839. Dem. 

CLEMMER, S. W.; farmer and justice of the peace; 2^ m n 
w Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1831 ; settled in J. C. 1841. 
Dem. Christian. 

Clemmer, Wm. A.; farmer; 2^ m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. 
C. 1852. Dem. Believes in Christian doctrine. 

Core, John M.; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Dem. Methodist inclination. 

Core, D. J.; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1846. Dem. 

Cole, Benjamin; farmer; 4 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1817; 
settled in J. C. 1837. Dem. Protestant. 

Canary, Henry; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 18 10; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Presbyterian. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 299 



Deer, William H.; farmer; % m s Union Village; P. O. Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1835. Neutral. Christian. 

Deer, Robert L.; farmer; 2ms Union Village; P. O. Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1837. Neutral. Christian. 

Delph, James R.; farmer; 2% m s w Union Village; P.O.Frank- 
lin. Born in Ky. 1842; settled in J. C. 1847. Christian. 

DEER, WESLEY; farmer; 1 m w Union Village; P.O.Frank- 
lin. Born in Va. 1804; settled in J. C. 1831. Rep. Chris. 

DEER, JOSEPHUS H.; farmer; 1 m w Union Village; P. O. 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. Rep. Christian. 

DEER, JOHN W.; farmer; 1 m w Union Village; P.O.Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1855. Rep. Christian. 

DEMAREE, G. W.; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1832. Rep. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Deer, Jefferson C; farmer; 8 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Rep. Granger. Christian. 

Dillman, Samuel; farmer; 12 m w Franklin. Born in Pa. 181 3; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. 

DEER, REV. HIRAM ; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1813; settled in J. C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Doty, Daniel; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Granger. Christian. 

Deer, Henry J.; farmer; 1 m s w Union Village; P. O. Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1840. Granger. Christian. 

DEER, WILLIS ; farmer and Township Trustee ; 1 ]/ 2 m s w 
Union Village. P. O. Franklin. Born in Va. 1802 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 83 1. Dem. Christian. 



300 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



DEER, LOUIS C; farmer; 2ms Union Village; P. O. Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1836. Granger. Christian. 

Deer, Alford S.; farmer; 2|msw Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1832. Granger. Christian. - 

Doty, John; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1826. 
Dem. Christian. 

DEER, HIRAM H.; farmer; fmsw Union Village. P. O. 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 18=53. Dem. Christian. 

DEER, JOSHUA C; farmer; }4 m s w Union Village; P. O. 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Christian. 

Dollins, Willis; farmer; 6% m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. Baptist in belief. 

Davis, James; farmer; 4^ m n Morgantown. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Christian in belief. 

DEMAREE, HENRY; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1816; settled in J. C. 1845. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Demaree, J. S.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin., Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. Presbyterian in belief. 

DEMAREE, J. Y.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1838. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Demaree, D. L.; farmer and stock raiser; 9 m w Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1839. Rep. Granger. Presbyterian. 

Deer, Louis; farmer; % m w Union Village. Born in Mo. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1867. 

Dean, Mrs. A.; farmer; 2 m w Greenwood. Born in Ky. 1803; 
settled in J. C. 1831. Methodist. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 301 



Etter, L. C; farmer; 2%^ m n w Union Village; P. O. Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1853. Granger. Christian. 

Ennis, B.; farmer; 2]/ 2 m n Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1834; set- 
tled in J. C. i860. 

ETTER, EPHRAIM ; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in Va. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1822. Granger. Protestant. 

Eads, A. J.; school teacher; Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Granger. M. Baptist. 

ETTER, LEVI; farmer; Union Village. Born in J. C. 1831. 
Granger. Christian. 



Fox, Daniel; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born *in Mo. 1796; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Christian. 

FORSYTH, M.; farmer; 3J m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1849. Dem. 

Featherngill, G. N.; farmer; 5 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1844. Dem. Baptist in belief. 

FARRIS, JONATHANS.; physician and surgeon; Bargers- 
ville. Born in Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. 
Christian. 



GARR, W. B. ; farmer, and proprietor of saw mill; 3^ m w 
Union Village; P. O., Franklin. Born in Va. 1824; settled 
in J. C. 1844. Granger. Spiritualist. 

Garr, Benjamin T. ; farmer; saw-milling, and mechanical work 
done by this man; lives 3 m w Union Village; P. O., Frank- 
lin. Born in J. C. 1848. 



302 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



GROSCLOSE, WILLIAM N.; farmer; 2 m w Union Village; 
P. O., Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. Granger. Christian 
in faith. p 

Garshwiler, George; 2 m n Trafalgar. This man refused to give 
our agent any information in reference to where he was 
born and when he settled in the county. Our agent fur- 
nished us with no reasons, so we conclude that if Mr. Garsh- 
wiler had any, he kept them to himself. Perhaps he thinks 
he is already well enough known for all practical purposes. 

Garshwiler, J. W.; 2 m n Trafalgar. Out on business, and 
could not be seen. 

Good, Abraham; scientific farmer; 8 m w Franklin. Born in 
Tenn. 1818; settled in J. C. 1841. Rep. C. Presbyterian. 

GREEN, JAMES S.; farmer; 4^ m n Morgantown. Born in 
Ky. 1828; settled in J. C. 1837. Dem. 

Garshwiler, A.; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1853. 
Christian. 

GILLASPY, JAMES H.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in 
Ind. 1849; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Christian. 

GARSHWILER, A. K.; farmer; 2 m w Bargersville. Born in 
J. C. 1852. Granger. Christian. 

GIBSON, GEORGE W. ; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born 
in Ind. 1854; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 



Humphries, Charles H.; carpenter and contractor; Bargersville. 
Born in Ind. 1846; settled in J. C. 1869. Re P- Prot 

Harris, Philip; farmer; 6 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Christian. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 305 

HARWELL, LINDSAY; farmer; 3 m s w Union Village ; P. 
O. Franklin. Born in Ind. 1844; settled in J. C. 1866. 
Granger. Christian. 

Harris, Jesse; farmer; ij(msw Union Village; P. O. Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1837. Dem. Protestant. 

Horrel, Hiram H.; farmer; 3 m s w Union Village; P. O. Frank- 
lin. Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Chris. 

Harris, Mrs. Jane; farmer; Jmw Union Village. Born in Ire- 
land 1818; settled in J. C. 1838. Christian. 

Hamilton, M.; retired farmer; 5 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Va. 
1797; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. Presbyterian. 

HAMILTON, WILLIAM ; farmer ; 5 m n w Trafalgar. Born 
in J. C. 1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Harris, Jesse T. ; farmer; 1 ms Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1841. Dem. Christian. 

Hoyton, John W.; farmer; Union Village. Born in .Va. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Protestant. 

Henderson, Stephen ; farmer ; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1846. Rep. Christian. 

HAYMAKER, JOHN ; blacksmith and farmer ; Bargersville. 
Born in J. C. 1834. Dem. Protestant. 

Humphreys, John R. ; carpenter and contractor; Bargersville. 
Born in Ind. 1841; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Prot. 

HANDLEY, J. H«; farmer; 6 m w Franklin. Born in Md. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Hilderbrand, W. H.; farmer; 1 1 m w Franklin. Born in Ohio 
1831; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Methodist. 



304 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



HENDERSON, JOHN; farmer; 1% m w Union Village; 
P. O., Franklin. Born in Ky. 1809; settled in J. C. 1831. 
Democrat. 

Harris, William; farmer; \y 2 m sw Union Village; P.O., Frank- 
lin. Born in Ind. 1824; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. 
Christian. 

HINDS, JAMES O.; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born in 
Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Hamilton, A.; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. M. Baptist in belief. 

Hemphill, Samuel; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1844. Dem. M. Baptist in belief. 

Hamilton, Robert P.; farmer; 45 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. 
C. 1839. Rep« Presbyterian. 



Jackson, H.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; set- 
tled in J. C. i860. Rep. Christian. 

Jackson, F. E.; farmer; 3 m s w Union Village; P. O. Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1849; settled in J. C. 1865. Granger. Chris. 



Kerlin John ; farmer ; 1 m s Union Village. P. O. Franklin. 
Born in Ky. 1818; settled in J. C. 1831. Granger. 

Kephart, William; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Dem. 

KERLIN, GEORGE ; farmer; 6 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1834. Granger. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 305 



Kerlin, H.; farmer; 6 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Dem. P. Baptist. 

Kerlin, G. D.; canvassing agent; 3 m n Trafalgar. Born in J. 
C. 185 1. No politics. P. Baptist in faith. 

KEPHART, THOMAS ; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1846. Dem. Christian. 

Knox, J. W.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Granger. Protestant. 

Knox, John H.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Granger. Protestant. 

Knox, Elisha C; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Dem. Methodist. 



Lyster, Cornelius; retired farmer; 5 m s w Franklin. Born in 
N. J; 1789; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Christian. 

LOGAN, JOHN; farmer; \% m s Union Village; P. O. Frank- 
lin. Born in Ireland 1801; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. 

Logan, John A.; farmer; 5 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Layman, L.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ohio 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Granger. Christian. 

Layman, F.; farmer; 6 m w Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1844. 
Dem. Christian in faith. 

Lyster, Cornelius; farmer; 2^ m w Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1828. Dem. Christian. 
20 



306 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Miller, Jacob G. ; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1828 ; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Cares nothing for politics. Christian. 

MIDDLETON, JAMES; farmer and carpenter; 11 mw Frank- 
lin. Born in Ireland 1828; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. 

Mathews, James L.; farmer and blacksmith; 7 m w Franklin. 
Born in Ind. 1840; settled in J. C. 1861. Granger. Chris. 

McAllister, James; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 12; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Granger. Christian. 

MULLINIX, GREENBURY; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. 
Born in J. C. 1821. Rep. Protestant. 

MULLINIX, THOMAS; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born 
in J. C. 1855. Rep. Protestant. 

Messersmith, Anthony; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born in 
Va. 18 1 2; settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Protestant. 



Nay, William N.; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1848. Dem. 

Nay, James S.; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Dem. No thoughts about eternity. 



Paris, J. W.; teacher and student; 10 m w Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1850. Dem. Christian. 

PARIS, C. L.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Bor N n in Ind. 1855; 
settled in J. C. 1861. 

Paris, George W.; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Christian. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 307 



PETTIT, THOMAS ; wagon maker, and boot and shoemaker ; 
Bargersville. Born in Ky. 1821; settled in J. C. 1851. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Poor, Nathaniel; farmer; Bargersville. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Pittman, N. M.; proprietor saw and grist mill; Union Village. 
Born in Ohio 1845; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Prot. 

PRUNER, T. W. ; farmer and school teacher; 2^ m n Bargers- 
ville. Born in J. C. 1847. Rep. United Brethren. 

Pottenger, Harvey; farmer and stock trader; 1^ m s w Bargers- 
ville. Born in Ohio 1812; settled in J. C. 1847. Rep. 
Christian. 

Park, A. W.; farmer; 2 m s w Union Village; P. O. Franklin. 
Born in J. C. 1850. Rep. Christian. 

Parkhurst, Daniel; farmer; 2% m n Trafalgar. Born in 111. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. 

PROVINCE, WILLIAM M.; physician and surgeon; residence 
in Union Village; P. O. Franklin. Born in Ky. 1840; set- 
tled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Christian. 

Parkhurst, John; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1835. 
Dem. Christian. 

PARIS, JAMES B.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1824; settled in J. C. 1848. Straight Dem. Christian. 

PRUNER, HENRY; farmer; 2^ m n Bargersville. Born in 
Va. 1815; settled in J. C. 1825. Indpt. United Brethren. 



308 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Ruffin, James H.; farmer; 3% m n w Trafalgar. Born in N. C. 
1843; settled in J. C. 1843. Dem. M. Baptist. 

RAGSDALE, H. W. ; farmer; 6 m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1850. Dem. 

Rivers, Richard ; 8 m w Franklin. Here is another man, who 
either believes himself independent of all other human be- 
ings, or fears the result of his fellow-men having an extended 
knowledge of his previous history. If his conduct hereto- 
fore has been on the square, he certainly should not be back- 
ward about letting his neighbors know where he was born, 
when, and at what time he came to Johnson county. Our 
agent could get no information from him concerning his 
previous history. We give this advertisement to the pub- 
lic free of charge, for the gentlemen above named, hoping 
he will withhold no good thing from his neighbors. 

Rivers, William; farmer; i|rasw Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1828. Dem. 

RIVERS, J. W.; farmer and stock trader; 1 m s w Bargersville. 
Born in Ky. 1820; settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. 

Rivers, W.; school teacher; 1 m s w Bargersville. Born in J. 
C. 1853. Dem. Christian. 

Riggs, George R. ; writing teacher; 6 m w Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1853. Predestinarian Baptist. 

RIGGS, S. T; farmer; 6| mw Franklin. Born in Ind. 1823; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Predestinarian Baptist. Mr. 
Riggs says he is one of seven brothers, none of whom were 
guilty of chewing or smoking tobacco. He does not say, 
however, that he and his six brothers are entirely clear of 
all other evil practices, equally as obnoxious as that of chew- 
ing and smoking tobacco. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 3O9 



Rule, J. M.; toll-gatekeeper; Bargersville. Born inTenn. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Protestant. 

ROBINSON, JAMES; farmer; 12 m w Franklin. Born in Va. 
1846; settled in J. C. 1869. Granger. Protestant. 

Russell, Jonathan; farmer; iy 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born in 
Va. 1811; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Methodist. 



Smith, Jesse; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 18$ 1. 
Granger. Christian. 

SMITH, JAMES W.; farmer; 9^ m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1845. Granger. Methodist. 

SELCH, JAMES W.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J.C. 

1846. Granger. Christian. 

Smith, William; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. Protestant. 

Sandifur, John M.; farmer; Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Protestant. 

Shuck, John J.; farmer; 9 m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 

Smith, W. W.; farmer; 2 m e Smith's Valley. Born in J. C. 
1835. Indpt. Methodist. 

Shuck, Joseph H.; farmer; 1 m s Bargersville Born in J. C. 

1847. Granger. 

Shuck, William ; farmer ; 10 m w Franklin. Dem. Presbyte- 
rian. This man does not give his age and date of settle- 
ment. 



3IO JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Smith. Charles A.; farmer; 6 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Christian. 

SHUCK, JOHN J.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. 

Shuck, John ; farmer; 8 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1800; 
settled in J. C. 1837. Granger. Presbyterian. 

SMITH, GEORGE W.; blacksmith; Union Village. Born in 
Ky. 1833; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Christian. 

Spurgeon, William ; farmer; Union Village. Born in Ind. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 



Throckmorton, John; west of Franklin. This man refused to 
give our agent any information concerning himself; so our 
patrons will have to be content with knowing that there is 
such a man, and that he lives somewhere west of Franklin. 
We only occasionally come in contact with such men, and, 
as it seems strange to most reasonable men, that any one 
should refuse to have his name, date of birth, settlement, 
etc. , placed before his neighbors, we can give only a few 
reasons why any one should do so. A man in Crawfords- 
ville, doing a large business in the sale of agricultural im- 
plements, utterly refused to give us his name, or any other 
knowledge concerning himself, because, as he said, "we 
would make money out of it." The science of physiog- 
nomy taught us that the real reasons for his refusing were 
hid within his breast years ago. Some refuse from positive 
ignorance ; some because of egotistical selfishness ; and 
others from a morbid and spiteful hatred they have for all 
public enterprises. 

TAYLOR, J. W.; farmer and local minister; 3I m w Union 
Village; P. O. Franklin. Born in J. C. 1832. Rep. Meth. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 3 I I 



THORNBERRY, THOMAS B.; merchant; deals in general 
merchandise, drugs, medicines, etc.; Bargersville. Born in 
Ind. 1 841; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 

Throckmorton, Winfield S.; farmer; 5 m s e Waverley. Born 
in J. C. 1853. Rep. Christian. 

THROCKMORTON, SAMUEL; farmer and carpenter; 5 m s 
e Waverley. Born in N. C. 181 1; settled in J. C. 1832. 
Rep. Free Thinker. 

