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Full text of "Peters of New England : a genealogy, and family history"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 

IIIIIIIIIHIIII 



3 3433 08071505 9 



r 




Abt. 1874 



S^. ^ ^^i^^e^^Z^ 



1893 



CHARLF.STOWN, MASS. 



Peters of New England 

A Genealogy, and Family History 



Compiled by 



Edmond Frank Peters 



and 



Eleanor Bradley Peters 

(Mrs. Edward McClure Peters) 



» »' , » ► 






> » > 



Author of " Hugh Peter: A Mosaic" ', ' \ ,i 



Ube Ifcnicfterbocfter (press 

1903 



THE r^hvV YORK 
PU^'Tn LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TiLDiN FOUNDATIONS 

R 1915 L 



^. 



TO THE MEMORY 

OF 

EDMOND FRANK PETERS 

AND OF 

THOMAS McCLURE PETERS, S.T.D. 



)> 



'' = ' 



3 '> 



CONTENTS 






PAGE 


List of Illustrations and Signatures 


iii 


The Making of the Book .... 


vi 


Tradition 


ix 


Inference ....... 


XV 


Corrections and Additions 


. xvii 


Explanation 


. xxi 


GENEALOGY 




MASSACHUSETTS: Ipswich and Andover 


I 


Reading and Wakefield .... 


• 53 


The Revd. Andrew of Middleton 


• . S6 


Medfield ....... 


. . 63 


Andover 


102 


MAINE: Blue Hill 


112 


Ellsworth 


. 127 


Boston 


• 137 


CONNECTICUT: Hebron 


• 152 


Colonel John of the Queen's Loyal Rangers . 


. 186 




. 241 


The Reverend Samuel 


• 257 


New York State 


. 267 


Litchfield ....... 


. 282 




304 


Ohio 


• 311 


NEW HAMPSHIRE: Seborne 


• 314 


Andrew ....... 

i 


. 349 



11 



Contents 



Appendix : 

Beamsley 

My Native Land, Good-Night! 

Autobiography of Colonel John op the Queen's 
Loyal Rangers 

Peters Traits . 

Divers Families 

Military Service 
Allied Families . 
General Index . 



PAGE 

357 
361 

366 

387 
394 

408 
412 
420 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND SIGNATURES 



Title-page, Edmond Frank Peters (about 1874), 

Signature 1893 (see page 203) 
Gravestone of Andrew Peters, 1713 (1901) 
Will of Andrew Peeters, 1702 
Gravestone of Phebe Peters, 1702 . 
Site of House of Andrew Peeters (1901) 
Common and Pond adjoining House of Andrew 

Peeters (1902) ...... 

Signature of Samuel Peeters, 1703 . 

Grave of the Revd. Andrew Peters of Middleton 

1756 (1901) 

Signature of Joseph Peters (43), 1781 
Signature of Capt. Adam Peters, 1781 
Beulah Lovett, wife of Lt.-CoL. Andrew Peters 
Lt.-Col. Andrew Peters (from an oil painting) 

Signature, 1779 ...... 

Lovett Peters, Westborough, Mass. 

Gravestone of John Peters of Andover, Mass. (17) 

1797; Signature, 1767 .... 

Portrait of John Peters of Andover (213), (from 

A miniature), 1836 ..... 

Signature of John Peters of Andover (213), 1815 
Sarah Peters (Mrs. Leopold Grozelier), 1857; Sig 

nature, 1901 ...... 

Nathaniel Peters of North Andover, Mass. (242) 

188- ; Signature, 185- .... 

Monument to John Peters of Blue Hill, 1821; Sig 

nature, 1813 

Portrait of Chief-Justice John Andrew Peters of 

Maine, 1884; Signature, 1902 



PAGE 



27 
28 

43 



43 
43 

61 
63 

63 

8r 

82 
84 

102 

106 
106 

108 

no 

112 

^33 



111 



IV 



List of Illustrations and Signatures 



Portrait of Edward Dyer Peters of Boston (from 

an oil painting, 1839); signature, 1834 
Country Residence of Edward Dyer Peters (built 

1799, taken about 1861 ?) . 
Portrait of the Revd. Thomas McClure Peters 

(about 1885); Signature .... 
Portrait of the Revd. John Punnett Peters, 1897 

Signature, 1902 ...... 

Portrait OF Edward Dyer Peters, 2d, 1901; Signa 

TURE, 1903 . . . . . . 

Gravestone of Colonel John Peters, Gilead, Conn. 

1804 (taken 1902) ..... 

Signature of Colonel John Peters, 1783 
Residence of Colonel John Peters, Hebron, Conn 

(built ABOUT 1740), 1902 .... 

Portrait of Judge John Thompson Peters 
Portrait of John Samuel Peters, Governor of Con 

necticut (about 1845); Signature, 1844 
Monument to Governor Peters (taken in 1902) 
Monument to the Revd. Samuel Peters (taken 

1902) 

Residence of Governor Peters (taken 1902), built 

1806 ........ 

Portrait of General Absalom Peters 
Portrait of John Rogers Peters; Signature . 
Portrait of Lt.-Col. De Witt Clinton Peters; Sig 

nature ....... 

Portrait of the Revd. Absalom Peters; Signature 

1858 

Signature of Major George Pierce Peters, 1814 
Portrait of George Absalom Peters, M.D., (from an 

oil painting); Signature .... 
Portrait of Hannah Peters (Mrs. William Jarvis) 

FROM A water-color (aBOUT 1787?) 

Portrait of the Revd. Samuel Peters, from a 
water-color (about 1787?); signature, 1822 

Graves of the Revd. Samuel Peters' Three Wives 
(taken 1902) 



137 
138 
140 

143 
146 

157 

157 

160 
164 

180 
182 

182 

182 
241 
244 

249 

250 
250 

253 

257 
258 

260 



List of Illustrations and Signatures v 

PAGE 

Portrait of the Revd. Samuel Peters (from a 
miniature on ivory, by purcello, taken june, 

1824) 262 

Portrait of Samuel Jarvis Peters (from a da- 
guerreotype, 185-?); Signature . . . 264 

Portrait of the Revd. Garret Eber Peters, De- 
troit, 1903; Signature, 1902 . .■ . . 294 

Portrait of John Peters of Henniker, N. H. (about 

1862) 335 

Will of William Beamsley, 1658 .... 359 

Portrait of the Revd. Charles Russell Treat, 

1899 387 

Portrait of William Henry Peters, of Norfolk, 

Va., 1898; Signature, 1899 388 



THE MAKING OF THE BOOK 

Twenty-three years ago Andover was visited by the 
present compiler, and for the first time the correct family 
descent was ascertained. The work, however, was aban- 
doned almost as soon as begun, to be resiimed only in 
1895. In the meantime, Edmond Frank Peters, a de- 
scendant of the Tory colonel, as he is commonly called 
(Colonel John of the Queen's Loyal Rangers), started on 
his labors, and for six years toiled unceasingly on a 
Peters history and genealogy, which at his death, in 
1893, was practically finished. His papers were left to 
his relative, the Rev. Thomas McClr.'^e Peters, who had 
been greatly interested in and had given every encourage- 
ment to the work, but his death also taking place the 
same summer, the entire material passed into the hands 
of the present compiler. For the past eight years she 
has been correcting, adding to, and perfecting the book. 
Sections of family history collected by some six or eight 
different individuals have been studied and copied. At 
least sixty towns have been visited for the personal in- 
spection of town and parish records, probate, and some- 
times deeds, being investigated as well. Between forty 
and fifty graveyards have been visited, which in nearly 
every case means the inspection of each stone. The 
genealogy has been rewritten from end to end, the form 
and system completely changed, and a number of sepa- 
rate articles on subjects of family interest have been 
added. Portraits, views, and signatures have been col- 
lected, and, although very far from complete, the work is 
believed to be in sufficient shape to justify its printing in 

vi 



The Makinof of the Book vii 



& 



the hope that, by pubHshing what there is, in time an 
almost perfect history may be obtained. Far more 
could have been accomplished had individuals shown 
more interest in the matter, it being in many cases almost, 
or quite, impossible to obtain even the common courtesy 
of a reply, or if information was sent it was often done 
with so little interest as to be of no value. 

To all those who have in any way aided or encouraged 
the compiler, her heartiest appreciation is due, especially 
to the Hon. John Andrew Peters, of Bangor, Me., whose 
active sympathy and generous assistance are most grate- 
fully acknowledged. To Miss Augusta Peters of Blue 
Hill, Miss EHzabeth Sewall of Medfield, Mrs. GrozeUer of 
North Andover, Mrs. Annis Welles of Hebron, Mr. Jesse 
S. Reeves of Richmond, Ind., Mr. George Albert Taylor 
of Albany, and Mr. F. C. Bissell of Hartford; to Miss 
Charlotte Abbott of Andover, who is a mine of informa- 
tion on all town matters; and to Mrs. Almira Clarke of 
Woodville, Conn., whose sensible and valuable letter^^^ 
have been of the greatest service, the compiler wishes 
also to express her thanks, as well as to the Essex Institute 
for the loan of a copy of Edmond Frank Peters' papers. 
Town histories have often been quoted and have been 
found of great value. 

Distant members of the family, in many instances 
total strangers, have loaned valuable papers, autographs, 
portraits, etc., and have sent information which, in some 
cases, they procured at the cost of much time and 
trouble to themselves. It is impossible to name all whom 
the compiler would thank, in person if possible, but she 
assures them that their kindness is fully appreciated. 

The present compiler has again, in person, gone over 
much of the ground already carefully studied by Edmond 
Frank Peters, and can hold herself responsible for the 
sections entitled Ipswich and Andover, Middleton, An- 



viii The Making of the Book 

dover, Maine, General Absalom, The Revd. Samuel, Lost 
Tribes, Andrew in New Hampshire, nearly all of Reading 
and Wakefield, and portions of other sections. The 
articles before and after the genealogy and the illustra- 
tions and signatures are furnished by the present com- 
piler. Nearly the whole of Medfield, all of Colonel John, 
most of Seborne, and the greater part of the sections im- 
mentioned are wholly due to Edmond Frank Peters, and 
the present compiler has everywhere been greatly assisted 
by his thorough and conscientious labors. 

The enormous amount of material he amassed in the 
six years of his toil would have been remarkable had he 
devoted his entire time to the work, but when one realizes 
that it was the result of his leisure hours only, it seems 
little short of a miracle. His system of collecting matter 
was most elaborate, painstaking, and complete, and was 
undoubtedly the principal cause of his remarkable success. 
Were it not for him this work would doubtless never 
ave been written, certainly not by the present author. 
^:!^ven in the portions more especially her own he has 
been an ever-present guide, counsellor, and friend, often 
presenting her with some curious bit of information, or 
warning her of some rock or shoal. In short, the entire 
work is founded upon and permeated by Edmond Frank 
Peters, and as his face is the first one sees upon opening 
the book, so is his guiding and sustaining spirit the last 
one leaves upon closing the volume. 



TRADITION 

A WELL disseminated tradition causes our family history 
to begin in Boston, in 1634, with one William Peters, a 
merchant, who was educated at Leyden, was a brother 
of the Revd. Hugh Peters of Salem, and of the Revd. 
Thomas Peters of Saybrook, and removed to Andover, 
where he built a church and was buried under the pulpit.* 
This attractive fiction emanates from the Revd. Samuel 
Peters, a gentleman of whom it may be truly said that he 
was indebted to his imagination for his facts, the facts 
necessarily changing with the amoimt of imagination 
temporarily at his command, and thus producing varied 
versions of one and the same event. For instance, he in 
one letter says that William Peters came to Boston in 
1634, in another that his great-grandfather went from 
London, a merchant, in 1640.! Now he supposes his 

* " William Peters Esq., of Boston, in 1634, was rich and noble, did 
good in his day, built a meeting-house in Andover about twenty miles 
from Boston for the Puritans and ordered his body to be buried under 
the pulpit and turned his soul to God, to sing Praises with the pious 
and venerable fathers who settled New England." — (Letter from the 
Revd. Samuel Peters to Gen. Absalom Peters, dated New York, Oct. 
10, 1821.) 

t In the rough draft of a letter he is composing in London, November 
14, 1775, to Lord Petre of Writtle, the Revd. Samuel says: "My 
Lord, I lately came from New England to which country my Great- 
grandfather went from London, in the year 1640, a Merchant, his son 
bore his name William Peters, his Grandson bore the name of John, 
his great Grandson bears the name of Samuel who is a clergyman of 
the church of England. The family have ever lived in Affluence in 
America and with the Honorable Tradition that William Who first 
went to Boston was a nigh Relation of the then Lord Petre. I had 
a manuscript copy of my great-grandfather giving an Account of his 
Pedigree but the Rebels have Seized it and all my Property." 

ix 



X Tradition 

great-grandfather to be William, and always so designates 
him; but in fact his great-grandfather was Andrew (of 
whose existence the reverend gentleman apparently had 
never heard), born in 1634 (we always find some sub- 
stratum of truth at the bottom of the reverend gentle- 
man's assertions) and of him we have no record before 
1659. (Curiously enough there is record of a William 
Peters in Virginia in 1634.) Nor has any record of any 
William Peters been found in New England prior to that 
date, or of any one there who could be Andrew's father. 
Andrew did remove to Andover (about 1686), but there is 
no mention of any of the family building a church or 
being interred in any part of it, and if such an event had 
occurred it is almost certain there would be some record 
or recollection of it. As for William (who if he existed 
would necessarily be the father of Andrew) being educated 
at Leyden, again there is no record there of any such 
person being in any way connected with that university.* 

* Leiden, i April, 1896. 
My dear Prof. Peters. 

I have gone over our Album Academicum and compared all students 
of the name of W. or G. Peters, Peter, Petri, Petrijii, Petraeus, in- 
scribed between 1614 and 1634, but all of them were either Dutchmen, 
by the name of Gerardus or Godofredus, or Danes, Swedes, or Germans. 
Dickwood, Dirkwood or Duykwood, nor anything coming near, is to 
be found among the students of our University. No Professor, Lector 
or Master of a College of either name has taught at Leiden. I am 
sorry that this is only a negative result, and though I have no idea in 
what other waj^ your forefather could be connected with our University 
I will ask the Recorder of our Senatus if he can give any light. He is 
just recovering from a serious illness, so I cannot trouble him for the 
moment, but I hope to have his advice after a couple of weeks. I 
don't think there will be any expense; only if we should be so happy 
as to find some documents relating to Peters or Dirkwood, there might 
be wanted a small remuneration for copying. I thank you very much 
for your kind intention to send me an off-print of your last article 
the subject of which most interests me. Believe me dear Sir, Yours 
truly, 

C. P. TiELS. 

(Letter to the Revd. J. P. Peters.) 



Tradition xi 

As to William's being a brother of the Revd. Hugh and 
of the Revd. Thomas, and simultaneously "a nigh rela- 
tion of the then Lord Petre," he might have been one or 
the other, but hardly both, for Hugh and Thomas Peter 
(not Peters) had parents whose names were, respectively, 
Thomas Dirkwood and Martha Treffry * the former de- 
scending from ancestors who fled from Antwerp on ac- 
count of religious persecution in 1543. The name of 
Dirkwood was changed to Peter between 1599 and 16 10, 
for cause unknown, unless it might be from the marriage 
of Deborah Treffry (sister of Martha, who married Thomas 
Dirkwood), in 1609, to Henry Peter, M. P. for Fowey, 
and descendant of a sister of Sir William Peter, who was 
"secretary and of the Privy Cotmcil to four Kings and 
Queens of this realm and seven times ambassador abroad 
in foreign lands," said Sir William being also ancestor of 
the Barons Petre of Writtle, Essex, which seat the Revd. 
Samuel Peters persistently places in Devonshire. Now if 
we descend from the Dirkwood family, it is difficult to see 
how we are closel}^ related to the family of Lord Petre, 
unless it might be through the female side, several Peters 
having married Treffrys ; but this is not what the reverend 
gentleman intends. t Even at the present day there are 
Peters who will insist, unblushingly, — though Hugh Peter 
left but a daughter — that they derive the name of Peters 
from the fourth pastor of the First church in Salem. Being 
closely connected with two families of such consequence 
as that of Treffry and of Peter, it is not impossible that 
lands and the coat-of-arms may have been given to the 
descendants of the Flemish merchant to place them on an 
equality with their relatives by marriage, — but even here 
there is little hope for us. There is record of a William, 

* Parish records, Fowey. 

t "William, fourth son of Sir John Petre, Knt. of Exeter, is said to 
have been father of Hugh." 

(Letter from the Revd. Samuel Peters.) 



xii Tradition 

"son of Thomas Dirkwood," born in Fowey in 1600, but 
there is also the burial of William, "son of Thomas Peter,* 
17th October, 1609." It certainly is self-evident that we 
could not descend from William, brother of Hugh, and 
yet have the ancestry claimed for us by the Revd. Samuel 
Peters, t Personally the compiler is of the opinion that 
we descend from some branch of the Peter family form- 
erly of Devonshire and Cornwall, and that the relation- 
ship to the Revd. Hugh Peter — if relationship there 
be — comes through the Treffrys and not through the 
Peters. It might be worth the while of some one, with 
idle pence and hours, to investigate the claim of descent 
from "the fourth son of Sir John Petre, Knt. of Exeter, 
in Devon" (this is the usual version), who actually did 
live and did have four sons, the youngest being named 
William. In the face of what has here been said it seems 
■unnecessary to make any comment upon the pedigree 
given in the Revd. Samuel Peters' Life of Hugh Peters, 
or to do more than remark that the Revd. Thomas 
Peter was not the first Englishman to arrive at Say- 
brook (in fact there is no evidence of his being there 

* The names of Peter and of Dirkwood appear to have been used 
interchangeably. 

t In a letter dated New York, Oct. 10, 182 1, to his nephew Gen. 
Absalom, he says: "You are the oldest surviving son of my oldest 
brother Col. John Peters, the honest man, and son of John Peters the 
good man, who was the grandson of William Peters Esq. of Boston in 
A.D. 1634, who was the fourth son of the Right Honorable Lord John 
Peters, Lord of Writtle in Devonshire, England, and one of the six- 
teen Peers who educated King Edward VI and governed England dur- 
ing the minority of that good King.J By the Herald's office of London 
you know now the rock from which you descend, you cannot boast of 
Royal blood in your veins, but you can boast of Noble Blood running 
in your veins and arteries." 

J (At the period mentioned there was no Lord Petre; this title not 
existing until 1603, when Sir John Peter was made baron. Our 
reverend relative means Sir William, father of the first lord. That he 
is often confused as to his own belief on the subject, these various 
quotations from his writings sufficiently prove.) 



Tradition xiii 

before the summer of 1645 ; a few months later he was 
certainly at the Pequot Plantation, now New London, 
and he returned to England in December, 1646) ; that 
he did not found an academy in Saybrook which later be- 
came Yale College, nor did he die after the restoration of 
Charles II; neither did he "bequeath his library"* to 
that College, all his books being left in his will to his 
only son, John. 

That the Revd. Samuel Peters, while in England, did 
actively interest himself in the family pedigree is evident 
from the following letter f : but he did not possess an 
exact mind, and as years accumulated his impressions, at 
least upon this subject, became greatly confused, until w^e 
finally come upon this astonishing statement : ' ' Therefore 
King William in 1066, gave Sir John Peters, his secretary 
of State, this motto in his Coat of Arms, Sans Dieu rien!" 
(Letter from the Revd. Samuel Peters, dated Harsimus, 
July 6, 1822.) 

Another tradition, emanating from Mary Peters, 
daughter of Col. John and Lydia Phelps, and wife of 

* History of Connecticut, p. 51. 

t Harlyn, 26th August, 1776. 

Dear Sir: — Your last favor I received and am much obliged to you 
for your friendly invitation sent. As I find you are not so happy as 
to enjoy a good state of health perhaps a journey into Cornwall may be 
of service to you and I will do myself the pleasure of meeting you on 
any part of the Road to conduct you to my house where you may be 
sure of meeting with a sincere welcome. I live in the country on my 
Estate which is situated on a dry healthy spot near the sea. I am a 
young man and had the misfortune of losing a very good father in 
January last. My Mother and six sisters live with me and I have 
a brother at a Latin school. I have made all the inquiries into our 
ancestors and make not the least doubt but that you and myself came 
from Padestow as five of the most capital Estates in that Parish were 
in the possession of the Peters, viz., Treator, Trenarse, Tregewin, 
Trengho and Trebouza. The latter is my possession and a Mr. WilUam 
Peters lives at Treator ; the three other Estates are not in the family. 
I see by a deed dated the 2nd year of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth 
[which would be in 1560] wherein Mr. John Peters conveys Trebouza to 



xiv Tradition 

Joseph Hosford of Thetford, Vt., is incorrect from end 
to end, and is not worth quoting. It is said she left to 
each of her children a paper entitled "Genealogy of the 
Ancestors of Molly Gillette by her mother and written 
by her own hand in the 66th year of her age." 

his father John Peters of Trenara. My father's name was WilHam and 
I had three tincles named Samuel. There was a family in the Parish 
(St. Merryn) there were four brothers John, Hugh, Walter and William 
Peters and they are extinct. My mother and sisters join me in best 
comp'ts to you and am. Dear sir, your most obedient humble servant, 

Henry Peters. 
To the Revd. Mr. Samuel Peters. 

A somewhat ctirious paper in the handwriting of the Revd. Samuel 
and inscribed "Veritas March 25, 1792, London. Kipha Bar Zona 
Cedras Libani Galilae" gives his pedigree as follows: 

1736 Samuel Peters Hebron. 1696 John Peters, Hebron, Conn. 

1640 William Peters, Boston, N. E. 1598 William Peters, Fowey, 
Cornwall. 

1574 William Peters, Fowey, Cornwall. 1550 John Petre, Exitor, 
Deron. 



INFERENCE 

Having shown in tradition what does not exist in our 
family history, we now come to what does: this is soon 
disposed of. We know nothing whatever of the antece- 
dents of Andrew Peeters, barring certain safe inferences. 
From the date of his death and of a deposition made in 
Salem, we find him to have been born in 1634 or 1635. 
He came to this country a young man, well educated, as 
his will shows, — somewhat remarkably so for those days, 
in fact ; for if, after a life of farming and distilHng (some 
sixteen years of these being largely taken up with fighting 
Indians), his hand and mind were still so docile to the 
pen as to write and spell as he does in his will, it seems 
probable that he possessed a liberal education. It is also 
evident that he came to this country well provided with 
money and that he possessed, or acquired, a social posi- 
tion which gave him the title of Mr., a word of meaning 
in those days. Inferences point to a residence in Hol- 
land ; some have consequently inferred him to be Dutch. 
It is safe, flatly, to contradict this theory. If in law a 
man is judged innocent until he is proved guilty, so among 
the early settlers of New England it is safe to assert that 
a man is English until he has been proved a foreigner. 
Were he the latter he would be referred to as the Dutch- 
man, would not be persona grata among his neighbors, 
and his spelhng and writing — arts which he would be 
little called upon to exercise after his emigration — would 
assuredly not be of the character found in his will. His 
education was certainly all European, whether Conti- 
nental or British. The spelling of his name, Peeters, is or, 
was, a recognized one in the west of England. It is by 
no means impossible, as Miss Charlotte Abbott suggests, 
that he came to New England from New York, from Vir- 
ginia, or even from the West Indies, and not directly 
from Europe. The compiler is of the opinion that, being 

XV 



xvi Inference 

a distiller by trade, he would probably be a member of that 
guild in England, and that his ancestry might thereby be 
traced on the other side of the water. Being unable to con- 
tradict the Revd. Samuel Peters' statement that Andrew 
(or his father) was the fourth son of John Peters, or Peter 
(Knt., or otherwise), of Devon, this or something approxi- 
mate may be found to be correct, and those of the family 
who now yearn for a coat-of-arms may be blessed with 
satisfied, and, what is more, justified, aspirations. We 
may be entitled to a coat-of-arms, even to that so long' 
used by some branches of the family, but the compiler 
has done her best to produce a correct and exact history, 
based only upon facts known and proved to be such. 
Some one — probably the Revd. Samuel— is responsible 
for a number of colored engravings of Peters coat armor, 
all made at the same time, and which have spread from 
Maine to California. It will be hard for many of the 
family to part with these should they be proved to be 
incorrect; but there is no trace of arms until our rev- 
erend relative gave his attention to the subject. Old 
Andrew's seal is a very different affair, and to the com- 
piler's mind is far more interesting and valuable than 
any number of European crests. An American heraldry 
we might surely have ; then why not take his seal, which 
the compiler believes to mean so much, and to tell of 
that terrific fight in the Narragansett country and of 
long years of border warfare,* and make that the father 
of a new heraldry — a heraldry all our own ? 

* During his residence in Andover Andi-ew appears to have been cer- 
tainly once, perhaps twice, burned out by the Indians. (Page 22.) 
"1692 Mr Andrew Peeters (now an inhabitant in Andover), being 
lately burnt out by ye Indians." This may have occurred in 1689, or 
it may have been more recent, bvit certainly his son Samuel was too 
young to be his partner at that time, and he says in his will: "whereas 
I was Burnt out bij ye heathen Enemij hee ye said Samuell Peeters 
hath been mij Copartner Euer Since." This second burning may have 
been the one referred to in 1608 (see note at foot of page 28). 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

P. 8 (line 8), quarter musters, not quarter masters. 

P. 23 (note), 24 (line 5), 26 (note), Carleton, not Carlton. 

P. 23 (line 8), John Aslebe was great-great -uncle, not great- 
grandfather. 

P. 36 (lines 15, 16), Andrew Allen was brother, not father; 
this is proved by reference to the "widdowe Allen." 

P. 54 (line 19), 25, not 55 miles. 

P. 60 (line 24), 4/, not 44/. 

P. 67 (line 13), July, 1780, not July 17, 1780. 

P. 104 (line 14), Nancy Carney died in 1865. Her first 
husband is said to have been drowned at sea. She was mar- 
ried to Andrew Peters Oct. 14, 1798. 

William (216 VI) died in Oakland, Cal., June 15, 1885; 
md, in Parish of Portsea, Hampshire, Eng., , 1835, 

Cicely, dau. William Silver, and Frances Nyren, his wife; she 
died in 1839. 

Cicely Frances (226), bom in Le Havre, was md. in Wash- 
ington, D. C, to Francis Boarman. No children. 

Andrew Vincent died in Eugene, Ore., 1901. 

Mary Harriet, born in Ingouville, France, died unmd. 

Ignatius Kemble, bom in Georgetown, D. C, died Jan. 12, 
1901, in Eugene, Ore.; md. in Eugene, Ore., Eudora, dau. 
Richard Henderson. No children. 

Joseph Chrysostom, bom in France, living 1903; md. in 
San Francisco, Cal., Alice, dau. Edward Cain and Alice 

his wife, born in Eng. , 

and had 9 children. 

Arthur Silver, born in Lavana, N. Y. ; md. in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., Agnes, dau. Lucas Lancaster, and had 7 children. 

William Bonaventure, died in Oakland, Cal., 1875; md. in 
Washington, D. C, 1864, Margaret, dau. John Major, born in 

xvii 



xviii Corrections and Additions 

Ireland, died in 1876, and had 3 children, one of whom, Cecile 
von Sieberlich, now lives in San Francisco. 

William J. (233) has been connected with the U. S. Geo- 
graphical Survey, and is now (1903) second in command of 
the Ziegler Arctic expedition, being the representative of the 
National Geographical Society. 

Nancy Peters McNally died 1889. 

Sarah Carney (217) died in 1888. 

P. 113 (lines 17-19), reverse notes. Andrew 271 (8), see Ells- 
worth, not Boston. Dyer 272 (9), see Boston, not Ellsworth. 

P. 118 (line 7), Simeon Blanchard (md., ch.). 

P. 144 (line 28), Vt., not Va. 

P. 161, lines 18 to 27 do not belong to this Samuel, but to 
Samuel 1107, on p. 309; line 26 is uncertain. 

P. 161, Jan. I, 1 781, Samuel is in Capt. Betts' Co., Light In- 
fantry, under the Marquis de La Fayette, marched to the 
southward. 

P. 166 (line 9), may be William who enlisted from Norwich, 
Conn., in the 6th Reg., Aug. 23, 1861-July 5, 1863. 

P. 186 (line 4), Ann Bamet, dau. Robert Barnet of Windsor, 
Conn. 

P. 187 (line 25), Hublenston, not Hubleston. 

P. 237 (line 9), Ellen, born in Portland, Me., md. in Port- 
land, John Franklin Purinton, son John Purinton and Mary 
Sweat, his wife, died Feb. 14, 1899. No children. 

Susan Tucker (line 21), born in Portland, Me., Jan. 6, 1836, 
living 1903; md. in Portland, Nov. 22, 1872, George Clinton 
Fobes, son Charles Fobes and Hannah Webster, his wife, born 
in Portland, died in Baltimore, Md., June 14, 1892. No 
children. 

Caroline Robison (line 29), born in Portland, Me., July 28, 
1839, living 1903; md. Edward A. Bailey, son Joseph S. 
Bailey and Isabel Dix his wife, born in Portland, July 28, 
1 83-, living 1903, and had 2 sons. 

P. 239 (line 4), Charles Thomas, born in Portland, Me., 
March 31, 1866, living in Portland, 1903; md. in Portland, 
Jan. 20, 1892, Cora Belle, dau. Benjamin Whitehouse and 



Corrections and Additions xix 

Georgiana Webber, his wife, bom in Portland, Dec. 20, 1869, 
living 1903, and had one son, Walter Nauman, bom in Port- 
land, Oct. 2, 1893. 

P. 244 (line 21), Abby Louisa, died in Portland, Ore., Jan. 
7, 1893 ; was md. in New York, Sept. 10, 1851, to Arthur Cook, 
son Harry Cook and Anne Bradwin Wright, his wife, born in 
London, Eng., Oct. 10, 1819, died Mar. 24, 1879, near Pueblo, 
Col., and had 6 children. 

P. 282 (addition to notes), copy of a letter, July 12, 1896: 

". . . the enclosed is a copy from my history of Hugh 
Peters amended as my mother and your mother told me. 
William Peters, son of John Peters of Hebron, Conn., a.d. 
17 1 7, a planter, married Ruth Capel, and by her had one 
daughter, Mary, wife of Philip Judd, and two sons. William, 
his son, married Deborah Strong, and had six children. Eber 
S. Peters, our grandfather, was one of the two sons. — Wm. 
B. Rogers." 

P. 298 (line 33), demons, not Clemens. 

P. 314 (note to line 15), 1726, the proprietors in a town 
meeting in Andover, Mass., voted to build a block-house for a 
fort and a meeting-house (in Concord, N. H.). 1730, Nov. 18, 
the first church was organized with nine members (Concord, 
N. H.). 

The name of Sibbons, Seborne, Seaborn, etc., has been 
spelled exactly as found in each instance. 

P. 338 (line i), Joseph, perhaps son of James, and Rhoda 
(see pages 318, 319). 

P. 340 (line 19), John, perhaps son of James, and Elizabeth 
Farnham (see p. 317). 

Pages 346, 347, 348, death of Obadiah quoted from History 
of Hopkinton. 

P. 352, Simon, bom Feb. 20, died in Bath, Me., Ap. 18, 
1890. 

Susan, died Feb. 4, 1890. 

Benjamin, died in East Pass, Fla., Sept. 22, 1885. 

Sarah, died Feb. 26, 1901. 

Mary, died Oct. 22, 1892. 



XX Corrections and Additions 

Lydia, died March i, 1888. 

Benjamin E., md. in Bath, , 

Mary J. Hinckley, dau. Enoch H. Hinckley and Elizabeth 
Small, his wife, born in Bath, 18, 1830, 

living 1903, and had two sons, George H., living in Bath, 
1903, unmd., and Albert J., born in Bath, 1857, died in 
Bath, Oct. II, 1862, aged 5 yrs. and 5 mos. 

P. 356 (line 20), John Peters, not John Peter Peters, 



EXPLANATION 

Large Arabic figures to the left of a name give the individual 
number; smaller figures in parentheses give the order of 
birth. Roman figures indicate the generation. The first 
Andrew Peeters being a generation by himself has the Roman, 
and not the Arabic, numeral. A number repeated, accom- 
panied by an A, indicates discovery of individuals too late for 
them to receive individual numbers. 

Md. Married. 

Dau. Daughter. 

Ch. Children. 

Int. mar. Intention of marriage. 

Unk. Unknown. 

Enl. Enlisted. 

This being a Peters history only, the descendants of female 
Peters are not given. A name in capitals indicates the an- 
cestor of all those in that subdivision, or section, of the work. 
Names in italics indicate all the males of the second genera- 
tion in that particular subdivision or section. Every num- 
bered individual is a Peters by birth. Old style and new 
style have been avoided as much as possible. Before 1752, 
March was the first month. Prior to 1752, eleven days should 
be added to make a date correspond to the new style. There 
are, however, exceptions to this rule. 

Illustrations and Signatures. — The date to the right of the 
portrait or picture indicates the year when it was taken. 
The date to the left of the signature gives the year when it 
was written. 



XXI 



GENEALOGY 



MASSACHUSETTS 

IPSWICH AND ANDOVER 

I. Andrew Peeters. No record of birth (bom prob- 
ably in England, in 1634-35), died in Andover, Mass., 
December 14, 1 713, in the seventy-ninth year of his age; 
md. (no record of marriage, probably in Boston, Mass., 
early in 1659) Mercy, dau. of William Beamsley * and 
Anne his wife and widow of Michael Wilbourn,t bom 
in Boston, the ninth day of the tenth month (December), 
1637; died in Andover, Mass., November 6, 1726, and 
had seven children. 

Children of Andrew Peeters, ''Church and Parish Records of the 
Town of Ipswich,'' Mass.: 

1(1). "John, son of Andrew Peeters, borne 28th of 
February 1659-60." 

3 (2). " Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew Peeters, borne 

26 of August 1662 " 

3 (3). Andrew 

4 (4). " Mary,{ daughter of Andrew Peeters bome the 
12 of June, 1668" 

5 (5) . " Mercy, daughter of Andrew Peeters bome the 

27 of January, 1670." 

6 (6). "Wry (William) son of Andrew Peeters, bome 
the 7 of February 1672 " 

7 (7). Samuel." 

* See article on Beamsley. 

t It has been stated that they were md. in Ipswich, April 16, 1658. 

t This made Mercy, the wife of Andrew, the mother of two living 

Marys. 



I 



2 Massachusetts 

No record can be found of the birth of Andrew or of 
Samuel, but the former is said to have been bom in 1664, 
and Samuel's date must be 1674 or 1675. 

Boston Marriages. Michael Wilboume and Mercy 
Beamsley, daughter of William Beamsley of Boston, were 
married the 17th day of the 8th month (Oct.), 1656, by 
Richard Bellingham, Deputy Governor. 

Boston Births. Mary of Michael and Mary Wilbome, 
bom October 30, 1657. 

Michael Wilboume was a carpenter. There is no 
record of his death, but Mercy appears to have been a 
widow in September, 1658, when her father's will was 
made. It will be seen that Mercy and Mary are used 
interchangeably; probably the old pronunciation, and 
consequent spelling "Marcy, " are responsible for this 
error, 

THE FIRST RECORDED MENTION OF ANDREW * IS IN BOSTON 
IN 1659. SUFFOLK CO. DEEDS, III, 358. 

This Indenture made the eighteenth day of November 
in the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred fiffty 
and nine Betweene Andrew Peters of Boston in the 
county of Suffolk in NEW England, Distiller and mercje 

* The Wilson manuscript gives us the first glimpse of our earli- 
est ancestor in this country. Mercy Beamsley was one day stand- 
ing at her window to watch the people wading through the trails, 
which then served as streets, when her attention was attracted by "a 
young Holland" picking his way through the mud. Andrew Peeters 
had just arrived, and looking up he saw her watching. He then and 
there resolved to marry her, it is said. This version calls Andrew a 
Dutchman. It is certain that he was an Englishman though he 
probably lived, and possibly was born in Holland. He appears in 
this country as a young man with sufficient worldly possessions and 
a good education, especially for those days, — witness his will written 
by himself and in which the spelling is quite remarkable and the 
writing that of a man thoroughly used to the pen. For account of 
the Wilson manuscript see note following the description of the deaths 
of John and Andrew Peeters in 1689. 



Ipswich and Andover 3 

his wife of the one parte and Martha Beamesley of the same 
— Boston Widdow of the other part Witnesseth that 
Andrew and Mary Peters hath on or before the day of 
the date hereof, Received of said Martha Beamesley widdow 
(mother of said Mercy) the full and whole summe of tenn 
pounds sterling by the value thereof in Currant of and In 
NEW England : and for and in Consideration of the sayd 
summe Received The sayd Andrew Peeters and Mercy 
his wife jointly and either of them particularly for him 
and herself and the executors and Administrators of 
either of them Doeth remise release and forever quit 
clayme unto the sayd Martha Beamesley, her heires ex- 
ecutors and Administrators all and all manner of Actions 
cause and causes of Actions and suites bills, bonds, 
Writings and accompts debts dutjes, legatje or legatjes — 
reconings summe or summes of money and demands 
whatsouer and howsoeuer to be made or demanded which 
"he the sayd Andrew or she the sayd Mercje or the Execu- 
tors Administrators or Assignes of either of them in 
tyme to come Cann or may haue to for or Against the said 
Martha Beamesley her heires executors or Administrators 
for or by reason of any legatje guift matter cause or thing 
whatsoeuer from the beginning of the world untill the day 
of the date hereof. 

And further this Indenture, Witnesseth, That the 
sajd Andrew Peeters and Mercy his wife for the Great 
Goodwill & lowe on his part and the motherly affection 
on hir part, wch they beare unto Mary Wilboum 
Daughter of the sajd Mercy — by hir former husband 
Michael Wilboum late of boston aforesajd. Carpenter, as 
also for and In consideration of the aforesajd sume of tenne 
pounds which he the sajd Andrew hath received and doth 
enjoy wth and by the sajd Mercy his wife. Itt is Cowen- 
anted, Graunted, Condisended and fully agreed upon by & 
between the sajd — Beamesley partjes to these Indentures. 



4 Massachusetts 

That at the end of three yeeres from after the date hereof 
the sajd Andrew Peeters his executors or Administrators « 
shall repay the afore sajd simie of Tenn pounds sterling 
by the value there of in Current pay of and in NEW 
England vnto the sajd Martha Beamesley her executors, 
Administrators or Assignes for & to the use and behoofe 
of the sajd Mary Wilboum, furthermore It is Concluded 
Condesended and fully Agreed imto by the partjes to 
these presents That in Case the sajd Mary decease before 
she be married or be of fitt years to take the sajd sume 
into her own Coustady and disposall — That then the 
sume of tenn pounds shall be pajd by the value thereof in 
Current pay in New England by the sajd martha beames- 
ley her heires Executors or Administrators vnto the 
Eldest Child of the sajd mercy — whether male or female 
Issue of the body of the sayd Andrew Peeters and remaine 
to be his or her vse for euer. In wittness where of the 
partjes aboue named to these Indentures, Interchangeably 
theire hands & scales have putt the day & yeere first 
aboue written. 

Signed, Sealed & 

delivered in the Andrew Peeters * 

presence of vs and a seale 

Humphrey Atherton 
Thomas Clark 

Endorsed 

I the wthin named Martha Beamesley, Widdowe Doe 
hereby Assigne all my right and power in point of Receiv- 
ing the sayd sume wthine named of tenn potmds, the same 
to be received by Mr John ff ownell of Charlestowne & by 

* He spells it "Peeters" in all his signatures I have ever seen. 

E. B. P. 



Ipswich and Andover 5 

him to be Imployed for the benefitt & behoofe of the 
wthin named Mary Wilboum wthin written 
Witness my hand ye day & yeere wthin written 

ye mark of Martha Beamsley 
Witnessed by vs 

Thomas Clark 
Will jam Pearse 
Entred & Recorded at Request of marth Beamesley 
i4» 2m 1660 

Edw. Rawson, Recordr 

166 1 Sept, 20 — Record of Andrew Peeters as a witness. 

Essex County Deeds 
Bridgett Varney for £^0 deeds to Andrew Peters " all 
that my dwelling-house wherein the sayd Andrew now 
dwelleth, together with the shop, outhouses, yards, gar- 
dens, Orchards & all the appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing; bounded S.E. on land & house of Mr. William 
Norton; abutting on the street towards the north-east; 
having a lane towards the N.W. and pasture-land of Mr 
William Norton toward the S.W. 

November 2, 1663 
Simon Tuttle ") 

Robert Lord, Marshall j 

Volume ii of Old Ipswich Records — Salem 

1664 Andrew Peters has one share * in Plum Island, 
Castle Neck and Hog Island. No. of lot 19 Feb, 14, 

Town Records. 

1665 May 20 Andrew Peeters, Ipswich, for 66;^ buys 
of Richard Shatswell of Ipswich 15! acres of upland & 
marsh at a place called Reedy Marsh, bounded N.W. and 
N.E. on land of Thomas French Sr, & Thomas Lovell, 
S.E. and S.W. on Mr Wm Norton and Joseph Quiller 

Witt Richard Hubbert 

Thomas Lovell 

* The shares were according to amount of property taxed. 



6 Massachusetts 

1665 May 29 Land sold by Richard Shatswell to 
Thos. Lovell bounded by Andrew Peters marsh toward 
the south — 

Witness Richard Hubbert 

Andrew Peeters 

1665-6. A petition to the General Court in Boston, 
protesting against certain aspersions cast upon them 
relative to their feelings for the king and declaring their 
loyalty ; signed among others by Andrew Peeters. Mass. 
Hist. Coll. ist series vol. viii, page loy. 

1667 Jan 24. Deeds Conto — Andrew Peeters, Ipswich, 
in consideration of a Barne for me alredy built and finished 
neare my dwelling house in Ipswich, — deeds to Ezekiel 
Woodward carpenter, my two small lots on Plum Island 
containing 7 acres more or less. 
Town Records, Ipswich. 

1667 Granted to Andrew Peters timber for a lean-to. 

1668 To Andrew Peeter for a leanto to his Barne 
(timber) 

1668 To Andrew Peeters, to fell for a cyder-mill.* 
1668 Jan 22 Simon Tuttle for 6;!^ deeds to Andrew 
Peeters, Ipswich, distiller one and one half acres bounded 
East on Simon Tuttle and north west on Muddy river and 
the common, on the south side by the highway leading to 
Rowley. 

Suffolk Deeds, Book V, page 518. 
Bee it knowne unto all men by these presents that I 
Andrew Peters of Ipswich stiller for and in consideration 
of a six acree Lott lying in the Common fence, on the 
north side of the River in Ipswich aforesayd, bargained 
sold and confirmed unto mee the sayd Andrew Peters 
by Samuell Graues of Ipswich aforesayd and for Other 
ualluable Considerations mee thereunto moving, haue 

* The Revd. Augustine Caldwell informs me that the "cyder-mill" 
indicated that Andrew had a large orchard. 



Ipswich and Andover 7 

fully freely and cleerly bargained sold Enfeofed and 
Confirmed, & doe by these presents fully freely and 
cleerly, bargaine sell enfeofe & Confirme unto the aboue 
mentioned Samuell Graues of Ipswich ffeltmaker, all my 
right Title and interest into any inheritance or part of 
Inheritance, Giuen or bequeathed by will & Testament, of 
William Beamsley late of Boston deceased vnto Mercy the 
wife of mee the sayd Andrew Peters, & the sayd Samuell 
Graues To Hold possess & enjoy all my sayd shaire or 
portion in the sayd Inheritance of Houses & Lands with 
all the priviledges & Appurtinences thereto belonging, to 
him the sayd Samuell his heires Executors Administrators 
& assignes foreuer, Giuing & granting to the sayd Samuell 
all my right & Titlepower & interest, to ask require de- 
mand recouer, by suite of Law or other wise, all my sayd 
right of inheritance in the sayd houses, Lands, Tene- 
ments or heriditaments. To haue hold possess and enjoy 
all the sayd premises, without let hinderance or molesta- 
tion from mee the sayd Andrew my heires Executors 
Administrators or assignes for euer. 

In wittnes whereof I the sayd Andrew Peters haue here- 
unto set my hand & scale this: 13th of April: 1668 
Subscribed sealed & deliuered in the presence of 

Andrew Peters Richard Hubbert 

(a scale) Thomas Clarke 

This was Acknowledged by the sayd Andrew Peters to 
bee his Act and deed vpun the i6th day of Aprill 1668. 

Before me 

Samuell Symonds 

And at the same time mercy the wife of the sayd An- 
drew Peters did yeald vp her right of Dowre & possibility 
of right in the premises. 

Entered and Recorded word for word & Compared with 
the Originall this 19th of Decem: 1668 
As Attests Edw. Rawson Recordr 



8 Massachusetts 

Town Records, Ipswich: 

167 1 To Andrew Peeters for house over his cyder-mill. 
(This was a grant of timber.) 

167 1 At a meeting of the selectmen the 26 of January 
— Ordered that the Gierke informe the Court that the 
Selectmen of Ipswich "doe concieve that Andrew Peeters 
(upon consideration of his carriage at mile brooke, his 
miscarriage at quarter masters, his miscarriage to the 
Constable and before the Selectmen) is not fitt to have 
any licence for to sell any liquor." * 

1673 Upon the petition of Andrew Peeters about 
Sarah Ross living at his house. The Selectmen gave him 
the liberty to entertain her till eleven weeks be expired 
for her coming to Towne from Boston. She declaring 
some inclination to live with her husband as a wife, and 
to goe to him when he comes to Towne. 

Essex Co. Deeds 

1673 Andrew Peters of Ipswich in acct with the estate 
of Thomas White 

1673 Petter Andrew (91) in acct with est. of Thomas 
White 

New Hampshire Court Files. 1674-16 7 7. 
1673 Know all men by these presents yt I John pick- 
erin of Strawbery bankf for and upon good Consideration 
doo owne myselfe to be indebton to Andrew peters of 
Ipswich ye full and just sume of nine poimds to be paid in 
good mutble t Codfish upon the Isles of Shoals to be deliv- 
ered at ye next Spring ensuing at waying season fitt to 
be shipped aboard and to be paid at the price Currt as 
marchts § take it and I John Pickerin doe by these 

* His carriage at Mile Brooke was a fight between himself and a 
friend on one side and two of his fellow-townsmen on the other. 
They were all returning home from Wenham and Andrew and Bridges 
refused to let the others pass. 

t Now Portsmouth, N. H. ^ Merchantable. § Merchants. 



Ipswich and Andover 9 

presents engage to fulfill this obligation to ye said peter 
or his assignors, and for ye true performance hereof I. 
bind myself my heirs and assignors as witness my hand 
this 7th of November, 1673. 
John pickerin 

I doe assign this bill and all ye within mentioned 
mchtble * Cod ffish vnto Francis Wainwright his heirs, 
executrs Administ and assignors as witness my hand this 
23d Decem 1673. Andrew peters. 

Witness Tho Burnham Senr James Bumhams hands 
Thomas Burnham Senr and James Burnham ye wit- 
nesses sworne say they were present and saw Andrew 
peters sign and deliver ye aboue written assignmt to mr 
Wainwright as his act and deed before me 

Daniel Dennison. Sept. 25, 1674. 
{Copy of Records of Court of Associates, held in Dover, 
Sept. 2g, 1674.) 

1675 Andrew Peeters of Ipswich hath a browne bay 
horse, a star in the forehead, mealy belly, browne nose, 
noe ear-marke, nor brand that is seen, dock, alsoe a sorell 
mare a white slip over the nose & white in the forehead 
mealy under the belly, a little piece cut, a snip neare eare 
doct & lame ; prized both of them at 405 by Simon Tuttle. 

SOLDIERS IN KING PHILIP's WAR 

(Military Service), by G. M. Bodge 

From ledger accounts of Treasurer John Hull, closing 
with Sept. 28, 1676. 

Later grants for military service 

Ipswich, January 24 1676-7 

Andrew Peters 02 14 00 

List of Grantees, Heirs and later Proprietors of Narra- 
gansett No 3, Souhegan West, now Amherst N. H. 

* Merchantable. 



lo Massachusetts 

1728 Andover Andrew Peters — — An- 

drew, son Andrew Peters, Andover.* 

History of Amherst, New Hampshire, by D. F. 
Secomb. 

"In the house of Representatives 19 Jan. 1731-32. 

Whereas there have been several endeavours to accomo- 
date the Narrhagansett Soldiers and their Descendants 
with a suitable Quantity of Land for the Settlement as an 
Acknowledgement & Reward for their great Service to 
this Country which have failed hitherto of the desired 

* The Revf Andrew, who inherited the land from his military an- 
cestor, was son of Samuel, and grandson of Andrew who fought in 
the Narragansett campaign. The following letter from the Revnd. 
George Madison Bodge, author of Soldiers in King Philip's War, a 
most exhaustive work and the authority on the Narragansett cam- 
paign, is of great interest and value to us: 

Westwood, Feby 26, 1900 
Dear Mrs Peters 

I have just come upon a letter of yours dated Sept. 25, 1898, which 
I fear has never been answered, but got covered up with some other 
papers and forgotten. In regard to the questions contained I will 
say that (i) The soldiers who served in the Narragansett Campaign 
from Dec. 10, 1675, to Feb'y 21 (or thereabouts), 1676 received a 
grant of Land, — each equal to every other in value. 

The seven townships were supposed to be of equal value and were 
assigned to 840 (about) the number of Claimants either the soldiers 
themselves or their heirs, then known to be in the country. 

The companies of claimants were made up according to the resi- 
dences of the men at the time of the assignment about 1733-1735- 
This assignment took in the Plymouth Colony soldiers as Plymouth 
had then become a part of Massachusetts. An officer who served the 
whole war had no more than a private who served a week. 

As to Andrew Peters. The sum with which he is credited would 
indicate that he served from Dec. 10 to the end of the campaign. His 
name in the list of Soldier Grantees is positive proof that he was in the 
Campaign. My own ancestor John Harmon was in the same Township 
allotment. (P. 24.) 

I do not think the seal had any reference to the capture of the fort. 

I have no further information about Andrew Peters, which would 
assist you and I presume this is all too late to be of interest. 

Yours very truly 

George M. Bodge. 



Ipswich and Andover ii 

Success, His Honor have thought it might tend to pro- 
mote a good understanding & Harmony in this Court to 
lay before the Hon'ble Board wherefore it is that the 
Representat'ves have come into the Grant of a Tract of 
six miles square to each number of one hundred & twenty 
persons which they have made this Session, in answer to 
the Petition of Thomas Tileston & others, a Comm'tee in 
behalf of themselves and the rest of the Soldiers & their 
Descendants who were in the Narragansett War, And 
one great Reason is that there was a Proclamation made 
to the Army in the name of the Govemm'nt, — as living 
evidences very fully testify, — when they were mustered 
on Dedham Plain where they began their March, that if 
they playd the Man, took the Fort and Drove the Enemy 
out of the Narragansett Country, which was their great 
Seat, that they should have a gratuity in Land beside 
their Wages ; and it is well known that this was done ; 
and as the Conditions have been performed, certainly the 
Promise, in all Equity and Justice ought to be fulfilled ; 
and if we consider the Difficulties these brave Men went 
thro' in Storming the Fort in the Depth of Winter and the 
pinching wants they afterward underwent in pursuing the 
Indians that escaped, thro' a hideous wilderness, famously 
known throughout New England to this day by the name 
of the hungry March; and if we further consider that 
until the brave tho' small army thus played the Man, the 
whole Country was filled with Distress & fear & we trem- 
bled in the Capital, Boston, itself, and that to the Good- 
ness of God to this Army we owe our Fathers and our 
Safety & Estates, We cannot but think yt those Instru- 
m'ts of our Deliverance and Safety ought to be not only 
justly but also gratefully and generously rewarded & even 
with much more than they prayed for. If we measure 
w't they receive from us by w't we enjoy & have received 
from them, we need not mention to ye Hon'ble Board the 



12 Massachusetts 

Wisdom, Justice & Generosity of our Mother Country & 
ye ancient Romans on such occasions, Triumphs, Ora- 
tions, Hereditary Honors & Privileges; All the Riches, 
Lands & Spoils of War & Conquest have not been thought 
too great for those to whom they have not owed more, if 
so much as We do to those our Deliverers, & we ought 
further to observe what greatly adds to their merit that 
they are not vagabonds & Beggars & Outcasts, of wh'ch 
Armies are Sometimes considerably made up, who run 
the Hazards of War to avoid the danger of Starving ; so 
far from this, that these were some of ye best of Our Men, 
the Fathers and Sons of some of ye greatest & best of 
Our famil'es and could have no other view but to serve 
ye Country, & whom God was pleased accordingly in a 
very remarkable manner to Honor & Succeed Of these 
things the Hon'ble the General Court of the Late Colony 
of the Massachusetts in those days was not insensible and 
accordingly gave to ye Soldiers, being upward of Five 
Hundred, abt Two Thirds of the Army that went from ye 
Massachusetts & the Late Colony of Plimouth, a tract of 
abt forty thousand acres in the Nipmug Country, this or 
the value of it these Soldiers would be contented with, & 
take in their Brethren of Plimouth too, tho' that sh'd 
take away two thirds of w't was granted them and would 
after that have more in value than w't they now ask for 
them all, for every one must own that 40,000 acres in the 
Heart of the Country, as the Nipmug country is, is of 
more value than five times that quantity in the Borders, 
& in Danger if there should be a French war, as is & 
would be the case with all the unappropriated Lands of 
the Province w'ch they now ask for. 

It is hoped that the neglect of these petition'rs so 
long, or the provinces having disposed of the Nipmug 
Country to others & so defeated their ancient Grants, will 
not be thought to wear out any more than it reveals 



Ipswich and Andover 13 

their merit. The Grant seems to be made in acknowledge- 
ment both of ye promise & of ye fulfilHng ye conditions 
& being well entitled to it, & there is great Reason to 
fear that public Guilt w'd ly upon the Cotmtry if we 
should neglect & continue in the Breach of this Promise, 
after it has been made & omitted for above fifty years. 

As to the late Grant of two Townships to Seven or 
Eight Hundred of these Soldiers, It is so far below the 
value of the Land they conquered, & the Price the prov- 
ince had for it when it was sold, & the money divided 
In the Colonies that carried on the War, It is such a 
Pittance of w't they obtained for us, so exceedingly be- 
neath w't the Province has defeated them of, which was 
granted to about Two thirds of them in the Nipmug 
Country, that it is rather mocking and deriding them to 
offer it. Beyond w't has been offered, it sh'd be con- 
sidered that to grant the present petition and give such 
a quantity of Land as may be worth Settling, & upon 
Conditions of bringing forward Townships, is much more 
agreeable to Charter & for the publick Good than to 
Give away Tracts of Land & suffer & even tempt men 
to let them ly waste & unimproved, for in the way that 
has been proposed & in which some Progress has been 
made the Lands will be divided into such scraps that 
they will not be worth receiving. 
In Council: Read" 

Jan 19- 1731-32. The House ordered that further 
grants be made so that each 120 persons should have a 
township six miles square. 

June 30 — 1732 The claims of 840 persons having been 
allowed a grant of 5 additional townships was made to 
the Narragansett soldiers by the House of Representa- 
tives. 

April 26, 1733 Governor Belcher gave his approval 
to the new grant 



14 Massachusetts 

Andover Lot No. io6 was drawn by the Rev. Andrew 
Peters for his father (should be grandfather) . 
Andrew Peters, lot exchanged. 

1678 Feb. 18, A list of ye Names of those persons yt 
have right of commonage according to law and order of 
this town (Ipswich) Andrew Peeters (among 

others) 

Richard Shatswell, formerly of Ipswich now of Dracut, 
near Chelmsford, conveys if acres to Andrew Peeters, 
adjoining to that land said Andrew bought of Simon 
Tuttle, running upon a straight line to take in two crooks 
of Muddy River, which river is the division bettwixt me 
the said Shatswell & Simon Tuttle. Also my part of a 
parcel of land lying without the common fence on south 
east side of muddy river containing 1-4 acre. April 4, 
1679 

Andrew Peeters,* Ipswich, aged 50 years his deposition, 
that he being pr'sent at the bargain of saile of a p'cell of 
marsh that Mr Richard Hubbard bought of Rich'd Shats- 
well & the sd Hubbard was to pay the said Shattswell, 
fifty shillings for the sd land to old Goodm Hart or Deacon 
Knowlton & the said deponent did see the land delivered 
& staked out for the bounds of it this was in Ipswich 

Andrew Peters made Oath in Court to the truth of this 
March 31, 1684. 

Attest Jo. Appleton Cler 

1686 Ipswich Town Records The Particulars which 
the town rate is lay for And. Peeters & Capt. Appleton 
for Bulls 3-08-00 

1686 To Andrew Peters rate abated 00-05-07 

Andrew Petters Ips. for 8o£ conveys to Philip Fowler f 

* This places his birth in 1634. 

t Great-great-grandfather of Phebe Carleton, who married John 
Peters (i 705-1 797). 



Ipswich and Andover 15 

Ips. land with an old barn thereon and an orchard & 
other appurtenances adjoining to the dwelling house of 
said Andrew bounded on one side by Fetters lot, bounded 
on the other side by the hight St and land of Mr Wm 
Norton which is one acre all the land Fetters bought of 
Richard Hubbard, that ye said Hubbard enjoyed on the 
South side of the said high St 

9 April 1685 (The same deed is witnessed Ap 21 1685) 

From Old Ipswich Records, Vol. v. Salem. 

1687 By Andrew Feters rate allowed 00-05-01 

Ipswich Town Records. 

Andrew Feeters to William Baker, Deed 

1687 Andrew Feeters, Ipswich, and wife Mercy, for 
;^65 deed to Wm Baker glover, "all my dwelling House 
with all ye land about it and all ye other housing orchards, 
yards, &c. in all containing i acre, with all the appurte- 
nances thereunto belonging, excepting and reserving to 
myself the cyder mill and the house that is over the same. 
The said house and land being situated in the called Hill 
street, bounded on the orchard of Mr John Whittingham 
dec'd, now Fhillip Fowler toward ye east, and a lane or 
highway toward ye west, abutting at the one end upon 
the street above toward the North, at the other end abut- 
ting upon pasture land of Mr Wm Norton Nov. 22-1687 

This probably indicates his departure for Andover 
which we know occurred about this time. That town had 
first been called Cochichawick, and was settled about 
1640-42, principally by Newbury and Ipswich men. 

ANDOVER TOWN RECORDS 

1689 Layd out to Andrew Feeters three Acres and 
sixty rods of land, adjoining to the Land of Walter Wright 
where it is thirty-three Rod in length ; and from Walter 
Wright comer to a swamp walnut tree marked, it is 



1 6 Massachusetts 

seven Rods, which is the south end of sd * and then 

we run Northward to a groat white Oak eighteen Rods, 
which La * so far makes a gore ; And then wee run 

from sd white Oak Northward to a great old stump by 
the swamp, and from that stump we ran westward sixteen 
Ro* to Walter Wright's corner fence next the 

street This land was sold by the * and they have 

received pay for it, Layd out by Thomas Chandler 
Stephen Osgood ffeb. 19-1689.! 

1689 Jan 6 — Sold to Mr Andrew Peters what land lyeth 
on ye south side of what land he bought of ye towne 
formerly, up to ye highway leading to John Abbotts, he 
paying after ye rate of thirty shillings per acre. Capt. 
Chandler and Steven Osgood to measure it to him. 

"Deaths having occurred either in the wars abroad or 
by savage violence at home 
John Peters killed by the Indians Aug 14th, 1689 
Andrew Peters killed by the Indians Aug 14-1689 

1690-91 Mar 2— Sold to Mr Andrew Peters a parcell of 
land as it shall appear by measure for thirty shillings acre 
sd land to lye on ye north side of Capt Chandlers lott and 
joyning to ye westerly side of some of Corpll Thomas 
Johnson's land ; goe in a straight line from Walter Wright 
notherly bounds to ye lower end of Corpll Johnson's 
swamp. 

FROM Hutchinson's "history of Massachusetts bay," 

VOL. II, PAGE 44: 

"To the honoured Court of Assize held at Salem 

The humble address of several of the inhabitants of 
Andover.J May it please this honoured court, 

* Illegible. 

t In land laid out to Walter Wright there is mention of "Mr Andrew 
Peeters " about this period. 

X This was probably in August of 1692, but no date is given. 



Ipswich and Andover 17 

We being very sensible of the great sufferings our 
neighbours have been long under in prison and charitably 
judging that many of them are clear of that great trans- 
gression which hath been laid to their charge, have 
thought it our duty to endeavour their vindication so far 
as our testimony for them will avail. The persons, in 
whose behalf we are desired and concerned to speak 
something at present, are Mrs. Mary Osgood,* Eunice 
Frye,t Deliverance Dane, J Sarah Wilson § and Abigail 
Barker, || , who are women of whom we can truly give this 
character and commendation, that they have not only 
lived among us so inoffensively as not to give the least 
occasion to any that know them to suspect them of 
witchcraft, but by their sober, godly, and exemplary 
conversation have obtained a good report in the place, 
where they have been well esteemed and approved in the 
church of which they are members. 

We are surprised to hear that persons of known in- 
tegrity and purity were accused of so horrid a crime, 
not considering, then, that the most innocent were liable 
to be so misrepresented and abused. When these women 
were accused by some afflicted persons of the neighbour- 
hood, their relations and others, though they had so good 
grounds of charity that they should not have thought 
any evil of them, yet through a misrepresentation of the 
truth of that evidence that was so much credited and 
improved against people, took great pains to persuade 
them to own what they were, by the afflicted, charged 

* Wife of Capt. John Osgood, datighter of the Rev. Robert Clemens, 
of Haverhill. 

t Eunice Potter, wife of Deacon John Frye, who was uncle of Phebe, 
who md. Samuel Peters. 

X Deliverance Hazeltine, wife of Nathaniel Deane. 

§ Sarah Chandler Wilson, aunt of Thos Chandler who md. Mary 
Peters. 

II Abigail Wheelock, wife of Ebenezer Barker. 



1 8 Massachusetts 

with ; and indeed did unreasonably urge them to confess 
themselves guilty, as some of us who were then present 
can testify. But these good women did very much assert 
their innocence; yet some of them said they were not 
without fear lest Satan had some way ensnared them, 
because there was that evidence against them which then 
was by many thought to be a certain indication and 
discovery of witchcraft, yet they seriously professed they 
knew nothing by themselves of that nature. Neverthe- 
less, by the im wearied sollicitations of those that privately 
discoursed them, both at home and at Salem, they were 
at length persuaded publickly to own what they were 
charged with, and to submit to that guilt which we still 
hope and believe they are clear of. And it is probable, 
the fear of what the event might be, and the encourage- 
ment that it is said, was suggested to them, that con- 
fessing was the only way to obtain favour, might be too 
powerful a temptation for timorous women to withstand, 
in the hurry and distraction that we have heard they 
were in. Had what they said against themselves pro- 
ceeded from conviction of the fact, we should have had 
nothing to have said for them, but we are induced to 
think that it did not, because they did soon privately 
retract what they had said, as we are informed; and 
while they were in prison, they declared to such as they 
had confidence to speak freely and plainly to, that they 
were not guilty of what they had owned, and that what 
they had said against themselves was the greatest grief 
and burden they laboured under. Now, though we cannot 
but judge it a thing very sinful for innocent persons to own 
a crime they are not guilty of, yet, considering the well 
ordered conversation of those women while they lived 
among us, and what they now seriously and constantly 
affirm in a more composed frame, we cannot but in 
charity judge them innocent of the great transgression 



Ipswich and Andover 



19 



that hath been imputed to them. As for the rest of our 
neighbours, who are under the hke circumstances with 
these that have been named, we can truly say of them, 
that while they lived among us, we have had no cause 
to judge them such persons as, of late, they have been 
represented and reported to be, nor do we know that 
any of their neighbotirs had any just grounds to suspect 
them of that evil that they are now charged with. 



Dudley Bradstreet 


II 


Wm. Peters 


I Francis Dane, Sen. 


12 


Samuel Peters 


2 Thomas Barnard 


13 


Walter Wright 


3 Thomas Chandler, sen. 




Hooker Osgood 


_^"ohn Barker 




Benja. Stevens 


Henry Ingalls, sen. 




Ann Bradstreet 


4 Wm Chandler, sen. 




/oanna Dane 


Samuel Martin 




Eliza. Stevens 


Samuel Ingalls 




Eliza. Barnard 


5 Ephraim Stevens 




Phebe Robinson 


Daniel Poor 


14 


Hannah Chandler 


John Ingalls 


15 


Hannah Dane 


John Abbot, sen. 




Henry Ingalls, jun. 


Samuel Blanchard 


16 


/ohn Frie, sen. 


Wm Ballard 


17 


James Frie 


Thomas Hooper 


18 


John Aslet (Aslebe) 


John Hooper 


19 


Samuel Holt 


Wm Abbot 




Joseph Robinson 


James Russell 




Thomas Johnson 


Oliver Holt 




Tho. Johnson, jun. 


John Bresson 


20 


Andrew Peters 


6 Francis Dane, jun. 


21 


Mary Peters (Mercy) 


7 George Abbot 


22 


Bridget Chandler 


8 Wm Chandler, jun. 




Mary Johnson 


9 John Chandler 




Robert Russel 


10 Elizabeth Rite 




Mary Russel " 



20 Massachusetts 

o Captain and son of Simon Bradstreet. 
1-2 Clergymen of Andover. 

3 Father-in-law of Mary Peters Chandler. 

4 Uncle of Thomas Chandler who married Mary Peters. 

5 He married Sarah, daughter of Hannah Chandler and 
George Abbot. She was own cousin to Mary Peters 
Chandler's husband. 

6 Son of the Revd. Francis Dane, and step-son to 
Hannah Chandler, widow of George Abbot, and third 
wife of the Rev^ Francis Dane. She was own aunt to 
Thos. Chandler, jun. 

7 Son of Hannah Chandler and George Abbot, and own 
cousin to Thomas Chandler, husband of Mary Peters. 

8 Brother of Thomas, Jr. and John Chandler. 

9 Brother of Thomas and William Jr. 

10 Oldest daughter of Andrew Peeters who married 
Walter Wright for her second husband. 

II-I2 Sons of Andrew Peeters. 

13 Son-in-law of Andrew Peeters. 

14 Hannah Abbot, wife of John Chandler sister-in-law 
of Mary Peters. 

15 Hannah Chandler, aunt of Thomas, Jr., widow of 
George Abbot, and third wife of the Revd. Francis Dane, 

16 Father of Deacon John and James Frie, and grand- 
father of Phebe who three years later married Samuel 
Peters. 

17 Son of John Frie, Sen. 

18 Lieut. John Aslebe, brother-in-law of Samuel Frie 
and maternal uncle of Phebe who later married Samuel 
Peters. 

19 He married a sister of John Allen who married 
Mercy Peters. 

20-21 Our earliest ancestor and his wife Mercy. 
22 Bridget Henchman, second wife of William Chand- 
ler, senior. 



Ipswich and Andover 21 

John Allen was brother of the well-known Martha 
(Allen) Carrier, who was hanged as a witch. It will be 
seen that the Peters family was in the very midst of those 
accused as witches. The paper was a bold one to draw 
up and it must have taken great courage to sign it. 

FILES OF COURT PAPERS. 

"Know all men by these presents, That we William 
Chandler as principle & Andrew Peters & George Herrick 
Suretyes do acknowledge ourselves to owe & be justly 
Indebted unto our Sovereign Lord & Lady King William 
and Queen Mary, their Heirs and Successors, for the Sup- 
port of their Majesties' Government here, the sum of 
Fifty pounds, for the true performance of which payment 
well and truly to be made we bind ourselves each of us 
and each of our Heirs Executors and Administrators 
firmly by these Presents, Sealed with our Seals, dated in 
Salem, this 17 day of Janry 1692. 

The condition of this Obligation is such. That whereas 
the aforesaid William Chandler is admitted and allowed by 
their Majesties Justices at a General Sessions of the Peace 
to keep a common house of entertainment and to use 
common selling of ale, beer, syder &c till the General 
Sessions of the Peace in . . . next in the now Dwell- 
ing-house of said Chandler in Andover commonly known 
by the sign of the horse-shoe,* and no other, If therefore 
the said William Chandler during the time of keeping a 
Publick House shall not permit suffer or have any playing 
at Dice, Cards, Tables Quoits, Loggets, Bowles, Ninepins, 
Billiards or any other unlawful Game or Games in his 
house, yard. Garden or Backside; nor shall suffer to be 
or remain in his House any person or persons not being 
of his own family upon Saturday flights after it is Dark, 
nor at any time on the Sabbath Day or Evening after the 

* He was a blacksmith. 



22 Massachusetts 

Sabbath, nor shall suffer any person to lodge or stay in 
his House above one day and one night ; but such whose 
Name and Surname he shall deliver to some one of The 
Selectmen or Constables or some one of the officers of the 
Town unless they be such as he very well knoweth and 
will answer for his or their forthcoming; nor shall sell 
any Wine or Liquors to any Indians or Negroes nor suffer 
any servants or apprentices or any other persons to re- 
main in his house Tippling or drinking after nine of the 
clock in the night time; nor buy or take to Pawn any 
stolen goods, nor willingly harbor in his said House, 
Barn, Stable or otherwise any Rogues, Vagabonds, 
Thieves, nor other notorious offenders whatsoever nor 
shall suffer any person or persons to sell or utter any 
ale, beer, cyder &c by Deputation or by colour of this 
License and also keep the true assize and measure in his 
Pots, Bread and otherwise, in uttering of ale, beer, cyder, 
wine, rum, &c, and the same sell by sealed measure. And 
in his said House shall and do use and maintain good 
order and Rule : Then this present obligation to be void 
or else stand in full Force Power and Virtue. 
Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of 

Jonathan Putnam 
Stephen Sewal 
William Chandler 
George Herrick 
Andrew Peeters" 

Files of Court Papers 
1692 This may certifye any that may be concerned yt 
Mr Andrew Peeters, (now an inhabitant in Andover) being 
lately burnt out by ye Indians & put by his husbandry 
& being a stiller of strong liquors by his calling & having 
sett up his still house in ye towne of Andover we ye 
subscribers being ye selectmen of Andover doe desire & 



Ipswich and Andover 23 

judge it a benefit to ye towne yt he may have Hberty to 
retaile his liquor by ye quart out of his owne house to the 
householders of ye Towne or others which he may think 
have need of it. We judging him a man carefull of 
observing law & good order in those matters. 

Dudley Bradstreet 

John Abbot 

John Aslebe * 

Samuel Frie f 

John Chandler, Selectmen of Andover 

Andover, ye 21 December 1692 

1692 " Granted to Mr Andrew Peters t to build a seat 
in ye east gallery & to Joseph Wilson to build a seat over 
ye north stairs." — Church Records, Andover. 

1692 A rate made for ye minister in the year 1692 
for the South end of the town of Andover (Assessors' 
Records,) Andrew Peters is one of those assessed. 

1692-3 Mar 6 Left. Christopher Osgood § moderator 
for the day, Capt. Dudley Bradstreet, Capt. Osgood,! 
John Chandler & Christopher Osgood are chosen select- 
men for the year ensuing 

1693-4 Jan. I Report of towne meeting, signed by 
Dudley Bradstreet, Thomas Chandler Senr, Andrew 
Peeters and others. 

1693-4 Mar. 5 Report of towne meeting. Left. Chris- 
topher Osgood, § moderator, Mr. Andrew Peeters (and 
four others) selectmen. 

* Great-grandfather of Samuel, 3 William, 3 Andrew 3 and John 3 
Peters. 

t Grandfather of Samuel, 3 William,3 Andrew 3 and John 3 Peters. 

X Miss Bailey, in her History of Andover says that only four men, 
early in the settling of the town, were given the title of " Mr." 
Andrew, after coming to Andover is, with two or three exceptions, 
invariably spoken of as " Mr. Peters." 

§ Grandfather of Phebe Carlton, who married John Peters, 1733. 

II This is Captain John Osgood. 



24 Massachusetts 

1693-4 Mr. Andrew Peeters treasurer, Capt. Chris- 
topher Osgood representative for the town this year. 

1694 July 30 Mr Andrew Peeters was chosen treas- 
urer of ye towne. 

1694-5 May 4 John Carleton * & WilHam Lovejoy 
constables Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer for the year en- 
suing. 

1696 May 4 Voted & passed yt these tenn men 
hereafter named shall have the libertie of making a ware 
for ye catching of fish in Merrimack River att a place 
commonly called ye fishing place against Maj. Bradstreet 
his Ground. According to these terms following : viz, to 
sell to ye inhabitants of this town at any price not ex- 
ceeding twelvepence ye score & ye inhabitants of this 
towne to be supplied before strangers. Mr Andrew 
Peeters, Left. John Chandler, Left. Thomas Johnson, 
Sergt. John Aslebe, William Chandler Senr, Andrew 
Foster, Walter Wright Sen, Henry Holt sr, Thomas 
Osgood, Daniel Bigsbee are ye sd tenn men. 

This above sd ware to be erected & finished as soon as 
ye streame will permit upon ye forfeiture of ye grant. 

1696 Aug. 13 William Peters killed by the Ind- 
ians, f 

ANDOVER TOWN RECORDS. 

1696-7 Mar I — Maj. Dudley Bradstreet, Left. John 
Osgood, Capt. Christopher Osgood, Left. Chandler, Mr 
Andrew Peeters, selectmen. Mr Andrew Peeters town 
treasurer. 

1697-8 Mar 7 Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer. 

* Father of Phebe Carlton, who married John Peters, 1733. 

t This is the same raid that was made on Haverhill, when Han- 
nah Dustin was carried off and so many of the Haverhill people 
were killed. William evidently lived near the river and some of the 
Indians must have outstripped their companions and crossed to the 
south side. 



Ipswich and Andover 25 

Certificate to Andrew Peters, Andover, March i, 1698-9 

This informes any that are concerned yt whereas 
WilHam Chandler late of Andover deceased, was the Inn- 
holder of our Towne & wee being likely to be vacant Wee 
desire Mr Andrew Peeters may be the person for ye next 
year for ye End; he having license from ye Quartr 
Sessions for ye same formerly, and behaved himself with- 
out offense soe farr as wee know * ; he is alsoe one of our 
Selectmen, And our Town Treasr. 
Dudley Bradstreet 

John Chandler 

John Abbot 

Samuel Frie.f Selectmen 

1698-9 Mar 6 Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer. 
1699-1700 Mar 4 Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer. 
1700-01 Mar 3 Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer 
1701-02 Mar 2 Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer 
1702 June 3 Ensign Jno. Aslebee and Mr Andrew 
Peeters were chosen to goe down to Boston to manage the 
concerns of ye towne against a petition yt may be putt 
in to ye Gener Court by Mr Benjamin Woodbridge and 
yt company concerns wh. him and J by ye town of 

Medford whomsoever any may thereby indeavor to in- 
trude upon any part of our town rites and privileges, and 
too hereby impower them to council, advise & implace 
against them in J matter and also yt ye Town doe 

hereby engage to bear their charges in ye management of 
the sd affair and be also hereby allowed to see an attorney 
to assist them Mr John J by Name if he be not 

otherwise ingadged against us ; if he another in stead of 
him or another to assist M C if need require; And for 

* It is evident that the taking away of his license while in Ipswich 
was from no serious cause. 

t Father of Phebe Frie, who md. Samuel Peters. 
t Illegible. 



26 Massachusetts 

ever to engadge him in ye civell law if they proceed 
against us with any process 

Voted and passed by a general vote ye day above." 

1702 " Rid with Mr Woodman and Smith to Andover 
which is a good In-land Town and of a good Prospect. 
Some warned us not to goe to the ordinary, because 
Mr Peters was dangerously sick of the Bloody Flux." — 
Mass. Hist. Coll., Sewall Papers. 

1703. For nearly thirty years the inhabitants of An- 
dover lived in garrison the greater part of the time. In 
1703 the following orders were issued to the military 
officer of Andover, Capt. Christopher Osgood.* "I am 
directed by his Excellency our Governor to build two 
block-houses in your town upon the brink of Merrimack 
river, one at the fording-place called Deare's Jump and 
one at a fording-place commonly called Mr. Petters 

wading-place . ' ' Miss Bailey's History of A ndover. 

1703-4 Mr Andrew Peeters one of the selectmen. 
1706-7 Mar 3 Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer 
1707 Mar I Mr Andrew Peeters treasurer. 

1 7 10 Nov 13 (Church Records) A committee con- 
sisting of Mr Andrew Peeters and two other are impowered 
to "make assessments and levy such moneys on the 
north precinct." 

171 1 Andrew Peeters assessor with two others is to 
"give order for ye drawing out of money out of our 
treasury." 

1 7 1 i-i 2 Feb I "Mr Andrew peeters, Richard Barker 
Senier and En. Samuel Frie were chosen a committee to 
seat the committee yt was chosen to seat people in our 
meeting house according to the Instructions as hath bin 
drawn up for seating said house." 

* Grandfather of Phebe Carlton, who married John Peters, 1733. 



THE 
IPUBL 



A8T©R, LE. 




1713 



GRAVE OF ANDREW PEETERS 

NORTH ANDOVER, MASS. 



1901 



Ipswich and Andover 27 

A minister rate made and proportioned the 21 day of 
November 171 2 and comited to John Osgood colecter to 
gather and pay in to ye Reuerend Mr barnard forth with 
— Andrew peter 1-6-0 

1 7 1 2 July 1 8 Parish taxes. ' ' Thep Mr Andrew 
Fetters with the Rest of the assors. Agreed with Deacon 
Joseph Stivens for to Ring the bell one yeare for seventy 
shillings." 

1713 nov. 19 Mr andrew peeters 1-6-7. 

1 7 1 3 April 17 " Mr Andrew Peeters, George Abbott and 
Richard Barker sen are chosen a committee for the year in- 
suing that is to say to make assessments for the precinct 
in order to the paying our minister his salary and what 
other grants of money they shall haue order to levy on sd 
precinct and to warn precinct meetings as in time past. 

1 7 13 Nov 16 Mr Andrew Peeters and two others are 
assessors for the year ensuing. 

"Mr Andrew Peeters dyed December ye 13th, 1713; 

aged about 77 years" Andover Town Records. 

The inscription on his gravestone in the North Andover 
graveyard is as follows : 

Here lyes the body of Mr Andrew Peters 

who deceased December ye 14th 17 13 in ye 79th 

year of his age * 

Church Records "Jan 12 — 1 713-14 Ephraim Foster 
was chosen assessor to serve in ye room of Mr Peeters 
deed for the year insuing 

From the Proprietors book, Andover Town Records 
1702-3 "Now the proprietors are to be stated — ac- 
cording to the burthen of their particular taxes — to calcu- 
late every proprietors money from 1681 to 17 13." — [The 
proprietors had an interest in Andover town lands; we 

* His gravestone is still standing and has been carefully enclosed 
in a heavy granite slab. 



28 Massachusetts 

see from this entry that Andrew Peters was rated as one 
of the proprietors] : 

" Mr Andrew petters paid from ye yere 1681 to 1714, as 
it is last represented. To be privileged by it as the Rest 
of the proprietors are in the common lands. ' ' The records 
prior to the eighteenth century are comparatively meagre ; 
the following vote shows why : 

1698 "Voted that a committee be chosen to receive 
anew the records of the town lands, according to what 
papers may be found that have b§en upon record be- 
fore ; our town records being taken away by the enemy 
Indians." * 

Andrew's will can now be seen in the court house in 
Salem ; it is in excellent condition and reads as follows : f 

WILL OF ANDREW PETERS 
Endorsed in his handwriting "my Will & Testament." 
' ' I Andrew Peeters of Andover the county of Essex in 
NEW England Being in Good health & memory (through 
ye Goodness of God) & willing to settle ye Estate the 
Lord hath Giuen mee after my Decease doe thus Ordaine 
my Last will & testamt 

To my dear wiffe Mercij Peeters I will & bequeth my 
whole estate in houses Lands & Cattle, goods, money &c 

* Andrew Peters had the misfortune to leave a town which had 
never been attacked by the Indians for a place which for many years 
suffered from repeated raids by the "heathen enemy." 

Judge Sewall describes this attack upon Andover: 

"Feb. 24 — 97-98. Feb 22 at Break of day Andover is surprised 
Lt/Col. Bradstreet's house, rifled, his .kinsman Wade slain, Capt. 
Chubb and his wife slain and three more. Some houses and Barns 
burnt and in one a considerable quantity of corn and twenty head of 
Cattel. Pulpit cushions taken away, fired but not quenched." 

As Andrew Peters lived not far from the church and the Bradstreet 
house it is probable that he suffered in this raid as well as his neigh- 
bours. 

t 1900 — It is in very bad condition and is no longer shown. 1902 — 
It is still worse. 



Ipswich and Andover 29 

— Dureing her natural Liffe, or whilst Shee Remains my 
widdow for her Comfortable subsisting in this world, and 
after her decease mij will is that mij son Samuell peeters 
Shall haue & enjoij my whole Estate in houses, Lands, 
Cattle, Stills, & Coppers & whatsoever I posses, — hee 
Paieing all mij Lawfull debts & Receiving all debts — 
Duw unto mee, and ye Reason is whereas I was Burnt 
out bij ye heathen Enemij, hee ye said Samuell Peeters 
hath been mij Copartner Euer Since, & also hath pur- 
chased a Great part of Said Land for himselue, of Collnl 
Dudley Bradstreet &c: Only I make this Exception, I 
Giue to my two daughters Tenne pounds in paij Each of 
them, that is to Say Elizabeth Wright & Mary Chandler, 
Itm : I Giue to my two Grand Children, Andrew & Mary 
Peeters, which are ye Children of my Son John Peeters, 
deceased. Each of them fiue pounds in pay, or ye Land I 
bought of Sargt Jeremiah Belcher, on ye north side of 
Merrimack Riuer * aboue Major dennisons farme where 
their Father dwelt, Itm : I Giue to my Grandson Seber- 
ence f peeters a paijer of oxren worth Tenne pounds in 
paij, or tenne pounds other wise as mij Executors & he 
shall agree when he is of age, Itm : I Giue to my Grandson 
John peeters ye son of Willm Peeters deceased, Tenne 
pounds in paij when he shall Com to ye age of Twenty & 
one years, Itm : I Giue unto my daughter in Law Mary 
Chapman J Fourty shillings in Money and To my Grand 

* Is this "Mr. Fetters' wading-place"? 

t We infer that this is the same as Sibbons. His brother Andrew- 
must have died in childhood, as his name is not mentioned in the will. 

t Mary Wilbourn "called the daughter of Andrew Peters," Andrew's 
stepdaughter, who December 30, 1674, was married to Nathaniel 
Chapman, of and in Ipswich, Mass., son of Edward and Mary Chapman. 

They appear to have had children as follows: 

John, born in Andover, February 13, 1685. 

Hannah, born in Ipswich, February 13, 169 1. 

Michael, born March i, 1694. 

David, born August 14, 1695. Probably there were others. 



30 Massachusetts 

daughter Annis Chandler, as my Executors shall see 
Cause, and as for my Grand Children John & hannah 
Allin * haue been under my Care, I haue Reserved them 
that which was their Fathers that is to Say for John Allin 
ye farme that was his Fathers, and for hannah Allin The 
household stuffe, as to a lead & pewter which I Gaue to 
their mother, & tenne pounds in ye hands of their unckle 
Samuel Holt, which will appear by an Instrument under 
ye said Samuel Holt his hand & seal, 

And if it should please God to Take my Son Samuell 
Peeters out of this world before my dear wiffe, my will 
is That my Estate shall be giuen unto his male Children 
lawfully begotten of his Body and whereas I haue Taken 
ye Care upon me for ye maintainance of Walter Wright 
junr I doe hereby bind my Executor, Samuell peters to 
Take ye Full Charge & Care of him, according to indent- 
ment I haue made with his Father to witt : Walter Wright 
Senr &c : I doe declare this to bee my Last will & Testa- 
ment & of This I make mij dear wiffe Mercij Peeters & my 
Son Samuel peeters my Executors, In Witness whereof I 
haue here unto Sett my Hand & Scale this i6 Daye of 
Novembr in ye year of our Lord God seauenteene hun- 
dered & two, 1702 

I haue written this with my owne hand. 

Andrew Peeters 




Signed and sealed in ye Presence of Thomas Barnard 
Theophilus Cotton Mary Famum 

* Their parents died of small-pox. 

f The seal on Andrew's will is no longer in existence. When I first 
saw it, in 1896, it was of black wax and in good condition. It 
plainly represented what is given above, namely, two or three (ap- 
parently) Indian arrow-heads about the sides, a log fort with flag 
flying and something showing above the top, — possibly a small gun, — 
over all the sun shines brilliantly; to me it is undoubtedly in memory 



Ipswich and Andover ' 31 

Mary Famum Alice Johnson declared they saw An- 
drew Peeters Signe & seale his last will & Testament 
&c Dec 29, 1 7 13 

Ipswich, May 3, 1 714 Mary Farnum appeared & made 
oath to what is aboue written The Widow (illegible) " 

Samuel Peters gave bonds in 200;^ with Thomas Bar- 
nard of Andover as suretie Feb 5, 17 13-14. 

There is no settlement of this estate on record. 

ANDOVER CHURCH RECORDS, 1686 AND LATER. 

Admitted to full Communion Mrs Mary * Peters 

Margaret Peters widow. 

Mrs. Mary* Peters widow and Relict of Mr Andrew Peters 
Died on the 5th of November 1726. 

1 II. John, first child of Andrew Peeters and Mercy 
Beamsley his wife, born in Ipswich, February 28, 1660; 
killed by the Indians in Andover, iVugust 14, 1689; mar- 
ried in Ipswich, May 25, 1680, Mary Edwards, daughter 
of John Edwards, bom in Ipswich , October 16, 1661, 
died in Ipswich, January 11, 1733, and had two children. 

of the great event of Andrew's life, — the desperate struggle and victory 
of the white men over the Indians, and the taking of their stronghold 
in the Narragansett campaign. The seal is evidently a home-made 
affair, but it is the more individual and valuable on that account. 

"The courage displayed during the action by every part of the 
army, the invincible heroism of the officers, the firmness and resolu- 
tion of the soldiers when they saw their captains falling before them, 
and the hardships endured before and after the engagement are 
hardly credible, and rarely find a parallel in ancient or modem ages. 
The cold the day preceding the action was extreme, and in the night 
the snow fell so deep as to render it extremely difficult for the army 
to move the day succeeding. Four hundred of the soldiers were so 
completely frozen as to be unfit for duty ! ' ' — History of the Indian 
Wars, by Henry Trumbull. 

(Out of eleven hundred and twenty-seven men two hundred and 
ninety-nine were killed and five hundred and thirteen wounded. The 
Massachusetts men were at the head of the army and led the charge 
against the fort.— E. B. P.) * Probably written "Marcy." 



32 Massachusetts 

///. Children of John and Mary Edwards: 

8 (1). Andrew,* born in Ipswich, December i, 1682. 

9 (2). Mary. 

John hved, according to his grandfather's will, "on ye 
north side of Merrimack Riuer, aboue Major Dennison's 
farme." As he lived out of the town it is probable that 
there were other children whose births were not recorded. 
Mary must have been one of them, and whether it is her 
death which is recorded in Ipswich on the nth of Jan- 
uary, 1733, or her mother's, it is impossible to say. 
Probably the latter. John Peters was killed during the 
raid on Haverhill of August 13, 1689, when so many in 
that town lost their lives. There are two records in 
Ipswich of his marriage to Mary Edwards, the first, April 
12, 1680, is, undoubtedly, a publishment. 

2 II. Elizabeth, second child of Andrew Peeters and 
Mercy Beamsley his wife, bom in Ipswich, A^ugust 26, 1662, 
died in Andover, October 31, 1 703 ; was married in Ipswich, 
November 25, 1678, to John Sady, and had two children. 

///. Children of Elizabeth Peters and John Sady: 

(1). John, born (probably in Ipswich in 1679) died in 
Andover August 13, 1702, "aged about twenty-four 
years." 
(2). Samuel, born (probably in Ipswich, in 1680), mar- 
ried September 25, 1704, Mary Hamden. "Capt. 
Samuel Sady died Oct. ye 8-1744 aged 64 years." 
His gravestone is in Medfield, Mass. The intention of 
marriage and his marriage are both recorded in Middleton, 
Mass., town records. 

Elizabeth Sady was married (2) to Walter Wright 
(widower) September 9, 1684, by Mr. Russell (he married, 
February 26, 1667, Susannah . Johnson ; "died June 3, 
1684, Susannah wife of Walter Wright.") 

* See New Hampshire. 



Ipswich and Andover 33 

III. Children of Elizabeth Peters Sady and Walter Wright: 

(1). Elizabeth, born in Andover, July 20, 1685. 

(2). Dorothy, born in Andover, July 23, 1688. 

(3). Joseph, born in Andover, October 28, 1693. 

(4). Sarah, born in Andover, March 20, 1696. 

(5). Abigail, born in Andover, January 31, 1699. 

(6). Dorothy, born in Andover, 1701. 
" 1 71 2, October 20 (25?), died Walter Write, aged about 
seventy." 

3 II. Andrew, third child of Andrew Peeters and Mercy 
Beamsley his wife, no record of birth (probably bom in 
Ipswich, in 1664), killed by the Indians in Andover, Au- 
gust 14, 1689; married in Andover, February 8, 1685, by 
Major Saltonstall, to Elizabeth Farnham, dau. Thomas 
Famham and Elizabeth Sibbons, his wife, bom in An- 
dover, February 19, 1661, died in , 
and had 2 children. 

///. Children of Andrew and Elizabeth Farnham: 

10 (1). Andrew, born in Andover, December 9, 1686; no 
further record. Probably died young, as he is not mentioned 
in his grandfather's will. 

11 (2). Sibbons,* born in Andover, February 19, 1688. 

He is undoubtedly the one called " Seberence " in his grand- 
father's will, whence it may be inferred that the name was 
written according to a careless pronunciation and that it was 
not "Seaborn," as has been surmised. 

Elizabeth Farnham Peters was married (2) by Captain 
Danforth, April 2, 1692, to James Johnson, son of Thomas 
Johnson and Mary Holt, his wife, bom in Andover, 
February 4, 1672, died in Andover, October 14, 1748, and 
had children. 

Andrew ", the second son of Andrew ', is curiously 
enough, his only child not mentioned by name in his 
will. He was killed at the same time as his elder brother 
John. 

* See New Hampshire. 



34 Massachusetts 

FROM THE WILSON MANUSCRIPT.* 

" The settlers were so much annoyed by the Indians at 
this time, that they could with difficulty support their 
families.! Their houses were burned, their crops de- 
stroyed and their cattle driven away. During a period 
of more than thirty years (1686-1725) they were com- 
pelled to spend more or less of each year at the garrison. 
(Blanchard's was the one at Haggett's Pond.) When 
they went out to work in their fields, each man armed 
himself in readiness to repel an attack. Notwithstand- 
ing these precautions, many of the inhabitants were killed ; 
among others the sons of Mr. Peters. 

"A couple of Indians had been looking around the 
settlements and had taken one prisoner and were cau- 
tiously retiring when they saw two young men, John and 
Andrew Peters, approaching. They had been at work 
in the field and were returning to the garrison. The In- 
dians immediately hid behind a log fence, and told their 
captive, John Singletary, if he stirred or made any noise 
they would instantly kill him. They suffered the brothers 
to pass and then they both fired. One of the young men 
fell dead from his horse, the other was mortally wounded, 
the ball passing through his body and through the neck 
of his horse. The wounded animal dashed off at full 
speed, carrying the unfortunate rider to a considerable 
distance from the spot where his brother fell." 

4 II. Mary, fourth child of Andrew Peeters and Mercy 
Beamsley his wife, bom in Ipswich, June 12, 1668, died 

* Mrs. Margaret Wilson Mighill, of Danby, near Wallingford, Vt., 
died in 1820, aged ninety-one. She told the tale of John's, Andrew's, 
and William's death, to her granddaughter, Sarah Ives Fox, who 
wrote it down. Mrs. Mighill was the oldest daughter of Abigail 
Whittemore and Thomas Wilson, son of Margaret Russ Peters (widow 
of WilHam Peters) , and her second husband, James Wilson, of Cam- 
bridge. James Wilson removed to KilHngly, Conn. 

t This was in Andover. 



Ipswich and Andover 35 

in Andover, July 21, 1753, in the 86th year of her age; 
was married, May 22, 1686, to Thomas Chandler, son of 
Capt. Thomas Chandler and Hannah Brewer his wife, 
bom in Andover, October 9, 1664, died in Andover, 
January 20, 1737, and had nine children. 

///. Children of Mary Peters and Thomas Chandler: 

(1). Mary, born in Andover, February 18, 1687. 
(2). Annis, born in Andover, March 21 (24?), 1689. 
(3). Thomas, born in Andover, June 4, 1691. 
(4). Elizabeth, born in Andover, July 13, 1693. 
(5). Timothy, born in Andover, March 29, 1695. 
(6). Ephraim, born in Andover, October 2, 1696. 
(7). David, born in Andover, January 11, 1699. 
(8). Hannah, born in Andover, August 23, 1700. 
(9). Mary, born in Andover, March 8, 1702. 

5 II. Mercy, fifth child of Andrew Peeters and Mercy 
Beamsley his wife, bom in Ipswich, January 27, 1670, died 
in Andover, of the small-pox, December 25, 1690; was 
married by Mr. Dane, May 22, 1686, to John Allen, son 
of Andrew Allen and Faith Ingalls his wife, bom in An- 
dover, March 16, 1662, died of the small-pox, November 
26, 1690, and had three children. 

///. Children of Mercy Peters and John Allen. 
(1). John, born April 30, 1687. 
(2). John, born June 12, 1688. 
(3). Hannah, born September 12, 1690. 
John Allen and his young wife evidently caught the 
dread disease from his sister, the unfortunate Martha 
Allen, wife of Thomas Carrier, who only a few years later 
was- hanged as a witch. The Carrier family came from 
Billerica to Andover, and in 1690 some of them became 
ill with small-pox. 

"To Samuel Holt, Andrew Allen and John Allen, 
Neighbors and ffriends. — We the subscribers of Andover 



36 Massachusetts 

have been informed that your sister Carrier and some of 
her children are smitten with that contagious disease the 
small-pox and some have been so inconsiderate as to 
think that the care of them belongs to the salact men of 
Andover which does not, for they took care when first 
they came to towne to wame them out again and have 
attended the law therein; and shall only take care that 
they doe not spread the distemper with wicked careless- 
ness which we are afraid they have already done. You 
had best take what care you can about them, nature and 
Religion requiring of it. We hope we have done faith- 
fully in this information and are your friends and ser- 
vants. Oct. 14th, 1690. 

A most cold-blooded, selfish document! Samuel Holt 
was brother-in-law of Martha Carrier, and Andrew Allen 
was her father. It was the custom, when a new family 
came to town to warn them out, otherwise, in case of 
poverty or disease, they might become a charge to the 
town. 

Later, Walter Wright, brother-in-law of John Allen 
and Mercy Peters Allen (through his marriage to Eliza- 
beth, oldest daughter of Andrew Peeters), received the 
following warrant. 

"To Walter Wright, Constable ; Whereas it has pleased 
God to visit those of the widdowe Allen's family which she 
hath taken into her house with that contagious disease 
the small-pox, it being as we think part of our duty to 
prevent the spreading of sd distemper we therefore re- 
quier you in their Majesties' names to warn sd family not 
to goe near any house soe as to endanger them by sd 
infection nor to come to the public meeting till they may 
come with safety to others ; but what they want let them 
acquaint you with; which provide for them out of their 
own estates." 

Dated the 4.9.1690. 



Ipswich and Andover 37 

6 II. William, sixth child of Andrew Peeters and 
Mercy Beamsley his wife, born in Ipswich, February 7, 
1672, killed by the Indians in Andover August 13, 1696. 
(No record of marriage, but is said to have married Mar- 
garet Russe in 1694, perhaps daughter of John Russ and 
Deborah Osgood, bom in Andover, April 10, 1673?) 

///. Children of William and Margaret Russ: 

12 (1). John * bom in Andover, October i, 1695. 

Margaret Russ Peters was married (2) April, 1704, to 
James Wilson of Cambridge. 

1696 "One Peters and Hoyt scalp 'd at Andover this 
week; were not shot, but knock'd in the head." 

Mass. Hist. Coll. jth series, vol. ii. 

Dunstable, August 14, 1696 (Letter to Captain Lane) 
"from Andover I have advice alsoe of two men being 
murdered and scalped by ye Indian enemy, living in a 
forsaken house half a mile from a garrison, whereof Peters 
his son being one . . . Jonathan Tyng, major." 

New Eng. Hist. & Gen. Register. 

