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Full text of "Peoria Medical Monthly (1880-1891)"

^UBRARY 



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VOLUME I. 



1880-1881. 



THE PEORIA 



MEDICAL MONTHLY 



A JOURNAL 



©evoted to ]V[edidii|e ki\(i ^ui'^efy. 



E ID ITOE/S : 



J. Murphy, M, D. J, L. Hamilton, M, D, H. Steele, M. D. 



THOS. M. MelLVAINE, A. M., M. D., 

P-ublisher anl Proprietor. 



PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

204 South Jefferson Street. 
1880. 



iv Peoria Medical Monthly. 



ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS-Ctonimwed. 

PAGE. 

Keurasthenia 6-27 

IXew Remedies 108 

Nitrite of Amyl 197 

Notes on a Few Cases of Gouorrhcea 255 

On the Curability of Acute Phthisis, or Galloping Consumption 225 
•On the Use of Ice to the Interior of the Uterus in Excessive 

Hemorrhage from Placenta Praevia 247 

Physicians versus Druggists 22 

Pioneer Doctors — Doctor R. Rouse 189 

Doctor E. Dicliinson 277 

Quinia as a Preventive of Scarlet Fever. . . . 12 

Repeated Tapping as a Preparatory Measure to Successful Ovari- 
otomy 14 

Rhus Aromatica 60 

Rupture of the Bladder 254 

Salicylic Acid in Scarlet Fever 110 

Scarlet Fever and Diphtheria 139 

Sick Headache 42 

Some of the Uses of Santonin 58 

State Medicine 221 

Teething not a Cause of Diarrhoea in Children 88 

The Accommodation of the Eye and What it Means 194-227 

The Best Position for Women in Labor 258 

The Position of Women in Parturition 84 

The Preparation of Material for Dissection 250 

Toothache Drops 15 

Treatment of Inveterate Ague 76 

Ununited Fracture of the Femur Successfully Treated 55 

"Vesical Calculi Impacted in tlie Prostatic Portion of the Urethra 317 
Whooping Cough 39 

TRANSLATIONS. 

Long Vitality of Diphtheritic Virus 90 

Spontaneous Cure of Tuberculosis 89 

Esmark's Bandage as a means of Diagnosis in Simulated Con- 
tractions 115 

CLINICAL LECTURES. 

Acute Eczema 116 

Capillary Aneurism 263 

Cystitis in the Female 175 

Diphtheria in Children 320 

Epilepsy 229 

Ingrowing Toe Nails 261 

Lead Poisoning 141 

Mutism 157 

Necrosis of the Tibia 259 

Operation for Phymosis 264 

Partial Paralysis of the Deltoid 262 

Pelvic Abscelis 199 

Spontaneous Dislocation of the Wrist 260 

Treatment of the Opium Habit 198 

Tumor on the Neck 263 

Typho-Malarial Fever 232 



Table of Contents. 



HOSPITAL NOTES. 

PAGE, 

Notes from St. Francis Hospital— Chorea— Cases Illustrating 

some of the Varied Effects of Malarial Poisoning 178 

PERISCOPE. 

A Simple Method of Evacuating Small Calculi 25 

Albuminuria in Facial Erysipelas 43 

Anaesthesia in Labor 15 

Antidote to Carbolic Acid 153 

Bi-Sulphite of Soda in Burns 291 

Black Silk for Ligatures 203 

Boracic Acid in Inflammations of Mucous Membranes... 40 

Boracic Acid as an Internal Remedy 42 

Caution in the Use of Chrysophanic Acid 203 

Chian Turpentine 146 

Cholera Infantum— Treatment of 94 

Chrysophanic Acid — Ointment of. 97 

Chrysophanic Acid in Diseases of the Skin 202 

Complete Amaurosis from the use of Salicylate of Soda 149 

Compound Liquorice Powder , 88 

Death from Ethyl Bromide 20 

Dental Instruments Transmitting Syphilis 125 

Diphtheritis — Treatment of. 95 

Dr. E. R. Squibbs on Ethyl Bromide 20 

Ergotine in Prolapsus Ani 236 

Ethyl Bromide.... 16 

External Treatment for Night Sweats.. 149 

Facts from the Smallpox Hospital at Troy, N. Y 285 

Finger Blistering for Neuralgia 91 

Forced Alimentation IT 

Forceps or Its Alternative 20 

Hemorrhoids— Painless Cure of Internal 40 

Hip Joint Lameness - 65 

How to Eradicate Syphilis 203 

Infantile Colic 63 

Infantile Eczema 63 

Infant Dietetics 119 

Infra-hyoid Bronchotomy 124 

Is It to be Wondered At? 290 

Misuse of the Iron' Preparations 151 

Morphia in Uraemia 21 

New Method of Using Salicylic Acid 18 

New Method of Administering Kousso 23 

Night Sweats — External Treatment for 149 

Ointment of Chrysophanic Acid 97 

Old Sore Legs 151 

Organic Matter in Running Water 147 

Ovariotomy in Italy 19 

Oxalate of Cerium as a Cough Remedy 62 

Painless cure of Internal Hemorrhoids 40 

Pathological Condition of the System Denoted by the Diflerent 

Conditions of the Tongue 150 

Pilocarpin in Diphtheria 235 

Poisoning by Santonin 152 

Poisoning by Iodoform 153 

Potassic Iodide and Opium in Rheumatism 118 



vi Feoria Medical Monthly. 



PERISCOPE— Contimted. 

PAGE. 

Providence and Disease 13 

Sick Stomach of Pregnancy 96 

Subcutaneous Injections of Ergotine in Myomatous Fibromas 

and Clironic Hypertropliy of the Uterus 289 

Suggestions for Professional Success 61 

Sunstroke — Treatment of. 64 

Tests for Arsenic Without Tecliuicalities 122 

The Cause of Miss Neilson's Deatli '. 181 

To Terminate the Cliloroform Narcosis 319 

To Control Hemorrhage during Hip-joint Amputations 43 

Treatment of Constitutional Syphilis by Sulphate of Copper 180 

Treatment of Uterine Disease 234 

Treatment of Sunstroke 64 

Treatment of Cholei'a Infantum 94 

Treatment of Diphtheritis 95 

Treatment of Typhoid Fever 92 

Typhoid Fever — Treatment of 92 

Typho Malarial Fever 22 

Use of Turpentine in Cancer.. 19 

Union of Tendons 236 

Whooping Cough 63 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

Dr. Gilliland's Letter 264 

Dr. Carpenter's Letter 326 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Convention of Illinois Pharmacists 246 

Chicago Letter 212 

Diet 98 

Do Scarlet Fever Signs do any Good ? 272 

Relation of Physicians to the Quackery Question 305 

Rush Medical College 130 

Introductory. 24 

In Memoriam 307 

Legislation Regulating Practice in Illinois 244 

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 345 

Opening the Abdominal Cavity 46 

Our Success 99 

Physicians versus Newspapers 128 

Substitution of Drugs 46 

Small Pox 273-306 

The Elevation of the Character of the Profession 66 

Treatment of the Insane 158 

Trichinosis 246 

Why is the State Law Forbidding Quackery Not Enforced? 44 

What They Say of Us 47 

Visiting the Sick 273 

BOOK NOTICES. 

A Manual of Midwifery 156 

Carlotta 25 

Cinchona (Jure 69 

Drug Catalogue 70 

Guide to the Qualitative and Quuiiiitative Aualyais of the Urine 270 



Table of Contents. vii 



BOOK NOTICES— Contmwed. 

PAGE. 

Hernia, Strangulated and Reducible 302 

Health and Health Resorts 211 

Higher Education of Medical Men and its Influence on the Pro- 
fession and the Public 211 

Medical and Surgical Directory of the State of Iowa 185 

Notes on Hospital Practice 270 

Official Register of Physicians in Illinois 156 

Our Homes 241 

Pamphlets and Exchanges 70, 97, 157, 271 

Practical Treatise on Nervous Exhaustion 184 

Quarterly Epitome of Medicine and Surgery 70 

Surgery, Surgical Pathology and Surgical Anatomy of the Fe- 
male Pelvic Organs 185, 

Transactions of Arkansas State Medical Society 156 

Treatise on Common Forms of Functional Nervous Diseases 184 

Treatise on Foreign Bodies in Surgical Practice 210 

Treatise on the Medical and Surgical Diseases of Women 243 

Venereal Diseases, Including Stricture of the Male Urethra 184 

Wood's Medical Library 156 

Walsh's Physicians' Handy Ledger and Case Book 271 

THERAPEUTIC NOTES. 

Abortive Treatment of Smallpox by Salicylic Acid 299 

Acute Bronchitis in Children 269 

Albuminuria 325 

Albuminuria of Pregnancy 325 

Amenorrhoea 183 

Anodyne Liniment 209 

Aristocratic Remedy for Itch 155 

Arthritis 325 

Barber's Itch — Treatment of. 155 

Bismuth in Skin Diseases) 125 

Burns 299 

Carbolic Powder 183 

Chillblains — Local Application for 299 

Chloral Injections in Gonorrhoea 299 

Chlorate of Potassium in Scrofulous Diseases of the Skin 155 

Chorea and Mania 269 

Chloroform Cough Mixture 183 

Chronic Bronchitis 183 

Cold in the Head— For a Fresh 237 

Cough Mixture 299 

Croup 209 

Cystitis 325 

Dandruff Eradicator 183 

Deodorizer of Iodoform 183 

Diarrhoea 126 

Diphtheria 183-209 

Diuretic and Heart Tonic 183 

Dressing for Burns 155 

Dyspepsia of Phthisis 183 

Eczema 325 

Eczema 299 

External Treatment of Night Sweats 183 

Fetid Perspiration of the Feet 209 



viii Peoria Medical Monthly. 



THEKAPEUTIC IS OT^S— Continued. 

For Obstinate Constipation or Obstruction of the Bowels 155 

For PainftU Hemorrhoids 237 

For Ulcerated Stomatitis ] \ \ 155 

Fresh Cold in the Head ' [....' 237 

Gonorrhoea — Chloral Injections for ..."....!.!"!!!......'!. 299 

Habitual Constipation ' 269 

Haemoptysis in Phthisis 126-269 

Hemorrhoids— For Inflamed 269 

Hiccough— Nitrite of Amyl for '. ! ! . . ! 209 

Hints for the Use of the Actual Cautery 269 

Itching of the Scalp 155 

Laxative in Habitual Constipation 325 

Local Application in Diphtheria 209 

Lotion for Iritis 269 

Local Application for Chillbiains 299 

Nitrite of Amyl for Hiccough 209 

Oxalate of Cerium in Cholera Infantum 209 

Pills in Hemicrania 237 

Pruritus Vulvae 269-209 

Pruritus of Pregnancy 325 

Rock and Rye 126 

Scabies 325 

Sore Nipples 325 

Stimulant and Febrifuge 155 

Syphilitic Ulcers . . 299 

Syphilitic Neuralgia • 325 

Tinea Circinata 209 

Trigeminal Neuralgia 209 

Tuberculous Laryngitis 237 

Ulceration of the Cornea 237 

Ulcerating Surfaces and Abscesses .' 237 

Use of Belladonna in Threatened Abortions and Dysentery. . . . 126 

Venereal Warts 237 

Vomiting of Pregnancy 299 

Whooping Cough 126 

Worms 269 



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THE PEORIA 

]\Iedical IVEontlily, 

A JOURNAL DEVOTED TO 

MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 



Will be published at Peoria, Illinois, the 20th of each 
month. A large edition (2,000 copies per month) will be 
issued during the present year, for the purpose of bringing 
it before the medical profession. 

This journal will be devoted to short, practical articles 
on live questions, giving the experience of successful men 
in a brief, topical manner, desiring rather to aid physicians 
in the routine of every day work, than to advance profound 
theories of untried value. 

We wish every physician, into whose hands this journal 
may come, to feel that it in part, belongs to him, and that 
its pages will always be open to anything of interest that 
he may wish to lay before the profession; an interesting 
and instructive case, a favorite and tried prescription, a new 
thought towards the elucidation of some of the knotty 
points of our science, or a successful method of treatment 
of disease. During the year, our pages will contain con- 
tributions from many eminent men and an active and sus- 
tained effort will be made to add to its value. We cordially 
invite correspondence from physicians, and will welcome 
to our pages everything of benefit to our profession. 

We urge all professional brethren to take an active 
interest in our monthly, as only by their co-operation and 
support can the aim of this journal — viz: Mutual benefit 
and counsel — be attained. 



rJ. MURPHY, M.D., 



Editors, { J. L. HAMILTON, M. D., 
til. STEELE, M. D. 
Address all communications to 

THOS. M. McILVAINE, A. M., Publisher, 
229 S. Adams St., Peoria, 111. 



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This journal was not started for the purpose of making money ^ 
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— ( editors : ) — 

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H. Steele, M. D. 

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?eofik }iedi(5kl JViontl^ly. 

J$^ Contributions most be short — not to exceed five hundred words.'dL 

VOL. I. MAY, 1880. NO. L 

[For &e Peoria Uedical Monthly.] 

Fracture of the Neck of the Femur. 



BY J. MURPHY, M. D. 



We have certainly no cause of complaint with regard 
to the extent of the literature of fractures of the neck of 
the femur, whatever objections there may be to its quality, 
its precision, or its practical bearing on the treatment of 
formidable and not unfrequent accident. The wordy war- 
fare in which surgical writers have so long indulged with 
reference to it, their lack of unanimity with regard to many 
important points connected with the accident and its treat- 
ment, and the almost universal deformity which it entails, 
indicate that the subject has either not been investigated 
with sufficient painstaking precision, or that a restoration 
of the part to its natural condition is not within the re- 
sources of surgery. 

In the limits to which I am confined, I regret that I 
-cannot enter into a consideration, either general or special, 
of the many interesting but unsettled points connected with 
this fracture; although this regret is somewhat neutralized 
by reflecting on the very trifling advantages of a practical 
character which have been derived from the apparently in- 
terminable warfare that has been waged with reference to 
the diagnosis of the fracture, whether within or without, 
•or partly within and partly without the capsule; and 
^whether bony union ever occurs, and how often we may 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



expect it. These considerations do not, I conceive, involve- 
any questions of an important practical character, and it i& 
fortunate that they do not, because while it may be possi- 
ble for an hospital surgeon of large experience and superior 
powers of perception and discrimination to detect the dif- 
ferent fractures, I feel quite certain that the general prac- 
titioner cannot do so, at least in the great majority of cases. 
The different species of the fracture do not present suffi- 
ciently distinct characteristics of a general nature to enable 
an ordinary surgeon to decide, definitely respecting it; 
while the special symptomology equally fails in conveying 
to the surgeon's mind any definite idea regarding it. Some 
of the special symptoms which are depended on to enable 
us to discriminate between the different fractures will not 
bear rational analysis ; for example, that one relative to the 
diminished arc of a circle described by the trochanter in^ 
rotating the femur. Any attempt at rotating the limb in 
those cases is so painful that in many instances very little 
information is to be gained by attempting it, but in those 
eases where rotation can be performed, that rotation will, I 
believe, be found to occur invariably in the axis of the ' 
shaft of the femur, provided the fracture of the neck is not 
an impacted one. In its natural position in the acetabulum 
the head of the femur serves as a pivot, and enables the 
trochanter to move in a certain segment of a circle; but 
when the neck is fractured the pivotal function of the head 
is lost, and the trochanter being more firmly fixed than the 
fragment of the neck attached to it, the free end of the 
latter performs the segmental circular movement, while the 
trochanter is the pivot by which that movement is accom-^ 
plished. The principle involved here is so purely mechan- 
ical that it will be readily appreciated, and can be easily 
tested by any one familiar with the most ordinary scientific 
principles. Other special symptoms depended on to prove: 
the species of fracture are equally fallacious. 

Again, all the discussions which have occurred with 
reference to the question of a bony or ligamentous union, 
although of much abstract interest, have really no practical 
bearing on the treatment of the fracture. The character 
of the union is a question which the surgeon treating the 
case should not give a moment's attention to, as the im- 
pression that a bony union is not likely to occur has induced 
a carelessness and slovenliness in the treatment of sucb 
cases which has unquestionably produced thousands of de- 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



formities, many of which could have been avoided. It is 
probably not so important as surgical writers lead us to 
suppose, what the character of the union may be. A firm 
ligamentous union is probably as useful as a bony one. 
During the lifetime of the individual we are not able to 
detect the difi'erence. In those cases where union of some 
kind has occurred, we cannot detect any motion or flexi- 
bility at the seat of the fracture, in any movement of the 
limb which may be made. All those considerations with 
regard to the position of the fracture or the character of 
the union, and which are of no special importance in the 
treatment, should be merged in the all absorbing question: 
Can the normal length of the limb in fractures of the neck 
of the femur be preserved ? This should be the pivotal 
idea of the surgeon, and round it all subordinate ideas 
should revolve. The opinions of surgical writers, occasion- 
ally very loosely expressed, that more or less shortening is 
inevitable in this fracture, has deterred the great bulk of 
general practitioners from making any vigorous effbrts to 
prevent it, and hence the almost constant deformities which 
we observe in such cases. 

Why there should be this want of zeal in treating a 
fracture of so much importance it is difficult to determine. 
It cannot be from the abstract apprehension that a useful 
union will not occur, because we find that union does act- 
ually occur almost invariably, notwithstanding our care- 
lessness in frequently not even making an attempt at bring- 
ing the fragments into apposition, or keeping them there. 
It ought not to be from the dread of the possible disagree- 
able effects which continued confinement might exercise, 
because the aged are the most frequent sufferers from this 
accident, and confinement is less irksome and less injurious 
to them than to the young. It should not be from any 
morbid or irrational fear of want of sufficient constitutional 
vi^or to promote union, because as I have said union does 
occur, and we find that other fractures in aged persons unite 
quite readily. Besides a large majority of ununited frac- 
tures occur in the young and apparently vigorous. 

ITone of those causes is, I believe, the true one why 
we lay our patient's limb on a pillow in whatever position 
is most comfortable to him; or put him on a double inclined 
plane, where adequate extension is impossible; or extend- 
ing the limb for two or three weeks by some one of the 
traditional modes of doing so, until the patient begins to 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



complain of the restraint and then release him ; or getting 
him up on his crutches a few weeks subsequent to the 
accident. Those are some of the ordinary modes of treat- 
ment (?) adopted in this fracture ; eachoffhem is supported 
by eminent surgical names, and after practicing them we 
solace ourselves with the idea that we have exhausted the 
resources of surgery for our patients. Surgeons here 
appear to be at sea. Nothing connected with the fracture 
or its treatment appears to be definitely fixed or absolutely 
maintained. The great majority of eminent surgeons 
appear to consider, that shortening of the limb is a foregone 
conclusion, and speak confusedly and indefinitely on the 
subject, and consequently young practitioners are bewild- 
ered as to what they are to do, or whether they should do 
anything. The ban of mischievous authority which we are 
under, is the great cause why this fracture is not treated 
more carefully and scientifically by the general practitioner, 
and the sooner we rid ourselves of this ban the better it 
will be for all concerned. 

Every case of fractured neck of the femur, should be 
treated on the general principles which constitute the true 
foundation of the treatment of all fractures of the long 
bones at least, that is, a perfect coaptation must, if possible, 
be procured and maintained by extension and counter- 
extension for a suflicient length of time to permit a union 
to occur. We must not permit ourselves to be governed 
by any consideration as to the character of that union, and 
it will be more likely to be firmer and more rapid in its 
completion, the greater care the surgeon exercises and the 
greater quietude the patient observes. The details of the 
initial treatment particularly, of this fracture, are not dwelt 
on sufficiently by surgical writers. We have here two dis- 
placements of the bone to be remedied, displacement in the 
direction of the axis of the shaft of the femur, and dis- 
placement in the direction of the axis of the neck. We 
can by extension restore the natural length of the limb, but 
if we do not also restore the normal length of the neck the 
fractured fragments will still override in the direction of its 
axis. To preserve the proper length of the limb, the per- 
ineal band with extension by means of adhesive plaster ap- 
plied to the leg, and a pulley and weight, is the simplest 
and perhaps the beat method we can pursue. A long 
outside splint may be useful in steadying the limb, but it 
is not essential. All unnecessary bandaging and all super- 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



fluous splints should be avoided, as interfering with the 
capillary circulation. In order to restore the normal length 
of the neck and the natural rotundity of the trochanter, 
we must make traction in the direction of the axis of the 
neck of such power as will bring the fractured surfaces in- 
to opposition. This will be best accomplished by passing a 
iirm band round the upper end of the thigh from within 
outwards, by which extension is made, while counter-ex- 
tension is accomplished by another band passed round the 
pelvis in the opposite direction. After the fractured ends 
of the bone have been thus brought into proper position, 
they can be best kept there by placing an unyielding com- 
press of the requisite thickness between the thighs, close to 
the perineum, retaining this in proper position by strapping 
the two limbs together at the knees and ankles. Firmly 
made and carefully retained in the position indicated, I 
consider this pad an indispensable requisite to the success- 
ful treatment of this fracture. In addition to this, a broad 
bandage should be applied round the pelvis, embracing 
both trochanters. While the object of the compress is to 
prevent the ends of the fracture from over-riding each 
other, the object of the pelvic band is to keep those frac- 
tured ends in close opposition, and thus facilitate their 
union. This treatment should be continued for a sufficient 
length of time to admit of union being accomplished. The 
time that may be required in such cases will depend very 
much on the constitutional vigor of the patient and on the 
skill and care exercised by the surgeon. It is a case which, 
more than any other fracture, requires constant watchful- 
ness and devotion on the part of the medical attendant. 

By carrying out this simple method of preserving the 
length ot the limb and that of the neck of the femur, there 
cannot be much deviation from a natural position of the 
fracture ; and union is more likely to occur, and to be of a 
more firm and satisfactory character, and with less danger 
of shortening, than under any other system of treatment 
with which I am acquainted; certainly much more so than 
in the plans of treatment usually pursued and recommend- 
•ed by eminent surgeons. The general result of this frac- 
ture heretofore has been a blot and an opprobrium to our 
profession; and it is therefore the duty of every practitioner 
to observe such cases with critical solicitude, and reflect 
maturely on the causes which in the past have rendered our 
treatment of them so unfortunate and unsatisfactory. 

Peoria, April, 1880.^ 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



[For the Peoria Medical Mouthly.] 

Neurasthenia. 

Read befare tJie Decatur Medical Society June 26th, 1879, by 
A. Robertson Small, M. D. 

The term jSTeurasthenia comes from two Greek words: 
neuron^ meauiug a nerve, and asthenia, want of strength, de- 
bility. It is»a functional disease of the nervous system — 
that is, the true pathological changes have not yet been dis- 
covered. It is a disease of recent origin, and I believe all 
that has ever been written on the subject has been done 
within the last ten years; and hence, the literature on the 
subject is scanty and inadequate, and, so far as I can learn, 
none of the recent standard works contain a chapter on the 
subject, with exception of Erb, in the thirteenth volume of 
Ziemssen's Cyclopaedia, to which article, as well as one in 
the i^ew York Medical Journal, by Dr. Geo. M. Beard, and 
one in the Medical and Surgical Reporter, by Dr. W. 0. Still- 
man, I owe much of my information on the subject. 

^Neurasthenia, though of recent origin, is by no means, 
infrequent in this country. Dr. Beard says : "But in spite 
of its frequency and importance, neurasthenia, although 
long recognized in a vague way among the people and the 
profession under such terms as ' general debility,' ' nervous 
prostration,' 'nervous debility,' 'nervous asthenia,' 'spinal 
weakness,' and more accurately by some of its special 
symptoms and accompaniments, as ' spinal irritation,' ' ner- 
vous dyspepsia,' 'cerebral and spinal hypersBmia,' 'irritable 
ovary,' ' irritable uterus,' ' uterine asthenopia ' and ' sexual 
exhaustion,' yet until quite recently no attempt has been 
made to formally introduce it into science, by describing in 
detail all its symptoms and showing their relation to each 
other and to the morbid nervous condition of which they 
are all the results and expressions. My first paper," says 
he, " on this subject, based on the study of thirty cases, was 
prepared in 1868, was read before the New York Medical 
Journal Association, and was published in the Boston 
Medical and Surgical Journal, April 29th, 1869, and subse- 
quently appeared in the first edition of Beard & Rockwell's 
' Electricity.' " 

The above, I believe, is the first paper ever written on 
the subject. Abroad it seems to have received less atten- 
tion than in this country, possibly because it is not so com- 
mon there as here. The term neurasthenia covers all the 
forms of nervous exhaustion, whether the symptoms come 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



from the brain or spinal cord, though the term cerebras- 
thenia is applied to the former, and myelasthenia to the 
latter. 

We understand by neurasthenia, those conditions of the 
brain or cord, or both, in which marked and unquestion- 
able disturbance of their function exist, for which no con- 
siderable anatomical basis can be found or assumed; a^ 
disease, therefore, which must at present be classed as a 
functional -disease. Many of its symptoms, however, resem- 
ble closely the symptoms in the early stages of severe dis- 
ease of the cord, with anatomical lesions, but whether this- 
disease may lead to actual organic disease of the cord is. 
doubtful, and most authorities believe it does not. I believe^ 
however, that cerebral and spinal anaemias, hyperaemias^ 
and irritations, are often only the symptoms of neuras- 
thenia, and that inervation precedes the disturbance of 
circulation. 

ETIOLOGY. 

The predisposition to this affection is most common in 
the male sex, and youth and middle age are most exposed 
to the disease. It is also most apt to occur in delicately bal- 
anced and highly sensitive nervous organizations, and 
among the signs of this are fine soft skin, fine hair, deli- 
cately cut features and tapering extremites. Most sufferer& 
come from neuropathic families, in which psychosis, hys- 
teria and other neuroses, are well known guests. The 
higher and most intellectual classes are much more predis- 
posed to the disease than the lower classes. The following- 
are some of the direct causes. Flint says : "It proceeds, 
from under functional activity of the nervous system, as 
connected with the exercise of the intellectual and emo- 
tional faculties." 

We, as Americans, work too much and play too little; 
and it is this close application to study and the worry of 
business day after day, week after week, and year after year,, 
with little or no relaxation or recreation, that finally tires- 
out the nervous system, and it gives out exhausted. Exces- 
sive mental efforts, as severe and long-continued study — es- 
pecially if not sufficient sleep be taken — are very prolific 
causes of neurasthenia, and a similar effect is produced by 
violent grief or excessive excitement of the affections and 
passions. But the immediate cause in the great majority 
of cases is worry — worry connected with business matters. 



g Peoria Medical Monthly. 



or excited by domestic complications. Man can do an im- 
mense amount of mental work without being injured 
thereby, if he will only keep this element of worry in the 
background. Another frequent and important cause is 
sexual excesses, masturbation begun very young and long- 
continued, inordinate sexual gratification, or even lack of 
the same. Frequently-repeated sexual excitement without 
gratification, in predisposed persons, acts similarly. Ex- 
cesses of less degree, but longer continued, are often at 
fault, and the disease frequently occurs after the honey- 
moon. Excessive bodily effort may also produce the dis- 
-«ase, as long forced marches, mountain climbing, etc. In- 
sufficient food, or anything that depresses the powers of 
the nervous system, has an influence in the same direction.^ 
I believe also, that the excessive use of tobacco acts many 
times as a factor in producing the disease by weakening 
the nervous system. We all know its well-known power 
of producing at least one of the symptoms of neurasthenia, 
that of sexual debility. But the disease is most distinct 
Tt^hen several of the above causes co-exist, as great mental 
and bodily overwork with disturbance of sleep and rest, or 
when, amid great m intal exertion, business or domestic 
worry, sexual excesses are indulged in. 

"We now come to the symptoms of neurasthenia. Neu- 
rasthenia is divided into cerebrasthenia or exhaustion of 
the encephalon, and myelasthenia, or spinal exhaustion. 
These condition are sometimes found distinct and separ- 
ate, but usually more or less blended. Their causes are 
usually different, and their treatment differs much. Their 
distinctive difference, however, will be more especially con- 
sidered under the heads of diagnosis and treatment. The condition 
found in these cases is that of an orer-worked brain and nervous 
system, and the symptoms such as would naturally arise under such 
a condition. Confusion of thought is one of the earlier symptoms. 
The patient cannot force his mind to think consecutively on any 
one subject, but his ideas will come and go without his having any 
power over them. There may be times when his mind seems clear, 
but soon again, it will be in a state of chaos, and his ideas indis- 
tinct. This condition will be particularly noticed if he attempt to 
add up a column of figures. The memory, too, is usually defective, 
though this usually occurs also in all forms of nervous debility, 
whether caused by exhaustion, organic change, or senility. Another 
symptom ia hesitancy of speech, arising from confused thought, and 
bad memory, rendering it difficult to form a clear conception of the 
subject under consideration, and hard to summon the necessary 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



words to express it. This symptom is much better marked in some- 
cases than others and in some it does not occur at all. Indecision^ 
timidity and lack of confidence in ones own judgment are common 
symptoms in this affection. An almost universal symptom is irrit- 
ability of mind, and depression of spirits. The patient is very apt 
to be suspicious of others, and to think that conspiracies are being 
plotted against him, though he can give no valid reason for such 
belief. If he be a business man, he is apt to have vague apprehen- 
sions of financial ruin, though there may not be the slightest 
ground for such apprehension. He is apt to take thoughtless acts 
and remarks of friends as personal slights, or possibly insults. He 
is constantly in a worry and fret about something, or brooding over 
his imaginary troubles. He is restless and wanders aimlessly from 
one place to another. He is ill at ease, and usually confused if any 
one is watching him. Insomnia is nearly always present, and some- 
times may even precede the disease itself, when it may act as a 
cause. It is usually not very troublesome, but of a peculiar char- 
acter ; the patient wakes after a few hours sleep with a sense of 
great uneasiness in his limbs, and may not be able to fall asleep 
again for several hours afterwards, and in the morning feels unre- 
freshed and prostrated. He is also inclined to dream a good deal, 
and his dreams are generally of a frightful character and awake 
him in terror. The preceding symptoms, which we have just con- 
sidered, are more particularly connected wit i tVe cerebrum, and the 
higher intellectual faculties, and we now come to a different class, 
embracing the motor apparatus, the sensory department of the 
nervous system, and the glandular organs, and prominent among 
these are languor and a sense of general or local weakness. A 
feeling of general fatigue is very common, but it is apt to come 
and go suddenly; at one time the patient may feel as strong as a 
giant, and be capable of performing severe labor, and at another as 
weak as a babe, so that the least exertion is a hardship ; and this 
sense of profound exhaustion may come on suddenly without warn- 
ing, in the midst of his labor. 

There is a peculiar leg weakness in many of these cases, associa- 
ted with a certain form of myelasthenia, growing out of sexual 
indulgence, and this feeling of exhaustion is more particularly felt 
in the morning before getting up. They are incapable of walking 
or standing for any length of time, and if they continue long in the 
standing posture it makes them very tired, with a feeling of pain in 
the back, with shooting or tearing pains in the districts of certain 
nerves. If more severe exercise be indulged in, there will be trem- 
bling of the limbs, and this will be more readily produced by un- 
accustomed exercise. Sometimes a strong mental impression will 
produce the same effect. These same symptoms of exhaustion and 
want of endurance may occur in the arms, but usually not to the^ 
same extent as in the legs. It is very difllcult for some of these 
patients to write, owing to trembling and unsteadiness of the hand^ 



10 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

especially if the emotions be excited or the mind embarrassed, 
though others can perform the most delicate movements without 
trouble. The sensations are also markedly effected in this disease. 
The patient complains of flashes of heat, and perhaps the next 
moment of cold, which may be in circumscribed spots. The hands 
and feet are often cold. These sensations probably arise from vaso- 
motor disturbances. Creeping and crawling sensations just under 
the skin are often complained of; abnormal ticklishness is often 
present ; hypersesthesia or amesthesia, local or general, are some- 
times found ; neuralgia, shifting quickly from one place to another, 
is very common ; often there is a peculiar pain in the muscles of 
the back, appearing when the body is bent forwards or backwards. 
In a large proportion of these cases there are localized points of 
tenderness along the spine, the same as in nervous irritation. The 
patient is very susceptible to cold and sudden changes in the 
weather. Sometimes the nutrition in neurasthenia is good, and the 
patient may present a hearty and even robust appearance, though 
usually the nutrition is more or less impaired, and the patient 
somewhat pale and anaemic. He is often troubled with a nervous 
dyspepsia. Flatulence and oxaluria are often met with, and not 
infrequently constipation. Redness of the face and irritable eye 
frequently occur, the eye being injected and painful, caused by de- 
bility of the vaso-motor nerves allowing too much blood to be car- 
ried to the part ; and probably the same condition exists in the 
brain at times, and perhaps at others a condition of anaemia. 
Sometimes there are sounds in the ears of a roaring character. 
The sense of taste and smell may also be abnormal. The secretions 
are sometimes at fault, as the lachrymal and salivary glands, the 
sudoriferous follicles, the intestines and testes. There is a tendency 
to shed tears, and this when the emotions are only moderately ex- 
cited, and they may flow profusely without the patient knowing 
why. Disturbance of the sexual organs occupy a very prominent 
place among the symptoms of neurasthenia, and they may stand in 
the relation of cause or effect; thus, impotence not infrequently 
results from nervous debility, and nervous debility from sexual 
excesses. They commonly take the form of " irritable weakness," 
the power of erection and of performing the act are lessened, the 
ejaculation takes place prematurely, and a repetition of the act is 
impossible. The indulgence is usually followed by great prostra- 
tion, restlessness, trembling of the limbs, etc. The symptoms are 
usually all worse after the indulgence of the act. 

Impotence may be caused by suppressed secretion of the sperm, 
due to innervation of the glandular structure of the testes, or the 
I0.SS of desire, or both. Spermatorrhoea is not a regular symptom 
of the disease, unless it previously existed, when it may be consid- 
ered a cause. Their recurrence, however, often aggravates the 
trouble, and when genital affections appear as a cause, the recovery 
is likely to be slow, and the prognosis more unfavorable than when 
they occur secondarily. 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 11 



You will notice that the symptoms are almost entirely subjec- 
tive, the objective symptoms being slight or entirely negative. 
There is no disturbance of motility ; the patient can usually per- 
form the finest and most complicated movements easily and securely, 
can stand on one foot with eyes closed ; yet the power of muscular 
endurance is weakened, and the patient is more or less ansemic. 

Another important feature is the instability of the symptoms. 
They are not local or constant in their character, as in organic 
lesions, but are constantly flitting from one set of symptoms to an- 
other ; to-day the patient may be complaining of one set of symp- 
toms, and as soon as they are subjugated another set springs up. 
[concluded next month.] 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Hyclrt)broiiiic Acid. 



One of the most valuable preparations lately introduced 
to the notice of the medical profession is Hydrobromic 
Acid, a pale straw-colored liquid, a combination of bromide 
of potassium and tartaric acid. I regard tliis acid as one 
of the most efficient remedies we possess in a certain class 
of nervous diseases. It was first brought to the notice of 
the profession by Dr. D. C. Wade, in the Peninsular Medi-' 
cal Journal, and recommended highly for its property of 
preventing the headache and ringing in the ears produced 
by the administration of quinine. Given with or immedi- 
ately after each dose, it prevents in a remarkable degree 
these unpleasant symptoms. It is also of especial value in 
nervous and delicate individuals, in preventing the fulness 
felt in the head, induced by the administration of the various 
preparations of iron. Where there is nervous excitement 
induced by excessive indulgence of tea, cofl'ee or alco- 
holic stimulants, nervous exhaustion from prolonged appli- 
cation, prostration induced by excessive venereal indulgence 
and in many hysterical conditions of reflex origin, it has, 
in my hands, yielded excellent results. This acid combines 
readily with many substances ; is a good solvent for sul- 
phate of quinine, with which it may be administered, al- 
though I prefer giving it immediately after each dose. 
The advantage of hydrobromic acid over the bromide of 
potassium is its agreeable taste, for when given in half a 
glass of lemonade, it forms a very pleasant and refreshing 
draught. 

Dr. J. Milner Fothergill, in the Philadelphia Medical 



12 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Times, December 9th, 1876, says be has used it to allay 
bronchial irritation. His formula is as follows : 

^ Spts. Chloroform, 20 minims. 
Hydrobromlc Acid, }4 ounce. 
Syr. ScUlo?, 1 ounce. 

Aqua ad., q.s. '2 ounces. 

M. ET SiG.— One or two teaspoonsful three times a day. 

The above recipe I have used many times, with very 
gratifying results. The dose of the acid is from half to one 
drachm, given largely diluted. The formula for the prep- 
aration of hydrobromic acid is as follows : 

Bromide of Potassium, 10 ounces, 6 drachms, 28 grains. 

Dissolve In four pints of water and add 
Tartaric Acid, 13 ounces, 1 drachm, 27 grains. 

Bitartrate of potass, is thrown down as a precipitate, when 
the clear liquid may be decanted. It is then ready for use. 
This acid, from its pleasant and agreeable taste, is des- 
tined to supersede the use of bromide of potassium as it 
has been heretofore administered, and its combination with 
tartaric acid heightens the action of the bromic salts. It 
has been estimated that half a drachm ^is equal in efficacy 
to one and a half drachms of the bromide of potassium. 
The medicinal quality of this combination oft'ers a wide field 
for investigation, and if it sustains its reputation as a nervous 
sedative, superior in all respects to the bromide, we have 
gained a preparation of no trifling value. 

Peoria, III. J. S. Miller, M. D. 



Quinia as a Preventive of Scarlet Fever* 

During the late epidemic of scarlet fever in this city, I 
have used quinine to prevent its spread in a family, after 
one member of that family has contracted this disease, and 
in no instance has it attacked any other member of the 
family, unless the attack came on in a day or two after 
commencing the quinia. 

I give two or three grains, three times a day, according 
to the age of the child; then, after four or five days, the 
dose may be lessened ; but the administration of the 
(luinine must be kept up for three weeks, or until the sick 
members of the family are fully recovered. I have tried 
this practice in a number of cases, and with complete 

KUCCeSB. 

As scarlet fever still prevails in many parts of our 
country, I would like to have physicians try it and inform 
us of their .success with it. H. 

Peokia, April, 1880. 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 13 



Providence and Disease. 

In an article under the above title, published in the 
Detroit Lancet for March, 1880, Dr. C. E. Page claims that 
an unregulated and unseasonable diet is a potent factor in 
the causation of many of our most malignant though 
widely dissimilar forms of disease. Of course the form ot 
disease being determined by the constitutional predis- 
position of the individual. 

Although it is a well established fact, that a diet, to be 
healthy, must be suited to climate and season, we think the 
ground taken by Dr. Page is somewhat novel and cer- 
tainly worthy the consideration of sanitarians. 

We are too apt to ignore common sense in our search 
after the cause of disease, allowing our imagination too 
much sway, becoming infatuated with dazzling theories, 
when often times the cause sought for, lies plainly before 
us and may be found in what we foolishly considered too 
commonplace and familiar an origin. 

Dr. Page says : " The excessive or wrongly composed 
diet (too many meals, too much at each, and too hot ; meat,, 
pastry, rich cake, greasy biscuits, short cake, coffee, tea, 
chocolate, gravies, spices, pepper, &c.,) that in summer 
proper, in spite of perfect ventilation, when we are virtu- 
ally living out of doors, will cause bilious, slow or yellow 
fevers, cholera or cholera morbus, will, during our artificial 
summer weather in winter — rooms over-heated, doors and 
windows sealed tight and almost entire absence of ventila- 
tion — produce scarlet, typhus and typhoid fevers, diph- 
theria, croup and the like." ^ 



* [For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

' Wliooping Cough. 

" Medicus " writes us, to ask the readers of the Peoria 
Medical Monthly, for the best treatment of whooping 
cough: both abortive (if there be any) and palliative. Let 
us hear from our readers. 



Apropos of the metric question : The U. S. nickel five 
cent piece is two centimetres in diameter, and its weight is 
five grammes. Five of them placed in a row will give the 
length of the decimetre, and two of them will weigh a 
decagramme. 



14 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Repeated Tapping- as a Preparatory Measure to Successful 

Ovariotomy. 

The three patients upon whom ovariotomy was per- 
formed in this cit}^ during the past year, and all of whom 
recoTered, were in the previous two years tapped and the 
fluid withdrawn by^ the aspirator, ten, fifteen and twenty- 
three times respectively. 

In none of these cases was the operation performed 
until the system of the patient was no longer able to sustain 
the drain upon it, and the operation was imperatively 
demanded. 

Does not this repeated tapping prepare the peritoneum 
for the final operation of extirpation, and render it less 
liable to take on inflammatory action, and septic influence? 

I do not think tapping as dangerous an operation as 
many consider it. I have performed it many times in the 
past few years, and have never yet seen any serious conse- 
quences follow. It is done with but slight inconvenience 
to the patient, and generally she will be up and around the 
house the next day. 

In multilocular tumors but a single puncture need be 
made. I have emptied at least a dozen cysts without 
removing the needle. 

Statistics show that ovariotomy has been more success- 
ful when performed on tumors of many years growth, than 
when more recent. Emmet gives- as the reason for this, 
that "a judicious delay enables the peritoneum to become 
more tolerant to irritation and much less liable to inflam- 
mation than it would be were the tumor removed at an 
earl}' stage of its growth." But may not the tolerance of 
the peritoneum in these cases be found to be due more to 
the repeated tappings than to the mere existence of the 
tumor in the cavity for a variable number of years ? 

Peoria, April, 1880. H. 



Dr. J. Marion Sims reports, in the Medical Record^ the 
loss of a patient, '21 hours after the use of the bromide of 
ethyl. The operation (Battey's) was a long one, and the 
woman had for five years, been subject to epileptic attacks. 
Whether the anaesthetic was directly the cause of death, or 
not, does not seem to be clearly settled. We are glad Dr. 
Sims has laid this case before the profession, as it may 
deter many from a too hasty and careless use of this pow- 
erful agent. * 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 15 



Anaesthesia in Labor. 

In an able and very interesting paper read by Dr. D. M. 
Barr before the Obstetrical Society, of Philadelphia, and 
published in the Surg, and Med. Bep., Dr. Barr offers the 
following combination as an anaesthetic for use in cases of 
labor, the proportions graded according to the relative 
•strength and nature of the ingredients, and the demands of 
the case: 

^ Ether, 3 parts ; 

Chloroform, 1 part ; 

Alcohol, 2 parts. 

In summing up he makes the following points : 

1. The claim of the parturient woman for anaesthesia 
is unequaled by any claim in the wide world. 

2. These claims will not have received a fair response 
until the anaesthetic is as common in the lying-in chamber 
as upon the operating table. 

3. A proper anaesthesia is more directly indicated and 
more safe in the ordinary obstetric patient than in the surg- 
ical patient, case for case. 

4. We have an anaesthetic mixture, capable of produc- 
ing perfect immunity from suftering, without intoxication, 
without vomiting, without reaction or dangerous sequences. 

5. The babe offers no contra-indication, since its safety 
is not jeopardized, 

6. Labor is not hindered, but rather hastened by the 
anaesthetic. 

7. Anaesthesia offers no contra-indication for the use 
►of any medication, which would be indicated in its absence. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Tooth Ache Drops. 

The following formula has been tried for a long time 
:and has proven very successful. The writer of this has had 
jpersonal experience of its efficacy and alway carries a small 
phial in his pocket ready for use : 

^ Chloroform (pure). 

Tr. Aconite rad., a. a. 3 drachms ; 
Tr. Capsicum, 1 drachm ; 

Oil of Cloves, 1 drachm ; 

Camphor, }4 drachm. 

Mix and apply on cotton to the hollow tooth. ^ 



16 Peoj'ia Medical Monthly. 

Ethyl Bromide, or Hydrobromic Etlier. 

In relation to this new anaesthetic, which is now the- 
subject of much discussion among physicians, we take the 
foirowiuo; extracts from an article in the College and Clinical 
Becord, Feb. 16th, 1880 : 

" It is not so recent an agent as is generally thought. 
Robin made known its properties as an anesthetic in 1837^ 
after having made many experiments with it. 

"Mr. jSTunnely, of Leeds, England, reported some ex- 
periments in 1849, and in 1865 exhibited it to the members 
of the British Medical Society, stating that he was using it 
quite extensively, both in his private practice and in the 
Leeds General Infirmary, 

"Dr. Laurence Turnbull, of Philadelphia, in 1878, seems- 
to have been the first to arouse an interest in it in this 
country. Since that time it has been tried somewhat exten- 
sively." 

Dr. R. J. Levis reports on its properties and use as 
follows : 

" The principal physiological characteristics which will, 
concern the surgeon are its rapidity of action and the 
quickness of recovery from its effects. So far as observed 
by me, it does not influence the circulation, except some- 
times to produce a slight increase in the rapidity of the 
heart's action. The cerebral anaemia and the fatal syncope 
of cardiac depression, to which chloroform is liable, do 
not appear to threaten. Respiration is but little influenced 
beyond the ordinary characteristics of all anaesthetic sleep. 
* * * Nausea and vomiting appear to occur less fre- 
quently than after chloroform and ether. * * * Its vapor 
is quite unirritating to the respiratory passages when in- 
haled. * * * General excitement and tendency to 
struggle occur less frequently than in the early stages of 
ether or chloroform anaesthesia. * * * Recovery from ' 
its effects is much more rapid. * * * The pupils dilate 
as soon as complete anaesthesia is induced, and as the sen- 
tient state returns they resume their normal condition. 
Anaesthesia is usually effected in from two to three minutes, 
the quantity used varying, with the operation, from one to 
eleven fluid drachms. The vapor of bromide of ethyl is 
not inflammable. * * * The ordinary essentials of the 
proper and safe production of anaesthesia are required in 
the use of the bromide of ethyl. Whilst feeling inclined 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 17 

to impress caution in regard to the use of so powerful an 
agent, I am, from a basis of experience, inclined to recom- 
mend its use to the profession." * 



Forced Ailnientation. 

An excellent paper on an important and too often over- 
looked theraputic measure, was read before the New York 
State Medical Society and published in the " Proceedings " 
for March, 1880. Its author, Dr. A. Hutchins, claims that 
the principle of forced feeding is a valuable adjunct in 
resisting certain influences of heredity. He says, " The 
inheritors of certain constitutional taints are notoriously 
light and fickle feeders. The parents themselves uncon- 
scious of the discipline of food, accept their oftspring's 
" weak stomach " as the inevitable. But this weak stomach 
is also an uneducated stomach, with latent possibilities that 
a cultivated discretion ma}^ call into vigorous exercise. 

This digestion, not stimulated by drugs, but exercised 
by materials that possess the elements of nutrition, can 
enforce a nutrition by which the malign hereditary influ- 
ences may be set aside, and the maturing years be coinci- 
dent with maturing powers of resistance that would be 
unknown to the period of development, ill-trained and ill- 
nourished. 

Bearing in mind that food is the natural tonic, and that 
drug tonics are but excitants to the natural tonics, it, at the 
same time, is not to be lost sight of that, during the entire 
period of growth and development, where waste and repair 
go on so rapidly, where accumulation stretches way up 
beyond the region of supply, and that tor a long continu- 
ous succession of years, any protracted failure of appetite 
and an inadequacy of food, coincident with a want of 
enthusiasm and buoyancy native to vigorous youth, must 
naturally suggest the most gloomy forebodings. * * * 
^ * Aside from all considerations of appetite, notwith- 
standing any weakness of will power, or the multiplied 
obstacles of repulsion, loathing, or seeming impossibilities, 
the first point is to get food of some kind into the stomach 
in such quantities as is possible, and at stated intervals, as a 
stern duty, either in fulfillment of an intelligent apprecia- 
tion of the necessity, or in submissive obedience to inflex- 
ible orders." 

In carrying out this system Dr. Hutchins suggests : 



18 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

1. The food selected should not require mastication,. 
possess no special flavor and be capable of being sawllowed 
by a single effort. 

2. Solids and semi-solids have, for familiar physiolo- 
gical reasons, preference over liquid foods. 

3. Food must be taken at stated intervals, stretching- 
over a long period of each day. It is best practiced eigh- 
teen hours out of the twenty-four. And should be com- 
menced before the patient is out of bed in the morning. 

4. Mtrogenized foods are inappropriate in the early- 
stages of forced feeding. 

5. The free use of water is to be insisted on as a requi- 
site to success. 

6. These measures must be united with all those con- 
ditions which influence free animal action, regular evacua- 
tions, abundant fresh air, judicious exercise and cheerful 
occupation. 

We think this subject worthy of the most careful con- 
sideration by physicians, and feel assured that it is a most 
valuable measure in connection with the prevention audi 
treatment of disease, * 



New Metliod of Using- SaKcylic Acid. 

Compresses wet with an aqueous solution of the salicy- 
late of soda, 5 per cent., are applied upon painful articula- 
tions. To avoid acidity the liquor is neutralized with a 
drop or two of ammonia. In two cases the pains were re- 
markably diminished in a short time ; one of the patients- 
could move his affected joint slightly half an hour after 
the compresses were applied. No great irritation of the' 
skin was produced, but slight disquamation took place. 
The salicylate is absorbed quite rapidly, since its presence 
could be demonstrated in the urine in twelve to fifteen 
hours. Many patients cannot tolerate salicylic acid, and' 
refuse to take it; here is a handy means for its employ- 
ment. — Detroit Lancet, March, 1880. 



Dr. Thos. G. Morton has measured the length of the- 
lower limbs of over 300 boys at Girard College, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. He found asymmetry and not symmetry to be? 
the rule, the difference in length ranging from a fraction, 
of an inch to an inch. 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 19 

Ovariotomy in Italy. 

A report of the first one hundred operations of ovari- 
otomy in Italy was published in the Journal des Sciences 
Medicales for February, 1880. These were performed by 
thirty-four different surgeons. The recoveries were thirty- 
seven ; the deaths sixty-three. Dr. Peruzzi thinks the 
unsatisfactory results are accounted for by the number o± 
different surgeons making the operation, and that results 
are better in the hands of a few specialists, who by practice 
become expert in the operation. — Surg, omd Med. Eep.^ 
April, 1880. 

[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Ergotine as a Topical Application to the Eye. 

The excellence of this remedy in some forms of ophthal- 
mia is undoubted, especially when the inflammation is 
intense and accompanied with chimosis. In the proportion 
of thirty grains to the ounce of water, a few drops instilled 
into the eye every three or four hours, at the same time 
applied externally by a cloth saturated with the solution 
and laid over the organ, ergotine gives very satisfactory 
results. The evidence of others as to its efficacy, as well 
as our own experience in its use, leads us to consider this 
a remedy of great value. S. 



Use of Turpentine in Cancer. 

That such a familiar substance as turpentine should be 
found of value in cancer is somewhat surprising. Il^ever- 
theless, Dr. John Clay, of Birmingham, England, relates 
in the Lancet, March 27th, several cases in which Chian 
turpentine, freely administered, thirty or sixty grains a day, 
really seemed to modify favorably the disease as it appeared 
in uterine schirrus and epithelioma. He thinks he can 
safely assert that when the remedy is steadily used for some 
time, it arrests the progress of the disease and relieves the 
pain incidental to the malignant growth. Certainly, if it 
will accomplish this, the discovery will prove one of the 
highest importance in therapeutics. — Medical and Surgical 
Heporier, Ajml 17 th. 



Mr. Kelley, Representative from Pennsylvania, intro- 
duced a bill, March 22d, to impose a duty of 10 per cent, 
on quinine. 



20 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Forceps or Its Alternatives. 

Dr. Barnes read a paper before the London Obstetrical 
Society on the use of forceps, compared with its alterna- 
tives. After fully discussing the objections to the use of 
ergot, its danger, its uncertainty, &c., the conditions which 
demand a resort to the use of forceps or its alternatives, he 
concludes as follows : 

"1. In lingering labor, when the head is in the pelvic 
cavity, the forceps is better than its alternatives. 

2. In lingering labor, when the head is engaged in the 
pelvic brim, and when it is known that the pelvis is well 
formed, the forceps is better than its alternatives. 

3. In lingering labor, when the head is resting on the 
pehnc brim, the liquor amnii discharged, and it is known, 
either by exploring with the hand or by other means, that 
there is no disproportion, or only a slight degree of dispro- 
portion, even although the cervix uteri is not fully dilated, 
the forceps will generally be better than its alternatives. 

4. In proportion as the head is arrested high in the 
pelvis, in the brim, or above the brim, the necessity, the 
utility and safety of the forceps become less frequent. 

5. As a corollary from the preceding proposition, in- 
creasing caution in determining on the use of the forceps 
and greater skill in carrying out the operation are called 
for." S. 



Dr. E. R. Squibbs, of Brooklyn, confesses to hav- 
ing a prejudice against bromide of ethyl, though purely upon 
theoretical grounds. He gave as a chemical rule, that the 
anffisthetics, which are the least dangerous, are those 
which are the most simple, and when decomposed yield 
elements, which, physiologically, are known to be most 
innocuous, as nitrous oxide, &c. The bromide of ethyl, 
which is a loosely molecular article and more easily decom- 
posed than bromides of ordinary bases, contains 73 per 
cent, of the irritant poison, bromine. If then, under cer- 
tain circumstances, this agent becomes discomposed the 73 
per cent, of bromine goes into the system and grave effects 
will be produced, if not soon eliminated. Whereas under 
other circumstances, if it remains as bromide of ethyl it 
may work no harm. — Medical Record. * 



The next annual meeting of the Illinois State Medical 
Society will be held at Belleville, Tuesday, May 18th, 1880. 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 21 

Morphia in Uraemia. 

A writer to the Louisville Medical News says : Of this 
method Prof. Loomis stands an eminent defender, and 
those who have listened to his lectures or read his book, 
must have been somewhat impressed with the plausibility 
of his views. Prof. Loomis reasons as follows : The skin 
in patients with acute uraemia loses its excretory action — 
and diaphoresis if induced is not eliminative — nor do the 
bowels respond readily to purgatives. Then, if the sys|j;em 
is overwhelmed by this uraemic poison, and all the avenues 
of elimination closed, the question is, how can you coun- 
teract the influence of this poison and open again the 
channels of elimination ? 

To diminish reflex sensibility and subdue spasmodic 
muscular paroxysms must be speedily accomplished, for 
either, if continued, will terminate life. Chloroform, here- 
tofore, has been almost a sole remedy, but Prof. Loomis 
believes that so far from being beneficial, it even prejudices 
the chance of ultimate recovery by the changes its inhala- 
tion produces in the blood, which changes hasten rather 
than retard the development of the uraemic toxaemia. It 
also seems to him to be more diflicult to establish diapho- 
resis and diuresis in patients to whom chloroform has been 
given. Chloroform only controls muscular spasm tem- 
porarily, and does not exercise any neutralizing eflect on 
the poison. Dr. Loomis says that in morphia he has an 
agent that not only controls muscular spasm, but re-opens 
the avenues of elimination, either by counteracting the 
eftects of the uraemic poison on the nerve centers, and thus 
facilitating the action of diaphoretics and diuretics, or itself 
acting as an eliminator. He uses it in cases where the 
premonitory symptoms are most severe, as well as during 
the convulsions. The rules relating to its administrations 
are altogether governed by the convulsions. Sufficient 
quantities should be given to control spasm. ISTeither the 
condition of the pupil nor the number of respirations afford 
liable guides. Thus, he believes, morphia administered 
hypodermically becomes a powerful eliminator, in which 
belief Dr. Loomis is sustained by weighty corroboration, 
based upon reliable clinical data. 



Always read our advertisements, as we know them to 
be from responsible parties. ISTo others will be admitted 
to our pages. 



22 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

[From the Medical Brief, April, 1880.] 

Tji>ho-3Ialarial Fever. 

Editor Medical Brief: A number of your correspoDdent& 
from this State are asking and giving the treatment of 
typho-malarial fever, so-called. What is typho- malarial 
fever? Some of its early advocates, and indeed those that 
first discovered it, say that said fever ceased to exist as soon 
as the special causation was removed ; that armies closely 
crowded in unhealthy camps were attacked with a fever 
that they (the surgeons) called typho-malarial fever, and 
as soon as the armies were disbanded and allowed to go 
home, where they were better fed and clothed, and their 
location healthier, then said fever became one of the 
things that were. 

JS'ow no sane physician will admit that we have any 
disease in this climate which is not more or less compli- 
cated with malaria — that subtle, indescribable, but potent 
poison, common to our climate. Why not say pneumono- 
malarial fever, or rheumo-malarial fever, when our 
patient has pneumonitis or arthritis ? The fact is, they are 
fighting either aggravated remittent or simple typhoid 
fever. I make quinine in five to ten grain doses, differ- 
entiate for me. If after the use of said remedy, I am 
enabled to note a decided remission, I say then remittent 
fever. If my quinine aggravates symptoms, I drop at once 
to a simple expectant treatment, and call it typhoid fever. 
The treatment of either disease is given, far better than I 
can give it, in any standard text-book. 

J. E. Stinson, M. D. 
Montague, Texas. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Physicians vs. Druggists. 

The difficulties between druggists and doctors seem to 
be nearing a climax, and physicians are eagerly seeking 
relief. Some of the charges against the druggist are but 
too well founded. The use of prescriptions, over and over,, 
without permission or directions ; the very common habit 
of prescribing for venereal diseases; the use of poor, cheap 
drugs, and the substitution of others for the drugs called 
for in the prescription ; and last, but not least, the enor- 
mous prices patients are made to pay. The druggist in- 
sists on cash payments, the doctor cannot always do so, 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 23 

hence the druggist often gets all the money, and the doctor 
can go hang for his pay. It will drive physicians to dis- 
pensing their own remedies, as was formerly the custom, 
or to the establishing of co-operative societies by physicians^ 
who will buy their own medicines, employ a competent 
clerk and charge patients only a small advance on cost, as 
has been suggested in several medical journals. * 



Diiplicating- Prescriptions. 

A recent medical act in Wisconsin reads as follows : 
" If any physician practising medicine in this State, shall 
write or cause to be printed on any prescription the words, 
' No duplicate,' any vender of medicines who shall dupli- 
cate such prescription without the physician's consent, shall 
be subject to a fine often dollars for each ofi^'ence." 



New Method of Administering- Kousso. 

One-half ounce of fresh powdered kousso is treated 
with one ounce of hot castor oil, and afterward by two 
ounces of boiling water by displacement, express, and by 
means of the yelk of an egg, combine the two percolates- 
into an emulsion, and add forty drops of sulphuric ether, 
flavoring with some aromatic oil. This is to be taken at 
one dose early in the morning, after a previous fast of about 
eighteen hours. The worm is usually expelled dead after 
six to eight hours. — Buffalo Medical and Surgical Journal. 



Cystitis. 

A writer in the Medical News gives the following as a 
very prompt remedy for an inflammatory condition of the 
bladder and painful micturition : 

Acidi Benzoic!, 1 drachm. 

Ext. Belladonnae, }A drachm. 

Ext. Eucalypti Globuli, 2 drachms. 
Mixturse Amigdalse, 53-^ ounces. 
01. Cinnanaoni, 8 drops. 

M. SiG.— A tablespoonful every three hours. 

The mixture is not a very pleasant one to the taste, but 
taken in a half-glass of skim milk it is quite tolerable. 
The diet should be confined as largely as possible to skim 
milk, and the bladder washed out twice a day with a pint 
of lukewarm water, to which has been added two drachms 
of bicarbonate of sodium. 



2-i Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

EDITORS: 

John Murphy, M. D., J. L. HamiUon, M. D., . 

R. Steele, M. D. 



All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. McHvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

229 South- Adams Street, PEOKIA, ILL. 

Notes and Extracts. 

In offering another journal to the profession, we hope 
that it will be found, what it is intended to be, a help to 
the busy practitioner — a practical working journal. Our 
idea of a medical journal is, that the articles should be short 
and to the point, and of such character that they may 
be of actual benefit in every-day practice. We call the at- 
tention of our readers to the prospectus (printed elsewhere) 
and hope all will give us their assistance in carrying out 
this idea. It will not take you long to contribute a short 
article, and you may help a brother physician out of a very ' 
hard place. Please take an interest in our work and give 
us something from your experience that will benefit others, 
and you may find something in our pages that will be of 
great help to you. * 

We had expected a contribution from Prof. W. H. 
Byford, of Chicago, for this number of our Monthly, but 
in a letter received. Dr. Byford begs to be excused until 
next time. Dr. Byford is busily engaged in getting ready 
for press a new edition of his work on " Diseases of 
Women." When published this work will mark a new 
epoch in the gynaecological literature of our country. It 
will be the latest and best work on the subject, and coming 
from such a master of the art of teaching, its practical 
nature will render it a necessity to every practitioner. * 



The article on "Neurasthenia" will be found to be a 
most able and interesting resume of our present knowledge 
of this disease. It is longer than it was our purpose to 
print, but it will fully repay a perusal. We won't do so 
again. 



Peoria Medical Monthly. ^ 25 



A Simple Method of Evacuating Small Calculi. 

Dr. Mercier recently demonstrated before the Societe de 
Medicine, an easy and practical means of getting rid of 
small vesical calculi. It consists in making the patient lie 
on his belly, then the calculi fall by their own weight into 
the anterior part of the bladder. The patient is then 
allowed to rise slowly on all fours. He micturates in this 
position, and the calculi, which have not yet had time to 
return into the cid de sac behind the prostate, are carried 
away in the stream of urine. — Medical Press and Circular. 



A doctor went out west to practice his profession. An 
old friend met him on the street one day and asked him 
how he was succeeding in his business. 

"First rate," he replied. "I've had one case." 

" Well, what was that ? " 

" It was a birth," said the doctor. 

" How did you succeed with that? " 

" Well, the old woman died, and the child; but by the 
grace of God, I'll save the old man yet." — Exchange. 



At the Autopsy. — Three medical students met together 
to consult at the sick bed of General X. After they go, 
the General rings for his man-servant : 

" Well, Jaques, you showed those gentlemen out; what 
did they say ? " 

"Ah, General, they seemed to difter with each other ; the 
big fat one said they must have a little patience, and at the 
autopsy — whatever that may be — they would find out what 
the matter was." — Exchange. 



Book I^otiee. 



Dr. Robert Roskoten, of this city, has just published an 
historical drama, entitled, "Carlotta." It is founded on 
the eventful and unfortunate career of Maximillian and 
Carlotta in Mexico, It is finely written, and evinces a 
thorough acquaintance with the subject, as well as an ac- 
curate knowledge of the laws of dramatic unity. This work 
aflbrds abundant proof that a physician may enjoy a large 
practice and at the same time find opportunity to success- 
fully cultivate a fine literary taste. 



Advertisements^. 



ST, FfiftNCIS' BBftOLEy HOSPITAL 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements ; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jfos. Studeb. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartmen^^s for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, (Doctor's 
attendance at regular rates), are from $7 to $10 per week, according 
to size of room and accommodation required. In the general wards, 
the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

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ISAAC VTALKER & SON 

Importers of 

AND 

Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 

AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKER AND COLT 

SHOT GUNS. 




A SPLENDID LINE OF 

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AND 

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REVOLVERS, 

Fine Gufiery. 

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Wholesale and Retail Dealers ia 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

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125 and 127 

SOUTH WASHINGTON 

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PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



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WE HANDLE A FULL LINE OF 

IMPORTED & DOMESTIC CHEMICALS. 

g^PERFUMES^O 

AND 

TOILET ARTICLES OF THE BEST QUALI7Y, 

OUE STOCK OF 

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Anything in the line of 

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is large and well selected. 

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^""^ ^^^ And Dealers in 

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Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

803 South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

EXCELSIOR ARTESIAN TUB AND SWIMMING BATHS, 

BLUFF STKEET, (between Main and Hamilton,) PEOBIA, ILL. 

Dr. J. Perrin Johnson, Proprietor. 
The water used in these baths comes from an artesian well, 912 feet deep. An analysie 
shows a pint to coTitain : SOLIDS.- 



G rains. 

Carbonate of Lime 2-75 

Carbonate of Ma^eaia 1 . 

Clilorldcof .Sodium 7.75 

Chloride of Potsma 2.2i0 



Grains. 

Snlpbateof Lime 10.625 

Sulphate of Magnesia 8.875 

Sulphate of Soda 5.625 

Protoxide of Iron, Manganese and Phos- 
phates traces 

OASES. Cubic Inches. 

Carbonic Acid »•••• 0.29 

Nitrogen 0-38 

H jdrogen Sulphide 0.48 

The use of thin water hai been found h»ghlj beneficial in diseases of the UEINAKT AP- 
PARATUS, STOMACH and CUYLOPOETIC VISCERA, of the CUTICLE and in CATARRHAL, 
RHEUMATIC and SYPHILITIC AFFECTIONS. 

Patients from a distance can find comfortable accommodations at St. Francis Hospital or at 
private boarding houses. 



Advertisements. 



COLBURN, BIRKS d CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 

AND DEALERS IN 



KIDDER'S BATTERIES, GAIFFE'S BATTERIES, 
AMPUTATING, 

OPERATING, 

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Instruments Repaired and Niekle Plated. , 

Our new Instrument (Catalogue ready for distribu- 
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Our prices ^^ill be found low for first quality 
goods. 

Write for quotations before buying. 



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218, 220 & 222 S. Washington St., Peoria, 111. 



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purely Medical Journal with any thing near an equal circulation. 

Advertisements are indexed, immediately following the table 
of contents. 

This journal will be considerably enlarged in a few months ; 
but no increase will be made in rates to regular advertisers. The 
space devoted to advertisements is limited and is now nearly 
occupied. 

We invite correspondence. 



T:E!I?.15v3:S : 

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Half page 30.00 20.00 15.00 

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SPECIALTIES 

INTRODUCED TO THE PROFESSION BY 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



— , . -_, . ._, . , DEFIBRINATED BULLOCKS' BLOOD (DE- 

Sanguis Bovinus Exsieeatus. ^^^t:^^:^^^^^tZ^ 

Hospital, New York, and subsequeutly investigated bj F. E. Stewart, Ph. G., M. D., of the same city, who utilized the pro- 
duct by desiccation. Popularly employed as a remedy for consumption, etc., by invalids who drink it at the abattoirs, as it 
flows from the freshly slaughtered animals. 

.\3 SUSTAINING aud SUPPORTING measure it supplies nitrogenous tissue waste, obviates the tendency to death by asthenia, 
and forestalls a degree of prostration dangerous to life. 

.\s a RESTORATivB agent, it is indicated in the slow convalescence from fever, in wasting diseases of various forms, con- 
sumption and the like, in cachectic states from various constitutional poisons, as syphilis, scrofula, etc., and in all cases 
where impaired blood, nerves, or digestion, give rise to the anamio condition, with its resulting general debility, hypochon- 
driasis, or other functional disorder. 

As a CDRATivE agent, in atouic dyspepsia, anaemia, and various derangements of nutrition and secretion. 

For a description of the process of manufacture, etc., in detail, please send for circulars. 



.__. .J n -1—1.1 1 (HYDROBEOMIC ETHER)— chemically pure. The new anajsthetic. This ar- 

J-^Y'Q JT'1 1 (2J g QT H . 1. ll V I tide has been used for producing anesthesia, with very satisfactory results, 
"^"^ »^^A-i.x ^^ v.-* jf • pi-QY-ing to have very important advantages over chloroform, ether and other 

agents heretofore in use. It is powerful, rapid in action, and, in short, it possesses many advantages over the above agents. 
-Although comparatively a safe anaesthetic, we would still advise care in its use by those unfamiliar with its properties, and 

will be pleased to furnish circular containing report of case by Dr. J. Marion Sims, in which dangerous effects followed its use. 



J.__ ., (PISCXDIA ERYTURIXA.) The reports which have already been received 

Cjry^QK^Q I jOfT\A7'OOrj of the effects of this drug more than justify our action in placing it before 
'-^'■■^■*""^^^"- -'— "-'>J vv v.^'v^'.M.. the profession of this couutry. Making due allowance for the enthusiasm 
which its action has aroused, we would only say, that whereas, we a short time since merely asked the profession to submit it 
to a trial, we are now justiSed in recommending it as a substitute for opium in many painful affections. Its advantages over 
opium lie in its not coustipating or locking up the secretions, and in its leaving none of the unpleasant constitutional effects 
associated with the administration of opium. 



.- _. (FRANCISCEA UNIFLORA.) This drug is officinal in both Brazilian Dispensatories in which It Js 

JVI ri X\ r5 r*r5 classed among alteratives of the more active and positive kind. So marked is its effects in the syphilitc 
^*^^ * cache.'cia, that it has been called mkrcurio vegetal by the Brazilians. It is recommended also as au 
anti-rheumatic, relieving the pain and uiaterially shortening the natural course of the disease. 

We ask for it a thorough trial, under the belief that it will prove a valuable addition to the list of remedies commonly 
employed in rheumatism, "it is regarded by the Brazilians as almost a specific in the chronic form of the disease. 

. . TVe are just in receipt of a direct importation of this rare and expensive drug. 

Ih V +Y3Q /-sf 1)1 1 r^OI '^i Pi Duboisia, although scarcelv two years before the profession of this country, has 
•■— '•*^ '''■ *-*■*-' " -•— ' *-* V-.'^-'AkJ-IC*. already largely supplanted atropia, formerly regarded as indispensable as a my- 
driatic, in the practice of onthalmology. Its action on the eye is similar to that of atropia, dilating the pupil and paralyzing 
the mu.scle3 of accommodation, but is much more prompt and is attended by none of the disagreeable effects of that salt, irri- 
tation of the conjunctiva, dryness of the throat, and, in children, hallucinations, delirium, etc. 

, We would ask the especial attention of the medical profession and pharma- 

(1/a I Q + 1 y-j fi T- 'r'Ofl 1 1 f^T^ <=ist3 to our line of gelatine and gelatine-coated prep.arations, comprising 

^^-l ^^ i-C*-y^ I- ^^^ -L ■•■ i^"-*. «-iV-> i'^. Empty Capsules, Improved Rectal Suppository Capsules, and Gelatine-ooated 

, Pills. Our facilities for the manufacture of these articles are unsurpassed, and the perfection to which we have brought them is 

due to the sparing of no expense in the securing of the best methods and the most experienced skill. We confidently ask a 

comjiarison of our Gelatine preparations with those of any other maker. We have but recently added Gelatine-coated Pills to 

our .nock, preferring to delay manufacturing them until we should be able to perfect a process through which the objections to- 

Gelatine-coated Pills, as heretofore offered, might be entirely overcome, Our process is the result of years of experiment, 

and the expenditure of much capital. We claim for it complete freedom from the objections which attached to all the 

methods previously employed. 

. The desirability of some neat and expeditious method for the administration 

flci I Q+i n £4 I PI T^C;n I <SC; of bitter or nauseous drugs, will be particularly manifest to physicians during 
*— '^^'■C* mi*^ V-/C* Jk.»0 »..Ai^..^«J. tijg spring mouths, in which the demand for quinine, especially In malarial 

dislricta, la large. By using our Capsules the disagreeable taste of the most disagreeable drug may be completely obviated, 

and the patient saved the disturbauce arising from nausea and repugnance. 

.^ To enable us to supply the Physician with the means of utilizing to the fullest degree 

('^CJ r^CI 11^ Th 1 I I Oy^C the many advantages attending the employment of Gelatine Capsules, we have taken. 
K^CX [-'O l-AHi; J. AiiV^AO. ^^^ agency for two very ingenious Capsule Fillers, known respectively as Davenporf.s 
and Whitfield. With one of these instruments capsules may "be filled in much less time, than it would take to prepare pow- 
ders or to make pUla. 

Send for full descriptive circular of these instruments. 



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•€) 



1 eofik JVLedidkl viontlily 



;8®=" Contributions must be short — not to exceed five hundred words.'^li 

VOL. I. JUNE, 1880. NO. 2, 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Neurasthenia. 

Bead before the Decatur Medical Society June 2%th, 1879, iy 
A. Robertson Small, M. D. 

( CONCLUDED.) 
COURSE, DURATION AND TERMINATION. 

It usually comes on in a gradual and insidious manner, though 
sometimes it comes suddenly after some severe or long-continued 
mental exertion, or excesses. The symptoms usually increase 
gradually for weeks ; then they may remain stationary for awhile. 
Sometimes slight transitory improvement occurs, and then, after a 
slight excess, the patient grows worse. 

If proper treatment be adopted, improvement generally occurs, 
but months and years may elapse before recovery takes place. 
Some are very much benefited by treatment in a few months' time, 
but relapses are likely to occur in all cases, even on exposures of a 
trifling nature. Erb says that " intercurrent febrile afiections often 
«eem to have a favorable influence on the disease and to hasten re- 
covery," but says that he is unable to state whether there are incu- 
rable cases. He says: " I am also in doubt whether the disease can 
pass into any tangible chronic form of spinal disease (myelitis, 
sclerosis, gray degeneration). I have never observed such an event, 
and have never had to modify my diagnosis in the direction indi- 
cated. But only continued experience can decide." While Dr. 
Beard says on this subject, " Some of these cases, under proper and 
persevering treatment, seem to acquire a new constitution. Very 
many of these cases of neurasthenia I have watched not only while 
under treatment, but for months and years. I see every week, in- 
deed almost every day, cases that I treated all the way from five to 
ten years and more ago, and can testify that the results are often 
permanent. They may be sensitive, delicate perhaps, but they are 
•well, in working order, and in no need of special medical aid." 



28 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Pathology. — About the pathology of neurasthenia, if it has a 
pathology, there seeras to be but little known. Erb thinks the 
hypothesis of anremia of the cord is very plausible, but then, what 
causes antemia ? The conditions or anaemia and hypertemia are 
contracted by the vaso motor nerves, and, hence, it seems to me 
that anremia and hyperemia are rather the results of neurasthenia 
than causes of it. Erb also says : "It seems most natural to recur 
to fine disturbance of nutrition in the cord, such as we are si ill 
obliged to assume in so many diseases of the nervous system." Dr. 
Stillman says : "A rational explanation appears to be, that it is a 
debility affecting the nerve cells ; that there is a deficiency in vigor 
in the gray matter of the brain and cord. This cell debility arises, 
as is frequently the case elsewhere, from functional over-work, 
which weakens and enfeebles cell life, thereby interfering with the 
power of assimilation and nutrition, and, as a consequence, with the 
capability of performing physiological duty ; hence, the condition 
and symptoms found in neurasthenia. Just as over-drain upon 
physical strength may shatter and permanently weaken the muscu- 
lar system, so great draughts upon nervous energy may produce a 
similar result in the nervous system." Dr. Beard seems to hold to 
nearly the same view. He says, "In regard to the probable path- 
ology of neurasthenia, my view, as expressed in my first paper on 
the subject, is, that there is an impoverishment of the nerve force 
resulting from bad nutrition of the nerve tissue, on the metamor- 
phosis of which the evolution of nerve force depends ; as in anaemia 
there may be a deficiency in quantity, or impairment in quality of 
the blood, so in neurasthenia there is, without question, deficiency 
in quantity or impairment in quality of the nerve tissue ; hence the 
exhaustion, the positive pain, the unsteadiness, the fluctuating char- 
acter of the morbid sensations and phenomena to which the term 
neurasthenia is applied." Dr. Salisbury, of Cleveland, claims to 
be able to diagnosticate a seriously exhausted condition of the 
nervous system by the changed condition of the blood corpuscles, 
his theory being that the red corpuscles are carriers of substances 
that feed the nerves, and he asserts that when these corpuscles are 
not properly laden with food for the nerves, as in the case of 
nerve exhaustion and insanity, the corpuscles exhibit changes that 
the microscope can recognize ; hence an addition to our means of 
diagnosticating nerve impoverishment. Dr. Heintzman, of New 
York, claims to be able to determine, by examination of the blood 
under the microscope, whether the constitution is good or bad, and 
even to tell whether the subject is especially exhausted at the time 
of the examination — as, for example, after a sleepless night. If 
these claims can be verified we may soon have some positive knowl- 
edge on the pathology of this disease. 

Diagnoeis. — It is usually easy to distinguish neurasthenia from 
other nervous diseases. The symptoms of neurasthenia are nearly, if 
not all, subjective, while the objective symptoms which belong to 



Original Communications. 29 



organic diseases are lacking. The symptoms of neurasthenia are 
transient, fleeting and recurrent, may have one set of symptoms 
to-day, another different set to morrow, while the symptoms of 
organic disease are fixed and stable. It may readily be distinguished 
from most organic diseases by the absence of the objective symp- 
toms peculiar to them, thus it may be distinguished from locomotor 
ataxia by the absence of lancinating pains, of disturbance of sensi- 
bility ; of tottering when in the dark or when the eyes are closed, 
and by the co-ordinating power not being effected. Reflex activity 
is usually increased in neurasthenia, while, as a rule, it is dimin- 
ished in organic disease of the cord. 

Anaemia is sometimes mistaken for neurasthenia, and may ac- 
company it, though it is not necessarily present. Anaemia is more 
common among females, and usually follows bad nutrition, 
impure air, exhausting discharges, etc., while neurasthenia arises 
from intellectual labor or worry, or emotional or sexual exhaustion. 
It is necessary also to be able to distinguish the two divisions of 
neurasthenia — cerebrasthenia and myelasthenia ; and as Dr. Beard 
describes these differences very concisely and accurately, I cannot 
do better than give you his words. Tie says : " The symptoms that 
suggest cerebrasthenia are obviously those that are directly or in- 
directly connected with the head, and they may be either physical 
or psychical. Tenderness of the scalp, a feeling of fullness in the 
ears and head, all disorders of the special senses, tenderness of the 
gums, deficient thirst, morbid desire for stimulants and narcotics, 
gaping, yawning, rushes of blood to the head, congestion of con- 
juctiva ; the different forms of morbid fear, mental depression and 
impairment of memory and intellectual control, all indicate that 
the brain is chiefly affected. Certain symptoms, however, — as ex- 
ternal tenderness of the scalp, general or local itching, clamminess 
of the extremities, muscle volitantes, pain and heaviness in the back 
of the head, — may arise from exhaustion in the upper part of the 
spine. The symptoms that suggest myelasthenia, or spinal exhaus- 
tion, are local spasms of muscles, local chills and flashes of heat, 
shooting pains in the limbs, startings on falling to sleep, morbid 
sensations on the bottoms of the feet, as of burning or tenderness, 
vague pains in the feet, podalgia, sexual debility in its various 
phases, pain in the back — any part of it, from the nape of the neck 
to the tip of the coccyx, with or without the accompaniment of 
spinal irritation, — creeping and crawling sensations up and down 
the spine, incontinence of the urine or paresis of the bladder, feel- 
ing of pressure in the chest, with or without ticklishness in that 
region, heaviness and stiffness of the muscles simulating rheuma- 
tism, sensitiveness to cold and changes in the weather, hypersesthe- 
sia of mucous membranes, dryness of the skin or morbid perspira- 
tion, dryness of the joints, and dilated pupils. Some other 
symptoms — as nervous dyspepsia, constipation, flatulence, sick 
headache in all its forms, numbness, hyperasthesia and insomnia, — 



30 Feoria Medical Monthly. 



appear to be common in both states, since they manifest themselves 
when either cerebasthenia or myelasthenia is uppermost." 

Another important point of difference in these two conditions is 
that, in myelasthenia, physical exercise, as standing or walking, or 
even exercise of the arms, is tiresome and disagreeable, and makes 
the patient very soon feel exhausted ; while in cerebrasthenia, long 
and violent physical exercise can often be well borne, and may 
even be desired, while mental exertion, even for a short time, makes 
the patient tired and exhausted. But these two conditions are fre- 
quently combined, and sometimes alternate with each other. 

Prognosis. — The prognosis, as compared with organic nervous 
disease, or as regards life is favorable, though it may take months 
and years to restore the patient to health under the most favorable 
circumstances, and even then he is apt to be nervous and subject to 
a relapse. The prospect, however, of a final recovery depends a 
good deal on the severity of the attack, and the temperament and 
surroundings of the patient. This disease does not seem to involve 
any immediate danger to life, and whether it leads to any severe 
organic disease is doubtful, to say the least. 

We now come to the treatment of the disease, which embraces 
both the hygenic and medicinal. In the first place, all excessive 
claims on the nervous system must be forbidden. The patient must 
have a period of rest from all harmful occupations, and mental 
worry and trouble must be as far as possible removed. If the 
disease has been brought on by business worry or too close applica- 
tion to the same, it would be advisable to take a sea voyage, and 
forget, for a time, his business cares. In short, the causes, if they 
can be ascertained, should be removed entirely. Travel, change of 
scenery, and climate, cheerful and pleasant society are great helps 
in the treatment. The diet must be generous and varied, and 
should include those foods containing most phosphates. Alcohol, 
in moderate amount is allowable, but it should always be taken 
with meals. The patient must work but little and sleep much, 
must go to bed early, and at regular hours and sleep as long as he 
can, for nothing is more beneficial in these cases than plenty of 
good, sound, natural sleep. The sleeping room must be well ven- 
tilated, and the patient must move about in the open air a good 
deal, but never to the point of exhaustion. In most cases the sex- 
ual act need not be entirely prohibited, but should only be indulged 
in, in great moderation. Sexual excitement without gratification 
must be avoided. 

At this point the distinction between cerebrasthenia and myel- 
asthenia must be considered. In the former physical exercise is 
usually beneficial, such as walking, mountain climbing, skating, 
horseback riding, etc., but in the latter, absolute rest is demanded, 
or, at least only passive exercise should be indulged in according to 
the patient's strength. Riding may be indulged in in moderation, 
but in either case, open air exercise should not be indulged in to 



Original Communications. 31 

the point of actual fatigue or exhaustion. It is of the highest 
importance that the domestic and social life should be cheerful and 
agreeable, with no worry or anxiety. The patient should go as 
much as possible in pleasant and agreeable society, visit theaters, and 
places of amusement, in short, have his mind diverted as much as 
possible from business and worry. A change to the sea coast, or 
mountain air is often desirable. Sea bathing is also useful. 

Erb says : " Of the plans of treatment for the direct relief of 
the disease, the use of a moderate cold-water cure, well graduated 
to the patient's strength and sensitiveness, deserves special mention. 
Rubbing down with partly warmed water, gradually made colder, 
washing of the back, of the feet, and sitz baths are most suitable, 
and usually soon impart an increase of power and vigor. Douches 
and very cold applications should be avoided." 

Salt baths are stimulating and protective against cold. Stillman 
recommends Turkish and Russian baths as being useful, from their 
alterative action, and stimulation of the functions of the skin. He 
also recommends the cold spray or douch, directed against the 
spine, as being useful in rousing up the dormant energies of the 
nervous system. The galvanic and faradic currents have also been 
applied in these cases with good results. 

Among the medicines which have been found most useful are 
those which more properly come under the head of foods. Thus, 
the phosphates have produced excellent results. Malt, cod liver 
oil, iron, quinine and strichnia are all beneficial. Pills of phos- 
phorous and nux vomica are also useful. Dilute phosphoric acid 
is also used. As a sedative, or to procure sleep, nothing will equal 
the bromides, or the bromides combined with chloral. Stillman 
recommends a combination of Fowler's solution, bromide of potas- 
sium and nux vomica. Calabar bean and zinc have also been 
used. These remedies must be continued steadily and for a long 
time to gain any noticeable benefit. Any symptomatic indications 
which may arise, such as sleeplessness, pain, spermatorrhoea or in- 
digestion, should be treated with the appropriate remedies. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Arsenic in Ifeuralgia. 

One old and tried remedy is worth a thousand of the 
new ones that are thrust upon the profession with the 
sound of trumpets by manufacturers of drugs all over the 
country. This statement is pre-eminently true as to arsenic 
in ordinary neuralgia. Many competitors have risen and 
fallen, many are now striving to supersede it; still it stands 
above them all, without an equal. Yet it is not fully ap- 
preciated by a large part of the profession, because they do 
not know how to so administer it as to obtain its best ef- 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



fects. To derive the lull benefit of this drug it must be 
given, at first, in small and frequently-repeated doses, grad- 
ually increasing the dose, until the neuralgia is controlled 
or the medicine begins to show its constitutional eflects. 

Another point of equal importance is this : Long expe- 
rience has taught me that by combining it with opium a 
much larger quantity will be tolerated by the system than 
would be if given alone. The opium aids it also in con- 
trolling the neuralgia. The following is a formula which 
I have used with great satisfaction for many years : 

9f Fowler's Solution, 3 drachms 

Tinct. Opii, li drachms 

Alcohol, Ih drachms 
Mix. 

The alcohol, of course, is added to prevent so much of 
the opium in the laudanum from being precipitated. In 
giving this mixture I am in the habit of beginning with 
ten drops in water every three hours, and increasing two 
or three drops a day until the disease is controlled, or until 
decided constitutional eflects of arsenic are produced. It 
is rarely that the neuralgia does not yield before the con- 
stitutional eflects of the drug are manifest. In obstinate 
cases I have repeatedly increased the dose in this way until 
fifteen or twenty drops of Fowler's Solution were given 
every three hours with perfect tolerance on the part of the 
system, and generally had the satisfaction of seeing the 
neuralgia yield. 

I do not by any means put this forward as a specific. 
Many cases of neuralgia require other remedies as well,, 
such as iron, quinine, strychnia, etc.; but I do say that I 
have never found any one remedy that will compare with 
it if given as I have indicated. J. T. Stewart, M. D. 

Peoria, III., May, 1880. 



[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Eclampsia Puerperium. 

The subject of puerperal convulsions seems to have 
elicited rather more contrariety of opinion among observers 
than most things in the range of professional investigation. 
It doubtless seems reasonable, at first sight, to look for and 
expect to find a constant set of causes producing a constant 
set of symptoms, upon the general ground of cause and 
eft'ect. But, in the investigation of disease, it would be 
well to remember that nothing is more fallacious. Anaemia 



Original Coryimunications. 3B 

of the brain, from loss of blood, and hypersemia of the 
nerve centres (the opposite condition), both produce con- 
vulsion ; and when neither condition is present, the same 
phenomenon is observed, on account of reflex movement 
from sources of irritation far removed from the nerve cen- 
tres. It is plain that eclampsia puerperium presents itself 
to us in at least two forms, as widely separated as the poles, 
in causation and requirements for treatment. One set of 
cases will be found associated with general plethora, in 
which cerebral hypersemia is the proximate cause of the 
convulsion. These require the prompt and vigorous em- 
ployment of venesection for their relief. In strong con- 
trast to these is another group, which might very properly 
be styled the nervous or hysterical form. These have their 
origin in reflex nervous action, from the irritable gravid 
uterus, through the nerve centres, and are very properly 
and successfully treated with chloroform, chloral hydrate, 
opium, forced delivery, etc. The "confusion of tongues'^ 
in the literature of this most important subject arises from 
careless analysis of cases, and generalization from insuffi- 
cient data. 

One observer rushes into print with a single case of 
puerperal convulsion, leaving us in total ignorance of any 
condition present save convulsion and pregnancy, and con- 
cludes his report with the declaration that he shall never 
fear any case of this frightful disorder so long as he has 
chloral hydrate for his "armamentum medicorum." An- 
other, equally obscure in the description of his case, is just 
as positive in excluding everything but the lancet. 

It is true that medicine is not, and cannot ever be, an 
exact science, yet we certainly may expect a higher degree 
of unanimity than this. 

The two sets of cases referred to above are as widely 
separated as the poles in their pathology, and present a fair 
illustration of the worthlessness of generic names as at 
present used in the classification of disease. Puerperal 
convulsion is certainly not a specific disease, but one of 
ever varying conditions, each requiring its own line of 
treatment. Let us leave to the followers of Hahnemann a 
monopoly of the doctrine of " Specifics," and set it down 
that there is no "royal road" in the management of this 
ailment or any other. 

This generalization from insufficient data disfigures our 
medical literature to a lamentable extent, and it is by na 



54 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

means confined to observers of small experience and ob- 
scure position in the profession. That Bright's disease of 
the kidneys may co-exist with the puerperal state is not 
denied, but when Dr. Carl Braun, of Vienna, advanced the 
theory that albumenuria was almost, if not quite, the only 
cause operating in the production of puerperal convulsion, 
he promulgated a heresy which has done much harm. For- 
tunately the theor}' has been consigned to that vast museum 
of German medical abstractions, and no one is now alarmed 
at the discovery of albumeuous urine in connection with 
the puerperal state. Indeed, it is almost as common as 
morning sickness or discolored areola, and just as little 
regarded. 

Let us have more care in classification of cases and less 
generalization, and we will have more uniformity. " One 
sparrow does not make a summer," nor does one case, or 
even one entire class of cases, establish a general principle. 
It is safe to discard generic names altogether in the inves- 
tigation of diseased conditions, for, as an exponent of 
these, our nomenclature is altogether useless and only cal- 
■culated to mislead the inexperienced and unwary. 

S. M. Hamilton, M. D. 

Monmouth, III., May 10, 1880. 



[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Cliroiiiie Acid on Cancroid GroTvtlis. 

Editors Monthly: — I had a very critical case under my 
€are four years since, which, at the time, caused some talk 
in these parts, and which I think ought to be presented to 
the profession because of its peculiarity, both in appearance 
and success in specific treatment. 

November 25th, 1875, I was called to see Mrs. R. On 
examination I found a large cauliflower excresence on the 
lower part of the abdomen, about the size of the crown of 
a man's hat, having four or five points that looked like the 
blossoms of that plant. It was covered with a gelatinous 
substance, which discharged from it freely, supposed to be 
about one fluid ounce per day, and the tumor appeared to 
be increasing daily. 

The history of the case was the following: About six 
years previous Dr. Thomas of New York, had removed an 
ovarian tumor from her. (It weighed 57 fes., and she still 
has it preserved). Since the operation she had enjoyed 



Original CoTmnunications. 35> 

comfortable health to within six months ; at that time she 
was taken with a bilious, malarial fever, and at the begin- 
ning of convalescence this tumor made its appearance. Her 
physician thought it might be a hernia and advised a truss 
or pressure, but it grew rapidly worse. Several eminent 
physicians were consulted, but after vigorous treatment 
they pronounced it malignant and incurable, advising that 
nothing more be done, only careful nursing and bringing 
the mind to a condition of regeneration. 

Having carefully examined the case I determined to 
extirpate the tumor by means of caustics, if possible, hav- 
ing the promise of free co-operation by the family. I 
commenced by applying to the entire surface a saturated 
solution of chromic acid and gave freely of chloral hydrate 
and glycerine. The first application charred the substance 
about half an inch deep. In one week all that appeared 
killed was shaved off with a razor, and I applied another 
dressing as before, with an occasional dressing of chloride 
of zinc instead of the acid. Watching the case carefully 
that the sound tissues were not interfered with, fearing 
perhaps peritonitis might be induced, (which, let me say, 
was happily prevented.) 

About May 12th, I made the last application, and as a 
result in a few days, extracted from the opening a hard 
substance, about the size of a hen's egg, extending point 
downwards to the stem of the ovar3^ After which she 
made a good recovery, and to-day walks our streets as firmly 
and proudly as any lady can. 

I wish to call the attention of the profession to the 
merits of chromic acid in all cases of a cancroid character. 
I do not think in genuine cancer it has any strongly marked 
specific virtues, but I believe in epithelial cancroid tumors, 
wherever found, if properly applied, it will arrest their 
growth. 

In the past ten years I have radically cured many cases 
of so-called cancers, and simply by the judicious use of 
chromic acid. 

I have a case now under treatment — from a lady's womb 
I have taken two, about the size of a good sized hickory 
nut. I applied the acid but twice, two days in succession,, 
and she is rapidly convalescing. Have any of your corres- 
pondents had any experience with this drug ? I would like 
to hear from them. Geo. W. Carpentek, M. D. 

South Bend, Ind., May 10, 1880. 



36 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Alkaliue Treatment of Acute Rlieuiiiatisin. 

"We regret to observe that for the past few years there 
has been a tendeDcj to abandon, to a considerable extent, 
the use of alkalies in this disease. This is probably a result 
of two causes: first, a misconception of the action of the 
different alkalies, and their proper mode of administration ; 
secondly, the disposition on the part of the profession to 
experiment with new remedies. The experience of ever}- 
ph^'sician who has used the alkaline treatment understand- 
ingly, and the aggregate statistical results of that treat- 
ment, indicate its therapeutic value so unmistakably that 
we should pause and hesitate before abandoning it. Fuller 
treated 439 cases without a death and with only nine car- 
diac complications by alkalines. Contrast this with 246 
cases treated miscellaneously at St. George's Hospital in 
London, in which there were 114 cases of heart affection; 
or with Libson's, treated on different plans, in which fifty 
per cent, of all the cases had heart complications. 
Furnival had no heart affections in fifty cases treated on 
the alkaliue plan, and Chambers, under similar treatment, 
had only nine cardiac complications in 174 cases. Garrod, 
in fifty-one consecutive cases, had no heart difliculty after 
administering alkalies in the manner of Fuller for forty- 
eight hours. Dickenson treated by this method forty-eight 
cases with only a single heart complication, while in 113 
cases otherwise treated, he had 35 heart difficulties. 

Every unprejudiced observer must admit that these 
statistics are positively conclusive; and when the alkaline 
treatment fails, it does so probably from either inefiiciency 
or impropriety in its administration. Errors have been 
made in the doses and in the character of the alkalies used. 
The preparations of the two alkalies most frequently used, 
potass, and soda, have very different effects on the system. 
The salts of potass, depress the heart's action in large doses, 
weaken the action of the spinal system of nerves, and pro- 
duce an anfcmic condition of the general system, while it 
is known that the salts of soda do not produce au}^ of those 
disagreeable effects. Fuller's treatment takes these con- 
siderations into account, and is both soundly philosophic 
and eminently successful. He administers the neutral salts 



Original CommuniGations. 37 



of both potass, and soda combined, with a proportion of the 
free carbonate of one of them. His prescription is : 

9 Potass, acetas, 2 scruples, 
Soda bi-carb, U drachms, 
Aq, Pura, 3 ounces, 

Rendered effervescent by the addition of two drachms 
of citric acid. 
This draught is repeated every three hours until alka- 
line urine is produced, the action being usually prompt. If 
alkahnity of the urine does not soon follow this treatment, 
and particularly if any depressing effects are manifested, 
Fuller attributes them to the retention of too large an 
amount of the alkalies in the system, and renders the aboje 
draught aperient by using two scruples of the potassio- 
tartrate of soda instead of the acetate of potass, and tar- 
taric acid instead of citric acid. By this means the excess 
of the potass, salts is eliminated, the prostrating effectsof 
that excess are removed, and the urine becomes speedily 
alkaline. Further, all the comparative statistics that we 
have on the subject show that under the alkaline treatment 
the average duration of the disease is shorter, and the ten- 
dencv to relapses less, than under any other treatment. 

J. Murphy, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Case of Lacerated Cervix Uteri— Operation— Recovery- 

Mrs. F. G. P., the mother of two children — the elder 
about twelve years of age and the younger about ten 
months old — called at my office October 31st, 1879, with 
the following history and symptoms : 

She enjoyed fair health until the birth of her second 
child, who, at the date of her visit to me, was about three 
months old, except occasional attacks of indigestion, and 
sometimes leucorrhoea. She was attended in her last labor 
by a midwife, and had a very tedious labor ; and since get- 
ting up has had continual trouble with her stomach, for 
which she had consulted several physicians, but without 
relief. Her symptoms were a distressed feeling in the 
stomach which could not be called a pain, and which she 
described as a " cold feeling." Her distress was aggravated 
after eating. She declared that she could eat no meat, 
butter, in fact nothing but bread, without aggravating her 
distress. She also complained of nausea at times and 
bitter eructations, and said, " I have to spit all the time." 



38 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Her flesh was very mncli reduced, and she was weak and 
exhausted, A very prominent symptom was depression of 
spirits. She was utterly despondent, and had the most 
hopeless and gloomy forebodinejs. Her bowels were con- 
stipated, and she complained of a profuse leucorrhoea. 

Suspecting that the derangement of the stomach was 
only reflex, and that the uterus was primarily at fault, I 
made an examination, and found the uterus enlarged to 
about four times its normal size, and the cervix lacerated 
on the left side to within about one-eighth of an inch of the 
utero-vaginal junction, and on the right side about half 
that extent. 

Is'ovember 24th, with the assistance of Dr. Chenoweth,, 
of this city, I performed Emmet's operation. The patient 
was placed in Sims's position, anaesthetized, and the uterus- 
drawn down as low as possible. I then carefully and 
thoroughly pared the edges, and inserted three silver wire- 
sutures on the left side and two on the right, and, fastened 
them with perforated shot. She was then put to bed and 
kept quiet until union took place. I ordered the vagina to 
be washed out thoroughly two or three times a day with 
warm water slightly carbolized. The sutures were removed 
on the eighth day, when we found perfect union had taken 
place, except a small space of about one-fourth of an inch 
in diameter at the lower part of the right side, and this I 
again pared and united with a single silk suture. In five 
days this was removed, when union was complete through- 
out the whole extent, leaving the cervix as good as ever. 
^o rise in temperature or inflammatory symptoms followed 
the operation, and the woman has steadily improved' 
ever since, and is now well, and the uterus reduced to 
its normal size. During one week (the fourth after) 
she gained nine pounds in weight. Before the- 
operation she was an invalid, unable to work, and confined 
to her bed most of the time. In one month after the ope- 
ration she was able to move about and assist in the house- 
work, and in three months after the operation she was well 
and able to do all of her housework, and has continued so- 
since. A. Robertson Small, M. D. 

Decatur, 111. 



International Sanitary Conference. — The joint res- 
olution, authorizing the President to call an Internationals 
Sanitary Conference has passed the Senate. 



Original Communications. 39 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Whoopiiig" Coiigli. 

In answer to the inquiry of " Medicus" in the last issue, 
I will give my experience and remedy : 

In the year 1852, I saw an article by Dr. Carson, of 
Montgomery county, Pa., in the American Journal of Medi- 
cal Sciences^ on the efficacy of belladonna in whooping 
cough. I had a wery bad case in hand at that time — one 
child in the family having died, and a second one it seemed 
would die. I began at once to give belladonna as recom- 
mended by Dr. Carson, and in less than one week the 
cough had ceased, and the child made a rapid recovery. 
Since that time I have used belladonna in all bad cases of 
whooping cough, and with uniformly happy results. 

The formula of Dr. Carson was eight grains of the ex- 
tract of belladonna to one ounce of water. Nine drops of 
this contains one-eighth of a grain of the extract. I usu- 
ally begin with four drops of this, every three hours to a 
child two years old, and continue till the pupils are dilated 
or the face ilushed. If these eliects are not produced the 
iirst da}^ the dose is to be increased two drops daily until 
they appear or the cough is stopped. Of late years, since 
the bromide of potassium has come into use, I have given 
with the belladonna, a mixture of the elixir bromide of 
potassium with syrup of squills, wild cherry, or some other 
of the expectorant syrups ; believing that the bromide of 
potassium does, to some extent lessen, the liability to con- 
gestion of the brain, which belladonna may produce. 
They may be given together, but I prefer to prepare them 
separately as above given, and drop the belladonna into 
the mixture at each dose. In this way the dose can be 
regulated better, and you always know just how much you 
are giving, and can increase or reduce it at your pleasure. 
Always instruct the parents or nurse to stop the belladonna 
when the pupils are much dilated or the face flushed soon 
after taking the medicine. The next day the belladonna 
may be given again, but it is better to begin again with a 
reduced dose. Many cases of whooping cough may be 
greatly benefited by wearing a belladonna plaster on the 
spine, over the lower cervical and first dorsal vertebrae. 
The plaster should be small, so as not to inconvenience the 
child. J. L. H. 



40 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Boracic Acid in Inflammations of Mucous Membranes. 

At a meeting of the Baltimore Clinical Society, Dr. J. 
Sheltou Hill reported a case of gonorrhoea in which he used 
an injection of boracic acid (half a drachm to four ounces). 
Four days after, the patient was entirely well. He has also 
used it in a primary attack, the dose being increased to ten 
grains to the ounce. This case was cured in one week, 
after having lasted six days. The patient (a letter carrier) 
continued his employment during treatment. He has also 
employed this agent by inhalation in follicular tonsillitis 
with good results and in post nasal catarrh. In a very 
painful cystitis from long standing resilient stricture, the 
injection of an eight grain solution, morning and evening, 
after drawing the urine, gave equally surprising and satis- 
factory results. Astringents of zinc, acetate of lead, 
opium, nitrate of silver, etc., had been used for the cistitis, 
but the patient grew steadily worse, until the employment 
of the boracic acid. The injections were made through a 
small flexible catheter, about a !N"o. 2. The patient had 
suftered intensely, necessitating hypodermic administra- 
tion of anodynes, but after a short time was enabled to 
walk a long distance without distress. — Maryland Medical 
■Journal. 



Painless Cure of Internal Hemorrhoids . 

Dr. R. A. Vance of Cincinnati, gives the following 
painless and certain cure of these troublesome tumors : 
" The tumor must be completely extruded. This done by 
means of enemata of hot water. Investigate the condition 
of the uppermost tumor ; find the spot where sensibility is 
least (which is always at the summit), and pass a curved 
needle through the summit, being careful not to go too 
deep, or to bring the needle out too far from where it en- 
tered. By attending to these points the needle is passed 
without pain, yet if passed too deep or carried too far from 
the entrance, not only will pain be excited, but the rectum 
will contract and the tumors return. As soon as the needle 
is passed, tie the ligature into a loop about six inches long ; 
this loop will enable the surgeon to control the movements 
of the whole mass of tumors; next, pass a ligature through 
each of the other tumors, making the thread double, and 
tying them so that there is not more than an inch of loop 
in all. Finally, draw down the upper tumor by means of 



Periscope. 41 

the double thread through it, and tie* a knot in the latter 
so close to the tumor that all the setous may be alike in 
length ; then cut off the superfluous thread and return the 
tumors within the anus. This done, the patient should be 
instructed to keep his bowels freely open, daily, but above 
all to at once assume the recumbent posture should any 
pain develop in the parts. Cases vary widely in the dis- 
position of the seton ; in some this comes away within a 
fortnight, leaving an ulcer that continues open until the 
hemorrhoidal tumor disappears; in others it remains until 
all the pathological products have been absorbed, and then 
drops out. It is worthy of trial in cases in which the 
patient cannot abandon his calling during treatment. It 
takes from five to nine weeks to cure an average case by 
this method." — Med. and Surg. Rep., May, 1880.' 



Medical Societies. 

The Woodford County Medical Society met in El Paso, 
111., May 4th, and was called to order by the president. Dr. 
W. 0. Ensign. The minutes of the last meeting were read 
and approved. The reports of secretary and treasurer 
were approved. At the afternoon session. Dr. J. S. Whit- 
mire gave a description of several cases of puerperal con- 
vulsions which had come under his notice. The discussion 
on this subject was continued b}^ Drs. Zeller, Rich, Blanch- 
ard, Reynolds, Kinnear, Lichtenberger, Slenimons and Cole. 
Dr. K. E. Rich read a clinical report of thirty-five cases of 
scarlet fever. President Ensign extended the report from 
his own practice. The discussion following was partici- 
pated in by Drs. Zeller, Whitmire, Lichtenberger and 
others. The election of ofiicers for the ensuing 3'ear re- 
sulted as follows: President, Dr. Chas. T. Lichtenberger; 
Vice-President, Dr. Enoch Blanchard; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Dr. F. Cole. Drs. J. G. Zeller and C. T. Lich- 
tenberger were appointed delegates to the American Medi- 
cal Association, and Drs. Whitmire, Cole, Slemmons and 
Crawford, delegates to the State Medical Society. After 
appointments for essays and papers for the next meeting, 
the society adjourned. F. Cole, M. D., Sec'y. 



A BILL to regulate the Practice of Medicine in the State 
of Maryland, failed to pass at the late meeting of the legis- 
lature. The West seems to lead the East in such matters, 
as many of the Western States have had such laws in force 
for some years. 



42 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Transactions of- the Peoria City Medical Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Peoria City Medical Society,. 
Dr. J. T. Stewart ofiered the following resolutions, which 
were nuauiraously adopted : 

Whereas, The Peoria Medical Monthly supplies a 
want long felt by the profession of Peoria; therefore, be it. 

Resolved, That we hail with pleasure its advent. 

Resolved, That we tender to its able corps of editors our 
thanks and our best wishes for the success of their lauda- 
ble undertaking. 

Resolved, That we give it our influence, co-operate with 
its editors, and render them all the assistance in our power 
to enable them to make it an honor to the profession and 
a benefit to the country. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Sicli Headaclie. 



Editors of the Monthly: Will some of the many read- 
ers of the Monthly give me their treatment for sick head- 
ache ? The cases to which I especially refer are those of a 
periodic character — recurring every two or three weeks,, 
and continuing from one to three days, causing the patient 
intense suffering, with distressing nausea and vomiting. 

Peoria, 111. ^ R. A. DuMars, M. D. 



Boracic Acid as an Internal Remedy. 

Considering the well-known antiseptic properties of 
boracic acid, it is curious how little it has been adminis- 
tered as an internal remedy. Its effect in diphtheria, both 
locally and internally, is very marked, and by its use the 
disease is shortened and other members of the family pro- 
tected from infection. From what I know of its power in 
combating the action of disease germs, I cannot help think- 
ing it would materially lessen, not only the intensity, but 
also the duration of the various eruptive fevers. I incline 
to tbis belief very strongly ; time will show whether it is 
correct or not. Boracic acid is but sparingly soluble in 
cold water ; an ounce will only take up about eighteen 
grains, but a drachm of boiling water will dissolve about 
five grains. The dose is from five to fifteen grains. It has 
one particular recommendation, and that is its tasteless- 
ness. — Dr. E. P. Atkinson, in Practitioner. 



Periscope. 43 

To Control Hemorrhage during Hip-Joint Amputa- 
tions. — Dr. Frank Woodbury suggests the following 
plan : " The bowel should be evacuated by a large 
warm water injection previous to the operation. The hand 
being anointed, (with lard or vaseline) and the fingers 
folded into a cone, it is gradually introduced into the rec- 
tum, with its dorsum to the sacrum, until reaching the 
sigmoid flexure, where the hand may be pronated and, as 
the vessels are right under the fingers, the main supply of 
"blood to the limb ma}- thus in a few moments be completely 
controlled. "With the prior application of the elastic ban- 
dage from the foot to the thigh, this operation may in this 
manner, be rendered almost as bloodless as some of the 
operations of minor surgery." 



Albuminuria in Facial Erysipelas. 

" The second point to which I wish to call your atten- 
tion is the condition of the urine. Some years ago I found 
that albuminuria was very constant in erysipelas, and since 
then have tested the renal secretion in every case of 
the disease that came under my notice. I now give you 
this rule : In a case of erysipelas of any marked severity 
— that is, in any except the very lightest cases — you will 
have albuminuria. It is a consequence of the disease, and 
not an accident. It appears when the disease has reached 
its height and is beginning to decline. At this time there 
is a congested state of the kidneys, and the mucous mem- 
brane, like the cutis upon the face is tumefied, and the 
epithelium is exfoliated in sheets, formiug epithelial and 
granular casts which may contain a few blood cells. This 
shows an intimate connection between the morbid action 
going on in the kidney and upon the surface. The album- 
inuria is not, as a rule, accompanied by a large number of 
casts; it was not in the present case. Moreover, from the 
presence of albumen in the urine, and its quantity, you may 
get some idea of the stage of the disease, and some prog- 
nostic indications, for when it exists, we know that the 
disease has reached its height or is declining. It does not 
occur in the first few days. When the albumen is in large 
quantity, it is a grave case, and relapses are more likely to 
happen. Therefore, look out for the kidneys; if they fail 
to act well, you may have to come to their aid by purga- 
tives, diaphoretics and dry-cupping the loins. — Dr. Da Costa 
in College and Clinical Record. 



44 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

EDITORS: 

John Murphy, M. D., J. L. Hamilton, M. D.^ 

V H. Steele, M. D. 



All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. Mellvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

229 South- Adams Street, PEOBIA, ILI,. 

"Wliy is tlie State Law Forbidding- Quackery K^ot Enforced ? 

" Why are all honorable physicians forced to comply 
with all the requirements of the law regulating the prac- 
tice of medicine, while quackery is permitted to exist un- 
rebuked and unhindered? What justice is there in a law 
that is not equally binding on all?" These questions are 
frequently asked, but are difficult to answer. We would 
answer them " Yankee like," by asking another: Whose 
fault is it that the law, as it now stands, is not enforced?" 
The blame must rest somewhere — either with the State 
Board of Health, with the medical profession as recognized 
by the law, with the law itself, or with the various officers 
of the law ? We do not think the law is entirely satisfac- 
tory as it now is. It is not wide enough or sufficiently ex- 
plicit to meet the exigencies of every case that may come- 
up, but it is a beginning in the right direction, and we hope 
in the near future to see it amended and the weak places 
strengthened. Still, faulty as it may be, it would accom- 
plish much good if it was strictly and impartially enforced. 
The State Board of Health seems very dilatory. Period- 
icity seems to be the law governing its actions. Spasmod- 
ically it breaks out upon some flagrant offenders, but after 
a great splurge goes to sleep again for a six month, having 
accomplished but little more than an extensive advertising 
of these quacks. As regards the profession, sometimes 
personal feelings prevent that cordial co-operation of physi- 
cians with each other, w^hich is necessary to success in such 
cases, still there are better reasons for their inactivity. 
There is the lack of proper co-operation on the part of the 
proper officers of the law, and the difficulty of getting a 
grand jury, or any kind of a jury, to regard the suit in. 



Editorial Jfotes and Comments. 45 

any other light than that of persecution prompted by per- 
sonal jealousy and instigated by pecuniary motives. The 
matter has been tried in our own city by a physician 
against whom none of these reasons could possibly be 
urged, and whose practice, wholly in the country, was not 
in the least degree interfered with by the traveling " cure- 
all;" yet he, with apparently all-sufficient proof, was barely 
able to get a hearing. It is needless to say nothing was 
done in the case, and all that he received for his honest 
effort to have the laws enforced and to protect the com- 
munity, was personal abuse and villification. The greatest 
opposition, however, to the enforcing of this law comes 
from the public press. Through its agency public opinion 
is to a large' extent formed, and we would exempt from 
this charge many papers which either denounce quackery 
wherever found, or at least do not uphold it, but too many 
denounce any attempt at the suppression of quackery 
with a vehemence and abuse that can only come 
from an attack upon the pocket-book. Quacks are 
large advertisers, and these papers are loth to kill 
the goose that lays the golden egg, even though the 
goose be a goose only to them, but a snake to the com- 
munity, doing immense harm and no good. What is to be 
done ? A steady and continued pressure should be kept 
up upon the State Board, and it should be spurred, if nec- 
essary, to its work. Active co-operation on the part of 
every physician and medical society should be cordially 
given to any one brave enough to face the storm of slander 
he will certainly receive. Physicians should, in every hon- 
orable manner, try to counteract the evil influence of the 
press, and by their own influence and a pure example mould 
public sentiment in the right way, and finally the State 
Medical Association should seek to have the law so amend- 
ed as to make it absolutely impartial as well as eminently 
protective of the rights of all, whose interests it is the aim 
of the law to guard. 



