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Full text of "Peoria city and county, Illinois; a record of settlement, organization, progress and achievement"

LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



S77.352 
R36p 



V.2 



I.H.S. 




PEORIA 

CITY AND COUNTY 

ILLINOIS 



A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and 

Achie\'ement 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1912 




EUGEXE F. BALDWIN 



Biographical 



b 



EUGENE F. BALDWIN. 

There is no struggle more continuous or more severe than that which is con- 
stantly transpiring in the wonderful operations which furnish men with news. 
The demand for live, honest and up-to-date news, is constantly increasing, but the 
supplv is dependent on many contingencies of which he must be a clear observer 
and accurate reasoner who measures. The revolution, too, in methods of busi- 
ness that has been witnessed even by the young men of this generation, lias had 
the effect of stranding many who could not conform to the new systems. The 
most successful editor or newspaper man today is he who is most comprehensive 
in his grasp of thought ; who perceives most clearly ; discriminates most keenly ; 
seizes on the right means and the right time most decisively ; and retains his 
eiiuanimity in situations most complex and difficult. The successful new^spaper 
man of todav must lie a man well versed in every line of culture, and must be 
able to estimate this culture truly and apply it properly. 

Such a man is Eugene F. lialdwin, veteran editor of I'eoria, Mr. ISaldwin has 
climbed the journalistic ladder from the bottom round, and has attained his present 
position in the newspaper world through his own individual eft'orts and by strict 
application and hard work, and has brought his paper, The i'eoria Evening Star, 
to a position of honor and distinction which it richly deserves. Air. Baldwin is 
more than a mere newspaper editor. He is a scholar and a gentleman. In the 
course of his long editorial career, he has acquired a .style that is classic, bril- 
liant, scintillating, with wit, scholarly and fluent with the ease of rare culture 
and learning. His success in the important department of journalism, against 
manv adverse influences, is truly creditable to his intelligence, enterprise and in- 
dustry. But his success is not simply individual in its results ; through the Peoria 
Star, he is aiding to advance all the interests of Peoria, advocating its institu- 
tions and enterprises, and helping to increase its wealth, and extend its propor- 
tions to that of a metropolitan city. 

^ Eugene F. Baldwin was born in Watertown, Connecticut, on December i, 
1840. His parents were Stephen and Julia ( Pardee) Baldwin. Stephen Baldwin 
was a deacon in the Congregational church, as was his father before, and the boy 
was brought up in strict Calvinistic principles, an early training which gave a 
distinct trend to his mind, and flavors his writings to the present day. The relig- 
ious influences of his early life were remarkably intense. The Bible was his 
daily reading, and his deep and detailed knowledge of the Book of Books is 
perhaps due to this early education in its beauties. Stephen Baldwin, the father 
of Eugene, was strongly religious in his tendencies, and being a builder by trade, 
conceived the idea that God had called him by Divine appointment to devote his 
energies exclusively to the building of churches. The mental food of the family 
consisted of Watt's Hymns, the Shorter Catechism, and Baxter's Saints' Rest. 
ilr. Eugene B.aldwin's keen mind absorbed this religious atmosphere, and it 
colored all his life and writings. 

Stephen Baldwin came west in 1855 and settled with his family in Milwaukee. 
Eugene was at this time of high-school age, and he attended the high school at 
Milwaukee. In i8(to he secured a position as teacher in Clinton county, Illinois, 
a situation which he gave up to enter the State Normal School at Bloomington, in 

5 



6 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

order better to tit himself for what he beheved at that time to be his hfe"s pro- 
fession. However, the next spring found him working at his carpenter's l)ench 
in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father had moved in the interval. In 1861, 
when the Civil war had commenced. Eugene Baldwin enlisted in the Twelfth 
Indiana X'olunteers. and served honorably and bravely until 1863, when after 
having been captured by the Confederates, and broken down physically, he was 
discharged as an invalid. In 1864, Air. Baldwin came to Chillicothe, Illinois, to 
take the position as principal of the schools there. He made such a success of 
this work that he was soon called to Peoria to take the head of the First Ward 
school there, \\hen a year later, he accepted the position as local editor of the 
Peoria Transcript, his long newspaper career began. After serving four years in 
this capacity, he resigned, and went to El Paso, Illinois, where he bought the El 
Paso Journal. The next year, however, he returned to Peoria, and in partnership 
WMth Mr. A. R. Sheldon established the Peoria Review, which remained in ex- 
istence but three years. There followed a short experience as editor of the Rock 
Island Union, after which Mr. Baldwin again purchased the El Paso Journal. 
In 1877, with Mr. J. B. Barnes as a partner, he came to Peoria and established 
the Peoria Journal, which is today one of the leading newspapers of the city. 

In 1891, Mr. Baldwin left the newspaper world, and associated himself with 
Charles H. Powell in the Sylvan Remedy Company, dealing in patent medicines. 
This venture proved disastrous financially, and when it failed entirely three 
years afterward, iMr. Baldwin went back to the business for which he was so 
uni<|uely fitted, and began the publication of the Peoria Star, the first issue ap- 
pearing September 27, 1897. Xeither Mr. Baldwin nor Mr. Powell, who was 
still associated with him. had at this time, any money. They bought the printing 
press on credit, and even foimd themselves unable to pay the freight when it was 
shipped down to them. In comparing the humble beginnings of flie Peoria Star 
of fifteen years, with the magnificent organ of weight and influence to which it 
has grown, we can but be struck with the commanding force of energetic per- 
severance in a worthy cause. Mr. Baldwin was then, as he is now. a forceful, 
aggressive, earnest man, and in those fifteen years has demonstrated the advan- 
tages of the city he has made his home, and abundantly verified the good opinions 
of his many friends. He has always kept abreast of the times, and in his en- 
thusiastic pursuit of his business is often in advance and always read}' to meet 
the demands of this rapid age of improvement. He is a man of progressive 
ideas, has been successful in his business and has proved his ability as a manager 
of an enterprise which calls for intelligence, tact and skill. He has long been one 
of Peoria's energetic and enterprising citizens. He has brought the Peoria Star, 
from its precarious Iieginning to a position in the journalistic world which makes 
it one of the most weighty and influential newspapers in the city today. 

Mr. Baldwin is now sole owner of the paper, and acts as its editor. His 
editorial remarks are read eagerly every day. for their clear, concise and pointed 
expositions of the current affairs of the day. In addition to the editorials, the 
Sunday issue of the Star contains a page from the pen of Mr. Baldwin, called 
The Philosopher. In this page, Mr. Baldwin has an organ for the expounding 
of his views on science, religion, current events, and all the various and manifold 
influences which make up the world. It is always a page of the most profound, 
cultured and scholarly philosophy, written in the pointed, witty, telling style, 
which is Mr. Baldwin's own. This Sunday page has earned for its author, a 
reputation which extends far beyond local limits. 

■Mr. Baldwin's style is strong and forcible, clear in expression, and of com- 
manding purity of English. Mr. Baldwin himself is public-spirited, without 
being partisan : charitable without ostentation : enterprising, but careful : imbued 
with high religious principles, always accomplishing remarkable results with 
quiet power. 




WILLIAM HAZZAKl) 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 7 

On April 2t,. 1866, Air. Baldwin was married to ]\Iiss Sarah J. Gove, and they 
became the paVents of three children: Ethel, deceased; Frank E., now a prom- 
inent physician and surgeon in Peoria; and Mildred, now living with her i)arents 
in their home at 211 North Perry avenue. 

For some time, Mr. Baldwin did considerable outside literary work, lie is 
the author of several jximphlets, one novel and a work on hypnotism. Of late 
years, however, he has given this up, devoting his outside time to lectures and 
speeches for which lie is in great demand on account of his eloquent lucidity of 
thought. He was also one of the promoters and builders of the Grand Opera 
House, which building housed for twenty years the most exclusive and high-class 
amusements in the city until it was burned' down a few years ago. 

Mr. Baldwin is ntnv in the sevent3'-second year of his age. He is in the full 
vigor and strength of manhood with all his faculties unimpaired. Almost his 
entire life has been directed to the study and betterment of journalism in his 
city. He is most industrious in his pursuit of his business and his breadth of 
learning corresponds to the laI)ors he performs. As a thorough, sound and deep- 
read writer he occupies a position in the first ranks of his brethren. Clear and dis- 
tinct, always logical, with a full command of language, earnest and of strong 
convictions, he never fails to impress his audience with the justice of the cause 
he pleads. He is noted for his aptitude in grappling with details, and for his 
accurate and keen perception and judgment. Fearless, impulsive and frank to 
a degree, what he thinks, he says, and says it hard. He indulges in no prelimi- 
naries, but strikes straight from the shoulder. Perhaps the most obvious, if not 
the strongest trait of Mr. Baldwin's character is his intense individuality. No 
one who has ever met him can mistake anyone else for him, or him for anyone 
else. He is known as a forceful man whose strong and well-balanced views have 
enabled him to accomplish what he has undertaken and gain considerable prestige 
as a journalist, and his reputation for ability is of the very best. He is a man of 
strong presence, with a determined will and a kindly manner which carries every- 
thing Ijefore it : a sound, enterprising, clear-headed benevolent and versatile man, 
and Peoria is constantly the gainer by his remarkable abilities. 

In social life he is universally respected and esteemed by all classes of our 
citizens. In the large circle of his acquaintances he forms his opinions of men 
regardless of worldly wealth and position. He has labored, and not in vain, for 
the welfare of the city, and enjoys in a marked degree that reward of the pro- 
gressive, upright citizen, the respect and confidence of his fellowmen. He bears 
the burden of his years lightly, and shows but few traces of the cares and per- 
plexities inseparable from an active, busy life. 



WILLIAM HAZZARD. 



William Hazzard is well known in financial circles as the cashier of the Com- 
mercial German National P.ank, to which position he has attained by advance- 
ment through intermediate positions from that of messenger. Ability and faith- 
fulness have led to his continuous progress and he is recognized as a keen, prac- 
tical business man. His birth occurred in Peoria in 1869, his father being 
Joseph F. Hazzard, who was also a native of Peoria, born in 1843. After ac- 
quiring his education in the public schools of this city, the father engaged in the 
contracting and building business with his father, James Hazzard, who came to 
Peoria in 1840 as one of the pioneer residents of the city and spent the re- 
mainder of his life here in the contracting business. The name of Hazzard has 
ever stood as a synonym for business activity, enterprise and reliability in Peoria. 
During the past thirty years Joseph F. Hazzard has been in the government em- 
ploy in connection with the internal revenue office. He married Miss Louisa 



8 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

A. Phenix, who came to Peoria from the south with her father, Leander Phenix, 
who spent the greater part of his life in this city. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
F. Hazzard four chikh"en have heen born : Florence, who is the wife of John Lloyd, 
of Los Angeles, California; Charles, a resident of Xew York city; Alary, of 
New York ; and William. 

The latter spent his youth as do most boys, dividing his time between the 
work of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and such tasks as were 
assigned him by parental authority. When he had graduated from the high 
school as a member of the class of 1888 he entered the office of Stevens, Lee & 
Horton, with whom he studied law until April. i88g. Thinking, however, that 
activity in the financial world would prove more congenial than law practice, 
he accepted a position as messenger in the Commercial German National Bank, 
when about twenty years of age, and since that time has worked his way steadily 
upward by reason of his close application, ready mastery of tasks assigned him and 
his indefatigable industry. He served as bookkeeper from 1892 until 1899 and was 
afterward exchange and collection clerk for two years. In 1901 he was made 
assistant cashier and in Alay, 191 1, was chosen cashier to succeed E. A. Cole. 
Thus practically his entire business career has been spent in connection with the 
Commercial German National Bank and his activity has contributed in no small 
measure to its success. 

In Peoria, in 1894, Mr. Plazzard was united in marriage to Miss Lona R. 
Evans, a sister of Willis Evans, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
volume. They are the parents of three children : Lowell B., Lucia and Martha 
E. The parents attend and hold membership in the Alethodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. Hazzard is preeminently a home man, taking no active part in club life, yet 
is greatly interested in the welfare of his city and cooperates in measures and 
movements for its growth and progress. In quiet devotion to his duties he has 
won the respect and confidence of his fellowmen who name him as one of the 
representative citizens of Peoria. 



CHARLES R. WHEELER. 

Honored and respected by all, there is no man who occupies a more enviable 
position in the business and financial circles of Peoria than Charles R. Wheeler, 
the president of the First National Bank. It has not been his success alone that 
has placed him in high regard but rather the straightforward business policy 
which he has ever followed and the utilization of methods which never seek nor 
require disguise. He has been a resident of this city since 185 1, coming here 
when a youth of ten years. His birth occurred on a farm near Kenton, Hardin 
county, Ohio. January 22, 1841, his parents being H. N. and Matilda (McCoy) 
Wheeler. The father was born in Scioto county, Ohio, in 181 1, and his parents 
were .Amos and Elizabeth ( Snow ) Wheeler, the former of Wheelersburg, Ohio, 
and the latter a native of Connecticut. When eleven years of age H. N. Wlieeler 
left his native county and removed with his parents to Monroe county, Ohio, 
where he resided until sixteen years of age, when upon the death of his father 
he went Burlington, where he completed his education. Five years were thus 
passed, after which he returned to Marion county and soon afterward embarked 
in merchandising, in which he continued until 1851. That year witnessed his 
arrival in Peoria. Some years before — in 1837 — H. N. Wheeler was married in 
Hardin county, Ohio, to Aliss Matilda McCoy, a native of Putnam. Muskingum 
county, that state. Following his arrival in Peoria he opened a wholesale grocery 
house under the firm style of Wheeler, Sloan & Company, and continued in the 
business for five or six years, after which he sold out. For many years he was 
engaged in the real-estate and banking business, in which connection he gained 





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CHARLES i;. W'llKKI.KI! 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COLWTY U 

prominent recognition as a leading business man of that city. For several _vears 
he was a director in the Second National liank, becoming a memi^er of its first 
board, but resigned that ])osition upon his election in January, 1866, to the presi- 
dency of the Mechanics National Bank. He remained at the head of that insti- 
tution for many years and succeeded in establishing it upon a safe, substantial 
basis, making it one of the leading financial institutions of the city. In 1879 he 
was elected to the presidency of the Chamber of Commerce of Peoria and was 
also treasurer of the Peoria Mercantile Library Association, being the first in- 
cumbent of that office. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church 
and much of his time and thought was devoted to furthering its interests. In 
business afl:"airs his plans were well formulated and carefully executed so that he 
carried forward to successful completion whatever he undertook. Death came 
to him in 1884 and his wife passed away two years later. 

Charles R. Wheeler supplemented his public-school education by study in 
Antioch College at Yellow Sjjrings, Ohio, after which he returned to Peoria 
to enter u]5on his business career. He joined his brother, P. C. Wheeler, in the 
conduct of a wholesale grocery business and was also a partner in the llarker & 
\\'heeler Drug Company until he disposed of his interests in that enterprise in 
1910. His identification with the First National Bank dates from the ist of 
January, 1896, when he was called to the vice presidency of the institution. He 
served as its second executive officer for ten years and upon the death of John C. 
Proctor in 1906 was elected to the presidency. Recognizing the fact that the 
liank is most prosperous which most carefully safeguards the interests of its de- 
positors, he has been most watchful in making investments and loans and has thus 
protected the interests of the institution and its clients. He has made a thorough 
study of the banking business in its various phases and his capability enables him 
to find ready solution for intricate financial problems. 

In 1870 Mr. Wheeler was united in marriage to Miss N. J. Williams, of 
Marion, Ohio, and unto them has been born a son, Charles N., who is now secre- 
tary of the S])ringdale Cemetery Association. The family is very prominent 
sociallv and Mr. Wheeler belongs to the Creve Coeur Club and to the Country 
Cluli. His friends find him a most congenial and entertaining companion and the 
social cjualities of his nature constitute an even balance with his s])len(iid business 
abilitv. Ikisiness has been his foremost interest and yet he has not allowed it to 
preclude his activity along other lines and especially in matters of citizenship he 
stands ready to aid and further any project for the general good. 



JOSEPH V. GRAFF. 



Joseph \'. Graff, lawyer and lawmaker, in whose congressional record there 
is no esoteric phase and whose work has constituted a valuable contribution to va- 
rious lines of progress, was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, July i, 1834. He comes 
of German and Scotch-English ancestry. His paternal great-grandparents were 
natives of Germany and on coming to America settled at Brownsville, Pennsyl- 
vania. There the birth of Jacob K. Graff, the father of Joseph Y. Graff, oc- 
curred. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Mary Jane Miller, was a 
native of Ohio and was of Scotch-English lineage. The family home was es- 
tablished in Terre Haute. Indiana, and at the usual age Joseph W Graft' entered 
the public schools, in which he passed through the consecutive grades to his 
graduation from the high school. His more advanced literary course was pur- 
sued in Wabash College at Crawfordsville, Indiana, but in 1873 he became 
a resident of Illinois, settling first at Delavan, where he became interested in 
merchandising in connection with his brother and brother-in-law. His desire, 
however, was to enter upon a professional career and he devoted his evenings 



12 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

and other leisure hours to the mastery of the principles of jurisprudence, his 
progress being such that in 1879 he was able to pass an examination that won 
him admission to the bar. 

Mr. Graii' at once entered upon the active practice of law in Delavan, where 
he remained until 1883, when he removed to Nebraska. During that period he 
was for one year a partner of W. R. Curran. He remained in the west for two 
years and then returned to Illinois, opening an office at Pekin, Tazewell county, 
where he remained alone in practice until 1894. He then entered into practice 
with Judge George C. Rider and was thus engaged until his removal to Peoria 
in 1899. In this city he became a partner of Lyman J. Carlock, their relation, 
however, being terminated when Mr. Graff was instrumental in securing the ap- 
pointment of his partner to the position of one of the United States judges in the 
Philippine Islands. Mr. Graft' was then joined bv C. \'. Miles, under the firm 
style of Graff & Miles. 

Until 1891 Mr. Graff never had held public office but in that year was elected 
one of the inspectors of schools for the city of Pekin and was made president 
of the board of education. He continued in that position until his nomination for 
congress. His political record is characterized by a devotion to duty that none 
has questioned. He has ever placed patriotism before partisanship and the 
public welfare before personal aggrandizement, and his election was a tribute 
to his personal worth and the confidence reposed in him. During the period of 
democratic rule in the state legislature, under the administration of Governor 
Altgeld, the state was redistricted that the election of democratic candidates for 
congress might be more sure. The counties of Putnam, Marshall, Peoria, Fulton 
and Mason were placed in one district, which was supposed to have a democratic 
majority of at least twenty-two hundred. So confident were the democratic 
leaders of victory that one strong democratic county was given to another dis- 
trict to make it more sure. In 1894 was held the first nomination after the re- 
districting was done and Hon. George O. Barnes, of Lacon, was made the dem- 
ocratic standard bearer, while the republicans chose Joseph \'. Graff as their 
candidate. The election that followed was a surprise to the democratic leaders 
throughout the state, for Mr. Graft" won by a majority of thirty-three hundred. 
That his first term's service won the commendation and approval of the gen- 
eral public is indicated in the fact that for three successive terms he was re- 
nominated by acclamation and reelected by a decisive majority. He became an 
active working member of the house, connected with much constructive legis- 
lation. He never gave his support to any measure without carefullv informing 
himself concerning its salient points and its possibilities for eft'ectiveness. He 
was made chairman of the committee on claims, which has jurisdiction over 
every claim presented against the government, with the exception of war claims. 
He was made a member of the committee on agriculture. His most important 
work was six years' service on the committee on appropriations, where as a 
member of the sub-committee of five, he had to do with the fortification appro- 
priations of the country, which amounted to from eight to fifteen million per 
year. Afterward he was added to the sub-committee having charge of all de- 
partment employes of the government. He was the only member from this 
part of Illinois who ever served upon the appropriation committee of Congress, 
which has no rival in importance in that body. 

His work in behalf of the Civil war veterans won him the gratitude and 
thanks of all the "boys in blue." He interested himself in the river and harbor 
bills, which were before congress during the session of 1900-1 and led to an 
appropriation of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars for the survev of the 
Illinois and Desplaines rivers from the lower end of the Chicago drainaoe canal 
with the view of deepening the same and giving a deep waterway from the lakes 
to the gulf. The bill, however, was defeated. The republican convention for 
the new sixteenth congressional district met in Peoria, Mav 5. 1902, and by 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 13 

unanimous vote, Mr. Graff was tendered the reelection to congress, being thus 
nominated for the fourth consecutive term by acclamation — a record that is 
almost without parallel in the political history of the state. He served in con- 
gress from the tifty-fourth to the sixty-first general assemblies, his term ex])iring 
March 4, 191 1. Over the record of his political activity there falls no shadow of 
wrong or suspicion of evil. He has been loyal to his principles and his promises, 
sans peur and sans reproclie. 

Air. Graff is a valued member of se\eral fraternal organizations. He belongs 
to the ]\Iasonic Lodge, the Modern Woodmen CamiJ. the Union \'eterans' Union 
and the Sons of \'eterans Camp. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. It is well known that his cooperation can be counted ujjon wherever 
matters of pulilic welfare are involved. Advancement and improvement con- 
stitute the keynote of his character and have been manifest in his professional 
career, in his political service and in his private life. Since his retirement from 
congress he has entered upon the general practice of law at Peoria and in addition 
is the vice president and a director of the First National Bank of East Peoria. 
His was an extended congressional service and the record of none has been 
more faultless in manner, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation. 



HENRY WIIITCOMB LYNCH. 

Henry W. Lynch is prominently before the public in Peoria at the present 
time as postmaster of the city and yet long before entering upon the duties of 
this position he has been known as a representative and valued citizen because 
of the extent and importance of his business connections. He is one of the fore- 
most representatives of the coal trade-in the central part of the state, conducting 
his sales along wholesale lines while at the same time he is interested as an 
owner in various coal mining properties of this state and of Indiana. His birth 
occurred in Magnolia, Putnam county, Illinois, on the 26th of July, 1857, his 
parents being Jesse and Harriet (W'hitcomb) Lynch, the former a native of 
New York and the latter of Michigan. The son entered the public schools of his 
native county and after mastering the branches of learning therein taught, con- 
tinued his education in the University of Illinois, where he spent two year's. 
Turning his attention to the profession of teaching, he took charge of a school 
south of Chenoa and later accepted a clerkshi]) in a grain elevator at Ballard. 
Afterward he became connected with the railroad service as an employe of the 
Toledo, Peoria, Warsaw & Western Railway Company, acting as agent at Shel- 
don, Illinois, from 1881 until 1888. 

On the 1st of February of the latter year Mr. Lynch came to Peoria where 
he has since made his home and entered business circles here as manager of a 
coal company that was operating extensively in central Illinois. He has been 
engaged in business on his own account since 1894 and in the intervening period 
his course has been characterized by continuous progress resulting from the 
wise and judicial use of time, talents and ojiportunities. He has been a leading 
factor in the development of the coal trade in this and adjoining states, eventually 
becoming one of the most extensive operators in Illinois. He handles the product 
of various mines of the middle west and in a number of these is largely inter- 
ested financially. He has studied the trade and its possibilities, has bent his 
energies to the mastery of every problem connected therewith and in this way 
has advanced to a position of leadershij) in his chosen field. 

As previously stated, however, Air. Lynch is also well known because of the 
service which he is now rendering to the public in office. In politics he has ever 
been a stalwart and earnest but conservative republican and his opinions have 
carried weight in the local councils of his ])arly. He was first called to office in 



14 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

1895 when elected alderman from the old first ward and his first term's service 
received commendation and approval in his reelection in 1897. Further indorse- 
ment of his record as councilman came to him in his election to the office of 
mayor in 1899 and to the city he gave a Inisinesslike, practical and progressive 
administration. In njoCt he was again called from private life to public office 
in his appointment as postmaster of Peoria, to which he was reappointed on the 
expiration of his four years' term. The local press said of him : "As alderman, 
mayor and ])ostmaster his official course has been marked by the same earnest 
qualities that have made him a successful business man. He has alwavs en- 
deavored in an official capacity to perform his duties in the interest of the public 
welfare and in this his sterling integrity and his capabilities have made him a 
valued public official." Neither is Mr. Lynch unknown in the financial field for 
he figures in local banking circles as the vice president of the Central National 
Bank. 

On the 24th of July, 1884. Mr. Lynch was united in marriage at Oxford, 
Indiana, to Miss Frances M. Baldwin, a daughter of Ira and Phoebe Baldwin, 
and unto them have been liorn two sons. Ralph A. and Harold \V., both vet at 
home. The family attend the Congregational church in which Mr. Lynch holds 
membership, and he belongs also to several fraternal organizations including 
the Masonic. Knights of Pythias. Woodmen and Maccabee lodges. He is a mem- 
ber of Illinois Lodge No. 263. F. & A. M., the chapter, commandery and the 
Scottish Rite. He is likewise a member of the Creve Coeur and Countrv Clubs. 
In business and social circles he stands equally high. He is a man of 
firm purpose, dependable under all circumstances and in any emergency. His 
quietude of deportment, his easy dignity, his frankness and cordiality of address, 
with the total absence of anything sinister or anything to conceal, foretoken a 
man who is ready to meet any obligation of life with the confidence and courage 
that come of conscious personal ability, right conception of things and an habit- 
ual regard for what is best in the exercise of human acitvities. 



EDWARD N. WOODRUFF. 

Firm of purpose, progressive in spirit and with notable conception of the 
duties, obligations and opportunities of citizenship, Edward N. Woodruff well 
merits the honor which has come to him in a third election to the office of mayor 
of Peoria. .Moreover, his life record stands in contradistinction to the old adage 
that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country, for he is a native 
son of the city which has three times called him to serve as its chief executive. 
There are those who address him in terms of familiarity which indicate long 
acf|uaintance from boyhood days ; there are those who greet him with the dignity 
that seems to be a part of his office, but both entertain for him the resjiect which 
is given in recognition of individual character and of fidelity to principle. 

His father. Nelson L. Woodruff, was one of the pioneer residents of Peoria, 
arriving in this city in 1834. He was born in Chenango, New York. May 24. 
1818, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Woodruff, who on coming to this 
state, settled upon a farm and aided in the early agricultural development of their 
district. Nelson L. Woodruff' at the time of the removal was a youth of sixteen 
years. He continued to reside upon and assist in the cultivation of the old home 
farm until he had reached his majority, when he began learning the cooper's 
trade, which he followed for some time. He afterward built the first canal boat 
used on the Illinois canal and named it Fort Clark. In 1855 he turned his at- 
tention to the ice business, in which he continued successfully for almost a quar- 
ter of a century, enjoying a large trade in the handling of the output to the time 
of his death, which occurred October 23. 1879. His wife afterward took up the 



HISTORY OF I'EORIA COUNTY 17 

management of the business, which later was turned over to tlieir son. Edward. 
Mrs. W oodruft' had become a resident of Peoria in 1835. She bore the maiden 
name of Mary A. Monroe and was born in Luzerne county, I'ennsylvania. Jan- 
uary I, 1826, her parents being Samuel and Eois (Brown) ?\lonroe, who were also 
natives of the Keystone state. It was on the 15th of October, 1846, that she 
gave her hand in marriage to Nelson L. Woodruff, and unto them were born six 
children, of whom two are living, the daughter being Mrs. Harriet Emerson, 
wife of George Emerson, of Peoria. The parents were consistent members of 
the First Baptist church and the father was a republican in his political views. 

At the usual age Edward N. Woodruff entered the public schools and jiur- 
sued his studies in consecutive grades vmtil he was graduated from the high 
school. A year thereafter was devoted to range riding in New Mexico, and dif- 
ferent lines of business claimed his attention at various periods but in early man- 
hood he settled down to the management of the ice business which his father had 
established. Progressive methods constituted his control of this undertaking, 
as was manifest in the fact that he later erected a modern ice plant, equipped 
with the latest improved machinery, its location being at No. 1122 South 
Adams street. Mr. Woodruff" is still at the head of this business, wdiich has 
now grown to extensive proportions and is a source of gratifying revenue. 
Into other fields of activity he has extended his efforts and is now a director 
of the Peoria Life Insurance Company and vice president of the Peoria Tent & 
Awning Company. He is likewise the president of the Ice Dealers Association 
of the state, formed to further the interests of those connected with the trade. 

Mr. Woodruff has followed in the political as well as the business footsteps 
of his father, for his mature judgment has indorsed the principles of the repuljli- 
can party and its ]:>olicy. 

Of him it has been said: "The same elementary constituents in the composi- 
tion of E. N. Woodruff that made him a good Ijusiness man have made him a 
good politician, and more." He is not a political leader in the ordinary sense of 
the term, for he employs party organization only as a means to an end and yet 
manifests those ciualities which in a wider sphere constitute the statesman. He 
is essentially a student of municipal affairs and gives much thought, consideration 
and study to questions relative to city government. While he holds to high 
ideals, his methods are practical and even the bitterness of partisan politics can- 
not o'ercloud the service which he has rendered in behalf of progress, reform 
and improvement. He was first called to the office of alderman, representing 
the first ward for two terms. In 1903 he was called to the mayoralty and retired 
at the close of that term. A careful reflection concerning the work of his ad- 
ministration led to his selection again as a candidate in 1909. The people 
indorsed the choice of the party delegates and once more he was elected and again 
in 191 1. One of the local papers said concerning his reelection in April, 1910, 
that it came "after a severe criticism of his previous administration and a cam- 
paign for a commission form of city government in which his administration was 
mercilessly reviewed, and yet wdien the heat of party passion and civic criticism 
had spent its force, the fact remained that the administration of Mr. Woodruff' 
had been sound and just and he was reelected by a majority of over fifteen 
hundred. A greater comjiliment was never \)a'\<\ a luayor of tlie city of Peoria. 
It was a vote of confidence and his present term would show that this confidence 
was not misplaced. Mayor Woodruff is a man with a brain and a sense of justice ; 
with administrative power to plan much for the city's good and the executive 
will to carry his plans into effect. Elected twice an alderman and three times 
as mayor, attests the f|ualities not of a politician but of a man with high ideals 
as a public oflicer and these have been duly recognized and will continue to be 
recognized as the years roll on." Many tangible evidences of Mr. Woodruff's 
loyalty to the city's welfare can be given. He has made many pul)lic improve- 
ments and while never countenancing needless expenditure, he has not believed 



18 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

in retrenchment at the sacrilice of ]3rogressiveness, and has sought the city's ad- 
vancement along all possiljle lines. During his administration about eighteen 
miles of paving has been laid on the east side in two years and twenty miles 
of cement sidewalk. A bridge proposition has been put through, planning for 
a bridge across the river, which will be of great benefit to the city. His plans 
have made it possible and he has promised the settlement of difficulties between 
the citizens and the water company by a direct vote of the people. He also sub- 
mitted the bridge referendum to the vote of the people and has introduced many 
im])rovements in the police and fire departments, including civil service reform. 

In Peoria, in 1888, Mr. Woodruff was united in marriage to Miss .Anna 
Smith, a daughter of Gottlieb Smith, an early settler of Peoria, who resided here 
for many years, and they have one child, Mary Monroe. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. \^^oodruff is a thirty-second degree Mason and 
a Shriner, and he is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the llenevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He earlv learned the lesson that life means more than pleasure and has a deeper, 
broader purpose than activity for the benefit of self alone. He has therefore 
made an effort to render his career a serviceable one in the world's work and his 
fellow townsmen attest and appreciate the fact that he has done so. 



B. FRANK BROWN. 



B. Frank Brown, founder of the Brown Printing Company and an official 
of various other local enterprises, is one of the successful business men of Peo- 
ria whose life should be an inspiration to every ambitious young man. as it 
clearly demonstrates what it is possible to achieve through the intelligent ap- 
plication of intense energy. Mr. Brown is not only prominently connected 
with the manufacturing and industrial interests of the city but he is actively 
identified with political affairs, having for some years been a member of the 
board of aldermen. He was born in \\'ashington, Illinois, on the i8th of Sep- 
tember, 1866, and is a son of Adam and Salome Brown. The father is one of 
the foremost citizens of El Paso, this state, where he has been engaged in car- 
riage building for more than thirty years. He is a republican in his political 
views and has been a member of the town council during a part of his residence 
there. Originally the Brown family came from Pennsylvania and they are of 
Dutch extraction, but they have long been residents of Illinois. 

The education of B. Frank Brown was obtained in the public schools of El 
Paso, which he attended until he was fourteen years of age. He then laid aside 
his text-books to become a clerk in the postoffice. He subsequently apprenticed 
himself for three years to the jewelrv business and after the expiration of his 
period of service worked for several years as journeyman watchmaker in the 
states of Illinois, Kansas, Nevada and California. \Miile employed in the lat- 
ter state he learned how to make rubber stamps from the man with whom he 
worked at the bench. Upon his return to Illinois he located in Peoria and bor- 
rowing sevent)'-five dollars engaged in the manufacture of rubber stamps. He 
engaged in this enterprise with intense enthusiasm and an abundance of energy, 
determining to make it a success. He did his work thoroughly, delivered his 
orders promptly and took infinite pains to satisfy his patrons, and as a result his 
trade increased rapidly and he was subsequently able to extend the scope of his 
activities bv adding a job printing department. This likewise proved to be very 
remunerative and he later engaged in book binding also, and during the inter- 
vening years the business has developed until it is now the largest concern of the 
kind in the state outside of Chicago. As his business has prospered, ^Ir. Brown 
has extended his interests in various directions and is financiallv interested in 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 19 

several thriving enterprises of the city. He is secretary and treasurer ol Ihe 
Peoria Bulletin Company located at 201 and 203 South Washington street, and is 
secretary of The -Smith-Brown Tent & Awning Company, located at 107 South 
\\'ashington avenue, and treasurer of The Saratoga Cigar Stores Company. 

In this city on the ist of June, 1887, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to 
]\Iiss Adah Prince, a daughter of :\Irs. Cordelia Prince, and to them have i)ccn 
horn two children: Chauncey, who is superintendent of the monotype de])art- 
ment of the Brown Printing Company; and \'era, who died in i88g at the 
age of fourteen months and is buried at Washington, Illinois. The family home 
is located at 518 Bryan street, where they have a very pleasant and comfortable 
residence. 

Mr. Brown is a Knight Templar and a member of the Shrine. He is attihated 
with the Knights of Pvthias. the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while his connection with organizations of 
a more purelv social nature is confined to his membership in the Crevc Coeur 
Club. ^Ir. Brown votes the republican ticket and is now serving his second 
term as alderman from the third ward. He manifests the same qualities in the 
discharge of his public duties as characterize him in his business transactions, 
and as a result has proven to be a highly satisfactory and efficient official. He 
possesses an intense capacity for work, pronounced executive ability and unusual 
powers of organization, which qualities have been dominant factors in his career. 



BENJAMIN LANGFORD TODD BOURLAND. 

Among those who are operating in real estate in Peoria Benjamin Langford 
Todd Bourland is well known and it would be difficult to find one who has a 
wider acquaintance with realty values or who has conducted more important ne- 
gotiations over the exchange of property here. He was born in Trigg county, 
Kentucky. October 10, 1825, a son of Andrew and Damaris (Reese) Bourland, 
both of whom were natives of South Carolina. His great-grandfather, John 
Bourland, was born in the north of Ireland and early in life sought the oppor- 
tunities oflrered by the new world, establishing his home in South Carolina. In 
that state occurred the birth of his son, the Rev. John Bourland, who, on attain- 
ing his majority, there married Miss Mary Loving, also a native of that state. 
On the maternal side Benjamin L. T. Bourland comes of ancestry established in 
South Carolina in colonial days. One of his great-grandfathers was Bayless 
Earle, whose wife lived to the age of one hundred and four years. Their daugh- 
ter, Nancy Earle, became the wife of John Reese, also a native of South Caro- 
lina, and they were the jxirents of Damaris Reese, who became the wife of An- 
drew Bourland. It was in the year 1834 that Andrew Bourland removed with 
his family to Illinois, settling in Perry county, where they remained until 1836. 
In that year a removal was made to \'andalia, which was then the capital of the 
state, and in 1840 when the capital was removed to Springfield, Mr. Bourland 
became a resident of that city. In May. 1844, he became a resident of Chicago, 
and the year 1847 witnessed his arrival in Peoria, which became his place of per- 
manent abode. 

In the meantime Benjamin L. T. Bourland had been attending the public 
schools in the different localities where the family resided and for a time was a 
student in an academy at -Springfield. He was also employed for a period in the 
office of the Hon. Alexander P. Field, secretary of state, and after going to Chi- 
cago he had his first experience in the real-estate business with Ogden, Jones & 
Company. On coming to Peoria l>e continued in the same line of business in 
company with William R. Phelps, adding thereto a banking and loan business. 
During his residence in Peoria, covering a period of sixty-five years, he has been 



20 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

identiticd with various banking enterprises and in addition has conducted some 
of the most important real-estate operations in the history of the city. He has 
always kept well informed concerning property values and has therefore been 
enabled to negotiate important realty transfers beneficial alike to his clients and 
to himself. At the present time he is engaged in the real-estate and loan business 
as senior member of the firm of Bourland & Bailey. They have large and com- 
modious offices in the new Dime Savings Bank building and have an extensive 
clientele which indicates that the business is one of the most important and ex- 
tensive of the kind in the city. 

Mr. Bourland has been twice married. On the 20th of November, 1849 he 
wedded Julia M. Preston, of St. Louis, Missouri, and on the 17th of January, 
1869, Clara Parsons, of Chicago, became his wife. By the first marriage there 
were born two sons, Ogden Phelps and Rudolphus Rouse. The children of the 
second marriage were six in number, four sons and two daughters. Benjamin 
Parsons, Caroline Brown, Elsie Parsons, Norman T., Philip D. and Robert C. 

In religious belief Mr. Bourland is a Unitarian and in politics he is a demo- 
crat. He has always been a broad and liberal-minded man, interested in life, its 
purposes and its activities and seeking ever to benefit not only himself but others 
by his labors and his example. He enjoys an unassailable reputation for integ- 
rity and honor in business and his success is the merited reward of earnest labor 
and capable management. Mr. Bourland has now passed the eighty-sixth mile- 
stone on life's journey and is one of the venerable and honored residents of the 
city. He has been a witness of a greater part of the growth and development 
of the state. The leading events in its history are familiar to him not because 
he has read of them btit because he has lived through the period in which they 
occurred. There are few men today who can claim residence in \'andalia when 
it was the capital of the state. He has watched the marvelous growth of Chicago 
and almost equally wonderful development of the entire commonwealth. While 
he has not sought to figure prominently in public aiTairs he has ever been faith- 
ful to the duties that have come to him day by day and his worth as a citizen and 
business man has long been widely acknowledged. 



EDWARD C. LEISY. 



Edward C. Leisy is perhaps most widely known outside of Peoria as the 
president of the Leisy Brewing Company, but in the city his work has included 
not only the upbuilding of this mammoth enterprise but extended also to other 
fields whereby Peoria has largely profited. He is the builder of some of the 
finest structures of the city and has again and again shown his faith in Peoria 
by placing his investments in business projects here. His sound judgment and 
enterprise are forces which overcome difficulties and obstacles, and he has at 
all times been able to coordinate seemingly diverse elements into a unified and 
harmonious whole. 

'Mr. Leisy was born in Keokuk, Iowa, November 16, 1859, and, as the family 
name indicates, comes of German ancestry. The family record running back 
two hundred years in Germany shows that throughout this entire period repre- 
sentatives of the name have been connected with the brewing business, and their 
adaptability thereto comes largely to them through heredity. John Leisy, the 
father of Edward C. Leisy, left his native land to establish a home in America 
and resided for some time in Keokuk, Iowa, where he owned and operated a 
brewery. He was also at one time connected with the brewing business in 
Cleveland, Ohio, under the name of the Isaac Leisy Brewing Company. The 
thorough training which he received in Germany well qualified him for the suc- 
cessful conduct of the business after coming to the new world. When the 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 21 

family removed to I'eoria, Edward C. Leisy purchased the phint which is now 
conducted, in its enlarged state, under the name of the Leisy Brewing Company. 
It was in 1884 he purchased the Old City Brewery which had been established 
in 1849 and was the oldest in the city. In 1890 the Leisy Brewing Company 
was incorporated, prior to which time the business had been conducted under 
a partnership relation between Edward C. Leisy, who is now the president, 
Albert Leisy, secretary and treasurer ; John Leisy, vice president and (nistave 
Leisy, who at present is not connected with the business. These gentlemen are 
brothers and have continued in the line of trade which w-as the ancestral busi- 
ness of the family through many generations. When John Leisy, the father, 
came to the new world he brought with him between thirty-two and thirty-three 
thousand dollars in gold. He therefore had no diiificulty in establishing himself 
in business on this side of the Atlantic, and under his guidance his sons were 
trained to the work in which he had been so carefully reared. 

Edward C. Leisy s]5ent his youthful days under the parental roof and ac- 
quainted liimself with the business in his father's establishment. He has been 
identified with brewing interests in Peoria since the purchase, in 1884, of what 
is now the Leisy Brewery. From the beginning success has attended the under- 
taking here and the firm today does the largest brewing business in the state 
outside of Chicago, their plant having a capacity of two hundred and fifty 
thousand barrels annually. Their barrel and keg trade has been extended 
throughout the states of Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, while their bottle prod- 
ucts are shipped throughout the west to the Pacific coast, one firm in Los An- 
geles, California, handling nothing but the Leisy goods. To provide for their 
growing bottle trade the company, in 1910, erected at a cost of fifty thou- 
sand dollars, an extensive addition to their bottling plant, and equipped 
it with the latest improved machinery, including two machines which fill, 
cork and label ninety bottles a minute each. During the busy season this 
plant runs night and day and turns out over four hundred thousand bot- 
tles in the twenty-four hours. The beer is bottled from enameled stor- 
age tanks under government supervision in a two story brick building absol- 
utely fire proof. In shipments by the barrel and keg the business has 
reached a corresponding ratio, and the Leisy Brewing Company controls the 
biggest switching interest on the Rock Island track, distributing twenty-eight 
carloads daily. They employ three hundred and sixty people and pay out an- 
nually two hundred thousand dollars in salaries. For the accommodation of 
the trade in this city and agencies seventy-five wagons and one hundred and 
sixty horses are used. The plant is a most extensive one, including a number 
of buildings, and the business transacted each year approximates two million 
dollars. The upbuilding of this mammoth enterprise is due to Edward C. 
Leisy and his associates, and yet this does not cover the scope of his business 
activities. In many other connections Peoria has profited by the labors, enter- 
prise and ability of Mr. Leisy, who is a director of the Merchants National 
P)ank and also of the Home Savings and State Bank of Peoria. He is presi- 
dent of the Jefferson Deposit Company, ow-ner of the Jefiferson building, which 
is the finest and largest office building in the city, and a director of the new 
Jefifer.son hotel which has just been com])]eted and is the finest hotel in the 
state outside of Chicago. The Jefiferson l)uilding is a strictly modern steel 
structure twelve stories in height with attractive interior finishings and most 
modern equipment. Metal and marble have been used in the interior deco- 
ration and mosaic tiled floors. The building contains over four hundred stores 
and office rooms and is occupied by the Home Savings and State Banks, the 
Peoria Journal and many other of the leading business concerns of the city. 
It represents an investment of seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and 
stands as a perpetual monument of the enterprise of the man who erected it. 
After the destruction of the Grand Opera House by fire Edward C. Leisy and 



22 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

his Ijruthers began the erection of the Orpheuni Theater on ]\Iadison street, 
which was completed, equipped and furnished at a cost of two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars and will compare with the finest theatrical structures 
in the middle west. All this indicates how largely Edward C. Leisy has been 
identified with the improvement and upbuilding of the city and how impor- 
tant has been his work in its behalf. 

In 1893 Edward C. Leisy was united in marriage to Aliss Emma W'elte, of 
Peoria, a daughter of Ferdinand Welte, and they have four children, Florence, 
Lucile, Lena and Elizabeth. Mr. Leisy stands for all that is of general in- 
terest to the Peoria public and is now president and largely the financial backer 
of the Peoria Baseball Club. He belongs to the Schiller Lodge of Masons and 
to the Redman Camp and is also a member of the Creve Coeur and the Country 
Clubs. Speaking of the Leisy brothers one of the local papers said. "They are 
men with brains, and with the constantly increasing capital at their command 
have ideas that extend beyond their original business and make for a city beau- 
tiful." Thev are still in the prime of life, and what they have done is an ex- 
ample of what they will continue to do. Their future is rich in hope and the 
promise of still greater achievements. 



THOMAS J. PURSLEY. 

No history of the grain trade in Peoria would be complete without extended 
mention of Thomas T- Pursley, now the honored president of the Board of 
Trade and for many years a partner in the well known firm of Buckley, Pursley 
& Company. For a long period his opinions have been accepted in this locality 
as authority concerning operations in grain and he attributes his success to just 
those qualities which have accomplished it — determined energ}- and straight- 
forward dealing. 

Mr. Pursley is a native of Hartsville, Tennessee, and represents one of the 
old families of that state. His father, W. L. Pursley, was a lifelong farmer 
and always retained his residence in the south.' The family removed to western 
Tennessee when Thomas T- Pursley was twelve years of age, and. true to his loved 
southland, he responded to the call of the Confederacy following the outbreak 
of the Civil war, enlisting in the fall of 1861. He served for more than three 
years as a private and participated in many important engagements although but 
a boy in his teens at the outbreak of the war. The Thirty-third Tennessee In- 
fantry, of which he was a member, was assigned to Strahl's Brigade, Cheatham's 
Division and Hardy's Corps, and he participated in all of the engagements with 
his command in the state of Georgia from Lookout Mountain to Atlanta. He 
was twice wounded and at the battle of Nashville, Tennessee, was taken pris- 
oner, being sent to the state penitentiary which his father had advised him long 
before was a good place to keep out of. Later he was transferred as a prisoner 
of war to Columbus, O., where he was incarcerated for six months. W'hile there 
he became ill with smallpox and while lying in his ward could look down from 
the upper window and see the white headboards erected over the newly-made 
graves of his comrades who had succumbed to that disease. At length he was 
paroled at Columbus and following the close of the war removed to Illinois. 
He devoted two years to the improvement of his education as a student in 
Hedding Seminary at Abingdon, Illinois, and then returned to his native state, 
spending two years with his father on the farm. On the expiration of that 
period he located in Bardolph, Illinois, where he engaged in the grain trade, 
there residing until 1873, "^vhen he removed to Peoria and in the intervening 
period, covering nearly forty years, he has been continuously connected with 
the grain trade in this city and has since attained to a place of prominence. For 




THOMAS J. PURSLEY 



i 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 25 

two years he was employed as traveling agent by the grain firm of N. B. Haynes 
& Company and following their failure he embarked in business on his own 
account, entering into partnership under the firm style of .McMillan & Pursley, 
grain merchants. After a year the partnership was dissolved and for ten years Mr. 
r\irs!ey was alone in business. He then entered into partnership with Warren R. 
Buckley under the firm name of Buckley, Pursley & Company and theirs was a most 
harmonious relation during the twenty-seven years in which they were associated. 
Their connection was terminated in the death of ]\Ir. Buckley in March, 1910, but 
the iirm name was not changed as his brother, C. W. Buckley, assumed his interests. 
The latter is a resident of Chicago and they maintain offices in that city as well 
as in F'eoria, Mr. Buckley being in charge in Chicago. This is one of the fore- 
most firms operating in the grain trade in Illinois. They have twenty elevators, 
all in this state, situated along the lines of the Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw and 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroads west of Peoria. 

During the early period of his residence here Mr. Pursley became a memijer 
of the Board of Trade and throughout the intervening years to the present has 
served almost continuously on its more important committees and in the fall of 
iqii was elected president. One of the local papers in writing of him said: 
"Oldest among the memliers of the Peoria Board of Trade, Thomas J. Pursley, 
its president, has come to be regarded as its Nestor and the dean of the estab- 
lishment and its younger members look up to him with regard that is almost 
paternal. .Advancing years have not chilled the geniality of his nature and to 
the older members he is the same 'Tom' that he was more than a third of a 
century ago. Tom Purslex', as he is familiarly known, presents the qualities that 
have made the southerner distinctive as a social and business factor. The oc- 
casion cf his election to the presidency of the Board of Trade was made mem- 
orable from the fact that on assuming the duties of the office Tom served a 
buffet lunch of such dimensions and variety that its like has never been seen 
before, and it will be many a year before it is repeated." 

In Prairie City, Illinois, Mr. Pursley was married to Miss Beagles, and unto 
them have been born three children : C. B., who died in Peoria about seven years 
ago; Mrs. C. W. McCollough, of Decatur, Illinois; and W. L., who is now living 
in Waverly, Kansas. That Mr. Pursley is one of the most prominent and 
popular members of Illinois Lodge. No. 263, F. & A. M., is indicated bv the 
fact that he has been its treasurer for twenty-seven years and for twenty-two 
years has been treasurer of Peoria Consistory. He likewise belongs to the 
Mystic Shrine and the beneficent spirit of the craft finds exemplification in his 
life, while its principles have been a guiding factor in his career. Moreover, 
the old-time southern hospitality and chivalry are points in a life that iiave 
brought to Thomas J. Pursley success, respect and popularity. 



WALTER I. MURRAY 



\\'alter I. Murray was called to the position of secretary of the board of 
park commissioners on the 20th of June, 1910. This was not his first public 
office for in other connections he had proven his loyalty to the best interests of 
the city in the faithful performance of duties which devolved upon him. He 
is one of Peoria's native sons, his birth having here occurred October 27, 1870. 
His parents were Jatnes J. and Mary (McLean) Murray, the latter a daughter 
of William McLean who was a native of England. In the paternal line Walter 
J. Murray comes of Irish and English ancestry. His father was born on the 
Emerald isle and the mother in Liverpool, England. In 1854 the father was 
"iroutrht by his parents to the United States, the family home being established in 
Peoria. He became a moulder bv trade and afterwards served for a number of 

Vi,i. II— :> 



26 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

years on the police force of the city. Both he and his wife have now passed 
away, but their son, Waher J. .Murray, still occupies the old home at 1208 
North Monroe street in which he was born and to which his parents removed 
in 1864. 

The public schools alYorded him his early educational privileges, and after 
he began earning his own livelihood he continued his studies by attending night 
school. He was first employed as a page in the circuit court under Sheriff 
Berry and was afterward connected with the firm of Singer & Wheeler for two 
years in the wholesale drug business. He then entered the employ of Xickol- 
Burr & Company, serving an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade. He after- 
ward silent eleven years as a machinist in the shops of the Rock Island Rail- 
road and then became superintendent of sewers of Peoria under Alayor Bryan. 
That his services were appreciated by the railroad company is indicated in the 
fact that he was solicited to return to his old position where he continued until 
the shops were moved from the city. He next entered the service of the Key- 
stone Fence Company as a machinist, and while there became his party's nominee 
for city clerk against Robert Joos, the republican candidate. He lost the elec- 
tion by a majority of one hundred and thirty-four votes, but was appointed as- 
sistant city comptroller under Mayor Tolson, and acted in that capacity for two 
years. When Thomas O'Connor succeeded Mr. Tolson to the position of 
maj'or Mr. Murray was appointed city comptroller and continued in the office 
for two years more, after which he returned to the Keystone Fence Company. 
A year later he was elected by the park commissioners to the office of secretary 
of the park board, and has now filled that office for two years. In this connec- 
tion he is rendering valualile service and is doing much to further the park in- 
terests of the city. 

Mr. Murray is connected with various fraternities and societies. He belongs 
to the Modern Woodmen camp, the Independent Order of F"oresters and was 
the first financial secretary of Court Gibbons Independent Order of Foresters. 
He is also a member of the Peoria Yacht Club. He likewise holds membership 
with the Knights of Columbus and the International Association of Machinists 
and for three years was secretary of the Machinists' Union. His religious 
faith is that of the Catholic church. He has made a creditable record in public 
office, and in his different private positions has proven himself thoroughly loyal 
and faithful to the interests which he has represented. 



I. B. BARTHOLO:\IEW 



Out of the struggle with small opportunities J. B. Bartholomew has come 
finally into a field of broad and active influence and usefulness. Industry has 
been the root of his notable success and added to this is the quality of quick 
discernment and the faculty of separating the important features of any subject 
from its incidental or accidental circumstances. In other words, sound judg- 
ment passes upon the value of every situation. The broader spirit of the new 
twentieth century finds expression in his activities as the president of the Avery 
Company, manufacturers of farm implements and macljinery. This is the larg- 
est manufacturing plant of the city and in addition to the position of president 
which he fills in this connection he is also the president of the Bartholomew 
Company, manufacturers of the Glide automobile. ^loreover, the soundness 
of his judgment and the wisdom of his opinions are uniformly recognized. 

Mr. Bartholomew's identification with the Avery Company dates from De- 
cembei* 8, 1879. when he began driving a team used in hauling lumber, his salary 
being a dollar and ten cents per day. He has lieen a life-long resident of Peoria 
county, his birth having occurred upon a farm in Elmwood township, February 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 27 

19, 1863. His parents were Albertus Y. and Mary E. (Ennis) Bartholomew. 
1 he father was the second white child born in Elmwood township and was a son 
of Luzern Bartholomew, who was the tirst settler in Peoria county north of 
what is now the town of Elmwood. He took up his abode there at a very early 
period in the settlement of this part of the state and subsequently went to Cali- 
fornia in 1849. attracted by the gold discoveries on the Pacific coast. However, 
he afterward again became a resident of Peoria county and his death occurred 
in Washington, D. C, whither he had gone to see about a patent in which he 
was interested. Death came to him very suddenly. His son, Albertus Y. Bar- 
tholomew, made farming his life work. 

On the old homestead farm J. P.. Bartholomew was reared and his first posii 
tion was with the .Vvery's, then in Galesburg. In 1882 the company moved its 
plant to Peoria and -Mr. Bartholomew thus became a factor in the industrial 
circles of this city. The faithfulness and capability which he displayed in his 
original position with the firm led to his promotion. He ceased team drivmg 
to enter the assembly shop where the machines were put together and he became 
thoroughlv acquainted with the trade in all the different mechanical phases of 
the business. He then went upon the road as an expert demonstrator and 
afterward joined the sales force. Each dift'erent connection brought him larger 
duties and broader experience, calling forth his latent powers and energies. He 
afterward established a branch for the company at Des Moines, Iowa, where he 
resided for ten years or from 1882 until 1892. In the fall of the latter year he 
returned to Peoria to take charge of the manufacturing and designing depart- 
ment and later he was elected to the vice presidency of the company and also 
became a member of its board of directors. He succeeded to the presidency 
on the death of C. M. Avery and has since been at the head of a business which 
is the foremost industrial enterprise of I'eoria. employing thirteen hundred 
workmen. The company has not only followed a progressive lead but has been 
foremost in the work of advancement in the line of agricultural implement manu- 
facture. Mr. Bartholomew's long experience has made him thoroughly acquainted 
with every phase of the business and its success is atributable in large measure 
to his enterprise and efforts. At the present time he is bending his energies to 
executive control and administrative direction and the great concern of which 
he is the head has been so carefully systematized that the business runs on with 
the smoothness of clock work. Of course there are jaroblems, often most in- 
tricate ones, arising again and again, but the keen sagacity and discernment and 
the long experience of Mr. I'.artholomew have enabled him to find ready solu- 
tion for these. 

.•\lthough at the head of the foremost manufacturing industry of the city, 
this does not comprise the scope of Mr. Bartholomew's activity. He is also the 
president of the I'.artholomew Company, a large Peoria concern engaged in the 
manufacture of the Glide automobile. This was organized in 1892 to take over 
a small personal business which had been developed by Mr. Bartholomew in 
Des Moines — the manufacture of peanut roasters, which the company still con- 
tinues, although in later years their largest output has been the automobile. The 
busines.s was removed to Peoria in 1900 and Mr. Bartholomew's son, A. Y. 
Bartholomew, is now vice president of the company. The father is also a di- 
rector of the ^Merchants National Bank of Peoria. 

One of the recent honors, which has brought Mr. Bartholomew wide ac- 
quaintance throughout the nation, was that of president of the National Imple- 
ment and \'ehicle show, which was held in Peoria September 27 to October 5. 
The event was an extremely successful one, promoting the interests of trade and 
advancing an understanding among manufacturers and business men that is 
of untold value. 

On the 2d of July, 1884, occurred the marriage of Mr. Bartholomew and 
Miss Luella Moore, who was born in Eureka, Illinois. They became the parents 



28 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

of four children : A. Y., vice president of the Bartholomew Company ; Ethel, 
the wife of Francis W. Gray; Margaret; and John B. Mr. Bartholomew be- 
longs to the Creve Coeur Club, the Country Club and the Illinois \'alley Yacht 
Club and was president of the first named when they completed their new 
building. He was also vice president and one of the directors when the enter- 
prise was undertaken. His life history is another proof of the fact that there 
is no success in life without eifort. Not seeking honor but simply endeavoring 
to do his duty, honors have come to him and prosperity has followed his un- 
dertakings. 



WILLIS H. BALLANCE. 

Willis H. Ballance, president of the Gipps Brewing Company, which is 
located at the foot of Bridge street in Peoria, was born in this city on November 
6, 1849. Hs is a son of Colonel Charles and Julia (Schnebly) Ballance. The 
family is of French huguenot origin and came to America before the Revolution. 
Colonel Charles Jiallance was a prominent real-estate lawyer and practiced in 
the supreme court of Illinois and in the supreme court of the United States. 
He did more than any attorney to settle the titles of Illinois settlers that were 
claimed by French land sharks. During the Civil war he organized the Seventy- 
seventh Regiment of the Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, and he has also served as 
mayor of Peoria. He was a great friend of Abraham Lincoln. 

Willis H. Ballance laid the foundation for his education in Peoria and later 
became a student in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, New York. 
Afterward he studied in the Williston Seminary at East Hampton, Massachu- 
setts. Subsequently he returned to Peoria, where he became bookkeeper for the 
Central City Elevator Company, remaining with them for one year. He then 
took a position as bookkeeper for the Gipps & Shurtlefif Company and afterward 
for the Peoria Beer, Ale & Malt Company. He then became interested in the 
Gipps, Cody & Company and when the firm vi'as reorganized in 1887, as the 
Gipps Brewing Company, he became secretary and treasurer and remained in 
that position until October. iQio, when he was elected president. He has been 
connected with this establishment since 1870. The brewery is located on the 
ground of the old Miller brewery, which was the first establishment of its kind 
in Peoria. The business was first established by John M. Gipps, a graduate of 
Cambridge L^niversity, England, and a younger son of an English clergyman 
who was a brother of Lord Methuen and also a brother of the celebrated Eng- 
lishman, Mr. Gipps, who was governor of Australia and for whom Gippsland 
was named. After Mr. Gipps' demise his interest was purchased by his partners 
Leslie Robison and Mr. Ballance, and ever since that time the business has grad- 
ually increased until it has reached its present capacity. Its growth for the past 
ten years has been largely due to the business sagacity and foresight of Leslie 
Robison, seconded by his son, Charles W. Robison and by the subject of this 
sketch, Mr. Willis H. Ballance. Owing to the advanced age of Mr. Robison, 
Sr., and at his urgent request, Mr. Ballance purchased the former's interest on 
October i. 1910. Since Mr. Ballance has become president the growth of the 
business has surpassed that in any of its previous existence. 

In Peoria, in 1871, Mr. Ballance was married to Miss Augusta Nevius, who 
passed away in 1899, leaving seven children. Virginia, who is now the wife of 
Lewis Starke, makes her home at Atlanta, Georgia. Florence, living at Denver, 
gave her hand in marriage to Dr. E. W. Stevens, who passed away in October, 
1910. Dr. Harriett P>allance is a practicing physician of San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Julia gave her hand in marriage to Ernest E. ^^'atson, general claim agent 
for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. Myrtle is the wife of Henry 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 29 

M. Towar, president of llie Atlas llelting Company of Harvard, Illinois. Willis 
II., a graduate of the mechanical engineering department of Cornell University 
and also of the Wahl Henius In.stitute in Chicago, is the vice president of the 
Gipps Brewing Company. Nevius \'. is pursuing a course in chemical engineer- 
ing at the University of Wisconsin. In Peoria, in 1903, Mr. Ballance was again 
wedded, his second union being with Miss Ida Lundcjuist, and of this marriage 
have lieeii horn two children: Robert Green, whose birth occurred in San Fran- 
cisco on the lOth of July, 1905 ; and Bettina, who was born at Yuma, Arizona, 
on the 20tli of April, 1909. The family reside at No. 256 Randoljjh avenue in a 
beautiful home which was erected in 1879. In his political views Mr. Ballance 
is an independent republican. 



JOHN BAGGS, D. V. S. 

Dr. John Baggs was one of Peoria's pioneer residents and for many years was 
an interested witness of the growth and progress of the city. Here he engaged in 
business and followed his profession of veterinary surgery to the later years of 
his life, when he retired and spent his remaining days in the enjoyment of well 
earned rest. He was born in Urbana, Ohio, January 13, 1837, and passed away 
March 23, 1909, having attained the ripe old age of seventy-two years. His par- 
ents were Abraham and Mary Baggs, also natives of Ohio, who removed west- 
ward to Illinois in 1838. Peoria was then a town of but a few hundred inhabi- 
tants and the entire countryside was largely wild and undeveloped. The father 
secured a tract of land and became a prominent pioneer farmer, converting his 
place into rich and productive fields and thus aiding greatly in the agricultural 
development of the community. 

Dr. Baggs was only a year old when brought by his parents to this state. The 
educational advantages which Peoria offered in that early day constituted the ex- 
tent of his education. In his youth he assisted his father on the home farm and 
early became familiar with the arduous task of developing and cultivating new 
land. He carefully saved his earnings and at the age of twenty years was himself 
the owner of a good farm, which he continued to cultivate successfully until 1861. 
At the time of the outbreak of the Civil war, however, all business and personal 
considerations were put aside that he might respond to the country's call for aid. 
He enlisted in the Eighty-sixth Regiment of Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, which 
was organized and commanded by Colonel D. D. Irons, and later by Colonel 
McCiee. He was on active duty until injuries sustained at the front caused him to 
be honorablv discharged and he returned home with a most creditable military 
record. 

About that time Dr. Baggs disposed of his farm and took up his abode in the 
city. Here he became a veterinary surgeon and practiced his -profession success- 
fullv for many years, his ability in that direction making his services in constant 
demand. In 1905 he retired from all active business, having in the years of his 
previous labor acquired a competence sufficient to supply him with all the necessi- 
ties and comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 

On the 17th of November, 1858, Dr. luiggs was united in marriage to Lydia 
Meredith Gill, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Moss) (iill, the latter a repre- 
sentative of the Moss family that figured prominently in the early history of 
X'irginia. Her grandfather, a member of that family, served in the Revolutionary 
war. L'nto Dr. and Mrs. Baggs was born one son, William, who is now 
deceased. 

Dr. P>aggs was i)reeminently a home man and f()und his greatest hajjpincss at 
his own fireside. He was very hospitable and greatly enjoyed entertaining com- 
l^any in his own home. He also manifested a marked fondness for music and 



30 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

literature and these added greatly to the joys of his life. His political allegiance 
was always given to the republican party from the time that age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. lie believed it to be the party of reform and progress 
and recognized the fact that it was the defense of the Union in the dark days of 
the Civil war. In manner he was quiet and unassuming but his genuine personal 
worth gained him recognition and won him many friends. He was deeplv inter- 
ested and closely associated with the pioneer development of this part of the state 
and mention should be made of him in a history of Peoria county's upbuilders 
and promoters. 



DOUGLAS H. BETHARD. 

No history of Peoria and its commercial activities would be complete without 
extended reference to Douglas H. Uethard, the president of the Jobst-Bethard 
Company, and therefore head of one of the most extensive wholesale grocery 
establishments of the middle west. Under the title of "The Acorn and the 
Oak." this house has issued an attractive little pamphlet, telling the story of the 
growth of the business. The same simile may well be applied to Mr. Eethard, 
whose advancement to his present prominent position is indicative of the wise 
use he has made of his time, talents and opportunities. Peoria is proud of his 
record and called him to the lirst presidency of the Peoria Association of Com- 
merce. Moreover, he is widely known throughout the country in trade circles 
and has been honored with the presidency for the term of one year of the 
National Wholesale Grocers Association. He was born in the village of Derbv- 
ville, Pickaway county. Ohio, October lo, 1858, a son of George W. and Eliza 
(Hurst) Eethard, who during the early boyhood of their son Douglas removed 
from the Buckeye state to Peoria county. The father for many years was a 
coal operator and general merchant at Kingston Mines in this county. He was 
an active factor in the life of his community and both directly and indirectly 
contributed to the development and welfare of the county. For three terms he was 
mayor of Wenona. Illinois, and resided in this place until his death which oc- 
curred in 1910. 

At the usual age Douglas H. Bethard began his education in the public 
schools and during the periods of vacation worked in his father's store. He 
afterward came to Peoria, where he spent a year's study in the high school and 
also a year in Brown's Business College of Jacksonville, Illinois. When but a 
lad he entered the employ of S. H. Thompson & Company as errand bov at a 
salary of three dollars per week and that he was faithful, diligent and reliable 
is indicated by the fact that he was continued in Mr. Thompson's emplov until 
the latter went out of business, when he became one of the owners of the store 
in which purchase he was associated with Charles Jobst and Charles E. Fulks. 
Taking over the business of S. H. Thompson & Company, they organized what 
is now the Jobst-Bethard Company. Through intermediate positions Mr. Bethard 
had been advanced from errand boy to department manager and was occupying 
the position of sales manager when Mr. Thompson retired. His services in the 
meantime had covered the positions of shipping clerk, billing clerk, assistant 
bookkeeper, bookkeeper and traveling salesman. For fifteen vears he remained 
upon the road and then returned to the house to accept the position of depart- 
ment manager, although even then he devoted half his time to traveling. Several 
years thus passed and gradually he worked into the position of general manager, 
for he was practically filling that position when the firm of S. H. Thompson & 
Company sold out. The business at that time was located at Nos, 116 and 118 
Main street. Their capital was small but the partners felt this an excellent 
opportunity to embark in business on their own account. W. P. Gauss and 
Herbert Simpson also entered the partnership and the new firm was originallv 




DOUGLAS H. BETHARD 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 33 

known as Gauss, Jobst, Bethard & Company, but a little later tlie first named 
sold his interest to Messrs. Jobst, Bethard and Fulks, who soon also purchased 
the interest of Herbert Simpson. It was in 1805 that the interest of Mr. Gauss 
was taken over and in K)02 that of Mr. Simpson, in which year the fn-m of 
lobst-lSethard Company was iiicor])orated under the laws of the state, at which 
time the three principals arranged to take in some of their old and trusted em- 
ployes under a mutually satisfactory working arrangement. The experience of 
the men who constituted the company well qualified them for the successful 
conduct of the business, and from the outset the new enterprise prospered. 
Their original building was a double' store with fifty feet frontage and three 
stories in height, at Xos. 114 and 116 Main street. The growth of their trade 
necessitated the acquirement of another building after a year or two and nearly 
every year saw an additional building until they occu])ied practically the entire 
north half of the block on Main street between Washington and Water streets, 
and also a three story warehouse at Xo. 106 South Washington street. Again 
their facilities were found to be entirely inadetiuate in 1909 and at a meeting of 
the board of trustees it was decided to erect a building of their own. The pre- 
liminary work of the architects was approved in the spring of 1910 and about 
the 1st of Tune of that year ground was broken and work was begim in the con- 
struction of their present mammoth, modern, ujvto-date. reinforced concrete 
and strictly fireproof warehouse, which was ready for occupancy on the ist of 
Mav. 191 1. The dimensions of the building are one hundred and five by one 
hundred and sixty feet, six stories in height, with basement. The floor space 
comprises one hundred and fifteen thousand, one hundred and ten square feet, 
their private tracks from the Peoria Railway Terminal and Chicago Burlington 
& Ouincy Railroad furnishing direct switch connections with the sixteen rail- 
roads entering Peoria. In the year in which the new building was begun the 
cajiital stock of the company was also increased. At its incorporation in 1902 
it had been capitalized for two hundred and fifty-five thousand, and in 1910 
this was increased to four hundred thousand, and in addition the building was 
erected at a cost of two hundred thousand dollars. The present officers of the 
company are : Douglas H. Bethard, president ; Carl Jobst, vice president : and 
Charles' E. Fulks, secretary and treasurer, and in addition, Alexander Furst, 
George W. Fulks and C. G. Cole are on the board of directors. Since the or- 
ganization of the present firm a high standard has been maintained in the per- 
sonnel of the house, in the class of goods carried and in the character of service 
rendered to the public. A large and efficient office force is employed and there 
are between twenty and thirty traveling salesmen upon the road. Theirs is a 
splendidly equipped plant with handsomely outfitted offices and large store rooms 
for the various kinds of goods handled, everything being most modern and at- 
tractive in appearance and orderly in arrangement, while the handling of all 
goods is done in a most systematic manner. 

In 1887 Mr. Bethard was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Daugherty. of 
this city, a daughter of James Daugherty. an early shoe merchant of Peoria who 
came here in 1840 and died in 1909, at the very venerable age of ninety-three 
years. Mr. lietliard is a member of the Creve Coeur Club, the Madison .Ave- 
nue Golf Club, the Illinois \'alley Yacht Club, the Chicago Automobile Club 
and the Peoria Country Club, associations which indicate much of the nature of 
his interests and recreation. He is popular wherever known and is best liked 
where best known. He is always approachable, genial and courteous. He is 
treasurer of the Peoria Country Club and a member of its board of governors, 
and also serves as a director of the Creve Coeur Club. He was the first pres- 
ident of the Peoria Association of Commerce which was organized in 1910, 
Mr. Bethard becoming its first chief executive officer. He is now the chairman 
of the ways and means committee of this association, on which committee are 
serving two hundred and fifty of Peoria's prominent men. His fitness for the 
position none questioned, as his reputation in commercial circles is too well 



34 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

established. He also served as a member of the executive committee of the 
Peoria Association of Commerce. He is, further, the first president of the Illi- 
nois Federation of Commercial Organizations and from 1903 until 1908 served 
as chairman of the advisory committee of the Illinois Wholesale Grocers Asso- 
ciation, resigning to become president of the national body called the National 
Wholesale Grocers Association, of which he was president for one year — the 
longest term for which a president may hold office according to the by-laws of 
this association. He has also been a member of the executive committee since 
the organization of the association. In this connection he has become known 
throughout the entire country. Business is after all necessarily the principal 
feature in a man's life and in the department in which he chose to concentrate 
his energies and his attention Air. Bethard has made continuous progress, nor 
has he ever sacrificed to success the high ideals which he holds as a man and 
citizen. 



WILLIAM H. SOMAIER. 

William H. Sommer, vice president and general superintendent of the Key- 
stone Steel & Wire Company, was born in Tremont, Illinois, June 25, 1882, a son 
of Peter and IMary (Breisacher) Sommer. He received his early education in the 
public schools of Peoria. Illinois, and subsequently entered Brown's Business 
College. As soon as he had completed the course of study offered at that institu- 
tion he started upon his independent career as a draftsman and pattern maker. He 
also did some experimental work from 1901 until 1907 for four months each 
year. During the summer he went west to L'tah and also spent six years in 
Colorado where he superintended improvements on the various ranches the 
family owned. In July, 1909, he returned to Peoria and assumed management 
of the factory of the Keystone Steel & Wire Company and was elected vice pres- 
ident and general superintendent. 

At Monte \'ista, Colorado, on the nth of June, 191 1, Mr. Sommer was mar- 
ried to Miss Emma Getz, a daughter of Mr. and 'Mrs. Henry Getz. The former 
was at one time an agriculturist of Tremont but is now living retired in Colorado. 

Politically ]\Ir. Sommer is a republican. He holds membership in the Creve 
Coeur Club. The familv reside at 122 Columbia terrace. 



TOHN \\'ALKER. 



Among the enterprises of Peoria which are being successfully conducted and 
contribute to the city's material growth and prosperity as well as to individual 
success is the large industrial concern of Walker & \Verner, carriage manufac- 
turers. The scope of their business, however, also includes the building of 
buggies, automobiles and all kinds of repair work appertaining thereto. Their 
establishment is one of the important industries of the city and places its owners 
in a prominent position among Peoria's leading business men. Air. Walker has 
resided here continuously since 1 881. He is' a native of England, his birth having 
occurred at Stockport on the 5th of June, 1875. His parents were George and 
Sarah Ann Walker, who in 1881, when their son was a little lad of six years, 
sailed for the new world with Peoria as their destination. 

In that city John Walker entered the public schools anil when he had mastered 
the branches of learning that are regarded as essential in laying the foundation 
for success in later life, he started out in the business world as an emplove of 
E. L. Bigham & Company, under whose direction he learned the carriage trade. 
He worked for three years in the paint shop, three years in the trimming shop 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 35 

and then entered the blacksmith's shop, thus acquainting himself with all the 
different departments of carriage and wagon making. He has a most compre- 
hensive and practical knowledge of the various branches of the trade. 1 lis con- 
stantly developing and increasing skill made him in time an expert workman 
and for several \ears he was in the service of the Enterprise Carriage Com]Kuiy, 
just prior to the establishment of his present business. He was joined by Joseph 
P. Werner in organizing the lirm of Walker &■ Werner for the manufacture of 
carriages, to which they have since added the manufacture of buggies and auto- 
mobiles. They do all kinds of repair work in their line and they own and occupy 
a fine brick building which they erected during the summer of 1902 and which 
was ready for occupancy, in September of that year. It is located at Nos. 207-213 
Fayette street and on its comi^letion they left their old ciuarters at Nos. 211-215 
Hamilton street, where they had started in business in igoo, and came to their 
present location, where they now have a splendidly ec|uipped plant. The building 
is a brick structure two stories in height, with well ajijiointed offices and a factory 
su]i|ilied with all modern e(|uipments and improved machinery necessary for the 
successful conduct of their work. It covers a floor space one hundred by seventy- 
two feet and they employ about twenty-five men. 

Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Clara Ulrich, the daughter of 
John Ulrich, of this city, and they now have one child, Neva Luella. Mr. Walker 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity and also to the Modern Woodmen 
Camp and is held in high esteem by his brethren of those organizations as well as 
by his business colleagues and contemporaries. 



JOSEPH P. WERNER. 

For a period of twelve years Joseph P. Werner has been jimior [lartner in the 
well known firm of \\'alker & Werner, carriage and automobile builders. He was 
born in Peoria, September 22, 1873, and is the son of N'alentine and Catharine 
Werner. .\t the usual age he entered the public schools, wherein he passed 
through the consecutive grades until he felt it incumbent upon him to provide for 
his own support, at wdiich time he entered business life. He was then, in fact, 
ver_\- young to assume the burdens and responsibilities that are to be met with in 
the business world but necessity and ambition both urged him to the step and for 
ten years, from the age of eleven to the age of twenty-one, he was employed in the 
office of the Manhattan Distilling Company of Peoria. On leaving that position 
he became shipping clerk with the American Glucose Company, with which he 
continued for six years, after which he entered into partnership with John 
\\'alker, in 1900, under the present firm style of \\'alker & Werner. They have 
since conducted a carriage and automobile manufactory and repair shop and 
their business has steadily developed. They were originally located at Nos. 211- 
215 Hamilton street, where they remained until September, 1909, when the new 
building which they had been erecting was ready for occupancy. Its situation is 
at Nos. 207-213 Fayette street and this removal to a larger building indicates 
something of the growth of their trade. They have a fine modern two-story brick 
structure well ec|uipped for office and factory purposes. It has a frontage of one 
hundred feet and a depth of seventy-two feet and its equiiiment includes all that 
will facilitate their trade. Thoroughness is demanded on the part of all their 
employes and the substantial character of their manufactured goods insures them 
a liberal sale. They now employ twenty-five workmen and the business returns 
to them a gratifying annual income. ^Mr. Werner's long experience as an office 
man naturally led him to assume the office management of the business, while Mr. 
Walker, trained in the practical lines of the trade, superintends the manufactur- 



36 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

ing. Thus the labors of the one ably supplement and round out the efforts of the 
other and their interests are conducted with the utmost harmony. 

On November 6, 1894, Mr. \\'erner was united in marriage to Aliss Ida Lane, 
of Peoria, and they now have two children, Ralph and Russell. Mr. Werner is 
well known in fraternal circles, holding membership with \'ictor Lodge. K. P., 
with the Modern \\ oodmen Camp, the Royal Neighbors and the Travelers" Pro- 
tective Association. He has been a lifelong resident of this city and his record 
commands the admiration of those who know aught of his career, for he started 
out empty-handed and has depended entirely upon his resources and ability for 
the attainment and achievement of success. 



OTHO BOYD WILL, M. D. 

Advancing in his profession to a point where scientific research and investiga- 
tion have supplemented the ordinary knowledge gained from the te.xt-books, Dr. 
Otlio Boyd \\'ill is recognized as one of the eminent ph)'sicians of Peoria, spec- 
cializing in practice in gynecology. He has known equal renown as a medical 
writer and in his labors as a member of the State Aledical Society has done much 
to inspire and systematize the labors of the profession. 

His birth occurred in Mercersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, June 2"/, 
1846, his parents being William S. and Elizabeth (Baxter) Will, who were also 
natives of the Keystone state. The former was a son of David and Elizabeth 
Will, and the mother was a daughter of William Baxter, a native of Ireland, 
who after coming to the new world served an apprenticeship in the printing 
office of Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia. In the year 1856 the parents of 
Dr. Will left their home in the east and removed with their family to Illinois, 
settling at Canton. Fulton county where the residue of their days was passed. 

Dr. Will, then a lad of ten summers, pursued his education in the public 
schools of Canton and afterward pursued a course of scientific study under the 
direction of John Wolf and other private tutors. In 1866 he entered upon the 
study of medicine under the direction of Dr. William M. Swisher, of Canton, 
and the following year was enrolled among the students of Rush ]iledical Col- 
lege of Chicago, in which he completed the regular course and won the M. D. de- 
gree at his graduation with the class of 1869. He afterward did post-graduate 
work in gynecology and nervous diseases in New York and all through his pro- 
fessional career he has sought advancement wherever he has believed that knowl- 
edge would promote the skill and efficiency of the profession. 

In 1869 Dr. \\'ill located for practice at Kickapoo and in addition to his pro- 
fessional duties assisted in Ijuilding up the town of Dunlap in Peoria county. 
In 1 88 1, however, after pursuing his special studies in the east, he came to Peoria 
and with Dr. J. L. Hamilton and Dr. T. M. Mcllvaine assisted in organizing the 
Cottage Hospital. In this connection his work has been of a most important 
character and an extensive practice has been accorded him. That Dr. Will oc- 
cupies a prominent position as a physician and surgeon is indicated by the fact 
that he was elected in 1894 to the presidency of the Illinois State Medical So- 
ciety, of which he has been an active member for a number of years. He has 
also been president and secretary of the Military Tract Medical Society and 
president of the Rush College Alumni Association. He belongs also to the North 
Central Illinois Medical Society, the Peoria City Medical Association, the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and the Chicago Gynecological Society. 

In his practice he has made a specialty of gynecology and his study and work 
along that line have carried him far beyond the ranks of the average practitioner. 
He has always been deeply interested in biology- in its kindred relation to the 
medical profession. He has spent considerable time studying abroad under emi- 




111!, miiii I'., w ii.i. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 39 

nent physicians and surgeons of the old world and in investigating the leading 
hospitals of Europe. For a number of years he was editor of the Peoria Medical 
Journal and his contributions to the literature of the profession in this and other 
connections have awakened widespread interest and consideration. 

On the 14th of .\])ril, 1870, Dr. Will was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Grant, of I'.rimtield. this county. To them were l)orn four children, Maud, ( )tho, 
Charles and Irene, all of whom are now deceased. In politics the Doctor is an 
independent republican, being allied with that movement which seeks the general 
welfare rather than the success of party. Socially as well as professionally he 
is prominent. 



GEORGE HOGG McILVAIXE. 

Among the builders and promoters of Peoria George H. Mcllvaine was num- 
bered. His activities touched many of the general interests of society and proved 
a factor in business development and in educational and moral progress. His 
name was, indeed, an honored one in Ijanking circles, for the policies which he 
pursued and the methods which he inaugurated as vice president of the Peoria 
National Bank and as president of the Clearing House and liankers Association 
commended him to the confidence and high regard of all. The extent of his use- 
fulness cannot be measured until the many interests with which he was actively 
associated have reached their full measure of fruition in the world's work, 

Mr. Mcllvaine was a native of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, born August 10, 1834, 
his parents being the Rev. W. B. and Elizabeth (Breading) Mcllvaine, who were 
natives of the Keystone state. The mother died in Pittsburg in 1851 and the 
father was afterward for many years a resident of Peoria but eventually passed 
away here. 

In his native city George H. Mcllvaine spent his youthful days and there 
ac(|uired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by a course of study 
in Washington College of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1853, 
winning the Bachelor of Arts degree, while later his alma mater conferred 
upon him the Master of Arts degree. His collegiate training well ciualified him 
to enter upon life's practical and responsible duties and in 1854 he started for 
Illinois, hoping to find better business opportunities in the middle west. Estab- 
lishing his home in Peoria, he here became connected with the hardware and iron 
business, becoming the successor of H. Lightner in the well established firm of 
Walker & Lightner, at which time the firm style was changed to Walker & Mc- 
llvaine. They conducted business along both wdiolesale and retail lines until 
1872, success attending their eiiforts so that at the end of that period Mr. Mcll- 
vaine found himself in a financial position to enter banking circles. Withdraw- 
ing from commercial pursuits, he became connected with the Second National 
Bank, of which he was the manager, vice president and cashier until 1883, when 
its charter expired and the bank went into lic|uidation. He was in control of its 
interests during the widespread financial panic of 1872-3 and such was the con- 
servative business policy upon which he conducted its interests that the bank 
suffered the loss of not a dollar during that period and, in fact, continued upon 
its progressive course and paid in liquidation one hundred and seventy-five dol- 
lars and a half for each one hundred dollars of stock. In 1883 the Peoria Na- 
tional Bank became the successor of the Second National Bank and with the 
newly formed institution Mr. Mcllvaine remained as cashier until the ist of 
November, 1888. At that time he turned over the active management to others, 
although retaining official connection therewith as vice president. This insti- 
tution prospered from its organization, being based upon the sound and con- 
servative methods instituted by Mr. Mcllvaine, who ever recognized tlie fact 



40 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

that the bank which is most worthy of patronage is that which most carefully 
safeguards its depositors. His standing in banking circles is indicated in the 
fact that he was elected president of the Clearing House on its organization and 
so continued until a few years prior to his death, when he retired. 

There was no public enterprise of Peoria that sought in vain the aid and co- 
operation of Mr. Mcilvaine. if his judgment deemed it worthy of support, and 
at all times he was actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general good 
that none questioned. He was one of the organizers of the Peoria Library As- 
sociation and assisted in the erection of the building which stood at the corner 
of Jel?erson and Main streets. He hgured for many years as one of the direc- 
tors of the Chamber of Commerce and was in hearty sympathy with its projects 
for furthering the trade interests and promoting the welfare of the city. He 
dealt quite extensively in real estate and erected the first modern building on 
Adams street, a three story brick structure. He sought success along legitimate 
lines nor failed to accomplish what he undertook, for his carefully formulated 
plans had their root in good judgment and progressiveness. 

On the i8th of August, 1857, Mr. Mcllvaine was united in marriage to Miss 
Priscilla I. McClure, a resident of Peoria and a sister of Colonel John Dixon 
2\IcClure." She was born in Franklin county. Pennsylvania, in 1834, her parents 
being Josiah E. and Jane McClure, who became early residents of Peoria county, 
the father engaging in pork packing here during the pioneer epoch in the city's 
development. The names of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Mcllvaine are enumer- 
ated below : \\'illiam B. is an attorney of Chicago, a member of the firm of Wil- 
son, ^loore & Mcllvaine, and has four children, Romain, Madaline, Priscilla and 
William B. Elizabeth is the wife of .\lbert T. Johnson, formerly of the Peoria 
National Bank, whose children are : Elizabeth, the wife of Lincoln J. Scales and 
the mother of one child, Elizabeth McClure Scales ; Harry McClure ; and Albert 
T., Jr. Emma is the wife of Lewis E. Rollo, of Chicago. Priscilla became the 
wife of Mack Merriam, of Albion, Michigan. George H. makes his home in 
Chicago. 

Mr. Mcllvaine provided his family with a beautiful home at No. 11 1 North 
Madison street, situated in the midst of a fine lawn, rendering this one of the 
most attractive residences of the city. He found his greatest happiness in pro- 
viding for the welfare of his family and spared no eii'ort or expense if he could 
promote their best interests. He was a man of broad mind, who always kept 
informed concerning the current events and vital political issues of the day. He 
had no ambition for office, yet kept abreast with the best thinking men of the 
age in his understanding of political conditions. He was an unwavering advo- 
cate of the Union cause during the Civil war and was a member of the Christian 
and Sanitary commission organized by the Young Men's Christian Association 
of Peoria. To this he gave freely of his time and means and to other Ijranches 
of Christian work he was equally loyal. For many years he was a devoted and 
faithful member of the Presbyterian church, was an earnest worker in the -Sunday 
school and for a number of years served as its superintendent. He was also 
particularly interested in the fourth ward mission, which developed into Grace 
church and of which he was also superintendent. He always recognized the 
truth of the proverb "train a child up in the way he shall go and when he is 
old he will not depart from it." He. therefore, believed most firmly in educating 
the young that their moral teaching might bear fruit later in life. He was as 
jjersistent, earnest and zealous in his different lines of church work as he was 
in the conduct of his business interests. His labors were never actuated merely 
by a sense of duty but rather by a deep interest in his fellowmen and a most 
earnest desire to aid them to reach a position where individual worth commands 
respect and honor. He regarded a promise made as too sacred to be broken and 
his word was as good as any bond ever solemnized by signature or seal. \\'hile 
his ideals of life w^ere high, he never manifested a spirit of superiority and his 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 41 

own nobilitv ut character was manifest in its very simplicity. He regarded life 
as his opportnnitv for doing good, for furthering progress and promoting civ- 
ilization and he felt that all this was best conserved through a close conformity 
to the teachings of the church. 



^VILFORD C. BLACK. 



Wilford C. Black has been the secretary of the Peoria Hotel Keepers" Associ- 
ation since its organization in 1906. He was born in Boone, Iowa, February g, 
1872, the son of James W. and Emma Black. The father was a well known 
capitalist and live-stock man there and also served as mayor of that city. During 
the Civil war he volunteered and after one year of service was mustered out on 
account of a wound which he had received. During the Spirit Lake uprising of 
the Indians he was one of the fifty men who were chosen by the governor of 
Iowa to control that part of the country for one year. These men were designated 
as "tlie fifty brave men of Iowa." He passed away in 1898 at the age of sixty- 
six. His wife, who preceded him by a number of years, died in 1874 at the age 
of twenty-six. Both are buried in the Glcndale cemetery in the family burial 
ground. 

Wilford C. Black received his early education in the public schools of Boone 
and afterward studied at the Sacred Heart Academy, from which institution he 
was graduated at the age of eighteen. He then studied law for one year, after 
whifh he left his native town, going to Memphis, Tennessee, then to New Orleans 
and later to a lunuber of cities in the south. Finally he located in Oklahoma 
City, where he was employed in a farm implement house as a bookkeeper and 
general man. He remained in that position until \S()C\ when he became a trav- 
eling salesman for the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company at Racine. Wiscon- 
sin. During that same year he was transferred to Peoria, where he became local 
manager of that firm. In 1905 he was appointed general sales manager at Racine 
but resigned his position after two months to purchase the Hotel Black, of which 
he is today the proprietor. Since the organization, in 1906, of the Peoria Hotel 
Keepers' Association, which has its offices located at Xo. 100 Chestnut street. Air. 
Black has served as its secretary. He has been very successful in hotel work and 
also in other Inisiness affairs, and he has extensive holdings in this city. 

At Milwaukee, on December ig. 1905, Mr. Black was married to Miss Jean 
Hollinghausen, a daughter of Julius and Jennie Hollinghausen, who reside at 
Austin, Illinois. The father was engaged in the shoe business in Chicago. In poli- 
tics Mr. Black is a republican and fraternally he is a Mason, having attained the 
thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite and belonging also to the commandery 
and the shrine at Peoria. He is likewise affiliated with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and is a member of the Creve Coeur Club. He resides in his beau- 
tiful, modern home, which was erected in 1909, at 146 West Parkside drive. An 
extremely successful and enterprising business man, Mr. Black has rendered 
valuable service in advancing the interests of and in improving the hotels of tliis 
citv. 



JOHN E. KEENE. 



Starting out in life without any vaulting ambition to accomplish something 
especially great or famous, John E. Keene has followed the lead of his oppor- 
tunities, doing as best he could anything that came to hand and seizing legitimate 
advantages as they have arisen. He has never hesitated to take a forward step 
when the way was open and, although content with what he has attained as he 



42 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

has gone along', he has always been ready to make an advance. Fortunate in 
possessing ability and character that have inspired confidence in others, tlie 
simple weight of his character has carried him into important relations with large 
interests until he is now a member of the firm of Kempshall & Keene, managers 
of the General Western Agency of the Aetna Life Insurance Company, and, 
moreover, a prominent figure in financial circles as the vice president of the 
Dime Savings & Trust Company and the vice president of the Title & Trust 
Company. 

Mr. Keene was born March 28, 1853, in Loudoun county, \'irginia, and has 
been a resident of Peoria county, Illinois, since 1858, in which year his parents, 
Thomas W. and Roberta E. A. Keene. removed to this section of the state. Roth 
the father and mother were natives of \'irginia and were of Scotch-Irish descent. 
They remained continuous residents of Peoria and Tazewell counties from 1858 
imtil death, the father passing away in 1902, while the mother's period of resi- 
dence covered an entire half century, as she was not called to her final rest until 

1908. Thomas \\'. Keene was a builder. He resided in Elm wood from 1861 
until 1878 and afterward in Peoria and in Washington, Illinois. 

John E. Keene has been practically a lifelong resident of Peoria county. He 
supplemented his public-school education by a course in Asbury. now De Pauw, 
University at Greencastle, Indiana, from which he was graduated in June, 1877, 
with the Bachelor of Arts degree. Three years later his alma mater conferred 
upon him the Master of Arts degree. He represented the university in the state 
oratorical contest of 1877 ^"d was chosen to deliver the master's oration in 
1880. Immediately following his graduation he entered the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and devoted his life thereto until 1884. He was 
pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal church of Peoria from C)ctober. 1882, 
until October, 1884, during which period the present house of worship was 
erected. On account of failing health he gave up the ministry in the latter year 
and identified himself with the Aetna Life Insurance Company, of which he is 
now manager, conducting his business along that line under the firm name of 
Kempshall & Keene. While he has thoroughly acquainted himself with insurance 
in every particular, he has not concentrated his energies upon this business to 
the exclusion of all other interests, having extended his efl^orts into other fields 
with equal success. As his financial resources have permitted he has made large 
investments in land and his holdings are now extensive. Moreover, he occupies 
a very prominent position as a financier of Peoria, being an extensive stockholder 
and the vice president of both the Dime Savings & Trust Company and the Title 
& Trust Company of Peoria. Well balanced mentally and physically, he pos- 
sesses sufficient courage to venture where favoring opportunity is jiresented and 
his judgment and even paced energy have carried him forward to the goal of 
success. 

Mr. Keene has lieen three times married, losing his first two wives by death. 
In Chicago, on the 8th of August, 1893, he wedded Miss Florence M. Overall, a 
daughter of ?\lr. and Mrs. James G. Overall, of Lewistown, Illinois. Her father 
was an Englishman by birth and was a large stock dealer but died about forty 
years ago. Mr. Keene's children are: Dr. Floyd E. Keene, a practicing physician 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania : and Florence R., who on the 25th of ^larch, 

1909, became the wife of A. \\'ilson Oakford, a wholesale grocer. ]\Ir. Keene is 
a member of the First Congregational church, deeply interested in its growth 
and success, as is evidenced by his hearty support of and cooperation in its vari- 
ous lines of work. Since 1890 he has been a member of the Kniehts of Pythias 
lodge and is a oast chancellor of \\'est Blufif Lodge, No. 177. He also belongs 
to the Creve Coeur Club. Politically he is a believer in republican principles 
but does not hesitate to cast an independent ballot, if his judgment so directs. 
He believes that in politics and in citizenship the interests of the many should 
be regarded before the welfare of the few. He filled the office of school in- 
spector of Peoria from 1900 until 1905 and in 1900 he was also appointed a mem- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 43 

ber of the Library board, which position he still tills, having served for three 
years as its president. His influence has always been on the side of progress, 
iinprovement and advancement. He has never believed in choosing the second 
best in business, in matters of citizenship or in social and church relations. He 
is a de])endable man under anv condition and in any emergency. His quietude 
of de])ortnient. his easv dignity, his frankness and cordiality of address, with 
the total absence of an'vthing sinister or anything to conceal, foretoken a man 
who is readv to meet aiiv obligation of life with the confidence and courage that 
come of conscious personal ability, right conception of things and an habitual 
regard for what is best in the exercise of human activities. 



BENJAMIX L. S0:MAIER. 

Benjamin L. Sommer, who has been secretary and treasurer of the Keystone 
Steel & Wire Company of Bartonville since 1904, was born in Livingston county, 
Illinois, on the 17th of Jamiary, 1880, his parents being Peter and Mary ( Breis- 
acher) Sommer. After" pursuing his education in the public schools of Tremont, 
Illinois, until he was fifteen years of age, he entered Brown's Business College 
where he took the regular course of study to prepare him for a Inisiness career. 
After having graduated from that institution he accepted a clerical position with 
the concern of which he is now an officer, and by gradual but constant promotion 
reached the position he now holds. His business ability has been of great value 
to the company, and much of the development and expansion of the activities 
of the Keystone Steel & Wire Company since its reorganization in 1904 is due 
to Mr. Sommer's labors. 

In politics he is a republican, but because of his broad views he casts his vote 
for man and measure rather than strictly according to party dictates. He holds 
membership in the Creve Coeur Club. Although still a young man he has won a 
high place in the business circles of Peoria. 



WILLIAM DOLPHUS DICKSOX. 

From a comparatively humble position in the business world William Dolphus 
Dickson gradually advanced, overcoming difficulties and obstacles and resolutely 
working his way upward to success and prominence. What he accomplished 
represented the fit utilization of his time, talents and opportunities and was the 
fitting reward of laudable ambition and persistent energy. He was born in 
Millsborough. Ohio, .August 16, 1848. and was, therefore, in his sixty-third year 
when death called him on the 21st of January, 191 1. His parents were John and 
Priscilla ( Martin ) Dickson, who carefully guided his younger years, endeavoring 
to plant within his mind the seeds that would in time In-ing forth rich fruit in 
all that makes for honorable manhood. His education was acquired in the public 
schools of his native city and he started in the business world as a tinner, ac- 
quainting himself with that trade and also the trade of a furnace worker. Grad- 
ual advancement brought him to the ownership of a business of that character 
and in time he extended the scope of his business to include hardware, furnaces, 
heating and ventilating and eventually a plumbing department was establislied. 
He liuilt up a good business in all those lines, keeping abreast of the progress of 
the times and doing work as a contractor of a most im[)ortant character. His 
sales, too, were extensive and indicated his honorable, straightforward dealing. 
As the years passed he became identified with Iniilding operations in Peoria, of 
which city he became a resident in 1872. He erected the Observatory building, 



44 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

the .Majestic Theater and also the present business house occupied by the Dickson 
Company in the conduct of the trade which had its inception in the marked en- 
terprise and laudable ambition of him whose name introduces this review. He 
was a man of marked constructive and inventive ability and was the inventor 
and patentee of the Dickson Heating and \'entilating Systems and the Bifurcated 
Drain Spout, devices which have been accepted and adopted by the trade as 
valuable improvements in their respective lines. Each forward step in his career 
brought him a broader outlook and wider ojjportunities. He never regarded any 
position as final but considered it rather as the starting point for further con- 
quests in the business world. In addition to his commercial connections he was 
a director and treasurer of the Farmers Loan Association and aided largely in 
placing this upon a safe and substantial basis. 

On the 6th of October, 1884, at Camp Chase, Ohio, Mr. Dickson was united 
in marriage to Miss Ella Heyle, a daughter of John C. Heyle, and unto them 
have beenborn three children, a son and two daughters. \'ictor Heyle, Hazel B. 
and Nina. Mr. Dickson was a member of several clubs and trade associations. 
He belonged to the Country Club and the Creve Coeur Club and his high stand- 
ing in business circles is indicated in the fact that he was president of the Master 
Plumbers' Association and also president of the Master Tinners" Association. 
His political allegiance was given to the republican party and his religious faith 
was that of the Congregational church. Life to him meant opportunity — the 
opportunitv to accomplish substantial results in business, to aid his fellowmen and 
to make v/ise use of his time and talents. He never faltered in the performance 
of any dutv and met every obligation and situation with the courage that comes 
from personal rectitude and an understanding of one's own powers and capacity. 



^^T^■SLO^v e\'axs. 



Since the inception of the city, Peoria has always been distinguished for 
the high rank of her bench and bar. Each decade has brought new recruits 
to the profession and many have developed ability which places them in a fore- 
most position among those who are protecting in the courts the lives and liberty, 
the property and the rights of their fellowmen. To this class belongs Winslow 
Evans, who' has practiced continuously in I'eoria since 1891. Fifteen years be- 
fore he had been admitted to the bar in Marshall, Illinois, practicing there and 
in the surrounding country until he came to this city twenty-one years ago. 

Mr. Evans was a native of Marshall, his liirth having there occurred on the 
19th of December, 1855. His parents were Albert and Harriet (Springer) 
Evans, who established their home in Marshall county in 1830 upon their arrival 
in Illinois from Newark, Ohio. The grandfather, Joshua Evans, was a native 
of Loudoun county, \'irginia, and was of Welsh descent, but in pioneer times 
had removed to Ohio and later the family became represented in the pioneer 
development of this state. Albert Evans was a farmer by occupation, devoting 
his entire life to the tilling of the soil after he took up his abode in Marshall 
countv, where his remaining days were passed. 

Winslow Evans was reared upon the home farm until he reached the age 
of twelve years, after which he spent a number of years in Wenona, Marshall 
county, and there enjoyed the benefit of public-school instruction. Still his 
ambition for an education was not satisfied and he entered the Illinois Wesleyan 
University at Bloomington. from which he was graduated. He afterward did 
post-graduate work and pursued the law course and in the intervals of his 
study engaged in teaching in Marshall county. He regarded that, however. 
merely as an initial step to other professional labor, for it was his desire to 
enter upon the practice of law, which he did in his native town, having been 




WINSLOW E\-ANS 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 47 

admitted to the bar in September iSji). He jiracticed alone for a lew years 
and then Ijecame a member of the tirm of Edwards & Evans, being thus as- 
sociated until he withdrew in order to remove to Peoria in 1891. Since that 
time he has continued in private practice on his own account. He remains a 
general practitioner, well versed in all departments of jurisprudence, yet has been 
connected with much of the most important litigation tried in the courts of the 
district during the last two decades. For four years he was judge of the county 
court of Marshall county. He has ahvays been careful to conform his practice 
to a high standard of professional ethics and never seeks to lead the court 
astrav in a matter of fact or law. He has ever treated the court with the 
studied courtesy which is its due, nor has he indulged in malicious criticism 
because it arrived at a different conclusion, in the decision of a case, from that 
which he hoped to hear. He is calm, dignified self-controlled and has given to 
his clients the service of great talent, unwearied industry and broad learning. 

In 1883 Mr. Evans was united in marriage to Miss Eva McCullough, a na- 
tive of Henry county, Illinois, and they now have one son, Donald \V., who is a 
graduate of the Xorthwestern University, at Evanston, Illinois, where he pur- 
sued the literary and law courses. He was graduated from that institution and 
in the fall of 191 1 joined his father in practice. Aside from his law work Mr. 
Evans is serving on the board of directors of the First National Bank and the 
Savings Bank of Peoria and for both of these is attorney. He is a Knight 
Templar Mason and is a charter member of the Creve Coeur Club. He has 
now been a member of the Illinois bar for more than thirty-five years and his work 
in the courts has placed him in a prominent position, while his individual worth 
has gained him the friendship and warm personal regard which in every land and 
clime are accorded in recognition of those characteristics which work for honor- 
able manhood and citizenship. 



CHARLES \V. LUCAS. 

Among the leading commercial enterprises of Peoria is the excellent con- 
fectionery and jobbing house of Charles W. Lucas who is successfully carrying 
on a large and growing business at No. 415 South Washington street. To this 
department of trade he has devoted his energies for nineteen years, establishing 
the enterprise on a small scale but gradually developing it to large and profit- 
able proportions until his business today features as one of the important manu- 
facturing and commercial undertakings of the citv. 

I'eoria county numbers j\lr. Lucas among her native sons, his birth having 
occurred in Mossville, January 31. 1873. His parents were J. P. and Anna M. 
( Schnebly ) Lucas, both of whom have now passed away, the father's death 
occurring in 1910, while the mother survived until the 15th of October, 191 1. 
They were early settlers of this county, J. P. Lucas arriving about 1850. 

Charles W. Lucas was only a year old when the parents removed from 
Mossville to Peoria, which was then a town of some size and importance, yet 
gave comparatively little indication of reaching its present size and greatness. 
His father had ])een engaged in the grocery business in Mossville butafter re- 
moving to Peoria he conducted a milk dairy for a time. He gave to his son 
such advantages as he could afford and the boy, after acquiring his education in 
the city schools, began to earn his own living by working as a clerk in a book 
store, in which he was employed for a year. He next secured a position in a 
wholesale candy factory, with which he was connected until he started in busi- 
ness for himself. While in that employ he acquainted himself with every 
branch of the trade, learned the methods of manufacture and the .best process 
of shipment and with that knowledge as a foundation he has builded his success. 



48 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

He now occupies a prominent position in trade circles as a wholesale confectioner 
and jobber of candies. He is engaged in the manufacture of hard goods of 
this character, including peanut candy and butterscotch, having a splendidly 
etiuipped establishment at Xo. 415 South Washington street. He started in busi- 
ness on a small scale, handling a stock at his residence and doing his manufactur- 
ing there but in 1907 he removed to his present location and he now occupies 
four floors of the building, having about seven thousand square feet of floor 
space. In the conduct of the business in Peoria he employs ten men and also 
has two traveling salesmen upon the road and one city salesman. Shipments 
are made to the surrounding territory and the trade is constantly growing. 

In 1904 'Mr. Lucas was married to Miss Cora James, of Lincoln, Illinois, a 
daughter of D. H. James, and they now have one child, Marjory. -Mr. Lucas 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity, the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Masonic lodge and is also connected with the Illinois Commercial Men's 
Association. His business ability is demonstrated in the success which he has 
won. He had no special advantages to aid him at the outset of his career but he 
realized that energy, determination and honest dealings are indispensable con- 
comitants of success. Through the employment of these agencies he has con- 
stantly advanced and his business is one which adds to the commercial activity 
and consequent prosperity of the city as well as to his individual success. 



FRANK J. MILLER. 

Frank J. Miller was a lifelong resident of Peoria and it will be long ere his 
friends cease to remember him, for he had a firm hold on the aft'ectionate re- 
gard and respect of those with whom he came in contact. He represented busi- 
ness interests of the city as a member of Joseph Miller & Sons and also of the 
Garside Manufacturing Company, in both of which connections he manifested 
a spirit of progress that found tangible expression in substantial success. He 
was born ]\Iarch 9, 1850, in this city, and came of German ancestry, manifest- 
ing in his life many of the sterling characteristics of the people of the father- 
land. He was a son of Joseph Miller, a native of Germany, who on coming to 
America first settled in Cincinnati but in the latter "40s came to Peoria, where he 
established a lumberyard, continuing in that business for many years. He was 
one of the early lumber merchants of the city and is classed with those who laid 
broad and deep the foundation upon which has been builded the present growth 
and prosperity of this section. 

His son Frank J. Aliller was sent to the German schools of Peoria, in which 
he pursued his studies to the age of eighteen years, when he began working for 
his father in the lumber business. He studied every phase of the trade, mani- 
fested unfaltering industry in performing the tasks that devolved upon him and 
won his promotion not through parental influence but through genuine personal 
worth. Eventually he was admitted to a partnership under the firm style of 
Joseph Aliller & Sons. Following the death of the father he was associated 
with his brother Joseph Aliller, who is also now deceased. They controlled and 
enjoyed an extensive trade, their sales reaching a large annual figure. They 
handled building materials of all kinds, sought to obtain only a fair profit upon 
their investment and in all of their dealings were strictly relialjle. Their pro- 
gressiveness was tempered by a safe conservatism that never countenanced un- 
warranted risks and yet they steadily forged forward along the path of success. 
In addition to his connection with the lumber trade ^Ir. ^filler was interested in 
the Garside ^Manufacturing Company and was a stockholder in the Commercial 
German National Bank. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 49 

On the 5th of Xovember, 1873, occurred the marriage of Mr. r^fillcr and 
yUss Franziska Streibich, a daughter of Frederick Streibich, a prominent pioneer 
of Peoria. Unto Air. and ]Mrs. Aliller were born seven children : Frank J., who 
is engaged in the lumber business as a member of the firm of Joseph Miller & 
Sons; Joseph F. ; Fred C, who is also associated with the lumber company; 
Charles W'., who is a practicing physician of Peoria; Edward A., a jewelry 
manufacturer of this city; Irma, the wife of William J. Fickeson, of Peoria; and 
Olga, at home. 