Taylor, James; farmer; 6\ m w Franklin. Born in Tenn. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. Christian. 

Tomlinson, M. E. ; farmer; 9 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Presbyterian. 

THROCKMORTON, CHARLES B.; farmer; 5 m s e Waverly. 
Born in J. C. 1847. R- e P- Methodist. 

TUMY, ISAAC; farmer; nmw Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 18; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Granger. Christian. 

Townsend, L. E. ; Franklin College student; P. O. , Bargersville. 
Born in J. C. 1852. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Topp, Willson T.; farmer; 2 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1846. Dem. Protestant. 

Topp, Richard T. ; retired farmer; 2 m n w Trafalgar. Born in 
Va. 1815; settled in J. C. 1842. Granger. R. Baptist. 



UTTERBACK, ANDERSON ; engineer; Union Village. Born 
in Ky. 1824; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Christian. 

UTTERBACK, BLUFORD ; farmer ; \ m w Union Village. 
Born in Iowa 1853; settled in J. C. 185- 



312 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Utterback, Joseph ; harness maker; Bargersville. Born in Ky. 
1813; settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. Protestant. 

Utterback, Preston ; farmer ; 1 ]/ 2 m s w Union Village. P. O. 
Franklin. Born in Ky. 1827; settled in J. C. 1834. Gran- 
ger. Christian. 

UTTERBACK, P. C; farmer; 1 y 2 m s w Union Village; P.O. 
Franklin. Born in J. C. 1843. Dem. Christian. 

Utterback, Henry; retired farmer; i|msw Union Village; P. 
O., Franklin. Born in Ky. 1808; settled in J. C. 1826. 
Dem. Christian. 

UTTERBACK, JAMES H.; farmer; i|msw Union Village; 
P.O. Franklin. Born in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Christian. 

UTTERBACK, GEORGE W. ; farmer; 2 m s w Union Village; 
P. O. Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; settled in J. C. 1833. 
Dem. 

UTTERBACK, HIRAM; farmer; 2 m s w Union Village; P. 
O. Franklin. Born in J. C. 1847. Dem. Christian. 

Utterback, J.; farmer and carpenter; 4 m n w Trafalgar. Born 
in J. C. 1830. Takes no interest in politics or religious 
matters; his little farm is his country and his heaven. 

UTTERBACK, BENNETT J.; farmer; 1 m s w Bargersville. 
Born in J. C. 1834. Granger. Protestant. 

Utterback, Mrs. Mary; 1 m s w Bargersville. Born in Va. 1797; 
settled in J. C. 1820. Baptist. 

Utterback, James; farmer; 1 m s w Bargersville. Born in J. C. 
1838. Dem. Protestant. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 3 13 



VANDIVIER, JAMES R.; farmer and teacher; 2§ m n w Tra- 
falgar. Born in J. C. 1837. Dem. Christian. 

Vandivier, John J.; farmer and trader; 12 m w Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1829; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Christian. 

VANDIVIER, JEFFERSON ; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born 
in J. C 1828. Dem. Inclined to be a Christian. 

Vandivier, P. P.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1824. 
Date of settlement not known. Dem. 

VAN ARSDALL, C; farmer; 6 m w Trafalgar. Born in 
Ky. 1 831; settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. Cumberland Pres- 
byterian. 

Vandivier, Garret ; farmer; 1 m s Bargersville. Born in Ky. 
1 8 10; settled in J. C. 1831. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Vandivier, William H.; farmer; 2^ m n Trafalgar. Born in J. 
C. 1847. Dem. M. Baptist in belief. 

Vandivier, John W.; farmer; 25^ m n Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
185 1. Dem. M. Baptist in belief. 

Vandivier, James S.; farmer; 3 x / 2 m n Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1848. Dem. Predestinarian Baptist in faith. "The earth 
is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof." 

Vandivier, W. H.; farmer; 2\ m n Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1842. Dem. 

Vandivier, Peter; farmer; 2,y 2 m n Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1 8 18; settled in J. C. 1826. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Vandivier, Isaac; farmer; 7 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Dem. 



314 JOHNSON COUNT\. 



Vandivier, J. M.; farmer; 3 m n Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1845. 
Democrat. 

VANDIVIER, JAMES H.; farmer; $y 2 m w Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1823; settled in J. C. 1826. Dem. Christian in 
faith. 

Vandivier, John H.; farmer; 3^ m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. 
C. 1838; Dem. Christian. 

VANDIVIER, WILLIAM T.; farmer and stock trader; 3 m n 
w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 18 16; settled in J. C. 1826. 
Dem. Baptist in belief. 

Vandivier, A. E.; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1854. Dem. This man is 20 years old and weighs over 
300 pounds. 



WILLIAMS, W. T.; blacksmith; all kinds custom work done 
to order by Mr. Williams; Bargersville. Born in Ind. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Protestant. 

Wyrick, Andrew; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Va. 18 12; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. R. Baptist. 

Weyl, Henry; merchant; Union Village. Born in Europe 1841; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Christian. 

White, R. T.; farmer; 7 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1852; set- 
tled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

Wood, J. M.; farmer; 7 m w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849; set " 
tled in J. C. 1866. Rep. M. Baptist. 

WRIGHT, THOMAS; merchant; 8 m w Franklin. Born in 
Ireland 1822; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Episcopalian. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 3*5 



WINCHESTER, JOHN M.; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1826; settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Wyrick, Nancy; farmer; 10 m w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1830. R. Baptist. 



Young, Joseph; farmer; io£ m w Franklin. Born in Pa. 1800; 
settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. Presbyterian. 

YOUNG, JONATHAN; farmer ; iojmw Franklin. Born in 
J. C. 1843. Dem. 



3 l6 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHR 



Hensley Township is located in the southwest corner of the 
county, and contains thirty-six square miles. It lays in a body, 
six miles square. The surface of the township is somewhat 
broken. The bottoms, along the creeks, are made of sand and 
soil, composing a pliable loam unsurpassed for the production of 
corn. The uplands are not so rich, yet they produce good crops 
of wheat, oats, fruits, vegetables, and average yields of corn. 

The most valuable production of these high lands is blue 
grass; the dryness of the soil gives to it a richness not obtained 
from the grasses produced in the low lands. 

Hensley township is watered in the southern part by a small 
stream called Indian Creek ; this creek affords stock water for 
many good farms, and is of much consequence in that respect. 
Other parts of the township are watered by small branches, 
running in various directions. 

The public property is of a substantial character, and well 
cared for. The improvements in the township are generally of 
the first-class ; farmers and tradesmen seem to be thriving in their 
several occupations. Great interest is taken in the moral and 
educational affairs of the township ; school houses and churches 
are seen on every hand, and go to establish the fact that these 
people are looking forward to a time when every man will be 
rewarded according to that which he has done. 

Hensley township is traversed by the C. & M. R. R., thereby 
affording to the inhabitants means for the transportation of their 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 3 17 



produce. The township has two villages within her borders, 
Trafalgar and Samaria. The former is the principal place of 
business, and is located on the C. & M. R. R. , near the north- 
east corner of the township. Trafalgar has a population of 
about 300 ; the people are industrious, benevolent and affable. 

Our agent desires that we mention the name of R. Cook, a 
hotel keeper in Trafalgar, who, according to our agent's report, 
is a genial and accommodating gentleman, always endeavoring 
to make his customers feel at home, and supplying his table 
with the best of refreshments. We suppose there can be no 
doubt as to the gentlemanly qualifications of Mr. Cook, but we 
suspect that our agent, J. L. Crooks, was smartly sharpened by 
the good things on the table. 

The village of Samaria is situated on the C. & M. R. R., near 
the center of the township, and has a population of about one 
hundred. Its citizens are enterprising and courteous towards 
strangers. They also take much pride in the advancement of 
the interests of the community at large; in fact, we may say that 
the citizens of Hensley township are a live, industrious, go-ahead, 
benevolent, and social people generally. 

This township has ten school houses, valued at $6,000. 

Voting population, 375; Democratic, 300; Republican, 75. 

G. W. Musselman is the present Township Trustee. 

We are requested to mention the existence in this township 
of an organization called the Hensley Township Horse Thief 
Detective Association. The object of this association is to de- 
tect and bring to justice thieves of every character. Their call- 
ing is surely legitimate, and needs to be imitated in other parts 
of the country, until prowling thieves could find no safe retreat 
in the land. We understand that considerable stolen property 
has, at various times, been recovered and returned by the mem- 
bers of this association to its proper owners. "The way of the 
transgressor is hard." "The wages of sin is death." 



3l8 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



The following are the names of some of the early settlers of 
Hensley township, still living: Andrew Underwood, H. S. 
Lyster, Samuel Kephart, A. Davenport, Thomas Spicer, R. 
Slack, S. Sturgeon, William Evans, Benjamin Byers, Richard 
Furgason, J. M. Green, John Slack, James T. White, G. W. 
Musselman, Jesse Moore, and others. 

Richardson Hensley was the first white man who settled in 
Hensley township. From him the township took its name. 
He settled on Indian Creek. The first election in the township 
was held at his house. Mr. Hensley died at the good old age 
of ninety years. The old pioneer sleeps in the valley of death, 
but his name still lives with the people of Hensley township. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Trafalgar; Rev. Jos. 
W. Barrow, pastor; membership, about 135 ; Robert M. Moore,. 
Sabbath school superintendent; average attendance at school, 
1 IO ; value of church property, $3,000. 

M. E. Church, Trafalgar ; Rev. A. Z. Wade, pastor ; mem- 
bership, 50 ; J. W. Pickett, Sabbath school superintendent ; av- 
erage attendance at school, 85 ; value of church property, $2000. 

SECRET ORGANIZATIONS. 

Trafalgar Lodge, No. 413, F. and A. M.; membership, 33; 
value of Lodge property, $500. 

DIRECTORY OF HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 

Anderson, Wm.; wagon maker; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Separate Baptist. 

Alexander, John; farmer; 1 m s w Samaria. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Admire; James; brick moulder; Samaria. Born in Ind. 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Protestant. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 3I9 



Boker, Robert; laborer; Samaria. Born in Ky. 1841; settled in 
J. C. 1863. Dem. Methodist. 

Bridges, J. D.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1838. Dem. 
M. Baptist. 

Buckner, A.; farmer; 1 m n w Samaria. Born in Ky. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Burbridge, Gilbert; farmer; 3ms Samaria. Born in Ohio 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1869. 

Byers, Benjamin; farmer; x / 2 m w Samaria. Born in Ky. 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1824. Rep. M. Baptist. 

BLANKINSHIP, HIRAM F.; farmer; 3 J m n w Samaria. 
Born in Ky. 1853; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Meth. 

Bass, Arthur; farmer; 2 m e Morgantown. Born in S. C. 1794; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Old School Baptist. 

BOLES, JOHN W.; blacksmith; Samaria. Born in Ohio 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 

Buckner, G. W.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1840. Dem. 
M. Baptist. 

BRANCH, B. ; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Va. 1799; settled in 
J. C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Buckner, William; farmer; 2^ m w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1823; settled in J. C. . Dem. 

Bather, M. E.; farmer; 2 m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Methodist faith. 

BUCKNER, J. M.; farmer; 3^ m w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1826; settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. M. Baptist. 



320 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Bass, Henry; farmer; i m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 1823; 
settled in J. C. 1825. Dem. Baptist. 

BASS, ALEXANDER; farmer; 2^mse Morgantown. Born 
in Iowa 1849; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. 

Buckner, H. P.; engineer; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. 



Coleman, F.; farmer; 1 J m e Morgantown. Born in Ohio 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1843. Dem. Protestant. 

COONFIELD, JAMES H.; farmer; 3 m s e Morgantown. 
Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Prot. 

Coffman, T. A.; farmer and mechanic ; 3 J m s Trafalgar. Born 
in Va. 1831; settled in J. C. 1838. Dem. Protestant. 

Cottle, J. M.; miller; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. 

Campbell, M. P.; wagon maker; Trafalgar. Born in Ind.; set- 
tled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Methodist. 

Chandler, John; laborer; Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1839; settled 
in J. C. 1868. Rep. M. Baptist. 

COFFMAN, S.; farmer; \y 2 m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. 

Coleman, W. D.; farmer; 3 m e Morgantown. Born in J. C. 
1850. 

Conner, Richard; farmer; 4 m s w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1838. 
Dem. 

Canary, Henry; farmer; 2mn Samaria. Born in Ky. 1806; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. C. Presbyterian. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 321 



COOK, RINEAR; proprietor of "Cook House," Trafalgar. 
Born in Ohio 1811; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. M. Bap. 

Cook, J. M.; blacksmith; Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1837; se t- 
tled in J. C. 1871. Rep. 

Cottle, James M.; proprietor flouring mill ; Trafalgar. Born in 
Ohio 1821; settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. 

Christie, I.; saddle and harness maker; Trafalgar. Born in Ire- 
land 1827; settled in J. C. 1872. 

Coleman, W. C. H.; farmer; 3 m n e Morgantown. Born in J. 
C. 1843. Dem. 

Coleman, Warren; farmer; 3 m n e Morgantown. Born in Ohio 
1816; settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. 

Coleman, G. W.; farmer; 3 m n e Morgantown. Born in J. C. 
1852. Dem. This man believes that the whole human 
race will finally be made holy and happy ; gives the Bible 
for proof. 

Coleman, Thomas M.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 18 13; 
settled in J. C. 1838. Dem. Universalist. 



Davenport, A.; farmer; 4 m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1823; settled in J. C. 1825. Dem. Predestinarian Baptist. 

DURMAN, C. T.; blacksmith; Trafalgar. All kinds of repair- 
ing, horse-shoeing and new work done to order at reason- 
able rates. Born in Va. 1846; settled in J. C. 1872. 

Davenport, G. A.; farmer; 4 m e Morgantown. Born in J. C. 
1849. Dem. 
21 



322 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Dunham, W. W.; carpenter and contractor; Samaria. Born in 
Ind. 1846; settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. 

Durbin, H. P.; retired farmer; Samaria. Born in J. C. 1841. 
Democrat. 

Dickerson, T. B. ; farmer; 2 m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
185 1; settled in J. C. 1872. Granger. Protestant. 



Evans, Wm.; retired farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Tenn. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Eaton, C. M.; carpenter; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1846. Dem. 
M. Baptist. 

ELLIS, NOAH; farmer; 3ms Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1832. 
Dem. Separate Baptist. 

ELLIS, JOHN; saw milling and dealer in lumber; 2]/ 2 m s 
Samaria. Born in Ohio 1838; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 
Protestant. 



Forsyth, Jasper; merchant; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Dem. 

Forsyth, J. T. ; merchant; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Christian. 

FORSYTH, M. H.; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1855. Christian. Residence in Union township. 

Featheringill, J. H. ; farmer ; 2 m s w Samaria. Born in Ky. 
1831; settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. 

Forsyth, J. H.; farmer; ^ m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Christian. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 323 



Furgason, Richard; farmer; I y 2 m n Spearville. Born in Ky. 
1801; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. 

Furgason, Levi; farmer; i^mn Spearville. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. 

Ford, M.; farmer; 5 \ m s Trafalgar. Born in Pa. 18 13; settled 
in J. C. 1852. Dem. 

Ford, L. M.; farmer; 5 \ m s Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 

Fansler, J. B.; house and sign painter; Trafalgar. Born in Iowa 
1850; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Fogarty, Thomas E.; shoemaker; Samaria. Born in the city of 
Albany 1848; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Protestant 

Fulps, Peter H.; farmer; 1 m s Samaria. Born in N. C. 1827; 
settled in J, C. 1871. Protestant. 

FORELANDER, THOMAS B.; miller; Samaria. Born in Va. 
1825; settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Protestant. 



Gebhart, Z.; farmer; 2^ m w Samaria. Born in Ohio 1825; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Goldy, S. ; retired farmer; Trafalgar. Born in N. J. 1793; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. 

Green, J. M.; farmer; Samaria. Born in Ky. 1826; settled in 
J. C. 1836. Dem. 

GREEN, WILLIAM ; retired farmer; 2 m n w Trafalgar. Born 
in Tenn. 1797; settled in J. C. 1836. Protestant. 