Dr. K. S. Sutton of Pittsburgh, Pa., the new lecturer 
on Gynaecology in the Spring Faculty at "Rush," has 
completed his course and returned home. His lectures are 
said to have been very interesting and instructive, and 
"Rush" is said to be congratulated on the acquisition of 
such a man. 



46 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Substitution of Drugs. 

An instance recently came under our observation which 
served to convince us absolute!}^, that the reprehensible cus- 
tom some druggists have of substituting drugs other than 
tliose called for in prescriptions still prevails, and to a 
greater extent than most physicians suppose, though we are 
loth to believe that anj- reputable druggist would be guilty 
of so contemptible and dishonest an act. 

In the case alluded to, the prescription called for Balsam 
Peru. The patient was told that he might have trouble in 
getting his prescription filled. One druggist frankly ad- 
mitted that he did not have the drug. The next one put 
up the prescription promptl}' enough, but something arous- 
ing the patient's suspicions, he had the prescription filled 
at a third place. The difference between the two mixtures 
was so apparent, that he used neither, and they were 
brought to us for inspection. It was at once manifest that 
neither contained a particle of Balsam Peru. 

A few such instances in the experience of each physi- 
cian, coupled with some other abuses for which some drug- 
gists are responsible, will eventuate in physicians dispens- 
ino; their own remedies. S. 



Opening the Abdominal Cavity. — The operation of 
ovariotomy has done more than enable us to remove the 
ovarian tumor ; it has demonstrated the important surgical 
fact, that free incisions can be made into the abdominal 
cavity without that danger from peritonitis which was for- 
merh' apprehended. A^ has been well remarked, the suc- 
cess of this operation has changed the entire surgery of the 
abdomen, and demonstrated the possibility, by this abdom- 
inal section, of removing various tumors of the uterus, 
enlarged mesenteric glands, or tumors connected with the 
mesentery. Intussusception has been successfully treated 
by openiug the cavity of the abdomen, and it is probable 
that other acute affections of the abdominal viscera may be 
treated equally successfully. With an atmosphere satura- 
ted with carbolic acid spray, an incision into the abdominal 
cavity is sometimes justifiable, as has been stated by a high 
authority, for the purpose of making or confirming a 
diao^nosis. J. M. 



Editorial Motes and Coinments. 47 

We enjoyed a pleasant call from Dr. S. S. Wiltbank, a 
week or two ago, and found him a thoroughly genial gen- 
tleman, and well posted in his business. He left us several 
samples of Wm. Warner & Co.'s goods, among them was 
Quinamine, which we have tried and found to be all that 
he claimed for it. We like the Parvules too, and think the 
idea which led to' their manufacture a srood one. Bv this 
means we can administer staple drugs in a pleasant manner, 
and b}' small doses, frequently given, probably obtiiiu the 
same effects as from larger doses given at greater intervals. 
They will be found especially advantageous in treating dis- 
eases of children. 



We invite secretaries of district or county medical 
societies to send us short synoptical reports of their pro- 
ceedings, tor publication; also of any interesting papers or 
reports read before the societies. 



We hope our readers will send all items of interest to 
the profession that may come under their notice. Marriage 
and death notices inserted free ; also, change of address 
of physicians. 



Drs. Scott, Capps and McCosh, members of the class of 
1880, Rush Medical College, have died since their gradua- 
tion. 



What They Say of Us. 

" The Peoria Medical Monthly is a new journal pub- 
lished at Peoria, 111. To judge from the first number, 
which contains several original articles of considerable 
interest, besides selections from other journals, it deserves 
the support of the profession." — Medical and Surgical Re- 
porter, May 22, 1880. 

" The Peoria Medical Monthly is the latest addition in 
medical journalism. Its contents are mostly brief, very 
practical and suited to the wants of its subscribers. We 
hope its success will be all that its Editors can desire." — 
Si. Louis Clirdeal Record. 

Thank you, gentlemen, for your kind words and good 
wishes. 



48 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Ovariotomy by a Traveling Quack. 

The Cincinnati Lancet and Clinic reports a case of 
ovariotomy by quack. The patient had suffered from 
abdominal enlargement for some time, and when this quack 
came along, he pronounced it an ovarian tumor, and per- 
suaded the patient to allow him to remove it, to which she 
consented. An incision was made, but no tumor found — 
only a large deposit of adipose tissue in the walls of the 
abdomen. The wound was sewed up, but the patient died 
in three davs. 



Gratuitous Services to Clergymen. — The Allegan 
County, Mich., Medical Society, adopted the following, 
July 26, 1877 : 

" Resolved, That the custom of giving our professional 
services to clergymen and their families gratuitously is un- 
just to a large class of our patrons, whose incomes are much 
less than the average incomes of theirs, and that we will 
hereafter adopt the practice of charging them the same as 
others." 



CoTO Bark in Diarrhea. — Dr. G. B. Grandall writes to 
the Thera.peutie Gazette for January, 1880, that he has found 
the following formula successful in a case of diarrhoea with 
tubercular complications : 

Fl. Ex. Goto Bark, 2 ouuces, 

Comp. Tr. Cardamon, 2 ounces, 

Mucilage Acacia, i ounce, , 

Syrup, I ounce. 

Cinnamon water, q. s. ad., 8 ounces, m. 
Sig. — Teaspoonful every three hours. 



We hope that many physicians will take an active in- 
terest in our work, and show it in two ways — first, by 
sending us a doHar as their subscription; and secondly, by 
sending us a contribution. Many have already done both^ 



for which we are grateful. 



Always read our advertisements. "We admit none of 
questionable character, and physicians are safe in corre- 
sponding with any firm whose card is found in our pages. 



Advertisements. 



Russian Koumiss. 



A sparkling beverage prepared from Pure Sweet Milk, grateful 
to the taste and agreeable to the most delicate stomach. 

A delicious article of food for invalids — refreshing, nourishing 
and strengthening; of such easy digestion that it can be taken 
when the stomach is so weak that it can bear no other kind of food. 

Of the greatest benefit to persons sufiering from Dyspepsia^ 
Feeble or Imperfect Digestion, Nausea, Vomiting, General Debility, 
Diabetes, Chronic Diarrhoea, Cholera Infantum, Consumption, 
Catarrhal Afiections, etc. 

From our large experience with Koumiss we are able confident- 
ly to recommend to the profession this new — or rather, old — dietetic 
preparation as a valuable auxilliary agent in the treatment of 
diseases which are dependent upon, or are accompanied with defect- 
ive nutrition. 

For full particulars see pamphlet published by C A. Bowman 
& Co., entitled " BOWMAN'S RUSSIAN KOUMISS : ^ a brief 
description of Its Nature, Uses and Benefits; also, the opinion of 
some of the Leading Physicians concerning it." Pamphlets free on 
application. 

We also prepare Koumiss combined with Hypophosphites. 
(See pamphlet.) 

Packed in our refrigerator boxes, Koumiss can be safely 
shipped to any distance in the hottest weather. 

Price-List of Koumiss, either with or without the Hypophos- 
phites : 

Our Koumiss is put up in quart bottles. 

Per Bottle, .$ .25 

Per Dozen 3.00 

Per Dozen, packed for shipping 3.25 

Champagne Taps, each- 1.00 

Sixty cents per dozen allowed for bottles returned clean and 
sweet. 

Orders from a distance should be accompanied by a PostoflSce 
order or draft. 

C. A. Bowman & Co., 

Druggists and Manufacturers of Koumiss ^ 

520 Main Street, Peoeia, III. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Pboria Mbdical Monthly. 



Advertise inents . 



ST, FfilllCIS' BRftOLE! HOSPITAL 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake* and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressl}^ for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements ; 
laro-e rooms, well ventilated, and evervthino- comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studer. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, (Doctor's 
attendance at regular rates), are from $7 to $10 per week, according 
to size of room and accommodation required. In the general wards, 
the cost is from $4 to §6 per week. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC WALKER & SON 



AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKER AND COLT 

SHOT GUNS. 




Importers of 



AND 



Muzzie-Loading 



A SPLENDID LINE OF 

Fishing Tackle 

AND 

Sporting Equipments. 
EVOLVERS, 

Fine Guilery. 

ALSO, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers ia 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

I 

125 and 127 

SOUTH WASHINGTON 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 



THE PEORIA 

M:ed.ioal IMontlily, 

A JOURNAL DEVOTED TO 

MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 



Will be published at Peoria, Illinois, the 20th of each 
mouth. A large edition (2,000 copies per month) will be 
issued during the present year, for the purpose of bringing 
it before the medical profession. 

This journal will be devoted to short, practical articles 
on live questions, giving the experience of successful men 
in a brief, topical manner, desiring rather to aid physicians 
in the routine of every day work, than to advance profound 
theories of untried value. 

We wish every physician, into whose hands this journal 
may come, to feel that it in part, belongs to him, and that 
its pages will always be open to anything of interest that 
he may wish to lay before the profession ; an interesting 
and instructive case, a favorite and tried prescription, a new 
thought towards the elucidation of some of the knotty 
points of our science, or a successful method of treatment 
of disease. During the year, our pages will contain con- 
tributions from many eminent men and an active and sus- 
tained effort will be made to add to its value. We cordially 
invite correspondence from physicians, and will welcome 
to our pages everything of benefit to our profession. 

We urge all professional brethren to take an active 
interest in our monthly, as only by their co-operation and 
support can the aim of this journal — viz : Mutual benefit 
and counsel — be attained. 

fj. MURPHY, M.D., 
Editors, <^ J. L. HAMILTON, M. D., 
(H. STEELE, M. D. 

Address all communications to 

THOS. M. McILVACSTE, A. M., Publisher, 
229 8. Adams St., Peoria, 111. 



SPEING STEM SUPPOETEES. 



Abdominal Supporter, 
S. 



SOLID STEM SUPPOETEE. 
E. —5.— (Economy,) 




Prices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Procide tla Cnp A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Contil 
Finished Belt X, $7.00. On Z, Fig. 
5, $6.00. On Y, Coutil, $8.00 ; and 
on T, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring SfPtn, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long 11, or 1 U, the Bams on either 
belt as A. 

Hetrnversion E, on X, or T, 
Cotton, $S.OO. Cn Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on Z, $7.^0. 

Aiileversion, Solid Stem 
C, or Soli I Sffrn Glohf- Top 
O, on X, or Y. Cotton. $5.50. On Y, 
Coutil, $G.50. and on Z, $4.50 only. 

Mules. — The Stem Supporters 
Fifr. 1 and 5, are only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Speculums, Fig. 0, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cup D, 
either separate, or in connection 
with Stem Supporters. 

Elastic Oums S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; 4 at 35 cts.; and Springs 
at 3 cts. each. 

Jf, B. — The figures on these engravings cor- 
respond with those on the full Catalogue plate. 

Selection. — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
If a cup, it must be modelled after the junction of 
the axis of the uterus and vagina, or the cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I U, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptation 
and border cup. In cases of slight Anteversions 
and slight Retroversions, deep cupa may be called 
for, and in most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cups are usually 
selected by giving the full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, H4 to l^.g; Multiperae, l'',^ 
to 2, and Procidentia to 2}( inches and over soixie 
times. Belts — For X, and Z, waist measure to be 
given, and Y, hip measure. 

Anteversion V, Fig. 1 — This had been re- 
modelled a number of times, and the fenestrated 
top found best to remain in position. 

Retroversion J3. — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent efficiency. The broad lever, lifts up the 
fundus, while the cup corrects the prolapsus and 
holds the uterus, by a double elastic nfotion, if a 
spring stem. f<mall, long stem, Globe Tops G, 
Fig. 1, are placed with success against the sensitive 
fundus, after everything else been intolerable, 



^izes— 1, 1 3.16, 1 6.16 and 
1 9.16, Flesh color enam- 
eled. Price, $2.50 each. 



Price. — Permanent, Curved Stem 
Cup U C, on elastic webbing Z, 
$4.50. On X, or Y, cotton, $5.50, 
and Y, coutil, $6.50. 

No esptnse has been saved to 
give even the Economical Supporter 
all possible advantages. 



HAED EUBBEE UTEEINE EXAMINING GASP 




Prices.— VnW case, $8.00; Quill Canst'c Holder IT, or Camel's 
Hair Brush Holder and Case I, each $1.00. Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket affer the cnp is In posi- 
tion. This is safer thau all other contrivances, 
but is seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made in this Series to correct Retro- 
version through the posterior cuI-dc-sac. '■ 

Cystocele and Mectocele. — These are suc- 
cesofully drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops G, or Oblong H, Fig. 1. 

Cup Jif Fig. 5.— vSnpplements EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed into A D, 
Fie.l. 

Globe H, Fig. 5. — This is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with all the objectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now a^ain 
a popular pesi^ary. 

Speculum, Fig. 6 — The conductor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and in position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be introduced; 
this together with the thin shell, gives a suflBcient 
calibre to embrace the entire cervix within the 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the enclosure of the cervix by rotation. 

Examining Case, Fig. 12. — Sounds A, B, 
C, Movers D, F, and Q, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on 51, of H, and form instruments 12 
inches long. L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Sett Yf Fig. 3. — Is made to order of any size 
and strength, to support the stem supporter and 
pendulous abdomen. Hip Straps S S, are elastic. 



Intra Uterine Stem Cup I JJ. — The stem 
Mailed on receipt of quotation prices, and all the hard rubber parts on the full Catalogue exchanged 
to meet any indication, aun cover the purchaser's risk. Catalogues on application. 

/v. „^^,„/, „„7/ r.un,. 1 S. S. STAUFER, D. D. 

Corre-fponaents imll please ( „„ - _ ,,.„.,»,.., iy~. «tj» »._ 

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BLUFF STREET, (between Main and Hamilton,) PEOKIA, ILL. 

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The water used in these baths comes from an artesian well, 912 feet deep. An analysis 
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_,^ .. . .__ J We would ask the especial attention of the medical profession and pharma- 

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^^ , -.^ .| The desirability of sOme neat and expeditious method for the administration 

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>e@^ Contributions must be short — not to exceed five hundred worda.'^H 

VOL. I. JULY, 1880. NO. 3. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Broncliocele. 



BY. J. MURPHY, M. D. 



It is generally considered that the importance of a local 
disease depends in a great degree on the importance and 
accessibility of the organ which is implicated, and on the 
degree of danger which our experience enables us to as- 
certain, attaches to that disease. But, nevertheless, there 
are some local diseases in which the organs implicated have 
not much comparative importance, and in which the degree 
of danger is not usually considerable, which are yet very 
important to those who are affected by them, and very in- 
teresting to the physician. One of those diseases is bron- 
chocele, which, although rarely fatal, still merits a large 
share of our attention, because it is a disease which is in- 
creasing rapidly in proportion to the ratio of the increase 
of population, because it more especially attacks females at 
a period of life when perhaps the deformity is most intol- 
erable, and because it aftects that part of the body which 
is, w4th the exception of the face, the most disagreeabl}- 
€onspicuous. When to this we add the carefully-expressed 
opinion of our greatest living surgeon, that it is only in the 
milder forms of the disease, and in its earlier stages, that 
any decided benefit can be looked for from treatment, it 
will be readily obvious how important the disease is, and 
how necessary it is that, among the profession, it should 
awaken much interest and induce much reflection. 

Considering that bronchocele is a well-established affec- 
tion, and that so much has been written respecting it, it is 
remarkable how little positive knowledge we have regard- 



50 Feoria Medical Monthly. 

ing it, and how impotent the treatment is in severe cases of 
the disease. Five or six decades ago, it was considered to 
be in a great measure confined to a few localities, such as 
certain Alpine valleys in Switzerland, the southern slopes 
of the Alps and Pyreenes, certain districts in Bohemia, 
Hungary and the Hartz mountains, a few central shires in. 
England, and the hill region extending from Vermont to 
Virginia in the United States. Within the last two or 
three decades, however, we find that the disease has been 
extending its territorial boundaries, and is now found pre- 
vailing over the entire of Switzerland, in the German and 
Austrian empires frt?m the mouth of the Elbe to the estuary 
of the Danube, throu^'h the north of France and the south 
of Italy, over the Britisi: Islands and the United States, be- 
sides numerous other localities in different parts of the 
world, which it is unneces.<5ary to refer to. If space per- 
mitted, we could adduce a m.HSs of evidence showing that 
it is met with in districts of t*"be West, where not many 
years since it was unknown, exce^^t from imported cases. 
At one time it was stated very pertiL^aciously that it could 
exist only in elevated localities ; or, .''■t least, that it was 
only found there. Again, the views v?f^ writers were 
changed, and it was considered that low, a.'^'iiip localities 
ivere most likely to develop the disease ; but o bs^rvation 
has amply demonstrated that neither of those coUvT^i^ions 
exercise any effect in its production, and if either of X.^^^^ 
appear at any time to do go, it is probably entirely acci- 
dental. 

The attempt to associate the production of the disease 
with the use of water containing calcareous matter, is, we 
consider, equally untenable. Our own observation, which 
has been extensive and careful, on this subject leads us to 
the conclusion that the use of no species of water has the 
slightest influence in either producing the disease, or in 
counteracting its production. If bronchocele could be 
proven to exist most frequently in low, malarious situations, 
we might be led to attribute its production to miasmatic 
influences, and that the thyroid gland having many ana- 
tomical and physiological functions and peculiarities in 
common with the spleen, it might, like the latter organ, be 
acted on specifically by malaria ; but as far as our observa- 
tion has extended, the facts will not support any such con- 
clusion. 

Several years ago, in order to ascertain as correctly as 



Original Cammunications. 51 

possible the opinions of the profession with reference to 
the influence, if any, that altitude, climate, malaria or 
water may exercise in producing goitre, we addressed a 
large number of letters to physicians in diflerent sections 
of the Union, soliciting information in relation to those 
disputed and uncertain points, and also requesting an ex- 
pression of opinion as to w^hat they considered the most 
rational and frequent factors, internal or external, predis- 
posing or exciting, in producing bronchocele. We received 
replies to nearly all of those letters, and a full analysis of 
the views which they contain shows very conclusively that, 
in the opinion of the great majority of the writers, none 
of the agencies mentioned exercise any perceptible influ- 
ence in producing the disease; and they also farther ex- 
press themselves very decidedly as being unable to indicate 
any rational or appreciable cause for its production. Sev- 
eral of the writers had observed that the disease prevailed 
more in some localities than in others, but none of them 
were able to give any satisfactory theory on the subject or 
any rational explanation of the fact. 

From the well established curative power that iodine 
and its salts possess over goitre, it had frequently occurred 
to us that as the greater number of sea-weeds — if not all — 
contain iodine, and as from this cause the air in the vicinity 
of the ocean is impregnable with that agent ; therefore it 
might be expected that some prophylactic power would be 
exercised in restraining the production of goitre, among 
persons living in that region. From the evidence which we 
have been able to procure from a number of physicians 
resident on the seaboard, it would appear that the disease 
is not so frequent there as in the interior, and also that the 
sea air probably renders it more amenable to treatment. 
The information however which we have been able to obtain 
with reference to this question, is neither sufficiently full 
nor positive, to enable us to pronounce definitely, regard- 
ing it. 

The internal causes which influence the production of 
this disease are equally as mysterious, equally as difficult to 
discover, as the external causes are. In cases which we 
have seen where it appeared to occur hereditarily, the coin- 
cidence has usually proved to have been purely accidental; 
although it may occasionally present itself in an apparently 
hereditary form. Neither have we been able to associate it 
with a struragus diathesis, We would rather be inclined 



52 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

to believe that there is a degree of antagonism between 
bronchocele and scrofula, as it is unusual to find an enlarged 
thyroid gland associated with a similar condition of the 
other glandular appendages of the neck and throat ; and 
certainly the treatment most beneficial in scrofula exerts 
no special influence in curing goitre. Anaemia, again, 
which has been frequently dwelt on as a cause of this dis- 
ease cannot even, where the angemia and the goitre coexist, 
be considered more than a coincidence, as in the majority 
of cases, the disease occurs in persons of plump, healthy 
physique, with no evidence of any deficiency either in the 
quantity or in the quality of the blood. On the not irra- 
tional supposition that congestion may be a condition pre- 
cedent to the production of the disease, we might be led to 
infer that it would be apt to occur in young females of 
sedentary habit or occupation. What the feeling of the 
profession may be in relation to this question, we have no 
means of ascertaining ; but as far as our own experience 
enables us to express an opinion, we consider that neither 
of those conditions exercise any influence in producing the 
disease. Neither is it confined to any particular grade of 
society. Those who live in commodious, well-veutilated 
houses, eat wholesome, nutritious food, and are free from 
the deteriorating efifects of poverty and filth, do not appear 
to have any greater immunity from the disease, than their 
more unfortunate neighbors. 

From those considerations, and many others that might 
be adduced, the legitimate, the irresistible conclusion is 
that we are still in profound ignorance of any of the 
causes which exercise the remotest agency in producing 
bronchocele. The mystery in which its causation is in- 
volved appears to be impenetrable, and it is quite probable 
that science and subtlety may never be able to unriddle it. 

Peoria, June, 1880. 

(Concluded next Month.) 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Acute Mania, terminating in Dementia, finally ending- in 
Perfect Restoration of Health. 

Mrs. L., of Quincy, 111., aged thirty-five years, was de- 
livered of a healthy girl — her seventh child — on January 
6th, 1877, and enjoyed apparently the best of health for the 
next five weeks, but owing to a multitude of family trou- 



Original Coryimunications . 53 

bles the foundation was laid, terminating on Feb. 24th, in 
acute mania. Her father had been sick for three months 
with dropsy, from which he died Jan. 30th, 1877. This 
certainly contributed much to disturb the equilibrium of 
her mind, producing insomnia, loss of appetite, and most 
of all the secretion of milk grew weaker and less every 
day, so that the infant had to be weaned at the age of five 
weeks. The funeral of the father, whom she dearly vene- 
rated, took place two days after his death, Feb. 2d. It was 
a damp, cold day, and nothing could dissuade her from 
participating in the funeral to a distant cemetery, where 
the poor, weak body stood trembling for an hour, chilling 
all the while and returning home fainting. When, a few 
days later, the lady learned that her father had left his 
estate financially embarrassed, it added very materially to 
her trouble, producing sleeplessness for a number of days 
and nights, and upsetting the already too much weakened 
mind. Acute mania was the immediate result, increasing 
in severity from day to day, in spite of all eftbrts to quiet 
her condition. Large doses of bromide of potassa were 
given every three hours, which seemed at first to quiet the 
brain, but the financial troubles, heretofore entirely un- 
known to her, kept her mind disturbed and kindled the 
fire to another fit of violence. Continually for a week she 
kept talking of her ruined hopes, using the roughest 
language, while she was from her girlhood the most pleas- 
ant, amiable person known to me. 

In order to quiet her mind and produce rest, I ordered 
a bath to be taken every day for not less than thirty min- 
utes, the water saturated with a peck of common salt, at a 
temperature of not less than from 85 to 90 degrees, the 
whole body to be rubbed and brushed until our patient was 
completely tired out. Ice cold rags were applied to her 
head while in the bath. After being wiped oft' she was put 
in well warmed woolen blankets, and a dose of strong milk 
punch administered. This treatment seemed to quiet her 
for a few days ; she began to answer more rationally until 
on the sixth day of her insanity, she became a perfect 
maniac. She was dangerous ; she would take hold of any- 
thing within her reach, and once while not closely watched, 
she succeeded in catching a hatchet, and would go for any- 
body who resisted in her efforts to gain liberty. With great 
danger and after many attempts, she finally was caught and 
placed out of harm's way. Such condition could not be 



54 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

endured for any length of time; the relatives were com- 
pletely worn out and exhausted, and I advised to send her 
to the Jacksonville State Lunatic Asylum as soon as possi- 
ble. She was kept there from March 9th to July 13th, 1877. 
"When she had been there over two months, I visited Jack- 
sonville with her husband and mother-in-law. We found 
her in a most deplorable mental condition — her wildness 
had ceased — complete dementia — " the tomb of reason,''^ (Prof. 
Banduy) — had followed. She gave no sign that she recog- 
nized either of us. Her looks were entirely apathetic, her 
pulse scarcely to be felt, her skin dark blue and ice cold, 
while she, who had always been quite fleshy, had become 
in this short time a perfect skeleton. I had a long conver- 
sation with Dr. Carriell, the President of the Institution, 
who described her condition as quite hopeless. He would 
not object to her being removed at any time, as they (the 
doctors and nurses) could not do anything for her, and she 
required more care than they could bestow upon her. For 
she must be fed like a baby, and constantly admonished to 
eat or drink anything, otherwise she would starve to death. 
All hope, all prospect being lost, her husband took her 
home July 13th, after a stay of over four months. At 
home, being very quiet and harmless, she was carefully 
nursed and cared for ; she received from time to time from 
me — say every other night — a dose of quinine with extract 
of aloes, entertaining my only hope that the restoration of 
menstruation might give her a chance of getting better. 
Late in the fall, 1877, she showed the first signs of return- 
ing menses, and one day, when not watched closely, she 
ran away, nobody knew whither. Messengers were sent in 
every direction, and at dark, after a lapse of eight hours, 
she was found five miles ofl' in a lake, standing in ice cold 
water up to her breast, motionless. She made no resistance' 
in taking her out of the water and carrying her home. She 
was undressed, placed in a warm bed, where she, for the 
first time since many months, enjoyed a sound sleep. From 
this shock, which might have killed, or endangered most 
anybody else, she grew better, gradually, slowly, but surely. 
She began to talk again ; she would cry and shed tears, which 
she did not during the whole time of her sickness. She- 
would eat without being urged to do so. She improved in^ 
this way ; but she regained her full qualities of intellect,, 
her full memory only, when she, on Feb. 24, 1878, became 
pregnant. Dxxx'va^ (jestation she fully recovered, and was de- 



Original Communications. 55" 

livered, December Ist, 1878, of a healthy child. Here I 
must not fori^et to mention that during a few labor-pains, 
she showed signs of returning delirium or mania ; but being 
armed with sulphuric ether, she received the full benefit of 
it, which gave her quiet and rest. N"ever has this wild spell 
returned, and up to this time she enjoys the very best of 
health, converses with ease and has the fullest and most 
minute recollections of all and every period of her fearful 
sickness. The only point of fear consists of an inclination 
to obesity. She weighs now near 200 pounds, and for this 
she takes every day a couple teaspoonfuls of bicarbonate of 
soda with Rocbelle salt. Francis Drude, M. D., 

Secretary Board of Health, Quincy, IlL 



tJniinitecl Fracture of the Femur Successfully Treated. 

Harvey Korman, age forty-three, a wood chopper, was 
caught by a falling tree, Oct. 14th, 1879, and sustained a 
fracture of the left femur at its lower third. The case was 
attended by two responsible physicians, who used long side 
splints, with weights for counter extension. 

Five months afterwards the patient came to my office 
seeking relief. On carefully examining the limb I found 
the fragments entirely separated, the ends of each fragment 
clubbed with deposits of calous, floating loosely among the 
tissues — in short, a perfect specimen of ununited fracture. 
On March 17, 1880, assisted by Drs. Allen and Fitch, I 
attempted to place him under the influence of chloroform, 
but the immediate symptoms were so alarming that we were 
compelled to desist. The patient being then firmly held, I 
proceeded to operate, adopting Brainard's plan, viz : Per- 
forating the ends of either fragment, subcutaneously with 
a bone drill, and lacerating the intervening tissues. The- 
limb was then incased in plaster of paris dressing. This- 
operation proved a failure, the local inflammation being; 
insufficient to accomplish the desired result. On account 
of our inability to push the anaesthetic, the Brainard plan 
was abandoned and the seton plan substituted. April 14th, 
with the patient under the influence of Ethyl Bromide, I 
entered a long spear shaped needle, armed with linen tape, 
between the ends of the fragments, or rather through the 
calous deposits, the needle entering from the outside and 
passing forwards and upwards. 

Thus transfixed, the limb was again placed in a plaster- 



66 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

dressing to await the result of inflammatory action. On 
the 6th day, a section of the plaster cast, from the hip to 
the knee and including one-half the circumference of the 
limb, was thrown back and the secretions from the wound 
carefully removed. The seton was withdrawn May 2d, 
(the 18th day), at which time I found that the calous deposit 
had broken down and passed away in the form of pus, and 
the patient suffering greatly in hfealth from the constant 
■discharge of matter. At the time of the withdrawal of the 
fleton the patient first complained of a tenderness in the 
ends of the fragments. This, I think, an important point, 
showing disintegration of the old and useless structures to 
be complete, and the bones in a proper condition to knit. 
May 12th, the whole limb swollen, very tender and painful. 
Very slight discharge. May 16th, consolidation rapidly 
taking place, with new deposits thrown out, discharge very 
much lessened and thin and watery in character. Appetite 
•and general health rapidly improving. 

May 20th, patient shows symptoms of intermittent fever ; 
has chills, night sweats, &c.; ordered quinine, iron with acids. 
May 2oth, has had no chills for two days, and is much im- 
proved. May 28th, removed the plaster dressing, and find 
evidences of complete bony union. Careful measurement 
gives shortening of one-half inch, shape and contour per- 
fect. Since that time he has continued to improve. Health 
is now as good as before the accident, and everything indi- 
cates as useful a limb as ever. 

R. D. Bradley, M. D. 

Pekin, III., June 20, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Ethyl Broiuide. 

I have used this new anaesthetic in over thirty cases, 
and am very much pleased with the results. It acts with 
great rapidity, requiring only about one-half the time to 
produce insensibility that is required by chloroform. Its 
exhibition is not accompanied with or followed by sickness 
at the stomach, as in cases of ether and chloroform, I 
have several times given bromide of ethyl immediately 
after a full meal without the slightest disturbance of the 
digestion. 

The cases have varied from the simple extraction of a 
single tooth to a case of perineal section, which occupied 



Original CoTmnwnications. 57 

sixty minutes ; and in point of age of patient, they have- 
varied from six to eighty years. Three of the cases had 
previously proved very refractory under ether and chloro- 
form, owing to severe disturbance of the heart's action, so 
that we were obliged to discontinue the anaesthetic, and 
proceed without it. Subsequently we used the bromide of 
ethyl with complete success in these very cases. The pulse 
and breathing were remarkably good in every case. 

One pleasant feature of the new anaesthetic is its faint 
odor. One can hardly detect its presence in the room while 
it is being used, and in from three to five minutes every 
trace will have vanished from the napkin in which it was- 
administered. 

The rapid recovery of the patient after its use is a con- 
stant marvel. I have observed the well-recognized neces- 
sary precautions required in the use of all anaesthetics, viz : 
loose clothing, prone position as far as practicable, and a 
competent physician to watch the, pulse in all cases. Hav- 
ing used nitrous oxide, ether and chloroform almost daily 
for fourteen years, I am pleased to find an agent sure^ 
agreeable, and to all present appearance safe. 

H. H. Fitch, D. D. S. 

Pekin, III., May 29, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Case of Triplets. 

On December 29, 1879, I was called to attend Mariah- 
LaFramer, the wife of a barber in Princeton, in labor in 
her third confinement. She was a lady in feeble health,, 
strongly inheriting a tendency to pulmonary consumption,, 
of which disease five of her half-brothers and sisters and 
mother had died. She was sick about three hours, when 
a girl was born, head presenting in the second position, 
which was followed in ten minutes by a boy, feet present- 
ing. I immediately ordered steady pressure to be made 
upon the abdomen of patient by a lady attendant, and gave 
a drachm of fluid extract ergot, and ordered more ligatures 
prepared. It is amusing to notice the eft'ect .produced upon 
the lady attendants when informed that there is another, 
after two have been delivered, and in this instance their 
fear, wonder and astonishment well compared with a boy's 
first visit to a circus or show. Their curiosity was soon 
relieved by the appearance of another fat and healthy girl,, 



58 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the largest of the three, which was soou followed by one 
placenta containing three compartments. 

The children were named in the order of their births — 
Zora, Ora, and Cora — and weighed respectively 5^, 6 and 
Q^ pounds. The boy died at six weeks of cyanosis. The 
^irls are all right and growing finely. The mother made 
a good recovery, and from the time the first child was born 
to the completion of the labor did not exceed forty minutes. 
This was her third confinement. The first she had one; 
the second, two; and now three — all living, except one, as 
above mentioned. 

The father is doing well, and very proud of his little 
.shavers, very thankful that none of them got away. 

F. C. RoMNSON, M. D. 

Wyanet, III., June, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Some of the Uses of Santoniiie. 

Bantonine is ordinarily considered only for its anthel- 
mintic properties, but to me it has proven a valuable agent 
in conditions of disease other than those dependent upon 
the presence of intestinal parasites. 

Casual observation of its effects when prescribed in 
•obedience to the frequent demands of parents for "worm 
medicine " for their children, convinced me that it was 
most frequently administered under a mistaken diagnosis, 
from symptoms frequently found unassociated with the 
presence of worms, and owing to gastric and intestinal dis- 
turbance from other causes, but that, nevertheless, relief 
from the unpleasant symptoms was just as certain to follow 
the use of the remedy in the one case as in the other, thus 
indicating some benign influence of the drug aside from 
its anthelmintic properties. Subsequent observation has 
only served to confirm this opinion, and I now use the 
medicine in various disordered conditions of the digestive 
tract and sympathetic affections, with the most pleasing 
results. 

When administering santonine as an anthelmintic, it is 
my habit to precede and follow the course with a dose of 
castor oil, and I often follow the same routine when using 
.for other purposes, but not always, as briefly indicated be-, 
low. 

When, in the cases of children especially, there exists 



Original Communications. 69 

a coated tongue, constipation, with clay-colored stools, 
tumid abdomen, more or less pallor of the face, with in- 
clination to pick much at the nose, loss of appetite and 
nervous irritability ; in a word, those symptoms which are 
popularly supposed to infallibly indicate the presence of 
-worms, I prescribe santonine with the greatest confidence, 
knowing that the result will speedily justify its use, and in 
nine cases out of ten the most watchful care will fail to 
■discover in the •evacuations any evidences of the presence 
of entozoa. 

The above represents a class of cases in which I for- 
merly prescribed mercury, podophillin, leptandrin, and the 
like, singly or in combination, but with tardy and unstable 
efifect. Now, having ordered first a dose of castor oil suf- 
ificiently large to cleverly move the bowels, I prescribe san- 
tonine in from one-half to two-grain doses, with a little 
liydg. cum. creta, three times a day for three or four days, 
at the end of which time the unpleasant symptoms disap- 
pear, and the patient is restored to a state of health which, 
under the old regime, would have required a week or two. 

In cases where there exists an irritability of the stom- 
a,ch, with a varying state of the bowels, I have often ob- 
tained the most satisfactory results from the use of santo- 
nine combined with small doses of ipecac and hydg. cum. 
creta, when the latter two alone, or in combination with 
other remedies, failed to give relief. 

In infants, in whom there is an inability to digest food 
of any kind, even milk, with consequent aneemia and ex- 
treme emaciation, tumid abdomen and variable state of the 
bowels, sometimes accompanied with more or less convul- 
sive tendency and cerebral disturbance — a condition often 
met with — no remedial measure can be more satisfactory, 
either alone or in combination with a mild mercurial prep- 
aration. The powers of digestion and assimilation are 
rapidly re-established, color and fiesh are restored, and the 
■disturbed state of the nervous system subsides. 

In acites from Bright's disease and other causes, I have 
seen great relief from the use of santonine and some of 
the stronger mercurial preparations. In fact, there are 
but few remedies with which I would part with with more 
regret. It seems to exert a beneficent influence upon the 
glandular system of the digestive or mucous tract, which 
is exerted by no other drug with which I am familiar. 
When administered in connection with mercurials, which, 



60 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

it will Ije observed, is nearly always the case in ray pre- 
scriptions, its action, as well as that of the mercury, seems 
to be somewhat modified, and both are carried from the 
system with judicious speed, without, according to my ob- 
servation, any untoward results in the way of convulsions- 
or otherwise. 0. B. Will, M. D. 

DuNLAP, III., June 21, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Sick Headache. 



Editors Monthly: — In reply to Dr. R. A. DuMars' re- 
quest for suggestions with regard to the treatment of sick 
headache, I would suggest a special study of symptoms, 
etc., in each case, as there is no specific for headache or 
anything else, I think. I very frequently prescribe : 

9; Hoflfman's Anodyne, 

Fl'd Ext. Valerian, a.a., 1 ounce. 

Tinct. Opii, 

Fl'd Ext. Colocynth, a.a., I drachm. 

M. Ft. Mist, et Sig.: 
Shake, and give one teaspoonful every three 

hours until relieved. 

Now, the above prescription I freely use for nervous 
headache with a pretty good result. I also, after the at- 
tack has passed away, place my patient on a nerve tonic — 
say: 

^ Fl'd Ext. Cinchona, 2 ounces. 
Fl'd Ext. Nux Vomica, 2 drachms. 
Fl'd Ext. Colocynth, 1 drachm. 
Whisky, 4 ounces. 

M. Sig.: Teaspaonful five times daily. 

This must be given during the period of quiet, /. e., the 
two or three weeks occurring between attacks. 

J. E. Stinson, M. D. 
Montague, Texas, June, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Rhus Aroiuatica. 



Within the past two years numberless new remedies 
have been introduced to the profession. Many of them 
worthless, others falling lamentably short of the merits 
ascribed to them, while a few promise to be valuable addi- 
tions to our therapeutic agents. In this latter class Rhus 



Original Communications. 61 

Aromaticii may be properly included. If the representa- 
tions made by those who have tried it are true, it will in 
all probability, find a permanent place in the list of reme- 
dial agents. My experience in its use is limited to a few 
cases, and in most of them its results have been satisfactory. 
A few months since I was called to see a child with 
incontinence of urine. Every night the bed was wet. Many 
of the ordinary remedies were tried without eft'ect. Hav- 
ing seen accounts of the virtues of tiie Rhus Aromatica in 
those cases, I gave it a trial, and my success equaled my 
expectations. I have given it in similar cases since that 
time with equally favorable results. In one or two cases of 
that form of eneuresis so frequent in old age, I have used it 
with benefit. In children of w^eak constitution and of a 
strumous diathesis, and in those in whom innervation is 
impaired by weak or defective assimilation, it is in my judg- 
ment one of our best remedies. It has been highly recom- 
mended in menorrhagia, hemorrhage from the bladder and 
kidneys, and in other affections of the genito-urinary 
organs. I have not had occasion to use it in any of these 
cases but when an opportunity offers will do so. I have no 
doubt it is applicable in all cases of atony in the genito 
urinary organic, when a tonic or astringent is indicated. 
•How a more extensive and thorough trial of the remedies 
may determine its merit, no one can say ; but so far as the 
experience of those who have tried it goes, it bids fair to 
become one of our most valuable remedies. The fluid 
extract in doses varying from five drops to half a drachm, is 
the best and most convenient form in which to administer 
it. R. B. 

Peoria, III. 



Siig^gestions for Professional Success. 

An editorial in the Medical and Surgical Reporter, June 
5tb, 1880, under the above head, is so good and to the point, 
that we will give some of it for the benefit of those who 
do not see that excellent journal. The article in question 
insists : 

1st. That a doctor must know his business — not only 
having a thorough medical training, but should keep him- 
self posted by constant reading of new books and medical 
journals. 

2d. That he must attend to his business. 



62 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

3d. That his personal demeanor and habits must be 
above reproach. 

4th. That he must be stationary. "A rolling stone 
gathers no moss." Nor will a peripatetic physician ever 
build up a pleasant and profitable practice. 

5th. He should make fair charges. With but few ex- 
ceptions those who have made but moderate charges have 
acquired the most property. It pays best in the long run. 

6th. Books of account should be kept with entire accu- 
racy, and collections made regularly, and the people will 
get into the habit of paying their "doctor bills " as readily 
as they do their grocery bills. 

7th. Excessive expenditure in living and display is no 
advantage — it savors too much of quackery. 

8th. It pays to be on good terms with professional neigh- 
bors. A physician often wants counsel and assistance, and 
he will get a better article of both from one with whom he 
has had no quarrels or bitter feelings. 

To these a few more might be added : 

That a physician should be at all times pleasant and 
kind; not talk too much, never insinuate anything about 
either a professional or non-professional acquaintance. If 
he has grievances let him keep them to himself and not 
parade them before his patients. An acted sneer carries 
with it more meaning, often times, than an open reproach. 
In short, to succeed, a physician must be, at all times, in all 
places and under all circumstances, a gentleman — conscious 
of the dignity of his profession — he must endeavor to main- 
tain it. Anyone who has these qualifications, added to a 
knowledge of his business, must succeed. To him there is 
no such word as fail. 



Oxalate of Cerium as a Cough Remedy. 

The ISTew York Therapeutical Society has been investi- 
gating the action of the above-named drug on coughs, and 
their committee handed in the following conclusions : 

1. It can be safely given in doses of ten grains three 
times a day for many days in succession. 

2. The only unpleasant symptom, when so used, was 
slight dryness of the mouth that appeared after several 
days. 

3. It is probably most efiicient when given dry upon 
the tongue. 



Periscope. 63 

4. Its effects began two or three days after its use was 
iDegun, and lasted two or three days after its discontinuance. 

5. It is most efficacious in the treatment of chronic 
<;ough, and the initial dose should be five grains. 

6. In the majority of cases it had not proved an effi- 
cient cough medicine for any considerable length of time, 
but could be regarded as a valuable agent to be employed 
in alternative with other remedies. 

7. It did not disturb the stomach. On the contrary, 
it relieved nausea and improved digestion, 

8. Difl:erent preparations upon the market are not 
'equal in value; and when success was not attained by one, 
another should be substituted. — Medical Record, May, 1880. 



Infantile Colic. — Instead of treating these cases with 
•opiates, Dr. J. P. F. Brunner recommends, in the Paeific 
Medical Journal, the following combination, which he finds 
gives almost instantaneous relief and eft'ects a permanent 
cure: 

P Tr. Assafoetida, 15 drops. 

Tr. Cinnamonis, J ounce. 

Sodse Bicarb., 1 drachm. 

Syr. Rhei Aromat, 3 drachms. 
Aquse, IJ ounces. 

M. Sig. : Half a teaspoon ful every three hours. 



Whooping Cough. — For a child from nine to twelve, 
give one teaspoonful at bedtime, and repeat in two hours if 
the child coughs or is restless: 

P Bromidia, 1 ounce. 
Glycerine. 3 ounces. 

— Dr. H. A. Beeson, in Medical Brief. 



Infantile Eczema. — 1. Wean the child. 2. Give a 
purge of a few doses of podophillin and leptandrin, with 
biartrate of potass. 3. Tepid baths the order of the day. 
4. Apply the following three or four times daily, by linen 
rags : 

Vi Chloral Hydrate, 2 drachms. 
Glycerine, 2 ounces. 

AquEe Sambugi, 2 ounces. 

The blood to be restored to its healthy condition by liquor 
pot. arsen. — Dr. C. Graha?n in Medical Brief. 



64 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Treatment of Sunstroke. 

The following is from a recent article in the 31edical and 
Surgical Reporter, by Dr. H. R. Bigelow : 

The pathological character of the atitection as manifested 
by the symptoms is the clue to the treatment in each case. 
In the adoption of such a course therapeutical measures 
will be opposed to each other in different instances. Many 
cases have terminated fatally which might have recovered 
had it been possible to insure absolute rest to the patient. 
The necessity of removing the sufferer to a hospital, and 
the leno;th of time which may elapse before medical assist- 
ance can arrive, are causes which may operate fatally. Es- 
pecially is rest a prerequisite to recovery in cases of exhaus- 
tion where death is imminent from asthenia or syncope. 
When summoned to attend an adult suffering from heat 
stroke, our lirst duty is to remove the clothing and insure 
free ventilation. If it be a well-marked apoplectic case^ 
with full, bounding pulse, stertorous breathing, slow respi- 
ration, heat of the surface, with throbbing of the carotids 
and temporal arteries, we should apply the ice-cap and 
sponge the body ; the cold douche to the shoulders and 
chest is of great service. The bowels should be freely 
moved by a brisk cathartic, preferably a drop of croton oil 
upon the tongue, and the head should be raised. The 
abuse of any procedure in the practice of medicine is not a 
contraindication of its use, and the physician will use his 
own discretion as to the propriety of bloodletting; while 
the abstraction of blood would be fatal in some cases, it 
seems to be very important in others. In the purely apo- 
plectic cases free wet-cupping of head and spine seems to 
be good practice, aad the history of its discriminating use 
confirms this view. Revulsives should be applied to the 
extremities. If the case should be one in which the pre- 
dominant symptom is exhaustion, as represented by a weak, 
frequent pulse, feeble heart, and with the absence of the 
signs of cerebral congestion, we must avoid, absolutely, ca- 
thartics, emetics and all depressing agencies, and cautiously 
administer stimulants by mouth or rectum. If the surface 
be hot and dry we may sponge the body with spirits and 
water. In the mixed form of the affection the treatment 
will be regulated by the predominance of symptoms. The 
use of cotd to the head, of the douche, of cathartics or 
bloodletting, or of stimulants, will be governed by the in- 
tensity of either the apoplectic symptoms or those of ex- 



Periscope. 65 

liaustion. Serious sequels are not apt to follow, but in 
certain instances well marked sjaiiptoms of cerebral im- 
pairment have been noticed. The father of a family which 
I attend has never full j recovered from the eftectsof a sun- 
stroke received three years ago. For six months after the 
attack he was obliged to stop on the sidewalk and hold on 
to a tree box or lamp post if he heard the rumble of an 
approaching horse car or carriage. He was for a year 
troubled with extreme insomnia and nervousness, and he 
now has well developed neurasthenia. The use of pills of 
phosphorus and uux vomica in these rare cases, conjoined 
to the daily exhibition of electricity, will be followed, gen- 
erally, with improvement. 

Insanity as a result of heat stroke was noticed by Dr. 
•Smith in only two cases. Surgeon-Major A. R. Hall, R.A., 
•of India, suggests the hypodermic injection of quinine. 
His formula is as follows : 

^ Quini^ sulphatis, 10 grains. 

Acid, sulph. dilut., 10 minims. 

Aquse, ad 100 minims. M. 

To be used in three injections at sliort intervals, until 
reaction supervenes. 

Dr. Thomas G. Herron, of Cincinnati, {Med. and Surg. 
Heporter, October, 1868,) advises hot water. This is to be 
poured over the neck and head, and wet towels, frequently 
-changed, are to be applied to the head. 

In the Virginia Medical Monthly for E'ovember, 1874, Dr. 
C. G. Hill, of Maryland, recommends the inhalation of 
•oxygen. 

Hip-joint Lameness. — 

Vi Tr. Macrotys, 4 ounces. 
Tr. Aconite, 1 drachm. 
M. Sig.: Teaspoonful four times a day. 

Use locally to afiected part : 

Vi Tr. Aconite, 
Tr. Belladon., 
Chloroform, 
Colodion, 

Tr. Cautharides, a.a. 1 ounce. 
M. Apply on coarse brown paper. 

Should it vesicate, discontinue the linament for a time, and 
•apply simple cerat. — Dr. J. M. Taylor, in Medical Brief. 



66 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

EDITOKS: 

John Murphy, M. D., J. L. Hamilton, M. D., 

H. Steele, M. D. 



All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. Mcllvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South- Jefferson Street, PEOKIA, Ilili.. 

The Elevation of the Character of the Profession. 

Much has been written of late on the elevation of the- 
character of the medical profession, and various plans have 
been proposed for its furtherance, but they all look to the 
medical colleges to do the entire work. The faculties of 
the various colleges can undoubtedly do much in one way; 
they can require a higher grade of scholarship from matri- 
culants and increase the length of the course, but to our 
mind this is not over one-half of what is desired. We cer- 
tainly require a higher grade of intelligence on the part of 
practitioners, but we also require a higher grade of moral 
character and manhood on the part of candidates for diplo- 
mas. The faculties cannot become sufficiently acquainted 
with their students to judge at all upon this point; and 
certificates of good moral character and of all the virtues 
can be got for the asking by almost any man, be he 
honest or rascal. So they amount to nothing. What then^ 
can be done ? We think that, in their individual capacity,, 
physicians can do more towards this much-desired end than 
all others combined. If every physician would refuse to- 
admit to his office, as student, every young man who had 
not the requisite education and those moral qualities which 
are essential, the way would be at once plain and simple.. 
Every doctor should take sufficient pride in his profession 
to see to this, and carry it out. It would lessen the number 
of yearly graduates, but the country would not suffer if no 
more were graduated for five or ten years. We consider 
honesty, virtue, temperance, and similar qualities of equal 
importance with acuteness of thought or book-learning, 
and who can judge so well upon these as the preceptor?' 
We throw out this suggestion that it may not be overlooked! 



Editorial J^otes and Comments. 67 



when the time comes (and it is not far distant) when de- 
cisive action must be taken in this matter, or the standing 
of the profession in the community be very much im- 
paired. 

To All Our Readers. 

Please do not refuse to take our Monthly from the 
postoffice through fear that a bill will be presented. Such 
is not our intention. You may receive one, two or three 
numbers as samples. If you do not desire to subscribe, 
pass them along to a friend. We enter no names on our 
books, except those who have sent us their dollar, and we 
do not mean to take advantage of the postal laws to get 
subscribers. If you like our Monthly send us your sub- 
scription. If you do not care to subscribe you will not be 
bothered with many numbers of it. We have received 
much encouragement, both by subscriptions and good 
words, and feel confident that we shall succeed. Our ob- 
ject is not to make money; for if it had been that, we 
should never have started. Nor do we even look for pay 
for the labor we expend upon it. But if we can add a 
mite, however small, towards the success of our noble pro- 
fession — if we can aid in establishing a warmer, more cor- 
dial feeling between members of the profession, or if we 
can aid a brother in any trouble, by bringing before him a 
thought or experience adapted to the case which bothers 
him, we shall consider ourselves amply repaid for the time 
and labor expended upon this journal; and any one who 
has had experience in this line will know that it is no easy 
work. With these objects in view, we have a right to ask 
and expect support from the profession, and we feel that 
our appeal will not be in vain. We ask for three things — 
your moral support and encouragement, your experience in 
the shape of contributions, your financial comfort in the 
small sum of one dollar. 



We invite secretaries of district or county medical 
societies to send us short synoptical reports of their pro- 
ceedings, for publication ; also of any interesting papers or 
reports read before the societies. 



Dr. D. W. Aldrich, formerly of Gibson, Knox county, 
111., has changed his address to Galesburg, Knox county, 

HI. 



68 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

We regret that lack of space compelled us to divide the 
article on Bronchocele. Dr. Murphy has devoted much 
attention to this aliection and proposes an entirely original 
method of treatment, which in his hands has proved emi- 
uentlv successful. 



"We hope our readers will send all items of interest to 
the profession that may come under their notice. Mar- 
riage and death notices inserted free; also, change of 
address of physicians. 



There are, according to the Chicago Medical Gazette, in 
the State ot Illinois, 4,850 exponents of the healing art, of 
whom 3,846 are physicians, 456 are eclectics, 437 are 
homoeopaths, 37 are " tizzle-o-medicals," and 874 are " go- 
as-you-please " prescribers. 



Samples of Staufer's hard-rubber uterine instruments 
and supporters can be seen at the office of this journal. 
Also send for catalogues. In sending for catalogues or in- 
struments always mention this journal. See advertisement 
elsewhere. 



Alwaj^s read our advertisements. We admit none of 
questionable character, and physicians are safe in corre- 
sponding with any firm whose card is found in our pages. 



Sentenced for Malpractice. — Dr. Schultze was con- 
victed and sentenced to the penitentiary from Burlington, 
Iowa, for one year for malpractice in causing the death of 
Mrs. Paul Raier some two weeks since. The case was a 
peculiar one, and the judge, in sentencing the prisoner, 
admitted he onlj' imposed a light sentence from the fact 
that there seemed to be evidence that the accused honestly 
followed a practice of medicine known as " Baumscheidt," 
a theory well known in Germany, the main principle of 
which is apparently the application of a peculiar oil to the 
skin l)y means of an irritating instrument, and also its use 
internally. It was the latter prescription which caused the 
death of Mrs. Raier. The oil used is said to be croton oil. 
— Chicago Times. 



Editorial Kotes and Coimnents. ' 69 

Some druggists seem to take very much to heart a 
couple of articles which appeared in previous numbers of 
this journal. Well, gentlemen, if the shoe fits, put it on. 
The articles in question contained nothing that could in 
au}^ manner oftend a good, honest, fair-dealing druggist, 
but could only be objected to by those who practice what 
was condemned, and the sooner such quit their evil ways, 
or quit the business, the better it will be for druggists, 
doctors and patients. For their howls we do not care one 
cent. 

We would again call the attention of advertisers to our 
rates, and inducements on page 3. We will reach more 
physicians than any journal in the west, and offer lower 
rates. This journal w^ill be read by from 8,000 to 10,000 
practicing physicians this year. Several advertisements 
have been received too late for the July but will appear in 
the August number. Our advertisers all say that we give 
more than we promised. 

Those subscribing will please notify us if they have not 
received the first two numbers of this journal. We have a 
limited number on hand and will send them to subscribers 
during this month, and the journal for one year from date 
of subscription. 

Recent Literature. 

We have received a reprint from the Chicago Medical 
■Journal and Examiner, entitled " Cinchona Cure for Intem- 
perance," by Dr. C. W. Earle, of Chicago, 111.; pp. 20. _ In 
this pamphlet Dr. Earle takes up and, to our mind, effect- 
ually " uses up" the much vaunted cinchona cure of Dr. 
D'Unger. The facts which Dr. Earle (and as physician to 
the Washingtonian Home for Inebriates, he is certainly in 
a position to know whereof he writes) brings out are 
enough to disgust any unprejudiced mind with the preten- 
sions of D'Unger, and to warrant the denunciation of his 
" cure" as a purely money-making scheme, and a shameful 
-one at that ; for to delude drunkards in their attempts to 
cast off their chains, and not only rob them of their money, 
but furnish them with what will increase their taste for al- 
cohol, can only be characterized as devilish. 

Quarterly Epitome of Practical Medicine and Surgery : 
an American supplement to Braithwaite's Retrospect. 



70 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Part I, March. W. A. Townsend, publisher; pages, 160, 
S2.50 a year in advance, or with Braithwaite $4.60. 

We have examined the " Epitome " with great interest, 
and are much pleased with it. It contains a vast fund of 
knowledge culled from the very best sources, and will 
prove a benefit to every practitioner. 



To CoLBURN, BiRKS & Co., wholesale druggists of thi& 
city, undoubtedly belongs the honor of issuing the finest 
and most complete catalogue and price-list of druggists' 
supplies and sundries and surgical instruments published 
in this country. Mr. M. W. Shultz, as editor, deserves 
great credit for the way in which he has done the laborious 
work of compilation and arrangement, as do also Franks 
& Sons, the printers, for the elegant style in which the 
book is printed; pages, 670. 



St. Louis Clinical Record — Wm. B. Hazard, M. T>.y 
editor, St. Louis, Mo. 

Pacific Medical and Surgical Journal — Henry Gibbons, 
M. D. and H. Gibbons, Jr., M. D,, editors, San Francisco, 
California. 

Medical Summary — Dr. R. H. Andrews, editor, Lans- 
dale. Pa. 

College and Clinical Record — Drs. R. J. Dunglison and 
F. Woodbury, editors, Philadelphia, Pa. 

New York Medical and Surgical Journal — E. M. Fish- 
blatt, M. D., editor. New York. 

Medical Brief — J. J. Lawrence, M. D., editor, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Indiana Medical Reporter — Drs. Owen, Harper and 
McCoy, editors, Evansville, Ind. 

Medical and Surgical Reporter — D. G. Brinton, M. D.,, 
editor, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Medical Record— Geo. T. Shrady, M. D., editor,. 
New York. 



The Illinois Foreman, devoted to the interests of the 
A. O. U. W. — 0. E. Schupp, editor ; monthly, fifty cents 
per annum. 



Advertisements. 



BO"V7":]N^jLisr's 

Russian Koumiss. 



A sparkling beverage prepared from Pure Sweet Milk, grateful 
to the taste and agreeable to the most delicate stomach. 

A delicious article of food for invalids — refreshing, nourishing 
and strengthening; of such easy digestion that it can be taken 
when the stomach is so weak that it can bear no other kind of food.. 

Of the greatest benefit to persons suffering from Dyspepsia, 
Feeble or Imperfect Digestion, Nausea, Vomiting, General Debility, 
Diabetes, Chronic Diarrhoea, Cholera Infantum, Consumption,, 
Catarrhal Affections, etc. 

From our large experience with Koumiss we are able confident- 
ly to recommend to the profession this new — or rather, old — dietetic 
preparation as a valuable auxilliary agent in the treatment of 
diseases which are dependent upon, or are accompanied with defect- 
ive nutrition. 

For full particulars see pamphlet published by C A. Bowman 
& Co., entitled "BOWMAN'S RUSSIAN KOUMISS: a brief 
description of Its Nature, Uses and Benefits; also, the opinion of 
some of the Leading Physicians concerning it." Pamphlets free on 
application. 

We also prepare Koumiss combined with Hypophosphites- 
(See pamphlet.) 

Packed in our refrigerator boxes, Koumiss can be safely 
shipped to any distance in the hottest weather. 

Price-List of Koumiss, either with or without the Hypophos- 
phites : 

Our Koumiss is put up in quart bottles. 

Per Bottle, « $ .25 

Per Dozen 3.00 

Per Dozen, packed, for shipping 3.25 

Champagne Taps, each 1.00 

Sixty cents per dozen allowed for bottles returned clean andi 
sweet. 

Orders from a distance should be accompanied by a PostoflSce 
order or draft. 

C. A. Bowman & Co., 

Druggists and Manufacturers of Koumiss^ 
520 Main Street, Peoria, III. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



ST, PRIINCIS' BfiHOLEy HOSPITftL! 

A well-kuowu lustitutiou conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and ev^erything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studeb. 

Surgeon ...Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, (Doctor's 
attendance at regular rates), are from $7 to $10 per week, according 
to size of room and accommodation required. In the general wards, 
the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

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Ad V ertiseii vents 




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STREET, 

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S Advertisements. 



THE PEORIA 

IVdIedical IVIontlily, 

A JOURNAL DEVOTED TO 

MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 



Will be published at Peoria, Illinois, the 1st of each 
month. A large edition (2,000 copies per month) will be 
issued during the present year, for the purpose of bringing 
it before the medical profession. 

This journal will be devoted to short, practical articles 
on live questions, giving the experience of successful men 
in a brief, topical manner, desiring rather to aid physicians 
in the routine of every day work, than to advance profound 
theories of untried value. 

We wish every physician, into whose hands this journal 
may come, to feel that it in part, belongs to him, and that 
its pages will always be open to anything of interest that 
he may wish to lay before the profession ; an interesting 
and instructive case, a favorite and tried prescription, a new 
thought towards the elucidation of some of the knotty 
points of our science, or a successful method of treatment 
of disease. During the 3'ear, our pages will contain con- 
tributions from many eminent men and an active and sus- 
tained effort will be made to add to its^alue. We cordially 
invite correspondence from physicians, and will welcome 
to our pages everything of benefit to our profession. 

We urge all professional brethren to take an active 
interest in our monthly, as only by their co-operation and 
support can the aim of this journal — viz : Mutual benefit 
and counsel — be attained. 



(J. MURPHY, M.D. 



Editors, { J. L. HAMILTON, M. D., 
Ul- STEELE, M. D. 

Address all communications to 

THOS. M. McILVAmE, A. M., Publisher, 
204 8. Jefferson St., Peoria, III. 



SPEINQ STEM SUPPOETEES. 



Abdominal Supporter. 
3. 




SOLID STEM SUPPOETEE. 
E. C— 5-— (Economy.) 




Prices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Procide-itia Cup A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Coutil 
Finished Belt X, $7.00. On Z, Fig. 
5, fe.OO. On T, Coutil, $8.00; and 
on Y, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring Stfm, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long H, or 1 U, tho same on either 
belt as A, 

Retroversion JC, on X, nr Y, 
Cotton, $8.00. Ou Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on Z, §7.00. 

Anteversion, Sntid Stem 
C, or Sol! I Slfni Glnb" lop 
G, on X, or Y, Cotton. ♦5.r,0. On Y, 
Coutil, $6.'0. and on Z, $4.50 only. 

Sules. — The Stem Supporters 
Fig. 1 and 5, are only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Speculnms, Fi°;. 6, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cup D, 
either separate, or in connection 
with Stem Supporters. 

Elastic Oums S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; 4 at 35 cts ; and Springs 
at 3 cts. each. 

N. B« — The fignres on these engravings cor- 
respond with those on the full Catalogue plate. 

Selection: — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
If a cup, it must be modelled after the junction of 
the axii of the nterus and vagina, or the cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I U, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptation 
and border cup. In cases of slight Antoversions 
and slight Retroversions, deep cnps may be called 
for, and in most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cups are usually 
selected by giving the full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, 1]/^ to l-;^; Multiparae, If'g 
to 2, and Procidentia to 23^ inches and over some 
times. Belts— ¥oT X, and Z, waist measure to be 
given, aod Y, hip measure. 

Anteversion V, Fig ■ 1 — '''his had been re- 
modelled a number of times, and the fenestrated 
top found best to remain in position. 

Retroversion E — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent efficiency. The broad lever, lifts up the 
fundus, while the cup corrects the prolaps.is and 
holds the uterus, by a double elastic motion, if a 
spring stem, .-mall, long stem. Globe Tops G, 
Fig. l,are placed with success against the sensitive 
fundus, after everything else been intolerable. 



Price. — Permanent, Curved Stem 
Cup E C, on elastic webbing Z, 
$4.50. On X, or T, cotton, $5.50, 
and Y, coutil, $6 50. 

No expense has been saved to 
Sizes— 1, 1 3.16, 1 6.16 and ^1<^ even the Economical Supporter 



1 9.1 6, Flesh color enam- all possible advantages, 
eled. Price, $2.50 each. 

HAED EUBBEE UTEEINE EXAMINING CASF 




Prices. — Full case, $S.00; Quill Caust'C Holder H, or Camel's 
Hair Brush Holder and Case I, each $1.00, Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket after the cnp is in posi- 
tion. Tnis is safer than all other contrivances, 
but is seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made in this Series to correct Retro- 
version through the posterior cul-de-sac. i . 

Cystocele and Rectoeele. — These are suc- 
cessfully drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops 6, or Oblong H, Fig. 1. 

Cup 2>, Fig. 5. — .Supplements EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed into A D, 
Fif.l, 

Globe B, Fig. 5. — This is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with all the objectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now a^ain 
a popular pessary. 

Speculum, Xtg. 6 — The conductor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and in position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be introduced ; 
this together with the thin shell, gives a sufficient 
calibre to embrace the entire cervix within the 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the enclosure of the cervix by rotation. 

EoBfiniining Case, Fig. 12. — Sounds A, B, 
C, Movers D, F, and 6, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on JI, rf H, and form instruments 12 
inches long. L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Jielt Y, Fig. 3.— Ts ma<le to order of any size 
and strength, to support th» stem supporter and 
pendulous abdomen. Hip Straps S S, are elastic. 



Intra Vterine Stem Cup I J7. — The stem 
Mailed on receipt of quotation prices, and all the hnrd rubber pa-'s on the full Catalogue exchanged 
to meet any indie ition, ann cover the purchaser's risk. Catalogr s on application. 

name this Journal \ ^-^ FrnnMin St , Wes* side, above Green, Phila., Fa. 

) Near 9th & Green Sts. (or Bound Brook) Ketc York Itepot. 



10 



Advertisements. 




It is the nicest ch^ir in the market for 
the Office, Library or I'arior. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 



Prices witliiii le Reacli of All. , 



Call on US or send for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 




G^F. G. BOURSCHEIDT,^ 



s^potlieCcii^Y cii|d L]:\eii\i^t, 



LIBRARY BUILDING, 



PEORIA, ILL. 



PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

I AM NOW PREPARED TO UNDERTAKE ANALYTICAL WORK, 

ASSAYING, ETC. Special Attention given to 

CRIMINAL AND SANITARY MATTERS, 

Potable and Mineral Waters, Milk, 

Urine, etc., etc. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICl TED. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Feokia Medical Monthly. 



AcLverbisejYients. 



WE HANDLE A FULL LINE OF 



'^^MPORTED & DOMESTIC CHEMICALS, 

G^PERFUMES^^E) 



We are enabled to furnish 




TOILET ARTICLES OF THE BEST QUALIIY. 

OUR STOCK OF 

ip^nsroir g-oozds 

AND 

^ DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

f i3k,\ is large and well selected. 



ARTISTS' AND WAX WORK 

SUPPLIES. 



The Medical Profession 

Anything in the line of 

NE\A^ AND SPECIAL 



INSTRUMENTS, ETC., \f ^^ 
AT LOWEST PRICES ON SHORT NOTICE 

CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Druggists & Chemists, 

And Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at all Hours of the Day/ 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

SOS South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

c. j^. BO"wii^j^isr &c CO., 
Prescription Druggists, 

520 I^jSLJ^HIST STI^CEET, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



N. B.— A full line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 



Advertisemenis. 



COLBURN, BIRKS & CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 

' AND DEALERS IN 



KIDDER'S BATTERIES, GAIFFE'S BATTERIES, 
AMPUTATING, 

OPERATING, 

DISSECTING, and 
POST-MORTEM INSTRUMENTS, 
TOOTH FORCEPS, 
OBSTETRICAL FORCEPS, 

FEVER THERMOMETERS, 

HYPODERMIC SYRINGES, 
POCKET INSTRUMENT CASES, 

VIAL CASES, BUGGY CASES, 
SADDLE BAGS, 
PLASTERS, BANDAGES, SPLINTS, 

CRUTCHES, ETC. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our new Instrument Catalogue ready for distribu- 
tion June IS, 1880. 

Our prices will be found low for first quality 
goods. 

Write for quotations before buying. 



COLBURN, BIRKS & CO., Wholesale Druggists, 

218, 220 & 222 S. Washington St., Peoria, 111. 
. In answering advertisements, mention tiie Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements . 



TERMS: ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM, iN ADVANCE. 



IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS! 



Fiiiii li&il l@itMy 



Monthly Circulation, 2000 Copies. 



This journal will reach eight thousand (8,000) physicians 
the present year, and as a medium for advertising, is not excelled 
in the West. The rates of advertising are lower than in any other 
purely Medical Journal with any thing near an equal circulation. 

Advertisements are indexed, immediately following the table 
of contents. 

This journal has been considerably enlarged ; but no increase 
will be made in rates to regular advertisers. The space devoted 
to advertisements is limited, and is now nearly occupied. 

We invite correspondence. 



<L_^==PAYABL,E QUARTERLV.^^-' 

1 Year. 6 Months. 3 Months. 

Whole page $50.00 $30.00 $20.00 

Half page 30.00 20.00 15.00 

Third page 25.00 18.00 12.00 

Quarterpage 20.00 15.00 10.00 

Address all communications to 

THOS. M. McILVAIIsrE, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-Jefferson St., PEOKIA, ILL. 



Advertisements. 



*^SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS. =©R 



eSPEGIALTIESe 

INTRODUCED TO THE PROFESSION BY 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



Sanguis Bovinus Exsieeatus. 



DEFIBRINATED BULLOCKS' BLOOD (DE- 
SICCATED.)— This article was first introduced 
bv Dr. A. H. Smith, physician to St. Luke's 
Hospital, New York, and subsequently investigated by F. E. Stewart, Ph. G., M. D., of the same city, who utilized the pro- 
duct by desiccation. Popul.^rly employed as a remedy for consumption, etc., by invalids who drink it at the abattoirs, as it 
flows from the freshly slaughtered animals. 

As si'STAixiNG and sdfportixg measure it supplies nitrogenous tissue waste, obviates the tendency to death by asthenia, 
and forestalls a degree of prostration dangerous to life. 

As a BESTORATIVK agent, it is indicated in the slow convalescence from fever, in wasting diseases of various forms, con- 
sumption and the like, in cachectic states from various constitutional poisons, as syphilis, scrofula, etc., and in all cases 
where impaired blood, nerves, or digestion, give rise to the antemic condition, with its resulting general debility, hypochon- 
driasis, or other functional disorder 

As a CURATIVE agent, in atonic dyspepsia, anremia, and various derangements of nutrition and secretion. 
For a description of the process of manufacture, etc., in detail, please send for circulars. 



■i-j tn^'^ P TT"-*-!-. 1 (HYDROBROMIC ETHER)— chemically pure. The new aniBStbetic. This ar- 

fl T'O IM 1 fl f^ OI Mi l, ll V I tide has been used for producing anssthesia, with very satisfactory results, 
*J ' proving to .have very important advantages over chloroform, ether and other 
agents heretofore in use. It is powerful, rapid in action, and, in short, it possesses many advantages over the above ageuts. 

Although comparatively a safe aniesthetic, we would still advise care in its use by those unfamiliar with its properties, and 
will be pleased to furnish circular containing report of case by Dr. J. Marion Sims, in which daugerous effects followed its use. 



-|- • -p-v -J (PISCIDIA EEYTHRINA.) The reports which have already been received 

JQ_yY^Q^J(3a -LJ O Cf W^ O O d of the eliects of this drug more than justify our action in placing it before 
*^ * the profession of this country. Making due allowance for the enthusiasm 

which its action has aroused, we would only say, that whereas, we a short time since merely asked the profession to suljmit it 
to a trial, we are now justified in recommending it as a substitute for opium in many painful aff'ections. Its advantages over 
opium lie in its not constipating or locking up the secretions, and in its leaving none of the unpleasant constitutional effects 
associated with the administration of opium. 



-. y|- (FRAXCISCEA UNIFLORA.) This drug is officinal in both Brazilian Dispensatories in which it is 

J^|_Q J^Q^QQ^ classed among alteratives of the more active and positive kind. So marked is its effects in the syphilitc 
* cachexia, that it has been called mhrcurio vegetal by the Brazilians. It is recommended also as an 
anti-rheumatic, relieving the pain and materially shortening the natural course of the disease. 

■We ask for it a thorough trial, under the belief that it will prove a valuable addition to the list of remedies commonly 
employed in rheumatism. It is regarded by the Brazilians as almost a specific in the chronic form of the disease. 



—^ -p-.,^ 1 . . We are just in receipt of a direct importation of this rare and expensive drug, 

fi^^f 'T'pQO'r I_J11 OOlSia Duboisia, although scarcely two years before the profession of this country, has 
^■^■^^ ui €-*<—> o .»— ' <-«. Kj\-f • ^[rg^jy largely supplanted atrop'ia, formerly regarded as indispensable as a my- 

driatic, in the practice of opthalmology. Its action on the eye is similar to that of atropia, dilating the pupil and paralyzing 
the muscles of accommodation, but is much more prompt and is attended by none of the disagreeable effects of that salt, irri- 
tation of the conjunctiva, dryness of the throat, and, in children, hallucinations, delirium, etc. 

^^ - , .| — ^ -J We would ask the especial attention of the medical profession and pharma- 

( -- O I O T 1 y^ ^ I — ^y^O(jlir^T^ cists to our line of gelatine and gelatine-coated preparations, comprising 
^^^^'■'-^^'■'■^'^ '- -^ v-yvM. <^v^ u^. Empty Capsules, Improved Rectal Suppository Capsules, and Gelatine-coated 
PilU. Our facilities for the manufacture of these articles are unsurpassed, and~the perfection to which we have brought them is 
due t/> the sparing of no expense in the securing of the best methods and the most experienced skill. We confidently ask a 
comparison of our Gelatine preparations with tlu'sc of any other maker. We have but recently added Gelatine-coated Pills to 
our sio*;k, preferring to delay manufacturing ihem until we should be able to perfect a process through which the objections to 
Gelatine-coaled Pills, as heretofore offered, might be entirely overcome. Our process is the result of years of experiment, 
and the expenditure of much capital. We claim for it complete freedom from the objcctious which attached to all the 
methods previoujlj employed. 

^^ .. , -.^ . The dcsiratiility of some neat and expeditious method for the administration 

I — £2 I O T'i PI O ( .Q'nClll If^Q of bitter or nauseous drugs, will be particularly manifest to physicians during 
'"-' *^ ••■«-* •'•1 '■ '■^ ■<^f^ l-f^ 1^ A\,^o . jijp „pr|„g months, in which the demand for "quinine, especially in malarial 

dinirict-. JH hirge I'.y u-fing our Capsules the disagreeable taste of the most disagreeable drug may be completely obviated, 

and the patient saved' the disturbance arising from nausea and repugnance. 



Cap 



1. , . . To enable u.s to supply the Physician with the means of utilizing to the fullest degree 

fa r* 1 I I f^T'S ""-' >"*"y advantages'attendirig the employment of Gelatine Capsules, we have taken 
^^ ■'• AiAV^i>j, the agency for two very ingenious Capsule Fillers, known respectively as Davenport's 
and Whitlleld. With one of these instruments capsules may be filled in much less time, than it would lake to prepare pow- 
I or to make plll«. 
S-od for full di;wrlptlvc circular of these instruments. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



reofik JVLedidkl ^oiitlily. 

4®=" Contributions must be short — not to exceed five hundred words.*^H 

VOL. I. AUGUST, 1880. NO. 4. 



[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Broucliocele. 



BY J. MURPHY, M. D. 



(CONCLUDED.) 

"We pass over any special consideration of the pathology 
■of bronchocele, because our knowledge of this phase of the 
disease is neither full nor satisfactory; because it is appar- 
ently so diverse in its character, in the experience of differ- 
ent observers; and especially because it does not afford the 
■slightest indication of what treatment would probably be 
the most rational and successful. In proceeding to discuss 
the treatment of the disease, I shall also pass over without 
farther reference those mild recent cases, in which simple 
iodine inunction is all that is required to effect a cure, and 
go on to a consideration of the treatment of those chronic 
•eases which have existed for a long time, which have at- 
tained a large size, and in which there is a radical change 
in the structure of the gland and its envelope. In these 
cases we usually find the parenchyma of the gland harden- 
■ed and hypertrophied, and the skin and subjacent cellular 
tissue condensed and thickened. This hardening and thick- 
ening of the various tissues of the tumor are what consti- 
tute the chief difficulties in the treatment. As the tumor 
becomes harder and denser, not only does the vigor of the 
capillary and absorbent vessels become lessened and other- 
wise impaired, but the number and size of those vessels 
also become lessened, thus necessarily depressing the vital 
power of the tumor, interfering seriously with its absorb- 
ent functions, and materially impairing its susceptibility of 
treatment. It is this class of cases which has been gener- 



72 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

ally considered incurable, to which we wish to draw atten- 
tion, and in which we have adopted a special mode of treat- 
ment. If we are correct in our premises, that the impaired 
circulatory and absorbent functions of the tumor, which 
are the leo-itimate result of the change of structure we have 
referred to, constitute the chief impediment to the success- 
ful treatment of such cases, the corollary is inevitable, that 
a removal, to a certain extent at least, of that hardened con- 
dition of the tumor, and a restoration of the capillary and 
absorbent vessels to a state approaching a normal one, con- 
stitute necessary conditions precedent to a successful treat- 
ment of the disease. 

An agent which will not positively disintegrate the har- 
dened tissues, but which will soften them to such an extent 
as to permit their more free permeation by absorbents and 
blood vessels, is evidently what is here required. Such an 
agent will, we believe, be found in chromic acid. We had 
occasion some time since to make a series of experiments 
with this acid in connection with a new method for treat- 
ing old, gristly urethral strictures; a resume of which we 
hope at no distant time to present to the readers of this 
journal. We found during these experiments that chromic 
acid saturated with water, completely destroyed any soft 
tissue to which it might be applied, but that unlike any 
other caustic, by sufficiently diluting it, it had the eiiect of 
only softening the parts it was brought into contact with. 
A powerful caustic, if careful]}^ used on diseased tissue, it 
rather renovates than destroj^s. An equally powerful resol- 
vent, it softens hardened tissue without infringing on its 
vitality. Reflecting on this peculiar property of chromic 
acid we considered that it might be utilized in softening 
hardened and so-considered incurable cases of goitre, and 
in preparing them for the favorable action of iodine. Act- 
ing on this impression we have been experimenting for sev- 
eral years with chromic acid in those cases, and have been 
so much gratified with the results that we have concluded 
to submit them to the profession, in sufficient detail, we 
hope, to be understood. 

The preliminary treatment is simply injecting a solution 
of chromic acid of proper strength into the tumor, in such 
a manner as to avoid injurious irritation, and insure equal 
distribution through its substance. This treatment should 
be continued until its peculiar eflect of softening the tumor 
has been effected. The injections should be first used irb 



Original Communications. 73 

the skin and subjacent cellular tissue, both of which appear 
in many cases to be closely welded together, to be much 
thickened and hardened, and to be very deficient in circu- 
latory and absorbent power. After this outer layer of the 
tumor has been suificientl}' softened, we proceed to inject 
the central layer, and finally the inner layer. By this 
means we avoid attempting to accomplish too much at once, 
lessen the risk of undue irritation and insure the equal dis- 
tribution of the acid through the whole tumor. For mak- 
ing the injections we use an ordinary hypodermic syringe, 
of a capacity of sixty minims, with a platinum-plated steel 
tipped point, the latter longer than usual. We generally 
commence with a solution of ten grains of the acid in one 
ounce of water, and increase its strength according to the 
requirements of the case as it progresses. The period 
which should elapse between the injections should not be 
less than three, and not more than five days. Injecting 
oftener than three days would be apt to produce irritation 
and thus interfere with the proper action of the remedy. 
Allowing a longer interval than five days would be liable 
to afifect the continuous action of the acid. Those periods 
constitute a general rule, but they will have to be frequent- 
ly deviated from. 

For the convenience of injecting the tumor uniformly 
we checquer its surface with red lines intersecting each 
other at right angles, and half an inch apart ; thus insur- 
ing a regular distribution of the acid through its substance 
and avoiding the irritation which might arise from inject- 
ing too frequently in the same place. The amount of the 
solution to be injected into each square should be limited 
in the first place to ten or twelve minims, gradually increas- 
ing the quantity to sixteen or twenty minims. By watch- 
ing the effect of the first injections, we can easily deter- 
mine the propriety of increasing the strength of the lotion, 
its amount and the frequency with which it can be used. 
If we find that the softening process does not progress as 
rapidly as we could wish, we ma}', without danger, increase 
the strength of the solution to forty or sixt}^ grains of the 
acid to the ounce of water. But although the chromic acid 
may be safely used to an extent that does not actually dis- 
integrate the parts ; still we consider it safer, and in the 
end more beneficial, not to be over-zealous in using it too 
strong or too frequently. By softening the parenchyma of 
the gland and the cellular tissue gradually the renewed cap- 



74 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

illary circulation will be in a more healthy condition, and 
the absorbents will be in a more favorable state for being 
acted on afterwards b}- iodine. 

The length of time necessary to produce the peculiar 
softening effect of the acid on the tumor will necessaril}^ 
vary in different cases; but the treatment should be perse- 
vered in until the object is accomplished. If used cautious- 
ly there is no danger of any disagreeable effects resulting. 
Close attention, however, is necessary on the part of the 
phj'sician to avoid errors in, or accidents from its use; and 
should any serious irritation at any time result, threatening 
inflammation and abscess, the treatment should be imme- 
diately suspended, and leeching and cooling applications 
should be resorted to. 

On the success of the chromic acid treatment depends 
entirely our hope of curing old cases of goitre. The soft- 
ening of the hardened tissues involved in the tumor; and 
the restoration of the capillar}' and absorbent vessels to a 
condition approaching their natural efficiency, are abso- 
lutely essential to the subsequent successful treatment of 
the case. 

It must be remembered that while the chromic acid ex- 
ercises no curative influence over the disease, it 3'et prepares 
the way for the efficient action of the iodine, on which we 
entirely depend for eft'ecting a radical cure. We are not 
aware of an}^ other remedj^ which will -per se, cure this dis- 
ease. All other aa-ents which we have resorted to have en- 
tirely failed when used alone, and any therapeutic charac- 
ter which any of them has achieved, has been owing to its 
being combined with iodine. The degree of thickness 
which the tumor generally attains renders it impossible for 
the application of the iodine to the skin alone, to produce 
any eflect on its deeper seated parts. This consideration 
involves the necessity of using the iodine by hypodermic 
injection, as well as by inunction. For both those purposes 
we prefer the aqueous solution of the iodine to any other 
of its preparations. For external application we use a lo- 
tion of the strength of Ave grains to the ounce of water, 
strengthening or diluting it as the exigencies of the case 
may demand during its progress. In so apparently simple 
a matter as painting the skin with iodine, physicians are 
sometimes guilty of errors. It should here be applied very 
cautiously, and when the skin tingles it should be discon- 
tinued. If any irritation is produced, more blood is deter- 



Original Cormnimications. 75 

mined to the parts, and the disease is consequently aggra- 
vated. It is better to apply the iodine four times daily to 
the extent that it can be tolerated comfortably, than to use 
it once or twice more freely. By this means irritation is 
avoided, tanning of the skin is prevented, and its absorp- 
tive power is maintained. As an injection we commence 
with an aqueous solution of iodine of the strength of two 
grains to the ounce of water, diluting or strengthening it as 
our observation as we proceed, may dictate the necessity 
of. Injecting the tumor with iodine requires more circum- 
spection than injecting it with the acid. The tumor has 
now more vitality, and has been rendered more irritable 
by the previous treatment; besides the iodine is more 
stimulating in its action than the chromic acid, and more 
uncertain in its effects. The iodine injections should be 
used in the same manner and with the same precautions 
that the chromic acid injections were used; carrying them 
first to the central section of the tumor, and afterwards to 
its deeper seated portions. The intervals between the in- 
jections, however, should at first be longer than in using 
the acid, and the strength of the lotion should be increased 
more cautiously. It would be impossible to indicate the 
exact strength to which the injections can be safely and 
advantageously carried, or how frequently they can be used 
as the treatment progresses. Those therapeutic considera- 
tions are necessarily' so different in different cases that it 
would be extremely difficult to lay down any general rule 
on the subject. Much must be necessarily lett here to the 
care, capacity and discretion of the physician. 

During the progress of every case the treatment ought 
to be zealously guarded, and conducted with the most un- 
remitting circumspection. A single indiscretion may prove 
disastrous to our treatment, by leading to an abscess, or to 
some other untoward event, not the least disastrous of 
which might be our ignominious, or at least unceremoni- 
ous dismissal from the case. 

The period which the treatment may occupy in effect- 
ing a cure, is from the nature of the disease, its long 
standing, the intrinsic difficulties surrounding it, and its 
complicated character, likely to be protracted. We have 
not yet treated a sufficient number of cases to enable us to 
form even a proximate estimate on this point. The chro- 
mic acid treatment will however have to be persisted in 
for from two to four months, and the iodine treatment at 



76 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

least double this period and not unfrequently much longer. 
We have little space left for any consideration of the 
internal treatment of this disease, and perhaps this should 
not be regretted, as it is very questionable- whether any 
special benefit results from such treatment; still as a possible 
adjunct to the local remedies, it may be judicious to resort 
to the only two agents which are likel}^ to be productive of 
any advantage in those cases — iodine and mercury. The 
iodide of potass, and the bi-chloride of mercury, are the 
representative preparations from those two great classes of 
medicine, which we usually administer ; two grains of the 
former and one thirtieth of a grain of the latter, thrice every 
day, continued during the progress of the local treatment. 
If there is any appreciable derangement of the system, or 
any suspicion of the presence of malaria, previous to the 
commencement of the treatment, or during its continuance, 
appropriate remedies should be resorted to. During the 
progress of the case as perfect quietude as possible should 
be imposed on the patient, an unstimulating diet should be 
used, and mild mercurial and saline medicines should be 
prescribed, to keep the secretary and portal systems in a 
healthy condition, 

"We do not claim that this system of treatment will cure 
every case of chronic broncho'cele, but we believe it will 
cure if properly carried out, a number of such cases; all of 
which have hitherto been considered incurable. It will 
not be surprising, however, if it should not succeed in the 
hands of those who may lack the patience, perseverance 
and tact so necessary to its success, or who may lack the 
manual ambidexterity, so essential in carrj^ing it into effect. 
Peoria, July, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Ti'eatmeiit of Inveterate Ague. 

The treatment of ordinary ague is not difiicult, but the 
treatment of inveterate ague is far otherwise. Some of 
the cases are most obstinate and rebellious. It is only in 
localities where malaria is concentrated that these obstinate 
cases occur, but unfortunately there are many of these 
places in the West and South. No one who has not prac- 
ticed in these regions, can have a clear idea of the unyield- 
ing nature of some of them. During a practice of thirty 
years in Peoria, I have been consulted from time to time^ 



Original Cormmmiccubions . 77 

bj persons living in the bottoms above and below the city, 
ail telling the same story, that they have had ague, some 
six months, some a year, others a year and a half and even 
two years and have not been able to get it cured. They 
have had the paroxysms broken sometimes continuing 
free from them, one, two or three weeks and then they 
return. 

These persons are usually sallow, cachectic, sometimes 
jaundiced, often with more or less engorgement and torpid- 
ity of the liver, and enlargement of the spleen, the latter 
organ is sometimes enormously enlarged. To these symp- 
toms, especially among children, is not infrequently added, 
ascites with oedema of the lower limbs. 

If this class of patients remain in these malarial dis- 
tricts during the fall, I believe it impossible to cure all of 
them; but when winter comes or sooner, if they are 
removed to a healthy locality they can all be permanently 
cured unless some organic lesion has developed, which is 
rare except in some of the oldest or worst cases. The idea 
in the treatment of this form of disease is to eradicate the 
poison with which the system is saturated, or to so treat 
the system as to enable it to eliminate it and to recuperate 
from its effects. 

The drugs which are necessary in the treatment of these 
cases are few but they are powerful and require care and 
judgment in their application. They must be selected, 
varied, combined and given in doses to suit each case. 
The man who has the capacity to do this best, will be the 
most successful. To become expert in this requires some 
experience as well as study. They are chiefly quinine, iron, 
mercury, arsenic, strychnia. ^ 

The first thing to be done is to break up the paroxysms, 
which can usually be done with full doses of quinine, then 
the following, which I give as a general formula, may be 
administered : 



Vi Quinife sulpb. 


20 grains.^ 


Ferri sulph. 


15 " • 


Acid, arsen. 


H " 


Hyd. bichloridi, 


1* " 


Strychnia, 


1 grain. 


Ext. conii, 


10 grains. 


Ft. Pill, 30. 




One three times a day. 





Sig. 

The bichloride and strychnia may be left out if thought 
advisable. The first three being the chief dependents, yet 



78 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

if the latter are not contraindicated they add to the efficieu- 
•cy of the pill. It may be desirable to give in addition once 
or twice a day, some of the vegetable tonics as tinct. cin- 
<?hona comp. or tinct. gentian comp., with or without 
whisky and occasionalh' a laxitive. I have often increased 
the arsenious acid to the tenth of a grain and the strych- 
nia to the fifteenth with marked benefit, and never with 
bad results. Some such course as this steadily persevered 
in, gradually lightening it, from one to three months will 
readily and permanentl}' cure' the most obstinate intermit- 
tents that occur in this country. 

As the paroxysms are more likely to recur on the sev- 
enth, fourteenth and twenty-first days, if the patient under 
treatment is in an intensely malarial atmosphere it is well 
to anticipate these periods b}^ giving on the previous days, 
i. e., the sixth, thirteenth and twentieth da3^s, ten to twelve 
grains of quinine, suspending all other agents on those 
days. 

Fowler's solution, especially in combination with tinct. 
opii, given four or five times a day and steadily persevered 
in is sometimes sufficient. 

By pursuing the above course from one to three months, 
modifying, adjusting and reducing as the treatment con- 
tinues, I have never yet failed to radically and permanently 
<iure the most obstinate case of ague. Alany of these cases 
are complicated with engorgement and torpidity of the liver, 
with enlargement of the spleen, and some with dropsy. 
The treatment above indicated with an occasional mercu- 
rial purge is usually sufficient to clear away the complica- 
tions. When the dropsy is persistent, as it often is in 
cliildreu, the best thing I have ever found to relieve it is 
quinine and sulphate of iron with diuretics and occasionally 
a laxative. The most common and persistent complication 
is enlarged spleen, which often remains for years and if not 
properly treated som»etimes becomes disorganized and 
■causes death. One of the most efficient combinations for 
this is Twining's spleen mixture, which is: 

I* Pulv. jalap, 
" rhei, 
" columbo, 
Ziiigiberis, 

Potassa Vjitartras, a a 1 drachm, 
Ferri sulph, i scruple, 

Tinct. senna, 4 drachms, 

Aqute menth. sat., 10 ounces, 
M. Dose, tablespoouful three times a day. 



Original Coiynnunications . 79* 

This mixture rarely fails to cure the most protracted 
and refractory cases iu a reasonable time. 

Another very reliable treatment is one drachm of syrup 
phosphate of iron with five drops Fowler's solution, three- 
times a day. This was first recommended by Prof. Allison, 
of Edinburgh. I have had less experience with it than the 
former, but have had enough to know that it is valuable, 
I have never yet tl-eated cases of enlarged spleen, except 
those in which the organ was already in a state of actual 
disorganization, which one or the other of these prescrip- 
tions would not cure. The free use of iodine externally 
may facilitate the cure. 

Peoria, III. J. T. Stewart, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Tlie Differential Diagnosis of the Tenereal Diseases. 

[Notes on a lecture delivered in Rush Medical College, June 22d, 1880,. 
by Lafayette W. Case, M. D., lecturer on Dermatology and Syphilis. Re- 
ported by O. J. Roskoten.] 

There are three venereal diseases; gonorrhoea, chan- 
croid or soft chancre, and syphilis, the initial lesion of 
which is the true chancre. Herpes progenitalis and the 
ulcerated abrasion ma}- be mistaken for venereal ulcers. 

A few words will suffice for gonorrhoea. A yellowish- 
white, or greenish discharge from the urethra, attended 
with itching and pain in urinating, usually indicates the 
existence of gonorrhoea; not always, however, as a chan- 
cre within the urethra is attended by a urethral discharge. 
In such cases the discharge is scanty, watery, or mixed 
with blood, and the pain on urinating is felt at some fixed 
point. On grasping the penis between the thumb and fin- 
ger at this point the characteristic induration of chancre 
will be felt, and other symptoms of syphilis will follow. 

Chancroids may also exist within the urethra. Their 
most frequent site is at the meatus, but ihey may exist 
at any part of the urethra. The discharge is not so abun- 
dant as in gonorrhoea, and is rusty colored or streaked with 
blood. Pain is felt at a fixed point as in urethral chancre, 
and there may be inflammatory hardness, but not the spe- 
cific induration of syphilis. If complicated with gonor- 
rhoea as it sometimes is, the diagnosis will be more difficult. 
Auto-inoculation of the discharge may be employed to 
determine this point. In such cases, however, chancroids 
will usually be found upon the external parts. 



80 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Chancre is the initial lesion, the first manifestation of 
the constitutional disease, syphilis. It occurs at the point 
where syphilitic virus has entered and will invariably be 
followed by other symptoms of syphilis. 

Chancroid on the other hand is always a local disease 
and is not followed by general symptoms. 

Herpes progenitalis, and ulcerated abrasions are also 
local disorders. 

Chancre is caused by the absorption of syphilitic virus, 
whether from a chancre or other syphilitic lesion, vaccin- 
nation with syphilitic blood, or the accidental or intentional 
inoculation of any vehicle containing- syphilitic virus. 

Chancroid is usuallv the result of sexual connection 
with a person bearing a chancroid on or near the genitals, 
but may also be caused by inoculation of virus from a 
chancroid or virulent bubo. 

Herpes progenitalis, the result of mechanical irritation 
during coitus, or of irritating discharges, colds, fevers, etc., 
is sometimes followed by herpetic eruptions upon the 
genitals as well as upon the face. 

Ulcerated abrasions result from mechanical or chemical 
irritation as in herpes. 

Chancre is most frequently seen on or near the genitals, 
but is also seen in other locations, particularly the hands, 
face and nipples. 

Chancroid is rarely seen except upon or near the 
genitals. 

Herpes and ulcerated abrasions are frequent upon the 
genitals. They are usually seen upon the glans, penis or 
prepuce, or upon the inner surface of the labia. 

In syphilis there is always a period of incubation 
between the absorption of the virus and the appearance of 
the chancre. This period varies from ten to seventy-two 
days, the average time being about three weeks, during 
which there are no symptoms of disease. 

After the absorption of chancroid virus there is no 
period of incubation; the ulcer being usually formed in 
two or three days, rarely later than a week. 

Chancre begins as a papule, tubercle, or erosion, and 
generally becomes ulcerated. 

Chancroid begins as a pustule or ulcer, and always 
remains as an ulcer. 

Herpes begins as a group of vesicles, which break and 
form a superficial ulcer. 



Chi'ginal Coiynnunications, 81 

The ulcerated abrasion begins as a simple abrasion or 
fissure and afterwards ulcerates. 

Chancre is generally single, but if multiple, it is so from 
the beginning; never becoming multiple by auto-inocula- 
tion, and never becoming confluent. 

Chancroid is usually multiple from the beginning or 
tVom auto-inoculation, the virus producing a sore wherever 
it is absorbed. The ulcers frequently become confluent. 

In herpes there may be several groups of vesicles, and 
they may occur in successive crops, sometimes becoming 
confluent. 

The ulcerated abrasions are generally multiple and 
confluent. 

The chancre is usually round or oval in shape, flat or 
scooped out, with sloping edges, and smooth, glistening 
floor of a dark red or gray color. The secretion is scanty, 
adherent, and sero-sanginolent, unless irritated, when it 
furnishes an abundant supply of pus. Sometimes the 
chancre is of a livid color and scaly, and sometimes cov- 
ered with a scab. Upon the skin the chancre frequently 
assumes the form of a dry, scaly papule 

The chancroid may be round, oval or irregular in shape, 
being the result of the blending -of several ulcers. The 
edges are then scolloped. It is always a true ulcer, and 
appears as if punched out, with edges abrupt or sharply 
cut and sometimes burrowed under. The floor of the 
ulcer is uneven, not shiny, whitish, grayish, or tawny, and 
covered with an abundant purulent secretion. 

The ulcer resulting from the breaking down of a cluster 
of herpetic vesicles is irregular in shape with the border 
marked by segments of circles left by the vesicles. It is 
very superficial and has a less virulent look than the chan- 
croid, which it somew^iat resembles. It is most frequent 
in men with long prepuces. 

The ulcerated abrasion may have any shape, and resem- 
ble a superficial chancroid. 

Induration is a pathognomonic symptom of chancre. 
It is always present in one of the following varieties : 1. As 
a thin, parchment-like layer, underlying the ulcer. This is 
the form most frequentl}^ seen. 2. As a firm, cartilaginous, 
circumscribed mass the size of a split pea or larger, freely 
movable over the parts beneath. It does not shade off 
into the surrounding parts like an inflammatory hardness, 
but terminates abruptly, feeling like a bit of cartilage or 



82 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



bone beneath the skin. The third variety is similar to the 
second, only more extensive and passes beyond the border 
of the ulcer. Induration usually appears a short time 
after the appearance of the ulcer, and remains a long time 
after the sore is cicatrized; sometimes indeed for years.. 
Sometimes the induration precedes the ulceration. 

The chancroid does not become indurated generally^ 
and when it does, the induration is inflammatory ; has a 
boggy feel, is sensitive to the touch, adheres to adjacent 
parts and shades off into surrounding tissues. It is of 
short duration and disappears when the inflammation is 
subdued. 

The herpetic ulcer and the abrasion, if irritated, may 
present the same inflammatory induration as the chancroid. 

The chancre is rarely painful; indeed, the inconven- 
ience from it is often so slight that it passes unnoticed. If 
irritated, however, it becomes painful. 

Chancroid on the other hand is nearly always painful,, 
and frequently highly so. 

Herpes and the ulcerated abrasion are usually painful, 
the pain of herpes being an itching or stinging sensation. 

Chancre is not auto-inoculable unless it has been irri- 
tated and secretes thick pus. The sore thus produced is a 
simple inflammatory pustule, neither chancre nor chancroid. 

Chancroid is readily auto-inoculable, a true chancroid 
being produced within two or three days. 

The herpetic ulcer and the ulcerated abrasion are auto- 
inoculable occasionally, under the same circumstances as 
the chancre, producing abortive pustules. 

The course of chancre is slow. It reaches its height in 
a few days generally, and maj^ remain stationary for some 
time, when it gradually heals. It has little destructive 
tendency, rarely spreads much, and scarcely ever becomes 
}thagedenic. 

Chancroid progresses rapidly, often spreads widel}^ 
more often becomes phagedenic, and heals slowly. 

Herpes and abrasion rarely grow in size, and heal 
rapidly. They do not become phagedenic. 

One chancre usually aftbrds complete protection against 
contraction of the disease a second time. Cases where 
syphilis occurs a second time are exceedingly rare, though 
possible. 

Chancroid occurs in all subjects whether syphilitic or 
not. One attack is no protection against another. 



Original CoTnmunications. 83 

Herpes and abrasions are found by preference on per- 
sons with long, tight prepuces, of uncleanly habits. 
Herpes is apt to return at irregular intervals, in such per- 
sons, especially after violent sexual intercourse or after a 
spree. 

Chancre, herpes and ulcerated abrasions are not trans- 
missible to the lower animals. Chancroid is transmissible 
with difficulty. 

Induration of the lymphatics is common, occurring 
in perhaps twenty per cent, of the cases. The induration 
is specific, inflammation rarely taking place, and when it 
does is simple and the pus is never auto-inoculable. Hard, 
knotty, insensitive cords, the size of a crow-quill or larger, 
are felt under the skin, which preserves its natural color. 
Lymphitis generall}^ occurs soon after induration of the 
chancre, and before induration of the glands. 

Inflammation of the lymphatics is rare in chancroid. 
It may be virulent, the pus being auto-inoculable, or a sim- 
ple inflammatory lesion, the pus not being auto-inoculable. 

Simple inflammatory lymphitis is alone possible in 
herpes and the ulcerated abrasion, but very rare in both. 

Induration of the neighboring glands is always present 
in chancre. It is a specific induration, rarely becoming 
inflammatory, and if so the pus is not auto-inoculable. 
The induration develops a week or two after the chancre, 
and if the latter be on the penis, the superficial glands in 
one or both groins are afiected, being usually only slightly 
enlarged, not sensitive, feeling like cartilage under the skin,, 
which is freely movable over them, and presents no signs 
of inflammation. Occasionall}- several glands become 
matted together, but even then the indolent character of 
the induration is preserved. The induration lasts for sev- 
eral weeks or even months, but finally terminates in reso- 
lution. 

In about one third of the cases of chancroid, inflam- 
mation of the glands is present. In the others they remain 
unaft'ected. The inflammation may be either simple or 
virulent, the pus in the latter case being auto-inoculable, 
producing true chancroids ; usuall}^ but a single gland is 
affected, but there may be one in each groin. The gland 
is fixed, from inflammation of the surrounding tissues, and 
the skin is red, hot, painful, presenting all the characters 
of ordinary inflammation. The course of the bubo is a few 
weeks, or it may be many months. A simple inflammatory 



84 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

bubo may terminate by resolution, but the virulent bubo 
always suppurates. Phagedena may ensue and is some- 
times exceedingly destructive, spreading over large 
surfaces and lasting for years. 

The glands are seldom affected in herpes and the ulcer- 
ated abrasion, when inflammation does occur it is always 
simple, and the pus if there be any, is never auto-inoculable. 

In chancre the prognosis, as regards the ulcer, is favor- 
able, but the patient will sooner or later have general 
symptoms of syphilis. These generally appear in from six 
to twelve weeks after the chancre. 

In chancroid the local effects are much more severe 
usually, but when once healed no further trouble need be 
feared, except in urethral chancroids, which may be fol- 
lowed by stricture. 

In herpes and ulcerated abrasions the prognosis is 
always good. 

Local treatment of chancre has but slight curative 
effect. It should not be canterized or otherwise irritated. 
It improves under the influence of mercurials. 

Local treatment of chancroids is curative. They 
should always be thoroughly canterized. Mercury is of no 
use and in the majority of cases injurious. 

Herpes and the ulcerated abrasion are benefited by 
local treatment. Mercury is not indicated. , 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

The Position of Women in Parturition. 

I desire to throw out a few suggestions to the medical 
public on the above subject, hoping that some may test my 
theories and determine their importance. 

The reason why head presentations predominate is 
that the head is the heaviest part of the foetus and natur- 
ally sinks while the woman is in the erect posture ; while 
the side on which the woman lies most ordinarily deter- 
mines whether the child will present in a first or second 
position of vertex ; thus, if she sleeps on the right side the 
vertex will probably present in the first position, while if 
on the left side, the head will assume the second, and if she 
sleeps on her back it is very apt to bring the face in front. 
The position assumed by the foetus can be readily shown 
on a still-bc«"n child in water. 

It ie very probable tliat more girls present with the 



Original Cormnunications. 85 

lower extremities and also breech first than boys, for the 
reason that the average of girls' heads are lighter and 
their hips are heavier than the same parts of boys. 

The reason why the back of the child generally lies in 
front and the vertex presents in front is, that the position of 
the uterus while the woman is in the erect posture, ordina- 
rily favors the floating of the child in that direction. 

If the physician perceives the vertex presenting in the 
first position, it is proper for him to direct the patient to 
lie on her left side during the first part of the second stage 
of labor, although it is perhaps better if she should set up 
or walk around up to nearly the last stage. And vice versa, 
when the child presents in the second position she should 
lie on her right side as above. 

During the last stage when the vertex begins t,o jut out 
from under the pubic arch and the anterior fontanelle has 
come down on the perineum, putting it on the stretch, the 
woman ought to lay on her back, for then the fundus of the 
uterus will fall back and with it the body of the child, 
which, favoring the rotation of the head, and requiring the 
neck to be less bent back, will aid in the expulsion of the 
head and body. By carrying out these simple rules women 
may frequently be saved a great amount of pain, time and 
possibly danger. The parturient woman, if left to herself, 
will ordinarily assume the position which most favors the 
expulsion of the child, and attendants should recognize the 
reason why they do so, and encourage them in it. 

Many physicians have noticed these facts and some au- 
thors refer to them, but they do not give the reasons for 
them, or explain why patients prefer diflerent postures 
during labor. 

I will briefly relate a case to show how position con- 
verted a forehead case into an occiput case : 

February 1st, 1847, I was called to attend a large heavy 
woman in labor with her fourth child. I found the waters 
discharged, the os well dilated, with the face presenting. I 
directed her to lie on the right side, hoping to bring down 
the vertex, but finding no progress after an hour I changed 
her to the left side, hoping to bring down the chin, which 
was accomplished, and the woman was speedily delivered 
of a large healthy girl. 

I think that, during the first stage of labor, before the 
head engages, mal-positions might often be rectified by 
elevating the hips, even to nearly a vertical position for a 



86 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



moment. It would be harmless and less irritating and 
dangerous both to mother and child than any other mode 
of procedure, and might aid in the evolution of the foetus 
to a proper position. 

I have known physicians to truly diagnose certain 
positions during the last week of gestation, but still allow 
their patients to proceed in labor without any eftbrt being 
made to rectify these mal-positions, which I think might 
easily be done by directing certain positions for the woman 
to assume before labor began, or during first stages. 

I have no doubt but that very many of the profession 
have recognized these principles, but if I have added any- 
thing to the general stock of useful knowledge, my object 
in writing will be accomplished. 

Silas Hubbard, M. D. 

HrDSON, McLean Co., 111. 



[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Case of Granular Urethra iu the Female. 

I was called to see Mrs. D., a clergyman's wife, 32 years 
years of age, November, 1876. She had been out of health 
for some time, and a physician was in attendance, but as he 
could not see why she made such bitter complaints of suf- 
fering and not give her any relief, he was discharged and 
I was called. 

When I asked her what she had to complain of, she 
answered that her worst trouble was on account of a dis- 
position to pass urine every fifteen or twenty minutes. 
This was accompanied with intense urinary tenesmus and 
nearly every time with hemorrhage, passing but a small 
quantity of urine at each effort. What else ? Pain in the 
lower part of the back, constipation, pain in the head of a 
burning character at the occiput, loss of appetite and great 
nervousness, caused by loss of sleep and long continued 
pain. Is that all? Yes. 

Upon examination, the urethra was found nearly full of 
fungous granulations, bleeding upon slight disturbance and 
extending the whole length of it. The os uteri was found 
eroded and the cervix in a state of chronic inflammation. 
Not having seen any account of such a condition in standard 
medical literature, I made some search for authority with- 
out avail, and this is the reason this article is written at the 
present time. IIow should I proceed to effect relief for this 



Original CoiyiTnunications . 87 

lady ? At first dilitation by laminaria tents was attempted, 
but failing in this on account of the pain it caused, the liq. 
ferri subsulphatis and water, equal parts, was used by 
means of a small syringe. In about three days the eschar 
came out leaving the urethra more patulous and ameliorat- 
ing the pain and bleeding. Another application was then 
made with similar results, and this treatment was continued 
with more or less frequency, for some months; occasionally 
a strong solution of nitrate of silver was substituted, ap- 
plied by wetting a small laminaria tent in the solution and 
immediately passing it into the urethra. The bowels were 
cared for by using a pill composed of 

Vi Strychnia, 1 grain. 

Ferris sulph., 10 grains. 
Ex. Rhei, ^ drachm. 

M. ft. pil. No. 20, et sig. 

A pill morning, noon and night. The utrus was treated by 
lunar caustic once a week, thoroughly applied to the os 
and cervix, and the vagina kept clean by using injections 
of quite warm water, used in a Molesworth female suction 
syringe, ISTo. 2, twice daily. Once or twice a day a medica- 
ted injection into the vagina of the following: 

9^ Acidi carbol., 3 drachms. 
Glycerine, 3 ounces. 

Aquae purae, 2 pints. 

Also, she was directed to use twice a day a sitz bath of the 
temperature of the body for a half hour each time. Medi- 
cated stringent injections should not be used too frequently 
in the vagina, or they will prove deleterious instead of 
beneficial. A safe rule is never to repeat them until the 
parts have become uniformly moistened by the natural 
secretion of the parts. 

This lady was restored to health in about ten months 
under this course of treatment ; but at the present time I 
should treat the urethral difiiculty by rapidly dilating the 
urethra under anaesthesia, and scraping away the granula- 
tions completely with a curette, and cauterizing the base. 
The uterine difficulty requires considerable- time to cure, 
and I do not yet know of any better treatment than that 
above indicated. There was no syphilis in this, but what 
the cause was deponent saith not. 

Smithville, July, 1880. jST. Holton, M. D. 



88 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Teething K^ot tlie Cause of Diarrhoea in Children. 

At this season of tlie year, when diarrhcea prevails sa 
extensively among children between the ages of six months 
and two years, a very natural question arises in the minds 
of physicians as to whether teething has any influence in 
its causation, or whether it is noi almost entirely caused by 
heat, impure air, and unwholesome and unsuitable food. 
To these latter causes, I believe we can attribute this dis- 
ease. I do not think teething has much if anything to dO' 
with it. 

Children are teething all the year round, but they are 
not likely to have this trouble except during the summer 
months. While it is possible that the reflex nerve irrita- 
tion may in some way be a remote cause in some cases, still 
I believe it is a duty we owe to the public, to discourage as^ 
far as possible the widespread belief that teething is the 
principal, if not sole cause of summer complaint in chil- 
dren. When called to see a child sinking from frequent 
and copious discharges, we frequently hear the remark, that 
the patient has been sick for a week or more ; but they 
thought it was from its teeth, and that it would not be best 
to check it. This popular error has been the cause of the 
death of thousands of children who might have been saved 
by timely medical attention. I am sorry to say that this 
belief is still encouraged by some doctors, who are quite 
ready to say, when asked the cause, " Oh, it is only its^ 
teeth." I think it is a duty the profession owes to the com- 
munity in which they live, to impress upon parents the ne- 
cessity of attending to this disease at its first appearance. 
If this was done, very few children that are properly taken 
care of and well nourished, would die. We know by ex- 
perience how easy it usually is to check this disease if called 
early, and how difficult it is to cure after it has been allowed 
to run on for several days. J. L. H. 



Compound Liquorice Powder. 

The German formula is preferred by many, since the- 
addition of the fennel prevents the griping and flatulency 
which is apt to occur, even in laxative doses. 

^ Pul. sennae. 

" glyc. aa 1 ounce, 

" fennel, 

Sulph. lot. a a J ounce, 

Bach, albae, 3 ounces. 



Original CoTnmunications . 89 

[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Translations from the Vienna Medical Gazette. 



BY 0. J. ROSKOTEN. 



Spontaneous Cure of Tuberculosis. 

Prof. Heitler gives some very interesting data about the 
spontaneous cure of tuberculosis of the lungs, which he 
collected from the post ynortem records of the Vienna 
Pathological Institute. His list includes only the cases 
in which the autopsy showed " tuberculosis obsoleta pul- 
monalis," where more or less extensive indurations, includ- 
ing hard, coarse lumps, or cheesy mortar-like masses, or 
caverns were found, cases in which the cause of death was 
some inter-current disease. 

Tuberculosis obsoleta pulmonalis was found in 780 out 
of 16,562 cases, 503 being in males, 277 in females. The 
cause of death was : 

Carcinoma, 107 cases ;. tubercular aflections, (exclusive 
of those of the lungs) 101 ; chronic Bright's disease, 83 ; 
diseases of the nerve centres, 62 ; emphysema of the lungs, 
58 ; heart disease, 55 ; granular liver, 45 ; croupous pneu- 
monia, 46; accidents and suicides, 20; peritonitis, 31; caries 
and necrosis of bone, 28; typhus, 20; pleurisy, 19; dis- 
eases of the alimentary canal, 17 ; amyloid degeneration 
of the abdominal viscera, 10; puerperal fevers, 6; 
pyaemia, 6, etc., etc. 

