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Petitions of the early inhabitants 
of Kentucky to the General ... 

James Rood Robertson, Virginia. General Assembly 



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JAMES ROOD ROBERTSON, M. A. Ph.D. 
Member of the Filson Club. 



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FILSON CLUB PUBLICATIONS No. 27 

Petitions of the Early 

Inhabitants of 

Kentucky 

TO THE 

General Assembly of Virginia 

1769 to 1792 



BY 



JAMES ROOD ROBERTSON, M.A.Ph.D. 

Member of the American Historical Assodation, the Pilson Club, 

the Ohio Valley Historical Society, and the Oregon 

Historical Society; Professor of History and 

Pblitical Science in Berea College. 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 
JOHN p. MORTON & COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

Printers to the Filson Club 




1914 





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.FA* 

COPYRIGHT, 1M6, 

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The Filson Club 

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Dedicated to 

THE PIONEERS OF KENTUCKY 

Men and women whose courage, endurance, and integrity 
laid well the foundations of our first common- 
wealth west of the Alleghany Mountains. 



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PREFACE 

THE petitions here printed are oflfered as a contribu- 
tion to the early period of Kentucky history. During 
a visit of the editor to Richmond, Virginia, in the summer 
of 1910, they were found in the archives of that State. 
The archivist had recently segregated them from a large 
mass of other material and an examination of the contents 
showed their value as a source of information on the 
beginnings of Kentucky. 

The petitions are printed verbatim, with the thought 
that they will be more useful and interesting to the student 
of history in the language of the pioneer inhabitants of 
our first Commonwealth west of the Alleghany Mountains. 
The editor has added foot-notes which may help to explain 
the purpose, the subject-matter, and the effect of the 
various petitions. 

The names attached to the petitions have been separated 
from them and arranged in alphabetical order, with num- 
bers referring to the petitions on which they appear. This 
saves considerable space, as many of the names are signed 
to two or more petitions. It also makes reference to them 
more easy. 

The appearance of the original material from which 
these petitions were copied may be seen in the facsimile 

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Preface 

of a petition from the settlers of Lincoln County. This is, 
however, better than the average in form and state of 
preservation. Many of the petitions are worn, the writing 
faded, and the style not so good as the illustration given. 

The wording of the petitions, though formal, is full of 
life and spirit, and in some cases reflects quaintness of 
expression. There is always a respectful deference for the 
authority of the Commonwealth of Virginia at the same 
time that freedom of speech is indulged. 

The petitions are printed in chronological order rather 
than topical, with the thought that the development of 
community life can best be seen in that way. The first 
petition is dated 1769 and the last 1831. Only two are 
earlier than 1776 and six later than 1792. Thus they are 
seen to pertain to the period when Kentucky was a County 
of Virginia and those of earlier and later date are logically 
connected with that period. Thus the collection presents 
a unity that is valuable. 

The collection does not include petitions which were 
sent to the National Government at Philadelphia or New 
York which have been used extensively in the printed 
histories of Kentucky, as they have been more accessible 
than the ones here printed. Nor is the collection entirely 
complete, as there are some laws, passed by the Assembly 
of Virginia, evidently based on petitions which have not 
been found. The collection, however, is essentially com- 
plete, and is fully representative of the activities of the 
pioneer population. 



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Preface 

I desire to express appreciation to the following for 
assistance rendered me in the preparation of this book: 
To William G. Frost, President of Berea College, for encour- 
agement and financial aid in gathering the material; to the 
late Colonel Reuben T. Durrett, formerly President of the 
Filson Club, for use of his extensive library; to R. C. Ballard 
Thruston, President of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
for his cordial interest and support; to the Filson Club and 
its officers for publication; to Doctor H. R. Mcllwain, 
Librarian of the State Library of Virginia, and Doctor H. J. 
Eckenrode, Archivist of State Library of Virginia, for cour- 
tesies in use of source material in the Virginia archives. 

James Rood Robertson. 
Berea College, 

Berea, Kentucky. 



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CONTENTS 



PAOR 

Introduction 1 

PETITION No. 1. Request of the inhabitants east of the Alleghany Moun- 
tains for sixty thousand acres of land in the upper valley of the Cum- 
berland River 35 

PBTition No. 2. Request of the inhabitants of Kentucky at Harrodsburg 

to be taken under the jurisdiction of Virginia 36 

Pbtition No. 3. Request of the Committee at Harrodsburg to be taken 

under the jurisdiction of Virginia 38 

PBTITION No. 4. Request of Thomas Slaughter and other inhabitants of 

Kentucky for a method of defense 41 

PETITION No. 5. Request of Hugh McGary for compensation for services 

rendered as a messenger to Fort Pitt 42 

PETITION No. 6. Request of the inhabitants of Kentucky for salt manu- 
factories 43 

Petition No. 7. Request of Nathaniel Henderson for compensation for a 

negro slave killed at Fort Boone 44 

Petition No. 8. Statement of grievances by inhabitants of Kentucky in 

regard to land laws and request for a remedy 45 

Petition No. 9. Statement of grievances by the inhabitants of Boone's 
Fort and request for a grant of six hundred and forty acres for town 
site and a board of trustees 48 

Petition No. 10. Request of Richard Calloway for the right to establish 

a ferry across the Kentucky River at Boonesborough 53 

Petition No. 11. Request of the inhabitants at the Falls of the Ohio 

River for an act to establish a town at that place 63 

Petition No. 12. Request of the inhabitants north of the Kentucky River 

for a division of the County of Kentucky * 65 

Petition No. 13. Request of George Rogers Clark for confirmation of a 
grant of thirty -six thousand acres of land northwest of the Ohio River, 
given to him by the Indians 67 

Petition No. 14. Request of the inhabitants of Lexington for a grant of 

land for a town site 60 

Petition No. 15. Statement of grievances by the inhabitants of Kentucky 
and a request either for a better government or independence from 
Virginia 62 

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Petition No. 16. Request of the inhabitants of the three counties of Ken- 
tucky for the old land law which required cultivation; also for the 
creation of a Superior Court 66 

Petition No. 17. Request of inhabitants of Lincoln County for laws to 
secure better military protection, care ol orphans, civil marriage, and 
stray stock 68 

Petition No. 18. Request of the trustees appointed to hold forfeited land, 

used for school purposes, for an extension of powers 69 

Petition No. 19. Request of John Campbell that the act creating the 

town of Louisville be repealed 72 

Petition No. 20. Request of John Morton for aid in securing a title to 

land pre-empted in Fayette County 73 

Petition No. 21. Request of Patrick Doran for a warrant on a tract of 

land pre-empted in Lincoln County 74 

Petition No. 22. Request of William Lytle for aid in securing the title 

to a tract of land at a place called Dry Run 74 

Petition No. 23. Request of the inhabitants of the District of Kentucky 

for the establishment of Circuit Courts 76 

Petition No. 24. Request of the inhabitants of Kentucky either for a 
better government by Virginia or a statement of the intentions of that 
Commonwealth 78 

Petition No. 25. Request of the inhabitants of Jefferson, Fayette, Lin- 
coln, and Nelson Counties for an act acknowledging the independence 
of Kentucky from Virginia 79 

Petition No. 26. Request of the inhabitants of Lincoln County for a 

grant of land for a town site 82 

Petition No. 27. Request of the inhabitants of Lincoln County for a 

division of the county 84 

Petition No. 28. Request of the inhabitants of the County of Fayette for 

a division of the county 85 

Petition No. 29. Request of James Hogan for the right to establish a 

public ferry across the Kentucky River near Hiclonan's Creek 87 

Petition No. 30. Request of David Crews for the right to establish a public 

ferry across the Kentucky River near Jack's Creek 88 

Petition No. 31. Request of William Steele for the right to establish a 

public ferry across the Kentucky River at Stone Lick 89 

Petition No. 32. Request of the inhabitants of part of Bourbon County 

at Limestone Settlement for division of the county 89 

Petition No. 33. Protest of the inhabitants of Bourbon County against 

a division of the county 91 

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Pbtition No. 34. Request of the inhabitants of Washington, in Limestone 

Settlement of Bourbon County, for the grant of land for a town site . . 91 

Pbtition No. 36. Request of James Holloway for land in payment of 

services in the Revolutionary War 92 

Petition No. 36. Request of the inhabitants of Lincoln County for the 

establishment of the town of Stanford 93 

Petition No. 37. Request of Jane Todd for the appointment of trustees 

for an estate left by John Todd of Fayette County 95 

Petition No. 38. Request of Mary Ervin to be allowed to inherit the land 

of John Askins 96 

Petition No. 39. Request of Christopher Greenup, Clerk of Supreme 
Court of Kentucky, for change of procedure in regard to taxes arising 
from legal processes 97 

Petition No. 40. Request of the inhabitants of Fayette County for the in- 
spection of tobacco at the mouth of Hickman's Creek, on the north side 
of the Kentucky River 98 

Petition No. 41. Request of Ignatius Mitchell for the establishment of a 
town to be called Charlestown, on his land on the Ohio River near 
Lawrence's Creek 100 

Petition No. 42. Request of the inhabitants of the District of Kentucky 
for establishment of a Commission to settle pay rations and other 
claims under expeditions of Clark and Logan 100 

Petition No. 43. Request of the inhabitants of Fayette County for the 
establishment of tobacco inspection on the Kentucky River near the 
mouth of Stone Lick 102 

Petition No. 44. Request of James Buchanan of Bourbon County that a 

public ferry be established on his lands across Licking Creek 103 

Petition No. 45. Request of sundry inhabitants of Fayette County for 
the establishment of tobacco inspection on the land of General Scott 
on the Kentucky River near Craig's Creek 105 

Petition No. 46. Request of the inhabitants of Lexington for an act 

incorporating the town 106 

Petition No. 47. Request of sundry inhabitants of Fayette, Bourbon, and 
Madison Counties for a new county to be created from them, with 
courthouse at Boonesborough 107 

Petition No. 48. Request of the inhabitants of Limestone Settlement and 

other parts of Bourbon County for a division of Bourbon County 108 

Petition No. 49. Protest of the inhabitants of Bourbon County against 

a division of the county 110 

Petition No. 50. Request of the Trustees of Transylvania Seminary for 

one-sixth of Surveyors* legal fees, for support of the Seminary 112 

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Contents 

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Petition No. 51. Request of inhabitants of Fayette County for tobacco 

inspection on Kentucky River near the mouth of Stone Lick Creek 113 

Petition No. 62. Request of the inhabitants of Fayette County for a 

division of the county 114 

Petition No. 53. Protest of the inhabitants of Fayette County against 

a division of the county 116 

Petition No.^ 54. Request of the inhabitants of the Limestone Settlement 

of Bourbon County for a division of the county 117 

Petition No. 65. Protest of the inhabitants of Bourbon County against 

a division of the county 119 

Petition No. 56. Request of the inhabitants of Bourbon County for 

tobacco inspection on Licking Creek 120 

Petition No. 57. Request of the inhabitants of Bourbon County for the 

establishment of a town at Bourbon Courthouse 121 

Petition No. 58. Request of the inhabitants of the District of Kentucky 

for a repeal of the Act of Separation 121 

Petition No. 69. Request of George Muter, Samuel McDowell, Caleb 

Wallace, and Harry Innes that taxes be made payable in specie 122 

Petition No. 60. Request of the inhabitants of the District of Kentucky 
that Lexington and Bardstown be appointed as places for sittings of 
the Supreme Court 124 

Petition No. 61. Request of Benjamin Stevenson, that he be relieved 
from the penalty of the law against bringing slaves into Kentucky 
without notice 125 

Petition No. 62. Request of the inhabitants of Bourbon County for the 

establishment of the town of Hopewell 127 

Petition No. 63. Request of the inhabitants north of the Kentucky River 

for tobacco inspection on the Kentucky River near Tate's Creek 128 

Petition No. 64. Request of the inhabitants of Kentucky for appointment 
of Commissioners by Supreme or County Courts for locating places 
for tobacco inspection 129 

Petition No. 65. Request of the inhabitants of Fayette and Bourbon 

Counties that a new county be created from parts of the same 130 

Petition No. 66. Protest of sundry inhabitants of Bourbon County against 

a division of the county 131 

Petition No. 67. Request of the inhabitants of Fayette County for the 
establishment of tobacco inspection on lands of Eli Cleveland on the 
Kentucky River 132 

Petition No. 68. Request of the inhabitants of the town of Louisville for 

the appointment of trustees who live in the town 133 

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Contents 

PAGB 

PBTItion No. 69. Request of the inhabitants of Kentucky that the Supreme 

Court be not removed 134 

PBTITION No. 70. Request of William McKenzie for value of forfeited lands 

of Robert McKenzie which were taken for a public school 137 

PETITION No. 71. Request of Anne Craig that the right of escheat of lands 

of James Douglass may be set aside in the interests of a debt to her . . . 138 

Petition No. 72. Request of some inhabitants of Fayette County for 

tobacco inspection opposite Boonesborough and on Howards Creek . . 139 

Petition No. 73. Memorial of the Convention of the District of Kentucky 
which asks for an amendment to the act separating Kentucky from 
Virginia 140 

Petition No. 74. Request of the inhabitants of Lincoln County living on 

lands reserved for officers and soldiers, for a division of the county 141 

Petition No. 75. Request of Jane and Robert Todd, executors, for powers 

in regard to sale and conveyance of estate of John Todd 142 

Petition No. 76. Request of the inhabitants of Lexington for certain 

powers and authorities 143 

Petition No. 77. Request of the inhabitants of Bourbon County for the 
right to erect grist mills on the Stoner and Hinkson's forks of the 
Licking River 144 

Petition No. 78. Request of the inhabitants of Bourbon County to estab- 
lish the navigation of the Licking River and that grist mills be not 
erected 145 

Petition No. 79. Request of sundry inhabitants of Bourbon County that 
the navigation of the Licking River and its forks be not impeded by 
grist mills 146 

Petition No. 80. Request of the trustees of the town of Hopewell that 
the land on which the town is located be condemned and vested in the 
trustees, and that the name be changed to Paris 147 

Petition No. 81. Request of Laban Shipp that no act be passed in favor 
of navigation on the Licking River and its forks that will cause the 
removal of his mill 148 

Petition No. 82. Request of the inhabitants of Bourbon County for act 

to allow the erection of grist mills on the Licking River and its forks . . 150 

Petition No. 83. Request of claimants to tracts of land in the Illinois 
grant and others, for an extension of time to give proof before Com- 
missioners 151 

Petition No. 84. Request of sundry inhabitants of Bourbon County for 

the establishment of tobacco inspection on land of Lawrence Protzman. 152 

Petition No. 85. Request of William Bruce and John Linn for compensa- 
tion as scouts in 1789 153 

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Contents 

PAGE 

Pbtition No. 86. Request of James Smith that he be granted the right 

to prove his pre-emption claim to land improved in 1773 154 

Petition No. 87. Request of the inhabitants of the town of Maysville for 

an extension of time, to fulfill the requirements for title to their lots. . 155 

Petition No. 88. Request of some inhabitants of Bourbon County for an 
extension of time for recording deeds, on account of death of the 
sheriff 156 

Petition No. 89. Request of William Shannon for the adjustment and 
settlement of his accounts as Commissary and Quartermaster to the 
Illinois Department 157 

Petition No. 90. Request of the Trustees of Transylvania Seminary for 

the right to raise money by a lottery 160 

Petition No. 91. Request of the Trustees of Transylvania Seminary for 

a reduction of the number of trustees 161 

Petition No. 92. Request of Henry Banks that the register of land office 

be authorized to accept land warrants on a claim 162 

Petition No. 93. Request of the inhabitants of the District of Kentucky 
for an extension of time for recording surveys, as required by a new 
land law of 1791 164 

Petition No. 94. Request of John Crow for compensation for keeping 

Indian prisoners 165 

Petition No. 95. Request of Isaac Ruddle for payment of claims for service 
and horses furnished, thus far unsettled because of charges of dis- 
loyalty . 168 

Petition No. 96. Request of Levi Todd, Clerk of Fayette County, for the 

refunding of money paid as tax on clerks. 169 

Petition No. 97. Request of Joseph Martin for the establishment of a 

ferry across the Cumberland River 170 

Petition No. 98. Request of James McAfee for compensation for supplies 

furnished the troops at the Falls of the Ohio in 1780 and 1781 171 

v' 

Petition No. 99. Request of James Wilkinson for the establishment of 

tobacco inspection at Frankfort 171 

Petition No. 100. Request of George Rogers Clark for the payment of his 
general statement of claims, debts, and arrearages, due for services 
and for advances to the State 172 

Petition No. 101. Request of John Campbell for payment of wages as 

inspector of tobacco at the Falls of the Ohio 174 

Petition No. 102. Request of John Stewart for the right to enter and 
survey a tract of land on the Licking River, improved by Henry 
Stewart in 1775 176 

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Contents 

PAOB 

Petition No. 103. Request of James Gilmore and Stephen Huston, for 

compensation for service as scouts 177 

Petition No. 104. Request for delay in the establishment of a ferry across 

Patterson's Creek 177 

Petition No. 106. Request of George Rogers Clark for half pay for life or 

full pay for five years 178 

Petition No. 106. Request of Daniel Boone for a land-office treasury 

warrant for six hundred and twenty-eight acres of land 178 

Petition No. 107. Request of James Bullock for duplicate certificate 

issued for a horse impressed into the service of the State 179 

Petition No. 106. Request of William Bledsoe for a warrant on the treas- 
ury in pa3rment for a beast taken into service in 1782 179 

Petition No. 109. Request of Edmond Southard and his wife Sarah, for a 
land-office treasury warrant for land unlocated tiius far because of the 
separation of Kentucky from Virginia and other causes 180 

Petition No. 110. Request of Berry Cawood of Harlan County for a grant 
of land in lieu of land to which he was entitled in the tract set apart 
for Clark and his soldiers 186 



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

The Author Frontispiece 

opposite Page 

Facsimile of Surveyor's Map of Kentucky 6i 

Facsimile of Petition of the Inhabitants of Lincoln County 82 

Facsimile of Signatures attached to the Petitions 130 

Facsimile of Signatures attached to the Petitions 189 



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INTRODUCTION 

The value of this collection of legislative petitions of 
early Kentucky is general as well as local. Since Ken- 
tucky was the first Commonwealth to be established west 
of the Alleghany Mountains, anything which illustrates the 
formative growth of society is significant of the subsequent 
growth of the nation westward. It is believed that these 
petitions will prove of interest and value for three main 
reasons: First, as an illustration of the process of petitioning; 
second, for the subject-matter contained in them, and 
third, for the list of names attached to the petitions which 
is a large one and representative of the pioneer population. 

The right and the practice of petitioning is an old one, 
much prized by our English ancestors. It has occupied 
an important place in the development of liberty and govern- 
ment by the people. It was in use in the Colonies and their 
records all show to what a large extent it figured. Hence, 
it may be said that the early settlers of Kentucky, in 
petitioning, were only doing that which they were accus- 
tomed to do east of the mountains. 

The petitions here presented are the basis of almost all 
the legislation of Virginia for her western settlers. The 
editor has followed them through the various steps of 
legislation as recorded in the Journal of the House 
of Burgesses, the Journal of the Convention, the Journal 

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Introdu6Uon 

of the House of Delegates, the Calendar of State papers, 
and the Statutes as edited by Hening. In many cases the 
preamble of the bill enacted repeats the substance and in 
some cases the very phrases of the petition, thus linking 
the two together in a most interesting and unique manner. 

A regular process was followed in the matter of petition. 
The law required posting for a certain length of time that 
all might have an opportunity to be acquainted with the 
contents. Certifications of such posting may be seen to 
accompany several of the petitions as printed. Then the 
petition was taken to Williamsburg or Richmond, either by 
Kentucky's representative to the Virginia Assembly or by 
a special messenger. Before the outbreak of the Revolu- 
tion the petition was addressed to the colonial Governor, 
and after that to the legislative body. Only one of our 
petitions was thus addressed to the Governor and a second 
referred to in the Calendar of State Papers. All the others 
are addressed to the Convention, the General Assembly, or 
the House of Delegates. 

If a western community was not organized it sent its 
petitions to the most westerly county by which it was 
forwarded to the capital. Thus the settlers of Kentucky 
gained access to the ear of the legislative body through 
Fincastle County. The organization of a body of settlers 
into a committee to petition was the first step in the forma- 
tion of civic life in the westward expansion of population. 

The petitions presented to the legislative body must, 
by the law of Virginia, be deposited with the Clerk of the 



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Introduction 

House of Delegates. The Clerk read the petition and it 
was then referred to one of the standing committees, of 
which there were five — on religion, on propositions and 
grievances, on claims, on courts of justice, and at times on 
the state of the country. Special committees were some- 
times appointed, and often petitions were considered by 
committee of the whole. These committees were appointed 
at the beginning of the session and often were composed 
of the most prominent men of the Commonwealth. Thus 
the affairs of the distant western settlers were sometimes 
discussed by such men as Henry Lee, Patrick Henry, James 
Madison, and Thomas Jefferson. 

The House ordered the committees to which the matters 
were referred to take them under consideration and make 
a recommendation. In the original documents the course 
through which the petitions passed is endorsed on the back 
as they were filed away. These endorsements are given 
in the notes to the text of the petitions. If the judgment 
of the committee was favorable the word ''reasonable" was 
written across the back and a bill was generally drawn to 
conform to the request. If the judgment was not favorable 
the word "rejected" was written across the back, and no 
bill was enacted. Sometimes the petitions, if important, 
passed through quite a long and devious course, as may be 
seen. In some cases the requests were divided and part 
were granted and part rejected. The reasons for this 
action are not on record, though it may often be inferred 
from the action or the language in the Journals. 



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Inirodtiction 

The statutes which match these petitions are well 
known and embody, in general, the substance of the peti- 
tions. They consist of a preamble, an enacting clause, and 
the provisions of the law. The petitions, however, add 
considerable to our knowledge as they give us the settler's 
point of view in his own language. Taking the two 
together it is possible to have as perfect a picture as may be 
of the relations of the old Commonwealth and her remote 
inhabitants. That these distant settlers suffered is cer- 
tainly true; that they were dissatisfied with their parent 
State is evidenced by the petitions they sent to the Govern- 
ment at Philadelphia; but one can not make a study of the 
petitions and the laws based upon them without being 
impressed with the fact that Virginia attended to the 
affairs of her **good people" on the ''western waters." 
The impression is left of a population self-assertive and 
resourceful but withal respectful toward constituted 
authority. 

In the second place the petitions are of value because 
of the light which their subject-matter throws on the early 
history of Kentucky and the West. It would be difficult 
to find a more graphic picture of the life of a pioneer popu- 
lation in all its lines of activity, in the expression of diffi- 
culties, hopes, and desires. We have too often been content 
to select some typical hero of frontier life and record his 
exploits. In these petitions we have set before us the 
associated life of the community. Allowance must be 
made, it is true, for extravagance of statement, but even 



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Introduction 

such phrases are a vivid reminder of the strenuous life 
of those early state-builders whose sacrifices and efforts 
made possible the conditions that exist to-day. 

The petitions are not all of equal importance. Some 
deal only with personal affairs or with matters of small 
account. Others throw light on matters that belong to 
the field of serious history and are significant. The greatest 
good can be derived by taking them as a whole, illustrative 
of the beginnings of a community. 

The topics that make up the subject-matter of the 
petitions may be summed up as follows: The system of 
landholding, the establishment of courts, the organization 
of a militia for protection from Indians, the organization 
of the community into counties and towns, the establish- 
ment of communication by ferries and roads, the inspection 
of tobacco, the building of gristmills, the perfecting of a 
medium of exchange, the foundation of an educational 
system, the status of slavery in the western country, the 
effort to secure better social conditions in the care of 
orphans and in the performance of marriage rites, and 
finally the movement of the population toward separation 
from Virginia. 

The question of land naturally occupies a large place in 
the petitions. The settlers came to the country west of 
the mountains with certain ideas regarding land which 
had been worked out through many years of controversy 
in the colonial period of Virginia. The Journals of the House 
of Burgesses reflect this struggle. In general it may be 



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Introduction 

said that the representatives of the people stood for west- 
ward expansion, for small grants of land to bona fide 
settlers, for titles free from quit rents, and for legislative 
management of land conditions rather than executive. 

A resolution of the House of Burgesses of December, 
1766, urged upon the administration that settlers who had 
taken up lands on the waters of the West could not be 
deprived of their land or compelled to move without a 
violation of public faith and of law. It showed that the 
encouragement of settlement to the west would be conducive 
to the King's service and Colony's interest and the King 
was urged to rescind his restrictive proclamation and give 
orders to grant land to **all adventurers" in the accustomed 
manner. Many of the lands were shown to be unoccupied 
by Indians and others could be readily secured by purchase. 

In 1768 the treaty of Fort Stanwix with the Indians 
was in line with the wishes of the settlers and seemed to 
prepare the way for settlement. Our first petition of 1769 is 
a request for land in the valley of the Cumberland River, 
to the west of the mountains, and in the same year the 
House of Burgesses discussed expansion again, urging that 
the country be opened as far as the confluence of the Ohio 
with the Mississippi, and a purchase be made from the 
Cherokees which would add to the King's revenue and the 
trade and navigation of the western country. 

The desire for small holdings is seen in the memorial 
which asks that the King in his * 'royal wisdom" be graciously 
pleased to ''discourage all monopolies of those lands" by 



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granting them **in small or moderate quantities to such 
adventurers as might incline to seek and settle the same." 

The feeling against quit rents may be seen in the 
opposition to the grants of Lord Dunmore in 1775, when the 
surveyor of Fincastle County refused to return a survey 
until it had received the approval of the House of Burgesses 
and that body inquired, whether ''his majesty may of 
right advance the terms of granting lands in the colony." 

The few settlers in Kentucky had not been able to secure 
from Virginia a title to their lands until the Revolutionary 
War came on. Petitions Numbers 2 and 3 are requests 
for such recognition. It was the War which brought the 
western settlers and the government of Virginia together, 
through mutual need of one another, the former for money 
and riflemen and the latter for settled titles to land. Thus 
the first land act in behalf of the trans-AUeghany settlers 
was passed by Virginia in response to those petitions, in 
the latter part of 1776, and curiously enough, is entitled 
**An act for raising a supply of money for public exigencies." 

This law referred to the fact that ''great numbers of 
people had settled in the waste and ungranted lands on 
the western waters to which they have not been able to 
secure titles." It resolved that all such settlers upon 
unappropriated lands, to which there was no just prior 
claim, should have the "preemption or preference to the 
grant of such lands" and it gave to all bona fide settlers, 
previous to June 24, 1776, a right to "four hundred acres 
for each family." The land thus located was to bear a 
tax to the colony of Virginia according to the "pound rate." 

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The Transylvania Company, under the lead of Richard 
Henderson and by the aid of Daniel Boone, had anticipated 
Virginia by the purchase of the land between the Cumber- 
land and Kentucky Rivers from the Cherokees and had 
started a colony of a proprietary type with quit rents to 
the land and features not in accordance with the ideas 
which had been shaping in Virginia during the period 
between the close of the French Wars in 1763 and the open- 
ing of the Revolution. The petitions are wonderful 
exhibitions of the tact and skill with which the settlers 
induced the Commonwealth of Virginia to extend juris- 
diction over Kentucky, and thus change the subsequent 
course of events. 

The Land Act of 1776 was in accord with the popular 
views on the subject and had it remained the law there 
would not have been the grounds for complaint which many 
of the petitions so strongly voice. An act of the Assembly 
in 1779 confirmed the grants as given in the previous law 
and extended it to all settlers before January i, 1778. 
It departed, however, from the first in granting the right 
to preempt one thousand acres on the condition of erecting 
a cabin. Another act of the same year established a land 
office and gave to any person the right *'to acquire title to 
so much waste and unappropriated land as he or she shall 
desire on paying the consideration of forty pounds for every 
hundred acres." 

These two acts were due to the emergencies of the War 
and the pressure to secure funds for it. They became. 



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however, a source of great annoyance to the actual settlers 
of the West who were bearing the burdens of the day. 
Petition No. 8 is a pitiful wail by the ''distressed inhabi- 
tants" of the county of Kentucky, who saw men surveying 
the thousand-acre tracts, when they had not so much as a 
hundred and in some cases none at all — ''too rough a med- 
icine ever to be dejested by any set of people that have 
suffered as we have." Petition No. 15 protests against 
the second act by which every person is "at liberty to 
purchase without cultivating as much Land as He or She 
shall think proper." Petition No. 16, though pertaining to 
the same grievance, is more restrained, and recognizes the 
acts as emergency acts in the time of war. 

To the settler west of the AUeghanies the period just 
following the War was one of great perplexity. He did 
not know to whom he should look for security in the title 
to his land. Petition No. 24 contains an expression of 
this feeling of uncertainty. Referring to a refusal of 
Congress to accept the cession of land offered by Virginia 
and a report of the committee to the effect that Virginia 
had no just claim to any of the land northwest of the 
AUeghanies, they assert their right "for it is through them 
and those they claim as citizens that the greatest part of 
the western waters is not now in the possession of our most 
inveterate enimies." 

The changes made from time to time by the Virginia 
laws for perfecting a title to land gave rise to a great deal 
of trouble and discontent. Some of the settlers did not 



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conform to the necessary steps by reason of ignorance, 
some were prevented by absence from the section in service 
of the country in the War or against the Indians. The 
death of a sheriff would prevent the perfecting of a title; 
fraud is sometimes charged, through concealment of the 
law by ''knavish" men who expected to profit thereby; 
legal processes were forced on settlers who could not 
stand the expense and would thus lose their land, and finally 
the separation of Kentucky from Virginia left titles incom- 
plete. These and other complaints are found in Petitions 
Nos. 22, 23, 88, 93, 102, 106, 109, and no. With the com- 
plaints there is to be found a very graphic and complete 
revelation of the land question of the early period. 

Closely connected with the land question and second, 
perhaps, in importance in the petitions, was the establish- 
ment of courts for the securing of order and for the regula- 
tion of the various relations of community life. The county 
courts were the first to be created and they began with the 
act by which the Kentucky County was separated from 
Fincastle in 1776. By this act justices were to meet at 
Harrodsburg on the first Tuesday of April to establish a 
court. They were instructed to appoint a clerk and arrange 
for a permanent place of meeting. The Assembly mani- 
fested its appreciation of the difficulties of getting things 
started in the remote region beyond the mountains by 
providing that the meetings might be postponed where a 
majority may have been detained **by bad weather or 
accidental rise of the water courses." 



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County courts were established in each of the counties 
as they came into existence, previous to separation from 
Virginia. In fact the desire for more courts to facilitate 
the matters of record, land titles, and secure order in the 
community was the main motive in creating new counties. 
For example, in Petition No. 12, which is the basis of the 
first division, we read: **the settled parts of the county of 
Kentucky is of late growing so extensive that in a Time of 
peace it would be extremely inconvenient for your peti- 
tioners to attend at Court House much more so at present 
when an inveterate war rages with unremitted violence.'' 

The increase in land troubles was responsible, largely, 
for a request for a superior court, as shown in Petition 
No. 16. This was established in 1782, and in Petition No. 
17 the settlers of Lincoln County thank the Assembly for 
the establishment of this court, *'the good effects of which 
we begin already to feel by the discouragement of vice and 
fraud which was too prevalent among us." That there 
was opposition may be inferred from the statement of 
the petition which alludes to a set of inhabitants "who 
were never friendly to the government of Virginia nor 
would be pleased with any laws its Legislature can pass." 

The act which established the superior court created the 
District of Kentucky, after August i, 1782, and it was 
generally referred to henceforth as a District rather than 
a County. This court was a supreme court of judicature, 
separate and independent of all other courts except the 
Court of Appeals. It had jurisdiction in cases of treason, 

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murder, felony, crimes, and misdemeanors, except those 
reserved for the General Court in Virginia. It also had 
jurisdiction of matters at common law and cases in chancery 
arising therefrom. There was to be one judge and three 
assistants, and four sessions of eighteen days duration were 
provided for each year. It was also to be a court of record, 
to take cognizance of matters such as probating of wills, 
deeds, and the granting of letters of administration and 
cases of escheat and forfeiture. The rates for suits at 
law were set somewhat lower than in the courts of Virginia 
and did not always provide sufficient funds to make the 
court efficient. Several subsequent acts of the Assembly 
sought to strengthen the court by raising the rates, by 
using the receipts of custom on the Ohio, and by appoint- 
ment of ''naval officers" for that purpose. Petition No. 59 
requests that taxes from which the salaries of court officials 
were to be met must be paid in specie, and Petition No. 39 
requests that the money collected from taxes, so far as it 
is to be used for officials' salaries, may be kept out from the 
funds sent to Virginia. This request led to the appoint- 
ment of a receiver in Kentucky and measures which con- 
stantly strengthened his hands. 

Requests soon came for the establishment of assize or 
circuit courts and for the establishment of different places 
for the sitting of the Supreme Court. These are found in 
Petitions Nos. 23, 24, and 60. The objections are stated 
in Petition No. 69, which asserts the principle that ''those 
governments are best who employ fewer officers." Accom- 



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panying Petition No. 60 is an interesting statement of the 
business of the Supreme Court with number of cases 
pending. 

The establishment of the local units of government 
occupies a large place in the petitions. Each county and 
town required a separate act of the Assembly for its creation. 
Petitions Nos. 2 and 3 are the basis for the establishment 
of the county of Kentucky, independent from Fincastle. 
In the organization of this western county they profess to 
be following the example of West Augusta County in 
Virginia, which thus becomes a model in county develop- 
ment. There is a great deal of shrewdness wrapped up 
in the insinuation of these westerners that '*it would be 
impolitical to suffer such a Respectable body of prime 
Riflemen to remain even in a state of Neutrality." The 
act was passed by the Convention granting their request 
and the boundary is thus described: ''all that part therof 
which lies to the south and westward of a line beginning 
on the Ohio at the mouth of Sandy Creek and running up 
the same and the main or northeasterly branch thereof 
to the Great Laurel Ridge or Cumberland Mountains 
thence southwesterly along the said mountain to the line 
of North Carolina."* 

The county, thus created, was entitled to representation 
in the legislative body of Virginia by two delegates elected 
by free white men, possessing ''twenty five acres of land 
with house and plantation thereon." The first election 
was delayed and had to be validated by a special act which 

* This written description does not correspond exacUy with its physical fea- 
tures, as later surveyed. 

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referred to the election as "fair and open" with ''most of 
the landholders in the county present and voting." Peti- 
tion No. 12 is a request for a division of Kentucky County 
in 1780. The details of county administration as provided 
by the act were essentially similar to those of the first 
county. By 1785 the three counties thus created were 
again subdivided. Petitions Nos. 27, 28, 32, 33, 47, 48, 
49f 53t 54» 55> 65, 66, and 74 are requests for and against 
such division. The opponents of division thought such 
act would weaken the military force, increase expense, and 
derange public business. They do not seem disposed to 
make an attempt to ''bring the Courthouse and church 
to every man's door," and they think that "some individuals 
in such cases ought to give up their private case for the 
good of the people at large." Division was held to be 
unnecessary since "their numbers are too inconsiderable to 
enable them to accumulate expense, without adding either 
to their convenience or general welfare." 

The first request for a town came from Boonesborough. 
Petition No. 9 gives an interesting summary of the troubles 
and suspicions of the settlers under the proprietors who 
first began this settlement, as the capital of the Transyl- 
vania colony. They complain of the distribution of lots 
and selection of trustees. They desire that every settler 
be allowed to draw a free lot, and that the town be laid out 
on the south side of the river, as the land at this township 
"lies much incommoded by hills." The act establishing 
this town became the model for all that followed. A 



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board of trustees was provided and lots were to be granted 
to settlers on condition that they built *'a dwelling house, 
sixteen feet square at least, with a brick, stone, or dirt 
chimney to be finished fit for habitation within three years 
from the date of their respective deeds." 

Petitions Nos. ii, 14, 19, 26, 34, 36, 41, 46, 57, 62, 76, 
80, and 87 bear upon this subject, and provide for towns 
at Louisville in 1780, Lexington in 1781, Harrodsburg, in 
1785, Washington, Charlestown, Hopewell, Maysville, Stan- 
ford and Milford. The petitioners for a town at Louisville 
think it will render them secure from any ** hostile intention 
of the Indians and will induce merchants to bring articles of 
commerce that the merchants of this western part of the 
state stands much in need of." When this town was estab- 
lished it was supposed to be on forfeited land but it was later 
found that part of this land was held by John Campbell, as 
security for a debt, and this situation gave rise to consider- 
able petitioning before it was straightened out. 

The settlers asking for a town at Lexington had at 
* 'considerable risque and expence" located there, laid off 
a town, and selected trustees, depending on an act of the 
Assembly allowing settlers six hundred and forty acres 
for such a purpose. They desired to be assured of their 
right to do this. This place is elsewhere referred to as 
"most flourishing and best peopled place of any at this 
time in the District of Kentucky." They wish to encourage 
'Veil disposed persons, artisans and mechanicks" to come, 
*Vho from motives of convenience do prefer a Town life." 



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The settlers of Lincoln County had ''taken into serious 
consideration of a Proper place for Trade and Domestic 
Business and for the more ready procuring of those articles 
in our precincts that are much wanted in the new coun- 
try." Their site for a town is described as ''sufficiently 
level, very fertile, and well watered by never failing springs 
and a large Stream running quite through the same." 
The town of Hopewell, in Bourbon County, was later 
changed to Paris by request of the settlers. Maysville 
was established on a site "intirely exposed to the depreda- 
tions of hostile Indians." Several petitions ask an exten- 
sion of time for fulfilling the conditions of building to secure 
their lots because of their constant struggles with Indians. 

The statutes of Virginia show towns established also 
at Campbellstown, in Jefferson County, New Market in 
Mercer County, Danville in Mercer County, Warwick in 
Lincoln County, Beallsborough in Nelson County, Bards- 
town in Nelson County, Milford in Madison County, and 
Georgetown in Woodford County, although no petitions for 
the same were found. 

Many of the petitions pertain to the industrial develop- 
ment of Kentucky. More space is given to the provisions 
for inspection of tobacco than anything else. The statutes 
of Virginia regarding this product are many and long, thus 
showing the important place it held in the industrial life. 
Previous to 1775 the provisions concerning inspection seem 
to have lapsed and in that year an act was passed reviving 
several warehouses for the reception of tobacco. This bill 



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is interesting as illustrative of the legislation on the subject. 
Subsequent bills provided more detail but along essentially 
the same lines. Inspection was to be had **at and near the 
heads of creeks and rivers." The inspectors, after examin- 
ing and recording the quality of the tobacco, were to issue 
warehouse receipts and these could be used as currency 
in certain cases. By an act of 1786 the value of tobacco 
was fixed at twenty shillings per hundred pounds for Ken- 
tucky. The first act for inspection "on the western waters" 
was passed in 1783. Petitions Nos. 40, 43, 45, 63, 64, 67, 
72, 84, and 99 pertain to this subject. Because of the 
important part that James Wilkinson occupies in the devel- 
opment of the tobacco industry in Kentucky, his petition, 
No. 99, asking for inspection at Frankfort is significant. 

The rise of gristmills suggests the increase in wheat 
and com. Petition No. 77 in 1790 is the first request 
that refers to that subject. The inhabitants of Bourbon 
County complain that they are obliged '*to go from eighteen 
to twenty five miles to mill," that they are subjected "to 
grate loss of time," and they wish a mill established on 
Stoner and Hinkson's Forks of the Licking River. They 
think that if "either locks or slopes sufficient for boats to 
pass by the dams with safety" were constructed, "the 
Stoner and Hinkson would be above ten times the value to 
Bourbon than what it is at present with only them nava- 
gations alone." 

In the petitions regarding the mills there is a sharp 
controversy between the construction of mills and the pres- 



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ervation of the stream open for navigation. In opposition 
to the view expressed above is that of Petition No. 78 
which strenuously objects to dams and mills. The stream 
is said to flow "through a fertile soil thickly Inhabited, 
abounding with a variety of Fish** and *'it is the only 
stream by which the greater part of the county can be 
relieved from a Difficult Land carriage of many miles." 
The petitioner in No. 81 has "nearly spent his little fortune" 
on a mill and its removal would bring himself and family 
ruin. At any rate the navigation is not so all important a 
matter as "only one boat has had a safe passage in two 
years" and several boats "have been obliged to unlode and 
waggon their loades to other landings more safe and cer- 
tain"; "some have been overset and their loads lost, some 
have been drowned and many more have been exposed 
to the Greatest hardship." Petitioners in No. 82 think 
their opponents "puflfed up with the most romantic expecta- 
tions of the utility acruing from the free and open naviga- 
tion of the Stoner and Hinkson." 

Intercommunication by land and water was a matter of 
much importance to the early settlers. In 1779 an act of 
the Assembly was passed to mark and open a road over the 
Cumberland Mountains. In the preamble the purpose is 
thus set forth: "To afford mutual aid and support to one 
another and cement in one common interest all the citizens 
of the state a good wagon road through the great mountains 
into the settlements will greatly contribute." A commis- 
sion was appointed to examine a route and a guard of fifty 



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men was provided to protect them from Indians, if neces- 
sary. In 1786 another commission was appointed to receive 
subscriptions for a road from the falls of the Great Kanawha 
to Lexington. In 1792 an act for better communication 
expresses the sentiment that "This Assembly are at all 
times willing to contribute every encouragement to such 
designs as are represented to be of general utility so far 
as is consistent with prudence and good economy." 

There are many references throughout the petitions to 
the difficulties of communication by land and requests are 
made for the improvement of waterways. In Petition 
No. 78 the inhabitants of Bourbon County request that 
the navigation of the Licking River be established, ''begin- 
ning at its junction with the Ohio thence up the south 
fork to the Junction of Hinkston and Stoner, thence up 
Stoners Fork to Bramblets Lick." 

Ferries were established at an early date. Petition 
No. 10 is the first request, and was made by Richard 
Calloway in 1779, for a ferry across the Kentucky at 
Boonesborough. It states that from the ''first seating of 
This Town both the inhabitants and travilers has Found it 
very inconvenient to get across the Kentucky River only in 
dry seasons in the summer time." Because "this Town and 
country is become very popular and much Resorted to 
by travilers," he asks the privilege of keeping a public 
ferry. The right was granted by the Assembly. Calloway 
later lost his life while working on the ferry which is still 
in existence and in use. Petitions Nos. 29, 31, 44, 97, and 



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104 are requests to establish ferries at different points. 
One across the Cumberland River was especially desired 
where the "Kentuckey road crosses the same." 

In many cases individuals had been carrying people 
across the water ways and a private service was turned 
into a public one. One man says that "by request of his 
neighbors" he had provided a boat and had at **his own 
Expence set over passengers in the time of high water." 

The petitions give occasional hints at other matters 
of an industrial nature. Petition No. 6 is a request regard- 
ing salt. The petitioners had not for some time been able 
to make salt because of the incursions of Indians and they 
were feeling the lack of that article of importance to frontier 
life. Salt springs abounded in the country and could be 
worked at small expense. They had not been worked by 
their owners, however, and the request is made that unless 
works are erected at once the springs be made "publick 
Property and [salt] be manufactured by Government" to 
the profit of Virginia as well as the settlers. The request 
is not so peculiar as it appears at first sight, for the statutes 
of Virginia show that the Commonwealth had at various 
times taken an active part in the production of salt. An 
act of 1775 provided for the erection of salt works in the 
colony; a later act allowed a bounty for the manufacture 
of salt, and still another act placed an embargo on the 
export of salt. 

Slavery, of course, is referred to in the petitions. Peti- 
tion No. 7 asks compensation for a negro killed at the 



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siege of Boonesborough in 1778, in the famous attack by 
Indians in September. He was described as very ''likely" 
and his value was estimated as six hundred pounds. The 
charge is made that he was put in an exposed place pur- 
posely. Petition No. 37 requests that the administrator of 
an estate be allowed to dispose of part of it and purchase 
a couple of "likely fellows" for the young heiress of the 
estate. 

Petition No. 61 is the request of a slaveholder in 1787, 
who had come from Maryland, bringing with him his 
slaves. Through ignorance of the law — passed by Virginia, 
requiring notice from those bringing in slaves — he had 
forfeited his property. The Assembly was lenient to his 
petition, asking relief for "those who have neither education 
nor leisure to enable them to be acquainted with the Laws 
of their country." He asks for such relief as "will secure 
to him the possession of the hard earnings of many years 
industry." 

The law referred to required that those coming into 
Virginia should give oath within ten days that no slaves 
were brought from Africa or the West Indies since Novem- 
ber, 1778, and that none were brought with the "intention 
of selling them." The petitioner in this case was allowed 
extra time to conform to the law, "as such failure hath been 
chiefly, if not altogether, owing to the impracticability of 
complying with the said act." 

The social relations and development of the pioneer 
community are suggested in several of the petitions. The 



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early population was awake to the advantage of schools, 
and the parent Commonwealth seems also to have had that 
interest at heart. By an act of 1780 the Assembly had 
vested some eight thousand acres of lands, forfeited from 
loyalists in the Revolutionary War, in a board for the 
cause of * 'public education." The preamble of the act refers 
to *'the interest of the commonwealth always to promote 
and encourage every design which may tend to the improve- 
ment of the mind and the diffusion of useful knowledge, 
even among its remote citizens, whose situation a barbarous 
neighborhood and a savage intercourse might otherwise 
render unfriendly to science." The land was placed in 
trust of a body of thirteen trustees "as free donation from 
the commonwealth for the purpose of a public school, or 
seminary of learning, to be created within the said county 
as soon as the circumstances of the county and the state 
of its funds will admit and for no other purpose whatever." 
At a future time it was thought these lands might *'be 
a valuable fund for the maintenance and education of 
youth." 

Several petitions pertain to the incorporation of the 
Board of Trustees for the Transylvania Seminary and the 
vesting in them of the forfeited land, defining their powers, 
fixing the number, and increasing their facilities for getting 
funds. The attitude of the pioneer population toward 
education may be seen in the words of Petition No. 18: 
"The solicitous anxiety which discovers itself in the principal 
inhabitants of this country for having Schools or Semi- 



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naries of Learning among them that their children may be 
educated as becomes a civilized people, encourages your 
Petitioners to hope that the Liberality of Individuals will 
be extended in aid of the public Donations were Trustees 
incorporated by Law &c." They are confident that the 
* 'Assembly will listen with pleasure to every proposition 
that has a Tendency to banish Ignorance and Error and 
to introduce in their room what may polish the manners, 
encourage the improvement of the mind promote liberality 
of sentiment and by refining give additional Incentives to 
virtue." 

By Petition No. 50 a request is made for an allotment 
of one-sixth of the land surveyors' fees to the funds of the 
institution. This had previously been assigned to William 
and Mary College, "a Seminary which we greatly respect 
but from which the Inhabitants of Kentucky are too 
remote to derive any immediate advantage." This was 
granted, as also the request that escheated lands should 
revert to the benefit of education. Petition No. 90 asks 
the privilege of conducting a lottery to raise five hundred 
pounds for the erection of an academy, a request which 
was granted in an act allowing the same privilege to a 
church and a school east of the mountains. Petition No. 
91 also pertains to the educational matters. Petition No. 
70 is a request from a descendant of the owner of one of 
the confiscated estates which had been donated to the 
cause of education. He had been informed that the 
Assembly **have always shewn a readiness to give the value 



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of all confiscated property to the next in succession" and 
he requests the value of the property. The request is 
marked as reasonable but no act seems to have been passed. 

Social conditions and needs are illustrated, along other 
than educational lines, by requests made in various peti- 
tions. In Petition No. 17 the settlers of Lincoln County 
ask for the passage of a "few more laws indispensibly neces- 
sary for this District." Among these is one seeking "some 
civil power to solemnize the Rites of matrimony as we have 
no clergy either of the church of England or Presbyterians, 
who compose the Greater part of our inhabitants." 

This request was granted in 1783 and provision was 
made that "Where it shall appear to the court of any 
county on the western waters that there is not a sufficient 
number of clergymen authorized to celebrate marriages 
therein, such court is empowered to nominate so many 
sober and discreet laymen as will supply the deficiency." 
Those so nominated were to receive a license and could 
perform the ceremony according to the church of which 
they were members. Parties to the ceremony were obliged 
to have a license or a certificate of the publication of the 
banns made for three successive times. 

In the same petition was a request for a law to provide 
for the "orphans of poor people as we have no church 
wardens to bind them out." The law of Virginia required 
that orphans should be bound out to a master or mistress 
under certain conditions. An act of 1785 provides that they 
must "be taught some trade, art or business;" also reading, 



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writing, and if a boy, arithmetic, including the rule of three. 
Monthly reports had to be made by the overseers who had 
the authority to bind out the orphans. 

A large number of the petitions are claims of various 
kinds. Such are Petitions Nos. 5, 13, 35, 83, 85, 89, 92, 
94, 95, 100, 103, 105, 106, 107, 108, and no. Three of these 
requests are from George Rogers Clark. In No. 13 he 
refers to his services in Illinois in the War, speaks of a 
grant of land adjoining the Falls on the northwest side of 
the, Ohio River, of an extent of thirty-six thousand acres 
"which he could not refuse without giving umbrage," 
given by the Indians with the request that he live among 
them. Though claiming no title by virtue of this gift he 
asks the Commonwealth to confirm the title, as it would 
save the State the expense of purchase and would re- 
imburse him for what he had lost through his service to the 
country. 

In Petition No. 100 Clark asks half pay for life or full 
pay for five years for debts "arising from past Military 
services or from advances of the better part of his Fortune 
for the credit of the state"; for debts incurred in "the neces- 
sary maintenance of your Troops under my Command in 
the Western country, troops (it behooves me to say) who 
with a fortitude, fidelity and martial hardihood, perhaps 
unexampled, have braved heroically and with successful 
effect every kind of want and every Species of peril to pre- 
serve the very fairest portion of your State and indeed of 
the whole Union"; debts for "having, from my own funds, 



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Introduction 

supplied your Garrisons and those heroic Troops with bread 
to feed on." 

There are many personal claims presented of various 
kinds. Petition No. 5 is a request from the impulsive 
Hugh McGary, who figured so prominently later in the 
defeat of the settlers at the t>attle of Blue Lick. He asks 
pay for his services as a messenger to Pittsburgh, as bearer 
of a list of horses stolen by the Indians that they may be 
recovered by an expedition about to start for the recovery 
of stolen property. Petition No. 35 is a request for bounty 
as a reward for three years in the service. Petition No. 83 
is a request for extension of time to present claims to the 
commission appointed to hear them. Petition No. no is 
the request of a member of the regiment of Clark, in the 
Illinois campaign, for land. The petitioner gives account 
of the difficulties of the campaign; says he was at the taking 
of Lieutenant Governor Hamilton and acted as his guard 
part of the way to Kentucky, and the rest of the way he 
served as spy. He had received a discharge from the army 
but had lost it. He could have shared in the lands allotted 
to the followers of Clark but he had lived in isolation **in 
the hills and mountains detached from almost every com- 
munity or opportunity for information." 

Petitions Nos. 85 and 103 are requests from scouts for 
consideration. Petition No. 89 is the request of a quarter- 
master in control of supplies^for the Illinois division of the 
army under Clark for three years. The memorialist had 
drawn bills of exchange on the State for some of the bills, 



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Introduction 

they had been protested, and he was in "a very disagreeable 
situation not only on account of these bills but by being 
charged with monies paid him during the time he was in the 
office and no credit allowed him.'* Petition No. 92 refers 
to a suit brought in the High Court of Chancery for pay- 
ment of salt purchased by a public agent of Virginia. Peti- 
tion No. 94 is the claim for payment as compensation for 
the keeping of Indian prisoners. Part of the bill had been 
paid but the amount had been reduced in the later months 
and petitioner could not get rid of the Indians. Petition 
No. 95 is a claim for service in raising a company on the 
Holston, suppljdng them with arms, provisions, bags, pack 
horses, and marching them to the Falls of the Ohio in 1779, 
for the reduction of Illinois under Colonel Clark. The 
amount had once been allowed by the commissioners, but 
some person had been making trouble by stating that the 
petitioner was "enimical to the United States'' when he 
was a captive at Detroit where he was taken in 1780. 
Petitions Nos. 107 and 108 are requests for payment for 
horses impressed into the public service. 

The petitions, lastly, are valuable as a means of deter- 
mining the feeling which the settlers west of the mountains 
had for the parent State and the gradual movement toward 
separation. We have already seen that there was a popu- 
lation unfriendly to the jurisdiction of Virginia, even from 
the beginning. The Revolutionary War, however, had led 
them to prefer her jurisdiction to any alternative. There 
were many causes for dissatisfaction which were due to 



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Introduction 

the necessities of the case rather than intentional neglect. 
As the War drew to a close and the new system of Federal 
Government was established, expectation turned toward a 
separate existence as a State. 

Petition No. 15, May, 1782, contains the first expression 
of that feeling in this collection of petitions. It grew out 
of the discontent of the settlers with the land policy of 
Virginia, especially the grants to absentee purchasers. The 
petitioners had proposed the setting aside of tracts of land 
for actual settlers; they referred to considerable dissention 
among them as the result of a pamphlet in circulation on 
the "Public Good" and asked the Assembly to create them 
*'a power sufficient for the Controul and Management of all 
Civil and Military affairs in this Country" or else to grant 
them '*a Separation with your Intercession with the Hon- 
ourable the Continental Congress for their incorporation 
with them." The request is respectfully worded and they 
speak of "a proper deference to your wise Determinations, 
Reposing special Trust and Confidence in you." Part of 
their request was rejected, but "so much thereof as prays 
for the establishment of some kind of controuling power 
for the better management of their civil and military affairs 
is reasonable." 

Petition No. 16, June, 1782, renews the same complaints 
and asks in definite terms for the passage of an act for 
cultivating and improving the lands and the creation of a 
superior court which will "carry us towards that stage' of 
maturity when with the tenderness of a kind parent to a 



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Introduction 

departing child, you will direct us to form a constitution 
and act for ourselves." They refer, in Petition No. 24, to 
the unsatisfactory conditions, mention a resolution of Con- 
gress denying Virginia's title to lands northwest of the moun- 
tains, but express loyalty in the words: "When your 
memorialists through your Honble. house make a request to 
Congress for a new state and are received into the Union, 
They are then and not before subject as another state"; 
and again they say, "your memorialists have ever considered 
themselves and country as part of Virginia and were happy 
in being so. Her laws suited them and do yet suppose it to 
be their interest to be Governed by Her, untill it shall 
appear for their mutual advantage to separate at which 
period it is expected there will be no objection." The 
creation of a superior court in the same year seems for a 
time to have satisfied the requests of previous petitions. 
Petition No. 25, October, 1785, is the request of a 
convention for separation. It was called "to take into 
consideration the General State of the District and especially 
to decide the expediency of making application to your 
Honorable Body, for an Act of Seperation." They give 
various reasons for their request; they say they have 
waited patiently "the hour of Address nor ever ventured to 
raise their voices in their own cause, Untill Youth quickening 
into manhood hath given them vigor and Stability." If 
their application is granted they count it "a new spectacle 
in the History and Politicks of Mankind. A Sovereign 
Power, solely intent to bless its People, agreeing to a dis- 



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Introduction 

memberment of its parts, in order to secure the Happiness 
of the Whole/' the beginning of a movement which "we 
persuade ourselves is to diffuse throughout the World the 
inestimable blessings which mankind may derive from the 
American Revolution/* Their request was considered in 
committee of the whole by the Assembly, referred then to a 
special committee, and a bill was passed which provided 
for the calling of a convention at Danville, to consider the 
matter of separation. Three bills were passed before the 
separation actually took place. 

The opposition to separation is seen in Petition No. 58, 
which says: "An augmentation of states under the general 
government, by the erection of a new government here which 
will be clothed with no new national power " will only 
serve "as one of Pharos lean kine to devour our liberty 
whilst it can be of no security to our property." They 
ask for a repeal of the act of separation lest it "injure us 
until time shall be no more." 

The general tone and tenor of the petitions here printed 
is considerably different from that of the petitions sent 
to Philadelphia or New York, now in the Library of Congress 
and which have been referred to and quoted in the printed 
histories of Kentucky. 

The list of names attached to the petitions is the third 
and last source of value to be mentioned in this intro- 
duction. The signatures of the larger part are autograph 
which adds to their worth. Many of the lists of early pio- 
neer populations have been gathered secondhand and often 



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Introduction 

from the sound of the name. Thus the army rolls of the 
Virginia soldiers found on pay-rolls or official papers are 
often incorrect. In some cases it is evident that the list 
of names attached to a petition was copied in one hand- 
writing and in some cases names have been written for the 
petitioner, but in most cases the autograph signature appears 
on one of the petitions if not more. The editor spent over 
a month on the names, examining them with a magnifying 
glass and copying them. In this way it was possible to 
gain a familiarity with them. Where the name appeared 
several times, as most of them do, it was possible to check 
and come to a judgment as to the proper form. Variations 
of spelling have been preserved in order to make the list 
of as much value as possible. The same name occurring 
on different petitions does not necessarily indicate the same 
person. No effort has been made to go beyond the preser- 
vation of the name in this work. 

Facsimile reproductions have been made of some of 
the signatures by way of illustration. Not all the auto- 
graphs are so good as these. Many are barely legible, 
but there were very few that could not be made out after 
some study. Surely this list of names is abundant proof 
that the pioneer population of Kentucky was not illiterate. 

The list of names is important for two main reasons, 
first, it throws light on the racial composition of the early 
population of Kentucky, and second, it is of use for the 
study of genealogy. 

The earlier petitions show a decided preponderance of 
Scotch and Scotch-Irish names with a large number of 

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English and a few German/ Dutch, and French. The num- 
ber of English names increases in the later petitions. The 
large number of religious names indicates the nonconformist 
character of much of the population. 

While the list will not give much detail to aid the gene- 
alogist, it fixes the existence of a certain name in a locality 
at an early period and thus gives a clue that may be fol- 
lowed further. 



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Text of the Petitions 

Verbatim transcript with editor's emendations in brackets 
only when meaning requires the same. 



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TEXT OF THE PETITIONS 



NUMBER 1. 

To TH« Right Honbi^. Norbornb Baron db Botetourt His Majesty's Libut. 
AND Governor General op Virginia and Vice Admiral op the Same and 
THE HoNBLB. Council Thereof :— 

The Petition of Joseph Cabell, Junr., Nicholas Cabell, William 
Megginson, William Horsley, Robert Horsley, John Horsley, 
Wm. Hopkins, Jas. Hopkins, Saml. Burks, Cornelius Thomas, 
John Thomas, Jas. Thomas Junr., Henry Hopson, Samuel Hop- 
son, John Hughs, Joseph Hornsby, Edward Harris, John Harris, 
Thos. Harris, John Davis, John Warberton, Benj. Warberton, 
Gary Wilkinson, Emanl. Taylor, Joseph Turner, W m. Cabell^ 
Junr ., Sanders Xabell, Hector Cabell, Frederick Cabell, X^*?** 
Ca bell Ju nr., Geqrge^^ab§ll, Frederick Cabell, Hugh Innes, 
Robert Innes, Harry Innes, Jas^ThnS, James Buchanan, 
Taverier~^eal, Abraham Hite, Isaac Hite, the Younger, Abra- 
ham Hite Junr., ^JoiepRnRRte, Thos. TIarmon,'~Benj. Hains, 
Joseph Hains, ^EBehezef^vern, Philip Ross, Felix Seymour, 
IsaacJJite, I saac H ite, Junr., John Mc. Donel, Abel Randle, 
Garret VanMeter, hmnBlylsheweth that his Majesty's Title to 
the Lands situate on the east side of the Ohio having lately 
been recognized by the six nations of Indians, your Petitioners 
humbly pray that they may have leave to take up and survey 
sixty thousand acres of Land to begin at the Falls of the Cum- 
berland River and extend down the said River for compliment 
in one or more surveys and your Petitioners will pray. 



(December, 1769. According to Calendar of State Papers.) 

In the Calendar of State Papers reference is made to a Petition of April 25 , 
1772, asking for a large grant of land in the valley of the Louisa River; in the 
Journal of the House of Burgesses for May 25, 1774, reference is made to a 
Petition from several persons on the Western Waters; in the Journal of the Con- 
vention reference is made to several Petitions: on May 21, 1776, to a Petition 
from settlers in West Pincastle; on May 30, to a Petition from John Craig, 
a settler in IVansylvania; on June 15, 1776, to a Petition from Richard Hen- 
derson and his associates of the Transylvania Company; and on June 10, 1776, 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

to two Petitions from settlers in the western part of Pincastle beyond the 
mountains. 

In the sources there are quite full summaries of the above mentioned Peti- 
tions but the text itself has not been found. The Petitions or copies of them 
may be in existence. Together with Petitions Nos. 2 and 3, of this collection, they 
led to the act separating Kentucky County from Pincastle, confirming the land 
titles of the settlers and ensuring the jurisdiction of Virginia over the country 
west of the AUeghanies. 

NUMBER 2. 

To THB HONORABLB TH« CONVENTION OP VIRGINIA. 

The Humble Petition of tiie Inhabitants of Kentucke (or 
Louisa) River on the Western parts of Fincastie County. 
Humbly Sheweth that many of your Petitioners became Adven- 
turers in this part of the Colony in the year 1774, in order to 
provide a subsistance for themselves and their Posterity; but 
were soon obliged by our Savage Enemy to abandon their 
Enterprise and in the year Following, after the Country had 
been discovered and explored, many more became Adventurers, 
some of whom claimed Land by Virtue of Warrant by Lord 
Dunmore agreeable to the Royal Proclamation in the year 
1763 and other by Preoccupancy, agreeable to the Entry Laws 
of Virginia. And in the meantime a Company of men from 
North Carolina purchased or pretended to Purchase from the 
Cherokee Indians all that track of Land from the southernmost 
waters of the Cumberland River to the Banks of the Louisa or 
Kentucke River including also the Lands on the which inhabi- 
tants live in Powells Valley, By Virtue of which Purchase they 
stile themselves the true and absolute Proprietors of the new 
Independent Province, (as they call Transylvania) they are 
indeavoring to Erect and in consequence of their Usurped 
authority officers both Civil and Military are appointed, Writs 
of Election issued Assemblys convened, a Land Office opened, 
Conveyances made, Lands sold at an Exorbitant Price and a 
System of Policy introduced which does not at all Harmonize 
with that lately adopted by the United Colonies, But on the 
Contrary for ought yet appears this Fertile Country will afford 
a safe Asylum to those whose principles are Inimical to American 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

Freedom. But your Petitioners have the greatest Reason to 
question the Validity of those mens purchase being well in- 
formed that the Cherokees never extended their claims north 
of the Cumberland River, nor would warrant any Lands on 
the other side. Besides its well known, that the Indians of 
the Six Nations Claimed and ceded those very Lands to the 
Crown of Great Britain at a Treaty held at Fort Stanwix in 
November 1768. We therefore are not willing to obey those 
men, or the Authority they have assumed or indeed to acknowl- 
edge any power or prerogative, which is not derived from the 
Convention of Virginia whose subjects we desire to be 
<?onsidered. 