]\Ir. Miller held membership in St. Joseph's German Catholic church and his 
political faith was that of the republican party, his ballot always being given for 
the support of its men and measures. He was interested in all the uplifting in- 
fluences of life. He greatly enjoyed German literature and was a home man, 
devoted to the welfare of his family. He possessed that quality which for want 
of a better term has been called personal magnetism, having the happy faculty 
of dra'wing men to him by reason of his sterling character, his geniality, his 
kindlv spirit and his hospitality. He was, indeed, a warm-hearted and great- 
hearted man and there was in his life record much that is worthy of commenda- 
tion and emulation. 



ROBERT I. EVANS. 



Robert J. Evans, president of the Duroc Bulletin Company, founded that 
paper and has published the same for the past eight years. He was born in El 
Paso, Illinois, August 22, 1863, and is a son of Robert and Nancy Evans. The 
father was one of the pioneer agriculturists of Woodford county, and as he was 
an enterprising and progressive man he became one of the foremost citizens of 
his community, efficiently discharging the duties of various township offices. 
Both parents are now deceased, the father having passed a\vay in 1893 and the 
mother in 1906. They are buried in the cemetery at El Paso. The Evans 
family was originally of Welsh extraction, but they have been residents of 
America for practically a century, the fourth generation having been born here. 

Reared in the country Robert Evans passed his early years in a manner very 
similar to other farmer lads of that period. At the usual age he entered the 
common schools, completing his education upon his graduation from the El 
Paso high school in 1883. He subsequentlv engaged in teaching in Woodford 
county for two years and then went to Emporia, Kansas. There he turned his 
attention to journalism, beginning his newsjjaper career on the Emporia News, 
of which he was city editor for three years. Returning to El Paso, he bought 
an interest in one of the local papers, which he edited for eighteen years. At 
the expiration of that time, he came to Peoria and founded the Duroc 
lUilletin. Three years later the business was incorporated under the name of 
the Peoria Bulletin Company, and his plant is now located at number 201-203 
South Washington street. As the name would imply his paper is entirely de- 
voted to the interests of the Duroc Jersey hog, and it is the only publication 
issued whose columns are exclusively confined to any single breed of hogs. The 
paper has become well known during the eight years Mr. Evans has been publish- 
ing it and not only has a large circulation but has become recognized as a valu- 
able advertising medium. His early agricultural training and thorough familiar- 
ity with live stock well qualified him for this undertaking and through judicious 
management the paper has been placed on a paying basis. 

At Emporia. Kansas, on the 15th of January, 1S89, Air. Evans was united in 
marriage to Aliss Nellie Rooke, and they have become the parents of six chil- 
dren, as follows: Annie, now the wife of Hugh Aliller. principal of the schools 
of Lockport, Louisiana ; Walter R., who is a professional athlete and associated 



50 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

with his father in business ; Bernard : Esther ; George : and Lawrence, now re- 
siding in Chicago. 

Fraternally Mr. Evans is affiliated with the Masonic order and in politics 
he is a republican. He has become recognized, since publishing The Duroc 
Bulletin, as one of the best authorities in the country on this particular breed of 
hogs and from 1893 to 1906 he was secretary of The National Duroc Jersey 
Recording Association; in December, 191 1, he was elected secretary of the 
American Duroc Jersey Swine Breeders' Association and maintains an office 
in the Live Stock Record building, stock yards of Chicago. He has become 
widelv known through his official duties and also through the columns of his 
paper and enjoys a favorable acquaintance among agriculturists and stockmen 
throughout the United States. 



GEORGE PARKER. M. D. 

Dr. George Parker, with offices at 427 Jefferson building in Peoria, acts as 
medical director of the Peoria Life Insurance Company and is one of the rising 
30ung professional men of this city, having practiced here since 1905. He was 
born in Huntsville, Illinois, and reared in Alount Sterling, this state. His father. 
Dr. William Parker, is still practicing at Mount Sterling. 

George Parker received his early education in the graded and high schools 
of i\Iount Sterling and following his graduation entered the Illinois College at 
Tacksonville. which institution conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of 
"philosophy. He next became a student in the Northwestern University Medical 
School, being graduated from that institution in 1902 with the degree of M. D. 
After winning his M. D. degree he served for a year and a half as interne in the 
Cook County Hospital of Chicago and then spent one year in post-graduate 
work in Menna and Berlin, coming direct from these world-renowned seats of 
medical learning to Peoria. Dr. Parker does a general practice, making a spe- 
cialty of diagnosis and the treatment of internal diseases. He is on the staff of 
St. Francis Hospital and in 1910-11 acted as president of that staff. As a mem- 
ber of the Peoria City Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association, he keeps in close touch with the progress that 
is being continuously made by the profession. 

Dr. Parker selected as his life helpmate and companion Miss Amy Josey, of 
Calumet, Michigan. To them were born two sons, William and George, Jr. 
Aside from his professional activities Dr. Parker finds time to fraternize with 
some of the leading social institutions. He has attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite in Masonry, belongs to the Mystic Shrine and is also a 
member of the Creve Coeur Club of Peoria. 



ERNEST H. WAHLFELD. 

Ernest H. Wahlfeld is secretary and treasurer of The Wahlfeld Manufactur- 
ing Company, which fact is ample assurance of his being entitled to mention 
among the capable representatives of the business and commercial interests of 
Peoria. His birth occurred in this city on the 4th of October, 1883, and he is 
a son of August and Anna Wahlfeld, who are mentioned at greater length else- 
where in this work, 

Peoria has always been the home of Ernest H. Wahlfeld. who attended the 
public schools until he was sixteen years of age, in the acquirement of an edu- 
cation. Feeling he was then qualified to begin preparation for his life voca- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 51 

tion. he laid aside his text-ljooks and liecaine a worker in the (ikint with which 
he is still connected. He began in a very minor capacity and won his promo- 
tion from department to department by reason of the energy and intelligence he 
manifested in the discharge of his duties. He applied himself diligently to the 
mastery of every detail of the business, becoming thoroughly familiar with its 
varying needs and requirements, thus qualifying himself for the position he 
now holds as an official of the company. The \Vahlfeld Manufacturing Com- 
pany engage exclusively in the manufacture of interior woodwork and fixtures, 
their plant being located at Xos. 1101-1125 South Washington street. ?klr. 
Wahlfeld is progressive and highly intelligent and has given much thought and 
consideration to all questions relating to the development of the company's en- 
terprise. He is widely informed on all matters pertaining to industrial or com- 
mercial conditions and keeps in close touch, not only with those having direct 
bearing on his own interests, but those aiTecting business affairs generally. 

This city was the scene of Mr. Wahlfeld's marriage in 1905 to Miss Clara 
Tappe. a daughter of Mrs. Marie Tappe. They reside at No. 211 Moss avenue, 
where in 1900, they erected a very attractive and comfortable home, thoroughly 
modern in all of its appointments. 

Mr. and Mrs. \\'ahlfeld are members of .St. Paul's German Lutheran church 
and his allegiance in political matters he accords to the re])ublican party. He 
is widely known in the city and highly regarded among both his social and busi- 
ness accjuaintances. the majority of whom have known him from early child- 
hood, and recognize in him a worthy representative of an honored pioneer 
family. 



JOSEPH MILLER. 

Joseph Miller, now deceased, figured prominently in industrial and financial 
circles of Peoria, and owed his success to hartl work and honest methods. In all his 
undertakings he put forth earnest, persistent effort, realizing that the source of 
power is within the individual, and that not upon environment or circumstances 
does progress depend. He became well known in connection with the lumber 
trade of the city, also with its manufacturing, insurance and banking interests, 
and in every relation commanded the trust and admiration of his associates. 
He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 25, 1848, a son of Joseph Miller, who 
was a native of Germany and became one of the early residents of Peoria after 
living for a few years in Cincinnati subsequent to his immigration to the new 
world. It was in the early '50s that he arrived in Illinois, where he entered the lum- 
ber trade, establishing a yard which constituted the nucleus of the present large 
lumber business now conducted under the name of Joseph Miller & Sons. He 
built his success upon a broad and stable basis, and the reliability of his methods 
commended him to the public patronage. 

Joseph Miller, whose name introduces this review, was but three years of age 
when brought by his parents to Peoria, and in the German schools of this city 
he pursued his studies. His business training came to him under the direction 
of his father whom he joined after putting aside his text-books, thoroughly ac- 
quainting himself with every department of the trade. The business prospered 
year after year, for. to the broad experience and sound judgment of the father 
were added the enterprise and progressiveness of the two sons, for both Joseph 
Miller and his brother Frank were admitted to a partnership in the business 
under the style of Joseph Miller & Sons. Following the father's death the 
brothers continued the business with Joseph Miller as the senior partner, and 
thus the subject of this review was closely associated with the lumber business 
of this city up to the time of his death. The business of the house constantly 



52 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

grew in volume and importance for they carried an extensive line of lumber and 
all kinds of building material, and their business methods measured up to the 
highest standard of commercial ethics. Joseph ^ililler was well known also in 
other connections, becoming treasurer of the Garside Manufacturing Company, 
vice president of the German Fire Insurance Company and a director of the 
Commercial German National Bank. He found ready solution for intricate bus- 
iness problems, and seemed to recognize almost intuitively the possibilities and 
opportunities of a situation. He was also prominently identified with the Board 
of Trade and enjoyed an enviable reputation for his sound, conservative and 
reliable business methods and his straightforward dealing. 

On the loth of April, 1871, occurred the marriage of ^Ir. ^liller and Miss 
Mary DeFries, a daughter of Charles DeFries. They became the parents of four 
children: Joseph, who is identified with the firm of Joseph Aliller & Sons; Mary 
M., Emma J. and Oscar W. The eldest son is now married and has two children, 
Joseph. Jr., and Helen Elizabeth. ;\Ir. Miller held memebrship in the St. Jos- 
eph's Catholic Church, also with the St. Joseph's Brothers and Knights of St. 
George. His political support was given to the republican party where national 
questions and issues were involved, but in local elections he cast an independent 
ballot. He was a splendid type of a successful German- American citizen. What- 
ever the quiet forces and influences at work in his life to shape his destiny, it 
was evident at the outset of his business career that he understood clearly the 
fact that energy and unfaltering perseverence constitute the surest basis upon 
which to build success. Those qualities were ever numbered among his salient 
characteristics and won for him the constant promotion and advancement which 
attended him in his business career and gained for him his prominent and hon- 
orable position in the trade and banking circles of the city. 



t 



^lARCUS WHITING, M. D. 

In the twenty-nine years of his connection with the medical profession in 
Peoria, Dr. INIarcus \Miiting has made continuous progress, keeping in touch with 
the advancement that has characterized the medical fraternity in its search for the 
deep scientific truths which underlie their work. He came to this city in April. 
1883, then a young man of nearly twenty-three years. He was born on a farm in 
Lafayette county, Missouri. August 22, i860, a son of the Rev. Charles Whiting. 
D. D., a Baptist minister, who devoted forty years of his life to the work of the 
church. At intervals he accepted new pastorates, filling Baptist pulpits in Dover, 
Boonville and Springfield, ^Missouri : Fort Scott, Kansas ; and Quincy and Can- 
ton, Illinois. Earnest and purposeful, his teachings bore fruit in the lives of 
those who came under his guidance and he continued actively and successfully in 
the work of the ministry to the time of his demise, which occurred in Canton. Illi- 
nois, April 26, 1893. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Lucy \\'ebb. still 
survives him at the age of seventy-nine years. She was ever in hearty sympathy 
with him in his work in behalf of the church, and in the training of her children 
in the home she gave to them principles which have been effective forces in 
molding their lives since leaving the parental roof. 

Dr. Whiting, whose name introduces this record, acquired his primary educa- 
tion in the different towns in which the family were located. He was a student in 
the high school of Ouincy, Illinois, and was graduated therefrom with the class of 
1875. He continued his studies for four or five years, following the direction of 
his father, who was a man of liberal education, the son devoting his attention to 
the classics. The broad knowledge thus ac<iuired served as an excellent founda- 
tion upon which to build professional learning. Determining to make the prac- 
tice of medicine his life work, he matriculated in Rush Medical College at Chi- 




DR. JIARCUS \\THITIN(1 



4 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 55 

cago as a member of the class of 1880, and was one of thirteen in a class of one 
hundred and eightv-tive to pursue the full three years' course that brought him 
to his graduation on the 20th of February. 1883. Throughout his entire pro- 
fessional career he has been a resident of Peoria, opening an ottice in this city on 
the I St of April, at Xo. 902 Xorth Adams street. After six months, however, he 
removed to Soo Xorth Adams street, where he maintained his office for twenty- 
one years. During that period his practice steadily grew as the public came to 
recognize his skill and ability, which were continually augmented by liis further 
study and research. For five or si.x years he had his office in the Woolner build- 
ing, from which he removed to his present location in the Jefferson building, in 
June, iqio. He has never specialized but has continued in general practice and 
throughout the entire period of twenty-nine years has been accorded a liberal 
patronage. His work has been eminently satisfactory and resultant and his close 
conformity to a high standard of professional ethics has brought him the regard 
and confidence of his brethren of the medical fraternity. He has done consider- 
able hospital work, serving on the staff' of St. Francis Hospital, also of the 
Deaconess Hospital and the Proctor Hospital. He has also served as commis- 
sioner of health of Peoria, filling the office from 188S until i8go, inclusive. He 
has kei:)t in touch with the advancement made by the medical profession not only 
through private reading and research but also through the proceedings of the 
Peoria Cit)- Medical Society, the Illinois State IMetlical Society and the American 
jMedical Association, in all of which he holds membership. His practice has 
made continuous demands upon his time and energies and yet he has found oppor- 
tunity for cooperation in business aft'airs of an entirely diff'erent character. He 
was one of the incorporators and original stockholders of the Interstate Bank & 
Trust Company of Peoria and served on its directorate for several years, retiring 
in 1910. 

On lanuarv 24, 1888, Dr. Whiting was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
Elizabeth Garthwait, of Indianapolis, and unto them has been born a daughter, 
Ethel, who is the wife of A. B. Scofield, of Peoria. In Alasonry Dr. Whiting has 
attained high rank. He has not only taken the degrees of the lodge but has also 
ac(|uainted himself with the work of capitular, cryptic and chivalric ^Masonry in 
the cha|.)ter. council and commandery. He has likewise crossed the sands of the 
desert with the nobles of the 'Mystic Shrine and he belongs to the Knights of 
Pvthias fraternity, to the Maccabees Tent, to the Royal League and to the For- 
esters. His political allegiance is given the democratic party and in its local coun- 
cils he is a man of considerable influence, holding firmly to the principles which 
he deems of vital moment in good government. He served for six years, or for 
three terms, as alderman from the first ward of Peoria, being called to the 
office in 1003. In that connection he exercises his official prerogatives in support 
of many progressive pul)lic movements. At all times he stands for advancement 
and im|)rovement whether in professional relations or in his connections with the 
city's best interests. He is a man of broad and liberal culture, whose friendship 
is prized wherever he is known and most of all where he is best known. 



BERNARD MURNIGHAN. 

Bernard ]Murnighan, who has been vice president and manager of the Peoria 
Bedding Company w-ith factories at 1500 North Adams street since its incorpo- 
ration in 1910, was born in Bloomington, Illinois, on the 8th of November, 1876. 
He is a son of P. J. and Margaret ( ]\Iullins ) Murnighan. The father was em- 
ployed as gardener by Judge Davis, a position which he held for forty-two years. 
His death occurred on the 5th of August, 1894, when he was eighty-two years of 



56 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

age. Ills wife passed away in 1884 and they are l)oth buried in the Catholic 
cemetery. 

Bernard Alurnighan was a pupil in the public schools of Bloomington until 
he was thirteen years of age. At that time he laid aside his text-books and 
began earning his own livelihood by work as a farm hand. He was first employed 
by a cousin. A. Williams, for eleven months. Afterw-ard he returned to Bloom- 
ington and was employed for some time in the labeling department of a packing 
house, but on the 17th of January, 1890, he entered his present line of business. 
He started with the firm of Robert Thompson as an apprentice, but in about four 
years he had worked up to the position of foreman of the mattress department. 
He served in that capacity until iSgg, when he removed to New York city and 
became foreman of the Acme Bedding Company. After two years he accepted 
the position of superintendent of the Bohnart Brunsman Company. Three years 
later he returned to Bloomington and remained there as foreman of the Dodge- 
Dickinson Company until in March, 1910, he formed the present company. He 
has since been a resident of Peoria and is at present serving as vice president and 
manager of the Peoria Bedding Company. He has worked his way upward 
from a position of minor importance to the head of a concern which has a wide 
reputation as reliable manufacturers. 

On the 13th of July, 1900. Mr. Murnighan was married to !Miss Jeannette 
Kirby, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kirby, the former a prominent agri- 
culturist of his locality. In politics Mr. Murnighan gives his support to the 
republican party, and although he has never sought nor desired office, he main- 
tains a citizen's interest in the issues of the day. He holds membership in the 
Association of Commerce. His life has been an extremely busv and useful one. 
and while his interests have brought him great success, his work has always been 
of a nature which benefits the community as well. The family residence is located 
at 1508 Xorth Madison street. 



PETER COLCORD BARTLETT. 

It is not given to the majority of men to attain prominence in military or 
political circles, but the possibilities of a successful career in business are before 
every individual. The attainment of success, however, attests the possession of 
certain essential qualities. These are industry, concentration, close application 
and firm purpose and with all these requisites Peter Colcord Bartlett was richly 
endowed. By their exercise he gained a creditable position in business circles 
and, moreover, his was a notable career in that he remained actively in business 
to the time of his death, which occurred when he was about eighty-five years of 
a,ge. He was born February 13, 1826, in Salisbury. Xew Hampshire, and departed 
this life in Peoria. April 5, 191 1. As a pioneer merchant and representative 
business man he certainly deserves mention in this volume. His parents were 
Peter and Anna (Pettengill) Bartlett. The father was a capable and learned 
physician, who in 1836 removed to Peoria, becoming one of the earliest prac- 
titioners of medicine in this city which at that time contained a very limited pop- 
ulation. He was a representative of one of the old Xew England families, among 
whose members were many who attained prominence, their names being closely 
associated with a number of the leading educational institutions of Xew England, 
also wdth the records of the bar and the medical profession. 

Peter C. Bartlett was a pupil in the public schools of his native town and also 
of Peoria, following the removal of the family to this place. He first sought 
employment as a clerk in a general store and his initial business experience 
qualified him for larger responsibilities at a later date. He soon entered the 
employ of Pettengill & Bartlett, proprietors of a general mercantile establishment, 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 57 

the junior partner being a cousin of Peter C. L5artlctt. While thus enipluyecl the 
latter carefully saved his earnings until his industry and economical expenditure 
had brought him a sufficient sum to enable him to engage in business on his own 
account He then opened a grocery store, which he conducted successfully for 
twelve years. His trade grew during that period and brought him substantial 
success.' He afterward turned his attention to the dry-goods business, forming 
a partnership with A. P. Bartlett, who had previously been his employer when 
a member of the firm of Pettengill & l^artlett. The connection between the 
cousins was discontinued in 1877. when A. P. Bartlett retired from business. 
The following year Peter C. Bartlett entered the revenue service, in which he 
continued for seven vears. On the expiration of that period he once more lie- 
came connected with the grocery trade, in which he continued successfully up to 
the time of his death. He was a'business man of the highest type and the straight- 
forward, honorable policv which he followed is still being pursued by his son 
Kdward P. Bartlett, who is his successor in commercial circles. Despite his 
eighty-five years he went each day to his oflice and continued actively in business 
to the time of his demise. 

On the I2th of November, 1851, Mr. Bartlett was united in marriage to Aliss 
.■\higail Thompson, and unto the'm were born four .sons but Henry T. Bartlett 
is the only one now living. The wife and mother passed away September 2, 
1861. and 'Mr. Bartlett afterward wedded Margaret Culbertson, by whom he had 
five children: Sue Herron, Nancy Culbertson. Edward P., Lucy Ellen and Wil- 
liam C. There are two granddaughters: Alice C, a daughter of Henry T. Bart- 
lett: and Margaret C, a daughter of Edward P. Bartlett. 

The parents were members of the Presbyterian church and were people of 
broad and liberal views and of charitable spirit, ever ready to extend a helping 
hand to one in need or to speak an encouraging word. In business afTairs \Ir. 
Bartlett was conservative yet never allowed this to interfere with progressive- 
ness. He clung tenaciously to a cause which he believed to be right and his 
opinions were founded upon through understanding of every vital question. He 
was a well read man and he was fond of music. He had many lovable traits of 
character, was alwavs considerate of the opinions of others and his friendship 
was much prized by all to whom it was given. There are no exciting chapters 
in his life record but it is that of a man who ever recognized his duties and met 
his obliijations. 



JAMES B. DOOLEY. 



lames B. Dooley is the jiresident of the firm of Dooley Brothers, agents for 
the Dujjont powder and dynamite and wholesale and retail coal merchants in 
Peoria, having their offices at C104 South Adams street. He was born in Nova 
Scotia, Tnne 21, 1856, the son of Edward and Johanna Dooley. The father 
followed the occupation of coal mining. He passed away in this city in 1888 
and is buried in St. Mary's cemetery. 

lames B. Dooley attended school in Nova Scotia until he was ten years of age 
when, to help toward the support of the family, he began working in a coal mine 
and followed that line of work until 1886. During that time he won promotion 
and attained a remunerative position in the business. In 1881 he came to Peoria 
and here, in 1887, he was appointed by Mayor Kinsey as a policeman, in which 
capacity he served for two years. Subsequently he was appointed bridge tender, 
holding that office for three years. Then, he and his brother, Richard A. Dooley, 
started the business with which they are now connected. They have met with 
excellent success and in iqoS is was incorporated into the present firm. They 



58 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

are the only Diipont agents in Peoria. Mr. Dooley is also president of the East- 
ern Coal Company, the mine being owned by himself and his brother. 

In Peoria, on the 25th of February, 1884, 'Sir. Dooley was married to Miss 
Fredericka Schultz, daughter of Mr. and I\Irs. Henry Schultz. The father is 
a farmer in Peoria county and an old settler here. To Mr. and Airs. Dooley has 
been born one son, Edward, who is the cashier of the Dooley Brothers Company. 
The family lives at 713 Garden street in a residence that was erected in 1897. 
In politics Mr. Dooley is a democrat and he and his family adhere to the faith 
of the Catholic church. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of 
Foresters and of the Loyal Americans. ]\Ir. Doolev's success in life is due to 
his energy, persistence and business management. 



HEXRY MEANS PINDELL. 

Henry Means Pindell whose name figures prominently in the history of 
journalism in Peoria being now and for many years owner and proprietor of the 
leading paper of the city — the Peoria Journal — was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, 
December 23, i860. He is a son of James Morrison and Elizabeth Pindell and 
comes of an ancestry honored and distinguished, various representatives of the 
family having figured prominently in connection with events that have left their 
impress upon American annals. His great-grandfather. Dr. Richard Pindell. 
served on the staff of General ^^'ashington in the Revolutionarv war and dressed 
the wounds of Lafayette when the French patriot was injured in battle and when 
twenty years afterward he visited America for the second time, he was enter- 
tained in Lexington, Kentucky, at the home of Alajor Thomas R. Pindell the 
Doctor's son. James Morrison Pindell was an own cousin of Senator Thomas 
Hart Benton, of Missouri. He became a warm and personal associate of Henrv 
Clay who was his guardian and with whom he was closely connected through 
Clay"s political career. In fact, the Clays and Pindells were for years verv in- 
timate and their burying lots in the Kentucky cemetery adjoined. The great- 
grandmother of Henry M. Pindell was a relative of Virginia's first governor. 
James M. Pindell made the practice of law his life work and his professional 
career added laurels to an honored family name. In theory, in person and in 
character, Henry Means Pindell is a worthy scion of his race. His intellectual 
training, so far as the work of the schoolroom went was completed in the De Pauw 
University at Greencastle, Indiana, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1884. -'^11 through his life he has followed journalism, and during President 
Cleveland's first administration was editor of the Wabash (Indiana) Times. 
Later he was connected with The Chicago Tribune and from that paper went to 
The State Register at Springfield, Illinois, as its city editor. \\'hile residing at 
the capitol he was elected city treasurer, serving from 1887 until 1889, under 
Mayor Charles E. Hay. a brother of the late Honorable John Hay, secretary 
of state during President AIcKinley's administration. 

jMr. Pindell removed from Springfield to Peoria in 1S89 and founded The 
Peoria Herald. Subsequently he purchased The Peoria Transcript and The 
Peoria Times, but sold the latter to J. B. Barnes, proprietor of The Peoria Jour- 
nal and consolidated The Transcript and The Herald under the name of The 
Herald-Transcript. On the 13th of July, 1902, he purchased The Journal and 
in October of that year sold The Herald-Transcript to a number of business 
men, republicans. ]\Ir. Pindell continued the publication of The Journal and has 
developed it according to the most modern and progressive methods of news- 
paper publication until it is today the strongest Peoria newspaper, stalwart and 
vigorous in its policy in keeping in touch with the advance movements resulting 
from the wise and careful consideration of the vital and significant problems of 




11. M. PDSIDELL 



I-IISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 61 

tliL- (lav. The Journal's plant is the best equipped in tlie city. The policy of the 
liapcr has ever been characterized by fearlessness and this quality has ever 
featured in the journalistic and private activities of Air. Pindell. In iSg6 and 
again in 1900, associated with The Herald in the former year and with The 
Herald-Transcript in the latter. Mr. Pindell repudiated \\'iniam Jennings IJryan 
and became an independent with democratic leanings. He fought the free silver 
craze. He was wholly responsible for the death of the infamous Illinois Allen 
law which gave corporations the right of the use of the streets for fifty years. 
He has always vigorously opposed corporate greed. He stands for the interests 
of the people at large, holding also to the policy that political organizations 
should he operated for the benefit of the majority rather than for the few. In 
fact, at all limes, Mr. Pindell has been a cham]iion of j^rogress and im]:)rovement 
and this spirit has led to his official interest in the Peoria Public Library and the 
Peoria Association of Commerce, in both of which he is a director. He was 
active in the management of the movement for the commission form of govern- 
ment in the state and Governor Deneen gives him credit for putting the law on 
tlie statute books of Illinois. 

On the 29th of October. 1890, Mr. Pindell married Miss Eliza Adelia Smith, 
a daughter of Honorable P. W. Smith of Springfield, whose people were early 
pioneers of Illinois, representing a i)rominent southern family. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pindell have two children, Elizabeth and Frances, both attending school in the 
east. The parents hold membership in the Second Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Pindell is a member of the Creve Coeur Club and the Peoria Country 
Club. He was one of the organizers and for two years was president of the 
Illinois Daily Newspaper Publishers Association. For years he was a member of 
the board of the Western Division of the Associated Press. His strongly marked 
personal characteristics are of the highly sensitive nature of the southern type ; 
a keen and analytical mind that recognizes the advance features and phases of 
any subject to which his attention is closely directed, and therefore arrives at a 
largely impartial opinion ; a generous appreciation of the rights and privileges 
of others ; and a deep and commendable interest in ancestral and historical records 
as well as in modern day events. He is a lover of a good horse and all manly 
out-door sports. He enjoys a game of golf and in fact, likes a game of chance 
which calls forth his metal and his ability. His is the success which comes to 
those who, as a Chicago journalist has put it, "are willing to stand by their stand- 
ards, who are ready to endure the siege of misjudgment, who are prepared to 
face the fire of criticism and to accept defeat until they become vaccinated 
against it." .Such men not onlv win but deserve their success. 



CAL\TN C. SCHNEBLY. 

Throughdut the years of his residence in Peoria county — years that covered 
his entire life span — Calvin C. Schnebly was connected with agricultural in- 
terests. He was a representative of one of the old and prominent families of 
this part of the state, his father, Henry Schnebly, having arrived in Peoria 
county in 1833. in which year he traveled across the country from Pennslyvania 
to Illinois. He found that all this section of the state was largely wild and un- 
improved, its prairies covered with its native grasses and starred with a million 
wild flowers during the summer months while in the winter season the plain 
presented the appearance of one dazzling and unbroken sheet of snow. Here 
and there a hardy ])ioneer had braved the difficulties of frontier life to establish 
a home in the far west, and Henry Schnebly, wishing to become identified with 
farming interests in this part of the state, secured one hundred and sixty acres 
of land adjoining Peoria, which was then but a tiny hamlet. 



62 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

It was upon the old homestead farm that Calvin C. Schnebly was born and 
reared, his natal day being March lo, 1845. His education was largely acquired 
in the district schools of that early day, although for a short time he attended 
Dixon ( Illinois ) College. In the meantime he assisted his father on the farm, 
and after permanently putting aside his text-books he remained on the old home- 
stead, bearing his part in the work of converting the tract into rich and productive 
fields. Following his father's death he became owner and manager of the prop- 
erty which he continued to cultivate until his own demise on the 15th of Septem- 
ber, 1905, when he was sixty years of age. He was a progressive agriculturist, 
following modern methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops, and in his 
cultivation of the fields he used the latest improved machines. He was a man of 
rather quiet and retiring disposition, yet his friends ever found him congenial 
and hospitable, extending a hearty welcome to all who passed his threshold. He 
enjoyed nature in all its forms and life in the open fields under the blue sky and 
in the clear air was ever a source of joy to him. 

Mr. Schnebly was twice married. He first married Miss Jennie Chambers 
and they became the parents of five children, two of whom reached adult years, 
namely,' Lucy C. and Alice W., but the latter is now deceased. The mother 
passed away' September 18. 1890, and Mr. Schnebly afterward married her sis- 
ter. Miss Lucy Chambers, who still survives him as does his brother. Joseph 
Schnebly, of Peoria, and two sisters, Mrs. T. C. Rounds, of Chicago, and Mrs. 
George Treadwell, of Albany. Xew York. 

Politically Mr. Schnebly was a republican, indorsing the principles of the 
party from the time age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He served 
as school trustee for many years, and the cause of education ever found in him 
a stalwart champion. Shortly before his death he was elected supervisor of 
Peoria county, and in that position was proving capable and faithful. He was 
also a trustee' of the First Presbyterian church and one of its active and devoted 
members to the time of his death which occurred when he was sixty years of age. 
He had always been a resident of Peoria county, and was a witness of or par- 
ticipant in many events which, to the majority, are merely matters of history. 



JOHN CONRAD WOELFLE. 

Among the highly esteemed pioneer business men of Peoria who are now 
living retired must be numbered John Conrad Woelfle, who has resided here for 
fifty years, during forty of which he owned and successfully conducted a jewelry 
store' He was born iii Baden, Germany, on the i6th of January, 1843. and is a 
son of John Jacob and Agnes (Kienzle) Woelfle, likewi.se natives of Baden, 
where they passed away during the early childhood of our subject. 

Reared in the land of his birth, after the completion of his studies in the com- 
mon schools, John Conrad Woelfle was apprenticed to the watchmaker's trade, 
which he followed in Germany until he was eighteen years of age. In the au- 
tumn of 1861, together with his sister. Anna Marie, he took passage for the 
United States to join his brother John J., who had emigrated to this country 
about three years previously. John J. Woelfle was then located at Peoria, but 
he subsequently removed to Pekin, where he is now engaged in the jewelry busi- 
ness. Being unfamiliar with the language and customs of the country, John Con- 
rad W'oelfle followed various occupations after coming to this country. Finally 
he took a position with his brother at Pekin as watchmaker, but he later entered 
the employ of John C. Wieting of Peoria. It was his ambition to have an estab- 
lishment of his own and with this thought in mind he practiced the most rigid 
economy until he had accumulated the necessary capital. He achieved his desire 
on the 1st of Deceml)er, 1S71. when he resigned his position and engaged in 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 63 

Imsiness for himself at 122 Adams street, this city. Owing to his limited means 
it was necessary for him to begin in a small way, but he used excellent judgment 
in investing his money, and when he threw open the doors of his little shop to 
the holiday trade, he had on dis])lay an attractive assortment of silverware and 
jewelry. The Peoria of forty years ago bore little resemblance to the thriving 
populous city of today, and in the smaller cmnmunity the e.xcellent skill and 
workmanship that Mr. WoelUe had manifested during the years of his clerkship, 
had made him favorably known and enabled him in winning recognition with 
little diificulty and building up a trade. He remained at his original stand for 
thirty-two years and then removed to number 112 South Adams street. Here 
he continued to engage in business until the 8th of May, 191 1, when he sold his 
store to W'elte & Wieting and retired from active business, having acquired 
during the long period of his connection with commercial activities sufficient 
means to warrant his retirement. When he sold out, his was the second oldest 
jewelry store in the city, the oldest being that of Jacob Faber. As he had l)ut 
limited capital when he started out Mr. Woelfle had more or less of a struggle 
to get his business established, meeting with the obstacles and difficulties that 
confront practically every young man. However, he possessed the determination 
of purpose and optimism that enabled him to forge ahead until he was perma- 
nentlv established on a paying basis. The methods he pursued and his business 
policy together with his high standards of commercial integrity won for him the 
respect and cooperation of those with whom he had transactions and enabled 
him not onlv to win customers but to retain them, so that many of the names 
appearing on his books when he retired bad been there for more than a quarter 
of a century. 

On the 1st of November, 1888, Mr. Woelfle was united in marriage to Miss 
.Amelia Hesler, a native of Peoria and a daughter of .Vugust Hesler, who was 
well known ;i.mong the early settlers in Peoria and is now deceased. One 
daughter has been born to Air. and Mrs. Woelfle. Amelia, who is eighteen years 
of age and a junior in the Bradley Polytechnic. The family home is located at 
413 North Jefferson street, where they own a very comfortable and pleasant 
residence. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Woelfle hold membership in the Lutheran church, and 
fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while 
in ]3olitics he is a democrat. During the long period of his connection with the 
business interests of the city. Mr. Woelfle witnessed ])ractically a transforma- 
tion in commercial methods owing to the advent of modern inventions and ap- 
pliances that have revolutionized trade conditions and placed the United States 
in the front rank among the nations of the world. Although he has always been 
loyal to the land of his birth, which he dee])ly admires, Mr. Woelfle has never 
had occasion to regret coming to America, where he has achieved more than a 
moderate degree of success. 



E. E. HARDING. 



E. E. Harding, a representative of the legal fraternity in Peoria, with offices 
at No. 107 South Adams street, has here practiced his ])rofession continuously 
and successfully for almost three decades. His birth occurred in this city on the 
13th of January, 1858, his parents being John J. and Jane (Greenough) Hard- 
ing. In 1845 the father crossed the Atlantic from England to the United States, 
making his way direct to Peoria. He came here with less than a dollar in his 
pocket but by dint of unremitting industry and careful expenditure gradually 
augumented his financial resources and acquired over four hundred acres of 
valuable land in Peoria county. In politics he was a stanch rei^ublican, loyally 



64 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

supporting the men and measures of that party. He reared six sons, one of 
whom, Robert G., passed away and was buried in this county. All of the others, 
with the exception of our subject are agriculturists by occupation. They are 
as follows: John J., who acts as supervisor of Logan township; Henry W., who 
was formerly supervisor and now holds the office of assessor of Rosefield town- 
ship ; William W., residing in Brimfield township, who is engaged in the raising 
of Duroc Jersey hogs ; and Judson, who resides at Trivoli, near where is located 
the Texas cemetery, in which the family has a burial lot. 

E. E. Harding obtained his early education in a district school on one of his 
father's farms and remained under the parental roof until nineteen years of 
age. He then came to Peoria and attended the Peoria County Normal School 
until graduated from that institution in 1879. During the next three years he 
followed the profession of teaching in this county, imparting clearly and readily 
to others the knowledge he had acquired. Subsequently he began reading law 
with lulius Star, former city attorney, and was admitted to the bar at the end 
of two years — on the 26th day of February, 1883. From that time to the present 
he has devoted his attention to the practice of law in Peoria and has 
enjoyed an enviable clientage. At no time has his reading ever been confined 
to the limitations of the question at issue. It has gone beyond and compassed 
every contingency and provided not alone for the expected but for the unex- 
pected, which happens in the courts quite as frequently as out of them. Mr. 
Harding is also a prominent factor in business circles, acting as secretary of the 
W. U. Hanford Company and the E. L. Stevens Company. 

On the 28th of November, 1883, at Trivoli, Air. Harding was united in mar- 
riage to Aliss Emma Linck, daughter of Jacob Linck, a pioneer settler of Peoria 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Harding have two daughters and a son, namely: Agnes, 
who is a graduate of the Whittier school and also has an excellent musical edu- 
cation, is now soloist at the First Baptist church ; Edith, a graduate of the Tri- 
voli high school ; and Jacob Weston, a lad of seven. The family residence is at 
No. 323 Pennsylvania avenue, our subject owning the property. 

At the polls Air. Harding supports the men and measures of the republican 
partv, believing that its principles are most conducive to good government. For 
a period of four years, from 1893 to 1897, he held the offices of justice of the 
peace. Fraternally he is identified with the Maccabees and the Moose, while 
in the line of his profession he is connected with the Peoria Bar Association. 
In the county where his entire life has been spent, he is well known as an able 
attorney, enterprising lousiness man and public-spirited citizen. 



RUDOLPH A. SCHBIPFF. 

It is appropriate that mention be made of Rudolph A. Schimpff among the 
German-American residents of Peoria, for through an extended period covering 
the greater part of his life he resided in this city and for many years was well 
known here as a leading grocer, in which connection he developed a business of 
extensive and gratifying proportions that enabled him to spend his later years 
in quiet retirement. He was born Alarch 13, 1836, in Landau, Bavaria, Germany, 
a son of Carl W. and Elizabeth (Schimpff) Schimpff, who, upon coming to 
America in 1850, at once made their way into the interior of the country with 
Peoria as their destination. The father was one of the pioneer grocers of this 
city and ranked with the leading business men of that earlv dav. 

Rudolph A. Schimpff began his education in the schools of his native land 
where he remained until fourteen years of age when he accompanied his parents 
on their immigration to the new world. He also pursued a course of study for 
a short time in the schools of Peoria, and afterward became his father's assis- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 65 

tant in the business, working for him until 1S59. Desiring to enter upon an 
independent career he then opened a grocery store on his own account and con- 
tinued in that hue of trade until a few years prior to his death. As time passed 
on he developed a btisiness of large and growing importance. In all his trade 
dealings he was strictly reliable, never taking advantage of the necessity of an- 
other, and his well selected line of goods and his earnest desire to please his 
patrons were features in his success. He was justly accounted one of the prom- 
inent and well known merchants of Peoria during the latter part of the nine- 
teenth century. 

On the Sth of February, 1S65, was celebrated the marriage of Air. Schimptif 
and Miss Henrietta Haedicke, who was born in Woodford county, Illinois, on 
October i, 1843, a daughter of Adolph and Hanna (Brautigam) Haedicke, who 
were early settlers in this part of the state, coming from Germany to the new 
world. Air. and Airs. Schimpfif became the parents of four children, of whom 
Earnest G. and Harriet \V. are now deceased. Those still living are Louise, 
who was born October 4, 1868, and Anna, born January 17, 1876, both yet at 
home with their mother. Air. Schimpit was devoted to his family, spending 
his happiest hotirs at his own fireside. 

Air. Schimpff's political indorsement was given to the republican party, yet 
the honors and emoluments of office had no attraction for him. He was a man 
of unfaltering honor whose word was as good as his bond. He died August 18, 
1891, when fifty-five years of age, having for forty-one years been a resident 
of Peoria. He had witnessed the development of the city from a comparatively 
small town to one of the metropolitan cities of the middle west, and as the years 
passed on he cooperated to the extent of his opporttmitv in all that pertained 
to public progress and improvement. At the same time he carefully conducted 
his business interests, knowing his first duty was to his fainily for whom he pro- 
vided a comfortable living and at his death left them a goodly competence. 



JAMES AI. MORSE. 



Among the permanent business and professional men of Peoria is James AI. 
Morse, an extensive owner of real estate, with offices at No. 105 South Jefferson 
street, who has been operating here since 1884. Air. Alorse was born in Peoria, 
Illinois, August 22. 1854, a son of John H. and Almira C. (Childs) Alorse. The 
lather, from 1844 to 1875, was a well known jeweler in this city. He was born 
in Dedham, Alassachusetts, Alarch 13, 1823, and was reared and educated in 
the state of his nativity. His tastes and inclinations were toward the jewelry 
business and he became a goldsmith while yet a young man. Shortly after mas- 
tering the details of his trade he married at Jacksonville, Illinois, Alay 3, 1847, 
Miss Almira Childs of West Woodstock, Connecticut, and with his wife, came 
to Peoria on their bridal tour. They were so much pleased with the then western 
city that they decided to locate here and remained residents of Peoria until 1875, 
when they moved to Evanston. Illinois, where Air. Alorse was made superinten- 
dent of Rose Hill cemetery, a position which he held until his death in 1897. 
Subsequently Airs. Alorse returned to Peoria, where he is now making her home 
with the subject of this review. She is now eighty-three vears of age, her birth 
having occurred in Connecticut in 1829. Her husband, John H. Alorse, was also 
well known in Peoria as an inventor of unusual talent. In 1858-1860 he received 
from the government patents on many of the safe and vault locks of that day, 
some of which are still in u.se. In 1872-1873, he patented the first '■hollow-arm" 
twine grain binder. 

James AI. Alorse was reared in Peoria, attending the graded and high schools 
of the city until graduated therefrom. He then took up the reading of law with 



66 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 



Major Wells, with whum he practiced uniil 1884, having been admitted to the bar 
in 1875. In 1884 he gave up the practice of his profession to enter the real estate 
business with John Comstock. This partnership was continued until the death of 
Mr. Comstock in 1905, whereupon Mr. Morse succeeded to the entire business. 
The real estate activities of the firm included practically the handling of their own 
properties, and since the death of his partner Mr. Alorse has handled not only 
his own affairs but also the former business interests of Mr. Comstock. His 
holdings and dealings in city property, which has always been his specialty, 
are extensive and varied. 

In 1875 Mr. Morse was united in marriage to Miss Agnes L. Armstrong, of 
Peoria, a daughter of Alexander Armstrong. Mr. Morse is identified w^ith the 
Masonic fraternitv and is also a member of the Creve Coeur and Peoria Country 
Clubs, being active and prominent in these organizations. As the entire life of 
Mr. Morse has been passed in Peoria, he has by his geniality and many other 
good qualities attracted to himself a large number of business and social friends 
and not many men in the city are held in higher esteem. 



CLIFFORD U. COLLINS, M. D. 

The medical and surgical profession finds one of its most eminent and capable 
representatives in Dr. Clifford U. Collins, whose offices are located in the Jeft"er- 
son building and who is now concentrating his energies entirely upon surgical 
work, in which connection he manifests superior skill as the result of wide study, 
thorough research and long experience. He was born in Batavia, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 17, 1867, and is a son of John D. and Martha (Cox) Collins. His father was 
a native of Clinton county, Ohio, born September 17. 1838, and was a son of 
Samuel P. Collins, a native of New Hampshire, who wedded Nancy Dalton, who 
was also born in the old Granite state. Removing westward he settled in Clinton 
county, Ohio, in 1830, becoming one of the pioneer residents of that district, 
which was then a wild and undeveloped region in which the work of improvement 
had scarcely been begun. He became the owner of a large farm and devoted the 
greater part of his life to its cultivation and improvement. The death of the 
grandfather occurred when he was sixty-nine years of age and his wife passed 
away at the age of forty-two years. The maternal grandfather of Dr. Collins was 
Aaron Cox, who was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, June 6, 1800, and 
whose life record covered the intervening span of years to the 3d of February, 
1883. He wedded Mary Bailey, who was born in March, 1820, and died at the 
age of seventy-nine years. They were of the Quaker faith and were stanch advo- 
cates of the abolition cause. 

lohn D. Collins, the Doctor's father, acquired a good education while spend- 
ing his youthful days under the parental roof, and having arrived at years of 
maturity was married, on the 23th of September, 1859, to Miss Martha Cox, who 
was born in Auglaize county, Ohio, January 21, 1839. The young couple began 
their domestic life in Ohio but in 1862 John D. Collins put aside all personal and 
business considerations in order to prove his loyalty to the Union cause by active 
service at the front. The country was then engaged in Civil war and he felt that 
it needed the aid of all loyal citizens. In 1862, therefore, he enlisted, becoming a 
member of Company K, Seventy-Ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he 
served as a sharpshooter for three years. During that period he went with Sher- 
man on the celebrated march from Atlanta to the sea and when the war was over 
he was mustered out at Washington, D. C. He participated in the grand review 
in the capital which was the most celebrated military pageant ever seen in the 
western hemisphere, thousands of victorious Union soldiers marching down Penn- 
svlvania avenue over which was suspended a banner bearing the words "The only 




CLIFFORD V. COLLINS 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 69 

debt wliicli the ciiuntrv owes that she canimt pay is the debt which she owes to 
her solthers." 

The war over, Mr. Collins returned tu his home in Ohio, where he remained 
until 1873, when he removed with his family to Vandalia, Illinois. He became 
a prominent factor of Fayette county, this state, acting as principal of the schools 
of \andalia and also of Ramsey. He turned from professional life to commer- 
cial pursuits, however, in 187S, when he embarked in general merchandising at 
\'andalia, where he successfully continued for many years. John Collins and his 
wife were people of sterling worth whose influence and labors were always given 
on the side of advancement, reform and improvement. They were especially 
active in support of the temperance cause, Mr. Collins voting for many years with 
the prohibition party of which he was an active worker, while his wife was very 
prominent in the Women's Christian Temperance Union. 

Dr. Clifford U. Collins was not yet six years of age when the family removed 
from Ohio to \'andalia, where he pursued his education until graduated from 
the high school of that city with the class of 1885. He then turned to the pro- 
fession of teaching as his initial experience in the business world, devoting five 
years to that work. He was first employed as teacher in the country schools but 
later became principal of the \'andalia schools. However, he regarded school 
teaching merely as a step toward other professional labor and with a desire to be- 
come an active member of the medical profession he entered upon a course of 
studv in the Marion Sims College of Medicine in that city. Following his grad- 
uation there in 1892 he practiced for two years in \'andalia and then removed to 
.\vervville, Peoria county, on the ist of April, 1893. Success attended him in his 
efforts at that place and won him a reputation which made him well known in 
Peoria. Seeking the broader field of labor oft'ered by the city he came to Peoria in 
1904 and after continuing in general practice for a time he determined to devote 
his energies exclusively to surgical work, in which field of practice he displays 
marked skill and ability, having comprehensive knowledge of anatomy, the com- 
]ionent parts of the human body and the onslaughts made upon it by disease. 
Cool and quiet in an emergency, he is well adapted for the difficult and arduous 
duties that continuously devolve upon the surgeon. 

On the 7th of January, 1890, in Vandalia, Dr. Collins was united in marriage to 
Miss Belle Henry and unto them has been born a daughter, Constance. Mrs. 
Collins is a daughter of Judge B. W. Henry, who was born in Shelby county in 
1834 and for many years practiced law in ^'andalia. His father, the Rev. Bush- 
ford Henrv, who for an extended period resided in- Shelbyville, Illinois, was one 
of the ]5ioneer preachers, contributing to the moral progress and development of 
that district. His son, B. W. Henry, determined to devote his life to the practice 
of law and ultimately attained to high judicial honors in that connection. He 
married Sarah Johnson, who was born in Pocahontas, Illinois, in 1842. 

Dr. and Mrs. Collins are well known socially in Peoria and throughout the 
county where they have an extensive circle of warm friends. He is identified 
with several fraternal organizations including the Supreme Court of Honor, the 
Modern Woodmen of .America and the Royal Neighbors. In strictly professional 
lines he is connected with the Peoria City Medical Society, the Illinois State Med- 
ical Societv, the American Aledical Association and the Western Surgical Asso- 
ciation. Through the proceedings of these bodies he keeps in close touch with 
what is being done by eminent members of the profession and in his work em- 
ploys the most modern and scientific methods. There has been marvelous ad- 
vance in the practice of surgery in the past quarter of a century and Dr. Collins 
is thoroughly informed concerning the work of the most eminent members of 
the profession throughout the country. 

Although Dr. Collins' professional duties are arduous, yet few physicians have 
their time better systematized. He has recently added to his activities by his elec- 
tion to the presidency of the Peoria Association of Commerce, a position which 

Vol. n— 4 



70 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

he entered upon the resignation of Douglas H. Bethard. On March 25th the 
directors of the association called a meeting to decide upon a successor to the 
office. A few hours before the meeting. Dr. Collins was informed that he had 
been selected as the dark horse candidate for the presidency. But instead of being 
the dark horse candidate, when the meeting was called to order, Dr. Collins was 
unanimously proclaimed head of the big association. This was a tribute to the 
acknowledged executive ability of the Doctor, and to the complete confidence 
which his fellow citizens repose in him. 



JOHN J. HARDING, Jr. 

John J. Harding, Jr., who engages extensively in agricultural pursuits in 
Logan township, was born in Peoria on November 28, 1851. He is the son of 
John J. and Jane ( Greenough) Harding, both of whom are natives of Eng- 
land, the father born in Bratton Fleming, Devonshire, June 3, 1819, and the 
mother in Lancashire, July 14, 1830. The paternal grandparents, John and 
Mary (Gill) Harding, were also natives of England and resided there all their 
lives, the grandmother dying at the age of ninety. John J. Harding, Sr., left 
England for America on April 4, 1845, landing at New York, and thence came 
to Chicago by the water route and from there with team and wagon to Peoria, 
where he arrived June 24. For some time he was employed as clerk in a com- 
mission house but in 1861 he moved to Logan township, settling on a tract of 
eighty acres on section 5. Later he removed to Rosefield township, where he 
purchased eighty acres on section 32 and to this afterward added one hundred 
and fifty acres on sections 30 and 31. He was twice married, his first union 
being with JNIiss Sarah Tucker, whom he wedded in England, March 29, 1845, 
and who died in Peoria in September, 1847. His second union was with Aliss 
Jane Greenough, who was a daughter of James and Jane (Pilkington) Green- 
ough, who came from England to America in 1842 and settled in Brimfield town- 
ship, Peoria county. To John J. and Jane (Greenough) Harding were born 
six sons. The parents celebrated their golden wedding January 9, 1901, and 
the father died just six days later, on the isth of January, at the age of eighty- 
one years, while the mother passed away January 5, 1906. 

John J. Harding, Jr., was reared under the parental roof and when twenty- 
four years of age his father gave him forty acres of land which was then valued 
at sixty dollars an acre and is now worth one liundred and fifty dollars per acre. 
In 1891 he purchased another one hundred and twenty acres, for which he paid 
thirty-eight dollars per acre and which is now valued at ninety dollars per acre. 
He engages extensively in raising grain and live stock. He markets yearly from 
fifty to one hundred hogs, has sixteen head of horses and yearly raises from two 
to five colts and about ten head of cattle. He has fifty-five acres in corn, twenty- 
five acres in wheat, forty-five acres in oats and fifty acres in pasture land. He 
now sells his grain at Eden but when he first came to his present farm his near- 
est market was Peoria. 

In 1875 ]\Ir. Harding was united in marriage to Miss Ida A. Green, of Rose- 
field township, and they have become the parents of three sons and one daughter. 
The eldest son, Ira J., died in November, 1910. The daughter, Laura I\Iay, was 
born in 1878 and is at home. The second son, Walter E., was born in 1881 and 
remained on the home farm until twenty-seven years of age, when he went to 
Hanna City, where he was employed as engineer for the Applegate & Lewis Coal 
Company until November, 1910, when he returned to the farm. In 1907 he 
married Miss Fay Scott and they have one child. Harley E. William C. Hard- 
ing, who completes the family, was born in 1883 and was married in 1907. He 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 71 

engages in farming in Rosefield township, where he owns one hundred and 
twenty acres of land. 

In poHtics Mr. Harding is a repubhcan and he served as assessor of Logan 
township from 1907 to 191 1 and in April, 191 1, was made township supervisor. 
He has been very successful and besides his farming interests is a member of the 
Farmers' Telephone Association and of the Farmers' Fire & Lightning Insur- 
ance Company. He and his family are all members of the Baptist church at 
Trivoli. Mr. Harding is a well known man throughout the community, has 
been very prosperous and is highly respected by all his acquaintances. 



EDWARD WHITE. 



Edward White, president and manager of the Amole Soap Company of 
Peoria, was born in Purlington, Iowa, September 21, 185 1. His parents were 
among the first settlers of that state, his father emigrating to Michigan territory, 
as Iowa was then called, in 1833. while the mother became a resident of that 
territory in 1835. At an early age Edward \Miite entered the employ of the 
Burlington Hawkeye and by devoting all of his spare time to study and reading, 
liecame a writer as well as a practical printer. In 1874 he went to Chicago and 
soon afterward became one of the founders of the first literary magazine pub- 
lished west of the Alleghany mountains — The Northwestern — its publishers be- 
ing the firm of Street, White & Bowen. In 1876 ^Ir. White went to northwest- 
ern Missouri, where he engaged in the publication of a country newspaper, being 
thus connected with journalistic interests in Missouri and Kansas until 1884, 
when he returned to Chicago and ptirsued literary work for several years. In 
1892 he went to New York, where he remained for several years, doing editorial 
work on The Bankers Magazine, The Banking Law Journal, Leslie's Weekly, 
The New York Commercial and other publications. In 1903 he established the 
Monetary Record of St. Louis and in 1907 founded the industrial magazine. 
Industry, at Pittsburg. He has edited and published several hooks on indus- 
trial and financial subjects and has written exhaustive commercial and financial 
reviews on all of the large cities of the United States. In May, 191 1, he came 
to Peoria and engaged with the Amole Soap Company as financial manager. 
Shortly afterward the company became insolvent and ^Ir. White was appointed 
receiver by Judge Humphrey of the United States district court. Two months 
later he was elected trustee by the creditors and within thirteen months after 
his appointment as receiver succeeded in lic|uidating every dollar of unsecured 
indebtedness through cash and stock payments to the creditors. Upon the re- 
organization of the Amole Soap Company he was made president and manager. 
This company was estaljlished in 1884 by Abraham Brayshaw, who was later 
succeeded as proprietor by his sons, B. W., W'. W. and C. W. Brayshaw. 



ROBERT McCOWAN. 



Robert McCowan, who resides in Rosefield township and is actively engaged 
in general farming, was born in Canada, February 23, 1857. He is the son of 
Robert and Hannah ( Blake ) McCowan. who came from Canada in 1865 and 
located in Elmwood townshij) where they resided the remainder of their lives, 
the father dying in 1873 at the age of forty-five and the mother in 1908 at the 
age of sixty-six. In their family were seven children, of whom Robert of this 
review is the eldest. Robert McCowan remained at home with his parents until 
he was twenty-one years of age at which time he began working as a farm hand 



72 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

and was thus employed until 1881. At that date he removed to Iowa where he 
rented and operated a farm of forty acres for two years and then returned to 
Elmwood township and was again employed for two years as a farm hand. In 
1887 he removed to Kansas and remained in that state until 1890, when, return- 
ing to Illinois, he located in Peoria where he resided for ten years, during four 
of which he was employed on a United States mail wagon. In 1900 he re- 
moved to a farm of ninety acres near Oak Hill, and in 1903 he rented a two 
hundred acre farm at Harkers Corner where he resided for two years. In IQ05 
he removed to the Johnson farm of two hundred acres and operated the same 
for four years. He purchased his present farm of eighty acres in 191 1, and 
rents in addition an adjoining one hundred and thirty acres. He engages in 
raising corn, wheat, oats and hay, and also live stock, making a specialty of 
hogs, horses and cattle. On the 3'd of February, 1880, Mr. McCowan was mar- 
ried to Miss Vilena Hutchinson, who is a daughter of Abraham and Sarah 
(McCoy) Hutchinson. To Mr. and Mrs. McCowan have been born four chil- 
dren : Mabel ; Stella, deceased ; Robert ; and Luella. 

In politics Mr. McCowan is a stanch republican and socially he is identified 
with the Order of Maccabees. He is highly considerate of his neighbors, is 
greatly interested in the welfare of his community, and is known as a straight- 
forward energetic business man. 



FRANK T. SHIVELY. 



Among the native residents of Elmwood is Frank J. Shively, who is a suc- 
cessful contractor and builder. He was born October 6, 1871, the son of Wil- 
liam and Celia (Wilson) Shively, the former born in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1847, and the latter in Wisconsin, in 1852. The maternal grand- 
parents, Hiram and Julia Wilson, were natives of the state of New York, who 
removed to Wisconsin and about i860 came to Elmwood. The grandfather 
operated a dredging machine in the Illinois marshes for some time but during 
the later years of his life lived retired in Elmwood. ' The father, William Shively, 
was reared in his native state and when only a youth enlisted in a company of 
Pennsylvania cavalry and served for nearly four years. Af.ter the war he came 
to Peoria county, settling near Elmwood. where he worked for a time on a 
farm. He then married and moved to Elmwood and was engaged for several 
years in a paper mill, after which he took up the carpenter trade and followed 
it the rest of his life, dying in 1905. Both he and his wife were members of 
the Methodist church, and he was identified with the blue lodge of Masons and 
with the Grand Army of the Republic.' In his family were five children, of 
whom Frank J., of this review, was the eldest. The others are : Edith : Edward, 
now living in Peoria ; Harlan, who is working for the subject of this sketch and 
is familiarly known by the nickname of Joe ; and Verna. 

Frank J. Shively received his education in Elmwood and after putting aside 
his text-books was employed for four years in the grocery store of S. R. Henry 
and then for two years in the grocery store of Harry Patterson. Subsequently 
he learned the carpenter's trade and for the past eight years has been engaged 
in carpentering and contracting for himself. His patronage is constantly grow- 
ing and he now is conducting an extensive business. He formerly was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Shively & Lewis, owners of a five-acre farm upon which were 
raised thoroughbred Poland China hogs of the large type for breeding purposes. 
In 191 1 their hog known as Senior Yearling took the first prize at the state fair. 

On the 5th of July. 1899, Mr. Shively was united in marriage to Miss Edna 
M. Lawrence, who was born in Elmwood township, August 3, 1873. and is a 
daughter of Erastus and Emma Lawrence, of whom mention is made on another 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 73 

page of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Shively have become the parents of four chil- 
dren, Doris, Roma, Ruth and Francis. In politics Mr. Shively is a republican 
and has served as city alderman. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights 
of Pythias and with the Modern Woodmen of America. He is progressive and 
energetic in his contracting and building business and is meeting with excellent 
success. 



LEONARD D. JEFFRIES. 

The machinery of government in Peoria is in safe hands and capable men 
are on the whole filling the public offices and directing municipal business. In 
this connection Leonard D. Jeffries deserves mention. He is serving as city 
engineer, to which position he was called on the 13th of December, 191 1, as the 
successor of Ross J. Canterbury, who resigned. He had previously had two 
years' experience as a draftsman in the city engineering department and his 
qualifications were such as to commend him for appointment to his present posi- 
tion, although he is yet a young man, only about twenty-si.x years ago. Peoria 
is glad and proud to thus honor her native sons whose capability entitles them 
to such distinction. Air. Jeffries was born here November 29, 1886, and is a 
son of Joseph and Sarah (Woodson) JeftVies. His father is still a resident of 
this city and is one of the oldest boiler makers here. He was born in England 
but since early manhood has resided in the new world. 

Leonard D. Jeffries was reared in Peoria and attended the public schools, 
passing through consecutive grades until graduated from the Peoria high school 
with the class of 1904. He then started out to earn his own living and secured 
employment in a gun store, working as a gunsmith and locksmith, thus calling 
into play his natural mechanical ingenuity and developing his latent powers 
along that line. That he was ambitious and desired to prepare himself for ad- 
vancement is shown in the fact that while there he pursued a correspondence 
course in civil engineering and thus mastered the technical and scientific phases 
of the business, while practical experience came to him through a vear's service 
in the sewer department of the city of Peoria, in which he was employed in 1908. 
In the following year he entered the city engineering department, where he spent 
two years as a draftsman, becoming thoroughly acquainted with the duties which 
constitute the work of that department. Therefore, when Ross J. Canterbury 
resigned Mr. Jeffries was called to fill the vacancy and is giving excellent service 
in this connection. 

On the 30th of June, 1909, Mr. Jeffries was united in marriage to Miss lone 
Ford, of this city. His religious faith is that of the Scientist church. He is 
widely known in the city where his entire life has been spent and his social and 
personal qualities have gained him popularity among many friends. The storv 
of his life is the story of honest industry and thrift and he may be aptly termed 
a man of purpose. 



FREDERICK MICHEAL P.URRACH. 

Frederick Micheal Burbach, filling the office of justice of the peace and well 
known for thirty years as a representative of industrial interests in Peoria, was 
born in St. Louis, Missouri, August 19, 1866. His father, John George P>ur- 
bach, was a native of Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, and married Christina Run- 
kel. They became the parents of three sons and two daughters, and the father 
provided for the support of his family by the manufacture of saddletrees. 



74 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Frederick J\I. Burbach began his education in the pubHc schools of his native 
city and in the mornings, evenings and on Saturdays he worked for his father. 
The necessity of his assisting in the manufacture of saddletrees made it impos- 
sible for him to attend high school. To that work he gave his attention until 
1882, when he entered upon an apprenticeship at the pattern maker's trade in 
St. Louis, jMissouri, with the firm of Kupferle Brothers. On the 27th of Febru- 
ary, 1900, he removed to Peoria, at the solicitation of the Brass Foundry & 
Heating Companj', to make brass patterns and other goods for the Corning 
Distilling Company. He continued in that position for three and a half years 
and then went to the Kinsey & Mahler Company as pattern maker. Later he 
was employed by the Bartholomew Automobile Company and spent altogether 
thirty years at the bench as a pattern maker and brass worker, his labors being 
of an important character and his position one of responsibility. When three 
decades had thus passed he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, in 
which he is now serving for his second year and his record in this connection 
is creditable, for his decisions are strictly fair and impartial, being based upon 
the law and the equity in the case. 

In 1887 Mr. Burbach was married to Miss Lizzetta Shornhorst, who was 
born in St. Louis. They have become the parents of two daughters, Lilly and 
Florence. The former is the wife of Ernest W'itherell and lias one child, a 
daughter. 

Mr. Burbach is prominent in ]\Iasonic circles, holding membership in Peoria 
Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. ^.L. of which he is a past worshipful master; Peoria 
Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M., of which he is now high priest; and Peoria Council, 
No. II, R. & S. M., of which he has been thrice illustrious master. He also be- 
longs to Electa Chapter, O. E. S., and to Peoria Camp, No. 812, M. W. A., 
of which he is venerable consul. In politics he has always been a stalwart re- 
publican, active as a worker in the party. He does not go ofif on a tangent after 
new ideas and was elected justice of the peace as a reward for party service 
and in recognition of his efficiency as a citizen. He is most loyal to the interests 
of Peoria and he led an annexation fight in the village of Mechanicsville in the 
one hundred thousand population campaign. \\'inning, he thereby added three 
thousand to the population of the city. In 1910 he was in charge of the cam- 
paign committee. He has always been a close student of the science of govern- 
ment and he is now studying law — two things which are closelv allied. 



FRED H. CA:^IP. 



The name of Fred H. Camp is largely known throughout the country because 
of his extensive operations in realty, particulary in farm lands. The many large 
property transfers which he has negotiated indicate the day of small under- 
takings in real-estate dealings is past. He has bought and sold lands through- 
out the entire Mississippi valley and his sound judgment is manifest in his care- 
ful investments and his judicious sales. 

^Ir. Camp claims \'ermont as the state of his nativity, his birth having there 
occurred on the 7th of June, 1849, Bennington being his natal city. His parents 
were Harvey and Lydia (Rounds) Camp. The father was for many years a well 
known farmer and land owner who met with substantial success in his business 
undertakings, and while he loaned thousands of dollars, such was his keen judg- 
ment that he never lost a cent in that manner. He became one of the most ex- 
tensive property holders in Peoria county, owning a number of valuable farms 
in the western part of the county, north of Elmwood. Much of this property 
he bought at a low figure, paying for all of it only sixteen dollars and a half per 
acre. Gradually it increased in value owing to the rapid settlement of this part 




FKF.l) II. (AMI' 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 77 

of the state and also to the many improvements which he placed upon it. He 
sold none of his land for less than two hundred dollars per acre, and his last 
sale brought him two hundred and sixty-two dollars and a half per acre. He 
died in 1897 at the venerable age of eighty-six years, and his death then was the 
result of an accident, a fall breaking his neck, although he lived for three days 
after sustaining that injury. His widow still survives and is now eighty-six 
years of age. 

Fred H. Camp was a lad of only six years when the family left the New 
England states and came to Peoria, settling in this part of the state in 1855. 
Here he has since lived, and after attending the local schools he finished his 
education in Knox College at Galesburg. from which he was graduated when 
twentv-two years of age. He then started out in the drug business which he 
followed for a year, after which he secured employment in connection with the 
commission and grain trade. A year later he removed to Brimfield, Illinois, 
where he erected a brick block and for five years conducted a grocery store. At 
the end of that time his stock was destroyed by fire and he returned to Peoria. 
He then accepted a position as bookkeeper with the Avery Planter Company, 
where he continued for five years at the end of which time he entered the employ 
of the Kingman Company, a firm which he represented on the road for several 
years, selling their plows and farm implements. He afterward made settlements 
for the company, collecting for them thousands of dollars. As the years passed 
his services became of more and more value to them and his income increased 
accordingly. Thus as his financial resources permitted he made investments in 
land, and for the last five years he has concentrated his energies upon his land 
dealings all over the United States. He has handled property in almost every 
state in the Union. He is now the proprietor of the Florida Land Company with 
offices in the German Fire Insurance building and he also handles farm lands 
on an extensive scale, not only in Peoria county i)ut throughout Kansas, Texas, 
Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, North and South Dakota, Minnesota and Indiana. It 
would be difficult to find one more thoroughly informed concerning land values, 
or whose judgment is sounder in relation to the possible rise or diminution in 
the same. 

In 1876 ]\Ir. Camp was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Mary Cowles who was 
then a teacher in the school of Brimfield. She was born and reared in this 
county, a daughter of Lieutenant \Y. W. Cowles, who won his rank by service in 
the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry in the Civil war. Both he and his wife who, 
in her maidenhood bore the name of Adelia Woods, are still living at the age of 
more than eighty years, making their home with their daughter, ]\Irs. Camp, in 
a pleasant and attractive home at 1005 Knoxville avenue. 

It has been well said that "There is no royal road to wealth," but again and 
again there is found verification of the fact that the road of opportunity is open 
to all and that the rewards of labor are sure and certain. Earnest, persistent 
efl^ort, well defined purjiose and intelligent direction of his investments have been 
the prominent features in the business career of Mr. Camp, making him one of 
the successful and widelv known land dealers of Peoria and Illinois. 



M. A. \YAS.SON. 



M. .-X. Wasson, who is a prosperous and enterprising farmer of Rosefield 
township, was born in Stark county, February 15, 1869. He was the son of 
Jacob D. and Louisa (Bohanon) Wasson, the former born in Cayuga county, 
New York, December 3, 1S43, and the latter in Peoria county, Illinois, March 
31, 1845. In 1868 the parents located in Stark county, where they purchased 
eighty acres of land and engaged in farming for ten years. In 1878 they removed 



78 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

to Peoria county, wliere they resided on an excellent farm of two hundred and 
sixty acres until 1894 when they retired and moved to Elmwood where they 
now reside. The father, Jacob D. Wasson, deserves special mention as an 
honored veteran of the Civil war, in which he was actively engaged and during 
the whole time of which he was never sick, wounded or taken prisoner. He 
was in many of the miportant battles, among which are Chickasaw Bluff, Ar- 
kansas Post, ;\Iagnolia Hills, Champion's Hill, Black River Bridge, the battle of 
\'icksburg, the siege of \'icksburg, the siege of Jackson, and the battles of 
Mansfield, Kane River, Marksville, Yellow Bayou, Fort Gaines, Fort Morgan, 
Spanish Fort, Blakely, and Whistler Station. Air. and Mrs. Jacob D. Wasson 
were the parents of three children, of w-hom M. A., of this review, w'as the eld- 
est. The others are: Sarah E., who was born January 8, 1871, and is now the 
wife of C. A. Bartholomew^, who is engaged in the automobile business in Elm- 
wood; and Esther C, who was born December 13, 1874, and is the wife of 
Henry B. Mack, who is engaged in the wholesale hardware business in New- 
York city. 

M. A. Wasson was educated in the public schools of his native state and 
remained at home with his parents until 1892, when he rented one hundred and 
sixty acres of land from his father and began farming for himself. In 1905 he 
purchased an adjoining eighty acres, making in all two hundred and forty acres 
in the farm which he now operates, and he engages in raising grain and live 
stock. He is a very progressive and successful farmer and stock-raiser. 

On the 28th of January. 1892, Air. Wasson was united in marriage to Miss 
Nellie S. Walchli, who is a daughter of Jacob and Catherine ( Housier ) Walchli, 
who reside in Hollis township, Peoria county. To Air. and Airs. Wasson have 
been born two children, one of whom died in infancy, the other being Alax D. 
G., who was born December 30, 1897. Air. Wasson is a republican in politics 
and has served as road commissioner. He is greatly interested in the cause of 
education and has been an efficient member of the school board for the past 
twelve years. Both he and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian 
church. He is an energetic, prosperous man and has a great number of friends 
in Peoria county, including many who have known him from his boyhood days. 



CHARLES L. DUNCAN. 

One of the highly enterprising and progressive citizens of Brimheld is Charles 
L. Dungan, president of the Exchange Bank and proprietor of the local lumber- 
yard. He was born in the vicinity of the town where he now resides on the 
30th of September, 1862, and is a son of John AI. Dungan, one of the pioneer 
settlers of Peoria county. The father is a native of Pennsylvania, whence he 
came to Illinois during the early days, locating on a farm in Brimheld town- 
ship. He was a man of untiring energ)-. great sagacity and determination of 
purpose, and ultimately became one of the extensive property owners and pros- 
perous agriculturists of the county. In connection with farming he also en- 
gaged in the grain business, making a financial success of both and at the time of 
his death was one of the influential citizens of the township. The mother, whose 
maiden name was Aliss Ellen A. Burt is still living at an advanced age and con- 
tinues to make her home in Brimfield. She is a native of \'ermont but accom- 
panied her parents on their removal to Illinois during the early pioneer days 
and has ever since made her home in Peoria countv. 

The education of Charles U. Dungan was pursued in the district schools until 
he was twelve years of age and continued in those of Brimfield until he was 
eighteen. After leaving high school he assisted his father on the farm for four 
years, thus acquiring a thorough, practical knowledge of agricultural methods 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 79 

that has been of inestimable vakie to him all through life. In 18S7 he became 
associated with his father in the grain business and three years later he extended 
the scope of his activities by buying an interest in the lumberyard of which he 
is now the sole proprietor. His entire attention was devoted to these two 
activities until 1899, when he purchased a half interest in the Exchange Bank. 
This institution was founded in the early '80s by David Herrier, who later dis- 
posed of it to H. O. Peters, who in turn sold it to Walter L. Wiley. The latter 
took j\Ir. Dungan in partnership with him and they were associated tagether for 
seven years. In March. igo6, Mr. Dungan bought out his partner's interest and 
together with his mother, Mrs. Ellen A. Dungan, owns all of the stock. Two 
years prior to this, in 1904, Mr. Dungan sold his interest in the grain Inisiness 
and now is- devoting practically his entire attention to his bank and lumberyard. 

In Peoria county on the i6th of March, 1887, Mr. Dungan was united in 
marriage to Miss Carrie M. Tucker, a daughter of Homer C. and Emily Tucker 
of Brimtield township. Homer C. Tucker came to this county from Buffalo, 
New \ork, in 1845, locating on some land that had been purchased from the 
government by his father, who settled here in 1832. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker are 
now deceased! Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dungan, as fol- 
lows: Alma, who was born on the 15th of ^Nlay, 1895; Helen L., whose_ birth oc- 
curred on May 20, 1897 ; John, whose natal day was the 2gth of November, 
1899: Charles F., who was'born on July 13, 1901 ; and Ruth, born on the 12th 
of January, 1905. 

The family affiliate with the local Protestant churches and Mr. Dungan votes 
the republican ticket. For six years he served on the board of supervisors for 
Brimfield township, and four years of that time he was chairmcT,n of the finance 
committee. He is one of the foremost citizens of the town, in the uplmilding 
and development of which both he and his father have been prominent factors, 
through their successful promotion of various enterprises that have added to 
the commercial activity of the community. He is a man who takes an en- 
thusiastic interest in every progressive public movement and champions every 
cause that he feels will advance the welfare of the municipality either morally, 
intellectually, socially or financially. 



OSCAR HEINRICH. 



For eleven years Oscar Heinrich has been connected with the county clerk's 
office in Peoria' county, serving first as deputy while later he was elected to the 
office of county clerk and is now in his second term. He is accounted one of 
the leaders of' the republican party and as an official his record is one which 
has brought to him high commendation owing to the prompt and faithful man- 
ner in which he has discharged the duties which have devolved upon him. 

Illinois claims Mr. Heinrich as one of her native sons, his birth having oc- 
curred in Peru, January 4. 1856. His parents were Julius and Henrietta Hein- 
rich, who became residents of LaSalle county in pioneer times. The father was 
for thirty-five years an attorney, justice of the peace and notary public of Peru, 
and was classed with its leading and influential citizens. 

It was in that town that Oscar Heinrich spent his boyhood days and in the 
public schools pursued his education although he has since learned many valu- 
able lessons in the school of experience. He was early apprenticed to the mould- 
er's trade in an iron foundry and w^orked at that for many years, but always 
found clerical work congenial and at various times temporarily withdrew from 
active connection with his trade to occupy a clerkship in some office. In 1875 
he removed to Nebraska and spent two years upon a farm there. He then re- 
moved to IlHnois, and in 1877 became a resident of Peoria, here entering the 



80 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

employ of Hart & Hitchcock, foundrymen. and later working at his trade of 
moulder in several different foundries. He afterward served as shipping clerk 
at the starch works in Peoria for seven years and left that position to enter the 
employ of the Avery I'lanter Company, with whom he remained for several 
years or until he entered the office of the county clerk as deputy. He is now 
county clerk, having been twice elected on the republican ticket, and on both 
occasions he led the ticket, a fact which indicates his personal popularity and 
the confidence and trust reposed in him. That this trust has never been be- 
trayed in the slightest degree is manifest in the fact that he has twice been 
the' choice of the public for the position, the duties of which he discharges in a 
most careful and systematic manner. His corps of assistants is efficient, hav- 
ing been carefully selected and he attempts to minimize time and labor in the 
discharge of the duties of the office. 

In 1879. in Peoria, Air. Heinrich was united in marriage to Miss Kate Trom- 
peter, of Peoria, and unto them have been born seven children, namely : Oscar, 
Jr., Alinnie, who is now the wife of Herbert Crowl ; Annie, who married Robert 
Koch; Frederick, who is deputy county clerk; Henrietta, Caroline and George. 

Fraternallv Air. Heinrich is a Alason and is also connected with the Alodern 
Woodmen of America and the Knights of Alaccabees. In the early '70s he 
joined the Aloulder's L'nion and is now one of its honorary members. His posi- 
tion in the lodges to which he belongs is a creditable one owing to his fidelity 
to the principles and tenets which constitute the basic elements of those organi- 
zations. A cordial, genial manner wins him friends wherever he goes, and he 
well merits the political honors which have come to him. 



ELMER M. ECKARD. M D. 

Dr. Elmer M. Eckard, a practicing physician and surgeon of Peoria, maintain- 
ing his offices at Xo. 510 Main street, has been a prominent and successful repre- 
sentative of the medical profession here for the past sixteen years. His birth 
occurred in Alason county, Illinois, on the 2d of Alarch, 1872, his parents being 
W. H. and Amelia Eckard. The father acted as station agent at Topeka, Illinois, 
where he also conducted business as a coal and grain merchant. At the present 
time he resides at San Jose, Texas, in a health resort. His wife passed away at 
Topeka, Illinois, in igofe, and was buried in Pekin cemetery. 

Elmer M. Eckard obtained his early education at Jacksonville and was gradu- 
ated from Whipple Academy in 1892. Subsequently he spent three years as a 
student in Illinois College at Jacksonville and then entered Rush Aledical College 
of Chicago, winning the degree of AI. D. in 1S96. Peoria has since remained the 
scene of his professional labors, and the success which has attended him is ample 
evidence of his skill and ability in the field of his chosen life work. At the 
end of the first year of his professional career he was appointed assistant super- 
intendent of the Alma Sanitarium at Alma, Michigan, and while serving in that 
capacity attended and was graduated from Alma College, which institution con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Science in i8q8. He now acts as 
chief surgeon for the Toledo, Peoria & Western and the Chicago, Peoria & St. 
Louis Railroads. Through his membership in the Peoria County Aledical Society, 
the Illinois State Aledical Society and the American Aledical Association he keeps 
in close touch with the progress that is being continually made by the fraternity. 
He is a director of the American Association of Railway Surgeons, is a member 
of the staff of the Proctor Hospital in Peoria and holds the rank of lieutenant in 
the medical corps of the Illinois National Guard, and also holds a commission as 
Lieutenant of the U. S. Army Medical Reserve Corps. 

On the 20th of October, 1895, Dr. Eckard was united in marriage to Aliss 




JJU. I-:. M, K( KAKI) 






f 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 83 

Agnes Lillian Dessot Scars, a daughter of Alexander Sears and a representative 
of'an old Jacksonville family. The wedding ceremony was performed at Kenosha, 
Wisconsin. Dr. and -Mrs. Eckard have one son, Frederick, who is attending 
school. The family residence, which the Doctor built in 1905, is a beautiful mod- 
ern home at Xo. 615 Indiana avenue. Our subject likewise erected seven other 
houses. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Dr. Eckard has supported 
the men and measures of the democratic party. From 1905 until 1907 he served 
in the capacity of health commissioner. Fraternally he 'is identified with the 
Masons, belonging to the commandery and the shrine. He is also an esteemed 
member of the Creve Coeur Club. His professional labor is regarded as of value 
by the general community and he enjoys the respect of his brethren of the medical 
fraternity by reason of his strict conformity to a high standard of profesional 
ethics. 



DA\ID H. MORTON, jNI. D. 

David H. ]\Iorton, who is a rising young physician and surgeon of Elm- 
wood, was born at Edgington, Rock Island county, Illinois, December 19, 1880. 
He is the son of Dr. Archibald J. Morton, who formerly was a practicing phy- 
sician in this city. Dr. Archibald J. Alorton was born in Scotland in 1855 and 
when six months old was brought by his parents to America, locating in Rock 
Island county. Later his parents removed to Colchester, where their son Archi- 
bald L received his early education in the common schools. He then entered 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Chicago and was graduated from that 
institution in the class of 1889. Subsequently he located for practice in Wil- 
liamsfield but after five years removed to Elmwood, where he purchased the 
interests of Dr. W. T. Sloan and entered into partnership with Dr. J. D. C. 
Floit. Unfortunately Dr. Morton had practiced in this city only four years 
when he passed away, July i, 1898. He was a man who was true in every rela- 
tion of life, faithful to every trust and devoted to his profession. He was a 
member of the American Medical Association and the Illinois State Medical 
Society, and fraternally he was identified with the Masons and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His wife, Sidona (Holmes) Alorton, the mother of 
our subject, was born in i860 and now resides in Elmwood. In their family 
were five children, four of whom are now living. 

Dr. David H. ^lorton received his education in the public schools of Elm- 
wood, graduating from the high school at that place. He then entered the 
medical department of the State University of Illinois, which is the same insti- 
tution his father attended, and was graduated in the class of 1904. Subse- 
quently he located for practice in Elmwood, entering into partnership with Dr. 
T. D. C. Hoit, who formerly was his father's partner. Dr. Hoit was one of the 
"well known ])hysicians in this section of the country. He practiced at Yates 
City for more than twenty-five years and in 1891 moved to Elmwood, where 
he entered into partnership with Dr. W. T. Sloan and later was in partnership 
with the father of the subject of this sketch. He was an extremely successful 
practitioner and was for many years one of the most prominent physicians in 
this part of the country. He belonged to the county, state and national medical 
societies, and fraternally was a Mascjn. belonging to the Knights Templar, and 
was a blaster ]\Iason for about seven years. The partnership of Dr. David H. 
Alorton with Dr. Hoit lasted only about two and one-half years and since then 
Dr. Morton has practiced alone. He has worked up an extensive practice, 
which includes not only Elmwood, but a radius of about twelve miles in the 
surrounding country. Fraternally he belongs to Arcanus Lodge, No. 103, 
I. O. O. F., and in politics he is an independent. 



84 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Although yet a young man in the medical world Dr. Alorton by his labors, 
his high professional attainments and his sterling characteristics has gained the 
respect and confidence of all with whom he has been associated in his profes- 
sional work. He is a busy and successful practitioner and is rapidly gaining a 
leading place among the physicians in this section of the country. 



ROBERT P. JACK. 



Robert P. Tack is a member of the well known and prominent law firm of 
Jack, Irvin, Jack & Miles, of Peoria, where he has practiced continuously since 
1898. He is comparatively one of the younger members of the bar of this city 
and has made substantial progress which has brought him to a prominent posi- 
tion and placed his work on a par with that of many older representatives of 
the profession. 

Mr. lack is one of Peoria's native sons, his birth having here occurred Sep- 
tember "30. 1872. His father is William Jack, a distinguished and prominent 
citizen of Peoria. While spending his youthful days in his parents' home Robert 
P. lack mastered the branches of learning taught in the public schools until 
graduated from the high school with the class of 1889. He then went east for 
his college course and entered Princeton University, which conferred upon him 
the Bachelor of Arts degree upon his graduation with the class of 1894. He 
took up the study of law in the office and under the direction of the firm of 
Jack & Tichenor, of which his father was the senior partner, and after thorough 
preliminary reading was admitted to the bar in 1898. He has since followed 
his profession in Peoria and is engaged in general practice. In the fourteen 
years which have since elapsed he has done good work, carefully preparing and 
presenting his cases, his logical deductions indicating his thorough understand- 
ing of the points in controversy while his correct application of principle or 
precedent shows his comprehensive knowledge of the law. He is well known 
socially in this city and is now a member of the Creve Coeur Club and the Ivy 
Clul), while of the Peoria Country Club he was formerly president. 



HALLER E. CHARLES. 

Haller E. Charles, deputy collector of internal revenue at Peoria, was born 
in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1848, a son of John E. and Mar- 
garet (Oliver) Charles. He was a pupil in the public schools and the academy 
at Princeville, Illinois, and completed the work of the freshman and sophomore 
years in Hillsdale College of Michigan. In early manhood he taught school in 
the vicinity of Princeville and later took up the study of law, being admitted to 
the bar upon examination in Peoria in 187 1 and to the bar of Arkansas upon 
examination in 1875. While official duties now claim his time and attention, he 
is still a member of the legal profession in good standing and entitled to prac- 
tice in both Illinois and Arkansas. 

Mr. Charles' first active work in behalf of his country followed his enlist- 
ment as a soldier of the Civil war, on the 4th of January, 1864, when he still 
lacked a few days of being sixteen years of age. He joined Battery A of the 
Second Illinois Light Artillery and was continuously on active duty until dis- 
charged July 27, 1865. He again entered the active service of his country when 
appointed ganger in the internal revenue department at Peoria, Illinois, in 1878. 
Seven years were passed in that position and from 1890 until 1894 he was. deputy 
United States marshal at Chicago. In i8q8 he was appointed deputy collector 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 85 

of internal revenue in Peoria and has since lieen thus identified with the lifth 
United States internal revenue district. He has made an excellent record in 
all public connections, being systematic and methodical in the discharge of his 
duties and loyal at all times to the trusts reposed in him. 

On the 21 St of January, 1880, Mr. Charles was married to Miss Margaret 
Raymond, a daughter of Charles Raymond. They now have one living child, 
Alice, born in 1881, and they lost a son, Raymond, who was born in 1885 and 
died in 1906. Mr. Charles has held membership in the Grand Army of the 
Republic since its organization and was post commander of Bryner Post during 
1903. He is regarded by his friends as a steady, substantial citizen, who has 
served Peoria well in every capacity and in every position to which he has been 
called. 



EDWARD C. SPANGLER. 

Edward C. Spangler, who resides on his farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section thirty-si.x of Elmwood township, was born in that township in 
1853. His parents were Henry B. and Cynthia A. (Lawhead) Spangler, who 
came from Zanesville, Ohio, to Peoria county, Illinois, in 1848, and located on 
a farm in Elmwood township. In their family were four children of whom 
Edward C. of this review is the second in order of birth. 

Edward C. Spangler was reared under the parental roof, remaining at home 
until about twenty years of age, when he began working out as a farm hand in 
which occupation he was employed for about six years. He was on the plains 
of Texas and later Wyoming and then in Colorado, where he had some very in- 
teresting experiences in the hunting of buffalo. In 1877 he purchased eighty 
acres of improved land in Rosefield township and resided there for seventeen 
years, after which he rented his farm and was engaged for eight years in the 
real-estate business in Elmwood township. In 1894 he sold his farm of eighty 
acres and in 1895 his wife inherited one hundred and ninety-five acres which 
he also sold the same year, and then puchased a farm of two hundred and 
seven acres on section six of Logan township. In the spring of 1912 he sold 
that and bought his present farm, on which he engages in general farming. 

In 1883 Mr. Spangler wedded Miss Maggie M. Kershaw. They have four 
children : Eva M., the wife of Hayes Corbett, of Elmwood ; Clarence H., at 
home; Harold L., who is in business at Bowen, Illinois; and Cecil V., who 
is working for his brother in Bowen. Mr. Spangler is a republican in politics 
and fraternally he is a member of the Court of Honor. He has been very 
successful in his farming interests and in all his business relations, and is one 
of the prosperous men of his township. 



ROSCOE J. MORGAN. 



A successful real estate man, well known in Oklahoma and Illinois, is Roscoe 
J. Morgan, secretary of the Mexican Agricultural Land Company, with offices 
at Nos. 16-19, Mayer building Peoria. Mr. Morgan has been prominently iden- 
tified with this company since its incorporation in 1904. He was born in Gallia 
county, Ohio. November 27, 1862, a son of Joseph A. and Nancy E. Morgan. 
The father during the earlier period of his business career followed agricultural 
pursuits but later in life became a miller. He was a volunteer in the Federal 
army during the Civil war, serving for about a year. He passed away in June, 
1890, at the age of fifty-five years. His wife is also deceased and both are buried 



86 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

in a cemetery at \'alley Falls, Kansas, where they had resided during the latter 
part of their lives. 

Roscoe J. Morgan was educated in the public schools of Ohio. At the age 
of fifteen years he put aside his text-books and, leaving the parental roof, went 
to Iowa, where for about two years he worked as a farm laborer. At the end of 
that period he settled in Kansas and while employed at various occupations 
during the day, began studying telegraphy at night. Having become sufficiently 
proficient in the art of telegraphy to enable him to qualify for employment, he 
secured a position with the Santa Fe Railroad Company and for nineteen years 
was in the employ of that company. At the time of his retirement from railroad 
work he resigned his position as agent at Norman, Oklahoma, to engage in the 
real estate business. He was very successful in this line of work and remained 
a resident of Norman until 1908, during which period he organized the Oklahoma 
State Investment Company, with head(|uarters in Norman, of which company he 
was president from the time of its organization until three years ago, when he 
came to Peoria. 

At Wichita, Kansas, on December 20, 1884, 'Sir. ]\Iorgan was married to ^liss 
Lucretia Snodgrass, a daughter of Mrs. Jane Snodgrass, and to this union three 
children have been born : Blanch, now the wife of H. P. Allen, of the .\llen- 
Wookey Land Company ; Clarence, at home ; and ^luriel, who is attending 
school. 

Mr. ^Morgan is a member of the Masonic order and is also affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having been a member of the latter organi- 
zation for about twenty-five years. The important position which ]\Ir. ^Morgan 
occupies in the company with which he is now connected has fallen into good 
hands and by tact and the experience which he has gained he is enabled to di=- 
charge the duties devolving upon him with distinction to himself and satisfaction 
to his business associates. He has become well' known in real estate circles in 
the city of his adoption, where his opinions and judgment are given the most 
respectful consideration. Aside from his business duties he takes time to culti- 
vate the social side of life and in his fraternal connections he is a popular and 
valued member of the organizations to which he belongs. 



GEORGE W. .MICHELL, M. D. 

Dr. George \V. IMichell is a specialist in the treatment of mental and nervous 
diseases and is proprietor of a sanitarium located at No. 106 North Glen Oak 
avenue. He has done important work and has not only followed the most ad- 
vanced methods as promulgated by others but has also evolved plans of practice 
\vhich have proven eminently effective in bringing about a return of normal con- 
ditions. He has been located in Peoria since 1904, coming to this city two years 
after his graduation from Rush [Medical College in Chicago. That period' was 
spent in private and hospital practice in Wisconsin and Minnesota, after which 
he came to this city, with whose professional interests he has since been identified. 

Dr. Michell is a native of Gridley, ^IcLean county, Illinois. He was bom 
May 18, 1876, of the marriage of James M. and Cynthia Ann (Stokes) Michell. 
The father erected the first house at Gridley, to which place he removed from 
Boston, Massachusetts. He was born in Queens county, Ireland, and spent the 
first seventeen years of his life in that country, after which he bad adieu to friends 
and native land and sailed for America. He served as postmaster at Gridley for 
a quarter of a century and also engaged in general merchandising there through 
an extended period, figuring to the time of his death as one of the prominent and 
influential residents of that place. He was called to his final rest in 1891. 



I 



HISTORY OF PEOlilA COUNTY 87 

Dr. Michell was reared in Gridley and attended the public schools, passing 
through grade after grade until he had completed the high school course with 
the class of iSgy. His interest in the medical profession determined him to enter 
upon practice as a life work and with that end in view he became a student in 
Rush :\ledical College at Chicago, in which he completed his course in 1902. For 
a time he was located in professional work at Dewey Sanitarium at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, and in 1903 went from there to the Lenont Mining and Railroad Hos- 
pital at \'irginia, Minnesota, and the following year became identified with the 
State Hospital for the Insane at Eartonville, this county, serving as chief of its 
medical stat¥ from 1904 until 1910. He entered upon active practice in Peoria 
in the former year and during the entire period of his residence here has con- 
centrated his energies and etforts upon the treatment of mental and nervous 
diseases. The profession has made rapid strides in this branch of practice and 
Dr. Michell has kept in close touch with the work. He believes in studying each 
individual case, learning what produces injurious and beneficial effects, and then 
safeguarding the patient from the former, brings to bear all that can promote the 
latter. In estal)lishing and conducting his sanitarium at No. 106 North Glen Oak 
avenue, he is doing a most excellent work and in that institution have been ef- 
fected many cures. 

In December, 1910, Dr. Michell was united in marriage to Miss I\Iyrtle Mc- 
Kee, of Aledo, Illinois. They have an attractive home in Peoria, and like her 
husband, ^Irs. ]\Iichell is rapidly winning friends here. Dr. Michell is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and his professional connections are with the Peoria 
City Medical Society, the Illinois State ^ledical Society and the American Medi- 
cal Association. Those who know him recognize his sterling worth as a man 
and citizen as well as a physician. He bases his labors upon the broadest scien- 
tific principles and holds to the highest standards in all of his professional duties. 



MICHAEL McALEENAN. 

Success may awaken admiration but kindness and geniality win the still 
warmer and higher tribute of friendship. Michael McAleenan possessed these 
qualities in large degree and at the same time had determination and energy, 
which enabled him to advance steadily in the business world until the prosperous 
owner of the \'ulcan Iron Works bore little resemblance to the almost penniless 
young man wdio came from Ireland to America in 1854. He was born in County 
Down, Ireland, in 1S31, a son of Patrick and Sarah Mcx\leenan. He attended 
the schools of his native country and there learned the blacksmith's trade. In 
1854, however, he bade adieu to the Emerald isle and sailed for the United States, 
having heard favorable reports concerning the opportunities of the new world. 
He settled at Peoria and secured a position at the head of the blacksmithing de- 
partment of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company. Later he 
entered the employ of the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad Company in the 
same capacity but was not content with that business connection, as he wished 
to become interested in an enterprise of his own. In 1867, therefore, he became 
a partner in the foundry firm of Nicol, Burr & Company, with which he was as- 
sociated for ten years. On the expiration of that period he entered into partner- 
ship with Joseph Cody in the boiler making business and afterward he bought 
out his partner, conducting his plant as the \'ulcan Iron Works. In this business 
he continued with gratifying success to the time of his death and for fifty years 
he was a notable figure on the commercial and industrial stage in Peoria. His 
was the industry that seemed never to tire, the enterprise that knew no bounds 
and the determination that never recognized fatigue. He worked on persistently 
day after day, his interests broadening in their scope, and year after year chron- 



88 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

icled the fact that he was far in advance of the position to which he had allaincci 
the previous year. 

On the 22d of April, 1861, in Peoria, Mr. AIcAleenan was married to Miss 
Jane Smith, a daughter of Bernard and -Mary (Conlan) Smith, who were natives 
of Ireland and in 1845 arrived in Peoria, which was then a comparatively small 
town of little commercial and industrial importance. Her father engaged m 
the transfer business here and was well known at an early day. Mr. and ^Irs. 
McAleenan became the parents of six children: William J., who is married and 
has two sons, Howard and Fred; Margaret A.; Eugene; Charles; George R., 
who is married and has three children, Eugene, Jane and Edward; and Walter S. 
Mr. McAleenan was a member of the Builders' Exchange, gave his political al- 
legiance to the democratic party and his religious support to St. Patrick's church. 
He was liberal to a fault and as he prospered contributed generously of his means 
to the support of the church and to the aid of many charitable projects and in- 
stitutions. As a citizen he was public spirited, seeking ever the welfare and im- 
provement of city and county. He justly earned the proud American title of a 
self-made man, for he never heedlessly passed by any opportunity. He won his 
success at the cost of earnest, self-denying labor, but in the end found that the 
prize was worth the effort. Fie was accounted one of Peoria's most prosperous 
and prominent citizens and merited as well the high reputation which he won 
for character and ability. 

The Peoria Daily Transcript in its editorial columns on September 12. 1890, 
said : "The sympathy of The Transcript is extended to the family of the late Mich- 
ael McAleenan. Peoria has lost a good citizen ; the family a husband and father, 
who leaves the legacy of a good name. The writer has known him well, and sor- 
rows with those who have a better right. Mr. McAleenan's career furnishes an 
example to American youth. He was literally a self-made man. He started in 
life with nothing but a good trade, but by hard work and perseverance had become 
proprietor of the iron works in this city. His habits of industry clung to him 
after he had built up his business, and he personally superintended even the minor 
details. He was a man who knew not what it was to be discouraged. In hard 
times, he only worked the harder. When his plant was destroyed by fire, he 
said nothing, but quietly went to work again, building larger and better. Such 
men as Air. McAleenan are good men for any city or county. They are splendid 
specimens of the kind of men America turns out from her work-shops. They 
are an example to the young of what hard work can accomplish. Mr. Mc- 
Aleenan was somewhat abrupt and brusque in his manner, but a kinder heart 
never dwelt in human bosom. Xo one who was deserving ever asked a favor of 
him and was refused. For a positive man he leaves very few enemies, while his 
friends — warm friends who looked beneath the surface, are numbered by the 
hundred." 



JOSEPH A. MERCER. 



Joseph A. Mercer lived a life that in its good influences can be measured 
not by time but by eternity. If success is reckoned by worldly gains he was 
not a successful man for no fortune crowned his efforts. Some one has said : 
"Not the good that comes to us but the good that comes through us is the 
measure of our success," and judged by this standard Joseph A. Mercer was a 
highly successful man. Fie ever held with Kant that : "The object of education 
is to train each individual to reach the highest perfection possible for him," 
and it was this spirit which actuated him in all of his career as a teacher. The 
memory of such a man can never die while living monuments remain upon 
which were inYprinted the tcnich of his noble soul. 



1 




PROF. JOSEPH A. JIERCER 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 91 

Professor Mercer was born in Princeton, Illinois, November 12, 1844, and 
after mastering the elementary branches of learning in the public schools of his 
native town he entered Dover Academy, six miles north of that place. He 
came of sturdy Scotch descent and was surrounded in his youth by some of 
Illinois' most renowned citizens, notably Owen Lovejoy and the LJryants. Reared 
amid such an environment it was but natural that the growing boy should be- 
come a strong lover of the right and an opponent of all that savored of evil 
or oppression. He was ambitious to acquire a college education and was cjual- 
itied to enter college at the age of sixteen but limited financial resources made 
this step impossible. He then began teaching in the district schools, following 
the profession for two years, during which period he carefully saved his wages 
and thus opened the way for further study. Matriculating in the University 
of .Michigan, he remained at Ann Arlior until his funds were exhausted and he 
was again compelled to resort to teaching to replenish his depleted exchequer. 
Two years later he was again able to enter the university and this time he took 
with him to Ann Arbor his bride, Elizabeth (Kinsman) Mercer, a "woman of 
marked sweetness of character and purity of life," whose personality must surely 
have contributed largely to his successful career. Two more years at Ann 
Arbor completed his course, at the end of which time he accepted the position 
of principal of schools at Sheffield, Illinois, thereby returning to his native county. 
For fifteen years he occupied that ])osition and in 1882 was elected principal 
of the Lincoln school in Peoria. For twenty-seven years he continued as its 
head, resigning because of ill health in March, 1909. During that period he 
declined more remunerative positions, including the chair of Latin in the State 
University, preferring rather to remain where his home and friends were 
than to earn a higher salary in a strange environment. It would have meant 
much for him to have broken home ties for he loved his city and fellowmen 
to an unusual degree and they came to admire and love him as few men are 
loved. I lis abilitv and his upright life ever compelled the admiration of a_ con- 
stantlv growing acquaintanceship. Men of affairs often deferred to his judg- 
ment, recognizing its soundness, for his opinions had their bases in wide infor- 
mation and in the habit of looking at things judicially. He did not have to 
ponder long over any situation to form an opinion because there was a reserve 
store of knowledge that had usually already acquainted him with the principles 
that were involved in a specific situation. His earnestness of speech carried 
conviction to his hearers and from early manhood he was accorded a position 
of leadership. One writing of him in this connection said : "Joseph Mercer 
was always a leader. At the university, president of his class and one of seven 
chosen from one hundred to speak on Commencement Day : on the athletic 
field, at the head of his baseball team as catcher ; in Sunday school, a successful 
teacher of the most advanced class for many years; in the leading Congregational 
church of his city, a deacon for life, in recognition of his character and worth ; 
in prayer meeting, an occupant of the front seat, most eloquent in speech and 
fervent in jjetition ; in professional gatherings, an active, earnest worker and 
the recipient of numerous offices of trust and honor." 

No matter how strenuous were his duties nor how imjjortant the work that en- 
gaged his attention. Professor Mercer always felt that his chief interest was his 
home and family. The relation that there existed was largely an ideal one. Unto 
him and his wife were born two daughters : Clara, who is the widow of Fred- 
erick R. Avery, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this work; and Mrs. 
Edith Ro.sbrook. Disease fastened itself upon Professor Mercer and though 
unable for several months to give more than a part of the day to his school 
work, the board of education and the public in general were loath to lose his 
services, preferring him as principal to anyone else. In the Lincoln school, of 
which he had charge for twenty-seven vears, he had the high respect and warm 
regard of teachers and pupils alike. The boys and girls felt that they had his 



I 

92 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY | 

sympathy and that his interest in them was unfailing. His Hfe and work were 
ever an inspiration to fellow members of his profession. For many years he 
served as treasurer of the Central Illinois Teachers' Association and at one 
time acted as its president. For several terms he was a director of the State 
Pupils' Reading Circle. In 1903 he was vice president of the Illinois State 
Teachers' Association and in 1906 was its president. When the time for the 
convening of the meeting came ill health prevented his attendance. One of his 
friends said: "It was mv privilege to be with him on the day the message of 
re°-ret and sympathy came from the State Association, then in session at Spring- 
field, and I am sure it comforted and cheered him greatly to know his friends 
had given him a passing thought of kindness and love." It is not from the 
few conspicuous duties of life that the blessings chiefly come which make the 
world better, sweeter, happier; but from the countless little ministries of the 
everydays ; the little faithfulnesses that fill long years. So it was with the life of 
Professor 'jMercer, who day after day in the performance of the duties of his 
profession sought to inspire and encourage others and to make the young realize 
what life is with its meaning and its opportunities. His career was indeed an 
inspiration to many and his work yet bears fruit in the lives of those who 
came under his influence. 



! 



WILLIAM :m. cooley, m. d. 

Dr. William AI. Cooley is one of the most prominent among the younger 
physicians of Peoria. While he has practiced here only since 1905, or for a 
period of about seven years, he has demonstrated his ability to cope with the in- 
tricate and complex problems which confront the physician and his professional 
labors have been attended with a gratifying measure of success when viewed 
from the health and the financial standpoints. Dr. Cooley is a native of Toulon, 
Stark county, Illinois, born March 2, 1879. His parents were Jonathan B. and 
Lucy (Parrish) Cooley, the former a shoe dealer who is now deceased, having 
passed away in 1892. He had for a number of years survived his wife, who 
died in 1884. 

In his native city William M. Cooley was reared and he supplemented his 
public-school education by a course of study in Toulon Academy. He then 
started out to make his own way in the world, securing a position in a hardware 
store, in which he remained for a year. Desirous, however, of entering the 
medical profession, he then matriculated in Northwestern Medical College, 
of Chicago, in which he pursued a four years' course, being graduated there- 
from with the class of 1903. During his residence in that city he was interne 
at iNIichael Reese Hospital for two years and in his broad hospital experience 
and practice gained wide knowledge and skill which have proven of immense 
benefit to him in the conduct of his private practice in Peoria. On coming to 
this city in 1905 he opened an office at 426 Main street and is now pleasantly 
located in the JeiTerson building, in the conduct of a general practice. 

Dr. Cooley's home relations are attractive and pleasant. He was married in 
February, 1906, to Miss Ella V^. Engstrom, of this city, and they now have two 
children, Elizabeth and William. Dr. Cooley and his wife have many friends 
here and the hospitality of a large number of the best homes is extended them. 

The Doctor is a thirtv-second degree ^lason and a member of the Mystic 
Shrine and has many friends among the brethren of this order. He possesses 
a social, genial nature, which endears him to those with whom he comes in con- 
tact but he never allows siocial or outside interests to interfere with the faithful 
performance of his professional duties. He is now serving on the staff of the 
Deaconess Hospital and he belongs to the Peoria City IMedical Society, the Illi- 



t 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 93 

nois State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He served 
for three years on the board of censors of the tirst named and was chairman of 
the board in 1910. He believes in holding high the standards of the profession, 
realizing fully how great are the obligations and responsil)ilities that devolve 
upon the medical practitioner. 



ROLAND L. AIAHER. 



Roland L. Malicr. president of The Peoria Engraving Company, has been 
identified with the business interests of Peoria for the past twelve years. He 
was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on the i8th of January, 1871, and is a son of 
Patrick and Ellen Maher, both of whom are now deceased. The father was for 
many years a meat inspector in Louisville, and there he and the mother passed 
away and were laid to rest in a Catholic cemetery. 

The education of Roland L. Maher was acquired in the public schools of 
Louisville, which he attended until he was fourteen years of age. He then laid 
aside his text-books and became a wage earner, his first position being that of 
a messenger boy with the \\"estern L'nion Telegraph Company. Two years later he 
withdrew from this and became an apprentice in an engraving establishment. 
After completing his period of service he followed this occupation at various 
places until 1900, and in January of that year he came to Peoria to become iden- 
tified with The S. F. Hallock Company. He was a most capable and efficient 
workman and was subsequently made a partner in the business, and later when 
the ct)m])any was incorporated under the name of The Peoria Engraving Com- 
pany, Mr. Maher was made president. In this capacity he has manifested more 
than average executive ability and powers of organization, and under his capa- 
ble supervision and direction the company has developed in a most gratifying 
manner and is now one of the thriving and highly prosperous enterprises of the 
city. Employment is given to a large corps of skilled workmen and their receipts 
show a marked increase from year to year, which must largely be attributed to 
the intense diligence and systematic methods employed bv ^Ir. Maher as chief 
executive of the company. 

^Ir. Maher resides at No. 310 North street, while his office is in the factory 
at No. 107 Main street, where the company have been located since the 2d of 
I\Iay, 1901. In matters of religious faith he is a Roman Catholic and in politics 
he is independent, giving his support to such men and measures as he deems best 
qualified to subserve the highest interests of the majority. Mr. Maher is highly 
regarded in local business circles, as he possesses the (jualities that command 
the resjiect the commercial fraternity generally and in his transactions he con- 
ducts himself in a manner that entitles him to the esteem and confidence of 
those with whom he has dealings. 