GREEN, SAMUEL ; farmer; 2 m w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. Protestant. 



324 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Green, William T. ; farmer ; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1848. Rep. Protestant. 

GERMAN, L. ; farmer; 2 m n w Samaria. Born in Ind. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. R. Baptist. 

Gillaspy, Thomas C. ; farmer ; 2 m s Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 

183 1. Dem. Protestant. 

Garshwiler, C. L.; proprietor feed and sale stable; Trafalgar. 
Born in J. C. 1844. Rep. 

GILLASPY, JAMES; farmer; % m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 

1832. Dem. Christian. 

Green, Robert; farmer; 4 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1830. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Green, Wm. A.; farmer; 4 m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Green, B. F. ; farmer; 4 m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Green, C.; farmer; 4% m w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1823; set- 
tled in J. C. 1837. Dem. M. Baptist. Mr. Green was a 
soldier in the Mexican war, and fought the Mexicans at the 
battle of Buena Vista. 

Green, John; farmer; 5 m n w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1837. Dem - M - Baptist. 

Green, H.; farmer; 2^ m s Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1848; set- 
tled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Protestant. 



Hickey, Andrew; dealer in lumber; \ m e Morgantown. Born 
in Tenn. 1826; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 325 



HOGELAND, JOHN ; farmer and stock trader; 3J m w Mor- 
gantown. Born in Ky. 1824; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. 
M. Baptist. 

Hutchison, C. M.; saddle and harness maker; Trafalgar. Born 
in Ky. 1849; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 

Hunt, Robert F.; farmer and teacher; 1^ m s w Samaria. Born 
in J. C. 1842. Dem. Methodist faith. 

HOLEMAN, JAMES M.; farmer; 2 m s w Samaria. Born in 
Ind. 1826; settled in J. C. same year. Is a Granger, and 
Predesunarian Baptist in faith. 

Holeman, A. B.; farmer; 2 m s w Samaria. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Dem. Predestinarian Baptist in belief; thinks the Bible 
will sustain him in this idea. 

Henderson, S. W.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Va. 1820; set- 
tled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Baptist. 

Hunter, S. A.; farmer; 4 m w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Holman, Isaac J.; farmer; 1^ m e Morgantown. Born in J.C. 
1844. Dem. Protestant. 

HEROD, REV. E. D.; minister and farmer; 3! m s e Morgan- 
town. Born in Ky. 18 18; settled in J. C. 1871. Granger. 
O. S. Baptist. 

Howard, R. A.; farmer and cooper ; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1844. Dem. Baptist. 

Hubble, Joseph; farmer; 3 m s w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1836. Dem. 

Herod, S. ; farmer; 3 J m s e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C 1871. Granger. 



326 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Howard, David; retired farmer; 2 m s w Trafalgar. Born in 
Ky. 1798; settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. 

HUNTER, S. W. ; farmer and carpenter; Trafalgar. Born in 
Ky. 1829; settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Hunter, O. H.; farmer; yi m s e Samaria. Born in J. C. 1850. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Holdren, C; laborer; Samaria. Born in Ky. 1840; settled in J. 
C. 1874. Dem. 

Hunt, James G. ; farmer; 1 ^ m s w Samaria. Born in J. C. 
1850. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Hensley, Thomas; farmer; 2^ m s Samaria. Born in J. C. 
1844. Dem. 



Israel, John; general mechanic; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Dem. Inclined to Methodism. 



Jolliffe, A. E.; merchant; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1838. Dem. 
Baptist. 

Jamison, R. H.; butcher and trader; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1837. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Jamison, C. M.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1832. Dem. 
Christian. 

Jeffries, James E. ; farmer and teacher; 1 m n w Trafalgar. Born 
in Ky. 1835; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Christian. 

JACOBS, P. C; farmer; 3J m s Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1830; 
settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Christian. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 327 



KEPHART, SAMUEL; farmer; Samaria. Born in J. C. 1830. 
Democrat. 

Kephart, S. ; farmer; 2 m n Morgantown. Born in Ky. 1801; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. 

Kindle, M. ; farmer and teacher; Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1841; 
settled in J. C. 18—. Dem. Christian. . 



Lang, B. T.; farmer; 1 mn e Morgantown. Born in J. C. 1844. 

LYSTER, H. S.; retired farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 18 16; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Lyster, W. H.; laborer; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1842. Dem. 

Linton, J. W.; school teacher; 4J m s e Trafalgar. Born in Va. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1856. Granger. Christian. 

Lesig, John; farmer; 5 ms Trafalgar. Born in Pa. 1825; settled 
in J. C. 1848. Dem. Protestant. 



Morris, Mrs. E. ; farmer ; 1 % m s w Samaria. Born in J. C. 
1832. Methodist. 

McCray, William; farmer; 2 m w Samaria. Born in J. C. 1838. 
Dem. 

McFADDEN, CORNELIUS ; farmer ; 3 m s Trafalgar. Born 
in Ohio 1832; settled in J. C. 1853. Granger. Christian. 

Mussleman, T. J.; farmer; 3^ m s Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1840. Dem. 

MUSSLEMAN, G. W.; farmer and Township Trustee; 2ms 
Samaria. Born in J. C. 1826. Dem. 



328 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Moore, Jesse; farmer; 1 m e Morgantown.' Born in Va. 1820; 
settled in J. C. about 1835. Dem. 

Moore, Thomas A.; farmer; 1 m e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Mussleman, Mrs. Sarah ; 2| m s w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1804; 
settled in J. C. 1823. Baptist. 

MOORE, J. J.; merchant; Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1831. 
Dem. Mr. Moore is a diligent Bible reader, and believes 
that good deeds done to our fellow men constitute the true 
Christian. 

MOORE, ROBERT M.; merchant and Justice of the Peace; 
Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1840. Dem. M. Baptist. 

MOORE, J. J. & CO. ; merchants; Trafalgar; dealers in dry- 
goods, notions, boots, shoes, hats, caps, and ready-made 
clothing. 

Morgan, E. W. ; merchant; Trafalgar. Born in N. C. 1814; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. 

Morgan, W. C; merchant; Trafalgar Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. Christian. 

Murphy, G. W.; farmer; 2~y 2 m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1849; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. 

Merriman, J. F.; farmer; 3 J m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1 841; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Baptist. 

Montgomery, John; farmer; 2 m s e Morgantown. Born in J. 
C. 1852. Granger. Protestant. 

Montgomery, Duncan; farmer; 2 m e Morgantown. Born in 
Scotland 1831; settled in J. C. 1838. Dem. Protestant. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 329 



McFaden, Robert; farmer and trader; 3I ms Trafalgar. Born 
in Ohio 1837; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

McFaden, John; farmer; 3^ m s Trafalgar. Born in N. J. 1788; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

McFaden, James; retired farmer; Samaria. Born in Ohio 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Protestant. 

MUSSLEMAN, JAMES K. P.; farmer and log merchant; Sa- 
maria. Born in J. C. 1845. Dem. Protestant. 



Nail, David; farmer; 2^ m s Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Protestant. 



PITCHER, P. M.; farmer and stock trader; Trafalgar. Born 
in J. C. 1835. Dem. 

Perry, H.; carpenter; Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 18 12; settled in 
J. C. 1840. Dem. 

PICKETT, J. W.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in 111. 1840; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

Porter, Francis K.; merchant; Samaria. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Paskins, W. V.; farmer; 1^ m s Samaria. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Dem. 

Prather, Thomas H.; farmer; 1 m s w Samaria. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. about the year 1857. R- e P- Meth. 

Pitcher, M.; farmer; 3 m s w Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1812; 
settled in J. C. 1821. Dem. United Brethren. 



33° JOHNSON COUNTY. 



PORTER, HIRAM ; farmer and trader; 2| m s Samaria. Born 
in Ind. 1820; settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. Methodist. 

Pitcher, James; farmer; 2^ m s e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1829. Dem. United Brethren. 



Ruffin, William; farmer; 5 m n w Trafalgar. Born in N. C. 
1836. Dem. M. Baptist. 

REAM, J. B.; physician and surgeon; Trafalgar. Born in Pa. 
1827; settled in J. C. 1853. Rep. Methodist. 

Richmond, Jesse; farmer; 3I m s Newburg. Born in Va. 1787; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. 

Ray, J. L.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Va. 1833; settled in J. 
C. 1854. Granger. Methodist. 

Ruffin, L.; farmer and brickmason; Trafalgar. Born in N. C. 
1812; settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Ruffin, D.; farmer; 2 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Ragsdale, John D.; farmer; 3 m n w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1847. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Richardson, Bluford; farmer; 2ms Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1840. Dem. Christian. 



Slack, John; farmer; 4ms Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1807; set- 
tled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Universalist. 

SLACK, E. ; carpenter ; 4} m s e Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 
1830; settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. M. Baptist. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 33 I 



Smyser, Henry; farmer; 2 m s w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. Christian. 

Smith, Nathan S.; merchant; Samaria. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. 

SCOTT, THOMAS L.; physician and surgeon; Samaria. Born 
in Ohio 1841; settled in J. C. 1872. Methodist. 

Spooks, Edward ; farmer; fmn Spearville. Born in J. C. 1836. 
Dem. 

Stockton, Aaron; was not at home, and could not be seen. 

Spicer, James H.; contractor and builder; Samaria. Born in 
N. C. 1824; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. M. Baptist. 

SHOEMAKER, WILLIAM R.; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in 
J. C. 1838. Rep. Methodist. 

Slack, R.; retired farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Ohio 1803; set- 
tled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Universalist At the time Mr. 
Slack settled in this part of the county there were but few 
settlers in the township — all was a howling wilderness ; the 
forest was heavy and very dense, with plenty of wild game 
and some Indians. 

Shank, Geo.; farmer; 2 m w Samaria. Born in Va. 1826. Dem. 

STURGEON, S.; retired farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1802; 
settled in J. C. 1833. Dem. M. Baptist. 

SMYSER, ELIJAH; farmer; 2 m s Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1840. Dem. 

SHANNON, ALEXANDER; farmer; 2 m s e Morgantown. 
Born in Pa. 1832; settled in J. C. 1872. Granger. Prot. 

Stewart, William; farmer; 2 m w Samaria. Born in J. C. . 

Democrat. 



332 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Spicer, Mrs. Rebecca; farmer; I m w Samaria. Born in J. C. 
1832. Methodist. 

SPICER, THOMAS; Postmaster; Trafalgar. Born in N. C. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1834. Re P- Methodist. 

Stout, J. N.; harness and saddle maker; Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 
1834; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Stephens, J. M.; boot and shoemaker; Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1866. 

Shake, James A.; laborer; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1846; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Dem. 

Selenberg, Miss Minnie; milliner; Trafalgar; settled in J. C. 1872. 
Age not known. Methodist. 

Shake, William; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1831; settled 
in J. C. 1851. Dem. Baptist. 

SPICER, WILLIAM A.; farmer; Samaria. Born in J. C. 

185 1. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Smith, Montgomery; farmer; 2|m w Samaria. Born in Tenn. 
18 16; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Protestant. 

Swain, Mrs. Matilda E. ; farmer; 2 J m s w Trafalgar. Born in 
J. C. 1836. Protestant. 

Sloan, Isaac; farmer; 3 m s w Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Protestant. 

SLACK, C. J.; fanner; \]/ 2 m s Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Granger. Christian. 

SMYSER, ABRAM; farmer; \\ m s Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 

1852. Granger. Christian. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 333 



Terhune, D.; farmer; y 2 m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 183 1. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

Terhune, C; farmer; 1 m s e Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1843; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. 

TERHUNE, G.; farmer; ^ m n w Trafalgar. Born in N. J. 
1 79 1 ; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Mr. Terhune settled 
in the county when it was a wild wilderness ; the rich bot- 
tom lands were covered with underbrush, nettles, and wild 
pea vines. 

THOMPSON, B. F.; farmer; 4% m s Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Methodist. 

Tharp, James H.; farmer; 3ms Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1854. 

Terhune, Thomas L. ; farmer and school teacher; 3 m e Morgan- 
town. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. 



Underwood, Andrew; farmer; 3^ m n Morgantown. Born in 
N. C. 1802; settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. M. Baptist. 

UNDERWOOD, A. G.; farmer; 3^ m n Morgantown. Born 
in Ky. 1828; settled in J. C. 1829. This man was educated 
at the Deaf and Dumb Institute, Indianapolis. 



VOORHEIS, I. F. ; farmer and plasterer. All work done as 
desired, and warranted to be good, and at reasonable figures. 
Call and see me. Post Office at Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1834. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Vories, James M.; farmer; 2*4 m s w Samaria. Born in J. C. 
1850. Dem. 



334 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Vories, W. A.; farmer; 2 m s w Samaria. Born in J. C. 1846. 

VORIES, HERVEY; retired farmer; Samaria. Born in Ky. 
1821; settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. R. Baptist. 



Watson, Newton; farmer and cooper; 4ms Trafalgar. Born in 
Ohio 1841; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant. 

Watson, Jasper; farmer and cooper; 4ms Trafalgar. Born in 
Ohio 1847; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant. 

Watson, Daniel ; farmer and cooper; 4ms Trafalgar. Born in 
Ohio 1809; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant. 

Watson, John ; farmer and cooper; 4ms Trafalgar. Born in 
Ohio 1849; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant. 

Willan, W. R. ; clerk; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1845; settled 
in J. C. 1869. Dem. Christian. 

Wells, J. W.; farmer; 2 m s e Samaria. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Rep. Methodist. 

White, James T.; retired farmer; 2 m s w Trafalgar. Born in 
Ky. 181 1; settled in J. C. 1833. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Walker, Charles; engineer; 2^ m e Morgantown. Born in J. 
C. 1847. Dem. Protestant. 

Walker, J.; farmer; 3^ m se Morgantown. Born in Ky.; set- 
tled in J. C. 1833. Granger. Protestant. 

Walker, Granville; farmer; 2^mne Morgantown. Born in J. 
C. 1839. Granger. Protestant. 



HENSLEY TOWNSHIP. 335 



Walker, M. ; farmer; 3^ m s e Morgantown. Born in Ky. 
1809; settled in J. C. 1823. Methodist. 

Watson, Samuel; farmer and cooper; 1 y 2 m s Trafalgar. Born 
in Ohio 1838; settled in J. C. 1849. Dem. Protestant 

Willan, R. D. ; physician; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1842; settled 
in J. C. 1864. Dem. Christian. 

Willan, E. B.; physician; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1833; settled 
in J. C. 1861. Dem. Mr. Willan believes the Bible is 
sufficiently plain and true, so that it needs no wise men to 
comment on its meaning, in order that the people may 
understand it. 

Winkler, John; boot and shoemaker; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1 8 19; settled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

Woods, A. S. ; farmer; ^ m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1836; settled in J. C. 1858. Rep. 

Wallace, T. Z.; farmer; i]^_ m n e Morgantown. Born in Ind. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

Winkler, C. ; farmer; Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1846; settled in 
J. C. 1862. Rep. Christian. 



Young, R. M.; farmer; 2|mne Morgantown. Born in J. C. 
1 841. Rep. Universalist. 

YOUNT, JONATHAN A.; farmer and breeder of fine stock; 
3 m e Morgantown. Born in Ky. 1829; settled in J. C. 
i860. Granger. Persons in want of pure blooded stock 
would do well to look at Mr. Yount's animals. 



336 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Zook, Wm. A.; farmer; 2^ m n Morgantown. Born in J. C. 
1839. Dem. Christian. 

ZOOK, J. O.; farmer; 3^ m w Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Universalist. 

Zook, David; farmer; 2^ m n e Morgantown. Born in Ky. 
18 17; settled in J. C. 1827. Dem. Christian. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 337 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 



Nineveh Township is located in the south part of the county, 
between Blue River and Hensley townships. It lays in a square, 
and contains an area of 36 square miles. The north part of the 
township is rich and highly productive ; the south part is consid- 
erably broken, and is valuable for pasture, and for its immense 
forests of splendid poplar, walnut, ash and oak timber. The 
township is watered by Nineveh, Burkhart, and Herriott Creeks, 
all small streams. Other little branches run through it, which 
are valuable for stock water, and as an outlet for waste water. 