Virginia, we conceive, can claim this country with the 
greatest justice and propriety, its within the Limits of their 
Charter, They Fought and bled for it. And had it not been 
for the memorable Battle at the Great Kanaway, these vast 
Regions had yet continued inaccessable. Nor can we conceive 
how it is practicable for those men who stile themselves Absolute 
proprietors, to settle this Country at so great a Distance from 
all the Colonies and in a Neighborhood of some Enemy Indians. 

But should our Infant Settlement become the object of 
your deliberations, and be taken under your protection and 
Direction unto whom we justly conceive to Belong, Every 
obstacle would be Removed, Population increase and of con- 
sequence a Barrier to the interior parts of Virginia from the 
Indians. A new source of wealth would then be opened, as 
Trade and Navigation under the auspices of Virginia would 
Flourish, in the Western world, And therefore willing to acquit 
our conscience and not entail Slavery upon our posterity by 
submitting to the pretensions and impositions of the pretended 
proprietors, We the Inhabitants of the North and South Sides 
of Kentucke River having assembled togather after preparatory 
notice on the Eighth day of June 1776 and continued to poll 
till the 15th. of said Instantin . . . [illegible] a majority 
has chosen Captain John Gabriel Jones and Captain George 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Rodgers Clark, and hope ye Honorable the Convention will 
receive them as our Delegates from this the Western parts of 
Fincastle County. And as we sincerely concur in the measures 
established by the Continental Congress and Colony of Virginia, 
And willing to the utmost of our abilities to support the present 
laudable cause, by raising our Quoto of men and bear a pro- 
portionable share of Expense that will necess^ily accrue in 
the support of our common Liberty. And that good order may 
be observed we proceeded to Elect a Committee consisting of 
Twenty one members, already some in West Augusta and which 
precedent we rely upon to justify our Procedings to the world, 
for without Law or authority. Vice here could take its full 
scope having no Laws to Restrain or Power to Controul. Upon 
the whole we Cheerfully submit to the Authorities and Juris- 
diction of this House, not doubting but you will take us under 
your protection, and give us such direction by our Representa- 
tives, as you, in your great Wisdom may think Best, and your 
petitioners as in duty Bound &c. 

Herrodsburg, June 7 — 15th. 1776 

Signed by order of the Inhabitants 

Abraham Hite Jr. 
Clerk. 



This was sent first to the committee of Fincastle County and by them to the 
Convention. 

NUMBER 3. 

To THB HONOURABLS TH8 CONVENTION OP VIRGINIA : 

The Humble Petition of the Committee of West Fincastle of 
the Colony of Virginia, Being on the North and South sides of 
the River Kentucke (or Louisa) Present John Gabriel Jones 
Esqr. Chairman, John Bowman, John Cowen, William Bennett, 
Joseph Bowman, John Crittendon, Isaac Hite, George Rodgers 
Clark, Silas Harland, Hugh Mc. Gary, Andrew Me, Connel, 
James Herrod, William Mc. Connel, and John Maxwell, Gent'n. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

The Inhabitants of this Frontier part of Virginia who are 
equally desirous of contributing to the utmost of their power to 
the support of the present laudable cause of American Freedom, 
and willing to convince and prove to the world that tho they 
live so remote from the seat of Government that they Feel in 
the most sensible manner for their suffering Brethern ; and that 
they most ardently desire to be looked upon as a part of this 
Colony, notwithstanding the Base proceedings of a Detestible, 
Wicked and Corrupt Ministry to prevent any more counties 
to be laid off, without the Inhabitant would be so pusilanimous 
as to give up their right of appointing proper persons to repre- 
sent them (in Assembly or) in Convention; And as we Further 
conceive that as the Proclamation of his Majesty for not 
settling on the Western parts of this Colony, is not founded upon 
Law, it cannot have any Force, and if we submit to that Procla- 
mation and continue not to lay off new Counties on the Fron- 
tiers that they may send Representatives to the Convention, 
its leaving an opening to the wicked and Diabolical designs of 
the Ministry, as then this immense and Fertile Country 
would afford a safe Asylum to those whose Principles are inimical 
to American Liberty. And if new Counties are not laid off, as 
Fincastle County now Reaches and already settled upwards 
of Three Hundred Miles from East to West it is impossible 
that two delegates can be sufficient to Represent any such a 
Respectable Body of People, or that such a number of Inhabi- 
tants should be bound to obey without being heard. And as 
those very people would most cheerfully cooperate in every 
measure tending to the Publick Peace, and American Freedom, 
They have delegated two Gentlemen who was chosen by the 
Free voice of the People, and which Election was held Eight 
days at Harrodsburg (on the Western waters of Fincastle on 
Kentucke) after the preparatory notice of Five Weeks given to 
the Inhabitants and on the poll being closed Captain John 
Gabriel Jones and Captain George Rodgers Clark, having the 
majority were chosen and not doubting the acceptance of them 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

as our Representative by the Honorable the Convention, to 
serve in that capacity; as we conceive the precedent Established 
in West Augusta will justify our Proceeding; and we cannot 
but observe how impolitical it would be to suffer such a Respect- 
able body of prime Rifle men, to remain (even in a state of 
Neutrality) When at this time a Certain set of men from North 
Carolina, stiling themselves, proprietors and claiming an abso- 
lute right to these very Lands taking upon themselves the 
Legislative authority, Commissioning officers, both Civil and 
Military, having also opened a Land office. Surveyors General 
and Deputies appointed and act, Conveayances made and Land 
sold at an Exorbitant Price many other Unconstitutional 
practices, tending to disturb the minds of those, who are well 
disposed to the wholesome Government of Virginia, and 
creating Factions and Divisions amongst ourselves. As we 
have not hitherto been Represented in Convention; And as at 
this time of General danger we cannot take too much Precaution 
to prevent the Inroads of Savages, and prevent the Effusion of 
Innocent Blood. We the Committee after receiving a message 
from the Chiefs of the Delawares who are now settled near 
the mouth of the Waubash, informing us that a Treaty was 
to be held at Opost, by the English and Kiccapoos Indians, 
and that they would attend to know the purport of the same, 
and if their Brothers the Long Knives would send a man they 
could rely on, they would, on their return, inform him of the 
same, as they were apprehensive the Kiccapoos would strike 
their Brothers the Long Knives, therefore we thought it most 
prudent, and shall send immediately a certain James Herrod 
and Garret Pendergrass to converse with them on the same. 
And as its the request of the Inhabitants that we should point 
out a number of men capable and most acquainted with the 
Laws of this Colony to act as Civil Magistrates, a list of the 
same we have enclosed. And for other matters relative to 
the country we conceive that Captain Jones and Captain Clark 
our Delegates will be able to inform the Honourable the Con- 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

vention, not doubting but they will listen to our just petition 

and take us under their Jurisdiction, And your petitioners 

as in Duty Bound &c. 

Signed by order of the Committee, Herrodsburg, June 20th. 

1776. 

J. G. Jones Chairman 
Abraham Hite Jnr. Clerk. 



This was sent first to the committee of Fincastle County and by them to the 
convention. 

The division requested was made and West Fincastle created into the Ken- 
tucky County by an act entitled, An act for dividing the county of Fincastle into 
three distinct counties and parishes of Botetourt into four distinct parishes. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 9, 257. 

"Whereas, from the great extent of the county of Fincastle many incon- 
veniences attend the more distant inhabitants thereof on account of their remote 
situation from the courthouse of the said county and many of the said inhabitants 
have petitioned this present general assembly for a division of the same; Be it 
therefore enacted &c." 

The division was to take effect after December 31, 1776, and the boundaries 
are thus described: "All that part thereof which lies to the south and westward 
of a line beginning on the Ohio at the mouth of the Great Sandy Creek and run- 
ning up the same and the main or northeasterly branch thereof to the Great 
Laurel Ridge or Cumberland Mountain, then southwesterly along the said 
mountain to the line of North Carolina shall be one distinct county and called 
and known by the name of Kentucky." 

A system of administration was provided for the county to consist of a cotu^ 
to meet the first Tuesday of every month. They were to give bond and could 
appoint a clerk and select a place of meeting. The court was to meet for the 
first time at Harrodsburg. Any appointment had to be by majority of the jus- 
tices and could be postponed "where such majority shall have been prevented 
from attending by the bad weather or accidental rise of water coiurses." 

The right of franchise was vested in "every white man possessing twenty-five 
acres of land with house and plantation thereon . . . and having right to 
an estate for life at least in the said land in his own right or in the right of his 
wife." 

NUMBER 4. 

To TH8 HONORABI«B THS SpSAKBR & GBNTLBMSN OP THE HOUS9 OP DELBOATBS 

OP Virginia. 

The Petition of Thomas Slaughter on behalf of himself & 
the other inhabitants situate near Kentukke humbly sheweth; 
That the said Inhabitants are exposed to the incursions & 
depredations of the Indians & from the small number are 
incapable of protecting themselves. & this inconvenience is 
greatly increased on Account of the melitia's not being im- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

bodyed. The Petitioner therefore humbly prays that some 
method may be fixed on to protect & defend the said inhabi- 
tants, & if in the meantime military Commissions were issued 
for training the militia of the place a smaller number of men 
to act in conjunction with the said militia would answer the 
end desir'd. 

Your Petitioner humbly submits the Premises to the con- 
sideration of the honorable house & hopes such relief will be 
affoarded as the exigence of the Case requires. 

Thos Slaughter. 

Endorsement on the back of the petition: Thomas Slaughter October 11th. 
1776. Ref'd to Com. on state of the country. 



NUMBER 5. 

To TH9 HONBLS. TB9 SpBAKBR & OSNTLBlCBN OP THB H0US9 OF DSLSOATBS: 

Hugh McGary humbly sheweth, That in the months of 
March and April last the northern Indians invaded the County 
of Kentucky, killed many of the inhabitants, destroyed part 
of their stock & took off upwards of two Hundred horses. 
News arriving that Government had ordered an Expedition 
against the Towns of the Enemy Indians from Pittsburg 
The Commanding officer at Kentucky sent your petitioner 
thither as Express with a List of Horses lost & their descriptive 
marks in order that they might be recovered to the Owners. 
Your petitioner hath obeyed his Orders which are hereto 
Subjoined with General Hand's Receipt & a Certificate of his 
return to Kentucky & the Distance he rode. Your petitioner 
only prays the customary allowance to Expresses if this honble 
House thinks proper & shall pray &c. 

Fort Pitt 22th June 1777 reced of Hugh Mcgary Express from 
Kentucky, a Li^t of the Horses, taken by the Northern Indians 
at or near Harrodsburg. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

This is to Certify that sd Hugh McGary was sent express by 

me to Pittsburg the Distance Seven Hundred & Fifty Miles 

Given under my hand Harrodsburgh 22d Augst. 1777. 

G R Clark, Cmd. 

Edwd Hand Brigadr Genl. 

this is to Certify that Mr Hugh McGary is appointed by me 
as Express to Pittsburg I do request all persons to assist 
him as such 
Given from under my hand at Harrodsburgh May 17. 1777 

G R Clark, Cmd. 



Endorsement on the back of the petition: Hugh McGary Pet.n. Decr.l. 
Refd to claims, reasonable . AUd. for 750 miles at lbs. 28- 2-6. 

NUMBERS. 

To TH9 HONOURABL9 HoUS9 OP D^LBGATSS FOR THB COMMONWBALTH OP VIR- 
GINIA— 

The Petition of die Inhabitants of the County of Ken- 
tucky humbly sheweth, . . . 

That your Petitioners are and have for some time past been 
almost destitute of the necessary Article Salt. That by reason 
of the Incursions of the different Nations of Indians this year 
past we have been prevented from making what Quantities 
would be necessary for ourselves and Families as we formerly 
did, for small Parties would be in great Danger of being cut 
off and larger ones could not be spared from the defence of the 
Families. 

That as bountiful Nature hath plentifully furnished this 
Country with Salt Springs where at a small expence Salt might 
be made in abundance many of which are claimed by Persons 
resident in this State who have never been at any Pains or 
Expence to errect Manufactories at them which if done would 
be very Beneficial to not only adjacent Settiers but also interior 
Inhabitants of this Commonwealth — 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Now your Petitioners humbly pray that if the Claimants do 
not immediately errect Salt Manufactories at the different 
Springs claimed by them The honourable House would take 
it into their consideration and Order that the said Springs 
should be made publick Property and be Manufactored by 
Government by which Means Government would be profited & 
your Petitioners have speedy relief and your Petitioners in 
duty bound shall ever pray 
[Names.] 

Endorsement on the back of petition: Petition of Inhabitants of Kentucky. 
1777, Nov. 25. Ref'd to Propns. ref'd to next session of Assembly. 1st (Re- 
jected) 

The importance of a conservation of salt and the encouragement of its pro- 
duction may be seen from the following acts bearing upon the subject and passed 
at different times by the Assembly : 

An ordinance for erecting Salt works in the colony and for encouraging the 
making of Salt. Henings Statutes Vol. 9 — 122. An Act for encouraging the 
making of Salt. Henings Statutes Vol. 9 —310. 

An Act authorizing the seizure of Salt in the same manner as provisions for 
the use of the army. Henings Statutes Vol.9. 381. An Act to supply the inhabi- 
tants of the commonwealth with salt upon reasonable terms. "Whereas divers 
iU disposed persons have possessed themselves of large quantities of Salt, which 
they have not only refused to sell at any reasonable price, but to enhance the 
value of their own salt&c." An embargo was placed on the shipment and the 
freeholders might seize salt upon warrant issued by a justice of the peace. 

NUMBER?. 

To THB HONORABLS THB OSN^RAL ASSSMBLY OP VIRGINIA. 

The Humble petition of Nathaniel Henderson Sheweth, that 
on or about the Eleventh day of Septer last, in defending fort 
Boon in the County of Kentucky against an attempt of the 
Indians, your Petitioner had a valuable negro fellow[ed] killed — 
That the said negro was ordered by the Commanding officer 
to take a gun, and place himself in a dangerous post and to 
keep watch & fire on the Indians, which he accordingly did 
and was killed — ^That if the said negroe had been suffered to 
remain within his Cabbin, he could not have been hurt. That the 
loss of so valuable a slave together with the many other losses 
sustained by your petitioner in that Country distress him very 
much — ^Therefore hopes, that the Assembly will order a recom- 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

pense — and that the value of the said slave may be paid to 
your petitioners, who as in duty bound shall ever pray &c 
Wmbg. Novr. 21. 1778. Nathaniel Henderson 



The Deposition of Captain William Buchanan of lawful age, 
being first sworn on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God, 
deposes and says, that in the month of September last Fort 
Boon was attacked by a party of Indians, to the number of 
about three hundred and forty, at which time there was not 
more than sixty men in the Fort, including the Garrison Sol- 
diers, & all the settlers; that arms & ammunition were given 
to the negroe men in the said Fort, and stationed by the com- 
manding officer in such a manner, so as to make the best 
defence possible; that a certain negroe man the property of 
Nathaniel Henderson (who was then absent) had taken post 
on the outside of the Fort, as directed by the Commander, and 
in consequence thereof, the said negroe fellow was killed by 
the Indians; the Deponent further says, that the said Negroe 
was very likely, about twenty four years of age, and in his 
opinion worth upwards of Six hundred pounds — ^and further 
sayeth not — 
Wmsburg. Novr. 28th 1778 W. Buchanan 

Sworn to before 
Edwd Charlton 



Endorsement on back of petition. Rcf.d to Claims Nov.24 1778 rejected — 
to be reported especially — ^recommitted — rejected — reported Deer. 10th. 

NUMBERS, y 

To THB HONOURABLB HOUSB, OP ASSEMBLY, FOR THE STATE OF VIRGINIA. 

The petition of the Destressed Inhabitants of the county of 
Kentuckky, Humbly, shweth, That whereas we your distressed 
petitioners, situate in this remote part, exposed to all the Bar- 
berous ravages of inhuman savage, whose savage disposition, 
being animated by the rewards of Governour Hamilton has 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

enabled, them to hold up a constant war this four years, which 
term has reduced many, of us so low that we have scarce cattle 
amongst us to supply, our small Family's and many of us that 
brought good stocks of both Horses and cows, now at this 
juncture have not left so much as one cow for the support of 
our familys, which to our great disadvantage may plainly 
appear to every spectator, we have thought proper to present 
you with a just estimation of our losses in settling and defending 
this extensive country, which we hope will contribute much 
to the benefit of the common charge, by virtue of the late act 
of Assembly, in opening and establishing a Land office, tho 
at the same time we your depressed petitioners many of us 
will be intirely deprived of the opportunity of geting so much 
as one hundred acres of land, notwithstanding the loss of our 
properties and so many of our lives which we have expended 
in Defence of this country, except we your petitioners get 
speedy redress by this our petition, (this must be the unhappy 
event) we must lie under the disagreeable necessity of going 
Down the Mississippi, to the Spanish protection, or becoming 
tennants to private gentlemen who have men employed at 
this junction in this country at one hundred pounds per 
Thousand for, running round the land, which is too rough a 
medicine ever to be dejested by any set of people that have 
suffered as we have, you the Honourable House of Assembly 
in whom rests our most sacred rights and priviledges, justice 
at this time loudly calls your attention we your petitioners 
hope that the extensive distance of our situation will not create 
a negligence of this nature, but rather a curious reflection, on 
our inabilities, we think it expedient to show you the reasons 
why some of us who first setled in the country -will be deprived 
of geting amends for our losses and troubles first, that many, 
of our inhabitants both married and single, have been taken by 
the Indians and carried to Detroyt others killed and their 
wives and children left in this destitute situation not being 
able as yet even to support their indigent family's some of 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

which never marked or even choose a piece of Land in the coun- 
try, we your petitioners think four hundred acres two small a 
compensation, which will be all we have in our powers to pro- 
cure. Secondly those who have setled since the year one 
thousand seven hundred and seventy seven who have suffered 
equally as much as they that first setled, who could only loose 
their all; is now deprived of the opportunity of securing any 
land except four hundred acres and that at the state price 
which is fair from many of our capacities to be able to comply 
with the terms proposed to us by act of Assembly, by our 
being reduced so in coming to the country and loosing what we 
had after we got to it by the Indians. Thirdly those who have 
been in the country before the year, one Thousand seven 
hundred and seventy eight and only raised a small cabbin 
perhaps never stayed, three weeks in the country never lost to 
the amount of one shillings worth yet they are intituled to 
their choice of one Thousand Acres at State price. If no 
alteration be made it had been well for us if we had all been 
such cultivators and never come to settle in the country untill 
there had been a peace. We have long united on the opening 
of a Land office hoping each sufferer to receve some compen- 
sation in Land for his loss trouble and risk, and we your peti- 
tioners are still in hopes that when this our petition comes 
under your consideration, and a mature reflexion is cast upon 
the whole, that you will find that our loss is at this juncture 
to the great advantage of this state. On a reflection of your 
justice & mercy we congratulate ourselves that a good cause 
never suffered in the hands of just men, we cheerfully refer 
the whole of our grievances to do as you in your wisdom may 
think right, and we your petitioners as in duty bound shall 
ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: Octr. 14th. 1779 — Referred to Propositions 
— Novr.Sth to be heard — reasonable. 

The first action recognizing the rights of settlers to titles in the land is found 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

in an act entitled, An Act for raising a supply of money for public exigencies. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 9, 349. 

The grievances of the settlers led to the passage of an act entitled. An Act 
for adjusting and settling the titles of claimers to unpatented lands under the 
present and former governments previous to the establishment of the common- 
wealth's land office. Henings Statutes, Vol. 10, 38. 

"And whereas great ntunbers of people have settled in the county upon the 
western waters, upon waste and unappropriated lands for which they have been 
hitherto prevented from suing out patents or obtaining legal titles by the king 
of Great Britain, proclamations or instructions of government, and the present 
war having delayed until now, the opening of a land office and the establishment 
of any certain terms for granting lands and it is just that those settling under 
such circtunstances should have some reasonable allowance for the charge and risk 
they have incurred and that the property so acquired should be secured to them, 
Be it enacted," etc. 

All bona fide settlers after January 1, 1778, were allowed to have four hun- 
dred acres even though they had laid off a less amount. 

The right to buy an indefinite amount of land was granted by an act entitled. 
An Act for establishing a land office and ascertaining the terms and manner of 
granting waste cmd unappropriated lands. Henings Statutes, Vol. 10, 50. 

"Be it therefore enacted that any person may acquire title to so much waste 
land as he or she shall desire to purchase, on paying the consideration of forty 
pounds for every hundred acres," etc. 

NUMBBR9. 

To THS HONOURABLS HOUSB OF ASSEMBLY FOR THS STATB OP VIRGINIA. 

The petition of the Distressed Inhabitants of Boonsfort 
Humbly sheweth, that whereas the late act of Assembly has 
reserved in this county of Kentuckky six hundred and forty 
acres of Land for the use of a Town that is not to be entered 
or surveyed by any private individual untill a true representa- 
tion of our case is laid before you the Honourable House of 
Assembly, the better to inable you the Honourable House 
of Assembly to be compitent judges of the cause, we your peti- 
tioners are now laying before you, we your petitioners think it 
expedient at this time to set forth to you the Honourable 
House of Assembly the plan and form that this fort and Town- 
ship was first settled on, and also the methods that has been 
used by some of those gentiemen that first pretended a claim 
to this country by a purchase from the Cherukee Indians, and 
also the names of every person kill'd and taken belonging to 
this sd fort since the time of its being first settled, with the 
dates as near as can be calculated at this time, which we hope 
will enable you the Honourable House of Assembly to judge 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

who has suffered in selling this place. In the first place after 
Richard Henderson & Company had made purchase from the 
Indians they applyed to Daniel Boon who was to be their pilot 
to this country they further desired to know the most conven- 
ient place for a Town on the Kentuckky river sd Boon Directed 
them to this place letting them know the length and breadth 
of the low grounds as near as he could, upon his information it 
was resolved that this was the spot, they would place the 
Town on, and in coming to the place the company agree'd to 
lay it off into two acre tending lotts which was to be given up 
the next year for the use of a Town and Town common's tho 
at the same time this would entitle every man to draw a free 
lott in Town and also, entitle him to his Bounty Land altho he 
had made com on his own entry as the proprietors proclamation 
run thus that every man that made com in this country in the 
year one Thousand seven hundred and seventy five should be 
entitled to five hundred acres of Land at this time of all the 
men raised com here the first year there is now but three at 
this fort, after the people that has made com the first year 
had gone into the Inhabitants and times began to grow some- 
what difficult sd Colo. Richard Henderson had the fence that 
was made by the people broke and took the rails and fenced in 
betwixt twenty and thirty acres of the most convenient ground 
next the fort which has been held under sd Henderson ever 
since except the value of one or two acres that was taken for 
gardians for people in sd fort, we your petitioners think it a 
grand Imposition that sd Henderson should hold such a quan- 
tity of Ground whilst some of us your petitioners have been 
under the necessity of clearing ground at the risk of our lives 
and tending our crops round sd Hendersons slaves. In the 
second place John Luttrel one of the Gent, proprietors enterd 
on the S W. side of sd Township and improved on the Land, 
first allowed by sd proprietors for a Town. In the third place 
Nathaniel Heart another of the sd proprietors entered the upper 
half of the Town Land which was cleared and fenced by the 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

people who tended corn the first year, there may perhaps be 
one hundred acres within the fence and the one half of that 
clear'd this sd Nathaniel Heart finding his entry under sd pro- 
prietors would not entitle him to the Land sd Heart came out 
last spring to this country and warmly recommended to the 
Inhabitants of this fort to lay off a Town which some of the 
Inhabitants agreed to in some measure, they thought it would 
be well for every man to know his own ground as the Land 
convenient was held by two or three men. without the least 
notice given for an election for trustees the Drum beat to 
arms and these names read over by one of these trustees to 
wit. Richard Callaway Nathaniel Heart George Madin, 
James Estill & Robert Cartright and these questions was 
ask'd, Gentlemen has any of you any objections to these gentle- 
men to be trustees for this Town, to which little or no. Answer 
was made our silence taken for conscent. they proceeded to 
Business, in the first place they reserved five hundred acres 
of Land for the use of a Town & Town commons two hundred 
acres on the south side of the Kentuckky and three hundred 
on the north side which three hundred acres on the North 
side is not of the least advantage to this Town by reason of a 
large steep hill that binds all that side of the river opposite to 
this town and the hill so steep that it will be with great difficulty 
to get timber down from any place on that side, what could 
be the motive of these men to reserve Land on that Incon- 
venient side we are at a loss to know except some private views 
incited this sd Nathaniel Heart in order to obtain the upper 
half of this Town Land which sd Heart unjustly claims as cir- 
cumstances seem to make it appear, in the first place it could 
not be supposed had we been left to our choice that we would 
have choose men that were intire strangers to us as three of 
these men were and not even settlers in the country & especially 
men that was deeply interested as Capt. Heart was, the terms 
that the tolls were let upon was entirely out of the power of 
several of them that suffered most for them and Especially 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

widowes who in justice ought to have the greatest indulgence 
there was not the least Distinction made, for they that had been 
here but two days had the same previledg to draw a lott as 
they that first settled so that they complyed with the terms 
which was, that, every lott holder should build upon his lott 
one House twenty by sixteen with hew'd or sawed loggs with 
a shingled or clapboard roof with a brick stone or mud chimney 
by the first day of February next, and they that did not comply 
with these terms was to forfeit their lott, which must certainly 
be the case with several of us your petitioners who have not 
left so much as one Horse even to Draw Timber. Upon 
information that the late Act of Assembly intituled the Inhabi- 
tants of this Township to six hundred and forty acres of Land, 
we your petitioners Assembled ourselves called upon Colo. 
Richard Callaway being one of the Trustees in the first appoint- 
ment and Desired that a fair Election should be held and that 
he would still serve as a Trustee but he utterly refused to serve 
any other way, than by the first appointment and seemed much 
Disaffected at our proceedings however as it is impossible for 
some of us your petitioners to subsist with our Family's unless 
we have some convenient pice of ground allowed us at this 
Township we your petitioners pray that the sd six hundred and 
forty acres of Land be established for the use of this sd Town- 
ship by the Name of Boonsborough and that ^ou appoint 
James Estill Capt., David Gass Capt, Jno. Holder, John 
South Pemberton Rawlings Stephen Hencock & Jno Martin 
Trustees for the same being unanimously [Chosen] for that 
purpose we your petitioners further pray that every Actual 
settler at this Township may be entituled to Draw a free lott; 
and in the lemitation of three years make such improvement as 
before Directed, the lotts to consist of half acre in lott and five 
acre out lott as the Indians is so frequent amongst us that we 
cannot settle any other way than in Forts or Townships, at 
this time and whereas several single men from convincing 
circumstances have resided with us with no other motive than 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

to give their assistance that we might not become a prey to 
our Enemies which was nearly the case with all the assistance 
we had in Septr seventy eight when the Indians laid close 
seige Eleven Days to our fort we your petitioners pray that 
every such single man be intituled to a lott upon the like terms 
upon applying to the trustees for the same we your petitions 
pray that the sd Six hundred and forty acres of land allowed 
to the Inhabitants of this sd Township be laid upon the south 
side of the Kentuckky river and that the lines may be Directed 
by the late Trustees Elected, as the land at this Township 
lies much incommoded by hills and that we your petitioners 
may have, the previledg of running the land as may be most 
convenient for the use and benefit of sd Township as there 
is no claim prior to the Township claim and we your petitioners 
as in Duty bound shall ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: October 16th. 177^— referred to Propo- 
sitions — reasonable. 

Land for the purpose of settlers in towns was provided by the act in Henings 
Statutes, Vol. 10, 39. To those settling in towns for the purpose of protection 
six hundred and forty acres were to be set apart for such use until a true rep- 
resentation could be made to the Assembly. 

The town of Boonsborough was created by the act entitled. An Act for estab- 
lishing the town of Boonsborough in the county of Kentucky. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 10, 134. 

"Whereas it hath been represented to the present assembly that the in- 
habitants of the township called Boonsborough, lying on the Kentucky river, 
in the County of Kentucky, have laid o£f twenty acres of land into lots and streets 
and have petitioned the assembly that the said lots and streets together with 
fifty acres adjoining thereto may be laid off into lots and streets and established 
a town for the reception of traders and that six hundred and forty acres of land 
allowed by law to every such township for a common may also be laid off adjoin- 
ing thereto. Be it enacted," etc. 

The trusteeship was vested in Richard Callaway, Charles Thruston, I<evin 
Powell, Edmund Taylor, James Estil, Edward Bradley, John Kennedy, David 
Gist (Gass ?), Pemberton Rawlings, and Daniel Boone. 

The plan of the town was to be recorded with the court of the county. I<ots 
were to be conveyed to applicants "subject to building on each a dwelling house, 
sixteen feet square at least with a brick, stone or dirt chimney to be finished fit 
for habitation within three years from the date of their respective deeds." 

The same general plan was followed in the creation of all towns while the 
Kentucky County lasted, and until separation was granted. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 10. 

To THB HONOURABLB THB SPEAKBR AND GBNTLEMBN OF THE HOUSB OP DBLBGATBS 

The petition of Richard Calloway of Boonsborough Humbly 
sheweth that from the first seating of This Town both the 
inhabitants and travilers has Found it very inconvenient to 
get across the Kentucky River only in dry seasons in the 
summer time, and as both this Town and country is now 
become very popular and is much Resorted by travilers: I 
therefore pray that your Hone. House will pass an Act of 
Assembly That shall intitle me to keep a publick ferry across 
the Above said River from the Town Land to the land of this 
state and your petitioner as in duty bound will pray &c 

Richard Calloway 

Endorsement on back of petition: Octor.25.1779 — Ref'd to Propositions — 
reasonable — drawn. 

This request was granted by an act entitled, An Act for establishing several 
new ferries and for oUier purposes. 

"Whereas it is represented to this present general assembly, that publick 
ferries at the places hereafter named will be of great advantage to travellers and 
others, Be it therefore enacted, etc." ". . at the town of Boonsborough, 

in the county of Kentucky across Kentucky river to the land on the opposite 
shore, the price for a man three shillings and for a horse the same ; the keeping 
of which last named ferry and emoltunent arising therefrom are hereby given and 
granted to Richard Callaway, his heirs or assigns, so long as he or they shall well 
and faithfully keep the same according to the directions of this act. And for the 
transportation of wheel carriages tobacco, cattle and other beasts at the places 
aforesaid the ferry keeper may demand and take the following rates; that is to 
say, for every coach charriot or wagon, and the driver thereof the same as for 
six horses; for every cart or four wheeled chaise and the driver thereof the same 
as for four horses; for every two wheeled chaise or chair t^e same as for two 
horses; for every hogs head of tobacco as for one horse, for every head of neat 
cattle as for one horse; for every sheep goat or lamb one fifth part the ferriage 
of one horse; and for every hog one fourth part the ferriage of one horse and no 
more." Henings Statutes, Vol. 10, 196. 

NUMBER 11. 

To THB HONOE. THE SPEAKER AND GENTLEMEN OP THE HoUSE OP DELEGATES. 

The petition of the inhabitants of the County of Kentuckey 
living at the falls of the River Ohio Humbly sheweth, that 
your petitioners have at great risque and expence removed to 
this remote part of the state and from the advantageous situa- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

tion of the place, both for Trade and Safety was induced to 
settle here, and having laid out a Town under directions of 
persons appointed for that purpose by the Court of Kentuckey 
(a plan of which we have sent to be laid before you) and when 
laid out we cast lotts for the choice of the Lotts in the said 
Town, have improved & settled on some of the Lotts, and some 
have sold their houses & Lotts to persons that have come 
here since the Town was laid out who are still adding to our 
improvements, but the uncertainty of the title thereto prevents 
some from settling here that are inclined thereby making us 
less secure from any attack of the Indians, for we are informed 
the land that we have laid out for a Town above the mouth of 
a gutt that makes into the river opposite the falls was surveyed 
& patented for Connelly who we have understood have taken 
part with the Enemies of America, and agreable to a late act 
of Assembly the Land we expect will be escheated and sold; 
we are well assured that a Town established at this place will 
be of great advantage to the inhabitants of Kentuckey, and 
think the plan on which the Town is now laid out will conduce 
towards its being a populous Town and of great advantage to 
us, as many of us have built houses according thereto; and will 
render us secure from any hostile intention of the Indians & 
will induce Merchants to bring articles of commerce that the 
inhabitants of this Western part of the State stands much in 
need of, we therefore pray that an act may pass to establish 
a Town at the Falls of the Ohio river agreable to the plan sent, 
and that the present settlers & holders of the lotts in the said 
Town may have them confirmed to them on paying a compen- 
sation that may be thought reasonable to any one having a 
right thereto if thought requisite or to the Commonwealth; 
and not let us be turned out of houses we have built and from 
lotts we have improved & are about to build on & thereby 
loose the labour we have preformed at the risque of our lives, — 
all these several matters we your petitioners beg leave to lay 
before your Hone. House and hope, you will comply with our 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

request in [a]dopting the prayer of our petition, or some other 
method that you in your wisdom may think proper, that will 
conduce to the Interest and Security of this exposed part of 
the State, and we as in duty bound shall ever pray &c. &c. &c. 
May I, 1780. 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition: Reasonable — Propositions — ^May 1st. 
1780. 

This request was granted by an act entitled, An Act for establishing the town 
of I<ouisville at the falls of the Ohio. Henings Statutes, Vol. 10, 293. 

"Whereas sundry inhabitants of the county of Kentucky have, at great ex- 
pense and hazard settled themselves upon certain lands at the falls of the Ohio, 
said to be the property of John Connaly, have laid off a considerable part thereof 
into half acre lots for a town, and having settled thereon have preferred petitions 
to the general assembly to establish the said town Be it enacted," etc. 

Following were trustees: John Todd, Jr., Stephen Trigg, George Slaughter, 
John Floyd, William Pope, George Meriwether, Andrew Hines, James Sullivan, 
and Marshen Brashiers. 

The grant was one thousand acres of the forfeited land of John Connelly 
adjoining the land of John Campbell. 

Lots were to be sold at auction and if they brought $30 the money was to be 
put into the treasury of the Commonwealth. 

NUMBBR 12. •/ 

To THB HONBLB THE SpBAKER, AND GENT. OF THE HOUSB OP DELEGATES, 

Your petitioners Inhabitants of the north side of Kentucky 
humbly represent 

That the setied part of the County of Kentuckey is of Late 
grown so Extensive that in a time of pace it would be extremly 
inconvanient for your petitioners to attend at the Courthouse 
mutch more so at present when an invetorate War rages with 
unremited violance. 

That the Militia Inhabitants of the north side of Kain- 
tucky Amount to about four hundred with Eleven fortified 
posts — ^That a place Central to Every post might be fixed upon 
Distant from the farthest not more than fifteen miles — ^That 
the nearest settiement to the Courthouse is at least forty 
miles and the farthest about Seventy miles at present That 
the River Kentuckey is rendered impasable half the year by 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

high waters & is ever inconveniant and Dangarous by Reasons 
of its Craggy and precipitate Bancks Thus severed by nature 
from our felow Citizens of the Southside of the river and Com- 
pactly situated in a fertile Land where aditional adventurers 
bid fair for a farther population your petitioners conceive 
themselves ripe for a Separation and pray 

That the said County be Divided by a Line begining at 
the mouth of Kaintuckey River runing up the same and its 
midle fork to the head thence South East to Washington Line 
— Your petitioners farther pray that Comissioners be apointed 
to colect the sentements of the people upon the properest place 
for holding a Court & invested with authoraty to purchase 
Lands for a town to be laid off under such r^alations as your 
Honarable House shall please to derect & your petitioners as 
in Duty bound shall pray &c — ^Signed in behalf of Lexington 
Station Signed in behalf of McConnells station 

[Names.] 

The Inhabitants of Unity Station twenty in Number unani- 
mously desired this Petition to be signed in their behalf by 
May 1st 1780. Levi Todd 

To THB HONBLB THB SPEAKBR AND GSNT. OF THB HOUSB OP DSLBGATBS, 

The Petition of the Inhabitants at and near the Falls of 
the Ohio Humbly sheweth that your Petitioners are situated 
generally near one hundred Miles from the Court house of this 
County in a compact, rich settlement. That so great a Dis- 
tance from holding Court, General-Musters render all Civil & 
Military Regulation altogether ineffectual — that the Number 
of Setlers at present amount to (at least) eight Hundred & are 
daily increasing. 

To remedy the Disorders ever attendant upon the Want of 
Law & render the Administration of Justice less Burdensome; 
Your Petitioners pray: that all that Part of the south side of 
Kentucky River which lieth below Hammonds Creek and the 
Beach-Knobs, may be erected into a seperate County, and that 
all the Priviledges & Advantages of other Counties within the 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

Common- Wealth, may be granted to its Inhabitants, and your 
Petitioners. — 

shall ever pray &c. — 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition : Reasonable — Propositions. 

The division of the county of Kentucky is provided in an act entitled, An Act 
for establishing three new counties upon the western waters. Henings Statutes. 
Vol. 10, 316. 

"Whereas the inhabitants of the county of Kentucky are subject to great 
inconveniences for the want of due administration of justice, arising principally 
from the great extent of the county and the dispersed situation of the settlements 
Be it enacted," etc. 

The names of the new counties were Jefferson, Fayet^te, and Lincoln. Court 
was to be held in each alternately on the first, second, and third Tuesdays of the 
month. Payette was to try all cases in equity not settled to date. County seats 
to be at Louisville, Lexington, and Harrodsburg. The surveyors of Kentucky 
could choose the county they preferred. 



NUMBER 13. 

To THE HONOURABLB THS SpSAKSR AND GSNTI«BMBN OP THS HOUSS OP DBLB- 
GATBS, 

HUMBLY SHEWETH. 

THAT your petitioner, soon after the Discovery of the fine 
lands upon the Kentucky and the adjacent waters of the Ohio 
River, removed into that Country, where he determined to 
lay out and risk all his little Fortune, and accordingly was 
deeply engaged in settling, building on, and improving Lands 
there, according to the Custom of the Country; expecting 
thereby to secure considerable Quantities of Land ; but finding, 
during his Residence there, that the Inhabitants in that Quarter, 
and other parts over the Alleghany Mountains, were constantly 
exposed to the Incursions and Depredations of the Indians 
on the North west side of the Ohio, instigated and aided by 
the British Garrisons at the Kaskaskies near the Mississippi, 
and at St. Vincents upon the Obache, and Experience having 
proved it extremely expensive and difficult, if not impracticable, 
to protect so extensive a frontier against the Savages by troops 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

stationed among the Settlements, He formed the Design of 
surprising and reducing the before mentioned British Garri- 
sons; thereby to prevent the evil Consequences of their Influence 
upon the Indians, and by establishing military posts of our 
own Troops in their Country, to deter them from distant 
Expeditions against our frontier Inhabitants on the South 
East of the Ohio, and by Degrees bring them over to the 
American interest. Deeply impressed with these Sentiments, 
he, at his own Expence, sent confidential persons, in the Char- 
acter of Indian Traders, to reconnoitre and examine those 
places, and sound the Disposition of the French Inhabitants; 
and having made himself perfectly acquainted with the strength 
and situation of the said posts, and other material Circum- 
stances, he was thoroughly convinced of the practicability and 
success of a secret Expedition against them, and of its great 
importance to the public, and therefore determined to lay his 
plan before the Governor and Council, and relinquishing all 
his undertakings and Improvements at Kentucky, to devote 
himself to the service of his Country, by engaging in the said 
Expedition (if it should be approved) either as an Officer, or a 
Voluntier; or in any other Character in which it should be 
thought he could do most Service. 

That upon the said Expedition being approved, the Governor 
and Council, unsolicited by your Petitioner, were pleased to 
appoint him to command it; by the Blessing of divine provi- 
dence, and the bravery of his fellow Soldiers, he has been able 
to carry it into effectual execution, and in the ample and hon- 
ourable testimony he has received of the public Approbation, 
enjoys the most pleasing of all Reflections — of having discharged 
the Duty of a good Citizen, and thro' Scenes of uncommon 
Difficulty and Danger, rendered essential Service to his native 
Country. Your petitioner, in his Negotiations and Treaties 
with the numerous Indian Tribes settled in those parts, has 
spared no pains in endeavouring to alienate them from the 
British, and fix them in the American Interest, wherein he 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

flatters himself he has in a great measure succeeded. In the 
Course of these Treaties, the Indians inhabiting the Country 
on the Obache, and the adjacent parts of the Ohio, express the 
most earnest Desire that your Petitioner should continue to 
reside among them, and as a proof of their Affection and 
Attachment, insisted upon giving him a Tract of Land, adjoin- 
ing to the Falls, on the North West Side of the Ohio River, of 
seven miles and a half square, and containing about thirty-six 
thousand Acres, which he could not refuse without giving them 
umbrage and forfeiting the Influence he had acquired among 
them; they accordingly made him a Deed of Conveyance in 
the French Language, which being registered in the Records 
of the Court of St. Vincents, the Original is humbly submitted 
herewith to the Consideration of the General Assembly. 

Your Petitioner is sensible, that the Commonwealth hath, 
and ought to have, the exclusive Right of pre-emption from the 
Indians of all Lands within its own Territory, and therefore 
presumes to claim no Title, under the said Deed to the Lands 
therein mentioned, unless the same shall be confirmed to him 
by the Legislature; but he begs leave to observe, that this 
Deed will save to the public the Expence of hereafter pur- 
chasing the same Land; and as his Fortune was at best small, 
the greater part of which he had expended in improving Lands 
at Kentucky, which by engaging in the service of the Public, at 
the time and under the circumstances before mentioned, he 
was obliged to abandon, and has been disabled from carrying 
into Execution the Improvements and Settlements he had 
begun, so as to entitle him to Certificates for anything consider- 
able under the late Land Law, whereby he hath, in a manner, 
lost his All ; Confiding therefore in the Liberality of his Country, 
he is induced to hope, and humbly prays, that the General 
Assembly will be pleased to grant him the Lands contained in 
the said Deed — ^according to the Bounds therein expressed. 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

upon such Conditions and Terms, as they, in their Wisdom 
shall think fit— 

And your Petitioner shall ever pray. 

George Rogers Clark 

Endorsement on back of petition: Petition of Colo. Geo. Rogs. Clarke — 
May 27 1780— Referred to Propositions— Reported. 

There is no act showing that this was done, but the following is a resolution 
for a cession of the lands on the northwest side of the Ohio to Clark's regiment. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 10, 564. 

"As Col. Geo. Rogers Clarke planned and executed the secret expedition by 
which the British posts were reduced, and was promised if the enterprize suc- 
ceeded a liberal gratuity in lands in that county for the officers and soldiers who 
first marched thither with him, that a quantity of land not exceeding one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand acres, be allowed and granted to the said officers and sol- 
diers and other officers and soldiers that have since been incorporated with said 
regiment, to be laid ofif in one tract the length of which is not to exceed double 
the breadth, in such place on the northwest of the Ohio as the majority of the 
officers shall choose, and to be afterwards divided among the officers and soldiers 
in due proportion according to the laws of Virginia." 

This reservation is preserved in an act entitled, An Act to authorize the 
delegates of this state in Congress to convey to the U. S. in Congress assembled 
all right of this commonwealth to the territory northwestward of the Ohio. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 11, 326. 



NUMBER 14. 

To THE HONORABLE THE SpBAKBR OP THE HOUSB OF DBLBGATBS— 

The Petition of the Subscribers, settiers at Lexington in the 
County of Fayette humbly sheweth — 

That they at a considerable risque and expence settied them- 
selves at this place which was then and still is unappropriated 
and unclaimed by any private person, That from an Act of 
Assembly passed in May 1779 intitled An Act for adjusting 
and settiing the Titles of claimers to unpatented Lands, under 
the present and former Government, previous to the Estab- 
lishment of the Commonwealth's Land Office, they were 
induced to expect a Grant of Six hundred & forty acres, in 
confidence of which they elected Trustees who proceeded to 
lay off a Town, including the said Quantity, a plot of which 
is hereto annexed, making condition at Lines with adjacent 
claimers, a suitable square is reserved for the publick Buildings 

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FACSIMILE OF MAP 

A Surveyor's Sketch Map of Kentucky. 

From photograph of the original in Archives of Virginia. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

of the County and a Sum of money granted by the Trustees 
for said Buildings, a considerable part of the Land is divided 
among the present settlers, upon the most equitable and just 
Terms, a part reserved to be disposed of to future settlers to 
create a fund for making necessary Improvements in the Town 
and encourage Settlers in future. That they have purchased 
Seventy acres being part of a Survey made for John Floyd to 
augment the Quantity and add to the convenience and benefit 
of the Inhabitants a former Petition to the same purpose for 
reasons unknown to your Petitioners having been unanswered 
raises in us an anxiety to know the Determination of your 
honorable House, Your Petitioners therefore pray that the said 
640 acres together with the adjoining purchase be vested in 
Trustees for a Town that the present Lot holders be confirmed 
in their Titles and subjected to such Reasonable requisitions 
towards settling and improving thereon as to your honourable 
House shall seem just & we in Duty bound shall ever pray 

[Names.] 

Fayette County Court 

We do certify that we have no Objectson to the confirming 
to the Lexington Trustees the Survey of the Town Lands 
agreeable to the within plat & that no person hath any just 
claim to said Lands to our knowledge 

J. N. Todd 
Levi Todd 
atty. for John Maxwell 
April 14 — 1782. R. Patterson 

Map and the following: — 

June i6th 17th 1782 Drew near 10 miles to the inch From 
the T Falls to Squire Boons 30 miles from thence to Leeston 
20 miles from thence to Lexinton 25 miles, from Elkhom to 
the mouth of Lickin 70 miles, from Elkhorn to the Salt Spring 
on Lickin 40 miles, from thence to Lime stone 20 miles 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

From Elkhom to Lime stone a level country except near the 
Salt Springs and from Elkhorn to the mouth of the Lickin 
great part of the way Hilley and poor 

Robt. Johnson 

Endorsed on back of petition: Dec. 7th 1781 — Referred to Propositions — 
June 6th 1782— Reasonable— Repd. 

The request is granted in the act entitled, An Act to establish a town at the 
courthouse in the county of Fayette. 

"Whereas it is represented to the assembly that six hundred and forty acres 
of unappropriated lands in the county of Fayette whereon the courthouse of the 
county stands, have been by the settlers thereon laid out into lots and streets 
for a town and that the said settlers have purchased seventy acres of land contig- 
uous to the said six hundred and forty acres, being part of a survey made for John 
Floyd. And whereas it would tend greatly to the improvement and settling the 
same if the titles of settlers on the lots were confirmed and a town established 
thereon. Be it enacted," etc. 

The trustees were: John Todd, Robert Patterson, William Mitchell, Andrew 
Steel, William Henderson, William McCowwald, (?) and William Steel. Henings 
Statutes, Vol. 11, 100. 

NUMBER 15. / 

To THE Honourable speaker and the General Assembly op Virginia. 

We your Petitioners Inhabitants of Kentuckey, Humbly 
beg leave to address you as their Legislative Body, imploring 
you to take into consideration our grievances; considering us 
as faithful subjects to the Republick and equally intitled to 
the Common Privileges with our fellow Citizens who pay a due 
reverence to the Constitution, and a proper regard for the preser- 
vation of it. 

Your Memorialists thro* the Paternal Tenderness they have 
for their Infant Families, the obligation which Nature binds to 
provide for them, Removed from the Interior parts of the Coun- 
try through a Wilderness infested with the most Savage and 
cruel Enemies, combating with the greatest Difficulties, and yet 
continue to be Invaded by the Merciless Banditty, continually 
Harrased, confin'd to stations, and even debarred from applying 
the necessary means for the support of their Families, and have 
thought proper first to have recourse to redress through your 
Honourable Body, as Duty calls us to pay all Imagenable 

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To the General Assembly of yirginia 

Deference to your Paternal Authority and Guardianship over 
us which your Memorialists are bound to observe while you 
Act for their safety and defence. 

Your Memorialists humbly beg you to have a Retrospect to 
the year Seventy nine, at which time your Honourable House 
thought proper to open a Land office for the Population of the 
Country & the megration of Foreigners, as Expressed in the Act 
of Assembly, at which time and ever since, every person was 
at Liberty to purchase without Cultivating as much Lands as 
He or She should think proper, which has been very injurious 
to the Indigent Inhabitants, and of but small advantage to 
the commonwealth, it has not only prevented sufficient Immi- 
gration, but has been Destructive to all Ages Sexes and Condi- 
tions of Existence, which has occasioned a continual Deme- 
gration, with those exterminated out of being by the Savage 
Barbarians that your Memorialists find their Number of Fight- 
ing Men considerably deminished since the year seventeen 
Hundred and Eighty, notwithstanding the small continued 
Immegrations since that Time. 

Your Memorialists beg leave to point out a way for the 
Emolument and happiness of the Indigent Inhabitants, as also 
the most easy and Indubitable way of defending this Country, 
unless you can without an Infringment of the Rights of the 
People, Revive the antient Cultivation Law which seems very 
difficult to your Memorialists after such Lands has been appro- 
priated with Reserve. 

Your Memorialists beg leave to inform you that the Persons 
granted Land by the Act of May Session in Eighty one, in 
Consideration of their setling here since Seventy nine, and for 
other causes, have been prevented from acquiring such Lands 
by an Inundation of Warrants being in the County where the 
Land office continued open before the county courts issued 
certificates, but there being great Quantities of Waste and un- 
entered Lands yet in the other Counties in the District of 
Kentuckey which your Memorialists Conceives may be held in 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Reserve for the aforesaid setlers, as also for the Immediate 
Peopling of this Country, and such megrants to be allowed 
according to Antient Custom, who shall immediately cultivate 
such lands or become Inhabitants with your Memorialists, as 
all other means has hitherto been found inadequate to the 
happiness and Safety of this Country, your Memorialists con- 
ceives this Method to be the most easy and least injurious to 
the Publick weal, and as the Depredation of Land Warrants 
being equal to that of the Paper Currency has become a Pub- 
lick notority, and that the one Exchanges for the other without 
being in credit for scarcely any other Commodity. And your 
Memorialists must beg leave to add that the moneys in their 
hands died being in this Exterior part, they conceive this Mode 
if adopted, will quickly raise a Fund sufficient for the Redemp- 
tion of such Warrants upon the same Terms they shall Receive 
for their Paper Currency. Your Memorialists wish to have 
their Locations secured to them who came early into this Coun- 
try, and many of them through illetrisy, and unable to ascertain 
the true meaning of the Law with the Troubles of Indians, 
have not Enter'd their Lands so special and precise as the Law 
Requires — many of whose Entries have been Reentered by 
others, which without the kind interposition of your House, 
will produce Tedious Letigations. 

Your Memorialists pray you to take into consideration 
their Scatter'd Situation, which is neither Eligible nor happy, 
and neither Aids nor any apparent Redress of their Grievances 
has appeared, which has produced Considerable Desentions 
amongst them, which an Inflamatary Pamphlet intitled publick 
Good has augmented which, we pray you to take into Con- 
sideration and Create them a power Sufficient for their Controul 
and better Government, as well as for the Controul and Manage- 
ment of all Civil and Military affairs in this Country which 
they only claim according to the Rights of Constitution, or 
otherwise that you will grant them a Separation with your 
Intercession with the Honourable the Continental Congress 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

for their Incorporation with them, at the same time they pay a 
proper Deference to your wise Determinations, Reploring 
[Reposing?] special Trust and Confidence in you. And your 
Petitioners as in Duty bound shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

The Committee of the Courts of Justice to whom the Petition 
of sundry Inhabitants from Kentucky was referr'd, has gone 
thro' the same and come to several Resolutions thereupon, as 
follow. 

Resolved, That so much of the said Petition as relates to 
the revival of the ancient cultivation Law be rejected. 

Resolv'd, That so much thereof as relates to the claims of 
poor persons under the act of May Session 1781 and prays for 
the Liberty of locating their Claims in other Counties, is reason- 
able; and that where other Entries on Warrants of a subsequent 
Date should be ofifer'd at the same time for the same Land, 
such claims shall have the preference. 

Resolv'd, That so much thereof as prays for all other un- 
appropriated Lands to be set apart for encouraging the Settle- 
ment of the Country be rejected. 

Resolv'd, That that part which prays a confirmation of 
former Locations, tho* not made with that exact precision 
which the Law directs, provided they are so described as that 
the Location can be known and that the Claimants shall not 
be at Liberty to lay off their Land in such a manner as to 
injure any one adjoining Claim in order to favor another or to 
make a vacancy adjoining thereto for themselves or others, is 
reasonable. 

Resolv'd, That so much thereof as prays for the establish- 
ment of some kind of controuling power for the better manage- 
ment of their civil and military affairs, is reasonable. 

Endorsement on back of petition: May 30th 1782— Ref'd to Courts of 
Justice — Security for their Entries — do. for poor persons — in having civil and 
military Govermt. ref'd to Propositions. June 13th 1782— Some parts Reasonable 
— Other parts rejected — ^Reported. 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

The request for some kind of controlling power was provided in an act en- 
titled, An Act for establishing a District Court on the western waters. 

"Whereas the mode of administering justice has become exceedingly incon- 
venient and burdensome to suitors living westward of the Alleghany mountains, 
Be it enacted," etc. Henings Statutes, Vol. 11, 85. 

The act provided that Jefferson, Fayette, and Lincoln counties should be 
united into one district after August 1st, for a supreme court of judicature of 
original jurisdiction separate of all other courts except the Court of Appeals. 
It was to have jurisdiction in cases of treason, felonies, misdemeanors and crimes, 
except those triable in the General Court according to the Constitution. Also 
all matters in common law and equity arising therefrom. There were to be three 
judges, four sessions of coiu-t to be held each year on the first Monday of March, 
June, Septeml)er, and November, lasting eighteen days exclusive of Sunday. 
Three days were set for criminal matters, five for chancery and the remainder 
for other cases. 

The court was to l)e a court of record, was to take cognizance of matters re- 
lating to probating of wills, deeds, and the granting of letters of administration, 
escheat, and forfeiture, and caveats. 

A grand jury of twenty- four was to be chosen at the beginning of each term. 
The court appoint^ a clerk and gaoler and the attorney of the Commonwealth 
was selected by the Assembly. 

A tax of twenty shillings was charged at the beginning of a suit and the judge 
at the close was to receive fifty pounds. Assistants received twenty shillings a 
day for attendance, the attorney for the Commonwealth received thirty-seven 
pounds and ten shillings a quarter and the remainder was to go toward buildings, 
etc. 

The court was to be held at Harrodsburg and could adjourn to places thought 
proper. 

NUMBER 16. 

To THB HONOURABLB THE SPEAKER OP THE HOUSE OP DELEGATES— 

We the Inhabitants of the three Counties of Kentuckey, 
beg leave with reverence & freedom to address your honorable 
house — 

The former favours shewn by the Government of Virginia 
to the Inhabitants of this Country thro the various stages of 
its population, till now, call forth our warmest acknowledge- 
ments — ^When we were weak we were assisted with aids of men 
and money, until by the blessing of providence we have arrived 
to a considerable degree of strength, but just as we emerge 
from a state of obscurity & Indigence we find ourselves and our 
dear bought possessions to become a subject of noted contro- 
versy. — But we place our entire confidence in your honorable 
house, having no person or power on earth, in whome to rely, 
but under shelter of the Government of Virginia — 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

When our parent state was engaged in an expensive war, 
and taxes on all the articles of luxury and husbandry proved 
insufficient to raise supplies, we never once murmured that the 
Lands around us, as well as those we possessed, should be 
seized as a sinking fund and offices opened for disposing of it, 
tho' we were aware that the Land System adopted would at 
first cause very unequal distribution of Land by giving enor- 
mous Quantities to those who could advance most money, yet 
we apprehended that the fertility of the soil, and the former 
acts of assembly enforcing a Cultivation proportionate to the 
Quantity, would induce the adventurer to become a settler. — 
But Mr. Speaker, Experience! sad Experience! proves that 
without further compulsory acts, the Engrosser will neither 
settle himself, nor dispose of it to those who will. — We are 
surrounded by numerous savage nations. Disjoined from every 
other settlement in the united states, and amounting to only 
fifteen hundred men here a tract of Country of five Million of 
acres of Tillable Land nearly secured under rights from Virginia 
to defend for those whome ease & Cowardice prevent settling — 
Usual supplies of men seem just expended, and the fury of war 
yet unabated. — ^Such is our melancholy situation — ^We fly to 
your house for redress, To whome else shall we apply? We 
know by experience that Kentuckey has friends in your house, 
and we now call on them with an Importunity that becomes 
distressed Citizens to espouse the use of justice for us — 

We therefore humbly Petition 

That the act of assembly for Cultivating & Improving 
Lands may be declared in force — 

That all Lands as well those granted under the old Military 
and Treasury rights as the new, be subject to such regulations — 
That a superior Court competent to the decision of these as 
well as all other Land disputes be established in this Country. — 
These regulations we have, will carry us still towards that stage 
of maturity when with the tenderness of a kind parent to a 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

departing child, you will direct us to form a constitution and 
act for ourselves. 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on the back of petition. June 1st. 1782 — ^To lie on the table. 
The act for establishment of a District Court is referred to in previous petition. 

NUMBER 17. 

To THB HONBLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA. 

The Petition of sundry inhabitants of the county of Lincoln 
humbly sheweth — 

That your Petitioners have the highest sense of, and ac- 
knowledge with thankfulness the attention which your Hon- 
ourable Body paid the Trustees of this remote comer of the 
State in the last May Session, in establishing a court of general 
Judicature in this District, the good effects of which we begin 
already to feel by the discouragement of Vice & fraud which 
was too prevalent among us — ^and we cannot help expressing 
our concern to understand that there are some people in Ken- 
tucky lost to virtue, honesty & good order as to wish for its 
repeal — ^We cannot but believe that those are a set of people 
who never were friendly to the Government of Virginia, nor 
would be pleased with any law that its Legislature can pass — 
We therefore hope your Honourable House will pay no regard 
to any Petitions which may be sent to you by a disaffected 
few whose wishes are rather to overturn, than support your 
Government. 

Encouraged by our former success we now petition for the 
passage of a few more laws indispensibly necessary for this dis- 
trict, and first. That our militia may be put on a footing 
that may more effectually defend us against our savage Enemy. 

2ndly — ^A Law to dispose of the orphans of poor people; 
which cannot be done at present, as we have no church Wardens 
to bind them out. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

3rdly — ^A particular law respecting Strays — ^it being impos- 
sible to put them in the Gazettes according to the present Law. 

4thly — ^A Law authorising some Civil power to solemnize 
the Rites of matrimony — as we have no clergy either of the 
church of England or Presbyterians who compose the Greater 
part of our inhabitants 

These requests we make no doubt you will grant, because it 
is the Interest of our whole District — But where we may be of 
different Interests, we wish no new laws to pass or amendments 
to be made until you know the sentiments of a majority of our 
District because frequent alterations in the Laws are very in- 
convenient to our remote comer of the State 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on the back of petition. May 21st. 1783 — Referred to Courts 
of Justice — June 19th 1783 — Referred to consideration of the next session of the 
Assembly. 

The request for the right to perform civil marriage is provided in an act 
entitled, An Act to authorize and confirm marriages in certain cases. Henings 
Statutes, Vol. 11, 281. 

"Whereas it hath been represented to the present General Assembly that 
many of the good people in the remote parts of the commonwealth are destitute 
of any persons, authorized by law to solemnize marriages amongst them, Be it 
enacted," etc., "That where it shall appear to the court of any county on the 
western waters, that there is not a sufficient number of clergymen authorized 
to celebrate marriages therein, such.Qourt is empowered to nominate so many 
sober and discreet laymen as will supply the deficiency." 

Those so nominated were to receive a license to perform the act in accordance 
with the church of which they are members. Parties to be married must produce 
a certificate showing that the bans had been thrice published. Previous marriages 
might be confirmed in a similar manner. 

NUMBER 18. 

To THB HONORABLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA. 

The Petition of several of the Trustees in whom certain 
escheated Lands in the County of Kentucky were vested for 
a public School, humbly sheweth, 

That the General Assembly, sensible of the Advantages 
resulting to Society from the general diffusion of Learning in 
the various parts of the community; at the May Session, 1780, 
vested certain escheated Lands amounting to eight thousand 
acres, late the property of Robert M'Kinsie, Henry Collins and 

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Petitions of tJte Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Alexr. M'Kee in Trustees as a free Donation from the Common- 
wealth for the purpose of a public School or Seminary of Learn- 
ing to be erected within the County of Kentucky as soon as 
the circumstances of the Country and the state of its Funds 
will admit. That your Petitioners (a majority of the surviving 
Trustees) having convened for the purpose of carrying into 
execution the laudable design of the Legislature, and finding 
themselves greatly embarassed as to the manner of executing 
the Trust reposed in them, inasmuch as the Law does not declare 
whether a majority of the Trustees are sufficient to act, nor in 
case of the Death of any of the members, how vacancies are 
to be filled up, and as it does not appear that the Trustees have 
power under their present appointment to receive Donations 
from Individuals or in any respect to forward so desireable an 
Institution, without the Interposition of the Legislature; have 
unanimously come to the Resolution of petitioning the Assem- 
bly, for an amendment of the Law, & an enlargement of the 
Powers of the Trustees; not doubting but that the same benevo- 
lent disposition which actuated the Assembly when this Dona- 
tion was made will influence the present Members of the Legis- 
lature chearfully to contribute as far as in them lies to the 
noble designs of diffusing useful knowledge and cultivating the 
unimproved minds of the South in every comer of the State. 
The soUidtous anxiety which discovers itself in the principal 
Inhabitants of this Country for having Schools or Seminaries 
of Learning among them that their Children may be educated 
as becomes a civilized people, encourages Your Petitioners to 
hope that the Liberality of private Individuals will be extended 
in aid of the public Donations, were Trustees incorporated by 
Law with power of perpetuating their Succession, and author- 
ized to purchase Estates, to receive Donations, make sale and 
conveyances of Land and to legislate for the Seminary in such 
Cases as are customary and under such restrictions and limi- 
tations as may be prescribed by Law. 