In the History of Billerica, Massachusetts, by Hazen, 
there is a letter from Andover relating that William 
Peters belonging to Samuel Blanchard's garrison, went 
to his house with one Hoyt to fetch his horse, and not 
returning, search was made and both men were found 
killed and scalped. The house was about half a mile 
from the garrison on the Billerica road in an open plain. 

The Revd. John Pike records in his Journal, 1696, that 
"old John Hoyt of Amesbury and young Peters of And- 
over were slain upon the road between Andover and 
Haverhill." The Revd. Samuel Peters, of Connecticut, 
of Blue Law fame, made out of one man and one horse 
a captain of cavalry, and out of two white men slain by 

* Founder of the Connecticut line. See Connecticut. 



38 Massachusetts 

some Indians a pitched battle. It is evident that the 
Wilson manuscript is nearly or quite correct in its account 
of the death of William Peters, the father of John, who 
was the parent of all the Connecticut Peters. 

EXTRACT FROM THE WILSON MANUSCRIPT: 

" William Peters and Margaret Russe had been married 
but two years when William shared the fate of his broth- 
ers. It was in the month of August, 1696 and they were 
living at the garrison (Blanchard's) according to Hazen 
the historian of Billerica. Mrs Peters had that morn- 
ing ventured to go back to the house to gather some 
vegetables from the garden for dinner. It appears that 
after her return to the garrison, the Indians came to the 
house and hid themselves in a neighbouring corn-field. 
After dinner, Mr Peters concluded to go and take care 
of a lame horse that was in the pasture near the house. 
Mrs Peters wished to accompany him, but as it began 
to rain, he thought it would not be prudent for her to do 
so, (Their young son John was a babe ten months old.) 
She felt an uncommon anxiety to go with him, and fol- 
lowing him out, said she could go, the rain would not hurt 
her. Noticing her extreme agitation he turned and in a 
tender manner replied, * No, my dear, it will make you 
sick; the grass will be very wet, you will wet your feet 
and take cold.' He told her he would go to his father's 
who lived at the distance of about a mile from there and 
bring a fat lamb. He would also lead the horse to the 
fort that she might see it. He then left her and she 
watched him as long as he remained in sight. 

" He went to the pasture, led the horse up to the house, 
and stood examining his foot, when some Indians rushed 
upon him, seized and carried him into the house where a 
man by the name of Hoyt was making ropes. They in- 
stantly knocked Hoyt down and scalped him. They 



Ipswich and Andover . 39 

then gave Peters a pair of mocassins, told him he must 
put them on and accompany them. He sat down and 
began to tie the mocassins, carefully watching an oppor- 
tunity to make his escape. The Indians were very busy 
plundering the house, and when Peters saw the doorway 
clear, he sprang forward, knowing if he could get out, he 
could out run the Indians, as he had previously had 
several races with them. Unfortimately the pole on 
which Hoyt had hung his hemp was so low that he hit 
his head against it and fell back. The Indians sprang 
upon him with their hatchets. He made a gallant de- 
fense, throwing down three of them, when the fourth 
struck him over the eye, with the head of his hatchet and 
broke his skull. They scalped him, gathered their 
booty and fled. The Indians, from whom an account of 
this affair was afterwards obtained, said that they washed 
the scalps in rain water which had caught on the heads 
of some cider barrels that stood near the door. 

" Mrs Peters became uneasy at the length of time that 
had elapsed since the departure of her husband. As hour 
after hour passed away, her fears for his safety increased. 
Unable to control her feelings of apprehension, she spoke 
to the other women of the fort of her anxiety about him. 
They only laughed at her fears. About sunset one of the 
young men at the fort started to bring the cows from 
pasture. Mrs. Peters could bear the suspense no longer. 
As the path the young man would have to follow, led him 
near her house, she said she would go with him. They 
walked along in silence until they came to the path which 
would separate them. She told him he must go with her, 
she durst not go alone. Without saying a word, he 
stepped into the path before her and walked towards the 
house. When they came within sight of it, they were 
surprised to see the hogs (which usually ran in the woods 
and were very wild) around the house, and one of them 



40 Massachusetts 

appeared to be feeding upon something that lay in the 
doorway. As they came nearer, the path led them in 
such a direction that they could not see the front part of 
the house. 

"When the young man, who was a few steps in advance 
came round the comer of the house, he turned suddenly 
with an exclamation of terror and fled. Mrs Peters ran 
with him several rods and then stopped and asked him 
what he saw, 'I saw,' said he, 'blood on heads of the 
barrels and the hogs were eating Mr. Hoyt's head.' Ter- 
rible as this description was, it afforded a gleam of hope. 
* Did you see anything else ? ' 'I thought I saw a heap 
of cloth within.' The hope that had sustained her fled, 
and she sank helpless upon the ground. The young man 
caught her up and carried her toward the fort. His ap- 
proach was observed by the inmates of the garrison, who 
came out to meet him and assist in conveying Mrs Peters 
into their little fortress. Happily for her, she was not 
restored to consciousness for any considerable length 
of time, during that night and for several succeeding 
days. 

" Three men armed themselves and went to the house. 
They found Mr. Hoyt lying partly out of the door with 
his head nearly gone. The body of Peters was lying on 
the floor where he fell. One of the men raised him in his 
arms and thought he felt the heart beat, but it soon 
ceased. They laid him down again and, being too few in 
number to carry the bodies to the fort, placed the remains 
of Mr Hoyt within the house, closed the door and left 
them until morning, when they were brought in and 
buried. Margaret Peters thus early left a widow with 
one child, had several offers of marriage, but remained 
single until James Wilson, after the death of his wife, 
hired Mrs Peters to take care of his family. Her kindness 
and agreeable manners secured the attachment of father 



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and children. Her second marriage was a happy union, 
for fifty years." * 

7 II. Samuel, seventh child of Andrew Peeters and 
Mercy Beamsley, bom (no record of birth, probably in 
Ipswich, Mass., in 1674-75), died in Andover, May 2, 
1736; md. in Andover, by Mr. Dane, Dec. 15, 1696, to 
Phebe Frie, dau. Ensign Samuel Frie and Mary Aslebe, 
his wife, bom in Andover, May 28, 1680, died in Andover, 
May 14, 1757, in the 77th year of her age, and had nine 
children. 

///. Children of Samuel and Phebe Frie: 

13 (1). Samuel, born in Andover, Aug. 14, 1697 (md. ch.). 
14(2). Phebe, born in Andover, 26 day, 170 1 (record 
very defective), died in Andover, Aug. 10, 1702.! 

15 (3). Andrew, born in Andover, 1701 J (record defec- 
tive) (md., no ch.). 

16 (4). William, born in Andover, Jan. 7, 1704 | (md., 
ch.). 

17 (5). John, born in Andover, Nov. 6, 1705 (md., ch.). 

18 (6). Beamsley, born in Andover, July 3, 1707, died 
very young. 

* Margaret Wilson, the eldest child of Thomas, the second son 
of James Wilson and Margaret Peters, lived with her grandparents 
till she was eighteen. In 1819 at the age of ninety, she related the 
story of her ancestors in detail to her own granddaughter, who wrote 
it down, and from her manuscript this copy was made. It is referred 
to as the Wilson manuscript. 

t This is the oldest known Peters gravestone. It stands in the old 
North Andover graveyard close to her grandfather's, and next to the 
depression in the ground which is said to mark the spot where stood 
the first church in Andover. The inscription reads: " Phebe ye 
daughter of Samuel and Phebe Peters aged 3 years died August ye 
loth 1702." 

X The records about this time are very defective. The Rev. 
Andrew is said to have been bom September 26, but it could not have 
been in 1701 if Phebe was bom in that year. The latter was un- 
doubtedly bom in 1699, Andrew in 1701, and William January 7, 
1703-4, but this last date is taken from Colonel Andrew Peters' family 
Bible, the date in the Andover records being November, 1703. 



42 Massachusetts 

19 (7). Beamsley, born in Andover, - 1710 (md., one 

dau.). 

20 (8). Phebe, born in Andover, April 16, 17 19, died 
(prob. in Middleton, Mass.) between 1757 and 1760; 
was md. in April 17, 1744, to 
Timothy Perkins * of Middleton, son of 

Perkins and his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had five chidren. 

21 (9). Joseph, born in Andover, May 25, 1723, died in 
Andover, April 27, 1729. 

FROM proprietors' BOOK, ANDOVER, 1715, JUNE 27 

Voated and pegged out and granted to Samuell Fetters 
the benefit of half the money that his father mr Andrew 
petters paid from ye yere 1681 to 17 14, as it is last repre- 
sented. 

To be priviligd by it as the Rest of the proprietors are 
in the common Lands. 

Samuell petters 37 15 02 [Evidently the sum 
total of his property. Every five pounds entitled a man 
to a " voat " ; every fifty shillings to -^ a vote ; 25 shillings 
to ^ of a vote. Samuell petters had 7 votes, £21$ shil- 
lings ; 02 pence.] 

1 71 5 the 6 of July Laid out to Samuel Peters five 
acres of Land below the Lots joyning to his other land, 
(bounded by Left. Thos. Johnson) 

1 71 5 Sept. 15 Laid out to Samuel Peters two acres 
and a half and eight Rods & a half of land lying on the 
easterly side of his meadow called the den meadow, f 
(bounds of Faulkner and Barnard) 

* He may have been a cousin on the Beamsley side. After the 
death of Phebe Peters Perkins, Timothy married Hannah Trowbridge, 
and two of their sons, in succession, were named Beamsley. Hannah 
Beamsley, sister of Mercy, married, in Ipswich, Comet Abraham Per- 
kins. This Timothy is probably a descendant, though I have been 
unable to find any record of him. 

t See footnote on page 43. 



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Ipswich and Andover 43 

1 7 16 Jan. 24 Laid out to Samuel Peters two acres of 
land toward his wood Lott division below the lotts be- 
tween his own land and the way that leads to Paul 
Faulkner's house. 

1 716 Jan. 24 Laid out to Samuel Peters five acres and 
half and eight rods of land wh. is in full for his wood 
division Lying by the den hil.* 

Andover the 24 of February 171 7-18 Laid out to 
Samuell Peters a peece or parcel of land containing eight 
acres be it more or less lying and being in Andover afore- 
said lying on the southwardly side of the way that leads 
to Wamassack near Bilicria line and is bounded as fol- 
loweth beginning at the north east comer with a white 
oak tree marked: with stones about it: then Runing 
westwardly fourty pols to another white oak tree marked 
then runing southwardly thirty pols larg to a white oak 
tree marked : standing on the side of a Ridge with stones 
about it : then runing eastwardly fourty pols to a black 
oak marked with stones about it then runing north- 
wardly thirty two pole to the first bounds, that is the 
satisfaction of the said Samuell Fetters for the dammage 
that the highway doth or may doe him the said Samuell 
Peters or his heiers that hath bin laid out thorough the 
land by the name of Aliens farme In witnesse whereof 
the said Samuell Peters name was sett unto these presents 
By his order Samuel Peters 

Before us witnesses Ephraim Foster John frie 

Laid out by us John frie John Chandler Benjamin 
Barker selectmen. 

1 71 7-18 "the old training-field And that between Capt. 
John Chandler and Samuell Peterses and Ensign Henry 

* The compiler believes this to be a reference to the Den Rocks, 
which she thinks were in the family for nearly, or quite, two hundred 
years, until sold, about 1890, by Mr. Nathaniel Peters. She must 
confess, however, that Miss Charlotte Abbott, an authority on all 
matters pertaining to Andover, is not of the same opinion. 



44 Massachusetts 

Chandler — and that by the south meeting house; all 
these places shall Lye common: for ever; as they now 
Lye open." 

1 718 June 7 Laid out to Samuell Peters four acres 
and a half of land Lying on the Den hill.* Begun on the 
west comer on a white oak marked by his former bounds 
runing eastwardly by twelve rods to a white oak marked 
Joseph Osgoods Bounds then fourty three Rods to pine 
sd Osgoods bounds marked then fourty nine rods to the 
first boimds ; another parcel of it lying northerly of this 
above Begun att the South West comer on a pine tree 
marked Runing eastwardly on Wrights line fourty three 
rods to a pine marked So on Twenty rods to a great Rock 
att the comer of his pasture the northwest comer of ye 
land he bought of Barnard then northerly on his own 
land and Francis Faulkners land to Shawsheen river 
then westwardly by the river to a great swamp oak 
marked Ebenezer Barkers bounds then southwardly on 
sd barkers line fourty eight rods to a Read oak marked : 
another of sd barkers bounds then westwardly on sd 
barkers line fourty eight rods to a pine marked then 
southerly eleven rods to a pine marked sd peterses old 
bounds then southerly bounded on sd peterses land to the 
first Bounds. Laid out by us with allowance for Quality 

John frie Stephen Osgood 
Ephraim Foster Committee Joseph Bumap serveyer. 

1 7 18 Dec. 10 Samuel Peters falling short of his meas- 
ure of Land in his first division we doe allow him a small 
groove of land Lying on the south end of the land his 
father bought of Mr Dudley Bradstreet Esqr and the 
three acres of land that was laid out to Robert bamard 
near the den hill * Bounded on the northerly comer with a 
Rock which is the bounds of his other land whear it is a 
point. Then turning westwardly about nineteen rods to 

* See footnote on page 43 . 



Ipswich and Andover 45 

a stake and stone which is Bamerd's line; then twenty- 
rods to the first bounds Done by committee William 
Lovejoy Nehemiah Abbott (Committee) 
George Abbott lott layer 

The 26 December 17 18 Third division Laid out to 
Samuell Peters half an acre of land lying on a Lane be- 
tween his own land and Joseph Wilsons land by ye den 
hills Begim att ye South East comer on a stake sd Wil- 
sons comer Run northerly by one rod and a half to a stake 
and stone sd Peters comer bounds : before : then westerly 
joyning on sd Peterses line thirty two rods to his other 
stake and stone : then Southerly three rods to a white oak 
marked sd Wilsons bounds then eastwardly on sd Wilsons 
line thirty five rods to the first bounds. Laid out by us 
John frie Ephraim Foster committee 
Samuell Peterses land Recorded third Division the 13 
of april 1 7 1 9 Laid out to Samuell Peters two acres of land 
to his third Division lying by Bilicrea line by bilicrea 
great meadows joyning to his former land Begun att a 
black oak marked his former bounds Riming westwardly 
thirty eight rods to a white oak both marked then south- 
wardly sixteen rods to a walnut marked then eastwardly 
thirty four rods to a white oak marked : then northwardly 
nineteen rods to the first bounds with allowance for 
quallity laid out by us the committee 

John frie Ephraim Foster committee 
Ensign Henry Chandler Joseph Osgood, John Wright, 
John Wilson Stephen Osgood, Samuell peters and Capt. 
John Chandler lands recorded to latter part of their third 
division to each of the persons above named twelve rods 
and fourteen foot of land lying in partnership. 

The 21 of December, 1719, laid out to Ensign Henry 
Chandler, Joseph Osgood, John Wright, John Wilson, 
Stephen Osgood, Samuell peters and Capt. John Chand- 
ler a certain peece of land lying between a two rod way 



46 Massachusetts 

allowed between said John Wilsons land that was laid out 
before and these lotts; now laid out; and the County 
road the whole peece of which is laid out to the several 
persons above named ; is two rods wide att the west end 
and thirty rods in length and four rods wide att the east 
end lying between the said contey road that leads from 
town along by Capt. Christopher Osgoods ; and the way 
allowed for said Joseph Osgood ; to goe from his house to 
the town two rods wide and the contey-road lieth on the 
north side ; and is four rods wide ; and the said Osgoods 
way lieth on the south side of the seven lotts following 
which are laid out to the latter part of their third division ; 
all and each of these lotts to each of them these persons 
above named ; are thirty rods in length to each of them 
and each lott is five foott wide at the west end and 
eight foott wide att the east end the first lott on the south 
side lyeth next to said Osgoods two rod way and is laid 
out to Ensign Henry Chandler, the second is sd Joseph 
Osgoods the third is sd John Wrights the forth is sd John 
Wilsons the fifth is sd Stephen Osgoods, the sixth is sd 
Samuell Peters and the seventh lott is sd Capt. John 
Chandlers. Laid out by us John frie 

Stephen Osgood Ephraim Foster Committee. 

24 February, 1719-20 Laid out to Samuell Peters to 
the latter part of his third division three acres of land 
with allowance for quallity lying in the fals woods of Jo- 
seph Peabodys farm Begun att a white oak tree marked 
then run northwest and by north twenty pols to stone on 
a rock ; then easterly twenty six pols to a twin white oak 
tree marked ; then Southwardly twenty six pols to a white 
oak tree marked : said peabodys farm bounds then west- 
wardly twenty four pols to the first bounds. 

Laid out by us John frie Ephraim Foster Com- 
mittee 

1719-20 Mar 24 Laid out to Samuell Peters to the 



Ipswich and Andover 47 

latter part of his third division Two acres of land with 
allowance for quality Lying neare to bilicrea line ; on the 
east side and north end of his former land bounded on 
the south easterly comer with a white oak tree marked 
then run westwardly nineteen pols to a white oak tree 
marked one of his former bounds then northwardly along 
by his farm line nineteen pols and a half to a black oak 
tree marked So on thirty three pols to a white oak tree 
marked then westwardly fourty pols to a white oak 
tree marked then northwardly four pols to a white oak 
tree marked then eastwardly by the way not Damnifying 
the way about fourty two pols to a white oak tree marked 
Then south easterly eighteen pols to a white oak tree 
marked then Southwardly thirty six pols and a half to the 
first bounds and on the east side with a way that goeth 
over the hill and to come within a pole of said way Laid 
out By us 

John frie Ephraim Foster, Committee 
1720 the 25 of March then laid out to Samuell Peters to 
the first part of ye third division half an acre and eight 
Rods of Land And to the latter part of ye Division 106 
rods of Land with allowance for quality in two pieces one 
pice Bildreca Line at the south west comer of Mr Allen's 
great Division of Land now in the possession of sd Samuel 
Peters bounded on ye s. e. comer with a pine tree marked 
a bounds of sd division then running west by Wm Fosters 
land to bilceua* line then northwest joyning to sd bildreca* 
Line to sd Peterses Dam then easterly joyning to said 
Peters swamp Land to the line of his farm then south- 
wardly to the first mentioned Bounds; the second piece 
of Land Laid out to Samuell Peters in the west side of 
Wilson farme on the north side of said Peterses swamp, 
bounded on the north west comer with an elm tree 
marked then running easterly by a white oak tree marked : 

* Billerica. 



48 Massachusetts 

Samuel Blanchards bounds so on to sd Peters farm line 
that shall make a straight Line from sd elme by ye white 
oak to sd farme with sd Fetters former swamp 

Laid out by us Ephraim Foster John frie, com- 
mittee 

1720 March 25 Laid out to Samuell Feters half an acre 
of Land with allowance for quality on the west side of the 
den hill by Shawshin River to the first part of his 3rd 
division : boimded on the south west comer with a red oak 
tree marked at the Lower end of Joseph Osgood's meadow 
then running eastly 2 1 poles to a pine tree marked by sd 
Feters former land then north about thirty four poles to 
a pine tree marked on former bounds of sd Samuel Feterses 
Land Joyning to Ebenezer Barkers Land then westerly 
abt 32 poles to a swamp oak tree marked on the bank of 
Shawsheen River, then south joyning to the river about 
20 poles to the first bounds 

Laid out by us Ephraim Foster John frie, com- 
mittee 

WILL OF PHEBE PETERS, WIDOW OF SAMUEL PETERS 

In the Name of God Amen. I Fhebe Feters of An- 
dover in the County of Essex and Frovince of Massa- 
chusetts Bay in NEW England Widow of Samuel Feters 
Late of sd Andover Deceasd being Very weak in body 
but of a disposing mind and memory do in Consideration 
of my Mortality make this my last Will and Testament. 
Firstly Commiting my Sole into the hand of God who gave 
it, and my Body to the Earth from whence it was taken 
to be Decently buried at the discretion of my son John 
Feters.* and as touching such temporal Estate as it hath 
pleased God to bestow upon me I give and Dispose of it in 
the following manner (viz) 

Imprs I give to my son John Feters * Six pounds thir- 

* Old John of Andover, (1705--1797). 



Ipswich and Andover 49 

teen Shillings and fourpence out of my part or Sheir of the 
Estate that was my son Andrew Peters late Decesd 

Item : I Give to my son William * Peters my Large 
pewter Dish 

Item : I Give to my son Bemsley Peters ten Shillings to 
be paid to him by my son Samuel Peters 

Itim : I Give to my daughter Phebe Perkins the Wife 
of Timothy Perkins, my wering apperrel and household 
Stuf . Except what I have already or Shall here after Dis- 
pose of — To some other Parson in this my Last Will and 
Testament. Item: I Give to my Grand aughter Phebe 
Peters Daughter of my sd son John Peters three Pounds 
out of the Estate of my sd son Andrew Decesd that is to 
say out of my part of sd Estate. and my will is that the 
Books that were my son Andrews and are not Disposed of 
may be taken as so much of my part or Sheir of sd Estate 
and I give them to my Grandson John Peters j the son of 
my sd son John Peters. Itim: I give to my Daughter 
Phebe Perkins aforesd any note of hand that I may have 
against aiiy parson at the time of my Decese. I also order 
that my sd son John Peters pay my Funeral Expences 
and the Residue of my part of the Estate that was my sd 
son Andrews I give to my sons Samuel Peters WilHam 
Peters and John Peters and to my Daughter Phebe Per- 
kins aforsd to be equally divided between them. It is to 
be understood and my Will is that the ten shillings giuen 
to my son Bemsly and the three Pounds given to my 
Grandaughter Phebe be paid by my son Samuel out of 
what I have given him in this my last will which sums I 
order him to pay in six months after my Decese. Lastly 
I do hereby Constitute mak & ordain my son Samuel 
Peters aforesd the Sole Executor of this my last Will and 
Testament Ratifieing and allowing this and no other to 
be so In witness whereof I have hear imto set my hand 

* William of Medfield. t John of Blue Hill. 

4 



50 Massachusetts 

and Seal this Sixth day of May A D 1 757 and in the thirty 
thd year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
Second King &c 

Signed sealed Published and Declared by the sd Phebe 
Peters to be her Last Will and Testament in the Presence 
of us 

John Wilson Jnr Asa Foster Jnr * Daniel Foster Jnr 

Phebe [her mark] Peters 

[seal] 
Value of estate 214L 5 11 ^ 

A True Inventory of the Estate of Mrs Phebe Peters late 
of Andover Deed taken By us the Subscribers a Commite 
appointed and Sworn for that Purpose 
Land at Middleton Lying Betwen Brad- 
ford and the Meeting House Mow- 
ing and Pastureing 23 Acres and 
120 Pole Apraised at 6L o o Pr 

Acre 142 10 o 

Woodland By Middleton Pond 7 Acres 

and 40 Pole at 3;^ 7 o Pr acre 24 59 

Sum tot of ye Real 166 15 9 

Personal 

A Clock t 10 o o 

A Pair of Boots 6 o 

Greek and Latin Testament f 2 8 

Cambrg Concorde f 12 o 

29 Small Books 9 o 

2 Yock Irons 4 o 

4 Powder Horns 2 o 

device and Pin i 6 

In Bonds & Notes for Money 28 o 4 1-2 

39 15 6 1-2 

Andover May 17 1759 

* Later, husband of her granddaughter Hannah, child of Samuel. 

t The clock and books she evidently inherited from her son, the 
Rev. Andrew — probably also the powder-horns. As she left a very 
fair amotmt of property it is likely that she had already given away 
her personal effects to Phebe Perkins, who was her only living daughter. 



Ipswich and Andover 51 



2 chairs 

a Large Spinning whele 

34 lb of Old Iron 

an old Table 

A Stuff Gown 

a Pair of Stays 

an Apron & Cap 

A warming Pan 

an old Bible 

A note of John Martin on Interest Baring 
Date March the 8th 1747 Supposed 
to be ye four Double Money at ... . 

The Interest of the Same 





2 


6 




3 







5 


6 




I 


4 




8 


4 




2 







I 


2 




4 







2 





3 


15 


4 


2 


9 


6 



7 14 8 



John Johnson Juner Daniel Ingalls Benjamin 
Barker Com. 

13 III. Samuel, first child of Samuel, and Phebe Frie, 
bom in Andover, Mass., Aug. 14, 1697, died in Andover, 
, 1781 ; md. in Andover, June 11, 1722, Mary Robin- 
son, dau. Dane Robinson and Mary Chadwick, his wife, 
bom in Andover, April 22, 1698, died in Andover, June 
16, 1747, aged 49, and had six children. 

IV. Children of Samuel and Mary Robinson: 

33 (1). Mary, born in Andover, July 4, 1722, died in 
Andover, Nov. 19, 1738. 

33 (2). Samuel, born in Andover, May 30, 1726, died 
June 25, 1738. 

34 (3). Benjamin, born in Andover, Aug. 25, 1728 (md., 
eh.). 

35 (4). Hannah, born in Andover, Dec. 14, 1730, died 
(probably in Canterbury, N. H.) Jan. 11, 181 5; was 
md. 1776, to Asa Foster, Jr., son of Capt. Asa 
Foster of Andover, and Elizabeth Abbott, his wife. 



52 Massachusetts 

born in Andover, Sept. ii, 1733, died in Canterbury, 
N. H., Sept. 30, 1814. No children by Hannah Peters, 
who was his second wife. 

26 (5). Joseph, born in Andover, March 23, 1733-34, 
died Aug. 21, 1736, "aged 2 years, 4 months and 3 
weeks." 

27 (6). Lydia, born in Andover, March 26, 1737, died in 
Andover, June 30, 1738. 

Samuel Peters* is, March 15, 1742, one of the collec- 
tors. In 1754 he is one of a seating committee for the 
new meeting-house ; the committee, in seating, are to be 
governed by wealth, and are to give the best seats to 
"persons highest in the taxes, equal and personal estate 
that they have a due and proper regard to persons ad- 
vanced in years, to men advanced by posts of honour, or 
by a liberal education. ' ' His will is in Salem, and is dated 
May I, 1 78 1. His daughter Hannah, wife of Asa Foster, 
is to have forty Spanish milled dollars, or £ig lawful 
money, a pair of small andirons and a small Fire pan and 
a pair of small Tongs and a great chair ; his grandchildren, 
Benjamin and Samuel Peters, his two grand-daughters 
Hannah and Elizabeth, and his son Benjamin Peters are 
mentioned. 

* His wife died comparatively young (for those days) , undoubtedly 
from a broken heart, having lost four children within less than three 
years. This mortality was due to the dreadful "throat distemper" 
which deprived many families of all their children and which raged 
at intervals from November, 1735, to 1738. It is estimated that in 
Essex County alone, during that period, fourteen hundred children 
died from the disease. 



READING AND WAKEFIELD 

24. IV. Benjamin, third child of Samuel and Mary 
Robmson, bom in Andover, Aug. 25, 1728, died in South 
Readmg, Mass. (now Wakefield), April 17, 1812 aged 
84; md., March 22, 1753, Hannah Chickering' dau 
Samuel Chickering and Hannah Osgood, his wife, born 
m Andover, July 13, 1730, died in 
, and had eight children. 

V. Children of Benjamin and Hannah Chickering: 

28 (1). Hannah, bap. in Andover, 1753, died young. 

39 (2). Simeon, bap. in Andover, 1755 (no further 
record; was undoubtedly either twin of Benjamin, or 
the name should be Benjamin and not Simeon) ; Ben- 
jamin married and had children. 

30 (3). (Probably) Mary, born in 

, died in Middleton, Mass., Nov. 
21, 1846; was md., Oct. 14, 1779, to Jonathan Rich- 
ardson, ninth child of Solomon Richardson and Abigail 

. , his wife, 

born m Middleton, March 12, 1759, died March 15, 
1798, and had eight children. 

31 (4). Samuel, bap. in Andover, 1760, died very young. 
33 (5). Samuel, bap. in Andover, 1763 (md., ch.). 

33 (6). Hannah, bap. in Andover, 1766, died in 

34 (7). Elizabeth,bap. in Andover, 1769, died in 

June 17, 1852; was md., April 29, 
1788, to Josiah Hutchinson, son of Josiah Hutchinson 
and 5cux,^M. X^ji^^^. ^ his wife, bap. in Middle- 
ton, Mass., Feb. 26, 1764, died in Middleton, Dec. 
, 1814, and had nine children. 

35 (8). Naomi, bap. in Andover, 1774, died in 



53 



54 Massachusetts 

29, V. Benjamin (probably second), child of Benjamin, 
and Hannah Chickering, bom in 

, died in South Reading,* Mass., 
Aug. 25, 181 5, "aged 60 years." (As this would make 
the year of his birth 1755, it is probable that for Simeon 
we should read Benjamin; there is no record of any 
Simeon, at any other time, in Andover) ; md. in Read- 
ing, Mass., Oct. 9, 1783, Martha Brown, dau. Jeremiah 
Brown and Ruth , his wife, bom in Read- 

ing, Dec. 10, 1763, died in Andover, Jime 5, 1845, and 
had one daughter. 

VI. Children of Benjamin and Martha Brown: 

36 (1). Patty, born in Reading, Mass., Oct. 28, 1785, 
died in South Reading,* July 22, 1845, aged 59 years 
and 9 months. Unmd. 

Benjamin Peters was one of the Lexington Alarm men. 
His name is on the muster-roll of Capt. Peter Poor's 
company, which marched from Andover to Cambridge, 
fifty-five miles, on the 19th of April, 1775. 

33. V. Samuel, fifth child of Benjamin, and Hannah 
Chickering, bap. in Andover, Mass., 1763, died in South 
Reading,* Mass., , 1830; md. in Reading, 

April 21, 1 791, Elizabeth Steams, dau. Timothy Steams 
and Lydia , his wife, bom in Reading, 

April 2, 1 771, died in South Reading,* Aug, 21, 1849, 
and had six children. 

VI. Children of Samuel and Elizabeth Stearns: 

37 (1). Samuel, born in Reading, Jan. 3, 1792 (md.). 

38 (2). Benjamin, born in Reading, Dec. 29, 1795 (unk.) 

39 (3). Timothy, born in Reading, Sept. 26, 1797 (unk.) 

40 (4). Eliza, born in Reading, Oct. 21, 1801, died in 
South Reading,* Nov. 26, 1844; was md. in South 
Reading, April 29, 1822, to Jacob Parker, son of 

* Now Wakefield. 



Reading and Wakefield 55 

Parker and his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had five children. 

41 (5). Lydia, born in Reading, May 4, 1806, died in 
South Reading,* Aug. 12, 1848; was md. in S. Read- 
ing,* Oct. 16, 1831, to Nathan Slocomb, son of James 
Slocomb and Sarah Trask his wife, born in Eden, Vt., 
Sept. 21, 1804, died in Wakefield, Mass., Oct. 30, 1877, 
and had two children. 

42 (6). Naomah, born in Reading, Jan. 5, 1810, died in 
South Reading,* Sept. 13, 1844; was md., April 26, 
1850, to Peter Tucker, son of Tucker and 

his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had four children. 

37. VI. Samuel, first child of Samuel and Elizabeth 
Steams, bom in Reading, Mass., Jan. 3, 1792, died in 
Philadelphia, Penn., Jan. 8, 1822; md. in South Read- 
ing, Mass., April 30, 181 6, Ruth A Lovering, dau. 
of Lovering and , his wife, 
bom in , lost 
at sea , and had children. (No further record.) 

38. VI. Benjamin, second child of Samuel, and Eliza- 
beth Steams, his wife, bom in Reading, Mass., Dec. 29, 
1795, died in 

No further record. Removed to the West. 

39. VI. Timothy, third child of Samuel, and Elizabeth 
Steams, his wife, bom in Reading, Mass., Sept. 26, 1797, 
died in 



No further record. Removed to the West. 

* Now Wakefield. 



THE REV'D. ANDREW OF MIDDLETON. 

15. III. Andrew, third child of Samuel, and Phebe 
Frie, bom in Andover, Mass., Sept.,* 1701, died in Middle- 
ton. Mass., Oct. 6, 1756; md. Hannah dau. 
of , bom in 

, died in Wobum, Mass., May 
15, 1782, aged seventy-seven. No children. 

He graduated from Harvard College, 1723.! 

"1723 Sept. 2, " The Selectmen of Andover from the 
day of the date hereof agreed with Mr Andrew Peters that 
he should keepe a Grammar School a twelve month in the 
said Towne, allso that he would Teach boys J to Read, 
Rite and Cipher and that he would tech and keep School 
in each precinct according to each Precinct's Pay, for 
which Service the Selectmen of sd Towne promised to 
Give the sd Andrew Peters forty-four pounds." 

In 1 729 he was ordained as a minister, and in November 
of that year he removed to Middleton, Mass., being the 
first pastor of that town. In 1734-35 he was on the list 
of proprietors of Amherst, New Hampshire, land in that 
township having been granted to his grandfather, Andrew 
Peters of i\ndover, as one of the members of the Narra- 

* Sept. 26. 

t James Frie, brother of Phebe, who married Samuel Peters, was 
the father of Jonathan, "good young Frie, who was our Enghsh chap- 
lain," as the old ballad has it, and who was killed at Lovell's fight. 
Jonathan and Andrew Peters were therefore cousins: moreover they 
were near neighbors in Andover and classmates in college, being the 
only ones there that year from Andover, and both became clergymen. 
It is no great stretch of imagination, therefore, to picture them as 
close friends, grieving with each other's grief and joying with his joy. 

X Not girls! 

56 



Middleton 57 

gansett expedition. In 1741 he was present in Amherst, 
N. H., at the ordination of Mr. Wilkins. He is said to 
have been a large, muscular man, and a story is told of 
him as resenting an assault upon his negro servant, and, 
throwing his cassock aside, exclaiming: "Lie there. Di- 
vinity, while I chastise this rascal!" Curiously enough, 
his grave now lies almost in the shadow of the house of the 
man who committed the assault. 

It is also related that upon a visit to a near-by Indian 
settlement he was invited to dine. Knowing that the 
fare for that day was skunk, he declined; but, another 
time, receiving a similar invitation, he remained to dinner. 
After the meal was over, the squaw, remembering his 
former refusal, exclaimed, with much delight, "You no 
eat skunk, but you eat rattlesnake!" 

He appears to have suffered from ill health for some 
years before his death.* 



"A true inventory of all and singular the goods, chat- 
tels, rights and credits of the Revd. Mr Andrew Peters late 
of Middleton in the county of Essex, taken and approved 
by us the subscribers, being a committee appointed and 
impaneled by the Hon. John Choate, Esq. Judge of the 
Probate of Wills, &c, and for the county aforesaid which 
was shown to us by Mrs Hannah Peters being of the 
estate of the said Revd. Mr Andrew Peters D.D. viz. 
About 133 acres of Land Situate in said Mid- 
dleton with two Dwelling Houses & one 
Bam Standing on sd Land at 6£ per 

acre 798 — o — o 

About 44 acres of land adjoyning to Mid- 
dleton pond at 67/ per acre 133 — 5 — 8 

* His gravestone is still standing in Middleton. 



58 Massachusetts 



o 



Burkit upon ye New Testament o — 12- 

Cambridge Concordance o — 12 — o 

ye works of Thos Goodwin o — 1 2 — o 

Chamocks works two volloms o — 13— 4 

one Byble 8/5 Sancas morels 2/8 11 — i 

ye Body of Devinity by Thos Bray 2 — 8 

ye Greek and latten Testament 2 — 8 

40 other bound books i — 13 — 4 

29 sermon books o — 9 — o 

one Clock 10 — o — o 

one Piece of Broad Cloath 4 — 8 — o 

One Great 20/ one strait body'd Coat 2 — 15 — o 

one Coat 30/ two linnen wast Coats 6/ . . . i — 16 — o 
one Black flower'd Satten wastcoat one Do 

per of Breeches 3 — o — o 

one Black Russet wastcoat o — 16 — o 

two pe of linnen Breeches o — 5 — o 

one old Blue wastcoat o — 3 — o 

one per leather Breeches 22/ 22 — o 

one pr Do 2/ o — 2 — o 

four per of Stockings 8/ three per of 

Shoes 7/ 15 — o 

one Bever hat 26/8 one old Do 3/ . . . . i — 9 — ^ 

five Duzen and four Black horn Buttens . . . o — 3 — 6 

one Wigg 26/8 one Do 22 2 — 8 — 8 

5 linen Shurts 45/ five cotton and linnen 

Do 30/ 3—15—0 

3 old feather Beds & 3 und Beds and Sum 

other furniture 9 — °~~ ^ 

Ten pr of sheets 40/ one Duzen piller 

bears 10/ 2 — 10 — o 

One case of Drawers 2 — o — o 

one Chamber Table 10/ Table linnen 12/ 
one Looking Glass 14/ one Do 24/ 

one Do 30/ 4 — 10 — o 



Middleton 59 

eight chairs 16/ Six Small Delf earthen 

Dishes 1/ o — 1 7 — o 

one warming pan 2/ one old fashinyd 

Case of Drawers 20/ i — 2 — o 

one Tea Table 6/ one Block Tin Tea 

Pot 4/ o — 10 — o 

Cheaney wair 10/ half a Duzen silver 

Tea spoons & pr of Tongs 12/ i — 2 — o 

Sum Glass wair & 2 salt Celers o — 4 — o 

2 wooden Bottles o— 2 — o 

one per of hand Irons one fire shovel & 

Tongs o — 8 — o 

2 old round Tables o — 18 — o 

2 Small Do o — 2 — o 

21 old Chairs i — 1 1 — 6 

one per of hand irons o — 4 — o 

2 Brass Candlesticks 3/2 Brass Kettles 

20/ I— 3— 2 

one fire shovel & one per of Tongs 3/  . • . o — 3 — o 
two Tramels 4/ one Spit 1/6 one per 

of old hand Irons 5/ o — 10 — 6 

2 old Iron pots & i skillett o — 5 — o 

one frying pan & one old Box Iron o — 3 — o 

one per of Bellowses & one Lan thorn o — i — o 

7 pewter platters i — o — o 2 Duzen of 

puter plates i — 16 — o 

Sum old Puter o — 3 — o 

one Silver Tankard 9 — o — o 

four silver Spoons 18/ one skimer one 

Basting ladle one basting Spoon 1/6 

one old Chest & one Box 3/ i — 2 — 6 

about ten Bushels of rie i — 10 — o 

about 20 Bushell Indian Com 2 — o — o 

one Loom 10/ one reddleing sive 8d 

one Sadie & Bridle 15/ i — 5 — 8 



6o Massachusetts 

3 meat Barrels 2 — 10 — o one Chees Tub 

1/6 about 150 pd chees 40/ one 

Chees press 2/8 Twelve Barrels 48/ 7 — 2 — 2 

2 hogs & 2 Spring Peggs 4 — 12 — o 

Beatle & 3 Iron Wedges o — 5 — o 2 Iron 

Bars & one Barking Iron 9/ o — 14 — o 

2 ox yokes & Iron belonging to them o — 4 — o 

one Draft Chain & one Small Chain o — 6—0 

one ax 3/ i Iron tooth harrow 13/ 2 

plows 26/ 2 sleeds 8/ 2 — 10 — o 

one Cart & wheels 40/ one Cleavis & 

pin 1/6 2 — I — 6 

one horse 8 — o — o one per of oxen 15 — 6 — o 

one per of Steers 3 years old 3 — 15 — o 

one pr Do 2 years old 3 — o — o 8 Cows 

at 32/ each 15 — 16 — o 

one Bull 3 years old i- — 4 — o one heifer 

3 years old i — 12 — o 2 — 16 — o 

one Do 2 years old i — o — o one heifer 

I year old i — 15 — o 

four calves i — 6 — 8 i — 6 — 8 

1 negro man 40 — o — o 

one negro woman 40 — o — o 

one Desk 45/ one old chest & one Box 44/ 2 — 9 — o 

One Birch Canoe & a paddle i — o — o. . . i — o — o 

2 Guns 60/ 3 — o— o 

five powder horns 7/ one case of Knifes 

& forks 3/ o — 10 — o 

3 reasors 3/ one Small per of Stilyards 

1/6 o — 4 — 6 

one hamer — 2 pr of nepers & i small Iron 

to Draw nails o — 3 — o 

one spade 6/ i old shovel 0/6 o — 6 — 6 

Debts due on bonds & notes of hand Prin- 
ciple & Interest 344 — 8 — 3 



* ASTOft, LENOX 

■5EN FOUNDATIONS 



. £ 










1756 



GRAVE OF THE REVD. ANDREW PETERS 

MIDDLETON, MASS. 



1901 



Middleton 6i 

30 sheep & 28 Lambs 6 — 18 — o 

14 pounds of Sheeps wool 14 — o 



1510— 5— II 

Middleton Nov 30, 1756 

Hannah Peters Samuel Bradford Francis Peabody, 
Juner Elijah Porter 

Essex Co May 12, 1757 

Mrs Hannah Peters made oath to the truth of this 
Inventory and yt if more Estate appeared she would 
cause it to be added Before me 

John Choate Jus Probate 

The estate was divided between the members of the 
family of the deceased, the wife first getting one third.* 

Samuel, William, and John Peters, and Timothy Per- 
kins for Bemsley Peters "supposed to be out of the pro- 
vince" and also representative of Phebe Perkins and 
her heirs, and Phebe Peters, mother of the deceased, were 
the heirs to the estate, each receiving ;^38 — 10/ and 1/15 
of a farthing 

Hannah Peters appears to have lived in Middleton for 
many years after, as there is a record of her subscription 
for the relief of the town of Boston, which was suffering 
under the oppressive Port bill, in 1775. Her subscription 
was 2;^ 5 s She died in Wobum. 

Middleton graveyard. Stone of the Revd. Andrew 
Peters. 

Here Lyes the Body of The Revd Mr Andrew 
Peters 

Who departed this Life October the 6 1756 
Aged 55 Years. 

* Some of the minutes of the proceedings are written upon some 
sheets of paper which have served as a copy-book. Across one end in 
a beautiful copperplate hand is, " Nothing is more certain than Death 
the common enemy of all mankind. Andrew Fuller of Middleton La- 
bour continually to improve your hand. Fuller." ' 



62 Massachusetts 

Foot stone. The Revd Mr Andrew Peters 

1756. 

In the graveyard of Burlington, Mass. on the hill, is to 
be found the gravestone of the Revd. Andrew's wife, 
which reads as follows : 

Redeem your hours My glass is run And so 
must yours. 

Erected in memory of Madam Hannah Peters 
the relict of the Revd Mr Andrew Peters late Pastor 
of the church In Middleton lies here interred 
She died in Wobum May xv. MDCCLXXXII 
in the LXXVIII year of her age. 

The foot stone is inscribed Madam Hannah Peters. 



k 



TriE NEW yC]-;K 



\}K " 



T ASTOft, LENOX 

i._T"-P^'^ FOUNDATION3 [ 



^' 



Ptc^ ethCr- 





1798 

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA 




L^/^i^.//, //^/ 



j2/^'-^ ^,.7^::^ 



fCAPT. ADAM PETERS) 



MEDFIELD. 

16 III. William, fourth child of Samuel and Phebe 
Frie, bom in Andover, Mass., Jan. 7, 1704,* died in Med- 
field, Mass., Jan. 19, 1788!; md. in Medfield, March 18, 
1729, Hannah Chenery, dau. and sole heiress of Benjamin 
Chenery and Mary , widow of Thomas Clap, his wife, 
bom in Dedham, Mass., Feb. 24, 1707, died in Medfield, 
March 30, 1799,! aged 92, and had ten children. 

IV. Children of William and Hannah Chenery: 

43 (1). Joseph, born in Dedham, Mass. (now Walpole), 
Dec. II, 1729 (md,, ch.). 

44 (2). Benjamin, born in Dedham (now Walpole), Feb. 
8, 1731 (md., ch.). 

* From Colonel Andrew Peters 's farnily Bible. Andover records say- 
November, 1703. 

t "Mr. William Peters who died Jan. 19, 1788, in ye 85 year of his 
age." (Gravestone in Medfield graveyard.) 

% "Mrs. Hannah Peters relict of Mr William Peters who died 30 
March 1799 in the 93 year of her age." (Gravestone in Medfield 
graveyard.) 

Hannah, wife of William, for several years before her death, wrote 
verses on her birthday. She began in 1778; here are some written in 
1790, which, if not perfect as to rhyme, are most excellent reason. 

And now a thought comes in my head, 
To tell the children I have had, 
The number is ten and no more, 
They are six sons and daughters four. 

Joseph and Benjamin were first of the race, 
Mary and Adam come next in their place, 
Eve and Taphenes spoil my rhyme 
Except I leave four to tell the next time. 
Andrew and Jethro, I 've told you eight then, . 
Nathan and Finis they make up the ten. 

63 



64 Massachusetts 

45 (3). Mary, born in Dedham (now Walpole), Nov. 3, 
1732, died in , May 23, 1813, aged 80; 
was md. in Medfield, April 7, 1757, by the Revd. Jon- 
athan Townsend, to Hezekiah Allen, son of Hezekiah 
Allen and Mary his wife, born in Ded- 
ham, Mass., April 15, 1724, died in , 
and had ten children. 

46 (4). Adam, born in Medfield, Oct. 30, 1734 (md., ch.). 

47 (5). Eve, born in Medfield, Aug. i, 1737, died in , 
Dec. I, 1823, aged 86; md. in Medfield, , 1759, 
John Pepalow, son of Pepalow and 

his wife, born in , died 

in , and had children. 

48 (6). Taphenes, born in Medfield, Jan. 29, 1739-40, 
died in , Nov. 25, 181 7, aged 
77; md. in Medfield, May 4, 1769, Gershom Dunton, 
son of Samuel Dunton and his 
wife, born in Wrentham, Mass., , 1735, died in 

, and had five children. 

49 (7). Andrew, born in Medfield, Jan. 24, 1742 (md., 
ch.). 

50 (8). Jethro, born in Medfield, June 13, 1744 (md., 
ch.). 

51 (9). Nathan, born in Medfield, Aug. 26, 1747 (md., 
ch.). 

52 (10). Finis, born in Medfield, June 4, 1749, died in 

, was md. in Medfield, March 4, 
1784, by the Revd. Thomas Prentiss, to Daniel Gookin 
of Dedham, Mass., son of (perhaps Richard Gookin 
and Margaret his wife), born in 

, bap. in Dedham, March 28, 1735-6, 
died in , and had children. 

William Peters was a cordwainer. In 1 7 5 7 he removed 
from Dedham to Medfield. He is said to have been a 
soldier in the Revolutionary army, but this is doubtful. 
There is, in the Massachusetts Archives, however, the 
following record : 



Medfield 65 

" Peters, William. List of men from Medfield drafted 
to complete continental army according to warrant issued 
by Lt. Baxter, May 8, 1777. Paid money in lieu of ser- 
vice." William was seventy-four years old at this time. 
His gravestone and that of his wife are in the Medfield 
graveyard.* 



43 IV. Joseph, first child of William and Hannah 
Chenery, bom in Dedham, Mass. (now Walpole), Dec. 11, 
1729. died in Yeh. 13, 1800; 

i^d- in Abigail Thompson,! 

dau. of Thompson and his wife, 

born in died in 

1797, and had three children. 

V. Children of Joseph and Abigail Thompson: 

53 (1). Abigail, born in 

(about 1750), died in Medfield, Mass., Dec. 30, 1829, 
aged 79.1 Unmd. 

54 (2). Moses, born in Watertown, Mass., April 26, 1752. 
(md., ch.). 

* Extract from the Farmgr'5 Monthly Literary Journal: "An acount 
of the extraordinary longevity of the family of Peters has recently been 
published in several of the papers. William the father died aged 85, 
Hannah the mother aged 92, Joseph died 1800, aged 71, Benjamin 
aged 72, Mary aged 80, Adam 78, Eve 86, Taphenes 77, Andrew 80, 
Nathan 76, Finis 73, Jethro is still living, 80, and on the day when 
he completed his 80th year he travelled on foot thirteen miles. The 
average age of the children and parents is exactly seventy-nine years 
and two months." 

t Perhaps daughter of Jonathan Thompson and Abigail Fowle his . ,,^^^? 
wife, bom in Medford, or Woburn, Mass., July 16, 1729, probably died 
in HaHfax, N. S. 

X Gravestone in Medfield graveyard inscribed: "Miss Abigail Peters 
daughter of Mr. Joseph Peters and Mrs. Abigail Peters who died Dec. 
30, 1829 aged 79 years." 



66 Massachusetts 

55 (3). Alexander Abercrombie, born in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, 1764 (md., ch.). 

Joseph Peters first settled in Men don, Mass. ; later he 
removed to Watertown, Mass., then to Halifax, Nova 
Scotia. He was postmaster-general of Halifax; he was 
judge of the supreme court; he was a member of St. 
John's Lodge, Halifax; he was Grand Junior Warden in 
1784. Prom 1784 to 1792 he was Grand Secretary of the 
Provincial Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia. At the death of 
his wife he left by will all his property to his daughter 
Abigail, who lived for about thirty years after her father's 
death. A codicil gave a silver cup, which had been pre- 
sented to him by the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, to his 
son, Joseph Thompson Peters, but his aunt outlived him, 
and he never received it. 

54 V. Moses, second child of Joseph and Abigail 
Thompson, bom in Watertown, Mass., April 26, 1752, 
died in Mendon, Mass., Dec. 29, 1810, aged 58 years and 
8 months, md. in (int. Mendon, Mar. 18, 1782) Eleanor 
Penniman, dau. Penniman and his 

wife, bom in Sept. 

9, 1760, died in Mendon, May 15, 1826, and had three 
children. 

VI . Children of Moses and Eleanor Penniman: 

56 (1). Royal, born in Uxbridge, Mass., Jan. 12, 1783. 

57 (2). Alexander, born in Uxbridge, Feb. 4, 1785 (md., 
ch.). 

58 (3). Mary, born in Uxbridge, May 17, 1787, died in 
Medfield, Mass., Aug. 13, 1876 (unmd.)-* 

* Possibly she is the Mary whose intention of marriage is recorded 
in Mendon, Mass., with Marvel Hopkins of Scituate, R. I., June 28, 
1826. There seems to be no other possible Mary. 



Medfield 67 

MASSACHUSETTS ARCHIVES. 

Lexington Alarm Roll. Moses Peters, residence Med- 
field. Capt. Ephraim Chenery's company, Col. John 
Smith's regiment; service 11 days. 

Moses, private; in Capt. Bullard's company, Col. 
Read's regiment. Roll dated Aug. 1—75. Enlisted May 
15' 1775; service 2 months and 22 days. Residence 
Medfield. 

Company Returns, dated Roxbury, Sept. 26, 1775. 
Muster and pay roll. Capt. Thaddeus Read's company, 
Col. Nathan Tylers' regiment, services in Rhode Island; 
enlisted July 28, 1 780, discharged Aug. 7, 1 780. Marched 
to Tiverton by order of the Council, July 17, 1780. 

56 VI. Royal, first child of Moses and Eleanor 
Penniman, bom in Uxbridge, Mass., Jan. 12, 1783, died in 

July 5, 1827, aged 44 years 
and 6 months, md. in , dau. 

of and his wife, born in 

, died in , 

and had children. 

57 VI. Alexander, second child of Moses and Eleanor 
Penniman, bom in Uxbridge, Mass., Feb. 4, 1785, died in 
Mendon, Mass., Oct. 16, 1853, aged 68 years and 8 
months; md.in Medfield, Mass. (int. ent. April, 1809, with) 
EHzabeth Bullen, dau. Bela Bullen and Elizabeth Harts- 
hom his wife, bom in Medfield, Mass., 1787, died 
in , and had 5 children. 

VII. Children of Alexander and Elizabeth Bullen: 

59 (1). Joseph, born in Medfield, Mass., March 24, 1810 
(md., ch.). 

60 (2). Prudence Bullen, born in Medfield, Nov. 6, 1813, 
died in Medfield, Jan. i, 1820, "aged six years"; grave- 
stone in Medfield graveyard. 



68 Massachusetts 

61 (3). Sarah Bullen, born in Medfield, Oct. 6, i8i6, 
died in Milford, Mass., Sept. 27, 1856. Unmd. 

63 (4). Eleanor, born in Medfield, Nov. 13, 1818, died 
in Milford, Mass., June 9, 1855; was md. in Mendon, 
Mass., June 18, 1840, to Orrin G. Goodwin, son of 
Goodwin and his wife, born in 

, died in , 

and had 3 children. 

63 (5). Royal, born in Mendon, Mass., Aug. 3, 1821 
(md., ch.). 

59 VII. Joseph, first child of Alexander and Eliza- 
beth Bullen, bom in Medfield, Mass., March 24, 1810, 
died in April i, 1855; md. in 

Aug. 30, 1834, Lucretia Rogers, dau. 
Rogers and his wife, 

bom in [181 5], died Dec. 16, 1834, 

aged 19 years. 

Joseph md. (2) in June 2, 

1836, Theodosia Thacher, dau. Thacher and 

his wife, bom in 
died in and had 

one child. 

VIII. Children of Joseph and Theodosia Thacher: 

64 (1). Sarah Elizabeth, born in , 
May, 27, 1838, died in ; 
was md. in to 

, son of and 

his wife, born in , died 

in , and had children. 

63 VII. Royal, 5th child of Alexander and Elizabeth 
Bullen, bom in Mendon, Mass., Aug. 3, 1821, died in Mil- 
ford, Mass., Jan. 3, 1872; md. in Uxbridge, Mass., April 
18, 1850, Chloe Keith, dau. of Lyman Keith and Chloe 
Rawson, his wife, bom in Uxbridge, Mass., Aug. 18, 1831, 



Medfield 69 

died in Worcester, Mass., Dec. 21, 1901, and had four 
children . 

VIII. Children of Royal and Chloe Keith: 

65 (1). Helen Augusta, born in Uxbridge, Mass., Feb. 
21, 185 1, living in New York in 1903; was md. in 
Milford, Mass., Nov. 7, 1869, to Charles C P 
Hastings, son of Charles C. P. Hastings and Anna 
W. Allen his wife, born in Mendon, Mass; died in Men- 
don, May 24, 1874. No children. Helen Augusta 
Peters was md. (2), in Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 4, 1883, 
to Henry W Remington, son of Jefferson Reming- 
ton and Naomi Paine, his wife, born in 

, living in New York 
in 1903, and had two sons. 

66 (2). Lowell Mason, born in Mendon, Mass., Feb. 8, 
1855, died in Milford, Mass., Sept. 19, 1856. 

67 (3). Anna L , born in Uxbridge, Mass., June 8, 
1857, died in Providence, R. I., Dec. 15, 1880; was 
md. in Milford, Mass., Sept. 8, 1875, to Frank P 
Horton, son of John Horton and Elmira Cook, his wife, 
born in , died 
in . No children. 

68 (4). Minnie K , born in Mendon, Mass., May 24, 
i860, died in Worcester, Mass., Nov. 3, 1897; was md. 
in Worcester, Oct. 21, 1885, to Edward W Dodge, 
son of Henry Dodge and , his wife, born 
in 

died in , and had 

one daughter. 

55 V. Alexander Abercrombie,* third child of Jo- 
seph and Abigail Thompson, bom in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, 1764, died at Fort Johnstone 

* He must have received his education abroad, as the Rev. Samuel 
Peters, of Hebron, Conn., in a letter from London, dated August 30, 
1787, speaks of him, says he is an M.D. of Aberdeen University, a very 
clever man, is just going home, and that his father lives in Halifax. 



70 Massachusetts 

(now Smithville), North CaroHna, "now called South 

Fort at the mouth of the Cape Fear river," Nov. 26, 

1802; md. in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Jan. 21, 1788, Sarah 

Morris Salter, widow of Dr. Malachi Salter, and dau. 

Judge Charles Morris of Halifax, N. S., and 

his wife, bom in 

died in and had five children. 

VI. Children of Alexander Abercrombie and Sarah Morris 

Salter: 

69 (1). Mary Elizabeth, born in Boston, Mass., 
1789, died in , 1864; 
was md. in 1802, to Louis Landais, son 
of Franfois Henri de Landais and , his 
wife, born in San Domingo, June 7, 1779, died in 

, and had seven children. His father was treas- 
urer of the French Government for the island of San 
Domingo. Louis Landais was a cadet at West Point 
in 1798, being then 19 years old; he was afterwards 
commander of Fort Moultrie. In 1803, by his father's 
wish, he left the army and settled in St. Pierre, Mar- 
tinique, as a merchant. 

70 (2). Charles Morris, born in Boston, Mass., 

, 1790 (or 
1 791), died in infancy. 

71 (3). Joseph Thompson, born in Boston, Mass., March 
23, 1792 (md., ch.). 

72 (4). Harriet Smith, born in Rutland, Vt., Jan. 12, 
1796, died in Waltham, Mass., Aug. 14, 1876; was md. 
March 25, 1821, in Boston, Mass., to William Johnson 
Bettis,sonof Bettis and , 
his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had three children. 

73 (5). Charlotte Abigail, born in Rutland, Vt., June 30, 
1798, died in Waltham, Mass., March 10, 1875; was 
md. in 



Medfield 71 

1823, to Jacob Heard, son of Thomas Heard and Eliz- 
abeth , his wife, born in Wayland, Mass., 
Aug. 12, 1793, drowned in Boston harbor, Sept. 15, 
1827, and had two children. Charlotte Abigail was 
md. (2), in March 28, 
1832, to Samuel Heard, son of Richard Heard and 

, his wife, born in Wayland, Mass., Dec. 16, 
1800, died in Waltham, Mass., Dec. 16, 1852, and had 
three children. 

Alexander Abercrombie settled in Halifax, N. S., as a 
physician in Nov., 1787, two years later he returned to 
the States, and was in Boston, Mass., where he was an 
apothecary. In 1798-99 he lived in Rutland, Vt. In 
1802 he was a surgeon in the United States Army, com- 
mission dated April 21, 1802, and signed by Thomas 
Jefferson. 

71 VI. Joseph Thompson, third child of Alexander 
Abercrombie and Sarah Morris, bom in Boston, Mass., 
March 23, 1792, died in Boston, Aug. 6, 1824; md. in 
Gloucester, Mass., July 16, 181 5, Abigail Trask, dau. 
Joseph Trask and Abigail his wife, born in 

Gloucester, Aug. 15, 1792, died in Gloucester, Sept. 6, 
1843, and had four children. 

VII. Children of Joseph Thompson and Abigail Trask: 

74 (1). Harriet Louisa, born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 23, 
181 6, died in ; was 

md. in , 

Nov. 26, 1834, to William Clark, son of Benjamin 
Clark and Catherine his wife, born in Marl- 

borough, Mass., Aug. 25, 1809, died in 

, June 19, 1845, ^^d had 
four children. Harriet Louisa was md. (2), in 

, 1847, to Nathan 
Brooks Whitman, Jr., son Nathan Brooks Whitman, 



72 Massachusetts 

and Ann Dix, his wife, born in Boxborough, Mass., 
July 1 6, 1828, and had five children. 

75 (2). Mary Ehzabeth, born in Concord, Mass., Oct. 17, 
1817, died in ; 
was md. in , 
July 27, 1839, to Woodbury Langdon Crockett, son 
Charles Crockett and Sallie , his wife, born in 
Meredith, N. H., Oct. i, 1816, died in Salisbury, Mass., 
June 3, 1852, and had three children. She was md. 
(2), in , March 6, 
1859, to John Clark, son Jacob Clark and Rebecca 
Sanderson, his wife, born in Meredith, N. H., , 
died in 

No children. 

76 (3). Charles Ives, born in Boston, Mass., Oct. 28, 
1819 (md., ch.). 

77 (4). Isaac Alexander, born in Concord, Mass., June 
19, 1821 (md., ch.). 

76 VII. Charles Ives, third child of Joseph Thompson 
and xAbigail Trask, bom in Boston, Mass., Oct. 28, 1819, 
died in Gloucester, Mass., July 4, 1888; md. in Boston, 
May 14, 1840, Eliza Ann Gardner, dau. William Gardner 
and Sarah his wife, bom in Boston, April i, 

1822, died in Cambridge, Mass., March 25, 1890, and had 
five children. 

VIII. Children of Charles Ives, and Eliza Ann Gardner: 

78 (1). Charles Joseph, born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 14, 
1840 (md., ch.). 

79 (2). George Edwin, born in Boston, July 19, 1842, 
died in Marlborough, Mass., Sept. 19, 1843. 

80 (3). George Edwin, born in Boston, May 15, 1852. 
(md., ch.). 

81 (4). Carrie Eliza, born in Cambridgeport, Mass., Feb. 
2, 1856, died in Cambridgeport, July 17, 1861. 

83 (5). Carrie Eliza, born in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. i, 
1864, died in Cambridge, Aug. 22, 1864. 



Medfield 73 

78 VIII. Charles Joseph, first child of Charles Ives 
and Eliza Ann Gardner, bom in Boston, Mass., Nov. 14, 
1840, died in - 

md. in Jan. 13, 1864, Mary EHza- 

beth Bates, dau. Abner L Bates and Mary Elizabeth 
his wife, bom in Boston, Mass., Nov. 5, 
1843, died in Maiden, Mass., Feb. 14, 1870, and had one 
child. 

IX. Children of Charles Joseph, and Mary Bates: 

83 (1). Mary Lizzie, born in Maiden, Mass., April 20, 
1866, died in , 
was md. in , Oct. 15, 1884, to 
John F Gilmore, son John Gilmore and Catherine 

, his wife, born in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 6, 
1855, died in 
and had one child. 

Charles Joseph md. (2) in Yonkers, N. Y., Nov. 18, 
1874, Helen Mary Southard, dau. Zibeon Southard and 
Helen Maria , his wife, bom in Boston, Mass., 

March 15, 1846, died in , 

and had four children. 

Children of Charles Joseph, and Helen Mary Southard: 

84 (2). Arthur Gardner, born in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 
9, 1876. 

85 (3). Edward Southard, born in Cambridge, July 2, 
1877, died in Cambridgeport, Mass., Feb. 27, 1891. 

86 (4). Charles Albert, born in Cambridge, Nov. 14, 
1878. 

87 (5). Helen Maria, born in Cambridge, Aug. 20, 1880. 

84 IX. Arthur Gardner, 2d child of Charles Joseph 
and first child of his second wife, Helen Maria Southard, 
bom in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 9, 1876. 



74 Massachusetts 

86 IX. Charles Albert, 4th child of Charles Joseph 
and third child of his second wife, Helen Maria Southard, 
bom in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 14, 1878, died in 



80 VIII. George Edwin, third child of Charles Ives 
and Eliza Ann Gardner, born in Boston, Mass., May 15, 
1852, died in , md. 

in Oct. II, 1876, Mary Ella Viles, dau. 

James Viles and Frances Ann his wife, bom in 

Boston, Mass., Aug. 26, 1853, died in 

, and had three children. 
IX. Children of George Edwin, and Mary Ella Viles: 

88 (1). Marion Frances, born in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 
24, 1877. 



89 (2). Mary Edith, born in Cambridge, Feb. 12, 1879. 



90 (3). George Edwin, born in Cambridge, Sept. 14, 1880. 



77 VII. Isaac Alexander, fourth child of Joseph 
Thompson and Abigail Trask, born in Concord, Mass., 
Jtme 19, 1821, died in Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 8, 1878 ; md. 
in Oct. 25, 1842, Sarah Johanna Hawkes, dau. of John 
Hawkes and Johanna his wife, bom in Bos- 

ton, Mass., Dec. 9, 1824, died in Philadelphia, Penn., 
July I, 1880, and had two children. 

VIII. Children of Isaac Alexander, and Sarah Johanna Hawkes: 

91 (1). Sarah Adelaide, born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 29, 
1843, died in ; 



Medfield 75 

was md., in May 31, 

1863, to William Hobbs Chadbourn, son of George 
Chadbourn and Asenath , his wife, born 

in Sanford, Me., Feb. 18, 1841, died in 

, and had three children. 
92 (2). Emma Eliza, born in Boston, Mass., July 27, 
1845, died in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 14, 1874, unmar- 
ried. 



44 IV. Benjamin, second child of William, and 
Hannah Chenery, bom in Dedham, Mass., Feb. 8, 1731, 
died in July 13, 

1803, md. in 

Maria Van Wagner, dau. of Van Wagner 

and his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had two children. 

V. Children of Benjamin, and Maria Van Wagner: 

93 (1). John, born in 

, lost at sea 

94 (2). Wilham, born in 

, 1773 (md., ch.).. 

Benjamin Peters was a physician ; he emigrated at an 
early age to Marbletown, Ulster Co., New York. In 1 761 
he served in the French and Indian wars. His grave- 
stone can be seen in Bloomingburg, N. Y. 

94 V. William, second child of Benjamin, and Maria 
Van Wagner, bom in 

1773, died in 

1 81 4; md. Margaret Hasbrotick, 
dau. of Hasbrouck and 

his wife, bom in 



76 Massachusetts 

1774, died in 

1857, and had four children. 

VI. Children of William and Margaret Hasbrouck: 

95 (1). Benjamin, born in ,1799- 

96 (2). Eliza, born in 

, died in 

; was md. in 

to Jacob Blanchard, son of 
Blanchard and i 

his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had children. 

97 (3). Jacob, born in 

98 (4). Hannah, born in 

, 1805, died in 

, unmarried. 

William was a physician. 

95 VI. Benjamin, first child of William, and Margaret 
Hasbrouck, bom in 
1799, died in 
1877; md. in 

dau. and 

his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had children. 



97 VI. Jacob,* third child of William and Margaret 
Hasbrouck, bom in 

, died in > 

md. in 

dau, and his 

wife, bom in » 

* Said to have removed to Michigan. 



Medfield 



11 



died in , and had 

children. 



46 IV. Adam, fourth child of William, and Hannah 
Chenery, bom in Medfield, Mass., Oct. 30, 1734, died in 
Medfield, March 12, 1813,* aged 78; md. in Medfield, 
May 5, 1758, Olive Plimpton, f daughter of John Plymp- 
ton and Abigail Fisher, his wife, bom in Medfield, Feb. 8, 
1737, died in Medfield, Sept. 12, 1768, and had three 
children. 

V . Children of Adam and Olive Plimpton: 

99 (1). Hannah, born in Medfield, March i, 1760, died in 

, 1850; was md. in Medfield, 
Jan. 7, 1779, to William Clark, son of Asa Clark and 
Zillah Cheney, his wife, born in Medfield, 
1758, died in , 1825, and had five 

children. 

100 (2). Amy, born in Medfield, Feb. 6, 1762, died in 
Medfield, May 20, 1762. J 

101 (3). Sarah, born in Medfield, April 16, 1767, died in 

; was 
md., in Providence, R. I., , 1797, 

to Eleazar Ellis, ist child of Nathan Ellis and Hannah 
Bacon, his wife, born in Medfield, i7S3. 

died in Providence, R. I., 1805 and had 

children. She md. (2), in 

, James Forbes of 
Rutland, Vt., son of Forbes and 

*" Captain Adam Peters died March 12, 1813, aged 78 years." 
(Cross of the Sons of the Revolution on his grave.) 

t Gravestone in Medfield graveyard: "In memory of Mrs Olive 
Peters ye wife of Mr Adam Peters who died Sept. ye 12 1768 in ye 
32nd year of her age." 

X " Amy Peters daughter of Adam Peters and Mrs Olive his wife, who 
died May 21, 1762." (Medfield graveyard.) 



yS Massachusetts 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had one child. 

Adam md. (2) Nov. 30, 1769, Margaret Dunton, widow 
of Benjamin Dunton (md. Aug. 25, 1763) and dau. of 
Samuel Morse and Abigail Fisher, his wife, bom in 

, Aug. 19, 1737, died in Medfield, Mass., 
May 23, 1 8 16, aged 78,* and had six children. 

Children of Admn and Margaret Morse Dunton: 

103 (4). Amy, born in Medfield, Sept. 13, 1770, died in 

; was 
md. in (int. Medfield, March 12, 1803) to Amasa Baker 
of North Yarmouth, Me., son of Baker 

and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
, had children. 

103 (5). William, born in Medfield, Aug. 26, 1772 (md., 
ch.). 

104 (6). Olive, born in Medfield, June 6, 1774, died in 
Medfield, Sept. 27, 1776. 

105 (7). Samuel, born in Medfield, Oct. 17, 1776, died at 
sea., 1799- 

106 (8). Oliver, born in Medfield, Sept. 7, 1779 (md., ch.). 

107 (9). Margaret, born in Medfield, Oct. 30, 1783, died 
in Medfield, Aug. 26, 1785. 

Adam Peters of Medfield received money for "turns 
done in late wars in the days of Capt. Morse, the ist and 
Capt. Coolidge." 

MASSACHUSETTS MUSTER AND PAY ROLLS (76-173). 

1776, 4th Suffolk Regiment, April 23, Adam Peters rec- 
ommended by Field officers as adjutant in Col. Ephraim 
Wheelock's Regiment. Commission ordered April 23, 
1776. 

* "Mrs. Margaret Peters relict of Capt. Adam Peters died May 22, 
1 816, aged 78 years." (Medfield graveyard.) 



Medfield 79 

1776, Dec. Capt. Sabin Mann's Co. Adjutant Pe- 

ters, dated Cumberland. 

1778. Col. Howe's Regiment, Capt. Adam Peters, en- 
listment Aug. 15, 1778, dated Cumberland. 

Discharged Sept. 12, 1778. {From" Various Services," 22,6) 

1780. 5th Co. 4th Suffolk county Regiment, Capt. 

Adam Peters. {Militia Officers, &c., 28-10) 

1 78 1. March 2, Col. Seth Bullard's Regiment, Capt. 
Peters, Medfield. (70-15.) 

As can be seen from these reports, he served in the Rev- 
olution, and was afterward captain of militia in the town 
of Medfield. He was a tanner. 

103 V. William, fifth child of Adam Peters, and 2d 
child of his 2d wife, Margaret Morse, bom in Medfield, 
Mass., Aug. 26, 1772, died in Medfield, Feb. 26, 1843,* 
aged 71 ; md. in Medfield, July 17, 1794, Mary Ellis, dau. 
Jesse Ellis and Mary Harding, his wife, bom in Medfield, 
1776, died in Medfield, March 18, 1835, aged 58, and had 
two children. 

VI. Children of William and Mary Ellis: 

108 (1). Mary, born in Medfield, Dec. 27, 1794, died in 
Medfield, Oct. 18, 1876; was md., in Nov. 27, 1814, to 
James Hewins, M.D. (Harvard, 1804), son of Jacob 
Hewins of Dorchester, Mass., and of , 
his wife, born in Sharon, Mass., July 2, 1782, died in 
Medfield, Aug. 8, 1846, and had two children. 

109 (2). Amy, born in Medfield, Dec. 9, 1802, died in 
Medfield, Aug. 15, 1872; was md., in Medfield, Mass., 
Oct. I, 1823, to the Revd. Charles C. Sewall, son of Chief 
Justice Samuel Sewall of Marblehead, Mass., and Abi- 
gail Devereux, his wife, born in Marblehead, May 

* Gravestone in Medfield graveyard: "William Peters Esq. died 
Feb. 26, 1843, aged 72 years Mrs Mary his wife died March 18, 1835 
aged^SS years." 



8o Massachusetts 

lo, 1802, died in Medfield, Nov. 20, 1886, and had ten 

children. 

William received a captain's commission in 1805; he 
was several times selectman, and was representative in 
1838-39. 

106 V. Oliver, eighth child of Adam, and fifth child 
of Margaret Morse Dunton, his second wife, born in Med- 
field, Mass., Sept. 7, 1779, died in Providence, R. I., July 
7, 1 81 7; md. in Providence, Sept. , 1804, Abigail Price, 
dau. of Edward Price and Mary Potter, his wife, bom in 
Providence, Sept. 25, 1784, died in Providence, Feb. 5, 
1825, and had 6 daughters, two of whom died in infancy. 

VI. Children of Oliver and Abigail Price: 

110 (1). Abby, born in Providence, R. I., July 26, 1806, 
died in Providence, Dec. 24, 1888; was md. in Wood- 
stock, Conn., Jan. 2, 1845, to Samuel Hopkins, son of 
Jeremiah Hopkins and Susan Rice, his wife, born in 
Coventry, R. I., May 16, 1796, died in Providence, 
R. I., Oct. 12, 1874, and had three children. 

111 (2). Mary, born in Providence, R. I., Oct. 5, 1808, 
died in Coventry, R. I., Sept. 26, 1839; was md., in 
Providence, May 19, 1834, to John Harris, son of 
Joseph Harris and Catharine Greene, his wife, born in 
Cranston, R. I., Nov. 13, 1797, died in Providence, 
June 21, 1874, and had three children. 

112 (3). Sarah, born in Providence, R. L, April 25, 181 2, 
died in Weston, Mass., July 2, 1871 ; was md., in Med- 
field, Mass., Jan. 31, 1838, to John Pearson Bowker, 
Jr., son of John Pearson Bowker and Mary Baker, his 
wife, born in Walpole, Mass., July 17, 18 14, died in 
Walpole, May 14, 1885, and had 6 children. 

113 (4). Rebecca, born in Providence, R. I., Aug. 7, 
1814, died in Woodstock, Conn., June 16, 1871; was 
md. in Woodstock, Conn., Sept. 5, 1841, to Elisha 
Lyon, son of Judah L Lyon and Mehitable Childs. 



•■■'£. V V I U a i\ 



IPUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOft, LENOX 
_TILD£N FOUNDATIftNa 




BEULAH LOVETT, WIFE OF LT.-COL. ANDREW PETERS 



Medfield 8i 

his wife, born in Woodstock, Conn., Jan. 22, 1803, died 
in Providence, R. I., June 19, 1877, and had seven 
children. 



49 IV. Andrew, seventh child of William, and Hannah 
Chenery, bom in Medfield, Mass., Jan. 24, 1742, died in 
Westborough, Mass., Feb. 5, 1822 ; md. in 
March 30, 1768, Beulah Lovett, dau. Phinehas Lovett, 
and Beulah Morse, his wife, bom in Mendon, Mass., Oct. 
31, 1747, died in Westborough, July 29, 1810, and had 8 
children. 

V. Children of Andrew and Beulah Lovett: 

114 (1). Lovett, born in Mendon, Jan. 19, 1769 (md., 
ch.). 

115 (2). Daniel, born in Mendon, July 27, 1770. 

116 (3). Sibyl, born in Mendon, Sept. 4, 1772, died in 

; was 
md. in Mendon (int. Nov. 24, 1786) to Elijah Penni- 
man, son of Josiah Penniman and Esther Ware of 
Needham, his wife, born in Mendon, April 5, 1762, 
died in Mendon, June 22, 1789, and had one child, 
Lovett, born April 8, 1787. 

117 (4). Amy, born in Mendon, Feb. 7, 1775, died in 

; was 
md. in Westborough, Mass., March 27, 1796, to Sam- 
uel Daniels Davenport of Boston, son of 
Davenport and , his wife, born 

in ' , died 

in ' , and 

had children. 

118 (5). Rachel, born in Mendon, Nov. 12, 1781, died 
Nov. 12, 1781. 

119 (6). Silvia, born in Mendon, Nov. 8, 1783, died in 

, March 12, 1810. 



82 Massachusetts 

120 (7). Hannah, born in 

, March 14, 1786, died in 

, Aug. II, 1809. 

121 (8). Joseph, born in , May 5, 1788. 

Col. Andrew served in the French and Indian war in 
1 76 1 . His name is on the Lexington Alarm roll as private, 
1775, April 19, in Capt. John Albee's company; he 
marched from Mendon to Roxbury, then serving eight 
days. 1775, June 15, he was captain in Col. Joseph Read's 
regiment, and was probably present at Bunker Hill.* 

1776, from Jan. i to Dec. i, he was captain in Read's 
Massachusetts regiment, Continental infantry. 

1777, Jan. I. He was major in Col. Bailey's 2d Massa- 
chusett's regiment ; 1 779, July i, commissioned lieutenant 
colonel, 15th Massachusetts Reg., Col. Timothy Bigelow. 
He was present at the siege of Boston, the invasion of 
Canada, the surrender of Burgoyne, and Continued in 
service until Jan. i, 1781, having served five years and 
nine months. His name continued on the rolls imtil 
October, 1783. He was one of the original members of 
the Cincinnati. In 1788 he taught school in Mendon, 
Mass. 1788-89, he taught school four months in Annap- 
olis Royal, Nova Scotia. 1789-90, he taught school in 
Sturbridge, Mass. 1790, December, to April, 1791, and 
November to April, 1792, from November, 1792, to 
April, 1793, and from 1793 to 1794, November to April, 
he taught school in Medfield. 1794, August 15, he was 
employed by the town of Marlborough to survey for a 
plan of the town. In October and November he made 
a plan of the town which bears the date of December 
30, 1794. He laid down the old post road and the 
Concord road, ascertained the number of acres in the 
ponds, and the grist- and saw-mills in the town. His 
account was $11.25. 1794- November, to March, 1795, 

* (Massachusetts Archives, vol. Ixx., p. 40.) 










LT.-COL. ANDREW PETERS 




Y YORK 
JBRART] 



WTOR, L6K.OX 



Medfield 83 

he taught school in Westborough, Mass., in different parts 
of the town. In 1 794 he bought a farm in Westborough, 
where he Hved and died. In 1792-93 he was town 
treasurer of Mendon, and was on several committees. 
These records are taken from his family Bible, as well as 
from some of his other books. 

114 V. Lovett, first child of Col. Andrew and Beulah 
Lovett, bom in Mendon, Mass., Jan. 19, 1769, died in 
Westborough, Mass., Jan. 13, 1863 ; md. in (int. ent. West- 
borough, May 24, 1796, with) Mary Plympton, dau. Capt. 
Silvanus Plympton and Hannah Phipps, his wife, bom in 
Medfield, Mass., Nov. 4, 1771, died in Westborough, Ap. 
28, i860, and had nine children. 

VI. Children of Lovett and Mary Plympton: 
123 (1). Beulah Lovett, born in Westboro, April 2, 
1797, died in Westboro, May 16, 1875, unmd. 

133 (2). Andrew, born in Westboro, March 11, 1799, 
died in Westboro, Ap. 11, 1840, unmd. 

134 (3). Augustus, born in Westboro, Nov. 7, 1800 
(md., ch.). 

135 (4). Onslow, born in Westboro, March i, 1802 (md., 
ch.). 

136 (5). Mary Plympton, born in Westboro, May 26, 
1804, died at Fort Jessup, La., June 8, 1841; was md. 
in Westboro, Dec. 3, 1835, to the Revd. Henry Lamb 
of Boston, Mass., chaplain U. S. A., son of Dr. Jabesh 
Lamb and Sally , his wife, born in 

178 , died 

i^ , and 

had one daughter. 

137 (6). William, born in Westboro, March 5, 1807 (md., 
ch.). 

138 (7). Daniel, born in Westboro, Nov. 9, 1808, died in 
Westboro, May 8, 1849, aged 40. Unmd.(?) 

139 (8). John, born in Westboro, Dec. 26, 18 10, died in 
Westboro, Dec. 28, 1810. 



84 Massachusetts 

130 (9). Hannah Phipps, born in Westboro, June 23, 
1812, died in Westboro, Jan. 31, 1902, unmd. 

124 VI. Augustus, third child of Lovett and Mary 
Plympton, bom in Westborough, Mass., Nov. 7, 1800, 
died in Westboro', 1848; md. in 

Nov. 10, 1830, Lucy Pollard, dau. Andrew Pollard and 

his wife, bom in 

, died in Detroit, Mich., Nov. 30, 
1852, and had one child. 

VII. Children of Augustus and Lucy Pollard: 

131 (1). John Lovett, born in Detroit, Mich., July 11, 
1831 (md., eh.). 

131 VIL John Lovett, bom in Detroit, Mich., July 11, 

1 83 1, died in , 

md. in Worcester, Mass., Nov. 29, 1859, Mary Frances 

Eddy, dau. Eddy and , 

his wife, bom in , 

died in , and 
had four children. 

VIII. Children of John Lovett and Mary Eddy: 

133 (1). William Curtis, born in North Brookfield, Mass., 
Feb. 10, 1861. 

133 (2). John Eddy, born in Worcester, Mass., Oct. 17, 
1866. 

134 (3). Lewis Augustus, born in Worcester, July 22, 
1869. 

135 (4). Charles Adams, born in Worcester, June 29, 

1875- 

133 VIIL William Curtis, first child of John Lovett 
and Mary Eddy, bom in North Brookfield, Mass., Feb. 10, 
1861, died in , 

md. in Worcester, Mass., Sept. 26, 1885, Minnie Augusta 
Trask, dau. Trask and , 

his wife, bom in 




LOVETT PETERS 

WESTBOROUGH, MASS. 



185- 



NDATIONS 









Medfield 




85 


died 


in 






, and had 


one 


child. 




\ 








IX. 


Children 


of William Curtis and Minnie Trask: 





136 (1). LiUian Mary, born in Worcester, Mass., Aug. 
10, 1887. 



133 VIII. John Eddy, second child of John Lovett and 
Mary Eddy, bom in Worcester, Mass., Oct. 17, 1866. 



134 VIII. Lewis Augustus, third child of John Lovett 
and Mar>^ Eddy, bom in Worcester, Mass., July 22, 1869. 



135 VIII. Charles Adams, fourth child of John Lovett 
and Mary Eddy, bom in Worcester, Mass., June 29, 1875. 



135 VI. Onslow, fourth child of Lovett and Mary 
Plympton, bom in Westboro, Mass., March i, 1802, died 
in Peoria, 111., Feb. 28, 1855; md, in Westboro, Mass., 
Oct. 29, 1829, Hannah Parkman Tyler, dau. John Eugene 
Tyler and Hannah , his wife, bom in West- 

boro, Sept. 25, 1803, died in Westboro, 1857, 

and had six children. 



86 Massachusetts 

VII. Children of Onslow and Hannah Tyler: 

137 (1). Mary Lovett, born in Westboro, Mass., Ap. 
7, 1830, died in 

; was md. in 

, Oct. 26, 1858, to Henry B. Wiston, 
D.D., president of Crozier Theological Seminary, Up- 
land, Penn., son of Wiston and 
, his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had children. 

138 (2). Susan Tyler, born in Westboro, June 21, 1831, 
died in ; 
was md. in , May 9, 1852, to 
George Blakely, son of Blakely and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
and had children. 

139 (3). Onslow, born in Westboro, March 11, 1836 
(md., ch.). 

140 (4). Hannah Breck, born in 

, died in 

; was md. in 
, Oct. 26, 1856, to John F. Rollins, son of 
Daniel Rollins and Mary , his wife, born 

in , July 4, 1835, died in 

, and had four 
children. Resides at Fort George, Fla. 

141 (5). Hugh, born in 

142 (6). Eugene, born in 

Onslow graduated from Brown University in 1825. In 
1836 he was counsellor and attomey-at-law in West- 
borough, Mass. In 1837 he removed to Peoria, 111., where 
he was judge of the i6th judicial circuit of the state of 
Illinois. 

139 VII. Onslow, third child of Onslow and Hannah 



Medfield 87 

Tyler, bom in Westboro, Mass., March 11, 1836, died 
in 



141 VII. Hugh, fifth child of Onslow and Hannah 
Tyler, bom in , died in 



143 VII. Eugene, sixth child of Onslow and Hannah 
Tyler, bom in , died in 



137 VI. WilHam, sixth child of Lovett and Mary 
Plympton, bom in Westborough, Mass., March 5, 1807, 
died in Peoria, 111., Dec. i, 1862; md. in Steventown, N. 
Y., Oct. 19, 1 83 1, Martha Hall, dau. Oliver Hall and 
Deborah Williams, his wife, bom in Steventown, N. Y., 
April 8, 1810, died in Richmond, Ind., Sept. 15, 1895, and 
had six children. 

VII. Children of William and Martha Hall: 

143 (1). Mary Plympton, born in North Adams, Mass., 
Aug. 13, 1833, living in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., 1903; 
was md. in Milwaukee, Wis., April 28, 1 851, to Edward 
Joseph Cowell, son of John Van Hyst Cowell and Han- 
nah Marache, his wife, born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 
18, 1828, died in Erie, Pa., July 12, 1884, and had 
seven children. 

144 (2). Sarah Phipps, born in North Adams, Mass., 
June 17, 1835, died in Chicago, 111., Nov. 29, 1901 ; was 
md. in Peoria, 111., Jan., 1854, to Samuel Parker Haz- 
zard, son of Stephen Hazzard and Mary Russell, his 
wife, born in Dover, Del., Oct. 9, 1826, 

and had three children. 



88 Massachusetts 

145 (3). Hannah More, born in North Adams, Mass., 
Aug. 5, 1837, living in Richmond, Ind., 1903; was md. 
in , Feb. 16, 
i860, to James Ireland, son of Fielding Ireland and 

 , his wife, born in New Paris, O., Jan. 

ID, 1835, died in New Paris, O., Oct. 10, 1861. No 
children . 

Hannah More Peters was md. (2), in Peoria, 111., 
Sept. 17, 1863, to James Eyre Reeves, son of Mark 
Reeves of Gloucester Co., N. J., and Ann Ewan, his 
wife, born in Berkeley, N. J., Nov. 27, 1814, living in 
1903, and had two sons. 

146 (4). Andrew Washington, born in Westborough, 
Mass., May 22, 1843, died in Peoria, 111., Feb. i, 1878, 
unmd. 

He was a private in the 86th Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry in the Civil War. He was in Southern prisons 
at Danville, Richmond, Andersonville, and Florence. 
His health was shattered, and he was an invalid until 
his death. 

147 (5). Charles William, born in Peoria, 111., Aug. 19, 
1847, died in Kansas City, Mo., April 14, 1877. 

148 (6). Deborah, born in North Adams, Mass., May 15, 
1840, died in North Adams, Sept. 18, 1840. 

149 (7). Wilham Henry, born in Peoria, 111., March 18, 
1845, died in Peoria, May 19, 1845. 

128 VI. Daniel, seventh child of Lovett and Mary 
Plympton, bom in Westborough, Mass., Nov. 9, 1808, 
died in Westborough, May 8, 1849, aged 40; md. in (int. 
Shrewsbury, Mass., with Eliza E Ruggles, July 6, 
1836), dau. Ruggles and , his 

wife, bom in , 

died in , and 

had children. 



Medfield 89 

115 V. Daniel, second child of Col. Andrew and Beulah 
Lovett, his wife, bom in Mendon, Mass., July 27, 1770, 
died in (Harvard, 

1793). Removed south 1793, or later, and died soon 
after. No further record. 



121 V. Joseph, eighth child of Col. Andrew and 
Beulah Lovett, his wife, bom in Mendon, Mass., May 5, 
1788, died in 
No further record. 



50 IV. Jethro, eighth child of William, and Hannah 
Chenery, his wife, bom in Medfield, Mass., June 13, 1744, 
died in Bolton, Mass., Feb. 16, 1824, aged 80; md. in (in- 
tention pub. in Holliston, Mass.) Oct. 8, 1769, Rachel 
Fairbanks, dau. Fairbanks and , 

his wife, bom in , May , 

1740, died in Medfield, Mass., May i, 1792, and had 7 
children. 

V. Children of Jethro, and Rachel Fairbanks: 

150 (1). William, born in Northborough, Mass., Sept. 13, 
1770 (md., ch.). 

151 (2). Rachel, born in Northborough, July 20, 1772, 
died in Medfield, Mass., Dec. 28, 1786. 

153 (3). George, born in Northborough, Aug. 9, 1774 

(md., ch.). 
153 (4). Hannah, born in Northborough, April 13, 1777, 

died in Bolton, Mass., April 22, 1871 ; was md. in 

, to James 

Moore, son of Josiah Moore and Abigail , 



90 Massachusetts 

his wife, born in Bolton, Jan. 7, 1777, died in Bolton 
Nov. 6, i860, and had five children. 

154 (5). Julia, born in Northborough, April 13, 1779, 
died in ; 
was md. in , 
to Atherton, son of Atherton 
and , his wife, born in 

, died in 

155 (6). Peter, born in Northborough, April 15, 1781, 
died in Medfield, Mass., Aug. 3, 1789. 

156 (7). Peace, born in Medfield, March 25, 1783, (md.) 

Jethro was a worker in leather. He settled in North- 
borough, Mass., where he was town clerk in 1800, 1801, 
and 1802. He was on the Lexington Alarm roll, being 
sergeant in Capt. Samuel Wood's company, in General 
Ward's regiment, which marched on the 19th of April, 
1775, from Northborough; service eleven days. 

150 V. William, first child of Jethro, and Rachel Fair- 
banks, bom in Northborough, Mass., Sept. 13, 1770, died 
in , md. in 

, dau. of , and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had children, 

153 V. George, third child of Jethro, and Rachel Fair- 
banks, born in Northborough, Mass., Aug. 9, 1774, died 
in , Jan. 27, 1859; 

md. in (prob. 

1800), Lydia Maynard, dau. Ephraim Maynard and Eu- 
nice , his wife, bom in Marlborough, Mass., 
Nov. 7, 1779, died in , Nov. 2, 
1 86 1, and had eight children. 



Medfield 91 

VI. Children of George and Lydia Maynard: 

157 (1). George, born in Feltonville,* Mass., Nov. 28, 
1800 (md., ch.). 

158 (2). Ephraim, born in Feltonville,* Dec. 26, 1801, 
died in Feltonville, Sept. , 1803. 

159 (3). Luther, born in Feltonville,* April 20, 1806 
(md., ch.). 

160 (4). Irene, born in Feltonville,* March 26, 1808, 
died in Feltonville, Jan. 18, 1833, unmd. 

161 (5). Adolphus, born in Feltonville,* June i, 1810, 
died March 6, 1814. 

163 (6). Adolphus, born in Feltonville,* Jan. 13, 1814 
(md., ch.). 

163 (7). John Howe, born in Feltonville,* Feb. 16, 1820 
(md., ch.). 

164 (8). Freeman S , born in Feltonville,* March 5, 
1824, died in Feltonville, Sept. 5, 1825. 

George removed to Marlborough, Mass., probably from 
Medfield, about 1798. 

157 VI. George, first child of George and Lydia May- 
nard, bom in Feltonville,* Mass., Nov. 28, 1800, died in 
Ware, Mass., Oct. 28, 1849; md. in 

, May 8, 1823, Hannah L • Brigham, dau. 
of Jedediah Brigham and Lydia , his wife, 

bom in Marlborough, Mass., Oct. 3, 1802, died in Marl- 
boro, March 31, 1832, and had two children. 

VII. Children of George and Hannah Brigham: 

165 (1). George Lewis, born in Marlborough, Mass., 
March 3, 1825 (md., ch.). 

166 (2). Lydia Brigham, born in Marlborough, Oct. 20, 
1826, died in Ware, Mass., Nov. 22, 1849. 

George mid. (2), in Boxborough, Mass., Nov. 23, 1833, 
Lydia Whitcomb, dau. Moses Whitcomb and Anna 

* Now Hudson. 



92 Massachusetts 

, his wife, bom in Boxborough, April 25, 1813, 
died in Boxborough, Aug. 5, 1841, and had two daughters. 

167 (3). Hannah Maria, born in Boxborough, Sept. 16, 
1836, died in Hartford, Conn., March 14, 1888; was 
md. in , 
April 8, 1859, to Merrick Whiting, son of Artemus 
Whiting and Nabby , his wife, born in 
Springfield, Mass., May 8, 1832, died in 

, and had one daughter. 

168 (4). Anna Elizabeth, born in Boxborough, July 9, 
1841, died in ; 
was md. in Worcester, Mass., March 28, 1872, to El- 
bridge Gerry Hastings, son of Rozel Hastings and 
Phebe , his wife, born in 

, July 21, 1840, died in 

, and had 
four daughters. 

George md. (3), in Barre, Mass., April 26, 1843, Lydia 
E Sibley, dau. of Lyman Sibley and Hannah 

, his wife, bom in Barre, April 28, 1819, and had 
no children. 

165 VII. George Lewis, first child of George, and Han- 
nah Brigham, bom in Marlborough, Mass., March 3, 1825, 
died in , md. 

in , Ann Maria 

Stevens, dau. Moses Stevens and Maria , his 

wife, bom in , 

died in , and 

had one daughter. 

VIII. Children of George Lewis and Ann Maria Stevens: 

169 (1). Effie, born in 

159 VI. Luther, third child of George, and Lydia May- 
nard, bom in Feltonville,* Mass., April 20, 1806, died in 

* Now Hudson. 



Medfield ^ 93 

, md. in 
, May 31, 
1832, Abigail Holman, dau. Abraham Holman and Azu- 
bah , his wife, bom in Bolton, Mass., 

Feb. 5, 181 2, died in Hudson, Mass., March 13, 1847, and 
had four children. 

VII. Children of Luther and Abigail Holman: 

170 (1). Luther Holman, born in Feltonville,* Mass., 
May 30, 1833 (md., ch.). 

171 (2). Irene Freeman, born in Feltonville,* Feb. 16, 
1836, died in 



172 (3). Onslow Blake, born in Feltonville,* May 21, 
1839 (md., ch.). 

173 (4). Warren Sibley, born in Feltonville,* Oct. 7, 
1845 (ind., ch.).  

Luther md. (2) in , 

April 12, 1848, Maria Gould, dau. John Gould and Anna 

, his wife, bom in Ware, Mass., May 
25, 1820, died in Feltonville, Mass., Nov. 12, 1855, and 
had two sons. 

Children of Luther and Maria Gould: 

174 (5). John G , born in Feltonville,* May 8, 1850. 

175 (6). Edwin R , born in Sterling, Mass., March 
30, 1853, died in Feltonville, May 3, 1855. 

Luther md. (3), in , 

Sept. I, 1857, Lydia Howe, dau. Solomon Howe and Sarah 

, his wife, bom in Berlin, Mass., 
Aug. II, 181 1, died in Berlin, Jime 6, 1882. No children. 

170 VIL Luther Holman, first child of Luther, and 
Abigail Holman, bom in Feltonville, Mass., May 30, 1833, 
died in , md. ' 

in , Nov. 14, 

* Now Hudson. 



94 Massachusetts 

1 86 1, Ellen Maria Dyar, dau. Smith Dyar and Mary Jane 

, his wife, bom in Charlestown, Mass., 
Sept. I, 1842, died in Maiden, Mass., July i, 1883, and 
had one daughter. 

VIII. Children of Luther Holman and Ellen Maria Dyar: 

176 (1). Cora Maria, born in Charlestown, Mass., Sept. 
17, 1863, died in 



173 VII. Onslow Blake, third child of Luther and 
Abigail Holman, bom in Feltonville,* Mass., May 21, 1839, 
died in , md. 

in , Oct. II, 

1863, Augusta J Brown, dau. Simeon Brown and 

Catherine W , his wife, bom in Stowe, Mass., 

died in 
, and had one son. 

VIII. Children of Onslow Blake and Augusta Brown: 

111 (1). Albert H , born in Hudson, Mass., Nov. 28, 
1864, died in ; 

md. in 



173 VII. Warren Sibley, fourth child of Luther and 
Abigail Holman, bom in Feltonville,* Mass., Oct. 7, 1845, 
died in , md. 

in , Mary Susan 

Maynard, dau. Maynard, and 

, his wife, bom in , 

Oct. 15, 1853, died in 

, and had four daughters. 

* Now Hudson. 



Medfield 95 

VIII. Children of Warren Sibley and Mary Susan Maynard. 

178 (1). Mary Augusta, born in 

, March 15, 1874, died in 

; was md. in 
, to 
, son of and , 

his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had children. 

179 (2). Irene Abigail, born in 

July 24, 1876, died in 

, was md. in 
to , 

son of , and , his wife, born 

in , died 

in , and 

had children. 

180 (3). Nettie Bell, born in 

, Jan. 6, 1881, died in 

; was md. in 

to , 

son of and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in , 

and had children. 

181 (4). Bertha Louise, born in 

, Sept. 9, 1885, died in 

, was md. in 
to , 

son of and , his wife, born 

in , died 

in , and 

had children. 

174 VII. John G , fifth child of Luther (first child 
of Luther and Maria Gould, his 2d wife), born in Felton- 
ville,* Mass., May 8, 1850, died in 

* Now Hudson. 



96 Massachusetts 

, md. in 
, dau. of 
, and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had children, 

163 VI. Adolphus, sixth child of George, and Lydia 
Maynard, bom in Feltonville, Mass., Jan. 13, 1814, died 
in Ware, Mass., Dec. 12, 1846, md. in 

Nov. I, 1840, Julia Ann Phelps, 
dau. Samuel Phelps and Betsey , his wife, 

bom in Chester, Mass., Jan. i, 1816, died in Ware, Mass., 
Dec. 24, 1857, and had one daughter. 

VII. Children of Adolphus and Julia Ann Phelps: 

183 (1). Julia Augusta, born in Ware, Mass., Dec. 18, 
1 841, died in , 

was md. in Hardwick, Mass., June 17, 1863, to Rhesa 
Griffin, son of Rhesa Griffin and Rhoda , 

his wife, born in Salina, N. Y., April 25, 1841, died in 

, and had 
daughter. 