The I. & C. R. R. runs through the north-west corner of the 
township. Nineveh (Williamsburg) is the only town, and is lo- 
cated in the south part of the township. It is a thriving place, 
made up of a good class of people. The township is well sup- 
plied with roads, which are well kept. There are about five 
miles of good gravel road within her borders. 

Ten school houses, valued at $12, ockd, show that the people 
are interested in educational matters. 

E. B. Graves is the present Township Trustee. 

The following names are some of the early settlers still living 
in Nineveh township : James Ware, James A. Mitchell, M. 
Deringer, E. DeHart, P. K. Parr, L. Lowe, S. Bills, A. D. 
Barnett, F. M. Burton, J. J. Keaton, William Keaton, Charles 
S. Legan, J. M. Woodruff, Wm. S. Dodd, J. M. Dunham, O. 
22 



338 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



P. Burget, B. J. Keaton, D. P. Prichard, R. Nay, D. Wilkes, 
and others. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

Christian Church, Williamsburg; Rev. Alfred Ellmore, pas- 
tor; membership not reported; value of church property, $2400. 

Christian Church, three miles west of Nineveh ; membership, 
about 70 ; A. Burget, Sabbath school superintendent ; average 
attendance at school, 50; value of church property, $1400. 

Separate Baptist Church, two and a half miles west of Nine- 
veh; Rev. Mr. Pawn, pastor; value of church property, $800. 

Christian Church, Nineveh; Rev. Alfred Ellmore, pastor; 
membership, about 220; James Saylor, Sabbath school superin- 
tendent; average attendance at school, 85. There are also two 
assistant superintendents, John Griffith and R. Birchard. This 
church house was built in the year i860, and is now valued at 
#2,400. 

M. E. Church, Nineveh; Rev. P. S. Brooks, pastor; member- 
ship about 40; Mrs. Gertrude Farmer, Sabbath school superin- 
tendent; average attendance at school, 65; value of church prop- 
erty, $1,200. 

Predestinarian Baptist Church ; four miles south of Franklin ; 
membership not reported; value of church property, $2,000. 

SECRET ORGANIZATIONS. 

Herriott Creek Grange, No. 683; membership 80; P. K. Parr, 
Master; value of Lodge property, $75. 

DIRECTORY OF NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 

ABBOTT JOHN W.; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1831; settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. Freewill Baptist. 

Alexander, Mr. ; £ m e Trafalgar. Gone from home; could not 
be seen by our agent. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 339 



APPLEGATE, A. W.; commercial tourist; formerly with J. 
C. Green & Co., Indianapolis. Born in N. J. 1839; set- 
tled in J. C. 1841. Dem. Protestant. 

Applegate & Bro.; druggists; Williamsburg; P. O. Nineveh. 

Applegate, Hiram; druggist; Williamsburg. Born in J. C. 1847. 
Dem. Protestant. 



Bills, S. ; farmer; 8 m w Edinburgh. Born in N. J. 1806; set- 
tled in J. C. 1833. Dem. 

Bills, Thomas; farmer; 3 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Dem. Methodist inclination. 

Barnett, A. D.; broker; Williamsburg. Born in Ky. 1809; set- 
tled in J. C. 1822. Indpt. Universalist. This man believes 
that salvation is granted to every living soul. "Ask of me 
and I shall give the heathen for thine inheritance, and the 
uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession." "The 
Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his 
hand." "Thou hast given him power over all flesh, that 
he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given 
him." "The soul that sinneth, it shall die." "Depart 
from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the 
devil and his angels." These shall go away into everlast- 
ing punishment, but the righteous into life eternal." 

Barnett, H. C; farmer and teacher; 2^ m n w Nineveh. Born 
in J. C. 1848. Dem. Christian. 

Burget, A.; farmer; 2^ m w Nineveh. Born in Ohio 18 18; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Protestant. 

Burget, O. P.; farmer; i}( m w Nineveh. Born in Ohio 1828; 
settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Protestant. 



340 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



BOWMAN, FRANKLIN ; saw milling and dealer in lumber; 
\y 2 mw Nineveh. Born in Ohio 1829; settled in J. C. 187 1. 
Dem. Protestant. 

BRUMMETT, WILLIAM R.; farmer; 2^ m n w Nineveh. 
Born in Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. i865. Dem. Prot. 

Barnett, B. F.; farmer and teacher; 2 m n w Nineveh. Born in 
J. C. 1842. Granger. Christian. 

Burget, Oliver P., Jr.; farmer; 2^ m n w Nineveh. Born in J. 
C. 1837. Dem. Methodist in belief. 

BRITTON, D.; blacksmith, butcher and Justice of the Peace; 
Nineveh. Born in Tenn. 1833; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. 
Methodist. 

Burton, F. M,; farmer; 2 m n w Nineveh. Born in Va. 1789; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Dem. R. Baptist. 

BURKH ART, JACKSON ; farmer; 4 m w Edinburgh. Born 
in J. C. 1828. Dem. Methodist. 

Burton, S. P.; farmer; 2 m n w Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1831. 
Granger. Protestant. 

Burget, Thomas; farmer; Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1839. Rep« 
Christian. 

Boswell, John; farmer; 2^ m n Nineveh. Born in Ind. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

Barton, A. ; farmer ; 2 m s e Trafalgar. Gone from home, and 
could not be seen by our agent. 

BATES, JACOB ; farmer; 2 % m n w Nineveh. Born in Ohio 
1840; settled in J. C. i860. Rep. Methodist inclination. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 34I 



Bowers, John; farmer; 5)( m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1839. Rep. Christian. 

Buckman, D; farmer; 7ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 1844; set- 
tled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

Bills, J. F.; farmer; 3 J m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Brown, James M. ; carpenter and teacher ; J m n e Bluff Creek, 
in White River township. Born in Ind. 1846; settled in J. 
C. 1871. Rep. 

Burkhart, Jefferson; farmer; 5 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1827. Dem. Methodist. 

BILLS, PETER; farmer; 3 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
185 1. Dem. Inclined toward the Methodist faith. 

Burguett, William; carpenter; Nineveh. Republican. Christian. 
This man gives no information relative to his age and date 
of settlement. 

Belk, A. J.; wagon maker; Nineveh. Born in Ind. 18 17; set- 
tled in J. C. 1846. Rep. Spiritualist. 



Craig, Joseph; farmer; 5ms Franklin. Born in Ireland 18 12; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Methodist. 

CHAPMAN, WILLIAM ; boot and shoemaker; Williamsburg. 
Born in Va. 1810; settled in J. C. 1832. Granger. Chris. 

Core, James C. ; farmer; 1 m w Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1834. 
Dem. Protestant. 

CAMPBELL, A. W.; merchant and farmer; Nineveh. Born in 
Ky. 1834; settled in J. C. 1863. Indpt. Christian. 



342 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Clarke, Mrs. Anna; Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1788; settled in J. 
C. about 1834. Our agent is a young man, and has learned 
early to honor old age ; consequently he has given this ven- 
erable old lady a place in this book. 

Clark, W. J.; blacksmith; Nineveh. Born in Ind. 1834; settled 
in J. C. 1837. Re P- Methodist in faith. 



Drake, William H.; farmer ; 4 m w Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1827; settled in J. C. about 1838. Rep. Methodist. 

De Hart, E.; farmer; 3! m w Edinburgh. Born in N. C. 1801; 
settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Methodist. This man has 
lived 49 years on one farm, as reported by himself to our 
agent. More than half the days of a natural lifetime has 
this man lived within so diminutive a circle of God's crea- 
tion that we should be surprised, upon examination, if the 
contracted space in which he moved for forty-nine years, 
had not worked mental contraction, and miserly develop- 
ments, in proportion to the limited practical knowledge of 
the world which this man has. 

De Hart, Jackson ; farmer; 3J m w Edinburgh. Born in J C. 
185 1. Rep. Methodist inclination. 

Drake, Lewis; farmer; 4^ m w Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1821; settled in J. C. time not known. Rep. Methodist. 

DRYBREAD, J. M.; farmer; 4 m e Nineveh. Born 1848; 
place of birth not given. Rep. Christian. 

Dunham Joab; merchant; Williamsburg. Born in J. C. 1827. 
Rep. Christian. 

Dunham, J. M.; wagon-maker; Williamsburg. Born in Ohio 
1822; settled in J. C. 1824. Rep. Christian. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 343 



Dunham, R. M. ; carpenter; Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Rep. Christian. 

DUNHAM, S. M.; boot and shoe maker; Nineveh. Born in 
J. C. 183 1. Dem. Christian. 

Dodd, William S.; farmer; 2}mn e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 
1806; settled in J. C. 1829. Whig. Protestant. 

DeCoursey, William M.; farmer; 4 m s Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Christian in belief. 

DERINGER, M. ; farmer ; 4^ m s Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1 8 10; settled in J. C. 1829. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Deringer, H. ; farmer; 5ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Dem. 

Dragoo, Samuel; farmer and stock raiser; 4 m n w Edinburgh. 
Born in Ohio 1833; settled in J. C. 1835. Methodist. 

Dark, William; farmer; 4 m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1850. Rep. Christian. 

DeHart, Elisha; farmer; 4 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. Methodist. 

Depue, W. H.; farmer; 5ms Franklin. Born in N. Y. 18 16; 
settled in J. C. 1838. Rep. Christian. 

Durbin, L. P.; claims to be a man of leisure; Nineveh. Born in 
J. C. 1853. Dem. Christian. Better go west, young man, 
and find something to do ; men of leisure are not apt to be 
good citizens or Christians either. 



ELLIOTT, S. B.; farmer; 5ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1843. Dem. 



344 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Elliott, D. D.; farmer; i|mne Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Granger. Protestant. 

Ellmore, Rev. Alfred; Nineveh. Born in Ind. 1838; settled in 
J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 



Forsyth, M. S.; farmer; i£ m e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1845. 
Indpt. M. Baptist. 

Farr, W. F.; stock breeder and carpenter; Nineveh. Born in 
Ohio 1852; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 



Gosney, William; blacksmith; Williamsburg. Born in Ky. 18 17; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Rep. Christian. 

Gosney, Thomas; carpenter; Williamsburg. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Rep. Protestant. 

GALE, VIRGIL P.; firm of Gale &Teed; Williamsburg. Born 
in J. C. 1832. Rep. Christian. 

GALE & TEED ; merchants, dealers in dry goods, notions, 
groceries, hats, caps, boots and shoes, queensware, tinware, 
glassware and good assortment of clothing ; also stock of 
millinery goods, in charge of MISS ELMA GALE ; Wil- 
liamsburg. 

Gardner, D.; retired cabinet maker; 2^ m e Trafalgar. Born 
in N. Y. 1802; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

GRAVES, E. B.; farmer; 1% m e Nineveh. Born in N. Y. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. Protestant. 

Gosney, Rev. Richard; nurseryman; ^ m n Nineveh. Born in 
Ky. 1809; settled in J. C. about 1834. Rep. Christian. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 345 



Gosney, Joseph; nurseryman; ^ m n Nineveh. Born in J. C. 
1852. Rep. Protestant. 



Hamilton, J. I.; farmer and Lacier; 7 m s w Franklin. Born 
in Ind. 1844; settled in J. C. 1870. Granger. Protestant. 

HUBBLE, RUFUS ; farmer ; 1 m e Nineveh. Born in J. C. 
1837. Dem. Protestant. 

Hunt, J. W.; farmer; 2\ m n Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Christian. 

Handy, H.; farmer; 3 \ m s w Nineveh. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Methodist. 

HUNT, G. M.; farmer; 2 J m e Trafalgar. Born in Ind. 1847 ; 
date of settlement not given. Dem. Christian. 

Hibbs, Oliver; farmer; Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1834. Gran- 
ger. Christian. 

Harter, S. ; farmer, but in consequence of affliction is not able 
to work. Born in Ohio 18 18; date of settlement not 
known. Dem. Christian. 

Hunt, Robert; farmer; 4 m e Franklin. Born in J. C. 1832. 
Granger. Protestant. 

Hancock, F. F. ; plasterer; Nineveh. Born in Ky. 18 16; set- 
tled in J. C. 1852. Dem. Protestant. 

Holtz, William; carpenter; Nineveh. Born in Pa. 1836; settled 
in J. C. 1868. Rep. Christian. 



Keaton, William M.; farmer; %^ m w Nineveh. Born in J. C. 
1852. Rep. Christian. 



34^ JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Keaton, John; farmer; i m s e Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1829. 
Rep. Christian. 

Keaton, B. J.; farmer; ^ m e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. Protestant. 

Kelly, D. ; wood chopper; Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1808; settled 
in J. C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 

Knapp, John ; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1 837. 
Granger. Methodist. 

Kelley, William J.; farmer; 2 m e Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1835. Dem. Protestant. 

Keaton, J. J.; harness maker; Williamsburg. Born in Ky. 182 1; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Christian. 

Keaton, William, Sen.; retired judge of law; i|mn Nineveh. 
Bom in Va. 1794; settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. Christian. 
Mr. Keaton bought his land of the United States Govern- 
ment, and has lived on it 48 years. 

Kindell, Joseph ; retired farmer ; Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1793; 
settled in J. C. 1841. Christian. 

Kindell, John S.; farmer; 2 m w Nineveh. Born in Ohio 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Dem. Universalist. 



Lowe, Lawrence; farmer; 7 m n e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1827. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Law, James H.; farmer; 5 m w Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Methodist. 

LYSTER, WILLIAM; farmer; 4m w Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 185 1. Christian in belief. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 347 



LEGAN, CHARLES S.; farmer; 3^ m s Franklin. Born in 
Ky. 1824; settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. Protestant. 

Lee, Wm. A.; farmer; i| m e Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. M. Baptist. 



McQuinn, J.; farmer; 6ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 18 18; set- 
tled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Protestant. 

McQUINN, WILLIAM; farmer; 6ms Franklin. Born in J. 
C. 1852. Dem. Christian. 

Middleton, Mrs. E.; farmer; 1 m n e Nineveh. Born in Ire- 
land 1808; settled in J. C. 1840. Christian. 

Marshall, William J.; farmer; 1 ms e Nineveh. Born in J. C. 
1850. Rep. Christian. 

MEAD, L. J.; farmer; Nineveh. Born in Va. 1822; settled in 
J. C. 1866. Rep. Christian. 

Marshall, T. H.; house and sign painter; Nineveh. Agent 
could not see this man. 

MARSHALL, J. A.; physician and surgeon; Nineveh. Born 
in Ohio 1826; settled in J. C. 185 1. Granger. Christian. 

Mathis, J. K. ; farmer and teacher; 1 m w Nineveh. Born in 
Ind. 1849; settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Christian. 

Mozingo, Milford; farmer; 5^ m s w Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1852. Dem. M. Baptist. Permanent location 3^ m e 
Franklin. 

McQuaid, Mrs. Susan D. ; farmer; 3 m e Nineveh. Born in 
Ind. 1809; settled in J. C. 1832. Christian. 



34-8 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



MULLENDORE, LEWIS; farmer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born 
in Ohio 1823; settled in J. C. 1857. Granger. Christian. 

Miller, G. W.; farmer and trader; Williamsburg. Born in J. 
C. 1825. Rep. Protestant. 

Morrow, John; carpenter; Nineveh. Born in Ohio 1836; set- 
tled in J. C. 1840* Rep. Protestant. 

Mitchell, Benjamin; farmer; 1^ m e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1833. Rep. M. Baptist in belief. 

McMurray, Thomas J.; farmer; 3 m w Nineveh. Born in Ind. 
1823; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Christian. 

Mullikin, J. M.; farmer; i£ m w Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1838. 
Anti-Granger. Indpt. Here is a man who dares to stand 
on his own individual judgment. He is not dependent on 
the diction of rings or clubs for thought or action. He 
believes the great Creator of the universe has abundantly 
blessed the farmer ; and is not willing that the weak shall 
be oppressed by the strong. He believes that all public 
enterprises, judiciously carried out, are a blessing to the 
country. He is independent of creeds, dogmas and re- 
ligious hypocrisies. 