Of these patients, death occurred : 

Between 10 and 20 years, in 12 individuals. 



20 




30 






105 




30 




40 






131 




40 




50 






156 




50 




60 






157 




60 




70 






142 




70 




75 






36 




75 




80 






11 




80 




85 






6 




85 




90 






2 




100 










1 




103 










1 





In the majority of cases (650) the changes mentioned 
above were observed at the apices of both lungs. In some 
they occupied a considerable portion of the upper lobe ; in 
a few the " obsolete" spots were noticed also in the middle 



90 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

and lower lobes. Besides, four cases of cured, dift'used 
tuberculosis are mentioned ; in these, numerous indura- 
tions of hazelnut size were found scattered throughout the 
whole lung, containing the mortar masses, so called. 
Healed tuberculous ulcers were seen three times in the 
hirynx, once in the ascending colon and seven times in the 
ileum. 

Thus it appears that a spontaneous cure occurs in many 
cases of tuberculosis of the lungs as well as of other organs, 
at any period of life, and under widely difterent conditions 
of life, even in persons living in the most unfavorable cir- 
cumstances. 

Why and when the disease ceases to progress is as yet 
unknown. One point is settled, viz : That the prognosis 
is unfavorable when the affection runs beyond certain 
limits, which Dr. Heitler has given as the second and third 
ribs in front and the middle of the scapula behind, an 
observation which has been corroborated by still more 
recent experience. 

Dr. Heitler says that, under certain circumstances, even 
miliary tuberculosis ma}^ heal spontaneously, and calls 
particular attention to the frequent occurrence of granula- 
ted liver as the cause of death in cases in which obsolete 
phthisis is found ; a fact which still awaits a satisfactory 
explanation. 

JLi««>^ liong Vitality of Diphtheritic Virus. 

A remarkable case showing the long vitality of the 
diphtheritic virus is reported from Russia. An aristocratic 
family of the southern part of Russia lost a child from diph- 
theria, four years ago. In order to remove the remains to 
a famil}' vault recently built, the body was exh-umed. 
Wishing to see once more the face of his son, the father 
had an opening cut into the lid of the coffin, and he and 
his five children took a look at the corpse. The following 
day all the children were suifering from diphtheria, with 
fatal issue to oue of their number. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Concussion and Conipression of the Brain. 

We give below a short and condensed table for the dif- 
ferential diagnosis between these two lesions. It will of 
course be understood that the symptoms indicated are not 
always present, or by any means clearly marked, but by 



Original Cojiimunications. 



91 



remembering the following points, and making a careful 
study of the case, mistakes may be avoided. 



COMPRESSION. 

1. Unconsciousness is com- 
plete. You may scream into the 
patient's ear at the top of your 
-voice, but will receive no answer. 

2. The special senses are en- 
tirely suspended. 

3. Complete or partial paraly- 
sis ; in most cases hemiplegia. 



CONCUSSION. 

1. Unconsciousness incom- 
plete ; the patient can le made 
to answer, though it may be 
briefly and in single words. 

2. The special senses are not 
entirely abolished, though they 
may be greatly blunted. 

3. The power of action is not 
destroyed; if the position of a 
limb be changed, the patient will 
resist or immediately return it to 
the original position. 

4. Respiration is quiet and fee- 
ble. 

5. Pulse feeble, frequent and 
intermittent. 

6. The stomach usually sick- 
ens after a while, and rejects its 
contents. 

7. The feces and urine may be 
discharged incontinently. 



8. Deglutition is not destroyed. 

9. Pupil variable but generally 
contracted. Eyelids somewhat 
open. 

10. Temperature ^of tlje body 
less than natural. 



4. Respiration full and noisy. 

5. Pulse full and slow. 

6. The stomach is insensible to 
all impressions, no nausea or 
vomiting. 

7. The bowels are torpid, and 
the bladder incapable of empty- 
ing itself, but the urine may 
escape by overflow. 

8. Deglutition is impossible. 

9. Pupil variable, though gen- 
-erally much dilated ; eyelids 
closed. 

10. Temperature almost natu- 
ral, a little below the normal 
standard. 

In cases of concussion, nausea and vomiting are Regarded 

iis signs of reaction. 

Finger Blistering- for Neuralgia. 

Dr. Walke gives in the Southern Clinic this recipe : 

V^ Chloroform, 

Bay Rum, a a equal parts. 
Sig. Shake well before using. 

He says of it: "My attention was called to this as a 
remedy for neuralgia of the scalp some ten years ago. I 
have known it to be used by others. By applying it to the 
temple or seat of pain with the end of the finger, holding 
the finger to the parts to exclude the air and prevent evap- 
oration, in two or three minutes it so reddens the skin, and 
the pain from it so severe, I have had to remove it to pre- 
vent blistering. A blister can be formed, I am satisfied, in 
five to ten minutes. — Medical and Sur'gical Reporter. 



92 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Treatment of Typlioid Fever. 

Sir William Jenner, in an able and elaborate address 
before the Midland Medical Society at Birmingham, gave 
his views as to the treatment of this disease. 

The high repute he holds as authority on the pathology, 
and the extensive and prolonged experience he has had in 
the treatment with this and other methods, are sufficient 
grounds for giving a careful study and trial to his method. 

His treatment is based on the firm belief that the disease 
can not be cut short by any known means, but that it must 
run its course over a period of 28 to 30 days. 

Hence his aim from first to last is to support the powers 
and strength of his patient, and to check or hold in abey- 
ance all unfavorable symptoms until the cause of the dis- 
ease has exhausted itself. 

The patient should be confined to his bed from the first, 
as any exercise or fatigue after the inception of the poison, 
aggravates the trouble. The most severe and fatal cases 
occur among those who have not thus been kept at rest. 

There should be an abundant supply of pure fresh air. 

Pure cold water may be given ad libitum; it acts as a 
diluent to the blood, and passing out of the system through 
the kidneys, keeps them in a healthy condition, and carries 
out some of the poison from the blood. 

The diet should receive particular attention. It should 
be liquid and farinaceous, or such food as can be easily and 
readily digested, and leave no residuum. 

Milk, the much vaunted specific, he says, should be used 
with caution, as the casein has to pass into a solid form 
(curds) before being absorbed. The digestive functions 
being weakened, the curds, if in any considerable quantity, 
are not absorbed, but remain in the stomach or bowels, and 
cause many unpleasant symptoms. 

There are two prominent symptoms, headache and 
sleeplessness, in the early stage, which require attention. 
Yet these, if let alone, will disappear at the end of ten or 
twelve days. 

Sleeplessness is the more important, as the nervous sys- 
tem becomes weakened and exhausted by this continual 
strain. Henbane, potass, brom., and chloral, or a combin- 
ation of the last two, are the most beneficial. Opium, in 
doses sufficient to produce sleep, is a dangerous remedy, in 
that it disturbs digestion and checks secretion. It should 
be used with caution during the entire progress of the dis- 
ease. 



Periscope. 93 

The causes of the diarrhoea are : 

1. The specific intestinal changes, ulceration of Peyer's 
patches. 

2. Errors in diet. 

3. Catarrhal inflammation of the mucous membrane^ 
and irritability of the bowels. 

If the disease could be limited to the specific changes, 
there would be only a slight diarrhoea; and this can be 
accomplished to a certain degree by a careful attention and 
removal of the last two causes. 

If the stools do not exceed three to five in twenty-four 
hours, nothing need be done, as this is more of an advant- 
age than an injury. But when, from the number of stools, 
the strength of the patient is being rapidly reduced, it 
becomes necessary to interfere. It is necessary to examine 
the stools, and, if possible, find the cause. 

If the stools show nothing but a strong alkalinity, dilute 
sulphuric acid will remedy this, and also lessen the number 
of stools. 

If in addition we find solid matter or curds in the stools, 
an inquiry as to the diet and a regulation of it is all that is 
necessary. 

If the stools are ammoniacal and offensive, this can be 
removed by giving charcoal, in impalpable powder, one tea- 
spoonful two or three times a day. 

If the stools are only too frequent, an enema of starch 
water, to which may be added a few drops of tinct. of 
opium, will check them sufficiently. 

If there is a catarrhal inflammation of the bowel, this 
will be best controlled by the carbonate of bismuth gr. xx 
every four to six hours. To this may be added tinct. of 
kino and catechu, and if necessary tinct. of opium. 

Sometimes instead of a diarrhoea there exists an inaction 
of the bowels. This is caused : 

1. By torpidity of the large intestines, with free 
absorption of the fluid contents. The fecal matter becomes 
dry and hard, causes irritation and inflammation, and finally 
diarrhoea. This condition should be relieved by enemata. 
of thin gruel. 

2. The most important, and not unfrequent, cause, is 
the deep ulceration of one or more of Peyer's patches, caus- 
ing paralysis of' the intestines. This is also a cause of the 
accumulation of flatus and distension of the abdomen. 
These conditions occur during the third and fourth week of 
the disease. 



94 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

To relieve this condition alcohol in doses sufficient to 
improve nerve, energy and increase temporarily the mus- 
cular action of bowels and abdomen. 

Hemorrhage also occurs at this time from the deep 
ulcers. When this occurs the bowels should not be moved, 
but held in check by enemata of starch water and tinct. of 
opium. Internally may give acetate of lead, gallic acid and 
tinct. of opium. 

From the beginning of the disease the temperature is 
elevated. But a temperature so high and continuous as to 
be a cause of danger occurs only in exceptional cases. 
Tepid water sponge baths are usually sufficient to control 
the temperature. 

Such in the main is the treatment he has adopted, and 
which has proven most successful in his hands. He deems 
it more safe to allow nature to take its course, only inter- 
fering when it is necessary to avert some impending evil. — 
Medical News and Abstract. 



Treatment of Cliolera lufantiiin. 

From an article written by Dr. W. B. Akinson, in the 
Jledical and Surgical JReporter, we abstract the following : 

The most prominent symptoms imperatively demanding 
immediate relief are the irritable stomach and the exhaust- 
ing discharges. For the persistent vomiting, the exhibi- 
tion of small doses of calomel, say one-twelfth to one-sixth 
of a grain, repeated every hour, will almost invariably 
suffice. It will be best given placed dr}^ on the tongue and 
washed down with a sup of milk. This frequently checks 
the diarrhoea as well as the vomiting, as there is little 
doubt that the former is more or less continued by the 
efforts of the child in vomiting. Rest, in a recumbent 
position, is of great value, and this should be strongly im- 
pressed on the attendants. When the calomel fails give 
the following : 

V' Acidi sulphuric! dil., 40 gtts., 
Syr. simplicis, 1 ounce, 

Aq. menthas viridis, 2 ounces. 
M. dose, one teaspoonful every half hour, or hour. 

To aid our remedies we may emplo}' some form of 
•warm fomentation to the stomach, or, by producing a posi- 
tive redness of the surface of the epigastrium, by means of 
a mustard plaster, great relief is frequently obtained. To 



Periscope. 95 

arrest the frequency of the discharges, a very useful rem- 
edy is the bismuth, in five to ten grain doses, with Dover's 
powder : — 

^ Pulv. ipecac, comp., 4 to 6 grains, 

Bismithi subnitrat, 1 drachm, 

Ft. in chait., No. 12, et sig. 

One every two to four hours according to circumstances. 

Where the exhaustion is great, the bismuth may, with 
much advantage, be combined with the aromatic spirits of 
ammonia, which is a most excellent stimulant in all cases 
of exhaustion in children ; or it ma}^ be given separately, 
while the bismuth is continued, with or without the ipecac, 
powder. 

The diet must be mainly milk with lime water, beef 
tea, mucilaginous fluids. Brandy or whisky should be added 
in small, repeated doses from the outset. Frequent spong- 
ing with alcohol and water, or tepid water, is far better 
than the bath. 

Regarding cholera infantum as usually if not invariably 
the result of congested bowels, good effects have been 
observed after the employment of a positive counter-irri- 
tant to the surface of the abdomen and also to the whole 
length of the spine. 

9= Liq. ammoniae, 2 drachms, 

01. terebinthiual, 2 ounces, 

01. ricini, 4 ounces, 
M. ft. linimentum. 

E.Lib the abdominal surface and the spine briskly with 
this, so as to redden the skin, and repeat every two hours. 
In cases where the brain is involved, apply cold to the head 
by the ice cup, or pieces of ice in a folded towel ; at the 
same time pediluvia, sinapisms and rubefacients will be of 
great aid; but it must not be forgotten that cerebral symp- 
toms may be simulated by exhaustion, for which the proper 
treatment will be more positive stimulation, and larger 
doses of quinine and iron in some form. As the case pro- 
gresses, tonics may be given to aid the recovery of strength. 

Blisters in very young children are always a remedy of 
doubtful value. Relapse is extremely liable to occur; 
therefore, eternal vigilance will be necessary in diet,ventila- 
tion, clothing and exposure. 



Treatment of Diphtlieritis. 

Dr. J. A, Miller writes to the California Med. Journal 
^hat he has treated 493 cases of diphtheria, without losing 



96 Feoria Medical Monthly. 

a case where he had been called before the disease had pro- 
gressed past the third day, and where his directions were 
fully carried out. His treatment is as follows : 

9 Aromat. sulph, acid, 

Tr. sanguinaria, a a 2 drachms, 

Tr. capsicum, 1 drachm, 

Spts. menthae, 10 gtts., 

Syr. simplicis, 2 ounces. 

M. Sig. : A teaspoonful once in two hours, varied 
of course according to age, &c. 

The only restriction necessary is to interdict the use of 
milk, which combining with the acid, would form an indi- 
gestible coagulum in the stomach. For the fever peculiar 
to diphtheria he uses exclusively 

9^ Gelsemini, 2 drachms, 
Aquae, 2 ounces. 

M. Sig. : A teaspoonful once an hour 
till the fever abates. 

As an external application he uses : 

^ Potassi nitras, J ounce, 

Spts. camphorae, 2 ounces. 

Aquae, 3 ounces. 

M. : Keep a cloth wet with this solution 

around the neck. 

He always urges the most generous diet. 



Sick Stomacli of Preg-nancy. 

In the Medical and Surgical Reporter, July 10, Dr. W. S. 
Forwood impresses upon physicians the claims that the 
pregnant woman has ui>on their best attention. He says : 
" In the entire catalogue of ills that afflict the human fam- 
ily, we can recall none, not immediately dangerous to the 
existence of life, so annoying, so embarrassing and so dis- 
tressing to the sufferer as the sick stomach of pregnancy. 
This malady, conjoining, as it does, the mental with the 
physical distress, the natural temperament of the patient 
undergoes a radical change; the habitually kind and placid 
disposition of the individual becomes impatient, irritable, 
morose and petulant. We can conceive of but few obliga- 
tions resting upon ub as physicians, apart from the actual 
aversion of impending death, more imperative in their de- 
mands upon our talents and moral obligations than that of 
relieving the mental and physical suffering incident to 
pregnancy." Dr. F. has used with entire success for many 
years the following, and many of his friends having used 



Periscope. 97 

it add the weight of their testimony to his strong endorse- 
ment: 

V( Rad. col umbo, contus. 

Rad. zimgibar, " a a J ounce, 
Fol. sennse 1 drachm, 

Aqua bullient 1 pint. 

Make infusion, take a wineglassful before each meal. 
Should the bowels be relaxed, omit the senna; or in cases 
of unusual acidity of the stomach, add half a drachm of 
magnesium carbonas. 



Ointment of Clirysoplianic Acid. 

This is now used in cases of psoriasis, erythema mar- 
ginatum, chloasma, acne tuberculosa, acne rosacia, etc. 
The formula of the British Hospital for diseases of the skin 
is as follows : 

Vi Chrysophanic acid 120 grains, 
Prepared lard 1 ounce. 

Heat together on a water-bath for half an hour, con- 
stantly stirring; when set, mix with a pestle and mortar. 
Caution. — The erythema which sometimes follows only a 
few applications of this ointment, should be watched for, 
and on its appearance, the use of the ointment should be 
discontinued. Avoid applying it near the eyelids. — Medi- 
cal Summary. 

Recent Literature. 

The Treatment of Puerperal Septicemia by Intra-Uterine 
Injections, by Edward W. Jenks, M. D., L. L. D., pp. 24. 
Reprint from Vol. IV. Gynaecological Transactions. 

A lecture on Coccygodynia, by the same author, pp. 15. 
Reprinted from the Medical Record, April 17, 1880. 

Suppl}^ and Demand, in its Relation to the Growth, De- 
velopment and Health of the Human Body. An address 
before the Coles County Academy of Medicine and Sur- 
gery, by V. R. Bridges, Mattoon, 111., pp. 12. 

Physicians and their Patients, a lecture delivered at the 
formation of the Douglas County, Oregon, Medical Insti- 
tute, by C. H. Merrick, M. D., pp. 20. 

Two cases of Ovariotomy. A case of Lithotomy. Ex- 
tirpation of the Parotid Gland, by A. V. Banes, M. D., St. 
Joseph, Mo. Reprinted from the *S'^. Louis Medical and Sur- 
gical Journal. 



98 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

EDITORS : 

John Murphy, M. D., J. L. Hamilton, M. D., 

H. Steele, M. B. 



All communications must be addi'essed to 

Thos. M. Mcllvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-Jefferson Street, PEOKIA, ILL.. 

Diet. 

"Whether Dr. Tanner succeeds in his attempt to exist 
forty days without any nourishment other than water, is 
really a matter of very little importance, although it is 
attracting great attention. The fact that a man can live 
even longer than the time proposed bj' Dr. Tanner, is a 
matter of record. Berard cites the instance of a convict 
living sixty-three days on water, and cases are reported by 
other observers where the time of deprivation from food 
varied from five to forty days. 

The experiment of Dr. Tanner will, however, be of con- 
siderable importance, if it will recall to the minds of physi- 
cians the oftentimes great utility of low diet or even abso- 
lute abstinence from food as a hygienic and therapeutic 
measure. In the treatment of the less important but more 
frequent ailments of mankind, there is often too little 
attention given to the diet, this being left as a matter of 
course to the uneducated idea of the patient, and unless the 
disease becomes more grave, the physician rarely gives 
directions as to the quality or amount of food to be taken. 
"We think a vast deal of good would be accomplished were 
physicians to educate their patients upon this point, giving 
them a few simple rules concerning the diet. Many of the 
more common ailments could be obviated or cured by the- 
patient did they but know something of the value of diet 
and fasting. 

There is no danger that the people would cure all their 
diseases by this means, and thus rob the physician of his 
living. There will always be disease enough in the world 
to occupy the thought and skill of the physician without 
attending to all those fjetty derangements due to overload- 



Editorial Jfotes and Coimnents. 99 

ing of the stomach and the like. But this education of 
patients in hygiene and simple therapeutics, would be of 
far greater beneiit to the physician than to the patient; it 
would give the public greater confidence in the disinterest- 
edness of the profession, and have great influence in dis- 
abusing the public mind of the popular idea that the 
physician is a shark, who is always ready to prey upon 
their ignorance and misery, and only wishes for a chance 
to " run up a bill." This may assist in opening the way to 
a closer confidence between the profession and public, a 
thing devoutly to be hoped for. 

Other methods of accomplishing this end will be spoken 
of at a future time. 



Our Success. 



We are pleased to announce to our readers, that the sup- 
port already shown to the Peoria Medical Monthly has 
been so liberal that we are, at the end of the first three 
months, justified in adding one-fourth to its size. The 
journal will hereafter be forty-four pages, instead of thirty- 
six*, as before ; and we hope at no distant day to again en- 
large its size and increase its interest. We are making 
arrangements whereby we will publish regular clinical lec- 
tures by some of our best teachers. Also we expect papers 
from several whose names are widely known in the range 
of medical literature. Translations from foreign journals 
will be given from time to time. But we will by no means 
overlook what was stated in our prospectus, viz : That our 
aim is to make this a practical help to the busy practitioner, 
and that short, pithy articles or questions on medical topics 
are especially desired. We hope that the support given us 
in the past will be continued, and that we shall continue to 
deserve it. Our price will not be increased. Send us a 
dollar and help us to still further improve your journal. 



Subscribers will please notify the publisher if they have 
not received the previous numbers of this journal. We 
have a limited number on hands, and will send them to 
those subscribing during this month, and the journal for 
one year, making fifteen numbers of the monthly for only 
one dollar. If you want the back numbers signify the fact 
on the subscription blank. 



100 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Maltine. 

One of the most reliable drug firms in the United States 
is that of Messrs. Reed & Carnrick, of ISTew York. What- 
ever comes from them, with the stamp of their names upon 
it, can be depended upon; it will be found to he pure, and 
of as high a degree of excellence as it is possible for skill, 
honest}', and unlimited resources to make it. One of the 
best remedies introduced to the notice of physicians is their 
preparation of Maltine. The constructive power of this 
preparation in rebuilding impaired vigor and bringing 
nourishment to the debilitated tissue is undoubted. We 
have tried this remedy to a considerable extent, and in 
selected cases have yet to find its equal. Our inquiries 
among physicians, on the same point, have almost invaria- 
bly been answered by: "It is the best agent I know any- 
thing of. " The chemical analysis, which is given else- 
where, speaks for itself. We consider the combinations of 
Maltine with Hypophosphites and Peptones unrivalled. 
We have several cases now on this remedy, and will give 
the results at a future time. 



Special Notice. 



We will send three copies of this journal for one year, 
to an}' address, on the receipt of two dollars, or will allow 
a commission at the same rate for any larger number of sub- 
scribers. We make this offer for several reasons : To in- 
crease our subscription list; to relieve physicians of the 
trouble attending the mailing of a small sum; by this 
one physician can easily get the names of his friends in his 
locality, send the money altogether, and get a copy free, or 
enough to pay him for his trouble; and finally, to enable 
us to dispense with canvassers. We wish physicians would 
call the attention of some one in their vicinity to tliis offer, 
if they do not desire to avail themselves of it. It will aid 
us in giving you a better journal. The special inducement 
mentioned elsewhere will be included in this offer. 



Always read our advertisements. We admit none of 
questionable character, and physicians are safe in corre- 
sponding with any firm whose card is found in our pages. 

Samples of Staufer's hard-rubber uterine instruments 
and supporters can be seen at the office of this journal. 



SPEIJSG STEM SUPPOETEKS. Abdominal Supporter. 
-i. 3. 



SOLID STEM SUPPORTER. 
E. C-— 5.— (Economy.) 




frices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Prociile'itla Cup A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Ooutil 
Finished Belt X, $.7.00. On Z, Fig. 
5, $6.00. On Y, Coutil, $8.00; and 
on Y, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring Stem, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long II, or 1 U, tho same on either 
belt as A, 

Retroversion JE, on X, or Y, 
Cotton, $S.uu. On Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on Z, $7.00. 

Anteocfsion, Solid Stem 
C, or Soil I Strm Globe lop 
O, on X, or Y, Cotton. «r,,r,0. On Y, 
Coutil, $r,.50, and on Z, $4.50 only. 

Mules. — The Stem Supporters 
Fip. 1 and 5, are only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Sppculnms, Fig. 6, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cnp D, 
either separate, or in connection 
with Stem Supporters. 

Mlastic Oiims S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; 4 at 35 cts.; and Springs 
at 3 cts. each. 

N, B. — 1'^® figures on these engravings cor- 
respond with those on the full Catalogue plate. 

Selection. — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
If a cup, it must be modelled after thejunclion of 
the axis of the uterus and vagina, or the cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I U, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptation 
and border cup. In cases of slight Anteversions 
and slight Retroversions, deep cups may be called 
for, and in most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cnps are usually 
selected by giving the full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, li^ to l-^.^; Multiparae, V'.^ 
to 2, and F'rocidentia to '2,}^ inches and over some 
times. Belts — B'or X, and Z, waist measure to be 
given, and Y, hip measure. 

Antcverslon V, Fig. 1 — This had been re- 
modelled a number of times, and the fenestrated 
top found best to remain in position. 

Retroversion E. — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent efficiency. The broad lever, lifts up the 
fundus, while the cup corrects the prolapsvis and 
holda the uterus, by a double elastic motion, if a 
spring stem, ."^mall, long stem, Globe Tops G, 
Fig. 1, are placed with success against the sensitive 
fundus, after everything else been intolerable. 
Intra Uterine Stetn Cup I U. — The stem 



Sizes— 1, 1 3.16, 1 6.16 and 
1 9.16, Flesh color enam- 
eled. Price, $2.50 each. 



Price. — Permanent, Curved Stem 
Cup E C, on elastic webbing Z, 
$4.50. On X, or Y, cotton, $5.50, 
and Y, coutil, $6 50. 

No expense has been saved to 
give even the Economical Supporter 
all possible advantages. 



HAED EUBBEE UTEEINE EXAMINING 0AS7 




/Vices.— Full case, $8.00; Quill Caustic Holder II, or Camel's 
Hair Brush Holder and Case I, each $1.00. Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket after the cup is in posi- 
tion. This is safer than all other contrivances, 
but is seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made in this Series to correct Retro- 
version through the posterior cul-de-sac. 

Cystocele and Rectocele. — These are suc- 
cessfully drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops G, or Oblong H, Fig. 1. 

Cup jD, 'Fig. S. — (Supplements EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed into A D, 
Fiff. 1. 

Globe JB, F^g. 5.— This is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with all the objectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now a^ain 
a popular pessary. 

Speculum, Fig. 6 — The conductor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and in position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be introduced ; 
this together with the thin shell, gives a sufficient 
calibre to embrace the entire cervix within the 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the enoioBure of the cervix by rotation. 

Examining Case, Fig. 12. — Sounds A, B, 
C, Movers D, F, and G, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on M, of H, and form instruments 12 
inches long, L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Rett Y, Fig. 3. — Is made to order of any size 
and strength, to support th" stem supporter and 
peudulous abdomen. Hip Straps S S, are elastic. 
Mailed on receipt of quotation prices, and all the hard rubber paTts on the full Catalogue exchanged 
to meet any indie ition, ana cover the purchaser's risk. Catalogv a on application. 

S. S. STAUFZR, D. D. 

634 FranJclln St.. West side, above Oreen, Phila., Pa. 



Correspondents luill please 
name tins Journal 



Near 9th & Green, Sta. (or Round RrooK) New York Ifepot. 



AdertisementSi 



CHEMICAL REPORT ON MALTINE. 

BY WALTER S. HAINES, M. D., 

Professoi' of Chemistry and Toxicology, Rush Medical College, Chicago. 



Chemjcal Laboratory op Rush Medical College, ) 
Chicago, November 18tli, 1879. ) 

In order to test the comparative merits of Maltine and the va- 
rious Extracts of Malt in the market, I purchased from different 
druggists samples of Maltine and of the most frequently pre- 
scribed Extracts of Malt, and have subjected them to chemical 
analysis. 

As the result of these examinations, I find that Maltine con- 
tains from half as much again to three times the quantity of Phos- 
phates (Nerve and Brain food and Bone producers), and from three 
to fourteen times as much Diastase and other Albuminoids (Diges- 
tive agents and Muscle producers), as any of the Extracts of Malt 
examined. Since the value of such preparations is indicated very 
exactly by the proportion of these — their two most important con- 
stituents, I have no hesitation in pronouncing Maltine greatly 
superior to any Extract of Malt which I examined. 

The large amounts of Phosphates and Albuminoids found in 
Maltine demonstrates, moreover, the superior skill and care 
employed in its preparation, and thoroughly warrants the confidence 
placed in it by the Medical Profession, 

Very respectfully, WALTER S. HAINES. 



MALTINE WITH PEPTONES. 

Maltine with Peptones is a combination of the nutritive 
properties of malted Barley, Wheat and Oats with Beef, perfectly 
digested and ready for rapid assimilation. The starch in the Cereals 
Is converted into Glucose by the action of the Diastase, the nutritive 
properties of the Beef, and the Albuminoids of the malted grains, 
are converted into Peptones by the action of the digestive agents of 
the gastric juice and pancreas, in which form they are assimilated. 

Maltine with Peptones contains no inert matter. The digestive 
agents are applied only to the nutritious principles, these elements 
being perfectly separated from the refuse matter. 

Whenever natural digestion is partly or wholly in abeyance, in 
Mal-nutrition, Gastric and Intestinal Lesions, Alimentation in Fe- 
vers, Pulmonary Affections and all wasting diseases, we have the 
utmost confidence that this preparation will meet the fullest expec- 
tations of the profession. It is by far the most important production 
of our iiouse during tlie past twenty years. 

In anawering advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS OF MALTINE. 



During the past year we have received nearly one thousand let- 
ters from the Medical Profession in this country and Great Britain, 
referring to the therapeutic value of Maltine; their character is 
indicated by the several extracts which we present below. 

St. Louis, Mo., June 1st, 1879. 
" As regards the use of Maltine, I can only say I am charmed with it, and 
would not know how to replace it in my practice. I suppose no one in the West 
uses it more extensively than I do. The results 1 have obtained have been more 
satisfactory than 1 can possibly express. I have never met with a preparation 
to which I am more indebted." J. K. BAUDQY, M. D., 

Prof. Nervous and Mental Diseases, Missouri Medical College. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec. 29th, 1879. 
"I have used Maltine largely in the Clinic of the College, and in private 
practice, and And it exceedingly efficient as a medicine, and much superior to 
anything of the kind with which I am acquainted." 

GEO. E. WALTON, M. D., 
Prof Prin. and Prac. of Med., Cin. Col. Med. and Surg. 

Richmond, Va., Jan. 10th, 1880. 
"I have found your Maltine preparations so valuable that I use some of 
them almost daily in my practice." HUNTER McGUIRE, M. D., 

Prof of Surgery, Medical College of Virginia. 

Chicago, Jan. 21st, 1880. 
"I am very much pleased with Maltine, and since its introduction here I 
have entirely give^ up the use of Extract of Malt." 

E. P. INGALLS, A. M., M. D. 

Kensington Dispensary, London, Nov. 24th, 1879. 
" We are using your Maltine among our patients, and find great benefit from 
it, especially in cases of Phthisis." DR. CHIPPENDALE, Res. Medical Officer. 

The Beeches, Northwold, Eng., July 28th, 1879. 
"I And that my patients can readily digest your Maltine with Cod Liver Oil 
without causing any unpleasant after- feeling. I have full confldence in the virtue 
it possesses to sustain the system during prolonged diseases of a Tubercular or 
Atrophic nature." FREDERICK JOY, L. R. C. P., M. R. C. S. 

123 Landsdowne Road, Notting Hill, W. ( 
London, Oct. 16th, 1879. i 
" I have much pleasure in bearing favorable testimony to the merits of your 
Maltine preparations. I have used Maltine with Cod Liver Oil witli the happiest 
results in a case of Tuberculosis attended witli Tubercular I'eritonitis, in which 
the temperature of the patient rose to 105 1-5 deg., and persistently remained 
above 100 deg. for upwards of two months. The only medicine taken was Maltine 
with .Cod Liver Oil. and an occasional dose of Carbonate of Bismuth to check 
diarrhcea. She gradually improved and made a perfect recovery. I find Maltine 
with Cod Liver Oil is more readily taken and more easily assimilated than Cod 
Liver Oil in any other form." EDMUND NASH, M. D. 



LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. MALTINE witli Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINK with Phosphates Iron and Quinia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE with Phos. Iron, Quinia & Strychnia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Hops. MALTINE WINE. 

MALTINE with Hypophosphites. MALTINE WINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. MALTO-TERBINE. 

Maltine is now in the hands of the Wholesale Trade throughout the United States. 

We guarantee that Maltine will keep perfectly in any climate, or any season of the year. 

Faithfully Yours, REED &CARNRICK, 

Ne-vi^ York. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements . 



ST, FRJNCIS' eeiiOL[y HOSPIUL! 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



M. WL&mKm w&m. ^-^imm ^iok. 

Delightfully situated on the bluif, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements ; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studeb. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and A urist Dr. J. Perrin JohnsoN; 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, (Doctor's 
attendance at regular rates), are from $7 to $10 per week, according 
to size of room and accommodation required. In the general wards, 
the cost is from $4 to $0 per week. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

In answering advertlHements mention the Pp;oria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC 'WALKER & SON 

Importers of 

AND 

Muzzle-Loading 




AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKER AND COLT 

SHOT GUNS. 



A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 

AND 

Sporting Equipments. 



REVOI.VERS, 

Fine Guilery. 

ALSO, 
Wholesale and Ketall Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 



_ _ I 

i*liii^ 125 and 127 

SOUTH WASHINGTON 

STRKET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



10 



Advertisements. 




ComstoGk& Avery, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 

mm. 



Call the attention of Physicians 
to their 



MTllf 01411 



It is the nicest chair in the market for 
the Office, Library or Parlor. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 



Prices wilMu tlie Eeacli of All. 

Call on us or send for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 




in. C- BOTJIE^SCIIEIIDT, 

MALYTICIL CHEIST, 



Special attention given to Criminal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters, 
Milk Wine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, III. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Corr'espondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 



In answerlQg advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical. Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



WE HANDLE A FULL LINE OF 




JMPORTED & DOMESTIC CHEMICALS, 



TOILET ARTICLES OF THE BEST QUALIJY. 

OUK STOCK OF 

We are enabled to fumi.h\ -.^, . DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

is large and well selected. 

ARTISTS' AND WAX WORK 

SUPPLIES. 

W . 



The Medical Profession 

Anything in the line of 

NEW AND SPECIAL 



INSTRUMENTS, ETC., 



AT LOWEST PRICES ON SHORT NOTICE. 



CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Druggists & Chemists, 

^^^ ^""^ And Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

SOS South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

o. -A.. BO^wnvLi^:]^ &c CO., 
Prescription Druggists, 

520 :]yCA.IISr STIiEET, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



N. B.— A full line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 



Advertisements. 



ANALYTICAL CHEIST, 



Special attention given to Criminal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters, 
Milk Wine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, III. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Correspondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 




ComstoGk& Avery, 



Manufacturers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 




Call the attention of Physicians 
to their 

Mfllf OHMl 



It is the nicest chair in the market for 
ths Office, Library or Parror. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 



Prices wittin tie Reacli of All. 

Call on us or send for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 




Id answ«ring advertisements, m»ntlOB the Pbobia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



TERMS: ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. 



IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS! 



Fi@ili lii 




Monthly Circulation, 2000 Copies. 



This journal will reach at least 12,000 physicians during the 
year, and is not excelled as an advertising medium by any journal 
in the West. The rates are far below any journal in the country 
with equal circulation. We propose to make the advertising pages 
as valuable to the reader as any in the journal, and this can only 
be done by excluding everything that is not first-class. 

This journal will be considerably enlarged, and the rates for 
advertising will be advanced to those who have not taken advant- 
age of these low rates. No advertising agents employed. 

We invite correspondence. 



<^-^==PAYABLE QUARTERLY. ^==^-^ 

1 Year, 6 Mouths, 3 Months. 

Whole page $50.00 $30.00 $20.00 

Half page 30.00 20.00 15,00 

Thirdpage 25,00 ^ 18.00 12,00 

Quarterpage 20.00 15.00 IQ . 00 

Address all communications to 

THOS. M. McILYAINE, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-Jefferson St., PEORIA, ILL. 



Advertisements. 



*S=-SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS.-=®R 



aSPECIALTIE 

INTRODUCED TO THE PROFESSION BY 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



O^.^ .-.i-.';^ TD^,».:^ T-' • J. DEFIBRINATED BULLOCKS' BLOOD (DE- 

OanQUlS JzJOVinUS iliXSieeatUS. SICCATED.)-TMs arUde was arst introduced 
«3 -— I ^■wKjx^w/ >_/•-». WV.AKJ. ^^ jjj. ^ H. Smith, physician to St. Luke's 

Hospital, Xew York, and subsequently investigated by F. E. Stewart, Ph. G., M. D., of the same city, who utilized the pro- 
duct by desiccation. Popularly employed as a remedy for consumption, etc., by invalids who drink it at the abattoirs, as it 
flows from the freshly slaughtered animals. 

As susTii.vLNG and scpposting measure it supplies nitrogenous tissue waste, obviates the tendency to death by asthenia, 
and forestalls a degree of prostration dangerous to life. 

AS a KESTOEATivK agent, it is indicated in the slow convalescence from fever, in wasting diseases of various forms, con- 
sumption and the like, in cachectic states from various constitutional poisons, as syphilis, scrofula, etc., and in all casea 
where impaired blood, nerves, or digestion, give rise to the anffimio condition, with its resulting general debility, hvpochon- 
driasis, or other functional disorder. 

As a CDttATivB agent, in atonic dyspepsia, ana;mia, and various derangements of nutrition and secretion. 
For a description of the process of manufacture, etc., in detail, please send for circulars. 

T- 1 *.»-»• J P "CT' + 'U^ 1 (HYDROBROMIC ETHER)— chemically pure. The new anresthetlc. This ar- 

ri T^OTll 1 fi ft OI H. T. M \7 I tide has been used for produciug auissthesia, with very satisfactory results, 
«/ * proving to^have very important advantages over chloroform, ether and other 
agents heretofore in use. It is powerful, rapid in action, and, in short, it possesses many advantages over the above agents. 

Although comparatively a safe anesthetic, we would still advise care in its use by those unfamiliar with its properties, and 
will be pleased to furnish circular containing report of case by Dr. J. Marion Sims, in which dangerous effects followed its use. 



J Q^JYlQ^i(39_ XDOCfW^OOCi of the effects of this drug more than justify our action in placing it before 
«3 * the profession of this country. Making due allowance for the enthusiasm 

which its action has aroused, we would only say, that whereas, we a short time "since merely asked the profession to submit it 
to a trial, we are now justified in recommending it as a substitute for opium in many painful affections. Its advantages over 
opium lie in its not constipating or locking up the secretions, and in its leaving none of the unpleasant constitutional effects 
associated with the administration of opium. 



Ma 



(FRANCISCEA UNIFLORA.) This drug is officinal in both Brazilian Dispensatories in which it is 
J^Q (^Q classed among alteratives of the more active and positive kind. So marked is its effects in the ayphilitc 
• cachexia, that it has been called mkrcurio vegetal by the Brazilians. It is recommended also as an 
anti-rheumatic, relieving the pain and materially shortening the natural course of the disease. 

We ask for it a thorough trial, under the belief that it will prove a valuable addition to the list of remedies commonly 
employed in rheumatism. It is regarded by the Brazilians as almost a specific in the chronic form of the disease. 



_^ -_^ .- . • We are just in receipt of a direct importation of this rare and expensive drug. 

}-<', y T/PP) C^\, 1_J11 DOlSia Duboisia, although scarcely two years before the profession of this country, has 
•*"^ ■^ |>1. CA v> u ±—f \^ •w' v^AiJ \^ • already largely supplanted atropia, formerly regarded as indispensable as a my- 
driatic, in the practice of opthalmology. Its action on the eye Is similar to that of atropia, dilating the pupil and paralyzing 
the muscles of accommodation, but is much more prompt and is attended by none of the disagreeable effects of that salt, irri- 
tation of the conjunctiva, dryness of the throat, and, in children, hallucinations, delirium, etc. 

-.^ - , - — . J We would ask the especial attention of the medical profession and pharma- 

( .- f^ I O T 1 1^ O r-^T^O(l 1 1 (^T ^ cists to our line of gelatine and gt'latine-coated preparations, comprising 
'-^ "^ *■ "■ ''•^ *■ ■* ^ -^ A. »^v-i. »^v.> usj. Empty Capsules, Improved Rectal Suppository Capsules, and Gelatine-coated 
Pill.i. Our facilities for the manufacture of these articles are unsurpassed, and the perfection to which we have brought them is 
due to the sparing of no expense in the securing of the best methods and the most experienced skill. We confidently ask a 
compari.^on of our Gelatine preparations with those of any other maker. We have but recently added Gelatine-coated Pills to 
our stock, preferring to delay manufacturing them until we should be able to perfect a process through which the objections to 
Gelatine-coated Pills, as heretofore offered, might be entirely overcome. Our process is the result of years of experiment, 
and the expenditure of much capital. We claim for it complete freedom from the objections which attached to all the 
methods previously employee*. 

—^ . . _^ , -The desirability of some neat and expeditious method for the administration 

|.,o|Qfin^ ( .PlT^Qll I P^C! of bitter or nauseous drugs, win be particularly manifest to physicians during 
'^-' '-'•^'-^ '''^'^■'^ v^o< |_»o l^xv^o. tiie spring months, in which the demand for quinine, especially In malarial 

diatrlcts, is large By using our Capsules the disagreeable taste of the most disagreeable drug may be completely obviated, 

and the patient saved the disturbance arising from nausea and repugnance. 

1. ... To enable us to supply the Physician with the means of utilizing to the fullest degree 

f* Hill ftT*^ '■'"' many advantages attending the employment of Gelatine Capsules, we have taken 
^^ ■*- .1 •»• A v.' i »-J • the agency for two very Ingenious Capsule Fillers, known respectively as Davenport's 
iiid WhIllicM. With one of these instruments capsules may be filled in much less time, than It would take to prepare pow- 
Jers or to make |>llls. 

Send for full descriptive circular of these Instruments. 

In answering advertisements, mention tlie Peokia Medical Monthly. 



Cap 



?eorik JViedidkl ^oi^tlily. 

VOL. I. SEPTEMBER, 1880. NO. 5. 

0ngiml ^ammunimHan^. 

Etiology of Typhoid Fever. 

BY J. L. HAMILTON, M. D. 



Head before the I'eoria City Medical Association. 

As the Etiology of typhoid fever is the subject proposed 
for discussion this evening, the question arises: Is typhoid 
fever ever spontaneously developed, and does it ever appear 
-without connection in some way with a prior case ? 

We find in looking over the history of the disease, that 
men of learning in the profession differ in their views on 
this question. The cause of a disease is one of the most 
important things to know about it. After once knowing 
the cause, we are in a more favorable position to treat the 
disease intelligently, and, as a sanitary consideration, direct 
more readily, preventive measures. All physicians have 
noticed, doubtless, the difference which exists in the de- 
gree of contagiousness of the acute specific diseases. We 
do not often find much difficulty in tracing out-breaks of 
measles, small pox or scarlet fever, to their first starting 
point. They are diseases easily communicated. Typhoid 
fever, diphtheria and erysipelas are representatives of 
iinother class of specific diseases, which possesses a limited 
power of propagation. Although communicated to a cer- 
tain extent, or thought to be, cases of these diseases are 
frequently occurring in the country, away from lines of 
travel or communication, that have no connection, as far as 
known, with a previous case. This state of things is so 
■often noticed, that if the disease cannot appear without 
some communication with a previous case, we certainly 
would be able in most of these cases to trace out the source. 



102 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

But as a matter of fact we all know the difficulty of tracing- 
out any previous contact or communication with the dis- 
ease. To a certain extent, typhoid fever is thought to be 
communicated, yet it is seldom that the physician or nurse 
take the disease, or even other members of the family^ 
unless they take it from the same cause that produced it in 
the iirst case ; that is if the house is large, free ventilation 
is observed, and the discharges from the patient is buried 
or thrown where no after communication can be had. 
This I think is very important, for from them the conta- 
gious principal seems most liable to emanate. 

In looking for the cause of typhoid fever, either air or 
water pollution obtrudes itself upon our notice, as the 
principal factor in starting the disease. If you inquire of 
the patient or his friends how the disease was caught, the 
answer will generally be, they do not know, without a cer- 
tain exposure brought it on. There seems to be a general 
belief among the people that the disease is not "caught'*" 
but "generated." Those who do not believe in the sponta- 
neous origin of the fever, inquire : " How is it that the peo- 
ple drink the same polluted water and breathe the same 
infected air for a long time, and while they may suffer from 
other ailments in consequence, are not aHected with fever, 
until the arrival ^f a person suffering with the fever- 
comes amongst them. This is a strong argument in favor 
of the common origin of the disease. But just as the poi- 
son that produces ague is generated — which lately has been 
found to be a germ or spore — in, and emitted by earth laden 
with decomposing organic matter under certain states of 
climate and soil, so the poison of this fever, I believe, may 
arise from some unknown changes in the excrementitious 
matter of flesh-eating animals under certain atmospheric- 
conditions. There can be no doubt that a certain condition 
of the system of the individual is necessary for the invasion 
of the disease and that certain periods of life are more dis- 
posed to the fever than others. 

We have noticed this year that the ages between fifteen 
and twenty-five were most susceptible to the disease. — "It. 
is illogical to argue that because a disease can be proved to- 
be often communicated by the sick to. the healthy, it can- 
not arise in any other way." The poison that gives origin 
to the diseases known as dysentery, puerperal fever, ery- 
sipelas and diphtheria, are believed by the profession to> 
be produced "de novo." Physicians who have had some of 



Original CoTmnunications. 103 

the best opportunities of studying dysentery in different 
parts of the world, maintain that "the dysenteric stool is as 
contagious as the typhoid fever stool, and that the dysen- 
teric poison is produced by the putrification of animal 
substances under certain climatic conditions." Puerperal 
fever, which usually arises from accidental causes becomes, 
sometimes, actually contagious. 

Dr. Alfred Carpenter is of the opinion that scarlet fever 
can originate from the decomposition of the blood of ani- 
mals, and that in those districts where much blood passes 
into the sewers and there becomes putrid, scarlet fever is 
almost sure to arise. There are a great many instances 
given by medical writers, on typhoid fever, where the out- 
break of the disease was clearly traceable to water in which 
excremental filth had found its way. Two years ago a 
family, in the lower part of this city, was invaded with 
typhoid fever, two members were already sick with the dis- 
ease, and others were threatened with attacks. I exam- 
ined the premises and found the privy back of the house 
and on higher ground than the house ; the privy was 
nearly full; some heavy rains previously had filled it up 
and the over-flow had ran down by the cistern, and there 
was nothing to prevent its running into the cistern. I or- 
dered them to get their water for family use from other 
sources ; they did so, and the disease did not spread any 
farther, 

"The decay of tilth in the dark, away from the free 
access of air, is supposed to be productive of gases espe- 
cially dangerous to health." It is from this cause that 
sewer gas is supposed to be so productive of ill health. 
The odor of this gas sometimes is hardly perceptible, con- 
sequently more dangerous, for it may then invade the 
house while the inmates are not conscious of its presence. 

Liebermeister in Ziemssen's work says: "We must 
therefore recognize, on the one hand, that typhoid fever is 
never contagious from person to person ; and on 
the other hand, that it never originates spontaneously, but 
by a continuous transmission of the poison. Typhoid fe- 
ver, therefore, like cholera and dysentery belongs to the 
miasmatic contagious diseases, in the sense in which these 
diseases were different in the introduction. The disease is 
not contagious in the proper sense of the word, for it is 
never transmitted by direct contact. It is not purely mias- 
matic, for external conditions alone are not sufficient to 



104 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

produce it; the presence of a person suffering from this 
disease, or substances derived from such a person, is neces- 
sary. The poison is propagated continuously. It travels 
from the diseased individual to the localities which are 
favorable for its growth and multiplication, and from these 
localities again into the human body. The question then 
arises, what are the substances derived from diseased in- 
dividuals, which act as transporters of the poison ? Evi- 
dently these substances are to be looked for in the 
excrements. But it may be questioned whether such 
excrements contain the poison while still in their fresh 
condition. The circumstance that physicians and nurses 
and patients, in the same wards, are seldom attacked, even 
if they handle the fresh excrements, seems to indicate that 
the poison, in order to become active, has to go through a 
certain stage of development outside of the body. This 
development can take place if the dejections are left to 
themselves as in dirty linen; but it seems to go on more 
abundantly if the dejections are collected in privies, sewers 
or ground already saturated with organic substances. "In 
this way," he says, "it can be explained how a typhoid pa- 
tient who comes to a house or region previously free from 
the disease, can establish there a focus of infection from 
which many other persons become diseased." 

Now 3'ou will notice that this writer tells us that the 
typhoid fever patient cannot give the disease to those who 
attend him or those about him; that the dejections do not 
contain the poison when in a fresh condition ; it is only 
after the}^ have been deposited where the conditions are 
favorable for a development of the poison that they become 
dangerous or in a condition to inoculate others. 

I can only reconcile his theory upon the hypothesis 
tliat these elements, thrown off under proper circumstances, 
combine to form germs, bacteri, or some kind of animal 
organisms, and if we accept the "germ theory," we can ex- 
jilain more satisfactorily the way that sewer gas acts in 
producing this disease. Analysis of sewer gas has never 
been able to detect anything that will produce the poison. 

Prof. Brewer says: "If the physiogical effects which 
follow the breathing of sewer gas, so called, are produced 
by actual gases acting chemically, then these gases are, as 
yet, absolutely unknown to the chemist, and if they exist at 
all they are in too small quantities to be estimated by any 
known process'of gas analysis." But upon the theory that 



Original ComTnunications . 105 

germs are formed in sewers or privy vaults, the gas then 
generated acts only as a vehicle to carry them into our 
houses. It is possible to imagine a condition of things in 
decaying organic gases similar to that which occurs in de- 
caying organic infusions. It is known that infusions soon 
swarm with minute organisms, which are known by general 
name of "infusoria." 

And that difl'erent forms are generated, According to the 
different chemical character of the solution. Drinking 
water has already been referred to as one of the vehicles of 
this poison into the system. The same germ, I imagine, 
may be vivified in wells where the passage of excrementi- 
tious matter has found its wa}' and the poison finds its way 
into the system, by drinking this water. Liebermeister 
eays "that so far, all observations favor the assumption that 
the typhoid poison can be destroyed by boiling the water." 
If this is so, it is another proof of its being a living germ. 
This is not, however, his opinion; for he says: "it is most 
probable that the infectious agent consists of minute parti- 
cles of solid matter suspended in the air, the inspiration of 
the poison. Moreover, does not imply that it passes 
through the lungs into the blood. It is equally possible it 
passes through the pharynx into the alimentar}' canal." 

I^ow, is it not quite reasonable to suppose that the ex- 
■crementitious matter may contain the elements that go to 
form these poison germs, even if it has not been in any 
way connected by a former case of the disease ; and when 
everything is favorable for the incubation and growth, they 
-come forth to poison the air or water in which they may 
have their living. Moisture is always an element in decay- 
ing organic substances, and the quantity in the gases is 
sufficient to nourish floating organism if direct from sew- 
ers, so that the germs, whether in gases or water, are no 
less the same poisonous substances that act in causing 
typhoid fever. And where the fever is once started, the 
dejections, no doubt, contain the elements in large quanti- 
ties, and the germs under favorable conditions organize in 
great numbers, or may thej^ not be thrown off from the 
bowels in an organized state and revive under certain fa- 
vorable conditions? Either condition would explain the 
■cause of the rapid spread of the disease, after the introduc- 
tion of a case into a place formerly free from it. 

Peoria, III. 



106 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Gelseiiiium. 

Medical Properties. — Anodyne, diuretic, diaphoretic^ 
febrifuge, nervous and arterial sedative. 

Physiological Action. — In moderate doses it produces 
an agreeable sense of languor followed by muscular relaxa- 
tion so that the patient has difficulty in keeping his eyes 
open and jaws ck)sed. In larger doses it causes dizziness, 
dimness of vision, double vision, dilated pupils, general 
muscular debility and universal prostration. It reduces 
the force and frequency of the pulse and the frequency of 
the respiration, and produces insensibility to pain without 
stupor or delirium. Its action begins in about half an 
hour, passing off in an hour or two, leaving no unpleasant 
effects. In toxical doses the respiration becomes slower, 
the pulse slower and irregular, surface cold and congested, 
unconsciousness ensues and finally death by asphyxia. 

Antidotes. — Brandy, quinine, aromatic spirits ammonia 
and opium. 

Indications for Use. — It is indicated where there is 
increased heat of the scalp, flushed face, bright eyes, con- 
tracted pupils, increased general temperature; large, full 
and quick but soft pulse; restlessness and nervousness de- 
pending upon irritation or excitation of the motor part of 
the cord ; diseases where there are exacerbations and also 
in diseases where there is excessive waste. 

Preparation and Waste. — Gelsemii ex. fl., gtt. 3-20. 
Gelsemii tr. gtt. 10-50. Gelsemiin, gr. ^-2. 

Therapeutical Uses. — Fevers. — First given in bilious 
fever, its use has been extended to the whole range of 
fevers — intermittent, remittent, typhoid, yellow, puerperal, 
cerebro-spinal meinngitis or spotted fever and the irritative 
fevers of childhood. 

Inflammations. — In pneumonitis, pleuretis, gonorrhoea, 
dysentery and rheumatism it has been given with satisfac- 
tion. 

Nervous Diseases. — It has been used with success in 
delirum tremens, chorea, epilepsy, neuralgia and tetanus. 
Associated with anodynes it increases their efficacy. 

Dr Ilenning claims it as a specific for spermatorrhoea. 

Dr. T. J. Fentress says that "in convulsions of both 
adults and children it has no equal in the Materia Medica." 

Dr. Connor says, "given in large doses it will prevent 
the suffering and exhaustion attending the dressing of 
wounds." 



Original Communications. 107 

In cases of scanty, high-colored urine, attended with 
burning, smarting or pain after niicturition, in combination 
with spts. aeth. nit. it gives speedy relief. 

In spasmodic stricture of the urethra it acts like a charm 
as also in retention of urine. 

It relieves the tenesums of dysentery' and corresponding 
"bearing down" pain of congestive dysmenorrhoea. 

Dr. J. Sawyer in "The Practitioner," advises its use in 
doses of fifteen minims every six hours in dental neuralgia 
or neuralgic pains associated with carious teeth, and in 
eight drop doses every two hours for irregular uterine con- 
tractions. He claims that in the drop doses every ten min- 
utes lor three or four doses it causes diliatation of the 
cervix uteri. 

A combination of gelsemium and nux vomica has a re- 
markable tonic influence on the spinal system of nerves. 
Dr. Adolphus says : "This combination often cures the 
colliquative diarrhoeas of teething children ; the neuralgias 
of nervous women ; the pain and tormina of bladder and 
rectum diseases ; arouses the exhausted nervous system in 
low fevers; checks the flow in excessive hemorrhage and 
relieves the pain in neuralgia." This combination has also 
been used successfully in veratrum poisoning. Gelsemium 
is considered antidotal to strychnia poisoning and the tinc- 
ture or fluid extract may be applied locally as a remedy for 
poison oak eruption. 

Among the diseases not mentioned above in which this 
remedy has been used are, coughs, colds, nervous and bil- 
ious headache, leucorrhoea, ague-cake and asthma. 

If in the compilation of this article I have benefited 
any of my professional brethren I am amply repaid for my 
labor. W. V. Grimes, M. D. 

Milton, III., July, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Case of Twin Pregrnancy — Death of One Foetus at Five 

Months. 

June 16th, 1879, I was called out in the country to at- 
tend a case of confinement. Mrs. B., a German woman, 
married, 34 years old, the mother of six children, oldest 12 
years. Found her in labor at full term. The labor was 
rapid, and she was soon delivered of a rather puny female^ 
weight six pounds. Placenta soon followed, and to my 
surprise following it a closed sack, spherical in shape, about 



108 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

six inches in diameter, containing both fluid and solid. 
The placenta was rather larger than normal size. Along 
one side, about one-fifth of placenta was of a dense, firm 
texture, light colored, one-half inch thick, quite smooth on 
either side, with a plain ridge or line of demarcation be- 
tween it and normal part of placenta. At or near the 
€dge of this dense part was attached a cord one-fourth of 
an inch in diameter, round, firm, light colored. The artery 
and veins were completely obliterated. The length of cord 
between its placental attachment and sack was twelve 
inches. On tearing open the sack (which was tough) I 
found the cord continued inside about four inches, and an 
umbilical attachment to a female foetus of about four 
mouths development. The liquor in sack had a strong 
•odor, very similar to that in which pathological specimens 
have been kept. The foetus was somewhat shriveled and 
presented an appearance as if it had been macerated in 
dilute alcohol. The mother had been sick with low grade 
of fever, abdominal pain and tympanitis for about two 
weeks during her fifth month of pregnancy, regaining health 
but partially till after confinement. My conclusion is she 
conceived a twin pregnane}^ That one died in utero about 
the beginning of the fifth month of gestation, and nature 
was equal to and did perform the task of preventing de- 
composition of dead foetus (and its concomitant evil results 
to both mother and living foetus), until term of gestation 
was complete and birth of a living child. This child lived 
five months, dying of inanition and atony with dilitation 
of stomach and bowels. 

T. H. Stetler, M. D. 
Paw Paav, III. 

New Remedies. 

Editors Peoria Monthly : — As the medical journals derive 
their support very largely from various companies who are 
engaged in a lively competition for the manufacturing, 
vending and ad^rertising of extracts, elixirs, emulsions, 
pills, pellets, parvules, granules and every other conceiva- 
ble shape of medicine, made up and done up in every con- 
ceivable shape and manner for pleasing the eye and taste, 
and as such competition has been encouraged mainly by 
physicians, to whom appeals through the advertising col- 
umns of the journals have not been in vain, we are aware 
of the futility of an individual protest; and it may seem 



Original Communications. 109' 

much like impertinence, if not folly, to inquire, with no 
intent to do injustice, however, whether these wholesale 
manufacturers, inventors and discoverers of "new reme- 
dies," have not more than fulfilled their mission, so far as 
the medical profession is concerned? 

"For years past the office tables of physicians have been 
deluged with periodical, pamphlet, circular and sample, 
recounting the respectively superior qualities of prepara- 
tions emanating from a dozen or more establishments ; and 
we confess that we have not been entirely proof against 
the seductive influences of some of these elegant prepara- 
tions. We are free to express our gratitude for the enter- 
prise, industry and ingenuity which has been displayed in 
furnishing remedies of decided merit, conveying at th& 
same time to physicians a lesson on the importance of 
prescribing, as far as possible, medicines which are palata- 
ble as well as powerful for good; but we must confess that 
we are too much of an "old fogy" to be carried entirely 
away from, all the good things which we learned in our 
youthful days at the medical school. We do not believe 
that the increasing number of cinchona alkaloids which are 
put on the market for speculative purposes have any supe- 
rior advantages, therapeutically or economical, claimed for 
them over sulphate of quinine, and the "official" compound 
tincture of cinchona, although they all come from the same 
parent tree. Neither will we admit that the large family 
of elixirs of iron, with their various combinations, are 
equal in remedial power and suited to meet as many mor- 
bid conditions as that good old preparation of our pharma- 
copeia — the muriated tincture of iron. The modern 
preparations may be more palatable, fashionable and 
"aristocratic," but in my opinion can never supersede its 
distinguished predecessor, which has so long retained the 
confidence of the medical profession. 

We are not yet prepared to admit that all of our medi- 
cal colleges are a failure, and have not imparted a sufficient 
knowledge of pathology and therapeutics to enable the 
gentlemen who graduate therefrom to understand the laws 
of health and the true seat of disease, so as to do their own^ 
prescribing in a proper manner. 

We object finally to the usurpation of the physician's 
rights and duties by a wholesale and free trade system of 
compounding prescriptions, to cure every form and compli- 
cation of disease, the meaning if not the intent of which is 



110 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

to the effect that there is no longer any necessity for phy- 
sicians to write prescriptions. 

If educated physicians allow such a system to be 
perpetuated which threatens to degrade them to the level of 
the quacks, they may with some reason express themselves 
in the bad English of the drowning Frenchman, who cried 
oat, "I will die and no one shall help me." 

J. R. Snelling, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Salicylic Acid in Scarlet Fever. 

I am aware that the use of salicylic acid is not new in the 
treatment of scarlet fever; but amid the hurricane of rem- 
edies continually being recommended for that disease, 
many of them apparently specifics in the estimation of 
their suggesters, it has not been tried so extensively as its 
probable merit deserves. New remedies are so liable to be 
used wildly and unscientifically, the same remedy being 
often used in a variety of diseases, differing frequently ioio 
ccelo from each other, that the reflecting portion of the 
profession very properly exhibits caution and even timidity 
in their adoption. Any therapeutic agent, however, which 
may be considered likely from analogy or otherwise to be 
useful in combating this very formidable disease, is worthy 
of attention and experiment in order that its value may be 
ascertained. 

Having lost two children in the same family from scar- 
let fever during the epidemic which prevailed here last 
winter, in which cases established remedies, though used 
carefully and persistently, exercised no influence in avert- 
ing death, I have since that time treated all my cases of 
scarlet fever — twelve in number — with salicylic acid, and 
have every reason to be satisfied with its salutary results. 
It is true that none of those cases were apparently of a 
very severe type, but it is also true that in all of them I 
commenced using the acid as soon as I had any suspicion 
of the character of the disease, and before there were any 
positive evidences of its presence; and in all of them the 
acid was continued in diminished doses for two or three 
weeks after the disease proper had disappeared. It is wor- 
thy of remark that in none of those cases were there any 
of the secondary affections which wc so much dread in this 
disease, and the frequency of which I have long felt to be 



Original Communications. Ill 

a stigma on the skill of the physician and a blot on the 
efficacy of medicine. How far the early use of the acid in 
those cases may have prevented the development of the 
poison in the system, and thereby have kept the throat 
symptoms at bay, and rendered the general symptoms 
milder, or how much influence the continued use of the 
acid after the acute symptoms had disappeared, may have 
had in preventing subsequent complications from develop- 
ing, I have not used the remedy long enough to express 
any positive opinion respecting. 

I am aware that I have not used the acid treatment in 
a sufficient number of cases to dogmatically assert its su- 
periority over other established remedies, but I feel confi- 
dent that while it may disappoint us, as all other remedies 
will, in its favorable action on those apparently necessarily 
fatal cases of scarlet fever, which we are all liable occasion- 
ally to meet with, I have reason to believe that it will be 
found to be a very valuable, and what is important in the 
throat diseases of children, a very convenient remedy. 

Every physician is aware of the extreme difficulty, 
sometimes the utter impossibility, of satisfactorily making 
applications to the throats of children in scarlet fever and 
diphtheria. The furious struggling which under such cir- 
cumstances almost invariably occurs, not only aggravates 
the local lesion, but also increases the fever and the general 
symptoms ; while I believe I am correct in stating that not 
more than once in a dozen attempts do we succeed in 
applying our lotion at all effectively to the diseased surfaces, 
and after injuring the child materially, often do not suc- 
ceed in touching the affected parts of the throat at all. 
But still medical men who are considered humane and 
skilful continue to carry on those very equivocal practices. 

It would undoubtedly be a desideratum in this disease 
if a remedy could be procured which diluted in a properly 
prepared and palatable menstruum, would, when swal- 
lowed produce the desired effect on the throat, and thus 
supersede the necessity of making any local applications 
to it. I hope that salicylic acid may prove to be such a 
remedy. There are many other agents which can be ad- 
ministered in this manner, but none that I am aware of 
which possess the therapeutic power of the acid, or 
which can be given of sufficient strength to exercise any 
favorable influence on the throat. 

'^Vhen I add, that the beneficial constitutional eff'ects of 



112 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the salic^'lic acid are obvious in relieving the accompanying 
fever, quieting the nervous irritability, lowering the heart's 
action, and lessening the aggravated temperature of the 
body, we find in the acid a combination of therapeutic 
qualities which it would be difiicult to find elsewhere. 

I do not pretend to indicate what its peculiar action on 
the diseased tissues of the throat may be, but I believe if 
used early, it has a tendency to prevent ulceration of the 
throat, and induce a more healthy action in its different 
tissues. It probabl}' has the effect of preventing or at least 
restraining the rapid and often disastrous molecular changes 
which are so liable to occur in the throat during the pro-« 
gress of scarlet fever. What conservative influence it may 
exercise on the system, what general antiseptic qualities it 
may possess, or what neutralizing efifects it may have on the 
peculiar maieries morbi of the disease it is impossible at 
present to ascertain. The prescription which I use is as 
follows : 

P Acid, salicylici, 3 dr., 

Aq. rosae, l}'^ oz., 

G. acaciae mucil., 1% oz., 

Syr. tolu, 1 oz. M. 

One or two teaspoonsful of this mixture, according to 
the age of the child, should be given every two hours un- 
til a favorable impression has been made on the throat, and 
on the general symptoms. When this has been accom- 
plished the intervals of administering the medicine should 
be extended to four or five hours, varying the periods as 
the changing symptoms of the disease may indicate the 
propriety or necessity of During the existence of the 
acute symptoms the use of the acid should not be permit- 
ted to interfere with the sustaining treatment which is so 
essential in this disease. Nor should its continued use 
after the acute symptoms have subsided prevent the adop- 
tion of the tonic treatment so positively required during the 
period of convalescence. J. Murphy, M. D. 

Peoria, August, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Lamentable Case of Delay. 

I was called to see Miss L., 15 years of age, June 10^ 
1880, on account of injury of the foot, received while assist- 
ing her father to drive some hogs. Being bare-footed, she 
stepped upon a piece of glass, making an incision in the 



Original Cormnunications. 113 

« 

hollow of her foot and severing a branch of the planter 
arch artery. The hemorrhage continued till she fainted, 
when the father by dint of tight bandaging arrested it. In 
a few days, and when the bandage seemed somewhat loos- 
ened, hemorrhage again occurred to fainting. The father 
now went to Peoria, and instead of calling in medical skill, 
secured some adhesive plaster and tr. ferri chloridi, and 
having applied them to the wound, again bandaged the foot 
tightly. Every few days she would bleed, and becoming 
alarmed by the fetor, I was called on the above date, thir- 
teen days from date of injury. Upon entering the room 
w^here the patient was, I was strongly reminded of the dis- 
secting room by the fetor. The foot was quite skillfully 
bandaged so far as the application of the bandage was con- 
cerned, but in regard to results was horrible, for the whole 
foot was mortified. Her general condition was what might 
have been expected, considering the loss of blood and ab- 
sorption from the wound — anemic and septicemic. The 
prognosis was unfavorable, amputation alone giving 
any possibility of recovery. The parents and patient con- 
senting, it was determined that amputation should be per- 
formed early the following morning. The delay was only 
sufficient to make preparations for the operation, securing 
assistance, instruments, etc. Dr. Lucas, of Smithville, 
kindly assisted me by giving chloroform and otherwise, and 
the leg was amputated below the knee at 9 a. m. on the 
11th of June. She came under the influence of chloroform 
pleasantly, and there was very little loss of blood, and 
everything seemed as favorable as possible considering the 
circumstances. The general treatment was tr. ferri chlo- 
ridi, quinine and whisky liberally, with the most nutritious 
diet possible for her to use. The stump was dressed in the 
ordinary way, after being thoroughly disinfected with 2J 
per cent, solution carbolic acid. 

June 12, 9 a. m., reaction moderate, but no appetite, 
and she could be induced to take but a trifling amount of 
nourishment at any time after the accident, and this greatly 
contributed to the final fatal result. Suffice it to say from 
this time she gradually sank and died on the fourth day 
after the operation, in spite of stimulants, antiseptics and 
nutrition, a deplorable result of mistaken economy, for one 
visit at first, costing perhaps ten dollars, would have saved 
the whole sad sequel. N. Holton, M. D. 



114 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Case in Practice and a Question. 

While hoisting a heavy piece of iron to the top of the 
new synagogue in this city, one of the guy ropes broke and a 
workman, aged twenty-one years, was thrown to the ground, 
a distance of fifty-five feet. He struck on his hands and 
knees. After he was taken to his room, I found the right 
hip dislocated with the head of the femur resting on the 
dorsum of the ilium. His wrists were badly sprained and 
he complained of pain in the chest over the region of the 
heart. The reaction from the shock was good and he soon 
became sensible. While under chloroform I reduced the 
dislocation by manipulation after Reid's method; feeling 
and hearing the bone slip back into the acetabulum with a 
decided "thud.." 

The most interesting feature in the case was the follow- 
ing: After reducing the dislocation, I placed my hand 
upon his chest and felt a peculiar movement with the 
heart's action. On placing my ear over the base of the 
heart I could hear distinctly with the second sound of the 
heart, a peculiar "click" and with this, or immediately fol- 
lowing it, a "gurgle." The click was heard by several 
and was audible at a distance of from ten to twelve inches 
from the body. The patient told me that he could both 
feel and hear it. When we turned him upon the right side 
it almost disappeared and was only heard with about every 
third beat of the heart, but on placing him again on his 
back it returned as before. These peculiar sounds contin- 
ued for about twenty hours. ISTo ribs were broken, and 
respiration was not much interfered with. The patient 
made a very rapid recovery, and is now well. 

I would like to have the opinion of the profession as to 
what caused these sounds, having never heard anything 
like them in a long practice. J. L. H. 

Peoria, III., August. 



We invite secretaries of district or county medical 
societies to send us short synoptical reports of their pro- 
ceedings, for publication ; also of any interesting papers or 
rq-jorts read before the societies. 

We hope our readers will send all items of interest to 
the profession that may come under their notice. Marriage 
and death notices inserted free; also, change of address of 
phy.sicians. 



Translations. 115 



^tHnHhtion§* 



JEsmarch's Bandage as a Means of Diagnosis in Simulated 

Contraction. 



From the Vienna Medical Oazelte, by O. J. Boskoten. 

The hope of escaping the disagreeable soldier-life in- 
duces many European recruits to simulate some disease 
rendering them unable to perform the duties of active mil- 
itary service. Among the more common ailments feigned 
are contractions of muscles, generally of the upper and 
lower limbs. 

Much time veas lost in the observation of such patients 
in the hospitals — the use of chloroform having been aban- 
doned after one or two deaths had occurred, the trivial 
purpose of the anaesthesia not warranting the risk, how- 
ever small it be, to the patient's life. Furthermore, by the 
latter means the recruit himself could not be convicted, for 
as soon as he passed from under the influence of the drug 
he would again flex the limb, under the impression never 
to have changed its position. For this reason a discovery 
of Dr. Harten, of Warsaw, Poland, is of considerable im- 
portance, since it furnishes a means of proving satisfac- 
torily to both physician and the would-be patient the ab- 
sence of any muscular contraction; it is prompt in its 
action, and not attended by any danger. 

The anaemia produced in a limb by the application of 
Esmarch's bandage, as well as its pressure upon the nerves, 
must stop muscular and nerve activity. In spite of the 
most strenuous efforts of the patient to keep the limb in a 
state of flexion, it will be easy for the physician to extend 
it, and the limb will remain in the extended state as long 
as the bandage is applied. Dr. Harten cites the following 
case as an illustration : 

A young healthy recruit was sent to the military hos- 
pital of Warsaw, claiming to be suffering from contraction 
of the flexor muscles of the right leg, of six years standing. 
His truthfulness being doubted, the limb was wrapped up 
in the bandage to the middle of the thigh, the India-rubber 
band applied and the bandage removed. The leg which 
had in this way been made bloodless, extended itself spon- 
taneously, in spite of the strong will of the man to keep it 
flexed. A prickling sensation and a feeling of languor re- 



116 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

mained for teu or fifteen minutes after the removal of the 
elastic bandage, and then the cripple walked off, expressing- 
his thanks for the speedy and painless cure. — St. Petersburg; 
Medical Weekly. 



^littiml lectures. 



Acute Eczema. 



CLINICAL LECTURE AT THE JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL. 



BY W. W. VAN VALZAH, M. D. 



This man's age is 36. He gives the following history : 
He has always been in good health until about two weeks 
ago, when he began to notice that his food disturbed him. 
He complains now of discomfort after eating, and a saltish 
taste in his mouth. He has always been a hearty eater of 
rich, greasy food. Besides this intestinal trouble, he calls 
my attention to a redness on his face, which is attended 
with much smarting and itching. This he attributes to be- 
ing shaved at a barber-shop, following which, in a few 
hours, appeared a red blush about his upper lip and nose ; 
soon after the redness appeared, it was followed by intense 
itching and burning. The redness on the face gradually 
spread upwards toward the eyes, and then outwards toward 
the cheeks. Furthermore, he says, that little vesicles have 
appeared on his face near the alse of the nose, which, in a 
short time, seemed to break and discharge water. Wher- 
ever this watery substance ran on his face, the skin became 
red and hot and then itched. Soon after one of these ves- 
icles burst a crust or scab would form, leaving, when re- 
moved, a bright red surface. As the patient protrudes his 
tongue, you observe that it is characteristic of chronic dys- 
pepsia. It is large, flabby, coated, and indented by the 
teeth. He informs me that he belches a great deal of wind, 
which at once points to decomposition of food and acidity. 
There does not appear to be any tenderness in the epigas- 
tric region. 

Turning our attention again to the face, we notice the 
redness and the different stages of the eruption. The skin 
appears to be red, thickened, and inflamed. Just above 
the lip we see some of the scabs, and a little higher up are 
a few minute vesicles. 



Clinical Lectures. 117 



As this is a case which would cause you some difficulty 
in diagnosing, if it came to you in private practice, I will 
let some of you favor me with an opinion. Some one says 
" erysipelas," another "sycosis," another " psoriasis," an- 
other " acne rosacea," still another " eczema." Certainly 
^ variety of opinions, but only one right one. Let me dif- 
ferentiate this point for you. If this was a case of erysip- 
■elas, we would doubtless have had a history of chill, fever, 
prostration, followed by red and hot skin. The redness be- 
ing about the ear, neck, or eye, and extending over the face 
and scalp. There would not have been any eruption, un- 
less possibly an eczematous eruption came about the time 
the erysipelas was leaving. The case affords no such his- 
tory. The fact that this man first noticed the redness soon 
.after a shave at a barber-shop would suggest sycosis. But 
if this were sycosis parasitica, or non-parasitica, the inflam- 
mation and pustulation would be confined to the hair folli- 
cles and sebaceous glands, and it would be limited to where 
the beard grows. On the contrary we see that the disease 
■does not attack the hair follicles, nor the portion where the 
beard grows, but extends upwards toward the eyes. The 
fact that the disease appeared just after shaving, has no sig- 
nificance further than aiding in calling it out. Again, if 
this was a case of psoriasis, there would not be this bright 
redness and moisture, but, instead, the skin would be more 
of a dark red, and the surface elevated, rough and scaly. 
The scales would have been fine and silvery. These appar- 
ent scales are nothing but the scabs which follow the vesi- 
cation. Besides, psoriasis usually first appears on extensor 
surfaces of the arms or legs, and rarely about the face. 

Still again, if this was a case of acne rosacea the disease 
would have probably come on the end or side of the nose. 
It would have come on slowly, and would have been very 
chronic. In acne rosacea, the small superficial vessels be- 
come enlarged and tortuous, and there is general hyperse- 
mia of the skin. Ultimately papules appear, which in time 
pustulate. There is no such history or pathology here ; 
we come now to the last opinion, which was a correct one. 
This is a case of acute eczema, for it has all the symptoms 
so common to that affection. We have here the bright 
redness and thickening due to acute inflammation. We 
■find the vesicles exudation or weeping, which is not seen 
in any other skin affection. We also get a histor}' of itch- 
ing, burning, and scabbing so peculiar to this form of skin 



118 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

disease. In giving you the history, I was p^articular to call 
your attention to the marked derangement of digestion, as- 
shown by this man's tongue. It is not uncommon for ecze- 
ma to be dependent upon indigestion ; and I think it is so 
in this case. In our treatment the first endeavor should be 
to reach the underlying cause. We must correct this man's 
diet, and improve the state of his stomach. I shall restrict 
him for a few days to milk, bread, fresh vegetables and 
fruits. He must avoid the hearty and greasy foods he has 
been in the habit of eating, and abstain also from all stim- 
ulants. As for medicinal agents, it is best to first employ 
such as will unload his intestinal tract, and improve the 
secretions. For that purpose I mention : 

9^ Pil. hydrargyri, 8 grs. 
Podophyllin, '% grs. 
M. Efft. in pil. No. 4. 
Sig. Two at bed-time until all are taken. 

In treating the eruption, we should aim to prevent the 
itching, and allay the inflammation. The two best agents 
for the itching are camphor and carbolic acid. For the- 
eruption proper there is nothing better than the oflacinal 
zinc ointment. Hence I order: 

^ Ung. zinci oxidi, J^ ounce, 
Liq. acid carbolici, 36 gtt. 
Sig. To be applied three times daily. 

— \The Medical Bulletm.. 



Potassic Iodide and Opium in Rheumatism. 

Dr. G. K. Barton, in a communication to the London 
Lancet, gives the following account of his use of these 
agents in the treatment of rheumatism: — 

I have been in the habit of using, both at home and 
abroad, iodide of potassium in large doses — five to twenty 
grains every three hours, with ten grains of Dover's pow- 
der at night. I have pursued this practice for at least 
thirty years — /. e., since the remedy was first introduced^ 
and have treated many hundred cases on this system with- 
out disappointment or failure, and generally the treatment 
only lasts a week or ten days, even in acute articular rheu-. 
matism. I have a case now just recovered of articular 



Feidscope. 119 

rheumatism in the shoulders, elbows, knees, ankles, etc., 
which under this treatment was convalescent in a week. 
Mustard plasters, if applied the first day the pain is felt, 
will stop rheumatism at once, without medicine ; where 
mustard fails, blisters may be used. In a late case of very 
severe rheumatism in the joints, I found cold water was the 
only thing which gave relief, locally applied. 

In rheumatic inflammation there is a deposit of lymph 
into the joints and tissues, which, if not removed speedily, 
becomes hard and organized, causing severe pain by its 
pressure. Iodide of potassium has the power of removing 
this deposit by absorption, and is, to my mind, the most 
scientific and appropriate remedy that can be used. It has 
the great advantage of not exposing the person taking it 
to cold, which the old calomel and opium treatment did, 
by opening the pores of the skin. 

Another remedy which seems much neglected nowa- 
days is opium, which possesses very great power in subdu- 
ing inflammation. 

If iodide of potassium in large doses can cure 
rheumatism in a week, why resort to doubtful and danger- 
ous remedies, merely because they are new ? 

Another advantage of this treatment is that complica- 
tions seldom follow. In fact, I have seldom seen them 
occur when this remedy has been freely used in the begin- 
ning of the disease. 



Infant Dietetics. 



Some of the readers of the Boston Journal of Chemistry 
may recall an article published therein some three years 
ago, in which the writer. Dr. C. E. Page, of Biddeford, 
Me., strongly recommended a radical reform in the alimen- 
tation of infants, in the belief (which is shared by all sci- 
entists who have given any thought to the subject) that 
excess in diet is one of the chief causes, if not the princi- 
pal cause, of the excessive mortality during the first two 
years of life. 

The article in question was copied into a good many 
papers, and excited considerable attention at the time, 
though chiefly on account of its extreme views. To most 
people the theory appeared too startling to receive the care- 
ful consideration which it perhaps deserved. Dr. Page had 
long held the belief that there was no logical or physiolog- 



120 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

ical reason why infants should be fed oftener than adults; 
that their stomachs were as large, proportionately, as those 
of adults; their food better adapted to the requirements of 
their organism than much of the food indulged in by grown 
people ; and that if men in the performance of the most 
arduous labors, mental and physical, working hard with 
body and brain, ten, twelve, and fifteen hours out of the 
twenty-four, were perfectly nourished and sustained on 
three, and in thousands of cases on two, meals, new-born 
infants, with only normal growth to provide for, could not 
require more than three meals of appropriate food. He 
claims that the excessive fat, so generally regarded as the 
sign of a healthy babe, is simply a proof of the ability of 
the digestive organs to go on for a time digesting more 
food than is required for simple growth, the excess going 
to the production of fatty tissue, which he rightly claims 
is, at au}^ stage of life after infancy, universally regarded 
as of itself disease; that this condition is no less disease in 
infancy, and tends to check the really normal growth ; and 
that all excessively fat babies are only cured by either a 
longer or shorter period of non-growth, or a violent sick- 
ness, which strips them of the fat, if not of life. In proof 
of his faith in the three-meal system, he has made a test 
case with his own infant, now six months old, who has had 
but three meals a day since her birth in December, 1879. 
His own description of her condition and progress may 
prove interesting : 

" Her physical condition has been perfect throughout. 
She has uttered no cry of pain indicative of stomach or 
bowel disturbance, and has caused me no moment of anxi- 
ety or uneasiness since the hour of her birth. For ease 
and comfort and inuscular strength she has been a marvel 
to all who have observed her from day to day. There has 
been a complete escape from the fat disease, with the pasty 
complexion so common to infants. The body and limbs 
have lengthened by normal growth, while remaining well 
covered and rounded with muscle and flesh, and the com- 
plexion has been and remains brown and ruddy, like that 
of any human being, perfectly nourished, who spendsmuch 
of the time, as she has, in the open air, during the winter 
as well as since spring began. There has been entire ex- 
emption from hiccough, throwing up, colic, constipation, 
diarrhcea, and in fact from all the endless variety of dis- 
turbances commonly supposed to be the natural and una- 



Periscope. 121 

voidable experience of a pioneer in this world of sin and 
disease. Her breakfast at six, dinner at 12, and supper at 
6 are taken with a keen relish, fully satisfying her appetite 
and keeping her throughout the twenty-four hours without 
any exhibition of hunger or lack of nourishment. Her 
sleep has been perfect, sound, and continuous from soon 
after supper to near breakfast time. From the beginning 
she has been put down wide awake a few minutes after 
supper, with no occasion for disturbing her or her attend- 
ants until her awakening in the morning. This also 
implies that she sleeps in garments as free and unconfining, 
and with the same security as to cleanliness, as is the case 
with healthy adults. In short, she has been a delight to 
herself and to us, fully meeting my most sanguine expec- 
tations, in a scientific point of view, thus far throughout 
ber young life. While other infants have to be kept in 
arms much of the time to pacify' them, or to be quieted by 
the breast or bottle every hour or two through the day, our 
' three-mealer ' is a joy unto herself, requiring little more 
attention, except in the matter of locomotion, than a healthy 
kitten. 

"As to the normal growth of an infant from birth, I 
hold peculiar views. Every one knows the common rate of 
increase of weight during the first four weeks of infant 
life, — a pound a week. During the nine months of foetal 
growth the increase, except in the case of monstrosities, 
is about 0.37 ounce per day, or 2.59 ounces per week. 
Why it should be thought rational for this ratio to be in- 
creased six or seven hundred per cent, directly after birth 
is beyond my comprehension. In spite, or because, of this 
hot-house forcing during the first few months, the average 
weight at, say, five years is much less than if the rate of 
pre-natal growth had been kept up throughout these years. 

"In a pamphlet soon to be published I shall endeavor 
to present the whole subject of infant mortality, and the 
general and particular 1:reatment of infants and young chil- 
dren, with a view of preventing in great measure the undue 
proportion of sickness and death during the first years of 
life, and I solicit correspondence from physicians and others 
who are alive to the importance of this subject." — Boston 
Journal of Chemistry, July, 1880, 



We understand that Prof. Byford's new work on dis- 
eases of women will be ready sometime before Christmas. 



122 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Tests for Arsenic, Witliout Teclinicalities. 



BY JOHN B. BOND, M. D. 



Acting upon j'our suggestion I give for the benefit of 
your readers a few thoughts upon the subject of the chem- 
ical tests for arsenic in cases of suspected death from that 
poison. Some of these tests are not at all intricate, and 
every medical man, without exception, should make him- 
self competent, by a little study and practice, to perform 
them with accuracy and satisfaction. 

A knowledge of chemistry is of course very desirable, 
but satisfactory tests showing the presence or absence of 
arsenic can be performed by persons who are mere tyros 
in the science of chemistry. Such persons would cut a 
sorry figure on the witness stand, perhaps, but if certain re- 
sults under certain manipulations should be obtained by 
them, they could safely say " this stomach contained 
arsenic." 

These manipulations are, as I have said, not at all difii- 
cult. Suppose it is suspected that a person who has been 
dead three weeks was poisoned by arsenic; a simple pro- 
cess of determining this would be as follows : 

Exhume the body and remove the stomach after ligating 
both orifices. (Do not forget to keep it under lock and 
key, except when it is under your own eye !) Presuming 
that at such a time after death the organ will be empty or 
nearly so, cut it into small fragments and place them to- 
gether with the contents into a porcelain-lined dish, with 
say half pint of distilled water and a small quantity of mu- 
riatic acid. Boil this mixture half an hour, strain it 
through muslin into a clean glass jar. Filter the liquor 
through paper and it is ready for the chemical test known 
as Marsh's. 

Every person who has attended chemical lectures will 
remember the "Philosopher's lamp." A common junk 
bottle, fitted with a glass tube drawn to a small point, con- 
taining strips of zinc, sulphuric acid and water is the ap- 
paratus, simplified. From this glass tube will issue a gas 
called hydrogen, that will burn like a lamp; hence the 
name "Philosopher's lamp." Should a little solution of 
arsenic be added to the bottle the gas will be "arsenietted 
hydrogen," and the flame will have properties that no other 
flame has, though it may ba simulated in some degree by 
one other substance. 



Periscope. 123 

The examiner should proceed thus : Select a wide- 
mouth strong bottle, holding say, eight ounces. Pass the 
pointed tube (made by "drawing out" a small tube by 
means of the spirit lamp until the aperture is reduced to 
the size of a cambric needle) just through the cork. Pass 
another and larger tube nearly to the bottom of the bottle; 
if this tube had a small funnel at its outer end it would be 
more convenient. Put into the bottle (or hydrogen flask, 
as it may now be called), a few pieces of zinc cut from a 
sheet of the metal, then add, say three ounces of pure 
water, and to this, say one-half ounce of pure sulphuric 
acid, and close the bottle with the cork carrying the glass 
tubes already described. 

Chemical action will be at once set up; the water will 
be decomposed, giving up its hydrogen, which will escape 
out of the fine-pointed tube together with the atmospheric 
air which has until this time remained in the flask. 

As soon as the air has been forced out, say in five min- 
utes after strong chemical action is set up, the hydrogen 
escaping at the end of the tube may be safely ignited; now 
we have the "Philosopher's lamp " burning. The exam- 
iner must next satisfy himself that the ingredients in the 
flask are free of arsenic. If any be present it will be indi- 
cated by the deposit of a black shining spot upon a piece 
of clean porcelain held in the flame say five seconds. If 
no such spot can be made with the flame, it is proof that 
arsenic is not present. 

Now add to the flask through the larger (funnel) tube, 
say a half ounce of the suspected liquid, as heretofore de- 
scribed. If arsenic be in that liquid, the flame will increase 
in size, and will change to a blue or livid tint. But the 
most important change in the character of the flame will 
be its power to form a black, shining disk or metallic mirror 
upon a porcelain dish or surface. The clean top of an 
ointment pot is the most handy thing a physician can find. 

Holding this in the flame for a few seconds the spot will 
be deposited; an hundred of them may be taken in two or 
three minutes if the quantity of arsenic be large. 

Are these disks due to the presence of arsenic? Will 
any other substance produce them? Solution of antimony 
poured into the flask (previously cleaned of the matters), 
in lieu of the solution of arsenic, will cause a deposit of 
dead, black, lusterless spots, simulating, as I have said, in 
some degree the arsenic disks. They will be much larger^ 



124 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

more quickly deposited than arsenic, and they will lack the 
metallic luster of the other. But further : apply a drop or 
two of saturated solution of chloride of lime, or of chlori- 
nated soda to the disk; if it be arsenic it will disajjjyear 
quickly; if it be antimony there will be no change in several 
hours. If the hydrosulphate of ammonia be used in lieu 
of the solution of chloride of soda, arsenic spots will re- 
main permanent and antimony spots will disappear at once ! 
Are other tests wanted? They can be had with the 
ammonia nitrate of silver and with the ammonia sulphate 
x>f copper, which show the characteristic colors of the arsen- 
ites of these metals ; but these tests, though simple enough, 
require more familiarity with chemical manipulation than 
most practitioners possess, and are really not needed in 
arriving at a conclusion, if the other results are clearly set 
forth. These are the simple tests, yet they point unerr- 
ingly to the truth. Every medical man should be prepared 
to perform as well as to explain them. — Arkansas Medical 
Monthly. 



Infra-Hyoid Broiicliotoniy. 

Dr. T. H. Manley, Lawrence, Mass., reports a very in- 
teresting case of Infra-Hyoid Bronchotomy. A man 
swallowed about twelve ounces of lime water, and was 
immediately attacked with vomiting .and suffocation. An- 
tidotes could not be administered and the case was so 
urgent that medical assistance could not be procured, so by 
the light of a small lamp the Dr. "made a transverse inci- 
sion between the hyoid bone and the thj^roid cartilage of 
the larynx." He says: "this brought me down below the 
obstructions in the pharynx, and by the contraction of the 
divided muscular fibres secured a permanent opening with- 
out the necessity of using retractors; besides it allowed of 
the opening with the least hemorrhage. There was little, 
except from the small transverse branches of the superior 
thyroid artery. No tissues to divide except the skin, fat, 
one ribbon-like muscle, the platysmia and the fibrous mem- 
brane that connects anteriorly the hyoid bone with the 
thyroid cartilage of the larynx." Very little bleeding fol- 
lowed, and on the insertion of a silver tube it entirely 
<;ea8ed. The symptoms were all relieved, and in a week's 
time the wound began to close and at the end of five weeks 
was entirely healed. "In the evening following the acci- 



"*.>. 



Periscope . 125- 

(lent, he passed by the rectum, large quantities of lime in 
small lumps. Why this should have excited such violent 
inflammation at the primary orifice of the alimentary canal, 
and none at its middle and lower parts, I cannot under- 
stand, unless that it spent its strength at the outset on the 
first mucous membrane it came in contact with." — Medical 
and Surgical Reporter, August. 



Dental Instninients Transmitting- Syphilis. 

The Revista de Buenos Ayres, relates a case which should 
be read by every dentist in the country. The wonder is 
that there are not more cases of the same kind. 

It says: — "A middle aged lady called on us for treat- 
ment of several ulcers on the tongue and palate and for 
severe pains extending from the mouth down the neck to 
the body. She said that a dentist had plugged a tooth 
with an instrument containing blood, which had just been 
drawn from the mouth of a youth. The woman had syph- 
ilis; was treated for it, and recovered. It is unquestionable 
that the dental instrument had been the innocent medium 
of inoculating the lady with a syphilitic virus. How many 
innocent persons are no less victims of dental carelessness 
and filth." 



Medical Society. 



The Military Tract Medical Association will meet at 
Galva, 111., Tuesday, November 9, 1880. The following 
are the committees : Practice of Medicine, R. B. Smead, 
T. Hatchett, A. L. Craig; Surgery, A. E. Baldwin, H. M. 
McClanahan, H. C. Hopper; Obstetrics and Diseases of 
Women and Children, T. A. Scott, H. L. Harrington, W. 
S. Holliday ; Ophthalmology, L. S. Lambert, H. B. Young; 
Essayist, S. M. Hamilton ; Lecturer, M. A. McClelland ; 
]S"ecrology, A. C. Babcock, J. B. Ingels, B. S. Peck; Pub- 
lication, J. F. Todd, N. A. Grove. 

H. JuDD, President. 

B. S. Peck, Secretary. 

This is one of the largest and most important societies 
in the state. It includes the counties of Bureau, Stark,. 
Henry, Mercer, Knox, Warren and Henderson. 



126 



Feoria Medical Monthly. 



"^Brn^mtiti t^ote§. 



DIAKBHOEA. 

Dr. W. B. Atkinson gives the 
following as an old but very ex- 
cellent formula, both in chronic 
and other forms of diarrhoea : 

^ Acidi nitrosi, 35 minims, 

Tr. opii, 15 minims, 
Aq. camphorae, 

Syr. simp. a.a. f. \}4, ounces. 

M. Dose, teaspoonful every 
three to four hours. Where opi- 
um may be contra-indicated, we 
may substitute extract hyoscya- 
mus, say half a grain in each 
dose. — Med. and Surg. Reporter. 

HAEMOPTYSIS IN PHTHISIS. 

Dr. Wm. Pepper gives this as 
a substitute for ergot, or in cases 
where it cannot be used : 
9= Acidi gallici, 2 drachms, 

Acidi sulph. aromat. 1 drachm, 
Glycerinae, 1 ounce, 

Aquae, q. s. ad. 6 ounces. 

M. A tablespoonful as requir- 
ed. — Med. and Surg. Reporter. 

ROCK AND RYE. 

Dr. C. C. Vanderbeck, Allen- 
town, N. J., says he makes his 
own after the following formula: 

9; Rock candy, 1% fts., 
Boiling water, 1 pint, 
Best rye whisky, 3 quarts. 

Stir, and after the candy is dis- 
solved or saturation reached, 
strain.— iVec?. and Surg. Re- 
porter. 

USE OF BELLADONNA IN THREAT- 
ENED ABORTION AND IN DYS- 
ENTERY. 

Dr. Q. C. Smith, Austin, Tex., 
writes: When miscarriage is 
threatened, give fl. ex. bellad., 
two to five drops, every thirty to 
sixty minutes until pains are re- 
lieved. Sliould disagreeable ef- 
fects follow tlie use of the bella- 
donna, alcoholic stimulants will 
relieve them. He says he has 
this drug in many instances un- 
til the patient was delirious, but 



has never had any bad results, 
and on the other hand has had 
unlooked-for good results follow. 
In acute dysentery he uses this 
formula: 

9^ Fl, ex. belladonna, 1 dr., 
Subnit. bismuthi, 1 dr., 
Elix. cinchonae, 3 oz. 

M. ft. sol. For an adult give 
teaspoonful every half hour until 
pains are relieved. Shake the 
bottle before each dose. Give 
sulph. magnesia, a teaspoonful 
in water every hour until free 
watery discharges are produced. 
Keep the patient quiet in bed 
twenty-four hours after the salts 
cease to operate. A mild tonic 
may be given afterwards. — Nash- 
ville Journal of Medicine and 
Surgery. 

WHOOPING COUGH. 

Dr. R. W. Brower, of Sheridan, 
111., writes us that his most de- 
cidedly successful method of 
treating whooping cough is the 
following: Quinine sulph. 10 
grains, pulv. glycyrrhizae Vy^ 
scruples. Mix. Give to a small 
child what will lay on a small 
steel pen reversed in its holder, 
leaving half an inch free, every 
hour or two. Let the half inch 
of the pen exposed be moder- 
ately rounded. Turn on the 
tongue dry. His own child was 
in a few days entirely relieved 
of the cough by this means 
alone. Since then he has used 
it with entire success in several 
other cases. Cliildren seem to 
like this medicine and enjoy the 
method of taking it. 

BISMUTH IN SKIN DISEASES. 

Dr. Sweet says : Mixed with 
cosmoline or fresh lard in almost 
any proportions, it is a sovereign 
remedy for eczema, herpes, inter- 
trigo of infants, and anything 
where there is an abraided or 
irritated surface. — Southern Med- 
ical Record. 



Medical College Announcements. 127 

Medical College Aniioiiucements. 

As it might be of benefit to some of our readers, we 
give herewith the date of opening of several colleges. 

Starling Medical College, Columbus, Ohio. Winter 
session opens September 1st. 

Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio. Winter ses- 
sion begins October 1st. 

Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City; 
opens winter course September 15th. 

Medical Department University, of N'ew York, New 
Y'ork. Winter course opens September 29th. 

The Medical College of Indiana, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Regular session begins October 4th. 

Central College of Physicians and Surgeons, Indianap- 
olis, Ind., opens winter course October 4th, 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Winter session begins October 4th. 

Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia Penn, Winter course begins October 4th. 

Medical Department of the University of Louisville, 
Louisville, Ky.; session opens October 1st. 

The Hospital College of Medicine, Louisville, Ky. ; ses- 
sion opens October 1st. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, Keokuk, Iowa; 
opens winter session October 15th. 

Medical College of Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio. Winter 
session opens October 4th. 

Missouri Medical College, (formerly the "McDowell") 
St. Louis, Mo. Winter session begins October 4th. 

Chicago Medical College, Chicago, 111. ; regular session 
begins September 28th. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City. 
Winter session begins October 1st. 

Detroit Medical College, Detroit, Mich. Regular ses- 
sion opens September 6th. 

Medical Department of Harvard University, Boston, 
Mass. Winter course begins September 30th. 

Medical Department of Y^ale College, New Haven, 
Conn. Regular session begins October 2d. 

Department of Medicine and Surgery University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. ; year begins October Ist. 

Iowa State University, Department of Medicine, Iowa 
City, Iowa; session begins October 6th. 



V28 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

EDITORS: 

John Murphy, M. D., J. L. Kainilton, M. D., 

H. Steele, M. D. 



All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. Mcllvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-Jefiferson Street, PEOBIA, ILL. 



Mitotml ^efidrtment 



Physicians Versus Newspapers. 

Why a portion of the pirblic press is so disposed to* 
criticise and censure physicians whenever an opportunity 
ofters is a mystery, but that such is the case cannot be dis- 
puted. They say it is their duty as guardians of the pub- 
lic welfare to make known all cases where even a suspicion 
exists that a physician has done wrong, and to make every 
practitioner observe the law, where the health of the peo- 
ple is at stake. Passing over the question which might 
ver}^ pertinently be asked as to who constituted them the 
guardians of the public health, also as to their qualifica- 
tions for the office; and granting them to be so, the ques- 
tion arises why do the papers uphold quacks who do not 
have any license to practice, and hound, as they do, repu- 
table physicians, against whom nothing more may exist than 
the gossip of a lot of ignorant women. If they are sa 
anxious about the public health why do they not turn their 
attention to these men and women practicing in defiance 
of law, and who by their ignorance and cupidity work 
more harm to the community than many mistakes of many 
physicians would occasion. There must be some reason 
for this. It is not our aim to consider this question at pres- 
ent; but in view of the fact that these newspaper attacks 
upon physicians are becoming more frequent and more 
virulent, there is a very important point for physicians to 
consider under such circumstances, viz : What is the best 
course to pursue? Shall I deny these slanderous lies, or 
pass them by in silence as their character merits ? On this 



Editorial Department. 129 

point we cannot do better than quote from an article by 
our co-editor, Dr. Steele, printed elsewhere some time since. 
"We protest against another thing, somewhat common 
with physicians, and that is personal explanations for the 
purpose of vindicating themselves from some unjust criti- 
cism, or explaining something which may have occurred 
for which they themselves know they are blameless, but 
which others may not see so readily. With some excep- 
tions this should be avoided if possible. The instances are 
rare indeed, when this course is adopted, that the one 
interested does not heartily regret it. We have known in- 
stances where physicians did this against the earnest pro- 
test of their professional friends, while, if they could have 
restrained their feelings, and waited, would have learned 
that time vindicated infinitely better than a volume of 
denials and explanations. We have no hesitation, there- 
fore, in asserting that no controversy or diflterence of opin- 
ion, and rarely personal explanations, purely professional 
in character, was ever corrected or settled in the remotest 
degree by appealing to the public through the public press. 
But, on the contrary, becomes more complicated, more 
mystifying, more difficult of adjustment; leads to further 
embarrassment; often humiliation to those concerned, and 
fails to accomplish the purpose inten-ded; involving in fur- 
ther difficulty, not only those immediately interested, but 
frequently others who had no interest whatever in the mat- 
ter at issue. We say to physicians then, if you have 
differences of opinion which you are unable to settle — some 
matters of dispute or unavoidable misapprehension relating 
to professional matters — avoid, if possible, an appeal to the 
public. Experience has proven that, with rare exceptions, 
no good can result ; but, on the contrary, irreparable harm 
may be the consequence. 

To Readers. 

With increased size, better paper and larger number of 
contributors, we hope during the coming fall months to 
receive a large number of subscribers. We do not aim to 
take the place of the larger journals, but to give a good, 
handy, practical journal at a low price that every physician 
can afford to take in connection with the one he is accus- 
tomed to read. There are but few who cannot afford to 
pay a dollar for a monthly of this size. 

We want every one to take a personal interest in this 



130 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

journal and help us make it the best journal in the West. 
You may rest assured that we will spare no pains, and do 
every thing possible to add to its value. That it has value 
is fully established by the number of commendatory letters 
that we are daily receiving. Send us your subscription at 
once, and we will send you the back numbers you have not 
already received and this journal for one year, making six- 
teen numbers, or over five hundred pages for one dollar. 

Advertisements. 

It is perhaps unnecessary to advise physicians to read 
the advertisements, since we believe that they are gener- 
ally read. It is a fact that well selected advertisements 
from responsible firms are frequently of as much benefit to 
physicians as any pages in any journal. Through them 
the physician knows where to obtain just what he wants, 
or may have his attention called to an article that will be 
of incalculable benefit to him. 

We propose to make our advertising pages valuable in 
this way to our readers, and our readers will soon find out 
that they can depend on the responsibility of all firms who 
may appear in our pages. Correspond with them or try 
their goods, and we know you will find them the best of 
their kind. In corresponding with advertisers please men- 
tion where you saw their advertisement; it will be doing us 
a favor. 



Rusli Medical College. 

At the head of western colleges and in the front rank 
of American medical colleges stands Rush. The last class 
numbered four hundred and eighty-one and the coming 
winter bids fair to see over five hundred students assem- 
bled within her walls. There are now over seven hundred 
graduates of this college in practice in this state. The 
standard is raised every year and Rush graduates take 
equal rank with those of any college in the country. We 
are proud of this, our representative western college. 

The winter session opens September 28th. 



• Errata. 

On page 84, tenth line, for fir.st position read second 
position. Page 84, eleventh line, for second position read 
first position. Page 85, thirty-third line, for occiput read 
"chin case." 



Editorial Department. 131 



Bog-US Diplomas. 

The l^ew York Medical and Surgical Journal promises to 
publish in the September issue the names of those holding 
•diplomas from Buchanan's various medical colleges. We 
hope the list will be full and complete. If it is, it will 
make a very interesting piece of reading. We would also 
like to see a list of graduates (?) from some of the bogus 
colleges in Cincinnati. 



Our friend of the Arkansas Medical Mojithly, seems to 
have struck a goodly sized hornet's nest, to judge from the 
amount of trouble he is taking to set himself right in the 
matter. We have only read his side of the question, but 
he certainly makes out a strong case against the offenders, 
and we do not see how the faculty of the "medical depart- 
ment of the Arkansas Industrial University" can get out 
■of it, except by backing down, and then — not starting at 
all. 



Fifty years ago there were eight medical journals in the 
United States. Now there are fifty-three of the regular 
school, nine homeopathic, and seven eclectic. In the last 
fifty years 1,630 regular journals and 214 homeopathic have 
been started, leaving about six per cent, of the former and 
four per cent, of the latter class as survivors. — Exchange. 

The number of defunct journals seems large, and the 
number of living journals much too small, indeed we think 
there are not far from one hundred medical journals now 
in existence and even this is not too many. With between 
50,000 and 60,000 physicians in the United States, this 
would give one journal to every five hundred to six hun- 
dred, and almost every physician takes from two to four 
journals. 



Dr. E. P. Murdock has been appointed Curator of the 
Museum at Rush Medical College. This is a very good 
thing for the college, as a well appointed museum is a very 
valuable adjunct to medical lectures. Dr. Murdock has 
every qualification for the position, and we know will fill 
it satisfactorily. He has promised us some articles for 
coming numbers of this journal. 



132 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Notice. 

If we can accommodate any physician by purchasing- 
or ordering any books or instruments, we will be glad ta 
do so, free of charge. We will select with as much care 
as if buying for ourselves, and can get as low prices as can 
be had anywhere. The goods can be sent C. 0. D. Ad- 
dress the publisher. 

Facetiie. 

Reputation Vindicated. — The London Truth is respon- 
sible for the following : Dr. R was one who could 

seldom resist telling a good story, even when it turned the- 
laugh against himself. On one occasion a man-servant,, 
whom he had recentlj^ engaged, astonished him by appear- 
ing to wait at breakfast with a swollen face and unmistak- 
able black eyes. "Why, John," said he, "you seem to- 
hjive been fighting!" "Yes sir, I have," was the reply. 
"And who may your opponent have been?" "Why sir. 

Dr. M 's man," naming a rival ./Esculapius. "And what 

did you fall out about, pray ? " Why, sir, as he said you 
wasn't fit to clean his master's shoes." "And what did 
you say ? " "Well, sir, I said as you was." 

A Model Student. — A young American, who had 
been in Paris for a year studying medicine, was visited by 
his father. He paraded the old gentleman through the city, 
and pointed out its architectural lions. Finally, they halt- 
ed before a many-pillared building. "What is that lordly 
pile ? " asked the father. "I don't know," replied the 
youth, "but there is a sergeant-de-ville." They crossed 
over and put the question. "That gentlemen," said the- 
oflficial "is the medical school." 



Subscribers will please notify the publisher if they have- 
not received the previous numbers of this journal. We 
have a limited number on hand, and will send them to- 
those subscribing during this month, and the journal for 
one year, making sixteen numbers of the monthly for only 
one dollar. If you want the back numbers signify the fact 
on the subscription blank. 



Samples of Staufer's hard-rubber uterine instruments, 
and supporters can be seen at the oflSce of this journal. 



tddvertisements. 




Dr. MclNTOSH'S 

NATVRAIi 




No instrument has ever been placed before the medical profes- 
sion which has given such universal satisfaction. The combination 
is such that the Physician is able to meet every indication of Uter- 
ine Displacements, Falling Womb, Anteversion, Retroversion and 
Flexions are overcome by this instrument, where others fail, this is 
proven by the fact that since its introduction to the Profession it has 
■come into more general use than all other instruments combined. 

Among the many reasons wliich recoqamend this Supporter to 
the Physician is its self-adjusting qualities. The Physician after 
applying it need have no fear that he will be called in haste to re- 
move or readjust it, as is often the case with rings and various pes- 
saries held in position by pressure against the vaginal wall, as the 
patient can remove it at will and replace it without assistance. 

The Abdominal Supporter is a broad morocco leather belt with 
elastic strains to buckle around the hips, with concave front, so 
shaped as to hold up the abdomen. The Uterine Support is a cup 
and stem made of highly polished hard rubber, very light and dura- 
ble, shaped to fit the neck of the womb, with openings for the secre- 
tions to pass out, as shown by the cuts. Cups are made with ex- 
tended lips to correct flexions and versions of the womb. 

The cup and stem is suspended to the belt by two soft elastic 
Rubber Tubes, which are fastened to the front of the belt by simple 
loops, pass down throu2;h the stem of the cup and up to the back of 
the belt. These soft rubber tubes being elastic adapt themselves to 
all the varying positions of the body and perform the service of the 
ligaments of the womb. 

The instrument is very comfortable to the patient, can be re- 
moved ord"eplaced by her at will, can be worn at all times, will not 
interfere witli nature's necessities, will not corrode, and is lighter 
than metal. It will answer for all cases of Anteversion, Retrover- 
sinns, or any Flexions of the womb, and is used by the leading 
Physicians with never failing success even in the most difficult 
■cases. 

PSICE— To Physicians, $8 ; To Patients, $12. 

Instruments sent by mail, at our risk, on receipt of price, with 
16 cents added for postage, or by Express, C. O. D. 

DR. M'INTOSH'S NATURAL UTERINE SUPPORTER COMPANY, 

Our valuable pamphlet, "Some Practical Facts About Dis- 
placements of the Womb," will be sent you free on application. 192 
Jackson street. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



NOTICE! 



To Pahlishers, Manufacturing Chemists, In- 
strument Makers, Druggists : 

As it is our desire to bring before the Physicians every- 
thing that will be of benefit to them, we will carefully 
and impartially examine, review or test whatever may be 
sent to us in these lines, and notice all that we think would 
be of value to the profession. 



DR. L. D. M'INTOSH'S 




or 



If this new combination could be seen afid tested by the medical profession, 
few, if any, words would be needed from us in its favor, for it combines utility 
with iimplicity in such perfection that seeing it is convincing proof of its great 
value. The medical profession to-day acknowledge, almost universally, Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

This combination is composed of sixteen cells, placed in pockets ©n a belt. 
Each cell is made of hard vulcanized rubber, lined with a copper cell, which 
constitutes the negative plate. The rubber coating perfectly insulates each celL 
The positive plates are of zinc, wrapped in a porous material to absorb the ex- 
citing fluid, and prevent cont»ct with the copper, and permit the current to pass 
from the coppsr to the zinc. 

Thus the cells are charged without wetting the belt, and the discomfort fol- 
lowing to the patient. A wire is soldered to each zinc plate, which connects 
with the copper cell by entering a tube on its side, thus rendering the belt 
pliable. 

The Mcintosh Electric Belt is superior to all others for the following reasons: 

It is compoRed of sixteen cells— thus giving a powerful current. A current 
•elector is so arranged that one or more cells can be used at pleasure. There is 
not anything irritating about the Belt, as Is the case with all other contrivances 
where the metal used is wet with weak acids and placed next to the skin. The 
electrodes are pieces of metal covered similar to ordinary battery electrodes, 
and connected with the cells by connecting cords. By this arrangement, a cur- 
rent from the Belt can be applied to produce a general or local effect. 

Physicians who have used this Belt in their practice do not hesitate to re- 
commend it to the profeBSion. 

PRICE, $10.00; 'WITH SUSPENSORY, tl2 50. 

Our pamphlet on Medical Electricity sent free on application. Address, 

McINTOSH G.\LVAMC BELT AND BATTER! COMPANY, 192 agd 194 Jackson St., Chicago, III. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medioai. Monthly. 



Advertisements . 



RUSH 




CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Annual, Spring Course, or Post Graduate An- 
nouncement, address the Secretary, 



J kme^ S. ^ijtlieridge, 



16S4 MICHIGAN AVENUE 



In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



COLBURN, BIRKS d CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 

AXD DEALERS IN ' 



KIDDER'S BATTERIES, GAIFFE'S BATTERIES, 
AMPUTATING, 

OPERATING, 

DISSECTING, and 
^ POST-MORTEM INSTRUMENTS, 

TOOTH FORCEPS, 
OBSTETRICAL FORCEPS, 

FEVER THERMOMETERS, 

HYPODERMIC SYRINGES, 
POCKET INSTRUMENT CASES, 

VIAL CASES, BUGGY CASES, 
SADDLE BAGS, 
PLASTERS, BANDAGES, SPLINTS, 

CRUTCHES, ETC. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our new Instrument Catalogue ready for distribu- 
tion June 15, 1880. 

Our prices ^A^ill be found low for first quality 
goods. 

Write for quotations before buying. 



COLBURN, BIRKS & CO., Wholesale Druggists, 

218, 220 & 222 S. Washington St., Peoria, 111. 
In answering advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



SPEING STEM SUPPOETERS. 



Abdominal Supporter. 
3. 