163 VI. John Howe, seventh child of George and Lydia 
Maynard, bom in Feltonville, Mass., Feb. 16, 1820, died 
in Hudson, Mass., May 10, 1887; md. in , Sept. 2, 
1840, Lucy Woods Hapgood, dau. Asa Hapgood and 
Phebe , his wife, bom in Marlborough, Mass., Jan. 8, 
1820, died in Feltonville,* Jan. 12, 1857, and had three 
children. 

VII. Children of John Howe and Lucy Woods Hapgood: 
183 (1). Lucy Woods, born in Feltonville,* Mass., 
June 28, 1 841, died in ; 

was md. in , Jan. 25, 

1866, to Charles Whitney Gleason, son of Benjamin 
Whitney Gleason and Louisa Fessenden, his wife, born 
* Now Hudson. 



Medfield 97 

in North Andover, Mass., April 9, 1841, died in 

, and had one son. 

184 (2). John Melville, born in Feltonville,* Sept. 22, 
1843, died in Ware, Mass., Jan. 15, 1846 (1847?). 

185 (3). John Melville, born in Feltonville,* Feb. 10, 
1849 (md., ch.). 

185 VII. John Melville, third child of John Howe, and 
Lucy Woods Hapgood, born in Feltonville, Mass., Feb. 10, 
1849, died in , md. in 

, Dec. 25, 1879, Mary 
F Campbell of Machias, Maine, dau. of Alexander 

F Campbell and Julia Patten, his wife, bom in Co- 

lumbia, Maine, June 22, 1849, died in 

, and had two daughters. 

VIII. Children of John Melville and Mary Campbell: 

186 (1). Lucy Gleason, born in Hudson, Mass., Feb. 28, 
1880, died in ; was md. 
in to , 
son of and , his wife, born 
in , died in 

, and had children. 

187 (2). Maude Julia, born in Hudson, March 12, 1882, 
died in ; was md. in 

to , son of 

and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had children. 

John Howemd. (2), in Feb. 19, 1868, Zil- 

pah H. Leland, dau. of Eleazar Leland and Zilpah 

, his wife, bom in Sherborne, Mass., June 15, 
1 84 1, died in , and had 

one daughter, 

188 (3). Gertrude L., born in Hudson, Mass, Dec, 26, 

1868. 

* Now Hudson. 



98 Massachusetts 

156 V. Peace, seventh child of Jethro, and Rachel Fair- 
banks, bom in Medfield, March 25, 1783, died in 

, md. in 
, Jan. 31, 1802, Hannah Maynard, dau, 
Simeon Maynard and Silence , his wife, bom 

in Marlborough, Mass., Dec. 28, 1782, died in 

, and had children. (No further 
record.) 



51 IV. Nathan, ninth child of William, and Hannah 
Chenery, his wife, bom in Medfield, Mass., Aug. 26, 1747, 
died in , Feb. 7, 1824, 

aged 77 ; md. in Preston, Conn., June 10, 1770, LoisCrary, 
dau. Crary and , his wife, bom 

in , died in 

, and had nine children. 

V. Children of Major Nathan, and Lois Crary: 

189 (1). Benjamin, born in Preston, May 20, 1771, died 
May 9, 1774. 

190 (2). A son (Nathan ?), born in Preston, Dec. 26, 
1772, died Jan. 8, 1773. 

191 (3). William S ., born in Preston, Jan. 24, 1774, 
died at Niagara, June , 1804. 

193 (4). Sally, born in Preston, Feb. 2, 1776, died in 
Chester, Conn., Jan. 4, 1845 ; was md. in 

(probably 1798 *) to Joel 
Canfield, son of Samuel Canfield and 
his wife, born in ' , 

died in Chester, Jan. 11, i860, aged 89, and had nine 
children. 
193 (5). Polly, born in Preston, May 30, 1778, died in 

; was md. in 

* A child, Sarah, was bom to them in 1799. 



Medfield 99 

Preston, Jan. 10, 1796, to Joshua Meech, son of 

Meech and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had seven children. 

194 (6). Hannah, born in Preston, Dec. 18, 1780, died in 

; was md. in 
Preston, June 16, 1805, to Duncan McCollom of Say- 
brook, son of McCollom and , 
his wife, born in , 
died in , and had 
children. 

195 (7). Robert Crary, born in Preston, July 28, 1787 
(md., ch.). 

196 (8). Andrew, born in Preston, July 15, 1789, died in 

, unmarried. 

197 (9). Eliza, born in Preston, Conn., July 7, 1793, 
died in Chester, Conn. ; was married 
in to Ansel Ship- 
man of Chester, son of Shipman and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had six children. 

Nathan Peters was on the Lexington Alarm roll, as 
private, in Col. Wells' regiment, service 21 days, resi- 
dence, Preston, Conn. 

April 26, 1775, he was ensign in the 7th Co., 6th regi- 
ment.* Jime loth and 17th, 1775, he is in Roxbury, 
Mass., and signs receipts, as captain, for arms and supplies 
for his company, which he has received from Aaron Blaney. 
He was brigade major during the Rhode Island campaign 
under Gen. Tyler. In 1780 he is credited with service 
along the western coast, and did some privateering about 
New London. In 1781 he made himself conspicuous 
after the taking of Fort Griswold. Gen. Arnold's report 
of Sept. 6, 1 781, says: "A very considerable magazine of 

* Colonial Records of Connecticut. 



lOO Massachusetts 

powder, and barracks to contain three hundred men 
were found in fort Griswold, which Capt. Lemoine of the 
Royal Artillery, had my positive direction to destroy ; an 
attempt was made by him, but unfortunately failed. He 
had my orders to make a second attempt ; the reasons why 
it was not done, Capt. Lemoine will have the honor to 
explain to your Excellency." It is supposed that a train 
of powder was laid from the barracks to the magazine. 
As soon as the Americans saw the departure of the British, 
they crossed the river in boats and hastened to the fort. 
Major Nathan Peters is said to have .been the first to 
enter. 

"Perceiving the barracks on fire and the train laid, 
without a moment's hesitation, he perilled life by entering 
the gate, and being well acquainted with the interior ar- 
rangements, rushed to the pump for water to extinguish 
the fire: here he found nothing that would hold water 
but an old cartridge-box ; the spout of the pump likewise 
had been removed ; but notwithstanding these disadvan- 
tages, he succeeded in interrupting the communications 
between the burning barracks and the powder." * 

195 V. Robert Crary, seventh child of Major Nathan 
and Lois Crary, bom in Preston, Conn., July 28, 1787, 
died in Chester, Conn., Aug. 24, 1870, aged 83; md. 
in , Rosalinda South- 

worth, dau. Martin Southworth and Anna , his 

* "The exploit noticed in the text has been attributed to others, but 
documentary evidence, afterward exhibited at the Pension office, gives 
to him the honor of having been the first man who entered the fort 
after its evacuation by the enemy, and of having had the chief agency 
in extinguishing the fire." — History of New London, by Miss Frances 
Mainwaring Caulkins. 

A letter written by his brother Joseph, in 1798, refers to Nathan's 
being "busy in law matters," whence we may infer that after leaving 
the army he became a lawyer. In 181 8 he was a revolutionary pen- 
sioner as of Massachusetts. 



Medfield loi 

wife, bom in Chester, April, 1789, died in Chester, Dec. 14, 
i860, aged 71 years and 8 months, and had four children. 

VI. Children of Robert Crary, and Rosalinda Southworth: 

198 (1). Sarah, born in 

, 1813, died in Deep River, Conn., Sept. 17, 
1877, aged 64; was md. in 

to Daniel Ormistead Emmons of East Had- 
dam, Conn., son of Emmons and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in Deep River, Jan. i, 1893, aged 65, 
and had three children. 

199 (2). Ann Webb, born in Chester, Conn., Sept. 7, 
1815, (living, 1902); was md. in Chester, Aug. 7, 
1836, to John Nelson Sanders, son of John Sanders 
and Martha Bates his wife, born in Lyme, Conn., 
Aug. 7, 1815, died in Chester, March 12, 1899, and 
had three children. 

200 (3). Betsey S , born in Chester, June 17, 181 7, 
died in Middletown, Conn., July 5, 1866, aged 49; was 
md. in ' to John 
W Bailey, son of William Bailey and Emma J 
Manley, his wife, born in 

, died in 
. No children. 
301 (4). Nathan, born in Chester, Sept. 4, 18 , died in 
Chester, Jan. 19, 1881, unmarried. He was burned to 
death in his own house. 

Connecticut Troops. Militia. Robert Crary Peters, 
private, in Capt. Eleazer Clark's Co. Aug. 2 to 13. 1813. 



ANDOVER 

17 III. John, fifth child of Samuel, and Phebe Frie, 
bom in Andover, Mass., Nov. 6, 1705, died in Andover, 
1797, April 19; md. Phebe Carleton of and in Andover, 
March 20,* 1733, dan. of John Carleton and Hannah Os- 
good, his wife, bom in Andover, March 21, 1705-6, died in 
Andover, March 31, 1752, and had seven children. 

IV. Children of John and Phebe Carleton: 

203 (1). Phebe, born in Andover, Mass., Nov. 8, 1733, 
died July 3, 1738. 

203 (2). John, born in Andover, June 10, 1735, died 
June 23, 1738. 

204 (3). Sarah, born in Andover, Dec. 19, 1736, died 
June 29, 1738. 

205 (4). Phebe, born in Andover, May 11, 1739, died 
Dec. 5, 1822; md. in Andover, Aug. 7, 1760, Daniel 
Faulkner, son of Faulkner and 

, born in Andover, , died in 

Blue Hill, Me., and had children. 

206 (5). John,t born in Andover, Mass., Aug. 7, 1741 
(md., ch.). 

207 (6). Andrew, born in Andover, Mass., March 26, 
1744 (md., ch.). 

208 (7). Sarah, born in Andover, Mass., Oct. 24, 1751, 
died about 1770, unmarried. 

John Peters md. (2), in Andover, Aug. 7, 1759, Sarah 
Peabody, w^idow of James Stevens, dau. of 
Peabody, and , his wife, bom in 

, 1742, died in Andover, Sept. 
4, 1808, aged 86, and had two children. 

* Church Records say March 20th; Town Records, March loth. 
t See Maine. 

102 



i U i\ i\ ji 

3RARY; 






3TOR, LENOX C;> 
TfLDEN FOU^■OATIC^JS 



Andover 103 

309 (8). Ariel, born in Andover, Mass., Jan. 31, 1762, 
died Jan. 31, 1849, unmarried. 

310 (9). Joseph, born in Andover, Mass., June 10, 1764 
(md., ch.). 

John left no will, and most of his property appears to 
have been disposed of before his death. His gravestone 
and that of his second wife are still standing in the old 
North Andover graveyard. His first three children died 
at the time of the "throat distemper," v^hich wiped out 
entire families in Essex Coimtv. 



207 IV. Andrew, sixth child of John, and Phebe Carle- 
ton, bom in Andover, Mass., March 26, 1744, died in 
Andover, Oct. 6, 1824; md. in Andover, Oct. 18, 1768, 
Hannah Kimball, dau. Daniel Kimball and Mehitable 
Ingalls, his wife, bom in Andover, Oct. 29, 1744, died in 
Andover,March 14, 1822, aged 78, and had five children. 

V. Children of Andrew and Hannah Kimball: 

311 (1). Mehitabel, born in Andover, March 5, 1769, 
died in Blue Hill, Maine, April 11, 1818; md. in An- 
dover, Nov. 12, 1795, Daniel Faulkner of Blue Hill, 
Me., son of Faulkner and , 

born in Andover, Mass., July 17, 1765, died Oct. 24, 
1840, and had five children. 

313 (2). Andrew, born in Andover, Mass., Oct. 26, 1771 
(md., ch.). 

313 (3). John, born in Andover, Feb. 4, 1774 (md.,ch.). 

314 (4). Daniel, born in Andover, Mass., Jan. 3, 1778 
(md., ch.). 

315 (5). Hannah, born in Andover, Mass., Sept. 17, 
1 781, died Aug. 12, 1820; was md. in Andover, Nov. 
24, 1803, to Nathaniel Frothingham of Boston, son of 

Frothingham and , born 

in , died in 

, and had children. 



I04 Massachusetts 

Andrew's name is on the Lexington Alarm roll as 
sergeant in Lieut. Peter Poor's comipany, which marched 
from Andover to Cambridge, on the 19th of April, 1775, 
serving three and a half days. It is said that he was em- 
ployed on the fortifications at Charlestown, and he may 
have been at the battle of Bunker Hill. He also fur- 
nished supplies to the Continental army. 

213 V. Andrew, second child of Sergeant Andrew, and 
Hannah Kimball, bom in Andover, Mass., Oct. 26, 1771, 
died in Wiscasset, Maine, April 9, 1825, aged 54; md. in 

Nancy Carney, widow of 
William Isbestos and dau. Mark Carney and Susanna 
Goud, his wife, bom in , 

June 10, 1776, died in , 

and had nine children. 

VI. Children of Andrew and Nancy Carney: 

216 (1). William, born in Newcastle, Me., March 9, 1799 
(md., eh.). 

217 (2). Sally Carney, born in Newcastle, July 14, 1800, 
died in , unmd. 

218 (3). Andrew, born in Newcastle, Jan. 17, 1802, died 
at sea on board schooner Grecian, July 13, 1828, unmd. 

219 (4). Albert Kimble, born in Newcastle, Sept. 4, 1803. 

220 (5). Hiram, born in Newcastle, March 9, 1805, died 
in Newcastle, July 21, 1805. 

221 (6). Nancy, born in Newcastle, Sept. 21, 1806, died 
in ; was md. in 

to Thomas McNally, son of 
McNally and , his wife, born 

in , died in 

, and had children. 

222 (7). Kiah Bailey, born in Newcastle, March 27, 1808. 

223 (8). Nathaniel, born in Newcastle, Jan. 20, 181 1. 

224 (9). Harriet, born in , 
died in ; was md. in 





Andover 105 




, to Joseph Vankirk, 


son of 


Vankirk and his 


wife, born in 


, died in 




, and had children. 



Andrew lived in Newcastle, Alna, and Wiscasset, Maine. 
He was a trader and a shipbuilder on the Sheepscot river. 
He built the old store at Sheepscot, near the bridge, and 
gave the land in front of it for a road. His widow and her 
three daughters in, or prior to, 1847 removed to New 
Albany, Indiana, and the widow probably died in Ken- 
tucky. 

216 VI. William, first child of Andrew, and Nancy Car- 
ney, bom in Newcastle, Maine, March 9, 1799, died in 

, md. in , 

Cicely Silver, dau. of Silver and , 

his wife, bom in London, 'England, , died in 

, and had eight children. 

VII. Children of William and Cicely Silver: 

225 (1). William Bonaventure, born in Le Havre, 

France (md., ch.). 
336 (2). Cicely Frances, born in 

, living in San Francisco, Cal., in 1903; was 

md. in , to 

Boarman, son of Boarman and 

, his wife, born in , 

died in , and had 

children. 
327 (3). Andrew Vincent, born in 

338 (4). Albert Richard, born in Havre de Grace. 
France, Feb. 10, 1835, living in Worcester, Mass., in 
1903; priest of the Church of Rome and member of 

the Society of Jesus. 

339 (0). Joseph Chrysostom, born in 
330 (6). Mary Harriet, born in 

, died in ; was md. 



io6 Massachusetts 

in , to , 

son of and , his wife, born 

in, died in 

, and had children. 

231 (7). Arthur Silver, born in 

332 (8). Ignatius Kemble, born in 

225 VII. William Bon a venture, first child of William 
and Cicely Silver, bom in Le Havre, France, , 

died in , 

md. in , 

(iau. and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had children. 

VIII. Children of William and 

233 (1). William J , born in Oakland, Cal., , 
1863. 

213 V. John, third child of Andrew, and Hannah Kim- 
ball, bom in Andover, Mass., Feb. 4, 1774, died in An- 
dover, April 18, 1842; md. in Andover, Sept. 21, 1801, 
Elizabeth Farrington Davis, dau. Davis and 

Ruth Farrington,* his wife, bom in Walpole, N. H., Dec, 
19, 1780, died in Andover, Sept. 29, i860, and had twelve 
children. 

VI. Children of John and Elizabeth Davis: 

234 (1). Willard, born in Andover, Jan. 11, 1802, died 
in Colombia, Tenn., Oct. 19, 1823, unmd. 

235 (2). Louisa, born in Andover, March 11, 1803, died 
in Andover, Sept. 20, 188 1, unmd. 

236 (3). John, born in Andover, April 22, 1806 (md., 
ch.). 

237 (4). Andrew, born in Andover, Oct. 10, 1807, died 
while a member of the senior class of Harvard Univer- 
sity, Sept. 15, 1831. 

238 (5). Clarissa, born in Andover, Feb. 12, 1809, died 

* Niece of General Israel Putnam. 




4^(fUn S:^i^ 



1836 



1815 



ANDOVER, MASS. 



*STOR, LENOX 

FOUNDATION' 



Andover 107 

in Boston, Mass., Aug. 12, 1854; was md. in Salem, 
Mass., Feb. 19, 1839, to Moses B. Russell, son of 

Russell and , his wife, born 

in Woodstock, N. H., 1810, died in 

, Jan. 30, 1884, and had one son. 

339 (6). Charlotte, born in Andover, Nov. 30, 1810, 
died in Andover, Sept. 14, 1886; was nid. in Andover, 
Jan. 22, 1835, to Abiel Stevens, Jr., of Methuen, Mass., 
son of Abiel Stevens and Abigail , his wife, born in 
Boston, Mass., Nov. 24, 181 1, died in Galveston, Texas, 
Sept. 2, 1884, and had one daughter. 

240 (7). Putnam, born in Andover, Feb. 18, 181 2, died 
in the South (probably during the Civil War) ; is known 
to have lived for some time in Mobile, Ala., after 1833. 

341 (8). Hannah Kimball born in Andover, Dec. 3, 1 814, 

died in Andover, July 26, 1856; was md. in Andover, 

July 12, 1838, to John Howlett of Saugus, Mass., son of 

Hewlett and , his wife, 

born in , died in 

, Nov. 23, 1877, and had six children. 

243 (9). Nathaniel, born in Andover, Jan. 14, 1817, 
died in North Andover, March 16, 1891, unmd. 

243 (10). Susan Elizabeth, born in Andover, May 28, 
1819, died in North Andover, May 28, 1840, unmd. 

244 (11). Sarah, born in Andover, May 21, 182 1, living 
in North Andover, in 1903 ; was md. in Andover, June 
14, 1855, to Leopold Grozelier, son of Louis Grozelier 
and Anne Lecrivain, his wife, born in Beaune, Cote 
d'Or, France, , 1830, died at Clarendon Springs, 
Vt., July 27, 1865. No children. 

245 (12). Emily, born in Andover, Nov. 19, 1823, died 
in Andover, May 15, 1871 ; was md. in Andover, June 
I, 1847, to John H Clark, son Hon. Hobart Clark 
and Elizabeth Farwell, his wife, born in Andover, Jan. 
21, 1816, died in Andover, Dec. 29, 1891, and had 
five children. 

236 VL John, third child of John, and Elizabeth Davis, 



io8 Massachusetts 

bom in Andover, Mass., April 22, 1806, died in Andover, 
Jiine II, 1840; md. in , June 15, 1834, Su- 

sanna Thompson, dau. Stephen Thompson and Nancy 
, his wife, bom in Thomaston, Maine, March 
9, 1808, died in North Andover, Mass., Nov. i, 1881, and 
had three children. 

VII. Children of John and Susanna Thompson: 

346 (i). Susan Elizabeth, born in Andover, Mass., April 
19, 1835, died in , Sept. 

14,1871; was md. in , 

June 29, 1863, to Horace N. Stevens, son of Na- 
thaniel Stevens and Harriet Hale, his wife, born in 
North Andover, Dec. 14, 1837, died in North Andover, 
May I, 1876, and had five children. 

247 (2). Frances Louisa, born in Boston, Mass., July 2, 
1837, died in New Bedford, Mass., July 21, 1869; was 
md. in , July 2, 1858, to 

James Henry Howland of New Bedford, Mass., son of 
Captain Henry Howland and Elizabeth Lucretia 
, his wife, born in North Andover, 
1836, died in New Bedford, May i, 1876, and had 
one child. 

348 (3). John Hugh, born in Andover, April 7, 1839, 
died in , April 29, 1840. 

214 V. Daniel, fourth child of Andrew and Hannah 
Kimball, bom in Andover, Mass., Jan. 3, 1778, died in 
Andover, Feb. 2, 1844; md. in Andover, July 8, 1802, 
Susanna Frye, dau. Lieut. John Frye and Hannah Dol- 
liver, his wife, bom in Andover, May 7, 1782, died in 
Andover, , and had five children. 

VI. Children of Daniel and Susanna Frye: 

249 (1). Hannah, born in Andover, Mass., Oct. 23, 1802, 
died in Andover, April 13, 1879; was md. in Andover, 




1901 



(MRS. LEOPOLD GROZELIER) 

NORTH ANDOVER, MASS. 



.^ Mft 



libra: 






Andover 



109 



Dec. 22, 1825, to Isaac Wilson, son of 
Wilson and , his wife, born in 

, died in , 

Jan. , 1870, and had two children. 

250 (2). Mehitabel, born in Andover, Feb. 6, 1805, died 
in Andover, Feb. 7, 1849; was md. in Andover, Dec. 
25, 1834, to Daniel Foster, son of Foster 
and , his wife, born in , 
died in , March , 1851, and had 
children. 

251 (3). Daniel Kimball, born in Andover, June 3, 1807, 
died in Andover, , 1852, unnid. 

352 (4). William, born in Andover, Aug. 25, 1810 (md., 
ch.). 

253 (5). Susann'a, born in Andover, June 9, 181 2, died 
in Andover, Feb. 21, 181 6. 

252 VI. William, fourth child of Daniel, and Susanna 
Frye, bom in Andover, Mass., Aug. 25, 1810, died in An- 
dover, Jan. 17, 1883; md. in Andover, Dec. 25, 1838, 
Elizabeth P. Gardner, dau. Gardner and 

, his wife, bom in , 

died in Andover, , 1890, and had one daughter. 

VII. Children of William, and Elizabeth Gardner: 

254 (1). Rebecca Frances, born in Andover, Dec. 31, 
1848, died in Andover, Aug. 2, 1864. 

(Also other children who died in infancy.) 

210 IV. Joseph, ninth child of John, and second child 
of his second wife, Sarah Peabody Stevens, bom in An- 
dover, Mass., June 10, 1764, died in Paris, Tenn., July 12, 
1843; md. in Andover, Dec. 24, 1795, Mehitable Adams, 
dau. Henry Adams and Sarah Emery, his wife, bom in 
Newbury, Mass., Jan. 12, 1764, died in Andover, Dec. 25, 
1827, and had five children. 



I lo Massachusetts 

V. Children of Joseph and Mehitable Adams: 

355 (1). Henry Adams, born in Andover, Aug. 5, 1796, 
died in Andover, Aug. 8, 1827, unmd. He graduated 
from Harvard University in 181 8, and was an instruc- 
tor in Clarksville, Tenn. 

356 (2). John, born in Andover, Sept. 27, 1797, died in 
Andover, Dec. 31, 182 1, unmd. 

257 (3). Joseph, born in Andover, Jan. 21, 1799, died in 

Paris, Tenn., July 20, 1839. Unmd. 
358 (4). Sarah, born in Andover, June 5, 1800, died in 
Andover, ; was md. in Andover, March 

20, 1834, to David Grey, son of Grey and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in , 

and had one son, Henry Peters Grey. 

259 (5). Jeremy, born in Andover, June 14, 1803 (md., 
ch.). 

259 V. Jeremy, fifth child of Joseph, and Mehitable 
Adams, bom in Andover, Mass., June 14, 1803, died in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan. 9, 1883 ; md. in , Aug. 

17, 1835, Joanna Carlton, dau. Capt, Benjamin Carlton 
and Molly Merill, widow of French, of Salis- 

bury, Mass., bom in Sandown, N. H., June 13, 1809, died 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb. 18, 1893, and had three children. 

VI. Children of Jeremy and Joanna Carlton: 

260 (1). Sarah Jane, born in Paris, Tenn., March 28, 
1837, living in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1903; was md. in 

, Jan. 16, 1 86 1, to William Alexander 
McCall, son of James A McCall and Maria Walker, 
his wife, born in Philadelphia, Penn., July 11, 1831; 
living in Cincinnati in 1903. No children. 

261 (2). Mary Tennessee, born in Paris, Tenn., Dec. 7, 
1845, died in Cincinnati, June 15, 1849. 

262 (3). Joseph Henry, born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 
13, 1849, died at Hot Springs, Ark., May 20, 1896, 
unmd. 





188- 



T85- 



NORTH ANDOVER, MASS. 



roft, LEKOX , 

; FOUNDATIONS 



Andover 1 1 1 

Jeremy left five hundred dollars to the north parish of 
North Andover, Mass., for the care of the old burying- 
grounds there. 



19 III. Beamsley, sixth child of Samuel, and Phebe 
Frie, bom in Andover, Mass., , 1710, died 

in Woodstock, Conn, (prob.), 1762; md. in , 

Jan. 8, 1735, Hannah Wright, dau. Joseph Wright and 
Hannah , his wife, bom in Andover, Mass, 

June 20, 1 71 7, died in , 1796, 

aged 93, and had one daughter, 

IV. Child of Beamsley and Hannah Wright: 
263 (1). Hannah, born 

In 1742-43, Beamsley subscribed io£ to the first 
Episcopal Church in that part of the country, in Strat- 
ford, Conn. He was a felt -maker. In 1757 he is referred 
to in connection with his mother's will as being "out of 
the Province." * 

* Probate, Salem, Mass. Beamsley, Woodstock, Wenham Co. 1762. 
Hannah Peters, spinster, sole heir. Land and house worth £100 in 
Middleton, Essex Co. Whole value of estate, ;^i25-o-s. 



MAINE 

BLUE HILL 

206 IV. John, fifth child of John and Phebe Carleton, 
bom in Andover, Mass., Aug. 9, 1741, died in Blue Hill, 
Me., Aug. 20, aged 80 yrs. and one day*; md. in Blue 
Hill, July I, 1770, Mary Dyer, widow of Nathaniel Gush- 
ing, and dau. of James Dyer of Cape Elizabeth, Me., and 
Mary Marriner, his wife, bom in Cape Elizabeth, Nov. 19, 
1750, died in Blue Hill, June 23, 1826, and had twelve 
children. 

V. Children of John and Mary Dyer Gushing. 

364 (1). John, born in Blue Hill, July 28, 1771 f (md., 
ch.). 

265 (2). Phebe, born in Blue Hill, March 18, 1773, died 
in Bucksport, Me., May 15, 1839; was md. in Blue 
Hill, Aug 24, 1794, to Daniel Spofford of Bucksport, 
son of Amos Spofford and Abigail Pearl, his wife, born 
in Boxford, Mass., Feb. 18, 1766, died in Bucksport, 
Oct. 10, 1852, and had seven children. 

266 (3). William, born in Blue Hill, May 4, 1774, died 
May 5, 1774. 

267 (4). James, born in Blue Hill, May 11, 1775 (md., 
ch.). 

268 (5). Molly, born in Blue Hill, March 13, 1778, died 
in Blue Hill, Jan. 26, 1810; was md. in Blue Hill, Oct. 
II, 1795, to Seth Kimball (2d wife), son of 

Kimball and , his wife, 

* The date of birth being old style it is necessary to add eleven days. 
The Andover records say August 7th. 
t See Ellsworth. 

112 




MONUMENT TO JOHN PETERS 

1821 BLUE HILL, MAINF 



1900 




M^x^ 




C't^ 



7V.i.>e_ ^?;/^^&:.^<?5^1.<.<_^ 



1813 




rPUBLIcllBRARY 



A8TOR, LENOX 



Blue Hill 113 

born in Bradford, Mass., Oct. 31, 1768, died in Blue 
Hill, Jan. 16, 182 1, and had six children. 

369 (6). Sally, born in Blue Hill, Feb. 2, 1780, died in 
Blue Hill, Sept. 17, 1850; was md. in Blue Hill, Jan. 
16, 1799, to Reuben Dodge, son of Jonah Dodge and 
Sarah Thorndike, his wife, born in Beverly, Mass., 
Feb. 19, 1773, died in Blue Hill, Dec. 16, 1830, and had 
13 children. 

270 (7). Charlotte, born in Blue Hill, Jan. i, 1782, died 
in , Sept. 12, 1833; was md. in Blue 

Hill, Aug. II, 1805, to Sabin Pond, son of Eli Pond and 
Huldah , his wife, born in Medway, 

Mass., Jan. 14, 1775, died in Orono, Me., May 16, 
1848, and had 2 children. Resided in Ellsworth, Me., 
and in Boston, Mass. Was of the firm of Peters & 
Pond. 

371 (8). Andrew, born in Blue Hill, Feb. 7, i784*(md., 
ch.). 

273 (9). Dyer, born in Blue Hill, Nov. 14, 1785 f (md., 
ch.). 

273 (10). Aphia, born in Blue Hill, March 17, 1788, 
died in Bucksport, Me., March 5, 1862; was md. in 
Blue Hill, May 3, 1808, to Elias Upton, son of Abra- 
ham Upton and Susannah , his wife, 
born in Lynnfield, Mass., Feb. 16, 1773, died in 
Bucksport, June 16, 1857, and had 4 children. 

274 (11). Lemuel, born in Blue Hill, April 3, 1790 (md., 
ch.). 

275 (12). Daniel, born in Blue Hill, Feb. 15, 1792 (md., 
ch.). 

John removed from Andover to Blue Hill, and was one 
of the proprietors there in 1765. He was town clerk, 
selectman, and served on various committees from 1769 
to 1779. In July, 1775, he was a delegate, sent to meet 
other delegates of "the towns. Islands and Districts" of 
that locality. He was a member of the Committee of 

* See Boston. f See Ellsworth. 



114 Maine 

Inspection in 1776, and of the Committee of Safety in 
1778 and 1779. " 1784 June 17, Blue Hill Bay. This is 
to certify that John Peters of the town afore said this 
day was chose by the Inhabitants of the Town to repre- 
sent the true state of the Proprietors and Settlers in said 
Township to the Committee chosen by the General Court 
of the Massachusetts State to receive and examine the 
Claims of land in the County of Lincoln," etc., etc. 

In 1788 he was deputy naval officer for the old Penob- 
scot (Castine) district. " He was a noted land surveyor, 
for many years in the employment of the agents of the 
Bingham estate and surveyed many townships in the 
Penobscot purchase, in Hancock and Washington coun- 
ties. He will be remembered for generations, as his sur- 
veys are the foundation for a large majority of the deeds 
of lands in these counties." He was a ship-builder and 
a ship-owner, owned one quarter of a grist-mill and one 
quarter of a saw-mill. He was one of the original trus- 
tees of the Blue Hill Academy, and its treasurer, and he 
was justice of the peace. In 1790 his estate was the 
largest and the best in town, consisting of 35 acres of 
mining, 35 acres of pasture, and 1692 acres of wild land; 
he was half owner of the potash works in Blue Hill. In 
1 813 he had a vessel seized by the British. "Sale by 
Nathan Ellis to John Peters, one quarter of schooner 
Sally, now Ajax, lying in the Penobscot river, April 5, 
1813, for $850." "I hereby certify that Samuel Upton 
has given me security for six hundred dollars as a remu- 
neration to the British captors for the return of the Schoo- 
ner Sally and sloop Jewel of Blue Hill, to John Peters & 
Nathan Ellis of that place, and they are therefore not to 
be molested, but to be admitted to all the privileges of 
vessels in this district, in a similar situation. Castine, 
Sept. 20, 1814. L. Owen." 

He gave a bell to the Congregational meeting-house in 



Blue Hill 115 

Blue Hill, which was first rung on his eightieth birthday, 
and was first tolled at his funeral. An old lady in Lowell, 
Mass., now in her ninety-fourth year, remembers him 
well. She says : "He was a man of medium height, with 
brown hair, blue eyes, and fair complexion — a fine-look- 
ing man and a man who was much respected for his good 
judgment and integrity. His wife was a paralytic, and 
he used to walk into her sitting-room and, offering her 
his arm, lead her out to the table to her meals. He was 
made an Esquire * and often served as referee, his judg- 
ment being usually accepted as decisive." 

267 V. James, fourth child of John and Mary Dyer, 
bom in Blue Hill, Maine, May 11, 1775, died m Blue Hill, 
Oct. 26, 1814; md. in Blue Hill, March 23, 1800, Sally 
Ciinningham, dau. John Cunningham and Aphia Brown, 
his wife, bom in Nobleborough, Maine, June 15, 1782, 
died in Blue Hill, Oct. 20, 1851, and had six children. 
Sally Cim.nrngham Peters md. (2), Oct. 16, 181 7, in Blue 
Hill, Ebenezer Hinckley, son of Ebenezer Hinckley and 
Elizabeth Coggins, his wife, and had six 

children. 

VI. Children of James and Sally Cunningham. 

376 (1). Maria Langdon, born in Blue Hill, Me., July 
II, 1 801, died in North Reading, Mass., Nov. 8, 1880; 
was md. in Boston, Mass., Nov. 18, 1824, to Joseph 
Warren Flint, son of Daniel Flint and Priscilla Sawyer, 
his wife, born in North Reading, Mass., 

, died in North Reading, Mass., , 

and had three children. 

377 (2). Anson, born in Blue Hill, Dec. 28, 1804, died 
in Philadelphia, Penn., June 8, 1831, unmd. 

378 (3). Hannah Frothingham, born in Blue Hill, Nov. 
18, 1806, died in Blue Hill, Nov. 5, 1870; was md. in 

* This means he was made a Justice of the Peace. 



ii6 Maine 

Blue Hill, Jan. 24, 1827, to Johnson Wood, son of 
Robert Haskell Wood and Mary Coggins, his wife, 
bom in Blue Hill, July 26, 1796, died in Blue Hill, 
Aug. 13, 1 86 1, and had 9 children. 

279 (4). Salem Towne, born in Blue Hill, July 2, 1810, 
died in New Orleans, La., July 18, 1831, unmd. 

380 (5). John, born in Blue Hill, July 4, 1812, died in 
New Orleans, La., March 8, 1833, iinmd. 

281 (6). Aphia Brown, born in Blue Hill, Aug. i, 18 14, 
died in Ellsworth, Me., May 27, 1900; was md. in 
Ellsworth, Sept. 22, 1836, tp Samuel Button, Jr., son 
of Samuel Button and Nancy Jordan, his wife, bom in 
Ellsworth, , died in Ellsworth, 

, and had 4 children. 

274 V. Lemuel, eleventh child of John, and Mary Dyer, 
bom in Blue Hill, Me., April 3, 1790, died in Blue Hill, 
Oct. 28, 1870; md. in Blue Hill, Sept. 7, 181 3, Betsey 
Wood, dau. John Wood and Polly Patten, his wife, bom 
in Blue Hill, Nov. 2, 1794, died in Blue Hill, Oct. 28, 
1 87 1, and had 12 children. 

VI. Children of Lemuel, and Betsey Wood: 

282 (1). Pearl Spofford, born in Blue Hill, July 28. 
1814 (md., ch.). 

283 (2). Almira Parker, born in Blue Hill, Oct. 31, 
1817, died in Blue Hill, Nov. , 1892; was md. in Blue 
Hill, Jan. i. 1839, to Haswell Wood Johnson, son of 
William Johnson and Molly Wood, his wife, born in 
Blue Hill, March 30, 181 5, died in Blue Hill, 

1 89-, and had two children. 

284 (3). Lemuel Edward Byer, bom in Blue Hill, Oct. 
15, 1819 (md., ch.). 

285 (4). John Hamilton, born in Blue Hill, Feb. 4, 
1822, drowned July 15, 1845, while trying to save 
others. 

286 (5). Joseph Parris, born in Blue Hill, April 13, 
1824 (md., ch.). 



Blue Hill 117 

387 (6). Simeon Parker, born in Blue Hill, Feb. 14, 1826, 
died Nov. 17, 1847, unmd. 

388 (7). Clarissa (Clara) Elizabeth, born in Blue Hill, 
July 25, 1828; living in Blue Hill in 1903; was md, in 
Blue Hill, Oct. 14, 1851, to Thomas N. B. Holt, son of 
Jeremiah T. Holt and Elizabeth (Betsey) Osgood, his 
wife, born in Blue Hill, Nov. i, 1827, living in Blue 
Hill in 1903, and had three children. 

389 (8). Henry Franklin, born in Blue Hill, April 19, 
1830 (md., ch.). 

290 (9). Augustus Connate, born in Blue Hill, Dec. 7, 

1832 (md., ch.). 
391 (10). Augusta Maria, twin of Augustus Connate, 

born in Blue Hill, Dec. 7, 1832, living in Blue Hill in 

1903, unmd. 
393 (11). William Ward, born in Blue Hill, Dec. 26, 

1835 (md.,ch.). 

393 (12). Charles Tilden, born in Blue Hill, May 28, 
1838 (md., ch.). 

383 VI. Pearl SpofTord, first child of Lemuel, and Bet- 
sey Wood, bom in Blue Hill, Me., July 28, 1814, died in 
Farmington, Gal., February 22, 1893; md. in Blue Hill, 
Feb. 4, 1840, Mary Augusta Erskine, daughter of Levi 
Erskine and Hannah , his wife, born in 

Auburn, Me., May 5, 1814, died in Chelsea, Mass., Jan. 
13, 1887, and had four children. 

VII. Children of Pearl Spofford and Mary Erskine: 

394 (1). Mary Frances, born in Blue Hill, April 25, 
1841, living in 1903; was md. in Boston, Feb. 4, 1862, 
to Frank B. Bennett, son of William Bennett and 
Hannah Barry, his wife, born in Sanford, Me., June 
10, 1829, killed at the battle of the Wilderness, May 7, 
1862. No children. 

395 (2). Clara Augusta, born in Blue Hill, Feb. 22, 
1843, living in Chelsea, Mass., 1903; was md. in Bos- 
ton, Mass., Nov. 28, 1862, to Frank Warren Norton, 



ii8 Maine 

son of Stephen Norton and Clara Carleton, his wife, 
born in Blue Hill, May 2, 1 841, living in Chelsea, Mass., 
1903, and had 4 children. 
396 (3). Pearl Lawrence, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 25, 

1845. 
297 (4). Simeon Blanchard, born in Blue Hill, Nov. 5, 

1847. 

296 VII. Pearl Lawrence, third child of Pearl Spoflford, 
and Mary Erskine, bom in Blue Hill, Me., Jan. 25, 1845, 
living in San Jose, Gal., 1903. 



397 VII. Simeon Blanchard, fourth child of Pearl 
Spofford and Mary Erskine, bom in Blue Hill, Me., Nov. 
5, 1847, living in Chatham, Mass., 1903; md. in Steu- 
ben, Me., Oct. 16, 1883, Jennie Brooks, daughter of Cal- 
vin Brooks and Mary Parker, his wife, born in Eastport, 
Me., Jan. 23, 1856, living in Chatham, Mass., 1903, and 
had two children. 

VIII. Children of Simeon Blanchard, and Jennie Brooks : 

398 (1). Charles Blanchard, born in East Boston; Mass., 
Aug. 3, 1895. 

399 (2). Joseph Frank, born in Chatham, Mass., July 
23, 1897. 

384 VI. Lemuel Edward Dyer, third child of Lemuel 
and Betsey Wood, bom in Blue Hill, Me., Oct. 15, 1819, 
died in Blue Hill (the last male of his name there), Dec. 
12, 1901; md. in , Oct. 14, 1849, Maria 

D Westcott, dau. Joseph Westcott and Lucy 

, his wife, bom in Blue Hill, Aug. 27, 181 8, died 
in Blue Hill, Dec. 17, 1863, and had three children. 



Blue Hill 119 

VII. Children of Lemuel Edward Dyer and Maria Westcott : 

300 (1) George Lemuel, born in Blue Hill, March 21, 

1851, died Aug. 26, 1858. 
' 301 (2) Alma Maria, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 26, 1853, 

died in Gilmore, Minn., Aug. 4, 1891 ; was md. in 

, Sept. 8, 1873, to the Rev. Arthur Teb- 

bets, son of Benjamin F. Tebbets and Sarepta Keyes, 

his wife, born in New Hampton, N. H., Sept. 9, 1847, 

living in Minneapolis, Minn., 1903, and had five 

children. 
303 (3). Lemuel Ward, born in Blue Hill, July 29, i860 

(md., no ch.). 

Lemuel Edward Dyer md. (2), March 6, 1865, Sarah 
M Westcott, dau. Joseph Westcott and Lucy 

, his wife, born in Castine, Me., March 27, 1820, 
died in Blue Hill, Jan. 17, 1894, aged 74 years 9 months 
and 20 days. No children. 

302 VII. Lemuel Ward, third child of Lemuel Edward 
Dyer and Maria Westcott, bom in Blue Hill, July 29, 
i860, living in West Roxbury (Boston), Mass., 1903 ; md. 
in Boston, Sept. 20, 1892, Charlotte Gardiner Snelling, 
dau. Washington Gardiner Snelling and Harriet Hunt 
Fowle, his wife, bom in Boston, April 23, 1867, living in 
Boston, 1903. No children. Lemuel Ward graduated 
from Middletown University, Middletown, Conn., 1884, 
and from the Boston University Law School, 1887, with 
degree of LL.B. 

386 VI. Joseph Parris, fifth child of Lemuel and Betsey 
Wood, bom in Blue Hill, Me., April 13, 1824, supposed 
to have been drowned at sea about Feb., 1863; md. in 
Blue Hill, Sept. 28, 1848, Nancy Westcott, dau. Archi- 
bald Westcott and Nancy Lymebumer, his wife, bom in 
Blue Hill, May 15, 1826, died in Boston, Mass., May 12, 
1866, and had two children. 



120 Maine 

VII. Children of Joseph Parris and Nancy Westcott: 

303 (1). John Parris, born in Blue Hill, Aug. 22, 1849 
(md., no ch.) 

304 (2). Joseph V/estcott, born in Blue Hill, Dec. 31, 
1854, died in Portland, Me., Dec. 13, 1898. Un- 
married. 

303 VII. John Parris, first child of Joseph Parris and 
Nancy Westcott, bom in Blue Hill, Aug. 22, 1849, died 
in Boston, Mass., March 29, 1876; md. in Boston, Nov. , 
1875, Alice Marion Friend, dau. of John Willard Friend 
and Sarah Day, his wife, bom in Blue Hill, Oct. 31, 1856, 
living in 1903. No children. 

289 VI. Henry Franklin, eighth child of Lemuel and 
Betsey Wood, bom in Blue Hill, Me., April 19, 1830, 
died in Farmington, Cal., Sept. 4, 1895; md. in Blue 
Hill, May 15, 1859, Sarah Peters Wood, dau. Johnson 
Wood and Hannah Peters, his wife, bom in Blue Hill, 
April 17, 1836, living in San Francisco, Cal., 1903, and 
had two children. 

VII. Children of Henry Franklin and Sarah Wood: 

305 (1). Clarence Henry, born in Columbia, Cal., Sept. 
4, i860 (md., ch.). 

306 (2). Elizabeth Augusta, born in Farmington, Cal., 
Nov. 30, 1869, living in San Francisco in 1903; was 
md. in Farmington, Cal., Nov. 12, 1895, to the Rev. 
John Stephens, son of Stephens and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
. No children. 

305 VII. Clarence Henry, first child of Henry Frank- 
lin and Sarah Wood, bom in Columbia, Cal., Sept. 4, i860, 
living in Palermo, Butte Co., Cal., 1903 ; md. in Farming- 
ton, Cal., April 4, 1883, Grace McKenzie, dau. of 

McKenzie and , his wife, 



Blue Hill 121 

bom in , living in Palermo in 

1903, and had one child. 

VIII. Children of Clarence Henry and Grace McKenzie : 

307 (1). Arthur, born in Farmington, Cal., May 9, 1885. 

290 VI. Augustus Connate, ninth child of Lemuel and 
Betsey Wood, bom in Blue Hill, Me., Dec. 7, 1832, died 
in Blue Hill, Jan. 14, 1897; md, in Bucksport, Me., Oct. 
20, 1856, Abby Osgood, dau. Joseph Osgood and Phebe 
P Hinckley, his wife, bom. in Blue Hill, March 11, 
1834, died in Blue Hill, May 21, 1891, and had four 
children. 

VII. Children of Augustus Connate and Abby Osgood: 

308 (1). Sarah Flavilla, born in Blue Hill, Sept. 23, 
1857, died in Searsmont, Me., Jan. 13, 1893; was md. 
in Blue Hill, Oct. 11, 1880, to Moses Fowler of Sears- 
mont, Me., son of Enoch M Fowler and 
Abigail Averill, his wife, born in 

, died in , and 

had one child. 

309 (2). Edward Augustus, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 19, 
1859, died Feb. 11, 1880, of consumption, in West Vir- 
ginia, unmd. 

310 (3). Elizabeth Lovering, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 23, 
1862, living in Blue Hill in 1903 ; was md. in Blue Hill, 
June 12, 1890, to Washington Irving Partridge, son of 
Ellison L Partridge and Sarah Ann Cotton, his 
wife born in , living in 
Blue Hill in 1903, and had two children. 

311 (4). Ida Augusta, born in Blue Hih, Feb. 27, 1864, 
living in Bar Harbor, Me., in 1903; was married in 
Blue Hill, May 3, 1886, to David Wellington Bunker, 
M.D., son of John Edward Bunker and Mary Ann 
Ally, his wife, born in , 
died in  , and had 
children. 



122 Maine 

Augustus Connate md. (2), in Blue Hill, Oct. 10, 1892, 
Mary A Hargrave, widow of Hosea Horton of 

Blue Hill and dau. Thomas Hargrave and Sophia Cole- 
man, his wife, bom in Buckinghamshire, Eng., 

living in Blue Hill in 1903. No children. 

Augustus Connate was commissioned, Aug. 16, 1862, 
second lieutenant, Co. K, i6th Maine Reg. Mustered 
into U. S. service Aug. 14, 1862; wounded at battle of 
Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, discharged for disability 
occasioned by wounds, March 30, 1863. He lived on 
Peters' Point in Blue Hill, in the old homestead. 

293 VI. William Ward, eleventh child of Lemuel and 
^»>v- Betsey Wood, bom in Blue Hill, Me., Dec. 26, 1835, 
living in Blue Hill, 1903; md. in Machiasport, Me., Sept. 
9 1 85-, Abby Merean Crocker, dau. Timothy Crocker, 
and Lois Merean, his wife, bom. in Machiasport, July 14, 
1840, living in 1903, and had two children. 

VII. Children of William Ward, and Abby Crocker: 

312 (1). Ella Mary, born in Machiasport, Nov. 8, 1859, 
living 1903; was md. in Blue Hill, June 9, 1880, to 
Eugene F. Hinckley, son of Benjamin F, Hinckley, 
and Matilda Gray, his wife, born in Blue Hill, June 9, 
1857, living 1903, and had four children. 

313 (2). Augustus, born in Machiasport, April 26, 1864, 
drowned in Blue Hill, Sept. 9, 1872. 

293 VL Charles Tilden, twelfth child of Lemuel and 
Betsey Wood, bom in Blue Hill, May 28, 1838, died in 
Blue Hill, Jan. i, 1897; md. in Salem, Mass., Nov. 22, 
1869, Ellen Cousens, formerly wife of Robert Morton, and 
dau. of Isaac Cousens, and Betsey E. Peters, his wife, 
bom in Brooklin, Me., March 16, 1838, living in Blue 
Hill 1903, and had one daughter. 



Blue Hill 123 

VII. Children of Charles Tilden and Ellen Cousens Morton: 

314 (1). Nora Ellen, born in Blue Hill, Aug. 17, 1874, 

living in Blue Hill, 1903. 

Charles Tilden Peters served during the Civil War in 

the 1 6th Maine Regiment, Co. K, enlisting Aug. 14, 1862, 

and was wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg, Dec. 

13, 1862. 



275 V. Daniel, twelfth child of John and Mary Dyre, 
bom in Blue Hill, Feb. 15, 1792, died in Blue Hill, March 
20, 1878; md. in , Oct. 9, 181 7, Phebe 

Billings of Sedgwick, Me., dau. Benjamin Billings and 
Abigail , his wife, bom in , 

Feb. 4, 1795, died in Blue Hill, March 17, 1877, and had 
eleven children. 

VI. Children of Daniel and Phebe Billings : 

315 (1). Rufus Bailey, born in Blue Hill, May 7, 1818 
(md., ch.). 

316 (2). Daniel Porter, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 28, 1820 
(md., ch.). 

317 (3). Sabin Pond, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 14, 1822, 
died July 3, 1850, unmarried. • 

318 (4). Phebe Billings, born in Blue Hill, Aug. 22, 
1823, died in Blue Hill, May 4, 1850, unmarried. 

319 (5). Dudley Bridges, born in Blue Hill, May 28, 
1825, died in Blue Hill, March 24, 1834. 

330 (6). Moses Pillsbury, born in Blue Hill, May 25, 
1827 (md., ch.). 

331 (7). Thomas Hugh, born in Blue Hill, May 25, 
1829, died in Blue Hill, Nov. 28, 1867, unmarried. 

333 (8). Ephraim Dyer, born in Blue Hill, Sept. 21, 

1831, died Nov. 5, 1832. 
333 (9). Francis, born in Blue Hill, Oct. 30, 1834, died 

May 26, 1883, unmarried. 



124 Maine 

334 (10). Julia Ann, bom in Blue Hill, Dec. 13, 1836, 
died , was md. in 

Dec. 16, 1863, to Otis Farnham of Brooksville, 

Me. , son of John Farnham and Serena , 

his wife, born in Brooksville, died 

Jan. 25, 1885, and had three children. 

325 (11). Caroline Maria, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 12, 1843, 

living in Blue Hill, 1903; was md. in Blue Hill, Dec. 

9, 1864, to Sewall Perkins Snowman, son of Alexander 

Snowman and Susan , his wife, born in 

Brooksville, Me., Oct. 27, 1838, living in Blue Hill, 

1903, and had six children. 

315 VI. Rufus Bailey, first child of Daniel and Phebe 

Billings, bom in Blue Hill, May 7, 181 8, died in Blue Hill, 

March 2, 1887; md. in Ellsworth, Jan. 31, 1855, Mary 

Jane Clark of Mt. Desert, Me., dau. of David Clark and 

Sally Ally, his wife, bom in Surry, Maine, Oct. 5, 1828, 

died in Blue Hill, April 9, 1886, and had seven daughters. 

VII. Children of Rufus Bailey and Mary Jane Clark : 

336 (1). Sarah Jane, born in Blue Hill, Jan. 25, 1856, 
died in ; was md. in 

, Jan. 26, 1876, to Seldon Kimball, son of 

Kimball and , 

his wife, born in , died 

in , and had seven 

children. 

337 (2) Phebe Ann, born in Blue Hill, Oct. 3, 1857, died 
in Lowell, Mass., Oct. i, 1875, unmd. 

338 (3). Emily J., born in Blue Hill, June 29, 1859, died 
in ; was md. in 

, Aug. 20, 1884, to Peter Webster, son of 

Webster and , 

his wife, born in , died 

in , and had one child. 

339 (4). Mira Matilda, born in Blue Hill, Dec. 4, i860, 
died Aug. 15, 1883, unmd. 



Blue Hill 125 

330 (5). Caroline Maria, born in Blue Hill, May 5, 1863, 
died in Chelmsford, Mass., ,189 ; was md, in 
Chelmsford, Mass., Aug. 3, 1885, to Walter Stackpole, 
of Lowell, Mass., son of Stackpole and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had children. 

331 (6). May Frances, born in Blue Hill, June 7, 1866, 
died in Chelmsford, Mass., Feb. , 1902; was md. in 

, June 4, 1887, to William Parlee, 
son of Parlee and , 

his wife, born in , died 

in , and had children. 

332 (7). Charlotte R., born in Blue Hill, Oct. 31, 1870, 
died Dec. 10, 1889. 

316 VI. Daniel Porter, second child of Daniel and 
Phebe Billings, bom in Blue Hill, Jan. 28, 1820, died at 
Mt. Pleasant Hospital, Washington, D. C, Aug. 8, 1864; 
md. in , May 1 7, 1845, Abigail Billings, 

dau. Nathan Billings and Susan , his wife, 

bom in Sedgwick, Me., Jan. 20, 1818, died in 

, and had two daughters. 

VII. Children of Daniel Porter and Abigail Billings: 

333 (1). Martha Ann, born in Blue Hill, Aug. 18, 1845, 
died in ; was md. in 

, Aug. 15, 1865, to Leroy Farnham, 
son of Farnham and , 

his wife, born in , died 

in . No children. Martha 

Ann md. (2) in , John 

Freethy, son of Freethy and 

, his wife, born in , 

died in , and had two 

children. 

334 (2). Susan Clara, born in Blue Hill, July 12, 1850, 



126 Maine 

died in ; was md. in 

, Nov. , 1867, to Charles Simmons 
of Sedgwick, Me., son of Simmons and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in , 

and had children. 

320 VI. Moses Pillsbury, sixth child of Daniel and 
Phebe Billings, bom in Blue Hill, March 25, 1827, died in 
Sargentville, Me., Jan. 6, 1903; md. in , 

Dec. 15, i860, Salome Brown, dau. Edward Brown and 
Permilla Billings, his wife, born in Sedgwick, Me., Jan. 17, 
1825, died in Sargentville, May 9, 1888, aged 63 years and 
4 months, and had three children. 

VIL Children of Moses Pillsbury and Salome Brown: 

335 (1). Otis Sev/all, born in , June 
21, 1863, died in , July 19, 1863. 

336 (2). Sewall Everett, born in , 
Sept. 20, 1865 (md., ch.). 

337 (3). Ida, born in , June 9, 1867, 
died in , March 11,1897, unmd. 

Moses Pillsbury md. (2), in , Sept. 29, 

1889, Mrs. Susan Dix, dau. 

, born in , June 25, 

1 841, died in , and had 

children. 

336 VII. Sewall Everett, second child' of Moses Pills- 
bury and Salome Brown, bom in , 
Sept. 20, 1865, living in , 1903; md. in 

, April , 1896, Clara Gray, dau. 
Gray and , his wife, bom 

in , died in , July 

, 1898. No children. 



ELLSWORTH 

264 V. John, first child of John, and Mary Dyer, bom 
in Blue Hill, Me., July 28, 1771, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
July 30, 1843; md. in (probably Ellsworth, Me.), 
Charlotte Langdon, dau. (prob. John Langdon and 
Martha Forester, his wife), born in (prob. Wiscasset, Me.), 

1783, died in Boston, Mass., Feb. 9, 
1 82 1, aged 38, and had (7 ?) children. 

VI. Children of John, and Charlotte Langdon: 

338 (1). Alexander Hamilton, born in (prob. Ells- 
worth, Me., 1807), died in Boston, Sept. i, 1817, aged 
10 years and 4 months. 

339 (2) Charlotte, born in (prob. Ellsworth, 1809), 
died in Brooklyn, N. Y., ,1837, aged 
28, unmd. 

340 (3). John, born in 

died in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 17, 1846, unmd. 
Graduated Harvard University, 1831. 

341 (4). Alfred Langdon, born in 

(1814), died in Boston, Mass., May 13, 1832, 
aged 18. 
343 (5). Harriet, born in , 

died in Texas, , was md. in 

, to Dexter, son 

of Dexter and , 

his wife, born in , died 

in , and had children. 

343 (6). Eloisa Paine, born in 

, died in , was 

md. in , to John T 

Rollins, son of Capt. George Rollins and Catherine 

127 



128 Maine 

, his wife, born in , 

1809, died in Jersey City, N. J., April 30, 1872, and 
had three children. 

344 (7). Alexander Hamilton, born in Boston, Nov., 
1819 (md., ch.). 

John md. (2) in South Berwick, Me., May i, 1822, Mary 
Haggens, dau. Major Edmund Haggens and Susan Hamil- 
ton, his wife, bom in 

, died in 

and had six children. 

Children of John and Mary Haggens: 

345 (8). Mary, born in , 1823, died 
in Boston, Mass., Dec. 25, aged 10 months. 

346 (9). Edmund, born in Boston (April , 1824?), died 
in Boston, Oct. 22, 1824, aged 6 months. 

347 (10). Adrian, born in Boston, (1825), died 
in Boston, Jan. 22, 1826, aged i year. 

348 (11). Susan Hamilton, born in New York, Oct. 8, 
1828, died in Boston, April 8, 1898; was md. in 

1846, to James Pierrepont 
Haliburton, son Andrew Haliburton and Sarah Ann 
Manning, his wife, born in 

, died in Portsmouth, N. H., 

, and had 
two daughters. Susan Hamilton was md. (2) in 

Oct. 18, 1858, to George Wallis Haven, 
son John Haven and Anne Woodward, his wife, born in 

, June 24, 1808, died in 
Portsmouth, N. H., Aug. 9, 1895, ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ so^- 
349. (12). Mary Elizabeth, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Aug. 15, 1830, died in Santa Barbara, Cal., March , 
1900; was md. in Brooklyn, N. Y., June , 1853, 

to Gilbert W Bowne, son Samuel Bowne, and 

Ann Skinner, his wife, born in 

died in Brooklyn, Dec. , 

1853. No children. Mary EHzabeth was md. (2) in 

June i860, to Har- 



Ellsworth 129 

manus Barkuloo Duryea, son Cornelius Rapalyea Dur- 
yea, and Ann Barkuloo, his wife, bom in 

, July 12, 1 81 5, died in Navesink, 
N. J., Aug. , 1884, and had two sons. 

350 (13). Thomas, born in 
drowned at sea. 

344 VI. Alexander, seventh child of John, Jr., and 

Charlotte Langdon, born in Boston, Mass., Nov. , 18 19, 

living in Chicago, 111., 1903; md. in Southport,* Wis., 

' Feb. , 1847, Margaret Huguenin, dau. Daniel Huguenin 

and Clarissa Van Horn his wife, born in 

died in 
, and had three daughters. 

VII. Children of Alexander Hamilton and Clarissa Van Horn: 

351 (1). Margaret, born in Southport, Wis., 

, 1847. 
353 (2). Joanna Sutherland, born in Southport, Wis., 

, 1849- 

353 (3). Cornelia Appleby, born on Lake Erie, 

, 1852. 

371 V. Andrew, eighth child of John and Mary Dyer, 
born in Blue Hill, Me., Feb. 7, 1784, died in Ellsworth 
Me., Feb. 15, 1864; md. in Ellsworth, Jan. 16, 1812, 
Sally Jordan, dau. Col. Melatiah Jordan and Elizabeth 
Jellerson, his wife, bom in Ellsworth, Aug. 28, 1789, died 
in Ellsworth, March 13, 1878, and had 12 children. 

VI. Children of Andrew and Sally Jordan: 

354 (1). Charles, born in Ellsworth, Nov. 23, 181 2 
(md., ch.). 

355 (2). Sally, born in Ellsworth, Oct, 9, 1814, died in 
Ellsworth, Nov. 3, 18 14. 

* Now Kenosha, Kenosha Co., Wis. 



130 Maine 

356 (3). Mary Elizabeth, born in Ellsworth, Feb. 23, 
1816, died in Manchester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1902; was 
md. in Ellsworth, Nov. 10, 1836, to George Nixon 
Black, son Col. John Black and Mary Cobb, his wife, 
born in Ellsworth, Jan. 15, 1814, died in Ellsworth 
while a resident of Boston, Oct. 2, 1880, and had four 
children. 

357 (4). Sally, born in Ellsworth, Jan. 12, 18 18, died in 
Ellsworth, Sept. 4, 18 18. 

358 (5). Ann Maria, born in Ellsworth, April 3, 18 19, 
living in Greenfield, Mass., 1903 ; was md. in Ellsworth, 
Sept. 22, 1848, to John Winthrop Jones, son Theo- 
dore Jones and Catharine Sargent, his wife, bom in 
Ellsworth, Feb. 14, 181 7, died in Greenfield, Mass., 
Sept. 19, 1887, and had three children. 

359 (6). Caroline, born in Ellsworth, Dec. 20, 1820, died 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., March 26, 1873; was md. in Ells- 
worth, March 28, 1849, to Frederick S. Means, son 
Matthew Means and Lydia Coggins, his wife, born in 
Ellsworth, June 3, 1815, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Nov. 3, 1870, and had 3 children. 

360 (7). John Andrew, born in Ellsworth, Oct. 9, 1822 
(md., ch.). 

361 (8). Sarah, born in Ellsworth, June 17, 1824, died 
in Bangor, Me., Oct. 10, 1896; was md. in Ellsworth, 
Aug. 5, 1850, to Arno Wiswell, son John Wiswell and 
Lucy Gilmore, his wife, born in Frankfort, Maine, 
Aug. 5, 18 1 8, died in Ellsworth, Nov. 6, 1877, and 
had 3 sons. 

363 (9). George Stevens, born in Ellsworth, June 2, 
1826 (md., ch.). 

363 (10). Harriet Upton, born in Ellsworth, Nov. 11, 
1828, living in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1903; was md. in 
Ellsworth, June 24, 1852, to Charles 0. Butman, son of 
Charles Butman and Lydia Alden, his wife, bom in 
Dixmont, Me., Nov. 28, 1828, died in Ellsworth, May 3, 
187 1, and had one son. 



Ellsworth 131 

364 (11). Edward James, born in Ellsworth, March 28, 
1831 (md., ch.). 

365 (12). William Bourne, born in Ellsworth, Aug. 23, 
1833 (md., ch.). 

354 VI. Charles, first child of Andrew and Sally Jor- 
dan, bom in Ellsworth, Me., Nov. 23, 1812, died in Morris- 
town, N. J., Aug. 16, 1894; md. in Castine, Me., July 14, 
1835, Phebe Dyer, dau. Elisha Dyer and Sally Perkins, 
his wife, born in Castine, Aug. 31, 1813, died in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Sept. 25, 1868, and had 6 daughters. 

VII . Children of Charles and Phebe. Dyer: 

366 (i). Helen Frances, born in Ellsworth, Me., Sept 
22, 1836, living in New York, 1903; was md. in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., , 1857, to Reuben Nickels, 
son Jeremiah O. Nickels and Elvira Dodge, his wife, 
born in Cherryfield, Me., Feb. 8, 1831, died in New 
York, May 29, 1901, and had 3 children. 

367 (2). Sarah Elizabeth, bom in Ellsworth, June 15, 
1838, living in Manchester, N. H., 1903; was md. in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 23, 1858, to Nathaniel Jones 
Miller, Jr., son Nathaniel Jones Miller and Mary Wood- 
man, his wife, born in Hollis, Me., Jan. 26, 1824, 
died in Portland, Me., April 18, 1873, and had 2 
children. 

368 (3). Maria Louise, bom in Ellsworth, Nov. 29, 1840, 
living in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1903; was md. in Brooklyn, 
Feb. II, 1864, to Thompson Lewis, son Birdsey Lewis, 
and Rhoda Foster, his wife, born in Cherryfield, Me., 
March 18, 1831, died in Brooklyn, Sept. 23, 1896, and 
had 3 children. 

369 (4). Clara Howard, born in Ellsworth, May 7, 1843, 
died in Hamden, Conn., Sept. 17, 1902; was md. in 
Brooklyn, May 29, 1866, to Alexander Dunn, son 

Dunn and 
his wife, born in Plainfield, N. J., Oct. 24, 1883, died 



132 Maine 

in , and 

had 2 children. 

370 (5). Phebe Ann, bom in Ellsworth, Me., Oct. 4, 
1845, ^iisd in Bangor, Me., April 29, 1887; was md. in 
Bangor, Nov. 28, 1872, to Frank P. Wood, son Daniel 
Wood and Mary Bartlett, his wife, born in Bangor, 
Sept. 19, 1838, living in Bangor, 1903, and had three 
children. 

371 (6). Florence, born in Ellsworth, Me., June 3, 1849, 
living in Morris Plains, N. J., 1903; was md. in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1870, to Robert Andrews Granniss, 
son George Benjamin Granniss and Laura Ann Dun- 
ham, his wife, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 28, 
1840, living in Morris Plains, N. J., 1903, and had 3 
children. 

Charles mar. (2) in Bangor, June 3, 1869, Ara vesta Huck- 
ins, dau. John Huckins and Sarah Tibbetts his wife, born 
in Exeter, Maine, Sept. 16, 1831, living in Bangor, 1903. 
No children. 

360 VI. John Andrew, eighth child of Andrew and Sally 
Jordan, bom in Ellsworth, Me., Oct. 9, 1822, living in 
Bangor, Me., 1903; md., in Bangor, Sept. 2, 1846, Mary 
Ann Hathaway, dau. Hon. Joshua' Warren Hathaway and 
Mary Ann , his wife, born 

Ellsworth, Me., Jan. 31, 1826, died in Bangor, May 26. 
1847, and had one son. 

VII. Children of John Andrew and Mary Ann Hathaway: 

373 (1). John Hathaway, born in Bangor, May 25, 1847, 
died in Bangor, Aug. 2, 1848. 

John Andrew md. (2) in Bangor, Sept. 23, 1857, Fanny 
Elizabeth Roberts, dau. Hon. Amos Mfv t v^ Roberts and 
Charlotte Rich, his wife, bom in Bangor, Feb. 25, 1838, 
living in Bangor, 1903, and had two daughters. 



[the new York' 
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1884 



Ellsworth 133 

Children of John Andrew and Fanny Elizabeth 
Roberts: 

373 (2). Fannie Roberts, born in Bangor, Sept. 3, i860, 
living in Bangor, 1903. Unmd. 

374 (3). Annie Charlotte, born in Bangor, Oct. 25, 1865 
living in Bangor, 1903; was md. in Bangor, June 2, 
1898, to Prescott H. Vose, son George Vose and Abi- 
gail Vose Tucker, his wife, born in Milton, Mass., 
Sept. 3, 1856, living in Bangor, 1903, and had 3 chil- 
dren. 

John Andrew attended Gorham Academy. He gradu- 
ated from Yale in 1842. Studied law at Harvard, 1843- 
44. Was admitted to the bar in 1844, and settled in 
Bangor. Member of the Maine Senate in 1862, 1863; 
Representative, 1864; Attorney-General, 1864-67; Rep- 
resentative to Congress, three terms, 1867 to 1873. 
Appointed Judge of the Supreme Court of the State of 
Maine, 1873, and Chief Justice, 1883 to 1900, when he 
resigned on account of advancing years. He is a member 
of the Maine Historical Society, the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, and of the Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts; a trustee of Bowdoin College, and LL.D. 
of Bowdoin and of Colby College, and of Yale University. 
' * As a lawyer he commands profound respect. His knowl- 
edge of the law is said to be encyclopedic, and his insight 
unusually keen. His decisions, and those of the court 
over which he presides, are quoted in every State in the 
Union. As a public speaker he ranks high. He has the 
faculty of winning and holding the attention of his au- 
dience from the first word; this is due, in part, to his 
keen, incisive way of putting things, in part to his com- 
manding presence, and in part to the ever bubbling 
stream of humor which runs through all he says. In his 
old stump-speaking days, his political opponents, after 



134 Maine 

being unmercifully roasted by him, used to leave the hall, 
vowing that they had had a capital time." — (The Cadet.) 
Judge Peters's successor in the office of Chief Justice of 
Maine, is his nephew, the son of his sister Sarah, Andrew 
Peters Wiswell. 

363 VI. George Stevens, ninth child of Andrew and 
Sally Jordan, bom in Ellsworth, Me., June 2, 1826, died 
in Ellsworth, Oct. 6, 1881 ; md. in Hallowell, Me., Oct. 6, 
1848, Charlotte Ann Clark, dau. William Clark and 
Elizabeth Bidwell, his wife, bom in Hallowell, Feb. 21, 
1825, living in Waltham, Mass., 1903, and had 2 children. 

VII. Children of George Stevens and Charlotte Ann Clark: 

375 (1). Elizabeth Clark, born in Ellsworth, Maine, Nov. 
24, 1849, living in Waltham, Mass., 1903. Unmd. 

376 (2). Mary Alice, bom in Ellsworth, Jan. 9, 1851, liv- 
ing in Ellsworth, 1903; was md. in Ellsworth, Sept. 29, 
1875, to William H. Drury, son William E Drury 
and Martha K. Haskell, his wife, born in Worcester, 
Mass., Jan. 12, 1842, living in 1903, and had 2 children. 
He is a graduate of Bowdoin, 1867, and practised law 
in Ellsworth, Me. 

364 VI. Edward James, eleventh child of Andrew and 
Sally Jordan, born in Ellsworth, Me., March 28, 1831, 
living in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1903; md. in New York, Oct. 
II, i860, Mary Wilson Cruse, dau. Isaac Cruse and Mary 
Elizabeth Kelso, his wife, born in Baltimore, Md., Nov. 12, 
1836, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 15, 1901, and had 2 
sons. 

VII. Children of Edward James, and Mary Cruse: 

377 (1). Andrew, bom in New York, Dec. 22, 1863. 

378 (2). Isaac Cruse, born in Tarrytown, N. Y., Oct. 7 
1866, died in Tarrytown, Dec. 4, 1866. 



Ellsworth 135 

377 VII. Andrew, first child of Edward James and 
Mary Cruse, bom in New York Dec. 22, 1863, living in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1903. Unmd. 

365 VI. William Bourne, twelfth child of Andrew and 
Sally Jordan, bom in Ellsworth, Me., Aug. 23, 1833, 
living in 1903; md. in 

May 6, 1863, Martha Elizabeth Chute, dau. Andrew 
Chute and Maria Perry, his wife, bom in Orland, Me., 
Jan. 4, 1841, died in Ellsworth, June 24, 1868, and had 3 
children, 

VII. Children of William Bourne and Martha Chute: 

379 (1). John Andrew, Jr., born in Ellsworth, Aug. 13, 
1864 (md.). 

380 (2). Charles, born in Ellsworth, July 20, 1866. 

381 (3). WilHam Chute, bom in Ellsworth, June 15, 
1868. 

379 VII. John Andrew, Jr., first child of William 
Bourne and Martha Chute, born in Ellsworth, Me., 
Aug. 13, 1864, living in Ellsworth 1903; md. in Ells- 
worth, Nov. 20, 1889, Mary Frances Cushman, dau. 
Albert W. Cushman and Sarah Whiting his wife, born in 
Ellsworth, Nov. 24, 1865, living in Ellsworth, 1903. No 
children. 

Graduate of Bowdoin College, 1885. Admitted to the 
bar 1887. 



380 VII. Charles, second child of William Bourne and 
Martha Chute, bom in Ellsworth, July 20, 1866, living 
in 1903. 



136 Maine 

381 VII. William Chute, third child of William Bourne 
and Martha Chute, bom in Ellsworth, Me., July 15, 1868, 
living in Boston, Mass., 1903. M.D., Tufts Medical 
School, 1902. On staff Boston City Hospital, 1903. 



tP^^^^^^ LIBRAE ri 



i ASTSR, LENOX ' s 




1839 




1834 



BOSTON 

273 V. (Edward) Dyer, ninth child of John and Mary 
Dyer, born in Blue Hill, Me., No. 14, 1785, died at Forest 
Hill (Boston), Mass., Oct. 21, 1856; md., in Boston, May 
26, 181 7, Lucretia McClure, dau. Thomas McClure and 
Nancy Hunter, his wife, born in Bristol, Me., May 26, 
1793, died at Forest Hill (Boston), Sept. 11, 1862, and 
had nine children. 

VI. Children of Edward Dyer and Lucretia McClure: 

383 (1). Edward Dyer, Jr., born in Boston, March 17, 
1818 (md., ch.). 

383 (2). Lucretia, born in Boston, Oct. 15, 1819, died 
at Forest Hill, Sept. 22, 1850; was md. in Boston, June 
6, 1844, to Joseph Porter Ellicott, son of John A. 
Ellicott and Mary S. Porter (widow of John H. Ross), 
born at Avalon, Baltimore Co., Md., June 8, 1818, died 
in Boston, April 30, 1901. No children. « 

384 (3). Thomas McClure, born in Boston, June 6, 182 1 
(md., ch.). 

385 (4). George Haswell, born in Boston, Jan. 31, 1823 
(md., ch.). 

386 (5). Henry Hunter, born in Boston, May 23, 1825 
(md., ch.). 

387 (6). William Cowper, born in Boston, Aug. 12, 1827 
(md., ch.). 

388 (7). Andrew James, born in Boston, Feb. 9, 1829 
(md., ch.). 

389 (8). Mary Anne, bom in Boston, June 12, 1830, died 
in Clarens, Switzerland, Dec. 4, 1879; was md. in 
Boston, March 31, 1853, to Buckland Watson Bull, son 

137 



138 Maine 

of Ebenezer Watson Bull and Sophia Buckland, his 
wife, born in Hartford, Conn., Nov. 5, 1824, died in 
Hartford, Sept. 26, 1885, and had three children. 

390 (9). Francis Alonzo, bom in Boston, Feb. 2, 1833 
(md., ch.). 

Edward Dyer was baptized Dyer and prefixed to it the 
name of Edward in 1810-11. The record of his bap- 
tism may be found, with that of other Blue Hill children, 
in the church register of Rockport, Mass., under the date 
of Sept. 14, 1787. He was in the lumber business, at first 
with his brother John, in Ellsworth, Maine, and then in 
Boston, Mass. In 18 15 he went into partnership with 
Jechonias Thayer, and, for one year, was a member of the 
firm of Peters & Thayer. In 18 16 he gave his name to 
the house of Edward D. Peters, later Edward D. Peters 
and Co. He was well known for his business ability and 
integrity. 

383 VI. Edward Dyer, Jr., first child of Edward 
Dyer and Lucretia McClure, born in Boston, Mass., March 
17, 1818, died in Boston, Feb. 20, 1900; md. in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., April 15, 1847, Jane Almira Gould, dau. of the 
Revd. William R. Gould and Eunice York, his wife, bom 
in Torrington, Conn., Oct. 14, 1828, died in Boston, Dec. 
13, 1877, and had four children. 

VII. Children of Edward Dyer, Jr., and Jane Gould: 

391 (1). Edward Dyer, born in Boston, Feb. 25, 1848, 
died March 8, 1848. 

393 (2). Jane, born in Boston, April 10, 1850, died 

March 28, 1857. 
393 (3). Edward Gould, born in Boston, May 9, 1853 

(md., no ch.). 
.394 (4). William York, bom in Boston, March 12, 1858 

(md., ch.). 













COUNTRY RESIDENCE OF EDWARD DYER PETERS 

FOREST HILL, BOSTON 



ABT. 1861 



iC LIBRARY 



ASTeR, LENOX 
.DE.N FOUNDATIONS 



Boston 139 

393 VII. Edward Gould, third child of Edward Dyer, 
Jr., and Jane Gould, bom in Boston, May 9, 1853, living, 
1903; md. in London, Eng., 1898, 
Mrs. Eva Cameron, dau. 

born in 
living 1903. No children. Graduated from Harvard, 
1874; Boston Law School (1878?). 

394 VII. William York, fourth child of Edward Dyer, 
Jr., and Jane Gould, bom in Boston, March 12, 1858, living 
in Boston, 1903 ; md., in Providence, R. I., April 25, 1893, 
Amey Dexter Sharpe, dau. Lucien Sharpe and Louisa 
Dexter, his wife, bom in Providence, July 4, 1864, living 
1903, and had three children. 

VIII. Children of William York and Amey Sharpe: 

395 (1). Amey, born in Boston, Jan. 17, 1895. 

396 (2). Jane, bom in Boston, June 30, 1896. 

397 (3). William York, Jr., born in Boston, April 20, 
1899. 

Graduated Harvard, with degree, A.B., 1881. Studied 
architecture in Paris. Is an architect in Boston. 



384 VI. Thomas McClure, third child of Edward 
Dyer and Lucretia McClure, bom in Boston, Mass., June 
6, 1821, died in Peekskill, N. Y., Aug. 13, 1893; md. in 
New York, June 29, 1847, Alice Clarissa Richmond, bom 
July 6, 1828, living in New York, 1903, and had fourteen 
children. i 

VII. Children of Thomas McClure and Alice Richmond: 

398 (1). Lucretia, born in New York, April 17, 1848. 

399 (2). William Richmond, bom in New York, April 13 
1850 (md., ch.). 



I40 Maine 

400 (3). John Punnett, born in New York, Dec. i6, 
1852 (md., ch.). 

401 (4). Andrew, born in New York, Jan. 19, 1855 (md., 
ch.). 

403 (5). Alice, born in New York, Jan. 13, 1857, died 
Sept. 10, 1858. 

403 (6). JuUa, born in New York, June 22, 1858. 

404 (7). Edward McClure, born in New York, June 21, 
i860 (md., ch.). 

405 (8). Frances, born in New York, March 11, 1862. 

406 (9). Hubert, born in New York, Nov. 24, 1864; died 
Feb. 22, 1865. 

407 (10). Marion, born in New York, Feb. 11, 1866. 

408 (11). Thomas McClure, Jr., born in Great Barring- 
ton, Mass., Aug. 25, 1867. 

409 (12). Elizabeth, bom in New York, Sept. 10, 1869. 

410 (13). Isabel, born in New York, Aug. 15, 1872, died 
Jan. I, 1873. 

411 (14). Sally Clarkson, born in New York, June 21, 
1874. 

Tke Revd. Thomas McClure Peters studied at the Boston 
Latin School, and graduated from Yale in 1841, with de- 
gree of A . B . He entered the General Theological Seminary 
in New York the same year and remained there until he 
sailed for Europe, in June, 1843. He travelled on that 
continent, made a trip to Egypt, and was attache to the 
American Legation in Constantinople, while Mr. Dabney 
Carr was our minister there. The winter of 1844-45 he 
spent at Weimar, where he was attache to the British 
Legation. At the end of three years he returned horne 
and resumed his studies at the Theological School. He 
was ordained on Trinity Sunday, 1847. That year he 
married and became assistant to the Revd. William Rich- 
mond, having, during his first stay at the Theological 
School, been lay reader at Mr. Richmond's church, 
St. Michael's. In 1853 he became rector of St. Mary's, 




THE REVD. THOMAS McCLURE PETERS, S.T.D. 

RECTOR OF ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH, NEW YORK 



NE\¥a'ORK 
IC LIBRARY 



ast9r, lenox 
:n foundations. 



Boston 141 

at 125th Street, Manhattanville, New York City. In 
1858 Mr. Richmond died, and from that time, until his 
death, he was rector of St. Michael's, being elected Sept. 25, 
1858. He founded the Sheltering Arms in October, 1864, 
and gave up to it, for a number of years, his own home 
at loist Street and Broadway. He founded St. Timo- 
thy's (now Zion and St. Timothy), St. Matthew's (formerly 
Bethlehem Chapel, and where, for many years, he held 
an evening service in German). He was also, practically, 
chaplain of the Bloomingdale Lunatic Asylum, and later 
of the Leake and Watts Orphan Asylum. He was greatly 
and actively interested in the House of Mercy, St. Barna- 
bas House, and the New York Infant Asylum, all three 
of which had been founded by Mrs. William Richmond. 
He was also connected with the Mission to Public In- 
stitutions and the New York City Mission. For several 
years he was chairman of both, and chief of the work, as 
well as chairman of St. Barnabas' House. He was 
prominent in the organization of the Church Congress, 
and he had much to do with dividing the diocese into 
Albany, Central New York, Long Island, and New York. 
He founded St. Michael's Cemetery on Long Island. 
He was one of the first to preach, and to practise, a free 
church, and the first to open his church to sisterhoods, 
that of St. Mary being founded in February, 1864 (1865 ?), 
in St. Michael's. He was also one of the first to increase 
the number of services in his church, and to amplify and 
beautify the ritual. He practically reorganized the 
Children's Fold, the Shepherd's Fold, and the House of 
Rest for Consumptives ; he built a new parish church in 
which was celebrated his jubilee the winter before his 
death. About this time he was made Archdeacon of 
New York. Mt. Minturn, an annex to the Sheltering 
Arms, in the country and for boys only, he left unfinished. 
He received the degree of S.T.D. from Trinity College. 



142 Maine 

399 VII. William Richmond, second child of Thomas 
McClure and AHce Richmond, born in New York, April 13, 
1850, living in New York, 1903 ; md. in New York, June 
II, 1879, Helen Russell Heiser, dau. Henry Anthon 
Heiser and Rosalie Mercein, his wife, bom in New York, 
June 28, 1852, living in 1903 and had six children. 

VIII. Children of William Richmond and Helen Heiser: 

412 (1). Isabel, born in New York, Oct. 13, 1881. 

413 (2). Alice Richmond, born in New York, June 16, 
1883. 

414 (3). Mercein, born in New York, Oct. 19, 1885, died 
Oct. 19, 1885. 

415 (4). William Richmond, born in New York, Dec.13, 
1886. 

416 (5). Thomas McClure, born in New York, June 28; 
1888. 

417 (6). Helen, born in New York, May 18, 1890, died 
Nov. II, 1890. 

400 VII. John Punnett, third child of Thomas Mc- 
Clure and Alice Richmond, bom in New York, Dec. 16, 
1852, living in New York, 1903 ; md. in Dresden, Saxony, 
Aug. 13, 1 88 1, Gabriella Brooke Forman, dau. Thomas 
Marsh Bryan Forman of Georgia, and Helen Brooke of 
Fredericksburg, Va., born in Fredericksburg, Sept. 20, 
1858, living in 1903, and had seven children. 

VIII. Children of John Punnett and Gabriella Forman: 

418 (1). Thomas McClure Forman, born in New York, 
Sept. I, 1883, died Feb. 21, 1885. 

419 (2). Gabriella Brooke Forman, born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., Aug. i, 1885. 

430 (3). John Punnett Forman, born in Philadelphia, 
Dec. 4, 1887. J-Dec.zq I'^'^'s H>;f^-T d,2o,^.(,. 

431 (4). Bryan Forman, born in Beirout, Syria, April 
I, 1890. 



HE NEW YORK 




1897 




1902 



THE REVD. JOHN PUNNETT PETERS, D.D. 

RECTOR OF ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH, NEW YORK 



Boston -143 

422 (5). Frazier Forman, born in New York, July 20, 

1895- 

433 (6). Joan St. Michael Forman, born in New York, 
July 30, 1896. 

434 (7). Lucretia McClure Forman, born in New York, 
March 15, 1899. 

John Punnett graduated from Yale with the degree of 
A.B. in 1873, received Ph.D. from Yale in 1876, and was 
at the same time elected tutor in that university. He 
spent three years there instructing in Greek and Latin,. 
In December, 1876, he was ordained deacon, and in 1877, 
priest, of the Protestant Episcopal Church. From Sep- 
tember, 1879, to May, 1883, he studied the Semitic lan- 
guages in Berlin and Leipzig, and was chaplain of the 
American Church in Dresden, from March, 1881, to 
October, 1882. In September, 1884, he was offered the 
professorship of the Old Testament languages and litera- 
ture at the Protestant Episcopal Divinity School in West 
Philadelphia. In 1886 he became professor of Hebrew 
at the University of Pennsylvania. In the autumn of 
1888 he was director of the Babylonian expedition sent 
out by that university. He returned to America in 
November, 1890, and went back to the East the following 
year. In October, 1891, he was assistant rector of St. 
Michael's Protestant Episcopal Church, Amsterdam Ave- 
nue and 99th Street, New York. In June, 1893, he 
resigned his professorship at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania and became rector of St. Michael's, succeeding his 
father, who died the year before. In 1898 he pubhshed 
an account of his connection with the Babylonian expe- 
dition, entitled Nippur; or, Explorations and Adventures 
on the Euphrates. He is also the author of several works 
on the Bible, and on Biblical literature, and philology. 
He is actively interested in municipal riiatters, and in 



144 Maine 

various institutions and societies. In 1895 he received 
the degree of S.C.D. from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and he is D.D. of Yale. 

401 VII. Andrew, fourth child of Thomas McClure and 
Alice Richmond, born in New York, Jan. 19, 1855, living 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1903; md. in Brooklyn, Jan. 16, 
1889, Cornelia Halsey Cowles, dau. Henry Cowles and 
Henrietta Kitchell, his wife, born in Jersey City,-N. J,, 
Aug. 12, 1865, living in 1903, and had three children. 

VIII. Children of Andrew and Cornelia Cowles: 

425 (1). Andrew, born at Lake George, N. Y., Aug. 18, 
1890. 

426 (2). Alice Lillian, born in Chicago, Ills., March 22, 
1892. 

427 (3). Mildred, born in Chicago, Ills., Dec. 27, 1895. 

404 VII. Edward McClure, seventh child of Thomas 
McClure and Alice Richmond, born in New York, June 
21, i860, living in New York, 1903; md. in New York, 
Feb. 2, 1892, Eleanor Bradley Peters, dau. Henry Hunter 
Peters, and Emily Cummings Bradley, his wife, bom in 
Southborough, Mass., July 6, 1855, living 1903, and had 
one child. 

VIII. Children of Edward McClure and Eleanor Peters: 

428 (1). Edward McClure, Jr., bom in Jersey City, N. J., 
Dec. 25, 1892. 

Lieutenant U. S. N. during Spanish -American war, May 
to October, 1898. Navigator, U. S. S. Badger, from June to 
October same year. Degree B.S., Norwich University, Va. 

408 VII. Thomas McClure, Jr., eleventh child of Thomas 
McClure and Alice Richmond, born in Great Barrington, 
Mass., Aug. 25, 1867, living in New York, 1903; gradu- 
ated, Princeton University, 1888, A.B., M.A., from 



Boston 145 

Columbia, 1889, and Ph.D., Columbia, 1890. Admitted 
to the bar, 1891. 



385 VI. George Haswell, fourth child of Edward Dyer 
and Lucretia McClure, bom in Boston, Mass., Jan. 31, 
1823, died in Philadelphia, Penn., Dec. 30, 1889; md. 
in Boston, Oct. 27, 1847, Melancie Anna Williams, dau. 
Samuel Williams and Elizabeth Winslow Whitman, his 
wife, born in Boston, June 26, 1824, died in Boston, June 
2T), 1897, and had three children. 

VII. Children of George Haswell and Melancie Williams: 

439 (1). Elizabeth Winslow, born in Boston, Oct. 19, 
1848. 

430 (2). A daughter, born in Boston, Feb. 5, 1854, died 
Feb. 26, 1854. 

431 (3). George Gorham, born in Boston, Dec. 10, 1858. 

431 VII. George Gorham, third child of George Has- 
well and Melancie Williams, bom in Boston, Dec. 10, 
1858, living in Boston, 1903, unmd. A.B., Harvard, 
1881. 



386 VI. Henry Hunter, fifth child of Edward Dyer and 
Lucretia McClure, bom in Boston, Mass., May 23, 1825, 
died in Boston, April 6, 1877; md. in Dorchester, Mass., 
July 12, 1848, Susan Barker Thaxter, dau. Edward 
Thaxter and Susan Joy Thaxter of Hingham, Mass., 
bom in Hingham, Sept. 16, 1827, died in Dorchester, 
July 22, 1849, and had one son. 

VII. Children of Henry Hunter and Susan Thaxter: 

433 (1). Edward Dyer, 2nd, born in Dorchester, June i, 
1849 (md., no ch.). 



146 Maine 

Henry Hunter md. (2) in Lewiston, Me., July 6, 1854, 
Emily Cummings Bradley, dau. Charles Bradley and 
Sarah Ellen Cummings, his wife, bom in Boston, Mass., 
Sept. 10, 1830, died in Jamaica Plain (Boston), March 28, 
1902, and had five children. 

Children of Henry Hunter and Emily Bradley: 

433 (2). Ellen (Eleanor) Bradley, born in Southborough, 
Mass., July 6, 1855, living in New York, 1903; was 
md. in New York, Feb. 2, 1892, to Edward McClure 
Peters, son of the Revd. Thomas McClure Peters and 
Alice Richmond, his wife, born in New York, June 21, 
i860, living in New York, 1903, and had one child. 

434 (3). Henry Hunter, Jr., born in Southborough, Oct. 
21, 1857, died in Southborough, May 17, i860. 

435 (4). Charles Bradley, born in Southborough, April 
i6, 1861. 

436 (5). Frederick Watson, bom in Southborough, July 
17, 1864. 

437 (6). McClure, bom in Nice, France, Jan. 27, 1867. 

432 Vn. Edward Dyer, 2nd, only child of Henry 
Hunter and Susan Thaxter, bom in Dorchester, Mass., 
June I, 1849, living in Dorchester, 1903 ; md. in Dorches- 
ter, Sept. 28, 1881, Anna Quincy Cushing, dau. Benjamin 
Gushing, M.D., and Anna Thaxter, his wife, born in Dor- 
chester, Feb. 23, 1857, living, 1903. No children. 

Edward Dyer, 2nd, graduated from the Royal School 
of Mines, Freiberg, Saxony, in 1869; was Territorial 
Assayer of Colorado for two years ; built the Mt. Lincoln 
Smelting Works and was their first superintendent; 
returned East in 1874 and graduated at the Harvard 
Medical School in 1877. He was the only medical gradu- 
ate whose thesis was mentioned on the Commencement 
program of that year. Practised medicine in Dorchester 
from 1877 to 1880, then returned to his first profession. 
He originated, or was associated with, some of the largest 




1901 




5Zr^ z \ 



1903 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



.W YORK 
LIBRARY 



?TQR, LENOX 

-N FOUNDi-TIONS 



f 



Boston 147 

American copper and nickel smelting establishments. 
He was the first superintendent of the New York Works 
of the Orford Nickel and Copper Co. He erected and 
managed the then new smelter of the Parrot Copper Co., 
at Butte, Mont. He built and managed the nickel and 
copper works of the Canadian Copper Co. at Sudbury, 
Ontario. In 1887 he published Modern American Methods 
of Copper Smelting, which has now reached eleven editions 
and is the recognized authority upon this subject. In 
1892 he was called to Tasmania to advise upon the 
Mount Lyell mine. He discovered, and, with his associ- 
ates, proved up, the value of the extensive coal area in the 
state of Coahuila, Mexico, which is now supplying the 
railroads and smelters of northern Mexico with fuel. 
At present his business is mainly consulting. 

435 VII. Charles Bradley, fourth child of Henry 
Hunter, and third child of his second wife, Emily Brad- 
ley, bom in Southborough, Mass., April 16, 1861. 



436 VII. Frederick Watson, fifth child of Henry 
Himter, and fourth child of his second wife, Emily Brad- 
ley, bom in Southborough, Mass., July 17, 1864, living 
in Boston, Mass., 1903. Unmd. 



437 VII. McClure, sixth child of Henry Hunter, and 
fifth child of his second wife, Emily Bradley, bom in 
Nice, France, Jan. 27, 1867. 



387 VI. William Cowper, sixth child of Edward Dyer 



148 Maine 

and Lucretia McClure, born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 12, 
1827, died in Jamaica Plain (Boston), June 14, 1895; 
md. in Hartford, Conn., Jan. 21, 1850, Gertrude Chene- 
verd Morgan, dau. William Henry Morgan, M.D., and 
Margaret Julia Cheneverd, his wife, born in Hartford, 
Conn., April 16, 1825, died in Jamaica Plain (Boston), 
Dec. 5, 1890, and had four children. 

VII. Children of William Cow per and Gertrude Morgan: 

438 (1). William Morgan, born in Jamaica Plain, Dec. 
24, 1855 (md., ch.). 

439 (2). Richard Dudley, born in Jamaica Plain, Aug. 
13, 1858 (md., ch.). 

440 (3). Maurice, born in Jamaica Plain March 4, i860, 
died, March 11, i860. 

441 (4). Gertrude Cheneverd, born in Jamaica Plain, 
May 4, 1862, living in Brookline, Mass., 1903; was 
md. in Jamaica Plain, April 29, 1886, to Henry Rossiter 
Worthington Browne, son Causten Browne and Kath- 
arine E. Maynadier, his wife, bom in Boston, April 11, 
1858, living, 1903. No children. 

438 Vn. William Morgan, first child of William Cow- 
per, and Gertrude Morgan, bom in Jamaica Plain (Bos- 
ton), Dec. 24, 1855, living in 1903; md. in Jamaica Plain, 
April 12, 1882, Cora Lucretia Bull, dau. Buckland Watson 
Bull and Mary Anne Peters, his wife, bom in New York, 
Oct. 29, 1854, living in Chicago, Ills., 1903, and had two 
children. 

VIII. Children of William Morgan, and Cora Bull: 

442 (1). Dora, born in Jamaica Plain, Jan. 30, 1884. 

443 (2). Pauline, bom in Chicago, Ills., July 28, 1894, 
died Jan. 14, 1895. 

439 VII. Richard Dudley, second child of William 
Cowper and Gertrude Morgan, bom in Jamaica Plain 



Boston 149 

(Boston), Mass., Aug. 13, 1858, died in Jamaica Plain, 
April 13, 1897; md., Oct. i, 1884, Priscilla Rice Quincy, 
dau. George Quincy and Frances Rice, his wife, bom in 
Boston, Mass., Aug. 30, 1861, living in Brookline, Mass., 
1903, and had two sons. 

VIII. Children of Richard Dudley, and Priscilla Quincy: 

444 (1). George Quincy, born in Roxbury (Boston), 
Mass., July 10, 1885. 

445 (2). Richard Dudley, Jr., born in Roxbury, May i, 
1889. 

388 VI. Andrew James, seventh child of Edward 
Dyer and Lucretia McClure, bom in Boston, Feb. 9, 1829, 
died at Forest Hill, (Boston) Mass., Feb. 22, 1895; md. 
in Jamaica Plain (Boston), June 13, 1866, Mary Richards 
Whitney, dau. Eli Martin Whitney and Catherine Rich- 
ards, his wife, born in Boston, Jan. 5, 1848, living in 
Boston, 1903, and had two sons. 

VII. Children of Andrew James, and Mary Whitney: 

446 (1). Andrew James, Jr., born at Forest Hill (Bos- 
ton), Mass., April 3, 1872. 

447 (2). Harold,born at Forest Hill (Boston), Mass., Jan. 
13, 1888. 

446 VII. Andrew James, Jr., first child of Andrew 
James and Mary Whitney, bom in Boston, Mass., April 
3, 1872, living in Boston, 1903. Unmd. Graduate 
Harvard, A.B., 1895, LL.B., 1895. Admitted to the bar, 
1897. Representative Massachusetts legislature, 1902. 



390 VI. Francis Alonzo, ninth child of Edward Dyer 
and Lucretia McClure, bom in Boston, Mass., Feb. 2, 
1833, living in Boston, 1903; md., Oct. 7, 1857, Mary 



150 Maine 

Elizabeth Austin, dan. Thomas Austin and Elvira Reed, 
his wife, bom in New York, Nov. 24, 1833, living in 
Boston, 1903, and had five children. 

VII. Children of Francis Alonzo, and Mary Austin: 

448 (1). Austin, born in Jamaica Plain (Boston), June i , 
1859 (md., ch.). 

449 (2). Alice McClure, born in Jamaica Plain, Feb. 9, 
1 86 1, living in Milton, Mass., 1903; was md. in Jamaica 
Plain, Oct. 12, 1882, to Isaac Tucker Burr, Jr., son 
Isaac Tucker Burr and Anna Frances Hardon, his 
wife, bom in Newton, Mass., Feb. 21, 1858, living, 
1903, and had 4 children. 

450 (3). Frank Reed, born in Jamaica Plain, Feb. 27, 
1867. 

451 (4). (William*) Morris Austin, born in Jamaica 
Plain, March 10, 1870. 

453 (5). Lucien Haynes, born in Jamaica Plain, Dec. 18, 
1872. 

448 VII. Austin, first child of Francis Alonzo and 
Mary Austin, born in Jamaica Plain (Boston), Mass., 
June I, 1859, living in Jamaica Plain, 1903 ; md. in Jamaica 
Plain, Oct. 20, 1888, Frances Howey Lee, dau. James 
Lee and Frances Van Dusen, his wife, born in Charles- 
town, Mass., Oct. 30, 1855, living in Jamaica Plain, 1903, 
and had three children. 

VIII. Children of Austin and Frances Lee: 

453 (1). James Lee, born in Jamaica Plain, Aug. 13, 
1889. 

454 (2). Dorothy, born in Jamaica Plain, Jan. 13, 1892, 

455 (3). Ruth McClure, born in Jamaica Plain, Feb. 22, 
1895. 

450 VII. Frank Reed, third child of Francis Alonzo 

* Dropped "William" from his name by act of legislature. 



Boston 151 

and Mary Austin, bom in Jamaica Plain, Feb. 27, 1867, 
living in Boston, 1903. Unmd. 