Mitchell, J.; farmer; 2\ m n e Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Christian. 

Mitchell, John D. ; retired farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1790; settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. Baptist. 

Mitchell, Stephen; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1839. 
Democrat. 

MITCHELL, G.; farmer and carpenter; 4ms Franklin. Born 
in Ky. 1846; settled in' J. C. 1872. Dem. 



* NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 349 

Mitchell, James A.; farmer; ij m w Amity. Bprn in Ky. 1814; 
settled in J. C. 1 83 1. Dem. Christian. 

Mitchell, Jasper N. ; farmer; 7 m s Franklin. Born in Ind. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Christian. 

MITCHELL, JAMES G.; shingle manufacturer; 7ms Frank- 
lin. Born in Ind. 1824; settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. 
Christian. 

Morris, N. N.; gunsmith and farmer; Nineveh. Born in Ohio 
1828; settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Protestant. 

Mellette, U. M.; physician and surgeon; Nineveh. Born in Ind. 
1835; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Liberal. 



NOWELS, GEORGE ; farmer; 5 m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Protestant. 

Nay, J. T.; farmer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born in Ky. 1823; set- 
tled in J. C. 1833. Dem. Protestant. 

Nay, Mrs. Jennie; farmer; 2\ m s e Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 
1825. Christian. 

NAY, R. ; farmer; 2 m e Trafalgar. Born in Va. 1 796; settled 
in J. C. 1833. Dem. Baptist. 

Nay, James S.; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 1833; 
settled in J. C. about 1833. Dem. Protestant. 



Olmsted, Joseph; farmer; 1 m e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Methodist. 



350 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Prichard, William; farmer; 3 m n Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1822. Granger. Protestant. 

PICKERELL, D. M.; farmer; % m e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1839. Rep. Protestant. 

Parkhurst, R. C; farmer; 6 m s w Franklin. Born in Tenn. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. R. Baptist. 

PARK, S. W.; farmer and harness maker; 2^ m e Trafalgar. 
Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. Protestant. 

Park, Mrs. Margaret; 2^ m e Trafalgar. Born in N. C. 1780; 
settled in J. C. 1845. R. Baptist. This venerable old 
lady claims to be the oldest person now living in J. C. 

Prichard, D. P.; farmer; 1^ m e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1804; 
settled in J. C. 1823. Rep. Protestant. 

Parr, M.; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in Tenn. 18 18; settled 
in J. C. 1834. Dem. Mr. Parr is 4 feet 3^ inches in 
hight, and weighs 124J lbs. 

Pearce, Wm. E.; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in Tenn. 1838; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

PARR, P. K.; farmer, surveyor and civil engineer; 6ms Frank- 
lin. Born in Tenn. 1825; settled in J. C. 1828. Dem. Pre- 
destinarian Baptist. 

Prichard, Robert F. ; farmer; 4 y 2 m n w Edinburgh. Born in 
J. C. 1838. Rep. Christian. 

Prichard, D. ; farmer and stock trader; 5 m w Edinburgh. Born 
in J. C. ; date of birth not given. Rep. Methodist. 

Prichard, D. ; farmer; 1} m e Nineveh. Born in J. C. about 
1844. Rep. Christian. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 35 I 



PENDELTON, A. V.; farmer; 2)4 m n Nineveh, and 6ms 
Franklin. Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1856. Gran- 
der or Indpt. Christian. 

Prichard, R. W. ; farmer; Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1842. Rep. 
Christian. 



Robison, A. L. ; farmer; 4 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1848. Rep. 

Rodgers, R. L. ; farmer; 2 m e Trafalgar. Born in Va. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1836. Dem. Protestant. 

Ruble, J. H. ; farmer; 3 m n e Nineveh. Born in Ind., but 
date not known; settled in J. C. 1856. Granger. Christ. 

REIDENBACH, P. B.; farmer; \% m w Nineveh. Born in 
Pa. 1833; settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Christian. 

Roseberry, M. M.; farmer; 2 m n w Nineveh. Born in Ohio 
1828; settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Methodist. 

RIGGS, RANSOM; farmer; 2)/ 2 m n w Nineveh. Born in Ind. 
1825; settled in J. C. 1835. Granger. Regular Baptist. 

Ream, J. J.; farmer; Nineveh. Born in Pa. 185 1; settled in J. 
C. 1853. Protestant. 

Ramey, William; farmer; 4 m s w Franklin. Born in Ind. 1840. 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Protestant. 



Smyser, H.; farmer; 3 m e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1835 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1843. Dem. Christian. 

SMITH, J. S.; farmer; 2 m w Nineveh. Born in Ind. 1845 
settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Protestant. 



352 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Slack, Homer; farmer; 4 m s e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 1837. 
Indpt. Protestant. 

SHELTON. JOHN ; farmer ; 2 m n Nineveh. Born in Tenn. 
about 1836; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Swift, Margaret; farmer; 4ms Franklin. Born in Ky. 181 5 ; 
settled in J. C. 1833. Predestinarian Baptist. 

Saylors, Joseph ; farmer ; 1 m s e Nineveh. Our agent could 
not see him. 

Shelton, Thomas J.; farmer; 5 ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1853. Dem. 

Smith, C. A.; farmer; 3 y 2 m w Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1854. Methodist. 

SCOTWHITE, SAMUEL S.; farmer; 3 m e Trafalgar. Born 
in Ky. 1821; settled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Protestant. 

Sherman, Anderson ; blacksmith ; Williamsburg. Born in Ky. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. Protestant. 

STURGEON, T. W.; farmer; i|me Trafalgar. Born in J.C. 
1837. Dem. Baptist in belief. 

Smyser, W. F. ; about 2 m s e Trafalgar ; was gone from home, 
and could not be seen by our agent. 

Smyser, W. D.; farmer; 3 m e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1833 ; 
settled in J. C. 1843. Dem. Spiritualist. 



Tindel, John M.; blacksmith; 5ms Franklin. Born in Ind. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Methodist. 

Tremain, R.; farmer; 3 m w Amity. Born in Mass. 1793; set- 
tled in J. C. 1848. Dem. Predestinarian Baptist. 



NINEVEH TOWNSHIP. 353 



Tremain, James; farmer; 3 m w Amity. Born in J. C. 1848. 
Dem. 

Tatum, Alfred; farmer; ^ m e Nineveh. Born in Ky. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Christian. 

Tucker, John; farmer; 2^ m s e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Rep. Christian. 

Tulley, Charles; farmer; 2^ m n Nineveh. Born in Ind. 1833; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Protestant. 

THOMPSON, J. M.; Clerk of Johnson County Court. Born 
in J. C. 1 83 1. Indpt. Protestant. 

TEED, J. W.; of the firm of Gale & Teed; Williamsburg. 
Born in 111. 1848; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 



Vandivier, Alfred; farmer; 2\ m e Trafalgar. Born in J. C. 
1839. Rep. M. Baptist. 



Ware, G. W.; farmer; 3ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Rep. Methodist in belief. 

Williams, Thomas; carpenter; 4ms Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1846. Dem. Liberal in religious matters. "No man can 
serve two masters." "Ye can not serve God and Mammon." 
"I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot (but 
liberal). I would thou wert cold or hot. So, then, because 
thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew 
thee out of my mouth." — Rev. "Your covenant with death 
shall be disannulled, and your {liberal) agreement with hell 
shall not stand." — Isaiah. My friend, seek the strong city. 
23 



354 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Ware, James; farmer and trader; 3ms Franklin. Born in Va. 
1808; settled in j. C. 1821. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Waltz, Joseph; farmer; 5ms Franklin. Born in Ind. 1840; set- 
tled in J. C. 1863. Rep. Christian. 

Wallace, Thomas; farmer; 2\ m e Williamsburg. Born in Ky. 
1832; settled in J. C. i860. Rep. Methodist. 

Woodruff, J. M.; farmer and raiser of fine blooded cattle; 1 m se 
Nineveh. Born in Ohio 1812; settled in J. C. 1822. Gran 
ger. Christian. 

Wilkinson, George; farmer; 3 m n Nineveh. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. Christian. 

Wheetan, J. F.; farmer; 3 m w Nineveh. Born in Ohio 18 16; 
date of settlement not known. Dem. Christian. 

Wheetan, J.; farmer; 3 J m s w Nineveh; agent did not get to 
see this man. 

Wilkes, D. ; farmer; i|mw Nineveh. Born in Ohio 1824; set- 
tled in J. C. 1830. Dem. Protestant. 

White, William; farmer; 3 m s e Trafalgar. Born in Ky. 1819; 
settled in J. C. 1832. Dem. Protestant. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 355 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHP. 



Blue River Township is situated in the south-east corner of 
the county, and is bounded on the south by Bartholomew 
county, on the east by Shelby county, on the North by Frank- 
lin township, and on the west by Nineveh township. It is a 
small township, the smallest in the county, and contains less 
than twenty square miles. The soil is very rich, and produces 
abundantly of all the grains and vegetables common to the 
climate. 

The township is watered by two very important streams — 
Sugar Creek and Blue River. Sugar Creek runs through it 
from north to south, and near the south line of the township it 
makes a junction with Blue River. Sugar Creek runs nearly 
through the center of the township, thus giving to Blue River 
township drainage facilities not common to most townships. 
Blue River cuts across the south-east corner of the township, 
and enters into Sugar Creek near the Bartholomew county line. 
These streams are both valuable for milling purposes, generally 
affording water sufficient to propel heavy machinery. The sur- 
face of the country is somewhat broken along the streams, yet 
there is much land lying undulating and on a level. 

The improvements of Blue River township are generally of 
the first-class. Many fine farms, good, substantial dwellings and 
out-buildings, mills, factories, bridges, roads, and school houses, 
all go to show that the people are enterprising and appreciate 
advancement in the arts and sciences. 



356 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Edinburgh is the principal town in Blue River township, and 
is located in the southeast corner of the township. It is a place 
of much enterprise, and seems to be in a thriving condition. 
It contains many good buildings, and is beautifully located upon 
the banks of Blue River. Some of the residences are splendid, 
and situated upon plats of rolling ground, which give to them an 
inviting appearance. Edinburgh is a place noted for its ship- 
ments of grain, its factories, school facilities, and general enter- 
prise. The Blue River Starch Works are located at this place, 
and are said to use annually 150,000 bushels of corn, amounting 
to a business of $150,000 yearly. The Blue River Grape 
Sugar Works are also located here. For a more extended 
notice of these enterprises see county history. 

Edinburgh has a graded school of a high-toned character, and 
affords educational facilities to about six hundred and fifty 
scholars. The building is estimated to be worth $15,000. 

The J., M. & L. R. R. runs into this township at the south- 
east corner, and runs diagonally through the township from south 
east to north-west, affording excellent shipping facilities. The 
city of Edinburgh is located upon this railroad. 

Among the early settlers now living in Blue River township, 
are John McEndree, Charles Bay, N. S. Branigan, John Collier, 
E. M. Williams, Levi Ray, P. G. Robison, A. C. Halstead, L.J. 
Henderson, William Durbin, J. Runkle, H. D. Wright, John 
A. Thompson, Alexander Breeding, and A. C. Thompson. 

Mr. Allen Williams, one of the early settlers of Johnson 
county, claims to have made the first coffin used in the neigh- 
borhood of Edinburgh. It was made for a Mrs. Townsend. It 
is also claimed that Mr. Williams cleared the first ground in the 
city of Edinburgh. 

Rev. John Logan preached the first Methodist sermon in Blue 
River township, which was in the year 1822. 

A man by the name of John Beard settled in this township 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 357 

, r 

in the year 1822; eight years afterward this inhuman monster, 
in the middle of winter, bound a negro woman to a stump and 
left her out in the cold wintry blasts all night ; she died from 
the effects of the exposure, which caused Mr. Beard to flee the 
country, and saved Blue River township from being the home of 
a murderer's posterity. Let vengeance follow them that fear not 
the laws of justice. 

One Isaac Collier is said to have been the man who built the 
first mill in the township, and was the first blacksmith in Edin- 
burgh. 

The township of Blue River has five school houses — two brick 
and three frame — valued at about $6000. 

The population of the township is about 3500. Vote of town- 
ship, 600; Republican, 325; Democratic, 275. 

Adam Mutz present Township Trustee. 

THEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES. 

Presbyterian Church, Edinburgh; Rev. J. A. Williams, pastor; 
membership, JJ\ C. C. Forrer, Sabbath school superintendent; 
average attendance at school, 70. 

St. John's Lutheran Congregation, Edinburgh; Rev. J. H. 
Link, pastor; membership, 20.. This congregation was organ- 
ized but a short time ago, and as yet has no house of its own to 
worship in ; its members, however, contemplate erecting a $3000 
house before long. 

Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Edinburgh; membership, 125; 
average attendance at school, 65; value of church property, 

$5000. 

M. E. Church, Edinburgh; Rev. R. Roberts, pastor; member- 
ship, 220; Prof. J. H. Martin, Sabbath school superintendent; 
average attendance at school, 150; value of church property, 
including parsonage, $21,000. 



35§ JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Christian Church, Edinburgh; Rev. Mr. , pastor; mem- 
bership, 165; J. B. Nickey, Sabbath school superintendent; 
Olney Hazzard, secretary; average attendance at school, no; 
value of church property, $5,000. 

Christian Church, four miles northwest of Edinburgh; Rev. 
J. M.Brown, pastor; membership, about 115; R. F. Prichard, 
Sabbath school superintendent; average attendance at school, 75; 
value of church property, $2,000. 

M. E. Church, five miles north of Edinburgh; Rev. S. M. 
Shumway, of Hancock county, Ind. , pastor; James Shipp, Sab- 
bath school superintendent; average attendance at school, 50; 
church membership, about 125; value of church property, 
$6, 000. 

M. E. Church, four miles northwest of Edinburgh ; Rev. A. 
Z. Wade, pastor; membership, about 120; W. H. Drake, Sab- 
bath school superintendent; average attendance at school, about 
no; value of church property, $5,000. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Edinburgh Lodge, No. 100, F. and A. M.; membership, 70; 
James Kelly, Secretary ; value of Lodge property, $2000. 

Herndon Lodge, No. 95, I. O. O. F.; membership, 89; Elijah 
Payne, Secretary ; value of Lodge property, $2000 ; the rooms 
of this Lodge are said to be well furnished. 

Fidelity Lodge, No. 42, K. of P.; membership, 45; W. R. 
Strawn, Secretary ; value of Lodge property, $500. 

DIRECTORY OF BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 

ASHLEY, JOHN W.; farmer; 2^ m w Edinburgh. Born in 
J. C. 1854. Christian. 

Adams, G. C; railroad agent; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1842; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. 

Adams, L. F. ; painter; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 185 1. Rep. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 359 

Adams, David; physician and surgeon; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio 1 831; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Universalist. 

Armstrong, J. T. ; fire insurance agent; Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 1842. Rep. Methodist. 

Armstrong, Mrs. L. A.; proprietress Gait House; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1828; settled in J. C. 1869. Methodist. 

Alexander, T. K.; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Methodist. 

Allison, James; head sawyer; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. 

Adams, Ephraim; agent for American Express Co. ; Edinburgh. 
Born in Pa. 181 1; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Prot. ' 

ADAMS, L. P.; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1837; set- 
tled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Infidel. Here we have a man 
who is willing to say to the world that he believes the Bible 
to be a book of lies and silly tales, originated by designing 
men for the purpose of ambitious gain ; he is willing to say 
that the most intelligent creature of God's creation is as the 
beast of the field, having no promise of a life hereafter. He 
is willing to say that God did lie when he pronounced man 
a living soul. He is willing to say that his Creator lied 
when he promised the Son of Man for the salvation of the 
world — that he lied when he said, ' 'This is my beloved Son, 
hear ye him." Mr. Adams, that word " Infidel" is a fear- 
ful one to attach to one's faith. Yet, if you can see no 
God in man's nature — in his desires and aspirations, or in 
this beautiful world, then cling to it. 

Adams, C. E.; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1828; set- 
tled in J. C. 1870. Protestant. 