Impressed with this hope and the full persuasion that the 
Assembly will listen with pleasure to every proposition that 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

has a Tendency to banish Ignorance and Error, and to intro- 
duce in their room what may polish the manners, encourage 
the improvement of the mind, promote liberality of sentiment 
and by refining give additional Incentives to Virtue. Your 
petitioners pray that the said Law may be amended in the 
several Cases herein before recited, and some fixt plan and Form 
adopted which may be most conducive to the welfare and suc- 
cess of the Institution, and your Petitioners as in duty bound 
will ever pray etc. 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on the back of petition : June 3rd. 1783. — Bill pursuant to Peto. 
—by Mr. Wallace; Avery; A. White; C. M. Thruston; Ct. Jones. 

The process of forfeiture is provided for in a measure entitled, An ordinance 
for establishing a mode of punishment for the enemies to America in this colony. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 9, 101. 

''Whereas the most dangerous attempts have been made by some persons in 
the colony to subvert the rights and liberties of the inhabitants/' etc., "Be it 
enacted," etc. 

"All persons in arms within two months after the ordinance and all persons 
aiding the enemy by enlisting soldiers, giving intelligence, fiu-nishing them with 
arms, provisions, or naval stores may be imprisoned, and their estates will be 
placed in the hands of persons chosen by the committee and subject to the de- 
termination of the Convention." 

Escheated or forfeited lands were set apart for public education in an act 
entitled. An Act to vest certain escheated lands in the coimty of Kentucky in 
Trustees for a public school. 1780. Henings Statutes, Vol. 10, 287. 

"Whereas it is represented to the General Assembly, that there are certain 
lands, within the county of Kentucky formerly belonging to British subjects, 
not yet sold under the law of escheats and forfeitures which might at a future 
day be a valuable fund for the maintenance and education of youth, and it being 
the interest of this commonwealth always to promote and encourage every design 
which may tend to the improvement of the mind and the diffusion of useful knowl- 
edge, even among the most remote citizens, whose situation a barbarous neigh- 
borhood and a savage intercourse might otherwise render unfriendly to science. 
Be it therefore enacted," etc. 

"That eight thousand acres of land within the said county of Kentucky, 
late property of Robert Mc.Kenzie, Henry Collins and Alexander Mc.Kie, be 
and the same are hereby vested in William Fleming William Christian, John 
Todd, Stephen Trigg, Benjamin Logan, John Floyd, John May, Levi Todd, John 
Cowan, George Meriwether, John Cobbs, George Thompson, and Edmund Tay- 
lor, as a free donation from the commonwealth for the purpose of a public school 
or seminary of learning to be created within the said county as soon as the 
circumstances of the county and the state of its ftmds will admit and for no 
other use or purpose whatsoever." 

The fund above referred to was made over to the trustees of Transylvania 
Seminary in an act entitled. An Act to amend an act entitled an act to vest cer- 
tain escheated lands in the county of Kentucky in trustees for a public school. 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

The act refers to the forfeited land and says that representations had been 
made that private donations might be obtained were the trustees incorporated 
and such privileges granted as would enable them to carry into efiFect the inten- 
tion of the Legislature. 

Transylvania Seminary was incorporated with the following board of trustees : 
William Fleming, William Christian, Benjamin Logan, John May, Levi Todd, 
John Cowan, Edbmund Taylor, Thomas Marshall, Samuel McDowell, John Bow- 
man, George Rogers Clark, John Campbell, Isaac Shelby, David Rice, John 
Edwards, Caleb Wallace, Walker Davie, Isaac Cox, Robert Johnson, John Craig, 
John Mosby, James Speed, Christopher Greenup, John Crittenden, and Willis 
Green. 

The escheated land was vested in the above board of trustees and was exempt 
from taxation. Future escheats were to revert to the trustees and professors and 
students were to be free from military duty. 

Henings Statutes, Vol. 11, 282. 

NUMBER 19. 

To THB HONORABLB THB GBNBRAL ASSEMBLY OP VIRGINIA— 

The Memorial of John Campbell Respectfully Sheweth — 

That in your last session a Law was passed for suspending 
the Sale of Lotts in the Town of Louisville and also the Sale 
of Land adjoining which was Escheated as the property of 
John Connolly. That nevertheless the Trustees of the Town 
have proceeded to sell on Credit several Lotts within the same 
altho no single Lott heretofore disposed of is built upon and 
saved according to the Conditions of the Act of Assembly 

That the Land laid out into a Town is Mortgaged to your 
Memorialist and his former partner in Trade Joseph Simon — 

That half of the land Escheated is the property of your 
Memorialist and great Damage may accrue to him if the 
Appropriation made by the Assembly be confirmed — 

That some of the Title Deeds of the same are Defaced and 
not recorded others tho duly executed and Intire have not yet 
been recorded owing to the Confusion of the Times to their 
being executed in another State and the long Captivity of your 
Memorialist 

Your Memorialist therefore prays that the Act for Estab- 
lishing the Town of Louisville be repealed — ^That the Lines of 
Division between his Lands and the Escheated Lands be run 
agreeable to the Deed of Partition between him and John 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

Connolly That the Deficiencys of the Title Deeds may be 
remedyed as far as their authenticity deserves, Or any other 
Relief be granted to him which may seem meet and your 
Memorialist in Duty bound will ever pray &c. 



Endorsement on back of petition: December 1st, 1783 — ^referred to the 
courts of Justice — December 8th, 1783— Reasonable and Reported, by Charles 
Hay. 

The request was met by an act entitled, An Act for repealing in part the act 
for establishing the town of Louisville. Henings Statutes, Vol. 11, 321. 

The act states that the line had not been run between the land of Connolly 
and Campbell ; that money was not yet paid for which Connolly gave mortgage ; 
that it was unjust to deprive Campbell of his security. The act was repealed so 
far as it effected the land of Campbell and Simon, and surveyors of the county 
were to run a line between the land of Connolly and Campbell. 



NUMBER 20. 

To THB HONBLB. THE SpBAKSR & GBNN. OP THB HOUSB OP DBLBGATSS 

The Petition of John Morton humbly representeth — 
That your Petitioner was captur'd by the Indians at the 
battle of the Blue Licks whilst a soldier under Capt. Daniel 
Boon, was taken by them to their Towns, from there to Detroit 
where he remained sometime & from thence was carried to 
Canady where he was confin'd in close Gaol for upwards of 
Two years — ^That previous to your Petitioner's Captivity he 
had acquired a right of Preemption in the County of Fayette & 
that shortly after his releasment, went out to the Western 
Country laid his claim before the County Court of Fayatte & 
obtained a Preemption Certificate for One thousand Acres of 
Land which Certs, is hereunto annexed and that upon appli- 
cation for a preemption Warrant is inform'd, that your Honble 
House did at their last Session of Assembly pass a Resolution 
forbidding the issuing any Treasury Land Warrants untill the 
further order of the Genl. Assembly, Which has deprived your 
Petitioner of the Benefit of his Location. Your Petitioner 
therefore prays that your Honble House will take his Case 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

under Consideration & grant him such relief as you in your 
Wisdom shall think just — ^And your Petitioner as in duty bound 
will ever pray &c. 



Endorsement on back of petition : May 26th. 1784 — Refd. to props. Moved 
to be discharged — June 10th 1784 — ^propositions discharged and referred to a 
committee of the ... on the state of the Commonwealth. 

NUMBER 21. 

To THB HONOURABLS THB SpBAKBR & GBNTLBMBN OP THB HOUSB OF DBLBGATBS— 

The Petition of Patrick Doran Humbly sheweth that your 
Memorialist is entitled to a right of Preemtion to a tract of 
land in Lincoln County which will apear by a certificate issued 
November 1783. by the Court of the said County of Lyncoln — 

Your Memorialist prays that your honourable house will so 
order that a warrant may Issue on his certificate & he as in 
duty bound will pray &c. — 



Endorsement on back of petition : May 28, 1784 — Refd. to props — (rejected) 
(repd.) 

NUMBER 22. 

To THB HONOURABLB SpBAKBR AND HOUSB OP DBLBGATBS FOR THB COMMON- 

WBALTH OP Virginia. 

The Petition of William Lytle of Kentuckey Settlement 
humbly Sheweth, That Your Petitioner in the year 1775 hired 
a Certain Ash Emerson to make an improvement for him in 
Kentuckey at a Certain place called the dry run, for which he 
made him full satisfaction as by his Certificate herewith sent 
will appear. Also that your Petitioner came by Water, and 
landed at the falls of Ohio with his family in the Spring of the 
Year 1780, a few days before the term of the Court of Commis- 
sioners Expired, then siting at Herodsburgh 70 or 80 miles 
Distant from the falls, shortly after Landing your Petitioners 
horses Strayed away, and having a wife and large family of 
small Children to provide for was compelled to stay till he could 
make some shelter to protect them from the weather and before 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

he could find them to enable him to proceed to the Commis- 
sioners to lay in his claim, their powers Expired and he being 
unacquainted with the law and reduced to such Circumstances 
by Sickness & Misfortunes, as rendered him unable to apply 
to the general Court to make good his Claim within the time 
limited by law, Your Petitioner was therefore advised to apply 
to the County Court wherein his claim lay for redress, the Court 
was of opinion his case did not come under the Description 
prescribed in the law for their Cognizance, Whereby your 
Petitioner is deprived of his just right, & Claim, Your Petitioner 
therefore most humbly prays that you will be pleased to take 
his unfortunate case under your Serious Consideration, and 
Grant him Such redress by a law, or otherwise as you in your 
wisdom and Judgment may think just and reasonable and your 
Petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray. 

William Lytle. 
April 14th 1782 — 

We the undernamed Subscribers, Inhabitants of Fayette 
County, in Virginia, being made Duly sensible of the truth of 
every circumstance Your Petitioner has herein mentioned, do 
humbly pray your honourable House his behalf, to grant him 
his petition, and we your Petitioners as in duty bound shall 
pray— 

Willim. M Connell 
James McConnell 
James January 
William Steel 
Levi Todd 

This is to certify that I Ash Emerson made an improvement 
for the youse [use] of William Little in the year 75 in Cantucky 
on a run called the Dry Run above my owne improvement 
for which he made me full satisfaction pr me Ash Emerson. 



Endorsement on back of petition: June 4th 1784 — ^referred to propositions — 
(rejected) (rept.) 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

haJMBER23. 

To The Honourable the General Assembly op Virginia, 

The petition of the Inhabitants of the District of Kentucky 
humbly sheweth, That your petitioners from a variety of Inci- 
dents which have accrued and will still accrue in acquiring prop- 
erty in Land in this Western Country, are like to be over- 
whelmed in Litigation; which will not only create discords 
amongst us, but ruin hundreds of poor Families, who being 
opprest and stript of almost their whole Substance by the 
Indians, have not the Means of defraying the Expences of a 
Law Suit upon the present Establishment. In this State of 
Indigence we have the additional mortification to find that not 
a few of those who have been more fortunate are taking pos- 
session of our just Claims knowing that we are not able to make 
Opposition. Such of your Honourable House as have not been 
Eye Witnesses can form no Idea of the Distresses which many 
of your petitioners have suffered for a Series of Years from the 
cruel and vindictive Hand of the Savages; and now on the back 
of these Distresses to be compelled into a Court of Judicature, 
by those who are endeavouring to avail themselves of our 
poverty and that Ignorance of the Law which was unavoidable 
in our remote Situation, will complete our Ruin: If we prose- 
cute our Claim the last Cow and Horse must be sold to main- 
tain the Suit; or if we decline the Contest, the Land upon which 
we had Hopes of supporting ourselves and Families in peace 
during the Remainder of our Lives will be wrested from us. 

Your petitioners are therefore induced to pray that Circuit 
Courts may be established for the special purpose of trying 
Caveats, to be held by the Judges of our Supreme Court at 
such stated Times and places in each County as they shall 
think most convenient to the people, where they shall proceed 
in a summary Way to hear and determine according to Law and 
Equity all Caveats in the respective Counties where the Lands 
lie. These Courts to be attended by the Sheriff of the County 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

and his Deputies, and by the Clerk of the Supreme Court who 
shall keep record of the Business relating to Caveats in each 
County in separate Books: 

In all other Respects the Court and their officers shall exercise 
the same powers, observe the same Rules of procedure, and be 
entitled to the same Fees as are now prescribed by Law in the 
Case of Caveats; save only, that a Jury need not be summoned 
and empannelled unless the Nature of the Cause shall make it 
necessary, or either of the parties contending shall require it; 
and as the pleadings are not to be had in writing, if Counsel 
shall be thought necessary at all, we presume that the Fee 
heretofore allowed to Attorneys for conducting Land Causes 
in County Courts will be sufficiently adequate. 

We are encouraged by the former Benevolence of the L^s- 
lature in appointing Circuit or District Commissioners in a 
Case nearly Similar, to submit this plan to the Consideration 
of the General Assembly, which if it can consistently be adopted, 
will curtail the greater part of the Expence of Litigation and 
at the same time render equal Justice to the Litigants; and we 
flatter ourselves that in Compassion to our many and compli- 
cated sufferings, this or some other Mode suited as far as possible 
to our Circumstances will be established for the Trial of Cave- 
ats, which at present are like to be the great Source of Con- 
tention amongst us. 

And your petitioners shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition: June 5th 1784 — referred to propositions — 
(rejd.) 

Relief was given to complainants in two acts entitled, An Act for giving 
further time to enter certificates for settlement rights and to locate warrants 
upon preemption rights and for other purposes. Henings Statutes, Vol. 11, 291. 

An Act to give further time for the probation of deeds and other instnmients 
of writing and for other purposes. Henings Statutes, Vol. 11, 294. 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 24. ^ 

To THE HONBLB THS SpSAKBR AND THS GENBRAL AsSBMBI^Y OP VIRGINIA 

That whereas a memorial was presented by the representa- 
tives and others on their behalf in December last to the Honble 
Assembly then sitting, praying for a court of assize &c for the 
better government of your memorialists. And they finding a 
matter of that very great importance to the reciprocal interest 
of the State in general, neglected, or at least not attended to 
agreeable to their wishes as part of the state, more particularly 
at this critical conjuncture of affairs, when the interest of the 
indigent inhabitants so loudly call for some ease or indulgence; 
Your memorialists would wish to observe that the very great 
distance from them to the seat of Government render it imprac- 
ticable for those in poorer circumstances to maintain their 
Just rights to lands, and next to impossible for the civilist to 
punish offences of the most criminal nature, a number of other 
evils might be enumerated to prove the utility of the exersize 
of laws — under the authority alluded to, or some other similar 
thereto 

Your memorialists must beg leave to obserye that they have 
been lately alarm'd at finding that Congress has not only 
refused the Cession offer'd them by a former Assembly, But a 
committee of that August body appointed for the purpose of 
Enquiry have resolved, 'That Virginia, has not any just right 
to land, Northwest of the Alleghany mountains. That with 
pamphlets we have seen and now conceive to have been written 
for the purpose of prejudicing the publick against the claim of 
Virginia, and to prepare your memorialists for paying twenty 
pounds sterling pr hundred for their own lands. Your memorial- 
ists do conceive from the very principal of the constitution of 
America, that if the country they possess does not in right 
belong to Virginia, the prosperity [property] of course must be 
vested in themselves, and that congress has no right to any 
part thereof, and when your memorialists through your Honble 
house make a request to Congress for a new state and are 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

received into the union, They are then and not before subject 
as another state, Those are reasons they think necessary to 
offer to your Honble house, But your memorialists have ever 
considered themselves and country as part of Virginia and 
were happy in being so. Her laws suited them and do yet 
suppose it to be to their interest to be Governed by Her, untill 
it shall appear for their mutual advantage to separate, at which 
period it is expected their will be no objection. What your 
memorialists at present wish is Virginia protection to them as 
part of the State intitled to all its privileges or an information 
of what they may expect; Justice is what they claim, and that 
the Equity of their pretentions will allow them, they view 
themselves as Virginians, and as such they hope what is alluded 
to will not be given up without their consent — ^They allso know 
that it is through them and those they claim as citizens of their 
detached country that the greatest part of the western waters 
is not now in the possession of our most inveterate enimies, 
and could easily prove the importance they have been to the 
interest of the United States — Your memorialists therefore 
hope that your Honble house will take their case into considera- 
tion & grant them such relief as to you may seem Just & 
reasonable 

[Names.] 

NUMBER 25. ^ 

To THE HONORABI^E THE GBNERAI^ ASSEMBLY OF VIRGINIA. 

The Subscribers resident, in the Counties of Jefferson, 
Fayette, Lincoln, and Nelson, composing the district of Ken- 
tucky, being chosen at free Elections, held in these Counties 
respectively, by the Freemen of the same, for the purpose of 
constituting a Convention to take into Consideration the 
General State of the District, and espressly to decide on the 
expediency of making application to your Honorable Body, 
for an Act of Seperation — : deeply impressed with the impor- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

tance of the measure, and breathing the purest filial affection, — 
Beg leave to Address you on the momentous Occasion. — 

The Settlers of this distant region, taught by the arrange- 
ments of Providence, and encouraged by the conditions of that 
Solemn Compact, for which they paid the price of Blood, to 
look forward to a Seperation, from the Eastern parts of the 
Commonwealth, have viewed the subject leisurely, at a distance 
and examined it with caution on its near approach; irrecon- 
cileable as has been their situation to a connexion with any 
Community beyond the Apulachian Mountains, other than the 
Federal Union Manifold as have been the grievances flowing 
therefrom, which have grown with their growth, and increased 
with their Population; They have patiently waited the hour of 
Address nor ever ventured to raise their voices in their own 
cause. Untill Youth quickening into manhood, had given 
them vigor and Stability. — 

To recite minutely the causes and reasoning, which directed, 
and will justify this Address, would we conceive be a matter of 
impropriety at this Juncture; It would be preposterous for us, 
to enter upon the support of facts and consequences, which we 
presume are incontestible; our sequestered situation, from the 
seat of Government, with the intervention of a mountainous 
desart of two hundred miles, always dangerous, and passable 
only at particular seasons, precludes every Idea of a connexion, 
on Republican principles; The Patriots who framed our Con- 
stitution Sensible of the impracticability of connecting perma- 
nently, in a free Government, the extensive Limits of the Com- 
monwealth, most wisely made provision for the Act which we 
now Solicit — . To that Sacred Record we Appeal. — 

*Tis not the ill directed or inconsiderate Zeal of a few, 'tis 
not that impatience of Power to which ambitious minds are 
prone, nor yet the baser consideration of Personal Interest, 
which influence the people of Kentucky; directed by superior 
motives, they are incapable of cherishing a wish unfounded in 
justice, and are now impelled by expanding evils, and irremedi- 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

able grievances, universally seen, felt and acknowledged, to 
obey the irresistible dictates of self preservation, and seek for 
Happiness, by means honourable to themselves, honourable 
to you, and injurious to neither. — 

We therefore with, the consent and by the authority of our 
Constituents, after the most Solemn deliberation being warned 
of every consequence, which can ensue, for them, for ourselves 
and for Posterity unborn — do Pray — ^That an act may pass at 
the ensuing session of Assembly, declaring and acknowledging 
the Sovereignty & Independence of this district. — 

Having no object in view, but the acquisition of that Security 
and happiness, which may be attained by a Scrupulous adher- 
ence to principles of private justice and public Honor, we should 
most willingly at this time, enter into the adjustment of the 
concessions, which are to be the condition of our Seperation, 
did not our relative situation forbid such negotiation, anxious 
however to bring this interesting part of the transaction, to a 
Speedy Issue, we have appointed the Honble George Muter & 
Harry Innes Esquires to present this Address, and in our behalf 
to enter into & ratify such engagements, as may ascertain the 
general Principles, on which the final adjustment of the condi- 
tions of Seperation is to be established. — 

Our application may exhibit a new spectacle, in the History 
& Politicks of Mankind — A Soverign Power; solely intent 
to bless its People agreeing to a dismemberment of its parts, in 
order to secure the Happiness of the whole — ^and we fondly 
flatter ourselves from motives not purely Local, it is to give 
Birth, to that catalogue of great events, which we pursuade 
ourselves, is to diffuse throughout the World, the inestimable 
blessings, which mankind may derive from the American 
Revolution. — 

We firmly rely, that the undiminished Lustre of that Spark, 
which kindled the flame of Liberty, and guided the United 
States of America to Peace & Independence, will direct the 
Honourable Body, to whom we Appeal for redress of Manifest 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

grievances, to embrace the Singular Occasion, reserved for them, 
by Devine Providence; to Originate a precedent, which may 
Liberalize the Policy of Nations and lead to the emancipation 
of enslaved millions. — 

In this Address we have discarded the complimentary stile 
of adulation & insincerity — it becomes Freemen when speaking 
to Freemen, to imploy the plain, manly unadorned Language of 
Independence . . . .[?] 
September 23d 1785. 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition. Octo. 1785 — Refd. to Whole as Com. — 
November 14th 1785 — Committee of Whole discharged and referred to Ths. Madi- 
son, Henry Lee, Bullit, Ronald, Carrington, Alexr. White, Corbin, Page, Th. 
Smith, and Prentis. 

The first action looking toward the creating of Kentucky into a separate State 
is found in an act entitled. An Act concerning the erection of the district of Ken- 
tucky into an independent state. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 37. 

"Whereas it is represented to be the desire of the good people inhabiting the 
district known by the name of the Kentucky District that the same should be 
separated from this Commonwealth whereof it is a part and be formed into an 
independent member of the American Confederacy and it is judged by the General 
Assembly that such a partition of the Commonwealth is rendered expedient by 
the remoteness of the more fertile which must be the more populous part of the 
said district and by the interjacent impediment to a convenient and regular com- 
munication therewith. Be it enacted," etc. 

A convention was to be held at Danville on the fourth Monday of September 
made up of delegates from the seven counties, five from each. The call was to 
be posted twenty days and the election was to continue five days to give full 
opportunity for expression of opinion. 

The boundary was to be unchanged, the new State was to assume its ju^t 
proportion of the debt, the lands of non-residents were not to be taxed above 
those of residents, grants of land by the new State were not to interfere with grants 
made by Virginia, lands set apart for soldiers were subject to grant only by Vir- 
ginia, up to 1788, the use of the Ohio River to be common, disputes between Vir- 
ginia and Kentucky to be settled by a commission, and assent of United States 
Congress to the separation necessary. 

NUMBER 26. 

To THE HONOURABLB RBPRESBNTATIVES OF THE CiTIZBNS OF THE COMHONWBALTH 

OF Virginia, in Gbnbral Assembly met — 

The petition of the Inhabitants of Lincoln County — 
humbly sheweth — 

That your petitioners beg leave to present their following 
Request to your Honble House, confiding in your Wisdom & 

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CUT OF FACSIMILE PETITION 

Photograph of a petition from Lincoln County to the General Assembly. Illustrative of the source from 

which the book is made. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

generous Encouragement, of this Scheme; Which they persume 
to lay before You — 

That your petitioners taking into their serious Considera- 
tion, of a proper place for Trade and Domestic Business, and 
for the more ready procuring those Articles in our precincts 
that are much wanted in the new Country; Are of opinion, that 
the Survey of Six hundred and forty acres of Land, which your 
Honble House formerly reserved for the Use of the Garrison 
& Town of Harrodsburgh, is the most convenient and suitable 
in the County, It not only being commodious to any convenient 
Division of the County, but also central to the present Inhabi- 
tants of the same; And we can assure your Honble House not 
only its relative; but its natural Situation & Conveniences, are 
almost in every Respect suitable for Domestic Trade; The 
Premises being sufficiently level very fertile and well watered, 
by many never failing Springs and a large Stream running 
quite through the same; from which Circumstances We are of 
opinion that no Survey of the same Quantity can excel it in the 
County — 

And we would further beg leave to present to your Honble 
House, an exact plot of the premises, with the plan of a Town 
adapted to the same; praying that your Honble House would 
take the whole into Consideration, & pass an Act for Conveying 
the same to Freeholders, and other Citizens in a Manner most 
agreeable to your Wisdom and determination — 

For which your petitioners are bound in duty to pray — 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition: Lincoln Pets, for a Town — (reasonable). 

The request for a town in Lincoln was granted in an act entitled, An Act for 
establishing a town in the county of Lincoln. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 223. 

"That six hundred and forty acres of land allowed by law, including the said 
village or township, shall be and the same is hereby vested in William Christian, 
John Brown, Robert Mosby, Samuel Lapsley, peter Casey, John Smith, Samuel 
Taylor, John Cowan, John Gilmore, James Harrod, Abraham Chaplaine, William 
Kennedy, and Benjamin Logan.'' 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

haJMBER 27. 

To THB Honourable thb speaker and Gentlemen op the House op Delegates 
POR THE Commonwealth op Virginia — 

The petition of sundry inhabitants of the county of Lincoln 
humbly sheweth — 

That they labour under great inconveniences from the large 
extent of said county and number of inhabitants therein; and 
that the vast number of litigants whose causes must of necessity 
be determined in the court of said county renders it very 
tedious and expensive attending the same for the calling of 
their causes and oppressive to the justices who determine 
them — 

Your petitioners beg leave to represent to your honourable 
house that the aforesaid Grievances may be redressed by 
laying off two distinct counties to be taken from the county 
of Lincoln to be bounded as follows, viz. The first county — 
By a line beginning at the confluence of sugar Creek and Ken- 
tucky river thence proceeding by a direct line to John Crows 
sinking spring, the mouth of Clark's Run, thence a straight 
line to Wilson's Station in the fork of Clark's run thence the 
same course continued to the line of Nelson Coupty — ^Thence 
with said line to the line of Jefferson county, thence with that 
line to the Kentucky River, Thence up said river to the Ban- 
ning. For one distinct county — ^The second county — By a 
line beginning at the confluence of Kentucky river and sugar 
creek, thence up said creek to the fork James Thompson lives 
on, thence up said fork to the head thereof, thence a straight 
line to where an East course from John Ellis's will intersect 
the top of the ridge that divides the waters of Paint Lick from 
the waters of Dicks river, thence along the top of the said ridge 
southwardly opposite Harman's lick, thence 45° East to the 
main Rock Castle river, thence running up said river to the 
head thereof, thence with the ridge that divides the waters of 
Kentucky river from the waters of Cumberland river to the 
line of Washington county, thence along said line to the main 

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To tlte General Assembly of Virginia 

fork of Kentucky river that divides Fayette from Lincoln 
county, thence down the said river to the Beginning for one 
distinct County. 

We your petitioners in reliance upon the propriety and the 
Justice of your prayer, hope that you in your wisdom will duly 
consider the premisses and that our request will be attended 
to — and your petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Lincoln, to wit: 

I hereby certify that it has been publickly advertized within 
the said county that a petition would be presented to the next 
session of Assembly for a division of the county of Lincoln by 
a line to run as proposed in the within petition. Given under 
this 26th day of September 1785. 
(Copy) Willis Green Clk. L. C. 



Endorsement on back of petition: November 23rd. 1785 — Refd. to Props. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for dividing Lincoln into 
three distinct counties. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 118. 

The division was to date from August, 1786. The counties were Mercer and 
Madison. 



haJMBER 28. 

To THB Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Delegates — 

The petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of Fay- 
ette Humbly sheweth 

That from the extensive Boundaries of this County it 
subjects many of its Inhabitants to great Inconveniences, In 
Transacting their necessary business at their County Court, 
Many of your Petitioners have at least Sixty five miles to 
Lexington their present Court House; and most of the way 
being uninhabited render it dangerous to your petitioners In 
going to and from Court, from the frequent Incursions of Hos- 
tile Savages, And as your petitioners conceive, that in all 
governments the obtaining of Justice should be made as safe 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

& easy as possible to all its Citizens, and as no persons can 
possibly receive any Injury from the Division of this County; 
And your Petitioners acquire an I mediate Benefit. Pray, that 
your Honorable House will at the next Session pass an act for 
the Division thereof In manner following — 

Beginning at the mouth of Uper Howards Creek on Ken- 
tucky River runing up the Main fork thereof to the Head 
thence with the Dividing Ridge between Kentucky & Licking 
Creek untill it comes opposite the Head of Eagle Creek, from 
thence a Direct Line to the nearest part of Ravin Creek a 
Branch of Licking, Down Ravin Creek to the Mouth thereof, 
thence with Licking to the Ohio — thence with the Ohio to the 
mouth of Sandy Creek, Up Sandy to the Cumberland Mountain 
with sd Mountain to Lincoln Line thence with the Lincoln 
Line & Down Kentucky River to the Beginning, And all that 
part within the Lines above described, be Established into a 
seperate County. And your petitioners shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Fayette County to wit 

I Levi Todd Clerk of the Court of the County aforesaid do 
certify That an advertisement setting forth (that a Petition 
praying for a division of the County aforesaid nearly (if not 
quite) agreeable to the plan mentioned in this Petition would 
be presented to the next Session of the General Assembly) On 
two different Court days at the Courthouse of the said County. 

Test Levi Todd 



Endorsement on back of petition: Nov. 25th. 1785 — Refd. to Props. — 
(reasonable) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for dividing the County 
of Fayette. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 89. 

The division was to date ifrom May, 1788. Bourbon Co. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 29. 

To TH8 Honourable thb General Assembly for the Commonwealth of 
Virginia. 

The Petition of James Hogan Humbly sheweth 
That your Petitioner at the request and solicitations of a 
number of the Inhabitants in the Kentucky District has pro- 
vided himself with a Boat, Hands &c for the purpose of keeping 
a Ferry across the Kentucky River from Lands of his own in 
Lincoln County to his Lands in Fayette County at the mouth 
of Hickmans Creek where the publick Warehouses are ordered 
to be erected. Your Petitioner therefore prays this Honorable 
House to pass an Act for establishing the same a publick Ferry 
and fixing the rates of Ferriage. And whereas the keeping of a 
Ferry across the Kentucky River will be attended with more 
trouble and inconvenience than is usual on Rivers of that size 
owing to its peculiar situation & its being fordable generally 
six or seven months of the year your petitioner is induced to 
ask your Honble House for such as Augmentation to the 
general rates of Ferriage as may enable him to attend and serve 
the publick faithfully — 

And your Petitioner shall ever pray etc. 

James Hogan 
October 1st 1785 — 

Fayette County 

I Levi Todd Clerk of the County aforesaid do certify that 
James Hogan did legally advertise that he intended presenting 
this Petition at the ensuing Session of Assembly. Given under 
my Hand this 13th day of September 1785 — 

Levi Todd CI. 

Lincoln to wit: — 

I hereby certify that James Hogan did advertise at the 
Courthouse of said County on two several Court days that he 
intended to prefer a Petition to the next Session of Assembly 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

for establishing a Ferry across the Kentucky at the mouth of 
Hickman. Given under my hand this 4th day of October 

1785— 

Willis Green 



Endorsement on back of petition : Nov. 29th. 1785 — (Refd. to Props) (reason- 
able) 

This and subsequent requests were granted in an act entitled, An Act for 
establishing several new ferries. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 83. 

NUMBER 30. 

To THB Honorable the Gbnbrai* Assbmbi^y of thb Coicmonwbai^th op 
Virginia. 

The Petition of David Crews Humbly sheweth That at the 
request of sundry Inhabitants of the County of Lincoln & 
others Your Petitioner was induced to build a Boat for the 
purpose of Transporting passengers across the Kentucky River 
near the mouth of Jacks Creek from Lands of his own in 
Lincoln County to other Lands which he claims in the County 
of Fayette to which place Roads are now clearing and gen- 
erally adjudged the most convenient crossing place on the 
Kentucky River above Hickmans Creek. 

Your Petitioner prays that an Act may pass your Honora- 
ble House establishing the same as a publick Ferry and to 
ascertain the rates of Ferriage. 

And your Petitioner shall ever pray &c 

David Crews 
Oct. 1st 1785 — 
Lincoln County Set. 

I do hereby certify that an Advertisement was set up at 
the Courthouse Door of this County at the July and August 
Courts last, notifying that an application would be made to 
the next General Assembly for the within purpose signed by 
David Crew. 

Teste Willis Green CI. L. C. 

Oct. 7th 1785— 

Endorsement on back of petition: Dec. 9th, 1785— (Refd. to Props) (Reason- 
able) 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 31. 

To THB HONBLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP THB COMMOKWSALTH OF VIRGINIA^ 

The Petition of William Steele Humbly sheweth 
That your Petitioner has furnished himself with proper 
Boats for the purpose of keeping a Ferry across the Kentucky 
River at a place called the Stone lick from Lands of his own in 
Fayette to the Land supposed to belong to John Craig in 
Lincoln County, to which place a Road is now opening from 
Lexington. Your Petitioner prays that an Act may pass your 
Honble House for establishing the same a publick Ferry And 
shall pray &c. 

Will Steele 

Notice is hereby given to all whome it may concern that a 
petition will be presented to the next General Assembly to 
obtain an act for Establishing a publick ferry across the Ken- 
tucky River from the Lands of William Steele on the uper side 
of the mouth of the Stone Lick branch in Fayette County to 
the lands opposite in Lincoln County Oct. nth 1785 

This day came before me David Henderson and made oath 
that the within was set up on Fayette Court House two Courts. 
Given under my hand this nth day of Oct. 1785 — 

Wm. McConnell. 



Endorsement on back of petition: Dec. 10 1785 — ^Refd. to Props — (Reason- 
able) 



NUMBER 32. ^ 

To THB HONORABLB THQ SpSAKBR AND GQNTLSMBN OP THS HOUSB OP DBLBGATBS 

The petition of sundry inhabitants of the County of Bourbon 
humbly sheweth, That a Number of your petitioners are settled 
in that part of the said County of Bourbon which is commonly 
known by the name of Limestone Settlement about forty 
miles distant from the place agreed on for holding the Court 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

of the said County, and which is not only a distinct settlement 
at present from the part of the said County but must remain 
so for many years by the Intervention of a Mountainous tract 
of Barren Land running down on each side of the main branch 
of Licking Creek, that cannot be inhabited. And exposes your 
petitioners to be surprised & murdered by the savages who fre- 
quently infest such places. And the main branch of Licking 
being a considerable and Rapid Water course often obstructs 
a convenient communication with the other part of the County 
and renders it inconvenient and expencive to suitors and others 
to attend the present Courthouse. And altho it may be ob- 
jected that the number of Inhabitants in the neighborhood of 
Limestone are too inconsiderable to be separated from the other 
part of the County at present. Yet when it is considered that 
one of the principal inlets for Emigrants into the Country is 
at this place, and from the Rapid Settlement that is now 
making. There is no doubt but a sufficiency of Inhabitants 
will soon be collected. Your Petitioners therefore pray that 
your Hon. House will take their situation into consideration, 
and Erect all that part of the said County of Bourbon, which 
lies Nortli of the main branch of Licking, To b^n at the mouth 
of the said Licking Creek, thence up the main branch thereof 
to the Head thence a direct line to the Junction of the Maddison 
& Russell County lines thence along the Russell line to Bigg 
Sandy, thence down the same to the mouth, thence down the 
Ohio River to the Beginning into a distinct County, and your 
petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray 
August 25th 1786 [Names.] 

I do hereby certify that advertisements have been exhibited 
according to Law for them shewing the Intention of the within 
petitioners In presenting the same to the next General Assembly 

John Edward CI 

Endorsement on back of petition : Octo. 26. 1786 — ^Refd. to Props. — Rejected 
— ^recommitted next session. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 33. / 

To THB Honorable ths Spbakbr and Gbntlbmbn op thb Housb op Dblbqatbs 
OP Virginia. 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of 
Bourbon humbly sheweth that advertisements have been 
exhibited at the door of their Court House ever since the May 
past at which time the Court of Bourbon took place for 
dividing the same into three Counties, and as your Petitioners 
conceive that such Division if granted will not only derange 
all the public business of the County which has been very 
much the Case by the late Division to the great injury of 
individuals, but must so weaken the militia of the present 
County as to render them incapable of defending themselves 
as well as of paying their County Levy; the County having 
now in all not more than four hundred effective militia, and 
your Petitioners further conceive that as the Erection of Ken- 
tuckey into a free independent state will most undoubtedly 
take place and that the good people of the said District may 
divide the same into Counties as they think proper: And as 
your Petitioners conceive that the Petition to be presented 
to your Honorable House for the Division of the County of 
Bourbon, if it takes place may be very oppressive to your 
Petitioners who pray that no such Divisions may take place, 
but that the same may be postponed until the next session of 
Assembly or until it is known whether the District is erected 
into an independent State and your Petitioners as in duty 
bound will ever pray 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: Octo. 26th. 1786— Refd. to Props— reason- 
able — ^recommitted. 

NUMBBR34. 

To THB HONOURABLB THB SpBAKBR AND GBNTLBMBN OP THB HOUSB OP DBLBGATBS 

The petition of sundry inhabitants of the county of Bourbon 
humbly sheweth, that the most of them are settied in a new 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Village called Washington in the settlement of Limestone in 
the Cty aforesaid, where there are upwards of Seven hundred 
Acres Land laid off for in & out lots for the use of sd Village, 
and where there are now settled upwards of Fifty families 
among whom are Mechanicks of divers kinds, and the prospect 
of a rapid settlement being made to the great advantage of 
village & Country. The sd Village is also judged to be situated 
in the most central & convenient place to the adjacent County, 
and that it would be the most proper place for erecting publick 
buildings for the use of a County as soon as one is laid off. We 
therefore humbly pray that your honourable House will estab- 
lish the said Village into a Town by the name of Washington 
and your petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray &c 
August 22d 1786 — 

[Names.] 

I do hereby certify that advertisements according to Law have 
been Exhibited shewing the Intention of the petitioners In 
presenting the same to the next General Assembly. 

John Edward CI. B. C. 



Endorsement on back of petition: October 27th. 1787— Refd. to Props— 
(Reasonable) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for establishing a town 
in the County of Bourbon. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 361. 

The name was to be Washington. The trustees were Edmund Lyne, Edward 
Waller, Henry Lee, Miles W. Conway, Arthur Fox, Daniel Boone, Robert Ranldns, 
John Gutridge, William Lamb. 

NUMBBR35. 

To THQ HONOURABL8 THB SpEAKBR and GBNTLBMBN OP THB HOUSB OF DBLB- 
GATES, 

the petition of James HoUoway humbly sheweth, 

That he entered the Service in March 1776, in the fourth 
Virginia Regiment and continued as an officer in sd. Regiment 
untill the engagement at White Plains, Sept. 1778, at which 
time he became a Supernumerary. After returning home he 
raised a company of militia and fought in the battle of Guilford 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

under command of Gen. Lawson, who had been Commander of 
sd 4th Regiment. During the service, your petitioner was in 
the following engagements, viz, at Trenton, Princeton, Brande- 
wyne, German-Town and Monmouth. 

As it has been allowed to several persons in similar circum- 
stances to receive the bounty in lands which was stipulated for 
three years service; and as your Petitioner continued more 
than that time in the duties of a soldier on every opportunity 
of action, and still continues to act his part in defending the 
Western Frontiers in present expeditions against the Indian 
Tribes; it is the prayer of this petition that your Honourable 
House will take his case into consideration and indulge him 
with such recompence as his conduct may seem to merit, such 
as has been conferred in like cases, and such as may have been 
requested or obtained by several whose circumstances rendered 
them less proper objects of liberality to their Country: And 
your Petitioner, as in duty bound shall ever pray &c. 
Fayette County, Sept. 21 1786 

Endorsement on back of petition: HoUoways Rep. — October 27th. 1786 — 
Rejected. 

NUMBER 36. 

Thb Honourable thb Spbaker & Gbntlbmbn op the housb op Dblbgatbs 

The petition of Sundry of the Inhabitants of Lincoln County 
humbly sheweth — ^That the Courthouse of the said County 
Now is and heretofore has been on the Land of a private Indi- 
vidual. In consequence of which no person could undertake 
to Build houses and provide proper accomodations for those 
whose business obliges them to attend the said Court of ^d 
county. — ^That Colo Benjamin Logan the proprietor of the 
Land whereon the courthouse now stands, has given up and 
conveyed twenty six acres of Land to the Court of said County 
for the purpose of laying off a Town and Building a courthouse 
and prison thereon for the Use of said County. In consequence 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

of which conveyance, the Court of said County have proceeded 
to lay off the said 26 acres of Land into Lotts and streets, 
and have made sale of the Lotts some of which are considerably 
improved. 

The said 26 acres of Land lies within one half mile of where 
the courthouse now stands, and as near the center of the County 
as any place can be had with Equal advantage, The Roads to 
and from the place where the Courthouse now stands being 
easyly turned in a Direction to any part of the 26 acres of 
Land, — 

Your petitioners therefore humbly pray that a Law may 
pass for establishing a Town of the said 26 acres of Land, to be 
called Stanford and that John Logan, Benjamin Logan, Isaac 
Shelby, Henry Pauling, Walker Baylor, Wm. Morrison and 
Alexander Blair — Be appointed Trustees of said town that the 
Court of said County be empower'd to remove the Courthouse 
and prison of said County to the Town of Stanford ; Or to Erect 
new ones as to them shall seem most expedient for the holding 
of Courts in said County for the future and your petitioners 
shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Lincoln to wit 

I hereby certify that it has been publickly advertised at the 
Courthouse of said County on two several Court days, that the 
within Petition would be preferr'd to the next Session of Assem- 
bly Given under my hand this 28th day of September 1786. 

Willis Green. 



Endorsement on back of petition: Octo. 27. 1786 — Refd. to Props, (reason- 
able) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to establish a town on 
the lands of the late Benjamin Logan, in the county of Lincoln and to fix the place 
of holding court therein. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 306. 

The following were to be the trustees : Benjamin Logan, John Logan, William 
Montgomery (?) , Henry Pauling, Isaac Shelby, Walker Baylor, Alexander Blane. (?) 

The amount of land was twenty-six acres and the name of the town was 
Stanford. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 37. 

To TH8 HONORABLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA— 

The Petition of Jane Todd widow and relict of John Todd 
late of the County of Fayette deceased, and also Executrix of 
the said John Todd; and Robert Todd Excr. of the said John 
Todd Humbly sheweth 

That their Testator upon the opening of the Land office in 
the year 1779 vested the greatest part of his personal property 
in Land Warrants and settlements & Preemption Claims, which 
were located in the District of Kentucky, but before titles could 
be obtained for the Lands to which he was intitled, he was 
killed by the Indians in an engagement with them, in the County 
of Fayette, as is supposed, he not having been heard of since — 

That none of the said Lands were surveyed in the Lifetime 
of the Testator, and Since his decease your Petitioners have 
been obliged to pay the expence of surveying & obtaining 
Titles for the said Lands and to discharge Debts due from the 
Testator to a much greater amount than the Personal Estate 

That there are a number of Debts still due from the Estate 
of the said John Todd and other claims upon the Estate for 
Lands sold by the Testator, for which Titles cannot be made and 
for the payment of which the few slaves belonging to the 
Estate consisting of two Women only, must be sold but which 
will not it is supposed be sufficient for that purpose. — 

Your Petitioners beg leave further to observe that the Testa- 
tor has only one Child Mary Owen Todd living, who is about 
five years old, and that the Estate would be very sufficient to 
support her genteely, & to pay all Taxes upon the Lands could 
a Sale of Part of the Lands be made, and after discharging the 
Debts a Sum not considerable be applied to the purpose of 
purchasing Slaves for her, as she has several very valuable 
Tracts of Land — ^That your Petitioner Jane who is entitled to 
Dower would chearfully join in a sale of any part thereof for 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

the purpose aforesaid and would be satisfied to take her Dower 
in the slaves to be purchased, in lieu of her Dower in the Lands — 

Your Petitioners therefore Humbly Pray that an act may 
pass, appointing Trustees to sell & convey as much of the Lands 
belonging to the Estate as will pay off the Demands thereupon 
and purchase two likely young negro fellows and one wench to 
be vested in the said Mary Owen Todd & your Petitioner Jane 
as aforesaid — 

And they as in duty bound will ever pray &c. 



Endorsement on back of petition: Octo. 28th. 1786. — ^Refd. to props. — 
(Reasonable) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act appointing tnistees to 
sell part of the lands of John Todd, deceased, for the payment of his debts and for 
other purposes. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 360. 



NUMBER 38. 

To THB HoNBLB Thb Housb OP Dblbgates 

The petition of Mary Ervin most humbly sheweth That 
your petitioner's Son John Askins served as a soldier in the 
continental service for three years and afterwards as a captain 
of the militia in the District of Kentucky and always distin- 
guished himself as a good and faithful citizen of the United 
States in general and of Virginia in particular. That he, in 
common with the rest of his fellow soldiers, received an oppor- 
tionment of Land in the District afsd as a Reward for his 
services and to the great distress of your Petitioner lately 
died — leaving neither wife nor children nor any person so nearly 
related to him as your Petitioner — ^That during his life time he 
sold fifteen hundred Acres of the above mentioned Land to 
sundry persons whose titles have not been confirmed — Now 
your Petitioner most reluctantly sheweth to this Honble House 
That her afsd Son John Askins was not bom in lawful wedlock 
and therefore by the laws of this Commonwealth his property 
escheats. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

But your petitioner most humbly prayeth that in considera- 
tion of her being the nearest and dearest Relation to the de- 
ceased, your Honble House will compassionate her situation 
and permit a Law to pass relinquishing the Right of the com- 
monwealth to the Land afsd. and vesting the Title in her, 
reserving nevertheless the equitable Rights of the purchasers 
afsd. and your Petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray. 

Monongalia County SS. Before Me one of the Justices of 
said County came Mary Ervin you worships [?] Petitioner & 
made oath that the above mentioned John Askins was her son 
and was ill^etmate Bom & is Dead and Died without Being 
Tested or having any Heirs at Law 

her 
Mary X Ervin 
mark 
Sworn & Subscribed this nth Day of Oct 1786 
Dal McCoUum 



Endorsement on back of petition : Octo. 30th. 1786— Refd to props — (Reason- 
able) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to vest the land whereof 
John Askins died seized in Mary Arvin, [Brvin] his mother. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 12. 363. 

NUMBER 39. 

To THB Honourable thb Gqnbral Assembly op thb Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia — 

The Petition of Christopher Greenup Humbly sheweth 
That your Petitioner being appointed Clerk to the Supreme 
Court for the District of Kentucky, is obliged by virtue of his 
office to transmit an Account, and pay into the publick Treas- 
ury, all Taxes arising on Process and other Law proceedings 
instituted, or admitted in the said Court, That the distance of 
his residence from the seat of Government is so great, he cannot 
possibly attend in person to make the Payments, but is under 
the necessity of applying to and trusting such Persons as he 
can procure to do that business for him, by which he is constant- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

ly exposed not only to considerable expence and inconvenience 
but the risk of incurring the Penalty inflicted by Law on Delin- 
quent Clerks 

Your Petitioner begs leave further to Represent to your 
Honourable House, that he is entitled to draw money from the 
Treasury annually for his Ex offico Services, which is also 
attended with inconveni^ice and Risk, and might in a great 
measure be remedied if he was authorized to retain in his hands 
so much of the money arising on Taxes as wou'd satisfy his 
demand, and also the Expence of procuring Record Books and 
other incidental charges of the said Court (the Same being 
first Liquidated and Certified by the Judges, to be just) and the 
Treasurer authorized to receive such claims in discharge of 
those Taxes — 

Your Petitioner therefore prays that your Hon'ble House 
will so far indulge him as to settle his publick account of Taxes 
in the manner herein pointed out, or such other mode of indul- 
gence as your Honors shall deem Just And your Petitioner 
will pray &c 

Christr Greenup 

September 26th 1786 



Endorsement on back of petition: Novr. 6th. 1786— Refd. to Props. — (Reas- 
onable)— (rept.) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An act for further amending an 
Act intiiled, an Act for establishing a district court on the western waters. Hen- 
ings Statutes, Vol. 12, 704. 

Provision was made for a receiver to avoid the necessity of judges and other 
officials applying to counties for salaries. 



NUMBER 40. 

To THB HONORABLS TH8 SpBAKBR AND GBNTLBMBN OP THB HOUSB OF DBLBGATBS 

The petition of Sundry of the Inhabitants of the county of 
Fayette, humbly sheweth, that from the situation of your 
petitioners they think it highly convenient that an Inspection 
of Tobacco be established on the North side of the Kentucky 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

River at the mouth of Hickman Creek, your Petitioners there- 
fore prays this honorable house to take the same under their 
consideration and to pass a law for the purpose aforesaid. 
And your petitioners as in duty bound shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Fayette County Virginia to wit — 

I Levi Todd Clerk of the Court of the County aforesaid do 
certify that an advertisement was set up at the door of the 
Court house of the said County on the Court days in the months 
of July and August notifying that a Petition would be presented 
the next Session of the General Assembly praying that a 
Warehouse may be established on the North side of Kentucky 
River at the mouth of Hickmans Creek. Given under my 
hand this Seventeenth day of September 1787. 

Levi Todd 



Endorsement on back of the petition: October 19th. 1787 — Refd. to proposi- 
tions — (reasonable) (repd) 

The request was granted in an act entitled. An Act for establishing several 
new inspections of tobacco and reviving and establishing others. Henings 
Statutes, Vol. 12, 680. 

This act provides inspection in Fayette, Mercer, Mason, Madbon, and Bour- 
bon counties. 

An earlier act provided for inspection of tobacco, entitled, An Act for estab- 
lishing inspections of tobacco on the western waters. Henings Statutes, Vol. 
11, 345. 

This was in October, 1783, and provided inspection in Fayette, Lincoln, and 
Jefferson counties. 

The provisions generally included in the inspection acts may be seen in a 
general act entitled. An Act for reviving several public warehouses for the re- 
ception of Tobacco and other purposes. Henings Statutes, Vol. 9, 153. 

Several acts previous to tliis had expired in 1775, and it was now "thought 
expedient that some temporary method should be provided for the reception and 
inspection of tobacco at or near the heads of the rivers and creeks." 

Among the detaib of inspection it is provided that "if the inspectors, upon 
breaking open a hogshead, shall agree that the same is merchantable they shall 
weigh such tobacco and the ca§k, entering in their books and stamping on the 
cask the mark, number, gross, tare, and new weight thereof, and give to the owner 
a note or receipt for the same," etc. 

These notes of the warehouse "shall pass in payment of levies, officers fees, 
and other tobacco debts payable in the counties," etc. Forging and counterfeit- 
ing tobacco notes renders liable "to suffer death without benefit of clergy." 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentticky 

NUMBER 41. 

To THB HONORABLB THB ASSBMBLY OF THB COMMONWBAI.TH OF VIRGINIA— 

The Petition of Ignatius Mitchell humbly Sheweth — 

That your Petitioner is possessed of a Tract of Land lying 
on the River Ohio, at the mouth of Lawrence's Creek about 
Six miles below Limestone, a Spot remarkably advantageously 
situated for a Town, it is well known, to have an excellent 
Bank on the River, and from accurate Surveys a road far 
preferable to any other, may be obtained: Your Petitioner 
conceives it unnecessary to detail the advantages of this Spot, 
and b^s leave to refer your Honbl House to the Representa- 
tives of Bourbon and Fayette Counties, for particulars. — 

Your Petitioner prays that a Town by the name of Charles 
Town may be established by an Act of your Hona House at 
the aforesaid Spot, subject to such regulations as your wisdom 
may direct; And your Petitioner as in duty bound shall ever 
pray &c. 

We the Subscribers are of opinion, that the Spot, before 
described, is well calculated for a Town; and a good road may 
be made thereto, 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: 20th. October. 1787 — Referred to propo- 
sitions — (reasonable) (Repd.) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to establish a Town on 
lands of Ignatius Mitchell, in Co of Bourbon. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 608. 

The trustees were John Grant, Charles Smith, Jr., Thomas Warren, Miles 
Withers Conway, Henry Lee, John Machir, Robert Rankin. 
, The name of the town was to be Charlestown. 

NUMBER 42. 

To THB HONOURABLB THQ SpBAKER AND GSNTLBMBN OF THB HOUSB OF DBLB- 
GATBS. 

The petition of the Subscribers Inhabitants of the District 
of Kentucky humbly sheweth That the Commissioners ap- 
pointed to settle the pay rations and other claims accruing from 
two Expeditions carried on in the year 1786 under General 
Clark and Col. Logan have sat in different parts of the District 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

and issued certificates for claims to them preferred for such 
Services & property as is enumerated in the Law under which 
they acted But it appears there are some Claims which have not 
been offered for settlement owing to the inattention of the 
claiiners and their not having Knowledge of the Law and in 
some instances Certificates have issued for Property supposed 
to be lost which has since come to hand, and as there was 
Property necessary for the army which is not particularly 
mentioned in the Law such as Liquor, Vessels for the transporta- 
tion of the Troops and stores, some Tents, & a few other articles 
which tho necessary for the army but not being enumerated 
in the Law. The Commissioners did not think themselves 
justifiable to issue Certificates therefor — Your Petitioners 
therefore pray that the Law may be amended authorizing and 
directing the County Courts upon due proof being made to 
grant Certificates for claims yet unsettled for all necessaries 
furnished or Impressed for the use of the said armies, and where 
it is made appear that the property for which a Certificate is 
issued is tendered or restored to the original owner that he 
may be called on and compelled to deliver to the commanding 
officer of the County or some other person such property or 
Certificate of the same value under such penalty and regulation 
as the Honorable Houses of Assembly may judge proper or 
that such other method may be desired that may render equal 
Justice to the Inhabitants of the District and we in Duty 
bound will ever Pray &c. 

[Names.] 

We are of opinion this Petition is just and reasonable witness 

our Hands this 19th day of Septr 1787. 

Edmund Lyne 
Isaac Shelby 
Rich. Taylor 

Endorsement on the back of petition: 22nd, October 1787. Referred to 
Propositions. — County Courts to finish business — not to extend allowances — 
(rejd.) 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to amend the Act for 
appointing Commissioners to liquidate and settle the expenses incurred in two 
expeditions carried on from the Kentucky District against the neighboring 
Indians and for other purposes. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 521. 

By the act the powers of the Commissioners were extended. They were 
authorized to settle claims, grant certificates to pay militia necessary to defense 
of frontier during 1786 and 1787 and for removing arms and ammunition from 
Limestone to Lexington, and from Blockhouse to Danville. 

The act first creating the board of commissioners is an act entitled, An Act 
for appointing Commissioners to liquidate and settle the expenses incurred in 
two expeditions carried on from the Kentucky District against the neighboring 
Indians. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 231. 

"Whereas the citizens of this Comimon wealth in the District of Kentucky 
have lately carried on two expeditions against the neighboring tribes of Indians 
and it is reasonable that such services should be rewarded, Be it enacted," etc. 

The commissioners were Edmund Lyne, Isaac Shelby, Richard Taylor. 

The lands of officers and soldiers in the Kentucky District were to be exempt 
from taxation until further direction of the Legislature. 

NUMBER 43. 

To THB Hon'BLB the SpBAKBR AND DELBGATES OP THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 

Virginia — 

The Petition of Sundry inhabitants of the County of Fayette 
and those contiguous to Steeles ferry, near the mouth of Stone 
Lick on the Kentucky River. Sheweth to your honors that 
your Petitioners are desirous of making Tobaco to pay their 
taxes and for other purposes and have not at this time any 
Convenient warehouse or Inspection to receive it when made, 
they therefore pray that your honors may pass an Act to estab- 
lish Inspections on the Land of William Steele, who has already 
a convenient house erected for the purpose at his landing near 
his ferry on the said River, it being a very convenient place for 
the reception and shiping Tobaco, and^ convenient to a large 
number of the Inhabitants of the said County, and your Peti- 
tioners shall pray &c &c. 

[Names.] 
Fayette County Virginia to wit 

I Levi Todd Clerk of the Court of the county aforesaid do 
certify that it was publickly advertised at the Door of the 
Courthouse of the County aforesaid at the Courts held in the 
months of July and August that a Petition would be presented 
to the next General Assembly for the Establishing a Warehouse 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

for the reception of Tobacco at or near Steels landing near the 
mouth of Stone Lick 

Given under my hand this 12th day of September 1787. 
Levi Todd. 

Endorsement on back of petition: 22 October 1787 — Referred to Props. — 
reasonable — (rept. ) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to enable the citizens of 
this Commonwealth to discharge certain taxes, by the payment of tobacco. Hen- 
ings Statutes, Vol. 12, 258. 

Notes for inspected tobacco were to be used and rated at twenty shillings for 
one hundred pounds. They were good in payments to superior judges, and ex- 
penses of government due to public treasury in case of surplus. 

NUMBER 44. 

To THB HONORABLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA 

the petition of James Buchanan of the County of Bourbon 
humbly sheweth that your Petitioner having acquired at a 
great expence the claim of one half the lower blue Licks on 
Licking Creek of a certain James Parberry of Henry County 
& hath lately had the same divided and conveyed by Deeds 
in Fee Simple which were acknowledged and recorded according 
to Law: Your Petitioners part of the said Tract or parcel of 
Land includes the only good place for a Ferry across said Creek 
on the road leading from the mouth of Limestone to Lexington 
& your Petitioner at the request of many of his Neighbours 
hath provided a Boat & hands at his own Expence & set over 
passengers in time of high water from many of whom he has 
neither received Fee nor reward therefore your Petitioner prays 
that a Ferry may be established on his Lands on the one side 
of Licking Creek to his Lands on the opposite Shore. Your 
Petitioner lately alarmed by an advertisement set up at the 
door of the Court House of this County by said Parberry 
declaring his Intentions of applying to the next General Assem- 
bly for the establishment of a Ferry on what he calls his Lands 
on the said Creek running parallel with your Petitioner's which 
Place your Honorable House may be assured is a rapid and 
entirely unfit for a Ferry & therefore he can derive very^^little 
advantage to himself but would do much Injury to your Peti- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

tioner who hath for some Time lived with his Family on the 
Place much exposed to the Indians: Your Petitioner in support 
of the above allegations hath obtained a certificate of Colo 
James Garrard Surveyor of the said County who run the 
dividing Line by Consent of the Parties which Line stands as 
the Boundary mentioned in the Deed To which Certificate your 
Petitioner hopes your Honorable House will give the highest 
credit he being no way interested. Your Petitioner begs Leave 
further to inform your Honorable House that the said Parberry 
had prior to the Sale of the one Half sold to your Petitioner 
disposed of his other Half of the said Claim unto William 
Buchanan at the same time giving sufficient writings for the 
Conveyance of the Same and receiving full value in Lands lying 
on Holstan's river which obligations have since been assigned 
over and now become the claim of Mr. James French of the 
District of Kentuckey. And your petitioner for the better 
Information of your Honorable House hath inclosed a true 
copy of the Articles of agreement between William Buchanan 
and sd Parberry & your Petitioner humbly hopes that your 
Honorable House will take the same Into consideration & 
grant him the said Ferry & your Petitioner as in duty bound 
shall ever pray. j^^ Buchanan 

This is to certify that being caird on by Mr. James Parberry 
to Divide the Tract of Land that contains the lower Blue Licks 
and having run the Dividing Line through the two Licks, one 
on each side of Licking Creek and having View'd the situation 
of the Landings proper for a Ferry are of opinion that the 
Lands of Mr James Buchanan is by far the most proper for a 
ferry By reason of a short Break of the Hills which forms a 
perfect Eddy and secure Landing when the Creek is past ford- 
ing which runs rapidly over Mr. Parberrys Landing, and I do 
further certify that I am not Interested any way in the Estab- 
lishment of the ferry at the Lick, only as a Citizen Given under 
my hand this 15th day of Sept 1787. 

James Garrard, Surveyor Bourbon C. 
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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

I John Edmund Clerk of Bourbon County do Certify that the 
within Petition was advertised according to Law 

John Edmund C B C 
September the 20th 1787. 

Endorsement on back of petition. 27th October 1787 — Referred to Propo- 
sitions — (rept.) 

NUMBER 45. 

To THB HONBI^S THB SpBAKSR AND DBLBGATES OP THB GBNI« ASSEMBLY OP VIR- 
GINIA 

The petition of Sundry inhabitants of the County of Fayette 
and those Contiguous to the Mouth of Craigs Creek on the 
River Kentuckey sheweth to your Honors that your petitioners 
are desirous of making Tobacco to pay their Taxes and for 
other purposes and have not at this time any Convenient 
Warehouses or Inspection to receive it when made they there- 
fore pray that your Honors may pass an act to establish inspec- 
tions on the Land of GenI Scott near the mouth of Craigs Creek 
on the said River it being the only place for a considerable 
distance on the River where the banks are acceptable we 
farther pray your Honours to establish a ferry upon said Scotts 
Land at the same place & your petitioners shall pray &c &c 

[Names.] 
Fayette County Virginia to wit 

I Levi Todd clerk of the Court of the County aforesaid do 
certify that it was publickly advertised at the door of the 
Courthouse of the County aforesaid on two several Court days 
to wit in the months of June & July 1787 That a Petition would 
be presented to the next General Assembly for the Establishing 
a Ferry and also a Ware house for the Inspection of Tobacco 
on the Kentucky River on the Lands of Genl. Charles Scott 
near the mouth of Craigs Creek In witness whereof I have 
hereto set my Hand this Twelfth day of Septr 1787. 

Levi Todd 



Endorsement on back of petition. Nov. 6. 1787 — ^Referred to Propositions — 
reasonable — ^reported. 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 46. 

To THB HONBLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA 

The petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Lexington 
and County of Fayette most humbly sheweth 

That whereas the said Town being well designed and com- 
modiously, situated in the midst of a fertile country; and haveing 
met with the earliest attention and approbation of your Hon- 
orable body as will appear by the Act establishing the same, 
hath continued to increase in population and improvement, so 
that it is the most flourishing and best peopled of any at this 
time in the District of Kentucky. 

And as we are persueded that a Strict attention to the inter- 
nal police of the same, which like that of Similar bodies require 
perticular rules, for its regulation, would greatly contribute to 
the comfortable accommodation of its inhabi tents; and conse- 
quently be an inducement to well disposed persons, artizans 
and mechanicks who from motives of convenience do prefer a 
Town life to come and settle among us. And believing that 
the true interest of our Country will be greatly promoted by 
such. Your Petitioners therefore Humbly pray that the Honor- 
able the General Assembly will be pleased to take these matters 
into consideration, and if they should deem it expedient, pass 
an Act erecting the said Town into a body Corporate, with such 
rights and priviledges as other inland Towns which are Incor- 
porated, within this Commonwealth have and possess, as the 
most effectual means of produceing those desirable ends above 
specefied. And your Petitioners as in duty bound shall ever 
pray &c. [Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: Nov. 6th. 1787. — Referred to propositions 
-— rejd.) (repd.) / 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act concerning certain regu- 
lations in the town of Lexington and county of Fayette. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 13, 191. 