GEORGE W. PRINGLE. 



George \V. Pringle is the Peoria manager for the Inter-state Indeiiendent 
Telephone & Telegraph Company, formerly known as the Northwestern Tele- 
phone Company, with offices located at No. 125 South Jefferson street. His 
birth occurred at Green Bay, Wisconsin, on the loth of September, 1862, and 
he is a son of Thomas W. and Rose Pringle.' The father, who has always been 
more or less actively identified with agricultural pursuits, is a veteran of the 



94 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Civil war, having gone to the front as a private in the First Regiment of JUinois 
Light Artillery. He saw considerable active service, having participated in some 
of the notable conflicts of the war, and was incarcerated for a time in Libby 
prison. His health suffered from the hardships and privations incident to camp 
life and he was honorably discharged at the close of his period of enlistment 
with the rank of corporal. 

The boyhood and early youth of George \V. Pringle were passed on his 
father's farm in the cultivation of which he assisted until he was eighteen years 
of age. His education was acquired in the common schools of Duck Creek, 
Brown county, Wisconsin, and after laying aside his text-books he entered the 
office of a local dentist, with the expectation of adopting this profession for his 
life vocation. He remained there for two years and was subsequently com- 
pelled to give up the work owing to the state of his health. For several years 
thereafter he was employed at Battle Creek, Michigan, going from there to 
Minneapolis, where he entered the service of the Northwestern Telephone Com- 
pany. His next removal was to Detroit, Michigan, to assume the duties of line 
foreman with the Michigan Bell Telephone Company. He continued in their 
service for four years, and at the expiration of that time became line foreman 
with the Bell Telephone Company at Chicago. He subsequently was employed 
in the same capacity by the Chicago Telephone Company, after which he accepted 
the position he now holds. Mr. Pringle has proven very efficient and capable in 
his present position, discharging his duties in a manner highly satisfactory both 
to his employers and their patrons. 

At Glencoe, Illinois, on the 15th of September, igoi, Mr. Pringle was united 
in marriage to Miss Lena Micholson, a daughter of John Micholson, a retired 
farmer of Allegan, Michigan. One daughter has been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Pringle, Helen M., who is attending school. The family reside at No. 2165^ 
Fourth avenue. 

Mr. Pringle votes with the republican party, but he has never sought political 
preferment. He has been a resident of Peoria for eleven years and enjoys the 
regard of a large circle of acquaintances, many of whom are held in the more 
intimate bond of friendship. 



WILLIAM R. ALLISON, M. D. 

Dr. William R. Allison is a general practitioner of medicine of Peoria with 
office in the Observatory building. He has practiced here since 1892 and the 
years have chronicled his continuous progress. Indeed advancement has been 
the watchword of his life. He is largely a self-educated as well as a self-made 
man and has depended upon his own resources and ability for the attainment 
of success. lie is a highly intellectual man, of c|uick perceptions and sharp dis- 
crimination, of great eloquence, and always speaking to the point. His being 
possessed of a thorough classical and medical education in combination with 
his innate talents, explains also why he is a very successful practitioner. He 
loves science for science's sake ; is a hard student ; and is enthusiastic in his 
efforts to cultivate and elevate the standard of the medical profession. He is 
also a public-spirited man, and has, by word and deed, done much for the benefit 
of our city. He is a gentleman of fixed principles — a man in the full sense 
of the W'ord. 

Illinois claims Dr. Allison as a native son, his birth having occurred upon a 
farm in McDonough county, January 16, 1863. His parents are Andrew' and 
Louisa (Russell) Allison, who were farming people of that section of the state. 
The son was reared on the old home place and his experiences were those which 
usually fall to the farm lad who divides his time between the acquirement of 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 95 

an education and the work incident to the development of the tields. Me at- 
tended the rural schools and afterward became a student in Lincoln University, 
at Lincoln, Illinois. He was eighteen years of age when he left college and 
faced a situation which called forth all his latent energies, determination and 
ambition. He knew that he must depend upon his own labor for advancement 
and he purchased a run-down creamery, which he operated for two years, placing 
the business upon a substantial Ijasis. His close application, his unremitting in- 
dustry and his careful management enabled him to acquire in that time a capital 
sufficient to pay his expenses while pursuing a course in Rush ]\Iedical College 
of Chicago. He had resolved upon the practice of medicine as a life work and 
for three years was a student in that institution, being graduated therefrom in 
1886. Immediately afterward, he located for practice at Good Hope, Illinois, 
where he resided for six years, or until he came to Peoria in 1892. Twenty 
years have since come and gone and each year has seen him at a higher point 
than he had reached the preceding year. He has been a close and discriminating 
student of his profession, has been most conscientious and faitliful in the per- 
formance of his professional duties and at all times has held to a high ethical 
standard in his work. 

In 1887 occurred the marriage of Dr. Allison and Miss Carrie Potter, of 
Macomb, Illinois, and they now have one child, Cora Belle. Extending his social 
and fraternal connections as the years have passed on. Dr. Allison has become 
a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He belongs 
also to the Creve Coeur Club. He gives his political allegiance to no party, 
keeping at all times well informed on the questions and issues of the day. and 
supporting the men and measures which were in his judgment to the best in- 
terests of citv. state and nation. He has held some local offices, representing the 
fourth ward on the board of aldermen, and he has served as commissioner of 
health of the city of Peoria. 

As a man and a citizen, he has yet to be viewed from another standpoint. 
Of large and liberal views in all matters of business, full of enterprise and be- 
lieving much in jnish and perseverance, he can always be found in the van of 
every movement looking toward the accomplishment of real and practical good. 
Of extensive acc|uaintance and very popular socially: charitable to an extent al- 
together disproportionate to his means; unostentatious in everything: one of 
the truest men to his friends that ever lived : still in the vigor and prime of a 
remarkably eventful life, the work before him to do and yet unaccomplished is 
immense, but to the fulfillment of his destiny he will carry in the future as in 
the past, the matured and strengthened elements and accessories of a character 
that ultimately is to triumph over all obstacles and survive to be made stronger 
and better. He is no partisan. Cultivated and intelli.gent. he rises to the dignity 
of true statesmanship: no narrow, or prejudicial or sectional opinions ever con- 
trol his conduct. He believes in our American nationality, and in his policies 
for the development of the physical, moral and intellectual improvement of the 
country, he embraces the whole of it. and all its parts. 

Dr. Allison is an ex-president and was also at one time secretary of the 
Peoria City Medical Society and he belongs to the Illinois State Medical Society 
and the .American Medical Association. He is now serving on the staf? of the 
Proctor Hosiiital and is its secretary. This connection indicates plainly his 
high standing among his professional brethren, as well as in the re.gard (if the 
public. He certainly deserves nnich credit for what he has accomplished. He 
liravely and resolutely met the difficulties and obstacles and overcame these by 
determined and resolute i)urpose. thus qualifying for the highest position in his 
profession and as a citizen, in both of which capacities he has made continuous 
advancement. 

Dr. Allison is still in the visjor of manhood, and it is hoped, will be spared 



I 



96 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

many years to witness the prosperity of the city he has already done so much 
for. His life record finds embodiment in the words of Pope : 

"Statesman, yet friend to truth ; of soul sincere, 
In action faithful and in honor clear; 
Who broke no promise, served no private end; 
Who gained no title, and who lost no friend.'' 



W. T. SLOAX, M. D. 



Records show that early in the history of the ancient Egyptians, there were 
men of science — priests — who were professed medicine men and certainly their 
art of embalming demonstrates that they were familiar with methods unknown to 
us today. The East Indians believed in the virtue of certain amulets worn under 
direction of the priests. The Mosaic laws gave specific directions regarding med- 
icine and their being administered, but perhaps the first eminent name that has 
come down to us today as a synonym for matters medical, is that of the Greek 
god of medicine. Aesculapius, the son of Apollo and Coronis. Pythagoras, the 
famous Greek philosopher and mathematician, who lived from about 582-500 
B. C., is believed to have promulgated the study of anatomy, but the father of 
Greek medicine was Hippocrates, who lived from about 460-377 B. C. The 
greatest Roman physician was Galen, who was born about A. D. 130. From the 
seventh to the tenth century, the Arabs began the study of medicine as a science, 
and then progressed no further, their greatest physician being Avicenna (Ibn 
Sina) surnamed the "Prince of Physicians," who lived about A. D. 1020. Later 
came upon the field Paracelsus, 1493-1541, the German-Swiss physician and al- 
chemist, and \^esalius, 15 14- 1564, the Flemish anatomist and court physician to 
Charles \\ and Philip II., but the discovery of the circulation of the blood by 
Harvey, 1578-1657, expounded in his chief work "Essay on the Alotion of the 
Heart and the Blood," 1628, gave the first great impulse to medicine as a science. 

However, all of this research and study, while it prepared the way for the 
wonderful discoveries which came later, did little to enlighten the minds of the 
physicians as to the real causes and effects of disease. 

Dr. Sloan whose name heads this biographical record has devoted his life to 
this profession, and he has been deservedly crowned with its choicest rewards. 
To attain the success which he has reached, he has never resorted to extraneous 
means or influences, or any of the arts by which popularity is sometimes pur- 
chased at the expense of science and of truth. He has risen simply by the same 
means which woidd have enabled any other person to have risen to his place, and 
without which no man, in any of the professions, but especially in that of medi- 
cine, can hope to achieve permanent distinction. There are heights to which 
even genius cannot soar, which can only be reached by patient, arduous, unre- 
mitting toil, unfaltering courage and inflexible determination to succeed. Dr. 
Sloan is a highly intellectual man, of quick j^erceptions and sharp discrimination. 
Flis being possessed of a thorough classical and medical education in combina- 
tion with his innate talents, explains also why he is a very successful practitioner. 
He loves science for science's sake; js a hard student, and is enthusiastic in his 
efforts to cultivate and elevate the standard of the medical profession. He is 
also a public-spirited man, and has by word and deed, done much for the benefit 
of our city. He is a gentleman and a man of fi.xed principles — a man in the full 
sense of the word. . 

No general practitioner of Peoria is accorded a more extensive or important 
practice than is given Dr. W. T. Sloan, a fact at once indicative of his broad skill 
and ability and his unfaltering devotion to the duties of the profession. He has 




l)i:. \V. T. SLOAN 



1 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 99 

practiced medicine in this city since' 1894, and previously had twenty years' ex- 
perience as a general practitioner in Elmwood, so that he has been connected with 
the medical fraternity of Peoria county for thirty-seven years. 

Pie was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, September 2S. 1849. ^'I'l i^ I'le 
son of John J. Sloan. His boyhood and youth were spent upon his father's farm, 
where his experiences were those that usually fall to the lot of the farm lad who 
divides his time lietween the work of the school room, the pleasures of the play- 
ground and such tasks as are assigned by parental authority. After attending the 
country schools he engaged in teaching to some extent in his own county and later 
resumed his own education as a pupil in summer normal schools. He has always 
been a student of life's problems as well as of the literature of the different ages, 
and his knowledge has thus been continually augmented and broadened. He 
took up the study of medicine in Pellevue Hospital Medical College at New York 
city, from which he was graduated in the spring of 1874. His training was thor- 
ough and comprehensive and well (jualified him for the onerous and responsible 
duties which have since devolved upon him in general practice. Following his 
graduation, he came at once to Elmwood, Peoria county, and opened an office. 
The early cases which were given him proved him to be capable of solving the 
intricate problems that contiiuially confront the physician and his practice steadily 
grew in volume and importance. For twenty years he continued at Elmwood and 
then removed to Peoria in 1894. His reputation had preceded him and he was 
not long in becoming well estalilished in business here, having today the largest 
general practice in Peoria, his patronage coming from among the best families of 
the city. In addition to his general practice he is now serving on the staff' of 
Proctor Hospital and he has also extended his connections to commercial inter- 
ests, becoming a director and the secretary of the Allaire-Woodward Company, 
manufacturing chemists of this city. He belongs to several professional societies, 
whereby he keeps al)reast with the onward march of professional progress, hold- 
ing memliership in the Peoria City Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. Of the tirst named he was at one 
time president. 

In 1876 Dr. Sloan was united in marriage to Miss Bertha \'andervoort, of 
Elmwood. a daughter of J. A. \'andervoort, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren, of whom two are living, John and Helen, the latter the wife of James C. 
McRae of Indiana])olis. Their daughter Eleanor, the wife of S. M. Russell, 
superintendent of the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad, died in 1908. John 
is a graduate of the Law Department of the University of I'oston and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Massachusetts. The family is very prominent socially and 
theirs is one of the attractive homes of the city, justly celebrated for its warm- 
hearted hospitality. 

Dr. Sloan is well known in ^Masonic connections, having taken various degrees 
in the York and Scottish Rites and is now a consistory Alason and a member of 
Mohammed Temjile of the Alystic Shrine. He is also a past eminent commander 
of the Knights Templar commandery, and in his life exemplifies the beneficent 
spirit of the craft. He belongs to the Peoria Country Club and is a prominent 
member of the Creve Coeur Club, of which he served on the building committee 
during the erection of its fine club house. His position as a citizen and in pro- 
fessional and social relations is a most enviable one, personal worth and acquired 
ability gaining for him well merited honor and esteem. 

It is an appreciable fact that no man is held in higher esteem or nearer and 
dearer to the hearts of those comprising the home circle than the familv physi- 
cian, and no one is called upon to make greater sacrifices than the medical man. 
Xo one who is so compelled to ]nit aside all personal pleasures and convenience 
than he. It is also true of the family physician that many of his patients have 
paid him only in love and gratitude for he never stops to ask if his fee is forth- 



100 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

coming, but visits the penniless as cheerfully as the millionaire. Such. is the 
record of Dr. Sloan, who has practiced in Peoria county for nearly four decades. 

Upon many occasions Dr. Sloan was called in the dead of night to attend a 
patient who lived many miles away. In those days there were no automobiles, no 
electric cabs, and many of the roads were in a terrible condition. The physician 
was forced to trust to the instinct of his faithful horse and left matters lilindly 
with him as the little sulky went swaying along in the midnight darkness. Often- 
times the good ph}-sician worn out with the worries and work of the day would be 
suffering from nervous headache, his great heart torn over the sufferin,gs of 
others who needed him so badly. Once arrived at the home of the sick one, he 
not only was the family doctor, but the family friend, the family confes.sor and 
confidant, and oftentimes the family financier. The modern physician who con- 
fines himself to an office practice has no conception of the hardships of such a pro- 
fessional life as Dr. Sloan led, in the early days of his practice in Peoria county, 
nor does he experience the intense joy that falls to the lot of the old physician 
when he realized how dependent his people were upon his skill and cheering 
words. 

Sometimes his visits led him so far from home that he went on horesback and 
would be away from his own home and its comforts for many hours and even 
days at a time. His family dreaded these trips, for he never spared himself, and 
would return exhausted from overwork and long riding. His sympathy was so 
great that he always suffered with his patients, fully entering into their lives, and 
the strain told upon him both in mind and body. Few properly consider what 
toil, what a wealth of expense, zeal, watchfulness, knowledge and supremacy of 
skill and talent was required in those olden days. It took patience and persever- 
ance, backed by estimable character and homely virtues to bring the physician of 
half a century ago out of the difficulties with which he was beset. What modern 
physician, fresh from his school and hospital, imbued with all the latest theories 
regarding germology, fixed in his ideas regarding antiseptics, used to every con- 
venience and appliance could battle successfully against the odds that confronted 
this brave pioneer in the medical field? Dr. Sloan had no hospital to which to 
send his patient when he felt he had exhausted his skill. He had no knowledge 
of so many recent discoveries to aid him, and yet he has seldom failed to save the 
life of a patient unless the disease was one no human power could arrest. 

To have lived as he, to have done what he did, to have accomplished so much 
of good and so little of evil, is to have worked out the great problem given all to 
solve, successfullv and brilliantlv, and no man can do more. 



HERBERT T. LAXDAUE-R. 

Among the well established attorneys at law in Peoria is Herbert T. Land- 
auer, who has offices at 60 1 Observatory building, having been engaged in gen- 
eral practice in this city since 1896. He was born in Canton, Illinois. May 15, 
1869, a son of Moses and Sarah Landauer. The father was engaged in the mer- 
cantile business for many years and the mother was a daughter of Squire 
Thomas M. Hamilton, who was one of the first white men to settle in Fulton 
county, Illinois. The mother died in 1882 at the age of forty-eight years, being 
interred at the Greenwood cemetery. Canton, Illinois. The father is now resid- 
ing in Jersey City, New Jersey. 

The public schools of Canton furnished Herbert T. Landauer with his primary 
education and he was graduated from the high school of that place in 1890. 
After his graduation from that institution he entered the University of Mich- 
igan, taking the law course, and after one year was graduated with honors, re- 
ceiving the degree of LL. B. Upon his return from Ann Arbor he practiced 



HISTORY OF PEORTA COUNTY 101 

law at Canton. Illinois, in partnership witli lion. ( ). j. Hover, when he removed 
to Fine Bluff, Arkansas, for the jiraetiee (jt his profession, which he iiursued at 
that point ior three years, after which he returned to Canton, remaininij there 
for a short time, later coming to P'eoria with Meredith Walker, with whom he 
had formed a partnership while in Canton. This i)artnership was continued in 
this city for two years and was then dissolved, Mr. Landauer succeeding to the 
firm's business in Penria. Since that time he has remained alone in the prac- 
tice of his profession which he has prosecuted with uniform success. He holds 
certificates entitling him to practice in Illinois, Michigan, Arkansas and the 
United States courts. He is a member of the Peoria County Pjar Association 
and hv constant reading keeps pace with the constantly changing legal enact- 
ments and supreme court decisions. His jiolitical allegiance is given to the re- 
publican party and he is at present chief inspector of the city streets and pave- 
ments under Sherman W. Eckley, commissioner of public works of the city of 
Peoria. During nearly the score of years which have marked the residence of 
Mr. Landauer in Peoria he has formed a large acquaintance in this city and 
throughout the county and has built up a very satisfactory law practice. His 
clients are representatives of practically all classes and the attention which he 
gives to business entrusted to him and the success which he has before courts and 
juries give him an excellent standing in the community where he is greatly 
respected. 



WIIJJAM HEXRY EASTAIAN. 

Throughout much of his life William Henry Eastman was connected with 
public office and the record which he made placed his name high on the list of 
those who in positions of political preferment have conferred honor and dignity 
upon the communities which they represented. For fifty years he was a prom- 
inent and well known citizen of Peoria. 

He was born in New York in 1831 and died in this city on the 20th of Janu- 
ary, 1902, being then about seventy-one years of age. His education was ac- 
quired in the schools of the Empire state and in 1851, when a young man of 
twenty years, he came westward, establishing his home in Peoria. The follow- 
ing year he accepted a position as engineer on the first railroad that entered the 
city — the old Peoria & Oquawka road, which is now a part of the Rock Island & 
Pacific Railroad system. He followed that occupation for many years and finally 
removed to Yates City, where he invested his savings in a mercantile enterprise, 
continuing as proprietor of that store for several years. 

In 1861;, however, Mr. Eastman withdrew from independent business con- 
nections and entered the government service as a ganger, occu])ying that posi- 
tion for nine years, or until 1S78. The greater part of his life from that time 
on was spent in public office. He served as alderman of Peoria for one term, 
re])resenting the first ward in iS'iti. In 1804 he was elected justice of the peace 
and continued in that position mitil iSi|8. ITe then retired from active life at 
the age of si.xty-seven years, spending his remainine days in the enjoyment of 
well earned rest. In all oublic jiositions he was loyal, his duties were prrnuptly 
performed and his faithfulness and integrity were ever bevond question. He 
was a well known advocate of republican principles, kept well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day and took a deep and helpful interest in everv- 
thing- pertaining to the welfare of his city. 

Mr. Eastman was married twice. His first wife died in i8g8 and the three 
children of that marriage have also nassed away. On the lOth of October, 1899, 
occurred his marria.ge to Miss Lydia Knupp. a daughter of Frederick and Ann 
Knn|)]i, who were natives of Switzerland and on coming to .America settled in 



102 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Phihulelpliia. In 1870 they became residents of Peoria, where the father en- 
gaged in carpet manufacture. 

Air. Eastman was a great reader and had a well selected library. He also 
loved music and travel and along those lines secured rest and recreation. He 
was a prominent Mason, holding membership in Illinois Lodge, F. & A. AI.; 
Peoria Chapter, R. A. M. : Peoria Commandery. K. T. ; Peoria Consistory, A. 
A. S. R. ; and Alohamnied Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He was likewise a 
member of Electa Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star and extended his 
menabership relations to the Knights of the Maccabees, belonging to Peoria Tent. 
His religious faith was that of the Methodist denomination, his membership be- 
ing in the Madison Avenue church. His life was ever honorable and upright, 
in harmonv with his professions, and he endeavored to choose only that which is 
best in the develojiment of character, which he recognized as the most highly 
prized possession that is given to man. 



i 



LEWIS M. HIXES. ■ 



Lewis M. Hines has since 1906 been numbered among the county officials of 
Peoria county, filling the office of treasurer at the present time. He was previous 
to that time identified with agricultural interests and in both connections has 
made a creditable record. Peoria county numbers him among her native sons, his 
birth having occurred May 30, 185S. His father. John Hines, came from Coshoc- 
ton county, Ohio, to Illinois, in 1835, when a lad of ten years, making the trip in 
company with his father. John Hines, who settled in Richwood township, where 
he spent his remaining days, his time and energies being given to farming. To 
the same work his son and namesake turned his attention and for a long period 
was a representative of agricultural interests in Richwood township, where he 
carefully directed his labors and won a substantial measure of success in tilling 
the soil. He was a public-spirited citizen, active in support of all the measures 
and projects which he believed would prove beneficial to the community. In 
politics he was a stanch republican, never faltering in his support of the party, 
which he believed was most likely to conserve the interests of good government. 
Wherever he was known he was held in high regard and a long and useful life 
brought him to an honored old age, which was terminated by death in 1903. He 
married Laura Corrington. a native of Hamilton county, Ohio, a daughter of 
Washington Corrington, who was a farmer by occupation. Mrs. John Hines still 
survives, as do all of her nine children, namely: Lewis M. ; John B., who is living 
in Peoria county; -Mary E., who makes her home with her mother; Charles W., 
a resident of Peoria county, Illinois ; Walter Sherman, living in Peoria ; Gilbert 
B., who is located in Dunlajj, Illinois; Mrs. Laura A. Sammis, of Chillicothe, Illi- 
nois ; and Everett and Winfrcd, both of whom are residents of Richwood town- 
ship. 

The public schools afforded Lewis M. Hines the educational privileges which 
he enjoyed and which qualified him for responsible duties in later life. He 
worked upon his father's farm when not busy with his text-books, continuing on 
the old homestead until twenty-one years of age, when he started out in life on 
his own account as a farmer of Richwood township. He was itlentified with gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits until he reached the age of forty-eight years but now 
leases his land to one of his sons. He became a prosperous agriculturist because 
his labors were practical and his industry unfaltering. He added to his place all 
modern improvements and equipments and as he prospered, increased his hold- 
ings until he was recognized as one of the substantial residents of his community. 

Mr. Hines has never neglected his duties of citizenship and at all times has 
contributed to public progress to the extent of his ability. For nine years he 




LEWIS Jl. HIXK.S 



HISTORY Ol- I'l'OKlA COUNTY 105 

served as school director in his township and was also school trustee for three 
years. The cause of education has ever found in him a warm friend, and he did 
all in his powder to uphold the standard of the schools. For two years he Hlled 
the office of supervisor and in 1906 he was made the candidate of his party for 
the office of sheriff, to which he was elected for a four years' term. He dis- 
charged the duties of that office fearlessly and faithfully and the excellent record 
which he made in that connection commanded for him further official honors, so 
that in 1910 he was elected countv treasurer and is now the incumbent in that 
position. He is proving equallv faithful as a custodian of the \mh\k funds, his 
record being at all times characterized bv faithfulness and promptness in the 
discharge of his official duties. He has been an active supporter of the republican 
party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and keeps well in- 
formed concerning the salient questions and issues of the day. 

In March, 1881, in Peoria county, Mr. Hines was united in marriage to Miss 
Laura A. Pierce of this countv, a daughter of Hiram H. and Harriet (Lockwood) 
Pierce, the latter a native of the state'of Xew York. Her father belonged to one 
of the earlv families of this part of the state and for a long period was a repre- 
sentative of industrial interests, conducting a brick manufacturing plant, ^nto 
Mr. and Mrs. Hines were born five children, of whom three are yet living, 
namely: Mrs. Belle Moore, of Peoria; W. C, residing in Richwood town.ship : 
and Harrison, who is a resident farmer of Brimfield township. The parents are 
members of the Methodist church and Mr. Hines is a prominent ]\Iason. He 
belongs to the blue lodge and the chajiter, has attained the Knight Templar degree 
in the commanderv and the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. In his life 
he exem])lifies the' beneficent spirit of the craft and holds to the teachings con- 
cerning the universal brotherhood of mankind. He is at all times approachable 
and genial and wishes to be ranked by his genuine worth rather than by any false 
standards. 



HENRY MANSFIELD, Jr. 

The identification of Henry Mansfield, now senior member of the law lirm 
of Mansfield, Cowan cS: Boulware, with the legal fraternity of Peoria dates from 
1888. Mr. Mansfield was born in Peoria, March 4, 1864, the son of Henry and 
Isabelle I". Mansfield. The father came to Peoria in 1839 and was one of the 
first settles here. His Inisiness was that of a druggist and soon after settling in 
Peoria he formed a ])artnership with Dr. N. S. Tucker, which relationship was 
continued until shnrtly after the close of the Civil war, when the firm sold out 
and Mr. Mansfield invested a portion of his capital in real estate and also did a 
considerable loan business. .After selling the drug store he confined his atten- 
tion to looking after his holdings, which under his wise management accumu- 
lated so that at the time of his death in 1893, when he attained the age of 
seventy-three years, he was in affluent circumstances. His remains were laid to 
rest in Springdale cemetery. The mother survives and occupies the old home- 
stead at the corner of Perry street and Hamilton boulevard, Peoria. The Mans- 
field familv. which is of English extraction, was founded in the new world at a 
very early day and comprises eleven generations in America. 

In the public schools of Peoria Henry Mansfield secured his primary educa- 
tion, later entering the \'irginia Military Institute at Lexington, Yirginia, from 
which he was graduated in 1886. He then became a student in the law de- 
partment of the L'niversity of Virginia, pursuing his studies in that institution 
for two vears. In 1888 he was admitted to the bar by the supreme court of 
Illinois and immediately began the practice of his profession in Peoria. After 
a short time, however, he went to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he labored in his 
chosen profession for five years. In 1894 he returned to Peoria and has since 



106 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

been continuously engaged in the practice of his profession in this city, where he 
is meeting with gratifying success. In January, 1910, Mr. Mansfield entered 
into partnership with David J. Cowan, former state's attorney of Johnson county, 
and Jefferson R. Boulware, former state representative from Peoria county, 
forming the law firm of Mansfield, Cowan & Boulware. JNIr. Mansfield is a 
member of the P^eoria and the State Bar Associations, being active in his con- 
nection therewith. 

On March 4, 1909, occurred the marriage of ]\Ir. Mansfield to Miss Elizabeth 
J. Bruninga. a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bruninga. Mr. Alansfield gives 
his political adherence to the democratic party and he has taken an active in- 
terest in the promotion of those principles and policies for which democracy 
stands. In 1897 '""^ '^'^'''s appointed assistant city attorney and held that position 
until December, 1901. In April of the succeeding year he was elected city attor- 
ney and satisfactorily filled that position for two years. He was appointed as 
special counsel by the mayor and the city coimcil of Peoria to conduct the litiga- 
tion pending at the time of his appointment between the city of Peoria and the 
Peoria Gas Light & Coke Company. As a result of this litigation the price of 
gas to consumers was reduced to ninety cents per thousand cubic feet. In 1906 
he was appointed corporation counsel of the city of Peoria, a position which he 
held for three years. 



J. M. BELCK. 



J. M. Belck, who has been practically a lifelong resident of Peoria, is now 
the president of The B. F. Adams Company, dealers in farm implements, seeds, 
automobiles, etc., at Nos. 114-116-118 South Washington street. This enter- 
prise owes its development and prosperity in no small measure to the efforts 
of him who stands at its head, for Mr. Belck is a farsighted, sagacious and pro- 
gressive business man, whose plans are carefully formulated and promptly ex- 
ecuted. 

He was born near Mansfield, Ohio, in 1851, a son of Martin Belck, a har- 
ness maker who came to Peoria with his family during the infancy of his son, 
J. M. Belck. For many years the father was engaged in the harness-making 
business in Peoria in connection with H. M. Frederick under the firm style of 
Frederick & Company, this being one of the early business concerns of the city. 
The father died about the time his son J. M. Belck attained his majority but the 
mother had passed away while he was a schoolboy. His education was ac- 
quired in the public schools and in the high school when it was located at the 
old state house square. He likewise attended Brown's liusiness College and 
thus became well equipped for the practical and responsible duties which have 
devolved upon him in his later years. 

His identification with his present business dates from 1886, at which time 
he secured the position of bookkeeper and clerk with The George M. Moore 
Company. Later the business was reorganized under the name of the Peoria 
Implement Company, in which B. F. Adams became interested in 1894. The 
business, however, was conducted under the old style until 1907, when it was 
incorporated under the name of The B. F. Adams Company, with J. M. Belck 
as the president and manager. In the meantime he had continuously worked 
his way upward, acquainting himself with the various branches of the business, 
his powers growing through exercise. The business is conducted at Xo. 1 16- 
118 South Washington street, which is probably the oldest stand for an imple- 
ment concern in Peoria. They occupy the entire building, which is three stories 
in height, has a frontage of thirty-four feet and a depth of one hundred and 
seventy-two feet. They also occupy the entire two-story building at 114 South 
Washington street, which is twenty-four by one hundred and seventv-two feet. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 107 

They are extensive dealers in farm implements and yet their largest trade is in 
the jobbing of seeds. In that connection they have built up a business of mam- 
moth proportions and their output covers a wide territory. The business methods 
of the house are such as will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny, for at 
all times their interests have conformed to a high standard of commercial ethics. 
Mr. Belck was married in 1884 to Miss Alice Couch at Camp Point, Indiana. 
The social phases of his life are further represented in his connection with the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken the degrees of the lodge, chapter, 
council, commandery and the Mystic Shrine. He is in thorough sympathy 
with the purposes and teachings of the craft. Moreover, he is a member of 
the Peoria Association of Commerce and is interested in its various projects for 
the welfare of the city, its adornment, improvement and business development. 
Mr. Belck is a typical business man of the present day, alert, enterprising, prompt 
and notablv relial)le. He early realized the truth of the old adage that "honesty 
is the best policy" and it has been through the employment of progressive, reli- 
able methods that he has gained the presidency of one of the important com- 
mercial concerns of the city. 



ROSS S. W ALLACE. 



The popular and efficient manager of the Peoria Gas & Electric Company, 
with offices at No. 316 Jetferson street, is Ross S. Wallace, who has filled that 
position with this company since 1908. He came to Peoria in 1900 and ob- 
tained the position of chiei engineer for the concern of which he is now serving 
as general manager. His ability soon won him promotion and at the end of three 
years he was made department superintendent and later general superintendent. 
Mr. Wallace was born in Chatsworth, Illinois, December 9, 1869, the son of 
Robert R. and Louise (Strawn) Wallace. The father is now a practicing at- 
torney at Pontiac, Illinois, where he has followed his profession for a number 
of years. He is a veteran of the Civil war, serving four years and retiring with 
the rank of captain. He has long been associated with the professional and 
political affairs of Livingston county, having for twenty years filled the position 
of county judge. The Wallace family came originally from the north of Ire- 
land, its first representatives emigrating to the new world in or about 1750. 
They participated in the Revolutionary war and representatives of the family 
on the maternal side were identified with the "boys of '76." 

Ross S. Wallace received his preliminary education in the public and high 
schools of Pontiac and later entered the University of Illinois at Urbana. being 
graduated from the mechanical engineering department of that institution in 
1891 with the degree of B. S. After his graduation he gave his entire atten- 
tion to mechanical engineering and was employed at this work in various cities 
previous to settling in Peoria in 1900, when he became chief engineer of the 
Peoria Gas & Electric Company, of which company he is now filling the posi- 
tions of second vice president and general manager. He is also serving as vice 
president of the Citizens' Gas & Electric Company of Pekin, Illinois, and holds 
the same position with the Washington Light & Power Company of Washington, 
Illinois. He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
the American Institute of I'^lectrical I'.ngineers and the National Electric Light 
Association. 

On June i, 1898, Mr. Wallace was married to Miss Jessie Waring, a daugh- 
ter of E. S. and Helen Waring. Two daughters have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Wallace, Margaret and Helen, both of whom are attending the White 
school. In his political faith Mr. Wallace adheres to the principles of the re- 
publican party. He is a member of the Creve Coeur Club, the Peoria Country 



108 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Club and the Kickapoo Golf Club. In his religious associations he is a member 
of and deacon in the First Presbyterian church. The family reside at No. 2i6 
North street and here their many frientls are assured of a cordial greetmg. 
Possessing unusual ability, Mr. W'allace has by careful education, training and 
experience acquired a broad knowledge along electrical and engineering hues 
and is universally respected and admired for his ability and business capability. 



ABRAHAM P. COLVIN. 

Abraham P. Colvin, treasurer and cashier of the Peoria Gas & Electric Com- 
pany, with offices at 316 Jefferson street, has been with this concern since 1899 
in the capacity of cashier but since 1909 has also filled the office of treasurer. 
He was born 'at Maysville. Kentucky. October 29. 1856, a son of William and 
Martha Ann (Crow'ell) Colvin. The Colvin family has been established in 
America for many generations, the ancestrv being easily traced to colonial days. 
The father for many years conducted a paint and decorating establishment at 
Maysville, where most of his life was spent. He was a stanch supporter of the 
democratic party, although never becoming a politician in the office-seeking sense 
of the term. His death occurred in 1879, when he was fifty-three years of age. 
His wife survived him for many years, passing away on the 28th of April, 191 1, at 
the age of eighty-three years, and both were buried at Maysville. 

Abraham P. Colvin was reared and received his education in the city and 
state of his nativity. Putting aside his text-books at the early age of thirteen, 
however, he went to work as a clerk in a book and stationery house at Mays- 
ville and with various firms handling the same line continued in that business 
until 1898. He first came to Peoria in 1882 and remained a short time, re- 
turning later to Kentucky. In 1897 he settled permanently in this city since 
■which time he has made this his home. Two years later, in 1899, he became 
connected with the I'eoria Gas & Electric Company as its cashier, a position 
which he has since held. Owing to his ability and the tact shown in the hand- 
ling of his official duties he was ten years later given the additional responsi- 
bility of treasurer of the company, retaining also the cashiership which he had 
so long held. 

Mr. Colvin was married, in Peoria, September 18, 1895, to Miss Anna Rulon. 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Rulon. and they reside at 478 North Park- 
side Drive in a beautiful modern home which he erected in igog. The business 
career of Mr. Colvin has been distinguished from the beginning by those es- 
sential traits of integrity, strict attendance to business and ambition, without 
which no young man makes a success in life or rises in the esteem and respect 
of his fellows. In the responsible positions which he has held he has by his 
efficiency made himself almost indispensable and at the same time has extended 
his acquaintance in business and social circles until he is now well known 
throughout the city where he has the confidence and respect of all who know him. 



FREDERICK A. LAMMERS. 

Although many years have passed since Frederick A. Lammers was called 
to his final rest, he is yet remembered as a progressive, prominent business man 
of Peoria and one whose labors contriliuted to the material development of the 
city. He was here born in 1853, his parents being Henry and Sophia Lam- 
mers, who had come to Peoria the previous year from Hanover, Germanv. and 
resided in this citv until called to their final rest. Their son Frederick A. Lani- 



ii 



]11S'1-()RV OF PEORIA COUNTY 109 

mers pursued his early education in St. Joseph's school of Peoria and afterward 
attended Cole's Business College and the Pio Xono College at Mdwaukee, Wis- 
consin. For an extended period he was connected with the grocery busuiess, 
becoming the leading grocer in the southern part of Peoria. He conducted his 
store in the building at the corner of Cedar and Adams streets, which had been 
built i)y his father, Henry Lammers. He carried a large and well selected line 
of staple and fancy groceries and his straightforward business methods, his 
reasonable prices aiid his earnest desire to please his patrons secured to him a 
very gratifying trade, from which he annually derived a good profit. About 
two' years prior to his death he sold his grocery business to his brother Henry 
and turned his attention to the furniture trade, establishing the store which is 
now conducted under the name of the Banner Furniture Company at No. 141 1 
South Adams street. Sound judgment guided his activities and his energy en- 
abled him to overcome all the difficulties and obstacles in his path. He met 
competition by straightforward methods and made for himself a most credit- 
able name in business circles. Aside from his mercantile interests he was a 
stockholder in the German Fire Insurance Company of Peoria. 

In St. Joseph's German Catholic church of Peoria Mr. Lammers was mar- 
ried to ^iiss Elizabeth 'SL Rubel. of Chillicothe, Ohio, and unto them were born 
three daughters, Lillian \'era. Martha Henrietta and Maria Sophia, all yet liv- 
ing at home with their mother at No. 1029 North Madison avenue. In his 
political views Mr. Lammers was a democrat and labored earnestly and effect- 
ively for the welfare and growth of his i)arty. In April. 1887, he was elected 
tow'nshi]) assessor for Peoria township but had little desire for public office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business interests. Something 
of the nature of his recreation is indicated in the fact that he was a member of 
the Peoria Gun Club and the Peoria Rifle Club. He held membership in St. 
Joseph's German Catholic church and he belonged to St. Joseph's Benevolent 
"Society and the Knights of St. George. There are no unusual or spectacular 
features in his life record but it is none the less valuable and none the less 
essential, for his history contains many lessons that may well be learned by 
those who seek to win honorable success and who never neglect duty but find 
in each day's tasks the courage and inspiration for the labors of the succeeding 
day. 



JOHN C. RAMBO. 



John C. Rambo is the secretary of the Commercial Travelers' Loan and 
Homestead Association, with which he has been connected continuously since 
November, 1894, serving for fourteen years as its secretary. He came to this 
city in the previous July and has maintained a place among the prominent rep- 
resentatives of financial and business interests here, proving his worth in every 
connection and manifesting his ability in carefully formulated plans for the 
growth of the business of which he is a leading e.xecutive ofiicer. 

Mr. Rambo was born ui^on a farm near Keokuk, Io\ya, October 7, 1868, and is 
the son of H. C. and Isabel Rambo, who were agriculturists of that part of the 
state. The son early became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil 
and caring for the crops. He worked in the fields during the summer months 
and when educational opportunities offered, attended the country schools and 
finally became a high-school student at Farmington. Io\ya. Later he attended 
the Baptist College at Pella, Iowa, and in his broad and liberal education laid the 
foundation for his later success. He also jnirsued a course in Pierce's Business 
College in Keokuk. Iowa, and for a time was a teacher in that institution. He 
then taught in a business college in Fairfield, Iowa, and became acquainted with 



110 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

the methods pursued in banking circles while acting as cashier and bookkeeper 
in a bank is Farniington. Iowa. On leaving that position he came to Peoria, 
where he arrived in July, 1894, and in the following November he entered upon 
his present connection With the Commercial Travelers' Loan and Homestead 
Association. His efforts have been a feature in the continued growth and pros- 
perity of the business. On the 30th of June, 191 1, the forty-fifth semi-annual 
statement of the association was issued, indicating the continuous growth and 
substantial condition of the association at the present time. Its assets on the 
1st of Tuly, 1900, were one hundred and seventy-one thousand, six hundred and 
thirty-two' dollars, and on the ist of July, 191 1, were four hundred and ninety 
thousand, one hundred and eighty-seven dollars. 

In 1892 Mr. Rambo was united in marriage to ]\Iiss J\latie Eddy, of Farm- 
ington, Iowa. They have gained many friends during the period of their res- 
idence in Peoria and are widely and favorably known. They hold membership 
in the First Baptist church and in its work and kindred interests take an active 
and helpful part. Mr. Rambo is the president of the Peoria County Sunday 
School Association, is superintendent of the Olive Street Mission Sunday School 
and is a trustee of the First Baptist church. While he has closely confined his 
efforts and attention to business, he has never allowed this to preclude his active 
participation in eft'orts for the moral uplift of the race and his work in behalf 
of the church and Sunday School has been effective, beneficial and far reaching. 



ED\\'ARD \\'. BURDICK. 

Among the men whose business activities have contributed to public progress 
as well as to individual prosperity, Edward W. Burdick was numbered. He lived 
a quiet, uneventful life if judged by some standards, and yet his years were 
fraught with usefulness, and his labors resulted largely for the benefit of others. 
His friends, therefore — and they were many — came to regard him as one of the 
leading residents of his community, and rejoiced in the success which enabled him 
in his later years to live retired in the enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil. 
He was born on the i6th of January, 1826, and was therefore seventy-eight years 
of age when he passed away November 11, 1904. His birthplace was in Allegany 
county. New York, and his parents were Jabez and Abigail (Millard) Burdick, 
both of whom were natives of Berlin, Rensselaer county. New York. Upon the 
father's farm the boy was reared. He early became acquainted with the best 
method of tilling the soil and caring for the crops, and when not busy with the 
work of the fields he attended the district school. After attaining his majority he 
came west, settling first in Farniington, Fulton county, Illinois. There he became 
identified with agricultural pursuits, tilling the soil in that locality until 1862 when 
he sold his property there and removed to Peoria county, settling in Akroii town- 
ship. There he successfully followed farming for many years, converting his 
land into rich and productive fields from which he annually gathered rich and 
abundant harvests. His methods were of a most practical character that were 
based upon modern scientific principles. Moreover, he owned a third interest in 
the West Hallock Cheese Factory, one of the largest concerns of the kind in this 
part of the country, its extensive output annually returning to its owners a very 
substantial and gratifying income. As the years passed and success rewarded his 
labors Mr. Burdick felt he was justified in putting aside the more active duties of 
life, and during his last years lived retired, his financial resources being suflicient 
to supply him with all the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. In earlier 
years he had practiced frugality and economy, and his careful expeditures and 
judicious investments constituted the foundation upon which his fortunes were 
built. 




MR. AXn .MRS. K. \V. RlRDIeK 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COL"XTY 113 

At Farmington, on the 12th of April, 1852, :\Ir. Burdick was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Saunders, a native of Berlin, New York, who died on the 29th of Janu- 
ary, 1882. Mr. Burdick was again married on the 29th of November, 1888, his 
second union being with Mrs. Ophelia Partridge, a daughter of Reuben and 
Delight (I'almer) I'.rown, and the widow of Albert I'artridge who died November 
4, 1882. Her parents were natives of Rhode Island, and upon removing west- 
ward settled first in Illinois but afterward went to Wisconsin. Mrs. Burdickwas 
the third in a family of four children and was born in Ellisburg, New York, 
March 18. 1828. Although she is now eighty-four years of age she enjoys re- 
markablv good health and is splendidly preserved both physically and mentally. 
She is a member of the Seventh Day Baptist church to which Mr. Burdick also 
made them reach out a helping hand to those in need of a parental roof and 
lives. Thev never had any chddren of tlieir own, but their kindness of heart 
made them reach out a helping hand to those in need of a parental roof and 
protection. They reared five chikiren to whom they gave their name, these being 
Joseph, Charles, Dorcus E., Lillie J., and Cora A. Burdick. Dorcus became the 
wife of William Bavington, who is now deceased. They had one child, Betsy 
Bavington. Cora A. became the wife of Frank Rotterman and died leaving one 
child. Francis Rotterman. By her first marriage Mrs. Burdick had four children, 
but the eldest, James H., and the youngest, Mary, are now deceased. Harvey E. 
Partridge is married and has two children, William and Ida, the latter being the 
wife of Jesse Scholes and the mother of one child, Ida Scholes. Charles A. Part- 
ridge is married and has three children, Albert, Robert and liugene. Mrs. Bur- 
dick also has two great-grandchildren, Ruth and Lulu Partridge. 

In his political views Mr. Burdick was ever an earnest republican, stanchly 
advocating the principles of the party, although he did not seek the rewards of 
office. He was always actively interested in the welfare of his community and 
no other man of the community did more in developing the county. For more 
than fortv years he resided in Peoria county and gained for himself an enviable 
reputation as an agriculturist and as a citizen. It has been said, "Not the good 
that comes to us but the good that comes to the world through us is the measure 
of our success," and judged in this way Mr. Burdick was a most successful man. 
Giving homes to five orphan children would alone entitle him to distinction as 
one of the world's benefactors. In other ways too he lived out a life of useful- 
ness and his good deeds will long be remembered and cause his memory to be 
honored. 



NEWTON MEREDITH LO\'E. 

In presenting to the public the representative men of the city of Peoria, and 
the state of Illinois, who have by a superior force of character and energy to- 
gether with a combination of ripe (jualities of ability and excellency, made 
themselves conspicuous and commanding in private and public life, we have 
no example more fit to present, and one more worthy a place in this volume 
than Newton Meredith Love. Not only does he rise above the standard of his 
line of business, but he also possesses in a high degree the excellences of human 
nature that make men worthy of regard among their fellows. He is a high- 
minded and liberal business man ; one who is keenly alive to all the varying re- 
quirements of trade, and one of those who conduct operations of the most ex- 
tended and weighty character and who, above all others, have succeeded in 
making Peoria a great commercial center. 

Newton Meredith Love was born in this city, September 21, 1869, his par- 
ents being Newton B. and Sarah (Candee) Love. The Love family is of 
Scotch-Irish origin and the founder of the family in this country, John Love, 



i 



114 HISTORY OF i'EORIA COUNTY 

came from Ireland about 1720. Thomas Love, who was the great-great-grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was an officer in the Revolutionary war, 
and in the American army at that time were other members of the Love family. 
John Love, the original American ancestor, was a member of the first general 
synod and descendants of the name were ruling elders of the Presbyterian 
church in this country. The Candee family is of French origin and members of 
it were fugitives from the Huguenot persecutions. This family was also estab- 
lished in the new world at a very early day — about 1740 — and various members 
were soldiers in the Revolution and following wars which have been waged in 
America. The original name was Conde, but shortly after the establishment of 
the family in this country the present form was adopted. The maternal uncle 
of our subject, George W. Candee, was deputy paymaster general of the United 
States army at the time of his death. Newton B. Love was a railroad man of 
ability and for many years was the representative of the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad Company at Peoria. His death occurred in 1888. at the age of 
sixty-one years, and that of his wife in 1907, the latter passing away at the age 
of seventy-six years. Both were buried in Hope cemetery at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, which is the Candee family burial place. He was an elder in the First 
Presbyterian church in Peoria and a commissioner to the general assembly of 
that denomination. Mr. Love is related through his mother's family to the 
Gales from whom the city of Galesburg was named. 

Newton Meredith Love received his education in the public schools of Peoria, 
and was graduated from the high school in 1886. He then went to Knox Col- 
lege at Galesburg, where he studied a few years, and in 1888 entered the service 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad, his first position being that of office clerk. He 
proved an intelligent and efficient worker, and was promoted from time to time 
until he was appointed freight solicitor for this division of the road. In 1903 
he succeeded M. W. Goss, who was retired, as agent at Peoria, Illinois. This 
position he still retains. Possibly there is no wider known or more popular man 
in the middle west in railroad traffic circles than Mr. Love. He has been ever 
\eady to advance the interests of his state and city in this line and was one of 
the chief promoters of the Transportation Club, of which he is now the second 
vice president. 

In his political faith he is a member of the republican party. Fraternallv he 
is a Scottish Rite Mason, belonging to the consistory, and is also a Shriner. 
He is a member of the Creve Coeur Club, director of the Peoria Canoe Club, a 
member of the Kickapoo Club, and is also affiliated with the college fraternity 
Beta Theta Pi. Although he was not a dealer in grain or what may be termed 
a grain man, still his enthusiasm, energy and untiring efforts in behalf of the 
promotion of the traffic and business interests of the grain trade gained for him 
the unsolicited honor of appointment to the vice presidency of the Peoria Board 
of Trade, and he is still a member of that organization. 

Mr. Love resides at 301 Ellis street with his sister, Mrs. Anna L. Archer, 
who is assistant librarian of the Peoria Public Library. He has been a life-long 
member of the Presbyterian church, is an elder of the First church of Peoria, 
and was a commissioner to the genera! assembly of that denomination. He 
has been an enthusiastic supporter of the Y. ^I. C. A. and a liberal financial con- 
tributor towards its building. He is a true son of Peoria, where he has lived 
all his days, his prominence in commercial, social and church circles making 
him a representative citizen. Throughout the history of the world, mere success 
has never, save in rare instances, been the cause of any man being remembered 
by his fellows after he has passed from life, and never has the mere accumula- 
tion of wealth won honor for any individual. The methods emploved in the 
attamnient of prosperity however, may awaken approval and admiration, for 
the world pays its tribute to him who through enterprise, unfailing effort and 
clear-sighted judgment makes substantial advance in the business world without 



I 



I 



HISTORY OF TEORIA COUNTY 115 

infringing on the rights ami privileges of others. Such is the record of Mr. 
Love who throughout liis entire business career never deviated from a course 
that he believed to be right, but stands through many years as a leading represen- 
tative of Peoria. 

He was early taught to comply with the Biblical injunction "Be diligent in 
business," and the religious and moral training which he received, coupled with 
his honorable lineage, caused him to early develop those essential traits of char- 
acter, integrity, stamina and perseverance — which have contributed to make his 
business career an honorable and successful one. 

yir. Love is still a young man, full of the fire of youth, of wonderful energy 
and tireless diligence, learned in his profession, gifted preeminently with engag- 
ing social qualities which draw around him numbers of friends wherever he 
goes. He has all that straightforward courage and sincerity, that unfaltering 
integrity of purpose and whole-hearted generosity of impulse which fit a man 
for leadership ; he is welcomed and appreciated in every circle, social and polit- 
ical, and his hold upon the hearts of the people at large is growing firmer and 
stronger with the flight of vears. 



RUDOLPH H. ILAMMEL. 

Rudolph H. Hammel, local commercial agent for the Central States Dispatch 
and also vice president of the Workingmen's Loan & Homestead Association, 
was born in Peoria on the 3d of August, 1876, and is a son of Heni-y and Eliza- 
beth Hammel. The father was a native of Germany and there he was reared 
and educated. At the usual age he entered the army, remaining in the service 
during the German-.Xustrian war. He suljsequently decided to become a citizen 
of America and emigrated to the United States, locating in Peoria, and here for 
thirty years he engaged in the hay and grain business. He was a man of sterling 
worth and high integrity and made many friends during the long period of his 
residence in this city. He passed away on the 25th of July, 1905, at the age of 
sixty-five years, and was laid to rest in the family lot at Springdale cemetery. 
The mother is still living and now makes her home at Xo. 611 Lincoln avenue. 

Practically the entire life of Rudolph H. Hammel has l>een passed in this 
city. He attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education until he 
was' fifteen years of age and having com|)leted his grammar-school course, he then 
enrolled in the Brown liusiness College, where he studied shorthand and bookkeep- 
ing. In 1892 he became a wage earner, his employers being the North Chemical 
Company, whom he served for eighteen months in the capacity of manager. He 
subsequently took a special course in penmanship at the General Business Col- 
lege at Quincy. Illinois, after which he became a teacher of this art. On the 
20th of April, 1896. he took a position as stenographer with the Big Four Rail- 
road Company, serving in this capacity for about a year. At the expiration of 
that time he became a freight solicitor for the same company, contiiniing to 
discharge the duties of this position until the 1st of October, 1906. He resigned 
from their service on the latter date in order to take the position he now holds 
with the Central States Dispatch. In addition to his duties in this connection 
since October, 1910, Mr. Hammel has been vice president of the Workingmen's 
Loan & Homestead Association with offices at No. 31 Arcade building. 119 North 
Jefl^erson avenue. 

Peoria was the scene of Mr. Hammel's marriage on the 2d of October, 1901, 
to Miss Lizzie Kasjens, and to them have been born three daughters, as fol- 
lows : Hilda E. and Florence M., who are attending the German school ; and 
Verna T., who is two years of age. The family home is located at 704 Lincoln 
avenue. 



116 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Hammel are memljers of the German Lutheran EvangeHcal 
church, in the faith of which they are rearing their family. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Modern Woodmen of America, while his political indorse- 
ment is given to the republican party. Mr. Hammel is well and favorably known 
throughout the community as a reliable business man, public-spirited citizen and 
trustworthy friend. 



EDWARD L. SPURCK. 

Edward L. Spurck is treasurer of the ^Mexican Agricultural Land Company 
in the organization of which he assisted in 1905. They have met with success 
in the development of their interests during the seven years they have been pro- 
moting the organization and have every reason to feel gratified with their 
achievements. The birth of Edw-ard L. Spurck occurred in this city on the 9th 
of June, 1867, and he is a son of Peter E. and Ellen P.. Spurck. The parents 
are now both deceased, the mother having passed away in June 1889. at the age 
of forty-nine years, while the father was sixty-six at the time of his death, which 
occurred on the 23d of March, 1897. They were communicants of the Roman 
Catholic church and were interred in the family lot in St. Joseph's cemetery. 
The father was one of the successful pioneer business men of this city and was 
at the time of his death, and had been for many years previous, treasurer of the 
Peoria Distilling Company. The Spurck family originally came from Germany 
and upon their arrival in this country located in Pennsylvania. They subse- 
quently removed to Ohio, whence the grandparents came to Peoria in 1846. 

The education of Edward L. Spurck was begun in St. Patrick's parochial 
school, and there he pursued his studies until he was fifteen years of age. He 
then supplemented the knowledge there acquired by a course in one of the local 
commercial colleges thus qualifying himself for the practical duties of a business 
career. After completing his education his father put him in charge of his real 
estate interests, the duties thus involved engaging his entire attention until 1889. 
In the latter year he acquired some stock in the Peoria Paving Block Company, 
and continued to be identified with this enterprise in the capacity of secretary 
and treasurer until 1893. He next became associated with others in the organi- 
zation of the Spurck Street Paving Brick Company, the manufacturers of the 
first large brick used in Peoria, their yards being located across the river. 
Mr. Spurck was superintendent of their plant until they sold it in 1898 to Mr. 
Carter. After disposing of this he withdrew from business activities for a year, 
but at the expiration of that time, in 1899. he bought an interest in the Union 
Corn Planter Company. His uncle. M. D. Spurck, was for many years promi- 
nently identified with this industry, which was founded by James Selby & Com- 
pany. They engaged in the manufacture of various farming implements and 
were the second concern in the L^nited States to put out a corn planter. Mr. 
Spurck was connected with this company for four years, and during that time 
acquired a very thorough and practical knowledge of the business. In 1903 the 
plant was sold and he then embarked in the real estate business. Two years 
later, in 1905. he became associated with others in the purchase of large land 
tracts in Mexico and they organized the Mexican Agricultural Land Company to 
promote the development of their holdings. The company was incorporated 
under the laws of the state of Oklahoma with a capital stock of one hundred and 
fiftv thousand dollars. Its officials are all well known and thoroughly responsible 
business men and as a result the company has been a financial success from its 
incipiencv and is now recognized as a firmly established and stable enterprise. 
Their offices are located in the Mayer building. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 117 

On the 5th of luiic, 1907, Mr. Spurck was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
:M. Steffen. a daughter of Henry and Louise StetTen. The father was for many 
years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Scott county, Iowa, but is now de- 
ceased, his death having occurred in Davenport, that state. The mother is 
still living, however, and now makes her home at Eldridge, Iowa. Mr. and Airs. 
Spurck live at No. 147 Glenwood avenue, where he erected a residence in 1910 
that is in every way a credit to the community. 

In matters of religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Spurck are members of the Roman 
Catholic church and'he also belongs to the Knights of Columbus, while his po- 
litical allegiance he gives to the democratic party. He is a very capable man and 
attributes his success in business to the fact that he has always concentrated his 
entire efforts upon anything he undertook and has made it a principle not to 
identify himself with any activity that did not conduct its transactions in a 
perfectly legitimate and honorable manner. Mr. Spurck has passed his entire life 
in this city and has always been identified with its business interests, as was like- 
wise his father. Also like him he has maintained a reputation that is above 
question, both being men of incorruptible integrity and upright principles. 



WILLIAM E. BRUNINGA. 

William E. Bruninga, who ranked with Peoria's most prominent and well 
known business men, occupying for many years the position of general manager 
with the F. Meyer Furnace Company, was born March 29, 1871, in the city which 
was ever the scene of his labors. Here he lived until death called him on the 
3d of March, 191 1, representing one of the old families of Peoria. His parents 
were John and Elizabeth Bruninga, natives of Germany, who settled in Peoria 
at an early period in the city's history. The son pursued his education in the 
public and high schools and in a business college and when he started out in life 
for himself he obtained a position in a bank, in which he remained for several 
years. He next became connected with the coal trade, being employed by a local 
coal company for several years, and in 1890 he entered into active association 
with the F. Meyer Furnace Company, gradually working his way upward with 
that firm until his persistent effort and ability brought him to the position of 
general manager, in which capacity he served for a number of years, thus occu- 
pying a prominent place in the business circles of the city. He was thoroughly 
reliable as well as progressive, manifested good judgment in business affairs and 
was devoted to the interests and welfare of the company which he represented. 

On the 25th of June, 1894, Mr. Bruninga was married to Miss Matilda Meyer, 
a daughter of Frank and Anna Marie (Janssen) Meyer. Her father was a 
native of Norden. Germany, and with his parents came to America, landing at 
New Orleans, while on the 28th of May, 1858. he arrived in Peoria. He was 
closely identified with the business development and progress of the city for a 
long period. He became the founder of the F. Meyer Furnace Company which 
bears his name and as one of Peoria's pioneer lousiness men, capable, resource- 
ful and reliable, he occupied a high position in public regard. He not only con- 
tributed materially to the business development of the citv but also to its edu- 
cational progress, doins; effective service in behalf of the public schools in four 
years' service on the school board. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bruninga were born two 
children, \\'^illiam and Frank, who are yet attending school. 

The father was a democrat in his political views and kept well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day. althousjh he was never an aspirant for office. 
His religious faith was that of the German Lutheran church, to which he was 
ever most loyal. He was also a valued member of the Creve Coeur Clul) and he 
possessed a genial nature that was manifest in the hospitality and cordiality 



118 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

which were marked features of his home. He was a great reader, loved music 
and possessed no little ability in that direction himself. In fact, he found his 
greatest pleasure in the enjoyment of those interests which are of an ennobling 
and uplifting character. He always chose the better part nor was he ever con- 
tent with the second best. He achieved success and it came to him as the reward 
of earnest effort. He felt life's sorrows, its shadows and its sunshine but in 
every relation he was found as a man among men and he leaves behind him the 
priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



ANDREW JAMES HODGES. 

Through almost three-quarters of a century Andrew James Hodges was con- 
nected with the upbuilding and the progress of Illinois, being closely associated 
with its industrial and manufacturing interests. His labors constituted an impor- 
tant element in the work of general progress and improvement and he always 
rejoiced in what was accomplished as the state forged forward and took its place 
with the leading commonwealths of the Union. It was in the town of Norton, 
Massachusetts, on the 31st of October, 1815, that the birth of Andrew J. Hodges 
occurred and following the acquirement of his education he learned the car- 
penter's trade in Boston. The opportunities of the growing west attracted him in 
18^7 and when a young man of twenty-two years he arrived in Illinois, taking up 
his abode at Delavan, where for eighteen years he was connected with building 
operations, working as a master carpenter. He was first employed upon the 
building of the well known Delavan House and during his residence in that town 
he was also engaged on the construction of the courthouse at St. Louis. Missouri. 
Experience developed his skill and in course of time he came to be recognized as 
one of the foremost builders of. central Illinois. He established his home in 
Peoria in the spring of 1848. occupying a residence on Third street, which he had 
erected in the spring of that year. Here he was closely identitied with building 
operations for a long period and gained a position among the leading contractors 
of the city, erecting a number of the substantial buildings that are still standing, 
including the Dobbins House, which was afterward used as the Creve Coeur Club, 
the LIniversalist church and the Cox building at the corner of Adams and Fulton 
streets. From the time of his arrival in the city until his demise he figured as one 
of its representative and prominent business men, his activities contrii)Uting not 
only to individual success but also to public progress and prosperity. In 1864 he 
took charge of the Ilarker & Hawley works at Decatur, which some years later 
were consolidated with the plant owned by the same company at Pekin. Not long 
afterward Mr. Hodges became proprietor of the business, which he conducted 
under the firm style of A. J. Hodges & Company until 1S90, when he disposed of 
his interests in that enterprise to the Acme Harvester Company. In the mean- 
time he had become well established as a leading manufacturer of agricultural 
implements in this state. He built what is known as the Haines Illinois harvester, 
developing from the original wooden machine the I lodges steel header — a machine 
used extensively in the United States and also well known in South .America. He 
displayed great care and insight in developing his l)usiness, was watchful of every 
opportunity relating to the trade, and constantly improving the output of his fac- 
tory, was able to command a very liberal patronage, making his business one of 
the profitable enterprises of central Illinois. It has been said of him : "He was 
not only a competent but a reliable mechanic and executed every contract with the 
utmost fidelity. He needed no superintendent or watchman to see that any work 
undertaken by him was honestly done. He ranked deservedly high in his com- 
munity !)ecause of his integrity, his uprightness, his singleness of purpose and his 
public spirit." 




ANDEKW J. lIolHiKS 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 121 

(Jn the 1st of August, 1S44. was celebrated the uiarriage of Mr. i lodges and 
Miss Sarah E. Grant, of Delavan, Ilhuois, formerly of Providence, Rhode Island, 
who is still living at the age of ninety years, a remarkably well preserved woman, 
both physically and mentally. Unto this marriage there were born live children, 
of whom the second died in infancy. Anna E. became the wife of H. P. Wilber 
i)ut is now deceased. Her children are : Belle, who is the wife of Charles H. 
Thorne, of Winnetka, Illinois, and has three children, Elizabeth, Hollett and 
Leslie; Xellie, who is the wife of Xorman Borland; and Florence, the wife of 
William Heckler. Mittie is the wife of E. E. Arnold, of Providence, Rhode 
Island, and has live children, Mittie, Dorothy, Edwin, Henry and Elizabeth. The 
other members of the family are Jennie G. and Charles A., who reside with their 
mother in a beautiful liome on Perry avenue in Peoria, which was erected by Mr. 
Hodges. His death occurred on the 9th of October, 1900, when he had almost 
reached the age of eighty-five years. His political allegiance was 
given to the rej)ublican party from the time of its organization and his re- 
ligious opinions were indicated in the fact that he attended the Universalist 
church. It has been well said that he deserved the tribute that "an honest man is 
the noblest work of God." His life was, indeed, well spent. He was fair, re- 
liable, enterprising and progressive in business, faithful in citizenship. lo_\-al in 
friendship and most devoted to his home and family. All the qualities that men 
most admire in the individual were his and yet he never took any special credit 
to himself for what he accomplished. He was free from ostentation or display 
but the breadth of his nature and the ui)rightness of his character placed him high 
in public regard. 



JOHN DALTON. 



John Dalton is the secretary and treasurer of the S. C. Bartlett Company, 
grain commission merchants, with offices in the Chamber of Commerce building. 
His identification with this concern dates from April, 1872, when he became 
ofifice boy for the firm then operating under the name of S. C. Bartlett & Com- 
pany. In this connection he has gradually worked his way upward and one of the 
elements of his success is that he has concentrated his efforts along a single line 
to the exclusion of outside interests. His fidelity to the house is manifest in 
his long connection therewith and his ability is attested by the promotions which 
have brought him to his i)resent official ])osition. Mr. Dalton was born in Peoria, 
June 29, 1857, his parents being Martin and Catharine (Cashin) Dalton, who 
came to this city in 1848. They were natives of Ireland and on sailing from that 
country to the United States landed at New Orleans, whence they made their 
way northward to Chicago and from that point came to Peoria. The city by the 
lake was then a small town of comparatively little industrial and commercial im- 
portance and Peoria, too, had scarcely entered upon the era of growth and de- 
velopment which has brought it to its present i)osition as a commercial and man- 
ufacturing center. 

John Dalton was here reared and the public schools afforded him his educa- 
tional privileges. He started out in life for himself at a compartively early age 
and whatever success he has achieved is attributable entirely to his industry, 
perseverance and resourcefulness. He first entered the employ of Robert A. 
King in the produce commission business and nine months later became an em- 
ploye of S. C. Bartlett & Company, his initial position with the house being that 
of office boy. This was in April, 1872. Forty years have since passed and he 
has had no occasion to change his vocation for he found the work congenial and 
it gave to him the opportunities which his ambition sought. He early recognized 
the fact that industry and trustworthiness meant promotion and gradually he 



122 HiSiURV UF i'EURlA COUNTY 

was advanced through intermediate positions until he was called to the office of 
secretary and treasurer. The business with which he is now officially connected 
had its inception in i86y, having been organized by S. C. and W. H. Bartlett, 
brothers. Operations were begun under the name of S. C. Bartlett & Company 
and were so continued until 1890, when W. H. Bartlett went to Chicago and 
entered the firm of Bartlett, Frazier & Company. In 1892 S. C. Bartlett also 
removed to Chicago and entered the same firm, continuing an active factor in the 
grain trade in this city until his death in March, 1893. The brothers still re- 
tained their interests in Peoria, however, until the life labors of S. C. Bartlett 
were terminated in death. On the ist of July. 1908, the business in Peoria was 
incorporated under the style of the S. C. Bartlett Company with a capital stock 
of three hundred thousand dollars. Its present officers are : J. H. Riggs, presi- 
dent; Norman W. Bartlett, vice president; and John Dalton, secretary and treas- 
urer. Mr. Dalton was also secretary and treasurer of the Northwestern Com- 
pany before it was merged with the S. C. Bartlett Company. The main offices 
of this company are in Peoria and they have a line of elevators along the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railroad between Peoria and Sterling and between Peoria and 
Keithsburg on the Iowa Central Railroad. Their operations are now very ex- 
tensive, making them one of the leading grain firms of eastern Illinois. They 
largely control the grain trade in the cities where they operate and their business 
has become one of magnitude. 

In 1880 Mr. Dalton was united in marriage to Miss Rose Mary Mooney, of 
this city, a daughter of Thomas Mooney, who served as circuit clerk in Peoria 
during the Civil war and later was police magistrate. He was one of the hon- 
ored pioneer residents of the county, having taken up his abode in ]\Iedina town- 
ship in 1834 in what is know-n as the Mooney settlement. He bought up hun- 
dreds of acres of land there and for many years was one of the extensive 
property holders of that district. Unto -Mr. and Mrs. Dalton have been born 
six children : Lucy Frances, the wife of Charles Charvat, of Chicago ; Anna 
L. ; Marie ; Francis F. ; Edwin and Willard. The family are commtmicants of 
St. Mark's Catholic church and Mr. Dalton also belongs to the Knights of 
Columbus. He has comparatively few outside interests beyond his business 
yet is loyal and progressive in all matters of citizenship and gives his cooperation 
to many measures contributing to the general good. In the grain trade his name 
is indeed widely known and the success of the large enterprise of which he is 
now an officer is attributable in no small measures to his efforts and his interest. 
As an employe he worked diligently and perseveringly and since coming to a 
position of executive control he has bent his energies to administrative direction 
and his well formulated and carefully executed plans have wrought for success. 



GEORGE A. UMDEN STOCK. 

George A. Umdenstock, secretary of The Central Stone Company, was born 
on a farm in the vicinity of Peoria on the 8th of September. 1875. He is of 
German extraction and is a son of Christian and Mary Umdenstock, both of 
whom are now deceased. His father was the first undertaker, in the city of 
Pekin, but he subsequently withdrew from this business and turned his attention 
to agricultural pursuits. He was living retired on his farm in this county at 
the time of his death, which occurred in 1882 at the age of fifty-one years. The 
mother, who survived him until 1901, was sixty-eight at the time of her death. 
Both were laid to rest in the cemetery at Pekin. They were the parents of ten 
children, seven girls and three boys, George A., the subject of this sketch, being 
the ninth child in order of birth. 




GAEDNER T. BARKER 



HISTORY OF I'EORIA COUNTY 125 

The education of George A. Umdenstock was begun in the district schools 
and completed in those of Peoria, his student days being terminated at the age 
of sixteen years. He then started out to ht himself for the graver responsibili- 
ties of life, and entered the plant of the Peoria Marble Works, where he learned 
the stone cutters' trade. He continued in the employ of this company for seven- 
teen years, and during that period became thoroughly familiar with every detail 
of the business. Not being satisfied to continue in the service of others all of 
his life he resigned his position in 1907, antl became associated with Henry F. 
Bremer in the organization of The Central Stone Company. They engage in the 
manufacture of building stone at No. 1710 South Water street, this city, where 
their plant has been located ever since the company was organized. J\Ir. Bremer, 
who is mentioned at greater length elsewhere in this work, is president of the 
company and Air. Umdenstock is secretary, and as they are both thoroughly 
familiar with every phase of the business and are men of wide experience, they 
have met with little difficulty in building up a good trade. They have adopted a 
policy in the conduct of their indsutry that fully entitles them to the confidence 
of all who have dealings with them, and thus not only have the faculty of winning 
patrons but of retaining them. During the five years they have been operating 
this plant they have been awarded some excellent contracts and as they strive 
never to turn out an order that does not reflect credit on themselves and their 
establishment they are rapidly winning patrons, and are recognized as the owners 
of one of the thriving and prosperous activities of the city. 

The 7th of June, iSqq, vvas the wedding day of Mr. Umdenstock and Miss 
Barbara Dinkey, a daughter of Alelchoir and Elizabeth Dinkey. The father who 
is now living" retired, is a veteran of the Civil war. having served in Company I, 
Fortieth Missouri Infantry. He was mustered out in St. Louis. Three children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Umdenstock, as follows : Clarence and Edna, 
both of whom are attending school; and George A., Jr., who is four years of age. 
The family home is located at No. 414 Arago street, where Mr. Umdenstock 
erected a very pleasant residence with thoroughly modern appointments in igo2. 

Mr. Umdenstock and his wife are members of Grace Evangelical church, 
and Mr. Umdenstock is on the board of trustees of this organization. He is a 
man of progressive ideas in matters of citizenship, but is not partisan in his 
views, casting his ballot for those candidates he deems best qualified to serve 
the highest interests of the municipality. .As a business man he has always 
manifested the diligence and persistency of purpose that win success and is now 
making marked progress in this direction. 



GARDNER THURSTON BARKER. 

W hilc ( iardner Thurston Barker became a conspicuous and honorable figure 
on the stage of business activity in Peoria, he played other ]iarts in the drama of 
life with ec|ual ability. He was recognized as a leader in public altairs and sev- 
eral times as chief executive of the city administered its municipal interests. 
Over the record of his public career as well as his private life there fell no shadow 
of wrong or suspicion of evil, for he held to high standards and neither fear nor 
favor could swerve him from a course which he believed to be right. With a 
nature that could never be content with mediocrity, he made constant advancement 
in business and for a long period controlled important commercial and financial 
interests of the city. 

Air. Barker was a native of New York, his birth having occurred in Moriali, 
Essex county, January 10, 1814. His parents were Gardner T. and Harriet 
(Lyon) Barker and wdiile spending his youthful days under the parental roof he 
pursued his education, seeking a home and fortune in the west in 1838, when a 



126 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

young man of t\vent)--four years. At that time Peoria was a tiny town, contain- 
ing very few inhabitants and giving but httle promise of future greatness. His 
business abihty, however, was soon manifest here and with the growth of the 
city he was continuously identified, his individual efforts constituting an important 
factor in jiromoting the commercial and industrial activity and prosperity of 
Peoria. Pie was first associated with Almeran S. Cole in a general mercantile 
enterprise under the st3de of Cole & Barker, and a change in the partnership 
afterward led to the adoption of the firm name of Barker & Steams. Still later 
Mr. Barker became sole proprietor. In 1867 he entered into active connection 
with the distilling business, which has been one of the chief sources of Peoria's 
upbuilding and prosperity. He also extended his efforts into various other lines 
of business and all of his dififerent investments proved successful, indicating his 
sound judgment and keen discrimination. He never allowed pleasure or outside 
interests to interfere with the management of his business affairs and gradually 
he advanced to a position of leadership, enjoying the prosperity which was his by 
reason of intelligently directed effort and indefatigable energy-. He retired in 
1887 from the active management of his different interests and thereafter gave 
his attention solely to his duties as president of the Commercial Xational Bank 
and as president of the Allaire-Woodward Chemical Company. In all of his 
business affairs he found ready solution for intricate and involved problems. He 
seemed to recognize almost intuitively the opportunities and possibilities of a 
situation and he so directed forces as to produce a harmonious and resultant 
whole. As one of the wealthy residents of Peoria he took up the bonds when the 
city borrowed large sums of money and negotiated them in New York. 

Business, however, was but one feature of the intensively active career of Mr. 
Barker. His deep interest in Peoria and her welfare and his thorough under- 
standing of the political c|uestions and issues of the day led him to cooperate 
heartily with the democratic party, for he was an earnest believer in the principles 
which constitute its platform. In local political circles, therefore, he figured 
prominently. In 1852 he was elected to the city council and ten years later was 
chosen mayor of Peoria. His first term received indorsement in a reelection so 
that he served in 1870 and 1871. He gave to the city a businesslike and pro- 
gressive administration, characterized by retrenchment in useless expenditures yet 
marked by progressiveness where the best interests of the city were to be con- 
served. His word could always be relied upon whether in business or in politics. 

On the 20th of August, 1840, Mr. Barker was united in marriage to Aliss 
Helen White, of Champlain, New York, a daughter of Elial and Alary B. (Lewis) 
W'hite, who were natives of Massachusetts, the former born at Medway, Decem- 
ber 21, 1794, and the latter at Amherst, February 9, 1799. The marriage cere- 
mony of her grandparents was celebrated by the Rev. Daniel Morton, the father 
of Vice President Levi P. Morton. The death of Mr. Barker occurred October 
26, 1894. He was succeeded in business by his son Walter, who became the presi- 
dent of the Commercial National Bank, and he is also survived by a daughter, 
I\Irs. Ellen B. AIcRoberts, and her two sons, Walter and W. G. i\IcRoberts, and a 
grandson, Jesse, who was the son of Mr. Barker's youngest daughter and was left 
motherless during his infancy, at which time he was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Barker. Three years after the demise of her husband Mrs. Helen (\\'hite) 
Barker passed away. They had figured prominently in the social life of the city, 
where ]\Ir. Barker made his home for fifty-six years. He had watched the 
development of Peoria from a small town to a city of metropolitan proportions 
and had proven a most important factor in this work of transformation. In all that 
he undertook, whether of a public or private nature, whether in business or in 
office, he put forth earnest, persistent effort, realizing that the source of power is 
within the individual and that not upon any environment or circumstance does 
progress depend. Whatever the quiet forces and influences at work in his life 
to shape his destiny, it was evident at the outset of his business career that he 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 127 

iinderstood clearly the fact that energ)- ami unfaltering ijurpose constitute the 
surest basis upon'which to build success. He was a well balanced man mentally 
and physically, possessed sufficient courage to venture where favoring opportunity 
presented and his judgment and even-paced energy carried him forward to the 
goal of prosperity. 



HENRY SCHWABACHER. 

The life record of Henry Schwabacher covered seventy-five years, through- 
out which period his industry and determination constituted the strong motive 
forces of his advancement. He deserved all the credit implied in the term a self- 
made man, for when he reached the new world his capital consisted of less than 
a dollar. Gradually he advanced as the years passed by until he occupied a 
prominent position on the plane of affluence. He was for thirty-three years one 
of Peoria's most prominent capitalists and successful business men. during which 
period he followed various pursuits, his last years being spent in honorable re- 
tirement. 

He was born in P>llheim. Bavaria, Germany, June ii, 1829. and acquired 
his education in the schools of that country. In 1848. when a youth of nineteen 
years, he came to the new world, leaving his native country at the time of the 
German revolution of 1848. When he reached New York city his cash an(l cap- 
ital has been reduced to ninety-five cents, but with the aid of friends he soon 
secured a position, and in business circles he demonstrated his worth, proving 
most diligent, capable and determined. In this way he gradually won advance- 
ment that brought him increased salary, and when his industry and careful ex- 
penditure had provided him with a small capital he invested in a little line of 
goods which he sold from house to house. In time his attention was attracted 
to the middle west with its growing liusiness ojiportunities. For a brief period 
he engaged in the sale of goods in Cleveland and then continued on his way 
westward to Keokuk. Iowa, in 1853. There he o])ened a small store, carrying 
a little line of dry goods until four years had passed, when he disposed of his 
business interests there and in 1857 came to Peoria. Here at different times he 
was connected with various business enterprises. In 1861 he entered the 
wholesale liquor trade and soon afterward admitted his brother Jacob to a 
partnership under the firm style of H. & J. Schwabacher. Some time afterward 
they formed a partnership with Philip Zell and Ijuilt a distillery, which they 
operated under the firm style of Zell, Schwabacher & Company. The house 
became widely known and they conducted the business along successful lines for 
over twenty years, when they sold out to the trust. Henry Schwabacher then 
retired from active life and his brother Jacob at that time removed from Peoria 
to Chicago. The record of Henry Schwabacher indicates what may be accom- 
plished in America where excellent business opportunities are afforded each in- 
dividual but where worth and merit must win aflvancement. He had but ninety- 
five cents when he arrived in the new world and at his death left an estate valued 
at over eight hundred thousand dollars. His judgment was sound, his insight 
keen and his energy unfaltering. After the distillery had lieen purcliased by the 
trust the wholesale liquor business of the firm was continued by Julius and Louis H. 
Schwabacher, sons of him whose name introduces this review. Within the last 
few years, however, this business has also been sold and the sons are now devot- 
ing their attention to the management of the estate left by their father. As he 
prospered in his undertakings Henry Schwabacher, Sr.. made extensive and im- 
portant investments in real estate, becoming the owner of nuich valuable projierty 
in Peoria and in Chicago, It seemed that his judgment was never at fault in 
making purchases, for the realty which came into his possession rose steadily 



128 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

in value with the growth and development of the city. His opinions came to be 
relied upon as most substantial factors in business and he was accorded a position 
as one of Peoria's most progressive business men. 

In 1857 Mr. Schwabacher was united in marriage to Miss \'irginia Ancker, 
a representative of a pioneer family of Peoria, and they became the parents of 
the following children: Julius and' Louis are both residents of Peoria. The 
former married and has "a daughter, Jeanie, w-hile the latter has three children, 
Virginia, Florence and Louis H. Leo is a resident of Bahimore, Maryland. 
Hattie is the wife of Samuel I. Reichman, of New York city, and they have two 
children, \'irginia and Stanley Reichman. Maud is the wife of Joseph A. Wilde, 
of Peoria. Florence is the wife of the Rev. A. J. Messing, of Bloomington, 
Illinois, and their children are Allen, Fannie. \'irginia and Elizabeth Messing. 
Bertha is the wife of ]\Iyron H. Greisheim, of Bloomington. and they have two 
children, Henry and Katherine. Jacob died leaving a widow. Mrs. Henrietta 
Schwabacher, and three children: Fannie, the wife of Harry Hexter, by whom 
she has one child, Myron H. ; Hart J. ; and Helen Schwabacher. Nathan Schwab- 
acher, the eldest of the family, died leaving a son, Herbert J. Mrs. Henry 
Schwabacher, the mother of this family is still residing at the old home at No. 
204 North Perry avenue. 

In his political views Mr. Schwabacher was a republican where national 
questions and issues were involved but cast an independent local ballot, support- 
ing the candidate whom he regarded as best qualified for office. He was a man 
of refined taste, was most genial and hospitable and greatly enjoyed entertaining 
his many friends at his own fireside. He loved art and music and greatly en- 
joyed travel, utilizing much of his leisure time in that way. He was very firm 
in his convictions and his determinations and was regarded as a conservative, 
farsighted business man. He stood as a splendid type of the German American 
citizen of Peoria, his record being creditable alike to the land of his birth and 
the land of his adoption. Moreover, his life history proves wdiat may be ac- 
complished when determination and energy lead the way and when firm purpose 
overcomes difficulties and obstacles. 



HARRY C. BEEBE. 



Harry C. Beebe is the sole proprietor of The Beebe ^Mill Works, located at 
No. 1007 and 1009 South Adams street. Although he has been identified with 
the industrial interests of Peoria for only a brief period, Mr. Beebe is well known 
in local business circles, as for eighteen years he was manager of the firm of 
■ Cartwright & Russell. He was born in Chillicothe. this county, on the 19th of 
May, 1861. and is a son of Reuben and Josephine Beebe, well known pioneer set- 
tlers of that town. The father, who was a carpenter by trade, was actively en- 
gaged in contracting and building in Chillicothe for more than fifty years. He 
was a man of marked loyalty and patriotism and went to the front as a private 
in the Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war, being hon- 
orably discharged at the close of his period of enlistment. In matters of citizen- 
ship he was enterprising and progressive and during a large portion of his life 
was actively identified with municipal afi'airs and on several occasions was 
called to fill the mayor's chair. He lived to attain a ripe old age, passing away 
in 1904. and is buried in the cemeterv at Chillicothe. The mother is still "living 
and continues to make her home in the latter place, where she is widely known 
and held in high regard, as was likewise the father. 

The boyhood and youth of Harry C. Beebe were passed in his native town, 
in whose public schools he pursued his education until he had attained the age 
of sixteen years, terminating his student days before he had completed his high- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 129 

school course. After la3'ing aside his text books he worked for his father for 
four years and during that period thoroughly mastered the details of the car- 
penters' trade. He next entered the employ of The St. John Marsh Company 
as their traveling representative, and during the succeeding five years he went 
through the western states seeking locations and establishing lumber yards for 
this firm. They discontinued business in 1886 and JMr. Beebe went to Denver, 
Colorado, and engaged in contracting and building for six years. In i8()2, he 
returned to Peoria and became manager for Cartwright & Russell, remaining 
in their service until 1909, when he resigned his position in order to establish 
the enterprise he is now conducting. This proved to be a very lucrative imder- 
taking. and at the end of his first year Mr. P)eebe erected the fine brick factory 
building he is now occupying on South Adams street. It is sixty by one hundred 
and eighty feet, thoroughly modern in its construction and equipped with every 
appliance and machine essential to a plant of this kind. The growth of this 
activity has not been remarkable in any way, but its development has been 
characterized by the substantial and permanent progress that manifests stability. 
The receipts have shown a marked annual increase from year to year and em- 
ployment is now given to eight skilled workmen. 

Hudson, Kansas, was the scene of Mr. P>eel)e's marriage on the 6th of April, 
1886, to Miss Addie F. Cole, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Cole, the father 
a highly respected agriculturist of Reno county. Kansas. One daughter has been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Beebe, Rtith, who is now at home with her parents. The 
family home is located at No. 502 Bigelovv street, where they own a very j)leasant 
and comfortable residence. 

Fraternally Mr. Beelie is a member of the Modern W'oodmen of America. 
He is energetic in his methods and directs his efforts along well defined lines 
with the determination of purpose that invariablv wins success, and in the or- 
ganization and concentration of his forces in the development of his industry is 
manifesting the same powers that cliaracterizcd him when working under the 
supervision and direction of others. 



HENRY HEDRICH. 



No account of the financial interests of Peoria would be complete without 
extended and personal reference to Henry Hedrich, the president of the Savings 
Bank and also director of the First National Bank of the city. He has occupied 
the presidency of the former institution since December, 1906, when he succeeded 
to the position left vacant by the death of W. A. Herron. Throughout his entire 
business career he has been associated with banking interests, having served as 
cashier of the Savings Bank from the ist of February, 1872. He was born in 
the dukedom of Hessen, Germany, September 25, 1845, his parents being Chris- 
topher and Catharine Hedrich, who spent their entire lives in the fatherland. 
The son Henry pursued his education there and in 1865 bade adieu to friends 
and native country and sailed for the new world, making his way direct to Peoria 
where he arrived when twenty years of age. He was first emploved by Dr. 
McGee in a grocery store, in which he remained for a year, at the end of which 
time his employer was appointed postmaster of Peoria and made Mr. Hedrich a 
clerk in the postoffice. He remained there for five years and during the last 
year served as assistant postmaster. Pie then entered the Savings Bank as 
cashier and has been continuously connected with the financial interests of the 
city in an executive capacity to the present time. From the position of cashier 
he was called to the presidency in December, 1906. For six years he has remained 
chief officer of this bank which is one of the strong financial centers of eastern 
Illinois. The policy pursued commends it to the patronage of all and back of it 



130 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

stand a corps of officers who are widely recognized as progressive and reliable 
business men. In addition to his interest in the Savings Bank Mr. Hednch was 
elected to the directorate of the First National Bank in January, 191 1. He has 
become a recognized power in financial circles here and his reputation has been 
gained no less by his business integrity than by his success. In point of con- 
tinuous service he is today the dean of the banking profession in the county. His 
other activity in financial circles covered nineteen years' service as secretary of 
the Clearing'House of Peoria— from 1879 until 1898. 

Mr. Hedrich was married in Peoria in 1869 to Miss Jeanette Christens, of 
this city, with whom he traveled life's journey for about thirty-nine years. Mrs. 
Hedrich was then called to the home beyond and at hqr death left four children: 
Ida, now the wife of Leaton Boggess,' of Peoria : Alice, the wife of Howard 
Bill's; Blanche, the wife of Albert Trubel ; and Edward, who resides in Chicago. 
Mr. Hedrich is prominent in Masonry and has served for four years as master 
of Schiller Lodge, of Peoria. He has'also attained the Knight Templar degree in 
the commandery and is a member of the Alystic Shrine. He is treasurer of the 
Old Settlers' Union of Peoria county and in 1906 he succeeded Mr. Herron to the 
position of treasurer in this society, as he did in the presidency of the bank. He 
has for forty-seven years been a resident of Peoria and is everywhere spoken 
of in terms of respect and high regard because he has never deviated from what 
his judgment has regarded as right between himself and his fellowmen. His 
life has been actuated l)y high and honorable principles and his record is an indi- 
cation of the fact that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 



I 



WILLIS E\'ANS. 



Willis Evans, residing at No. 803 Bradley avenue, in Peoria, his native city, 
was born January 16, 1872. His parents, Isaac and Phoebe (Waggoner) Evans, 
were natives of Ohio and came to Peoria about i860. The son attended the old 
Fifth Ward school, later called the Franklin school, on Moss avenue, but instead 
of entering the high school he became an assistant in his father's grocery store 
at West Blut^'. Almost immediately he began newspaper work, thus following 
the advice of his mother. C. E. Nixon began the publication of the West BlulY 
Budget, a local weekly paper, and Willis Evans contributed articles, written for 
it from a stool behind the counter in the grocery store. Later he wrote for the 
West Bluff Herald, also a Nixon publication, and while still connected with the 
store he did valuable work for Edward Francis Younger, managing editor of the 
Peoria Transcript, who was Mr. Evans' journalistic mentor. In 1890 the latter 
became a regular contributor to the Transcript at the same time carrying for 
the West Blufl:' Bureau. Later in the same year he became regularly associated 
w^ith the Transcript and afterward became a member of the staff of the Peoria 
Herald, owned by Henry :M. Pindell. Eventually the two papers were consoli- 
dated under the name of the Herald-Transcript, their publication being con- 
ducted under the direction of Mr. Pindell. P. J. Rennick and Charles H. May. 
Starting as a reporter, Mr. Evans was advanced through successive promotions, 
becoming city editor, managing editor, editor and Washington correspondent. 
He has long since won for himself a creditable position in journalistic circles, 
not only as a writer but one who has adopted the most progressive methods of 
newspaper publication. 

.\lr. Evans was named by Representative Joseph \'. Graft' as clerk of the 
committee on claims in the house of representatives at the opening of the fifty- 
sixth congress in 1899 and served in that capacity for three terms. He after- 
ward acted as secretary to Mr. Graff to the close of his term of office on the 4th 
of March, 191 1, and at the same time remained in active connection with news- 




WILLIS EVANS 



I 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTV • Kil 

pai>er work, being Washington correspondent of the Peoria Herald-Transcript. 
During the sessions of congress he also acted as assistant to Charles P. Keyser. 
chief of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat I'.ureau. 

In politics Mr. Evans has ever been a republican and in 1898 was the candi- 
date of his party for city clerk of Peoria, easily winning the nomination o\ct 
old-time leaders 'of the party in the big city convention. He met defeat at the 
polls, however, at the hands of Robert M. Orr, the incumbent, who was an old 
and tried official. . 

On the 27th of August, 1895, JNIr. Evans was married to Miss Leoti Runyan, 
a daughter of Washington and Martha Runyan. They became the parents of two 
children: Marguerite, who was born June 23. 1896. and is a student in the 
Bradley Polytechnic Institute of Peoria; and Melody, who died January 20, 1908, 
when six and a half years of age. Mr. Evans is connected with most of the 
representative organizations of Peoria. He belongs to the Illinois Farmers 
Club, the Peoria and Illinois Historical Associations, is secretary of the Peoria 
County Old Settlers Association, is a member of the Peoria Association of Com- 
merce, the Creve Coeur Club, the Peoria Transportation Club, National Imple- 
ment S: \'ehicle Show, and the Child's Welfare League. These memljershij) rela- 
tions indicate much of the nature of his interests and the line of his thought and 
activitv aside from that already indicated as his chosen life work. On Feb- 
ruary i. 1912, Mr. Evans was unanimously chosen executive secretary of the 
Peoria Association of Commerce and secretary and a director of the National 
Implement & Vehicle Show, which organizations are flourishing under his direc- 
tion. There is something in a journalistic career that keeps the individual in 
close touch with the world's work and progress, and Mr. Evans has ever been 
stimulated bv the s]Mrit of advancement and in turn has made liberal contribu- 
tion to that progress which awards Peoria a first place as a typical city of the 
middle west, utilizing the best that the east has to ofifer and at the same time 
possessing the initiative that produces advancement along original lines. 



OSCAR ALLEN, ^I. D. 



Dr. Oscar Allen, now a jiracticing physician and surgeon of Chillicothe, Illi- 
nois, is one of the foremost men in Peoria county in the ranks of his profession. 
He was born in Medina township, this county, twelve miles north of Peoria, in 
1867. His father, William H. Allen, was a native of Rhode Island but 
lived for seventy-five years in Illinois and for seventy years in Peoria county. 
He w'as one of the pioneer settlers of this district and carried on and operated 
an extensive farm for many years. He is now living retired on the old home- 
stead. During a portion of his life he was engaged in brickmaking, and his 
father was the first brickmaker in Peoria county. He married Miss Sarah E. 
Xuttall. of England, who came to this country when she was eighteen years 
of age and settled in Peoria county. They have four other children besides Dr. 
Oscar Allen of this sketch. 

Oscar .Mien was educated in the district schools of the county, and the Peoria 
high school. Fie gained his medical education in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, and took his post-graduate course in Chicago. 
Immediately after his graduation from college he went to Lawn Ridge. Illinois, 
and practiced there for two and one half years. At the expiration of that time 
he removed to Dunlap. Illinois, and remained there for fifteen years. He spent 
two years in Chicago jiracticing his profession, and on January I, 191 1, removed 
his office to Chillicothe. in the ^^"escott building where he is at present located. 
During his long period of activity in the medical profession Dr. Allen has at- 
tained a degree of efticiency wdiich can only be the result of per.sonal experience. 



132 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

He regards his calling as a sacred obligation and has a full appreciation of the 
duties of a physician to his fellowmen. 

In i8q2. Dr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Linnie Waite, who was 
born in Topeka, Kansas, but spent most of her life in Peoria county. She is a 
granddaughter of Loren Wilder, one of the pioneer settlers of this district. To 
Dr. and Mrs. .Allen four children have been born, Donald M.. Robert B. and 
Willadell, and an infant son all living with their parents at home. 

Politically Dr. .Allen keeps himself entirely independent of lines and parties. 
He is a liberal thinker on all subjects and prefers to keep his judgment free and 
his principles unbiased by any partisanship. Both his father and his uncle were 
prominent in democratic politics in Peoria county for many years, but Dr. Allen, 
although he takes an active interest in public afifairs, has never sought office. 
Fraternallv he belones to the Modern Woodmen of America and is prominent in 
the affairs of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Most of his time and at- 
tention is ffiven to the practice of his profession, and the extensive practice which 
he has built up in Chillicothe and throughout the county is ample evidence of his 
proficiency and skill. 

MATHEW HENEBERY. 

So important and valued were the business connections of Mathew Henebery 
as to gain him classification with the prominent and representative citizens of 
Peoria. He was associated with manufacturing, commercial and financial inter- 
ests, all of which constituted features in the city's development and progress as 
well as his individual success. His determined purpose enabled him to carry for- 
ward to a successful completion whatever he undertook. However, he never 
regarded anv position as final but rather as the starting point for still further 
accomplishment, and each forward step brought him a l^roader outlook and wider 
opportunities. He was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, September 8, i^?,4. a 
son of Nicholas and Anastasia (Carroll) Heneberv. He was a youth of fifteen 
years when, in the spring of 1849, he was brought bv his parents to America. 
They landed at Montreal, Canada, and by way of Bufifalo and Chicago, pursued 
their way to La Salle, Illinois, where they stopped for a brief period and then 
continued their journev to Peoria. 

Mathew Henebery had been a pupil in the schools of Ireland before coming to 
America, and soon after reaching this country he began earning his own living, 
being employed as superintendent of a line of drays for about two years. He 
afterward worked upon the telegraph line between Peoria and Chica.go, and m 
185 1 became connected with the liquor business as an employe of Napoleon B. 
Brandamour. His ability soon led to his admission to a partnership in the busi- 
ness, and the firm built an alcohol distillery and continued the conduct of their 
enterprise for two years. .At the end of that time business relations were dis- 
solved, I\Ir. Brandamour taking over the alcohol still while Mr. Heneberv became 
the owner of the wholesale branch of the business. From that time until his death 
Mr. Henebery continued in that line of trade, and yet it would be unfair to speak 
of him only in this connection. His business interests were of a most varied and 
important character, and many of the leading commercial and financial concerns 
of Peoria profited by his keen sagacity, his unfaltering enterprise and his 
capability in coordinating forces. Aside from his connection with the Branda- 
mour liquor business, he was one of the organizers and builders of the Great 
Eastern Distillery, and for a long period was president of the Peoria Pottery 
Company and took an active part in formulating its business policies. He was 
likewise largely instrumental in establishing the Peoria Stock Yards and in organ- 
izing and conducting the Peoria Packing &- Provision Company. Tie became 



i 




MATiiKw iikm:i;ki;^ 



HISTORY OF PF.ORIA COUXTV 135 

president of the Peoria Opera House Company, and in financial circles lif,'nrcd 
prominently as vice president and one of the directors of the First National Bank 
of the city for many years. As he prospered in his undertakings, he made exten- 
sive and judicious investments in property, becoming the owner of several val- 
uable farms in Illinois and Nebraska. He remained in active connection with both 
the r.randamour licjuor trade and with banking interests up to the time of his 
death which occurred November 4, 1907. 

On the loth of May, TS57, ^^i"- Henebery was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Daniels, and their union was a long and happy one. Mrs. Henebery sur- 
vived her husband about five years. She died on March 12, 1912, at the ripe old 
age of seventv-seven years, one of the best loved women in the city of Peoria. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henebery became the parents of twelve children. Those still living 
are : Richard I. Heneljery, of Peoria, manager of the Henebery estate ; Josephine, 
the wife of E. J. Cashin'of Peoria; Nellie, the wife of Samuel H. Cummings of 
Peoria ; '^lary, the wife of Robert De \\'a\d of Fort Wayne ; Lida, married to 
Charles B. -\iuhler, also of Fort Wayne; Theodosia, the wife of Edwin Muir of 
Detroit ; and Miss Lucy Henebery, of Peoria. There is still living a brother of 
Mrs. Henebery, Mr. John Daniels of San Antonio, Texas. 

.Mr. Henebery was a member of the Roman Catholic church, and his political 
faith was that of the democratic party. He held membership in the Creve Coeur 
Club, and was identified with various public interests, some of a social, others of 
a benevolent nature. Any project that liad for its object the welfare and upbuild- 
ing of the city received his indorsement and his liberal financial support. He 
served as one of Peoria's aldermen at an early day, and was afterward a member 
of the school board. Since his death the Mathew Henebery Memorial school has 
been erected as a monument to his memory. The cause of education ever found 
in him a warm friend, and he was an earnest and zealous champion of the public 
library, having served as a director from the time of its organization until 1894, 
Fie gave liberally in support of the hospitals of the city and coo]3erated with many 
organized charities, while his individual charitable gifts were almost innumerable. 
He had a deep and al)iding love for his fcllowmen and was therefore interested in 
all that tended to ameliorate hard conditions of life for the unfortunate, or sought 
to further the uplifting and ennobling influences which work for an advanced civ- 
ilization. His advice was often sought and always freely given. He was loving 
and kind, and his many friends found him a congenial companion who was always 
considerate of the words and wishes of another. His advancement in the busi- 
ness world was the righteous outcome of his energy and determination. 



J. N. HECKARD. 



T. N. Heckard, a man of enterprise and of marked force of character, who 
through his business life has made good use of his time and opportunities, is 
now the owner of a general merchandise store at Oak Hill, He was born March 
17, 1858, in Illinois, his parents being Peter J. and Margaret (Wilson) Heck- 
ard, wlio came to Peoria county in 1863. In the father's family were five chil- 
dren, of whom J. N. of this review, is tlie third in order of birth. 

T. N. Heckard was reared under the parental roof and remained at home 
until 1882, when he began working for the Monarch Brewery firm of Peoria, 
where he remained until i8gi. For the following six years he was employed in 
the Peoria Malt House and in 1897 he jiurchased forty acres of land in Rose- 
field township, on which he followed farming until 1902. He then, on selling 
this tract of land, bought fifty-six acres in Elmwood township, which he owned 
until T906, when he engaged in the general mercantile business at Oak Hill, 
where he now has a well stocked store. 

Vi.i. II— 7 



136 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

On the 22d of January, 1882, Air. Heckard was united in marriage with Airs. 
Mayme Fash, a daughter of Charles and Sarah Aloore. The father, Charles 
Aloore, was killed in battle in the Civil war, and his widow subsequently became 
the wife of Thomas Clark. Air. and Airs. Heckard are the parents of two chil- 
dren: Frank R., who was born June 16, 1886, is married and is a blacksmith 
for the Star Alining Company at Peoria. Goldie R., aged nine, is attending 
school. In politics Air. Heckard is a stanch democrat. He gives much time to 
the cause of education and is now serving as president of the school board. He 
is an energetic, public-spirited man, well liked both as a merchant and in a 
social way and is meeting with excellent success in his business career. 



AIARTIN \'. B. CUAIERFORD. 

In a history of the successful men of Peoria mention should be made of Mar- 
tin \'. B. Cumerford inasmuch as personal effort, intelligently directed, consti- 
tuted the basis of a growing and gratifying success that enabled him in his later 
years to live retired. Within the period of his close connection with business 
interests in Peoria he ever commanded the good will and confidence of those with 
whom he had dealings and, therefore, was spoken of in terms of high regard 
wherever known. He was born in Aluncie, Delaware county, Indiana, February 
24, 1841, a son of George and Harriet ( Collis ) Cumerford. The father, a 
native of Virginia, was a cabinet maker by trade and followed that pursuit 
throughout the greater part of his life. His political allegiance was ever given 
to the democratic party. 

Alartin V. B. Cumerford was the eldest of a family of eight children and 
was early called upon to contribute to their support because of the invalid con- 
dition of his father. His education was acquired in the public schools and in the 
Aluncie Seminary, and wdien fifteen years of age he became a post boy, carry- 
ing the mail between Aluncie and Alarion, Indiana, a distance of thirty-three 
miles. While thus engaged he never missed a trip summer or winter. In 1859 he 
secured the position of bell boy in the Spencer House at Indianapolis and was 
acting in that capactiy at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. His patri- 
otic spirit prompted his enlistment and he became a bugler with a cavalry com- 
pany under Captain Bracken. He soon ceased, however, to act as musician and 
went into the ranks, participating in many hotly contested engagements, in the 
long marches and in the hard campaigning which led to the final victory that 
crowned the Union arms. His was the first cavarly company organized in 
Indiana and was later mustered in as Company K, First Indiana \'olunteer Cav- 
alry. The regiment was assigned to General Siegel's force whose corps was in 
the middle of the line at the battle of Bull Run, on which occasion Air. Cumerford 
was one of General Siegel's orderlies, accompanying him in that capacity in 
several other engagements. In August, 1862, and in September of the same year, 
he was recommended because of brave and meritorious service for promotion 
to the rank of lieutenant, but owing to the confused condition of affairs this was 
not agreed upon. He went through the several campaigns in Tennessee and was 
then mustered out at Nashville. In October, 1864, he returned to Indianapolis, 
where he cast his first vote for Oliver P. Alorton for governor and a month 
later supported Abraham Lincoln for the presidency. 

This was an eventful year in the life of Air. Cumerford, for it was on the 
15th of November, 1864. that he married Jennie E. Tout. They started on a trip 
southward and after two years returned to Indianapolis, where Air. Cumerford 
accepted a clerkship in a grocery store. He also held the office of clerk in the In- 
diana house of representatives during 1866 and 1867. In the latter year he came 
to Peoria and entered business circles of this city as bookkeeper in the planing 



I 



HISTORY OF I'EORIA COUNTY 137 

mill of Truesdale & Conijxiny. Two years later he became manager of Ballard's 
lumber yard and subsequently was employed in the freight office of the Indiana, 
Bloomington & Western Railroad. In 1874 he engaged in the grocery business, 
retiring in 1890. During his sixteen years' connection with that trade he secured 
a good patronage and the business was one of the profitable enterprises of that 
character in the city, a large and carefully selected line of goods bringing to 
him a well merited trade. In 1893 he entered the undertaking business with his 
son, Harry E., at No. 708 JMain street. In this connection they built up a large 
estal:)lishment, lieing among the foremost in their line in central Illinois. The 
father, however, practically lived retired in his later years, leaving the manage- 
ment and active work of the business entirely to his son. 

In poHtics Mr. Cumerford was always a stalwart republican but was not a 
politician in the ordinary sense of the term. He was never a seeker after office, 
yet in 1875 he was elected alderman of the new eigth ward. He belonged to Bry- 
ner Post, No. 67, G. A. R., and to Fort Clark Lodge, I. O: O. F. He passed 
away on the 2gth of April, 1912, being then seventy-one years of age, and thus 
was ended a life of usefulness and honor — one which gained for him the high 
respect of all with whom he had been brought in contact. He was independent 
in character, fearless in action and was a splendid type of the high-minded, pro- 
gressive citizen, whose fidelity to every cause in which he believed gained for 
him the respect and confidence of those who knew him. His personal charac- 
teristics were such as made him well liked and highly regarded and his record 
indicates what may be accomplished when determination and energy lead the 
way. 



THOMAS FORBES. 



Thomas Forbes, who now lives retired in Ilanna City, was liorn in New 
Tersey. May 3, 1830. His parents were William and Susan ( Cjraham) Forljes, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland and came from that country in 1828, set- 
tling in New Jersey, where the father was employed in the iron works. In 1836 
the parents removed to Philadelphia and the following year came to Peoria 
county, locating in Logan township, which was then called the middle precinct, 
where the father entered eighty acres of government land and later purchased 
an adjoining forty acres. In their family were four children, of whom Thomas, 
of this review, was the eldest. The others are: John, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Mrs. 
Nancy Shepherd, a widow of W'ashington county, whose husl)and was a physi- 
cian and was drowned while crossing a creek' in Tazewell county, on his way 
to see a patient : and \\'illiam, who lives in Peoria. 

Thomas Forbes, being only seven years of age when his parents removed 
to Logan township, was reared and educated here and remained under the par- 
ental roof until 1856. At that date he began farming a tract of forty acres of 
land which he and his father together had innxhased. Later he l)ought an ad- 
joining one hundred and twenty acres, making in all one hundred and sixty acres 
in tlie tract which he cultivated. At the time of the purchase of this tract the 
greater part of it was under timber but a few acres of it were ready for cultiva- 
tion. At the beginning of the war he enlisted in the Seventy-seventh Illinois 
Regiment, under General D. P. Greer, and remained in service for three years. 
During this time he w'as taken prisoner and lay for thirteen months and nine- 
teen days in prison at Camp Ford. At the close of the war he returned to his farm 
and resided on the same until 1892 when he sold it and removed to Hanna City, 
where he now owns an excellent home and is living retirefl. 

On the first of May, 1856, Mr. Forbes was united in marriage with Miss 
Catherine Cox and to them have been born five children. They are: Mrs. 



138 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

lantha Louila Foster, of Washington, Illinois ; Mrs. Susan Stewart, who resides 
on a farm in Logan township; ]\Irs. Ida I\Iary Patton, of Lenox, Iowa; Charles, 
who is engaged in farming near Mount Pleasant, Iowa; and Mrs. E. M. Pat- 
ton, who resides on a farm near Cleartield, Iowa. 