360 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



BRANNAN, W. J. B.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1873. 

Burton, J. T. ; dentist; Edinburgh. Born in Mass. 1835 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

BOWERS, H. H.; wagonmaker; Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 
1820; settled in J. C. 1 87 1. R. Baptist in belief. 

Bland, J. A.; physician and surgeon; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1836; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. Methodist. 

Bruce, John; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Scotland 18 18; 
settled in J. C. 1844. Protestant. 

Berryman, N. B.; lawyer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1843; set- 
tled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Universalist. 

BAKER, A. J. & WIFE ; dealers in jewelry, clocks, watches 
and millinery goods; Edinburgh. 

BAKER, A. J.; jewelry; Edinburgh. Born in 111. 1841; settled 
in J. C. 1867. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Baker, Mrs. A. J.; millinery store; Edinburg. Born in Wales 
1835; settled in J. C. 1867. Presbyterian. 

Baker, Ira; retired farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Vt. 18 12; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 87 1. Rep. Unitarian. 

BAY, J. R. ; editor Edinburgh Chronicle; Edinburgh. Born in 
JVC. 1847. Methodist. 

Barry, H. W.; trader; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1836; settled 
in J. C. 1865. Rep. Lutheran. 

BRENTON, J. T. ; physician and surgeon; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 1832; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Liberal. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 36 1 

Brickey, William T.; starch maker; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 
1830; settled in J. C. 1863. Dem. Methodist. 

Brickey, James T.; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1853; 
settled in J. C. 1 87 1. Dem. Methodist. 

Bannister, Oliver; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Methodist. 

Betts, William H.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1841; set- 
tled in J. C. 1864. Dem. 

Brown, R. B.; drayman; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1818; set- 
tled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Methodist. 

Barker, George W.; gardener; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 18 19; 
settled in J. C. i860. Dem. 

Boucher, Thomas ; farmer ; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1834; settled in J. C. 1835. Rep. Believes in the Meth- 
odist doctrine. 

BRADLEY, J. L. ; farmer, banker and railroad superintendent; 
3J m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1819; settled in J. C. 
about 1849. R- e P- M. Baptist. 

Bay, I.; farmer and broom maker; 3^ m w Edinburgh. Born 
in J. C. 1849. Re P- Methodist faith. 

Bay, Charles; farmer; 3 J m w Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 18 19; 
settled in J. C. 1834. Rep. Methodist. 

Branigin, E. D. ; farmer ; 6)4 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1844. Dem. Deist. 

BRANIGIN, N. S. ; farmer ; 6 m s e Franklin. Born in Ky. 
1818; settled in J. C. 1833. Dem. Deist. 

BURRY & SANDERS; butchers; Edinburgh. 



362 JOHNSON COUNT\. 



Branigin, Emery D.; farmer; 6 m s e Franklin. Born in J. C. 
1852. Dem. Deist. 

BURRY, E. W. ; butcher; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1831; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. 

Britton, Jacob W.; boot and shoemaker; Edinburgh. Born in 
Maine 1845; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. 

Bryson, James N.; farmer ; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in N. C. 
1831; settled in J. C. 1873. Dem - Methodist. 

BROCKMAN, S.; farmer; 1% m w Jollity, in Shelby county. 
Born in Ind. 1824; settled in J. C. i860. Rep. Meth. 

Barker, Charles ; farmer ; 5 m n Edinburgh. Born in N. Y. 
1839. Re P- 

Barnett, Thomas ; farmer ; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
Rep. 

Barnett, J. K. ; farmer; 2|ran Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1813; 
settled in J. C. 1822. Rep. Predestinarian Baptist. 

Brannan, E.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1853. Rep. 

Byers, William; not in any business; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1843; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. 

BREEDING, ALEXANDER; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ky. 1823; settled in J. C. 1828. Rep. Christian. 

Bowlen, T. J.; feather renovator; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1 841; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. 

Brockman, A. S. This man refused to give his name, age, 
native State, date of settlement, political or religious views, 
or any other information which would lead our agent to un- 
derstand that he was qualified to do so. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 363 



Bowlen, J.; painter; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 185 1; settled in 
J. C. 1874. Rep. 

Broderick, M.; railroader; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland; about 
35 years old. Dem. R. Catholic. 



CARPENTER, A. ; manufacturer of shingles; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1833; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. 

Cook, J. R.; teamster; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1814; settled 
in J. C. i860. Rep. Lutheran. 

CROCKET, D.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1835; settled 
in J. C. 1872. Methodist. 

Chester, Thomas; retired miller; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Corwin, Edward; driver of fast horses ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1849; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Protestant. 

Chancy, C. F. ; proprietor livery, feed and sale stables ; deals in 
fast horses; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1850; settled in J. 
C. 1872. 

CHANCY & WHITE ; proprietors livery, feed and sale stables; 
also dealers in fast horses; Edinburgh. 

Compton, John ; farmer ; 3 m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Lutheran. 

Compton, L.; proprietor flouring mills; 3 m n w Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1846; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. 

Coy, Jesse T.; farmer; 4 m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Methodist. 



3^4 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Chapman, S.; farmer; 3 J m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1823 ; 
settled in J. C. 1855. 

Collier, John; farmer; 2 m w Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1825 ; 
settled in J. C. 1825. Rep. 

Collier, I. D. ; farmer; 2 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1825. 
Rep. 

Cox, J. D.; book-keeper and salesman; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio 1841; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Copeland, W. H.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Mass. 1809; 
settled in J. C. 1849. Rep. Friend. 

Connett, A. M.; Supt. Edinburgh F. Co.; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1832; settled in J. C. 187 1. Liberal Republican. 
Methodist. When the sons of God went down to worship, 
the devil went along, seeking whom he might make friends 
with; and we presume he sought out all the liberal believers, 
and led them captive to the headquarters of his department, 
where compromise measures were promulgated, and where 
the devil was allowed to have at least half of every good 
thing. We have, in this day, liberal Republicans, liberal 
Democrats, liberal Christians, liberal social systems. Truly, 
ignorance remaineth. 

Copeland, William; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1849. Rep. 

Campbell, J. A.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1800; set- 
tled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Presbyterian. 

Clarke, J. H.; trader and teacher; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1836. Rep. Methodist. 

CHEATHAM, JOHN; employe at saw mill; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ky. 1842; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 365 

Cassatt, A. H.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1821; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Believes in progression in all things. 
Spiritualist. 

Campbell, William; farmer and teamster; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1842; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Coffman, I.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1816; settled 
in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Methodist. 

Cochrane, William; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1828; 
settled in J. C. 18 — . Rep. Methodist. 

Collins, A. R. ; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 185 1; settled 
in J. C 1874. Dem. Christian. 

Cooper, W. D. ; proprietor grocery and provision store ; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Pa. 1803; settled in J. C. 1847. Dem. 

CUTSINGER, JOHN M.; farmer; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in 
J. C. 1839. Granger. Methodist in faith. 

Coner, George; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1846. 
Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Criteser, James; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Criteser, H.; miller; 1 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 18 14; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Methodist. 

CRITESER, W. A.; farmer; 1 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1841; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Baptist in faith. 

Compton, Wm.; farmer; 3^ m w Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1825; settled in J. C. 1869. Granger. Methodist in faith. 

CORWIN, JOHN A.; farmer and merchant; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 183 1; settled in J. C. 1868. Christian. 



366 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Creetors, Andrew; house and sign painter; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1839; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Protestant. 

Cochran, William; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1827; set- 
tled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Methodist. 

CAMERON, JAMES; blacksmith; Edinburgh. Born in Can- 
ada 1843; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 



Durbin, T. J.; farmer; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1838. 

DURBIN, MRS. ELIZABETH; farmer; 1 m w Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1840; settled in J. C. i860. Christian. 

Drake, M. Y.; farmer; 3 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1840. 
Rep. 

Drake, B.; farmer; 3 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1847. Rep. 
Christian. 

Durbin, Wm.; farmer; 2 m w Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 181 1; 
settled in J. C. 1821. Rep. 

DOWNES, G. W.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1827; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Danford, Wm.; marble cutter; Edinburgh. Born in N. Y. 1849; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Liberal. Episcopalian. 

Doolittle, Wm.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1848; set- 
tled in J. C. 1874. Rep. 

DEMING, J. G. ; retired from business ; Edinburgh. Born in 
N. Y. 1809; settled in J. C. 1849. ^ e P- Presbyterian. 

Dodd, Thomas M.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Methodist. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 367 

Drake, J.; at leisure; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1834; settled in 
J. C. 1839. Rep. Presbyterian. Horace Greeley would 
have advised this "man of leisure" to go west and grow up 
with the country. 

DODD, S.; plasterer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1840; settled 
in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

Dear, J.; watchman; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1834; settled in 
J. C. 1868. This man says he is mixed in politics, and a 
Methodist without mixture. 

Dawson, William ; boot and shoemaker ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Va. 1843; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 

Dawson, William T.; boot and shoemaker; Edinburgh. Born 
in Va. 1843; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. 

Deupree, John E.; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1840; settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Christian. 

DEUPREE, A. C; farmer; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
181 1; settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Christian. 

Deupree, William N.; farmer and teacher; 3 m n Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1848. Rep. Christ. 

Durham, G. B. ; farmer; 2m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. Christian. 

Durham, J. C, Sen. ; retired farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born 
in Ky. 1803; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. R. Baptist. 

DURHAM, J. C, Jr.; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
1852; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Christian. 

Drod, J.; plasterer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1845; settled in 
J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 



3^8 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Duckworth, M.; Postmaster; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Universalist. 

Drockman, W. T.; farmer; Jollity. Born in Ind. 1830; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Rep. Methodist. 



ERNSBERGER, A. M.; editor and proprietor of the Edinburgh 
Watchman; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1843; settled in J. 
C. 1873. 

Evans, J. J.; boot and shoemaker; Edinburgh. Born in Ire- 
land ; settled in J. C. 1873. 

ENSLEY, T. B.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1832; set- 
tled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Liberal on religious matters. 

Ewing, Mrs. Mary; select boarding; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1826; settled in J. C. 1866. Presbyterian. 

England, William H.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Methodist. 

EMERICK, A.; undertaker; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Lutheran. 

Edgerly, H. C; clerk; Edinburgh. Born in Mich. 1829; set- 
tled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Protestant. 

England, Wm. H.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Md. 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Methodist. 



Fulton, Lorenzo; millwright; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1821 ; 
settled in J. C. 1848. Granger. Infidel. 

Foxworthy, George; farmer; 4 m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
1 844. Rep. Christian. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 369 

FOXWORTHY, JOSEPH; farmer; y/ 2 m n w Edinburgh. 
Born in J. C. 1851. Rep. Christian. 

Foxworthy, P. J.; farmer; 4 m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
18 19; settled in J. C. 1847. R- e P- Christian. 

Frost, S. P. ; proprietor grocery and provision store; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ohio 1823; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Meth. 

FANNING, JOHN ; City Marshal ; Edinburgh. Born in Ire- 
land 1846; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Rom. Catholic. 

Freese, J. A.; marble dealer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1835; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Inclined toward Methodism. 

Fee, J. D.; painter and grainer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1844; settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. Methodist. 

Fahy, H.; section boss; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 1847; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

FITZGIBBON, D.; agent in boot and shoe trade; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1842; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Roman 
Catholic. 

Fisher, Henry; retired; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1796; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Lutheran. 

FIELDS, ANDREW; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1823: 
settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Baptist. 

Fear, A.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1828; settled in 
J. C. 1873. Dem. Baptist. 

FORRER, C. C; merchant; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1830; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Presbyterian. 

24 



370 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



FORRER & CO.; general merchants, dealers in all kinds mer- 
chandise necessary to supply a strong country demand. 
Edinburgh. 

Freese, J. C; salesman; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1842; set- 
tled in J. C. 1864. Protestant. 

FOLLETT, NATHANIEL; miller; Edinburgh. Born in Eng- 
land 1839; settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Methodist. 

Foy, I.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1840; settled in 
J. C. 1864. Rep. Methodist. 

Foy, George; carriage painter; Edinburgh. Born in 1847; se t~ 
tled in J. C. i860. Rep. Methodist. 



Graves, L. ; manufacturer of woolen goods; Edinburgh. Born 
in N. Y. 181 1; settled in J. C. 1844. Dem. Methodist. 

GRISWELL, E. T.; teamster and farmer; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1830; settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Methodist in 
faith. 

1 
Graham, I.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1837; settled in 

J. C. 1 87 1. Dem. 

GRIFFITH, CHARLES; blacksmith; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio 1830; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Protestant. 



Hubbard, W. W.; surveyor and Justice of Peace; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1827; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Christian. 

HAZZARD, ORLANDO A.; student at law; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 1854; settled in J. C. 1864. Christian. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 37 1 

Harrison, Levi; physician and surgeon; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1827; settled in J. C. 1874. Christian. 

HACKNEY, T. J. ; dealer in fast horses, and keeps livery, feed 
and sale stables; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1825; settled in 
J. C. 1 85 1. Dem. Protestant 

Hess, C. M. A.; clerk; Edinburgh. Born in Holland 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Indpt. Protestant. 

HEYER & BRO.; proprietors Blue River Grape Sugar Works; 
Edinburgh. 

Hand, Lawrence; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1830; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. 

Heyer, T. ; grape sugar manufacturer ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Germany 1842; settled in J. C. 1873. 

Hayes, Lewis; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 185 1. 
Rep. Methodist. 

HALSTEAD, A. C; farmer; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in N. 
Y. 1789; settled in J. C. 1833. Rep. Infidel. 

Hubbard, George ; teacher ; 3 m n Edinburgh. Could not be 
seen. 

Hood, J. W.; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1865. Rep. Christian. 

Hart, O. S.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1844; settled in 
J. C. 185 1. Rep. Methodist. 

Henderson. F. A.; farmer; 3^ m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 1850. 

Hitch, O. G.; plasterer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1833; set- 
tled in 1864. Rep. 



372 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Henderson, L. J.; farmer; 3I m n w Edinburgh. Born in N. 
C. 1817 ; settled in J. C. 1824. Would not give political 
and religious views. 

Hosford, E. K. ; merchant; Edinburgh. Born in Vt. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Anti-Monopolist. Spiritualist. 

HOLEMAN, I. W.; employe at saw mill; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1846; settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Universalist. 

Hazzard, R. P.; physician and surgeon; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ky. 1828; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Christian. 

Hughes, Joseph; in livery business; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 
1825; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Universalist. 

Hartley, J. L.; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1834; settled 
in J. C. 1 87 1. Inclined toward the Methodist doctrine. 

Hogan, R.; employe in starch factory; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ireland 18 10; settled in J. C. 1844. Rep. Christian. 



Irvin, R; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 1833; settled in 
J. C. 1873. Rep. Christian. 

Irwin, William; blacksmith; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1858. Dem. 

Irvin, R. C; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 1828; settled 
in J. C. 1862. Rep. Christian. 



JACOBS & POTTENGER; proprietors of livery, feed and sale 
stables; also dealers in hacks, carriages and buggies; Frank- 
lin. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 373 

Jacobs, J. M.; firm of Jacobs & Pottenger. Born in J. C. 1844. 
Dem. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM A.; attorney at law; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1852; settled in J. C. 1856. 

Johnson, R. L.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1832; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Methodist. 

Johnson, Richard; retired from business. Edinburgh. Born in 
Va. 1793; settled in J. C. 1862. Rep. Methodist. Mr. 
Johnson was sergeant in Captain Logan's Company, Gen. 
Cass's Division, in the war of 18 12. He was also kept a 
prisoner of war for six months in the city of Quebec. 

Johnson, J.; firm of Holmes & Co.; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1827; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Methodist. 

JACKSON, J. B.; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1833; set- 
tled in J. C. i860. Dem. Methodist. 

Jarrell, Ada; dressmaker; Edinburgh. Christian. 

JOHNSON, OLIVER R.; boot and shoe manufacturer; Edin- 
burgh. Born in 1839; settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. Meth, 



King, David ; log merchant; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1829; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Kennedy, N. B. ; blacksmith; 3 m nw Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1840; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Christian in faith. 