Trustees were to be elected by all living within a mile, owning twenty-five 
pounds of property, and having lived there six months, except negroes and mu- 
lattoes. 

Trustees could erect market house, appoint clerk of market, repair streets, 
impose taxes under one hundred pounds, and make ordinances. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 47. 

To TH8 HONOURABLS THB GENBRAL ASSEMBLY OP THE COMMONWEALTH OP VIR- 
GINIA. 

We your Petitioners Sundry of die Inhabitants of the coun- 
ties of Fayette Bourbon & Madison humbly sheweth, that from 
the late Division of the counties of Fayette & Lincoln, the 
remote and detach'd, situation of a number of Inhabitants on 
the extreame parts of the new counties conceive ourselves 
greatly discommoded and a large number are excluded the 
advantage and benefit of an easy and convenient access to the 
place of publiok Resort, therefore the good Intension of the 
Legislature is not fully extended to the community in general 
tho a much larger expense incur'd Pray a division of that part 
of the counties of Fayette & Bourbon & Madison (and the court 
house to be fix'd, in the Town of Boonsborough) to witt Begin- 
ning at the mouth of silver creek thence up the same to the 
mouth of Taylors fork thereof, thence a strait line to saltpetre 
cave near Capt. David Gases, thence a strait line to the uper 
Blue Lick, thence a southeast course to Russel county line, 
thence with said line so far as a Northwest course will strike 
Bramlets lick on Stoners fork of Licking creek, thence down the 
same so far as a southwest course will strike the head of the 
main branch of Boons Creek, thence down the same to the 
Kentuckey River thence Down said River to the mouth of 
Silver Creek the Beginning — 

And your Petitioners as in duty bound shall ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

This is to inform, the publick that there will be a petition pre- 
sented to the next General Assembly of Virginia for a Division 
of part of the counties of Fayette, Bourbon & Madison to be 
added into one county as foUoweth viz — 

Beginniilg at the mouth of Tates Creek, thence up the same 
to Taylors fork thereof thence a strait line to a salt petar cave 
near Capt. Gass's — ^Thence a strait line to the Blue Lick — , 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

thence a southeast course to Russel county line thence with said 
line so far as a northwest course will strike Bramblet lick on 
Stoners fork of Licking creek. Thence down the same so far 
a south west cours will strike the head branch of Boons Creek, 
thence down said creek to the Kentucky River, then down said 
River to the mouth of Silver Creek the Beginning 
This was advertised two Courts at Lexington. 

Levi Todd CI 



Endorsement on back of petition: Nov. 6. 1787. — Referred to propositions 
—reasonable— reported. See note to Petition No. 64. 

NUMBER 48. v^ 

To THE HONOURABLB THB GENL. ASSEMBLY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA 

The Petition of the People of Limestone; and other Inhabi- 
tants of the County of Bourbon Humbly sheweth that your 
Petitioners on account of their detach'd situation; subject to 
much danger inconvenience and expence; in having to attend 
their transactions of their County Business at the distance of 
forty miles from their habitations (for the most pact surrounded 
with all the borrows of a Savage Enemy.) 

Petitioned your Honourable house at their last Session for 
a division of the sd County of Bourbon; which for reasons 
appearing to them, they thought proper to postpone the con- 
sideration of till the present Session. That your petitioners 
finding the inconveniences greatly increased; and that it is to 
your honorable house only they are to look up for relief. B^ 
leave to recall your attention to their disagreeable situation; 
and to crave the indulgence of your honorable house in laying 
before you a state of their grievances. 

Your Petitioners humbly observe that Twelve or fifteen 
miles of the way they must travil to their Courthouse is thro a 
Barren Country unfit for Cultivation that this aggrevates their 
danger as it is and may remain a secure Asylum to the Savages 
who infest the road, that for the most part it is unsafe to travil 

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To the General Asse^nbly of Virginia 

it in the Summer time unless in Companies of armed men, and 
that in the Winter time, the journey to or from Court cannot 
be performed in much less time than two daies. And that there 
are several considerable & rapid water courses, which often 
obstructs a convenient communication with the other part 
of the sd County. Which renders their attendance at Court 
extremely expensive & inconvenient, that they are often under 
the indispensible obligations of attending Court being subject 
as they become freeholders to attend on Grand Juries & other 
necessary duties which as Citizens they are liable to. That from 
being so much expos'd to the inroads of the Savages they have 
not a horse left for every tenth man. Neither can they on 
these accounts attend their Elections, which will ever be oppres- 
sive; as it will be in the power of the Inhabitants, South of 
Main Licking, to send members to the Genl. Assembly; opposed 
to a division who may be unwilling to become advocates for 
our distress, or not feeling the inconvenience we labour under 
unable to represent them ; 

That your Petitioners while attending Court are obliged to 
leave their dearest connexions exposed to the Merciless attack 
of a Cruel enemy, and that the division of Fayette hath afforded 
them little or no relief in any of these cases. And that the Clerks 
office being kept almost at the extremity of the sd County. 
Subjects them to additional inconveniences as recourse thereat 
is absolutely necessary in many Cases. 

Your Petitioners are duly sensible of the Inconsistancy of 
dividing Counties where the numbers are so few as there is at 
present but humbly conceive their situation to be peculiarly 
distressing; And that a division might be a means of speedy 
strengthing their frontiers whereas few will ever risk their lives 
& property under the present disadvantages; Your Petitioners 
also expect that the Erection of the district of Kentucky into 
an Independent State will soon take place; and that they must 
continue to groan under their present Burden, till a Legislative 
body is formed here; unless relieved by your honorable house, 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

this they humbly conceive to be another cause of remonstrance, 
and for reasons already appearing they will not have a repre- 
sentation in forming the Constitution, to which their property, 
their lives and happiness will be subject. 

Your Petitioners therefore pray your honorable house to 
take their case into consideration, and grant them a division 
of the sd County of Bourbon as follows. Beginning at the mouth 
of Licking, runing up the main branch thereof to the head, 
thence a direct line to the nearest part of Russell County line, 
along the Russell line to Bigg Sandy, & down the same to the 
mouth, thence down the Ohio River to the Beginning into a 
distinct County. And your Petitioners as in duty Bound will 
ever Pray &c. 

[Names.] 
September the 19th 1787. 

I do hereby certify that an advertisement of the within 
Petition was set up at the door of Bourbon Court House. 

John Edward C. B. C. 

NUMBER 49. ^ 

To THB HONORABLB THB GENBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA 

The petition of sundry Inhabitants of the County of Bour- 
bon, humbly sheweth that your petitioners warned by two adver- 
tisements one from the neighborhood of Limestone, and the 
other from the County of Madison proposing to petition your 
honorable house for the devision of Bourbon County. The 
first to divide the County by a line running up the main fork 
of Licking, The other to run from the head of Boon's creek near 
the Kentucky river a North East course untill it strikes Stoner's 
fork the south branch of Licking and up the same until a south 
east course shall strike the Russell line. Your Petitioners b^ 
leave to observe the division proposed from Limestone will leave 
this County very weak and will render both Counties (should 
a division take place) very deficient both as to the judiciary as 
well as to the military departments. They further shew that 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

the settiements of Limestone do not contain more than one 
hundred and thirty militia, nor more than one hundred and 
fifty Tithables, Their taxable property under the revenue law 
does not amount by the last return to ioo£ as strength and 
wealth altogether inadequate to the expences of a new Countyi 
but as inconsiderable as it is, it will greatly distress the remaining 
part should a division take place, we beg leave to observe the 
division proposed from Madison to include a part of this county 
will run within four miles of Bourbon courthouse, and take fifty 
settlers, and drag them across the Kentuckey river through 
clifts and hills almost impasible to the proposed courthouse at 
Boonsborough amoungst whome are many of your petitioners 
who are living near twenty miles from the proposed courthouse 
and within six miles of the present, Your petitioners beg leave 
further to observe that the good people of the present County of 
Bourbon is sufficiently distressed already with the payment of 
their County and the whole military strength of the County as 
it now stands doth not exceed four hundred, Therefore your 
petitioners hope that your honourable house sensible of the 
detached small Bodies of settlers in all new frontier Counties, 
and that it is impossible to bring the Courthouse and church to 
every mans door and that some individuals in all such cases 
ought to give up their private case for the good of the people 
at large untill such time as the county may populate and such 
division become necessary, Your petitioners therefore pray that 
no such division may take place at present. — ^And as in duty 
bound shall ever pray &c 

[Names,] 



Endorsement on back of petition: 1st. November-1787 — Referred to Props. 
-Rejected — (reasonable in House) (bill drawn) 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 50. 

To THS HONORABLB THB GENBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA 

The Petition of the Trustees of the Transylvania Seminary 
humbly sheweth. 

That the one sixth part of all legal Fees received by Sur- 
veyors, are by the Law appropriated to the University of William 
& Mary, a Seminary which We greatly respect but from which 
the Inhabitants of Kentucky are too remote to derive any 
immediate Advantage; And as the Legislature have repeatedly 
manifested their benevolent Disposition of providing the Means 
of Education within this district, We are induced to pray that 
you would be pleased to direct that the One Sixth part of the 
said Fees hereafter arising within the said District may be 
paid by the several principal surveyors therein to the Trustees 
of the Transylvania Seminary for the Use and Support thereof 

We also beg leave to represent that many Entries and 
Surveys of Land have been made in the district which may 
become justly liable to be escheated thro' the default of Heirs 
or otherwise; But as it is supposed that such Lands cannot be 
regularly escheated before Grants have been obtained, for 
which no Person is authorized to apply, such Lands will lapse or 
become forfeited in such a way as that other private adventurers 
may reenter and obtain Grants for the same to the great Injury 
of the Transylvania Seminary, the Trustees of which are 
empowered to appropriate to its use twelve thousand Acres 
of escheatable Lands. We therefore pray that an act may pass 
declaring. That Claims to unpatented Lands may be escheated 
in the same manner and for the same Reasons as are prescribed 
by Law in the Case of Lands for which the Titles have been 
compleated, and that it may be particularly directed, how & 
by whom such escheatable Lands may be surveyed, or the 
surveys returned to the Register's office so that a proper Grant 
may issue. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

And your Petitioners shall ever pray &c 
Signed by order & in Presence of the Board — 

Test: Harry Innes Ck. 

Ebenezer Brooks, Clk. 



Endorsement on back of petition: 22d. November 1787. — Referred to Propo- 
sitions—Survey's fees rejected — escheatable survey's rejd. — (repd.) 

NUMBER 51. 

To THB HONORABLB THE SpQAKBR AND MSlfBBRS OP THE HOUSB OP DBLBGATBS, 

the petition of Sundry inhabitants of the County of Fayette 
and District of Kentucky humbly sheweth, 

That from their local situation, they find it very incon- 
venient, and attended with considerable expence, to send their 
Tobacco to any of the warehouses for the reception of Tobacco, 
now by Law established, and that there is a place on the Lands 
of William Steele near the mouth of the Stone Lick Creek, where 
a warehouse might be established, which would be very advan- 
tagious to them and to many of their neighbours, and where 
there is one of the most convenient landing places on the river 
Kentucky. — 

Your petitioners therefore humbly pray that an act may 
pass by the Assembly, establishing a warehouse for the recep- 
tion of Tobacco, on the lands of William Steele near where the 
Stone Lick Creek emptys into the Kentucky: And your peti- 
tioners as in Duty bound shall pray — 

[Names.] 

Fayette County Virginia to wit 

I do certify that it was advertised at two different Court 

days at the Door of the Courthouse in the County aforesaid 

that a petition would be presented to the next General Assembly 

agreeable to the purport of the within Witness my hand this 

loth Sept. 1788 — 

Levi Todd CI 



Endorsement on back of petition: 23 October — Referred to propositions — 
(reasonable) (repd.) 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 52. / 

To THE HONOURABLB THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF VIRGINIA 

The petition of the subscribers Inhabitants of Fayette 
County humbly sheweth that we conceive a Division of our 
County would be highly conclusive to the convenience, safety & 
public Interest of a great Number of its Inhabitants. 

Many of our Magistrates as well as litigants live so remote 
from Lexington where our Courts are held that they cannot 
attend without Incuring a greater expense than they can sus- 
tain & from the great Number of Inhabitants in the . . . 
County our Docket which is already crouded must shortly be 
so far in arrears as greatly to Delay the due administration 
of Justice. 

Our Militia have been formed into three Batalions and before 
the Division we wish for can take place there will probably 
be more than four which in our scattered situation prevents 
us from exerting our strength against the savages with the 
same unanimity & vigour as if the extent of the County was 
less and our Commanding officers more contiguous to each other 

We beg leave also to present that our County contains three 
times the Number of Inhabitants as any other County within 
the District and unless it is Divided it will destroy every idea 
of equality in representation. 

For these Reasons we humbly pray that the County of 
Fayette may be Divided by a line to begin on the Kentuckey 
River at Todds Ferry to run a direct course to the south Fork 
of Elkhorn opposite Abraham Bowmans house thence down the 
Creek to the old Road from Lexington to the surveyers office 
thence a Direct line to the five mile tree on the Leestown Road 
thence a straight line to Run one mile below Wm. Russells to 
the line of Bourbon. 

N B since our advertisement we are inform'd the Division 
line propos'd is disagreeable to some of the Inhabitants of our 
County unless the following alteration is made (viz) From Todds 

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To the General Assembly of PSrginta 

Ferry to run a straight line to the six mile marked tree on the 
Leestown Road thence a direct course to cross North Elkhom 
three miles below Wm. Russells to the line of Bourbon which 
alteration we have no objection to if the Honourable Assembly 
think proper to redress our grievances 

And your petitioners shall ever pray — 
[Names.] 

We the Subscribers do certify that the proposd alteration in 
r^ard to the Division of Fayette viz. From Todds Ferry to 
run a straight line to the six mile markt Tree on the Lees Town 
Road thence a Direct course to cross North Elkhom three 
miles below William Russells to the Bourbon Line, that we 
think the Division reasonable and necessary and that we wish 
our Delegates to use their endeavours to carry the same into 

Execution. 

Septr 17th 1788— 
Robt Todd 
Robt. Johnson 
Wm. McConnell 
Richd Young 
Andrew Gatewood 
Lewis Craig 
Wm. Henry 
Benjn Craig 
Jn. Clark 
Richd W Shippy 
Laban Shippy 
Colby Shippy 

This is to certify that I was aganst the first proposed division 
of Fayatte & had signd a petetion against the proposed plan 
but I am now willing that the county may be devd agreeable 
to the above direction, which I think reasonable & wish the 
above Devision to be granted as witness my Hand this i8th of 

Sepr 1788— 

Edwd. Pajme. 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Fayette Set. 

Coleby Ship of this County made oath before me one of 
the Justices of said County that he saw publickly advertized 
at the Court house of the aforesaid County at August Court the 
Division of Fayatte as set forth in the petition for that purpose 
and that he personally applyd to Levi Todd Clerk of sd county 
Court for a certificate of the same and that he refused to give 
one, application was made this day 

Sworn to before me this 22d day of Sepr 1788 

Richd Young 

Endorsement on back of petition. 24 October, 1788. — ^Referred to props — 
(rejected^ (reasonable) 

Request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for dividing the county of 
Fayette into two distinct counties. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 663. 
Woodford County. 

NUMBER S^y 

To THB Gbnbral Assembly of thb Commonwbalth op Virginia— 

The petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of Fayette, 
humbly sheweth — 

That your petitioners deeply interested in the welfare of 
their County, cannot but express their disapprobation of the 
artifices made use of by Individuals, to bring about a division 
of their County, and would suggest the impropriety of entering 
upon this business circumstanced as our District is with respect 
to the State of Virginia — 

They conceive the proposed division highly improper at this 
period, as the infancy of their County, renders it entirely 
unecessary and as their numbers are too inconsiderable to 
enable them, to accumulate expense, without adding either to 
their convenience or general welfare — 

They would therefore hope, that your Honble. House would 
not assent to the division of their County at this period — ^And as 
they conceive it unecessary to detail the reasons in opposition 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

to the division beg leave to refer your Honb. House to the 

Del^ates from their County — 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition. 24th October 1788 — Referred to Proposi- 
tions — ^reasonable — rejected . 



NUMBER 54 



/ 



To THB HONOURABLB THB SpBAKER AND GSNTLBMEN OF THB HOUSE OP DELE- 
GATES. 

The petition of Sundry inhabitants of the County of Bourbon; 
humbly sheweth. That your Petitioners heard with great con- 
cern the rejectment of their petition to your last session for a 
Division of their County. Your petitioners are induced again 
from the hardships and disadvantages they labour under to 
approach your honourable house; and to lay before you the 
grievances they labour under; by being connected with the 
County of Bourbon, (viz) your petitioners live in the Lime- 
stone settlements near the Ohio River and are detached from 
every other Inhabitant of said County — at least thirty miles, 
except a small settlement at the Blue Licks, they have forty 
miles to Court, thirty of which is thro, a verry dangerous 
Wilderness exposed in every part to the attacks of the savages 
and there are four large Creeks to Cross; which in all rainey 
Seasons are not fordable. 

These things it is hoped will be sufficient inducements to 
your honourable house to Grant to your petitioners a division 
of their County; especially also; When your honourable house 
is informed that the settlements near Limestone are lately 
greatly increased by a number of respectable Inhabitants; so 
that there are now Two hundred and six Families & three 
hundred and fifty Tithables; and as Limestone is the inlet for 
Emigration by Water to this Western Country; there is a 
prospect of the settlements being rapidly increased and largely 
extended which will be greatly promoted by your honourable 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

house granting to your petitioners the priviledges and authority 
of a County. We your petitioners therefore pray that a divi- 
sion of sd County of Bourbon may be made in the following 
manner — Beginning at the Junction of Licking with the Ohio 
runing up the main branch of Licking to the head, then a 
direct course to strike the nearest part of Russell County line, 
thence along said line to Bigg Sandy, and down the same to the 
Ohio River, thence down the Ohio River to the Beginning — ^all 
which part of said County lying on the North side of the main 
branch of Licking — to be a New and distinct County — 

In full confidence that your honourable House will do us 
every act of Justice; We as in duty bound shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Bourbon County 

I do hereby certify that I have the above petition for the 
Division of Bourbon was advertised according to Law 
Test John Edwards Clerk of Bourbon. 

This will notify the publick that a petition will be presented to 
the next general assembly for the purpose of forming a New 
County out of the Counties of Bourbon, Fayette and Madison, 
Viz, Begining at the mouth of Silver Creek, thence up the same 
to the mouth of Taylors Fork thereof, thence a direct line, to 
a saltpeter Cave, near Capt. David Gasses thence a strait line 
to the Blue Licks, thence a South East Course to Russell 
County line, thence with said line so far as North West Course, 
will strike Bramlets lick, on Stoners forks of licking Creek, 
thence a strait line to the head of the main Branch of Boons 
Creek thence down the same to the Kentuckey River thence 
down the River to the Beginning: — 

August the 25th 1787 I do hereby Certify that this adver- 
tisement have been set up according to Law at Bourbon [Court] 
House. 

John Edward Clerk Bourbon Co. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

August the 28th 1787 I do certify that the within has been 

advertised as the Law directs. 

Will Irvine Clk, M C 

Endorsement on back of petition: 25 Octo. 1788.— Refd. to Props.— For a 
Division — repd. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for dividing Bourbon. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 668. Mason County. 

The last two paragraphs were filed with this petition but belong to No. 47. 

NUMBER 55. %/ 
To THB Honourable thb Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Delegates 

The petition of Sundry Inhabitants of Bourbon County 
South of Main Licking Humbly sheweth — ^That your petitioners 
being notified by an advertisement at the Court House Door 
that a petition would be presented to your Honourable House 
praying for a Division of Bourbon County by Main Licking 
beg leave to observe that a petition of this Kind was rejected 
at your Last Session as your petitioners are informed for the 
want of a sufficient number in that part of the County praying 
a Division your petitioners can affirm with confidance that the 
number of Titles North of Main Licking does not by the Last 
return amount to more than One Hundred and Seventy a 
number altogether inadequate to the Expence of a County and 
your petitioners cannot but express their astonishment when 
they find a clause in their petition praying that the monies paid 
by them for erecting the Public Buildings in the County should 
be repaid by your Petitioners this part of their petitions is as 
unreasonable as the other part is designing the whole calcu- 
lated to gratify the ambition & averice of a few Individuals; 
Your Petitioners therefore pray that no such Devision may be 
granted, but should a Division be thought reasonable that 
your petitioners may not be obliged to refund any money paid 
toward erecting the public buildings & Your petitioners shall 

^^^•^ P''^y *<^- [Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: 26th Octo. 1788 — Referred to props. — 
rejected. 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 56. 

To THB HONORABLB THS GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA— 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the county of Bour- 
bon Humbly sheweth that Every other county in the District 
of Kentucky have been indulged with the advantages of Pub- 
lick warehouses for the reception of Tobacco and that your 
Petitioners living near the Courthouse & on Licking Creek in 
the most populous part of said County — too far remote from 
either of the other — Inspections to remove their Tobacco by 
Land without much labour and Expence. and your petition- 
ers fully sensible of the disposition of your Honorable House 
to do Justice & upon all occations to afford relief to such of the 
community as you conceive is intitled to your patronage we 
your petitioners therefore pray that an inspection for the re- 
ception of Tobacco may be established on the South fork of 
Licking Creek at the Confluence of Stoner and Hinksons forks 
of said Creek and in the fork near Isaac Ruddles Mill which 
your petitioners conceive will be of great publick utility and 
of singular advantage to them provided the article of Tobacco 
should continue to be of value and your petitioners as in duty 
bound will ever pray 

[Names.] 

July 1788 I do hereby certify that the within Petition has been 
legally advertised at the Door of the Courthouse the several 
days required by Law given under my hand. — 

John Edwards Clerk Bourbon County 



Endorsement on back of petition: 25th Octo. 1788. Referred to propositions 
— ^reasonable — on Isaac Ruddles land — (repd.) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for establishing an inspec- 
tion of tobacco on the lands of Isaac Ruddle, in the county of Bourbon. Henings 
Statutes, Vol. 12, 677. 

According to this act it was not lawful to build houses within fifty yards, in 
which fire was to be used. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 57. 

To THS HONOURABLB THB GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY 

A petition for Establishment of the Town of Bourbon Court- 
house [One of several papers circulated.] 

[Names.] 

I do hereby certify that a petition for the Establishment of a 
Town at Bourbon Courthouse was advertised at said court- 
house according to Law 

Test John Edwards Clerk Bourbon County Court 
September 2d 1789 J^^n Edwards 

NUMBER 58. \/ 

To THB HONOURABLB THB GBNBRAI* AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA.— 

The petition of sundry inhabitants of the District of Ken- 
tucky Humbly sheweth. — ^That whereas in consequence of an 
act of the legislature in their session of Octr 1788 intitled an 
act concerning the erection of the District of Kentucky into 
an independant State: a convention met at Danville under the 
strongest conviction as your petitioners conceive that it was 
not the will of the good people of said District that the same 
should be erected into an independant state: and we are pur- 
suaded that to have voted the same in the affirmitive would have 
been too glareing a violation of the trust reposed in them 
when brought into contrast with their avowed sentiments 
previous to their election; Notwithstanding which they have 
petitioned your Honourable body to make certain amendments 
to the terms proposed in the late act of separation. Your 
petitioners therefore beg leave to suggest that although the 
objects complained of, might greatiy injure a fiew of the sons 
of liberty yet their amendments can be of no importance to 
an independant sovereignty. Your petitioners further beg 
leave to express their apprehentions (which is) that the smallest 
alteration may be thought sufficient to santify the prosecution 
of a separation after cloaking their designs with a ficticious 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

zeal for the public good, should the present convention be 
continued, to consider the same: Your petitioners b^ leave 
further to observe that as no special powers were given the 
convention to sue for terms; but only to determine on the ex- 
pediency of said separation on the terms in said act contained 
therefore the evasion of said determination has tacitly confirmed 
that truth, which your petitioners and the good people in 
General both wished, and expected to have been declared, in 
positive terms. — Your petitioners therefore conceiving that an 
augmentation of states under the general Government, by the 
erection of a new Government here, which will be clothed with 
no national power and which will only serve as one of Pharos 
lean kine to devour our liberty, whilst it can be of no security 
to our property, Therefore your petitioners in full faith, hope 
and confidence request that the general Government will secure 
everything which the most sanguine can desire: and that a 
separation may injoure us until time shall be no more do pray 
that the tacit acknowledgement of said convention be con- 
firmed and the will of the people be established by a repeal 
of the separation Act: and your petitioners as in duty bound 
shall ever pray &c. — 

[Names.] 

No endorsement appears on the back, but the request is based on an act 
entitled, An Act concerning the erection of the district of Kentucky into an in- 
dependent state. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 788. 

The Convention provided for previously had been hindered from meeting 
and another had been provided for in August of 1787, according to an act entitled. 
An Act making further provision for the erection of the district into an inde- 
pendent State. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 240. 

NUMBER 59. 

To THB HONOURABLE THB GENERAL ASSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA, 

The Memorial of the Subscribers respectfully represents, 
That notwithstanding the attention of the two last Assem- 
blies to the support of the Supreme Court for the District of 
Kentucky, their favourable designs are like to be frustrated. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

By the late Laws appointing Commissioners to settle and adjust 
certain Claims in that District, the Certificates granted by 
them are made receivable in discharge of any of the Taxes which 
should afterwards become due therein: and this privilege is 
supposed by many still to extend to all or to most of the Taxes 
which since have been appropriated to the payment of the 
Salaries of the officers of the said Court. This will probably 
give rise to tedious litigations between the Collector of these 
Taxes and those from whom they are due; and in the meantime 
the officers of the Court will be obliged to sell their Certificates 
at a large discount, or at still greater loss and delay apply to 
the Treasury at Richmond for payment. Therefore we hope, 
that on this representation, the intention of the Legislature in 
the Case will be more explicitly declared ; and that all the Taxes 
for which the several Clerks in the District are accountable 
may be either made payable in Specie only, or that some 
other fund may be established for defraying the Expences of 
the said Court. 

And your Memorialists shall ever pray &c. 

George Muter. 
Saml. McDowell 
Caleb Wallace 
Harry Innes 



Endorsement on back of petition : Petition referred to Courts of Justice — 
22d. October 178^— Reasonable— Law of 1786 to be amended— Reported. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to amend the Acts for 
appointing Commissioners to liquidate and settle the expenses incurred in two 
expeditions, carried on from Kentucky district against the neighboring Indians 
and for other purposes. "Be it enacted," etc. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 2. 
"That from and after the passing of this act the tax on law process and aliena- 
tions and also the tax on tobacco receivable within the district of Kentucky, 
shall be paid and accounted for in specie only, any law to the contrary notwith- 
standing." 

This was to take the place of certificates issued by the Commissioners. 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 60. 

To THB HONORABLS THB GBNSRAL ASSEMBLY OP VIRGINIA. 

The Petition of a number of Inhabitants of the District 
of Kentucky, humbly sheweth; 

That whereas a very great expence and inconvenience at- 
tends the sitting of the Supreme Court only at one place in 
this District, the greater part of which expences and incon- 
veniences may be obviated by appointing additional places 
for holding the said Court: We therefore pray your Honorable 
body to take the same into your serious consideration, and 
should you in your wisdom think our prayer reasonable, that 
you appoint the two following places in addition to the former 
(to wit,) the one at Lexington, in the County of Fayette, and 
the other at Baird's Town, in the County of Nelson; and we 
as in duty bound shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

[There are about fifteen or twenty printed sheets with the 
above paragraph on them, and each one of them has a number 
of names on it— over eight hundred in all.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: Referred to Props. 

Danville Augt 
Sirs 

Agreeable to your request I herewith give you a Statemt. of 
the business in the Supreme Court as it will stand at the ensu- 
ing September Term. — together with some past statemts con- 
cerning Wits attendance 

State of the Docket to Septr 

Caveats now on the Court Dock (of which 82 have been Amt 
upwards of 4 yrs depending) 96 

N B near one half of these depend on the priority of Location. 
Specialty of Entry or written agreements which will require 
few or no Witnesses. — 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

Chancery causes for hearing 23 

Chancery References & apprs. on the Rule Dockett 132 

Common Law Issues 146 

New Issues & References &c on Rules. 140 

NB. of the above 286 — there's about 139 for Debt which do 
not require Witnesses 90 in Case of which 1 1 are for Slander — 
21 for Batteries & the residue are for breach of Covt Detinues, 
Trespaser & Ejectmts — 

Pleas of the Commonwealth 13 

An Acct. of Witnesses attendance for 1789 — 

March Term 18 days No of Wits 90 1300 50 

June Term 24 days 109 400 50 

NB More Witnesses Attende entered these Courts [than] were 
entered in any two courts before 

State of the office 

There is lodged in the present office of the Supreme Court, 
Books containing the copies of all the Entries for Settlements 
& preemptions granted by the commissioners of the Kentucky 
District and that promiscously as they were entered without 
regard to County 

There is lodged in the same office 5637 entries from the 
county surveyors pursuant to a late law — ^Also I am well in- 
formed that the surveyor of Jeflferson has copied all the old 
Kentucky entries to be lodged as the said Act directs 

Four large blank Books lately procured by the clerk for 
the use of the sd Court & not immediately wanted 

NUMBER 61. 

To THB HONORABLB THS GBNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA. 

The Petition of the Subscriber humbly sheweth, That in 
the year 1787 Your petitioner removed from the State of 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Maryland into the District of Kentucky and brought with him 
a few Negro Slaves; but doth most solemnly aver that he never 
was informed, or heard that it behooved him to take any oath 
concerning the importation of his Negroes into the State of 
Virginia until sometime in May in the present year 1789, when 
he was informed that by neglecting to take the Oath prescribed 
by law his Negroes were entitled to freedom, and himself 
liable to heavy penalties; and that then it was too late even to 
avail himself of the indulgences granted by an Act of the last 
Session of Assembly to persons in his situation: He was also 
informed that the Plea of Ignorance would be of no Avail in a 
Court of Justice: and that his only prospect of relief was from 
the Legislature. For those who have neither education nor 
leisure to enable them to be acquainted with the Laws of their 
Country, their only prospect for impunity is ap honest inoffen- 
sive deportment; and in the prospect of absolute ruin, it is 
some Consolations that their misfortune does not arise from any 
wilful fault or neglect. But your petitioner conceives his case 
to be peculiarly hard, as the ruin with which he is threatened 
will be produced by Laws which it cannot be supposed he was 
acquainted with before he became a Citizen; and during the 
short period he has been in the State, it has required his most 
vigorous exertions to procure Shelter and Sustenance for a 
numerous Family, and in the meantime he has been necessarily 
secluded from the opportunities of information. Therefore 
your petitioner hopes and prays that the peculiarity of his 
situation may be taken into Consideration, and such relief 
granted as will secure to him the possession of the hard earnings 
of many Years industry, and deliver his beloved Wife and 
Children from that povorty which otherwise will be unavoidable. 
And as in duty bound he will ever pray &c. 

Benjamin Stevenson. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

District of Kentucky, August 1789 — 
At the request of Mr Benjamin Stevenson, the Subscriber 
to the within Petition, We certify — ^That since he came into 
this Country we are well assured he has supported Character 
of a good Citizen; — ^That he has applied himself with great 
diligence in building, clearing, and farming on a small tract 
of Land on which he has settled: — ^And that from his established 
veracity, as well as from the circumstances of the case, we 
verily believe the Allegations of his Petition to be strictly true. 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: October 28th. 1789 — Refd. to Courts of 
Justice. 

The procedure regarding slaves referred to in the petition is found in an act 
entitled, An Act concerning the importation of slaves into the District of Ken- 
tucky. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 713. 

"Whereas many persons who have removed from some other parts of the U. S. 
into the District of Kentucky and have become citizens of this Commonwealth, 
have failed within ten days after their removal into the same to take the oath 
or oaths, prescribed by two acts of assembly, the one intituled 'An act for pre- 
venting the further importation of slaves,' the other intituled, 'an Act concern- 
ing slaves to be taken on the importation of the same,' Although they might 
with great truth have taken the oaths ; and whereas such failtu-e hath been chiefly 
if not altogether, owing to the impracticability of complying with the said acts. 
Be it enacted," etc. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 713. 

The act provides that those already removed may take the oath on or before 
May 1st. and those going to Kentucky after the act shall take the oath within 
sixty dajrs. The act is not to affect the right of a slave to freedom when so entitled. 

NUMBER 62. 

To THB Honourable thb Virginia Asssmbly 

the petition of the Inhabitants of Bourbon County Humbly 
Sheweth that the Land whereon our present Courthouse now 
stands to the amount of two hundred & fifty acres is laid off 
in Lotts by the Propriator, for the purpose of setling a Town 
which Lotts are principly bought up by those who are now 
living on & improving them and have erected a number of 
very convenient buildings — on sd Lotts we your petitioners 
conceiving it realy necessary that sd Town be established by 
Law pray your Honorable body that a Law pass for the estab- 
lishment of a Town agreeable to the manner the Lotts are 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

now laid off and that Trustee be appointed for the purpose of 
suprintending & Regulating of the Building of sd Town and 
in duty Bound we pray — 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition. Octo. 28tli. 1789. — Refd. to props, (reas- 
onable) (repd.) 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to establish a town in 
each of the counties of Madison, Albemarle, and Bourbon. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 13, 87. 

The town for Madison was Milford, and for Bourbon it was Hopewell. 

The trustees were Notley Conn, Charles Smith, Jr., John Edwards, James 
Garrard, Edward Waller, Thomas West, James Lanier, James Little, and James 
Duncan. 

NUMBER 63. 

To THB HONORABLB THB SpBAKER AND GBNTLSMSN OF THB HOUSB OP DSLSGATSS 

The Petition of sundry of the Inhabitants on the North 
side of the River in the district of Kentucky Humbly begs 
leave to Represent; that they experience many dificulties in 
carrying their Tobacco to the Warehouses already establish'd 
by Law at Jacks Creek on the South side of the River Kentucky 
and at the mouth of Hickmans Creek, owing to the danger of 
discending the cliffs, the badness of the Roads and the Risque 
of crossing the River. That there is a Comodious and conven- 
iant place for an Inspection below the mouth of Tate Creek on 
the Lands of Michael [Bedinger] & nearly where the Main 
Road leads by an easy, and safe discent down the Hill to the 
said River of Kentucky 

We your Petitioners therefore pray, that you would be 
pleased in consideration of the Premisses to pass a Law, estab- 
lishing a Warehouse on the Lands of the said Michl Bedinger 
about three fourths of a mile below the mouth of the aforesaid 
Tates Creek, under such Regulations and Restrictions, as you, 
in your Wisdom may deem fit and Proper. 

And your Petitioners as in duty bound, will ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: 2nd. Novr. 1789. — Refd, to Props — Nov. 
4th. 1789— Props discharged. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 64. 

To THB HONORABLB THS GSNBRAL ASSBMBLY OP THB COMMONWBALTH OP VIR- 
GINIA 

The petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the District of Ken- 
tucky humbly sheweth that your petitioners are much surprised 
to find many petitions in circulation and which we apprehend 
will be presented to your Honorable house prayg the Estab- 
lishment of a number of Inspections of Tobacco on the Kentucky 
River Exclusive of those already Established and we conceive 
the principles of said petitions is founded on neither Justices 
or good policy; but wholy Calculated for the Interest & Con- 
venience of a few Individuals because the Kentucky River is 
so inclosed with Hills & pricepeces [precipices] that it is in 
very few places that any kind of access can be had to said 
River or situations for public buildings your petitioners humbly 
pray that the said petitions may be rejected and that your 
Honorable house will vest a power in the Supreme or County 
Courts within the said District to Establish Inspection of 
Tobacco by appointing Disinterested free holders as Com- 
missioners to view the different places proposed, and that not 
more than two shall be established in any one County & those 
where it is most Conveniant for the people in General as your 
petitioners humbly conceive that more than two will be mjuri- 
ous and . . . [torn off] because we are not able to build 
the necessary houses and furnish weights and scails for a 
greater number and a greater number will Certainly devid 
[divide] the attention of the people so that they must fall and 
your petitioners will ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition: 3d. Novr. 1789 — ^Refd. to Props, (reasl.) 
(repd.) 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 65. / 

To THE HONOURABLB GfiNBRAL AsSBMBLY OP THE COMMONWEALTH OP VIRGINIA— 

The Petition of us the subscribers of the Counties of Fayette 
and Bourbon whom it doth concern humbly sheweth, That 
your petitioners conceive it to be expedient and necessary that 
the upper parts of Fayette and Bourbon Counties be struck off, 
for the purpose of forming a new County, in the following 
manner (to wit) Beginning at the mouth of Boones Creek, and 
running up said Creek to the mouth of Bogg's fork, thence a 
Direct line to the Junction of Welch's fork, with the main 
fork, known also by the name of Robinson's fork of said Creek; 
thence up said Welch's fork and the longest branch thereof 
to the head; thence a direct line to strike Mason County line 
one mile below the upper Blue licks on main Licking Creek; 
thence with said Mason County line to Madison County line; 
thence with said Madison County line to the banning which 
Division we conceive wou'd be very advantageous to the In- 
habitants of the proposed new County, and not disadvantageous 
to the Counties of Fayette and Bourbon, we therefore Request 
that you will grant the prayer of our Petition, and your peti- 
tioners as in duty bound shall ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

I do certify that notice of the same purport of the within was 
publickly set up at two different Courts previous to September 
Court in the present year at the Court house in Bourbon County 
Given under my hand this 8th day of Septr. 1789. 

John Edwards C B C 

I do certify that Notice of the same purport of the within was 
publickly set up at two different Courts previous to September 
Court in the present year at the Courthouse in Fayette County 
Given under my hand this 8th day of Sept. 1789. 

Levi Todd CI. Co. F. 

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oxfn^ 


















^yiKl^ o<^c^<^^^ 



FACSIMILE SIGNATURES 
Tracings made from characteristic signatures found on the petitions herein printed 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

Notice is hereby given that a Petition will be presented to 
the next General Assembly, praying that the upper parts of 
the Counties of Fayette and Bourbon be struck off, for the 
purpose of forming a new County in the following manner (to 
wit) Beginning at the mouth of Boones Creek and running up 
the same to the mouth of Boggs fork thence a direct line to 
the Junction of Welch's fork with the main fork, known by the 
name of the middle fork of said Creek; thence up said Welch's 
fork and the longest branch thereof to the head, thence a 
direct line to strike Mason County line one mile below the 
upper blue Licks on main Licking Creek, thence with said 
Mason County line to Madison County line, thence with said 
Madison County line to the beginning. 

Endorsement on back of petition: 6th Novr. 1789 — Refd. to Props. — Re- 
jected. 

There are five copies of this petition circulated in different places. 

NUMBER 66. v^ 

To THS HONORABLB THB SpBAKER AND GBNBRAL ASSSMBLY OP VIRGINIA 

the petition of Sundry inhabitants of the County of Bourbon 
humbly sheweth that a petition for the Division of said county 
is to be presented to the General Assembly at their next setting 
contrary to the wishes of the majority of the inhabitants of 
said County, but being earnestly pressed by a few settlers in 
the upper end of Fayatte whose views can be no other thdn 
pecuniary ones which is proved by naming themselves for 
certain offices. They have prevailed upon a few scattered 
setlers in the upper end of this County who is amused with 
having the Courthouse among them; The amount of whom 
does not exceed one Militia Company amongst whom together 
with the inhabitants of said intended County in the upper end 
of Fayatte few or none have been found qualified for the office 
of civil or other department. The Line intended by said peti- 
tion will destroy the very center of the now county of Bourbon 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

and cause a removal of the Court house, as it will not run more 
than six Miles from the same and on that side which the body 
and extent of Good Land lies, the Two other sides is barred 
by the line of Fayatte and Hills unfit for cultivation, The 
setlers in this county so much injured by their detached situa- 
tion is not almost above Sixteen or Seventeen Miles from the 
Courthouse and those who are so amazingly anxious for a 
County in Fayatte are from about twelve to Eighteen Miles 
from that Court house — Now your petitioners would inform 
your honorable house that the only thing they can urge in 
favour of the Division is that Mr Jacob Moyers is forming a 
setlement on State Creek twenty four miles from the upper 
settlement where it is said he intends erecting Iron works and 
there is still an extent of country above that place after the 
population of which your honorable house may decide with 
propriety with respect to the bounds of said Counties and leave 
each in possession of a number of men sufficient to administer 
Justice to the Citizens thereof — ^and your Petitioners as in 
duty bound will ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition : 6th. Novr. 1789— Refd to Props. 

NUMBER 67. 

The petition of Sundry Inhabitants of The County of 
Fayette in the district of Kentucky humbly beg leave to Repre- 
sent, that from their remote situation they experience many 
Inconveniences on getting their Tobacco to the DiflFerent 
Warehouses Established by Law, Oweing to the Badness of 
the roads and the difficulty in descending the Clifts down 
to the river Kentucky on which the said Warehouses are already 
established; that there is a commodious and convenient Place 
for an Inspection on the Land of Eli Cleaveland Gentleman on 
the said river Kentucky, to which an Exceeding good road may 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

be made and an easy and safe descent down the Clifts to the 
river. 

Your Petitioners therefore pray that you would be pleased 
in consideration of the premisses to pass a Law Establishing 
a Warehouse on the Lands of the aforesaid Eli Cleaveland 
gentn. on the said river . . . and in your Wisdom may 
deem fit and proper. 

And your Petitioners as in Duty bound will ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

NUMBER 68. 

To THB HONORABLB THE SpBAKBR & HOUSB OP DBI/BGATBS QP VIRGINIA. 

The petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Louisville, 
humbly sheweth. 

That your petitioners, from the Number of Difficulties 
which the Settling of a new Country must unavoidably expose 
people to, from the savage Incursions, from the Want of mate- 
rials and more particularly from the very great scarcity of 
Species, have hitherto been prevented from making the Improve- 
ments, as required by an act of your Honble House, on their 
several lots in the said Town of Louisville; your petitioners 
cannot but acknowledge your kind Indulgence in giving them 
Time still to make the necessary Improvements; which Time 
will expire on Jany next, we therefore humbly pray That you 
will farther extend your kindness to us and give us the farther 
Time of three years from the Expiration of the former act, to 
make such Improvements. 

Your petitioners also b^ leave to observe, that they are 
very much aggrieved by the appointment of new Trustees 
instead of the former ones in Louisville. That the present 
Trustees are Gent, who reside some distance from the Town 
and that very few of them have any Interest in lots therein. 
Which in the opinion of yr petrs occasions a very great Inat- 
tention in them to the Business of the Town. That there are 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

numbers who are in want of Deeds for their lots, which they 
cant obtain by Reason of the present Trustees not attending, — 
Your petrs also think that the Town & its Interests wou'd be 
much better r^^ulated by men who live in it. — ^We therefore 
humbly pray that an act may pass appointing such men as you 
in your wisdom shall approve, (who reside in Louisville) to be 
and act as Trustees to said Town, to all Intents & purposes 
instead of the Gent last appointed. — 

[Names.] 

Jefferson County Set. 

I William Johnston clerk of said county do hereby certify, 
that notice hath been twice publickly set up at the Court House 
Door of said County, on two several Court days, previous to 
this date, of the within petition's being to be presented to next 
Genl. Assembly of Virginia. Given under my Hand & seal 
August 25 1789. 

Will. Johnston (seal) 

Endorsement on back of petition: Nov. 12th. 1789 — Refd. to Props. — further 
time to improve — ^reasonable — Present Trustees to be displaced — ^Rejected — ^Ad- 
ditional Trustees to be added — any to act. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for appointing trustees 
to the town of Romney and for adding trustees to the town of Louisville in the 
county of Jefferson. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 90. 

Trustees: Buckner Thruston, James Wilkinson, Michael Lacassange, Alex- 
ander Scott Bullitt, Benjamin Sebastian, James Felty, Jacob Reager, James Pat- 
ten, Samuel Kirby, Benjamin Erickson, and Benjamin Johnson. 



NUMBER 69. 

To THS Honourable thb General Assembly op Virginia. 

The petition of Sundry inhabitants of Kentucky Humbly 
sheweth that whereas petitions are handed about for Subscribers, 
seting forth their desire to have the Seat of the Supreme Court 
for the District of Kentucky removed, from the place where 
it is now held, to some other part of the said District & also 
others to have the business carried on by District Courts — 

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To the Getter al Assembly of Virginia 

your petitioners conceive it their duty to lay before your 
Honourable body the Reason upon which they found their 
dislike of both measures — being convinced that if they have any 
weight, you will not Grant such a removal or such division of 
the business of this District, 

Your petitioners will observe that Kentucky is setded now 
Generally speaking in two lines one from North to South about 
ninty miles, & another from the Extremity of that Line west 
about the same Distance, that the point of that angle, is the 
place where the Court is now held — ^That Removing it either 
to Lexington or Bairds [Bards] Town as proposed, a distance 
from Danville between thirty and forty miles, will subject the 
seders of one of those corners, to travil that distance in order 
to favour with the same distance the seders of the other Ex- 
tremity, which partiality your petitioners, hope you will not 
countenance — 

Your petitioners will further add that they do not think it 
at present a proper time to remove the Seat of the Court, as it 
would force us to Expences for the new buildings, & that a 
most Rigid plan of Economy suits best our present circum- 
stances. — 

This last mentioned Reason for not allowing the removal 
of the Supreme Court to any other place will stand still better 
for not allowing three buildings in lieu of one, in case District 
Courts should be granted — 

it is thought that those Governments are best who employ 
fewer officers, but the Creating District Courts will necessarily 
increase that number — 

there is another Evil attending any alteration of that kind, 
which your petitioners beg leave to mention — the books of 
commissioners for setdement & previous Rights, those of En- 
tries with the diferent surveyors are lodged with the present 
court — in case you Grant District Courts, copies of those books, 
must be had at a very great Expence & loss of time & business 
must Stagnate & have an End 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Your petitioners know full well the ostensible pretence of 
those other petitioners is to make it more convenient to the 
parties concerned, & their Witnesses, but that pretence are 
far from being founded on truth, as the Constant Removals 
[of] our Seders make it to them one day more Disadvantageous 
& the next more convenient. — 

We see with pain that the ... of those petitions 
Grumble at the Distance which they must travil, when several 
of the Districts of this Commonwealth contain no more square 
miles than the settied parts of Kentucky do at present with more 
anxiety we observe that the consequence of District Courts, 
in lieu of «cpediting business will eflFectually retard it by double 
the time which is now required to obtain redress and what will 
humanity feel when it is considered that in Criminal Causes it 
Lengthens doubly the dreadfuU punishment of a . . . in a 
country where the Laws show indulgence to the very Culprit 
who has infringed them — ^as your HonWe body is to take a full 
view of the community at large & promote the greatest good 
possible to the greatest number, 

Your petitioners hope, that you will not Grant those peti- 
tions, which tend only to favour a very small portion of this 
District, at the Expence of the far greater number & they shall 
ever pray &c. 



Endorsement on back of petition: Novt^ 14th 1789— Refd to Props. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for further amending the 
act establishing a Supreme Court in Kentucky District. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 13. 66. 

By this act the power of the receiver was increased. He had joint authority 
with Uie auditor and treasurer to settle with sherififs. Taxes were to be payable 
in any article receivable in other parts of the Commonwealth, and also in cer- 
tificates granted by the Commissioners for service against the Indians. There 
were to be three sessions of the Supreme Court. 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 70. 

To THB HONORABLE THB GSNBRAL AssSMBLY 

The petition of William McKenzie humbly sheweth: tiiat 
by an act of the legislature of this commonwealth, certain 
lands in the district of Kentucky belonging to Robert McKenzie 
were confiscated and granted to a public school: That your 
petitioner is the nearest in blood to the said Robert; and being 
informed that your honorable body have always shewn a readi- 
ness to give the value of all confiscated property to the next in 
succession, your petitioner prays, that such value may be 
allowed to him. 

And as in duty bound he will ever pray &c. &c. 

Extract of Law — 

Whereas it is represented to the General Assembly, that 
there are certain lands, within the County of Kentucky formerly 
belonging to british subjects, not yet sold under the law of 
escheats and forfeitures, which might at a future day be a 
valuable fund for the maintenance and education of youth; 
and it being the interest of this common wealth always to pro- 
mote and encourage every design which may tend to the 
improvement of the mind and the diflFusion of useful knowledge, 
even among its most remote citizens, whose situation a bar- 
barous neighborhood and a savage intercourse might otherwise 
render unfriendly to science: Be it therefore enacted that eight 
thousand acres of land within the said county of Kentucky, 
late the property of Robt. McKensie, Henry Collins, and 
Alexd McKie, be, and the same are hereby vested in Wm. 
Fleming, Wm. Christian, John Todd, Stephen Trigg, Benjamin 
Logan, John Floyd, John May, Levi Todd, John Cowan, Geo. 
Meriwether, John Cobbs, Geo. Thompson, and Edmund 
Taylor, trustees as a free donation from this Commonwealth 
for the purpose of a publick school, or seminary of learning, 
to be erected within the said county as soon as the circum- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

stances of the County and the state of its funds will admit, 
and for no other use or purpose what so ever: Saving and reserv- 
ing to the said Robert McKensie, Henry Collins, and Alexd. 
McKie, and of every of them, and all and every person or per- 
sons claiming under them, or either of them all right and interest 
to the above mentioned lands, or any part thereof to which 
they may be by law entitled and of which they shall in due 
time avail themselves, any thing herein contained to the Con- 
trary notwithstanding. . . . 

The Land Bounded as followeth — On the South side of the 
Ohio 8 miles above the Falls, on the upper side of the mouth of 
Harrods Creek — 3000 acres. 

Endorsement on back of petition: 16 Novr. 1789. — ^Refd. to Courts of Justice 
— Reasonable. 

NUMBER 71. 

To THB HONORABLE THB GBNBRAL ASSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA. 

The petition of Anne Craig humbly sheweth: 

That a certain James Douglass, now deceased, put his only 
daughter, Jessy Douglass, to board with your petitioner, and 
promised to make her ample compensation for the same: 
that she continued with your petitioner for several years; 
the board for which amounted to more than one hundred and 
thirty pounds: that your petitioner trusted the said James 
Douglass in contemplation of certain lands, which he held in 
Kentucky and other parts of Virginia: that the said James 
Douglass and the said Jessy Douglass are now dead intestate 
and without an heir: whereby the said lands are escheatable to 
the commonwealth. 

Your petitioner therefore prays, that the right of escheat, 
now vested in this commonwealth, may be so far released, as 
to permit the said lands to be sold for the payment of the just 
debts of the said James and Jessy Douglass. 

And your petitioner, as in duty bound will ever pray &c, &c. 

Endorsement on back of petition : 16 Novr. 1789. — Refd. to Courts of Justice 
— ^Rejected. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 72. 

To THB HONOURABLB THE GBNBRAI^ AsSBMBI«Y OP VIRGINIA 

The Petition of a number of Inhabitants of the County of 
Fayette Humbly sheweth — 

That whereas a very Great Expence and Inconvenience 
attends the Ferriage of Tobacco over the River Kentucky to 
the Town of Boonsborough the greater part of which Expences 
and Inconveniances might be obviated by appointing Inspec- 
tions on the North side of the said River at Two Distinct 
places to be attended by one appointment of Inspectors, as the 
Precipices of Howards will not admit of a waggon Road, we 
therefore pray your Honorable Body to take the same into 
serious consideration and should your Wisdom think our prayer 
reasonable that you appoint the Two following places, the one 
nearly opposite Boonsborough on William Bushes Land and the 
other on the west side of Howards Creek on John Holders 
Land and we as in Duty Bound shall ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

Notice is hereby given, that a Petition will be presented to the 
next General Assembly, praying that an Inspection be estab- 
lished for the Reception of Tobacco, on Colo John Holder's 
land on the Kentucky River, below the mouth of lower Howard's 
Creek, at the place called Holder's landing, also another Inspec- 
tion on the land of Capt. William Bush, on the Kentucky River, 
above lower Howard's Creek, and nearly opposite to the Town 
of Boonsborough, to be included under one Inspection. 

Fayette County 

William Bush before me upon oath says that the within 
notice was publickly set up at the door of the court house of 
said county on two several Court days within the present year 
Sept. 9, 1789. 

Robt. Todd 

Endorsement on back of petition: 30 Novr. 1789— Rejected. 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 73V 

To THE HONORABI«B THE SpSAKSR AND MBMBBRS OF THB GBNL. AsSBMBLT 

The Memorial of the Convention for the District of Ken- 
tucky Sheweth, that by an Act of the last Session of the Assem- 
bly, the terms on which the sd District of Kentucky, may be 
erected into a seperate and independant State, are materially 
different from those heretofore offered by Virginia, and agreed 
to by a former Convention on the part of the sd District; and 
that the alteration in one of the terms is more particularly 
injurious to your Memorialists as it forever precludes them, 
tho declared an Independent and sovereign state from excessing 
[exercising] this right of sovereignty over part of the Lands 
contained within their own boundaries without the consent of 
the legislature of Virginia, a situation degrading to your Memori- 
alists, as they would thereby not lie on equal footing with the 
other States in the Union and injurious, as it would prevent 
them from making the advantage of the surplus Lands within 
their boundaries, which in Equity they are intitled to. 

From which circumstances your Memorialists find that they 
cannot at present determine whether it is expedient for and 
the will of the people that the District shall be erected into a 
seperate & independent State. 

Your Memorialists reflect with gratitude on the generous 
and disinterested conduct pursued by the Legislature with 
respect to the wishes of the People of this District for a sepera- 
tion and relying with the fullest confidence on the Justice and 
generosity of the present Assembly, they now request that the 
Act concerning the erection of this District into a seperate 
and independent State may be so amended that the terms oflFered 
by the Legislature of Virginia to the people of this District, 
respecting the Seperation of the District from Virginia, and 
its being erected into a seperate State may be made equal to' 
those offered by former Acts of Assembly (except such part of 
the seventh Article of the Act of 1785 as relates to the concur- 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

rent Jurisdiction of the Ohio with the States that may possess 
the opposite shores of the sd River) and agreed to on the part 
of the District by a former Convention. And your Memorial- 
ists as in duty bound shall ever pray — 
A copy. Saml. McDowell Prest 



Endorsement on back of petition: Novr. 1789. — Refd. to Whole on Co. — 
For Govt. Moreland of Kentucky. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act concerning the erection 
of the district of Kentucky into an independent state. Henings Statutes, Vol. 
13, 17. 

"Whereas it is represented to the present General Assembly the act of the 
last session intituled * An Act concerning the erection of the district of Kentucky 
into an independent state' which contains terms materially different from those 
of the act of October session 1785, are found incompatible with the real views of 
the Commonwealth as well as injurious to the good people of the said district, 
Be it enacted," etc. 

The act provides for a convention at Danville July 26th, selected as in pre- 
vious acts. The seven conditions are similar to those of the act of 1785. The 
authority of Virginia over Kentucky was to end at date posterior to November 1, 
1791. The objectionable features were omitted. 



NUMBER 74. 

To THB HONOURABLB THB GBKBRAI^ AsSBMBI^Y OP THB STATB OP VIRGINIA. 

The Petition of the Inhabitants of Lincoln County residing 
on the reserved Lands for the officers and Soldiers of the State 
aforesaid on the Waters of Cumberland River and Parts adja- 
cent doth Respectfully shew. — 

That your Petitioners find themselves sensibly aggrieved by 
their distance from Courts of Justice, it being near two hundred 
miles from this Settlement to Lincoln Court House, by which, 
when Business renders our attendance indispensably necessary, 
we are frequently exposed to much Danger in Travelling, 
through an uninhabited Country; being subjected to Fines, 
and other Inconveniances, when from High Waters, Enemies 
near our Frontiers; or other Causes it is Impossible to attend. — 

We therefore most humbly Pray the General Assembly, to 
grant a County to be laid oflF including these settlements in the 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

reserved Land for the officers and soldiers, on the south of 
Green River, and to the Coloney Line, thence to the Ohio, and 
your Petitioners as in Duty bound will ever Pray &c. — 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition : 21st. Oct. 1790. — Refd. to Props. — Reason- 
able — (repd.) 

NUMBER 75. 

To THB HONORABI3 THB GBNBRAL AsSSMBLY OF VIRGINIA. 

The petition of Jane Todd and Robert Todd Executors of 
the Estate of John Todd deceased humbly sheweth — 

That whereas an Act of Assembly passed in the year of our 
Lord 1786 appointing Trustees to sell a part of the Land of 
John Todd deceased for the payment of his Debts, and for 
other purposes, vested power in four Trustees therein named 
to carry the same into execution reserving the Tract of Land 
in the County of Fayette where on the said John Todd resided 
at the time of his death, That the said Trustees found it difficult 
to act under the said Law as the decedent at the Time of his 
death resided on a lot in Lexington, that on the North West 
side of the Town he had a military claim of 130 acres and on 
the South East lands claimed by Settlement and preemption — 

To remove which uncertainty, and to give the Trustees 
power to sell a part of the said military survey, one other act 
of Assembly was passed in the year 1787 reserving the Tract 
whereon his widow Jane Todd then resided, which was in the 
bounds of that part of the Land which was obtained by Virtue 
of the Decedents Settlement and adjoining to which there was 
2400 acres procured by other Rights, which reservation strictly 
construc'd prevents the Sale of any of the said Tract and 
frustrates the good intent of the Legislature as we conceive 
the whole of the 130 acres ought not to be sold or if sold would 
prove insufficient to answer the purpose, and excepting this 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

and the Tract before mentioned there is no land that belonged 
to the decedant that would sell unless to great [advantage.] 

Your petitioners therefore pray that the said Trustees may 
be authorized to sell and convey any Lands of the Estate of the 
said decedant, for the purposes mentioned in the said recited 
acts, and to carry the same into full execution, excepting and 
reserving the four Hundred Acres obtained by virtue of the 
said decedants actual settlement and none other, and provided 
that the part sold shall not exceed one fourth of what the sd 
decedant died possessed of. 

And as one of the Trustees before appointed is dead and 
other removed from the County so that it will be difficult to 
procure his attendance we pray that two additional Trustees 
may be appointed vested with the same powers as those first 
appointed and that any three may be authorized to act and we 
in duty bound will ever pray &c — 

Jane Todd 
Robt. Todd 



Endorsement on back of petition: 21st. Oct 1790 — Refd. to Courts of Justice 
— ^Reasonable — Bill drawn. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to amend two acts of the 
assembly appointing trustees to sell part of the lands of John Todd, deceased, 
and other purposes. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 231. 

The added trustees were Percival Butler and Robert Barr. 



NUMBER 76. 

To THE HONBI^B. ThB GBNQRAL ASSEMBLY OP THE STATE OF VIRGINIA— 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the Town of Lexing- 
ton (in the County of Fayette) and its vicinity; humbly sheweth 
That your Petitioners anxious for the welfare of the Town afsd 
and feeling sensibly a variety of inconveniences under which 
they labor, beg leave to request the interference of your Honble 
Body in their behalf. 

They would pray that the Legislature would invest a certain 
number of Inhabitants of said Town and its vicinity, with the 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

following powers & authorities — the appointment of officers by 
your Honble Body or by Election of the Inhabitants of said 
Town as your Wisdom sees fitt. 

1st — ^To levy, collect, and appropriate such sums of money as 
the persons appointed for that purpose, may conceive necessary 
for the following uses — 

2. — ^To r^fulate and improve the Market, the streets & High- 
ways of the Said Town and its vicinity — 
3. — ^To establish and preserve the peace and good order of the 
Town afsd & its vicinity — 
4. — ^A power to remove & prevent Nusances — 
In fine your Petitioners humbly pray that your Honble Body 
would invest the persons before referred to, with such powers 
& authorities as your wisdom may direct, for the more effectually 
promoting & preserving the hapiness of said Town &c. 

Your Petitioners would b^ leave to suggest to your Honble 
House, their wish, that the limits within which the said powers 
may be «cercised shall be extended to one mile in each direction 
from the Court House in said Town. — 

And your Petitioners as in duty bound shall ever pray &c 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition : Octo. 23d 17G0. — Refd. to Props. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act concerning certain regu- 
lations in the town of Lexington and county of Fayette. Henings Statutes, Vol. 
13, 191. 

trustees were to be elected by all within one mile possessed of twenty-five 
pounds in property, except negroes and mulattoes. Trustees could erect market 
houses, appoint clerk of market, repair streets, and impOKse taxes not exceeding 
one hundred pounds. 



NUMBER 77. 

To THB HONBLB THE SPEAKER AND GENTLtEMEN OF THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES— 

The Petitioners of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of 
Bourbone Humbly sheweth that your petitioner & resident on 
the waters of Stoner and Hinksons forks of Licking are desti- 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

tute of Every advantage resulting from water Grist mills except 
what must be erected on branches of said Stoner and Hinkson 
which does not aflford water sufficient to grind longer than the 
middle of April your petitioners therefore are necessiated to go 
from eighteen to twenty five miles to mill and even then under 
the disadvantage of frequantly being disappointed which 
subject your petitioners to grate loss of time and your peti- 
tioners are very confident that if mills was suffered to be built 
on stoner and Hinksons forks of Licking with ither good locks 
or slopes sufficient for boats to pass by the dams with safety 
that the said Stoner and Hinkson would be above ten times the 
value to Bourbone than what it is at present with only them 
navogations alone we therefore pray that Stoners fork and 
Hinksons may have mills on every Convenient place for erecting 
them but for all mills that is built on said Stoner and Hinkson 
to have a good lock or slope fixed for boats to pass and we in 
duty bound will pray 

[Names.] 

Bourbon County 

I do hereby certify that the within Petition has been advertised 
at the Door of the Court house agreeable to Law, Given under 
my hand this 27th day of Aug. 1790 

John Edwards Clk. 



Endorsement on back of petition: Octo. 22d. 1790. — Refd to props— (in 
opposition) — (repd.) — Rejected H.L. 



NUMBER 78. 