Politically Mr. Forbes gives his allegiance to the republican party. He has 
served as road commissioner and also as township tax collector. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church and his life is faithfully guided by its teachings. 
He has done efficient work in citizenship, being at all times public-spirited and pro- 
gressive. He has now attained the advanced age of eighty-one years, has resided 
in Peoria countv for over seventy-four years and has been an interested witness 
to the changes that have here occurred. Wherever he is known he is held in the 
highest esteem and is most warmly regarded where he is best known. 



HEYE DIEKEX. 



Heye Dieken, who, since 1894, has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
Logan township, was born in Norden, Hanover, Germany, on May 14, 1856. In 
early youth he decided to seek a home in America, and at the age of eighteen 
he arrived in Peoria county where for eight years he was employed as a farm 
hand. He then visited his native country, but after four months was 
again in Peoria county where he became employed on the poor farm, and 
after two years was promoted to the position of assistant superintendent of 
the insane department, which office he filled for five years. Subsequently he 
purchased in Limestone township two hundred acres of land which was known 
as the Walter Booth farm. Seven years later he sold the same and bought 
his present farm of one hundred and seventy-two acres on sections 17 and 8 in 
Logan township. He has now resided here for seventeen years. He has an ex- 
cellently improved farm and employs the latest methods in tilling the soil, one 
hundred and forty acres of the land being under a high state of cultivation and 
thirty-two acres in blue-grass pasture. He engages in raising corn, oats, wheat 
and alfalfa, and also raises quite extensively horses, cattle and hogs. 

On the 26th of October. 1885, Mr. Dieken was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Mary Davis, a resident of Limestone township. To this union have been born 
five children. They are : Minnie, now Mrs. Richardson ; Adeline, the wife of 
Lester Quin; and Delitha, George and Carl Otto, all of whom are at home. 

In politics Mr. Dieken gives his support to the democratic party and has 
served in the capacity of road commissioner for three years and as town- 
ship supervisor for four years. He is greatly interested in the cause of edu- 
cation, is now a school trustee, and has efficiently filled that office at previous 
times. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, and in the country he 
has chosen to make his home he is a most useful, valued and highly honored 
citizen. 



TOHX A. READ. 



Among Peoria's representative citizens John .A. Read is numbered. He has re- 
sided continuously here since 1878 and is today proprietor of the largest auc- 
tion and furniture house in this part of the state. Aside from his business con- 
nections he is well known as a republican leader and one whose advocacy of the 
party and its principles is based upon comprehensive and thorough knowledge 
of the political issues and questions of the day. He was born in Hannibal, Os- 
wego county, New York, July 16, 1850, and traces his ancestry back to Amos and 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 139 

Mary (Rennett) Read, who were married about 1776. Their second child. 
Caleb, was born at Lisbon, Connecticut, November 24, 1780, and died in W'est- 
morcland, Onieda county. New York, ^[arch 15, 1849. He had been married at 
Alontville. Connecticut. September 6. 1804, to Miss Mary Leffingwell, a daugh- 
ter of Benjamin and Lettis (Camp) Lelifingwell. Her birth occurred at Alont- 
ville or at Bosw-ell. Connecticut, January 17, 1782. and she passed away September 
30, 1825. Dwight Ripley Read, the father of John A. Read, was a son of Caleb 
and Alary Read and was born at Rrooktield, Aladison county. New York. He 
wedded Aliss Alargaret J. Wasson, who was born at Little Sodus Bay, Cayuga 
county. New York, in 1825. and was a daughter of George and Sallie (Brew- 
ster) Wasson, wlio were natives of New York, born in the \icinity of Schenec- 
tady. 

When a little lad of twelve years John A. Read began to earn his own liveli- 
hood and from that time to the present has been dependent entirely upon his own 
resources. Whatever success he has achieved is the reward of his own labors. 
In 1867 he accompanied his parents to Peoria, and two years later, having reached 
the age of nineteen, he went to Kansas where, in 1872, he .settled on a govern- 
ment claim in Alorris county, remaining there for two years. After some time 
spent in Iowa he returned to Illinois and for a year made his home in Elmwood, 
Peoria countv, where he engaged in auctioneering. He became an auctioneer and 
furniture dealer in Peoria in 1878 and is now proprietor of the largest auction 
and furniture house in this part of the state. Recently he has extended the scope 
of his business by the establishment of a large storage and warehouse, and is 
accorded a liberal patronage in these different connections. He has labored dili- 
gently, basing his advancement upon the safe, substantial qualities of unfaltering 
industry and determination. He helped to organize the Illinois .Auctioneer .Asso- 
ciation and for years served either as its ])resident or secretary. 

In Alay, 1887. in Brimfield, Peoria county, Mr. Read was united in marriage 
to Aliss Alary E. Barlow and they now have five children, Mary Lillie, Emma 
.Alice, Stella, John Wilbur and Sala Hamilton. J. Wilbur is engaged in business 
with his father as an auctioneer and Sala H. is connected with the express and 
storage department of the business. 

In politics Air. Read has always been a republican since obtaining the right 
of franchise and is today recognized as one of the active workers of the party in 
this portion of the state. He is a speaker of al)ility and prominence; is a wide 
reader of books, magazines and papers that deal with the chief political ques- 
tions of the day and is a student of political economy. In 1899 he was appointed 
sealer of weights and measures for Peoria but otherwise has held no public 
ofifice, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business interests that, 
continually growing in volume and importance, make heavy demands on his 
time and energies. 



E. H. BRADLEY, M. D. 

Peoria has reason to be proud of the personnel of her medical profession and 
the ability displayed in the various lines of practice. This is an age of speciali- 
zation and the man who attains high skill is he who concentrates his efforts along 
a single line of activity, acquainting himself with everything that pertains 
thereto. This Dr. E. H. Bradley has done and his work in the treatment of dis- 
eases of the eye, ear, nose and throat has brought him much more than local 
reputation and fame. He has resided in Peoria continuously since 1892 and in 
the intervening period of twenty years has confined his efforts alone to the par- 
ticular work in which he is still engaged. He was born in the eastern part of 
Ontario, Canada, September 18, 1861, and is a son of J. A. Bradley. The father 
was a leading citizen of his town, where he carried on merchandising and also 



140 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

served as postmaster for about fifty years. There Dr. Bradley was reared and 
attended the public schools, continuing his education in the Sydenham (Ontario) 
high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1880. Thinking to 
find broader and better business opportunities elsewhere, he then went to the 
Canadian northwest and was one of the first homesteaders in Saskatchewan, 
where he spent two years, after which he returned to the place of his nativity. 
Having determined to enter upon a professional career and thinking to find the 
practice of medicine a congenial vocation, he soon afterward matriculated in the 
University of the City of New York as a medical student. Later he entered the 
University of Vermont at Burlington and was graduated therefrom in 1891 with 
the M. D. degree. He conducted a general practice in Canada for some time and 
won success in that way. His attention was more and more largely concentrated, 
however, on diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He found that branch of 
the profession a most interesting one and his reading and study were directed 
largely along that line. In 1802 he came to Peoria as assistant to Dr. Dombrow- 
ski, a specialist in the treatment of the eye, ear nose and throat. A year later 
he • was admitted to a partnership and the business connection between them 
continued for three more years. He then entered upon an independent practice, 
opening an office on his own account, and to further qualify himself for the work 
in which he was especially interested he took a post-graduate course in New York 
city at the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat College. He is now oculist and aurist at 
the St. Francis Hospital and in addition he has a large private practice, which is 
constantly growing in volume and importance. He belongs to the Peoria City 
Medical Society, the Illinois State ^Medical Society, the American Academy of 
Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology, and the American Medical Association, 
and has served both as secretary and as president of the first named. 

Not only in professional lines has Dr. Bradley proved his worth as a valued 
and representative resident here. His labors in other connections have been of 
an important character. He has served for four years, or for two terms, as super- 
visor of Peoria, the nominati(in for the office being given him without his knowl- 
edge or consent. He made no canvass for the position but his personal worth 
secured his election. He served for one year as chairman of the finance committee, 
which converted the debt of two hundred thousand dollars in Peoria county 
into bonds, thus placing the finances of the county upon a business basis. He 
keeps w^ell informed concerning all the significant, vital political problems and 
is an earnest and unfaltering advocate of the republican party. 

Dr. Bradley was united in marriage to Miss Maud Matthews, of Peoria, a 
daughter of Newton Matthews, of this city. He belongs to the Illinois \'alley 
Yacht Club, of which he is serving as a director, and he has also filled the office 
of club commodore. He likewise holds membership in the Creve Coeur Club 
and is a prominent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite, while of the Mystic Shrine he is also a representative. His inter- 
ests and his activities are wide and varied. There is nothing narrow nor self- 
centered in his life. Fie reaches out along the lines of usefulness and his work 
in manv directions has been most serviceable in the world. 



HENRY MANSFIELD. 



\\'ith the passing away of the late Henry Mansfield, Peoria lost one of her 
most substantial and prominent citizens, whose active connection with commer- 
cial affairs and extensive business enterprises for more than half a century, made 
him one of the dominant factors in promoting the progress and development of 
the city. The greater part of his life was passed in the state of Illinois, his birth 




HENRY MANSFIELD, SR. 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 143 

haviiiL; occurred in New Haven. Connecticut, on the 22(1 of ^Nlarch. i8i(i. lie 
was a son of Leverett and Sarah ( Sanford ) r^Iansheld, both natives of Connecti- 
cut. The father was born in North Haven in ijSh, and the mother in New Haven 
on :March 8. 1789. They were married in Connecticut and subsequentlv went to 
Esperance, New York, •^'ir. Alansfield being one of the prominent and influential 
citizens of that community until 1843. He then disposed of his interests there 
and removed to Illinois, then considered to be the far west. Upon his arrival in 
this state he first located in the vicinity of Elgin, but he later went to Princeville, 
Peoria countv, and there he passed away on the 23d of December. 1868, just three 
davs after the death of his wife. They had both lived to attain a ripe old age. 
being eightv-two and seventy-nine years respectively. In the paternal line Henry 
Mansfield belonged to one of the early colonial families of Massachusetts, being 
a direct descendant of Richard Mansfield, who came to America from Devon- 
shire, England, in 1639, and located near Hampden, Massachusetts. He was the 
father of a large family, among his sons being one Joseph Mansfield, who became 
an extensive property holder and the owner of the famous Mansfield farm. His 
son Titus, the great-grandfather of our subject, married Mabel Todd, and they 
became residents of North Haven, Connecticut, and there their son Richard was 
born. He chose for his wife .Mary Styles and they in turn liecame the parents of 
Leverett Mansfield, the father of Henry Mansfield. 

Reared at home, in the acquirement of his education Henry Mansfield attended 
the local schools. While still in his early youth he left home and went to Albany, 
New York, obtaining a position in one of the leading drug stores of that city. 
There he learned the business, continuing to remain until his health became 
affected to such an extent by the close confinement that it was necessary for him 
to procure outdoor employment and seek a change of climate. He. therefore, 
joined a party of government surveyors and went to northern Michigan in the 
Chippewa Indian section, a hundred miles from a white settlement, where he 
remained for four years. While his general health was greatly improved by the 
vigorous climate of the north, the air and severe cold brought on throat and lung 
troubles that made it advisable for him to go to a warmer climate, so he started 
for St. Louis. The accommodations for travelers in those days bore little resem- 
blance to the luxurious trains of the present period, particularly in the more 
sparselv settled portions of the middle west, and the journey southward was not 
onlv slow and tiresome but it proved to be most exhausting. Therefore, when 
Mr'. Mansfield reached Peoria he stopped over for a rest and to seek professional 
advice. He was referred to Dr. N. S. Tucker, a nephew of Dr. E. J. Dickinson, 
and thus began the acquaintance that developed into a lifelong intimacy and a 
business connection that covered a period of practically half a century, having 
been terminated by the death of Dr. Tucker in 1S88. just forty-nine years and 
nine months after they first engaged in lousiness. As his health began to improve 
Mr. 'Mansfield considered the advisability of locating in Peoria, and recognizing 
that there was an excellent opening He and Dr. Tucker established a drug store, 
that under their efficient management became one of the leading concerns of the 
kind in the city. This enterprise thrived from its incipiency, and yielded to its 
proprietors a most gratifying income. Mr. Mansfield early began to invest his 
suri)lus income in real estate, which proved to be most lucrative, his returns from 
this and his business together with the property that came to him by inheritance, 
making him one of the wealthiest men in the city. In the direction of his enter- 
prises he always manifested the highest standards of commercial integrity. 

Mr. ]\Iansfield was twice married. His first union was with Miss Harriet .\. 
Elting, a native of Red Hook, Dutchess county. New York, who came west with 
her people in the early pioneer days. They located in Peoria and here ]\Irs. Mans- 
field was residing at the time of her marriage. Three children were born to them, 
two of whom are deceased ; the third. Fannie, who Ijecame the wife of O. B. 
Blakeslee, lives in San Gabriel, California, and has two children, Henry M. and 



144 HISTORY OJ- PEORIA COUNTY 

Denison. In 1856, Mr. Alansfield married Miss Isabelle F. Servoss, a native of the 
city of New York, and a daughter of Thomas L. Servoss, and a granddaughter of 
John Jr'intard, L.L. D., also of New York city. Eight children were born of this 
marriage, seven of whom are still living: Louise P., who married C. W. 
Mosher, formerly of Chicago, now of Portland, Oregon : Henry, an attorney of 
Peoria ; Nathaniel S. ; Eleanor T., who married J. Harold Ross ; Isabelle P., the 
wife of J. Lee Newton; Margaret E., the widow of F. J. Green; Sarah Sanford, 
who became Mrs. George H. Newton and died November 29, 1902; and Eliza H., 
who is living with her mother. ^Ir. Mansfield passed away ^lay 29, 1893, and is 
survived by his widow, who resides at 112 Perry avenue, this city. 

During a residence here that covered a period of more than fifty years, Mr. 
Mansfield made many close and stanch friends who admired him for his wonder- 
ful business ability and the enterprising and progressive spirit he at all times 
manifested in matters of citizenship, but most of all they esteemed him because 
of his high sense of honor, fine personality and kind, generous nature. 



MARSHALL T. LOTT. 



Marshall T. Lott, a member of the banking firm of Clinch, Schenck & Lett 
of Elmwood, is a native resident of this city, born February 22, 1863. He is a 
son of William H. and Catherine (\'ansickle) Lott, the father a native of Canada 
and the mother of New Jersey. The father as a young man came to Illinois, 
locating at Elmwood, where he was married. He was a carpenter by trade and 
later was engaged in the grain business at Chillicothe, Illinois, where he re- 
mained for ten years. He then moved to Hoopeston, Illinois, where he also 
was engaged in the grain business, but after two years he returned to Elmwood 
where he purchased a farm and resided until his death. He was an excellent 
business man and was an assignee with Mr. Thomas Clinch and \\'alter A. 
Clinch of the H. P. Tracy bank of Elmwood at the time of its failure. He and 
Mr. Clinch then organized the present bank with which the subject of this 
sketch is now connected. Mr. Lott was killed in 1887 in the Chatsworth wreck. 
His wife is still living. In their family are two sons and three daughters, all 
of whom are now living. 

Marshall T. Lott received his early education in the public schools of Hoopes- 
ton and Elmwood, completing a high-school course. Also for six months he at- 
tended the Burlington Business College. He then worked on the farm until 
1887, when he became connected with the lianking lousiness. He has been very 
successful in the business world, and the Ijank of Clinch, Schenck & Lott is now 
one of the well known banks of Peoria county. 

In 1889 Mr. Lott was united in marriage with Miss Lucy P. Wiley, a native 
of Elmwood, and daughter of Wilson and Rebecca Wiley, vi'ho were early set- 
tlers in this section of Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Lott have been born two 
children : Clifford, the elder, is a graduate of the Elmwood high school and was 
for two years a student at Knox College. He is now teaching at Lowpoint, 
Illinois. Alice is a graduate of the Elmwood high school, was for one year 
a student at Knox College and for one half year a student in the University of 
Wisconsin. She is now engaged in teaching at Farmington, Illinois. 

Politically Mr. Lott is a republican, and he served as first city treasurer tui- 
der the new corporation which was established in 1892. Also he was a member 
of the board of city aldermen for ten years. Fraternally he is identified with 
the ^Masons, being a member of the Shrine at Peoria. He belongs to the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and was identified with the Knights of Pythias 
at Elmwood until the lodge gave up its charter. He is well known in the bank- 
ing world, and is a member of the Bankers Association of Illinois, also of the 



1 1 IS TORY Ol- I'I'.okIA COUNTY 145 

Anu-ricaii r.ankers Association. -Mr. I.ott is a man of a(lniiral)le characteristics, 
and his banking and all his business etYorts have ever been conducted on a high 
mental and moral i)lane. Tliroughout his entire residence in Elmwood he has 
always been classed with the valued citizens in this commnnitv. 



AAJES DR(.)\VN PECK. 



Though not a politician. James Drown Peck has been an influential factor in 
relation to matters of public importance, particularly in his advocacy of the in- 
terests of the people in the fifty year franchise campaign. Through many years 
he has maintained a creditable position in business circles and, although now 
seventy-three years of age, is engaged in dealing in paints, oils and artists' su]> 
plies as well as doing contract painting. lie was born in Rhode Island, Sep- 
tember 3, 1839, his parents being Leonard and Harriet (Scott) Peck, who were 
also natives of that state and are now deceased. The son was born upon a farm 
but pursued his education in the schools of Providence, Rhode Island, and there 
learned the painter's trade, which he followed in that city. After the outbreak 
of the Civil war, however, he put aside business and personal considerations 
that he luight oft'er his aid to the government, enlisting as a member of Com- 
pany I, Eleventh Rhode Island \'olunteer Infantry. He served for one year as 
a private and was brevetted sergeant of his company at the close of the war. 
During the last year of the war he came to Peoria, having determined to make 
his home in the middle west. At the corner of Jackson and Hale, now Glen- 
dale streets, he was located for ten years. He then established a paint shoji in 
Dr. Troyer's building on Hamilton street, where the Mayer office building now' 
stands, and there he conducted a painting business in connection with his partner, 
Charles Frazier. He then estalilished an independent enterprise on South Adams 
street and later purchased a store at Nos. 104 and 106 Main street. There for 
a number of years he conducted a general painting business, also dealing in 
paints, oils and artists' supplies. At length he removed to No. 208 Main street, 
where he continued the sale of paints and artists' materials for twenty years. 
Recently he has removed to No. 211 South Madison avenue. The old-time paint- 
ers of Peoria are James D. Peck, John A. Bush and Richard McBurnie — all 
veteran business men of the city whose activity has been a factor in the in- 
dustrial develojMiient here. For years Mr. Peck has been a large employer of 
labor, utilizing the services of a number of men in the execution of his paint- 
ing contracts. His work is seen in various sections of the city and he is at all 
times accorded a very liberal patronage, which is well merited. 

Mr. Peck has been married twice. In 1864 he wedded Miss Harriet .\. 
Woodberry. This was after he had enrolled as a soldier of the Union army 
and he ran away in order to wed the lady of his choice. Thev adopted three 
children but two died in childhood. The other, Nellie June, became the wife of 
Oliver lioynton, of St. Ignace, Michigan, and departed this life seven years 
ago, being survived by her husband and two sons. Having lost his first wife, 
Mr. Peck married Mrs. Louisa Demorest. and they now reside at No. 229 North 
Elizabeth street. 

Mr. Peck has never been a club man but he maintains pleasant relations with 
his old army comrades through his memi)ership in Brvner F^ost, G. A. R. He 
has never been a politician in the usually accepted sense of that term, yet he 
was elected and served for two years as a member of the city council from the 
fifth ward during the time of the fifty year franchise camjiaign, in which he 
fully demonstrated his loyalty to the people and their interests. He has ever 
closely studied vital and significant questions of the day and has given his sup- 
port to many measures which he has believed to have appreciable values in 



146 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTY 

municipal affairs. He belongs to the First Congregational church and has 
served on both the board of trustees and the board of deacons. He has thus 
worked earnestly for material, political and moral progress and a well spent 
life has established him high in pulilic regard, while his record as a citizen has 
proven him to be as true and loyal to the welfare of his country in days of 
peace as he was in times of war. 



CAPTAIN HEXRY DET\VEILLER. 

Captain Henry Detweiller, deceased, who was the founder of the Detweiller 
Ice Company, which has its offices at io8 South Adams street, has been a resi- 
dent of this city since 1837. He was born June 19, 1825, in Lorraine, which 
was then a province of France but now belongs to Germany. His parents were 
Christian and Catherine ( Shertz ) Detweiller, both of whom were natives of 
France. The father was engaged in farming, milling and in the transportation 
business there, in which occupations he accumulated a large fortune. He owned 
three large estates, situated in different parts of the province, at which he 
lavishly entertained the gentry and nobility for weeks at a time, according to 
the custom of that day. During the War of 1812 and 1813 he met with great 
reverses, and he passed away in 1832, a poor man. 

Henry Detweiller remained in his native country until 1837. when he came 
to America together with his mother and three sisters, reaching Xew York 
after a voyage of sixty-eight days. Then the family made their way to Peoria 
to join a brother, John Detweiller, who had located in this city in 1833. Their 
journey from Xew York to Peoria covered a period of forty-two days. They 
traveled from New York to Rochester and thence to Buffalo by canal, from there 
bv way of the lakes to Cleveland and then to Cincinnati by canal. From there 
they went by boat down the Ohio river to the ^Mississippi and then up the Illinois 
to Peoria, which at that time was a village of about twelve hundred inhabitants. 
During the following year the mother and one sister passed away. After coming 
to Peoria. Mr. Detweiller attended school and clerked for his brother, who 
kept the St. Croix tavern on \\'ater street, which was then the principal street 
in Peoria. Afterward he clerked in a shoe store for Charles W. McClellan and 
later for Samuel A'oris & Company, receiving as compensation six dollars per 
month. The business of Peoria with the outside world was at that time chiefly 
transacted by water, and ^Ir. Detweiller conceived a strong desire to become a 
pilot on the river. Accordingly he entered the employ of John Frink. of the 
firm of Frink & Walker, and became employed on the steamer Frontier, which 
was then running as a mail and passenger packet from Peoria to Peru. Through 
the kindness of Mr. Frink, the captain instructed Mr. Detweiller in the work of 
operating the boats and he was soon appointed as second pilot. He was upon this 
boat, the Frontier, when it was sunk by the steamer Panama, which ran into it at 
the "Towhead" above The Xarrows. This occurred in the early morning of Sep- 
tember 2, 1842, just after the Frontier had left the village of Little Detroit, which 
was then situated oh the eastern shore of the river but which has since entirely dis- 
appeared. By running the boat ashore at the "Towhead." the forty or fifty pas- 
sengers who were on board, escaped with their lives, but the boat was a total loss. 

The companv then built a new steamer which was christened Chicago, on which 
Captain Detweiller became second pilot under his old instructor. He remained 
with that boat until it was withdrawn from the river in the spring of 1844. He then 
continued as second pilot on other boats for a year. In 1847 he was made captain 
of the Governor Briggs, which then carried the St. Louis and Alton trade. At that 
time, owing to the war with ^Mexico, the boat carried many troops and much 
equipment from Alton to Jeft'erson Barracks, below St. Louis. In 1848 and 



I 



A 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 149 

1849 he acted as first jiilot on ditTerent lioats. The latter year was remarkable 
for the epidemic of cholera which broke out in St. Louis and hundreds were 
dving there daih'. People were leaving the city upon boats as rapidly as possi- 
ble and Captain Detweiller continued at his post until one night, while taking 
the steamer Danube to St. Louis, he was suddenly stricken with cholera, super- 
induced by overwork and loss of sleep, and had just time to ring the stopping 
bells before he fell to the floor of the pilot house. Fortunately, a pilot on the 
Mississippi was on board and he took charge of the boat. Captain Detweiller 
was then removed to Peoria, where for nine months he was unable to resume 
his duties. His captain at that time was stricken with cholera, died from the 
effects and was buried in Pekin. 

From 1850 to i860 the river business between the north and the south was 
very large. During these years 'Mr. Detweiller acted in the capacities of pilot 
and' captain on a number of boats on the Illinois and ^lississippi rivers. In 
1856 he became part owner of the steamer Alovastar and in 1857 becanie the 
sole owner of the steamer Minnesota. During his last years upon the river he 
frequently had Abraham Lincoln as a jiassenger and came to know him _ well. 
In 1862 he offered his services to the goverimicnt and was sworn into service at 
St. Louis. He was assigned to the command of the L'nited States steamer Jen- 
nie Lind and was ordered to Cairo to await the arrival of the fleet with General 
Pope's troops from Island No. 10. The Jennie Lind was detailed as a dispatch 
boat to the flagship, accompanying the fleet up the Tennessee river to Pittsburg 
Landing. Later on Captain Detweiller was with the fleet at Memphis. In 1863 
he was transferred to the United States steamer Yankee, of which he had charge 
until the close of the war, and was attached to the fleet at the fall of Vicksburg. 
While managing the government transports he performed much important and 
often hazardous service. So great was the danger to which his boat was ex- 
posed during these perilous years that Captain Detweiller was compelled to 
adopt various schemes to evade the enemy and often his boat was disguised 
as a gunboat. The Yankee was never seriously disabled, although often fired 
upon, and the last important service of the boat was to take a cargo of horses, 
mules and stores, valued at two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, from St. 
Louis to New Orleans. The boat was fired upon, but the cargo was at length 
safelv delivered in New Orleans. After the war Captain Detweiller was in 
charge of the steamer lieaver until 1874. 

Captain Detweiller abandoned the work on the river in order to give his 
entire attention to the ice business, in which he had engaged in 1870 in partner- 
ship with N. L. Woodruff'. In December, 1876, Captain Detweiller severed his 
connection with \lr. Woodruff and the business has been conducted ever since, 
either in his own name or under the name of the Detweiller Ice Company. 

(;)n the 5th day of Noveml^er, 1848, Captain Detweiller wedded JMagdalena 
Bachman, the marriage l)eing celebrated at the home of his sister in Woodford 
county, Illinois. Mrs. Detweiller was also a native of France. To this union 
seven children were born, three of whom are yet living; Thomas H., Amelia 
]\I., and Mathilda E. The son, Thomas H. Detweiller, has since 1903 been the 
president and manager of the Detweiller Ice Company, and under his capable 
direction the business has steadily increased. Mrs, Detweiller passed away 
December 10, 1888, and her death was a severe blow to her husband, as she 
had ever been in all respects his true helpmate. She was in her home not onl}" 
a devoted wife and mother, but was a useful member of society, kindly, chari- 
table and helpful to all who were in trouble or in want. She was active in 
charitable work and was connected with the Women's Christian Home Mission 
and with the Women's Relief Corps. 

Captain Detweiller died in Peoria on April 2, 1903. He had taken no active 
part in his business for some years before his death, leaving everything to the 
management of his son. His life was a laborious one; and beset wnth as many 



150 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

hardships as fall to the lot of most pioneers, ^'et, through it all he bore himself 
honorably and with characteristic geniality and maintained that pleasant kindly 
character which endeared him to all with whom he came in contact. As an evi- 
dence of the confidence his fellow citizens placed in his integrity, he was elected 
SIX times to the office of city treasurer without his seeking and even against 
his personal desire. Fraternally he belonged to the Odd Fellows and was a 
charter member of the I'ryner Post, No. 67, G. A. R. and was an active member 
of the Creve Coeur Club. For thirteen years, he was president of the Old 
Settlers' Association of Peoria. He cast his first vote for General Taylor for 
president in 1848 and since the organization of the republican party was ever 
one of its ardent supporters, believing its principles most conducive to good 
government. He resided in Peoria for over three-quarters of a century, and 
during that time he witnessed its development from a village to the present 
beautiful city and during his life-time contributed his full part :o the genera' 
growth. It may be said of him. as of very few men, that he had not a single 
enemy in the city of Peoria, or anyone who entertained aught but the kindest 
sentiments toward him. His disposition was genial and kindly and his efforts 
were to help rather than to mar the fortunes of any man or woman. He was 
a man of decided character and strong convictions, but willing that other men 
should enjoy the same right and freedom of thought and action which he 
claimed for himself. Such evenly balanced characters are rare, and when we 
see them, we cannot refrain from expressing our appreciation of them and our 
commendation of the men or women who bear them. If there were more men 
like Captain Detweiller, it would be better for the community, for the state 
and for the nation. 



EDWARD E. BARBOUR, M. D. 

There is probably no calling, either in business or the professions which 
necessitates the possession of so much strict integrity, scruplousness and thorough 
mastery of detail, on the part of its members, as does the practice of medicine. 
The physician often holds the lives of his patients in his hands. Upon his skill, 
his fertility of resource, his calmness in a crisis, life itself depends. Therefore, 
a doctor should regard his profession as a high and honorable one, and his 
worthy practice of it, a sacred debt which he owes to humanity. A doctor of 
this high class is Edward E. Barbour, one of the most able physicians of this 
city. 

Dr. Barbour has offices at 427 Jefferson building, Peoria, and has since 1903 
done a general practice, specializing in obstetrics. He was born on the farm of 
his father in Carroll county, Indiana, January 10, i86g, his father, Reuben D. 
Barbour, being a prominent agriculturist. Here he was reared close to the heart 
of nature, and grew to manhood. He attended the public schools and attained 
proficiency in the common branches of English learning. Later he extended 
his education l)v attending night school in Indianapolis and when he had fitted 
himself to do so. took up the study of medicine on September 15, 1895, which 
he diligently pursued until March 22, 1899, when he was graduated from the 
Physio Medical College of Indianapolis, Indiana. .'Mter his graduation, he be- 
gan the practice of his profession in Putnam county, Illinois, where by his pro- 
fessional skill he achieved success and by his personal magnetism formed many 
lasting and pleasant acquaintanceships. Desiring a larger field for his chosen 
life work, in 1903 he settled in Peoria. During that year, he took post-graduate 
work in the Chicago Polyclinic and since that time has been engaged profes- 
sionally in this city. He is on the stafl^ of St. Francis Hospital of Peoria, acts 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 151 

as health officer at Averyville, a suburb north of Peoria, and is also jiresidcut of 
the Averyville board of education. 

On August 25, 1892, Dr. Barbour was married to Aliss Sadie M. Kendall 
of Indiana])olis, Indiana, a daughter of John AI. and Mary (Willetts) Kendall. 
They became the parents of one son, Orville E., who was born in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, on June 25, 1893, and who graduated from Western Military Academy, 
at Alton, Illinois, in June, 1912. Dr. Barbour's first wife died March 22, 1900, 
and on December 24, igoi he was again married. His second wife was Miss 
Cleopatra Axtell of Tipton, Indiana, a daughter of John \\'and and Sarah ( Mc- 
Farland) Axtell. 

The Doctor is a member of the Peoria City Medical Society, the Illinois- 
State Medical Society and the American ^Medical Association. He has attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Masonry and is also a member 
of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to the Knights of Khoras.san, and 
is past chancellor commander of Calanthe Lodge, No. 43 of the Knights of 
Pythias. He is active in the Independent Order of Red Men and several other 
fraternal orders, Ijesides being a prominent member of the Y. 'M. C. A. and 
the Peoria Association of Commerce. As a citizen. Dr. Barbour is universally 
esteemed, always sustaining the character of a true man. His business trans- 
actions, like his professional duties, are always conducted on the principles of 
strict integrity, and he is kind in his relations and conduct towards all. 



lOHX R. GRANT. 



John R. Grant, who is serving in his third year as superintendent of streets of 
Peoria, has made his home in this city for twenty-six years. He has been a life- 
long resident of the county. He was born on his father's farm in Limestone 
township, July 19, 1861, and is a son of Peter and Catharine (Ritchie) Grant. 
The father not only was an agriculturist and owned and cultivated a tract of 
land in Limestone township but also owned and operated coal mines there. In 
1858 he removed from Belleville, Illinois, to this county and was thereafter 
closely and prominently associated with business interests. 

The usual experiences of farm life came to John R. Grant in his boyhood 
and youth while spending the period of his majority upon his father's farm. 
He attended the country schools and also a night school but as soon as old enough 
to begin work he was assigned certain duties on the farm which he performed 
through the summer seasons and in the winter months worked in his father's 
coal mines. His boyhood was therefore a period of earnest and unremitting toil 
and brought to him an understanding of the value and efifectiveness of earnest 
labor. He has devoted a number of years of his life to public service and for 
some time was employed by the Park board of Peoria before entering upon his 
present position as superintendent of streets. He has done excellent work in 
this connection and during his administration many improvements have been made 
in the thoroughfares of the city. 

In 1886 occurred the marriage of Mr. Grant and Miss Catharine Botzenhardt, 
also a native of this county. They have become parents of five children but Ben, 
the eldest, was drowned at the age of ten years and Elsie, the youngest, died 
when about nine months old. Those still living are Fred, Joseph and Janet. 

Mr. Grant is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternitv and his political 
allegiance has always been given to the republican party. He has ever taken an 
active interest in city and county politics and was a delegate to the famous "lock- 
out" convention at Springfield in 1904. He served on the village board of trus- 
tees of South Peoria in 1895-6 and through his efforts and influence the village 



152 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

was annexed to the city. He has a wide acquaintance throughout the entire 
county and his circle of friends is an extensive one for his reliability and personal 
worth and his social, genial nature have gained for him the warm regard of all 
with whom he has come in contact. 



JOHN A. SCHNEIDER. 

lohn A. Schneider is commissioner of buildings at Peoria and for a long period 
has" been identified with building operations in this city. He has filled his pres- 
ent position since Alay 4, 1909, under appointment of Mayor Woodruff, and the 
record which he has made in this connection is most creditable. He was born 
in 1849, soon after his parents landed in America on their immigration to this 
country from Germany. He is a son of Bernard and Anna Schneider, who 
established their home in the Empire state, where the son was reared. He pur- 
sued his education in the schools of New York city and of Albany, New York. 
He was a youth of seventeen years when, in 1866, he came to the middle west 
with his parents, settling in Peoria, at which time he began providing for his 
own support by working at the leather trade. He spent two years in that way 
and then began work at the builder's trade, serving an apprenticeship with his 
brother-in-law, \'. Jobst. After completing this apprenticeship he worked as a 
contractor and builder in Chicago and in the west for five years but returned to 
Peoria on the expiration of that period and for twenty years was foreman for 
his brother-in-law in the contracting and building business. He then embarked 
in the same line of business on his own account and was well known in that con- 
nection at the time that he accepted his present office. He has erected many 
substantial structures here and his labors have brought him excellent returns. 
His knowledge of the trade in all of its departments well qualifies him for the 
duties that devolve upon him as commissioner of buildings. 

In 1880, in St. Louis, ^lissouri, Mr. Schneider was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth Renth and unto them have been born two sons, George and Oscar. 
Fraternally !Mr. Schneider is connected with the Alasons and the ]\Iaccabees and is 
loyal to the teachings and tenets of those organizations. He started out in life 
with no special advantages and has worked his way steadily upward by his own 
merit and capability, reaching a creditable position in business and official circles. 



CLYDE E. STONE. 



Judicial honors have come early to Clyde E. Stone but public opinion is 
unanimous in that they are well deserved. Nature equipped him with keen men- 
tality and he has wisely and conscientiously used the talents which came to him 
as a birthright. No outside aid or influence has favored him and in a profession 
where advancement depends solely upon individual merit he has gained distinc- 
tion and honors. On the 8th of November, 1910, popular suft'rage called him to 
the office of county judge and on the 3d of December following he took his place 
upon the bench and has since administered the law in the county court. 

Judge Stone is yet a young man. having been born in Mason City, Illinois, 
March 23, 1876. Plis paternal grandfather, William A. Stone, was one of the 
pioneers of this state, settling in Menard county in 1835 upon his removal to 
Illinois from Kentucky. He was, however, a native of Virginia. During the 
period of his residence in this state he followed farming and aided in replacing 
the evidence of frontier life by the improvements of modern civilization. His 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 153 

son, Claudius L. Stone, was born and reared in JMenard county and for thirty- 
five years engaged in farming in Mason county, after which he put aside the work 
of the fields and retired to Mason City where he is now filling the position of 
postmaster. He has ever been a respected, worthy and honored resident of his 
community, influential in public affairs. He wedded Mary Marot, a native of 
Jllinois, and unto them were born six children of whom four are vet living: Wil- 
liam E., a practicing attorney of Mason City; Arthur L., who is agent for the 
Chicago & Alton Railroad at Peoria ; Clyde E., of this review ; and Hal M., who 
is master in chancer}- at Bloomington, Illinois. 

Spending his youthful days on his father's farm the rural schools afforded 
Judge Stone his early educational advantages which were supplemented by a 
course of study in the high school of Alason City, from which he was in due time 
graduated. Pie afterward took up the profession of teaching which he followed 
altogether for six years in Alason county, but regarded this merely as a prepara- 
tory field for the practice of law. Thinking to find the work of the legal pro- 
fession more congenial and hoping also to find it more profitable, he entered 
the University of Illinois for a law course and was graduated therefrom on the 
lOth of June, 1903. In May of that year he had been admitted to the bar and 
in less than a month after his graduation came to Peoria, arriving in this city 
on the 1st of July. Plere he entered into partnership with I. L. Fuller, the pro- 
fessional relations between them continuing until the ist of January, 1906, when 
Judge Stone entered into partnership with Joseph \\ Graff, who for sixteen 
years was a member of congress. They practiced together until Judge Stone's 
election to the bench on the 8th of November, 1910. From the ist of June, 1906, 
until the 1st of January, 1909. he had been first assistant state's attorney. While 
in college he was a member of the Phi Kappa Sigma, the Phi Delta Phi law fra- 
ternity and the Scholarship fraternity, Theta Kappa Nu, membership in which 
dejjcnds upon the grades made in the class roorn. As a lawyer Judge Stone soon 
demonstrated his ability to handle intricate and involved problems of jurispru- 
dence and to accurately apply the principles of the law to the points in litigation. 
His preparation of a case was ever thorough and comjjrehensive, his presenta- 
tion clear and forceful and his deduction logical. He is seldom, if ever, at fault 
in the citation of principle or precedent and his success is due above all other 
things to his indefatigable industry. He enjoyed a large and distinctively rep- 
resentative clientage until his election to the bench, since which time lie has 
presided in able, dignified manner over the sessions of the court. His decisions 
indicate strong nientalit}-, careful analysis, a thorough knowledge of the law and 
an unbiased judgment and. moreover, he possesses that self-control which enables 
him to lose his individuality, his personal feelings, his prejudices and his peculiar- 
ities of disposition in the dignity, impartiality and equity of the office to which life, 
probity, right and liberty must look for protection. 

On the 14th of November. 1900, Judge Stone was united in marriage at 
Havana, Illinois, to ]\Iiss Jessie Browning, a daughter of the late Joseph and 
Lucy E. (Harpham) Browning. Pier father was a native of Massachusetts and 
was educated in an eastern university and also in study abroad. For some years 
he was a professor of languages in different educational institutions but later 
took up the study and afterward the practice of medicine. His wife is a native 
of Mason county, Illinois, and is still living in the old home in which she was 
born. Judge and j\Irs. Stone have become the parents of two children: Claudia 
E., four years of age; and Inez Browning, who is but two years of age. Both 
Judge and Mrs. Stone are people of benevolent spirit and he is serving as a 
member of the hoard of directors of the Associated Charities. His recognition of 
the universal brotherhood of mankind is manifest in his membership in the 
Masonic fraternity in which he has attained the Knight Templar degree and has 
also become a member of the ]\Iystic Shrine. He is further connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern 



154 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Woodmen of America, and is popular in all those organizations. When Judge 
Stone arrived in Peoria on the ist of July, igoo, he knew no one in this city 
save his law partner. His individual worth and ability soon won him the respect 
and confidence of the people of the county and led to his selection for judicial 
honors. He early demonstrated his ability as an organizer and leader and in 
his campaign for county judge showed that he could lead what others regarded as 
a forlorn hope and achieve victory. The same qualities have made him a promi- 
nent factor in republican circles. He is aggressive yet never to the point of in- 
fringing on another's rights ; it is an aggressiveness of an enterprising spirit and 
a firm belief in the course which he has followed. That his mind has a strong 
judicial cast is indicated by the work which he has thus far done on the bench and 
which indicates a masterful grasp of every problem presented for solution. 



COLONEL JAAIES POWELL. 

A picturesque and interesting figure on the stage of action in Peoria for many 
years was Colonel James Powell of the L'nited States army, who was a veteran 
of the Alexican and Civil wars and one of the noted Indian fighters in the cam- 
paigns which subjugated the red race and led to the extention of civilizing influ- 
ences into the west. His life history if written in detail would prove a thrilling 
one, giving a picture of every phase of warfare in which this countrv engaged 
save that which brought independence to the nation. 

Colonel Powell was a native of ElHcotts Mills. Maryland. He was liorn May 
12, 1831, of the marriage of Samuel and Mary ( Kelley ) Powell, the former an 
arcliitect and bridge builder. The son pursued his education in the schools of his 
native state and from early youth was interested and stirred by tales of military 
prowess. At the age of sixteen years, therefore, he enlisted in the Eleventli 
United States Infantry for service in the Mexican war, going to the front during 
the last year of that struggle in the land of ^lontezuma. Again his patriotic 
spirit rose paramount to all else when the country became involved in Civil war 
and in 'May, 1861, he was appointed second lieutenant in the Eighteenth Ohio 
Infantry, ^\'ith that command he went to the front and on the 21st of October, 
1862, he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. Subsequentlv he was 
brevetted for gallant and meritorious service at the battle of Chickamauga on the 
29th of September, 1863. He participated in the Atlanta and Jonesboro cam- 
paigns and on the ist of September, 1864, was brevetted major for distinguished 
gallantry. He was given his captaincy on the 9th of September of the same year. 
His military duty was of a varied, important and arduous character. At the 
close of the war he ranked as major and continued in the service of the regular 
army. In August, 1867, he was brevetted lieutenant colonel for braverv dis- 
played during the engagement with the Indians at Fort Philip Kearnv in Dakota 
territory. In 1868 he was retired on account of wounds received in battle with 
the red men. He was one of the most noted officers of the army who participated 
in the campaigns against the Indians. In General Dodge's Thirty Years of In- 
dian War are found several accounts of engagements in which Colonel Powell 
was the commanding officer. Experience not only taught him how to meet his 
fellow countrymen on the battlefields of the south, where was established the 
supremacy of the federal government, but also how to meet the wily savage who 
seldom faces his foe in the open but, skulking liehind trees, bushes and rocks. 
takes his enemy unawares if possible. Colonel Powell became thoroughlv 
acquainted with the methods of warfare as followed by the Indian and it was this 
which made his work on the western frontier so successful. \Miile guarding a 
fort in ^^'yoming he was attacked by a band of Indians and made breastworks of 
wagon beds behind which his men fought for hours. The official report savs that 
over two hundred Indians were killed but a surveying party says that the Indian 



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(III.. .I.\\1K> W . I'dWKLL 



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to 



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HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 157 

losses were fully eight hundred. It was soon after this engagement that Colonel 
Powell was retired on full pa\'. Thus was ended his military service, w'hich dis- 
played many brilliant features, while at the same time he was connected with 
much of the difficult and arduous campaigning on the western frontier. 

After his retirement Colonel Powell paid a visit to Peoria, intending only to 
remain a short time, but he and his wife were so pleased with surroundings and 
conditions in this part of the state that they resolved to remain and he purchased 
a farm in Putnam county, on which he resided for a few years. Later he disposed 
of that iM-operty and came to the city of Peoria, where he lived retired until his 
death, which occurred on the i6th of April, 1903. It was wounds which he sus- 
tained at the battle of Chickamauga that practically caused his retirement from 
the army. 

On the i6th of August, 1861, occiu'red the marriage of Colonel Powell and 
Miss Anna M. Stewartson, a daughter of Richard and Anna (Mitcheson) Stew- 
artson, who were natives of England and on coming to America settled in New- 
buryport, Massachusetts, while subsequently they established their home at Union- 
town. F'ennsylvania. Colonel and Mrs. Powell had an extensive circle of warm 
friends in Peoria. 

His political allegiance was given to the republican party, which was the 
defense of the Union in the dark days of the Civil war and which he always 
regarded as the party of reform and progress. He never ceased to feel the 
deepest interest in military affairs and held membership in the Army of the Ten- 
nessee, in the Old Sailors and Soldiers Union and in the Grand .Krmy of the Re- 
public. He ever maintained his soldierly bearing and air of command and yet 
he was a most genial gentleman, winning friends wherever he went and gaining 
high regard b_\- reason of his fidelity to all those (jualities which in every land and 
clime awaken respect and confidence. His record is, indeed, a creditable one — 
veteran of two of the most important wars of the country and four times brev- 
etted and promoted by the government for gallant, meritorious service during 
the contest between the north and the south. He was also an active participant 
in the campaigning against the Indians in Colorado and Wyoming. Then he 
retired to enter u]ion the pursuits of civil life and the same spirit of fidelitv to 
dulv characterized him in everv relaiton to the end. 



WILLIAM H. .MOORE. 

William H. Moore, member of the Peoria l:)ar, has for three terms filled the 
office of city attorney, being elected to that position for the term lieginning in 
May, 1005, and retiring from the office in May. 191 1. Si.x years before he was 
first called to the position, he began practice in Peoria, having been admitted to 
the bar on the 7th of June, 1899. Five days later he arrived in this city and 
has since been a representative of the legal profession here. Mr. Moore was 
born on a farm in Douglas county, Illinois, December 31, 1870, and is a son of 
George ^\'. and Martha ( Shields) Moore. The father is a farmer by occuiJa- 
tion and still makes his home in Douglas county, where for many years he has 
carried on general agricultural pursuits. 

The usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farmer boy came to William 
H. Moore in his boyhood and youth, .\fter attending the country schools he be- 
came a pui)il in the Xormal school at Dixon, Illinois, and during the periods of 
vacation he worked upon the home farm, early becoming familiar with the duties 
and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist as he plows and plants the fields 
and cultivates the crops. He felt that he would prefer a professional to an 
agricultural life, however, and with this end in view he became a student in 
the Kent College of Law. at Chicago, where he remained for a year. He also 
studied under James 'SI. Rice, a lawyer of Iowa, for three years, and also spent 



158 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

two years as a law student in Dixon, Illinois. As previously stated, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar on the 7th of June, 1899, and immediately afterward came to 
Peoria. Here he began practice, proving his merit and ability in the resultant 
work which he did in connection with the courts. After about six years' prac- ' 
tice he was called to the office of city attorney and the excellent work which he 
did in that position is manifested in the fact that he was twice reelected. In 
^lav, 191 1, he retired from the office as he had entered it — with the confidence 
and good will of the great majority. He then joined the law firm of Sucher & 
McXemar, already well established in business, and to the firm style his name was 
added, so that the partnership is now known as Sucher, McXemar & Moore. 
They are engaged in general practice and their work in the courts has given them 
an enviable reputation. 

On the 22d of August, 1906, Mr. ^loore was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace Aldrich, who died on the 12th of March. 1910. His fraternal relations 
are with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. In the first named he has advanced to the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite and he is also a member of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise be- 
longs to the Creve Coeur Club and is well known socially in Peoria, where he 
has an extensive circle of warm friends. 



COLONEL FREDERICK H. SMITH. 

A republican leader of Illinois, a financier and business man of large and 
varied interests and factor of equal importance in social circles, Colonel Fred- 
erick H. Smith belongs to that class of American citizens who are making his- 
tory. He was born in Buftalo, New York, a son of \\'!lliam Henry Smith, who 
was for many years general manager of the Lackawanna Railroad Company and 
a leading figure in railroad circles. Liberal educational privileges were accorded 
him and following his graduation from De ^'eaux College at Niagara, New 
York, he decided to start out independently and test the worth of his own force. 
He came to Peoria in 1888 and was soon established in business as the general 
agent of a fast freight line representing eastern railroads. In the fall of 1897 
he retired from that business but it was only to take up work of a more extended 
and important character. He is the vice president of the Dime Savings & Trust 
Company, vice president of the Alerchants National Bank, a director of the 
Peoria Railway Terminal, a director of the Peoria Gas & Electric Company and 
a director of the ^IcCoy Wholesale Grocery Company of Peoria. He is also 
heavily interested in timber lands in the state of Wisconsin and in Washington as 
well as being a director in a number of large lumber interests in the north. He 
has done much as a promoter and the practical force of his well formulated plans 
has brought substantial results of value to the city as well as to himself. Colonel 
Smith is very widely known in political circles. He became interested in local 
politics in early manhood and his opinions have carried weight w-ith the repub- 
lican leaders of this state. In 1897 he was selected a member of the staff of 
Governor Tanner and was commissioned with the rank of colonel. Governor 
Yates reappointed him to the position and in that connection he widened his ac- 
quaintance among the political leaders. In 1900 when the republican state con- 
vention convened in Peoria he was selected as a delegate from the fourteenth 
congregational district to the republican national convention of that vear and was 
made a member of the committee on rules and order, in which connection his serv- 
ice awakened general commendation and satisfaction among the party throughout 
this state. In 1908 he was named as a presidential elector from Illinois and cast 
his vote for Theodore Roosevelt. In 1908 his executive ability in politics was 
recognized bv his selection as chairman of the finance committee of the national 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 159 

republican central committee, a position which he filled so ca])ably that he re- 
ceived national prominence in the party councils. Governor Yates in 1901 ap- 
pointed him commissioner to the Charleston Exposition and he was elected pres- 
ident of the commission, having charge of the Illinois department during the 
continuance of the exposition. He was awarded a gold medal for distinguished 
services by the directors of the exposition. 

He has served as chairman of the republican central committee and chairman 
of the judiciary committee of the fifth district and in both connections has ren- 
dered excellent service to his party. One of Colonel Smith's marked character- 
istics is the fact that he sees things to do and does them. He is clear-sighted 
and far-sighted. He has a firm grasp on the great questions before the people 
today and possesses a thorough knowledge of the needs of his congressional dis- 
trict. Colonel Smith has received the nomination for congressman. No man 
is better fitted to capably and intelligently represent his district. He has never 
before been a seeker for office but has assisted scores of other men to election. 

On the 27th of May. 1891. Colonel Smith was married to ^liss Sarah Brock- 
wav, of Saginaw, ^Michigan. It would seem that Colonel Smith's intense activ- 
ity in business and political lines would leave him little opportunity for other 
interests and yet he is one of the leaders in the social and especially the club 
life of Peoria. He was president of the Kickapoo Club, is president of the 
Country Club, has also been similarly honored two times with the presidency of 
the Creve Coeur Club and at the ending of the last term was tendered a compli- 
mentary banquet by three hundred of Peoria's leading business men and the pres- 
ident of the Illinois Country Club Association. He acted as the first vice president 
and in iqoi became president of the Peoria Commercial Exposition and Carnival 
.\ssociation. The fine home which he purchased on the bluff has been the 
scene of many attractive social functions over which Airs. Smith has presided 
with gracious hospitality, while Colonel Smith ably plays the part of genial, cor- 
dial host. Perhaps no better estimate of his character and his ability can be 
given than in the words of one who. writing for the local press, said : "In the 
ability to adapt himself to every important situation, social, political, civic and in 
those aft'airs involving a state and national interest. Colonel Frederick H. Smith 
occupies a position all his own. It was conceded to him years ago by the people 
of Peoria and he has continued to maintain it without a shadow of a question. 
He has tact, the grace, the faculty of meeting every emergency, the diplomacy that 
wins over every difficulty, the aggressiveness wdiich knows no defeat and all the 
manly qualities that count in summing up the constituents of a leading character 
such as every community absolutely requires. For many years Colonel Smith has 
by popular consent occupied this position and is todav in line for greater oppor- 
tunities. Thus far his career has been one of uninterrupted success and the 
C|ualities that have made it so are still dominant and insure its continuation." 
All this is due to the fact that he is a man of highly balanced capabilities and 
powers, with a strong character that inspires confidence in others. 



SHERMAN W". ECKLEY. 

The excellent condition of Peoria's streets is due in no small measure to 
Sherman W.Eckley, who has been the promoter of much of the paving done in 
this city in the last few years. He brings to his public work the energy and en- 
terprise of a keen business man combined with the jjatriotic devotion to duty 
that has always been one of his characteristics. Moreover, he enjoyed the public 
confidence and regard as a leading business man of this city for many years. 
He was here born February 27, 1866, the son of Jacob W. and Barbara (Weid- 
nerj Eckley. The father was born at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, July 12, 1834, 



160 mSTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

and his life record spanned the intervening years to the 29th of October, 1899, 
when he passed to his tinal rest. His wife was a native of Reading, Pennsyl- 
vania, and thev were married in Philadelphia, removing westward to Peoria in 
1855. The father was a carpenter by trade, becoming senior partner of the 
firm of Eckley & JMcKinzie, in which 'connection he was active in the building 
of most of the houses on the blulT. They erected the Griswold, Cooper and other 
fine residences, well known in those days, and were prominent factors in building 
operations. About twenty years prior to his death the father retired, the fruits 
of his former toil supplying him with all of the necessities and many of the 
comforts of life, in llie' family were four children: Oscar, Lillie, Sherman W. 
and Kate, the eklcr daughter liecoming the wife of Thomas West. 

After leaving the high school of Peoria Sherman Eckley became a pupil in 
Cole's Business College and then turned his attention to the contracting busi- 
ness, especially in the line of brick work. He devoted fifteen years to that in- 
dustry and then turned his attention to the jewelry business at No. 1305 South 
Adams street. He not only thoroughly acquainted himself with that trade but 
also pursued a complete course in the Horological School of Peoria and has con- 
tinued in that field of endeavor to the present time. 

Aside from winning a place among the successful and resourceful business 
men of the city Mr. Eckley has become well known in political circles as a re- 
publican leader. He has always served as a committeeman from his district 
and has been particularly active in the efiforts to better conditions along many 
lines. His practical knowledge of brick laying was one of the features which 
secured his appointment to the position of sewer inspector under Mayor Wood- 
rufif during his first term. He served in that position during the mayor's 
first and second terms and during his present or third term received the a])point- 
ment of commissioner of public works. He is president of the board of local 
improvements and in that connection has exercised his oiificial prerogative in 
support of many works of value to the city. Under his guidance the greatest 
amount of work on the streets within a given period has been done. Under his 
direction Harrison, Aladison and Perry streets and Baker avenue have all been 
paved with asphalt, covering sixty-four thousand, one hundred and twenty square 
yards in paving three and three-fifths miles. Repair work to the extent of ten 
hundred and sixty-three square yards has also been done and sixty-six thousand, 
two hundred and eighty square yards of brick pavement has been laid in different 
parts of the city. The creosote block pavement put down under the direction 
of Mr. Eckley covers fifteen thousand, six hundred and forty-seven square 
yards, but perhaps the greatest work accomplished under his direction has been 
the laying of eighteen miles and eleven hundred and twenty feet of six-foot 
cement sidewalk. The bridges are under his official care and the most rigid in- 
spection is being put on the new bridge, Mr. Eckley paying a daily visit thereto 
in order to inspect and pass upon the work and the materials used. In the near 
future University street will be opened up. The hill is being leveled from a 
seventy-five-foot embankment and a roadway will be built opening up University 
street to Mechanicsville over a concrete bridge which for years has stood thirty- 
five feet in the air. In the summer of 1912 Mr. Eckley expects to build a levee 
that will be modern in every particular and will cost about fifty thousand dollars. 
To this he also expects to give his personal supervision, seeing that the citv shall 
receive full value for money expended. He is also considering the wishes of the 
people concerning paving to be done on East Bluft" and is carrying forward the 
work as rapidly as practicable. In the paving work he has changed all of the 
old forms of continuous mixers of concrete which must now be so mixed as to 
produce uniform values and give to the property owners the best for their money. 
The opening of Jellfer.son avenue is another of the most important improve- 
ments that have come before the local board, and Mr. Eckley may be called the 
father of this i^roposal. He has been agitating tliis jiublic measure on various 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY Kil 

occasions in public gatherings as a long-felt want and its realization must be 
largely credited to his efforts. 

Air. I'x-kley is pleasantly situated in his home life. lia\ing in i<)i i wedded 
Mrs. Margaret Reitz, of Peoria. He has a very wide acquaintance in this city 
where his entire life has been passed and where his sterling personal worth has 
gained him a large circle of warm friends. No better testimonial of his efficient 
public service could be given than the fact that the mayor has, during the three 
years of his term, called him to pul)lic office, placing him in positions of trust 
and responsibility. 



J.\.MES A. CAMERON. 

James A. Cameron is the senior member of the law lirm of Cameron & Cameron, 
his associate being his son, Glen J. Cameron. The father is one of the older and 
most honored members of the Peoria bar, where he has practiced since the 8th 
of September, 1873. He was that year admitted to the state bar and in August 
arrived in this city. He needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, 
because his professional labors and iiis devotion to high standards of citizenship 
have made him well known here. He was born on a farm in Fulton county, 
Illinois, October 16, 1845, ''"'^ is a son of John and Isabella (TuUochj Cameron, 
both of whom were natives of Scotland. They became pioneer settlers of this 
state, establishing their home in Fulton county in 1834, just two years after the 
Black Hawk war had put a termination to Indian supremacy in Illinois. I'ron- 
tier conditions were everywhere prevalent and the family shared in the hard- 
ships and privations of pioneer life in an attempt to establish a home in a new 
and undeveloped region. In 1847, when James A. Cameron was two years of 
age, his parents removed to a farm about ten miles west of Peoria, settling in 
Limestone township. The mother died during the infancy of her son and the 
father was afterward married in Peoria county, to Isabella Cameron, who, 
though of the same name, was not a relative. 

James A. Cameron was reared on the old homestead in this county and the 
experiences of farm life early became familiar to him, as he assisted in the 
work of field and meadow. He attended the country schools and afterward had 
the benefit of instruction in Monmouth College, thus laving a good foundation 
for his legal knowledge in his broad literary course. He read law at Ottawa, 
Illinois, under the direction of Alexander T. Cameron, a cousin and also in Peoria 
with J. K. Cooper as his preceptor. As previously stated, he was admitted to 
the bar in September, 1873, and has been in continuous practice in this city ever 
since. He continues in the general practice of law, is strong in argument and 
logical in his deductions, while in the application of a legal principle he is sel- 
dom if ever at fault. 

On the 1st of January, 1873. in Peoria, Mr. Cameron was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Amelia Trial, of this county, her father being William D. Trial, a 
very early settler of Hollis township, who arrived here in the '20s. The only 
child of this marriage is Glen J., who attended the public schools and entered 
Valparaiso College, of Indiana. He afterward studied in the Law University 
at Champaign. Illinois, and was admitted to the bar in iqo6. He then re- 
turned home to enter into partnership with his father and the law firm of Came- 
ron & Cameron ranks among the foremost representatives of the profession in 
Peoria. Their work has been marked by unfaltering devotion to the interests 
of their clients and yet they have never forgotten that they owe a still higher 
allegiance to the majesty of the law. James A. Cameron is a member of the 
Beta Theta Phi, a college fraternity. His interests are broad because his read- 
ing has been wide and because his recognition of the responsibilities and oppor- 



162 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

tunities of life is a correct one. He never fails to cooperate in public measures 
where the welfare of the city is involved or where the interests of the individual 
citizen might be advanced. He commands the respect of all who know him and 
is best liked where he is best known. 



HON. BERNARD CREMER. 

Prominent among the citizens w'ho have contributed to the upbuilding and 
prosperity of Peoria is Bernard Cremer, who came with his parents to America 
from Germany in 1854, settling first in Wisconsin. Ten years later Peoria en- 
rolled him as one of her citizens and, associated with four of his brothers, he 
took charge of the Peoria Demokrat, of which he has since been editor and busi- 
ness manager. The paper had then been in existence for four years, having 
been established by Alvis Zotz in i860. That it is a leading German paper of 
central Illinois has become a recognized fact. It has been made both the mirror 
and the molder of public opinion. Typographically correct from the modern 
standpoint of progressiveness, its influence is what has made it a great journal, 
its editorial discussions of vital questions, and its principles constituting a dynamic 
force in shaping public thought and action among the German-American res- 
idents of this part of the state. 

In business circles, too, I\Ir. Cremer is equally well and widely known and 
has contributed in substantial measures to the financial development of the city 
as one of the organizers of the German Bank, which has since developed into the 
German- American National Bank, of which he was president for twelve years. He 
became one of the directors of the jNIerchants National Bank and in 1886 greatly 
assisted that institution in tiding over a serious crisis in its aftairs, growing out 
of the depletion of its capital through embezzlement by a trusted employe. He 
was the organizer of the German Fire Insurance Company of Peoria in 1876 and 
since 1883 has been its president. This company paid over a half million dollars 
for fire losses in the San Francisco disaster. Mr. Cremer was one of the orig- 
inators of the company which built the Grand Opera House and in other fields 
his labors have been equally efifective and far reaching in results. 

As a political leader 'Sir. Cremer has long been widely known and his party 
made him its nominee in 1878 for the legislature. Following the election he 
took his seat as a member of the twenty-second genera! assembly and was ap- 
pointed to some of the most important committees of the house. ^Ir. Cremer is 
interested in philanthropic, church and hospital work and is an adherent of the 
Catholic church. He serves as secretary of the library board and is the only 
living member of the original board. As journalist, as financier and as citizen 
Bernard Cremer has made a record which might well be emulated by others who 
in so doing would produce a higher standard of manhood and of citizenship. 



ISAAC W. DONMEYER. 

Whether standing in life's sunshine or its shadows, whether meeting ad- 
versity or prosperity, Isaac W. Donmeyer faced every condition as a man. 
Strong and noble were his purposes and lofty his principles and yet he never 
took to himself especial credit for what he had accomplished. He lived his life 
day after day content to do the duties that devolved upon him to the best of his 
ability and as the years passed the simple weight of his character and abilitv 
carried him into important public relations. For fifty-six years he figured 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 165 

actively in connection with the milHng business, spending much of this time 
in Peoria, where as one of the members of the firm of Donmeyer. Gardner & 
Company he developed the extensive interests of the \'ienna mills. 

A native of Pennsylvania. Isaac W. Donmeyer was born in Lebanon county, 
April 22, 1838. and came of German ancestry. His parents were Michael and 
Barbara (Wolf) Donmeyer. The family was established in America in colonial 
davs and the great-,s:rand father was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. The 
father was a scholarly man. who devoted his life to the profession of teaching 
and gave his children the best educational opportunities possible although finan- 
cial conditions made it imperative that they start out in the business world at an 
early age. Isaac W. Donmeyer was a lad of only ten years when he took up 
the task of self-support. He filled such positions as he could secure and about 
the time he attained his majority sought the opportunities of the growing middle 
west, believing that his chances for advancement were better there than in the 
older and more thickly settled states of the east. He had first been employed at 
the age of ten years as a boy on the towpath of the Schuylkill canal and at 
sixteen years of age had worked his way upward to bowman. The following 
year he entered upon an apprenticeship to the miller's trade and thoroughly 
acquainted himself with the business, which was the source of his prosperity 
throughout his after life. Removing westward to Indiana, he rented a small 
flouring mill and in its operation secured good financial returns. Subsequently 
he removed to Ouincy, Alichigan. where he continued in the milling busmess, 
and later he became a resident of Woodbine, Iowa, where he owned and operated 
a mill that was afterward destroyed by fire, causing him considerable loss. He 
then returned to Quincy. Michigan, and later went to Terre Haute. Indiana, 
where he formed a partnership with \\'illard Kidder, with whom he operated a 
mill for three years. In June. 1879, he became a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, 
and established the Broadwav mills, of which he was proprietor until the fall 
of 1882, 

That date witnessed the arrival of I\Ir. Donmeyer in Peoria, for he had here 
purchased the \'ienna mills from George Cox. In the following year he was 
joined in business by R. G. Gardner and Washington Gates under the firm name 
of Donmeyer, Gardner & Gates and thus continued for ten years, when Mr. 
Gardner purchased the interest of i\Ir. Gates, after which the business was con- 
ducted under the firm style of Donmeyer, Gardner & Company. One of the 
local papers said of .Mr. Donmeyer at the time of his death : "He was one of 
the best equipped men for the milling business in this state. He was a practical 
miller, a sagacious business man and familiar with every detail of the milling 
processes from the growing of the grain to the delivery of flour to the consumer. 
As one of the proprietors of an extensive industry and a member of the Board 
of Trade for twenty-eight years he was a moving force in the commercial life 
of Peoria and his unswerving integrity and conscientious business methods 
commanded the esteem and confidence of all with whom he was brought in contact 
and assisted materially in the progress of the citv. In his passing, the city of 
Peoria as well as those who are associated with him in business and social and 
fraternal organizations have sustained a heavv loss." 

During the first period of his residence in Ouincy, Michigan, Mr. Donmeyer 
was united in marriage on the 7th of August. 1865, to ^fiss Ellen M. Clizhc, 
who still survives him, together with two sisters, iIMrs. Angeline Rohland, of 
Lelianon, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Katherine Gingrich, of Reading, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Donmeyer was a prominent ]\Iason. being identified with the craft for forty- 
three years. He held membership in Illinois Lodge, No. 263, F. & A. ^I. ; at- 
tained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Peoria Consistory; and 
was also a Knight Templar of Peoria Commandery and a noble of Mohammed 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise held membership in Electa Chapter. 
O. E. S., to which Mrs. Donmeyer still belongs. Since the death of her husband 



166 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Airs. Donmever has made arrangements whereby she will make a bequest of one 
hundred and twenty thousand dollars for the erection of a memorial to his 
memory. This sum is to be given to the local chapters of the Eastern Star for 
a permanent home, the only request accom])anying the gift being that the ashes 
of her husband, herself and their one child, a daughter, may always be kept in 
that shrine as long as the building shall stand. In their travels Mr. and -Mrs. 
Donmeyer had been most cordially received and entertained by members of the 
Masonic fraternity in various cities. 

In his life Mr. Donmeyer exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft, which 
recognizes the brotherhood of mankind and the fatherhood of God. His ])oliti- 
cal indorsement was given to the republican party upon questions of national 
importance but at local elections he cast an independent ballot. He belonged 
to the Peoria Board of Trade and was active in support of many measures and 
movements instituted for the welfare and upbuilding of the city. In his youth 
he was confirmed in the German Lutheran church but later he and his wife be- 
came members of the First Presbyterian church of Peoria and for eighteen 
years he served as one of its trustees and during his last two terms was president 
of the board. He contributed generously to the support of the church and did 
everything in his power to advance its upbuilding and extend its influence. All 
who knew him admired his rugged honesty and his upright character. He was 
generous to a fault and many have reason to bless him for his timely assistance in 
an hour of need. He proved himself, indeed, a friend to the poor and needy 
and it was well known that he never turned one from his door empty handed if 
he was worthv of aid. Mr. Donmeyer was firm in his determination and con- 
victions and strict and exacting in his business dealings. He was never known 
to take advantage of another in any trade transaction and he required the same 
strict honest v from others. To his employes he was not only just but kind and 
considerate and they had for him the greatest admiration and respect. Of him 
it may be said that he was a lover of truth, a doer of deeds and a devotee of 
manlv principles. He passed away on the loth of February, 191 1, and press and 
people united in speaking of him in terms of praise and honor. His friends 
were many and the high regard tendered him was the expression of an appre- 
ciation of the upright, honorable life he had lived and his sterling principles 
of manhood and of character. 



FREDERICK BREWSTER TRACY. 

Frederick B. Tracy, serving for the second term as city clerk at Peoria, has 
in public office made an excellent record, characterized by thorough understand- 
ing of the duties that have devolved upon him and promptness and efficiency in 
their execution. To him a public office is a public trust, and it is well known 
that no trust reposed in Frederick B. Tracy has ever been betrayed. 

Mr. Tracy, who is one of New England's native sons, was born in Ellington, 
Tolland county, Connecticut, September 3, 1852. His parents were Addison L. 
and Ann L. (Chester) Tracy, who were residents of Tolland county in which 
the town of Ellington is located. In the year of their son Frederick's birth, 
however, they sought a home in the middle west, taking up their abode at Elm- 
wood, Illinois, where the father engaged in merchandising. Some years after- 
ward he and his wife went to Florida where they spent their remaining days. 

Frederick B. Tracy is the only surviving child of that marriage. The public 
schools of Elmwood afforded him his early educational privileges which were 
supplemented by a course in Knox Academy at Galesburg, Illinois. He entered 
business life in the capacity of clerk in a general store at Elmwood, and came 
to Peoria in 1890 to fill the position of deputy circuit clerk, in which capacity he 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 1G7 

remained for one term. He then turned his attention to the -insurance business 
which he followed in connection with other lines of activity until elected city 
clerk of Peoria in the spring of 1909. That his course was creditable and com- 
mendable is evidenced in the fact that he was reelected in 191 1, and is the present 
incumbent in the office. He is methodical in the discharge of his duties and has 
carefully systematized the work of the position. He is a stalwart advocate of the 
re|)ublican principles and along legitimate lines does all he can to further the 
interests and promote the success of his party. 

In 1878, at Elmw'ood, Mr. Tracy was united in marriage to Miss Mary l'>. 
Rogers, a daughter of Henry P. Rogers of Peoria county, who engaged in the 
lumber business at Elmwood. Her mother bore the maiden name of Annie Wilkin- 
son and was a resident of Farmington, Illinois, prior to her marriage, having 
come to this state from New York. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Tracy have been born 
two children : Annie C, who is now a teacher in the public schools of Peoria ; 
and Frederick B., Jr., connected with the public utilities at Muncie. Indiana, as 
a member of the Central Indiana Gas Company. 

Fraternally Mr. Tracy is identified with the Masons, and has attained high 
rank in that order. In 1901 he served as master of Illinois Lodge, No. 263, 
A. F. & A. M. at Peoria. He is also a member of the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite, \'alley of Peoria, and of Mohammed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 
In his life he exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft which recognizes the 
truth of universal brotherhood. He has attractive social qualities which render 
him a companionable man and the circle of his friends is constantlv increasing 
as the circle of his ac(|uaintance broadens. He is well known as a leading re- 
publican of Peoria county, and one to whom the public mav look with confidence 
and trust as an able official. 



SAMUEL WOOLNER. Jr. 

As a prominent representative of real-estate holdings, of banking investments 
and of distilling interests Samuel Woolner, Jr., is well known. He is capable of 
controlling important and mammoth business concerns, of formulating well 
defined plans and of executing these with results that add not only to individual 
success but also to general prosperity. His business activities on the whole have 
been features in the growth and material progress of Peoria, where the greater 
part of his life has been passed. He was born July 4, 1866. in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, a son of Adolph and Antonia Woolner. The removal of the family to this 
city enabled him to pursue his education in the ward and high schools here until 
his graduation from the latter with the class of 1883. He afterward went to 
Ithaca, New York, where he entered Cornell University, and was graduated with 
the class of 1888. He has since been engaged in the distilling business and in 
other enterprises. He entered upon the former in connection with his father, 
the founder of the Woolner Distilling Company, under which name an enter- 
prise of extensive proportions has been developed. He acquainted himself with 
the trade as a factor in executive and administrative control and eventually was 
called to the presidency of the company. He is likewise a director in various 
other business concerns which are features in the commercial, industrial and 
financial activity of the city. He has made extensive investments in real estate 
and in banking and at one time was a director of the Alerchants National liank 
of Peoria and also was vice president of the Central Railway Companv. 

In Scranton. Pennsylvania, on the 12th of Octolier. 1898, Mr. Woolner was 
united in marriage to Miss Martha Moses, a daughter of B. Moses, and they 
now have two children, Gladys T. and Adolph M. In social circles the family 
is well known and the hospitality of their home is most attractive. Mr. Woolner 



168 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

is prominent in democratic circles and has done much to shape the policy of his 
party here. lie was formerly chairman of the city and county committee, also 
a memher of the democratic state central committee and has been a delegate to 
state and national conventions of his party. At all times he keeps thoroughly 
informed concerning the vital and significant problems of the country and in 
this connection stands abreast with the best thinking men of the age. His posi- 
tion in business circles is further indicated by the fact that he has been honored 
by the election to the presidency of the Peoria Board of Trade ; nor is he neglectful 
of his religious duties, being vice president of the congregation of Anshai Ameth. 
lie is likewise a prominent member of the Independent Order of B'nai Brith, of 
which he several times served as president. He belongs to the Creve Coeur and 
the Country Clubs of Peoria and to the Illinois Athletic Clul5 of Chicago. He 
is vice president of the National Wholesale Liquor Dealers' Association and is 
now serving his third term. He is a man of most courteous manners yet firm 
and unyielding in what he believes to be right. In various lines he has. indeed, 
won success and distinction, vet in all he wears his honors with becoming modestv. 



HENRY ^^'ARD WELLS. 

Plenry Ward Wells, a distinguished lawyer, lawmaker and author, whose 
contriijutions to the literature of the profession are regarded as of a most valu- 
able nature, entered into active connection with the Illinois bar in 1853 and from 
the close of the war until his death was a prominent practitioner of P'eoria. He 
was born in Pulaski, New York, June 20, 1833. His father. Colonel Wells, an 
Englishman by birth, married Julia Tracy, a daughter of Dr. E. Tracy, of !Middle- 
town, Connecticut, and granddaughter of General Artemas Ward. 

In his youthful days Henry W. Wells became a resident of Illinois, pursuing 
his education in the schools of Galesburg. When still quite young he came to 
Peoria and entered the employ of Pettingell & Babcock, with whom he remained 
for a year, receiving a hundred dollars as compensation for his services. It was 
his ambition, however, to enter upon a professional career and in 1850 he attended 
the National Law School at Ballston Spa. New York, where he was graduated 
with the class of 1853. He then returned to Illinois and further continued his 
law studies by entering the office of Johnston & Blakesley, well known attorneys 
of Peoria, in the spring of 1854. The period there passed brought to him practi- 
cal as well as theoretical knowledge and experience, and in 1855 he opened a law 
office in Cambridge, Henry county, Illinois, where he continued in active practice 
imtil after the outbreak of the Civil war. 

At the second call for troops ]\Ir. Wells ofl:"ered his aid to the government, 
enlisting as a member of Company D. One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Infan- 
try. He v\'as promoted to the rank of major on the staff of General Tillson, who 
commanded the defense at Knoxville. He afterward served on the staff of Gen- 
eral J. D. Cox, of Ohio, and took part in all the battles from Buzzards Roost to 
the capture of Atlanta. He was thus often in the thickest of the fight and was 
always faithful and loyal to his duty, whether on the firing line or the lonely 
picket line. 

At the close of the Civil war ^Ir. \\'ells established his home in Peoria and 
from that time forward until his death was a distinguished representative and 
honored member of the bar of this cit}'. His practice was of a most important 
character and indicated his thorough and comprehensive knowledge of various 
departments of the law. Furthermore, he was called to aid in framing the laws 
of the state, being elected a member of the convention which formed the Illinois 
constitution of 1870. His authorship included a work entitled Mechanics" Lien, 
also a volume on Patent Law and another entitled Wells on Replevin. He stood 




II. W. WKI.LS 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 171 

ainung the foremost representatives of the ilhnois bar. his abiHt\' cuniinanding 
the admiration of his colleagues and contemporaries. While he was most faithful 
to the interests of his clients he never forgot that he owed a still higher allegiance 
to the majesty of the law. He won his success through wisely and conscientiously 
using the talents with which nature had endowed him, ever recognizing the fact 
that careful preparation must precede the successful presentation of a cause in 
the courts. 

While a resident of Cambridge, Illinois. !\lr. Wells was married, on the 8th 
of September, 1859, to i^Iiss Demaris C. Showers, a daughter of Alexander Hardy 
and Lucy M. Showers, who are now deceased. She holds membership in the 
First Congregational church and also in the Peoria W'oman's Club, the motto of 
which is "To help another from what one has or is. is the most noble deed." 
The club works for the best interests of Peoria in meeting its needs and beautify- 
ing the city, and with this work Mrs. Wells is in hearty sympath}-. 

In his ]iolitical views Mr, W'ells was an earnest republican, feeling that the 
platform of the party contained the best principles and elements of good govern- 
ment. He belonged to the Alasonic fraternity and he was a man of kind and 
gentle nature who ever wished to do justice to all. He was very fond of chil- 
dren and took great interest in them. He loved art and was considered an expert 
judge on art works. For eighteen years he served as a member of the library 
board and was greatly interested in all that tended to improve the literary tastes 
of the general public. In fact, his intlucnce was always on the side of progress 
and improvement and his symi)athies and aid were given to those activities which 
work for the material, intellectual, social and moral uplift of humanity. His 
character and reputation were above reproach and he was honored no less for 
his personal traits than for the position of prominence to which he attained in 
his profession. 



JUDGE HEZEKIAH MORSE WEAD. 

Illinois has always been distinguished for able jurists and attorneys, many 
of whom have achieved distinction. Among those who were well known at an 
early day and who labored persistently and conscientiously for the upbuilding 
of the state, especially in its educational and judiciary systems, was Judge Heze- 
kiah ^I. Wead. for many years a prominent lawyer of Peoria, Illinois. 

Judge Wead possessed an analytical mind, a comprehensive knowledge of 
the fundamental principles of law, a clear judgment, which made him not only a 
formidable adversary at the bar, but also gave him distinction, while on the bench. 
Fie cultivated the talent of expressing himself clearly in few words, a habit 
which enabled him to present an argument forcibly and convincingly. 

Judge \\'ead was born in Sheldon, \"ermont, June 1, 1810. His ancestor, 
Samuel W^ead, of huguenot descent, was one of the early settlers of Danbury, 
Connecticut, a member of the general court and a iirominent citizen. After the 
burning of Danbury by the British, the family removed to New York, where in 
one of the many "[jatent" disagreements of that state, they lost nearly every- 
thing and settled at Lanesboro, Massachusetts, on Silver street, where the house, 
built by Jacob Wead, grandfather of Hezekiah. still stands. Jacob took part 
in the Revolutionary war, but later, boundary controversies drove the family to 
\'ermont, where Samuel Wead, son of Jacob, married Rebecca Morse, daughter 
of Rev. Daniel Moss, whose ancestors were prominent in the uj)building of 
New Haven, Connecticut. They incorporated the town of Wallingford. and at 
least two of them fought in King Philip's war. while another joined the crusaders 
and assisted in the cajiture of Jerusalem. 

Having learned what he could at the public schools of Sheldon, Judge Wead 
took a short course at Castleton Academy, \'ermont, and then engaged in teach- 



172 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

iny, wliile preparing for his chosen profession of law. In 1832 he was admitted 
to the bar both in \'ermont and New York and in 1840, in search of wider op- 
portunities, he went to Illinois and settled at Lewiston. Here he won distinc- 
tion as an able practitioner, was elected judge of the circuit court and became a 
member of the state constitutional convention of 1847, aiding by his legal knowl- 
edge in framing the organic laws of the state and assisting materially in solving 
many of the problems which came before the convention. In 1855 he removed 
to Peoria, where he soon gained a large and representative practice and where 
he was regarded as one of the most capable lawyers of central Illinois. In civic 
affairs, he always took a keen, vital interest, and throughout life manifested a 
spirit of zealous participation in the larger affairs of the community. 

It is interesting to note that in 1876, he published in the Peoria Daily Trans- 
cript a series of articles in which he earnestly advocated the submission of state 
laws, and particularly, of all city ordinances, to a vote of the electors to be 
affected therebv before they should become valid; a theory of legislation now 
much discussed, and growing steadily in popular esteem, but then quite generally 
regarded as an impracticable theory. 

In 1841, fudge W'ead married Miss Eliza Young Emery, a scion on her 
father's side of an old family, running back through colonial days to England 
and thence to Normandy ; on her mother's side she is a descendant of Elder 
William Brewster, of ]\Iayfiower fame. Of this imion four children survive, 
two daughters and two sons, one of whom. Judge S. D. Wead, has followed in 
his father's footsteps in the practice of the law. Judge H. M. Wead died May 
10, 1876, and his wife, February 10, 1887. 



JONATHAN L. PLUMMER, M. D., axd AMZI S. PLUM.MER. AI. D. 

The history of Drs. Jonathan L. and Amzi S. Plummer is unique in that 
father and son pursued their college medical course at the same time, were 
graduates in the same class and have since practiced together in Peoria for a 
period of fourteen years, having well equipped offices in the German F"ire In- 
surance building and also an office at 13 15 Main street. Both father and son, 
in the course of their long career as practitioners, have achieved distinct success, 
and are now looked upon as among Peoria's most able and prominent physicians. 

Dr. Jonathan L. Plummer was born upon a farm in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, near West Newton, November 18. 1847, and is a son of William 
and Sarah Elizabeth ( Robertson ) Plummer. The father disposed of his farm 
during the boyhood days of his son and removed with his family to a farm in 
Jeft'erson coimty, Ohio, near Steubenville. There the boy was reared, meeting 
with the usual experiences that come to the lad who spends his youth amid rural 
surroundings. He attended the district schools and in the summer months aided 
in the work of plowing, planting, and harvesting. He then pursued an academic 
course at Richmond College at Richmond, Ohio. He also studied medicine with 
his brother. Dr. T. R. Plummer, at Trivoli. Illinois, and later under two pre- 
ceptors in Ohio. Two of his brothers died while surgeons in the army during 
the Civil war. Owing to poor health, he was obliged to discontinue his studies 
and adopted farming as a temporary vocation to give him the benefit of outdoor 
life, that he might recuperate his health for the furtherance of his future pro- 
fessional work. In the fall of 1895. he entered the college of Physicians and 
Surgeons at St. Louis, accompanied by his son, both taking up the study of medi- 
.cine and graduating together with the class of 1898. 

On the 6th of February, 1873, occurred the marriage of Dr. Jonathan L. 
Pkmimer and ]Miss Alice R. Worthington, a native of Pennsylvania, who. how- 
ever, was a resident of Peoria when they were married. They have but one 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 17:] 

child, Dr. Amzi S. Plummer, who was born December 20, 1873, in ihis city. He 
attended school here and also pursued a course in Hedding college at Abmgdon, 
Illinois, and in Brown's Business College at Peoria. He then spent three years 
as pharmacist for Charles Fisher & Company, prominent druggists of this city. 
He subsequently accompanied his father to St. Louis, where they entered the 
college of Physicians and Surgeons, father and son pursuing the full three years' 
course together, after which they were graduated in 1898, this being the only 
case on record, so far as is known, where father and son completed a full course 
together. They then opened an office in Peoria, where they have since en- 
gaged in practice. Dr. Jonathan L. Plummer had previously had some exper- 
ience as a general practitioner in Kansas. Their work in this city has been 
crowned with a substantial measure of success, they being now accorded a liberal 
practice which brings to them good returns. 

Dr. Amzi S. Plummer was married in September, 191 1, to Miss Bessie I. 
Pitney of Peoria, a daughter of I. R. and Alary Hopkins (Hall) Pitney, the 
former a conductor on the Rock Island & Peoria Railroad. Both father and son 
are members of the Masonic fraternity, and Dr. Amzi S. Plummer also belongs 
to the I'eoria City and the Illinois State Medical Societies. They are also mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian church and their lives are guided by high and 
honorable principles. They are in hearty sympathy in their purposes, plans and 
ambitions and since coming to Peoria they have made continuous progress along 
professional lines. 



MILO T. EASTON, .M. D. 

Dr. Milo T. Easton, physician and surgeon, who is also city bacteriologist, 
came to the starting point of his career well equipped by thorough training, and 
in the intervening years has been a close and discriminating student, quickly 
adopting those methods and measures which his judgment sanctions as of value 
in the work. He is proud of his native city, and on the other hand, Peoria is 
glad to number him among her native sons. He was born September 29, 1884, 
of the marriage of O. M. and Delia (Tripp) Easton, both of whom were rep- 
resentatives of old American families that were early established in Peoria. 
Here Milo T. Easton was reared, his boyhood and youth being uneventfully 
passed, his time being largely given to the acquirement of his education in the 
local schools until he was graduated from the Peoria high school in the class of 
1901. He worked in a drug store in the city for about a year and then entered 
the Northwestern Medical College when but little more than seventeen years of 
age. He was the youngest member of his class but this did not prevent his 
thorough and systematic work leading him to his graduation in 1906. He was 
afterward house physician at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago for a year 
and a half and during that time also engaged in teaching, giving instruction con- 
cerning the diseases of the chest at the College of Physicians and Surgeons. His 
active practice in the hospital and his work as an educator were both acceptable 
and further qualified him for the professional duties which have devolved upon 
him since he entered u])on active practice in Peoria. While he continues in gen- 
eral practice, he has also done considerable microscopic work and his skill in this 
particular is noted by the profession, as well as by the general public. 

On the i8th of Alay, 1910. Dr. Easton was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
Blackburn, a daughter of George M. Blackburn, and unto them has been born 
one child, Alary Elizabeth. Dr. Easton holds membership with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. Politically he is a republican and from Mayor Wood- 
ruff in 1909 he received the appointment of city bacteriologist. He also be- 
longs to the Phi Beta Phi, a medical fraternity, and he is a member of the Peoria 



174 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

City Medical Society and of the Illinois State ^Medical Society. His reading 

embraces the most advanced writings concerning the profession, especially in 

the line of his specialty, and quick to adopt new and improved methods, his 
work is at all times thoroughlv modern and scientific. 



J. REX SHOLL, M. D. 



Dr. J. Rex Sholl, commissioner of health of Peoria, has engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine here since 1903, and is now serving for the second term in the 
office, his appointment coming to him from Mayor Woodruff. He was born in 
Pekin, Tazewell county, Illinois, September 7, 1880, and is therefore one of the 
younger representatives of the profession in this city. His parents are J. M. 
and Rosie (Cluser) Sholl, who removed to Peoria when their son Rex was but 
three years of age, so that he was reared in this city and is indebted to its public- 
school system for the early educational privileges which he enjoyed. Gradually 
he worked his way upward, passing through consecutive grades until his gradua- 
tion from the high school in 1897. Thinking then to make the practice of den- 
tistry his life work, he began studying with that end in view in Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated in 1901, receiving the degree 
of D. D. S. Two weeks later he was made a member of the faculty, being 
appointed professor in physiology. During the two years which he occupied 
that position he also studied medicine and thus won his M. D. degree. He is a 
graduate of the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College of the class of 1903 and 
of Hahnemann INIedical College of the class of 1904. In April of the latter year 
he opened an office in Peoria. He has pursued a special course in electricity 
and X-ray work in the Illinois School of Electro-Therapeutics, of Chicago, and 
is now making a specialty of practice of that character and also of internal 
medicine. His offices are in the Hamlin building and in the city hall. He main- 
tains the second office by virtue of his position of commissioner of health, which 
he has occupied since 1909, being kept the incumbent in the office in the second 
term, receiving his appointment from Mayor Woodruff. His work in this con- 
nection is most satisfactory and creditable and he is one of those who is making 
his present administration in all of its departments an honor to the city. He 
holds to high standards in his professional work and is most conscientious and 
capable in the discharge of his duties. He belongs to the Peoria City Medical 
Society, the Peoria County Medical Society, the Illinois State ]kledical Society, 
the American Medical Association and is also a member of the American Public 
Health Association. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protec- 
tive Order of Elks and socially with the Country Club, the Creve Coeur Club 
and the Peoria Social Athletic Club. His advancement for one of his years is 
most creditable, showing that his preparation was thorough and that since en- 
tering upon practice, his diagnosis of cases has been most carefully made, so 
that success has followed his administration of remedial agencies. 



willia:\i t. ^^'HITIXG. 

William T. Whiting, attorney at law, and also prominently known as a worker 
in local political circles, was born upon a farm in Kickapoo township. Peoria 
county. May 4, 1850, his parents being William and Jane ( Cunimings ) Whiting. 
The father came to this county in 1839 from Kent. England, and settled upon a 
farm, casting his lot with the pioneer residents of this part of the state, for the 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 175 

work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun here. He 
aided in the arduous task of developing new land, converting wild prairie into 
productive fields and for manv years was numbered among the representative 
agriculturists of the community. It was in this county that he was married, his 
wife having come to Illinois in 1834 from Ohio. The father of William T. 
Whiting remained a resident of Peoria county until his demise, passing away 
in 1896, and the mother is still living on the old homestead farm, at the advanced 
age of eighty-seven years. 

As a boy William T. \Miiting worked in the fields and did the chores upon the 
home place. In the winter seasons he attended the public schools but with the 
opening of spring took his place behind the plow. However, in early manhood 
he came to the conclusion that he did not care to pursue agricultural pursuits 
throughout his entire life but preferred a professional career and with this end 
in view he began reading law in the office of Judge Nicholas E. Worthington, 
in the spring of 1874. Later he read law with Lawrence Harman and afterward 
spent a year as a law student in the office of James & Jack. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1876 but did not enter at once upon active practice. For four 
years thereafter he engaged in teaching school in the rural districts of Peoria 
county. He then took up the work of the profession and has been a member of 
the Peoria bar since the ist of August, 1880. Advancement in law is proverbially 
slow, but year by year saw an increase in his business and he has now a 
large clientage of distinctively representative character. He served for one 
term as city attorney under Mayor C. C. Clark, having been called to that. office 
in 1 891, and something of his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in 
him by his fellow townsmen is indicated in the fact that he was elected alderman 
on the democratic ticket in the fifth ward, which usually gives a strong repub- 
lican majority. He has always practiced independently in the general field of 
law, is attorney for the Savings Bank of Peoria, has been attorney for the park 
district of Peoria since its organization and has been an advocate on many im- 
portant cases. He marshals his evidence with the precision of a military com- 
mander and never fails to give due prominence to the important point in the case. 

Mr. Whiting was united in marriage to j\Iiss Linda Craig, of Peoria, who 
died in 1895, leaving two children: Alida, and Doctor William T. Whiting, Jr., 
who was a physician and surgeon in the mines at Lafayette, Colorado. While 
returning in his automobile from a professional call. Dr. Whiting was instantly 
killed at an interurban railway crossing on the 2d of January, 1912. 

;\Ir. Whiting holds membership with the ]\Iasons and with the Modern Wood- 
rnen of America. He has never sought to figure prominently in public life out- 
side his profession and yet is interested in the duties of citizenship to the extent 
of _ giving his aid wherever it is needed. He is a firm believer in democratic 
principles and, as every true American citizen .should do, keeps well informed 
on the issues of the day and votes for the candidates and the principles of his 
party. 



GEORGE B. SUCHER. 



In the twenty years in which he has practiced law in Peoria, George B. 
Sucher has made continuous progress and has now a good clientage which attests 
his position as an able and well read member of the bar. He began as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Cassidy & Sucher. On a farm in Putnam county. Illinois, his 
birth occurred on the ifith of March, 1865, his parents being Jacob and Catharine 
Sucher. The usual experiences which fall to the lot of a farm bov were his. He 
attended the country schools and afterward the public schools of Granville, Illi- 
nois, prior to entering Knox College, at Galesburg. from which he was graduated 
in 1889. He worked upon the home farm in the summer seasons and for three 



176 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

years engaged in teaching school in the winter months, sjiending a year as teaclier 
of a rural school and two years as a teacher in Auburn. Illinois. It was his 
desire, however, to become a member of the legal profession and with this end 
in view he read law in offices in Galesburg and Springfield. He was admitted to 
practice at JMount \'ernon. Illinois, in August, 1892, and immediately afterward 
came to Peoria. Here he entered into partnership with Lysander Cassidy, un- 
der the firm style of Cassidy & Sucher and together they so continued until Mr. 
Sucher was called to the office of police magistrate, which he filled from 1S95 
until 1903. He made a creditable record in that position and on his retirement 
he formed a partnership with Joseph Wilhelm, who is now deceased. Mr. 
Sucher has not only been active in the practice of law but has also been a recog- 
nized leader in local political circles. In 1904 he was the candidate of his party 
for the ofifice of state senator. He was declared elected but the election was 
contested and early in 1905 the contest was decided in favor of his opponent. He 
served as assistant city attorney under \V. H. Moore. In 1909 he formed his 
present law partnership with C. E. McXemar, and in the spring of 191 1, upon the 
expiration of ^Nlr. Moore's term as city attorney, he, too, entered the firm, under 
the present style of Sucher, McNemar & Moore. They conduct a general law 
practice and are accorded a fair share of the litigation held in the courts of tht 
district. 

Mr. Sucher was united in marriage to Miss Clara Gunn, of Putnam county, 
Illinois, and unto them have been born four children. Bertha. Jocoli, Ralph and 
Robert. Mr. Sucher belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the Knights of 
Pythias lodge. Outside of the strict path of his profession, however, he has 
been most active in political circles, especially in connection with local govern- 
ment. He has always stood on the side of progress and improvement and he 
took a very prominent part in the contest for the commission form of govern- 
ment in Peoria in the spring of 191 1. He believes that political power should 
be exercised for the benefit of the people at large and not in favor of a certain 
class and has done all in his power to further good government in city affairs. 



CAPTAIN JOHN HARRY HALL. 

Whatever success came to Captain John H. Hall in his long and well spent 
life was the merited reward of his earnest and persistent labor, for he started out 
empty-handed, earning his own living from an early age. He became one of 
Peoria's pioneers and was always interested in her welfare and upbuilding. His 
spirit of patriotism was manifest too when, at the alarm of war, he offered 
his services to the government in defense of the L'nion. 

He was born in Pittslnirg, Pennsylvania, May 12, 1828, a son of Captain Wil- 
liam A. and Prudence (Spaulding) Hall, who were natives of Connecticut and 
became pioneer residents of Chicago, Illinois, traveling overland in 1822, and 
taking up their abode in the tiny hamlet which was known as Fort Dearborn. 
There occurred the birth of their eldest child on the 12th of June, 1823, and it is 
believed that this is the first white child born in Chicago. The little daughter 
grew to womanhood and became the wife of Auren Garrett of Peoria. In 1824 
the parents left the frontier Illinois town and returned westward as far as Cha- 
grin Falls, Ohio. A year later they took up their abode in Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, where they resided until 1829. That year witnessed the establishment of 
their home in Cincinnati, Oliio, and in 1833 they came to Peoria, arriving on the 
1st of September. They were among the earliest settlers here. The town con- 
tained only a few inhabitants. The Black Hawk war had occurred the previous 
year, settling forever the question of Indian supremacy in this state. However, 
there were still many evidences of Indian occupancy in Illinois, and only the 




CAPTAIN JOHN H. HALL 



HISTORY OF TEORIA COUNTY 179 

southern section of the state was at all thickly populated. To the north lay great 
uninhabited and unimproved prairies, save that here and there a little settlement 
had been established, constituting the nucleus of the great, enterprising cities of 
the present day. The Hall family bore their part in the hardships, trials and pri- 
vations of pioneer life, and contributed to the early development and progress 
here. The mother, Mrs. Prudence Hall, died in 1852, but the father long surviv- 
ing her, passed away .August 11, 1881, having for almost a half century been a 
resident of this city. 

Captain Hall pursued his education in the public schools of Peoria, and at the 
age of fourteen years began clerking in the drug store of Tucker & Mansfield 
with whom he remained for four years. He afterward went to St. Louis and be- 
came salesman in the employ of Charles & Blow, druggists. A year later, how- 
ever, he became a clerk on boats plying between St. Louis and New Orleans, con- 
tinuing in that work until 1849, at which time attracted Jjy the discovery of gold 
in California, he started for the Pacific coast, hoping to win a fortune in the 
mines. He was one of a party of sixteen who left Salt Lake City on a trail over 
which a wagon -had never traveled. They carried with them forty days' rations 
but were one hundred and twenty-five days in making the trip. Two days before 
reaching the great desert five of the party, including Captain Hall, were sent as 
a folorn hope to secure aid for the others. This little band almost starved to 
death ere they secured assistance. They were obliged to eat a crow and a dog 
which attended them. At length, however, they saw a deer which they killed and 
which furnished them food until they arrived at the mission at San Bernardino, 
California. From that point they sent back supplies to the others of the party. 
Captain Hall did not meet with the success in the mines that he had anticipated 
and resolved he would depend upon the business conditions of the middle west 
for a living. Accordingly he started homeward by way of Central America, pass- 
ing through Nicaragua. At Graytown he boarded an English man-of-war which 
sailed for New Orleans, and from that point he pursued up the Mississippi and 
Illinois rivers to Peoria. For two years thereafter he engaged in farming and 
then began clerking. In 1S56 he took charge of the Springdafe cemetery, remain- 
ing in that position until .August, 1862, when he opened a recruiting station on 
Adams street. On the 29th of the same month he was mustered into the Union 
army as captain of Company H of the Eighty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and in Octo- 
ber the command was sent to Louisville, Kentucky. On the 8th of the month they 
participated in the battle of Perrysville. and in September, 1863, took part in the 
battle of Chickamauga. They were also in the hotly contested engagements at 
Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, and in the entire series of battles before 
Atlanta. After the fall of that city Captain Hall and his company marched with 
Sherman to the sea and then northward through the Carolinas, participating in 
the engagements at Averyboro and at Bentonville, the latter being the last battle 
in which Captain Hall took part. He participated in the grand review at Wash- 
ington on the 6th of June, 1865, where thousands of victorious Union soldiers 
marched through the streets of the capital and passed the stand from which the 
president reviewed the army. 

At the close of the war Captain Hall returned home and resumed his position 
in connection with the Springdale cemetery, having charge thereof until 1873. In 
that year he became president and general manager of the old Fort Clark Street 
Railway, continuing at its head for many years, or until a few years prior to his 
death, when he retired. 

On the i6th of March, 1854, Captain Hall was married to Miss Janet G. Cov- 
entry, a native of Scotland, who .still survives. They were the parents of four 
children, of whom two are living, Willis and John D. The former is married and 
has five children. Harry, Howard, Leslie, Bernice and Murray. 

Captain Hall always gave his political support to the republican partv from 
the time of its formation, recognizing that it was not onlv the defense of the 
Union during the dark days of the Civil war but that it ever remained a party of 

Trtl TT n ' 



180 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

reform and progress. His fraternal relations were with the Masons and the Odd 
Fellows, and the beneficent spirit of those organizations found exemplification m 
his life.' He never sought to do anything especially great or famous but was con- 
tent to follow the lead of his opportunities, and came in time to a prominent 
position among the business men of the city in his connection with the street 
railway. He was ever as loyal and devoted in his citizenship as when he followed 
the old flag on southern battlefields, and the same spirit of fidelity characterized 
him in every relation through the long years of an active and useful life which 
was brought to a close on the 13th of August, 1909, when he had reached the age 
of eighty-one years. 

WILLIAM TRAVIS IRWIX. 

Throughout the greater part of his professional career, which had its begin- 
ning in his admission to the bar in 1881, William Travis Irwin has practiced 
in Peoria and has gained recognition as one of the able and learned lawyers of 

this citv. 

The" careful preparation of his cases has been one of the strong and salient 
features of his success, together with the recognition of the responsibility which 
devolves upon the lawyer in his efforts to protect life, liberty, right and property. 
:Mr. Irwin was born in Dayton. Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, June i, 1856, 
his parents being Joseph t. and Marv J. (Travis) Irwin. The family is of 
Scotch-Irish lineage on the paternal side, the ancestry being traced back to Ben- 
jamin Irwin, the great-grandfather who was born in the north of Ireland. He 
became the leader of the family to America, settling in Cumberland county, Penn- 
sylvania, where his son and namesake, Benjamin Irwin, was born and reared. 
There the latter married Miss Margaret Marshall, a native of Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania. Although born under the British flag Benjamin Irwin, Sr., be- 
came a soldier in the Revolutionary war and rendered valiant aid to the cause of 
independence. The maternal grandparents of William Irwin were William and 
Jane Travis, both of whom were natives of Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 

Spending his youthful days in his parents' home William T. Irwin began 
his education in tlie public schools of his native town and afterward entered the 
Glade Run Academy from which he was graduated with the class of 1878. Dur- 
ing vacation periods he assisted his father in the work of the home farm, and 
when his educational training was sufficient to enable him to win a certificate he 
took up the profession of teaching in the graded schools of Dayton, and in 1879 
came to Illinois, where he began the study of law with Judge .Alfred Sample, at 
Paxton. Ford county. His preliminary reading was thorough and comprehensive 
and enabled him to successfully pass examination which won him admission to 
the bar at Springfield, Illinois, in May. 1881. In the succeeding autumn he came 
to Peoria, and for more than thirty years has practiced in the courts of this city 
and district. He entered into partnership here with Judge J. W. Cochran, and 
the association was maintained until Judge Cochran removed to Fargo, North 
Dakota. Mr. Irwin then practiced alone until 1896, when he formed a partner- 
ship with W. I. Slemmons. His preparation of his cases is thorough and ex- 
haustive, his presentation of his cause clear, forcible and logical. He is seldom 
if ever at fault in the citation of principle or precedent, and the strength of his 
defense is found in his correct application of legal principles to the point at issue. 
In 1891 he was elected city attorney of Peoria and was reelected two years later, 
notwithstanding that he was a republican candidate in a city which usually gives 
a strong democratic majority. The vote given him was indeed complimentary 
to his popularity and to the confidence reposed in his ability, and his record in 
office is one which gained for him high encomiums. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 181 

On the 1st of June, 1880, ^Lr. Irwin was united in marriage to Aliss Ida M. 
W'oodrutT, a daughter of Nelson L. Woodruff. Air. Irwin was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his w'ife, who passed away in Peoria, on the 7th of August, 
1899, leaving one son, Joseph W". 

Air. Irwin has long been a faithful memlier of the Presbyterian church, and 
the principles which govern his conduct are further indicated in the fact that he 
has attained the thirty-third degree in Alasonry. He likewise belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity, and enjoys the highest regard of his brethren in 
those orders. He is always interested in matters of progressive citizenship and 
is a cooperant factor in many projects for the general good, yet he regards the 
practice of law as his real life work, and in his chosen field of labor has won 
continuous advancement through merit and ability which has placed him with 
the leadin"- lawvers of Peoria. 



G. L. A\'ERY. 



G. L. Avery occupies a position of leadership as a representative of industrial 
activity in Peoria, being secretary of the Avery Company, owning and controlling 
one of the most extensive manufacturing plants in this city. It is true that he 
entered upon a business already established, but he has contributed to its en- 
largement and to its successful management and today there is no resident of 
Peoria who occupies a more honorable or enviable position in trade circles here. 
He has proven his worth in every connection, has learned the lessons which 
each day brings and has used the knowledge thus acquired for the furtherance 
of a business which is a feature in the general prosperity as well as in individual 
success. Air. Avery was born in Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, in 1879, and 
is descended in the eighth generation from Christopher Avery, the ancestral 
line being traced down through James, Thomas, Abraham, Nathan, William 
and George to Cyrus Alinor Avery, his father. George .Avery was the founder 
of the family in the west, establishing his home in Galesburg in 1837. There 
he built the second house in what was then known as Log City, in the midst of 
a tract that came to be called the Avery farm. He married Saraphena Princess 
Alary Phelps, who came to the west with her brother and mother, settling in 
Knoxville, Illinois, where she married Air. Avery. For many years Air. Avery 
continued to engage in general farming but at length retired and took up his 
aliode within the limits of Galesburg, living on North Cherry street. There the 
fruits of his former toil supplied him with all of the necessities and many of 
the comforts of life up to the time of his death, which occurred on the first of 
January, 1884. His wife also died at the Cherry street home. They were mem- 
bers of the First Congregational church, in the work of which they took active 
and helpful part. Air. Avery serving as deacon for many years. His political 
indorsement was given to the republican party. In the family were six children : 
Robert H., who died September 13, 1892; Mary, the wife of W. R. Butcher, 
Hving at Roodhouse, Illinois; John T., who died August 11, 1905, at Galesburg; 
Cyrus AI.; Phoebe T., who is living in Biloxi, Ali.ssissippi ; and George, also of 
Biloxi. The first named and his brother, Cyrus M. Avery, uncle and father of 
our subject, were the founders of the business now conducted under the name 
of the Avery Company. Cyrus AI. Avery was educated in the public schools of 
Galesburg and Knox College, and after working with his father on the farm for 
a time engaged in manufacturing. It was early in the '70s that he joined his 
brother, Robert Hanneman Avery, in the establishment of a plant for the manu- 
facture of agricultural implements in Galesburg under the style of R. H. & C. AI. 
Avery. They conducted the business there until 1882, when they removed their 



182 HiSTUUV UF I'EOKIA COUNTY 

factory to Peoria. The following year the Avery Planter Company was or- 
ganized with a capital of two hundred thousand dollars. Ten years afterward 
the authorized capital was increased to three hundred thousand dollars and 
in 1900 the name was changed to the Avery jManufacturing Company, at which 
time the capital stock was increased to one million dollars. After the business 
was incorporated R. H. Avery became its president and so continued tmtil his 
death, which occurred on the 13th of September, 1892. At that time C. M. 
Avery, who was vice president, succeeded to the presidency and remained at 
the head of the business until his death. From the time of the removal of the 
plant to Peoria he divided his time between that city and Galesburg. In the 
latter he was married, October 4, 1877, to Miss Minnie Evalena Bartholomew, 
who was born at Elmwood, Illinois, February 25, 1856, and is a daughter of 
Luzerne and Sarah Elvira (Payne) Bartholomew. They became the parents 
of five children: Elvira Princess, born September 25, 1878; George Luzerne; 
Grace Ophelia, born October 8, 1883; Harriette, June 20, 1886; and Cyrus 
Minor, May 29, 1899. The mother is still a resident of Galesburg but the 
father died on the 15th of September, 1905. He occupied a most honored and 
prominent position in the business circles of the city and his son, G. L. Avery, 
has followed in his footsteps. 