KELLY, JAMES M.; hominy manufacturer; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1817; settled in J. C. 1857. Dem. Methodist in 
faith. 



374 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Kelly, O. W. ; shipping clerk; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1839; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Rep. Christian. 

KENNEDY, J. D.; teamster; Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 1838; 
settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. M. Baptist. 

Kerr, Thomas; runner for drug store; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1824; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. 

Kennedy, Thomas; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1838; 
settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. 

Kinney, J.; employe in starch factory; Edinburgh; 28 years old. 
Dem. Methodist. 

King, James H.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1854; set- 
tled in J. C. 1873. Dem. Inclined toward the Methodist 
faith. 

Kennedy, Thomas A.; agent for the Singer Sewing Machine; 
Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1843; settled in J. C. 1873. 
Dem. M. Baptist. 

KELLY, JOHN C; general hardware merchant; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Prot. 

Kinsey, J. W.; blacksmith. Born in Ohio 1830; settled in J. 
C. 1850. Rep. Presbyterian. 



Lang, Henry; baker and confectioner; Edinburgh. Born in 
Germany 1823; settled in J. C. 1856. Dem. Lutheran. 

LESLEY, ISAAC ; machinist ; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1830; settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Lutheran. 

Landis, J.; stock trader; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1836; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Rep. 



BLUE RIVER ' TOWNSHIP. 375 

LYNCH, REV. J. H.; preacher of the gospel; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ohio 1839; settled in J. C. 1873. Takes no sides 
in politics. Lutheran. "Ye can not serve God and Mam- 
mon," neither can a man be a wholesome citizen without 
taking part in, political matters. If he is true to himself 
and his neighbors, he will stand either on one side or the 
other. 

Lynch, John; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 1824; set- 
tled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

Lemar, James; retired; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1801; settled 
in J. C. 1874. Dem. M. Baptist. 

LEWIS, HENRY; dealer in agricultural implements, and breed- 
er of thoroughbred Jersey cattle, Southdown sheep, and 
Berkshire pigs; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1828; settled in 
J. C. 1853. Rep. Methodist. 

Lancaster, John P.; miller; Edinburgh. Born in Mo. 1841; set- 
tled in J. C. 1874. Dem. Universalist. 



M ALONE, D. R.; physician and surgeon; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1867. Christian. 

McKeehan, James; blacksmith; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Protestant. 

Mayer, Elias; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1848; settled 
in J. C. 1859. Dem. Protestant. 

MITCHELL, D. G.; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1843. 
Rep. Protestant. 

Moorman, Jesse ; cabinet maker ; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1 820; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Methodist. 



376 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



McCalgin, F. A.; dealer in millinery goods; Edinburgh. Born 
in Va. 1815; settled in J. C. 1831. Dem. Protestant. 

McCoy, John; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1837; set- 
tled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

Mansfield, Wm. ; not employed just now; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 185 1 ; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. As this man is not 
engaged at any business, it seems to us that he might em- 
ploy his time profitably by looking after his moral welfare. 
To be a man of leisure, and without any religious faith, is 
certainly a precarious situation. 

Mitchell, Mrs. L. J.; proprietress of boarding house; Edinburgh. 
Born in J. C. 1831. Christian. 

MARTIN, REV. J. H.; superintendent public schools; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Ky. 1834; settled in J. C. 1859. Meth. 

MARTIN & VORIS; dealers in drugs and medicines, oils, 
paints, glass, school books, stationery, etc. ; Edinburgh. 

Matlock, J.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 18 12; settled in 
J. C. 1870. Rep. 

Mooney, John ; clerk in wholesale liquor store ; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1855. Dem. 

MOONEY, NATHAN ; wholesale liquor dealer ; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1850; settled in J. C. 1854. Dem. 

MILLER, JACOB M.; pump manufacturer; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 1834; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 

Mutz, Adam ; druggist and Township Trustee ; Edinburgh. 
Born in Pa. 1829; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. 

Marsh, William L. ; farmer and stock trader; 1 m n Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1838; settled in J. C. 1866. Universalist. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 377 

Miner, John; farmer; 2]/ 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1861. Baptist in faith. 

Millens, Joseph; farmer; 3 m w Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1846; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Dem. 

Mullen, J.; railroader; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 1847; set- 
tled in J. C. 1 87 1. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

Mullen, L.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 1842; settled 
in J. C. 1866. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

McFadden, A. T. ; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1859. Dem. 

Matlock, S. R.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1839. Dem. 

MOONEY, MARION; attorney at law; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1837; settled in J. C. 1842. Dem. Unitarian. 

Middleton, J. H.; butcher and stock trader; Edinburgh. Born 
in Mass. 1848; settled in J. C. 1861. Rep. Protestant. 

McCLAIN, J. D.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

McEndree, John; farmer; 3 m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
1833; settled in J. C. 1834. Dem. Methodist. 

Mathis, Wm.; farmer; 3 m n w Edinburgh. Could not be seen. 

Mathis, Benjamin; farmer; 3 m n w Edinburgh. Gone from 
home, and could not be seen. 

Mitchell, M. H.; clerk; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1846; settled 
in J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

MOFFETT, M.; manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes; 
Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 1823; settled in J. C. 1854. 
Dem. Roman Catholic. 



37^ JOHNSON COUNTY, 



Miller, Franklin ; boot and shoemaker ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Canada 1828; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Methodist. 

Mullendore, David ; furniture manufacturer; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 1838; settled in J. C. 1872. Dem. Lutheran. 

Mutz, G. A.; furniture maker; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1837; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. 

McDONALD, D.; cabinet maker ; Edinburgh. Born in Can- 
ada 1834; settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist. 

Moorman, G. W.; carpenter and cabinet maker; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1869. Methodist. 

Morgan, P. ; railroader; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland; settled in 
J. C. 1854. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

Mullen James; section boss; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 18 17; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

MELVILLE, DAVID ; gardener and cultivator of small fruits; 
Edinburgh. Born in Scotland 1824; settled in J. C. 1853. 
Rep. Christian. 

McCallister, T. R. ; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Dem. 



NICKEY, I. B.; shoemaker; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1822; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Christian. If you desire your work 
done in a substantial and durable manner, call on Mr. 
Nickey. 

Nay, A. R.; farmer; 1 y 2 m e Amity. Born in J. C. 1844. Dem. 

Nay, D. T.; farmer; 2 m s e Amity. Born in J. C. 1840. Dem. 
Baptist in faith. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 379 

Neidigh, Samuel; miller at Compton's Mills; 3 m nw Edinburgh. 
Born in Pa. 18 10; settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. United 
Brethren in Christ. 

Nicholson, W. W.; furniture manufacturer; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1827; settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. 

Niebel, L.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1821; settled in 
J. C. 1870. Dem. Lutheran. 

Niebel, S.; gardener; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 18 17; settled 
in J. C. 1873. Dem. Baptist. 

NICHOLSON, CHARLES; undertaker; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1822; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Lutheran. 



Oleary, Jeremiah ; shoemaker ; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 
1852 ; settled in J. C. 1857. Roman Catholic. 



Pottenger, John; firm of Jacobs & Pottenger. Born in Ind 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Rep. 

Preston, James; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1850; 
settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Prichard, John M.; farmer; 4^ m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 1834. Rep. Christian. 

Pierce, Joel; farmer; 3)^ m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1838. 
Dem. Christian. 

Paine, Luther; blacksmith; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Spiritualist. 



380 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Perry, John A.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1829; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. 

Perry, ThomasK.; blacksmith; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1852. 
Democrat. 

Pate, H. F.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Vt. 1822; settled 
in J. C. 1862. Rep. Methodist. 

Poppino, J.; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1847; set ~ 
tied in J. C. 1870. Dem. Universalist. 

Paine, George F. ; blacksmith ; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1846; settled in J. C. 1852. Rep. Protestant. 

Perry, Noah ; blacksmith ; Edinburgh. Born in Indiana Ter- 
ritory 1814; settled in J. C. 1837. Dem. 



RUBUSH, F.; brick mason ; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. 

Rubush, L.; brick mason; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1842. 
Rep. 

Rush, T. A.; moulder; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1851. Dem. 
Roman Catholic. 

Richardson, T. F. ; general hardware merchant ; firm of Forrer 
& Co.; Edinburgh. Born in Mo. 1849; settled in J. C. 1869. 
Rep. Protestant. 

REED, W. H.; keeps grocery and provision store; Edinburgh. 
Born in Ohio 1820; settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Christ. 

Rush, William P. ; physician and surgeon ; Edinburgh. Born 
in Pa. 1822; settled in J. C. 1845. Dem. Rom. Cath. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 38 1 



Robbins; Philip; retired farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1820; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Methodist. 

Robison, P. G. ; farmer and brick mason; 4^ m n w Edinburgh. 
Born in J. C. 1824. Rep. Methodist. 

Roe, A. ; farmer; 3 m w Edinburgh. Could not be seen — gone 
from home. 

RUNKLE, J.; harness maker; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1824; 
settled in J. C. 1826. Rep. 

Roberts, Rev. R.; pastor M. E. Church; Edinburgh. Born in 
Md. 1835; settled in J. C. 1873. Temperance. 

Roch, Henry; tailor; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1836; set- 
tled in J. C. 1869. Presbyterian. 

ROTH, G. J.; drayman; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1826; 
settled in J. C. 1853. Dem. Christian. 

Roth, M. A.; drayman; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1853; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Dem. Christian. 

Ross, J. W.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 185 1; settled 
in J. C. 1859. Dem. 

RICHARDSON, NATHAN ; wholesale liquor dealer ; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Ind. 1836; settled in J. C. 1840. Dem. 

Roth, J. J. ; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1853; settled 
in J. C. 1854. Dem. 

Ray, Levi ; farmer; 2 m s e Amity. Born in Tenn. 1808 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 183 1. Dem. Methodist in faith. 

SNOW, CHARLES W.; attorney at law; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1827; settled in J. C. 1845. Dem. Presbyterian in 
faith. 



382 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



RUSSEL, E.; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Mr. Russel claimed 
that he was not good enough to be published in a book, 
consequently refused to give the necessary information that 
we might arrive at a knowledge of his age, native State, or 
date of settlement. Our agent thinks, however, that Mr. 
Russel was laboring under a mistake, as he was kind enough 
to give him a dinner, — a thing which none but the best of 
men do for book agents. 

Runkle, G. B. ; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. Methodist. 

SCHALL, WILLIAM; barber; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 
1847; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Lutheran. 

Scudder, E.; plasterer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1827; settled 
in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Methodist. 

Stafford, William W.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1843. Rep. 

Scholler, H.; overseer starch factory; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1844; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. Inclined to be a 
Lutheran. 

Sherman, C. E. ; painter and paper hanger; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ky. 1848; settled in J. C. 1865. 

Stein, William; baker; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1844; 
settled in J. C. 1867. Dem. Presbyterian. 

SANDERS, WILLIAM; farmer and stock raiser; 4^ m n 
Edinburgh. Rep. Methodist. Age, native State, and 
date of settlement not reported. 

STRAHMIER, EDWARD; proprietor Scott House; Edin- 
burgh. Born u Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1854. Indpt. 
Protestant. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 383 

Spurgin, George; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1819; set- 
tled in J. C. 1861. Dem. 

SIMS, N. N.; butcher and dealer in produce; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ind. 1833; settled in J. C. 1844. Rep. Protestant. 

Sims, W. P. ; butcher; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1836; settled 
in J. C. 1844. Rep. Protestant. 

SERGEANT, JOHN M.; merchant; Edinburgh. Born in Md. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 

Sharp, J. R.; salesman; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1842; settled 
in J. C. 1853. Rep. Protestant. 

Shaffer, D. W. ; attorney at law and pump manufacturer ; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Va. 1818; settled in J. C. 1837. Dem. 
Protestant. 

STRAUGHN, W. R.; book-keeper; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 
1842; settled in J. C. 1868. Rep. Methodist. 

Stilley, Harrison; miller; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1832. Rep. 
Protestant. 

SANDERS, ALEXANDER; butcher; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ky. 1832; settled in J. C. 1854. 

Schow, Stephen; baker; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1852; 
settled in J. C. 1874. Radical. Catholic. 

Snow, Samuel ; dealer in lime and coal ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1837; settled in J. C. 1839. Dem. Methodist. 

SCHOLLER, HENRY W.; starch manufacturer ; Edinburgh, 
Born in Ky. 1845; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

Stivers, R. ; commercial traveler ; P. O. Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio 1846; settled in J. C. 1867. Rep. 



384 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Slater, William; farmer ; I m n Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1874. Universalist. 

Shipp, Joshua ; farmer and trader ; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in 
Ky. 1825; settled in J. C. 1854. Rep. Methodist. 

Shipp, James; school teacher; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
185 1; settled in J. C. 1854. Methodist. 

SHIPP, THOMAS; farmer and trader; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born 
in J. C. 1853. Methodist. 

Smith, Samuel; farmer; 5 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Stainbrook, Saloman; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1844; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

STAINBROOK, ADAM; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio about 1809; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

Stainbrook, George W.; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio 1848; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

Stainbrook, John A.; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1853; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Methodist in faith. 

Shepard, R. P.; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1840; 
settled in J. C. i860. Dem. 

Stainbrook, Joshua; farmer; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1837; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Christian faith. 

STAINBROOK, WILLIAM; farmer; 3 m n Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1833; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. 

Sconce, William; farmer; 3 m n w Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1829; settled in J. C. 1868. Dem. Christian. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 385 



SCHRUGHAM, M.; farmer; 4 m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 1833. Dem. Christian. 

Schrugham, Murry; farmer ; 3J m n w Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. Rep. Methodist. 

SCHWEHM, WILLIAM; clerk in store; Edinburgh. Born in 
Germany 1832; settled in J. C. 1869. Dem. Lutheran. 

Snyder. R. W. ; picture artist ; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1842 ; 
settled in J. C. 1873. Rep. Methodist. 

SWEETMAN, HENRY; boot and shoemaker; Edinburgh. 
Born in Germany, 182 1 ; settled in J. C. 1852. Dem. 
Roman Catholic. 

Stater, L. ; sewing-machine agent ; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1845 5 settled in J. C. 1874. Rep. M. Baptist. 

Swanger, Mrs. Frances ; seamstress ; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 
1805 ; settled in J. C. 1859. Baptist. 

Staut, A. ; watchman; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1826 ; 
settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Lutheran. 

SIMS, J. L. ; freight agent; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1854; 
settled in J. C. 1845. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Snow, Samuel ; dealer in lime and coal ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1837; settled in J. C. 18 — . Dem. Methodist. 



Townsend, George P. ; retail liquor dealer; Edinburgh. Born in 
J. C. 1842. Rep. 

TAPP, JAMES; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1845; 
settled in J. C. 1862. Dem. Methodist in faith. 

25 



386 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



TAPP, RICHARD ; farmer ; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1848; settled in J. C. 1871. Believes in the Methodist doc- 
trine. 

TOWNSEND, JAMES P.; farmer; 1 m n w Edinburgh. Born 
in J. C. 1824. Rep. 

Toner, John ; retired from business ; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 
1792; settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Methodist. 

Thompson, John A.; merchant milling; Edinburgh. Born in 
J. C. 1828. Rep. 

Thomas, J. C; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1835; set- 
tled in J. C 1868. Rep. Presbyterian. 

Thompson, J. D.; broom maker. Edinburgh. Born in Md. 
1811; settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Lutheran. 

Tanner, William; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1834; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Rep. Lutheran. 

THOMPSON, A. C; banker and farmer; Edinburgh. Born in 
Tenn. 18 11; settled in J. C. 1821. Rep. Christian. Mr. 
Thompson was one of the very first settlers in Blue River 
township. He assisted in building all the roads running 
into the now thriving town of Edinburgh, and is the only 
person now living in the township who settled there in the 
year 1821. 

Thompson, E. C; engaged in banking, farming and merchan- 
dising; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1837. Rep. Christian. 

Toner, J. F.; milling and farming; Edinburgh. Born in the 
year 1821; settled in J. C. 1846. Rep. Protestant. 