451 VII. Morris Austin, fourth child of Francis Alonzo 
and Mary Austin, bom in Jamaica Plain, March 10, 1870, 
living in Boston, 1903. Unmd, 



453 VII. Lucien Haynes, fifth child of Francis Alonzo 
and Mary Austin, bom in Jamaica Plain, Dec. 18, 1872, 
living in Boston, 1903. Unmd. 



CONNECTICUT 

HEBRON 

The founder of the Connecticut line was John, only- 
child of William (II), the son of our earliest ancestor, 
Andrew (I). He was but ten months old when his 
father was killed. He is mentioned in his grandfather's 
will and is left "tenne pounds is paij." The following 
account of the death of William is given in a letter which 
was written Aug. 14, 1696, by Capt. Christopher Osgood, 
head of the militia in Andover, to express his fear that 
the men who had been called away to serve in the East 
should have been left at home, where they were sure to 
be needed, as the force on hand was insufficient to cope 
with the enemy should there be an attack; the river, he 
said, was low, and could easily be crossed by the Indians, 
and he wished men from the "inmost towns" sent to 
Andover for their present help. " For we are in expecta- 
tion every hour of an attack by a great body of the 
enemy that hath been discovered this day, we are in- 
formed, between Exeter and Haverhill upon the march 
towards Haverhill and Andover. We have therefore no 
other help under God but to make as speedy application 
to your honour for present relief which we doubt not 
but that your fatherly pity towards us will appear in 
preferring the most humble addresses of him, that is in 
behalf of our town. 

' ' Your honours most humble petitioner 

"Christopher Osgood of Andover." 
152 



Hebron 153 

Another paper pasted upon the first is as follows ; 

" Our Major being at this instant at Newbury I account 
it nextly my duty to give your honour of some mischief 
done upon us by our enemy, which in brief is as follows. 
Yesterday in the afternoon William Peeters belonging to 
Samuel Blanchard's garrison, went from the garrison to 
his house to fetch up his horse and another man whose 
name was hoyt was with him and as we conceive by the 
effect, went both into the house which was about half a 
mile from the garrison just upon Billerica Road" [he wrote 
it Bildrecky] "in an open plain place and were both sur- 
prised by the enemy and killed without any shooting so 
that no discovery neither of the enemy nor of the tragedy 
wrought by them till about sunset which were then dis- 
covered by two persons going to the house to look after 
them because of their tarrying longer than was expected 
who found them both killed and scalped and lying in 
their blood within the house and our enemy undiscovered. 
Sir, I am sorry that I have the occasion to trouble you 
with reading such news. Your honours most humble and 
obedient servant 

" Christopher Osgood. * 

"Andover, Aug. 14, 1896." 



13 III. John, only child of William and Margaret 
Russ, born in .Andover, Mass., Oct. i, 1695, died in 
Hebron, Conn., Oct. 20, 1754; md. in North Brookfield, 
Mass., April 3, 171 7, Mary Marks, dau. Joseph Marks 
and Mary his wife, born in 

Sept. , 1698, died in Hebron, July 25, 

1784, and had twelve children. 

* His granddaughter, Pliebe Carleton, married John Peters in 1733. 



154 Connecticut 

IV. Children of John and Mary Marks: 

456 (1). John, born in North Brookfield, Mass., Dec. 28, 
1717 (md., ch.). 

457 (2). Mary, bom in Hebron, Oct. 18, 1720, died in 

; was md. 
in Colchester, Conn., Feb. 25, 1741, to Thomas 
Carrier,* son of Thomas Carrier and 

, his wife, bom in Colchester, June 20, 
1711, died in 

and had seven children. 

458 (3). William, born in Hebron, Aug. 30, 1722 f (md., 
ch.) 

459 (4.) Margaret, bom in Hebron, Aug. 5, 1724, died 
in , June 2, 1769; was 
md. in Hebron, Jan. i, 1741, to John Mann, son of 
Nathaniel Mann and Elizabeth/..^ - ^..7^ , his 
wife, bom in Hebron, Nov. 20, 1720, died in 

, June 4, 1806, and had ten 
children. 

460 (5). Joseph, born in Hebron, Aug. 20, 1726 f (md., 
ch.) 

461 (6). Phebe, bom in Hebron, June 30, 1728, died in 

; was 
md. in Hebron, Aug. 16, 1744, to Moses Case, son 
Moses Case and , his 

wife, born in Hebron, July 24, 1724, died in 

, and had 
children. 
463 (7). Mercy, born in Hebron, March 26, 1730, died 
in was 

md. in Hebron, Jan. 24, 1751, to Timothy Buell, Jr., 
son of Timothy Buell and 
his wife, born in Hebron, Nov. 20, 1732, died in Canada, 

* Grandson of Martha Allen Carrier, who was hanged as a witch in 
Salem, 1692. 
t See Lost Tribes. 



Hebron 155 

, and 
had two children born in Hebron. He was a major in 
the king's service. 

463 (8). Andrew, born in Hebron, Aug. 31, 1732, died, 
Aug. 31, 1732. 

464 (9). Andrew, bom in Hebron, Nov. 16, 1733, died, 
Nov. 5, 1754-* 

' 465 (10). Samuel, born in Hebron, Dec. i, 1735 f (md., 
ch.). 

466 (11). Jonathan, born in Hebron, Aug. 15, 1737 
(md., ch.). 

467 (12). Bemslee, bom in Hebron, Nov. i, 1743 (md., 
ch.). 

John appears to have removed from Andover, Mass., 
with his step-father, James Wilson, and to have settled 
in Leicester, Mass., about 17 14. He removed to Hebron 
about 171 7. His marriage and the birth of his first child 
are both recorded in North Brookfield, Mass., and in 
Hebron, Conn. His gravestone and that of his wife are 
still standing in the old Hebron graveyard. J It is prob- 
able that the old Peters house, now in decay, and standing 
on the road between Hebron and Gilead, was built by 
him about 1740. Sept. 5, 1746, he deeded to the Revd. 
Ebenezer Punderson, of Groton, missionary, and to Samuel 
Pennock and Thomas Brown of Hebron, and the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 30 
acres for a glebe land lying about 3-4 of a mile northerly 
from the church. This land was leased by the parish 
for 9999 years, April 6, 1795, for the annual rent of one 

* "Mr Andrew Peters Died Nov. 5, 1754 in ye 21st year of his age." 
(Gravestone in old Hebron graveyard.) 

t See The Revd. Samuel Peters. 

X Inscriptions: " In memory of Mr John Peters who died Oct. ye 20 
1754 in ye 60 year of his age." 

"Here lies ye Body of Mrs Mary Peters widow to Mr John Peters 
who departed this life July 25, A. D. 1784 in ye 86 year of her Age." 



156 Connecticut 

grain of pure silver or either silver or gold equivalent (if 
demanded) upon the festival of St. John the Baptist in 
each year. In 1745 his name was on the tax list of the 
Church of Engand. 

His will is to be seen to-day in Colchester, Conn. He 
appoints Mary, his wife, and his son Andrew, his execu- 
tors, and he leaves to his sons John, William, and Joseph 
all his land lying in Marlboro ; Samuel * has one thou- 
sand pounds; his daughters, Mary Carrier, Margaret 
Mann, Phebe Case, and Mercy Buell, receive each five 
pounds, and Andrew, Jonathan, and Bemslee are to have 
the rest of the property divided between them. The will 
is probated Dec. 2, 1754. The signature is a mere scrawl 
and of no value, — that of a very sick or a very weak man. 

Mary Marks' father, Joseph Marks, was from Spring- 
field, Mass., where he had a grant of land, on the west side 
of the river, Feb. 2, 1685. He was a soldier in Capt. Bull's 
company, which was sent to Albany and Schenectady in 
November, 1689, to protect the English settlers there 
against the French and Indians. In a skirmish, Marks 
and Samuel Beamen were taken prisoners. Beamen 
escaped, but Marks was carried to Canada, whence, after 
a varied experience, he returned in 1692. He was a noted 
Indian fighter. Marks' Garrison and Mountain were 
named after him. 

He soon after removed to Brookfield, Mass., where he 
received a grant of 60 acres of upland for a house-lot. 
He afterward had an additional grant of 180 acres. His 
was one of the fortified houses named in connection with 
the Indian wars. 



456 IV. John, first child of John and Mary Marks, 
born in North Brookfield, Mass., Dec. 28, 1717, died in 

* See The Revd. Samuel Peters. 



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Hebron 157 

Hebron,* Conn., Nov. 9, 1804; md. in Hebron, Feb. 22, 
1739, Lydia Phelps, dau. Joseph Phelps and 

, his wife, bom in Hebron, Nov. 25, 1723, 
died in Hebron, Feb. 15, 1784,* and had fifteen children. 

V. Children of John and Lydia Phelps: 

468 (1). John, born in Hebron, June 30, 1 74ot (md., ch.). 

469 (2). Lydia, born in Hebron, Feb. 24, 1742, died in 
Bradford, Vt., Sept. 3, 1825; was md. in Hebron, Nov. 

' 25, 1761, to Benjamin Baldwin, Jr., son Benjamin 
Baldwin and Elizabeth , his wife, born 

in Norwich, Conn., Dec. g, 1733, died in Bradford, Vt., 
Feb. 21, 18 1 8, and had nine children. 

470 (3). Mary, born in Hebron, Jan. 19, 1744, died in 
Thetford, Vt., Aug. 30, 1826; was md. in Hebron, 
Sept. 27, 1764, to Joseph Hosford, Jr., son Joseph 
Hosford and Abigail , his wife, born in 
Hebron, June 21, 1743, died in Thetford, Vt., Nov. 3, 
181 9, and had twelve children. 

471 (4). Susanna, bom in Hebron, Dec. 5, 1745, died in 
Norwich, Vt., Oct. 14, 1834; was md. in 

, April 24, 1 771, to John House, Jr., 
son John House and , his 

wife, born in Lebanon, Conn., April 29, 1744, died in 
Norwich, Vt., Feb. 17, 1825, and had seven children. 
He was colonel in the American army during the 
Revolution. 
473 (5). Phebe, born in Hebron, April 29, 1748, died in 
Hebron, Jan. 20, 1794; was md. in Hebron, June 25, 
1769, to David Sutton, M.D., son Seth Sutton and 

, his wife, born in He- 
bron, Dec. 26, 1736, died in Hebron, Jan. 29, 1804. 
No children. He was a graduate of Yale, 1760. 

* Gravestones in Gilead graveyard, Hebron. 
t See Col. John of the Queen's Loyal Rangers. 



158 Connecticut 

473 (6). Mercy, bom in Hebron, Feb. 7, 1750, died in 
Hebron,* Feb. 16, 1753. 

474 (7). Margaret, born in Hebron, March 29, 1752, died 
in Piermont, N. H., March , 1821; was md. in 

to Zenas 
Case, son of Case and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 

and had 7 children. 

475 (8). Absalom, f born in Hebron, March 25, 1754 
(md., ch.). 

476 (9). Andrew, bom in Hebron, Jan. 30, 1756, died 
Dec. 26, 1758. 

477 (10). Mercy, bora in Hebron, Dec. 9, 1757, died in 
Cambridge, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1839; was md. in Hebron, 
March 11, 1779, to Ruel Beebe, son Ebenezer Beebe 
and Abigail , his wife, born in Lyme, 
Conn., Jan. 8, 1752, died in Cambridge, N. Y., Jan. 20, 

"^ 1 74.1. and had 3 children. 

478 (11). Samuel, twin of Mercy, born in Hebron, Dec. 
9, 1757 (md., no ch.). 

479 (12). Andrew,! born in Hebron, Dec. 23, 1759 
(md., ch.). 

480 (13). Joseph Phelps, § born in Hebron, Nov. 7, 1761 
(md. ch.). 

481 (14). William, born in Hebron, March 11, 1764 
(md., ch.). 

483 (15). Sarah Popelia, born in Hebron, Oct. 24, 1768, 
died in Cambridge, N. Y. (between 1836-1843); was 
md. in 

♦Gravestone in old graveyard, Hebron. Stone inscribed: "In 
Memory of Marcyye Daugh'. of Ensign John Peters and Mrs Lydia his 
wife who Died Feby i6th A.D. 1753 in ye 3 year of her age." 
"Let not ye Dead Forgotten Lye 
Lest Men Forget that they Must Die." 
t See Gen. Absalom. 
% See Ohio. 
§ See New York State. 



Hebron 159 

to Ira Parmerly, son Parmerly and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
Cambridge, N. Y., Aug. 18, 1839, and had two chil- 
dren. 

John md. (2) in Hebron, Feb. 6, 1785, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Murry, dau. Jonathan Phelps of Northampton, Mass., and 

, his wife, born in 
, Feb. 22, 1739, died in Hebron, 
July 29, 1790. No children. 

1755. He was established and confirmed by the As- 
sembly to be ensign of the train-band in the parish of 
Gilead and ordered to be commissioned accordingly. 

1756, Aug. 17. John Peters of Gilead in Hebron, ensign, 
in Col. John Trumbull's regiment, alarm for relief of Fort 
William Henry, service 15 days. 

1758. He was estabHshed by the Assembly to be lieu- 
tenant of the train-band. 

1762. He was established captain of the same in the 
12th regiment. 

It is said that a colonel's commission was sent to him at 
the beginning of the Revolution, but that he returned it, 
as he was in sympathy with the American cause. 

The following is a copy of a letter he sent to his relatives 
in Medfield, Mass. : 

"Hebron, August ye 22, a.d. 1783 

" Sir, i would in form you that my wife is sik and not 
likely to be well ever a gain and i am old and not abel 
to com and see you but i have not for got you and want 
to see you and yours and would be glad you would right 
to me, and let me know whetl;ier Mr Samuel* and John 
peters * of Andover are alive or dead and how the world 

* Samuel (III.), son of Samuel (II.), son of Andrew (I.), and John, 
his brother, second cousins of the writer, and brothers of the William 
to whom the letter is written. 



i6o Connecticut 

goes with you and yours and I want to no the eage 
of William peters of Medfield and the eage of his two 
brothers at Andover my mother is 85 years old in Sep- 
tember and is yet alive and in great hopes to see her 
two sons * that are now in old England and her datter 
that is in Canedy * and thinks it hard that Rebels shall 
keep Loylest out of their estates because they love thair 
king and pray for him that he may conker all his inne- 
mies which in duty bound they ever pray. This from a 
a friend to trew liberty 

"John Peters to Mr William peters 

of Medfield if he is alive if not ahve then to his children 
my eage is 66 and nomber of my children 13 alive 2 dead." 

The Boston Magazine of 1784 contains the following 

notice : 

"An obituary for March 1784 Died on the 15th of 
February at Hebron Conn., Mrs Lydia Peters, wife of Col. 
John Peters and second daughter of Joseph Phelps Esq. 
She was married at the age of fifteen, and lived with her 
consort three times fifteen years ; And had fifteen living 
children, thirteen now alive, and the youngest fifteen 
years old; She had three times fifteen grandchildren; 
She was sick fifteen months, and died on the fifteenth 
day of the month, aged four times fifteen years." 

In the graveyard at Gilead (Hebron) may be seen 
the three stones with these inscriptions : 

"In memory of Col° John Peters who died Nov 9, 
1804 aged 86 years 10 months and 12 days. 

"This modest stone, what few vain mortals can, 
May truly say, here lies an honest man ! 
Calmly he looked on either life, and here 
Saw nothing to regret or there to fear." 

* The Rev''. Samuel Peters and Bemslee, who was a captain in the 
king's service. Her "datter" is Mercy, wife of Col. Timothy Buell. 



Hebron i6i 

"In memory of Mrs Lydia Peters loving consort of 
Coll° John Peters and Daught of Joseph Phelps Esq, She 
Departed this life Feb. 15, 1784, in ye 6 ist year of her age." 

"Here lyes the Body of Mrs. Elizabeth Peters the 
second wife of Col John Peters Second daughter of Mr 
Jonathan Phelps of Northampton She departed this life 
July ye 29 A.D. 1790, 51 years 5 months and 7 days old 
She was own Cousin to my first wife." 

478 V. Samuel, twin of Mercy and eleventh child of 
Col. John and Lydia Phelps, bom in Hebron, Conn., 
Dec. 9, 1757, died in Hebron, Sept. i, 1821; md. in He- 
bron, Sept. 25, 1782, Hannah Trumbull, dau. Deacon 
Asaph Trumbull and Zilpher , his wife, 

bom in Hebron, (1761), died in Hebron, 

Dec. 28, 1 84 1, aged 80. No children. 

He served in the Revolutionary army, 1775, July 12 to 
Dec. 17, under Capt. Abijah Rowlee, 3d Co., 2d Regi- 
ment, and from July 11 to Dec. 17, 1776. 

1776 Sept. Samuel Peters is a drummer in Capt. Well's 
Co., 12th Reg., to West Chester. 

1778 Aug. 2, Samuel Peters, drummer, enlisted in 
Capt. Rudd's Co. to Sept. 12, in Col. Chapman's Regiment, 
under Brig. -General Tyler, under Gen. Sullivan, engaged 
in an attempt to dislodge the British at Newport, R. I., 
Aug. 29, 1778 (Battle of Rhode Island). 

1 78 1 Samuel Peters, paid from Jan. i, to Dec. 31, 1781. 

His monument and that of his wife are to be seen in 
the graveyard in Gilead, Hebron, Conn.* 

* " In Memory of Capt. Samuel Peters who died Sept. i , 182 1 , in the 
64th year of his age. How lovd how valud now avails thee not, 

To whom related or by whom begot, A heap of dust, alone re- 

mains of thee." 

" In Memory of Hannah Relict of Capt. Samuel Peters, and daughter 
of Deacon Asaph Trumbull, who died Dec 28, 1841. 2S, 80." 

She was on the list of pensioners of the Revolution, as of Hebron, in 
1840. 



i62 Connecticut 

466 IV. Jonathan, eleventh child of John and Mary- 
Marks, bom in Hebron, Conn., Aug. 15, 1737, died Oct. 
26, 1778, on Long Island*; md. in Hebron, Nov. 25, 
1 76 1, Abigail Thompson, dau. John Thompson and Mary 
<^> ^^ , his wife, bom in Hebron, Sept. i, 1737, 

died in Hebron, April 9, 181 2, f aged 74, and had six chil- 
dren. (It is April 9th in Hebron records and 6th on 
her gravestone.) 

V. Children of Jonathan and Abigail Thompson: 

483 (1). Abigail, born in Hebron, Oct. 16, 1762, died 
March 28, 1764. J 

484 (2). John Thompson, born in Hebron, Oct. 11, 1764 
(md., ch,). 

485 (3). Jonathan, bom in Hebron, Dec. 7, 1766 (md., 
ch.). 

486 (4). Samuel Andrew, born in Hebron, Jan. 17, 1770 
(md., ch.). 

487 (5). Abigail, bom in Hebron, Aug. 19, 1773, died in 



488 (6). John Hugh, bom in Hebron, May 11, 1776, died 

* The Rev. Samuel Peters, in a letter dated New York, March 17, 
1821, says that Jonathan died of camp fever on board a British ship, 
commanded by Lord Howe, between New York and Chesapeake Bay. 
The Hebron records say "on Long Island." Which is to be believed? 
The Rev. Samuel always tries to inflate every fact that relates to the 
Peters family! 

t Gravestone in Gilead graveyard: "Abigail wife of Jonathan Peters 
Died April 6, 1812, Aged 74." 

X Stone in the old Hebron graveyard inscribed. "Mrs. Abigail 
daughter of Mr Jonathan and Mrs Abigail Peters who died March 28, 
1764, in ye 2d year of her Age. 

Happy ye babe Who privileged by fate To shorten labour 

and a lighter weight Received but yesterday ye gift of breath 

. . . [illegible]." 



Hebron 163 

in Chatham, Conn., Oct. 7, 181 1, unmd.* He resided 
in Chatham. In 1798 he graduated from Williams Col- 
lege. He studied law with his older brother, John T. 
Peters. In 1803 he began to practise law in Middle 
Haddam, Conn., and practised there and in Chatham 
until his death. From 1804 to 181 1 he was postmaster 
at Middle Haddam, being its first postmaster. He 
was a man of superior intellect, but of singular habits. 

484 V. John Thompson, second child of Jonathan and 
Abigail Thompson, bom in Hebron, Conn., Oct. 11, 1764, 
died in Hartford, Conn., Aug. 28, 1834; md. in 

, Mrs. Elizabeth Caulk- 
ins of Norwich, Conn., dau. Capt. John Famham, and 
Elizabeth Chapman, his wife, bom in 

, died in New York, Sept. 4, 
1 84 1, aged 71, and had five children. 

VI. Children of John Thompson and Elizabeth Famham 

Caulkins: 

489 (1). Mary Otis, bom in Hebron, May 2, 1802, died 
in Gilead (Hebron), Feb. 7, 1879. Unmd. 

490 (2). Abigail Thompson, born in Hebron, Nov. 23, 
1803, died in Darien, Conn., June , 1882; was md. in 
Hartford, Conn., Dec. 25, 1827, to Selah Burr Treat, 
son of Selah Treat and Anna Williams, his wife, born in 
Hartland, Conn., Feb. 19, 1804, died in Boston, Mass., 
March 28, 1877, and had seven children. 

491 (3). WilHam Thompson, born in Hebron, May 29, 
1805 (md., ch.). 

493 (4). Hugh, born in Hebron, Jan. 30, 1807, died in 
Cincinnati, O., June 9, 1831. Unmd. Graduated 
from Yale, 1826. Studied law with his father; 1828, 

* Stone to be seen in the graveyard at Middle Haddam (Chatham) 
Conn.: " Siste Viator. John Hugh Peters Esq. Died on the 7th day 
of October A.D. 181 1 in the 36th year of his age. His remains are here 
interred. He was a learned man and an honest lawyer." 



164 Connecticut 

was admitted to the bar and was a practising attorney 
in Hartford, Conn., where he was also major and aide- 
de-camp in the militia. In 1829 he removed to 
Cincinnati, O., where he practised law and was 
commissioner for the state of Connecticut. He was 
a writer of verses at one time well known and much 
esteemed. He was a contributor to the New England 
Review, Cincinnati Chronicle, Illinois Magazine, etc.; 
and, though but twenty-four when he died, had already 
entered upon what gave every indication of being a 
brilliant career. He had no enemies, and was gen- 
erally admired and esteemed, and his sudden and 
singular death,* not wholly devoid of mystery, was a 
loss both to literature and the bar. His volume of 
Yankee Lyrics is full of wit and humor, and his verses 
entitled My Native Land, Good Night, were at one time 
almost as well known as Home, Sweet Home, f 
493 (5). Andrew, born in Hebron, July 26, 1809, died in 
Centerville, Md., Oct. 15, 1829. Unmd. 

John Thompson graduated from Yale, 1789. He 
studied law in the office of Governor Smith, of Sharon. 
After his admission to the bar he practised in Hebron 
until 18 13, when he was appointed by President Madison 
collector of Internal Revenue of the First District in 
Connecticut. He then removed to Hartford. In May, 
1818, he was appointed a judge of the Superior Court, 
which office he held at the time of his death. He held 
divers local offices, and from 1834 to the time of his death 
was brigadier general of the 3d Brigade in the State 
militia. 

491 VI. William Thompson, third child of' John 
Thompson and Elizabeth Farnham Caulkins, born in 

* His body was found floating in the Ohio river. In the Hebron 
churchyard are to be seen the gravestones of John Thompson, his wife 
Elizabeth, and his sons, Andrew and Hugh. 

t S&eMy Native Land, Good-Night. 





JOHN THOMPSON PETERS 

JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CONNECTICUT 



'TJBUC LIBRARY 






Hebron 165 

Hebron, Conn., May 29, 1805, died in Waterbury, Conn., 
Julys, 1885; md. in 

Etha L Town, dau. Ithiel Town of 

New Haven and , bom in 

Boston, Mass., Feb. 12, 1809, died in Cheshire, Conn., 
Feb. 26, 1 87 1, and had eight children. 

VII. Children of William Thompson and Etha Town: 

494 (1). William Thompson, Jr., born in Cheshire, Feb. 
2, 1828 (md., ch.?). 

495 (2). Hugh Florien, born in New Haven, Conn., June 
14, 1829 (md. ). 

496 (3). Ithiel Town, born in New Haven, May 27, 1834, 
died in Cheshire, Dec. 2, 1855. 

497 (4). Charles S , born in New Haven, 
July 25, 1837, died in Cheshire, Aug. 26, 1844. 

498 (5). John Andrew, born in New Haven, June 6, 
1843, died in Baltimore, Md., Sept. 5, 1863. In 1861, 
Oct. 27, he enlisted in the ist Regiment of Connecticut 
Cavalry and died in the service. He was a spy, and of 
much aid to the cause. On several occasions he made 
use of the disguise of an old woman. His name is on 
the state Roll of Honor. 

499 (6). Andrew Otis, born in New Haven, Aug. 5, 1846 
(md., ch.). 

500 (7). Charles W , born in New Haven, 
Feb. 3, 1848 (md., ch.). 

501 (8). Florence, born in New Haven, Sept. 26, 1850, 
died Sept. 3, 1852. 

William Thompson graduated from Yale College in 
1825. He was a physician and a farmer. In 1841-43 
he was recording secretary and treasurer of the New 
Haven Horticultural Society. In 1852 he was town 
treasurer of Cheshire, Conn., whither he had removed 
about this time. In 1857 he was elected state senator. 



1 66 Connecticut 

and while of the Senate, being a farmer, he was appointed 
on the Committee of Agriculture. In 1861 he was 
elected representative from Cheshire, Conn., and served 
on the Committee of Agriculture. In 1870 he was judge 
of the Cheshire District of Probate, In 1873 he was 
representative from Cheshire. 

494 VII. WilHam T., first child of William Thompson 
and Etha Town, born in Cheshire, Conn., Feb. 2, 1828, 
died in * md. 

in dau. of 

and 
his wife, born in 

died in and 

had one son. 

VIII. Children of William T. and 

503 (1). 



495 VII. Hugh Florien, second child of William 
Thompson and Etha Town, born in New Haven, Conn., 
June 14, 1829, died in Cheshire, Conn., Oct. 4, 1856; md, 
in 

dau. and 

his wife, born in 
died in 
and had children. 



He graduated from Yale in 1849. 



* Said to have died in a Soldiers' Home in New York State, and to 
have left one son. 



Hebron 



167 



499 VII. Andrew Otis, sixth child of William Thompson 
and Etha Town, bom in New Haven, Conn., Aug. 5, 
1846, died in Cheshire, Conn., Feb. 16, 1871; md. in 

, Nov. 30, 1866, Elizabeth 
Hubbard, dau. Hubbard and 

his wife, bom in Springfield, Mass., Jan. 26, 
1849, died in 
and had two children. 

VIII. Children of Andrew Otis and Elizabeth Hubbard: 

503 (1). Florence E , bom in Hartford, 

Conn., Sept. 13, 1867, 



504 (2). Andrew C 
Conn., Nov. 19, 1870. 



, born in Hartford, 



504 VIII. Andrew C 
Conn., Nov, 19, 1870, died in 



, bom in Hartford, 



500 VII. Charles W , seventh child of 

William Thompson and Etha Town, bom in New Haven, 
Conn., Feb. 3, 1848, died in 
; md. in 
Alice Roberts, dau. Roberts and 

his wife, bom in 
died in 
and had children. 



i68 Connecticut 

VIII. Children of Charles W and Alice Roberts: 

505 (1). 



485 V. Jonathan, third child of Jonathan and Abigail 
Thompson, bom in Hebron, Conn., Dec. 7, 1766, died in 
Hebron, Aug. 20, 181 2* ; md. in 

Caroline Cone, dau. Zachariah Cone 
and Mary his wife, born in Andover So- 

ciety, Hebron, Conn. (bap. Hebron, Ap. 29, 1770), died 
in Hebron, Aug. 19, 1853, aged 85,* and had ten children. 

VI. Children of Jonathan and Caroline Cone: 

506 (1). Elizabeth, born in Hebron, Aug. 29, 1788, died 
in Hebron, Dec. 8, 1843 t; was md. in 

, Nov. 26, 1806, to John Graves, son 
Samuel Graves and Anne Heme, his wife, born in Ston- 
ington. Conn., June 20, 1784, died in Hebron, July 15, 
i868,t and had ten children. 

507 (2). Abigail, bom in Hebron, Oct. 12, 1790, died in 
Hebron, Aug. 21, 1866 f; was md. in 

, March 28, 1809, to WilHam Graves, son 
Samuel Graves and Anne Heme, his wife, born in Ston- 
ington. Conn., Feb. 9, 1780, died in Hebron, July 14, 
1859, aged 79, and had 2 children. 

508 (3). Jonathan, born in Hebron, July 23, 1792. (md,, 
ch.). 

509 (4). Samuel Andrew, born in Hebron, Aug. 22, 1795. 

510 (5). George, born in Hebron, Dec. 12, 1797! (md., 
ch.). 

* Jonathan was buried in the old Hebron graveyard, but there is a 
stone to his memory, and one to his wife, Carohne, in St. Peter's 
churchyard in Hebron. 

t Buried in St. Peter's churchyard, Hebron. 



Hebron 169 

511 (6). Mary Cone, born in Hebron, Dec. 4, 1799, died 

in Hebron, Aug. , 1804. 
513 (7). Caroline, born in Hebron, Sept. 5, 1801, died in 

; was 
md. in , Sept. 13, 1826, 

to Roger Loomis, son Joel Loomis and Jemima 

, his wife, born in Columbia, Conn., Feb. 7, 
1796, died in Columbia, Feb. 3, 1862, and had two 
children. 

513 (8). Emily, born in Hebron, Oct. 15, 1803, died in 
Hebron, Aug. 19, 1857.* Unmd, Buried in St. Peter's 
churchyard, Hebron. 

514 (9). Joseph Priestly, born in Hebron, Nov. 9, 1805 
(md., ch.). 

515 (10). Otis Thompson, born in Hebron, July 19, 
1808, died in New York, Feb. 10, 1861. Unmd. Buried 
in St. Peter's churchyard, Hebron. 

508 VI. Jonathan, third child of Jonathan and Caro- 
line Cone, bom in Hebron, Conn., July 23, 1792, died in 
, Erie Co., O., ; md. in 

, Lydia Bum- 
ham dau. Joseph Bumham and Jerusha Kellogg, his wife, 
bom in Hebron, Aug. 15, 1796, died in , 

Erie Co., O., and had five children. 

VII. Children of Jonathan and Lydia Bumham: 

516 (1). Marinda, born in Hebron, Nov. 10, 1816, died 
in Vergennes, Mich., Oct. 11, 1877; was md. in 

, March , 1841, to Andrew 

Cole, son Abner Cole and Amy 

, his wife, born in New Berlin, N. Y., 

, 1 813, died in Vergennes, Mich., Aug. i, 

1875, ^^^ h3,d 3 children. 

517 (2). Laura, born in Hebron,. , died in 

, Ind.; 

* Hebron records say Aug. 22. Her gravestone says Aug. 19. 



170 Connecticut 

was md. in 

to David Butler, son Butler and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
Ind., and had 
children. 

518 (3). Jonathan, born in 
Erie Co., O. (md., ch.). 

519 (4). Otis, born in Hebron, (md. ch.). 
530 (5). Hugh, born in (md. ch.). 

518 VII. Jonathan, third child of Jonathan and 
Lydia Burnham, born in 
Erie Co., O., , died in 

; md. in 
Maria dau. 

and . his 

wife, bom in 

died in and 

had 3 children, 

VIII. Children of Jonathan and Maria 
521 (1). 



533 (2). 



533 (3). 



519 VII. Otis, fourth child of Jonathan and Lydia 
Burnham, born in Hebron, Conn., 
died in New York, ; md. in 



Hebron 171 

Rosamond Snell- 
grove, dau. Snellgrove and 

his wife, bom in 

(Georgia, or N. Carolina), died in 

Dec. 5, 1842, and had chil- 

dren. 



530 VII. Hugh, fifth child of Jonathan and Lydia 
Burnham, bom in 

, died in 
md. in Eliza 

Mead, dau. Mead and 

his wife, bom in 
died in Richmond, Va., May 4, 1870, and had 3 children. 

VIII. Children of Httgh and Eliza Mead: 

534 (1). 



535 (2). 



536 (3). 



510 VI. George, fifth child of Jonathan and Caroline 
Cone, bom in Hebron, Conn., Dec. 12, 1797, died in 
Hebron, March 15, 1881*; md. in Portland, Conn., 
Sept. I, 1837, Almira Wehs, dau. Roswell Wells and 
Almira , his wife, bom in Portland, July 

30, 1817, died in , Ap. 29, 

1895, and had two children. ^ 

* Buried in St. Peter's churchyard, Hebron. 



1 72 Connecticut 

VII. Children of George and Almira Wells: 

527 (1). Elizabeth, born in Hebron, June 25, 1858, 
died in was 

md. in , Nov. 3, 1875, to 

Seth Daniel Clark, of Hebron, son Jonathan Clark and 
Ann , his wife, born in Middletown, 

Conn., June 12, 1852, died in 

, and had three children. 

538 (2). George Otis, bom in Hebron, June 17, i860 
(md., ch.). 

538 VII. George Otis, second child of George, and 
Almira Wells, bom in Hebron, Conn., June 17, i860, 
died in Hebron, Aug. 25, 1888; md. in Hebron, Dec. 23, 
1887, Margaret Jane Hanna, dau. George Hanna and 
Rebecca , his wife, bom in Hebron, 

, 1862, living in Hebron, 1903, and had one child. 

VIII. Children of George Otis and Margaret Hanna: 

539(1). Bessie Otis, born in Hebron, Dec. 30, 1888, living 
in Hebron, 1903. 

514 VI. Joseph Priestly, ninth child of Jonathan and 
Caroline Cone, born in Hebron, Conn., Nov. 9, 1805, died 
in , Sept. 17, 1842*; md. in 

, Jane Scaif, dau. 
Scaif and his 

wife, bom in , Eng., , 

died in and had 

children. 

VII. Children of Joseph Priestly and Jane Scaif: 

530 (1). Jane S , born in 

, 1836, died in 
, Nov. 4, 1852, aged 16.* 
* Gravestones in St. Peter's churchyard, Hebron, 



Hebron 173 

531 (2). Carrie Otis, bom in 

(bap. May. 2, 1842), died in San 
Francisco, Cal. 



486 V. Samuel Andrew, fourth child of Jonathan and 
Abigail Thompson, born iii Hebron, Conn., Jan. 17, 1770, 
died in Colchester, Conn., Dec. 19, 1854; md. in Col- 
chester, Conn., Jan. 17, 1799, Orrel Wyles, dau. David 
Wyles, and Elinor , his wife, born in Col- 

chester, Feb. 14, 1777, died in Colchester, May 20, 1835, 
and had three children, 

VI. Children of Samuel Andrew and Orrel Wyles: 

532 (1). John Thompson, born in Colchester, Oct. 27, 
1799 (md., ch.). 

533 (2). Samuel Andrew, Jr., born in Colchester, Oct. 
27, 1799, died Sept. 9, 1806. 

534 (3). Abigail Thompson, bom in Colchester, May 
12, 1807, died in Colchester, Sept. 9, 1841, aged 34, 
unmd. 



Samuel Andrew was, at his death, being then 85 years 
old, probably the oldest member of the legal profession in 
the state of Connecticut. In 1794 he graduated from 
Yale College. From 1800 until his death he was a practis- 
ing attorney in Colchester, Conn. From 1800 until 18 18 
he was postmaster at Colchester. He was state senator 
about 1808. From 1810 to 1840 he was justice of the 
peace for Colchester. Between 18 10 and 1843, for fifteen 
years, he served as representative from Colchester. In 
1825 and 1830 he was one of the burgesses of Colchester. 
From 1828 to 1840 he was town treasurer for Colchester. 
From 1838 to 1839 he was chief judge of the county court 
of New London, 



1 74 Connecticut 

533 VI. John Thompson, first child of Samuel Andrew, 
and Orrel Wyles, bom in Colchester, Conn., Oct. 27, 1799, 
died in Colchester, March 21, 1867; md. in Colchester, 
Sept. I, 1824, Sophie M Chester, dau. 

David Chester, and Prudence , his wife, 

born in Montville, Conn., July 4, 1803, died in Colchester, 
Aug. 18, 1884, and had nine children. 

VII. Children of John Thompson and Sophie Chester: 

535 (1). Ellen R , born in Colchester. 
Sept. 27, 1825, died in New London, Conn., May 12, 
1870; was md. in Colchester, June 8, 185 1, to Robert 
Douglas Holt, of Waterford, Conn., son Joel Holt and 
Hannah , his wife, born in Salem, Conn., 
Aug. 3, 1820, died in Waterford, Conn., Jan. 24, 1902, 
and had one child. 

536 (2). Samuel Andrew, born in Colchester, Aug. 15, 
1827 (md., ch.). 

537 (3). Rebecca Wyles, born in Colchester, Sept. 13, 
1829, living in 1903'. 
was md. in Colchester, Sept. 30, 1856, to Reuben 
F Smith, son Edwin Smith and Amanda 
F , his wife, born in Windham, Conn., 
June 20, 1830, hving 1903, 
and had three children. 

538 (4). John Thompson, born in Colchester, Aug. 13, 
1831 (md., ch.). 

539 (5). Sarah Cushman ("Kate"), born in Colchester, 
Nov. 7, 1833, living 

1903; was md. in Clenlana, O., July 7, 1863, 
to Thomas Newton Bond, of Chicago, son EH Bond 
and Sarah E , his wife, born in Paines- 

ville, O., March 27, 1818, died in Clenlana, O., Feb. 2, 
1 90 1, and had three children. 

540 (6). Abigail Orrel, born in Colchester, Nov. 13, 1837, 
died in *. 



Hebron 175 

was md. in , Nov. 23, 

1 88 1, to William P Maxey, of Miss., son 

Zenas Maxey and Sarah T , his wife, born 

in Powhatan Co., Va., Sept. 20, 1834, died in Norwich, 
Conn., 1902. No children. 

541 (7). Mary Sophie, born in Colchester, July 15, 1840, 
died in Chicago, Ills., Ap. 8, 1899; was md. in Hart- 
ford, Conn., Jan. 31, 1871, to John P 
Kline, son John P Kline and Elizabeth 

, his wife, born in Buffalo, N. Y., Ap. 
22, 1840, died in New Orleans, La., 
1900. No children. 

543 (8). Mariah Dickman, born in Colchester, 1842, died 
1842, when five days old. 

543 (9). William Hugh, born in Colchester, Nov. 2, 
1844, died Nov. 4, 1850. 

536 VII. Samuel Andrew, second child of John Thomp- 
son and Sophie Chester, bom in Colchester, Conn., Aug. 
15, 1827, living in Norwich, Conn., 1903; md. in 

, Nov. 2, 1859, Mrs. Sarah 

Churchill Longley, dau. Jared Hurlburt and Elizabeth 

, his wife, bom in Middle Haddam, Conn., 

Nov. 2, 1826, died in Hartford, Conn., Aug. i, 1876, 

and had two daughters. 

VIII. Children of Samuel Andrew and Sarah Hurlburt Longley: 

544 (1). Josie Clark, born in Colchester, Sept. 12, 1861, 
living in Norwich, Conn., 1903; was md. in 

, Oct. 15, 1889, to A 
Thatcher Otis, son Amos T Otis and 

Mary C , his wife, born in Norwich, 

Conn., Aug. 25, 18 

, and had children. 

545 (2). NelHe Chester, born in Rocky Hill, Conn., Ap. 
22, 1863, living in Thompson ville, Conn., 1903; was 



176 Connecticut 

md. in , Oct. 21, 

1884, to Willis Gowdy, of Thompsonville, Conn., son 
Charles Gowdy, and Cynthia , his wife, 
born at Sommers Corner, Conn., 

, and had three children. 

Samuel Andrew was clerk and registrar in Colchester, 
1858. He was justice of the peace, 1859. The same 
year he was also representative from Colchester. 

538 VII. John Thompson, Jr., fourth child of John 
Thompson and Sophie Chester, bom in Colchester, Conn., 
Aug. 13, 1831, died in Hartford, Conn., Jan. 9, 1891; 
md. in , July 7, 1859, Mary 

E Townsend of Providence, R. I., dau. 

Thomas A Townsend and Mary A 

his wife, born in Newport, R. I., . , died in 

Washington, D. C, March 2, 1903, and had 3 children. 

VIII. Children of John Thompson, Jr., and Mary Townsend: 

546 (1). George H , born in Hartford, 
Conn., , 1863. 

547 (2). Jessie Townsend, born in Hartford, , 
1866, died in 

; was md. in , Oct. , 

1885, to Mahlon A Winter, son Alpheus 
Winter, and Flora , his wife, born in 

, Ills., Sept. 26, 1863, died in 

and had one 
child. 

548 (3). Courtney Chester, born in Hartford, July 9, 
1871. 

John Thompson, Jr., graduated from Brown University, 
Providence, R. I., in 1855; he studied law with Judge 
L. P. Waldo and Alvah P. Hyde. In 1853 he was ad- 



Hebron 177 

mitted to the bar and settled in Hartford, Conn. In 
1861-68 he was justice of the peace. He was for many 
years city auditor, and at his death was secretary to the 
board of poHce commissioners. 

546 Vni. George H., first child of John Thompson, 
Jr., and Mary Townsend, bom in Hartford, Conn., 

, 1863, living in Washington, D. C, 1903; 
md. 

No children. 

548 Vni. Courtney Chester, third child of John 
Thompson, Jr., and Mary Townsend, born in Hartford, 
Conn., July 9, 1871, died in 



467 IV. Bemslee, 12th child of John and Mary Marks, 
bom in Hebron, Conn., Nov. i, 1743, died in Kingston, 
Upper Canada, Oct. 16, 1798; md. in Hebron, May 24, 
1762, Annis Shipman, dau. Dr. Samuel Shipman, and 
Martha , his wife, bom in Hebron, 

, 1739, died in Hebron, Jan. 12, 1819, and had seven 
children. 

V . Children of Bemslee and Annis Shipman: 

549 (1). Clarinda, born in Hebron, Nov. 27, 1762, died in 
Hebron, Sept. 14, 1810; was md. in Hebron, Oct. 24, 
1782, to Thomas Welles, Jr., son Thomas Welles, and 
Prudence , his wife, bom in Hebron, 
Aug. 16, 1760, died in Hebron, July 2, 1826, and had 
seven children. 

550 (2). Annis, born in Hebron, March 3, 1765, died in 
Ballston, N. Y., July 16, 1802; was md. in 

• , to Ezekiel Hor- 
ton, son of Ezekiel Horton and Lydia , his 



178 Connecticut 

wife, born in Hebron, , 1765, died in 

Ballston, June 16, 1843, and had three children. 

551 (3). Bemslee, born in Hebron, July 21, 1767, died in 
Hebron, Nov. 5, 1775. He is buried in the old grave- 
yard in Hebron. The stone is inscribed: " In memory 
of Bemsle son to Mr Bemsle Peters, & Annas his wife 
he died Nov. 5 1775 in ye 9th year of his age. O 
honored Father & Mother dear, dont Be concarned 
sense I can hear, tis God that calleth me away No 
longer with you Could I stay." 

552 (4). Desdemona (Destimony), born in Hebron, Ap. 
29, 1770, died in Verona, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1841; was 
md. in 

to Samuel Pease, son of Pease and 

, his wife, born in 

, 1769, died in 
Marion, N. Y., July 24, 1835, and had five children. 

553 (5). John Samuel, bom in Hebron, Sept. 21, 1772, 
died in Hebron, March 30, 1858, unmd. 

554 (6). Mary Martha, born in Mooretown, Vt., Dec. 6, 
1774, died in Hebron, March 18, 1864, unmd. Buried 
in St. Peter's churchyard, Hebron. 

555 (7). Bemslee, born in Hebron, Ap. 28, 1777 (md., 
ch.). 

In 1774 Bemslee removed to Mooretown, Vt., but a 
year later he returned to Hebron, on account of failing 
to obtain the title to certain lands for which he was 
agent, as well as on account of the political troubles of 
the times. He was a Tory. In 1777 he went to New 
York, whence he sailed for England where he joined his 
brother, the Revd. Samuel Peters, and his nephew, Col. 
John Peters, and lived as a half -pay captain in London 
until 1794 when he drew a large tract of land near Toronto, 
and removed to Little York, Canada. 

Gravestones to himself and his wife in St. Peter's 
churchyard, Hebron. 



I 



Hebron 179 

The house built by Bemslee before his departure from. 
America is still standing in Gilead, a fine example of a 
rare Colonial type and apparently in perfect condition. 
An outhouse belonging to it is the building in which 
the Revd. Samuel Peters formerly housed his slaves. 

The following letter, from Hannah Peters, daughter of 
the Revd. Samuel Peters, is written to Clarinda, daugh- 
ter of Bemslee. 

London, August 20, 1784. 
Dear Cousin. — Your favor by my cousin Mann was de- 
livered in even (?) June it gave me great pleasure to hear 
from you, after so long a silence; you ask what the reason is 
that your papa cannot return! Are you. Dear, insensible of 
the many difificulties that attend his return; first, that he 
has rendered himself obnoctious to the state, by being what 
they call a tory, secondly that he has been within the King's 
lines, and perhaps fighting them, I mean the Americans, 
thirdly that Congress have never repealed the act against the 
tories, namely that it should be death to any one that has 
been aiding or assisting against them, to return to his Native 
country, these examples I think, my Dear, are sufficient 
reasons to deter your Papa from returning to America, and I 
think my Dear, under such circumstances, you would not wish 
to see him a corpse, which I cannot suppose. And if it was 
not death for him to return, and he could do it, what has he to 
return for? his property is confiscated, his stock all gone, and 
everything else — what better would he be, by his returning — 
he has no money to buy a farm or fresh stock, and he is grow- 
ing in years, and would not be able to set about to clear a wild 
piece of land for the benefit of his family — these considerations 
put together will in all probability prevent your papa seeing 
you in Connecticut, what ever he may do, in any other place, 
yet he must have as great regard for his family as ever, and 
be as willing to do anything for them, that lay in his power, 
but he has nothing in his power — therefore cannot assist 
them. I wish you joy as a married woman, and in having 



i8o Connecticut 

increased your little family, but how came you to call him 
Andrew, I should have thought that you would have named 
him after your husband, as his father. My duty to your 
mama, my love to your sister and compliments to your hus- 
band and thank him for his letter. I am Dear Cousin, your 
sincere friend, H. Peters. 

.Mrs. Clarinda Welles. 



553 V. John Samuel, fifth child of Capt. Bemslee and 
Annis Shipman, bom in Hebron, Conn., Sept. 21, 1772, 
died in Hebron, March 30, 1858. He was a physician 
and surgeon of high standing. 

1 8 14, Aug. 23 to Sept. 28, he was a surgeon in the 
Conn. Militia in Col. William Belcher's regiment, stationed 
at Fort Groton. He was vice-president, and then presi- 
dent, of the Connecticut Medical Society ; he was a director 
of, and of the examining committee for, the Society for 
the Relief of the Insane. In 1827 he was president of 
the Society for the Improvement of Connecticut Schools, 
From 1827 to 1833 he was president of the Connecticut 
Colonization Society. From 1828 to 1840 he was com- 
missioner for the Connecticut River Company. In 1828 
he was a director of the State Prison. From 1830 to 
1842 he was president of the General Hospital Society of 
Connecticut. From 1843 to 1858 he was vice-president 
of the Connecticut Historical Society. He was of the 
corporation of Yale College, and from 1831 to 1833 he 
was medical examiner there. 

In 1854 he was vice-president of Trinity College; from 
1827 to 1845 he was trustee of Washington College. He 
held town, county, judicial, and state offices; from 1807 
until 1826 he was almost continually representative; in 
1808, and from 18 19-1825, he was senator; in 181 7 clerk 
of the House of Representatives ; in 1 8 1 8 he was delegate 
to the convention, in 1819 he was of the governor's council. 




Abt. 1845 




^£)L^A^d? yiyf^^>i^ 




1844 



GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT 



';r''''1J'jT717iw^Y0i^K ■• 



TtLB^^' FO'0ND ATIONg_ 



Hebron i8i 

From 1827 to 1831 he was lieut. -governor, and from 1831 
to 1832 he was governor. He was surgeon of the 2d 
Regiment, from 1807 to 1816. In 1821 he was lieutenant 
in the ist Regiment of the Rifle Brigade; from 1827 to 
1 83 1 he was lieutenant-general, and in 1832 he was com- 
mander-in-chief, and captain-general. He held several 
high offices among the Masons. In 1825 he gave five 
hundred dollars towards a new church in Hebron, and 
in 1827 he gave three hundred more. In 1846 he gave 
one thousand dollars towards an endowment fund. At 
his death he left the church four thousand dollars and 
land for a parsonage. He is buried in St. Peter's church- 
yard, Hebron, his own house standing next to the church. 
He built this house in 1806, and, strangely enough, though 
there have been weddings and deaths in it, there has never 
been a birth. 

He received the degrees of M.D. and of LL.D. 

He has left, in manuscript, an account of himself 
which, in brief, is as follows. At the age of seven the 
family finances were so low* that he was obliged to work 
for a neighbor, Joel Horton, where he was employed to 
take care of children and to do some light work. He 
worked on farms in the summer and attended school in 
the winter until he was eighteen, then, for five winters, he 
taught a district school. At the age of twenty he began 
the study of medicine with Dr. Benjamin Peters of Marble- 
town, N. Y. After reading with him for six months he 
returned to his school in Hebron. The next summer he 
read with Dr. Abner Moseley of Glastonbury, Conn. In 
November, 1796, he went to Philadelphia to attend the 
anatomical lectures of Drs. Shippen and Wistar, the 
chemical lectures of Dr. Woodhouse, and the Medical 
Institute of Dr. Benjamin Rush. In March, 1797, he 

* Their property had been confiscated because his father was a Tory 
and held a commission in the British army. 



1 82 Connecticut 

returned to Hebron, and in May he travelled up the 
Connecticut River, nearly as far as Canada, looking for a 
place in which to settle. He then passed through Ver- 
mont to Saratoga Co., N. Y., visited friends, and returned 
to Hebron. He says: "I had thus spent twenty-four 
years of my life and all my money. I sat down tired and 
discouraged. In a few days my neighbor called upon me 
for medical advice and in a short time I had as much 
professional business as I could do. I continued to prac- 
tice forty years. In the meantime I was called upon 
to render my part of service in the social and political 
societies: school visitor, highway surveyor, selectman. 
Town clerk. Representative to General Assembly, State 
senator, Lieut. Governor, Governor of the state. At the 
age of fifty-nine I retired from public life and left the 
practice of physic as soon as I could leave my old friends 
in the care of others." He then spent part of his time 
on his farm and part in travelling. In 1835, in company 
with the Revd. William Jarvis, he visited Saybrook, 
New York, Philadelphia, and Washington. Introduced 
to the President, he says he found Gen. Jackson the most 
polite man he had ever seen, but when aroused he was a 
tiger. A mutual friend, who was of the Senate, brought 
up an old and favorite bill in which the Senate was op- 
posed. The President's pipe came from his lips, his cane 
rattled upon the floor, and he roared out, " I can do noth- 
ing for this cursed Senate." The subject was changed, 
so was the President. Afterward the mutual friend said, 
"I have taken some pains to show you the whole of the 
President." 

555 V. Bemslee, seventh child of Capt. Bemslee and 
Annis Shipman his wife, born in Hebron, Conn., Ap. 28, 
1777, died in Ballston, N. Y., May 6, 1841 ; md. in 

, Feb. 8, 1798, Christya McEntyre, 




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OATfONs 







Hebron 183 

dau. Daniel McEntyre and Jean , his wife, 

bom in Ballston, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1775, died in Ballston, 
May 16, 1864, and had seven children. 

VI. Children of Bemslee, and Christya McEntyre: 

556 (1). Daniel McEntyre, born in Ballston, Feb. 23, 
1800, died in Burnt Hills,* N. Y., June 16, 1803. 

557 (2). Annis, bom in Burnt Hills, N. Y., Feb. 15, 
1802, died in Ballston, N. Y., Sept. i, 1874, unmd. 

558 (3). John Samuel, bom in Ballston, N. Y., July 30, 
1804 (md., ch.). 

559 (4). Jeannette, bom in Burnt Hills, N. Y., March 
16, 1807, died in Burnt Hills, Ap. 19, 1868; was md. in 

, July I, 1830, to Wil- 
liam Sherman, son Hugh Sherman and Cornelia 
, his wife, bom in Amenia, Dutchess 
Co., N. Y., Nov. 15, 1801, died in 
. No children. 

560 (5). Daniel McEntyre, born in Burnt Hills, N. Y., 
May 10, 1809, died in Ballston, N. Y., May 20, 1851, 
unmd. 

561 (6). Clarinda, born in Bumt Hills, N. Y., March 
3, 181 2, died in Bumt Hills, June 11, 1840, unmd. 

562 (7). Mary, bom in Bumt Hills, N. Y., Nov. 7, 
i8i5,died in Ballston, N. Y., June 8, 1857,; was md. in 

, Ap. 14, 1841, to John 
McKnight, son John McKnight, and Phebe 
his wife, bom in Ballston, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
1813, died in 

, and had one son. 

558 VI. John Samuel, third child of Bemslee and 
Christya McEntyre, bom in Ballston, N. Y., July 30, 
1804, died in West Troy, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1886; md. in 

, Lucretia Valentine, dau. 
Frederick Valentine and Rachel , his wife, 

* Ballston. 



184 Connecticut 

bom in Charlton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 

died in and 

had one son. . 

VII. Children of John Samuel, and Lucretia Valentine: 

563 (1). William, born in 



John Samuel md. (2) in 

Sarah Jones, dau. Jones and 

, his wife, bom in Castle- 
ton, N. Y., Sept. 2, 181 1, died in Glenville, N. Y., Aug. 
29, 1 88 1, and had five children. 

VII. Children of John Samuel, and Sarah Jones: 

564 (1). Catherine, bom in Glenville, N. Y., June 25, 
1843, died in 

; was md. in 

, 1886, to John Gillette, son Gilbert Gil- 
lette and Sophia , his wife, bom in 
Kinderhook, Columbia Co., N. Y., Feb. 28, 1848, died 
in . No 
children. 

565 (2). Clarinda, born in Burnt Hills, N. Y., June 23, 

1845, *ii6<i i^ 

; was md. in Burnt Hills , 1866, 

to James Manzer, son Manly Manzer and Jerusha 
his wife, bom in Ballston, N. Y., 

, died in Charlton, N. Y., Aug. 11, 
1883, and had two children. She md. (2) Lewis 
Potter. 

566 (3). Jeannette, bom in Glenville, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1851, 
died in ; 
was md. in , Ap. 2, 
1870, to William Ferguson, son John Ferguson and 
Sarah , his wife, bom in New Scotland, 



Hebron 185 

N. Y., Nov. 30, 1850, died in 

, and had two children. 

567 (4). WilHam Sherman, born in Glenville, N. Y., 
March 18, 1853 (md., ch.). 

568 (5). Sarah E , bom in Burnt Hills, 
N. Y., May 15, 1855, died in 

; was md. in 
, Dec. 25, 1870, to the Revd. H 
L Griffing, son of Frederick M 

Griffing and Julia A Rikert, his wife, born 
in Hudson, N. Y., Ap. 21, 1850, died in 

and had six children. 

567 VII. William Sherman, fourth child of John 
Samuel and Sarah Jones, bom in Glenville, N. Y., March 
18, 1853, died in , 

md. in , Jan. 16, 1878, Mary- 

Ella Cobb, dau. Benjamin Cobb and Mary 
his wife, bom in Greenville, N. Y., March 9, 1852, died 
in and had 

one daughter. 

VIII. Children of William Sherman and Mary Cobb: 

567 a (1). IdaBelle,borninCharlton,N. Y.,Sept. 7, 1879, 
died in West Troy, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1889. 



COLONEL JOHN OF THE QUEEN'S LOYAL 

RANGERS 

468 V. John, first child of CoL John, and Lydia Phelps, 
bom in Hebron, Conn., June 30, 1740, died in London, 
England, Jan. 11, 1788; md. in Hebron, Nov. 25, 1761, 
Ann Barnet, dau. Bamet and 

, his wife, bom in 
, Ap. 30, 1740, died in 

, and had nine children. 

VI. Children of Col. John, and Ann Barnet: 

569 (1). John, bom in Hebron, Conn., Ap. 26, 1762 
(md., ch.). 

570 (2). Andrew Barnet, born in Hebron, Jan. 29, 1764 
(md., ch.). 

571 (3). William, born in Thetford, Vt., Dec. 21, 1766, 
was killed by the fall of a tree in Mooretown,* Vt., 
March 9, 1773. t 

573 (4). Samuel, bom in Thetford, Vt., June 24, 1768 
(md., ch.). 

573 (5). Henry Moore, born in Piermont, N. H., Ap. 
30, 1770 (md., ch.). 

574 (6). Edmond Fanning, born in Mooretown,* Vt., 
May 7, 1773, died in , 
1798. 

575 (7). William Barnet Tryon, born in Mooretown,* 
Vt., June 10, 1775 (md., ch.). 

* Now Bradford. 

t Epitaph on gravestone: 

"Death took me hence just as I did begin, 
Thanks be to God! before I grew in sin." 

186 



Colonel John 187 

576 (8). Joseph, bom in Montreal, Canada, Nov. 11, 
1779 (md., ch.). 

577 (9). Ann Bamet, born in Quebec, Canada, Jan. 18, 
1782, died in , Jan. 4, 
i860; was md. in Sydney, Cape Breton, June 17, 1802, 
to William Watson, son Daniel Watson and Isabella 

, his wife, born in Albany, N. Y., 
June 18, 1775, died in , 

June 20, 1847, and had ten children. 

William Watson was captain of a British revenue 
cutter for a number of years. 

In 1759, John graduated from Yale and received degree 
of B.A.; 1765, he removed to Piermont, N. H, ; 1765, 
he was appointed by Gov. Wentworth captain command- 
ant of militia; 1770, he removed to Mooretown,* Vt. ; 
1770, he was appointed by Gov. Tryon to be colonel of 
militia, justice of the peace, judge of probate, and regis- 
trar of Gloucester County, and judge of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas. He was several times mobbed on account of 
his Tory sentiments, entered the British army (having 
escaped to Canada) in 1776, and in 1777 was ordered to 
raise a regiment, of which he was to be lieutenant-colonel, 
and which was called the Queen's Loyal Rangers. He 
joined Gen. Burgoyne, and was at every fight except 
Hubleston, that took place in the campaign between that 
general and the American forces. He commanded the 
Loyalists at Bennington, where he was wounded. At 
Saratoga he was obliged to flee before the capitulation 
was concluded, as he had never received a commission 
and would probably have been hanged, or shot, as a traitor 
had he been taken. He escaped to Fort George, thence 
to Ticonderoga, and later to Canada. He was most un- 
justly treated by the British authorities, and in 1784 re- 
moved to Cape Breton with his family, and from thence 

* Now Bradford. 



1 88 Connecticut 

to England, hoping to receive there the money and jus- 
tice due him. He died in London, and was buried in 
St. George's churchyard, Hanover Square. His stone is 
inscribed : 

"Here Hes the body of John Peters Esq. Col. Queen's 
Rangers in Canada bom Hebron, Conn. June 30, 1 740, died 
London Jan. 4, 1788, with Gout in his head and loyalty 
in his heart. His parents the Revd. Hugh Peters, Gen. 
Thomas Harrison and John Phelps Esq. suffered for want 
of loyalty in 1648 and he for having loyalty in 1788. 
"Success is right [English thus] weakness is wrong 

Put not your trust in Kings 

Nor in Cromwell's mob 

O, ye posterity of Peters 

But put your trust in God." 

Even at the present day it is believed that he obtained 
his commission (which he actually never received) by 
stealing his father's, escaping to Canada with it, and pass- 
ing himself off as Col. John the elder.* 

569 VL John, first child of Col. John and Ann Barnet, 
bom in Hebron, Conn., Ap. 26, 1762, died in 

, (living in Upper Canada, 
i8i8);md. in , 

Rogers, dau. Col. James Rogers and 
, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had six children. 

VII. Children of John and Rogers: 

578 (1). Mary Ann Barnet, born in 



579 (2). John, born in 
* See Autobiography of Col. John of the Queen's Loyal Rangers. 



Colonel John 189 

580 (3). Margaret McGregore Rogers, born in 



581 (4). David McGregore Rogers, born in 

582 (5). James Samuel Rogers, born in 

583 (6). Ann Barnet, born in 



John was an ensign in the British army, in his father's 
regiment, the Queen's Loyal Rangers. He settled on a 
grant of land, which he received from the British Govern- 
ment, in, or about, 1787, at Cateroqui* 



570 VI. Andrew Barnet, second child of Col. John and 
Ann Barnet, bom in Hebron, Conn., Jan. 29, 1764, died 
in Bradford, Vt., Aug. 10, 185 1 ; md. in 

, Jan. 18, 1787, Anna White of Newbury, Vt., 
dau. White and 

, his wife, born in 

, died of consumption within a year of her mar- 
riage. No children. 

* Fort Cateroqui stood where Kingston now stands. A settlement 
was begun there in 1672, by the French, under De Courcelles, and 
the fort subsequently received the name of Fort Frontenac, in honor 
of the French Count of that name. This fort continued in the pos- 
session of the French until destroyed by the expedition under Colonel 
Bradstreet in 1758. In 1762 the place came into the hands of the 
British, from whom it received its present name. 1838 it was in- 
corporated as the city of Kingston. 



IQO Connecticut 

Andrew Barnet md. (2) in 

, Dec. 16, 1790, Lydia Bliss of Bradford, Vt., dau. 
Ellis Bliss of Hebron, Conn., and Tamar , 

his wife, born in , June 14, 

1767, died in Bradford, Vt., March 5, 18 16, and had seven 
children. 

VII. Children of Andrew Barnet, and Lydia Bliss: 

584 (1). John, born in Bradford, Vt., May 6, 1792 
(md., no ch.). 

585 (2). Anna, born in Bradford, Nov. 2, 1793, died in 
Charlestown, Mass., June 20, 1848; was md. in 

, 182 1, to Eleazer Smith, of 
Washington, Vt., son Smith and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in Went- 
worth, N. H., (abt. 1890), and 

had two children. 

586 (3). Samuel, born in Bradford, Ap. 16, 1797 (md., 
ch.). 

587 (4). Daniel C. born in Bradford, Ap. 
4, 1799 (md., ch.). 

588 (5). Hannah, born in Bradford, Ap. 18, 1801, died 
May 31, 1853. 

589 (6). William, born in Bradford, Dec. 14, 1803 (md., 
ch.). 

590 (7). Andrew Bliss, born in Bradford, March 14, 1812 
(md., ch.). 

Andrew Barnet md. (3) in , 

Sept. 15, 1816, Keziah Howard of Tamworth, N. H., dau. 
Howard and 

, his wife, bom in Bridgewater, Mass., Nov. 25, 1783, 
died in Bradford, Vt., Sept. 2, 1872, and had two sons. 

Children of Andrew Barnet, and Keziah Howard: 

591 (8). Joseph Howard, born in Bradford, Vt., Oct. 7, 
1817 (md., ch.). 



Colonel John 191 

593 (9) Edmund Fanning, born in Bradford, Vt., Sept. 
5, 1822 (md., ch.). 

Andrew Bamet was, from his seventeenth to his twen- 
tieth year, in the British navy; Sept. 16, 1783, Shank, 
then at Quebec, gave him an honorable discharge, saying 
that from the 27th of June, 1780, he had served on His 
Majesty's ship the Wolf, also on board his Majesty's 
armed schooner the Mercury, and in the year 1781 was 
ordered upon Lake Champlain, where he served on sev- 
eral vessels, at times being in command of one, until the 
i6th of September, 1783, when he was discharged. He 
was then not quite twenty years of age, but his com- 
mander speaks highly of his conduct as an officer and a 
gentleman, and recommends him to further consideration 
in his Majesty's service. Receiving, however, no en- 
couragement or hope of promotion, he returned to Brad- 
ford and settled there. His uncle, the Revd. Samuel 
Peters, writes him from London in 1 797 : "I tried to have 
you made a lieutenant in the navy, but did not succeed, 
because you were born in America. The Admiralty 
treated all American bom midshipmen in like manner 
after the independence of America. Perhaps it is for the 
best." 

He was town clerk of Bradford for forty-six years, and 
was also Representative to the State Legislature for five 
years. He was Justice of the Peace, and for half a cen- 
tury occupied various public offices. He died on Sunday, 
Aug. 10, 1 85 1, aged 87 years 6 months and 12 days. His 
obituary, in the Vermont Family Gazette of August 12, 
185 1, represents him as one of the fine, sturdy, energetic, 
temperate country squires, than whom there are no better 
men. 

584 VIL John, first child of Andrew Barnet and Lydia 
Bliss, bom in Bradford, Vt., May 6, 1792, died in Jay, 



192 Connecticut 

Vt., Oct. 19, 1858; md. in 

, Dolly Rowe, dan. Rowe and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
. No children. He re- 
sided in Jay, Vt. 

586 VII. Samuel, third child of Andrew Barnet and 
Lydia Bliss, born in Bradford, Vt., Ap. 16, 1797, died in 
Benton, Vt., Jan. 22, 1875 ; md. in 

, March i, 1821, Margaret Nelson of Ryegate, Vt., 
bom in , June 4, 1802, died 

in , and had 

eleven children. 

VIII. Children of Samuel, and Margaret Nelson: 

593 (1). Ann Eliza, born in Lyman,* N. H., Ap. 15, 
1822, died in 

; was md. in Bath, N. H., Nov. 2, 1848, to 
Myron Bailey, son Bailey and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

. No children. 
Resided in Littleton, N. H. 

594 (2). George Robert, born in Lyman,* N. H., Feb. 
24, 1824, died March 3, 1824. 

595 (3). William, twin of George Robert, born in Lyman,* 
N .H., Feb. 24, 1824, died March 3, 1824. 

596 (4). Lydia Bliss, born in Ryegate, Vt., June 30, 
1825, died in ; 
was md. in Haverhill, N. H., Jan. 4, 1855, to Andrew 
Warden, son Warden and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had six chil- 
dren. Resided in Barnet, Vt. 

* Now Monroe, N. H. 



Colonel John 193 

597 (5). Nancy Nelson, born in Ryegate, Vt., May 19, 
1827, died Dec. 9, 1848 (unmd.). 

598 (6). Henry Nelson, born in Ryegate, Vt., July 18, 
1829 (md., ch.). 

599 (7). Milo Robert, born in Ryegate, Vt., March 20, 
1832 (md., ch.). 

600 (8). Margaret Flora, born in Ryegate, Vt., July 2, 
1834, died in 

; was md. in , 

March 5, 1857, to James B Trueworthy, 

son Trueworthy and 

, his wife, born in Unity, Me., 
, died in 

, and had six children. Resided in Lowell, 
Mass. 

601 (9). Helen Margaret, born in Ryegate, Vt., Jan. 5, 
1837, died in 

; was md. in Mantena, Ills., Feb. 7, 1866, to Paul 
H Seagar, son Seagar 

and , his wife, bom in 

, died 
in . No 

children. Resided in Kankakee, Ills. 
603 (10). R Chastina, born in Ryegate, 

Vt., Jan. 22, 1840, died in 

; was md. in Lowell, Mass., Oct. 18, 
1875, to the Revd. Frank W Smith, son 

Smith and 
, his wife, bom in 
, died in 

, and had one son. Resided in Cape 
EHzabeth, Me. 
603 (11). Jared H , born in Haverhill, 

N. H., Aug. 15, 1848, died in Haverhill, Feb. 27, 1849. 

Samuel lived in Ryegate, Vt. 

598 VIII. Henry Nelson, sixth child of Samuel and 

Margaret Nelson, born in Ryegate, Vt., July 18, 1829, 
13 



194 Connecticut 

died in ; md. 

in Bath, N. H., Jan. 4, 1854, Charlotte E Davies, 

dau. Joseph Davies and Priscilla , his wife, 

bom in , died 

in , and had 
four sons. Resided in Mantena, Ills. 

IX. Children of Henry Nelson, and Charlotte Davies: 

604 (1). Fred Henry, bom in Bath, Me., Oct. 6, 1854. 

605 (2). Charles Joseph, bom in Summer, Ills., May 30, 
1861. 

606 (3). Frank M born in Mantena, Ills., 
Nov. 10, 1866. 

607 (4). Arthur N , bom in Mantena, 
Ills., Sept, 27, 1873. 

604 IX. Fred Henry, first child of Henry Nelson and 
Charlotte Davies, bom in Bath, N. H,, Oct. 6, 1854, 



605 IX, Charles Joseph, second child of Henry Nelson 
and Charlotte Davies, born in Summer, Ills., May 30, 1861, 



606 IX. Frank M , third child of Henry 

Nelson and Charlotte Davies, bom in Mantena, Ills., Nov. 
10, 1866, 



607 IX. Arthur N , fourth child of 

Henry Nelson and Charlotte Davies, born in Mantena, 
Ills., Sept. 27, 1873, 



Colonel John 195 

599 VIII. Mile Robert, seventh child of Samuel and 
Margaret Nelson, born in Ryegate, Vt., March 20, 1832, 
died in ; md. 

in Mantena, Ills., Oct. 22, 1856, Ellen F 
Richardson, dau. Richardson and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had seven children. 

IX. Children of Milo Robert, and Ellen Richardson: 

608 (1). Minnie J , born in 

, died in infancy. 

609 (2). Nellie May, born in Mantena, Ills., May 3, i860. 



610 (3). Margaret J , bom in Mantena, 
Ills., Sept. 22, 1862, died in 

, was md, in Mantena, Oct. 22, 
1886, to William H Harney, son 

Harney and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had children. 

611 (4). George M , bom in Mantena, 
Ills., Feb. 13, 1866. 

613 (5). Mary J , born in Mantena, Ills., 

Aug. 23, 1869, died in 



613 (6). William Ernest, born in Mantena, Ills., May 21, 
1874. 

614 (7). Florence E , born in Mantena, 
Ills., July 26, 1882, 



611 IX. George M , fourth child of 



196 Connecticut 

Milo Robert and Ellen Richardson, born in Mantena, Ills., 
Feb. 13, 1866, died in 



613 IX. William Ernest, sixth child of Milo Robert and 
Ellen Richardson, born in Mantena, Ills., May 21, 1874, 



587 VII. Daniel C , fourth child of An- 

drew Bamet and Lydia Bliss, born in Bradford, Vt., Ap. 
4, 1799, died in Peoria, Ills., Dec. 3, 1891 ; md. in 

, Jan. 20, 1825, Sarah White of Brad- 
ford, Vt., dau. White and 
, his wife, bom in 

, died in Peoria, Ills., Aug. 12, 1885, and 
had six children. 

VIII. Children of Daniel, and Sarah White: 

615 (1). Laura, born in Bradford, Vt., Jan. 8, 1826, 
died in Peoria, 111., Sept. 22, 1862; was md. in 

, Aug. 16, 1848, to Benjamin F 
Robbins, of Lowell, Mass., son Rob- 

bins and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in a Confederate prison in Savannah, Ga., Oct. 22, 
1864. No children. 

616 (2). Andrew Barnet, born in Bradford, Vt., Jan. 29, 
1829, died Aug. 12, 1833. 

617 (3). Mary Ann, born in Bradford, Vt., Nov. 22, 1832, 

Resided in Peoria, 111. 

618 (4). Sarah Maria, born in Bradford, Vt., Oct. 3, 1835, 

. Resided in Peoria, 111. 



Colonel John 197 

619 (5). Elizabeth Pritchard, born in Bradford, Vt., 
March 22, 1838, died in Peoria, 111., Nov. 27, 1883; 
was md. in , Aug. 14, 
1855, to Col. Samuel R Baker, son 

Baker and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had two children. 

620 (6). Susan Augusta, born in Lowell, Mass., Aug. 4, 
1841, 

. Resided in Peoria, 111. 

589 VII. William, sixth child of Andrew Barnet and 
Lydia Bliss, born in Bradford, Vt., Dec. 14, 1803, died in 
Chelsea, Vt., Aug. 14, 1887; md. in 

, Sept. 2, 1830, Mary Johnson, dau. Capt. Haynes 
Johnson and Jane , his wife, born in Brad- 

ford, Vt., Sept. 26, 1803, died in Charlestown, Mass., 
Feb. 7, 1844, and had three children. 

VIII. Children of William, and Mary Johnson: 

631 (1). WilHam Francis, born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 

30, 1831 (md., no oh.). 
633 (2). Charles Edward, born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 

24, 1833 (md., ch.). 
633 (3). Mary Jane, born in Bradford, Vt., Jan. 11, 1840, 
died in 

was md. in , Oct. 22, 

1867, to Thomas H Moore, son 

Moore and , 

his wife, born in 
, died in 
. No children. Resided in Denver, Col. 

William md. (2) in - , Jan. 

19, 1845, Hannah Johnson (sister of his first wife), bom 
in Bradford, Vt., Oct. 10, 18 13, died in Boston, Mass., 
Feb. 5, 1872, and had two children. 



198 Connecticut 

Children of William, and Hannah Johnson: 

624 (4). Alvah Henry, bom in Charlestown, Mass., Dec. 

23, 1846 (md., ch.). 
635 (5). Martha Nellie, born in Charlestown, Mass., 
Aug. 17, 1851, died in Cambridge, Mass., April 22, 1869. 

William md. (3), in , Nov. 

21, 1882, Mary J F Tappan, 

dau. Tappan and 

, his wife, born in Lyndon, Vt., July 12, 18 19, died in 

No chil- 
dren. They resided in Chelsea, Vt. 

621 VIII. William Francis, first child of William and 
Mary Johnson, born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 30, 1831, died 
in ; md. in 

, Aug. 24, 1885, Eliza 
Reynolds, dau. Reynolds and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 

No chil- 
dren. They resided in Denver, Col. 

William was a corporal in the army, enlisting Feb. 18, 
1862, discharged Sept. 10, 1863. He served in a Vermont 
regiment. He afterward enlisted again and served for 
the remainder of the war. 

632 VIII. Charles Edward, second child of William 
and Mary Johnson, bom in Boston, Mass., Aug. 24, 1833, 
died in ; md. 

in , Aug. 24, 1855, Lucinda 

E Hodgsdon of Piermont, N. H., dau. 

Hodgsdon and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had two children. 



Colonel John 199 

IX. Children of Charles Edward, and Lucinda Hodgsdon: 

636 (1). Charles Henry N , born in Bos- 
ton, Mass., May 25, 1857 (md., ch.). 

637 (2). Lillian May, bom in Bradford, Vt., June 2, 1867. 



Charles Edward enlisted as private in the Civil War, 
Co. D, 8th Vermont Regiment. He re-enlisted Feb. 18, 
1862, discharged July 18, 1865. He resided in Denver, 
Col. 

636 IX. Charies Henry N , first child of 

Charles Edward and Lucinda Hodgsdon, his wife, bom in 
Boston, Mass., May 25, 1857, died in 

; md. in 
, Sept. 20, 1879, Etta C Ormsby, dau. 

Rufus F Ormsby and Mary , 

his wife, bom in Bradford, Vt., May 13, 1857, died in 

, and had two 
daughters. 

X. Children of Charles Henry, and Etta Ormsby: 

638 (1). Lou May, born in Bradford, Vt., June 13, 1880, 



639 (2). Ethel Florence, born in Denver, Col., Feb. 12, 

1887, 



634 VUL Alvah Henry, fourth child of William and 
first child of his second wife, Hannah Johnson, bom in 
Charlestown, Mass., Dec. 23, 1846, died in Boston, 

; md. in , June 17, 



200 Connecticut 

1873, Etta J Damrell, dau. 

Damrell and , his wife, born 

in , died in 

, and had one 
daughter. 

IX. Children of Alvah Henry, and Etta Damrell: 

630 (1). Martha Nellie, born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 28, 
1876, 



Alvah Henry was cit^^^ messenger of Boston for many 
years. 

590 VII. Andrew BHss, seventh child of Andrew Bar- 
net and Lydia Bliss, born in Bradford, Vt., March 14, 
1812, died in Charlestown, Mass., March 9, 1857; md. in 

, Jan. 23, 1839, Susan M 
Jones of Durham, N. H., bom in 
, Oct. 9, 1 814, died in 

, and had two children. They 
lived in Charlestown, Mass. 

VIII. Children of Andrew Bliss, and Susan Jones: 

631 (1), Lydia Ann, born in Charlestown, Mass., Jan. 9, 
1840, died in Charlestown, July 17, 1864. 

633 (2). Charles Franklin, born in Charlestown, Ap. 12, 
1842, died in the West, , 1883. 

591 VII. Joseph Howard, eighth child of Andrew Bar- 
net, and first child of his third wife, Keziah Howard, born 
in Bradford, Vt., Oct. 7, 181 7, died in Bradford, Vt., 
March 18, 1887; md. in , 
Nov. 25, 1 841, Clarissa Culver Washburn, dau. 

Washburn and , his wife, 

born in Lyme, N. H., Sept. 7, 1820, died in 

, and had six children. 



Colonel John 201 

VIII. Children of Joseph Howard, and Clarissa Washburn: 

633 (1). Andrew Baraet, born in Bradford, Vt., March 
10, 1843 (md., ch.). 

634 (2). Mary Ann, bom in Bradford, Vt., June 23, 
1845, died Aug. 20, 1846. 

635 (3). Mary Ellen, born in Bradford, Vt., March 30, 
1847, died in 

; was md. in , 

Dec. 25, 187 1, to Charles A Leavitt, son 

Leavitt and 
, his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had one son. 

636 (4). Clara Emma, bom in Bradford, Vt., June 15, 
1849, died in , Sept. 
17, 1883; was md. in , 
Dec. 20, 1870, to Andrew J Tarleton, 
son Tarleton and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 

. No children. 

637 (5). Arthur W , born in Bradford, 
Vt., July 31, 1851 (md., ch.). 

638 (6). Minnies , born in Bradford, Vt., 
Jan. 4, 1855, died in 

; was md. in 
, March 17, 1872, to Job M Clem- 

ent, son Clement and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had two children. 
Resided in Fitchburg, Mass. 

Joseph Howard settled on the old home farm in Brad- 
ford, Vt. 

633 VIII. Andrew Bamet, first child of Joseph How- 
ard, and Clarissa Washburn, bom in Bradford, Vt., March 



202 Connecticut 

lo, 1843, died in 

; md. in , June 14, 1872, 

Sarah J Young, dau. Young 

and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had one daughter. 
Resided in Fitchburg, Mass. 

IX. Children of Andrew Barnet, and Sarah Young: 

639 (1). Sophie Louise, born in 

, July 21, 1876, died in Bradford, Vt., Nov. 8, 
1885. 

637 VIII. Arthur W , fifth child of 

Joseph Howard, and Clarissa Washburn, born in Brad- 
ford, Vt., July 31, 1 85 1, died in 

; md. in , 

Nov. 14, 1 87 1, Velma Louise Jenkins of Bradford, dau. 
Jenkins and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in , 

and had four children. 

IX. Children of Arthur W and Velma Jenkins: 

640 (1). Eva May, born in Bradford, Vt., May 4, 1873, 
died Sept. 23, 1873. 

641 (2). Frank Arthur, born in Bradford, Vt., Aug. 25, 
1875, died Ap. 14, 1886. 

643 (3). Andrew H , born in Bradford, 

Vt., June 18, 1883. 
643 (4). Joseph Edward, born in Bradford, Vt., March 

2, 1890. 

Arthur W , like his father, interested 

himself in agriculture, and resided on the old home farm 
in Bradford. He was well known for his high-bred 
stock, especially for his sheep and horses. The county 
fair grounds were situated on his land. 



Colonel John 203 

642 IX. Andrew H , third child of Ar- 

thur, and Velma Jenkins, bom in Bradford, Vt., June 18, 
1883, 



643 IX. Joseph Edward, fourth child of Arthur, and 
Velma Jenkins, bom in Bradford, Vt., March 2, 1890, 



592 VII. Edmond Fanning, ninth child of Andrew 
Bamet and second child of Keziah Howard, his third 
wife, bom in Bradford, Vt., Sept. 5, 1822, living in Chel- 
sea, Vt., 1903 ; md. in 

, Ap. 6, 1848, Mary Ann Slack, dau. 
Abner Slack and Mary , his wife, born in 

Wilmington, Mass., Nov. 13, 1827, died in Charlestown, 
Mass., Aug. 17, 1883, and had three children. 

VIII. Children of Edmond Fanning, and Mary Ann Slack: 

644 (1). Mary Emma, born in Charlestown, Mass., Jan. 
18, 1849, died in Charlestown, Jan. 5, 1874 (unmd.). 

645 (2). Edmond Frank,* born in Charlestown, Mass., 
Aug. 12, 1852, died in Somerville, Mass., July 10, 1893; 
md. in Charlestown, Dec. 25, 1877, Alice Isabel Linnell, 
dau. Joshua Linnell and Emily A. Mears, his wife, born 
in Charlestown, Jan. 9, 1854, living 1903. No children. 

646 (3). Carrie Louise, born in Charlestown, Mass., Dec. 
25, 1865, died Oct. 28, 1866. 

Edmond Fanning md. (2), in 

, Aug. 31, 1885, Elvira Magoon, dau. 

* The compiler of this work. 



204 Connecticut 

Charles W Magoon and Charlotte M 

Bagley, his wife, born in 

, Jan. 20, 1849, died in 

, and had one child, bom in 
Chelsea, Vt., Feb. 22, 1886, which died shortly after 
birth. 

Edmond Fanning enlisted in the Massachusetts Cav- 
alry during the Civil War, and served for some time as 
bodyguard to Gen. Grant and to Gen. Mead. 



573 VI. Samuel, fourth child of Col. John and Ann 
Barnet, bom in Thetford, Vt., June 24, 1768, drowned at 
Cape Breton, Aug. 9, 181 2 ; md. in 

, Oct. 20, 1789, Catherine Grant, dau. 
Grant and , his wife, bom in 

Edinburgh, Scotland, , died in 

, Oct. 15, 1853, and had 
seven children. 

VII. Children of Samuel, and Catherine Grant: 

647 (1). Samuel, born in , 
Jan. 4, 1792 (md., ch.). 

648 (2). Ann, born in 

Nov. 12, 1792, died in , 

Jan. 9, 1881; was md. in , 

Dec. 8, 181 1, to John Meloney, son Me- 

loney and , his wife, 

born in , March 8, 1778, 

died in , Ap. 17, 1874, 

and had eleven children. 

649 (3). John Robert, born in 

, Jan. 27, 1799 (md., ch.). 

650 (4). Mary, born in 

, died in 

; was md. in 



Colonel John 205 

to Capt. John Muggah, son 
Muggah and 
, his wife, bom in 

, died in 

, and had nine children. 
651 (5). Margaret Charlotte, born in 

, died in 
(Mnmd.). 
653 (6). Catherine, born in 

, died in 

; was md. in 

to Edward Morgan, son 
Morgan and 
, his wife, born in 

, died in 

. No children. She died within a 
year of her marriage. 

653 (7). Peter Edmond, bom in Sydney, Cape Breton, 
Aug. 27, 1804 (md., ch.). 

Samuel was Comptroller of Customs at Sydney, Cape 
Breton. 

647 VII. Samuel, first child of Samuel and Catherine 
Grant, bom in , Jan. 4, 1792, 

died in , Ap. 6, 1876; md. 

in , Sept. 28, 1820, Mary 

Anderson, dau. Anderson and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
, Dec. 5, 1 88 1, and had twelve children. 

VIII. Children of Samuel, and Mary Anderson: 

654 (1.) Catherine, born in , 
July 27, 182 1, died young. 

655 (2). Mary, born in 

Ap. 10, 1823, died in , 

Dec. 4, 1885 ; was md. in 



2o6 Connecticut 

, to Capt. William Muggah, son 
Muggah and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had five children. 

656 (3). Helen, born in 
March i8, 1825, died in 

Unmd. Resided in Sydney 
Cape Breton. 

657 (4). Robert, born in 
Jan. 21, 1827 (md., ch.). 

658 (5). Samuel, bom in 
Jan. 31, 1829 (md., ch.). 

659 (6). John, born in 
Ap. 23, 1831 (md., ch.). 

660 (7). WilHam, born in 

July I, 1832, lost at sea, Aug. 24, 1875, being captain 
of a vessel trading between Cape Breton and Boston 
Mass.; md. in , Feb. 12 

1873, Eliza Styles, dau. Styles and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
. No chil- 
dren. 

661 (8). Ann, born in 
May I, 1835, died in 

; was md. in Sydney, Cape Breton, Feb. 
24, 1857, to Theopolis Spencer, M.D., son , 

Spencer and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in 
and had six children. 

662 (9). James, born in 
July 25, 1837 (md., ch.). 

663 (10). Edmond, born in , 
Nov, 20, 1839, died young. 

664 (11). Andrew, born in , 
Dec. 14, 1840, died young. 



Colonel John 207 

665 (12). Henry, born in 
July 23, 1844 (md., ch.). 

657 VIII. Robert, fourth child of Samuel and Mary 
Anderson, bom in , Jan. 21, 

1827, died in ; 

md. in , Feb. 12, 1863, Es- 

ther Martell, dau. Martell and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had six children. 

IX. Children of Robert, and Esther Martell: 

666 (1). Kate F , bom in 

, Jan. I, 1864, 



667 (2). Edmond W , born in 

, Aug. 26, 1865. 

668 (3). Robert A , bom in 

, Feb. 16, 1867. 

669 (4). Clarence N , bom in 

, Nov. 20, 1868. 

670 (5). Frederick S , born in 

, Oct. 30, 1870. 

671 (6). Samuel G , bom in 

, June 21, 1874, 

667 IX. Edmond W , second child of 

Robert, and Esther Martell, bom in 
, Aug. 26, 1865, died in 



668 IX. Robert A , third child of Robert, 



208 



Connecticut 



and Esther Martell, bom in 
Feb. i6, 1867, 



669 IX. Clarence N , fourth child of Rob- 

ert and Esther Martell, born in 
, Nov. 20, 1868, 



670 IX. Frederick S 
ert and Esther Martell, bom in 
, Oct. 30, 1870, 



, fifth child of Rob- 



671 IX. Samuel G 
and Esther Martell, born in 
June 21, 1874, 



, sixth child of Robert 



658 VIII. Samuel, fifth child of Samuel and Mary An- 
derson, born in , Jan. 31, 
1829, died in 

md. in , Feb. 13, 1866, An- 

nie Muggah, dau. Muggah, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had four children. 



Colonel John 209 

IX. Children of Samuel, and Annie Muggah: 

673 (1). Isabel Sutherland, born in 

, Dec. 29, 1866, died March 7, 1869. 

673 (2). George Edward, bom in 
, Jan. 17, 1868. 

674 (3). William Grant, born in 

Nov. 10, 1870. 

675 (4). Emma Mary, bom in 

, Nov. 29, 1873. 

This family lived in Wabasha, Minn. 

673 IX. George Edward, second child of Samuel and 
Annie Muggah, bom in , Jan. 

17, 1868, 



674 IX. William Grant, third child of Samuel and 
Annie Muggah, born in , 

Nov. ID, 1870, 



659 VIII. John, sixth child of Samuel and Mary An- 
derson, born in , Ap. 23, 1831, 
died in ; md. 
in , Nov. 14, i860, Catherine 
Julia Cossit, dau. Cossit and 
, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had nine children. 

IX. Children of John, and Catherine Cossit: 

676 (1). Mary Elizabeth, bom in 
, Nov. 9, 1863, died in 

; was md. in 
, Jan. 20, 1884, to W 



210 





Connecticut 




M 


Dobson, son 


Dobson 


and 




, his wife, bom in 
, died 


in 




, and 



had one daughter. 

677 (2). Ellen, born in 
March 31, 1865, died in 

; was md. in 
, Feb. 2, 1 886, to Douglas Hill, son 
Hill and , his wife, 

bom in , 

died in , 

and had children. 

678 (3). Herbert, bom in , 
June 6, 1867. 

679 (4). Caroline, bom in , 
Oct. 22, 1869. 

680 (5). Elizabeth R , born in 

, Ap. 18, 1872. 

681 (6). Emily S , born in 

, June 18, 1875. 

682 (7). John, bom in 
Aug. 17, 1878. 

Also two sons who died in infancy. 

678 IX. Herbert, third child of John and Catherine 
Cossit, bom in , June 6, 

1867, 



683 IX. John, seventh child of John and Catherine 
Cossit, bom in , Aug. 17, 1875, 



663 VIII. James, ninth child of Samuel and Mary An- 
derson, bom in , July 25, 



Colonel John 211 

1837, died in ; 

md. in , Feb. 9, 1863, Mary 

Ann Logue, dau. Logue and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had nine children. 

IX. Children of James, and Mary Ann Logue: 

683 (1). James A , born in 

, Nov. 24, 1864. 

684 (2). John, born in 
Nov. 5, 1867. 

685 (3). Anne, born in , 
Nov. 19, 1869, died in 



686 (4). Samuel R , born in 

, Jan. 5, 1872. 

687 (5). Henry Pierce, born in 

, Feb. 12, 1874. 

688 (6). William, bom in , 
Nov. 3, 1875. 

689 (7). Charles C , bom in 

,Ap. 27, 1878. 

690 (8). George, born in , 
May 6, 1880. 

691 (9). Austin, born in , 
Sept. 30, 1883. 

683 IX. James A , first child of James, 

and Mary Ann Logue, bom in 
, Nov. 24, 1864, died in 



684 IX. John, second child of James, and Mary Ann 



212 Connecticut 

Logue, born in , Nov. 5, 

1867, 



686 IX. Samuel R , fourth child of James 

and Mary x^nn Logue, bom in 
, Jan. 5, 1872, 



687 IX. Henry Pierce, fifth child of James and Mary 
Ann Logue, bom in , Feb. 

12, 1874, 



688 IX. William, sixth child of James and Mary Ann 
Logue, born in , Nov. 3, 

1875, 



689 IX. Charles C , seventh child of 

James and Mary Ann Logue, born in 
, Ap. 27, 1878, 



690 IX. George, eighth child of James and Mary Ann 



Colonel John 213 

Logue, born in , May 6, 1880, 



691 IX. Austin, ninth child of James and Mary Ann 
Logue, bom in , Sept. 30, 

1883, 



665 VIII. Henry, twelfth child of Samuel and Mary 
Anderson, bom in , July 23, 

1844, died in ; 

md. in , June 9, 1882, Brid- 

get Ormond, dau. Ormond and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had four children. 

IX. Children of Henry, and Bridget Ormond: 

693 (1). Albert, bom in 
Ap. 25, 1883. 

693 (2). Francis E , born in 

, Oct. 15, 1884. 

694 (3). Ellen, born in 
Jan. 2, 1886, 



695 (4). Thomas Andrew, born in 
, Aug. 15, 1888, 



649 VII. John Robert, third child of Samuel and 



214 Connecticut 

Catherine Grant, bom in , 

Jan. 27, 1799, died in > , 

March 20, 1876; md. in , 

March 5, 1829, Ann Cradus (or Crowdus), dau. 

Cradus and , his wife, 

bom in , Dec. 20, 1791, died 

in , Aug. , 1876, and had 

four children, two of whom died in infancy. 

VIII. Children of John Robert, and Ann Cradus: 

696 (1). Died in infancy. 

697 (2). Died in infancy. 

698 (3). Samuel, bom in , 
March 18, 1833 (md., ch.). 

699 (4). John, born in 

June 15, 1835, died Oct., 1850. 

698 VIII. Samuel, third child of John Robert and Ann 
Cradus, bom in , March 18, 

1833, living in Peyallup, Washington, 1902, md. in 

, Feb. 24, 1855, Charlotte 
Richardson, dau. Richardson and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, 1898, and had three children. 

IX. Children of Samuel, and Charlotte Richardson: 

700 (1). Whitman Spurgeon, born in 

, Ap. 16, 1857, died March , i860. 

701 (2). Sarah Ellen, born in 

, Aug. 26, 1859, died Sept. 13, 1881. 
703 (3). Bessie Amelia, born in 

, Sept. 7, 1862, died Feb. 14, 1885; was md. in 

, Nov. 10, 1883, to 
Ronald McSween, son McSween and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 



Colonel John 215 

, 1885, 
and had one daughter. Resided in New Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

653 VII. Peter Edmond, seventh child of Samuel and 
Catherine Grant, born in Sydney, Cape Breton, Aug. 27, 
1804, died in , 

Nov. 30, 1884; md. in • , 

March 18, 1830, Elizah Muggah, dau. Mug- 

gah and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had ten chil- 
dren. 

Vni. Children of Peter Edmond, and Elizah Muggah: 

703 (1). John Grant, born in Braddeck, Cape Breton, 
Jan. 18, 1831 (md., ch.). 

704 (2). Samuel Joseph, born in Braddeck, C. B., July 
II, 1832 (md., ch.). 

705 (3). Ann Mary, born in Braddeck, C. B., Dec. 23, 
1833, died in 

; was md. in , 

Oct. 4, 1865, to Charles R. Bown, son 
Bown and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in , 

and had six children. 

706 (4). George Muggah, born in Braddeck, C. B., Sept. 
15, 1835 (ind., no ch.). 

707 (5). Catherine Isabel, born in Sydney, C. B., Dec. 2, 
1837, died in 

; was md. in , 

Oct. 6, 1869, to George R Sutherland, 

son Sutherland and 

, his wife, born in Lower Stewiacke, Nova 
Scotia, Nov. 24, 1838, died in 

, and had five children. 



2i6 Connecticut 

708 (6). William Edward, born in Sydney, C. B., June 
23, 1839 (md., ch.). 

709 (7). Cornelia Eliza, born in Sydney, C. B., Feb. 2, 
1 84 1, died 

Unmd. 

710 (8). Richard Burke, born in Sydney, C. B., March 
15, 1843 (md., ch.). 

711 (9). James Robert, bom in Sydney, C. B., Nov. 11, 
1844, died Ap. 29, 1876 Unmd. 

713 (10). Mary Ann, born in Sydney, C. B., Sept. 22, 
1847, died in 

; was md. in , 

Oct. 27, 1869, to Alexander C Ross, son 

Ross and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had four children. 

703 VIII. John Grant, first child of Peter Edmond and 
Elizah Muggah, bom in Braddeck, Cape Breton, Jan. 18, 
183 1, died in ; 

md. in , Nov. 9, 1859, Mary 

McNab, eldest daughter of Robert McNab and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had two children. 

IX. Children of John Grant, and Mary McNab: 

713 (1). Charles McNab, born at Low Point, Sydney, 
Cape Breton, June 9, 1864. 

714 (2). Eliza Margaret, born at Low Point, Sydney, 
C. B., Feb. II, 1866, 



John Grant was appointed lighthouse-keeper at Low 
Point, Sydney, Cape Breton. 



Colonel John 217 

713 IX. Charles McNab, first child of John Grant, and 
Mary McNab, born at Low Point, Sydney, Cape Breton, 
June 9, 1864, 



704 VIII. Samuel Joseph, second child of Peter Ed- 
mond, and Elizah Muggah, born in Braddeck, Cape Bre- 
ton, July II, 1832, died in 

; md. in Boston, Mass., Ap. 3, 1854, Mary Gates, dau. 
Capt. Elias Gates of Wilmot, Nova Scotia, and 

, his wife, bom 
, died in 
, and had nine children. 

IX. Children of Samuel Joseph, and Mary Gates: 

715 (1). Henry Edmond, born in Boston, Mass., May 12, 
1855 (md., ch.). 

716 (2). Charlotte Eliza, born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 25, 
1857, 



717 (3). Joseph Samuel, born in Ingerish, Cape Breton, 
Jan. 21, i860. 

718 (4). William George, born in Sydney, Cape Breton, 
Nov. 4, 1861. 

719 (5). Charles Muggah, bom in Sydney, C. B., Aug. 
12, 1864. 

730 (6). Matilda Mary, born in Sydney, C. B., Feb. 13, 
1866, died in Sydney, C. B., Jan. i, 1867. 

731 (7). Branch Eldrich, born in Sydney, C. B., March 5, 
1868, died March 20, 1868. 

733 (8). Horatio Nelson, twin of Branch Eldrich, born 
in Sydney, C. B., March 5, 1868, died March 20, 1868. 



2i8 Connecticut 

723 (9). Ada Mary, born in Sydney, C. B., July 5, 1870, 
died June 12, 1872. 

715 IX. Henry Edmond, first child of Samuel Joseph, 
and Mary Gates, born in Boston, Mass., May 12, 1855, 
died in - ; md. 

in , Feb. 4, 1886, Eliza Gib- 

son, dau. James H Gibson, of Melrose, 

Mass., and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had two 
children. 

X. Children of Henry Edmond, and Eliza Gibson: 

124t (1). Mary Crawford, born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 
27, 1887, 



735 (2). Edmond Howard, born in Boston, Mass., Dec. 
18, 1888. 