SOLID STEM SUPPOETEE. 
E. —5-— (Economy.) 




Prices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Procicle tia Cup A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Coutil 
Finished Belt X, $T.OO. On Z, Fig. 
5, $6.00. On Y, Coutil, $8.00; and 
on Y, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring Stem, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long II, or 1 U, the same on e.ther 
belt as A, 

Retroversion E, on X, nr T, 
Cotton, SS.OO. On Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on Z, $7.no. 

Aniever.sion, Snlid Stem 
C, or Soli' Stem Glnb" lop 
O, on X, or Y. Cotton. ?.j.50. On Y, 
Coutil, fC.'O, and on Z, $4.50 only. 

Rules. — riio Stem Supporters 
Fig. 1 9ii(i 5, arn only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Speculnms, Fig. 6, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cup D, 
oither separate, or in connection 
with Stem Supporters. 

Elastic Gums S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; i at 35 cts ; and Springs 
at 3 cte. each. 

JT, Bt — Tbe fignres on these engrayings cor- 
respond with those on the full Cataloprue plate. 

Selection. — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
Tf a cup, it must be modelled after the Junction of 
the axis of the uterus and vagina, or the cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I U, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptatiou 
and border cup. In cases of slight Anteversions 
and slight Retroversions, deep cups may be called 
for, and in most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cups are usually 
selected by giving the full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, IV^ to Iv'g; Multiparae, 1;''^ 
to 2, and Procidentia to 2 j|^ inches and over some 
times. Belts — For X, and Z, waist measure to be 
given, and Y, hip meafure. 

Atiteversion C, Fig. 1 — This had been re- 
modelled a number of times, and the fenestrated 
top found best to remain in position. 

Retroversion E — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent efficiency. The broad lever, lifts up the 
fundus, while the cup corrects the prolapsus and 
holds th« uterus, by a double elastic motion, if a 
spring stem, t^mall, long stem. Globe Tops 0, 
Fig. 1, are placed with success anainstthe sensitivo 
fundus, after everything else been intolerable. 
Intra Uterine Stem Cup I XT. — The stem 



.'^izes— 1, 1 3.16, 1 6.16 and 
1 9.1 6, Flesh color enam- 
eled. Price, $2 50 each. 



$1.50 

Price. — Permanent, Curved Stem 
Cup E C, on elastic webbing Z, 
$4.50. On X, or Y, cotton, $5.50, 
and Y. coutil, $6 50. 

No expense lias been saved to 
give even the Economical Supporter 
all possible advantages. 



HAED EUBBEE UTEEINE EXAMINING CASF 




Prices. — Full case, $8.00; Quill Caustic Holder H, or Camel's 
Hair Brush Holder and Case I, each $1.00. Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket after the cup is in posi- 
tion. This is safer than all other contrivances, 
but is seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made in this Series to correct Retro- 
version through the posterior cul-de-sac. i 

Cystocele and Rectocele. — These are suc- 
cessfully drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops G, or Oblong H, Fig. 1. 

Cup J), Fig 5 — .Supplements EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed into AD, 
Fip. 1. 

Globe S, Fig. 5. — This is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with all the objectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now a^ain 
a popular pessary. 

Speculum, Fig. 6 — The conductor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and in position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be introduced ; 
this togHther with the thin shell, gives a sufficient 
calibre to embrace the entire cervix within the 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the enclosure of the cervix by rotation. 

Examining Cane, Fig. 13. — Sounds A, B, 
C, Movers D, F, and G, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on >I, of H, and form instruments 12 
inches long. L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Rplt Y, Fig. 3. — Is made to order of any size 

and strength, to support thi stem supporter and 

Ilip Straps S S, are elastic. 



pendulous abdomen. 

Mailed on receipt of quotation prices, and all the hard rubber p» rfs on the full Catalogue exchanged 
to meet any indie ition, ana cover the purchaser's risk. Catalog! s on api)lication. 

^ , ■„ 7 ) S. S. STATJFER, D- D. 

(hrrespondents xmll please [ ^^^ ^ ., ,. I. tT^ -^ t ^ m.ii »-. 

name tlds Journal \ G"* FranhUn St , West side, above Green, Philn., Pa. 

J Near 9th & Green Sts. {or Sound Brook) yew TorJe Itepot. 



10 Adertisenhents. 



CHEMICAL REPORT ON MALTINE. 



BY WALTER S. HAINES, M. D., 

Professor of Cliemistry and Toxicology, Rush Medical College, Chicago. 



Chemical Laboratory of Rush Medical Colle0e, \ 
Chicago, November 18th, 1879. ) 

In order to test the comparative merits of Maltine and the va- 
rious Extracts of Malt in the market, I purchased from different 
druggists samples of Maltine and of the most frequently pre- 
scribed Extracts of Malt, and have subjected them to chemical 
analysis. 

As the result of these examinations, I find that Maltine con- 
tains from half as much again to three times the quantity of Phos- 
phates (Nerve and Brain food and Bone producers), and from three 
to fourteen times as much Diastase and other Albuminoids (Diges- 
tive agents and Muscle producers), as any of the Extracts of Malt 
examined. Since the value of such preparations is indicated very 
exactly by the proportion of these — their two most important con- 
stituents, I have no hesitation in pronouncing Maltine greatly 
superior to any Extract of Malt w^hich I examined. 

The large amounts of Phosphates and Albuminoids found in 
Maltine demonstrates, moreover, the superior skill and care 
employed in its preparation, and thoroughly warrants the confidence 
placed in it by the Medical Profession. 

Very respectfully, WALTER S. HAINES. 



REPORT ON MALTINE. 

BY L. P. YANDELL, M. D., 

PROFESSOE OF CLINICAL MEDIOINB AND DISEASES OP OHILDEEN, UHIYERSITY OF LOUISVILLE. 

\^Frovi the Louisville Medical News, January 3d, 1880.] 

After an extensive trial of the Maltine preparations of Reed & 
Carnrick, of New York, in private and dispensary practice, we are 
convinced that Maltine is one of the most valuable remedies ever 
introduced to the Profession. Our exalted estimate of this article is 
confirmed by all of the many practitioners who have expressed to 
us their opinion of it. Wherever a constructive is indicated, Malt- 
ine will be found excellent. lu Pulmonary Phthisis and other 
Scrofulous Diseases, in Chronic Syphilis, and in the various Cachec- 
tic Conditions it is invaluable. In Convalescence it is a delightful 
and eflficacious Cordial. We have invariably found it liked by Chil- 
dren, who devour it as they do candy. The Maltine Wine with 
Pepsin and Pancreatine has yielded us the happiest results in 
Apepsia and Atonic Dyspepsia, and in general Muscular and Nerv- 
ous Debility. The preparations Maltine with Hypophosphites, 
Maltine Ferrated, Maltine with Pepsin and Pancreatine, and Plain 
^laltine we especially commend. It is prepared in innumerable 
combinations. 

Maltine deserves to stand in the front rank of constructives ; and 
the constructives, by their preventive, corrective and curative power, 
are probably the most widely-useful therapeutical agents that we 
possess. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 11 



PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS OF MALTINE. 



During the past year we have received nearly one thousand let- 
ters from the Medical Profession in this country and Great Britain, 
referring to the therapeutic value of Maltine; their character is 
indicated by the several extracts which we present below. 

St. Louis, Mo., June 1st, 1879. 
"As regards the use of Maltine, I can only say I am charmed with it, and 
would not know how to replace it in my practice. I suppose no one in the West 
uses it more extensively than I do. The results I have obtained have been more 
satisfactory tban 1 can possibly express. I have never met witli a preparation 
to which I am more indebted." J. K. BAUDUY, M. D., 

Prof. Nerrous and Mental Diseases, Missouri Medical College. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec. 29th, 1879. 
"I have used Maltine largely in the Clinic of the College, and in private 
practice, and find it exceedingly efficient as a medicine, and much superior to 
anything of the kind with which I am acquainted." 

GEO. E. WALTON, M. D., 
Prof. Prin. and Prac. of Med., Cin. Col. Bled, and Surg. 

Richmond, Va., Jan. 16th, 1880. 
"I have found your Maltine preparations so valuable that I use some of 
them almost daily in my practice." HUNTER McGUIRE, M. D., 

Prof, of Surgery, Medical College of Virginia. 

Chicago, Jan. 21st, 1880. 
"I am very much pleased with Maltine, and since its introduction here I 
have entirely given up the use of Extract of Malt." 

E. F. INGALLS, A. M., M. D. 

Kensington Dispensary, London, Nov. 24th, 1879. 
" We are using your Maltine among our patients, and find great benefit from 
it, especially in cases of Phthisis." DR. CHIPPENDALE, Res. Medical Officer. 

The Beeches, Northwold, Eng., July 28th, 1879. 
"I find that my patients can readily digest your Maltine with Cod Liver Oil 
without causing any unpleasant after-feeling. I have full confidence in the virtue 
it possesses to sustain the system during prolonged diseases of a Tubercular or 
Atrophic nature." FREDERICK JOY, L. R. C. P., M. R. C. S. 

12.3 Landsdowne Road, Notting Hill, W. I 
London, Oct. 16th, 1879. I 
" I have much pleasure in bearing favorable testimony to the merits of your 
Maltine preparations. I have used Maltine with Cod Liver Oil with the happiest 
results in a case of Tuberculosis attended with Tubercular Peritonitis, in which 
the temperature of the patient rose to 105 1-5 deg., and persistently remained, 
above 100 deg. for upwards of two months. The only medicine taken was Maltine 
with Cod Liver Oil, and an occasional dose of Carbonate of Bismuth to check 
diarrhoea. She gradually improved and made a perfect recovery. I find Maltine 
with Cod Liver Oil is more readily taken and more easily assimilated than Cod 
Liver Oil in any other form." EDMUND NASH, M. D. 



LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. MALTINE with Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINE with Phosphates Iron and Quinia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE with Phos. Iron, Quinia &. Strychnia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Hops. MALTINE WINE. 

MALTINE with Hypophosphites. MALTINE WINE with Pej sin and Pancreatine- 

MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. MALTO-TEKBINE. 

Maltine is now in the hands of the Wholesale Trade throughout the United States. 

We guarantee that Maltine will keep perfectly in any climate, or any season of the year. 

Faithfully Yours, REED &CARNRICK, 

Ne-v^^ York. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



12 



Advertisements. 



MALTOPEPSINE-TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



The experience we have had of many years as Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
has brought us more or less in regular contact witli the medical profession and 
its waQtsI and has afforded us advantages for experiment, study and practical 
development, whicli have eugraged our attention in perfecting new and more effi- 
cacious agents for physicians' use in the control, subjection, treatment and cure 
of diseases, and we trust the Medical Profession will feel assured that in no in- 
stance shall we solicit their attention, except we have some production worthy 
of their highest consideration and confidence. 

We would respectfully call your attention to our new preparation Maltopep- 
sine, which we regard a very important Remedial Agent for Indigestion, Consti- 
pation. Dyspepsia, Vomiting in Pregnancy, Nervousness, Loss of Appetite, all 
forms of Gastric Derangement, Atonic Diarrhoea, and Indigestive Diarrhoea of 
children. This valuable remedy contains tlie digestive and nutritive properties 
of the grain unimpaired, combined with the active agents of digestion, viz: Dias- 
tase, Pepsine, Lactic Acid, Hydrochloric Acid, with a small addition of Phos- 
phoric Acid, Powdered Firwein, and tlie Bromide and Chloride of Aluminium 
and Sugar of Milk. TESTIMONIALS: 

K. K. Clark, M. D., Georgia, Yt.: I Indianola, Iowa, .Tan. 21, 1880. 

Gentlemen — A medical friend gave me a Tilden & Co. — Have used your Maltopepsine 
small sample bottle of your Jlaltopepsine, in a case of obstinate vomiting in pregnancy. 



which I took with apparent decided benefit. I 
did not Vomit during the week I bad the med- 
icine to take, nor have I been troubled up to 
this time, and as I do not wish to be without so 
Taluable a medicine, I enclose two dollars with 
the request to have j'ou send me by return mail 
the value of the money sent. I am very confi- 
dent it will entirelj' cure me, as the small 
amount used acted so favorably. I would like 
also to use it in my practice, as it will certainly 
prove very beneficial in all cases of dyspepsia. 
New Lebanon, N. Y., Dec. 11, 79. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Having suffered for 
some months past from Gastric derangement 
and most distressing dysycptic symptoms, I was 
instructed by my pliysician a week or two ago, 
to make a trial of your new preparation Malto- 
pepsine, and I am happy to say it has given me 
more relief than any other remedy I have ever 
tried. The disagreeable nausea and vomiting 
after eating have altogether disappeared, my 
•ppetite is better than for a long time — the sick 
headaches that caused me so much annoyance 
have ceased to trouble me, and my general 
health seems fully re-established. These good 
reiults are due entirely to Maltopepsine, and 
I feel it an act of justice to you, and a duty to 
others who may be suffering from like causes, 
to state the facts of tlie case. 

Yours, Resp'llv, J. H. .Johnston. 

C. A. MosHKR, Druggist, West Troy. N. Y. 

Messrs. Tildkn & Co. — You certainly have 
got a wonderful preparation in your Maltopep- 
sine. I gave the samples to the doctors, and 
every one of them speak in its favor and say it 
is far superior to any similar preparation. 

One doctor gave it when Lactopeptine had 
failed him, and to his surprise was just the 
thing. 

H. M. Wilson, M.D., N. Y., Nov. 10, 79. 

Gentlemen — I consider your Maltopepsine 
tlie most valuable remedy ever known for Dys- 
pepsia and all forms of Ga.stric derangement. 



when everything had failed. The result was 
very gratifying -so much so, that I wish you to 
send me one pound of Maltopepsine by express 
at once. Yours truly, 

E. L. Baker, M. D. 

E. M. Bibber, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Says : "Have been using your Maltopepsine 
freely and with the most perfect satisfaction, 
preferring it to any similar prepai'atiou 
known." 
A. T. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Reports that so far as he had used our Malto- 
pepsine, he had found it far superior to any 
other preparation he has ever used. 

New Lebanon, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1880. 
X. T. Bates, M. D. 

Messrs. Tilpen & Co. — Of late I have been 
using your new preparation, the Maltopepsine, 
and am .so highly pleased with its action, that I 
am induced to give you the results of my ex- 
perience with it. Almost invariably this rem- 
edy has given me satisfaction, and in several 
cases of dyspepsia and irritable stomach, when 
the several preparations of Pepsin and Bismuth 
and kindred agents have failed, the use of 
Maltopepsine has been a complete success. I 
regard it particularly useful in debility of the 
stomach following acute or chronic gastritis, 
and that attendant upon convalescence from all 
exhausting diseases. 

In vomiting of pregnancy it is a superior 
remedy. It will be found highly useful in the 
diarrhcca of children; which is generally de- 
pendent upon imperfect digestion. 

The aluminium which you have incorporated 
into it is a happy idea. I heartily recommend 
it to the profession. 

E. M. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Speaks in the highest terms of our Malto- 
pepsine, also of our Saccharated — thinks the 
latter the strongest he has ever used. 



FORMULA OF MALTOPEPSINE. 



Sugar of Milk 35 oz. 

Nutritives of the Grain... 10 " 
Powdered Firwein 7 '• 



Pepsine 10 oz. 

Diastase dr. 

Lactic Acid .5fl. dr. 

PRICE 



Hydrochloric Acid .5fl.dr. 

Phosphoric Acid 3" " 

Aluminium 3 '' oz. 



LIST. 

MaltopepRine, Hn oz. hot.) per o/, % .ir, l We also prepare the various Elixirs 

" •' •' do7,... 7.W and Syrups in combination with Malto- 
" (]4 ft), bot.) " ft) K.OO I pepsine. 

Prepared by Tlldcn &. Co., New Lebanon, N. Y., and 34 Liberty St., N. Y. 



Advertisements. 13 




An EPITOME of the numerous cases reported monthly/ 
in the Journal of Materia Medica efnbracing the following 
diseases, sent on appUcuiion: 

Scrofula; Scrofulous enlargement of the cervical glands; Scrofulous 
affections of the bone; Scrofulous swelling and abscess of the knee; 
Scrofulous Eczema; White Swelling ; Scrofulous swelling of the glands 
of the neck. 

Cancerous affections; Cancerous affections complicated with Scrofula; 
Lupus. 

Necrosis of the Tibia, Femur and Ilium; Osteo-Periostitis; Exostosis 
of Ulna; Caries of Vertebra; Synovitis of knee joint ; Hip joint dis- 
eases ; Anchylosis. 

Psoriasis ; Prurigo. Tuberculous affections of the bones. 

Skin Diseases of all kinds. Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis. 

Syphilis; Syphilitic sore throat ; Gonorrhoea. 

Enlargement of the Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys. 

Bronchocele; Goitre; Exophthalmic Goitre. 

Epilepsy; Otorrhoea; Deafness- 
Diphtheria; Erysipelas; Erysipelas with Scrofula; Tonsillitis, 

Gangrene of the Lungs ; Dry Gangrene ; Pleuro-Pneumonia. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of the lodo Bromide i^alts. 



WITH HYDRARGYRI BICHLORIDUM, 

And Alteratives as StilliDgin, Menispermin, Dulca- 
marin, Rumicin and Conicine. 

For some time we have made specially this preparation, to meet those cases 
constantly occurring in the practice of Physicians, in which the impression of 
mercury is required, and it has been the custom of many in the most inveterate 
cases of Scrofula, and particularly in thatof Scrofulo-Syphilis, to give for a week 
this combination of one one-hundredth of a grain to each fluid dram, and then 
resume the Elixir plain, alternating as circumstances indicate. In this special 
combination, we have increased the Stillingin and other alteratives specially 
applicable to the treatment of Syphilis and its complications, from that used in 
the plain Elixir. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of lodo Bromide Comp. Salts,, 
and eight one-hundredths of a grain of Hydrargyri Bichloridum. 



WITH IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

We have added to our list the Elixir lodo Bromide of Calcium Comp. with 
Iodide of Potassium. Each ounce contains 72 grains of the lodo Bromide Comp. 
Salts, with 32 grains of Iodide of Potassium. The vegetable alteratives are the 
same as in the plain Elixir. 

TIIiDEN & CO., Mew Lebanon, N. Y., and 34 Liberty St., New Yorli^ 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



14 Advertisements. 



PHOSPHATE IRON, OlIININE- AND STBYCHNIi 

• — 

It is many years (quite fifteen) since we asked the attention of Physicians to the above 
Elixir. It has been very largely prescribed with uniform satisfactory results, confirming our 
claims for the advantages of administering this deservedly favorite combination in solution orer 
pill form. Owing to the intensely bitter taste of the solution or the syrup, patients very gener- 
ally object to them, and many sensitive stomachs reject their administration. Physicians of 
expt^rience hesitate to prescribe in powder or mass either Quinine or Strj'chnia, from the want of 
prompt action, the frequent passing aw»y from the system, undissolved and the occasional cum- 
ulative action of the Strychnia, when the pills are long retained. While this is a grave objec- 
tion often noted in such powerful medicinal agents, it is equally true that solutions of Iron are 
nut only much more efficient, being assimilated and absorbed with little danger of inducing 
irritation, as is often the case when given in pills. Using pure alkaloids of Quiniaand Strychnia, 
the excess of acid is not required, avoiding in this way the development of the bitter 
ta»te, enabling us to prepare the Elixir so that it will be readily taken by children as well as 
adults. We cannot exaggerate the therapeutic advantages of administering this prescription in 
the form we present it, and feel we have a right to ask medical men to direct our manufacture of 
this preparation, not only because we first prepared it. but from the fact that Physicians can feel 
every assurance of the care and exactness of its manufacture, and that theie is one grain of Qui- 
nine in each teaspoonful, a strt-ngth not possible at the price this Elixir is sold by manufacturers. 
We have always carefullj' avoided exploiting or in any way introducing this or any of our prep- 
arations except through Druggists and Physicians. 

Each fluid dram contains two grains of Phosphate of Iron, one of Quinine, and one-sixtieth 
of a grain of Strychnia in simple Elixir flavored with Oil of Orange. ADULT DOSE — One tea- 
spoonful three times a day. 



ELIXIR GUARANA. 

(PAULLINIA SORBILIS.) 



Guarana is used with much benefit in cases of Sick and Nervous Headache, Neuralgia, 
Diarrhrt-a, G«stralgia, etc. 

The active principle is analagous to Caflfein, being found in Paullinia in five times the quan- 
tity that it exists in the best Cofl'ee. Ihe tonic influence allied with the stimulating effects ren- 
ders it an exceedingly valuable medicine. 

As its use has proven the entire absence of any irritating properties or any astringent effect 
in Debility, Languor, Protracted Convalescence and Nervous Irritability, it is specially useful. 

The effect is almost immediate in all cases of Headache, from whatever cause it may arise ; 
but it is more especially beneficial in those produced by over-excitement to the nervous system. 

The usual mode of administration has been in powder; but the Elixir will be found not only 
more agreeable, but much more efficacious. 

Each fluid ounce contains eighty grains Guarana. 

For Headache — Dose, a tablespoonful for an adult, to be repeated in an hour, if the first 
dose does not give relief. 

For Diarrhfi'a — A dessertspoonful morning and evening. 

For Neuralgia, as a General Tonic for Nervousness, Debility, etc. — Adult dose, a dessert- 
6po(jnful three or four times a day. 

Note. — There are many Elixirs of Guarana manufactured of much less strength than that 
prepared by us. If Physicians will specify our preparation they can rest satisfied they will not 
be disapirointed in the effects we claim. 

Physicians will find our i)reparation.s in all the Wholesale and leading Retail Stores in the 
United States and Canada. 

]oM Wyetli & Sf otl\ef, 



Id an8werln<? advertlecmcnls mentlTi the I'eoria Mkdical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 15 



ST, FRANCIS' BRIIDLE! HOSPITHL! 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



A. noiiis w&wt 'irixs ^iOK« 

Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studer, 

Surgeon. Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including a|tention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is charged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Moxthly. 



16 



AcLvertisements . 



ISAAC WALKER <fe SON 

Importers of 

AND 

Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 

AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKER AND COLT 

SHOT GUNS. 




A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 



Sp 



AND 

orting Equipments. 
EVOLVERS, 

Fine Guilery, 

A.LSO, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

HARDWARE ! 

126 and 127 

SOUTH WASHIHeTON 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 




(LIQ^TJIIDJ 



FORMULA : 

EACH FLUID DRACHM CONTAINS 

5 1-2 gr. free phosphoric acid (PO5). 
3 gr. phosphate of lime (SCaO PO5). 
1-2 gr. phosphate of mag. (3MgO POg) 
1-6 gr. phosphate of iron (Foa O3 POj). 
14 gr. phosphate of potash (3 kO.POg). 

Total amount of Phosphoric Acid 
in one fluid drachm, free and com- 
bined, 7 grains. 

It contains no pyrophosphate, or 
metaphosphateof any base whatever. 



F 



or Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nenousness, 
Diminished Yitalily, Urinary Difficulties, Etc. 

HORSFORD'S 
ACID PHOSPHATES. 

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. HORSFORD, of Cambridge, Mass. 
There seems to be no difference of opinion, in liigh medical authority, of the 
value of phosphoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public 
which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. 



It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. 

No danger can attend its use. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. 



W. A. HAMMOND, M. D., late Surgeon-Gen- 
eral U. S. Army, said that under the use of ar- 
senic and Horsford's Acid Phosphate, a young 
lady rescued her reason who had been ren- 
dered insane by a dream. 

DR. M. H. HENKY, of New York, says : 
Horsford's Acid Phosphate possesses claims as 
a beverage beyond anything I know of in the 
form of Medicine, and in nervous diseases I 
know of no preparation to equal it. 



DR. BEUBEN A. VANCE, of New York : 
The preparation on which I place the most re- 
liance is Horsford's Acid Phosphate. 

The late WINSLOW LE^^^S, M. D., of Bos- 
ton, said : Having in my own person experi- 
enced those ills for which the Acid Phosphate 
is prescribed, I have found great relief and 
alleviation by its use, most cheerfully attest 
my appreciation of its excellence. 



Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free 
on application to manufacturers. 

Physicians desiring to test it will be furnished a bottle free of expense, except 
express charges, if they mention Peoria Medical Monthly. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

RUWFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, Rhode Island. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



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Advertisements. 



NEW PHARMACEUTICALS 



-WORTHY OF THE- 



— M ATTENTION OF PHYSICIANS. ^ 



^- 



NITRO-GLYCERINEPILLS 



Nitro-glycerine is introduced on 
the aulliority of Dr. Murrell, of Lon- 
don, as a remedy in angina pectoris 
and in cases of chronic neuralgia in 
any part of the body. Cases of an- 
gina pectoris which had resisted 
all attempts at even alleviation, 
much less cure, have promptly 
yielded to nitro-glycerine, and a 
number of cases of actual cure are 
reported. This is more than can be 
said of any other known remedy. 
In neuralgia the effects of this drug 
have, in some instances, been 
scarcely less marked. 

The pill form is very eligible, be- 
sides ensuring exactness of dose. 



Sanguis Bovinus Exsiccatus. 



-i-H 

In this preparation of blood we 
have a true food, the albumen being 
entirely retained. In this respect it 
differs from the various beef ex- 
tracts, beef essences, etc., in the 
market. These preparations are, 
from the very methods of their 
manufacture, entirely deprived of 
albmen, the true nutritive principle 
of beef, and are thus not foods in 
any proper sense of the word. 

Sanguis bovinus exsiccatus is 
blood deprived of nothing but its 
water and fibrin, which latter is 
naturally small in quantity and 
practically of no nutritive value. 



Liquor Ergots Purificatus. 



This form of ergot is of constant 
strength. In its preparation only 
the active principles of the drug 
are retained, all inert and noxious 
ingredients being removed. As 
these active principles »re assayed 
the liquor contains them in con- 
stant and definite proportions, 
and thus is obviated the uncer- 
tainty of strength due to varia- 
bility in the quality of the sample 
of the drug employed. Liquor 
ergotse purificatus is as constant 
in its strength as morphia, quinia. 
or any of the other alkaloids of 
vegetable drugs. 



CASCARA + CORDIAL 



This laxative and alterative 
preparation stands unequalled 
among pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions as a remedy in constipation. 
Its agreeable and efficient action 
has been abundantly attested by 
the medical profession of this 
country, and it stands now as a 
remedy of unquestionable efficacy 
in chronic constipation. Great 
care should be exercised in not pre- 
scribing too large a dose, inasmuch 
as cascara sagrada, its active ingre- 
dient,overcomes constipation by its 
tonic action on the bowel, rather 
than by direct laxative influence. 



FULL AND DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS OF THE ABOVE 

—WILL BE SENT FREE ON APPLICATION TO — 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich., 

Manufacturing Chemists and Special Dealers in New and Rare Drugs. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical MonTHiiV. 



Peorik ^eclidkl ^oi\tlily. 

VOL. I. OCTOBER, 1880. NO. 6. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Injury of tlie Head Involving the Brain. 

Having of late had my mind called to this important 
class of injuries, by reading reports of cases of that charac- 
ter in the journals, and having been intensely interested in 
.a case in my own practice, I have been induced to present 
the following for the consideration of your readers, which 
may be regarded as an unusual recovery, to say the least of 
it : 

I was hastily summoned January 4. 1872, at 8 o'clock 
p. M., to visit P. R., aged 20 years, w^ho the messenger said 
had his head sawed completely open at a saw mill ten miles 
in the country. I arrived at the house at 10 p. m. 

The foreman of the mill gave me these facts : " At 5 
p. M. the hands quit work for the week (it being Saturday 
evening), and P. R. was directed to clean out the dust pit 
for an early run on Monday morning. The man went into 
the pit, and in a short time the saw was heard to strike 
:Something (all the machinery being yet in motion), and on 
looking down saw P. R. lying at the bottom of the pit, with 
his head and face cut open. When immediately under the 
saw in a stooping position, he had undertaken to straighten 
up, when his head came in contact with the rapidly revolv- 
ing saw, which was four and one half feet in diameter. 
The rapid movement of the saw had dashed the man 
with great violence against the wall of the pit. He was 
quickly dragged out, and to their utter astonishment was 
alive, and manifested consciousness and a determination to 
help himself, and by the assistance of two of his comrades 
he walked to the residence of his brother, a distance of over 
•eighty rods." 



134 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

On examination I found that the first tooth of the saw 
had punctured the skull at a point one half inch above the 
occipito parietal articulation of the right side, and one and 
one half inches to the right of the superior angle of the 
occipital bone. The second tooth had struck near the 
sagittal suture in the right parietal bone, one and seven- 
eighths inches from the first, lacerating the scalp on either 
side one and one-half inches, and tearing out the bone one 
and one-fourth inches in width. The third struck the left 
parietal bone, tearing through the sagittal suture to the 
place of the second. The fourth struck near the fronto- 
parietal articulation. The fifth struck through the frontal 
bone over the left orbit. The sixth struck the external 
angular process, and the seventh struck the cheek opposite 
the left angle of the mouth, tearing through the molar 
bone, the whole of the bone being removed the whole 
length of the cut, being a distance of something over 
thirteen inches, cutting into the brain substance from the 
first to the sixth tooth. 

The teeth on the saw were ten and four-fifths inches 
apart, so that seventy-five and three-fifths inches of the cut- 
ting surface of the saw had passed through thirteen inches 
of surface on the head. The point at which each tooth had 
struck the head was known by the lacerated flaps of the 
scalp, which were torn back an inch and a half on each side 
of the main wound. When the wound was cleansed of 
hair, blood, bones, dirt, saw-dust and managled brain, it 
measured one and three-fourths inches at the point of its 
greatest depth. The sixth tooth had torn the eye-lids apart 
at the outer angle of the eye, and stripped the supera 
orbital ridge, and lay the covering over the right eye, leav- 
ing the left eye uninjured, but without a covering. 

The hair was removed from the remainder of the head, 
the wound thoroughly cleansed, the flaps, or the points of 
the lacerated scalp were drawn in contact, and the longest 
points held together by silk stitches, the head dressed with 
cold water, an opiate ordered and the man left to die. 

On the morning of the 7th, however, I was surprised to- 
be recalled to the man, who it was said was rational and 
wanting something to eat. On visiting him I found him 
not only rational and calling for nourishment, but the 
points of the scalp and skin had united and healed by the 
first intention. The wound was not disturbed. After this 
I saw him every second day until the 2l8t, when it was- 



Original Communications. 135 

thought safe to dismiss him. His recovery was rapid and 
regular. Very little suppuration took place in any part of 
the wound, and six weeks from the day of injury I found 
him cutting wood in the back yard. 

I observed one feature in this case that I had never had 
an opportunity to observe before, and never have since : In 
dressing the wound it was necessary to make some pressure 
on the brain substance with the sponge, in order to cleanse 
it of the dirt and hair drawn into the wound. And when 
any degree of pressure was made on the brain, the man 
became delirious, and as soon as the pressure was removed 
the delirium as suddenly left him. This was repeatedly 
tried and the attention of the bystanders called to the fact. 

This man was under my observation about one j^ear 
after the accident, and if there was any mental derange- 
ment, or any difference in his mental condition in any way, 
I failed to observe it. 

If this curious case can be of any benefit to any one, the 
readers of the Monthly are welcome to it. 

Carthage, 111, Sept. 4, 1880. Wm. H. Veatch, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Thoru in tlie Heart. 



The specimen to which you refer, in the college museum, 
was furnished by Dr. J. L. White, of Bloomington, Illinois, 
concerning which he gives the following account : 

" The subject was George Joslyn, age about 7 years, an 
inmate of the Illinois Soldiers' Orphans' Home. Upon the 
occasion of my visit to the institution, Wednesday, July 7, 
I found him in bed, decubitus upon back inclining to the 
left side, left arm pressed tightly against his body, and left 
leg drawn up. Did not take his temperature, but the sur- 
face was about normal heat; pulse 130, jerky. Complained 
of pain in region of the heart and in left arm. Screamed 
when I attempted to move the arm (i. e.) to carry it out 
from the body. Also complained when any attempt was 
made to straighten his leg. Tongue considerably coated. 
Auscultation revealed nothing to my ear abnormal either 
in the heart or lungs, except as to the rythm of the heart. 
I could get no bruit of any kind. Gave a mercurial 
cathartic, to be followed by quinine and Dover's powders 
every three hours. 

^urse reported that he came to the hospital on the even- 



136 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

ing previous complaining as I had found him, and said " he 
had been getting sick all day." 

July 8, condition much the same as yesterday ; pulse 
more feeble but complains less of pain ; talks freely and is 
cheerful, still will not permit the arm to be moved. July 
9 was informed in the morning by telephone that he was 
better. Was called to him between 11 and 12, saying that 
he had suddenly taken worse. I found him with surface of 
body congested and bathed in cold perspiration ; counte- 
nance indicating great distress ; pulse scarcely perceptible 
at the wrist; rolling his head but perfectly rational when 
spoken to ; still kept the arm closely pressed to the side, 
and complained of pain in the chest and arm; leg also kept 
drawn up. Gave stimulants freely. Condition remained 
about the same until he died, which was about midnight. 
Autopsy nine hours after death : Surface of body mottled ; 
rigor mortus slight ; upon opening the thorax and abdomen 
all the organs presented a normal appearance ; severed the 
vessels and removed the heart, and was about to dip it in a 
bucket of water, but as I pressed my finger into the 
descending vena cava, I felt some object move before the 
end of my finger. Upon examination I found it to be a 
thorn. Its position was directly across the vena cava, just 
at the entrance of the auricle. 

I found extending from the auricle into the ventricle a 
long clot, which I presume originally extended from the 
thorn. I have no theory to offer, only I think at some time 
in the past the thorn entered the body through the skin and 
traveled as we have frequently known of needles traveling, 
to the spot where found." 

The specimen as I have it shows a thorn 1\ inches long, 
extending across the vena cava at the entrance of the auri- 
cle, but gives no positive clue as to the source from whence 
it came. It has been suggested that it might have been 
swallowed by the child, and becoming lodged in the oesoph- 
agus worked its way through the walls, and finally into its 
present location. Respectfully yours, 

E. P. MuRDOCK, M. D., 

Chicago, 111. Curator Rush Med. College. 



[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Cystic Disease of the Ovum. 

Mrs. Bessie S., aged 19, pale and ansemic, had suffered 
much from painful menstruation. Married September 12, 



Original Cormnunications. 137 

1876. Last menstrual show four days after marriage, and 
almost from that time suffered greatly from nausea and 
vomiting, beginning in the morning and lasting throughout 
the day. Eight weeks after menstruating, or about the 
16th of November, commenced flowing with all the symp- 
toms of miscarriage, throwing off clots in quantities, expul- 
sive pains, etc. A midwife, a near neighbor, saw her fre- 
quently, probably daily, but did nothing but watch and 
wait. The flow gradually subsided, until about the 25th of 
December, or nearly forty days from first attack, another 
excessive flooding came on, this time followed by great 
prostration. Yet I was not called until January 3 ; found 
patient very weak — scarcely able to speak above a whisper. 
Upon examination found abdomen very much enlarged, 
so much so that I began to question whether there had not 
been a miscount, or something else. By the touch found 
the uterus quite large and well down, but os remarkably 
close and undilated. Found no clots in vagina. The dis- 
charges, now pale and colorless, had excoriated the parts, 
so that investigation was intensely painful, and as they 
were gradually lessening, considered the alarm over for the 
present, prescribed gentle stimulants and waited results. 
Next day (the 4th) was sent for in haste. Arriving at the 
bedside found my patient completely exhausted, and the 
bed and clothing completely saturated with blood. Of 
<;ourse there was no further time for dallying. Found the 
OS still undilated, even so much as to admit the point of the 
little finger, but bleeding had overcome resistance, and 
dilatation was readily eftected ; the index finger could pass 
almost entirely around the immense mass, which led me to 
suspect placenta preevia, especially as there had been so 
much hemorrhage. Further examination encountered 
adhesions, which I still thought placental, and commenced 
■detaching, as I had many an after-birth. Then the question 
was, what had become of the foetus ? Dilatation by this 
time admitted two fingers, which by grasping the mass, and 
by the aid ot a pain, the whole bulk was thrown off alto- 
gether. Finding no umbilicus, and the uterus empty, the 
contents of vessel were the next object of interest, when to 
my surprise found the " delivery " a great hydatidiform 
mole, and nothing else, not the slightest sign of foetus or 
placenta — hydatidiform vesicles, thousands upon thou- 
sands of them, from the size of a millet seed to a malaga 
^rape, and much the same shape^ rather more elongated, 



138 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the larger attached to a base membrane and the smaller 
apparently to each other, by long slender necks. . Contrac- 
tions followed as in natural labor and flooding ceased. The 
lochia was rather more ofiensive than usual for a while. 
Patient somewhat feverish for a day or two, but continued 
to gain strength and improve from that time ; appetite nat- 
ural and digestion good, and in less than two weeks went 
down regularly to her meals. E'o particular medication 
was used except a few drops of dialyzed iron in a little gin, 
three or four times daily. 

In less than four months from the mishap reported, the 
lady again became pregnant, went the full time, and was 
delivered of a healthy child, who, the father wrote me (as 
they had removed to a distant city), was the finest boy in 
the country. 

This article might be strung out indefinitely by specu- 
lating as to the cause of such growths. Most ojp the 
authorities are about as " clear as mud " on the subject. 

One says that " an alteration in the envelopes of the 
ovum, with an enlargement of the chorial villosities, is the 
only origin of the true mole." Another (Leishman) that it 
is " simply an alteration and degeneration of previously 
existing structures." Gierse "is of the opinion that the 
change consists in hypertrophy of the normal structures 
found in the chorian villii, with secondary oedema." 
Another that some specific disease of the blood might likely 
produce morbid changes in the circulating fluid, that would 
lead to the production of vesicular disease of the ovum. 
However that might be, I'm sure that in the case described 
no syphillitic taint existed. 

The point that puzzled me most was why there was so 
much flooding, and at such long intervals, if there was not 
placental attachment and detachment? In twenty-five 
years' practice I never saw a similar case, and if any one- 
could give any ligU or explanation why such things occur, 
that the average mortal could understand, I for one would 
be under obligations to them. 

Hamilion, III. Wm. H. Githens, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Case in Practice. 



I was called the night of October 14, 1877, to see a man,, 
aged 35 years. I found Ijiim very much excited, trembling 



Original Communications. 139 

violently, pulse quick and jerky; he could not lie still but 
a moment or two at a time ; was seeing very beautiful 
images in the distance, and occasionally would see some- 
thing under the sofa that did not seem to strike him so 
pleasantly — in short, a well marked case of delirium tre- 
mens. I learned that he had been in the habit of drinking 
about two quarts of whisky a day for some time, but had 
left it off entirely about three months previous to this 
attack, and in order to satisfy his appetite for liquor, had 
been using from twelve to sixteen ounces of Sanford's 
Extract of Jamaica Ginger per day. (And just here let me 
state that in Maine it was no uncommon thing for so-called 
reformed drunkards to use Extract of Jamaica Ginger in 
the place of whisky, and I have known of several such cases 
as I here relate following its use.) Some four hours pre- 
vious to my seeing him, he had fallen on the street and was 
said to be intoxicated, but there was no smell of liquor on 
his breath, and he told me afterwards that he had not tasted 
liquor since his " reformation," but had used extract of 
ginger only. 

The treatment was large doses of bromide of potassium, 
which quieted the excitement, and chloral hydrate to pro- 
duce sleep. In two days he was able to attend to business 
again. I attended him afterwards through two similar 
attacks of the same nature, which, however, were caused by 
drinking whisky. 

L. S. Cole, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Scarlet Fever and Diplitheria. 

The intimate relationship existing between these two 
diseases has frequently developed itself during the recent 
epidemic of scarlet fever in this city. While there is no 
doubt of their being distinct diseases, yet their etiology and 
mode of attack are very similar. Any cause likely to bring 
on an attack of one, will apply with equal force to the other. 

I have seen in the same family, and coexistent, scarlet 
fever and diphtheria. And the same individual may have 
both diseases at the same time. While it is not uncommon 
for diphtheria to be developed in a patient recovering from 
scarlet fever, I have never seen scarlet fever follow directly 
in the course of diphtheria. 

Dr. Thompson, in the Medical Record, August, 1880, in 



140 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

speaking of the relationship of these two diseases, says : 
""When the characteristic features of diphtheria occur coin- 
cident with the existence of scarlet fever, in any particular 
case during a scarletinal epidemic, I am inclined to believe 
that the former is to be viewed in the light of a complica- 
tion rather than as a distinctive disease. The diphtheritic 
invasion, intercurrent with and aggravating an existent 
scarlet fever attack, finds its vulnerable point of seizure in 
connection with already invaded parts, namely, the organs 
of the throat ; and when this happens, to-wit, the formation 
of a well marked exudative membrane in the fauces, it may 
be said, I think, with all propriety, that the distinguishing 
feature of the one disease is engrafted, as it were, upon the 
other general malady." I have observed, however, that, 
wiien both diseases are developed in the same patient and 
are coexistent, the constitutional symptoms are very much 
aggravated, and you usually have what appears to be a hope- 
less case ; yet my experience leads me to conclude that the 
two, coexisting diseases, in some way destroy each other, and 
the course of the two is much shorter, than either one alone, 
especially if it be of a severe nature. This may have 
occurred only incidentally, but I am led to regard the 
engrafting process as not an unfavorable one. If, however, 
the diphtheritic attack is delayed and occurs in the scarlet 
fever patient during the period of convalescence, it is likely 
to be much more serious. One characteristic difference in 
these diseases is, that one attack of scarlet fever protects 
one against further attacks of the same disease, while in 
diphtheria one attack affords no immunity against the dis- 
ease in the future, but rather predisposes to its return. 

While both diseases are more or less aggravated by the 
lack of proper sanitary condition of cities, scarlet fever is 
probably less so than diphtheria. Both diseases are con- 
sidered contagious, but scarlet fever is more of an infectious 
disease, and, I believe, may be spread through the air in an 
infected district without any direct comm.unication, pro- 
vided the system be in a proper condition for its invasion. 

Diphtheria is quite generallj^ supposed to be caused by 
a " microscopical fungus " that attaches itself to the throat 
and developes rapidly at expense of the animal fluids. 
The disease may be, and doubtless is, spread by the excre- 
tions thrown off from the throat and other dejections of the 
body during the progress of the disease. Some writers on 
•diphtheria claim that a rash often accompanies it. I have 



Original Communications. 141 

never seen anything of the kind in cases unaccompanied 
with some of the cutaneous diseases, and do not believe 
that diphtheria itself developes any cutaneous eruption. 
These differences mentioned are enough to show that thejr 
are really separate and distinct diseases, even more unlike 
than scarlet fever or measles, but I think that the develop- 
ment of both at the same time, in the same person, is not 
so greatly to be dreaded than an attack of either in a malig- 
nant form. Such, at least, has been my experience. 
Peoria, 111 J. L. H. 



liniml Wectnres, 



Lead Poisonine-. 



BY AUSTIN FLINT, M. D. 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine in Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, New York. 



I had intended, gentlemen, to bring in several cases, but 
as our time is limited, we shall have to content ourselves 
with presenting but one more. This case opens up a very 
interesting and important subject, namely, the varied effects 
of lead poisoning. They are varied, and unless we have in 
our minds the different effects which are referable to this 
cause, we are sometimes liable to overlook their influence, 
the patient perhaps, in the meantime, continuing to be 
exposed to the poisoning. 

This patient's name is William C, he is forty-six years 
of age, a native of Ireland, and his occupation of late has 
been working in white lead. He works in the manufacture 
of white lead, and inhales the vapor of it. It has occurred 
to me to meet with a good many cases of poisoning from 
lead, occurring in persons who are engaged in the manu- 
facture of white lead, so that although I do not know all 
the details of the manufacture of it, still I know it involves 
the presence of lead in the atmosphere. It is inhaled. 

He was admitted on the 25th of May. The family his- 
tory has no bearing at all on the patient's disease. He has 
always been a hard working man, and he has been variously 
employed as a sailor, a laborer in iron and sugar works, but 
for the last four months as a laborer in a white lead factory. 
He has led a temperate life. He has never had gout, rheu- 



142 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

matism, syphilis, or malaria, and has usually enjoyed excel- 
lent health. It is not very often that we have presented so 
clear a previous history as this case presents ; in this hos- 
pital, I mean. 

Three weeks ago the patient began to be troubled with 
vague pains in the knees and elbows. Well, now, it is 
pretty common to have patients complain of pain in the 
joints and limbs. "We are very apt not to think much about 
It. not to form a very definite idea about it. Sometimes we 
cannot form a very definite idea; but there are various half 
neuralgic aflections, as they are termed, where patients 
complain of these vague pains. "We should have attention 
directed to other points of inquiry in such cases ; look for 
other evidences of poison by lead. 

He lost his appetite, as patients do when poisoned by 
lead ; he suffered from nausea with occasional emesis. 
That is common. He was constipated, and that is the rule; 
but, of course, constipation is something common enough. 
He noticed that his urine was below normal in quantity, 
and dark in color. I am not prepared to say of how much 
importance that dark color may be, as indicating poison 
from lead. An examination of the urine was overlooked in 
this case, and it is usually overlooked. My impression is 
that the text books do not give directions for the examina- 
tion of the urine. Indeed, I have reason to know so, that 
is, with regard to many of them, because I have had occa- 
sion to refer to some of them. 

I saw a patient several years ago who had characteristic 
lead paralysis, but lead poisoning had not been suspected ; 
it had not been thought of; still the patient, a child five or 
six years old, had wrist drop. Well, when I saw that I 
spoke to the physician whom I saw in connection with the 
case, and said I thought it was due to lead poisoning. He 
said it had not occurred to his mind. Immediately we 
made inquiry with regard to any exposure to lead, but 
could find no evidence of it. No others had symptoms of 
lead poisoning in the house. I looked for every evidence 
possible, and then it occurred to me to make an examina- 
tion of the urine. I took it to Prof. Doremus, tlie chemist, 
and his assistant at that time examined it and brought the 
result to me. It was perfectly black, and showed undoubt- 
edly the presence of lead. That it was that led me to look 
into works and see whether directions were generally given 
for the examination of the urine for lead, and I failed to find 



Clinical Lectures. 143 



them. I do not assume to say that there are no books that 
contain it, but it was not contained in the books to which I 
referred, so that in my clinical medicine I asked Dr. Dore- 
mus to give me the details for an examination for lead, and 
introduced it into that work, thinking it might be useful. 
I do not think it is often done in order to obtain evidence 
of lead poisoning. I do not know how frequently we do 
obtain evidence of it, but I know we do in some cases, from 
that case I have just referred to. In regard to that case, we 
finally concluded that the child got lead into the system by 
the use of certain toys, leaden soldiers, which he played 
with a great deal, and which he was accustomed to put into 
his mouth. That seemed to be the only source of lead 
poisoning in that case. 

You will please observe that blue line on this man's 
gums ; the blue line on the gum which we should always 
look for in cases in which we have any ground for suspect- 
ing lead poisoning. It is pretty well marked in this case. 
I suppose it is more likely to be marked in those who 
receive lead into the system by the inhalation of the atmos- 
phere coming in contact with the gums, and there meeting 
with the sulphide of hydrogen. But we get the blue line 
when it is not to be explained in that way ; when a suffi- 
cient amount of the lead comes through the blood to the 
gums to form the characteristic blue line. 

This patient became weakened, and lost considerable 
flesh, but continued to pursue his general vocation, how- 
ever, until May 18, when he discontinued his work, owing 
to exhaustion and general malaise. He suffered from severe 
frontal and occipital cephalalgia, IS'ow, various neuralgic 
affections are due to lead, and when we have a case of per- 
sistent neuralgia, no matter where the neuralgia may be 
situated, we should think of this as a possible or probable 
cause. We do have in some cases, but rarely, a very severe 
cerebral affection, called lead encephalalgia, in which there 
occurs convulsions and coma, and usually a fatal termina- 
tion. It has occurred to me to meet with but one well 
marked example of this effect of lead poison. 

ISTow I come to another point in his history : May 19, 
he was attacked for the first time witk intense pain in his 
abdomen, constant in character, but increased in exacerba- 
tion, and situated in the epigastric and the umbilical region. 
At the same time he sufi'ered very severe headache, con- 
striction in the chest, pains in the limbs, anorexia, exhaus- 



144 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

tion, and great constipation. These symptoms persisted at 
the time of his admission, May 25. Now, here we have a 
group of local symptoms which attended lead colic. It has 
received also a great variety of other names. It is charac- 
terized by pain, usually constant, but increased in exacerba- 
tion, situated, as it is here, in the epigastrium and around 
the umbilicus, not infrequently attended by restriction of 
the abdomen, unaccompanied by tenderness on pressure; 
indeed, pressure sometimes affording relief; and accompa- 
nied by obstinate constipation, and absence of fever. The 
want of tenderness on pressure, the constipation, the absence 
of fever, at once suffice to exclude all the inflammatory 
affections which are liable to give rise to colicky pain, and 
when we meet with these symptoms, we should at once 
think of lead, and direct our attention at once to the pos- 
sible and probable sources of the introduction of this poi- 
sonous principle into the system. 

On examination he was found to possess a well marked 
blue line upon his gums. ISlothiug abnormal was detected 
in any of bis thoracic or abdominal organs. His urine was 
high colored, and had a specific gravity of 1.026; it con- 
tained no albumen. He has had no paralysis. 

Well, now, what is to be done in a case like this ? What 
is the treatment ? Constipation is a symptom which claims 
attention, but it does not claim as much attention, it seems 
to me, as it has heretofore received. It is the old practice, 
one of the traditional things, that patients with lead colic 
must be purged, the purgation kept up, and that active 
cathartics should be employed, as those of a milder charac- 
ter did not eff'ect the object. Well, constipation is a symp- 
tom which claims attention, of course, but I do not know 
that we produce any marked impression upon the disease 
by overcoming the constipation. We should endeavor to 
secure such an evacuation of the bowels as to prevent any 
inconvenience from that cause. Aside from that I do not 
know that the use of cathartics effects any very important 
object. However, ot course it claims attention. And at 
the same time the pain is to be relieved. If the patient is 
suffering extremely from pain, it is important to relieve it, 
and these objects conflict with each other. We cannot well 
give cathartics and opiates at the same time, as one neutral- 
izes the other. However, we can effect something if we do 
not give our opiates in too large doses. 

This patient, gentlemen, does not belong to my division,. 



Clinical Lectures. 145 



but the treatment has been as follows : He was put upon 
the sulphate of magnesia and the camphoretted tincture of 
opium, of each an ounce, and water added to make a pint, 
and he got of this an ounce every two hours. In addition 
to that he was given the iodide of potassium, ten grains 
three times a day. For the past twenty -five years and more 
we have followed the observations made by a French 
observer, who published a monograph on the subject of 
lead poisoning, and gave a series of cases which seemed to 
show conclusively that the iodide of potassium exerted a 
curative eftect upon this disease in this way ; it formed 
combinations of lead in the tissues, wherever the lead might 
be deposited — for no doubt the eftects are due to the actual 
presence of lead in different tissues, although it has not 
been exactly ascertained as yet in what tissues it especially 
is. But it formed combinations which were soluble, and in 
this way the lead was eliminated through the kidneys. 
And ever since that time this has been the standard remedy 
in the treatment for lead poisoning. "Well, with regard to 
the effect of it, I think a good many would state that their 
experience accords with mine, that we do not get such evi- 
dence of its special effect as we were led to suppose we 
should by the above named observations and writings. At 
the same time, it by no means has been shown that it does 
not have more or less effect in that way, and therefore, 
especially in the absence of any other remedy at the present 
time which accomplishes this object, and this being the 
desirable object, this remedy is given ; and the moment we 
reach the diagnosis that we have to deal with a case of lead 
poisoning, the iodide of potassium comes in as a matter of 
course. 

Well, this patient has been taking ten grains of the 
iodide of potassium three times a day, and it will probably 
be increased in quantity. ISTow, what has been the effect of 
that treatment ? The patient has been in the hospital only 
since May 25. He says his pain has been much relieved. 
It was necessary to resort to the use of croton oil in order 
to make his bowels move, and that proved successful, and 
he says he was relieved by it. Well, there is one great 
comfort in the use of active cathartics, whether they are 
really indicated or not; whether they do any good or not; 
they are very apt to satisfy the mind of the patient. And 
a patient who takes a dose of croton oil is conscious of the 
inconvenience attending a good many evacuations, and is 



146 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

very apt to think that something is being done, and that 
that something is very likel}'^ to be useful. It has a good 
moral eftect anyhow. I do not mean to say that that covers 
the whole ground, but sometimes it is not unwise to embrace 
that consideration in prescriptions, 

Well, that is the case, gentlemen ; a well marked case of 
lead poisoning, and it is a case which shows so far the good 
effect of the treatment which has been pursued, and which 
is now being pursued. — Medical and Surgical Reporter. 



Cliian Turpentine. 

The London Lancet of March 27, 1880, contains the 
records of four cases of carcinoma uteri, treated by Chian 
turpentine, with the result of checking bleeding, fetor and 
pain, which were rapidly followed by diminution in the 
size, and finally entire disappearance of the morbid growth. 
The question of accuracy in diagnosis cannot arise when 
Professor John Clay is the observer, but the details of each 
case are fully given. The first patient, aged 52 years, suf- 
fered from scirrhous cancer of the cervix and body of the 
uterus. Hemorrhage was excessive, pain of the back and 
abdomen agonizing, and cancerous cachexia well marked, 
the uterus so extensively destroyed that its cavity readily 
admitted three fingers. Six grains of Chian turpentine, 
with four grains flowers of sulphur, were made into two 
pills, and both administered every four hours during the 
day. No opiates nor lotions used. On the fourth day the 
patient reported herself greatly relieved from pain, in better 
spirits, but complained of vaginal discharge consisting of 
a dirty white tenacious secretion, without blood or fetor; 
on the twelfth day this was replaced by a somewhat serous 
fluid. The OS would only admit one finger; the patient's 
general health was improved; medicine well tolerated. In 
the twelfth week "the parts feel ragged, and do not bleed 
on roughly touching them." The other three cases were of 
a similar character, two of much more advanced condition, 
with enormous cancerous tumors ; the treatment resulted in 
all in the same way — steady improvement. In one, on 
account of the size and fungosity of the tumor after diminu- 



Periscope. 147 

^ion under the turpentine had commenced, vaginal injec- 
tions were used, in one instance, solution of perchloride of 
iron, in the other arsenical solution, which Mr. Clay 
thought assisted in reducing the growths. Many experi- 
ments were made, in which various remedial agents were 
added to turpentine, and the other varieties of turpentine 
were also tried, but owing to effects upon the digestive or 
other organs which were more or less harmful, preventing 
necessary constancy in use of the medicines, they were all 
•cast aside, excepting the sulphur. In order to administer 
the Chian turpentine in other than pill form, Mr. Clay gives 
the following formula, which is said to be agreeable and 
readily taken for weeks together. An etherial solution of 
the turpentine is prepared by dissolving one ounce of the 
turpentine in two ounces of pure sulphuric ether (anaes- 
thetic) : 

Jt Solution of Chian turpentine, 34 ounce. 

Solution of tragacanth, 4 ounces. 

Sinsple syrup, 1 ounce. 

Flowers Of sulphur, 2 scruples. 

Water, q s. ad. 16 ounces. 
Dose, one ounce three times daily. 

The remedy appears to act upon the periphery of the 
growth with great vigor, causing speedy disappearance of 
infiltration, and arrest of the further development of the 
tumor. Pain is promptly arrested, as are the hemorrhages. 
The cicatrization leaves the cervix nodular to the feel, and 
examination through the speculum shows small cicatrical 
depressions. Glandular involvement is prevented, and the 
peculiar cancerous cachexia disappears. The evidence 
adduced by the observer is of the most encouraging charac- 
ter, and the treatment certainly deserves extended careful 
trial. Patience and perseverance on the part of both phy- 
sician and patient are requisite, and the aphorism of Tros- 
seau must not be forgotten, that " chronic diseases require 
chronic remedies." If this agent proves as valuable as 
these cases indicate, in malignant disease of the uterus, may 
we not expect also good results when the disease affects 
other organs ? — >S'/. Louis Courier of Medicine. 



Organic Matter in Running- Water. 

On one point chemists agree, viz. : that organic matter 
tends to be eliminated from running water. But when it 
comes to the question of how long the process lasts, there 
is a wide difference of opinion. At the late meeting of the 



148 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Association for the Advancement of Science, a paper was- 
read showing that the organic matter of a peaty water was 
rapidly oxidized in a mountain stream. Here, however,, 
the conditions were unusually favorable. The rapid fall 
and the consequent agitation of the water tended to bring 
the organic particles into intimate and frequent contact 
with the air. It is evident that in a slowly moving stream^ 
the oxidation would take place much more slowly. 

Tidy, in his paper on " River Water," (English Chem.. 
Soc. Journal), says that organic matter is rapidly oxidized 
in running water. He says that the waters of the Shannon 
lose more than thirty-eight per cent, of their organic matter 
during a flow of one mile. He also instances a stream in^ 
the north of England which loses fifty per cent, of its 
organic matter in a flow of four miles. Dr. Frankland, in^ 
a recent communication to the Chemical Society, the joint 
work of himself and Miss Lucy Halcrow, denies that water 
strongly impregnated with peaty and other organic sub- 
stances, is so rapidly purified. A sample of peaty water 
kept for seventy days in contact with air, and freely 
exposed to the sunlight, but without shaking, lost only six 
per cent, of its organic elements. When the water was 
violently shaken the results were but little more satisfac^ 
tory. The conclusion arrived at by the investigators is that 
peaty matter is oxidized with extreme slowness, and in nO' 
case in such amounts as the report of Tidy seemed to show. 
In the discussion which followed, particular attention was 
given to the question, " Can running water be safely used 
for dietetic purposes a few hours or days after it has been 
mixed with sewage?" In discussing this question Dr. 
Erankland took strong grounds against the theory of oxi- 
dation. He said no river in the United Kingdom was long 
enough to eftect the complete destruction of sewage filtra- 
tion. On the other hand Dr. Tidy asserted that the experi- 
mental proof was good of the rapid oxidation of organic 
matter. 

Fortunately in this country our rivers are longer than in 
England, and hence there is a much better chance to secure 
the destruction of organic matter. It is also not often 
necessary that one town should draw its water supply from 
a stream which has but lately received the sewage of 
another. But the above facts should at least make us more 
careful about the sources of water supply in large cities. 
We may safely adopt a mean of the two extremes stated 



Periscope. 149 

above, and, while we admit the probability of sewage con- 
tamination, let us not deny the possibility of sewage elimi- 
nation by atmospheric means. It is possible that the citi- 
zens of Peoria may not be altogether wrong when they say 
that the Illinois river at that point is still foul with the filth 
of Chicago ; but the Peorians should remember that it is 
much more likely to be foul from the sewage of Peoria. — 
'Chicago Medical Review. 

Complete Amaurosis from the Use of Salicylate Soda. 

Dr. Francisco Gatti reports, in " Gazetta degli Ospitali," 
a case of sudden and complete amaurosis, which lasted ten 
ihours, and was induced by the medicinal use of salicylate 
of soda. The patient, a girl of sixteen, was suffering from 
acute articular rheumatism, for which 12J grains of the 
drug was prescribed every hour during ten hours. After 
taking this amount the articular pains were relieved, but 
the patient was seized with deafness, noises in the ears, and 
complete blindness. The pupils were widely dilated, and 
the sclerotic and cornea on each side highly sensitive. 
After preception of light had returned, the mydriasis still 
continued. The optholmoscopic examination generally 
gave negative results. Xeither the urine nor the saliva 
yielded the characteristic reaction of salicylic acid in pres- 
ence of ferric perchloride. The ocular symptoms lasted in 
all about ten hours, but left no permanent impairment of 
sight. 

External Treatment for Night Sweats. 

Dr. T. H. Currie, of Lebanon, JS^ H., writes: 
For over thirty years I have used the following prescrip- 
tion without a single failure in sweats from whatever cause. 
In one case a neighboring physician was poisoned while 
■dressing a mortified finger. He suffered untold misery and 
was drenched with perspiration for a number of days and 
his life despaired of. When I saw him I ordered him to be 
bathed immediately and repeat once in two hours. The 
third application stopped all perspiration, and convales- 
cence commenced at once : 

^ Alcohol, Oj; sulphate of quinine, ^j. M. "Wet a 
small sponge with it and bathe the body and limbs, a small 
surface at a time, care being taken not to expose the body 
to a draft of air in doing it. — Mich. Med. News. 



150 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Patliological Condition of tlie System Denoted by the Dif- 
ferent Conditions of tlie Tongue. 

M. J. E. LEGRIS, M. D. 



Editor Medical Brief : In answer to J. K. S., inquir- 
ing in the August number of the Brief for the pathological 
conditions of the system according to the difterent condi- 
tions of the tongue, I will say that we cannot tell and judge 
in a sure way; nevertheless, on a great many occasions, one 
can guess pretty near right. For the benefit of the doctor 
and the profession in general, I will give an account of my 
studies and observations on the subject. 

Dryness of the tongue is caused by a want of spittle or 
mucous, and indicates a tendency to the deviation of secre- 
tion of the salivary glands, and is generally met with erup- 
tive and continual fever, inflammation of the abdominal 
viscera and of their serous membranes, and in many other 
feverish and acute afi'ections. 

Humidity is regarded as a good symptom, and announces 
in most instances a good condition of the whole system. 

According to its dififerent colors, we also mark the dif- 
ferent changes. When pale, it indicates anaemia, affections 
of the spleen, or some organic disease. Completely red is 
met in the course of exanthem. In gastric and bilious fever 
the redness is limited to the end and the edges of that organ. 

When loaded you will generally have active inflamma- 
tion of the mucous membranes, affections of the brain, and 
of its membranes, and every kind of fever. If the tongue 
is white you must have an active fever, without any inflam- 
mation of the internal organs ; but if loaded with a yellow- 
ish tinge we must suspect a disease of the liver, with reten- 
tion of the bile in the blood. 

When the tongue is firm, narrow, slender, red and dry 
to the end and edges, always some inflammation ; if soft and 
large, pale or white at the same time, debility of the 
whole system in general. We cannot tell much by its 
examination in the morning before eating. 

Let some other tell his exDerience on the subject. 

Natick, R. L, Aug. 3, 1880". —Med. Brief. 



We expect to have a representative at the next semi- 
annual meeting of the Military Tract Med. Society, who- 
will report the proceedings for publication in this journaL 



Periscope, 151 

Misuse of the Iron Preparations. 

In cases of debility, prostration, or loss of appetite, 
preparations of iron, alone or variously combined with bit- 
ter tonics, are seemingly indicated clearly, and are very 
generally used. But in many cases they do harm, either 
from their being administered at a wrong time or because 
they are not tolerated under any form or circumstance. 
The greatest abuse of iron is where it is given for loss of 
appetite or difficult digestion, and when it is given within 
half an hour before eating or within three hours after, "We 
have found entirely to our own satisfaction, both by clinical 
observation and by experiment, that iron preparations intro- 
duced into the stomach while digestion is going on either 
hinder or arrest the process. 

We have found the use of iron preparations to produce 
indigestion, feeling of fulness at the epigastrium, and even 
vomiting, when given at the wrong time. 

The tendency both on the part of prescribers and the 
large drug manufacturers is to combine iron with other 
tonics, so that the markets are flooded with elixirs, syrups, 
and wines of iron and quinine, iron and strychnia, iron, 
strychnia and pepsin, and so on ad infinitum. The combina- 
tions with pepsin are a shameful waste of this valuable 
medicine, and well calculated to bring it into disrepute. 
None of the others above mentioned should be used for or 
in any gastric derangement, except with due regard to time 
of administration. The most suitable time to give iron is 
one hour before meals, or four hours afterwards. — Alf. W. 
Ferry, M. D., in Western Lancet. 



Old Sore Legs. 



In answer to the inquiry of Dr.. A. A. Wolfe, Gossett, 
Illinois, I state that twenty years ago the treatment of indo- 
lent ulcers was an opprobrium to the profession. By care 
they could be healed only to break out again. The modern 
and successful treatment is to apply a Martin Elastic 
Bandage in the morning, so soon as the patient is ready to 
get up, and before he puts his foot on the floor. On retir- 
ing remove and wash it. Should there be much discharge 
it is well to apply a dressing of ointment, covered by a com- 
press for the purpose of keeping the bandage clean. The 
application must be neatly and evenly made, and extend 
from the toes above the knee or as much higher as may be 



152 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

necessary. The bandages can be procured of any width 
and length, and have tapes attached for the purpose of 
securing thera. Dr. Martin, of Boston, and Dr. Bulkley, 
of New York, have both written monographs on the sub- 
ject. Even in cases where the elastic stocking has failed to 
afford relief, the elastic bandage will effect a speedy and 
permanent cure. 

For varicose veins the bandage is the only auxiliary cure. 

Dr. Bulkley claims that eczema of the legs can be cured 
in the same manner. In this I cannot coincide, as I opine 
there was an error in the diagnosis. — Dr. J. H. Egan, in 
Medical Brief. 

Poisoning- l>y Santonin. 

A native girl, aged 7, an inmate of one of the schools 
conducted under foreign auspices at Kinkiarg, complained 
of symptoms that were interpreted to point to intestinal 
worms. Accordingly, half a teaspoonful of santonin was 
administered in one dose early in the morning. For half 
an hour she appeared quite well, but she then suddenly fell 
down in a fit, became insensible, foamed at the mouth, with 
livid face and stertorous breathing. Fortunately, at this 
moment she vomited freely, and w^as placed by her attend- 
ants in a warm bath, in which slie regained consciousness. 
Dr. Jardine, who records the case, saw her soon afterwards, 
and, on hearing of the dose of santonin, ordered a smart 
purge. The patient was well in the afternoon of the same 
day ; and it is to the timely vomiting that she probably" 
owes her life. Santonin, even in small medicinal doses, is 
sometimes capricious in its action, so that care should 
always be taken in its administration. A number of cases 
have from time to time been recorded in various medical 
journals, both home and foreign, where doses of six grains 
and under have been attended with most alarming symp- 
toms. — Br. Med. Jour. 



As has been said by one of eminence in our profession 
(Prof. Parvin) : " If society does treat the medical man 
harshly and unkindly, is it any worse than medical men 
treat each other? Many of the worst things ever said of a 
physician, originally came from a physician's tongue. Soci- 
ety is often the mere whispering gallery, which echoes back 
these utterances. Were we more charitable towards each 
other, we would silence half the reproaches which are 
brought upon the profession." — The Black Arts in Mediciiie. 



Periscope. 153 

Poisoning- by Iodoform. 

N^ot much is at present known of the toxic effects of 
iodoform, and considerable interest therefore attaches to 
two cases which have been published by Oberlander. The 
maximum dose given was 0-8 gramme (12| grains) in a pill. 
The symptoms of poisoning occurred in one case (a woman 
twenty-six years of age) after forty-two grammes of iodo- 
form had been taken in eighty days ; in the other case (a 
woman sixty-nine years of age) after five grammes had been 
taken in the course of seven days. The symptoms produced 
were giddiness, vomiting, and deep sleep, from which the 
patient could be roused with difficulty. This somnolence 
w^as interrupted by periods of excitement, each lasting sev- 
eral hours, and was followed by delirium, intense headache, 
sense of impending death, spasmodic contractions of the 
facial muscles, and in the case of the younger patient, 
diplopia. The functions of the other sensory organs were 
not disturbed, and the pupils presented a normal reaction. 
Deep inspirations alternated with apncea of about a min- 
ute's duration. After five or six days the toxic symptoms 
gradually lessened and passed away. — Lancet. 



Antidote to Carbolic Acid. , 

Dr. Senftleben states that sulphuric acid is a good anti- 
dote to carbolic acid, entering into combination with it, and 
forming an innocuous compound. His formula is dilute 
sulphuric acid, 10 grams ; mucilage of gum arabic, 200 
grams ; simple syrup, 30 grams. A tablespoonful of this 
mixture to be given every hour. Carbolic acid is unfortu- 
nately so often taken in error, even in spite of its powerful 
•odor, that there will be abundant opportunities for testing 
the value of this recommendation. — Louv. Med. News. 



Report of the Michig-an State Board of Health. 

The regular quarterly meeting of this Board was held at 
Lansing, July 13, 1880. 

Dr. Lyster called the attention of the Board to syphilis, 
a disease to which but little attention was paid by sanitari- 
ans, but which causes much sickness and many deaths in 
this state. He was requested to prepare a paper on this 
subject and present it to the Board at the next meeting. 

The resignation of Dr. H. 0. Hitchcock and the appoint- 



154 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

ment of Prof. E. A. Strong were announced. Complimen- 
tary resolutions to Dr. Hitchcock were adopted. 

Drs. Lyster and Baker were appointed as a committee 
to prepare a plan for a board of health in Detroit, and tO' 
endeavor to secure its adoption by the city authorities. 

The Board spent considerable time in perfecting the 
details for examining and marking the standing of candi- 
dates in the examination in sanitary science inaugurated 
the following day, and which requires : " The replies on 
each set of topics shall be marked on a scale of 10, and an 
average standing of 70 per cent, on all topics shall be 
necessary in order to pass the applicant." One who suc- 
cessfully passes the examination receives a certificate that 
he is considered qualified to act as health ofiicer of any 
township, city, or village in Michigan. 

A paper on " Unsanitary Conditions in Our Public 
Schools," by G. E. Corbin, M. D., of St. Johns, was read. 
The paper consisted of details of overcrowding, bad venti- 
lation, and the sickness resulting therefrom, which came 
under his personal observation. The paper will be pub- 
lished in the report for 1880. 

ADULTERATIONS OF FOODS. 

Dr. Kedzie said he had received a request from gentle- 
men in Chicago to enter upon an investigation of adultera- 
tions of foods, and had replied that the Board had no funds. 
He stated that the adulteration of sugar with glucose was 
increasing rapidly, and was being done more skillfully. 
That adulteration with pure glucose did not endanger 
health, but the sugar was not so sweet. The manufactured 
glucose, however, was unhealthful to take into the stomach, 
because of poisonous substances which are always associated 
with it. Dr. Lyster said a prominent candy dealer had 
informed him that all candies excepting rock-candies were 
composed in part of glucose. Dr. Kedzie said nearly all 
syrups were made from glucose. 

The Board performed a large amount of routine work, 
such as auditing of bills, and adjourned until October 12, 
1880. 



We call the attention of those of our readers who are 
not subscribers to the prospectus on page 7. There they 
will find what we propose to do, and what is thought by 
the profession of what we have already done. Read page 
7 carefully. 



Therapeutic Jfotes. 



155 



"^herapeuHii (^ote^. 



TREATMENT OF BARBER'S ITCH. 

Brame recommends the follow- 
ing treatment : Shave off the 
hairs or cut them very short; 
then npply once or twice a week 
an ointment composed of: 

5fc Prepared chalk 10 parts, 
Coal tar 1 to 4 " 

Glycerine 5 " 

Simple cerate 50 " 

ARISTOCRATIC REMEDY FOR ITCH 
^ Balsam of Peru 1 ounce, 
Benzoic acid 110 grains. 
Oil of cloves 40 drops. 

Alcohol 2J^ drachms. 

Simple cerate 7 ounces. 

Dissolve the essential oil and 
the benzoic acid in the alcohol 
and mix them with the cerate. 
Lastly add the balsam of Peru. 
It is said to effect a cure in twen- 
ty-four hours. — Med. and Surg. 
Reporter. 

STIMULANT AND FEBRIFUGE. 

The following is in almost con- 
stant use at the New Haven 
(Conn.) General Hospital, as a 
stimulant and febrifuge : 

Jfc Camphorfe 1 scruple, 

Ammon. carb. 1 drachm. 

Muc, acacite 1 ounce, 

Aquse 1 pint. M. 

Sig. h ounce every two hours. 

ITCHING OF THE SCALP. 

Dr. Geo. P. Oliver gives the 
following in the Med. and Surg. 
Reporter, as effectual for itching 
of the scalp and falling off of the 
hair : 
T^ Hyd. chlorid. mit. 1 scrup., 

Cerat. plumbl subacetat. 2 drs., 
Ung. aquae rosse 1 oz. 

Apply night and morning. 

FOR OBSTINATE CONSTIPATION 
OR OBSTRUCTION OF THE BOW- 
ELS. 

Dr. S. J. Bumstead says the 
following formulae by Dr. Thor- 
oughgood, is the best thing he 
has ever used in obstinate con- 
stipation, and in cases where in- 
vagination or other serious ob- 
structions of the bowels are feared 
to exist. Dr. B. says his experi- 
ence with it has led to such 



happy results after everything^ 
else had failed, that he is inclined 
to believe it " almost a specific :"" 

~9^ Plumbi acetat. 10 grains, 

Ex. belladonnse fl. 1 drachm, 
Aquse 4 ounces. 

M. Teaspoonful doses till the- 
effect desired is produced, or un- 
til the physiological effects of 
the belladonna appear, when sus- 
pend for a while and begin again 
after they have passed off. 

CHLORATE OF POTASH IN SCROF- 
ULOUS DISEASES OF THE SKIN. 

Dr. Jno. V. Shoemaker, in the 
Medical Bulletin, says : "I have- 
been using the chlorate of pot- 
ash for several years, particularly 
in scrofulous disease of the skin, 
and am glad to add, that in con- 
nection with suitalDle hygienic- 
surroundings and the proper local 
remedies, it has acted with won- 
derful success. I generally give 
from one-half to ten grains of 
the chlorate of potash in pure 
water, three or four times daily. 

If continued internally for any 
length of time, it will increase 
the appetite, change the charac- 
ter of the blood, improve the 
color of the skin, and fatten the- 
patient." 

DRESSING FOR BURNS. 

The Canada Journal of Medi- 
cal Science, for September, 1880, 
recommends the following form- 
ula : 

p: Iodoform 1 drachm, 

Spermaceti 1 ounce. 

Extract of conium 2 scruples. 
Carbolic acid 10 drops. M. 

Sig. Spread on some soft mate- 
rial and cover the burned parts. 

FOR ULCERATED STOMATITIS. 

The following local remedy has 
been tried for years, and always 
acts like a charm : 
^ Pul.kino 1 drachm, 

Sodse boras. 1 drachm, 

Sach. albse 2 drachms. 

M. Put a small powder in the 
mouth dry, and allow it to dis- 
solve gradually. 



156 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



]ook <^atice^. 



A Manual of Midwifery for Midwives and Medical Stu- 
dents, by Fancourt Barnes, M. D., with illustrations; Phil- 
adelphia, Henry C. Lea, 1879; pp. 192, price $1.25. 

We have read this work with interest, as to our mind it is 
a work whose widest dissemination among midwives is a 
thing greatly to be desired. Without pretension, it is suffi- 
ciently technical to enable a midwife to express herself 
intelligibly to practitioners, yet simple enough for one with 
but modest literary entertainments to comprehend and 
master. With this book in the hands of every midwife in 
the country, and carefully studied, mistakes, deplorable 
and often damnable, on the part of professional midwives, 
would be less common, and the lives of many infants . as 
well as mothers saved yearly. We advise every physician 
to urge midwives of his acquaintance to procure and read 
this truly valuable book. For students it possesses but 
little to recommend it, except as a work for review before 
examination, the treatment of the various complications or 
diseases incident to the puerperal state being almost 
entirely omitted. 

Official Register of Physicians and Midwives to whom 
certilicates have been issued by the Illinois State Board of 
Health, and those who have registered in the county clerks' 
•offices, and those who claim to have practiced in Illinois 
ten years prior to July 1, 1877, but to whom no certificates 
have been issued ; pp. 286. 

We presume this is as complete as it is possible for such 
a vast undertaking to be made. As a work of reference it 
is invaluable. 

Transactions of the State Medical Society of Arkansas 
at its fifth annual session, Little Rock, Ark., 1880 ; pp. 118. 

A very interesting report from an intelligent and pro- 
gressive body of men, containing a number of papers of 
more than ordinary interest, among which we notice the 
address of Dr. Dale, president of the society; "An Account 
of the Yellow Fever at Forest City, Ark., during 1879," by 
Dr. J. B. Cummings ; " Scarletina and its Analogues Diph- 
theria and Membraneous Croup," by C. E. IS'ash, M. D. 

The publishing house of William Wood & Sons is now 
prosecuting a work that should earn for them the gratitude 



Book Jfotices. 157 



and patronage of every physician in the country. We refer 
to " Wood's Library." In a compact and elegant form, 
and at a wonderfully low price, they present to the medical 
public, each month, a new volume on some important topic. 
We have not space at this time to notice in detail the works 
which are thus put within the reach of every one, and we 
will have to defer the pleasure to succeeding numbers of 
this journal. In the meanwhile, however, we would say to 
every reader, subscribe for the year (only $15), and you 
will get what would otherwise cost you at least $50. 

A Contribution to Cerebral Localization, by S. J. Bum- 
stead, M. D., Decatur, 111.; pp. 6. Reprinted from the 
Archives of Medicine, 1879. 

This is an article of more than usual interest, both from 
the nature of the case itself and also from the nicety and 
precision of observation on the part of the author. 

Transactions of the Southern Illinois Medical Associa- 
tion for the year 1880; George O. Rumbold & Co.; paper, 
pp. 92. 

Many state societies do not publish a better or more 
interesting report than this district society. The address 
of the president. Dr. C. W. Dunning, of Cairo, 111., is one of 
the most polished and effective that we have ever read. An 
elaborate paper on the treatment of Postpartum Hemor- 
rhage, by George J. Engelmann, M. D., is also worthy of a. 
close reading. 

Among new exchanges we note : 

The International Surgical Record, I^Tew York, weekly,. 
$5.00 per annum. A. Rose, M. D., Editor. 

Canada Medical and Surgical Journal, Montreal. Drs. 
Ross and Molson, Editors. 

The Clinical Kews, Philadelphia, weekly. S. M. Miller, 
M. D., Editor. 

The St. Joseph Medical and Surgical Reporter, St. 
Joseph, Mo. Dr. J. P. Chesney, Editor. 

Chicago Medical Review ; Dr. E. C. Dudley, Editor ; bi- 
monthly; Chicago, 111. 

Arkansas Medical Monthly, Little Rock, Ark. Dr. J. J. 
Jones, Editor. 

The Medical Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa. Dr. John Y.. 
Shoemaker, Editor. 



158 Peoricb Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. Mcllvaine, A. M., PuhlisTier, 

204 South-Jefferson Street, PEOKIA, ILL. 



ditarinl ^epHrtment 



The Treatment of tlie Insane. 

One of the curses which seems to be entailed upon the 
high degree of civilization that this century has attained, is 
the rapid increase of diseases of the mind; consequently 
one of the most important questions of the day, both to 
physicians and philanthropists, is, how shall we treat our 
insane? 

Without referring to medication, which is foreign to the 
topic we wish to consider here, we ask the question, for 
reflection and thought, and certainly no class of patients 
demands a greater consideration on the part of the commu- 
nity or should enlist warmer sympathies, not only from 
friends but from every one, than the one we call the insane: 
What shall we do with this rapidly growing class of unfor- 
tunates ? 

Shall the already enormous buildings of the various 
state asylums be still further enlarged, bringing still greater 
numbers of insane together under one roof, and adding to 
the duties and responsibilities of those intrusted with" their 
welfare ? We think the experience of the past answers 
that this should not be done. That harm does follow, and 
recovery is retarded by the association of a large number 
of unhealthy minds, in a vast penitentiary-like edifice, with 
the restrictions and restraints absolutely necessary in such 
large institutions, is beyond question. This subject has 
received much serious thought both at home and abroad, 
and various plans have been suggested, among which we 
believe the one variously known as the seggregation sys- 
tem, the cottage system, and as the home-like treatment, to 
be the most rational and to offer the best prospects for 
recovery. By limiting the number of patients in an asylum 
the buildings needed will be smaller and more like the one 
the patients are accustomed to ; the number of uneducated 



Editorial Department. 159 

and unsympathizing attendants will be smaller; patients 
can be allowed a wider, freedom and be under less Vestraint ; 
the physician in charge can see his patients more fre- 
quently and have more time to study the peculiarities and 
exigencies of each case, and the influence of even one 
healthy, educated, sympathizing mind in the close commu- 
nication of a home-like life will have an etiect beyond any 
system of medication. 

Unfortunately this plan, having other advantages which 
space forbids here to enumerate, is only possible to a limited 
extent among the poorer classes. The state cannot afl:brd, 
nor would it perhaps be wise, to establish the number of 
separate institutions which this system demands. But 
among the better classes of society, and those who do not 
need to rely upon the charities of the state, this system 
should be understood, and if once understood we feel con- 
fident it would be appreciated. One institution in this state, 
to our knowledge, fully realizes the requirements of this 
home-like system of treatment. We refer to that of Dr. 
McFarland, at Jacksonville, and we wish every physician 
could visit this establishment and understand its workings 
and the aim of its founder. The friends of the insane 
depend largely, if not entirely, upon the family physician 
to recommend a place for treatment, and we feel that it is 
the duty of every physician to know something of such 
institutions, their workings and methods, so that he can 
feel fully assured that what he recommends will be the very 
best thing for his unfortunate patient, and will give it the 
best possible opportunity for a happy recovery. 

The call for advice of this kind may come very unex- 
pectedly, and it behooves every physician to be fully posted, 
so that his advice may be given promptly, without waiting 
to read up or correspond with others as to what they con- 
sider the best asylum. An early removal of many patients 
to an asylum is imperative, and the chances for recovery 
are oftentimes materially decreased by hesitation and delay 
on the part of the medical attendant. 



Up to date 348 have matriculated at Rush for the com- 
ing term. This is 80 more than had matriculated last year 
at the same time. The total number enrolled last year was 
481. This year the number bids fair to exceed 500. The 
college building has had its annual overhauling, and is 
^' resplendent with paint and calcimine." 



160 Feoria Medical Monthly. 

We are happy to announce that the E'ovember issue of 
this journal will contain an original article from the pen of 
Dr. William Goodell, of Philadelphia, and we will have one 
from Dr. William Pepper for our December number. 
Beginning in November, we hope to publish regularly a 
series of clinical lectures by the most eminent lecturers in 
the West. These will be reported expressly for this jour- 
nal. 

Drs. Kendall and Meacher (Rush, '80), the successful 
candidates at the examination for internes at the Cook 
County Hospital, held September 16, will assume their 
duties October 1. 

Horsford's Acid Phosphate is so well and favorably 
known to the profession as a valuable remedy, that it needa 
no special commendation on our part. We have used it 
and like it. 

Physicians will benefit themselves by reading the adver- 
tisement of S. D. Miller, medical publisher, on pages 2 and 
3, and will no doubt wish to have the book, which has so 
many good features to recommend itself to them. The 
almost unparalleled sale which the work has already 
attained attests its value. 

Any one who has occasion to consult an analytical 
chemist, will do well to call on Mr. F. C. Bourscheidt. He 
pays especial attention to criminal analyses, and we know 
will give satisfaction. 

Physicians needing an ofiice chair for examinations or 
other purposes, will find the chair manufactured by Com- 
stock & Avery to fill every want. Many are in use by phy- 
sicians, and give good satisfaction. 

Married. — At Danville, Ky., September 1, by the Rev. 
Dr. J. Edwards, Samuel 0. Loughridge, M. D., of Peoria,. 
111., and Effie M. Edwards, daughter of the officiating min- 
ister. 

Dr. A. W. Edmiston (Rush, '80) is located at Clinton,. 
111., and has made a fair start towards success. 

If we can accommodate any physician by purchasing 
or ordering any books or instruments, we will be glad tO' 
do so, free of charge. We will select with as much care 
as if buying for ourselves, and can get as low prices as can- 
be had anywhere. The goods can be sent C. 0. D. Ad- 
dress the publisher. 



Advertisements. 




Dr. McINTOSH'S 

NATURAL 




No instrument has ever been placed before the medical profes- 
sion which has given such universal satisfaction. The combination 
is such that the Physician is able to meet every indication of Uter- 
ine Displacements. Falling Womb, Anteversion, Retroversion and 
Flexions are overcome by this instrument, where others fail, this is 
proven by the fact that since its introduction to the Profession it has 
come into more general use than all other instruments combined. 

Among the many reasons which recommend this Supporter to 
the Physician is its self-adjusting qualities. The Physician after 
applying it need have no fear that he will be called in haste to re- 
move or readjust it, as is often the case with rings and various pes- 
saries held in position by pressure against the vaginal wall, as the 
patient can remove it at will and replace it without assistance. 

The Abdominal Supporter is a broad morocco leather belt with 
elastic straps to buckle around the hips, with concave front, so 
shaped as to hold up the abdomen. The Uterine Support is a cup 
•and stem made of highly polished hard rubber, very light and dura- 
ble, shaped to fit the neck of the womb, with openings for the secre- 
tions to pass out, as shown by the cuts. Cups are made with ex- 
tended lips to correct flexions and versions of the womb. 

The cup and stem is suspended to the belt by two soft elastic 
Rubber Tubes, which are fastened to the front of the belt by simple 
loops, pass down through the stem of the cup and up to the back of 
the belt. These soft rubber tubes being elastic adapt themselves to 
all the varying positions of the body and perform the service of the 
ligaments of the womb. 

The instrument is very comfortable to the patient, can be re- 
moved or replaced by her at will, can be worn at all times, will not 
interfere with nature's necessities, will not corrode, and is lighter 
than metal. It will answer for all cases of Anteversion, Retrover- 
sions, or any Flexions of the womb, and is used by the leading 
Physicians with never failing success even in the most difficult 
cases. 

PRICE— To Physicians, $8 ; To Patients, $12. 

Instruments sent by mail, at our risk, on receipt of price, with 
16 cents added for postage, or by Express, C. O. D. 

DR. MINTOSH'S NATURAL UTERINE SUPPORTER COMPANY, 

CHICAGO, IIulLrlPfOIS. 

Our valuable pamphlet, "Some Practical Facts About Dis- 
placements of the Womb," will be sent you free on application. 192 
Jackson street. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements . 



PEOEIA, PEKIN & JACKSONmLE RAILWAY, 

THE ROUTE TO TAKE FOR 

Pekin, Havana, 

Springfield, Virginia, 

Beardsto-wn, Jacksonville, 

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THE FA.VORITE ROUTE TO 

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And all points in KANSAS and COLORADO. 

GEORGE SKINNER, CHAS. MACABE, 

Manager. General Ticket Agent. 



DR. L. D. M'lNTOSH'S 




If this new combination could be seen and tested by the medical profession, 
few, if any, words would be needed from us in its favor, for it combines utility 
with simplicity in such perfection that seeing it is convincing proof of its great 
value. The medical profession to-day acknowledge, almost universally, Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

This combination is composed of sixteen cells, placed in pockets on a belt. 
Each cell is made of hard vulcanized rubber, lined with a copper cell, which 
constitutes the negative plate. The rubber coating perfectly insulates each cell. 
The positive plates are of zinc, wrapped in a porous material to absorb the ex- 
citing lluid, and prevent contact with the copper, and permit the current to pass 
from the copper to the zinc. 

Thus the cells are charged without wetting the belt, and the discomfort fol- 
lowing to the patient. A wire is soldered to each zinc plate, which connects 
with the copper cell by entering a tube on its side, thus rendering the belt 
pliable. 

The Mcintosh Electric Belt is superior to all others for the following reasons: 

It is composed of sixteen celLs— thus giving a powerful current. A current 
selector is so arranged that one or more cells can be used at pleasure. There is 
not anything irritating about the Belt, as is the case with all other contrivances 
where the metal used is wet with weak acids and placed next to the skin. The 
electrodes are pieces of metal covered similar to ordinary battery electi'odes, 
and connected with the cells by connecting cords. By this arrangement, a cur- 
rent from the Belt can be applied to produce a general or local effect. 

PhyKicians who have used this Belt in their practice do not hesitate to re- 
commend it to the profession. 

PRICE, $10.00; WITH SUSPENSORY, $12 50. 

Our pamphlet on Medical Electricity sent free on application. Address, 

MclMOSH GALVANIC BELT A\D BATTERY COMPAPiY, 192 and 194 Jackson St., Chicago, 111. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



—OF— 

The Peoria Medical Monthly. 

The wonderful success which this Journal has met in a few months is a suffi- 
cient proof of its value and popularity. It has been enlarged twice within five 
months, and will again be enlarged as soon as its patronage warrants. We pro- 
pose to make this Journal indispensable to Western Practitioners, who, as act- 
ive, progressive men, see it is to their advantage and personal benefit to support 
a home Journal of this kind. 

Original. Communications. — The main feature is intended to be the origi- 
nal communications. We have articles for future numbers from some of the 
most able writers in the profession, among whom we may name Dr. Wm. 
Ooodell and Dr. Wm. Pepper, of Philadelphia ; Dr. Warren, and others. But we 
especially desire short, practical articles from our subscribers. An interchange 
of opinion beiwg what is intended. 

Tkanslations— Made expressly for this Journal will appear regularly from 
Foreign Journals. 

Clinical and Didactic Lectures.— We are making arrangements where- 
by we will be regularly supplied each month with Clinical and Didactic Lectures 
by experienced teachers. 

Therapeutic Notes.— Short, compact modes of treatment, and tried and ap- 
proved formula? from every available source, will make this department of un- 
usual interest to readers. 

Medical. News. — We will keep our readers posted on all matters of interest, 
reports of societies throughout the State, etc., etc. 

SXJBSCItlBE AT OIVCE. 

Fifty-Two Pages. 

Now is the time to get the largest amount of good reading for the least 
money. We will for a short time send to subscribers the back numbers, begin- 
ning at May, and the Journal for one year from date of subscription, for 

OIVE DOLLAR. 

As the number we have on hand is limited, this oflfer will only be open for a 
limited time. You will get seventeen numbers containing over five hundred 
pages, for only ONE DOLLAR. Take as many other Journals as you please, but 
you cannot aflTord to omit the Peoria Medical Monthly. 

A few extracts from letters received will show what is thought of it by the 
profession : 

Among the numerous Medical Journals which are sent to me, there is none brighter or 
more creditable to its authors than the Peoria Medical Monthly. I have read it with pleas- 
ure, for it shows that you are all alive in Peoria. Writing makes men think, and the more the 
opportunities for writing the greater the amount of thinking. 

HENRY M. LYMAM, M. D., 
Chicago, III., 1880. Prof. Physiology and Nervous Diseases, Bush. Med. Col. 

I like your Journal and will devote some of my time to its advancement. 

St. Joseph, Mo., 1880. A. V. BANES, M. D. 

I have received your Journal and am well pleased with it. 

Lincoln, 111., 1880. L. L. LEEDS, M. D. 

The number just received is worth the whole subscription. I enclose one dollar, and will 
'try and get you some subscribers. J. B. VEITCH, Grafton, Jersey Co., 111. 

If the number I have received is a specimen of what it will continue to be. it will be valu- 
able indeed. C. ¥. STRINGER, M. D., Aurora, Kane Co., 111. 

I have received your Journal and like its arrangement and style. Think it worth the 
money, and enclose the amount. W. H. GITHENS, M. P., Hamilton. 111. 

I am pleased with your Journal, and believe it should be patronized by all Western Physi- 
cians. I hope it will meet with the approval of every Physician in Illinois. 

H. B. W. BARNES, M. D. 

JSS^Subscribe at once and you mill be pleaded tuitJi it. 

Address all communications to THOS. M. MclLVAINE, 

204 South JeflFerson Street, PEORIA, IIiL. 



Aclvertisenients. 



ANALYTICAL CHEBST. 



Special attention given to Criminal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters-, 
Milk, Urine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, IlL 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Correspondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 




Prices witMii tlie Reacli of All. 

Call on us or sjnd for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 



Comstock& Avery, 



Manufacturers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 




Call the attention of Physicians 
to their 



iJ PJ 



F4T1I! 



It is the nicest chair in the market for 
the Office, Library or Parlor. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 




In answering advertisenients, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



WE HANDLE A FULL LINE OF 



JMPORTED & DOMESTIC CHEMICALS, 

G^PERFUMES=:§D 

AND 

TOILET ARTICLES OF THE BEST QUALITY. 



V^^o^o^ 




We are enabled to furnish 

The Medical Profession 

Anything in the line of 

NEW" AND SPECIAL 



OUE STOCK OF 

iP^A^isroir c3-oox)s 

AND 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

is large and well selected. 

ARTISTS' AND WAX WORK 

SUPPLIES. 



/^"^^^^^ 



INSTRUMENTS, ETC., \S. 
AT LOWEST PRICES ON SHORT NOTICE. X7© 
CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Druggists & Chemists, 

^^ ^^ And Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

603 South-Adanns, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

c. .A-. BO"w^:M:.^isr ac acD., 
Prescription Druggists, 

520 IMIJLin^r STK-DBEO?, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



N. B.— A full line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
.maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 



10 



Advertisements. 



RUSH 





Medidkl Collesfe, 










CHICA^GO, ILU 





For Annual, Spring Course, or Post Graduate An- 
nouncement, address the Secretary, 



Jkme^ S. ^tl\erid^e, 



1634 MICHIGAN AVENUE. 



In answering advertisements naention the Peoria Medical MoNTHiiY. 



Advertisements. 11 



COLBURN, BIRKS i CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 

AND DEALERS IN 



KIDDER'S BATTERIES, GAIFFE'S BATTERIES, 
AMPUTATING, 

OPERATING, 

DISSECTING, and 
POST-MORTEM INSTRUMENTS, 
TOOTH FORCEPS, 
OBSTETRICAL FORCEPS, 

FEVER THERMOMETERS, 

HYPODERMIC SYRINGES, 
POCKET INSTRUMENT CASES, 

VIAL CASES, BUGGY CASES, 
SADDLE BAGS, 
PLASTERS, BANDAGES, SPLINTS, 

CRUTCHES, ETC. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our new Instrument Catalogue ready for distribu- 
tion June IS, 1880. 

Our prices ^atIU be found low for first quality 
goods. 

Write for quotations before buying. 



COLBURN, BIRRS & CO., Wholesale Druggists, 

218, 220 & 222 S. Washington St., Peoria, 111. 
In answering advertisements, mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



SPRING STEM SUPPOETEES. 



Abdominal Supporter. 
3. 



SOLID STEM SUPPOETEE. 
E. 0—5-—( Economy.) 




Prices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Procide itia Cup A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Coutil 
Finished Belt X, $T.oO. On Z, Fig. 
5, $6.00. On Y, Coutil, $8.00 ; and 
on Y, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring Stem, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long n, or 1 U, tbe same on either 
belt as A, 

Hetroversion E, on X, or Y, 
Cotton, $8.00. On Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on Z, «;7.00. 

Anteveraion, Solid Stem 
C, or Sollt Stpni Olnbe lop 
O, on X, or Y, Cotton. $5.50. On Y, 
Con til. $G..'-,0. and on Z, $4.50 only. 

Rules. — Tlie Stem Supporters 
Fig. 1 and 5, are only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Speculnms, Fig. 6, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cup D, 
either separate, or in connection 
with Stem Supporters. 

Elastic Gums S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; 4 at 35 cts ; and Springs 
at 3 cts. each. 

N. Ba — The figures on these engravings cor- 
respond with those on the full Catalogue plate. 

Selection. — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
If a cup, it must be modelled after the junction of 
the axis of the uterus and vagina, or tbe cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I U, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptation 
and border cup. In cases of slight Antovorsions 
and slight Retroversions, deep cups may be called 
for, and In most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cups are usually 
selected by giving the full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, 1}/^ to If'^; Multiparae, 1% 
to 2, and Procidi^ntia to 2J!^ inches and over some 
times. Bells — For X, and Z, waist measure to be 
given, and Y, hip meaPure. 

Anteversion V, Fig. 1 — This had been re- 
modelled a number of times, and the fenestrated 
top fonnd best to remain in position. 

Retroversion E. — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent efficiency. The broad lever, lifts up the 
fandas, while the cup corrects the prolapsus and 
holds the uterus, by a double elastic motion, if a 
spring stem, t-mall, long stem, Globs Tops O, 
Fig. 1, are placed with success against the sensitive 
furdus, after ovorything else been intolerable, 



;izes— 1,13.16, 16.1G and 
1 9.1 6, Flesh color enam- 
eled. Price, $2.50 each. 



Price. — Permanent, Curved Stem 
Onp 11 C, on elastic webbing Z, 
$4.50. On X, or Y, cotton, $5.50, 
and Y', coutil, $6 50. 

No expense has been saved to 
give even the Economical Supporter 
all possible advantages. 



HAED EUBBEE UTEEINE EXAMINING CASF 




Prices. — Full case, $8.00; Quill Caustic Holder H. or Camel's 
Hair Brush Holder and Case I, each $1.00. Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket after the cup is In posi- 
tion. This is safer than all other contrivances, 
but is seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made in this Series to correct Retro- 
version through the posterior cul-de-sac. ti\ 

Cystocele and Rectocele. — These are suc- 
cessfully drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops G, or Oblong H, Fig. 1. 

Cup I), P'//jr. <5>.— vSupplements EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed into A D, 
Fip. I. 

Globe B, Fig. B. — This is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with all the objectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now ajain 
a popular pessary. 

Speculum, Fig. 6 — The conductor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and in position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be introduced ; 
this together with the thin shell, gives a sufiicient 
calibre to embrace the entire cervix within tbe 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the enclosure of the cervix by rotation. 

Examining Cane, Fig. 12. — Sounds A, B, 
C. Movers D, F, and G, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on M, if II, and form instruments 12 
inches long. L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Jiflt Y, Fig. 3. — Is made to order of any size 
and strength, to support th'» stem supporter and 
pt-ntlulous abdomen. Hip Straps S S, are elastic. 



Intra Uterine Stem Cup J U.—The stem 
Mailed on recelr>t of quotation prices, and all the hard rubber psTts on the full Oatalogne exchanged 
to meet any Indie ition, ana cover the purchaser's risk. Catalogi b on apiilication. 

Oarrenp'mdentii will please I ^' ^* STAUFER, D-D, 

nanw. this Journal [ 634 FrfinJclln St , JTest side, above Green, Phila., Pa. 

J Near 9th & Green Bt». (or Bound Brook) New Torh Itepot. 



Advertisements. 13 



TERMS: ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. 



IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS! 



f i©ili M^ioil M©itMj 



Monthly Circulation, 2000 Copies. 



This journal will reach at least 12,000 physicians during the 
year, and is not excelled as an advertising medium by any journal 
in the West. The rates are far below any journal in the country 
with equal circulation. We propose to make the advertising pages 
as valuable to the reader as any in the journal, and this can only 
be done by excluding everything that is not first-class. 

This journal will be considerably enlarged, and the rates for 
advertising will be advanced to those who have not taken advant- 
age of these low rates. No advertising agents employed. 

We invite correspondence. 



C-^==PAYABLE QUARTERLY. '^^-J 

1 Year. 6 Months. 3 Months. 

Whole page $50.00 $30.00 $20.00 

Half page 30.00 20.00 15.00 

Thirdpage 25.00 18.00 12.00 

Quarterpage 20.00 15.00 10.00 

Address all communications to 

THOS. M. McILVAINE, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-Jefferson St., PEORIA, ILL. 



14 Adertisements. 



CHEMICAL R EPORT ON MALTINE. 

BY WALTER S. HAINES, M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, Bush Medical College, Chicago. 



Chemical Labokatory of Rush Medical College, j;^ 
Chicago, November 18th, 1879. ) 

In order to test the comparative merits of Mai tine and the va- 
rious Extracts of Malt in the market, I purchased from different 
druggists samples of Maltine and of the most frequently pre- 
scribed Extracts of Malt, and have subjected them to chemical 
analysis. 

As the result of these examinations, I find that Maltine con- 
tains from half as much again to three times the quantity of Phos- 
phates (Nerve and Brain food and Bone producers;, and from three 
to fourteen times as much Diastase and other Albuminoids (Diges- 
tive agents and Muscle producers), as any of the Extracts of Malt 
examined. Since the value of such preparations is indicated very 
exactly by the proportion of these — their two most important con- 
stituents, I have no hesitation in pronouncing Maltine greatly 
superior to any Extract of Malt which T examined. 

The large amounts of Phosph .es and Albuminoids found in 
Maltine demonstrates, moreovei, (lie superior skill and care 
employed in its preparation, and thoroughly warrants the confidence 
placed in it by the Medical Profession. 

Very respectfully, WALTER S. HAINES. 



REPOET ON MALTINE. 

BY L. p. YANDBLL, M. D., 

PB0FES60E OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND DISEASES OF CHILDREN, UNIVERSITY OP LOUISVILLE. 

\^From the Louisville Medical News, January 3d, 1880,] 

After an extensive trial of the Maltine preparations of Reed & 
Carnrick, of New York, in private and dispensary practice, we are 
convinced that Maltine is one of the most valuable remedies ever 
introduced to the Profession. Our exalted estimate of this article is 
confirmed by all of the many practitioners who have expressed to 
us their opinion of it. Wherever a constructive is indicated, Malt- 
ine will be found excellent. In Pulmonary Phthisis and other 
Scrofulous Diseases, in Chronic Syphilis, and in the various Cachec- 
tic Conditions it is invaluable. In Convalescence it is a delightful 
and efficacious Cordial. We have invariably found it liked by Chil- 
dren, who devour it as they do candy. The Maltine Wine with 
Pepsin and Pancreatine has yielded us the happiest results in 
Apepsia and Atonic Dyspepsia, and in general Muscular and Nerv- 
ous Debility. The preparations Maltine with Hypophosphites, 
Maltine Ferrated, Maltine with Pepsin and Pancreatine, and Plain 
Maltine we especially commend. It is prepared in innumerable 
combinations. 

Maltine deserves to stand in the front rank of constructives ; and 
the constructives, by their preventive, corrective and curative power, 
are probably the most widely-useful therapeutical agents that we 
possess. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 15- 



PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS OF MALTINE. 



During the past year we have received nearly one thousand let- 
ters from the Medical Profession in this country and Great Britain, 
referring to the therapeutic value of Maltine; their character is 
indicated by the several extracts which we present below. 

St. Louis, Mo., June 1st, 1879. 
" As regards the use of Maltine, I can only say I am charmed with it, and' 
would not know how to replace it in my practice. I suppose no one in the West 
uses it more extensively than I do. The results I have obtained have been morer 
satisfactory than I can possibly express. I have never met with a preparation 
to which I am more indebted." J. K. BAUDDY, M. D., 

Prof. Nervous and Mental Diseases, Missouri Medical College. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec. 29th. 1879. 
"I have used Maltine largely in the Clinic of the College, and in private 
practice, and find it exceedingly efficient as a medicine, and much superior to 
anything of the kind with which I am acquainted." 

GEO. E. WALTON, M. D., 
Prof. Prin. and Prac. of Med., Cin. Col. Med. and Surg. 

Richmond, Va., Jan. 16th, 1880. 
"I have found your Maltine preparations so valuable that I use some of 
them almost daily in my practice." HUNTER McGUIRE, M. D.. 

Prof, of Surgery, Medical College of Virginia. 

Chicago, Jan. 21st, 1880. 
" I am very much pleased with Maltine, and since its introduction here I 
have entirely given up the use of Extract of Malt." 

E. F. INGALLS, A. M., M. D. 

Kensington Dispensary, London, Nov. 24th, 1879. 
" We are using your Maltine among our patients, and And great benefit from 
it, especially in cases of Phthisis." DR. CHIPPENDALE, Res. Medical Officer. 

The Beeches, Northwold, Eng., July 28th, 1879. 
"I find that my patients can readily digest your Maltine with Cod Liver Oil 
without causing any unpleasant after-feeling. I have full confidence in the virtue 
it possesses to sustain the system during prolonged diseases of a Tubercular or 
Atrophic nature." FREDERICK JOY, L. R. C. P., M. R. C. S. 

123 Landsdowne Road, Notting Hill, W. I 
London, Oct. 16th, 1879. f 
" I have much pleasure in bearing favorable testimony to the merits of your 
Maltine preparations. I have used Maltine with Cod Liver Oil with the happiest 
results in a case of Tuberculosis attended with Tubercular Peritonitis, in which 
the temperature of the patient rose to 105 1-5 deg., and persistently remained 
above 100 deg. for upwards of two months. The only medicine taken was Maltine- 
with Cod Liver Oil, and an occasional dose of Carbonate of Bismuth to check 
diarrhoea. She gradually improved and made a perfect recovery. I find Maltine 
with Cod Liver Oil is more readily taken and more easily assimilated than Cod 
Liver Oil in any other form." EDMUND NASH, M. D. 



LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. MALTINE with Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINE with Phosphates Iron and Quinia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE with Phos. Iron, Quinia & Strychnia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Hops. MALTINE WINE. 

MALTINE with Hypophosphites. MALTINE WINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine • 

MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. MALTO-TERBINE. 

Maltine is now in the hands of the Wholesale Trade throughout the United States. 

We guarantee that Maltine will keep perfectly in any climate, or any season of the year. 

Faithfully Yours, REED & CARNRICK, 

I^e-w York. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



16 



AdLvertisements. 



MALTOPEPSINE-TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



The experience we have had of many years as Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
has brought us more or less in regular contact with the medical profession and 
its wauts, and has afforded us advantages for experiment, study and practical 
development, which have engaged our attention in perfecting new and more effi- 
cacious agents for physicians' use in the control, subjection, treatment and cure 
of diseases, and we trust the Medical Profession will feel assured that in no in- 
stance shall we solicit their attention, except we have some production worthy 
of their higlaest consideration and confldence. 

We would respectfully call your attention to our new preparation Maltopep- 
sine, which we regard a very important Remedial Agent for Indigestion, Consti- 
pation, Dyspepsia, Vomiting in Pregnancy. Nervousness, Loss of Appetite, all 
forms of Gastric Derangement, Atonic Diarrhcea, and Indigestive Diarrhoea of 
children. This valuable remedy contains the digestive and nutritive properties 
ol the grain unimpaired, combined with the active agents of digestion, viz: Dias- 
tase, Pepsine, Lactic Acid, Hydrochloric Acid, with a small addition of Phos- 
phoric Acid, Powdered Firwein, and the Bromide and Chloride of Aluminium 
and Sugar of Milk. TESTIMONIALS: 



K. K. C'laek, 51. D., Georgia, Vt.: 

Gentlemen — A medical friend gave me a 
small sample bottle of your Maltopepsine, 
which I took with apparent decided benefit. I 
did not vomit during the week I had the med- 
icine to take, nor have I been troubled up to 
this time, and as I do not wish to be without so 
valuable a medicine, I enclose two dollars with 
the request to have you send me bj' return mail 
the value of the money sent. I am very confi- 
dent it will entirely cure me, as tire small 
amount used acted so favorably. I would like 
also to use it in mj' practice, as it will certainly 
prove very beneficial in all cases of dj'spepsia. 
New Lebanon, N. Y., Dec. 11, 79. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Having suffered for 
some months past from Gastric derangement 
and most distressing dysj'eptic symptoms, I was 
instructed by my physician a week or two ago, 
to make a trial of your new preparation Blalto- 
pepsine, and I am happy to say it lias given me 
more relief than anj' other remedy I have ever 
tried. The disagreeable nausea and vomiting 
after eating have altogether disappeared, my 
appetite is better than for a long time — the sick 
headaches tliat caused me so much annoyance 
have ceased to trouble me, and my general 
health seems fully re-established. These good 
results are due entirely to Maltopepsine, and 
I feel it an act of justice to you, and a duty to 
•others wlio may be suffering from lilve causes, 
to state tlie facts of the case. 

Youre, Resp'Uy, J. H. John.ston. 

C. A. MosiiER, Druggist, West Troy. N. Y. 

Messrs. Tilden k Co. — You certainly have 
got a wonderful preparation in your Maltopep- 
sine. I gave tlie samples to the doctors, and 
every one of them speali in its favor and say it 
is far superior to any similar preparation. 

One doctor gave it when Lactopeptine had 
failed him, and to his surprise was just the 
thing. 

H. M. Wilson, M. D., N. Y., Nov. 10, '79. 

Gentlemen — I consider your Maltopepsine 
the most valualile remedy ever known for Dys- 
pepsia and all forms of Gastric derangement. 



Indianola, Iowa, Jan. 21, 1880. 
Tilden & Co. — Have used your Maltopepsine 
in a case of obstinate vomiting in pregnane}', 
when everything had failed. The result was 
very gratifying— so much so, that I wish you to 
sen4 me one pound of Maltopepsine by express 
at once. Yours truly, 

E. L. Baker, M. D. 

B. M. Bibber, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Says : "Have been using your Maltopepsine 
freely and with the most perfect satisfaction, 
preferring it to any similar preparation 
known." 
A. T. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Keports that so far as he had used our Malto- 
pepsine, he had found it far superior to any 
other preparation he has ever used. 

New Lebanon, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1880. 
X. T. Bates, M. D. 

Messrs. Tilden k Co. — Of late I have been 
using your new preparation, the Maltopepsine, 
and am so highly pleased with its action, that I 
am induced to give you the results of my ex- 
perience with it. Almost invariably this rem- 
edy has given me satisfaction, and in several 
cases of dyspepsia and irritable stomach, when 
tlie several preparations of Pepsin and Bismuth 
and kindred agents have failed, tlie use of 
Maltopepsine has been a complete Success. I 
regard it particularly useful in debility of the 
stomach following acute or clironic gastritis, 
and that attendant upon convalescence from all 
exhausting diseases. 

In vomiting of pregnancy it is a superior 
remedy. It will be found highly useful in the 
diarrhoja of children; which is generally de- 
pendent upon imperfect digestion. 

The aluminium which you have incorporated 
into it is a happy idea. I heartily recommend 
it to the profession. 

E. M. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Speaks in the highest terms of our Malto- 
pepsine, also of our Saccharated — thinks the 
latter the strongest he lias ever used. 



FORMULA OF MALTOPEPSINE. 



.Sugar of Milk Zh oz. 

Nutritives of the Grain... 10 " 
Powdered Firwein 7 '' 



Pepsine 16 oz. I Hydrochloric Acid 5fl. dr. 

Diastase (i dr. Phosphoric Acid 3" " 

Lactic Acid .511. dr. Aluminium 3'' oz. 



PRICE LIST. 

Maltopepsine, (in oz. bot.) per oz % .7.5 I We also prepare the various Elixirs 

" •' " doz... 7.00 and Syrups in combination with Malto- 
" (Yj, ft), bot.) " lb 8.00 I pepsine. 