Valentine, J. C; merchant; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 18 19 
settled in J. C. i860. Dem. Methodist. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 387 

VAN BIBBER, A. J.; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
18 13; settled in J. C. 1864. Rep. Spiritualist. 

Voris, S. M.; physician and surgeon ; Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 18 — . Presbyterian. 

VANDORN, T. D.; wagon and carriage manufacturer; repairs 
all kinds of farming implements; Edinburgh. Born in N. 
J. 1817; settled in J. C. 1850. Dem. 

Vandorn, D. C; wagon and carriage maker; Edinburgh. Born 
in J. C. 1853. Dem. Protestant. 



Whitlock, James; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1848; 
settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. 

Winnans, C. W.; wool spinner; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 
1851; settled in J. C. 1855. Rep. Methodist. 

Wells, James; gardener; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 181 5; set- 
tled in J. C. 1867. Rep. Methodist. 

WINTERBERG, A. W.; manufacturer and dealer in boots and 
shoes; keeps constantly on hand a large and well selected 
stock, and solicits the patronage of the public. Call and ex- 
amine his stock before purchasing elsewhere. Edinburgh. 
Born in Germany 1839; settled in J. C. 1856. Rep. 

Wilson, C. W.; attorney at law; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1854. 
Protestant. 

WALLACE, PETER; merchant tailor; Edinburgh. Born in 
Scotland 1838; settled in J. C. 1865. Dem. Methodist. 

WINTERBERG, F. ; proprietor bakery and confectionery store; 
Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1843; settled in J. C. i860. 
Dem. Catholic. 



388 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



WILLETT, FRANK & CO.; dealers in monuments, tombstones 
and other marble materials ; keep a large stock ready for 
the market at all times, and respectfully solicit the patron- 
age of the people ; Edinburgh. 

WILLETT, FRANK; dealer in marble work; Edinburgh. Born 
in Ohio 1850; settled in J. C. 1870. Dem. Lutheran. 

WARNER, JOHN C; manufacturer of boots and shoes; keeps 
constantly on hand a full and good assortment of his own 
manufacture; repairing neatly done to order; Edinburgh. 
Born in Germany 1830; settled in J. C. 1854. Lutheran. 

Webb, D. R. ; Assistant Postmaster; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1854. Rep. Protestant. 

White, W. D.; proprietor of livery, feed and sale stable, and 
dealer in fast horses ; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1850 ; set- 
tled in J. C. 1873. 

White, John, Sen.; wagon maker; Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 
1820; settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Roman Catholic. 

WHITE, JOHN, Jr.; wagon maker; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ireland 1849 > settled in J. C. 1861. Dem. Roman 
Catholic. 

Wallace, Elisha ; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Scotland 1836; 
settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Protestant. 

Weaver, J.; Cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1 86 1. Rep. Protestant. 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM; brick manufacturer and brick mason; 
Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1829. Rep. 

WESTE, J. D.; engineer; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1827; set- 
tled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Presbyterian. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 389 

Weste, J. H.; saw mill employe; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1850; settled in J. C. 1872. Rep. Baptist. 

Watson, D.; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1851; settled in 
J. C. 1852. Rep. Methodist. 

Watson, J.; laborer; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 1828; settled in 
J. C. 1852. Rep. 

WATSON, L.; employe in starch factory; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ky. 1843; settled in J. C. 1869. Rep. 

WADE, JAMES S.; farmer and owner of the noted Red Cloud 
horse; Edinburgh. Born in Va. 1823; settled in J. C. 1866. 
Dem. Universalist. 

Ward, James; manufacturer of separators and smut mills; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Pa. 183 1; settled in J. C. 185 1. 

Ward, R.; inventor of Ward's separator and smut mill ; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Pa. 1804; settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. 

Ward, John; manufacturer of separators and smut mills; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Pa. 1829; settled in J. C. 185 1. Dem. 

Wilson, S.; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 18 19; settled 
in J. C. 1850. Rep. Spiritualist. 

Watson, J. A.; house painter; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1840; 
settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. Christian. 

White, R.; seminary janitor; Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 1849. 
Dem. 

White, Mrs. E.; retired farmer; Edinburgh. Born in N. J. 
1808; settled in J. C. 1872. Christian. This lady settled 
in Bartholomew county in the year 181 8, when wild beasts 
and Indians possessed the land. 



390 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Wade, John; driver of the celebrated Red Cloud horse; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Ind. 1848; settled in J. C. 1866. Dem. 
Christian. 

Williams, John; retired; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1788; settled 
in J. C. 1855. Rep. Methodist. Mr. Williams has been 
a member of the M. E. Church for sixty years, and served 
his country in the war of 18 12. "Blessed are the peace- 
makers, for they shall inherit the earth." 

Wayt, J. B.; teamster; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 1849; settled 
in J. C. 1864. Methodist. This man is not interested in 
political matters, even in these times which try men's souls. 
We say, arise, and feed the great eagle, for he has flown 
across the great deep, that all the people might see the sal- 
vation of him who sitteth on the great white throne, and 
wields the sword of liberty. Then come out, Mr. Wayt, and 
help to wave the old flag of stars and stripes in the face of 
oppression. 

Williams, Rev. J. A.; minister of the Gospel of the Presbyterian 
faith; Edinburgh. Born in Mass. 1827; settled in J. C. 1872. 

Wetzel, V.; cooper; Edinburgh. Born in Germany 1822; set- 
tled in J. C. 1850. Dem. Presbyterian. 

WRIGHT, A. R.; harvester and farmer ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ind. 1847; settled in J. C. 1849. Re P- Christian. 

Wolfe, William ; carpenter; Edinburgh. Born in Ohio 1837; 
settled in J. C. 185 1. Rep. Methodist in faith. 

Wells, George; proprietor of saloon ; Edinburgh. Born in J. 
C. 1836. Inclined toward the Methodist persuasion. 

Wilber, & Co. ; proprietors of saddle, harness, and buggy shops; 
Edinburgh. 



BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 39 1 

WILLIAMS, C; farmer; Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 1814; 
settled in J. C. 1871. Dem. Been a member of United 
Brethren Church for twenty years, and still strong in the 
faith. Blessed will they be who hold out faithful to the 
end. 

Wilber, George ; of the firm of Wilber & Co. Born in New 
York 1844; settled in J. C. 1868. 

Winans, Lewis ; boot and shoemaker ; Edinburgh. Born in 
Ohio 1844; settled in J. C. 1857. Rep. Inclined to the 
Methodist belief. 

WOOD, C. E.; furniture finisher; Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
1852; settled in J. C. 1870. Roman Catholic. 

Welch, John A.; telegraph operator ; Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1853; settled in J. C. 1865. R ep. Methodist. 

Wright, H. D.; proprietor saw-mill and lumber yard; Edin- 
burgh. Born in Ky. 1824 ; settled in J. C. 1833. Mr. 
Wright says he has run a saw-mill for twenty-five years and 
never found time to attend to political and religious mat- 
ters. We only wish to ask, where the end of the next 
twenty-five years will leave him. 

Wiegand, H.; chemist at grape sugar works; Edinburgh. Born 
in Germany 1848; settled in J. C. 1873. 

Warder, Jackson; farmer; 2 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ky. 
1839; settled in J. C. 1843. Rep. 

WILLIAMS, E. M.; farmer; 4m n Edinburgh. Born in Tenn. 
1832; settled in J. C. 1832. Rep. 

Willard, William; farmer; 4 m n Edinburgh. Born in Ind. 
1837; settled in J. C. 1864. Dem. M. Baptist. 



39 2 JOHNSON COUNTY. 



WHITE, THOMAS; book keeper at Edinburgh starch works; 
Edinburgh. Born in Ireland 1847; settled in J. C. 1861. 
Rep. 

Walker, Abner; farmer; 1 m w Edinburgh. Born in J. C. 
1835. Rep. Christian. 

Ward, Robert; clerk; Edinburgh. Born in Pa. 1837; settled 
in J. C. 185 1. Dem. 



PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE INDIANA STATE GRANGE. 



ARTICLE I. 
This Grange shall be known and distinguished as the "Indi- 
ana State Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry," and in all 
its acts shall be subject to the Constitution of the National 
Grange. 

ARTICLE II. 

The members of the State Grange shall be Masters and Past 
Masters of the Subordinate Granges of the State. 

ARTICLE III. 

This Grange shall hold regular annual meetings on the fourth 
Tuesday in November, at such place as the Grange may by 
vote decide. Special meetings may be called by the Master 
and Secretary, by giving written notice to each Subordinate 
Grange thirty days preceding, or by a vote of the Grange at a 
regular meeting. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Thirteen members shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business. 

ARTICLE V. 

It shall be the duty of the Master to open and preside at all 
meetings of the Grange, and in conjunction with the Secretary, 
call special meetings of the Grange. 



394 PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY. 

ARTICLE VI. 
The duties of the Lecturer shall be such as usually devolve 
upon that officer in a Subordinate Grange. 

ARTICLE VII. 

\ 

It shall be the duty of the Overseer to assist the Master in 
preserving order, and he shall preside over the Grange in the 
absence of the Master. In case of a vacancy of the office of 
Master he shall fill the same until the next annual meeting. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

It shall be the duty of the Steward to have the charge of the 
inner gate, and to preside over the Grange in the absence of the 
Master and Overseer. 

ARTICLE IX. 

The Assistant Steward shall assist the Steward in the perform- 
ance of his duties. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Secretary shall keep an accurate record of all the pro- 
ceedings of the Grange ; make out all necessary returns to the 
National Grange ; keep the accounts of the Subordinate Granges 
with the State Grange ; receive and pay over to the Treasurer 
all moneys, and take a receipt for the same. 

ARTICLE XI. 

It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all moneys 
from the hands of the Secretary, giving his receipt for the same ; 
to keep an accurate account thereof and pay them out on the 
order of the Master, with the consent of the Grange ; he shall 
render a full account of his office at each annual meeting, and 
deliver to his successor in office all moneys, books, and papers 
pertaining to his office, and he shall give bonds in a sufficient 
amount to secure the money that may be placed in his hands, 
subject to the approval of the State Grange. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE INDIANA STATE GRANGE. 395 

ARTICLE XII. 
It shall be the duty of the Gate Keeper to see that the gates 
are properly guarded. 

ARTICLE XIII. 
All elections shall be by ballot, and a majority vote elects. 

ARTICLE XIV. 

All Committees, unless otherwise ordered, shall consist of 
three members, and shall be appointed as follows : two mem- 
bers by the Master and one by the Overseer. 

ARTICLE XV. 

At the regular annual meeting a Committee on Finance shall 
be appointed, whose duty it shall be to audit all accounts pre- 
vious to their being paid. To them shall be referred the reports 
of the Secretary and Treasurer for examination. 

ARTICLE XVI. 

At the first annual meeting six members shall be elected by 
ballot, three of whom shall hold their office for two years, and 
three for one year, their several terms of service to be deter- 
mined by lot ; and at each annual session thereafter, there shall 
be chosen three members of said committee who shall take the 
place of the retiring members. The duties of this committee 
shall be confined to business, and in the recess of the Grange 
they may suggest or adopt such regulations as may seem neces- 
sary and expedient for the welfare of the Order. 

ARTICLE XVII. 
The annual year of this and Subordinate Granges shall com- 
mence on the 1st day of January and end on the last day of 
December of each year. 

ARTICLE XVIII. 

The Secretary shall see that the quarterly dues of Subordinate 
Granges are promptly paid, and in case the dues remain delin- 



39^ PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY. 

quent two quarters, the delinquent Grange shall be reported to 
the Master of the State Grange. On receiving such notice it 
shall be' the duty of the Master to warn the delinquent Grange, 
and if the dues are not forwarded in thirty days it shall be the 
duty of the Master to revoke the charter of the delinquent 
Grange. 

ARTICLE XIX. 

Any Grange whose charter has thus been revoked may appeal 
to the State Grange at any regular meeting asking for reinstate- 
ment, and the State Grange shall have power to reinstate such 
Grange, subject to such penalty as may seem just. 

ARTICLE XX. 

In case a member of a Subordinate Grange wishes to transfer 
his or her membership to another Subordinate Grange, or with- 
draw his or her membership altogether, it may be done by a 
vote of the Grange of which he or she is a member, when, upon 
the payment of all dues, the Master and Secretary of the Grange 
shall give him or her a certificate that he or she is a member in 
good standing, and that in accordance with his or her wishes, 
the membership with that Grange has been dissolved. When ap- 
plying for membership in any other Subordinate Grange this 
certificate shall entitle him or her to be received therein upon a 
majority vote, without any further action on the part of the 
Grange to which he or she may unite. Such members, can, 
however, be expelled for cause, the same as any other member. 

ARTICLE XXI. 

There shall be appointed by the Master of the State Grange 
a sufficient number of Deputies, who are Masters or Past Mas- 
ters, whose duty it shall be to organize new Granges, on appli- 
cation having been made to them by those desiring such an or- 
ganization ; to install officers of Granges when the same have 
been elected, and shall be vigilant that no disorder shall obtain 



CONSTITUTION OF THE INDIANA STATE GRANGE. 397 

in Granges under their jurisdiction, and shall promptly report 
any such disorder to the Master. The jurisdiction of a Deputy 
shall be limited to the county in which he resides, except by 
special permit. Deputies shall receive, for organizing new 
Granges, their traveling expenses and five dollars additional for 
each day's service actually necessary for the work. The Depu- 
ties shall be appointed for two years, but shall be subject to re- 
moval for cause by the Master. No other Granges shall hereafter 
be recognized except those organized by Deputies appointed as 
herein specified, excepting only the Master and Secretary of this 
Grange. 

ARTICLE XXII. 

This Constitution may be amended or revised at any regular 
meeting of the Grange, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 



The Amendment proposed to the Constitution, June 8, 1866. 
ARTICLE XIV. 

Section i. All persons born or naturalized in the United 
States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the 
United States, and of the State wherein they reside. No State 
shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges 
or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any 
State deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due 
process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction 
the equal protection of the laws. 

Sec. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the 
several States according to their respective numbers, counting 
the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians 
not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the 
choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United 
States, Representatives in Congress, the executive and judicial 
officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is 
denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being 
twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in 
any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion or other 
crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the 
proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to 
the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in 
such State. 

Sec. 3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 399 

Congress, or Elector of President and Vice President, or hold 
any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under 
any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member 
of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a mem- 
ber of any State Legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer 
of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, 
shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, 
or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress 
may, by a vote of two thirds of each house, remove such disa- 
bility. 

Sec. 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, 
authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pen- 
sions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or re- 
bellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States 
nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred 
in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or 
any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave ; but all 
such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

Sec. 5. The Congress shall have power to enforce, by ap- 
propriate legislation, the provisions of this article. 

The amendment passed the Senate by a vote of 33 yeas to 1 1 
nays, and the House by a vote 138 yeas to 36 nays. 

ARTICLE XV. 

Sec. i. The right of citizens of the United States to vote 
shall not be denied or abridged by the United States, or by any 
State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servi- 
tude. 

Sec. 2. The, Congress shall have power to enforce this 
article by appropriate legislation. 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Declaration of Independence 3 

Constitution of the United States 9 

Constitution of Indiana 26 

Emancipation Proclamation 54 

Political Platforms 56 

Baxter Liquor Law 85 

Geological Items 93 

Philosophy 104 

Sketches of Astronomy 106 

Pay of Government Officers 114 

Religious 115 

Population of States and Territories 117 

Population of Principal Cities 117 

Male Inhabitants 118 

Vote of Each State 119 

Population of Indiana by Counties 120 

Population of Indiana Towns 121 

Sabbath Schools 125 

Recipes 127 

Preface 131 

Historical Sketch of Johnson County 133 

Franklin Township 143 

Clark Township 218 

Pleasant Township 232 

White River Township 273 

Union Township 294 

Hensley Township .'.... 316 

Nineveh Township 337 

Blue River Township 355 

Constitution Patrons of Husbandry 393 

Constitutional Amendments. 398 



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