735 X. Edmond Howard, second child of Henry Ed- 
mond, and Eliza Gibson, bom in Boston, Mass., Dec. 18, 
1888, died in 



717 IX. Joseph Samuel, third child of Samuel Joseph, 
and Mary Gates, born in Ingerish, Cape Breton, Jan. 21, 
i860, 



Resides in Manitoba. 

718 IX. William George, fourth child of Samuel Joseph, 
and Mary Gates, born in Sydney, Cape Breton, Nov. 4, 



Colonel John 219 



1 86 1, died in 
md. in 



719 IX. Charles Muggah, fifth child of Samuel Joseph, 
and Mary Gates, bom in Sydney, Cape Breton, Aug. 12, 
1864, died in 



706 VIII. George Muggah, fourth child of Peter Ed- 
mond, and Elizah Muggah, bom in Braddeck, C. B., Sept. 
15, 1835, died in , July 25, 

1886 ; md. in Boston, Mass., 

(about 1870), Ann Raymond, dau. Ray- 

mond and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
. No children. 
George Muggah was a sea captain for twenty-five years, 
and never lost a vessel or a man. 

708 VIII. William Edward, sLxth child of Peter Ed- 
mond, and Elizah Muggah, bom in Sydney, C. B., June 
23, 1839, died in 

; md. in , Feb. 15, 1872, 

Jane S Nisbet, dau, Nisbet 

and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had two children. 

IX. Children of William Edward, and Jane Nisbet: 

736 (1). Jennie E , born in 

, Dec. 4, 1872, 



220 Connecticut 

121 (2). Abbie M , born in 

, Feb. 7, 1875, 



710 VIII. Richard Burke, eighth child of Peter Ed- 
mond, and EHzah Muggah, born in Sydney, C. B., March 
15, 1843, died in ; 

md. in , March 19, 1873, 

Augusta Josephine MulHng, dau. MulHng 

and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had seven chil- 
dren. 

IX. Children of Richard Burke, and Augusta Mulling: 

12s (1). Edmund Randolph, born in 

, Jan. 4, 1874. 
129 (2). George James, born in 
,Oct. 8, 1875. 

730 (3). Charles Herbert, born in 

, Dec. 9, 1877. 

731 (4). Arthur Mulling, born in 

, Ap. 13, 1880. 
733 (5). Richard Alexander, born in 
,May 3, 1883. 

733 (6). Augusta Blanche, born in 

Sept. 4, 1885, died Feb. 26, 1886. 

734 (7). Blanche, born in , 
Jan. 15, 1888. 



Richard Burke removed to Newfoundland in 1870, and 
has resided there since then. 



Colonel John 221 

573 VI. Henry Moore, sixth child of Col. John and Ann 
Barnet, born in Piermont, N. H., Ap. 30, 1770, 

, died on the island of Cape Breton, 
May ,i8o8;md. in , Aug. 

21, 1 79 1, Tamar Bliss, (half-sister of Lydia, his brother 
Andrew's wife), dau. Ellis Bliss and Grace , 

his w4fe bom in Hebron, Conn., Nov. 14, 1771, 
died in Hebron, May 11, 1792, and had one daughter.* 

VII. Children of Henry Moore, and Tamar Bliss: 

735 (1). Nancy B , born in Hebron, 
Conn., March 25, 1792, died in Mendon, N. Y., Nov. 5, 
1867; was md. in , 
Feb. 14, 1813, to Ezra Brown of Gilead, Conn., son of 

Brown and , 

his wife, bom in , 

Ap. 19, 1784, died in Springwater, N. Y., Feb. 28, 1854, 
and had eleven children. 

Henry Moore md. (2), in 

, Orilla Payne, dau. Payne 

and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had six children. 
Lived at Cow Bay, Cape Breton. 

Children of Henry Moore, and Orilla Payne: 

736 (2). Barnet, born in 
1799 (md., ch.). 

737 (3). Ormond, born in 

, 1801 (md., ch.). 

738 (4). Anna, born in 
1802, died in 

, Feb, II, 1856; was md. in 

, 1820, to Nathaniel Spen- 
cer of Mira River, son of Spencer and 

* Hebron records say May ii, 1802, but this is impossible. 



22 2 Connecticut 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, Feb. i6, 1872, 
and had fourteen children. 

739 (5). Edwin H , born in 

, 1805 (md., ch.). 

740 (6) WilHam Wentworth, born in 

, 1807 (md., ch.). 

741 (7). Lydia, born in 

1809, drowned at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, when a child 
of nine. 

736 VII. Bamet, second child of Henry Moore, and 
first child of his second wife, Orilla Payne, born in 

, 1799, died in 
, England, 
; md. in » 

dau. of and 

, his wife, and had children. 

"He went to England, where he married, and died 
there, in Middlesex." 

" He was a shipwright and was lost at sea ; he went on 
board a ship that he had built, and on her way home near 
the Scilly Islands she was lost with all on board." * 

737 VII. Ormond, third child of Henry Moore and 
second child of his second wife, Orilla Payne, bom in 

, 1801, died at Cow Bay, C. B., 
Jan. 29, 1880; md. in , 1825, 

EHzabeth Sheppard, dau. Sheppard and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had eleven children. 

* These appear to be the simultaneous, but necessarily separate, 
traditions anent Barnet. The reader can take his choice. 



Colonel John 223 

VIII. Children of Ormond, and Elizabeth Sheppard: 

743 (1). Henry, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Nov. 24, 1826, 

died 
He was an invalid for forty years, most of the time being 

confined to his bed. 

743 (2). Annie, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Aug. 6, 1828, 
died in ; 
was md. in , 
to Charles Lee, son of Lee and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had 
children. 

744 (3). Samuel E , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Aug. 29, 1830 (md., ch.). 

745 (4). Elizabeth, bom at Cow Bay, C. B., Aug. 17, 
1832, died in ; 

; was md. in 

, to George Spencer, son Nathaniel 
Spencer and Anna , his wife, born in 

, June 5, 1831, died in 
, and 
had eight children. 

746 (5). Joel N , born at Cow Bay, C. B., 
Oct. 28, 1834 (md., ch.). 

747 (6). WilHam W , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Feb. 7, 1836 (md., ch.). 

748 (7). Emily, born at Schooner Paw, C. B., Dec. 20, 
1840, died , Dec. 18, 
1868; was. md. in. , 
Jan. 20, 1863, to Nathaniel Spencer, son Nathaniel 
Spencer and Anna , his wife, born in 

, Sept. 27, 1837, died 
in , and 

had four children. Resided at Cow Bay. 

749 (8). Charles, born at Schooner Paw, C. B., Oct. 14, 
1842 (md., ch.). 



224 Connecticut 

750 (9). Bennory, born at Cow Bay, C. B., March lo, 
1844, died young, at Cow Bay. 

751 (10). Martha, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Dec. 14, 
1846, died in 

; was md. in 

, to Theodore Mostelle, son 
Mostelle and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in 

and had children. Resided at Glace Bay. 

753 (11). Fanny, born at Cow Bay, C. B., July 29, 1851, 
died at Cow Bay, June 17, 1853. 

Ormond md. (2), in 

, 1868, Sarah Robertson of Glace Bay, dau. 
Robertson and , 

his wife, bom in 

, died in , 

and had three children. 

Children of Ormond, and Sarah Robertson: 

753 (12). 

754 (13). 

755 (14). 



744 VIII. Samuel E , third child of Or- 

mond and Elizabeth Sheppard, born at Cow Bay, Cape 
Breton, Aug. 29, 1830, died in 

; md. in , 

Nov. 29, 1859, Maria J Holmes, dau. 

Holmes and , his 

wife, born in , Ap. 12, 1838, 

died at Cow Bay, Ap. 27, 1887, and had nine children. 



Colonel John 225 

IX. Children of Samuel, and Maria Holmes: 

756 (1). Alonzo I , born at Cow Bay, C. 
B., Sept. 16, i860, was lost at sea, Aug. 29, 1883, from 
his father's ship as he was returning home from Bos- 
ton. 

757 (2). Samuel W , bom at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Jan. 7, 1862, 

758 (3). Herbert E , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Oct. 17, 1863, died Jan. 17, 1884. 

759 (4). Wallace A , bom at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Nov. 29, 1865, died June i, 1883. 

760 (5). Edmond C , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., March 4, 1869. 

761 (6). Galen H , born at Cow Bay, C. 
B., Jan. 29, 1871. 

762 (7). Annie Maria, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Feb. 19, 
1873. Resided at Cow Bay. 

763 (8). Lewis I , born at Cow Bay, C. 
B., Dec. 9, 1S74. 

764 (9). Frank H , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Nov. 6, 1883. 

757 IX. Samuel W , second child of 

Samuel and Maria Holmes, born at Cow Bay, Cape Bre- 
ton, Jan. 7, 1862, 



Resided in Boston, Mass. 

760 IX. Edmond C , fifth child of Sam- 

uel and Maria Hohnes, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
March 4, 1869, died in 



Resided at Cow Bay. 



15 



226 Connecticut 

761 IX. Galen H , sixth child of Samuel 

and Maria Holmes, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, Jan. 
29, 1 87 1, died in 



Resided in Boston, Mass. 

763 IX. Lewis I • , eighth child of Samuel 

and Maria Holmes, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, Dec. 9, 
1874, died in 



Resided at Cow Bay. 

764 IX. Frank H , ninth child of Sam- 

uel and Maria Holmes, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Nov. 6, 1883, died in 



746 VIII. Joel N , fifth child of Ormond, 

and Elizabeth Sheppard, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Oct. 28, 1834, died in 

; md. in 1863, 

Elizabeth Dillon of Catelone, C. B., dau. 
Dillon and , his wife, bom in 

, died in. 
, and had twelve 
children. 



Colonel John 227 

IX. Children of Joel, and Elizabeth Dillon: 

765 (1). William N , born at Cow Bay 
C. B., Nov. 29, 1863, died , 
1875. 

766 (2). Austin C , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Oct. 12, 1865. 

767 (3). Joel S , born at Cow Bay, C. B., 
July 13, 1867. 

768 (4). Eva B , born at Cow Bay, C. B., 
May 30, 1869, 



769 (5). Theodore B , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Feb. 7, 1871. 

770 (6). Samuel I , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Feb. 21, 1873. 

771 (7). John F , born at Cow Bay, C. B., 
Jan. 18, 1875, died 

772 (8). Margaret A , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., March 23, 1876, 



773 (9). John F , born at Cow Bay, C. 
B., July 9, 1878, died 

774 (10). Charles R , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., June 23, 1880, died 

, 1886. 

775 (11). Joseph E , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Nov. 14, 1883, died 

, 1886. 

776 (12). George G , born at Cow Bay, 
C. B., Feb. 28, 1886. 

766 IX. Austin C , second child of Joel 



228 Connecticut 

and Elizabeth Dillon, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Oct. 12, 1865, died in 



767 IX. Joel S. third child of Joel and 

Elizabeth Dillon, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, July 13, 
1867, died in 



769 IX. Theodore B , fifth child of Joel 

and Elizabeth Dillon, born at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Feb. 7, 1 87 1, died in 



770 IX. Samuel I , sixth child of Joel 

and Elizabeth Dillon, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Feb. 21, 1873, died in 



773 IX. John F , ninth child of Joel 

and Elizabeth Dillon, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
July. 9, 1878, died in 



776 IX. George G , twelfth child of Joel 

and Elizabeth Dillon, born at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Feb. 28, 1886, died in 



747 VIII. WiUiam W , sixth child of 

Ormond and Elizabeth Sheppard, born at Cow Bay, Cape 
Breton, Feb. 7, 1836, died in 



Colonel John 229 

; md. in , 

Oct. 7, 1858, Jane Martel, dau. Martel and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had six children. 

IX. Children of William, and Jane Martel: 

777 (1). Charles, born at Cow Bay, C. B., May 18, i860. 

778 (2). Elizabeth, born at Cow Bay, C. B., March 4, 
1862, died 

779 (3). Orlando, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Ap. 14, 1865. 

780 (4). George, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Sept. 16, 1868. 

781 (5). Jane, born at Cow Bay, C. B., June 17, 1870. 

782 (6). Orilla, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Dec. 13, 1874. 

777 IX. Charles, first child of WilHam and Jane Martel, 
born at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, May 18, i860, died in 



779 IX. Orlando, third child of William and Jane Mar- 
tel, born at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, Ap. 14, 1865, died in 



780 IX. George, fourth child of William and Jane Mar- 
tel, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, Sept. 16, 1868, died in 



749 VIII. Charles, eighth child of Ormond and Eliza- 
beth Sheppard, born at Schooner Paw, Cape Breton, Oct. 
14, 1842, died ; 

md. in , Feb. 7, 1870, Rachel 

Missant, dau. Missant and 



230 Connecticut 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had seven children. 

IX. Children of Charles, and Rachel Missant: 
783 (1). Bessie, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Dec. 16, 1871, 



784 (2). Amanda, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Jan. 5, 1874, 



785 (3). Edgar, born at Cow Bay, C. B. Feb. 8, 1878. 

786 (4). Ollie, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Oct. 18, 1879. 

787 (5). Louise, born at Cow Bay, C. B., Nov. 12, 1881, 



788 (6). Ellinor May, born at Cow Bay. C. B., July 12, 
1884. 



789 (7). Carrie A , born at Cow Bay, C. 

B., June 18, 1887. 



785 IX. Edgar, third child of Charles and Rachel Mis- 
sant, bom at Cow Bay, Cape Breton, Feb. 8, 1878, died in 



739 VII. Edwin H , fifth child of Henry 

Moore and fourth child of Orilla Payne, his second wife, 



Colonel John 231 

bom in , 1805; 

died at Catelone, Cape Breton, Nov. 12, 1885 ; md, in 

, July , 1833, Jane Mat- 

tel, dau. Martel and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had six children. 

VIII. Children of Edwin, and Jane Martel: 

790 (1). William, bom in 

791 (2). Anthony, bom in 

792 (3). Joseph, born in 

793 (4). Patience, born in 



794 (5). Mary Ann, born in 



795 (6). Orilla, born in 



790 VIII. William, first child of Edwin and Jane Mar- 
tel, born in 



791 VIII. Anthony, second child of Edwin and Jane 
Martel, bom in 



232 Connecticut 

793 VIII. Joseph, third child of Edwin and Jane Mar- 
tel, bom in 



740 VII. Wilham Wentworth, sixth child of Henry- 
Moore, and fifth child of Orilla Payne, his second wife, 
bom in , 1807, 

died in md. 

in Newport, Nova Scotia, , 1837, Abigail 

L Card, dau. Card and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had eight children. 

VIII. Children of William Wentworth, and Abigail Card: 

796 (1). Mary Matilda,* born in 

, Nov. 24, 1841, died in 

; was md. in Portland, Nov. 23, 
1870, to Joseph Weeks. 

797 (2). Elizabeth,* born in 

, Nov. 30, 1844, died in 

798 (3). William Henry,* born in 

, May 13, 1846. 

799 (4). John Moore,* born in 

, Feb. 6, 1849. 

800 (5). Orelia Jane,* born in 

, Nov. 29, 1857, died in 

798 VIII. William Henry, third child of WiUiam 
Wentworth, and Abigail Card, born in 

* These entries are all in Portland, Me., with the remark: "Children 
not bom in Portland." 



Colonel John 233 

May 13, 1846, died in 

md. in Portland, Me., June 15, 1876, Addie Fickett, dau. 

Fickett, and his wife, 

bom in died 

in and had 
children. 



799 VIII. John Moore, fourth child of WilUam Went- 
worth, and Abigail Card, born in 
Feb. 6, 1849, died in 



575 VI. WilUam Barnet Try on, seventh child of Col. 
John, and Ann Barnet, bom in Mooretown, Vt. (now 
Bradford), June 10, 1775, died in Portland, Me., Oct. 3, 
1837 ; md. in , 

1794, Mary Purkitt of Boston, Mass., dau. 
Purkitt and , his wife, born 

in , Sept. 6, 1770, died in 

, Oct. 19, 18^25, and had 
eight children. 

VII. Children of William B. T., and Mary Purkitt: 

801 (1). Mary Ann Waite, born in Boston, Mass., Dec. 
21, 1795, died in , Ap. 

6, 1875; was md. in Portland, Me., Oct. 30, 1842, to 
Seth Winship, son Winship and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 
. No children. 
She md. (2) in 

, the Revd. Stephen Bennett, son 



234 Connecticut 

Bennett and , his 

wife, born on Great Chebeague Island, Casco Bay, Me., 

died in 

. No children. 
803 (2). WilHam, born in New Gloucester, Me., July 3, 
1796 (md., ch.). 

803 (3). Barnet, born in Portland. Me., Nov. 17, 1797 
(md., ch.). 

804 (4). Edmond Fanning, born in Portland, Me., Aug. 
13, 1799 (md., ch.). 

805 (5). Betsey Purkitt, born in Portland, Me., Sept. 4, 
1802, died in 

; was md. in , 

Oct. 15, 1832, to Samuel Cox Dadley, son George 
Dadley and Eliza , his 

wife, bom in 

, 1 801, died in 

, and had one daughter. 

806 (6). Sarah Byles, born in Portland, Me., July 16, 
1804, died in Somerville, Mass., Jan. 22, 1870; was md. 
in Portland, Me., Nov. 8, 1823, to Abraham Watson 
Crowninshield, son Crowninshield and 

, his wife, born in 
Portland, Me., Dec. 16, 1801, died in East Somerville, 
Mass., May 12, 1883, and had seven children. 

807 (7). Ann Christina, born in Portland, Me., Dec. 30, 
1806, died in Portland, Oct. i, 181 2. 

808 (8). Laura, born in Portland, Me., Oct. 18, 1809, died 
in , Aug. 21, 1875; was 
md. in Portland, Jan. 12, 1847, to John Connor, 
son Connor and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 

. No children. 

William Bamet Try on md. (2), in Portland, Me., March 
25, 1827, Elizabeth P Patrick, dau. 

Patrick and , his wife, bom 



Colonel John 235 

in Stroudwater, Me., Dec. 13, 1786, died in Portland, 
Sept. 30, 1849. No children. 

803 VII. William, second child of William Bamet 
Try on and Mary Purkitt, his wife, bom in New Glou- 
cester, Me., July 3, 1796, died in 

; md. in 
, Susan Caroline Hicks, dau. William 
Hicks of Halifax, N. S., and 
his wife, bom in 

died in and 

had four children. 

VIII. Children of William, and Susan Hicks: 

809 (1). Walter Hicks, bom in 

, died in New York, 

, 1867; buried in 
New Orleans, La. Unmd. He was well known in 
New Orleans as a poet and as a scholar. 

810 (2). Mary Teresa Hicks, born in 

, died in 

, July 15, 1875; was 
md. in 

to Mitchell of Long Island, son 

' Mitchell and , 

his wife. 



They resided in New Orleans, where it is believed he 
died; his widow first removed to Montreal, Canada, 
then to New York State, where she died. 
811 (3). Mary Louise, born in 

, died young. 
813 (4). Caroline Phinney, born in 

, died in 

, was md. in 



236 Connecticut 

, to R 
W Gale, son Gale 

and . his wife, born in 

, died 
in , and 

had one daughter. 

William removed from the Provinces to Portland, Me., 
then to New York, and later to New Orleans, La. 

803 VII. Bamet, third child of William Bamet Tryon 
and Mary Purkitt, bom in Portland, Me., Nov. 17, 1797, 
died in ; md. 

in , Sophia 

Hodgkins, of Bnmswick, Me., dau. Hodg- 

kins and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had five chil- 
dren. 

VIII. Children of Bamet, and Sophia Hodgkins: 

813 (1). A son, born in 

, died in childhood. 

814 (2). A son, born in 

, died in childhood. 

815 (3). Mary Elizabeth, born in Portland, Me., Jan. 27, 

1828, died in 

; was md. in 
Feb. 22, 1849, to Henry Locke of Lexington, Mass. 
son Abel Locke and EHza , his wife 

born in , Oct. 6, 1824 

died in 
1889, and had four children. 

816 (4). William Bamet, born in Portland, Me., July 20, 

1829, died 

817 (5). Sophia, born in 



Colonel John 237 

804 VII. Edmond Fanning, fourth child of William 
Bamet Tryon, and Mary Purkitt, bom in Portland, Me., 
Aug. 13, 1799, died in Portland, July 4, 1838; md. in Port- 
land, May 14, 1827, Susan Tucker Corey, dau. James 
Corey and Esther , his wife, bom in 

, July 13, 1805, died in 

, and had five children. 

VIII. Children of Edmond Fanning, and Susan Corey: 

818 (1). Ellen Louise, born in Portland, Me., May 8, 
1828, died in 

; was md. in Portland, Oct. 18, 1852, to John 
F Purington, son Pu- 

rington, and , his wife, born in 

died in 
. No 
children. 

819 (2). George Chase, born in Portland, Ap. 12, 1S30 
(md., ch.). 

830 (3). Edmond Lothaire, born in Portland, July 20, 
1832. 

831 (4). Susan Tucker, bom in Portland, Jan. 6, 1835, 
died in ; 
was md. in Portland, Nov. 28, 1872, to George C 

Fobes, son Fobes and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 

. No children. 
Resided in Mobile, Ala, 
823 (5). Caroline Robinson, bom in Portland, July 28, 
1838, died in 

; was md. in Portland. Dec. 22, 1861, to Ed- 
ward A Bailey, son 
Bailey and , his wife, 
born in , 
died in , 
and had two children. Resided in Washington, D. C. 



238 Connecticut 

819 VIII. George Chase, second child of Edmond Fan- 
ning, and Susan Corey, bom in Portland, Me., Ap. 12, 
1830, died in ; 

md. in , June 4, 1854, Susan 

Janet Burbank of South Paris, Me., dau. 
Burbank and , his wife, 

bom in , died 

in , and had 

four children. 

IX. Children of George Chase, and Susan Burbank: 

833 (1). Mary, born in Portland, Jan. 9, 1857, died in 

; was 
md. in , Jan. 7, 1885, 

to William H Nauman, son 

Nauman and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in , 

and had one son. 

824 (2). Alice Manning, born in Portland, Me., Aug. 18, 
i860, died in Portland, Aug, 27, 1862. 

835 (3). Henry Burbank, born in Portland, Me., July 26, 
1863 (md., ch.). 

836 (4). Charles Thomas, bom in Portland, Me., March 
31, 1866. 

835 IX. Henry Burbank, third child of George Chase, 
and Susan Burbank, bom in Portland, Me., July 26, 1863, 
died in ; md. 

in , Dec. 3, 1885, Calista 

Fay of Maiden, Mass., dau. Fay and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had one son. 



Colonel John 239 

X. Children of Henry Burbank, and Calista Fay: 

837 (1). Clinton Noyes, bom in 
, Feb. 4, 1888. 



836 IX. Charles Thomas, fourth child of George Chase, 
and Susan Burbank, born in Portland, Me., March 31, 
1886, 



830 VIII. Edmond Lothaire, third child of Edmond 
Fanning, and Susan Corey, bom in Portland, Me., July 30, 
1832, died in 



576 VI. Joseph, eighth child of Col. John and Ann 
Bamet, born in Montreal, Canada, Nov. 11, 1779, died in 

; md. in 
, England, 



VII. Children of Joseph, and 
838 Mary Ann, born in 



839 Nancy, bom in 

, Oct. , 1836, died in Bradford, Vt., Sept. 
10, 1839. 



240 Connecticut 

In his youth Joseph resided with his mother at Cape 
Breton ; when of age he entered the British army and was 
sent with the forces under WelHngton to Spain, where he 
was engaged in various battles, and was one of those who 
assisted in driving the French from the Peninsula. After 
a long absence from his native land he returned to 
America and settled in Bradford, Vt., near his brother 
Andrew, where he engaged in agriculture. But his Eng- 
lish wife longed for home, and in or about the year 1843 
he went back to England where it is understood the old 
warrior died soon after. 



5f liiE NEW YORK 



r> r T /^ 



' :brary 



^.8T0R, LENOX 




GENERAL ABSALOM PETERS 



GENERAL ABSALOM. 

475 V. Absalom, eighth child of CoL John and Lydia 
Phelps, born in Hebron, Conn., March 25, 1754, died in 
New York, March 29, 1840; md., in 

(abt.) Jan. i, 1783, Mary Rogers, dau. Nathaniel 
Rogers of Leominster, Mass., and Rebecca Symonds, his 
wife, bom in Boxford, Mass., June 14, 1756, died in Went- 
worth, N. H., Oct. 5, 1819, aged 63 years, and had nine 
children. She was buried in Wentworth. 

VI. Children of Absalom, and Mary Rogers: 

830 (1). John Rogers, born in Wentworth, N. H., Sept. 
22, 1783 (md., cli.). 

831 (2). Phebe, born in Wentworth, N. H., May 13, 
1785, died in New York, Aug. 29, i860; was md. in 
Piermont, N. H., Dec. 25, 1806, to Josiah Fisk, son 
Amos Fisk, and Mary Wheeler, his wife, born in Haver- 
hill, N. H., Sept. 8, 1 781, died in Keesville, N. Y., Aug. 
10, 1844, and had 7 children. 

833 (3). Lydia, born in Wentworth. N. H., Feb. 23, 
1787, died in Keene, N. H., July 25, 1871; was md. in 
Wentworth, Aug. 18, 181 7, to Joseph Perry, son Silas 
Perry and Catherine , his wife, born in 

Westminster, N. Y., Mar. 30, 1788, died in Keene, N. H., 
June 17, 1865, and had two sons. 

833 (4). George Pierce, bom in Wentworth, May 30, 
1789 (md., no ch.). 

834 (5). James Whitelaw, born in Wentworth, June 20, 

1791, died in Blakely, Ala., Dec. i, 1822. He was one 

of the first settlers and purchasers of Blakely in 181 7, 

and was of the firm of Peters and Stebbins. He was 
16 

241 



242 Connecticut 

elected representative to the Territorial Legislature, 
1819, and was later Chief Justice of Baldwin Co. 

835 (6). Absalom, born in Wentworth, Sept. 19, 1793 
(md., ch.). 

836 (7). Mary, born in Wentworth, Oct. 2, 1795, died 
in Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1847; was md. in New 
York, Nov. 23, 1837, to the Hon. Samuel Wilkeson 
of Buffalo, N. Y., son John Wilkeson and Mary 

, his wife, born in Carlisle, Penn., 
, 1 7 8 1 , died in Kingston, Tenn. , July , 

1848. No children. 

837 (8). William (twin of Mary), born in Wentworth, 
Oct. 2, 1795 (md., ch.). 

838 (9). Myra, bom in 
Aug. 3, 1797, died in 
Oct. 26, 1862; was m.d. in 

, Ap. 22, 1824, to John W Mason of 

Saratoga, N. Y., son Mason and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had three 
children. 

Absalom md. (2) in Lebanon, Conn., Dec. 6, 1820, Mrs. 
Mary Gurley, widow of the Revd. John Gurley of Lebanon, 
and dau. of Deacon Pelatiah Porter and 
, his wife, born in 

, 1757, died in Lebanon, Ap. 27, 
1837. No children. 

He had intended studying for a profession, but, his 
health failing, he varied teaching with fighting (it is said 
that he was at the battle of East Chester) until he settled 
down as a farmer in New Hampshire. In 1775, while 
teaching choirs to sing in Norwich, Conn., it is said he 
composed the music for the' ode. The American Hero, 
which has been called the war song of the Revolution.* 

* The tune is called " Bunker Hill." 



General Absalom 243 

He graduated from Dartmouth in 1780. While in col- 
lege he was captain of a volunteer company composed of 
the students, who were armed and equipped ready to repel 
an Indian attack upon the settlement, or to give other 
needed aid* The class consisted of ten members, under 
the first president, the Rev. Dr. Wheelock. They were, 
Amos Case, E. Longfellow, Noah Miles, William Putten, 
Absalom Peters, George Peirce, P'^ter Poloquonnonquet 
(an Indian chief of the St. Regis tribe), John Ralphe, 
Joseph Stewart, and Daniel Story. In October, 1780, 
great alarm was felt at the destruction of Royalton, Vt., by 
the Indians, and by the report that 4000 Canadian troops 
tinder the command of Col. John Peters, elder brother 
of Absalom, had crossed Lake Champlain and were on 
the march toward the Connecticut River. The younger 
Peters immeditely started, at the head of six companies, 
to join Gen. Bailey in Newbury, and was this officer's 
aide-de-camp until the close of the war. It is said that he 
sent to his brother a man thoroughly at home in the 
wilds of Vermont, and who gained the confidence of Col. 
Peters to such an extent that he was chosen to lead the 
British troops across the state. This agent at once 
started them on an endless journey, causing them to 
cross and to recross their own tracks, until, wearied and 
bewildered, they lost heart and returned to Canada.* 
Col. John appears never to have suspected this trick of 
his younger brother's. In 1781 he was member, for six 
sessions, of the Vermont Assembly. He was justice of the 
peace and high sheriff of the county for several years. 
1785, May 10, he was commissioned captain of the 6th 
Co. of the 13th Regiment of the State of New Hamp- 
shire. 1793 he was commissioned major of the ist Bat- 
talion in the 30th Regiment of militia. 1794, Sept. 29, he 

* From the Hartford Columbian, May 17, 1845. The compiler does 
not vouch for the truth of these statements. 



244 Connecticut 

was commissioned "lieutenant colonel commandant" of 
the 13th Regiment of the New Hampshire Militia. 
1 80 1, June 12, he was commissioned brigadier-general of 
the 6th Brigade of the State of New Hampshire. In 1806 
he "begged leave to resign his commission." 

From 1832-40 he was postmaster in Lebanon, Conn. 

830 VI. John Rogers, first child of Gen. Absalom, and 
Mary Rogers, bom in Wentworth, N. H., Sept. 22, 1783, 
died in New York, Ap. 24, 1858; md. in Troy, N. Y., 
Oct. 3, 1815, Abbey Covell, dau. Silas Covell* and Re- 
becca Thurber, his wife, bom in Troy, N. Y., May 27, 
1792, died in N. Y., Nov. 23, 1837, and had twelve chil- 
dren.! 

VII. Children of John Rogers, ajtd Abbey Covell: 

839 (1). George Covell, born in New York, July 30, 
1816 (md., ch.). 

840 (2). John Rogers, Jr., born in New York, June 19, 
1818 (md., ch.). 

841 (3). Franklin Armstrong, born in New York, Jan. 2, 

1820, died Feb. 10, 1821. 

842 (4). Abbey Louisa, born in New York, Sept. 10, 

182 1, died in Portland, Oregon, Jan. 7, 1893; was md. 
in , Sept. 10, 1851, to 
Arthur Cook of London, Eng., son Cook 
and , his wife, born in 

, died in New York, , and had 

four children. 

843 (5). Mary Lorrain, born in New York, Nov. 8, 1822, 
living in Greenwich, Conn., 1903; was md. in Geneva, 
N. Y., Aug. 19, 1847, "to Henry John Overmann, son 
Christian Frederick Overmann and Henrietta Ade- 

* He is said to have been with Washington at Trenton, and to have 
crossed the Delaware in the same boat with the commander-in-chief. 

t The dates of birth are taken from John Rogers Peters' family 
Bible. 



-^ 




JOHN ROGERS PETERS 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A^T^Vf*, U.ENOX 
Yd. DEN FOUNDATIONS 



General Absalom 245 

laide Lind, his wife, born in St. Thomas, West Indies, 
Oct. , 1822, died in New York, Ap. 2, 1884, and 

had five children. 

844 (6). CaroHne Cora, born in New York, Ap. 18, 1824, 
died in Pewee Valley, Ky., May 6, 1870; was md. in 
New York, Feb. 9, 1852, to Joseph Wesley Benson, son 
James Benson and Anne Robinson, his wife, born in 
Kingston, Canada, Nov. 23, 182 1, died in Chicago, 111., 
Dec. 23, 1884, and had eight children. 

845 (7). Charles RoUa, born in New York, Jan. 26, 
1826 (md., ch.). 

846 (8). Franklin, born in New York, Oct. 23, 1827, 
died Ap. 22, 1829. 

847 (9). De Witt Clinton, born in New York, July 30, 
1829 (md., ch.). 

848 (10). Frances Marion, born in New York, Ap. 8, 
1832, died in New York, Feb. 17, 1835. 

849 (11). Helen Frances, born in New York, July 19, 
1835, living in Albany, N. Y., 1903; was md. in New 
York, Ap. 6, 1863, to James Truman Taylor, M.D., son 
Nicholas Brink Taylor and Cynthia Hagaman, his wife, 
born in Ingersol, Canada, March 13, 1840, died in 
Utica, N. Y., July 27, 1892, and had seven children. 

850 (12). Hamilton Lovett, born in New York, Nov. 5, 
1837, died Aug. 18, 1855, while on a hunting expedi- 
tion in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. 

John Rogef'S md. (2) in Albany, N. Y., Nov. 27, 1838, 
Mary Lucretia Lovett, dau. John Lovett and Nancy 
McClellan, his wife, born in Albany, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1791, 
died in Albany, June 23, 1862. No children. 

John Rogers began his business career in Groton, Mass., 
in the same establishment with the late Amos and William 
Lawrence, of Boston. He went from there to Troy, 
.N. Y., where he was with Silas Covell, whose daughter 
he eventually married, and in 18 14 he removed to New 
York City. He did much to develop the cotton trade of 



246 Connecticut 

the South, more especially of Mobile, out of which port, 
his brother James, in 18 16, took the first cotton vessel. 
He was assistant alderman of the Ninth ward from 1825 
to 1829, and alderman from 1828 to 1831. After leaving 
the Common Council he served as commissioner of the 
Alms House for several years. These offices were at this 
time purely honorary and the duties were arduous. He 
identified himself with many progressive movements, 
among others in turning Potter's Field into the present 
Washington Square, in removing the Alms House to the 
Island during the cholera epidemic, and he originated, or 
seconded, the idea of a society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. He was a social man, witty and full 
of anecdote, and knew many prominent persons. 

839 Vn. George Covell, first child of John Rogers, and 
Abbey Covell, born in New York, July 30, 18 16, died in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Ap. 21, 1879; md. in New York, Oct. 
II, 1843, Catharine Matilda Stoutenborough, dau. William 
Stoutenborough, and Caroline Henderson, his wife, born 
in New York, June 20, 1823, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
July 22, 1883, and had three children. 

VIII. Children of George Covell, and Catherine Stouten- 
borough. 

851 (1). Mary Rogers, born in New York, Sept. 6, 1844, 
living in Troy, N. Y., 1903; was md. in New York, 
Feb. 20, 1867, to Alexander Masterton Knowlson, son 
Richard Knowlson and Margaret , his 

wife, born in Sand Lake, N. Y., May 16, 1842, living 
in Troy, N. Y., 1903. No children. 

853 (2). Catherine Covell, born in New York, May 5, 
1846, living in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1903 ; was md. in New 
York, Jan. 9, 1867, to Chester Berkely Lawrence, son 
Effingham Nicoll Lawrence and Margaret Clendenning, 
his wife, born in New York, Sept. 15, 1845, living in 
1903, and had three children. 



General Absalom 247 

853 (3). Frank Henderson, born in New York, July 7, 
1848, died at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., July i, 1850. 

840 VII. John Rogers, Jr., second child of John 
Rogers and Abbey Covell, born in New York, June 10, 
1818, died in Georgetown, Pa., Dec. 30, 1900; md. in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., March 18, 1867, Susan Mary Calhoun, 
dau. Capt. Richard Calhoun, and EHzabeth McCurdy, his 
wife, born in Pittsburgh, Pa., , died in 

Georgetown, Pa., Aug. 30, 1897, and had three children. 

VIII. Children of John Rogers, Jr., and Susan Calhoun: 

854 (1). Elizabeth, born in Georgetown, Pa., June 6, 
1868, living in Georgetown, 1903. 



855 (2). Henry Cogell, born in Georgetown, Pa., Nov. 
14, 1870 (md., ch.). 

856 (3). Grace, born in Dover, N. J., Jan. i, 1876, liv- 
ing in McKeesport, Pa., 1903; was md. in George- 
town, Pa., Nov. 23, 1901, to Addison Louis Petty, son 
Asbury Louis Petty and Sara Eliza Taylor, his wife, 
born in Sewickley, Pa., Nov. 9, 1875, living in McKees- 
port, Pa., 1903. 

855 VIII. Henry Cogell, second child of John Rogers, 
Jr., and Susan Calhoun, born in Georgetown, Pa., Nov. 
14, 1870, living in Georgetown, 1903; md. in George- 
town, April 18, 1893, Parthenia Calhoun Parr, dau. Capt. 
Andrew H. Parr, and EHzabeth Calhoun, his wife, born in 
Georgetown, Pa., died in 1902, 

and had one daughter. 

IX. Children of Henry Cogell. and Parthenia Parr: 

857 (1). Pauline Marie, born in Georgetown, Pa., July 
27, 1894. 



248 Connecticut 

845 VII. Charles RoUa, seventh child of John Rogers 
and Abbey Covell, born in New York, Jan. 26, 1826, died 
in New York, May 17, 1881 ; md. in 

, Ap. 14, 1859, Mary Watkinson Warrin, dau. John 
Warrin and Mary E. , his wife, born in New 

York, March 25, 1840, living 1903, 
and had two children. 

VIII. Children of Charles Rolla, and Mary Warrin: 

858 (1). Mary Warrin, born in 

, March 12, i860, living in San Francisco, Cal., 
1903; was md. in San Francisco, Ap. 22, 1889, to Robert 
Joy Woods, son Isaiah C Woods and 

Anne Eliza Fitch, his wife, born in San Francisco, 
Dec. 2, 1856, living, 1903, and had one child. • 

859 (2). Charles Rollo, Jr., born in San Francisco, Cal., 
Ap. ID, 1862 (md., ch.). 

859 VIII. Charles Rollo, second child of Charles 
Rolla and Mary Warrin, born in San Francisco, Cal., Ap. 
10, 1862, living in Monterey, Cal., 1903 ; md. in San Fran- 
cisco, Dec. 30, 1 89 1, Kathleen Murphy, dau. 
Murphy, and Margaret Chambers, his wife, born in San 
Francisco, 1870, died in 

1902, and had four children. 

IX. Children of Charles Rolla, Jr., and Kathleen Murphy: 

860 (1). Charles Rollo, born in Paris, France, Sept. 29, 
1892. 

861 (2). Warrin Hugh, born in Monterey, Cal., Dec. 4, 
1896. 

861a (3). Kathleen Murphy, born in 

Feb. 18, 1902. 
861b (4) De Witt Clinton, twin of Kathleen Murphy, 

born in Feb. 18, 1902. 

847 VII. De Witt Clinton, ninth child of John Rogers 
and Abbey Covell, born in New York, July 30, 1829, died 



-•jui-ioat: ' ■■: 




Abt. 186- 



-C*^ 



LT.-COL. DeWITT CLINTON PETERS 

SURGEON, U.S A. 



General Absalom 249 

in Brooklyn, N. Y., Ap. 22, 1876; md. in 

, Emily Stoutenborough, dau. 
William Stoutenborough, and Caroline Henderson, his 
wife, born in 

died in , and 

had three children. 

VIII. Children of De Witt Clinton, and Emily Stoutenborough: 

862 (1). William Theodore, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Ap. 6, 1862. 

863 (2>. De Witt Clinton, born at Fort McHenry, near 
Baltimore, Md., June 11, 1865 (md., ch.). 

864 (3). Emily Louise, born in 

, Jan. , 1873, died July , 1873. 

De Witt Clinton was a surgeon in the army, with the 
rank of lieutenant-colonel, during the Civil War. He 
wrote a Life of Kit Carson at Carson's request. 

863 Vin. Wilham Theodore, first child of De Witt 
Clinton, and Emily Stoutenborough, born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Ap. 6, 1862, living in Paris, France, 1903; Unmd. 
He has this year (1903) been made an officer of the 
French Academy on account of his poems. 

863 VIII. De Witt Clinton, second child of De Witt 
Clinton, and Emily Stoutenborough, born at Fort Mc- 
Henry, near Baltimore, Md., June 11, 1865, living in 
Baltimore, 1903; md. in , 

March 15, 1890, Adele Bacon, dau. Bacon, 

and • , his wife, born in 

, living, 1903, and 
had three children. 

IX. Children of De Witt Clinton, and Adele Bacon: 

863a (1). John Clinton, born in Paris, France, Jan. 24, 
1891. 



250 Connecticut 

863b (2). Margaret Elizabeth, born in Paris, France, 

Aug. 25, 1892. 
863c (3). Emily Ruth, born in Paris, France, Jan. 6, 

1894. 

833 VI. George Pierce, fourth child of Absalom and 
Mary Rogers, born in Wentworth, N. Y., May 30, 1789, 
died at Fort Gadsden, Florida, Nov. 28, 1819; md. in' 

, June 8, 1814, Lorraine 
Allen Hitchcock, dau. Judge Samuel Hitchcock, and 
Lucy C , his wife, and granddaughter of 

Col. Ethan Allen, born in Burlington, Vt., Jime 5, 1790, 
died in Burlington, Ap. 22, 181 5. No children. 

He was a graduate of West Point. 1808, he was en- 
sign in the 4th Infantry. 1809, July, he was 2d lieutenant. 
181 1, Oct., he was ist lieutenant. 181 1, Nov., he was 
wounded at the battle of Tippecanoe where he distin- 
guished himself by his bravery. 181 2, Aug. 9, he was at 
the battle of Magnago and was again wounded. He 
served with distinction through the war of 1812. 1812, 
Dec. 14, he was regimental paymaster. 181 3, Feb., he 
was assistant adjutant general with the rank of major. 
1 81 4, Feb., he was captain of the 4th Infantry. 1814, 
May, he was captain of artillery. His likeness is en- 
graved on a cannon by the equestrian statue of Jackson, 
in Washington, Major Peters having taken the cannon at 
Pensacola. His grave and that of his wife are in the 
old graveyard in Burlington, Vt. 

835 VI. Absalom, sixth child of Absalom, and Mary 
Rogers, born in Wentworth, N. H., Sept. 19, 1793, died 
in New York, May 18, 1869, ; md. in 

, Oct. 25, 18 19, Harriet Hinckley Hatch, dau. 
Reuben Hatch and Eunice , his wife, born 

in Norwich, Vt., Ap. 2, 1796, died in New York, May 27, 
1890, and had seven children. 




^,*-e,<-'(^ 0^.,<^^t*j ^ 



1858 



J J. 



t^Cf^L.^ 



THE REVD. ABSALOM PETERS, D.D. 



1814 




MAJOR GEORGE PIERCE PETERS, U.S.A. 



'""^^IIC LlBRARYi 






General Absalom 251 

VII. Children of Absalom, and Harriet Hatch: 

865 (1). George Absalom, born in Bennington, Vt., May 

12, 1821 (md., ch.). 

866 (2). Harriet Adaline, born in Bennington, Vt., June 

13, 1823, died in New York, March 27, 1891 ; was md. 
in Williamstown, Mass., Jan. i, 1845, to the Revd. 
William Clift, son William Clift and Nancy Denison 
Avery, his wife, born in Griswold, Conn., Sept. 12, 
181 7, died in Mystic Bridge, Conn., Dec. 9, 1890, and 
had three children. 

867 (3). Horace Hatch, born in Bennington, Vt., Nov. 
4, 1825, died in Pittsfield, Mass., Sept. 15, 1827. 

868 (4). Edward Payson, born in New York, Oct. 9, 
1828, was killed in Cuba in Garcia's insurrection, in 
Aug. or Sept., 187 1, while fighting for the Cubans. He 
was a captain of Volunteers in the Civil war. 

869 (5). Frances Margaretta, born in New York, March 
6, 1831, died May 4, 1832. 

870 (6). Mary Elizabeth, born in New York, May 13, 
1835, ^i^^ i^ New York, Jan. 2, 1864; was md. in Wil- 
liamstown, Mass., June i, 1854, to Albert S 

Ward, son William Ward and Electa Beach, his wife, 
born in Livingston, N. J., Jan. 16, 1828, died in New 
York, Oct. 8, 1875, ^^^ had three children. 

871 (7). James Hugh, bom in New York, Nov. 13, 1837 
(md., ch.). 

After ordinary home and school instruction and being, 
for a few months at a time, a teacher in a district school, 
Absalom graduated from Dartmouth College in 18 16. 
The same year he entered the Princeton Theological 
seminary, and leaving it in May, 1819, was licensed by 
the presbytery of New York. For a few months he was a 
missionary in northern New York, then pastor of the 
first church in Bennington, Vt., from July, 1820, to Dec, 
1825, when he left the church to become the secretary of 
the United Domestic Missionary Society, and to aid in 
the organization of the American Home Mission Society. 



252 Connecticut 

May, 1826, he was its first corresponding secretary, and 
held this office, during successive elections, until 1837, in- 
clusive. During that time he was the principal agent of the 
society in organizing and forming its system, and he was a 
member of the executive committee until 1 844. He says : 
" In the twelve years of my agency for the American Home 
Missionary Society I travelled in nearly all of the United 
States and Territories, as they then were, a distance of 
perhaps three times the circumference of the globe, 
preached in churches of different denominations, at Pres- 
byterian camp -meetings in the West, and on many inter- 
esting occasions at the meetings of presbyteries, synods, 
associations, and other public bodies." As secretary of 
the American Home Missionary Society he edited the 
Home Missionary and Pastor's J^ourjial from 1827 to 1837, 
and then took charge of the American Biblical Repository, 
beginning January, 1838, and ending in the summer of 
1842. In January, 1841, he also began the publication 
of the American Eclectic which he continued until May, 
1842. This year he became agent for the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary of New York, of which he was one of the 
original projectors and a director, and was collector for 
its funds for two years. He was also professor of Homi- 
letics and Pastoral Theology in that institution. In 1844 
he resigned and was installed pastor of the first church 
of Williamstown, Mass. From 1845 imtil 1869 he served 
Williams College as trustee, and in 1852 as collector. In 
1854 he resigned his pastorate, but this resignation was 
not accepted until 1857. After this his life was less 
active, but he continued to preach in divers towns, and 
to write for sundry papers. At the age of seventy he 
composed a long poem on Life and Time, and wrote a 
sketch of his life from which these facts are taken. He 
had great executive talent, was deeply interested in his 
work, and was generally beloved. 




u^ 



a^- 




GEORGE ABSALOM PETERS, M.D. 



General Absalom 253 

865 VII. George Absalom, first child of Absalom, and 
Harriet Hatch, bom in Bennington, Vt., May 12, 182 1, 
died in New York, Dec. 6, 1894 ; md. in 

, Ap. 10, 1849, Julia Coggill, dau. George 
Coggill and Anne Atkinson, his wife, bom in New York, 
Aug. 8, 1824, died in New York, Dec. 12, 1873, and had 
two children. 

VIII. Children of George Absalom, and Julia Coggill: 

873 (1). Frederick Dennison, bom in New York, Nov. 
25, 1852, died May 30, 1859. 

873 (2). Bertha Borodell, born in New York, Feb. 13, 
1855, living in Burlington, Vt., 1903; wasmd. in 

, Oct. II, 1877, to Horace 
Hatch Chittenden, son Lucius Eugene Chittenden and 
Mary Yates Hatch, his wife, bom in Burlington, Vt., 
Jan. 24, 1855, living in 1903, and had two sons. 

George Absalom, after the usual preparatory educa- 
tion, entered the class of 1842 at Yale college, but was 
obliged by circumstances to leave, without completing 
his course, at the end of the sophomore year. His father, 
the Rev. Absalom Peters, was at that time in the pub- 
lishing business, and Dr. Peters, for a limited period, 
entered that business with him in connection with the 
Eclectic Magazine. After a time, preferring a profes- 
sional life, he took up the study of medicine at the college 
of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, and was gradu- 
ated from there with honors in 1846. After his gradu- 
ation he became an interne at the New York Hospital, 
and after completing the usual course there began a 
general practice in New York, which he continued until 
the time of his retirement in the year 1890. 

Dr. Peters' active work continued for a period of 
nearly fifty years, and he attained great success during 
all that time. 



254 Connecticut 

Among the positions occupied by Dr. Peters in pro- 
fessional life, the following may be enumerated : 

Attending and consulting surgeon at New York Hos- 
pital, from the time of his graduation until 1890. 

Attending and consulting surgeon at St. Luke's Hos- 
pital from 1859 until 1888. 

Attending surgeon at the Presbyterian Hospital. 

Consulting surgeon at St. Mary's Hospital. 

Attending surgeon at the Hospital for the Blind. 

President of the Academy of Medicine. 

President of the Physicians' Mutual Aid Society. 

Dr. Peters was quite as prominent in social life as he 
was in professional life. At various times and for varied 
periods, he was a member of the following clubs: Uni- 
versity (being president thereof for three years) , Century, 
Union League, Knickerbocker, and the Medical and Sur- 
gical Society. He was also a member of various dining 
clubs and many other social organizations of minor 
importance. In his later years Yale University con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. 

Dr. Peters was distinguished for unfailing energy and 
industry, and great personal attraction. These charac- 
teristics not only inspired general respect, but general 
affection, and it would be difficult to find, among the 
men of his time in New York, one whose memory is more 
fondly cherished by those who knew him. He had a keen 
and kindly sense of humor and the sunniest of natures, 
qualities which enabled him to endure the sufferings of a 
painful and lingering last illness with a fortitude as rare 
as it was admirable. 

837 VL William, eighth child of Absalom and Mary 
Rogers, and twin of Mary, bom in Wentworth, N. H., 
Oct. 2, 1795, died in Bloomfield, N. J., Dec. 31, 1887; 
md. in , Aug. 23, 1837, Ma- 



General Absalom 255 

tilda McComb, dau. John McComb, and Elizabeth 

, his wife, bom in New York, Feb. 12, 1801, died 
in Bloomfield, N. J., Oct. 30, 1875, and had three children. 

Vn. Children of William, and Matilda McComb: 

874 (1). Mary Matilda, born in Bloomfield, N. J., March 
8, 1839, died in Bloomfield, Jan. 24, i860. 

875 (2). Elizabeth Glean, born in Bloomfield, N. J., Dec. 
5, 1840, died in Bloomfield, Aug. 13, 1891; was md. in 
Bloomfield, Oct. 9, 1867, to Charles H. Nash, son 
John R Nash and Ann , 
his wife, born at Niagara Falls, Canada, Feb. 10, 1839, 
living, 1903, and had three children. 

876 (3). Malcolm, born in Bloomfield, N. J., May 11, 
1844 (md., no ch.). 

876 VII. Malcolm, third child of William, and Ma- 
tilda McComb, born in Bloomfield, N. J., May 11, 1844, 
living in New York, 1903 ; md. in Bloomfield, N. J., June 
3, 1868, Margaretta Artimesia Andruss, dau. Col. Isaac 
Mix Andruss and Lydia Isabella Austin, his wife, bom in 
Newark, N. J., July 31, 1840, living, 1903. No children. 



871 VII. James Hugh, seventh child of Absalom and 
Harriet Hatch, born in New York, Nov. 13, 1837, living 
in Englewood, N. J., 1903 ; md. in 

, Feb. I, 1866, Mary Ann Booth, dau. William A. 
Booth, and Louisa Edgar, his wife, born in New York, 
Feb. 25, 1842, living, 1903, and had four children. 

VIII. Children of James Hugh, and Mary Booth: 

877 (1). Theodore Lewis, born in New York, June 26, 
1869 (md., ch.). 

878 (2). George Absalom, born in Englewood, N. J., 
Oct. 14, 1871, died Oct. 17, 1871. 



256 Connecticut 

879 (3). Louise Edgar, born in Englewood, N. J., Nov. 
25, 1872. 



880 (4). Hugh, born in Englewood, N. J., May 6, 1S80. 

877 VIII. Theodore Lewis, first child of James Hugh 
and Mary Booth, bom in New York, June 26, 1869, living 
in Englewood, N. J., 1903; md., in Englewood, Nov. 29, 
1893, Alberta Louise Preston, dau. Col. Albert William 
Preston, U. S. A., and Mary EHzabeth Ord, his wife, 
born in Rochester, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1871, living 1903, and 
had one child. 

IX. Children of Theodore, and Alberta Preston. 

881 (1). Alberta Louise, born in Englewood, N. J., Sept. 
8, 1894. 



880 VIII. Hugh, fourth child of James Hugh and Mary 
Booth, bom in Englewood, N. J., May 6, 1880, living in 
Englewood, 1903. Unmd. 



5 THE NEW YORK k 



I 




HANNAH PETERS (.MRS WILLIAM JARVI3) 

(PROB. TAKEN IN LONDON ; ABT. 178?) 



THE REVEREND SAMUEL 

465 IV. Samuel, tenth child of John, and Mary Marks, 
bom in Hebron, Conn., Dec. i, 1735, died in New York, 
Ap. 19, 1826; md. in Hebron, Feb. 14, 1760, Hannah 
Owen, only child of Silas Owen and Elizabeth 
his wife, bom in Hebron, Dec. 29, 1740, died in Hebron, 
Oct. 25, 1765, and had three daughters. 

V. Children of the Revd. Samuel, and Hannah Owen: 
883 (1). Hannah, born in Hebron, Dec. 19, 1760, died 
in Hebron, March 2, 1761. 

883 (2). Hannah Delvena, born in Hebron, Jan. 2, 1762, 
died in Queenstown, Canada, Sept. 20, 1845; was md. 
in London, Eng., Dec. 12, 1786, to William Jarvis, son 
of Samuel Jarvis and Martha Seymour of Norwalk, 
Conn., born in , Sept. 
II, 1756, died in York, Canada, Aug. 13, 1817, and 
had 7 children. 1782, he entered, as cornet, the 
(so-called) ist American Reg., the Queen's Loyal 
Rangers. 1789, he was lieutenant of militia in Upper 
Canada, and captain in 1791. Provincial secretary 
under Lt.-Govs. Simcoe Hunter and Gore, and regis- 
trar of Deeds. He was first Grand Master of Free 
Masons in Upper Canada. 

884 (3). Elizabeth, born in Hebron, Jan. 19, 1764, died 
Aug. 27, 1765. 

The Revd. Samuel md. (2), in 

, June 25, 1769, Abigail Gilbert, dau. Samuel Gil- 
bert, of New Haven, and Abigail , his wife, 
born in , Jan. 31, 1752, died 
in Hebron, July 14, 1769. 

'' 257 



258 Connecticut 

He md. (3) in Stratford, Conn., Ap. 21, 1773, Mary 
Birdseye, dau. William Birdseye and Eiinice 

, his wife, born in Stratford, July 26, 1750, 
died in Hebron, June 16, 1774, and had one son.* 

Children of the Revd. Samuel, and Mary Birdseye: 

885 (4). William Birdseye, born in Hebron, June 5, 
1774 (md., ch.). 

Samuel (or Samuel Andrew, as he sometimes wrote 
himself) was left by his father's will (1754) one thousand 
pounds. In 1757 he graduated from Yale and in 1758 
went to England, where he was ordained deacon by Dr. 
Shelton, Bishop of Chester, and priest, it is said, by the 
Bishop of London and the Archbishop of Canterbury. 
In 1760 he returned to the Colonies and was the first 
officiating rector of Hebron and Hartford, which office he 
held until 1774, when his pronounced Tory feelings caused 
his house to be attacked by the Americans during the 
months of August and September, and he was obliged to 
flee from the state and put himself in hiding. On the 
27th of October, 1774, he sailed from Portsmouth, N. H., 
and remained in England thirty-one years. His only 

* In the old graveyard in Hebron are to be found these stones : 
(i) "The Corse of Mrs. Hannah Peters born 29th Decb. 1739 died 
25th Oct 1765 Daughter of Mr Silas and Mrs Elizabeth Owen Consort 
to ye Rey. Mr Samuel Peters is buried here, ye world Contends a 
Second birth is past ye First begins at death on Virtue bent My mind 
I Fixd Obeyd my Love Example to my sex." 

(2) " Mrs Hannah Peters dau. Rev. Mr Samuel Peters and Mrs 
Hannah born Dec. 19 1760 died March 3d 1761." 

(3) " Ye corse of Mrs Elizabeth ye Daughter of ye Rev. Mr. Samuel 
and Mrs Hannah Peters is buried here Born Jan 19, 1764 died Aug. 
ye 27 1765." 

(4) " Here is interred ye Corpse of Mrs Abigail Peters a second 
Consort of ye Revd. Mr Samuel Peters, a Daughter of Samuel Gilbert 
Esq by Mrs Abigail his wife, born J any 31st 1752 Married June 25 th 
1769 and died July 14th 1769. a wedding Changed to Lamentation 
ye Greatest Greif in all Creation a Mourning Groom in Desperation." 

(5) " Here is inter'd ye Corpse of Mrs Mary ye 3d Wife of ye Revd. 
Samuel Peters, and only Daughtr to Mr William and Mrs Eunice 
Birdsey of Stratford. She was Born July 26th 1750 and Died June 
16 1774 Leaving a son 11 days old Baptized Willm Birdsey The Law 
of Kindness reigned upon her tongue." 




Pros. abt. 1787 



1822 



^oomAAjJi UeA^/'y-^ 



TriE MEW YORK , 
PUBLIC UBRArW 



ASTOft, LENOX 



The Reverend Samuel 259 

daughter, Hannah, was taken to England two years later 
(so her father says) in the Somerset, British man-of-war.* 
He received a pension from the British government, as 
well as a grant of land, but in 1803-04, having quarrelled 
with Pitt, his name was taken off the pension list. In 
1805 he returned to America. He spent several years in 
Washington, petitioning for confirmation of a grant of 
land near St. Anthony's Falls, and in October, 18 17, then 
in failing health and eighty-two years of age, he visited 
that part of the country where he passed over a year 
and spent the winter at Prairie du Chien. In 1818 he re- 
moved to New York and lived in that city and in Jersey 
City imtil his death. He suffered from various physical 
ills during a great part of his life. He was a man of 
strong character, and of marked individuality. It is 
probable that he had a violent temper. His nephew, 
Governor Peters, says that he possessed an iron will in 
an iron frame. He was impressive in appearance; six 
feet in height, of powerful build, with light blue eyes, and 
features strongly marked with the small-pox, of which 
he nearly died in London in 1 7 5 8 . He was very arbitrary , 
deeply impressed with a sense of his own importance, and 
determined to receive full measure of consideration from 
others. He was sensitive, and unforgiving, as his let- 
ters testify, and he greatly admired and bowed to those 
of high estate; but he possessed sound common-sense, 
and real affection for, and interest in, his relatives, 
giving them the best of hard, worldly advice, and helping 
them out of his own pocket when he could not have had 
great store for himself. His inflexible and indomitable 
spirit enabled him to endure many and various ills, afflic- 
tions, and losses, with unflinching stoicism. His History 
of Connecticut, which first appeared in London, in 1781, 
was signed "by a Gentleman of the Province," and was 

* This is his own statement, but the compiler feels it to be doubtful. 



26o Connecticut 

not acknowledged, for some time, by him. By its immiti- 
gated exposure of the pecuHarities of the countryfolk, 
and by his exaggerated descriptions, he brought upon 
himself the wrath of his compatriots and earned 
an unenviable reputation for mendacity. His unre- 
liable history of Hugh Peter, and varied versions of a 
mythical ancestry are not so well known, but are harder 
to deal with. In the preface of his History of Connecticut 
he says: "For three generations my forefathers were 
careful observers of the proceedings of the Connecticut 
colonists," when, as a matter of fact, his father had lived 
less than twenty years in Connecticut when the reverend 
gentleman was bom. He received an A.B. from Yale in 
1757, and A.M. from the same college, as well as from 
King's College (now Columbia) in 176 1. It is stated 
that in 1776 he received an LL.D. from Trinity College, 
Nova Scotia, and he claimed for himself an LL.D. from 
Certona, Tuscany. Toward the end of his life he visited 
Vermont, and, possibly with good reason, styled himself 
the first bishop of that state though he was never con- 
secrated. He was buried in St. Peter's churchyard, 
Hebron.* 

* The Revd. Samuel owned slaves, some twenty in all, and the fol- 
lowing relation seems to be of sufficient interest to quote. Records 
prove the tale to be correct. Descendants of Cassar, for many years, 
dwelt in and about Hebron, and may be found there yet. Governor 
Peters used to call them his "colored cousins." 

" Cassar Peters was owned as a slave by the Revd. Samuel A. Peters. 
During the Revolution the Revd. Mr. Peters left Hebron and went to 
England, leaving Cassar and his family living upon land near by his own 
house. Some time after, Nathaniel Mann, a nephew of Mr. Peters, 
and who lived in Georgia, claimed to have a power of attorney from 
his uncle to take C^sar and his family to the South. Mann engaged 
two Northern men to capture the negroes, and to take them to some 
convenient shipping point. They chose a day in autumn when all the 
males had gone to East Haddam for regimental training. The women 
of the neighborhood, however, learning what was going on at Csesar's 
home, went to his house, and did everything in their power to prevent 
their departure, cutting the harness, and using every means they 



y-^i 




GRAVES OF THE REVD. SAMUEL PETERS' THREE WIVES 

HEBRON, CONN. (l 765-1 769-177+) 



1902 



ASTOft, LEi40)(' 



The Reverend Samuel 261 

885 V. William Birds eye, fourth child of the Revd. 
Samuel, and only child of his third wife, Mary Birdseye, 
bom in Hebron, Conn., June 5, 1774, died in Mobile, Ala., 
June 4, 1822; md. in Stamford, Conn., May 4, 1796, 
Mary Martha Marvin Jarvis, dau. Samuel Jarvis and 
Hannah Owen, his wife, bom in Stratford, Conn., Dec. 
29, 1772, died in New York , 1842,* and 

had nine children. 

VI. Children of William Birdseye, and Patty Jarvis: 

886 (1). Mary Elizabeth, born in " June 26, 
1797, died in Little York, Canada, , 1801. 

887 (2). Henrietta Erminie Albertina, bom in Stratford, 
Conn., Feb. 11, 1799, died in New York, Ap. 8, 1891 
Unmd. 

could devise. At last the poor slaves, eighteen in number, were 
loaded into a big waggon, but Cassar himself was compelled to walk at 
the tail. He was given a certain length of rope, so that in going up- 
hill he picked up stones, and put them into the waggon, to increase the 
load, and impede their progress. The vessel lay at some point on the 
river between Norwich and New London. When the men reached 
home that night, and learned what had happened (not knowing that 
it was contrary to law to take slaves from the state) , they held a 
council. Near by lived a Mr. Graves, a tailor. He had been making 
clothes for Caesar, and as Caesar had called for the garments and taken 
them away in the tailor's absence, they resolved, as the only means of 
saving him, to get out a warrant for his arrest. It was near midnight 
before Messrs. Phelps, Horton, Graves, Welles, and five others, 
mounted on their fleetest steeds, and started in pursuit. It was re- 
lated by one of the party, in after years, that, one of the horses having 
steel shoes, fire flew from his hoofs at every stride as they galloped 
down the hills. They must have presented a fine appearance, clad 
in uniform as they were, with plumes waving in the breeze. Ere long 
they overtook the party. Thomas Welles, who was constable, read 
the warrant to Prior: the kidnapper said: 'What, CcEsar, you've 
been stealing? ' ' Dat 's none of your business,' was the reply. The 
poor negroes had cried until their cheeks were wet with tears. They 
were taken from the waggon, mounted each on a horse behind the 
rider, and joyfully returned to their quiet homes." 

* Her death was caused from' inhaling smoke, her bed curtains 
having caught fire. 



262 Connecticut 

888 (3). Samuel Jarvis, born in York, Canada (now 
Toronto), July 31, 1801 (md., ch.). 

889 (4). Mary Elizabeth, born in 

, Aug. 22, 1803, died in , Conn. 

, 1837; was md. in 

, 182 , to Capt. William 
Thomas, son Thomas and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had two children. 

890 (5). Sally Hannah, born in 

, Ap. 20, 1805, died in 

1886; was md. in 

, 1823, to Joshua Beal 
Ferris, son Joshua Ferris and Letitia , his 

wife, bom in Greenwich, Conn., , 1805, 

died in Stamford, Conn., May ,1883, and had 

six children. 

891 (6). William Birdseye, born in 

, June 21, 1807, died in Mobile, Ala., of 
yellow fever, Oct. 11, 1824. 
893 (7). Albert Jarvis, bom in 
, Dec. I, 1808, died in 
, Canada, ,1811. 

893 (8). Harriet Augusta, bom in 
, Aug. 25, 1810, died in 
. N. J., 



894 (9). Hugh Albert, bom in Stamford, Conn., Sept. 
12, 181 2, died in Stratford, Conn., Sept. 2, 1857, Unmd. 

William Birdseye was brought up by his grandparents 
until he was fourteen years of age, when he joined his 
father in England and was educated there and at the 
Jesuits' College in Arras, France. He returned to Eng- 
land, entered Trinity College, Oxford, then entered the 
Temple, in London, and became a barrister-at-law, and a 




W* 2.cwv.^JL. K TiW? 






THE REVD. SAMUEL PETERS 

FROM A MINIATURE ON IVORY BY PURtELLO, 
NEW YORK, JULY, 1824- 



1 



THE KEW YORK 
IPUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LEMOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 



The Reverend Samuel 263 

special pleader. He removed to Canada, was ensign in 
the British service, and was a lawyer in York (now To- 
ronto) and Queenstown, Canada, until 181 7, or later, 
when he removed to Mobile, Ala., where he died. 

888 VI. Samuel Jarvis, third child of William Birds- 
eye and Patty Jarvis, born in York (now Toronto), Can- 
ada, July 31, 1 80 1, died in New Orleans, La., Aug. 11, 
1855 ; md. in , Nov. 14, 

1822, Marianne Angelique De Lilly, dau. Jean Philippe De 
Lilly and Angelique Genevra , his wife, 

bofn in Kingston, Jamaica, , 1804, died in 

New Orleans, La., May 31, i860, and had seven children. 

VII. Children of Samuel Jarvis, and Marianne De Lilly: 

895 (1). Samuel Jarvis, born in New Orleans, Dec. 13, 
1823 (md.). 

896 (2). Harriet Angelique, born in New Orleans, Feb. 
16, 1825, died in Bay St. Louis, Miss., Aug. 28, 1854; 
was md. in New Orleans, Dec. 20, 1842, to Jules 
A Blanc, son Evarist Louis Blanc and 
Fanny Labatut, his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had seven children. 

897 (3). William, born in New Orleans, Ap. 25, 1826, 
died in New Orleans, Ap. 10, 1827. 

898 (4). Myrth6 Elizabeth, born in New Orleans, Feb. 
27, 1828, died March 26, 1854. 

899 (5). Corinne, born in New Orleans, May 28, 1829, 
died March 19, 1832. 

900 (6). Amanda, born in New Orleans, June 3, 1830, 
died Ap. 2,- 1832. 

901 (7). Benjamin Franklin, born in New Orleans, July 
23, 1831 (md., ch.). 

Samuel Jarvis first spent some time in the counting- 
house of a French firm in New York City. In 182 1 he 
removed to New Orleans and in 1823 established the 



264 Connecticut 

grocery firm of Peters and Millard, the largest grocery 
house of that day in the city, and of which firm he was a 
member until his death. In 1824 he was a member of 
the New Orleans City Council, and chairman of its finance 
committee. He was the originator of the Pontchartrain 
Railroad. In 1836 he was the first president of the 
Chamber of Commerce, which office he held from its 
founding until his death. He was president of the City 
Bank. He was president of the State Bank of Louisiana. 
In 1849 he was collector of the port, under Gen. Taylor. 
He was instrumental in introducing the common school 
system into New Orleans, in connection with which he 
founded a public lyceum and a library. In 1863 he was 
the mayor's adviser when the Hon. Mr. Crossman held 
that office. He was director of many institutions. He 
was instrumental in building the St. Charles Hotel, the 
Merchants' and Commercial Exchange, the City Hall, the 
Masonic Hall, the Commercial Bank, the water works, 
etc., etc. He was president of the New England Society 
for many years and until his death. In this connection 
it is interesting to note in his character, as well as in his 
personal appearance, several distinctive Peters traits. 

895 VII. Samuel Jarvis, first child of Samuel Jarvis,and 
Marianne Angelique De Lilly, born in New Orleans, La., 
Dec. 13, 1823, died in New Orleans, Dec. i, 1863; md. in 
New Orleans, April 25, 1847, Aspasie Lavillebonne, dau. 
Jourdan Lavillebonne, and , 

his wife, born in 

died in , and 

had one child who died in infancy. 

901 VII. Benjamin Franklin, seventh child of Samuel 
Jarvis, and Marianne De Lilly, born in New Orleans, La., 
July 23, 1831, living in New Orleans, 1903; md. in New 
Orleans, Jan. 7, 1862, Marie Felicie LeMonnier, dau. Dr. 




-^ ^aP ^ C^.^s--^^^i^ 



SAMUEL JARVIS PETERS 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



^^ THS m^V YORK 



'ASTOft, LENOX 



The Reverend Samuel 265 

Y. R. LeMonnier, and Adele Communy, his wife, born in 
Philadelphia, Penn., March i, 1842, living, 1903, and had 
nine children. 

VIII. Children of Benjamin Franklin, and Marie LeMonnier: 

903 (1). Myrthe Marie, born in New Orleans, Feb. 28, 
1866, living 1903. 

903 (2). Marie Felicie, born in New Orleans, Dec. 12, 
1870, died July 15, 1872. 

904 (3). Samuel Jarvis, born in New Orleans, Dec. 13, 
1873, died Aug. 15, 1878. 

905 (4). Benjamin Franklin, born in New Orleans, Nov. 
10, 1875, died Aug. 17, 1878. 

906 (5). Joseph LeMonnier, born in New Orleans, Jan. 
29, 1877, died Feb. 5, 1877. 

907 (6). William LeMonnier, born in New Orleans, July 
22, 1878. 

908 (7). Samuel Jarvis, born in New Orleans, Nov. 15, 
1879. 

909 (8). Marie Amire, born in New Orleans, Dec. 21, 
1 88 1, living 1903. 

910 (9). Benjamin Franklin, Jr., born in New Orleans, 
Nov. 18, 1884. 

Benjamin Franklin entered the Harvard Law School 
in 1850, and graduated in 1852. March 21, 1862, he en- 
tered the Confederate service, under Gen. Polk, and 
served until the ist of May, 1865, being paroled the same 
day. 

907 VIII. William LeMonnier, sixth child of Benjamin 
Franklin, and Marie LeMonnier, bom in New Orleans, La., 
July 22, 1878, living in New Orleans, 1903. 



266 Connecticut 

908 VIII. Samuel Jarvis, seventh child of Benjamin 
Franklin, and Marie LeMonnier, bom in New Orleans, 
La., Nov. 15, 1879, living in New Orleans, 1903; md. in 
New Orleans, April , 1903, Lillian Catherine MoUegen, 
dau. MoUegen, and 

, his wife, bom in , 

living in 1903. 



910 VIII. Benjamin Franklin, Jr., ninth child of 
Benjamin Franklin, and Marie LeMonnier, born in New 
Orleans, Nov. 18, 1884, living in New Orleans, 1903. 



NEW YORK STATE 

Part I 

479 V. Joseph Phelps, thirteenth child of Col. John 
and Lydia Phelps, born in Hebron, Conn., Nov. 7, 1761, 
died in Portland, "Salem Cross Roads" (now Brocton, 
Chatauqua Co., N. Y.), Sept. 21, 1843; md. in Danbury, 
Conn., Ap, 28, 1785,* Azubah Case, dau. Zia Case and 
Azubah , his wife, born in Hebron, Conn., 

Ap. 26, 1770, died (probably) in Thetford, Vt., of con- 
sumption, , and had several children, all of 
whom died young, the oldest being 

VI. Children of Joseph Phelps, and Azubah Case: 

911 Zia, born in 

, died in Mendon, N. Y., when 15 years of 
age. 

Joseph Phelps md. (2) in Pittston, N. Y., Ap. 8, 1794, 
Lydia Day, dau. Noah Day and Ann , his 

wife, of East Mendon, N. Y., bom in Colchester, Conn., 
Nov. 15, 1777, died in Portland, N. Y., May 8, 1858, and 
had six children. 

Children of Joseph Phelps, and Lydia Day: 

913 (1). Azubah, born in Hoosick, N, Y., Jan. 20, 1795, 
died in Mendon, N. Y., Oct. , 1796. 

913 (2). Joseph, born in Mendon, N. Y., July 31, 1796, 
died in Mendon, Aug. 27, 181 2. 

914 (3). David, born in Cazenovia, N. Y., Nov. 23, 
i8oo (md., eh.). 

915 (4). Lydia, born in Cazenovia, N. Y., Feb. 17, 1803, 
died in Portland (now Brocton), N. Y., Oct. 29, 1884; 
was md. in Murry, N. Y., March 21, 1824, to James 

* The marriage is on the records in Hebron, Conn, 

267 



268 Connecticut 

Harvey Hurlburt, son of the Revd. David Hurlburt 
and Elizabeth , his wife, born in Essex, 

Vt., July 8, 1802, died in Portland,* N. Y., June 23, 
1880, and had nine children. 

916 (5). John, born in Mendon, N. Y., June 2, 1805, 
drowned in the whirlpool at Niagara Falls, N. Y., July 
25, 1828. 

917 (6). Eliza, born in Mendon, N. Y., Dec. 11, 1808, 
died in Brocton, N. Y., 

; was md. in Portland,* N. Y., June 27, 
1830, to John Chamberlain, son Phineas Chamberlain 
and Rebecca , his wife, born in Litch- 

field, Herkimer Co., N. Y., Dec. 25, 1804, died in Broc- 
ton, N. Y., June i, 1885, and had nine children. 

Joseph Phelps was a soldier in the Revolution, serving 
(it is said) the last two years of the war. He drew a pen- 
sion. After the Revolution he studied medicine with Dr. 
Hosford in Pittsfield. He resided, in 1 793, in Thetford, Vt. ; 
i794,heresidedinPittston, N. Y. ; i795,in Hoosick, N. Y. ; 
1796, in Mendon, N. Y. ; 1800-03, he resided in Cazenovia, 
N. Y. From 1805-19 he resided in Mendon, from then 
imtil 1825 he dwelt in Murry, N. Y., and then removed to 
Portland, N. Y. He was a physician and surgeon, and 
was considered a skilful man. He was five feet ten 
inches in height and had dark blue eyes and brown hair. 
He had a remarkable memory and used to teach his grand- 
children mathematics, to count in Latin, etc. When a 
boy he once visited the British army, ostensibly to find 
his two uncles (Col. John and Capt. Bemslee) who were 
officers there. He learned the intention of the English to 
attack the saw-pits, where his brothers, Absalom and 
Samuel, were stationed with troops to guard the American 
stores. The attack was to be made the next morning 
at sunrise. He managed to depart without being ob- 

* Now Brocton, N. Y. 



New York State ' 269 

served, hastened to his brothers' camp about eight miles 
away, and told them of the plan. The camp was at once 
fortified, troops were sent out, and other preparations 
made. When morning came and the British appeared 
they were met by the advance guard, which was mounted, 
and they at once gave up the attack. 

914 VI. David, third child of Joseph Phelps, and Lydia 
Day, his second wife, bom in Cazenovia, N. Y., Nov. 23, 
1800, died in Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., Nov. 21, 1880; md. 
in Murry, N. Y., March 21, 1823, Matilda Lucas, dau. 
Ira Lucas, and Lucretia , 

his wife, bom in , N. Y., Dec. i, 1804, died 

in , Lawrence Co., Mo., Sept. 

2, 1866, and had nine children. 

VII. Children of David, and Matilda Lucas: 

918 (1). William Hugh, born in Clarendon, Genesee Co., 
N. Y., June 8, 1824 (md., ch.). 

919 (2). Ira, born in Cattaraugus, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1826 
(md., ch.). 

930 (3). Lucretia, born in Portland, N. Y., Aug. 23, 
1827, died in 

; was md. in , 

Oct. 23, 1848, to Josiah Loomis, son 
Loomis and his wife, born in 

, Broom Co., N. Y., Dec. 
24, 1807, died in , July 

14, 1882, and had four children. 

931 (4). John, born in Arkwright, Chatauqua Co., N. Y., 

, died in Pewaukie, Wis., Feb. , 

1842. 
933 (5). Eliza Jane, twin of John, born in Arkwright, 
N.Y., , died in Ark., Feb. 

12, 1868; was md. in 

1846, to George Franklin Loomis, son Warren Loomis 
and Sibyl , his wife, born in Co- 

lumbus, Wis., Jan. 14, 1825, died in Columbus, Ap. 6, 



270 Connecticut 

1855, and had four children. EHza Jane was md. (2), 
in , to Charles Root, 

son Root and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had one daughter. She was 
J md. (3), in 

, to William Stubblefield, son 
Stubblefield and , his 

wife, born in , Oct. 30, 

1825, died in 

, and had two children. 
923 (6). Joseph, born in 

N. Y., , died in Wau- 

kesha, Wis., Feb. , 1842. 

934 (7). Lydia, born in Buckeye, Chatauqua Co., N. Y., 
July 4, , died in 

; was md. in 

, to William Hunger 
Hooper, son Hooper and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had two children. She 
md. (2) in 

, George Davis of Harper, Kansas, 

and had one daughter 

935 (8). Daniel, born in 

Trumbull Co., O. (md., ch.) 

936 (9). David, born in 

Henry Co., O., , died in Chicago, 111. 

Feb. 17, 1865. Unmd. He was taken prisoner at 
Arkansas Post, Jan. 11, 1863. He died of pneumonia 
at Camp Douglas, 111. 

918 VII. William Hugh, first child of David, and 
Matilda Lucas, bom in Clarendon, Genesee Co., N. Y., 
June 8, 1824, died in 

; md. in , 



New York State 271 

Jan. 26, 1847, Roxanna Graves, dau. Stephen Graves, and 

, his wife, bom in Middle- 
field, Hampshire Co., Mass., June 29, 181 7, died at Beaver 
Dam, Dodge Co., Wis., Oct. 8, 1856, and had one son. 

VIII. Children of William Hugh, and Roxanna Graves: 

937 (1). Stephen William, born at Beaver Dam, Wis., 
May 19, 1848 (md., ch.). 

William Hugh md. (2) in 

, Feb 17, 1857, Myra D. Clifford, dau. Rufus 
Clifford and Lydia , his 

wife, bom in North Danville, Vt., Dec. 2, 1837, died in 

, and had 
seven children. 

Children of William Hugh, and Myra Clifford: 

938 (2). Lydia M , born at Beaver Dam, 
Wis., Jan. 14, 1858, died 

; was md. in 

, June 27, 1880, to Jacob 
F Brewer, son Fletcher Brewer and 

America , his wife, born 

at Beaver Dam, Wis., Jan. 14, 1858, died in 

{ , and had 
six children. 

939 (3). Mary Jane, born in Dallas, Texas, Dec. 13, 1859, 
died in ; was 
md. in , Oct. 6, 
1878, to George W Davis, son George 
Davis and Nancy , his 
wife, born in , Dec. 13, 
1859, died in 

, and had three children. 
930 (4). Martha Ann, born in Dallas, Texas, June 15, 
1864, died in ; was md. 

in , July 25, 188 , to 

Edmund Reeve, son Thomas Reeve and Elizabeth 



272 Connecticut 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had five children. 
931 (5). Rodney Ira, born in Aurora, Mo., Ap. 15, 1867. 
933 (6). Rufus S , twin of Rodney Ira, 

bom in Aurora, Mo., Ap. 15, 1867. 

933 (7). William A , born in Polo, Car- 
roll Co., Ark., Ap. 13, 1871. 

934 (8). Caroline A , twin of William 
A , born in Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., Ap. 
13, 1871, died in 

; was md. in 
, Ap. 28, 1889, to Rupert Martin, son Wil- 
liam Martin and Elizabeth 
, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had children. 

937 VIII. Stephen William, only child of William 
Hugh, and Roxanna Graves, born at Beaver Dam, Wis., 
May 19, 1848, died in ; md. 

in , Nov. 23, 1863, Or- 

lena Richardson, dau. Samuel Richardson, and Jane 

, his wife, bom in Carleton, Ark., 
June 29, 1856, died at Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., Nov. 18, 
1879, and had three daughters. 

IX. Children of Stephen William, and Orlena Richardson: 

935 (1). Mary Alice, born in 

, Carroll Co., Ark., Nov. 30, 1870, died in 



936 (2). Sophronia Jane, born in 

, Carroll Co., Ark., Nov. 23, 1873, 



New York State 273 

937 (3). Cornelia R , born in 

, Cherokee Co., Kansas, Nov. 9, 
1876, 



Stephen William md. (2) in , 

March 7, 1882, Mary J. Rhodes, dau. Absalom Rhodes, 
and Sarah , his wife, born in 

, Lawrence Co., Ala., June 
6, 1853, died in 

and had two sons. 

Children of Stephen William, and Mary Rhodes: 

938 (4). William Absalom, bom in 

, Carroll Co., Ark., Jan. 20, 1884, 

939 (5). Joseph Franklin, born in 

, Carroll Co., Ark., Aug. 4, 1887, 

938 IX. William Absalom, fourth child of Stephen 
William, and first child of Mary Rhodes, his second wife, 
bom in , Carroll Co., Ark., 

Jan. 20, 1884. 



939 IX. Joseph Franklin, fifth child of Stephen Wil- 
liam, and second child of his second wife, Mary Rhodes, 
bom in , Carroll Co., Ark., 

Aug. 4, 1887. 



274 Connecticut 

931 VIII. Rodney Ira, fifth child of William Hugh and 
fourth child of his second wife, Myra Clifford, born in 
Aurora, Mo., Ap. 15, 1867. 



933 VIII. Rufus S , twin of Rodney Ira, sixth child 
of William Hugh, and fifth child of his second wife, Myra 
Clifford, born in Aurora, Mo., Ap. 15, 1867, died in 

; md. in 
, Ap. 3, 1890, Rhoda Cooper, dau. 
James Cooper and Emeline , 

his wife, born in Gooding Grove, Ills., Jan. 17, 1869 

, and had chil- 
dren. 

IX. Children of Rufus S , and Rhoda Cooper: 

940 (1). (son), born in 

, Lawrence Co., Mo., 
May 5, 1 89 1. 



933 VIII. William A., twin of Caroline A., seventh 
child of William Hugh, and sixth child of his second wife, 
Myra Clifford, born in Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., Ap. 13, 
1871. 



919 VII, Ira, second child of David, and Matilda Lucas, 
bom in Cattaraugus, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1826, died in Aurora, 
Lawrence Co., Mo., July 3, 1869; md. in 



New York State 275 

, Dodge Co., Wis., July 18, 1849, Elizabeth 
Stagg, dau. Joseph Stagg and Sarah , his 

wife, bom in Somerton, Somersetshire, England, Jan. 28, 
1830, died in Galena, Kansas, Nov. 20, 1880, and had six 
children, 

VIII. Children of Ira, and Elizabeth Stagg: 

941 (1). Sarah Ann, born in 

, Dodge Co., Wis., Ap. 23, 1850, died in 

; was md. in 

, Feb. 4, 
1873, to J W Davis, son 

Davis and 
, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had 

942 (2). Eliza Jane, bom in 

, Dec. 4, 1853, 



943 (3). Joseph Eli, bom in 

, July 12, 1856, 

944 (4). Lucretia Matilda, bom in 

, Jan. 20, 1859, died in 
, July 18, 1869. 

945 (5). Roxana Myra, bom in 

, Feb. II, 1863, died in 

, March 18, 1875. 

946 (6). David William, bom in 

, Nov. 7, 1865, 

925 VII. Daniel, eighth child of David, and Matilda 

Lucas, born in , Trumbull 

Co., O., died in ; 

md. in , and had 
one child. 



276 Connecticut 

VIII. Children of Daniel, and 
947 (1). 

Although his sympathies were with the North he was 
obHged to serve in the Confederate army. He was last 
heard from at the battle of Yellow Bayou, La., and was 
known to be in the service May loth, i8th, and 19th, 
1864. 



Part II 

480 IV. William, fourteenth child of Col. John, and 
Lydia Phelps, born in Hebron, Conn., March 11, 1764, 
died in Bergen, Genesee Co., N. Y., Aug. 18, 182 1 ; md. in 
Hebron, Sept. i, 1785, Lydia Phelps, dau. Ichabod Phelps, 
and Mary Trumbull, his wife, born in Hebron, Conn., 
Oct. 12, 1766, died in , Oct. 

14, 1855, and had six children. 

V. Children of William, and Lydia Phelps: 

948 (1). William, born in Hebron, Conn., May 13, 1786 
(md., ch.). 

949 (2). Lydia, born in Hebron, Jan. 15, 1788, died in 

, 1826; 
was md. in 

, to Jewett, M.D., 

son Jewett and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, and had 
children. 

950 (3). Daniel Phelps, born in Hebron, Sept. 25, 1790 
(md., ch.). 



New York State 277 

951 (4). 

952 (5). 

953 (6). 

1 78 1, June 29, William was appointed ensign in the 
8th Co., 2d Reg. of the New York line, Continental In- 
fantry, Col. William Cortland. 1782, Jan., he was dis- 
charged. His name appears on the half -pay roll. 1787. 
Sept. 29, he was elected lieutenant in an infantry regi- 
ment. 1 79 1, he was appointed adjutant. 1791, Nov., 
he was appointed captain. 1792, he was captain of sub- 
legion. 1794, July I, he was appointed major of sub- 
legion. 1796, he was of the 4th Infantry. 1802, June i, 
he was disbanded. 1806, he settled in Township No. 2 of 
the Phelps and Gorham purchase. 181 2, he was ap- 
pointed sergeant of a company of Silver Grays, raised at 
Bergen, N. Y., and consisting of old men who were to 
assist in repelling invasion. They did no service. 

948 V. William, first child of William, and Lydia 
Phelps, bom in Hebron, Conn., May 13, 1786, died in 
Bergen, N. Y., Dec. 8, 1820; md. in 

, May 13, 181 2, Susan Tuller, dau. Abel Tuller, 
and Rhoda Phelps, his wife, born in 
, Ap. 6, 1790, died in 
, May 31, 1867, and had two children. 

VI. Children of William, and Stisan Tuller: 

954 (1). Marietta M , born in 

, Ap. 27, 1813, died in Brockport, 
N. Y., ,1898; was md. in 

, 1833, to Isaac Joslyn, son 
Joslyn and , 

his wife, bom in , 

March 18, 1806, died in , 

Dec. 20, 1878, and had children. 

955 (2). William Hugh, born in 



278 Connecticut 

, Dec. 14, 1818, died in 
, Ap. I, 1840 (md., no ch.). 

William was lieutenant of troop in 2d Squadron of 
5tli Division of Cavalry of N. Y., May, 1800. ist Lieu- 
tenant, 12th Regiment, N. Y., June, 181 2. Captain 
i2tli Reg., Ap., 1814. Lt.-Col., i6th Reg. Cavalry, N. Y., 
Oct., 1 8 19. In the war of 181 2 his name appears on 
the roll from Sept. 26, to Oct. 31, 1812, term charged, 
one month, five days. Also from Dec. 20, 181 3, to March 
25, 1 8 14, term charged, 3 months, 3 days, when he served 
as first lieutenant in a company of cavalry attached to 
the ist (Harris?) N. Y. Reg. of Militia. 

950 V. Daniel Phelps, third child of William, and 
Lydia Phelps, bom in Hebron, Conn., Sept. 25, 1790, 
died in , Mich., , 1837; 

md. in , Abi- 

gail Tuller, dau. Abel Tuller, and Rhoda Phelps, his wife, 
bom in Symsbury, Conn,, , 1799, died in 

, Mich,, , 1884, and had 

three children. 

VI. Children of Daniel Phelps, and Abigail Tuller: 

956 (1). John W , born in Bergen, N. Y. , 

, 1814, died , 1843 

(md., no ch.). 

957 (2). Ida L , born in Bergen, N. Y., 

, 1817, died in , Mich., 

1883; was md. in 

, to William Williams, son of 
Williams, and , 

his wife, born in 
;. , died in Mich., 

1883. No children. 

958 (3). Marmion, born in Bergen, N. Y., Jan. 24, 1819 
(md., ch.). 



New York State 279 

958 VI. Marmion, third child of Daniel Phelps, and 
Abigail Tuller, bom in Bergen, N. Y., Jan. 24, 1819, living 
in Bergen, N. Y., 1903 ; md. in Bergen, , 1849, 
Mary A. Mitchell, dau. William Mitchell and Martha Gib- 
son, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had nine children. 

VII . Children of Marmion, and Mary Mitchell: 

959 (1). John W , born in Bergen, N. Y., 

, 1849 (md., ch.). 

960 (2). Abigail S , bom in Bergen, N. 
Y., , 1851, living 1903; was md. in 

, to Frank 
Merrill, son Wadsworth Merrill and Abigail Fairbank, 
his wife, born in 

, living in Ohio, 1903. No children. 

961 (3). Lydia Phelps, born in Bergen, N.Y., 

, 1853, living in 1903 ; was md. in 

, 1876, to Elmer Root, son 
Root, and , 

his wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had one son. 
963 (4). Hugh D , born in Bergen, N. Y., 

, 1855 (md., ch.). 

963 (5). Ida L , bom in Bergen, N. Y., 

, 1857, died in Sweden, Monroe Co., 
N. Y., , 1895 ; was md, in 

, 1883, to Frederick Root, 
son Root and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
. No 
children. 

964 (6). Jervis T , bom in 

, 1859, died in 



28o Connecticut ,^ 

, 1881. Unmd. 

965 (7). Nellie M , born in 

, 1863, died 

, 1896. Unmd. 

966 (8). Anna S , born in 

,1867, 
; was md. in 
, 1884, toEliasP 
Joslyn, son Joslyn 

and , his wife, born in 

, liv- 
ing in Ohio, 1903, and had one child. 

967 (9). Frederick H , born in Bergen, 
N. Y., , 1869, died in Bergen, N. Y., 

, 1885. 

Marmion now lives on the farm taken by his grand- 
father in 1806. 

959 VII. John W. , first child of Mar- 

mion and Mary Mitchell, born in Bergen, N. Y., 
, 1849, living in 1903 ; md. in 
, 1889, Amanda Randal, dau. Ran- 

dal and , his wife, bom in 

, living, 1903, 
and had two children. 

VIII. Children of John W. , and Amanda Randal: 

968 (1). Bessie, born in , 
1890. 

969 (2). Lewis, born in , 
1901. 

963 VII. Hugh D , fourth child of Mar- 

mion, and Mary Mitchell, born in Bergen, N. Y., 
, 1855, living, in Michigan; 1903, md. in 

, 1875, Jennie Strickland, dau. 



New York State 281 

Strickland, and 

, his wife, born in 

, and had several 

children. 

VIII. Children of Hugh, and Jennie Strickland: 
970 (1). 



LITCHFIELD 

Part I 

Eber,* child of and 

, bom in 
, July 19, 1768, died in Litchfield, Conn., Oct. 14, 
1 84 1, aged 73 ; md. in , May 

23, 1787, Catherine McCollumn, dau. Daniel McCollumn,t 
and , his wife, bom in 

Scotland, , (1764?), 

died in Litchfield, July 6, 1836, aged 72, and had six (?) J 
children. 

Children of Eber, and Catherine McCollumn: 

971 (1). Norman, born in Woodville,§ Conn., Feb. 11, 
1788 (md., ch.). 

* It is at present impossible to place Eber, although it appears more 
than probable that he was a son of William and Deborah Strong, who 
figure in The Lost Tribes. Indeed, from the dates, it would be im- 
possible for him to be the son of any one else. Beyond the records of 
two of the children of this William, we have nothing of this family. 
Tradition among Eber's descendants makes them members of the 
Hebron family, and declares Eber to be the son of a William, and to 
have had a brother Joseph. These are such thoroughly Peters names 
that this tradition is probably correct, especially as we find the dis- 
tinctive Hebron name of John Thompson in this line. It is to be 
hoped that the publication of this volume will clear and straighten 
out many obscure and uncertain lines. 

t Daniel McCallum (or McCollumn), it is said, came to this country, 
from Scotland, with the avowed purpose of giving his money and his 
life to the American cause. He landed in New York about the time 
of the occupation of that city by Sir Henry Clinton (1777), was taken 
prisoner, and thrown into a prison ship, and his family scattered. 
(Duncan McCollom of Saybrook, Conn., married Hannah Peters of 
Preston, 1805; perhaps he was of the same family. See page 99.) 

$ From the records of Sturbridge, Mass.: "Died, 1813, Dec. 28, 
child of Eber Peters." 

§ In Washington, Litchfield County. 

282 



Litchfield 283 

973 (2). Melinda, born in Woodville, Conn., March 28, 
1792, died in 

; was md. in 

, to Alanson Morgan, son 
Morgan, and , his wife, 

born in > 

died in » 

and had five children. Removed to Henry, Putnam 
Co., 111., abt. 1835. 

973 (3). Eber Samuel, born in Woodville, Conn., March 
14, 1797 (md., ch.). 

974 (4). Manley, bom in Woodville, Conn., March 11, 
1799 (md., ch.). 

975 (5). John Thompson, bom in Litchfield (?), Feb. 11, 
1803 (md., no ch.). 

976 (6). Catherine B , born in Litchfield. 
Conn., June 23, 1807, died in Springfield, Mass., Dec. 

, 1 891; was md. in 

to William Rogers, son 
Rogers, and , his 

wife, born in 

, died in New Haven, Conn., 
and had five children. 

Eber md. (2) in Litchfield, , 1836, Annie 

Catlin, dau. Charles Catlin, and Sibyl Compton, his wife, 
and widow of Mathias Dane, Elijah Stuart, and 

, bom in , 

Sept. 3, 1783, died in Litchfield, Aug. 18, 1867. No chil- 
dren. 

1788, Dec. 23, Eber was a resident of Washington, 
Litchfield Co., Conn. 1794, he resided in Litchfield. He 
had an iron foundry, and made tools, ploughs, etc. He 
was also engaged in hauling iron ore from Salisbury. 
He owned a good deal of land. In 1827 he built a stone 
house about seven miles from the village of Litchfield. 
On a marble slab over the door are inscribed the names 



284 Connecticut 

and dates of birth of all his children, and below: "Eber 
Peters built this house in 1827." This house stands on 
the western side of the Shepaug River, which is the 
boundary line between Warren and Litchfield. 

971 Norman, first child of Eber, and Catherine McCol- 
lumn, bom in Woodville (Washington), Litchfield Co., 
Conn., Feb. 11, 1788, died in , N. Y., March 

30, 1874, aged 86; md. in , 

Nov. II, 1809, Abbie Smith, dau. Smith, 

and , his wife, born in 

, Dec. 14, 1782,* died in 
, Aug. 3, 1824, aged 34 years, 7 months, 
19 days,* and had seven children. 

Children of Norman, and Abbie Smith: 

977 (1). William E , bom in Litchfield, 
Conn., July 15, 1810 (md., ch.). 

978 (2). Joseph L , born in 

, Ap. 29, 1812 (md., ch.). 

979 (3). Abigail,bominLitchfield, Conn.,Feb. 26, 1814, 
died in Cato, N. Y., March 20, 1853 ; was md. in Litch- 
field, Ap. 5, 1832, to Josiah Eaker, son 

Eaker, and , his wife, 

born in ' 

died in Cato, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1872, and had three chil- 
dren. 

980 (4). Samuel Eber, born in Litchfield, Conn., Sept. 
25, 1816 (md., ch.). 

981 (5). A son, bom in » 
July 15, 1819, died Sept. 10, 1819, aged i month, 26 
days. 

983 (6). A son, bom in 

Oct. 9, 1820, died May i, 1821, aged 6 months, 20 days. 
983 (7). Marie Louise, born in 
* Given to the compiler from Norman Peters' family Bible. Will 
some one correct it? 



Litchfield 285 

, Sept. 7, 1822, died in Elizabeth, N. J., Ap. 21, 
1890; was md. in Clyde, N. Y., May , 1838, to 

Robert S Gallt, son Joseph Gallt, and 

Esther Dart, his wife, born in 

, died in Oswego, N. Y., Aug. 13, 1888, and 
had four children. 
Norman md. (2) in , Dec. 

10, 1827, Mary E Hill, dau. 

Hill, and , his wife, bom in 

, Aug. 29, 1799, died in 
, Ap. 24, 1874, and had eight 
children. 

Children of Norman, and Mary Hill: 

984 (8). Johnson Hill, born in 

, Ap. 16, 1829 (md., ch.). 

985 (9). James Milton, born in 

, Jan. 10, 1831 (md., ch.). 

986 (10). Manly B , born in 

, Feb. 20, 1833 (md., ch.). 

987 (11). Mary Ann, born in , N. Y., Dec. 
5, 1834, died in Corsicana, Texas, July 12, 1902; was 
md. in Snatchwine, 111., Oct. 11, 1859, to Joseph Huey, 
son Huey, and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had seven children. 