The latter was largely reared in Peoria but was graduated from Knox 
College at Galesburg in 1902. He has since been connected with the Avery 
Company and is today occupying an executive position as its secretary. After 
his graduation in 1902 he became connected with the business as private secre- 
tary to his father, who was then president of the company, and following his 
father's demise was appointed secretary and also was made one of the directors 
of the company. His associate officers are : J. B. Bartholomew, president ; H. C. 
Roberts, vice president ; and Ellwood Cole, treasurer. The first two have been 
connected with the company for thirty-three consecutive years and the last named 
for three years, so that the different officers are thoroughly acquainted with 
their departments of the business. The plant of the Avery Company covers a 
total of twenty-seven and five-hundredths acres and the main factory building, 
together with the various warehouses, have a total floor space of six and a half 
acres. The various departments of the factory are united by an improved type 
of trolley system of the company's manufacture which greatly facilitates the 
rapid handling of both finished and unfinished goods at a minimum of expense. 
That harmonious and notable relations exist between the company and its em- 
ployes is indicated by the fact that labor troubles are unknown in their factory. 
The company manufactures steam and gasoline traction engines, self-lift plows, 
traction steam shovels, traction hauling wagons, threshing machinery and all 
its various attachments, mounted steel water tanks, farm wagons, corn planters, 
riding and walking cultivators, single and double row stalk cutters and gaso- 
line tracts — both farm and city. Their output is sent to all parts of the country 
and into foreign lands as well. They have branch houses located at Omaha, 
Des Moines, Kansas City, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Grand Forks 
and Fargo, North Dakota, and Aberdeen, South Dakota. They have a large 
traveling force upon the road and their Canadian trade is handled from Winni- 
peg. Their foreign shipments go to Mexico, Argentine Republic, Brazil, Russia, 
Austria-Hungary, the Philippines, Portugal, China, Sweden, Cuba and Egypt. 
The foreign trade gives an outlet for much machinery at a time when the ship- 
ping season for the home trade is lightest. The officials of the companv work 
together in the utmost harmony and their relation is one of close social as well 
as business interests. 

Mr. Avery was united in marriage to Miss Miriam Hunter, of Chillicothe, 
Illinois, a daughter of E. F. Hunter, and theirs is one of the attractive and 
hospitable homes of the city. Mr. Avery belongs to the Creve Coeur Club and 
is recognized aside from other connections alreadv mentioned as a citizen of 



HISTORY OF TF.ORIA COUNTY 183 

wortli, cooperating heartily and generously in support of many projects which 
have constituted valuable 'features in the city's growth and improvement, lie 
is a broad and liberal-minded man of progressive spirit, keeping m touch with 
the tendency of the times and always holding to the high standards which have 
made the name of Avery the synonym not only for enterprise but for incorrupt- 
ible integrity in business circles. 



HORACE CLARK. 



I 



Horace Clark is the secretary and general manager of the Clark Coal & 
Coke Company, with offices on the ninth floor of the Jeft'erson building. In 
this connection he is prominently identified with the trade and business inter- 
ests of Peoria, yet he does not allow commercial affairs to monopolize his time 
and energies to the exclusion of other interests and duties. He takes an active 
part in jsromoting the moral progress of the city and is now president of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. He was born in this city July 13, 1863, 
and is a son of Horace and Mary (Kingsbury) Clark. His father was one of 
the early pioneers of eastern Illinois. He came from the state of New York 
and settled in the town of Morton, in Tazewell county, in 1843. His wife also 
arrived in this city from New York in the same year. They became acquainted 
at Morton and were there married, and in t86i they removed from Tazewell 
county to Peoria. Here the father established the Horace Clark & Sons Com- 
pany, owners of flour mills, in 1862. This is today one of the leading concerns 
of the kind in the county, o\yning and operating an elevator and flour mills in 
the conduct of a growing business that is already extensive in its proportions 
and profitable in its sales. Of this company, Horace Clark, whose name intro- 
duces this review, is now secretary. The father died in 1902, and Peoria thus 
lost one of its representative, well known and honored business men. For a 
long period he survived his wife, who died in 1889. 

Their son, Horace Clark, was reared in Peoria and attended the graded 
and high schools here, being graduated from the latter with the class of 1882. 
He then went east to continue his education and was a member of the Dart- 
mouth College class of 1886. When his college days were over he returned to 
Peoria and for five years thereafter was a traveling salesman in the employ of 
Clark, Quien & Morse, a firm which has recently changed its name to the Clark- 
Smith Hardware Company, of which his brother, Charles D. Clark, is the presi- 
dent. On severing his connection with that house Horace Clark organized the 
Clark Coal & Coke Company, of which he is the secretary and general manager. 
They have offices on the ninth floor of the Jefferson building and they operate 
the Fmiiire mines west of Peoria, on the Minneapolis & .St. Fouis Railroad, and 
handle the output of many other mines. In fact they have branches all over 
the middle west and their business is one of notable magnitude. Since the estab- 
lishment and incorporation of the business in April, 1892, it has grown continu- 
ously under the capable management and active control of its founder. It was 
in 1901 that the company opened the Empire mines west of Peoria, where they 
have about twentv-threc hundred acres of the best coal land in the state, and 
employ three hundred and fifty miners. The officers of the company are: 
George C. Clark, president ; Charles D. Clark, vice president : Horace Clark, 
secretary and general manager ; and George Arthur Clark, a nephew, treasurer. 

In 1887 occurred the marriage of Horace Clark and Miss Jennie M. Robin,son. 
a dau.^hter of E. J. Robinson, of Brimfield, Illinois. Mrs. Clark was born and 
reared in Peoria county, and by this marriage there are two children, Thomas 
and Robert. ^Ir. Clark is a member of the Creve Coeur Club and also of the 



18i HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Country Club, and is well known socially. Outside of his business, however, 
his greatest activity is perhaps in the line of the Young .Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation work and he is now president of the Peoria organization. In this his 
labors are very elTective. He realizes the necessity of proper environment for 
young men at' the critical period of their lives and is doing all in his power 
through organized effort to surround them with such interests, advantages and 
opportunities as will awaken in them an earnest and masterful desire for the 
best physical, mental and moral development. His business activities and his 
labors along this line constitute well balanced forces in his life. 



FRIEDRICH STREIBICH. 

Among the prominent German-American citizens of Peoria was Friedrich 
Streibich. He was born in Baden, Germany, on June 12, 1827, a son of Joseph 
Streibich, and on coming to America in 1847 made his way to Peoria, then a 
young man of twenty years. Here he improved his opportunities for advance- 
ment and in 1850 engaged in the hotel business while the following year he be- 
came proprietor of the William Tell House which he conducted until 1853. In 
that year he built the Washington House which he managed until 1857 when he 
sold out and built the summer resort at the corner of Smith and McReynolds 
streets. At that place he continued until 1865 when he established vineyards 
and a wine garden at 1006 Moss avenue. This became a popular resort and 
speedily proved to be a very profitable enterprise. Mr. Streibich possessed the 
native characteristics of the German race — thrift and diligence — and so con- 
ducted and managed his aiifairs as to win success. He understood the German 
people and their desires and gave to them a resort that was attractive to all his 
nationality. 

In Peoria, on the loth of June, 1851, ^h. Streibich was married to Miss 
Sarah Bauer, and they became "the parents of four children, Joseph, Francisca, 
Frederick F. and Tohn C. i^Ir. Streibich was for many years a Mason and one 
of the first members of Schiller lodge. He gave his political allegiance to the 
democratic partv, studying the questions and issues of the day with the result 
that his ballot gave indorsement to democratic principles. He never had occasion 
to regret his determination to come to the new world for here he found the op- 
portunities which he sought and which he improved as the years passed by, 
gaining at length a creditable position among the substantial residents of his 
adopted city. 



]MRS. ELLEX (BARKER) IMcROBERTS. 

Mrs. Ellen (Barker) McRoberts needs no introduction to the readers of this 
volume, for her entire life has been passed in Peoria, and she has been for many 
years a leading figure in social circles. She was born in this city October 29, 1843, 
a daughter of Gardner Thurston and Helen (White) Barker. Her father came 
to this city in 1838, casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers of a tiny town 
that was destined to rise to greatness owing to the efforts of Mr. Barker and his 
business associates and contemporaries. He stood as a splendid type of all that is 
admirable in citizenship and in manhood and a tribute to his worth and his memory 
is to lie found on another page of this volume. 

■Mrs. McRoberts was sent to the east to continue her education, begun in the 
schools of Peoria, pursuing a course of study at Maplewood in Pittsfield, Massa- 
chusetts. She then returned to her parents' home in Peoria. Here in early worn- 




M1!S. EIJ.KX llAKKKi; McROBERTS 



j 

I 



'w 

C01 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 187 

anhiiod Iicr liaiul was sought in marriage by William AIcRohcrts, a native of 
Ireland, who was born near Belfast, in Aug;ust, 1824. His father, William .Me- 
Roheris, Sr., was also a native of the Emerald isle. William ]\IcRoberts. Jr., 
emigrated to the United States in early manhood, making his way to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where he secured a situation in the distillery of Boyle, Miller & Company. 
From a comparatively obscure beginning he worked his way u]nvard, advancing 
through intermediate ]iositions until he was at length admitted to a partnership, 
having in the meantime gained a masterful knowledge of the distilling business. 
Following his marriage he became a partner of his father-in-law. Clardner Thurs- 
ton Barker, in the distilling business and so continued until his death, which 
occurred in January, 1876. He left to his widow the care of two young sons, 
\\'illiam Gardner and Walter. The former is a graduate of Cornell University 
and is now engaged in the practice of law in Peoria, while the latter is well known 
as a traveler and author. Mrs. McRoherts is a member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and her religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. She 
has a verv wide aci|uaintance in Peoria and is esteemed by all who know her. 
The work of her father and her husband has connected her closely with the city's 
development and she has felt a keen personal interest in all that has pertained to 
its progress and prosperity. Moreover, she has been a witness of many of the 
events which have shaped its history and she has done not a little to mold and 
maintain its high social standard. Her own home has ever been the abode of 
warm-hearted hospitality and good cheer, its doors ever being open for the recep- 
tion of her man\' friends. 



C. E. McXEMAR. 



The legal profession of Peoria finds a worthy representative in C. E. Mc- 
Nemar, who is practicing as a member of the well known firm of Sucher, Mc- 
Nemar iX: Moore. He has been identified with the Peoria bar since the fall of 
1902, at which time he was admitted to practice. Still a young man. he has 
before him a successful future if we argue by what he has accomplished in 
the past. He was born upon a farm in \IcLean county, Illinois, about eight- 
een miles north of Bloomington, on the i8th of August, 1877, his parents being 
C. J. W. and Mary ( Pirtle ) McXemar. The father was a farmer, and amid 
the environments of rural life the son was reared. He early began assisting 
in the work on the farm, and throughout the school year pursued his education 
until graduating from the Iiigh school of Gridley. He afterward continued his 
education in the high school of Lexington, Blinois, of which he is also a graduate, 
and then entered the Eureka College at Eureka, Illinois, where he completed a 
course of study, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Science. He then became 
a student in the law school of the University of Michigan, which institution he 
entered in the fall of 189(3 and from which he was graduated in 1902. He had 
determined to make the jiractice of law his life work, and with this end in view 
he pursued a very thorough course of study and bent every energy toward the 
mastery of the principles of jurisprudence, that he might thus become well 
equipped for the onerous and responsible duties of the profession. In the fall 
following his graduation he entered upon active practice in Peoria, and for 
six months was associated with the firm of Sheen & Miller. At the expiration 
of that period he became assistant state's attorney under W. V. TeiTt, filling the 
position until the end of Mr. Teflft's term of office. He also practiced law with 
Mr. Teft't for about a year and was assistant city attorney for a year. At the 
end of that time he became associated with George T. Page and S. D. Wead, 
with whom he continued for three years. In 1907 he formed his present part- 
nership with George Sucher. and on the ist of May, 191 1, Mr. Moore entered the 



188 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

firm, leading to the adoption o£ the present hrni style of Sucher, McXeniar li 
Moore. They are now well established in practice and their business is con- 
tinually growing in volume and importance. The labors of one are supple- 
mented and rounded out by the ef^^orts of the others and they are thus well pre- 
pared to take charge of all kinds of law practice and win success in the different 
fields of jurisprudence. Mr. McXemar has never feared that laborious atten- 
tion to office work which must precede the strong and forcible presentation of 
a case in court. He is ever ready for defense as well as attack, and the strength 
of his argument results from his careful analysis and his logical reasoning 
combined with ability to accurately apply the principles of the law. 

In 1906 Mr. jNIcXemar was married to Miss M. H. Bower, of Manton, Mich- 
igan. They are well known socially in the city where thev reside and Mr. Mc- 
Xemar is a worthy representative of the Masonic fraternity in which he has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish rite. He is also a member of 
the ]\Iystic Shrine, and in his life exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft. 
He also holds membership in the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of Khoras- 
san, and has held all the offices in both. He is likewise a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of the World and enjoys the high regard of his brethren of this or- 
ganization. He possesses a genial nature which makes him popular, while his 
laudable ambition and earnest efforts have gained him prominence in the profes- 
sion where advancement depends solely upon individual merit. 



H. C. ROBERTS. 



The leaders are few. The great majority of men are content to follow in 
the paths, that others have marked out. Only here and there is found one who 
has the initiative to venture beyond the point that others have reached and 
branch out into broader fields where favoring opportunity leads the way. H. C. 
Roberts, however, is one whose even-paced energy and sound judgment have 
brought him into prominent business relations and in enlarging the scope of the 
great productive industry with which he is connected he has shown much of the 
pioneer spirit in formulating new plans which with the assistance of his fellow 
officers he has been able to carry forward to successful completion in the con- 
trol and management of the Avery Company, of which he is the vice president. 
Theirs is the leading manufacturing plant of Peoria devoted to the building of 
farm implements and traction engines. Mr. Roberts entered into active con- 
nection with this business as an employe, Ijut gradually worked his way upward 
until long since he has had voice in its management. 

He was born upon a farm in Henry county. Illinois, in 1857. His father, 
N. K. Roberts, became a soldier of the Civil war and was one of the thousands 
that marched to the scene of conflict. The boy went to live with his grand- 
father who was a prominent farmer of Henry county and there spent his boy- 
hood days, attending the country schools and meeting with such experiences as 
usually fall to the lot of the lad who is reared on the farm. He started out for 
himself, eager to make his way in the world, and practically his first steady posi- 
tion was with R. H. & C. M. Avery, then located in Galesburg, given over to 
the manufacture of farm implements and agricultural machinery. He began 
work in the erection shop and later went upon the road as an expert, being sent 
all over the country to demonstrate and put in operation the machinery which 
was made by them at that time. Subsequently he went upon the road as a sales- 
man and occupied that position for about twenty years, making good at every 
point. He was afterward promoted to the position of sales manager and in 1905 
becaiue vice president of the company. The business was established by R. 
H. and C. ]\I. Avery at Galesburg but after some years was removed to Peoria 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 189 

where it lias steadily i;ri)\vn. The plant has been enlarged from time to time 
and is a most extensive one, covering twenty-seven acres with six and a half 
acres of floor space in its principal buildings. It is thoroughly equipped with 
the latest improved machinery and is now devoted to the manufacture of farm 
implements and traction engines, in which connection employment is furnished 
to twelve hundred skilled mechanics. It was in Deceniljer, 1879. tli'it Mr. 
Roberts first became connected with the company, little dreaming then that he 
would one day be one of its chief executive officers, yet ambitious at all times 
to progress. He soon proved his worth, demonstrated his ability and by reason 
of his faithfulness and able service worked his way steadily upward. 

In 1892 Mr. Roberts was united in marriage to Miss Ella L. Robinson, who 
was born in Brimfield, Peoria county. They have two children, Helen and jud- 
son Edwin. Mr. Roberts is a member of the ]\Iasonic fraternity and exempli- 
fies in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft. He has been president of the 
Creve Coeur Club of Peoria, the leading social organization of the city, and he 
belongs also to the Peoria Country Club, the Illinois N'alley Yacht Club, the 
Chicago Automobile Club and the Peoria .Automobile Club, now serving as the 
president of the last named. He is furthermore connected in membership re- 
lations with the First Congregational church of Peoria and he never promotes 
business interests at the sacrifice of his obligations to citizenship. On the con- 
trary he finds time and opportunity for cooperation in those things which foster 
the intellectual, social and moral progress of the city and within his extensive 
circle of friends is held in the higliest esteem. It is said, however, that the in- 
dividual may best be judged bv the way in which he treats those below him in 
the social scale. If judgment is passed upon Mr. Roberts in this connection the 
\cr(lict will be one which establishes him in even a higher position in public 
regard. It is well known that the Avery Company is not only just but gener- 
ous in its treatment of its employes, which is evidenced by the fact that labor 
troubles are an unknown thing in their factories. The humblest employe may 
approach Mr. Roberts with the certainty of securing a courteous hearing and 
the greater part of his employes he can call by name. He is a man of strong 
and forceful individuality who has left and is leaving the impress of his per- 
sonality upon the commercial and industrial development of this city. 



GEORGE W. CAMPBELL. 

Among the younger members of the Peoria bar who have attained success 
is (ieorge W. Campbell, who is now practicing as a member of the firm of Covey, 
Campbell & Covey, with which he has been identified since December, 1910. 
He has, however, practiced law in Peoria since 1900, or the year following his 
admission to the bar. He was born upon a farm five miles west of Belvidere, 
in Boone county, Illinois, February 11, 1874. and is a son of George \V. and 
Charity (\\'akefield) Campbell, who were farming people, and upon the home 
farm the son spent his boyhood and youth. He supplemented his education 
acf|uired in the country schools by study in the high .school at North Belvidere, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1891. He afterward engaged in 
teaching for a year in the country schools but, still ambitious for other educa- 
tion, he entered the Beloit College at Beloit, Wisconsin, where he took up the 
study of Latin and Greek. He afterward spent a year in the L^niversity of 
Illinois, pursuing the literary course, and with this Ijroad foundation upon which 
to build the superstructure of his professional learning entered upon the study 
of law in Belvidere in the office of the Hon. Charles E. Fuller, member of con- 
gress. He was also associated with the firm of Covev & Covey in Peoria for 
a year, devoting his evening hours to the study of law, after which he returned 



190 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

to Belvidere and spent another year as a law student in the office of Congress- 
man Fuller. He then successfully passed the examination in Chicago which 
secured hmi admission to the bar in May, 1899. For a year thereatter ne prac- 
ticed in Belvidere and then came to Peoria where he has remained continuously 
since 1900. He was associated with the Covey brothers from 1900 until 1904 
and then opened an office in the Young IMen's Christian Association building 
which he shared with Congressman Joseph \'. Graff. After several years he 
took offices in the Jefferson building and practiced there until he entered the 
present firm of Covey. Campbell & Covey in December. 19 10. with offices in 
the W'oolner building. 

In June, 1909, Air. Campbell was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Mary C. Clark, 
of Peoria, and they are well known socially in this city, their circle of friends 
continuously increasing. Mr. Campbell belongs to the Creve Coeur Club and 
other social organizations. He is recognized as a rising young attorney, well 
known and well liked in Peoria, and his increasing professional ability is in- 
dicated bv a growing practice which in later years has connected him with 
much of the important litigation tried in the courts of this district. 



RUFUS A. DU MARS, M. D. 

Dr. Rufus A. Du Mars, physician and surgeon, who has practiced in Peoria 
continuously since 1877, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, about live 
miles east of Harrisburg, on the 6th of December, 1849, ^ son of G. W. Du Mars. 
His mother died when he was only a year old, after which the father married 
Sarah Ainsworth Allen who, indeed, filled a mother's place in her care for, at- 
tention to and love of the boy, who could have no deeper or more filial affection 
for an own mother. He was five years of age when the father removed with 
his family to Illinois with Peoria county as his destination. He settled upon 
a farm in Logan township and there Dr. Du Mars was reared, early becoming 
familiar with all the experiences that fall to the lot of the farm boy. He at- 
tended the country schools and in the further pursuit of his education afterward 
entered the W'esleyan University at Bloomington, Illinois, in which he spent 
four years. He then took up the study of medicine under Dr. Frye, who directed 
his reading for some time and afterward admitted him to a partnership, their 
business and professional connections continuing until the death of his erst- 
while preceptor. Following the demise of Dr. F'rye, Dr. Du Mars began practice 
independently. He pursued his reading with Dr. Frye in 1874 and 1875 and at 
the same time attended the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. In the 
following year he entered the Medical College at Louisville, Kentucky, from 
which he was graduated in 1876. He then returned to the University of Penn- 
sylvania and completed the medical course in that institution in 1877. Imme- 
diately afterward he returned to Peoria and has since been numbered among 
the capable and successful general practitioners here. Dr. Du Alars has been 
for the past thirty-five years on the medical staff' of St. Francis Hospital and 
for the past thirty-one years has been physician and surgeon for the Peoria & 
Pekin Union Railroad and is at present District Surgeon for the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad. His ability enables him to quickly solve the intricate 
problems which confront the physician. He is most careful in the diagnosis of 
his cases and his judgment is seldom, if ever, at fault in determining the out- 
come of disease. He now enjoys a large practice and is the beloved family 
physician in many of Peoria's best households. 

In this city, in 1879, Dr. Du Mars was united in marriage to Miss Nellie B. 
Frye, a daughter of Dr. J. C. Frye, who established his home in Peoria in 1834. 
Three children have been born of this marriage: Eliza Sterling, who is the 





DR. R. A. and DR. E. C. TiV MARS 



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HISTORY OI' I'KORIA COUNTY 193 

widow of Frank C. Bourscheide ; Dr. Eliot C, who is a graduate of the W'asli- 
ington University of St. Louis and practices medicine with his father : and 
Fahian R., who is residing in Chicago. 

Dr. Du ilars is a member of the ]\Iasonic order and also of the Knights of 
Pythias. He belongs to the Crave Coeur Club and his professional connections 
are with the Peoria City Medical Society and the Illinois State Medical Society. 
His religious views are indicated by his membership in the Second Presbyterian 
church. He served as health commissioner of Peoria during the administration 
of Mayor Miles. Thirty-five years' residence in this city has made him very 
ividely known and his upright "life has gained for him the respect and good-will 
of the general public, while his methods of practice and his conscientious service 
have won for him the un(|ualified regard of his professional brethren. 



FRANK P. LEWIS. 



Frank P. Lewis, a cigar manufacturer of Peoria, who has engaged in this 
line of business since 1880 and has conducted his Peoria establishment since 
1885, ranks today as a most prominent and valuable re])resentative of industrial 
activity in this city. Along well defined lines of trade and ctMiimerce he has 
developed the second largest cigar factory in the state of Illinois, the enterprise 
being the visible and tangible evidence of his well defined and carefully executed 
plans. 

Mr. Lewis is a native of Portland, Oregon, his birth having occurred on 
the Pacific coast on the 25th of January, i860. His father was the Rev. Wil- 
liam S. Lewis, a missionary and presiding elder of the Methodist Episcopal 
church of I\irtland, where he died in 1865. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Julia Pierce and following her husband's death she returned to the ^Iississip])i 
valley, accompanied by her son Frank, establishing her home in Havana, Illinois. 
Jt was there that the subject of this review was reared and the local schools 
afforded him his educational privileges. After leaving school he learned the 
cigarmaker's trade in that city and when he felt that his experience and capital 
were sutificient to justify the step he opened a factory on his own account in 
Havana in 1880. He made cigars and conducted a small cigar store and grad- 
ually worked his way upward in that connection. For five vears he continued 
in business in Havana and then sought the broader opportunities offered in the 
larger city of Peoria. When he arrived here he employed less than ten people. 
In the quarter of a century which has since elapsed his business has con- 
stantly grown along substantial lines and something of the extent of his trade 
is indicated by the fact that he now employs about two hundred people. His 
leading cigar is called the Lewis Single P.inder cigar. His factory is the second 
in size in the state and the output brings to him a substntial financial return 
annually. Since igoo he has occujiied his own building, which was formerly 
the residence of Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll. using the entire structure for 
factory purposes. He has a well equipped establishment, one of the few fac- 
tories of the United States making all hand-made cigars. He always holds to 
a high standard of excellence in his output which is sold not only largely in 
Peoria but in thirty-eight difl:'erent states in the Union. During the past twelve 
years his employes have earned more than one million, one hundred and seventy- 
five thousand dollars, this vast wage sum going into general circulation and thus 
becoming a benefit to the entire city. The excellence of the manufactured 
product, combined with Mr. Lewis' thorough business rectitude, has constituted 
the salient feature in the attainment of his success. In addition to. his manu- 
facturing interests he is connected with the Commercial German National Rank 



194 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

as one of its directors and stockholders, and he is also a stockholder of the 
Central National Bank. 

Mr. Lewis was married, in 1895, to Miss Violet Phelps, of Elmwood, Illi- 
nois, a daughter of the Hon. W. E. Phelps, and they now have three children, 
Richard. William and Margaret. Mr. Lewis is a member of the Creve Coeur 
Club and also of the Peoria Association of Commerce. His activities are wide 
and varied, touching the general interests of society in all that relates to pro- 
gressive citizenship. His "worth in this direction is widely acknowledged for 
it is known that his cooperation can be counted upon in support of any move- 
ment or project for the general good. What he -has accomplished in a business 
way represents the fit utilization of the innate talents and powers which are his 
and the improvement of the opportunities which come to every individual. 
Xo unusually favorable circumstances aided him at the outset but through his 
energy and close application has he worked his way upward to the conspicuous 
and enviable position that he now fills. 



JOHN P. McMAHAX. M. D. 

During twenty-eight years' practice in Peoria, Dr. John P. ^NIcMahan has 
maintained a foremost position as a physician and surgeon. Aside from his 
study in colleges of this country, he has pursued his investigation and researches 
in Paris and \'ienna, and corning under the instruction of some of the most 
eminent members of the profession in the old world, he became particularly 
well qualified for the duties which have devolved upon him in his daily prac- 
tice. He maintains his office at No. 105 Elizabeth street, being located on 
the Bluff, which is the finest residence section of Peoria. He came to this city 
the year after his graduation from Rush Medical College, arriving in the sprmg 
of 1884. He was born in Pike county, Illinois. The family removed to Logan 
county, Illinois, during the infancy of Dr. MciNIahan and he was reared upon a 
farm,' meeting the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farmer boy who 
attends the public schools in the winter seasons and works in the fields through 
the summer months. He was ambitious to secure better educational advantages 
than could be obtained in the rural schools and therefore entered the Lincoln 
University, at Lincoln. Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1881. He im- 
mediately began preparation for a professional career, entering Rush Medical 
College, of Chicago, in which he pursued a three years" course and was graduated 
in 1S83'. In the "spring of the following year he opened an office on the plank 
road in Peoria and about a year later removed to 141 5 South Adams street, 
where he continued for twelve years. He afterward spent a year in post- 
graduate study and in general hospital work in Europe, dividing his time be- 
tween \'ienna, Austria," and Paris, France. He was absent altogether from 
Peoria for six years, Ijeginning in 1900, but in 1906 returned to this city. In the 
interim he engaged in teaching, in igoi and 1902, in the Post Graduate ^led- 
ical School, at Chicago, after which he went to Colorado and New Mexico, 
spending some time in the southwest. Six years were thus passed and he once 
more located in Peoria, opening his office in this city. 

Dr. ]\Ic;Mahan is now serving on the stafif of Proctor Hospital and he be- 
longs to the Peoria Citv Medical Society and the Illinois State Medical Society. 
His professional work 'is actuated by high ideals and his practice comes from 
among the best families in the city. He is ever faithful and conscientious in 
the performance of his duties and in his practice he finds many opportunities 
to exemplify the principles of the ?kIasonic fraternity, of which he is a \vorthy 
and prominent representative, having taken the Knight Templar degree m the 
York Rite and the thirt\--second degree in the Scottish Rite. He is also con- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COL'XTY 19j 

nected with the Mystic Shrine and Eastern Star. He believes that no other 
fraternity approaches the IMasonic in its ethical teachings and its high purposes 
and is in hearty sympathy with the order in these connections. Those who 
know him, and his friends are many, find him a genial, cordial gentleman, whose 
personal qualities as well as his professional skill entitle him to the high re- 
gard in which he is uniformly held. 



ALBERT E. LEISY. 



Albert E. Leisy is well known in connection with the brewing interests 
<vhich for many years have been a chief source of revenue for Peoria. He is 
now secretary and treasurer of the Leisy Brewing Company, yet does not con- 
fine his attention alone to this line, being also secretary and treasurer of the 
Jefferson Deposit Company and a factor in the promotion of other business 
concerns. He was born in Keokuk, Iowa, July i8, 1868, and is a son of John 
and Christina Leisy. His youthful days were spent in his native state until 
1884, when the family came to Peoria. Throughout the entire period of his 
residence here the name of Leisy has been associated with brewing interests in 
this city. He comes of a family that through many generations has been con- 
nected with this line of business. For two hundred years members of the family 
were brewers of Germany and after coming to the new world his father, John 
Leisy, established a brewery in Keokuk, Iowa, where his sons learned the de- 
tails of the business from the purchase of hops and the making of malt to the 
art of brewing and the disposal of the product. They sought a broader field 
of labor, however, than Keokuk offered and found it in Peoria. They became 
identified with the business in this city in the purchase of the first brewery 
plant established here. From the beginning of their operations in this city 
they have met with continuous and growing success until their enterprise is 
today the largest of its kind in the state outside of Chicago, their plant having 
a capacity of two hundred and fifty thousand barrels annually. Their barrel 
and keg trade extends throughout Illinois, Iowa and Missouri and their bottled 
products are shipped clear to the Pacific coast, one firm in Los Angeles hand- 
ling nothing beside the Leisy goods. They have increased their bottling plant, 
erecting an extensive addition thereto and equipping it w'ith the latest improved 
machinery, including two machines which fill, cork and label ninety bottles a 
minute each, or one hundred and eight thousand in a day's work of ten hours. 
During the busy season the plant is operated night and day with two shifts of 
men and turns out two hundred thousand bottles in the twenty-four hours. 
They are also manufacturers of Leisy's Malt Ease tonic, a special brew which 
is recommended by physicians for its particularly nourishing (|ualities. In this 
department the Leisy Brewing Company spends annually thirty-five thousand 
dollars for bottles and eight thousand dollars a year for cases. Their barrel 
and keg shipments have reached equally large proportions and it is a matter 
of record that the Leisy Brewing Company has the biggest switching interest 
on the Rock Island track, distributing twenty-eight carloads daily. The num- 
ber of their employes exceeds three hundred and sixty and two hundred thou- 
sand dollars is yearly paid out in salaries. Seventy-five wagons and one hun- 
dred and sixty horses are used in delivering the product in and around Peoria 
and the plant covers a tract on the river front in the upper end of the city four 
hundred and ninety by three hundred and forty-six feet. It comprises a num- 
ber of buildings, all of which are necessary in the conduct of their growing 
trade. The brothers who are at the head of this enterprise. E. C. and A. E. 
Leisy, are both progressive, energetic men. who regard obstacles simply as an 



196 HISTURY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

impetus for renewed effort. They accomplish what they undertake and their 
business methods are at all times characterized by progressiveness. 

This sketch would not be adequate if it represented Albert E. Leisy merely 
in this one connection. He has been interested in many other business enter- 
prises, all of which have benefited by his cooperation and his sagacity. He and 
his brother have proven benefactors in many cases in aiding business interests 
that were passing through hard straits. They have become stockholders in 
many a concern that needed a little financial aid and their response to calls of 
this character are really too numerous to mention, but it is well known that they 
have produced magnificent results. The Leisy brothers have come to be relied 
upon in crises of this sort and the encouragement and aid which they have 
given have invariably proven to be the prime incentive to further endeavor. 
They were the builders of the Jefierson building at the corner of South Jeffer- 
son avenue and Fulton street, a strictly modern office building of steel construc- 
tion, twelve stories in height. They also became large stockholders in the 
Jefferson hotel and they erected the Orpheum theater on iladison street. This 
is a beautiful structure, equipped and furnished at a cost of two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars, and it will compare favorably with the finest theaters 
ot the middle west. Albert E. Leisy. moreover, is president of the Peoria 
Baseball Club and has been connected with the team as one of its promoters 
for fifteen years. He gave Peoria the first pennant it ever received in 191 1. 

In 1899 '^^'^s celebrated the marriage of Albert E. Leisy and Miss Jennie 
Thobe, of Peoria, a daughter of John Thobe. His social interests are further 
manifest in his connection with a number of the leading clubs and fraternities 
of the city. He holds membership in the Creve Coeur Club, the Illinois \'alle)' 
Yacht Club, the Peoria Country Club and the Social Athletic Club of Peoria. 
He likewise belongs to the Chicago Automobile Club and the Travelers Pro- 
tective Association and his name is on the membership rolls of a number of 
the leading fraternities, including the Red ^len, the Eagles, the Elks, the For- 
esters and the National L^nion. He is one of the best known men in this part of 
the state and is an advocate of Peoria, doing everything in his power to enhance 
its growth and improvement. His influence has proven a vital support in many 
public projects and without invidious distinction he may be termed one of the 
foremost residents of the city. He is yet a young man and undoubtedly the 
future holds in store for him larger opportunities, for he never regards any posi- 
tion as final. \\'hen he once attains an object he passes on with the desire to 
reach out along further lines. It seems with him that 

"In sweat of toil he found life's zest. 
The moment's work was mastering lord. 
The long day's call a two-edged sword 
To fight one's way to well earned rest; 
The joy of work was work's reward." 



GEORGE H. WEBER, M. D. 

In the days of Peoria's early development the name of Weber was closely 
associated with pioneer industrial interests for the grandfather was proprietor 
of a flour mill here. Today the name is synonymous with skill and ability in 
the medical profession for Dr. George H. Weber has attained a prominent posi- 
tion as a physician and surgeon, having been an active practitioner of this city 
since 1900. He is one of Peoria's native sons, his birth having here occurred 
on the 2d of November, 1876. As indicated the family home was established 
here at a verv early day and the grandfather proved a valued factor in business 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY HIT 

circles in the conduct oi a tlour mill at the foot of South street. His son, (ieorge 
F. Weber, the father of Dr. Weber, died in Peoria in 1901 but the mother, who 
bore the maiden name of Kate Herschberger, is still living. 

In the attainment of his education Dr. Weber attended the pulilic schools, 
comjjleting a high-school course by graduation with the class of 1896. In the 
meantime he had determined to make the practice of medicine his life work and 
inmiediately afterward entered upon preparation for the profession, becoming 
a student of the Louisville Medical College, from which he was graduated with 
the class of March, 1900. He put his theoretical knowledge to the practical 
test as interne of the Louisville City Hospital, where he remained for a year, 
gaining the broad experience which comes only in the varied work oi hospital 
l)ractice. In igoi he returned to his native city where he opened an office. For 
several years he has been associated with Dr. C. U. Collins in the practice of 
surgery and now devotes his attention exclusively to that branch of the pro- 
fession. He is serving on the staff of the St. Francis Hospital and in addition 
he has an extensive private practice, which is of an important character and 
estalilishes his position as one of the leading surgeons of the city. He belongs 
to the Peoria Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association, and the proceedings of those bodies keep him thoroughly 
informed concerning the most advanced work being done in the country. 

In 1901 Dr. Weber was united in marriage to I\Iiss Edna Comegys, of Peoria, 
a daughter of Samuel C. Comegys. They are well know'n in this city where 
the Doctor has spent his entire life and where his sterling worth has gained 
for him a large circle of friends. He has attained high rank in Masonry, being 
now a member of the consistory and of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a mem- 
lier of the Knights of Pythias and the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khor- 
assan. lie is loyal to the teachings of these fraternities which he exemplifies 
in his life and in matters of citizenship he manifests a progressive and public- 
spirited interest, yet he devotes the greater part of his attention to his profes- 
sional duties which are constantly growing in volume and importance. 



T. W. GILLESPIE, \L D. 

Dr. T. W. Gillespie, physician and surgeon of Peoria, is engaged in general 
practice yet his tendency is toward specialization in the treatment of genito- 
urinary diseases. He is one of the younger, though successful, members of 
the profession here, having practiced in this city only since December, 1907. 
Rush Medical College numbers him among its alumni of the class of 1896. He 
is a native of Sauk county, Wisconsin, his birth having occurred September 10. 
1869, upon a farm just across the river from Kilbourn. Wisconsin, not far from 
that beautiful scenic district known as The Dells. His parents were Thomas 
and Martha (Simpson) Gillespie, who gave to their son such advantages as they 
could afford and instilled into his mind lessons that have since borne good fruit 
in high and honorable manhood. He attended the rural schools and afterward 
continued his studies in the high school at Kilbourn. Later he pursued a two 
years' course in Lawrence University and afterward took up the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for a year in Clark county, U'isconsin. He re- 
garded this, however, merely as an initial step to further professional labor, for 
it was his desire to become a physician, and with this purpose in view, in the 
fall of 1893 he entered Rush Medical College, at Chicago, and completed a three 
years' course, being graduated in 1896. He then accepted a salaried position 
with Dr. A. C. Gotten, who was at that time city jihysician of Chicago. For a year 
Dr. Gillespie had charge of the emergency and surgical work at practically all 
of the police stations of Chicago. After a year devoted to that work he located 



198 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

at Lostant, La Salle county, Illinois, where he engaged in general practice until 
the fall of 1907, when he came to Peoria. Since then he has acted as assistant 
to Dr. C. U. Collins in his surgical work. He displays considerable skill in 
surgical work and is greatly interested in genitro-urinary surgery and his studies 
and researches along that line incline him to special practice in that field. 

' Dr. Gillespie is a member of the Peoria City Medical Society and also be- 
longs to the Illinois State Medical Society and the American Medical Associa- 
tion. His fraternal relations are with the Masons. He is now serving on the 
staff of St. Francis Hospital and in addition is accorded a good private practice 
which is indicative of the confidence which the general public repose in his pro- 
fessional skill. 



THORNTON GILMORE MURPHY. 

Not all days in the business career of Thornton G. Murphy were equally 
bright. At times storm clouds threatened disaster, but with persistent purpose 
and unfaltering energy he made the best use of his opportunities and in time rose 
to a position among the prominent representatives of insurance interests in the 
middle west, becoming the founder and promoter of several insurance companies 
of Peoria. He was born in Adams county, Illinois, April 26, 1858, and died 
August 27, 191 1. His education was acquired in the district schools near Ouincy 
and in early life he studied medicine for a year in Chicago, thinking then to 
engage in practice some day. A year's preparation, however, convinced him that 
he did not wish to enter upon the profession as a life work and he turned from 
that line of study to a commercial course. He afterward went to Kansas City, 
where he invested heavily in real estate and also engaged in the nursery business. 
The citv was then enjoying a boom but in time there was a reaction in realty 
values and Mr. Murphy suffered heavy losses through his real-estate investments. 
Gathering together what. he could of his wrecked fortunes, he came to Peoria in 
1890 and sought to again upbuild his business. Here he began dealing in nursery 
stock and for seven years devoted his time to that line of activity. Success 
attended his efforts atid in 1897 he sold out to embark in still another line. He 
entered the field of life insurance and again his business ability and enterprise 
proved adequate to the situation. He organized and developed the Peoria Life 
Insurance Company, making it a profitable undertaking. He worked with untir- 
ing eft'ort and personally secured all the charter members necessary to make the 
concern a success. From the beginning its business and patronage grew, Mr. 
Murphv continuing to serve as secretary until 1904, when he resigned. He after- 
ward organized the Corn Belt Life Insurance Company, which was later merged 
into the La Salle Life Insurance Company of Chicago. He was a man of excep- 
tionally strong business ability and w^as recognized as one of the most successful 
life insurance organizers in this part of the county. As a salesman he had no su- 
perior and his thorough understanding of every feature of the business and the 
real value of life insurance made him very successful in founding and promoting 
such an undertaking. 

On the 22d of October, 1890, Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Iva L. Tarr, a daughter of James F. and Elizabeth (Hughes) Tarr, of Mendon, 
.■\dams county, Illinois, where they were pioneer settlers, the father there devot- 
ing his attention to farming. Unto Mr. and Mrs. !\Iurphy were born five chil- 
dren: Charles T., who was born September 17, 1891, and died in September, 
1894; Leo D., born July 14, 1894; James F., who was born on the nth of Janu- 
ary, 1897, and passed away in September, 1897; and Helen and Harold, twins, 
born December 23, 1901. 



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HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 201 

In his political \'ie\vs 'Slv. Murphy was an earnest democrat but never an office 
seeker. He held membership with the Modern \\'oodmen of America and also 
in the. Christian Science church. He was well read, keeping in touch with the 
world's thought and progress and becoming also conversant with the best writings 
of past ages. He had a wide acquaintance in various sections of the state and 
was honored and respected wherever known and most of all where he was best 
known. I'~irm and determined in his convictions, he never faltered in his alle- 
giance to what he believed to be right and the course and policies which he pur- 
sued gained him the trust, confidence and good-will of his fellowmen. 



CHARLES J. OFF. 



To characterize Charles J. C)fi:' in a single sentence would be impossible, for 
so many and varied are his activities and so important has been his work that 
extended mention is necessary to give an adequate account of what he 
has accomplished. It is an acknowledge fact, however, that public spirit with 
him constitutes an even balance to individual ambition, and in the attainment of 
notable success he has found time and opportunity to cooperate in many proj- 
ects for the general welfare. He is perhaps best known to the citizens of 
Peoria as a wholesale merchant, having for many decades been connected with 
that line of trade, although in 191 1 he retired from that field; throughout the 
state he is jierhaps more widely known because of his extensive real-estate oper- 
ations, for he is today one of the largest land owners of Illinois and his atten- 
tion is now largely given to the supervision of his property. 

Charles J. Off has been a resident of Peoria county since the nth of May, 
1855, and of this city since the spring of 1856. He was born in Wurteriiburg, 
Germany, October 24, 1843, and is the son of John Jacob and Christina ( Straes- 
ser) OfT. He was eleven years of age when in 1855, he accompanied his parents 
on their emmigration from the fatherland to the new world. They went by rail 
to Havre, France, from there by sailing ship to New Orleans and from there by 
boat to Peoria. They settled near the present site of the Insane Asylum at 
Piartonville, but the following year took up their abode in the city. The father 
was a stone mason and a builder and continued to work at his trade here for a 
number of years. He maintained his residence in Peoria until the time of his 
death. 

Charles J. Oft' began his education in the schools of his native countrv and 
mastered the English language as a pupil in the schools of Peoria. He started 
in business as a clerk in a grocery store here and was continuously conected 
with that branch of trade from the 12th of September, 1850. until the nth of 
February, 1911. so that his name is synonymous with the history of the grocery 
business of this city. He was employed first as a clerk in a wholesale and retail 
grocery house until the Tst of January. 1873, within which period he steadily 
advanced, his capability, industry and reliable luethods winning him promotion 
from time to tiiue with a proportionate increase in salarv. At length he deter- 
mined to engage in business on his own account and on the istof January, 1873. 
entered into partnership with Henry. Oakford & Fahnestock, a well established 
wholesale grocery firm of the city. For five vears he continued in that connec- 
tion and then retired from the firm and in 1877 erected the building where the 
Charles J. Off Companv wholesale grocery house is now located. The following 
year he occtipied that building with a large stock of groceries and continued in 
the wholesale trade as the head of that concern until 191 1. The business grew 
year by year, its ramifying trade interests covering a constantlv broadening ter- 
ritory and the house taking rank with the leading wholesale establishments of 
the state and for fifteen consecutive vears Mr. Off served as president of the 

AVholesale Grocers Association of Illinois, 
Vol. n— 1 n 



202 HISTORY OF PEORTA COUNTY 

As AJr. Off prospered — and his success increased year by year — he extended 
his efforts into other fields of business and placed not a little of his earnings m 
the safest of all investments — real estate. He became a large owner of city 
property, and farm lands in Alacon, Tazewell, Knox. Wayne and Peoria counties. 
He now owns aliout thirty-five hundred acres of valuable farm land of which 
a noted lecturer on the natural resources of the country has said: "There is no 
better investment in all America." This property is divided into several farms 
including one very extensive farm of eighteen hundred acres in Macon county. 
He also has five hundred and fifty acres in two farms in Tazewell county and 
ninety-six acres of Richwoods township, Peoria county. Upon his large farm in 
^lacon county he conducts an extensive canning business for the canning of corn, 
and this, as all other undertakings, in which he has engaged, is proving a profitable 
enterprise. He is a director of the First National Bank of East Peoria, is the 
owner of a large coal mine known as the Phoenix upon his farm in Tazewell 
county and has other business which are profitable sources of revenue. The 
first land which he ever owned was a tract in Nebraska which he purchased of 
the government. He became owner of, that property soon after the w^ar but 
traded it afterward for land in Macon county, Illinois. While few men are so 
extensively connected with farming interests in this state as Mr. Oft', he has al- 
ways maintained his residence in this city, having for fifty-seven years made his 
home in Peoria. 

On the 28th of October. 1879, Mr. Off was united in marriage to Miss ^Mar- 
garet Fey of this city, a daughter of David and Barbara Fey. They have five 
children : Charles David, who married Miss Elsie Wrenn of Washington, and 
has one child. Charles J. II.: Robert F. : Walter, who married Matilda Huver- 
stuhl, and has a daughter, Margaret : Clift'ord, who wedded Helen C. Willock, 
of Pittsliurg. Pennsylvania ; and Clarence, now at school. Four of his sons are 
now associated with him in business. 

Mr. Off is a Knight Templar and thirty-second degree consistory Mason, and 
has crossed the Sands of Desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is 
also a Red Cross Knight of Constantine. He is prominent in Episcopal church 
circles and has always taken a keen interest in his church. His religion is un- 
assuming, kindly, very charitalile. and charged with a keen realization of the 
universal brotherhood of man. He is a member of St. Paul's church in Peoria. 
Mr. Off's political allegiance is given to the republican party and in early man- 
hood he served as supervisor for one year and has been alderman from the 
third ward. In more recent years, because of the rapid growth and extent of 
his business, he has not taken an active part in politics, yet is never remiss in 
the duties of citizenship, his aid and influence being given in support of worthy 
project for the benefit of the city and state. He has, indeed, been an important 
factor in business life and his prosjierity is well deserved, as in him are embraced 
the characteristics of an unbending integrity, unabating energy and industry that 
never flags. 



EAIMET C. MAY. 



Emmet C. May, attorney at law and the vice president of the Peoria Life 
Insurance Company, has in both connections estalilished himself in a creditable 
position as a representative business man of the city of Peoria and one whose 
life record is w'orthy of more than -passing notice. His birth occurred in Salyers- 
ville, Kentucky, October 5, 1875, '"s parents being Dr. William A. and Fannie 
E. (Holderby) May. The father has been a life-long physician and is still en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine in Kentucky. In his native town the son was 
reared and the usual experiences of lads of that locality and age were his. He 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 203 

attended the public schools to his graduation from the high school at Salvers- 
ville. then jn further pursuit of his education entered the Xorthern Indiana 
University, at \ alparaiso. where he devoted two years to the scientific course. 
He then took up the study of law which he finished in the same institution and 
was admitted to the bar in March, tSgri. 

The following Septeml)er Mr. May located for practice in Peoria, where he 
has since remained, lie became junior partner of the law firm of \\'olfenbcrger 
& May, his partner coming to this city with him. They have since been closely 
connected in their professional interests, conducting a general law practice, and 
their standing is indicated in the importance of the litigated interests which they 
have safeguarded in the courts. Mr. May is a deep thinker and logical reasoner 
and is seldom if ever at fault in the application of legal principle or precedent to 
the point involved in his case. He has always prepared his cases with great 
thoroughness and care and his clear and forceful presentation has been the 
means of gaining many favorable verdicts for his clients. Moreover, he is gen- 
eral counsel for the Peoria Life Insurance Company and its active vice president, 
having been connected with this company since its organization. 

In 1898 Mr. May was united in marriage to Miss Nellie O'Hara, of Chenoa, 
Illinois, and they now have one child, Walter E. Mr. May is a member of the 
Creve Coeur Club. He is an excellent type of the southern gentleman and at 
the same time possesses the progressive spirit so characteristic of the present 
age. He ever keeps before him a high standard of jjrofessional service and at 
the same time is ever mindful of his duties and obligations of citizenship and 
of his responsibilities as a man among his fellowmen. 



GUY C. GOODFELLOW. 

Guy C. Goodfellow is general agent at Peoria for the Connecticut Mutual 
Life Insurance Company and in this connection has jurisdiction over several 
counties in central Illinois. Since entering business circles his attention has 
been given exclusively to insurance and few men have wider knowledge con- 
cerning its possibilities or the scope of the business. Laboring earnestly and 
indefatigably in the interests of the company which he has represented he has 
gradually worked his way upward and now occujiies a position of large respon- 
sibility. 

He was born on a plantation at Courtland, Alabama, on the 30th of August, 
1867, his parents being Thomas Miles and Elizabeth (Milton) Goodfellow. 
The father was a native of Pennsylvania and in ante-bellum days established his 
home in the south. He was a minister of the gospel and at the time of the Civil 
war enlisted for service as a chaplain in the northern army, liecause of his 
sympathy with and support of the Union cause he was driven out of the south 
by the Ku Klux Klan, establishing his home in Chicago when his son ( luy was 
but a year and a half old. 

Near that city the boy was reared, acquiring his education in the public 
schools and entering business life in connection with insurance interests. I le 
was first employed by the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York and 
has continuously been connected with the insurance business since 1883. or for 
a period of more than twenty-eight years. He made it his jnirpose to thoroughly 
acquaint himself with every jihase of the business and his close application, 
study and energv were the features which gained him advancement. He came 
to Peoria in 1889 as a representative of the company with which he was then 
connected, and ten years later, or in 1899, he entered the emjiloy of the Con- 
necticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, which he represented in the capacity 
of agent until June, iQio, when he was advanced to the position of general 



204 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

agent, having under his direction the work of the company in six counties — 
Peoria, Knox, Fulton, Tazewell, Alason and Woodford. In this connection he 
directs the labors of a number of sub-agents and has thoroughly and carefully 
systematized the work of his district so that the best possible results are being 
obtained. 

Mr. Goodfellow was married in 1893 in Peoria to ]Miss Ella Chuse, a daugh- 
ter of ]\Iarion X. Chuse. They have become the parents of four children, 
Marion, Thomas, Sarah and Ferdinand. Air. Goodfellow is well known socially 
in this city, being accounted a valued member of a number of leading clubs and 
fraternities. He is now the secretary of the Illinois \'alley Yacht Club, a mem- 
ber of the Peoria Country Club and of the Creve Coeur Club. He has also 
taken various degrees in i\Iasonry, becoming a Knight Templar and a member 
of the Mystic Shrine. He possesses a genial nature, is appreciative of the value 
of friendship and his unfeigned cordiality has won for him many friends. 



FRANKLIX S. DA\TS, M. D. 

The science of homeopathy has made remarkable strides in the past half 
centurv, and is rapidly gaining in the medical field the place which was for a 
long time denied it. The extraordinary results which have been obtained by 
its followers, and its now unquestioned efficiency have raised homeopathy to a 
recognized science. A prominent physician of this branch of medicine in Peoria 
is Dr. Franklin S. Davis, who has his offices at 712 Hamilton boulevard. Dr. 
Davis has attained a reputation in Peoria for his skill in the treatment of the 
diseases of little children. 

He was born in Lacon, Illinois, June 12, 1869, the son of Dr. George and 
Emily (Sheaff) Davis of that city. His father was a practicing physician in 
Lacon for many years but came to Peoria for a wider field in 1872 and remained 
in active practice here up to the time of his death in 1873, when his son was 
only four years old. Dr. Davis, the subject of this sketch, received his early 
education in the grammar grades of Lacon, and was graduated from the high 
school of that city in 1887. He spent the following year teaching school and in 
1888 entered the LVbana L'niversity of Urbana, Ohio, where he remained for 
one vear, coming to Peoria in 1889 to read up on the subject of medicine. He 
entered the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College soon after, and was gradu- 
ated from this institution in 1893. He returned immediately to Peoria, and 
opened his office, and his practice has increased in a gratifying manner year by 
year. Dr. Davis is well known in this city, and his remarkable success in the 
treatment of the ailments of small children has gained for him a local reputa- 
tion which is well deserved. He does a general medical practice, but takes a 
great interest in the subject of obstetrics and pediatrics, in which field he has 
been verv successful. 

Dr. Davis was married in 1894 to Aliss :NLaude Alexander of Sterling, Illi- 
nois, a daughter of Hon. J. W. Alexander, a prominent attorney of that place. 
Fraternally" Dr. Davis is a ]\Iason, and is prominent in the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the North American Union. He is very active in medical 
circles in this city, and his ability and success have been recognized by the pro- 
fession as well as the citizens of Peoria county. Since 1901 he has been at- 
tending phvsician for the Home of the Friendless of this city, is on the staff 
of the Deaconess Hospital and is attending physician for the Crittenton Home. 
Dr. Davis takes a great interest in the afi'airs of his profession, keeps his knowl- 
edge up to date and his methods modern, and is in every respect an able and 
worthy phvsician. He served as city medical inspector of schools for the last 
two vears.'and is a member of the Peoria City Medical Society. IMrs. Davis is 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 205 

secretary of the Peoria Women's Clul) of which she has been a iiiemher for 
many years. 

During all the years of his practice in Peoria Dr. Davis has kept his ideals un- 
tarnished and his professional conscience clear. Me keeps abreast of the times and 
is thoroughl)- acquainted with the most modern professional discoveries. The 
life of any doctor who is enterprising and scrupulous in the various relations 
of his life is not an easy one, but Dr. Davis" has always been an honor to the 
city he has made his home. 



FRANK 1'. KLXSEY. 



Frank P. Kinsey, superintendent and director of the Avery Company of 
Peoria, has been actively connected with it since 1882. .When the Avery Com- 
pany, which has grow-n so wonderfully in the twenty years which have since 
elapsed, first located in Peoria in the big shop, Mr. Kinsey came with them as 
foreman of the machine shop. All during the years of his connection with 
the great im[)lenient firm, his work has been of a high order, showing a thor- 
ough knowledge of the details of the machinist trade, and expert workmanship. 

Mr. Kinsey was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the son of Thomas P. and 
Ellen Kinsey. The family early removed to Reading, where Frank Kinsey re- 
ceived his education, and where he served his time as a machinist apprentice in 
the general shop of Millert & Kinsey of which his father was at that time a 
partner. The ejder Kinsey was an expert mechanical engineer, and brought his 
son up to an appreciation of the value of honest and expert workmanshi]), and 
to a knowledge of what the qualities of hard work and intelligent industry will 
gain for a man in the world of business. Frank Kinsey subsequently worked 
in Iowa shops, the last place being the Reading Iron Works. He came to Peoria 
in October, 1882, to take the position as foreman of the machine shop of the 
Avery Company. His promotion was rapid and well deserved. In 1894 he was 
appointed assistant superintendent, and was made a director in the company in 
1904, rising to his present position of superintendent two years later in 1906. 

Mr. Kinsey is a prominent man in Peoria today. He is a member of the 
Creve Coeur Club, and actively interested in the Association of Commerce. His 
position of responsibility in a firm einploying over thirteen hundred inen, and 
doing an immense amount of business in farm implements of all kinds, and 
whose market comprises the whole civilized w^orld, is not a sinecure. Mr. Kin- 
sey has a constant call upon his business initiative and his abilitv in the manage- 
ment of men, and the call never goes unanswered. 



R. R. BOURLAXD. 



The name of Bourland has been a synonym for over a half century in Peoria 
for all that is honorable and worthy in business life and all that is charming in 
social circles in this city. The family is now represented by B. L. T. Bourland, 
the first of the name to settle in this city, who is eighty-seven years old 
and is still prominent and active in commercial circles, and by his son, R. R. 
Bourland, who has been identified with the firm of Bourland & Bailey, dealers 
in real estate and investments, for over thirty years. B. L. T. Bourland is the 
father of the subject of this sketch and senior member of the firm of w^hich R. 
R. Bourland is now manager. There is no more active or public-spirited citizen 
in Peoria today than the elder Mr. Bourland and the qualities of energy, sound 



206 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTY 

business judgment and keen discrimination which were the foundations of his 
success he has handed down as a heritage to his son. 

R. R. Bourland was born in Peoria, March 12, 1856, and received his early 
education in the pubUc schools of this city. At the age of fifteen he left Peoria 
to enter the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, Xew York, where he re- 
mained one year and then entered the University of Illinois at Champaign, where 
he continued his civil engineering course. He followed the profession of en- 
gineering for about five years or until, in 1879, he entered into the employ of 
the real-estate firm of Bourland & Bailey, and is now occupying the position of 
manager of that concern. 

In 1879 Mr. Bourland married Miss Ida \'. Bailey, of Plainville, Michigan, 
a sister of Oliver J. Bailey. They have three children : Morrison B., now a 
prominent printer of Peoria; Julia Preston, who married Arthur G. Clark: 
and Fred B., an engineer and farmer of southern California. Mr. Bourland be- 
longs to the Creve Coeur Club and is also actively identified with the Royal 
League. During the entire course of his business life R. R. Bourland has mani- 
fested the honorable traits of high-minded business dealing and strict integrity 
which distinguished His father for so many years, and has gained a position in 
the business and social circles of this citv not unworthy of his name. 



ROBERT SCHOLES. 



Robert Scholes. serving for the second term as state's attorney, has made a 
most creditable record in defense of the interests of Peoria county before the 
bar. He holds to the highest standards of professional service and has never 
deviated from the course which he believes to be right. Peoria is therefore proud 
to number him among her native sons and accords him rank with her representa- 
tive and honored citizens. He was born here in 1866, the son of Richard and 
Anna Scholes, and has always resided in Peoria, save for a brief period of a few 
years which the family spent in Pekin during his boyhood days. He attended the 
grammar schools of that city and upon his return to Peoria entered the high 
school, where he pursued the Latin course and was graduated with honors. A 
liberal literary education thus constituted the foundation for his professional 
knowledge. In preparation for the bar he became a student in the law office of 
Kellogg & Cameron and was admitted to practice on the 21st of November, 1889. 
He had displayed great thoroughness in the mastery of the principles of jurisprud- 
ence and thus took up his professional duties well equipped for the work which 
has since claimed his time and energies. It was soon manifest that his ideals of 
professional service were very high. From the beginning of his practice he 
declared that he would never take a disreputable case or descend to trickery or 
chicanery and to this rule he has always strictly adhered throughout his active 
career. He believes in the honesty and fair dealing of the lawyer just as thor- 
oughly as he believes in that of the business man. and it soon became evident that 
the word of Robert Scholes was to be relied upon. Moreover, he gave to his 
clients the benefit of well developed talents and of unwearied industry, yet never 
has forgotten that he owes a still higher allegiance to the majesty of the law. 
Success came to him because his preparation of a case was comprehensive and 
exhaustive and his presentation of his cause before the court was strong, 
logical and forceful. 

It was not long before ^Ir. Scholes was entrusted with much litigation in 
which the city was interested. He served as municipal attorney for three terms 
in the villages of South Peoria, Peoria Heights and Bartonville. being called to 
the last named on the organization of the village. Still higher political honors 
awaited him, involving work of even greater importance, for in 1904 he was 




ROBERT SCHOLES 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 209 

elected by a !arge majority to the position of state's attorney for Peoria county. 
His record won the confidence and gained for him the honor and respect of re])re- 
sentatives of every poiUical faith and at the close of his term there was practi- 
callv no other candidate in the field against him. On his reelection he received 
the umiualitied indorsement of a majority of the voters of the county. During 
his first term the emoluments of the office were on the fee basis but by an act of 
the legislature at its recent session the position has been given a fixed salary. 

.Mr. Scholes' success in his profession affords the best evidence of his capa- 
bilities in this line. lie is a strong advocate with the jury and concise in his 
appeals before the court. His seems to be a natural discrimination as to legal 
ethics and he is so thoroughly well read in the minutia of the law that he is able 
to base his arguments upon a thorough knowledge of and familiarity with prece- 
dents and to present a case upon its merits, never failing to recognize the main 
point at issue and never neglecting to give a thorough preparation. His pleas have 
been characterized by a terse and decisive logic and a lucid presentation rather 
than by flights of oratory, and his power is the greater before the court or jury 
from the fact that it is recognized that his aim is ever to secure justice and not to 
enshroud the cause in a sentimental garb of illusion which will thwart the princi- 
ples of right and ec|uity involved. A strong mentality, an invincible courage, a 
most determined individualit}- have so entered into his niakeu]) as to render him a 
natural leader of men and a director of public opinion. 



JACOB WACHENHEIMER. 

One of the more prominent business men of Peoria is Jacob Wachenheimer, 
who was born in New York city. At an early age Air. Wachenheimer removed 
from the American metropolis to Peoria, Illinois, where he received his educa- 
tion and initial business training. He started as a clerk, when quite a young man, 
with the insurance firm of Robinson & Callender and his services were so efficient 
and so much appreciated by his employers that after a few years' time he was 
called to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by the general manager of the Franklin 
Fire Insurance Company of that city, where he served in the home office of that 
company for six years as assistant to the general manager — a position which he 
filled very creditably. Upon the death of Mr. Robinson, Mr. Wachenheimer 
returned to Peoria, where he became associated with Eliot Callender. Although 
the business of Mr. Callender before Mr. Wachenheimer became associated with 
him was very gratifying, it has expanded I)y leaps and bounds since the forma- 
tion of the firm of Callender & Company, which is now by far the largest con- 
cern of its kind in Peoria and the largest in Illinois outside of Chicago, and is 
doing a constantly increasing insurance business. Mr. Wachenheimer is the 
managing partner of his firm, his executive ability as well as grasp of detail 
being among his strong business qualifications. He was for two years president 
of the Illinois Association of Fire Insurance Agents, a fact which clearly in- 
dicates the esteem and confidence placed in him by his fellows. He is one of 
the directors of the Commercial German National P»ank of Peoria, is president 
of the Peoria Livery Company and vice jiresident of the I'urlington P^levator 
Company and a stockholder in a number of other local business concerns. 

Mr. Wachenheimer was married in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Miss Susie 
E. Hood, daughter of John and Mary A. Hood. Mrs. Wachenheimer comes of 
a very old and highly respected family of Philadelphia, which at one time owned 
all the property between that citv and Chester, Pennsylvania. 

In his political views and activities Mr. Wachenheimer is a republican. . He 
has been a trustee of the Peoria park board, intimating very clearly not only hi» 
public spirit but his consideration for the needs of his fellow citizens along lines 



210 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

of recreation and also his eye for the beautiful as well as for the useful in city 
life. His standing among the business men of Peoria is evidenced by the fact 
that he was for some time president of the Board of Trade, a position in which 
he was very active, filling the place with credit to himself and much satisfac- 
tion to his business associates and friends. He is a worthy exemplar of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to the l)lue lodge, the chapter, the consistory and 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also a memljer of the Country Club of Peoria, and 
was its president and governor for eleven years. The Creve Coeur Club is for- 
tunate in numbering among its members Mr. Wachenheimer, who served as its 
president and on its board of directors for several terms. He likewise belongs 
to the Illinois \^alley Yacht Club. The business and fraternal activities of Mr. 
Wachenheimer in Peoria have made him one of the best known and most highly 
respected residents of this city. His sterling integrity is a quality known and 
appreciated, while his genial manner has won for him a host of friends. 



PETER F. JAMES, M. D. 

Dr. Peter F. James, whose residence and office are at Xo. 2106 South 
Adams street in Peoria, has been a general practitioner of medicine here since 
June, 1910. On coming to this city he established himself in the Jefferson build- 
ing, there maintaining an office until February, 1911, when he removed to his 
present location, having taken over the practice of the late Dr. Norval, who 
had for over thirty-three years practiced in this block on South Adams street. 
Dr. James was born near Louisville, Kentucky, January 8. 1882, a son of John 
and Mary M. James. He was reared in Chicago and in the public schools he 
received a common and high school education. He then attended the \'alparaiso 
(Ind.) University, from which he was graduated in 1905, having taken the 
scientific course. Subsequently he entered the Chicago College of Medicine 
and Surgery, which institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in igio. 
During the last vear of his studies in Chicago he acted as interne at the West 
Side Hospital, leaving for Peoria upon his graduation. Dr. James is a mem- 
ber of the Peoria County and Illinois State Medical Societies and the American 
Medical Association. He is building up a very satisfactory practice and in- 
dications are that he will attain a prominent place among the professional men 
of the city of his adoption. 

Dr. James was married in 1909 to ^liss Alice Ryan, of Chicago, and to them 
one child, Frances, has been born. Fraternally he is identified with the Mac- 
cabees and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



\MLLIAM MAJOR. M. D. 

Since 1906 Dr. William IMajor has practiced in Peoria, maintaining his office 
at No. 3028 South Adams street. He was born on the farm of his father in 
Woodford county. Illinois, December 17, 1873, his parents being Joseph and 
Mary F. (Jones) Major. He was reared on the home farm and received a 
common-school education at the country schoolhouse, after which he entered 
Eureka College, from which he w-as graduated in 1896. Subsequently he en- 
tered the Chicago College of Physicians and Surgeons, winning the degree of 
yi. D. in 1901. He commenced the practice of medicine in Mexico, where he 
went as surgeon for the American Smelting & Refining Company, now the 
American Products & Refining Company. This position he held with distinc- 
tion to himself and satisfaction to his employers until 1906, after which he re- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 211 

moved to Peoria, entering upon a general practice. The Doctor is enjoying an 
extensive and lucrative patronage, particularly in South Peoria, which is grow- 
ing year by year as his professional skill is coming to be more generally recog- 
nized and as his acquaintance is being extended. He served for the two years 
of 1909 and 1910 as assistant county physician, a ])osition which he filled with 
much credit. 

On October 7, 1903, Dr. Major married Miss Maud Meacham, of hlureka, 
Illinois, and they reside at 2416 South Adams street. Fraternally he is a Mason, 
exemplifying in his life the beneficent teachings of the craft. Dr. Major is 
well and favorably known among the members of the medical fraternity here 
and in his practice has ever conformed to the highest ])rofessional ethics. 



WILLIAM T. DOWDALL, M. D., B. A. 

Occupying a conspicuous place in the professional galaxy of Peoria stands 
Dr. William T. Dowdall, a ]ihysician and surgeon whose natural ability, educa- 
tion and training have secured for him not only a fine general practice but also 
numerous appointments of trust and honor by various life insurance companies 
and fraternal orders and by one of the greatest railroad corporations in this 
state. The Doctor has practiced in Peoria since 1905. He is a native of this 
city, born August 18, 1872, a son of William T. and Delle (Mason) Dowdall. 
His father for twenty-five years was a newspaper man in Illinois. During his 
professional career he published two papers in Peoria — the Peoria Daily National 
Democrat (succeeded later by the Herald) and the Evening Review. He like- 
wise published the Pekin (111.) Times, the \'irginia Enquirer and the Jackson- 
ville Daily Courier. William T. Dowdall was also the first postmaster to oc- 
cupy the present fine postofifice building of this city, serving four years during 
President Cleveland's first term of ofifice. He is now living retired in Memphis, 
Tennessee, with another son, Paul Mason Dowdall, an attorney. 

William T. Dowdall, Jr., whose name introduces this review, received his 
early education in the common and high schools of the citv of his nativity. He 
became the first special delivery messenger in Peoria. Wishing to augment his 
knowledge, he entered the Illinois College at Jacksonville, there taking the 
preparatory course, and afterward attended the Wabash College at Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana, from which he was graduated in 1895 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. In the fall of that year he entered the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in Chicago, being graduated with honors from that institution in 1898. 
Subsequently he had over one year's experience as interne at the West Side 
Hospital in Chicago and then secured a civil service appointment placing him 
on the board of health in that city, a position which he held from 1899 until 
1903. During that time he was on the smallpox staff and also was commissioned 
to the care of scarlet fever and diphtheria cases. After the valuable profes- 
sional experience thus secured in Chicago. Dr. Dowdall, with his brother. Dr. 
Guy Dowdall. now chief surgeon of the Illinois Central Railroad went to Clin- 
ton, Illinois, in 1903, there practicing in partnership with his brother until 1905, 
when he came to Peoria. During the period of their residence in Clinton the 
brothers were division surgeons for the Illinois Central. On coming to Peoria, 
Dr. \\'illiam T. Dowdall opened offices at No. 105 South JefTer.son street and 
later removed to suite 232, Woolner building, where he is now located. In 
addition to discharging the duties devolving upon him by reason of his large 
general practice, Dr. Dowdall acts as local surgeon for the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, examiner for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, the Central Union 
Life Insurance Company, the Hartford Life Insurance Company, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, Independent Order of Foresters, Mystic Workers of 



212 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

the World and Fraternal Reserves. He is a member of the National Railroad 
Surgeons Association, the American Medical Association and the Peoria City 
and' Illinois State Medical Societies. 

Dr. Dowdall was united in marriage, in 1901, to Miss Anna Connole of Car- 
roUton, Illinois, and to them has been born one child, Annadelle :\Iason Dow- 
dall. Mrs. Dowdall is a leader in musical circles of the city and with her rich 
soprano of a peculiarly soft timbre and sweetness, of remarkable power of ex- 
pression, and precision and clearness of tone, even in the upper registers, often 
delights enraptured audiences with her renditions. The Doctor is a prominent 
member of the Creve Coeur and Kickapoo Golf Clubs. 



EBERHARD GODEL. 



A country has but one ruler, be he emperor, president or king. Few, there- 
fore, have the opportunity of attaining to the highest administrative position 
and the prizes in military life, too, are comparatively few. The field of business, 
however, is limitless and its prizes are many ; they may be won by earnest, per- 
sistent and intelligently directed efifort and as one passes beyond the starting 
point of his career he tinds that competition is less and his chances more certain. 
Eberhard Godel is numbered among those whose prosperity had its root in de- 
termined, persistent effort and sound business judgment. Moreover, his dealings 
were at all times in conformity with the high standard of commercial ethics and 
thus when death called him he left to his family the priceless heritage of an 
untarnished name as well as a most substantial competence. He was one of the 
worthy citizens Germany furnished Peoria, his birth having occurred in Feuer- 
bach, Wurtemberg, Germany, :\Iay 26, 1836. He was a youth of fourteen years 
when he came with his mother and younger sister to America. He served a four 
years' apprenticeship to the hatters' trade in Hoboken, New Jersey, and in 1854 
came with his mother and sister to Peoria where he became connected with the 
butchers' trade. For two years he was associated in that business with Charles 
Breier and then removed to Burlington, Iowa, where he engaged in the business 
of slaughtering and of selling meat. In 1857 he became a resident of Monmouth, 
Illinois, where he conducted a similar business and in May, 1858, he returned to 
Peoria. For nine years thereafter, he devoted his attention to buying and selling 
stock and won a measure of success in that business that enabled him to start 
out along another line. In 1867 he bought an interest in the firm of Ullman & 
Gebhardt at wdiich time the firm style of Godel & Gebhardt was assumed. This 
relation continued for ten years and in 1877 Mr. Godel purchased his partner's 
interest and bent his energies to the conduct of his business which he continually 
enlarged in scope and volume. He began pork packing in addition to slaughtering 
and selling meats and his jjatronage steadily increased. In 1882 his son. George 
G., joined him in a partnership under the firm name of E. Godel & Son and in 1885 
Frank G. Godel joined them under the firm style of E. Godel & Sons, the firm 
being incorporated in 1888. ]\Ir. Godel was successful in his chosen business 
and became the leading slaughterer and vendor of meats in the city of Peoria, 
and so continued for many years. He was fairly successful in his business and 
accumulated a fair fortune, which, with his good name, he left to his family 
as their inheritance. In 1882 he erected a brick business block on North Adams 
street, where he conducted the office and retail departments of the business. 

On the 8th of June, 1857. in Burlington, Iowa, occurred the marriage of 
Mr. Godel and Miss Elizabeth Renz, who was born September 15, 1832. in Liver- 
pool, Perry county, Pennsylvania. Her father. John Renz, was born in Schoen- 
dorf, Wurtemberg, Germany. June 9, 1782, and died the year of his arrival in 
Peoria — 1858. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Alary Elizabeth Smith, 




EBERHAltn GODEL 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 215 

was born in Liver])ool, Perry county, Pennsylvania, September 12, 1804, and 
in 1858 came to Peoria where she passed away in 1880. Seven children were 
born unto Mr. and Mrs. Godel : George G., deceased ; Frank G. ; Henry, who 
has departed this life; Henry E. ; Albert, also deceased; Theodore A.; and 
Louisa. Mr. Godel met death in the great railroad wreck at Chatsworth on the 
loth of August, 1887. He was spoken of as a "man of quiet, unostentatious 
manners, diligent in business, a faithful, devoted friend and honorable and up- 
right in all the relations of life." His political allegiance was given to the re- 
publican party and while he never sought office he was always loyal in citizenship 
and devoted to the best interests of the community in which he lived. He held 
member.ship in the Alethodist church, was an advocate of temperance and a 
supjiorter of all those i)rojects and measures which he deemed essential to honor- 
able, upright manhood. Peoria recognized that in his death she had lost one of 
her representative and valued citizens and many of his friends in this city still 
cherish his memorv. 



GEORGE J. JOBST. 



One who bears the name of Jobst needs no introduction to the readers of 
this volume, for the name has figured prominently and honorably in connection 
with building interests here and is a synonym for all that is most progressive in 
that field of labor. Under the firm name of \'al Jobst & Sons a contracting busi- 
ness is conducted that is second to none in Illinois. In addition to his connec- 
tion with this firm George J. Jobst is a director in the Dime Savings Bank, fig- 
uring in financial circles of Peoria in this capacity since 1909. 

He was born in this city in September, 1875, and pursued his education in 
the public schools. His business training came to him from his father, \'alen- 
tine Jobst, Sr., after he had graduated from the Peoria high school and also 
from the Uni\-ersity of Illinois, in which he pursued a course as a civil and ar- 
chitectural engineer. The broad scientific training thus received has been a feat- 
ure in the success of the firm, for after leaving school he at once joined his 
father and brothers in the conduct of a business of great magnitude. Their 
efforts extend beyond the limits of Peoria and their reputation places them in a 
foremost position as leading contractors of central Illinois. 

George J. Jobst was united in marriage to Miss Laura E. Nelson, of Cham- 
paign, Illinois, and in the social circles of Peoria they occupy a prominent place. 
Mr. Jobst belongs to the Delta Tau Delta, a college fraternity, also to the Creve 
Coeur Club and the Country Club of Peoria and to the University Club of Chi- 
cago. He is a typical young business man of the present age — wide-awake, 
energetic and resourceful, finding his opportunities in prevailing conditions, 
which he wisely utilizes in the upbuilding of his own fortunes and in the im- 
provement of the city of his nativity. 



HARRY T. TRUE. 



Among the young men of Peoria who undeniably exercise a percei)tible in- 
fluence in the business world of the city, is Harry J. True. Without tletracting 
from the inerits of thousands of other young men, who have .gained hoimrable 
distinction and enduring names for themselves in the jiaths of honest industrv 
ill this city, we may safely say that few men of his years have interwoven their 
names with as many projects and enterprises as has Mr. True. He belongs to 



216 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Peoria, whose citizens claim him as their own, and who dehght in honoring his 
intelhgence and business energy on any possible occasion. 

Mr. True, a young business man of ability and sterling integrity, was born 
on the home farm in Saratoga township, Marshall county, Illinois, January 25, 
1884. and his father, Albert True, is now living retired in Henry, this state. 
Harry J. True was reared under the parental roof, and began his education in 
the common schools, taking later on a high-school course in Marshall county, 
and then attended the Illinois Normal School of Dixon and completed his 
education in Brown's Business College of Peoria. At the age of eighteen he 
left the home farm and came to Peoria, here becoming identified with the imple- 
ment trade. In 1908 he secured a half interest in the old established imple- 
ment, transfer and storage business of the Kircher Company, a concern founded 
twenty-five or thirty years ago by Henry C. Kircher, now deceased. The com- 
pany handles carriages, buggies, implements, horse supplies and accessories, and 
does a large business in those lines. The transfer and storage of household 
goods is an equally important part of their business, to which they give careful 
attention with the result that they do a very satisfactory business in those lines. 
Harry J. True was the very efficient manager of this concern until January i, 
191 2, and not a little of their success was due to his careful management and 
capable business ability. On the first of January, 1912, he sold his interest in 
the above company, to take up the duties of oiifice manager of the Domestic 
Vacuum Sweeper Company. This sweeper was invented by Dr. Quist of Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts, who sold the right to patent and manufacture the same 
to the present owners. On February i, 1911, was organized the Domestic 
\'acuum Sweeper Company with headquarters at Peoria, Illinois, and factories 
at Worcester. Massachusetts. The business has grown wonderfully. The out- 
put which at first was about thirty per day has now reached six hundred, and 
the factories are being rebuilt to increase the output to over one thousand per 
day. The product is sold throughout America and Europe and many salesman 
are employed. The sweeper is designed especially for cleaning carpets and 
rugs. However, it can be used most successfully for cleaning walls, draperies, 
upholstered furniture, bedding, etc.. by use of special attachments. There is 
nothing to get out of order, and nothing to wear out — shortly, it is an article 
that is almost indispensable to the housewife. This industry is bound to prove 
one of the greatest in the middle west. The officers of the company are, Silas 
Ropp, president; B. C. Koch, secretary and treasurer; J. E. Gerber, vice pres- 
ident and general manager; Harry J. True, office manager. 

During Mr. True's ten years' residence in this city he has demonstrated that 
he not only has good business qualifications but also social qualities which indicate 
that he will achieve a prominent place in our business and social circles. In 
business transactions, he exhibits a quick appreciation and prompt decision 
which are as necessary to the successful merchant as the successful general, but 
tempered with a courtesv which wins the esteem of all who come into contact with 
him. In private life, his amiable and generous disposition have endeared him 
to numbers of friends. Mr. True has the rare gift of imbuing his followers 
w-ith an enthusiasm that never wearies nor is mercenary. Especially do the 
young men take service under him and do an incredible amount of work in- 
spired by that dvnamic force of their leader. Add to these qualities, an unabating 
energy, a perfect grasp of detail, an intensity of purpose that never takes any- 
thing for granted, and a boldness in planning, and a rapidity of execution that 
leaves between the flash and the report scarcely the interval of a second, and 
you have Mr. True in an almost perfect light. 

As a life companion, Mr. True chose Miss Josephine Cline, of Canton, Illi- 
nois, their union occurring November 18, 1909, and to them has been born a 
daughter, ]Marie Catherine, on November 28, 191 1. Social diversions Mr. True 
finds as a member of the Creve Coeur Club, and he is affiliated with the Travel- 



HISTORY OF PF.ORIA COUNTY 217 

ers" Protective Association. Mr. True's thorough business (|uahlications and 
his well-known executive ability have always been in great demand in the com- 
mercial activities of Peoria, and his strict probity in all his relations, have met 
with that return of warm ])ersonal regard and financial success which such dis- 
tinguishing qualities richly merit. 



CHAUNCEY G. COLE. 

Among the many successful business men of Peoria who have won place 
and fortune as the direct result of their own untiring diligence and unfailing 
integrity, we find occupying a prominent position Chauncey G. Cole, sales man- 
ager and director of the Jobst-Bethard Company, the largest and best known 
wholesale grocery house in this city. Mr. Cole, wdio is one of Peoria's own 
sons, was born on the 13th of January, 1874, his parents being Johnson L. and 
Louisa A. Cole. The father is one of Peoria's most prominent and influential 
men. He is a pioneer banker and a thirty-third degree Mason and his name is 
a household word in this city. More extended mention is made of him on 
another page of this work. 

Chauncey G. Cole was reared and educated in Peoria. lie attended its jjublic 
schools, where his diligence fitted him at the early age of fifteen years to accept- 
ably fill a position with the great wholesale establishment with which he has 
been for twenty-three consecutive years actively connected. Beginning at the 
foot of the ladder, he worked himself up through the various subordinate de- 
partments until he became sales and pricing manager for this mammoth con- 
cern, which has in its emjjloy more than a score of traveling salesmen, dispens- 
ing its output throughout the central west. In addition to the management of 
his departments, his voice is heard as a director in all the affairs and details 
concerning the policy of the business. PTaving grown up in the atmosphere of 
the wholesale grocery trade, he is well qualified to give advice on every detail 
of its affairs, and his alertness to the needs of the trade, gained through his 
close connection with the travelers representing the company, renders his counsel 
invaluable along all lines. The concern of Jobst-Bethard Company owes to him 
in no small degree the large success which it is enjoying. 

Mr. Cole chose for his life partner ]\Iiss Lillian C. Best of Peoria, a daugh- 
ter of Herman Best. One child, Louisa A. Cole, has been born to them. Mr. 
Cole occupies a prominent place in the fraternal life of the city. Pie is a Knight 
Templar Mascin, belongs to the Mystic Shrine and is at present eminent com- 
mander in the commandery. Long a member of the Travelers' Protective Asso- 
ciation, he is one of the state directors of that body and also chairman of the 
state board. The city of Peoria has few young men of greater promise and 
of more real value to its business, social, civic and fraternal life than Chauncev 
G. Cole. 



JOHN H. DUNLAP. 



Among those who are active in managing city affairs in official capacities is 
.numbered John H. Dunlap, who is now serving as alderman from the Fourth 
ward. At the same time he is carrying on a successful business as a contractor 
and builder, and in this connection has secured an extensive and growing 
patronage. He has resided in Peoria continuously since 1894 and since 181)7 
has been identified with its building interests. He was born at Chenoa, Illinois, 
on the 17th of February, i86g. His father, John Dunlap, was also a carpenter 
and contractor, who for a long period was engaged in building in Chenoa, 



218 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

where John II. Dunlap spent his boyhood and youth and acquired his educa- 
tion as a public-school student. He afterward learned the carpenter's trade 
under the direction of his father, with whom he worked until his removal to 
Chicago, Illinois, where he resided for eight years, later coming to Peoria. His 
training was thorough and practical and he came to this city well qualified to 
win advancement. His work has ever commended him to the public patronage, 
for he is straightforward and reliable in his dealings. After two or three years 
spent in this city in the employ of others he started in business on his own 
account and is today well known as a general contractor, evidences of whose 
handiwork are seen in some of the fine structures of the city. He erected the res- 
idences of Charles Ulrich, A. C. Pffeifer, \V. J. Balzer and a number of others, 
and also remodeled the Lyceum Theater and Onken's Laundry. During the busy 
season he has employed as many as fifty carpenters. He gives to all of the 
work his general supervision and sees to it that the labor is thoroughly done, 
that the buildings are constructed in a substantial manner and at the same time 
close attention is paid to comfort and convenience. 

In 1903, in Peoria. ^Ir. Dunlap was united in marriage to IMiss Nettie Wil- 
liamson, and thev have become the parents of an interesting little daughter, 
Ruth. ^Ir. Duniap is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In the former organization he has taken 
the degrees of the chapter and council and has filled all of the chairs in the differ- 
ent Masonic organizations with which he has been identified. His political 
allegiance is given to the Republican party, which, recognizing his fitness for 
office, made him its nominee for the position of city councilman in the spring 
of 1908. He was elected on that occasion and after two years' service received 
indorsement of his course in office in reelection. In 1912 he again was elected 
to the office, so that he is now serving for the third term. He does everything 
in his power in this connection to further the best interests of the city and his 
practical and beneficial ideas concerning good government are recognized by 
his associates in the council and the general public. 



benja:\iin d, brewster. 

Benjamin D. Brewster is vice president of the Brewster-Evans Coal Com- 
pany, producers and wholesalers of coal, with offices at 1028 Jefferson build- 
ing, Peoria. j\Ir. Brewster was born in Peru, Illinois. November 24. 18^14. 
His father, Theron D. Brewster, went to Peru in 1835 and in 1836-7 laid out 
the site of that city. The Brewsters still own considerable property in Peru 
and vicinity. After a long and successful business life Theron D. Brewster 
died in 1897. after which event Benjamin D. Brewster took up the work where 
it had been laid down. The senior Brewster was one of the first directors of 
the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company and also a prominent 
banker in his day. 

Benjamin D. Brewster was reared in Peru, where he received his early edu- 
cation, but while yet only a boy he became identified with the Chicago Board 
of Trade. His experience as a coal dealer and operator covers a period of about 
fifteen years. For many years during his early business career he paid a great 
deal of attention to locating and selling coal mines. In 1909 Mr. Brewster be- 
came the senior member of the coal firm of Brewster & Evans, which was con- 
ducted and continued in Peoria until February, 191 1, when was incorporated 
the Brewster-Evans Coal Company. The base of the supplies of this company 
is principally near South Bartonville, Peoria county. \\'allace C. Evans being 
president of the corporation. Their mine and coal are named the "\\'alben." 
Messrs. Brewster and Evans were interested in. the Crescent Coal Company 



HISTORY ()!• l'I-:()RI A COUNTY 'J19 

about one year. Previous to his locating; in Peoria. .Mr. I'.rewster had been in 
the coal business many years. Fie is a business man of sterhng intei,'rity. with 
a large circle of associates and friends. He is vice president an<l chairman of 
the board of directors of the Peru Plow & Wheel Company of Peru, Illinois, 
a concern doing an extensive business and retjuiring consideraljle attention at 
the hands of Mr. Brewster. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Brewster chose 
Miss Anna Detweiller, of Peoria, daughter of John and Louisa Detweiller. ( )ne 
son was born to them, Ik'njamin 1).. Jr. The family reside at Xo. 1015 North 
Jefferson avenue in Peoria. 



JOHNSON LAFAYETTE COLE. 

There are few, if any. residents of Peoria of Mr. Cole's age — seventy-eiglit 
years — who can claim as long a connection witli the city and its development 
as he, for he was but two years of age when brought to the little frontier village 
that has now become the second city in size in Blinois. He has, therefore, 
witnessed the development of this district from the days of the primitive past 
to the progressive present when Peoria has every advantage and opportunity 
known to the older east. To its development and jirogress he has made valu- 
able contribution through his identification in business affairs and in every rela- 
tion he has commanded the unc|ualified regard of his fellow townsmen. 

Mr. Cole was born in Cheshire. Berkshire county, Masachusetts, January 
19, 1834. The ancestral line is traced back to Hugh Cole of English birth who 
I)ecame the father of the American branch of the family, settling at Plymouth, 
Massachusetts, in 1632. and in 1634 he wedded INIary F"oxhall and from him the 
line of descent is traced down to Benjamin Cole, who was born in Swansea, 
Massachusetts, in 1678; Israel Cole in Swansea, in 1709; Israel Cole (11), born 
at Rehoboth in 1735: David Cole, born in Cheshire, in 1781 : and .Mmiran S. 
Cole, born in Cheshire in 1803. The founder of the family in the new world 
was a man of prominence in his community, filling various important positions 
in connection with the colonial government such as deputy of the general court, 
selectman of his town, and others. In September, 1835, Almiran S. Cole left 
Lanesboro. Massachusetts, and after spending sixty days in traveling across 
the country reached Peoria. In the embryo city he established a store on Main 
street but after two vears sold out to Gardner T. Barker who had been a clerk 
in his employ. Through the succeeding two years Mr. Cole ran the steamer 
"Frontier" as a passenger packet between La Salle and St. Louis. This was 
one of the first boats of its class on the Illinois river. Later Mr. Cole again, 
embarked in merchandising, erecting a building in which to conduct his store. 
In 1844 he built the first distillery in Peoria, conducting it for two and one half 
years after which he sold out to Sylvanus Thompson. In 1847 he began the 
erection of a much larger establishment — a four story structure which was huih 
at a cost of thirty-eight thousand dollars and had a capacity of sixteen hundred 
busliels of grain ]K'r da\-. In a history ])ublished in 1831 this is spoken of as 
one of the largest Iniildings in the Mississippi valley. .Mr. Cole had previously 
built the first wareliouse in Peoria on the site of old Fort Clark, .-\fter dis- 
posing of his second distillery in 1868 he removed to a farm in East Peoria 
upon which he spent his remaining days in practical retirement save for his 
supervision of his large real-estate interests. He was married at Pownall. \'cr- 
mont. January 18, 1833, to Chloe M. Brown of Cheshire. Mas.sachusetts. who 
died February ig. 1882. In their familv were nine children. 

Johnson L. Cole, one of the two surviving of this family, was liut two years 
of age at the time of ihc removal to Peoria which occurred four vears after the 



220 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Black Hawk war. He was one of the first pu|)ils in the schools of this town, 
and in his youth he became assistant to his father who was then conducting a 
distillery. In that connection he worked his way upward and in i860 became 
general manager, thus acquiring a wide acquaintance with practical business 
affairs. The distillery was sold in 1862 and Air. Cole afterward became an 
accountant in the office of a provost marshal at Peoria which position he con- 
tinued to fill until the close of the war. In 1865 he then accompanied Adjutant 
Norton to Jacksonville and assisted in closing up the affairs of the office at that 
point, .\bout 1868 he became accountant in the wholesale grocery house of 
S. H. Thompson, with whom he remained until the business was closed out in 
1881. He then became accountant in the banking house of Callender, Ayres i& 
Company, predecessors of the Commercial National Bank and remained with 
the institution through all its various changes until 1908 when he resigned. He 
is still, however, a director in the bank but at the present time gives his atten- 
tion to no active business duties. The rest that he is enjoying is well merited 
for through many years he continued a prominent factor in business circles of 
the city. Mr. Cole has been married twice. His first wife, Louisa A. Mason, 
was a daughter of William and Anne Mason of Peoria. The children of this 
marriage are: Lafayette, who spent seven years in Japan, but is now located at 
San Diego, California; Annie, who died in infancy; Elwood Andrew, cashier 
of the Commercial National Bankj William Edmund, cashier in the bank of 
Zell, Hotchkiss & Company; Alice Thompson, who died in infancy; Chauncey 
Guth, connected with the grocery house of the Jobst-Bethard Company ; and 
Thaddeus Elv, who died in infancy. The wife and mother passed away June 
4, 1876. Mr. Cole was later married to Mrs. Emma L. Harlow of Peoria, 
who by her former marriage had three daughters : Mrs. Mary Beckenhaupt, 
Jessie T. and Ruth M. 

Mr. Cole is a prominent Mason, stalwart in his support of the principles and 
purpose of the fraternity. He belongs to Peoria Lodge, F. & A. M. ; also the 
chapter, council and commandery of which he is a past eminent commander. In 
the consistory he has attained the thirty-second degree and he belongs to Mo- 
hammed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., and to St. Helena Conclave of the Knights 
of Constantine in Peoria. On September 7, 1907, at Boston, Massachusetts, 
the thirty-third degree in Masonry was conferred upon Mr. Cole. He is most 
loyal to the teachings of the craft and has held office in many of its branches. 
His entire life has been spent in harmony with its basic principles for he has 
ever recognized the brotherhood of man and has labored untiringly to secure 
their adoption. 



HARRY B. MAGEE, M. D. 

The medical profession has many worthy representatives in Peoria county — 
men who have been well trained for the onerous and responsible duties which 
now devolve upon them and who are most conscientious in their performance. 
To this class belongs Dr. Harry B. iNIagee. who is one of the best known and 
most successful among the yoimger physicians of the city. He has practiced 
here only since October 3, 1910, coming to this city after a year's private prac- 
tice in Pennsylvania and a year's service as interne in the Williamsport ( Penn- 
sylvania) Hospital. He is a native son of the Keystone state, his birth having 
occurred in Clarion county, April 28, 1884, his parents Ijeing John A. and Anna 
Eliza (Sloan) Magee. The father died in 1900. He was a prominent hardware 
merchant of Clarion and his enterprise ancl energy were important factors in 
promoting the business activity of that place. 




DR. 11. II. M,\i;KK 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTV 223 

Dr. Magec was reared in his native town and at the usual age entered the 
Clarion pubHc schools, wherein he pursued his studies until graduated from 
the high school with the class of igoi. He was ambitious, however, to acquire 
a broader knowledge and in liucknell University, of Pennsylvania, he pursued 
a special course in biology and chemistry, thus preparing himself to enter upon 
the study of medicine, which he pursued in the University of Pennsylvania, 
completing a four years" course at his graduation from the medical department 
of that institution in the spring of 1908. His standing won him appointment 
to the pt)sition of interne in the W'illiamsport Hospital of Williamsport, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained for a year, after which he returned to his native 
town, where he opened an otifice and continued in practice for a year. On the 
^d of October, 1910, however, he arrived in Peoria and has since engaged in 
general ])ractice here. His patronage has steadily increased anil the demands 
upon his time and skill are now many. 

In 1910 Dr. IMagee was married to Miss Cora Estelle Moore, of Clarion, 
Pennsylvania, and during the period of their residence in this city they have 
made many friends. Dr. IMagee, however, is closely concentrating his energies 
and attention upon his profession. He belongs to the Peoria City Medical 
Society, the Illinois State Medical Society, the American Medical Association, 
and the John 1!. Deaver Surgical Society, which is connected with the L'niversity 
of Pennsylvania. He is also a member of the Sigma Chi, a college fraternity, 
and is a ^lason. He finds ample opportunity to exemplify the spirit of the craft 
in his practice and again and again in a professional connection extends a help- 
ing hand to the poor and needy, thus recognizing the fundamental principles 
U])on which Masonry is f(^unflcd — the l)rotherhood of mankind. 



WILLIAM H. WILLIS, M. D. 

Dr. William 11. Willis is a very successful general medical practitioner of 
Peoria, where he has followed his profession since the 1st of April, 1898. His 
ability is displayed in the liberal patronage accorded him, for the worth of the 
l^hysician is at once manifest in the results which attend his labors. Added to 
broad scientific knowledge he has a sympathetic manner and a spirit of human- 
itarianism that constitute features of his growing and well deserved success. 
He has been a representative of the profession in Illinois since 1881, although 
a resident of Peoria only since 1898. He was born at Ipava, Fulton county, 
Illinois, January 20, i8C)0, a son of Dr. Amos Q. Willis, who practiced medicine 
at Ipava until his death, which occurred when his son William was but thir- 
teen months old. The lioy was reared in Fulton county and there attended the 
public scliools until he entered upon the study of medicine, pursuing a course 
in the ^Missouri Medical College, at St. Louis, from which he was graduated 
in the class of 188 1. Immediately afterward he opened an office in Eureka, 
Illinois, where he remained for five years, removing in 1886 to Marshall county, 
Illinois, where he continued in active practice for eleven years. Desirous of 
]iromoting his knowledge and skill he then entered the Xew York Polyclinic, 
where he inirsued his studies in 1897 and 1898, iieing in due lime graduated 
therefrdm. With this added equipment he resolved to seek the broader op- 
l)ortunitics offered in the city and came to Peoria. He has a large general 
practice but also specializes to a considera1)le extent in surgery and displays 
rare training and ability in that line. He has a comprehensive knowledge of 
the anatomy and the component parts of the human body and possesses that 
cool and quiet nerve necessary in emergency cases. He has served on the staff 
of Proctor Hosj^ital and is a member of the Peoria Citv and Illinois State 

Medical Societies and the American Medical Association. 
Vol. n— 11 



224 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

At Eureka, Illinois, in 1884, Dr. Willis was united in marriage to Miss Dycie 
Van Dyke, of that city, and they have become the parents of three children : 
Ethel, who is the wife of E. A. Brown, a resident of Elmwood, Illinois; and 
Hazel and Harold, twins, the former the wife of Charles E. Smith, of Elm- 
wood, and the latter now managing the farming interests of his father, in south- 
eastern Missouri. 

.\si(le from his professional interests. Dr. \\"illis is connected with agriculture 
in Illinois, and is the owner of valuable farm property which returns him a sub- 
stantial and gratifying annual income. He is also meeting with a large measure 
of success in his practice and his position as a representative of the medical 
fraternity of Peoria is most creditable. Several years ago, prior to his removal 
to this city, he was a member of the Illinois National Guard and was accounted 
one of the best marksmen of the state, at which time Colonel Rice was inspector 
for the state. Dr. Willis belongs to the Creve Coeur Club and has many friends 
among its members. He is also widely and favorably known in other connec- 
tions, possessing the social, genial qualities which everywhere gain friendship 
and win confidence. 



HARRY BATES. 



Commercial progress and prosperity are conserved through the efforts of 
such enterprising and reliable business men as Harry Bates, who occupies a 
creditable position in the business circles of Peoria as a manufacturer of office, 
store and bank fixtures, his establishment being located at Nos. 612 to 618 
Alonroe street, inclusive. He has been connected with this line of business 
for twenty-six years and for twenty-two years has been owner of his present 
concern. Twenty-eight years' residence in t^eoria has brought him a wide ac- 
quaintance, and the wise use which he has made of his time and opportunities 
during this period has gained for him the favorable regard of all with whom 
he has come in contact. 

yLr. Bates is a native of the neighboring state of Indiana, his birth having 
occurred in the town of Attica, August 16. 1859. His father, Albert Bates, 
was a blacksmith, who removed from Indiana to Illinois, settling with his family 
in the eastern part of this state just after the close of the Civil war. Harry 
Bates was therefore reared in Illinois and is indebted to its public-school system 
for the educational privileges which were accorded him. He began learning the 
trade of manufacturing office and store fixtures in 1877 but afterward worked 
at the trade in Chicago, in Denver, Colorado, and in other cities. Eventually 
he came to Peoria, where he has now made his home for twenty-eight years. 
He entered the employ of the Tucker Furniture Company of this city in the 
capacity of cabinet-maker and afterward was connected with the firm of Castle 
& Son, manufacturers of and dealers in office, store and bank fixtures. About 
twenty-two years ago he started in business on his own account, opening his 
factory at 213 INIain street, whei'e he remained until he removed to the corner 
of Fulton and Madison streets, remaining there until he removed to his present 
location about 1896, in which year he erected the building he now occupies. 
This is a two-story brick structure with basement, well equipped for the manu- 
facture of office, store and bank fixtures. It is supplied with the latest im- 
proved machinery and he employs about fifteen workmen in the manufacture 
of all classes of store, bank and office furniture. The business has steadilv grown 
and has reached gratifying proportions, the high-grade work and moderate 
prices bringing a good trade. 

Mr. Bates was married in Peoria, in 1894, to ^liss Alice Thompson, who 
was born and reared in this city and is a daughter of Joseph Thompson, now 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 



zso 



deceased, whi.) was one of Peoria's early settlers. Mr. and Airs. Pates have a 
daughter, Ruth. Mr. Pates belongs to the Illinois \'alley Yacht Club, which 
indicates something of the nature of his recreation. Plis interests are wide and 
varied, covering those activities which relate to the city's welfare as well as to 
individual enterprise and social affairs. Laudable ambition has brought him to 
his present position in manufacturing circles and his success proves what may 
be accomplished when determination and energy are unremittingly employed to 
overcome obstacles and difficulties and to meet competition. 



S. L. NELSON. 



Prominent among the energetic, far-sighted and successful business men of 
Peoria is S. L. Nelson, whose w^ell formulated plans, executive ability and in- 
itiative spirit have carried him into important relations and brought him to a 
position of leadership in connection with business affairs of this cty. He is 
today vice president of the Peoria Railway Company and also a director of the 
Dime Savings & Trust, Title & Trust, and the Merchants' National Banks. His 
identification with the Peoria Railway Company dates from 1906, but for thirty- 
five years he has been connected with railway and lighting interests. He was 
horn upon a farm near Fort Wayne, Indiana, June 23, 1859, and there resided 
until fourteen years of age, attending the country schools and meeting the usual 
experiences of farm life. At that early period he started out to make his own 
way in the world and his first position was that of water boy, carrying water 
to the men working on the construction of the Chicago division of the lialtimore 
& CJhio Railroad along the boundary line between the states of Indiana and 
Ohio. Subsequently he engaged in driving a team and also in building fences in 
connection with the construction of the same road, but he was ambitious, ener- 
getic and industrious and gradually worked his way upward, at length becom- 
ing telegraph operator on the Chicago division of the road. For ten years he 
handled the key and also became interested in the telephone business to which 
he later directed his entire attention. He constructed one of the first telephone 
exchanges in Illinois, outside of Chicago ( Cham])aign-Urbana) and promoted 
many of the early long-distance lines. In April, 1885, he became identified 
with W. B. AIcKinley, now president of the Illinois Traction system, and similar 
interests, whose residence is in Champaign, Illinois. Mr. AIcKinley was at 
that time largely interested in banking, real-estate and mortgage brokerage en- 
terprises and also purchased the electric light, street raihvay and w'ater works 
at Champaign, Illinois, of which Mr. Nelson became manager and treasurer. 
The interests of the company were continuously extended into Ohio, Michigan, 
Indiana and Kansas and about 1905 they jnirchased the Peoria Street Railway. 
I'ntil 1909 Air. Nelson was in full charge of the business but in that year re- 
tired from the active management, continuing as vice president. He removed 
to Peoria in 1906 and under his guidance the street railway system of this city 
was greatly improved, making it thoroughly modern and up-to-date in its equip- 
ment and in its operation. As previously stated, he is one of the directors of 
the Merchants' National Bank of Peoria and he was until January i, 1912. pres- 
ident of the Atchison (Kansas) Light & Power Company. Tie is also a director 
of the Trade-Mark Title Company of New York and I'ort Wayne, an institu- 
tion having representatives in every important city in the world. Gradually 
since starting out in life on his own account, he has worked his way u])ward 
and the circumstances and conditions of his business career have called forth 
strong purpose, have developed his powers and made him one of the forceful 
factors in the control of interests w^hich have had most important bearing upon 
the city and its progress. 



226 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Lupton, of Champaign. 
Illinois, and imto them have been born six children: Elgie, now the wife of K. 
M. Cressler, of Fort Wayne, Indiana ; Jeannette ; William O., a lieutenant of 
cadets at the Culver Military Academy; Grace; Elizabeth; and Charlotte. Mr. 
Nelson is identified with several fraternal organizations and is a prominent 
Mason, holding membership in Fort Wayne Consistory, and also in .Mizpah 
Temjjle of the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise connected with the Elks, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America, and is ever loyal 
to these diflferent organizations. He is likewise one of the directors of the 
Illinois \'alley Yacht Club and a member of the Creve Coeur Club, and of the 
Peor'a Country Club. These associations indicate something of the nature of 
his hiterests and recreation and also place his social standing which, like his 
business position, is of the highest. 



JOSEPH A. \\"EIL 



Twenty years' connection with the Peoria bar has well established Joseph 
A. Weil's position as a capable lawyer. He has gained distinction, especially in 
the field of criminal law in the middle west, and is perhaps without a peer in 
this branch of the profession in Peoria, his native city. He was born ^lay 30, 
1870, and is a son of I. A. and Barbetta (Heroldj Weil. His youthful days were 
here passed without any event of special importance. Like most boys, his 
youth was largely devoted to the acquirement of an education and in mastering 
the branches of learning in the various grades he won promotion until he en- 
tered the Peoria high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 
1886. In the meantime he had resolved to enter upon the practice of law as 
a life work and with this end in view he began reading in the office and under the 
direction of Michael O'Shaughnessy. He afterward became a student in the 
law office of I. C. Edwards and, following his admission to the bar. in 1891. 
joined Mr. Edwards in a partnership, becoming junior member of the law firm 
of Edwards & Weil. That connection was continued for about three years, or 
until March i, 1894, when Mr. Weil withdrew and has since practiced in- 
dependently. 

His success in a professional way affords the best evidence of his capabilities 
in this line. He is a strong advocate with the jury and clear and concise in his 
appeals before the court. In no calling is there a career more open to talent than 
in that of the law and in no field of endeavor is there demanded a more careful 
lireparation, a more thorough appreciation of the absolute ethics of life or of the 
underlving principles which form the basis of human rights and privileges. Un- 
flagging application and intuitive wisdom together with a determination to fully 
utilize the means at hand are the concomitants which insure personal success 
and prestige in this great profession which stands as the stern conservator of 
justice. Possessing all the requisite qualities of the able lawyer, Mr. Weil has 
made continuous advancement since entering upon jiractice and is today the 
strongest criminal lawyer of Peoria, nor is his reputation limited by this city. 
He is called to try criminal cases throughout the United States and seldom 
fails to win the verdict desired. He is strong and forceful in argument, impas- 
sioned and eloquent in his ])leading and logical in his deductions. 

The marriage of Mr. Weil to Miss Maud Schwabacher, a member of one 
of the wealthiest and most prominent families of Peoria, was celebrated in i8c)8 
arid they have become the parents of two children, Albert and Josephine. Mr. 
Weil is a prominent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree of the 
consistory in the Scottish Rite and also becoming a member of the Mvstic 
Shrine. He is likewise a past master of \'ictor Lodge. No. 370. K. P. He 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 227 

is regarded as one of the leading members of the Creve Coeur Club and for 
years served on its board of directors, but fmally resigned. The nature of his 
recreation is further indicated in the fact that he belongs to the Illinois \ alley 
^'acht Club. In politics he is an influential factor and is now representing this 
district on the democratic state central commitee and is serving on its executive 
board. All these, however, are merely side issues in a life that is largely de- 
voted to his personal activities and duties. He throws himself easily and natur- 
ally into the argmuent in the trial of a case, showing a self-possession and a 
deliberation with no straining after etYect. On the contrary there is precision 
and clearness in his statetuent, an acuteness and strength in his argmiient which 
speak a luind trained in the severest school of investigation and to which the 
closest reasoning has become habitual. 