To THQ HONOURABI^S TH8 SpBAKSR AND G9NTI«SMBN OP THB HOUSB OP DBLBGATBS 

the Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of Bour- 
bon Humbly sheweth That in the year one thousand Seven 
Hundred and eighty eight there was an inspection of Tobacco 
established at the Junction of Hinkson & Stoner fork of Licking 
and that Stoners fork has been found by trial made as navigable 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

a very considerable Distance above the Junction and for as 
large Boats, as it is below; and as long in the year and that it 
makes its way throug the center of the County, through a fertile 
soil thickly Inhabited, abounding with a variety of Fish, and 
that it is the only stream by which the greater part of the County 
can be relieved from a Difficult Land carriage of many miles, 
in exporting of their produce, and that an attempt is made for 
obstructing the same by the Court of sd County granting an 
order for a mill without any restricktions whatever, when 
granting two others the one prior & the other posterior to the 
former, obliging the owners to keep a passage for boats forty 
feet by twelve; the validity of which will evidently appear by 
the certificates attending this Petition from the Clerk of the 
County; Now being convinced that the obstructing the navi- 
gation of sd River would be highly injurious, and contrary to 
the Interest of the County; and also that your Honourable 
House are fully possessed of the advantages from a water 
carriage. We therefore pray that your Honorable House will 
take the same into consideration and remove all obstructions 
that shall be made across Sd River; and establish the naviga- 
tion of Licking Beginning at its Junction with the Ohio thence 
up to the mainfork, thence up the South fork, to the Junction 
of Hinkston & Stoner thence up Stoners fork to Bramblets 
Lick in such manner as in your wisdom you may think best 
and we your Petitioners shall ever pray 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition. Octo. 22d. 1790. — Refd to props. 

NUMBER 79. 

To THB HONOURABI^B TH8 SpBAKBR AND GQNTI^BMBN OP TH8 HOUSB OP DSLB- 
GATES.— 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of Bour- 
bon Humbly sheweth &c — ^That in the year 1788 There was an 
Inspection of Tobacco established at the Confluance of Stoner 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

and Hinkstons fork of Licking; And that the south fork, which 
is called Stoners fork, is found by Experiance navigable a very 
considerable Distance above the Junction ; even up to Bramlets 
Lick; for large Boats, and that it is the only Stream by which 
the greater part of the Inhabitants may be relieved from a 
Land Carriage of Many Miles in the Exportation of their 
produce, We therefore pray that the Navigation of said River 
may not be obstructed by Mill Dams or Fish Dams or the like 
&c and we your Petitioners shall ever pray 
March 28th, 1790. [Names.] 

NUMBER 80. 

To THS HONBLB THS GBNBRAI* AsSBMBLY OF VIRGINIA. 

We the Trustees of the Town of Hopewell in the County of 
Bourbon Humbly sheweth that doubts have arisen with the 
purchers. of the Lots in said Town, whether Lawrance Protzmon 
may be found the real proprietor at a future day of the Lands 
laid of for said Town, your petitioners together with said 
purchasers having been notified of claims to the said Lands 
obtained from the Court of said County under an Act of Assem- 
bly authorizing and vesting said Court with powers of Commrs 
to hear and determine all disputes between claimants for Land, 
by right of settlement and for lands by right of Preemption 
on Improvement &c for granting certificates to all those who 
had been detained in the Service of this Commonwealth and 
also that a part of the Lots or lands laid of for said Town is 
yet unsold. Therefore your petitioners conceive they have not 
a power vested in them to sell or make conveyance of said 
lots or any part thereof, and that the Good people of said Town 
may be secured from future claimants And that every encour- 
agement may be given to the population of said Town, which 
will be of Public utility, by reason of its situation on navigable 
water and the only stream by which the Inhabitants of said 
County could Export their produce. We your petitioners 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

therefore pray your honble house will take the same in considera- 
tion and condemn said Land, vesting the same in trustees so 
as to give Security to the holders and purchasers of said Lots, 
as also the Laying of and making conveyance of such Lots as 
yet remains unsold and that you will devise such ways and 
means for the good of said holders as in your wisdom you may 
think best reserving to the real Proprietor the Value of said 
Lands as unimproved and your Petitioners further prays that 
said Town may no Longer retain the name of Hopewell, but 
may be called and known by the Name of Paris and your 
Petitioners shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Resolved that the petition of the Trustees of the town of 
Hopewell in the county of Bourbon, setting forth, that many 
doubts have lately arisen who is the real proprietor of the Lands 
on which the said town is established, in consequence whereof 
the present holders of the same are much disquieted, & the 
trustees cannot proceed in the sale thereof. And praying that 
they may be authorized to sell the said Lands — reserving the 
money arising from such sale, for the person who shall hereafter 
appear to be the real proprietor, and that the name of the said 
town may be altered, is reasonable. — 

Endorsement on back of petition: 25th. Oct. 1790.--Refd. to Courts of Jus- 
tice. — Reasonable — Bill. 

The request was s^ranted in an act entitled, An Act to amend the act establish- 
ing the town of Hopewell in the county of Botu-bon and for altering the name of 
the said town. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 176. 

The name was changed from Hopewell to Paris. 

NUMBER 81. 

To THB HONORABLB THB SpBAKBR AND GSNTLBHBN OP THB HOUSB OP DBtBGATBS. 

The Memorial of Laban Shipp of the County of Bourbon, 
District of Kentucky, Humbly sheweth, 

That your Memorialists Resident on Stoners Fork of Lick- 
ing being impressed with the Great inconvenience of himself, 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

and others for the want of water Grist mills was induced to 
apply to the county court of Bourbon for an order to Build a 
water Grist mill on the said fork; which was granted your memo- 
rialist without any other restrictions than to pay the Damage 
any person might sustain from the building of said mill; your 
memorialist immediately proceeded to and at the Expence of his 
little fortune which is nearly exhausted has got the mill nearly 
compleated: Your memorialist notwithstanding he has nearly 
spent his fortune in erecting this usefuU Building felt himself 
happy in a prospect of being UsefuU to his country and family; 
having proceeded under the sanction of the laws of his country 
thought himself safe and his property secure. It is with con- 
cern that your Memorialist finds a number of Persons have pre- 
pared a Petition to your Honorable House praying that the 
navigation of Stoners fork of Licking may not be obstructed 
but the subject of the navigation of this little stream has called 
the attention of most of the Inhabitants of this County; and 
many of them fully convinced of the Impropriety of attempting 
such a navigation have petitioned your Honorable House to 
permit the erection of Water Grist Mills on the said fork; 
However this subject may be agitated by the differant parties 
no other Inconvenience can arise to either of them than the 
mortification of being outdone by the other; but the case is 
materially diflferant with your Memorialist; his fortune has 
been laid out on this usefuU building and if your Honorable 
House should oblige him to remove her for the precarias & 
Dangerous navigation; certain ruin must possess him and his 
family that the navigation is precarias apears from hence, near 
two years has elapsed since the Navigation was first attempted 
and but one boat has had a safe passage several Boats has been 
obliged to unlode and waggon their loads to other landings more 
safe & certain; that it is dangerous, is equally clear; several 
vessels have been overset & their loads lost, some men have been 
drowned and many more have been exposed to the Greatest 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

hardship; from these facts your Memorialist trust your Honor- 
able House will make no law to affect his property in the premises 
& Yr. Memorialist as in Duty Bound shall ever &c — 

Laban Shipp — 



Endorsement on back of petition. Octo. 27th. 1790. — Refd. to props — Reas- 
onable — (repd.) 

NUMBER 82. 

To THS Spbakbr & Gbnt of thb House of Dblbgatss 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of Bour- 
bon Humbly sheweth, that your Petitioners resident on the 
waters of Stoner and Hinksons forks of Licking are destitute 
of every advantage accruing from Water Grist Mills except 
what must be erected on said streams, every other stream 
failing to furnish a sufficiency of water to grind longer than to 
the middle of Aprl. Your Petitioners therefore are necessitated 
to go from eighteen to thirty miles to mill and even then under 
the disadvantage of frequent disappointment, which subjects 
us to great loss inconvenience, and labour. Your Petitioners 
are very confident if mills were suffered to be built without 
restricting the builders thereof to erect Locks &c for the passage 
of Boats numbers wou'd be encouraged to build mills sufficient 
to grind all the Grain of the Citizens of the County. But 
some of our fellow citizens puflfed up with the most romantick 
expectations of the utility accruing from the free and open 
navigation of Stoner and Hinkson have prepared a Petition to 
your Hon House praying that the navigation of Stoner may 
be kept open and that no mills may be erected thereon; Your 
Petitioners beg leave to lay before you the following statement 
of facts, the distance of Strodes fork a branch of Stoners fork 
(the head of the proposed navigation) to the junction of Hink- 
sons and Stoners forks is not more than ten miles of Land and 
on the meanders of the Creek not less than thirty five or forty 
miles This stream being confind within narrow banks rises and 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

falls so quick in the Winter Season (for in no other season is it 
navigable) that the water is generally exhausted before it can 
reach the confluence of the said Streams and what boats have 
attempted to navigate the fork of Stoner have been either 
wrecked injur'd or obliged to unlode for want of a water to 
continue Their passage These are facts so well authenticated 
that they cannot be contested. By an Act of Your Hon. 
House passed in October Session An Inspection of Tobo. was 
established at Ruddles at the junction of Hinkson and Stoners 
forks, from thence your Petitioners believe after a considerable 
expence to open the navigation that boats of small burden may 
navigate to the mouth of Licking perhaps as many as five or 
six times a year provided they manage with care and attention. 
Your Petitioners conceive that the erection of Water Grist 
Mills on said Streams will be of far greater benefit than the 
casual uncertainties of navigation can possibly be. We there- 
fore pray that a Law may pass at the ensuing Session appropri- 
ating the afore mentioned Streams for the Building of Grist 
Mills &c to any person who may build according to Law. And 
that the navigation be open'd from the confluence of the forks 
to Main Licking by such ways and means as the Hon. the Legis- 
lature may [think] expedient and your Petitioners in Duty 

Bound will ever Pray &c rvr««,^« i 

"^ [IN ames.J 

Endorsement on back of petition. Octo. 27th 1790. Refd. to props. 

NUMBER 83. 

To THB HONORABLB THE SpBAKBR & MBMBBRS 09 THB GENBRAL ASSEMBLY OP 

THE State op Virginia. 

The Petition of Sundry Claimants to portions of Land, 
contained in the Illinois Grant & others — Inhabitants of the 
District of Kentucky, humbly complaining sheweth. 

That the Time limited for the Claimants to exhibit their 
Claims before the Commissioners appointed to settle and 
determine the claims of Persons entitled to portions of Land in 
the Illinois Grant was so short, that a number of Claimants & 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Infants Heirs at Law to deceased Claimants from their distant 
and dispersed situations in different parts of the United States 
have been prevented from having their several Claims, settled 
and determined according to the Act of October Session 1786 
Your Petitioners further shew unto your HonoraUe Body that 
the Commissioners appointed under the aforesaid Law conceive 
that they have no power to grant Deeds for Claims that have 
already been settled & determined after the first day of Septem- 
ber 1789 by which means a number of Claims already settled 
which have been assigned to innocent purchasers, & which are 
held by Infant Heirs at Law of deceased Claimants, who are 
dispersed in diflferent parts of the United States & from a want 
of knowledge of the aforesaid Law are intirely prevented from 
receiving the benefit of their respective Claims or completing 
their Titles thereto, which your petitioners conceive is contrary 
to every principle of Equity and Justice. Your Petition«3 
therefore pray that you will pass an Act at the ensuing Session 
directing them to grant Deeds for all Claims that have heretofore 
been settled and determined when application shall be made 
therefor by the respective Claimants Assignees of Claimants 
or Infant Heirs at Law to deceased Claimants. And your 
Petitioners shall ever pray &c. 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: 28th Oct. 1790.— Refd. to C. of Justice.— 
Reasonable. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act giving further time to 
the Commissioners for surveying and apportioning the lands granted to the 
Illinois regiment, to execute deeds for the same. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 178. 

NUMBER 84. 

To THB HONORABLB THB SpKAKBR AND GBNTLSMBN OP THB HOUSB OP DELBCATBS. 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the County of 
Bourbon Humbly sheweth — 

That we your petitioners labour under much inconvenience 
for the want of an inspection of Tobacco in our County town — 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

The town is situate upon Stoners fork of Licking which has 
been found navigable by large Boats loaded, navigating the 
same from the sd town — Now this being the most convenient 
for the County in general and the navigation is as good as tis 
risky Miles below we are convinced it will be of Publick 
utility and tend much to the Ease and Convenience of the good 
people of sd County We therefore [requestl that an Inspection 
may be established upon the lots of Land set aside by the propri- 
etor Laurance Protsman for that purpose and we your petitioners 
shall ever pray 

[Names.] 



— repd 



Endorsement on back of petition: To land inspection — Reasonable H. L. 
pd. 



NUMBER 85. 



Th9 HONOUKABtS THB SpBAKBR AND GENTLBMBN OP THB HOUS8 OP GSN8RAL 

ASSEMBLY OP Virginia, 

the petition of William Bruce and John Lin Humbly sheweth 
that your petitioners served as scouts in the county of Bourbon 
for the year 1789 and was discharged legally and had their 
accounts setled with the auditors of publick accts & by certifi- 
cates from the county Lieutenant of said county for particulars 
your petitioners must refer you to Mr Conn a member of your 
Honorable House — some time in the latter part of November 
in the same year Col John Edward Lieutenant of said county 
was seting out for Richmond by whome your petitioners hoped 
their money would be sent, and applyed to him to fetch the 
whole or any part he could get, and do tBe Best he could for 
them as they were in Great want, having made no crops the 
ensuing season on account of their being in the service of the 
State — the aforesaid Lieutenant reed 45 pound of the money 
and on his return to the District of Kentucky was attacked 
by a number of Indians well armed in two Boats prepaired 
for the capturing of the vessels of Emigrants on the Ohio 
river, and was obliged to dessert his Boat and make his Escape 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

leaving considerable amount of his own property, his saddle 
bags and the money of your petitioners, which fell into the 
hands of the Enemy to the great Distress of your petitioners, 
who being well informed of the Justice & humanity that has 
hitherto marked the conduct of your Honorable House are 
Induced to ask a restoration of that money taken by the 
Enemy before it came to their hand which money they think 
in Justice they ought to receive in the country where they 
did the service — therefore your petitioners prays that your 
Honours would take the same into consideration and make 
such provision for them as in your wisdom may seem best and 
your Petitioners shall ever pray. 

William Bruce 
John Linn. 

Endorsement on back of petition ; 28th Oct. 1790. — Refd. to Claims — ^rejected 
— reported 3rd November '90. 

NUMBER 86. 

To THB HONOURABLB THB RBPRBSBNTATIVBS OF THS STATB OF VIRGINIA IN GBN- 
BRAL ASSBMBLY MBT 

the petition of James Smith Humbly Sheweth, that your 
petitioner spent Eleven months in Exploring the Kentuckey 
Country as Early as the year 1767 and in the year 1773 made an 
improvement on the Waters of Licking River, and sold the 
Chief of the land he then possessed in Pennsylvania in order to , 
move his family to Kentuckey, But as the War with Brittain 
at that Post Commenced your petitioner was Called upon to 
Serve his Country, and Continued in publick Business During 
the whole of Said War either as a Deligate in the House of 
Assembly or as a melitia officer in the Jersey State or against 
the Indiens on our fronteers or on Expeditions against the 
Indien towns; During this time your petitioner was obliged by 
the l^al tender act to take Depreciated Congress money as 
pay for his land — ^in the year 1786 he came to Kentucky and 
aplied for his Right of preemtion but the Court would not 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

admit of his proving his Right of preimtion as he had not been 
in the Regular Service immediately under Congress — ^in the 
year 1787 your petitioner moved his family to Kentuckey and 
being much reduced by the Depreciation of the Congress paper 
money could only purchas one hundred acres of land which is 
the only land he now possesseth (as an Evidance of what he 
has said he sends the following papers), and as the land he 
improved in the year 1773. is not yet occupied, your petitioner 
Humbley prays that he may be yet admitted to prove his 
Right of preimtion, your petitioner would not at this time 
trouble the House with this Singular petition were it not that 
he looks on his Case altogether Singular, and he makes no 
Doubt but the Honourable Hous will Do what is Just and Right 
and your petitioner as in Duty Bound shall ever pray — 

James Smith. 
Bourbon County July the 15th 1790. 

Jas. Smith setting forth — that in the year 1773 he acquired a 
preemption right to a Tract of Land on Licking River in the 
Ky-district — ^That he afterwards removed into the state of 
Pennsylvania in the year 1786 returned into this State: That 
upon application to the Court of the County in which the Land 
lieth they for reasons unknown to the Petitioners refused to 
admit his claim and praying that it may be permitted to prove 
his preemption Right to the sd Land 

Endorsement on back of petition. Octo. 30th. 1790. Refd. to Ct. of Justice 
— Rejected. 

NUMBER 87. 

To THS Honorable thb Spsakbr and mbmbbrs op thb Housb Dslsoatbs op 

THB COMMONWBAI«TH OP VIRGINIA. 

The Petition of Sundry Inhabitants of the Town of Mays- 
ville, Humbly sheweth; that your petitioners being settled in 
the said town of Maysville, which is situated on the Ohio 
River at the mouth of Limestone Creek and is a Frontier 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

intirely exposed to the depredations of the Hostile Indians, 
which reasons alone has put it [out] of the power of your petition- 
ers; to Compleat the necessary buildings for Securing their lotts 
within the time limited by an Act of Assembly Intitled an Act 
for establishing a town in the County of Bourbon; — Your 
petitioners therefore pray that your Honorable House will 
grant them such further time for Compleating their building 
as to you shall appear just & reasonable & your [petitioners] 
will ever pray &c 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition: 1st. Nov. 1790. Refd. to props. — Reas- 
onable — (Repd.) 

The act establishing the town referred to is entitled, An Act to establish a 
town in the qounty of Bourbon. Henings Statutes, Vol. 12, 633. 

The name of the town was Maysville and the trustees were Daniel Boone, 
Henry Lee, Arthur Fox, Jacob Boone, Thomas Brooks, George Mil ford. 

The town was on Mays land. 



NUMBER 88. 

To THB HONORABLB THB SPBAKBR AND GBNBRAL ASSBMBLY OP VIRGINIA — 

The petition of a number of the mhabitants of the County 
of Bourbon In behalf of themselves and others most humbly 
sheweth that there is a number of Deeds in the County for 
Land that is not recorded there being no Court in said County 
from July until January in consequence of the Death of the 
high Sheriff of said County in which time deeds run out of 
date and the persons who made those deeds are some of them 
mov'd out of Kentuckey others of them dead and their heirs 
under age so that new deeds cannot be obtained, your 
petitioners therefore prays your honorable House to take 
their care into consideration and pass a Law to give a 
Longer time for Recording those deeds that was lawfully 
obtained in the year 1789 and your petitioners as in duty 
bound shall pray 

[Names.] 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

Bourbon County 

I do hereby certify that the within Petition was advertised 
at the door of the Court house according to Law Given under 
my hand this 25th day of Aug. 1790. 

John Edwards Clk B. C. 

Endorsement on back of petition : 1st Novr. 1790 — Refd. to Cts of Justice — 
reasonable — Bill drawn. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act authorizing the Court of 
Bourbon Co. to admit the recording of Deeds in certain cases. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 13, 150. 

NUMBER 89. 

To THB HONORABLS THB SpBAKBR AND MBMBBRS OP THB GENERAL ASSBMBLY OF 

Virginia— 

The Petition of William Shannon. 
Sheweth. 

That in the month of March 1779, your petitioner was 
appointed Commissary and Quarter Master to the Illinois 
a Western department under the Command of General Clark, 
and continued to transact the duties of his office for upwards of 
three years, had employed several deputies to assist him, and 
during that period purchased and issued Sundry supplies to 
the troops in that department, which purchases and issues are 
accurately entered on his books of Accounts, for which books 
and Accounts he has receipts, (by order of the board of Com- 
missioners appointed to settle the business relating to that 
department) ready to be produced. 

That your Petr. in order to obtain a settlement of his Ac- 
counts, laid them before the said Commissioners, at their 
meeting at the Dutch-station — near Louisville, but the Com- 
missioners conceiving them necessary for the purpose of settling 
other claims in the same department, kept them in their posses- 
sion, without coming to any decision thereon, and appointed 
a meeting at Colo. Bowman's in Lincoln County, where your 
Petrs. attended, hoping the said accounts wou'd then be finally 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

settled, but the said Commissioners hearing of your Petrs 
intention to travel thro' the Wilderness they declined to take 
up the said accounts, and appointed another meeting at 
Botetourt Court house or Richmond, at which places your 
Petr also intended to be present, but unfortunately for him, 
he had his Leg broke on his way to Botetourt, which prevented 
his carrying his intention into execution, (as will appear by 
sundry papers in his possession) whereby he has not been able 
to have his accounts settled, or to receive any Compensation 
for his services or the services of his deputies. 

Your petr further shews, that in procuring the necessary 
supplies for the said troops, he became indebted to Sundry 
persons, and in order to discharge the same, drew bills of 
Exchange on the Treasurer of this State, several of which are 
protested, and others not paid, so that your petr remains in 
a very disagreeable situation, not only on account of those 
bills, but by being charged with monies paid him during the 
time he was in office, and no credit allowed him, either by the 
supplies furnished or his pay for his services or those of his 
deputies. 

Your Petr therefore requests, you will be pleased to pass a 
Law appointing some person or persons to adjust and settle 
his Accounts, and to authorise the auditor to issue warrants 
for the amount of what shall appear due to your Petr. for his 
pay and depreciation as Commissary and Quarter Master in 
the said department, and also for what may appear to be due 
to his deputies, and he will Pray. 

Jefferson County Set. 

This day Docter Samuel Culbertson personally came before 
me (James F. Moore) one of the Justices of the Commonwealth 
for the County aforesaid, and made oath on the Holy Evange- 
lists of Almighty God that in the month of April 1783 Capt. 
William Shannon of Lewisville, passed by Field's Station 
(where the Deponant then lived) on his way to the settlement 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

as he said to meet the commissioners appointed to settle the 
accounts of the Illinois Department and that he the said 
Shannon unfortunately broke his leg at Crows Station that 
this Deponant was sent for to set the bone which he did and 
attended him during his illness, but the bone was so fractured 
that he was not able to proceed on his journey that season 
and further this deponant sayeth not — ^Swom to before me 
this 2 1st Sept. 1790. 

James F. Moore 

We certify that when the Commissioners for Western accounts 
sat in the neighbourhood of Louisville in the year 1783 Capt 
William Shannon who by appointment from Genl. Clark had 
for some time acted as Commissary General to the Illinois 
R^ment presented his accounts to have them settled; But 
the Board finding that his Books which appeared to be regularly 
kept would be helpful in adjusting the accounts of the other 
officers of that department detained Capt Shanon from about 
the middle of January to the last of February when it was 
found that more accounts had been presented and would be 
presented than could possibly be adjusted before the time it 
would be necessary for the Commissioners to return through 
the wilderness, and in the investigation of which Capt Shannons 
books would also be needed and finding that Capt Shannon 
intended to travel to the eastward about the same time, his 
books were detained and he directed to attend the Board 
when it should set in Botetourt County or at Richmond to 
have his accounts finally classed. But Capt Shannon by having 
his Leg bone broken before he set off was rendered incapable 
of the Journey; so that his accounts were never settled by the 
Commissioners and he informs us that the Auditors have 
hitherto declined a settlement by which he is suffering great 
loss. Therefore we take the liberty of making this representa- 
tion of facts and beg lieve further to observe that as far as 
we can recollect, his Books appeared to be accurate & just, 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

only in some instances paper money contracts were not dis- 
tinguished from specie, which he assured the Board he did not 
know to be necessary when the entries were made, but that he 
should be able to make the distinction when it would be requi- 
site. We further b^ leave to represent that We understood 
that complaints had been made against Capt Shannon in the 
execution of his office. In order to examine into that matter 
the Board of Commissioners notifyed their Intentions to the 
publick of hearing all the charges that could be brought against 
him relative to his conduct as Commissary and appointed a 
time for exhibiting them — But that no charges were brought 
forward and supported nor anything made appear to his preju- 
dice in the execution of his office given under our hands this 
26th day of June 1790 — 

Saml McDowell 
Caleb Wallace. 

Endorsed on bock of petition: Novr. 2d. 1790.— refd to Claims—reasonable 
— 1st Reso: refd. to Executive — ^2nd Reso: that the Auditor of Public accts deliver 
him his papers — ^reported 8th Nov. 90. — 19h pasd. 

The request was granted in an act entitled. An Act granting a sum of money 
to William Shannon and others. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 211. 

The Auditor of Public Accounts was instructed to issue certificates to those 
holding Shannon's drafts and to Shannon two thousand and twenty-six pounds, 
six shillings and one penny. 

NUMBER 90. 

To THB HONORABLS THB GSNBRAI* ASSKMBLY OP THB COB£MONWBAI.TH OF VIR- 
GINIA. 

The Petition of the Trustees of the Transylvania Seminary 
humbly sheweth 

That notwithstanding the Indulgence and encouragement 
they have hitherto experienced from the Legislature with the 
laudable design of propogating Science in this District they find 
the funds still so low as to be unable to errect any suitable 
Buildings 

Encouraged by the favourable disposition to promote 
Education that has ever marked the proceedings of your 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

honorable house we are Induced to pray that a Law may be 
passed authorizing the Board of Trustees for the Transylvania 
Seminary to raise by Lottery the Sum of five hundred pounds 
for the purpose of errecting an Academy Under such regulations 
and restrictions as the Legislature may judge proper and we 
in duty bound shall ever pray 

[Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition: Nov. 6 1790. — Refd to Props — ^Reasonable 
— Repd. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act authorizing several lot- 
teries and the sale of certain lots in the town of Portsmouth. Henings Statutes, 
Vol. 13, 173. 

"Be it enacted by the General Assembly, That it shall be lawful for the 
trustees of Transylvania Seminary, or a majority of them, to raise by one or more 
lotteries, a sum not exceeding five hundred pounds, for the purpose of erecting 
an Academy.** 

The same bill allows a lottery to build a church, roads, and other academies 
in other places east of the mountains. 



NUMBER 91. 

To TH8 HbI^ TH8 G8NBRAI« ASSSMBLY OP THB COMMONWEALTH OP VIRGINIA 

The Petition of the Members composing the Board of Trustees 
of the Transylvania Seminary humbly sheweth 

Your Petitioners feeling sensebly an inconvenience under 
which they labor as a body constituted by Act of Assembly 
for conducting the business of the said Seminary, beg leave to 
request the interferrence of your Hble House in order the more 
effectually to enable them to carry into effect the Trust reposed 
in them. 

They would suggest to your Hble House that one essential 
inconvenience to which they are subjected arises from the 
great number of members which by Law are required to con- 
stitute a board for the transaction of business as they are so 
widely scattered thro the district: And would pray that the 
number necessary to conduct the business of said Seminary 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

should be reduced to seven or such number as the wisdom of 
the House may direct and your petitioners in duty bound 
shall ever pray. 

[Names.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: Nov. 6 1790. — ^refd. to props — Reasonable 
— Repd. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act concerning the Trustees 
of Transylvania Seminary. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 147. 

Seven trustees were henceforth sufficient to do business at the two annual 
meetings provided by law. 

NUMBER 92. 

To THB HONBLE THB SPQAKER AND MBMBSRS OP THE GQNQRAI« AsSEMBI«Y 

The Petition of Henry Banks humbly sheweth 

That during the latter period of the War your Petitioner 
was engaged in very considerable mercantile Transactions, as 
is well known to many honble members of the House, when it 
became absolutely necessary for him either to appropriate a 
large capital in the purchase of Land Warrants, otherwise a 
large sum would perish in his hands, being paper money 

That your Petitioner was appointed the Sole agent of the 
House of Hunter Banks & Co. who had had very considerable 
Transactions with different public agents, and found that they 
had a demand for 8oo Bus Salt, for which payment had never 
been made or a Certificate granted by which payment could 
be required, and that after attempting in various Instances 
to obtain payment without success your Petitioner was at 
length advised to bring a Suit in the High Court of Chancery 
against the Honble the Atty General, which suit has in due 
Course been referd to William Hay esqr. master Comr to the 
Honble High Court of Chancery, and he has reported and certi- 
fied a Balance of One Thousand Sixty Six pounds 13-4 to be 
due to your Petitioner but the final decree for the same is 
suspended until March next 

That in Consideration of the necessary purchase of Lands 
as aforesaid your Petitioner has created a large demand ag. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

himself for fees, without the Payment of which in advance, he 
is not permitted to enter the surveys in the Registers office, 
that in Consequence of some Misfortunes your Petitioner is 
not prepared with certain funds to pay those expences, and is 
therefore in great fear that he will loose some of them 

Your Petitioner is well aware of the impropriety of asking 
a payment of the aforesaid money until it is established by a 
final decree, and therefore only prays that this Honble House 
will pass a resolution requiring the Register of the Land office 
and the Depy Register of Kentuckey be directed to receive the 
warrants which may be issued for the aforesaiid claim, when 
finally ascertained or that this Honble House will grant to 
your Petitioner any other relief respecting the Premises which 
may be reasonable, and your Petitioner in duty bound will 
pray &c 

Henry Banks. 

that the petition of the said Henry Banks prajdng that any 
warrants which he may receive from the Aud, of public Ac- 
counts by virtue of the said Decree may be received by the 
Register of the Land office & Depy Raster of Kentuckey in 
discharge of fees due for entering surveys & be reasonable the 
petitioner for grants [?] 

Commissioners Office November 15 1790 

Hunter Banks and Company Plfts. 

against 
Turner Christian Richard Morris, James Innes Attorney 
General, and John Pendleton Auditor of public accounts .Defts. 

Pursuant to the Direction of James Innes on Behalf of the 
Commonwealth in these Words, to wit. Sir, whereas there is 
a Suit now depending, in the honourable the high Court of 
Chancery, Hunter Banks and Company agaiinst myself as 
Attorney for the Commonwealth and others, it was my Inten- 
tion to have consented that it should be sent to you for settle- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

ment at the last Term, but my Indisposition prevented, I do 
now consent on Behalf of the Commonwealth, that you do 
examine state and Report thereon, & that you ascertain what 
is due to the Complainants as soon as possible. Witness my 
Hand and Seal at Richmond the ninth Day of November one 
thousand seven hundred and ninety. 

James Innes 
To William Hay, Esq. 

Your Commissioner, having examined the Papers and con- 
sidered the claim of the PlaintiflFs, is of opinion that they are 
intitled to one thousand and sixty six Pounds thirteen shillings 
and foiu- pence for the eight hundred Bushels of Salt mentioned 
in the papers which is at the Rate of one hundred Pounds 
paper money pr Bushel, reduced by seventy five the scale in 
1780, and he submits it to the Court whether they should be 
allowed Interest from Decbr 1780. 

Wm. Hay, M. C. 
Commissioners fee 0.7.6 a copy 

Copy 1.6 Wm. Hay, M. C. 



0.9.0 



Endorsement on back of petition. 20 Nov. 17to — refd. to props. Reasonable 
— Repd. 

The request was granted in an act entitled. An Act giving further time to 
owners of entries on western waters to survey the same. Henings Statutes, Vol. 
13, 120. 

NUMBER 93. 

To THS HONOURABtS ThB GSNBRAL AsSQMBtY POR THB COMICONWBAI^TH OP 

Virginia. 

Gentlemen — 

We your Petitioners of the District of Kaintucky, do 
humbly petition for further time to fulfil, an Act passed last 
Session; obliging every person, to return their Plots of Surveys 
to the raster's Office before the — day of August 1791 — Our 
Del^ates brought no account of such an Act having passed, 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

And the Acts of Last Session coming late to this District fell 
into the hands of a few individuals; who either from Design 
or inattention never communicated to the publick, that such 
an Act was in being, Till the time of complying with it, was past, 
Therefore your Petitioners knew nothing of the Act till after 
the time was expired. And as advantages will now be taken by 
designing men; not only against your Petitioners, but against 
many of the good and industrious Citizens of this District. 
And Schemes entered into by persons, who support themselves, 
by fradulent and knavish practices, not only to the great 
damage of your Petitioners, but to the immense loss of many 
of the good people of this District. Therefore we petition for 
longer time to comply with the Act. And look up to you as the 
Guardians and Supporters of our lives liberty and property. 
Firmly reljdng on the justice and Equity of your honourable 
house so often experienced and which we are ever bound to 
acknowledge and your Petitioners will ever pray. September 
the 9th day 1791.- [Names.] 



Endorsement on back of petition : Oct. 22 1791 — Refd. to Props — Reasonable 
— Repd. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for the relief of persons 
owning surveys returned to the registers office, on which no patents can issue in 
consequence of the erection of Kentucky into an independent state. Henings 
Statutes, Vol. 13, 526. 

Warrants were to be issued in cases of certificates of survey sent to the land 
office of Virginia previous to separation. 

NUMBER 94. 

To TH8 HONCMtABLB ThS GQNQRAI* AsSQMBLY OP VIRGINIA 

The Petition of John Crow humbly Sheweth 

That your Petitioner did keep in victuals & . . . . the 
Indian prisoners from the time they were put into his possession 
untill the tenth of May 1788, for which expenses of his, he has 
been paid in full according to his account. 

That from the tenth of May 1788 untill the twelfth of 
September following your Petitioner still continued to keep 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

those prisoners, & presented his account which was allowed 
likewise, but curtailed. Still he had his pay, according to the 
Curtailment. 

That your Petitioner finding himself a considerable loser 
by this Curtaiil of his account resolved to get rid of the said 
prisoners as soon as possible; but it was the fifteenth of January 
1789 before he could write to Colonel Benjamin Logan to take 
them away; that his account has been since stated before the 
Executive who thought it convenient to reject it. 

That by the answer of Col. Logan Your Petitioner was 
obliged to take care of said prisoners from the 15th of January 
to sometime early in April, when at last they were taken away, 
which expence your petitioner hath not charged to Government. 

That your Petitioner conceives he has as much right to be 
reimbursed his expences for Nine Indian Prisoners from the 
thirteenth of September 1788 untill the fourteenth of January 
1789 as he had for the two former accounts, and That whatever 
compensation he may have received from the banning to 
the twelfth of September 1788 does not invalidate his claim 
for his expences posterior to that last date, as he would still 
have had the same compensation, in case the Indians had been 
taken away at that time. 

That your Petitioner refers your Honorable House to the 
letter of John Brown Esqr & the order of Council to shew 
that his just claim has been rejected; & to the letter of Col. 
Benjamin Logan to prove that your petitioner was still forced 
to keep the prisoners at his own expence from January till 
April when they were taken away from him. 

That on considering the whole, your Petitioner b^s of your 
Honorab Body that an order may pass ordering the payment 
of his expenditures from the thirteenth of September 1788 till 
the fourteenth of January 1789, as he is Justly intitled to; and 
as to your Wisdom shall seem meet. 

And your Petitioner shall ever pray &c. 

John Crow 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

In Council October 15, 1789 
On consideration of the Claim of John Crow for maintenance 
of Nine Indian prisoners & for Barracks hire — He is advised 
that the same be rejected — 
The Gov. orders accordingly. 
Extract from the minutes. 

A Blair C. C. 

The Commonwealth of Virginia to John Crow Dr 

To the keeping of nine Indian Prisoners from the thirteenth 

Day of Septr 1788 till the fourteenth Day of January 1789 — 

at I S pr Ration also Barracks at the Rate of £10 pr year — 

John Crow. 
State of acct according to the prayer of the Petitions 

To 1007 Rations for 9 prisoners 123 days— 9 

Rations pr day £50--7-_o. 

Barrack hire 4 mo £io pr an 3.-6.-8. 



£53-15.-8 
Dear Sir 

I have considered the situation of the Indians in your 
posession I have just Reason to think when you received them 
People you intended to have the profits arising from suporting 
them then you must know every person would supose any 
Deficences in Government ought to fall on you before it should 
be fixed on any other indeviduel as you have been liberaly paid 
for suporting them part of there time but I think you had better 
set them over the Ohio or leve them under the eye of those in 
the service of the United States I think this will be making the 
best of a bad bargain 

I am yours Benjamin Logan 

February 16 1787 

Staunton Novr, 3d 1789 
Sir 

Some Business which I did not expect when I left Kentucke 
made it indispensably necessary for me to pass through Win- 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Chester on my way to New York & consequently put it out of 
my power to call at Richmond to obtain a settlement of your 
Acct But on my arrival at N. York I inclosed your Acct. 
Colo. Logans Certificate & a power of Atty to Mr. Saml. 
McCraw requesting him to make application for a settlement 
on your behalf He did so but the Executive rejected your 
Claim supposing you had already reed, a Compensation ade- 
quate to your trouble & expence I inclose you a Copy of the 
Order of Council upon this application — I am sorry the deter- 
mination was not more favorable — Had the Claim been my 
own I should not have done otherwise with it than I did — 
I am Sir 

Your Mo. Hble Sevt. 

J, Brown. 
Mr. John Crow. 

Endorsement on back of petition: Oct. 22. 1791— Refd to Claims— Mr. Todd 
(of Nelson) rejected— reported 2d qre. 1792. 

NUMBER 95. 

To TH8 HONOURABLB THB SpBAKSR AND GbNTLBMSN OP THB HOUSB OP DBI«BGATBS 

The petition of Isaac Ruddle Humbly sheweth, that your 
petitioner In the year 1779 was appointed to the Command of 
a Compy for the Reduction of the Illinois under the then 
Colo. Clark, that He raisd a Company on Holstain and sup- 
plied them with the necessary arms Provision Bags and pack 
Horses, for the falls of Ohio to which place he Marchd them; 
that in the Beginning of March 1780 your petitioner with His 
Company was ordered on Duty to a frontier station on Licking 
By John Bowman the then County Lieutenant of Kentucky 
County, that your petitioner with His Company was on the 
24th of June 1780 Captured by a party of British and Indians 
under the Command of Capt Bird from Detroit, to which place 
they were taken and their remaind in Captivity till the 3d 
Nov. 1782. when He retumd — to the District of Kenty where 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

He Has since Resided, that after the return of your petitioner 
to the District of Kentucky He made out a pay role for the 
time of His last Services and Captivity for which He reed 
£497..o..o as will more fully appear Referance thereto being 
Had, that your petitioner on His return also made application 
to the Commissioners for setling The western Claims for the 
Liquidation of His Accounts for His first Services, that they 
Did settle His account and that their appeard to be Due to your 
Petitioner the sum of £442.. lo.. 03-5 which will more fully 
appear by the Inclosd Copy of their proceedings that your 
petitioner also furnishd for the service of the District two 
Horses which were Valued at £65 which will more fully appear 
by the Inclosd affidivate of Colo Bowman that at the time of 
settlement some Evil Disposd person informd the Commissioners 
that your petitioner while a prisoner was Enimical to the 
united States they then gave it as their Oppinion that no 
Certificate should Issue without Orders from Govomment that 
prior to those proceeding your petitioner on His way from 
Detroit stood a trial in the County Court of Fredrick for the 
above Crime where all His accusers were, and was accquited, 
which will appear by the Inclosd. proceedings and Certificate 
which your petitioner could not procure till the Commissioners 
had rose and there Powers Had Expird your petitioner therefore 
prays that His accounts may be fully and fairly Settled and 
that your Honourable body will Direct your Auditors of public 
accounts to Issue warrants for the principal and Interest due 
thereon in such manner as you in your wisdom shall think fit 
and your petitioner as in Duty bound shall ever pray 

Isaac Ruddle. 



Endorsemeut on back of petition: October 26th 1791 — Refd. to Claims — 
rejected — ^repd. 9th. qre. 1791 (?) Voucher delivered to Mr. Waller. 

NUMBER 96. 

To THG HONOURABI«E THB SPSAK^R AND MSMBQRS OP THQ HOUSQ OF DSl<EOATBS — 

The Petition of Levi Todd Clerk of Fayette County, on 
behalf of himself and the other clerks of Courts within the 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentticky 

District of Kentucky, Humbly sheweth, That by reason of 
your Petitioners remote situation from the seat of Government, 
The acts of the last Session of Assembly did not come to his 
hands untill a very late period — 

That your Petitioner being entirely ignorant that Laws had 
passed to repeal those Laws which imposed a Tax on the Clerks 
of Courts, and to repeal in part the act imposing new taxes — 
did on the 9th day of last March pay to Thomas Marshall 
Treasurer of the District of Kentucky for taxes which he 
supposed to have become due under the said Repealed laws, 
but which were in fact abolished by the said Repealing laws, 
£23.7-7 That your Petitioner has great reason to believe 
that many other clerks within the said District, have for want 
of information made similar payments He therefore Humbly 
prays that a Law may pass authorising and directing the said 
Treasurer to repay any monies which may have been so paid 
to him by mistake as aforesaid — 

Levi Todd 

Endorsement on back of petition: 1st Nov. 1791 — Refd to Props — Reason- 
able — ^rept. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act concerning the clerks 
within the District of Kentucky. Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 313. 

The receiver was authorized to pay Todd twenty-three pounds, seven 
shillings, and seven pence, which he paid on account of tax imposed on clerks 
subsequent to law repealing such tax. 



NUMBER 97. 

To THQ HONBI«S TH8 SpBAKSR AND MEMBERS OP THE HOUSQ OP DSLSGATES OP 
THS COMMONWBALTH OP VIRGINIA NOW SETTING 

The petition of Joseph Martin humbly sheweth that there 
is a very great necessity for a ferry across the Cumberland 
River where the Kentuckey road crosses the same from the 
land of your petitioner on the South side to the land — on the 
opposite shore claimed by William Hord Your petitioner 
therefore prays that this Honble House will take the same into 
consideration & prays an act may pass for establishing a ferry 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

at the said place to be called & known by the name of Martins 
ferry & your petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray &c. 

Endorsement on back of petition: 7th Nov. 1791 — refd. to Props — ^Reason- 
able — ^reported. 

NUMBER 98. 

To THE HONORABI«B THB SpSAKBR & HOUSE OP DELEGATES. 

The Petition of James McAfee humbly sheweth 

That he did in the years 1780 & 1781 furnish the Troops at 
the falls of Ohio with money Provisions and whisky for which 
he received Bills drawn on the Executive for the several supplies. 

That in the year 1782 he sent these papers to be laid before 
the Commissioners in the District of Kentucky and then went 
to New Orleans, from thence to the West Indies, from whence 
he did not return to America before the expiration of the Law 
for settling such Claims. That since his return the original 
papers have been delivered to him, with the information that 
no settlement with the State had been made. Your Petitioner 
therefore prays your honorable House to take his case under 
consideration and make him such compensation as shall be just 

The bills No. i, 2, 3 being drawn by persons not authorized 
by Government and not having been Reported on by the 
Western Commrs the Auditor cant act on them — ^The other 
Vouchers being in the latter situation the Auditor cant admit 
them 
Audrs Office ^ Pendleton 

15 Nov. 1791. 

Endorsement on back of petition : 7th Novr. 1791.— Refd to Claims—rejected 
— reported 18 qre. 91. 

NUMBER 99. 

To The Hon'bi«e The Speaker & Members op the Virginia Assembi«y.— 

The petition of James Wilkinson sheweth 

That the Lands now called Frankfort were some years ago 
called and known by the name of Lees Town bottom. That 
in the Year 1783 an Act passed for establishing an Inspection 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

of Tobacco at the said Lees Town. That your Petitioner in 
the confidence and belief that the distance of half a mile or 
three quarters would make little or no difference in the site 
of the said inspection proceeded to erect a Ware House at 
Frankfort. That the County Court of Fayette being also of 
the opinion of your petitioner proceeded to appoint inspectors 
who were duly commissioned by the Executive & proceeded to 
Act. Large quantities of Tobacco have been inspected thereat 
but doubts have arisen whether the Tobacco there inspected 
are Legal Tenders in Contracts or for officers fees. Your 
petitioner therefore prays that an Act may pass for the Inspec- 
tion at Frankfort to be established by the name of the Frank- 
fort Inspection & your Petitioner &c. 



Endorsement on back of petition. 11th. Novr. 1791 — Refd. to Props — Reas- 
onable, H. L. — Reported. 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act to establish an inspection 
of tobacco in the county of Woodford, on lands of James Wilkinson, at Frankfort. 
Henings Statutes, Vol. 13, 272. 

NUMBER 100. 

To THB HONORABLB ThB LBGISLATURB OF THB STATB OF VIRGINIA— 

The Memorial of George Rogers Clark, late a Brigadier 
General in the Troops of the State, and Commandant through- 
out the Western Jurisdiction of that Commonwealth — 

Sheweth: 

That your Memorialist, relying on the Justice, Magnimity & 
Indulgance of your venerable Body, experienced at all times 
by himself, and ever bountifully extended, in every instance, 
to those of your officers & Privates of the late war who, to say 
no more, as advantageously to the public weal as they 
could, have faithfully complied with their duty — now presumes 
as one among them, by this Instrument, to lay before your 
House, as well through devotional deference, as with modest 
confidence, his General Statement of claims. Debts, or Arrear- 
ages, with authenticated Vouchers substantiating the same, 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

due to him from your State — , debts of long standing, and 
vitally detrimental to your Memorialist's affairs, from their 
having been thus long pending & unliquidated — , debts arising 
from his past Military Services, or from advances of the better 
part of his Fortune for the credit of the State, when that of 
the State itself (in the instance, at least, in which these advances 
were made) had been prostrate — , debts insured by a free Gift 
of your own to the officers of your Establishment for the neces- 
sary maintenance of your Troops under my command, in this 
Western country, troops (it behoves me to say) who with a 
fortitude, fidelity & martial hardihood, perhaps unexampled, 
had braved heroically, and with successful effect every kind of 
want, and every Species of peril, to preserve the very fairest 
portion of your State, and indeed of the whole Union — , debts 
of commutation for my half-pay, and debts for having, from 
my own funds, supplied your Garrisons & those heroic Troops 
with Bread, to feed on. 

To say more on a topic so tissued with every incident that 
can have a rightful claim to the Equity & Humanity, not to 
talk of the Gratitude of any Government — , on a theme so 
well known to the existing Generation of our Countrymen — , on 
a subject so advantageously to be felt, in its consequences, 
not only by those who inhabit the various settlements now 
checquering the face of that wide-extended portion of our 
Empire, those redeemed from the Foe, but by the many Millions 
who, in the progression of not very many years, must cover 
it — ; to say more, I say, on a Subject so teaming with past, 
present, and future benefits to the citizens of this Common- 
wealth itself, as well as to those of the Confederacy in general, 
would (in your Memorialist's humble opinion) derogate from 
his own, as well as the universal Sense of men, on a Legislature 
of the State of Virginia. 

Your Memorialist, therefore, thinks it sufficient, at this 
Juncture, to have humbly requested, as he does, the attention 
of your venerable House to his General Acct, and to every 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

Document vouching for or relating to the same as herewith 
transmitted in detached Papers, Nos i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 
8 — ; and only to add: that the difficulty of collecting the afore- 
said enumerated Papers of document from the different & 
remotely resident Persons who had held them, was the sole 
cause of your Memorialist's not having made an earlier appli- 
cation, for his claims, to the Legislature of Virginia. — 

Signed G R Clark 

Gloster Town 28th Dec 1796 
My friend 

I reached this place on the 27th Inst. I found those for 
whom I felt the tenderest respect and affection well; but found 
myself impressed with that kind of Gloom which arises on 
returning to a country once the seat of grandeur and munificence 
but, now alas, exhibiting the most striking proofs of poverty. 
But my spirits were revived on seeing the refined buties 
of my fair relation. Indeed King I sincerely lament that 
fortune has so frowned on relation so dear to me. Come down 
my friend & lament with me that worth and beauty are now 
become a secondary object with the male sex. Will you do 
me the favour to leave the enclosed letter with Boyd & Carr 
and will encrease my load of obligation by appljdng to Mr 
Hay for Genl Clarks papers 

Adieu John Thurston 

I have no wafr seal the enclosed J T 

Endorsement on back of petition: 11th Novr. 1791 — p. 111. Refd to Claims 
—rejected 70,000 Flour— Reasonable— Bill Exche.— repd 24tli qre 1791. 1 Deer. 
1791— p 225-6. 

NUMBER 101. 

To Thb Honorablb thb Gbnqrai« Assbmbi«y op Virginia 

The Petition of John Campbell in behalf of himself & the 
Inspectors of Campbells Warehouse Sheweth: 

That in the Year 1783 an Act passed for establishing an 
Inspection of Tobacco at the Falls of Ohio on the Lands of the 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

said John Campbell without any condition restriction or ex- 
ception. That in consequence thereof the said Campbell 
hath built a Ware House and Inspectors have been legally 
appointed thereto that in the last Year the Quantity of Tobacco 
shipped falls short £23. 15 that the said Campbell hath applied 
to the Auditor for settlement thereof which he refuses alledging 
that if the Inspection doth not support itself it is therefore 
discontinued your petitioner thinks and is certain the Inspectors 
believed they were to receive their Wages as no orders from 
the County Court had issued to suppress or discontinue the 
said Inspection which is the only one in Jefferson County and 
the only one on Ohio River within the Kentucky District and 
one that is essentially necessary as it often happens boats are 
wrecked on the Falls and the Tobaccoes cannot be transported 
to any other inspection without great expence and decrease in 
the Value which will readily appear by considering that an 
Inland carriage of many miles & a carriage back again to the 
river must be very expensive & distressing to the unfortunate 
sufferers Your Petitioner therefore prays the Honorable the 
Assembly to take the same into consideration & direct the 
Auditor of Publick Accounts to settle & certify the said accounts 
in the usual manner or to grant any other relief which to you 
may seem just & your Petitioner &c. — 

The Auditor thinks that as the Inspection has never produced 
any surplus the Act under wch it is established will not suffer 
him to give a warrant on the public treasury for the deficiency 
and See Revisal Page 217. Chap. XXVIII— Sect 3d. 

I. Pendleton. 
Audrs office 
II Nov. 1791. 



Endorsement on back of petition : 12 Novr. Refd to Props — (rejected. ) (repd) 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

NUMBER 102 

Thb H0NOURABL8 THB Spbakbr and Gsntlsmqn op ths Houss op Dblbgatbs 

the petition of John Stuart Heir at Law to Henry Stuart Deed 
Humbly sheweth that the Decedent did in the year 1775 go 
down the river Ohio in the Company of Joseph Irwin James 
Comahan James Campbell and others in order to improve 
lands in the District of Kentucky that the Decedent did make 
an Improvement on the waters of Hinksons fork of Licking 
after which he returned to the Monongahala Country that in 
Jany 1776 He Inlisted in the 13th Virginia regiment under the 
Command of Colo Wm Russell for During the war and that the 
Decedant Died in Service — 

That in the year 1785 your petitioner then an Infant made 
application to Joseph Irwin who was going to Kentuckey to 
procure His right to the said land as Heir to the Decedant that 
the said Irwin did in April or May 1785 make application to 
the County Court of Fayette, in behalf of your petitioner that 
the said Court did grant your petitioner a right of settlement 
for 400 acres and a pre-emption of 1000 acres of Land adjoining 
that after this the said Irwin made application to the register 
of the land office who granted your petitioner a warrant for the 
land above mentioned, that the said Irwin Engagd to locate 
the same that on His way to Kentucky a difrance arose in 
which the said Irwin Killd His antagonist and fled Down the 
Misisipia river, that on His flight he left the Warrant and other 
necessary papers in Kentucky in the Hands of Major Moroson 
that Before your petitioner arrivd at the age of 21 years the 
time for Entering Certificates for settlement rights and locating 
Warrants on preemption rights had Expired your petitioner 
therefore prays that a Law may pass Impowering Him to Enter 
& Survey the same & your petitioner as in Duty Bound shall 
ever pray John Stewart. 

Endorsement on back of petition : 12th Nov. 1791. Refd. to Cts of Justice — 
15th Nov. 1791 — Reasonable — provided not to interfere with rights of any other 
person, or persons — Reported — 

The request was granted in an act entitled, An Act for giving further time to 
John Stewart to locate and survey certain lands. 
Henings Statutes, Vol 13—304. 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

NUMBER 103 

To THE HoNB. THE Speaker & House of Delegates— 

The petition of James Gilmore and Stephen Huston, Humbly 
sheweth — 

That your petitioners was employed in Lincoln County By 
Capt. John Martin and Capt. Samuel Kirkham as scouts to 
Discover the approach of the Indian Enemy That they served 
as such from the 25th Day of April untill the 2d day of July in 
the year 1781 and that they never Received any Compensation 
for their services — and prays that your Honorable Body may 
take their case into Consideration and grant them such Relief 
as you may think Just and Right 

And your petitioners in Duty Bound shall ever pray 

The Auditors office does not afford any check on these claims 
the Vouchers being in the hands of the State by Commr for 
setiing the continental Account . . . [illegible]. 

Endorsement on back of petition: Gilmour & Huston Pets. 12 Nov. 1791. 
Ref . to Claims. Reasonable Vouchers to Col. Logan repd 25tli Ex 01 Lincoln. 

NUMBER 104 

To THE Spbakbr op thb Honorable House op Representatives met in 
General Assembly 

Whereas I am inform'd that a Petition will be presented, 
praying the Establishment of a Ferry upon the Lands of John 
Kimburlin, with liberty to Land on the oposite shore, across 
Pattersons Creek at the Town of Frankfort on the main ford 
leading from Winchester to Fort pitt, now your Petitioner 
Humbly sheweth that the Land calld in the aforesaid Petition 
the Land of John Kimburlin is the real Property of your 
Petitioner, and that your Petitioner hath never given, or is 
under any obligation to give the sd Kimburlin any title to 
sd Land, any further that sd Kimburlin is in possession thereof 
by virtue of a Verbial Contract; and your Petitioner further 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

sheweth that he is very desirous to have a Ferry Established 
over the sd Creek in his own name and is always ready to comply 
with the sd Virtual Contract with sd Kimburlin; But your 
Petitioner Humbly prayeth that the General Assembly may 
at this time delay the establishment of sd Ferry, if they cannot 
consistantly establish the same in the name of your Petitioner 
who is the real owner of the Land on both sides of the Creek, 
and as in duty bound shall ever pray — 
Frankfort Sep. 22d 1792. [Name.] 

Endorsement on back of petition: 4 Oct. 1792. — to Props. — (next Session) 

NUMBER 105 

To THB HONORABLE THE SPEAKER & HOUSE OP DELEGATES 

The Petition of George Rogers Clarke humbly sheweth that 
he entered the service of this State the second day of January 
1778 and commanded the Troops raised for the defence of the 
Western frontier from that period until the end of the War, in 
the rank of Brigadier General. 

Your Petitioner therefore prays the consideration of the 
House and that they will allow him half pay for life or a commu- 
tation of five years full pay in lieu thereof. 

The Commutation has not been paid to the Petitioner. 

I. Pendleton 
4 Nov. 1793. 

Endorsement on back of petition: 4 Novr. 1793 — Claims — ^Reasonable — 
Special--22d qre. 93. 

NUMBER 106 

To THB Honorable thb SpBakbr and Mbicbbrs op Both HorsBS op Assbicbly 

The Petition [of] Daniel Boone Humbly sheweth, that your 
petitioner paid into the Treasury of this Commonwealth the 
sum of One thousand and five pounds, & was thereby entitled 
to a Land office Treasury Warrant, to amount of Six Hundred 
and Twenty Eight Acres of Land, as by Certificate obtained 
from the auditors of Publick accounts Dated on the 21st Day 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

of February 1783 will fully appear, — ^your petitioner begs leave 
to represent that this certificate was obtained for him by a cer- 
tain Samuel Pattison, who shortly after the Date thereof 
Departed this life, and lay amongst the said Pattisons papers 
untill some short time ago, when your petitioner applied there- 
with to the Register for a Land Warrant, who refused to Issue 
the Same, Your Petitioner therefore prays this General Assem- 
bly to pass an act Directing that the Register Issue to your 
Petitioner a Land office treasury Warrant for the quantity 
stated in the said certificate — and your petitioner will pray &c 



Endorsement on back of petition: Novr. 24th 1794 — ^Refd. to Props — 
(reasonable) (repd) 

NUMBER 107 

To THB HONBLE THE SPEAKER AND MEMBERS OP THE LEGISLATURE OP THE COM- 
MONWEALTH OP Virginia 

the Petition of James Bullock of the State of Kentucky 
Humbly sheweth that your Petitioner sometime in the year 1781 
obtmned from the Auditor of Public Accounts two certificates 
of twenty five pounds each for a Horse impressed into the 
public service: that some time in or about April 1788 the said 
certificates were lost or destroyed: your Petitioner therefore 
prays that an act may pass directing the Auditor of Public 
Accounts to issue to him Duplicates of the said certificates on his 
complying with the necessary requisites — ^And your Petitioner 
as in duty bound will pray &c — 



Endorsement on back of petition : Dec 7, 98 — Claims — ^Reasonable Reported 

NUMBER 108. 

ThB HONORABLB THB GBNBRAL ASSBMBI.Y OF THB STATB OF VIRGINIA. 

Your Petitioner William Bledsoe in the year 1782 had a beast 
taken into the service in an expedition against the Indians as 
by Reference to a certificate granted at St. Asaphs the nth 
of April 1783 by the Bord of Commisioners will appear Your 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

petitioner was Intitied to twenty pounds as a satisfaction for 
sd Beast that furthermore your petitioner was informed that 
an auditered certificate issued in favour of your petitioner 
By the name of William Bledsoe which certificate never came 
to the hands of your petitioner; Your petitioner caused due 
proof to be made to the court of Lincoln county then a district 
of the State of Virginia that sd certificate was the property of 
your petitioner and that the same was casually lost or mislayed 
upon which your petitioner entered into bond and Christopher 
Greenup esqr. Security to Indemnify the commonwealth of 
Virginia from the payment of sd Certificate in case a duplicate 
should issue that a duplicate has been applied for and your 
petitioner is informed that no Law exists in favour of issuing 
sd duplicate: forasmuch as your petitioner had sd Beast 
arrested from him and lost in the service of the State of Virginia 
to the hardship and detriment of your petitioner and not yet 
payed for your petitioner prayes that a Law may pass authoris- 
ing your petitioner to call on the auditor for his warrant on 
the Treasurer for the aforesaid sum of twenty pounds or grant 
such other Relief! as may appear Just and Right and Your 
petitioner as in duty Bound will pray &c. 

William Bledsoe 
February ist 1799 — 

Your petitioner not having a safe oppertunity to forward this 
petition in time hopes this his petition will be received and 
acted upon on its Receipt with the voucher and bond certified. 

William Bledsoe. 

NUMBER 109. 

To THE Honorable the General Assembly of Virginia 

The petition of Edmond Southard and Sarah his wife, 
formerly Sarah Thornton respectfully sheweth: 

That on the 19th of April 1783 there issued from the Land 
office of this commonwealth, a Land office Treasury Warrant 

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To the GcTieral Assembly of Virginia 

(No 15. 524) to the Revd Thomas Thornton the father of your 
petitioner Sarah for 1462 acres which warrant, was lodged at 
the time of the death of the said Thornton, and had been 
previous thereto, in the Land office of the Western District 
for location. 

That the said Thomas Thornton died early in the year 1792 
having first made a will by which he left the said warrant to 
your petitioner Sarah as will appear by a copy of that will 
herewith presented: That the Erection of the State of Kentucky 
into an independent government, and its consequent division 
from this state, and other causes, which are set forth in the 
letter of Major Charles Ewell also herewith presented, prevented 
the location of the said Warrant, and it remains unappropriated 
to this day, as will be seen by the accompanying certificate 
from the Rasters office, and your petitioners consequently 
deprived of the most material and important part of their 
patrimony. Your petitioners have had no agency in bringing 
upon themselves this lamentable state of things: Their parent 
has paid his money to the state for a land right which the State 
by its own act has prevented the execution of, and which act 
leaves your petitioners ''poor indeed" — ^An affectionate parent 
on his death had comforted himself with the belief that he had 
made provision for an infant daughter; but the operation of 
the Laws of the Commonwealth has deprived that daughter 
of the hope of ever enjoying a parents bounty — ^She throws 
herself upon the justice and magnammity of the Legislature of 
her Country, and asks at its hands some compensation for the 
loss she has sustained — ^She b^s the L^slature will remember 
that money Imd out in 1462 acres of Land in Kentucky in the 
year 1783 would now produce no small fortune — ^She asks that 
it will remember that lands have greatly appreciated, and 
money greatly depreciated since that period ; and although she 
will not ask full price for her land, she asks a reasonable com- 
pensation either in money or other lands — ^She asks the L^s- 
lature to redeem her ip some measure from the gaping 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

jaws of poverty — to relieve her from the situation which her 
dying father had never anticipated she would be in, and she 
thinks she asks all this not without some reason. Your peti- 
tioners have now a numerous offspring to provide for, or they 
might not so strenuously press their claim, and they do not 
exagerate when they declare they are ''poor indeed" — ^They 
hope therefore that the Legislature will hear their prayer, and 
grant them such relief as the nature of their case demands 
and they will ever pray &c. ^^^^^ Southard. 

Land office Treasury warrant No 15,524 issued to The Revd 
Thomas Thornton for 1462 acs Apl. 19th 1783 — no appropria- 
tion stands charged on the Register of said warrant. That 
is no survey is founded on said warrant. Searched from the 
year 1783 to the year 1793 and find no survey or grant in said 
Thorntons name. 

On further examination no survey appears to have been re- 
turned to this office in his name. 

In Case Mr Thornton in his lifetime should have made a 
location on said Warrant in Kentuckey and nothing further 
down therein, which might have escaped his recollection: By 
writing to some person who is acquainted with the nature of 
such things perhaps information might be obtained. If the 
warrant can be produced an Exchange warrant can issue for 
whatever appears due on same. — No location can be made on 
a Land office Treasury warrant or Exchange warrant & that 
bears date on or before Feby. 2nd 1804 — ''such warrants 
exchangeable." **By act of 181 5 ch: 30. Entries aiter SI 
December 1816 on such warrants were inhibited." 
Land office J^^^ Davenport elk. 

May 5th 1824. 