988 (12). Catherine E , bom in 

, N. Y., Oct. 4, 1836, living in 
Olivet, Mich., 1903; was md. in Battle Creek, Mich., 
Dec. 4, 1864, to Russel G Walker, son 

Walker, and 
, his wife, bom in 

, died in Olivet, Mich., July 31, 1870. 
and had two daughters. Catherine md. (2) in 

, Peter Willson, 
son Willson, and 



286 Connecticut 

, his wife, bom in 

, living, 1903, in Olivet, Mich., and 
had one daughter. 

989 (13). Norman I., born in 

, Nov. 5, 1839 (md., ch.). 

990 (14). Theodore C , born in 

, Oct. 28, 1841 (md., ch.). 

991 (15). DeWittC , born in 

, June 16, 1844 (md., ch.). 

About 181 7 Norman removed to New York State, 
where he passed the rest of his life. 

977 WilHam E , first child of Norman, 

and Abbie Smith, bom in Litchfield, Conn., July 15, 18 10, 
died in Detroit, Mich. ; md. in Detroit, 

Mich., Sept. 14, 1836, Catherine Crane, dau. 
Crane, and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had 
(several) children. 

Children of William, and Catherine Crane: 



978 Joseph L , second child of Norman, 

and Abbie Smith, bom in Warren, Conn, (or Litchfield?), 
Ap. 29, 1812, died in Hanover, Mich., Nov. 18, 1878, aged 
67 years, 7 months, and 19 days; md. in 

, Jan. 20, 1837, Catherine Cole, dau. 
Cole, and , his wife, 

bom in , died 



Litchfield 287 

in , and had 

five children. 

Children of Joseph, and Catherine Cole: 

992 (1). 

993 (2). 

994 (3). 

995 (4). 

996 (5). 



980 Samuel Eber, fourth child of Norman, and Abbie 
Smith, bom in Litchfield, Conn., Sept. 25, 1816, died in 
Corsicana, Texas, Dec. 16, 1892; md. in Detroit, Mich., 
Oct. 17, 1849, Mary Elizabeth Case, dau. Seth Case, and 
Paulina Chapin, his wife, bom in Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 
17, 1827, died in 

, and had three children. 

Children of Samuel Eber, and Mary Case: 

997 (1). Eber Seth, born in Detroit, Mich., May 2, 1852 
(md., ch.). 

998 (2). Charles Willis, born in Detroit, Mich., Jan. 26, 
1856 (md., no ch.). 

999 (3). Susan Paulina, born in Detroit, Mich., Jan. 14, 
1859, died in Syracuse, N. Y., Jan. 7, 1872. 

997 Eber Seth, first child of Samuel Eber, and Mary 
Case, bom in Detroit, Mich., May 2, 1852, living in Cal- 
vert, Texas, 1903; md. in Calvert, Nov. 13, 1879, Mary 
Whipple Hanna, dau. James Scott Hanna, and Martha 
Cole, his wife, bom in Robertson Co., near Calvert, Texas, 
Nov. 15, 1857, living 1903, and had six children. 

Children of Eber Seth, and Mary Hanna: 

1000 (1). Eber Hanna, born in Corsicana, Texas, Dec. 
20, 1880. 



288 Connecticut 

1001 (2). James Scott, born in Calvert, Texas, June 5, 

1884, died June 8, 1884. 
1003 (3). Emma Pearl, born in Calvert, Texas, Sept. 3, 

1886, died May 28, 1887. 

1003 (4). Joseph Huey, born in Calvert, Texas, Dec. 20, 

1887, died June 24, 1890. 

1004 (5). Mattie, born in Calvert, Texas, Dec. 2, 1889, 
died May 18, 1890. 

1005 (6). Beulah, born in Calvert, Texas, March 11, 
1891, 

998 Charles Willis, second child of Samuel Eber, and 
Mary Case, bom in Detroit, Mich., Jan. 26, 1856, living 
1903 ; md. in Corsicana, Texas, Feb. 4, 1880, Anna Car- 
penter, dau. Carpenter, and 
, his wife, born in 

. No children. 



984 Johnson Hill, eighth child of Norman, and first 
child of his second wife, Mary Hill, bom in 

, Ap. 16, 1829, died in , , 

Texas, Ap. , 1890; md. in , Texas, 

Theresa Walker, dau. Walker and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had two children. 

Children of Johnson Hill, and Theresa Walker: 

1006 (1). 

1007 (2). 



985 James Milton, ninth child of Norman, and second 
child of his second wife, Mary Hill, bom in 

, Jan. 10, 1 83 1, died in Brookfield (Mich.?) , 



Litchfield 289 

Jan. 9, 1893; md. in Adrian, Mich., , 185 , 

Ellen Baldwin, dau. Baldwin, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had six children. 

Children of James Milton, and Ellen Baldwin: 

1008 (1). Dwight, bom in 

, died in Snatch wine, Ills., 
, 1856 or 1857. 

1009 (2). Charles B , bom in 

1010 (3). Lowell, bora in 

1011 (4). Seward, bom in 
1013 (5). James Milton, bom in 
1013 (6). Nellie, bom in 



986 Manley B , tenth child of Norman, 

and third child of his second wife, Mary Hill, bom in 

, Feb. 20, 1833, died in 

; md. in Cato, N. Y., 
Oct. 26, 1853, Sarah M Sheldon, dau. 

Sheldon, and , his 

wife, bom in , 

died in , and 

had nine children. 

Children of Manley B , and Sarah Sheldon: 

1014 (1). Mary E , bom in 

, Oct. 12, 1856, 



1015 (2). Frank H , bom in 

, Aug. 2, 1858, died 
19 



290 Connecticut 

, Ap. 27, 1902. 

1016 (3). Ella E , born in 

, Aug. 6, i860. 

1017 (4). Idas , born in 

, Jan. 18, 1862, died Oct. 22, 1882. 

1018 (5). Helen R , bom in 

, Aug. 19, 1866, 



1019 (6). Lizette F , bom in 

, Dec. 31, 1867, 



1020 (7). Emma S , bom in 

, Dec. 3, 1869, 



1031 (8). Ada L , bom in 

, Sept. 15, 1871, died in 
, March 10, 1899. 
1033 (9). Minnie B , bom in 

, Sept. 4, 1874, died in 
, March 23, 1875. 



989 Norman I , thirteenth child of Nor- 

man, and sixth child of Mary Hill, his second wife, bom in 

, Nov. 5, 1839, died in 

; md. in Tishlewa, Ills., 
, Susan Merritt, dau. Mer- 

ritt, and , his wife, born in 

, died in 
, and had seven children. 



Litchfield 



Children of Norman I 

1033 (1). Floretta, bom in 



291 

, and Susan Merritt: 



1034 (2). Joseph, born in 

1035 (3). Frank, born in 
died in 

1036 (4). Huldah, born in 



1037 (5). Dewitt I 



, bom in 



1038 (6). Edith, bom in 



1039 (7). Chancey, bom in 



990 Theodore C , fourteenth child of 

Norman, and seventh child of Mary Hill, his second wife, 
bom in , Oct. 28, 1841, died in 

; md. in Washing- 
ton, Iowa, , Lizzie Kelley, dau. 

Kelley, and , his wife, bom 

in , died in 

, and had four children. 

Children of Theodore C , and Lizzie Kelley: 

1030 (1). Birdie, bom in 



292 Connecticut 

1031 (2). Edith, born in 

1032 (3). Josephine, born in 

1033 (4). Walter, born in 

991 De Witt C , fifteenth child of Nor- 

man, and eighth child of his second wife, Mary Hill, born 
in , June 16, 1844, died in 

; md. in Spring- 
port, Jackson Co., Mich., , Elizabeth 
Sheldon, dau. Sheldon, and 
, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had seven children. 

Children of Dewitt C , and Elizabeth Sheldon: 

1034 (1). Elmer, bom in 

1035 (2). Loda, born in 

1036 (3). Mary Rachel, bom in 

1037 (4). Dewight, bom in 

1038 (5). Emma Clare, bom in 

1039 (6). Arthur, bom in 



Litchfield 293 

1040 (7). Gertrude, born in 



973 Eher Samuel, third child of Eber, and Catherine 
McCollumn, bom in Litchfield, Conn., March 14, 1797, 
died in Kent, Conn., Feb. 28, 1892 ; md. in 

, Feb. 18, 1824, Harriet Winegar, dau. 
Garret Winegar, and Lucy , his wife, born in 

Kent, Conn., Dec. 19, 1798, died in Kent, Feb. 26, 1857, 
and had five children. 

Children of Eher Samtiel, and Harriet Winegar: 
1041 (1). Garret Eber, born in Warren, Conn., Jan. 30, 

1825 (md., ch.). 
1043 (2). Catherine Eliza, bom in Kent, Conn., Oct. 5, 
1827, died in 

; was md. in , 

Jan. 9, 1848, to Walter S Booth, son 

Daniel Booth, and Sabra , his wife, born 

in Bridgewater, Conn., Sept. 28, 1827, died in 

, and had five 
children. 

1043 (3). John Henry, bom in Kent, Conn., Feb. 2, 
1829 (md., ch.). 

1044 (4). Lucy Malinda, born in Kent. Conn.. June 11, 
1830, died in Kent, Jan. 31, 1851. Unmd. 

1045 (5). James Hull, born in Litchfield, Conn., Aug. 
18, 1836 (md., ch.). 

Eber Samuel md. (2) in 

, Mary Ann Moultrop, dau. Solomon Moul- 
trop, and , his wife, born in 

^ , died in 

. No children, 
1848, Eber Samuel was Justice of the Peace in Kent, 
Conn. 



294 Connecticut 

1041 Garret Eber, first child of Eber Samuel, and Har- 
riet Winegar, bom in Warren, Conn., Jan. 30, 1825, living 
in Detroit, Mich., 1903; md. in Amherst, Mass., June 29, 
1850, Lucy Eliza Merrill, dau. Calvin Merrill, and Cor- 
delia Amelia Leonard, his wife, bom in Amherst, June 6, 
1828, living 1903, and had two children. 

Children of Garret Eber, and Lucy Merrill: 

1046 (1). Franc Noble Monnell, born in Kewanee, Ills., 
Aug. 18, 1854, living in Detroit, 1903; was md. in De- 
troit, Oct. 21, 1885, to Robert Thomas Yeats, Jr., son 
Robert Thomas Yeats, and Susan M , his 
wife, born in London, Eng., , 1830, liv- 
ing 1903, and had four children. 

1047 (2). Mary Armstrong, born in 

, Feb. 10, 1878, living 1903. 

1852, Garret Eber graduated from Trinity College, Conn. ; 
1853, he was ordained priest of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, and is settled in Detroit, Mich. 

1043 John Henry, third child of Eber Samuel, and Har- 
riet Winegar, bom in Kent, Conn., Feb. 2, 1829, died in 

; md. in 
Freeport, Stephenson Co., Ills., Sept. 3, 1853, Helen M 

Kneeland, dau. Hector P Knee- 

land, and , his wife, born in 

Binghampton, N. Y., , 1^^?,^^ died in Lin- 

coln, Cal., March i, 1885, and had three sons. 

Children of John Henry, and Helen Kneeland: 

1048 (1). Harry Kneeland, born in Delhi, Delaware Co., 
Iowa, Dec. 22, 1854 (md., ch.). 

1049 (2). Hugh Eber, born in Delhi, Delaware Co., 
Iowa, June 2, 1856. 

1050 (3). John Gerard, born in Delhi, Iowa, Dec. 8, 
1862. 




(7- 



I'ljzyi^ /.^i^^-T-KC^f^ 



1903 




1902 



DETROIT, MICH. 



I, 



L 



ASTOR, LENOX 
ILDEN FOUNa/,T 



Litchfield 295 

John Henry was educated at Trinity College and stud- 
ied law with Truman Smith, afterward U. S. Senator from 
Connecticut. 1853, he resided in Freeport, Ills. He was 
admitted to practice in the Supreme Court. 1854, he re- 
moved to Iowa, He was a member of the Constitutional 
Convention which framed the present constitution of the 
State of Iowa. 1861, he enlisted as captain, Co. B, 4th 
Iowa Cavalry, Volunteers. He was later major, lieut.- 
col., and colonel of the same command. 1865, Sept., he 
was mustered out of service. He was seriously wounded. 
1867, he removed to Memphis, Tenn., and engaged in the 
practice of law for one year, but his health failing, he re- 
turned to Iowa and resided in Delhi, Delaware Co. 1886, 
he removed to Manchester, Iowa. 

1048 Harry Kneeland, first child of John Henry, and 
Helen ICneeland, bom in Delhi, Delaware Co., Iowa, Dec. 
22, 1854, died in Eldora, Iowa, Jan. 30, 1882 ; md. in 

, dau. , 

and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had two children. 

Children of Harry Kneeland, and 

1051 (1). Helen, bom in , 

March, 15, 1878, 



1053 (2). Solon, bom in 
Dec. 20, 1881, 

Harry KJneeland was a farmer in Delhi, Iowa. 



296 Connecticut 

1049 Hugh Eber, second child of John Henry, and 
Helen Kneeland, bom in Delhi, Iowa, June 2, 1856, 



Hugh Eber was a teacher in Delhi, Iowa, 

1050 John Gerard, third child of John Henry, and 
Helen Kneeland, bom in Delhi, Iowa, Dec. 8, 1862, 



1045 James Hull, fifth child of Eber Samuel, and Har- 
riet Winegar, bom in Litchfield, Conn., Aug. 18, 1836, died 
in ; md. in 

, Dec. 22, 1864, Welthy 
Hungerford, dau. Ansel Hungerford, and Louisa 

, his wife, bom in Pawling, Dutchess Co., N, Y., 
Jan. 7, 1840, died in 

, and had three children. 

Children of James Hull, and Welthy Hungerford: 

1053 (1). John Alva, bom in Kent, Conn., Dec. 26, 1868. 

1054 (2). Hattie Louise, born in Kent, Conn., Oct. 20, 
1872, died in Kent, March 26, 1878. 

1055 (3), Jessie Louise, bom in Kent, Conn., Feb. 14, 
1 88 1, living 1902. 



1053 John Alva, first child of James Hull, and Welth}^ 
Hungerford, bom in Kent, Conn., Dec. 26, 1868, 



Litchfield 297 

974 Manly, fourth child of Eber, and Catherine Mc- 
CoUumn, bom in Woodville, Conn., March 11, 1799, died 
in Norwich, Conn., Oct. 12, 1863; md. in 

, May 22, 1827, Hannah Lucretia Griswold, 
dau. Griswold, and 

, his wife, bom in Hartland,* Conn., Aug. 26, 1805, 
died in Norwich, Conn., Jan. 15, 1893, aged 87, and had 
five children. 

Children of Manly, and Hannah Griswold: 

1056 (1). Delia, bom in Milton, Conn., Feb. 23, 1828, 
died June , 1829. 

1057 (2). Martha, born in Milton, Conn., March 
1830, died in Milton, , aged 7 years. 

1058 (3). Delia, bom in Milton, Conn., Aug. 8, 1832, 
living in Chicago, Ills., 1903 ; was md. in 

, June , 1 8 5 3 , to Stephen Jared 

Mowry, son Samuel Mowry, and Rebecca , 

his wife, born in Bozrahville, Conn., June 26, 1828, 
died in Norwich, Conn., Aug. 26, 1865, and had two 
children. 

1059 (4). Julia, bom in Milton, Conn., June 22, 1834, 
died in Petersburg, Tenn., Nov. , 1867 ; was md. 
in Courtland, Ala., , 1863, to A 

W Bentley, M.D., son 

Bentley, and . his 

wife, born in ,Va., , died 

in Petersburg, Tenn., July , 1866, and had four 

children. 

1060 (5). Mary Griswold, born in Warren, Conn., Jan. 
22, 1842, living in Norwich, Conn., 1903; was md. in 

, Sept. 18, 1865, to 
John S Mowry, son Samuel Mowry, and 

Rebecca , his wife, born in Bozrahville, 

Conn., Jan. i, 1826, died in 

, and had six children. 

* (Or Goshen.) 



298 Connecticut 

Manly was educated at Yale and graduated from the 
Pittsfield Medical School, 1826. For ten years he was a 
physician in Milton, Conn. His father had an iron foun- 
dry in Woodville, Conn., and about 1836 Manly engaged 
in this business, the name of the firm being M. & J. Peters. 
Later he was inspector of the iron and steel used in build- 
ing the Collins line of steamers. In 1856 he bought a 
tract of land near KJnoxville, Tenn. Here was dis- 
covered that rich vein of iron ore first developed during 
the Civil war. The war began before the work was 
finished. Dr. Peters returned to Connecticut in the fall 
of i860, having been outspoken in his loyalty to the Union 
he could not live in the South. But Jefferson Davis 
needed this ore, and sent a letter to Dr. Peters offering 
him protection, and promising money to complete the 
furnaces, and that the property should not be confiscated. 
This letter was delivered to Dr. Peters in Norwich. He 
gave it no consideration, though to him it meant wealth. 
He did not even speak of it, and Gen. Longstreet used the 
lumber designed to build the hamlet, for Confederate cof- 
fins, and Southern mules and horses fed on the farm. Dr. 
Peters always retained his interest in his profession and 
kept in touch with the march of science. He resumed 
his medical practice, ministered to the families of the 
soldiers, and did many charitable deeds, now but blessed 
memories to those he cheered with his quaint humor 
and his kindly ways. 1846-47-48-50, he was justice of 
the peace in Warren, Conn. 



975 John Thompson, fifth child of Eber, and Catherine 
McCollumn, born in , Litch- 

field Co., Conn., Feb. 11, 1803, died in Litchfield, Conn., 
March 23, 1878; md. in , 

June 6, 1828, Lucy demons, dau. Abel demons, and Ma- 



Litchfield 299 

hitable , his wife, bom in Litchfield, Dec. 

12, 1798, died in Litchfield, Feb. 20, 1885. No children. 
They adopted one daughter, now Mrs. S. Almira Clarke 
of Woodville, Conn., to whom the compiler and all those 
who read this book are indebted for the interest she has 
taken and the help she has given in genealogical matters. 
John Thompson was an iron-master. 



PART II. 

Joseph,* child of 

and , 

bom in , died 

in Darien, Genesee Co., N. Y. ; md. in 



Children of Joseph, and 

1061 (1). Joseph, born in Warren, Conn., July 8, 1783, 
died in Darien, Genesee Co., N. Y., Feb. 16, 1846; md. 
in , Sept. 8, 1805, Lu- 

cina Curtis, dau. Augustus Curtis, and Lowena 

, his wife, born in Warren, Jan. 3, 1786, died in 
Warren, May 7, 1855, and had one son. 

Children of Joseph, and Lucina Curtis: 

1063 (1). Theodore Curtis, born in Warren, Conn., July 
30, 1806. 

1776, Joseph, Sr., was a resident of Warren, Conn., 
and was one of the subscribers of the following document : 

"We, the subscribers, being convinced of the necessity 
of a body of forces to defeat certain wicked purposes, 

* This Joseph is supposed to be a brother of Eber, but nothing cer- 
tain is known about him. 



300 Connecticut 

formed by instruments of ministerial Tyranny, do sol- 
emnly engage ourselves and enlist as private soldiers, in 
a regiment to be commanded by Col. Andrew Ward, Jr., 
under command of Major Gen. Lee, for the term of 8 
weeks at the utmost, from the day we march from Fair- 
field which is the place of rendezvous. The Hon. Major 
Gen. Lee having given his word and honor, that we shall 
not be detained a single day after said term. Dated at 
Litchfield, 21st day of January, 1776." The list of 
names comprises the leading men of Litchfield, Torring- 
ton, Goshen, and Warren. 

It is said he (or his father) md. (2), in New York State, 
Mrs. Miller 



1063 Theodore Curtis, only child of Joseph, and Lucina 
Curtis, bom in Warren, Conn., July 30, 1806, died in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., May 6, 1876; md. in 

, Feb. 16, 1835, Ruth Lovett Miller, dau. John 
Miller, and Rebecca' , his wife, bom in Hano- 

ver, N. Y., Jan. 5, 1814, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Ap. 24, 
1879, and had four children. 

Children of Theodore Curtis, and Ruth Miller: 

1063 (1). Joseph Augustus, born in Darien, N. Y., Feb. 
20, 1840 (md., ch.). 

1064 (2). Hugh, born in Darien, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1843 
(md., no ch.). 

1065 (3). Genevra Mary, born in Darien, N. Y., June 24, 
1846. 

Unmd. 

1066 (4). John Miller, born in Darien, N. Y., June i, 
1850 (md., ch.). 

Joseph, Sr., Joseph, Jr., and Theodore removed to 
Darien, N. Y., about 1810, the elder members having 



Litchfield 301 

bought land there a few years before. The hardships of 
the journey and of the early life of the settlement made 
a great impression on Theodore. He was educated at 
Middlebury Academy, N. Y. 1833 he was admitted to 
the bar, and he soon after began the practice of law in 
Buffalo. He was city marshal of Buffalo, and later city 
clerk. 1853-54, he was a member of the Assembly of 
New York, i860 he was appointed one of the original 
members of the State Board of Assessors. 1865, he was 
elected president of the State Agricultural Society. About 
1865 he removed to Maryland, but was soon appointed 
to the Department of the Interior in Washington, as an 
agent to visit the South, and to examine its agricultural 
resources. After this he settled in Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
was an officer of the Internal Revenue Department and of 
the Appraiser's Department at the Custom House. He 
was at one time associate editor of the Rural New Yorker. 
He was associated with the World. He established in 
Buffalo a magazine called The Wool Grower. 

1063 Joseph Augustus, first child 'of Theodore Curtis, 
and Ruth Miller, born in Darien, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1840, 
died in St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 22, 1883 ; md. in 

, Ap. 21, 1 86 1, Phebe Jane Williams, 
dau. Williams, and 

, his wife, bom in , Oct. 

30, 1839, died in 

, and had three sons. 

Children of Joseph Augustus, and Phebe Williams: 

1067 (1). Hugh C^wardine, born in Darien, N. Y,, Jan. 
4, 1864. 

1068 (2). George Llewellyn, bom in Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 
21, 1865. 

1069 (3). Robert Howard, bom in Newark, N. J., July 
26, 1873. 



302 Connecticut 

Joseph Augustus md. (2) in 

, dau. 
and 
his wife, bom in , 

, died in , 

and had four children. 

Children of Joseph Augustus, and 

1070 (1). 

1071 (2). 
1073 (3). 
1073 (4). 

1067 Hugh Cc^wardine, first child of Joseph Augustus, 
and Phebe Williams, bom in Darien, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1864, 

. Unmd. 



1068 George Llewellyn, second child of Joseph Au- 
gustus, and Phebe Williams, bom in Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 
21, 1865, 
Unmd. 



1069 Robert Howard, third child of Joseph Augustus, 
bom in Newark, N. J., July 26, 1873, 

. Unmd. 



1064 Hugh, second child of Theodore Curtis, and Ruth 
Miller, bom in Darien, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1843, 

; md. in 
, June 12, 1889, Maude Clark of Portland, 



Litchfield 303 

Ore., dau. Clark, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
No children. 

1066 John Miller, fourth child of Theodore Curtis, and 
Ruth Miller, bom in Darien, N. Y., June i, 1850, 

; md. in 
, Oct. 17, 1877, Mary Eskildson Whit- 
ney, dau. James Frothingham Whitney, and Mary Hen- 
derson, his wife, bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 2, 1852, 

, and had 
three daughters. 

Children of John Miller, and Mary Whitney: 
1074 (1). Ruth, bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1878, 



1075 (2). Carrie Whitney, bom in Brooklyn, N.Y., Nov. 
4, 1882, 



1076 (3). Dorothy, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 16, 
1886, 



LOST TRIBES 

458 IV. William, third child of John, and Mary- 
Marks, bom in Hebron, Conn., Aug. 30, 1722, died in 
Hebron, Ap. 23, 1760; md. in Hebron, Jan. 5, 1744, 
Ruth Chapwell, dau. Jonathan Chapwell, and Ruth 

, his wife, bom in Hebron, Jan. 25, 1725, died in 
Hebron, Feb. 20, 1751, and had four children. 

V. Children of William, and Ruth Chapwell: 

1077 (1). Mary, bom in Hebron, Sept. 29, 1744, died in 

; was 
md. in Hebron, June 23, 1764, to Philip Judd, son 

Judd, and , 

his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had six children. 

1078 (2). William, born in Hebron, July 17, 1746 (md., 
ch.). 

 1079 (3). Joseph, born in Hebron, , 

(1747?) (md., ch.). 

1080 (4). Jonathan, born in 

, died in Hebron, Jan. 9, 1756. 

William md. (2) in 

, Abigail Moreau, dau. Mpreau, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had five children. 

Children of William, and Abigail Moreau: 

1081 (5). Ruth, born in 

304 



Lost Tribes 305 

108.3 (6). Lydia, bomin 

, died in 

; md. in Scotland, Conn.,* March 2, 
1775, Dean Manning, son Manning and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had 
children. 
1083 (7). Rachel, born in 



1084 (8). Andrew, born in 
, Ap. 2, 1758. 



1085 (9). Margaret, born in 
, Ap. 12, 1760, 



William removed from Hebron (Gilead) in 1748.! 

1078 V. William, second child of William, and Ruth 
Chapwell, bom in Hebron, Conn., July 17, 1746, died in 

; md. in 
Hebron, Ap. 10, 1766, Deborah Strong, dau. Eleazer 
Strong, Jr., and , his wife, 

born in Hebron, Dec. 8, 1745, died in 

, and had eight children. 

* Marriage recorded in Colchester Church records as of Scotland, 
Conn. 

t In the old graveyard in Andover, Conn., is a stone with the follow- 
ing inscription: "Here lyes ye Body of Mrs Ruth Peters wife Mr 
William Peters Who Died Feb. 20, 1751 in ye 26th year of her age 
Who lived Desired and Died Lamented by Mr William Peters and her 
children Mary, William, Joseph and Jonathan." 



3o6 Connecticut 

VI. Children of William, and Deborah Strong: 

1086 (1). Deborah, bom in Hebron, Ap. lo, 1767, died 
in 

1087 (2). 

1088 (3). 

1089 (4). 

1090 (5). William (?) born in Hebron, Sept. 27, 1773. 

1091 (6). 
1093 (7). 

1093 (8). 

1079 V. Joseph, third child of William, and Ruth Chap- 
well, bom in Hebron, 

(1747?), died in ; 

md. in Hebron, Conn,, June 23, 1768, Dorothy Owen, dau. 
Amos Owen, and , his wife, 

bom in Hebron, July 27, 1750, died in 

, and had twelve children. 
VI. Children of Joseph, and Dorothy Owen: 

1094 (1). Amasa,* born in Hebron, Feb. 17, 1769. 

1095 (2). 

1096 (3). 



1097 


(4). 


1098 


(5). 


1099 


(6). 


1100 


(7). 


1101 


(8). 


1103 


(9). 


1103 


(10). 


1104 


(11). 


1105 


(12). 



1084 V. Andrew, (probably eighth) child of William, 
and (probably fourth) child of his second wife, Abigail 
Moreau, bom in 



* (Or Amos?) 



Lost Tribes 307 

1775' J^ly 12 to Dec. 18, Andrew Peters, private in 
5th Co., 2d Regiment, Capt. Charles Ellsworth. (Officers 
from East Windsor and Enfield.) 1778, Jan. 10, Andrew 
Peters entered the service, Capt. Clark's Co. 1781, Feb. 
8 to Dec. 31, Andrew Peters of Coventry, Conn., for 3 
years, 2d Regiment. 



PART II 

460 IV. Joseph, fifth child of John, and Mary Marks, 
bom in Hebron, Conn., Aug. 20, 1726, died in Chatham, 
Conn., Jan. 21, 1761; md. in Hebron, Jan. 14, 1748, De- 
borah Burchard, dau. Burchard, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had six children. 
V. Children of Joseph, and Deborah Burchard: 

1106 (1). Joseph, born in Hebron, Dec. 24, 1748, died 
Dec. 26, 1751. 

1107 (2). Samuel, born in Colchester, Conn., Dec. 9, 
1750 (md., ch.). 

1108 (3). Deborah, born in Colchester, May 4, 1753, 
died in 

Unmd. 

1109 (4). Joseph, born in Colchester, Jan. 5, 1756 (md., 
ch.). 

1110 (5), Susannah, born in 

, died in 

; was md. in 

, to Hopkins West, son 
Moses West, and Sarah , his wife, born 

in 

died in , 

and had five children. 



3o8 Connecticut 

till (6). Phebe, born in Middletown, Conn., Oct. 26, 
1760, died in East Hampton, in the town of Chatham, 
Conn., June I, 1795 ; wasmd. in 

, Dec. 12, 1780, to George Gates, son Nehemiah 
Gates, and Ann , his wife, born in 

Chatham, Conn., (bap. Nov. 2, 1760), 

died in Chatham, Conn., Ap. 6, 1826, and had six 
children. 

Joseph was a physician and died of the smallpox. 
When he found that he had been exposed to the disease 
he settled all his affairs and made what provision he could 
for his family. His gravestone is standing in Chatham, 
Conn., and is inscribed: "In memory of Joseph Peters 
bom Aug. 27, 1726, died Jan. 27, 1761, to ye great grief 
of his relict five children & acquaintances, whose chari- 
ties to ye poor entitle him to ye temple of everlasting 
memory, ye blessings of God. Mortals must die to be- 
come immortal, Heaven gained only through Death. 
Faith in crucifixion Hope by resurrection." 

He may be the Joseph who was in the 8th Co. (Capt. 
Hobbey's), 1755, from Sept. 5 to Dec. 6; 1756, Aug. 3 to 
Dec. i; and again, 1757, Ap. 5, in the 3d Co., under 
Major Pateison, 3d Reg. If this is not our Joseph the 
man mentioned must be from Massachusetts, and either 
of the New Hampshire line or of the Salem family. 

1107 V. Samuel, second child of Joseph, and Deborah 
Burchard, bom in Colchester, Conn., Dec. 9, 1750, died 
in ; md. in 

, Huldah 
Young, dau. Young, and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had three children. 



Lost Tribes 309 

VI. Children of Samuel, and Huldah Young: 

1112 (1). 

1113 (2). 

1114 (3). 

1776, Sept., Samuel was in the 12th Regiment, Capt. 
Wells's Co., as drummer, and marched to West Chester. 
1778, Aug. 2 to Sept. 12, he was drummer in Capt. Rudd's 
Co., under Col. Chapman, under Brig.-Gen. Tyler, under 
Gen. Sullivan, and engaged in the attempt to dislodge the 
British at Newport (battle of Rhode Island), Aug. 29, 
1778. He was also in the service from Jan. i, 1781, to 
Dec. 31, 1 78 1.* 

1109 V. Joseph, fourth child of Joseph, and Deborah 
Burchard, bom in Colchester, Conn., Jan. 5, 1756, died in 

; mci. in 
Hebron, Conn., Oct. , 1778, Sarah Welles, dau. 

Edmund Welles, and , his 

wife, bom in , 

died in , and 

had children. 

VI. Children of Joseph, and Sarah Welles: 

1115 (1). Mary, born in 

died in . Unmd. 

1116 (2). Sarah, bom in 

, died in 

; was md. in 

, to Mathew Gibbs, son 
Gibbs, and , his 

wife, born in 

, died in 

, and had five children. Resided Cambridge, 
N. Y. 
*This service was erroneously given to Capt. Samuel (478). It is 
difficult to distinguish in many cases, but this is now believed to be 
a correct division. 



3IO Connecticut 

1117 (3). Joseph, born in 

, died in 
. Unmd, 

1118 (4). James, bom in 

, died in 
. Unmd. 

1775, Joseph enlisted in Capt. Abijah Rowlee's Co. 
1776, July 12, Joseph enlisted in the 8th Regiment, 6th 
Co.; discharged Dec. 17. 



OHIO 

478 V. Andrew, twelfth child of Col. John, and Lydia 
Phelps, bom in Hebron, Conn., Dec. 23, 1759, died in 
Columbia, Hamilton Co., Ohio, Feb. 25, 1825 ; md. in 

, Sarah Taft, dau. 
Taft, and , 

his wife, bom in 

, died in , 

and had nine children. 

VI. Children of Andrew, and Sarah Taft: 

1119 (1). William, bom in 

1130 (2). John, born in 

1131 (3). Simeon Andrew, bom in 
1133 (4). Absalom Oliver, bom in 
1133 (5). Azubah, bom in 

, died in 

; was md. in 

, to Jenkens 

son Jenkens, and 

, his wife, 



1134 (6). Sarah P 



and 



IP 


, bom in 




, died in 




; was md. in 




,to 


Pritchard, son 


Pritchard, 


, his wife, 





1135 (7). Bethia, bomin 



3" 



312 



son 



Connecticut 




, died in 






; was md. 


in 




,to 




Anderson, 


Anderson, 


and 




, his wife. 






Lydia P 


» 


bom in 
, died in 

; was md. in 
, to 


Rawson, son 




Rawson, 



1137 (9). Dolly P 



Green, son 



, bom in 
, died in 

; was md. in 
, to 
Green, and 



It is probably this Andrew who served in the Revolu- 
tionary army, entering 1778, April 10, for nine months, 
in Col. Humphrey's regiment. 

1119 VI. William, first child of Andrew, and Sarah 
Taft, bom in 



1120 VI. John, second child of Andrew, and Sarah 
Taft, bom in 



Ohio 313 

1121 VI. Simeon Andrew, third child of Andrew, and 
Sarah Taft, bom in 

, died in , Calhoun 

Co., Ills., Jan. 16, 1842 ; md. in 

, dau. , and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had five children. 

VII. Children of Simeon Andrew, and 

1138 (1). 

1139 (2). 

1130 (3). 

1131 (4). 
1133 (5). 

1133 VII. Absalom Oliver, fourth child of Andrew, and 
Sarah Taft, bom in Columbia, Ohio, Feb. i, 1808, died in 

; md. in 
, 1840, 
, dau. and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had children. 

He was living in Clark Co., 111., in 1843. 

VIII. Children of Absalom Oliver, and 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SEBORNE (Seberance) 

The descent of the New Hampshire Peters is purely 
inferential, and the only clue — but which, fortunately, is 
of serious importance — is the unusual name of Sebome. 
The birth of the second child of Andrew 3 II of Andover 
is recorded on the Andover records as Sibbons. In his 
grandfather's will the name is Seberance* It is evident 
that this is the real name, and that Sibbons, Sebome, 
Seaborn (and probably the name of Seavems) are spell- 
ings according to the usual clipping English pronunciation 
of long family names, like Cholmondeley, which is pro- 
nounced Chumley, Beecham for Beauchamp, Sinclair for 
Saint Clair, etc. The name is, therefore, our only clue, 
but it is a fairly safe one to follow, especially in view of 
the fact that Concord, N. H., was largely settled by 
Andover people, that the dates correspond, and that Sib- 
bons, or Sebome (Seberance), disappears from Andover. 

The first mention of Sebome we find in New Hamp- 
shire is in 1747, when he is in garrison in Mr. Jonathan 
Eastman's house at the same time that his son (or brother) 
James is in garrison in Capt. Henry Lovejoy's house. 
Jonathan Eastman's house was on the Mill road, opposite 
the home of Mr. Aaron Shute, in the West parish ; " Sea- 
borne" Peters and William Peters are both there. In 
1 75 1 Sebome is mentioned as follows: "I Sebom Peters 

* According to his grandfather's will he is to have "a payer of 
oxren worth tenne pounds in pay or tenne pounds other wise as my 
Executors & he shall agree when he is a (fit?) age." 

314 



Seborne 3 i 5 

of Rumford in New Hampshire. Miller," and he sells to 
Benjamin Fifield twenty acres of land by Turkey Pond ; 
the land is bounded "south by land of Barachias Farnum, 
east and north by common land, and west on Turkey 
Bogg ; also twenty-eight acres by Turkey river near river 
Bank, bounded south east by Eastman's mill farm," etc. 
The deed is signed Seborne Peters, 1751, Nov. 5. 

In the list of church members Seborne Peters stands 
No. 16, and Mary Peters No. 17; presumably they were 
husband and wife, but whether of the first or second New 
Hampshire generation it is impossible to say. There are 
dates only at intervals; the date of No. 15 is 1744, but it 
is possible that there were no admissions for some years 
after. 

In 1757 Seaborn Peters is mentioned: "One head, one 
house, o land, i horse, o oxen, 2 cows." This gives the 
impression of a very young man, just beginning life and 
as yet unmarried. Probably he is of the third generation. 

11 III. Seborne (Seberance), second child of An- 
drew, and Elizabeth Famham, bom in Andover, Mass., 
Feb. 19, 1688, died in 
; md. in 

(Mary?) , dau. 

and , his 

wife, bom in , 

died in , and 

had (seven?) children. 

IV. Children of Seborne, and 

1133 (1). James, bom in 
(1711) (md., ch.). 

1134 Sebom, bom in 

1135 Elizabeth, bom in 
(abt. 1 7 16?), died in 

; was md. in 

, 1738, to William Walker 



3i6 New Hampshire 

(both of Rumford, intention posted May lo, 1738), son 
Walker, and 
, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had children. 

1136 William, born in 

(abt. 1718?) (md., ch.). 

1137 Mary, bom in 

(abt. 1722 ?), died in 

; was md. in 
, Ap. 17, 1743, to Nathaniel Rix 
(both of Rumford), son James Rix, and Annah Her- 
rick, his wife, bom in Preston, Conn., June 6, 17 14, 
died in Concord, N. H., , and had six 

children. In 1745 he enlisted in the expedition to 
Crown Point. 

1138 Obadiah, born in 

(abt. 1725?), killed by the Indians at Pennacook, 
N. H., Aug. II, 1746. 

1139 Hannah, born in 

(abt. 1726?), died in 

; was md. in 
, Aug. 15, 1747, to Benjamin 
Fifield, son Fifield, and 

, his wife, born in 
, died in 
, March 8, 1794, and had twelve children. 

1133 IV. James (probably first child of Sebom, and 

(Mary?), bom in 
(17 11), died in Salisbury, 
N. H., Oct. 16, 1801, aged 90 years; md. in Andover, 
Mass., Dec. 31, 1736 (intention of marriage posted 
on meeting-house door in Rumford, Oct. 16, 1736; mar- 
riage in Andover records as above),* Elizabeth Famham, 

* He is referred to as James Peters of Suncook (now Pembroke), 
N. H. 



Seborne 317 

dau. c p h r. * / iri,. Famham, and V'> /^a //^ /7s> /f 
, his wife, bom in i'^ '"if  '^ ^ ►^ Ji>i/^^ 

, died in Salisbury, N. H., Aug. 
, 1793, and had children. 

V . Children of James, and Elizabeth Famham: 

1140 (1). James, bom in Concord, N. H., Jan. 14, 1738- 
39 (md., ch.). 

1141 (2). William, born in Concord, N. H., Dec. 7, 1740 
(md., cli.). 

1142 (3). Sarah, born in 

, (bap. Sept. 20, 1746, by the Revd. 
Timothy Walker, in Concord, N. H.), died Oct. 8, 1746. 

1143 (Perhaps) Ruth, born in 

, died in 

; was md. in Thomp- 
son, Conn., July 3, 1769, to Ebenezer Burrill, son 

Burrill, and , 

his wife, bom in 
, died in 

, and had children. (She was "of 

Douglas.") 

1144 Sarah, bom in 

, died in 

; was md. in Concord, N. H., May 
22, 1772, to John Farnham, Jr., son 
Famham, and , his wife, 

born in , 

died in , 

and had children. 

1746, Aug. II, James is in garrison in Mr. Henry Love- 
joy's house, in the West Parish village. 1747, James 
signed a petition, with other Rumford men, for a grist- 
mill. 

" 1748, a muster roll of men from the neighborhood of 
Manchester in His Majesty's service, under command of 



3^8 New Hampshire 

John Goffe, captain, employed in scouting on the fron- 
tiers of the province of New Hampshire, Anno Domini, 
1748: James Peters, Sentinel, entered June 10, dis- 
charged Oct. 2; time of service 16 weeks, 3 days. Pay 
1-5-10." 

Expedition against Forts Duquesne, Niagara, and 
Crown Point. New Hampshire furnished a regiment of 
600 men against Crown Point, ready April i, under Capt. 
Joseph Blanchard. James Peters, sentinel, ent. Ap. 24, 
dis. July 6, 1756. Expedition against Crown Point, 1 756, 
New Hampshire regiment of 700 men under Col. Nathan- 
iel Meserve of Portsmouth, James Peters, sentinel, ent. 
May 12, dis. Nov. 3.* 

He removed to Hopkinton, N. H. He was one of the 
first settlers of Henniker, N. H., in 1761 (formerly called 
New Marlborough, and referred to as Moolbury), where 
he exchanges land with his son William. 

1776, May, Henniker Alarm list, Capt. Adams' training 
soldiers, James Peters. 

1140 V. James, first child of James, and Elizabeth 
Famham, bom in Concord, N. H., Jan. 14, 1739, died in 

, md. in 
, (prob.) Rhoda 
Taylor, dau. Jonathan Taylor, and Rhoda , 

his wife, bom in 

died in ^ 1812, 

and had children. 

VI. Children of James, and Rhoda Taylor (?) : f 

1145 (1). (Prob.) Mary, born in 

, (abt. 1760.?), died in 
, March , 1837; was md. (2d 

* There appear to be two James here. They may be father and 
son. 

t This family is purely inferential. The persons named cannot be 
placed elsewhere, and divers indications point to their home as here. 



Seborne , 319 

wife), in , 

to Bigford Spooner, son Spooner, and 

, his wife, born in 

, Dec. 18, 
1743, died in 

, Aug. 5, 18 1 9, and had ten children. He was 
of Dartmouth and Lisbon, N. H. 

1146 (Prob.) Comfort, born in 

, 1760 or 1 76 1, died in Swan- 
zey, N. H., March 11, 1833. 

1147 James, born in 

, 1763-64. 

It is inferred that the first child of James and Elizabeth 
Farnham married Rhoda Taylor, — some James did, and 
apparently about this time. If his son James is the one 
who married Susannah Coombs, then Susannah was eight 
years older than her husband, but this is possible. Among 
the children of Mary, who married Bigford Spooner, are 
to be found the names of Comfort, Barnabas, and Rhoda, 
all uncommon names, and all significant. Mary's first 
child was bom in 1779. There was a James hailing from 
Douglas, and a Comfort from Worcester Co., and we are 
told that Susannah Coombs used to live in Douglas, and 
that in her old age she liked to talk of that town where 
she may have been born. Comfort has record as follows : 

(Massachusetts Archives.) 1777, May 4, to July 4, 1777. 
Comfort Peters, private. Capt. Isaac Martin's Co., Col. 
Joseph Whitney's Reg., Service 2 mos, 6 days. 

1777, Dec. I, to Jan. 2, 1778, in Capt. Joseph Sibley's 
Co., Col. Danforth Keyes' Reg. 1777, Dec. 8, service at 
North Kingston, dated (Sturbridge, Mass., Aug. 3d, 1783.) 

1779, May 17, to July i, Comfort Peters, private, 19 
years of age, 5 ft. 5 in. Dark. Residence, Douglas 
(Mass.), Capt. Whitney's Co., Col. Tyler's Reg. Marched 
July 2d, 1779. 



320 New Hampshire 

1779, July 22, in Capt. Webb's Co., 4th Reg., to Ap. 22, 
1780. 

1780. July 10, to Dec. 14, 1780, Service in Rhode 
Island under Gen. Spencer. 

Descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Conti- 
nental Army for the term of 6 mos. agreeable to resolve 
June 5, 1780. Comfort Peters, private. Arrival at 
Springfield, July 12, 1780, 13th Division. Marched to 
camp July 12, 1780, under command of Ens. Gilbert. 

1780, enlisted July 12, for twenty days, Capt. Japheth 
Daniel's Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's 6th Reg., Aug., Sept., 
Oct., Nov., Dec, 1780. 

List of men raised for the 6 mos. service and returned 
by Brig. -Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a 
return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 2, 1780. Comfort 
Peters, private. Col. Shepherd's 4th Reg. Engaged for 
9 mos. Ap. 10, 1780. 

Our James (or Jameses) of Worcester Co. and of Doug- 
las have records as follows: 

{Massachusetts Archives.) James Peters, Douglas, for 
one year in Capt. Turtelot's Co., Col. Carey's* Reg., Service 
at Rhode Island, dated June 4, 1778. 1778, 

Jan. I to 1782, Dec. 31, clothing acct. James Peters, 6th 
Reg. private. James Peters, private, 6th 

Reg. Col. Thomas Nixon, 6th Co., to 1782, during war. 
A return of men entitled to $80 gratuity for serving dur- 
ing war. James Peters, private, 6th Reg., 
Lt. Col.'s Co., 1780, clothing, Peekskill, Dec. 5, 1780. 
(Has his signature attached.) 

James Peters appears (probably the son, and the other 
the father) on an order dated West Point, Jan. 28, 1783, 
for wages for years 1781-82-83, as drummer in the 6th 
Reg. 

Enlisted men, James Peters, Douglas, Worcester Co., 

* (Or Crarey.) 



Seborne 321 

16 years, 5 ft. 5 in., dark brown hair, enl. Ap. 15, 1780, 
for time during war; Capt. Holden's Co., Lt. Col. Smith's 
6th Mass. Reg., West Point, Jan. 29, 1781, drummer. 

James Peters, drummer, 6th Reg., Lt. Col.'s Co., ser- 
vice for July, 1780, for Aug. and Sept., 1780, Lt. Col. 
Whitney's Co., 6th Reg., clothing, Oct. 16, 1780 (makes 
his mark). 

Receipt for clothing, Aug. i, 1780 (his mark). Service, 
May 13, 1780, to Dec. 31, 1780. 1781, Jan. to Dec, for 
wages, etc., Capt. Abel Holden's Co., Lt. Col. Calvin 
Smith's Reg. 1782, Jan. to Dec, Capt. Mason Wottle's 
Co., Lt. Col. Calvin Smith's Reg. On command, March; 
sick, Sept. and Oct., 1782. 

Service, Oct., Nov., Dec, 1780. Boston, 1781, June22, 
also Dec, 1781. 1784, Feb. i, arrears of pay, etc. James 
Peters, Worcester, 6th Reg., entitled to 200 acres of land, 
or $20 in money by resolve of court, March 5, 1801. 

Same. Boston, Feb. 18, 1804, a certificate of service 
for gratuity of $20. 

(State Papers, New Hampshire, Hammond. Vol. xiv., 
Rev. Rolls.) "Three years' men enlisted from 4th militia 
Reg., 1777. Town from, Henicor James Peters. Capt. 
Elijah Clarges. 

Capt. Elijah Clarges' Co. Three years' men. Roll — 
James Peters, Jr. Bounty 20. Travel money from their 
home to Charlestown, N. H., at 2d. per mile — 10. (Hen- 
niker men.) 

2d Reg. commanded by Col. Geo. Reid, for years 1777, 
1778, and 1779. 6th co. James Peters, private. Amt. 
of depreciation — 12.70. 

1147 V. James, * child of James, and 

(Rhoda Taylor ?), born in Rumford (now Concord), N. H., 

(1763-64), died in Swanzey, N. H., Oct. 6, 

* Probably the drummer referred to in military service above. 



32 2 New Hampshire 

1825 ; md. in , 

Susannah Coombs, dau. Coombs, and 

, his wife, born in 

, died in Alstead, N. H., 
Aug. 4, 1853, aged 100 years, 8 months, and had seven 
children. 

VI. Children of James, and Susannah Coombs: 

1148 (1). Jephthah, born in Douglas, Mass., Dec. 14, 
1784. 

1149 (2). Reuben, born in Gloucester, R. I., Aug. 2, 
1786 (md., ch.). 

1150 (3). James, bom in Gloucester, R. I., Jan. 2, 1788. 

1151 (4). Thankful, bom in Adams, Mass., July 4, 1790, 
died in 



1153 (5). John, born in Adams, Mass., Sept. 18, 1792. 

1153 (6). Jesse, bom in Adams, Mass., June 15, 1794 
(md., ch.). 

1154 (7). Barnabas Coombs, bom in Adams, Mass., Feb. 
I, 1798 (md., ch.). 

1148 VI. Jephthah, first child of James, and Susannah 
Coombs, bom in Douglas, Mass., Dec. 14, 1784, died in 



1149 VI. Reuben, second child of James and Susannah 
Coombs, born in Gloucester, R. I., Aug. 2, 1786, died in 

; md. in 



dau. 



Seborne 323 

and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had 
seven children. 

VII. Children of Reuben, and 

1155 (1). Reuben, born in North Adams, Mass., May 17, 
1810 (md., ch.). 

1156 (2). Mary EmeHne, born in 

, Jan. 31, 1813, 



1157 (3). Barnabas Coombs, born in WilHamstown, 
Mass., Sept. 19, 1817 (md., ch.). 

1158 (4). Eliza Ann, born in 

, Oct. 18, 1819, died in 



1159 (5). Judith Brown, born in 
, Nov. 7, 182 1, died in 



1160 (6). Persis Abigail, bom in 
, Sept. 10, 1825, died in 



1161 (7). Lucy Juliette, bom in 
, Sept. 21, 1830, died in 



1155 VII. Reuben, first child of Reuben, and 

, bom in North Adams, Mass., 



324 New Hampshire 

May 17, 1810, died in Mercer Co., Mo., March 14, 1870; 
md. in , Sylvia 

Edson, dau. David Edson, and Polly Belding, his wife, 
bom in Wilmington, Vt. , ,1813, died in 

, and had six 
children. 

VIII. Children of Reuben, and Sylvia Edson: 

1163 (1). James, born in 
1163 (2). Mary, born in 



1164 (3). William Earle, born between North and South 
Adams, Mass., July 2, 1838 (md., ch.). 

1165 (4). Ann Maria, born in 



1166 (5). Sarah Jane, born in 



1167 (6). Mary Esther, born in 



1162 VIII. James, first child of Reuben, and Sylvia 
Edson, born in , 

died in 



1164 VIII. William Earle, third child of Reuben, and 
Sylvia Edson, born between North and South Adams, 



Seborne 325 

Mass., July 2, 1838, died in 

; md. in , May 

12, 1872, Mary Alma Smith, dau. Josiah Smith, and Eliza- 
beth , his wife, bom in Franklin Co., Ohio, 
June I, 1846, died in 

, and had four children. 

IX. Children of William Earle, and Mary Smith: 

1168 (1). Earle, bom in Pleasanton, Iowa, Feb. 22, 1873. 

1169 (2). Leota, born in Pleasanton, Iowa, March 29, 
1876. 

1170 (3). Essie, bom in Lindley Springs, Mo., May 19, 
1878, 



1171 (4). Zora, born in Lindley Springs, Mo., July 10, 
1881, 



1157 VII. Barnabas Coombs, third child of Reuben, 
and , bom in Williamstown, 

Mass., Sept. 19, 181 7, died in Wetmore, Nemaha Co., 
Kansas, Feb. 4, 1887 ; md. in , 

May 9, 1850, Harriet E Smith of Homby 

Forks, N. Y., dau. Smith and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 

, and had children (several). 

VIII. Children of Barnabas Coombs, and Harriet Smith: 
1173 (1). 



''26 New Hampshire 



o 



1150 VI. James, third child of James, and Susannah 
Coombs, bom in Gloucester, R. I., Jan. 2, 1788, died in 



1152 VI. John, fifth child of James, and Susannah 
Coombs, bom in Adams, Mass., Sept. 18, 1792, died in 

; md. in 



1153 VI. Jesse, sixth child of James, and Susannah 
Coombs, bom in Adams, Mass., June 15, 1794, died in 
Mohawk, N. Y., Feb. 28, 1865; md. in 

, March , 181 5, Celinda Larrabee, 

dau. Larrabee, and 

, his wife, bom in ' , Dec- 

II, 1799, died in Mohawk, N. Y., Ap. 28, 1859, and had 
four children. 

VII. Children of Jesse, and Celinda Larrabee: 

1173 (1). Clarissa, born in Westford,* N. H., Dec. 20, 
1819, died in Mohawk, N. Y., March 5, 1891 ; was md. 
in , March 14, 1836, to 
T J Thayer, son 

Thayer, and , his 

wife, born in 

, died in Thurburn, Oneida Co., N. Y., Jan. i, 
1857, and had three children. 

1174 (2). Susan, born in Westford,* N. H., Aug. 16, 
1827, died in Mohawk, N. Y., Aug. 2, i860; was md. 
in , July 6, 1845, to 
C T West, son 

West, and , his 

wife, born in Fairfield, N. Y., July 30, 1809, died in 
Mohawk, N. Y., June 23, 1863, and had three sons. 
* Or Westport ? 



Seborne 327 

1175 (3). Janette, bom in Westford,*jN. H., Oct. 11, 
1830, died in Herkimer, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1890; was 
md. in , Feb. 17, 
1849, to George F White, son 

White and , his 

wife, born in Herkimer, N. Y., , died at 

the Soldiers' Home, Bath, N. Y., , and 

had two children. 

1176 (4). James W , bom in Westford,* 
N. H., Dec. 13, 1832 (md., ch.). 

1176 VII. James W , fourth child of 
Jesse, and Celinda Larrabee, bom in Westford,* N. H., 
Dec. 13, 1832, died in 

; md. in , 

Aug. 17, 185 1, Rosan Haines, dau. James Haines, and 

Catherine Caster, his wife, born in Little Falls, N. Y., 

Sept. 4, 1832, died in , 
and had five children. 

VIII. Children of Jatnes W , and Rosan 

Haines: 

1177 (1). Horatio, born in , 
June 23, 1852. 

1178 (2). Viola, born in 
Sept. 18, 1853, died in 



1179 (3). Delia, born in 
Nov. 18, 1855, died in 



1180 (4). Linda, born in 
March 23, 1859, died in 

* Or Westport ? 



328 New Hampshire 

1181 (5). Libbie, born in 
4, 1 86 1, died in 



About 1843 James removed to Mohawk, N. Y. 

1154 VI. Barnabas Coombs, seventh child of James, 
and Susannah Coombs, bom in Adams, Mass., Feb. i, 
1798, died in ; 

md. in Winchester, N. H., Aug. 26, 181 9, Rebecca P 
Willard, dau. Amos Willard, and OHve 
, his wife, bom in Winchester, N. H., May i, 1802, 
died in , and 

had four children. 

VII. Children of Barnabas Coombs, and Rebecca Willard: 
1183 (1). Francis R , born in Rutland, 

Mass., Aug. 16, 1821 (md., ch.), 

1183 (2). John Q , born in Swanzey, 
N. H., Aug. 2,* 1821, died in Swanzey, Oct. i, 1830. 

1184 (3). Lauren W , born in Swanzey, 
N. H., Aug. 22, 1828 (md., ch.). 

1185 (4). Mary A , born in Swanzey, 
N. H., May 14, 1836, died in 

; was md. in Walpole, N. H., 
Oct. 2, 1855, to Orrin P Gleason, son 

Gleason, and 
, his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had children. 

1183 VII. Francis R , first child of Bamabas 

Coombs, and Rebecca Willard, bom in Rutland, Mass., 
Aug. 16, 1 82 1, died in 
; md. in 
, Lucy M Severance, dau. Ebenezer 

*The record says 1821. Will some one correct it ? 



Seborne 329 

Severance, and Sarah , his wife, born in Al- 

stead, N. H., Sept. 17, 1820, died in 

, and had one daughter. 

VIII. Children of Francis R , and Lucy 

Severance: 

1186 (1). Emma F , born in Alstead, 

N. H., Jan. 7, 1847, died in Winchester, N. H., June 5, 
1880; was md. in Keene, N. H., June 20, 1866, to 

Woodward, son Woodward, 

and , his wife, born in 

, died 
in and 

had one child. 

1184 VII. Lauren W , third child of Bar- 

nabas Coombs, and Rebecca Willard, bom in Swanzey, 
N. H., Aug. 22, 1828, died in Mohawk, N. Y., Dec. 3, 
1882 ; md. in 



VIII. Children of Lauren W , and 

1187 (1). A son, , born 
in 

1188 (2). A daughter, 



1141 V. William, second child of James, and Elizabeth 
Farnham, bom in Concord, N. H., Dec. 7, 1740, died in 
Henniker, N. H., July 5, 1775 ; md. in Hopkinton, N. H., 
Oct. 15, 1766, by the Revd. James Soales, to Sarah Jewell, 
dau. Jewell, and , 

his wife, bom in 



2,3^ New Hampshire 

(1736 ?), died in Henniker, N. H., Jan. 22, 1812, 
and had four children.* 

VI. Children of William, and Sarah Jewell: 

1189 (1). Sibbons, born in 

, died prior to 1772, aged 6. 

1190 (2). Joseph, born in 
1768, 

1191 (3). Mary, born in 
1770, died in 



1193 (4). Jacob, born in 
Aug. 17, 1772 (md., ch.). 

WilHam removed from Hopkinton, N. H., to Henniker, 
N. H., and settled in the eastern part of the town, upon 
the farm now known as the Jacob Peters farm. He and 
his family passed the first night in town under a rock, 
near which he built his cabin. He was a prominent man 
in the town. He often assisted the committee of pro- 
prietors in laying out roads and in other improvements. 

1767, July 18, he was voted to be one of the survers (sur- 
veyors ?) by four of the proprietors. 1768, Nov. 10, he 
was one of the incorporators of the town. In 1775, July 
5, he was killed by the falling of a tree while at work for, 
and with, Lieut. Samuel Wadsworth, upon the farm now 
owned and occupied by Franklin Goss, and a little east 
of his present residence. 

1190 VI. Joseph, second child of William, and Sarah 
Jewell, bom in , 

1768, died in ; 

* Gravestones in old Henniker graveyard: "Mr William. Peters who 
was instantly by the Fall of a Tree Killd July 5, 1775 aged 35 years." 
" Mrs Sarah Carr formerly wife of Mr. William Peters who died Janu- 
ary 2 2d 18 1 2, aged 75 years and 6 months." 



Seborne 331 

md. in , Nov. 29, 1791, 

Sarah Peters, dau. Peters, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had children 

1193 VI. Jacob, fourth child of William, and Sarah 
Jewell, bom in Henniker, N. H., Aug. 17, 1772, died in 
(Canaan, N. H. ?), Sept. 19, 1845 ; md. in Henniker, Dec. 
3, 1793, Sarah Wood Eager, dau. Joseph Eager, and 

, his wife, bom in Marlborough, 
N. H., died in Henniker, July 26, 1814, and 

had six children. 

VII. Children of Jacob, and Sarah Eager: 

1193 (1). William, born in Henniker, N. H., Sept. 10, 
1794 (md., ch.). 

1194 (2). John, bom in Henniker, N. H., Sept. 29, 1796 
(md., ch.). 

1195 (3). Hannah, born in Henniker, N. H., June 7, 
1799, died in Henniker, Nov. 28, 1825. Unmd. 

1196 (4). Elizabeth, born in Henniker, N. H., Dec. 2, 
1 80 1, died in Henniker, 

; was md. in 

, to Descomb, 

son 



1197 (5). Moses Sawyer, born in Henniker, N. H., June 
10, 1804 (md., no ch.?). 

1198 (6). Lois, born in Henniker, N. H., Feb. 14, 1809, 
died in ; 
was md. in , Dec. 24, 
1829, to Henry F Murtough of Brad- 
ford. Vt. 



S3^ New Hampshire 

Jacob md. (2) in , Sept. 

7, 1 81 5, Anna Cochran, dau. Cochran, and 

, his wife, bom in Bradford, 
N. H., , died in Henniker, Sept. 19, 1865, 

and had five children. 

Children of Jacob, and Anna Cochran: 

1199 (7). Joseph Colby, born in Henniker, N. H., June 
I, 1816 (md.). 

1300 (8). Sarah W , bom in Henniker, - 
N. H., Feb. 28, 1818, died in Henniker, Dec. 4, 1877; 
was md. in Henniker, June 6, 1844, to Joseph B 

Colby, son Eliphalet Colby, and Lydia W 
, his wife, born in Henniker, Feb. 25, 1819, 
died in Henniker, July 19, i860, and had chil- 

dren. Sarah was md. (2) in 

, July 14, 1864, to C G 

Mc Alpine, son Daniel Mc Alpine, and Abigail Gould, his 
wife, born in Hopkinton, N. H., 
, died in 
. No children. 

1301 (9). Mary C . bom in Henniker, 
N. H., Nov. 21, 1819. 



1203 (10). Jacob, born in Henniker, N. H., Oct. 9, 1821 

(md., ch.). 
1303 (11). Fanny, born in Henniker, N. H., 

1827, died Ap. 13, 1831. 

Jacob resided on the homestead in Henniker, N. H. ; 
later he removed, with his sons Joseph and Jacob, to 
Canaan, N. H., and probably died there. 

1193 VII. William, first child of Jacob, and Sarah 
Wood Eager, bom in Henniker, N. H., Sept. 10, 1794, 
died in Salisbury, N. H., Dec. 18, 1881 ; md. in 



Seborne 333 

, Jan. 23, 1822, Fanny Hadley, dau. 
Obadiah Hadley, and Hannah , his wife, 

bom in , 1799, 

died in Canaan, N. H., March 5, 1866, and had five chil- 
dren. 

VIII. Children of William, and Fanny Hadley: 

1304 (1). John, bom in Bradford, N. H., Dec. 2, 1822 

(md., ch.). 
1205 (2). Obadiah, born in Bradford, N. H., Ap. 4. 

1825 (md., ch.). 
1306 (3). Hannah, bom in Bradford, N. H., 
, 1827, died in 



1307 (4). Sarah, bom in Bradford, N. H., 

, 1828, died in 



1308 (5). Dmzilla, born in Bradford, N. H., 

, 1832, died in 



1304 VIII. John, first child of William, and Fanny 
Hadley, born in Bradford, N. H., Dec. 2, 1822, died in 

; md. in 

, Jan. 16, 1842, Hannah Toplin, 

dau. Richard Toplin and Polly , his wife, 

bom in Orange, Vt., Jan. 13, 1828, died in Canaan, N. H., 

July 29, 1856, and had one daughter. 

IX. Children of John, and Hannah Toplin: 

1309 (1). Druzilla, born in Canaan, N. H., Sept. 20, 
1851, died March 10, 1858. 



334 New Hampshire 

John md. (2) in , Ap. 14, 

1857, Rosannah Hadley, dau. Silas Hadley, and Sally 

, his wife, bom in Canaan, N. H., Nov. 15, 
1828, died in , 

and had children, 

1305 VIII. Obadiah, second child of William, and 
Fanny Hadley, born in Bradford, N. H., Ap. 4, 1825, 
died in ;md. 

in Newport, N. H., , Lydia Hind, dau. 

Hind, and , his 

wife, born in - , 

died ia , Ap. 9, 1862, and 

had children. (?) Obadiah md. (2), in 

, July 26, 1865, Harriet E 
Hutchinson, dau. Solomon Hutchinson, and Catherine 
P , his wife, bom in East Wilton, N. H., 

May 5, 1829, died in 

, and had five children, 

IX. Children of Obadiah, and Harriet Hutchinson: 

1310 (1). Emma L , born in 

, March 5, 1868, 



1211 (2). Sarah E ' , born in 

; was md, in 
. to J 
R Hutchinson, son 



1313 (3). Fannie, bom in 






*8"'"Oft, LENOX 
-I!i££il^OUNDATION8 




(1796-1875) 



JOHN PETERS 

HENNIKERj N.H. 



1862-63 



Seborne 335 

1213 (4). William H , born in 

1314 (5). Josie, born in 



Obadiah was a machinist, and at one time resided in 
Nashua, N. H. 

1194 VII. John, second child of Jacob, and Sarah 
Eager, bom in Henniker, N. H., Sept. 29, 1796, died in 
Henniker, Ap. 4, 1876; md. in Henniker, Feb. 17, 1825, 
Eliza Foster, dau. Zebulon Foster, and Polly 
his wife, bom in Essex, Mass., June 30, 1799, died in Hen- 
niker, Jan. 18, 1853,* aged 54, and had three children, 

VIII. Children of John, and Eliza Foster: 

1315 (1). John Foster, born in Henniker, N. H., Feb. 14, 
1826 (md., ch.). 

1316 (2). Eliza, bom in Henniker, Aug. 14, 1827, died 
in Henniker, 1902; was md. in Henniker, Ap. 23, 1857, 
to Levi Colby Newton, son Solomon Newton, and Sarah 
Colby, his wife, born in Henniker, March 23, 1826, 
living in Henniker, 1902, and had three children. 

1317 (3). Walter H , bom in Henniker, 
N. H., March 2, 1831, died in Henniker, Ap. 13, 1846, 
aged i4.t 

John md. (2) in , Nov. 5, 

1855, Mary Sawyer of Warner, N. H., dau. 
Sawyer, and , his wife, bom 

in , Jan. 2, 1799, died in 

* Gravestone in Henniker churchyard. 

t Gravestone in Henniker churchyard. Mistake somewhere, will 
some one correct it? 



336 New Hampshire 

Henniker, N. H., Dec. i, 1899, aged 100 years and 11 
months. 

1818, John was a member of the first rifle company in 
the state. He was a cabinet-malcer. 

1315 VIII. John Foster, first child of John, and Eliza 
Foster, born in Henniker, N. H., Feb. 14, 1826, living in 
Concord, N. H., 1902 ; md. in , 

Nov. 3, 1857, Harriet Jane Worthington Heath, dau. 
Robert Heath, and Hannah Nelson, his wife, bom in Bris- 
tol, N. H., Aug. 20, 1833, living 1902, and had two chil- 
dren. 

IX. Children of John Foster, and Harriet Heath: 

1318 (1). Everett Foster, born in Concord, N. H., 
March 12, 1863, died in Concord, July 28, 1863. 

1319 (2). Arthur Webster, born in Concord, N. H., Oct. 
29, 1867, died in Concord, Oct. 14, 1872. 

John Foster resided in Concord, N. H. He was for 
many years engaged as express messenger on the railroad 
between Concord and Boston, and as express messenger 
for the American Express Co. between Claremont and 
Concord, N. H. 

1197 VII. Moses Sawyer, fifth child of Jacob, and 
Sarah Eager, bom in Henniker, N. H., Jime 10, 1804, died 
in ; md. in 

Henniker, Nov. 8, 1827, Lois M Phillips 

dau. Ebenezer Phillips, and Hannah Eager, his wife, bom 
in Henniker, March i, 1804, died in Groton, N. H., Sept. 
17, 1884, aged 80 years and 6 months, and had 
children (?). 

Moses Sawyer lived in Henniker, but removed to Dor- 
chester, N. H., in 1835, to Bristol, N. H., in 1866, and in 
1882 to Groton, N. H. In 1886 he was living in Hebron, 
N. H. 



Seborne ' 337 

1199 VII. Joseph Colby, seventh child of Jacob, and 
first child of Anna Cochran, his second wife, bom in Hen- 
niker, N. H., June i, 18 16, died in (Canaan ?), 

; md. in 
, Sarah W E 

Phillips, dau. Ebenezer Phillips, and Hannah , 

his wife, bom in , Sept. 24, 

1817, died in , 

and had children (?). 

VIII. Children of Joseph Colby, and Sarah Phillips *.• 



Joseph Colby commanded the cavalry belonging to the 
40th New Hampshire Regiment over fifty years ago. 

1203 VII. Jacob, tenth child of Jacob, and fourth child 
of Anna Cochran, his second wife, bom in Henniker, N. H., 
Oct. 9, 182 1, died in 
; md. in 
, Hannah , dau. 

and , his wife, born in 

Grafton, N. H., 



VIII. Children of Jacob, and Hannah : 

1330 (1). 

1331 (2). 
1333 (3). 

1333 (4). Jacob, born in Henniker, N. H., Sept. 22, 1864. 



* There was a Joseph C Peters, who md. Adeline Bailey, dau. 
Levi Bailey, and Betsey , his wife, born Ap. 3, 1828. 

Probably this Joseph is a. son of Joseph, and Sarah Phillips, or is this a 
second marriage of this same Joseph ? 



338 New Hampshire 

Joseph,* child of and 

, his wife, bom in Hopkin- 
ton, N. H., Dec. , 17 74, died in 

, Feb. 25, 1829; md. in Hopkinton, Oct. 16, 
1800, by the Revd. Ethan Smith, to EHzabeth Gould, 
dau. Gould, and , 

his wife, bom in , Jan. 13, 

1777, died in , Aug. 12, 

1857, and had eight children. 

Children of Joseph, and Elizabeth Gould: 

1234 (1). Hannah, born in Goshen, N. H., Feb. 15, 1801, 
died in , June 

1874; was md. in Oct. 

3, 1839, to Franklin Fisk, son Joseph Fisk, and EHza- 
beth , his wife, born in 

, Oct. 16, 1804, died in 

, and had two children. 
1225 (2). Nathan, bom in Goshen, N. H., Jan. 21, 1803 

(md., eh.)? 
1236 (3). Tabitha G , born in Goshen, 

N. H., Ap. 8, 1807, died in 

; was md. in 
, Nov. 24, 1 83 1, to Edmund Chadwick, son 
David Chadwick, and Betsey , his wife, 

bom in Sutton, N. H., Oct. 9, 1799- died in 

, Jan. 13, 1876, and had three 

children. 
1337 (4). Elizabeth, bom in Sutton, N. H., 
1809, died in 

; was md. in 

, to Joshua Tenney, son 
Tenney, and , his wife, 

born in > 

died in ' 

and had three children. 

* Unplaced. 



Seborne 339 

1338 (5). William, born in Sutton, N. H., June 2, 1811 

(md.). 

1339 (6). Henry Harrison, born in Sutton, N. H., Dec. 

I, 1813 (md., ch.)- 
1330 (7). Rhoda, born in Sutton, N. H., June 
1815, died in 



1331 (8). Cordelia, born in Sutton, N. H., Ap. 4, 1821, 
died in , Aug. 13, 1844. 

Joseph removed, about the time of his marriage, to 
Goshen, N. H., where his three oldest children were bom. 
1808, he removed to Sutton, N. H., where he was engaged 
in the clothing business until 1826. He is remembered as 
an intelligent, honorable man. 

1335 Nathan, second child of Joseph, and Elizabeth 
Gould, born in Goshen, N. H., Jan. 21, 1803, died in 
(Southampton, N. H.?), 

; md. in , Sept. 

24, 1843, Dorothy Jewell, dau. Jacob Jewell, and Mary 

, his wife, bom in , 

March 8, 1796, died in , 

and had children. 

1338 William, fifth child of Joseph, and Elizabeth 
Gould, bom in Sutton, N. H., June 2, 181 1, died in 

, May , 185 1, md. in 

, Lydia Beals, dau. 

Beals and , 

his wife, bom in , 

died in , and 

had children. 



340 New Hampshire 

1339 Henry Harrison, sixth child of Joseph and EHza- 
beth Gould, bom in Sutton, N. H., Dec. i, 1813, died in 

; md. (abt. 
1844), in Groton, Mass., Olive J 

Butler, dau. Nehemiah Butler, and Olive Davis, his wife, 
bom in , Ap. 29, 18 14, died 

in , and had 

two children. 

 Children of Henry Harrison, and Olive Butler: 
1333 (1). Horace L born in 

Sept. , 1845 (md.). 

1333 (2). William H bom in 

1333 Horace L , first child of Henry Har- 

rison, and Olive Butler, bom in , 

Sept. , 1845, died in 

; md. in , 

Oct. 12, 1875, Clara F Spofford, dau. 

Spofford, and 



John,* (child of James, and Sally 

?), bom in , 

March 1755 (1756 ?),diedin , 

March , 181 7; md. in , 

Jan. 23, 1785, Hannah Usher of Dracut, Mass., dau. Rob- 
ert Usher, and Sarah Steams, his wife, bom in Merrimack, 
N. H., Feb. 7, 1759, died in 

, and had two children. 

Children of John, and Hannah Usher: 

1334 (1). Sally, born in Salisbury, N. H., June 

1785, died in Salisbury, Dec. , 1843; was md. 

* Unplaced. 



Seborne 341 

in Salisbury, , 1805, to her cousin, 

Joseph Farnham, son John Farnham and Sally 

, his wife, bom in Salisbury, , 

1778, died in Salisbury, Aug. , 1839, and had 

thirteen children. 
1235 (2). John, born in Salisbury, N. H., June 27, 1778 
(md., ch.). 

John md. (2), in 

, Mrs. Betsey Stanley of Hopkinton, N. H., dau. 
Stephen Hoyt and Abigail , his wife, bom 

in Hopkinton, , died in 



1335 John, second child of John and Hannah Usher, 
bom in Salisbury, N. H., June 27, 1787, died in Danbury, 
N. H., Feb. 16, 1871 ; md. in , 

March 23, 1812, Sarah Peasley of Sutton, N. H., dau. 
Abraham Peasley and Martha , his wife, 

bom in Sutton, Sept. 21, 1791, died in Danbury, Sept. i, 
1869, and had nine children. 

Children of John and Sarah Peasley: 

1336 (1). Luther, born in Salisbury, N.H., Sept. 
1812, died Sept. 28, 1812. 

1337 (2). John, born in Salisbury, N. H., Dec. 25, 1813 
(md., ch.). 

1338 (3). Susan, born in Salisbury, N. H., Dec. 26, 1815, 
died in 

Unmd. 

1339 (4). Hannah Usher, born in Sahsbury, March 20, 
1818, died in 

. Unmd. 

1340 (5). Nancy E , born in Danbury, 
N. H., Ap. 24, 1820, died in Tama City, Iowa, Feb. 24, 
1886; was md. in Salisbury, N. H., Dec. , 1850, 



342 New Hampshire 

to Joseph Sanborn, son Joseph Sanborn, and Elizabeth 

, his wife, born in Sanborntown, N. H., 

Nov. 29, 1806, died in Tarna City, Tarna Co., Iowa, 

June 20, 1885, and had one daughter. 

1241 (6). WilHam D , born in Danbury, 

N. H., Oct. 10, 1822, died in Danbury, Sept. 20, 1832, 

1243 (7). Jane D , born in Danbury, N- 

H., Aug. 30, 1825, died in 

. Unmd. 

1243 (8). Mary Ann, born in Danbury, N. H., July 19, 
1829, died in Alexandria, N. H., May 23, 1863; was 
md. in , Dec. 31, 1851, 
to James G Tenney, son Moses Tenney, 
and Shisah , his wife, bom in Hill, 
N. H., Oct. , 1822, died in 

, and had four children. 

1244 (9). Ruth, born in Danbury, N. H., Jan. 15, 1832, 
died in ; 
was md. in , March 28, 
1849, to Sanford G Kendall, son Wil- 
liam Kendall, and Durexea , his wife, 
bom in Rockingham, Vt., June 15, 1829, died in 

, and had five 
children. 

1237 John, second child of John, and Sarah Peasley, 
his wife, bom in SaUsbury, N. H., Dec. 25, 18 13, died in 
Danbury, N. H., Nov. 7, 1892 ; md. in 

, Dec. 25, 1838, Laura Williams, dau. Ohver 
Williams, and Jemima Barney, his wife, born in Grafton, 
N. H., Ap. , 1806, died in Danbury, N. H., July 

13, 1844, and had one daughter. 

Children of John, and Laura Williams: 

1345 (1). Hannah Jemima, bom in Danbury, N. H., 
Feb. , 1844, died in Danbury, March, 1844. 

John md. (2) in Manchester, N. H., Feb. , 1845, 



Seborne 343 

Eleanor C Whitney, dau. Isaac Whitney 

and Abigail Edson, his wife, bom in Brookline, Vt., 

, 1814, died in Danbury, N. H., Dec. 30, 1861, 
and had three children. 

Children of John and Eleanor Whitney: 

1246 (2). Abbie Eleanor, bora in Manchester, N. H., 
Dec. , 1845, died in Danbury, N. H., May , 

• 1847- 

1247 (3). George W , bora in Danbury, 

N. H., Oct. 26, 1850, died in 

Unmd. 

1248 (4). Daniel W , born in Danbury, 
N. H., Nov. 2, 1851 (md., ch.). 

John md. (3) in , Ap. 15, 

1863, Mrs. Mary A Titus of Hill, N. H., 

dau. Page and 

his wife, bom in , 

, died in 
, and had five children. 

Children of John, and Mary Page Titus: 

1249 (5). Albert E , bora in Danbury, 
N. H., Jan. 29, 1864. 

1250 (6). Willis E , bora in Danbury, 
N. H., March 7, 1866, died in Danbury, Nov. 15, 1881. 

1251 (7). Frederick C , bom in Danbury, 
N. H., Jan. 3, 1868. 

1252 (8). Edith, bom in Hill, N. H., May 22, 1873, died 
in 



1253 (9). Laura E , bora in Hill, N. H., 

May 13, 1876, 

; was md. in Boscawen, N. H., Oct. 21, 1897, 
to Henry Jones of Concord, N, H., son 



344 New Hampshire 

Jones, and , his wife, 

bom in , 

and had children. 

1348 Daniel W , fourth child of John, 
and third child of Eleanor Whitney, his second wife, born 
in Danbury, N. H., Nov. 2, 1851, 

; md. in , 

Oct. 4, 1882, Mrs. Celanda Tucker, dau. Hiram Pierce, and 
Hannah , his wife, bom in Grafton, N. H., 

, 1851, 
. No children. 

1349 Albert E , fifth child of John, and 
first child of his third wife, Mary Page Titus, bom in Dan- 
bury, N. H., Jan. 29, 1864, 



1351 Frederick C , seventh child of John, 

and third child of his third wife, Mary Page Titus, bom 
in Danbury, N. H., Jan. 3, 1868, 





William,* child of 




and , bom in 




, died in 




, Oct. 17, 1790; md. in 




, Hannah 


dau. 


and 




, his wife, bom in 




, died in 




, and had children. 




* Unplaced. 



Seborne 345 



Children of William, and Hannah : 

1354 (1). Ruth, born in 

July 9, 1758 (bap. July 16, 1758), died in 



1355 (2). Sarah, bom in Hopkinton, N. H., July 30, 
1760 (bap. Aug. 10, 1760), died in 



1256 (3). Abigail, bom in Hopkinton, N. H., Jan. i, 
1763 (bap. Jan. , 1763), 



1357 (4). William, born in Hopkinton, N. H., Aug. 27, 
1765 (bap. Oct. 6, 1765). 

1358 (5). Mary, bom in Hopkinton, N. H. (bap. in Hop- 
kinton, Oct. 4, 1767). 



1359 (6). Elizabeth, bap. in Hopkinton, N. H., Oct. 15, 
1768, 



1729, Feb. 25, the first meeting of settlers to locate at 
Contoocook, N. H., was held in Andover, Mass. 1732, 
the second meeting was held in Newbury, Mass. 1733, 
William was one of the settlers. 1734 (spring), he was 
living in Contoocook (now Boscawen), N. H. 1734, he 
was one of the first grantees of Contoocook. 1743, Nov. 
29, he was a soldier at Contoocook, N. H. 1747-48, Jan. 
2, he was a petitioner for a grist-mill at Contoocook. 

A muster roll of the company (near Manchester, N. H.) 



34^ New Hampshire 

in His Majesty's service, under command of John Goffe, 
Capt., employed in scouting on the frontiers of the Prov- 
ince of New Hampshire, Anno Domini, 1748. William 
Peters, Sergt. Time of discharge, Oct. 3, 18 weeks, 3 
days service, whole wages, 13- 16- 5. 

1752, July 13, his name appears on the proprietors' 
grant of Henniker. 1753, July 18, the proprietors went 
to Portsmouth and drew their lots. His lot was 
numbered No. 76. 1753, July 18, the petitioners of 
Henniker, being mostly from Londonderry, etc., met in 
Portsmouth, N. H. Hopkinton, or No. 5, as it was called, 
was settled mostly from Hopkinton, Mass. 

This William is unplaced, but the mention of Andover 
is most significant. He was probably the William who, 
in Haverhill, Mass., Sept. 16, 1742, married Ruth Standley. 
In that case Hannah would be a second wife. This would 
account for the names of Elizabeth, Ruth, and Mary. A 
William was in garrison with Sebome in Jonathan East- 
man's house in the West Parish, Concord, N. H., and was 
probably Sebome's son, or brother of Sebome of the next 
generation. 

1138 IV. Obadiah, (probably youngest) child of Se- 
bome, and Mary ( ?) , bom in 

(1725 ?), died at Pennacook, N. H., Aug. 
II, 1746, being killed by the Indians. Was probably 
unmarried. 

1744-45, he was in the expedition against Louisburg, 
in a company commanded by Capt. Eastman. 

1746, Aug. II, Monday, he, with others, set out from 
Rumford (now Concord), for Hopkinton, N. H. He at 
the time was a member of Capt. Melville's Co. of Mas- 
sachusetts, enrolled in the Rumford company under 
command of Capt. Nathaniel Abbott ; his name is thus 
mentioned on the muster roll, and his death is so re- 
corded. His father and family lived near Eastman's fort, 



Seborne 347 

to which the party were going when they were attacked 
by the Indians. They, knowing that there were Indians 
in the vicinity, were using all due care; two were on 
horses, the others on foot, all armed, but, not at all ex- 
pecting an attack, they marched on leisurely. 

Obadiah was one of those on foot, and had gone some 
distance beyond the others, into a hollow about one and 
one half miles from Concord; here he set down his gun 
and awaited the approach of the others. The Indians, 
thinking themselves discovered, rose from their hiding- 
place, fired, and killed him, shooting him through the 
head. At this moment the rest of the party, with Jona- 
than Bradley at their head, came over the hill, and, 
seeing the fate of their comrade and their own danger, 
Bradley cried out, " Fire, and follow on ! " and then rushed 
down upon them. But the savages were too strong for 
them, being twelve to one. Samuel Bradley was shot 
down in the road. To Jonathan Bradley they offered 
quarter, having known him, but he refused, his heroic 
spirit thirsting to avenge his comrades. They then de- 
spatched him with their tomahawks; two others, John 
Bean and John Lufkin, were fired upon, ran four or five 
rods, fell, and expired. The rest were captured and 
carried to Canada as prisoners. 

The following is a report of one of the company who 
escaped: "Daniel Oilman says that Lieut. Bradley, with 
six men, was going about two and a half miles from Rum- 
ford to a garrison, on August 11, 1746, when they had 
gone about one and one half miles they were shot upon 
b)y about thirty or forty Indians if not more, as it was 
supposed, and killed down dead Lieut. John Bradley, 
Samuel Bradley, John Lufkin, John Bean, and Obadiah 
Peters. These were killed dead on the spot, and the most 
of them were stripped, two of whom were stabbed, cut 
and disfigured, it was supposed that there was an Indian 



348 New Hampshire 

killed when they had the fight for the said Oilman who 
made his escape, saith that he was about sixty rods be- 
fore those men, when they were shot upon, and he says 
the Indians shot three guns first, and as he thought that 
the party had shot at a deer, he ran back up a hill about 
forty rods, so that he could see over upon the other hill 
where the Indians lie and shot upon the men, and when 
he came upon the hill so as to see over upon the other 
hill he heard Lieut. Jonathan Bradley speak and say, 
' Lord have mercy upon us, fight ! ' In a moment his gun 
went off and there was more of the party also who fired, 
then the Indians rose up and shot a volley and ran out 
on to the path making all sorts of howling and yelling, 
and he did not stay long to see it, he said it was supposed 
that John Lufkin was upon the front and Obadiah Peters 
in the rear, and they were shot down the first shot, and 
they were in the path about twelve or fourteen rods apart, 
and Samuel Bradley was about twelve feet from Oba- 
diah Peters." This accotmt is attested to as a true copy 
by the clerk of the county. The Oeneral Assembly passed, 
November 19, 1747, the following resolution: "Voted 
that there be paid out of the money in the public treasury 
£']$ to those that were killed, heirs or legal representa- 
tives." The heirs of Obadiah Peters received £"] los. 
The initials of those massacred were inscribed on a large 
tree standing near the spot, which remained for a number 
of years, until some person cut it down. In 1836, August 
22, a monument was erected at the place of the massacre, 
and bears the following inscription : 

" This monument is in memory of Samuel 

Bradley Jonathan Bradley Obadiah 

Peters John Bean and John Lufkin 

who were massacred Aug. 11, 1746, by the In- 
dians. Erected 1837 by Richard Bradley, son of the 
Hon. John Bradley, and grandson of Samuel Bradley." 



ANDREW 

8 III. Andrew, first child of John, and Mary Edwards, 
bom in Ipswich, Mass., Dec. i, 1682, died in 

; md. in 
(pub. in Ipswich, Oct. 30, 
1708), to Mary Beare, dau. Beare, and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had children. 

IV. Children of Andreiu, and Mary Beare: 

1360 (1). John, born in Ipswich, Mass., Dec. 9, 1709. 

1361 (2). Mary, born in 

, bap., Portsmouth, N. H., Sept. 21, 
1 7 12, died in 



1363 (3). (Probably) Ruth (?), bom in 

, died in 

; was md. in Ips- 
wich, Mass., July 28, 1731, to Holle Marshall, son 
Marshall, and , 

his wife, born in 
, died in 

, and had children. (Both of Ipswich, 

intentions pub. Ap. 29, 1731.) 
1363 (4). Andrew (?). 

Church Records, Portsmouth, N. H. : "Andrew Peters 
owned the Covenant in ye church at Ipswich, his daughter 

3+9 



350 New Hampshire 

Mary was baptised Sept. 21,1712." 1713, July 1 5 , he was 
a petitioner at Bloody Point, N. H. (near Dover). 

A list of men's names that marched under the command 
of Capt. John Gilman to Winnipissiocky Pond : " Entered 
the 6th day of May, 1723, ended the i8th day inst. being 
in all thirteen days. Andrew Peters i8s. 7d." (Adju- 
tant General's report, vol. i., p. 42, State House, Concord^ 
N. H.). Capt. John Gilman was from Exeter, N. H. 

John (perhaps John, first child of Andrew, and 
Mary Beare ?), bom in 
, died in 
; int. mar. in Kittery, Me., Nov. 8, 1740, with Han- 
nah Johnson, dau. Johnson, and 

, his wife, bom in 
, died in 
, and had children. 

Children of John, and Hannah Johnson: 

1364 (1). Mary, born in Kittery, Me., Nov. 21, 1742, 
died in 



1365 (2). Andrew, born in Kittery, Me., Aug. 30, 1744, 
1266 (3). Elizabeth, bom in Kittery, Me., July 21, 1746, 
died in 



1367 (4). Simon, born in Kitter^^ Me., Sept. 29, 1749, 

1368 (5). Elinor, born in Kittery, Me., July 25, 1752,. 
died in 



Tax list, Kittery, 1 756-1 770, John Peters. 



Andrew 351 

1365 Andrew, second child of John, and Hannah John- 
son, bom in Kittery, Me., Aug. 30, 1744, died in 

; md. in Kittery, Nov. 

3, 1776 (int. ent. Sept. 24, 1774,) Hannah OHver, dau. 

OHver, and , 

his wife, bom in , 

died in , and 
had • children. 

Children of Andrew, and Hannah Oliver: 

1269 (1). John, born in Kittery, Me., June 29, 1777. 

1270 (2). Hannah, bom in Kittery, Me., July 17, 1779, 
died in 



1371 (3). Simon, born in Kittery, Me., Nov. 24, 1781. 

1269 John, first child of Andrew, and Hannah Oliver, 
bom in Kittery, Me., June 29, 1777, died in 

; md. in Kittery, Ap. 8, 1797, 
Anna Billings, dau. Billings, and 

, his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had children. 

1271 Simon, fourth child of John, and Hannah Johnson, 
bom in Kittery, Me., Sept. 29, 1749, died in 

; md. in 
, dau. 
and , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
, and had chil- 

dren. 

Children of Simon, and 
(Prob.) Simon, born in Berwick, Me., Feb. , 1784. 

Simon Peters, private, Capt. Amos Cogswell's Co., Col. 



352 New Hampshire 

James Wesson's, Reg., 1777, Jan. 25, 1778. 

Residence Holden. 

Simon Peters, private, Col. Wesson's Reg., enl. during 
war. Certified Feb. 14, 1781 {Mass. Archives). 

Simon, bom in Berwick, Me., Feb. , 1784 

died in . ^id 

in Bath, Me., July 25, 18 16, Reliance Edgecomb, dau 

Edgecomb, and 
his wife, bom in 

died in ^ and 

had children. 

Children of Simon, and Reliance Edgecomb: 

1373 (1). Susanna H , born in 

, Nov. 3, 181 7, died in 

1373 (2). Benjamin E , born in Bruns- 
wick, Me., Nov. 2, 1819, 

1374 (3). Sarah E , born in 

, Jan. 19, 1822, died in 

1375 (4). Mary H , bom in 

, July 23, 1825. Unmd. 

1376 (5). John A , born in 

, Oct. 12, 1828. 

1377 (6). LydiaE , bom in 

, Nov. 20, 1830, died in 

Unmd. 

1378 (7). James C , born in 

, May I, 1832. 

1373 Benjamin E , second child of 

Simon, and Reliance Edgecomb, bom in Bmnswick, Me., 
Nov. 2, 1819, died in 

; md. in 
dau. and 

, his wife, bom in 



Andrew 353 

, died in 
, and had children. 

Children of Benjamin E , and 

George H , born in Bath, Me., 

July 14, 1854. 

The New Hampshire section entitled Andrew is ex- 
tremely short and fragmentary. That the first i\ndrew 
therein is the son of John, oldest son of our earHest ances- 
tor Andrew there can be no doubt. But beyond this, and 
a few glimpses of him later, all is darkness. The name of 
John would naturally go down in this line, but there is a 
confusion of Johns. In the Gloucester, Mass., records is 
the marriage of John Peters, sojourner, to Mary Sweet of 
Ipswich, Jan. 5, 1770. This is probably a descendant of 
our Andrew and, presumably, the John whose record is 
as follows : 

1. John Peters, private, Capt. Nathaniel Wade, Col. 
John Barker, date Ap. 17, i775' Co. of Volunteers, 3d 
Essex County Reg. Took the place of Benjamin Averill. 
Lexington Alarm Roll, John Peters, Ap. 19, 1775, Capt. 
Wade's Co. marched from Ipswich to Mystic, 21 days. 
Ap. 20, ordered to Salem, Ap. 21, to Ipswich, then to 
Cambridge. Remained in service to May 10, 1775. 

John Peters, private, Capt. Wade, Col. Little, from Ips- 
wich, age 30 ; rep. enlisted May 10, 1 775 . In service, June 
5, 1775. company of Provincials marched to Cambridge. 
1775, Dec. 21, dated in camp, Capt. Wade, Col. Little, 
bounty coat due for 8 months service. 1776, March 

2 2 , Prospect Hill, pay for arms, clothing, etc. John Peters, 
Capt. Wade, Col. Little, enlisted May 10, 1775. service 11 
months, 5 days. From Ipswich. Mary Peters, receipt 
dated Ipswich, Feb. 24, 1777, for wages and travel allow- 
ance. Capt. Wade, Col. M. Little {Mass. Archives). 



23 



354 New Hampshire 

It seems possible that the first John was son of the 
second : 

2. Pay roll, Col. Thos. Stickney's Reg. com'd by Lt. 
Col. Henry Gerrish, raised in town of Concord & Towns 
adjacent which Co. marched July 5, 1777, for the relief 
of the garrison at Ticonderoga on the Alarm, & marched 
seventy miles when we had the news of the evacuation of 
the fort. John Peters, private. Entry July 5. Dis- 
charge July 12. Time in service 8 days. Rate per mo. 
;^4-io. Amt. wages 1-4. Travel amt. at 2d per mile 
and home at 2d ;;^2-7-8. 

Capt. Peter Kimball's Co. in Col. Thos. Stickney's 
Reg. in Gen. Stark's Brigade, raised out the 13th Reg. 
N, H. Militia, July 20, 1777, which Co. joined the North- 
em Continental Army at Bennington and Stillwater. John 
Peters, private. Time discharge, Sept. 20. Time ser- 
vice, 2 mos. I day. Rate ;^4-io. Amt. wages £g-T,. 
Travel to Charlestown, No. 4, at 2d per mile 60-15. 
Travel home from Stillwater and Bennington at 2d per 
mile i3o.;^i-i-8. Amt . wages & travel ;^ i o- 1 9-8 . Wages 
rec. ;^4-io. Balance due ;^6-9-8. , 

Pay roll, Capt. Joshua Abbot's Co., Col. Henry Ger- 
rish 's Reg. N. H. Volunteers, which Co. marched from 
Concord and towns adjacent, Sept. 1777, and joined the 
Northern Continental Army at Saratoga. John Peters. 
Entry Sept. 28, 1777, discharge, Oct. 26, 1777. Time in 
service, 29 days. Rate ;^4-io. Amt. wages, ;^4-7-o. 
Travel to Bennington, 128 miles at 3d per mile, ;^i-i2. 
Travel home from Saratoga, 155 miles, at 2d, ;!^i-5-io. 
{State Papers, New Hampshire — Hammond, vol. xiv. ; 
Revolutionary Rolls, I.) 

In the Miscellaneous Papers in the department of the 
secretary of state, Concord, N. H., vol. i. : "Aug. 18, 
1778, John Peters of Concord, bill for £/i^-6-6 for nursing 
Timothy Johnson, in the state service in July, 1777, son- 



Andrew 355 

in-law of John Peters." Johnson was in Capt. Peter Kim- 
ball's Co. Col. Stickney's Reg., in Stark's Brigade, 
marched to Bennington, was taken sick, and was cared 
for by John Peters who was in the same company. The 
paper is addressed "To The Hon'ble the Council and the 
House of Representatives of the State of New Hamp- 
shire convened at Exeter, Aug. 18, 1778." Thus it is 
evident that the second John is considerably older than 
the first John, who was bom in 1745. 

3. Massachusetts Archives. 1777, John Peters, prize- 
master of the officers and crew of the ship Essex, priva- 
teer. Capt. John Cathcart ; age 32 (consequently bom in 
1745), 5 ft. 6 in. From Boston. 

4. 1780, Aug. 2, John Peters, seaman, of the ship Pil- 
grim. Capt. Joseph Robinson. Age 26, 5 ft. 6 in., dark. 
From the Kennebec. 1779, May 24 to Aug. 31, service 
3 months, 8 days. John Peters, seaman, brigantine 
Active. Capt. Allen Hallett, Esq. (sic). 

5. John Peters, who served in Capt. Bumham's Co., 
Col. Michael Jackson's regiment, and who engaged for 
the war, was reported deserted Feb. 27, 1778, and Sep. 
25, 1780 ; was from Sturbridge, Mass., and is in one place 
called a Frenchman. We therefore need not concern our- 
selves about him. 

6. John Peters, from Hampshire Co., Mass. 1779, age 
17. 5 ft. 8^ in., complexion Indian, residence Southwick, 
Mass., under Ens. E. White. Served only to Jan. i, 
1780. Men enlisted for Continental army for 9 months, 
Springfield, Mass. Oct. 19, 1779, enlisted for town of 
Southwick, 

7. 1778, Ap. 25, to Dec. 31, 1779, John Peters, private 



356 New Hampshire 

in Capt. Hunt's Co., Col. Vose. Roll dated Providence, 
R. I., May 6, 1 779, John Peters, private, Capt. Hunt's 

Co., Col. Vose's Reg., March and April, 1770; enl. Dec. 
2, 1776, for war. He is mentioned, in camp, on or before 
Aug. 15, 1777; as receiving a gratuity, Providence, Feb. 
13, 1779; also Aug. 15, 1777, and Dec. 9, 1778. He is 
on the depreciation roll, Sept. 21, 1787. 

8. John Peters, private, Capt. Amasa Soper, Col. Mar- 
shall. Enlisted Dec. 28, 1776, dis. Feb. 10, 1777; 
marched to Bennington. 

9. John Peters, private. Col. Marshall, Jan. i, 1777, to 
Jan. I, 1778. Residence Dighton (Mass.). Reported 
dead on or before Aug. 15, 1777. Reported dead Jan. i, 
1778. 

10. 3d Reg. com'd by Col. Alexander Scammell, 1777, 
1778, 1779, 7th Co., John Peters, private. Amt deprecia- 
tion, 114.80. 

Return of the men 3d N. H. Reg. who are For Ware the 
Companies they belong to. And the Towns they come 
from. Camp Danbury, Dec. 8, 1779. John Peter Peters, 
Adkinson, (N. H.) Capt. McGregor's Co. 

11. Pay roll Capt. Robert Pike's Co. in Lt. Col. Joseph 
Senter's Reg. raised by the state of New Hampshire, and 
marched to the state of Rhode Island 1777. John Peters. 
Entry July 8, Discharge Jan. 6, 1778. Time in service, 6 
mos. Rate per mo. ;^2. Amt. wages, ;£ 12-0-0. Bounty 
;;^6. Travel from Exeter to Providence, 255-102, 7, 5. 
Travel from Warwick home, at 2d per mile, 112, 18, 8. 
Whole amt. of wages, bounty and travel ;^2o-3-8. 
Bounty and travel money rec. of the State 7-5. Balance 
due £12-18-8. 