EZRA TOPJAS. 



One of the leading insurance agencies of Peoria and eastern Illinois is that 
conducted under the firm style of Tobias & Company, in which Ezra Tobias is 
the senior partner. He has been continuously connected with insurance in- 
terests since 1896 and there are few who are more thoroughly and intimately 
acquainted with every de])artment of insurance, its aims and its possibilities than 
he. He claims Ohio as his native state, his birth having occurred near Circle- 
\ille on the nth of October, 1847. His parents were James and Caroline 
(Hittell) Tobias, who removed with their family from the Buckeye state to 
Washington, Illinois, during the early boyhood of their son Ezra. There the 
father engaged in merchandising but did not confine his attention solely to com- 
mercial pursuits, for he also carried on farming. After a number of vears he 
and his wife removed to Peoria, where the mother died, and the father subse- 
(|uentl}' went to Chicago, where his last days were passed. 

I-'zra Tobias acc|uired his education in the public schools of Washington, 
Illinois, and also spent a year as a student in Northwestern College, then lo- 
cated at Plainfield, Illinois, but now at Naperville, this state. He had thus com- 
pleted his college work w-hen he came to Peoria, arriving here in 1865. when a 
youth of seventeen years. To provide for his own su])])ort he at once sought 
employment, which he obtained in the wholesale and retail dry-goods estab- 
lishment of Day P)rothers & Company. His position was that of stock bov, but 
he did not long continue in that humble capacity, for his industry and diligehce 
won recognition that led to promotion. He remained with Day Brothers & 
Company for six years, acting for some time as clerk in the retail department. 
On the expiration of that period he removed to Gilman, Illinois, where he spent 
a few years on the farm with his parents. He then proceeded to Assumption, 
Illinois, where he engaged in merchandising for several years, after which he 
returned to Peoria. Here he was in the coal business for several years, and 
was also in the employ of Kingman & ComiJany in one of their branch stores in 
Peoria. The firm dealt extensively in farm implements and Mr. Tobias acted 
as bookkeeper and cashier. Pie continued in that position for several years, 
after which he went upon the road as traveling salesman, representing an agri- 
cultural implement factory. While thus engaged he made his headquarters in 
Peoria and was for thirteen years on the road and at length entered the insur- 
ance field, with which he has been connected since 1896. He organized the 
present firm of Tobias & Company, handling all known kinds of insurance, 
including fire, tornado, plate glass, elevator, rent, accident, health, automobile, 
steam boiler. liability, burglary, fraternal and contract bonds. The firm repre- 
sents the leading companies not only of this country liut of Kurtipc and they 



228 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

have developed an extensive business, writing a large amount of insurance of 
various kinds each year. 

Mr. Tobias has not only made a creditable position in business circles, but 
has also long been pleasantly situated in his home life. He married Aliss Linda 
Bramble, a daughter of James Brainble, who for many years was a prominent 
contractor of this city, but is now deceased. Unto this marriage has been born 
a son, Walter W. Tobias, who is a special insurance agent for Indiana and 
Ohio, with headquarters at Indianapolis. He married Miss Anna Mcllvaine, a 
daughter of Dr. Thomas \\". Alcllvaine, of Peoria, and they now have one 
child, Walter jNIcIlvaine Tobias. Mr. and Mrs. Tobias reside at No. 901 Glen 
Oak avenue and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by their many 
friends. He has a very wide acquaintance not only in this city, but throughout 
the state in those regions which he visited as a traveling salesman. His geniality, 
social disposition and personal worth have made him popular wherever he has 
gone. He is always considerate of the opinions of others and without bigotry, 
sham or pretense' he has gained respect which is the merited recognition of 
genuine personal worth. 



HENRY SANDMEYER, Sr. 

Henry Sandmeyer, Sr., is numbered among Peoria's builders and promoters. 
He has been identified with the city's interests along commercial, industrial and 
financial lines since 1849 and his activity and enterprise have brought him to 
a most prominent position in connection with those projects and movements 
which have constituted important factors in the city's growth. Moreover, the 
integrity of his business methods has commended him to the confidence and 
respect of all and he is today one of Peoria's most honored and valued residents. 
He' was born in Germany, July 16, 1829, and has therefore passed the eighty- 
third milestone on life's journey. 

His youthful days were spent upon a small farm in the fatherland and at the 
age of twenty years he crossed the Atlantic to America, attracted by the favor- 
able reports which he had heard concerning the business conditions and oppor- 
tunities in the new world. He did not tarry on the Atlantic seaboard but made 
his way at once to Peoria, arriving here sixty-three years ago. His financial 
condition rendered it imperative that he secure immediate employment and he 
began working in a hardware store conducted by Moore & Cooper. That he 
was a diligent and faithful employe is indicated in the fact that he remained in 
that establishment in the capacity of assistant for several years and then pur- 
chased the interest of ^Ir. ^loore, becoming a partner of ^Ir. Cooper. A num- 
ber of years passed in that connection, after which he entered into business 
with the firm of Culter & Proctor, hardware merchants. Still later he established 
an independent business under the firm name of H. Sandmeyer & Company, the 
location of the store being on South Adams street. Their establishment became 
one of Peoria's noted commercial enterprises, enjoying a large and profitable 
trade for many j-ears. The business methods of the house were such as com- 
mended them to the confidence and respect of the public. Straightforward 
dealing, careful management and a progressive spirit were the salient features 
in the business, resulting in the development of a large and gratifying trade. A 
disastrous fire overtook the firm in 1903. since which time Mr. Sandmeyer has 
not reentered the trade but has concentrated his energies and efl:'orts upon the 
management of his invested interests. In 1906 Mr. Sandmeyer, in connection 
with his son, Henrv Sandmever, Jr., erected the Sandmeyer apartments, the larg- 
est and most exclusive of the kind in the city, located at the corner of INIonroe 
and Fayette streets. All of the attractive features of the modern apartment 




HENIIV bAXDilEVEK 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 231 

house have been introduced and the interior finishing vies with the pleasing 
style of architecture which has been eni])loyed in the construction of the build- 
ing. Mr. Sandme\er is at present connected with the building interests of the 
city as president of The Peoria Stone & Mari)le Company and he also occupies an 
important place in financial circles, filling the position of vice president of the 
Merchants National Bank. 

In 1855 Mr. Sandmeyer was united in marriage to Miss Mary Deitwig, also 
of German lineage, and for a long period they traveled life's journey together 
but were separated by the death of the wife in 1896. Of their four children, 
George, the third, is now deceased, the others being Elizabeth, ^lary and Henry. 

^I^. Sandmeyer has given his political allegiance to the republican jwrty and 
while he has not been active as an office seeker he has always been deeply in- 
terested in whatever has pertained to the welfare and progress of his adopted 
city. coo]5erating heartily in various movements for the general good. He is one 
of the oldest Masons of Peoria and his life has been an exemplification of the 
beneficent spirit of the craft. While his success has been such as to place him 
upon a plane far above the majority of his fellowmen, he is thoroughly demo- 
cratic in s])irit and has never allowed the accumulation of wealth to in anv way 
affect his relations toward those less fortunate. Indeed, he is a broad, liberal- 
mindecl man, generous in thought, considerate in spirit and kindly in action, and 
Peoria honors him as one of her representative and valued pioneer citizens. 



JOSEPH MILLER & SONS. 

No history of Peoria's industrial and commercial progress would be complete 
and satisfactory were there failure to make reference to the enterprise long 
conducted under the name of Joseph Miller & Sons. This firm manufactures 
and handles lumber and building materials, its plant being at South Washing- 
ton, Walnut and South Water streets. The yards extend from South Wash- 
ington to South Water at the corner of Walnut and the office is at No. 530 
South Washington. This business was established in 1848 by Joseph Miller, 
one of the pioneer lumbermen of the city. Later his two sons, Joseph and 
Frank J., joined him in a partnership under the firm style of Joseph ^filler & 
Sons, but all three are now deceased, the business being conducted as a part of 
the estates of Joseph and Frank J. Miller. It is in active charge of Joseph Mil- 
ler, a son of Joseph Miller II, and Frank J. and Frederick C. Miller, who are 
sons of Frank J. Miller, Sr. All three are grandsons of Joseph Miller, the 
founder of the business, wdiich stands as a monument to the enterprise and 
])rogressive spirit of the promoter. 

Joseph ^Miller w-as a native of Baden-Iiaden. Germany, and came to America 
in the '40s. He resided for a short time in Cincinnati, Ohio, and about 1846 
came to Peoria, where two years later he established a lumberyard and also 
entered upon the contracting business. His elder son, Joseph Miller, was born 
in Cincinnati and the younger son, Frank- J. Miller, in Peoria. Thev were 
reared and educated here and on attaining manhood entered the lumber and 
contracting business with their father, forming the firm of Josepli Miller & 
Sons. Joseph ?ililler, Jr., became very prominent in industrial and bankin,g 
circles and was a director of the Commercial German National Bank of Peoria 
at the time of his death, which occurred October 4, 1905. Frank J. Miller was 
also a leading figure in business circles here and passed away January 24, 1904. 
Both are mentioned at length elsewhere in this volume. 

The three grandsons of the original proprietor, who are now active in the 
management of the business, are also well known as leadinsj factors in trade 
circles in Peoria. Of these Joseph Miller married Theresa K. ^IcDermott, of 



232 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Elmwood, Illinois, and they have two children, Joseph and Helen E. Joseph Mil- 
ler III is a member of the Creve Coeur Club, of the Illinois X'alley Yacht Club and 
also a prominent member of the Knights of Columbus. Frank J. Miller II married 
Anna R. Prenger and his brother, Frederick C. ^^liller, wedded Alice Yingst. 
Like their cousin, they are memljers of the Knights of Columbus and all three 
hold membership in the Roman Catholic church. They are all active, enterpris- 
ing, energetic young business men, who were born and reared in this city and 
who have made for themselves a substantial and creditable position in its busi- 
ness life. Thev are now proprietors of one of the most extensive lumberyards 
of central Illinois, the volume of their trade having reached a large figure annu- 
ally. Thev possess the same stable and creditable business characteristics which 
characterized their grandfather and their fathers, and in the further dcAelop- 
ment of their business are proving their right to rank with the leading young 
men of the city. 



COLONEL JOHN E. STOUT. 

Colonel John E. Stout needs no introduction to the readers of this volume 
and, indeed, is widely known throughout the country as one of the leading 
auctioneers. In this connection he has gained a reputation which extends almost 
from coast to coast and manifests ability that has given him preeminence in this 
field. For six years he has made his home in Peoria and is a native son of Taze- 
well county, Illinois, having been born and reared on a farm about three miles 
from Tremont, his natal day being ]\Iay 19, 1857. Flis father was the Rev. 
Isaac Stout, one of the oldest settlers in this part of the state. At the time of 
his death in 1900 he had been a resident of Tazewell county for seventy-four 
years. He was born in Ohio but removed to Illinois in early manhood and 'took 
an active and helpful part in the work of reclaiming the wild region for the 
purposes of civilization. Much of the land in this district was still unclaimed 
and uncultivated at the time of his arrival and with its agricultural development 
he was closely associated. He was equally active and his labors were equally 
restiltant in connection with the moral progress of the community. He became 
a pioneer preacher of the Christian church and his labors and teachings did 
much toward influencing many to choose the better path of life. He erected 
the Concord church, took subscriptions for its building and then utilized his own 
skill as a carpenter in the erection of the hotise of worship. There were, indeed, 
few things which the Rev. Stotit could not do. He was a man of marked 
ingenuity and was the inventor of the first riding cultivator. Whatever he 
undertook he seemed to carry forward to successful completion and liis life 
was, indeed, a servicable one in the world's work. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Rebecca Smith, passed away in 1882, and, like her husband, 
she was held in high esteem because of her many sterling traits of character. 

Colonel J. E. Stout was reared upon the home farm and in early manhood 
supplemented his public-school education by attending Eureka College at 
pAireka, Illinois, working his way through college for two years. He then 
entered the grain business at Mackinaw, Illinois, where he conducted an ele- 
vator for four vears, after which he removed to Pekin. Illinois. While living 
in that locality he was appointed deputy sheriff of Tazewell county and served 
for four years. On the expiration of that period he was elected sheriff' and con- 
tinued in the ofifice for a similar period, discharging his duties with prompt- 
ness and fidelity. Again he was called to public office in his appointment by 
Governor Yates as live stock inspector, with headquarters at the Peoria Stock 
Yards, which position he filled for a part of two years, making his home, how- 
ever, during that period in Pekin. In early manhood he entered the auctioneer- 



IIISTURV OF PEORIA COUNTY 233 

iny field ami of late years has more and more largely concentrated his efforts 
upon this business. He became well known as a crier of land sales and has 
won a reputation as one of the best known auctioneers of the country. He is 
apt. ready, resourceful and the success that has attended his labors has placed 
him in a foremost jiosition among the auctioneers of Illinois. He cried the 
Russell sale, which was the largest ever held in Illinois. He also made the 
record on that occasion for the l)est prices and shortest time, his sales amount- 
ing to twenty-two thousand, one hundred dollars in three hours and fourteen 
minutes. This was held in 1908. He has always made a specialty of farm 
sales and has auctioneered many farms, together with their equipments. His 
high standing in the profession is shown by the fact that he was elected the 
first secretary of the Auctioneers Association of the State of Illinois and was 
continued in that position for ten years. He also served as treasurer of the 
organization and was elected treasurer of the International Auctioneers Asso- 
ciation of the World, tilling that position for four years. Since 1906 he has 
liecn secretary and treasurer of the congressional committee of the International 
Auctioneers Association and it would be difficult to find one in his line of busi- 
ness who has a wider acquaintance throughout the country. 

Colonel Stout was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Chajjman. of Mackinaw. 
Illinois, and they became the parents of three children, \'elde E.. and Lola Ruth 
and Lela Clara, twins. Lola is now the wife of Harry Giblin. treasurer of the 
Orpheum Theater of Peoria. The son, \'elde. has a wide reputation as a 
bowler, having made first record in the state bowling contest of igo8, while in 
1910-1911 he was accorded first place as Peoria's best bowler. He is now a 
member of the Leisy League. Having lost his first wife, Mr. Stout has been 
again married, his second union being with Miss Nettie Brown, of Pirimfield, 
Illinois, a daughter of Clark and Nancy lirown, of that [ilace. Their wedding 
was celebrated in November. igo6. 

Colonel Stout is a member of the Modern Woodmen of .America and the 
Court of Honor, being affiliated as a charter member with the local organization 
at Pekin. The title of "Colonel" which he bears is an honorary one, expressive 
of the high regard and good-will entertained for him by those with whom he 
comes in contact. On various occasions Colonel Stout has been called upon 
to render his services in political campaigns and he has given valuable assistance 
in the campaigns of such prominent men as Colonel Smith, Governor Deneen 
and Governor Yates when they were running for ofifice. In this way as well 
as through his business relations he has naturally become one of the best known 
men in the state and wherever he is known he is highly esteemed and api^re- 
ciated. He possesses a social, genial nature, has a faculty of placing any one 
at ease in his presence, always has ready the apt word and the fitting answer 
and at the same time he possesses a marked executive force and business abil- 
ity that have enabled him to far outstrip manv others in the race of life on the 
same road on which his course has been run. 



LLEWEL^'N OWEN. 



Llewelyn Owen is superintendent of the electrical department of the Peoria 
( las & Electric Comi^any. with which he has been connected since its reorgani- 
zation. In 1899 he became assistant superintendent of the Peoples Gas & I^lec- 
tric ("ompany. which in igoo was merged with the General Electric Company 
unrler the name of the Peoria Gas & Electric Company. Mr. Owen became 
assistant superintendent of the new company and acted in tliat capacity for 
several years, w'hen he was given the position of superintendent. He is well 
qualified by thorough collegiate training for the responsil)ilities and onerous 



234 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

duties which devolve upon him in this connection, and in the management of 
the office he displays most careful systematization. together with keen sagacity 
in the control of affairs. 

Mr. Owen is a native of ^Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His boyhood and youth 
were spent in that city and he attended the public schools, after which he 
entered the University of Wisconsin, wherein he pursued the electrical engineer- 
ing course, which he completed with the class of 1897. ^6 h^s since been 
engaged in the electrical business and practical experience has constantly pro- 
moted his skill and ability. He came to Peoria in 1891) and has since made this 
city his home. He is, therefore, well known as a representative of electrical 
interests here, acting as assistant superintendent of the Peoples Gas & Electric 
Company and continuing in the position after the merger with the General 
Electric Company. He is thoroughly acqtiainted with every phase of the elec- 
trical engineering and is yet an interested student of the literature of the pro- 
fession, keeping in touch with the rapid strides that are being made in the 
electrical field. 

Mr. Owen was united in marriage, in 1905, to Miss Abigail Blair, of Peoria, 
a daughter of Richard M. Blair, of this city, and they now have two children, 
David Blair and Robert Llewelyn, Mr. Owen belongs to the Delta Upsilon, a 
college fraternity. Something of his social standing is indicated in the fact that 
he is a valued and popular member of the Creve Coetir Club. He also belongs 
to the Peoria Association of Commerce and is in hearty sympathy with its pro- 
jects and purposes for the benefit of Peoria and the development of its growth 
along progressive and substantial lines. 



THOMAS ATHERTOX GRIER. 

Thomas Atherton Grier needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, 
for his long connection with the grain trade of Peoria has made him well known 
and his efforts have ever been of a character which have contributed to public 
progress and prosperity as well as to individual success. He has done much to 
give Peoria its present standing as one of the leading grain markets of the great 
Mississippi valley and in all his business alYairs has followed constructive meth- 
ods, never seeking success at the cost of another's failure btit winning ad\ance- 
ment through fair competition and straightforward dealing. He was born in 
W'ilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, March i, 1850, and the following year his parents, 
John C, and Elizabeth (Perkins) Grier, left the Keystone state and made their 
way westward to Illinois, settling in Peoria. The father was a son of the Rev. 
Isaac Grier, a Presbyterian clergyman who at one time was president of the 
Northinnberland College in eastern Pennsylvania, where he died in 1814. John 
C. Grier was born in Northumberland, Pennsylvania, in 1808, and in 1819 went 
to Danville, that state, where he entered a mercantile house, ^^'ith knowledge 
thus acquired and as his capital permitted he entered that line of business on his 
own account, continuing in acth-e connection with mercantile interests in Danville 
until 1846, when he removed to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, remaining there 
until 185 1. In the latter year he removed westward, settling in Peoria, where he 
engaged in pork packing and in the lumber trade. From the time of his location 
in this city he took an active part in its upbuilding and improvement. He was 
also prominent in advancing its moral and financial interests and manifested an 
extraordinary earnestness and zeal in whatever he undertook. He served the 
city for two terms as a member of the county board of supervisors, actuated 
only by his public spirit and with no desire for public prominence. He was a 
thorough Christian gentleman and practiced his religion seven days in the week. 
He is a devoted inember of the Presbvterian church and with his familv 




THOMAS A. CIIIKR 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 237 

took a keen interest and active part in its work. He served as one of the original 
directors of the Northwestern Theological Seminary, now the AlcCorniick Theo- 
logical Seminary at Chicago, Illinois, and for years was a memljer of its board. 
He married Elizabeth Perkins, of Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of 
five sons and six daughters. 

In the local schools of Peoria Thomas Atherton Grier pursued his education 
to the age of sixteen years, when he put aside his text-books that he might become 
a factor in the business world. He secured a clerical position in the Mechanic's 
National Bank, and six years later he left that institution to enter the employ of 
his brothers, Robert C. and David P.. grain merchants. The name of Grier has 
been inseparably interwoven with the history of the grain trade in Peoria and 
with the development of the local board of trade. The brothers erected the first 
elevator here. It was a small concern but constituted the nucleus of the immense 
grain business which has been developed in this city, making Peoria one of the 
prominent grain markets of the United States. Entering the employ of his 
brothers, Thomas A. Grier became a factor in developing the vast business which 
eventually crowned their labors. He continued with the firm for ten years, 
spending a part of the time in Boston, looking^ after the eastern interests of the 
business. He made a close study of the grain trade in every possible relation, 
accjuainted himself with the markets of the east and the west and eventually 
embarked in business on his own account, in 1886 organizing the present firm of 
T. A. Grier & Company, for the conduct of a grain trade, commission, shipping 
and elevator business. From the outset the new undertaking prospered and has 
grown steadily year by year until it is now the largest of the kind in Peoria. 
In this connection the name of Thomas A. Grier has become known throughout 
the country. He is also the president of the Burlington Elevator Company, 
which owns and operates one of Peoria's largest grain elevators. He is likewise 
the vice president of the Peoria Railway Terminal Comjiany, which owns and 
conducts the traction line running between Peoria, South Bartonville and I'ekin, 
Illinois. W^hatever he undertakes is carried forward to successful completion. 
He carefully considers his plans and then executes them with determination. 
He seems to realize the possibilities of any undertaking and to use his advan- 
tages in the best manner. Moreover, his name is recognized as a synonym for 
relialile dealing as well as for mammoth operations and in the past few decades 
he has done much to establish the grain trade of the state. 

On the fith of January, 1S76, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Grier and 
Miss I'lUa Bancroft Clarke, anel unto them have been born five children, of whom 
four are living, Caroline King, Isabel Hooker, Thomas Perkins and Samuel 
Clarke. The elder daughter was graduated from Smith College with the class 
of 1900 and in October, 1901, was celebrated her marriage to Herbert R. Jami- 
son, of Peoria. The second daughter, Isabel, was married in February, iQio, 
to William A. Jack of this city. The family is very prominent socially and at 
their home are held many of the most attractive social functions of the city. 
Mr. Grier has been honored with the presidencv of the Creve Coeur Club, acting 
as its chief officer in 1890-1900. and also of the Countrv Club. His aid is always 
counted upon where the public interest and welfare are involved. He cooi:)erates 
heartily, willingly and liberally in various projects for the general good and his 
efl'orts have been a tangilile element in the city's improvement and adornment in 
many ways. He was the president of the Corn Exposition in 1900 and he has 
been \-ery ])roniinent in promoting a taste for and love of music in this city, being 
widely recognized as a patron of that art. His own love of music is inherent. He 
holds to the religious faith of his ancestors who for generations have been loval 
members of the Presbyterian church, to which Mr. Grier also belongs. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he was appointed by 
Governor Yates as commissioner from Illinois to the Pan-American Exposition 
in Buffalo in 1901, and by Governor Deneen as one of the board of three trus- 
tees of the State Hospital for the Insane at .South Bartonville in which capacity 



238 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

he served until the state institutions were all placed under a board of control. 
Political honors and offices, however, have had no attraction for him, as he has 
preferred to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs and in their de- 
velopment he has shown himself to be capable of managing mammoth interests 
which are alike of benefit to the city and to the individual. 



WILLIAM FREMONT WOLFNER. 

No matter in how much fantastic theorizing one may indulge as to the 
causation of success the conclusion must eventually be reached that unabating 
energy, straigtforward dealing and industry that never flags are the indispensa- 
ble concomitants in attaining prosperity, these have figured largely in the life 
of William Fremont Wolfner, a prominent representative of the distillery inter- 
ests of Peoria and the first vice president of the National Cooperage & Wooden- 
ware Company, which is undoubtedly one of the largest concerns of its kmd 
in the world. As these connections indicate, Mr. Wolfner has attained to a posi- 
tion among the foremost representatives of trade and manufacturing interests in 
the city and at the same time he has figured prominently in charitable work, few- 
men realizing more fully than he the obligations and responsibilities of wealth. 

Mr. Wolfner was born on the loth of March, 1862. His parents were Isaac 
and Josephine (Saxel) Wolfner, who were natives of P.ohemia, .\ustria, which 
was also the birthplace of his grandparents, Carl and Bertha Wolfner, and 
Joseph H. and Francesca Saxel. In his life record William F. Wolfner has dis- 
played many of the sterling characteristics of an ancestry noted for industry 
and enterprise. 

He acquired his education in the inililic schools of Chicago and St. Louis, 
and in 1881, when a vouth of nineteen years, came to Peoria. Even then his 
business ability and capacity had been recognized, for he became assistant secre- 
tary of the Great Western Distilling Company and also the local representative 
of 'the cattle interests of, Nelson Morris, the well known Chicago packer. _ As 
the years passed by he increased in his business capacity and knowledge of the 
trade and in 1887 was made manager of the Great Western Distillery, which posi- 
tion he continued to fill for ten years, or until July, 1897, when he purchased 
an interest in the Mound City Distilling Company of St. Louis. A year later, 
or in July, 1898, he became associated in the same capacity with the Standard 
Distilling' & Distributing Company of Peoria and has since been recognized as 
a foremost factor in connection with the distillery interests of this city, which 
are a chief source of revenue here. Into other fields, however, he has extended 
his efforts and as vice president of the National Cooperage & Woodenware 
Company he is the second executive officer in what is one of the largest con- 
cerns of its kind in the world, its output being represented by mammoth fig- 
ures. Mr. Wolfner is also financially interested in other business concerns and 
corporations and his sound judgment has proved a valuable asset in their suc- 
cessful management. He is a director of the Commercial German National 
Bank of Peoria, the largest bank in the state outside Chicago. He readily 
recognizes the opportunities of a situation and never passes an opportunitv by 
in a heedless manner. He has concentrated his energies upon his business affairs 
in such a wav as to insure success and graduallv has advanced in his trade and 
financial connections until he stands as one of the foremost residents of his 
adoDted citv. 

On the '26th of Januarv, 1887, Mr. W^olfner married to Miss Sophia Wool- 
ner, of Peoria, and "unto them have been born three children. Ira W., Rose and 
Josephine. Mr. Wolfner rejoices in his success because of what it enables him 
to do in behalf of his family and also because of the opportunity it gives him 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 239 

lo aid his fellowmeii. He has been most generous of his means in assisting 
otliers and both his individual and his pubhc charities are large. lie gives most 
freely and generously where it is neetled and something of his activity in this 
relation is indicated by the fact that for many years he has held the position 
of president of the Hebrew Relief Association' of Peoria. He is also president 
of the .Vnshai Amuth congregation. His beneficence and his benevolence are 
entirely free from ostentation or display and he never limits his charity to 
people of his own nationality and religious faith. He holds to the belief of his 
fathers, yet is liberal and tolerant of the opinions of others and never regards 
religious faith when aid is needed. In politics he is a repuljlican and keeps 
thnniu.ghly informed concerning the vital and significant questions of the day. 
With him ])atriotism is above partisanship and the general welfare before ])er- 
sonal aggrandizement. He is indeed a man of broad sym|)athies and interests 
as well as of marked business capacity and with him commercial activity finds 
an even balance in his broad humanitarianism. 



W. THO.MAS TREWYX, .M. D. 

Dr. W. Thomas Trewyn, who since September, 1906, has engaged in the 
practice of medicine in Peoria, his office being located at No. 2522 South Adams 
street, came to the starting point of his profesional career well equipped for 
the duties which have since devolved upon him. He was born upon a farm 
in jett'erson county, Wisconsin, January 16, 1877, his parents being Thomas T. 
and Margaret Chapman (Bryant) Trewyn, both of whom are now deceased. 
The father was a farmer by occupation and devoted his entire life to the work 
of tilling the soil. 

It was upon the old home farm that Dr. Trewyn spent his boyhood and 
youth and when not attending the country schools in the acciuirement of a gen- 
eral education he devoted his attention to the work of the fields, early assisting 
in the labors of plowing, planting and harvesting. He afterward had the l)ene- 
fit of instruction in the state Normal School at Whitewater, Wisconsin, and 
entered upon the profession of teaching, which he followed for ten years, 
spending four years of that time as an instructor in the State Reform School 
for Boys, in Wisconsin. He also engaged in teaching in the public schools of 
Whitewater and Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, and proved an able educator 
imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge which he had acquired. 
He felt that there was comparatively little future, however, in that profession 
and, thinking to find the practice of medicine more congenial and hoping alsit 
to find it more ]3rofitable, he entered the Northwestern L'niversity as a student 
in the medical department, from which he was graduated with the class of 1905. 
He then served as interne in St. Luke's Hospital in Chicago for a year and 
during that period gained a broad and varied experience which only hospital 
practice can bring. The following year, or in September, 1906, he came to 
Penria, where he has since remained. In a ]jrofession where advancement de- 
jiends entirely upon individual merit he has made continuous progress and is 
today accounted one of the leading ])hysicians and surgeons of South Peoria, 
where he has built up a very large [practice. His is now serving on the staff of St. 
Francis Hospital and he is a member of the Peoria City Medical Society, the 
Illinois State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, which 
enables him to keep in close touch with what is being done by eminent members 
of the medical fraternity. 

Dr. Trewyn is ])leasantly situated in his home life. He married Gertrude 
Mary Cross of Marshalltown, Iowa, and they have one son, \'ictor Cross. In 
the six years of their residence in Peoria they have become widely known and 



240 . HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

have gained a large circle of warm friends. Dr. Trewyn holds to high profes- 
sional standards and puts forth conscientious efforts to make his labors of the 
utmost value to his patients. That his work is attended by gratifying results is 
manifest in his constantly increasnig patronage and that he holds to high profes- 
sional ethics is evidenced in the fact that his fellow practitioners always speak of 
him in terms of high regard. 



WILLIAM H. C0LE:MAN. 

In the history of William H. Coleman is found an example that stands in 
direct contradiction to the often expressed opinion that the eminently successful 
business man cannot be a thoroughly honest man. In all of his life Mr. Coleman 
has never been known to take advantage of another in a trade transaction. On the 
contrary, he has held to the highest standards of justice and fairness with the 
result that his business has grown to large proportions, but no matter what de- 
mands are made upon his time and energies as a contractor and builder he has 
always found opportunity to aid in church work and promote the moral prog- 
ress of his community. He w-as born in Ireland, July 6, 1852, and was sixteen 
years of age when he came alone to the new world. Favorable reports had reached 
him concerning the opportunities on this side of the Atlantic. He had a brother 
and sister who were then living in Haverstraw, New York, and he made his 
way direct to that place, residing there for about four years. During that period 
he learned the carpenter's trade, which he mastered in principle and detail, 
becoming an expert workman. Thinking that still better opportunities were to 
be secured in the Mississippi valley, he made his way to Bloomington, Illinois, 
in 1872, and during the year there passed, also followed carpentering. In the 
later part of 1873 he returned to Haverstraw where resided the lady whom 
he wished to make his wife. In that state he wedded Miss Elizabeth Kattyle, 
a native of the north of Ireland, who was residing, however, in New York city 
at the time of her marriage. The young couple began their domestic life in 
Haverstraw, where ilr. Coleman worked at carpentering until 1876, when he 
removed westward with his family with Peoria as his destination. After follow- 
ing his trade in the employ of others for a year he began contracting and build- 
ing on his own account. The first contract ever accorded him was for the 
erection of a building on First street, the lower floor to be used for business 
purposes and the second floor as a dwelling. He has never had a partner, but in 
time his ability and trustworthiness gained recognition and his patronage has 
steadily increased. He has done much important contract work in the city, 
employing a number of workmen, and his success is further indicated in the 
fact that he erected his own business building at Xos. 800-802 ^lain street, 
a two-story frame structure, in i8go, and also residence property on Green 
street. In addition he owns his own home on East Armstrong street, a resi- 
dence on Munson avenue, another on St. James avenue, still another on Indiana 
and one on Behrends streets. He has thus engaged in speculative building and 
from his properties he derives a good annual rental which constitutes a valua- 
ble addition to his income. His work has always been characterized by thor- 
oughness and reliability. He w'as the contractor for the Kingman Plow Works, 
also the new automobile factory for the Bartholomew Company, and the ware- 
house on South Washington street for the J. I. Case Threshing ^lachine Com- 
pany. These and many other important structures stand as monuments to his 
progressiveness, his business abilitv and his straightforward dealing. He takes 
contracts for the erection of buildings from the ground up, including the plas- 
tering, plumbing, etc., and makes a specialty of heavy buildings. More and more 
largely year by year he has come into public favor as a contractor until his pat- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY -211 

roiiage is now extensive and he is one of the foremost representatives of build- 
ing interests in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coleman have gained a large circle of friends during their 
residence in Peoria and here they have reared their family of two sons : William 
PL, who is sales agent for the Standard Oil Company: and John R.. who is 
assistant manager at Peoria for the same company. The family are members of 
the First Congregational church and have long been most active, earnest and 
effective workers in behalf of the denomination. Mr. Coleman previously 
served as pastor of the South Peoria Congregational church and is now pastor 
of the Peoria Heights Congregational church. No matter how extensive or 
how important have been his business affairs he has never allowed material 
things to interfere with his religious duties and in fact he feels that he has 
been the more prospered as he has labored the more earnestly for the bene- 
fit of the church. He has organized seven different missions and Sunday 
schools in and near Peoria in the last thirty years, and who can measure the 
influence that has thus been exerted for good. He has been continuously in 
missionary work since coming to Peoria and in all of his efforts to advance the 
cause of Christianity he is ably assisted and encouraged by his wife, who has 
been a teacher in the Sunday school and an active helper in all lines of church 
work until ill health has forced her to in a measure put aside her efforts in that 
direction. Mr. Coleman's example is often quoted not only in Peoria but in 
Cleveland and in other centers as one who has found that it was possible to 
lead a consistent Christian life and at the same time win success. He has felt 
that he has been all the more prospered when his devotion to the church has 
been the greatest. His life demonstrates the fact that it is perfectly possible 
to conduct a good business and at the same time give much assistance to the 
more important eft'ort of Christianizing the world. He never believes in chos- 
ing the second best but always in seeking that which is the highest : he has 
never compromised with evil or with wrong-doing in the slightest degree, but 
has held firmlv to the standards of right, justice and truth and today enjoys 
that untarnished name which is to be chosen in preference to great riches. 



HAROLD R. WETHERELL. 

Gradually working his way upward, undeterred by obstacles and difficulties 
in his path, Harold R. \\'ctherell is now superintendent of the steam-heating 
department of the Peoria Gas & Electric Company, with which he has lieen 
connected for nine years, having charge of the heating system for about six 
vears. Peoria claims him as a native son, his birth having here occurred on 
the 29th of July, 1S84. His parents are E. and Caroline Wetherell, both of 
whom are still living. The father was engaged in the electrical business, also 
conducting an awning and gear works, and is a practical mechanic. For half 
a century he has been a resident of this city and has become known as a leading 
representative of mechanical pursuits. 

Harold R. \\'etherell was reared in Peoria and attended the public schools 
until he entered Bradley Polytechnic Institute, from which he was in due time 
graduated. He afterward worked for the Acme Harvester Company for seven 
months as draughtsman and also spent several months with the McAleenan 
Boiler Works in the same capacity. He next entered the employ of what is now 
the Peoria Gas & Electric Company and has since continued with this corpora- 
tion. He was with the old General Electric Company as draughtsman and later 
had charge of construction work, steam work, etc. He continued with the 
Peoria Gas & Electric Company when it took over all of the business of the 
General Electric Company, his ability being recognized by the new manage- 



2J2 HISTORY OF TKORIA COUNTY 

ment. In the summer months he has at times from fifty to lOO men under his 
supervision, but in the winter seasons only ten or fifteen men are employed. 
He is thoroughly acquainted with the great scientific principles which underly 
his brancli of the work which, added to his practical experience, has made him 
particularly well qualified to discharge the duties that now devolve upon him. 
He does a great deal of steam heating work and engineering on the outside 
and it was he who made the plans for the heating system in the new Jefferson 
Hotel. He also made the plans for the separate plant to heat the building for 
the Bradley Polytechnic Institute. 

On the 7th of November, 191 1, Mr. Wetherell was united in marriage to 
Miss Jean Earnhardt, of this city, a daughter of Samuel Earnhardt. In his 
leisure hours Mr. Wetherell enjoys manly outdoor and athletic sports and is a 
member of the Peoria Canoe Club. He stands as a splendid type of the progres- 
sive young business man who at the outset of his career recognizes the fact 
that there is no royal road to wealth. He felt that his advancement must de- 
pend upon individual efforts and ability and he has concentrated his labors 
along the lines that have been the most resultant. He is thoroughly conver- 
sant with the various lines of work that come under his direction and his long 
practical experience well enables him to direct the labors of his subordinates. 



FRANK G. GODEL. 



Frank G. Godel is president of the Eehrends Ice & Fuel Company of Peoria, 
his place of business being at the corner of Apple and South Washington streets. 
His identification with the company covers three years, during two years of 
which period he has served as president, and as active manager has so directed 
its interests and growth as to win substantial success. He has always followed 
constructive methods in his business, never taking advantage of the necessities 
of another but in the legitimate lines of trade winning his prosperity. 

Mr. Godel was born in Peoria on the 7th of May, 1863. his father bejng 
Eberhard Godel. a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and for many years a 
prominent, influential and honored resident of this city. He came to Peoria 
in 185s and after residing here for two years removed to Eurlington, Iowa. 
After a brief period, however, he returned to this city in 1867 and became the 
founder of the large Godel Packing Company, one of the important manufactur- 
ing interests of the city. For many years he occupied a prominent position in 
business circles here and on the loth of August, 1887, passed to the life beyond. 
His wife, who was a native of Pennsylvania, survived him for many years, her 
death occurring in July, 1910, at the age of seventy-seven years. 

Frank G. Godel was reared in Peoria and attended the local schools, thus 
acquiring a fair English education which fitted him for life's practical and 
responsible duties. He then entered his father's packing house of which his 
eldest brother, George Godel, was the first president after the business was in- 
corporated. Upon the death of his brother Frank G. Godel succeeded to the 
presidency and for fifteen years remained at the head of that business, his capa- 
ble direction of its affairs proving a substantial and gratifying source of success. 
He mastered the business in principle and detail, acquainting himself with every 
feature of the trade, and in the course of years developed a business that reached 
extensive and gratifying proportions. At length, however, he turned his atten- 
tion to the ice and fuel business, becoming interested in the Eehrends Ice &' 
Fuel Company in IQ08. A year later he was elected to the presidency and has 
since bent his energies to administrative direction and executive control. His 
son Walter is vice president of the company with J. W. Wickler. secretary and 
treasurer. They handle both natural and artificial ice, having erected their plant 




FRANK (1. CiiDEI, 



HISTORY OF TEORIA COUNTY 245 

for the manufacture of ice in lyii. They also handle every kind of fuel and 
conduct a cold storage warehouse. The business in its various departments is 
meeting with substantial success, the energy and enterprise of the owners con- 
stituting a feature of growth that makes this one of the important manufacturing 
and cunnnercial interests of Peoria. 

Mr. Godel was united in marriage to Aliss Emilv Thiene. of this city, a 
daughter of John Thiene. and unto them have been born five children, namely: 
Edna, the wife of Herman Stanhope, of Peoria; and Irma, Walter. Alma and 
Olga, all yet at home. Mr. Godel belongs to the Masonic fraternity in which he 
has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and the Knight 
Tem]ilar degree of the York Rite. He is likewise a member of the Mystic 
Shrine and also holds membership with the Independent Order of Odd h'ellows 
and the Creve Coeur Club. His life has been one of continuous activity in 
which he has been accorded due recognition of labor and today he is iunnl)ered 
among the substantial citizens of his count\-. His interests are thoroughly identi- 
fied with those of Peoria, his native city, in which his entire life has been passed, 
and at all times he is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any movement 
calculated to benefit this section of the countrv or advance its wonderful de- 
velopment. 



MICHAEL R. HALLIGAN. 

Michael R. Halligan is the sole proprietor of the business conducted under 
the name of the People's Transfer & Baggage Company, with offices at No. 115 
Depot street, Peoria. Since embarking u])on this line of activity he has met 
with notable success, his capable management and unfaltering enterprise develop- 
ing a business of large proportions. He was born in Peoria, August 30, 1887, a 
son of Michael and Julia Halligan. His grandfather, Stephen Halligan, came 
from Ireland to .America about 1<'^30 and served as a soldier in the Civil war. His 
son, Michael Halligan, Sr., father of our subject, was a boiler manufacturer, 
operating for many years in Peoria. He was also commissioner of public works 
in this city for some time, and in politics was a stanch democrat. His death oc- 
curred in 1894, at the age of forty-seven years, and he was buried at St. Mary's 
cemetery, Peoria. His wife is still living and now makes her home in this city. 

Michael R. Halligan, whose name introduces this review, was reared 
in Peoria, here attending the public schools until his graduation from Spaldmg 
Institute in 1903. He then entered the employ of the Lake Erie & Western 
Railroad Company, having worked his way up in the business world from the 
position of office boy to an assistant casliiership. .After holding that position for 
one year he purchased a small baggage and bus i)usiness from W. F. Saurer and 
from that small lieginning built up the business to its present proportions, it Ise- 
ing one of the largest of its kind in Peoria at the present time. The business 
was established only three years ago. at which time he tised but two teams. It 
is now the second largest transfer business in the city, using twenty teams and 
transferring freight for one hundred and fifty business houses, while handling 
more personal trunks than any firm in the city. Mr. Halligan, who is the jjresi- 
dent and manager of the concern, is contemplating a material increase in the 
equipment of the business, and what he has already accomplished argues well 
for future growth and success. His slogan has been "two men to every trunk'." 
thus avoiding all scratching of stairways or walls, and the excellent service which 
he has rendered has been the prominent feature in his success, winning for him 
a constantly increasing patronage. 

Politically Mr. Halligan is indejiendent, preferring to vote for those candi- 



246 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

dates for political office who seem to him best fitted for the place to which they 
aspire. In his fraternal relations he is a member of the Knights of Columbus 
and also of the Elite Club. He makes his home with his mother at 400 Third 
avenue. In building up the large and successful business w^hich he now enjoys 
he attributes his success principally to energ)- and ambition. The public char- 
acter of his business has made him well acquainted throughout Peoria and the 
careful attention which he gives to all business entrusted to him has served in 
a verv large degree to build up the undertaking to its present proportions. 



•THEODORE H. PAGE, M. D. 

Dr. Theodore H. Page is junior member of the firm of Kruse & Page, ocu- 
lists and aurists of Peoria. He is numbered among the alumni of Rush Medical 
College of Chicago and has been a representative of the medical profession in 
Peoria since igo6. He was born in Jerseyville, Illinois. March 10. 1875. a son 
of J. M. and Sarah M. Page, the former well known in journalistic circles. His 
course was pursued, as previously stated, in Rush Medical College, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1897. The following year was spent in 
special service in the Cook County Hospital and in the Presbyterian Hospital of 
Chicago, and his varied experiences there made him particularly well qualified 
for the onerous duties of private practice. He came into contact with the most 
eminent and capable physicians and surgeons of the city and acquainted himself 
with their methods. In 1899 he entered upon general practice, opening an office 
in St. Louis, where he remained until he came to Peoria in 1906. He holds to 
the highest standards of the profession and has taken post graduate work in 
some of the best colleges of the country. He is now devoting his time and atten- 
tion exclusively to the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat and 
has been very successful as an oculist, aurist and laryngologist. His office is 
in the Herald-Transcript building and his practice is now very extensive. His 
suite of rooms is equipped with the latest appliances to further his work. 

In 1904 Dr. Page was united in marriage to Miss Mathilda Heidrich. of 
Peoria, a daughter of Edward C. Heidrich, president of the Peoria Coardage 
Company, of this city, and they have two children. Frances and Theodore. Dr. 
Page has high social as well as professional standing and is a member of the 
Creve Coeur and the Country Clubs. He has passed through various degrees 
in Masonry to the thirty-second degree in the consistory and is also a member 
of the ^lystic Shrine. He belongs to the Peoria City ^ledical Society, the Illi- 
nois State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and is thor- 
oughly conversant with the work of those organizations. 



CYRUS MINOR A\'ERY. 

In the city of Galesburg, where many years of his life were passed, Cyrus 
Minor Avery was widelv known and his many attractive social qualities and 
admirable characteristics gained for him the friendship and kindly regard of all 
with whom he came in contact. He was one of Galesburg's native sons, his birth 
having here occurred on the 19th of June, 1846. when the city was but a small 
town and outlying districts of the state were largely undeveloped and unim- 
proved. His parents were George and Saraphena Princess Mary (Phelps) 
Avery, both natives of the state of New York. The father was born in New 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 247 

Lebanon and was a representative in the seventh generation of a family that 
traces its ancestry back to Christopher Avery, the line coming down through 
James, Thomas, Abraham, Nathan and William Thomas to George. As a young 
man the last named came to the west, arriving in Galesburg in 1837. Here he 
built the second house in what was then known as Log City. Later the place 
of his abode, now on \\'est Main street, came to be called the Avery farm. 
There he followed general agricultural pursuits at a time when the most fore- 
sighted could not have dreamed that his place would one day be near the very 
heart of the enterprising city. The lady whom he afterward made his wife came 
to the west with her brother and mother, settling in Knoxville, where they 
were married. For many years Mr. Avery continued to engage in general farm- 
ing but at length retired and took up his abode within the limits of Galesburg, 
living on North Cherry street. There the fruits of his former toil supplied 
him with the necessities and comforts of life up to the time of his death, 
which occurred on the ist of January, 1S84. His wife also died at the Cherry 
street home. They were members of the First Congregational church, in the 
work of which they took active and helpful part, Mr. Avery serving as deacon 
for many years. His political indorsement was given to the republican party. 
In the family were six children: Robert H., who died September 13, 1892; 
Mary, the wife of \V. R. liutcher. living at Roodhouse. Illinois: John T., who 
died .August 11. 1905. at Galesburg; Cyrus M.; Phoebe T., who is now living in 
Biloxi, Mississippi : and George, also of Piiloxi. 

Cyrus M. Avery was educated in the public schools of Galesburg and in 
Knox College, where he completed his course with the class of 1868. He work- 
ed with his father on the farm for a time and was early trained to habits of 
industry and diligence. He afterward engaged in the manufacturing business 
and made for himself a creditable position in trade circles in his native city. 
Early in the '70s he joined his brother. Robert Hanneman Averv, in the es- 
tablishment of a plant for the manufacture of agricultural implements in Gales- 
burg. The brother had been a soldier in the Civil War. was cajitured and was 
lield as a prisoner at Andersonville, where he spent many otherwise idle hours 
in drawing in the sand of the prison yard designs of agricultural implements 
which he began to make soon after his release, the first being a stalk cutter and 
a corn planter. When the plans of the brothers were perfected for the conduct 
of an agricultural implement manufactory, they began business under the style 
of R. H. &• C. M. Avery, operating their jilant at Galesburg until 1882, when 
they went to Peoria and made arrangements for removing their factory to the 
latter city. There the enterprise was developed into a very large corporation 
known as the Avery Comjjany. In 1883, after the removal of the business to 
Peoria, the Avery Planter Company was organized with a capital of two hun- 
dred thousand dollars. Ten years later the authorized capital was incresed to 
three hundred thousand dollars, and in 1900 the name was changed to the 
Avery Alanufacturing Company, at which time the ca|)ital stock was increased 
to one million dollars. The business continued to grow and is now capital- 
ized for two million, five humlred thousand dollars. The plant is one of the 
most extensive and ])rominent productive industries of Peoria, with business 
connections that reach out to all parts of the world. C. M. Avery continued 
active in the management and control of the interests at Peoria until 1902, when 
he returned to his native city and erected here a large, comfortable and attractive 
modern residence. The remainder of his life was divided between the two cities 
of Galesburg and Peoria, although he regarded the former as his home. 

It was here on the 4th of October, 1877. that Mr. Avery was united in mar- 
riage to Miss ]\Iinnie Evalena Bartholomew, who was born at Elmwood. Illinois, 
February 25, 1856, and is a daughter of Luzerne and Sarah Elvira (Payne) 
Bartholomew. They became the parents of five children: Elvira Princess, born 
September 25, 1878; George Luzerne. September 12, 1879; Grace Ophelia, Octo- 



248 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

ber 8, 1S83; Harriette, June 20. 1886; and Cyrus Elinor, May 29, iSyy. The 
first two were born in Galesburg, the last three in Peoria. George Luzerne 
Avery is still connected with the Avery Company as its secretary. The enter- 
prise is now a business of mammoth proportions and includes the manufacture 
of agricultural implements, farm wagons, engines, threshers, engine gang plows, 
gas tractors and citv and farm trucks. While the factory and main office are at 
Peoria, branch houses are maintained at Omaha, Xel)raska ; Des Aloines, Iowa ; 
Minneapolis, Minnesota; Fargo. North Dakota; ISillings, Montana; Kansas 
City, Missouri ; Indianapolis, Indiana ; St. Louis, Missouri ; Grand Forks. North 
Dakota ; Sioux Falls, South Dakota : and Aberdeen, South Dakota. 

The family circle was broken by death, when on the 15th of September, 
1905, in Galesburg, Cyrus M. Avery passed away. His life record has been 
a credit and honor to the city which had ever honored and respected him. His 
business career was notable by reason of its successful achievement and the extent 
of the concern which was developed through the enterprise and under the able 
direction of himself and brother. He seemed to possess a faculty for devising 
and executing the right thing at the right time and this was joined to every day 
common sense. He seemed easily to discriminate between the essential and the 
non-essential, to see the possibility for the coordination of forces and to use 
each opportunity to the l)est advantage. Method and system were ever features 
of the business^ together with the employment of skilled and expert workmen. 
In matters of judgment ^Ir. Avery was seldom if ever at fault and what he ac- 
complished represented the fit utilization of the innate powers and talents which 
were his. As prosperity came to him he continually reached out a helping hand 
to those less fortunate and his benevolence was manifest in generous support of 
manv worthy public projects and charities. Something of his position in the city 
of his birth' is indicated in the fact that at his demise the year book of Knox 
College for 1907 bore the following inscription : 

"To the memory of 

Cyrus Minor Avery, 
honored alumnus, valued trustee, successful business man, up- 
right and influential citizen ; whose singular nobility of character, 
loyal friendship and warm-hearted, open-handed generosity, his 
Alma ]\Iater holds in grateful and loving esteem. 

This Book is Dedicated." 

This pictured forth the feeling entertained for him not only in Galesburg 
and in Peoria but wherever he was known and no higher testimonial of his char- 
acter could be given than the fact that lie was most honored where best known. 



CHARLES D. CLARK. 



Charles D. Clark has occupied a central place on the stage of business activ- 
ity in Peoria for a number of years. He is today widely known as the president 
of the Clark-Smith Hardware Company, the president of the Western Stoneware 
Company, as the vice president of the Clark Coal & Coke Company and vice 
president of the Horace Clark & Sons Company, dealers in grain, flour and feed. 
His identification with the hardware trade of this city dates from 1869 and 
his name is svnonvmous with the highest standards of commercial ethics. He 
was born upon a farm in Tazewell county, September 22, 1848, his parents being 
Horace and Marv E. (Kingsburv) Clark. ("Genealogical records of the two fam- 
ilies are transferring in tlie paternal line. Charles D. Clark is descended from 
a certain captain of the Revolutionary war. The Kingsbury and the Clark 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 249 

record shows a lieutenant-colonel of the War for Independence. The children 
of Charles D. Clark on their mother's side are also descendants of Captain David 
Blakely, of Connecticut. 

Horace and Mary E. (Kingsbury) Clark were farming people of Tazewell 
county, who, when their son was a youth of thirteen years left the old home- 
stead in Tazewell county and removed to the city of Peoria, so that his prelim- 
inary education, which was acquired in the district schools, was supplemented 
by study in the graded and high schools of this city. The training thus received 
well qualified him for the practical and responsible duties which have devolved 
upon him in later life and gradually iiis broadening experiences have developed 
his powers and energies until he stands among the most resourceful, capable 
and representative business men of central Illinois. He crossed the threshold 
of the business world as bookkeeper for the firm of Ely, Clarke & Comi)any, 
with whom he remained for several months and then entered the hardware trade 
in i86g, as partner in the firm of Clark, Quien & Chalmers. On the incorpora- 
tion of the business in 1888 he entered the corporation under the style of Clark, 
Quien iS: Morse and was elected to the presidency of the company, which 
operated under that name until 1910, when a reorganization was affected under 
the style of Clark-.Smith Hardware Company. In 1903 was erected their pres- 
ent large brick building on Commercial street, which is a four-story structure, 
one hundred and thirty-one by one hundred and fifty-five feet. There they 
carry an extensive line of hardware of every description, which they sell to 
the retail trade, ernploying 14 traveling salesmen and in connection they are en- 
gaged in the manufacturing of eave troughs and conductor pipes. The business 
in both branches has grown continuously, making theirs one of the leading mer- 
cantile and manufacturing establishments of the city. He has largely concen- 
trated his energies along this single line and undoubtedly one of the strong fac- 
tors of his success is the fact that he has continued in that department of busi- 
ness in which he embarked in early manhood. He has achieved success be- 
cause he has labored indefatigably and because his energy and perseverance 
have enabled him to meet competition and overcome all the difficulties and ob- 
stacles in his path. Air. Clark has recently been elected president of the West- 
ern Stoneware Company, the largest business of its kind in the world, and 
will have the full management of this firm. 

In 1875 Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Emily Blakesley, of Peo- 
ria, a daughter of Joel and Amy Blakesley, and imto them have been born five 
children: Lucie B., w-ife of H. L. Parkhurst, of Brooklyn, New York; Marie 
V. and Richard P., who are living at home; and Horace and Charles, who have 
passed away. In 1910 Air. Clark took his w'ife and children on a trip around 
the world, being passengers on the ship Cleveland, of the Hamburg-.American 
line, which visited many ports and from these the party made their way to many 
points of interest in the interior of the countries. Mr. Clark wrote a series of 
most interesting articles concerning tlie trip to the Peoria Star. His letters dis- 
play high literary merit and at the same time indicate a most keen observation 
and retentive memory. He seems not only to have seen those things which are 
pointed out to the traveler, but also to have noted many little incidents and cus- 
toms which indicate something of the life of the people, their habits and trend 
of thought that does not usually aj^pear in works of travel. From his letters it 
would appear that he forgets nothing that he has once seen, and he describes with 
equal clearness the great temjiles or the peculiar kinds of foods found in the 
markets of the Orient, the clothing of the people, or a distant mountain range 
with its lights, shadows and coloring. He was as interested in the mat weaving 
of Java as in the burials of India and he presents to the reader a vivid picture 
of each. Day by day brought something new- and interesting, all of which he 
describes most graphicallv until the reader feels that he himself has looked upon 
the scene or witnessed the action told. It would be impossible in this connec- 



250 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

tion to quote at length from Mr. Clark's description of the lands visited, but 
something of his style of writing is gathered from the closing words of one of 
his letters which read: "The experiences of such a trip as this are manifold. 
Xo attempt has been made to enumerate the many little incidents that enlivened 
the trip and which will be cherished for years by those who participated. 
Yet no matter what sights were seen or what lands were visited, no sight could 
so thrill their hearts and cause the tears of joy to spring unbidden to their eyes 
as the sight of the dear old flag as it waved a glad welcome, from the heights 
of I\Ianila. 

"Never will be forgotten the golden days and the balmy nights when the good 
ship went gliding smoothly over the tropic seas, where all around, for limitless 
miles, stretched the vast ocean with its mysteries. Deep below the waves lie 
life and death tcigether: The coral builders at work and women in their last 
sleep; living hshes and wrecks of ships; lofty mountains, deep valleys and wide 
deserts ; sea mosses, shells and caverns ; petrified forests and the mouths of dead 
volcanoes. Every ideal, every real, every hope, every faith ; lessons of courage, 
heroism, sacrifice ; these and a hundred other virtues and glories spring to the 
mind out of the everlasting fountains of the sea. 

" "Oh, boundless sweep of restless deep, what secrets dost thou hold 
Locked safe within thy heart of hearts through ages manifold." " 

His powers of description and his ability in story telling, as well as other 
individual traits of character have made ]Mr. Clark a valued and well known 
member of the Creve Coeur and Country Clubs, with both of which he has been 
identified for some time. He is one of whom the word citizenship is no mere 
idle term. He has rendered full return for the privileges and opportunities 
that have been his and in compensation has given faithful and effective service 
in promoting public progress and advancing the general good in many lines. 
In whatever condition of life he has been found he has sought for all that is 
best in American manhood. He believes that every citizen should exercise the 
right of franchise and, moreover, that each should thoroughly inform himself 
concerning the political conditions and the significant problems of the age. His 
mature judgment has led him to supjiort republican principles and while never 
an office seeker, he has served as chairman of the republican county central 
commitee. His fellow townsmen recognize his merit and ability and his business 
colleagues and contemporaries entertain the warmest admiration for his many 
good qualities. 



GUY C. PO\\"ELL, M D. 

During the years of his residence in Peoria Dr. Guy C. Powell occupied a 
commanding position as a member of the medical profession, especially in the 
field of his specialty. He ever fully recognized the duties, obligations and respon- 
sibilities of his chosen life work and put forth persistent effort to make his labors 
valuable in checking the ravages of disease. He received the patronage of many 
of the best families of the city and in addition he won success in other business 
undertakings. He was born September 23, 1S68, in Rockfield, Indiana, a son of 
Dr. J. W. Powell. Whether parental example, early environment or natural ten- 
dency had most to do with his choice of a life work it is impossible to determine. 
At all events, however, he decided to follow in the footsteps of his father, who 
about 1878 removed wath his family from Rockfield to Peoria, Illinois. The boy 
had previously begun his education in the schools of his native city and here he 
continued his studies, attending the Greeley school. His professional training was 
received in the Louisville ( Ky. ) Medical College, from which he was graduated 
in 1895. He then returned to Peoria and practiced as a specialist for ear, eye and 




UK. ULV C. POWELL 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 253 

throat troubles and soon gained poi)ularity and success, becoming" well known as a 
representative and able member of the medical fraternity in this city. As he jjros- 
percd he made investments in land in Texas and became the owner of large hold- 
ings there, which added materially to his income. 

On the 17th of August, 1903, Dr. Powell was united in marriage to Aliss Dean 
Weaver, a daughter of Abraham and Eudora (Jewett) Weaver, both of whom 
were natives of \'ermont and on removing westward became residents of Illinois. 
Dr. I'owell held membership in the Episco[)al church, which his widow also attends. 
His political allegiance was given to the republican party, for he believed that its 
princi])les contained the best elements of good government. He held membership 
with the -Masonic fraternity and attained the Knight Templar degree. He also 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the Creve Coeur and Ivy Yacht Clubs, and was loyal to each. 
In fact, fidelity wis one of his marked characteristics and was evidenced as 
strongly in his devotion to these fraternal organizations and to his church as to 
his profession. His ideals of life were high and he never lowered the standard 
which he set up at the outset of his career. Death came to him August 25. 191 1, 
when he was scarcely forty-three years of age, yet within that period he had 
accom])lished a work equal to that which crowns the lives of many men of twice 
his vears. 



HENRY SAND]\IEYER, Jr. 

Henry Sandmeyer, Jr., is manager of the Majestic Theater, the leading and 
highly exclusive show house of Peoria, presenting the best attractions know-n 
to the stage. In the control of this theater he displays keen business judgment 
and sagacity and substantial success has crowned his labors. He needs no in- 
troduction to the readers of this volume for he has been a lifelong resident of 
Peoria and is a representative of one of its oldest families, his father, Henry 
Sandmeyer, Sr.. having located here at an early day. He was a well known 
business man in the period of Peoria's pioneer develojiment and [jrogress, be- 
coming well known as a manufacturer, banker and capitalist. He is today one 
of the venerable and honored residents of the city and is mentioned at length 
on another page of this work. 

The son was born in Peoria, February 24, 1862, and at the usual age entered 
the public schools, therein mastering the common branches of learning. Start- 
ing out in the business world, he became an employe in his father's hardware 
store, then situated in the Hundred block, on South Adams street. There he 
remained and worked his way upward through the development of business 
cajJability until he finally became manager, retaining that position until the time 
the business was closed out. in 1905. He then devoted a year or more to the 
erection of the Majestic Theater and also to the building, in connection with his 
father, of the elegant Sandmeyer apartments, which is the largest and most 
e.xclusive apartment building of the city. Every modern convenience has been 
introduced, the interior finish and equipments are most attractive and the style 
of architecture thoroughly pleasing. On tlie completion of the Majestic Theater 
Mr. Sandmeyer assumed its management and has never deviated from the high 
standard which he set up in assuming control here. The most distinguished 
actors and actresses not only of this country but of England have here appeared 
and Mr. Sandmeyer has given to the city a list of attractions equal to those ap- 
pearing in the leading houses of Chicago. He is also a director of the Peoria 
Stone & Marble Works, of which his father is the president, and he is a stock- 
holder in the Merchants' National Bank, of which his father is the vice pres- 
ident. In many other of Peoria's prominent business concerns he is financially 



254 HISTORY OF PEORU COUNTY 

interested and is recognized as a man of sound judgment and keen discrimina- 
tion whose opinions constitute valuable and effective forces in the successful 
management of business concerns. 

In 1887 Mr. Sandmeyer was united in marriage with Miss Emma C. Singer, 
a daughter of P. J. Singer, and theirs is one of the attractive and hospitable 
■homesuf the city. " Mr. Sandmeyer is a very prominent Mason, and he was one of 
the original members and of Alohammed Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He also 
belongs to the Creve Coeur Club and is one of the fifteen life members of the 
Peoria Country Club. His friends are many in the city in which he has always 
lived, for his salient qualities have endeared him to those with whom he has come 
in contact. He enjoys the admiration and respect of his colleagues and contem- 
poraries, the good-will of acquaintances and the strong and enduring regard of 
those with whom he has been more intimately associated. 



GEORGE A. ZELLER, M. D. 

Dr. George A. Zeller, occupying the responsible position of superintendent 
of the Peoria State Hospital at South Bartonville, an institution caring for two 
thousand patients, entered upon this connection well equip]:)ed by thorough prelim- 
inary training and broad e.xperience. Indeed, he is a man of national reputa- 
tion, whose investigations and researches have gained him world-wide prom- 
inence. Along many lines of professional activity he has manifested the spirit 
of the pioneer in that he has advanced beyond the majority of his fellows into 
new and untried fields, wherein he has gleaned many facts and truths of im- 
mense value in professional service. 

Dr. Zeller was born at Spring Bay. Woodford county, Illinois, just across 
the river from and within sight of the city of Peoria, in 1858. His father. Dr. 
John G. Zeller, was one of the best known physicians of central Illinois and, 
stimulated by his example, the son entered upon preparation for the profession, 
which he has made his life work. His early education was acquired in the 
public schools of his native village, wherein he displayed special aptitude in his 
studies, entering the University of Illinois before he reached the age of fifteen 
years. He continued his studies in that institution from 1873 until the close of 
the school year in the spring of 187^1. He had determined upon the practice of 
medicine as his life work and in the fall of the latter year he matriculated in 
the St. Louis ^ledical College, in which he pursued the regular three years' 
course and was graduated in 1879. He then entered upon active practice in con- 
nection with his father, Dr. John G. Zeller, at Spring Bay, Illinois, and their pro- 
fessional relation continued for ten years, or until 1889, when Dr. George A. 
Zeller after spending a year in European clinics removed to Peoria, where he 
continued in active practice until 1898. He was then appointed superintendent 
of the Peoria State Hospital, which important position he has since filled save 
for the period of his service in the l'hili|)|)ines. In Xovember, 1899, he en- 
tered the volunteer medical service of the United States army and on the 21st 
of March, 1901, he was promoted captain and assistant surgeon of volunteers 
while in the field, and remained in the government service until November, 1902, 
spending the entire time in the Philippines. He then returned to Peoria and 
was reappointed superintendent of the Peoria State Hospital. The l)uildings 
of this institution were in process of erection while he was in the military service 
of the country and he was excused from his duties as superintendent to go to 
the front. Today the Peoria ."^tate Hospital is one of the best equipped and 
most thoroughly appointed institutions of this character in the country, and its 
methods of caring for the two thousand unfortunate people who are thus wards 
of the state there embodv the most advanced and scientific principles and re- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 255 

ceive the indorsement of all those qualified to speak intelligently upon the sub- 
ject. Dr. Zeller holds to the highest standards in his care of the patients and 
the plans utilized in an attempt to effect cures. He has long made a close and 
thorough study of mental and nervous diseases and of the various causes which 
produce mental aiierration. He was one of the most prominent in bringing to 
the scientific world a knowledge of the disease now known as pellagra and is 
the general secretary of the National Association for the Study of Pellagra. 
He also belongs to the Peoria City Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical 
Society, the American Medical .Association and the National .Association of 
Military Surgeons. 

In 1889 Dr. Zeller was tmited in marriage to Miss Sophie Kline, of Henry, 
Illinois. He has not allowetl his interest in public affairs to lag and has been 
many times chairman of the Peoria county and city republican central commit- 
tees, maintaining a leadership that had the united support of the party and 
achieved an unbroken line of victories. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons and socially with the Creve Coeur Club and Country Club. As a 
scientist his contributions to the world's work have been most valuable and the 
advanced methods which he has introduced into the Peoria State Hospital place 
him with the foremost representatives of the profession in America. His brother. 
Rev. Julius C. Zeller, is president of the University of Puget Sound, of Tacoma, 
W'ashintrton,, 



JOHN MICHAEL NIEHAUS. 

John M. Niehaus, master in chancery at Peoria, to which office he was ap- 
pointed by the circuit court in November, 1898, exemplifies in his life many of 
the sterling characteristics of his German ancestry, and his record is another 
proof of the fact that Peoria is largely indebted to its German citizenship for 
its progress and development. He was born at Warendorf, Germany, February 
C> '855, and came to America with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Nie- 
haus, who first made their home in Pittsburg for about one year and then re- 
moved to Peoria where the father engaged in mercantile business, becoming one 
of the early and representative merchants of this city. In his native country 
lie had engaged in the hardware business. 

John M. Niehaus was an infant at the time of the migration to the new 
\yorld and was about two years of age when brought to Peoria where, later he 
pursued his education in German private schools and received special instruc- 
tions in Latin and the classics. He also attended a local business college from 
which he was graduated in 1871. He then took up the study of law under the 
preceptorship of the firm of O'Brien & Harman, well known Peoria attorneys, 
who directed his reading until his admission to the bar in 1874. He did not begin 
active practice, however, until 1877. .\s a representative of the legal fraternity 
he made continuous progress and the ]utblic recognition of his ability won to 
him a large clientage. He was also a student of the political issues, t|uestions 
and conditions and in 1880 was elected on the democratic ticket to the state 
legislature in which he served for one term. In 1883 he was chosen state's 
attorney of Peoria county to fill out an unexpired term and was elected to the 
office in 1884 and again in 1S88, serving until 1892, or for nine consecutive years 
in that position during which time he carefully safeguarded the legal interests of 
the county, conducted much important litigation and won many favorable ver- 
dicts. He again became one of the lawmakers when in 1S92 he was elected 
state senator, serving for four years. In both the house and the senate he gave 
careful consideration to the f|uestions which came up for settlement and stanchly 
supported those measures which he deemed of value in promoting the welfare of 
the commonwealth. 



256 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

In 1895 ■^'i'- Xiehaus was married to Miss Kathryn L. Gallagher, and the 
children of this marriage are two in number — Kathryn M. and John M. Mr. 
Niehaus holds membership in the Uenevolent Protective Order of Elks and is 
also prominent in club circles, belonging to the Creve Coeur Club of Peoria and 
the Peoria Country Club. He has gained a large circle of warm friends in 
those organizations, also among his professional associates, and he is justly ac- 
counted a representative member of a bar that has numbered many distinguished 
and able lawyers. For more than a third of a century he has continued in active 
practice and the excellent work he has done in behalf of his clients indicates 
liis thorough mastery of the principles of jurisprudence and his devotion to the 
legal interests of those who retain his services. 



SANDOR HOR\MTZ. M. D. 

The story of the Jewish people since the beginning of historv has been a 
record of high and ennobling sacrifice, the unmurmuring acceptance of unde- 
served subservience for the sake of standards which thev loved and cherished. 
The better class of Jews, the class which has written its story upon the records of 
time, are high-minded, God-fearing, upright men. honoring their own people, 
loyal to their own religion and leaving the impress of this honor and love in 
tragic history. The life of the subject of this sketch. Dr. Sandor Horwitz, has 
its roots in this tragedy. Before his babyhood was well over he had known 
hunger and homelessness, and the loss of friends. His childish years were filled 
with work for food and shelter, and with the dread need of money to purchase 
his existence. And yet through it all he kept in his heart his loyalty to the 
faith of his fathers, and his burning ambition, which he has todav realized, to 
be a learned and a cultured gentleman. 

Dr. Sandor Horwitz, city physician of Peoria, enjoying also a large private 
practice in medicine and surgery, was born in Hungary, August 11, 1867. He 
traces his ancestry back to the middle of the seventeenth century, when the first 
person of his line was a very prominent rabbi in Bohemia. Today his relatives 
are occupying rabbinical chairs in various communities in Hungary. His father, 
Moses Horwitz, was a rabbi in the Jewish church in Hungary, and his brother 
is today chief rabbi of Jerusalem. 

Until he was six years old. Dr. Horwitz lived happily with his parents, being 
trained in the daily exercise of Jewish virtues, and acquiring a love of learning 
and culture which has never left him. In 1873, a terrible scourge of cholera 
Asiatica broke out in Hungary and raged there for many months, and among 
its first victims were Moses Horwitz and his wife, the parents of Dr. Sandor 
Horwitz. He lost both father and mother in one month, and was left with one 
brother and two sisters dependent absolutely upon the bounty of relations, who 
did not have a bountiful enough supply of this world's goods themselves to keep 
their own families in comfort. So at the early age of six years. Dr. Horwitz's 
wandering and troublous life began. He was sent about from place to place, 
unable to find any of his relatives who could take care of him properly. .\nd 
yet, despite his removal from one town to another, amid constantly changing 
surroundings. Dr. Horwitz was nevertheless kept in school as much as possible 
by his relatives who had been trained to appreciate the value and uses of edu- 
cation. He attended the public and religious schools, and his training was almost 
entirely along a theological line. His relations were poor, but they managed to 
keep the boy in school until the age of twelve, by the expedient of giving him 
board and lodging every day at a different place. 

.At the age of twelve. Dr. Horwitz was obliged to take his career into his own 
hands. It was the custom in Hungary, for the citizens of little villages where 




OR. SAXDOR IIDIIWITZ 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTY 259 

ihcy had nu public schools, to come to the market places in the larger cities, and 
look for men able to teach their children. Dr. Horwitz entered the higher rab- 
binical school, in one of the larger cities, and earned his board and tuition, by 
hiring himself out from the market place. During the first winter season he 
received for his services the sum of four dollars for the six months" work. By 
dint of hard work and much saving, however. Dr. Horwitz managed to continue 
his college course in theology, and at the age of seventeen had the good fortune 
to be engaged by a prominent family as a private tutor for their children. This 
time the six months' work earned him forty dollars. With this princely sum in 
his pocket, and fired by tales of the wonderful wealth to be found in America, 
the boy concluded to emigrate to the new country. He landed in New York 
in April, 1885, with three pennies in his pocket, to conquer his destiny. 

\Vith true Jewish humble-heartedness, this young boy, descendant of a long 
line of rabbincal ancestors, educated in the high and uplifting theology of his 
race, cultured, sensitive, high-minded, realized that the way to success was along 
the road of hard work, and like all the emigrants of his day. he did the one thing 
which his hand found to do, and spent the first three months in New '^'ork 
])eddling in the streets. He earned enough in that length of time for a ticket 
farther west, and in July of the same year he landed at St. Louis. Here he still 
pursued his occupation of peddling, always with the intention of earning enough 
money to comjilete his already fine education in the American schools. As soon 
as he could afford it. he entered the grade work of the St. Louis public schools, 
and made ci.ght grades in one year. In September, 1888, he passed the exami- 
nation for the high school and pursued the four years' course in the Central 
high school of St. Louis and was graduated therefrom on the 29th of January, 
1892. During this time. Dr. Horwitz supported himself and paid the expenses 
of his education, by tutoring in German and Hebrew. Coming from a rabbinical 
line, and having acquired an excellent theological course in Europe, he sup- 
I)lemented this tutoring by serving as rabbi during the Jewish holidays. 

During the last year of his high-school course, he definitely determined upon 
his life work and in i8qi entered the Missouri Medical College, continuing his 
studies therein alon.g with his senior high-school course. This medical college 
is now the medical department of the Washington L^niversity. His medical 
course at the ^Missouri Medical College was interrupted in 1893 by his removal 
to Richmond, where an opportunity came to him to combine the duties of rabbi 
with an excellent medical training, thus enabling him to support himself more 
adequately. However, he returned to St. Louis in 1894, and completed his 
course, receiving his medical degree in March, 1895. 

\'aluable exjierience came to him during three months' connection with the 
St. Louis City Dis])ensary as physician. In August. 1895, he came to Peoria 
after practicing in the interim at St. Louis. Here he opened an office and in 
connection with general practice makes a specialty of genito-urinary diseases. 
He pursued a post-graduate course in the ^lissouri ^Medical College along that 
line in 1906 and dis])lays broad skill in his specialty. His professional duties are 
always discharged with a high sense of conscientious obligation and he is con- 
tinually reaching out along broadening lines in order that his work mav l)e of 
greater benefit to humanity. 

On May 20. 1897, Dr. Horwitz was married to Miss Bertha Horwitz, a dis- 
tant relative, and they now have one child. Miriam L., who is attending the 
Bradley Polytechnic Institute. Fraternallv. Dr. Horwitz is connected with the 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He belongs to the Monroe Street Temple, sometimes acting temporarilv as rabbi. 
In strictly professional lines he is connected with the Peoria Medical Society, 
the Illinois State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He is 
now examiner for the Germania Life Insurance Company and the Prudential 
Insurance Company, and he has held several public offices directly connected 



260 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 



with the profession. He was police surgeon under .Mayor Woodruff's first ad- 
ministration in 1903 and the same year was assistant county physician. In 
1907 Mayor Woodruf appointed him citv physician, which office he is stdl filhng. 
He is now physician in charge of the Emergency Hospital and surgeon for the 
police department, and is medical examiner for the police and fire departments. 
The record which he has made is most creditable. His characteristics of deter- 
mination and energy were strongly manifest in the \vay in which he mastered 
the public-school course until his completion of the high-school work and then 
entered upon preparation for the medical profession. Laudable ambition has 
actuated him in all of his career and brought him to a prominent place among 



the physicians of Peoria. 



LOUIS F. MEEK. 



Louis F. Meek, for almost a quarter of a century a representatiye of the 
Peoria bar and admitted to practice in Illinois in 1884, is now accorded a large 
and distinctiyely representative clientage and has won many notable successes 
in the courts. His careful preparation of his cases is one of the elements in 
his advancement, bringing him to a position which many a lawyer might %vell 
envy. He was born in Eureka. Woodford county, Illinois, in June, 1863, and is 
a son of Basil D. Meek, an attorney at law who was associated with Colonel 
Robert G. IngersoU in raising the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, of %vhich he Ijc- 
came lieutenant colonel. After two years" service he resigned and returned 
to Illinois, where he resumed the practice of law. He was regarded as one of 
the distinguished and able members of the bar in his county and figured prom- 
inently in public life, serving at one time as county judge and on other occasions 
as county treasurer and as county superintendent of schools. He was thus a 
recognized leader in professional, educational and political circles and his high 
standard of manhood and citizenship gained for him the warm regard and 
honor of his fellowmen. He died in Eureka, April 30, 1909. 

In his native town Louis F. Meek was reared and the public schools alTorded 
him his preliminary education, which was supplemented by a course of law study 
in the Northwestern University of Chicago. He was there graduated with the 
class of 1884 and was admitted to the bar that year. He first engaged in prac- 
tice in Eureka, where he remained for three years, becoming a partner of his 
father, which association was maintained until 1888, when he decided to seek 
the opportunities ot^'ered by a larger city and removed to Peoria. Here he 
opened an office in 1888 in connection with R. J. Cooney, afterward state's 
attorney of this county, with whom he continued for two years. He later spent 
two years as assistant state's attorney under John Niehaus and later practiced 
alone until he was joined by Mr. El' wood in a partnership that still continues. 
He is a general practitioner of law, of superior merit and wide reputation. This 
is a profession in which outside ?id or influence have little avail. The indi- 
vidual must depend upon his own merit and ability for advancement and Mr. 
Meek has won his success by reason of the excellent work which he has done 
in the courts. He is strong and forceful in argument and logical in his deduc- 
tions and his labors place his name high on the roll of leading attorneys in this 
city. In 1907 Mr. Meek was away from the state on business and returned 
to find that he had been nominated bv the democratic party for congress in a dis- 
trict that had never given his republican opponent less than six thousand major- 
ity. Mr. Meek was defeated by less than three thousand votes but made a 
clean race and gained many friends in his canvass. 

In 1890 Mr ]\Ieek was united in marriage to Miss Ella Perry, of Indiana, 
and they have three children, Elizabeth, Perry and Louis. They are well known 



HISTORY Ol' 1'1'.(M^I.\ COUNTY 261 

socially in this city, where they have continuously resided since their marria;^c, 
and the hospitality of many of the best homes is freely accorded them. Air. 
Meek belongs to the Masonic fraternity and his life conforms to the principles 
and the purpose of the craft. There have been no spectacular phases in his 
career, his life being characterized by the continuous devotion to dut\- that 
eventually wins success. 



CARL JO! '..ST. 



What the name of Marshall Field & Company is to the dry-goods trade of 
America, that' of the Jobst-lJethard Company is to the grocery trade of I'eoria. 
This great wholesale house has set the standard for commercial activity in their 
line in the city and the development of the business is the outcome of the sound 
judgment, experience and laudable amliition of the men who are at the head. 
In this connection Carl Jobst, vice president, has been continuously known since 
the business was taken over by the present company in 1890. It was conducted 
as a ]3artnership concern for about twelve years and in iyo2 was incorporated 
under the present style. .Mr. Jobst is yet in the prime of life and probably has 
many more years of activity before him. His entire career has been marked 
by a continuous progress and never has he allowed obstacles and difficulties to 
bar his path if they could be overcome by persistent, earnest and honorable 
effort. 

Peoria names Mr. Jobst as one of her native sons, his l)irth having here oc- 
curred September 18, 1860. His parents are \'alentine and Susanna ( .Schnei- 
der) Jobst, both of whom are living, l-'or a number of years the father has 
enjoyed the well earned and well merited rejiutation of being one of the best 
and most widely known building contractors of central Illinois, and is mentioned 
at length elsewhere in this work. The son spent his youthful days under the 
parental roof, without any special advantages or opportunities to aid him when 
he started out in life. He began to earn his own living at an early age, working 
as an office boy at the meager salary of a dollar and a half per week, in the em- 
ploy of the firm of Oakford & Fahnestock, wholesale grocers. He laughingly 
tells when he drew his first week's salary he ran faster than he ever had before 
or has since in order to give the money to his mother. For ten years he re- 
mained with the firm of Oakford & Fahnestock but did not long remain in his 
original position, for his earnestness and industry enabled him to work his way 
upward and he served successfully as clerk, assistant bookkeeper and buyer. 
Then on account of the confinement which was undermining his health he went 
upon the road as a traveling salesman, spending five years in that way. In 
1887 he became a partner in the wholesale house of S. H. Thompson S: Com- 
pany, and in 1890, when Mr. Thomjison wished to retire from business, became 
associated with Douglas H. Rethard and Charles E. Fulks, in the purchase of 
the business. At the outset there were also two other partners, W. P. Gauss 
and Herbert Simj^son, and at that time the firm style of Gauss, Jobst, Bethard 
& Company was assumed. The partnership under that style continued for 
three years, when Mr. Gauss retired, selling his interest to Messrs. Jobst, Beth- 
ard & Fulks, and in 1902 the interest of Herbert Simpson was purchased. The 
other three original partners have since retained their connection in the business, 
which has grown along substantial and gratifying lines. There has been no 
esoteric phase in the history of the house. Its business methods have always 
been such as would bear close investigation and scrutiny and its trade has in- 
creased because of the honorable methods of the firm and tlie excellent line of 
goods carried and jiromptness in delivery. From time to time it has been 



262 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

necessary to increase their facilities in order to meet the growing demands of 
the trade. Almost each year they were compelled to seek additional room until 
they occupied practically the entire north half of the block on Alain street, be- 
tween Washington and Water streets, and also a three-story warehouse at No. 
io6 South Washington. Still their quarters were not sufficient to enable them 
to handle their trade to the best advantage and to meet the exigencies of the 
case they determined to erect a building which was begun on the ist of June, 
1910. and was ready for occupancy on the ist of Alay, 191 1. It is a splendid 
reinforced concrete structure, with brick exterior, the dimensions being one 
hundred and five by one hundred and sixty-eight feet. The building rises to 
the height of six stories and also has a basement underneath. The entire floor 
space is one hundred and fifteen thousand, one hundred and ten square feet, 
and the equipment of the building is most complete and modern .in every way, 
enabling them to handle their business in the best possible manner. Since the 
incorporation of the company in 1902 Air. Jobst has been the vice president, 
Mr. Bethard the president, and Charles E. Fulks the treasurer, and associated 
with them as directors are .Alexander Furst, George \\'. Fulks and C. G. Cole. 
The three men who are the principal factors in the business have alwavs worked 
together in utmost harmony, the labors of the one ably supplementing and 
rounding out the labors of the other. 

In 1886 Air. Jobst was united in marriage to Aliss Amalia Aluller, a daugh- 
ter of Jacob Aluller, of Peoria, and they have one child, Natalie. Fraternally 
Air. Jobst is an Elk and also a Alason and in his life exemplifies the beneficent 
spirit of the craft, which is based upon the truth of the universal brotherhood 
of man. He is also prominently known to the membership of the Creve Coeur 
Club and the Peoria Country Club, both of which claim him as a worthy rep- 
resentative. He also belongs to the Peoria Association of Commerce and co- 
operates in all its various movements and measures to advance the interests of 
the city and promote its trade relations. He is a thorough-going, enterprising 
business man and one who merits and commands the respect and confidence of 
his fellow townsmen. 



GUSTA\' DREYAIEIER. 

Gustav Breymeier is a captain of the Peoria police force with which he has 
been identified since 1902, in which year he became a patrolman. He continued 
in that position for four years and was then promoted, having served as captain 
for six years in charge of the night force. His birth occurred in this city, 
October 16, 1856, his parents being Barney and Elizabeth Breymeier, who were 
natives of Germany. They settled in this city, but when their son was two and 
one-half years old they removed to El Paso, Illinois, where he received his 
schooling. Starting out for himself he engaged with a farmer named Joe Ellis, 
for whom he worked in exchange for board and clothing, meanwhile attending 
school during the winter terms. Thus he spent a year and a half, after which 
he went to work for Al. Dimery, proprietor of a barber shop. Later he worked 
for Joe Widman, driving a horse w'hich supplied the power for hoisting brick 
and mortar used in the construction of a building. .After this work was com- 
pleted he returned to farm labor for which he received twelve dollars per 
month, his employer being a Air. Harper. In 1876 he returned to Peoria with 
his mother, the father having passed away when his son Gustav was but five 
years of age. Here he entered the employ of Reuben Armfield, for whom he 
drove an express wagon. He afterward worked for one season in the old 
Reynolds packing house and later secured a situation in the blacksmith shop of 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 263 

William Iluppie. lie next turned his attention to the tinner's trade whieh he 
learned in the establishment of Frank Meyer & Brother, working at that until 
he joined the poliee force. For two years he conducted a shop of his own. 
He first became identified with the police department twenty-five years ago, 
but severed his connection with the force soon thereafter and worked at the 
tinners' trade, until in 1902 he again entered the department. No special ad- 
vantages W'ere his at the outset of his career. He has been diligent and indus- 
trious and to these qualities he owes whatever success he has achieved. 

In 1880 Captain Dreymeier was united in marriage to Miss Alary Schuster, 
a native of Peoria and a daughter of Adam Schuster. Five children were born 
of this marriage of whom three are yet living: Elizabeth, the eldest, is the 
wife of William Metzell. of this city, and they have two children, Harold and 
Claude. Pearl is the wife of John Herget, of Peoria. Gustav William is now 
a high-school student. The two who passed away were : Theodor Robert, who 
was the second in order of birth and died at the age of four years ; and Hazel, 
who died when an infant of three months. 

Captain Breymeier is a memlier of the Modern Woodmen of America and has 
many warm friends in that organization. He is very popular with the members 
of the police force and in iQio they presented him with a handsome solid gold 
policeman's star set with a large diamond and a ruby. During his identifica- 
tion with the department the force has been increased in its membership from 
thirty-six to eighty-six men, a fact which is indicative of the growth of the city. 
There have also been many improvements made in its equipment and the work 
of the department is now most carefully systematized and is therefore proving 
very effective. In the discharge of his duties Captain Breymeier is most earnest 
and faithful and his record is a commendable one. 



C. W. SPANGLER. 



C. W. Spangler, who since 1868 has resided on his farm, on section 18, 
Rosefield township, was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, June 18, 1834. His 
parents were Alathias and Sarah (Wells) Spangler, who settled in Elm wood 
township in 1851 on a farm of sixty acres, where they passed the remainder of 
their lives. In their family beside C. W". Spangler, of this review, were the 
following children : Eliza, who died at the age of ninety-two ; Airs. Nancy Har- 
per, who died at the age of seventy-two ; Amanda, who died at the age of ninety- 
one ; H. B., who died at the age of seventy-five ; Washington, who died at the 
age of eighteen months; O. P., who died at the age of seventy-two; Mrs. Phoebe 
Sloan, who died at the age of seventy-six ; Mrs. Minerva Kent, who died at the 
age of seventy ; and one who died in infancy in Ohio. 

C. W. Spangler was only seventeen years of age when he removed with his 
parents to Elmwood township and at the age of thirty-four he purchased his 
present home. He now owns three hundred and twenty-five acres which are situ- 
ated in Rosefield and Elmwood townships and he engages extensively in raising 
grain and a high grade of live stock. He has seventy-five acres in corn, forty 
acres in wheat, thirty acres in oats, sixty acres in timothy, fifteen acres in al- 
falfa, and one hundred and twenty acres in pasture. He now is the owner of 
two excellent stallions, one an imported Percheron, weighing two thousand 
pounds, and the other a standard bred roadster, weighing twelve hundred pounds. 
He also has forty head of Poland China hogs, fifteen head of cattle and eight- 
een head of horses. 

_ On the 6th of November. 1862. Mr. Spangler was united in marriage with 
Miss Rachel Magee. who was a daughter of Deacon John and Maria" (Mus- 
kimins) Alagee. Mr. and Mrs. Spangler have become the parents of two chil- 



264 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

dren: one who died in infancy; and Howard, born June 7, 1870. Mr. Spangler 
cast his first vote for John C. Fremont and till today he is a stanch republican. 
He takes a great interest in local party work and has served as township super- 
visor. He has given much time to the cause of education and has been a very 
efficient member of the school board. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Masonic order. Mr. Spangler has now been a resident of Peoria county for 
over sixty vears and has lived on his present farm for more than forty-four years. 
In that time he has not only been a witness to the general development of the 
community but has borne his full share in the general reform and progess and 
he stands in the highest regard of all with whom he is associated. 



J. W. McALlSTER. 



J. W. McAlister who is engaged in farming, is a native resident of Logan 
township, born on September i, 1855. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Enos Mc- 
Alister who resided on their farm of one hundred acres in Logan township. J. 
W. McAlister was reared under the parental roof where he remained until he 
W'as thirty years of age. When he was twenty-one years old he, together with 
his father, purchased forty acres of land and later twenty acres more, but sell- 
ing the same J. W. McAhster bought one hundred and forty acres on section 
16 of Logan township four miles from Hanna City where he now resides, and 
is farming in addition another sixty acres, making in all two hundred acres 
which he is now cultivating. He engages quite extensively in raising grain, 
and also live stock, making a specialty of hogs. 

On the 25th of December, 1883, Mr. McAlister was united in marriage to 
Miss Drusilla iNIcAvoy of Timber township, and to them have been born seven 
children. Clarence E., who remained on the farm until twenty-one years of 
age is now married to Miss P>ertlia McMeen and is engaged in farming on a tract 
of eighty acres in Elmwood township. Ethel Fern, who is the wife of John 
Gibbons was for two 3'ears engaged in teaching. Roy married Blanche Bitner, 
and is now farming in Elmwood township, Xellie is at home. Grace is de- 
ceased. Enos and Mary are both at home. 

In politics Mr. McAlister gives his allegiance to the democratic party, and 
fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
gives much time and attention to the interests of education and has served as 
school director. He has ever been active as an agriculturist in promoting the 
growth of the county, and its material improvement and his well directed labors 
make him a successful farmer of his native township. 



WILLIAM E. PER.SONS. 

Prominent among the energetic, far-sighted and successful business men of 
Peoria is William E. Persons, now manager for the Larkin Company of Illinois. 
He has been connected with the business in Peoria since the company established 
its branch here on the ist of April, 1902, and in the ten years of his residence in 
this city has won recognition as an enterprising business man and progressive, 
public-spirited citizen. Fie was born in Bennington, Xew York, on the 1st of 
December, 1868, but the greater part of his life has been spent in the middle west, 
for he was reared in Wisconsin, to which state his parents removed in his child- 
hood days. His public-school course was supplemented by studv in the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin at Madison, from which he was graduated on the completion of 
a four years' course in 1889. He then joined his father who was engaged in the 




W. ]•:. I'ERSONS 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 267 

lumber business and for ten _\'ears continued in that line of trade. This brought 
him to the period of his connection with the Larkin interests. He came to Peoria 
as their representative from the home office in Buttalo, New York, following the 
establishment of their business at this point on the 1st of April, 1902. He was 
made general manager in Peoria and as such supervised the erection of the large 
warehouse in this city. Something of the extent of the business at this point is 
indicated by the fact that there are about three hundred and fifty emploves in the 
Peoria branch. The Larkin company is the largest concern of its kind in the 
world. They manufacture soap, perfumes, etc., and sell their j^roducts through 
agencies. They give attractive premiums of furniture and many kinds of mer- 
chandise and the business has had a phenomenal growth. They keep their prod- 
uct up to a high standard of excellence and their trade now covers every section 
of this country. The Peoria house controls a large branch of the trade in the 
middle west and in this connection ^Ir. Persons displays excellent executive 
ability. 

In 1907 occurred the marriage of Mr. Persons and Miss Katharine Forbes, 
and unto them has been l)orn a daughter, Eleanore. Mr. Persons is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity in which he is a Knight Templar and a Noble of the 
Mystic Shrine. He belongs also to the Creve Coeur Club and the Ivy Club and is 
thus well known in the leading social circles of the city. While he has been a 
resident of Peoria for only a decade he has become widely known here and his 
substantial qualities of manhood and of character have gained for him an enviable 
position in the regard of those with whom he has come in contact. 



WILLIAM lACK. 



No class of citizens has borne a more conspicuous or influential part in giving 
to Peoria the prominence which it has enjoyed among the cities of the state, 
than has its lawyers. These have numbered among them men who have not only 
won reputations in the practice of their profession at the bar, but who have 
achieved distinction upon the bench, in the forum and in the councils of the 
state and nation. Of those belonging to a later period, no name stands more 
prominent at the present time for actual service at the bar than that of William 
Jack, of the firm of Jack, Irwin, Jack & Miles. ^Ir. Jack is a native of West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, born January 10, 1844, his parents, Joseph and 
H. J. (Herron) Jack, both being natives of that state. After a course in the 
Sewickley Academy in his native state, in i860, at the age of sixteen, he came to 
Peoria, where he attended the high school, being graduated therefrom in 1862. 
He then engaged in the study of law, at first with the late Judge Marion Wil- 
liamson, and later in the ofifice of Judge Hezekiah M. Wead, upon his admis- 
sion to the bar becoming a partner of the latter. 

In 1873 he was appointed master in chancery for the Peoria countv circuit 
court, serving for several terms. The firm of \\'ead & Jack having been dis- 
solved, in January, 1874, Mr. Jack formed a partnership with Judge Lawrence 
W. James, which was continued until about 1882, when Mr. James having l)een 
elected county judge of Peoria county, Nathan G. Moore, now of the firm of 
Wilson, Moore & Mcllvaine, Chicago, was admitted to the firm. Mr. ]\Ioore 
retired about 1885. when Mr. Jack entered into partnership with F. H. Tichenor 
which continued for many years. The business of late years has been largely 
in connection with incorporation cases. For more than fifteen years Mr. Jack 
has been one of the attorneys for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincv Railroad, 
and has also been identified in a similar capacity with several of the banks and 
other corporations of the city of Peoria. In politics he is an independent (or 



268 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

goldj democrat, but does not aspire to be an active politician, preferring to de- 
vote his attention to the practice of his profession. 

Mr. Jack was united in marriage on August 5, 1869, to IMiss Annie Grier, a 
daughter of John C. Grier, a prominent grain and commission merchant of 
Peoria, and has four children — two sons and two daughters. The older son, 
Robert P., is now a practicing attorney of Peoria. The other children are 
Sarah G., W^illiam J. and Elizabeth. Mrs. Jack is a sister of the late General 
David P. Grier, who won a high reputation as a soldier and an officer during the 
Civil war. Air. Jack is a member of the Second Presbyterian church and is, 
in the language of the Bench and Bar of Illinois, a valued citizen of the 
community who gives his support to all beneficial measures, and lends the in- 
fluence of his opposition to all movements detrimental to the public good." 



P. A. KRATZER. 



P. A. Kratzer, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits in Rosefield town- 
ship, has resided on his present farm since 1866. At that date he purchased 
sixty-three acres of land and later, at different times, added adjoining tracts of 
forty acres, seven acres, eleven acres, forty acres and eighty-two acres, making 
in all two hundred and fifty-three acres that he now owns. He makes a specialty 
of raising grain and live stock. He has fifty acres in com, forty acres in wheat, 
thirty acres in oats, seventeen acres in timothy, twelve acres in clover, and one 
hundred and forty acres in pasture land. He owns one registered imported 
Percheron stallion, weighing two thousand pounds, and has one hundred Duroc 
Jersey hogs, thirty head of cattle and twelve head of horses. 

In 1889 Air. Kratzer was united in marriage with Aliss Katie Streider and 
they have become the parents of five children : Louis C. who is engaged in 
farming in Rosefield township ; Lizzie, who died in November, 1907, at the age 
of seventeen years ; and Philip, Walter and Ethel, all of whom are at home and 
are seventeen, fifteen and thirteen years respectively. In politics Mr. Kratzer 
votes the republican ticket and he has served as road commissioner. . He is 
greatly interested in the cause of education and has given efficient service as 
school director. Fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and both he and his wife attend the Methodist Episcopal church. Both 
in raising grain and live stock Mr. Kratzer has had excellent success and he 
is now considered one of the substantial farmers of his township. He is thrifty 
and industrious and show^s the most admirable traits of character in both busi- 
ness and social relations and, therefore, has the highest regard of all who know 
him. 



CHARLES \\ AIILES. 



Charles V. Miles, attorney at law, is practicing as a member of the firm of 
Jack, Irwin, Jack & Miles, and has been an active member of the Peoria bar 
since 1901. Nine years before he had been admitted to practice at Omaha, 
Nebraska, and since entering upon his professional career has made steady 
advancement by reason of his close study and strong purpose. He was born in 
Jerseyville, Illinois, April 12, 1868, and is a son of George S. and Alartha (De 
Wolf) Allies, both of whom are now- deceased. The father was a dentist, largely 
devoting his life to the practice of that profession. The son spent his youthful 
days in his native town and at the usual age entered the public schools, wherein 
he pursued his work through consecutive grades until graduated from the high 



HiSTURY OF TEORIA COUNTY 269 

school with the class of 1886. He then entered newspaper work, devoting his 
energies thereto for two years. In 1888 he became a student in the University 
(if Michigan, pursuing an academic course and in 1891 was graduated from the 
law department. He ne.xt went to Omaha, Nebraska, and was admitted to ])rac- 
tice at the bar of that state and remained here until 1901, wdien he returned to 
Illinois and opened an office in Peoria, joining Joseph V. Grafif, under the lirm 
name of GraiY & Miles. That association was maintained for five years, at 
the end of wdiich time Mr. Miles withdrew and entered the present firm of Jack, 
Irwin, Jack & Miles. This is one of the strongest and most capable law firms of 
the city and the litigation entrusted to them is of a most important character. 
Their clientage, too, is very extensive and makes constant demand ujjon the time 
and energies of the different members of the firm. Recognizing the fact that 
careful preparation is one of the most potent elements in success in the courts, 
Mr. INIiles has never failed to thoroughly acquaint himself with his case and 
careful analysis has enabled him to readily determine the law applicable thereto. 
In 1899 occurred the marriage of Mr. Miles and Miss Josephine Danforth, 
of Washington, Illinois, and unto them have been born two children : Catherine, 
who died in 1906 at the age of six; and \N'arren. Mr. Miles is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and has advanced to the Knight Templar degree in the 
York Rile. He has also crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the 
Ancient Arabic Order of the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Creve Coeur 
and to the Country Clubs and in all these different organizations is well known, 
having a circle of friends which attests his personal worth and his fidelity to 
high and manly principles. 



GEORGE J. JOCHEM. 






For ten years George J. Jochem has been a practitioner at the bar of Peoria, 
entering upon the work of the profession here immediately after being admitted 
to practice by the supreme court. He is one of the city's younger lawyers, yet 
the measure of success he has attained and the kind of work he handles identify 
him rather with the old and tried practitioners. He was born in Peoria, Octo- 
ber 14, 1876, and is a son of George J. and Rosina (Off) Jochem. His father 
was connected with the brewing interests of Pekin, Illinois, in the latter '60s and 
early '70s, and died in 1877. His mother, however, still survives. 

Mr. Jochem acquired his education from the public-school system, complet- 
ing a four years" select course in the Peoria high school. He then entered the 
University of Michigan for the study of law, and was graduated therefrom in 
June, 1902, having pursued the regular course. In the fall of the same year he 
was admitted to practice, opened an office in Peoria, and entered upon what has 
proved a most successful professional career. He now occupies a suite of rooms 
in the \\'oolner building and his clientage, already large, is steadily growing. 
The class of work he handles is eminently satisfactory, not only because it has 
brought him good returns, but because it is of the substantial kind of which the 
handling is a guarantee of good citizenship and progress. His fidelity to a high 
standard of professional ethics and his adherence to straightforward business 
methods and manly ideals has gained for him the warm regard and good will 
of the legal fraternity and business men in general, in this city, .'\lthough he 
attends to the general practice of law, he has devoted a great amount of time to 
the study of corporation law, and handles a considerable amount of that sort of 
work. 

George Jochem is well known in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite in Peoria consistory while with the Nobles of 
I Mohammed Temple of the Mystic Shrine, he has also crossed the sands of the 



270 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

desert. He is a member of the Creve Coeur Club, and actively interested in 
various legal organizations. He is widely known in Peoria, and his admirable, 
enduring traits of character have won him the regard and friendship of those 
with whom he has been associated. 



ALMOX METS WHITNEY. 

The sudden death of Alnion \'. Whitney on the 29th of October, 191 1, was 
the occasion of deep and widespread regret in Peoria. He was at the time fill- 
ing the office of justice of the peace to which he was elected by a larger vote 
than given to any candidate of the party except Mayor Woodruff. Those who 
knew him — and his acquaintance was wide — found him a genial whole-souled 
man, "fair and square" in his dealings and popular alike with young and old, 
rich and poor. He was born in Geauga county, Ohio, May 25, 1842. His father, 
the Rev. Jonathan Ransaker Whitney, was a native of Massachusetts and be- 
came a minister of the Alethodist Episcopal church. He, his father and his 
wife's father were the first three settlers in IMontville township, Geauga county, 
Ohio. The district there was an unbroken forest, the trees standing in their 
primeval strength. The greenwoods were the haunt of many wolves and pan- 
thers and there was little indication that the work of civilization had been begun 
in all the surrounding district. Jonathan R. Whitney wedded Miss Mary Moore, 
also a native of Massachusetts. She died when her son Almon was but two 
months old, the father, however, surviving until he had reached the age of 
eighty-five years. Almon Whitney was the youngest of twelve children, there 
being nineteen years' difference in age between himself and his oldest brother, 
S. E. Whitney, who is now living in Portland, Michigan. 

Almon \^ Whitney pursued his early education in the district schools and 
afterward attended the Burton (Ohio) Academy, from which he was graduated 
when he was twenty-three years of age. He engaged in teaching in the rural 
schools of his native state, and while following that profession was married 
on the twenty-fifth anniversary of his birth, to Miss Clara E. Coe, of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, who was a teacher in the ])ublic schools of that state. They became 
the parents of three children, but their first born, a daughter, Blanche Maude, 
died when but three years of age. Ernest died in New York in 1898, only three 
months after his marriage. The living son, Ray A., is an efficient representative 
of the firm of Bartholomew & Company at Peoria, Illinois. 

Following his marriage A. V. Whitney continued to engage in teaching 
in Ohio for several years and then came to Illinois, accepting the position of 
principal of the public schools at Sheridan, LaSalle county, where he continued 
for three years. He then purchased a newspaper, the Sheridan News Letter, 
which he conducted for three years and then sold. At the expiration of that 
period he went to Burlington, Iowa, and became a local reporter on the Bur- 
lington Hawkeye. Subsequently he removed to Canton, Illinois, purchased an 
interest in the Canton Republican, which he edited for two years. He came to 
Peoria in 1885 to accept a position on the old Peoria Morning Transcript, then 
published by Alexander G. Stone at Adams and Fulton streets. When three 
years had passed he was made milk inspector for the city and continued in 
that position for several years during which time he revolutionized the milk 
business. He determined that the milk supi)ly should be sanitary and placed 
the public on its guard against conditions detrimental to the end in view. He 
was known as the "father of pure milk" in this city. He would not take the 
word of venders of milk but obtained samples from their wagons and made 
careful analvses of the milk. His valuable service in that connection led to his 
selection for still other political duties and honors. In 1903 he was chosen 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 271 

justice of the peace and was reelected in IQOQ by a very flattering majority, liis 
vote exceeding that of any candidate of the party save Mayor Woodruff'. Be- 
fore coming to Peoria Mr. Whitney had been admitted to the bar, his diploma, 
issued in LaSalle county, bearing date of July 21, 1871. 

He was for thirty years a valued member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and held all the offices in Peoria Lodge, No. 15, being secretary and 
recorder at the time of his death. He was a high degree Mason, holding mem- 
bership in Temple Lodge, F. & A. ]\I., Peoria consistory and Mohammed Temple 
of the Mvstic Shrine. His recreation largely came to him through driving 
horses, lie had great love for the noble steed, owning his first horse when 
eighteen vears of age, and always keeping one or more from that time forward. 
He had just such qualities as drew men to him and won for him their high 
regard and confidence. They greatly appreciated his many sterling traits, his 
unfeigned cordiality, his genial disposition and his wdiolehearted interest in 
others. His death, therefore, brought a sense of personal bereavement to many 
outside of his immediate family, and many years will pass ere his memory ceases 
to 1)6 cherished liv those who were in any wav associated with him. 



CHARLES lOITXSOX. 



Mastering the lessons of life day by day until his post-graduate work in the 
school of experience has placed him with the men of ability and enterprise 
in the business circles of Peoria, Charles Johnson now figures prominently as 
president of the Johnson Plardware Company, and has conducted business since 
March, 1885, at 2023 South Adams street. The mammoth enterprise of the 
present dav'had Irnt a small beginning but it has gradually developed and im- 
proved until it now stands foremost among the most enterprising concerns of 
this character in the city. 

Mr. lohnson was born in Peoria, January i, 1862. a son of John H. John- 
son, a native of northern Germany who, in 1852, crossed the Atlantic to the new 
world and came to Peoria. Here he followed the blacksmith's trade which he 
had ]5reviouslv learned in his native land, continuing in that line of activity until 
1867. He then removed to Farmington, Illinois, where he conducted a shop 
until 1886 in which year he returned to Peoria where he lived retired in the en- 
joyment of a well earned rest until the time of his death in 1890. His wife, 
who in her maidenhood was Mary C. Reiker, was also a native of Germany, 
and of their marriage eleven children were born, eight of whom are still living: 
George, Charles, Peter A., John, William, Mrs. Alma Spindler, Mary Johnson 
and Mrs. T. England. Of "this family Peter A. Johnson is now city treasurer 
of Peoria, and is mentioned on another page of this work. 