Prepared by Tilden &, Co., New Lebanon, N. Y., and 24: Lilberty St., N. T. 



Advertisements. VT 




An EPITOME of the numerous cases reported tnonthly 
in the Journal of Materia Medica embracing the following 
diseases, sent on application: 

Scrofula; Scrofulous enlargement of the cervical glands; Scrofulous 
affections of the bone; Scrofulous swelling and abscess of the knee; 
Scrofulous Eczema ; "White Swelling ; Scrofulous swelling of the glands 
of the neck. 

Cancerous affections ; Cancerous affections complicated with Scrofula ; 
Lupus. 

Necrosis of the Tibia, Femur and Ilium; Osteo-Periostitis; Exostosis 
of Ulna; Caries of Vertebra; Synovitis of knee joint ; Hip joint dis- 
eases ; Anchylosis. 

Psoriasis ; Prurigo. Tuberculous affections of the bones. 

Skin Diseases of all kinds. Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis. 

Syphilis; Syphilitic sore throat ; Gonorrhoea. 

Enlargement of the Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys. 

Bronchocele; Goitre; Exophthalmic Goitre. 

Epilepsy; Otorrhoea; Deafness. 

Diphtheria; Erysipelas; Erysipelas with Scrofula; Tonsillitis. 

Gangrene of the Lungs ; Dry Gangrene ; Pleuro-Pneumonia. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of the lodo Bromide Salts. 



WITH HYDRARGYRI BICHLORIDUM, 

And Alteratives as StilliDgin, Menispermin, Dulca- 
marin, Rumicin and Conicine. 

For some time we have made specially this preparation, to meet those cases 
constantly occurring in the practice of Physicians, in which the impression of 
mercury is required, and it has been the custom of many in the most inveterate 
cases of Scrofula, and particularly in that of Scrofulo-Syphilis, to give for a week 
this combination of one one-hundredth of a grrain to each fluid dram, and then 
resume the Elixir plain, alternating as circumstances indicate. In this special 
combination, we have increased the Stillingin and other alteratives specially 
applicable to the treatment of Syphilis and its complications, from that used in 
the plain Elixir. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of lodo Bromide Comp. Salts, 
and eight one-hundredths of a grain of Hydrargyri Bichloridum. 



WITH IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

We have added to our list the Elixir lodo Bromide of Calcium Comp. with 
Iodide of Potassium. Each ounce contains 72 grains of the lodo Broruide Comp. 
Salts, with 32 grains of Iodide of Potassium. The vegetable alteratives are the 
same as in the plain Elixir. 

TIIiDEN «& CO., New Lelianou, N. Y., and 34: Liitoerty St., New York. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



18 Advertisements. 



OAK LAWN RETREAT 



-FOR THE- 



INSANE, 



j-^oicsonsrviijijE!, ill. 



rpHIS INSTITUTION", founded by its present pro- 
-*■ prietor, is now in its ninth year of successful 
operation. Possessed of every conceivable advantage 
in location, site, retirement, and building arrange- 
ments — all carefully studied from the beginning — it 
is prepared to carry into effect the most advanced 
ideas in the treatment of the insane. It especially 
adapts itself to the care of cases of a chronic nature, 
where a home with something of permanency is an 
object. Favoring circumstances permit of lower rates 
of charge than can possibly be afforded in any other 
institution so supported. The proprietor presents his 
grateful acknowledgements to the medical profession 
for the countenance it has received. 

ANDREW McFARLAND, M. D., 

Sole Proprietor. 

October, 1880. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 19 



ST, FfillNCIS' BRftDLEy IIOSPITIIL 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluif, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studer. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benelit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is charged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



20 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC VTAIiKER <foSON 

Importers of 

AND 

Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 

AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKEE AND COLT 

SHOT GUNS. 




A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 

AND 

Sporting Equipments. 



REVOLVERS,. 

Fine Guilery. 

ALSO, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

HARDWARE ! 

125 and 127 

SOUTH WASHMTON 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 




(LXQ^TJIX) 



FORMULA : 

EACH FLUID DKACHM CONTAINS 

5 1-2 gr. free phosphoric acid (POg). 
3 gr. phosphate of lime (3CaO PO5). 
1-2 gr. phosphate of mag. (3MgO PO5) 
1-6 gr. phosphate of iron (Fea O3 PO5). 
1-1 gr. phosphate of potash (3 kO.POg). 

Total amount of Phosphoric Acid 
in one fluid drachm, free and com- 
bined, 7 grains. 

It contains no pyrophosphate, or 
metaphosphate of an y base whatever. 



F 



or Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness,. 
Diminished Vitality, Urinary Difficulties, Etc. 

HORSFORD'S 
ACID PHOSPHATES. 

Pi-epared according to the directions of Prof . E. N. HORSFORD, of Cambridge, Mass. 
There seems to be no diflference of opinion, in high medical authority, of the 
value of phosphoric acid, and no preparation has ever been oflfered to the public 
which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. 

It is not nanseons, but agreeable to the taste. 

No danger can attend its use. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. 



W. A. HAMMOND, M. D., late Surgeon-Gen- 
eral U. S. Army, said that under the use of ar- 
senic and Horaford's Acid Phosphate, a young 
lady rescued her reason who had been ren- 
dered insane by a dream. 

DR. M. H. HENRY, of New York, says: 
Horsford's Acid Phosphate possesses claims as 
a beverage beyond anything I know of in the 
form of Medicine, and in nervous diseases I 
know of no preparation to equal it. 



DR. REUBEN A. VANCE, of New York: 
The preparation on which I place the most re- 
liance is Horsford's Acid Phosphate. 

The late WINSLOW LEWIS, M. D., of Bos- 
ton, said : Having in my own person experi- 
enced those ills for which the Acid Phosphate 
is prescribed, I have found great relief and 
alleviation by its use, most cheerfully attest 
my appreciation of its excellence. 



Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free 
on application to manufacturers. 

Physicians desiring to test it will be furnished a bottle free of expense, except 
express charges, if they mention Peoria Medical Monthly. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, Rhode Island. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



SPECIMEN PAGE (See opposite page.) 

Notes of Hospital Practice. 

h 

^ Constipation Due to Want of Peristaltic Action. — A sitz- 

H bath is ordered every night, the water used being as cold as 

g the patient can bear ; or, upon rising in the morning, the 

iS spine and abdomen are sponged with cold water. In other 

^ cases, great benefit is derived from dashing water against the 

M abdomen while the patient stands up. ISTux vomica, com- 

>• bined with soap and rhubarb, has proved very serviceable. 

R The application of the faradic current, one pole of the bat- 

rf tery being placed over the spine, and the other passed up 

2 and down over the abdominal walls, has often been of great 

^ benefit. In still other cases, the health-lift is recommended. 

> Constipation Due to Chronic Inflammation of the Rectum. — 

^ The rectum is emptied by means of enemata. When it is 

35 thoroughly cleansed out, strychnia is injected locally, a fold 

^ of the mucous membrane being drawn down and the needle 

\i inserted. This same hypodermic method has given the most 

u excellent results in Dr. Thomson's hands in cases of constipa- 

P» tion accompanying enlarged p)T0state. In every instance the 

S rectum is first thoroughly emptied by means of an enema. 

^ Kissengen water,is prescribed in the morning, and a sup- 

^ pository of belladonna, or stramonium, used at night. Far- 

^ adization along the course of the colon, and hip-baths, are 

«j; also of service. 

H Constipation Following Febrile Diseases is treated by means 

of the compound jalap powder, 

p Constipation Associated with Chlorosis. — Dr^^ heat is applied 

5c to the feet and hands. In addition to the dry heat, the feet 

^ and arms are wrapped in clothes dipped in a solution of cap- 

^ sicum. The same application is made over the abdomen. 

M After these measures have been continued for some time, 

n cathartics are administered, the one most generally employed 

g atBellevue Hospital being the compound rhubarb pill. Of 

Ph these, three ane given at night, twice a week, or given every 

'^ night until the bowels have been rendered soluble. Iron is 

J, not used until the bowels have been rendered soluble. The 



3.500 COPIES SOLD IX NINE MONTHS. 






TAL PRACTICE. 

8vo., pp. 256. Price, $2.00 in clo., $2.50 in calf. 

iiows the Treatment of over 400 Diseases by eminent New York and Phil- 
adelphia Physicians. Among other things, it contains: 

'tlS^ £\'V^ ifN <f\ tf^ T\TnT T 9C! Treatment of Sore Nipples, Puerperal Fever, Vagin- 
, J^%J£ • K3r\J\J lJ£d Jit JLl tS ismus, Cystitis in the Female, Gathered Breasts, 
]3tiitis, Vaginismus. Management of the Funis, Dysmenorrhoea, Amenorrhcea, Ovarian Cysts, Carun- 
(! of the Urethra, Sleeplessness in Uterine Disorders, etc., etc. 

■% yTfc /^THl T'¥^/^#^T\9S3 Treatment of Thermic Fever, Collapse, Sexual Exhaustion, 
, £^%J £ » vV ^i/V^JJ' ^ Idiopathic Peritonitis, Tetanus, Chorea, Acute and Chronic 

secterj, etc., etc. 
*1'0' /^ TC TT^TC^ynr^T^ T%9Cf Treatment of the Menopause, Typhoid Fever, Organic 
. Jt»i V* * » tL iPif MT M HtH S%f SS Heart Disease, Sciatica, Saccharine Diabetes, Addi- 
la's Disease, Perityphlitis, Acute Tonsilitis, Acu'e Angina, Acute and Chronic Kheumatism, Dys- 
ipsia. Ulcer of the Stomach, Lumbago, the Opium Habit, etc., etc. 

^'SZJJrf^T' "WX fk i^T^rf^Onn A 'C TreatmentofBright'sDlsease, influenza. Diabetes 
,. «K*)V^ JT • U Jrk. %J\J^JLJ^ l9 Insipidus, Acute Rheumatism, Chronic Psoriasis, 
iistric Vertigo, the Night Sweats of Phthisis, Hfematemesis, Pneumonia, Pleurisy, Typhoid Fever, etc. 
|j%^3/>Tr^ /^lOrfTkGGJ' Treatment of Paraphimosis, Erysipelas, Intra-Capsular Frac- 
J JtSsV^Jl • \y-iSL\^5-ll!3 tures, Stricture, External Haemorrhoids, Nsevus Materna, Pros- 
'lorrhtea, Cystitis, Gleet, etc., etc. 

i"Obir\"B? iPiV /ii "IS XT' 9 £3 Treatment of Pneumonia, Empyema, Asthma, Pleurisy, 
J, .Kl*^^ • wXj.i3LX*iJAi SI3> Jaundice, Typhoid Fever, Peritonitis, etc., etc. 
S'D /'^"O nn "Ey ^TWT A C Treatment of vaginismus. Fibroids of the womb, Pmn- 
, iCx^JI •• JL a!* VF JLli Jr». O tus vulvae, Anteflexion, CanceroftheWomb, Abdominal 

egnancy, Leucorrha?a, Tympanites, Chronic Ovaritis, etc., etc. 

5TO^^^ /^^\TTT TC1S/''CS Treatm.ent of Gonorrha?al Cystitis, Acute Urethritis- 
. JRiXJ X. • \3rVr %J JdlJu Ja. (3 Perineal Fistula, Acute Retention of Urine, Cystorrha' 
a, etc., etc. 

I^TQl^^TC d" A ^/^TDTC'C! Treatment of Fibrous Anchylosis, chronic Synovitis, In- 
^jSki\JS.» \3JnL IL SitSd l9 growing Toe-Nall, injuries of the Joints, eic. 
iTStf'^'C T'"K3r/^TI/rC/^TVr'S! Treatment of Scarlet Fever, Constipation, Croup- 
1. JXi'vJC • A, jSuL%J lll^\S\J J^ K9 ous Pharyngitis, Acute Rheumatism, Cirrhosis of 
e Liver, Broncho- Pneumonia, ec, eic. 

3>^3tf^'C^ g* HJg"Tr rglTTT S gl Treatment of Dysenteric Diarrhosa, Flatulent Diarrhoea, 
\. JEk\3 ji m idiXJLAJLJijL O the Diarrhrea of Detention, Cholera Infantum, Nervous 
jeadache, SiolcHeadaciie, Malarial Headache, the Headache of Syphilis, the Headache of Kheumatism, 
irsemic Headache, Dyspeptic Headache, etc., etc. 

'U'O^r^TC X'T T IWT"© Treatmentof Acute Dysentery, Rpidemic Dysentery, Chronic 
!• SMt%M £ ' Jl Jo^ i^ JL b9 Dysentery, subacute Enteritis, Valvular and Aoritlc Lesions 
!' the Heart, Angina Pectoris, etc. 

ii'^irf^Tn IT tf^tf^TWB'TO' Treatmentof Mitral and Aortic Regurgitation, Typhoid 
\.EV\JX.» Ma\J\^ Sm.jL\^ Fever, Rum stomach, etc. 
'3T? llT^T* "52 A ^^IHT "B^'K? '^ Treatment of Menorrhagia, Abortion, etc., etc. 

^•^^Tri "IPI g-% GLlT'^r^ TTTI^'C Treatment of Migraine, Trigeminal Neural- 
k X%iV#£ c Jkde w« O^^VJT w iLi^ kS gla. Epilepsy, Insomnia, Insanity, Hay 
sthma, etc. 

3T? <n^lE* "FT A IMTTWSTtf^lCTT^'© Treatmentof Splnal congestion. Cerebral Ante- 

• X%>^L^Jb • JZiXak JjJL.ijUL V^.131 Ajf ^ mia. Acute Cerebral Meningitis, Spinal Anaemia. 

21 ^S ^% S^ iT^ ir\ lUI ET Al 'CS Trentmentof Dilatation of the Stomach, Tinea Favosa, 

IXW*"* \^WrTiC.RI 2» Post-Nasal Catarrh, Laryngeal Phthisis, Dropsy, Sjph- 

iticSore Throat, Paralysis of tUe Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve, etc., etc. 



»ROF. AG 

•reducible Hernia, etc. 

3R. WEIR 



EW'S 



Treatment of Fractured Patella, Hip-Joint Disease, 
Fractured Clavicle, Surgical Shock, Reducible and 



9 '^ ^ W IS* i I ' ^ Treatment of the Various Forms of 



*.,;-* Sent, post-2}aid, to any address, upon receipt of price, by the jiublisher . 

AMDEL M. MILLER, M. D., 536 SPRUCE ST., PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



Advertisements. 



NEW PHARMACEUTICALS 



WORTHY OP THE 



» 



N/TRO-GLYCERINE PILLS 



Nitro-glycerine is introduced on 
the autliority of Dr. Murrell, of Lon- 
don, as a remedy in angina pectoris 
and in cases of chronic neuralgia in 
any part of the body. Cases of an- 
gina pectoris which had resisted 
all attempts at even alleviation, 
much less cure, have promptly 
yielded to nitro-glycerine, and a 
number of cases of actual cure are 
reported. This is more than can be 
said of any other known remedy. 
In neuralgia the effects of this drug 
have, in some instances, been 
scarcely less marked. 

The pill form is very eligible, be- 
sides ensuring exactness of dose. 



Sanguis Bovinus Exsiccatus. 

In this preparation of blood we 
have a true food, the albumen being 
entirely retained. In this respect It 
differs from the various beef ex- 
tracts, beef essences, etc., in the 
market. These preparations are, 
from the very methods of their 
naanufacture, entirely deprived of 
albmen , t he true nutritive principle 
of beef, and are thus not foods in 
any proper sense of the word. 

Sanguis bovinus exsiccatus is 
blood deprived of nothing but its 
water and flbrin, which latter is 
naturally small in quantity and 
practically of no nutritive value. 



Liquor Ergots Purificatus. 

This form of ergot is of constant 
strength. In its preparation only 
the active principles of the drug 
are retained, all inert and noxious 
ingredients being removed. As 
these active principles ere assayed 
the liquor contains them in con- 
stant and definite proportions, 
and thus is obviated the uncer- 
tainty of strengih due to varia- 
bility in the quality of the sample 
of the drug employed. Liquor 
ergotte purificatus is as constant 
in its strength as morphia, quinia, 
or any of the other alkaloids of 
vegetable drugs. 



^ 



CASC/IR/l + CORDIAL 



This laxative and alterative 
preparation stands unequalled 
among pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions as a remedy in constipation. 
Its agreeable and efficient action 
has been abundantly attested by 
the medical profession of this 
country, and it stands now as a 
remedy of unquestionable efficacy 
in chronic constipation. Great 
care should be exercised in not pre- 
scribing too large a dose, inasmuch 
as cascara sagrada, its active ingre- 
dient.overcomes constipation by its 
tonic action on the bowel, rather 
than by direct laxative influence. 



M 



J|_FULL AND DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAES OF IHE AEOVE 

PX —WILL BE SENT FREE ON APPLICATION TO — 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich, 

Manufacturing Chemists and Special Dealers in New and Rare Drugs. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



?eori^ JViedidkl ]VIontl\ly. 

YOL. I. NOVEMBER, 1880. NO. 7. 

0f[iginnl ^ammnnimtion§. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Congestion of the Uterus. 



BY J. MURPHY, M. D. 



Every decade which elapses adds materially to the per- 
centage of uterine diseases among all classes of women, 
but especially among that class the members of which are 
compelled to attend to their household afiairs. This latter 
<3lass probably constitutes ninet}' per cent, of our entire 
adult female population, and when we consider that it may 
be, twenty per cent, of this class are laboring under some 
affection of the uterus, which necessarily impairs their 
health to a greater or less extent, and as necessarily impairs 
their usefulness in their families, the amount of the evil, 
and its far reaching disastrous consequences, can readily be 
■appreciated. The unfortunate relative position which the 
uterus occupies, with the abdominal viscera pressing on it, in 
the vertical position of the body, together with its being a 
pendant organ, and its venous circulation being in conse- 
quence easily interfered with, renders it easy to estimate its 
liability to disease, and also demonstrates the great, and in 
many cases almost insuperable, difficulties attendant on its 
treatment. Its anatomical structure favors the determina- 
tion of a large amount of blood to it, thus encouraging 
congestion ; while its physiological peculiarities render it 
sensitive and irritable, and very susceptible of derangement 
and disease. 

Without referring farther to general uterine disease, or to 
the causes which may induce it, I will consider briefly a condi- 
tion of the uterus which may legitimately be considered as 
preliminary to almost every disease of which it is suscepti- 



1G2 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

ble — I mean congestion of that organ. Unfortunately, 
from a variety of circumstances which it is unnecessary I 
sliould farther refer to, this congestion has frequently ex- 
isted for a lengthened period, before the attention of the 
physician is attracted to it, or at least before he has had an 
opportunity of verifjnng its presence either by the hand or 
the eye; and at this time he probably finds conjoined with 
the congestion an indurated, hypertrophied, and ulcerated 
neck. But when the opportunity of an early examination 
is afforded us, we invariably find a simple congested condi- 
tion probably of the whole organ, certainly of its neck, 
showing that congestion is usually a condition precedent of 
all the diseases to which it is subject. It is legitimate 
enough to conclude then that the removal of the primary 
lesion — the congestion — if accomplished sufliciently early,, 
will prevent the manifestation of other diseases, and that 
if other diseases have set in, any treatment which we may 
adopt is not likely to be followed by any positive or perma- 
nent benefit until that congestion has been relieved. 

What system of treatment are we to adopt then which 
will be likel}^ to accomplish this desideratum ? Persistence 
in the recumbent position, with the pelvis somewhat ele- 
vated, is one of the most important factors in combating 
this- disease ; but it is not available in the class of patients 
which I refer to in this article, viz : those who are obhged 
to do their own house work. Among them such measures 
must be resorted to in order to meet the exigencies of the 
situation, as can be practically carried out by our patients. 
This class of cases are, I believe, more annoying and per- 
plexing to the general practitioner than almost any other,. 
and their results are too often an opprobrium to medical 
science. The question as to what we are to do here is a 
momentous one. Any reply to it involves the unfor- 
tunate admission that the resources of our profession, 
so far developed at least, aflx>rd no very adequate, satisfac- 
tory, or radical treatment for this disease. 

Internal remedies are entirely nugatory in combating 
the symptoms, and can only be considered useful in restor- 
ing depraved function, or in strengthening the general 
system, in those cases, where the one may be deranged, and 
the other debilitated. 

Of the numerous methods of local treatment whicb 
have been suggested, there are very few which in 'practice 
appear to exercise any very favorable influence over the- 



Original Comrnunications. 163 

disease. The various pessaries — almost iiafiuite iu number, 
variety and conformation — which have been put forward as 
80 many specifics in uterine affections are, it is almost un- 
necessary for me to say, wholh^ incapable of restoring a 
congested uterus, or indeed of relieving any of the diseases 
what spring from and accompany that congestion. All 
pessaries are simply mechanical powers, invented by 
ingenious artisans, who know little of the anatomy of the 
parts, and probably still less of the mischief those instru- 
ments may produce. They are not aware that the mere 
vis ineriiae of a mechanical power is wholly inapplicable to 
this class of diseases. They forget that force from below, 
generates resistance from above; and that the uterus placed 
between the upward action of the pessarj^ and the in- 
creased downward pressure of the abdominal viscera, has 
actually the existing congestion increased, in place of being 
relieved or diminished. This is the first mischievous effect 
of the pessary. Its second effect is even more disastrous 
than its first. The inevitable result of every mechanical 
appliance in the vagina to push a congested and prolapsed 
uterus up into its natural position and retain it there, will 
be the production in the end of complete or partial retro 
or anteversion. It cannot be otherwise. The pressure 
below from the instrument, and that above from the 
abdominal viscera, are not likely to operate on the uterus 
in a line with its axis, and the moment there is any devia- 
tion from that line, either the neck or the fundus is pushed 
out of the axis of the organ, and some species of anterior 
or posterior displacement is liable to occur. I believe that 
in the class of cases I have been referring to, all mechanical 
vaginal appliances are either entirely ineficacious or posi- 
tively injurious. Every experienced practitioner must have 
seen cases where the most untoward events have ensued 
from their use. I have had occasion to see many such 
cases. One recurs to me at this writing, which several of 
m}' colleagues in Peoria were kind enough to see with me. 
It was the case of a 3'oung unmarried lady, who while 
absent from home at a boarding school, had a pessary 
introduced by the physician of the establishment, for some 
uterine difliculty, with the injunction that it should be 
worn for a lengthened period. Daring the eighteen 
months that she continued in school, it was occasionally 
removed and replaced. After her return home it was re- 
moved by myself, the parts in the meantime having become 



164 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

very painful. I found the neck of the uterus bent back at 
nearl}^ a right angle with its body, and that the continued 
pressure which it had exercised on the posterior part of the 
vagina, had produced quite a large ulcer there. 

Astringent injections into the vagina, and the various 
astringent and irritating applications which are made to 
the neck of the uterus in this disease, although not open 
to such grave objections as the pessary, are still objection- 
able, first, from their general ineficiency in controlling the 
symptoms; secondly, from the injurious effects which they 
exercise on the vagina and neck, adding in many instances 
to the already existing irritation, and astringing the capil- 
lar}^ vessels of those parts to such an extent that their vital 
power is weakened, and the healthy action necessary for a re- 
turn of the parts to a normal condition is seriously interfered 
with; thus actually favoring a continuance of the derange- 
ment they were intended to relieve. I am compelled to 
pass over without further consideration, many methods of 
treating this atfection which have from time to time been 
suggested. Unfortunately the greater part of these sug- 
gestions have emanated from physicians whose practice is 
among the richer classes, or in hospitals, and is no doubt 
very successful ; but in that class to which I have been 
referring, none of the modes of treatment which I have 
seen suggested by medical writers will eftect a cure, often 
will not even alleviate the symptoms. 

Tired of persisting in the use of agents which in my 
hands did not exercise any positive or certain iufluience in 
curing congestion of the uterus, I, several years since, 
adopted a method of treatment in those cases diftering in 
some respects from that ordinarily adopted, and which in 
my practice has proved more successful than any I had pre- 
viously used, and which I will now detail as briefly as 
possible. 

Unquestionably one of the most important factors in 
the treatment of this disease, without which no other treat- 
ment will be more than palliative, if even that, is to sup- 
port the abdominal viscera, and as far as possible prevent 
their pressing on the uterus. This is undoubtedly one of 
the cardinal points of the treatment. I have never been 
able to procure any so-called '■^Abdominal Supporters,'^ from 
which more than temporary advantage has been received. 
Attractive as they are to the eye, with all their luxurious 
arrangement of springs and pads and cushions, they are gen- 



Original Communications. 165 

erally useless to a woman who has to encounter the drudgery 
of her household. I am acquainted with a woman who has 
over two hundred dollars worth of those very elegant contriv- 
ances hung up in her chamber, and who is now with much 
comfort and advantage wearing one of the bandages de- 
scribed below. The bandage which I use is a very simple 
one. It ma}^ be composed of any firm, thin textile fabric, 
doubled, stiffened and quilted. It should be sulBcientl}^ 
wide to reach from the pubes to the epigastrum, and long 
enough to encircle the body, minus two inch^es. A gore 
three or four inches wide at the base and reaching within 
an inch of the other edge, should be cut out of the center 
of the bandage, and the edges afterwards sewn neatly 
together. Fastening the bandage temporarily round the 
abdomen, a vertical cut should be made in it from below to 
nearly its upper edge on each side opposite the center of 
the crest of the ilium ; and into each of those cuts a gore 
three or four inches wide at the base should be accurately 
adjusted. The bandage should be laced behind, and in 
order to give it the required elasticity, a strip of india 
rubber cloth should be attached to each of its ends. The 
object of removing the gore shaped piece in the center of 
the bandage, is to form a concavity in the front, large 
•enough to receive the convexity of the abdomen, and when 
it is tightened, a direct upward pressure is thus exercised 
on the abdominal viscera. The object of the lateral gores 
is to allow the bandage to expand over the iliac bones. In 
some cases shoulder straps and a padded perineal strap are 
required to keep the apparatus in position. Frequently 
several bandages will be made before a perfectly fitting one 
is procured. 

Although blood-letting of every character is very little 
practised at present, the profession is aware of the beneficial in- 
fluence which its local abstraction has on congested surfaces. 
In congestion of the uterus it is unquestionably a most 
•eflicient remedy. The withdrawal of two or three ounces 
of blood from the neck of the uterus has a very gratifying 
•effect in relieving the back ache and the disagreeable feel- 
ing of pelvic fulness, which are such constant symptoms. 
How often those local bleedings should be practised must 
depend on the effect which they produce. I have been in 
the habit of repeating them every six or eight days, as the 



166 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

exigencies of the case may demand, until the symptoms re- 
quiring their continuance are removed. Leeches suit well 
enough, but they are not always procurable, are usually 
troublesome in their application, and their use is often 
repulsive to our patients. Simple scarification of the neck 
accomplishes the object very satisfactorily, and if sufficient 
blood is not obtained, Ave can by means of any exhausting 
apparatus procure the requisite quantity. A very conveni- 
ent and efficient air pump can be extemporized for this 
purpose, by cutting off the end of a large sized hard rubber 
female syringe. 

The third important agent which I use in this disease, 
and one on which I place much reliance, is the throwing a 
stream of cold vv^ater directly on the neck of the uterus. 
The unequivocal feeling of relief which follows the use of 
cold water, applied in this manner, in this disease, aflbrds 
the most convincing evidence of its efficacy. The ease 
which the patient experiences during its application, some- 
times induces its continuance longer than what is requisite,. 
or perhaps useful. Its efficacy evidently reaches beyond 
the point of its application, and by sympathy of continuity 
probably extends to the whole uterus. The water should 
be used if possible twice daily, for fully half an hour at a 
time. It should be thrown up the vagina with some degree 
of force and continuously, by means of a common elastic 
enema syringe, with along ivory or bone point. The point 
should be long enough to nearly touch the neck of the 
uterus, as on the water striking it in an unbroken stream 
depends in a great measure the success of the application. 
In winter it will be requisite to take the frostj^ chill off the 
water before using it. Those are the chief agencies which 
I use in combatting this very frequent and very trouble- 
some affection ; and from which I have derived more satis- 
factory results, than from any other system of treatment 
which I had previously used. In addition, I admonish my 
patients to observe as great a degree of quietude as possible ; 
to sleep on a firm, level mattress; to avoid over-reaching or 
heavy lifting;, to eat easily digested nutritious food ; and 
especially to keep the bowels as free from feculent matter,. 
as regularity of habit, and the judicious use of aperients,. 
or the syringe, may be able to accomplish. 

Peoria, October, 1880. 



Original Coimf)%unications. 16T 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Contribution to the Tlierapeiitics of Neurasthenia. 



BY 0. B, WILL, M. D. 



It is not the object of this paper to present anj^thing- 
new in regard to the nature of the pathological conditions 
underlying the manifestations of neurasthenia. My sole 
purpose is to convey to the mind of the reader, in as lucid 
a manner as possible, the practical results of my experience 
in the treatment of the disease, and to that end I do not 
account it necessary to enter into a conventional descrip- 
tion of the history and nature of the malady further than is 
required in considering in detail the indications for treat- 
ment. 

The fact is that in every case of well marked neurasthe- 
nia there is such a complexity of symptoms and conditions 
as to render it impossible to determine with exactitude the 
primary cause, and consequently certain course of the dis- 
ease. The action and reaction of cause and effect evade the 
severest scrutiny, and it is only by considering the manifes- 
tations in the aggregate that a knowledge of the controlling 
systemic lesion is at all arrived at. Therefore I say that 
whatever may be the general controlling influence in the 
state called neurasthenia, or the pathological condition 
underlying it, the essential practical features are another 
thing, bearing no constant relation to it, and are those of 
immediate concern from a therapeutic point of view. 

Before passing to a consideration in detail of the several 
indications, and the manner in which I am in the habit of 
meeting them, I desire to raise an earnest protest against 
the insult offered to the observing powers of hosts of our 
older practitioners, by the attempt of recent writers to 
place the disease whose therapeutics we are considering, in 
the category of those of recent origin. Simply applying a 
new name to a condition cannot affect its antiquity or 
nature. " A rose by any other name will smell as sweet." 
The claim of nervous exhaustion as a " new " disease cer- 
tainly cannot be sustained in the light of the past. 

But to return to my subject: In treating a case of 
neurasthenia the first thing to which I direct my attention 
is the condition of the digestive apparatus, because, as the 
reader will readily understand, it is only through and by 
the restoration of its proper function that we can hope for 
any length of time to successfully introduce into the system. 



168 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the necessary remedies and food. In all cases there is 
found a greater or less disturbance of this function, either 
primarily or secondarily. I generally find acidity, flatu- 
lence and constipation as the most troublesome features. 
There has seldom been any evidence of a catarrhal condi- 
tion of the gastric mucous membrane, in cases which have 
fallen under my care, the condition being that of simple 
debility and relaxation, with a light, yellowish white coat 
on a pale, flabby tongue. In one case, however, I particu- 
larly remember the existence of an extremely irritable con- 
dition of stomach, but in my experience this is very rare. 
In the majority of cases, where there is a poor appetite, 
with acidity and extreme flatulence of stomach — and the 
latter I have found to be a very troublesome feature — I 
prescribe for the relief of the latter and improvement in the 
tone of the stomach and its digestion, the following mix- 
ture, with the most admirable results : 

p: Tinct. nucis vom., 3 drachms. 

Acid, nitro mur., dllut., 2 drachms. 

Tinct. cinchonia comp., 
Tinct. gent, comp , aa 2 ounces. 

M. Sig. From a tea to a desert spoonful half an hour before meals. 

If acidity is not present the acid may be withheld. If 
■constipation is not excessive the above often suffices to pro- 
duce a daily evacuation, but if the same is more or less 
obstinate I invariabl}' prescribe the following, which is sim- 
ply charming in its action, and according to my experience 
never fails to give satisfaction : 

^ Fluid ext. cascara sagrada, 1 ounce. 
Extract of malt, 2 ounces. 

Pepsin wine, 1 ounce. 

M. Sig. From a tea to a desert spoonful after each meal. 

Aside from the laxative influence of the cascara, the 
•combination exerts a beneficial influence upon digestion 
in those cases in which constipation is a leading feature. 

After the relief of the most urgent symptoms of digest- 
ive disturbance comes the necessity for the introduction of 
food of a character at once nourishing and easily digested. 
In most cases I have found milk well borne, and urged its 
use in increasing quantities. Oysters in the raw state are, 
for those who like them, an excellent article of diet for the 
neurasthenic. Beef, also, and vegetables, are added to the 
list as soon as the stomach can well bear them. 

Connected with the digestive disturbance, common to 
■other conditions than this, we find a very prominent and 
almost characteristic feature presenting itself in neurasthe- 
nia in the shape of excessive general muscular debility. I 



Original Communications. 169' 



have seen those suffering from this malady possess so little 
muscular power as to be unable to raise themselves from, 
the chair in which they were placed, or even a moderately 
sized book from an adjoining table, when, to all casual 
appearance, they were in a moderate degree of health. In 
such extreme cases I invariably counsel absolute rest in the 
recumbent posture. One lady under my care, who was 
suffering from neurasthenia, brought about by a chronic 
ulceration of urethra and bladder, I kept in bed for two 
months, in order to retrieve the muscular strength, using 
applications of mild currents of electricity occasionally to- 
stimulate gently and inexhaustively the contractility of the 
muscles and the functional activity of the internal organs. 
The latter treatment I consider of great importance in a 
certain class of cases, including those in whom an erect 
posture serves to aggravate existing local affections. 

Eight-tenths of the neurasthenic invalids who have fallen 
under my notice were females, suffering from either 
primary or secondary inflammatory or ulcerative affections 
of the urinary or reproductive organs. All affections of 
this nature, when under the influence of the morbid sensi- 
bility occasioned by the exhausted state of the nerves and 
nerve centres, are peculiarly obstinate and intractable. I 
have found that all remedies which have a good effect when 
applied in the simple form of these local affections, readily 
lose their influence in the neurasthenic state, and require to 
be alternated in use in order that their good effect may be 
sustained. The most constantly useful local application to 
the urethra, vagina and uterus under these circumstances I 
have found to be the iodoform ointment, or the same in the 
dry state, but even it requires to be alternated with other 
local alterative applications, such as the silver nitrate, lead 
sub-acetate, potassa chlorate, etc. 

In the neurasthenic state the mind is weak and needs to 
be provided with rest by judicious care in the removal of 
all causes for solicitude and anxiety, personal or otherwise. 
The circumstances of each individual case must of course 
determine the exact course to be pursued for the accom- 
plishment of this object. 

But after all has been done for the removal of the com- 
paratively local affections just enumerated, and many others, 
the anxious physician oftentimes fails to get in his neuras- 
thenic patient the improvement which he feels justly 
entitled to, and which he might expect under almost any 



170 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

other circumstances. Why is it? Beneath, and governing 
all, there seems to remain a lesion of nutrition — a prepon- 
derancy of waste over repair — associated either as a cause 
or an effect, with two of the distinguishing characteristics 
of what is called nervous exhaustion, morbid sensibility, both 
general and special, and a disturbed, fluctuating circulation 
of blood. A patient laboring under this condition is mor- 
bidly sensitive, and acutely alive to every impression, 
whether of greater or lesser moment, upon mind or body. 
The natural reflex excitability is increased many fold, and 
the sufi'erer is thereby rendered more and more wretched 
and helpless. The cerebro-spinal and vaso motor nervous 
systems being in such a condition it is not at all surprising 
that the circulation of the blood should be fluctuating and 
uncertain. Such patients always sufler from cold extremi- 
ties, sudden flushings of the face and other parts of the 
body, irregular secretions, chilliness, nervous sweats, teip- 
porary local congestions of various organs, sleeplessness, 
palpitations, and all those conditions which arise from a 
disturbed circulation. 

Right here comes the important question, do we have 
any remedy or remedies able to correct this state of aflairs? 
Measurably I think we have. The well known action of 
belladonna is to energize the vaso motor nervous force, and 
increase the tone of the capillary circulation. By what 
peculiar change in the molecular forces this action is 
brought about I know not. It is enough to know, for my 
purpose, that such is the case. Whether the lesion of 
nutrition which perpetuates the nervous exhaustion is acted 
upon directly, I know not, but that by the maintenance of 
a regular and equal vascular supply the lesion of nutrition 
is gradually wiped out, experience and observation compel 
me to believe. Under the influence of belladonna the cir- 
culation acquires a steadiness which is astonishing, and a 
glow of natural warmth pervades the system. But in order 
that this influence be derived from its use, it must he given 
in small and frequently repeated doses. The reader will please 
mark the emphasis, for in no other way than that indicated 
will its administration prove satisfactory. The following is 
the manner in which I have been in the habit of prescribing 
it: 

Jjl Fluid fixt. belladon., 8 drops. 

Ferri cit., soluble, 15 drops. 

Vinum, sherry, 1 ounce. 

Afjua dist., ;} ounces. 

M. Slg. Tcaapoonful evoy two hours from early morning until latebed time. 



Original CornTnunications. 171 

The neurasthenic patient needs iron, and I have found 
the citrate in small doses to be the most satisfactory form. 
Coupled with the use of the other remedies as may be indi- 
cated, the use of belladonna will suffice to remove the 
unpleasant flushings, nervous sweats, sleeplessness and pal- 
pitations, assist in provoking a healthy peristaltic action of 
the intestines, and prevent the excessive loss of animal heat 
from which these patients particularly suffer. 

The reader will understand, of course, that this also is a 
temporizing remedy, and must, in order to have its effects 
become permanent, be backed up by all the hygienic influ- 
ences at command, coupled as before stated with a good 
substantial regimen. 

The foregoing is, briefly, the writer's way of managing 
this class of cases, in which he has met with marked suc- 
-cess. In endeavoring to be brief he may have proven dog- 
matic, and left unsaid what should have been said, or said 
in a different manner. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 



A Case of Retroversion of tlie Uterus in a Woman Three 
Months Pregnant. 

On the night of October 8, 1880, I was called to see 
Mrs. JE. I learned on arriving there that she had been 
€onfined to her bed about a week, and had been under the 
care of a physician for nearly that length of time. Her 
friends having expressed a wish to have another physician 
called in, he told them to do so and he would retire from 
the case. I found her suffering with great pain in her 
bowels. On examination found them much swollen, and 
tympanitic over a part of them, but in the left iliac region, 
I discovered what appeared to be a tumor, about the size 
of a man's head. On inquirj^ I learned that about ten days 
previous to this, in lifting a tub, she thought she hurt her- 
self, and noticed soon after that she had difficulty in voiding 
her urine. This led me to suspect that the apparent tumor 
was a distended bladder. I asked her if she had difficulty 
in making water now. She said it just dribbled away, and 
had been doing so for several days. I told her what I 
thought the trouble was, and that I should have to get a 



172 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

catheter and remove the water, as I had none with me. At 
this, a woman present suggested that the patient was in the 
family way — her elderly appearance had led me to think 
she was past that time of life. On inquiry she said she- 
thought she was about three months advanced in pregnancy. 
At least it was that long since she had had her monthly- 
flow. I then made a vaginal examination and found a 
pregnant womb, retroverted ; the fundus lying in the hollow 
of the sacrum and the os pressing up against the neck of 
the bladder. This at once revealed the whole difficulty. 
As soon as I could obtain a catheter I drew from the dis- 
tended bladder a large chamber full of urine. I then had 
the patient get on her knees in bed, with her shoulders as 
low as possible. With two fingers in the vagina I pressed 
firmly upwards and forward against the fundus of the 
uterus until I had the satisfaction of feeling it pass back 
over the promonotory of the sacrum, and the womb assume 
its natural position. This was accomplished in a very few 
minutes, although from the history of the case, the retro- 
version must have taken place at least ten days before this. 
The bowels had not moved since the accident except by 
injections, and were much bloated and tympanitic. I gave 
her a prescription recommended by Dr. Meigs for tympani- 
tis: 

Manna, 1 ounce. 

Anise seed, 1 drachm. 

Boiling water, 8 ounces. 

After standing half an hour strain and add 3 drachms of 
carb. magnesia. Ordered a wineglassful every two or three 
hours until it operated. This very effectually opened her 
bowels and relieved the tympanitic condition. I had to use 
the catheter for two or three days, when the bladder again 
assumed its natural functions. No symptoms of abortion 
followed. She is making a very good recovery considering 
the length of time the uterus was in this unnatural position. 
Instances are recorded where the womb has righted itself 
at this period of gestation by keeping the urine drawn off. 
But there is a risk in leaving these cases to nature, for if 
not soon replaced, adhesions may form, the organ is contin- 
ually growing larger, and the process of replacing it will 
become more and more difficult, while the life of the foetus 
is greatly endangered. 

Peoria, 111. J. L. H. 



Original Communications. 173 

[Tor the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Catarrh of the Bladder in the Female — Treated Success- 
fully by Dilatation of the Urethra. 

I had a very interesting case a short time since, and as 
the treatment was so eminently successful, thought it 
might be of assistance to some of the readers of your 
monthly. Mrs. F., one of our wealthiest ladies, had been 
suffering severely with chronic catarrh of the bladder for 
some weeks. She had terrible tenesmic pains in the blad- 
der, constant desire to void urine a few drops at a time, 
anaemic, distressed expression, " complete loss of appetite, 
et caetera." She had employed several of our best physi- 
cians, and as she said, they had exhausted the materia 
medica. She had been fed on opium, belladonna and all 
kinds of diuretics until she was about disgusted. As she 
was six months advanced in pregnancy I made a careful 
examination, thinking it might depend on pressure, but 
everything seemed normal in that respect. So after testing 
the capacity of the bladder, I dilated the urethra and para- 
lyzed the sphincter muscle so as to very readily admit my 
index finger. Of course all this was done under the influ- 
ence of sulphuric ether. The bladder was gently syringed 
with liq. calcis one pint, acid carbol. half a drachm, for 
three days, and my patient has not had a semblance of a 
pain since. I saw her this morning, three weeks from the 
date of operation, and under the influence of tonics and a 
generous diet does not look like the same woman. 

A. Y. Banes, M. D. 

St. Joseph, Mo., October 2, 1880. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Boracic Acid. 



My experience in the use of boracic acid, considering 
the length of time I have been using it, has been some- 
M^hat extensive; limited, however, almost exclusively to its 
use as a local remedy. So uniformly efficient has it proved 
that I am induced to record my evidence favoring its use, 
and attest its value as a therapeutic agent. From the 
favorable reports from other sources of its salutary effects 
as a local application in gonorrhoea, I was induced to give 
it a trial, thinking, however, that like many other remedies 



174 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

recommended, it would prove successful occasionally only, 
and one of many to be tried in the event of failure by ordi- 
nary methods. Of twelve cases treated, regardless of the 
stage of the disease, whether inflammatory or chronic, 
boracic acid was used in all. Of the twelve cases, eight 
were cured with it alone, no other remedy being used ex- 
cepting bicarb, potassa, which was given only in those 
cases the disease just beginning, and for a short time more 
inflammatory or much pain and burning experienced in 
micturating. The maximum length of time requisite 
for a cure was eighteen days. Four cases terminated in 
recovery in five, eight, eleven and thirteen days respect- 
ively. In five cases the treatment was inaugurated very 
soon after the first appearance of the disease, and in each 
the inflammatory condition was much less than is usual. 
The four cases which were not cured with the boracic acid 
alone were those in which the disease had existed for some 
time, had become more chronic and required the addition 
of an astringent. Sulphate of zinc was chosen, and com- 
bined with the acid. The strength used was in all cases a 
saturated solution in water alone ; that is to say, a given 
quantity of water, to which was added as much of the acid 
as would be dissolved, and injected three times daily. I 
have also found it yield excellent results in vaginal leu- 
corrhoea, in granular inflammation of the cervix and 
vagina. ISTo other remedy that I have ever used have I 
obtained such good results as from this in pruritus vulva, 
in a number of instances immediate relief following its 
application. I have also used it as a local application in 
three cases of eczema, two acute and one chronic. The 
result was all that could be desired, the intense itching be- 
ing relieved immediately following its application, and its 
continued use in connection with suitable constitutional 
remedies, eventuating in a cure. I also used it in a case of 
poisoning from poison ivy ; the case, a young lady, whose 
face, neck and ears were all involved, completely covered 
with the characteristic eftects from contact with the poison 
ivy, at the end of four days no trace of the disease remain- 
ing, the patient applying it freely upon the parts aftected, 
the strength of the solution being the same as indicated 
above. Dr. J. Perrin Johnson, of this city, oculist and 
aurist, whose experience in the use of boracic acid has ex- 
tended over a longer time than my own, informs me that 
he has obtained excellent results from its use in naso-phar- 



Clinical Lectures. 175 



ingeal catarrh, applying with a syringe a saturated solution 
■daily ; also in ottorhbea, cleansing the ear daily with the 
solution, and in connection with tannic acid and glycerine 
in chronic conjunctivitis, and with aqua camphor alone in 
acute conjunctivitis, regarding it especially a remed}" of 
much value in the latter named disease. That boracic 
acid is destined to take a high place in the estimation of 
the profession as a valuable remedy in diseased raucous 
membranes, there can be no doubt, and from its superior 
antiseptic properties would undoubtedly prove especially 
•efficacious as an internal remedy in those diseases where an- 
tiseptics are known to be useful, as diphtheria, scarlatina, 
etc. H. S. 



Peoria, 111, October, 1880. 



liniml WntnreB. 



[Special Report for the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Cystitis in the Female. 



A CLINICAL LECTURE BY WM. GOODELL, M. D , 
Professor of Clinical Gynaecology in the University of Pennsylvania. 



Very few women are free from this trouble at some 
period or other in their lives. If the womb happens to be 
retroverted, or anteverted, the consequent pressure upon 
the neck of the bladder is very likely to bring on inflam- 
mation. Again, it may be due to the pressure of a neigh- 
boring tumor, or one of the internal organs, or be the 
result of a tedious labor or forceps case. It is very hard to 
treat cystitis successfully. One method has been to perfor- 
ate the bladder and remove the irritation, by making a 
vesico-vaginal fistula. The great difficulty lies in the innate 
tendency of such artificial fistulae to heal up at once, so 
that it needs our constant attention, and, perhaps, several 
operations, to keep the fistula open. Knowing how hard 
it is to cure a natural vesico-vaginal fistula [i. e., one pro- 
duced during the process of labor, or by some other natu- 
ral cause), this difiiculty in keeping an artificial opening 
patulous must seem very remarkable to you, and yet such 
is always the case. The bladder is usually very much 
thickened by the cystitis, and not only is the operation a 



176 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

very delicate and laborious one, but, as I have said above^ 
a clean-cut incision tends to heal rapidly, "We may attempt 
to get at the root of the disorder by the introduction inta 
the vagina, night and morning, of a suppository contain- 
ing one grain of opium and one grain of belladonna. Or^ 
we may use rectal suppositories containing one grain of the 
watery extract of opium. Joined with this treatment, 
which gives very good results in some cases, only the light- 
est of food should be allowed. Suppose, however, that we 
are led to believe that the cystitis is largely due to the 
acrid qualities of the urine. Of course, when this, is the 
case, our efforts must be directed to the neutralization of 
the urine, and I should prescribe from ten to fifteen minims 
of liquor potassii thrice daily in milk. Joined with this 
the same amount of the tincture of belladonna may be ad- 
ministered. If both of these modes of treatment fail, we 
may try to cure by injections into the bladder, say of from 
four to five ounces of "a solution containing from two to- 
three grains of morphia. The bladder absorbs but very 
slightly, still this injection must not be long retained. A 
German gynaecologist has lately advised the injection of 
normal urine into the bladder. The bladder is, of course, 
intended for healthy urine, and I have no doubt but that 
this method has great merit, although I have not yet tried 
it. Of late years an operation has been devised for the 
relief of cystitis. If you pass your finger through the 
junction of the urethra and bladder, you will touch, in the 
vast majority of cases, a very painful spot. This tender- 
ness may be due either to the presence of a fissure, or of 
an unhealed ulcer. Physicians in England have cured cys- 
titis by forcibly dilating the urethra. If the cystitis be de- 
pendent upon the ulcer, the partial paralysis of the con- 
stringing muscle consequent upon the dilatation, is the best 
possible remedy. The woman, after the dilatation has been 
accomplished, passed her water with far more ease through 
the yielding sphincter. I remember one instance where I 
performed a dilatation without any success. It was the 
case of a woman who had remained all day in a stage- 
coach without making her water; as a consequence of 
which imprudence she had a terrible attack of cystitis, 
joined with retroversion of the womb. Dilatation did no 
good in that case. 

This patient was confined with her second child last 
March a year. She is to-day in the third month of a third 



Clinical Lectures. Yll 



pregaancy. Ever since the birth of her first child she has 
suffered from dysuria. Lately she has been obliged to pass 
her water twenty or thirty times during the day, and from 
five to ten times during the night. You remember that I 
dilated this woman's urethra on the 7th of last March. So 
much good was affected by that dilatation that she wants 
me to perform the operation a second time. Sometimes 
we give rise to dangerous bleeding during the process of 
dilatation, but the hemorrhage is usually controllable. If 
much blood escapes, just pass a threaded needle under- 
neath the part and close up the wound with a stitch. You 
see that while I have been talking to you I have intro- 
duced a uterine dilator, and have been gradually and gently 
dilating the sphincter. I usually have a slight laceration ; 
to-day the tear has been the cause of quite considerable 
bleeding, owing to the highly congested state of the parts. 
•Some doctors use the uterine focceps for dilating, but I 
prefer this instrument. After inserting and separating the 
blades as far as necessary, I allow it to stay in for a short 
time. You see that it is provided with a little rat-hook 
which holds it in place. I think that I have now dilated 
sufficiently to enable me to insert the tip of my little finger. 
By gently forcing my finger I am getting it in further and 
■further. I always take this opportunity to investigate the 
bladder and see that there is no stone in it. There is none 
here, and, moreover, I am not able to discover any serious 
roughness of the lining membrane of the bladder, except 
just at its neck. I have, as you see, passed my little finger 
all the wa}^ in, and will now do the same with my index 
finger. No harm can happen from this, if it be done care- 
fully. I may say, in passing, that very many physicians 
insert their little finger into the bladder for the purpose of 
•diagnosing tumors, etc. In the vast majority of cases dila- 
tation is followed by signal success. This woman has only' 
to rise once or twice, at night now, instead of five or ten 
times as formerly. By the way, let me call your attention 
to the remarkable association existing between the brain 
and the bladder. When one's bladder is irritated and not 
working rightly, the attention is sure to be directed to that 
organ, and the more we think of it the more frequently we 
have to pass water. I have succeeded in getting the sec- 
ond joint of my index finger through the sphincter, and I 
have now carried the dilatation far enough. I told you that 
this woman was in the third month of pregnancy. Some 



178 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

would, no doubt, consider any operation, such as dilatation, 
dangerous under the circumstances, but I am quite sure 
that no harm will come of it. I shall order the woman to 
bed until she is entirely over the effects of the ether. 
There will be but very little pain consequent upon the^ 
dilatation. 



Notes from St. Francis Hospital, Peoria, 111. 



BY J, T. STEWART, M. D., 
Surgeon to the Hospital. 



CHOREA. 

John G., from Minonk, age twelve and a half, admitted' 
August 24. Pie is large for his age, well proportioned, and 
of a healthy family. He lirst evinced symptoms of chorea 
about January 1, 1880, while attending school. The first 
symptom which attracted attention was the shaking of his 
hand in writing, which increased until he had to give up 
the exercise. The disease slowly developed, but unfortu- 
nately he was continued at school. After the hot weather 
came on, he got overheated one day, and medical aid was 
summoned. What the treatment was I was not able to 
learn. 

On his arrival at this Hospital August 24, he had had 
the disease about eight months, and was still growing 
worse. His limbs were in constant motion, as were the 
muscles of his face. One saving clause in his case was, 
that he slept well at night, his bowels were regular and 
appetite fair. Ordered Fowler's solution, five drops in a 
teaspoonful of elix. pyrophosphate iron, three tinies a day. 

August 31. No perceptible change. Ordered the- 
above given four times daily. 

September 7. Very slight improvement noticed; con- 
tinued the same treatment with the addition of one grain 
of sulphate of zinc to each dose. 

September 14. Improvement very decided, appetite 
good, gaining in weight. Same treatment continued. 

September 21. Much improved every way. He can, 
by an efibrt of will, keep every muscle perfectly still for- 
th ree minutes at a time. 



Hospital Notes. 179 



September 29. Almost well, with every prospect of a 
perfect recovery. At the urgent request of his mother he 
was sent home to-day. 

There are two remedies, which are reliable above all 
others in the treatment of chorea. One is arrsenic, the 
other is the sulphate of zinc. The addition of iron is gen- 
erally beneficial, and sometimes essential. 

CASES ILLUSTRATING SOME OF THE VARIED EFFECTS OF MALARIAL' 

POISONING. 

Case 1. — J. L. Farmer, aged fifty, admitted July 10, 
1879. Had always enjoyed good health until the last two 
weeks, when each afternoon he had been suflering from a 
mental derangement. Not violent, but crazy. iSTo fever, 
no pain, appetite poor, tongue presenting that peculiar con- 
dition that all ph^'sicians recognize as the " malarial 
tongue." 

Ordered three comp. cathartic pills, and twenty grains 
of quinia, to be taken in four doses before the next par- 
oxysm. 

July 12. Had no " crazy spell " yesterday. Ordered 
ten grains of quinia to-day and a blue pill at night. 

July 13. Man apparently well. Directed: 

Jfc Acidi hydrochor. dil. 2 drachms, 

Tr. cinchonae comp., 

Tr. gentiani comp., aa. 2 ounces, 
Syr. ginger 1 ounce, 

Tr, nucis vomicae y^ drachm. 

M. Sig. Two teaspoonsful in water three times a day. 

July 20. Entirely recovered. 

A year afterwards he said he had never had a return of 
his head troubles. 

Case 2. — John Young, admitted August 20, 1880. Says 
he is ninet3'-two years old, but he is evidently mistaken ; 
he is probably about seventy-five to eighty. Much ema- 
ciated, very feeble, sallow, and desponding; says he was 
taken with diarrhoea two months ago, and could get nothing 
to control it. 

The peculiar.ity of his case is, that the diarrhcea came 
on every evening, continuing till morning, when it ceased 
until the next evening, then returning as before. I 
directed : 



Quinia sulph. 


30 grains. 


Pul. opii. 


5 grains. 


Pul. camphorae 


5 grains. 


Hyd. cum cretae 


5 grains. 



M. Make ten powders. One to be taken every three 
hours during the day. 



180 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Of these he took five the first day and five the second, 
after which he had no return of diarrhoea until just one 
week later. The same prescription was renewed, with the 
same good effects. 

October 10. He is as well and strong as a man of his 
age could be expected to be, and has had no return of the 
diarrhoea. 

Case 3. — Mrs. E. A. G., a middle aged lady was brought 
in from the country by her physician August 23. For sev- 
eral months she had been troubled with paroxysms of pain 
in her stomach and side, extending back to the spine. 
These paroxysms had not come on at regular intervals, but 
once in two or three daj's, and sometimes a little longer. 
They were so violent that her physician was compelled to 
give her anodynes very freely ; then in from twelve to 
twenty-four hours they would pass off. Diagnosis : ITeural- 
gia of a malarial origin. Treatment : Twenty grains of 
quinia daily for three days in succession, provided she can 
bear so much, followed by a teaspoonful three times a day 
of the following : 

^ Bismuthi subnitras 2 drachms, 

Tr. nucis vomicae J^ drachm, 

Elix. calisayae, 

Aq. menth. pip. aa 2 ounces. 

M. With these directions she returned home. 

October 9. Her phj^sician called on me to-day and re- 
ported that the patient had taken the medicine as directed, 
and has had no return of the pain since, excepting once for 
a few minutes, three days after beginning treatment. 



Treatment of Constitutional Syphilis by Sulpliate 
of Copper. 

Drs. Martin and Oberlin gave a brief report on this 
subject at a late meeting of the Paris Acadetay of Medicine. 
The authors treated fifty patients, who showed various 
manifestations of syphilis, by the copper sulphate. The 
results were quite satisfactorj', the fifty patients all being 
cured. A comparison of this method was made with the 
ordinary mercury methods, and it was found that the cop- 
per salt proved more efficacious and required less time for 



Periscope. 181 

its beneficial action than did the mercury salts. The cop- 
per was also well borne by most patients ; in only one case 
it produced initial vomiting, followed, however, by perma- 
nent tolerance of the drug. In a case of very grave syph- 
ilis, when mercury had proved useless, the administration 
of copper effected a rapid and complete cure. In a few 
patients, the gums became affected, a greenish tint appear- 
ing at their free border. But this cupric gingivitis yielded 
more rapidly than the analogous mercurial affection ordi- 
narily does. Actual sponginess of the gums was not 
observed. The salt was exhibited by the mouth in doses 
of gr. yV — gi'- P^i" d^y* -^"^ aqueous solution was em- 
ployed. External application was also made by adding 5 
drachms of the salt to a full bath. — Gaz. med. de Paris, 
April 10, 1880.— Medical Record. 



The Cause of Miss Neilson's Death. 

The London Times of August 26th, publishes the fol- 
lowing letter: 

I take the liberty of asking room in your columns for 
a word in regard to the death of the lamented Miss Neilson. 
For the last five years I have had the charge of her health 
during her visits to Paris, one of the treatments running 
through a period of four months. The disease from which 
she suffered was principallj^gastralgia — one of the forms of 
dyspepsia, attended with neuralgia of the stomach, a form 
extremely fantastic in its coming and going, and, in her 
case, quite as dependent on moral causes as on errors of 
diet. The last fatal attack in the Bois de Boulogne was 
evidently one of her usual attacks of gastralgia, which 
might have been relieved then, as it often had been before, 
by a free use of morphine. The unfortunate lady sent her 
maid for me at 7 o'clock, but, to my great regret, I was 
absent that evening, on a visit to my family, in the country, 
and I did not hear of her illness till I heard of her death. 
At 3 o'clock in the morning, twelve hours from the com- 
mencement of the attack, during a most violent recurrence 
of the pain, she suddenly ceased to complain, went into a 
state of sjmcope, and died in the syncope. The post-mor- 
tem examination made the next day by Dr. Brouardel, 
Professor of Legal Medicine at the Medical School of Paris, 
and now one of the first authorities in Europe in legal 



182 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

medicine, disclosed the extraordinary fact — one of the rar- 
est in the history of medicine — that in her writliing she 
had ruptured a varicose vein in the Fallopian tube, and had 
died from internal hemorrhage. Two quarts and a half of 
blood was found in the peritoneal cavity, and the ruptured 
vein presented an orifice of from four to five millimetres in 
diameter. 

Very truly, etc., 
Faris, August •22d. W. E. Johnston, M. D. 



\oci^tS ^ransnctians. 



T>e Witt County Medical Society. 

[Reported for the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

This society met at the court house in Clinton on the 
12th day of October. There was a good attendance of the 
members ; Dr. J. A. Edmiston, vice-president, in the chair. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. 

On motion of Dr. Goodbrake, Dr. F. B. Bullard, of 
Logan county, was elected an honorary member of the 
society, and the Doctor, in a few well-chosen remarks, 
thanked the society for the honor conferred. 

The secretary read the instructions of the Attorney 
General to the State Board of Health, in regard to the 
proper manner of prosecuting violations of the 
Medical Practice Act. 

Dr. A. M. Drew reported a case of post-partem hemor- 
rhage, of much interest to the profession. 

The pathology and treatment of dysentery was then 
taken up. Dr. John Wright leading in the discussion ; fol- 
lowed by Drs. Cochran, D. W. Edmiston, and others. 

Drs. Cochran and J. A. Edmiston exhibited to the soci- 
ety, under the microscope, "a fine specimen of epitheloma 
recentl3' removed from the lower lip of a medical gentle- 
man of this county. They also exhibited other very inter- 
esting specimens. 

On motion of Dr. Wright, the society adjourned to the 
second Tuesday of January, 1881. 

C. Goodbrake, M. D., 

Secretary. 



Therapeutic Motes. 



188 



'ihera^euHii (^ote^. 



DYSPEPSIA OF PHTHISIS. 

Dr. Libert prescribes the fol- 
lowing effervescing powder for 
the dyspepsia of phthisis: 

56; Lactate of iron 60 grains, 

Bicarbonate of soda 180 grains, 

Tartaric acid 45 grains. 

Sugar 60 grains. 

M. Put in a tight bottle and 
give a spoonful in sweetened 
water twice a day. — Med. and 
Chir. Pract. 

CARBOLIC ACID POWDER. 

The formula for the carbolic 
acid powder in use at the Mt. 
Sinai Hospital, is: 

9; Carbolic acid 25 parts, 

Rosin 60 parts, 

Stearin 15 parts. 

M. Add plaster of Paris 700 
parts. — Med. Beeord. 

DEODORIZER OF IODOFORM. 

It is said that twenty minims 
of the oil of fennel added to the 
drachm of iodoform will remove 
the unpleasant odor of the latter 
drug. — Med. Record. 

CHLOROFORM COUGH MIXTURE. 

This is prepared as follows : 

9; Morphia acetas 3 grains. 

Tr. belladonnae 2 dracliins, 

Spls. chloroformi 6 draclims, 

Syr. senegae 1 ounce, 

Syr. prun. virg. ad. 4 ounces. 

Dose, one teaspoonful four 
times a day. — Boston Journal of 
Chemistry. 

DIURETIC AND HEART TONIC. 

In general anasarca and ascites 
accompanying disease of the 
heart and functional derange- 
ment of the liver, this formula 
is, perhaps, without a rival : 

Jfc Potassii acetas, 

Card. tr. comp., aa. 1 oz., 

Tr. digitalis l^ oz.. 

Aquae dest. q. s., 8 oz. 

M. S. Half an ounce four or 
five times daily, pro re nata. 
The bowels to be kept free, in 
case the solution fails so to do, by 
the use of I gr. pills of eliterium 
once or twice daily. — Med. Brief. 



FOR DIPHTHERIA. 

Dr. L. L. Leeds writes that he 
has used the following very suc- 
cessfully in diphtheria : 
P; Potas. chloras. 2 dr., 

Aq. buUient 1 oz., 

Mlsci, solve et addi 

Ammon. carbonas 2 dr., 

Syr. simp. 3^ oz., 

Aq. camphorae 1}^ oz. 

M. One teaspoonful every 
three hours. 

AMENORRHCEA. 

The following pill has been 

found very efficacious at the 

Columbia Hospital for Women : 

p: Ferri sulph. exsiccat 12 grains, 

Quiniae 24 grains, 

Ex. aloes socot. 3 grains, 

Ex. hyoscyami 6 grains. 

M. One, an hour eating. If 
the aloes disturb the bowels the 
pills may be omitted for a few 
days and resumed if necessary. 

CHRONIC BRONCHITIS. 

A favorite prescription of Dr. 
Young for chronic bronchitis- 
and chronic phthisis has been : 

9; Ex. cannabis indicae fl. 

Alcoholis aa. 1 dr., 

Syr. acteae co., 

Syr. pruni virg., aa. 7 dr. 

M. A teaspoonful every four 
hours. — Med. and Surg. Bep. 

DANDRUFF ERADICATOR. 

P; Simple tr. of cinchona 1 oz., 

Solution of potassa 2 dr.. 

Salt of tarter 1 dr., 

Cologne water 1 oz., 

Water to make 8 oz. 

M, Apply to the head twice 
or thrice a week. — Druggists^ Cir- 
cular. 

EXTERNAL TREATMENT OF 
NIGHT SWEATS. 

Dr. T. H. Currie, of Lebanon,. 
N. H., writes : 
P Alcohol 1 pint, 

Sulphate of quinine I drachm. 

M. Wet a small sponge with 
it and bathe the body and limbs, 
a small surface at a time, care be- 
ing taken not to expose the body 
to a draft of air in doing it. — 
Mich. Med. Neivs. 



184 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



*aak tffatice^. 



A Practical Treatise on Nervous Exhaustion (Neuras- 
thenia), its Symptoms, Nature, Sequences, Treatment, by 
Geo. M. Beard, M. D. New York: Wm. Wood & Co. ; 8 
vo. pp. 198; cloth, $1.75. 

Few medical works appearing within the last decade 
have been more extensively read and thoroughly criticised 
than the one before us. This fact alone would indicate 
that there must be something in it, and such indeed we find 
to be the case. It is full of minute and close observations, 
and original deductions on a class of disease which the au- 
thor alludes to as "of comparitively recent development," 
and characterizes as " at once the most frequent, most 
interesting and most neglected nervous disease of modern 
times." 

This book is a valuable contribution to the literature of 
nervous diseases, and furnishes a vast deal of food for 
thought, and no one who is at all interested in explorations 
made into this terra incognita of medicine can aftbrd not to 
be acquainted with its contents. 

A Treatise on Common Forms of Functional Nervous 
Diseases, by L. Putzel, M. D. New York: Wm. Wood & 
Co.; pp. 256. Being vol 10 of Wood's Library of Stand- 
ard Medical Authors for 1880. 

Quite different in contents and scope from the work last 
noticed is this handsome volume of Dr. Patzel. It treats 
of a class of neuroses long recognized by the profession — 
chorea, epilepsy, neuralgia, &c., &c. 

Making no great pretensions to originality. Dr. Putzel 
has given us a book of more than ordinary value, in which 
special attention is given to the clinical history and diag- 
nosis of nervous diseases, classed as functional, while the 
pathology, which is so unsatisfactory at best, is only men- 
tioned or omitted entirely. Great pains has evidently been 
taken to give the opinions of the best authorities on the 
flubjects, the number of authors quoted being very large, 
and the large experience ot the author has enabled him to 
add much of interest from original observations. The very 
practical character of the work will commend it to all. 

The Venereal Diseases, including Stricture of the Male 
Urethra, by E. L. Keyes, A. M., M. D., Professor of Der- 
mathology and Adjunct Professor of Surgery in the Belle- 
vue Hospital Medical College; one of the Surgeons of 



Book Jfotices. 185 



Bellevue Hospital, etc., etc. ; ISTew York, pp. 348. Volume 
1 of Wood's Library of Standard Medical Authors for 1880. 
Price of the set, 12 vols., |15. W. F. Keener, Chicago, 
111., Western Agent. 

Being written for the general medical practitioner, the 
aim of the author has been " to present the various venere- 
al diseases as clearly as possible, avoiding such unnecessary 
refinement upon theoretical and mooted points as would be 
apt to lead to confusion or to error." And excellently 
well has this idea been carried out. 

The experience of Dr. Keyes as a teacher has enabled 
him to write a thoroughly systematic and practical work. 
It would serve equally well as a text book for study, or a 
book of reference to the practitioner. 

The Medical and Surgical Directory of the State of Io- 
wa for 1880-'81, containing the names, postoffice address 
and professional status of the physicians ; the various med- 
ical societies with names and residence of the officers and 
members ^ * * * Medical Laws, Fee Bills of Societies, 
etc., etc., by Chas. H. Lathrop, Lyons, Iowa; printed at 
Clinton, Iowa; cloth; pp.172. 

This is one of the most complete and useful directories 
we have ever seen. It includes everything that is of value 
concerning the Iowa profession. The new medical and 
pharmaceutical laws of the state are very explicit, and will do 
much to advance the interests of the profession in the state,. 
if rigidly carried out. 

The Surgery, Surgical Pathology and Surgical Anatomy 
of the Female Pelvic Organs, in a series of plates taken 
from nature, with commentaries, notes and cases by Henry 
Savage, M. D., F. R., C. S., etc. Third edition with 32 
plates and 22 wood engravings. Volume 6 of Wood's 
Library of Standard Medical Authors. 

The mere mention of this edition of Savage's plates is- 
sufficient to make all physicians desire to have it. The 
price at which it was formerly held ($14 to $17) placed it 
beyond the reach of many ; now, however, it is within the 
reach of all, and with it, for less than the former price of 
these plates alone, the subscriber to Wood's Library will 
get eleven other volumes of good, new medical reading. 
Whether the notes and text accompanying the plates are 
in accord with the present state of gynaecology few will 
care to inquire; the anatomy is the same and that is what 
renders them valuable to the happy possessor. 



186 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

All commuuications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. Mcllvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-Jeflferson Street, PEORIA, ILL. 

Notes and IVews Items. 

We regret to learn that Dr. D. T. Fitch, of Chicago, 
well-known to the profession as the originator of Fitch's 
Uterine Sound and other instruments, valuable in gynteco- 
logical practice, and an active member of the Illinois State 
Medical Association, is seriously ill. He was struck down 
with hemiplegia with effusion about two weeks ago, and 
his friends fear his early demise. 

Professor Gunn performed an operation at the Hospital 
last week, first suggested and made by Dr. E. W. Lee, of 
Chicago, for the radical cure of hernia. It consists in cut- 
ting freely down upon the inguinal canal, then passing gut 
ligatures through the sides of the canal and under it, the 
course of the ligature (starting from the internal pillar of 
the external ring,) is downward, inward and forward, then 
upward and outward, the ligature piercing the external 
pillar opposite to its place of entrance, so that when the 
ligature is drawn up it tends to shorten the canal and draw 
.the surfaces closer together, the ligatures are cut short and 
left for absorption. Several ligatures may be used and 
placed as close together as the case may require, all, how- 
ever, following the course of the one above described. 
The operation was done under antiseptic precautious. 
Lister's method being used at the Hospital in all operations. 

There is quite an epidemic of typhoid fever at the Cook 
County Hospital, for which the physicians have not been 
able to discover a sufficient cause. The typhoid patients 
are constantly about twenty-five in number. The deaths 
have not been numerous. One was of considerable inter- 
est. The necropsy showed perforation had taken place, 
although there had been no symptoms to indicate it. Per- 
itonitis was extensive, but there had been no unusual 
increase in temperature or pulse, and absolutely no pain. 



Editorial Department. 187 

Up to date 465 students have matriculated at Rush 
Medical College. This is the largest number ever matric- 
ulated so early in the course, and the number will cer- 
tainly be swelled to over 500. 

The class at the Chicago Medical College is of about 
the usual size. We think, however, the students average 
older than in past years, and we think also is true as re- 
gards the other colleges. The number of students at Rush 
who attend three regular winter courses is largely on the 
increase. This is a long step in the right direction. If the 
colleges would at once (as they propose to do in the future,) 
make a thorough preliminary examination, the grade of the 
students would be materially advanced, j^one could enter 
except those fit to begin the study of medicine, and these 
students would see that it was for their own good to take 
a longer term of study, and they would do it. 

We have made arrangements to publish the reports of 
several county and district societies in this state, and hope 
at no distant future to complete arrangements whereby we 
will regularly report the proceedings of most if not all of 
such societies in the state. We want to keep physicians 
■posted in what their brethren are doing elsewhere, and we 
know the effort and labor will be appreciated. 

We invite secretaries of district or countj^ medical 
societies to send us short synoptical reports of their pro- 
ceedings, for publication ; also of any interesting papers or 
reports read before the societies. 

We hope our readers will send all items of interest to 
the profession that may come under their notice. Marriage 
and death notices inserted free ; also, change of address of 
physicians. 

About all the relaxation and pleasure that many physi- 
cians allow themselves is their semi-annual or annual hunt. 
This being the case, they are interested in guns and sport- 
ing equipments, and we advise them to buy these through 
the firm of I. Walker & Sons. Their stock is as full and 
complete as any in the state. Besides a full line of English 
breech-loaders they handle the celebrated Parker and Colt 
guns, and have a large assortment of everything a hunts- 
man needs. 



188 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

We expect to have a representative a t the next semi- 
annual meeting of the Military Tract M ed. Society, who 
will report the proceedings for publication in this journal. 

We are happy to announce that the December issue of 
this journal will contain an original article from the pen of 
Dr. Wm. Pepper. We hope to publish regularly a series 
of clinical lectures by the most eminent lecturers in the 
West. These will be reported expressly for this journal. 

Notes of Hospital Practice, New York and Philadel- 
phia Hospitals. 8vo.; pp. 256; price in cloth $2.00; in full 
calf $2.50. Samuel M. Miller, M. D., 536 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa., editor and publisher. Mailed on receipt 
of price. 

The busy physician will find this compact, neatly printed 
and neatly bound volume, a very practical and handy refer- 
ence book. It is essentially a manual of therapeutics. 
The treatment of over four hundred diseases by the emi- 
nent medical authorities of New York and Philadelphia 
is condensed and epitomized in its pages. Its value is very 
much enhanced by the fact that the proof sheets have, in 
every instance, been revised by the professors whose treat- 
ment is set forth therein. The unprecedented sale of th6 
book, 3,200 copies being sold in nine months, is a very 
strong argument in its favor. It will prove an indispens- 
able companion to the hard worked practioner, whose time 
is too much occupied to allow of his reading all the current 
medical literature, but who must needs keep himself thor- 
oughly informed of all the salient points of progress in 
therapeutics. See pp. 2 and 3. 

Suggestions on the Management of Natural Labor. 
Reprinted from the St. Louis Medical and Surgical JournaL 
By J. W. Singleton, M. D., Paducah, Kentucky; pp. 16. 

If we ';an accommodate any physician by purchasing 
or ordering any books or instruments, we will be glad to 
do so, free of charge. We will select with as much care 
as if buying for ourselves, and can get as low prices as can 
be had anywhere. The goods can be sent C. 0. D. Ad- 
dress the publisher. 

Samples of Staufer's hard-rubber uterine instruments- 
and supporters can be seen at the office of this journaL 



Advertisements. 




Dr. MclNTOSH'S 

NATURAIi 




No instrument has ever been placed before the medical profession which has given such uni- 
versal satisfaction. The combination is such that the physician is able to meet every indication 
of Uterine Displacements. Falling Womb, Anteversion, Retroversion and Fle.xions are over- 
come by this instrument, where others fail ; this is proven by the fact that since its introduction 
to the Profession it has come into more general use than all other instruments combined. 

Among the many reasoffs which recommend this Supporter to the Physician is its self-ad- 
justing qualities. The Physician after applying it need have no fear that he will be called in 
haste to remove or readjust it, as is often the case with rings and various pessaries held in posi- 
tion by pressure against the vaginal wall, as the patient can remove it at will and replace it 
without assistance. 

The Abdominal Supporter is a broad morocco leather belt with elastic straps to buckle 
around the hips, with concave front, so shaped as to hold up the abdomen. The Uterine Sup- 
port is a cup and stem made of highly polished hard rubber, very light and durable, shaped to 
fit the neck of the womb, with openings for the secretions to pass out, as shown by the cuts. 
Cups are made with extended lips to correct flexions and versions of the womb. 

The cup and stem is suspended to the belt by two soft elastic Rubber Tubes, which are fast- 
ened to the front of the belt by simple loops, pass down through tlie stem of the cup and up to 
the back of the belt. These soft rubber tubes being elastic adapt themselves to all the varying 
positions of the body and perform the service of the ligaments of the womb. 

The instrument is very comfortable to the patient, can be removed or replaced by her at 
will, can be worn at all times, will not interfere with nature's necessities, will not corrode, and 
is lighter than metal. Tt will answer for all cases of Anteversion, Retroversions, or any Flex- 
ions of the Womb, and is used by the leading physicians with never failing success even in the 

most difficult cases. Price— To PhysicJans, $8. To Patients, $ 1 2. 

Instruments sent by mail, at our risk, on receipt of price, with 16 cents added for postage, or 
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Our valuable pamphlet '-Some Practical Facts about Displacements of the Womb," will be 
Bent you on application. 




DR. MCINTOSH'S 



This celebrated Battery combines both the Galvanic 
and Faradic, or induced current which can be used sepa- 
rate or in combination. 

Any strength or intensity desired can be obtained for 
use in electro-therapeutics. This Battery is constructed 
on an improved plan, as follows: The zinc and carbon plates are arranged in couples securely 
clamped to hard rubber plates with thumb screws. These thumb screws are also used for bind- 
ing posts. All the connections are positive and brought near together, thus lessening th& 
internal resistance. The cells are made in sections of six, composed of one solid piece of hard 
■vulcanized rubber. By this arrangement a section can be handled, emptied, cleaned and refilled 
as easily and quickly as one cell. A hard rubber drip cup is placed by the side of each section 
of cells, to receive the zincs and carbon plates when removed from the cells. The rubber plates, 
which hold the zinc and carbons, project over on one side enough to cover the cells, when the 
zinc and carbons are placed in the drip cups. The under side of this projection is covered with 
soft rubber, which is clamped over the sections, which makes the cells water tight. This alone 
recommends the Battery. 

We claim superiority over all other batteries for the reason that by the improved plan of 
construction and close connections we gain more quantity and Intensity of current. We com- 
bine all that is desirable in either a Galvanic or Faradic Battery, a combination never before 
attained. We furnish it with or without the Faradic coll. It weighs less than any other of the 
same power. It can be carried without spilling the fluid, thus being the only perfect portable 
Galvanic Battery made. We will be pleased to send circulars giving full information, price, 
etc., free on application. 

Mcintosh galvanic belt and battery co., 

Mos. 193 and 194 Jackson St., CHICAGO, Ilili. 



Advertisements. 



PEORIA, PEKIN & JAGESONmLE RAILWAY. 

THE ROUTE TO TAKE FOR 

Pekin, Havana, 

Springfield, Virginia, 

Beardsto'wn, Jacksonville, 

Alton, Quincy, Hannibal, 

C5^ST. LOUIS^S^O 

And all Points South and South-west, 
THE FAVORITE ROUTE TO 

xs^itei^e oi^'r ^itOi ^H^ iir^e^, 

Leavenworth, Atchison, St. Joseph, 

Lawrence, Topeka, Fort Scott, 

Baxter Springs, Newton, T^ichita, 

Denver, Pueblo, Canon City, Leadville, 

And all points in KANSAS and COLORADO. 

GEORGE SKINNER, CHAS. MACABE, 

Manager General Ticket Agent. 




DR. L. D. M'INTOSH'S 

Electric or Galfaalc Bell 



If this new combination could be seen and tested by the medical profession, 
few, if au y. words would be needed from us In its favor, for it combines utility 
with aimplicily in such perfection that seeing it is convincing proof of its great 
value The medical profession to-day acknowledge, almost universally, Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

This combination is composed of sixteen cells, placed in pockets on a belt. 
Each cell is made of hard vulcanized rubber, lined with a copper cell, which 
constitutes the negative plate. The rubber coating perfectly insulates each cell. 
The positive plates are of zinc, wrapped in a porous material to absorb the ex- 
citing fluid, and prevent contact with the copper, and permit the current to pass 
from the copper to the zinc. 

Thus the cells are charged without welting the belt, and the discomfort fol- 
lowina; to the patient. A wire is soldered to each zinc plate, which connects 
with the copper cell by entering a tube on its side, thus rendering the belt 
pliable. 

The Mcintosh Electric Belt is superior to all others for the following reasons: 

It Is composed of sixteen cells— thus giving a powerful current. A current 
selector is so arranged that one or more cells can be used at pleasure. There is 
not anything irritating about the Belt, as is the case with all other contrivances 
where the metal used is wei with weak acids and placed next to the skin. The 
electrodes are pieces of metal covered similar to ordinary battery electrodes, 
and connected with the cells by connecting cords. By this arrangement, a cur- 
rent from the Belt can be applied to produce a general or local effect. 

Physicians wlio liave used this Belt in their practice do not hesitate to re- 
commt^nd it to the profession. 

PRICE, $10.00; "WITH SUSPENSORY, $12 50. 

Our pamphlet on Medical Electricity sent free on application. Address, 

MclMOSlI G.\LVAMC BBLT .4\D BATTERY CO.\lPAi\Y, 192 and 194 Jackson St., Chicago, 111. 

In aimwerim^ fedvertlsements mention the Pkoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements . 



RUSH 




CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Annual, Spring Course, or Post Graduate An- 
nouncement, address the Secretary, 



J kme^ 9. ^tl\erid^e, 



1634 MICHIGAN AVENUE. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoeia Medical Monthly. 



AdvertiseTnents. 



AHALYTICAL CHEiST. 



Special attention given to Crinninal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters, 
Milk, Urine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, III. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Correspondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 




Prices wltMn tlie Reach of All. 

Call on 118 or send for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 



Comstock& Avery, 



Manufacturers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 




Call the attention of Fhysicians 
to their 

MTllf CMIE 

It is the nicest chair in the market for 
*JB the Office, Library or Parlor. The best 

Invalid Chair made. 




In answering advertisements, mention the Pkoria Mkdicai.. Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



NOTICE! 



To Publishers, Manufacturing Chemists, In- 
strument Mahers, Druggists : 

As it is our desire to bring before the Physicians every- 
thing that will be of benefit to them, we will carefully 
and impartially examine, review or test whatever may be 
sent to us in these lines, and notice all that we think would 
be of value to the profession. 

CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Druggists & Chemists, 

^■^ ^""^ And Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Connpounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

§03 South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Prescription Druggists, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

N. B.— A full line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



10 



Advertisements. 



COLBURN, BIRKS i CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 

AND DEALERS IN 




ATOMIZERS, 

Ei:.A.:srxD 



xALL VARIETIES. 



Electro -Magnetic Machines, 

CRUTCHES, 




PLAIN AND PADDED ARM PIECES. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our Instrument Catalogue for 1880 now ready for 
distribution. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Pbokia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



11 



Fever Therinometers 



Four and Five-inch, Self-Registering, Hicks' Patent- 
Lens Front, in Boxwood Case. 





FOWLERS H. R. PESSARIES 




Celluloid Cylindrical Speculum, 

CELLULOID BI-?ALVE SPEGOLDM, 

CELLEOIB HYPOBERMIC SYRIHGES, 

CELLULOID CATHETERS M BOD&IES. 



Our Prices will be found low for First Quality 
Goods. 

^Nviie for Quotations before buying. 

COLBiIRN, BlRKS & CO., PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



SPEING STEM SUPPOETEES. 



Abdominal Snpportei. 
3. 




SOLID STEM SUPPOETEE, 
E. C— ^.— (Eoonomy.) 




Sizes— 1, 1 3.16, 1 6.10 and 
1 9.16, Flesh color enam- 
eled. Price, $2.50 each. 



Price. — Pernjanent, Curved Stem 
Oup 11 C, on elastic webbing Z, 
11.50. On X, or T, cotton, $5.50, 
and Y, coutil, $6.50. 

No expense has been saved to 
give even the Economical Supporter 
all possible advantages. 



HAED EUBBEE UTEEINE EIAMIHING OASF 




Prices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Procide tla Cup A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Contil 
Finished Belt X, $7.00. On Z, Fig. 
5, $6.00. On Y, Coutil, $8.00; and 
on Y, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring Sffm, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long H, or 1 U, too same on either 
belt as A, 

Jietroversion E, on X, or Y, 
Cotton, $8.00. On Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on Z, S7.00. 

Anteversion, Solid Stem 
C, or Soli I StPni Globe Top 
O, on X, or Y. Cotton. «.-..50. On Y, 
Coutil, $G.."0. nnd on Z, $i.50 only. 

JRules. — The Stem Supporters 
Fig. 1 and 5, are only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Speculums, Fig. 6, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cup D, 
either separate, or in connection 
with Stem Supporters. 

JSlaatic Oums S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; 4 at 35 cts,; and Springs 
at 3 cts. each. 

N, B. — fi^ figures on these engravings cor- 
respond with those on the full Catalogue plate. 

Selection. — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
If a cup, it must be modelled after the Junction of 
the axis of the uterus and vagina, or the cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I IT, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptation 
and border cup. In cases of slight Anteversions 
and slight Retroversions, deep cups may be called 
for, and in most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cups are usually 
selected by giving the full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, 1]/^ to 1;"'^; Multiparae, 1 J^ 
to 2, and Procidentia to 2 j^ inches and over some 
times. Belts — For X, and Z, waist measure to be 
given, .ind Y, hip meaKure. 

Anteversion V, Fig. 1 — This had been re- 
modelled a number of times, and the fenestrated 
top found beat to remain in position. 

Itetroveritlon £1 — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent cfru.-ii'ncy. The broad lover, lifts up tljo 
fundus, while the cup corrects the prolaps is iind 
holds the uterus, by a double elastic motion, if a 
spring stem, ."mall, long stem. Globe To|)fl O, 
Fig. 1 . are placed with success aK.iinst the soiiHilivo 
fundU'<, after everything else been intoloraMo. 

Intra Uterine Stem Cup J U. — Tho stem 

Mailed on receipt of quotation pricoR, ami all tlio hnrd rubber psTts on the full Catalogue exchanged 
to meet any indie ition, an'i cover tho purchaser's risk. Catalog* s on application. 

Oyrr'.'por,fIcnf^wmpUa«>'.\ S. S. STATJFZR, D- D. 

rMme thi.'! Journ'xl [ 614 I'm n1:Un St , Went sldo, nhnve Oreen, JPhiln., Ha. 

J Near 9th & Oreen Sta. (or Knund Jtrook^ AV-fp TnrJe iJppot. 



Prices. — Full case, $8.00; Quill Caust'C Holder H, or Camel's 
Hair Brush Holder and Case I, each $1.00. Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket affer the cup is In posi- 
tion. This is safer than all other contrivances, 
but is seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made In this Series to correct Eotro- 
version through the posterior cul-de-sac. 

Cystocele and Hectocele. — These are suc- 
cessfully drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops G, or Oblong H, Fig. 1. 

Cup i>, fig.B. — .Supplements EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed Into A D, 
Fi?. 1. 

Globe B, Fig. B. — This Is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with all the objectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now a^ain 
a popular pessary. 

Speculum, Fig. 6 — The condnctor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and In position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be Introduced ; 
this together with the thin shell, gives a sufficient 
calibre to embrace the entire cervix within the 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the encloBure of the cervix by rotation. 

Examining Case, Fig. 12. — Sounds A, B, 
C, Movers D, F, and G, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on M, if H, and form Instruments 12 
iijcbee long. L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Itelt Y, Fig. 3. — Is made to order of any size 
nnd strength, to support tli" stem supporter and 
pendulous abdomen. Ilip t^tr/ips S S, are elastic. 



Advertisements. 13 



PHOSPHATE IRON, PININE AND STRYCHNIA. 

• 

It is many years (qwite fifteen) since we asked the attention of Physicians to the above 
Elixir. It has been very largely prescribed with uniform satisfactory results, confirming our 
claims for the advantages of administering this deservedly favorite combination in solution over 
pill form. Owing to the intensely bitter taste of the solution or the syrup, patients very gener- 
ally object to them, and many sensitive stomachs reject their administration. Physicians of 
experience hesitate to prescribe in powder or mass either Quinine or Strychnia, from the want of 
prompt action, the frequent passing away from the system, undissolved and the occasional cum- 
ulative action of the Strychnia, when the pills are long retained. While this is a grave objec- 
tion often noted in such powerful medicinal agents, it is equally true that solutions of Iron are 
not only much more eflScient, being assimilated and absorbed with little danger of inducing 
irritation, as is often the case when given in pills. Using pure alkaloids of Quiniaand Strychnia, 
the excess of acid is not required, avoiding in this way the development of the bitter 
taste, enabling us to prepare the Elixir so that it will be readily taken by children aa well as 
adults. We cannot exaggerate the therapeutic advantages of administering this prescription in 
the form we present it, and feel we have a right to ask medical men to direct our manufacture of 
this preparation, not only because we first prepared it but from the fact that Physicians can feel 
every assurance of the care and exactness of its manufacture, and that there is one grain of Qui- 
nine in each teaspoonful. a strength not possible at the price this Elixir is sold by manufacturers. 
We have always carefully avoided exploiting or in any way introducing this or any of our prep- 
arations except through Druggists and Physicians. 

Each fluid dram contains two grains of Phosphate of Iron, one of Quinine, and one-sixtieth 
of a grain of Strychnia in simple Elixir flavored with Oil of Orange. ADULT DOSE— One tea- 
spoonful three times a day. 



ELIXIR GUARANA. 

(PAULLINIA SORBILIS.) 



Guarana is used with much benefit in cases of Sick and Nervous Headache, Neuralgia, 
Diarrhoea, Gastralgia, etc. 

The active principle is analagous to Caffein, being found in PauUinia in five times the quan- 
tity that it exists in the best Coffee. The tonic influence allied with the stimulating effects ren- 
ders it an exceedingly valuable medicine. 

As its use has proven the entire absence of any irritating properties or any astringent effect 
in Debility, Languor, Protracted Convalescence and Nervous Irritability, it is specially useful. 

The effect is almost immediate in all cases of Headache, from whatever cause it may arise ; 
but it is more especially benefipial in those produced by over-excitement to the nervous system. 

The usual mode of administration has been in powder; but the Elixir will be found not only 
more agreeable, but much more eflicacious. 

Each fluid ounce contains eighty grains Guarana. 

For Headache — Dose, a tablespoonful for an adult, to be repeated in an hour, if the first 
dose does not give relief 

For Diarrhoea — A dessertspoonful morning and evening. 

For Neuralgia, as a General Tonic for Nervousness, Debility, etc. — Adult dose, a dessert- 
spoonful three or four times a day. 

Note. — There are many Elixirs of Guarana manufactured of much less strength than that 
prepared by us. If Physicians will specify our prep.aration they can rest satisfied they will not 
be disappointed in the effects we claim. 

Physicians will find our preparations in all the Wholesale and leading Retail Stores in the 
United States and Canada. 

Jol\i^ Wyetli & Si^otl\ef , 

In answering advertisements mention tlie Peoria Medical, Monthly. 



14 Adertisements. 



CHEMICAL REPORT ON MALTINE. 



BY WALTER S. HAINES, M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, BusJi Medical College, Chicago. 



Chemical Laboratory of Rush Medical College, 
Chicago, November 18th, 1879. 



In order to test the compai-ative merits of Maltine and the va- 
rious Extracts of Malt in the market, I purchased from diflferent 
druggists samples of Maltine and of tlie most frequently pre- 
scribed Extracts of Malt, and have subjected them to chemical 
analysis. 

As the result of these examinations, I find that Maltine con- 
tains from half as mucli again to three times the quantity of Phos- 
phates (Nerve and Brain food and Bone producers;, and from three 
to fourteen times as much Diasta«e and otlier Albuminoids (Diges- 
tive agents and Muscle producers), as any of the Extracts of Malt 
examined. Since the value of such preparations is Indicated very 
exactly by the proportion of tliese — their two most important con- 
stituents, I have no hesitation in pronouncing Maltine greatly 
superior to any Extract of Malt which I examined. 

The large amounts of Phosphates and Albuminoids found in 
Maltine demonstrates, moreover, tiie superior skill and care 
employed in its preparation, and thoronghly warrants the confidence 
placed in it by the Medical Profession. 

Very respectfully, WALTER S. HAINES. 



REPORT ON MALTINE. 

BT L. P. YANDBLL, M. D., 

PROFESSOB OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND DISEASES OF CHILDREN, UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE. 

{^From the Louisville Medical Neivs, January 3d, 1S80.'\ 

After an extensive trial of the Maltine preparations of Reed <fe 
Carnrick, of New York, in private and dispensary practice, we are 
convinced that Maltine is one of the most valuable remedies ever 
introduced to the Profession. Our exalted estimate of this article is 
confirmed by all of the many practitioners who have expressed to 
us their opinion of it. Wherever a constructive is indicated, Malt- 
ine will be found excellent. In Pulmonary Phthisis and other 
Scrofulous Diseases, in Chronic Syphilis, and in the various Cachec- 
tic Conditions it is invaluable. In Convalescence it is a delightful 
and efficacious Cordial. We have invariably found it liked by Chil- 
dren, who devour it as they do candy. The Maltine Wine with 
Pepsin and Pancreatine has yielded us the happiest results in 
Apepsia and Atonic Dyspepsia, and in general Muscular and Nerv- 
ous Debility. The preparations Maltine with Hypophosphites, 
Maltine Ferrated, Maltine with Pepsin and Pancreatine, and Plain 
Maltine we especially commend. It is prepared in innumerable 
combinations. 

Maltine deserves to stand in the front rank of coustructives ; and 
the constructives, by their preventive, correctiveand curative power, 
are probably the most widely-useful therapeutical agents that we 
possess. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Pkoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 15- 



PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS OF MALTINE. 



During the past year we have received nearly one tliousand let- 
ters from the Medical Profession in this country and Great Britain, 
referring to the therapeutic value of Maltine; their character is 
indicated by the several extracts which we present below. 

St. Louis, Mo., June 1st, 1879. 
"As regards the use of Maltine, I can only say I am charmed with it, and 
would not know how to replace it in my practice. I suppose no one in the West 
uses it more extensively than I do. The results I have obtained have been more 
satisfactory than 1 can possibly express. I have never met with a preparation 
to which I am more indebted." J. K. BAUDDY, M. D., 

Prof. NerrouB and Mental Diseaees, Missouri Medical College. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec. 29th. 1879. 
"I have used Maltine largely in the Clinic of the College, and in private 
practice, and find it exceedingly efficient as a medicine, and much superior to 
anything of the kind with which I am acquainted." 

GEO. E. WALTON, M. D., 
Prof. Prin. and Prac. of Med., Cin. Col. Med. and Surg. 

Richmond, Va., Jan. 16th, 1880. 
"I have found your Maltine preparations so valuable that I use some of 
them almost daily in my practice." HUNTER McGUIRE, M. D., 

Prof, of Surgery, Medical College of Virginia. 

Chicago, Jan. 21st, 1880. 
"I am very much pleased with Maltine, and since its introduction here I 
have entirely given up the use of Extract of Malt." 

E. F. INGALLS, A. M., M. D. 

Kensington Dispensary, London, Nov. 24th, 1879. 
" We are using vour Maltine among our patients, and find great benefit from 
it, especially in cases of Phthisis." DR. CHIPPENDALE, Kes. Medical OfBcer. 

The Beeches, Northwold, Eng., July 28th, 1879. 
"I find that my patients can readily digest your Maltine with Cod Liver Oil 
without causing any unpleasant after-feeling. I have full confldencp in the virtue 
it possesses to sustain the system during prolonged diseases of a Tubercular or 
Atrophic nature." FREDERICK JOY, L. R C. P., M. R. C. S. 

123 Landsdowne Road, Notting Hill, W. I 
London, Oct. 16th, 1879. ) 
" I have much pleasure in bearing favorable testimony to the merits of your 
Maltine preparations. I have used Maltine with Cod Liver Oil with the happiest 
results in a case of Tuberculosis attended with Tubercular Peritonitis, in which 
the temperature of the patient rose to 1051-5 deg., and persistently remained 
above 100 deg. for upwards of two months. The only medicine taken was Maltine 
with Cod Liver Oil. and an occasional dose of Carbonate of Bismuth to check 
diarrhoea. She gradually improved and made a perfect recovery. I find Maltine 
with Cod Liver Oil is more readily taken and more easily assimilated than Cod 
Liver Oil in any other form." EDMUND NASH, M. D. 



LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. JIALTINE with Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINE with Phosphates Iron and Quinia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE with Phos. Iron, Quinia & Strychnia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Hops. MALTINE WINE. 

MALTINE with Hypophosphites. MALTINE WINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. MALTO-TERBINE. 

Maltine is now in the hands of the Wholesale Trade throughout the United States. 

We guarantee that Maltine ivill keep perfectly in any climate, or any season of the year. 

Faithfully Yours, REED &CARNRICK, 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



16 



Ad/ve rtisements . 



MALTOPEPSINE-TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



The experience we have had of many years as Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
has brought us more or less in regular contact with the medical profession and 
its wants, and has afforded us advantages for experiment, study and practical 
development, which have engaged our attention in perfecting new and more effi- 
cacious agents for physicians' use in the control, subjection, treatment and cure 
of diseases, and we trust the Medical Profession will feel assured that in no in- 
stance shall we solicit their attention, except we have some production worthy 
of their highest consideration and confidence. 

We would respectfully call your attention to our new preparation Maltopep- 
sine. which we regard a very important Remedial Agent for Indigestion, Consti- 
pation, Dyspepsia, Vomiting in Pregnancy. Nervousness, Loss of Appetite, all 
forms of Gastric Derangement, Atonic Diarrhoea, and Indigestive Diarrhoea of 
children. This valuable remedy contains the digestive and nutritive properties 
of the grain unimpaired, combined with the active agents of digestion, viz: Dias- 
tase, Pepsine, Lactic Acid, Hydrochloric Acid, with a small addition of Phos- 
phoric Acid, Powdered Firwein, and the Bromide and Chloride of Aluminium 
and Sugar of Milk. TESTIMONIALS: 



B. K. Clark, M. D., Georgia, Vt.: 

Gentlemen — A medical friend gave me a 
small sample bottle of your Maltopepsine, 
which I took with apparent decided benefit. I 
did not vomit during the week I had the med- 
icine to take, nor have I been troubled up to 
this time, and as I do not wish to be without so 
valuable a medicine, I enclose two dollars with 
the request to have you send me by return mail 
the value of the money sent. I am very confi- 
dent it will entirely cure me, as the small 
amount used acted so favorablj'. I would like 
also to use it in my practice, as it will certainly 
prove very beneficial in all cases of dyspepsia. 
New Lebanon, N. Y., Dec. 11, 79. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Having suffered for 
some months past from Gastric derangement 
and most distressing dysyeptic symptoms, I was 
instructed by my physician a week or two ago, 
to make a trial of your new preparation Malto- 
pepsine, and I am happy to say it lias given me 
more relief than any other remedy I have ever 
tried. The disagreeable nausea and vomiting 
after eating have altogether disappeared, my 
appetite is better than for a long time — the sick 
headaches that caused me so mucli annoyance 
have ceased to trouble me, and my general 
health seems fully re-established. These good 
results are due entirely to Maltopepsine, and 
I feel it an act of justice to you, and a duty to 
othere who may be suffering from like causes, 
to state the facts of the case. 

Yours, Resp'lly, J. H. .Iohnston. 

<!. A. MosHER, Druggist, West Troy. N. Y. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — You certainly have 
got a wonderful preparation in your Maltopep- 
sine. I gave the samples to the doctors, and 
every one of them speak in its favor and say it 
is far superior to any similar preparation. 

One doctor gave it when Lactopeptine had 
failed him, and to his surprise was just the 
thing. 

H. M. Wilson, M. D., N. Y., Nov. 10, 79. 

Gentlemen — I consider your Maltopepsine 
the most valuable remedy ever known for Dys- 
pepsia and all forms of Gastric derangement. 



Indianola, Iowa, Jan. 21, 1880. 
Tilden & Co. — Have used your Maltopepsine 
in a case of obstinate vomiting in pregnancy, 
when everything had failed. The result was 
very gratifying— so much so, that I wish you to 
send me one pound of Maltopepsine by express 
at once. Yours truly, 

E. L. Baker, M. D. 

E. M. Bibber, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Says : "Have been using your Maltopepsine 
freely and with the most perfect satisfaction, 
preferring it to any similar preparation 
known." 
A. T. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Reports that so far as he had used our Malto- 
pepsine, he had found it far superior to any 
other preparation he has ever used. 

New Lebanon, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1880. 
X. T. Bates, M. D. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Of late I have been 
using j'our new preparation, the Maltopepsine, 
and am so highly pleased with its action, that I 
am induced to give you the results of my ex- 
perience with it. Almost invariably this rem- 
edy has given me satisfaction, and in several 
cases of dyspepsia and irritable stomach, when 
the several preparations of Pepsin and Bismuth 
and kindred agents have failed, the use of 
Maltopepsine has been a complete success. I 
regard it particularly useful in debility of the 
stomach following acute or chronic gastritis, 
and that attendant upon convalescence from all 
exhausting diseases. 

In vomiting of pregnancy it is a superior 
remedy. It will be found highly useful in the 
diarrhoea of children; which is generally de- 
pendent upon imperfect digestion. 

The aluminium which you have incorporated 
into it is a happy idea. I heartily recommend 
it to the profe.ssion. 

E. M. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Speaks in the highest terms of our Malto- 
pepsine, also of our .Saccliarated — thinks the 
latter the strongest he has ever used. 



FORMULA OF MALTOPEPSINE. 

-Sugarof Slilk ;i.j u/,. I I'epsine l(i o/,. I Hydrochloric Acid 5fl.dr. 

Nutritives of the Grain... 10 " Diiwhisc (i dr. riiosplioric Acid 3" " 

Powdered Firwein 7'' | Lactic .\cid .") f1. dr. | .\liiininiuni 3 '' oz. 

PRICE LIST. 

Maltopepsine, Hn oz. bot.) per o7, S ."•') I We also prepare the various Elixirs 

" •' " doz... 7.00 and Syrups in combination with Malto- 
" fi^lb. bot.) " ft IS.OO 1 pepsine. 

Prepared by Tilden & Co., New Lebanon, N. Y., and a* Liberty St., N. Y. 



Advertisements. VT 




An EPITOME of the numerous cases reported monthly 
in the Journal of Materia Medica embracing the follotving^ 
diseases, sent on application: 

Scrofula ; Scrofulous enlargement of the cervical glands ; Scrofulous- 
affections of the bone; Scrofulous swelling and abscess of the knee; 
Scrofulous Eczema; White Swelling ; Scrofulous swelling of the glands 
of the neck. 

Cancerous affections ; Cancerous affections complicated with Scrofula ; 
Lupus. 

Necrosis of the Tibia, Femur and Ilium ; Osteo-Periostitis ; Exostosis 
of Ulna; Caries of Vertebra; Synovitis of knee joint ; Hip joint dis- 
eases ; Anchylosis. 

Psoriasis ; Prurigo. Tuberculous affections of the bones. 

Skin Diseases of all kihds. Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis. 

Syphilis; Syphilitic sore throat ; Gonorrhcsa. 

Enlargement of the Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys. 

Bronchocele; Goitre; Exophthalmic Goitre. 

Epilepsy; Otorrhoea; Deafness. 

Diphtheria ; Erysipelas ; Erysipelas with Scrofula ; Tonsillitis. 

Gangrene of the Lungs ; Dry Gangrene ; Pleuro-Pneumonia. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of the lodo Bromide Salts, 



WITH HYDRARGYRI BICHLORIDUM, 

And Alteratives as Stillingin, Menispermin, Dulca- 
marin, Rumicin and Conicine. 

For some time we have made specially this preparation, to meet those cases 
constantly occurriDg in the practice of Physicians, in which the impression of 
mercury is required, and it has been the custom of many in the most inveterate 
cases of Scrofula, and particularly in thatof Scrofulo-Syphilis, to give for a week 
this combination of one one-hundredth of a grain to each fluid drana, and then 
resume the Elixir plain, alternating as circumstances indicate. In this special 
combination, we have increased the Stillingin and other alteratives specially 
applicable to the treatment of Syphilis and its complications, from that used in 
the plain Elixir. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of lodo Bromide Comp. Salts,, 
and eight one-hundredths of a grain of Hydrargyri Bichloridum. 



WITH IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

We have added to our list the Elixir lodo Bromide of Calcium Comp. with 
Iodide of Potassium. Each ounce contains 72 grains of the lodo Bronaide Comp. 
Salts, with 32 grains of Iodide of Potassium. The vegetable alteratives are the 
same as in the plain Elixir. 

TILDEN &. CO., New Lebanon, N. Y., and 84: Liberty St., New Tork. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria MEDicAii Monthly. 



118 Advertisements. 



OAK LAWN RETREAT 



-FOR THE- 



INSANE, 



j-JLCicsonsr-viLLE, ill. 



rPHIS INSTITUTION, founded by its present pro- 
-'- prietor, is now in its ninth year of successful 
operation. Possessed of every conceivable advantage 
in location, site, retirement, and building arrange- 
ments — all carefully studied from the beginning — it 
is prepared to carry into effect the most advanced 
ideas in the treatment of the insane. It especially 
adapts itself to the care of cases of a chronic nature, 
where a home with something of permanency is an 
object. Favoring circumstances permit of lower rates 
of charge than can possibly be afforded in any other 
institution so supported. The proprietor presents his 
grateful acknowledgements to the medical profession 
for the countenance it has received. 

ANDREW McFARLAND, M. D., 

Sole Proprietor. 

October, 1880. 

In answering advertisemeats mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 19 



ST, FRANCIS' BBftDLE! HOSPITIIL! 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluif, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studer. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
siciacs sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is charged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Sitpej^ior. 

In answering advertisements naention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



20 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC IKTAILKER <fe SON 



Importers of 



AND 



Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 

AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKER AND COLT . 

SHOT GUNS. 




A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 

AND 

Sporting Equipments. 
REVOLVERS, 

Fine Cuilery, 

ALSO, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

HARDWARE ! 



125 and 127 

SOUTH WASHMTOK 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 




(IL.TQ,TJIX)-) 



FORMULA : 

BACH FLUID DRACHM CONTAINS 

5 1-2 gr. free phosphoric acid (POg). 
3 gr. phosphate of lime (3CaO PO5). 
1-2 gr. phosphate of mag. (SMgOPOg) 
1-6 gr. phosphate of iron (Fe2 O3 PO5). 
1-1 gr. phosphate of potash (3 kO.POg). 

Total amount of Phosphoric Acid 
in one fluid draclim, free and com- 
bined, 7 grains. 

It contains no pyrophosphate, or 
metaphosphateof any base whatever. 



F 



or Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, 
Diminished Titality, Urinary Difficulties, Etc. 

HORSFORD'S 



Prepared according to the directions of Prof . E. N. HORSFORD, of Cambridge, Mass. 
There seems to be no difference of opinion, in high medical authority, of the 
value of phosphoric acid and no preparation has ever been offered to the public 
which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. 

It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. 

i\'o danger can attend its use. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. 



W. A. HAMMOND, M. D., late Surgeon-Gen- 
eral TJ. S. Army, said that under the use of ar- 
senic and Horsford's Acid Phosphate, a young 
lady rescued her reason who had been ren- 
dered insane by a dream. 

DR. M. H. HENBY, of New York, says: 
Horsford's Acid Phospliate possesses claims as 
a beverage beyond anything I know of in the 
form of Medicine, and in nervous diseases I 
know of no preparation to equal it. 



DR. REUBEN A. VANCE, of New York: 
The preparation on which I place the most re- 
liance is Horsford's Acid Phosphate. 

The late WINSLOW LEWIS, M. D., of Bos- 
ton, said : Having in my own person experi- 
enced those ills for which the Acid Phosphate 
is prescribed, 1 have found great relief and 
alleviation by its use, most cheerfully attest 
my appreciation of its excellence. 



Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free 
on application to manufacturers. 

Physicians desiring to test it will be furnished a bottle free of expense, except 
express charges, if they mention Peoria MEDiCAXi Monthly. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, Rhode Island. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peobia Medical Monthly. 



SPECIMEN PAGE (See opposite page.) 

Notes of Hospital Practice. 49 

^ Co7istipation Due to Want of Peristaltic Action.— A. sitz- 

S bath is ordered every night, the water used being as cold as ^ 

I the patient can bear; or, upon rising in the morning, the ^ 

25 spine and abdomen are sponged with cold water. In other M 

H cases, great benefit is derived from dashing water against the ^ 

M abdomen while the patient stands up. Nux vomica, com- g 

^ bined with soap and rhubarb, has proved very serviceable. H 

The application of the faradic current, one pole of the bat- H 

^ tery being placed over the spine, and the other passed up 

H and down over the abdominal walls, has often been of great ^ 

S benefit. In still other cases, the health-lift is recommended. 
K Constipation Due to Chronic Inflammation of the Rectum.— 

5 The rectum is emptied by means of enemata. When it is 

m thoroughly cleansed out, strychnia is injected locally, a fold 

U of the mucous membrane being drawn down and the needle 

? inserted. This same hypodermic method has given the most 

u excellent results in Dr. Thomson's hands in cases of constipa- 

pj tion accompanying enlarged prostate. In every instance the 

H rectum is first thoroughly emptied by means of an enema. 

^ Kissengen water is prescribed in the morning, and a sup- 

^ pository of belladonna, or stramonium, used at night. Far- 

g adization along the course of the colon, and hip-baths, are 

^ also of service. 
H Constipation Following Febrile Diseases is treated by means 

of the compound jalap powder, 
p Constipation Associated with Chlorosis.— Dry heat is applied 

^ to the feet and hands. In addition to the dry heat, the feet 
and arms are wrapped in clothes dipped in a solution of cap- 
sicum. The same application is made over the abdomen. 
H After these measures have been continued for some time, 
^ cathartics are administered, the one most generally employed 
p atBellevue Hospital being the compound rhubarb pill. Of 
P^ these, three are given at night, twice a week, or given every 
^ night until the bowels have been rendered soluble. Iron is 
2 not used until the bowels have been rendered soluble. The 

3.500 COPIES SOLD IN NINE MONTHS. 



NOTES OF 
HOSPITAL PRACTICE. 

8vo., pp. 256. Price, $2.00 in clo., $2.50 in calf. 

Shows the Treatment of over 400 Diseases by eminent New York and Phil-<- 
adelphia Physicians. Among other things, it contains: 

T>U fIT' #«0 f^ T^T'T T 'C Treatment of Sore Nipples, Puerperal Fever, Vagin- 
*• *^\r^ •" ^^wX^JI^X^AjJI^ O ismiis, Cystitis in the Female, Gathered Breasts, 
^f .^f ?• \t^^?J^°^H?! Management of the Funis, Dysmenorrhoea, Amenorrhcea, Ovarian Cysts, Carun' 
cle of the Urethra, Sleeplessness in Uterine Disorders, etc., etc. w ,v^ i^ 

^"DOT^ T)irOrtT^'G Treatment of Thermic Fever, Collapse, Sexual Exhaustion, 
Dj-sSt^^e* *etc ^^^-^^^ O Idiopathic Peritonitis, Tetanus, Chorea, Acute and Chronic 

^X^OX^ T^TT^^TU'C Treatment of the Menopause, Typhoid Fever, Organic 
^„vT^^ d" •:*^i!^*. ^TtH*** ^ Heart Disease, Sciatica, Saccharine Diabetes, Addi- 
^^S=1o TT?^^®'^^/v,^*yji^^'''^'A^'^^^J°"^>'*t*^'Ac"'e Angina, Acute and Chronic Rheumatism, Dys- 
pepsia, Ulcer of the Stomach, Lumbago, the Opium Habit, etc., etc. 

IP'DO'P 1^ A ^OQT'A'C Treatment of Bright's Disease, Influenza, Diabetes 
n^A<,uf^yv^if^,.*f^.f^?i:^<^^^y'?^rr■'^rS^ insipidus. Acute Rheumatism, Chronic Psoriasis, 
oastnc \ ertigo.the Night teweats of Phthisis, Hfematemesis, Pneumonia, Pleurisy, Typhoid Fever, etc! 