BEAMSLEY 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND ANNE BEAMSLEY 

Records, Boston, Mass. Births. 

1632, 12th mo. 13th day, Anne, of William, and Anne 
Beamsley. 

1635, 2d mo. loth day, Grace, of William, and Anne 
Beamsley. 

1637, loth mo. 9th day, Mercie,* son of William, and 
Anne Beamsley. 

1640, loth mo. 13th day, Samuel, son of William, and 
Anne Beamsley. 

1640, loth mo. 13th day, Habakkuk, son of William, 
and Anne Beamsley. 

1643, loth mo. , Hannah, dau. of William, and 

Anne Beamsley. t 

1645, , Abigail, dau. of William, 

and Anne Beamsley. 

Admissions. First Church, Boston. 
1635, 6th mo. 2d day, William Beamsley, laborer. 

Baptisms. First Church, Boston. 

1635, Grace, ye daughter of or Brother Willy am 
Beamsley, 20th of 7th mo. 

* Error corrected in the baptisms. The old speUing of the name 
Mercy as "Marcy," and the old writing of the "e" like an open "o," 
have repeatedly ca^lsed it to be written Mary. 

t She md. in Ipswich, Mass., Oct. 16, 1661, Cornet Abraham Per- 
kins, of that town. 

357 



358 Beamsley 

1637, loth of loth mo. Mercie, ye daughter of or 
Brother Willyam Beamsley. 

1640, 7th of 12th mo. Samuel and Habakkuk, ye 
sonnes of or Brother Willyam Beamsley, being about 
fourteen dayes old. 

1643, 1 7th day of loth mo. Hannah, ye daughter of or 
Brother Willyam Beamsley. 

1645, 8th day of 12th mo. Abigail, being about two 
dayes old. 

There was evidently a son William as later baptisms 
read: 

1659, Sept. 5, Mary of William, and Mary Beamsley, 
died 15th of ist mo. 1662. 

1 66 1, Nov. 22, Hannah, dau. of William, and Mary 
Beamsley, died March 1663. 

1663, May 15th, (bom) Sarah, 

1665, April 25, (bom) Mary. 

Ensigne William Beamsley (Senior) deceased Sept. 29, 
1658-9. 1638. William Beamsley was admitted freeman. 

William Beamsley md. (2) Martha , who 

survived him. 

In the Suffolk Deeds (5 volumes), there is frequent 
mention of William Beamsley and in 1643, 1 6-1 2 , of George 
Beamsley "his lot, near Cedar Swamp and Muddy river." 

A house is bought by William Wenboume of Christo- 
pher Lawson, next to the lott of William Beamsley. 

1652, Aug. 17, mention of upland of William Beamsley. 

1652, Feb. 2, Boundary of William Beamsley. 

1652-12-11 Boundary of William Beamslie. 

1651-Oct. Boundary of William Beamsley. 

Sale to William Beamesley by Mary Hawkins of Boston, 
land 100 feet towards the street, bounded east with the 
street, north with William Phillips, south with William 
Beamsley and "part of William Phillips' land and part of 
my owne westward." 



Beamsley 359 

1656, April, mention of William Beamsley's land. 

1650-6-5. Said William Phillips sold to William 
Beamsley land in Boston "in the Mill field being 238 feet 
in length, or thereabouts, and in breadth at the South 
East front fower score foote, and at the Reare Sixty 
foote more or lesse as it is now staked out being bounded 
with the lands of Mrs Mary Haukins wch I purchased of 
hir as aboue exprest South East, the land of Richard 
Bennet South West and my owne land North West and 
North." 

William Beamsley sells for £t,o land to Henry Shin. 

There are several other allusions to William Beamsley 
and to Martha Beamsley. In 1657 he is called a Yeo- 
man. The word "laborer" as applied to him in the 
church admissions is probably used in a religious sense, 
as he was a large owner of real estate in Boston, and it 
was only persons of some consideration who had military 
titles conferred on them. 



Will No. ig6, in the Probate Court, Pemberton Square, 

Boston. 

In the Name of God Amen I William Beamsley being 
sicke in Body, but of a perfect memory praised be God, 
doe make and Ordajne this my Last Will and Testa- 
ment, in manner and forme as followeth, first I committ 
my body, unto the earth and bequeath my spirit to God, 
that gave it, first [illegible] all I make my wife full 
executrix and Administratrix of all my houses, Lands, 
Orchards goods and Chattells whatsoeuer, that she shall 
enjoye and possesse the same, unto her owne proper use, 
as long as she shall Liue, Provided she shall Let Mercy, 
haue that Chamber, wherein she now lyes 'for her owne, 
and that there shall be with all conveniency made therein 



360 Beamsley 

A Chimney, and she to enjoye it dureing her widdow- 
hoode, And I desire that my wife, may take the care and 
charge of her, and see that she wants neither meate 
drinke nor Cloathing dureing the tyme of her widdow- 
hoode. And further my will is that after my wifes decease, 
my whole Estate shall be then prized, and set to sale, The 
whole Estate that is then left, to be equally distributed 
amongst all my Children, Namely Anne Woodward, 
Grace Graves, Mercy Wilbome, Hannah Beamsley, Ed- 
ward Bushnell, Ehzabeth Page, Mary Robison, And in 
case any of these dye unpossessed, then it shall Retume 
to the next heyre. And my desire is that these three 
Bretheren Thomas Clarke, Richard Gridley, and Alex- 
ander Adams, see this my will be fulfilled, according to 
their best Endeavour, in wittness whereof I haue sett to 
my hand and scale this fourteenth of September, 1658. 

William Beamsley r — ^— 
Sealed in the p'nts of vs | ^^ 

Thomas Clarke 

Alex. Adames 
John fferniside 

The m'k R G of 

Richard Gridley 
Before ye [illegible] & Recorded 28,8, 1658 

Thomas Clarke Alexander Adams Richard Gridley 
deposed this paper to be ye last w^ll & testament of Wm 
Beamsly yt they saw him signe & scale ye same & [illegi- 
ble] it to be his last will & yt then he was of a disposing 
minde to their best knowledge. 

Edw. Ra-WSON, Recorder. 



MY NATIVE LAND, GOOD-NIGHT* 

.The boat swings from the pebbled shore, 

And proudly drives her prow ; 
The crested waves roll up before, 
Yon dark gray land I see no more, 

How sweet thou seemest now! 
Thou dark gray land, m.y native land, 

Thou land of rock and pine, 
I 'm speeding from thy golden sand. 
But can I wave a farewell hand 

To such a shore as thine? 

I 've gazed upon the golden cloud 

Which shades thine emerald sod; 
Thy hills which freedom's share hath ploughed 
Which nurse a race that have not bowed 

The knee to aught but God. 
Thy mountain floods, which proudly fling 

Their waters to the fall, 
The birds which cut with rushing wing 
The sky that greets the coming spring, — 

And thought thy glories small. 

But now ye 've shrunk to yon blue line 

Between the sky and sea, 
I feel, sweet home, that thou art mine, 
I feel my bosom cling to thine, 

That I am part of thee. 
I see thee blended with the wave 

As children see the earth 
Close up a sainted mother's grave; 
They weep for her they cannot save, 

And feel her holy worth. 

* See page 163, (492 VI.). 
361 



362 My Native Land, Good-Night 

Thou mountain land, thou land of rock, 

I 'm proud to call thee free ; 
Thy sons are of the pilgrim stock, 
And served like those who stood the shock 

At old Thermopylae. 
The laurel wreaths their fathers won 

The children wear them still! 
Proud deeds these iron men have done, 
They fought and won at Bennington, 

And bled at Bunker Hill. 

There 's grandeur in the lightning stroke, 

That rives thy mountain ash; 
There 's glory in thy giant oak. 
And rainbow beauty in the smoke 

Where crystal waters dash. 
There's music in thy winter's blast 

That sweeps the hollow glen; 
Less sturdy sons would shrink aghast 
From piercing winds like those thou hast 

To nurse thine iron men. 

And thou hast gems — aye, living pearls, 

And flowers of Eden hue; 
Thy loveliest are thy bright-eyed girls, 
Of airy forms and elfin curls, 

And smiles like Hermon's dew. 
They 've hearts like those they 're born to wed, 

Too proud to nurse a slave; 
They'd scorn to share a monarch's bed, 
And sooner lay their angel head 

Deep in their humble grave. 

And I have left thee, home, alone, 

A pilgrim from thy shore ; 
The wind goes by with hollow moan, 
I hear it sigh a warning tone, 

"You see your home no more!" 



My Native Land, Good-Night 363 

I 'm cast upon the world's wide sea, 

Torn like an ocean weed; 
I 'm cast away, far, far from thee, 
I feel a thing I cannot be, 

A bruised and broken reed. 

Farewell, my native land, farewell! 

That wave has hid thee now; 
My heart is bowed as with a spell. 
That rending pang! would I could tell 

What ails my throbbing brow ! 
One look upon that fading streak 

Which bounds yon eastern sky. 
One tear to cool my burning cheek. 
And then a word I cannot speak, — 

My native land, good-bye! 

Their bark is out upon the sea. 

She leaps across the tide, — 
The flashing waves dash joyously 

Their spray upon her side; 
As if a bird, before the breeze 

She spreads her snowy wings. 
And, breaking through the crested seas. 

How beautiful she springs! 

The deep blue sky above her path 

So cloudless, and the air 
That pure and spicy fragrance hath 

Which Ceylon's breezes bear; 
And though she seems a shadowless 

And phantom thing in sport. 
Her freight, I ween, is happiness. 

And heaven her far-off port. 

Mild, tearful eyes are gazing now 
Upon that fleeting ship, 



364 My Native Land, Good-Night 

And here, perhaps, an ashy brow. 

And there a trembhng lip, 
Are tokens of the agony, — 

The pangs it costs to sever 
The mother from her first-born child, 

To say farewell for ever. 

And they who sail yon fading bark 

Have turned a yearning eye 
To that far land which seems a line 

Between the sea and sky. 
And as that land blends with the sea. 

Like clouds in sunset light, 
A soft, low voice breathes in the wind : 

" My native land, good-night! " 

And they who stood upon the shore, 

And bend them o'er the sea 
To catch the last faint shadow of 

The shrouds' dim tracery, — 
I ween, if one could hear the sigh. 

Could catch the mother's tone, 
He'd hear it say: "Good-night, good-night, 

My beautiful, my own." 

That ship is gone — lost to the eye, — 

But still a freshing breeze 
Is e'er awake and drives her on 

Through smooth and pleasant seas. 
Right onward then she will dash on 

Though tempests shake the air. 
For hearts that fear not Ocean's wrath 

I ween will aye be there. 

That sea is Life; that bark is but 

The hopes of wedded love; 
The wind which fills its swelling sails 

I trust is from above; 



My Native Land, Good-Night 365 

And ever may its progress be 

Through summer seas right on, 
Till blended with eternity's 

Broad ocean horizon. 

Hugh Peters. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF JOHN PETERS, LIEUT.-COL. 
OF THE QUEEN'S LOYAL RANGERS, IN CANADA, 
DRAWN BY HIMSELF IN A LETTER TO A FRIEND 
IN LONDON * 

At the time of the breaking out of the revolution which ended in 
the formation and establishment of the American Republic, certain 
resident colonists, to the number of more than twenty thousand, 
remained true to the royal cause. These gallant patriots are known 
to history by the name of United Empire Loyalists ; in consequence of 
the stand taken by them, they were proscribed by their fellow-colo- 
nists, and compelled to fly from their homes and seek protection 
under the British flag. Most of them fought valiantly on the royal 
side during the struggle, and, after its close, the various State Legis- 
latures adopted severe and highly penal enactments in order to pre- 
vent the return of "The Tories," as the United Empire Loyalists were 
called, to their homes in the new Republic. More than ten thousand 
of them eventually settled in Canada, and their energy contributed 
not a little to the prosperity of the country. Others found their way 
to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, others to Great Britain, and a 
few to the West Indies. Conspicuous among these gallant men who 
stood fast allies of the royal cause, was Lieut. -Col. John Peters, an 
officer in the Queen's Loyal Rangers. A few years after the close of 
the war he went to England, where he remained until his death, in the 
year 1786; he wrote a narrative giving an account of his life during 
the course of the rebellion. 

The original manuscript of this narrative is in the possession of Mr. 
S. P. Bell of New York City, and the contents, we understand, have 
never before appeared in print. Through the kindness of a corre- 
spondent, Mr. Samuel James McCormick of New Rochelle, West- 
chester Co., N. Y., we are enabled to lay a copy of this narrative 
before our readers. It will be noticed that the writer reflects somewhat 
severely upon the conduct of certain high officials whose names are 
familiar to persons acquainted with the history of Canada. These 
reflections may perhaps be to some extent colored by the writer's 
prejudices; at the same time the narrative is written in a spirit of 
evident fairness, and freedom from deliberate bias. Similar charges, 
moreover, have been made by other writers, and it is by no means 
probable that they are wholly groundless. The narrative contains 
some little information that is new, and upon the whole it is not with- 
out value as a contribution to Canadian history. 

Sir, I do not mean to take any pride from family, as 

* The Story of a United Empire Loyalist. (Copy of a newspaper 
cutting obtained from Nova Scotia.) 

366 



Autobiography of John Peters 367 

you will conceive, nor to boast of my exploits, but to 
relate my story in simplicity. 

I was bom in Hebron, in Connecticut, in the year 
1740. My father was a wealthy farmer, and colonel of 
the militia. He descended by his father from William 
Peters, a brother of Hugh Peters, Oliver Cromwell's 
chaplain, and of an ancient family in Cornwall, Old Eng- 
land, and by his mother from Major General Thomas 
Harrison, the Regicide. 

My mother was a descendant of John Phelps, a con- 
siderable man in Cromwell's Party. I had a liberal 
education at Yale College, in Connecticut, and received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1759; ini76i, I married 
Ann, daughter of Robert Bamett, a merchant at Windsor, 
in Connecticut; she was bom in the year 1740, and is 
now the mother of eight sons and one daughter. 

In 1763 I settled in Piermont, in the province of New 
Hampshire, on the east bank of the Connecticut river, 
where I had a Tract of land, and had built a house, a 
saw-mill and bam. I was, by Governor Wentworth, 
appointed Captain Commandant of the Militia, and 
Deputy Surveyor of the King's woods. In 1770 I re- 
moved to Mooretown, on the west side of the Connecticut 
river, where I had a large parcel of land, and I built an 
house, bam, saw and grist mills, and carried on hus- 
bandry. Being now in the province of New York, I was 
appointed by Governor Tryon to be Colonel of the Militia, 
Justice of the Peace, Judge of Probates, Registrar of the 
County, Clerk of the Court, and Judge of the Court of 
common pleas. Here I was in easy circumstances, and 
as independent as my mind ever wished. In 1774 the 
spirit of discord and rebellion so far prevailed as to occa- 
sion me much trouble, a congress was forming through 
the Colonies. The counties of Cumberland and Gloucester, 
(since called Vermont) desired me to attend the congress 



368 Autobiography of John Peters 

to meet at Philadelphia in 1774 which appointment I 
accepted of, and passing through Hebron on my way to 
Philadelphia, I was mobbed with my Uncles the Rev. 
Samuel Peters, Mr. Jonathan and Mr. Bemslee Peters, by 
Governor Trumbull's Liberty Boys, because we were ac- 
cused of Loyalty. I was liberated after suffering much 
ill language from the mob. The Rev. Samuel Peters 
suffered more than I did. He and I agreed in opinion 
that the teachers, bankrupts, dissenting teachers, and 
smugglers meant to have a serious rebellion and a civil 
and religious separation from the mother country. My 
Uncle advised me to meet the congress, to find out 
what their aim was. I did so, and being certainly con- 
vinced that nothing short of independence would satisfy 
them, I refused to take the oath of secrecy in Congress, 
and wrote to my uncle who had been forced to fly to 
England, telling him what to expect, and I returned to 
my family at Verdmont * ; but on my way home I was 
seized by three mobs, ill treated and dismissed at Weath- 
ersfield, Hartford, and Springfield. In April, 1775, I 
arrived in Mooretown, when another mob seized me and 
threatened to execute me as an enemy to Congress. 

Then they carried me to the committee, Deacon 
Bailey being president (but since a rebel general) who 
ordered me the same evening to gaol, and discharged 
me the same evening at 12 o'clock because they had 
not found proof of my corresponding with General 
Carleton, on pretense of which I had been committed to 
prison. 

Soon after another mob seized me, and insisted that I 
should sign their Covenant, which was to oppose the King 
and British army with my life and property, which Cove- 
rt' Evidently this is a spelling taken from his uncle the Rev. Samuel 
Peters, who insisted that it v/as correct and that Vermont meant a 
mountain of maggots. 



Autobiography of John Peters 369 

nant I did not sign and begged time for consideration, 
under bonds, which was granted. 

In the meantime news arrived that the British troop had 
marched out of Boston and were murdering the inhabi- 
tants, both young and old. Whereupon the committee 
required me to give orders to the miHtia to be ready at 
an hour's notice to march against the royahsts. I gave 
them orders. This gained me much favor for a few days 
with the mob. However, as the report of the massacre 
near Boston by the King's troops diminished away, the 
mob renewed their attack upon me, searched my house 
for letters of secret correspondence with General Carleton, 
w4th whom in fact I never had corresponded. 

They took all papers found in my house, insulted me, 
and required me to sign deeds of some lands I had bought, 
confined me to the limiits of the town, and threatened me 
with death if I transgressed their Orders. The mob 
again and again visited me, and ate and drank, and finally 
plundered me of most of my moveable effects. Added 
to this my Father, Col. Peters of Hebron, wrote against 
me, and urged on the m.ob, assigning for reason "that 
his Uncle, Peters, the clergyman, who had taught him 
bad principles, was driven out of the country, and that 
he would soon become a friend to America if severity was 
used." 

By January, 1776, vexation had hurt my health, and 
the madness of the people daily growing worse, I thought 
of a mode to make my escape to Canada, and I applied to 
the rebel Col. Beadle, who had been my old and steady 
friend, and was going against Canada. He consented to 
take me along with him as a companion, and obtained 
the consent of the Committee. 

March, 1776, we left Mooretown and Col. Beadle used 
me kindly and honourably, and never requested me to 
bear arms, which he had agreed to before we left home. 

»4 



1 



^o Autobiography of John Peters 



We arrived at the Cedars, when I prevailed upon Col. 
Beadle not to burn the town which he was ordered to do. 

I sent off to Captain (now Lieut. Col.) Foster of the 
8th Regiment at Catarague, all the proper information in 
my power and his answer was "he would attack the 
Cedars a certain day" and advised me to keep out of 
the way. I appHed to Col. Beadle to be sent to Montreal 
to procure provisions for the rebels ; whilst I was there, 
Captain Foster took the rebel fort at the Cedars; but I 
had got Col. Beadle away. 

Having received news of Capt. Foster's success, and 
that a rebel party was going to attack him, I sent him 
information which enabled him to form an ambuscade 
whereby he took and killed near 150 rebels; the Indians 
were enraged with the rebels because some of their 
friends had been killed in the skirmish, and they killed 
several captives and to stop their outrage Capt. Foster 
gave them eight yoke of oxen and several cows. At 
Montreal I met Dr. Franklin and the other Commissioners 
from Congress, also Gen. Wooster and Col. Arnold, and 
we dined together, when Arnold said: "Nothing but 
independence would settle these matters, and he wished to 
God it was now done." 

Dr. Franklin and Gen. Wooster wrote a letter to Col. 
Gazzen to let him know that Col. De Haws was going 
around the mountains with 700 men to attack Capt. Fos- 
ter, and Col. Arnold with the main Body, was to meet 
Foster at Lachine with four field pieces. I obtained that 
information and sent it over the mountains by Mr. Fer- 
guson (clerk to Mr. Doby of Montreal) to Capt. Foster, by 
which means he escaped over the river. 

Arnold on his return to Montreal found Dr. Franklin 
and Wooster had gone toward Albany, and he gave 
private order to plunder and bum the city of Montreal. 
I discovered this by Mr, Wheatly of Norwich, in Con- 



Autobiography of John Peters 371 

necticut, who, with Arnold, was to share the profit ; and 
Mr. Wheatly offered me part if I would join with him. I 
thanked Mr. Wheatly for his friendship, desired a few 
hours to consider of it, and went and informed the in- 
habitants of the design and they set a watch over the 
city till Arnold left the town. 

I went next to Sorel, where Gen. Sullivan commanded. 
He took me a prisoner on suspicion that I had given 
Capt. Foster and the Indians of Conisidoga information 
of their intentions, and sent me to St. Johns; the rebels 
burnt Chamblie and St. Johns on their way to Isle-la- 
Motte where we rested six days, and where I was set at 
liberty because they had no proof against me, except 
what arose from a letter that Deacon Bailey wrote to 
Gen. Sullivan, "to take care of Col. Peters, who was an 
enemy to America and would escape to Gen. Carleton 
the first opportunity." 

Gen. Sullivan and army set off for Crown Point, and I 
had retired to the woods on the Isle la Motte and returning 
in the evening of Jime 28th to the deserted camp, where 
I foimd a canoe, which Dr. Skinner (who had also es- 
caped) and I seized and paddled off in to St. Johns, 
nearly forty miles, where we met General Frazer on the 
29th of June. The General received me kindly and con- 
ducted me to General Carleton at Chamblie, who being 
satisfied with my conduct, gave me a pass to Montreal, 
where on my arrival the inhabitants treated me with 
much friendship and thanks for the assistance given in 
preserving their town and property. 

August 14, I met with Mr. Peter Levines, the present 
Chief -Justice of Canada, to whom I was known many 
years before. Mr. Levine showed me every kind of atten- 
tion that friendship and generosity could dictate, and 
carried me to Chamblie, and introduced me to General 
Carleton as a person he knew might be depended upon. 



372 Autobiography of John Peters 

October, 1776, I went as a volunteer with General 
Carleton on Lake Champlain as one of the pilots to General 
Frazer in the van of the army. After the defeat of the 
rebel fleet and army, on the third of November, the 
royal army returned from Crown Point to St. Johns. 

March, 1777. Two deserters from the rebel country ar- 
rived at Montreal and informed me that my property 
had been seized, confiscated, and myself outlawed, and 
that Mrs. Peters and the children had been turned out of 
my house in the month of January, 1777; that she and 
her children had been sent off in a sleigh with one bed, 
by Deacon Bailey, to Ticonderoga, one himdred and forty 
miles through the woods, snow-storms and bad roads; 
that Mrs. Peters, a small and delicate woman, had been 
compelled to travel with her young children in her arms, 
in deep snow and rain, and were almost dead when they 
arrived at Ticonderoga, where the rebel general Wayne 
received them with himianity and used them kindly, till 
April, when he sent her and her children thirty miles on 
their way to Canada, and left them with three weeks' pro- 
visions in a deserted house near fifty miles from any in- 
habitants between them and Canada; here she stayed 
eighteen days with her children only (the oldest being 
fourteen years), her servant having been detained by 
Deacon Bailey (for which General Wayne said he ought 
to be damned) . At length a British boat discovered and 
carried them to a vessel and thence to St. Johns, where 
they all arrived on the 4th May, 1777, well, but naked 
and dirty. 

May 6th, 1777, I met my wife and children at St. Johns 
(having been advised of their arrival there) with clothing 
and other necessaries, and carried them to Montreal. In 
May, 1777, I was ordered by Sir Guy Carleton to raise a 
regiment of which I was to be the Lt. -Colonel Command- 
ant. 



Autobiography of John Peters 373 

June 14th, I was ordered by General Burgoyne to join 
his Army with what men I had raised, and he gave my 
regiment the name of the Queen's Loyal Rangers. 

July 23rd, 1777, my corps, for the first time, was mus- 
tered at Skeensborough by Alexander Campbell, Deputy 
Commissary of Musters. I had mustered 262 men only, 
but I had raised in all 643, though, as my situation was 
generally in the advance party, my men were killed off 
not quite so fast as I enlisted them, but prevented them 
being mustered as regularly as they should have been. I 
was in every skirmish which happened between the army 
under Gen. Burgoyne and the rebels that campaign, 
except at Hublenston. 

August 1 6th, 1777, I commanded the Loyalists at 
Bennington, when I had 291 men of my regiment with 
me, and I lost above half of them in that engagement. 
The action commenced about nine o'clock in the morning 
and continued until near four o'clock in the afternoon, 
when we retired in much confusion. 

A little before the Royalists gave way the rebels pushed 
with a strong party on the front of the Loyahsts which I 
commanded ; as they were coming up I observed a man 
fire at me, which I returned. He loaded again as he 
came up, and discharged again at me, crying out : " Peters, 
you damned Tory, I have got you ! " He rushed on with 
his bayonet which entered just below my left breast, but 
was turned by the bone. By this time I was loaded and 
I saw that it was a rebel captain, Jeremiah Post by name, 
an old playmate and school-fellow, and a cousin of my 
wife. Though his bayonet was in my body I felt regret 

to destroy him. 

We retreated from Bennington to the reinforcement 
that was coming up, which was soon attacked and 
obHged to retreat to the bridge at the mills in Cambridge, 
which I broke up after the troops had retreated over it. 



374 Autobiography of John Peters 

And the same evening we retreated towards the camp 
which we reached the next day. General Frazer received 
me very kindly, and as I was wounded in the breast and 
was also lame with a hurt I had received in a skirmish the 
day before the action by a ball grazing my foot, and was 
much fatigued, and for some time had been harassed 
with fever and ague, he generously gave me up his bed 
for the night, and he laid himself in his cloak on a bench. 
I received his and Gen. Burgoyne's approbation for my 
conduct in this action. The report of the defeat of the 
royal troops at Bennington reaching Montreal, Gen. 
McLean, Col. of the 84th Regiment, went to Mrs. Peters 
and told her that news had come from Gen. Burgoyne's 
camp, and she must expect to hear of many being killed 
and wounded, but if Col. Peters or her son were among 
them she must hold up with good courage and not de- 
spond, as he would see to care being taken of her and her 
family, that they should never want. 

After some conversation in like manner, Gen. McLean 
thought proper to let her know that there was a report 
that Col. Peters and his son were both wounded and since 
dead. Mrs. Peters said: "My calamities are very great, 
but thank God, they died doing their duty to their King 
and Coimtry. I have six sons left, who, as soon as they 
shall be able to bear arms, I will send against the rebels, 
while I and my daughter will mourn for the dead and 
pray for the living." 

September 7th, the rebels made an attack upon the Brit- 
ish army marching from Saratoga towards Albany. They 
were repulsed with great loss of killed, and the royal army 
suffered much. The royal army kept their ground at Still- 
water till September 19, when the rebels attacked our ranks 
in the morning and the attack continued till dark. 

The royal army having suffered much and Gen. Frazer 
being mortally wounded, we retreated to Saratoga. 



Autobiography of John Peters 375 

Sept. 27th, we burnt some of our tents, and the 28th 
did the same. Here we remained until October 8th, 
hoping every day the Royal army would attempt to 
force their way to Fort George. Cessation of hostilities 
took place and treaties went on between the Royal army 
and rebel commanders. 

On the 14th of October, in the morning, when it was 
expected the capitulation was nearly concluded, as I was 
in great anxiety and distress of mind, knowing how im- 
possible it was that any capitulation could provide for 
my security, I met Gen. Phillipps, who asked me why I 
remained there, as I had told him before that no articles 
would protect me. 

I answered that whatever might be the event I would 
not go without orders in writing, for that no one should 
be able to say that I had deserted them in the hour of 
distress. He said he would get me orders. In the after- 
noon he met me again, and seemed surprised at seeing 
me still there. 

I reminded him of what he had said, on which he 
carried me with him to the general's tent, and he brought 
me out a written permission to take as many of my 
officers and men as I thought could not be protected 
and were willing to go. I accordingly got together as 
many as I could meet with in that condition who chose to 
make the attempt. 

While I was preparing for our departure a person who 
had left the rebel colonies for having counterfeited their 
paper money came to me and begged to be of the party. 
I did not much like his company, but I saw the poor 
creature in such a trembling situation from the certainty 
of being hanged that I could not but consent. As soon 
as it was dark enough we set out, being thirty-five in 
number, and each carrying two days' provisions. I 
ordered Lieut. Holiburt, of my regiment to lead, as he 



37^ Autobiography of John Peters 

knew the woods in the dark better than I did. I followed 
next, and ordered all of the rest to follow in single file, 
and in perfect silence, my son and Major Wright in the 
rear. We steered at first south westward. We had 
not got far when the money maker began to be very 
troublesome with his fears. I ordered him placed be- 
tween Major Wright and my son, and ordered the major 
if he made any noise to put his bayonet into him, and 
leave him dead; notwithstanding this he was very 
troublesome. When we had travelled two or three miles 
from the Royal camp we were challenged by a party of 
rebels. I replied: "From Gen. Gates and we v/ere in 
pursuit of some Tories who have fled from Burgoyne's 
camp." The rebels demanded the countersign and who 
commanded. The answer was: "Col. Peters with 1800 
men, and they might fire as soon as they pleased," was the 
countersign. The darkness and the surprise caused the 
rebels to take prudent care of themselves for that night, 
but next day they pursued us with about 100 men whom 
we saw at a distance from a hill, but whether they saw 
us or not I cannot say. When we thought we could do 
it safely we turned more north westerly and then north- 
erly. On the 1 6th, at the beginning of the night, we 
found ourselves on the western bank of the Hudson 
river. The moon was just risen, and close under us on 
the same side, at the mouth of a brook, was a man in a 
canoe, going to fish. We called to him, and by the fear 
of our firearms obliged him to come to us ; but as three 
only could go at once in the canoe, and one was obliged 
always to come back to fetch two more, and as we 
were obliged to paddle for fear of being heard, in case 
any scouts of the rebels were at hand, it was midnight 
before we all got over. 

Tedious as this was it was much better than the noise 
we should have made, and the time we should have con- 



Autobiography of John Peters 377 

sumed in felling and making a raft of trees to pass over 
upon. Whilst this was transacting, such of us as first 
went over detained the man, which we told him was only 
to prevent his discovering us. He seemed surprised at 
this, having taken us for rebels, and informed us that he 
and his father were sincere Loyalists and on his mentioning 
his name one of our party recognised him. After we had 
all got over he carried us to his father's who received us 
very kindly, and offered us all he had, some bear's flesh, 
some dried moose and some Indian com, and informed us 
that there were two parties lying on the two ways we 
were expected to pass and that perhaps in the morning 
they might visit his house, as they frequently did ; there- 
fore it would be necessary for us to be away very early, 
but that he would accompany and lead us directly over 
the mountain, so as to avoid these two parties, and go 
between them. 

He accordingly called us very early in the morning, 
and though the motintain seemed impracticable yet he 
led us over and clear of the two parties and then took 
leave of us. The 17th, in the woods, we heard the firing 
of cannon at Saratoga which I knew to be in consequence 
of the surrender of the British army to the rebels. It 
went to my heart to hear it, though I knew it was to be 
the case. We then kept northerly so as to avoid any 
path. On the i8th we thought we were sufficiently 
north, and stood east in order to strike Lake George, but 
to our surprise we suddenly came in sight of houses, 
which obliged us to stand west again and then northerly, 
and we stood on so until we were quite out of danger. 
Then we stood east, and on the 19th of October, near 
sunset, when we were almost famished, we struck Lake 
George, where Major Irwin, of the 47th, commanded. He 
received us very uncivilly till I produced my written 
order. He then treated us with great kindness and 



378 Autobiography of John Peters 

humanity, giving us food and ordered boats to carry us to 
Diamond Island, about five miles, where Major Aubery 
of the 47th commanded and had done good service. He 
treated us with all possible goodness, and as I was in a 
fever and ague, with which I had been troubled for some 
time before I had quitted the camp, and much fatigued, 
he was so good as to make me sleep in his bed while he 
went somewhere else for the night. Next day he gave 
us boats which carried us across the lake, from whence 
we marched to Ticonderoga, where we remained under 
the command of General Powel, till the fort was evacu- 
ated, when we returned to Montreal, and soon after to 
Quebec, where Gen. Carleton received me with appro- 
bation, but could not pay me till he had official ac- 
counts from Gen. Burgoyne. Hitherto I had received 
no pay from the King for my services. Gen. Carleton 
had put me on the subsistence list at 30;^ per muster, 
and had behaved with great attention and humanity to 
my family. 

In 1778, Gen. Haldimand took the command in Canada, 
to whom I was introduced by Gen. Carleton. His Ex- 
cellency ordered me to command a party of 200 white 
men and 100 Indians, and to march to Cobos, on Con- 
necticut river, and destroy the settlement there. Having 
arrived at Lake Champlain, on my way to Cobos, Gen. 
Haldimand's letter overtook me, which gave leave to all 
my party to return that chose to do so, but permitted 
me to pay a visit to Onion river. He also directed me to 
leave my orders. We all went on by water one day and 
landed at the river La Mile, and marched up by that 
river when some got discouraged and returned with all 
the Indians and all the white men except thirty-four 
with whom I had proceeded to the head of Onion river; 
and following it down we destroyed the Block house and 
all the buildings on it, for about thirty miles, as I was 



Autobiography of John Peters 379 

ordered, after which I returned with my thirty-four men 
to St. Johns, on the 23rd of August, 1778. 

In 1779, I again requested General Haldimand to pay 
me for my services under Gen. Burgoyne in 1777. His 
Excellency said that matter had been transacted before 
he took command, and he could do nothing in it till he 
should have official returns, but he continued me on the 
subsistence list where Gen. Carleton had placed me. I 
wrote to the Rev. Mr. Peters in London, who appHed to 
Lord George Germaine in my behalf, and his lordship 
wrote to Gen. Haldimand to settle my accounts and 
others in a hke situation. Gen. Haldimand seemed to 
be offended, and accused me of complaining home against 
him, which in truth I had not done, or thought of, nor 
hitherto had any reason. He appointed a board of 
officers to examine my claims, but ordered the com- 
missioners not to allow pay for any men that were killed 
or taken in the year 1777, or bat or forage, or for any 
money advanced by me or my officers to the men in the 
campaign of 1777 who had not returned to Canada. 

The commissioners obeyed his orders, although I pro- 
duced Gen. Burgoyne's orders, given out at Battlehill, 
August 26th, 1777, that all the provincial troops should 
be paid the same as the British troops. By this injustice 
I lost what was due me on British pay from the first of 
August to the 24th of December, 1783, when we were 
disbanded. 

November 12th, 1781, Gen. Haldimand draughted the 
provincial corps and out of them formed corps which he 
named "Loyal Rangers," and appointed Edward Jessop 
to be major of it, and at the same time gave out in 
general orders that he appointed ' ' Lieutenant-Colonel 
John Peters, of the Queen's Loyal Rangers, as captain 
of Invalids." This cruel, degrading change was worked 
while I was at Skeensborough, where I had been sent by 



380 Autobiography of John Peters 

Gen. Haldimand with a flag and rebel prisoners with a 
view to gain intelHgence from the southern army, which I 
performed and reported to him. On my return to Quebec 
I complained to the general of the hard measures he had 
dealt out to me by degrading me below those who had 
been under my command in 1777, nor did I understand 
why I was invalided. Mr. Mathews, secretary to Gen. 
Haldimand, gave me for answer that I had a wife and 
eight children and I might starve if I refused captain's 
pay, beside I should not be allowed rations if I refused. 
My subsistence money being stopped I was obliged to 
accept the pay of a captain till December 24th, 1783, or 
perish with my family. 

1784, Gen. Haldimand owning land at the bay of 
Chaleurs urged the Loyalists to settle on it, or at Catara- 
qui, and threatened to withhold provisions from them in 
case of a refusal. Some of the Loyalists, however, wanted 
to settle near Maisqui Bay in Canada, where they built 
some houses and cleared some land, but Gen. Haldimand 
sent Lieut. Buckley of the 29th to burn their houses and 
to bring off the settlers. The Loyalists then petitioned 
the governor for leave to settle in Cape Breton, and not 
at the Bay of Chaleur.* The governor having heard that 
I had drawn up the petition sent for me and told me that 
I was the supposed author of it, and in a passion treated 
me with great indignity. I told him that no man but 
the commander-in-chief should treat me so; he added: 
"I will allow the Loyalists nothing, they shall settle on 
those lands I have allotted for them, or I will send them 
back to the rebels." His threatening terrified some, and 
they settled on such lands as he chose, but I and my 
family left Canada, October 17th, with many others to 
get rid of such a petty tyrant, and we arrived at Cape 

* No attempt has been made to alter the spelling of proper names. 
They are printed exactly as fotmd. 



Autobiography of John Peters 381 

Breton. Here I left my wife and children in a fisher- 
man's home, under the protection of Peter, the Indian 
king of Cape Breton (who had more honour than two 
Swiss governors), and I went to Halifax. 

August, 1785, Sir Charles Douglas, who knew me in 
Canada, generously brought me with him to England. 
I first borrowed loo;^ for my family in Halifax, and drew 
on a friend in London for it. 

On my arrival in London I applied to the Lords of the 
treasury for subsistence, and they gave me temporary 
support of loo;^ per annum, notwithstanding Gen. Haldi- 
mand refusing a certificate of my loyalty and services 
though they had been so conspicuous for ten years past. 

One thing I omitted respecting my sons, who had 
served his Majesty against the American rebellion. My 
son John, the oldest ensign in the Queen's Loyal Rangers, 
was neglected by Gen. Haldimand when he drafted the 
provincial corps in Canada, and a son of Major Jessop's, 
quite a boy, who had never done any service, was ap- 
pointed a lieutenant over my son and all the ensigns who 
had served during the whole of the war. 

Andrew, my second son, was a midshipman during the 
war on the Lakes, under Commodore Chambers, and has 
no subsistence. Samuel, my third son, has been a volun- 
teer ever since 1779, and all the reward given me and my 
sons by Gen. Haldimand is, he returned me to the war 
office in these remarkable words " as captain of Invalids," 
and my son John as ensign in the Loyal Rangers, under the 
command of Major Edward Jessop, whom as Lieutenant- 
Colonel, I had commanded in 1777, and afterwards, till 
he was put over me in this astonishing manner. I cannot 
say I look back with regret at the part I took, from 
motives of loyalty and from a foresight of the horror 
and miseries of independence, though I never imagined 
they would be so great as they now are, yet I thought 



382 Autobiography of John Peters 

the part I took right, and I certainly think so still, from 
love to my country as well as duty to my sovereign and 
notwithstanding my sufferings and services, and scanda- 
lous treatment by Gen. Haldimand, I would do it again 
if there was occasion. It is true I see persons who were 
notorious on the rebel side who are now here, and taken 
notice of and advanced, while I am neglected and de- 
prived even of what is justly due me ; but with the con- 
sciousness of having done right I can look with disdain 
at the triumph of successful villains. 

Should you desire any further information, I shall 
willingly attend to your commands, either viva voce vel 
scriptis. 

I have the honour to be, sir, your faithful friend and 

obliged servant, 

J. Peters. 
Duke's Row, No. 3. 

Pimlico, June 5th, 1786. 

I have also had an occasion to overlook the original 
from which this was printed and find it to be compar- 
ably the same ; headed that it was written by Col. John 
Peters by request. It was to have been used by Dr. 
Peters in his application for Col. John Peters' relief to the 
British government. 

I have since ascertained that this clipping was from the 
Toronto Gazette. 

Col. Peters' anxiety and distress of mind and desire to 
get away from Burgoyne's army at the time of its capitu- 
lation arose from the fact that he had not as yet received 
his commission from the British government, although he 
was recognized by the government and his men had been 
mustered into the service of the King, just previous to 
that in July, but his commission was deferred as the 
office which he would be commissioned to depended on 
the number of men which he should have mustered into 



Autobiography of John Peters 383 

service, and the commission which he was fighting under, 
was his acknowledgment by the British government, and 
his orders from Gen. Governor Tryon of New York under 
his old commission of colonel of militia, and the general 
governor's proclamation to raise troops for the British 
government, as will be partially seen from the following 
abstracts from Hadden's Journal: 

" Though the provincials and Canadians with Burgoyne, 
like the volunteers in our late Civil war, received but 
slender praise from the regulars, yet there were some 
able officers among them, like the brothers Jessup, Lieut. 
Col. John Peters, and Captain Justin Sherwood. 

' ' Of irregular troops there were two provincial battalions 
commanded respectively by Lieut. Col. John Peters of 
Hampshire grants, and Lieut. Col. Ebenezer Jessup, of 
New York. The nimiber of companies in each battalion 
is unknown, but there were not sufficient to constitute 
a regiment, and Peters' corps was sent on the expedition 
to Bennington in the hope of swelHng its ranks by the 
accession of recruits in the neighborhood. Burgoyne in 
writing to Lord George Germaine from Skeensborough, 
July II, 1777, when everything had gone well with him 
says : ' Mr. Peters and Mr. Jessup who came over to 
Canada, last autumn and proposed to raise battalions, 
one from the neighborhood of Albany, the other from 
Charlotte County, are confident of success as the army 
advance. Their battalions are now embryo, but very 
promising! they have fought and with spirit. Sir Guy 
Carleton has given me blank commissions for the officers, 
to fill up occasionally, and the agreement with them is, 
that the Commissions are not to be so effective till two 
thirds of the battalions are raised.' 

" Peters' battalion at the battle of Bennington occupied 
a prominent position in the fight and at one time bore the 
brunt of the battle at the side of a stream and the Ameri- 



384 Autobiography of John Peters 

cans pressed up the hill in their rear where they had the 
whole field of action in their view. In that battle the 
British loss was 934 ; of that number Peters' battalion 
alone lost 157. 

"The Loyalist corps that served under Burgoyne seem 
to have led a precarious existence after their return to 
Canada, as we find a warrant antedated July 19, 1779, 
issued by order of Gen. Haldimand for payment of 
;^i634. Ss. lod. sterling, being the allowance made for 
the present relief of several corps of Loyalists belonging 
to Gen. Burgoyne 's army and sundry other persons 
who have taken refuge in this province from the rebel- 
lious colonies between 25th June and 24th August, 1779, 
inclusive. 

"The subsistence returns for Royalists commanded 
by Capt. McAlpine from which the above warrant was 
issued show the money was for the following parties as 
the returns denominated : 

" Capt. McAlpin's 78 

Mr. Jessup 98 

Mr. Peters 61 

Part of Capt. Leak's 30 

Part of Mr. Adams' 34 

Those not attached to parties 36 

John Peters received £^0. 

"Later on, in 1779, Gen. Haldimand determined to re- 
organize these Loyalist corps, if possible, as shown by his 
letter to Lord George Germaine dated Quebec, November 
I, 1779, and which is as follows: 

" My lord, I have the honor to present to your Lordship 
that several Gentlemen amongst whom are Capt. McAlpin, 
Mr. Leake, Messrs Peters and Jessup, having in conse- 
quence of Governor Tryon's Proclamation raised corps, 
with whom they joined Gen. Burgoyne's army, but having 



Autobiography of John Peters 385 

been by his misfortiine dispersed, they took refuge in 
this province with part of their men and made apphcation 
to me to have their corps re-estabhshed and put upon the 
same footing with the provincial corps that has joined 
the southern army, but the difficulty that I found 
in procuring men for the royal emigrants and Sir John 
Johnson's corps, and fearing that raising others might 
interfere with their success, I from time to time put 
them off. Finding these regiments have not been bene- 
fited by my design and seeing that the trial may be made 
without much expense to our government, these gentle- 
men with a number of other refugee Loyalists being indis- 
pensably supported at the pubHc expense and that such 
corps once raised would be useful particularly as they will 
be recruited upon the frontiers of Hampshire, and give 
an influence towards Vermont and that neighborhood, I 
have thought it expedient to make the attempt and shall 
begin with two battalions. I shall not give the officers 
commissions until their men are raised, and in proportion 
to their success I shall enlarge the plan, trusting to obtain 
the King's approbation of what I do for the best, and 
that I shall be enabled to fulfill the expectations of those 
gentlemen by putting them upon the same footing with 
the other provincials serving with the army. As soon as 
the winter sets in I shall permit them to send out people 
and to employ their friends upon the frontiers in raising 
men and shall give them every assistance in my power to 
effect their purpose. I shall at the same time set about 
raising some companies of Canadians and shall need arms 
for the purpose." 

Gen. Burgoyne's private instructions to Lt.-Col. Bainne 
were as follows : 

"The object of your expedition is to try the affections 

of the country, to disconcert the councils of the enemy, to 

mount Reidesils Dragoons, to complete Peters' corps, and 
25 



386 Autobiography of John Peters 

obtain large supplies of cattle, horses, and carriages. You 
will send in cattle from Arlington with a proper detach- 
ment from Peters' corps. Also as you will return with 
the regiment of dragoons mounted, you must always have 
a detachment of Capt. Frazer's or Peters' corps in front 
of the regiment of dragoons, in order to prevent your 
falling in with ambuscade when you are marching through 
the woods." 

I * will insert here a short sketch of Col. John Peters' 
emigration to Cape Breton. 

"As soon as it was known that a lieutenant-colonel 
governor was to be sent to Cape Breton and that grants 
of land would be issued the same as in the other provinces, 
heretofore denied, many persons directed their attention 
there. One of the first was Abraham Cuyler Esq. formerly 
mayor of Albany, then residing in London, who laid be- 
fore the King a memorial dated February 21, 1784, in 
which he stated that he himself and many other persons, 
who had been deprived of their property on occasion of 
their loyalty, had moved to Canada in 1782, and were 
desirous of obtaining grants of lands at Cape Breton with 
the intention of settling there. This memorial having 
been favorably received, a number of persons styling 
themselves the Associated LoyaUsts, sailed in their vessels 
for Cape Breton under the charge of Col. Peters, Capt. 
Jonathan Jones, and Mr. Robertson, late officers in the 
corps of Royal Rangers, and associates of Mr. Cuyler, 
where they arrived about October 25. About one hun- 
dred and forty persons came out in the vessel furnished 
with clothing and provisions by the British government. 
Some settled near St. Peters, others at Baddeck, and the 
rest at Louisberg." 

* This pronoun appears to refer to Mr. McCormick. 



u 



f AST' 

' "'".DEI 




THE REVD. CHARLES RUSSELL TREAT 

RECTOR OF ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, NEW YORK 



1899 



PETERS TRAITS 

" The more one studies histories, and races, and famihes, 
the more one must be convinced of the marked and 
permanent influence of blood despite all the crossings by 
intermarriages. Every genealogist has noted and mar- 
velled at the continuance, from generation to generation, 
of some particular type of character visible in the earliest 
ancestor. ... To read aright the lessons of human 
history, to reach wise and safe generalizations, one must 
not forget the law of descent and the power there is in 
blood of race." The present compiler finds these words 
among the papers of the earlier one, and they form an 
excellent introduction to the next pages. So distinct 
and unvaried are the Peters characteristics that it is 
more than safe to testify to the appearance and traits of 
our earlier ancestors. 

As were, and are, their descendants, in Massachusetts, 
in Connecticut, in Maine, so undoubtedly was Andrew 
Peeters and his sons. Fair, even to excess, with blue 
eyes and brown or light hair, with regular features, and 
the long, straight Peters nose. Hands and feet, usually 
small, always shapely, the former with long fingers, the 
latter narrow. The details vary to a certain extent, but 
the likeness is there, and becomes not only evident, but 
pronounced, after they have reached the age of forty, even 
in cases where there had seemed to be no resemblance at 
all. In stature probably our ancestors exceeded most of 
the Peters men of the present day, and were probably 
of larger mould and heavier build. This one point, 
the frame and height, is the only instance in which 

3S7 



388 Peters Traits 

the Peters of the three States named have been found 
to vary. Testimony from Hebron, Connecticut, and 
from Andover, Massachusetts, shows the Peters men 
of present and earlier days to have been tall, many or 
most of them of six feet in height, and in this respect 
only, different from their cousins of Boston, and of 
Maine, who are noticeable for their small bones and 
medium stature. But tall or short the one true stamp is 
the bullet head: This is the Peters hall-mark, and is 
found everyivhere accompanied — whatever the other 
traits — by a sound and practical mind, a great sense of 
humor, and real wit. The most striking resemblance 
existed between the late Revd. Charles Russell Treat,* 
and the sons of Edward Dyer Peters, Senior, of Boston : 
to reach a common ancestor it was necessary to return to 
Andrew Peeters, born in 1635, yet Mr. Treat might easily 
pass — and actually did, even to an immediate member 
of the family, — for one of his Massachusetts relatives 
already mentioned, f 

"The Peters of our branch have large blue eyes, fair 
complexion, light brown hair; it is not natural to them 
to be bald or grey young. My father looked as you see 
the picture when he died at sixty-eight } ; a large man 
of six feet, — walking around the farm with hands clasped 
behind, which gave him a slight stoop forward ; shoulders 
too narrow for a man of his height. I think the old 
Andrew must have been fair, as I know .grandfather § 

* Son of Abigail Thompson (490 VI.) and Selah Burr Treat. 

t A singular case is the remarkable likeness existing between 
the members of the family just mentioned and Mr. William Henry- 
Peters of Norfolk, Va. So far as is known there is no relation- 
ship, Mr. W. H. Peters' grandfather being a native of Denmark, but 
so many of the Peters traits appear, even to the handwriting, and 
peculiar ways of forming letters, that there is little doubt a tie of blood 
exists, however remote it may be. 

t John of Andover (213 V.)- 

§ Sergeant Andrew (207 IV.). 



\ 




^ 




1899 




1898 



KE KEW yORK~l 
PUBLIC UBR "^ 



5TT 



ASTOft, LENOX 
_TILD£N FOUNDATIONS 



Peters Traits 389 

was, fair and blue-eyed, as also Lazy John's * other 
children, and all of Uncle Joe's f children who succeeded 
him on the old place. I was the only dark-skinned 
Peters I ever saw." t 

"The members of the Peters branch that I have 
known § were fair with regular features, cared little for 
display, honest in their dealings with others, systematic, 
took good care of their belongings. My Aunt Mary, the 
Governor's sister, 1| was very systematic. Dinner at 
twelve, noon, whatever might occur ; the clock was 
always wound at that time. A place for everything and 
everything in its place." [How often have I heard my 
father speak those words!] "You could go in the dark 
and get what you went for in the pantry. A day for 
each household work. She made no show in dress, but 
always found time to read notwithstanding her many 
household duties, and frequent calls. A strong and re- 
tentive memory was a marked trait of the Peters. The 
Governor ^ had a pleasant address, was good company, 
had much ready wit and humor, but could make very 
cutting remarks if occasion required. Aunt Mary had 
much the same traits in a less degree. It was them- 
selves, not what they possessed, that drew people to 
them, but they were set in opinion ; when once they had 
made their mind it was hard to change them. Those 
I knew in the past were good men and women. I think 

* This is the usual and disrespectful appellation we apply to Old 
John of Andover (17 III.) ; the descendants who know him best 
being strongly impressed with the idea that he never did more than 
sit by the fire, live to a great age, and give away most of his property. 

t Joseph of Andover (210 IV.). 

J Mrs. Grozelier, of North Andover, Sarah Peters, daughter of John 
(244 VI.). 

§ Mrs. Annis Welles, of Hebron, Conn., great-granddaughter of 
Capt. Bemslee, of Hebron (467 IV.). 

II Mary Martha (554 V.). 

•f John Samuel (553 V.). 



390 Peters Traits 

Uncle John * was six feet in height, he was well-pro- 
portioned. He had a very large head with a bright 
blue eye. Aunt Mary had blue eyes too. I never saw 
their brother f but once, but as I remember him they 
looked much alike. I think I told you when here about 
Judge Peters of Colchester J starting to go to his farm. 
He had on an old coat, rubber shoe on one foot, an old 
boot or shoe on the other. A man gave him a tract and 
asked him if he could read. His reply was ' I can get 
some one to read for me.' His son's wife said he did not 
go out with the old coat again. He had a basket and 
hoe at the time." [This is deliciously Peters, both as to 
the garb, and the joke on himself. A Peters will enjoy 
a joke on himself more than anything else, will tell of it 
as long as he lives, and will never, never let the other 
persons concerned know of it. A Peters has a real 
talent for holding his tongue.] "As a rule the Peters 
family were a law-abiding people. There were three 
lawyers out of four sons in one family." [This was the 
Otis blood.] " The Governor was fond of story-telling " 
[every Peters is] ; " he told them in a very pleasant way, 
but he could be stem. I have mentioned him more be- 
cause I knew him better. I was in the habit of coming 
here from childhood. I heard father tell about Judge John 
Thompson Peters § buying a prayer-book ; it had a plain 
binding; some one remarked on his selection. His reply 
was, ' I bought it for use.' " 

A member of the family writes of John Peters of Blue 
Hill II : "Grandfather Peters was a very jovial man, full 
of jokes, and also very kind and benevolent to the poor, 
so I have heard my mother *! say, and a very kind man 
in his family. Mother said she lived there two years 

* John Samuel (553 V.). t Bemslee, Jr. (555 V.). 

J Samuel Andrew (486 v.). § (484 V.). | (206 IV.). 

TfPhebe Billings, wife of Daniel (275 V.). 



Peters Traits 391 

before she was married and a year after, and grandfather 
treated her always like an own child. He was a church- 
going man and, I judge, of a good disposition from his 
many kind deeds. I * am quite sure he had blue eyes 
and light hair. Grandmother had very black eyes and 
dark complexion." 

"It wrote to a cousin of mine in Lowell, Mass. I think 
she was ninety-three years old last summer, and her 
daughter writes in reply: 'Your letter to mother was 
received. I read it to her, and asked her if she remem- 
bered Mr . John Peters. ' ' ' [He has been dead nearly eighty- 
two years.] " ' Of course I do,' she said, ' and his wife too. 
He was a man of medium height, with brown hair, blue 
eyes, and fair complexion, a fine-looking man and a man 
who was much respected for his good judgment and in- 
tegrity. He was a courteous gentleman.' " 

"It was aware that Grandmother Peters § had mar- 
ried a Gushing. You must remember Uncle Gushing, her 
son ; father || was as much attached to him as to any 
of his own brothers. I remember Grandmother Peters 
very well. She had a stroke of paralysis some years be- 
fore she died, which affected her speech and locomotion. 
She was said to be the handsomest woman in the county, 
and Grandfather was fond of her, always took her to the 
table and prepared her food for her. She had sharp 
black eyes, and was a woman who would weigh probably 
175 pounds. Edward Dyer Peters ^ and Aunt Dodge ** 
resembled her, so did Uncle Daniel tt ; the other members 

* Caroline Maria, Mrs. Sewall Snowman (325 VI.)- 

t Augusta Maria (291 VI.). 

t Charles (354 V.) 

§ Mary Dyer Gushing, wife of John of Blue Hill (206 IV.). 

II Andrew of Ellsworth (271 V.). 

^-(272 v.). 

** Sally, wife of Reuben Dodge (269 V.). 
ff Husband of Phebe Billings (275 V.)- 



392 Peters Traits 

of the family resembled Grandfather. I used to enjoy 
going with father and mother. I can run my mind back 
to those days and enjoy thinking of the good times I 
used to have there. The first thing to do after we ar- 
rived in the winter trips was for Father and Grandfather 
to take a little brandy with some nice white loaf sugar, 
and father would have a little in his tumbler for me to 
take out with a spoon and drink it. After the brandy 
began to take a little effect the next thing in order was 
to go and see his big hogs, then to go to the bam to see 
the cattle and the hay -mows, and in the evening Pearl 
Peters * would parch com. Grandfather was full of fun, 
and a great joker, always in good spirits, cheerful, and 
wide-awake. I remember a sleigh he had painted red, 
with the initials of his name J. P. on the back of it. No 
Buffalo skins in those days, they used heavy bed-quilts." 

From Medfield, Mass., Miss Sewall f writes of an old 
Bible containing three locks of light brown hair as fresh 
as if cut yesterday, though the owners were bom in 1783, 
1760, and 1752, respectively. 

A little more of Governor Peters. " Miss Mary Peters, 
told me J of Uncle John when he was Governor. At that 
time stage-coach and mail-wagon were the only public 
conveyances. He was in Hartford, and was coming 
home (to Hebron) by stage. A colored woman asked for a 
passage too. ' I cannot take you, I have got to take the 
Governor,' said the driver. 'Let me see the Governor,' 
said the woman. 'Get right in, Liddie, get in,' said the 
Governor. She knew very well she had only to see him. 
Her husband was Henry Peters, one of the Revd. Samuel 
Peters' slaves." (So they were of those the Governor 
used to call his "colored cousins.") 

* Pearl Spofford (282 VI.) • 

t Daughter of the Revd. Charles Sewall, and Amy Peters (109 VI.). 

X Mrs. Annis Welles, of Hebron. 



Peters Traits 393 

A letter from Governor Peters, dated Hebron, Dec. 16, 
1844, and written to Edward Dyer Peters of Boston, is 
worth quoting. 

" My Dear Sir : I reed, a letter from Mr. Ellicott dated 
Hartford, Ct., Nov. i8th, requesting information on the 
subject of the Heraldry of our family. I have sought 
assiduously, but found nothing, — except what I found in 
the history of Hugh Peters, by Saml. Peters, L.L.D., and 
what was no more than Mr. Ellicott had obtained before, 
— to wit Sans Dieu Rien, I have no expectation of making 
interesting discoveries on the subject, as relates to an- 
tiquity, — but from my own observation, give the coat of 
Arms of that limb of the family that descended from 
John Peters, who settled in Hebron in 171 7, and whose 
progeny has scattered in all directions, — most indifferent 
to the varying Costumes of the day, and frivolous fashions 
that chase each other in ridiculous haste, down the current 
of time to the Ocean of oblivion, — they have embraced 
all creeds, all religions, all tenets, in politics, and take 
great latitude in adopting or rejecting the customs and 
manners of this or that our lower world — but have 
abounded in the grace of obstinacy, and an abiding con- 
fidence in their own taste and judgment and a Repub- 
lican determination to serve God, — their Country, — and 
themselves, in the way and manner that comports with 
their consciences, their Patriotism,- — and their sense of 
personal convenience; say then, the coat of arms of 
the family, worn and gloried in is, in plain English, — 
a slouched hat, tattered coat, and patched pants, — -In 
short they care little for any antiquity or their pedigree 
anterior to 1620." 



DIVERS FAMILIES 

To avoid confusion it is desirable to place families 
which are not of our blood. Chief among these, from 
their proximity, are the Peters of Salem, who must have 
transplanted themselves to Essex County about the same 
time as did Andrew Peeters of Ipswich. Apparently 
they were never numerous and now seem to have disap- 
peared altogether, at any rate in the vicinity of their 
old home. Only a small number can be noted and few 
of these can be definitely placed. \ rw k_v,.-. ..v-v4^j,.v-^Q:^'v^.^ 

I. Gilbert Peters, bom in 
(abt. 1645), died in (before 

Aug. 13, 1697); md. in Salem, Mass., Sept. 14, 1669, 
Elizabeth Hellyard (Hilliard), dau. Edward Hilliard, and 

, his wife, 
bom in , died in 

and had five (or more) children. 

//. Children of Gilbert, and Elizabeth Hilliard: 

2 (1). Richard, born in Salem, 12-11 (Jan.), 1670-71. 

3 (2). William, born in Salem, June 19, 1673. 

4 (3). John, bom in Salem, March 14, 1676. 

1668, Gilbert "Pettes," signed a petition against im- 
posts in Salem. 

1689, Gilbert Peters, mariner. 1689, Sept. 17, he com- 
manded the ketch D^'^^wc^. 1691, Aug. 26, he was cap- 
tured in it by a French frigate. • 

394 



Salem 395 

This Gilbert Peters was probably from Exeter, in 
Devonshire, and very likely one of the original Peter, 
Petre, or Peters family. There is mention, in 1543, in 
the neighborhood of Exeter, of fishermen (his own or his 
descendants' occupation) bearing the same names as 
these found in Salem. 

2 II. Richard, first child of Gilbert, and Elizabeth 
Hilliard, bom in Salem, Mass., 12-11 (Jan.), 1670- 
71, died in ; 

md, in Salem, Bethia , widow 

of Joseph Allen (after Nov. 13, 1684, and before Dec. 5, 
1684), dau. 
and had children. 

///. Children of Richard, and Bethia : 

5 (1). Bethia, born in Salem, 

, bap. Sept. , 1686, died 

; was md. in Salem, May 
10, 1 71 1, to George Daland, son Benjamin Daland, and 
Katherine , his wife, born in Beverly, 

Mass., Feb. 16, 1690-91, died 

, and had seven children. 

6 (2). William, born in Salem, Jan. 11, 1687 (prob. died 

, 1712). 

7 (3). Richard, bom in Salem, June 5, 1690, bap. June 
8, 1690 (prob. died 1715)- 

8 (4). A child (prob. Benjamin), bom in Salem, March 

, 1691. 

9 (5). Ebenezer, bom in Salem, Jan. 3, 1694-95, bap. 
Ap. , 1695. 

10 (6). Mary, born , bap. in Salem, Sept. 
12, 1697, died in 

; was md. in Salem, Nov. 14, 171 7, to Joseph 
Cloutman, son Cloutman, and 

, his wife. 

6 II. William, second child of Richard, and Bethia 



39^ Divers Families 

, bom in Salem, Mass., Jan. ii, 
1687, died , 1712 (prob. and prob. tmmd.). 

Will probated fn Salem. Fisherman, "son of Richard 
Peters." 

7 II. Richard, third child of Richard, and Bethia 

, born in Salem, Mass., June 
5, 1690, bap. June 8, 1690 ; died in 

. Will probated in Salem, Nov. 12, 17 15, now in 
existence in Salem. Prob. immd. Estate left to Benja- 
min Peters, and to Mary Peters. 

8 II. Benjamin, fourth child of Richard, and Bethia 

, bom in Salem, Mass., 
March , 169 1, died in 

; md. in Salem, Nov. 14, 17 16, Susan- 
nah Yoimg, dau. Young, and 
< > , his wife, bom in 



S..V- Ik 7 



(IV. ?) Esther, child of Benjamin, and Mary , 

his wife, born in , was 

md. in , Feb. 5, 1765, to 

James Bickford, of Salem, son of Benjamin Bickford and 
Mary , his wife, bom in 

, died in 
(previous to 1771). 
Esther Peters md. (2) Joseph Cook, Feb. 7, 1771, son 
of Joseph Cook and Eunice , bom in 

(IV. ?) Samuel, child of Benjamin, and 

Mary , bom in 

, died in ; 

md. Hannah Neal (widow), (int. mar. Salem, Sept. 7, 
1765), dau. of Benjamin Bickford and Mary 

, his wife, bom _^ (bap. in 



Salem 397 

Tabernacle Church, Salem, March 15, 1749), died in 

, and had three 
sons. 

(V.) Children of Samuel, and Hannah Bickjord Neal: 
John, bom in 

settled in Nantucket. 
James, 
Andrew, born 

, adopted by a Boston gentleman. 

(V. ?) James, child of Benjamin, and Han- 

nah Bickford Neal, bom in Salem, Mass. 17 73, 

died in Stonington, Conn., Aug., 1825 (aged 52), 

; md. in Stonington, , 1795, Han- 

nah Ash, dau. of Thomas Ash and Joanna , his 

wife, bom in , 

died in March 4, 

1 84 1, and had children. 

Children of 'fames, and Hannah Ash: 
(1). Sarah, born in Stonington, Conn., , 

1797, died in Jersey City, N. J., , 1889; 

was md. in , to Capt. 

Luther Fuller of Hampton, Conn., son of 

, born in 
, died in 

, and had two 
children. 
(2). Nancy, born in Stonington, Conn., , 

1800, died in Jersey City, N. J., , 1888; 

was nid. ,1^^;:, , to Capt. 

Charle^"^ Holmes, son of 

, born in 
, died in 

, and had 5 (?) children. 
(3). Mary, born in Stonington, Conn., Oct. 10, 1807, died 
in Westerly, R. I., Oct. 15, 1883; was md. in 

, May 10, 1826, to Austin 



39^ Divers Families 

Eldredge Avery, son of Samuel Avery and Lucy 

, his wife, bom in Poquonock, Conn., June 6, 
1804, died in Westerly, R. I., Oct. 19, 1883, and had 
seven children. 

(4). James, born in Stonington, Conn., 

, 1810, was lost at sea, , 1829. 

(5). Eliza, born in Stonington, Conn., ,1812, was 

md., Nov. 2, 1827, to Capt. John H Cutler, son of 

Benjamin Cutler and , 

born in , 

died in Stonington, April 14, 1861, and had eight 
children, four of whom died in infancy. 

(6). Hannah, born in Stonington, Conn., Dec. ir, 1814, 
died in ; 

was md., June 22, 1833, to Capt. George Elliott, son of 
George Elliott and Elizabeth , his wife, 

born in London, Eng., Dec. 2, 1810, died in Hartford, 
Conn., Jan. 22, 1862, and had ten children. 

Benjamin, child of 

, his wife, bom in , died in 

; md. in 
Salem, Nov. 22, 17 16, Elizabeth Cloutman, dau. of 

, bom 



Records of Marriages, Salem, Mass. 

1 7 16, Nov. 22, Benjamin Peters and Elizabeth Clout- 
man. 

1717, Nov. 14, Mary Peters and Joseph Cloutman. 
1740, April 2, Samuel Peters and Mary Page. 

1740, Jime 18, William Peters, of Salem, md. in Water- 
town to Elizabeth Smith, of Cambridge, by James Mann, 
Jus. Peace. 

1744, April 10, Mary Peters and Amos Rite, both of 
Salem. 



Salem 399 

1745, March 6, Mary Peters and Benjamin Whittemore, 
both of Salem. 

1752, Nov. 16, Benjamin Peters and Sarah West, both 
of Salem. 

1754, Sept. 17, Susannah Peters and Charles Sander- 
ford, both of Salem. 

1756, Jan. I, Bethia Peters of Salem, md. in Marblehead 
to William Dodd, of Marblehead. 

1 76 1, Oct. 21, Benjamin Peters, Jr., and Charity 
Tucker, both of Salem. 

1765, Feb. 5, Esther Peters and James Bickford, both 
of Salem. 

1776, July 4, Benjamin Peters, Jr., and Elizabeth John- 
son. 

1777, Sept. 17, John Peters and Elizabeth Skerry. 
1780, Dec. 23, Elizabeth Peters and John Gavett. He 

commanded the private armed brig Flying Fish. (Essex 
Hist. Coll., 111-126.) 

1782, June 17, Elizabeth Peters and John Billinghurst, 
both of Salem. 

1786, * Oct. 8, Benjamin Peters, Jr., of Salem, and: 
Hannah Shillaber, of Dan vers. 

1792, Jan. 21, George Peters and widow Elizabeth 
Gavett. 

i793» J'l^iie , Samuel Peters of Salem and Hannah 
Deland of Dan vers. 

1796, June II, Jonathan Peters and widow Elizabeth 
Trask, both of Salem. 

1800, Sept. 16, Capt. John Peters and widow Mary 
Norman, both of Salem. 

1807, Oct. 20, Peter Peters and Catherine Poor. 

1 81 2, Jan. 5, Susan Peters and Capt. Philip Pinal, f 
both of Salem. 

* In the intentions of marriage he is called " Benjamin Peters, ye 3d 
of Salem." t Or Pinet ? 



400 Divers Families 

1818, Oct. 19, Elizabeth Peters and John Young. 
1823, March 15, Nancy Peters and Nathaniel Pitman. 
1835, Sept. 6, James Peters and Frances Underwood. 

Intentdons of Marriage. 

1765, Sept. 7, Samuel Peters and the widow Hannah 
Neal, both of Salem. 

1782, Sept. 14, Mary Peters, of Salem, and Jonathan 
Roberts of Boston. 

1793, Feb. 22, Jonathan Peters and widow Elizabeth 
Wyman. 

18 16, Sept. 21, John Peters of Salem and Olive Bather- 
ick of Durham. 

1829, May 23, Susan Ann Peters and Joseph Francis. 

Deaths in Salem. 

1793, Dec. 6, George Peters. 

1794, Aug. 26, " Benjamin Peters, his son and a colored 
man drowned below Beverly bar." 

Henry Peters, grandson of above, drowned at Beverly 
bar. (Probably same as above.) 

1804, Dec, Mrs. Peters widdow. 

1808, Dec. 16, Mary N. , 6 years, daughter of 

Capt. John Peters. Mary the wife was an Archer.* She 
md. (i), aged 22, 1784, Elisha Gunnison, by whom she 
had one child. He died in 1789. She md. (2), in 1795, a 
Norman, who died in 1797; she md. (3), in 1800, John 
Peters, by whom she had one child. " He of the ancient 
family of Peters, Bridge street." f {Essex Hist. Coll., 
vol. 18.) 

181 1, March, a child of Capt. Samuel Peters. 

181 1, May, Capt. Samuel Peters. 

1816, May 12, Mrs. Mary Peters, wife Capt. John 
Peters, aged 55 years. 

* Dau. Jonathan Archer and Bethia , born Feb. 

8, 1 76 1, died in Salem, May 12, 181 6. 
t This was his second marriage. 



Salem 401 

1820, May, Benjamin, son of Capt. John Peters. 

1829, Sept. 24, Mary O., dau. Benjamin Peters. ■' 

1830, July 10, Mr. Simeon Peters. 

1 83 1, March 20, Mrs. Hannah Peters. 

1832, Jan. 8, Mr. Benjamin Peters. 

This Benjamin Peters— if there can be any certainty of 
individuality among so many Benjamins — was son of 
Benjamin, was born 1801, died 1832, and came to Salem, 
where he was a tanner, from Lynn. 

In 1778 there is a Benjamin Peters in a company of 
volimteers from Salem for the Rhode Island expedition, 
under the command of Capt. Samuel Flagg. 

Later in the same year he appears to be the bearer of a 
letter signed " B., & R. Ropes, " wherein he is referred to 
as "Mr. Peters." 

1776, Capt. Samuel King's Co., Col. Josiah Whitney's 
Reg. Service at Hull, Aug. i, 1776, to Nov. i, 1776. 
Benjamin Peters, private. 

1778, Capt. Nathaniel Gage's Co., Col. Jacob Gerrish's 
Reg., Benjamin Peters, private, Feb. 3, 1778, to Ap. 3, 
1778. Service, guards to Gen. Burgoyne's troops at 
Winter Hill. 

Service, Jime i, 1776, to Aug. i, 1776. Dec. 19, 1777, 
to Feb. 3, 1778. 

1815, Oct. 15, John Peters, son of Capt. John Peters, 
aged 20, was lost at sea. He left in the Albatross from 
the Falkland Islands with oil,iAug. 30, lat. N. 34°, long. 50°. 
Washed overboard with the captain; four saved, seven 
lost. The father from the Peters family of Essex, His 
second wife an Archer, first a Skerry. He lives on the 
Skerry estate. Bridge street." (Essex Hist. Coll., vol. 19.) 

Baptisms in Salem. 

1787, Nov., Hetty, dau. of Benjamin. 

1794, Jane, child of Benjamin. ; 

26 



402 Divers Families 

SALEM PROBATE. 

1782, John Peters, seaman in the privateer Junius 
Brutus of twenty guns and one hundred and ten men, in 
which he owned one share. 1782, Feb. 19, "A ship ar- 
rives taken by the Junius Brutus ^ Essex Hist. Coll. 

1805, Elizabeth Peters, only dau. of Elizabeth, wife of 
John Camick. 

1809, Andrew, Beverley, mariner, dies of consumption, 
leaving all to Benjamin Frost of Beverley. 

1809, Elizabeth Peters, widow, wife of John Peters. 

1 81 2, Capt. Samuel Peters, mariner, wife Hannah. (In 
1808, for excessive drinking, idleness and waste of estate 
a guardian was appointed for him. This guardian was 
discharged in 1809.) 



Benjamin , child of Samuel, and Hannah 

, born in , Aug. 21, 1800, 

died in > 

Jan. 18, 1832, md. Nancy Osborne of Danvers (now Pea- 
body), Mass., Oct. 22, 1826, dau. Amos Osborne and 
Anna , bom in Danvers, Sept. 24, 1802, died 

in S. Danvers, Jan. 19, 1850, and had two children. 

(1). Mary Osborne, born in Salem, Jan. 3, 1828, died in 
Salem, Sept. 24, 1829. 

(2). Mary Osborne, born in Salem, Feb. 17, 1830, died in 

; md. 
July 22, 1858, Edwin Ruthvin Litch, son of John Litch 
and Bethia , born in Granville, N. S., Aug. 10, 

1829, died in Exeter, N. H., May 7, 1875. Three 
children. 

Manchester, Mass., Town Records. 
1711-12, Ruth, the daughter of Richard Peters, and 
Ruth, his wife, was bom on the 19 day of february. 



Salem 403 

1 7 13, William, son of Richard Peters, and Ruth, his 
wife, born Oct. 21. 

1715, Liddiah, dau. of Richard Peters, and Ruth, his 
wife, born Aug. 21; died . md. Dec. 14, 1732, 

to Roger Hill, in Manchester. 

1 7 18, Recerd Peters, ye sun of Recerd peters, and of 
Rueth his wief, bom at Manchester Juen 8. 

1720, Mark peters son Recerd Peters and of Ruth his 
wife bom at Manchester, fowerth Sept. 

1722, Dec. 19, Sarah, bom in Gloucester, Mass., to 
Richard Peters, and Ruth his wife. 

Ruth Peters of 2d church, Gloucester, bap. Ap. 14, 1728. 

Gloucester Town Record. 

1734, Oct. 31, Md. by the Revd. Mr. John White, 
WiUiam Peters and Abigail Littlefield. (WilHam was 
probably born in Manchester, Oct. 31, 1713.) 

1735, Aug. 21, (Born) Sarah, dau. William Peters, and 
Abigail. Bap. in ist church, Sept. 14, 1735. 

1736-37. William, son of William, and Abigail Peters, 
bap. ist church, Feb. 4, 1736-37. 

Early Records of Manchester, Mass. 
1 717, Febwari, Recerd Peters on tax list for 00-08-06. 
1 7 17, July, Recerd petters 00-13-00. 

17 1 7, Heads in family Recherd Peters — 5. 

1 7 18, Recherd peters one of five "chowerds and feld 
drivers." 

1720, Recerd peters one of three "Constabals or feld 
drivers." 

1729-30, Ricard Peters one of three "chowards." 



Long Island. — This family descends from Dr. Charles 
Peters, who came to this country early in the i8th century, 
and who was living in Hempstead, Long Island, in 1720. 



404 Divers Families 

At the present day, many interesting old family grave- 
stones may be found there. The family has been well 
known in New York City and in New York State, espe- 
cially in Dutchess County. Some branches settled in 
Nova Scotia (1793) and in St. John's, N. B. The princi- 
pal Christian names are Charles, William, James, Rich- 
ard, Abel, Valentine. A history of this family, entitled A 
Peters Lineage, compiled by Mrs. Martha Bockee Flint, 
can be purchased of Alfred Peters, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Price, $2.00. 

Philadelphia. — This family descends from the Revd. 
Richard Peters ( 1 704-1 776), who came to this coimtry from 
England and was settled in Philadelphia as assistant- 
rector of Christ Church in 1735. Later he was rector of 
Christ Chiu^ch and of St. Peter's in Philadelphia. 1 737 he 
was Proprietary Secretary in charge of the Land Office. 
1762 to 1775 tie was Provincial Secretary and clerk of the 
Coimcil. Mrs. N. P. Black, of Atlanta, Ga., is compiling 
a history of this family. See Dorr's History of Christ 
Church, and Sharpless' Genealogy. 

Virginia. — It is almost impossible to place this fam- 
ily or these families. A William Peters first appears in 
this State in 1635. (See Virginia Magazine, VIII., p. 
60.) 

1645, Aug. 15, Simon Peter has land granted to him 
in Virginia, and in 1652 he has fifty acres more for the 
transportation of Alice Springwell. Vol. II., p. izg, 
quotes the will of Nathaniel Bacon, March 5, 1691, in 
which he leaves to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Peters, 
"if she live to the age of 21, or be married, a negro girl 
named Moll, now about 10 years of age and living on 
the Plantation belonging to the said Peters." There is 
mention of Peters as an old family in Mead's Old Churches 
of Virginia, in Surry Co., about Cabin Point church, and 
this family is said to have been a leading one in the 



Divers Families 405 

eastern part of the State in Colonial times. There was 
a General Thomas Peters in Revolutionary days. In 
Virginia genealogies there is mention of Martha Custis 
Peters in Leesburg, 1855; of Major Peters of Naletown; 
of Col. John Peters of Farquhar Co., who removed to 
Kentucky, probably prior to the 19th century, and whose 
grandson Belvard John Peters was judge of the Kentucky 
Court of Appeals, and Chief Justice of that State from 
1874 to 1876. 

Bethlehem, Pa., and Philadelphia. — See Bartow 
Genealogy for Peters said to descend from George, 1795, 
a merchant and a Moravian. 

Delaware and Pennsylvania. — See Sharpless 
Genealogy. 

Kentucky. — See McDonald Genealogy. A family said 
to have settled there from Wales about the middle of the 
1 8th century. 

Maryland. — There is a family which writes its name 
Peter, and which has been well known in Washington and 
in Georgetown. Mr. William Henry Peters of Norfolk, 
Va., already mentioned on account of his remarkable like- 
ness to some of the Boston members of the Peters of New 
England, is the son of a Danish sea-captain who settled 
in Newburyport, Mass., either late in the i8th century 
or early in the 19th. 

Thomas Peters of Plymouth, Mass., early in 1700 was 
probably ancestor of the family settled in Plympton, 
Mass., one of whose descendants undoubtedly was sergeant 
Amos Peters, a Revolutionary soldier, who died at Mount 
Airy, N. J., aged 90, Jan. 14, 1849. Some of this family 
removed to Berwick, Maine. There are colored Peters 
in Hanover, Mass., and many of their descendants in 
Warren, Maine, a whole school district being composed 
of them. It was usual in former times for slaves to take 
their master's family name. One man testified that, 



4o6 Divers Families 

whereas his name was Francis, his brother was Peters, 
having, since he belonged to the Revd. Andrew Peters of 
Middleton, assumed that name. 

There are isolated Peters who may be of great interest 
to us. Who was Arthur of Wethersfield, Conn., who died 
unmarried in 1690, and left his estate to Ephraim Good- 
rich of the same town? 

Who was Dr. John Peters, residing in Wobum, Mass., 
and who in April, 17 19, had a suit against Samuel Moul- 
ton, for his services as a physician? He says he comes 
from Rhode Island and is going to Boston. There is 
also a mention of his being in Windsor, Conn. 

Who is Capt. Peter, aged 40, in 1657, a Dutchman, 
trading to the Eastward, in Oct., 1656? 

Who is John Petts, or Pettis, or Pittis, of Ipswich, 
Mass., in 1642, later of Hatfield, Mass., where he is killed 
by the Indians in 1675 ? 

Who is John Peters of Gravesend, Long Island, in 
1652 (or 1642)? 

Who is Ann Peters of the ist church in Boston, 1632? 

Who is David Senior, in Capt. Joseph Robertson's Co., 
Dec. to Feb. 18, 1 710-17 11, at Annapolis Royal? 

David, Jr., is killed there Jan. (or June 10), 1711. 

171 1, "Major Paul Mascarene's Co of New England 
troops, during its being at Annapolis Royal in Her 
Majesties' Service from the loth of October, 17 10, to 
the loth of October, 171 1 : James Petties, Dec to Mar. 3." 

Who is Jonathan Peters "Centinel," and Ebenr Petter, 
of Springfield, 1722? 

And Josiah, John, Elisha, and Thomas "Peter," in 
Capt. Richard Bourne's Co. in 1725? Samuel Peters in 
Capt. Richard Kimball's Co. 1725? 

Capt. Peters in Falmouth in 1 7 2 5 ? 

Josiah and Ephraim in the expedition to the West 
Indies in 1740? 



Divers Families 407 

John and Sarah of Newport, Rhode Island, in 17 13? 

And the Peters of Richmond, N. H., formerly from 
Cimiberland, R. I., late in 1700, and giving freely of their 
men to Col. Doolittle's regiment at the battle of Bunker 
Hill? The names of Richard, Ebenezer, Israel, and 
Ephraim do not appear to belong to us, but may be of 
the Salem family. 

Among the early settlers of Londonderry, N. H., is to 
be found a John Peters, whose widow was Lydia Peters, 
apparently living in Andover, Mass., in 1777, when, she 
receives a letter from her brother, Jonathan Stevens ? 
(See Miss Bailey's History of Andover.) 

Mrs. Betsey Peters, who married Isaac Cousens of 
Brooklin, Maine, was daughter of Maurice Peters, and 
sister of James who married in Ellsworth, Maine, in 1,861, 
Mrs. Mary Beal ; they are not of the Peters of New 
England. (See page 122.) 

It is possible that this Maurice descends from Maurice 
Peters who, with wife and child, was among the Loyalists 
mustered in Digby, Nova Scotia, in 1784, and who may 
be of the Long Island family. 



',•- 



MILITARY SERVICE ^ 



Absalom, Conn., 242-243, 244 
Adam, Mass., 78-79 
Alexander Abercrombie, Mass., 71 
Andrew, Mass., 9-13, 31 2 
Andrew, Mass., 82, 83 
Andrew, Mass., 104 
Andrew, Conn., 307 
Andrew, Conn., 312 
Andrew, N. H., 350 
Andrew Washington, Mass., 88 
Augustus Connate, Me., 122 
Benjamin, Mass., 54 
Benjamin, Mass., 75 
Benjamin Franklin, Conn., 265 
Charles Edward, Conn., 199 
Charles Tilden, Me., 123 
Comfort, N. H., 319 
Daniel, Conn., 276 
Daniel Porter, Me., 125 
David, Conn., 270 
De Witt Clinton, Conn., 249 
Edmond Fanning, Conn., 204 
Edward McClure, Me., 144 
Edward Payson, Conn., 251 
George Pierce, Conn., 250 



James, N. H., 317 

James, N. H., 318 

James, N. H., 320 

James, Jr., N. H., 320-321 3 

Jethro, Mass., 90 

John, Conn., 159 

John, N. H., 353 

John, N. H., 354 

John, N. H., 355 

John, N. H., 355 

John, x^J. H., 355 

John, N. H., 355 

John, N. H., 355 

John, N. H., 356 

John, N. H., 356 

John Andrew, Conn., 165 

John Henry, Conn., 295 

John Samuel, Conn., 180 

Joseph, Conn., 299 

Joseph, Conn., 310 

Joseph Phelps, Conn., 268 

Mary, N. H., 353 4 

Moses, Mass., 67 

Nathan, Mass., 99, 100 

Obadiah, N. H., 346 



^ Names of those only who served in the regtilar army, or of those 
who were in militia companies in time of war. and were, or were likely 
to be, called upon for active service, are included in this list. The 
name of John Hamilton, who died while trying to save others from 
drowning, should, however, be mentioned here (p. 116). Divisions are 
appended in which the names of individuals are to be found. 

^ "Having in mind the new demand for critical accuracy imposed 
by the growing interest in American genealogy and biography, and 
especially in the patriotic societies like the Society of Colonial Wars, 
I have spared no pains to make my book absolutely correct. I have 
tested the lists of names, the dates, and other matter, from Hull's 
accounts, and am confident that they are entirely accurate. / have 
realized the importance of absolute accuracy here, since any one who can 
trace descent from one of these who are credited with mitilary service, has 
an indisputable claim to membership in the above named society." 
(Italics compiler's.) — Soldiers in King Philip's War, by George Madi- 
son Bodge, A.B., Member of the New England Historic-Genealogical 
Society, and Chaplain of the Massachusetts Society of Colonial Wars. 

3 James Peters, Jr., December 17, 1777, enl. for 3 yrs. Was at Battle 
of Monmouth, N. J., and joined the army under Washington. 

4 She probably was the Mary Peters who died in Ipswich, Mass., aged 
90, in 1830. 

408 



Military Service 



409 



Robert Crary, Mass., 101 i 
Samuel, Conn., 161 ^ 
Samuel, Conn., 309 ^ 
Simon, N. H., 351-352 
William (?), Mass., 64-65 



William Francis, Conn., 198 
William, Conn., 276 
William, Conn., 278 
William, N. H., 345-346 
William Thompson, Conn., 166 



UNPLACED. 

Andrew,'^ iTJ'^\ belonged either to a R. I. or Mass. Reg. 

Andrew,'' Stamford, Conn., Capt. Humphrey's Co., Ap. 10, 1778. 

Andrew* private, July 5 to Axxg. 14, 18 13. 

Andrew* 3d reg. Conn. Line, Capt. Betts's Co. of Norwalk, — 4th Reg. 
paid Feb. 8, 1781 to Dec. 31, 1781. 

Amos, private, Plympton, Mass. Capt. Brigham Co. Col., Cotton's 
Reg. May 4, 1775. Service 3 mos. 5 days. Service 8 mos. 

Jisahel, Brookfield, Mass. 3rd precinct June 30, 1778. Service xo\ 
mos. 

Benjamin (In service before), enl. Aug. 5, 1757, Col. Lyman, Capt. 
Waterbury, 6th Co. 

Benjamin, Nov. 18, 1757, to May 14, 1758. Col. Haviland, in com- 
mand. At Fort Edward, Capt. Ferris. 

Benjamin, Col. Archibald Crary's Reg. Rhode Island. Continental 
troops. 

Cons,Cvew of the Continental Yriga-te Federacy lying at New London, 
below Norwich, launched 1778. Capt. Seth Harding. (living in 
18 18, pensioner.) 

Daniel, private, Capt. Oliver Capron, Col. Ephraim Doolittle's Reg., 
Oct. 6, 1775. From Richmond, N. H. 

Ditto, Capt. Oliver Capron, Col. Doolittle's 24th Reg., dated Rich- 
mond (N. H.), Nov. 26, 1775. Order for bounty coat or equivalent in 
money for the 8 mos. service in 1775. Makes his mark. 

Same, enl. June 16, 1775. Service, i mo. 20 days. 

Daniel, seaman. Sept. 4, 1777. 

Daniel, seaman, Brigantine Freedom,, Mar. 15, 1778. Capt. John 
Clouston. 

David, A Muster Roll of Capt. John Robertson's Company of New 
England Troops at Annapolis Royal in Her Majesties' Service from 
the loth of Oct. 17 10, to the loth of Oct. 1711. David Peters Sen. 
Time of Death or Desertion, Dec. Feb. 18. Days in service 132. 

David Peters Jr. Kill'd June 10, Days in service, 244. 

Ebenezer, A Roll of Capt. William Humphrey's Co. in the Northern 
Army in the Continental Service as mustered and paid by Samuel 
Ashley, Esq., Muster Master and paymaster of said Co. Ebenezer 
Peters, advance wages and bounty 9-18. Billeting, 3-4. 

Frederick, July, 1778. Private, in Col. Armand's Legion, Inde- 
pendent Corps taken into Service hj resolve, June 25, 1778. 

George, (officers of Preston and Norwich, Conn.), 1755, Aug. 19 to 
Dec. 12, Capt. Billings' Co. 



^ Col. 7th Reg., 1827-1830. 

2 Capt., 1809. 

3 Samuel, Jan. to Ap. i, 1781, Light Infantry under the Marquis de 
La Fayette, marched to the southward. 

4 Undoubtedly belonging to the Peters of New England and members 
of the Connecticut line. 

5 Sup. 311-312, Andrew 478 (v). 



4IO Military Service 

Henry, A list of men's names signed to an order for advance pay, etc, 
Boston, June 3, 1776. Payable to Capt. Swan. 

Same, advance pay, blanket money, etc, June 8, 1776. Residence 
Wilmington, (Mass.). Same, Aug. i to Nov. i, 1776. ist Art. Co. 

Same, matross, Capt. James Swan's Co., Col. Thos. Craft's Reg., Nov. 
I, 1776, to Dec. I, 1776. ist. Art. Co. ist Art. Co. Dec. i, 1776, to 
Feb. I, 1777. Feb. i, 1777, to May 8, 1777. Capt. Philip Maiette. 
Col. Craft, service 3 mos. 7 days. Same, Dec. i, 1777, to Jan. i, 1778 
(spelled Petors) Nov. 4, 1777, to Oct. 1777. Reported absent, sick. 

Henry, matross, roll of Capt. Jotham Drury, Col. John Crane, Dec. 
1777- 

Same, Oct. 13, 1777. (Spelled Peeters.) Term of enlistment 3 
years. List of menfrom Suffolk Co., Boston, May 25, 1777. Col. Crane. 

Same, Residence Boston, Ap. 5, 1777, to Mar. 6, 1778. Reported 
deserted Mar. 6, 1778. Same. Boston, Sept. 21, 1778. Reported 
deserted. 

Israel, private, Capt. Capron, Col. Doolittle, dated Aug. i, 1775. 
Enl. May 16, 1775. Service 2 mos. 21 days. Residence, Richmond, 
N. H. Same, camp at Cambridge, Jime 24, 1775. Same, botmty coat 
Nov. 26, 1775. Makes his mark. Reported discharged Sept. 16, 1775. 

Capt. H owlet's Co. Pay Roll of Co. record out of Col. Ashley's Reg. of 
Militia which marched from Keene, N. H. to re-enforce the Continental 
Army at Ticonderoga, May, 1777, engaged May 7 — Israel Peters, 
Time of discharge June 24, Time in service i mo. 18 days. Rate per 
month £4-ios. Am't wages 7-4-0. Miles travel, at 2d per mile, 120, 
£1. Am't wages and travel 8-4-0. 

Jonathan, private, pay accounts Capt. Luther Bailey, Col. Bailey, 
service from Jan. i, to Dec. 31, 1780. Residence Hanover. (Possibly 
he was a colored man.) 

Jonathan, Stonington (Conn.), Feb. 16, 1777. Hyde's Co. enl. for 
war. (Prob. same) Capt. Wolcott's Co. 1 777-1 781. Paid Jan. i, 1781, 
to Dec. I, 1 78 1. 

Jabez, 1756, Ap. 16 to Nov. 11, 4th Reg. ist. Co. 

James, 1776, quartermaster, 2d Reg. Light Horse, Major William 
Hillhouse, New London. 

James, lieut. 3d Reg. New London, June i, to June 15, 1813. July 
15, to 28, 1817. 

John, Atkinson, N. H. 1777, 1778, 1779. 

John, 1776, Dec. 3, enl. for war; private in 7th Co. Capt. Henry 
Tiebout. N. Y. 

. Same, ist Reg. New York Line, 4th (Col's) Co. Oct. 31, for war, 
Corpl. Oct. 24, 1777. Sergt. Jan. 4, 1780. 

John, Milford, Conn. 6th Reg. Pond's Co., enl. Ap. 25, 1777, for war; 
deserted Sept. 19, 1777. 

John F., Hartford, ist Cav., Oct. 23, 1862. Sergt. Feb. i, 1864. 
Dis. June 2, '65. 

John S., Middletown, Conn. 31st Reg., Jan. 30, '64, dis. June 22, 
'65- 

John W., Norwich, Conn. Private, Co. D., 14th R. L Reg. Sept. 
22, '63, dis. Aug. 29, '64. 

Joseph, 8th Reg. 6th Co. 1775. Same, 1776, Capt. Wells' Co., 12th 
Reg. marched to West Chester, deserted. 

Joseph, May 24, 1777, Capt. Cliffs Co.; enl. for war, died time un- 
known, {prob. same) 3rd Reg., Plainfield Co., May 24, 1777. 

Joseph, 2d Reg. 1777-1781. 

Joseph, 4th Reg., Stonington, Conn, (near R. L) Feb. 16, 1777. 



Military Service 41^ 

Joseph, 7th Reg., July 26, to Dec. 18, 1775. 
Pe^^r, 1776, Col. John Topham's Co. Reed pay ;^2o-i3-9. 
Peter private, 1812. New London, Mar. 30, 1814- 37tn int., ais. 
May 10, 1815. Col. Stephen-Tilden. (Pensioner, living m 18 18). 
Peter, shipped for 6 mos. on board ship Trumbull, enl. Jan. 3, 1770, 

left ship, July 4. 1776- „, . -^ir ^ a 

Philip ist N. H. Reg., enlisted during the War, 1776. Muster and 

pay roll of Capt. Farwell's Co., Col. John Stark's Reg. Same, private 

May 21, aged 23, residence Alstead, N. H. Bounty, ;i£20. 

Philip, men mustered from Suffolk Co., Capt. Tuckerman, Bng. txen. 

Putnam, return made by Nathl. Barber. Boston, Feb. 16, 1777. 

Richard, Cumberland, R. I. ,1775. 
5amMe/,ensign,8thCo.Capt.LeonardBleecker, Nov. 21,1776. iN. Y. 

5amM^/, ist Co. 3d. Reg., private. t^., , r- t 

Samuel, paid from Jan. i, 1781, to Dec. 31, Capt. Riley s Co., ot 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

Simon, Mar. 16, 1777, enl. for 3 yrs., dis. Ap. i, 1780, 3d Reg. istuo. 
N. Y. private. ^ ,^^ 

Solomon, Jan. i, to Dec. 31, 1781. Capt. Wolcott's Co. (Officers 
from Windsor, Windham and Pomfret, Conn.) 

Solomon or Thomas, Sanford's Co., May 9, 1777, for 3 yrs. Uis. 
Sept. 19, 1779. (Conn. Line, 1777 to 1781.) . ,. ^ 1 oa 

William, Norwich (Conn.), 6th Reg., Aug. 23, 1861, dis. July 5, 1863. 

William, private. Muster and Pay roll, Capt. Enos Parker^ Col. 
Benj. Simonds; enl. Aug. 14, i777- dis- Aug. 19, 1777- Detachment 
from Berkshire Co. Reg. to re-enforce army at Bennington. Same, 
Officers Mass. Militia, 2d lieut., 13th Co., 2d Berkshire Reg. Commis- 
sion Oct. 8, 1779. . „. , , r% ^ 

Same, Lieut., Capt. Ezra Whipple, Col. Benj. Simonds, enl. Oct. 19, 
1780 Berkshire Co. Reg. Marched by order of Gen. Fellows on alarm 
at Castleton.— Lieut., Capt. Ezra Whipple, Col. Benj. Simonds., enl. 
Oct. 27, 1780, dis. Oct. 29, 1780, Marched on alarm of Oct. 27, to re- 
enforce Gen. Allen at the northward. (It is probable that this William 
is the son of Andrew, ancestor of the Ohio branch. See 478 V, p. 3 1 1 .) 

William, private, Capt. Nathan Peters' Co., Col. Timothy Danielson s 
Reg. enl. Ap. 26, 1775, service 3 mos. 13 days to Aug. i, i77S- Resi- 
dence Suffield, (Conn.) Same, private, Capt. Peters' Co., Col. Daniel- 
son's Reg. Residence Glastonbury (Conn.), Oct. 6, 1775, Company 
returns. Same, Bounty Coat, Capt. Peters' Co., Col. Danielson s Reg., 
dated Roxbury, Nov. 20, 1875, in camp. Same, loth Co., 2d reg. Gen 
Spencer, raised Ap.-May, 1775. Troops were at Bunker Hill siege of 
Boston. Arnold's Quebec expedition. All company officers, from 
Suffield, Conn. Capt. Oliver Hanchett's Co. Same enl. in Capt. Ely s 
Co. Nov. 25, 1776, for war, from Branford, Conn. Taken prisoner 
Sept. 20, 1777. (This William is undoubtedly a member of the Lost 

Tribes.) t, ,, nr 

William,'^ private, Lexington Alarm roll, Capt. Lebbeus Ball, Marched 
from Granville, company of Minute men, Ap. 20, to May 18, 1775, one 
month. , 

William,'^ private, Muster and pay roll, Capt. John Morgan s Co. 
Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Reg., enl. Sept. 18, 1777, service 2 mos. 11 
days. Reported furloughed. 

William,^ enl. Aug. 24, 1777, dis. Nov. 29, 1777. Service in Northern 
Dept. 

Zachariah, ensign, Capt. Hill's Co., Ap. to Mar., 1778. 

I Undoubtedly of Peters of New England, Connecticut line. 



ALLIED FAMILIES 



Abbott, 52 
Adams, 109 
Alden, 130 
Allen, 35 
Allen, 64 
Allen, 69 
Allen, 250 
Ally, 121 
Ally, 124 
Anderson, 205 
Anderson, 312 
Andruss, 255 
Aslebe, 41 
Atherton, 90 
Atkinson, 253 
Austin, 150 
Austin, 255 
Averill, 121 
Avery, 251 



B 



Bacon, 77 
Bacon, 249 
Bagley, 203 
Bailey, 10 1 
Bailey, 192 
Bailey, 237 
Bailey, 337 
Bailey, (note) 337 
Baker, 78 
Baker, 80 
Baker, 197 
Baldwin, 157 
Baldwin, 289 
Barkuloo, 129 
Bamet, 186 
Barney, 342 
Barry, 117 
Bartlett, 132 
Bates, 73 
Bates, loi 



Beach, 251 

Beals, 339 

Beamsley (Wilbourn), i 

Beare, 349 

Beebe, 158 

B elding, 324 

Bennett, 117 

Bennett, 233 

Benson, 245 

Bentley, 297 

Bettis, 70 

Bidwell, 134 

Billings, 123 

Billings, 125 

Billings, 126 

Billings, 351 

Birdseye, 258 

Black, 130 

Blakely, 86 

Blanc, 263 

Blanchard, 76 

Bliss, 190 

Bliss, 221 

Boarman, 105 

Bond, 174 

Booth, 255 

Booth, 293 

Bowker, 80 

Bown, 215 

Bowne, 128 

Bradley, 146 

Brewer, 35 

Brewer, 271 

Brigham, 91 

Brooke, 142 

Brooks, 118 

Brown, 54 . 