The boyhood and youth of Charles Johnson were divided between Peoria, 
Elmwood and Farmington, as his parents resided in the different places. How- 
ever, he returned to Peoria when a lad of thirteen years and soon afterward 
started out to earn his own livelihood, securing a position in the employ of the 
Meyer Hardware Company where he remained for several years, his long con- 
nection therewith enabling him to not only thoroughly learn the hardware busi- 
ness but also prove his fidelity, capability and trustworthiness. He was ambi- 
tious to engage in business on his own account and carefully saved his earnings 
until the sum was sufficient to purchase a small stock of hardware. This he 
offered for sale at 2023 South Adams street in March, 1885, and from that 
small beginning he has developed one of the largest hardware trades in central 
Illinois. In 1888 he purchased the site whereon he was conducting his business 
and erected there a substantial two-story brick building, both floors of which 
are occupied with an extensive stock of shelf and heavy hardware. A good 



272 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

addition has been erected in the rear across the alley and in this is conducted 
the tin, sheet metal and cornice department of the business. In 1891 the Charles 
Johnson Hardware Company was incorporated with Charles Johnson as pres- 
ident, Peter A. Johnson, vice president, and a third brother, William Johnson, 
secretary and treasurer. The three still remain actively interested in the business 
and they contract for all kinds of tin and sheet metal work such as roofing, 
spouting and cornice work. Their trade is conducted along wholesale and retail 
lines, and the volume of their business has grown annually so their yearly sales 
have reached a gratifying figure. 

]\Ir. Johnson was married in 1889 to Miss Anna Tjarks of Peoria, and they 
have five children, Anna, Carl, Lucile, Ruth and Cecilia. The life history of 
Charles Johnson is that of a self-made man. When determination, persever- 
ance and capability are arrayed against drawbacks, poverty and trials, the result 
is almost absolutely certain ; the former qualities are invincible, they know no 
defeat, and such have been the elements which have constituted the chief features 
in the success or him whose name introduces this review. 



COLONEL ISAAC TAYLOR. 

Peoria county numbered Colonel Isaac Taylor as a valued citizen. His life 
was one of usefulness. He served for many years in public office, filling the 
position of county treasurer for eleven years, and he rendered his country val- 
uable aid as a soldier of the Civil war. His life record in every phase com- 
mended him to the confidence and respect of those with whom he came in contact. 
He was born April 22. 1836, in Saratoga, Xew York, and his parents, Isaac Put- 
nam and Martha G. ( Scidmore ) Taylor, were also natives of that place, whence 
they removed to Illinois in 1837, settling in Canton, Fulton county. After two 
years they became residents of Trivoli townshi]). Peoria county, where the 
father devoted his attention to farming, and Colonel Taylor was, therefore, 
reared to agricultural life, assisting in the w^ork of plowing, planting and har- 
vesting throughout the period of his youth. His early education was acquired 
in the district schools and he afterward spent a year in Jonesville Academy, 
Ballston Springs, in Saratoga county, Xew York. He then returned to this state 
and devoted four years to the study of law under the direction of Henrv Grove 
and two years under Elbridge G. Johnson, of Peoria. \\'hile engaged in studying 
law he taught school. Ill health, however, prevented him from securing admis- 
sion to the bar at that time, and in the hope of finding benefit in a change of 
climate he removed to Minnesota and at St. Paul was admitted to the bar. Almost 
immediately his health improved so that by the 8th of October. 1861, he was 
able for military duty and his patriotic spirit prompted his enlistment for service 
in the Civil war. At Fort Snelling he enrolled as a member of Company H, 
Third Regiment of Minnesota Infantry, of which he became second lieutenant, 
while subsequently he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant and 
afterward to that of captain. He served until the fall of 1864 under his first 
term of enlistment and then veteranized, continuing with the Same regiment 
until April 27, 1865, when he resigned. His was a brilliant military record, 
characterized by marked bravery in times of intense danger. At the battle of 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in July, 1862, the Third Minnesota Infantry was cap- 
tured by the rebel forces under General Forest, but Colonel Taylor with a com- 
rade escaped and later was placed in command of a convalescent camp at Nash- 
ville, where he was located during the siege of that city. At length his regiment 
was paroled and transferred to Alinnesota, where it was engaged for a time in 
fighting the Indians. Lieutenant Taylor, however, remained on duty in Ten- 
nessee until the exchange of his regiment was effected, at which time he rejoined 




(liL. ISAAC TAVLdK 



HISTORY OF I'KORIA COUNTY 275 

his uld command at Columbus, Kentucky. With his comrades he participated 
in the advance on \'ickshurg in 18(13 with the Sixteenth Army Corps under 
command of General C. C. Washburn and after taking part in the siege and 
capture of \'icksburg, for three months the Third ^ilinnesota was engaged in 
military operations in Arkansas, including the capture of Little Rock and its 
reconstruction and the movements at Pine Bluff, Jackson and Devall Bluff. 
In the meantime the regiment was assigned to duty with the Seventh Army 
Corps and Captain Taylor, who had been promoted to the rank of captain on the 
15th of April, 1863, was assigned to duty with General Shaler commanding the 
division, to serve as judge advocate in the general court-martial at I'ine Bluff. 
having charge of many important cases during the remainder of his term of 
service. His entire military record whether on the firing line or in court-martial 
service was most commendable and he deserved all the honor and credit that 
was given to the brave boys in blue who defended the Union during the darkest 
hour in the country's history. 

In April, 1865. Colonel Taylor rejoined his family at Trivoli and soon after- 
ward went again to Minnesota but remained only for a short time. His health 
did not improve there and he returned to Trivoli, where he continued until 1871. 
In that year he took up his abode in Peoria and through much of the remainder 
of his life he was active in public service, in which connection he made a 
splendid record. In i86g he received appointment to the position of assistant 
assessor of internal revenue for Peoria county but in 1870 he was elected 
county treasurer and retired from the former position to accept the latter, in 
which he continued for eleven years. No higher testimonial of his faithfulness 
and capability could be given than his long retention in the position. Through 
appointment of Governor Oglesby he was canal commissioner from 1885 until 
i88g and in 1893 ^^ ^^''S made commissioner of public works in Peoria by Mayor 
Miles, continuing in the position for two years. He was also named as presi- 
dent of the special commission to inspect the Chicago drainage canal, his ap- 
pointment coming to him from Governor Tanner, in May, 1899, while his in- 
cumliency in office continued until June, 1900. His associates on this commission 
were Colonel John Lambert of Joliet, and Colonel Al. F. Schoch, of Ottawa. 
He was splendidly (|ualified for the ]5osition by previous experience and broad 
knowledge of the state, having for fifteen years been chairman of the Illinois 
Y^alley Association, which was organized in 1887 for the purpose of securing 
legislation from the general government for t^^e creation of a deep waterway 
between Lake Michigan and the Gulf of Alexico. In 1878 Colonel Taylor was 
commissioned by Governor Cullom colonel of the Seventh Regiment of the 
Illinois National Guard and in 1898 was chosen colonel of the Provisional 
Regiment organized in Peoria for service in the Spanish-American war. This 
regiment was never called for active duty but the quality of its members was 
such that it would not have been lacking in valor had it been placed on the 
firing line. Many of its members had been, like Colonel Taylor, in military 
service before and all were actuated by a spirit of patriotism that was most 
marked. During the later years of his life Colonel Taylor was engaged in the 
real estate and loan business, to which he devoted his energies until his death. 

On the 15th of October, i860, at Trivoli, Illinois, was celebrated the marriage 
of Colonel Taylor and Miss Mary Bartlett IVnirne. a daughter of Melatiah T. and 
Mary Loring Bourne. Their three children are : .Alice L., who is the wife of Charles 
E. Bunn, of Peoria : Laura B., the wife of Herbert Walker, of Chicago ; and Isa 
Dean. The family has long been prominent in this city, its members occujjying 
a creditable position in social circles. Colonel Taylor was a republican in his 
political views and never faltered in his support of a principle or measure which 
he deemed to be for the best interest of the community at large. His life was 
always actuated by high and noble purposes and he was a devoted member of 
the Congregational church. He stood as a splendid type of the progressive, 



276 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

patriotic citizen, honored wherever known and most of all where he was liest 
known. The simple weight of his character and ability carried him into impor- 
tant relations. Every trust reposed in him throughout his entire life was faith- 
fully fulfilled. His name stood as a synonym for those qualities which men most 
admire and which are most effective forces in good government and in the 
civilizing processes of the world. 



FRAX'CIS GRANT .MINOR. 

The name of Francis Grant ]\Iinor has almost continuously since the ist of 
December, 1888, been on the roll of officials of the city or county of Peoria and 
his long continued service as a public officer stands in incontrovertible proof of 
his ability and fidelity in discharging the duties that have devolved upon him. 
He is now serving as sheriff of Peoria county and it is well known that neither 
fear nor favor can swerve him from a course which he believes to be right. He 
was born in this city, October 18, 1852, a son of John Minor, who came here 
from Wheeling, West \'irginia, in 1850. He was a miller by trade and followed 
that business during the period of his residence in Peoria, w-hich continued to the 
time of his death in 1865. He married Martha Near, who, like her husband, 
was a native of western Pennsylvania. They became the parents of five children, 
all of whom are still living. 

At the usual age Francis Grant Minor began his education in the old First 
Ward schoolhouse which stood on the site now occupied by the Smith Hotel, his 
teacher being E. F. Baldwin, the present editor of the Peoria Evening Star, while 
later he was instructed by J. E. Dow, who was afterward city superintendent 
of schools. When his schooldays were over he crossed the threshold of the busi- 
ness world by securing a position of trust in the Mechanics' National Bank which 
later became' the Merchants" National Bank, entering that institution on the nth 
of December, 1871. That he was faithful and capable is indicated by the fact 
that he continued with the bank until the ist of December, 1888, and through 
intermediate positions was promoted to one of considerable responsibility. He 
severed his connection with financial circles, however, to enter public life in the 
position of circuit clerk of Peoria county, to which he had been elected in the 
previous November. His four years' term won him high commendation by 
reason of his loyal and efficient service and upon his retirement from that office 
in 1892 he was appointed oil inspector by Mayor Philo B. Allies, acting in that 
capacity during the Allies administration. Mr. Minor became connected with the 
coal trade when, on Christmas day, 1895, '^^ entered the employ of Stephen 
Wolschlag, a prominent coal operator. 

Mr. Alinor was called to the office of sheriff' in November, igio, and is the 
present incumbent in that office. His determination to enforce the laws through- 
out the county was soon evident and in this he won the approbation of every right- 
minded and law-abiding citizen. He has done everything in his power to suppress 
crime and vice and it is well known that conformity to the law is the only thing 
that can win his favor. He is never hesitant in the discharge of his duties but 
fearlessly and promptly administers justice according to the demands of his 
office and his record has gained him high commendation throughout the county. 

In 1879 Mr. Alinor was united in marriage at Peoria to Miss Pauline Prusch- 
witz, who was born in this city and is a daughter of Ewald Pruschwitz. who 
came from Germany and in Peoria engaged in the cabinet-making business. Air. 
and Mrs. Alinor are the parents of three children : John R., a farmer residing 
near Elmwood ; Ewald F., who is farming in Alilbrook township ; and Francis 
G., who is serving as deputy under his father in the sheriff's office. 



HISTORY OF rP:oRIA COUNTY 277 

-Mr. Minor gives his political allegiance to the republican party, believing 
that its principles contain the best elements of good government. In matters of 
citizenship he takes a progressive stand and whether in office or out of it seeks 
the welfare and development of his community. His labors in behalf of public 
advancement have always been of a practical character. He has a wide accjuain- 
tance among the leading citizens of Peoria county and the social qualities of his 
nature have gained him a wide circle of friends. 



CH.\RLES RIXDFLEISCH. 

Charles Rindtleisch is the mayor of Hanna City, now serving for his third 
term, and to the discharge of the duties of the office he brought the same spirit 
of carefulness, enterprise and integrity that has characterized his business career. 
He has resided here for eight years, establishing his home in this district about 
tile time the village was incorporated. His birthplace was a farm in Cuyahoga 
county, Ohio, near Cleveland, and his natal day was March 25, 1861. His par- 
ents, Frederick and .\ngie Rindtleisch, were both natives of Germany but the 
mother died when her son Charles was only seven years of age. His youthful 
days were spent upon the home farm near Cleveland where he remained until he 
had attained his majority, working in the fields through the summer months and 
acc|uiring his education during the winter seasons in the public schools. When 
he had reached manhood he decided to seek his fortune in another C|uarter and in 
1882 came to Peoria county, where he began to work as a farm liand for \'al 
I'lrich with whom he continued for two years. On the expiration of that period 
he removed to Cheyenne county, Kansas, where he homesteaded a farm. There 
he lived for ten years, after which he returned to Peoria and rented a farm in 
Logan township, from his brother Fred, who is now deceased. This property 
was situated about a mile from Hanna City. He continued its cultivation for 
two years, after which he rented the James Bowling farm in Limestone township, 
upon which he lived for three years. He afterward worked in the dairy of O. J. 
r.ailev for two years and then came to Hanna City where he has now resided 
for eight years or almost continuouslv since the incorporation of the town. He 
is now proprietor of the restaurant here and also purchased the grain elevator 
which he has since operated. His business activities as well as his official service 
make him a leading and renresentative citizen. 

In 1892 Mr. Rindfleisch was united in marriage in Kansas to Miss Mary 
Gallup and they now have two children, George and Ida, lioth at home. The 
family are well known in the locality where thev reside and have a large circle 
of friends who entertain for them warm regard! ]\Ir. Rindfleisch is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen camp and is loyal to the teachings of that order. He 
is nonular with his fellow townsmen who manifest their confidence in his ability 
and in his Dublic-spirited citizenshin bv choosing him f(ir the position of chief 
executive of the town, a position which he has occupied for six vears. 



GEORGE W. \AX FLEET. 

George W. \'an Fleet is a splendid representative of that class of enter- 
prising young business men who recognize and utilize opportunities and coordin- 
ate forces into a unified and harmonious whole. From a humljle position in 
connection with insurance interests he has steadily advanced to the presidency 
of the Peoria Life Insurance Company which had its inception in 1902. He 



278 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

has made his home in this city since 1907, and throughout the entire period has 
managed and controlled the interests of the corporation of which he is now 
the head. He was born upon a farm in \'an Buren county. Iowa, in 1874. and 
in his youthful days attended the country schools, after which he engaged in 
teaching for several years. Desirous, however, to further promote his own 
knowledge he entered Callahan College at Des Moines and afterward became a 
student in Drake University of this city. He is a graduate of the former in- 
stitution and he has remained throughout life a student of the questions, in- 
terests and conditions which are of vital significance in the business world and 
in the public life of state and nation. He became identified with insurance 
interests as a representative of the Northwestern Life Association with head- 
quarters at ^Minneapolis, being api^ointed to the position of superintendent of 
agencies. He spent three years in that connection and then entered the service 
of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York. Again he was at the 
head of the agency department, continuing with that company for seven years, 
and afterward spent two years as general agent for the state of Connecticut 
with the headquarters at New Haven. On the expiration of that period he 
came to Peoria and is now president and general manager of the Peoria Life 
Insurance Company. As previously stated, this was organized in 1902 and its 
present officers are : George W. \'an Fleet, president ; Emmet C. May, vice pres- 
ident ; and O. B. Wysong, secretary and treasurer. This was incorporated as 
a stock company with an authorized capital of five hundred thousand dollars and 
a paid-in capital of one hundred thousand dollars. This concern was established 
by Messrs. E. C. May, Warren Sutliff, E. J. Case and E. N. Woodruff and on 
the 1st of August, 1907, Mr. \'an Fleet became identified with the corporation 
as vice president and general manager. He then reorganized it as a stock com- 
pany and one year afterward was chosen to the presidency. His safe, con- 
servative business policv has placed it on a par with many older insurance com- 
panies and he has instituted a plan of expansion that has resulted in rapid and 
substantial growth. Today there are one hundred and forty agencies over 
Illinois. Iowa, Kansas and Michigan and a large volume of business is written 
annually. 

In i8q8 Mr. \'an F"leet was united in marriage to Miss Anna May Locke, of 
Farmington, Iowa. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons. He belongs 
to the Creve Coeur Club of Peoria, the Peoria .\ssociation of Commerce and 
the Union League Club of New Haven, Connecticut. He is widely recognized 
as a man of excellent business ability who readily discriminates between the 
essential and nonessential. His theories find justification in immediate and suc- 
cessful action and his executive force enables him to capably control a con- 
stantly growing corporation. 



CHARLES KNETZGER. 

Charles Knetzger is proprietor of large lumberyards of Peoria, and is also 
well known in financial circles as one of the directors of the Illinois National 
Bank. His identification with the lumber trade here covers a period of twelve 
years, prior to which time he had been in business in St. Louis, Missouri. He 
is a native of \\'isconsin, his birth having occurred in Germantown, November 
10, 1862. His parents were Leonard and Beatrice (Weber) Knetzger. His 
youthful days were passed in Naperville, Illinois, and there he attended the 
parochial schools of the Catholic church, after which he started out in the busi- 
ness world in a very humble capacity. He worked at the shoe bench and learned 
the shoemaker's trade under his father, whom he thus assisted until twenty years 
of age. Feeling that his education was not sufficient to enable him to advance 
as he desired in the business world, he then entered St. Joseph's College at 




CliAKLES KXETZGEK 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTY 281 

Teutopolis, Illinois, ami later took up the profession of teaching, which he fol- 
lowed for a time. He was also employed in a grocery store at Duquoin. Illinois, 
and when his labors had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to start 
out in business for himself, he opened a cigar store at Duquoin. Later he re- 
moved to St. Louis, where he continued in the same line of business for four 
years but afterward returned to Duquoin and accepted the position of book- 
keeper with a mining company. Subsequently he spent two years as cashier 
in the Duquoin bank, and then again went to St. Louis, where he remained for 
eight years and gained his experience in the lumber trade, being connected with a 
lumber tirm of that city. He left St. Louis in 1900 to become a resident of 
Peoria, and here bought out the old Rogers lumberyard. He now deals in all 
kinds of building materials and his yard covers an acre and a quarter of ground. 
He has a large lumberyard and a shed with a capacity for two million feet of 
lumber and has built up a big business, handling oak, maple and beech hardwood 
flooring, white pine, redwood, cypress, spruce and other finishing materials. 

On April 8, 1891, Air. Knetzger was united in marriage to Miss Anna AI. 
Reis, of Belleville, Illinois. They are very prominent members of the Catholic 
church and Mr. Knetzger is also well known in connection with the Knights of 
Columbus. Business interests and activities have claimed the greater part of 
his time since he started out in life on his own account, and without assistance 
from others he has worked his way steadily upward, realizing that energy, in- 
dustry and perseverance are substantial cjualities in the attainment of success. 



R. W. MORRIS. 



R. W. Morris, who is numljered among the substantial farmers and represen- 
tative citizens of Logan township, was born in Rosefield township in i8(X5. He 
is the son of Henry Morris, who was born in Lancashire, England, in 1808, 
and his wife, Ann (Wrigley) Morris, also a native of Lancashire. The parents 
were married in England, September 11, 1836, and together with the paternal 
grandparents, James and Betty (Manock) Morris, came to America in 1841. 
They took passage on a sailing vessel to New York city, being six wrecks in 
crossing the ocean, and thence came by the water route to Illinois, where they 
located in Peoria county. They intended to homestead at Rock Island but 
found Peoria county very inviting and the grandfather entered eighty acres of 
land there, for which he paid a dollar and a quarter per acre and in due time 
received the title for same, written on sheepskin parchment and signed by 
President James K. Polk. The grandparents resided on this tra.ct of land dur- 
ing the remainder of their lives, the grandfather dying in 1842, at the age of 
seventy-five, and his wife in 1845. at the age of sixty-five. The father, Henry 
Morris, rented a tract of eighty acres of land in Peoria county and tilled the 
same with an ox team. At the death of his father he was made executor of 
the estate and purchased the shares of the other heirs. He later purchased the 
adjoining eighty acres, owning in all a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 
He remained on his homestead until the fall of 1881, when he moved to Elm- 
wood, where he died on the 8th of June, 1883, at the age of seventy-four years, 
seven months and eight days. In his family were eleven children, of whom six 
are now living, R. W., of this review, being the youngest. 

R. W. Morris was reared under the parental roof and worked on his father's 
farm until he was twenty-one years of age. At that time he took full charge 
of the homestead which he had rented, until 1900, when he bought out the other 
heirs. In 1902 he purchased eighty acres on sections 8 and 9, Logan town- 
ship, and in 1903 he sold the old home place and bought forty acres on section 
17 of Logan township, so that he now has a farm of two hundred and twentv 



282 HISTORY ()!• I'KoRlA COUNTY 

acres in all. All of this except thirty acres, which is in pasture land, is under 
a high state of cultivation, and he raises yearly seventy acres in corn, forty-five 
acres in wheat and forty acres in oats. He has about one hundred head of 
hogs and eight head of horses. On his farm, which is situated two miles from 
Hanna City, are the very best improvements including an excellent house and 
barn. 

On the 30th of January, 1889, Air. Morris was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida Alice Alorby, and they are the parents of one son, Clyde, who was born 
August 16, 1894. and died January 2, 1895. In politics Mr. Morris casts his 
vote with the republican party. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian church and they enjoy a large circle of friends and acquaintances 
and are held in the highest regard by all who know them. 



WILLIAM DOREY. 



William Dorey is at the head of one of the well known productive industries 
of Peoria — The Advance Bottling Works, manufacturers and bottlers of soft 
drinks. His life record had its beginning on the 17th of October, 1871, Peoria 
being his native city. He was left an orphan by the death of his parents when 
only six months old and was adopted by a family that reared him. His youth- 
ful days were passed in this city and he attended the public schools, thus ac- 
quiring his education. He afterward engaged in driving a team and later be- 
came a street car conductor. He turned from this to enter the ice business and 
subsequently he engaged in dealing in coal. His ne.xt venture was in the feed 
business and at one time he dealt in gasoline and oil but sold out in that line 
to engage in the liquor trade, in which he continued in Peoria for six years, 
ning the manufacture and bottling of soft drinks at No. 313 Warner avenue. 
On the expiration of that period he entered his present line of business, begin- 
When he started in this line on the 28th of November, 1909, Frank E. Holland 
was associated with him in a partnershij) relation but Mr. Dorey has since pur- 
chased his partner's interest and is now sole proprietor. During the summer 
months he keeps three wagons in continuous use and two in the winter season. 
He manufactures the famous A. B. C. ginger ale and other popular soft drinks, 
conducting his business under the name of The Advance Bottling Company, a 
name that has become synonymous to the trade with the excellence of the prod- 
uct and straightforward dealing. Air. Dorey is also engaged in the gas drum 
business for drawing beer from kegs. 

In 1891 occurred the marriage of Mr. Dorey and Miss Mamie L. Jones, of 
Decatur, Illinois, and they have six children: Alyrtle, the wife of A. H. Miller; 
Earl; Chester; Theodore; Luella ; and Harold. Mr. Dorey holds membership 
with the Order of the Moose but is not otherwise prominent in fraternal circles, 
preferring to give his undivided attention to his business affairs. Gradually he 
has worked his way upward and is now at the head of an enterprise that is 
bringing him good returns. 



HON. SAAIUEL A. KIXSEY^ 

Hon. Samuel .\. Kinsey. former mayor of Peoria and president of the Kinsey 
i*v. Alahler Company, lirass founders, has been a resident of this city since 1856. 
He was born in Morris county. New Jersey, February 15. 1827. a son of Samuel 
and Elizabeth ( Pomp ) Kinsey. The father was a merchant of Easton, Penn- 
sylvania, and died at Hokendau(|ua, Pennsylvania. Captain Ingham Kinsey. the 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 283 

great-grandfather of Samuel A. Kiiisey, of this review, participated in the strug- 
gle for independence, as did several other members of the family. Lieutenant 
Samuel Kiusey, in the Maryland line, under the command of General Small- 
wood, was an ancestor, as was John Kinsey, one of the commissioners sent out 
by the proprietor of West Jersey, in the ship Kent in 1677. On his mother's 
side he is a descendant of the Rev. Nicholas Pomp, a native of Danzig, who was 
educated at Halle and was sent to America by the synod of Holland about 1760. 
His son, Thomas Pomp, was a German Reformed church preacher who for fifty- 
seven years was pastor of a church in Easton, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel A. Kinsey at the age of sixteen years was bound out as an ajjpren- 
tice to learn the machine and pattern-making trade. He served his time and 
worked in various places as journeyman until 1852. Then he began contracting 
and building railroads, in which business he engaged for four years. In 1856 
he came west and took charge of the Peters foundry and machine sho]) at the 
corner of Walnut and Water streets, Peoria, which position he held until 1860, 
and then went into business for himself in the brass foundrv, jiattern and model- 
making business. In 1866 this was consolidated with the interests of John C. 
Mahler, a coppersmith, who was the surviving partner of the firm of Loker, 
Seiler & Company who in 1850 established the business from which has grown 
the present Kinsey & Mahler Company. 

Samuel A. Kinsey, out of the fifty-six years of his residence in Peoria, has 
spent twenty-four in public life, eight years as alderman, two as mayor, ten as 
trustee of the Peoria Driveway and Park system, and four years as president 
of that department. He was a whig and since the organization of the repul)- 
lican [larty has been one of its sui^jiorters. He was a member of the Dutch Re- 
formed church in Philadelphia. His wife was Lydia Aim Emery, who passed 
away May 23, 1909. Their children were six in number, \\'illiam, Warren, 
Nellie. Blanche, Ada and Samuel, Jr. 



EDWARD LOUIS NOTHNAGEL. 

Edward Louis Nothnagel, a veteran of the Civil war, a public official whose 
record in office has been creditable and an engineer whose work in that field 
has been of an important character, is now serving as justice of the peace in 
Peoria. He was born in the city of Washington, Tazewell county, Illinois, 
March 11, 18^3, and his father, Edward Adolph Nothnagel, was a native of lies- 
sen, Germany, and in early manhood studied medicine. He located for practice 
in Peoria in 1835 but afterward removed to Tazewell county, where he long fol- 
lowed his profession. He was married there to Catherine Trautman, a native 
of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, who died when her son Edward L. was four- 
teen years of age. In their family were six children, Edward, George, Elijah, 
Mary, Lydia and William. 

The first named was a pupil in the city schools of Washington, Illinois, Init 
ere the completion of the full course there he put aside his text-books. The 
country was engaged in civil war and he felt that his first duty was to the Union. 
Although but eighteen years of age he enlisted as a member of Company E, 
Seventeenth r^Iissouri \'olunteer Infantry, and served for three years, one 
month and four days. During that period he participated in a number of im- 
portant engagements and was always faithful to his duty whether on the lonely 
picket line or on the firing line. When the war was over and the country no 
longer needed his aid he returned to Illinois and secured a position as railroad 
engineer in the operative departments of the Northwestern and Wabash rail- 
roads. His mechanical turn of mind and his ability found further expression in 
thirteen years' service as hoisting engineer at the coal banks. His life has thus 



284 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

been an active one, fur he has always been busily employed in mechanical pur- 
suits save when in office. He first filled the position of constable and was 
afterward deputy sherifl' under Cyrus J. Berry. He is now filling the position 
of justice of the peace and his decisions are strictly fair and impartial, winning 
him golden opinions. 

Mt. Xothnagel has been married twice. In Chicago, in 1866. he wedded 
Elizabeth Laura McGuire, and unto them was born a son, Charles Edward, 
who is now in the employ of the American Express Company at Chicago. In 
1875 Mr. Nothnagel wedded Mary Hagemier, and unto them have been born 
three children, of whom two died in infancy while one is yet living, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Zink, a resident of Peoria. Mr. Xothnagel belongs to Bryner Post, G. A. 
R.. and to the Charter Oak Camp. M. W. A. In politics he has always been an 
active republican since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, and in 
matters of citizenship he is as true and loyal to his country today as when he 
followed the old flag on southern battlefields. 



H. M. KILPATRICK. 



H. M. Kilpatrick, a resident of Elmwood, is well known in Peoria county 
as a director of funeral services and as an efficient undertaker. He was born 
in LaFayette, Indiana, September 21, 1865, his parents being Robert and Anna 
(Kleinhaus) Kilpatrick, the father a native of Illinois and the mother of Ger- 
many. The mother was brought to America at the age of two years by her 
parents, who located at LaFayette, Indiana. Robert Kilpatrick was reared in 
Illinois and later removed to LaFayette where he was married. He was a tin- 
ner by trade and in about 1869 went to Clinton, Illinois, where he followed his 
trade until 1874. when he came to Elmwood. Later he went west but returned 
to Illinois, settling at Danville, in which state he passed away. His wife is 
still living there. Their only child is the subject of this sketch. 

H. M. Kilpatrick was educated in the public schools of Elmwood and at the 
age of fourteen started out in life for himself. For the first two years he was 
employed in a grocery store and in 1882 he began to work for J. F. Caverly, in 
the furniture and undertaking business, which was operated under the firm name 
of the Caverly Brothers. In July, 1888, the firm name was changed to Caverly 
& Kilpatrick and in October, 1894, Mr. Kilpatrick, of this review, became the 
sole proprietor of the same and has continued thus ever since. He carries a 
large and excellent stock in his furniture department and his undertaking estab- 
lishment is well equip])ed and conducted. 

( )n December 5, i88g, Mr. Kilpatrick was united in marriage with Miss 
Clara M. Heptonstall, who was born in Peoria county, a daughter of John H. 
and Margaret Heptonstall, who were early settlers here. The father was a na- 
tive of England and came to America when a small boy. He died in this 
county, but the mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Kilpatrick have become 
parents of four children: Ralph Sidney, born 1893: Edwin Richard, born 1895; 
John Robert, born 1898; and Margaret Anna, born 1903. 

Mr. Kilpatrick has ever led an active and useful life, and has been engaged 
with many of the important organizations of his county. He belpngs to the 
Elnnvood Homestead & Loan Association and has been secretary of the same 
since 1906. He is a member of the Illinois State Undertakers Association, hav- 
ing served as secretary since June, 1906 and since 1908 has been secretary of 
the National Funeral Directors Association. A review of his excellent work as 
a funeral director has been written by many of the magazines, including the 
Embalmer's Monthly. Mr. Kilpatrick, being an energetic man, keeps no sten- 
ographers, but does all the work of his various offices alone. Fraternally he is 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 285 

identified with the Arcanus Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd I'ellows. 
He has ever taken an active interest in the schools of his town, and is now 
serving as a member of the board of education. He finds time in his unusually 
busy life to give much attention to social and recreative interests. He is the 
leader and manager of the American band of Elmwood. He is an enthusiast 
and motorist and is fond of out door life. Well known in the county where he 
has resided from early boyhood days, he has won the uniform trust and good 
will of all by reason of his pleasant and attractive personality, and all his life 
he has been straightforward and honorable. 



ARTHUR -MELMN OTMAN. 

Arthur Melvin Otman, probate judge of Peoria county since 1910, was born 
in Wyoming, Illinois, October 3, 1868. His grandfather, David Otman, was a 
resident of Stockbridge, New York, and a son of Nicholas Otman, two of whose 
brothers were soldiers of the Revolutionary war. Sylvester F. Otman, father 
of A. i\I. Otman, was a native of New York and came to Illinois in 184Q. Fol- 
lowing the outbreak of hostilities between the north and the south he enlisted 
in 1861 and served for four years as captain of Company E, One Hundred and 
Twelfth Illinois \'olunteer Infantry. He married Sarah Smith, a daughter of 
Harrison Smith, who removed westward from North Bridgewater, Massachu- 
setts, and settled in Peoria about 1850. He was one of the old-time residents 
here and filled the office of justice of the peace at an early day. In early woman- 
hood his daughter, Sarah, engaged in teaching school in the building now used 
as a teachers' club at Jefferson and Jackson streets. 

Arthur M. Otman pursued his education in the graded and high schools 
at \\'yoming and in Knox College at (jalesburg, Illinois, although he was not grad- 
uated there. Subsequently he entered the law department of the State Univer- 
sity of Iowa at Iowa City, where he won the degree of LL. B. on his graduation 
with the class of 1890. Removing to Peoria he opened a law office immediately 
after his graduation and his admission to the bar. He has been continuously con- 
nected with the profession and his comprehensive understanding of legal princi- 
ples, combined with his devotion to his clients' interests, secures him a large share 
of the business of the courts. He was deputy circuit clerk of Peoria county 
from 1900 until 1904, when he was made first assistant state's attorney, which 
position he filled until 190C1. He was a member of the law firm of Ouinn, 
Quinn & (Jtman until 1908, when he was appointed first assistant state's attorney 
and so continued until 1910, when he was elected probate judge, which office he 
is now acceptably filling. His comprehensive understanding of the general 
principles of jurisprudence qualifies him for the capable discharge of his duties 
in this connection and his course is winning him high commendation as the 
occupant of the probate bench. 

On the 24th of November, 18S7, in \\'yoming. Illinois, Air. Otman was mar- 
ried to Miss Florence Simmons, a daughter of Amor Simmons, who was a hard- 
ware merchant of \\'yoming and a veteran of the Civil war. The only child 
of Mr. and Mrs. Otman is Alice May, now a teacher of English literature in 
the Peoria Manual Training high school. Mr. Otman has always been a republi- 
can in his political views, supporting the party since age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise. He belongs to the Masonic lodge, the Alodern Woodmen 
camp and the Maccabees tent. In Masonry he has attained high rank and has 
been frequently honored with office. In 1910 he was master of Temple Lodge, 
No. 46, F. & A. M. : in 1898 was high priest of Peoria Chapter, R. A. M. ; in 
1899 ^^'^s commander of the Knights Templar Commandery : in 1900 was poten- 
tate of the Mystic Shrine; and in 1904 became commander-in-chief of the 



286 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Scottish Rite at Peoria. The same year he was elected to the supreme council. 
thirty-third degree of the Scottish Rite. Still higher Masonic honors came to 
him in his election as grand commander of the grand commandery of Knights 
Templar of Illinois. His social nature finds expression in his membership in 
the Creve Coeur and Ivy Clubs, in both of which he has many friends. His 
ability in his profession has won him constant advancement and his qualities 
of leadership are furthermore indicated in the offices to which he has been 
called in his fraternal connections. 



\V. W. RHOADES. 



W. \V. Rhoades, serving for the second term as chief of police of Peoria, has 
in the discharge of his official duties instituted various reforms and modern im- 
provements which have largely promoted the efficiency of the service. As a 
public officer his course has won wide indorsement from law-abiding citizens, the 
consensus of public opinion regarding his record being altogether favorable. 

Mr. Rhoades is one of the residents that Pennsylvania has furnished to Peoria, 
his birth having occurred in Phoenixville of the former state on the 29th of 
March, 1867. His father, William F. Rhoades, was descended from English and 
German ancestry but the family has been so long represented on this side of the 
Atlantic that it has become thoroughly American in thought, spirit and purpose. 
William F. Rhoades was engaged in the hotel business throughout his entire life. 
He wedded Mary Morgan, also a native of Pennsylvania, and unto them were 
born seven children, of whom six are yet living, four sons and two daughters. 
The parents were residents of Chester county, Pennsylvania, until called to their 
final home. 

In the schools of his native city W. W. Rhoades pursued his education and 
was twenty-three years of age when, in 1890, he came to Peoria. He was a potter 
by trade and for ten years followed that pursuit in this city, on the expiration of 
which period he engaged with the Acme Harvester Company, which he repre- 
sented here for two years. He entered into his connection with the police depart- 
ment without any previous knowledge of or experience in work along this line 
but the natural resourcefulness of the man. his determination to "make good," 
and his fidelity to the obligations devolving upon him have made him an officer 
whose record is above reproach. He was called to the office of chief of police in 
May, 1903, as the successor of Mr. Kennedy and remained at the head of the 
department for two years. He then retired at the change of administration and 
became connected with the sheriff's office as deputy, so continuing until ^Ia\'. 
1909. At that date he was again called to the office of chief of police, which 
position he has since filled. He has bent his energies to the improvement of the 
department in many ways, has installed a new flash light system, motor driven 
vehicles have taken the place of the old patrol wagons and the civil service plan 
has been adopted. He has given special attention to the personality of the men 
on the force, endeavoring to install as patrolmen such men as will make dutv 
paramount to all else. He has likewise increased and perfected the detective 
department and his work on the whole has won him high commendation and 
encomiums. 

In 1892. in Peoria. Mr. Rhoades was united in marriage to Miss Emma Heitz- 
man, a daughter of Albert Heitzman. who was at one time a tailor of Peoria but 
is now deceased. Three children have been born of this marriage: Inez and 
Ethel, twins; and Marjorie. In his fraternal relations Mr. Rhoades is a promi- 
nent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. He 
belongs also to the Modern Woodmen Camp, the ^Maccabees Tent and the Roval 
Arcanum Lodge, and finds in their beneficent teachings the high principles and 




\V. W. rjIOADES 



I 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 289 

rules which govern his conduct and shape his relations w ith his fellownien. He 
has always given his political allegiance to the republican part}- and is a firm 
believer in its principles as effective forces in good government, yet he ever 
places patriotism before partisanship and the general welfare before individual 
aggrandizement. 



CHARLES D. THOMAS, M. D. 

Dr. Charles D. Thomas, oculist and aurist, with office in the Hamlin build- 
ing, has practiced his profession in Peoria since 1897. He was previously a gen- 
eral practitioner in Lacon, Illinois, for nine years. His work has brought him a 
measure of success that could only be obtained through ability, for he i-s devoting 
his life to a profession wherein advancement is won only through the possession 
of marked skill and wide knowledge. He was born in Washburn, Woodford 
county, Illinois, November 17, 1863. and is a son of Dr. D. Erastus and Minerva 
Jane (Barnes) Thomas. The Barnes family was founded in ^Marshall county, 
Illinois, in 1832, when Captain Robert Barnes removed westward from Indian 
River, Delaware. With one exception this was the first family to establish a 
home in that county. Dr. D. Erastus Thomas was a native of Jacksonville, 
Indiana, and in early manhood he prepared for a professional career, practicing 
medicine from 1852 until his death, which occurred in 1903. Most of that period 
was spent in the town of Lacon although in 1852 he opened an office at Spring 
Bay, Illinois, where he practiced in connection with Dr. Burns. The office, how- 
ever, was destroyed by fire there in 1853 and he then removed to Washburn, Illi- 
nois, where he remained until the spring of 18O4, when he established his home in 
Lacon. His life was a most serviceable one, proving of great worth in the 
world, and his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. He died 
very suddenly of heart disease while at the home of his son, R. H. Thomas, in 
St. Peterslnirg. Florida, wdiere he was then visiting. His wife passed away six 
months later, dying in August of the same year. 

Dr. Charles D. Thomas spent his youthful days in Lacon, to which place 
his parents removed when he was but three months old. He there attended the 
public schools, ])assing through consecutive grades until the final year in the high 
school. On putting aside his text-books he began work in his father's drug store, 
where he remained for two years, but feeling the need of further educational 
opportunities he then entered Buchtel College of Akron, Ohio, where he s])ent 
the succeeding two years in study. He next became a student in the Ohio State 
University at Columbus, which he also attended two years in the mastery of 
an elective course. He began preparation for the medical profession in Rush 
Medical College of Chicago and was graduated in 1888. The same year he en- 
tered upon active practice in connection with his father at Lacon. where he con- 
tinued until 1892. when he went abroad for further study, spending one year in 
\'ienna, Austria, where he gave special attention to diseases of the eye, ear, nose 
and throat. He thus thoroughly acquainted himself with the most advanced and 
scientific methods as jjracticed by the leading specialists of the old world, and 
with a comprehensive knowledge along that line he returned to Lacon. In 
1896 he again went to F.uroj)e and spent a part of that and the following vear 
in \'ienna. jnirsuing his studies and investigations in the general hospital of that 
city and in the Polyclinic at \'ienna, specializing all the time on diseases of the eye, 
ear, nose and throat. He acted as second assistant in the hospital under Pro- 
fessor Adam Politzer, w^hose practice was confined to diseases of the ear and he 
also became second assistant to Professor Hajek, who concentrated his attention 
upon diseases of the nose and throat. This was a high honor conferred upon 
an .American and it gave him special advantages, qualifying him in notable meas- 
ure for the work to which he now devotes his time and energies. 



290 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

In August, iSy", Dr. Thomas removed to Peoria, where he has since prac- 
ticed, specializing as an oculist and aurist. He is now serving in that capacity 
on the staff of the Proctor Hospital and in addition he has a very extensive private 
practice. He is continually adding to his knowledge through reading and re- 
search and keeps in close touch with the most advanced work of the profession. 
He is now oculist and aurist for the Rock Island Railroad Company and is a 
member of the National Association of Pension Examiners, acting as expert 
examiner for this district. 

Dr. Thomas was united in marriage to Miss Cecilia C.eraldine Kendricken, 
of Boston, Massachusetts, with whom he became acquainted while studying in 
Vienna, where Mrs. Thomas was then studying music. Unto them were born 
three children, two of whom are now living, Paul K. and Charles D., Jr. Dr. 
and Mrs. .Thomas are prominent socially in the city, having an extensive circle 
of warm friends. The Doctor belongs to the Phi Delta Theta, a college fratermty, 
and is connected with the leading medical societies, belonging to the Peoria City 
Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society, the North Central Illinois 
Medical Society, the American Medical Association, the Oto-Laryngological As- 
sociation and the National Association of Railway Surgeons. He is one of three 
members on the board of censors for the Peoria City Medical Society and he is 
serving as a member of the board of trustees in the Bradley Polytechnic Insti- 
tute at Peoria. He is interested in all the vital and prominent questions relating 
to the welfare and progress of his city and the country at large and yet has no 
time for active participation in public affairs, owing to the increasing demands 
which are being made upon his professional skill and ability. His broad studv, 
his natural talent, inherited from a father and grandfather who were physi- 
cians, and his acquired ability have gained him a preeminent position as one of 
the foremost oculists and aurists of the state. 



HARRY SCHENCK. 



Harry Schenck. who is well known in the business world in Elmwood from 
his connection with the banking firm of Clinch, Schenck & Lott, was born in 
Peoria county, October 28, 1872. His parents were Henry and Susan (Selby) 
Snyder Schenck, both of whom were natives of Butler county, Ohio. The 
father was born December 23, 1838, and grew to manhood in his native county. 
He was married there to a Miss Kemp, who died one year later. Subsequently 
the father and lames Foster came to Peoria county, driving with a team and 
wagon from Butler countv, Ohio. They located in Elmwood township and m 
1864 ]\Ir. Schenck purchased two hundred acres of land there. He then re- 
turned to Ohio, where he was married to Susan ( Selby ) Snyder, who was then 
a widow, and subsequently they resided on his farm in Elmwood township. In 
1S88 he purchased an interest in the bank of Clinch & Lott and the firm name 
was changed to Clinch, Schenck & Lott, and he held this interest until the time 
of his death. In 1004 he retired from active work and moved to Elmwood, 
where he resided until his death, in 1905. In his family were two children: 
Harry, of this review : and a daughter, who is now Mrs. Edna E. Cone, of 

Harry Schenck received his early education in the public schools of Elm- 
wood and later completed a course' in a business college. In 1891 he began 
working in the bank in which his father had an interest and in 1905. at the 
time of his father's death, he became one of the partners in the firm of Clinch, 
Schenck & Lott. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 291 

On the 7th of October, 1896, Mr. Schenck was united in marriage with .Miss 
Mary C. Welles, who was born in Elmwood, February 29, 1876, a daughter of 
W. T. and Laura A. Welles, both of whom were natives of Peoria county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Schenck have become the parents of six children: Margery, Richard, 
Earl, William, Dorothy and Ruth. The last named died at the age of three 
years. In politics Mr. Schenck is a democrat and, being interested in local 
party issues, he has filled the office of city treasurer. He also gives much time 
to the cause of education and has served as school treasurer. Fraternallv he 
is identified with the Indcjiendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias. He is very fond of hunting and fishing, revelling in these sports several 
times a year, and is noted for his skill along these lines. He is a shrewd, 
conscientious business man and has many friends in the business world ; also 
he is popular socially in the city where his entire life has been passed and 
where many of his stanchest friends are those who have known him from 
boyhood. 



ELBERT H. ZARLEY. 



Elbert H. Zarley is the president of the lirown Printing Company, which has 
its plant at Xo. 201 South Washington street. His identification with this en- 
terjirise covers about sixteen years. He was but a boy when he entered the 
employ of the company and in the intervening period to the present time he has 
gradually worked his way upward, his ability and energy winning him advance- 
ment until he is now the chief executive officer in one of the leading business 
concerns of the city. He came to Peoria when a youth, his birth having oc- 
curred in Oakland. Coles county, Illinois. October zj, 1876, his father being 
.\bram Zarley. He spent his boyhood in his native town and at the usual age 
entered the public schools, passing through consecutive grades until he became 
a high-school pupil. When he put aside his text-books he began learning the 
printing business, with, which he is acquainted in all of its branches. He has 
been a resident of Peoria for about seventeen years and with the exception of 
one year the entire period has been spent in connection with the P>rown Print- 
ing Company, which is the successor of the Brown-Williams Printing Company 
that took over the business of Frank Brown, who opened a jirinting establish- 
ment on South Adams street about 1890. Mr. Zarley had not been long in the 
employ of the company before he proved his worth and capability and his in- 
dustry, energy and fidelity won him promotion from lime to time. Eventually 
he was elected one of the officers of the company and for five years served as 
its secretary. In June, 191 1, upon the reorganization of the business, he was 
chosen to the presidency and is, therefore, bending his energies to administrative 
direction and executive control. The company conducts a general printing and 
embossing business and employs about thirty people. They turn out work of 
the highest excqllence and of the most artistic design, embracing all that is 
best in the "art i)reservative of arts." Their patronage is now extensive, for 
the excellent work done commends them to the public. They make a specialty 
of color printing and in addition they manufacture blank books, rubber stamps, 
seals and stencils in addition to conducting a general printing and bookbinding 
business. Their plant is thoroughly equipped in every department and in the 
excellence of their work is found the secret of their success. 

In Peoria, in 1900, Mr. Zarley was united in marriage to Miss Xettie Brown, 
of this city, and they now have one .son. Brown Zarlev. Mr. Zarley is well 
known as a prominent Mason, having attained the thirtv-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite in the consistory. He has also crossed the sands of the desert 
with the Xobles of the ]\fystic Shrine and he holds membership with the Knights 



292 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

of Pythias. In his life he exempHfies the beneficent spirit of the craft, which in- 
culcates and develops all that is best in manhood and in citizenship. In his 
business career his steady progress has followed the manifestation of his aljility, 
which has been developed through close application, perseverance and unremit- 
ting energy. His course proves, too, that success and an honored name may be 
won simultaneously and that the rewards of persistent and intelligently directed 
labor are sure and certain. 



GEORGE \V. HA:\IMERBACHER. 

George W. Hammerbacher, a resident of Oak Hill, who is successfully en- 
gaged in the carpentering business, was born in Pickaway county, Ohio. August 
lo, 1850. His parents were Ludwig and Mary E. Hammerbacher. who came 
from Germany in 1847 and located in Ohio. In 1854 they removed to Illinois, 
settling in Ro'setield township, where they passed the remainder of their days. 
In their family were six children, of whom George W. was the third in order 
of birth. 

George W. Hammerbacher was reared and educated in Rosefield township 
and remained at home with his parents until he was eighteen years of age. He 
then began working as a farm hand, an employment which he followed for six 
years. In 1874 he took up the trade of carpentry and has since worked at it 
continuously. He has been very successful in his work and he now owns the 
old homestead of seventv-seven acres, which is situated one mile north of Oak 
Hill. 

On the 18th of February, 1870. Mr. Hammerbacher was united in marriage 
to Miss Margaret E. Dawson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronemus Dawson. 
In politics Mr. Hammerbacher gives his support to the republican party and so- 
cially he is identified with Horeb Lodge, No. 363, A. F. & A. M., at Elmwood. 
He is a stanch supporter of the interests of education and has been a school 
director for eighteen years and is now serving as school treasurer. He is well 
known throughout his community and in all matters relating to the welfare of 
the township" he is public-spirited and his cooperation can be counted upon 
to further all public progress. 



LESLIE RUTHERFORD, ^I. D. 

In eleven vears of active practice since his graduation from Rush Medical 
College. Dr. Leslie Rutherford has made continuous progress, experience and 
further reading adding to his skill and ability. He has been abroad for further 
study and keeps in close touch with the most advanced methods of eminent phy- 
sicians not onlv of this country but of the old world. Peoria is his native city 
and his natal day was December 27, 1879. He comes of Scotch ancestry, his 
grandfather being William Rutherford, a native of Scotland, who after sailing 
from the old world to the new, made his way into the interior of the country, 
settling in Tennessee in 1849. Soon afterward, however, he came to Peoria, 
thus founding the family in this city. His son, R. William Rutherford, the 
father of Dr. Rutherford, became a prominent coal merchant here and for 
many years occupied a leading position in commercial circles, so that his death, 
which occurred in 1901, was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. His 
wife bore the maiden name of Isabella Grieves. 

Dr. Rutherford was reared in Peoria and attended the public schools, mas- 
terino- the branches of learning in successive grades until graduated from the 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 293 

hig-h school with the class of iSg". A professional career appeared to him most 
attractive, and thinkinj,' to find the practice of medicine congenial and hojiing 
to rind it profitable, he entered Rush Medical College of Chicago in preparation 
for his chosen life work. He pursued the regular four years' course and was 
graduated in Kpi. being chosen president of his class by his fellow students 
and being awarded the Benjamin Rush medal by the college. His high standing 
secured him the position of interne in the Presbyterian Hospital of that city, 
where he remained for a year. The years 1903 to 1905 he devoted to post-grad- 
uate work in Chicago. He then returned to Peoria to take up his permanent 
abode and in the intervening years has concentrated his energies upon his chosen 
life work. He practiced here until 1908, when he went abroad, spending a part 
of that and the succeeding year in the General Hospital at \'ienna and also 
doing considerable work in a hospital in Berlin. He makes a specialty of in- 
ternal medicine and is serving on the staff of Proctor Hospital. He belongs to 
the I'eoria City Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. 

In 1904. Dr. Rutherford married Miss Margaret Tallman. of Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia, and they now have one child. Margaret. Dr. Rutherford is well known 
in the city where his entire life has been passed save for brief periods when he 
has absented himself for the purposes of study. Many of his warmest friends 
are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present and this fact is 
indicative of an honorable and well spent life. 



CHARLES H. BROBST, M. D. 

This is an age of specialization. Scientific knowledge has become so broad 
and so complex that a single individual cannot master fully every department 
of any single science, and therefore with a knowledge of the broad fundamental 
principles men have concentrates^ their efforts and their energies along a single 
line and have thereby attained a proficiency which otherwise could not be 
secured. Following the natural trend of the age, Dr. Charles H. Brobst has 
concentrated his attention upon the diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and 
is accorded a liberal patronage which enables him to maintain well appointed 
offices in the Observatory building. He has followed his profession in Peoria 
since November, 1893. He comes from one of the chief centers of medical 
learning, being a native of Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, his birth having there 
occurred in 1864. While spending his boyhood days in the home of his father, 
Jonas L. Brobst, he attended the public and high schools of Philadelphia, being 
graduated from the latter with the class of 1881. He studied medicine in the 
college of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore and at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity of the same city. From the former he was graduated with the class of 
1887 and he then pursued special studies in the latter. In 1888 he was gradu- 
ated from the Medico-Chirurgical College of Philadelphia and thus he came 
under the teaching of some of the most eminent physicians and surgeons of the 
country in the different centers of medical learning. He afterward went to 
New York City, where he studied for a year and acted as interne at the Post- 
Graduate School. His experience there greatly augmented his skill but still not 
content with the advantages he had already received and striving to attain as 
high a degree of perfection as possible, he went in 1890 to \'ienna. s])ending two 
years at the General Hospital as a student in that branch of practice, which has 
to do with diseases of the eye. ear, nose and throat. He also passed a year 
at Moorefield's Hospital in London and at the Golden .Square Nose and Throat 
Hospital of the same city. Splendid equipment qualified him for his specialty 
and upon his return to the United States he opened an office in Peoria, where he 



294 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

has since been located. He soon demonstrated his abiUty in practice and tlie vol- 
ume of his business has steadily grown until it has now reached extensive pro- 
portions. In addition to a large private practice he is serving as president on the 
staff of Proctor Hospital and has become well known as an educator, being 
the lecturer on physiological optics at Bradley Polytechnic Institute of this city. 
Pleasantly situated in his home life, Dr. Brobst was married in 1894 to Miss 
Marian K. Kuntz, of Peoria, and they have two children, Dorothy and Charles. 
They are widely and favorably known and theirs is a hospitable home, always open 
for the reception of their many friends. Dr. Brobst is a Mason of high standing. 
He has taken all of the degrees of the York and Scottish Rites, being a Knight 
Templar and a thirty-second degree consistory Mason, as well as a member of 
the Mystic Shrine. His social prominence is indicated in his admission to the 
Creve Coeur Club. Notwithstanding the fact that his many activities and in- 
terests are wide and varied, keeping him in touch with the world's progress 
along many lines, he yet concentrates his energies upon his professional duties, 
realizing fully the responsibilities that devolve upon him in this connection. 
He belongs to the Peoria City Aledical Society, the Illinois State Medical So- 
ciety, the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Oph- 
thalmology and Oto-Laryngology, and seeks always that perfection which is 
the legitimate aim of every earnest, conscientious physician. 



GEORGE FRANCIS EMERSON. 

Prominent among the energetic, enterprising and successful business men of 
Peoria is George Francis Emerson, of the firm of Cummings & Emerson, whole- 
sale dealers in heavy hardware. His career is another illustration of the fact 
that the road to usefulness and prosperity is open to any who wish to pursue it. 
He early learned the lesson that industry is the basis of all honorable success 
and that perseverance will often overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles. 
He was born in ^ilorton, Tazewell county, Illinois, April 4, 1S47, h'* parents 
being Enoch G. and Harriet P. (Waters) Emerson, both of whom were na- 
tives of New England. The father's birth occurred in Rochester, Vermont, 
April 19, 181 2, "and the mother was born in Lebanon, New Hampshire, Octo- 
ber 22, 1815. They came to Sangamon county. Illinois, in 1834. in company 
with a colony that expected to locate there but being disappointed in securing 
a satisfactory location as to lands they removed to Tazewell county and be- 
came pioneers of that section. This was only two years after the Black Hawk 
war occurred and on every hand were seen evidences of frontier life, with all 
its attendant hardships, difficulties and disadvantages. However, it is a well 
known fact that in the face of opposition the best and strongest in men is 
brought out and developed and Mr. Emerson proved himself equal to the ardu- 
ous task of cultivating a new farm on the frontier. He remained in Tazewell 
county until March, 1865, when he brought his family to Peoria. 

George Francis Emerson was then about eighteen years of age. He had 
been educated in the public schools of Tazewell county and early became fami- 
liar with the arduous task of developing a new farm. Following the removal 
of the family to this city he pursued a course of study in the Worthington. 
\\'arner & Coles Commercial College, and in the following fall entered actively 
in business life as assistant bookkeeper for D. C. Farrell. In 1866 and 1867 
he was bookkeeper for the firm of C. L. Bobb & Company and on the 15th of 
Tune. 1868. he accepted the position of bookkeeper with Cummings & Stone, 
wholesale dealers in heavy hardware. This was his initial step in connection 
with the business that has since claimed his time and attention. At length Mr. 
Stone sold out his interest in the establishment to his partner, Mr. Cummings, 




GEORGE F. EMERSON 



> 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 297 

who conducted ihc business alone for the next two years. On the 1st of Feb- 
ruary, 1872. he athnitted .Mr. Emerson to a partnership under the firm style of 
Cumniings & F^nierson. and since Mr. Cummings' death on the J5th of January, 
1878, the business has been under the sole management of Mr. Emerson. In 
the meantime the interest of Air. Cummings remained under the control of his 
widow until 1896, when it passed into the hands of her heirs. Early in March, 
1897, the business was incorporated under the original firm name of Cummings 
& Emerson, with Mr. Emerson as president and manager. The trade of the 
house has grown steadily since the establishment of the business in 1867. They 
carry a most complete and extensive line of heavy hardware and this is widely 
known as one of the most progressive houses in their branch of the trade. Im- 
provement and advancement have been Mr. Emerson's watchwords and he has 
never lost sight of the fact that each year should record a growth in the busi- 
ness. His has been an expensive policy, yet tempered by safe conservatism, and 
he has always kept in close touch with the various phases of the trade, so that 
he has l^een enabled to purchase judiciously from manufacturers and thereby 
gain a good profit on his sales without asking exorbitant prices. In addition 
to his other interests, Mr. Emerson is a director in the First National Bank and 
is thus widely and favorably known in financial circles. 

On the 17th of November, 1871, Mr. Emerson was united in marriage to 
Miss Harriet C. W'oodrutT, a daughter of Nelson and Mary A. Woodruff, of 
Peoria. They became the parents of four children, of whom Ada, the eldest, 
died in infancy, and George W. died at the age of five and a half years. The 
surviving children are Frank Nelson and Grace W. E., the latter of w-hom is a 
graduate of LaSalle Seminary, Bostoii. Frank Nelson Emerson was graduated 
frnm I'rinceton University of New Jersey, and also the Institute of Technology, 
at Boston, and is now a successful practicing architect in this city. 

Mr. Emerson lielongs to the Presbyterian church but is a broad-minded man, 
whose Christianity is above creed and dogma. His political faith is that of the 
republican party and while never an office seeker his cooperation has ever been 
counted upon for the benefit and welfare of the community in the long period 
in which he has made his home in Peoria. He started in business life without 
any special advantages but he early realized that "there is no excellence without 
labor." and also that "there is no royal road to wealth." He was willing to 
earn iiis success and he has used every honorable means for its attainment. 



CHESTER F. BARNETT. 

Chester F. Barnett, police magistrate and attorney at law, has come to his 
present position solely through his own merit. He is one of the younger mem- 
bers of the Peoria bar, whose earnest labor and ability have won recognition and 
secured his continuous advancement. He was born upon a farm in Dewitt 
county, Illinois, August 4, 1878, his parents being John W. and Mary Ellen 
(Cheek) IJarnett. The father is a farmer, who has devoted his entire life to 
agricultural pursuits, and both he and his wife are still living on the old home- 
stead farm in Dewitt county. The Barnetts were early settlers there and the 
family has been represented in America since colonial days. Prior to the Revo- 
lutionary war, the ancestors of our subject lived in \irginia and about 1780 
went to Kentucky. Sixty years later, or about 1840, a removal was made from 
that state to Illinois. Alexander Barnett, great-gfeat-great-grandfather of our 
subject, served in the Revolutionary war and was a pioneer and prominent i)hv- 
sician in Bourbon county, Kentucky. Robert Barnett, the great-grandfather, 
came from Kentucky with his family and in that state Benjamin Barnett. the 



298 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

grandfather, was also born. The Cheek family lived in Pennsylvania and was 
also founded in Illinois in pioneer times. 

It was upon the old home farm that Chester F. Barnett was reared and the 
work of tilling the soil early became familiar to him. When not occupied with 
the duties of the schoolroom, he worked in the fields and early became familiar 
with the best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting. He supplemented 
his early educational advantages by study in Kenney high school and afterward 
pursued a business course in Eureka (Illinois) College, where he took up the 
study of shorthand in connection with the regular business course. For a num- 
ber of years he worked as a stenographer but in that time became imbued with 
a desire to make the practice of law his life work, and with that end in view 
he entered the Illinois College of Law, at Chicago, in 1902, for a three years' 
course, which he completed by graduation with the class of 1905. He then 
came to Peoria in January, 1906, and has practiced continuously in this city. 
He soon demonstrated his ability in the successful conduct of the cases en- 
trusted to his care and in the spring of 191 1 there came to him a public ex- 
pression of confidence on the part of his fellow townsmen in his election to the 
office of police magistrate on the democratic ticket. He succeeded Frank Fox 
and was the only democrat elected on the democratic city ticket, a fact which 
is indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him and in 
his professional power. 

In 1900 Mr. Barnett was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Whicher, of 
Chicago, and unto them have been born two sons, Franklin Xewell and Robert 
Vernon. Mr. Barnett is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and exemplifies 
in his life the basic elements upon which the craft rests. By nature he is social 
and genial and he has many attractive social qualities which have won him a 
circle of warm friends. 



DAVID FORNEY. 



The years which have brought David F"orney to his present enviable position 
as a financier and land owner have been characterized by continuous progress 
that has resulted from his close application and keen business discernment. He 
has never sought to figure prominently in any public life outside his strict path 
of business, for therein he has found ample opportunity to utilize his ambition 
and his energy — his dominant qualities. He has been a resident of the city of 
Peoria for only a brief period, but has been a lifelong resident of the county 
and for years was one of the foremost representatives of agricultural life in 
eastern Illinois. The name of Forney has been associated with development and 
progress in Peoria since pioneer times. David Forney was born upon a farm 
in Kickapoo township on the 12th of February, 1854. His parents, J. Y. and 
Catherine (Feeser) Forney, were married in Pennsylvania in May, 1852, and 
immediately afterward removed westward, settling in Peoria county, the father 
purchasing' a tract of land which he converted into a rich and productive farm, 
making his home thereon for almost a half century, or until the time of his 
death which occurred January 25, 1900. He added to his original holdings 
until he was the owner of a very fine farm in Kickapoo township and also had 
an extensive tract of land in Radner township. Besides these he owned ftiree 
valuable farms in Woodford county. Illinois, and a large farming property in 
Kansas. He regarded real estate as the safest of all invesments, and as the 
years passed on and his financial resources increased he dealt extensively m 
land. His business efforts were always carefully and systematically managed, 
and his integrity was never a matter of question. He was survived for nearly 
six years by his wife who passed away November 9, 1905. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 299 

The old homestead farm in Kickapoo township was Iwth a jilayground and 
training school for David Forney in his l)oyhood and youth. He still owns a part 
of that property and resided thereon until January, 1908. He has, however, sold 
a portion of the original tract owned by his father hut still has one hundred 
and thirty-six acres in Kickapoo township, together with a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Woodford county, Illinois, near Minonk. He rents both of 
these properties, deriving a good income therefrom. While living on the old 
homestead he carried on general farming and brought his fields under a high 
state of cultivation in the raising of cereals best adapted to the soil and climate. 
He also dealt largely in fine stock and did not a little to improve the grade of 
cattle raised in this section. In his boyhood days Mr. Fornev attendedthe dis- 
trict schools and for two years was a student in the high school at Elmwood, 
after which he finished his course in the Peoria County Normal. He engaged 
in teaching for three years in Rosefield, Kickapoo and Radner townships, spend- 
ing one year in each, and displayed considerable ability in imparting clearly and 
readily to others the knowledge he had acquired, but farming was his real life 
work up to the time he retired from the old homestead and established his 
residence in Peoria. Here he figured prominently in financial circles, being the 
vice president of the State Trust t^ Savings Bank. He was one of the incorpo- 
rators of this institution, and he and the president, E. A. Strause, are now the 
only members of the original board of directors. He has served on the examin- 
ing committee of the bank for years, and in his present position has voice in its 
management and contributes in no small measure to its successful conduct. He 
is also largely interested in stocks, having made heavy investments in com- 
mercial paper of that character, and he also has much money loaned out but 
regards investments in land as su])erior to all others. 

On the 14th of December, 1882, Mr. Forney was married to Miss Annie 
Karnaghan of Hanna City, Illinois. They are the parents of one child, Everett 
E. The family residence is at 506 North Monroe street, and is one of the attract- 
ive homes of the city. Hospitality there reigns supreme, and good cheer is ex- 
tended to all their many friends. Mr. Forney has never regarded the word 
"citizenship" as an idle term. It represents to him obligations and duties as well 
as privileges, and he has utilized every means at hand to further the welfare and 
promote the progress and upbuilding of his county. His political allegiance has 
always been given the republican party and he has served as road commissioner 
of Kickapoo township, and for one term was supervisor, being elected by a 
majority of seventy-nine in a vote of three hundred and twenty-five that was 
cast in the democratic township. This fact alone indicates his personal popular- 
ity and the high regard entertained for him by his neighbors and friends. Mr. 
Forney has, in a manner, lived a quiet life. There have been none of the 
spectacular features which are to be found in connection with high political or 
military ofifice, but day by day he has faithfully performed the duties nearest 
at hand, and in so doing has commanded the respect and good-will of his fcllow- 
men. Moreover, in all his business transactions he has been found thoroughly 
reliable as well as enterprising, and the success which is his has come to him as 
the legitimate and well merited reward of earnest labor and keen business sagacity. 



ROBERT A. HANNA, M. D. 

Dr. Robert A. Hanna, a representative of the medical profession in Peoria 
since 1894, has devoted himself exclusively to surgerv since 1908 and has gained 
a position of distinction in that field of practice. He was born here fuly 20, 1868. 
a son of Robert S. and Charlotte ( Roberts ) Hanna. both of whom are still liv- 
ing in this city. His maternal grandfather came to Illinois in 1835, removing 



300 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

from Ohio to this state just three years after the Black Hawk war occurred, when 
all eastern -Illinois was largely an undeveloped and unimproved region. He set- 
tled in Tazewell county, just across the river from Peoria, which, however, at 
that time, was a mere hamlet and gave no indication of the prominence to 
which it was to attain as a commercial and industrial center. 

Dr. Hanna was reared in this city and his youth was passed as that of most 
boys, the public schools affording him his educational privileges. He passed 
from' one grade to another until he became a high-school student, and when he 
left school he entered business life, securing a position in a wholesale paper 
house, in which he was employed for four years. Thinking to find a professional 
career more congenial than commercial pursuits he then entered upon the study 
of medicine and was graduated from the Keokuk Medical College, at Keokuk, 
Iowa, with the class of 1894. Immediately afterward he returned to this city 
and opened an office. His record stands in contradistinction to the old adage 
that a prophet is never without honor save in his own country, for in the city 
of his birth Dr. Hanna has made continuous progress and is today regarded as 
one of the eminent members of the profession in eastern Illinois, especially in 
the field of surgery, to which he has confined his attention exclusively since 
1908. Up to that time he continued in general practice but his work was becom- 
ing more and more largely that of surgery and he felt the keenest interest in 
that branch of the pro'fession. His reading and study were largely directed 
along that line and his experience constantly added to his ability. His work 
embodies the mOst modern and scientific principles ind methods and he has 
proven his power in many notable instances. He served for three years as county 
physician, from 1899 until 1901. inclusive. He belongs to the Peoria City Medi- 
cal Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and the American Aledical Asso- 
ciation and has served as president of the first named. He holds to high stand- 
ards of professional service and is interested in anything that tends to bring to 
man the key to that complex mystery which we call life. His reading has been 
broad, his research deep and his wide knowledge makes his opinions authority 
upon many questions relative to the profession. 

Dr. Hanna was united in marriage to Miss Emma Coleman, of this city, and 
they have a large circle of warm friends here. Fraternally he is a Mason and 
socially is connected with the Creve Coeur Club. His friends, and they are 
manv, find him a social, genial gentleman of broad and liberal culture. 



WALTER HERMANN KIRK. 

Walter Hermann Kirk, attorney and counselor, was born December 5, 1870, 
in Baxter Springs, Cherokee county, Kansas, the son of John E. and Laura J. 
(Sevier) Kirk. His father. John E. Kirk was born in Richmond, Ray county, 
Missouri, March 4. 1850, and was the son of James F. Kirk, a native Ten- 
nesseean. His mother was born in Sullivan county, December 3, 1852. He was 
engaged in the cattle and grain business for a number of years, his home having 
been in the northern part of ]\Iissouri, near Kirksville, which city was named 
after relatives, who moved from \'irginia and Tennessee at a very early Period 
in the settling of the state of Missouri. After a few years in Kansas. Mr. 
Kirk returned to Missouri where he engaged in farming and later went to 
California, residing at San Jose and Colusa. From there he returned to AIis- 
souri about 1876, and shortly after acquired by purchase a patent hay-stackmg 
device from Tames R. Hill, which he perfected, manufactured and sold. His 
headquarters "were at Salisbury, Missouri, but this town did not furnish the 
facilities for a large manufacturing business, and in looking for a location he 
came to Peoria in August, 1881. Shortly afterward :Mr. Kirk organized the 




WALTER H. KIRK 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 305 

Acme Hay Harvester Compan\- and was president and general manager until 
his health failed in 1890. At that time he disposed of his interests and was 
not actively engaged in business at the time of his death, excepting the care of 
extensive land interests in California, where he died in IMarch, 1898. The in- 
terment was in the family lot in Springdale cemetery, Peoria. 

Walter H. Kirk was graduated from the Peoria grade and Peoria high 
schools, and in June, 1894, with the degree LL. B. from the University of 
Michigan. He returned to Peoria for the practice of law and has remained 
here since that time. i\Ir. Kirk was assistant supervisor in 1901-3 and city 
attorney, 1903-5. He has never held any other office, but is prominent in re- 
publican politics, and became widely known as a candidate for state senator in 
1908. He is now associated in the practice of law with George A. Shurtleff, 
the firm name being Kirk & Shurtlefif. 

Mr. Kirk was united in marriage with ]\Iiss Pearl ^Matthews, daughter of 
Newton Matthews, November 12, 1895. They have a daughter, Evangeline, 
born November 12, 1897. Their home, 'A'alley \'iew" on the Grand \''iew 
Drive, overlooks the Illinois river valley at Peoria Heights. Mr. Kirk is a 
member of the Second Presbyterian church of Peoria ; the Country Clul). the 
Creve Coeur Club and all the masonic orders leading up to and including the 
Knights Templar and the Mystic Shrine. 



JOHN HILLIS DE WEIN. 

It rarely falls to the lot of a man, even in these days of hustle and initiative, 
to start in a city the size of Peoria a business of an entirely new character. Men 
in this city have rung changes upon old established businesses, have torn down, 
built up, and improved, have branched out in new departments and large ad- 
ditions, but it was the part of the young man who is the subject of this sketch, 
John Hillis De Wein, to bring something new into the business world of this 
city. Mr. De Wein's business is the selling of rebuilt typewriters. He makes 
a specialty of this. He has no new typewriters in his shop. The rewards which 
are the natural result of orginality and initiative, and which invariably come to 
the pioneer in any line of activity in the development of a city, have been JMr. 
De Wein's in the short period of his business career. He is a man of marked 
capacity and decided character and of the most undoubted integrity. In busi- 
ness transactions he exhibits the quick appreciation and prompt decision which 
are as necessary to the successful merchant as to the successful general, but 
tempered with a courtesy which wins the esteem of all who come in contact with 
him. 

John Hillis De Wein was born in Peoria in 1886, the son of John N. and 
Catherine De Wein of this city. His father was at one time a prominent grocer 
in this city, with a large store on Liberty street, but retired a number of years 
before his death, which occurred in 1889. 

John Hillis De Wein was educated in the grammar schools of Peoria, but 
left at the age of thirteen years, after his graduation from the Franklin school, 
and entered the employ of the Underwood Typewriter Company, holding import- 
ant positions in the mechanical and sales departments until 1910. During all these 
years, Mr. De Wein gave his best efforts to the company by whom he was em- 
ployed, and all the aft'airs for which he was responsible were conducted m a 
manner reflecting upon him the greatest credit. He learned the business from 
the bottom up. Few men in the business today understand more about the 
mechanism and sale of typewriters than he does. He combines with business 
ability and sagacity of the highest order, those personal qualities which attach 
men to him. and gain for him the confidence and esteem of the business world. 



306 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

In 1910. Mr. De Wein left the employ of the Underwood company, and 
started in business for himself, selling rebuilt typewriters. He has a large 
and pleasant office on the twelfth tloor of the Jefferson building, where he con- 
ducts an extensive and constantly growing business. He has recently opened 
a repair department and a department of typewriter supplies, but his main at- 
tention is still given to the rebuilt typewriters. He gets his machines from the 
Typewriter rebuilders in Chicago who make a specialty of rebuilding, and al- 
though his business is young, it is flourishing from year to year. The first year 
his sales amounted to over two hundred rebuilt typewriters, and this record has 
been broken each year during which he has conducted the office. 

Mr. De Wein keeps himself entirely independent politically, voting always 
for the man whom he considers the best for the position. He is active in the 
Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, and is very much in- 
terested in the affairs of the Peoria Association of Commerce. 

Mr. De Wein is one of those active, rising young business men to whom 
Peoria looks for her future greatness. He is an indefatigable worker, a man of 
marked capacity, quick and decisive in his methods, keenly alive to any business 
proposition and its possibilities. He gives his time and his best energies to the 
business which he has established, believing in the doctrine of hard work, as 
the foundation of success. The record of such a life is well worth preserving, 
and in it his fellow citizens and friends may find much for emulation. 



CHARLES W. FEY. 



Peoria has every reason to be proud of its commercial enterprises, and con- 
spicuous among these is the extensive jewelry establishment in which Charles 
W. Fey is a partner. The house now sustains an enviable reputation by reason 
of the fine line of goods carried, showing everything that is most attractive in 
workmanship and design of both foreign and domestic manufacture. The busi- 
ness is one of the .old established houses of the city, and throughout has main- 
tained the highest standards in trade. It was founded by David Fey, the father 
of Charles W. Fey, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, August 2, 1833. The 
first thirteen years of his life were spent in his native land, during which period 
his parents died and he came with his brother to America, they inaking their 
way to Cincinnati. In that city he learned the watchmaker's and jeweler's 
trade, and when about nineteen years of age he went to Glasgow, Kentucky, 
where he engaged in the jewelry business for one year. At the expiration of 
that period he removed to Peoria. He was married here in 1856 and then re- 
turned to Glasgow, Kentucky, where he disposed of his business. Again he 
came to Peoria and opened a jewelry store on Main street. He continued alone 
until he admitted his two sons, George S. and Charles W., to a partnership in 
1882, at which time he retired from the active management of the store. Within 
that period he had built up a gratifying trade and had made for the house a 
most enviable reputation, owing to his straightforward dealings and his strict 
conformity to a high standard of commercial ethics. His name figures prom- 
inently upon the pages of Peoria's business history during the middle portion 
of the nineteenth century. He is still survived by his widow, who bore the 
maiden name of Barbara Schafer and is now living in this city. They were 
the parents of six children, of whom three survive : Mrs. C. J. Off, George S. 
and Charles W. The last named has now retired from business. 

Charles W. Fey was born in Peoria, January 21, i860, and upon attaining 
school age began his studies. He was still quite young when he entered his 
father's store, and learning the trade became a practical watchmaker and en- 
graver. As previously stated, his father retired in 1882, turning over the busi- 



HISTORY OF PRORIA COL'X IN' 307 

ness to his two sons, George S. and Charles W. Their original location was at 
319 Main street where the store had been located for about ten years. In 
1885, however, they removed to South Adams street where they continued for 
twenty-four years, or until Alay, 1909, when they came to their present loca- 
tion. ' The eider brother, George S.. has retired leaving Charles W. Fey as 
sole proprietor. He now confines his attention exclusively to the diamond and 
watch business, and his establishment is represented on the road by two traveling 
salesmen. For two years he has been located in the Masonic Temjile and con- 
trols a business of large and gratifying proportions, lie is acknowledged an 
expert judge of precious stones, particularly diamonds, and his trade therein is 
now a very extensive one. Moreover, he is interested in other business affairs, 
and at one time was associated with his brother under the firm name of Fey 
Brothers in the conduct of the Fey Hotel which was erected by their father in 
1893. It was then the leading hostelry of the city, and in 1894 was opened 
bv the brothers who conducted it for a year and then sold out. 

Charles W. Fey was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Swain of Still- 
water, Minnesota, and they have two children, Emma and Charles David. Their 
friends in the city are many, and their hospitality is greatly enjoyed bv those 
with whom they have social relations. A lifelong resident of this city Charles 
W. Fey is widely known here. In the specific line of his trade his knowledge is 
particularlv sound and his insight keen, while his capable management and un- 
daunted enterprise have been forceful and salient features in the attainment 
of the success which places him with the leading merchants of the city. 



M. H. DOTY. 



M. H. Doty, who, since October, 1903, has been connected with the business 
of undertaking and embalming at Hanna City, was born in Grundy Center, 
Grundy county, Iowa, March 15, 1876. His parents were John S. and Dora A. 
(Mayer) Doty, both of whom were born in Michigan and resided at Constantine, 
in that state, where the father for twenty years had a harness shop. They 
lived for a time in Iowa, but in 1879 returned to Constantine where the father 
died in April, 1890. 

M. H. Doty remained under the parental roof until fourteen years of age 
when he began work on a farm on which he was employed for four years. In 
1894 he came to Illinois, locating at Ottawa, where for two years he worked 
for the firm of H. L. Hossack & Son' in the farming implement business. In 
1896 he entered the employ of the Western Cottage Piano & Organ Company, 
remaining with them until 1900, when he became assistant superintendent of the 
Peoria County Poor Farm. In 1901 he went to Wieser, Idaho, where he was 
engaged for one year in the undertaking and furniture business in partnership 
with William McBratney. The following year he returned to Peoria and en- 
tered into partnershi]! with J. B. Wilton in the undertaking business. In 1904 
these partners established a branch office at Hanna City and Mr. Doty took 
charge of and managed the same for two years. In 1905 purchasing the interest 
of Mr. Wilton, he engaged alone in the undertaking business, which he is now 
conducting. He is a licensed embalmer. 

On the 4th of November, 1903, Mr. Doty was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora Leslie, who is a daughter of Samuel .-X. and Alice ( Patton ) Leslie of Logan 
township, and they have become the i)arents of two children : Nathan L., born 
September 4, 1905: and Alden L., born June 10, 1907, and now deceased. 

In politics Mr. Doty is a republican, and he is a faithful member of the 
Presbyterian church. Fraternally he is identified with the Columbus Lodge, 
No. 21 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Peoria, with the Lancaster 



308 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTY 

Lodge No. io6, A. F. & A. M., and with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He is very efficient and conscientious in his work as an undertaker and embalmer, 
and has the patronage of the residents not only of Hanna City but in a radius 
of miles around, and his fidelity and honorable and manly principles ha\'e won 
for him the good-will and friendship of all with whom he has been brought in 
contact. 



DA\ID FEY. 



In 1844 a small German family consisting of father and a ten year old son, 
left Bavaria to try their fortunes in America. Sixty-seven years afterward, 
the little boy, David Fey, died in Peoria, a wealthy and honored man. In the 
long life which he lived in America, each step he took was a step forward. The 
little boy grew into an industrious and intelligent young man, and the young man 
lived successful year after year, until the respect of his fellows and great pros- 
perity crowned his old age. 

Mr. Fey was for many years one of the most prominent jewelers of Peoria, 
and he brought into his business life the unflagging industry, the thorough mastery 
of his business, and the hard power of application which marked his character. 
Hard work was the keynote of his life. He had very little money of his own 
when he began his business life in America. What he died possessed of, was the 
result of the strength of his industry and the power of his mind. Peoria may 
well be proud of being the home of a citizen of such sturdy qualities as David 
Fey possessed, and may well mourn the loss of such a man when he dies. Mr. Fey 
was one of the city's pioneer business men. He worked hard until he was able 
to buy his own shop, and after he bought it he attended to it assiduously until 
it was one of the leading jewelry stores of the city. 

David Fey was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1834. At the age of ten year.^, 
he came to America with his father, and settled in Cincinnati. After what edu- 
cation the schools of that city then afforded, Mr. Fey applied himself to learn- 
ing the jewelry business. He learned it thoroughly. He mastered every detail 
of his craft with characteristic exhaustiveness. When in 1856 he came to 
Peoria, he put his training to practical use by going into the jewelry business, 
in a little shop at the foot of Main street. This little shop was the source of a 
large fortune. The foundation was solid, composed as it was of a man's self- 
reliance, honestv and business integrity. The business prospered, and in the 
course of time, Mr. Fey was able to erect a newer and larger store at 319 Main 
street. Here he remained until twenty-five years of age, when, w-ithout giving 
up his jewelry business. Mr. Fey embarked in a new venture. He built the 
Hotel Fev, at the corner of Adams and Liberty streets. This hotel was, at the 
time it was built, one of the finest hotels in the city, and it has prospered exceed- 
ingly from that day to this. Mr. Fey removed his jewelry business to one of 
the stores in the hotel, and continued in personal charge of it until five years 
later when he sold out to his tw^o sons. George and Charles Fey, who conducted 
the business for twenty years, when George retired in igog. After his retire- 
ment from business, Mr. David Fey, our subject, spent his time in managing 
his local real-estate interests which were extensive. Mr. Fey had always great 
faith in the future of his city, and seldom went outside for investments. He 
had a keen sense for real-estate values, and up to the time of his death when he 
was over seventy-seven years, his business sagacity never deserted him. Mr. 
Fey died on July 2, igii. deeply mourned by his many friends. He had five chil- 
dren, one daughter. Mrs. C. J. OiT, and two sons, George and Charles Fey, all 
of Peoria, who are living; and two daughters who have passed away. 

David Fey was a plain and practical business man. He was a man of quiet 
and domestic tastes, and rejoiced to have his familv about him. He had at the 



HISTORY ()!• PEORIA COUNTY ;WJ 

time of his dcalh eight grandchildren, in wlnim he took great pride and delight. 
He was vigorous and keen-sighted in husiness. gifted with the true instinct of 
the modern business man and his fmancial success was remarkable. He was a 
member of the Schiller lodge of the Masonic order, the only fraternal affilia- 
tion which he had. His life was a peaceful and a prosperous one — a life filled 
with promises which were realized by that small German boy who came to 
America with his father, attained success unaided and died full of years and 
honors after a worthy life. 



HEXRY COX. 



Henry Cox. who now lives retired in Elmwood was born in the northern 
part of Alississippi in 1859. He was the son of Lewis and Jitann Cox. iioth of 
whom were natives of Mississippi and spent all their lives there. In their family 
were four children. Henry Cox was born a slave and ran away just before 
the emancipation- proclamation, coming to Illinois, where he located in Elm- 
wood township. On reaching here he had five dollars in his possession and he 
immediately hired out by the month to a farmer and was thus employed for 
thirteen years. He then purchased a farm of seventy acres in this township, 
improved and cultivated the same, and now owns in all one hundred and sixty 
acres. He has always carried on general farming and stock-raising. In 1903 
he removed to Elmwood, where he purchased a home on the south side of town 
and has since lived retired. 

On the 6th of March, 1878, Mr. Cox married Miss Clara Reed, who was 
born September 2. 1847. at Rushville. Schuyler county. Illinois, the daughter 
of Reuben and Dolly Reed, who were old settlers in that section of the state. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Cox have been born three children, all of whom died in 
infancy. 

In his political relations Mr. Cox is a re]niblican, and both he and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Cox has been successful 
in his business and has gained the respect of his neighbors and the business men 
of the community. Roth he and Mrs. Cox have many friends here. 



JOHN SCHNEIDER. Jr. 

Trade relations in Peoria find a worthy representative in John Schneider, 
Jr., who, fortunate in entering upon a business already established, has carried 
it forward upon strictly business principles. He is now a partner in the firm 
of Schneider t\: Metzger. dealers in barber's supplies and barber's furniture, while 
at the same time they conduct a machine and general repair shop at 410 Fulton 
street. Mr. Schneider comes of Swiss ancestry. His father, John Schneider, 
Sr.. was born in Berne, Switzerland, and there spent his youthful days. He 
learned the cutlery trade in his native land, and as a young man came to America. 
He has been a resident of Peoria for forty-two years, and no citizen is more 
familiar with the history of the growth and development here than is John 
Scb.neider, Sr. Moreover, he figured for manv years as a leading factor in 
the business circles. He began dealing in i)arbers' supplies and barbers' fur- 
niture about 1879 and long continued successfully in that trade but then turned 
the business over to younger men and retired to private life, enjoying a well 
earned rest. He was married here to Miss Susana Stoller, and both are still 
residents of Peoria. Mr. Schneider receives the veneration and respect which 






310 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

should ever be accorded one who lias readied advanced years and whose Ufe 
has been well and worthily spent. 

His son and namesake. John Schneider, Jr.. acquired his education in the 
public schools of I'eoria. and in 1900 entered the employ of his father with 
whom he remained until 1908, when, on the retirement of his father, he suc- 
ceeded to an interest in the business in connection with Emil Metzger. his present 
partner and associate. Mr. Metzger is a practical mechanic and was connected 
"with the house first as an employe, but in 1890 was admitted to a partnership in 
the business. He is also at the head of the Reliance Motor Company located 
at 106 South Madison street, Peoria. The firm of Schneider & Aletzger em- 
ploy about ten men and have a plant fully equipped for the conduct of a general 
machine and repair business. They also handle the most complete line of bar- 
bers' supplies and barbers' furniture in this state outside of Chicago. They 
are still located at 410 Fulton street where Mr. Schneider's father so long car- 
ried on the business. They occupy the entire three floors and basement of the 
building and their trade covers a large territory, reaching out along constantly 
ramifying lines until the firm name of Schneider & Metzger is now widely 
known throughout the middle west. 



E. J. CASE. 



E. T. Case is a member of the wholesale drug firm known as the Sutlift & 
Case Company, manufacturing chemists and pharmacists and wholesale dealers in 
physicians', hospital and dental supplies. In addition to the wholesale department 
a retail business is carried on, their location being at Xos. 312 and 314 South 
Adams street. The company occupies the entire four stories of a double brick 
building there and the business is one of the most progressive commercial enter- 
prises in the city. Active in its management and control, E. J. Case has become 
well known in business circles. In addition to the drug business he is also the 
vice president of the Peoria Life Insurance Company and is also a member of the 
firm of Case & Kroenlein, manufacturers of and wholesale dealers in saddlery at 
Peoria. It is characteristic of him that what he undertakes he accomplishes and 
his constantly broadening interests indicate the scope of his ability and enterprise. 

Mr. Case was born upon a farm in .Medina tow^nship, Peoria county, Illinois, 
August 20. 1848, his parents being Irvin W. and Salina Case, who came to this 
state from Oswego, New York, in 1839, and settled upon a farm in Medina town- 
ship, Peoria county. It was there that E. J. Case spent his early days amid the 
scenes and environments of farm life, dividing his time between the duties of 
the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the work of the fields. He 
became familiar witli the best methods of cultivating and caring for the crops 
and was thus associated with farming interests until twenty-seven years of age, 
when, in 1875. he removed to Alta, Illinois. There he turned his attention to gen- 
eral merchandising and continued therein until 1887, when he disposed of his 
interests and sought the opportunities offered in the large city, coming at once to 
Peoria, where he joined forces with Warren Sutlif? in establishing what is now 
well known as the Sutlifl:" & Case Company. This house has maintained a high 
standard of service and has won a well merited reputation for the excellence of 
the products handled. They not only do a wholesale and retail business in drugs 
but also in physicians' and dentists' supplies and are manufacturing chemists and 
pharmacists. They also handle photogra]-)hic stock on (|uite an extensive scale, 
this ])roving quite an im]iortant branch of their business. Their trade now covers 
a wide territory and is constantly on the increase. It is now one of the important 
features in the commercial life here and the business methods of the house are 
such as have won for it a merited reputation for reliability and enterprise. 




E. J. CASE 



I 






HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 313 

Air. Case has been married twice. He first wedded Georgia Edgett, who died, 
leaving three chilch-en: Maurice E., secretary and treasurer of the Crescent Coal 
Company, in which his father is largely interested ; W'illard G., who is associated 
with the Sutliff iS; Case Company: and Florence. In 1887 Mr. Case chose for his 
second wife Miss Nettie W'augh. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, advancing 
steadily through the different branches of the order until he is now a member of 
the lodge, chapter, commander)-, consistory and the Mystic Shrine. He also 
belongs to the Creve Coeur Club, the Peoria Country Club and the Illinois Valley 
Yacht Club. Even his extensive business and his important social interests do not 
fully occupy his time. At least he makes opportunity to take part in the public 
life of the community, especially in support of those projects and movements 
which have for their object the general good. His ideas are practical, his efforts 
resultant and his cooperation can alwax's be counted upon to further any measure 
that he believes will prove beneficial to the community at large. 



TAMES GOURAN. 



James Gouran is commercial agent for the Wabash Railroad, with offices in 
the Woolner building, and has long been identified with railway interests in 
this section. He comes of a family that for more than a half century has 
been represented in Peoria. His father was Thomas Gouran, who was born in 
the county of West Meath, Ireland, in 1805, and was a son of John and Rosie 
(Haley) Gouran. natives of West Meath and Kildare respectively. Thomas 
Gouran was rearecl on his father's farm and after starting out in life on his ow^n 
account engaged in farming for himself. He was married in 1840 to Miss Mar- 
garet Gavigan, also a native of West Meath, and unto them were born seven 
children, John. James, Rosie, Jane, Mary, Bridget and Margaret. In the year 
1S58 the entire family came to the new world and cast in their lot with Peoria's 
citizens. The name has since been an honored one here because of the activity 
and the prominence of the different members of the household. For many 
years Thomas Gouran was active in railroad circles but at length sustained air 
injury and retired. 

James Gouran spent his boyhood and }outh largely in Peoria and at the out- 
set of his business career became connected with railway interests. Industry, 
fidelity and ready adaptability have won him promotion, bringing him added 
responsibilities until he now occupies the important position of commercial agent 
for the Wabash Railroad Company, with offices in the Woolner building. In 
this connection he is widely known but not more so than through his activity 
in church and benevolent work. He contributes generouslv where aid is needed 
and has ]iut forth earnest effort to alleviate the hard conditions of life for the 
unfortunate. 



HARLAN E. GIBBS. 



Harlan E. Gibhs. who is engaged in general farming, is a native resident 
of Elmwood township. He was born November 27. 1880. the son of Ichabod 
O. and Mary ( Truitt) Gibbs. The paternal grandparents. Justus and Betty 
Gibbs, were both natives of New York and were among the early settlers of this 
township and here they both passed away. They entered government land here 
and later owned a large tract of valuable land in this county. The maternal 
grandparents, i\Ir. and Mrs. Elijah Truitt. were both natives of Ohio and were 
also early settlers in Peoria county. The mother. Marv (Truitt) Gibbs. was a 

■\'ol. II— 1 .J 



314 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

native of Ohio but the father, Ichabod O. Gibbs, was born in this township in 
1838. The parents were both reared in this county and were married here. 
The father was a well known farmer in this community and now lives a mile 
south of the home of the subject of this sketch, residing with one of his sons. He 
deserves especial mention as an honored veteran of the Civil war, having served 
in Company I, of the Seventy-seventh Illinois ^'olunteer Infantry. His wife 
passed away in 1885. In their family were seven children, four sons and three 
daughters, all of whom are now living. 

Harlan E. Gibbs was educated in the public schools of this township and also 
completed a course in the Elmwood high school. Starting out in life for him- 
self, he engaged in farming and in 1908 purchased a tract of eighty acres in 
Elmwood township, where he now resides. He has made many improvements 
on this tract of land, erecting a new barn and generally bettering his farm. 
He engages in stock-raising, making a specialty of Berkshire hogs and Holstein 
cattle. He also raises potatoes quite extensively and last year produced over 
thirty-six hundred bushels on fifteen acres of ground. 

C3n April 29, 1904, Mr. Gibbs was united in marriage with ^liss Gertrude 
M. Wilson, who was born in Peoria county and is an adopted daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. James E. Wilson. To Mr. and Airs. Gibbs have been born three chil- 
dren, James Wilson, Harlan I. and Ruth E. In his political views Mr. Gibbs 
is a republican, and fraternally he belongs to Horeb Lodge, No. 363, A. F. & 
A. M., at Elmwood. Mr. Gibbs is a man of admirable characteristics and all 
his business relations have been conducted along the most honorable principles. 
He is exceptionally successful in his farming interests and is a prosperous 
resident of the section where he has always made his home. 



JOHN C. PADDOCK. 



John C. Paddock, whose business training has well qualified him for the 
solution of intricate and complex problems that arise in connection with his 
•duties as cashier of the Alerchants National Bank, has for almost a quarter of 
a century figured in connection with the financial interests of Peoria. His iden- 
tification with the bank which he now represents covers the period from 1897 
and previously he was for ten years associated with the Central National Bank. 
He was born in Canandaigua, New York, March 6, 1870, and is a son of 
Charles H. Paddock, who was a well known attorney of that city. The grand- 
father, John W. Paddock, was located in Peoria in the railway business and with 
him John C. Paddock came to Peoria in 1877. Here he was reared and attended 
the local schools until graduated from the high school with the class of 18S7. 
The field of banking proved an attractive one to him and he immediately sought 
and obtained employment in the Central National Bank, occupying a clerical 
position. During the ten years of his connection with that institution he was 
advanced from time to time through intermediate i)ositions until he resigned 
as teller to enter the Merchants National Bank as general bookkeeper. Sub- 
sequently he was appointed assistant cashier, which position he filled from 1903 
until 1908, when he was made cashier. The steps in his orderly progression 
are thus easily discernible and each advancement has come to him in recognition 
of his capability in the discharge of the duties devolving upon him. He early 
recognized the fact that fidelity and indefatigable industry are indispensable 
concomitants of success. By proving the worth of his work to the institutions 
which he has represented he has gained his promotions and now occupies a most 
creditable and responsible position in financial circles. 

Mr. Paddock is pleasantly situated in his home life, having married Aliss 
Alaude Littlewood, a daughter of George H. Littlewood, of this city. The 



PIISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 315 

circle of their friends is an extensive one and in duh circles, too. Mr. Paddock 
is well known, holding membership with the Creve Coeur and the I'eoria Country 
Clubs. His life is actuated by high and honorable principles that have their 
root in his membership in St. Paul's Episcopal church, in which he has served 
as vestryman and treasurer for ten years. In the various lines of church work 
he is deeply interested and his broad humanitarian spirit is further manifest in 
his coojieration with the Associated Charities, of which he is treasurer. He 
looks at life from a broad standpoint, recognizes its obligations and its oppor- 
tunities and in the enjoyment of the latter never neglects the former. 



GEORGE H. GIPPS. 



Peoria has long since attained a position of leadership in connection with 
brewing and distilling interests and its output along those lines exceeds those 
of any other city of equal size in the country, and at the head of its enterprises 
of this character are men of marked business ability, keen discernment and un- 
faltering energy — men who recognize the possibilities of trade and utilize each 
opportunity for its full worth. Of this class George H. Gipps is a representa- 
tive and his position in the business circles of the city is that of general agent 
for the Terre Haute Brewing Company. He has been identified with the brew- 
ing trade since he completed his education. Pie was born near Morton, Taze- 
well county, Illinois, August 31, 1863. upon the home farm belonging to his 
father. John Mathuen Gipps, who came from England to the new world in 
1845 ^n<^i- niaking his way to the interior of the country, settled upon a tract 
of land near ilorton. There for a number of years he successfully engaged 
in far'"'"^ ^""^ when his industry and careful expenditure had brought him 
sufficient capital he embarked in the brewing business in Peoria, engaging in 
that line of trade about 1864. He was associated with a Mr. Howe in the 
estal:>lishment and conduct of a little ale brewery, which was afterward re- 
moved to the foot of Bridge street, where the large plant of the Gipps Brew- 
ing Company now stands. Gradually he developed a business of extensive 
proportions. As his trade increased he enlarged his facilities and in time drew 
his patronage from a very wide territory. He was president of the Gipps 
Brewing Company at the time of his death, which occurred November 27, 1881, 
at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, Ellen Dawson, was also a native of 
England and they were married in New York city in 1852. They had two chil- 
dren, the elder being Mrs. Bessie Smith, the w'ife of C. B. Smith, of Peoria. 
The mother passed away in this city in 1898. 

George H. Gipps was but six years of a,ge when the family left the farm 
and took up their abode in Peoria, so that his education was acquired in the 
schools of this city, which he attended until he left the high school to become an 
active factor in business life. The o]3portunity was offered him of entering 
the establishment of the Gipps Brewing Company and he did so, thoroughly 
acquainting himself with every branch of the trade. He remained there until 
1885, when he became associated with the Union Brewing Company, of which 
he was secretary for fifteen years. He then withdrew from that connection to 
accept the agency and position of manager with the Terre Haute Brewing Com- 
pany in igoo. He has since been connected with this corporation and is today 
its general agent, having supervision of the e.xtension of its trade relations. 
The position is one of large responsibility and involves most important con- 
siderations and duties, for which Mr. Gipps' long experience has well prepared 
him. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Gipps and Miss Tennie V. Tripp, 
a daughter of R. H. Tripp. They now have two children, Charles M. and Delia 



316 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

T. In Masonry Mr. Gijjps has advanced to a high position. He has served as 
high priest of Peoria Chapter, R. A. M., for three years, is a Knight Templar 
Mason and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to the Bene- 
volent Protective Order of Elks and has various other social relations, being 
a member of the South Side Turners, the Concordia Singing Society and the 
Creve Coeur Club. His social qualities have rendered him popular, while his 
business ability has gained him prominence. 



ALBERT H. ADDISON. 

Twenty-three years' connection with the Central National Bank well estab- 
lishes the position of Albert H. Addison as a thoroughly reliable and progres- 
sive business man. Gradually he has worked his way upward through inter- 
mediate positions until called to the cashiership on the ist of January, 1910. 
His residence in Peoria dates from July, 1881. He was then a youth of four- 
teen years, his birth having occurred in Richland county, Illinois, in 1867. His 
parents died in his infancy and he was adopted by the Addison family, taking 
their name. His youthful days were passed in Livingston and in Lee counties 
of this state, in both of which he attended the public schools. His foster father 
also died when he was yet a boy so that he was thus practically twice orphaned 
when less than fourteen years of age. He was then thrown upon his own re- 
sources and, seeking the business opportunities offered in the city, came to 
Peoria where he was first employed in the grain office of Alexander G. Tyng, 
Sr., who was then located in the Board of Trade building. His salary was but 
three dollars per week and he paid out the entire amount for his board. What 
little money he had for clothing he obtained by gathering up grain in sacks and 
selling it to teamsters. His advantages and opportunities seemed e.xtremely 
limited l)Ut the way of advancement is open to every ambitious, industrious and 
persistent individual. He resolved that he would progress and he studied day 
and night as he found the chance until he had mastered bookkeeping while oc- 
cupying a humble clerical position. He afterward secured a position as clerk 
in a railroad office in which he remained for a year, and during that period he 
learned telegraphy. He then returned to the board of trade and for two years 
acted in the capacity of detail clerk with the firm of Taylor Brothers & Miles. 
On resigning that position he next entered the employ of the Central National 
Bank wTth which he has been continuously connected since i88g. His first posi- 
tion was that of bookkeeper and later he was advanced to teller. He next be 
came assistant cashier and so continued until the ist of January, 1910, when he 
was made cashier of this institution which is one of the strong moneyed con- 
cerns of the city. Thus gradually he has worked his way upward. Each step 
has meant a promotion and has been indicative of his increasing aljility and 
worth. He has indeed rendered his labors a serviceable and valuable element 
in the business world and his promotion has been the merited recognition of his 
fidelity. 

In i8c)2 Mr. Addison was united in marriage to Miss Norma Wesner, of 
Maquoketa, Iowa, and they have one daughter, Enid Marie. Mr. Addison is 
a Mason, belonging to Temple Lodge, F. X: A. M., and he also belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen camp, organizations which have his loyalty because of the 
beneficent principles upon which they are founded. Moreover, he is an active 
and helpful worker and a member of the Cavalry Presbyterian church, doing 
everything in his power to further its interests along various lines. He is now- 
serving as superintendent of the Sunday school and his labors have been effect- 
ive forces in extending the influence and promoting the growth of the church 
and its kindred activities. His life now shows the value of choosing "the 



HISTORY OF ri'.oRlA COUNTY 317 

better part." Denied in youth the home advantages and training which most 
bovs receive, the inherent strength of his character has guided his life, prompt- 
ing him to utilize those things which are most worth while in making life honor- 
al)le and serviceable. He has never deviated from what his judgment sanctions 
as right between himself and his fellowmen and, holding to high ideals, he has 
commanded the respect and enjoyed the confidence and good-will of his col- 
leagues and contemporaries. 



M. H. DARNELL. 



.M. H. Darnell, who with his wife owns an excellent farm of two hundred 
and ten acres situated in Elmwood township, was born in Knox county, Illinois, 
A])ril II, 185C). His parents were James C. and Mary (Tabor) Darnell, both of 
whom were natives of Ohio and came with their parents to this state, where 
thev were married. The father was a prosperous and prominent cattle dealer 
in Peoria county. He died in September, 1910, at the age of eighty-seven years, 
and his wife passed away in 1908. In their family were six children, five of 
whom are now living. 

^L H. Darnell was educated in the common schools of Peoria county and 
early became associated with the stock-raising business, at which he was em- 
ployed until 1898. In that year he became a traveling salesman for the Carter 
White Lead Company of Chicago and Omaha, and remained with them for 
twelve years, during which tiine he traveled in various parts of the United States. 
He has resided on the farm since 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Darnell have an excellent 
property and Mr. Darnell engages in general farming and in stock-raising. 

On August 29, 1877, Mr. Darnell was united in marriage with Miss Lenora 
.A. Wiley, who was born in Peoria county, a daughter of Morrison A. and Mary 
Wiley, who were early settlers in this county, having come here from Pennsyl- 
vania. To Mr. and Mrs. Darnell have been born two children: a daughter who 
died in infancy; and a son, James Morrison, who is now a Universalist minister 
at Owatonna, Minnesota. 

In his jiolitical views Mr. Darnell is a republican, and fraternally he belongs 
to Illinois Chapter. No. 263. A. F. & A. M., and to Peoria Consistory, S. P. R. S. 
Also he is a member of Mohammed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. Mr. Darnell 
has been prosperous in all his business relations, both as a traveling salesman 
and as an agriculturist. He has worked jiersistently and energetically as the 
years have gone by and his fidelity and strong purpose have been the founda- 
tion upon which he has builded the superstructure of his success. 



ELISHA U. HAZEN. 



Elisha B. Hazen is the secretary and treasurer of the Brass Foundry Com- 
pany. He became connected with this business in 1895, at which time he I'ur- 
chased an interest, and has since been an active factor in its capable manage- 
ment and successful control. He came to Peoria in 1890. when a young man of 
twenty years, his birth having occurred u])on a farm in Champaign county, Illi- 
nois, in 1870. At the usual age he began his education in the schools there and 
eventually reached the high school of Champaign, from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1889. He then looked about him for a favorable business 
opening and in the fall of 1890 came to Peoria, where he secured a clerical posi- 
tion in the offices of the Rock Island Railroad Company. There he remained 
for five years, although gradually working his way upward from one position 



318 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

to another. At length, however, he determined that his labors should more di- 
rectly benefit himself and to this end he [nirchased an interest in the present 
business and assumed charge as office manager. He also looks after new busi- 
ness and in this connection travels a part of the time. The president. J. G. 
Kasjens, is at the head of the manufacturing department and thus both branches 
of the Brass Foundry Company are capably controlled. Their works are at 
Nos. 711 to 717 South Adams street. They do all kinds of manganese bronze, 
nickel bronze, hydraulic and phosphor bronze work, aluminum castings, light 
and heavy machine work and brass finishing. They also manufacture soda 
fountain draft arms and coolers and take contracts for special work. The busi- 
ness is well housed, for they own a substantial building which has a frontage of 
sixty feet and a depth of one hundred and fifty feet, while their lot is one hun- 
dred and seventy-nine feet deep. They employ from twenty to thirty skilled 
mechanics and molders and in 191 1 their business amounted to about one 
hundred thousand dollars. The enterprise was established about 1890 and the 
business was incorporated in 1892, at which time the company occupied a small 
building at the corner of Persimmons and Adams streets. When they were 
burned out there they removed to the corner of Franklin and First streets, where 
they remained for eight years, and in 1906 came to their present location. I\Ir. 
Hazen is also interested to some extent in the real-estate business as a partner 
of Will S. Nash. 

In 1895 was celebrated the marriage of Elisha B. Hazen and Aliss Agnes 
McGill, of Peoria, and unto them have been born three children, Bruce, Effie 
and George. Mr. Hazen served as a member of the city council for one term. 
He belongs to the Creve Coeur Club, the Kickapoo Golf Qub and also to the 
Modern Woodmen camp. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. The 
world instinctively pays its tribute to him who through enterprise, unrelaxing 
effort and clear-sighted judgment makes advancement without infringing on the 
rights and liberties of others. Such has been the record of Mr. Hazen, who 
started out in life with no capital save commendable ambition and determina- 
tion. Gradually he has advanced and his expanding powers have taken him 
from humble surroundings to the field of large enterprise and broadening op- 
portunities. 



BENJAMIN OWEN. 



Benjamin Owen, filling the position of inspector of boilers for the city of 
Peoria, was appointed by Alayor Woodrufl^ and indorsed by the city council. He 
has occupied this position most creditably and acceptalily since 1908, prior to 
which time he was for fifty years engaged in the boiler-maker's trade. He was 
born in England, July 23, 1842, the son of George and Jane (Wight) Owen. In 
the paternal line he comes of \\'elsh ancestry, his grandfather, George Owen, 
having been a native of Wales. When Benjamin Owen was twelve years of age 
his parents left England for the new world, settling in Cumberland, Maryland, 
where the father worked in a blast furnace for a number of years. In 1865, how- 
ever, he removed with his family to Peoria and spent the remainder of his days 
in this city, his death here occurring in 1868. His wife survived until she reached 
the very advanced age of ninety-three years. 

Benjamin Owen was a young man of about twent}'-three years when he 
accompanied his parents to this city. He began to learn the boilermakers' trade 
in Cumberland, Maryland, in 1857, in the shops of the Baltimore & Ohio R. R, 
Company and was its employe until 1861, when, following the outbreak of the 
Civil war, he joined the army. His sympathies were with the Union cause and 
he resolved to strike a blow in defense of the stars and stripes. He therefore en- 




I'.KXJA.MIN (IWKX 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 321 

listed as a private in the Second Maryland \'olunteer Infantry, with which he 
served for three years and three months, retiring from the army as a corporal. 
He was mustered out at Cumberland in 1864 and returned home with a most 
creditable military record for on hotly contested battlefieUls he had given every 
evidence of his loyalty and valor. 