^"ROT* ^T?OQd' Treatment of Paraphimosis, Erysipelas, Intra-Capsular Frac- 
rhr'T^ o / - ?-*-^,*T^^'^^ tures, Stricture, External Hsemorrhoids, Noevus Materna, Pros- 

id-ioiruica, Cystitis, Gleet, etc., etc. 

'Pf?OT' tf^T. A l^lfG Treatment of Pneumonia, Empyema, Asthma, Pleurisy. 
^ *.«»x^i* • X^JLIxa.A«fXV l3 Jaundice, Typhoid Fever, Peritonitis, etc., etc. 
131? OT* T IT OTVT A Q' Treatment of Vaginismus, Fibroids of the Womb, Pruri- 
pTpcn?:' .^^r*", *„."T *^^^"*'"*'^S' .^"^ Vulva;, Anteflexion, Cancerof the Womb, Abdominal 
Pregnauc^v, I^eucorrhrea, Tympanites, Chronic Ovaritis, etc., etc. 

131>Oir' Cm€\TTf WG Treatment of Gonorrhojal Cystitis, Acute Urethritis, 
gia, etc etc * ^*^^ •^ MAJtA X k9 Perineal Fistula, Acute Retention of Urine, Cystorrha- 

P W OT* fi A ^r 1? V Q Treatment of Fibrous Anchylosis. Chronic Synovitis, In- 
■* ••■•♦^^*. • I9X&. JL JnfXtf O growingToe-Nall, Injuries of the Joints, etc. 

"PROT T'TTI^TVTQI^'W'G Treatment of Scarlet Fever, constipation, Croup- 
th^uTor^i'S.c'ho-^^mYi'rl^^eV-*-^ ^ ous Pharyngitis, Acute Rheumatism, Cirrhosis of 

Pl^OT SnVrTTPTT'C Treatment of Dysenteric Diarrhosa, Flatulent Dikrrhcea, 
Th^:^*!^* • »^^J.Jf XXJ. O the Diarrhoea of Detention, Cholera Infantum, Nervous 
TTr.S^i„ & i Headache, MalariKl Headache, the Headache of Syphilis, the Headache of Rheumatism, 
Ursetnie Headache, Dyspeptic Headache, etc., etc. 

"pi "R OT' T'T T \rT"C Treatment of Acute Dysentery, Epidemic Dysentery, Chronic 

Tfth'Tw^,, ' •* ?H'* • .■*■ "^ Dysentery, Subacute Enteritis, Valvular and Aoritic Lesions 

01 tne Heart. Angina Pectoris, etc. 

RROT* T/^OTMTTC Treatment of Mitral and Aortic Regurgitation, Typhoid 
^^ MXiVJM. • Ma\J\J]3^1S3 Fever, Rum stomach, etc. 

[PJDQJ' !BA.RTCn^'^ Treatment of Menorrhagia, Abortion, etc., etc. 

PROP* T! C\ QT'I^TTTWC Treatment of Migraine, Trigeminal Neural- 

*thmaeic » JC^WT U Alll |3 gia, Epilepsy, Insomnia, Insanity, Hay 

PROT TT A TVnVTOTVTTl'C Treatment of Splnal congestion. Cerebral An»- 
f* "*''^''* • AXXl^ASiAwL^^xH MJ |9 mia, Acute Cerebral Meningitis, Spinal Anfemia. 
M R O F OO 14 F M 'Q Treatment of Dilatation of the Stomach, Tinea Favosa, 
lifif\vtr^hT-.„? T3 1^ ■f.^J!'' ^ Post- Nasal Catarrh, Laryngeal Phthisis, Dropsy, Syph- 
lUic bore Throat, Paralysis of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve, etc., etc. ' v :», c.jri,u 

PROF AOMFiAI'G Treatment of Fractured Patella, Hip-Joint Disease, 
rreducibif Hernia, etc Fractured Clavicle, Surgical Shock, Reducible and 

DR. WEIR MITCHELL'S SS' °' '^' ™°"' ^''''^'''' 

*** Sent, post-x)aid, to any address, xipon receipt of x>rice, by the publisher. 

UMUEL M. MILLER, M. D., 536 SPRUCE ST., PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



Advertisements. 



NEW PHARMACEUTICALS 



WORTHY OF THE" 




NITRO-GLYCERINEPILLS 



Nitro-glycerine is introduced on 
the authority of Dr. Murrell, of Lon- 
don, as a remedy in angina pectoris 
and in cases of chronic neuralgia in 
any part of the body. Cases of an- 
gina pectoris which had resisted 
all attempts at even alleviation, 
much less cure, have promptly 
yielded to nitro-glycerine, and a 
number of cases of actual cure are 
reported. This is more than can be 
said of any other known remedy. 
In neuralgia the effects of this drug 
have, in some instances, been 
scarcely less marked. 

The pill form is very eligible, be- 
sides ensuring exactness of dose. 



Sanguis Bovinus Exsiccatus. 



In this preparation of blood we 
have a true food, the albumen being 
entirely retained. In this respect it 
differs from the various beef ex- 
tracts, beef essences, etc., in the 
market. These preparations are, 
from the very methods of their 
naanufacture, entirely deprived of 
albmen , the true n utritive principl e 
of beef, and are thus not foods in 
any proper sense of the word. 

Sanguis bovinus exsiccatus is 
blood deprived of nothing but its 
water and fibrin, which latter is 
naturally small in quantity and 
practically of no nutritive value. 



Liquor Ergotse Purificatus. 

'^H t i « • 

This form of ergot is of constant 
strength. In its preparation only 
the active principles of the drug 
are retained, all inert and noxious 
ingredients being removed. As 
these active principles ^ re assayed 
the liquor contains them in con- 
stant and definite proportions, 
and thus is obviated the uncer- 
tainty of strergrh due to varia- 
bility in the quality of the Fample 
of the drug employed. Liquor 
ergotfe purificatus is as constant 
in its strength as morphia, quinia, 
or any of the other alkaloids of 
vegetable drugs. 



^- 



CASCAR/i + CORDIAL 
-— ^: e ; • • 

This laxative and alterative 
preparation stands unequalled 
among pliarmaceutical prepara- 
tions as a remedy in constipation. 
Its agreeable and efficient action 
has been abundantly attested by 
the medical profession of this 
country, and it stands now as a 
remedy of unquestionable efficacy 
in chronic constipation. Great 
care should be exercised in not pre- 
scribing too large a dose, inasmuch 
as cascara sagrada, its active ingre- 
dient.overcomes constipation by its 
tonic action on the bowel, rather 
than by direct laxative influence. 



i 



FULL AND DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAES OF TEE ABOVE 

—WILL BE SENT FBEE ON APPLICATION TO— 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich., 

Manufacturing Chemists and Special Dealers in New and Eaxe Drugs. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Mbdical Monthly. 



reorik JVIedickl JVLoi^tlily. 

VOL. I. DECEMBER, 1880. NO. 8. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly J 

Dr. Rudolplius Rouse. 

During the past sixteen years, nine members of the 
medical profession have been taken from us by death. 
Two of this number had rounded out the allotted span of 
human life — three score and ten. Four were stricken 
down in the prime of manhood, and in full possession of 
their mental powers. Three were cut off in the morning 
of life, falling victims to the dangers incident to their pro- 
fession, and adding other names to the long list of martyrs 
who have died for humanity. With one or two exceptions 
they were unknown beyond the locality in which they 
labored. They had not acquired a widespread popularity 
or a great name in their profession, but wherever they were 
known they have left grateful remembrances in the 
hearts of the friends to whom their aid was rendered. No 
etone over these graves records their deeds of self-denial 
and heroism. Having w^orn out health, and sacrificed life 
in the cause of humanity, they have found that rest from 
their labors which was denied them upon earth. One 
among those who have gone, was widely known as a lead- 
ing and prominent practitioner of this city. His appear- 
ance is yet fresh in our recollection as he lived among us 
seven years ago. Few, if any, of our citizens at that time 
did not know, either personally or by reputation, the late 
Dr. Rudolphus Rouse, the subject of this brief biographical 
sketch. 

Dr. Rouse was born in Renssalaer county. New York, 
on the 20th of July, 1793. At an early age he commenced 
the study of medicine, and attended a course of lectures in 
the University of Pennsylvania. Near the end of the ses- 



190 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

sioD he was attacked with articular rheumatism and was 
obliged to return home. Recovering his health he secured 
a license to practice medicine and surgery in the State of 
!N"ew York from the censors of the Renssalaer County Med- 
ical Society. Soon after he was commissioned as assistant 
surgeon in one of the regiments raised by the State of 
iSTew York and accepted by the United States in the war 
with Great Britain in 1812. After serving in that capacity 
for some months he was honorably discharged in Novem- 
ber, 1814. In the winter following he attended a second 
course of lectures in the Pennsylvania University, and 
again near the close of the session was attacked with 
rheumatism and obliged to go home. He subsequently 
practiced his profession in the States of New York and 
New Jersey, daily acquiring that experience which made 
him a popular and able physician. After a practice of a 
few years in the above named states, as well as in the 
cities of New York and Philadelphia, he made a tour 
through the Southern States, and while greatly pleased 
with their climate, soil and productiveness, the curse of 
slavery deterred him from casting his lot there. In 1832 
he visited the three Western States. Struck with admira- 
tion of the beautiful valley of the Illinois, then but sparely 
settled, he determined to make it his future home. In the 
following year he moved with his family to the village, 
now city, of Peoria, where he resided until his death. His 
practice and reputation grew with the growth of the town, 
and there are many still living who speak of him as a 
physician in terms of unqualified praise. In his prime he 
ranked among the most prominent members of the profes- 
sion in the city and surrounding country. He held several 
positions of honor and trust — was president of the first 
Board of Trustees of the town of Peoria; president of the 
Peoria & Oquawka Railroad Company. In 1850 he presided 
at the meeting which founded the Illinois State Medical 
Society — was one of the original members — elected its 
third president, and for many years took a deep interest 
in its prosperity. For a long time he was the presiding 
officer of the Peoria City Medical Society and was always 
prominent and active in its membership. In whatever 
position he was placed he tilled it with integrity, ability 
and energy. His principles were keen, his judgment 
good and his powers of discrimination excelled by few. 
For the last two years of his life his strength gradually 



Original Communications. 191 

failed, but lie retained his clearness of mind in a remarka- 
ble degree. His attention was almost exclusively directed, 
during the last year of his life, to the erection of a monu- 
ment for his family and a tomb for himself in Springdale 
cemetery. When his strength permitted, he daily visited 
the spot and gave directions for the construction of the 
narrow house in which he expected soon to lie. He fre- 
quently expressed the fear that he would not live to see 
the monument and tomb completed. This seemed to be 
the only object for which he desired to live, and strange as 
it may appear, the one in which he took the greatest inter- 
est. He died April 30, 1873, having suffered for several 
years from chronic catarrh of the bladder and enlargement 
of the prostate gland. The personal appearance of Dr. 
Kouse was neither very striking nor commanding, yet no 
one could see him or be in his company without recogniz- 
ing in him a man of decided traits of character. His 
features were not regular, but were often lighted up by 
emotion of any kind. His countenance was sometimes 
staid and solemn, at times, beaming, particularly when re- 
lating a story or telling a joke, at which he was an adept, 
and of which he was very fond. His head was well 
formed and indicative of intellect. He was social in his 
habits and feelings. His step was slow, deliberate and 
firm, and his manners simple and dignified, but not invaria- 
bly so. Humanity has its infirmities, and to them Dr. 
Rouse was no exception. In the earlier part of his life his 
disposition was remarkably placid. As years and disease 
grew upon him he was at times irritable and irascible, at 
others genial and gentle. To those who had crossed or 
offended him he was short and curt in his language, 
and under great provocation occasionally rude in his inter- 
course. Beyond these named he exhibited no faults or 
foibles worth mentioning. At all events he and they are 
alike gone, and it would be ungracious and ungenerous to 
recount or remember infirmities over which the grave has 
closed. Of his professional character and reputation, men- 
tion has already been made. It may be truly said that 
no man filled a larger space or was better known in the 
community in which he lived than Dr. Rouse. He be- 
longed to that class of practitioners in a new country 
whose daily life was spent in the hard, rough work inci- 
dent to those early days. Few medical men of the present 
day can form an adequate conception of the dangers, trials 



192 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

and privations of those pioneer doctors. Nearly all were 
intelligent and energetic, and many of them educated men. 
They came in the vigor of youth and manhood to make a 
stern, unfaltering trial of their fortunes — with great labor, 
with much self denial, with slight prospect of pecuniary 
reward, struggling with poverty and with no hope of fame, 
their services were cheerfully rendered to all those who re- 
quired them. 

But two of that number besides the writer remain in 
the field, Drs. Frye and Murphy, Nearly, if not quite all, 
the others are dead, and if any survive, they have removed 
to other and distant fields of labor. Living or dead, their 
humble, laborious, useful and self-sacrificing lives challenge 
our admiration. While their sacrifices and labors will 
never be appreciated as they deserve, these pioneers in our 
noble profession, should not be forgotten when they are 
seen no more. It is to be hoped that those who have suc- 
ceeded them, will leave behind as green a memory in the 
hearts of the recipients of their care, as did the subject of 
this sketch and his cotemporaries. 

Peoria, III. Robert Boal, M. D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Case of Pneunio-liydro-Thorax of traumatic Orig-in. 

BY J. P. ROSS, M. D., 

Prof, of Clinical Medicine and Diseases of the Chest, 
in Rush Medical College. 



J. B., aged 35, a Scotchman, a grain dealer, was admit- 
ted to Cook County Hospital, Oct. 16tb, 18 — . We give 
the following history : 

Has always enjoyed good health. On the day previous 
to admission while crossing the street he was struck on the 
back with a pole of an omnibus. The blow knocked him 
down and produced insensibility, which lasted about one 
hour. On returning to consciousness he had a feeling of 
oppression in the stomach. His breathing was interrupted 
and so difiicult as to prevent his lying down. He had a 
slight hacking cough accompanied by severe lancinating 
pain in the right side of the chest. 

On admission he was unable to lie down. His counte- 
nance was expressive of severe suffering; pulse 150 and 
small. Respiration 50 and short and imperfect, skin moist, 
tongue furred, short dry cough. Severe pain in right side 



Original Communications. 193 

of chest. Bowels constipated. On inspection only slight 
motion was observed on the right side. There was partial 
obliteration of the intercostal spaces. Percussion revealed 
tympanitic resonance of right side of chest and normal re- 
sonance of the left side. In the erect posture there was 
dullness on the right side below the ninth rib and varying 
according to position of patient. 

On auscultation puerile respiration was found on the 
left side. In the infraclavicular region of the right side 
the breathing and the voice sounds were amphoric. There 
was metallic tinkling behind the nipple and total abstin- 
ence of all sounds below the sixth rib. The succussion 
sound was very distinct. 

The side was bathed with a soothing liniment, and a 
warm poultice was applied. Liq. ammoniac acet. was admin- 
istered internally and rest was secured, with Dover's powder 
at bed time. 

Oct. 19th, four days after the accident, the pain was 
much diminished. Respiration 45 and still labored. Pulse 
124. Patient still unable to lie down. A physical exam- 
ination revealed that the effusion in the pleural cavity had 
increased so that it reached as high as the fourth rib. The 
side was painted with tr. iodine and the poultices contin- 
ued. Patient was given acetate ot pot. 20 grs., and sweet 
spts. nitre one drachm, every four hours. 

On Oct, 26th, eleven days after the accident, the patient 
was able to lie on the aftected side. He complained but 
little of pain and less of dyspnoea. Respiration 40 ; pulse 
140, Ordered iod, of pot., grs. 6, with tr, digitalis, gtts. 
10. Discontinued poultices. 

On Oct. 30th, the effusion was somewhat diminished ; 
dyspnoea less. Continued the treatment. From this time the 
patient improved steadily. The urine became copious and 
the dyspnoea diminished with the decrease of the effusion 
and the proportionate expansion of the lung. The increased 
resonance and the amphoric sounds gradually disappeared. 

On Nov. 29th, six weeks after the accident, there was 
total absence of the amphoric sounds — the effusion was 
completely absorbed. The chest expansion was almost 
normal. The patient was discharged a few days later. 

On Dec. 1st, 18 — , a little over four years after the acci- 
dent, the patient called upon me at which time he was per- 
fectly well. He stated that his health had been perfectly 
good ever since the time he left the hospital, Dec. 20, 18 — . 



194 ' Peoria Medical Monthly. 

This case is one of exceeding interest because of the 
unusual cause of the rupture and the rapid progress of the 
recovery from the injury. There was no severe external 
injury to mark the place where the blow was received. A 
slight external bruise was all, and yet the lung was rup- 
tured and the pulmonary pleura torn. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

The Accommodation of tlie Eye and Wliat it Means. 



BY S. J. BUMSTEAD, M.D.- 



Knowing from my conversations with physicians who 
possess no special acquaintance with opthalmology that it 
is difficult for them to get a proper understanding of the 
accommodative and refractive affections of the eye, from 
the text books upon these subjects, as also from my own 
experience in acquiring that knowledge, I thought a service 
might possibly be rendered some professional brethren, if I 
gave them an idea of these conditions of the eye in simpler 
language than that in general use by our opthalmological 
authors. From a consideration of the accommodation of 
the eye, we may in successive articles consider in the same 
way presbyopia, hypermetropia, myopia and astigmatipm. 

The human eye constitutes of itself an optical system 
which, when of the normal construction, has a certain 
definite refractive power over the rays of light entering it 
from distant objects, or those which in relation to it are sit- 
uated farther than twenty feet. This normally constructed 
eye, in the optical sense, is known among occulists as an 
emmetropic eye, which signifies that when the eye is at rest 
and completely passive, ail objects over twenty feet from it 
are distinctly pictured upon its retina. For the present 
purpose we may regard the optical system of the eye as 
having an anterior and posterior focal point, and a nodal 
point. The nodal point in the emmetropic eye is situated 
in the lens, nearer the posterior than the anterior surface, 
and we have principally to concern ourselves now with the 
nodal and the posterior focal points. In this nodal point 
the rays proceeding from the top of an object before the 
eye, pass through and go to the lower part of the image 
upon the retina, and vice versa, placing it there upside 
down, a fact generally well known. This is easily demon- 
strated by allowing a landscape view to pass through a 



Original Communications. 195 

convex lens of short focus, upon a screen placed behind it 
in the focal point. A bi-convex lens has its anterior and 
posterior focal points at the same distances from the centre 
of the lens. Of course the eje is not so simple as a glass 
lens in its optical construction, because we have both the 
anterior and posterior surfaces of the cornea, the aqueous 
humor, the two surfaces of the lens, and lastly the vitreous 
humor, to exercise their distinct and difterent action upon 
the rays of light traversing them. 

And yet for the purpose we have in view it is correct 
enough to say, that these refractive media, taken collect- 
ively, so bend the rays of light that they come to a focus 
and form a perfect image, just 6.7 parisian lines behind the 
nodal point, and which is a little over half an inch, there 
being twelve lines to the inch, and the parisian inch a little 
longer than our own, about one-tenth. For our purpose, 
then, we can say the eye focuses its rays one-half inch 
behind the lens, and a glass lens of the same power is 
regarded as a strong one. The power the different media 
of the eye have in bending the rays over that in air, is called 
the index of refraction, and is as 4 : 3. Then if the emme- 
tropic eye can see distinctly, without effort, all objects more 
than twenty feet from it, how and why can it see an object 
when brought within six or eight inches from the eye ? 
This power the human eye possesses, and is called the 
accommodative power, and range of the eye. It is well 
known that rays proceeding from an object within a few 
inches are very divergent, and the lens of the eye in its 
passive state can only bring rays that are parallel to a focus 
upon the retina. Objects situated more than twenty feet 
from the eye send rays of light that are parallel, and such a 
convex lens of one-half inch focal power will bring to a 
perfect image just in the focus of said lens : that is, the 
retina. 

But if the object is brought within twelve inches of the 
eye, no addition having been made to the former optical 
system, the rays will come to the eye so divergent that the 
same focal power will not suffice to bring the image in the 
same place, but the retina would then lie anteriorly to the 
focus ; that is, only circles of unfocused rays would fall 
upon it. 

One can demonstrate this truth as follows : Take a con- 
vex lens of three-inch focus, and placing it in a cylinder to 
represent the camera obscura, turn it towards an object in 



196 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the distance, when if a,ground glass is placed three inches 
behind it, the image will be depicted thereon perfectly. So 
soon, however, as the object is brought as near as six or 
eight inches, the image disappears, and it will be necessary 
either to add another convex lens of six or eight inch focus, 
or place the screen farther from the lens, and this latter the 
«ye cannot do. 

[TO BE CONTINUED.] 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

A Case of Fracture of tlie Skull. 

On the afternoon of July 13th, 1880, while standing at 
my office window I saw a policeman make an arrest at a 
saloon immediately opposite, while standing in the door- 
way was the bar-tender, P. M., a young man about twenty- 
five years of age, who was covered with blood. Shortly 
afterwards I was called over to make an examination of 
the man's injuries. I found a slight dent in the cranial 
walls on the vertex, and that there was considerable 
hemorrhage from the right ear. 

The man was fully conscious although presenting a 
dazed appearance and answering questions in an absent 
minded manner. In reply to my inquiries as to the nature 
of the blow he had received, he said that while interfer- 
ing in a light he received a blow upon the head from a 
chair. I gave as my opinion that the man was severely 
and dangerously injured. When the blood was washed 
away he went behind the bar to attend to his regular duties, 
which, as I was afterwards informed, he performed for a 
half an hour or more. In the meanwhile another physi- 
cian had been called, and I retired to await developments. 
In less than an hour I was again summoned and responded, 
to find him stretched upon a sofa, breathing stertorously 
and with all the symptoms of a pressure upon the brain. 
I assured the bystanders that there was nothing to be done 
and that he would die without regaining consciousness, as 
he did, within an hour. On making a pos^ mortem examin- 
ation, Dr. Bluthart, the county physician, found a fracture 
of the skull extending from the vertex to the foramen 
magnum at the base. The remarkable feature in the case 
was his ability to attend to his duties as bar-tender for the 
length of time above mentioned, after he had received so 
extensive an injury. 

CnicAGO, III. F. E. Sherman, M. D. 



Original Comrtiunications . 197 

[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Mtrite of Amyl. 

This valuable remedy does not seem to be used as much 
as it is indicated. I have been using it for nearly three 
years and find it almost a specific in facial neuralgia and 
nervous headache. My mode of administering it is this : 
put four or five drops on a pocket handkerchief and have 
the patient inhale it until the face flushes and the patient 
complains of choking, which is caused by the increased 
pulsation of carotids, then withdraw the amyl. Give the 
patient one-half grain of morphine and two grains of quin- 
ine, let them lay down an hour and they will almost in- 
variably be cured of the attack and feel grateful. 

S. A. Oren, M. D. 
Mount Auburn, loiva, Oct. 26, 1880. 



linicdl Wectnres* 



Mutism— Treatment of tlie Opium Habit. 



BY WILLIAM PEPPER, M.D. 
[Special Keport for the Peoria Medical Mouthly.] 

Mutism. — All the rest of this woman's children can talk 
perfectly well except this one. There was no trouble at the 
birth of this girl. She had measles when eighteen months 
old, and whooping cough when two years of age. She was 
not able to make any sound whatever before she was two 
years old. She tries to read now, but cannot. She can 
count, however, up to twenty-four ; can say mother, father, I 
knovj; and repeat all the letters of the alphabet except W. 
She can make plenty of noise when she chooses to, so that 
there is no loss of the sound-producing power; she is not 
tongue-tied. Her tonsils are greatly enlarged, but they da 
not interfere with her voice. There is no tumor on the 
vocal cords, and they move freely. The difiiculty lies in 
the use of articulate speech. She is able to talk much better 
than she does. The mutism may be due either to a congeni- 
tal defect or to retarded development. I have seen this 
condition co-existing with very fully developed intellect. 
There is probably retarded development of the centre of 
speech in the brain in this child. Aphasia we usually con- 



198 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

nect with some defect or lesion of the anterior part of the 
left hemisphere, the left fissure of Sylvius and the island of 
Keil. In treating this condition we must be guided (1) by 
the extent of the defect (here the defect is very marked) and 
(2) by the condition of the general health and intellect (here 
it is excellent). There is one form of mutism, where speech 
begins to develop and suddenly comes to a dead stop, and 
another, in which speech begins to develop late, but goes 
on developing. Of these two, the first is the more unfavor- 
able condition. Here the prognosis is favorable. I should 
say that when she is fifteen this girl will speak quite well. 
She must be carefully taught to exercise the function of 
speech, and every eftbrt must be employed to get her to 
practice phonation. There are no drugs needed, except, 
perhaps, the phosphatic salts. Where the mutism is com- 
plete and is accompanied by deafness, the patient cannot, of 
course, be taught to employ vocal sounds. In some cases 
mutism is only dependent upon deafness. 

TREATMENT OF THE OPIUM HABIT. 

Up to four years and three months ago, this woman was 
in vigorous health, when she became a severe sufferer from 
sciatica. The only thing that gave her relief from her pain 
was morphia, of which she finally became in the habit of 
taking six grains thrice daily. During this prolonged 
course of morphia, her original trouble entirely disappeared. 
"When she came to stop its use, however, every attempt to 
diminish the dose was followed by the most horrible dis- 
tress, 80 that she found it impossible to give up the use of 
the drug, and became a confirmed opium-eater. This is 
just a type of the cases you will meet in practice. The 
quantity of opium which the system maybe brought to bear 
is truly enormous. There was lately in my wards at the 
Philadelphia Hospital, a young girl, who would take as 
much as a pint of laudanum in the course of twenty-four 
hours. 

In the present instance there was culpable carelessness 
on the part of her attending physician. Be always very 
careful how you sanction the use of opiates in chronic cases. 

In an incurable disease opium may be very properly 
administered to produce euthasia, but where the disease is 
curable it is your duty to be exceedingly careful. In this 
case the physician neglected that duty. 

After reaching a certain point it is morally impossible 
to give up the use of opium by force of will. The craving 



Clinical Lectures. 199 



for opium is much more soul enthralling than that for 
strong drink. If the dose is postponed, such a sensation of 
depression and distress, such craving and longing come on, 
that the patient will have the morphia, if he have to sell his 
soul to get it. The general functions of the body gradually- 
become accustomed to the regular administration of the 
drug. The bowels, stomach and kidneys perform their 
functions regularly so long as the habit is kept up. 

This woman has been so long an opium eater that she 
comes to us white, emaciated and shattered in body and 
nerves. How are we to break up the habit ? It is useless 
to appeal to the moral sense. We must endeavor to dimin- 
ish the need of the system for the opium. Rest is the first 
item in the cure : keep the patient in bed. If the habit be 
only in its infancy, extensive travel, as a diversion for the 
mind, will often work wonders. See that such patients 
have ample nourishment. If there is any morbid irritation 
of the mucous membrane of the stomach, put them on an 
absolute diet of skimmed milk, beginning with a pint, up 
to two quarts daily. All this while you must progressively 
diminish the amount of opium taken. If the conjoined 
milk and opium produce constipation you must try and 
overcome this condition by massage. Have the abdominal 
muscles w^ell kneaded daily. Regular injections of cod- 
liver oil may be given in the morning, followed by cold 
water injections at night, or you may give some vegetable 
laxative. Iron must be administered in large and ascend- 
ing doses. Dialyzed iron is an excellent chalybeate. It 
may be given in doses of from ten drops up to one fluid 
drachm thrice daily, Quinia and strychnia may be com- 
bined with the iron. This patient has been reduced to two 
grains of opium thrice daily, instead of six grains at the 
same interval. She is taking quinia and half a fluid drachm 
of dialyzed iron four times daily. In the course of three 
weeks I have every reason to believe that the habit will be 
entirely broken up. 



Pelvic Abscess. 



BY WM. H. BYFORD, M.D. 
Professor of Gynoecology in Rush Medical College, Chicago, HI. 



[Keported for the Peoria Medical Monthly by a Student.] 

This patient, a widow, is twenty-six years of age. She 
was married at fourteen ; has one child, now nearly eleven 



200 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

years old, and has had four miscarriages. Menstruation, 
which has always been regular and normal up to within a 
short time, began in her twelfth year. While she had never 
been very robust, she enjoyed a fair degree of health until 
three years ago, or after her last miscarriage, which is the 
date she gives us as the beginning other present difficulty. 
She then began to complain of general symptoms of pelvic 
disease; pain low down in the back; pain over the abdo- 
men, tympanitis, palpitation, frequent micturition, &c., &c., 
and also tells us, that eleven months ago she had what was 
called an attack of inflammatory rheumatism, for which she 
received treatment, and which passed off in a few days. 
This rheumatism was confined to the lower extremities, and 
principally to that of the right side. After the subsidence 
of this rheumatism, which was not accompanied by swell- 
ing, her health has been only fairly good. She has had a 
continuation of the symptoms I have enumerated, but not of 
such a severe character as to prevent her from attending to 
her household duties. 

In September last, she had another attack of rheuma- 
tism of the same character as before, followed, as she says, 
by typhoid fever. This febrile condition lasted between 
two and three weeks. During and since this last attack in 
September, she has had an aggravation of the pelvic symp- 
toms, with more localized pain in the right side of the pel- 
vis and back, which, are very severe, and to relieve which 
morphia in considerable doses has been administered. 
Some time later there was a copious discharge of pus 
through the vagina, and this discharge still continues, 
though greatly lessened in amount. Now, what has been 
and is the trouble here ? You will have no hesitancy in 
diagnosing a pelvic abscess, and I think I will have no diffi- 
culty in making her previous symptoms harmonize with her 
present condition. The rheumatism from which she suf- 
fered was not rheumatism at all, but was a reflex irritation 
of the nerves leading to the parts aft'ected, caused by the 
inception, in the first place, of this inflammatory process, 
and during the last attack, to the renewing of this inflam- 
mation and to the other morbid processes preceding suppu- 
ration and the opening of this abscess. There was no 
swelling, puffiness or especial tenderness in any of the 
joints which there would have been had the attack been 
rheumatic in character, while the fever accompanying it 
was of a low grade, too low for the usual rheumatic fever. 



Clinical Lectures. 201 



Her trouble dates from her last miscarriage, and there 
is no doubt in my mind, though the patient will not com- 
mit herself, but that force was used, that it was a produced 
miscarriage, brought on probably by a whalebone or some 
such instrument. The symptoms at that time subsided, but 
only to appear in September last; the trouble, however, 
had materially advanced, and the fever accompanying the 
pain was of considerably greater intensity. She says it was 
called typhoid, but from its course, character and duration, 
together with the sequelae, we know it was purely inflam- 
matory, and was caused by this localized point of inflam- 
mation. This, with the intimate relations existing in the 
pelvis between the nerves of the lower extremity and the 
organs occupying that cavity, will explain the nature of her 
so-called rheumatic attacks. 

Following the miscarriage, which was brought on by 
some violence done to the organs of generation and their 
appendages, she had a localized inflammation which with 
its exudate led by natural and known processes to the forma- 
tion of this abscess. ^ On examination I find, that the abscess 
situated in the righ^ broad ligament, opened into the vagina 
at the most favorable locality, just below the utero-vaginal 
juncture on the right side. The cavity was not entirely 
emptied at the first discharge, and this is usually the case. 
Now, what shall be the treatment? Were she in a position 
to carry out all my directions, I would first of all insist 
upon complete rest. Since that is impossible for her, as 
boarding-house keeper and doing her own work, to do, I 
will tell her to keep as quiet as she can, and rest as long 
each da}^ as she can find time. ISText, I would endeavor to 
lessen the amount of morphia she is obliged to take, by a 
resort to a sitz bath, an hour at a time twice a day. The 
water in this bath should only cover the pelvis and upper 
part of the thighs. In addition to this I will advise copious 
injections of water. You will notice that I do not say hot 
or warm or cold water, and I generally leave that to the 
patient, telling them to use water of that temperature which 
causes no discomfort and affords the most relief, and this 
they will find out by a few trials. This water for injecting 
may contain a small amount of permanganate of potassium, 
or carbolic acid as a purifier and antiseptic. Further, I will 
place her on the following tonic, which I frequently use and 
find most excellent in these and similar cases : 



202 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



J^ Tr. ferri chloridi, 1 ounce. 

Syrupi simp., 3 ounces. 

Potas citras., 1 drachm. 

M. Sig. Take a teaspoonful three times a day. 

The bowels should be kept open, and in these cases, I 
prefer to do this by regulating the diet rather than by medi- 
cines. Graham bread, used exclusively, is often sufficient. 
The diet must be nutritious and good. I shall also pre- 
scribe as an alterative, one grain of blue mass every night, 
which I find useful in cases where there is considerable 
induration, as an induration in the broad ligament. 

For a counterirritant she will use a liniment made of 
equal parts of tinct. iodine and dilute alcohol. This will be 
applied with a camel's hair pencil over the parts affected. 
In this case the prognosis is not as favorable, for a speedy 
cure, as it would be if she could enjoy complete rest and 
freedom from work of all kinds. Still I think that by doing 
as I have above outlined, she will make a good though 
somewhat tardy recovery. 



Clirysopliaiiic Acid in Diseases of the Skin. 

In ringworm of the scalp, chrysophanic acid is often 
very useful, but it is necessary to use it with considerable 
care, as it has and may produce severe inflammation. Ten 
grains to the ounce of cerate and vaseline is generally suffi- 
ciently strong. Of course it is necessary to use epilation in 
bad cases. One drawback to its use on the scalp is the 
staining of the hairs to a purplish brown color. I think it 
well to mention this fact to patients when stating to them 
the advantage of rapid cure which we are warranted in 
promising from the use of this acid. Ringworm of the 
body is readily cured by an ointment of moderate strength 
rubbed in several times daily. "When used upon the trunk 
or extremities, chrysophanic acid will inevitably stain the 
underclothes. To get over this trouble as well as we can, I 
state the fact to patients, and advise them to wear such 
clothes as are well-worn, and to continue their use while 
under treatment, as the time is usually not very long. In 
lichen planus, I have seen some of the most rapid cures 
produced b}' this agent, but the itching which usually 
accompanies this affection, often necessitates the addition 



Periscope. 203 

of some anti-pruritic agent. In other chronic forms of 
lichen this acid may often be used with great benefit. I 
have now under treatment a case of lupus erythematosus, 
which I am sanguine of curing by an ointment of the 
strength of twenty grains of the acid, to the ounce of oint- 
ment. — St. Louis Courier of Medicine. 



How to Eradicate Syphilis. 

A woman infected with syphilis, convicted of prostitu- 
tion, should be spayed, and, not to make any invidious dis- 
tinction on account of sex, every syphilitic or leper, married 
or single, should be interdicted from sexual co-habitation, 
under no less penalty than the deprivation of the procrea- 
tive power. Under existing law, it is optional for married 
syphilitics to live together or separate, but the continuance 
of the marriage relation under such disabilities, should be 
regarded as a crime. — Dr. French in Chicago Med. Rev. 



Clirysoplianic Acid, " Caution." 

Physicians prescribing this remedy should caution their 
patients against the accident of introducing it into their 
eyes through rubbing them with the fingers. Dilatation of 
the pupil ensues, accompanied with inflammatory itching 
and burning, causing much pain for the time it lasts, though 
the inflammation soon subsides. — Wesiern Lancet. 



Black Silk for Liaratures. 



Prof. AV. H. Pancoast says he uses only black silk for 
ligatures. " It is the purest silk, the iron dye makes it less 
irritating to the flesh, and all the white silk of commerce 
is dyed with lead." — Medical Bidletin. 



Military Tract Medical Association. 

The regular semi-annual meeting of the Military Tract 
Medical Association, was held at Masonic Hall, in Galva, 
111., on Tuesday, N'ov. 9th, 1880. 



204 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

The president, Dr. H. Jucld, of Galesburg, called the 
meeting to order at 10 A. M., and after the transaction of 
some business preliminary to the regular programme, a 
recess was taken until 1:30 P. M, 

At the appointed hour the association was again 
called to order, the president, Dr. Judd, in the chair. On 
motion, the following physicians were elected members of 
the association : Drs. E. Smith, of Viola; C. C. Smead, of 
Victoria; and I. K. Wear, of Fandon. Drs, J. P. Johnson 
and 0. B. Will, were present from the Peoria City Medical 
Society. 

Reports of the various committees being in order. Dr. 
A. L. Craig, from that on Practice of Medicine, reported 
two very interesting cases of " puerperal mania," in the 
course of the treatment of which uterine injections of an 
antiseptic character were used. Dr. Nance, of Kewanee, 
objected to the use of uterine injections of any description, 
unless the greatest possible care was exercised to ascertain 
for a certainty, a sufficiently patulous condition of the os 
to admit of a free out-flow, or a double current catheter 
used, to insure a rapid return of the injection. 

Dr. Baldwin, from the committee on surgery, reported 
a case of cancer of the breast — which had been examined 
and discussed by a number of surgeons — with operation for 
its removal by the knife, the wound healing kindly and 
remaining so for several weeks or months, to the comfort 
of the patient, the woman subsequently dying from spas- 
modic heart trouble, apparently owing to reflex irritation 
from the application of a caustic preparation to a small 
ulcer which finally appeared at the side of the cicatrix. 
The report of the case provoked a lively discussion as to 
the advisability of operating for cancer, participated in by 
Drs. Nance, Ingels, Todd and Babcock, of the association, 
and Dr. Johnson, of Peoria. 

Dr. J. F. Todd, from same committee, reported case of 
non-union of flaps after amputation of leg. Discussed by 
Drs. Nance and Ingels. 

Other committees failed to report, and the time was 
occupied in the discussion of various interesting topics. 
Although there were comparatively few present at the meet- 
ing of the association, it was an interesting and profitable 
one. The semi-annual meetings are never so well attended 
as are the regular annual meetings, the next of which will 



Society Transactions. 205 

be held in the citv of Galesburg on Tuesday, May 19th, 
1881. The members of the profession in Galva well sus- 
tained their reputation for hospitality, in providing accom- 
modations at their own homes for those in attendance. The 
reporter of the Monthly is thus indebted to Dr. A. C. Bab- 
cock and his estimable wife; and for many favors to the 
efficient secretary of the association, Dr. B. S. Peck. 

Below is appended the programme for the next meet- 
ing, as furnished by the president. W. 

The Military Tract Medical Association will meet at 
Oalesburg, 111., Tuesday, May 10th, 1881, prompt at ten 
o'clock A. M. 

PROGRAMME — ANNUAL MEETING. 

Practice of Medicine — S. M. Hamilton, H. Nance, H. L. 
Harrington, E. Smith, S. N. Wear, A. S. Slater. 

Surgery — J. S. Todd, M. Reece, G. L. Corcoran, H. C. 
Hopper, J. P. McClanahan, A. C. Babcock, W. S. Holiday. 

Materia Med. and Therajjeutics — A. E. Baldwin, J. A. 
Mitchell, J. M. McClanahan, E. R. Boardman. 

Obstetrics and Diseases of Children — R. B. Smead, T. A. 
Scott, J. H. Wallace, H. S. Hurd, J. B. Ingels, J. F. Pur- 
■dum, J. V. Frazier. 

Essayest — M. A. McClelland. 

Neerology — B. S. Peck. 

These committees are earnestly requested to prepare 
themselves, and to be present at this meeting. 

Herbert Judd, Pres't. B. S. Peck, Sec'y. 



Proceedings of the Jasper County (111.) Medical Association 
— November Meeting-. 

S. R. Youngman, M. D., West Liberty, President ; A. 
B. Faller, M.D., Secretary, Newton. 

Meets on the first Friday of each month, at Newton. 
Association came to order with the President in the chair. 
Members present, Drs. S. R. Youngman, Z. Allen, N. S. 
Clark, H. S. Hinman, James Piequet, George Shamhart, J. 
H. Maxwell and A. B. Faller. 

The minutes of the October meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The Committee on Resolutions reported as follows : 

Your committee upon whom you imposed the duty of 



206 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

drafting suitable resolutions in regard to the admission of 
medical practitioners within the state, would respectfully 
submit the following : 

Whereas, Whilst we cheerfully recognize the great 
good done to the public; by the laws passed by a late Legis- 
lature, regulating the practice of medicine within the state, 
and creating a Board of Health, we cannot help noticing 
the insufficiency of these laws, and the limited power for 
good of the Board of Health ; and, 

Whereas, A number of medical colleges annually con- 
fer the degree of M.D. upon individuals who are not quali- 
fied to practice medicine ; and 

Whereas, The Board of Health is compelled to recog- 
nize these diplomas, and grant certificates to practice to 
individuals possessing such diplomas, irrespective of their 
qualifications ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That we use our influence with our legislators 
to have a law so framed that, after a certain time, no person 
shall be admitted to the practice of medicine, in any of it» 
branches, within the state of Illinois, who in addition to a 
diploma granted by a medical college, shall not have been 
submitted to a public examination, held at stated intervals 
by the State Board of Health, or by medical men of recog- 
nized ability and integrity, not connected with any medical 
college, said examination embracing the different branches 
of medicine, viz: Chemistry, anatomy, physiology, pathol- 
ogy, materia medica, and surgery, and also a strict exam- 
ination on all the branches of knowledge which are an 
indispensable prerequisite of a thorough medical education ; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That this preamble and resolution be pre- 
sented to all the regular medical societies within the state^ 
and to the State Medical Society, and they be requested to 
give this matter consideration. 

J. PiCQUET, M.D., 1 ri -44 

A.B.Faller,M:D.,|^''^''"^^''-. 

After considerable discussion on the subject of medical 
education, the foregoing was adopted. 

The Association then adjourned for dinner. 

At 1 p.m. came to order. 

Dr. Maxwell read a paper on a dislocation of the femur 
in an old man, with atheromatous degeneration, in which 
chloroform was used, in the reduction, with no bad results. 
Drs. Shamhart and Clark reported a case of spermatorrhoea^ 



Society Transactions. 207 

or prostatorrhcBa, in a eunich, the patient having amputated 
the scrotum with all its contents, about fifteen years ago. 
This case was spiritedly discussed. 

The Association then adjourned until the first Friday in 
December. At this meeting Dr. Maxwell will open a dis- 
cussion on pneumonia, and Dr. Allen will contribute a 



paper. 



A. B. Faller, Secretary. 



Illinois State Board of Health. 

At the last meeting of the Illinois State Board of 
Health, the following resolution was adopted : 

Whereas, It is the legal duty of this Board to issue cer- 
tificates to persons presenting diplomas from Medical Col- 
leges in " good standing; " and 

Whereas, It becomes thus the duty of the Board to 
determine as to the good standing of such Colleges ; and 

Whereas, Complaints are frequently made to this Board 
as to the practice and standing of certain Colleges ; there- 
fore, 

Resolved, That a committee of this Board be appointed 
to report at the next quarterly meeting the requirements 
and characteristics which shall, in the judgment of this 
Board, constitute " good standing " in a Medical College, 
and also the conditions under which this Board will receive 
and hear complaints against the standing of any Medical 
School or College. 

The undersigned having been appointed a Committee 
under the above resolution, respectfully address the mem- 
bers of the profession in this State, asking them to reply to 
the following inquiries : 

1. In the present state of Medical Science and education 
in this country, what preparation is and ought to be 
required for admission to the lectures of a Medical College 
to entitle it to good standing? 

2. On what branches of Medical and Cognate Science 
ought courses of lectures to be provided, and what length 
of course on each to entitle the college to "good standing?" 

3. What requirements as to full attendance, reading and 
quizzes, or other examinations, occasional or final, ought to 
be maintained in such colleges? 

4. What attendance on lectures, as to time, number of 
terms or courses and intervals between courses, are, and 



208 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

ought to be required by such colleges as conditions of grad- 
uation? 

5. What other conditions of graduation, such as hospital 
practice, or practice under preceptors, attendance on clinics 
and dissections are and ought to be required for graduation? 
An early and full reply will be a favor to the Commit- 
tee, and we hope also to the best interests of Medical 
Science. 

Address reply to Committee State Board of Health, 
Springfield, 111. 

John M. Gregory, Chairman, 
Wm. M. Chambers, 
John H. Rauch. 



DeWitt County Medical Society — In Memoriam. 

At a special meeting of the DeWitt County Medical 
Society, held at the office of Dr. Goodbrake, in Clinton, on 
the 11th day of November, 1880, the following preamble 
and resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, The great creator and preserver of all things, 
has summoned from our midst our well beloved fellow 
member, Thomas K. Edraiston, M. D,,who died at his resi- 
dence in this city on the 9th inst., after a long and painful 
sickness; be it therefore 

Resolved, That in the death of Dr. Edmiston, our society 
has lost one of her oldest and most zealous members, the 
profession at large a skillful and experienced co-worker in 
the science and art of medicine, the community an honest 
and upright citizen, and his family a kind husband and 
indulgent father. 

Resolved, That we feel a deep and heartfelt sympathy 
with the widow and children of the deceased, and can only 
point them for comfort to Him who doeth all things well. 

Resolved, That this preamble and resolutions be spread 
upon the records of the society, that they be published in 
the Peoria Medical Monthly and our county papers; and 
that an attested copy be furnished the widow of our deceased 
colleague. 

Tnos. W. Davis, M. D., ^j 

John Wright, M. D., K Committee. 

Christopher Goodbrake, M. D., J 
C. Goodbrake, Sec'y. J. J. Starkey, PresH fro tem. 



Therapeutic Jfotes. 



209 



'{hem^mtiti a^ate^. 



NITRITE OP AMYL FOB HICCOUGH 

Dr. Simon, in the Medical Ex- 
aminer, states that he instanta- 
neously cured a case of hiccough 
which had lasted twenty-six 
hours, by the inhalation of three 
drops of the nitrite of amyl. 

FOR CROUP. 

Jfc Oil stilligia. 

Oil cajiput, a a 1 drachm. 
Oil lobelia. 

Oil lavender, a a \^ drachm. 
Oil cinnamon, 10 gtts. 

Alcohol, 1 oz M. 

As soon as thecroupal cough is 
noticed rub a small quantity on 
the throat ; repeat as often as ne- 
cessary. If the case be very ur- 
gent, give one or two drops on 
sugar internally, every hour or 
two. — Med. Summary. 

FETID PERSPIRATION OF THE 
FEET. 

Jfc Pul. alum, exsiccati, 3 ounces. 

Acid, salicylici, \}4 to 3 drachms. 

The patient is directed to bathe 
the feet every morning with 
warm water and soap, and while 
they are yet moist to cause the 
powder to partially adhere ap- 
ply it freely to the whole foot, 
leaving plenty between the toes 
and in the sulci underneath 
them. At first it may be neces- 
sary to apply this twice or more 
times in the day, but in a short 
time once a day will suffice. — 
Med. Record. 

PRURITUS VULVAE. 

]^ Pulv. gummi arable, 2 drachms. 

Peruvian balsam, 1 dracbm. 

Oil of almonds, IJ^ drachms. 

Rose water, 1 ounce. 

M. Apply with a camel's hair 
brush eight or ten times a day to 
the itching parts. This also 
rarely fails to cure sore nipples 
applied hourly for a few days. I 
prefer this to anythingelse. — Dr. 
Tauszky, in Med. Record. 



TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA. 

For a neuralgia of the first 
branch of the fifth pair of nerves, 
of six years duration. Dr. Lan- 
derberg used the following with 
perfect results : 

9; Aconitise, (Duquesnel's) Y^ grain. 
Glycerinaj, 1 drachm. 

Alcoholis, 1 drachm. 

Aq. menth. pip., 2 ounces. 

M. One tablespoonful three 
times a day. 

OXALATE OF CERIUM IN CHOL- 
ERA INFANTUM. 

This remedy is recommended 
by a writer in the Concours Med- 
icale, to be given in the following 
manner, viz : Four grains divi- 
ded into ten powders for chil- 
dren under two years, one to be 
given every hour; eight grains 
in ten powders, between two and 
ten years ; and fifteen grains 
similarly divided, for adults. 

DIPHTHERIA. 

Dr. Edwin Burd of Lisbon, 
Iowa, advises the following, 
which he believes, if given in 
time, will cure all cases of diph- 
theria : 

P Sodse hyposulphis, 8 scruples. 

Quinite sulph., J^ drachm. 

I Spts. frumenti, 4 ounces. 

M. For a child five years of 
age one teaspoonful every four 
hours, night and day. 

P; PotassEe cbloras., 2 drachms. J£ 
Tr. ferri chloridi, 2 drachms. 
Syr. simplicis, 4 ounces. 

M. A teaspoonful every four 
hours, night and day. — Med. and 
Surg. Rep. 

TINEA CIRCINATA. 

9; Argent, nitras (pulv.) 1 scruple. 
Hydr. oxid. rub., 2 scruples. 

Plumbi iodidi, 1 drachm. 

Cerati, 
Vaselinae, aa2 drachms. 

M. ft. ung. Sig. Rub a piece 
the size of a bean well into the 
diseased surface until it disap- 
pears; repeat night and morning. 
—Med. and Surg. Reporter. 



210 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



hak ^atice^. 



A Treatise on Foreign Bodies in Surgical Practice, by 
Alfred Poulet, M.D., Adjutant Surgeon Major, Inspector of 
the School for Military Medicine at Val-de-Grace ; 2 vols,, 
pages, 265 and 320 ; N'ew York, Wm. Wood & Co.; vols. 2 
and 3 of Wood's Library of Standard Medical Authors for 
1880. W. T. Keener, agent, Chicago, 111. 

We cannot indicate the aim and scope of this work bet- 
ter than by cop^^ing a few extracts from the preface. The 
author says : " Ko surgeon has hitherto thought of collect- 
ing in one book all the material which is scattered through- 
out the annals of science concerning the question of foreign 
bodies. However, there are few subjects which are more 
worthy of attracting the serious attention of practitioners. 

All those who have been brought in contact in the course 
of their practice with the numberless difficulties produced 
by the presence of foreign bodies, know how uncertain the 
diagnosis often is, how sudden are the symptoms and how 
often the treatment requires skill, address and varied and 
extensive learning." This work is confined to a considera- 
tion of foreign bodies entering the body through the natu- 
ral passages. The author has endeavored to bring this 
hitherto unarranged mass of facts into harmony with gen- 
eral laws, and to suggest the various therapeutic measures 
necessary in each instance. In this we think he has suc- 
ceeded admirably. The general practitioner, but especially 
the surgeon, will read with great pleasure and much profit 
this valuable addition to his library. The addition of a 
large number of cases, illustrative of the various accidents 
mentioned, adds variety and interest to the work. Part 
first treats of foreign bodies in general. Part second of 
those in the intestinal tract, including bodies in the pharynx, 
oesophagus, stomach, intestines and rectum. Part third, 
foreign bodies in the air passages. Part fourth, in the gen- 
ito-urinary organs, including those in the male and female 
organs, urethra, bladder and uterus. Part fifth, in the ear. 
Part sixth, in the nasal fossae. Part seventh, in the glandu- 
lar canal and Wharton's duct. 

The author promises a continuation of the work by con- 
sidering, at a later period, those bodies " which enter the 
economy by ' effraction ' or are fixed to the surface of the 
parts." 



Booh Kotices. 211 



Health and Health Resorts, a hand book of practical 
information, for the use of tourists and invalids, by John 
AVilson, M.D. ; cloth, 12 mo.; pp. 286; Porter & Coates, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

This little book contains a vast amount of useful infor- 
mation concerning the resorts and baths of Europe. It is. 
especially designed for persons who contemplate a visit to- 
Europe for their health, and mentions the class of diseases 
most likely to be benefited by a residence at each of these 
places. It will be of great use to the physician also, who is 
frequently called upon to recommend a journey to his 
patients. Both sides of the question are given, and the 
dangers and sufl'erings so often entailed by expatriation 
upon invalids in search of health, are placed in sharp con- 
trast with the possible good results. 

The style of the writer is easy and graceful, and dry 
details of portions of the book are made interesting by thia 
pleasing feature. 

In speaking of the health resorts of our own country, he 
says : " It may be fairly questioned whether our mineral 
springs and sanitary resorts do not possess elements as well 
adapted to the treatment of various forms of disease as any 
of the most famous baths or springs of Europe." In a new 
edition the proof should be more carefully read, and several 
mistakes corrected, especially in the names of places. 

Higher Education of Medical Men, and its Influence on 
the Profession and the Public : An address delivered before 
the American Academy of Medicine, by F. D. Lente, A.M., 
M.D., President of the Society. Published by direction of 
the Society ; pp. 16. 

This is an able plea for the higher education of the med- 
ical profession — recommending a high preliminary exam- 
ination as well as a more thorough course of medical study. 
The author gives us a fact, based upon college statistics^ 
that the men who stand highest in college, the best students^ . 
rarely study medicine. These prefer law, theology or mer- 
cantile life, while the poorer students, or those who do not 
graduate at all, adopt medicine as an easy way to make a 
living — that is they can get through a medical college, 
more easily than any other. We doubt the entire accuracy 
of this statement, but it has some truth in it. 



212 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. Mcllvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South- Jefferson Street, PEORIA, ILL. 

ditorml ^effnrtment 



Chicago Letter. 

Chicago, November, 1880. 

As your correspondent had the pleasure of hearing a 
lecture before the Chicago Philosophical Society, delivered 
by Dr. George M. Beard, of " Neurasthenia " fame, and 
more recently the hero of an episode on the Atlantic, which 
does not so redound to his honor, on the subject of " Ameri- 
can Nervousness; its causes and consequences," he thought 
it might be of interest to some of your readers to learn 
something of his appearance and manner, as well as of the 
present stage of his latest invention — American nervous- 
ness. Dr. Beard is slightly above medium height, and of a 
rather slender figure ; shoulders square but with a slight 
stoop ; his gait, as he walked up to the platform with his 
hands in his pockets, might be characterized as stift' and 
awkward. His face is thin, eyes large and exhibiting a 
tendency to roll up; his voice is not unpleasant, but subject 
to that peculiar modulation common to persons slightly 
deaf, as Dr. B. himself is. His manner, eminently dog- 
matic, is that of a man impressed by the grandeur and 
truth of his cause and a high sense of his own importance. 
He seems to be badly afflicted with the disease of which he 
is the great high priest, although we may be mistaken in 
this, for after a somewhat careful reading of his work and 
attentive hearing of his lecture last night, we are not 
exactly certain what " nervousness " is, and he may not 
have "it" after all. 

As regards the lecture we think we can safely say, that 
even from the standpoint of his previous productions it was 
below par. It was dogmatic in the last degree, wanting 
in connection and unity. Without defining what he means 
by nervousness, and especially that type he pleases to call 
American, he plunged i7i medias res and left his audience to 
flounder after him and be content with guessing at his 



Editorial Department. 213 

meaning. Some of the statements were rather large, to say 
the least. He told us : that we are more temperate than 
our ancestors in all things, because our nervous sensitive- 
ness is greater than was theirs, and we cannot, therefore, 
endure what they endured. Still this increased sensitive- 
ness is not hereditar}^ but is caused by modern civilization. 
Some of the ancients, the Greeks, for example, were civil- 
ized, but modern civilization is that civilization plus the 
steam power, telegraph, sciences, political anxieties and the 
mental activity of women. Then again our civilization is 
more intense than that of European nations. In Europe 
one man is delegated to bear the burden that rests upon 
the head wearing the crown, while in this country we have 
fifty millions of uncrowned sovereigns. In Europe the 
church does the thinking upon religious matters for the 
people, while here each man must work out his own salva- 
tion with fear and trembling and neurasthenia. Three 
great questions are the potent factors of American nervous- 
ness, viz : Who shall be our next President ? How shall 
we keep from starving? "Where shall we go to when we 
die ? The drier climate of the larger portion of the United 
States is also a cause of this disease. Our American women 
are the most beautiful in the world, because the climate and 
the social position accorded to them is highly productive of 
nervous sensitiveness, which in turn is essential to the high- 
est type of female beauty. In ending, however, the lecturer 
gave us a few grains of comfort in the statement that there 
was no danger of the American people becoming emascu- 
lated and destroyed by reason of their nervousness, as its 
increase was overcome by an unprecedentedly rapid growth 
of the people's strength. This is a bare outline of the lec- 
ture, but as full, perhaps, as it deserved. The lecturer was 
criticized and pretty severely handled at the conclusion by 
various members of the society, notably by Dr. Jewell, 
whose well known, close study of nervous disorders gave 
weight to his strictures upon the speaker's statements. The 
lecture is part of a book to be published soon, and then 
those desirous can find out, if they can, just what American 
nervousness is, and they will probably find that they have 
had it all their lives and didn't know it. 

The students and some of the faculty at Rush were con- 
siderably worked up by a long article which appeared in a 
daily paper of large circulation a short time ago. The- 



214 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

writer of the article in question seemed desirous of making 
out that the students at Rush are the worst set of roughs 
and blackguards imaginable, and that some of the Profess- 
ors are not far behind them. The statements are so obvi- 
ously false that they are not worth repeating or denying. 
Their author is probably some budding Esculapius whose 
vanity has been wounded, because he was not offered a 
chair in the Faculty, or perhaps even the presidency of the 
college. It has been your correspondent's privilege to have 
visited many medical schools, both in America and in 
Europe, and he can truthfully say, that the present class at 
Rush will compare favorably in conduct and gentlemanly 
deportment with any class of equal size that ever met in 
any college. 

The Hon. A. E. Bishop, President of the Board of 
Directors of the Central Free Dispensary, Chicago, a trustee 
of Rush Medical College, and an active worker in many 
charitable and educational causes, died at his residence in 
Chicago, N'ovember 15th, aged QQ years. 

In company with Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
The College of Physicians and Surgeons, I^ew York, The 
Medical Department of the University of New York, and 
others of equal standing, Rush Medical College has with- 
drawn from the American Medical College Association. 
These colleges prefer to make their own laws and require- 
ments, and not be made to stand as sponsors for all the 
small colleges springing up all over the West. We would 
not be surprised if the action of these leading schools for- 
bodes the speedy dissolution of the Association. It has, 
however, done good work in the past, and we predict that 
another and stronger association of the best and strongest 
colleges in the land will spring from its ashes. 



Notice to Readers. 



We call the attention of readers to the prospectus on 
page 7, and hope they will read it carefully. We have so 
far done all that we promised, and more. This should give 
us the confidence and support of the profession. The 
amount we ask for a year's subscription is small — you will 
never notice it, and a dollar bill can be enclosed in the let- 
ter. We do not know that a single dollar sent in this way 
has been lost. Put an extra piece of pap^r around it, and 
be sure that the letter just fits the envelope. 



Editorial Department. 215 



Medical Colleges. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Keokuk, 
Iowa, has about 300 students this year. 

The Chicago Medical College has about 175 in attend- 
ance. 

The Medical Department of the Iowa State University 
opened with 180 matriculants. 

The Woman's Medical College, at Chicago, has 80 
matriculants, which is a decided increase over previous 
years. The graduating class of 1880 numbered 10. This 
College is in a very flourishing condition, with all the facili- 
ties necessary for successful competition with the older col- 
leges in the East. It is now in the eleventh year of success- 
ful operation. 



Our esteemed friend of the St. Joseph Medical and Sur- 
gical Ile-porte}\\Q somewhat worked up over a letter received 
from Philadelphia, Pa., offering to furnish him, for a con- 
sideration, with reports of lectures and other material for 
his journal. He says : " he now catches a glimpse, for the 
first time, of the character of the enterprise of some of our 
brothers of the pen and scissors," and that this gives a 
chance to reiterate the declaration that his " is a Western 
journal^ to be made up of Western materials, foe Western 
men, and in the interests of Western medicine." 

This is all well enough, but we think that even "Western 
men would sometimes be glad to read a lecture from such 
men as Levis, Gross, Agnew, Morton, «&c., and that it would 
be a mark of enterprise on the part of our friend to furnish his 
readers with some original matter from Eastern men. It 
won't do to draw the line between Eastern and Western 
medicine too closely, for the majority of Western practition- 
ers were educated in the East, and can, perhaps, discriminate 
as to what they wish to read, as well as our friend. 

Of course we do not think that the " pecuniary ques- 
tion" had anything to do with the refusal of the offer. We 
are sure that our friend is sincere in his efforts to exclude 
everything Eastern, yet it is strange that while his "clip- 
pings " are almost entirely made up from Eastern journals, 
he should refuse to admit original articles by Eastern men 
in his journal — but such is life. 



216 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

We give below the addresses of several members of the 
class of '80 of Rush : 

Dr. J. D. Camerer, Kinmundv, 111. 

Dr. W. F. Howe, Brooklyn, Wis. 

Dr. M. H. McGrath, Kickapoo, Peoria County, 111. 

Dr. C. T. Dripps, Staunton, Macoupin County, 111. 

Dr. J. A. Robinson, 428 W. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Dr. E. P. Murdock, 133 S. Halstead St., Chicago, 111. 

Dr. J. T. Dicus, Streator, 111. 

Dr. John H. Mannon, Kevvanee, Henry County, 111. 

Dr. John C. STichols, Kewanee, Henry County, 111. 

Dr. M. I. Powers, formerly of Parkersburg, Butler Co., 
Iowa, has removed to Independence, Iowa. 

Samples of Staufer's hard-rubber uterine instruments 
and supporters can be seen at the office of this journal. 

If we can accommodate any physician by purchasing 
or ordering any books or instruments, we will be glad to 
do so, free of charge. We will select with as much care 
as if buying for ourselves, and can get as low prices as can 
be had anywhere. The goods can be sent C. 0. D. Ad- 
dress the publisher. 

At a late meeting of the Medico-Legal Society, of 
Philadelphia, the following resolutions and amendment 
were adopted : 

'■'■ Resolved, That physicians, when writing a prescription, 
which they do not wish renewed, should write on the bot- 
tom of such prescription, 'do not renew,' and also inform 
the patient of the fact in every case. 

Amended; And on the other hand the druggist will 
either write or print on the label upon the bottle or pack- 
age, 'not to be renewed unless by a written order of the 
doctor.'" — Medical and Surgical Reporter. 



One of the most ludicrous typographical errors lately 
reported was from the substitution of a "d" for the final 
" 1 " in chill. A gentleman on making a trip East left his 
wife in her usual good health, and was surprised in a few 
days at the receipt of a telegram announcing her serious 
illness. He telegraphed the family doctor for particulars, 
and received in reply the following : " Mrs. B. has had a 
child. If we can prevent her having another to-day she 
will do well." — Western Lancet. 



Advertisements. 




Dr. MclNTOSH'S 

NATVRAXi 

UTERIISUPPORTI. 




No instrument has ever been placed before the medical profession which has given such uni- 
i^ersal satisfaction. The combination is such that the physician is able to meet every indication 
of Uterine Displacements. Falling Wimib, Anteversion, Retroversion and Flexions are over- 
come by this instrument, where others fail ; this is proven by the fact that since its introduction 
to the Profession it has come into more general use than all other instruments combined. 

Among the many reasons which recommend this Supporter to the Physician is its self-ad- 
justing qualities. The Physician after applying it need have no fear that he will be called in 
haste to remove or readjust it, as is often the case with rings and various pessaries held in posi- 
tion by pressure against the vaginal wall, as the patient can remove it at will and replace it 
without assistance. 

The Abdominal Supporter is a broad morocco leather belt with elastic straps to buckle 
around the hips, with concave front, so shaped as to hold up the abdomen. The Uterine Sup- 
port is a cup and stem made of highly polished hard rubber, very light and durable, shaped to 
fit the neck of the womb, with openings for the secretions to pass out, as shown by the cuts. 
Cups are made with extended lips to correct flexions and versions of the womb. 

The cup and stem is suspended to the belt by two soft elastic Rubber Tubes, which are fast- 
ened to the front of the belt by simple loops, pass down through the stem of the cup and up to 
the back of the belt. These soft rubber tubes being elastic adapt themselves to all the varying 
positions of the body and perform the service of The ligaments of the womb. 

The instrument is very comfortable to the patient, can be removed or replaced by her at 
will, can be worn at all times, will not interfere with nature's necessities, will not corrode, and 
is lighter than metal. It will answer for all cases of Anteversion, Retroversions, or any Flex- 
ions of the Womb, and is used by the leading physicians with never failing success even in the 

most difficult cases. Price— To Physicians, $8. To Patients, $ 1 2. 

Instruments sent by mail, at our risk, on receipt of price, with 16 cents added for postage, or 
by Express, C. 0. D. 

DR. M'INTOSH'S NATURAL UTERINE SUPPORTER COMPANY, 

193 JA.CK:SOI<f STUEIJUT, CHICA-GO, IJLiL. 

Our valuable pamphlet "Some Practical Facta about Displacements of the Womb," will be 
sent you on ajjplication. 




DR. MCINTOSH'S 



This celebrated Battery combines both the Galvanic 
and Faradic, or induced current which can be used sepa- 
rate or in combination. 

Any strength or intensity desired can be obtained for 
use in electro-therapeutics. This Battery is constructed 
on an improved plan, as follows: The zinc and carbon plates are arranged in couples securely 
clamped to hard rubber plates with thumb screws. These thumb screws are also used for bind- 
ing poets. All the connections are positive and brought near together, thus lessening tho 
internal resistance. The cells are made in sections of six, composed of one solid piece of hard 
vulcanized rubber. By this arrangement a section can be handled, emptied, cleaned and refilled 
as easily and quickly as one cell. A hard rubber drip cup is placed by the side of each section 
of cells, to receive the zincs and carbon plates when removed from the cells. The rubber plates, 
which hold the zinc and carbons, project over on one side enough to cover the cells, when the 
line and carbons are placed in the drip cups. The under side of this projection is covered with 
soft rubber, which is clamped over the sections, which makes the cells water tight. This alone 
recommends the Battery. 

We claim superiority over all other batteries for the reason that by the improved plan of 
construction and close connections we gain more quantity and intensity of current. We com- 
bine all that is desirable in either a Galvanic or Faradic Battery, a combination never before 
attained. We furnish it with or without the Faradic coil. It weighs less than any other of the 
same power. It can be carried without spilling the fluid, thus being the only perfect portable 
Galvanic Battery made. We will be pleased to send circulars giving full information, price, 
•tc, free on application. 

Mcintosh galvanic belt and battery co., 

No8. 193 and 104 Jackson St., CHICAGO, IIjL. 



Advertisements. 



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Manager. General Ticket Agent- 




DR. L. D. M'INTOSH'S 



ic 



If this new combination could be seen and tested by the medical profession, 
few, if any, words would be needed from us in its favor, for it combines utility 
with simplicity in such perfection that seeing it is convincing proof of its great 
value. The medical profession to-day acknowledge, almost universally, Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

This combination is composed of sixteen cells, placed in pockets on a belt. 
Each cell is made of hard vulcanized rubber, lined with a copper cell, which 
constitutes the negative plate. The rubber coating perfectly insulates each cell. 
The positive plates are of zinc, wrapped in a porous material to absorb the ex- 
citing fluid, and prevent contact with the copper, and permit the current to pass 
from the copper to the zinc. 

Thus the cells are charged without wetting the belt, and the discomfort fol- 
lowing to the patient. A wire is soldered to each zinc plate, which connects 
with the copper cell by entering a tube on its side, thus rendering the belt 
pliable. 

The Mcintosh Electric Belt is superior to all others for the following reasons: 

It Is composed of sixteen cells— thus giving a powerful current. A current 
Helector is so arranged that one or more cells can be used at pleasure. There is 
not anything irritating about the Belt, as Is the case with all other contrivances 
where the metal used is wet with weak acids and placed next to the skin. The 
electrodes are pieces of metal covered similar to ordinary battery electrodes, 
and connected with the cells by connecting cords. By this arrangement, a cur- 
rent from the Belt can be applied to produce a general or local eflTect. 

Physicians who have used this Belt In their practice do not hesitate to re- 
commend It to the profession. 

PRICE, $10.00; WITH SUSPENSORY, $12 50. 

Our pamphlet on Medical Electricity sent free on application. Address, 

icIXTOSH GALV.\.\1C BELT AND BATTERY COMPANY, 192 and 194 Jackson St., Chicaga, III. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peobia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



—OF— 

The Peoria Medical Monthly. 

The wonderful success whicb this Journal has met in a few months is a suffi- 
■cient proof of its value and popularity. It has been enlarged twice within five 
months, and will again be enlarged as soon as its patronage warrants. We pro- 
pose to make this Journal indispensable to Western Practitioners, who, as act- 
ive, progressive men, see it is to their advantage and personal benefit to support 
a home Journal of this kiiid. 

Original Communications,— The main feature is intended to be the origi- 
nal communications. We have articles for future numbers from some of the 
most able writers in the profession, among whom we may name Dr. Wra. 
<3oodell and Dr. Wm. Pepper, of Philadelpliia; Dr. Warren, and others. But we 
especially desire short, practical articles from our subscribers. An interchange 
of opinion beliag what is intended. 

Translations— Made expressl J' for this Journal will appear regularly from 
Foreign Journals. 

Clinical and Didactic Lectures.— We are making arrangements where- 
by we will be regularly supplied each month with Clinical and Didactic Lectures 
by experienced teachers. 

Therapeutic Notes.— Short, compact modes of treatment, and tried and ap- 
proved formulae from every available source, will make this department of uq- 
asual interest to readers. 

Medical News. — We will keep our readers posted on all matters of interest , 
reports of societies throughout the State, etc., etc. 

SUBSCRIBE AJT OIVCE. 

Fifty-Two Fages. 

Now is the time to get the largest amount of good reading for the least 
money. We will for a short time send to subscribers the back numbers, begin- 
ning at May, and the Journal for one year from date of subscription, for 

ONE I>OLLA.rt. 

As the number we have on hand is limited, this offer will only be open for a 
limited time. You will get nineteen numbers containing over five hundred 
pages, for only ONE DOLLAR. Take as many other Journals as you please, but 
you cannot aflfbrd to omit the Peoria Medical Monthly. 

A few extracts from letters received will show what is thought of it by the 
profession : 

AmoDg the numerous Medical Journals which are sent to me, there is none brighter or 
more creditable to its authors than the Peoria Medical Monthly. I have read it with pleas- 
ure, for it shows that you are all alive in Peoria. Writing makes men think, and the more the 
opportunities for writing the greater the amount of thinking. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, M. D., 
Chicago, 111., 1880. Prof. Physiology and Nervous Diseases, Bush. Med. Col. 

I like your Journal and will devote some of my time to its advancement. 

St. Joseph, Mo., 1880. A. V. BANICS, M. D. 

I have received your Journal and am well pleased with it. 

Lincoln, III., 1880. L. L. LEEDS, M. D. 

The nuipber just received is worth the whole subscription. I enclose one dollar, and will 
try and get you some subscribers. J. B. VEITCH, Grafton, Jersey Co., 111. 

If the number I have received is a specimen of what it will continue to be it will be valu- 
able indeed. C. F. STRINGER, BI. D., Aurora, Kane Co., 111. 

I have received your Journal and like its arrangement and style. Think it worth tlie 
money, and enclose the amount. W. 11. GITHENS, M. D., Hamilton. 111. 

I am pleased with your Journal, and believe it should be patronized by all Western Physi- 
cians. I hope it will meet with the approval of every Physician in Illinois. 

H. E. W. BARNES, M. D. 

i$^8ubscribe at once and you vuill be pleased ivith it. 

Address all communications to THOS. M. MclLVAINE, 

204 South Jefferson Street, PEOKIA, Ilili. 



Advertisements. 



AHALYTICAL CHEMIST. 



Special attention given to Criminal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters, 
Milk, Urine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, III. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Correspondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 




Prices wlttiin tlie Reacli of All. 

Call on HB or hcihI for jirices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 



Comstock& Avery, 



IManufacturers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 




Call the attention of Physicians 
to tlieir 



FiTlIT Olill 



It is the nicest chair in the market for 
the Office, Library or Parlor. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 




In answerlDg advertlBemente, mention the Pkoria Medical, Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



NOTICE! 



To Publishers, Manufacturing Chemists, In- 
strument Makers, Druggists : 

As it is our desire to bring before the Physicians every- 
thing that will be of benefit to them, we will carefully 
and impartially examine, review or test whatever may be 
sent to us in these lines, and notice all that we think would 
be of value to the profession. 

CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Druggists & Chemists, 

^■^ ^"^ And Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

SOS South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

c. J^. BO"w^:M:j^:tT &c co.. 
Prescription Druggists, 

520 liKJ^T-lST STS-EET, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

N. B.— A fuU line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



10 



Advertisements, 



COLBURN, BIRKS A CO., 



Wholesale Druggists, 



-AND DEALERS IN 



^uf ^idal Ii\^^tf uir\er\t^ 




ATOMIZERS, 
ALL VARIETIES. 



Electro -Magnetic Machines, 

CRUTCHES, 




PLAIN AND PADDED ARM PIECES. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our Instrument Catalogue for 1880 now ready for 
distribution. 

In answering advertisenientB, mention the Pkokia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



11 



Fever Thermometers 



Four and Five-inch, Self-Registering, Hicks' Patent 
Lens Front, in Boxwood Case. 





FOWLER'S H. R PESSARIES 




Celluloid Cylindrical Speculum, 

CELLDLOID BI-VALVE SPECULUM, 

CELLULOID HYPODERMIC SYRIN&ES, 

CELLULOID CATHETERS AND BOUGIES. 



Our Prices >A^ill be found 1o>a/' for First Quality 
Goods. 

Write for Quotations before buying. 

COLBDRN, BIRKS & CO., PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



In answering advertisements mention the Pkokia Mkdical Monthly. 



SPEJNQ STEM SUPPOETEES. 



Abdominal Supporter, 
3. 



SOLID STEM SUPPOETER. 
E. C—^-— (Economy.) 




Prices. — Spring Stem Pro- 
lapsus and Pruciile tia Cup A, on 
Covered Silk Elastic and Contil 
Finished Belt X, %'.m. On Z, Fig. 
5, $6.00. On Y, Coutil, $8.00; and 
on T, Cotton, $7.00. 

Spring Sfm, Globe Top G, Ob- 
long U. or 1 U, toy same on ether 
belt as A. 

RetrovKrsinn K, on X, or Y, 
Cotton, $S.OO. Ou Y, Coutil, $9.00, 
and on 7., $7.00. 

Antevemion, Sniid Stem 
r, or Soil' Stern Olob>^ lop 
O, on X. or Y. Cotton. <.')..')0. On Y, 
Coutil, fC.O. and on Z, $4.60 only. 

Jtulea. — Tlie StPm Supporters 
Fig. 1 and 5, arp only sold complete 
and on any of the belts selected. The 
Specnlnms, Fiir. 6, only with the 
conductors. Globe B, or Cup D, 
either separate, or in connection 
wi'h Stem Pupportt-rs. 

Elastic Gums S S, are mailed, 
2 at 20 cts.; 4 at 35 ct» ; and Springs 
at :', cts. each. 

N. B. — The figures on these engravings cor- 
respond with those on the full Catalogue plate. 

Selection. — The success of a Uterine Correc- 
tor and Supporter depends on the size and style. 
If a cup. It must be modelled af:er the junction of 
the axis of the nti'rus and vagina, or the cervix 
will ride on the anterior edge of the cup. I U, 
Fig. 1, is a fair representation of this adaptation 
and border cup In cases of slight Anteversious 
and slight Iletroversions, deep cups may be called 
for, and la most cases the mere elevation with 
them corrects the trouble. The cups are usually 
selected by giving tbe full diameter across the 
top, thus for Virgins, V/i to ^'^<^•, Multip«rae, 1'';^ 
to 2, and Procidentia to 'J j^ inches and over aonie 
times. .B«i/«— For X, and Z, waist measure to be 
giT<'n. and Y, hip raea»nre. 

Anteveralon I', Fig. 1 — '''hiH had been re- 
modelled a numt>er of times, and the fenestrated 
top found b»at to remain In position. 

/let rover. lion E — This has likewise passed 
through many changes until it arrived at its pre- 
sent efTiciency. The broad lever, lifts up the 
fundas, while the cup corrects the prolapsis and 
boldi the uterus, by ad )Uble elastic motion, if a 
spring stem, .-mall, long stem. Globe Tops G, 
V\%.\ are placed with success against the sensitive 
fu'.du", after everything else been Intolerable. 

Intra Vlerine Stem Cup I U. — The stem 



izes— 1,13.16, IC.IG and 
1 9.16, Fl'-sh color enam- 
eled. Price, $2 50 each. 



Price.. — Permanent, Curved Stem 
Cup K C, on elastic webbing Z, 
$i.50. On X, or Y, cotton, $5.60, 
and Y. routll,$fi50. 

No expense li:is been saved to 
give even the Economical Supporter 
all possills advantages. 



HAED EUBBER UTEEINE EXAMIBING OASF 
2V. 




Prices. — Full case, $8.00; Quill Caustic Holder IT, or Camel's 
Hair Brnsh Holder and Case I, each $1.00. Any two of the 
first seven, with centre piece K, $2.50. 

locks in a square socket af^er the cup is In posi- 
tion. Ttiis is safer than all other contrivacces, 
but la seldom required, since such ample pro- 
vision is made in this Seriea to correct Ketro- 
version through the j-osterior cul-de-sac. 

Cy-itocele and Itectocele. — These are snc- 
cessfuUy drawn up by large, hollow and light 
Globe Tops Q. or Oblong II, Fig. 1. 

Cup J), V'kj /> — NSuppIementa EC, similar 
to Shifting Top A, when transformed into A D, 
Fie.l. 

Globe Tt, Vig. S. — This is a mere hard rubber 
shell, with air tlie olijectionable features of the 
former glass globes overcome, and is now a^ain 
a popular pessary. 

Specul'tm, Eig. 6 — The condactor with 
hollow bulb P, is shown separate, and in position. 
By the conductor a larger size may be introduced ; 
this together with the thin shell, gives a 8n£Bcient 
calibre to embrace f'e entire cervix within the 
mouth of the speculum. The polished edge fa- 
cilitates the enrlosnre of the cervix by rotation. 

Examining Ctme, Fig. lii.—SouaiB A, B, 
C, Movers D, K, and G, with Swab E, will screw 
on K, and on M, (f II, and form instrnmenta 12 
iucbes long. L, encases the 10 pieces — Wt. 4 oz. 

Jtelt T, Fig. 3. — la made to order of any size 
and strength, to support th" stem supporter and 



pendulous abdomen. Ilip Straps 8 S, are elastic. 
Mailed i n recelrit of quotation prices, and all the hard rubber paria on the full Calalogoe exchanged 
to me«t any iodic tion, an'i cover tbe porcbaaer'a risk. Catalogi s on application, 

C,rr.^or,^rr,t.uHnpl.a,..\ S. S. STAUFER, D- D. 

nam'.tliiK.rourTnil \ 6S4 Franklin St, IfeHf, tilde, above Oreen, Phlla., Pu. 

) Near 9th & Oreen Sta. (or Bound Itrook) yew York iJepot. 



Advertisements . 



13' 



RUSH 




CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Annual, Spring Course, or Post Graduate An- 
nouncement, address the Secretary, 



Jkii\e^ 9. i}tl:\erid^e, 



1634 MICHIGAN AVENUE. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



14 Advertisements. 



During the Past Year 

"We placed Maltine and several of its compounds in the 
hands of one hvmdred leading Physicians of the United 
States, Europe, Australia and India -with a request that they 
thoroughly test it in comparison -with other remedies ■which 
are generally used as constructives in Pulmonary Phthisis 
and other -wasting diseases. 

From the tone of the seventy reports already received, fifteen of which 
are upon comparative tests with the principal Extracts of Malt in the market, 
we are fully justified in making the following claims, viz: 

FIRST:— That Maltine (plain) increases weight and 
strength far more rapidly than Cod Liver Oil 
or other nutritive agents. 

SECOJ^D : — That Maltine, Maltine with Peptones, 
and Maltine with Pepsin and Pancreatine 
rapidly correct imperfect digestion and mal- 
nutrition in wasting diseases. 

THIRD : — That Maltine is the most important con- 
structive agent now hnown to the Medical Pro- 
fession in Pulmonary Phthisis. 

FOURTH: — That Maltine causes an increase in 
weight and strength one and a half to three 
times greater than any of the Extracts of Malt.* 
LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. MALTINE with Iodides. 

MALTINE with Hops. MALTINE with Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINE with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil. MALTINE with Phosphates Iron and Qninia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil & Iodide of Iron. MALTINE with Phos. Iron.Quinia A Strychnia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE WINK. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphorus. MALTINE WINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Ilypophosphites. MALTO-TERBINE. 

• Maltine Is a concentrated extract of malted Barley, Wheat and Oats. In its 
preparation we employ not to exceed 1.50 deg. Fahr., thereby retaining all the nu- 
tritive and digestive agents unimpaired. Extracts of Malt are made from Barley 
alone, by the German process which directs that the mash be heated to 212 deg. 
Kahr., thereby coagulating the Albuminoids and almost wholly destroying the 
Htarch digestive principle, Diastase. 

4^ We will forward gratuitously a 81.00 bottle of any of the above prepara- 
tions apon payment of the expressage. Address 



REED & CARNRICK, 



Laboratory : i 19e Fulton Street, 

Yonk«ni on the Badson- j New TTork. 

Id annwering advertlgementa mention the Pkokia Medical Monthlt. 



Advertisements. 15 



COMPARATIVE VALUE 



-OF- 



MALTINE AS A CONSTRUCTIVE. 



It has been clearly sito'wn by the most distinguished chemists in this 
country and Europe, xcho have made comparative analyses of MALTINE 
and Extracts of Malt that, quantitatively, MALTINE contains from fwo 
to three times the nutritive and digestive properties that are found in 
the best Extracts of Malt in the market. 

This fact has been ana ply demonstrated by the concurrent opinion of the 
most eminent medical authority In the world • and the practical experience of 
nearly the entire Mediral Profession of the United States and Great Britain 
proves beyond question that MALTINE, as a Constructive, is by far the most 
■valuable product yet presented for the consideration of Sfientific medical men. 

Being supplied at the same prices as the ordinary Extract of Malt, and con- 
taining fully double the quantity of Diastase and nutritive elements to be found in the 
best of them, it can be prescribed at less than one- half the expense. 

Sxtracls showing the value o/Maltink in comparison with Extract of Malt, and as a Constructive. 

In order to test the comparative merits of MALTINE and the various Ex- 
tracts of Malt in the market, I purchased from different druggists samples of 
MALTINE and of the most frequently prescribed Extracts of Malt, and have 
subjected them to chemical analysis. 

As the result of these examinations, I And that MALTINE contains from 
half as much again to three times the quantity of Phosphates, and from three to 
fourteen limes as much Disastase and other Albuminoids as any of the Extracts 
of Malt examined. Prof. Walter S. Hainfs, M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, Rush Medical College, Chicago.. 



In cximparison with the alcoholic Malt Extracts, your MALTINE is about 
ten times as valuable, as a flesh former; from Ave to ten times as valuable, as a 
heat producer ; and at least five times as valuable, as a starch digesting agent. 

Professor Attfield, E.CS., 
Professor of Practical Chemistry to the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. 

MALTINE is superior in therapeutic and nutritive value to any Extract of 
Malt made from Barley alone, or to any preparation of one variety of grain. 

Prof. R. Ogden DoREMtrs. 



In its superiority to the Extract of Malt prepared from. Barley alone I consider it to 
be all that is claimed for it, and prize it as a very valuable addition to the list of 
tonic and nutritive agents. C. H. Lewis, M. D., Jackson, Mich. 

The follounrig is an extract from a report of Wm. Porter, A.M., M.D., St. Louis, Mo. 

After a full trial of the different Oils, and Extract of Malt preparations, in 
both hospital and private practice, I lind MALTINE most applicable to the 
largest number of patients, and superior to any remedy of its class. 

Prop. L. P. VandeI/I>, in Louisville Medical News, saye: — MALTINE de- 
serves to stand in the front rank of the constructives ; and the conslructlves, by 
their preventive, corrective and curative power, are probably the most widely 
useful therapeutical agents that we possess. 

Ann Arbor, Mich., Sept. 2.5th, 1880. 
An increasing experience in the use of MALTINE confirms my former 
opinion as to its great therapeutic value, and 1 should hardly know how to get 
along without it. E. S. Demster, M. D., 

Prof. ObateL and IHs. Wont, and Children, University of Mich., and in Dartmouth Colleg*- 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peoria Medical, Monthly. 



16 



Advertisements. 



MALTDPEPSINE -TO THE WEDICft L PROFESSION. 

The experience we have had of many years as Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
has brought us more or less in regular contact with the medical profession and 
its wants, and has afforded us advantages for experiment, study and practical 
development, which have engaged our attention in perfecting new and more effi- 
cacious agents for physicians' use in the control, subjection, treatment and cure 
of diseases, and we trust the Medical Profession will feel assured that in no in- 
stance shall we solicit their attention, except we have some production worthy 
of their highest consideration and confidence. 

\Ve would respectfully call your attention to our new preparation Maltopep- 
sine which we regard a very important Remedial Agent for Indigestion, Consti- 
pation, Dyspepsia, Vomiting in I^regnancy. Nervousness, Loss of Appetite, all 
forms of Gastric Derangement, Atonic Diarrhoea, and Indigestive Diarrhoea of 
children. This valuable remedy contains the digestive and nutritive properties 
ol the grain unimpaired, combined with the active agents of digestion, viz: Dias- 
tase, Pepsine, Lactic Acid, Hydrochloric Acid, with a small addition of Phos- 
phoric Acid, Powdered Firwein, and the Bromide and Chloride of Aluminium 
and Sugar of Milk. TESTIMONIALS: 



R. K. Clark, M. U., Georgia, Vt: 

Gentlemen — A medical friend gave me a 
small sample iHjttle of your Jlaltopepsine, 
which I took with apparent decided benefit. I 
did not vomit during the week I had the med- 
icine to take, nor have I been troubled up to 
this time, and as 1 do not wish to be without so 
valuable a medicine, I enclose two dollars with 
the request to have you send me by return mail 
the value of the money sent. I am very confi- 
dent it will entirely cure me, as the small 
amount used acted so favorably. I would like 
also to use it in my practice, as it will certainly 
prove very beneficial in all cases of dyspepsia. 
New Leb.\xon, N. Y., Dec. 11, 79. 
Messrs. Tildf.n & Co. — Having suffered for 
some months piust from Gastric derangement 
and most distressing dysyeptic symptoms, I was 
instructed by my pliysician a week or two ago, 
to make a trial of your new preparation Malto- 
pepsine, and I am happy to say it has given me 
more relief than any other remedy I have ever 
tried. The disagreeable nausea and vomiting 
after eating have altogether disappeared, my 
appetite is better than for a long time — the sick 
headaches that caused me so much annoyance 
have ceased to trouble me, and my general 
health seems fully re-established. Tliese good 
results are due entirely to Mai.topepsink, and 
1 feel it an act of justice to you, and a duty to 
others who may be suffering from like causes, 
to state the facts of the case. 

Yours, Resp'lly, J. H. Johnston. 

C. A. MosiiF.R, Druggist, West Troy. N. Y. 

Messrs. Tii.dkn <fe Co.— You certainly have 
got a wonderful preparation in your Maltopep- 
Bine. I gave the samples to the doctors, and 
every one of them speak in its favor and say it 
Is far superior to any similar preparation. 

One doctor gave it when Lactopcptine had 
failed him, and to his surprise was just the 
thinf;. 

U. M. WiiJioN, M. D., N. Y., Nov. 10, '79. 
Gentlemen — I consider your Maltopcpsine 
the most valuable reniMiy ever known for Dys- 
|j4-pNia and all forms of (Jastric derangement. 



Indi.anola, Iowa, Jan. 21, 1880. 
, Tilden & Co. — Have used your Maltopepsine 
in a case of obstinate vomiting in pregnancy, 
when everything had failed. The result was 
very gratifying— so much so, that I wish you to 
send me one pound of Maltopepsine by express 
at once. Yours truly, 

E. L. Baker, M. D. 

E. M. Bibber, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Says: "Have been using your Maltopepsina 
freely and with the most perfect satisfaction, 
preferring it to any similar preparation 
'known." 
A. T. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Reports that so far as he had used ourJVIalto- 
pepsine, he had found it far superior to any 
other preparation he has ever used. 

New Lebanon, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1880. 
X. T. Bates, M. D. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co.— Of late I have been 
using your new preparation, the Maltopepsine, 
and am so highly pleased with its action, that I 
am induced to give you the results of my ex- 
perience with it. Almost invariably this rem- 
edy has given me satisfaction, and in several 
cases of dyspepsia and irritable stomach, when 
tlie several preparations of Pepsin and Bismutk 
and kindred agents have failed, the use of 
Maltopepsine has been a complete success. I 
regard it particularly useful in debility of the 
stomach following acute or chronic gastritis, 
and that attendant upon convalescence from all' 
exhausting diseases. 

In vomiting of pregnancy it is a superior 
remedy. It will be found highly useful in th« 
diarrhoja of children; which is generally de- 
pendent upon imperfect digestion. 

The aluminium which you have incorporated 
into it is a happy idea. I heartily recommend 
it to the profession. 

K. M. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Speaks in the highest terms of our Malto- 
pepsine, also of our Saccharated — thinks th*' 
latter the strongest he has ever used. 



FORMULA OF MALTOPEPSINE. 

SugarofMilk :{.) oz. I I'epsinc 16 oz. I Hydrochloric Acid Sfl.dr. 

Nutrltivesof the Grain... 10 " Diastase (1 dr. Phosphoric Acid 3 " " 

Powdered Kirwein 7 '• | Lactic Acid ."ih. dr*. ] Aluminium 3 ■' 0«. 

PRICE LIST. 

Maltopepsine, fin oz. hot.) per oz $ .75 1 We also prepare the various Elixirs 

•' •• do7,... 7.00 and Hyrups in combination with Malto- 

(^^ lb. hot.) " tb 8.00 I pepsine. 

Prepared by Tilden dt Co., New Lebanon, N. Y., and a* Liberty St., N. T. 



Advertisements. 17 




An EPITOME of iJie numerous cases reported monthly 
in the tlourtial of Materia Medica embracing the following 
diseases, sent on apjylicaiion: 

Scrofula ; Scrofulous enlargement of the cervical glands ; Scrofulous 
affections of the bone ; Scrofulous swelling and abscess of the knee ; 
Scrofulous Eczema; "White Swelling ; Scrofulous swelling of the glands 
of the neck. 

Cancerous affections; Cancerous affections complicated with Scrofula; 
Xiupusi 

Necrosis of the Tibia, Femur and Ilium ; Osteo-Periostitis ; Exostosis 
of Ulna; Caries of Vertebra; Synovitis of knee joint ; Hip joint dis- 
eases ; Anchylosis. 

Psoriasis ; Prurigo. Tuberculous affections of the bones. 

Skin Diseases of all kinds. Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis. 

Syphilis; Syphilitic sore throat ; Gonorrhcea. 

Enlargement of the Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys. 

Bronchocele ; Goitre; Exophthalmic Goitre. 

Epilepsy; Otorrhoea; Deafness. 

Diphtheria; Erysipelas; Erysipelas with Scrofula; Tonsillitis. 

Gangrene of the Lungs ; Dry Gangrene ; Pleuro-Pneumonia. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two g.'-ains of the lodo Bromide Salts. 



WITH HYDRARGYRI BICHLORIDUM, 

And Alteratives as Stillingin, Menispermin, Dulca- 
marin, Rumicin and Conicine. 

For some time we have made specially this preparation, to meet those cases 
constantly occurring in the practice of Physicians, in which the impression of 
mercury is required, and it has been the custom of many in the most inveterate 
cases of Hcrofula, and particularly in thatof .Scrofulo-Syphills, to give for a week 
this combination of one one-hundredth of a grain to each fluid dram, and then 
resume the Elixir plain, alternating as circumstances indicate. In this special 
combination, we have increas^ed the Stillingin and other alteratives specially 
applicable to ihe treatment of Syphilis and its complications, from that used in 
the plain Elixir. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of lodo Broinide Comp. Salts, 
and eight one-hundredths of a grain of Hydrargyri Bichloridum. 



WITH IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

We have added to our list the Elixir lodo Bromide of Calcium Comp. with 
Iodide of Potassium. Each ounce contains 72 grains of the lodo Bromide Comp. 
Salts, with 32 grains of Iodide of Potassium. The vegetable alteratives are the 
same as in the plain Elixir. ' 

TILDEN <fe CO., New Lebanon, N. Y., and 34 Liberty St., New York. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



18 Advertisements. 



OAK LAWN RETREAT 



-FOR THE- 



INSANE, 



j"^OK:so3srvzLLE, ill. 



npHIS INSTITUTION, founded by its present pro- 
-*- prietor, is now in its ninth year of successful 
operation. Possessed of every conceivable advantage 
in location, site, retirement, and building arrange- 
ments — all carefully studied from the beginning — it 
is prepared to carry into effect the most advanced 
ideas in the treatment of the insane. It especially 
adapts itself to the care of cases of a chronic nature, 
wliere a home with something of permanency is an 
object. Favoring circumstances permit of lower rates 
of charge than can possibly be afforded in any other 
institution so supported. The proprietor presents his 
grateful acknowledgements to the medical profession 
for the countenance it has received. 

ANDREW McFARLAND, M. D., 

Sole Proprietor. 

October, 1880. 

In answering advertisements mention the PaoBrA Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 19 



ST, FfUNCIS' BRftOLEy HOSPITAL 

A well-knowu Institution conducted by tiie 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluiF, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dr. Jos. Studeb. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is charged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Mbdigal. Monthly. 



18 Advertisements. 



OAK LAWN RETREAT 



-FOR THE- 



INSANE, 



j-^os:so]srviLXjE, ill. 



rpHIS INSTITUTION, founded by its present pro- 
-*■ prietor, is now in its ninth year of successful 
operation. Possessed of every conceivable advantage 
in location, site, retirement, and building arrange- 
ments — all carefully studied from the beginning — it 
is prepared to carry into effect the most advanced 
ideas in the treatment of the insane. It especially 
adapts itself to the care of cases of a chronic nature, 
wliere a home with something of permanency is an 
object. Favoring circumstances permit of lower rates 
of charge than can possibly be afforded in any other 
institution so supported. The proprietor presents his 
grateful acknowledgements to the medical profession 
for the countenance it has received. 

ANDREW McFARLAND, M. D., 

Sole Proprietor. 
October, 1880. 

In annwerlDg advertisements mention the Pkobia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 19 



ST, PfUNCIS' BRftOLEy HOSPITAL 

A well-knowu Institution conducted by tiie 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Physician Dk. Jos. Studeb. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is charged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Sioperior. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Mkdigai. Monthly. 



20 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC ^VAIiKER & SON 



Importers of 




AND 



Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 



AGENTS FOR THE 



PARKER AND COLT 



SHOT GUNS. 



A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 

AND 

Sporting Equipments. 
REVOLVERS, 

Fine Guilery. 

ALSO, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

HARDWARE ! 

12a and 127 

SOUTH WASHMTON 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 




(ILTQ,XJID.) 



FORMULA : 

EACH FLUIB DRACHM CONTAINS 

5 1-2 gr. free phosphoric acid (PO.j). 
3 gr, phosphate of lime (3CaO POg), 
1-2 gr. phosphate of mag. (3MgO PO5) 
1-6 gr. phosphate of iron (fe2 O3 PO5). 
1-1 gr. phosphate of potash (3 kOjPOg). 

Total amount of Phosphoric Acid 
in one fluid drachm, free and com- 
bined, 7 grains. 

It contains no pyrophosphate, or 
metaphosphate of any base whatever. 



F 



OP Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Ifervonsness, 
Diminished Vitality, Urinary Difflcalties, Etc. 

HORSFORD'S 
ACID PHOSPffAlES. 

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. H0B8F0RD, of Cambridge, Mass. 
There seems to be no diflference of opinion, in high medical authority, of the 
value of phosphoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public 
■which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. 

It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. 

No danger can attend its use. ' 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It makes a delicious drink .with ^ter and sugar only. 



W. A. HAMMOND, M. Di, late Surgeon-Gen- 
eral U. S. Army, said that under the use of ar- 
senic and Horsford's Acid Phosphate, a young 
lady rescued her reason who had been ren- 
dered insane by a dream. 

DB. M. H. HENKY, of New York, says: 
Horsford's Acid Phosphate possesses claims as 
a beverage beyond anything I know of in the 
form of Medicine, and in nervous diseases I 
know of no preparation to equal it. 



DK. REUBEN,. A. VANCE, of New York: 
The preparation on which I place the most re- 
liance is Horsford's Acid Phosphate. 

The late WINSLOW LEWIS, M. D., of Bos- 
ton, said : Having in my own person experi- 
enced those ills for which the Acid Phosphate 
is prescribed, 1 have found great relief and 
alleviation by its use, most cheerfully attest 
my appreciation of its excellence. 



Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free 
on application to manufacturers. 

Physicians desiring to test it will be furnished a bottle free of expense, except 
express charges, if they mention Peoria Medical Monthly.' 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

RUMFORD CHEMCAl WORKS. Providence, Rhode Island. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peobia Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



To the Medical Profession. 



LACTOPEPTINE 



We take pleasure in calling the attention of the profession to 
LACTOPEPTINE. After a long series of careful experiments, we are 
able to produce its various components in an absolutely pure state, 
thus removing all unpleasant odor and taste, (also slightly changing 
the color). We can confidently claim, that its digestive properties 
are largely increased thereby, and can assert without hesitation that 
it is as perfect a digestive as can be produced. 

LACTOPEPTINE is the most important remedial agent ever pre- 
sented to the Profession for Indigestion, Dyspepsia, Vomiting in 
Pregnancy, Cholera Infantum, Constipation, and all diseases arising 
from imperfect nutrition. It contains the five active agents of diges- 
tion, viz: Pepsin, Pancreatine, Diastase, or Veg. Ptyalin, Lactic 
and Hydrochloric Acids, in comi)ination with Sugar of Milk. 

FORMUIiA OF liACTOPEPTIBTE. 

Sugar of Milk 40 ounces. I Veg. Ptyalin or Diastase, 4 drachms. 

Pepsin 8 ounces. Lactic Acid 5fl. drs. 

Pancreatine Bounces. | Hydrochloric Acid 5fl. drs. 

LACTOPEPTINE issoldentlrely by Physicians' Prescriptions, and its almost uni- 
versal adoption by physicians is the strongest guarantee we can give that its therapeutic Talue 
has been most thoroughly established. . 

THE UNDERSIGNED HAVING TESTED LACTOPEPTINE, RECOMMEND IT TO THE PROFESSION. 

ALFRED L. LOOMIS, M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Practice of Medicine, University of the Oily of New York. 

SAMUEL R. PERCY, M. D., 

Professor Materia Medica, New York Medical College. 

F. LE ROY SATTERLEE, M. D., Ph. D., 

Prof. Chem., Mat. Med. and TJterap. in N. Y. Col. of Dent.; Prof. Chem. and Hyg. in Am. Vet. Ool.,elc. 

JAS. AITKEN MEIGS, M. D., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Prof, of the Institutes of Med. and Med. Juris., Jeff. Medical Ool.; Phy. to Penn. Bos. 

W. W. DAWSON, M. D., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Prof. Prin. and Prac. Surg., Med. Col. of Ohio; Surg, lo Good Samaritan Hospital. 

ALFRED F. A. KING, M. D., Washington, D. C, 

Prof, of Obstetrics, University of Vermont. 

D. W. YANDELL, M. D., 

Prof, of the Science and Art of Surg, and Clinical Surg., University of Louisville, Ky. 

L. P. YANDELL, M. D., 

Prof, of Clin. Med., Diieases of Children, and Dermatology, University of Louisville, Ky. 

ROBT. BATTEY, M. D., Rome, Qa., 

Emeritus Prof, of Obstetrics, Atlanta Med. College, Ex-Pres. Med. Association of Georgia. 

(JLAUDE H. MASTIN, M. D., L.L. D., Mobile, Ala. 

Prof. H. C. BARTLETT, Ph. D., F. C. S., London, England. 



The NEW TOEK PHARMAOAL ASSOCIATION, 

No8. 10 &12 COLLEGE PLACE, NEW YORK. 
P.O.BOX, 1574. 

la aDswering advertieements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



Salicylate of Cinchonidia. 



Satisfactory therapeutical results from tlie administration of 
Salicylic Acid in the treatment of Gout, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, etc., etc., have been much modified by the disturbance of the 
general system, especially the stomach, owing to the large doses re- 
quired. 

Medical men have experimented with the salts of this acid,hoping 
to qualify this tendency. That most largely used, (the Salicylate of 
Soda) has proven much less objectionable than the acid itself, but long 
■continued use results in the same trouble to the class of patients with 
whom freedom from nausea and internal irritation is a first necessity. 

Being convinced that the acid would be best prescribed in com- 
bination with some other base, it was suggested by Mr. F. H. Rosen- 
<JARTEN, of Messrs. Rosengarten & Sons, that the salt of a Cinchona 
Alkaloid would aid the remedial properties of the Salicylic Acid, in 
adding tonic, stimulant, and anti-periodic properties, and with such a 
powerful alkaloid as Cinchonidia, the dose required could be lessened. 

This salt opens up a wide range of uses in conditions, where, 
heretofore, physicians have not tested Salicylic Acid, for fear of direct 
debility and loss of muscular power so often induced by its use. 

Practical experience has borne out the above theory quite fully , 
and in a number of cases of severe Neuralgia and acute Rheuma- 
tism, the Salicylate of Cinchonidia has given immediate relief in 
■doses of five to ten grains, where Quinine, Salicylic Acid, or other 
general treatment has failed. 

Since the introduction of this Salt, it has been tried in the Jeffer- 
son Medical College Hospital at Philadelphia; St. Joseph's Hospital 
at Philadelphia, and by a number of careful practitioners, with im- 
mediate good effect in every case, so far as heard from , in fact, better 
results than could have been anticipated. 

It is administered in five grain doses, until the paroxysms of 
Neuralgia cease. This generally requires say from fifteen to twenty 
grains, five grains every two hours. The Salt, representing about 
one-third of its weight of Salicylic Acid, is almost insoluble in 
water, and is incompatible with iron solutions. We urge its trial in 
all cases of acute articular Rheumatism, Gout, Neuralgia, Sciatica, 
etc., etc., with almost absolute certainty of prompt relief. Owing to 
its insolubility, it cannot be given in solution, and physicians will 
find the nearest approach to this, in the administration of our Com- 
pressed Powders or Pills. These being free from coating, must 
necessarily disintegrate more quickly than a coated pill. 

We prepare the Salt in pills of two and one-half grains each, 
which will enable the physician to graduate the dose for children, as 
well as for adults. We recommend them in preference to a larger 
pill, as they are much more readily swallowed. 

JOHN WYETH & BROTHER, 

CHEMISTS, 

PHILADELPHIA. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



NEW PHARMACEUTICALS 



"WORTHY OP THE- 



AlTTENTION OF PHYSICIANS. 



fr+< 



NITRO-GLYCERINEPILLS 



Nitroglycerine is introduced on 
the authority of Dr. Murrell, of Lon- 
don, as a remedy in angina pectoris 
and in cases of chronic neuralgia in 
any part of the body. Cases of an- 
gina pectoris which had resisted 
all attempts at even alleviation, 
much less cure, have promptly 
yielded to nitro-glycerine, and a 
number of cases of actual cure are 
reported. This is more than can be 
said of any other known remedy. 
In neuralgia the eflfects of this drug 
have, in some instances, been 
scarcely less marked. 

The pill form i.s very eligible, be- 
sides ensuring exactness of dose. 



Sanguis Bovinus Exsiccatus. 



In this preparation of blood we 
have a true food, the albumen being 
entirely retained. In this respect it 
diflfers from the various beef ex- 
tracts, beef essences, etc., in the 
market. These preparations are, 
from the very methods of their 
naanufacture. entirely deprived of 
albmen , the true nutritive principle 
of beef, and are thus not foods in 
any proper sense of the word. 

Sanguis bovinus exsiccatus is 
blood deprived of nothing but its 
water and fibrin, which latter is 
naturally small in quantity and 
practically of no nutritive value. 



Liquor Ergots Purificatus. 

This form of ergot is of constant 
strength. In its preparation only 
the active principles of the drug 
are retained, all inert and noxious 
ingredients being removed. As 
these active principles yre assayed 
the liquor contains them in con- 
stant and definite proportions, 
and thus is obviated the uncer- 
tainty of strength due to varia- 
bility in the quality of the sample 
of the drug employed. Liquor 
ergotffi purificatus is as constant 
in its strength as morphia, quinia, 
or any of the other alkaloids of 
vegetable drugs. 



^- 



C/lSCAR/l + CORDIAL 



This laxative and alterative 
preparation stands unequalled 
among pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions as a remedy in constipation. 
Its agreeable and eflScient action 
has been abundantly attested by 
the medical profession of this 
country, and it stands now as a 
remedy of unquestionable efficacy 
in chronic constipation. Great 
care should be exercised in not pre- 
scribing too large a dose, inasmuch 
as cascara sagrada, its active ingre- 
dient,overcomes constipation by its 
tonic action on the bowel, rather 
than by direct laxative influence. 



^ 



rULL AND LESCEIPTIVE CIRCULAES OF TEE ABOVE 

—WILL BE SKNT FKEE ON APPLICATION TO — 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich, 

Manufacturisg Chemists and Special Dealers in New and Bare Drugs. 



In aQBwering advertiBcments meDtlon the Peoria Msdical Monthi.t. 



?eori^ ]^edi6kl ]V[oritl\ly. 

TOL. I. JANUARY, 1881. NO. 9. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Case of Fracture of the Occipital Bone, Witli Fracture 
of the Left Femur in Its Neck and Upper Third. 



IN THE PRACTICE OF J. MURPHY, M. D. 



The following case, I believe, embraces sufficient points 
of interest to justify its publication. The uncertainty 
which attached to the brain indications, and to the general 
symptoms for the first three days, or during the period of 
quiescent insensibility, as to whether the case was one of 
compression or concussion ; the obscurity as to the cause 
of the paralysis of the hypo-glossal nerves and the three 
nerves of special sense ; the absence of any paralysis of the 
other nerves which have a common origin with those men- 
tioned; the peculiar morbid condition of the sensorium 
which produced for several weeks the complete abeyance 
of his mental powers ; and his extreme, prolonged and 
very unusual restlessness, are all topics which interest the 
surgeon. The first perhaps especially so, as indicating that 
the symptoms which are usually recognized by surgical 
writers, as distinguishing compression of the brain from 
concussion are not always positive or demonstrative. But 
perhaps more interesting to the surgeon than any other 
phase connected with the case is that the double fracture 
of the femur was treated with scarcely perceptible deform- 
ity, without splints or bandages, by extension and counter- 
extension alone. 

T. M., fourteen years of age, lithe, vigorous and healthy, 
;nervo-sanguineous temperament, dark hair, and with no 
^apparent scrofulous diathesis, on the 16th of September, 



218 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

current year, fell through the elevator way, at the Tran- 
script newspaper office, in Peoria, a distance of about thirty- 
feet. Independent of the insensibility which immediately 
ensued, the palpable results of the fall were a transverse- 
fracture of the occipital bone at its lower part, without ap- 
parent depression ; an oblique fracture of the left femur itt 
its upper third, from before upward and backward; and a 
fracture of the neck of the same bone, whether within or 
without the capsule his extreme restlessness did not permit 
my ascertaining. For fifty-four hours after the accident 
the coma was as perfect as it is in compression, but during 
the last nine hours of this period, when very loudly spoken 
to, he exhibited a species of automatic consciousness, which 
afforded some evidence of concussion, but as counteracting; 
this, he did not articulate during that whole period. 
"While there was no paralysis such as we are accustomed to 
consider as a necessary concomitant of compression, there 
was none of that muscular will, power which we usually 
find accompanying concussion. There was paralysis how- 
ever. For more than nine days he could not articulate, 
indicating a paralytic state oi the hypo-glossal nerves. 
There was also a paralyzed condition of the three nerves 
of special sense. To what extent those nerves were par- 
alyzed is difficult to determine positively, except in the case- 
of the olfactory nerves. For several days ammonia pro- 
duced no sensible effect when applied to the nostrils, and 
for two weeks at least he was insensible to the odor of assa- 
fcetida. That vision and hearing were both very much im- 
paired, if not suspended for a number of days after the- 
accident, we had very positive evidence of; but whether 
their functions were for some time subsequent to the acci- 
dent entirely in abeyance, or were only feebly exercised,, 
there were no means of ascertaining. The comatose con- 
dition which he was in for several days, and the entire 
absence of intelligence which characterized him for several 
weeks afterwards, leave us completely in the dark on this 
subject. 

The bjeathing was not at all positive or decided in its 
character. Although there was no continuous stertorous 
breathing, still there was occasionally well marked stertor, 
and the respiration at no time had the quietude and feeble- 
ness which we so usually find in concussion. The action 
of the heart was also very indefinite in its indications. 
Throughout the entire case, except on one occasion during. 



Original CoTYirmjunications. 219 

the third week when symptoms of sinking were manifested, 
the pulse presented all the strength, slowness, and regular- 
ity which usually characterize compression, and at no time 
did it indicate the frequency, irregularity or weakness 
which we so often observe in concussion. 

The appearance of the pupil was so variable from day 
to day, never being much dilated, and never very rigidly con- 
tracted, that no diagnostic evidence of a positive character 
could be predicated from its condition. The temperature 
several times reached 103 degrees, but its mean for three 
weeks was under 100 degrees, a temperature which under 
the circumstances of the case 1 considered very favorable. 
The bowels were torpid, probably the result of the opiates 
which were administered, and the urine had to be drawn 
oiF occasionally, but the general condition of the sphincters 
afforded no positive indication of the character of the 
injury. On the third day he exhibited a certain degree of 
physical consciousness. On the fifth day he became utterly 
ungovernable, and continued so for six weeks during his 
waking hours. During this entire time his muscular 
movements while awake were violent and constant, making 
the most vigorous and persistent efforts to roll over in bed, 
and throw himself on the floor. During the period of vio- 
lence he was destitute of all intelligence. Every mental 
faculty appeared to be in abeyance. All appeals to his 
memory, his judgment, discrimination or reasoning powers 
remained unanswered. In fact for the time being he was 
an idiot. His facial expression and manner indicated it ; 
and what he said confirmed it. He was fretful, fitful, irri- 
table, obstinate by turns, and he appeared to be actuated 
by those passions and feelings which would be character- 
istic of an unreasoning animal. The state of extreme and 
uncontrollable restlessness continued for nearly six weeks. 
Its gradual disappearance seemed to be synchronous with 
the gradual return of his mental powers. 