Brown, 94 

Brown, 115 

Brown, 126 

Brown, 221 

Browne, 148 



_ ^ Names of all families in any way related to Peters descendants are 
mcluded. A widow is indexed under her maiden name, followed by 
her former husband's in parentheses. Family names have been left 
as found, even where spellings conflict. A second mention of one 
name on the same page when referring to a different individual, causes 
the name to be repeated in the index. 

4x2 



Allied Families 



413 



Buckland, 138 
Buell, 154 
Bull, 137 
Bull, 148 
BuUen, 67 
Bunker, 121 
Burbank, 238 
Burchard, 307 
Burnham, 169 
Burr, 150 
Burrill, 317 
Butler, 170 
Butler, 340 
Butman, 130 



Calhoun, 247 
Calhoun, 247 

(Cameron), 139 

Campbell, 97 

Canfield, 98 

Card, 232 

Carleton, 102 

Carleton, 118 

Carlton, no 

Carney (Isbestos), 104 

Carpenter, 288 

Carrier, 154 

Case, 154 

Case, 158 

Case, 267 

Case, 287 

Caster, 327 

Catlin (Stuart, Dane), 283 

Chadbourn, 75 

Chadwick, 51 

Chadwick, 338 

Chamberlain, 268 

Chambers, 248 

Chandler, 35 

Chap in, 287 

Chapman, 29 

Chap well, 304 

Chenery, 63 

Cheneverd, 148 

Cheney, 77 

Chester, 174 

Chickering, 53 

Childs, 80 

Chittenden, 253 

Chute, 135 

(Clap), 65 

Clark, 71 
Clark, 72 
Clark, 77 
Clark, 107 



Clark, 124 

Clark, 134 

Clark, 172 

Clark, 302 

Clement, 201 

demons, 298 

Clendenning, 246 

Clifford, 271 

Clift, 251 

Cobb, 130 

Cobb, 185 

Cochran, 332 

Coggill, 253 

Coggins, 116 

Coggins, 130 

Colby, 332 

Colby, 335 

Cole, 169 

Cole, 286 

Cole, 287 

Coleman, 122 

Communy, 265 

Compton, 283 

Cone, 168 

Connor, 234 

Cook, 69 

Cook, 244 

Coombs, 322 

Cooper, 274 

Corey, 237 

Cossit, 209 

Cotton, 121 

Cousins (Morton), 122 

Covell, 244 

Cowell, 87 

Cowles, 144 

Cradus (or Crowdiis), 214 

Crane, 286 

Crary, 98 

Crocker, 122 

Crockett. 72 

Crowninshield, 234 

Cruse, 134 

Cummin gs, 146 

Cunningham, 115 

Curtis, 299 

Cushing, 146 

Cushman, 135 



D 



Dadley, 234 
Damrell, 200 
Dart, 285 
Davenport, 81 
Davies, 194 
Davis, 106 



414 



Allied Families 



Davis, 270 
Davis, 271 
Davis, 275 
Davis, 340 
Day, 120 
Day, 267 
Descomb, 331 
Devereux, 79 
Dexter, 127 
Dexter, 139 
Dillon, 226 
Dix, 72 

(Dix), 126 

Dobson, 210 
Dodge, 69 
Dodge, 113 
Dodge, 131 
DoUiver, 108 
Drury, 134 
Dunham, 132 
Dunn, 131 
Dunton, 64 
Duryea, 129 
Van Dusen, 150 
Dutton, 116 
Dyar, 94 

Dyer (Gushing), 112 
Dyer, 131 



E 



Eagar, 331 
Eagar, 336 
Eaker, 284 
Eddy, 84 
Edgar, 255 
Edgecomb, 352 
Edson, 324 
Edson, 343 
Edwards, 31 
Ellicott, 137 
Ellis, 77 
Ellis, 79 
Emery, 109 
Emmons, 10 1 
Erskine, 117 
Ewan, 88 

F 

Fairbank, 279 
Fairbanks, 89 
Famham, 33 
Famham, 124 
Famham, 125 
Famham (Caulkins), 162 
Famham, 316 



Farnham, 317 
Famham, 341 
Farrington, 106 
Farwell, 107 
Faulkner, 102 
Faulkner, 103 
Fay, 238 
Ferguson, 184 
Ferris, 262 
Fessenden, 96 
Fickett, 233 
Fifield, 316 
Fisher, 77 
Fisher, 78 
Fisk, 241 
Fisk, 338 
Fitch, 248 
Flint, 115 
Fobes, 237 
Forbes, 77 
Forester (?), 127 
Forman, 142 
Foster, 52 
Foster, 109 
Foster, 131 
Foster, 335 
Fowle, 119 
Fowler, 15 
Fowler, 121 
Freethy, 125 
Frie, 41 
Friend, 120 
Fro thin gham, 103 
Frye, 108 



Gale, 236 
Gallt, 285 
Gardner, 72 
Gardner, 109 
Gates, 217 
Gates, 308 
Gibbs, 309 
Gibson, 218 
Gibson, 279 
Gilbert, 257 
Gillette, 184 
Gilmore, 73 
Gilmore, 130 
Gleason, 96 
Gleason, 328 
Goodwin, 68 
Gookin, 64 
Goud, 104 
Gould, 93 
Gould, 138 



Allied Families 



415 



Gould, 332 
Gould, 338 
Gowdy, 176 
Granniss, 132 
Grant, 204 
Graves, 168 
Graves, 168 
Graves, 271 
Gray, 122 
Gray, 126 
Green, 312 
Greene, 80 
Grey, no 
Griffin, 96 
Griffing, 185 
Griswold, 297 
Grozelier, 107 



H 



Hadley, 333 

Hadley, 334 

Hagaman, 245 

Haggens, 128 

Haines, 327 

Hale, 108 

Haliburton, 128 

Hall, 87 

Hamden (or Hemden ?), 32 

Hamilton, 128 

Hanna, 172 

Hanna, 287 

Hapgood, 96 

Harding, 79 

Hardon, 150 

Hargrave (Horton), 122 

Harney, 195 

Harris, 80 

Hartshorn, 67 

Hasbrouck, 75 

Haskell, 134 

Hastings, 69 

Hastings, 92 

Hatch, 250 

Hatch, 253 

Hathaway, 132^ 

Haven, 128 

Hawkes, 74 

Hazzard, 87 

Heard, 71 

Heard, 71 

Heath, 336 

Heiser, 142 

Henderson, 246 

Henderson, 303 

Heme, 168 

Heme, 168 



Herrick, 316 

Hewins, 79 

Hicks, 235 

Hill, 210 

Hill, 285 

Hinckley, 121 

Hinckley, 122 \ 

Hind, 334 

Hitchcock, 250 

Hodgkins, 236 

Hodgsdon, 198 

Holman, 93 

Holmes, 224 

Holt, 117 

Holt, 174 

Hooper, 270 

Hopkins, 80 

Van Horn, 129 

Horton, 69 

Horton, 177 

Hosford, 157 

House, 157 

Howard, 190 

Howe, 93 

Howland, 108 

Howlett, 107 

Hoyt (Stanley), 341 

Hubbard, 167 

Huckins, 132 

Huey, 285 

Huguenin, 129 

Hungerford, 296 

Hunter, 137 

Hurlburt (Longley), 175 

Hurlburt, 268 

Hutchinson, 53 

Hutchinson, 334 

Hutchinson, 334 



Ingalls, 35 
Ingalls, 103 
Ireland, 88 



Jarvis, 257 
Jarvis, 261 
Jellerson, 129 
Jenkens, 311 
Jenkins, 202 
Jewell, 329 
Jewell, 339 
Jewett, 276 
Johnson, 116 
Johnson, 197 



4i6 



Allied Families 



Johnson, 197 
Johnson, 350 
Jones, 130 
Jones, 184 
Jones, 200 
Jones, 343 
Jordan, 116 
Jordan, 129 
Joslyn, 277 
Joslyn, 280 
Judd, 304 



Keith, 68 
Kelley, 291 
Kellogg, 169 
Kelso, 134 
Kendall, 342 
Keyes, 119 
Kimball, 103 
Kimball, 112 
Kimball, 124 
Kitchell, 144 
Kline, 175 
Kneeland, 294 
Knowlson, 246 



Labatut, 263 
Lamb, 83 
Landais, 70 
Langdon, 127 
Larrabee, 326 
Lavillebonne, 264 
Lawrence, 246 
Leavitt, 201 
Lecrivain, 107 
Lee, 150 
Lee, 223 
Leland, 07 
LeMonnier, 264 
Leonard, 294 
Lewis, 131 
De Lilly, 263 
Lind, 245 
Linn ell, 203 
Locke, 236 
Logue, 211 
Loomis, 169 
Loomis, 269 
Loomis, 269 
Lovering, 55 
Lovett, 81 
Lovett, 245 
Lucas, 269 



Lymebtirner, 119 
Lyon, 80 

M 

Magoon, 203 

Manley, loi 

Mann, 154 

Manning, 128 

Manning, 305 

Manzer, 184 

Marache, 87 

Marks, 153 

Marriner, 112 

Marshall, 349 

Mart el, 229 

Martel, 231 

Martell, 207 

Martin, 272 

Mason, 242 

Maxey, 175 

Maynadier, 148 

Maynard, 90 

Maynard, 94 

Maynard, 98 

McAlpine, 332 

McCall, no 

McClellan, 245 

McClure, 137 

McCollom, 99 

McCollumn, 282 

McComb, 255 

McCurdy, 247 

McEntire, 182 

McKenzie, 120 

McKnight, 183 

McNab, 216 

McNally, 104 

McSween, 214 

Mead, 171 

Means, 130 

Mears, 203 

Meech, 99 

Meloney, 204 

Mercein, 142 

Mereau (or Merean ?), 122 

Merill (French), no 

Merrill, 279 

Merrill, 294 

Merritt, 290 

Miller, 131 

Miller, 300 

Missant, 229 

Mitchell, 235 

Mitchell, 279 

MoUegen, 266 

Moore, 89 

Moore, 197 



Allied Families 



417 



Moreau, 304 
Morgan, 148 
Morgan, 205 
Morgan, 283 
Morris (Salter), 70 
Morse (Dunton), 78 
Morse, 81 
Mostelle, 224 
Moultrop, 293 
Mowry, 297 
Mo wry, 297 
Muggah, 205 
Muggah, 206 
Muggah, 208 
Muggah, 215 
MuUing, 220 
Murphy, 248 
Murtough, 331 



N 



Nash, 255 
Nauman, 238 
Nelson, 192 
Nelson, 336 
Newton, 335 
Nickels, 131 
Nisbet, 219 
Norton, 117 
Norton, 118 



O 



Oliver, 351 

Ord, 256 

Ormond, 213 

Ormsby, 199 

Osgood, 23, 24, 26, 152, 153 

Osgood, 37 

Osgood, 53 

Osgood, 102 

Osgood, 117 

Osgood, 121 

Otis, 175 

Overmann, 244 

Owen, 257 

Owen, 261 

Owen, 306 



Page (Titvis), 343 
Paine, 69 
Parker, 54 
Parker, 118 
Parlee, 125 
Parmerly, 159 



Parr, 247 

Partridge, 121 

Patrick, 234 

Patten, 97 

Patten, 116 

Payne, 221 

Peabody (Stevens), 102 

Pearl, 112 

Pease, 178 

Peasley, 341 

Penniman, 66 

Penniman, 81 

Pepalow, 64 

Perkins, 42 

Perkins, 49 

Perkins, 61 

Perkins, 131 

Perry, 135 

Perry, 241 

Peters, 122 

Petty, 247 

Phelps, 96 

Phelps, 157 

Phelps, 159 

Phelps, 276 

Phelps, 277 

Phelps, 278 

Phillips, 336 

Phillips, 337 

Phipps, 83 

Pierce (Tucker), 344 

Plimpton, 77 

Plympton, 83 

Pollard, 84 

Pond, 113 

Porter (Ross), 137 

Porter (Gurley), 242 

Potter, 80 

Preston, 256 

Price, 80 

Pritchard, 311 

Purington, 237 

Purkitt, 233 



Quincy, 149 



Randal, 280 
Rawson, 68 
Rawson, 312 
Raymond, 219 
Reed, 150 
Reeve, 271 
Reeves, 88 



Q 



R 



4i8 



Allied Families 



Remington, 69 
Reynolds, 198 
Rhodes, 273 
Rice, 80 
Rice, 149 
Rich, 132 
Richards, 149 
Richardson, 53 
Richardson, 195 
Richardson, 214 
Richardson, 272 
Rix, 316 
Robbins, 196 
Roberts, 132 
Roberts, 167 
Robertson, 224 
Robinson, 51 
Robinson, 245 
Rogers, 68 
Rogers, 188 
Rogers, 241 
Rogers, 283 
Rollins, 86 
Rollins, 127 
Root, 270 
Root, 279 
Root, 279 
Root, 279 
Ross, 216 
Rowe, 192 
Ru'ggles, 88 
Russ, 37 
Russell, 87 
Russell, 107 



Sady, 32 
Sanborn, 342 
Sanders, 10 1 
Sanderson, 72 
Sargent, 130 
Sawyer, 115 
Sawyer, 335 
Scaif, 172 
Seagar, 193 
Severance, 328 
Sewall, 79 
Seymour, 257 
Sharpe, 139 
Sheldon, 289 
Sheldon, 292 
Sheppard, 222 
Sherman, 183 
Shipman, 99 
Shipman, 177 
Sibbons, 33 



Sibley, 92 ; 

Silver, 105 
Simmons, 126 
Skinner, 128 
Slack, 203 
Slocomb, 55 
Smith, 174 
Smith, 190 
Smith, 193 
Smith, 284 
Smith, 325 
Smith, 325 
Snell grove, 171 
Snelling, 119 
Snowman, 124 
Southard, 73 
Southworth, 100 
Spencer, 206 
Spencer, 221 
Spencer, 223 
Spoliford, 112 
Spofiford, 340 
Spooner, 319 
Stackpole, 125 
Stagg, 275 
Standley, 346 
Steams, 54 
Steams, 340 
Stephens, 120 
Stevens, 92 
Stevens, 107 
Stevens, 108 
Stoutenborough, 246 
Stoutenbo rough, 249 
Strickland, 280 
Strong, 305 
Stubblefield, 270 
Styles, 206 
Sutherland, 215 
Sutton, 157 
Symonds, 241 



Taft, 311 
Tappan, 198 
Tarleton, 201 
Taylor, 245 
Taylor, 247 
Taylor, 318 
Tebbetts, 119 
Tenney, 328 
Tenney, 342 
Thacher, 68 
Thaxter, 145 
Thaxter, 146 
Thayer, 326 



Allied Families 



419 



Thomas, 262 
Thompson, 65 
Thompson, 108 
Thompson, 162 
Thorn dike, 113 
Thurber, 244 
Tibbetts, 132 
TopUn, 333 
Town, 165 
Townsend, 176 
Trask, 55 
Trask, 71 
Trask, 84 
Treat, 162 
Trueworthy, 193 
Trumbull, 161 
Trumbull, 276 
Tucker, 55 
Tucker, 133 
TuUer, 277 
Tuller, 278 
Tyler, 85 



U 



Upton, 113 
Usher, 340 



Valentine, 183 
Vankirk, 105 
Viles, 74 
Vose, 133 



W 



Van Wagner, 75 
Walker, no 
Walker, 285 
Walker, 288 
Walker, 315 
Ward, 251 
Warden, 192 
Ware, 81 
Warrin, 248 
Washburn, 200 
Watson, 187 
Webster, 124 
Weeks, 232 
Welles, 177 
Welles, 309 
Wells, 171 



West, 307 
West, 326 
Westcott, 118 
Westcott, 119 
Westcott, 119 
Wheeler, 241 
Whitcomb, 91 
White, 189 
White, 196 
White, 327 
Whiting, 92 
Whiting, 135 
Whitman, 71 
Whitman, 145 
Whitney, 149 
Whitney, 303 
Whitney, 343 
Wilboum, 2 
Wilbourn, 29 
Wilkeson, 242 
Willard, 328 
WilUams, 87 
Williams, 145 
Williams, 162 
Williams, 278 
Williams, 301 
Williams, 342 
Willson, 285 
Wilson, 109 
Winegar, 293 
Winship, 233 
Winter, 176 
Wiston, 86 
Wiswell, 130 
Wood, 116 
Wood, 116 
Wood, 116 
Wood, 120 
Wood, 132 
Woodman, 131 
Woods, 248 
Woodward, 128 
Woodward, 329 
Wright, 32 
Wright, III 
Wyles, 173 



Yeats, 294 
York, 138 
Young, 202 
Young, 308 



INDEX 



Abbott, Charlotte, 43 

Elizabeth, 51 

George, 19, 20, 27, 45 

Hannah, 20 

John, 19, 23, 25 

Nehemiah, 45 

Sarah, 20 

William, 19 
Adams, Henry, 109 

Mehitabel, 109, no 
Albee, Captain John, 82 
Alden, Lydia, 130 
Allen, Andrew, 35, 36 

Anna W., 69 

Colonel Ethan, 250 

Hannah, 30, 35 

Hezekiah, 64 

John, 20, 21, 30, 35, 36 

Joseph, 395 

Martha, 21, 35, 36, 154 

Mary, 64 
Ally, Mary Ann, 121 

Sally, 124 
Anderson, Mary, 205, 207-21 
213 

, 312 

Andniss, Isaac Mix, 255 

Margaretta Artimesia, 255 
Appleton, Captain, 14 
Archer, Jonathan, 400 

Mary, 400 
Arnold, General, 99 
Ash, Hannah, 397 

Thomas, 397 
Aslebe, John, 20, 23-25 

Mary, 41 
Aslet (Aslebe), John, 19 
Atherton, Humphrey, 4 

, 90 

Atkinson, Anne, 253 
Austin, Lydia Isabella, 255 

Mary Elizabeth, 150, 151 

Thomas, 150 
Averill, Abigail, 121 



I, 



Avery, Austin Eldredge, 398 
Nancy Denison, 251 
Samuel, 398 



B 



Bacon, Adele, 249 

Hannah, 77 
Bagley, Charlotte M., 204 
Bailey, Adeline, 337 

Caroline Robinson, 237 

Colonel, 82 

Edward A., 237 

General, 243 

John W., loi 

Levi, 337 

Myron, 192 

William, 10 1 
Baker, Amasa, 78 

Mary, 80 

Col. Samuel R., 197 

William, 15 
Baldwin, Benjamin, 157 

Benjamin, Jr., 157 

Ellen, 289 
Ballard, William, 19 
Barker, Benjamin, 43, 51 

Ebenezer, 17, 44, 48 

John, 19 

Richard, 26, 27 
Barkuloo, Ann, 129 
Barnard, ElizalDeth, 19 

Rev. , 27 

Robert, 42, 44 

Thomas, 19, 30, 31 
Barnet, Ann, 186, 188, 189, 204, 
221, 233, 239, 367 

Robert, 186, 367 
Barney, Jemima, 342 
Barry, Hannah, 117 
Bartlett, Mary, 132 
Bates, Abner L., 73 

Martha, 10 1 

Mary Elizabeth, 73 
Batherick, Olive, 400 
Beach, Electa, 251 



420 



Index 



421 



Beal, Mary, 407 
Beals, Lydia, 339 
Bearaen, Samuel, 156 
Beamsley, Abigail, 357, 35^ 
Anne, 357 

Anne Woodward, 360 
Edward Bushnell, 360 
Elizabeth Page, 360 
George, 358 
Grace, 357 
Grace Graves, 360 
Habakkuk, 357, 358 
Hannah, 42, 357, 358 
Hannah Beamsley, 360 
Martha, 3-5, 359 
Mary, 358 
Marv Robison, 360 
Mercy, i, 2, 7, 31-35. 37. 4i. 

42, 357-360 
Samuel, 357, 35^ 
Sarah, 358 

William, i, 2, 7, 357-3^0 
Beare, Mary, 349, 350 
Beebe, Abigail, 158 
Ebenezer, 158 
Ruel. 158 
Belcher, Governor, 13 
Jeremiah, 29 
Colonel William, 180 
B elding, Polly, 324 
Bell, S. P., 366 
Bellingham, Richard, 2 
Bennett, Frank B., 117 
Rev. Stephen, 233 
William, 117 
Benson, James, 245 

Joseph Wesley, 245 
Bentley, A. W^, 297 
Bettis, WilHam Johnson, 70 
Bickford, Benjamin. 396 

James, 396, 399 
Bidwell, EHzabeth, 134 
Bigelow, Colonel Timothy, 82 
Bigsbee, Daniel, 24 
Billings, Abigail, 125 
Anna, 351 
Benjamin, 123 
Nathan, 125 
Permilla, 126 
Phebe, 123-126, 390, 391 
Billinghurst, John, 399 
Birdseye, Eunice, 258 
Mary, 258, 261 
William, 258 
Black, George Nixon, 130 
Colonel John, 130 
N. P., 404 



Blakely, George, 86 
Blanc, Evarist Louis, 263 
Blanchard, Jacob, 76 

Samuel, 19, 37, 38, 48, i53 
Blaney, Aaron, 99 
Bliss, Ellis, 190, 221 

Lydia, 190-192, 196, 197, 
200, 221 

Tamar, 221 

Boarman, , 105 

Bodge, George M., 9, 10 
Bond, Eh, 174 

Thomas Newton, 174 
Booth, Daniel, 293 

Mary Ann, 255, 256 

Walter S., 293 

William A., 255 
Bowker, John Pearson, 80 

John Pearson, Jr., 80 
Bown, Charles R., 215 
Bowne, Gilbert W., 128 

Samuel, 128 
Bradford, Samuel, 61 
Bradley, Charles, 146 

Emily Cummin gs, 144. i40. 

147 
Bradstreet, Ann, 19 
Colonel, 189 
Dudley, 19, 20, 23-25, 28, 29, 

44 
Simon, 20 
Brewer, Fletcher, 271 
Hannah, 35 
Jacob F., 271 
Brigham, Hannah L., 91, 92 
Jedediah, 91 
Lydia, 91 
Brooke, Helen, 142 
Brooks, Calvin, 118 

Jennie, 118 
Brown, Aphia, 115 
Augusta J., 94 
Catherine W., 94 
Edward, 126 
Ezra, 221 
Jeremiah, 54 
Martha, 54 
Ruth, 54 
Salome, 126 
Simeon, 94 
Thomas, 155 
Browne, Causten, 148 

Henry Rossiter Worthington, 
148 
Buckland, Sophia, 138 
Buell, Timothy, 154 

Timothy, Jr., 154, 160 



422 



Index 



Bull, Buckland Watson, 137, 148 

Captain, 156 

Cora Lucretia, 148 

Ebenezer Watson, 138 
Bullard, Captain, 67 

Colonel Seth, 79 
Bullen, Bela, 67 

Elizabeth, 67, 68 
Bunker, David Wellington, 121 

John Edward, 121 
Burbank, Susan Janet, 238 
Burchard, Deborah, 307-309 
Burgoyne, General, 187 
Bumap, Joseph, 44 
Burnham, James, 9 

Joseph, 169 

Lydia, 1 69-1 71 

Thomas, 9 
Burr, Isaac Tucker, 150 

Isaac Tucker, Jr., 150 
Burrill, Ebenezer, 317 
Butler, David, 170 

Nehemiah, 340 

Olive J., 340 
Butman, Charles, 130 

Charles O., 130 



Caldwell, Rev. Augustine, 6 
Calhoun, Elizabeth, 247 

Captain Richard, 247 

Susan Mary, 247 
Cameron, Eva, 139 
Campbell, Alexander P., 97 

Mary F., 97 
Canfield, Joel, 98 

Samuel, 98 
Card, Abigail L., 232, 233 
Carleton, Clara, 118 

John, 24, 102 

Phebe, 102, 103, 153 
Carlton, Benjamin, no 

Joanna, no 

Phebe, 23, 26 
Carney, Mark, 104 

Nancy, 104, 105 
Carnick, John, 402 
Carpenter, Anna, 288 
Carr, Dabney, 140 

Sarah, 330 
Carrier, Martha Allen, 21, 35, 36, 

154 

Thomas, 35, 154 
Carson, Kit, 249 
Case, Amos, 243 

Azubah, 267 



Mary Elizabeth, 287, 288 

Moses, 154 

Moses, Jr., 154 

Seth, 287 

Zenas, 158 

Zia, 267 
Caster, Catherine, 327 
Catlin, Annie, 283 

Charles, 283 
Caulkins, Elizabeth Farnham, 
163, 164 

Frances Mainwaring, 100 
Chadbourn, Asenath, 75 

George, 75 

William Hobbs, 75 
Chadwick, David, 338 

Edmund, 338 

Mary, 51 
Chamberlain, John, 268 

Phineas, 268 
Chambers, Margaret, 248 
Chandler, Annis, 30, 35 

Bridget, 19 

David, 35 

Elizabeth, 35 

Ephraim, 35 

Hannah, 19, 20, 35 

Henry, 43, 45 

John, 19, 20, 23-25, 43, 45 

Mary, 29, 35 

Thomas, 16, 17, 19, 20, 23, 35 

Thomas, Jr., 20, 35 

Timothy, 35 

William, 19—22, 24, 25 

William, Jr., 19, 20 
Chapin, Paulina, 287 
Chapman, Colonel, 161 

David, 29 

Edward, 29 

Elizabeth, 163 

Hannah, 29 

John, 29 

Mary, 29 

Michael, 29 

Nathaniel, 29 
Chapwell, Jonathan, 304 

Ruth, 304-306 
Chenery, Benjamin, 63 

Captain Ephraim, 67 

Hannah, 63, 65, 75, 77, 81, 
89 
Cheneverd, Margaret Julia, 148 
Cheney, Zillah, 77 
Chester, David, 174 

Sophie M., 174-176 
Chickering, Hannah, 53, 54 

Samuel, 53 



Index 



423 



Childs, Mehitable, 80 
Chittenden, Horace Hatch, 253 

Lucius Eugene, 253 
Choate, John, 57,61 
Chubb, Captain, 28 
Chute, Andrew, 135 

Martha EHzabeth, 135, 136 
Clap, Mary, 63 

Thomas, 63 
Clark, Asa, 77 

Benjamin, 71 

Catherine, 71 

Charlotte Ann, 134 

David, 124 

Captain Eleazer, 10 1 

Harriet Louisa (Peters) , 

71 

Hobart, 107 

Jacob, 72 

Jonathan, 172 

John, 72 

John H., 107 

Mary Jane, 124 

Maude, 302 

Seth Daniel, 172 

Thomas, 4, 5 

William, 71, 77, 134 
Clarke, S. Almira, 299 

Thomas, 7 
Clemens, Mary, 17 

Rev. Robert, 17 
Clement, Job M., 201 
demons, Abel, 298 

Lucy, 298 
Clendenning, Margaret, 246 
Clifford, Myra D., 271, 274 

Rufus, 271 
Clift, William, 251 

Rev. William, 251 
Clinton, Sir Henry, 282 
Cloutman, . 395 

Elizabeth, 398 

Joseph, 395 
Cobb, Benjamin, 185 

Mary, 130 

Mary Ella, 185 
Cochran, Anna, 332, 337 
Coggill, George, 253 

Julia, 253 
Coggins, Elizabeth, 115 

Lydia, 130 

Mary, 116 
Colby, Eliphalet, 332 

Joseph B., 332 

Sarah, 335 
Cole, Abner, 169 

Andrew, 169 



Catherine, 286, 287 

Martha, 287 
Coleman, Sophia, 122 
Communy, Adele, 265 
Compton, Sibyl, 283 
Cone, Caroline, 168, i6g, 171, 
172 

Zachariah, 168 
Connor, John, 234 
Cook, Arthur, 244 

Elmira, 69 

Joseph, 396 
Coolidge, Captain, 78 
Coombs, Susannah, 319, 322, 326, 

328 
Cooper, James, 274 

Rhoda, 274 
Corey, James, 237 

Susan Tucker, 237-239 
Cossit, Catherine Julia, 209, 210 
Cotton, Sarah Ann, 121 

Theophilus, 30 
Cousens, Ellen, 122 

Isaac, 122, 407 
Covell, Abbey, 244, 247, 248 

Silas, 244, 245 
Cowell, Edward Joseph, 87 

John Van Hyst, 87 
Cowles, Cornelia Halsey, 144 

Henry, 144 
Cradus (or Crowdus), Ann, 214 
Crane, Catherine, 286 
Crary, Lois, 98, 100 
Crocker, Abby Mereau, 122 

Timothy, 122 
Crockett, Charles, 72 

Mary Elizabeth (Peters), 72 

Sallie, 72 

Woodbury Langdon, 72 
Cromwell, Oliver, 367 
Crowninshield, Abraham Watson, 

234 
Cruse, Isaac, 134 

Mary Wilson, 134, 135 
Cummings, Sarah Ellen, 146 
Cunningham, John, 115 

Sally, 115 
Curtis, Augtistus, 299 

Lucina, 299, 300 
Gushing, Anna Quincy, 146 

Benjamin, 146 

Mary Dyer, 112, 391 

Nathaniel. 112 
Cushman, Albert W., 135 

Mary Frances, 135 
Cutler, Benjamin, 398 

Captain John H., 398 



424 



Index 



D 



Dadley, George, 234 

Samuel Cox, 234 
Daland, Benjamin, 395 

George, 395 
Damrell, Etta J., 200 
Dane, Deliverance, 17 

Rev. Francis, 19, 20, 35 

Francis, Jr., 19 

Hannah, 19 

Joanna, 19 

Mathias, 283 
Dart, Esther, 285 
Davenport, Samtiel Daniels, 81 
Davies, Charlotte E., 194 

Joseph, 194 
Davis, Elizabeth Farrington, 106, 
107 

George, 270, 271 

George W., 271 

J.W.,275 

Jefferson, 298 

Olive, 340 
Day, Lydia, 267, 269 

Noah, 267 

Sarah, 120 
Deane, Nathaniel, 17 
Deland, Hannah, 399 
De Lilly, Jean Philippe, 263, 264 

Marianne Ang61ique, 263,264 

Descomb, , 331 

Devereux, Abigail, 79 
Dexter, , 127 

Louisa, 139 
Dillon, Elizabeth, 226-228 
Dix, Ann, 72 

Susan, 126 
Dobson, W. M., 210 
Dodd, William, 399 
Dodge, Edward W., 69 

Elvira, 131 

Henry, 69 

Jonah, 113 

Reuben, 113, 391 
Dolliver, Hannah, 108 
Drury, William E., 134 

William H., 134 
Dunham, Laura Ann, 132 
Dunn, Alexander, 131 
Dvmton, Benjamin, 78 

Gershom, 64 

Margaret Morse, 78, 80 

Samuel, 64 
Duryea, Cornelius Rapalyea, 129 

Harmanus Barkuloo, 129 
Dustin, Hannah, 24 



Dutton, Samuel, 116 

Samuel, Jr., 116 
Dyar, Ellen Maria, 94 

Mary Jane, 94 

Smith, 94 
Dyer, Elisha, 131 

James, 112 

Mary, 112, 115, 116, 123, 127, 

129, 137 
Pliebe, 131 



E 



Eager, Hannah, 336 
Joseph, 331 
Sarah Wood, 331, 332, 335, 

Eaker, Josiah, 284 
Eastman, Jonathan, 314, 315, 346 
Eddy, Mary Frances, 84 
Edgar, Louise, 255 
Edgecomb, Reliance, 352 
Edson, Abigail, 343 

David, 324 

Sylvia, 324 
Edwards, Andrew, 32 

John, 31, 32 

Mary, 31, 32, 349 
Ellicott, John A., 137 

Joseph Porter, 137 

Joseph Porter, 393 
Elliott, George, 398 

Captain George, 398 
Ellis, Eleazar, 77 

Jesse, 79 

Mary, 79 

Nathan, 77, 114 

Sarah (Peters), 77 
Emery, Sarah, 109 
Emmons, Daniel Ormistead, 10 r 
Erskine, Levi, 117 

Mary Augusta, 117, 118 
Ewan, Ann, 88 



Fairbank, Abigail, 279 
Fairbanks, Rachel, 89, 98 
FaiTiham, Elizabeth, 33, 163, 315- 

319. 329 
John, 124, 341 

John, Jr., 317 

Joseph, 341 

Captain John, 163 

Leroy, 125 

Martha Ann (Peters), 125 



Index 



425 



Farnham {Continued) 

Mary, 30, 31 

Otis, 124 

Thomas, 2>5 
Farrington, Ruth, 106 
Farwell, EUzabeth, 107 
Faulkner, Daniel, 102 

Francis, 44 

Paul, 42, 43 
Fay, Calista, 238, 239 
Ferguson, John, 184 

WilHam, 184 
Ferris, Joshua Beal, 262 
Fessenden, Louisa, 96 
Fickett, Addie, 233 
Fifield, Benjamin, 315, 316 
Fisher, Abigail, 77, 78 
Fisk, Amos, 241 

Franklin, 3 38 

Joseph, 338 

Josiah, 241 
Fitch, Anne Eliza, 248 
Flint, Daniel, 115 

Joseph Warren, 115 

Martha Bockee, 404 
Fobes, George C, 237 
Forlpes, James, 77 
Forester, Martha, 127 
Forman, Gabriella Brooke, 142 

Thomas Marsh Bryan, 142 
Foster, Andrew, 24 

Captain Asa, 51 

Asa, Jr., 50-52 

Daniel, 109 

Daniel, Jr., 50 

Eliza, 335, 336 

Ephraim, 27, 43-48 

Rhoda, 131 

William, 47 

Zebulon, 335 
Fowle, Abigail, 65 

Harriet Hunt, 119 
Fowler, Enoch M., 121 

Moses, 121 

Philip, 14, 15 
Fox, Sarah Ives, 34 
Francis, Joseph, 400 
Freethy, John, 125 
French, Molly Merrill, no 

Thomas, 5 

, no 

Frie, James, 19, 20, 56 

John, 19, 20, 43-48 

Jonathan, 56 

Phebe, 17, 20, 25, 41, 48, 50, 
51, 56, 63, 102, III 

Samuel, 20, 23, 25, 26, 41 



Friend, Alice Marion, 120 

John Willard, 120 
Frothingham, Nathaniel, 103 
Frye, Eunice, 17 

John, 17, 108 

Phebe, 17 

Susanna, 108, 109 
Fuller, Andrew, 61 

Luther, 397 



Gale, R. W., 236 
Gallt, Joseph, 285 

Robert S., 285 
Gardner, Eliza Ann, 72, 74 

Elizabeth P., 109 

William, 72 
Gates, Elias, 217 

George, 308 

Mary, 217-219 

Nehemiah, 308 
Gavett, John, 399 
Gibbs, Mathew, 309 
Gibson, Eliza, 218 

James H., 218 

Martha, 279 
Gilbert, Abigail, 257, 258 

Samuel, 257, 258 
Gillette, Gilbert, 184 

John, 184 
Gilmore, Catherine, 73 

John, 73 

John F., 73 

Lucy, 130 
Gleason, Benjamin Whitney, 96 

Charles Whitney, 96 

Orrin P., 328 
Goodwin. Orrin G., 68 
Gookin, Daniel, 64 

Margaret, 64 

Richard, 64 
Gore, Lt.-Gov., 257 
Goss, Franklin, 330 
Goud, Susanna, 104 
Gould, Abigail, 332 

Anna, 93 

Elizabeth, 338-340 

Jane Almira, 138, 139 

John, 93 

Maria, 93, 95 

William R., 138 
Gowdy, Charles, 176 

Willis, 176 
Granniss, George Benjamin, 132 

Robert Andrews, 132 



426 



Index 



Grant, Catherine, 204, 214, 215 

General U. S., 204 
Graves, John, 168 

, 261 

Roxanna, 271, 272 

Samuel, 6, 7, 168 

Stephen, 271 

William, 168 
Gray, Clara, 126 

Matilda, 122 

Green, , 312 

Greene, Catharine, 80 
Grey, David, no 

Henry Peters, no 
Griffin, Rhesa, 96 
Griffing, Frederick M., 185 

Rev. H. L., 185 
Griswold, Hannah Lucretia, 297 
Grozelier, Leopold, 107 

Louis, 107 
Gunnison, Elisha, 400 
Gurley, Rev. John, 242 

Mary (Porter), 242 



H 



Hadley, Fanny, 333, 334 

Obadiah, 333, 334 

Rosannah, 334 

Silas, 334 
Hagaman, Cynthia, 245 
Haggens, Edmund, 128 

Mary, 128 
Haines, James, 327 

Rosan, 327 
Hale, Harriet, 108 
Haliburton, Andrew, 128 

James Pierrepont, 128 

Susan Hamilton (Peters), 128 
Hall, Martha, 87 

Oliver, 87 
Hamden, Mary, 32 
Hamilton, Susan, 128 
Hanna, George, 172 

James Scott, 287 

Margaret Jane, 172 

Mary Whipple, 287 
Hapgood, Asa, 96 

Lucy Woods, 96, 97 

Phebe, 96 
Harding, Mary, 79 
Hardon, Anna Frances, 150 
Hargrave, Mary A., 122 

Thomas, 122 
Harmon, John, 10 
Harney, William H. 195 
Harris, John, 80 



Harris, Joseph, 80 
Harrison, Gen. Thomas, 188 

Major-General Thomas, 367 
Hart, Goodm., 14 
Hartshorn, Elizabeth, 67 
Hasbrouck, Margaret, 75 
Haskell, Martha K., 134 
Hastings, Charles C. P., 69 

Elbridge Gerry, 92 

Helen Augusta (Peters), 69 

Phebe, 92 

Rozel, 92 
Hatch, Harriet Hinckley, 250- 
253, 255 

Mary Yates, 253 

Reuben, 250 
Hathaway, Hon. Joshua Warren, 
132 

Marv Ann, 132 
Haven, George Wallis, 128 

John, 128 
Hawkes, John, 74 

Sarah Johanna, 74 
Hazeltine. Deliverance, 17 
Hazzard. Samuel Parker, 87 

Stephen, 87 
Heard, Elizabeth, 71 

Jacob, 71 

Richard, 71 

Samuel, 71 

Thomas, 71 
Heath, Harriet Jane Worthington, 

336 

Robert, 336 
Heiser, Helen Russell, 142 

Henry Anthon, 142 
Hellyard (Hilliard), Ehzabeth, 

394, 395 
Henchman, Bridget, 20 
Henderson, Caroline, 246 

Mary, 303 
Heme, Anne, 168 
Herrick, Annah, 316 

George, 21, 22 
Hewins, Jacob, 79 

James, 79 
Hicks, Susan Caroline, 235 

William, 235 
Hill, Douglas, 210 

Mary E., 285, 288-292 

Roger, 403 
Hilliard, Edward, 394 
Hinckley, Benjamin F., 122 

Ebenezer, 115 

Eugene F., 122 

Phebe P., 121 
Hind, Lydia, 334 



Index 



427 



Hitchcock, Lorraine Allen, 250 

Samuel, 250 
Hodgkins, Sophia, 236 
Hodgsdon, Lucinda E., 198, 199 
Holman, Abigail, 93, 94 

Abraham, 93 

Azulah, 93 
Holmes, Captain Charles, 397 

Maria J., 224-226 
Holt, Henry, 24 

Jeremiah T., 117 

Joel, 174 

Oliver, 19 

Robert Douglas, 174 

Samuel, 19, 30, 35, 36 

Thomas N. B., 117 
Hooper, John, 17 

Thomas, 19 

William Munger, 270 
Hopkins, Jeremiah, 80 

Marvel, 66 

Samuel, 80 
Horton, Ezekiel, 177 

Frank P., 69 

Hosea, 122 

Joel, 181 

John, 69 

Mary A. (Hargrave), 122 

, 261 

Hosford, Abigail, 157 

Joseph, 157 

Joseph, Jr., 157 
House, John, 157 

John, Jr., 157 
Howard, Keziah, 190, 200, 203 
Howe, Colonel, 79 

Lydia, 93 

Sarah, 93 

Solomon, 93 
Howland, Henry, 108 

James Henry, 108 
Howlett, John, 107 
Hoyt, John, 37, 38, 40 

Stephen, 341 
Hubbard, Elizabeth, 167 

Richard, 5-7, 14, 15 
Hubbert, Richard, 5-7 
Huckins, Aravesta, 132 

John, 132 
Huey, Joseph, 285 
Huguenin, Daniel, 129 

Margaret, 129 
Hull, John, 9 
Hunter, Nancy, 137 

Simcoe, Lt.-Gov., 257 
Hungerford, Ansel, 296 

Welthy, 296 



Hurlburt, Elizabeth, 175 
James Harvey, 268 
Jared, 175 
Rev. David, 268 
Sarah Churchill, 175 

Hutchinson, Harriet E., 334 

J- R-, 334 

Josiah, 53 
Solomon, 334 



Ingalls, Daniel, 51 

Faith, 35 

Henry, 19 

Henry. Jr., 19 

John, 19 

Mehitabel, 103 

Samuel, 19 
Ireland, Fielding, 88 

Hannah More (Peters), 88 

James, 88 
Isbestos, Nancy Carney, 104 

William, 104 



Jackson, General, 182 

Jarvis, Mary Martha Marvin, 261 

Patty, 261, 263 

Samuel, 257, 261 

Rev. WiUiam, 182 

William, 257 
Jefferson, Thomas, 71 
Jellerson, Elizabeth, 129 

Jenkens, , 311 

Jenkins, Velma Louise, 202, 203 
Jewell, Dorothy, 339 

Jacob, 339 

Sarah, 329-331 

Jewett, , M.D., 276 

Johnson, Alice, 31 

Elizabeth, 399 

Hannah, 197, 199, 350, 351 

Haswell Wood, 116 

Captain Haynes, 197 

John, Jr., 51 

Mary, 19, 197, 198 

Susannah, 32 

Thomas, 16, 19, 24, 42 

Thomas, Jr., 19 

Timothy, 354 

William, 116 
Jones, Henry, 343 

John Winthrop, 130 

Sarah, 184, 185 

Susan M., 200 

Theodore, 130 



428 



Index 



Jordan, Melatiah, 129 

Nancy, 116 

Sally, 129, 131, 132, 134 135 
Joslyn, Elias P., 280 

Isaac, 277 
Judd, Philip, 304 



K 



Keith, Chloe, 68, 69 

Lyman, 68 
Kelley, Lizzie, 291 
Kellogg, Jerusha, 169 
Kelso, Mary Elizabeth, 134 
Kendall, Sanford G., 342 

William, 342 
Keyes, Sarepta, 119 
Kimball, Daniel, 103 

Hannah, 103, 104, 106, loS, 

391 

Seldon, 124 

Seth, 112 
Kitchell, Henrietta, 144 
Kline, John P., 175 
Kneeland, Helen M., 294-296 
Knowlson, Alexander Masterton, 
246 

Richard, 246 
Knowlton, Deacon, 14 



Labatut, Fanny, 263 
Lamb, Henry, 83 

Jabesh, 8^ 

Sally, 83 
Landais, Franfois Henri de, 70 

Louis, 70 
Lane, Captain, 37 
Langdon, Charlotte, 127, 129 

John, 127 

Martha Forester, 127 
Larrabee, Celinda, 326, 327 
Lavillebonne, Aspasie, 264 

Jourdan, 264 
Lawrence, Amos, 245 

Chester Berkely, 246 

Effingham NicoU, 246 

William, 245 
Leavitt, Charles A., 201 
L6crivain, Anne, 107 
Lee, Charles, 223 

Frances Howey, 150 

James, 150 

Major-General, 300 
Leland, Eleazar, 97 

Zilpah H., 97 , 



Lemoine, Captain, 100 
Le Monnier, Marie Felicie, 264- 
266 

Dr. Y. R., 265 
Leonard, Cordelia Amelia, 294 
Lewis, Birdsey, 131 

Thompson, 131 
Lind, Henrietta Adelaide, 244, 245 
Linnell, Alice Isabel, 203 

Joshua, 203 
Litch, Edwin Ruthvin, 402 

John, 402 
Littlefield, Abigail, 403 
Locke, Abel, 236 

Henry, 236 
Logue, Mary Ann, 21 1-2 13 
Longfellow, E., 243 
Longley, Sarah Churchill, 175 
Longstreet, General, 298 
Loomis, George Franklin, 269 

Joel, 169 

Josiah, 269 

Roger, 169 

Warren, 269 
Lord, Robert, 5 
Lovejoy, Captain Henry, 314, 317 

William, 24, 45 
Lovell, Thomas, 5, 6 
Lovering, Ruth A., 55 
Lovett, Bevilah, 81, 83, 89 

John, 245 

Mary Lucretia, 245 

Phinehas, 81 
Lucas, Ira, 269 

Matilda, 269, 270, 274, 275 
Lymebumer, Nanc}^, 119 
Lyon, Elisha, 80 

Judah L., 80 



M 



McAlpine, C. G., 332 

Daniel, 332 
McCall, James A., no 

William Alexander, no 
McClellan, Nancy, 245 
McClure, Lucretia, 137-139, i4S. 
148, 149 

Thomas, 137 
McCoUom, Duncan, 99, 282 
McCollumn, Catherine, 282, 284, 
293, 297, 298 

Daniel, 282 
McComb, John, 255 

Matilda, 254, 255 
McCormick, Samuel James, 366, 
386 ,.. ., 



Index 



429 



McCurdy, Elizabeth, 247 
McEntyre, Christya, 182, 183 

Daniel, 183 
McKenzie, Grace, 120 
McKnight, John, 183 
McNab, Mary, 216, 217 

Robert, 216 
McNally, Thomas, 104 
McSween, Bessie Amelia, 214 

Ronald, 214 
Magoon, Charles W., 204 

Elvira, 203 
Manley, Emma J., loi , 

Mann, John, 154 

Nathaniel, 154, 260 

Captain Sabin, 79 
Manning, Dean, 305 

Sarah Ann, 128 
Manzer, Clarinda Peters, 184 

John, 184 

Manly, 184 
Marache, Hannah, 87 
Marks, Joseph, 153, 156 
^ Mary, 153-156, 177, 257, 

304, 307 
Marriner, Mary, 112 
Marshall, Holle, 349 
Martel, Jane, 229, 231 
Martell, Esther, 207, 208 
Martin, John, 51 

Rupert, 272 

Samuel, 19 

William, 272 
Mason, John W., 242 
Maxey, William P., 175 

Zenas, 175 
Maynard, Ephraim, 90 

Eunice, 90 

Hannah, 98 

Lydia, 90, 91, 96 

Mary Susan, 94 

Simeon, 98 
Maynardier, Katharine E., 148 
Mead, Eliza, 171 

General, 204 
Means, Frederick S., 130 

Matthew, 130 
Mears, Emily A., 203 
Meech, Joshua, 99 
Meloney, John, 204 
Mercein, Rosalie, 142 
-Mereau, Lois, 122 
Merrill, Calvin, 294 

Frank, 279 

Lucy Eliza, 294 

Molly, no 

Wadsworth, 279 



Merritt, Susan, 290, 291 
Mighill, Margaret Wilson, 34 
Miles, Noah, 243 
Miller, John, 300 

Nathaniel Jones, 131 

Nathaniel Jones, Jr., 131 

Ruth Lovett, 300-303 
Missant, Rachel, 229, 230 
Mitchell, , 235 

Mary A., 279, 280 

William, 279 
Mollegen, Lillian Catherine, 266 
Moore, Abigail, 89 

James, 89 

Josiah, 89 

Thomas H., 197 
Moreau, Abigail, 304, 306 
Morgan, Alanson, 283 

Edward, 205 

Gertrude Cheneverd, 148 

William Henry, 148 
Morris, Charles, 70 

Sarah, 70, 71 
Morse, Beulah, 81 

Captain, 78 

Margaret, 78 

Samuel, 78 
Morton, Ellen (Cousens), 122 

Robert, 122 
Moseley, Abner, 181 
Mostelle, Theodore, 224 
Moultrop, Mary Ann, 293 

Solomon, 293 
Mowry, John S., 297 

Samuel, 297 

Stephen Jared, 297 
Muggah, Annie, 208, 209 

Elizah, 215-217, 219, 220 

Captain John, 205 

Captain William, 206 
Mulling, Augusta Josephine, 220 
Murphy, Kathleen, 248 
Murry, Elizabeth (Phelps), 159 
Murtough, Henry F., 331 

N 

Nash, Charles H., 255 

John R., 255 
Nauman, William H., 238 
Neal, Hannah, 396, 397, 400 
Nelson, Hannah, 336 

Margaret, 192, 193, 195 
Newton, Levi Colby, 335 

Solomon, 335 
Nickels, Jeremiah O., 131 

Reuben, 131 



430 



Index 



Nisbet, Jane S., 219 
Norman, Mary, 399 

, 400 

Norton, Frank Warren, 117 

Stephen, 118 

William, 5, 15 

O 

Oliver, Hannah, 351 
Ord, Mary Elizabeth, 256 
Ormond, Bridget, 213 
Ormsby, Etta C, 199 

Mary, 199 

Rufus P., 199 
Osborne, Amos, 402 

Nancy, 402 
Osgood, Abby, 121 

Captain Christopher, 23-26, 

152, 153 

Deborah, 37 

Elizabeth (Betsey), 117 

Hannah, 53, 102 

Hooker, 19 

John, 17, 23, 24, 27 

Joseph, 44-46, 121 

Mary, 17 

Stephen, 16, 44, 45 

Thomas, 24 
Otis, Amos T., 175 

A. Thatcher, 175 
Overmann, Christian Frederick, 
244 

Henry John, 244 
Owen, Amos, 306 

Dorothy, 306 

Elizabeth, 258 

Hannah, 257, 258. 261 

L., 114 

Silas, 257, 258 



Page, , 343 

Mary, 398 
Paine, Naomi, 69 
Parker, Jacob, 54 

Mary, 118 
Parlee, William, 125 
Parmerly, Ira, 159 
Parr, Captain Andrew H., 247 

Parthenia Calhoun, 247 
Partridge, Ellison L., 121 

Washington Irving, 121 
Paterson, Brigadier-General, 320 
Patrick, Elizabeth P., 234, 235 
Patten, Julia, 97 

Polly, 116 



Payne, Orilla, 221, 222, 230- 

232 
Peabody, Francis, 61 

Sarah, 102 
Pearl, Abigail, 112 
Pearse, Willjam, 5 
Pease, Samuel, 178 
Peasley, Abraham, 341 

Sarah, 341, 342 
Peirce, George, 243 
Penniman, Eleanor, 66, 67 

Elijah, 81 

Josiah, 81 

Lovett, 81 
Pennock, Samuel, 155 
Pepalow, John, 64 
Perkins, Abraham, 42, 357 

Beamsley, 42 

Phebe, 61 

Phebe Peters, 42, 49, 50 

Sally, 131 

Timothy, 42, 49, 61 
Perry, Joseph, 241 

Maria, 135 

Silas, 241 
Peter, Captain, 406 

Elisha, 406 

John, 406 

Josiah, 406 

Thomas, 406 
Peters, Abbey Louisa, 244 

Abbie Eleanor, 343 

Abbie M., 220 

Abby, 80 

Abel, 404 

Abigail, 65, 66, 162, 168, 284, 

345. 403 
Abigail Orrel, 174, 175 
Abigail S., 279 
Abigail Thompson, 163, 173 
Absalom, 268 
Absalom, General, 158, 241- 

244, 250, 254 
Absalom Oliver, 311, 313 
Ada L., 290 
Ada Mary, 217 
Adam, 63-65, 77-80 
Adolphus, 91, 96 
Adrian, 128 
Albert, 213 
Albert E., 343. 344 
Albert H., 94 
Albert Jarvis, 262 
Albert Kimble, 104 
Albert Richard, 105 
Alberta Louise, 256 
Alexander, 66-68 



Index 



431 



Peters (Continued) 

Alexander Abercrombie, 66, 

69-71 
Alexander Hamilton, 127- 

129 
Alfred, 404 
Alfred Langdon, 127 
Alice, 140 
Alice Lillian, 144 
Alice Manning, 238 
Alice McClnre, 150 
Alice Richmond, 142 
Alma Maria, 119 
Almira Parker, 116 
Alonzo T., 225 
Alvah Henry, 198-200 
Amanda, 230, 263 
Amasa, 306 
Amey, 139 
Amos, 405 

Amy, 77, 78, 79, 81, 392 
Andrew, 305-307, 311-315, 

349-351. 353. 387. 388, 

390, 391, 394, 397. 402 
Andrew (Colonel), 41, 63-65, 

81-83, 89 
Andrew (Peters), i-io, 14- 

16, 19-35. 37. 41. 49. 50. 

56, 57, 61-65, 81-83, 89. 

99, 102-106, 108, 113, 

129, 131, 132, 134, 135, 

140, 144, 155, 156, 158, 

159, 164, 206 
Reverend Andrew, 10, 14, 41, 

49. 50. 56. 57.61,62,406 
Andrew Barnet, 186, 189- 

192, 196, 197, 200, 201- 

203, 221, 240, 
Andrew Bliss, 190, 200 
Andrew C, 167 
Andrew H., 202, 203 
Andrew James, 137, 149 
Andrew James, Jr., 149 
Andrew Otis, 165, 167 
Andrew Vincent, 105 
Andrew Washington, 88 
Ann, 204, 206, 406 
Ann Barnet, 187, 189 
Ann Christina, 234 
Ann Eliza, 192 
Ann Maria, 130, 324 
Ann Mary, 215 
Ann Webb, 10 1 
Anna, 190, 221 
Anna Elizabeth, 92 
Anna L., 69 
Anna S., 280 



Anne, 211 

Annie, 223 

Annie Charlotte, 133 

Annie Maria, 225 

Annis, 177, 183 

Anson, 115 

Anthony, 231 

Aphia, 113 

Aphia Brown, 116 

Ariel, 103 

Arthur, 121, 292, 406 

Arthur Gardner, 73 

Arthur Mulling, 220 

Arthur N., 194 

Arthur Silver, 106 

Arthur Webster, 336 

Arthur W., 201-203 

Augusta Blanche, 220 

Augusta Maria, 117, 391 

Augustus, 83, 84, 122 

Augustus Connate , 117, 121, 

122 
Austin, 150, 211, 212, 227, 

228 
Azubah, 267, 311 
Barnabas Coombs, 322, 323, 

325. 328, 329 
Barnet, 221, 222, 234, 236 
Beamsley, 41, 42, 49, iii 
Belvard John, 405 
Bemslee, 155, 156, 160, 177- 

183, 268, 368, 389, 390 
Bemsley, 61 
Benjamin, 51-55, 63, 65, 75, 

76, 98, 181, 395-402 
Benjamin, Jr., 399 
Benjamin E., 352, ^.$3 
Benjamin Franklin, 263-266 
Benjamin Franklin, Jr., 265, 

266 
Bennory, 224 
Bertha Borodell, 253 
Bertha Louise, 95 
Bessie, 230, 280 
Bessie Amelia, 214 
Bessie Otis, 172 
Bethia, 311, 395, 396, 399 
Betsey, 407 
Betsey E., 122 
Betsey Purkitt, 234 
Betsey S., loi 
Beulah, 288 
Beiilah Lovett, 83 
Birdie, 291 
Blanche, 220 
Branch Eldrich, 217 
Bryan Forman, 142 



432 



Index 



Peters {Continued) 
Csesar, 260, 261 
Captain, 407 
Caroline, 130, 169, 210 
Caroline A., 272, 274 
Caroline Cora, 245 
Caroline Maria, 124, 125, 391 
Caroline Phinney, 235, 236 
Caroline Robison, 237 
Carrie A., 230 
Carrie Eliza, 72 
Carrie Louise, 203 
Carrie Otis, 173 
Carrie Whitney, 303 
Catherine, 184, 205 
Catharine B., 283 
Catherine Co veil, 246 
Catherine E., 285 
Catherine Eliza, 293 
Catherine Isabel, 215 
Chancey, 291 
Dr. Charles, 403 
Charles, 129, 131, 132, 135, 

223, 229, 230, 391, 392, 

404 
Charles Adams, 84, 85 
Charles Albert, 73, 74 
Charles B., 289 
Charles Blanchard, 118 
Charles Bradley, 146, 147 
Charles C, 211, 212 
Charles Edward, 197-199 
Charles Franklin, 200 
Charles Henry N., 199 
Charles Herbert, 220 
Charles Ives, 72, 74 
Charles Joseph, 72-74, 194 
Charles McNab, 216 
Charles Morris, 70 
Charles Muggah, 217, 219 
Charles R., 227 
Charles Rolla, 245, 248 
Charles Rolla, Jr., 248 
Charles S., 165 
Charles Thomas, 238, 239 
Charles Tilden, 117, 122, 123 
Charles W., 165, 167, 168 
Charles William, 88 
Charles Willis, 287, 288 
Charlotte, 107, 113, 127 
Charlotte Abigail, 70, 71 
Charlotte Eliza, 217 
Charlotte R., 125 
Cicely Frances, 105 
Clara Augusta, 117 
Clara Emma, 201 
Clara Howard, 131 



Clarence Henry, 120 
Clarence N., 207, 208 
Clarinda, 177, 179, 180, 183, 

184 
Clarissa, 106, 326 
Clarissa (Clara) Elizabeth, 

117 
Clinton Noyes, 239 
Comfort, 319, 320 
Cora Maria, 94 
Cordelia, 339 
Corinne, 263 
Cornelia Appleby, 129 
Cornelia Eliza, 216 
Cornelia R., 273 
Courtney Chester, 176, 177 
Daniel, 81, 83, 88, 89, 103, 

108, 113, 123-126, 270, 

275. 276, 390, 391 
Daniel C, 190, 196 
Daniel Kimball, 109 
Daniel McEntyre, 183 
Daniel Phelps, 276, 278, 279 
Daniel Porter, 123, 125 
Daniel W., 343- 344 
David, 267, 269, 270, 274, 

275 
David, Jr., 406 
David, Sr.. 406 
David McGregore Rogers, 189 
David William, 275 
Deborah, 88, 306, 307 
Delia, 297, 327 
Desdemona (Destimony) ,178 
Dewight, 292 
De Witt C, 286, 292 
De Witt Clinton, 245, 248, 

249 
Dewitt I., 291 
Dolly P., 312 
Dora>i48 
Dorothy, 150, 303 
Druzilla, 333 
Dudley Bridges, 123 
D wight, 289 
Dyer, 113 
Earle, 325 
Ebenezer, 395, 407 
Eber, 282-284, 293, 297-299 
Eber Hanna, 287 
Eber Samuel, 283, 284, 287, 

293, 294, 296 
Eber Seth, 287 
Edgar, 230 
Edith, 291, 292, 343 
Edmond, 206 
Edmond C, 225 



Index 



433 



Peters (Continued) 

Edinond Fanning, i86, 191, 

203, 204, 234, 237-239 
Edmond Frank, 203 
Edmond Howard, 218 
Edmond Lothaire, 237, 239 
Edmond W., 207 
Edmund, 128 
Edmtmd Randolph, 220 
Edward Augustus, 121 
(Edward) Dyer, 113, 137- 

139, 145, 147. 149. 388, 

391, 393 
Edward Dyer, 145-147 
Edward Dyer, Jr., 137-139 
Edward Gould, 138, 139 
Edward James, 131, 134, 135 
Edward McClure, 140, 144, 

146 
Edward McClure, Jr., 144 
Edward Pay son, 251 
Edward Southard, 73 
Edwin H., 222, 230, 231 
Edwin R., 93 
Effie, 92 
Eleanor, 68 
Eleanor Bradley, 144 
Elinor, 350 

Eliza, 54, 76, 99. 268, 335, 398 
Eliza Ann, 323 
Eliza Jane, 269, 270, 275 
Eliza Margaret, 216 
Elizabeth, i, 32, 33, 53, 140, 

168, 172, 223, 229, 232, 

247. 257- 258, 315, 331, 

338, 345. 35O' 399- 400, 

402, 404 
Elizabeth Augusta, 120 
Elizabeth Clark, 134 
Elizabeth Glean, 255 
Elizabeth Lovering, 121 
Elizabeth Pritchard, 197 
Elizabeth R., 210 
Elizabeth Winslow, 145 
Ella E., 290 
Ella Mary, 122 
Ellen, 210, 213 
Ellen (Eleanor) Bradley, 146 
Ellen Louise, 237 
Ellen R., 174 
EUinor May, 230 
Elmer, 292 
Eloisa Paine, 127 
Emily, 107, 169, 223 
Emily J., 124 
Emily "Louise, 249 
Emily Ruth, 250 



Emily S., 210 
Emma Clare, 292 
Emma Eliza, 74 
Emma F., 329 
Emma L., 334 
Emma Mary, 209 
Emma Pearl, 288 
Emma S., 290 
Ephraim, 91, 406, 407 
Ephraim Dyer, 123 
Essie, 325 
Esther, 396, 399 
Ethel Florence, 199 
Eugene, 86, 87 
Eva B., 227 
Eva May, 202 
Eve, 63-65 
Everett Foster, 336 
Fannie, 334 
Fannie Roberts, 133 
Fanny, 332 . . . 

Finis, 63-65 
Florence, 132, 165 
Florence E., 167, 195 
Floretta, 291 

Franc Noble Monnell, 294 
Frances, 140 
Frances Louisa, 108 
Frances Margaretta, 251 
Frances Marion, 245 
Francis, 123 

Francis Alonzo, 137, 149-151 
Francis E., 213 
Francis R., 328, 329 
Frank, 291 
Frank Arthur, 202 
Frank H., 225, 226, 289 
Frank Henderson, 246 
Frank M., 194 
Frank Reed, 150 
Franklin, 245 
Franklin Armstrong, 244 
Frazier Forman, 143 
Fred Henry, 194 
Frederick C, 343, 344 
Frederick Dennison, 253 
Frederick H., 280 
Frederick S., 207, 208 
Frederick Watson, 146, 147 
Freeman S., 91 
Gabriella Brooke Forman, 142 
Galen H., 225, 226 
Garret Eber, 293, 294 
Genevra Mary, 300 
George, 89-92, 96, 168, 171, 
172, 211, 212, 229, 399, 
,•;; . 400, 405 



434 



Index 



Peters (Continued) 

George Absalom, 251, 253, 

254, 255 
George Chase, 237, 238 
George Co veil, 244, 246 
George Edward, 209 
George Edwin, 72, 74 
George G., 227, 228 
George Gorham, 145 
George H., 176, 177, 353 
George Haswell, 137, 145 
George James, 220 
George Lem.uel, 119 
George Lewis, 91, 92 
George Llewellyn, 301, 302 
George M., 195 
George Muggah, 215, 219 
George Otis, 172 
George Pierce, 241, 250 
. George Quincy, 149 
George Robert, 192 
George Stevens, 130, 134 
George W., 343 
Gertrude, 293 
Gertrude Cheneverd, 148 
Gertrude L., 97 
Gilbert, 394, 395 
Governor John Samuel, 259, 

389, 390. 392, 393 
Grace, 247 

Hamilton Lovett, 245 

Hannah, 50-52, 53, 57, 61, 

62, 76, 77, 82, 89, 99, 

103, 108, III, 179, 180, 

190. 257-259, 282, 316, 

33^> 333' 338. 351. 398, 

401 
Hannah Breck, 86 
Hannah Delvena, 257 
Hannah Elizabeth, 52 
Hannah Frothingham, 115, 

116, 120 
Hannah Jemima, 342 
Hannah Kimball, 107 
Hannah Maria, 92 
Hannah More, 88 
Hannah Phipps, 84 
Hannah Usher, 341 
Harold, 149 
Harriet, 104, 127 
Harriet Adaline, 251 
Harriet Angelique, 263 
Harriet Augusta, 262 
Harriet Louisa, 71 
Harriet Smith, 70 
Harriet Upton, 130 
Harry Kneeland, 294, 295 



Hattie Louise, 296 
Helen, 142, 206, 295 
Helen Augusta, 69 
Helen Frances, 131, 245 
Helen Margaret, 193 
Helen Maria, 73 
Helen R., 290 
Henrietta Erminie Albertina, 

261 
Henry, 207, 213, 223, 400 
Henry Adams, no 
Henry Burbank, 238, 239 
Henry Cogell, 247 
Henry Edmond, 217, 218 
Henry Franklin, 117, 120 
Henry Harrison, 339, 340 
Henry Hunter, 137, 144-147 
Henry Hunter, Jr., 146 
Henry Moore, 186, 221, 222, 

230, 232 
Henry Nelson, 193, 194 
Henry Pierce, 211, 212 
Herbert, 210 
Herbert E., 225 
Hetty, 401 
Hiram, 104 
Horace Hatch, 251 
Horace L., 340 
Horatio, 327 
Horatio Nelson, 217 
Hubert, 140 
Hugh, 86, 87, 163, 170, 171, 

188, 256, 300, 302, 365, 

367 . ^A^ 

Hugh Albert, 262 
Hugh C^'^ardine, 301, 302 
Hugh D., 279-281 
Hugh Eber, 294, 296 
Hugh Florien, 165, 166 
Hiddah, 291 

Ida, 126 ; 

Ida Augusta, 121 
Ida Belle, 185 
Ida L., 278, 279 
Ida S., 290 
Ignatius Kemble, 106 
Ira, 269, 274, 275 
Irene, 91 
Irene Abigail, 95 
Irene Freeman, 93 
Isaac Alexander, 72, 74 
Isaac Cruse, 134 
Isabel, 140, 142 
Isabel Sutherland, 209 
Israel, 407 
Ithiel Town, 165 
Jacob, 76, 330-332, 335-337 



Index 



435 



Peters {Continued) 

James, 112, 115, 206, 210- 
212, 309, 314-322, 324, 
326, 328, 329, 340, 397, 
398, 400, 404, 407 

James A., 211 

James C, 352 

James Hugh, 251, 255, 256 

James Hull, 293, 296 

James Lee, 150 

James Milton, 285, 288, 289 

James Robert, 216 

James Samuel Rogers, 189 

James Scott, 288 

James W., 327, 32S 

James WhitelaAV, 241 

Jane, 138, 139, 229, 401 

Jane S., 172 

Janette, 327 

Jared H., 193 

Jeannette, 183, 184 

Jennie E., 219 

Jephthah, 322 

Jeremy, no, in 

Jervis T., 279 

Jesse, 322, 326, 327 

Jessie Louise, 296 

Jessie Townsend, 176 

Jethro, 63-65, 89, 90, 98 

Joan St. Michael Forman, 

143 
Joanna Sutherland, 139 

Joel N., 223, 226-228 

Joel S., 227, 228 

John, I, 2, 16, 23, 24, 26, 29, 

31-34, 37. 38, 41, 48, 49, 
61, 75, 83, 102, 103, 106, 
107, no, n2-ii6, 123, 
127, 129, 137, 153, 186, 
188-191, 206, 209-212, 
214, 257, 268, 269, 304, 
307, 311, 312, 322, 326, 
33^^ 333-33^, 340-344, 
349-351, 353-356, 369, 
388-394, 397, 399-402, 
406, 407 

Colonel John, 154, 156-160, 
161, 178, 186-189, 204, 
221, 233, 239, 241, 243, 
267, 268, 276, 311, 366- 
386, 405 

John, Jr., 113, 127-129 138 

John A., 352 

John Alva, 296 

John Andrew, 130, 132, 133, 

165 
John Andrew, Jr., 135 



John Clinton, 249 

Dr. John, 406 

John Eddy, 84, 85 

John F., 227, 228 

John Foster, 335, 336 

John G., 93, 95 

John Gerard, 294, 296 

John Grant, 215-217 

John Hamilton, 116 

John Hathaway, 132 

John Henry, 293-296 

John Howe, 91, 96, 97 

John Hugh, 108, 162, 163 

John Lovett, 84 

John Melville, 97 

John Miller, 300, 303 

John Moore, 232, 233 

John Parris, 120 

John Peter, 356 

John Punnett, 140-143 

John Punnett Forman, 142 

JohnQ., 328 

John Robert, 204, 213 

John Rogers, 241, 244-248 

John Rogers, Jr., 244, 247 

John Samuel, 178, 180-182, 
1S3-185, 393 

John Thompson, 162-164, 
173-176, 282, 283, 298, 
299, 390 

John Thompson, Jr., 174, 
176, 177 

John W., 278-280 

Johnson Hill, 285, 288 

Jonathan, 155, 156, 162, 163, 
168-173', 304, 305, 368, 
399,400, 406 

Joseph, 42, 52, 63, 65, 66-69, 
82, 89, 100, 103, 109, 
no, 154, 156, 187- 231, 
232, 239, 240, 267, 270, 
282, 291, 299, 300, 304- 
310, 330, 338-340, 389 

Joseph Augustus, 300-302 

Joseph Chrysostom, 105 

Joseph Colby, 332, 337 

Joseph E., 227 

Joseph Edward, 202, 203 

Joseph Eli, 275 

Joseph Frank, 118 

Joseph Franklin, 273 

Joseph Henry, no 

Joseph Howard, 190, 200, 
201 

Joseph Huey, 288 
Joseph L., 284, 286, 287 
Joseph Le Monnier, 265 



436 



Index 



Peters (Continued) 

Joseph Parris, ii6, 119 
Joseph Phelps, 15S, 267- 

269 
Joseph Priestly, 169, 172 
Joseph Samuel, 217, 218 
Joseph Thompson, 66, 70-72, 

74 
Joseph Westcott, 120 
Josephine, 292 
Josiah, 406 
Josie, 335 
Josie Clark, 175 
Judith Brown, 323 
Julia, 90, 140, 297 
Julia Ann, 124 
Julia Augusta, 96 
Kate F., 207 
Kathleen Murphy, 248 
Kiah Bailey, 104 
Laura, 169, 170, 196, 234 
Laura E., 343 
Lauren W., 328, 329 
Lemuel, 113, 11 6-1 2 2 
Lemuel Edward Dyer, 116, 

118, 119 
Lemuel Ward, 119 
Leota, 325 
Lewis, 280 

Lewis Augustus, 84, 85 
Lewis I., 225, 226 
Libbie, 328 
Liddiah, 403 
Lillian Mary, 85 
Lillian May, 199 
Linda, 327 
Lizette F., 290 
Loda, 292 
Lois, 331 
Louisa, 106 
Louise, 230 
Louise Edgar, 256 
Lou Mav, 199 
Lovett, 81, 83, 85, 87, 88 
Lowell, 289 
Lowell Mason, 69 
Lucien Haynes, 150, 151 . 
Lucretia, 137, 139, 269 
Lucretia Matilda, 275 
Lucretia McClure Forman, 

143 
Lucy Gleason, 97 

Lucy Juliette, 323 
Lucy Malinda, 293 
Lucy Woods, 96 
Luther, 91-95, 341 
Luther Holman, 93, 94 



Lydia, 52, 55, 157, 222, 241, 

267, 270, 276, 305, 407 
Lydia Ann, 200 
Lydia Bliss, 192 
Lydia Brigham, 91 
Lydia E., 352 
Lydia M., 271 
Lydia P., 312 
Lydia Phelps, 279 
Major, 405 
Malcolm, 255 
Manley, 283, 297, 298 
Manley B., 285, 289 
Margaret, 31, 78, 129, 154, 

156, 158, 305 
Margaret A., 227 
Margaret Charlotte, 205 
Margaret Elizabeth, 250 
Margaret Flora, 193 
Margaret J., 195 
Margaret McGregore Rogers, 

189 

Margaret Rviss, 34, 37-41 

Maria Langdon, 115 

Maria Louise, 131 

Mariah Dickman, 175 

Marie Amire, 265 

Marie F61icie, 265 

Marie Louise, 284 

Marie Rogers, 246 

Marietta M., 277 

Marinda, 169 

Marion, 140 

Marion Frances, 74 

Mark, 403 

Marmion, 278-280 

Martha, 224, 297 

Martha Ann, 125, 271 

Martha Custis, 405 

Martha Nellie, 198, 200 

Mary (Mercy), i, 3, 19, 31 

Mary, i, 3, 17, 20, 29, 34, 
35. 51, 53. 63-65, 66, 
79, 80, 128, 154, 156, 

157, 183, 204-206, 238, 
242, 304, 305, 309, 315, 
316, 318, 319, 324, 330, 

345, 349> 350- 353- 392, 
395-402 

Mary A., 328 

Mary Alice, 134, 272 

Mary Ann, 196, 201, 216, 231, 

239, 285, 342 
Mary Ann Barnet, 188 
Mary Ann Waite, 233 
Mary Anne, 137, 148 
Mary Armstrong, 294 



Index 



437 



Peters {Continued) 

Mary Augusta, 95 

Mary C, 332 

Mary Cone, 169 

Mary Crawford, 218 

Mary E., 289 

Mary Edith, 74 

Mary Elizabeth, 70, 72, 128, 

130, 209, 210, 236, 251, 

261, 262 
Mary Ellen, 201 
Mary Emeline, 323 
Mary Emma, 203 
Mary Esther, 324 
Mary Frances, 117 
Mary Griswold, 297 
Mary H., 352 
Mary Harriet, 105 
Mary J., 195 
Mary Jane, 197, 271 
Mary Lizzie, 73 
Mary Lorrain, 244 
Mary Louise, 235 
Mary Lovett, 86 
Mary Martha, 178, 389, 390 
Mary Matilda, 232, 255 
Mary N., 400 
Mary O., 401 
Mary Osborne, 402 
Mary Otis, 163 
Mary Plympton, 83, 87 
Mary Rachel, 292 
Mary Rogers, 246 
Mary Sophie, 175 
Mary Tennessee, no 
Mary Teresa Hicks, 235 
Mary Warrin, 248 
Matilda Mary, 217 
Mattie, 288 
Maude Julia, 97 
Maurice, 148, 407 
May Frances, 125 
McClure, 146, 147 
Mehitabel, 103, 109 
Melinda, 283 
Mercein, 142 
Mercy (Marcy), i, 3, 7, 15, 

20, 28, 30, 31, 35, 
.36, 154, 156, 158, 160, 

161 
Mildred, 144 

Milo Robert, 193, 195, 196 
Minnie B., 290 
Minnie J., 195 
Minnie K., 69 
Minnie S., 201 
Mira Matilda, 124 



Molly, 112 

Moses, 65-67 

Moses Pillsbury, 123, 126 

Moses Sawyer, 331, 336 

Myra, 242 

Myrtlie Elizabeth, 263 

Myrthc Marie, 265 

Nancy, 104, 239, 397, 400 

Nancy B., 221 

Nancy E., 341 

Nancy Nelson, 193 

Naomah, 55 

Naomi, 53 

Nathan, 63-65, 98-101, 338, 

339 
Nathaniel, 43, 104, 107 

Nelhe, 289 

Nellie Chester, 175 

Nellie M., 280 

Nellie May, 195 

Nettie Bell, 95 

Nora Ellen, 123 

Norman, 282, 284-292 

Norman L, 286, 290, 291 

Obadiah, 316, 333-335- 346- 

348 
Olive, 78 
Oliver, 78, 80 
Ollie, 230 
Onslow, 83, 85-87 
Onslow Blake, 93, 94 
Orelia Jane, 232 
Orilla, 229, 231 
Orlando, 229 
Ormond, 221—224, 226, 228 

229 
Otis, 170 
Otis Sewall, 126 
Otis Thompson, 169 
Patience, 231 
Patty, 54 
Pauline, 148 
Pauline Marie, 247 
Peace, 90, 98 
Pearl Lawrence, 118 
Pearl Spoft'ord , 1 1 6 - 1 1 8 , 

392 
Persis Abigail, 323 
Peter, 90, 399 
Peter Edward, 205, 215-217, 

219, 220 
Phebe, 41, 42, 49, 102, 112, 

154, 156, 157, 241, 308 
Phebe Ann, 124, 132 
Phebe Billings, 123 
Polly, 98 
Prudence Bullen, 67 



438 



Index 



Peters (Continued) 
Putnam, 107 
Rachel, 81, 89, 305 
R. Chastina, 193 
Rebecca, 80 
Rebecca Frances, 109 
Rebecca Wyles, 174 
Reuben, 322-325 
Rev. Richard, 404 
Rhoda, 339 
Richard, 394-396, 402-404, 

407 
Richard Alexander, 220 

Richard Burke, 216, 220 

Richard Dudley, 148 

Richard Dudley, Jr., 149 

Robert, 206-208 

Robert A., 207 

Robert Crary, 99-101 

Robert Howard, 301, 302 

Rodney Ira, 272, 274 

Roxana Myra, 275 

Royal, 66, 68 

Rufus Bailey, 123, 124 

Rufus S., 272, 274 

Ruth, 303, 304, 317, 342, 345, 
349, 402, 403 

Ruth McClure, 150 

Sabin Pond, 123 

Salem Towne, 116 

Sally, 98, 113, 129, 130, 340, 

391 
Sally Carney, 104 
Sally Clarkson, 140 
Sally Hannah, 262 
Samuel, i, 2, 17, 19, 23, 25. 

29-31. 37. 41-49. 51-56, 
61, 63, 78, 102, III, 112, 
155. 156, 158, 159. 161, 
186, 190, 192, 193, 195. 
204-215, 268, 307-309, 
396—400, 402, 406 

Rev. Samuel, 69,, 155, 156, 
160, 178, 179, 191, 257- 
260, 261, 368, 392 

Samuel Andrew, 162, 168, 
173-176,258,390 

Samuel Andrew, Jr , 173 

Samuel E., 223-226 

Samuel Eber, 277, 278 

Samuel G., 207, 208 

Samuel I., 227, 22S 

Samuel Jarvis, 262-266 

Samuel Joseph, 215, 217- 
219 

Samuel R., 211, 212 

Samuel W., 225 



Sarah, 77, 80, loi, 102, 107^ 
no, 130, 309, 317, 331, 

333' 345. 389. 397. 403. 

407 
Sarah Adelaide, 74 
Sarah Ann, 275 
Sarah BuUen, 68 
Sarah Byles, 234 
Sarah Cushman (Kate), 174 
Sarah E., 185, 334, 352 
Sarah Elizabeth, 68, 131 
Sarah Ellen, 214 
Sarah Fla villa, 121 
Sarah Jane, no, 124, 324 
Sarah Maria, 196 
Sarah P.. 311 
Sarah Phipps, 87 
Sarah Popelia, 158, 159 
Sarah W., 332 
Seaborn, 314, 315 
Seavems, 314 
Seberance, 314, 315 
Seberence (Sibbons?), 29 

33 
Sebom, 315, 316 
Sebome. 314, 315, 346 
Sewall Everett, 126 
Seward, 289 
Sibbons, 314, 330 
Sibyl, 81 
Silvia, 81 
Simeon, 53, 401 
Simeon Andrew, 311, 313 
Simeon Blanchard, iiS 
Simeon Parker, 117 
Simon, 350-352, 404 
Solon, 295 
Sophia, 236 
Sophie Louise, 202 
Sophronia Jane, 272 
Stephen William, 271-273 
Susan, 326, 341, 399 
Susan Ann, 400 
Susan Augusta, 197 
Susan Clara, 125 
Susan Elizabeth, 107, to8 
Susan Hamilton, 128 
Susan Paulina, 287 
Susan Tucker, 237 
Susan Tyler, 86 
Susanna, 109, 157 
Susanna H., 352 
Susannah, 307, 399 
Tabitha G., 338 
Taphenes, 63-65 
Thankful, 322 
Theodore B., 227, 228 



I 



Index 



439 



Peters (Continued) 

Theodore C, 286, 291 
Theodore Cui'tis, 299-303 
Theodore Lewis, 255, 256 
Thomas, 129, 404, 405 
Thomas Andrew, 213 
Thomas Hugh, 123 
Thomas McClure, 137, 139, 

140, 142, 144. 146 
Thomas McClure, Jr., 140, 

144 
Thomas McClure Format! , 

142 
Timothy, 54, 55 
Valentine, 404 
Viola, 327 
Wallace A., 225 
Walter, 292 
Walter H., 335 
Walter Hicks, 235 
Warren Sibley, 93, 94 
Warrin Hugh, 248 
Whitman Spurgeon, 214 
I Willard, 106 

Wilham, i, 19, 23, 24, 29, 34, 
37-41, 49. 61, 63-65, 75- 
81, 83, 89, 90. 104, 105, 
109, 112, 152-154, 156, 
158, 159, 184, 186, 190, 
192, 197-199, 206, 211, 
212, 231, 234-236, 242, 
254. 255, 263, 276-278, 
282, 304-306, 311, 312, 
314, 316-318, 329-334, 
339. 344-346, 367- 394, 
395. 398. 403. 404 
William A., 272, 274 
William Absalom, 273 
William Bamet, 236 
William Barnet Tryon, 186, 

233-237 
William Birdseye, 258, 261- 

263 
William B onaventure , 105, 

106 
William Bourne, 131, 135, 

136 
William Chute, 135, 136 
William Cowper, 137, 147, 

148 
William Curtis, 84, 85 
William D., 342 
William E., 284, 286 
William Earle, 324, 325 
William Edward, 216, 219 
William Ernest, 195, 196 
William Francis. 197, 198 



William George, 217, 218 
William Grant, 209 
William H., 335, 340 
William Henry^ 88, 232, 233, 

388,405 
William Hugh, 175, 269-272, 

274, 277 
William J., 106 
William Le Monnier, 265 
William Morgan, 148 
(William) Morris Austin, 150, 

151 
William N., 227 
William Richmond, 139, 142 
William Richmond, Jr., 142 
William S., 98 
William Sherman, 185 
William Theodore, 249 
William Thompson, 163-167 
William Thompson, Jr., 165, 

166 
William W., 223, 226 
William Ward, 117, 122 
William Wentworth , 222, 

232, 233 
William York, 138, 139 
William York, Jr., 139 
Willis E., 343 
Wry (William), i 
Zia, 267 
Zora, 325 

Petter, Ebenr., 406 

Petties, James, 406 

Petts (Pettis, Pittis), John, 406 

Petty, Addison Louis, 247 
Asbury Lewis, 247 

Phelps, , 261 

Betsey, 96 
Elizabeth, 159 
Ichabod, 276 
John, 188, 367 
Jonathan, 159, 161 
Joseph, 157, 160, 161 
Julia Ann, 96 

Lydia, 157, 158, 160, 161, 186, 
267, 276-278. 311, 372, 

374 

Rhoda, 277, 278 

Samuel, 96 
Phillips, Ebenezer, 336, 337 

Lois M., 336 

Sarah W. E., 337 
Phipps, Hannah, 83 
Pierce. Hiram, 344 
Pike, Rev. John, 37 
Pinal (Pinet ?) , Captain Philip, 399 
Pitman, Nathaniel, 400 



440 



Index 



Pitt, William, 259 
Plimpton, Olive, 77 
Plympton, John, 77 

Mary, 83, 85, 87, 88 

Silvanus, 83 
Polk, General, 265 
Pollard, Andrew, 84 

Lucy, 84 
Poloquonnonquet, Peter, 243 
Pond, Eli, 113 

Sabin, 113 
Poor, Catherine, 399 

Daniel, 19 

Peter, 54, 104 
Porter, Elijah, 61 

Mary, 242 

Mary S., 137 

Pelatiah, 242 
Potter, ]^unice, 17 

Lewis, 184 

Mary, 80 
Prentiss, Rev. Thomas, 64 
Presson, John, 19 
Preston, Colonel Albert William, 
256 

Alberta Louise, 256 
Price, Abigail, 80 

Edward, 80 

Pritchard, , 311 

Punderson, Ebenezer, 155 
Purington, John F., 237 
Purkitt, Mary, 233, 235-237 
Putnam, General Israel, 106 

Jonathan, 22 
Putten, William, 243 

Q 

Quiller, Joseph, 5 
Quincy, George, 149 
Priscilla Rice, 149 

R 

Randal, Amanda, 280 
Ralphe, John, 243 
Rawson, , 312 

Chloe, 68 

Edw., 5, 7 
Raymond, Ann, 219 
Read, Colonel Joseph, 82 

Captain Thaddeus, 67 
Reed, Elvira, 150 
Reeve, Edmund, 271 

Thomas, 271 



Reeves, James Eyre, 88 

Mark, 88 
Remington, Henry W., 69 

Jefferson, 69 
Reynolds, Eliza, 198 
Rhodes, Absalom, 273 

Mary J., 273 
Rice, Frances, 149 

Susan, 80 
Rich, Charlotte, 132 
Richards, Catherine, 149 
Richardson, Abigail, 53 

Charlotte, 214 

Ellen F., 195, 196 

Jonathan, 53 

Orlena, 272 

Samuel, 272 

Solomon, 53 
Richmond, Alice Clarissa, 139, 
142, 144, 146 

Rev. William, 140 
Rikert, Julia A., 185 
Rite, Amos, 398 
Rix, James, 316 , 

Nathaniel, 316 
Robbins, Benjamin F., 196 
Roberts, Alice, 167, 168 

Hon. Amos M., 132 

Fanny Elizabeth, 132 

Jonathan, 400 
Robertson, Sarah, 224 
Robinson, Anne, 245 

Dane, 51 

Joseph, 19 

Mary, 51, 53 

Phebe, 19 
Rogers, , 188 

Colonel James, 188 

Lucre tia, 68 

Mary, 241, 244, 250, 254 

Nathaniel, 241 

William, 283 
Rollins, Daniel, 86 

Captain George, 127 

John F., 86 

John T., 127 

Mary, 86 
Root, Charles, 270 

Elmer, 279 

Frederick, 279 
Ross, Alexander C, 216 

John H., 137 

Mary S. (Porter), 137 

Sarah, 8 
Rowe, Dolly, 192 
Rowlee, Captain Abijah, 161 
Rudd, Captain, 161 



Index 



441 



Ruggles, Eliza E., 88 
Rush, Dr. Benjamin, 181 
Russ, John, 37 

(Russe), Margaret, 34. 37- 38, 

153 
Russel, James, 19 
Mary, 19, 87 
Moses B., 107 
Mr., 32 
Robert, 19 



Sady, John, 32 

Samuel, 32 
Salter, Dr. Malachi, 70 

Sarah Morris, 70, 71 
Saltonstall, Major, 55 
Sanborn, Joseph, 342 
Sanderford, Charles, 399 
Sanders, John, loi 

John Nelson, 10 1 
Sanderson, Rebecca, 72 
Sargent, Catharine, 130 
Sawyer, Mary, 335 

Priscilla, 115 
Scaif, Jane, 172 
Seagar, Paul H., 193 
Severance, Ebenezer, 329 

Lucy M., 328, 329 
Sewal, Stephen, 22 
Sewall, Rev. Charles C, 79, 392 

Judge, 28 

Samuel, 79 
Seymour, Martha, 257 
Sharpe, Amey Dexter, 139 

Lucien, 139 
Shatswell, Richard, 5, 6, 14 
Sheldon, Elizabeth, 292 

Sarah M., 289 
Sheppard, Elizabeth, 222, 223, 

226, 228, 229 
Sherman, Hugh, 183 

William, 183 
Shillaber, Hannah, 399 
Shipman, Annis, 177, 180, 182 

Ansel, 99 

Dr. Samuel, 177 
Shippen, Dr., 181 
Shute, Aaron, 314 
Sibbons, Elizabeth, 33 
Sibley, Hannah, 92 

Lydia E., 92 

Lyman, 92 
Silver, Cicely, 105 
Simmons, Charles, 126 



Skerry, Elizabeth, 399 
Skinner, Ann, 128 
Slack, Abner, 203 

Mary Ann, 203 
Slocomb, James, 55 

Nathan, 55 
Smith, Abbie, 284, 286, 287 
Edwin, 174 
Eleazer, 190 
Elizabeth, 398 
Rev. Frank W., 193 
Governor, 164 
Harriet E., 325 
Colonel John, 67 
Josiah, 325 
Mary Alma, 325 
Reuben F., 174 
Truman, 295 
Snellgrove, Rosamond, 171 
Snelling, Charlotte Gardiner, 119 

Washington Gardiner, 119 
Snowman, Alexander, 124 

Sewall Perkins, 124 
Southard, Helen Maria, 73 
Helen Mary, 73, 74 
Zibeon, 73 
Southworth, Martin, 100 
Rosalinda, 100, loi 
Spencer, George, 223 
Nathaniel, 221, 223 
Theopolis, 206 
SpofEord, Amos, 112 
Clara F., 340 
Daniel, 112 
Spooner, Bigford, 319 
Comfort, 319, 320 
Rhoda, 319 
Stackpole, Walter, 125 
Stagg, Elizabeth, 275 

Joseph, 275 
Standi ey, Ruth, 346 
Stanley, Betsey, 341 
Stark, General, 354, 355 
Steams, Elizabeth, 54. 55 
Lydia, 54 
Sarah, 340 
Timothy, 54 
Stephens, Rev. John, 120 
Stevens, Abiel, 107 
Abiel. Jr., 107 
Ann Maria, 92 
Benjamin, 19 
Elizabeth, 19 
Ephraim, 19 
Horace N., 108 
James, 102 
Jonathan, 407 



442 



Index 



Stevens {Continued) 

Joseph, 27 

Maria, 92 

Moses, 92 

Nathaniel, 108 

Sarah Peabody, 109 
Stewart, Joseph, 243 
Story, Daniel, 243 
Stoutenborough, Catharine Ma- 
tilda, 246 

Emily, 249 

William, 246 
Strickland, Jennie, 280, 281 
Strong, Deborah, 282, 305, 306 

Eleazer, Jr., 305 
Stuart, Elijah, 283 
Stubblefield, William, 270 
Sweet, Mary, 353 
Styles, Eliza, 206 
Sullivan, General, 161 
Sutherland, George R., 215 
Sutton, David, 157 

Phebe, 157 

Seth, 157 
Symonds, Rebecca, 241 

Samuel, 7 



Taft, Sarah, 31 1-3 13 
Tappan, Mary J. F., 198 
Tarleton, Andrew J., 201 
Taylor, General, 264 

James Truman, 245 

Jonathan, 318 

Nicholas Brink, 245 

Rhoda, 318, 319, 321 

Sara Eliza, 247 
Tebbets, Rev. Arthur, 119 

Benjamin F., 119 
Tenney, James G., 342 

Joshua, 338 

Moses, 342 
Thacher, Theodosia, 68 
Thaxter, Anna, 146 
t Edward, 145 

Susan Barker, 145, 146 

Susan Joy, 145 
Thayer, Jechonias, 138 

T. J., 326 
Thomas, Captain William, 262 
Thompson, Abigail, 65, 66, 69, 
162, 163, 168, 173, 388 

John, 162 

Jonathan, 65 

Stephen, 108 

Susanna, 108 



Thorn dike, Sarah, 113 
Thurber, Rebecca, 244 
Tibbetts, Sarah, 132 
Titus, Mary A., 343, 344 
Toplin, Hannah, 2,2)5 

Richard, 2?>2> 
Town, Etha L., 165-167 

Ithiel, 165 
Townsend, Rev. Jonathan, 64 

Mary E., 176, 177 

Thomas A., 176 
Trask, Abigail, 71, 72, 74 

Elizabeth, 399 

Minnie Augusta, 84, 85 

Joseph, 71 

Sarah, 55 
Treat, Selah, 163 

Selah Burr, 163 

Rev. Selah Burr, 388 
Trowbridge, Hannah, 42 
Trueworthy, James B., 193 
Trumbull, Asaph, 161 

Hannah, 161 

Colonel John, 159 

Mar)^, 276 
Tryon, Governor, 187 
Tucker, Abigail Vose, 133 

Celanda, 344 

Charit)'', 399 

Peter, 55 
Tuller, Abel, 277, 278 

Abigail, 278, 279 

Susan, 277 
Tuttle, Simon, 5, 6, 9, 14 
Tyler, Brigadier-General, 309 

General, 99, 161 

Hannah, 85 

Hannah Parkman, 85, 8 d' 

John Eugene, 85 

Colonel Nathan, 67 
Tyng, Jonathan, 37 

U 

Underwood, Frances, 400 
Upton, Abraham, 113 

Elias, 113 

Samuel, 114 
Usher, Hannah, 340, 341 

Robert, 340 

V 

Valentine, Frederick, 183 

Lucretia, 183, 184 
Van Dusen, Frances, 150 
Van Horn, Clarissa, 129 



Index 



443 



Vankirk, Joseph, 105 
Van Wagner, Maria, 75 
Viles, Frances Ann, 74 

James, 74 

Mary Ella, 74 
Vose, George, 133 

Prescott H., 133 

W 

Wainwright, Francis, 9 
Walker, Maria, no 

Russel G., 285 

Theresa, 288 

William, 315 
Ward, Albert S., 251 

General, 90 

William, 251 
Warden, Andrew, 192 
Ware, Esther, 81 
Warrin, John, 248 

Mary Watkinson, 248 
Washburn, Clarissa Culver, 200, 

201 
Watson, Daniel, 187 

Isabella, 187 

William, 187 
Webster, Peter, 124 
Weeks, Joseph, 232 
Welles, Annis, 389, 392 

Edmund, 309 

Prudence, 177 

vSarah, 309 

Thomas, 177 

Thomas, Jr., 177, 261 
Wells, Almira, 171, 172 

Colonel, 99 

Roswell, 171 
Wentworth, Governor, 187 
West, C. T., 326 

Hopkins, 307 

Moses, 307 

Sarah, 399 
Westcott, Archibald, 119 

Joseph. 118, 119 

Maria D., 118, 119 

Nancy, 119 

Sarah M., 119 
Wheeler, Mary, 241 
Wheelock, Abigail, 17 

Colonel Ephraim, 78 

Rev. Dr., 243 
Whitcomb, Anna, 91 

Lydia, 91 

Moses, 91 
White, Anna, 189 

George F., 327 



Sarah, 196 

Thomas, 8 
Whiting, Artemus, 92 

Merrick, 92 

Nabby, 92 

Sarah, 135 
Whitman, Ehzabeth Winslow, 145 

Nathan Brooks, 71 

Nathan Brooks, Jr., 71 
Whitney, Eleanor C, 343. 344 

Eli Martin, 149 

Isaac, 343 

James Frothingham, 303 

Mary Eskildson, 303 

Mary Richards, 149 
Whittemore, Abigail, 34 

Benjamin, 399 
Whittingham, John, 15 
Wilborne, Mary, 2-5 

Michael, 2 
Wilbourn, Anne, i 

Mary, 29 

Michael, i, 2, 3 
Wilkeson, John, 242 

Samuel, 242 

Wilkins, Rev. , 57 

Willard, Amos, 328 

Rebecca P., 328, 329 
Williams, Anna, 163 

Deborah, 87 

Laura, 342 

Melancie Anna, 145 

Oliver, 342 

Phebe Jane, 301, 302 

Samuel, 145 

William, 278 
Willson, Peter, 285 
Wilson, Isaac, 109 

James, 34, 37, 40, 41, i5S 

John, 45, 46 

John, Jr.,. 50 

Joseph, 23, 45 

Margaret, 34, 41 

Sarah Chandler, 17 

Thomas, 34, 41 
Winegar, Garret, 293 

Harriet, 293, 294, 296 
Winship, Mary Ann Waite Peters, 
233 

Seth, 233 
Winter, Alpheus, 176 

Mahlon A., 176 
Wistar, Dr., 181 
Wiston, Henry B., 86 
Wis well, Arno, 130 

Andrew Peters, 134 

John, 130 



444 



Index 



Wood, Betsey, 1 16-12 2 

Daniel, 132 

Frank P., 132 

John, 116 

Johnson, 116, 120 

Molly, 116 

Robert Haskell, 116 

Captain Samuel, 90 

Sarah Peters, 120 
Woodbridge, Benjamin, 25 
Woodman, , 26 

Mary, 131 
Woods, Isaiah C, 248 

Robert Joy, 248 
Woodward, , 329 

Anne, 128 

Ezekiel, 6 
Wright, Abigail, 33 

Dorothy, 33 

(Rite) Elizabeth, 19, 29, ^^ 

Hannah, in 



John, 45 

Joseph, 35, III 

Sarah, 33 

Walter, 15, 16, 19, 20, 24, 30, 

32, 33< 36 

Walter, Jr., 30 
Wyles, David, 173 

Orrel. 173, 174 
Wyman, Elizabeth, 400 



Yeats, Robert Thomas, 294 

Robert Thomas, Jr., 294 
York, Eunice, 138 
Yotuig, , 396 



Huldah, 308, 309 
John, 400 
Sarah J., 202 
Susannah, 396