In the name of God amen I. Thomas Thornton of Fredericks- 
burg [clerk] being weak of body but of sound and perfect mind 
and memory, do make and ordain in this my last will and testa- 

[ 182 ] 



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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

ment hereby revoking all former wills by me made, first I 
recommend my soul to God who gave it in hopes of a Joyful 
resurrection to eternal life though Jesus Christ our Lord and 
the worldly Goods and estate wherewith it hath pleased a 
gracious God to bless me I give and devise as follows. Imprimis 
I give and devise to my loving and well beloved wife Mary Ann 
Bertrand Thornton two tracts of land lying situate and being 
in the County of Prince William given unto me by her father 
Colo Bertrand Ewell containing by estimation four hundred 
and three acres be the same more or less to have and to hold 
to her during her natural life she making no waste or destruction 
thereupon and after her decease I give and devise the same to 
my Son Thomas Thornton Jun. to have and to hold to my 
said Son his heirs & assigns as an absolute estate of inheritance 
in fee simple forever. I further give and devise unto my said 
wife all that tract of land lying situate and being in the county 
of Prince William aforesaid which I bought of David Reno to 
have hold occupy and enjoy the said tract with the building 
thereon until my said Son Thomas shall attain unto the full 
age of twenty-one years she making no waste or destruction 
thereon and after the end and expiration of the said Term, that 
is to say when my Son Thomas shall attain unto the Said full 
age of twenty one years I give and devise the said tract of land 
unto him my said Son Thomas his heirs and assigns as an 
absolute estate of inheritance in fee simple forever. It is my 
will and desire that all my stock of horses, cattle, sheep. Hogs, 
&c and all my household furniture and planatation utensils be 
kept together for the joint use of my wife & children until my 
said Son Thomas shall attain unto the full age of twenty one 
years and then I give and bequeath the same unto my said 
wife and my said Son Thomas to be equally divided between 
them to their own use & behoof forever. I further give unto 
my said wife the following n^^o slaves viz: Lotto Senr. Winny 
Senr. Vernon Squire Tom the Son of Winny Senr. and Maryann 
the daughter of Ralph and Mary to her own use & behoof 

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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

forever. Item. I give and bequeath unto my said Son Thomas 
four n^^ro slaves, viz: Ralph, Mary, Lotto Jun. & Billy the 
Son of Ralph & Mary, all the books I shalt die possessed of 
one enameled gold ring in memory of Colo.' William Golds- 
borough, also all my plate viz: one silver watch one large two 
handed cup and cover, two pint cans, two large sauce boats, 
one soup ladle, one soup spoon, one silver cup, or lamp four 
salts with their glasses and shovels, eleven Table spoons, 
twelve tea spoons, one spoon strainer and one pair of sugar 
tongs. Item. I give and bequeath to my daughter Ann 
Thornton the following n^^o slaves, viz: Ben Johnston Sarah 
and her other two children, Sam and Harry, which she had by 
Ben Johnson and her two children Lucy and Jack which she 
had by Col Taliaferro Randall to her own use and behoof 
forever. Item I give & bequeath to my daughter Sarah Thorn- 
ton three negro slaves viz: Abraham, Davy afid Winny to her 
own use and behoof forever and I further give and devise to my 
said Daughter Sarah Thornton a land office Treasury warrant 
No. 15.524 drawn in my favor by the Register of the land office 
for fourteen hundred and sixty two acres now lodged in the land 
office of the Western District for location hereby assigning unto 
my said Daughter all the right title or interest which I have in 
the same or which may accrue therefrom and to hold 
to her her heirs and assigns forever. Item. I give and be- 
queath unto my said wife my said Son Thomas and my said 
two daughters Ann & Sarah three loan office certificates, issued 
from the land office of the United States, in the State of Mary- 
land the twentieth of October seventeen hundred and ninety 
viz: No 8 for the sum of nine hundred and ten dollars and fifty 
cents bearing interest of six per cent per annum from the first 
day of January seventeen hundred and ninety one. Also No 8 
for the Sum of four hundred and fifty five dollars twenty five 
cents bearing interest at six per cent per annum from the first 
day of January One thousand eight hundred and one, also No 9 
for the Sum of nine hundred and sixty two & eighty four cents 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

bearing interest at three per cent per annum from the first day 
of January Seventeen hundred and ninety one also two other 
certificates issued December the thirtieth from the loan office 
of the State of Virginia Seventeen hundred and ninety both 
numbered One hundred and four One for the Sum of Sixteen 
dollars & eighty four cents bearing interest at six per cent per 
annum from the first day of January seventeen hundred and 
ninety one, the other for the Sum of eight dollars and forty 
three cents bearing interest at six per cent per annum from the 
first day of January Eighteen hundred and one to be equally 
divided between them together with the interest that has or 
may arise from the same to their own use & behoof forever, and 
I do hereby constitute & appoint my said wife to be Executrix 
and my worthy and esteemed friend Doctor Robert Wellford 
to be Executor of this my will & testament & joint Guardians 
to my said children. In witness whereof I the smd Thomas 
Thornton have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty 
fourth day of March in the year of our Lord One thousand seven 
hundred and ninety one. 

Thomas Thornton (seal) 

March 24th 1791. 
Fixed and sealed and declared by the said Thomas Thornton 
to be his last will and Testament in presence of 
Chilton Randell 
W S Stone 
Thomas Gamett 

At a District court held at Dumfries the 17th day of May 1792 
This will was proved by the oath of Thomas Garnett a witness 
thereto at a District Court held at Dumfries the 19th day of 
May 1792 the same was further proved by William Stone 
another witness thereto and ordered to be recorded. And at 
a District Court held at Dumfries the 21st day of May 1792 
On the motion of Mary ann Thornton the Executrix herein 

[ 186 ] 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

named who made oath & executed & acknowledged bond as 
the law directs certificate is granted her for obtaining a probate 
thereof in due form 

Teste G. Brooke C. C. 
A copy teste 

M. P. Sinclair C. P. W. S. C. 



Endorsement on back of petition. Deer. 4th 1824— Refd to Claims— 1825 
Jany 1 Rejected — Jany. 3 Reported 



NUMBER 110. 

To THE HONORABLB THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OP VIR- 
GINIA AT Richmond assembled 

The petition of Berry Cawood a citizen of Harlan County 
State of Kentucky and former resident of Washington County 
& State of Virginia 

He represents and Humbly sheweth to your Honorable 
body that in fall of 1778 your petitioner enlisted with a Captain 
John Williams who was commanded by Col George Clark and 
marched on a campaign of seven months servitude and was at 
the taking of Lt. Governor Hamilton at the Opost also garded 
him to Herods station Kentucky part of the way as a gard & 
the residue of the way as a Spie and at which place sometime in 
the month of April 1779 your petitioner obtained a Discharge 
from his officer and afterwards lost or mislaid the same and 
returned to the aforesaid Washington county Virginia and lived 
in an Extream of the said County in the hills and mountains 
detached from almost Evry community or oportunity of infor- 
mation and has ultimately been kept out of his wages and Land 
bounty. 

Your petitioner begs leave further to state that his former 
occupation was that of a hunter and being a man of little or 
no information but made repeted enquiry how to come at his 
rite his directions that he got were from such vague sources 
and such a contrast of opinions that he has hitherto been kept 
in the dark We presume there has been lands laid off near the 

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To the General Assembly of Virginia 

falls of Ohio in the now Indiana state for Colo Clark and his 
soldiers & by refferance to the Acts of Congress you will dis- 
cover the same but supposes your petitioners lott of Land has 
been otherwise appropriated and finely lost. 

Your petitioner b^s leave further to state it is given up by 
both officers and soldiers of the revolutionary war who was 
acquainted with that section of Country that Clarks campaign 
was amongst the hardest that was been performed enduring 
the revolutionary war as they had to travel a number of miles 
through inundated Lands and water cold. 

Your Petitioner begs leave further to state that he is far 
advanced in years which the dates of the aforesaid campaign 
will justify the same and from the result of that Expedition 
together with divers other hardships through life has rendered 
him infirm & is left without the necessary means of support. 

Your petitioner will further state that he would be willing 
that your Honourable body would contribute land in some 
section of country not far distant from this place otherwise 
its value thereof. We the undersigned subscribers do trust 
that the magnanimity of your Honorable body will hear your 
petitioners prayer and Extend your benevolance and in duty 
bound your petitioners will ever pray &c 

[Names.] 

State of Kentucky 
County of Harlan 

I Berry Caywood aged sixty eight years do upon oath 
testify and declare that in the year 1778 I enlisted for the term 
of seven months in Captain John Williams Company in the 
regiment Commanded by Colonel George Clarke of the Virginia 
and that I continued in the service aforesaid during the term 
of seven months afsaid was at the taking of Lieut Governor 
Hamilton and guarded the said Hamilton to Herod station in 
Kentucky at which place I was discharged r^^ularly and said 

[ 187 ] 



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Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky 

discharge is lost or mislaid and that I have not received any 
compensation for said services nor has any person been author- 
ised by me to receive the same. 

Berry Cawood 

Sworn to and subscribed before the undersigned a justice of 
the peace for the County afsd this 7th day of November 1831. 

John Noe J. P. 

Harlan County State af Kentucky January 9th 1830 

This day personally came before me Luke Noe One of the 
commonwealths justices of the peace for the County aforesaid 
William Hudson of the county of Clay & state aforesd and made 
oath that in the year of 1779 he saw Berry Cawood on an 
Expedition under the command of Colo George Clark & perhaps 
in the company of Capt John Williams and the said Cawood 
was at the taking of Lt Governor Hamilton & further the said 
Cawood held an Indian scalp in his hand and it was said that 
the said Cawood killed the Indian sworn to & subscribed this 
date above written 

William Hudson 

Luke Noe J P 

Endorsement on back of petition. Deer. 21st 1831.— Refd. to Revy. Claims. 



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5 








0c: /-^ 















^cm^ 






^mr- 



FACSIMILE SIGNATURES 
Tracings made from characteristic signatures found on the petitions herein printed 



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List of Names attached to the Petitions 

(Figures indicate the number of the Petition on which the name occurs) 



Adams, Alexander (Alexr.) 

(Adans.) 46,53,76 

Adams, George 17 

Adams, James 27, 60, 64 

Adams, John (Edams) 27, 28, 

33,48,52,64 

Adams, Peter 12 

Adams, Robert 27 

Adams, \^lliam 33 

Admire, George (admire) 52 

Aheam, Edmund (Edmd.). .60,65,72 

Aiken, John (Acken) 54 

Akers, Joseph 40 

Akers, Simon (Achors) 40 

Akers, Thomas (Thos.) 40 

Aldridge, William 17,84 

Alester, James 27 

Alester, Samuel 27 

Alexander, James 23, 26, 55, 56, 58 

Alexander, John (Jno.) (Elex- 

ander) 47,63 

Alexander, Randall (Randol) . . .60, 65 

Alexander, Samuel (Saml.) 63 

Alexander, Thomas (Thomas) 

(Ellisander.) (Alixander) . . .60,65 

Alexander, William (Wm.) 58 

Alford, Ancel (Ansel) 58 

Alford, Charles 58 

Algire, Adam 78 

Alkire, John 78,84 

Alkire, William (Alkier) 78, 84 

Allen, Archibald (Allan) 48 

Allen, Daniel 48 

Allen, David 60 

Allen, Elijah 74 

Allen, John (Allin) 

(AUan) 43, 53, 63, 65, 66, 77, 78 

Allen, John W. (Jno.) 49 

Ailen, Joseph (Jos.) 48,51,52,54 

Allen, Richard (Richd.) 40 

Allen, Silvanus 52 

Allen, Thomas (Thos.) 49, 57 

Allen, Zachariah 58 

Allen, WUUam (Wm.). 43, 58, 60, 65, 77 

Allerson, John [Allison?] 60 

AUerson, Peter 60 

Allerson, Thomas 60 

AUerton, David (Allarton) 78, 84 



AUerton, Jacob 84 

Allerton, Jonathan (Allarton).. 78, 84 
Allison, John (Jno.) (Alleson) 45, 52, 

53,58,60,63,78 

Allison, Peter 40 

Allison, Robert (Robt.) (Alison) 60, 78 

Allison, Thomas 27, 58 

Alsop, George (Geo.) 60, 67 

Alsop, Joseph (Jos.) (AUsup). ... 60 

Alston, John McCoy 74 

Alston, Phillip 74 

Alvey, Robert 60 

Ames (Alender) 27 

Anderson, Asher 47, 65 

Anderson, George 60 

Anderson, Henry 52 

Anderson, James 27, 46, 58 

Anderson, John 15, 27, 64, 78 

Anderson, Joseph (Jos.) 52 

Anderson, Nicholas 27, 65 

Anderson, Presley (presley)24, 47, 

60,65,78 

Anderson, Reuben 66 

Anderson, William (Wm.)..15,27, 

28, 33, 48, 49, 58, 62, 63, 64, 78, 84 

Anderson, William, Jr 48 

Andrews, Alexander 58 

Andrews, Isaac 54, 56 

Archer, Stephen 60 

Archer, William (Wilm.) 55 

Archer, Zacharias (Zach.) 52 

Ardery, James 56 

Ardery, John (Jno.) 56 

Ardery, MUiam (Wm.) 56 

Armstrong, James 27 

Armstrong, John 26 

Armstrong, Joseph (Jos.) . . .66,84,88 

Armstrong, Joshua 55 

Armstrong, Thomas 27 

Armstrong, William (Wm.).. 27, 46, 58 

Armstrong, William, Jr 27 

Arnett, David 58 

Amett, James 43 

Arnold, James 24,27,52 

Arnold, John ... 16, 24, 43, 52, 58, 69, 82 

Arnold, Nicholas 52 

Arnold, Reuben 69 

Arnold, Thomas (Thos.) ... .53, 60, 93 



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Ust of Names 



Arnold, Stephen 16 

Arnold, WiUiam (Wm.) ... .48,49, 

52,55,56,58,62,66,84 
Arrowsmith, Richard 

(Arrasmith) 49,78,84 

Arrowsmith, Samuel 54 

Ashbrooke, Aaron 

(Ashbroke) 49,54,84 

Ashbrooke, Felix 77 

Ashby, Daniel (Asbey) 9 (Ust) 

Ashby , David 68 

Ashby, Fielding 27 

Ashby, John 23 

Ashby, Stephen 58 

Ashford, Thomas (Thos.) 58 

Ashley, William 60, 65 

Ashurst, Robert 43 

Aske, David 78 

Askey, Zacharias [Ashby?] 74 

Asturgus, James 26 

Atchley, James 56 

Atchison, James 63 

Atkin, Robert (Robard) 78 

Atkins, William 69 

Atkinson, Jesse (Adkinson) 74 

Ayres, Richard (Riard) 54 

Ajrres, Samuel (Saml.) 46, 51, 53 

Baber, Stanley 65, 72 

Bacum, Henry 54 

Badger, Alexander 77 

Bailey, Groombride (Baley) 64 

Bailey, John Qno.) 58 

Bailey, Rezon (Baley) 54 

Baird, James 60 

Baird, Thomas 78 

Baker, David 60, 63 

Baker, Frederick 78 

Baker, H 54 

Baker, James 58 

Baker, John Qno.) 16, 63, 74 

Baker, Joseph 60 

Baker, Joshua (Jasha).32, 34, 48, 60, 63 

Baker, Moses 60, 63, 65 

Baker, Nathan 63 

Baker, Richard 36 

Baker, Thomas (Thos.) 27, 77 

Baker, Umphrey 69 

Baker, William (W.) 54, 83 

Baldock, Reuben 36, 58 

Baldwin, John 68 

Ball, James 63 

Ball, William (Wm.) 58, 69 

Ballard, Fielden 52 

Ballard, George 60 

Ballard, Proctor 60 



Banks, Henry 92 

Banks, Reuben (Reubin) 58 

Banks, Thomas 69 

Banks, WiUiam 68 

Barbee, Andrew 93 

Barbee, Joshua 83 

Barbee, Thomas (Thos.) 83 

Barber, Elias (Elijah) 23, 36 

Barber, John 23, 36 

Barker, Joseph (Jos.) Q.) 48,84 

Barker, William 74 

Barkley, John 93 

Barkley, Matthew 62 

Barksbery, Samuel, Sr 68 

Barkshire, Dickey 63 

Barlow, Ambrose (Ambrous) 60 

Barlow, Cornelius (Barlow) 60 

Barlow, Flanery 60 

Barlow, Henry, Jr 60 

Barlow, William 56 

Barnard, Jonathan 78 

Barnes, Elijah 60, 65 

Barnes, Francis 60 

Barnes, Joshua 64 

Bamett, Alexander (Alexr.) ... .62, 78 
Bamett, Edward (Bamet) (Eddy) 68 
Bamett, George (Geo.) . .27, 47, 60, 78 

Bamett, Humphrey 74 

Bamett, James (Jas.) 64 

Bamett, John (Jno.) 27, 36, 54 

Bamett, Robert 17 

Barr, Isaac 46, 63, 93 

Barr, John 49 

Barr, Robert (Robt.) 46, 46, 

63,63,76,90,91,93 
Bartlett, Anthony (Bartlet) 

(Anth.) 60 

Bartlett, Edmund 60 

Bartlett, Henry (Bartlet) 67,78 

Bartlett, Richard 46 

Bartlett, Matthias (Bartlet) 

(Mathias) 27 

Bartlett, Thomas 46, 60, 67, 78, 83 

Bartlett, W 17 

Barton, Andrew 77 

Barton, Joab 9 (Ust) 

Barton, Joshua 9 (Ust), 27 

Baseman, John 84 

Basil, John (Bazel) 27 

Baskett, John (Jno.) 66 

Basnett, Isaac 47, 72 

Basnett, Robert 47 

Bassett, William (Baset) 

(Wm.) 27,62,68 

Bastinett, John (Jno.) 60 

Bates, Ephraim (Baits) 60 

Battersell, Freeman (freeman) ... 78 



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List of Names 



Baugh, John 9 (List) 

Baughman, Jacob 9 (List) 

Baxter, James 60 

Baxter, Samuel 46 

Bay, David [Ray?] 82 

Baylor, Walter (Wallner) ........ 60 

Bayne, Thomas 60 

Beale, Leonard 63 

Beale, Richard Eustace 16 

Beall, Archibald (Beell) (Archd.) 

(Archble) 27,69 

Beall, Edward 63 

Beall, WiUiam (Wilhn.) 63 

Bear, William (Bare) 28 

Beard, John 63 

Beard, Joseph 74 

Beams, Will 58 

Beaseman, John 78 

Beasley, John (Beasly) 32, 48, 54 

Beatty, Daniel (Beaty) 60, 65 

Beatty, James 60 

Beatty, John (Beaty ) .33, 49, 66, 77, 84 

Beatty, Thomas (Thos.) 65 

Beck, Daniel 60 

Beck, Jeremiah (Becks) 48, 54 

Beck, Samuel (Saml.) 62 

Bedford, Benjamin (Benj.) 62,78 

Bedinger, Michael (G) 8, 9 

Beesley, William (Majr.) ... .9 (List) 

Bell, David 78 

Bell, Hugh 78 

Bell, John 43,52,84,93 

Bell. James 52,78 

Bell, Joseph 78 

BeU, Richard 63 

Bell. Samuel 78 

Bell, Thomas (Thos.) 24, 53 

Bell, William (Wm.) 57, 58, 78 

Benedict, John 36 

Benefil, John (Benefiel) 60, 63, 93 

Bennett, Benjamin 60 

Bennett, Daniel 68 

Bennett, George 51 

Bennett, Josephus (Bennit) 17 

Bennett, Joshua 24 

Bennett, Thomas 47 

Bennett, William 3 

Bennington, William 82 

Benson, James (Coin.) (Jas.) 82 

Benson, Joshua 84 

Bentley, James 60, 65 

Benton, John 54 

Benton, Simon 54 

Berson, William (Wm.) 55 

Berry, Benjamin (Benj.) 43, 52 

Berry, Edmund (Edmond) (Bery) 72 
Berry, Edward 66 



Berry, EUjah 32,34,48,84 

Berry, George 67, 78, 84 

Berry, George Jr 32, 34 

Berry, Henry 32, 34, 48 

Berry, James 8, 9, 26, 27 

Berry, Joel 32,34,48 

Berry, Joseph 27, 32, 34, 48, 54, 60 

Berry, Joseph, Jr 32, 34 

Berry, Robert 43 

Berry, Reuben (Berry) (Reubin)51, 52 

Berry, Samuel (Bery) 43, 52 

Berry, Themley 54 

Berry, Thomas (Tho.) 58 

Berry, Thomas, Jr 58 

Berry, WiUiam 40,48,58 

Berry, Withers 64 

Best, Humphrey 27 

Best, Stephen 27 

Bethel, George 56 

Bett, Josiah 68 

Bever, Matthias (Mathias) 

(Mattheas) 60,78,84 

Bever, Obadiah (Bavor) 

(Obediah) 47,72 

Bibelin, William 60, 65 

Bickerstaff, Benjamin (Benj.) 74 

Bickley, James (Bickey) 61 

Bickley, William (Beckley) . . .6, 32, 34 

Biddle, Daniel 78 

Biggs. Daniel 60,65 

•Bird, John, Sr 67 

Bird, John 46 

Bishong, John 63 

Black, Hugh 15 

Black, James 27 

BUck, John 27,58,64 

Black, Samuel 58,93 

Black, William (Wm.) 68 

Blackburn, David (blackbum 

david) 60 

Blackbum, George (Geo.)... 43, 51, 52 

Blackbum, James 54 

Blackbum, Isaac (blackbum) 60 

Blackbum, Joseph (Jos.) 54, 60 

Blackwell, Armstead 46 

Blackwell, James (blackwell) .... 47 
BlackweU, Robert (Robt.) . .61,52,60 

Blair, Alexander 66, 78 

Blair, Alexander, Jr 49 

Blair, 1 49,56,66 

Blair, John (Blare) 48, 56, 78 

Blair, Samuel (Saml.) 45, 46, 

53,60,78,84 

Blair, William 49,56 

Blanchard, David 46, 52 

Blank, Joseph (Jos.) 52 

Blanton, Carter 27 



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List of Names 



Blanton, James (Jas.) 52, 68 

Blanton, John 43 

Blanton, Thomas (Thos.) 62, 58 

Bledsoe, Abram 52 

Bledsoe, Benjamin (bledsoe) . . .51, 58 

Bledsoe, Elijah 69 

Bledsoe, 1 58 

Bledsoe, James 52 

Bledsoe, John 60,65 

Bledsoe, Joseph (Jos.) 52 

Bledsoe, Moses 60 

Bledsoe, William 17, 108 

Blincoe. James (Blencoe) 60, 65 

Bofifman, Catherine 8 

Boggs, Andrew 27 

Boggs, Andrew, Jr 27 

Boggs, James 60, 65 

Boggs, John 60,65 

Boggs, Robert 52, 12, 63, 65 

Bogie, Andrew 15 

Bohannon, Richard 60 

Bohun, Benjamin (Bohon) (Benj.)26, 58 

Boke, Thomas 15 

Bolar, Richard 58 

Boling, Henry (Henery) 93 

Bonar, Arthur 52 

Bonn, Andrew [Boone?] 24 

Boone, Daniel (Boon) . .6, 9 (List) 

12,24,45,48,106 

Boone, Edward 12 

Boone, Israel 12 

Boone, Jacob 48, 54, 87 

Boone, Jonathan 11, 58 

Boone, Josiah (Boon) 47 

Boone, Joseph (Bone) 60 

Boone, Misny (Boon) 9 (List) 

Boone, Ovid 57, 84 

Boone, Samuel (Saml.)24, 27, 60, 65, 83 

Boone, Samuel, Jr 24 

Boone, Squire 11,24,27 

Boone, Thomas (Thos.). 24, 54, 74, 87 

Boms, Basil (Bazal) [Bums?] 54 

Boshart, Jacob 60 

Boswell, George 60, 67 

Boudry, John 69 

Boum, William 40 

Bourns, George [Bums?] 66 

Bowles, Jesse 84 

Bowman, Jesse (Bowmine) (Jesse) 27 

Bowman, John 2, 6, 17 

Bowman, Joseph 3 

Bowman, Robert (Robt.) 58 

Boyd, John 16, 52, 66, 84 

Boyes, Joseph 60 

Boyle, James 78 

Boyle, John (Boyls) 32, 34, 54, 64 

Boyle, Stephen (Boyl) 60, 78 



Bradford, Enoch 63 

Bradford, Fielding (F.) 46, 60, 65 

Bradford, John 46,53,76 

Bradley, Dennis 60, 65 

Bradley. Dewand [ — ?] 

Bradley, Edward 60, 65, 84 

Bradley, John 62, 60 

Bradley, Moses (Bredley) 32, 78 

Bradley, Robert 62, 60 

Bradley, Samuel (S.) (Saml.) 40, 60, 74 

Bradley, Thomas 62 

Bradshaw, Benjamin 26 

Bradshaw, James (Brashaw) 65 

Bradshaw, Thomas (Brashaw) 66 

Bradshaw, William (Wm.) (Bra- 
shaw) 68,66 

Brady, William 66 

Bram, Andrew 77 

Brann, Joseph 66, 77, 84 

Branham, Benjamin (Branum) 

(Bcnj.) 62 

Branham, Thomas (Thos.). .23,62,60 

Brank, Robert (Robt.) 27, 64 

Brasfield, Wiley 58 

Brashear, John (Brasher) 78 

Brashear, Mashan 11 

Bray, James 26, 46, 46 

Breet, Joseph 78 

Brent, Innes B 93 

Brent, James 17 

Brent, Thomas (Thos.) 46, 62, 60 

Brenton, John 68 

Brice, James 84 

Brice, Samuel 84 

Bridges, John 58 

Bridges, William 64 

Bright, Henry 69 

Bright, John 69 

Brice, Daniel (Brise) 27 

Briggs, David 28 

Briggs, Samuel (Saml.) 17 

Brimagen, Jervis 66 

Brimagem, John (Brinnagem) 

(Jno.) 78 

Brink, Hibert 60, 66 

Brink, Samuel 24, 12, 60, 65 

Brinn, John (Jno.) 68 

Bristow, James ^ 66, 63 

Brite, Albertus [BrigkJ?] ; . 45 

Brite, Samuel (Bright) 66 

Brock, Henry 40 

Brockman, Thomas (Thos.) 60,66 

Bromfield, Joseph 28 

Bronson, Zebulon (Bronsun) 68 

Brookie, John 60 

Brooking, Samuel (Saml.) 58 

Brooks, Ebenezer (Ebenr.) . .17. 60, 63 



[ 192 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ust of Names 



Brooks, Henry (H.) 63,60 

Brooks, Samuel 9 (List) 

Brooks, Thomas (Thos.) 6, 24, 

40 54 87 

Brooks, William 9 '(List) 

Brothers, Thomas 84 

Brouse, Henry 52 

Brow, Bartlett 69 

Brown, Absolom 15, 23, 47, 58, 69 

Brown, Alexander (Alexr.) 66,84 

Brown, Andrew 66 

Brown, Benjamin 60 

Brown, Beverly 58, 69 

Brown, Daniel 26 

Brown, Frederick (Fred.) 47 

Brown, James (Brown) 6, 17, 

26,27,28,58,60,65,83 

Brown, Jeremiah 6 

Brown, John 26,27,60,65 

Brown, Joseph 69 

Brown, Manly 33 

Brown, McCagey 69 

Brown, Patrick (Patrick) .. .26,60,65 
Brown, Robert (Robt.) (brown).. 27 

Brown, Samuel 6 

Brown, Thomas (Thos.) 23, 60 

Brown, William (Wilhn.) 

(Wm.) 52,54,60,63,66 

Browning, Caleb 60, 65 

Brownlee, John 86 

Bruce, Benjamin 65 

Bruce, John 17 

Bruce, William 85 

Brumberry, Jacob 27 

Brumfield, Joab 17 

Brundidge, Bartlett 72 

Brundidge, Solomon 65, 72 

Brunner, Timothy 69 

Brush, James 84 

Bryan, Edmund (Bryans) 

(Edmum) 60 

Bryan, George 60 

Bryan, Samuel (Saml.) .6, 58, 60, 63, 78 

Bryan, William (Wm.) 6, 12 

Bryant, Daniel 63 

Bryant, James (Briant) 9 

Bryant, John 17, 47, 58, 60, 63, 69 

Bryant, ThoAs (Briant) (Tomas) 8 

Bryefen, RoWTt (Robt.) 58, 64, 69 

Bryson, George 93 

Buchanan, George 26 

Buchanan, James (J.) 

(Buhanan) 27,48 

Buchanan, John 26 

Buck, Conrad (Coonrad) 63 

Buck, Wilbey 69 

Buckner, William (Wm.) 17 



Buford, A 46 

Buford, John (Buferd) 63, 69 

Buford, Simeon 93 

Bulger, Edward 11, 12 

Bullen, Jedediah 49 

Bullitt, Parmenas (BuUett) 26 

Bullock. Edmund (Edm.) .. .53, 60, 65 

Bullock, Garland 60, 65 

Bullock, James (Jas.) 63, 107 

Bullock, John 8,9,53,60,66 

Bullock, Lewis 60, 67, 93 

Bullock, Nathaniel (Bullock) 

(Nathanel) (Nathel) 8, 9, 

9 (List) 66 

Bullock, Thomas (Thos.) 63,78 

Bunch, Callaway 58 

Bunch, Charles 68 

Bunch, Clark 58 

Bunch, Joseph 58 

Bunch, Record 58 

Bunch, Zachariah 58 

Bundan, David 9 (List) 

Bunnel, James 93 

Bunnel, Jonah (Jona) 93 

Bunnel, Stephen 93 

Burbridge, Rowland (Roweland) . 63 

Burch, John 84 

Burch, Joseph 60, 67 

Burdette, Frederick, Sr 68 

Burdette, Frederick, Jr 68 

Burdette, John (Burdett) 68.60 

Burdette, Joseph 68 

Burdette, Joshua (Burdett) 68 

Burgin, Charles 47 

Burgin, Dennis 46 

Burgin, Thomas 47 

Burgur, Henry (burgur) (Henry) . 33 

Burgur, John (burgur) 33 

Burk, Elihu (Burke) 60 

Burk, John 77 

Burk, Jonathan (Birk) 62 

Burk, R 66 

Burnett, William 60 

Bums, Andrew 78 

Burns, Arthur 66, 78, 84, 88 

Burns, George 77,78,84 

Bums, James 28, 84 

Bums, John 57, 78 

Burrows, Thomas (Burress) 

(Burows) 66,72 

Burton, Ambrose 69 

Burton, Gerred 66 

Burton, Jesse 84 

Burton, John 63 

Burton, Reuben (Reubin) 62 

Bush, Ambrose (Bush) 52, 72 

Bush, Charles 47 



[ 193 ) 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Bush, Francis 47, 65, 72 

Bush, Gilson (Gholson) 72 

Bush, John 47, 77 

Bush, Philip 47,65,72 

Bush, Philip. Sr 47 

Bush, William (Wm.) ... .6. 47, 52, 

60,63,65,72 

Bush, William, Sr. (Wm.) 47 

Butcher, Gasper 74 

Butcher, James (Boocher) 52 

Butcher, Joseph 64 

Butler, jfames 58 

Butler, John 58 

Butler, Joseph 58 

Butler, Peter 58 

Butler, Samuel (S. ) 15, 45, 60 

Butler, Thomas (Butlor) 27, 82 

Butler, William 52, 54, 55, 57, 78 

Byers, David 56 

Byers, Jeremiah (Byars) 58 

Byers, Joseph (Jos.) 46, 93 

Byram, James 32 

Byram, Peter (P.) (Petter) 

(Pet.) 32, 48, 56, 77, 78, 84, 88 

Byram, WilUam (Wm.) 62, 77 

Byrd, Abraham 56 

Byrd, John 49, 56, 62 

Byrne, Patrick (Patrick) (Bym)32,34 
Byrne, William 60 



Cabel, Hugh (Cable) 27 

Cade, Charles 47 

Calaman, John 60 

Calbreath, John 78 

Caldock, Levi 58 

Caldwell, Andrew 66 

CaldweU, David 48,54,60 

Caldwell, George (Geo.) 17 

Caldwell, James 56 

Caldwell, John 27 

Caldwell, Robert 84 

Caldwell, Thomas 93 

Caldwell, William (Wm.)...48,54, 

65,56,60,87 

Callaghan, Patrick 6 

Callaway, Caleb 6 

Callaway, Charles 6 

Callaway, Chesley 

(Calloway) 6,63,78 

Callaway, Eager 9 (List) 

Callaway, Edmund (Edmond) 

(Edmon) (Ed) 40,46,63 

Callaway, Elizabeth 9 (List) 

Callaway, Flanders (Coloway) 

(Caloway ) (Calloway) . 8, 9, 60, 63 



Callaway, Francis 9 (List) 

Callaway, James 6, 9 (List) 63 

Callaway, John (Calloway) 8 

Callaway, Richard (Calloway )6, 10, 27 

Calvert, Ralls 63 

Cameron, Angus 6 

Cameron, John 60 

Cammack, Christopher (Xpher).. 60 

Cammack, John 60 

Campbell, Alexander 52, 54 

Campbell, Allen 52 

Campbell, Archibald 

(Archd.) 62,60,93 

Campbell, Charles (Chas.).17,60, 

63,64,65 

Campbell, Daniel 52 

Campbell, George (Campbel) . .26, 52 

Campbell, Hugh 27,62,64 

Campbell, James (Jas.) . .36,52,54,60 

Campbell, John 19, 40, 52, 

58,64,83,93,101 

Campbell, Michael (Mich.) 60, 83 

Campbell, Matthew 64 

Campbell, Morry (Cample) 69 

Campbell, Robert 40,51,63,58,60 

Campbell, Samuel (Saml.) 6,52 

Campbell, Thomas 64 

CampbeU, William (Wm.) 

(Gamble) 32,43,45,51, 

52,53,54,58,63,78,87 

Campbell, WilUam, Jr 32, 52, 58 

Cannit, Edward (Edwart) 69 

Caperton, William 27 

Carey, Hohnan, (Holn.) 54 

Carigan, Edward 58 

CarUn, Thomas (Thos.) 42, 58 

Carlton, Isaac 58 

Carlyle, George 52 

Carlyle, James 60 

Carmichael, Patrick (Carmikel).. 26 

Cams, John 49 

Cameal, Thomas (Tho.) [Corneal?] 63 

Cameal, William (Wm.) 52 

Carpenter, Adam 36 

Carpenter, Christopher 74 

Carpenter, Henry (Herniary) 74 

Carpenter, James, Jr 54 

Carpenter, John 74 

Carpenter, Peter 74 

Carr, Peter 60, 93 

Carr, Walter 40, 43, 51, 63 

Carrington, William (Wm.) 

(Carinton) 65 

Carson, James (Jas.) 78 

Carson, John 69 

Carter, Braxton 8 

Carter, John 60 



[ 194 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Carter, Shadrach 60 

Cartmill, Andrew 78 

Cartmill, John 56, 63, 78 

Cartmill, Thomas (Thos.) 78 

Cartright, Jacob (Cartwright) ... 26 
Cartright, Jesse (Cartwright) .... 27 
Cartright, Peter (Cartwright) . .78, 84 

Cartright, Richard, Sr 78 

Cartright, Richard (Curtright).33,84 
Cartright, Robert (Cartwright) . . 26 
Cartright, Samuel (Cartwright)78, 84 
Cartright, Thomas (Thos.) (Cart- 
wright) 26 

Cary, Joseph 84 

Case, Goldsmith 78, 84 

Case, Joseph (Jos.) 84 

Case, Separate 58, 84 

Casey, Belias (Kecy) (Bealleas).. 24 

Casey, John 36 

Casey, Peter 58 

Casey, Peter, Jr 26 

Casey, William (Caysey) (Wm.).. 36 

Cash, Thomas 77 

Cash, Warren 52 

Cashaner, Jacob 

(Ceshener) 40,60,65 

Castleman, Lewis 43, 52, 63 

Casto, Jonathan 66 

Cather, Edward 58 

Catlis, F [Gatlif ?] 84 

Catoline, Benjamin (Bengemen) . . 65 

Caughey, John 84 

Cave, George 6 

Cave, Henry 52,60 

Cave, John 52 

Cave, Richard 60 

Cave, William 52,60 

Cave, William, Jr 52 

Cavins, Edward 60 

Cawood, Berry 110 

Chambers, Alexander (Allex- 

ander) 60,65 

Chambers, John 49 

Chambers, John Thompson 78 

Champ, John 77 

Champ, WilUam (Wm.) 27 

Champers, George 67 

Cheney, Richard (Chania)( 

(Chany) 65 

Chapman, Amos 27 

Chapman, George 74 

Chapman, Thomas 74 

Cheatham, Edward 

(Edwd.) 62,84,93 

Cheatham, James .66, 78, 84 

Chenoweth, Arthur 54 

Chenoweth, Thomas 54 



Cherry, Moses 52 

Chester, Nixon 27 

Childress, John 24 

Childreth, Squire 78 

Chiles, David 58 

Chiles. Henry 58 

Chiles, James 58 

Chiles, John 58 

Chilton, Thomas 69 

Chinn, Christopher 

(Christophr.) 67, 93 

Chinn, EHsah 15, 60, 67 

Chinn, John 93 

Chinn, Raleigh (Rawleigh) 60, 67 

Chinn, William 67, 93 

Chisley, John 62 

Chisom, Absalom 74 

Chisom, Elisha 74 

Chisom, John 74 

Chivelier, Anthony [Chevalier?] . 46 

Chrisman, Joseph 16, 63 

Christian, John 63, 60 

Christy, Ambrose 60 

Christy, Julius 60 

Christy, Thomas 11 

Church, Thomas (Ths.) 52 

Churchill, George 52 

Churchill, John, Jr 68 

Clare, William (Wm.) 33 

Clark, Charles (Cs.) 56 

Clark, Prances 27 

Clark, George Rogers (G.R.).3,6, 

13, 17, 100, 105 

Clark, George 6, 32, 34, 54 

Clark, James 60,65,67,78 

Clark, Richard 56 

Clark, Robert (Robt.) 32, 34, 

65,56,78,93 

Clark, Shadrach (Shadrack) 60 

Clark, Thomas (Thos.) 

(Clarke) .... 17, 55, 56, 60, 65, 74, 84 
Clark, WilUam (Wm.) .33, 48, 56, 78, 88 
Clarke, John (Jno.). 14, 46, 52,54,63 

Clarkson, David 78, 84 

Clarkson, Julius 60, 78 

Clarkson. WilUam (Wm.) . . .40,78,84 

Clary, EUsha 15,74 

Clary, WiUiam (Wm.) 15 

Clay, Marstan (M.) 40, 58, 63 

Clay, Samuel (Saml.) 27, 78, 84 

Cleeland, Alexander 11 

Clem, PhilUp 67 

Clements, Roger 24 

Clernand, WiUiam 27 

Cleveland, Alexander (Clevelad) . 12 

Cleveland, EU 60, 65 

Clifford, Michael (Mich.) 62 



[ 195 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



CUft, Joseph 58 

Cliflfton, Burditt 60 

Clindining, Robert (Robt.) 

[Clendening?] 78 

Cline, Peter (Clyen Petter) 78 

Clinkenbeard, Isaac 58, 78, 84 

Clinkenbeard, William (Clinken- 
beard) 24 

Clinton, Archibald (Archy) 69 

Clock, Richard 60 

Cloyd, James 15 

Club. William 60,65 

Coachyan, Andrew [Cushan?] ... 78 

Coats, William 74 

Cobum, John 25, 45, 46, 

53,63,76,90,91 

Coburn, William 84, 88 

Coby, Thomas (Thos.) [Colby?]. . 52 

Cochran, Andrew 78 

Cochran, Dennis (Cochrin) . . . .27, 64 

Cochran, Hugh 43 

Cochran, John (Cochran) 27, 64 

Cochran, William (Wm.) 

(Cochrian) 27 

Coffee, Ambrose (Coffy) 

(Ambros) 8, 9, 27, 47, 65, 72 

Cofman, Abraham (Kaufifman? )78, 84 
Coker, Jesse (Cokker).. .8,9.9 (List) 
Coker, Augustine (Augustin) .... 78 

Coker, Michael 40 

Coin, Edward (Coen) 77, 84 

Coldwell, David (CaldweU?) 32 

Coldwell, Matthew (Mathew) 

(Caldwell) 43,51,52 

Coldwell, WilUam (Wm.). . .32,48,49 

Cole. Richard (Richd) 52 

Cole, Jesse 52 

Coleman, Francis 52 

Coleman, Page 52 

Coleney, John.[?] 64 

Colley. James (Colly).... 33, 49, 57, 84 

Colley, Joseph [Colby?] 67 

Collier, Alexander (Alexr.) . .17, 58, 69 

Collier, Daniel 78 

Collier, James 58, 77 

ColUer, John 43. 51, 52, 58, 64 

Collier, Joseph (Colliear) 60 

Collier, Moses 58 

Collier, Robert 58 

Collins. Bartlett 17, 51, 12, 60 

Collins, Edmtmd 84 

Collins, Edward 63 

Collins, Elisha 24, 52 

Collins, James (Jas.) 60 

Collins, Joel 43, 52 

Collins, Joseph (Collings) . . .43, 51, 52 
Collins, Joshua 24 



Collins, Josiah 43 

Collins, Robert (Robt.) 48, 63, 84 

Collins, Stephen (Colins) 

(Stephan) 14,60,76 

Colter, Thomas (Thos.) 68 

Colville, Joseph 78 

Colvin, Aaron (Aron) 78 

Colvin, Luther (Colwin) .32,34,48,54 
Combs, Benjamin (Ben j.).. .47,60,65 

Combs, Cuthbert 12 

Combs, William (Comb.) 27, 60 

Conaway, John 11 

Conaway, John, Jr. (Connaway) . 45 

Conaway, Jesse 8 

Conaway, Joseph 26 

Congleton, William (Wm.) 63 

Conn, Jacob 60 

Conn, John 62 

Conn, Notley 78 

Conn, Raleigh ^oUy) 84 

Conn, Thomas (Thos. ) 56, 60, 62, 66, 84 
Connell. James (M.) Connall) ... 14, 60 

ConneU, WilUam (Wm.) 93 

Connelly, Arthur (Connely) 46,52 

Connelly, James (Connely) 52 

Connelly. Robert (Robt.) 52 

Conning, Daniel (Danel) 78 

Conning, James 78 

Conning, John 78 

Conner, Daniel 60 

Connor, John (Conner) . .43,52,60,65 

Connor, WiUiam 60 

Connors, Dennis (Connyers) 58 

Conrad. Abraham (Coonrad) 60 

Conrad[— ?] ^ 

Conrey, Jonathan 54 

Consenbary, John 84 

Consawley, James 54 

Consawley, John 54 

Constant, Isaac 84 

Constant, John 24 

Constant, Thomas 78 

Conway, James (Jas.) 55 

Conway, Jesse (Jesey) 7, 40, 55 

Conway, John ( Jno. ) . . 32, 34, 42, 46, 56 

Conway, John, Sr 40 

Conway, John, Jr 40 

Conway, Joseph 40, 45, 60 

Conway, Miles (W.) 32, 34, 48, 54 

Conway, Samuel 40 

Conwenhovn, Joseph 60 

Conyers, David[Connors?]60,65,78,84 

Conyers, James 74 

Conyers, Isaac 78 

Cook, Abel 54 

Cook, David 12,36 

Cook, Hosea 60 



[ 196 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Cook, James, Senior 74 

Cook, James, Junior 74 

Cook, John, Senior 49 

Cook, John 27, 32, 33, 56, 60, 78 

Cook, Samuel (Saml.) 33, 65, 66, 78, 84 

Cook, Seth 62 

Cook, William, (cook) 52, 74 

Cooley, Daniel » . 69 

Cooley, Ebenezer 38 

Coone, John 59 

Cooper, Benjamin 60 

Cooper, James 74 

Cooper, John (Coopper) 54 

Cooper, Samuel 53 

Coopstick, Samuel 62 

Copelin, William (Copelen) 69 

Copher, Jesse 63 

Copige, Isaac 52 

Copige, John (Coppege) 84 

Copige, Rhodus (Rhodes) 62 

Copper, McCagy 69 

Corneal, Thomas (Thos.) 

[Cameal?] 52 

Comelison, Michael (Kelnelison) 

(Comalisson) (Mickel) 77, 84 

Counts, William (Wm.) 52 

Courtenay, Chamick (Cortney)32, 34 
Courtenay, Chamo R. (Courtney) 54 

Courtenay, John (Courtney) 27 

Courtenay, Nehemiah (Corteney) 

(Courtney) (Nemiah) 48, 54 

Corn, Andrew 27 

Corn, Edward 27 

Com, Ebenezer 27 

Com, George 16,62 

Com, Solomon 58 

Coming, Ebenezer 27 

Corwin, I. Chebud 46 

Corwin, Jesse 48, 57 

Corwin, Joseph 57, 58, 78 

Corwin, Matthias 58, 84 

Corwin, Michael 60 

Corwine, Richard (Richd.) 54 

Coryell, Comelius 77 

Coryell, Joseph (Corell) 77 

Coryell, Levi 84 

Coryell, Lewis (1.) 77 

Cosgrove, James 27, 64 

Cotner, Frederick 69 

Cotton, Henry 60, 65 

Cotton, Ralph 60 

Couch, Francis (fransses) 65 

Couch, James 48 

Couchman, Benedict (Benndict 

(and Benedick) 49, 84 

Couchman, Benjamin 24 

Couchman, Frederick 24 

Couchman, Malachi 84 



Couchman, Michael (Mikal) 49 

Coulson, John 33, 48 

Cowan, Hugh (Cowen) . . .53, 66, 78, 84 

Cowan, James (Jas.) 26 

Cowan, John (Jno.)(Cowen)3,17, 18, 42 

Cowes, Jacob 57 

Cowherd, James (Jas.) 60, 67 

Cowley, WilUam (Wm.) 17, 60 

Cox, Andrew 93 

Cox, Benjamin (Benjn.) 61 

Cox, David 60 

Cox, Francis 58 

Cox, Gabriel 60 

Cox, Isaac 42 

Cox, John (Cocks) 60, 74.76, 93 

Cox, Jonathan 60 

Cox, Samuel (Saml.) 60 

Crabb, John 54 

Crabb, Vinson 64 

Crach, Joseph [Creech?] 27 

Cracraft, Joseph 66 

Cracraft, Reuben (Ruben) 84 

Cradlepaugh, William (Wm.) 
(Criddlebough) (Cradle- 
bough) 6,8,27 

Craddock, Thomas (Tho.) 42 

Craddock, W 83 

Cradle. Thomas (thomas) 69 

Craig, Absalom 48, 54 

Craig, Anne 71 

Craig, Benjamin (Bingn.) 

(Benj.) 17,62 

Craig, Elijah 51, 52, 60 

Craig, James 15, 17, 52 

Craig, Jeremiah 24, 43, 52, 60 

Craig, John . . 15, 24, 23, 43, 45, 52, 61, 65 

Craig, John H 24, 51, 52, 93 

Craig, Joseph 17, 60 

Craig, Joseph, Jr 60 

Craig, Lewis .... 17, 43, 45, 62, 60, 63, 67 

Craig, Martin (Martan) 15 

Craig, Reuben 52 

Craig, Robert 60, 78 

Craig, Samuel (Crage) 15 

Craig, Toliver, Sr 43, 52, 60 

Craig, Toliver, Jr 60 

Craig, William (Craige) 58, 78, 84 

Crancher, George 69 

Cranchfield, William (Cranchfeld) 

(Wm.) 69 

Crass, Michael (Crase) 58 

Crass, John 69 

Crawford, Abel 68 

Crawford, James 63, 58, 65, 90, 91 

Crawford, Josiah (Croflford) ... .32, 34 

Crawford, William 60, 66 

Creals, James (Creal) 56, 67 

Creamer, Henry 6 



[ 197 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ust of Names 



Creed, Elijah 52 

Crenshaw, James 65 

Cresswell, Hugh 53 

Cresswell, Samuel (Saml.) 62 

Crew, David (Crews) 27, 30, 64 

Crew, Elijah (Crews) 27, 47 

Crew, Jeremiah (Crews) 27 

Crew, Thomas (Thos.) 47 

Crimm, Jacob (Crim) 65, 78 

Crimm, John (Crim) (Jno.).58,65,78 

Crimm, Joseph 65 

Crimm, William 65 

Cripedge, Rhodin 52 

Crisel, Jeremiah 52 

Crittenden, John (J.) 3, 11, 60, 61 

Crockett, Anthony 27 

Crockett, Joseph 40, 46 

Crocy, William 17 

Cromwell, Joshua 58, 60 

Crook, Absalom 24, 27 

Crook, Jeremiah (Cruck) 77 

Crook, John (Crooks) 27, 51, 68 

Crosley, John 64, 63 

Cross, Henry (Crose) 78, 84 

Cross, John 9 (List) 

Cross, Phillip (Crose) 78, 84 

Cross, William 93 

Crosthwait, Reuben 47 

Crosthwait, Samuel 47 

Crouch, Joseph 47 

Crouchman, Benjamin (Ben) 

[Couchman?] 78 

Crow, Daniel 56 

Crow, John 94 

Cruikshanks, Joseph (Crook- 
shanks) 62 

Crum, Daniel (Crume) 60 

Crump, Richard 60, 65 

Crutcher, John (J.) 58 

Crutchfield, William 65 

Cruzen, Benjamin 78 

Culberson, William (Culbertson) 

(Wm.) 49,55 

Culberton, Samuel (Saml.) 16 

Cullin, Charles 55 

Cunningham, Hugh 27 

Cunningham, John (Jno.) 52 

Cunningham, R. (Ctmingham) ... 60 

Cunningham, W 58 

Curd, Charles 8, 11 

Curd, James 40 

Curd, John 40 

Curd, Price 58 

Curl, Dudley 60, 65 

Curry, James 58 

Curry, Robert 28, 48 

Curry, William (Currey) ... .27, 77, 78 
Curtis, John 48 



Cusenberry, Elijah 32,34,84 

Cusenberry, James (Quisenbey)47, 72 
Cusenberry, John (Crisenberry) 

(Cusenbury) (Quisen- 

berry) 32,33,65,72 

Cusenberry, Moses (Crusonberry) 

(Chrisenberry) 32, 34, 48, 84 

Cusenberry, Vinson (Vincin) 

(Cusenbary) 32,34,84 

Cusenberry, William (Cusenbary) 84 
Cusley, William (Will.) [Owsley?] 47 

Cutbearth, Benjamin 6 

Cutts, Shadrach (Shadrich) ... .65, 72 



Dale, Abraham 62 

Dale, George 62 

Dale, Ignatius 52 

Dale, WilHam 51,52 

Daly, John 58 

Daniel, John 63 

Daniel, Peter 72 

Daniel, W 42 

Daniels, Nathan (Dannals) 27 

Damaby, Edward 67 

Damaby, John (Donebey) . .40,67,78 

Damwood, Boston 58 

Darot, David [Durrett?] 61, 52 

Date, Robert 62 

Davenport, Jonas (Davinport).46,53 

Davenport, William (Wm.) 60,65 

David, Charles 60 

David, H 66 

David, Zebediah (Zebadiah) 54 

Davidson, Adonijah (Davidson) 

(ADonijah) 32,34 

Davidson, George (Geo.) 17 

Davidson, James [Davison] 77, 88 

Davidson, John 58 

Davie, Charles 64 

Davies, Azariah 6, 32, 34 

Davis, Alexander 47 

Davis, Augustine 65 

Davis, Benjamin 54, 60, 58, 66 

Davis, David 54,84,88 

Davis, Edward 62,74 

Davis, Elijah 62 

Davis, Hananiah 51 

Davis, Harrison 68 

Davis, J 68 

Davis, James 68, 74 

Davis, John (Davis) . . .8, 15, 60, 63, 66 

Davis, Joseph 27, 52, 58, 66 

Davis, Lamach (Lamack) 

(Davies) 49, 65,77,78,88 

Davis, Leonard (Lenard) 66 

Davis, Patrick 60 



[ 198 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Davis, Reason 78 

Davis, Richard 27,40,51,63 

Davis, Robert 49, 54 

Davis, Samuel (Saml.) 27, 33 

Davis, Stephen 61 

Davis, Theodore (Theodonis) 27 

Davis, Thomas (Davice) . . .24, 28, 

32,33,49,55,58,60,66,84 

Davis, Thomas, Jr 49 

Davis, William 14, 52, 58, 78 

Davy, Thomas 48 

Dawes, William (Wm.) 54 

Dawson (Christopher?) 52 

Dawson, Henry 78 

Dawson, James (Dason) 14 

Dawson, John 28,49,55,77 

Dawson, Richard (Rich.) 52 

Dawson, Thomas (Tho.) (Dosson) 62 
Deadman, Samuel (Dedman) . . .51, 52 

Dearangar, Jacob 52 

Dearengar, John 52 

Deatherage, Hillis 60 

Deford, Charles 93 

Delaney, Joseph (Jos.) 45, 52 

Demint, Jared 52 

Denham, Obed 52 

Denison, David 78 

Denison, Daniel (Danl.) 63 

Denison, Thomas (Thos.) 78 

Denison, William 63 

Denman, Samuel 54 

Denney, Jeremiah (Deney) 68 

Denncy, Lewis (Denny) 43 

Denney, William (Wm.) 77 

Dennis, Moses 27 

Dennis, Samuel (Saml.) (Dinnis) 

26,27,58 

Dennis, Samuel, Jr 36 

Denton, David 40, 63 

Denton, James 58 

Denton, John 6 

Denton, Silas 32 

Denton, Thomas (Thos.) 6, 26, 58 

Detay, Henry 84 

Devine, John 27 

Deweese, John (Jno.) (Dweise). . .52 

Deweese, Lewis (Dewese) 27, 52 

Deweese, Samuel (Saml.KDewees) 46 

Deweese, William (Wm.) 52 

Dewitt, Elisha (Elishua) (Dwitt) 

(Dewit) 32,34,48 

Dewitt, Henry 55, 82 

Dewitt, Peter 23,43,52 

Dewitt, William 84 

Dexter, Silas (Silos) (Siles) 

(Dextor) 34,48,54 

Diar, John 74 

Dibrell, Charles 27 



Dicken, Joseph 23 

Dicken, WilUam (Wm.) 60 

Dickerson, A 43 

Dickerson, Edward 74 

Dickerson, Griflfen 74 

Dickerson, Josiah 48 

Dickerson, Martin (Martain) .... 43 
Dickerson, Valentine (Valentine) 

(Vaul) 24,43,60 

Dickerson, William 24, 43 

Dickey, David 58 

Dickey, James 52 

Dickey, John ,58 

Dickey, Michael (Mich.) 52 

Dickey, Samuel 51 

Dickinson, William (Wm.) 52 

Dickson, John 78 

Dickson, Josiah 78,84 

Dickson, Thomas 84 

DikcWiUiam 77 

Diller, Samuel (Sam.) 40 

Dillon, Isaac (Dillion) 56 

Dillon, John 48 

Dillon, Michael 68 

Dillon, Samuel 63 

Dinwiddie, James (Jas.) (Dun- 

woodie) (Dunwiddy) . 17, 43, 53, 93 

Dinwiddie, Thomas (Thos.) 60 

Dive, Martin 60 

Diver, Dean (Dienn) 27 

Doak, James 26, 27 

Dobyns, Edward 32, 34, 48, 54, 62 

Dods, Finley 48 

Dodson, Joshua 58 

Dodsshuler, Benjamin (Benj.) 

60,65 

Doman, Bartholemew (Barth.)... 63 

Dougester, James (Dogester) 6 

Dougester, James, Jr 6 

Dole. John (Dolls) 78 

Dole, Josiah M 49 

Dole, William (Doll) 45 

Dolome[~?] 17 

Donald, Thomas 28 

Donaldson, Israel (Donalson) 87 

Donaldson, Jacob (Donelson) 74 

Donaldson, James 78 

Donaldson, John (Donnalson) 65 

Donaldson, Richard (Donelson).. 93 
Donaldson, Thomas (Thos.) 

(Donnalson) 62 

Donaldson, William (Wm.) 

(Donalson) 52 

Doniphan, Joseph 8, 9 

Doogans, William 58 

Dooley, Abner 58 

Dooley, Jacob 72 

Dooley, Moses 58 



[ 199 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Doolcy, Thomas 62 

Doran, Patrick 21 

Dorsey, Laken 64 

Doster, Elijah (Dostor) 05 

Doster, James 8, 9 

Doty, John (Jno.) 27 

Dougherty, Cornelius 15, 64 

Dougherty, David (Doaherty) ... 27 
Dougherty, James (J as.) (Daugh- 

erty) 52 

Dougherty, John (Doherthy) .... 78 
Dougherty, Roger (Dougherty) 

(Rogar) 54 

Dougherty, Thomas (Thos.) 17 

Dougherty, William 27 

Douglass, George 58 

Douglass, Hugh (Dougless) 78 

Douglass, James 71, 84 

Douglass, John 24, 58 

Douglass, Nathaniel (Dugles) 

(Nathan) (Nathenel) 58, 78 

Douglass, Samuel (Saml.) 

(Dugles) 49,57,78 

Douglass, William 57 

Dove, Augustine (Auguston) 47 

Dove, Francis 15 

Dowden, Michael (Michl.) 

(Dowden) 52 

Dowden, Nathaniel 52 

Dowell, Martin (Dowel) 51 

Dowling, James 60 

Downer, E 54 

Downing, Andrew 58 

Downing, Ezekiel (Ezekel) 58 

Downing, James 17 

Downing, John 17, 58 

Downing, Robert 48 

Downing, Thomas (Tomas) 58 

Downing, Timothy 32, 34, 48, 54 

Downs, Jonathan 65 

Downs, Richard 65 

Downs, William 58 

Doyle, Martin (Martain) 52, 68 

Doyle, Thomas (Doyal) 47 

Drake, Abraham 54 

Drake, Cornelius 54 

Drake, Ephriam 40, 60 

Drake, Isaac 54 

Drake, James 60 

Drake, John 60 

Drake, Joseph 6 (List) 

Drake, Margaret (Margret) 8 

Drake, Nathaniel (Nath.) 40,60 

Drake, Philip 24, 32, 34, 48, 54 

Drake, Samuel 60 

Drake, William 60 



Driggars, Julius (Julis) 74 

Drinkard, Francis (drinkard) .... 58 

Dromgoole, James 74 

Dryden, David 53 

Dryden. [— ?] 64 

Dryden, William (Wm.) 68 

Dudley, Ambrose 40, 60 

Dudley, William 60, 67 

Dukes, Samuel 68 

Dulan, James (Dulen) 

(Duling) 24,27,60,65,66 

Dumpard, Daniel 47 

Dumpard, John (Dumferd)..9 (List) 
Dumpard, Michael (Domppart) 

(Dompard) (Dompor) (Michal) 

(Mikel) 47,61,69,60,66 

Dunaway, Benjamin 

(Dunniway) 8, 9, 47, 60, 66 

Dunaway, Thomas (Thos.) 47, 66 

Dtmaway, William 47 

Duncan, Benjamin 27 

Duncan, Charles 40, 60 

Duncan, Gabriel (Dunldn) 

(Gabril) 64 

Duncan, James (Duncken)..6,49, 

56,62,66,78,79,84,88 

Duncan, John 88 

Duncan, Joseph 84, 88 

Duncan, Nimrod 26, 27 

Duncan, Samuel (Dtmcom) 69 

Dunlap. William (Wm.) 63 

Dunn, Jacob 104 

Dunn, James 60 

Dunn, Jeremiah 32, 34 

Dunn, John 9 (List) 

Dunn, Joseph 58 

Dunn, Richard (Richd.) (Dun) 27,64 

Dunn, Samuel 17, 58 

Dunn, Vincent 26, 27 

Dunn, William 60 

Dupuy, Bartholemew (Dupey) 

(Bartw.) 52 

Dupuy, James 40, 43, 52, 60 

Dupuy, James, Sr 43 

Dupuy, James, Jr 51 

Dupuy, Joel (Dupey) 52 

Dupuy, John (Dupey) 43, 52, 60 

Dupuy, John, Jr 43, 52 

Dupuy, Joseph 43, 51, 52 

Durbin, Christopher 47 

Durbin, Joseph 47 

Durrett, Richard 48, 56 

Dusker, John [Doster?] 84 

Dust, David 43 

Duval, William 60 

Dykes, Henry 84 



[ 200 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Hades, Robert 66 

Eades, Thomas (Thos.) 62, 66, 88 

Eakin, John 93 

Eartywine, George 82 

Easley, Stephen t""^ J 

Easley, Thomas [ — ?1 

Eastin, Achilles ... .55, 66, 66, 78, 84, 88 

Eastin, Richard (Rich.) 68 

Eaton, Geofge 52 

Eaton, Jonathan 60, 65 

Eaton, Joseph Qos.) 52 

Eaton, Levi 52 

Eckles, Robert (Eckels) 53 

Edgar, David 54 

Edgar, John 63 

Edington, John 40 

Edmiston, David 49, 66 

Edmiston, Robert 66 

Edmiston, Thomas 93 

Edmundson, David 55 

Edmundson, James (Edmondson) . 58 

Edrington, John 43 

Edson, George (Eidson) 60 

Edwards, Alexander 32, 34 

Edwards, Benjamin 69 

Edwards, David, Jr 56 

Edwards, Elipha (Elepha) 60 

Edwards, Frederick 68 

Edwards, Haden 49, 56, 66 

Edwards, Jacob 48, 54 

Edwards, James 48 

Edwards, John Qno.) 12,42,56,60, 

66,79,90,91 

Edwards, Sanford 12 

Edwards, Simon 52 

Egbert, David 52 

Egner, Isaac 82 

Egner, John 82 

Elam, John (Elim) 74 

Elam, Josiah 43, 52 

Elder, Andrew 58 

Elder, WiUiam 51 

Elgin, Samuel (Saml.) 49 

Elkin, Robert (Robt.) 47, 65 

Elkin, Zachariah (Zachriah) 50, 65, 72 

Ellet, Thomas [Elliot?] 65 

Ellet, William (Wm.) 51 

EUey, Henry 52,60 

EHey, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Elliott, John (Jno.) 52, 55 

Elliott, Martin 43,63 

Elliott, Robert (Robt.) 52 

Elliott, Samuel (Eliot) 6 

Elliott, Thomas 60,65 

ElUott, William (Eliot) (Wm.) 