Such, hastily grouped, are some of the mental phenom- 
ena, and also some of the more prominent physical 
symptoms which were exhibited in this somewhat remark- 
able case. It will be observed that the group of brain 
symptoms favored the existence of concussion, yet there 
were several indications which pointed strongly in the 
direction of compression, leaving for a time at least a dis- 
agreeable feeling of doubt as to the exact character of the 
injury, and of course the exact treatment to be pursued. 



220 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

That there was actual brain lesion is almost demon- 
strated by the general physical symptoms, and especially 
by the temporary paralysis of the hypo-glossal nerves, and 
of the three nerves of special sense. Originating as those 
nerves do in the medulla oblongata, it is probably here 
that the lesion existed; and it was likely a minute quantity 
of blood eftused on to its surface, or into its substance, so 
minute that the absorbents speedily removed it. 

If I might hazard an opinion as to the cause of the de- 
rangement and temporary loss of his intellect for several 
weeks after the accident, I would say that it was owing to 
the molecular changes which occurred in the sensorium as 
the result of the terrific concussion which such a fall must 
have produced. His peculiar mental condition indeed 
pointed distinctively to the disturbed condition which must 
have existed in the central hemispheres of the brain. 

It was full of interest to observe the gradual return of 
his mental faculties. Those lowest in the scale appeared 
to be regained first. The initial indication which I noticed 
of any glimmering of reason, was his attempt at imita- 
tion. I would say to him, " Good morning," and he would 
repeat it a dozen times. He seemed to have lost all ideas 
of distance, in this respect resembling an infant. He ap- 
peared to appreciate the abstract ideas of right and wrong 
while yet his reasoning power was absent. If I said to 
him, " You must be quiet or your leg will be injured," he 
became quiet ; but if I attempted to explain to him the 
reasons demanding this quietude, he appeared unable to 
appreciate them. One by one discrimination, judgment, 
power of anah'sis and memory assumed their nearly nor- 
mal status in his mental system. Although as might be 
expected there is still occasional confusion of ideas, and 
irregularity of mind action. 

As above mentioned the left femur was obliquely frac- 
tured in its upper third, and its neck was also fractured. 
For over two weeks I made persistent efforts to keep 
the requisite splints and bandages on his thigh; but 
his violent, and when awake, constant muscular move- 
ments, and the impossibility of preventing him from tear- 
ing off the dressings, induced me to abandon every 
appliance except extension by means of adhesive plaster to 
the leg with a weight of from twelve to fifteen pounds 
attached, and counter-extension by means of a stout per- 
ineal band, attached to the upper part of the bed, in such 



Original Communications. 221 

a manner that he could not reach it with his hands; and 
notwithstanding that it was impossible for six weeks after 
the accident to restrain his movements or prevent his 
incessant struggling, the shaft of the femur united with a 
very trifling anterior jutting of the upper fragment, the 
result of the violent action of the psoas muscles, and the 
fracture of the neck also united perfectly, with scarcely 
perceptible shortening. The case is one of peculiar inter- 
est to the surgical practitioner, as demonstrating the possi- 
bility of a union of the neck of the femur under the most 
adverse circumstances by extension and counter-extension 
alone, without any other appliances; and what is still more 
important, demonstrating the possibility of retaining the 
natural length of the limb by similar means, contrary to 
the dicta of so many eminent surgeons; and still farther 
demonstrating the necessity which every surgeon should 
feel under, to avoid putting such fractures on a double in- 
clined plane, where no adequate extension can be made ; 
of laying the limb on a pillow where no extension can even 
be attempted ; or of permitting the patient to get up on 
crutches as soon as his physical powers permit, all of which 
must unavoidably eventuate in a permanent crippling of 
our patients, and a slur and a disgrace to our profession. 



State Medicine. 



Read before the Central Illinois Medical Society, by 
0. T. ORNE, M. D. 

This new branch of our profession has, within the last 
decade established itself upon the lirm basis of scientific 
knowledge. 

I shall confine myself to-day more particularly to the 
subject of Drainage of Prairie Soils — that my remarks 
may have some practical benefit attached to them. 

The prairie soil of the West is the result of decayed 
vegetable matter accumulated for ages — the vegetable fibre 
uniting with the loose silica of the decayed plants, and the 
mineral basis of the underlying oceanic strata to form a 
dark, rich, spongy mold, capable of producing luxuriant 
vegetation. 

The surface, however, is not uniform in formation and 
level, the emerald green is dotted here and there with 



222 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

crystal lakes and ponds having no perceptible i^let or 
outlet — these ponds are inoccious in their effect upon 
the human system, having their origin in subterranean 
water courses and springs. The creeks and rivers of prairie 
countries are peculiar in their sluggishness and in their 
tendency during continued drouth to stagnancy and the 
formation of vegetable and animal organisms detrimental 
to public health. "Whether the parasite be fungoid or ani- 
malcular each leaves its impress upon man. This tendency 
to the formation of organisms, bacterial and fungoid is 
even greater in sloughs or bodies of water in which the 
surface is either wholly or in part covered with vegetation. 
"When the two conditions of heat and moisture are once 
established, you have all that is necessary to the reproduc- 
tion of parasitical life — if the germ be vegetable then you 
will have a fungoid variety — if animal, then the different 
forms of bacteria, diatomata, etc. 

I doubt not that all of you have in your night rides 
through the country noticed the warmth of the air on the 
little hillocks, and the heavy, damp, clammy fogs of the 
lowlands that chills you to the bone, while you inhale an 
atmosphere whose peculiar aroma is suggestive of solid 
ague. If the health of the many is of first importance to 
a community, in preference to the monetary loss and incon- 
venience of the few, then the only way to accomplish the 
most good is by a thorough system of drainage. 

All drainage is divided into two classes, natural and 
artificial. Water courses are the natural drainage of all 
countries, rivers, gathering within their bosoms each little 
creek and rivulet laden with the parasitical life of a vast 
surface drainage speed on to the ocean. Nature's vast re- 
ceptacle of refuse matter, her laboratory of chemical 
change, purifying what it receives and returning to us the 
pure distilled water of the rain-drop and the snow-flake. 
Each drop of water has an orbit around which it travels 
time and time again, as do the stellar drops in the blue 
ether above course with unerring precision the track 
assigned them. It is as essential that we should have suffi- 
cient rain in prairie countries in order to wash ott'the sur- 
face, as it is that such washing should be quickly carried 
into the larger water courses ; hence it follows that we are 
doing ourselves an injury in cutting down our forest trees 
and lessening the rain-fall. 

The only drawback to nature's drainage is the sluggish- 



Original Communications. 22S 

ness of the current and the tendency to form little bays 
and backwaters, which soon become stagnant. The mean- 
dering course of all streams in a level country gives surface 
drainage a longer time and a greater extent of country in 
which to diffuse infusorial life. This cannot be remedied 
save with costly direct channels, and this would be a ques- 
tionable proceeding in the cases of the Mississippi and 
Ohio, and all rivers whose best boating season is at the- 
time of freshets near their sources. The water would be 
carried away too rapidly and cut short the duration of nav- 
igability. It is probable that our river courses might be 
much improved by a thorough jetty system, and in that 
way the current be increased and the depth maintained at 
the expense of its width. 

Artificial drainage is divided into open and closed 
drains. Open drains are the arteries connecting the capil- 
lary closed drains with the aorta of river drainage. They 
should be as direct as possible, consistent with the topog- 
raphy of the country ; of such width as to easily discharge 
all their contents quickly and safely, and of such depth as to- 
drain eight feet beneath the surface, with a fall sufficient 
to produce at least a current of three miles an hour. These 
large drains should be established by the State, as are the 
public roads, and their advisability should be passed upon 
by a sanitary commission, so that at the same time we may 
assist the farmer in restoring land and sanitarily benefit 
the people contiguous. Local drainage can best be secured 
by covered tile or stone, never by wooden or gopher ditch- 
ing. In area draining the conduit should be of such mate- 
rial and size as to easily relieve the surrounding soils of all 
excess of moisture, and readily convey it to the open drain. 
It is essential that the water you drink and use for culinary 
purposes be pure — or free from all surface drainage — puri- 
fied by its passage through long lines of subterranean 
filters. Slough wells are an abomination, and their con- 
tents are as equally deleterious to domestic animals as to 
man. All wells should therefore be well bricked and lined. 

I was well pleased with a suggestion of our lamented 
friend Dr. R. G. Laughliu, of Bloomington, that " all wells 
should be thoroughly cemented for at least ten feet from 
the surface, so as to cut ofl'all surface drainage," an admir- 
able idea, worthy of its author. No water closet should be 
located nearer to the well than one hundred feet, and not 
that close if the surface drainage be in the direction of ther 



"224 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

well. If the cess-pool be in sand or gravel, it is better to 
thoroughly cement its bottom and sides, so that none of the 
contents may escape. It should be frequently disinfected 
by the introduction of chloride of lime, Labarraque's solu- 
tion, dilute carbolic acid or dried earth. I have not entered 
into the more complicated subject of sewerage as applied to 
our large cities with domiciliary water closets, catch basins, 
traps, &c. This is an important subject of itself, worthy the 
attention of the profession, since sewerage gas has been 
recognized as an important and intense toxicological agent. 
The subject of drainage has a present and important inter- 
est in Central Illinois, and the physicians of this district 
understand but too well, from the long list of malarial, 
typhoid and diphtheritic cases, how sadly the subject has 
been neglected. 

Since our sunny South land has been swept year after 
year by a plague whose malignancy has equalled if not 
excelled that of the black-death plague of the fourteenth 
and fifteenth centuries, the minds of our great sanitarians 
have been expending their energies upon the solution of 
the cause — the toxocological agent producing the dread 
pestilence. The general government has recognized the 
importance of this great work by the establishment of a 
National Board of Health. Many theories have been 
advanced respecting the cause and distribution of yellow 
fever. Many are theoretically plausible and others equally 
absurd. Since so many have advanced their ideas upon 
this subject, I feel less delicacy in obtruding my own 
thoughts upon the profession. 

It is known that the malign influence of parasitical life 
upon man is increased or diminished in accordance with 
local conditions of climate and topography. That such 
organisms become more virulent in their attacks when con- 
veyed to a warmer and different habitat and the resulting 
invasions changed and modified the symptoms of attack on 
the human system. Profs. Cowado, Tomassi-Crudeli and 
Prof. Klebs have attributed malarial fevers to the introduc- 
tion of the bacillus malarial into the human system. If this 
parasite is capable of producing intermittent fevers in Illi- 
nois and the dread malarial fever of the Roman Campagna, 
may not the Southern climate and locality afford suflicient 
reason for the belief that yellow fever is due to the invasion 
of this parasite ? The germs of these bacilli may be swept 
from their habitat — the prairies of Western states — by 



Original Communications. 225 

the spring freshets, carried down the Mississippi to the 
Gulf of Mexico, gernfiinating as they reach the Gulf ports of 
.Mexico and West India islands, and forming an inexhaust- 
ible supply at those ports by reason of their latitude and 
moisture. These germs taken up by the Gulf stream are 
carried northward along our Atlantic seaboard, and might 
account for sporadic attacks which frequently occur in 
Atlantic ports that cannot be accounted for by reason of 
commercial intercourse. As the season advances the dis- 
ease may be produced by germination taking place in the 
Mississippi itself, thus acting as local foci for the spread of 
the disease. 

This theory would not detract from that of fomites, but 
only give another reason for the rapid spread of yellow 
fever in the South. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

On tlie Curability of Acute Plitliisis, or Galloping- Con- 
sumption. 

Much has been written upon this subject, but I do not 
see that any new light has been thrown upon it. I do not 
see that we are any nearer to a solution of it than we were 
before, and it is doubtful whether we ever will be. Some 
things are susceptible of positive proof, of demonstration; 
other things are not. This is one of the cases in which 
positive proof is impossible. 

The difficulty lies in the diagnosis. This in some cases, 
in the present state of our knowledge, it is impossible to 
make with certainty, and until it can be done the question 
can never be settled. There is not a symptom in any form 
of consumption which may not exist in and accompany 
other diseases. This is especially true of acute consumption. 

A patient may die of acute phthisis, and after death 
milliary tubercles be found in the lungs. This would 
prove that he had the disease. Another patient presenting 
similar symptoms may die, and no tubercles be found in the 
lungs or any other part of the body. This would prove 
that he did not die of acute phthisis. Another patient may 
have the ordinary symptoms of acute phthisis and get well. 
How can it be demonstrated that he really had phthisis ? 
It is impossible. 

The fact is there are other diseases, and especially cer- 
tain stages of other diseases, which so perfectly simulate 



226 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

acute phthisis that nothing short of a post mortem can settle 
the question. When one of these cases recovers it is diffi- 
cult to get a post mortem for the purpose of settling a little . 
question of diagnosis. Doubtless all physicians who have 
practiced any length of time have seen cases of this charac- 
ter; cases in which the disease could not be determined 
with absolute certainty. 

I have seen sub-acute pneumonia (at least cases which I 
diagnosed to be that) present every symptom which acute 
phthisis ordinarily presents. Some years ago I treated a 
case of acute pneumonia which was very severe and resulted 
in suppuration. After suppuration had begun, and before 
the abscess was developed, and of course before it began to 
discharge, I was dismissed from the case and one of our 
best physicians employed. He diagnosed the case acute 
tuberculosis, and told the family the patient would inevita- 
bly die. The abscess matured, discharged through the 
bronchia, great quantities of matter having been thrown 
off", the man recovered and is now in robust health. 

Only recently I visited a young man in consultation 
with one of our leading physicians, a man of clear mind, 
careful in his diagnosis and practice. I judged the patient 
had typhoid pneumonia, but it was a peculiar case. His 
physician thought it acute phthisis, but was careful not to 
express his views to the patient or his friends. I was fear- 
ful he was correct, but reminded him of the difficulty of 
diagnosing correctly in these cases, which he well knew. 
After a prolonged illness the young man made a complete 
recovery, which is as good evidence as we can have that he 
did not have acute phthisis. 

I might go on and detail numbers of similar cases in 
which physicians of eminent ability have made mistakes in 
diagnosis in similar cases, but these are enough for my 
purpose. In these cases all careful and experienced physi- 
cians will be cautious as to their diagnosis, and the sooner 
those who are not learn this caution, the better it will be 
for their reputation. 

Whether any case of phthisis, acute or chronic, after it 
is fully established, recovers, I do not know. I have not 
seen any positive proof of it, certainly not in my own prac- 
tice. Either cases of acute tuberculosis do recover, or phy- 
sicians are sometimes mistaken in their diagnosis. The 
former proposition may be true, I do not say it is not, but 
think the evidence is strongly in favor of the latter. 



Original Cormnunications. 227 

Theoretically this is a question of some importance, but 
practically very little. Ordinarily, diseases presenting 
analagous symptoms require essentially the same treatment. 
Usually there is too much stress laid on the names of a 
disease. It matters little whether we can give a diseased 
condition a name or not, so we know that condition and the 
general principles on which to treat it, and are so versed in 
remedial agents as to select and apply those which are the 
best adapted to the condition which we find. Diseases 
often assume, as we would say in botany, polymorphus 
forms. Diseases of different names often require the same 
treatment, and certain stages of many diseases require the 
same treatment that other diseases require throughout. 
General principles should be studied more and special dis- 
eases less. One general principle may apply to an hundred 
cases, and by putting it in practice save us from studying 
out ninety-nine separate cases. 

J. T. Stewart, M.D. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

The Aceominodatioii of the Eye and What it Means. 



BY S. J. BUMSTEAD, M. D. 



[^Concluded.l 
The ciliary muscle, as is known, is in the interior of the 
eye, opposite the junction of the cornea and sclerotic, and 
having longitudinal and circular fibres, by their contraction, 
crowd upon the edge of the lens, increasing its convexity 
and thereby its refractive power. This change seems to be 
effected reflexly, whenever there is an indistinctness of 
vision in observing a close object, and when that is the one 
thing needful to perfect vision, the result is all that is 
desired, but when, as often happens, other defects exist, 
these efforts only add to the distress of the subject. That 
the change just mentioned actually takes place when the 
object is brought nearer the eye, has been proved in the 
most satisfactory manner, by the size of images reflected 
from the anterior surface of the lens, while the individual 
gazes successively into the distance, and nearer to him. 
In the latter case the image becomes decidedly smaller, 
showing an increase in the convexity of the reflecting sur- 
face, in accordance with the laws of reflection from convex 
mirrors. 



228 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

J^ow if we wish to look at an object eight inches from 
the eye, and see it distinctlj^ (assuming the eye an emme- 
tropic one), we will need in addition to the focal power of 
6.7 P. Lines of such an eye, an additional convexity which 
will so alter the rays of light entering the ej^e so divergently, 
as they do from such a close object, that they will be as 
though they came from an infinite distance and were par- 
allel, for such rays we now know the emmetropic eye can 
focus upon the retina. Such an eye, in addition to its 
ordinary focal power, needs that equal to a convex lens of 
eight inches focus, because when an object is situated in 
the focal point (eight inches) of such a lens the rays pro- 
ceeding on the other side are parallel, and would be 
expressed thus : ■gLxi=a lens of J^ focal power, making a 
difference in focal power of 3% or J of a line. (The ^ must 
be converted into parisian lines in working the above prob- 
lem, and stand Jg- instead). In this case the accommoda- 
tioij would equal the power of ^ convex glass, which is the 
technical method of designating the accommodative power. 
That also expresses the range of accommodation, because 
the individual is able, by the elastic apparatus within the 
eye, to see distinctly in the infinite distance as well as 
within eight inches. Young persons have such power over 
the lens that they are able to add a convexity equal to a 
lens of 2f and 3 inches focus, but the distance of 8 inches 
from the eye is the standard placed arbitrarily, up to which 
one should be able to see distinctly when in possession of a 
normal accommodative power. Of such a person the- 
accommodation could be expressed in two ways, viz: 
i=:i., and again, as the least technical and easily understood 
by all : Accommodative range extends from 8 inches to- 
infinite distance. Where a person having myopia (near- 
sightedness) can see distinctly as far as 12 inches from the 
eye, and as close as 4 inches, the range of accommodation 
would not be expressed technically as that of 8 inches, the 
distance between the two points, but as ^th, and for the 
reason : that the difference between a lens of 4 inches focus 
and one of 12 inches is one of 6 inches, ascertained thus : 
\=\ — y^=^, although the other representation of this case 
would be well understood by oculists, and has much to 
recommend it. The defects of accommodation will be next 
in order, and would naturally include presbyopia. 



Clinical Lectures. 229 



Uniml WectnnH, 



Epilepsy. 



BY HENRY M. LYMAN, M. D. 
Professor of Physiology and Nervous Diseases, Rush Medical College. 



[Reported for the Peoria Medical Monthly by a Student.] 

This little girl, eight years of age, comes to us from an 
interior town in the state, presenting the following history 
to which I invite your attention : During the first year of 
her life she had a severe illness, acute in its nature, but of 
its character we can learn nothing very definite, except 
that she recovered fully from it. When she was about two 
years old, she had au attack of fever, during which convul- 
sions or spasms were developed, and these convulsions con- 
tinue at irregular intervals up to the present time. They 
may appear everj^ day, or every second day, or they may 
be absent a month or two at a time. Her father states that 
they also vary considerably in intensity. At one time they 
may be confined wholly to the upper extremity of the left 
side and be slight, or they may appear in the lower ex- 
tremity and affect more of the body and be correspondingly 
much more severe. The time of their duration also varies 
greatly, lasting from only a few minutes to five or six 
hours. During the continuance of these convulsions, there 
is involuntary muscular action, but no loss of conscious- 
ness. I will now let her get up on this table and you can 
examine her more closely. You will notice that there is a 
partial dropping of the left wrist, although she has pretty 
good use of the hand, and also that she is slightly lame, 
the left leg being a little shorter than the right. The 
muscles of the calf are softer and less developed than those 
of the right leg, and this is also true of the muscles of the 
arm and body upon the same side. Her father now tells 
us an interesting fact in connection with the case, and one 
that he has not mentioned before, which is, that formerly 
when she had these seizures, her head would be suddenly 
thrown forwards upon her chest, so that if she was at the 
table her head would strike it forcibly ; these phenomena, 
however, are not so marked now as they were some time 
ago. 

This, gentlemen, is her history, and it is suflicient to 
warrant a diagnosis of epilepsy, and that of the rather rare 



230 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

variety characterized by the " salaam " convulsions, so 
called from the nodding movements of the head. She had 
an acute anterior poliomyetitis, that is an inflammation 
seated in the anterior columns of the spinal cord, extend- 
ing as far up as the cervical region on one side. Some of 
the nerve cells and fibres of this portion of the cord were 
destroyed by that inflammation, hence we have the defect- 
ive nutrition on the left side, the results of which you will 
notice in the atrophy of the muscles on that side. This 
defective nutrition is not so well marked in this as in some 
cases, but still is sufiSciently plain to be noticed by all of 
you. Here, then, gentlemen, we have the dread disease, 
epilepsy, in one of its protean forms. When we speak of 
epilepsy, the mind generally reverts to the most common 
form, where all the symptoms are strongly marked. The 
sudden pallor, the quick outcry from the patient, the sud- 
den fall forwards, the total loss of consciousness, and other 
symptoms which you will readily recall. But these are not 
present in all cases, as we must remember, since epilepsy 
difi'ers almost as much in its various manifestations as does 
hysteria. So in the case before us, there is no loss of con- 
sciousness, no outcry, the child remembers all that takes 
place during the convulsion, and sometimes laughs at the 
contortions of her limbs. 

This disease does not arise from one convulsive centre 
in the brain, but may exist in any part of that organ, and 
thus give rise to the varied symptoms which we observe in 
connection with it. 

The patient is often conscious of the approach of the 
convulsion, this premonition forming what is known as the 
" aura epilejjtica," and this we find to be the case with the 
patient before us. In her case the aura accompanies a 
forcible and involuntary flexion of the great toe, hence the 
spasm is said to begin there and run up towards the body. 
This form, where the attack begins in an extremity, is 
sometimes called spinal epilepsy, but that is not a correct 
term, for we must not form the idea that it begins at the 
periphery. It begins from the explosion of nerve matter or 
force in the brain, although it may be first felt in the 
extremity. 

Aside from the knowledge furnished by the awa, this 
little girl can frequently foretell an attack; her face flushes 
up and she experiences uneasy, uncomfortable sensations 
elsewhere. 



Clinical Lectures. 231 



The convulsion can sometimes be averted if the aura is 
well marked, and which might be done in this case by 
grasping and forcibly extending the toe, or by seizing and 
squeezing it if it be in the hand or foot ; in case it is felt in 
the arm or leg a bandage may be made tight around the 
part to the same effect. 

Nitrite of amyl may be used for the same purpose, pro- 
-vided the interval between the aura and convulsion be suflB- 
■ciently long to permit of its use. This, however, in a cer- 
tain number of cases is not found to be practicable, the 
interval being too short to permit of its being used. I 
usually advise patients to put a piece of cotton saturated 
with the nitrite of amyl in a small vial, tightly corked, so 
as to have it ready for use. This drug, classed among the 
anaesthetics, seems to have a peculiar action on the vaso- 
motor system of nerves, and acts by forcing the blood 
through the dilated arterioles, thus sending blood to the 
brain and preventing the anaemia, which is given as a par- 
tial cause of the spasm. Nothing can be done for the spinal 
-symptoms in this case. The inflammation has destroyed 
the integrity of parts of the substance of the cord, and this 
we cannot restore. This condition will probably last as 
long as her life. We may, however, attempt to give nutri- 
tion to these injured nerve centres, and in a manner stimu- 
late them. A great deal will depend upon her general 
treatment. She should not be required or allowed to study 
much, and close and constant attention should be given to 
her diet, dress and mode of life. 

In such cases as this we should always look for a com- 
plicating diathesis, rheumatic, scrofulous, tubercular, syph- 
ilitic, &c., and if found, attempt to correct it. This case is 
probably somewhat scrofulous, and for this we may give 
iron, cod's liver oil, sulphate of calcium or other remedies 
of this class. 

For specific treatment, besides the nitrite of amyl, we 
may use the bromides, and a combination like the follow- 
ing will be prescribed : 

^ Sodii bromidi, 10 grains. 

Ammoniae bromidi, 5 grains. 

Potasii iodidi, 2 grains. 

Syrupi, q. s. to make 1 drachm. 

M. Sig. For one dose, to be taken three times a day. 
We must make our plans for such treatment to continue 
through a number of years, and I have put in the bromide 
of sodium as being less apt to disturb the digestive func- 



232 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

tions than the bromide of potassium when taken for a long- 
time, and with the same purpose. "We may occasionally 
substitute the iodide of iron for the iodide of potassium itt 
the above formula. 

If there is no improvement from this line of treatment 
noticed within three years, there will be little to hope for 
from the bromides, and then we must put our hopes on the 
cod's liver oil and the strength of our patient. 

Local irritation by means of blisters applied to the back 
of the neck, is generally useful and should be resorted to. 
Their use will be recommended in this case. I may say in 
this connection that the curative effects of many drugs on 
this disease depend to a large extent, if not wholly, upon^ 
their connection with local irritation with blisters. This I 
think was the case with curare and others of the same- 
nature. 



Typho-Malarial Fever. 



BY J. M. DA COSTA, M.D., 
Professor of the Practice of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College. 



[Reported for the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

This young girl is about eighteen years of age, and ha& 
always enjoyed the most perfect health up to the time of 
her present sickness. She states that she has never had 
malarial fever or rheumatism. Last summer an eruption 
appeared on her face, but that was probably of some passing 
kind and connected with hepatic disturbances. Three 
months after the eruption had disappeared her feet began 
to swell and her menses suddenly stopped, and since then 
have been very irregular. With all this, however, there is 
no clear history of an attack of fever. It was probably 
nothing but disordered digestion. A week prior to her 
admission to the wards, the patient was seized with fever, 
headache, and pain in the back, stomach, and left side. 
Her face, too, was very much flushed. The thermometer 
marked 102-^° on the evening of her admission. Her 
tongue was coated and dry. The pain in her head and the 
pain in the back of her neck grew more intense. She also 
complained of cough and of pain in her left chest. There 
was no stiffness of the neck and none of the symptoms of 
cerebro-spinal-meningitis. There was a slight amount of 
nausea and gastric uneasiness. As regards my diagnosis df 
the case, the intestinal pains, the fever apparently without 



Clinical Lectures. 233 



cause, the headache, and the age of the patient, all pointed 
towards typhoid fever. On the second day after admission, 
•however, I decided positively that it was not a case of 
'typhoid fever, and this conclusion has been verified by the 
results. The symptom which led me to exclude the 
thought of typhoid fever was the extraordinary temperature 
record, — showing such marked remissions and exacerba- 
tions. In the corresponding stage of typhoid fever, such a 
state of aflfairs would be almost if not entirely unknown. 
-On the evening of the third day of admission the tempera- 
ture was 103° ; on the third morning it was 99° ; on the 
third evening it again rose to 108°. For several days fol- 
lowing this time there was a daily variation of from 3° to 
4° between morning and evening temperature. On the 9th 
of the month the morning temperature was 99° and the 
evening temperature 101°. On the 11th the temperature 
was about normal, with but very little difference between 
morning and evening charts. On the 12th, yesterday, I 
ordered the quinia to be stopped, as quininism was rapidly 
making its appearance. The patient had been taking a 
daily dose of sixteen grains of the drug. Our treatment by 
quinia had proved two things to our entire satisfaction, — 
first, that our view of the nature of the case was the only 
•correct one; and, second, that the minute you discontinue 
the anti-periodic in a case of malarial infection, the tem- 
perature may run right up again, although you may have 
succeeded in reducing it almost to the normal state. (On 
the evening of the 12th the temperature rose again to 101°.) 
This morning the patient's pulse is 74, her respiration 26, 
and her temperature 99^°. Her face is somewhat flushed. 
She is again under the influence of quinia, having taken 
eight grains this morning. There is no enteric tenderness 
and no eruption. The spleen is somewhat enlarged, extend- 
ing, as it does, nearly an inch below the ribs. The area of 
liver dullness is but slightly increased below the margin of 
the ribs. There is a left, basic, systolic blood-murmur to 
be distinguished over the heart. What can I tell you with 
regard to the probable origin of this case ? It looked very 
much at flrst like a case of typhoid fever, but we soon dis- 
■missed that idea. Though plainly an instance of malarial 
fever, we can discover no previous history of malarial expo- 
-sure. Lately, indeed, the woman has been living in a part 
of the city which at some rare intervals furnishes cases of 
aiialarial infection. I cannot tell you positively concerning 



234 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the origin of the case ; it is doubtful to me. Therapeutic- 
ally the case has been of much clinical interest. It has- 
been an admirable and convincing proof of the value of 
quinine. Quinia, as we have just seen, does not act rapidly 
in this disease, as it does in remittent and intermittent 
fevers. Here the fever had to run a certain course, and 
when we suspended the quinia the fever phenomena reap- 
peared at once. This shows us, then, we must be careful to- 
continue the anti-periodic until we are sure that the last 
trace of malaria has disappeared from the system. The 
patient is again put upon the use of quinia, is again taking 
sixteen grains daily. We will keep up this amount for a 
few days longer, and then lessen the dose to eight grains 
daily. She is also taking ten-drop doses of muriatic acid, 
occasionally. Her tongue is moist again and rapidly clear- 
ing oft'. We are regulating her food very carefully, and 
when the bowels become over-costive we shall administer 
some mild purgative. I hope that with care and good treat-^ 
ment our patient will soon be all right again. 



Treatment of Uterine Disease. 

We take the following from an excellent article by Dr. 
Joseph H. Warren, in the Virginia Medical Monthly for 
December, 1880: 

In an enlargement of the uterus and softening of the 
surrounding tissues, with a highly dilatable external and 
internal os, attended with or without ulceration, frequently 
discharging a leucosanguinous secretion, loaded with semi- 
purulent mucus, often off'ensive, and creamy in consistency. 
To this large variety of cases, I find the following formula 
gives me great satisfaction in its results ; in most cases, a- 
decided relief from the very beginning of its application: 

Jfc Ether, sulph., 1 ounce. 

Tine, lodlni, 1 ounce. 

Glycerinae, 6 drachms. 

Acldl carbolic! glacerialis, 4 drachms, 

lodlnl, lU drachms. 
Morphlae sulph., 2 grains. Mix. 

This mixture I apply in the following manner : Taking 
a bit of absorbent cotton and passing it through a vermicu- 
lar pointed probe, I then dip this probe and cotton into the: 



Periscope. 235 

mixture and pass it up to the fundus of the uterus. By the 
revolving motion of the point of the probe, the medication 
is thoroughly applied to the whole interior of the uterus. 
In this manner, we accomplish what could not very well be 
done with the ordinary soft camel-hair brush ; and should 
the internal os be not always easily dilatable, the peculiar 
form of this instrument, together with the cotton, acts as a 
dilator to overcome the slight contraction. The organ, 
while undergoing this operation, should be seized with a 
slender tenaculum at the anterior lip, and held while the 
medication is applied. 

It will be surprising what a vast quantity of cases, as we 
usually see them, will yield to this treatment when the 
application is made once every six or eight days. While 
undergoing these applications great benefit will be derived 
from the following tonic: 

^ Tinct. ferri chlorid., 3 drachms. 

Acidi phosphor, dilutl, 6 drachms. 

Quinias bisulph., V-A drachms. 
Malt, 10 ounces. 

M. Sig. One teaspoonful three times a day, after meals. 

In addition to this, an irrigation of the parts should be 
resorted to every night with hot water, or hot water con- 
taining 4 ounces of sodic chloride to every gallon of water. 
This salt and water should be applied with a fountain 
syringe, or with an extemporaneous syringe made of a 
bucket, in the bottom of which is an opening for the attach- 
ment of a rubber tube, on the distal end of which is to be 
secured the beak of a female syringe. The centre hole of 
this beak must always be plugged in such cases, as other- 
wise uterine colic may result from a stream of water, passing 
direct into the uterus. Or, the apparatus of Dr. C. H. 
Munson, of New York, will be found convenient for irriga- 
tion; it is simple and efl:ective. 



Pilocarpin in Diphtheria, 

The effect of pilocarpin in diphtheria is, according to 
various German writers, most admirable. Dr. Guttman 
{Allg. Med, Zeit, October 9th) says, that given internally a 
free salivary discharge is established, by which the diph- 
theritic membranes are softened and dissolved ; the inflam- 
matory phenomena rapidly lessen and disappear ; and the 
condition of the patient is speedily improved. Out of 
sixty-six cases, many of them severe, he did not lose one, and 
they all were cured in from twenty-four hours to three 
days ! 



236 Peoria Medical Monthly, 



Union of Tendons. 

Dr. Charles Baum reports a case occurring in the prac- 
tice of Dr. D. Hayes Agnew, which illustrates the readiness 
with which tendons unite. The patient's hand was struck 
on its dorsal surface by a circular saw. The stroke divided 
all the tissues, and almost completely severed the meta- 
carpal bones, except that of the thumb, just one and a half 
inches from the wrist-joint. The distal ends of the tendons 
of the extensor communis digitorum were lying at the bot- 
tom of the wound much lacerated. The proximal ends 
were retracted to such an extent as not to be visible. Each 
retracted tendon was brought down by passing a pair of 
forceps along the sheath to the extent of three-quarters of 
an inch. A fine carbolized catgut suture was passed, first, 
through the centres and through the sheaths of the divided 
tendons, and their ends brought well into apposition. 
Immediately after the sutures were fastened, the patient 
was able to extend his fingers almost as well as before the 
accident. The patient made a good recovery. The power 
of extension is free and strong. He can pick up a pin with 
ease; his fingers have become as supple as ever. He has 
long ago resumed work, and experiences no restraint in the 
muscular action of his fingers. — Philadelphia Medical Times. 



Ergotine in Prolapsus Ani. 

A boy five years of age came under my treatment, suf- 
fering from prolapsus ani of two years' standing. The gut 
came out to the extent of two and a half inches after each 
passage. My treatment at first was of the routine kind — 
cold aft'usions, cauterizations with nitrate of silver, tincture 
of iron, etc. The bowel persisted in coming down at 
every passage. As a last resort, I tried an ergotine sup- 
pository : 



^ Ergotine, 


2 gr. 


But. cocoa, 


q,s. 


M. Ft. suppos., 


No. 1. 


One after each passage. 





The efifect of the remedy has been magical, as after the 
use of a few of the suppositories, there has been no return 
of the condition, and the case is cured. — San Francisco West- 
ern Lancet. 



Therapeutic J^otes. 



237 



hemfientiii ,^ote§. 



VENEREAL WARTS. I 

Equal parts of burnt alum and 
tannin sprinkled in powder upon 
venereal warts will dessicate 
them, and they can be rubbed 
off in a few days. — Med. Rec. 

PILLS IN HEMICRANIA (DEBOUT). 
^ Quiniae sulph., 1 gr. 

Digitalis pulv., 21 gr. 

Syrupi simp., q. s. M. 

Ut flat pil. No. 30. 

One at bed time for three 
months.— Med. and Surg. Rep. 

TUBERCULOUS LARYNGITIS. 

Where there is great pain and 
dysphagia, the following mix- 
ture applied with a laryngeal 
brush, is recommended by Dr. 
E. Fletcher Ingalls : 



9-' Morphiae sulph., 
Tannin, 
Acid, carbolic, 
Glycerin., 



4gr. 

30 gr. 
20 gr. 
loz. M. 

Med. Record. 



ULCERATION OF THE CORNEA. 

After administering quinine in 
decided doses, Dr. Kamsdell 
made use of the following local 
application, with prompt and 
very gratifying effects : 

^ Atropiae sulph., 
Aquae rosae, 
Quiniae sulph., 
Acid, sulph. dil.. 



3oz. 
2gr. 
3 q. s. M. 

Ft. sol. Sig. Drop into the 
eyes every three hours. — Louis- 
ville Med. Herald. 

LOCAL APPLICATION IN DIPH- 
THERIA. 

Jpk Glycerinae V, oz. 

Tr. lodlnii, I4 dr. 

Acid, salicylic!, 20 grs. M. 

This should be applied freely, 
with a large camel's hair brush, 
morning and evening, carefully 
covering the whole of the diph- 
theritic surface with it. — Med. 
and Surg. Rep. 

IRRITABLE BLADDER. 

The following formula has 
been used many times with suc- 



cess in cases where direct pres- 
sure by an enlarged uterus or a 
general pelvic congestion alone 
suggested the cause : 



Acidi benzoic!, 
Sodae biborat., 
Aq. cinnamoni, 



2 dr. 

3 dr. 
60Z. 



M. 



Sig. A tablespoonful every 
two hours till relieved. — Chicago 
Medical Review. 

ULCERATING SURFACES AND 
ABSCESSES. 

To stimulate healthy granula- 
tions the following combination 
is usually successful : 



9; Hydrargyri, 
Iodoform!, 
Camphorae, 
Balsam Peru, 



20 gr. 
30 gr. 

2 dr. 

2 oz. M. 



Sig. After thoroughly wash- 
ing the part with carbolized 
water, apply to the surface or in- 
ject into the abscess. — Med. Re- 
view. 

FRESH COLD IN THE HEAD. 

For fresh cold in the head ac- 
companied with obstructions in 
the nasal passages : 

^ Carbolic acid., 1 dr. 

Absolute alcohol, 2 dr. 

Caustic sol. of ammon., 1 dr. 

Aq. dislillat., 3 dr. M. 

Make a cone of writing paper, 
put a small piece of cotton in it, 
drop on the cotton ten drops of 
the mixture and inhale till all 
is evaporated. Repeat every two 
hours until relieved. — Southern 
Med. Record. 

FOR PAINFUL HEMORRHOIDS. 



J^ fix. belladonnae. 
Iodoform!, 
Plumbi acetas, 
Vaselini, 



2 dr. 
Idr. 
3^oz. 
1 oz. M. 



Apply three or four times 
daily. The tumors should be 
bathed in cold water just before 
each application, and the bowels 
kept freely open with a gentle 
purgative. — Louisville Med. Re- 
cord. 



238 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Convention of Illinois Pharmacists. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE ILL. STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



[Special Keport for the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

This convention met at Springfield on the 7th and 8th 
of December, in the Senate Chamber. The meeting was 
called to order by W. W. Marmon, of Bloomington, and 
Mr. George Buck elected chairman pro tem., and Frank 
Fleurj, of Springfield, Secretary. An address of welcome 
was delivered by the Mayor of Springfield, after which the 
chair appointed the following Committee on Permanent 
Organization : R. H. Cowdry, Chicago, F. C. Bourscheidt, 
Peoria, J. J. Schubert, Kankakee, A. R. Greenwood, 
LaSalle, .J. McCann, Normal. The committee immedi- 
ately retired, and drew up a constitution and by-laws^ 
which were reported to the convention in the afternoon, 
considered section by section and finally adopted as a 
whole. 

The chair then appointed the following Committee on 
Permanent Officers : J. E. Espey, Bloomington, H. Schroe- 
der, Quincy, J. W. Day, Clinton, H. S. Maynard, Chicago, 
and E. N. Dodds, Springfield. The committed reported 
the following, and they were duly elected : 

President — W. W. Marmon, Bloomington. 

Vice-Presidents — George Buck, Chicago, F. C. Bour- 
scheidt, Peoria, P. F. N'ichols, Pana. 

Secretary — Frank Fleury, Springfield. 

Treasurer — Henry Smith, Decatur. 

Executive Committee — A. G. Vogler, Chicago, J. J. 
Schubert, Kankakee, Louis Van Patten, St. Charles. 

Committee on Legislation — George Buck, Chicago, F. 
C. Bourscheidt, Peoria, T. W. Harts, Springfield, G. T. 
Englehart, Chicago. The President and Secretary were by 
motion added to the committee. 

Governor Cullom, who was present, then addressed the 
convention. He expressed it as his opinion that the lives 
and health of the people were more in the hands of the 
druggist than the physician, and he hoped that they would 
be able to get proper legislation. 

The presiding officer thanked the Governor, explained 
the object of the convention, and hoped that the needed 



Society Transactions. 239 



legislation could be secured at the approaching session of 
the Legislature. 

The convention then proceeded to the consideration of 
a lengthy "pharmacy act" to be presented to the Legisla- 
ture. The act prohibits anybody but a registered pharma- 
cist from dispensing drugs, medicines or poisons, prescribes 
the qualifications of pharmacists, looks to the appointment 
of a Board of Pharmacy by the Governor, and prescribes 
penalties for the adulteration of drugs, medicines, &c. This 
act, however, shall not apply to pharmacists who are in 
business at the time of its becoming a law, provided they 
shall ree-ister their names within six months from that date. 



SECOND DAT. 

The President announced the following committee to- 
select the place of holding the next annual meeting of the 
Association : F. C. Bourscheidt, Peoria, T. E. Fell,Bloom- 
ington, A. G. Yogler, Chicago. They afterwards reported 
in favor of Peoria, and named the 2d Tuesday in Novem- 
ber, 1881. The report was adopted. 

One section of the pharmacy bill before mentioned pro- 
vides that the State Pharmaceutical Association shall, upon 
the taking effect of this act, submit to the Governor the 
names of ten pharmacists, who have had at least ten years 
experience and are doing business within the state, from 
which number the Governor shall, without unnecessary 
delay, appoint five persons, who shall constitute the Board 
of Pharmacy of the State of Illinois. The following were 
selected as the persons from whom the Governor shall 
make his appointments, if the bill shall become a law : H. 
Schroeder, Quincy, J. E. Espey, Bloomington, A. R. Green- 
wood, La Salle, F. C. Bourscheidt, Peoria, George Buck, 
Chicago, C. W. Day, Allendale, E. Marsh, Alton, W. 
Kempff, Belleville, E. B. Stuart, Chicago, Frank Fleury, 
Springfield. 

The following additional committees were appointed : 

Committee on Pharmacy and Queries — A. G. Yogler^ 
Chicago; T. E. Fell, Bloomington, A. V. T. Gilbert, Mon- 
mouth. 

Committee on Trade Interests — A. R. Greenwood, La 
Salle, J. A. Caldwell, Pontiac, R. N. Dodds, Springfield.^ 

Delegation to the National Association at Kansas City 
next year — A. R. Greenwood, La Salle, J. J. Pierron, Jr.>. 



.-240 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Lincoln, R. W. Diller, Springfield, M. W. Borland, Chicago, 
and A. Finke, E. St. Louis. 

The Association then passed a vote of thanks to Gov- 
ernor Cullom and Mayor Irwin for their addresses, to Colo- 
nel G. H. Harlow for the use of the Senate Chamber, to 
Vice-President George Buck, who presided, to the drug- 
gists of Springfield, to F. Fleurj, the Secretary, and to M. 
B. Church, for courtesies. 

Other business not of general interest was then trans- 
-acted, and the Association adjourned to meet again at 
Peoria, the 2d Tuesday in November, 1881. 



Proceedings of the Jasper County Medical Association. 

Friday, Dec. 3d, 1880. 

The Association came to order with the President, Dr. 
S. R. Youngman, in the chair. 

Members present : Drs. S. R. Youngman, James Picquet, 
James Larrabee, IST. S. Clark, George Shamhart, J. H. 
Maxwell, Z. Allen, Harmon Stevens and A. B. Faller. 

After the usual preliminary business, Dr. Maxwell was 
called upon to open the discussion. The Doctor being very 
iDusy during the epidemic of measles that has invaded our 
community since last meeting, excused himself, and intro- 
duced the subject of measles and the complications that 
occurred during our late trial with it. A spirited discus- 
sion followed, and all present participated. After this the 
Association adjourned until the next regular meeting 
.(January 7th, 1881), when the discussion on pneumonia 
ivill be taken up. 

A. B. Faller, Secretary. 



Announcement. 



The annual meeting of the Illinois State Board of Health 
Tvill be held at Springfield, January 12th, 1881. 

John H. Rauch, 

Secretary. 



"We invite secretaries of district or county medical 
eocieties to send us short synoptical reports of their pro- 
ceedings, for publication; also of any interesting papers or 
reports read before the societies. 



BooTc Jfotices. 241 



]aoh t^atice^. 



[For the Feoria Medical Monthly.] 

'*Our Homes." 

This is the title of the IX. in the series of American- 
Health Primers. It is written by Henry Hartshorne, M, 
D., formerly Professor of Hygiene in the University of 
Pennsylvania. While publishing the Herald of Health we 
noticed the successive numbers of this series, and most of 
them favorably. The series is now complete, and it gives 
me pleasure, Mr. Editor, to commend the whole series to 
the favorable consideration of your readers. They have 
been prepared for the people with a view of educating the- 
masses in the principles of sanitary science, and we think 
them eminently adapted to this purpose. After careful 
reading, we believe that this Mnth is among the very best 
of the series. The author discusses the question, " How 
shall we have Healthy Homes ?" under ten different heads : 

First — " Situation." The site of a dwelling should be 
dry, and not exposed to malaria, with a southern exposure. 

Second — Construction. " A frame house having double 
walls, with stone or brick foundations, good plastering, and 
tightly jointed timbers, may be made as little permeable 
by air as it is desirable for any house to be." " Nothing is 
more important in the construction of a house than that its 
foundations shall be protected from dampness." The de- 
tails given by the author are very appropriate and interest- 
ing. It will pay any one who contemplates building to 
consider them. 

Third — Light. Here we have presented briefly the im- 
portance of light in relation to certain diseases, and the 
mistake, made by so many, of crowding the yard with 
shrubs and trees that shut out the light and prevent the 
free circulation of air. 

Fourth — Warmth. Here we have in brief a history of 
warming appliances, of which there have been many. 
Without giving very special preference to any, the author 
says, " it is possible that the best way of all, (scarcely any 
where as yet tried,) may be hereafter found to be, to heat 
steadily all the floors and walls of apartments by warmed 
air circulating beneath and around or through them.'.' 
This accords with our own conviction on this subject. 
"To this complexion must we come at last." In the April,. 



242 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

1880, number of the Herald of Health is suggested a method 
of warming the floor, which I think will commend itself as 
practicable and safe, and one, whi<;h I doubt not, will, with 
more or less modifications, come into use, since the pre- 
vailing " stove," and the more expensive furnaces as now- 
built, are vexatiously unsatisfactory. 

Fifth — Ventilation. This topic naturally and closely 
follows that of warmth, for heating and ventilation must, 
I believe, go together in any system that will respond to 
the wants of people in northern latitudes. I regret that 
space will not permit me to give even a synopsis of these 
two chapters. I think any one attempting to build a 
"healthy home" will be benefited by the suggestions 
made. In ventilation, the objects to be aimed at are thus 
stated : (1) To move uniformly through a building the re- 
quired amount of pure fresh air. (2) Duly to distribute 
this air to the difterent apartments in the house. (3) Prop- 
erly to diffuse it in each room. (4) To remove the vitiated 
air from every room in the building. (5) To warm the air 
sufficiently in winter. (6) To supply it with an appropriate 
amount of moisture. 

Sixth — Water Supply. The various sources whence 
water is obtained for drinking and domestic uses, and the 
dangers to health arising from the use of impure water are 
set forth in attractive colors. The suggestions as to filters 
will prove useful. 

Seventh. "Drainage" next follows through thirty 
pages. The subject of drains and traps, with their too 
frequent defects and dangers, is quite fully discussed, and 
the most recent discoveries in relation to sewerage and 
plumbing set forth. 

Eighth — Disinfection. The author holds thdit fresh pure 
air is the best of all disinfectants, which, with thorough 
cleanliness, prevents all occasion for processes of correc- 
tion. He names the most serviceable disinfectants, and 
instructs how to use them — just what a great many people 
do not know. 

Ninth and Tenth — Under the heads of Pojmlation and 
Workhifjmen's Homes, he discusses the effect of crowding 
upon health, and sets forth many interesting facts. I quote 
the following from his introduction: "How we are to live, 
then, not as wanderers of the forest, nor yet as hermits, but 
in society, without abridging our lives and multiplying the 
'ills that flesh is heir to,' is the question. The imperfec- 



Book J{otices. 243 



tion of the manner in which this question has been so far 
generally answered, may be judged of by a late account 
given by the eminent statistician, Dr. Farr, of the propor- 
tion between population-density and mortality in 619 
districts of England and Wales from 1861 to 1870. In 7 
groups of these districts (excluding London) the number of 
persons to a square mile is, respectively, 166, 186, 379, 
1,178, 4,499, 12,351, 63,823. The annual mortality for each 
1,000 inhabitants in the same districts is 17, 19, 22, 25, 28, 
32 and 39. In other words, according to these results, the 
nearer people live to each other, the shorter their lives. 

In 53 districts the average proximity of residents is 147 
yards, and the mean duration of life is 51 years. In 345 
districts the proximity is 139 yards, and the mean length of 
life 45 years. In 137 districts the proximity is 97 yards, 
and the length of life 40 years. In 47 districts the prox- 
imity is 46 yards and life- duration 35 years. In 9 districts 
with an average proximity of 28 yards, the mean duration 
of life is 32 years. In Manchester the proximity is 17 yards 
and the mean length of life 29 years. In Liverpool the 
proximity reaches the maximum of 7 yards, and the dura- 
tion of life, its minimum average, 26 years." 

E. W. Gray, M. D. 

A Treatise on the Medical and Surgical Diseases of 
"Women, by Morton Monroe Eaton, M.D., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

We are of course unable in many instances to appreciate 
the value of his medical treatment of the different diseases 
he discusses ; but their history, etiology, pathology, symp- 
tomatology and diagnosis, indicate a degree of familiarity 
with those diseases which can only be the result of long and 
painstaking study and observation, and a perfect familiarity 
with their literature. The volume is unusually complete in 
the number of subjects which it embraces, scarcely any 
important disease being left unnoticed. The surgical 
department of the work contains many excellent practical 
suggestions, hints and cautions which the busy practitioner 
of any SQhool will appreciate and profit by. His chapter on 
instruments is very full, instructive and discriminating, and 
will be of much utility to the general practitioner. The 
work is profusely and correctly illustrated, thereby adding 
much to its practical value. It contains 780 pages, the 
letter press is large and beautiful, and the paper white and 
of excellent quality. It also contains a very full and excel- 
lently arranged index. The book will form a useful addi- 
tion to every medical library. J. M. 



244 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

All communications must be addressed to 

Thos. M. McHvaine, A. M., Publisher, 

204 South-JeflFerson Street, PEOBIA, ILL. 



ditarml fje^^rtment 



liegislation Regulating the Practice of Medicine in Illinois* 

The acts to regulate the practice of medicine, and to 
create a State Board of Health, have now been in force 
about three years and a half. This is a sufficient length of 
time for them to have become fully understood and duly 
appreciated both by the profession and the public; also for 
the Board to have completed the necessarily large amount 
of extra work incident to beginning its labors, and now be 
prepared to devote more time to the compelling of stricter 
obedience to these laws. There can be no doubt but that 
these acts have worked a vast amount of good, still for 
various reasons they were, and are, very defective. They 
were in a measure, pioneer laws, there being no successfully 
working precedents upon which to base them. There was 
considerable opposition on the part of the profession ; there 
was a strong prejudice against them manifested by the pub- 
lic, and there was the bitter opposition of all those parties 
whose previous license would be curtailed. 

All of these conditions, however, are now modified, and 
the time has come when amendments must be made and 
the weak places strengthened, or other states, taking warn- 
ing from our defects, will so frame their laws as to leave u& 
as far in the rear as we formerly were in the van. What 
these amendments shall be, it is not our intention at this 
time to consider, but we call upon the State Board and all 
Medical Societies to urge the matter upon the Legislature 
until the necessary changes are made. Until this is accom- 
plished, however, there is abundant opportunity for 
improvement under the present law. Quackery and char- 
latanism, driven for a time from the state or forced to 
remain concealed, again begin to show themselves in our 
cities, and the traveling cure-all to announce his monthly 
visit at our hotels. 



Editorial Department. 245 

We do not believe that one in fifty of these quacks are 
duly authorized to practice, and the profession has a right 
to demand their suppression. There are several reasons 
for this revival of quackery. When the laws first went 
into efi'ect many voluntarily went into other states, others 
were brought to justice by the Board, while others, we sus- 
pect, either made fraudulent representations or quietly 
retired for a time to wait until the excitement had blown 
over. Now they are beginning to return, thinking (and it 
would certainly seem correctly) that they will be permitted 
to resume their business unmolested. Again, physicians 
are for the most part ignorant of the modes of legal proce- 
dure necessary to bring the offenders to justice, and they 
are also uncertain as to how much support they will receive 
from the State's Attorneys or the Board of Health. 

Many of the newspapers are largely subsidized by these 
quacks in the way of advertisements, and their influence is 
cast in favor of their patrons and against the public weal. 

We think much good would be accomplished if the 
Board of Health would issue a pamphlet to the proper ofl5- 
cers of the courts, and medical societies, containing these 
laws in full ; also a digest of all cases tried, and decisions 
made under them, so that physicians especially may know 
what has been done, and the proper manner in which to 
undertake similar cases. This pamphlet might also contain 
the opinion of the Attorney General on the subject of these 
laws, as to their capabilities and what construction can be 
placed upon them. We hope the good that has been gained 
will not be allowed to be lost by any negligence or luke- 
warmness either on the part of the profession or the State 
Board of Health, and we further hope that the profession 
and Board will allow no opportunity to pass unimproved 
which has for its ofeject the advancement of the standing of 
the profession and the welfare of the public. 



A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

To whoever may read this we heartily wish a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

To those who have favored us with a subscription, our 
thanks for their aid and appreciation is cordially given. 
You have encouraged us to press onwards in our desire to 
be of benefit to the profession, and by your assistance we 
know that we have succeeded far beyond our most sanguine 
expectations. To those who are not subscribers we extend 



246 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

the same cordial greeting, and hope that you will see your 
way clear to become a subscriber. Our price is very low, 
and we claim to give as live and practical a medical journal 
as is published. 

Try ue, and we are sure that you will consider your 
money well expended. We could publish a long list of 
flattering letters from men who rank high in the profession 
throughout the West, but we prefer that our merits should 
speak to each one for themselves. We shall again enlarge 
our size as soon as our subscription list will warrant, for 
we aim to give the largest and best dollar monthly pub- 
lished. 

Convention of Illinois Pharmacists. 

We print elsewhere an abstract of the proceedings of 
the meeting of druggists. This is a good movement, and 
one that will be heartily endorsed by the medical profes- 
sion. With men of better and a more liberal education 
behind the dispensing counters, there will be less cause for 
the difl'erences which now exist between physicians and 
druggists, and the abuses which have crept into the drug 
business will correct themselves. We do not believe the 
Governor made such a statement as is attributed to him by 
our reporter, on the responsibilities of pharmacists, or if he 
did it was a pretty stiff piece of " taffy." We hope the 
pharmacists will obtain the legislative aid they seek. 

Readers will find an interesting article on page 221, on 
State Medicine, by Dr. C. T. Orner, of Saybrook, 111., (not 
O. T. Orne, as it appears in the heading). It is on a topic 
as important to physicians as any in medicine, including 
drainage and kindred hygenic topics, is receiving more at- 
tention every year, and there is no field oftering more 
inducements for original thought and investigation. We 
would be glad to hear from others on this subject. 

Many cases of trichiniasis are "reported in the papers 
throughout the country. As the only safe measure to be 
relied upon, physicians should circulate as widely as possi- 
ble the absolute necessity of cooking all pork thoroughly. 
It should be heated to a temperature of at least 212° Fahr. 
If any of our readers have had any experience in the treat- 
ment of this disease, we would be glad to hear from them, 
as any contribution to the therapeutics of this, as yet, not 
satisfactorily understood disease will be eagerly read by the 
profession. 



Advertisements. 




Dr. MclNTOSH'S 

NATURAXi 




No instrument has ever been placed before the medical profession which has given such uni- 
versal satisfaction. The combination is such that the physician is able to meet every indication 
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The Abdominal Supporter is a broad morocco leather belt with elastic straps to buckle 
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is lighter than metal. It will answer for all cases of Anteversion, Retroversions, or any Flex- 
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OR. M'iNTOSH'S NATURAL UTERINE SUPPORTER COMPANY, 

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Our valuable pamphlet '"Some Practical Facts about Displacements of the Womb," will be 
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DR. MCINTOSH'S 

GalfaiicaDflFaraflic Battery. 

This celebrated Battery combines both the Galvanic 
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Any strength or intensity desired can be obtained for 
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etc., free on application. 

Mcintosh galvanic belt and battery go., 

Kos. 19% and 194r Jackson St., CHICAGO, IliLi. 




Advertisements. 



PEORIA, PEilN & JACKSONVILLE RAILWAY, 

THE BOUTE TO TAKE FOR 

Pekin, Havana, 

Springfield, Virginia, 

Beardsto-wn, Jacksonville, 

Alton, Qulncy, Hannibal,. 

O^ST. L0UIS^5=O 

And all Points South and South-west, 
THE FAVORITE ROUTE TO 

Leavenworth, Atchison, St. Joseph, 

Lawrence, Topeka, Fort Scott, 

Baxter Springs, Newton, "Wichita^ 

Denver, Pueblo, Canon City, Leadville, 

And all points in KANSAS and COLORADO. 

GEORGE SKINNER, CHAS. MACABE, 

Manager. General Ticket Agent.^ 




DR. L D. M'INTOSH'S 

Electric or GalTaiic Bell 



If this new combination could be seen and tested by the medical profession, 
few. If any, words would be needed from us in its favor, for it combines utility 
with simplicity in such perfection that seeing it is convincing proof of its great 
value. The medical profession to-day acknowledge, almost universally, Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

This combination is composed of sixteen cells, placed in pockets on a belt. 
Each cell is made of hard vulcanized rubber, lined with a copper cell, which 
constitutes the negative plate. The rubber coating perfectly insulates each cell. 
The positive plates are of zinc, wrapped in a porous material to absorb the ex- 
citing fluid, and prevent contact with the copper, and permit the current to pass 
from the copper to the zinc. 

Thus the cells are charged without wetting the belt, and the discomfort fol- 
lowing to the patient. A wire is soldered to each zinc plate, which connects 
with the copper cell by entering a tube on its side, thus rendering the belt 
pliable. 

The Mcintosh Electric Belt is superior to all others for the following reasons: 

It is composed of sixteen cells— thus giving a powerful current. A current 
selector is so arranged that one or more cells can be used at pleasure. There is 
not anything irritating about the Belt, as is the case with all other contrivances 
where the metal used is wet with weak acids and placed next to the skin. The 
electrodes are pieces of metal covered similar to ordinary battery electrodes, 
and connected with the cells by connecting cords. By this arrangement, a cur- 
rent from the Belt can be applied to produce a general or local effect. 

Physicians who have used this Belt in their practice do not hesitate to re- 
commend it to the profession. 

PRICE, $10.00; WITH SUSPENSORY, 812 50. 

Our pamphlet on Medical Electricity sent free on application. Address, 

McIMOSH GALVANIC BELT AND BATTERY COMPANY, 192 and 194 Jackson St., Chicago. DL 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Mesicaij Monthlt. 



Advertisements. 



—OF— 

The Peoria Medical Monthly. 

The wonderful success which this Journal has met in a few months is a suffi- 
cient proof of its value and popularity. It has been enlarged twice within five 
months, and will again be enlarged as soon as its patronage warrants. We pro- 

?>ose to make this Journal indispensable to Western Practitioners, who, as aot- 
ve, progressive men, see it is to their advantage and personal benefit to support 
a home Journal of this kind. 

Original Communications.— The main feature is intended to be the origi- 
nal communications. We have articles for future numbers from some of the 
most able writers in the profession, among whom we may name Dr. Wm. 
-Goodell and Dr. Wm. Pepper, of Philadelphia ; Dr. Warren, and others. But we 
especially desire short, practical articles from our subscribers. An interchange 
of opinion beiag what is intended. 

Translations- Made expressly for this Journal will appear regularly from 
Foreign Journals. 

Clinical and Didactic Lkctttres.— We are making arrangements where- 
by we will be regularly supplied each month with Clinical and Didactic Lectures 
by experienced teachers. 

Therapeutic Notes.— Short, compact modes of treatment, and tried and ap- 
proved formulee from every available source, will make this department of un- 
usual interest to readers. 

Medical News.— We will keep our readers posted on all matters of interest , 
reports of societies throughout the State, etc., etc. 

SXJBSCItlBE A.T OIVCE. 

Fifty-Xwo Fages. 

Now is the time to get the largest amount of good reading for the least 
money. We will for a short time send to subscribers the back numbers, begin- 
ning at May, and the Journal for one year from date of subscription, for 

OIVE DOLLAR. 

As the number we have on hand is limited, this offer will only be open for a 
limited time. You will get nineteen numbers containing over five hundred 
pages, for only ONE DOLLAR. Take as many other Journals as you please, but 
you cannot afford to omit the Peoria Medical Monthly. 

A few extracts from letters received will show what is thought of it by the 
■profession : 

Among the numerous Medical Journals which are sent to me, there is none brighter or 
more creditable to its authors than the Peoeia Medical Monthly. I hare read it with pleas- 
ure, for it shows that you are all alive in Peoria. Writing makes men think, and the more the 
opportunities for writing the greater the amount of thinking. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, M. D., 
Chicago, IlL, 188Q. Prof. Physiology and Nervotts Diseases, Bush. M«d, OoL 

I like your Journal and will devote some of my time to its advancement. 

St. Joseph, Mo., 1880. A. V. BANES, M. D. 

I have received your Journal and am well pleased with it. 

Lincoln, IlL, 18S0. L. L. LEEDS, M. D. 

The number just received is worth the whole subscription. I enclose one dollar, and will 
^try and get you some subscribers^ J. B. VEITCH, Grafton, Jersey C!o., 111. 

If the number I have received is a specimen of what it will continue to be, it will be valu- 
able indeed. C. F. STBINGEK, M. D., Aurora, Kane Co., lU. 

I have received your Journal and like ita arrangement and style. Think it worth the 
aooney, and enclose the amount W. H. GITHENS, M. D., Hamilton. IlL 

I am pleased with your Journal, and believe it should be patronized by all Western Physi- 
'«ian8. I hope it will meet with the approval of every Physician in Illinois. 

H. E. W. BARNES, M. D. 

Ji^Subscribe at once and you wiU be pleased with it. 

-Iddrees all communications to THOS. M. MclLVAINE, 

204 South Jefferson Street, PEOBIA, ILIj. 



A dvertisements. 



F. O. BOTJK-SOHEinDT 

ANALYTICAL CliST. 



Special attention given to Criminal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters, 
Milk, Urine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, III.. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Correspondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given.. 




Prices witMn the Reacli Of All. 

Call on ns or send for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 



Comstock& Avery. 



Manufacturers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 



I' 




f 



Call the attention of Physiciana 
to their 



FATlSf CIAIE 



It is the nicest chair in the market for 
the Office, Library or Parlor. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 




In anawerlQg advertisementB, mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



OAK LAWN BETBEAT FOB THE INSANE ! 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



THIS INSTITUTION, founded by its present pro- 
prietor, is now in its ninth year of successful 
operation. Possessed of every conceivable advantage 
in location, site, retirement, and building arrange- 
ments — all carefully studied from the beginning — it 
is prepared to carry into effect the most advanced 
ideas in the treatment of the insane. It especially 
adapts itself to the care of cases of a chronic nature, 
where a home with something of permanency is an 
object. Favoring circumstances permit of lower rates 
of charge than can possibly be afforded in any other 
institution so supported. The proprietor presents his 
grateful acknowledgements to the medical profession 
for the countenance it has received. 

ANDREW McFARLAND, M. D., 

October, 1880. Sole Proprietor. 

CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Drucrqists & Chemists, 



^^ ^^ And. Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 
PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 
Prescriptions Carefully Connpounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

503 South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Prescription Druggists, 

520 nyCA-IlsT STI^E;E!T, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

N. B.— A full line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 

In answering advertisements mention the Pbobia Medicaij MonthIiT. 



10 



Advertisements. 



COLBURN, BIRKS i CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 



-AND DEALERS IN- 



^uf ^idkl Iri^tf tLii\ei\t^ 




ATOMIZERS, 



xALL VARIETIES. 



Electro - Magnetic Machines, 

CRUTCHES, 




PLAIN AND PADDED ARM PIECES. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our Instrument Catalogue for 1880 now ready for 

distribution. 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peokia Medical MonthiiT. 



Advertisements. 



11 



Fever Thermometers 



Four and Five-inch, Self-Registering, Hicks' Patent 
Lens Front, in Boxwood Case. 





FOWLER'S H. R. PESSARIES 




Celluloid Cylindrical Speculum, 

CELLULOID BI-VALVE SPECULUM, 

CELLULOID HYPODERMIC SYMNGES, 

CELLULOID CATHETERS AND BOUGIES. 



Our Prices "will be found low for First Quality 
Goods. 

Write for Quotations before buying. 

COLBDRN, BiRKS & CO., PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



12 Advertisements. 



COMPARATIVE VALUE 



-OF- 



MALTINE AS A CONSTRUCTIVE. 



It has been clearly sho^vn by the most distinguished chemists in this 
country and Europe, 'tvho have made comparative analyses of MALTINB 
and Extracts of Malt that, quantitatively, MALTINE contains from tvro 
to three times the nutritive and digestive properties that are found in 
the best Extracts of Malt in the market. 

This fact has been amply demonstrated by the concurrent opinion of the 
most eminent medical authority in the world ■ and the practical experience of 
nearly the entire Medical Profession of the United States and Great Britain 
proves beyond question that MALTINE, as a Constructive, is by far the most 
valuable product yet presented for the consideration of scientific medical men. 

Being supplied at the same prices as the ordinary Extract of Malt, and con- 
taining' /u^ij/ double the quantity of Diastase and nutritive elements to be found in the 
best of them, it can be prescribed at less than one-half the expense. 

Extracts showing the value of Maltins in comparison with Extract of Malt, and as a Gotistruciive. 

In order to test the comparative merits of MALTINE and the various Ex- 
tracts of Malt in the market, I purchased from diflferent druggists samples of 
MALTINE and of the most frequently prescribed Extracts of Malt, and have 
subjected them to chemical analysis. 

As the result of these examinations, I find that MALTINE contains from 
half as much again to three times the quantity of Phosphates, and from three to 
fourteen times as much Disastase and other Albuminoids as any of the Extracts 
of Malt examined. Prof. Walter S. Hainks, M. D., 

Professor of Chem,istry and Toxicology, Rush Medical College, Chicago^ 

In comparison with the alcoholic Malt Extracts, your MALTINE is about 
ten times as valuable, as a flesh former; from five to ten times as valuable, as a 
heat producer ; and at least five times as valuable, as a starch digesting agent. 

Professor Attfield, F.C.S., 
Professor of Practical Chemistry to the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. 

MALTINE is superior in therapeutic and nutritive value to any Extract off 
Malt made from Barley alone, or to any preparation of one variety of grain. 

Prof. R. Ogdbn Doremus. 

In its superiority to the Extract of Mali prepared from Barley alone I consider it to- 
be all that is claimed for it, and prize it as a very valuable addition to the list of 
tonic and nutritive agents. C. H. Lewis, M. D., Jackson, Mich. 

The folloudng is an extract from a report of Wm. Porter, A.M., M.D., 8t. Louis, Mo. 

After a full trial of the diflTerent Oils, and Extract of Malt preparations, in 
both hospital and private practice, I find MALTINE most applicable to the 
largest number of patients, and superior to any remedy of its class. 

Prof. L. P. Vandkll, in Louisville Medical iV^ews, says : — MALTINE de- 
serves to stand in the front rank of the constructives ; and the constructives, by 
their preventive, corrective and curative power, are probably the most widely 
useful therapeutical agents that we possess. 

Ann Arbor, Mich., Sept. 25th, 1880. 
An Increasing experience in the use of MALTINE confirms my former 
opinion as to its great therapeutic value, and I should hardly know how to get 
along without it. E. 8. Demster, M. D., 

I'rof. Obstet. and hit. Worn, and Children, University of Midi., and in Dartmouth Oolleg& 

Id answering advertisements, mention the Pboria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements, IS 



During the Past Tear 

"We placed Maltine and several of its compounds in the- 
hands of one hundred leading Physicians of the United* 
States, Europe, Australia and India -with a request that they" 
thoroughly test it in comparison -w^ith other remedies ■w^hich; 
are generally used as constructives in Pulmonary Phthisis 
and other 'wrasting diseases. 

From the tone of the seventy reports already received, fifteen of whicb 
are upon comparative tests with the principal Extracts of Malt in the market^ 
we are fully justified in making the following claims, viz : 

FIRST : —That Maltine (plain) increases weight and^ 
strength far more rapidly than Cod Liver Oid 
or other nutritive agents. 

SECOJ^D:—That Maltine, Maltine with Peptones^ 
and Maltine with Pepsin and Pancreatine- 
rapidly correct imperfect digestion and mal- 
nutrition in wasting diseases. 

THIRD : — That Maltine is the most important con- 
structive agent now Jcnown to the Medical Pro- 
fession in Pulmonary Phthisis. 

FOURTH: — That Maltine causes an increase in 
weight and strength one and a half to three- 
ti-m^es greater than any of the Extracts of Malt.* 
LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. MALTINE with Iodides. 

MALTINE with Hops. • MALTINE with Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINE with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil. MALTINE with Phosphates Iron and Quinia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil & Iodide of Iron. MALTINE with Phos. Iron, Quinia & Strychnia.. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE WINE. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphorus. MALTINE WINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Hypophosphites. MALTO-TERBINE. 

* Maltine is a concentrated extract of malted Barley, Wheat and Oats. In its- 
preparation we employ not to exceed 150 deg. Fahr., thereby retaining all the nu- 
tritive and digestive agents unimpaired. Extracts of Malt are made from Barley 
alone, by the German process which directs that the mash be heated to 212 deg. 
Fahr., thereby coagulating the Albuminoids and almost wholly destroying the- 
starch digestive principle, Diastase. 

-^*"We will forward gratuitously a $1.00 bottle of any of the above prepara- 
tions upon payment of the expressage. Address 

REED & CARNRICK, 

Laboratory: » 196 Fulton Street, 

Yonkers on the Hudson- f New TTork.. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Mbdical Monthly. 



14 



AdvertiseTnents. 



MALTOPEPSINE-TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



The experience we have had of many years as Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
has brought us more or less In regular csntact with the medical profession and 
its wants, and has afforded us advantages for experiment, study and practical 
♦development, which have engaged our attention in perfecting new and more effi- 
cacious agents for physicians' use in the control, subjection, treatment and cure 
of diseases, and we trust the Medical Profession will feel assured that in no in- 
stance shall we solicit their attention, except we have some production worthy 
of their highest consideration and confidence. 

We would respectfully call your attention to our new preparation Maltopep- 
Bine, which we regard a very important Remedial Agent for Indigestion, Consti- 
pation, Dyspepsia, Vomiting in Pregnancy, Nervousness, Loss of Appetite, all 
forms of Gastric Derangement, Atonic Diarrhoea, and Indigestive Diarrhoea of 
children. This valuable remedy contains the digestive and nutritive properties 
ol the grain unimpaired, combined with the active agents of digestion, viz: Dias- 
tase, Pepsine, Lactic Acid, Hydrochloric Acid, with a small addition of Phos- 
phoric Acid, Powdered Firwein, and the Bromide and Chloride of Aluminium 
and Sugar of Milk. TESTIMONIALS: 



B. K. Clark, M. I)., Georgia, Vt.: 
Gentlemen — A medical friend gave me a 

small sample bottle of your Maltopepsine, 
which I took with apparent decided benefit. I 
did not vomit during the week I had the med- 
icine to take, nor have I been troubled up to 
this time, and as I do not wish to be without so 
valuable a medicine, I enclose two dollars with 
the request to have you send me by return mail 
the value of the money sent. I am very confi- 
dent it will entirely cure me, as the small 
amount used acted so favorably. I would like 
also to use it in my practice, as it will certainly 
prove very beneficial in all cases of dyspepsia. 
New Lebanon, N. Y., Dec. 11, '79. 
Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Having suffered for 
8«me months past from Gastric derangement 
and most distressing dysyeptic symptoms, I was 
instructed by my physician a week or two ago, 
to make a trial of your new preparation Malto- 
pepsine, and I am happy to say it has given me 
more relief than any other remedy I have ever 
tried. The disagreeable nausea and vomiting 
after eating have altogether disappeared, my 
appetite is better than for a long time — the sick 
headaches that caused me so much annoyance 
have ceased to trouble me, and my general 
health seems fully re-established. These good 
results are due entirely to Maltopepsine, and 
I feel it an act of justice to you, and a duty to 
others who may be suffering from like causes, 
to state the facts of the case. 

Yours, Kesp'Uy, J. H. Johnston. 

C. A. MosHER, Druggist, West Troy. N. Y. 
Messrs. Tilden & Co. — You certainly have 

got a wonderful preparation in your Maltopep- 
sine. I gave the samples to the doctors, and 
every one of them speak in its favor and say it 
is far superior to any similar preparation. 

One doctor gave it when Lactopeptine had 
failed him, and to his surprise was just the 
thing. 

H. M. Wilson, M. D., N. Y., Nov. 10, '79. 

Gentlemen — I consider your Maltopepsine 
the most valuable remedy ever known for Dys- 
pepsia and all forms of Gastric derangement. 



Indi.vnola, Iowa, Jan. 21, 1880. 
Tilden & Co. — Have used your Maltopepsine 
in a case of obstinate vomiting in pregnancy, 
when everything had failed. The result was 
very gratifying— so much so, that I wish you to 
send me one pound of Maltopepsine by express 
at once. Yours truly, 

E. L. Bakee, M. D. 

E. M. Bibber, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Says : "Have been using your Maltopepsine 
freely and with the most perfect satisfaction, 
preferring it to any similar preparation 
known." 
A. T. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Reports that so far as he had used our Malto- 
pepsine, he had found it far superior to any 
other preparation he has ever used. 

New Lebanon, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1880. 
X. T. Bates, M. D. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Of late I have been 
using your new preparation, the Maltopepsine, 
and am so highly pleased with its action, that I 
am induced to give you the results of my ex- 
perience with it. Almost invariably this rem- 
edy has given me satisfaction, and in several 
cases of dyspepsia and irritable stomach, when 
the several preparations of Pepsin and Bismuth 
and kindred agents have failed, the use of 
Maltopepsine has been a complete success. I 
regard it particularly useful in debility of the 
stomach following acute or chronic gastritis, 
and that attendant upon convalescence from all 
exhausting diseases. 

In vomiting of pregnancy it is a superior 
remedy. It will be found highly useful in the 
diarrhoea of children; which is generally de- 
pendent upon imperfect digestion. 

The aluminium which you have incorporated 
into it is a happy idea. I heartily recommend 
it to the profession. 

E. M. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Speaks in the highest terms of our Malto- 
pepsine, also of our Saccharated — thinks the 
latter the strongest he has ever used. 



FORMULA OF MALTOPEPSINE. 

SngarofMilk 3.5 oz. I Pepsine 16 oz. I Hydrochloric Acid 5fi.dr. 

Nutritives of the Grain... 10 " Diastase 6 dr. Phosphoric Acid 3" ** 

Powdered Firweln 7'" | Lactic Acid 5 fl. dr. | Aluminium 3 •' oe. 

PRICE LIST. 

Maltopepsine, (in oz. bot.) per oz 8 .7.5 I We also prepare the various Elixirs 

" " " doz... 7.00 and Syrups in combination with Malto- 
" iYi ft), bot.) " fi> 8.00 I pepsine. 

Prepared by Tlldeu Ot, Co., New Liebanon, N. Y., and 84: Ijlberty St.| N. T. 



Advertisements. 15- 




An EPITOME of the numerous cases reported monthly 
in the Journal of Materia Medica embracing the following 
diseases, sent on application: 

Scrofula ; Scrofulous enlargement of the cervical glands ; Scrofulous 
affections of the bone; Scrofulous swelling and abscess of the knee; 
Scrofulous Eczema; White Swelling ; Scrofulous swelling of the glands 
of the neck. 

Cancerous affections ; Cancerous affections complicated with Scrofula; 
Lupus. 

Necrosis of the Tibia, Femur and Ilium ; Osteo-Periostitis ; Exostosis 
of Ulna; Caries of Vertebra; Synovitis of knee joint; Hip joint dis- 
eases ; Anchylosis. 

Psoriasis ; Prurigo. Tuberculous affections of the bones. 

Skin Diseases of all kinds. Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis. 

Syphilis; Syphilitic sore throat ; Gonorrhoea. 

Enlargement of the Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys. 

Bronchocele ; Goitre ; Exophthalmic Goitre. 

Epilepsy; Otorrhoea; Deafness. 

Diphtheria ; Erysipelas ; Erysipelas with Scrofula ; Tonsillitis. 

Gangrene of the Lungs ; Dry Gangrene ; Pleuro-Pneumonia. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of the lodo Bromide Salts. 



WITH HYDRARGYRI BICHLORIDUM, 

And Alteratives as Stillingin, Menispermin, Dulca- 
marin, Rumicin and Conicine. 

For some time we have made specially this preparation, to meet those cases 
constantly occurring in the practice of Physicians, in which the impression of 
mercury is required, and it has been the custom of many in the most inveterate 
cases of Scrofula, and particularly in that of Scrofulo-Syphilis, to give for a week 
this combination of one one-hundredth of a grain to each fluid dram, and then 
resume the Elixir plain, alternating as circumstances indicate. In this special 
combination, we have increased the Stillingin and other alteratives specially 
applicable to ihe treatment of Syphilis and its complications, from that used in 
the plain Elixir. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of lodo Bromide Comp. Salts, 
and eight one-hundredths of a grain of Hydrargyri Bichloridum. 



WITH IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

We have added to our list the Elixir lodo Bromide of Calcium Comp. with 
Iodide of Potassium, Each ounce contains 72 grains of the lodo Bromide Comp. 
Salts, with 32 grains of Iodide of Potassium. The vegetable alteratives are the 
same as in the plain Elixir. 

TII<DKN <fo CO., New Lebanon, N. T., and 84: Liberty St., Ne\r Tork. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peobia Mbdicai. Moitthi<t. 



16 



Advertisements. 



RUSH 




CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Annual, Spring Course, or Post Graduate An- 
nouncement, address the Secretary, 



Jknie^ S. 3B;tl\erid^e, 



1634 MICHIGAN AVENUE. 



In[aDswering advertisements mention the Pbobia MEDicAiy Monthly. 



Advertisements. 17 



ST, FBIINCIS' BRADLEy HOSPITAL! 

A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements ; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Surgeon Db. J. T. Stewart. 

Consulting Surg eons... Dus. Jos. Studer and John Murphy. 

Physician Dr. J. S. Miller. 

Consulting Physicians Drs. R. Boal and J. C. Frye. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. phy- 
sicians sending their own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is charged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Superior. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



18 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC VT^ALKEB & SON 



Importers of 




AND 

Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 

AGENTS FOR THE 

PARKER AND OOLT 

SHOT GUNS. 



A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 

AND 

Sporting Equipments. 
REVOI.VERS, 

fine Cuilery. 

ALSO, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOIUEESTIC 

HARDWARE ! 

125 and 127 

SOUTH WASHINGTON 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 



F 



FORMULA : 

EACH FLUID DRACHM CONTAINS 

5 1-2 gr. free phosphoric acid (PO5). 
3 gr. phosphate of lime (SCaOPOg). 
1-2 gr. phosphate of mag. (SMgOPOs) 
1-6 gr. phosphate of iron (Fcj O3 PO5). 
1-1 gr. phosphate of potash (3 kCPOg). 

Total amount of Phosphoric Acid 
in one fluid drachm, free and com- 
bined, 7 grains. 

It contains no pyrophosphate, or 
(-r "Tf^ TTXTD ) metaphosphateof any base whatever. 

or Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, BTeryousness, 
Diminished Vitality, Urinary Difflcnlties, Etc. 

HORSFORD'S 




ACID PHOSPHATES. 

Prepared accordivg to the directions of Prof . E. N. H0R8F0RD, of Cambridge, Mass. 
There seems to be no difference of opinion, in high medical authority, of the 
value of phosphoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public 
which seems to so happily meet the general want as i.his. 



jt is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. 

No danger can attend its use. 
its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. 



W. A. HAMMOND, M. D., late Surgeon-Gen- 
eral U. S. Army, said that under the use of ar- 
senic and Horsford's Acid Phosphate, a young 
lady rescued her reason who had been ren- 
dered insane by a dream. 

DR. M. H. HENRY, of New York, says: 
Horsford's Acid Phosphate possesses claims as 
a beverage beyond anything I kn6w of in the 
form of Medicine, and in nervous diseases I 
know of no preparation to equal it. 



DR. REUBEN A. VANCE, of New York: 
The preparation on which I place the most re- 
liance is Horsford's Acid Pliosphate. 

The Ute WINS LOW LEWIS, M. D., of Bos- 
ton, said : Having in my own person experi- 
enced those ills for which the Acid Pliospiiate 
is prescribed, 1 have found great relief and 
alleviation by its use, most cheerfully attest 
my appreciation of its excellence. 



Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free 
on application to manufacturers. 

Physicians desiring to test it will be furnished a bottle free of expense, except 
express charges, if they mention Peoria Medical Monthly. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

RUMFORD CHEMCM WORKS, Providence, Rhode Island. 

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Advertisements. 



To the Medical Profession. 



LAGTOPEPTINE 



T 



We take pleasure in calling the attention of the profession to 
Lactopeptine. After a long series of careful experiments, we are 
able to produce its various components in an absolutely pure state, 
thus removing all unpleasant odor and taste, (also slightly changing 
the color). We can confidently claim, that its digestive properties 
are largely increased thereby, and can assert without hesitation that 
it is as perfect a digestive as can be produced. 

Lactopeptine is the most important remedial agent ever pre- 
sented to the Profession for Indigestion, Dyspepsia. Vomiting in 
Pregnancy, Cholera Infantum, Constipation, and all diseases arising 
from imperfect nutrition. It contains the five active agents of diges- 
tion, viz: Pepsin, Pancreatine, Diastase, or Veg, Ptyaliu, Lactic 
and Hydrochloric Acids, in combination with Sugar of Milk. 

FORMULA OP LACTOPEPTINE. 

Sugar of Milk 40 ounces. I Veg. Ptyalin or Diast ase, 4 drachms. 

Pepsin Bounces. Lactic Acid 5fl. drs. 

Pancreatine 6 ounces. | Hydrochloric Add 5 fl. drs. 

|_ JVQYOPEPTINE is sold entirely by Physicians' Prescriptions, and its almost uni- 
versal adoption by physicians is the strongest guarantee we can give that its therapeutic value 
has been most thoroughly established. 

THE UNDERSIGNED HAVING TESTED LACTOPEPTINE, RECOMMEND IT TO THE PROFESSION. 

ALFRED L. LOOMIS, M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Practice of Medicine, University of the Oily of New York. 

SAMUEL K. PERCY, M. D., 

Professor Materia Medica, New York Medical College. ♦ 

P. LE ROY SATTERLBE, M. D., Ph. D., 

Prof. Chem., Mat. Med. and Therap. in N Y. Col. of Dent.; Prof. Chem. and Hyg. in Am. Vet. Col., etc. 

JAS. AITKEN JMEIQS. M. D., Philadelphia. Pa., 

Prof, of the Institutes of Med. and Med. Juris., Jeff. Medical Col.; Phy. to Penn. Bos, 

W. W. D.A.\VSON, M. D., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Prof. Prin. and Prac. Surg., Med. Col. of Ohio; Surg, to Good Samaritan Hospital. 

ALFRED F. A. KING, M. D., Washington, D. C, 

Prof, of Obstetrics, University of Vermont. 

D. W. YANDELL, M. D.. 

Prof, of the Science and Art of Surg, and Clinical Surg., University of Louisville, Ky. 

L. P. YANDBLL, M. D., 

Prof, of din. Med., Diseases of Children, and Dermatology, University of Louisville, Ky. 

ROBT. BATTEY, M. D., Rome, Ga., 

Emeritus Prof, of Obstetrics, Atlanta Med. College, Ex-Pres. Med. Association of Georgia. 

CLAUDE H. MASTIN, M. D.. L.L. D., Mobile, Ala. 

Prof. H. C. BARTLETT, Ph. D., F. C. S., London, England. 



The NEW YORK PHARMAOAL ASSOCIATION, 

No8. 10 &12 COLLEGE PLACE, NEW YORK. 
P.O. BOX, 1574. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Moxtuly. 



Advertisements. 



Salicylate of Cinchonidia. 



Satisfactory therapeutical results from tiie administration of 
Salicylic Acid iu the treatment of Gout, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, etc., etc., have been much modified by tlie disturbance of the 
general system, especially the stomach, owing to the large doses re- 
quired. 

Medical men haveexperimented with the salts of this acid,lioping 
to qualify this tendency. That most largely used, (the Salicylate of 
Soda) has proven much less objectionable than the acid itself, but long 
continued use results in tliesame trouble to the class of patients with 
whom freedom from nausea and internal irritation is a first necessity. 

Being convinced that the acid would be best prescribed in com- 
bination with some other base, it was suggested by Mr. F. H. Rosen- 
GARTEN, of Messrs, Rosengarten & Sons, that the salt of a Cinchona 
Alkaloid would aid the remedial properties of the Salicylic Acid, in 
adding tonic, stimulant, and anti-periodic properties, and with such a 
powerful alkaloid as Cinchonidia, the dose required could be lessened. 

Tills salt opens up a wide range of uses iu conditions, where, 
heretofore, physicians have not tested Salicylic Acid, for fear of direct 
debility and loss of muscular power so often induced by its use. 

Practical experience has borne out the above theory quite fully , 
and in a number of cases of severe Neuralgia and acute Rheuma- 
tism, the Salicylate of Cinchonidia has given immediate relief in 
doses of five to ten grains, where Quinine, Salicylic Acid, or other 
general treatment has failed. 

Since the introduction of this Salt, it has been tried in the Jeffer- 
son Medical College Hospital at Philadelphia; St. Joseph's Hospital 
at Philadelphia, and by a number of careful practitioners, with im- 
mediate good effect in every case, so far as heard from, in fact, better 
results than could have been anticipated. 

It is administered in five grain doses, until the paroxysms of 
Neuralgia cease. This generally requires say from fifteen to twenty 
grains, five grains every two hours. The Salt, representing about 
one-third of its weight of Salicylic Acid, is almost insoluble in 
water, and is incompatible with iron solutions. We urge its trial in 
all cases of acute articular Rheumatism, Gout, Neuralgia, Sciatica, 
etc., etc., with almost absolute certainty of prompt relief. Owing to 
its insolubility, it cannot be given in solution, and physicians will 
find the nearest approach to this, in the administration of our Com- 
pressed Powders or Pills. These being free from coating, must 
necessarily disintegrate more quickly than a coated pill. 

We prepare the Salt in pills of two and one-half grains each, 
which will enable the physician to graduate the dose for children, as 
well as for adults. We recommend them iu preference to a larger 
pill, as they are much more readily swallowed. 

JOHN WYETH & BROTHER, 
CHEMISTS, 

PHILADELPHIA. 
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Advertisements. 



Tonsro^A.- 

THE FIJIAN REMEDY FOR NEURALGIA. 



This remedy ha« been used for several centurlet by the aborigines of the FIJI 
Islands, though introduced to the notice of the profession in England only about 
a year ago. 

The success attending its use in the hands of Drs. Sidney Ringer and Wm. 
Murrell, of London, England, induced us to dispatch an agent to the Fiji Islands 
for the collection of a quantity of this valuable drug. Heretofore the secret of 
its source had been jealously guarded by the Fiji chiefs, the knowledge of its 
composition beine handed down as an heirloom from one generation to another. 
Through Mr. Ryder, a resident from Fiji, a specimen of the remedy was flrst 
brought to England, with the statement that he received it from a European who 
had married a chief's daughter and had learned the secret from his father-in-law. 

Tonga, as prepared by the Fijians is a compound of several plants, and occurs 
in the form of small loose bundles, the remedy being enveloped in a wrapper of 
the inner bark of the cocoanut tree. 

The natives administer it in the form of an infusion, but it has been found 
that alcohol much more thoroughly extracts its active principles. 

Drs. Ringer and Murrell base their report of the use of the drug on a sufficient 
number of cases, and C. Bader, ophthalmic surgeon to Guy's Hospital, says ; "The 
results obtained by Drs. Ringer and Murrell fully coincide with mine. I have 
notes of cures of brain and kidney disease in which Tonga alone succeeded in re- 
moving pain. All cases of neuralgia (supra- and infra-orbital branchesof the fifth 
nerve) with swelling of the temporal veins during the attack were benefited." 

Reports from Sidney, Australia, show that Tonga has also been successfully 
employed as a remedy for neuralgia by the profession of that country. 

THE FLUID EXTBAOT CAN BE OBTAIKED FROM 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 

Manufacturing Chemists and Pharmacists, DETROIT, MICH. 

LIPPIA MEXICANA. 

A NEW EXPECTORANT. 



This new Mexican remedy is introduced to the medical profession of this 
country on the auiliority of Dr. A. H. Saxion, Baltimore, Md., who has communi- 
cated the results of his experience in its use in an article in the January, 1881, 
number of the Thp:rapeutic Gazette. 

The demulcent and expectorant properties claimed for the drug by Dr. Sax- 
ton, are such as must commend it to the cnreful attention of the prolession, and 
especially so during the season of catarrhal affections of the respiratory pass- 
ages. A remedy which combines demulcent with expectorant properties, and at 
the same time does not nauseate, must meet with favor. The cases reported by 
Dr. Saxton would also seem to show the drug to be possessed of an alterative in- 
fluence in the respiratory mucous membrane which must enhance its value in 
those chronic affections sooften rebellious to treatment. 

We prepare a tincture of Lippla Mexlcana and will be pleased to furnish a re- 
print oi Dr. saxton's article, on application. 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO , 

Manvfactiiring Chemists and Pharmacists, DETROIT, MICH. 

In answering advertisements mention the Pkokia Medical Monthly. 



Peorik ^edickl ]VIoi\tl\ly. 

VOL. I. FEBRUARY, 1881. NO. 10. 

0t[igindl ^ammnnicHtian^, 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

On the use of Ice to the Interior of the Uterus in Exces- 
sive Hemorrhasre from Placenta Previa. 



BY JOS. H. WARREN, M. D., 
Author of " Hernia." 



The following cases were written out to read before the 
Boston Gynaecological Society some yeaprs ago, but at that 
time one of our most distinguished practitioners had had a 
case which terminated very unfortunately. As that case 
was commented on somewhat unfavorably by a few of the 
profession as well as by the friends of the patient, I did not 
wish at that time to report my case for fear of increasing 
this unpleasant criticism. As this distinguished practi- 
tioner has now gone to a higher realm, where all is fair and 
pure, there can be no harm from fear of unfavorable com- 
ment upon him in my citing the case. 

As the symptoms of placenta previa are well known, it 
is not necessary for me to enter into the description of them. 
As Ramsbothams, Simpson, Smilie, Barnes, T3'ler, Smith, 
and many others, fully describe and treat of the subject, I 
will content myself with relating the case at once. 

Mrs. B., a prima donna and a dancer by profession, age 
22, of German origin, weighing about 125 pounds, of very 
active and muscular organization, at the full term of preg- 
nancy, called me to attend her. She had been in labor 
some hour or more before my arrival, and the nurse said 
she had had great flow of blood, which had, at times come 
forth in gushes. I found upon examination that the os had 
dilated to about the size of a silver dollar, through which 
protruded a portion of the after-birth. This could be 
readily felt and recognized by its peculiar turfy surface 
where the blood vessels had been detached. 



248 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

The labor eautinued vigorously and the pains were very 
violent. I proceeded to press upon the posterior lip of the 
OS, and to dilate it as rapidly as possible in order to allow 
the head to advance, endeavoring to compress the after- 
birth against the anterior side of the uterus, as the greater 
portion of it was attached to the anterior part of the cer- 
vix. But as the labor continued, a greater amount of the 
after-birth became detached and fearful amounts of hemor- 
rhages began to appear. I now thrust the hand in and 
dilated more, in order to pass the blades of my long forceps, 
which I succeeded in doing after several pains. I should 
state, that owing to the extreme terror the instruments 
inspired in the patient, I found it necessary to etherize her^ 
and while under anaesthesia she was successfully delivered 
of a healthy child, weighing some ten pounds. There now 
seemed to be a paralysis of the uterus, as no uterine contrac- 
tion could be induced. Ergot and brandy were freely given 
and the case becoming every moment more desperate, the 
fearful hemorrhage threatening extinguishment of life, I 
happily thought of the introduction of ice. I had many 
times before passed ice into vagina, but never before into 
the uterine cavity. 

Ice being broken into pieces of the size of an ordinary 
hen's egg, I passed it in until I had completely filled the 
uterus. This, together with the pouring of water from a 
height upon the abdomen, and the adjusting of a compress 
and bandage, gave me the satisfaction of feeling the uterine 
muscles begin to contract beneath my hand. This they 
continued to do, expelling thereby both hand, clots and ice,^ 
until finally the hemorrhage was fully stopped. 

At that time I had never heard of ice being introduced 
into the cavity of the uterus for arresting uterine hemor- 
rhage. The case went on and made a full recovery, to con- 
ceive and miscarry some ten months later, when, however, 
no complication took place. 

Mrs. , age 25, after about eight months of preg- 
nancy, having had during her pregnancy several hemor- 
rhages, was taken in the pains of labor and profuse flowing. 
Upon my arrival I learned she had already fainted once or 
twice from fright and loss of blood. On examination I 
found the uterus dilated to about the size of a quarter of a 
dolhir, through which a prolapsus of the cord had taken 
place, extending from the vulva to near the middle of the 
thigh, cold and pulseless. Endeavoring to make out the 



Original Communications. 249 

presentation, I found the placenta had made the same ob- 
struction as in the former case, except that the edge could 
be felt where it had been ruptured off on account of dila- 
tion. It was attached upon the left side and overlaped the 
08 about one-third. 

This being a desperate case I called in consultation my 
friend. Dr. Storer, the senior, who confirmed n\y diagnosis 
and approved my course thus far. It was thought best to 
give ergot in drachm doses, and to proceed to deliver as 
soon as possible with instruments. This I did alone, Dr. 
S. not being able to remain with me, having on hand a case 
of midwifery of his own. I should state that I endeavored 
to hang (as is generally recommended in books on mid- 
wifery) the funis above the occiput, but as there seemed to 
be no such thing as finding any convenient place on which 
to hang the cord, I allowed it to take its natural course and 
proceeded, after sufficient dilitation, to deliver with the long 
forceps a dead child of some seven or eight pounds weight. 

Fearful hemorrhage, as in the above case, followed. 
Turning her upon her side and whipping the spine I excited 
the uterus to contract and succeeded in arresting the hemor- 
rhage by making pressure with the hand over the uterus. 
In addition to this I should say, that I held the mouth of 
the uterus in my hand, kneading and squeezing it. The 
case full}' recovered, and has since been delivered of a 
healthy child without any complication. Before and since 
the occurrences of these cases above named I have made 
much use of ice in uterine surgery with very great success, 
especially after the removal of tumors and operation for 
lacerated cervix. In cold weather we have but little 
trouble in obtaining ice. In warm weatherit can be frozen 
in models in the same way as ice cream. Packing ice 
around the uterus after any operation will keep down, not 
only hemorrhage, but inflammatory tendency. In very many 
surgical operations, ice with torsion forceps will do away 
in a great measure with the ligature. In many cases of 
prolapsus funis the best thing to save life of child, if there 
be no complication of placenta previa, I have found, is to 
turn and deliver by the feet. In place of ergot I have used 
borate of soda, 20 gr., once in twenty or thirty minutes, or 
the triple phosphates will act very well, but not so efficient 
as ergot or borate of soda. The triple phosphates are 
indicated where there is great prostration and fainting and 
lingering labor pains. I usually give it in doses of fifteen 



250 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

to twenty drops, once in half to three-quarters of an hour, 
in hot Avater, using the syrup triple phosphates. This will 
take the place of other vinous stimulants in many instances. 
In upwards of two thousand cases of internal and instru- 
mental successful delivery that I had attended some years 
ago and keep record of, I never lost a case by uterine hem- 
orrhage. I have attended many cases of my own, and been 
frequently called in consultation with others since I left off 
keeping any classification and account of cases, and I have 
yet to lose my first case b}' hemorrhage. I have lost some . 
by other causes, such as one belonginn" to another physi- 
cian in consultation by fibroid tumor of cervix uteri ; twice 
from puerperal fever, occurring soon after confinement. 
This is all that I can recall of ever losing in a practice ex- 
tending over a period of twenty-seven years. I think I 
have seen about all the ventures mentioned in the works 
on obstetrics, in my own and others' practice. This article 
is already too long, or I would otherwise go with more 
length in classifying the cases up to within ten years or so. 
While upon this subject of uterine hemorrhage, I trust the 
reader will not forget the use of hot water in severe uterine 
hemorrhage, to be thrown up the rectum and vagina. A 
description and use of hot water can be found in the Vir- 
ginia Medical Monthly for December, January and February, 
in a series of papers of mine upon the treatment of some of. 
the most common forms of uterine diseases. Should this 
paper be of any interest sufficient to the numerous readers 
of your valuable journal, I may at some future time give 
you another article. 
Boston, Mass. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

The Preparation of Material for Dissection. 

The subject of preparing material for dissection is one 
that can scarcely fail to interest the general practitioner 
who, removed from the conveniences of the city dissecting 
rooms, from time to time, desires to refresh his memory 
and recreate his mind with a little practical anatomy. 

There are many and various methods of preparing 
materia], and I will submit a few of the best, that the 
reader may choose for himself the one best suited to his 
means, apparatus, and the object of his work. 

First, he must obtain his material (obviously), and hav- 
ing Spencerized it, or otherwise, the point of interest next 



Original Coimnunications . 251 

_ 

to be considered is the point of injection. Of these there 
are two commonly selected, viz: The abdominal aorta, the 
best on many accounts, and the common carotid in the 
superior carotid triangle, by far the easier, and, therefore, 
the point most commonly selected. In the latter case, an 
incision is made along the anterior border of the sterno- 
cleido-mastoid muscle, the artery sought for isolated care- 
fully and drawn out of the wound. A puncture is made in 
the anterior wall of the vessel and a ligature is tied tightly 
above the puncture, while one with long ends is placed 
loosely below. 

The subject is now ready for the preservative. If it is 
designed to keep the body more than a month or six weeks, 
the internal jugular vein should be opened and the pre- 
servative forced with a powerful syringe through the vas- 
cular system, until it comes from the vein untinged with 
blood; after which the jugular should be tied above and 
below and the fluid injected until the subject is full. In 
ordinary cases this injection is best made with a Davidson's 
syringe, having a small blowpipe fitted to the nozzle. 

If the aorta is the point selected, an incision must be 
made through the abdominal walls, about six inches in 
length, the peritoneum torn through and the artery care- 
fully raised, care being taken not to wound the lumbar 
arteries in the operation. A puncture is made into the 
artery about two inches above its bifurcation ; two ligatures 
will be necessary, one above and one below the puncture, 
since in this situation we must inject both ways. If it is 
desired to wash out the veins, the vena-cava must be punc- 
tured and subsequently ligated. The circulation being 
filled, the subject should be allowed to lay for twenty-four 
hours, after which it may be injected with paint. Numer- 
ous combinations have been devised for the preservation of 
the human body after death, all of greater or less value. 
The saturated solution of the chloride of zinc is a preserva- 
tive, which, although open to many objections, is better 
than none. Still I would not recommend its use if any of 
the following can be obtained. The arsenic injection is 
much more preferable and is cheap and easily prepared by 
boiling together : 

Jfc Arsenious acid, 

Carbonate of sodium, aa. 8 ounces. 

Water, 8 pints. 

If to this formula from two to four ounces of carbolic 
acid or nitre, or both, be added, its preservative qualities 
will be greatly increased. 



252 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

1 ■ 

Chloral hydrate, methyl alcohol and glycerine is one of 
the best preservatives known, in the proportion : 

J^ Chloral hydrate, 16 ounces. 

Methyl alcohol, 3 pints. 

Glycerine, 4 pints. 

but its expense is a bar to its popularity. 

The same may be said of the acetate carbonate of 
aluminium of alcohol, etc. 

The celebrated Wickenscheimer fluid is as follows: 

9; Arsenious acid, 16 grains. 

Sodium chloride, 80 grains. 

Potassium sulph, 200 grains. 

Potassium nitrate, 25 grains. 

Potassium carbonate, 10 grains. 

Water, 20 lit. 

Glycerine, 4 lit. 

Methyl alcohol, % lit. 

Hagar suggests a substitute for the above, which, how- 
ever, I have not tried, though it appears feasable: 

^ Salicylic acid, 4 drachms. 

Bnracic acid, 5 drachms. 

Potassium carbon as, 1 drachm. 

Dissolve in boiling water, 2^ ounces. 
Glycerine, 5 ounces. 

then add oil of cinnamon. 

Oil of cloves, aa. 3 drachms. 

Dissolved in alcohol, 12J^ ounces. 

The preservative which I now use, and which has given 
me very good satisfaction, is a modification of Wicken- 
scheimer's : 

5fc Boiling water, 3 quarts. 

Boracic acid, 'i]4. ounces. 
Nitrate of sodium. 

Nitrate of Potassium, aa. 2 drachms. 

Carbonate of potassium, 2 ounces. 

Arsenious acid, 4 drachms. 

Mix, and when cool add : 

Glycerine, 2 pints. 

The subject having having been preserved, and allowed 
to remain twenty-four hours, the ligatures should be 
loosened and the arteries injected with some preparation to 
distinguish them from veins and nerves. The operator 
should provide himself with a large pewter syringe holding 
from one to three pints, and a common straight blowpipe 
or other tapering tube, having a groove or ridge near the 
smaller end to prevent its slipping out. The nozzle of the 
syringe should be made to fit the pipe closely. The pipe 
is then tied in the artery, leaving the long ligature loose. 
The syringe is then charged and some one of the subjoined 
injections introduced until the arteries are full. 

When the syringe is removed to be recharged, the 
artery may be controlled between the thumb and finger of 



Original Cojmnunicatiorbs. 253 

an assistant. The injection to be used depends upon the 
object of the dissection. If a dry preparation is to be made 
a wax or varnish injection is preferable; but if for ordinary 
dissection, the best and cheapest is made with plaster of 
paris and red lead. The plaster having been sifted to free 
it from all lumps and foreign substances, the lead is like- 
wise sifted upon it in sufficient quantity to give it a pink 
color when mixed dry. Water is then added until the 
mixture is about the consistency of cream, care being taken 
that the solid ingredients are thoroughly suspended, other- 
wise the syringe will become clogged and the injection 
partly or wholly a failure. A small quantity of molasses 
added Avill give the operator more time by delaying the 
hardening process. 

The wax and varnish injections are nearly as numerous 
as the formulfe for preservatives, but I will give some of 
the best. If wax is used the subject must be warmed in a 
bath, at about 120° Fahr., and the wax melted, and the 
thorax and abdomen opened. The common formula is: 

Jk Beeswax, 16 ounces. 

Tallow, 12 ounces. 

Resin, 8 ounces. M. 

The formula of Hyrtl is : 

p; White wax, 24 ounces. 

Canada balsam, 12 ounces. 

Mix with heat, and when partly cold add, cinnebar, six 
ounces, rubbed up in mastic varnish, then evaporate the 
whole until when a portion of it is dropped into cold water 
it is found to harden sufficiently. The varnish injection is 
much more easily used, as it may be injected cold, but it& 
preparation requires a paint mill, since the lead must be 
thoroughly ground with the oil to rid it of all particles. It 
is made as follows : 

^ White lead, 

Red lead, aa. 16 ounces. 

Boiled oil, fl. 10 ounces. 

Spts. turpentine, 4 ounces. 

Mix and grind together, then add, turpentine varnish^ 
four ounces. A small quantity should be mixed and al- 
lowed to stand to test its hardening qualities. If it solidifies 
in from three to five minutes it will answer. The great 
trouble with this injection is that it will sometimes harden 
too quickly, and sometimes remain partly or wholly fluid. 
A small quantity of resin incorporated in the varnish will 
remedy the latter, while the former requires additional tur- 
pentine. Finally, should you desire to inject the veins, any 



254 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

of the above injections can be used, substituting Prussian 
blue for the red lead ; the injection of veins containing 
valves being, of course, made from the periphery. 

Frederick E. Sherman, M. D. 
Chicago^ III. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Rupture of the Bladder. 

On the night of the 1st of July, 1879, Clark, a 

brakeman on a freight train of the Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific Railroad, was injured at the stone quarry, this side 
•of Joliet. The side-track upon which the train was stand- 
ing, ran close to a stone wall, the space between them be- 
ing but a few inches. Clark was standing next the wall, 
near the end of the train, with his lantern in front of him, 
the space between the wall and the cars grew gradually less, 
and when the train moved off, he was canght between the wall 
and the cars, and the bottom of the lantern was pushed with 
great force against the lower part of the abdomen, so great 
that the strong metal rim at the bottom of the lantern was 
bent from the pressure. He was put upon the train and 
brought down to the house of his father-in-law, six miles 
above the city, and I was summoned some twelve hours 
after the accident. The extremities were cold. Pulse 
small and frequent; countenance anxious. Complained of 
severe pain over the abdomen, particularly the lower por- 
tion, and had an incessant desire to pass urine. To use his 
own expression, the " water seemed to go some where 
else." The catheter was repeatedly introduced, but no 
•urine was obtained. The restlessness and abdominal pain 
increased to such a degree as to cause intense suffering, 
which the large and repeated anodynes, given both by the 
mouth and rectum, failed to alleviate. He grew rapidly 
worse, and died in fifty-six hours from the date of the in- 
jury, from the combined influences of shock and peritonitis. 
The history and symptoms led to the belief that rupture of 
the bladder had occurred. A post mortem examination 
made with the assistance of Drs. Holton and L, B. Martin, 
eight hours after death, verified the diagnosis. A rupture 
from one-half to three-quarters of an inch in length, was 
found upon the upper portion of the bladder, where it is 
covered by the peritoneum, and extending through it. 
Urine in considerable quantities was found in the perito- 



Original CoinfnunicatioTis. 255 



neal cavity. Flocculi, as well as a thin coat of fibrin, cov- 
ered the peritoneum and intestines in patches, which were 
not numerous. Indeed, the scanty fibrinous exudation was 
marked, showing it was the result of the injury. With 
the exception of a few contusions on the legs, no other 
injury was discovered. The interest of this case centers 
not alone in the accident itself, (which is comparatively 
rare,) but also to the manner in which it occurred. In 
most cases where this lesion has taken place it has been 
the result of blows upon or instruments penetrating the 
cavity of the abdomen, or the passage of a heavily loaded 
vehicle over it, or a fall upon the back or pelvis from a 
great height ; but perhaps in no one has the agency which 
caused the injury, and the surrounding circumstances, been 
so peculiar and exceptional. Before he died, Clark stated, 
in reply to the question asked, that his bladder was full at 
the time of the accident. 

Rob't Boal, M. D. 
Peoria, 111. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Notes on a Few Cases of Gonorrlioea. 

The treatment of this affection has become largely a 
stereotyped or routine system of practice by a large pro- 
portion of the profession, each physician having his " tried 
formulae," and to them he holds without giving much 
thought on the subject as to whether he could " give a 
reason for the faith that is in him " or not. This regular 
routine consists in astringent injections and internal 
administration of balsam, diuretics or alkalies, as the case 
may be, the selection of each particular drug being de- 
pendent largely upon the fancy of the physician himself, 
as if the disease was a simple urethritis instead of a specific 
inflammation. 

Now, while it will be acknowledged that under certain 
conditions " all pus is contagious," yet at the same time 
we must necessarily recognize a distinction between ure- 
thritis and gonorrhoea, although practically such a differ- 
ence is oftentimes difficult or almost impossible to demon- 
strate. But the natural histor}^ of the disease, its remark- 
able contagion, nature always reproducing its kind, its 
period of incubation, its progress, the virulence of the 
poison as shown when it comes in contact with the con- 
junctiva, and the absolute certainty of its communication 



256 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

upon contact, all go to show its specitic nature, and that 
simple urethritis, even of the most severe form, will be 
found to be quite difi'erent in these respects. 

Now, by placing some of this gonorrhceal virus under 
the microscope, it will be found to contain innumerable 
germs (the description of which I will not enter into at this 
time), and the application of antiseptics will be found to 
completely destroy them. It would seem, then, that anti- 
septic treatment would be the only philosophical way to 
attack this affection. That is, carbolic acid, boracic acid, 
rectified spirits, etc., the most suitable being that one most 
destructive to the germ, and at the same time least irritat- 
ing to the raucous membranes. Such a remedy we have 
in boracic acid, saturated solution, reinforced by a few 
minims of carbolic acid or a good quantity of rectified 
spirits, or aqua camphora, as the case ma_y seem to demand, 
and upon this plan I have treated a few cases, the account 
of which I send you. 

Case 1. — Male, age 23, suffering from gonorrhoea, ap- 
plied to me October 12th for relief. He said the discharge 
appeared four days after exposure, and was very slight for 
the first three days. He had tried a remedy recommended 
by a friend, and at the end of seven days found himself 
very much worse, the discharge being quite profuse, thick 
and creamy. I gave him the following : 

P; Aqua camphora, 

Aqua dist., aa. 3 ounces. 

Acid boracic, 2 drachms. 

M. Inject four times daily. 

At the same time giving specific directions concerning his 
diet, habits of living, etc. October 17th, patient returned, 
the discharge had ceased', but he complained of " a strange 
itching sensation in the urethra." Gave him the same in- 
jection, except adding 15 minims of carbolic acid to the 
six ounce mixture, also an alkaline diuretic. October 25th, 
returned again, saying he was cured. 

Case 2. — Male, age 26, colored. Applied for relief from 
the same trouble. I gave him the same treatment with 
such happy results that on the 29th, eight days after be- 
ginning the treatment, he concluded he was cured. I saw 
no more of the patient for ten weeks, when he told me the 
discharge had returned twice, and that he had the druggist 
repeat the first prescriptions, and thus completely subdued 
the disease. 