The following year Mr. Owen came to Peoria to work at his trade as boiler 
maker in the shops of the Rock Island Railroad and has remained a continuous 
resident of this city to the present time save for a period of six years. Five years 
of that time was spent in Forrest, Illinois, as foreman of the shops of the Wabash 
Railroad Company at that place and for about a year he was located in \'an \\'ert, 
Ohio, as foreman of the railroad roundhouse there. He then returned to this city 
to enter the service of the Toledo, Peoria iS: Warsaw Railroad, with which he 
remained for an extended period, and at length became foreman of the Peoria & 
Pekin Union boiler shops. A year later he became journeyman boiler maker for 
the Rock Island Railroad, in which connection he continued until he was called 
to his present ])osition in IQ08, Mayor Woodrut? recognizing his ability in ap- 
pointing him city boiler inspector for Peoria. His long and varied experience 
in boiler shops and in connection with boiler making well qualified him for the 
duties that devolved upon him in this connection. 

Mr. Owen was united in marriage with Miss Sarah E. Royster, of Peoria, 
and unto them have been born seven children. William B., the eldest son, is an 
engineer on the Illinois Centra! Railroad. The other members of the family are : 
Clara, Lulu. Harry, who has been an engineer for the Illinois Central Railway 
for three years : Fannie ; John, who is a molder ; and Julia. Mr. Owen gives his 
political support to the republican party, of which he has always been an advo- 
cate sinCe age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He belongs to the 
Grand Army of the Rei>ublic and in all matters of citizenship is as true and loyal 
to the country as when he followed the old flag on southern battlefields. He is 
a self-made man and whatever success he has achieved in life is attributable to 
his own labors and enterprise, for he started out empty-handed and has worked 
his way upward through industry, perseverance and determination. 



OMAR A. MORRIS. 



Omar A. ^lorris is superintendent of the rectifying house of Clark Brothers 
& Company, which firm owns the largest whiskey distillery in the world, its 
location being at the foot of Pecan street. He has been a resident of Peoria 
since 1901, coming to this city from St. Louis, [Missouri, to accept his present 
position. He was born near another of the important cities of the ?vlississippi 
valley, his birth having occurred in the vicinity of Indianapolis, Indiana, April 
27, 1856. His parents, Hugh Innis and Rebecca L. (Ferree) Morris, were both 
natives of Kentucky but in childhood went to Indiana where they were reared. 
The father became a farmer by occupation and following his marriage engaged 
in agricultural pursuits on his own account, so that Omar A. Alorris was reared 
on the home farm in Indiana until he reached the age of fifteen years. He then 
accompanied his parents on their removal westward to a farm near Kansas City, 
Missouri, where both his father and mother spent their remaining days, passing 
away only a few years after their arrival in that section of the country. 

Omar A. Morris supplemented his public-school education, acquired in 
Indiana, by a course of study in a business college of Kansas Cit)'. He then 
became a clerk for the Fort Scott & Memphis Railroad at that place and later 
entered the employ of the Kansas City Ilistilling Company in connection with 
the rectifving house in which he remained from 1881 until 1894. During that 
period of thirteen years he thoroughly mastered the business in principle and 



322 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

detail and with his conii)rehensive knowledge of the work went to St. Louis, 
Missouri, to become superintendent of the rectifying house of the Mound City 
Distilling Company. He was associated therewith until 1901, when he left St. 
Louis to come to Peoria and accept his present position as superintendent of 
the rectifying house of the world's largest whiskey distillery, owned by Clark 
Brothers & Company. He has carefully systematized the work of the depart- 
ment, gives general supervision thereto and has introduced some of the most 
improved processes known in whiskey manufacture. Because of the extent of 
the business his position is a most onerous and responsible one but he proves 
himself entirely adequate to the demands made upon his time and energies. 

Mr. Morris was married in 1885 to Miss Martha Shepherd, of Kansas City, 
and they have one child. Alma, who is the wife of H. X. Buckley, of Oak Park, 
Illinois. He is especially well known in Masonic circles. He joined the craft 
after coming to this city and has attained high honors in the order, serving in 
191 1 as eminent commander of the Peoria Commandery of the Knight Templars. 
He is also a member of the Mystic Shrine and is in hearty sympathy with the 
principles and teachings of the craft. His business associates find him enegetic, 
determined and resourceful and his Masonic brethren and his social acquaint- 
ances place him high in their regard because of the sterling traits of his man- 
hood and his citizenship. 



WILLL\M H. TRIEBEL. 

It has been well said that the architectural beauty of Peoria commands the 
unqualified admiration of every visitor to our city, come they from the metro- 
politan centers of our own country or be they wayfarers from the older coun- 
tries of Europe. The solid masses of brick and mortar that greet the eye upon 
every side of our commercial thoroughfares; the gigantic structures and monu- 
ments of granite and marble that raise their proud heads heavenward; the 
palatial mansions and stone fronts of the avenues ; the residences of our bankers, 
professional men and merchant princes, adorned and beautified with every sur- 
rounding that a cultivated taste and large wealth could suggest or command, all 
combine to arrest the attention and excite the amazement of those who 'behold 
them. To the men from whose brains and artistic taste much of this beauty 
has emanated, much praise is due. In this connection may be mentioned Wil- 
liam H. Triebel, whose reputation as a sculptor and monument builder and 
marble worker is as wide-spread as that of any man in the state. 

He was born in the city of Peoria, December 8, 1858, a son of Otto Triebel, 
deceased, the biographical record of whose life appears on another page in these 
volumes. He attended the German school on Second street for six years and 
was also a student in the public schools of this city. When he put aside his 
text-books he entered his father's marble works and gained practical knowledge 
of the business in all departments. He became specially skilled in hand carv- 
ing. In 1887 he was admitted to partnership under the firm style of Triebel & 
Sons and so continued until 191 1, when he disposed of his interest to his brother 
Henry and started upon an independent business career. His work sustains 
the high reputation for sculpture which the family has long borne. Their ef- 
forts far transcend the work of mere monument builders and embrace the 
artistic qualities and the excellence of workmanship shown in fine sculpture. 
The reputation and long experience of W. H. Triebel have been the factors 
which have won him immediate recognition and substantial success since he 
started in business independently. His motto is. and ever has been "Progress." 
No visionary dream of impossibilities fill his mind, but practical in all his ideas, 
he builds up as he journeys through life, benefiting his fellowmen, and seeking 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 323 

to leave the workl all the better for his having been in it; and although a sound, 
vigorous and unimpaired constitution predicts for him a long life of usefulness, 
yet if he were summoned to the "summer land" tomorrow, years would flow 
into the mystic gulf of eternity ere the footprints he has left upon the sands of 
time would be forgotten or washed away. 

Mr. Triebel is a gentleman of cultvu"e and rehnement. which coujiled with his 
genial manners and the warmth of his attachments towards friends, have se- 
cured for him a high place in tlie affections and esteem of his circle of acquaint- 
ances. His heart is ever in sympathy with the sorrows of the unfortunate, and 
his hand ever ready to contribute to the alleviation of distress. But perhaps 
the richest and most beautiful traits of his character are his strong domestic 
sentiments and habits, which impel him to seek his highest happiness in the 
family circle, and render him its joy and light. 

On October lo, 1894, occurred the marriage of Mr. Triebel and Miss Nettie 
Ciillig, of this city, and they now have two children, Clarence W. and Louis 
Cj. In 191 1 Mr. Triebel erected four liandsome brick residences at Nos. 1412, 
1414, 1416 and 1418 North Perry street. They are supplied with all modern 
conveniences and fitted out in most tasteful and artistic manner. Mr. Triebel 
and his family occupy the home at No. 1416 Perry street, and the others are 
rented. The houses were built on the old homestead site, where the father 
conducted a marble business for many years. Air. Triebel also owns much other 
valuable property on North Perry street and his real-estate interests add con- 
siderably to his income. 

Fraternally, Mr. Triebel is a prominent Mason, holding membership in the 
Knight Temj^lar commandery and the Mystic Shrine. He has traveled quite 
extensively, spending a year and a half in Italy, and his artistic tastes found 
great delight in the galleries and art centers of that and other European coun- 
tries, especially in a study of the noted marbles of the old world. 

Though he has not attained great distinction in public life, Mr. Trichcl has 
done much better than the majority of public men; he has gained the confidence 
and respect of the whole community by honesty, fair-dealing, and a modest and 
upright deportment : and while enjoying a goorl income from the profits of his 
l)usiness, he has the satisfaction of knowing that he has impoverished none and 
injured none in his efforts to ac(|uire wealth. 



LOUIS J. GAUSS. 



Louis J. Gauss, who from the ist of December, 1906, to the present writing, 
in the summer of 1912, has filled the office of deputy county treasurer and is 
well known in political circles in Peoria, was born September 17. 1882. His 
parents, William P. and Louisa Gauss, have been residents of this city for about 
fifty-nine years and the father has been prominent in public affairs, serving as 
alderman tor two terms, as city treasurer for one term and as county treasurer 
for one term. He has also been active in business circles in connection with 
both retail and wholesale enterprises for more than three decades and his com- 
mercial integrity and his devotion to the public good as an official are both 
unassailable. .At the present writing he is living retired, his activity in mer- 
cantile lines having brought to him a capital suflicient to supply him with all of 
the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. At the time of the Civil war he 
manifested his loyalty to the Union cause by serving for three years and four 
months with the boys in blue, and he is now a member of Piryner Post. G. A. R., 
in which he has served as commander. 

In the public schools of Peoria Louis J. Gauss pursued his preliminary edu- 
cation and later entered Brown's Business College, from which he was gradu- 



324 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

ated. He completed his course in the old Lincoln school in 1897 and his book- 
keeping course in the commercial college in 1900. Entering business circles, 
his first position was that of timekeeper for the Peoria & Pekin Terminal Rail- 
way in Alarch, igoo. He continued with that corporation until September i, 
1905, serving in various capacities such as car accountant, cashier, station agent, 
chief clerk to the superintendent and in other positions. He then became book- 
keeper for Libby, McNeill & Libby at Chicago, remaining with that house from 
j\Iay I, 1906, until the ist of December following, when he received the appoint- 
ment of deputy county treasurer of Peoria county. In the intervening period 
of six years he has made a most creditable record in this connection and is one 
for whom the future undoubtedly holds in store still higher political honors. 
He has ever voted with the republican party, having firm belief in its principles 
as factors in good government. 

On the 27th of October, 1908, in Peoria. Mr. Gauss was married to Miss 
Jennie Cornelia Ockenga. a daughter of Engelke Ockenga, of Peoria. They 
have one son, William P. Gauss, Jr. In fraternal circles Air. Gauss is well 
known, holding membership in Temple Lodge, No. 46, A. F. & A. M. ; Peoria 
Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M. ; Peoria Council, R. & S. M. ; Peoria Consistory. S. 
P. R. S. ; and Mohammed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He likewise belongs 
to West Bluff Lodge. No. 177, K. P.. and to Thrush Camp of the Sons of \'et- 
erans. He also belongs to the Marquette Club. He has been characterized as 
a "strong-minded, honorable young business man. who comes of sturdy Ger- 
man stock, is affable and winning in manner and as a citizen is wide-awake to 
the best interests of Peoria, the welfare of which-he is ever readv to advance." 



THOMAS W. GARDNER. 

Thomas W. Gardner, a lieutenant of the Peoria police force, was born in Ox- 
fordshire, England, in 1856, a son of Thomas Gardner, who devoted many years 
of his life to farming and passed away on ]\Iay 7, 1901. The usual experiences of 
the farm boy came to Thomas W. Gardner in his boyhood and youth and during 
that period he qualified for life's practical and responsible duties by pursuing a 
thorough course of study in the public schools. He remained a resident of his 
native land until twenty-six years of age, when in 1882, he crossed the Atlantic 
and made his way to Peoria. For a short time he worked upon the farm in this 
part of the state and then accepted a position in the freighting house of the Peoria 
& Pekin Union Railroad. He was next in a position in the baggage department 
but at length severed his connection with railway interests and went to the rolling 
mills at Averyville, where he remained as foreman for two or three years. His 
next business connection was with the upper sugar house and for one year he had 
charge of the gluten house. He was next made night foreman of the dry house, 
in which he continued for a year and a half, when he entered the public service, 
having been appointed patrolman on the city police force under Alayor Allen. He 
was on duty at night and later served on the force for a period under Mayor 
Warner. Mayor Lynch also continued him upon the force and during that admin- 
istration he was given duty as a day patrolman. He also served under Mayor 
Bryan, after which he retired but under Alayor Woodruff again went upon the 
day force and was appointed to the rank of sergeant. Further promotion came to 
him in the spring of 191 1, when he was made a police lieutenant. He has proven 
fearless in the discharge of his duties, prompt and faithful in all of his work and 
enjoys the confidence of the general public and the regard of his fellow officers on 
the force. He has always taken an active and helpful interest in city aft'airs and 
is an earnest worker in the ranks of the republican party. 

On the 31st of March, 1887. Mr. Gardner was married in Peoria to Mrs. Mary 




THOMAS W. rJARTlXER 



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HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 327 

Allaire, who i)ore the maiden name of Mary Doyle, and belongs to one of the old 
families of this city. They now have one child, Edna Florence, who is a teacher 
of music. Fraternally Air. Gardner is connected with the Alodern Woodmen of 
America. He has a wide acquaintance here and his record in connection with 
the police force has been characterized by unfaltering loyalty to dutv. 



AMAND AIOLL. 



Whenever the city of Peoria wishes to rejoice in a public manner over the 
successful completion of some civic project, whenever an amusement park opens 
for the season, or closes after a prosperous summer, whenever the local ball 
team wins a hotly contested game, whenever a yacht club wants music over a 
moonlight river during a regatta, or measures to dance to on a summer night — - 
then Spencer's band plays. Peoria children have grown up with a knowledge 
of it, and their parents can remember its organization. It takes its part in every 
demonstration of joy or sorrow, and when an old soldier dies, or a prominent 
citizen goes to his last resting place, Spencer's band plays "taps" over the grave. 
In the course of its many years of existence in Peoria, the band has taken on the 
nature of a local institution, and the business of directing its movements and 
leading its performances, requires rare tact and peculiar ability in the man who 
assumes it. .\mand Moll, at present leader and manager of this band, com- 
liines the (|ualities of a thorough musician with the ability and activity of a born 
executive, and he fills the duties of his difficult position with rare adequacy and 
skill. 

Amand Moll is a native of Germany, having been born in that country in 
1853. He was educated in the schools of the fatherland, and subsequently 
learned telegraphy. He was chief telegraph operator in Donaueschingen, Ger- 
many, during the Franco-Prussian war, 1870-1871, but immediately afterward 
he crossed the Atlantic to America, coming to Peoria in 1872, and in the follow- 
ing year he joined the band of which he is now leader. This band was organized 
in 1838 by Daniel Spencer and has maintained an unbroken existence in this 
city ever since that date. In 1862 the German Band of Peoria, composed of 
prominent old time citizens like Charles Pauli Winkelmeyer, G. M. Bohlender. 
Herman Friedrich and many others, gave up its separate corporate existence 
and was merged in Spencer's band, which was entirely reorganized. F. M. 
Reinhardt was the first leader, but resigned in 1871 and his position went to 
Christian Trantvetter who was director at the time Mr. Moll joined the band. 

In 1873, Amand Moll left Peoria for a tiine, and went to Williamsport, Penn- 
sylvania, where he joined Sam Sharpley's Sheridan and Mack's Minstrels. 
Lemon H. Wiley, who was a prominent figure in musical circles of Peoria at 
that time, was then leader of that famous organization. For some months. Air. 
Moll stayed with the minstrels, playing the clarinet in the orchestra, and alto in 
the brass band. Influenced by his uncle, Philip Auer, however, he left Sheridan 
and Alack's Minstrels in 1874 and accepted a position as bookkeeper in the 
Peoria grocery firm of Auer & Company, and in the following year he bought 
a share in this business. His partners were his cousin, William Auer, and Joseph 
Streibich. Amand AIoll soon afterward sold his share in the grocery enter- 
prise, and went into the clothing business in 1876. The store was located on 
Washington street and did business under the firm name of Auer & Moll. Later, 
however, Mr. AIoll bought out his uncle's share, and for twelve years ran the 
business alone and was very successful in its conduct. In 1898 he took in 
partnership Theodore H. Petersen, his long time clerk, under the firm name 
of AIoll & Petersen, under w-hich title it continued its activities at 505-507 South 
Adams street, until 1008. when it was dissolved. 



328 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Amand Moll has been city sealer of weights and measures under two ad- 
ministrations, and is acting in this capacity at the present time. He is also 
leader and director of Spencer's band, with which he has been identified promi- 
nently all during his term of residence in this city. He succeeded to the office 
of leader and manager when Christian Trantvetter organized a band of his own 
and has held the position continuously for thirty-seven years. He is an accom- 
plished band musician, as well as director, intensely interested in the different 
phases of music, and belongs to the Concordia and Liederkranz singing societies 
of this city. The organization of which he has been the head for more than 
a quarter of a century is a union organization, and is recognized as the lead- 
ing institution of its kind in central Illinois. It served in the Civil war with the 
Seventh Regiment, Illinois National Guard, under Colonel Isaac Taylor. It is 
recognized in Peoria today as a producer of good, stirring, and correctly played 
music, and much of its proficiency and fame are due to the untiring efforts of 
its director, Amand Moll, who gives his personal supervision to all the details 
of its performances, and never allows an inefficient musician to become asso- 
ciated with it. 

On October ig, 1876, Amand Moll was married to Miss Fannie Secretan, 
daughter of a retired farmer residing near Kickapoo, Peoria county, and they 
are the parents of one daughter, Lucy, who married E. E. Watton, at present 
secretary of the National Oil Company at Denver, Colorado. ^Ir. ]Moll is promi- 
nent in the order of Odd Fellows and holds membership in the Knights of 
Pythias, the Knights of Khorassan, in the Knights and Ladies of Honor, the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and the Elks. In politics he is a republican, 
but beyond casting his vote at every election, he takes no active part in public 
life. During his thirty-seven years of prominent identification with Spencer's 
band, Mr. Moll has given the best that was in him to promote its progress and 
efficiency. He has made the organization a household word here and he has 
done much to aid to the happiness of the city by making the holidays of its chil- 
dren joyous, and in softening the grief of bereavement in F'eoria by adding to the 
dignity and honor of death. 



CHARLES WEBSTER OLEARY. 

Charles Webster Oleary is a member of The Ziegler Company and manager 
of Peoria's leading undertaking establishment. The business is located on South 
JefTerson street and Mr. Oleary has been associated therewith since September, 
1896, when he entered the employ of his present partner. He had come to 
Peoria eight years before, arriving in this city when a youth of seventeen years. 
He was born upon a farm in Alason county, Illinois, July 6, 1871, his parents 
being T. H. and Mary (Daniels) C)leary, the father devoting his life to general 
agricultural pursuits. The grandfather of our subject was born in Wales and 
the grandmother was a native of Germany. The father resided upon the old 
homestead farm in Mason county until about 1897. and during his residence 
converted the place into rich and productive fields, the cultivation of his crops 
bringing him substantial and gratifying returns. He now resides in Bath, Mason 
county, Illinois, where he lives retired. The mother has long since passed away, 
her death occurring when her son, Charles, was but five years of age. 

Upon the old homestead Charles Webster Oleary remained until he reached 
the age of eleven years, after which he attended the jniblic schools at Bath, 
Illinois. In early manhood he took up surveying and was employed on the line 
of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad between Rock Island and Alton, 
Illinois. Subse(|uently he worked at various occupations until he became iden- 
tified with the Ziegler Company. For eight years he resided in Peoria ere 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 329 

entering into active connections with this company, at which time he began to learn 
the undertaking business. He remained as an employe of J. Frank Ziegler until 
they opened their present place of business in 1909, when he was made manager 
and on the ist of January, 191 1, he bought an interest in the business. Theirs 
is undoubtedly the finest undertaking establishment in the middle west. Even 
in Chicago there is nothing to compare with it. They occupy their own fine 
double building, erected of pressed brick. It is a two-story structure and they 
use the entire first floor in the conduct of their business. In addition to carry- 
ing a large and well selected line of undertaker's supplies they have the finest 
and most complete chapel east of the Rocky mountains. It is' most artistically 
and fittingly e(|uipped. It contains an organ, jiulpit. pews and at the sides are 
elegantly appointed retiring and rest rooms, fully supplied with toilet necessities 
for mourners. They have also erected brick stables for the housing of their 
horses and hearses and they have the finest private ambulance in Peoria. Air. 
Oleary remains as manager as well as partner in the business and largely has 
control, for Air. Ziegler is often out of town. He has found a business in 
which he is meeting with substantial and gratifying success and since enter- 
ing into active connection therewith he has gradually worked his wav upward. 
On the 1 2th of December, 1895, Air. Oleary was united in marriage in \'ir- 
ginia, Illinois, to Aliss Ida Alay Allen, a daughter of Henry and Lillv (Dingier) 
.Allen, both the parents having passed away. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Alasons and that he has attained high rank in the order is indicated by the 
fact that he is now a member of the Mystic Shrine. He also has membership 
relations with the Eastern Star, the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Court of Honor, and he belongs to the Creve Coeur Club. The storv of his life 
is the story of honesty, industry and thrift, and he is now prominent as a 
man whose constantly expanding powers have taken him from humble surround- 
ings to the field of large enterprise and continuously broadening ojjportunities. 



JOHN J. McDonald. 

An age of intense commercial and industrial activity calls forth the powers 
of men who can grapple with new conditions and utilize the opportunities that 
come with the changes. A man of well balanced activities and powers, John J. 
AIcDonald occupies a creditable position today on the stage of action in Peoria. 
Almost from the time when he made his initial efl:'ort in the business world he 
has steadily advanced and his labors have found culmination in the extensive 
interests and activities of the AlcDonald-Brady Contracting Company of which 
he is the president. He has been engaged in the contracting business in Peoria 
for a quarter of a century although the present firm was not organized until 1906. 
His birth occurred in New \'ork city, Alay 22, 1853, his parents being Alex- 
ander and Ellen (Connelly) AIcDonald, both of whom were natives of Ire- 
land. The father was a contrator and builder of New York city where he died 
during the boyhood days of his son, John. The latter was reared in the eastern 
metropolis and there learned the bricklayer's and mason's trades, completing 
a regular apprenticeship and becoming a competent and expert workman. For 
several years he traveled all over the United States and Central America, visit- 
ing nearly every city of imijortance and working at his trade in all those difl^er- 
ent places. He arrived in Peoria in 1881 and for five years continued to follow 
his trade in the employ of others but, feeling that he was competent to engage in 
business on his own account and that the hour was ripe for his initial move in 
that direction, he announced himself as a contractor in 1886 and was not long 
in winning a liberal share of the public i^atronage as he demonstrated his fitness 
for the work. He continued to conduct an independent contracting business 



330 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

until 1906 when he became one of the organizers of the AIcDonald-Brady Con- 
tracting Company of which he was chosen the President. The other officers 
of the company are John P. Brady, vice president, and WilHam Fuener, secretary 
and treasurer. They have their offices at No. 2029 South Adams street and their 
building operations have extended to all parts of the city. The firm is today 
one of the foremost in contracting circles in Peoria. Among the large buildings 
erected by Mr. McDonald during the quarter of a century in which he has been 
identified with the business affairs in Peoria as a building contractor may be 
mentioned the public library, the Great Western distillery, the Corning & Com- 
pany distillery, the building of the Clark-Smith Hardware Company, the build- 
ing of the Wilson Wholesale Grocery Company, St. Boniface Catholic church, 
the St. Joseph's home, the Home of the Good Shepherd and many other impor- 
tant structures. He is now engaged in building the convent of the Immaculate 
Conception. A recital of the list of these buildings is sufficient to indicate the 
extent and importance of the work in which Air, McDonald is engaged and his 
high standing as a contractor. 

In 1880 j\Ir. AIcDonald married Mary AI. Sullivan of LaFayette, Indiana, 
who died on January 23, 1907, and on November 28, 1909, Air. McDonald was 
married to Aliss Elizabeth Murphy, of Peoria, and they now reside at No. 
2909 Western avenue. They are both members of St. Alark's Roman Catholic 
church, to the support of which they are generous contributors. Air. AIcDon- 
ald has always taken an active interest in politics and for ten years served as 
alderman of the city, representing the eighth ward. He also served for one term 
as city treasurer, having been elected on the democratic ticket. Duty and honor 
have been his watchwords and justice is one of his strong characteristics. 



HON. LESLIE ROBISON. 

A retired capitalist, a political leader, progressive and representative busi- 
ness man and a humanitarian — all these represent in major part the activities 
which have claimed the time and energies of Hon. Leslie Robison, a gentleman 
of the old school, honored wherever known and most of all where he is best 
known. He has passed the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey. An un- 
tarnished reputation and a dignified personality have established him high in 
public regard. A forceful character has enabled him to leave a deep impress 
upon the state and his public spirit has ever made his influence a factor for im- 
provement and progress. There are few, if any, in Peoria who have more inti- 
mate knowledge of the city and its history or who have done more to direct 
its affairs for the benefit of the community at large. 

Leslie Robison was born in Detroit, Alichigan, August 8, 1834, his parents 
being James and Isabella (Leslie) Robison, who came to America from Aber- 
deenshire, Scotland, settling first at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, whence a removal 
was afterward made to Detroit. In 1837 they came to Illinois and the family 
home was established at what is now the village of Leslie, in Elm Grove town- 
ship, Tazewell county, and with the removal of the family to this state Leslie 
Robison entered upon a period of close connection with its development and 
progress, bringing him eventually to the honored position which he occupies 
as one of the foremost citizens of Peoria. He attended the common schools 
of Leslie and afterward continued his education in Tremont, Tazewell county. 
He next entered Knox College at Galesburg and with the completion of his 
preparatory course became a student at Yale University, from which he was 
graduated in 185S on the completion of a classical course. Following his return 
to Peoria he entered upon the study of law and was admitted to the bar at 
Springfield on the 6th of January, i860. He was introduced to the court by Abra- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY S31 

ham Lincoln, an honor which he highly appreciated. The two were friends 
and Mr. Roliison remains as one of the few who had close personal acquaint- 
ance with the president. Following his admission to the bar he entered upon 
active practice in which he continued successfully for twenty years, when large 
business interests compelled him to withdraw from active connection with the 
legal profession. His knowledge of law, however, has proved of inestimable 
value to him in the conduct of private interests. His father-in-law. Colonel 
Charles Ballance, was the owner of large tracts of land in Peoria city and county 
but became involved in financial and legal difficulties. ^Ir. Robison then took 
charge of all his aftairs and handled the property in such a manner that when 
Colonel Ballance died he was again well established in a material way, his hold- 
ings having been cleared from all incumbrance, owing to the sound judgment 
and business ability of Mr. Robison. 

Mr. Robison was first married January 7, 1864, in Peoria, to Miss Julia 
P>allance, and they became the parents of three children. Charles Webb, Leslie 
and Willis B., but only the first named is now living. The mother died May 
12, 1871, and on the 27th of June, 1872, Mr. Robison married Miss Elizabeth 
Rutherford, a daughter of William and Isabella Rutherford, of Peoria. Mr. 
Robison's home at No. 119 Flora avenue is a beautiful residence, attractively 
and tastefully furnished and pervaded with an air of hospitality and good 
cheer that makes.it a center of interest to his many friends. Aside from the 
important professional and business interests which Mr. Robison has managed 
he has taken active and helpful part in public affairs. In 1875 he was elected 
mavor of Peoria and the following year entered the office for a two years' 
term. He guided the destinies of the city with a firm hand, prompted by 
public-spirited devotion to the general good, and under his administration Peoria 
forged far ahead along various lines. For a (|uarter of a century he was director 
of the Peoria Gas Light & Coke Company and for five years was its president. 
He has also been a director of Xicol, Burr & Company, foundrymen and machin- 
ists, since 1882, and for several years has been president and one of the directors 
of the Peoria General Electric Company. From 1891 until a recent date he 
was president and director of the Gipps Brewing Company but has retired from 
that connection. He is now most comfortably situated in life, having attained 
a gratifying measure of wealth as the result of his judicious investments and 
the careful management of his business interests. Fie has ever been alert to 
the city's iiUerests and has cooperated readily in measures for the general good. 
Xo man has done more for the solid and substantial upbuilding of Peoria or is 
more thoroughly informed concerning" the events which have shaped its history. 
A courteous, kindly, dignified gentleman of the old school, he deserves in high 
measure the esteem and regard which are uniformly tendered him. He talks 
most interestingly of his acquaintance with Lincoln and other prominent men of 
the state, and his reminiscences of the early days constitute an attractive fea- 
ture of life in Peoria from its pioneer period to the present. 



^•TCTOR PAUL MICHEL. 

\'ictor Paul Michel, deputy county sheriff' and salesman for the Johnson 
Cigar Company, was born .\pril 29, 1887, in Peoria, and is therefore one of the 
younger business men. His years, however, seem no bar to his ability for he 
is rapidly forging to the front in various connections, being particularly promi- 
nent in athletic circles as well as a representative of commercial and political 
interests. His father, Leon Michel, was born in France and became a grocery- 
man at Peoria, where he died about fifteen years ago. The mother is still living 
in this city. 



332 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

\'ictor Paul Michel was a pupil in the public schools of Averyville, Illinois, 
and later he pursued his studies in tlie Galesburg Greeley school of Peoria. In 
fact he is practically a Peoria product in every way, standing as an excellent 
example of the opportunities here offered and of what may be accomplished 
when energ}-, capability and ambition lead the way. After his graduation from 
the Greeley school he went west to Portland, Oregon, where he remained for a 
year and then returned to Peoria. He was afterward made keeper of the 
joliet penitentiary and following his retirement from that position was ap- 
pointed deputy sheriff' of Peoria county, which office he continues to fill. He 
also has business connections as city salesman for the Johnson Cigar Company 
and is building up a large trade in that connection. 

No one need question Mr. MicheFs political position. He stands unequi- 
vocally for republican principles and is a recognized force among the young 
men of his party. He is also very prominent in city athletics, being a recog- 
nized leader among those who are interested in the chief athletic activities of 
the day. For eleven years he has been at the head of local athletics, especially 
football and bowling. He is now president of the Social Athletic Club and for 
eight years has been manager of its football team. His popularity is due not 
only to his personal skill but also to the feeling of fair play which he ever mani- 
fests, demanding at all times that the '"rules of the game" be observed. He 
belongs to that class of young men who are accomplishing things whether in the 
field of pleasure, of business or of public duty, and the results achieved are ever 
of a practical and progressive character. 



CHARLES A. HOPPIN. 

As a city grows the number of its business representatives naturally constantly 
increases, but here as elsewhere the rule of the world holds good that it is the 
men of ambition, energy and determination who advance to the front and become 
leaders in their particular lines. The Peoria Gas & Electric Company has asso- 
ciated with it a number of thoroughly competent men, who are capable of hand- 
ling the business in its various departments, and as one of these Charles A. 
Hoppin was chosen, being assigned to the position of general superintendent of 
the electric and heating departments. He has been associated with the company 
since 1907, entering its employ as chief engineer at the electric station, where he 
remained for three years, when he was called to his present office. He was born 
in La Crosse, \Msconsin, April 13, 1878, and pursued his education in the schools 
of Aurora, Illinois, to which place his parents removed, when in his- youthful 
days. Entering the high school he was graduated therefrom in 1897 and subse- 
quently he became a student in the Illinois L'niversity, for he wished to gain that 
thorough technical training which would fit him to advance beyond the 
point of mediocrity in the business world and make for himself a creditable 
place and name. He completed his .university course by graduation in 1901. 
when the degrees of Bachelor of Science and ^lechanical Engineer were con- 
ferred upon him. He then entered the employ of the Allis-Chalmers Company 
as erecting engineer, subsecjuently represented that company in Milwaukee and 
afterward became assistant engineer for the same corporation in New York city. 
On leaving the eastern metropolis he made his way to Peoria, where, as prev- 
iously stated, he has resided since 1907. Here he has won advancement in con- 
nection with the Peoria Gas & Electric Company until he now occupies a posi- 
tion of large responsibility as general superintendent of the electric and heating 
departments. He has full charge of both departments, a fact which is indicative 
of the confidence reposed in him by the corporation and the ability which he 
displays in the discharge of his duties. 




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HISTORY OF PEORIA COUXTY 335 

In 11)05 Air. llojipiii was united in marriage to Miss Jessie C. Cramer, of 
Champaign. Illimiis. and unto them have been born two children, Bessie Cramer 
and Charles Albert. Jr. Mr. Hoppin is well known in Masonic circles, having 
l)ecome a Knight Templar Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He be- 
longs to the University of Illinois Alumni Club of Peoria, the Creve Coeur Club 
and the Transportation Club. He is also a member of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. He is popular amon.g his friends, having the attractive 
social qualities which gain high regard. He is ambitious, resolute and energetic 
and whatever he undertakes, whether in business or other connections, is carried 
forward to successful completion. 



CLARENCE E. CASE. 



Twelve years have passed since Clarence E. Case was called to his final 
rest, and yet he is well remembered by his many friends because of the genu- 
ine worth of his character. He was a man of exceptionally good habits, his life 
being actuated by high and honorable principles, and, while he never sought to 
figure prominently in any public connection, those with whom he was daily 
thrown in contact entertained for him the warmest personal regard. He was born 
March 21, 185 1, in Medina township, Peoria county, not far from Alta, his par- 
ents being Imri and Salina Case, both of whom were natives of New York, Re- 
moving westward, they became early residents of Illinois and the father was 
numbered among the prominent and well-to-do farmers of this county, year 
after year carrying on the work of the farm in a manner that brought sub- 
stantial returns. His wife died during the infancy of their son, Clarence, but 
the boy remained upon the home farm with his father, spending his youthful 
days in the acquirement of an education and in the work of the fields. After 
attending the district schools at .Alta and thus mastering the elementary branches 
of learning he came to Peoria, where he entered the high school. When his 
education was com])leted he returned to Alta and assisted his father on the 
farin for several years, his labors proving an important element in the success- 
ful conduct and management of the property. He did not wish to engage in 
agricultural pursuits thoughout his entire life, however, and left the parental 
roof to learn telegraphy, w-hich he readily mastered, and for eighteen years he 
had charge of the railroad office at Alta. He proved a most capable, efficient 
and accommodating representative of the road at that place and had the good 
will of all who had business dealings with him. On the 17th of April, 1903, he 
gave up active work and removed to Peoria, after which he lived retired. 

On the first of January, 1873, Mr. Case was united in marriage to Miss 
Julia P.. Schneby. who was born in Peoria, April 2. 1852, and is a daughter of 
("leorge W. and Margaret (McVay) Schneby, both of whom were natives of 
Pennsylvania, w^hence they removed westward to Illinois, becoming early settlers 
of Peoria. The father was an honored pioneer here and engaged in merchandis- 
ing, being numbered among the leading factors in commercial circles here in 
pioneer times. He also served as government ganger for many years and had 
a wide ac(|uaintancc throughout the county, L^nto Mr. and Mrs. Case were 
born three children: Marsraret S., who was born October i, 1874, and died De- 
cember 9, 1874: Georgia I., who was born November 20, 1880, and died July 23, 
1897: and Harry Clarence, who was born April 14, 1876, and is the only sur- 
vivor of the family. He married Blanche L Johnston, and they lost their only 
child, Clarence. Jr., on the 29th of .April, tqit. The son, Harry Clarence, resides 
with his mother. 

Air. Case gave his political allegiance in early life to the democratic party 

and afterward advocated rejuiblican principles. At local elections, howevet", 
vni. n— 1 « 



336 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

he generally voted regardless of party ties, casting his ballot for the candidate 
whom he considered best qualified for office. He attended the Methodist church 
while a resident of Alta and after coming to Peoria attended the services of the 
First Congregational church. He held membership with the Masons and the 
Knights of Pythias and was loyal to the beneficent purposes and teachings of 
both orders. He was a man of genial, kindly spirit, who possessed a love for 
all mankind. His habits were exceptionally good and he never used intoxicants 
or tobacco and held to the highest standards of morality. He was a lover of out- 
door life and also very fond of reading, spending many happy hours among 
his books. Those in need found him most charitable, none ever being turned 
awav emptv-handed who appealed to him for aid. It has been said: "Not the 
good that comes to us but the good that comes to the world through us is the 
measure of our success," and judged in this way, Clarence E. Case was a most suc- 
cessful man. 



LINCOLN D. FOREMAN, 'SI. D. 

Through the greater part of his professional career Dr. Lincoln D. Foreman 
was a resident of Peoria, and the faithful and conscientious performance of his 
professional duties gained him high rank among the leading and successful phy- , 
sicians and surgeons of the city. He was born in Pike county, Illinois, February 
26, 1 86 1, and his life span covered the intervening years to the 9th of February, 
191 1 — almost half a century. His parents were James W. and Jennie (Norton) 
Foreman, both of whom were natives of Ohio but became early residents of 
Illinois, with the development and progress of which they were closely associated 
in the district in which they lived. The father devoted his life to farming and 
as his financial resources increased he added to his property until his landed 
holdings were extensive. 

At the usual age Dr. Foreman entered the public schools of his native county 
and therein laid the foundation for his professional knowledge. He attended 
the St. Louis Medical College of St. Louis, Alissouri, and also obtained his 
first practical experience in the profession in that city. From the outset his labors 
proved congenial and he displayed special aptitude in his studies and in the 
application of his theoretical knowledge to the special needs of his patients. 
He afterward went to Greene county, Illinois, where he continued in practice 
for four years, and then removed to Waverly, this state, where he followed 
his profession for ten years. Wishing to secure the broader opportunities of- 
fered in the city, however, he then came to Peoria, where he practiced with 
success until his death. His reading was broad, his researches deep and his 
methods were at all times practical and resultant. He was very conscientious 
as well as capable in the discharge of his professional duties and was seldom, if 
ever, at fault in diagnosing a case. He belonged to the State Medical Society 
and was well known to the profession, at all times enjoying the high regard 
of his fellow physicians and surgeons throughout the state. 

Dr. Foreman was pleasantly situated in his home life, having been happily 
married on the ist of March, 1884, to Miss Margaret \'an Sueringen, a daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Augusta (Aldrich) \'an Sueringen. The mother was born 
in Pike county, Illinois, in 1843, and was a daughter of D. J. Aldrich, a de- 
scendant of the old and distinguished Aldrich family of Massachusetts. He re- 
moved from the old Bay state to Illinois, traveling overland in the '30s and 
casting in his lot with the pioneer residents of this state. Mrs. Foreman is 
also a descendant of Garrett Van Sueringen, who figured in the early history of j 
the Empire state when it was ruled by the Dutch. Dr. and Mrs. Foreman were 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 337 

the parents of three children: Ethel and Lucille, who are now in school; and 
Lemuel R., deceased. 

In early life Dr. P"orenian was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal church. He 
never felt bound by creed or dogma, however, his sympathies reaching out along 
broad humanitarian lines to all mankind. In his life he exemplified the beneficent 
spirit of the Masonic fraternity, in which he attained the Knight Templar degree. 
He was also connected with the Modern Woodmen of America and his political 
allegiance was given to the rejiublican party. He was a lover of nature and all 
outdoor life and the hours which he spent "in communion with her visible forms" 
qualified him in large measure for the arduous duties which devolved upon him 
in his professional career. He was always a broad reader and possessed a studious 
nature that enabled him to delve below the surface of things and reach down to 
the very root of the matter. In manner he was entirely free from ostentation 
and display, but his true worth of character found recognition, as was attested 
by the warm friendship accorded him. 



CHARLES P. WATSON. 

Charles P. Watson, official reporter for the circuit court of Peoria county 
since the ist of July, 1887, was born September 21, 1851, in Tecumseh, Michi- 
gan, his parents being Cyrus L. and Elizabeth H. Watson. The father, born in 
1800. died in 1882, and the mother, born in 1813, passed away in 1907, both at- 
taining a very advanced age. 

Following the completion of his public-school education Charles P. Wat- 
son took up the study of shorthand with the purpose in view of becoming a court 
stenographer. He began reporting in the courts of Peoria in November, 1871, 
and was thus engaged until January. 1877, when he removed to Indianapolis. 
He was in Washington, D. C, from 1883 until 1887, as clerk of the senate com- 
mittee on territories, but in ^larch of the latter year returned to Peoria and on 
the 1st of July following was appointed official reporter of the circuit court of 
Peoria county. W'hat higher testimonial could be given than the fact that for a 
quarter of a century he has occupied this position ? Accurate, systematic, me- 
thodical, prompt and obliging, he has the high regard of the court and members 
of the bar and of all with whom his official duties bring him in contact. 

On the isth of October, 187CJ, Mr. Watson was united in marriage to Miss 
Ella H. Adams, a daughter of George F. and Rebecca Adams, of Indianapolis, 
Indiana. The two children of this marriage are: (Seorge A., who was born Sep- 
tember 3. 1880; and Charles L., born January 12, 1882. The latter was mar- 
ried in May, 1909, to ^liss Nancy Wolcott, of Indianapolis, Indiana. Mr. Wat- 
son is a member of Peoria Lodge, No. 230, K. P., and has been identified with 
the order since 1875. He also belongs to Lodge No. 20, of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He has a wide acquaintance among business and profes- 
sional men of this city and everywhere he is highly esteemed because of his per- 
sonal traits of character are such as command confidence and warm regard. 



SOLOMON BENNETT. 



In eastern Illinois few men were better known and none were held in higher 
regard than Solomon Bennett because his salient traits of character were such as 
awakened admiration and commanded respect. He was at one time proprietor 
of the only wholesale clothing establishment conducted in central Illinois, and 
for a long period he was extensively connected with the wool trade through- 



338 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

out the southwest. He was one of the worthy citizens that Germany furnished 
to Peoria, his birth having occurred in the fatherland April 15, 1842. His par- 
ents were Israel and Gertrude Bennett. The father, on crossing the Atlantic 
to the new world, settled in Buflalo, New York, the mother's death having pre- 
viously occurred. Solomon Bennett accompanied his father to America and pur- 
sued his education in the schools of Buiifalo where he remained for about si.x 
years. He was a youth of sixteen years when, in 1858, he came to Peoria and 
later embarked in business here as a dealer in clothing. His stock was small 
but his enterprising business methods and reliability won him favorable recog- 
nition and his trade constantly grew. Along safe, substantial lines he built up 
the business, and e^'e^tually developed a small retail store into a large wholesale 
clothing establishment with ramifying trade interests reaching over extensive 
territory. His was the only wholesale clothing house ever conducted in Peoria, 
and for many years it figured as a prominent feature in the business circles of 
the city. Mr. Bennett also became extensively engaged in the wool industry in 
the southwest, his business activities in that connection being represented by a 
large factory. 

About 1890 he retired from active life and lived quietly in his home in 
Peoria from tiiat time until his death, employing his leisure in the pursuit of those 
things which contributed to his interests and happiness. 

On the 27th of January, 1869, Mr. Bennett was united in marriage to Miss 
Delia Fridenberg, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and unto them were born two 
children: Charles AI., who is a real-estate dealer and well known business man 
of Peoria; and Gertrude, who is the wife of H. T. Bloom and the mother of three 
children : Delia, Sarah and Clara Gertrude. 

Mr. Bennett was a broad-minded man who never measured life by the inch 
rule of self but sought to view the world from the standpoint of public opin- 
ion. Each vital question he carefully considered, whether it related to the in- 
dividual or the community at large. He was a great admirer of Robert G. Inger- 
soll. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he served 
as a member of the board of supervisors at the time the courthouse was built. 
His public duties were ever discharged in a most capable, prompt and faithful 
manner, and he ever kept well informed on the leading questions and issues of 
the day relative to local progress and to the welfare of the nation at large. He 
held membership in the Jewish Temple, also with the Order of B'Nai Brith and 
in the Royal Arcanum and the ^Modern Woodmen of .America. He was a man 
of marked individuality and left the impress of his charcter and ability upon all 
with whom he came in contact. He never sought to figure in any spectacular 
life but preferred a quiet and unassuming life with the companionship of family 
and friends who ever found him a most congenial, hospitable host. He died May 
5, 1902, at the age of sixty years, and the consensus of public opinion is that 
he had used his time wisely and well and that his work had constituted an ele- 
ment in Peoria's progress and advancement. 



JOHN T. POLAND. 



John T. Boland is the active member in the firm of Daniel Boland & Son, of 
this city, one of the oldest and best known undertaking establishments in Peoria. 
He inherited the business from his father, Daniel Boland, and has been engaged 
in it since he left school and has given his time and attention from an early age 
to making himself thoroughly capable and efficient in his chosen line of activity. 
John T. Boland is the son of Daniel and Catherine Boland. His father was a 
native of Ireland, born in County Tipperary. \\'hen he was seventeen years of 
age he left Ireland, and made his way to Liverpool, where he took passage on a 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 339 

sailing vessel bound for America and landed in Philadelphia after having been 
twenty-three days on the voyage. Daniel Boland came immediately to Camden 
county. New Jersey, and engaged in farming there until 1858, when he removed 
to a farm at Jacksonville. Illinois, where he remained for three years. In 1861, 
he came to Peoria and became connected with the street railway company until 
1872, when he was made a member of the Peoria police force, and served for four 
years, resigning to open an undertaking parlor which he conducted successfully 
up to the time of his death when the business reverted to his son, John T. Boland, 
who is the present owner. 

Since the death of his father, John T. I'.oland has given his entire time and 
attention to his business. He has thoroughly mastered its details, and he al- 
lows no modern methods and innovations making for further efficiency to escape 
his notice. He keeps his knowledge up to date, and as a consequence his repu- 
tation in Peoria is of the highest. His present shop is located at 124 North Adams 
street, and is recognized as one of the leading establishments of its kind in the 
citv. John T. Boland is well known in Peoria as a public spirited and loyal citi- 
zen. 



MAXUAI. TRAINING HIGH SCHOOL OF PEORIA. 

The Manual Training High School was organized in September, 1909. The 
building ranks among the first in the United States in well-lighted rooms, well 
e(|uipped shops, laboratories, commercial department, cooking and sewing depart- 
ments for modern high school work. The attendance the first year was one 
hundred and seventy-nine, the second year two hundred and seventy-one, and the 
third year three hundred and seventy-eight. Full credit was given each depart- 
ment at the State University at the close of the second year, giving its gradu- 
ates the same standing at colleges and universities as is given to graduates from 
the best high schools of Illinois. The first class of graduates numbered seven and 
the second class in June, 1912, numbered twenty-nine. 

The plan of the building and aims of the school are in accord with the pres- 
ent high-school movement, that is extending equal advantages to all boys and 
girls. 

In every large city a large number of students go to work direct from the 
high school, and it has been ascertained that sixty per cent of those who do not 
go to high school are financially able to go, and would go, if in the judgment 
of their parents the education oiifered was worth while. In order to aid those 
who are going to work direct from the school and to help stop the early with- 
drawal of so many boys and girls from school, new types of high schools are 
organized, and among these new types is one known as the complete high school. 
This kind of high school has five courses, namely : the commercial course, the 
industrial course, the agriculture course, academic course, and domestic science 
and art course. These courses are equal or equivalent, one being better than 
another only as a student finds his ability along one course more than an- 
other. These five courses give the fundamental education for every occupation, 
trade and profession. This type of high school is one of the latest efiforts to 
equalize conditions in which boys and girls start into their life w-ork. 

The name of one dc[)artment, ]\IanuaI Training, has been made to cover the 
whole school, and emphasizes the change in the nature of education. Practice 
work at school is essential as book work. 

The one noticeable thing above all else, is the increased attention that must 
be given to studying the boy and finding the right course for him on entering high 
school. One of the results is, it gives more boys and girls a purpose in coming to 
high school. More boys and girls make going to high school a business and at- 
tend to it. 



340 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Instructors of 1911-1912. 

W. N. Brown, principal. 

Clara E. Barclay, algebra, geometry. 

F. W. Bennet, Latin, French, English. 

J. H. Blackman, manual training. 

Florence L. Ebaugh, English. 

Florence Cutright, algebra. 

Edna L. Earnest, English. 

W. \\'. Gorsline, geometry, algebra, surveying. 

W. F. Henning, physics and chemistry. 

D. C. Hilling, head of commercial department. 

F. C. Keeler, history, civics, economics. 
Anna A. Kellogg, German. 

Lena A. Kemp, typewriting. 
Charles G. Mason, history, English. 
A. C. Miller, biology. 
Elizabeth Persinger, shorthand. 
William Peters, manual training. 
Alice M. Otman, English. 

G. R. Spraker, commercial arithmetic, bookkeeping. 
*Minnie JNI. Peterson, supervisor, sewing. 
*Bertha Case, supervisor, cooking. 

Hazel Marcy, sewing. 

*A. P. Laughlin, supervisor, manual training. 

*Carl Graner, supervisor of physical culture. 

♦Florence Stackhouse, assistant of physical culture. 

*Clara Dailey, supervisor of music. 

Joanna M. Irish, secretary and librarian. 

*Part time. 

Alumni Association. 

In June 191 1, the alumni association was formed with Walter Stephenson as 
president. 



HON. NICHOLAS E. WORTHINGTON. 

Hon. Nicholas E. Worthington, judge of the circuit court at Peoria, is of 
English extraction, the entire Worthington family in America being descended 
from two brothers, one of whom settled in New England, and the other in 
Alaryland. His father, the Rev. G. J. Worthington. was a minister of the Aleth- 
odist Episcopal church. Born in Maryland, he resided at dififerent times in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and \'irginia, devoting his entire life to the work of the 
church. He wedded Mary I. Hedges and they became the parents of two sons 
and four daughters. 

Nicholas E. \\'orthington was born iMarch 30, 1836, in Brooks county. West 
Virginia. He accompanied his parents on their various removals according to 
the itinerant custom of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal ministry, residing at different 
times in Allegheny City, in Pittsburg and at Clarksburg, \'irginia. In the last 
named he attended college and later matriculated in Allegheny College at Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated with the class of 1854, winning 
first honors in that year. He afterward engaged in teaching in an academy at 
Clarksburg, A'irginia. and then entered the law office of ^^^aitman T. Willett. In 
1856 he came to Illinois and began teaching in Tremont, Tazewell county, and 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 341 

was appointed county superintendent of scliools. He retired from the teacher's 
profession to enter upon the active practice of law in I'eoria and has since 
been identified with the bar. 

Judge Wortliington has always been more or less actively identified with 
educational interests. For four years lie was a member of the board of public 
instruction. In 1872 he was a candidate for congress and in 1882 was again 
the nominee of his party, being elected a representative of his district in the 
national halls of legislation. At the close of his first term he was reelected 
and after four years' congressional service returned to Peoria to resume the 
practice of law. Soon afterward he was elected judge of the circuit court and 
is still U])on the bench, being now dean of the judiciary of Peoria. President 
Cleveland named him as a member of the commission to settle the famous rail- 
road strike in Chicago, on w'hich occasion the president aroused the opposition 
of Governor Altgeld, who objected to the United States troops being sent to 
Illinois. Judge Worthington served with distinction as one of the arbitrators 
at that critical period and on other occasions, perhaps of a less public character, 
his opinions have carried weight in political councils. 

In 1836 Judge Worthington married Miss Sarah Fowkcs, a daughter of 
Colonel Richard Fowkes, of West Mrginia, and they have three children, Louis 
B., Nellie and Frank E., the last named l)eing a resident of the west. 



PROFESSOR ALFRED WADLEIGH BEASLEY. 

Professor Alfred Wadleigh Beasley, principal of the Central high school 
of Peoria, was born in Ripley, Ohio, March 27, 1853, a son of Nathaniel K. 
and Susan H. (Wadleigh) Beasley. The father was born in Decatur, Ohio, 
April 4, 1828, and the mother's birth occurred in Oxford, Ohio, September 
22, 1830. The former was a son of Alfred and Margaret ( Kirker ) 
Beasley, who were natives of Ohio, and Alfred Beasley was a son of Nathaniel 
and Sarah (Sutton) Beasley, natives of \'irginia. The great-grandparents of 
Professor Beasley in the maternal line w^ere John and Susan Wadleigh, natives 
of Scotland. Their son, Thomas Jefferson Wadleigh, was born in Watertown, 
New York, and married Sophia Easton, a native of Oxford, Ohio. 

The removal of the family from the Buckeye state to Peoria during the 
early boyhood of Professor Beasley enabled him to pursue his education in the 
schools of this city and in 1870 he was graduated from the high school. He 
then entered Dartmouth College and upon his graduation four years later 
ranked first in his class in mathematics and fourth in general standing. During 
the succeeding four years he was connected with the firms of Beasley Brothers 
and Steele Brothers in the saddlery and hardware business, and in 1878 he 
began teaching in an ungraded school in South Peoria. A year later he was 
transferred to the Peoria high school as instructor in mathematics and sciences 
and later was made principal of the old Franklin school. He was subsequently 
appointed principal of the Peoria high school, which position he still continues 
to fill. For twenty-five years he has been at the head of this school and he is 
recognized as one of the prominent educators of the west, his service being fre- 
quently sought in connection with educational conventions, before which he has 
delivered many addresses. He stands as one of those whose study of pedagogy 
in its broadest sense has resulted in marked improvement in methods of teach- 
ing; his zeal and interest in the work are unabating and he inspires teachers and 
pupils under him with much of his own interest. His ideals are very high and 
he stands for that real progressiveness which recognizes that which is of value in 
the past while laboring for advancement in the future. 



342 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

On the 29th of Xovcniber, 1876, Professor Beasley was married to Miss Mary 
Ramsay, who was born June 6, 1856. They became parents of four children: 
Robert K., who is now deceased; Frederick E. ; Alfred F. ; and Jules de La- 
barthe. Professor Beasley is a Congregationalist in religious faith. He has 
always recognized the fact that there should be an even balance between the 
physical, intellectual and moral progress and in his teaching he has endeavored 
to stimulate an interest in each that would lead to direct and beneficial results. 



PETER A. WEAST. 



If one were called upon to name a typical business man of Peoria better 
selection could not be made than by naming Peter A. Weast. He stands fore- 
most among those whose sound judgment and enterprise have led to success 
and he is today familiar to all Peoria citizens as one of the most successful real- 
estate dealers' here. Yet he is more than a business man ; his interests are 
broad and varied and all those things which draw the traveler abroad — the works 
of art and the points of historic and modern interest — claim his attention and 
keep him in touch with the world's thought and work. 

Mr. Weast is a native of Peoria, Illinois, born on April 5, 1848. Early hi 
life he began his investments in realty, holding property until it advanced in 
price and when he was able to sell it at a good figure he still invested the re- 
turns in real estate and is today rated as one of the most wealthy of Peoria 
citizens. It is his advice always to make investment in property rather than 
along other lines, and he has proven his faith in Peoria by making his investnients 
here. He has owned some of the most valuable properties on South Jefferson 
avenue and on Fulton street. Whenever he has had a chance to sell advanta- 
geously he has done so, but a sale has usually been almost immediately followed 
by the purchase of adjacent property. 

Air. Weast was married August 16, 1887, to Miss Jennie Grunden, and they 
have a daughter, Maud, now Mrs. Claude Wallin. The home of Air. \\'east is a 
splendid residence, built in an attractive style of architecture and supplied in the 
way of furnishings with all that wealth can secure and refined taste can suggest. 
He takes his pleasure largely in fine horses and in good automobiles, of which 
he owns a number, and his wife and daughter are also skillful horsewomen. 
They all enjoy travel and have made a number of trips abroad, hunting out 
quaint, out-of-the-way places or sojourning in the cities as their desires of the 
moment dictate. While Mr. Weast has gained large wealth through his real- 
estate operations he has been generous in assisting others, especially the young 
man who is trying to make a start, and he has also given freely of his means 
to charitable projects. 



• FRANK T. MILLER. 

The life record of Frank T. Alillcr is another indication of the fact that 
it is only under the pressure of adversity and the stimulus of necessity that 
the strongest and best in man are brought out and developed. Hampered by 
lack of early opportunities, Mr. Miller resolved that he would advance despite 
all this and the consensus of public opinion places him today among Peoria's 
capable and foremost lawvers. He was born in Muehlheim, near Cologne, in 
the Rhine Province, Germany, January i, 1873, his parents being Theodore D. 
and Clara A. Miller, who were also natives of the same province. He was nine 
and a half vears of age when his parents, in July, 1882, came to America, bring- 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 343 

ing with them tlu-ir family of six children to whom li\e mure were added in 
this countr\-. The father was a carpenter and when he worked steadily at his 
trade earned about fifty dollars per month. According to the laws of his native 
country he w'as forced to render military service in the German army and had 
been on active duty during the I<>anco- Prussian war. When the family arrived 
in America they had absolutely nothing in the way of money or furniture or 
the barest neccessities of life. Not one of the household could speak a word 
of English and Frank Miller says that it has ever remained a puzzle to him 
how the family obtained a start. He himself often experienced unfair treat- 
ment at the hands of the boys of the neighborhood, his inability to understand 
English bringing upon him many a knockdown blow from a boy who wished 
to try his strength, before Mr. Miller knew w^hat was wanted. He had had 
three years' training in the schools of Germany and was sent to school in this 
country, spending three years in the ward schools in Champaign and Blooming- 
ton, but when twelve years of age he was forced to put aside his text-books and 
provide for his own support. He secured a situation in a drug store, washing 
windows, bottles, floors, etc., working twelve hours per day, for which a dollar 
and a quarter was paid into the family fund each week. By the time he was 
fourteen he was earning two dollars a w-eek in a dry-goods store. Realizing 
the fact that he had been taken out of school permanently he resolved to seek 
education along other lines and began selling Sunday papers, having, however, an 
understanding with his father that the money so earned should go for violin les- 
sons. Flis Sunday task proved to be a profitable one and his constant practice 
on the violin at all leisure hours won him such rapid advancement that at the 
age of sixteen years he was playing in a theater for experience. When eighteen 
years of age he was in demand as a musician and at twenty had become a recog- 
nized factor in musical circles in his home city. He had also made substantial 
advance in the stores in which he had been continuously employed but his vio- 
lin in the evenings brought him as much or more than his regular wages in the 
store. 

His earlier dreams for a higher education now began to take form and, leav- 
ing the store, he entered a law school, hoping to earn enough with the violin 
at night to meet the ex])enses of his course. He had been out of school for 
more than eight years and in consequence did not know how to study. For a 
time it was uphill work, his earlier examinations proving his incapacity in that 
direction, but at the end of two years he stood second in the class in examina- 
tions covering the entire course and drew a cash prize. The income from his 
music had steadily increased and enabled him to pursue a two years' special 
literary course, after which he spent a year in a law office. He w'on his LL.P). 
degree from the Illinois Wesleyan University in 1896 and completed his two 
years' special literary work in 1898. For twelve years he has been a resident 
of Peoria. In May, 1899, h^ opened a law ofifice with Judson Starr and on the 
1st of March, 1900, entered into a partnership with Daniel R. Sheen under the 
firm name of Sheen & Miller. When he located in Peoria he resolved to give 
up nuisic except for the pleasure of it and concentrate his efforts upon his 
law practice without any side issues, especially resolving not to become actively 
connected with politics. During the first year of his practice he made very 
slow progress and was obliged to live most economically, but his determination 
and ability won in the end and his success has far exceeded his fondest expecta- 
tions. His partnership with Mr. Sheen continued until July i. 1909, when he 
joined John S. Stevens and J. M. Elliott, in a partnership under the firm name 
of Stevens, Miller & Elliott, .succeeding W. S. Horton, who had previously been 
with them in the practice of law. The firm is today one of the strongest of the 
Peoria bar and has a large and distinctively representative clientage. As Mr. 
Miller has prospered in his undertakings he has become interested in city busi- 
ness and residence properties and is a stockholder in the Illinois National Bank. 



344 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

He is attorney for several Peoria banks and is local attorney for many railroad 
and other corporations. He was appointed public administrator of Peoria county 
by Governor Yates in 1901, was reappointed by Governor Deneen in 1905 and 
again in 1909. In politics he has ever been a stalwart republican and did active 
campaign work in 1900 and 1904. For a considerable period after entering 
upon practice, however, he did not engage actively in politics but his qualities 
of leadership and his deep interest concerning the government of city, state and 
nation have naturally forced him into more intimate and active relations with 
political affairs. 

On the 1 6th of September. 1903, in Peoria. Mr. Miller was united m mar- 
riage to Miss Lillian Bruce Morgan, a daughter of H. B. Morgan. Mrs. Miller 
is an exceptional pianist. She studied for four years in Chicago and Berlin, 
her instructors being Fannie Bloomheld Zeisler. Leopold Godowski and Xavier 
Scharwenka. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two daughters: Jeannette M., born 
in 1906; and Lillian Bruce, September 8, 191 1. Mr. and ;\irs. Miller are very 
prominent in social circles, particularly where music is a leading attraction and 
source of interest. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and 
held all the otflces in the lodge from 1901 until 1904. Since the latter year he 
has been connected with the Knights of Khorassan and has always been a 
member of the dramatic team. He likewise belongs to Schiller Lodge, F. & 
A. M., in which he is now holding office. In more strictly social and recreative 
lines he is connected with the Creve Coeur Club and the Kickapoo Golf Club. 
Never fearing to venture where favoring opportunity has led the way, never 
faltering when determination and courage could overcome difficulties and obsta- 
cles, never hesitating to make attempt to reach high ideals and to occupy a place 
of prominence, Frank T. Miller has continuously advanced since starting out 
in life on his own account at the age of twelve years, and is today numbered 
among the foremost citizens of Peoria in political, social and professional lines. 



DR. T. F. COOPER. 



I. F. Cooper, physician and surgeon, who entered upon the practice of medi- 
cine in Peoria in 1903, was born on a farm in Christian county, Kentucky, June 
21, 1853, his parents being Hugh C. and Elizabeth A. (McKenzie) Cooper, who 
were farming people of that district. L^pon the old homestead the son was 
reared, and after attending the district schools he had the advantage of academic 
instruction taking a course in LaFayette Academy in his native state. He took 
up the profession of teaching which he followed for four years in his home 
county and thus provided the funds necessary to meet the expenses of a course 
in a medical college. He entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Baltimore, Maryland, and was graduated in 1880. Immediately afterward he 
entered upon active practice, spending eighteen months in Bennettstown, Ken- 
tucky. He then came to Illinois, settling in Elmwood, Peoria county, where he 
remained in active practice for twenty-one years or until he came to the city of 
Peoria. He was successful in Elmwood and has enjoyed an even more exten- 
sive practice in Peoria for his labors have found recognition here, his fellow' 
practitioners as well as the general public acknowledging his skill and ability. 
He allows nothing to interfere with the faithful performance of his professional 
duties, and the years have brought him substantial success. 

On September 17, 1884, in Elmwood, Dr. Cooper was united in marriage 
to Miss Lois M. Brown, a daughter of E. R. Brown of that place and a former 
banker prominently known as "the sage of Elmwood." Three children were 
born to this marriage : Marilia E.. who is a graduate of Elmwood high school, 
the Bradley Polytechnic Institute and the Oberlin College of Oberlin, Ohio, and 




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HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 347 

is now a teacher in the high school of this cit\- ; Hugh II.. who is also a graduate 
of the Peoria high school, the Bradley I'olytechnic Institute and of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in the class of 191 1, while at present he is a student in the 
Rush Medical College of Chicago ; and Ruth L., who completed a course in the 
Bradley Polytechnic Institute and is now a student in the Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Evanston. 

While a resident of Elmwood Dr. Cooper served as president of the school 
board for several years, and the cause of education has ever found in him a 
warm friend and stalwart champion, as is indicated by the liberal advantages 
given his children. He was also local health officer there for several years. 
He holds memljership in the Congregational church. He belongs to the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and to the Creve Coeur Club, and his profes- 
sional connections are with the Peoria City Medical Society, the Illinois State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He has held to high 
standards in his profession, has sought public welfare in his indorsement of 
progressive pul)lic measures and at all times has endeavored to conform his 
life to those principles which make for honorable manhood. 



JOHN \\TLLIAM LITTLE. 

John William Little was known as one of the leading landowners of central 
Illinois, for as he prospered in his undertakings he placed his capital in the safest 
of all investments — real estate. He was born in Hampshire county, West Vir- 
ginia, January 13, 1832, and lacked but one day of being seventy-eight years of 
age at the time of his death on the 12th of January, 1910. His parents were 
David C. and Anna (Harrison) Little, the former a native of West Virginia 
and the latter of Devonshire, England. The paternal grandfather was George 
Little, who was born in Scotland and after coming to America wedded a Miss 
Carlyle, who was born in Pennsylvania. In the maternal line John W. Little 
rame of distinctively English ancestry, his grandfather being Robert Harrison, a 
native of Devonshire. 

In the schools of his native state John W. Little pursued his education. 
Like many another young man he felt he might have better opportunities in a 
district removed from that in which he was reared and he wisely chose Peoria 
county as the scene in his future labors, reaching the city of Peoria on the 23d 
of March, 1853. The following day he located at Princeville, in Princeville 
township, where he purchased land and began farming, successfully cultivating 
his fields which year by year yielded good harvests.. He afterward spent ten 
years in farming in Iowa, but later returned to Illinois and was closely associated 
with agricultural interests in this state until 1899, in which year he located in 
Peoria. By strict attention to business, economy and industry he added con- 
tinually to his possessions, and became in time the owner of one thousand acres 
of valuable farm land which yielded him a most gratifying annual income. In 
1899 he retired from active life save for the supervision which he gave to his 
property, his holdings comprising both town and country real estate in and near 
Princeville and Peoria. 

On the 28th of March, 1855, occurred the marriage of Mr. Little and Miss 
Harriet Harrison, a daughter of James and Susan (Evans) Harrison, who were 
natives of England, and upon coming to America became residents of Mrginia. 
Subsequently they removed westward to Peoria, and in the early period of his 
residence in this part of the state the father followed farming. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Little were born four children, of whom Susan L. and Marion are deceased. 
The others are Lillie and Henrv C, still residents of Peoria. 



348 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

In his political views Mr. Little was a democrat. He studied the questions 
and issues of the day with the purpose of casting an intelligent ballot in sup- 
port of the principles which he deemed of most value in good government, but 
he never sought nor desired office as a reward for party fealty. In Masonry he 
attained high rank, taking the thirty-second degree in the consistory and also 
becoming a member of the Mystic Shriners. He was likewise a member of the 
Odd Fellows for many years, and in his life exemplified the beneficent and help- 
ful spirit of these fraternities. In citizenship he was loyal, in friendship faith- 
ful, and in his home was a most devoted husband and father. His long life was 
an active, useful and honorable one. and- was crowned with a success which re- 
wards earnest effort, keen discrimination and judicious investment. The pleasure 
of his success largely came to him through the fact that it enabled him to provide 
liberallv for the members of his own household. 



MAX XEWMAX. 



When Max Xewman died in this city on May 8. 1906, the state of Illinois 
lost one of its pioneer residents, and the city of Peoria an upright, high-minded 
and sterling citizen and a thoroughly honest man. Max Xewman's career was 
an exemplification of those qualities of character and heart which are the founda- 
tion of our national citizenship, and he left to his family the glorious tradition 
of an upright life and an honorable career. His descendants in Peoria today 
take pride in striving to attain his standards, and to live according to his ideals. 

Max Xewman was born in the kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1834, 
and w^hile still a resident of his native land, was appointed assistant United 
States consul for that kingdom by President Pierce. He came to America in 
1856, going immediately to Chicago, where he obtained a position as bookkeeper 
in a wholesale house and remained there until 1859. when he came to Peoria and 
entered into partnership with Harry Ullman, as a jobber of cigars and tobacco. 
They organized the business under the firm name of Xewman & Ullman, under 
which name it continues today. It is one of the oldest original firms in the city, 
and is under the active management of !Mr. ^lilton G. Xewman, son of the 
subject of this sketch. It is doing an extensive and rapidly growing cigar and 
tobacco business in the Two Hundred block, South Washington street, and the 
qualities of strict business integrity, honesty and fair dealing, which were the com- 
mercial standards of the father, have been handed down in honorable tradition 
to his son. 

Max Xewman lived in America at a time when history was being made here. 
When the Civil war broke out in i860, Mr. Xewman was prevented from entering 
the service on account of his diminutive size, but his strict sense of duty and 
his loyalty to his adopted country, would not allow him to take advantage of this 
fact, and he paid a substitute eight hundred dollars to go in his place. Mr. Xew- 
man's loyal democratic political principles at that time brought him into personal 
contact with Stephen A. Douglas, and he became a warm friend of that mighty 
leader. His friendship with Robert G. Ingersoll is also a matter of record. 
Mr. Xewman remained in the democratic party until 1896, when his convictions 
changed and he voted for McKinley, having differed with his democratic brethren 
on the currency question. 

On February 21, 1864, Max Xewman was married in Peoria to Miss Rebecca 
Ullman, and to this union were born four sons and one daughter, Mr, Xew- 
man was a member of Schiller T-odge, A. F. & A. M., and was entirely in- 
terested in the affairs of the Peoria Public Library. He was also one of the 
organizers of the Cottage Hospital, now the John C. Proctor Hospital, was its 
first secretary and remained so up to the time of his death. He was a worthy 



I 



HISTORY OF TEORIA COUNTY 349 

representative of the true tvpe of an honorable and upright Jew. well \ersed 
in the history and trilnilations of his race, and living according to the customs 
and decrees of his religion. He was a member of the congregation of Anshai 
Emeth of which he wa^s an officer and a devout attendant up to the time of his 
death. He was interested in all kinds of benevolent and charitable work, and is 
remembered todav bv many of his less fortunate brethren whom he helped along. 
The record of hi's life is the story of a worthy and honorable business career. 
of a life filled with the practice of many public and private virtues, and of a 
faith in the innate honesty of the world, kept green and alive by his unbounded 
charitv, and his broad and high-minded character. 



IRA T. CO\'EY. 



Ira I. Covey, now a member of the Illinois state legislature from Peoria 
countv. 'is well known in this city as a brilliant lawyer and a rising politician. 
He is' a firm believer in republican principles and is at present beginning to be 
a power in the state as a leader in the re]3ublican party. His law offices in Peoria 
are in the Woolner Iniilding, where he carries on a general practice when his public 
duties allow him. He was born in Belvidere, Boone county. Illinois, October 
26, 1873. Three generations of Coveys have been residents of this state. The 
paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Stephen Covey, came to Illi- 
nois in 1839, and located in Boone county, where the father of Ira J. Covey 
was born. 

Our subject spent his early boyhood in Belvidere and went to the public 
schools of that city. He late'r attended the Illinois Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington. Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1893. His legal education 
was obtained under Judge Charles E. Fuller of Belvidere, Illinois, and he was 
admitted to the bar "in 1893. Later he came to Peoria, and entered upon the 
general practice of law. in'association with his brother. Frank R. Covey. In 
1901 Frank Covey retired, and the firm was reorganized, with P. E. Mann as a 
partner, under the name of Covey, Alann & Covey. This arrangement lasted 
for one year, when Mr. Mann retired and the firm again became Covey & Covey. 
Upon the election of Ira J. Covey to the legislature in 1910 George Campbell 
of Peoria entered the firm." and it became Covey. Campbell & Covey. They have 
offices in the Woolner building of this city, and are doing a flourishing business 
in all branches of law. Ever since he first entered upon active life. Ira J. Covey 
has shown a decided predilection for the duties of a political career. He is a 
stirring speaker, actively interested for tlie improvement of conditions, and can 
always be depended upon to cast his vote on the right side in a political controversy. 
He served for five vears as a member of the republican central committee for 
Peoria township, and later was active on the county and city committees. In 
.April. 1907. he was elected to the Peoria city council, of which body he was the 
recognized leader on the republican side. He served in this body until after his 
election to the legislature in igio, and has served the public in that capacity ever 
since. Ira 1. Covev is not a mere partisan politician. He is an intelligent, active 
and l)road-minded man, keenly desirous of doing his best toward the promotion 
of good and etificient government. He is a man of high ideals, and lofty prin- 
ciples, and is a practical agent of good in his chosen field of activity. In his 
career in the state legislature he has shown himself to be a man of independence, 
a tieliever in righteous causes, and as good a politician as he is a lawyer. 

On lune 27, 1899. Ira J. Covey was united in marriage to Miss .-\lta F. Lin- 
nell, and they became the i)arents of four children: Linnell. Marion. Ira J., junior 
andThirza E. Both Mr. and Mrs. Covey are well known socially in Peoria and 



350 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

are prominent members of the Union Congregational church. Mr. Covey is still 
a young man and comparatively new in political activity, but he has already 
made his presence felt in the circles in which he moves, and his political eli'orts, 
and aspirations as well as his public accomplishments have that dignity of honest 
purpose, and the commanding weight of high and unswerving independence, 
which is true statesmanship. 



HERMAN GUSTAVE TRAUTVETTER. 

Herman Gustave Trautvetter is another of those sterling citizens, which 
Germany has given to the new world. Although he himself was a native Peorian, 
his father was born in the fatherland, and brought to the new country the sturdy 
and common-sense virtues which are the foundations of the greatness of the old. 
Herman G. Trautvetter is at present head of the Peoria Collection Agency, and 
is doing a very successful business along that line, yet the great love and ambi- 
tion of his life lies in the direction of music. He is an accomplished pianist, 
and has gained a reputation through Illinois for his brilliant and original musical 
compositions. 

Herman G. Trautvetter was born in Peoria. July 22, 1873, in an old house on 
Chestnut street back of the historic old Ballance property. His father. Chris- 
tian Trautvetter was a native of Germany, and an old time Peoria pioneer. He 
was passionately fond of music, and an accomplished piano and violin player, 
attainments which he transmitted to his son. His wife. Ernestine Nitschke, 
mother of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Herman Trautvetter received his early education in the grade schools of Peoria, 
and later attended Herr Peter Iffland's school, where he obtained (|uite a repu- 
tation for his proficiency in German and mathematics. At the age of twenty- 
one, pursuing his growing ambition for a musical career, he went to Chicago, 
where for some lime he studied in Kimball Hall, showing remarkable talent upon 
the piano. It was during this period that he did most of his composing, pub- 
lishing a great number of instrumental compositions, and gaining a reputation 
throughout Illinois as a musician of rare originality and ability. Herman Traut- 
vetter is a true lover of music, and his fondness for the art is based upon an 
expert knowledge of its techni(|ue and a keen appreciation of its beauties. The 
musical profession lost a man of brilliant talent, and a composer of more than 
ordinary ability, when Mr. Trautvetter was obliged to leave its ranks. There 
was, ho'wever, sufficient cause for his desertion of a profession, where the keen- 
est interest and ambition of his life lay. When he finished his musical course 
In Chicago. Mr. Trautvetter returned to Peoria, with the purpose of gaining his 
livelihood by teaching music, and of devoting his spare time to original com- 
position. But no pupils came, and activity in musical lines seemed to be at a 
standstill in this city. Mr. Trautvetter spent two months, hoping against hope, 
and then realizing that he must devote his time to more lucrative employment, 
he entered the collecting business, in which he has been engaged since that time. 
His first position was with the firm of the F. H. Putnam Coal Company, who 
hired him for twenty dollars a month to collect their outstanding accounts. He 
did such good work, and had such quick success in this line, that it was not long 
before he added Dr. T. J. Mcllvaine to his list of clients and during the next 
three months made a remarkable record as a quick and efficient collector. He 
soon established a collection agency on his own account, known as the Peoria 
Collection Agency, and his success since that time has been quick and sure. 
Mr. Trautvetter is now at the head of the largest agency of its kind in the city, 
and his rapid rise in the business is undoubtedly due to his personal qualities 
of energy, politeness, and hard work. His list of clients is large, and embraces 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 351 

every business, trade and profession, in the city. Mr. Trautvetter has not let 
this success interfere in any way with his love for music, and he retains all his 
old-time proficiency as an instrumentalist and composer. What the musical 
world lost when Mr. Trautvetter left it. the business world of Peoria gained. 



WILLIS P. CONRAD. 



Willis P. Conrad, who since the 5th of July, 191 1, has held the office of 
sewer superintendent for the city of Peoria, and is well known as an active 
worker in republican ranks, was here born in 1873 and is a representative of 
one of the old families of Cincinnati. His grandfather, Jacob Conrad, started 
out at an early age and his father, William Conrad, who was born in Ohio, came 
to Cincinnati in young manhood. He married Miss Lizzie Schuers, a native of 
Illinois, and they became the parents of three children, two daughters and a son : 
Margaret, now deceased; Anna, the wife of J. H. Monroe; and Willis P. 

Spending his youthful days in his parent's home the son pursued his education 
in the public schools and in Brown's ISusiness College, in which he pursued a 
commercial course. He then joined his father, who was engaged in the street 
sprinkling business, and was so engaged for about twelve years, after which he 
retired although his father continued in the same line. Willis P. Conrad then 
became connected with the Onken Laundry Company, but severed his relations 
therewith to take uj) the duties of his present position as sewer superintendent 
for the city of Peoria, to which office he was appointed on the 5th of July. ic;ii. 
He is doing excellent work in this connection and it is an important part of the 
service — how important no one can realize save those whose scientific knowledge 
gives them an understanding of the fiends of disease whicli might be let loose 
upon the community were the work inadequately performed. Mr. Conrad's ap- 
pointment came to him through a republican administration. He has always 
been a stalwart advocate of the principles of the party, an active worker in its 
ranks and for years was a committeeman from the fourth ward. 

In 1898 occurred the marriage of Mr. Conrad and Miss Susie Hixtable, of 
Peoria, a daughter of John Hixtable. a contractor of that city. Unto them have 
been born three children, Harvey, Willis and Rhea. The family attend the Con- 
gregational church and Mr. Conrad holds membership with the Knights of Pythias 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. That his life has lieen well spent has 
been indicated by the fact that many of his warmest friends are those who have 
known him from his boyhood to the present. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The Illinois Free Employment liureau has been an institution in Peoria for 
many years, and has done wonderful work along its lines of activity, giving 
employment free of expense to many thousands of working men and women 
every year. It is in charge of John W. Kimsey as superintendent, and Peter 
Lulay as assistant superintendent. Both are Peorians of many years' residence 
and are well known in various circles in this city. 

The office at Peoria was established eleven years ago, and has done remark- 
able work according to the recent annual report. Of the six offices in the state 
of Illinois, Peoria proportionately has done its full share and has rendered aid 
to hundreds of worthy applicants for suggested employment, and has materially 
benefited hundreds of employers who desired labor of an efficient type. It has 
often supplied employers with a large number of helpers on remarkably short 



352 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

notice. Tliere is no underestimating the work of these employment bureaus under 
state direction and control, and enough can never be said of the good accomplished 
at the office in Peoria, under the charge of Mr. John Kimsey and Air, Peter Lulay. 

From Mr. Kimsev's ninth annual report for the year ending September 30, 
igoy, the following figures are interesting: The total expenses of the bureau 
for the year ending September 30, 1909, were only $1,358.13. At this small 
expense, the bureau secured positions for forty-six thousand, five hundred and 
fifty-six men, out of fifty-two thousand, two hundred and sixteen who filed 
applications for employment. The number of male applications filed and left 
unfilled, was only five thousand, six hundred and sixty. Forty-nine thousand, 
three hundred and thirty-seven men filed applications for help with the bureau 
during the year, and at the end of 1909, only two thousand, seven hundred and 
eighty-one were left unaided. Out of a total file of nineteen thousand, three 
hundred and eighty-three female applications for employment, the bureau filled 
sixteen thousand, one hundred and two positions, and left three thousand, two 
hundred and eighty-one unfilled. In the year ending September 30. 1909, nine- 
teen thousand, six hundred and nine women filed applications for help, of which 
all but three thousand, five hundred and seven were helped. 

Mr. Kimsev, the superintendent of the Peoria bureau has been known for 
years as one of the county's leading public officials. He has resided in Peoria 
and Richwoods township,' and recently served four years most acceptably as 
sheriff of Peoria county. He was appointed to his present position as superin- 
tendent of the Peoria bureau by Governor Deneen. 

Peter Lulay, the assistant superintendent in the Peoria office, was born in 
this city, and is a young man of ability and energy. He served a term as alder- 
man in the Peoria city council. He 'holds his present position under appoint- 
ment of Governor Deneen of Illinois. 



WARREN SUTLIFF. 



Warren Sutlift' is a member of the firm of Sutlift' ..K: Case Company, whole- 
sale druggists, secretary and treasurer of the Peoria Fife Insurance Company, 
president of the Commercial Travelers Loan and Homestead Association of 
Peoria, and a director of the First National Bank and the Savings Bank of 
Peoria. He has resided in this city continuously since the 31st of August, 1875, 
and each succeeding year has marked his advancement in the business world, 
for he has never feared to venture where opportunity has led the way nor 
failed to put forth the utmost possible effort at any given point of his career. 
He had no special advantages at the outset and in fact encountered some dif- 
ficulties and obstacles that do not fall to the lot of all. but notwithstanding 
these he has worked his way steadily upward and today occupies a conspicuous 
and honorable position as a foremost business man of his adopted city. He 
was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, luly i, 1848, and is a son of Theron and 
Emily (St. Clair) Sutliff, Who at the 'time of the birth of their son Warren 
were' living on the site of the present postoffice of Terre Haute. Their place, 
however, was then a farm. The boy was reared in that city and attended the 
local schools. Early in life he thought to become a physician and began the 
study of medicine, but after a short time changed his plans and entered the 
railroad service as an employe of the \'andalia Railroad Company. For fifteen 
years he remained on that road and on the Rock Island railroad, working his 
way upward to the position of passenger conductor. For eight years he ran 
out of Peoria over the Rock Island, coming to this city in 1875 and serving 
as passenger conductor for eight years, or until 1883. He was ambitious, how- 
ever, to enter a field of business that would give him broader opportunities and 







\VAi;i!Kx sen. IFF 



HISTORY OV PEORIA COUNTY 355 

ill that year he turned his attention to the physicians" supply business, forming 
a partnership with M. W. Schultz in the estabhshnient of the first enterprise of 
this kind in the United States. Their house was originally conducted under 
the tirm style of AI. W. Schultz & Company, at No. ii8 North Adams street. 
.\fter about two years Mr. Sutliff purchased his partner's interest and a year 
later, or in 1886, was joined by E. J. Case, forming the present tirm of Sutliff 
& Case. Gradually they developed their enterprise into a wholesale drug busi- 
ness, which is one of the most important undertakings of this character in Illi- 
nois. The growth of the trade has resulted from their progressive enterprise 
and reliable business methods, and success in this undertaking has enabled Mr. 
Sutlitf to extend his efforts along other lines, all of which have profited by his 
cooperation. He is now well known in the insurance field as secretary and 
treasurer of the Peoria Life Insurance Com])any and also operates in financial 
circles as president of the Commercial Travelers' Loan Association of Peoria, 
and as a director of the First National Bank and the Savings Bank of Peoria. 
Nor is he unknown in industrial circles, for he is president of the Best Manu- 
facturing Company, owners of a large planing mill. He is forceful and re- 
sourceful in business and whenever one avenue of opportunity seems closed 
seeks out another path which leads to the desired goal. 

Mr. SutliiT was married in I'eoria to Miss Bessie F. MacLee, of this city, 
where she was born and reared. Her father was a potter by trade. Mr. Sutliff 
is a member of the ^lasonic fraternity, in which he has attained high rank. 
He has reached the Knight Templar degree in the York Rite, the thirty-second 
degree in the consistory and is now potentate of Mohammed Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a past commander of Peoria commandery and is 
recognized as one of the prominent representatives of the fraternity in this city 
and widely known in the order throughout the state. He belongs to the Creve 
Coeur Clui) and the IllincMS \'alley Yacht Club — organizations which indicate 
something of the nature of his interests and recreations. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party and he has twice represented the fourth ward on 
the board of aldermen. He is also one of the board of directors of the Peoria 
Association of Commerce, in which connection he is doing effective work for 
the benefit, upbuilding and improvement of the city and the exploitation of its 
resources. It is a well known fact that exercise and effort develop power and 
thus it has been in the business career of Mr. Sutliff'. He has found in the 
faithful performance of each day's duties the strength and courage for the 
labors of the succeeding day and out of the struggle with small opportunities 
he has come finallv into a field of broad and active influence and usefulness. 



JOHN A. OXYUN. 



Peoria claims John A. Onyun as a citizen, although he is at present a resident 
of Washington, D. C, where he occupies the ])osition of proofreader in the 
Government Printing Office. Mr. Onyun has always been prominent in trade 
circles of Peoria county, and has been actively identified with the printing busi- 
ness in different capacities since 1865. He was born September 24, 1849, in 
Greenbush (now Rensselaer), New York, the son of Addison and ]\Iary Onyun. 
His father was born in West Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1812, and his mother 
was a native of Ireland, John Onyun's education was begun in the public schools 
of New York, and when his family removed to Illinois, it was continued in the 
schools of that state. He learned the jjrinting tratle and commenced work at 
it in June, 1865, at Lacon, Illinois. He temporarily abandoned the business in 
July, 1S73, to become a letter carrier at Peoria, in which occupation he con- 
tinued until November 15. 1886. He was connected with the publication of one 
dailv and a weeklv paper in this state. 

v'.l. 11— 17 



356 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

Mr. Onyun takes an intelligent interest in his trade, and for many years was 
prominently connected with its various organizations. He was successively vice 
president, chairman of the executive committee, recording secretary, financial 
secretary, treasurer and secretary-treasurer of the Peoria Typographical Union, 
No. 29, and from these positions he advanced to active participation in the af- 
fairs of the state organization, holding the position of secretary-treasurer of the 
Illinois State Typographical Union for thirteen years. He resigned this office 
to take a position in the Government Printing Office in Washington, D. C, in 
1901, where he has since been employed. 

Air. Onyun is a republican in politics and holds membership in the Republican 
Club of Washington, D. C. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, 
and holds membership in the Loyal Americans of the Republic. 

Mr. Onyun was married in Peoria, December 25, 1873, to Aliss Lucie A. 
Burns, a daughter of David Burns of this city. Mrs. Onyun was a native of 
Peoria, having been born here in 185 1. Her father came to this city from Colum- 
bus county, Ohio, in the early '40s, and is still living here at the ripe old age 
of ninety-one years. Mrs. Onyun's mother was a native of England, who came 
to Peoria in 1835. Mr. Onyun and his wife are the parents of four children : 
Jessie A., the wife of John T. Moran, a contractor of Peoria ; Clarence A., who 
married Anna Hubbell, and is living in \\'ashington, D. C. ; Archie R., now in 
charge of the news bureau for the Washington ( D. C. ) Times, at .-Mexandria, 
^'irginia : and Rolla G., a graduate of the McKinley Manual Training School 
of \\'ashington. 

Air. Onyun is a printer, thoroughly acquainted with the details of his trade, 
and standing high in the esteem of his colaborers. He has applied his native 
intelligence to the mastery of his chosen occupation, and his success is evidenced 
in the position which he now occupies in the government employ. 



COLONEL S. O. TRIPP. 

Military circles are well represented in Peoria by Colonel S. O. Tripp, now 
an assistant quartermaster general in the Illinois National Guard, with which he 
has been prominently connected since December i, 1878. Colonel Tripp has been 
identified with military aftairs in this state and in the United States army during 
all of his active life, and is well known in this city as a kindly, courageous and 
patriotic man. He was born in Cooperstown, New York, November 8, i860, and 
his military career began when he enlisted in Company B, Seventh Infantry, 
Illinois National Guards, then known as the Veteran Light Guards, on Decem- 
ber I, 1878. He retained his connection with this organization until 1882, serv- 
ing his last year 1881-1882 as ordnance sergeant of the Seventh regiment. He en- 
listed in the United States army. Company K, Fourth United States Infantry in 
1882, and remained until February 2"/, 1887, when he received his honorable 
discharge at Fort Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, after five years' service, during which he 
had participated in some very interesting campaigns on the western frontier 
where the Indian tribes were at that time in an unsettled and more or less 
troublesome condition. 

After his discharge from the United States army. Colonel Tripp returned to 
Peoria, and on June i, 1887, organized Company L, Fifth Infantry, Illinois Na- 
tional Guard, and was mustered into the service of the state, as captain of that 
organization, in which capacity, he continued to serve until January 7, 1891, 
when he was elected and commissioned major of the Fifth Infantry, Illinois 
National Guard, in recognition of his signal and able services in the organiza- 
tion and upbuilding of the regiment. During his residence in Peoria Colonel 
Tripp has organized a mounted military troop called the Peoria Hussars. Colonel 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 357 

Tripp has always been interested in horseback riding, and this Hussar organiza- 
tion was an outgrowth of his love for that exercise. He resigned liis commission 
as major of the Fifth Infantry, Illinois National Guard, to accept the position 
of Captain of his Peoria Hussars, and he continued to command this organization 
until it disbanded in 1898 in consequence of an act of the state legislature, which 
prohibited independent military organizations parading with arms, which were 
at that time more popular in the state than the organized militia. 

On January 15, 1899, Governor John R. Tanner authorized ^^lajor S. O. 
Tripp to organize a troop of cavalry to become a part of the militia of the state 
of Illinois, and promised him such a troop for the city of Peoria. This cavalry 
troop was mustered into the state service on June 15, 1899, as Troop G, First 
Cavalry, Illinois National Guard, with major Tripp as captain. He served in 
this capacity until June i, 1903, when he was commissioned lieutenant colonel 
and chief inspector of rifle practice on the staff of Brigadier-General James B. 
Smith, who was then serving as adjutant general of the state of Illinois. Colonel 
Tripp continued in this position until July 6. 1906. when he voluntarily retired 
from the state service and was placed upon the retired list as lieutenant colonel. 
His retirement lasted only two years. Army life and military company called 
loudly to him and on January 31, 1908, he was again commissioned major and 
chief (luartermaster on the stafT of Brigadier-General Edward Kittilsen, the 
commanding general of the Third Brigade, and he continued to serve in this 
capacity until January i, 1910, when he received the ap])ointment as colonel and 
assistant c|uartermaster general, on the staff of Hon. Charles S. Deneen, governor 
of Illinois, a permanent position which placed him on duty in the office of the 
adjutant general at the state capitol, in charge of the supply department in issu- 
ing stores to the state troops and in custody of the war department documents, 
relative to arms and equipment. Colonel Tripjj has made a record for efficiency 
and carefulness in this position, and his long military service and his personal 
contact with army conditions have made him peculiarly fitted to carry on the 
work. 

Colonel Tripp is one of the organizers of the Regular Army and Navy Union 
of the United States, which is made up of enlisted men of both the United 
States Army and the United States Navy. The only requirement is that the 
candidate shall have served honorably in either the army or navy for five years 
or more. Colonel Tripp was twice elected senior vice national commander of 
this union, and was appointed by the commander in chief to make an inspection 
of all the organizations comprising the national command. This duty was ably 
performed during the season of 1894. 

Colonel Tripp is a republican in politics and was for seventeen years a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the republican county central committee of 
Peoria county. He was a delegate to the national conventions at Philadelphia 
which nominated President McKinley and President Roosevelt, and was at the 
national convention at Chicago in the capacity of assistant sergeant at arms. At 
the inauguration of President Taft in Washington, March 4, 1909, Colonel Tripp 
was aide on the stafif of the chief marshal. He has acted as delegate to state re- 
publican conventions on various occasions. Colonel Trijjp is also prominent in 
local politics, was captain of police under Mayor Miles from 1893 'o i^QS- «i'ifi 
criminal deputy sheriff" in the office of the state's attorney of Peoria county from 
1895 to 1S98. He also held the office of de]nity United States marshal! in charge 
of the Southern division of the Northern district of Illinois for thirteen years, 
from January i, 1898, to ^lay i, 1910. Fraternall}' Colonel Tripp is an active 
worker in the Uniform Rank of Odd Fellows, and has also filled the ])osition as 
colonel of both the Third and Fourth Regiments of Patriot Militant and was vice 
president of the department council of that order. He is a member of the Peoria 
Lodge of Elks and is a past exalted ruler of that organization and a life member. 
He belongs to the Grand Lodge of Elks of the United States. He is prominent 



358 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

in the Creve Coeur Club and other social organizations in this city, and has 
hundreds of friends in Peoria, which his genial and ujjright character have 
won for him dtiring his years of residence here. 

In 1886 Colonel Tripp married Miss Pauline White and they became the 
parents of two children : one daughter, Almaretta E. Tripp, and one son, Alphonso 
E. Tripp. Colonel Tripp ha.s made this city his permanent home since 1878. but 
he and his family are now residing temporarily in Springtield, Illinois, in fulfill- 
ment of the re(|uirements of his present position, as assistant quartermaster general 
of the state of Illinois, Colonel Tripp, during his long term in the service of his 
country and state, has proved himself an able, active and energetic man, with a 
talent for organizing, building tip and keeping together the men under his 
charge. He is a typical military man, proud of the army, dignifying his posi- 
tion in it, loyal to his state and loving his country as a true American should. 



JOHN R. HILLIARD. 



It has been said that "an honest man is the noblest work of God." Public 
opinion is agreed that few men have displayed a higher sense of business in- 
tegrity than John R. Hilliard, for at all times his commercial transactions were 
straightforward and honorable, no one ever losing a dollar through him. He was 
at one time quite largely interested in coal lands and there were periods of both 
prosperity and adversity in his life, but neither were allowed to warp his kindly 
nature or to lower his ideals. He was born June 8, 1818, in Piqua, Ohio, and died 
on the sth of January, 1900. His parents were Joseph and Sarah (Reed) Hill- 
iard. The father was born in a log cabin in Piqua, Ohio, where his father had 
settled in the latter part of the eighteenth century, the family being pioneers 
of that locality and farming people closely identified with the agricultural devel- 
opment of that region. 

John R. Hilliard acquired his early education in Piqua and later attended 
school in Cincinnati and in Philadelphia, where he studied civil engineering. He 
devoted his time to the mastery of that course until he attained his majority, 
when he returned home and became superintendent of railroad construction, 
building the first railroad between Columbus, Ohio, and Logansport, Indiana. 
For thirty years he was thus connected with railway building and in 1871 he 
came to Peoria, where he superintended the construction of the old Peoria & 
Rock Island Railroad and remained as superintendent of the line for many years. 
When the Peoria & Pekin Union Railroad of Peoria went into the hands of a 
receiver he was appointed to the position and managed the affairs of the company 
until all business and interests were adjusted. He afterward made investments 
in coal lands in Wesley City and continued to own coal properties until his 
death. 

Mr. Hilliard was twice married. After losing his first wife he was mar- 
ried on the I2th of April, 1871, to Sallie R. Mattox, a daughter of Absalom and 
Druscilla Ann Mattox, of Springfield, Ohio, who were natives of X'irginia. Fol- 
lowing their removal to the middle west the father engaged in the dry-goods 
business in Springfield, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard had three children: Helen 
M., who is now a teacher in the Irving school of Peoria ; Sallie R. and Caroline, 
both of whom are deceased. While living in Piqua, Mr. Hilliard held member- 
ship in the Presbyterian church. He was a strict temperance man, firm in his 
convictions and loyal in his beliefs. He was one of the most enthusiastic mem- 
bers of the first Commercial Association organized for the advancement of the 
business, social and moral interests of Peoria. In politics he was a republican 
and took an active and helpful interest in the work of his party but never sought 
office. A man of high character, his life was ever actuated by noble principles. 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 359 

Although he met with reverses and difficulties in his coal business, he valued 
more his honor than he did his wealth and no one ever lost a dollar through his 
transactions. His integrity was unassailable and justice was one of his firm and 
un_\ielding traits. He was a man of modest and retiring disposition but he 
took great interest in the welfare of the city and did much for its betterment and 
advancement along many lines. 



DANIEL I. GORMAN. 



Daniel |. Gorman who for nearly fourteen years has been in the service of 
the Peoria Railway Company on the city lines of Peoria, is prominently identified 
with the circles of federated labor, not only in the city but in the state and nation. 
He has been president of the Association of Street and Electric Railway Em- 
ploves of America practically ever since its organization, and he is vice president 
of the Illinois State h'ederation of Labor. Mr. tiorman is a native of this state, 
his birth having occurred at Ottawa on the 15th of May, i87(), and a son of 
Thomas Gorman, a building mover. 

In the acquirement of his education Daniel J. Gorman attended the public 
schools until he was nine years of age, when he began earning his own living. 
He was first employed in a bottle factory of his native city, but at the expiration 
of a year withdrew from this position and went to work in a brickyard, being 
employed there and in various other minor capacities until 1891. In the latter 
vear he went to Omaha, Nebraska, to work for the Murphy, Wasey Chair 
Manufacturing Company, continuing in their service for four years. Later he 
learned the painter's trade, which he followed in Omaha until 1898. In the 
latter year he returned to Illinois, settling in Peoria, and subsequently entered the 
service of the Peoria Railway Company as motorman on one of the city's lines. 
Later he was made barn foreman but subse(|uently again was put on one of 
the city runs. 

Ever since he was old enough to be capable of forming an independent 
opinion, Mr. Gorman has strongly championed the cause of amalgamated labor. 
He is a strong union man, believing that the highest interests of the individual 
laborer necessitate the organization and united efl:orts of the entire trade or 
craft toward the accomplishment of a definite end, while the rights of the work- 
ing people at large are protected and advanced through the coalescence of all 
of the orders. He was one of the first members of the Association of Street 
and Electric Railway Employes of America and six months after its organization 
was made president of the order, and has ever since been the incumbent of that 
office. For the past two years he has been vice president of the Illinois State 
I'ederation of Labor, and was but recently reelected by acclamation to the same 
office. He is held in high regard in labor circles because of his loyalty and untir- 
ing efforts in promoting the interests of the working man. 

Omaha. Nebraska, was the scene of Mr. Gorman's marriage on the 12th of 
January, 1898, to Miss Maud \'an Ness, a daughter of Ralph Van Ness, a land- 
scape gardener of that city., and they have become the parents of the following 
children : Marie, who w'ill soon be thirteen years of age ; Irene, who is eleven ; 
Ruth, who has celebrated the ninth anniversary of her birth; Daniel J., Jr., who is 
anticipating his eighth birthday; and Ethel, who has but recently passed the 
fourth anniversary of her birth. 

Mr. Gorman is a member of the Foresters, Moose and the Peoria Social 
Athletic Society, while his political indorsement is given to the democratic party. 
He is a public-spirited man and takes an active interest in all municipal affairs, 
and has represented the interests of the first ward in the city council since 1910. 
Mr. Gorman has many friends in Peoria and a strong following, particularly 



360 HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 

among the laboring classes to whose interests he is ever loyal, always being pre- 
pared to champion their cause and protect their rights at the opportune time. 
He is a man of much inherent ability, modern in thought, humane in his instincts 
and sharing in truly advanced intelligent ideas. Having begun his independent 
career before his tenth year, his struggle with the world has develoiied an acute 
mentality and endowed him with the faculty of c|uickly and accurately coming 
to a defmite estimate of his fellow beings. I'ractically self-educated, he is a man 
of independent thought and views, yet sufficiently broad to accept new theories 
and possesses enough strength of character to live up to his convictions. He 
applies himself energetically to anything he undertakes, discharging his duties 
with efficiency in whatever capacity he may be serving. His strong individuality, 
determination of purpose and power to direct and control others well qualifies 
him for leadership. Naturally a man endowed with such qualities must make 
a success of anything he undertakes. Mr. Gorman is yet a young man and his 
present achievements would be highly creditable to one who had started life under 
far more favorable circumstances. 



\V1LLL\M E. KIXNETT. M. D. 

Dr. William E. Kinnett, a leading representative of the medical profession 
in Peoria, has practiced here for the past seven years and maintains his offices 
in the Masonic Temple. His birth occurred in Hamilton county, Ohio, on the 
3d of July, 1849, his parents being William and Ann (Brown) Kinnett. The 
father, who was one of the pioneer agriculturists of that county, passed away 
in 1883 when seventy-five years of age. His remains were interred at Elm wood 
cemetery in Yorkville, Illinois, where his wife was also buried after her de- 
mise in 1886. The family is of French origin and first came to the United 
States by way of Canada. 

William E. Kinnett acquired his early education in the countrv schools and 
subsequently continued his studies in a normal school, after wdiicli he followed 
the profession of teaching for four years. On the expiration of that period he 
entered the Eclectic IMedical Institute, now the Eclectic Medical College, which 
institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 1876. Locating for 
practice at Palmer, Illinois, he there continued for three years and then went 10 
]\Iinier, this state, where he remained for one year. In 1880 he went to York- 
ville, there practicing his profession continuously and successfully for a quarter 
of a century. In 1905 he opened an office in Peoria and this city has since re- 
mained the scene of his professional labors, but he is known by reputation 
throughout almost the entire country. He is a member of the Illinois State 
Eclectic Medical Society and was its secretary for twenty-four years, and is 
now its president, and also belongs to the National Eclectic Medical Association, 
of whicli he served as president, for one year and secretary for three years. He 
was also recently elected the chief e-xecutive officer of the American Associa- 
tion of Orificial Surgeons. 

Dr. Kinnett has been married twice. At \'irden. Illinois, he wedded Miss 
Mary E. Cave, who passed away in 1886 and was buried at Yorkville. She left 
two children, namely: Iva J., who is district manager for the Rambler auto- 
mobile in Texas and Louisiana ; and Lily D., who is the wife of Alvah L. Ff ill, 
a pharmacist of Geneva, Illinois. In 1887, at Yorkville, Illinois. Dr. Kinnclt 
was again married, his second union being with Miss Elizabeth R. Austin, n 
daughter of J. N. and Sarah Austin. Her father was a capitalist. 

In politics Dr. Kinnett is a republican, believing firmly in the principles of 
that party. He is a Master Mason, a member of the Eastern Star and patron 
of the Electa Chapter. He is also a member of the ^Modern Woodmen of 




DR. W. E. KINNETT 



HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY 363 

America and the Royal Neighbors. Mis residence at No. 802 Fourth avenue is 
a favorite resort with many friends of the family. His general thought is 
chieH\- given to his professional duties, whicii he discharges with a sense of con- 
scientious obligation. His labors are the exponent of the highest attainment 
in medical knowledge and skill, and he is continually promoting his efficiency 
by the most thorough research and investigation. 



WILLI A.M L. HULL. 



William E. Hull, who is known to everybody in Peoria and to his many 
friends throughout the state as "Ed," has won recognition, as a builder of val- 
uable enterprises, as a factor in the growth and development of Peoria. He 
possesses rare powers of organization and administration and, moreover, he 
has a large fund of that (|uality of common sense which is too often lacking. 
The work that he has accomplished iii belialf of municipal welfare and up- 
building marks him as a man of public spirit and he stands today as one of the 
greatest individual forces in municipal expansion, his well directed and cen- 
tralized energies, based upon broad-mindedness and liberality, being regarded 
as a public asset. New industries within the borders of Peoria owe their ex- 
istence to him and he has given new impetus to business achievement through 
advanced and progressive ideas. The community pays this debt to him in uni- 
versal honor and esteem. 

The traditions of the early training of the farm boy and the habits formed 
in an environment where early rising and strenuous labor are factors of the 
everyday life, have been brought by Mr. Hull into his activity in citizenship 
and his efforts for the betterment and development of municipal interests. He 
was born in Lewiston, I'ulton county, Illinois, in 1866, and is a son of Captain 
William Weslev and Mary A. Hull, who were married in that city in 1864. The 
first Hull of this line in America is thought to have been another Captain llull. 
who won fame on Lake Erie during the War of 181 2. His direct descendant 
and the first of the name in Illinois was Phillip Hull, grandfather of William 
E. Hull, who removed with his family from Licking county, Ohio, to a farm 
near Smithfield, Fulton county, Illinois, lieing a firm believer in education, 
Philli]) Hull built a tiny log schoolhouse on his land and this, known as Hull's 
schoolhouse, afterward became famous as a place for brilliant debates and inib- 
lic meetings. It still stands as one of the landmarks of the pioneer period. 
\\'illiam \\'esley Hull, the father of William E. Hull, did honorable service dur- 
ing the Civil war as cai)tain of Comjiany II, Seventeenth Illinois \'olunteer In- 
fantry, and after the close of hostilities returned to Lewiston, where he be- 
came a ]irominent figure in local political circles. 

William E. Hull, in early life showed a strong leaning toward politics and 
business. He was discerning enough to see that the first requisite for success 
was a good education and at a time when a high-school course was considered 
by most people as quite sufficient prejiaration for life's duties and responsibili- 
ties he determined to obtain the advantages of college training. Accordinglv, 
after leaving the Lewiston high school he entered the Illinois College at Jack- 
sonville, where he acfjuitted himself with great credit. While attending there 
he was a college mate of former Governor "S'ates and of William Jennings 
Bryan. From the time he left college Mr. Hull's political success was remark- 
able. His first position was that of assistant postmaster of Lewiston, to which 
he was appointed in 1884. As one of the founders of the Joe Fifer Young 
Men's Republican Club of that city he employed all his talent for work and or- 
ganization and made it an effective force i