14,49,53,55,60,65,66,84 
Ellis, John Jr 60 



Ellis, Jezreel 15,33,49,56 

Ellis. Thomas (Thos.) (ElUss). .53,54 

Ellis, William Jr 43 

Ellison, Benjamin (Benj.) 52 

Ellison, John 52,60 

Ellison, Joseph 27 

Ellison, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Elhnaker, Edward 63 

Embree, Jacob 72 

Embree, Jesse (Embrey) 27 

Embree, Joel (Embry ) 27 

Embree, John (Embry) 27, 58 

Embree, Joshua 58 

Embree, Joseph (Embrey)27, 60. 65, 72 
Embree, Tarlton (Embry) (Tal- 

ton.) 27,64 

Embree, William 47,65 

Emerson, Ash (Emison.) 50 

Emerson, Hugh (Emison) 26, 52 

Emerson, Reuben 60, 65 

Enbow, Joseph 60 

Enbow, Robert 36 

Endamond, John 53 

English, Charles 15 

English, John 15 

English, Stephen 15 

Erickson, Benjamin (Earockson) 

(Benj.) 68 

Ervin, Mary (Arvin) 38 

Erwin, James 48 

Essvey, John 60 

Estes, Elisha (Eastes) 23, 46, 52 

Estill, Benjamin 6 

Estill, James 8 

Estill, Samuel (Samel).. 8, 9, 27, 60, 64 
Eubank, Willis (Killis) ..47,60,65,72 

Evans, Alexander (Evins) 60, 65 

Evans, Jacob (Evens) 28 

Evans, Nathaniel (Evins) 

(Nathl.) 23,60,93 

Evans, Peter 60, 65 

Evans, Thomas 51 

Evans, William (Wm.) 93 

Ewing, Baker 17 

Ewing, Charles 60 

Ewing, George (Geo.) 60 

Ewing, William (Eiliom.) 84 

Fagin, David (fagin) 77 

Fagin, William (Fegines) 78 

Fair, Edmund (fair) 8, 9, 58, 63 

Farbett, James 51 

Farlow, John (Forlow.) 28, 33, 49 

Farlow, Robert (Forlow) 28, 49 

Farmer, Abner 43 

Farrar, Joseph R 60 



[ 201 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Farrcl. Michael (Mickel) 15 

Farrow, George 23 

Faulkner, John (Faukner) 65 

Faulkner, Joseph (Faulconer) 

(Fauconer) 53,60,93 

Faulkner, Thomas (Thos.) 27 

Fay, Jacob 57 

Felty, John 68 

Fenton, Bartholemew 6, 64 

Fenwick, John 93 

Ferguson, Abraham (Farguson) .51, 67 

Ferguson, Bryant 40, 53, 63, 65 

Ferguson, Hugh 60 

Ferguson, Isaac (Forgason) 64 

Ferguson, James (Jas.) (Fargeson) 

52,60 

Ferguson, Joseph 60 

Ferguson, Josias 60, 65 

Ferguson, Larkin (Farguson) 52 

Ferguson, Robert 52 

Ferguson, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Ferguson, Thomas, Jr. (Thos.)... 52 

Ferry, Jes 60 

Ficklin, John 24,43,53,63 

Ficklin, Thomas 24, 52 

Ficklin, William 52 

Field, Henry (Fields) 51, 52 

Fidler, Francis 63 

Fight, Isham 77 

Fight, Jacob 56 

Pilson, John 53 

Finch, Josiah 49 

Finet, John 53 

Finley, David 17,58 

Finley, George (Findly) 28, 33, 64 

Finley, Isaac 58 

Finley, James 68 

Finley, John (Fendly) .. .58, 60, 64, 77 

Finley, Samuel 26,58 

Finney John [Finnic?] 52 

Finney, Robert [Finme?] 53 

Finney, William (Wm.) [Finnic?]. 52 

Fishback, Jacob 42,65 

Fisher, Adam 58 

Fisher, Bamett 58 

Fisher, Elias 26, 58 

Fisher, James 52, 60 

Fisher, John 27 

Fisher, Stephen 17 

Fisher, Zachariah 52 

Fitch, Salathiel 77, 84 

Fitzgerald, Batn. (Fitzgarld.). .52,60 
Fitzgerald, Daniel (Fitzjarrell) 

(Danl.) 52 

Fitzgerald, William (Wm.) 32, 34 

Fitzwater, Thomas 56, 60 

Flanery, EHsha 74 



Flannigan, Dominick 16 

Flannigan, Lewis (Flanighan) . . 12, 24 

Fleming, John (J) Qo.) 11,24,48 

Fleming, Ralph 17 

Fleming, William (Wilhn.) 18 

Fletcher, Thomas (Thos.) 48, 49, 77, 84 

Fletcher, William 27, 65 

Flinn, Thomas (Thos.) 54 

Flinn, William (FUne) (Flin) 49,54,56 

Floumoy, David 43, 51, 52, 60 

Floumoy, John (Jno.) (Floumia) 

52,54,62 

Flower, Thomas 58 

Floyd, Benjamin 68 

Floyd, Charles 48 

Floyd, David 68 

Floyd, George 58 

Floyd, John (Jn.) 18,58 

Floyd. Robert (Robt.) (Floid)... 54 

Fluetey, John 47 

Foley, Henry 60 

Foot, Thomas 9 (List) 

Forbis, George 60 

Forbis, James 6, 36 

Forbis, Joseph 1 1, 60 

Forbis, Robert (Forbas) (Robart) . 69 

Ford, John (Jno.) 62 

Ford, Peter 58 

Ford, WiUiam (WiUm.) 60, 65 

Foreman, John 74 

Forker, Robert [Forbis?] 26, 27 

Forkner, Alexander [Faulkner?] . . 78 

Forkner, John [Faulkner?] 78 

Forkner, Thomas [Faulkner?] 77 

For^the, Phillip 96 

Forsythe, Robert 65 

Forsythe, William 78 

Fort, Christopher 52,60 

Foster, Asa (A.) 60,65 

Foster, Henry 60 

Foster, Ichabod 54 

Foster, Isaac 16 

Foster, Isaac, Jr 68 

Foster, Isaih 27 

Foster, James 60, 65 

Fowler, Benjamin 60 

Fowler, John 45,61,63 

Fowler, Joseph 47 

Fox, Arthur 32,33,48 

Fox, Richard (Richd.) 52, 54, 67 

Frakes, Joseph 58 

Frakes, Robert 66 

Frame, John 60 

Francis, Evan 46 

Francis, William (Wm.) 46 

Frankfort, William 104 

Franklin, Benjamin (Benj.) 47 



[ 202 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Franklin, James (franklin).. 40, 43, 60 

Franklin, John (franklin) 40, 60 

Franklin, Stephen (franklin) 78 

Franks, John M 46, 53 

Frazel, Phillip 16 

Frazer, George (Geo.) 61, 64 

Frazer, James C. (Freser) . . .60, 78, 84 

Frazer, Joseph (Jos.) 43, 60 

Frazer, Levi 64 

Frazer, Martin 68 

Frazer, Ralph 74 

Frazer, William 43, 46, 64 

Preman, Samuel 27 

French, Henry 16 

French, James (Jas.) 47, 48, 64 

French, Mo 72 

French, Thomas 11 

French, William 66 

Frier, David (Fryer) 60,65 

Frier, Donald (Donal) 26 

Frier, James 60, 65 

Frier, Robert, (Robt.) 60 

Friend, John 43 

Froman, Jacob 27 

Frush, Francis [Brush?] 58 

Fry, Jacob 60 

Frye, John 60 

Fulton, Hugh 43 

Pulton, James 46 

Pulton, Joseph 53 

Fulton, William 60 

Funk, Adam, Sr 26,78,84 

Funk, Adam, Jr 26 

Furnish, James (Fimish) 28,49 

Furtad, Anthony (An thy) 78, 84 

Gaddy, EHjah 27 

Gaines, B 45 

Galbraith, Hugh 27 

Gale, Joseph 45, 62 

Gale, Josiah 60 

Gale, Matthew 24,60 

Gale, Robert (Robt.) 52 

Galloway, James 52, 56, 66, 84 

Galloway, John 49. 54, 84 

Galloway, William (Wm.) (Gello- 
way ) (Gallway )49, 65, 56, 62, 66, 84 

Gamble, David 84 

Gamble, William 65 

Gamblin, Andrew 58 

Gano, Daniel (Dan.) 54,60 

Gano, Isaac E 62 

Gano, John S 54 

Gardiner, J. 6 

Gardiner, Thomas 68 



Gamett, John 62, 60 

Garrard, James 42, 65, 66, 62 

Garrard, William 28, 33, 49, 66 

Garrett, William (Wm.) 52 

Garry, Henry 46 

Gaskins, John 66, 78 

Gass, David 8, 27 

Gass, John (Gess) 27, 60, 64, 65 

Gates, David 58 

Gates, Elijah 58 

Gates, WiUiam 66, 74 

Gatewood, Andrew 43, 62, 60, 93 

Gatewood, Augustine 43 

Gatewood, Hugh 43 

Gatewood, James 43, 60 

Gatewood, John 43 

Gatewood, Peter 43, 60 

Gatliflf, Charles 8 

Gay, James 62 

Gay, James, Jr 77 

Gay, Joseph 56 

Gayley, Benjamin 58 

Gayley, James (Galey) 68 

Gayley, Samuel (Galey) 58 

Gayley, William (Galey) 58 

Geddis, James (Jas.) 43 

Geklege, John 69 

George, Gabriel 78,84,88 

George, Nicholas (Nichs.). .27,65,72 

George, Whitson 27, 72 

George, William (Wm.) 54 

Gerhart, Henry (Gherhart, Hen- 
nary) 74 

Ghursin, Garret [?] 88 

Gibbs, Ezekiel 69 

Gibbs, Hugh 27, 33 

Gibbs, Jeremiah 69 

Gibbs, John 27 

Gibbs, Julius 52, 60 

Gibbs, Peter 74 

Gibbs, Samuel 27 

Gibson, Francis 52 

Gibson, George (Geo.) 26, 27 

Gibson, John 26,45,52 

Gibson, Paul 26, 52 

Gilbert, John 74 

Gilderess, Samuel 54 

Gilkey, David 60 

Gilkison, WilUam (Wm.) 93 

Gill, George 36 

Gill, James M 58 

Gill, Samuel 69 

Gilles, Thomas (Thos.) 51 

Gillet, Jonathan Qona.) 88 

Gihnore, James 27, 68, 103 

Gilmore, John 63 

Gihnore, Samuel (Saml.) 17, 93 



[ 203 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Gilpin, Israel 66,77,84 

Gilpin, James 88 

Gilpin, Joseph 62, 88 

Ginkins,Jolm [Jenkins?] 77 

Giraud, Andrew 54 

Girdle, James (Girdles) 32, 48 

Girey, Richard 9 (List) 

Gist, Thomas (Thos.) 26 

Gist, WiUiam (Wm.) 63 

Glascock, James (Glasscock)32, 48, 49 

Glascock, Nimrod 32 

Glass, Thomas (Thos.) 45 

Glen, David 6 

Glencock, William 6 

Gleson, David 32 

Gloove, Matthew (Mathew) 46 

Glover, John 60 

Glover, Richard (glover) ...16,17,74 

Goflf, Thomas 78,84 

Goflf, WilUam 60 

Goforth, William 54 

Goggin, John 17,23,64 

Golden, WilUam 27,65 

Gooey, John 65 

Gooey, Thomas (Thos.) 65 

Gooden, Lewis 52 

Goodey. WilUam (Wm.) 54 

Goodloe, Thomas 60,67 

Goodloe, Vivion 60,65 

Goodman, Ancel 9 (List) 

Goodman, Daniel 9 (List) 

Goodnight, David 32,34 

Goodnight, John 32, 34 

Goodnight, Michael 32, 34, 60 

Goodnight, Peter 32, 34, 60 

Goodwin, Jonas C 60 

Goodwin, Patrick 60, 78 

Gordon, Ambrose 58 

Gordon, Evander (Evender) 6 

Gordon, George (Geo.). .46,60,63,76 

Gordon, James 17, 23 

Gordon, John (Gorden) 16, 60, 65 

Gordon, Patrick (Gorden.) 58 

Gordon, Robert (Gordan) 27 

Gordon, Samuel (Gordane) 

(Saml.) 15,27,64 

Gordon, WilUam 58 

Gorham, Sandford 84 

Gorham, Thomas (Goram) 93 

Gorin, John 43, 51 

Gorten, Uriah (Garton) 24, 46 

Goudy, Hugh 62,66,77 

Goudy, John 46 

Goudy, Robert 62, 66, 77, 78, 84 

Grace, Jeremiah (Jaremiah) 58 

Grady, Jesse 52 

Graham, Arthur 60 



Graham, Benjamin 26 

Graham, David (Grihem Daved). 54 

Graham, Forgis 60, 78 

Graham, H 36 

Graham, George 53 

Graham, James 46, 58, 60, 65 

Graham, John 58 

Graham, Joseph 26 

Grant, Adam 58 

Grant, G 66 

Grant, Israel 52, 78 

Grant, John( Jno.)45, 55, 56, 62, 66, 78, 84 

Grant, Michael 55, 78 

Grant, Moses 52, 57 

Grant, WilUam Sr. (WiUm.) 52 

Grant, WilUam, Jr 62 

Graves, Benjamin (Benj.) 62 

Graves, Bartlett 62, 60 

Graves, David 40 

Graves, George 49 

Graves, John 46, 61, 60, 66 

Graves, Leonard 27, 58 

Graves, Richard (Richd.) 40, 63 

Graves, Thomas (Thos.) 52, 60 

Graves, WilUam 40,60 

Gray, Archibald (Arcabold) 64 

Gray, David 40,60,63 

Gray, Drakeford 60 

Gray, George 52,60,65 

Gray, James 45, 47, 60, 65, 84 

Gray, Jonathan 62 

Gray, John 63, 64, 63, 93 

Gray, Patrick (Patt.) 63, 93 

Gray, Presley 60 

Gray, Richard 53 

Gray, Robert 64, 60 

Gray, Samuel 63, 65, 72 

Grayson, John (Jno.) 46 

Grayson, Richard (Grayston) 64 

Grayson, WilUam 66 

Greathouse, John 40 

Greathouse, WilUam 40 

Green, Benjamin 58 

Green, George 74 

Green, Henry 24,58 

Green, James 74 

Green, Jesse 74 

Green, John 49,68,77,78 

Green, Robert 58 

Green, Samuel (Sammuel) 27 

Green, Stephen 43, 63 

Green, Willis 17,36,90,91 

Greenup, Christopher (Christ.) 

39,63,83,90,91 

Greer, Samuel 60 

Greeton, John [Grayson?] 27 

Gregg, John (Gregs) 33, 36, 56 



[ 204 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Gregg, Joseph (Jos.) 77 

Gregg, Matthew 82 

Gregory, Samuel (Saml.) 52 

Gridler, James 34 

Griffey, Gorden 66 

Griffey, Ralph 51 

Griffey, Thomas (Tho.) 51 

Griffing, Ebenezer 84 

Griffing, Thomas 84 

Griffith, Thomas (Griffeth) 40 

Griffith, William (Wm.) 23, 48, 55 

Grisby, Nathaniel 60 

Grimes, Benjamin 58, 63, 65 

Grimes, Carlos (Carlis) 65 

Grimes, David 87 

Grimes, Esther 54 

Grimes, Harris 65 

Grimes, James 60 

Grimes, John (Jno.) 53, 54, 65 

Grimes, Noble 54 

Grimes, Philip 53, 60, 65 

Grimes, Stephen 65, 67, 88 

Grimes, Thomas 48, 54 

Grimsley, James 52 

Grissmn, William 74 

Groom, Zachariah (Zach.) 52, 60 

Grubbs, Higgas 27, 42, 46 

Grundy, George 60 

Guffey , Alexander 74 

Guil, James [?] 56 

Guilliam, Benjamin (GuUiam) .52,60 

Guilliam, Edward 60 

Guilliam, Jeremiah (Gullian) 60 

Guilliam, Robert (Robart) 60 

Guilliam, John (Gullian) 46, 60 

Guilliam, Starke 58 

Guilliam, WiUiam 58 

Guiltner, Abraham 57 

Gullen, Jeremiah (Jeremh.) 52 

GuUen, John 52 

Gutridge, James 48 

Gutridge, John (Jno.) ... .32, 34, 48, 54 

Guttrey, Benjamin (Benj.) 43, 52 

Gwinn, John (Gwenn.) 62 

Gwinn, Thomas 17 

Hackett, Peter 8,27 

Haff, Peter [Hoff?] 84 

Haggard, Bartholemew (Barthw.) 60 

Haggard, Bartlett 65, 72 

Haggard, James 60, 65 

Haggard, Martin 58 

Haggard, Nathaniel (Hagard) 

(Nathl.) 65 

Haggin, John [ — ?] 

Hakens, Samuel [ — ?] 



Halbert, Isaac 60 

Halbert, Isaih 65 

Hale, Job 58 

Hale, John 58,60 

Hall, Aaron 60,63 

Hall, Alexander (Alexr.) ... .43, 53, 93 

Hall, Caleb 56, 63, 78 

Hall, Case 47 

Hall, Clifton 63 

Hall, Edward 45 

Hall, Edward Senr 47 

Hall, Horatio 62, 66, 84 

Hall, James 77,78,84,88 

Hall, John 27, 40, 47, 52, 58, 78, 84 

Hall, Henry (Henery) 28, 33, 55 

Hall, Leonard 58 

Hall, Moses 63 

Hall, Pahner (Parmer) 26, 27, 58 

Hall, Richard 47 

Hall, Thomas (T.) 63,78,84 

Hall, William (Wm.) (W.)..27,51, 

52,57,60,68,84,88 
Halleck, Benjamin (Hallack) . .57,84 

Halleck, Thomas (Hallack) 57 

Halsey, Benjamin 51 

Halsey, Joseph 54 

Halsey, William 60,65 

Ham, William 27 

Haman, Charles (Chas.) 63 

Hamilton, Archibald (Archd.).... 93 

Hamilton, Benjamin 93 

Hamilton, David 93 

Hamilton, Elias 54 

Hamilton, Galbreath (Gelbroath) 

(Gilbreath) 77,84 

Hamilton, James 36, 54, 78 

Hamilton, John. . . .26, 48, 55, 62, 66, 77 

Hamilton, Joseph 77 

Hamilton, Robert 56, 84 

Hamilton, Samuel (Hamelton) ... 52 
Hamilton, Thomas (Thom.) .55, 66, 84 

Hamilton, William 93 

Hammon, Edmund 26, 58 

Hammon, James 58 

Hammon, John 58 

Hammon, Martin 6 

Hampton, Andrew 60 

Hampton, David (Hamton) 72 

Hampton, Michael 58 

Hamson, William [Hanson?] 26 

Hancock, George 27 

Hancock, Samuel (Saml.) 93 

Hancock, Stephen (Hencock) 8, 27, 64 
Hancock, William (Hankock) 

(Hanckok) (Hencock) ... .8, 9, 

9 (List) 64 
Hand, Edward (Edwd.) 6, 8 



[ 205 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Hanks, Absalom 47,60,65 

Hanks. B 47 

Hanks. George 62,60,65 

Hanks, John 55 

Hanks, Peter 47 

Hanks. WilUam 60, 65 

Hanley. George 47 

Hanley, John 47 

Hannan, James 46 

Hanningston, Bartholemew 56 

Harbeston. John 58 

Hardage, William 60, 65 

Hardesty, Benjamin (Hardisty) 

49 78 84 
Hardesty. Henry (Hardisty). .'.78! 84 

Hardin. Benjamin 74 

Hardin. John 60 

Hardin, Samuel 74 

Harding. John 60 

Hardwick. John 40,72 

Hardwick, John, Jr. Qno.) 65 

Hargis, John (Harges) 26, 27 

Hargrove, Robert (Haregrove) ... 74 

Harlan, Silas (Harland) 3, 16 

Harlow, Claibom (Clabon) 58 

Harlow, Michael 58 

Harlow, Samuel 58 

Harmon. Israel 64 

Harmon, Robert (Robt.) 52 

Harmon, Sol 23 

Harmon, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Harp, Joseph 32,34 

Harper, Alexander 60 

Harper, James 24 

Harper, John 27,47,58,60 

Harper, Peter (Harpar, Petar) 9, 

24,47,65 

Harper, Samuel 68 

Harrard. Samuel 11 

Harris. Andrew (Andw.) (Harriss) 64 

Harris. Archibald (Harriss) 65 

Harris, Christopher 27, 64 

Harris, James (Harriss) 11, 63 

Harris, John 46 

Harris, Joshua 72 

Harris. Robert 27 

Harris. Sherwood 43 

Harris, Thomas (Harriss) 65 

Harris, William (Wm.) 49, 65, 66 

Harrison, Benjamin (Benj.).28,55,66 

Harrison, Cuthbert 60 

Harrison, Garret (Harsin) 84 

Harrison, George (Geo.) 60 

Harrison, Hezekiah (Hez.). .51,53,93 

Harrison, Hiram 40, 45 

Harrison. John 54 

Harrison, Joseph (Jos.) 52 



Harrison, Law 56 

Harrison, Nicholas (Nicolas) 28 

Harrison, Robert 78 

Harrison. William 74 

Harrod. Edward (Herod) . . . .9,27,47 

Harrod. James 3,40,63 

Harrold. Moses 60 

Hart. George (Hartt) (Gco.)ll,58,60 

Hart, James 60 

Hart, John 78 

Hart, Nicholas 77 

Hartford, Adam 47 

Harthis, Robert [Hargis?] 52 

Hartman, Adam 60, 65 

Hartman. Peter 26 

Harvester, John 8 

Harwood. Joseph (Jos.) 45 

Hastings, William 62 

Hastlerigg. Charles 

(Hazelrigg) 12, 45, 47, 48, 65 

HasUerigg. James (Haselrigg) 

(Jas.) (Harclrigg) 47, 65 

Hastlerigg, James, Jr. (Hazelrigg) 65 

Hastlerigg. John (Hazelrigg) 12 

Hastlerigg, Joshua (Hazelrigg) 

(Jossway) 12 

Hastlerigg. William (Hazelrigg) 12,65 

Hathaway, David 32, 34 

Hathaway, Jonathan 60 

Hatton. Adam (Hatten) 65 

Hatton, John M 51, 65 

Hatton. Robert 54, 60 

Haughn. Jonas [Vaughn?] 65 

Havens, Michael (Havns) 88 

Hawkins. Gregory (Hewkins) .... 78 

Hawkins, James 52,60 

Hawkins, John ( Jno. ) .... 52, 60, 90, 91 

Hawkins, John, Jr 11 

Hawkins, Philemon 52 

Hawkins, Samuel 56 

Hawkes. Nicholas 64 

Hawle, Henry [Hall?] 58 

Hay, James 60 

Hay. WiUiam (Will.) 60 

Hayden, Nehemiah 78 

Haydon, Abner 43, 58 

Haydon, Benjamin 14, 24, 52 

Haydon, Enoch (Hayden) 58 

Haydon, James 24, 52, 60 

Haydon, John 40, 43, 61 

Haydon, Noel (Hayden) 58 

Haydon, Samuel (Hadon) 

(Headon) 27,51 

Haydon, Thomas (Thos.) 52, 60 

Haydon. WilUam (Wm.) 

(Haden) 24,51,52,60 

Haydon, WilUam, Jr 62, 60 



[ 206 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Haynes, Richard (Rich.) 62 

Hays. Hugh 36 

Hays, James 36 

Hays, John 36 

Hays, Patrick 36 

Hays, Richard (Hayse) 27 

Hays, Robert 68 

Hays, Wimam(Wm.)6, 12, 24, 40, 60, 63 

Hazard, James (Hazyard) 47 

Hazard, John (Jno.) 52 

Hazard, Martin 43,93 

Hazard, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Hazard, William 52 

Hazel, Daniel 26,27,58 

Head, Benjamin (Benj.) 69 

Headen, Samuel 51 

Headdy, Thomas 54 

Headley , George 54 

Heath, Charles 53 

Hedger, WilUam (Wm.) 78 

Heldridge, John 56 

Hehn, John 11 

Helm, Meredith (M.) .23, 32, 34, 48, 54 

Helm, William 11, 12 

Help, Henry 77 

Henbine, Henry 6 

Henderson, Alexander 93 

Henderson, David 24 

Henderson, James 60, 63, 64 

Henderson, Joseph 58 

Henderson, Nathaniel 7 

Henderson, Robert 54, 64 

Henderson, Samuel 6, 43, 49, 60 

Henderson, William 12, 24 

Hendrick, James 47 

Hendricks, Absalom 28 

Hendricks, George 9 (I^ist), 46 

Hendricks, Peter [Henricks] 46 

Hendricks, William (Hendrick) 

(Hendreck) 60,65 

Hendrickson, John 63 

Heney, WilUam (Wm.) 17 

Henry, John 65,78 84 

Henry, Moses 60, 65 

Henry, Robert (Henery) 64 

Henry, Thomas (Thos.) 58 

Henry, William (W.) 

(Wm.) 46,52,60,66,84 

Hensley, WilHam (Wm) 51, 62 

Henson, Iran 6 

Hemdon, David 24 

Hemdon, Henry 24, 60 

Hemdon, Thomas (Thos).23, 24, 52, 60 

Herren, WilUam (Wm.) 60 

Herring, I^angford 65 

Herrinton, Abijah 74 



Herrington, Bartholemew (Ber- 

themelu) 28 

Herrington, Charles 74 

Herrington, EUsha 74 

Herrington, WilUam 74 

Hestor, Jacob 84 

Hiatt, Abner 58 

Hiatt, Frederick 69 

Hiatt, John 69 

Hiatt, WilUam (Haiet) 58, 69 

HickUn, Hugh 43 

HickUn, John 84 

Hickman, Francis 60 

Hickman, James 60, 65 

Hickman, Joel 60, 65 

Hickman, Prescott (Phascott) .... 52 

Hickman, Richard (R.) 47, 60, 65 

Hickman, Thomas 60 

Hickman, Trammell 60 

Hickman WilUam (Wm.). 40, 43, 52, 60 

Hickman, WilUam Jr 62 

Hicks, Daniel (Hix) 58 

Hicks, Harris 45 

Hicks, John (Hikes) 49 

Higbee, John 60 

Higbee, Joseph (Higby) 53 

Higbee, Peter (Higby) 53 

Higgins, Gideon (Giddron.) 

(Gidn.) 26,27,58 

Higgins, Henry (Hnry) (Higgin) 

6,16,26,27,78 

Higgins, Jesse (Higgin) 67 

Higgins, Joel (Higgin) 60, 67 

Higgins, John (Higgin) ..60,65,67,84 
Higgins, Richard (Richd.) ..60,63,65 
Higgins, WiUiam (WilUn.) (Hig- 
gin) (Heggen) 26,67,78 

Hildreth, John (Hildridg) .. .55, 66, 84 

Hildreth, Joseph (Jos.) 78 

Hildreth, Squier 56 

Hill, Clemuel 58 

HiU, Humphrey 84 

Hill, Joseph 66 

Hill, Joshua 24 

Hill, Robert 15,27,64,77 

HiU, Russell (Russle) 66 

Hill. Samuel 52 

HiU, WilUam (Wm.) 43, 58, 78 

Hilman, Benjamin 77 

Hilts, Frederick 68 

Himans, Samuel (Saml.) 43 

Hinck, Samuel 28 

Hind, Samuel 56, 66 

Hindman, Samuel 49, 66, 84 

Hines, Richard 9 (List) 

Hinkson, John 28 



[ 207 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Hinkson, Robert (Robt.) ... .27, 33, 48 

Hinkson, Thomas 33, 54 

Hinkson, William 33, 84 

Hitchcock, Obadiah (Hichcock), 

(Obediah) 36 

Hite, Abraham, y 2 

Hite, Charles (Hites) 52 

Hite, F 16 

Hite, Isaac 3 

Hite, J. (James) (Hites) . . .16, 17, 

42,52,93 

Hite, Martin 27 

Hite, Thomas (Hiet) 27 

Hitt, Joel 60,93 

Hitt, Joseph (Josef) 69 

Hizer, Christopher (Hiser) 

(Christ) 60 

Hobbs, John 60 

Hoden, Thomas (Thos.) 27 

Hodges, Jesse (Hodgis) . 8, 9, 27, 60, 65 

HoflF, Paul 40 

Hoffman, Valentine (Hofman) 

(Valintine) 60 

Hogan, James 29 

Hogan, John 55, 66, 66 

Hogan, Philip (hogan) 27 

Hogan, Richard (Hoagans) 6 

Hogan, Thomas (Hogans) 65 

Hogan, William (Hogon) 6 

Hoge, David 28 

Hoge, Michael (Michl.) 28, 56, 78 

Hogg, Aaron (Aron) 26 

Holbert, Thomas 60 

Holder, Francis 47, 60, 65, 72 

Holder, John 6,8,24,47,51 

Holder, I.uke 47 

Hole, John 53 

Holland, Alexander 27 

Holland, Henry (Henery) (Hol- 

and) 46 

HoUey, Francis (Frans.) .27, 47, 60, 65 
HoUey, John (Hollay). .9 (List) 27,47 
Holliday, Stephen (Holladay). .60,65 

Holliday, William 66 

HoUoway, James 35, 51, 60, 63 

Holman, Daniel (Holeman) 52 

Hohnan, Edward (Holeman) 52 

Holman, Edward Jr. (Holeman) 

(Edwd.) 43,52 

Holman, George (Holeman) 52 

Holman, Henry (Holeman) 52 

Holman, Nicholas (Holeman) 52 

Holms, John 60, 65 

Holsdon, Jacob 16 

Holway, Clayton (Halway) (Cla- 

ton) 58 

Homan, Ebenezer 57, 58, 84 

Hone, Jonah 66 



Honey, George 68 

Honey, John 66,77 

Honsley, William 60 

Hood, Andrew Sr. (Andw.) 78 

Hood, Luppin 78 

Hood, William 74 

Hooge, John [Hoge?] 77 

Hook, John 84 

Hope, Richard 27 

Hopkins, Eldridge (Eldrege) 58 

Hopkins, Francis 58 

Horn, Aaron 27 

Horn, Christopher 27, 65 

Horn, Elizabeth 8 

Horn, Matthias 27 

Homback, Abraham 78,84 

Homback, Jacob 78 

Homback, James 78 

Homback. John 78,84 

Homback, Samuel 84 

Homback, Simon 78, 84 

Home, WilUam (Wilhn.) 27 

Hoskins, William 27 

Hostitler, John 74 

Hougham, Moses 48, 54 

Houghton, Aaron 54 

House, Adam 78,84 

House, John 58 

Houston, John [Huston?].. .66,78,88 

Howard, Charles 26 

Howard, Clement 54 

Howard, Elihu 74 

Howard, John 74 

Howard, Joshua 77 

Howard, Leroy 52 

Howard, Philip 77,84 

Howard, Samuel 60 

Howard. William (Wm.) 64 

Howe, Thomas (Hoo) 54 

Howes, Aaron (Hoes) 27 

Hoy, Tm 84 

Huckstoft, John (Jno.) 53 

Hudgens, Daniel 36 

Huffman, John (Hufman) 58 

Huffstudler, John 74 

Hughes, David (Huse) . . .55, 66, 78, 84 

Hughes, James 93 

Hughes, G 58 

Hughes, John (Jno. )32, 34, 56, 63, 83, 93 

Hughes, Ralph (Hughs) 56 

Hughes, Spencer (Hewes) 32 

Hughes, Thomas (Hughs).. 11, 56, 

60,62,66 
Hughes, William (Wm. ) . .32, 34, 60, 82 

Hulse, Daniel 60 

Humble, Michael (Michl.) 26,58 

Humble, Noah 84 

Hume, George (Geo.) 53,60 



[ 208 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Hume, Joel 63 

Hummer, Robert 63 

Humphrey, Merry 52 

Humphrey, William 60 

Hunt, John 67 

Hunt, Thomas 26 

Hunter, Charles 12, 52 

Hunter, Henry 12, 24 

Hunter, Jacob 12,24 

Hunter, John (Huntor) 46, 74 

Hunter, Peter 12 

Hurst, Henry (Henery) 93 

Hurst, John 93 

Hurst, Michael 93 

Hurt, James 82 

Huston, Archibald (Archd.) (A.)58, 76 

Huston, James 27, 65 

Huston, John 12 

Huston, Samuel 27 

Huston, Stephen 103 

Huston, William (Wm.) 63 

Hutcheson, James (Hutchison) ... 56 

Hutcheson, John 52, 78 

Hutcheson, Peter (Hutchison). 28, 

33,49,55,56 

Hutcheson, John Jr 52 

Hutcheson, Robert (Robard) 87 

Hutcheson, William 55, 88 

Hutson, Rawley [Hudson?] 52 

Hutson, Skinner 58 

Hutton, Hendrick 58, 60 

Hutton, James 58, 60 

Hutton, Joseph 58, 60 

Hutton, Samuel 58 

Hynes, Andrew (Andw.) [Hines?]. 12 
Hynes, WilUam R. (Wm.) 60 

Ignew, James [Agnew?] 82 

Indicut, Aaron [Endicott?] 52 

Indicut, Joseph 52 

Indicut, Moses 52 

lies, Nicholas 84 

lies, Thomas 78 

Ingles, James (Ingeles) 78, 84 

Ingram, Samuel 6 

Ingram, Uria 63 

Innes, Henry (Harry) 25,42,50,59,83 

Ireland, David 78,84 

Ireland, James 66, 77, 84 

Irvine, Abraham (Irvin) 69 

Irvine, Christopher 17, 23, 24, 27 

Irvine, James (J) (Irvin) (Erwin) 

83 93 
Irvine, William (Irwin) (Will.). 42, ' 

62,64,66 
Isrig, Michael 84 



Jacks, John 52 

Jackman, John 68, 69 

Jackson, Burwell 23 

Jackson, Congreve (Congrave).47,72 

Jackson, Ephraim (Ephrim) 58 

Jackson, John 27, 43, 60 

Jackson, Joseph 9 (List) 

Jackson, Josiah 47 

Jackson, William 62 

Jacoby, Henry (Jecoby) (Henery) 78 

Jacoby, Ralph (Jecoby) 84 

James, Daniel 52,60 

James, Abraham 11 

Jameson, Andrew (Andw.) . . 16, 26, 58 

Jameson, George 60 

Jameson, James (Jas.) 45, 93 

Jameson, John 16, 54, 93 

Jameson, Robert 26 

Jameson, Samuel 26 

Jameson, Thomas 15 

Jamison, David 43, 63 

Jamison, John 53, 84 

Jamison, William (Wm.) 43 

January, Ephraim 46 

January, James 14, 22, 43, 46 

January, John 46, 52 

January, Peter (Petter) 14 

January, Samuel 46 

January, Thomas (Thos.) 46, 63 

Jarvis, Edward 74 

Jefferies, Moses 60 

Jefferies, Thomas (Jeflferys) 58 

Jefferies, William (Wm.) 58 

Jefferson, George (Geffison) 74 

Jenkins, Richard 65 

Jenkins, Samuel (Jinkins) (Saml.) 57 

Jenkins, William 52, 60, 65 

Jenners, John 27 

Jennings, Jonathan 58 

Jockars, Charles 8 

John, Thomas 54 

Johnson, Andrew. 9 (List) 24, 43, 51, 52 

Johnson, Cave 24, 51, 52 

Johnson, Isaac 52 

Johnson, James 66 

Johnson, John (Jonson) 27, 47, 

49,52,54,72,77 

Johnson, Jonathan 82 

Johnson, Joseph (Jos.) 52 

Johnson, Randolph 84 

Johnson, Robert 24, 45, 51, 52, 55, 60, 66 
Johnson, Samuel (Saml.). . .24,23,43 

Johnson, Thomas 84 

Johnson, William 32, 34, 69 

Johnston, Alexander 60 

Johnston, Benjamin [B] 68 

Johnston, Ga. J 68 



[ 209 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Johnston, Jacob 9 (List) 

Johnston, James 63 

Johnston, John 45, 56, 84 

Johnston, Martin (Jonston) 60,65 

Johnston, Robert (Robt.). .12,60, 

67,84,90,91 

Johnston, Samuel (Sam) 40 

Johnston, Thomas 78 

Johnston, William (Wm.) (Will.)60,68 

Jolly, David 52 

Jolly, Jared 77 

Jones, Aaron 104 

Jones, Benjamin Sr. (Benj.) . . .52, 58 

Jones, Benjamin Jr. (Benj.) 52 

Jones, Charles 64 

Jones, Daniel 104 

Jones, David 6, 58 

Jones, Francis (Fras.) 65, 76 

Jones, Frederick (Frd.) 60 

Jones, James (Jas.) 52, 58, 65 

Jones, John 27, 52, 58, 60, 65, 74, 84 

Jones, John Gabriel 3 

Jones, John Jr 104 

Jones, Josua 60, 104 

Jones, Roger 65 

Jones, Samuel Paul 60 

Jones, Stephen 74 

Jones, Thomas 52, 60, 62, 66, 88 

Jones, Thomas Jr 88 

Jones, Uriah 82 

Jones, William (Wm.) 23, 27, 

49,60,67,77 

Jordan, Patrick 26 

Joyes, Patrick 68,83 

Judy, John 60 



Kage, August 68 

Kamper, Henry 67 

Kamper, John 58 

Kamper, Reuben 60,67 

Kamper, William 60, 67 

Kautzman, Michael 78, 84 

Kavanaugh, Charles 17, 27, 64 

Kavanaugh, Charles Jr 27 

Kavanaugh, William 27, 36 

Kay, James 54 

Kay, John 52, 60, 93 

Keen, Jonathan 93 

Keenan, Patrick (Pattk.) 58, 78 

Kegans, John 60 

Kellar, Isaac 52 

Kellar, John 104 

KeUy, Beal (KeUey) 72 

Kelly, Benjamin 9 (List) 

Kelly, Emanuel 24 

Kelly, James 55 



KeUy, John (Kelley) (Kemc).8,9, 

27,47 
Kelly, Joseph (Kelley).. 9 (List) 60 

Kelly. Samuel 24, 51 

Kelly, Stephen (Kelley) 47 

Kelly. William 52 

Kelsoe, Andrew 58 

Kelsoe, Robert (Robt.) 58 

Kendall, Joseph 28, 32, 55, 77 

KendaU, WilUam 60 

Kennedy, Andrew .27, 64 

Kennedy, James (Caneday) 

(Kaneddy) 77,78 

Kennedy, John 6,27,77 

Kennedy, Joseph 6, 27 

Kennedy, Peter (Kanaday) 77 

Kennedy, Thomas (Thos.).24,27, 

49 ^ 64,78 
Kennedy, WilUam (Wm.) ...'.. .'.23, 25 

Kenton, Bran [Aaron?] 6 

Kenton, John 32, 34, 48 

Kenton, Simon (Kinton) (Cen- 

ton) 17,32,34,48 

Kerlin, Thomas 87 

Kerns, John 33 

Kerns, William 28,33 

Kerr, David 6 

Kersey, John (Jno.) [Searcy?] 60 

Ketcham, Jonathan 6, 9 (List) 

Kibbey, Ephraim (Ephm.) 54 

Kidwell, Jonathan (Kidwel) 27 

Kilgore, John 56 

KiUogh. Allan 84 

Kilpatrick, Thomas (Thos.) 62 

Kimbrough, Samuel (Samomel) 

(Sam) 55,56 

Kimbrough, William (Wm.) 82 

Kindred, Edward 65, 72 

Kindred, William 72 

King, Aaron (Aron) [— ?] 

King, John (Jno. E) 6, 26, 36, 43 

King, George (Geo.) 6,60 

King, Valentine (Vale.) 12, 26 

Kinkead, Andrew (Andw.) .17,27 

36,56,62 66,84 

Kinkead, David 43,77 

Kinkead, Hopson 58 

Kinkead, James (Kinkiad) 27 

Kinkead, John 53, 58, 60 

Kinkead, Samuel (Kinkade) 56 

Kinkead, William (Kinkaid) 

(Wm.) 27 

Kinnett, Chester 60 

Elinney, Clement (Kiney) (Clem- 

ment.) 60 

Kinney, James (Jas.) 11» 49, 

53,60.62,84 



[ 210 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Kinney, John M 63, 65 

Kirby, Samuel (Saml.) 68 

Kirchevall, John 63 

Kirke, Vincent 57, 68, 78, 84 

Kirkham, Samuel 43, 51, 62 

Kirkman, Robert 36 

Kirkpatrick, Elijah 66 

Kirkpatrick, George 28 

Kirkpatrick, Hugh 64 

Kirkpatrick, John 66,84 

Kirkpatrick, Joseph 77, 88 

Kirkpatrick, Thomas 66, 77, 78 

Kiser, Christopher (Keiser) ... .53, 93 

Kiser, Jacob (Kieser) 28, 53, 60 

Kiser, John 28, 53 

Kiser, Phillip (Ciser) 78, 84 

Kisley, Joseph 78 

Knight, James 40 

Knightley, John 60,65 

Knox, David (Davd.) (D.)...43, 

46,53,60 

Knox, James 17,40 

Knox, John 84 

Knox, William (WiUem) 60, 65 

Kringle, James 93 

Kyle, Joseph 53 

Lacassange, Nl 68 

Lacfaild, Excell (Execell) 58 

I^amar, Benjamin 74 

I^amar, Samuel 74 

Lamb, William (Wm.) (Lamm) 32, 

34,48,54,68 

Lamwalt, Jacob 88 

Lancaster, John (Jno.) 60 

Lance, George 63 

Lander, Charles 60,65 

Lander, Jacob 65 

Lane, Ellis (Elis) 84 

Lane, Samuel (Sammel) 77 

Lane, Edmund (Lanes) (Edmond) 52 

Lang, Thomas 60 

Langiford, Stephen 15 

Langstone, Jacob 56, 77, 78 

Langstone, John 77 

Lanier, Henry 62,66 

Lanier, Isham 55, 66 

Lanier, James (Jas.) . .66, 77, 78, 79, 88 

Langwait, Thomas (Thos.) 84 

Lapsley, Samuel (Sam) 26, 27 

Larsh, Charles (Chas.) 60 

Laughlin, William 62,66 

Lause, Jeremiah 64 

Lawrence, John (Larrance) 26 

Lawrence, James 68 

Lawson, Aaron 68 



Lawson, Nicholas (Lason) 63 

Lawson, Ro 83 

Lawson, William (Wm.) 58 

Layson, John. . .28, 49, 66, 62, 66, 78, 88 

Layson, Robert 28, 49, 66, 78 

Layson, William 78 

Lea, Francis W 24, 52, 60 

Leach, David (Leitch) 63 

Leach, James (Leatch) 58 

Leary, Daniel (Lary) 78, 84 

Leary, Dennis 78 

Leary, WilUam (Willm.) 76 

Lease, James 62 

Lease, William 62 

Le Cont, Charles (Lacount) . . i . . . 62 

Lecky, Nathaniel (Nathl.) 78 

Ledgerwood, James 12. 27, 65 

Ledgerwood, William Sr 65, 78 

Lee, Conrad (Lea) (Coonrad). .51,52 

Lee, Henry 32,34,42,46,48 

Lee, James (Jas.) 52 

Lee, Peter 32,48,54 

Lee, William 58,60,66 

Leforge, Abraham 32, 34, 48, 64, 66 

Legget, James (Ligget) 43, 52 

I/egget, John 36 

Legon, Charles 62 

Lemare, Gaily 74 

Lemasters, Richard 77 

Letcher, Joseph 78 

Levie, Isaac 60 

Lewis, Alexander 68 

Lewis, Francis 40 

Lewis, George (Geo. ) . 34, 46, 46, 62, 67 

Lewis, John (Jno.) 64, 68 

Lewis, Joseph 42 

Lewis, Nicholas 63 

Lewis, Samuel (Sammel) 77 

Lewis, Thomas (Thos.) . . .40, 46, 68, 60 

Lewis, WiUiam 16,32,34, 

40,62,63,68,63,93 

Lighter, John (Jno.) 67 

Lighter, John Jr 57 

Lilly, Anniger 66 

Lincoln, George (Linen) 9 (List) 

Lincoln, Hanamakh 24 

Lindsay, Anthony 52 

Lindsay, Arthur 16 

Lindsay, David 66 

Lindsay, John (Lindsey) 52 

Lindsay, Joseph (Jos.) 14, 16 

Lindsay, Michael (Linsey) 

(Michel) 60 

Lindsay, Nicholas 43, 62, 60 

Lindsay, Vachl. (Lindzey) 62 

Lindsay, William (Wm.) 61, 63 

Linet, John 63 



[ 211 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ust of Names 



Linkhorn, Mordecai (Mordica) ... 60 

Ivinn, John (Lyn) 68,85,93 

Linn, Joseph 36 

Linn, Patrick 54 

Linn, William 11 

Linville, Morgan 78 

Lips, Jacob 52 

Lisle, Henry 60, 66, 72 

Lisle, John (Lyle) 60, 66, 72 

Liter, John 84 

Liter, John Jr 60 

Liter, Lewis (Lues) 84 

Little, James (Jas.) (Littel) (Lit- 

tell) 24, 27, 49, 65, 66, 78, 79, 88 

Little, John (Litle) 43, 93 

Little, WilHam [Lytle?] 63 

Livingston, Thomas 68 

Lizenby, WilHam (Wm.) 43, 52 

Lloyd, Richard 54 

Lock, Joseph 68 

Lockett, James 60 

Logan, Archibald (Archibal) 63 

Logan, Benjamin . . .6,' 16, 17, 18, 25, 42 

Logan, David 60,93 

Logan, George 52 

Logan, John 17,32,34,36,42,54 

Logan, Nathaniel (Nathl.) 63 

Logan, Samuel (Saml.) 52, 54 

Logan, WilUam (Wm.) 28, 32, 

33,34,36,52 

Loggins, Samuel 74 

Long, George 26,27,78 

Long, Jacob 27 

Long, John 24,26,27,43,60 

Longley, Thomas 64 

Longstreet, Jonas 64 

Loper, Jacob 74 

Lorin, John 27 

Lott, John 61, 62 

Lott, William (Wm.) 52 

Longhead, David 93 

Love, Isaac 60 

Love, John 49, 77 

Love, Thomas 77 

Love, William (Wm.) 6, 52, 78, 84 

Loveless, John (Lovlis) 54, 87 

Low, Aquilla (Aquilliah) 74 

Lowe, Edward 43 

Lowry, James 49, 63 

Lowry, John 40, 68 

Lowry, Samuel 49 

Lowry, Stephen 62 

Luckie. John 60,84 

Luckie, Robert 84 

Luless, John 48 

Luper, George 36 

Luper, Hugh 36 



Lusk, Hugh 58 

Lusk, Samuel 40, 63 

Luttrell, Thomas 6 

Lynam, Andrew 26, 68 

LyT^ch, David (Lintch) 27 

Lynch, William 58 

Lyne, Edmund 32,48,64 

Lyne, James 54 

Lyne, Henry 78 

Lyon, Hezekiah (Essekiah) 55 

Lyon. Humphrey 49, 66 

Lyon, John 27,29,32,33, 

49,55,56,66,78,84 

Lyon, John Jr 56 

Lyon, Joseph 27 

Lyon, Peter Jr 58 

Lyon, Samuel 27, 28, 33, 49, 

55,66,62,66,84,88 
LyUc, William 22, 93 

Machan, Thomas 66 

Machir, John 64 

Mack, Daniel 27 

Mack, John (J no.) 52 

Mack, Randall 60 

Mack, Thomas (Meek) 93 

Mack, William 33 

Mackey, Robert [— ?1 

Maddoz, Wilson (Madox) 32, 34 

Madison, Gabriel 16, 17, 42 

Madison, George 63 

Magill, Alexander 78 

Magill, David 66,78 

Magill, James 60,66 

Magill, John (Jno.) 63,78 

Magill, WiUiam 78 

Mahan, Arthur 60 

Major, Francis (Frans.) 84 

Major, James 82 

Major, John 52,78,84 

Major, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Mallory, William 67 

Malon, Michael (Micheal) 78 

Mabter, John 28 

Man, WiUiam (Mand) 69 

Manian, Thomas J 27 

Manldns, James 9 (List) 

Manley, James 54 

Mann, Francis (Frances) 82 

Manuel, George 60 

Marble, Earl 32,34,48 

Marble, Abner 32,34,48 

Marble, Ezra 32,34,48 

Marks, Thomas (Thos.) 77 

Marks, WilUam 60 

Marksberry, John 58 



[ 212 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Marksberry, Samuel Jr 58 

Marsh, John 28, 49 

Marsh, WilUam (Willim) 28 

Marshall, Alexander 78, 03 

Marshall, Archibald 78, 84 

Marshall, George (Marshel) ... .48, 54 

Marshall, Henry 45, 46, 53, 60, 76 

Marshal, James 63 

MarshaU, John (J.) (Marshal). 32, 

34,43,48,52,54,61 

Marshall, Joseph 47 

Marshall, Robert (Marshel). . .48, 

54,60,65 
Marshall, Thomas Sr. (Thos.) (T.) 

17,62,61 
Marshall, Thomas Jr. (Thos.) . .45, 

46,52 

Marshall, WilUam 11,58,63 

Martin, Abner 36, 58 

Martin, Benjamin (Benj.) 36, 58 

Martin, David 26,27, 33 

Martin, Henry 43, 47 

Martin, Hugh 14,24,78 

Martin, James (Marton) . . .27, 32, 

51,52,63,93 

Martin, James Jr 47 

Martin, John (Martain) (Mear- 

ten) . .8, 12, 14, 17, 47, 52, 54, 60, 

63,65,72,84 

Martin, Joseph (Jos.) 17, 97 

Martin, Lindsay (Lindza) 58 

Martin, Orson 72 

Martin, Reuben (Rubin) 58 

Martin, Richard 43 

Martin, Samuel 14, 51 

Martin, William (Wm.) (Martan) 

(Marton) ... 14, 27, 47, 52, 65, 72, 93 

Martzgar, Nicholas 6 

Mason, Dorsey 74 

Mason, Isaac 74 

Mason, James 27, 60, 67 

Mason, John (Meson) .40, 60, 67, 74, 76 

Mason, Michiah (Micijah) 60 

Mason, Peter 51 

Mason, Samuel 74 

Mason, Thomas 74,93 

Massie, David 27 

Massie, Harris 27 

Massie, Nathaniel Jr. (Nathl.) 

45,60,63 

Masten, John 43 

Masten, Peter (Mastin) 51, 63 

Masterson, James (Jas.) 24, 53 

Masterson, John 32, 34 

Masterson, Moses 32 

Masterson, Richard 45, 51 

Masterson, Zachariah 32, 34, 52 



Matan, John 6 

Matan, Lewis [Meytin] 43 

Mathers, Samuel 0^^eathers) 84 

Mathers, Thomas (Tomas) 78 

Mathers, William (Meathers) . .66,78 

Matland, John 36 

Matson, Henry 78 

Matson, James 78, 84 

Matson, James Jr 78, 84 

Mattox. Rolf (Mattex) 58 

Matthews, William (Mathews) ... 56 

Mattingly, Basil (Basel) 60 

Mattingly, John 60 

Mauldin, Ambrose 74 

Mauldin, James 74 

Mauldin, West 74 

Maupin, G 63 

Maupin, James (Moppin) 62 

Maurice, Maurice 77 

Mavrots, Thomas 56 

Maxwell, George 40,43, 51 

Maxwell, John 3, 14, 27, 60 

Maxwell, Thomas (Thos.) 40, 62 

Maxwell, William 40 

May, Jesse 15 

May, John 18 

May, William 60 

Mayfield, Isaac 58 

Mayfield, John 60 

Mayhall, Timothy 64 

Meeker, Abner 78 

Meeker, Joseph 54 

Meekins, John (Mekins) (Mik- 

kins) 17,46,53 

Mefford. George 32,48 

Megg, Rolistin 60 

Menejfee, Jarret (Jarrot) 56 

Menefee, Jonas 6 

Menefee, William 6 

Meriwether, Nicholas 11, 12 

Merritt, Joseph (Merit) 27 

Merritt, Stephen (Merit) 27 

Merry, Thomas (Thos.) 65, 67, 72 

Mershom, Titus 60 

Metcalfe, John 52 

Mickey, Daniel 28, 33 

Middleton, John (Midlton) 40,60 

Migbee, John [Higbee?] 76 

Mikel, George 23 

Miles, Henry 60 

Miles, Isaac 52,60 

Miles, John 24,26,58,60 

MilhoUand, John (Jno.) 33 

Millar, Charles 27 

Millar, Jacob 27 

Millar, John Conrad (Miller) 

(Coonrad) 60, 65 



[ 218 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ust of Names 



Miller, Abraham 60 

Miller, Andrew 27,74 

Miller, Charles 60 

Miller, Ebenezer 26,27 

Miller, George 60, 65 

Miller, Henry (Henery ) 27 

Miller, James 93 

Miller, John 66, 84 

Miller, Thomas (Thos.) 54 

Miller, William (Wm.) 27 

Million, John 27 

Mills, Aaron 78 

Mills, Edward 32,34,48 

Mills, Jacob 54 

Mills, James (MiUes) 74, 78 

Mills, Jesse (Jessy) 52 

Mills, Moses 78 

Mills, Thomas 32,34,54 

Milner, Isaac 93 

Miner, John 58,60,65 

Miner, Thomas 60,65 

Minter, Joseph 60 

Mira, Michael 9 (List) 

Miranda, Samuel (Meranda) 78 

Misbeth, James [""H 

Mitcham, Dudley[ Meatcham?143,52 
Mitchell, Alexander (Mitchcl) 

(Alex.) 78 

Mitchell, David 14,84 

Mitchell, Edward 52 

Mitchell, Elijah 66,84 

Mitchell, Ignatius 41 

Mitchell, Isaac 55,66,84 

Mitchell, James (Jas.) (Mitchel). 84 
Mitchell, John (Jno.) (Mitchel). 52, 77 

Mitchell, Joseph (Jos.) 49, 84 

Mitchell, Moses (Mitchel) .33,60,65 
Mitchell, Thomas (Thos.) (Mitch- 
el) 40,43,52,60,77,84 

Mitchell, Wilson (Mitchel) 84 

Mitchell, William (Wilhn.).49,51, 

55 66 84 
Mitchell, William Jr. (Mitchel^ ..' 78 

Moat, Alexander More 88 

Moberley, Edward 58, 69 

Moberley, John 64 

Moflfett, George (Moflfet.) 52 

MoflFett, John 52 

Moffett, Robert (Robt.) 51, 52, 60 

Moffett, Thomas 72 

MoflFett, William (Wm.) (MoflFot) 

60,65,72 

Monroe, Alexander (Alexr.) 60 

Montgomery, James 36 

Montgomery, John 43, 69 

Montgomery, Joseph (Jos.) 60 



Montgomery, Robert 36 

Montgomery, Thomas 60 

Montgomery, William (Wm.). .17, 

36,42,60.62,93 
Montgomery, William Jr. (Wm.)17, 36 

Moody, Henry 69 

Moon, Thomas 78 

Mooney, Samuel 54 

Moore, Arthur 64 

Moore, Benjamin (Benj.) 52 

Moore, Charles 60,65 

Moore, David 78 

Moore, Edward (More) 36 

Moore, Elias 60 

Moore, George 65 

Moore, Henry 60,66 

Moore, James (More) 53, 60, 65 

Moore, John (Moor) (Jno.) . . .6, 27, 

52,58,78 

Moore, Joseph (Jos.) 6, 43, 58, 93 

Moore, Joseph, Sr 15 

Moore, Luke (Look) 64 

Moore, Martin 15 

Moore, Moses 60 

Moore, Peter 43, 55, 56, 66, 78, 84 

Moore, Philip (More) 78, 84 

Moore, Quintin 51 

Moore, Robert (Moor) 27, 43, 60, 65, 78 
Moore. Samuel (Saml.) (Moor)... 60 

Moore, Shadrach 52,58 

Moore, Thomas (Thos.). .26,57, 

68,60,78 

Moore, Simeon 68 

Moore, William Sr 16, 17, 43 

63,60,64,66,66,88 

Moore, William Jr 15,88 

Morehead, John 60 

Morehead, Samuel (Morehed). .66,84 

Morel, Basil (Bazel) 27 

Morey, James 60 

Morgan, Charles (Chas.) 68,60,66,72 

Morgan, David 68 

Morgan, Evan 60 

Morgan, Jeremiah 65 

Morgan, John 12, 47, 60, 65, 78 

Morgan, John Sr 47 

Morgan, Mordecai (Mordeceia) 

(Mordachey) 12,47,65 

Morgan, Morgan 43 

Morgan, Samuel (Morgen) (Sam- 

mel) 60 

Morgan, William 66 

Morin, James (Morir) 56, 62, 66 

Morin, John 84 

Morrell, Joseph (Yoseph) 54 

Morris, David 64 



[ 214 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Morris, Kellis 47 

Morris, John [Moris] ... .33, 48, 77, 78 

Morris, James 74 

Morris, Robert (Morriss) 64 

Morris, Thomas (Thos.) 49, 

56,66,84 

Morris, William (Wm.) 56, 66, 84 

Morrison, Hugh 24 

Morrison, John (Morrason) . . 12, 

14,23,40,43,45,51,53 

Morrow, James 14, 24, 47, 60 

Morton, Andrew (Andw.) (Mor- 
tens) 60 

Morton, Benjamin 24 

Morton, David 60,65 

Morton, Jeremiah 52 

Morton, John (Mortin)..9 (List) 

20,27,47.51,52 

Morton, Jonathan 47, 60, 65 

Morton, Thomas (Thos.) .. .24,52,63 
Morton, WilHam (Will.) (Wm.).. 

27.32,34,52,67,68 
Mosely, Jacob (Moely) (Jacop) . . 58 
Mosely, Thomas (Thos.) (Mose- 

ley) 60,74 

Moseby, Abraham (Abram.). . .52,68 
Moseby, Daniel (Mosby). . .49,57,78 

Mosby, David 45 

Mosby, Isaac 52 

Mosby, John 17 

Mosby, Robert (Robt.) 42 

Moss, Frederick (Fredk.) 40 

Moss, John 40, 51, 58 

Moss, William (Wm.) 40, 51, 58 

Moulson, John 24 

Moulson, Thomas 55 

Mouncy, Matthias [Muncey ?] ... 58 

Mount, Absalom 15 

Mount, John (Mounce) 58 

Mount, Smith (Mounce) 58 

Mount, Thomas (Mounts) 55 

Mount joy, Alvin 32, 48, 66, 77 

Mountjoy, Edmund 65, 88 

Mountioy , George 77 

Muir, Samuel 46, 66 

Mulberry, Jacob 52, 60 

Mullikin, James 60 

Muloch, Richard Taylor (Mau- 

loch) 74 

Mulvan, John 82 

Muncey, John 27 

Munday, Edward 27 

Munday, Edmund (Edmd.) 68 

Munson, Isaac 52 

Mimter, Patrick (Muntere) 

(Patk.) 53 

Murphy, Andrew 60 



Murphy, Dennis 64 

Murphey. John (Jno.) 58, 60 

Murray, James (Murrey) 27, 52 

Murray, William (Murry) 27 

Murray, William, Jr 53 

Musselman, Christian 104 

Musselman, John 104 

Muter, George 25, 42, 45, 59, 83 

Mutson, James 33 

Myers, Gneorge (Mier) 82 

Myers, Jacob 17 

Myers, Melcher 76 

Myers, Phillip (Myars) 74 

Myers, William (Miars) 58 

McAdams, Samuel 60 

McAfee, George 26,27 

McAfee, James 16,26,27,98 

McAfee, James, Jr 26 

McAfee, Jesse 27 

McAfee, John 26, 27 

McAfee, Samuel 16,27 

McAfee, Robert 16,26,43 

McAllister, Joseph 27, 58 

McBrayers, James (McBriers) .16,27 

McBrayers. William (Wm.) 16,26 

McBride, James (McBrids) (Jas.) 

« 14,63 

McBride, John 69 

McBride, Robert (Robt.) (Mc- 

Bridg) 78 

McBride, William 11 

McCafferty, John 78 

McCaffrey, William 66 

McCaU, David (McAwl) 33 

McCall, James 49 

McCall, WilHam 46 

McCsmdlars, James 68 

McCann, David (McCame) 28 

McCann, John (McCane) 62 

McCann, Joseph 60, 93 

McCann, Neal 93 

McCann, Pleasant 60 

McCann, WiUiam 88 

McCard, David, Jr 60 

McCarge, Radford (R) 43, 65, 93 

McCarver, Archibald 6 

McChandless, John 84 

McChord, John (Jno.) 60 

McClanahan, Elijah (McClena- 

han) 88 

McClanahan, Thomas (Thos.).... 84 
McCleland. William (Wm.) .48, 49, 

64 84,88 

McClintock, Joseph 33,' 66, 82 

McClintock, William (Wm.) 82 

McClung, Matthew 93 

McClung, WilUam Jr. (Wm.) 42 



[ 215 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ust of Names 



McClure, Alexander (McCluer) 

(Alexr.) 26,27,58,63 

McClure, James 63, 58 

McClure, Andrew 86 

McClure, John (McLurc) (Mc- 

Cluere) 23,36,53,58,62,84 

McClure. Moses (McCle.).9 (List) 

26,27,60 

McClure, Nathan 27 

McClure, Samuel (McCluer) 

(Saml.) 55,58,64,78,84 

McClure, Thomas 26, 27, 68, 60 

McClure, William (McCluere).36, 

53,60,69,78 

McComb, James (Macomb) 27 

McComb, WilUam (Macomb) ..27,33 

McComsey , John 52 

McConey, John 63 

McConnell, Adam 58,60 

McConnell, Alexander (McConall) 

(Alexr.) 46,51,53,60 

McConnell, Andrew 3 

McConnell, Francis 12,60 

McConnell, James (Jas.).. .22,24, 

43,45,53,60,63 

McConnell, John 60,93 

McConnell, William (Willim.) 