C'a.se 3. — Male, age 2i, had sufiered two weeks before 



Original Communiccitions . 257 



he came for treatment, gave him the ?ame as the preced- 
ing. ISTovember 3d, he returned saying that on the 1st he 
had thought himself cured, but the discharge had returned 
fully as bud as ever. This uncomfortable circumstance I 
attributed to the election of Garfield. I then added to the 
first prescription two minums of carbolic acid to the ounce, 
and gave him an emulsion of balsam copaiva and oil of 
cubebs, internally. November 18th, thinking he was well 
he discontinued treatment, but still he noticed a little red- 
ness in the meatus urinarius. December 1st he came to see 
me again, saying that the discharge had returned, and that 
he had his prescriptions repeated, at which time I directed 
him to continue the same, and soon he had the disease 
under control again. But on the 15th he returned saying 
that the discharge had " opened up anew," as he put it, 
without any seeming cause whatever, and adding that in 
the former cases he believed he had been to blame himself, 
but this time he was perfectl}^ satisfied that he was not. 
Then thinking that a slight stringent would be advanta- 
geous, I added two grains of the sulpho-carbolate of zinc to 
the mixture, and soon found that while the discharge would 
subside it would not cease. I then instructed him to cease 
treatment entirely, as the president of our faculty some- 
times says, "take the doctor off and let the patient get 
well." The discharge is entirely mucoid in its nature, and 
fearing stricture, I have commenced the use of the sound. 
He is still under treatment. 

It might be well to say that this patient has but one arm, 
and that in using the injection he was compelled to lift the 
glands penis with the nozzle of the syringe inserted into 
the meatus. This process irritates the mucous membrane 
at this point and constantly keeps it inflamed, as is often 
the case when the nozzle of the syringe is rough or too long. 
Case 4. — Male, age 28. Says that he had suffered from 
an attack of gonorrhoea five years ago; that he was treated 
with the ordinary injections and other paraphernalia in- 
cident to the usual course by a very good physician, and 
that he had been just as careful as man could have been 
through three months of constant treatment, but only to 
have the trouble return again and again. Finall}'' he quit 
treatment and got well. This time he is anxious to get 
through in less time. I gave him the treatment detailed in 
Case 2, and on the seventh day the discharge ceased. He 
continued treatment, however, and "took the best of care 



258 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

of himself," as he said, and when I saw him last he de- 
clared himself entirely well, the discharge never having re- 
turned. 

In the treatment of other cases since the writing of the 
above notes, I have found very satisfactory results where I 
could induce the patient to follow directions completely. 
A few cases have been very unsatisfactory, but they have 
been so very few that I have no desire to abandon this plan 
of treatment, though I am persuaded it might be improved 
upon, or rather that a certain class of cases require some- 
thing more. Occasionally there is a decided tendency of 
the discharge to return, not in the form of a thin, glutty 
discharge, but just as thick and creamy as at first. But I 
have found no difficulty in controlling it again in a few 
days. 

Considering the prevalence of this disease in our cities 
and its peculiar treacherous nature, being sometimes very 
difficult to control when quite mild in appearance, and in 
view of its serious sequelae, it becomes a subject of much 
interest to the profession — so much so that we hope some 
such action ^s that proposed by the National Board of 
Health can be brought into eftect in our laws. 

E. P. Murdoch, M. Dv 



[ For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

The Best Position for Women in Labor. 

I desire to say that in the August number of your 
journal I published an article on the above subject. Since 
that time, Dr. George I. Englemann, of St. Louis, has 
written a paper on the same subject, which is reported in 
the proceedings of the American Gyngecological Associa- 
tion. He believes, as I stated, that ordinarily we should 
advise that in the early stages of labor the woman should 
be permitted to follow her own instinct with reference to 
position, and that in the last stages of labor the semi- 
recumbent position in bed was the one best adapted to give 
her the greatest assistance, which is as good as the recum- 
bent, the philosophy of which I explained. These remarks 
apply particularly to natural labor; and now I will ad- 
vance what I neglected to say in my former article, that in 
the last stage of labor, with the face towards the pubis, the 
recumbent or semi-recumbent position is the best ; I can 
also positively show that in a certain mal-position of the 



Original Communications. 259 

head, in the last stage of labor, when the chin comes down 
under the arch of the pubis, the recumbent or semi-recum- 
bent position is the best. 

My main object in writing these few lines is to inform 
those of your readers who have not seen Dr. Engelmann's 
essay, where they could find the subject ably discussed. 

Silas Hubbard, M. D. 

Hudson, 111. 



UnicHl Wectnres. 



Professor Gunn's Clinic. 

CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS BY A STUDENT. 



NECROSIS OF THE TIBIA. 

The patient, a boy 14 years of age, was at the clinic in 
March last, when he gave a history of an injury received 
upon the anterior surface of the tibia, several months be- 
fore. His health, at that time, was in a poor condition, 
and nothing was done, except to advise constitutional 
treatment, having for its object the building up of hi& 
health. He now comes back with two fistulous openings 
upon that bone, which are discharging pus rather freely. 
The probe detects small pieces of loose bone, which Prof. 
Gunn proceeded to remove. Esmarck's bandage was ap- 
plied, for the loss of any unnecessary amount of blood 
would naturally tend to retard his recovery. In applying^ 
any bandage, such as Esmarck's, in cases of this kind, care 
should be taken not to cover the immediate neighborhood 
of the diseased part containing pus, since this would tend 
to force this decomposing matter into the current of the 
blood, which might be followed b}' disastrous results. 

An opening was then made, extending from one fistula 
to the other, and the bone between them removed. The 
professor called our attention to the fact, that in cases of 
necrosis, as in all other diseases, typical cases such as are 
described in the text books, will rarely be found, and this 
was true of the present case, the condition being rather 
carious than necrotic. He did not find any large pieces of 
dead bone, but with a gauge scooped out a considerable 
quantity of softened bone tissue, which is a rather rare 
condition in this part of the bone. The following direc- 



260 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

tions were given for the dressing of the wound : The 
bottom of the cavity will be filled with crystals of boracic 
acid, and then it will be lightly plugged up with lint. In 
from 48 to 72 hours this dressing will be removed and a 
plug of white wax will be so moulded into the wound as to 
fit accurately every part of it. Then every day this wax 
tent will be removed, the cavity thoroughly washed out 
with a 2\ per cent, solution of carbolic acid, and the tent 
replaced ; first, however, crystals of boracic acid should be 
sprinkled in as before. 

When the granulations become healthy, a portion of the 
wax will be shaved from the bottom, of the tent, each day 
or every other day, and this method of dressing will be 
continued until the wound has entirely healed up from the 
bottom. 

SPONTANEOUS DISLOCATION OF THE WRIST. 

The next patient brought in was a girl, eight years of 
age. She was in a well nourished condition and looked 
very healthy. Two and a half years ago she complained 
of a pain in her left hand and wrist, and when her mother 
examined it she found the deformity as it now exists. The 
family history was good, and there was no history of any 
injury to the hand or wrist. The pain lasted but a short 
time, a week or ten days, and was not accompanied by any 
swelling, which would certainly have followed any injury 
sufficient to cause such marked deformity. She could flex 
the ^ hand a little more than half way, but all power of ex- 
tending it was wanting. 

It was diagnosed as a case of spontaneous dislocation of 
the wrist, the result of an altered nutrition in the part. 
There had probably been a chronic inflammation, which 
resulted in interstitial absorption in the articulating ex- 
tremity of the radius, altering its form and permitting this 
deformity. The mother was told that nothing could be 
done in the way of efifecting a cure, and that it was not 
probable that it would grow any worse. 

NECROSIS. 

The next case introduced was a girl of about sixteen 
years of age. She was of a decidedly scrofulous diathesis, 
and had been before the clinic sometime during the past 
summer, but at that time was in such a poor condition that 
V>eyond removing a few pieces of dead bone from the tibia, 
Dr. Gunn declined to operate further until her general 



Clinical Lectures. 261 



health was improved. There has been some improvement, 
but not so much as could have been desired. Upon inspec- 
tion, V7as seen a large ulcer just over the internal mullealus 
of the right ankle, an inch and a half in diameter, which 
was discharging pus profusely. There was also an ulcer 
upon the outer aspect of the right elbow, with pieces of 
dead and detached bone in both. After examination, Dr. 
Gunu stated that both joints were hopelessly involved, and 
if she was in a proper condition to withstand the shock of 
the operation, he should advise resection of the elbow and 
amputation of the leg. This, however, in her present con- 
dition would not be wise, so he should remove such dead 
bone as could be found without too great laceration of the 
tissues, hoping that this would put her in the way of im- 
proved general health, to undergo the further operations, 
which will be necessary. "Without using a knife. Dr. Gunn 
opened through the ulcer upon the ankle, and by means of 
a gouge and his fingers, removed a large amount of soft 
dead bone. In this way he removed all of the lower ends 
of both tibia and fibula. This, he considered a much more 
severe operation than one made a few days before at the 
hospital, where he removed several inches from the shaft of 
the tibia, for here he destroyed a joint. 

This cavity was ordered to be dressed in the same man- 
ner spoken of in a previous case, for he considers boracic 
acid to be one of the very best local disinfectants that we 
possess, and uses it almost exclusively for this purpose in 
these cases. 

From the ulcer upon the elbow, he only removed the 
loose, superficial pieces of bone, since the recuperative 
powers of the patient had already been sufficiently taxed. 
The prognosis in such a case is, as a matter of course, poor, 
but she will never recover until the operation suggested 
above has been made. 

IJSTGROWING TOE-NAILS. 

In connection with this case, Dr. Gunn said that it looks 
like a very trifling afi'air, but there was no doubt that it 
caused her a good deal of pain and discomfort. 

He mentioned several operations which have been sug- 
gested for the relief and cure of ingrowing toe-nails. 

An old one was to tear out the old one from the matrix, 
but in this, since the matrix was not removed, the nail 
would grow again and the relief obtained would be only 
temporary. 



262 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Another is to cut off the fleshy part of the toe on the 
side where the nail grows in, and thus remove the flesh into 
which the nail grew. 

This is successful in some cases, but where there is a 
decided incurvature of the nail, the relief obtained, as in 
the other operation, will be but temporary, as the nail will 
only curve in the more, and soon give trouble again. It is 
better to remove a part of the nail with its matrix, when it 
will certainly not grow in again on that side at least. In 
this case the latter operation was made, and about one- 
fourth of the nail, including all of the matrix of that por- 
tion, was removed. The incision was carried sufliciently 
far back to make sure of including all of the matrix under 
the root of the nail, and at the same time the fleshy portion 
of the toe beside the nail was taken oflL 

The wound was left open to allow of healing by granu- 
lation. 

PARTIAL PARALYSIS OF THE DELTOID — THE RESULT OF AN INJURY. 

The patient, a laborer, aged 45 years, gave the follow- 
ing history : Four or five weeks ago the limb of a tree fell 
from a considerable height, striking him upon the outer 
and back part of the left shoulder, since which time he has 
not been able to extend his arm. He was able to move it 
across his body, both in front and behind, and with some 
difficulty could place that hand upon the opposite shoulder. 
It was not accompanied by any pain or swelling. Watch- 
ing the action of the muscles about the injured shoulder, it 
was noticed that the deltoid muscle did not contract, or but 
very slightly, just above its insertion. It w^as diagnosed as 
a paresis, or partial paralysis, of that muscle, the result of 
the injury received upon it. 

This condition sometimes follows a downward disloca- 
tion of the head of the humerus, though only in a small 
proportion of cases, still it is to be looked for, and when 
present, recognized as a complication of that dislocation. 
In the way of treatment, Dr. Gunn recommended friction 
and rubbing. Electricity might hasten a cure, but best of 
all is the power of the will. The patient should be advised 
to try to use his arm some twentj^ or more times a day, and 
keep on trying until the cure is eft'ected. The will is the 
natural stimulus to the muscle, and will have the strongest 
curative eflect. He will probably recover the use of his arm 
in from four to six months, if he will persistently carry out 
the advice given. 



Clinical Lectures. 263 



TUMOR UPON THE NECK. 

The next patient was a young man, 25 years of ap^e, who 
came to the clinic for the removal of a tumor, situated on 
the side of his neck, just under the left ear. It began to 
grow ten years ago, since which time it has slowly ad- 
vanced to its present size — about that of a large Qgg. It 
has never been painful, and he has no others upon his body. 
It is movable, and placed just under the integument, and 
also appears to be lobulated. Dr. Gunn pronounced it an 
adenoid growth, the enlargement of one or more lymphatic 
glands, and said it looked as though it might be easily re- 
moved. But he cautioned the class about even saying that 
these tumors can be easily and quickly turned out. They 
may appear very movable and loosely connected, but they 
are frequently very deceptive, and take more time and a 
freer use of the cutting edge of the scalpel than at first 
would seem to be necessary. 

And this was the case in this operation. On cutting 
down upon it, the Professor was obliged to dissect it almost 
entirely out of its bed. Three small vessels needed ligation, 
and considerable oozing following in the wound. It was 
left open for all oozing to entirely cease, then closed by 
stitches and a compress applied. Dr. Gunn said that one 
of the hardest things a surgeon has to resist is the tempta- 
tion to close a wound too early. This should never be 
done until all oozing has stopped, and if practicable, 
although this is not absolutely necessary, until the parts 
are glazed over by the exudate. 

CAPILLARY ANEURISM. 

The patient, a young man, had a small capillary aneur- 
ism on the side of his nose, which he and his friends were 
very anxious to have removed, as they feared it might be a 
cancer. Dr. Gunn said it was the sort of cancer that 
quacks like to get hold of, for they can generally cure 
them, and thereby gain great reputation, and an oppor- 
tunity to bleed their patient's pocket-book. In anhydrous 
nitric acid. Dr. Gunn said, we have a ready remedy for 
these aneurisms. The acid should be carefully prepared 
by a chemist, and should be as nearly anhydrous as is pos- 
sible to get it. 

It is applied in the following way : Cut a piece of wood 
to the size of the part to which it is to be applied ; then, 
after dipping it in the acid, hold it on the surface of the 



264 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

skin until the aneurism disappears. A black crust will 
form, which comes off, as a dry eschar suppuration seldom 
follows this operation. 

OPERATION FOR PHYMOSIS. 

The operation was made in the usual manner, by slit- 
ting back the prepuce on the dorsum of the penis and 
uniting the cutaneous and mucous surfaces by a few sutures 
upon either side. 

One especially practical point to which Dr. Gunn called 
our attention to was the necessity of leaving the wound 
open for a considerable time after the operation. In these 
cases above all others is this rule to be observed. Secondary 
hemorrhage frequently does not come on for one or two 
hours, and if we close them up too hastily, we may be called 
back to secure a spurting vessel, where, just after the oper- 
ation, there was but a slight oozing. This does not occur 
in all cases, but should be remembered and avoided by the 
observance of this rule. 



^orrBBpandem^. 

[For the Peoria Medical Monthly .j 

Dr. Gilliland's Letter. 

CoATSBURG, III., January 17, 1881. 

Dear Sir: — In the January number of the Monthly, in 
the Editorial Department, there is an article on " Legisla- 
tion Regulating the Practice of Medicine " in the State of 
Illinois, in which you go over the same old well-beaten 
track that has been gone over and over by the State Board 
of Health, the State Medical Society, the County Medical 
Societies, and all the members of the profession who have 
dared to open their mouths over the subject until it, like 
Mark Twain's mule when it fell down the chimney of his 
" dug-out," for the time, has grown monotonous. 

If you had taken your view of the State Board of Health 
and its doings from the West by South as we have, you 
would, no doubt, have concluded, as we have long ago, 
that the good accomplished by that august body in the three 
years of its life is more apparent than real, and not at all 
commensurate with the fuss that it has made, nor with the 
expense attached to it. It reminds us of throwing a club 



Correspondence. 265 



into a pond of small frogs in spring time when they are 
singing their happiest songs — in a moment everything is as 
quiet as midnight at the North Pole; but in a little while 
one little fellow less timid than the rest puts his head out, 
under a leaf, in the most secluded part of the pond, and 
timidly cheaps out, " pede-weet," " pede-weet." In a little 
while another and then another will start up, and in a short 
time the whole chorus will be sung with more vigor, if 
possible, than before. It has been just so with the efforts 
of the State Board of Health in the suppression of charla- 
tanism and quackery in our part of the state. The Indian 
doctor, the corn doctor, the pile doctor, the professor of 
female complaints, &c., &c., all periodical phenomena, are 
again abroad in the land, and they are plying their several 
vocations with as much vigor and, perhaps, with as much 
success as they ever did before. There are, we have no 
doubt, good and sufficient philosophical reasons for all this, 
the principal ones of which ought to be apparent to all. It 
has been written that "the sweetest privilege that an 
American possesses is the privilege of being humbugged," 
and we have bo doubt that this accounts largely for the 
difficulties the Board of Health finds in the discharge of 
their duty, as well as for the amount of quackery practiced 
in the state. The average " Sucker " takes to humbuggery 
just as naturally as a duck does to water, and like the man 
who likes his morning dram, they will have it, the laws of 
the state and the edicts of the State Board of Health to the 
contrary, notwithstanding. But these are not the points 
we wish to call attention to. They are the ones that have 
been conned over and over again. 

We wish merely to raise the inquiry : Why is it that the 
State Board of Health, the authorities and the people, all 
look to the profession for the suppression of unlawful prac- 
tice and charlatanism just as if the profession, and not the 
people, were the victims? In the name of common sense, 
have nobody outside the profession any interest in this 
matter ? Is it really a squabble between the regular pro- 
fession on the one hand and quackery on the other? In 
short, whose ox is being gored ? If there is a class of men 
in the state who are able to take care of themselves it is 
the medical profession. They need not supplicate the state 
for any protection not guaranteed to citizens in general. 
Then, are they stronger, physically and mentally and better 
morally, (we trust they are) to exercise patriarchal care and 



266 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

protection over the masses than any other class of profes- 
sional men ? In the name of all that is good and holy, do 
they not have enough to do in charity in treating the poor 
and in leading public enterprise in morals and education, 
without having tliis new and onerous duty of driving out 
and suppressing quacker^^ in this state thrust upon them. 
We ask again, has nobody any interest in this but the pro- 
fession ? Is it not the masses who need protection? Is it 
not the ignorant and unsophisticated who are imposed 
upon? You tell us, "Let the State Board of Health issue 
pamphlets to the officers of courts and to the medical societies. 
(The italics are ours.) We organize and belong to medical 
societies for the purpose of cultivating friendship and 
sociability among the members of the profession and for 
the purpose of improving ourselves in medical knowledge. 
IS'ow, why should w^e have lashed on our backs pack sad- 
dles and have them laden with provender to feed the 
animals that bear the burden of common good to the com- 
mon mass ? There are other natural channels through 
which, the people are wont to look for protection in other 
matters. Why not let them look for protection in this mat- 
ter through those channels ? The Department of State, the 
Legislative, the Executive and the Judicial are the natural 
channels of protection to the people, and we say let them 
perform their duty. We, of the profession, have feelings, 
like other men, averse to litigation, yet it is expected that 
if a complaint is to be filed, some physician must do it. 
Where a physician is not concerned, is not injured by the 
practice of a charlatan, can you reasonably expect that he 
will squander his time and his substance and violate hm 
sentiments of peace and harmony for the sake of having a 
duty performed, the performance of which actually belongs 
to some one else. We do not understand that the duty of 
the State Board of Health extends further than to ascertain 
who are qualified according to law to practice medicine in 
the state. It is true that they may, the same as any other 
citizen, file complaint and prosecute any one for violation 
of the law, and they may, when in their judgment the cir- 
cumstances demand it, revoke a certificate they have once 
issued. What is everybody's business is nobody's business. 
The practice act is a common law, and may be enforced by 
any one who chooses to see it enforced, and it may be left 
severely alone when they do not choose to see it enforced. 
If it could be made the special duty of the State's Attorney, 



Correspondence. 267 



the Coroner, or some other suitable person to see this law 
duly executed, some good might be accomplished ; but as 
it is, it must ever remain a dead letter on the statute book, 
except so far as it serves the purpose of belligerent mem- 
bers of the profession in ventins: their spite at each other. 

^ W. E. GiLLILAND, M. D. 



\oci^tg transactions. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Proceedings of the Peoria City Medical Society. 

The Peoria City Medical Society met in regular session 
at the office of Dr. J, P. Johnson on Tuesday evening, Jan- 
uary 18, 1880, Dr. Coffey, Vice-President, in the chair. 

Present, Drs. Boal, Roskoten, Johnson, Anna S. Adams, 
Lane, Day, and Stewart. Minutes of preceding meeting 
were read, corrected and approved. 

Dr. Anna S. Adams read a paper entitled "Laceration 
of the Perineum," of which the following is a summary : 

This is the most common lesion, excepting subi^ivolu- 
tion of the uterus, following labor. The causes of this acci- 
dent are numerous, but one of the more prominent ones is 
the undue support given the perineum, and more especially 
is this true in first labor. 

The pressure of the head against the perineum is so 
great and so long continued as to paralyze the muscular 
tissues, to interfere with the circulation and thus prevent 
the physiological softening, which is so necessary. This 
pressure is increased when we attempt to support the 
perineum, and hence the danger of entire stoppage 
of circulation and nervous force increased. If our 
attention were confined to the head, and not the perineum, 
we would be doing a service and not an injury. The head 
may be supported by introducing two fingers into the 
rectum and the thumb of same hand into the vagina ; thus 
we can keep the occiput well up against the pubis, the cir- 
culation will be left free, the nervous force unimpaired, and 
Ihe parts remain as living elastic tissues. 

The results following this accident are manifold. Among 
the more prominent ones we find: the absorption of septic 
matters; there may exist profuse hemorrhage, which may 
be mistaken for flooding; subinvolution may follow; pro- 
lapse of the bladder, vagina and uterus; and, when the 
laceration involves the sphincter ani, incontinence of faeces 
and gases. An examination of the parts should be made 



268 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

immediately, aud if a laceration exists, and extends through 
the fourchitti, it should be attended to at once. But if the 
rupture extends through the sphincter ani, it is better to 
wait for a secondary operation. 

Dr. Roskoten thought the lacerations were usually not 
recognized until late, and then the troubles were in exist- 
ence. He thought more harm than good resulted from 
supporting the perineum. He selected a case where labor 
had been protracted for a considerable time. He was posi- 
tive no rupture had occurred at that time, but in a few days 
his attention was called to an extensive sloughing, which 
he had no doubt resulted from the death of the tissues from 
the long continued pressure. 

Dr. Lane thought that the patient should be instructed 
not to bear down, as the uterine action was increased by 
the pressure against the perineum. He said too much sup- 
port was usually given to the perineum, but it was neces- 
sary and beneficial when properly employed. 

Dr. Boal thought there was more or less rupture in 
everv primipara. It was better to support the head and 
not tne perineum. He thought it was best to operate im- 
mediately in case of a slight rupture, but where extensive, 
through the sphincter ani, to wait for a few days. He 
always made it a point to examine for rupture at once. 

Dr. Coffey said he always made it a point to examine 
for rupture while he was waiting for the placenta to be de- 
livered, thus avoiding giving any alarm to the friends or 
the woman by requesting an examination. He thought 
much harm was done by giving unnecessary support. He 
said that chloroform diminished the tendency to rupture, 
by causing relaxation of parts. 

J. Stout, M. D., Secretary. 



[For the Peoria Medical Monthly.] 

Proceeding's of the Jasper County Medical Association. 

The association came to order with the president. Dr. 
S. K. Youngman, in the chair. 

Dr. Faller read a paper on instrumental labor, with a 
case in which the anterio-posterior diameter of the pelvis 
was very small, owing to an excessive curvature of the 
sacrum. The discussion of this paper consumed all of the 
time of the association, so that the discussion on pneumonia 
is yet in the future. If nothing more interesting presents 
at the next meeting, pneumonia will be considered. 

A. B. Faller, Secretary. 



Therapeutic J^otes. 



269 



'herHpentiii f^ote§. 



ACUTE BRONCHITIS IN CHIL- 
DREN. 

Jft; Tr. veratri viridis, 12 min. 

Syr. scillae comp., 2 dr. 

Syr. balsam tolu, 14 dr. 

M. Sig- One teaspoonful every 
two or three hours to a child five 
years old, in Ihe first stages of 
this disease. 

When the temperature falls 
and the moisture appears on the 
skin under the influence of the 
above prescription, we may cease 
its administration and resort to 
expectorant mixtures, as the fol- 
lowing: 

P Ex. cubeb. fi., M. 40—1 dr. 

Syr. slmplicis, 2}^oz. 

M. Sig. A teaspoonful three 
or four times a day. — Medical 
Record. 



FOR WORMS. 



P 



Castor oil, 
Spts. turpentine, 
Tr. myrrti. 
Worm seed oil, 



aa. 1 oz. 
2dr, 



M. Sig. Give half to a tea- 
spoonful, with as much molasses, 
according to the age of the child, 
on an empty stomach, two or 
three times, half an hour apart. — 
^Clinical News. 



INFIiAMED HEMORRHOIDS. 



^ 



Glycerine, 3 parts. 

Gelatine, 1 part. 

ex. bellad. vel opii, }^ grain. 

The gelatine is melted in the 
glycerine, and suppositories are 
obtained of sufficient consistence 
for introduction into the anus. 
It should be introduced as deeply 
as possible. — 3Ied. and Surg. Re- 
porter. 

HINTS FOR THE USE OF THE ACT- 
UAL CAUTERY. 

In using the actual cautery, 
anoint the tissues around the 
place to be cauterized with liquid 
storax, and it will prevent them 
from being burned. In cauter- 
izing the OS uteri, always anoint 



the vagina with liquid storax, 
and the vagina will not be burned. 
— Dr. John M. White. 

IN COREA AND MANIA. 
^ Conii, 3 drs. 12 M. 

Act. acid, fort. 3 drs. 12 M. 
Spts. vini rect.. 1 drachm. 
Aq. distillat ad., 2 ounces M. 

Sig. Dose, hypodermically, 1 
minim to begin with, and grad- 
ually increase as necessary. Five 
minims of this solution contain 
one minim of coria. — Dr. Bur- 
man. 

LOTION FOR IRITIS. 

^ Morphiae sulph., 4 grains. 

Zlncisulph., 3 grains. 

Atropial sulph., 2 grains. 

Aque distillat, 1 ounce. 

M. Sig. Aslotion.— i)r. ^a?*- 

tholow. 

PRURITUS VULVAE. » 
'!^ Ung. diachyl. simp., 

Olei olivae, aa. 1 ounce. 

M. Sig. Apply to parts with 
a soft cloth. — Western Lancet. 

HAEMOPTYSIS IN THTHISIS. 

Dr. Wm. Pepper gives this as a 
substitute for ergot, or in cases 
where it cannot be used : 

P; Acid gallici, 2 dr. 

Acid sulpti, aromata, 1 dr. 
Glycerine, 1 oz. 

Aquae, q. s. ad. 6 oz. 

M. A tablespoon ful as re- 
quired. — Med. and Surg. Re-- 
porter. 

FOR HABITUAL CONSTIPATION. 

The following prescriptions 
have been used with much suc- 
cess in cases of habitual consti- 
pation : 
T^ Fluid extract of rhei, 1 oz. 

Extract senna fluid, 1 oz. 

Ol. tiglii, 1 drop. 

M. Sig. Teaspoonful every 
morning. 

Or the following: 

P; Fluid ext. cascara segrada, 1 oz. 

Glycerine, 1 oz. 

Fluid ext. nox- vomica, 1 dr. 

M. Sig. Teaspoonful night 
and morning. 



270 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



]oak Motice^. 



A Guide to the Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of 
the Urine, Designed for Physicians, Chemists and Phar- 
macists, by Dr. C. Il^eubauer and Dr. J. Vogler, with a 
preface by Prof. R. Fresenius. Translated from the sev- 
enth enlarged and revised German edition by Dr. E. G. ■ 
Culter and^Dr. E. Wood, E"ew York. Wm. Wood & Co., ; 
Publishers. Cloth, 551 pages. 

This is the mostcomplete work of the kind that we have 
ever had the pleasure of reading. The names of the authors 
are known throughout the world, and their reputation has 
in no measure lost by this work. It is as nearly perfect as 
a work of this kind can be made. Thorough, clear, con- 
cise, and omitting nothing that could be of interest, and 
yet not overloaded with any dry details, as too many of our 
authorities are apt to be found. 

Full enough to be of service to the practical chemist, it 
is yet simple enough to be invaluable to the busy practi- 
tioner. The tests given are the best we have ever seen or 
tried, and the plates illustrating the microscopical appear- 
ances of deposits are full and perfect. It is a work that we 
•can heartily recommend to any one wishing a complete 
guide to this important branch of medical science. 

Notes of Hospital Practice, ISI'ew York and Philadel- 
phia Hospitals. 8 vo.; pp. 256; price in cloth $2.00; in full 
calf $2.50. Samuel M. Miller, M.. D., 536 Spruce street,' 
Philadelphia, Pa., editor and publisher. Mailed on receipt 
of price. 

The busy physician will iind this compact, neatly printed 
and neatly bound volume, a very practical and handy refer- 
ence book. It is essentially a manual of therapeutics. 
The treatment of over four hundred diseases by the emi- 
nent medical authorities of New York and Philadelphia is 
condensed and epitomized in its pages. Its value is very 
much enhanced by the fact that the proof sheets have, in 
every instance, been revised by the professors whose treat- 
ment is set forth tlierein. The unprecedented sale of the 
book, 4,000 copies being sold in ten months, is a very 
strong argument in its favor. It will prove an indispens- 
able companion to the hard worked practitioner, whose 
time is too much occupied to allow of his reading all the 



Booh Jfotices. 271 



current medical literature, but who must needs keep him- 
self thoroughly informed of all the salient points of pro- 
gress in therapeutics. 

Walsh's Physician's Handy Ledger and Call Book. — 
The Ledger is most admirably arranged, combining in a 
convenient, simple and perfect form a day book and 
ledger, sufficient for six hundred names, each page adequate 
for an individual account an entire year. The busy physi- 
cian, after once using it, will find it indispensable, a few 
minutes time only being necessary to keep his accounts 
accurately and neatly. We have been using one since the- 
beginning of the year, and find it most convenient, and 
have no hesitation in recommending it as superior to any 
book which we have seen for this purpose. The Call Book 
is ot convenient size, neatly bound in red Russia leather^ 
and in addition to the usual contents of the best visiting 
lists, is the only visiting list which contains the fee bill 
adopted by the Chicago Medical Society. These books 
can be obtained of the publisher, Ralph Walsh, M. D., 
Washington, D. C, or in this city of D. H. Tripp & Co. and 
Adair & Brown, booksellers. 



Pamphlet Exchanges. 

Alveolar Abscess, by Eugene S. Talbot, M. D,, L.L.D. 
Reprinted from the Chicago Medical Journal and Examiner 
for January, 1881. pp. 9. 

We welcome to our exchange list the following : 

The Southern Clinic, Dr. C. A. Byce, Editor; Rich- 
mond, Ya. 

The Southern Practitioner, Dr. Dunca Eve, Managing 
Editor; Nashville, Tenn. 

The San Francisco Western Lancet, San Francisco, Cal. 

The St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal; semi- 
monthly; Thos. F. Rumbold, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Medical Advance, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Medical Gazette, weekly, E. J. Bermingham, M.D., 
Editor. New York, N. Y. 

The American Specialist, C. W. Dulles, M.D., Editor. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Canadian Lancet, Toronto, Can. 

The Journal of Materia Medica, New Lebanon, N. Y. 

The International Journal of Medicine and Surgery, 
weekly ; New York, N. Y. 



272 Peoria Medical MontJdy. 

Peoria Medical Monthly. 

DR. J. MURPHY, DR. J. L. HAMILTON, DR. H. STEELE. 



All exchanges, books for review, and communications must be addressed to 
the Publisher, 

THOS. M. MeILV.\INE, 
204 South-Jeflferson Street, PEORIA, ILIi. 



ditorml ^e^nrtmrnt 



Do Scarlet Fever Signs Do Any Good ? 

Can any good be accomplished by requiring physicians 
to report their scarlet fever cases, and municipal authori- 
ties placing signs on the houses of those reported, to des- 
ignate that they have the disease there ? In Peoria this 
system has been very faithfully carried out for a year or 
more. And yet we still have the disease continuing among 
us. At the outbreak of the disease this precaution seemed 
to be one that might prevent its spread, but it has not had 
the good effect we had hoped for. People generally do 
not like to have these signs placed upon their houses, and 
as soon as the doctor ceases to attend, and the patient is 
able to be up and about the house, the sign is removed, 
perhaps at a time when desquamation is taking place, at 
the very time the patient is most likely to communicate the 
disease. 

The sign being removed, friends and neighbors believe 
the danger is over, and no further precautions are taken. 
Again, this fear of a sign being placed upon their premises 
many persons do not send for a physician if they can 
avoid it. Mild cases recover without any medical atten- 
tion, and their neighbors for a like reason are kept ignor- 
ant of their having the disease among them, and it is 
spread in this way. After having observed its working in 
our city for the past year, we are fully convinced it has ac- 
complished no good in preventing the spread of the disease, 
but has had rather the opposite effect. If our authorities 
would do away with signs and employ a special police, 
properly instructed, to visit -every alley and backyard in 



Editorial Department. 273 

the city, and see that they were properly cleaned as spring 
opens, we could then hope to see our city free in a short 
time, not only from scarlet fever, but diphtheria also. 



Small Pox. 

This disease is prevalent to a considerable extent 
throughout the West at the present time. In Chicago it 
has been almost an epidemic. From Iowa and other west- 
ern states we hear through the daily press of many cases. 
There is really no good reason why it should not spread in 
an epidemic form. 

For several years little has been thought about it, and 
people have become very careless about vaccination. Many 
children of considerable age have never been vaccinated, 
and re-vaccinations are only practiced after the disease has 
become somewhat general. 

There is very good authority for the belief that vacci- 
nation protects in the majority of instances only for a lim- 
ited period of time, and five to seven years have been given 
and are generally received as this period of protection. 

Statistics also show that the larger the number of vac- 
cinations any one person has had, the greater the immunity. 
In a very large number of cases reported, the figures were 
about as follows : Out of 1,000 persons who have but one 
mark of vaccination, over eight per cent, on exposure con- 
tracted the disease, while out of the same number, and 
under similar circumstances, only three-fourths of one per 
cent, of those having four or more marks, exhibited any 
susceptibility to the disease. 

Physicians should bear this in mind, and having as they 
should, the welfare of their patrons at heart, from time to 
time should suggest re-vaccination as the best and most 
certain protection from this foul disease. 



Visiting the Sick. 

One of the annoyances the physician has to encounter 
in his professional duties, is the visitors who call to see his 
patients, to give them advice and encouragement. Their 
intentions, of course, are good. They want to aid the doc- 
tor in his good work. If the case is somewhat protracted, 
they feel it a duty to give the patient or friends a little ad- 
vice how the patient should be treated. They can tell how 
a friend of their's was cured by Dr. Fish's medicines, or 



274 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



they would have them take some prescription they have 
seen in some newspaper or almanac. These visitors can 
often inform the sick person of positive and speedy cures 
by Dr. Bosh in cases just similar to theirs; and as evidence 
of their assertion they refer them to newspaper certificates 
of the doctor's cures. These things are not only annoy- 
ing to the attending physician, but they keep the patient 
in a state of excitement which often aggravates and pro- 
longs the case. The people do not seem to understand 
that no two persons are sick just alike, although they may 
have the same disease. Constitutional peculiarities modify 
disease. Age, sex, diathesis, and bodily vigor, are some of 
the conditions that must be taken into account in treating 
disease. 



Elsewhere we publish a letter from Dr. Gilliland, in 
answer to and commenting upon an editorial in the Janu- 
ary number of this journal. We are very glad to give 
space to such articles upon such a live topic, and will be 
pleased to hear from others. We do not agree in all 
things with Dr. G., but lack time at present to go over his 
article at length. We will try and do so in the next issue. 

The Illinois State Board of Health is now engaged in 
preparing the second edition of the " Register of Physi- 
cians and Midwives," and will be obliged to the profession 
if they Will call attention to mistakes and changes of loca- 
tion, or omissions. Secretaries of medical societies are 
also requested to send the roster of their officers, and the 
names, age and cause of death of any medical men who 
have died within the last year. 

The Board is anxious to make the register as perfect as 
possible. It is also important to every one that his or her 
record is correct. 

Dr. Jos. H. Warren's new work on " Hernia " was re- 
ceived too late for review in this issue of the Monthly. 
Its evident merits deserve a better handling than our first 
cursory reading would permit. 

The Arkansas Medical Monthly, that Dr. Jones has been 
publishing at Little Rock, Ark., has ceased to exist under 
that name. The publisher has removed it to Memphis, 
Tenn. It will be published there under a new name. 

Ladies with beards will be glad to hear of a remedy. 
Dr. Lawson Tait reports a case where the beard fell off 
after the application of a galvatiic pessary. 



Editorial Depa?'tment. 275 

The graduating exercises of the class of 1881, Rush 
Medical College, will take place on Tuesday afternoon, 
Feb. 22d. The alumni meeting and the annual banquet 
will be held in the evening of the same day. The gradua- 
ting chiss will probably number over one hundred and lifty, 
though as examinations are not yet passed, the exact num- 
ber no man can tell. At any rate it will be the largest ever 
graduated west of the Alleghanies, and we know will com- 
pare favorably with any class in the country. One gratify- 
ing feature is the largely increasing number of three year 
men. 

We give for the benefit of those interested the location 
and addresses of some members of the class of 1880, Rush 
College : 

Dr. G. C. Synon, Columbus, Wisconsin. 

Dr. W. A. Harwood, Ishpingham, Wisconsin. 

Dr. C. H, Lewis, Windsor, Wisconsin. 

Dr. W. H. Earle, Wrightstown, Wisconsin, 

Dr. F. I. Pinch, Hillsboro, Wisconsin. 

Dr. D. S. O'Brien, Eaton, Wisconsin. 

Dr. W. H. Lyman, Eau Claire, Wisconsin. 

Dr. M. P. Goodwin, Hudson, Wisconsin. 

Dr. M. Cazier, Birmingham, Kansas. 

Dr. W. A. Quigley, Andrew, Iowa. 

Dr. M. VauDyke, Crookston, Dakota. 

Animal Vaccine. 

As there is considerable inquiry for vaccine matter, we 
would say to thdse interested that Col burn, Birks & Co., 
of this city, are supplied with fresh virus every second day 
from the well-known vaccine farm of Dr. A. H. Dorris, 
Wisconsin. The prices are, ten .points, doubly charged, $1 ; 
crusts, 11.75 each. Orders sent to us will be handed to 
this firm and we can guarantee will receive prompt attention. 

The acid phosphates, as made by the Rumford Chemi- 
cal Works, according to the directions of Prof. E. IST. Hors- 
ford, is, in cases of mental and physical exhaustion, 
nervousness, dyspepsia, and similar conditions, of undoubted 
value. It is largely prescribed by the profession, and so 
far as we know gives perfect satisfaction where the phos- 
phates are indicated. We have received samples and have 
used it with success. Physicians desiring to test it will be 
furnished a bottle free of expense, except expressage, by 
applying to the manufacturers and mentioning this journal. 

Of this preparation, Dr. R. S. Miller of Springfield, 111., 



• 276 Peoria Medical Monthly. 



says, " Having tested Horsford's Acid Phosphates, I con- 
sider it the best preparation of the kind I have ever used. - 
I use it in kidney diseases with good results. From the 
use I have made of it I do certainly consider it not only 
acts as a tonic to the nervous system, but as a food." 

The enterprising firm of Allaire, Woodward & Co., 
pharmaceutical chemists, has moved into new and very 
much enlarged quarters. They have gained a more than 
national reputation by the excellency of their preparations. 
Their sugar-coated pills, of wliich they make a full line, will 
be found very soluble and to contain just the amount of 
pure drugs that the formula, printed on the package, calls 
for. 

If we can accommodate any physician by purchasing 
or ordering any books or instruments, we will be glad to 
do so, free of charge. We will select with as much care 
as if buying for ourselves, and can get as low prices as can 
be had anywhere. The goods can be sent C. 0. D. Ad- 
dress the publisher. 

Parke, Davis & Co. have probablj' introduced more new 
remedies to the profession than any other one house in the 
country. It is not to be expected that every new remedy 
will prove better than an}^ we have had before, but by intro- 
ducing and having these new drugs tested by the profes- 
sion they have done a great work, for through their 
agency many remedies have been added to the list that have 
proved themselves truly invaluable. 

TiLDEN & Co.'s standard preparations have been before 
the profession for years, and have won, by their uniform 
excellency, the high reputation they possess. It is unnec- 
essary for us to do more than to call the attention of phj'si- 
cians to their advertisement of some new preparations. 

Lactopeptine, as prepared by the ISTew York Pharma- 
ceutical Association, has received the strongest endorse- 
ments from many prominent physicians both in this country 
and abroad. It is indicated in all diseases depending upon 
imperfect nutrition, and can be prescribed with almost cer- 
tain results. 

The very extensive and well known drug house of Col- 
burn, Birks & Co., of this city, carries as fine and large a 
stock of surgical instruments as any in the West. Physi- 
cians desirous of information about instruments will consult 
their own interests by corresponding with this firm and 
sending for a catalogue. 



.Advertisements. 




No instrument has ever lieen placed before the medical profession which has given such uni- 
versal satisfaction. The combination is such that the physician is able to meet every indication 
of Uterine Displacements. Falling Womb, Anteversion, Retroversion and Flexions are over- 
come by this instrument, where others fail ; this is proven by the fact that since its introduction 
to the Profession it has come into more general use than all other instrnnients combined. 

Among the many reasons which recommend this Supporter to the Physician is its self-ad- 
justing qualities. The Physician after applying it need have no fear that he will be called in 
haste to remove or readjust it, as is often the case with rings and various pessaries held in posi- 
tion by pressure against the vaginal wall, as the patient can remove it at will and replace it 
without assistance. 

The Abdominal Supporter is a broad morocco leather belt with elastic straps to buckle 
around the hips, with concave front, so shaped as to hold up the abdomen. The .Uterine Sup- 
port is a cup and stem made of highly poli.shed hard rubber very light and durable, shaped to 
fit the neck of the womb, with openings for the secretions to pass out, as shown by the cuts. 
Cups are made with extended lips to correct fle.xions and versions of the womb. 

The cup and stem is suspended to the belt by two soft ela&tic Rubber Tubes, which are fast- 
ened to the front of the belt by simple loops, pass down through the stem of the cup and up to 
the back of the belt. These soft rubber tubes being elastic adapt themselves to all the varying 
positions of the body and perform tlie service of the ligaments of the womb. 

The instrument is very comfortable to the patient, can be removed or replaced by her at 
will, can be worn at all times, will not interfere with nature's necessities, will not corrode, and 
is lighter than metal. It will answer for all cases of Anteversion. Retroversions, or any Flex- 
ions of the Womb, and is used by the leading physicians with never failing success even iu the 

most diiiicnit cases. Prlcc— To Physi cians, $8. To Patients, $ I 2. 

Instruments sent by mail, at our risk, on receipt of price, with 16 cents added fur postage, or 
by Express. C. 0. D. 

DR. M'INTOSH'S NATURAL UTERINE SUPPORTER COMPANY, 

193 JACItSOIS^ JS'TIl.EJJBT, CIIICA.GO, IIjL. 

Our valuable pamphlet ''Some Practical Facts about Displacements of the Womb," will be 
sent you on applicatioii. 




DR. MCINTOSH'S 



This celebrated Battery combines both the Galvanic 
and Faradic, or induced current which can be used sepa- 
rate or in combination. 

Any strength or intensity desired can be obtained for 
use in electro-therapeutics. This Battery is con.struoted 
on an improved plan, as follows: The zinc and carbon plates are arranged in couples securely 
clamped to hard lubber plates with thumb screws. These thumb screws are also used for bind- 
ing posts. All the connections are positive and brought near together, tlms lessening the 
internal resistance. The cells are made in sections of six, composed of one solid piece of hard 
vulcanized rubber. By this arrangement a section can be handled, emptied, cleaned and refilled 
as easily and quickly as one cell. A hard rubber drip cup is placed by the side of each section 
of cells, to receive the zincs and carbon plates when removed from the cells. The rubber plates, 
which hold the zinc and carbons, project over on one side enough to cover the cells, when the 
zinc ai:d carbons are pUced in the drip cups. The under side of this projection is covered with 
soft rubber, which is clamped over the sections, which mak^s the cells water tight. This alone 
recommends the Battery. 

We claim superiority over all other batteries for the reason that by the improved plan of 
construction and close connections we gain moi-e quantity and intensity of current. We com- 
bine all that is desirable in either a Galvanic or Faradic Batteiy, a combination never before 
attained. We furnish it with or without the Faradic coil. It weighs less than any other of the 
same power. It can be carried without spilling the fluid, thus being the only perfect portable 
Galvanic Battery made. We will be pleased to send circulars giving full information, price, 
etc., free on application. 

Mcintosh gaivukic belt m battery co., 

]Vos. 193 and 194 Jnckson St., CHICAGO, IIiL. 



Advertisements. 



PEORIA, PEKIN k JACKSOPILLE RAILWAY, 

THE ROUTE TO TAKE FOR 

Pekin, Havana, 

Springfield, Virginia, 

Beardstown, Jacksonville, 

Alton, Qulncy, Hannibal^ 

GSS^ST. L0UIS^=^=O 

And all Points South and South-west, 
THE FAVORITE ROUTE TO 

'm.M^'mmAM oi^ir Mm^m "^"mm. ^wm.wr^ 

Leavenworth, Atchison, St. Joseph, 

Lawrence, Topeka, Fort Scott, 

Baxter Springs, Newton, "Wichita^ 

Denver, Pueblo, Canon City, Leadville„ 

And all points in KANSAS and COLORADO. 

GEORGE SKINNER, CHAS. MACABE, 

Manager. General Ticket Agent. 




DR. L. D. M'INTOSH'S 

Electric or Galfaiic Belt. 



If this new combination could be seen and tested by the medical profession, 
few. if ary. words would be needed from us in its favor, for it combines utility 
■with simplicity in such perfection that seeing it is convincing proof of its great 
value. The medical profession to-day acknowledge, almost universally, Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

This combination is composed of sixteen cells, placed in pockets on a belt. 
Each cell is made of hard vulcanized rubber, lined with a copper cell, which 
constitutes the negative plate. The rubber coating perfectly insulates each cell. 
The positive plates are ol zinc, wrapped in a porous material to absorb the ex- 
citing fluid, and prevent contact with the copper, and permit the current to pass 
from the copper to the zinc. 

Thus the cells are charged without wetting the belt, and the discomfort fol- 
lowing to the patient. A wire is soldered to each zinc plate, which connects 
with the copper cell by entering a tube on its side, thus rendeiing tlie belt 
pliable. 

The Mcintosh Electric Belt is superior to all others for the following reasons: 

It is composed of sixteen cells— thus giving a powerful current. A current 
selector is so arranged that one or more cells can be used at pleasure. There Is 
not anything irritating about the Belt, as is the case with all other contrivances 
where the metal used is wet with weak acids and placed next to the skin. The 
electrodes are pieces of metal covered similar to ordinary battery electrodes, 
and connected with the cells by connecting cords. By this arrangement, a cur- 
rent from the Belt can be applied to produce a general or local etlect. 

Physicians who have used this Belt in their practice do not hesitate to re- 
commend it to the profession. 

PRICE, $10.00; WITH SUSPENSORY, $12 50. 

Our pamphlet on Medical Klectricity sent free on application. Address, 

McINTOSH CALVAMC BELT A.\ft BATTERY CO-MPANY. 192 and 194 Jackson St., Chicago. 111. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medicai. Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



—OF- ) 

The Peoria Medical Monthly. 

The wonderful success which this Journal has met in a few months is a suffi- 
cient proof of its value and popularity. It has been enlarged twice within five 
months, and will again be enlarged as soon as its patronage warrants. We pro- 
pose to make this Journal indispensable to Western Practitioners, who, as act- 
ive, progressive men, see it is to their advantage and personal benefit to support 
a home Journal of this liicd. 

Originaij Communications.— The main feature is intended to be the origi- 
nal comm.unications. We have articles for future numbers from some of the 
most able writers in tlie profession, among whom we may name Dr. Wm. 
Ooodell and Dr. Wm. Pepper, of Philadelphia; Dr. Warren, and others. But we 
especially desire short, practical articles from our subscribers. An interchange 
of opinion being what is intended. 

Translations— Made expressly for this Journal will appear regularly from 
Foreign Journals. 

Clinical and Didactic Lectures.— We are making arrangements where- 
by we will be regularly supplied each month with Clinical and Didactic Lectures 
by experienced teachers. 

Therapeutic Notes.— Short, compact modes of treatment, and tried and ap- 
proved formulfe from every available source, will make this department of un- 
usual interest to readers. 

Medical News.— We will keep our readers posted on all matters of interest , 
reports of societies throughout the State, etc., etc. 

SUBSCItlBE AT OrSTCE. 

Fifty-Xvvo Fages. 

Now is the time to get the largest amount of good reading for the least 
money. We will for a short time send to subscribers the back numbers, begin- 
ning at May, and the Journal for one year from date of subscription, for 

0]VE I30L1L.A.I1. 

As the number we have on hand is limited, this offer will only be open for a 
limited time. You will get nineteen numbers containing over five hundred 
pages, for onl.v ONE DOLLAR. Take as many olher Journals as you please, but 
you cannot afford to omit the Peoria Medical Monthly. 

A few extracts from letters received will show what is thought of it by the 
profession : 

Among the numerous Medical .Tournals which are sent to me, there is none brighter or 
more creditable to its authors than the Peoria 3Iedical Monthly. I have read it with pleas- 
ure, for it shov.'s that you are all alive in Peoria. Writing makes men thinli, and the more the 
■opportunities for writing the greater the amount of thinking. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, M. D., 
Chicago, III., 1880. Prof. Phijsioloijy and Nervous Diseases, Hush. 3Ied. Col. 

I like your Journal and will devote some of my time to its advancement. 

St. Joseph, 3Io., 1880. A. V. BANES, M. D. 

I have received your Journal and am well pleased with it. 

Lincoln, 111., 1880. L. L. LEEDS, M. D. 

The number just received is worth the whole subscription. I enclose one dollar, and will 
try and get you some subscribers. J. B. VEITCH, Grafton, Jersey Co., 111. 

If the number I have received is a specimen of what it will continue to be. it will be valu- 
able indeed. C. F. STP.INGER, M. D., Aurora, Kane Co., III. 

I have received your Journal and like its arrangement and style. Think it worth the 
money, and enclose the amount. W. II. GITHENS, M. D., Hamilton. III. 

I am pleased with your Journal, and believe it should be patronized by all Western Physi- 
cians. I hope it will meet with the approval of every Physician in Illinois. 

H. E. W. BARNES, M. D. 
^'Subscribe at once and you will be iileased with it. 

Address all communications to THOS. M. MclLVAINE, 

204 South Jefferson Street, PEORIA, ILL, 



Advertisements. 



F. G. botji?/SOh::h]I3dt, 

ilAlYTICAL CHEMIST. 



Special attention given to Criminal and Sanitary Mat- 
ters, Potable and Mineral Waters, 
Milk, Urine, Etc., Etc. 



Proprietor of the LIBRARY DRUG STORE, Peoria, III. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECSALTY. 

Correspondence Solicited. 
Charges Reasonable. References Given. 




Comstock& Avery, 



■\Iainifiictiirers and Dealers in all 
kinds of 




Call the attention of PhysicianB 
to their 



PMlIf CE 



It is the nicest chair in the market for 
the Office. Library or Harlor. The best 
Invalid Chair made. 



Prices wiMu tlie Eeacli of All. 

Call on us or Kpnd for prices. 

COMSTOCK & AVERY, 
116 and 118 

Peoria, 111. 




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OAK LAWN EETEEAT FOE TEE INSAM ! 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



THIS INSTITUTION, founded by its present pro- 
prietor, is now in its ninth year of successful 
operation. Possessed of every conceivable advantage 
in location, site, retirement, and building arrange- 
ments — all carefully studied from the beginning — it 
is prepared to carr}^ into effect the most advanced 
ideas in the treatment of the insane. It especially 
adapts itself to the care of cases of a chronic nature, 
where a home with something of permanency is an 
object. Favoring circumstances permit of lower rates 
of charge than can possibly be afforded in any other 
institution so supported. The proprietor presents his 
grateful acknowledgements to the medical profession 
for the countenance it has received. 

ANDREW McFARLAND, M. D., 

October, 1880. Sole Proprietor. 

CHAS. ZIMMERMANN & CO., 

Druggists & Chemists, 

^""^ ^""^ And. Dealers in 

FANCY ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, 

Surgical Instruments, Sponges, Braces, Trusses, 
PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at all Hours of the Day 
and Night. Call No. 161, Edison Telephone. 

503 South-Adams, at the head of Bridge St., . 
PEORIA, ILL. 



o. -A.. BO"v;r:M:.iAisr &o oo.. 
Prescription Druggists, 

520 :]VCJ^TISr STI4EET, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

N. B.— A full line of Dr. Edward Squibb's Fine Chemical and Phar- 
maceutical Preparations on hand for dispensing purposes. 

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10 



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colburn; birks a co., 



Wholesale Druggists, 



-AND DEALERS IN 



^uf g'idkl li\0tf uir\er\t^ 




ATOMIZERS, 
ALL VARIETIES. 



Kleetro- Magnetic Machines, 

CRUTCHES, 




PLAIN AND PADDED ARM PIECES. 



Instruments Repaired and Nickle Plated. 

Our Instrument Catalogue for 1880 now ready for 
distribution. 



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11 



Fever Thermometers 

tTTTTTrnTTTTm[TfffTf|Ti"T l lTM H 1 1 lTNTrn~'ll 11 1 •■W iTTlTTrTTTl I iTTTTTf 1 1 1 M I H iT ^ 
> ■ ' =^ 3 > ' ' '-^lOO ' ' ' ' .5 ' ' ' '/lO^ 



Four and Five-inch, Self-Registering, Hicks' Patent 
Lens Front, in Box^A/^ood Case. 





FOWLER'S H. R PESSARIES 




Celluloid Cylindrical Speculum, 

CELLULOID BI-VALYE SPEGOLUI, 

CELLULOID HYPODERMIC SYRINGES, 

CELLULOID CATHETERS AND BOU&IES. 



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Goods. 

V/rite for Quotations before buying. 

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12 Aclvertisements. 



COMPARATIVE VALUE 

MALTINE AS a'cONSTRUCTIVE. 

It has been clearly shoTen by the most distingrulshed chemists in this 
country and Europe, -who have made comparative analyses of MALTINE 
and Extracts of Malt that, quantitatively, MALTINE contains from tvro 
to three times the nutritive and digestive properties that are found in 
the best Extracts of Malt in the market. 

This fact has been amply demonstrated by the concurrent opinion of the 
most eminent medical auiii'^rity in the world; and the practical experience of 
nearly the entire Mediial Profession of the United States and Great Britain 
proves beyoni question that MALTINE, as a Constructive, is by far the most 
valuable product yet presented for the consideration of si"ientiflc medical men. 

Being supplied at the same prices as the ordinary Extract of V^^XX^SLn^ con- 
taining fully double the quantity of Diastase and nutritive elements to be found in the 
best of them, it can be piescribed at less than one-half the expense. 



Extracts shoiving the value o/Maltine in comparison with Extract of Malt, and as a Constructive. 

In order to test the comparative merits of MALTINE and the various Ex- 
tracts of Malt in the mariiet, I purchased from different druggists samples of 
MALTINE and of the most frequently prescribed Extracts of Malt, and have 
subjected tnem to chemical analysis;. 

As the result of these examinations, I find that MALTINE contains from 
half as much again to three times the quantity of Phosphates, and from three ta 
fourteen times as much Disastase and other Albuminoids as any of the Extracts 
of Malt examined. Pkof. Walter S. Hainks, M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, Mush Medical College, Chicago^ 

In comparison with the alcoholic Malt Extracts, your MALTINE is about 
ten times as valuable, as a Hesh former; from five to ten times as valuable, as a 
heat producer ; and at ieast five times as valuable, as a starch digesting agent. 

Professor Attfield, F.CS., 
Professor of Practical Chemistry to the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. 

MALTINE is superior in therapeutic and nutritive value to any Extract of 
Malt made from Barley alone, or to any preparation of one variety of grain. 

Prof. R. Ogden Doremus. 

In its superiority to the Extract of Mall prepared from Barley alone I consider it to 
be all that is claimed for it, and prize it as a very valuable addition to the list of 
tonic and nutritive agents. C. H. Lewis, M. D., Jackson, Mich. 

The following is an extract from a report of Wm Porter, A.M., M.D., St. Louis, Mo. 

After a full trial of the different Oils, and Extract of Malt preparations, in 
both hospital and private practice, I find MALTINE most applicable to the 
largest number of patients, and superior to any renaedy of its class. 



Pkof. L. P. Vandell,, ia Louisville Medical iV^et^'*, says: — MALTINE de- 
serves to stand in the front rank of ihe constructives ; and the constructlves, by 
their preventive, corrective and curative power, are probably the most widely 
useful therapeutical agents that we possess. 



Ann Aubor, Mich., Sept. 25th, 1880. 
An increasing experience in the u.se of MALTINE coullims my former 
opinion as to its great therapeutic value, and i. should hardly know how to get 
along without it. E. S. Dkmster, M. D., 

Prof. Obntel. and Lit. Worn, and Children, University of Mich., and in Dartmouth College 

In answering advertisements, mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



i 



Advertisements. 13 



During the Past Year 

We placed Maltine and several of its compounds in the 
hands of one hundred leading Physicians of the United 
States, Europe, Australia and India with a request that they 
thoroughly test it in comparison -with, other remedies which 
are generally used as eonstructives in Pulmonary Phthisis 
and other wasting diseases. 

From the tone of the seventy reports already received, fifteen of which 
are upon comparative tests with the principal Extracts of Malt in the market, 
we are fully justified in making the following claims, viz : 

FIRST:— That Maltine (plain) increases weight and 
strength far inore rapidly than Cod, Liver Oil 
or other nutritive agents. 

SECOJVD:~That Maltine, Maltine with Peptones, 
and Maltine with Pepsin and Pancreatine 
rapidly correct imperfect digestion and mal- 
nwtrition in wasting diseases. 

THIRD : — That Maltine is the most important con- 
stritctive agent now hnown to the Medical Pro- 
fession in Pulmonary Phthisis. 

FOURTH: — That Maltine causes an increase in 
weight and> strength one a.nd a half to three 
times greater than any of the Extracts of Malt.* 
LIST OF MALTINE PREPARATIONS: 

MALTINE— Plain. MALTINE with Iodides. 

MALTINE with Hops. MALTINE with Peptones. 

MALTINE with Alteratives. MALTINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Beef and Iron. MALTINK with Phosphates. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil. MALTINE with Phosphates Iron and Quinia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil & Iodide of Iron. MALTINE with Phos. Iron, Quinia & Strychnia. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Pancreatine. MALTINE Ferrated. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphates. MALTINE WINE. 

MALTINE with Cod Liver Oil and Phosphorus. MALTINE WINE with Pepsin and Pancreatine. 

MALTINE with Hypophosphites. MALTO-YEKBINE. 

*Maltlne is a concentrated extract of malted Barley, Wheat and Oats. In its 
preparation we employ not to exceed 150 deg. Fahr., thereby retaining all the nu- 
tritive and digestive agents unimpaired. Extracts of Malt are made from Barley 
alone, by the German process which directs that the mash be heated to 212 deg. 
Fahr, thereby coagulating the Albuminoids and almost wholly destroying the 
starch digestive principle, Diastase. 

4®= We will forward gratuitously a $1.00 bottle of any of the above prepara- 
tions upon payment of the expressage. Address 

REED & CARrHRICK, 

Laboratory: ( 19(i Fulton Street, 

Yonkers on the Hudson- ) New TTork. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peorta MEniCAL Monthly. 



14 



Advertisements. 



NIALTOPEPSINE-TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



The experience we have had of many years as Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
has brought us more or less in regular contact with the medical profession and 
its wants, and has afforded us advantages for experiment, studj' and practical 
development, which have engaged our attention in perfecting new and more effi- 
cacious agents for physicians' use in the control, subjection, treatment and cure 
of diseases, and we trust the Medical Profession will feel assured that in no in- 
stance shall we solicit their attention, except we have some production worthy 
of their highest consideration and confidence. 

We would respectfully call your attention to our new preparation Maltopep- 
sine, which we regard a very important Remedial Agent for Indigestion, Consti- 
pation, Dyspepsia, Vomiting in Pregnancy. Nervousness, Loss of Appetite, all 
forms of Gastric Derangement, Atonic Diarrhoea, and Indigestive Diarrhoea of 
children. This valuable remedy contains the digestive and nutritive properties 
ol the grain unimpaired, combined with the active agents of digestion, viz: Dias- 
tase, Pepsine, Lactic Acid, Hydrochloric Acid, with a small addition of Phos- 
phoric Acid, Powdered Firwein, and the Bromide and Chloride of Aluminium 
and Sugar of Milk. TESTIMONIALS: 



R. K. Clauk, JI. D., Georgia, Vt.: 

Gentlemeu — A medical friend gave mo a 
small sample bottle of your Maltopepsine, 
which I took with apparent decided benefit. I 
did not vomit during the week I had the med- 
icine to take, nor have I been troubled up to 
this time, and as I do not wish to be without so 
valuable a medicine, I enclose two dollars with 
the request to have you send nie by return mail 
the value of the money sent. I am very confi- 
dent it will entirely cure me, as the small 
amount used acted so favorably. I would like 
also to use it in my practice, as it will certainly 
prove verj' beneficial in all cases of dyspepsia. 
New Lebanon, N. Y., Deo. 11, '79. 
Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Having suffered for 
Bome months past from Gastric derangement 
and most distressing dj'syeptic symptoms, I was 
instructed by my physician a week or two ago, 
to make a trial of your new preparation Malto- 
pepsine, and I am happy to say it has given me 
more relief than any other remedy I have ever 
tried. The disagreeable nausea and vomiting 
after eating have altogether disappeared, my 
appetite is better than for a long time — the sick 
headaches that caiised me so much annoyance 
have ceased to trouble me, and my general 
health seems fully re-established. These good 
results are due entirely to Maltopepsine, and 
I feel it an act of justice to you, and a duty to 
others who may be .suffering from like causes, 
to state the facts of the case. 

Yours, Rcsp'lly, J. H. .Johnston. 

C. A. MosiiER, Druggist, West Troy. N. Y. 

Messrs. Tii.den & Co. — You certainly have 
got a wonderful preparation in your Jlaltopep- 
sine. I gave the samples to the doctors, and 
every one of them speak in its favor and say it 
is far superior to any similar preparation. 

One doctor gave it when Lactojiciitino had 
failed him, and to liis surprise was just the 
thing. 

U. M. Wilson, M. D., N. Y., Nov. 10, '79. 
Gentlemen — I consider your Maltopopsine 
the most valuable remedy ever known for Dys- 
pepsia and all forms of (iastric derangement. 



INDIANOLA, Iowa, Jan. 21, 1880. 
Tii.den & Co. — Have used your Maltopepsine 
in a case of obstinate vomiting in pregnancy, 
when everything had failed. Tlie result was 
very gratifying— so much so, that I wish you to 
send me one pound of Maltopepsine by express 
at once. Yours truly, 

E. L. Baker, M. D. 

E. M. Bibber, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Says: "Have been using your Maltopepsine 
freely and with the most perfect satisfaction, 
preferring it to any similar preparation 
known." 
A. T. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Reports that so far as he had used our Malto- 
pepsine, he had found it far superior to any 
other preparation he has ever used. 

New Lebanon, N. Y., Feb. .5, 1880. 
X. T. Bates, M. D. 

Messrs. Tilden & Co. — Of late I have been 
using your new preparation, the Maltopepsine, 
and am so highly pleased with its action, that I 
am induced to give you the results of my ex- 
perience with it. Almost invariably this rem- 
edy has given mo satisfaction, and in several 
cases of dyspepsia and irritable stomach, when 
the several preparations of Pepsin and Bismuth 
and kindred agents have failed, the use of 
Maltopepsine has been a complete success. I 
regard it particularly useful in debility of the 
stomach following acute or chronic gastritis, 
and that attendant upon convalescence from all 
exhausting diseases. 

In vomiting of pregnancy it is a superior 
remedy. It will be found highly useful in the 
diarrhcea of children; which is generally de- 
pendent upon imperfect digestion. 

The aluminium which you have incorporated 
into it is a happy idea. I heartily recommend 
it to the profession. 

E. M. Fuller, M. D., Bath, Me. 

Speaks in the highest terms of our Malto- 
pepsine, also of our Saccharated — thinks the 
latter the strongest he has over used. 



FORMULA OF MALTOPEPSINE. 



Sugar of Milk 

Nutritives of the Grain... 
Powdered Firwein 



10 " 



I'cpsilie 

Diastase 

Lactic .\(;iil.... 



() dr. 
.-3 11. dr. 



Hyilnicliloric Acid. 

I'liosphoric Acid 

Aluminium 



,5 0. dr. 
3" « 
3 •' oz. 



PRICE 

MaltopepHine, fin oz. bot.) per oz « .7.5 I 



(1^ lb. bot.) 



doz... 
lb 



.00 

8.00 



LIST. 

We also prepare the various Elixirs 
and Syrups in combination with Malto- 
pepsine. 



Prepared by Tilden &. Co., New Lebanon, Bf . Y., and a* JLtberty St., N. Y. 



Advertisements. 15 



e: L, I x: 1 1? 



lODO BROMIDE OF CALCIUM COMP. 



An EPITOME of the numerous cases reported monthly 
in the Journal of Materia Medica embracing the following 
diseases, sent on ajjpHculion: 

Scrofula ; Scrofulous enlargement of the cervical glands ; Scrofulous 
aflFections of the bone; Scrofulous swelling and abscess of the knee; 
Scrofulous Eczema; White Swelling ; Scrofulous swelling of the glands 
of the neck. 

Cancerous affections; Cancerous affections complicated with Scrofula; 
Lupus. 

Necrosis of the Tibia, Femur and Ilium; Osteo-Periostitis; Exostosis 
of Ulna; Caries of Vertebra; Synovitis of knee joint; Hip joint dis- 
eases ; Anchylosis. 

Psoriasis ; Prurigo. Tuberculous affections of the bones. 

Skin Diseases of all kinds. Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis. 

Syphilis; Syphilitic sore throat ; Gonorrhoea. 

Enlargement of the Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys. 

Bronchocele ; Goitre; Exophthalmic Goitre. 

Epilepsy; Otorrhoea; Deafness. 

Diphtheria; Erysipelas; Erysipelas with Scrofula; Tonsillitis. 

Gangrene of the Lungs ; Dry Gangrene ; Pleuro-Pneumonia. 

Each fluid ounce contain.s seventy-two grains of the lodo Bromide Salts. 



WITH HYDHARGYRI BICHLOKIDUM, 

And Alteratives as Stillingin, MGnispermin, Dulca- 
marin, Rumicin and Conicine. 

For some time we have made specially this preparation, to meet those cases 
constantly occurring in the practice of Physicians, in which the impression of 
mercury is required, and it has been the custom of many in the most inveterate 
cases of Scrofula, and particularly in thatof Scrofulo-Syphilis, to give for a week 
this combination of one one-hundredth of a grain to each fluid dram, and then 
resume the Elixir plain, alternating as circumstances indicate. In this special 
combination, we have increai-ed the Stillingin and other alteratives specially 
applicable to t.he treatment of Syphilis and its complications, from that used in 
the plain Elixir. 

Each fluid ounce contains seventy-two grains of lodo Bromide Comp. Salts, 
and eight one-hundredths of a grain of Hydrargyri Bichloridum. 



WITH IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

We have added to our list the Elixir lodo Bromide of Calcium Comp. with 
Iodide of Potassium. Each ounce contains 72 grains of the lodo Bromide Comp. 
Salts, with 33 grains of Iodide of Potassium. The vegetable alteratives are the 
same as in the plain Elixir. 

TILDEN &- CO., New Lebanon, N. Y., and a* Liberty St., New York:* 



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16 



Advertisements. 



RUSH 




CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Annual, Spring Course, or Post Graduate An- 
nouncement, address the Secretary, 



Jkii\e^ S. !35tl\erid^e, 



1634 MICHIGAN AVENUE. 



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Advertisements. 17 




A well-known Institution conducted by the 

Sisters of St. Francis. 



Delightfully situated on the bluff, above the city, com- 
manding a magnificent view of city, lake and sur- 
rounding country. The building is very commodious, 
and having been built expressly for the Hospital, has 
all the necessary conveniences and improvements; 
large rooms, well ventilated, and everything comfort- 
able. 



Physicians in Attendance. 

Surgeon Dr. J. T. Stewart. 

Consulting Surgeons... Drs. Jos. Studer and John Murphy. 

Physician Dr. J. S. Miller. 

Consulting Physicians Drs. R. Boal and J. C. Frye. 

Oculist and Aurist Dr. J. Perrin Johnson. 

Any one wishing to retain their own physician can do so. Phy- 
sicians sending tlieir own patients, retain the full benefit of their 
practice. 



Terms of Admission. 

The apartments for patients are private rooms and general wards. 
Elegant private rooms, including attention and medicine, are from 
$7 to $10 per week, according to size of room and accommodation 
required. In the general wards the cost is from $4 to $6 per week. 

Medical attendance is extra, and is cliarged to patients at the reg- 
ular rates. 

MOTHER MARY FRANCIS, 

Sioperior. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peokia Medical Monthly. 



18 



Advertisements. 



ISAAC A^ALKER <&; SON 



Importers of 




AND 



Muzzle-Loading 

SHOT GUNS! 



AGENTS FOR THE 



PARKER AND COLT 



SHOT GUNS. 



A SPLENDID LINE OF 

FishingTackle 

AND 

Sporting Ectuipmeuts. 
EVOLVERS, 

Fine Cuilery. 

ALSO, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

HARDWARE ! 

125 and 127 

SOUTH lASHIMTON 

STREET, 

PEORIA, 

ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements. 




(LIQ^XJIX).) 



FORMULA : 

EACH FLUID DRA-CHM CONTAINS 

5 1-2 gr. free pliosphoric acid (PO5). 
3 gr. phosphate of lime (3CaO PO5). 
1-2 gr. phosphate of mag. (3MgO PO5) 
1-6 gr. phosphate of iron (Fca O3 PO5). 
1-4 gr. phosphate of potash (3 kOtPOg). 

Total amount of Phosphoric Acid 
in one fluid drachm, free and com- 
bined, 7 grains. 

It contains no pyrophosphate, or 
metaphosphate of any base whatever. 



F 



or Dyspepsia, Mental and Physic^al Exbaustion, JTervousness, 
Diminished Yitality, Urinary Difficulties, Etc. 

HORSFORD'S 
ACID PHOSPHATES. 

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. H0R8F0RD, of Cambridge, Mass. 
There seems to be no difference of opinion, in liigh medical authority, of the 
value of phosphoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public 
■which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. 



It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. 

No danger can attend its use. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. 



W. A. HAMMOND, M. D., late Surgeon-Gen- 
eral U. S. Army, said that under the use of ar- 
senic and Horsford's Acid Phosphate, a young 
lady rescued her reason who had been ren- 
dered insane by a dream. 

DR. M. H. HENRY, of New York, says: 
Horsford's Acid Phosphate possesses claims as 
a beverage beyond anything I know of in the 
form of Medicine, and in nervous diseases I 
know of no preparation to equal it. 



DR. REUBEN A. VANCE, of New York: 
The preparation on which I place the most re- 
liance is Horsford's Acid Phosphate. 

The late WINSLOW LEWIS, M. D., of Bos- 
ton, said : Having in my own person experi* 
enced those ills for which the Acid Phosphate 
is prescribed, 1 have found great relief andi 
alleviation by its use, most cheerfully attest 
my appreciation of its excellence. 



Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free 
on application to manufacturers. 

Physicians desiring to test it will be furnished a bottle free of expense, except 
express charges, if they mention Peokia Medical Monthly. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, Rhode island. 

In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



To the Medical Profession. 



LACTOPEPTINE 



We take pleasure in calling the attention of the profession to 
LACTOPEPTINE. After a long series of careful experiments, we are 
able to produce its various components in an absolutely pure state, 
thus removing all unpleasant odor and taste, (also slightly changing 
the color). We can confidently claim, that its digestive properties 
are largely increased thereby, and can assert without hesitation that 
it is as perfect a digestive as can be produced. 

LACTOPEPTINE is the most important remedial agent ever pre- 
sented to the Profession for Indigestion, Dyspepsia. Vomiting in 
Pregnancy, Cholera Infantum, Constipation, and all diseases arising 
from imperfect nutrition. It co'ntains the five active agents of diges- 
tion, viz: Pepsin, Pancreatine, Diastase, or Veg. Ptyalin, Lactic 
and Hydrochloric Acids, in combination with Sugar of Milk. 

FORMULA OP liACTOPEPTIWE. 

Sugar of Milk 40 ounces. I Veg. Ptyaliu or Diastase, 4 drachms. 

Pepsin Bounces. Lactic Acid 5fl. drs. 

Pancreatine Bounces. | Hydrochloric Acid 5fl. drs. 

L ACTOP E PT I N E i^ ^o'd entirely by Physicians' Prescriptions, and its almost uni- 
versal adoption by physicians is the strongest guarantee we can give that its therapeutic value 
Las l>een most thoroughly established. 

THE UNDERSIGNED HAVING TESTED LACTOPEPTINE, RECOMMEND IT TO THE PROFESSION. 

ALFRED L. LOOMIS, M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Practice of Medicine, University of the Gily of New. York. 

SAMUEL R. PERCY, M. D., 

Professor Materia Medico, New YorTc Medical College. 

F. LE ROY SATTERLEE, M. D., Ph. D., 

Prof. Chem., Mat. Med. and Therap. in N. Y. Col. of Dent.; Prof. Chem. and Hyg. in Am. Vet. Col., etc. 

JAS. AITKEN xMEIGS. M. D., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Prof, of the Institutes of Med. and Med. Juris., Jeff. Medical Ool.; Phy. to Penn. Hos, 

W. W. DAWSON, M. D., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Prof. Prin. and Prac. Surg., Med. Col. of Ohio; Surg, to Good Samaritan Hospital. 

ALFRED F. A. KING, M. D., Washington, D. C, 

Prof, of Obstetrics, University of Vermont. 

D. W. YANDELL, M. D.. 

Prof, of the Science and Art of Surg, and Clinical Surg., University of Louisville, Ky. 

L. P. YANDELL, M. D., 

Prof, of Clin. Med., Diseases of Children, and Dermatology, University of Louisville, Ky. 

ROBT. BATTEY, M. D., Rome. Ga., 

Emeritus Prof, of Obstetrics, Atlanta Med. College, Ex-Pres. Med. Association of Georgia. 

CLAUDE H. MASTIN, M. D.. L.L. D., Mobile, Ala. 

Prof. H. C. BARTLETT, Ph. D., F. C. S., London, England. 



The NEW YORK PHAEMAOAL ASSOCIATION, 

No8. 10 &12 COLLEGE PLACE, NEW YORK. 
P.O. BOX, 1574. 

Id answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medicai. Monthi.y. 



Advertisements. 



Salicylate of Cinchonidia. 



Satisfactory therapeutical results from the administration of 
Salicylic Acid in the treatment of Gout, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, etc., etc., have been much modified by the disturbance of the 
general system, especially the stomach, owing to the large doses re- 
•quired. 

Medical men have experimented with the salts of this acid, hoping 
to qualify this tendency. That most largely used, (the Salicylate of 
Soda) has proven much less objectionable than the acid itself, but long 
•continued use results in the same trouble to the class of patients with 
whom freedom from nausea and internal irritation is a first necessity. 

Being convinced that the acid would be best prescribed in com- 
bination with some other base, it was suggested by Mr. F. H. Rosen- 
•GARTEN, of Messrs. Rosengarten & Sons, that the salt of a Cinchona 
Alkaloid would aid the remedial properties of the Salicylic Acid, in 
adding tonic, stimulant, and anti-periodic properties, and with such a 
powerful alkaloid as Cinchonidia, the dose required could be lessened. 

This salt opens up a wide range of uses in conditions, where, 
heretofore, physicians have not tested Salicylic Acid, for fear of direct 
•debility and loss of muscular power so often induced by its use. 

Practical experience has borne out the above theory quite fully , 
and in a number of cases of severe Neuralgia and acute Rheuma- 
tism, the Salicylate of Cinchonidia has given immediate relief in 
doses of five to ten grains, where Quinine, Salicylic Acid, or other 
general treatment has failed. 

Since the introduction of this Salt, it has been tried in the Jeffer- 
son Medical College Hospital at Philadelphia; St. Joseph's Hospital 
at Philadelphia, and by a number of careful practitioners, with im- 
mediate good effect in every case, so far as heard from, in fact, better 
results than could have been anticipated. 

It is administered in five grain doses, until the paroxysms of 
Neuralgia cease. This generally requires say from fifteen to twenty 
grains, five grains every two hours. The Salt, representing about 
one-third of its weight of Salicylic Acid, is almost insoluble in 
water, and is incompatible with iron solutions. We urge its trial in 
all cases of acute articular Rheumatism, Gout, Neuralgia, Sciatica, 
«tc., etc., with almost absolute certainty of prompt relief. Owing to 
its insolubility, it cannot be given in solution, and physicians will 
find the nearest approach to this, in the administration of our Com- 
pressed Powders or Pills. These being free from coating, must 
necessarily disintegrate more quickly than a coated pill. 

We prepare the Salt in pills of two and one-half grains each, 
which will enable the physician to graduate the dose for children, as 
well as for adults. We recommend them in preference to a larger 
pill, as they are much more readily swallowed. 

JOHN ^A/'YETH & BROTHER, 
CHEMISTS, 

PHILADELPHIA. 
In answering advertisements mention the Peoria Medical Monthly. 



Advertisements. 



THE FIJIAN REMEDY FOR NEURALGIA. 



This remedy has been used for several centuries by the aborigines of the Fiji 
Islands, though introduced to the notice of the profession in England only about 
a year ago. 

The success attending its use in the hands of Drs. Sidney Ringer and Wm. 
Murrell, of London, England, induced us to dispatch an agent to the Fiji Islands 
for the collection of a quantity of this valuable drug. Heretofore the secret of 
its source had been jealously guarded by the Fiji chiefs, the knowledge of its 
composition being handed down as an heirloom from one generation to another. 
Through Mr. Ryder, a resident from Fiji, a specimen of the remedy was first 
brought to England, with the statement that he received it from a European who 
had married a chief's daughter and had learned the secret from his father-in-law 

Tonga, as prepared by the Fijians is a compound of several plants, and occurs 
in the form of small loose bundles, the remedy being enveloped in a wrapper of 
the inner bark of the cocoanut tree. 

The natives administer it in the form of an infusion, but it has been found 
that alcohol much more thoroughly extracts its active principles. 

Drs. Ringer and Murrell base their report of the use of the drug on a sufficient 
number of cases, and C. Bader, ophthalmic surgeon to Guy's Hospital, says ; "The 
results obtained by Drs. Ringer and Murrell fully coincide with mine. I have 
notes of cures of brain and kidney disease in which Tonga alone succeeded in re- 
moving pain. All cases of neuralgia (supra- and infra-orbital branches of the fifth 
nerve) with swelling of the temporal veins during the attack were benefited." 

Reports from Sidney, Australia, show that Tonga has also been successfully 
employed as a remedy for neuralgia by the profession of that country. 

THE FLUID EXTRACT CAN BE OBTAINED FROM 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO.. 

Manufacturing Chemists and Pharmacists, DETROIT, MICH. 

LIPPIA MEXICANA. 

A NE^V EXPECTORANT. 



This new Mexican remedy is introduced to the medical profession of this 
country on the authority of Dr. A. H. Saxton, Baltimore, Md., who has communi- 
cated the results of his experience in its use in an article in the January, 1881, 
number of the Tiikrapkutic Gazette. 

The demulcent and expectorant properties claimed for the drug by Dr. Sax- 
ton, are such as must commend it to the careful attention of the profession, and 
especially so during the season of catarrhal affections of the respiratory pass- 
ages. A remedy which combines demulcent with expectorant properties, and at 
the same time does not nauseate, must meet with favor. The cases reported by 
Dr. Saxton would also seem to show the drug to be possessed of an alterative in- 
fluence in the respiratory mucous membrane which must enhance its value In 
those chronic affections so often rebellious to treatment. 

We prepare a tincture of Lippla Mexicana and will be pleased to furnish a re- 
print ol Dr. Saxton's article, on application. 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 

Manufactiirinrj Chemists and Pharmacists, DETROIT, MICH. 

In answering advertisements mention the Pboria Medical Monthlt. 



f^eofik ^edidkl ^oi^tlily. 

VOL. I. MARCH, 1881. NO. 11. 



Pioneer Doctors. 



BY ROBERT BOAL, M. D. 



Read before the "Dickinson Medical Club,''^ and published by its request. 



DR. EDWARD DICKINSON. 

Dr. D. was born in 1801, in Hadley, Massachusetts. He 
.:graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1830, 
and soon after commenced the practice of medicine in 
Hadley, his birth-place. Here he remained but a short 
time, and removed to iN'orthampton, Mass., where he prac- 
ticed two or three years in connection with Dr. Flint. His 
health becoming impaired, he left, and spent a year in the 
^outh, the summer in Tennessee and the winter in Mobile, 
Alabama. He came to Peoria in 1835. His health being 
^till poor, he did not engage in the practice of medicine 
immediately upon his arrival, but like many others went 
into what was then regarded as the short road to compe- 
tence and wealth — speculation in land and town lots. He 
purchased a farm in the neighborhood of the town, now 
city, of Peoria, and engaged in farming, in addition to his 
speculations in real estate. 

A year's experience on the farm satislied him that farm- 
ing was not his vocation, and he returned to the town and 
■engaged in the practice of medicine. A partnership was 

At the last meeting of the Club, upon the suggestion of the President, it 
•decided that the topic presented for consideration at its next meeting should not 
be exclusively medical. I have endeavored to partially comply with this deci- 
sion, and instead of a strictly medical subject, to give a brief sketch of the life 
and character of a medical man— that of a worthy deceased professional brother 
an whose honor this Club has been named. 



278 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

formed between him and the late Dr. Rouse, which contin- 
ued but for a short time. They found it more advantageous- 
to practice alone, and the partnership was dissolved with- 
out any ill-feeling on the part of either. On the contrary ,^ 
their friendship, both personal and professional, continued 
throughout their lives. 

The financial storm which swept over the country from 
1837 to 1840 numbered our friend among its victims, and 
left him broken and ruined pecuniarily. He did not 
despair, however, but set himself to work to repair his- 
shattered fortunes, or if not successful, to honestly, as far 
as able, pay every dollar he owed, and it is to his honor 
that he devoted twenty years of the best portion of his life- 
to that purpose, and succeeded. He might have availed 
himself of the relief of the bankrupt law of 1840, as did 
thousands of honest, and other thousands of dishonest 
men, but his pride and sense of right revolted against it. 
As his life drew to its close, he had the proud satisfaction 
of knowing that he had defrauded no one, and that he 
would die as he had lived, poor in this world's goods, but 
rich ?n a good name. Of Dr. Dickinson it can be truth- 
fully said that he conscientiously discharged his duty as a 
man and a physician, and this means the practice of the 
virtues and the avoidance of any vice. All his professional 
duties were performed in the right spirit, and to the satis- 
faction of his patients — and to the upright medical man 
who feels his responsibility and acts accordingly, no incense 
is sweeter, no reward greater, than the blessings he receives 
from the lips of the sick and afflicted. He was a man of 
truth; he despised all false pretenses, and neither by act 
nor speech was he guilty of the little meannesses and petty 
arts so often made use of, to advance the pecuniary interest 
or to increase the notoriety (not reputation) of the medical 
demagogue. 

He strictly and conscientiously practiced the great rule 
of the physician, that his first duty was to his patient, the 
second only to himself. Dr. Dickinson was temperate; he 
was neverguilty of the besettingand besotting vice of the use 
of strong drink, which has obscured so many bright intellects- 
in the profession, and brought its victims to an untimely 
and unhonored grave. He was pure; no breath of scandal 
ever sullied hia name; no house was closed against him for 
fear his presence would pollute its inmates. His services- 
were always rendered willingly to the poor and lowly, and 



Original Communications. 279 

he practiced those sublime virtues of the medical profes- 
sion, charity and self-denial — virtues which cause the 
possessors to brave the "pestilence which walketh in dark- 
ness, and the destruction which wasteth at noonday" — 
to penetrate the abodes of sickness and want, in hovel or 
garret, on their errands of mercy — to stand amid the storm 
of shot and shell on the battlefield, surrounded by the 
shrieks and agony of the mangled and dying, and tenderly 
minister to their necessities, with no thought of self. This 
is charity in its broadest sense, and was fitly characterized 
by the great Apostle, when in summing up the virtues he- 
declared that the " greatest of these is charity." Wha 
among us does not feel an honest pride in belonging to a 
profession whose pathway is thus marked by heroic and 
unselfish services in the cause of suffering humanity, and 
whose steps can be traced to every abode of sickness and 
sorrow ? 

Dr. Dickinson was modest and retiring. He was re- 
markably free from the vanity and egotism which, I am 
sorry to say, characterizes too many members of our pro- 
fession. He never gossipped to the community with regard 
to his patients. Their ailments, peculiarities and foibles 
were never spoken of. He never boasted of his large 
practice nor of his success. He never suffered his exploits 
to be detailed in the daily papers, nor did he boast of his 
attendance upon the rich or great. All these contemptible 
tricks he left to the small minds, who endeavor to obtain 
thereby the position and consideration in the community 
to which their merits would never raise them. He re- 
spected his profession, and above all respected himself. 
He was as free from the jealousies and the practice of the 
unfair arts which are so degrading to the profession, as 
anyone I ever knew, and his treatment of his professional 
brethren was always fair and honorable. He respected his 
profession too much to do otherwise. His feelings, habits 
and instincts were those of a gentleman, and in his inter- 
course with everyone, whether in or out of the profession,, 
he never forgot that he was one. His conduct in the sick 
room was courteous, kind, dignified and considerate. In 
short, he was a man of rare excellence in his private as 
well as professional character, and exhibited in his life a 
pure morality and cheerful affability, adorned with the 
graces of the Christian. Those who knew him will long 
cherish a pleasing recollection of his pure and upright life. 



280 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Dr. Dickinson was tall and erect, with a manly, digni- 
:fied and commanding presence. For the last few years of 
his life he snftered from an atfection of the heart (angina 
pectoris), of which he died. He bore his suffering with 
fortitude and resignation to the end, leaving us a model 
well worthy of our imitation. Dr. D. died childless. His 
widow still lives, and although in feeble health and ad- 
vanced in years, is the same bright and genial woman who 
made the sunshine of his life and rendered his home so 
happy. There is a mingled feeling of sadness and pleasure 
in thus recalling the scenes and actors in the past. Sad to 
know that we shall see them no more — pleasant to revive 
our recollections of how they lived and looked and acted. 
Sad to feel that we have lost the friends of our manhood 
and age, and that the evening of life is throwing its shad- 
ows across the paths of those who remain ; but a pleasure 
to remember all the good, and so little of the evil in their 
lives. 

" When I remember all 

The friends, so fondly linked together, 
I've seen around me fall 

Like leaves in wintry weather, 
I feel like one who treads alone 

Some banquet hall deserted, 
Whose lights are dead, whose garlands gone, 

And all but me departed." 

For this meagre and imperfect sketch I have no apology 
to make, I regret, however, that either the able President 
of this Club, Dr. Murphy, *br its esteemed member, Dr. 
Frye, who both knew him so well, and who for a quarter 
of a century held intimate social and professional relations 
with him, had not undertaken the task, but left it to one so 
much less qualified, to pay this feeble tribute to the mem- 
ory of an accomplished physician, an esteemed friend, and 
a pure and upright man. 



Formatioii of New Bone. 

A few years ago I was called to see a young man, seven- 
teen years of age, who had fallen from a tree. In falling 
he struck upon the ulna side of the wrist in such a way as 
to fracture the ulna about one inch from the joint, and dis- 
located the radius; the end of the radius protruded through 
the soft parts about one inch on the ulna side, near the 
point of fracture in the ulna. The integument hugged 



Original Cormnunications . 281 

the protruding ends of the radius very closely. After pro- 
curing the assistance of Dr. Boal, of this city, we gave the 
young man chloroform, and made the attempt to return 
the protruding portion of the bone to its natural position. 
But we failed to reduce it. In examining the end of the 
bone it seemed to be denuded of its periosteum. We con- 
cluded it would be better to saw off the protruding portion, 
than to attempt to replace it by cutting a way for it to go 
back through the structures about the wrist joint. We 
therefore removed about one inch of the articulating end 
of the bone. It was then easily replaced to its natural 
side of the arm. The arm and hand were incased in a 
thick paste-board splint, with a hole cut so that the wound 
in the arm could be dressed without removing the splints. 
I did not remove the splint for four weeks ; everything 
seemed to be doing well, the arm and hand retained their 
natural position, and the wrist had its natural fullness, 
which somewhat surprised me. I reapplied the splint, the 
wound in the arm having healed and the fracture in the 
ulna being well united, and I let it remain in the splintfor two 
weeks longer. I then removed all bandages, and found the 
wrist joint natural in every respect, the movement of the 
joint perfect, except the stiffness from want of use. I could 
distinctly feel the end of the radius, and could detect no 
deficiency in the bone, the ulna had united without any 
shortening, and there was a perfect wrist and arm. There 
was less swelling about the hand and wrist than is usual in 
oases where the hand and arm have been bandaged for that 
length of time. I examined the arm about two years ago, 
and it would have been impossible for any one to have told 
which arm had been injured, except from the scar on the 
side of the arm where the bone protruded. He said that 
arm was just as strong as the other, and as perfect in every 
way. How was that bone reformed? My own opinion has 
always been that the ligaments surrounding the end of the 
bone retained portions of the periosteum, and that from 
this the neoplasm and the elements necessary to form new 
bone were thrown out. The new bone could not have been 
formed from material thrown out by the end of the bone, 
■or from the fractured ulna, else there would have been con- 
solidation that would have interfered with the natural 
movements of the wrist joint. 

J. L. Hamilton, M. D. 
Peoria, 111. 



282 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

Broncliitis in Old Persons— A phase of this Disease with 
Reference to Treatment. 

During the progress of extensive bronchitis in the fee- 
ble, and especially in the old, when there is some oppression 
of breathing from accumulations in the fine tubes, we may 
often doubt the necessity or propriety of using emetics, 
and give or withhold them, as we may estimate the danger 
of accumulation. When this danger is present no one 
would refuse to use them ; but we would gladly adopt some 
means that would avoid the extreme condition which re- 
quires their use. 

The feebleness or structural debility of age, and the 
coughing, much of the time in a sitting posture, the great 
amount expectorated, dense with cellular elements from 
the blood, call upon us to save the patient from every un- 
necessary source of exhaustion. I would most especially 
direct attention to the relations between the fever process, 
condition of the circulation and the cough, at ditferent 
times through the day, as they may guide us to a rational 
treatment. The curve of temperature in these cases, is an 
exaggeration of that curve which, in health, shows the 
natural variations through the day, the lowest point being 
in the morning and the highest in the afternoon. The 
pulse in the morning, is either small and weak, or small 
and wiry, and it may be intermittent; we may call it the 
morning depression, perhaps without chill; as the fever 
rises the pulse becomes full, and the surface from pallor, 
becomes somewhat flushed, and this fullness and compara- 
tive plethora of the surface continue after the fever, but 
gradually decline through the night to the morning de- 
pression. 

It is an important observation, contrasted in ordinary 
bronchitis, that as the fever rises, or without fever, as the 
pulse becomes fuller and the surface circulation improves, 
the cough and quantity raised become much less, and the 
breathing much easier; and this comparative comfort to 
the patient may continue through the night in proportion 
to the fullness of the peripheral blood vessels. The morn- 
ing depression brings a distressing cough, which continues 
for hours ; and the quantity raised is much too great to 
admit of being accounted for, as a mere accumulation in the 
tubes during the night; it is evidently a result of the 
injected condition of the bronchial blood vessels, secondary 
to or coincident with the constricted state of the peripheral 



Original Communications. 283 

circulation ; there is then a turgescence of extensive 
mucous surfaces with a corresponding shrinking, with 
pallor of the cutaneous surface, and a copious exudation 
into the bronchial tubes. It would seem that, during the 
day, the vasomotor nerves in their periods of over action, 
exhaustion and rest, allow an alternating flux and reflux of 
blood between the cutaneous and bronchial surfaces, either 
with or without fever. It is easy to imagine how injurious 
these alternations may be in prolonging and extending the 
bronchial disease. It is of the highest importance to avoid 
the morning depression which causes the excessive exhaust- 
ing cough, and quantity raised also, interfering to some 
extent, with aeration and thereby with digestion. A tem- 
porary failure of digestion in these patients, may quickly 
cause much weakness ; and so important is nutrition with 
them that concentrated nourishment, and perhaps stimu- 
lants, should be given very frequently. 

In this class of cases, therefore, a most important indi- 
cation to guide in treatment relates to the circulation, and 
calls upon us to increase the fullness of the peripheral 
vessels (including those of the skin), at the time when the 
periodical depression, just described, would be expected. 
By so doing, we would relieve the bronchial vessels, the 
cough, and the amount raised would be less, and the breath- 
ing easier. 

As to the agents to be used for this purpose, I will only 
speak of a few, but especially of belladonna, salicylic acid^ 
and quinine. In the morning, but usually earlier than "In 
the morning by the bright light," a full dose of quinine 
should be given, and also the belladonna, sufficiently to 
cause a very slight flushing of the surface, which should be 
maintained only through the forenoon. It will be noticed 
that in these cases belladonna is remarkably well tolerated, 
and that the cough, but especially the quantity raised, will 
quickly become much less. Under these circumstances we 
need not fear making the cough " tight." It is true the 
patient may complain a little of this sensation, but the 
breathing of hot vapor from boiling water gives such relief 
that it will be called for when this bad feeling may return. 
Mustard draughts and hot bran poultices are also favorable 
at this time. The use of salicylic acid, though it has been 
much restricted to diseases having a septic origin, may 
have a wider range of application depending upon its- 
ability, which seems a true one, to equalize the general cir- 



^84 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

culation, when disturbed by extensive local disease of 
unknown origin. Accordingly, it may be used in these 
cases, unless the pulse is weak, and continued at uniform 
intervals. A small and wiry pulse would rather indicate 
its use than otherwise. It should be given in a perfect 
solution with citrate of potassium, otherwise the fine par- 
ticles adhering upon the alimentary tract to the stomach 
may excite reflex disturbance and vomiting. Though con- 
trasting with belladonna, in the manner of its action, it 
seems to supplement or sustain more permanently the good 
efl:ect8 of that drug in reducing the cough and the amount 
raised. Day by day the morning depression, with its ac- 
companying distress, diminishes, and the appetite, diges- 
tion and strength improve. It is true, however, that if, at 
any time, the breathing does become seriously oppressed 
by accumulations, by swelling of the fine tubes, or by indi- 
rect interference with the pulmonic circulation, in either 
•case we should not hesitate to use the propulsive efiects of 
ipecacuhana ; or, with great caution, under the proper cir- 
cumstances, we might try the peripheral dilating action of 
nitrate of amyl. 

Perfect recovery in this class of cases can seldom be ex- 
pected ; for usually these attacks are but acute exacerba- 
tions of a chronic bronchitis which has existed for years. 
This chronic bronchitis has one interesting peculiarity, in 
that the cough and amount raised vary inversely with every 
slight variation in health or strength, from any cause; even 
a temporary exhaustion from over-exertion is quickly fol- 
lowed by increased cough and expectoration. Therefore, 
a general restorative treatment is of the highest importance. 

I would mention that the balsams, and especially balsam 
Peru, and also coco, canabis indica, and oxide of zinc find 
some application at this time. 

M. J. Jones, M. D. 

Peoria, 111. 

Iodide of Ethyl in Dyspnoea. 

Dr. Lawrence, in the Medical Record, June 19, 1880, con- 
siders this drug of great value in the treatment of spasmodic 
asthma, and of all sorts of nervous dyspnoea. Let it first be 

fiven by inhalation from a handkerchief containing a few 
rops; then when the patient has become a little accus- 
tomed to the odor, it may be inhaled directly from the bottle, 
<}ontinuing for about ten minutes three or more times a day. 



Periscope. 285' 



§emca^^. 



Facts from the Smallpox Hospital at Troy, N. Y. 

We take the following extracts from an article by Dr. • 
C. C. Schuyler, of Troy, N. Y., published in the Medical 
and Surgical Reporter of February 19, 1881 : 

What I have to offer is merely a resume of a service of 
four months at the smallpox hospital in Troy. * "^ 
While there is little doubt that the greatest danger from 
infection in this disease is during the stage of suppuration 
and desiccation, I am led to believe, from the history of 
cases noted in families where its members have successively 
contracted the disease, that there is no stage in which it 
cannot be communicated ; that the breath and exhalations- 
from the body during that part of the period of incubation 
immediately preceding the stage of invasion can infect the 
unprotected. * * * It is well known that 

rarely does an individual suffer from a second attack of the 
disease. I have seen, I think, three exceptions, there be- 
ing room for doubt in but one, in which case no evidence- 
of a previous attack could be found upon the body. The 
history, given by the mother of the girl (whose age was 
sixteen), seemed to warrant the belief She said that when 
about four years of age she contracted the disease from her 
father; that she was nursed in the room with the father as 
soon as the disease manifested itself, which was during the 
period of desiccation. The other cases, both men, aged 
respectively thirty-six and thirty-seven, were scarred. The 
former died of the hemorrhagic form of variola. It is a fact 
worthy of note that in each of these three instances the 
primarj^ attack was previous to puberty. I say worthy of 
note, because many believe that if the protective power of 
vaccination during infancy is ever lost, it is at this period 
in life. 

The precursory signs, excepting, of course, the fever, 
were in some cases wanting, the pronounced headache and 
backache, which are as a rule present, having been wholly 
absent. It was also observed that when the eruption did 
not appear until the fourth daj^ it was invariably discrete^ 
In the discrete form it was often difficult to find umbili- 
cated vesicles at any stage of the disease. (In diagnosis 
this might be a source of error if smallpox were not pre- 
vailing.) 



286 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

In many instances I had noticed upon the forehead and 
breast, in this variety, a few aborted vesicles (I refer to 
cases admitted on the third or fourth day of the disease, or 
after the appearance of the eruption). This question im- 
mediately presented itself: Did these isolated vesicles come 
in sight, "umbilicate and abort previous to the appearance 
of the general eruption ? I was soon able, in two instances 
at least, to answer this question in the affirmative. 

I was called to see a young woman who was thought to 
be suffering from a severe cold. This was the second day 
of the attack. She had had the violent prodromic symp- 
toms of variola, and it w^as immediately suspected that she 
was suffering from that disease. Upon close inspection 
three small umbilicated vesicles were found ; one upon the 
forehead, one at the angle of the lower jaw, and one on 
the neck. Forty-eight hours after the general eruption ap- 
peared. 

Again, I saw, with a brother physician, an old gentle- 
man, on the morning of the third day of his sickness. He 
had no marked headache or backache; temperature 103J°, 
pulse quick, tongue dry, kidneys excreting but little. A 
few umbilicated vesicles were found upon the forehead, one 
or two of which were slightly crusted. The eruption made 
its appearance twenty-four hours later. Whether this is 
usual I am not prepared to say. I am not aware, however, 
that it has ever been observed. Bartholow, in his work on 
^' Practice of Medicine," refers to a form of eruption ap- 
pearing in clusters or patches, which he terms " corymbic." 
But one case having this variety of eruption was seen. 
Only a single cluster, the size of a silver dollar, appeared 
upon the left cheek. There were a few isolated vesicles, 
however, at the margin of the hair, on the forehead. A 
number of patches were present upon the legs and arms, 
the skin between them being wholly destitute of eruption 
for a distance, in some places, of at least twelve inches. 
The vesicles in some of the clusters were coherent, or in 
immediate contact, without being really cojifluent. 

Death was inevitable, as a rule, in the hemorrhagic 
variety, or what is popularly known as " black smallpox." 
Death usually took place before the period of pustulation 
was reached. In those that died, not only were the vesicles 
iilled with bloody 8erum, but there were extravasations of 
blood beneath the cutaneous layers, and hemorrhages from 
the various orifices of the body. I have seen them die as 



Periscope. 287 

early as the third day. Two adults recovered, one of which 
suffered from abscesses for a month after. 

Two cases were admitted during pregnancy, five and 
six months, respectively : one hemorrhagic, the other discrete. 
The former aborted on the fourth day and died on the fifth; 
the latter made a good recovery, without death to the 
foetus. 

The pharyngitis in some cases was so severe as to ren- 
der deglutition impossible. * * ITo uncontrolla- 
ble vomiting or diarrhoea was met with. These concomi- 
tants of the period of invasion were rarely seen thereafter. 

And now, as to treatment. The question naturally 
presents itself, Do we possess any power to arrest the 
development or mitigate the severity of this disease ? As 
to the development, I answer no; excepting, of course, 
vaccination immediately after exposure, which, if success- 
ful, will insure a modified form of the disease. There are 
certain stages, the severity of which may be mitigated, 
especially that of invasion, with restlessness and high tem- 
perature, when aconite, given hourly, has a most happy 
effect. Bitartrate of potash, in the proportion of an ounce 
to a pint of water, taken ad libitum, was a grateful drink. 
It seemed to limit the inflammation of the skin and hasten 
desiccation. At any rate, those taking it " cleaned off" 
quicker." 

In severe cases you are compelled to resort to the use of 
stimulants, heroically, too, sometimes. Many a life has, I 
believe, been saved by the judicious use of stimulants at 
the period of suppuration, when the patient is found with 
a dry tongue, quick pulse, blue lips, and, sometimes, active 
delirium — a condition very like the last stages of typhoid. 
Frequent sponging during the development of the eruption 
was found to be very grateful. 

Nothing I found gave so much comfort during the stage 
of desiccation as a warm bath, the patient frequently beg- 
ging to have it repeated. * * Nothing, T 
believe, can be relied upon when we deal with the hem- 
orrhagic variety; although tinct. chloride iron with tur- 
pentine seemed to be given with good effect in the two 
cases that recovered. 

Vomiting was invariably controlled with subnitrate of 
bismuth, taken dry, in ten or fifteen grain doses. What 
w^as done to prevent pitting ? you are no doubt ready to 
ask. Well, nothing, because I believe nothing can be 



288 



Peoria Medical Monthly. 



done. The pitting depends entirely upon the depth of the 
slough under each pustule. If the infiltration of the pus 
cells into the vesicle takes place without extension of in- 
flammation into the cellular tissue beneath, then there will 
be no pitting; but if it does extend into the deeper tissues 
and a slough is the result, then pitting is inevitable. 

The whole number of cases treated was 216. I have a 
record of 199. As to those who died previous to my keep- 
ing a complete record, a memorandum, as to age, vaccina- 
tion and variety of diseases, was made. 

A perusal of the following table will be of interest : 



VARIETY. 



Not vaccinated 

Vaccinated after exposure.. 

Vaccinated in infancy 

Vaccinated 

Inoculated 

Had smallpox 



105 

2 

64 

17 



50 



12 



35 



33 



It will be observed that the mortality w^as about twenty- 
two per cent., which w-e think is a very good showing, 
taking into consideration the type of the disease that has 
prevailed. Probably at no time in the history of smallpox 
in Troy has the disease been so malignant. And, too, the 
number of cases admitted when the disease was far ad- 
vanced necessarily increased the ratio of mortality, premis- 
ing that the hospital care and treatment were superior to 
that received at home. In the " vaccinated " all children 
were carefully examined as to scar. I mention this, as it 
will be seen, from the table, eleven had varioloid, five dis- 
crete and one confluent smallpox. Believing, as I do, that 
vaccination is an absolute protection against smallpox (not 
varioloid), I am positive thiit those having the discrete and 
confluent forms were unprotected. 

Not a single case haviny a recent vaccination was admitted 
during my service. One child having a recent vaccination 
(within two weeks), was admitted, with four others of the^ 
same family having the disease, and remained in the hos-- 
pital for two months without contracting the disease. 



Periscope. 289 

The greatest mortality, it will be observed, was among 
infants, forty-iive per cent, dying. The lowest rate was be- 
tween the ages of forty and fifty, only twelve per cent, 
dying. 

Subcutaneous Injections of Ergotine in Myomatous Fibro- 
nias and Chronic Hyj)ertropby of the Uterus. 



BY THOS. R. DUPUIS, M. D., KINGSTON, ONT. 
Translated from L' Union Medicale du Canada. 

In four women who were affected with interstitial 
fibromas in the body of the uterus, a diminution in the 
size of the tumor, and an arrest of the metrorrhagia was 
obtained by this means. In the case of two fibromas the 
size of a chestnut, situated in the neck of the uterus, the 
results obtained were not such as could be desired. In six 
sub-peritoneal tumors, varying in size from that of a chest- 
nut to that of a gravid uterus, no essential amelioration re- 
sulted from the injections; their volume remained the 
same, although the hemorrhages were somewhat less fre- 
quent. In hypertrophy of the uterus without any compli- 
cation, the ergotine was successfully employed fourteen 
times. In hypertrophy resulting from failure of the uterus 
to return to its original condition after parturition, or more 
particularly after abortion, it has shown itself especially 
serviceable. In uterine infarctions, and in cases of mem- 
branous dysmenorrhoea its use has produced equally good 
results. 

The author, after numerous trials, has come to prefer 
the preparation of Werniet, employed with the necessary 
precautions. In the majority of the cases referred to 
above, the injection was followed by a very prompt ameli- 
oration of the symptoms. Several of the patients became 
pregnant before the termination of the treatment; amongst 
the rest the improvement obtained, continued. Three of 
the patients — one having a fibroid, and the other two 
chronic metritis — found it necessary to have recourse to 
treatment again at the expiration of about a year and a 
half. Two women who had been thus treated died a length 
of time after the last injection. In one of the cases the 
fibroma was found to be surrounded by a calcareous shell 
{coque calcaire) in which were included also, the large vessels 
of the vicinity. In the other case, it was inclosed in a net- 



290 Peoria Medical Monthly. 

work of connective tissue in which were apparent fine 
musciUar fibres, some in a state of fsitty degeneration, and 
in several phices others in a state of calcareous degenera- 
tion. The author is of opinion that, during life, there was 
a marked ischi^mia of the morbid products. 

He concludes that when there is no improvement per- 
ceptible after the first few injections of ergotine, recourse 
should be had to some other system of medication. — Can- 
ada Lancet. 



Is it to be Wondered at ? 

Editor Advance : — I received only yesterday, the fol- 
lowing from a student now attending lectures in one of our 
most popular medical colleges. It speaks for itself, and it 
should carry sadness to the heart of every true homoeopath. 
If there should be any confusion among our medical insti- 
tutions in getting the coat upon the right back, the more's 
the pity. The student writes as follows : 

" It is strange to me that this college should be called 
homoeopathic. We have a few professors who, I think, are 
true homoeopaths, but the majority are not, and I am safe 
in saying that fully two-thirds of the students are not hom- 
oeopaths, but nearer eclectics than any other, unless it 
should be allopaths. We have many students who attend- 
ed their first course in eclectic or allopathic institutions, 
and whenever a hint is thrown out favoring rationalism, 
empiricism, eclecticism, or some other ism, it is greeted 
with a round of applause, while they almost hoot at any- 
thing pertaining to pure homoeopathy. JSTow are not these 
deplorable facts? When homoeopathic (?) professors write 
upon the board prescriptions containing from three to a half 
dozen, or even more, difierent drugs, is not homoeopathy 
put to the blush ? We are taught to treat patients in away 
which is in accordance with experience and reason. That 
is all right provided our reason and experience are in the 
right direction ; but alas, we hang our heads in shame." 
So you see, Mr. Editor, all is not gold that glitters. 

Yours, Medicus. 

After reading the above, taken from the Medical Advance^ 
the reason for the student's disgust may be better ex- 
plained by the following questions taken from a recent 
"quiz" at the Hahnemann College, Chicago. The Chi- 



Periscope. 291 

ca^o Medical Review pertinent!}' asks : " Is it possible for 
folly to attain a more lamentable degree of absurdity ?" 

Tip of nose is red and hot, particularly in warm 
weather? Belladonna. 

Greenish color about the eyes ? Veratrum album. 

Pains in the limbs; are worse if covered with feather 
bed? Sulphur. 

Headache in occiput, relieved by sitting? Gelsemium. 

Forgetting what one is asked and letting things drop ? 
Belladonna. 

Cannot sleep early in the night, but sleeps late in the 
morning? Belladonna. 

Complaint occasioned by eating ice cream ? Arseni- 
cum. Same in tall, slender persons ? Phosphorus. 

Circumscribed redness of cheeks ? Lycopodium. 

Sweat on face while eating? Ignatia. Sour sweat on 
neck? Belladonna. Profuse sweat about the head? Cal- 
carea carb. Same about the genitals? Galsemium. 

What would you give for lack of expression in the face ? 
Aconite. 

What for mumps on the right side? Mercurious. 
What for mumps on the left side ? Rhus tox. 

When getting out of bed brings on a cough, which gets 
worse on going into another room ? Phosphorus. 

What for fainting spells coming on every day about 11 
A. M. ? Sulphur. 

Delirious attacks at night about the house ? Belladonna. 

Slow breathing and pulse? Arsenicum. 

Much red sand in the urine? Lycopodium. 



• 



Bisulphite of Soda in Burns. 

Recently I was treating a farmer's child, several miles 
out in the country, for diphtheria, using bisulphite of soda 
in fine powder, taken in the mouth, a few grains every ten 
to fifteen minutes, for the sore throat, as a local remedy, 
and also as a constitutional remedy, and the remedy proved 
very efficient. About the time the diphtheria patient had 
recovered, another child of the same family while playing 
with a tea-kettle of boiling water that wa