(Wm.) 3,14,22,23,26, 

46,46,49,52,66,58,62,84 
McCormick, Daniel (McCormack) 36 

McCoun, Andrew (McCune) 62 

McCoun, David (McCune) 33 

McCoun, James 16,26, 66 

McCoun, James, Jr 16 

McCoun, John 16, 33, 62 

McCoun, Joseph 24, 78 

McCoy, WiUiam (Wm.) 33, 63 

McCracken, Cyrus (McCrakin) . 12, 60 

McCracken, John 77, 78 

McCray, Robert (Robt.) 46, 53 

McCreery, Andrew 77 

McCreery, James 77,78,88 

McCreery, John 60,78,84 

McCulloch, James (McCoollouch) 

(Coullouch) 16,26,93 

McCulloch, John (McCollough) 

(McCullough) 26,76 

McCullom, Samuel 54 

McDaniel, Alexander 66 

McDaniel, Francis (McDannel) 

33,49,56 

McDaniel, James 27 

McDaniel, John (McDanel). . .65, 

66,60,77 

McDaniel, Joseph 77 

McDaniel, Mack 62 

McDaniel, Robert 66 

McDaniel, Samuel (Mack Daniel) 77 



McDaniel, Rowland 66 

McDermed, Francis (Frcs.)..14, 

23,43,47,63,76 

McDermed, Hugh 63, 76 

McDonald, Alexander (McDonal) 33 
McDonald, Eneas (McDoneld) 

(Enes) 33,49,66 

McDonald, Francis ^cDonnal)14,78 
McDonald, Henry (McDonnal) . . 14 
McDonald, Hugh (McDonnal) ... 14 
McDonald, James (McDonnal) . 14, 78 
McDonald, Jeremiah (McDonel). 78 
McDonald, John (McDonnal) 

(McDonnald) 14, 49, 66, 78, 87 

McDonald, William 40, 61 

McDougall, Robert 46 

McDowell, Daniel 66,66,66 

McDowell, James (Jas.) . .26, 43, 63, 93 
McDowell, John (Jno.). . .17,40, 

46,64,60,63 

McDowell, Josias (McDowl) 66 

McDowell, Samuel (Saml.). . . .17, 

26,42,69,73,83 
McDoweU. William (Wm.)...65, 

66,84,93 

McDuff, Daniel 74 

McElheany, John (Jno.) 68 

McFaden, Andrew 74 

McFaden, William (McFadin) 74 

McFarland, Robert (McFadland) 

(Robt.) 60 

McFawl, John 68 

McFawl, Joseph 60 

McGary, Daniel (Magary) (Me- 

gary) 26,27 

McGarry, Hugh (McGary) ... .3, 6 

6,26 

McGarry, Robert (Magary) 27 

McGee, David 8 

McGee, James 26 

McGee, John (Magee) (Megee) . 16, 26 

McGee, Samuel (McGehee) 45 

McGee, WiUiam 6,8,60,65 

McGentery, James 14 

McGill, David 36 

McGill, James 74 

McGinnis, John (McGinis) . .32, 34, 78 

McGinnis, John Jr 32, 34 

McGinnis, Thomas 54 

McGinnis, William (Wm.)... 32, 34, 64 
McGowan, Robert (Megowan) ... 60 

McGuirc, Alexander (Air.) 60 

McGuire, X^omelius 60 

McGuire, James (Meguire) . .24, 43, 62 
McGuire, John (McGire) (Jno.). . 

47,60,62,63,66 

McHatton, John 60 

McHuron, Silas 62 



[ 216 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Mcllvain, Hugh , .43,76 

Mcllvain, James 43, 63 

Mcllvain, John 63 

Mcllvain, Moses 53 

Mclntyre, Alexander (McEntire) 

(Alexndr.) 48 

Mclntyre, James (McEntire) 78 

Mclntyre, John (Mclntire).24,66,60 

McKay, Alexander (McCay) 82 

McKay, James 48, 54 

McKee, David 63 

McKee, William (Wm.) (McCee). . 69 
McKenzie, Archibald (McKenzey) 

(Arch) 36 

McKenzie, Daniel (McKensy) 

(Danl.) 27 

McKenzie, James (Jas.) (McKin- 

sey) 27 

McKenzie, William 70 

McKeough, Dennis 74 

McKibbins, John 93 

McKinley, James (Jas.) 54 

McKinney, Alexander 78 

McKinney, David 61 

McKinney, Daniel 87 

McKinney, James (Jas.) 66 

McKinney, John 12, 60, 62, 84 

McKinney, Joseph (Jos.) 64 

McKinney, Robert 78 

McKinney, Wilson 6 

McKittrick, Robert 66, 78 

McLaughlin, Thomas (Thos.). .66,77 
McLean, Alexander (McClain) ... 14 
McLean, Daniel (McClain) (Dan- 

niel) 14 

McLean, James (McClain) 74 

McLean, John M 27 

McLean, Nathaniel (McClane) ... 63 

McLean, Robert 27 

McLean, Thomas 27 

McLeary, John 27 

McMillan, David (McMillin) 46 

McMillan, James (McMillion) . . 12, 65 

McMillan, Jonathan 12 

McMiUan. J. M. (McMillin) 24 

McMillan, Robert (McMillion).. 

12,60,65,72 
McMillan, Samuel (McMillion).. 

9 (List) 12, 14 
McMillan, William (McMillion) . . 66 

McMoney, William (Willm.) 68 

McMordie, Tres 93 

McMuUen, Charles * 68 

McMuUen, John (McMullin) 68 

McMullen, Samuel (Saml.) 46 

McMullen, Thomas (Thos.) 74 

McMullen, William 60 



McMurry, John 74 

McMurtry, James 43 

McMurtry, John 63 

McMurtry, Joseph 26 

McMurtry, William (McMirtry)60, 62 

McNab, John 64, 60, 77 

McNeely, Michael 64 

McNeely, Hugh 48 

McNelly, John (McNeely) 69 

McNickel, Arthur 77, 84, 88 

McNiel, Allen (McNele) 47 

McNeil, Arthur (McNeile) 65 

McNeil, Jonathan 45 

McNiel, Joseph 77 

McNiel, Thomas (McNeal) 

(Thos.) 45,62 

McNulty, Joseph 78,88 

McPayne, Daniel (Danl.) 

Mcpherson, Adam (McFarson).. 

48,49,65 

McQuady, John 60 

McQuady, WilUam (McQuiddy) 43, 62 

McQueen, John (Jo.) 47 

McQuid, Arthur (McWhidd) 66 

McWhinney, William 9 (List) 

McWilliams, William 27 

Nagle, W 66 

Napier, John (Napper) 14 

Naylor, John 17 

Naylor, Nathaniel (Nat.) 93 

Neal, Allan (Neil) (Allen) 65,72 

Neal, Benjamin (Neale) . . . . 12, 78, 84 
Neal, Daniel (Neel) (Dannel) 

(Dan) 52,60 

Neal, Daniel, Jr 62 

Neal, John 62,56,66 

Neal, Spence 62, 60 

Neal, William (Wm.) (Neel) 36 

Neely, Alexander 9 (List) 

Neely, Isaac (Niely) 68 

Neely, Matthew (Mathew) 66, 84 

Neely, William (Niely) 68, 60 

Nelan, Benjamin (Nelson) 6 

Nebon. Edward 8, 9, 12, 24, 61 

Nelson, Joseph 78 

Nelson, Moses 8, 66 

Nelson, Thomas (Thos.) 66 

Nelson, William 11 

Nesbit, Jeremiah 66 

Nesbit, Nathan (Nesbet) 66 

Nesbit. Robert (Nesbet) (Neis- 

beit) 33,66,93 

Nesbit, William (Nesbet.) 66 

Netherland, B 14, 17 

Newby , John 9 



[ 217 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Newell, Hugh 78 

Newell, WilUam (Wm.) 40 

Newland, George 78 

Newland, Horeb (Nuland) 

(Hored) 84 

Newman, Nathaniel (Nathannel) . 93 

Newton, Peter 68 

Niblack, John 24,60,65 

Niblack, William 14,24 

Nichol. Arthur (Nickle) 55 

Nicholas, G 82 

Nichols, John (Nickols) . .32, 34, 48, 54 
Nichols, Thomas (Nicolls) (Thos.) 

(Nickols) 32,34,48 

Nicholson, John (Nichosen) 68 

Nicholson, Thomas (Nichelson) 

(Thos.) 40,55,56,60 

Nicholson, William (Nickleson) . . 27 

Nickell, Joseph 63 

Nicklin, Thomas 60 

Noble, James 78,84 

Noe, Randall (Randal) 65 

Noel, Barnard 27 

Noel, Benjamin (Noahels) (Benj.) 

15,58 

Noel, Garret (Noell) 58 

Noel, George (Noahels) 15 

Noel, Musco (Noell) 58 

Noel, John (Noell) 58 

Noel, Thomas (Noell) 8,9 

Noland, Henry (Nowland) 27 

Noland, Matthew (Nowlon) (Now- 

len) 60,65 

Noland, William 27 

North, Abijah 28 

Norton, John 60,63 

Nott, John 14 

Nourse, James 42 

Nourse, James, Jr 12 

Nudigate, William (Wm.) 78 

Nutt, Matthew 52 



Ocoler, Nicholas (Oyler) [?]... 78, 88 

Ockly, William (Okly) 64 

Oden, Thomas (Thos.) 47 

Odom, Michael (Micall) 74 

Odor. Joseph 63 

Ogg, Joshua 78 

Old, John 65,72 

Oldfield, Joseph 12 

Oldham, Richard (Richd.) 65, 72 

Oldover, George 52 

Oldridge, William 57 

Oliver, Andrew (Andw.) 27 

Oliver, John 6,78 

Olley, Cripley 69 

O'Neal, John 74 



O'Neal, Jonathan 74 

O'Neal, Robert 43 

Orchard. Isaac 62,78,84 

Orchard, John 47 

Ormsby, John Jr. (Jno.) 46 

Ormsby, Stephen (Stepn.) 68 

Orr, Alexander D. (Alexr.)..42,45,46 

Orr, Samuel (Our.) 60 

Orr, Thomas (Thos.) 60 

Osbom, James (Osbum) 78 

Osbom, Samuel (Osbum) 60 

Oscar, WilUam 27, 47 

Overfield, Abner 32, 34 

Overstreet, Thomas (Thos.) 60 

Overton, I. Jr 53 

Overton. Richard (Rd.) 26, 27, 45 

Overton, Samuel 58 

Overton. Walter 11,51 

Owen, John 52 

Owens, Owen 26 

Owens. Patrick 14 

Owings, John Cockey (Jno.) (John 

C.) 23,83 

Owings, Joshua 78 

Owsley, John 48 

Owsley, Thomas (Thos.) 18 

Owsley, William 65 



Paddock, Jonathan 65 

Paddock. William 65, 78 

Palmer, Ellis (Palmore) 32, 48 

Palmer, Gideon (Giddion) 32 

Palmer, John 28, 33 

Palmer, Parmenus (Parmar) (Par- 

moinus) 74 

Parberry, James 44, 46 

Pardinez, James 6 

Paris, David 63 

Paris, Moses 65,78 

Park, Robert 57 

Parker, Alexander (Alexr.). . .45, 

46,53,60,93 

Parker, Barry 60 

Parker. Henry (Harry) ....53,62,63. 

67,76 

Parker, James 46,53,60,63 

Parker, John (Jno.) 27, 45, 46, 53 

Parker, Richard (Richd.) 52, 60 

Parker, Robert (Robt.) 46 

Parker, Thomas (Thos.) 15, 60, 

67 74,84 

Parker, WilUam (Wm.) '.46, 60 

Parkison. WilUam (Wm.) 54 

Parks, John 82 

Parks, Richard 46 

Parrish, Robert 65, 72 

Parrish, Timothy 65 



[ 218 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Parsons, John 77 

Partchment, Jacob 54 

Partchment» John 54 

Parton, Uriah 24 

Patterson, Arthur 53 

Patterson, Francis 53 

Patterson, John 52 

Patterson, J 25,43,45, 

46,51,53,63,76,93 

Patterson, Joseph (Jos.) 23, 52 

Patterson, Matthew (Mat.) ... .46, 63 

Patterson, Moses 46, 53, 60, 93 

Patterson, R 14, 51 

Patterson, Robert (Robt.) 42 

Patterson, William 8, 9 

Pattie, John 60 

Patton, Benjamin (Ben.) 17 

Patton, James (Patten.) 11, 54, 87 

Patton, John (Patten) 49 

Patton, Roger 16,43 

Patton, Thomas (Patten) 66, 87 

Patton, William (Wm.) (Patten). 

17,36,49 

Paul, Andrew (Paull) 60 

Paul, James 58 

Paulding, Benjamin (Benj.) 6 

Paxton, Thomas 93 

Payne, Edward (Edwd.) 53, 60 

Payne, Edward, Jr. (Edwd.).. 53, 

60,63,65 

Pajme, George 11 

Payne, Henry 63,84 

Payne, Jilson 53, 60, 63 

Payne, John 43,51,52 

Payne, WilHam (Wm.) (W.) 

43,51,68 

Peak, Daniel 52 

Peak, Jesse (Peek) 40, 60 

Peak, John (Pleak) 40, 52, 60, 72 

Peak, Presley 60 

Peak, Thomas (Thos.) 52, 60 

Peally, Peter 27 

Pearce, Thomas 17, 78 

Pearl, William 16 

Peary, Robert (Robt.) 33, 48, 66 

Peary. Thomas (Thos.) 78 

Peebles, Robert (Robt.) 49 

Pelham, Charles (Chas.). .. .51,60,61 

Pemberton, Charles 69 

Pendleton, Curtis 66, 78 

Pendleton, Rice 77 

Penick, Charles 58 

Penick, Jeremiah (Penck) 63 

Penick, William 53,63 

Penington, Isaac (Pennington) . . 

32,49,54 
Penix, Joshua 8, 9 



Penland, Alexander (Elexander)47, 65 

Perkins, James (Purldns) 77 

Perkins, Williaip 52 

Perry, John 52 

Perry, Lewis 52 

Perry, Ted 32 

Persons, Edward 60 

Petets, John (Jno.) 12, 58 

Petets, William (Willm.) (Petters) 68 

Pettill, Benjamin 6 

Petty, Ebenezer 58 

Petty, John (Pettey) 58,78 

Peyton, Lewis (Pay ton) 36 

Peyton, Timothy (Timoy.) 32 

Pharis, Elijah [Fans?] 58 

Phelps, Josiah 11 

Phillip, Edmund (Edmond) 48, 66 

Phillips, Elijah 78 

Phillips, Jenkins 68 

Phillips, John 54 

Phillips, Moses 32,34 

Phillips, PhilUp (PhiUps) 60 

Phillips, William 52 

Piatt, John 88 

Pickens, Aaron 14 

Picque, William (Willm.) 68 

Piels, Conredus 58 

Pierce, Jeremiah (Jeremia) 60 

Piettens, Jonathan 69 

Pim, John (J.) 58,60 

Pim, John, Jr 43 

Pitman, Joseph (Jos.) 16 

Pittey, Henry 54 

Pitts, Josiah 51, 52 

Pittlen, Frederick 54 

Piatt, Ebenezer S 32 

Playle, Richard 52 

Pleak, John 51 

Plefek, John, Jr 47 

Plugh, Elias 62 

Plummer, Benjamin (Benj.) 32,34,48 

Plummer, George 32, 34 

Plummer, Samuel 32, 34, 54 

Plummer, William ". 48 

Poage, Elijah ^ 51 

Poage, Thomas 40 

Poage, William 6 

Poage, Phillip (Pogue) 65 

Poe, Benjamin (Benj.) 52 

Poe, William 69 

Poff, George 17, 32 

Polke, Charles 60 

Pollard, Absalom 58 

Pollard, Braxton 93 

PoUey, Edward (Edwd.) 58 

Pollock, James 66 

Pon, John 62 



[ 219 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Pope, William 11, 12 

Port, Francis 77 

Porter, Andrew 57 

Porter, H. J 60 

Porter, Joseph 57 

Portwood, Lloyd (Loyd) 27 

Portwood, Page 27, 46 

Portwood, Ludy 27 

Portwood, Thomas 27, 47 

Portwood, Samuel 27 

Potter, Samuel 64 

Powell Ambros (Powell) (Am- 

brous) 47,60,65 

Powell, John 62 

Powell, Joshua 74 

Powell, WilUam 52 

Power, J. W 78 

Power, James 43 

Prather, Alexander (Preator) 27 

Prather, Edward (Preator) 26, 27 

Prather, Henry (Prater) 6, 26, 58 

Prather, John (Prater) 26 

Prather, Thomas (Preator) 

(Thommes) 26, 27 

Preston, John 6 

Prewitt, Joseph 40 

Pribble, James [Prebble?] 84 

Price, Alexander 78 

Price, Benjamin 69 

Price, Bird 40, 51, 53, 63 

Price, David 24 

Price, John (J.) 15, 17, 40, 43, 51, 60, 63 

Price, John, Jr 51 

Price, Moses 11,27 

Price, Pugh 40, 45, 63 

Price, Robert 51 

Price, Samuel 68, 65 

Price, Vinson 15 

Price, William (Wm.). 17, 40, 61, 58, 93 

Proctor, Benjamin 27 

Proctor, Hezekiah 63 

Proctor, John (Jno.) 52 

Proctor, Joseph 9, 24, 27 

Proctor, Little Pag 24 

Proctor, Nicholas (Procter). .8,9, 

24,27,64 
Proctor, Nicholas, Jr. (Nickles) . . 8 

Proctor, Reuben (Ruben) 8, 24, 27 

Proctor, Thomas 60 

Protzman, Lawrence ? . 56 

Provin, John 69 

Pryland, Nicholas 32, 34 

Pryor, Samuel (Sam.) 42 

Puckett, Allen 63 

Puckett, William 63 

PuUen, Jedediah (Pulen) (Jed- 

yah) 58,78,84 

Pullen, John 68,78,84 



Puntiney, Nelson 74 

Puppey, Samuel 64 

Purcel, Thomas (Tho.) 68 

Purviance, John (Jno.) 42, 84 

Pybum, Lewis 60 

Pybum, Richard 60 



Qualey, Patrick 78 

Quigley, Michael (Michal) 77, 78 

Quinn, Benjamin (Benj.) 52 

Quisenbury see Cusenberry 



Raburn, James (Rebum) 33, 46 

Rabum, John (Reborn) 74 

Raburn, John, Sr. (Rebum) 74 

Rabum, Robert 27,60,65 

Rabtu^, William 65 

Radcliff, Benjamin 68 

Radcliff, Edward 78,84 

Ragland, Edmund 47, 60, 66, 72 

Ragland, James 60, 65 

Rains, Cornelius (Reins) 34, 48, 64 

Rains, James (Reins) 32, 34 

Rains, John (Reins) 32, 34, 48, 64 

Rains, WiUiam 32,34,48,64 

Ralls, Horeb 84 

Ralph, Morris (Moris) 68 

Ralston, James 63 

Ralston, John (Rolston) 63 

Ralston, Joseph 63 

Ramdell, John (Jno.) 63, 93 

Ramey, Daniel [Remy?] 47, 60, 65 

Ramsey, Alexander 68 

Ramsey, George 68 

Ramsey, John 58 

Ramsey, Larkin 68, 69 

Ramsey, William 78 

Randolph, Malachi (Malachiah). 43 

Rankin, Adam 83 

Rankin, Benjamin (Benj.) (Ran- 

kins) 27,60,66,84 

Rankin, David 40,62,78 

Rankin, Reuben (Rankins) (Ru- 
ben) 27,48,66,57,78 

Rankins, Robert (Robart) (Robt.) 

27,32,34,64 
Rankin, William (Wm.) . . . .43, 46, 

61,53,63 

Ratcliffe, Richard 68 

Ravenscraft, Thomas (Thos.).33, 

49,55 

Rawlings, Aaron 93 

Rawlings, Pemberton 6, 8 

Ray, James 26, 84 

Ray, John (Ree) 26,27,69 



[ 220 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Ray, Joseph 27 

Ray, Stephen 27 

Ray, William 27 

Read, Andrew 77 

Read, WilHam [Reed?] 16 

Reading, Robert, M 66 

Reager, Barket 68 

Reager, Jacob 68 

Record, Josiah (Records) .32, 34, 48, 54 

Record, Laban 48, 54 

Reding, George 28 

Reding, Isaac (Redding) 52 

Reding, John 28 

Redmon, Daniel 48 

Redmon, Gabriel 48 

Redmon, Thomas 48 

Reed, Alexander 64 

Reed, James 78 

Reed, John 53, 58, 64, 65, 72, 78 

Reed, Joseph (Jos.) 60 

Reed, Matthew 69 

Reed, Robert 54 

Reed, Thomas (Thos.) 58, 66, 84 

Reed, William (Wm.) 46, 53, 55 

Rees, Azor 33, 48, 66 

Rees, David 45,46,77 

Rees, Isaac (Reas) 77 

Reemer, David 60 

Reeves, EHjah 32,34,48,54 

Reeves, George 68 

Reeves, Matthias (Mathias) 57 

Reeves, Michael (Michel) 57 

Reeves, Spencer 33, 48 

Reid, Alexander (Alexr.) [Reed?]. 64 

Reid, John [Reed] 69 

Remy, Archibald (Archebauld) 

(Artchy) 56,77,88 

Remy, Ferdinand (Ferd.) 33, 49 

Remy, Jeremiah (Jerh.) (Ramy) 

(Jerry) 56,78,88 

Remy, Joel 84 

Remy, Linnet (Ramey) (Reimy) 

(Raimy) 56,66,77,84 

Reno, Teky 56 

Rentfro, James 52 

Rew, Richard (Rue) 43, 52 

Rew, Raleigh (Rews) (Rawleigh) 

32,34 

Reynolds, Aaron 24 

Reynolds, Thomas (Thos.).. 40, 58, 60 

Rhea, Alexander (Alexr.) 55 

Rhodes, Clifton (Rodes) 63 

Rhodes, John (Rodes) 77 

Rhodes, Frederick (Roads) 53 

Rhodes, Robert (Rodes) 27 

Rice, David 46,58 

Rice, John 24, 65 



Rice, WilUam (Wm.) 52,67 

Richards, Robert (Robt.)27,60,65,72 

Richards, William 40 

Richardson, James (Jas.) 51 

Richardson, Jesse 15 

Richardson, Laudie 93 

Richardson, Turner 52 

Richardson, William 15 

Richey, Edward 52 

Richey, John (Ritchey) 60 

Richey, Samuel 60 

Ridmer, Gabriel 78 

Riggs, John 32,34,48,54 

Riley, James 74 

Ringbolt, Jacob 46 

Ringo, Cornelius 60, 65 

Rippey , Samuel 54 

Roach, Henry 63 

Roach, Little Berry 58 

Roach, William (Rosh) 67 

Robbins, Aaron 60 

Robenit, John 77 

Robert, Benjamin, Jr 11 

Roberts, Edward (Robards)....27,68 
Roberts, John (Robers) . . .6, 52, 58, 60 

Roberts, Joseph 11, 12,27 

Roberts, Nathan 27 

Roberts, Nealey 52 

Roberts, Nimrod 52 

Roberts, Thomas (Robartes) 52, 60, 64 
Roberts, William (Roberds) 

(Wilhn.) (Wm.) 52,68 

Robertson, Absalom (Absm.) 

(Robinson) 65,78 

Robertson, Alexander 27 

Robertson, Benjamin (Robinson) 

12,43 

Robertson, Hosea 68 

Robertson, James (Roberson). .27,46 

Robertson, James Jr 27 

Robertson, Jesse (Roper tson) 65 

Robertson, John 27, 60 

Robertson, Jonathan 52 

Robertson, Matthew 27 

Robertson, Mills 64 

Robertson, Samuel 60 

Robertson, William 27, 60, 64 

Robeson, John (J no.) 26, 68 

Robinson, Jeremiah 53, 63, 78 

Robinson, James 64 

Robinson, Joseph 28 

Robinson, William (Wm.) 40, 51 

Robison, Alexander 58 

Robison, George 60 

Robison, James 68 

Robson, Samuel 9 (List) 

Rock, John 57, 78 



[ 221 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Rock, Patrick 78 

Rodgers, Andrew (Andw.) 17 

Rodgers, Joseph [Rogers?] 28 

Rodgers, William 63 

Rodney, Martin (Roddeney) 

(Marten) 65 

Roe, Charles 64 

Roe, William (Wm.) 54 

Rogers, Anthony 16 

Rogers, Barnard 24 

Rogers, Edward 62 

Rogers, James (Jas. ) 26, 62, 60, 77 

Rogers, Jeremiah aereh.)40,60,66,67 

Rogers. John 62,60,67,84 

Rogers, Joseph 40, 46, 60, 65, 67, 93 

Rogers, Thomas (Thos.) 76 

Rogers, William 60, 67, 84, 104 

Rooney, Patrick (Pattk.) (Runey) 67 

Rooney, William (Roney) 84 

Rorison, Basil 46 

Rose, Enoch (Knock) ... .32, 34, 48, 54 

Rose, Jonathan 64 

Rose, Obezar 27 

Rosett, George 47 

Ross, Ambrose (Ambriss) 27, 46 

Ross, Ignatius (Ignatious) 64 

Ross, Samuel 67,78,84 

Ross, Thomas (Thos.) 27 

Routt, Byram (Buram). .56,66,66,77 

Routt, George 65 

Routt, Hardy (H.) (Row ts). 16, 33,66 

Routt, WilUam 60, 62 

Row, Adam 60 

Row, WiUiam 84 

Rowl, Thomas (Rowles) 46 

Rowl, William 78 

Rowan, W 60 

Rowland, David 61, 62 

Rowland, John 60 

Roy, James, Jr 84 

Royston, Elijah 66 

Ruble, Jacob 60 

Ruby, Dai^d 60 

Rucker, James 62 

Rucker, John (Roocker) (Jno.).. 

32,34,62 

Ruddle, Isaac 96 

Ruffner, Reuben 58 

Rule, Andrew 24 

Rule, Samuel 84 

Runyan, Henry (Runnen.) 60, 67 

Runyan, Joseph 58 

Rupert, George (Georg) 78 

Russell, Charles 60 

Russell, Edward (Edwd.) 47 

Russell, H 45 

Russell, James 6 



Russell, Joseph 54 

Russell, Obediah 74 

Russell, WiUiam (W) 23, 60, 93 

Russellhill, Robert 78 

Ruth, Davis 32,34 

Rutherford, John (Reatherford) 

(J) 36,68 

Rybolt, Daniel 49 

Rybolt, Jacob 53 

Rybolt, Michael (Mickal) 33, 49 

Rylands, Nicholas 46 

R3rman, Jacob 40,47 



Sacry, James 60,63 

Sage, Alexander (Alex.) 58 

Sage, Jeremiah (Jerrimiah) 58 

Sage, Jesse 58 

Sage, John 58 

Sage, William 58 

Sage, William, Sr 58 

Said, Edmund 60 

Said, William 60,65 

Salley, Abraham 60 

Salley, Jezreel (Jessril) 45 

Salley, John 58 

Salter, WilHam 66 

Sammuel, Anthony 67 

Samples, Benjamin 52, 60 

Samples, David (Sample) 52 

Samples, John 52,60 

Samples, Samuel (Sample) 62 

Samples, Samuel, Jr 52 

Sanders, Elisha 57 

Sanders, Gunnell 93 

Sanders, James 63 

Sanders, Hezekiah 60,66 

Sanders, Julius 6 

Sanders, John 12, 17, 

46,68,60,69,78,84 
Sanders, Nathaniel (Nath.) ... .40, 62 

Sanders, Robert 24 

Sanders, Samuel 9 (List) 

Sanders, Thomas 60 

Sandidge, David 67 

Sandidge, Larkin 67 

Sandusky, James 43 

Sandusky, John (Sanduske) 77 

Sapleton, Jobe [Saptleton] 26 

Sapp, George (Georg.) 47 

Sappington, Hartley 46 

Sappington, John, Sr 47 

Satterly, Samuel (Saml.) 52 

Scheibeler, George 78 

Scholl, Joseph 12, 24, 61, 62, 60, 66 

SchoU, Peter 12,24,63,60,63,65 

SchoU (Wm.) 12,24,60,65 



[ 222 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Schwartzmer, Nicholas 6 

Scofield, Thomas 78 

Sconce, James 49, 84 

Sconce, Robert (Robart) 49, 84 

Sconce, Thomas 49, 84 

Scooler, William (Wm.) (Schooler) 

28,48,56 

Scott, Arthur 84 

Scott, Charles (Chs.l 51, 61, 83 

Scott, David 43 

Scott, Elijah 60 

Scott, Elisha 60 

Scott, Gabriel 52, 60 

Scott, George . . .23, 49, 52, 65, 58, 60, 66 

Scott, Henry (Henery) 84 

Scott, James (Jas.) .. .23, 28, 33, 52, 55 

Scott, John 33, 49, 58, 77, 78 

Scott, Joseph 47, 58 

Scott, Levi 60 

Scott, Robert 28, 33, 52, 58 

Scott, Samuel (Saml.) 58 

Scott, Thomas (Thos.) 43, 48 

Scott, William (Wm.) 53, 60 

Seal, John 60 

Seaman, Charles (Charls) 14 

Searcy, Bartlett.6,9 (List) 12,43,51,52 

Searcy, Berry 51 

Searcy, Edmund (Searcey) (Ed- 

mond) 52 

Searcy, David 66 

Searcy, Reuben (Sercey) (Cercy) 

(Reubin) 6, 8, 43, 51, 60, 64, 93 

Searcy, Richard 6,43 

Sebastian, Benjamin (Ben.) ... .42, 83 

Self, Chamt 53 

Sellers, James 58 

Sellers, John 58 

Sellers, Joseph 58 

Sellers, Nathaniel (Nathan).28,33,58 

Sellers, Samuel 58 

Sellers, William 58 

Settle, Thomas 60 

Sevier, Valentine (Val.) 74 

Sewell, Hugh 84 

Sewell, John 11 

Shad, George 58 

Shanklin, Robert 60 

Shannon, Nathaniel (Nath) 52 

Shannbn, Hugh 52 

Shannon, William 89 

Sharp, Abraham 27, 58 

Sharp, David 49 

Sharp, John (Sharpe) 24, 67 

Sharp, Moses 63 

Sharp, Solomon 77 

Shaw, William 54 

Shawhan, Daniel 57 



Shawhan, Daniel, Jr 57 

Shawhan, John [Sheehan?] 57 

Sheehan, John 60 

Sheetz, Henry 104 

Shelby, Evan 54,87 

Shelby, Isaac 17,45 

Shelton, Samuel (Saml.) 17 

Shelton, Thomas (Thos.) 27, 64 

Shepard, George 46 

Shepard, Samuel (Sam) 52, 60 

Shepherd, Adam 17,26 

Shepherd, David 60 

Shepherd, John 69 

Shepherd, WilHam (Wm.) 26 

Sheridan, Martin 60 

Sherratt, Tudor (Sherrask) 73 

Sherry, Bernard (Bemerd) 46 

Shids, Samuel 84 

Shields, Patrick (Shiells) 58 

Shipp, Colby (Coly.) .23,52,60,62,67 

Shipp, Laban 51,52,62,66,81 

Shipp, Richard W. (Richd.) 52 

Shoots, John 43 

Short, John 52 

Short, Peyton 90,91 

Shortridge, George 12 

Shortridge, George, Jr 58, 84 

Shortridge, Lewis 52 

Shortridge, William 24 

Shortridge, Samuel 12, 60, 65 

Shotwell, John 54 

Shrope, Adam 57 

Shrope, Sebastian 57 

Shropshire, Benjamin (Shopshare) 

56,58,60,63,78,84 

Shropshire, James 33, 55 

Shropshire, John 78, 84 

Shropshire, Joseph 67 

Shropshire, Edward 78 

Shubling, William 65 

Shumaker, Daniel (Shewmaker) . . 54 

Shut, John 60 

Sibley, John 12 

SidweU, Elisha 77 

Sidwell, Hugh 32, 34, 48, 55, 56, 84 

Silvers, Samuel 60 

Simbrell, Francis 60 

Simons, Robert 78 

Simons, Sebrc 60 

Simpson, Allan 48, 64 

Simpson, Gilbert (Gilbt.) 32 

Simpson, James (Simson) 60 

Simpson, John 32, 34, 51, 58 

Simpson, Samuel 32, 34 

Sims, John (Jno.) (Simms)62. 56, 77, 84 
Singleton, Edmund (Edmd.) (Ed- 
mond) 46, 62, 60, 63 



[ 223 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Singleton, Jechonias 43, 52, 60 

Skiner, Joseph 27 

Slack, Randolph 26 

Slagle, Jacob 104 

Slater, John, Toms 46, 53, 63 

Slaughter, Cad 68 

Slaughter, George, Col 26, 68 

Slaughter, Tames R 68 

Slaughter, Thomas 4 

Sledd, William 58 

Sleet, Weden 69 

Sleet, John 69 

Slott, John 28 

Sly, George 27 

Smallwood, John 65 

Smart, James 78 

Smart, Jose 84 

Smart, Richard (Richd.) 78 

Smeathers, James 74 

Smiley, John 49,55,66 

Smith, Alexander (Alexr.) 60, 93 

Smith, Benjamin (Benj.) ••27,40, 

45,52,60,67 

Smith, Charles, Sr 40,78 

Smith, Charles, Jr. (Chas.) . . .28, 

33,62,63,79,84 

Smith, Christian (Smit) 54 

Smith, Christopher 48, 58 

Smith, Daniel (Danl.) 78, 84 

Smith, Ebenezer 32, 34 

Smith, Edmund 58 

Smith, Elijah 40,45,53,67 

Smith, Eleazer 60, 63 

Smith, Francis 60 

Smith, Garland (Garld.) 60, 67 

Smith, George 60,67 

Smith, George Stovall (S) . .15, 17,60 

Smith, Hawkins 60, 67, 78, 84 

Smith, Henry 53, 58 

Smith, Hugh 27 

Smith, Jacob 60 

Smith, James, Sr 60,86 

Smith, James (Jas.) 17, 23, 26, 

27,33,48,49,60,66,67,84 

Smith, Jesse 32, 34 

Smith, John Qno.) 17,27,33, 

40,60,65,82,83,84,88 

Smith, Joseph 60,65,78,84 

Smith, Josiah 52 

Smith, Lucas (Lucous) 32, 34 

Smith, Michael (Micael) 78 

Smith, Peter 78 

Smith, Rhodus (Rodes) 67 

Smith, Samuel (Saml.) . . .51, 52, 54, 60 

Smith, Thomas (Ts.) 27,52,58,67 

Smith, Trevance 84 

Smith, WilUam (Wm.). . .23,53,60,93 



Smith, Walter 60,65 

Smith, Zacharias 17 

Smock, Henry 60 

Smock, Joseph (Smott) 84 

Smyth, Jacob 78 

Snell, Charles (Chas.) 78, 84 

Snell, John 52 

Snell, WilUam 78 

Snoddy, John 15, 17,27 

Snowber, Christopher 33 

Sodowsky, Jacob [Sadowsky?] ... 60 

Solomon, Andrew (Andw.) 52 

Solomon, Jacob (Solsman) 52, 60 

Solomon. WiUiam (Wm.) 52 

Sorcncncy, David 66, 78, 84 

South, John, Sr 8, 9, 23, 27, 40, 46 

South, John, Jr 8,9,63,64 

South, Samuel 8,27 

South, Thomas 9 (List) 

South, Zedikiah (Zediakah) 27 

South, William 27 

Southard, Edmund (Edmond) 100 

Southern, William 58 

Sovamts, Briant 74 

Spangler, William 12 

Sparkle, Andrew 63 

Sparks, Elijah 65 

Sparks, George 48 

Sparks, Isaac 65 

Sparks, WiUiam (Wm.), Sr. .32,34, 

48 49 

Sparks, WilUam, Jr 32^ 34 

Spaulding, WilUam (Wm.) (Spawl- 

din) 52 

Spaur, Matthias (Matts.) 24 

Speaks, Hezekiah (Hesekiah) . . .28, 49 

Speed, James (Jas.) 17,42 

Spence, WilUam (Wm.) 78 

Spencer, Michael (Spenser) 60 

Spencer, William 78 

Spiers, WilUam (Spirs) 60, 65 

Spiller, Craven 62 

SpUlman, Henry (Spilman) (Spel- 

man) 26,27 

Spillman, Jacob (Spilman) 26 

Sportman, WilUam P 43, 52 

Springer, John 12 

Springkel, Michael (Michel) 68 

Spurgin, Ezekiel 77 

Spurgin, George 78 

Spurgin, Isaac 77 

Spurgin, James 77, 84 

Spurgin, Jeremiah, Sr 77 

Spurgin, Jeremiah, Jr 77 

Spurgin, John 77 

Spurgin, Samuel 77 

Spurgin, Zephaniah (Spurin) 77 



[ 224 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Spurr, Richard (Richd.) 65 

Stafford, Henry (Staford) 

(Henery) 45,93 

Stagge, William 9(List) 

Stagner, Barnabas 26 

Stamper, Joshua 24, 46 

Standford, Aquilla (Standeford) 

48,49,62,84 

Standford, George 55, 78, 88 

Standford, Nathan (Standeford) 

49,55,56 
Stanhope, Robert (Stanhop.) 14, 

46,53 

Stapleton, John 60 

Stapp, Achilles (Achihles) 60 

Stapp, Paul 63 

Stark, Tames 28,57 

Stark, Thomas 49 

Stams, Edward 

Stams, Frederick 9 (List) 

Stams, Jacob 8,9,27,47 

Starns, Joseph 9 

Station, B 74 

Station, Charles (Staton) 74 

Station, John, Curtis 54 

Station, John (Staton) 74 

Station, Thomas (Stay ton) 60 

Steel, Adam 63 

Steel, Andrew (Andw.) 24, 51 

Steel, David 68 

Steel, Hugh 82 

Steel, John 42, 53 

Steel, Joseph 46,60,77,78 

Steel, Richard 60 

Steel, Robert 60, 65 

Steel, William (Wm.) (Steele). .22, 

23,24,31,46,52,53,58,60 

Stephens, Andrew 27 

Stephens, John (Stevens) . . .27, 51, 52 
Stephens, Joseph (Stevenze) .. .47,72 
Stephens, Thomas L. (Stevens) 

(Ts.) 46,56,64,66 

Stephens, William (Wra.) 93 

Stephenson, Abraham (Abram.).. 58 
Stephenson, Benjamin (B.) 

(Stevenson) 53, 61 

Stephenson, David (Stevenson) . . 77 
Stephenson, James (Stevenson) . . 

27,61,64,77,84 
Stephenson, John (Stevenson) . 12, 

24,43,45,51,53,61,63,93 

Stephenson, Jonathan 78, 84 

Stephenson, Marcus 54 

Stephenson, Robert (Robt.) 

(Stevenson) 24, 45 

Stephenson, Samuel (Stevenson) 

(Saml.) (Stevenston)12,51,53,60 



Stephenson, Thomas (Thos.) 

(Stevenson) ... 17, 24, 43, 53, 60, 93 
Stephenson, William (Wm.) 

(Stevenson) ... .23, 45, 53, 60, 61, 93 

Sterett, James 52, 60 

Sterett, John (Starrete) (Jno.) . .52, 60 

Stewart, Abraham 74 

Stewart, Alexander (Alexr.) ... .60, 65 

Stewart, Ezekiel 65 

Stewart, James (Jas.) (Stuart). 26, 

43,52,53,74 

Stewart, John 67, 74, 82, 102, 93 

Stewart, Levi 65,82 

Stewart, Richard 40 

Stewart, William 60,74 

Stidger, Peter 53, 60 

Stivers, Edward 60,65 

Stivers, Reuben 60, 65 

Stocker, Edward 84 

Stocker, Hezekiah 40 

Stockton, Dorsey 54 

Stockton, Robert 54 

Stockwell, Samuel 54 

Stokes, Edward 77,78 

Stone, Obadiah, Jr 32 

Stone, Valentine (Ston) (Volen- 

tine) 27,47,60,65 

Stone. William (Steon) 58 

Stoner, Michael (Stonar) (Mical) 

8,46,52 

Story, James 84 

Story, William (Wm.) 23, 34 

Stott, Rawley 52 

Stotton, George (Geo.) 54 

Stout, Benjamin, Jr 60, 76 

Stout, Jonathan 54 

Stout, Obadiah, Sr 32, 54 

Stout, Obadiah, Jr. (Obediah) ... 33 

Stout, Josiah 54 

Stout, Thomas 32, 34, 54 

Strange, Philip (Phelep) 60 

Strange, Stephen (Stepen) 64 

Strekes, Allen 17 

StrickUn, Elihu (Elihugh) 74 

Stringer, Edmund (Edmond) 63 

Striplin, William (Wm.)(Stribling) 72 

Strode, James 32, 55, 60, 65, 66, 78 

Strode, John 60, 65, 78 

Strode, John, Sr 60 

Strode, Samuel 12,23,34,64 

Strode, Stephen 78 

Strong, Walter E 58 

Strother, Thomas 64 

Strother, William 52 

Stubblefield, Robert 60, 67 

Stubblefield, WiUiam (Wm.) 60 

Stucker, Jacob 24 



[ 225 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Stucker, Michael (Mical) .. .24,52,60 
Stuphelbun, John (Stofelbeen) 

(Stopelbeen) 28, 66, 66 

Stutville, Charles 60, 65 

Sublette. Allen (Sublett.) 58 

Sublette. Xewis (Sublett.) 43, 52 

Sudduth, WilUam 65,78 

Sudland, Angtis 66 

Suggett, John 52,55,60 

Sullivan, Daniel, Jr. (Dan) 26 

Sumalt, Andrew (Zomault) 49, 55 

Sumalt, Christopher (Cinunolt) 

(Christerfer) (Zumbalt) 

(ChrisUfer) 49,66,56 

Sumalt, Jacob (Zumalt) (Jackob) 

49,55 

Summers, Edward (Edwd.) 27,65 

Summers, Elijah (Summars) 54 

Summers, John (Summars). .54, 

60,65,69,72 

Summers, John, Jr 68 

Summers, Robert 68 

Summers, Thomas 69 

Summit, Christian 82 

Summers, Edward 60, 65 

Summers,Elijah 60, 65 

Summers, John 27, 58, 60, 62, 65 

Summers, Thomas (Thos.) 58 

Suter, Jesse 52 

Sutherland, David 65 

Sutherland, Frederick (Suther- 

ling) 60,65 

Sutherland, Thomas (Sutherling) . 47 

Sutherland, William 60 

Sutton, Benjamin (Benj.) 54, 87 

Sutton, James 55, 78 

Sutton, Nathaniel 65 

Sutton, Robert 23 

Swaine, Thomas (Thos.) 60 

Swcaringen, Thomas (Tlios.) 23 

Swearingen, Van (Swearengen) . . . 

45,56,62 
Sweet, Benjamin (Benj.). 32, 34, 48, 54 

Sweet, Joseph 32,48 

Sweet, Joshua 33, 48 

Sweet, Thomas 32,34,48 

Swindler, Henry 60 

Swope, Jacob 27 

Tabb, WilUam [Taub?] 60, 65 

Talbot, Edmund 62 

Talbot, Haile 64 

Talbot, Isham 23, 62 

Talbot, Isham, Jr 68 

Talbot, James, S 62 



Talbot, Samuel (Saml.) (Talbert) 

60,65 

Talifer, Richard 82 

Tandy, Achilles (Ach.) 51, 63, 93 

Tandy, John (Tanday) 62, 67 

Tandy, Moses 93 

Tandy, William 63 

Tandy, William, Jr 63 

Tanner, Archelaus 63 

Tanner, John 27, 62 

Tanner. William 60 

Tarbel, Conrad (Torbell) 27 

Tardiveau, P 42 

Tatman, Joseph 67 

Taub, Arthur Thomas (Thos.). .60,63 

Taylor, Abraham 16 

Taylor, Benjamin (Benj.) 63 

Taylor, Chapman 62 

Taylor, Elkin 74 

Taylor, George (Geo.) 62, 93 

Taylor, Griflfcn 27, 33 

Taylor, Henry (H) 17,93 

Taylor, Isaac 32, 33, 48 

Taylor, John 27,48,52,64,62 

Taylor, John, Jr 27, 32, 34, 62 

Taylor, Philip. W 40 

Taylor, Richard (Richd.) 62, 60 

Taylor, Robert 27, 32, 34, 48, 64 

Taylor, Samuel 27 

Taylor, Thomas 60 

Taylor, William (Wm.) 68,78 

Taylor, Zachary 60,63 

Tegarden, George 46,76 

Telford, Alexander (Alexr.) ... .63, 93 

Telford, James (Tillford) 27 

Telford, WilUam (Wm.) 63, 93 

TempUn, James 48 

TempUn, John (Templen) 27 

Tenant, John 64 

Terry, Enes 27 

Terrin, Henry (Terrell) 65 

Terrill, James (Tarrell) 74 

Terrill, Joseph (Terrel) 16 

Terrill, Robert 28, 33, 49, 56, 66 

Teters, George (Teter) (Geo.) .16,58 

Tcters, Jonathan 58 

Teters, Samuel 68 

Thanks, Michael (Mical) 67 

Thatcher, Amos (Thetcher) . . . 32, 

34,46,67 

Thatcher, Daniel (Danl.) 67, 78 

Thatcher, Joseph 78 

Theobalds, Clement 56, 78, 84 

Theobalds, Thomas 66, 66, 88 

Thoebalds, Sam 66, 56, 84, 88 

Theobalds, WilUam 78 

Theron, Hugh 60 



[ 226 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Thomas, Absalom 54 

Thomas, Charles (Chas.) 60, 67 

Thomas, Eli 62 

Thomas, Enos 60 

Thomas, Ephraim (Ephram) 66 

Thomas, Henry 26 

Thomas, John .... 26, 27, 32, 34, 43, 

52,54,60,65 

Thomas, Levi 54 

Thomas, Philip 52 

Thomas, Plummer 60, 67 

Thomas, M 49 

Thomas, Richard 43 

Thomas, Rowland 60, 67, 84 

Thomas, WilHam (Wm.). . 40,52, 

56,60,65,79,84 

Thompson, Andrew 32, 34, 48, 74 

Thompson, Charles 69 

Thompson, Clifton (Thomson) ... 93 

Thompson, Even 26 

Thompson, Gloss 52 

Thompson, Henry 49 

Thompson, Hugh 17, 53 

Thompson, Isaac 12 

Thompson, James 17, 52, 58, 65 

Thompson, John (Jno.) 26, 54, 58 

Thompson, Joseph (TQmson)58, 63, 78 
Thompson, Lawrence (L.) • • -26, 27, 52 
Thompson, Robert (Rober.) 

(Robt.) 14,53,56 

Thompson, Rhodus (Thomson) 

(Rodcs) 52,60 

Thompson, Samuel (Saml.) .58,77,78 

Thompson, Thomas 104 

Thompson, William (Wm.) .17,43,63 

Thompson, Zacharias 54 

Thorp, David 28, 55 

Thorp, Dodson 27, 64 

Thorp, Henry (Henre) 28, 55 

Thorp, John 24 

Threlkeld, John 26 

Threlkeld, Moses 26 

Threlkeld, Thomas (Thos.) 26 

Threlkeld, Thomas, Jr 26 

Threlkeld, William (WiUam.) .... 58 

Tichenor, Elijah 64 

Tilley, John 74 

Tilley , Thomas 74 

Tillery, William 52 

Tilton, Robert 43, 46, 53 

Tilton, William (Tulton) 65 

Timbcrlake, John 64 

Timberlake, Richard 64 

Timberlake, Samuel 62 

TindaU, William (Tindul) 56 

Timmons, Stephen 68 

Tingley, Levi 78 



Tinsley, William (Wm.) 62 

Tipton, Thomas 58 

Tired, Joseph 58 

Titus, Joseph 64 

Todd, Jane 37, 75 

Todd, John (Tode) 45, 61 

Todd, John, Jr. (Jno.) 14 

Todd, Levi 6, 14, 17, 18, 22, 

25, 42, 45, 46, 51, 53, 63, 90, 91, 96 

Todd, Owen 40, 46, 53, 60, 62, 67 

Todd, Robert (Robt.) 41, 43, 

45,46,52,63,75,90,91 
Todd, Robert, Jr. (Robt.) . .43,46,51 

Todd, Thomas 83 

Tolbert, Isham 27 

Tollen, Robert 69 

Tomlin, Nicholas (Nicklis) 60 

Tomlin, William 24 

Tomlinson, Ambrose (Ambrus) ... 93 

Tomlinson, Elijah 93 

Tompkins, George R (G. R.) .60, 67, 93 

Tompkins, Giles 64 

Tompkins, Ham 60 

Tompkins, John (Tompskin) 27 

Toole, William 11 

Tonines, David 93 

Torbit, James 62 

Torrans, John 14, 24 

Torry, Keeble 24 

Toul, Benjamin I (Benj.) 60 

Townsend, Garret (Townsen) 

(Townson) (Garrett).... 47, 60, 65 
Townsend, James (Jas.) (Town- 
sen) 47,66 

Townsend, John 11, 69 

Townsend, Oswald (Townsin) (Oz- 

wel) (Towns) 6,27,29 

Trabue, Daniel 62 

Trabue, Edward (Edwd.) 43, 62 

Tracy, Samuel (Saml.) (Trasey). . 52 
Tracy, William (Trasey). .9 (List) 52 
Trible, Andrew (A) (Tribble) . .47, 

60,65,78 

Trible, Samuel 65, 72 

Trimble, George (Trimbal) (Trim- 
bell) 60,78 

Trimble, Isaac 78 

Trimble, James 45 

Trimble, John (Jon) (Trimbel).. 

28,40,48 

Trimble, Thomas (Thos.) 77 

Trimble, Walter 84 

Trimble, WilUam (Wm.) (Will). 17, 47 

Triplett, William 65 

Trop, Martin 16 

Trotter, David 61,63,60 

Trotter, James 42,46,60 



[ 227 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Trotter, Richard 77 

Trotter, William 40 

Troutman, Jacob 67, 60, 84 

Troutman, John (Jno.) . .02,66,78,84 

True, Charles (Chas.) 32, 34 

Trumbo, Andrew 78,84 

Trumbo, George (Trumbow.) 84 

Trumbo, Jacob 78 

Trumbo, John 78 

Tnmibo, William 78 

Tucker, Edward 28,49 

Tucker, George 60 

Tucker, Jacob 58 

Tucker, John 49, 64, 66 

Tucker, Leonard (Lenord) 49 

Tucker, William 28 

TuU, WiUiam 60 

Tully, Israel (Isarel) 43, 61 

Turner, Daniel 68 

Turner, Edward 27, 64 

Tiu-ner, George 68 

Turner, James 27, 34, 77 

Turner, John 77 

Turner, Joseph 14, 63 

Ttu^er, Lewis C 63 

Turner, Philip 64 

Turner, Thomas 27 

Turner, William (Wilhn.) 63 

Turner, Z. E 63 

Tumey, Michael 68 

Tumham, Thomas (Thos.) 60 

Turpin,Wimam(Wm.) (Terpin) 63, 68 

Tuttle, David 64 

Twetty, William 9 (List) 

Twyman, James (Jas.) 24, 61, 63 

Twyman, Reuben (Twiman) 

(Reub.) 61,62,60 

Twyman, Thomas (Twieman) 60 

Twyman, William (Twiman) . . .62, 60 

Tyler, John (Tylor) 74 

Tyler, Peter (Tylor) 74 

Tyler, WilUam (Wm.) 32 



Ulery, Henry 78 

Umphreys, William (Umphress) 

9 (List) 
Underwood, Nathaniel 28, 49, 66, 66, 84 

Underwood, Reuben 28, 49, 66 

Uria, Robert 32,34 

Usselton, George 62 

Utman, Patrick 69 

Utterback, Benjamin (Benj.) 62 



Valandigham, James (Vanland- 

ingham) (Jas.) 62, 60, 66 

Valandigham, George 66 



Valandigham, Lewis fValandag- 

ham) (Valladigham) 62, 60 

Vance, Andrew (Andw.) 66,84 

Vance, David 14, 24 

Vance, John (Jno.) 63 

Vance, Joseph 36 

Vance, Webb 74 

Van Cleve, John 69 

Van Cleave, William 6 

Vanderen, Barnard 84 

Van Hook, Samuel (Samm.) 6,26, 

28,48,49,77 

Van Hook, Samuel, Jr 28,33 

Vaniman, Garrett 66 

Vanmatre, Jacob [Van Meter?] ... 12 

Vanzant, John (Jno.) 32, 62 

Vardiman, Peter (Vardeman) 

(Peater) 16,32,66 

Vart, Jacob (Vert) 67,68,84 

Vaughn, John 62 

Velley , Benjamin (Bengiman) 66 

Venablc, A 23, 40, 43, 61, 63, 63 

Verble, PhiUp (PhiUip) 62 

Verzadt, John 48 

Vice, John 64 

Vinson, P 15 

Violet, Henson 60,66 

Virgin, Price 32, 33 

Vivian, John, Sr. (Vivion) 47 

Vivian, John (Vivion) 47, 66 

Vivian, Thachet 66 

Vokes, George (Geo.) 58 

Voorhies, Christopher (Vorris) ... 74 
Voorhies, Garrett (Voorheesc) 

46,63 



Waddle, James 78,88 

Wade, John 47,60 

Wade, Dawson (Dorson) 47, 66 

Wade, Dawson, Jr 47 

Wade, James 60,66 

Wade, John 66 

Wade, Josiah 64 

Wade, Richard 9 (List) 

Waggoner, John 46 

Walden, John 69 

Walker, Archibald 62 

Walker, David 68 

Walker, Henry 62, 68 

Walker, James 93 

Walker, John 6,62,74 

Walker, Joseph Q) 58,64 

Walker, Matthew (Mat.) 24, 46 

Walker, Nathaniel 66 

Walker, Randall (Randel) 62 

Walker, Richard 64 

Walker, Robert 63 



[ 228 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Walker, Samuel 93 

Walker. WiUiam 43,52 

Wallace, Andrew 78 

Wallace, Caleb 42, 59, 63, 83 

Wallace, James 60 

Wallace, John (Jno.) 43, 60, 78, 93 

Wallace, Joseph 78 

Wallace, Robert 43,51,53,58 

Wallace, WilHam 64 

Waller, Benjamin, Jr 60 

WaUer, Edward (Edwd.).55,62,66,79 

Waller, James (WaUers) 27, 51 

Waller, John 28, 32, 55, 60 

Waller, Joseph 52 

Waller, Patrick 69 

Waller, Stephen 67 

Waller, WilUam (Wm.) (Williem) 

60,67 

Wallis, David 74 

Wallis, John 53 

Wallis, W. E 53 

Wallis, William (Walles) 74 

Wallingfitch, Daniel (Dan) 

(Daniel) 32,34,62 

Wallingford, Benjamin (Wolling- 

ford) (WalUngsford) 32, 34 

Walter, Bamet 64 

Walter, John 104 

Walton, Matthew 17, 83 

Wann, John (Jno.) 48 

Ward, George 74 

Ward, Isaac 43 

Ward, Jacob 52 

Ward, James .... 45, 51, 53, 60, 62, 63, 65 

Ward, James, Sr. (Jas.) 60, 93 

Ward, John 51,63 

Ward, Joseph 78 

Ward, Richard 64 

Ward, Thomas (Thos.) 77 

Ward, W 43,46,51,53,63,90,91 

Warden, Philip 52 

Ware, Daniel (Wer.) 27 

Ware, Dudley 58,69 

Ware, Marcum (Markim) 47 

Ware, Thomas 15 

Ware, WilUam (Wm.) 52,60 

Warford, John 68 

Waring, Thomas (Thos.) (T.)48,54,56 

Wamock, Michael 14,23,93 

Warren, John 26 

Warren, Thomas 27 

Warren, William (Warran) 60, 65 

Wasson, Charles 78 

Wasson, James (Jas.) (Wason) . .46, 53 

Waters, James 6 

Waters, R. J 68 

Watkins, Evan 60 



Watkins, John 45,52,60 

Watkins, Samuel 68 

Watkins, Thomas 74 

Watkins, William 69 

Watson, Jesse 27 

Watson, Michael (Michel) 54 

Watson, Robert 63 

Watts, David 60, 65 

Watts, John (Wats.) 27, 52, 62 

Watts, Julius 52 

Watts, WiUiam (Wats) 15, 60, 67 

Webb, Augustine (Angus tin). . .65,72 

Webb, Charles 52 

Webb, Forest 43,60 

Webb, James 78 

Webb, John (Web) 63,65 

Webb, William E 88 

Weddle, George [Waddle?] 32, 34 

Weekley, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

Weiser, Jacob (Wesirr) 60 

Welch, John (Joh.) [Welsh?] ..31,55 

Welch, Walter (Wilch) 8, 9 

WeUs, Abraham 60 

WeUs, Barnet 60, 65 

Wells, Basil (Basel) (Bazel).31,55,66 

Wells, Benjamin 33, 55 

Wells, James 78 

Wells, John 60, 65, 82 

Wells, Jonas (Jones) 84 

Wells, Peter 27 

Wells, Thomas (Thos.) 93 

Welsh, John 28 

Welton, John [Walton?] 26 

WentzeU, Daniel 68 

West, Charles 40 

West, Jonathan 46 

West, Joseph 58 

West, Nathaniel (NethenneU) . . . 47 

West, Rezin 56,88 

West, Thomas (Thos.). .. .46,47, 

53,55,62,66,84,88 

West, WilUam (Wm.) 67 

Westerman, Charles 52 

Whaley, James 65 

Whaley, John 54 

Wheeler, Benjamin (Benj.) 72 

Whitaker, Joel 60 

Whitaker, Mark (Whitacer) 52 

Whitaker, Thomas (Thos.) 52 

White, Abraham (Abrm.) 43 

White, Ambrose 9 (List) 

White, Aquila (AquUa) 27, 46 

White, Aquilla, Jr 27 

White, Benjamin 9 

White, James 27, 47, 60 

White, Jeremiah 60, 65 

White, Joel 40,43 



[ 



] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



White, John 60,74 

White, John, Sr 27 

White, John, Jr 27, 82 

White, Stephen (Steven) 63 

White, Thomas 49 

White, William 52 

Whiteman, Benjamin (Benj.) 48 

Whitefeett, John 60 

Whiteside, John (Jno.) 62, 78 

Whiteiside, Robert 60 

Whiteside, Samuel 60 

Whiteside, William 60 

Whitledge, Robert 33, 53, 56 

WTiitledge, Thomas (Thos.).48,58,84 

Whitley, James (Whittley ) 15, 32 

Whitley, Solomon (Whittley) .32,48 

Whitley, Thomas (Thos.) 15 

WhiUey, William 6, 15 

Whitsel, Lewis [Whitsett?] 32, 34 

Whitsett, William 78 

WhiUon, George 47, 65 

Whiwitt. Joseph [— ?] 88 

Whorl, Samuel 56 

Wick, Moses 54 

Wickliff, Charles (Wichliff) 

(Chars.) [? 

Wightman, Shardless 

Wiginton, Henry 58 

Wilbum, Zachariah (Zach.) 64 

Wilcox, Aaron 52 

Wilcox, Daniel (Willcox) (Wil- 

cocks) 24,52 

Wilcox, John (Willcocks) .32, 33, 34, 43 

Wildres, John [Hildreth?] 49 

Wiley, John 82 

Wilkerson, James 52, 78 

Wilkerson, John 47 

Wilkerson, John, Jr 60 

Wilkerson, Moses 27, 47, 65, 72 

Wilkerson, William 47 

Wilkinson, Daniel (Wilconson) .6,43 

Wilkinson, James 25, 99 

Willcockson, Daniel 8 

Willcockson, David 63 

Willcockson, Edward [— ?] 

Willey, James. *. 93 

Wilkin, John 24 

Williams, Andrew (Andw.) 58 

Williams, Alfred (Alferd) 60 

Williams, Bamett 17 

Williams, Basil (Bazal) 54, 77, 78 

Williams, Beverley (Beaverly) ... 58 

Williams, Charles 46, 77 

Williams, Daniel 27, 65 

Williams, David 14, 48, 51, 52, 58 

Williams, Edward 27, 47, 60, 65 

Williams, Evan 68 



Williams, Isaac 27, 64 

Williams, James 33, 40, 78 

Williams, Jesse 49, 56 

Williams, Joel 54 

Williams. John ... 12, 14, 24, 27, 32, 
34, 43, 45, 48, 51, 52, 54, 56, 60, 66, 

7i77,78 

Williams, John, Jr 32, 34, 48 

WilHams, J 23 

WilUams, Joseph 43, 49, 64 

Williams, Lawrence 54 

Williams, Peter 24 

Williams, Pleasant 64 

William, Shadrach (Shadrack) ... 27 

WilUams, Thomas 17,32,34,48,64 

WilUams, WilUam (Wm.) (W.).27, 

43,68,64 

WilUams, WilUam, Jr. (Wm.) 63 

WilUams, Zadock 64 

WilUamson, Alden (All.) 72 

WilUamson, Henry 48 

Willmore, Jacob 27 

Wilhnott, Robert 78,84 

Wills, Andrew (Andw.) 60, 66 

Wills, Bamet 65 

WiHs, Matthew 60, 66, 72 

Wills, Oscar 65 

Wills, Robert (Will) 27 

Wills, Samuel 82 

Wills, Thomas (Thos.) 60, 66 

Wills, William 60,63,65,66 

Wills, WilUam, Jr 60 

Wilson, Amos (Willson) . .32, 34, 48, 64 

Wilson, Andrew (WiUson) 78 

Wilson, Daniel 65, 77 

Wilson, David 28,33 

Wilson, Edward 49,78 

Wilson, George 26,26,68 

Wilson, Henry, Sr 26 

Wilson, Henry, Jr 26 

Wilson, Isaac 52 

Wilson, James 26, 40, 60, 77, 78 

Wilson, Jeremiah 60 

Wilson, John (WiUson) 15, 26, 

33,48,64,58,66,77,78,84 

Wilson, John, Jr 58 

Wilson, Joseph (WiUson) 62 

Wilson, Moses 27 

Wilson, Nathaniel (Nathl.) ... .46,63 

Wilson, Peter 77, 78 

Wilson. Samuel 28, 33, 60, 63 

Wilson, Thomas (Thos.)61, 52, 66, 84, 93 

Wilson. WilUam (Willson) 78 

Wiman, Lewis (Lues) 60 

Wimore, Frederick (Wimour) 40 

Wimore, John (Wymore) ... 14, 24, 

40,61,63,93 



[ 230 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Windsor, Christopher 26, 27 

Winemiller, Jacob 48, 55 

Winlock, Joseph 68 

Winn, Adam 60, 63, 65 

Winn, Daniel 65 

Winn, George 65 

Winn, Jesse 67 

Winn, Owen (Oen) 65 

Winn, Thomas 53,65 

Winn, Thomas M. (Thos.) 68 

Winn, William 60, 65 

Winters, Elisha 53,60,63 

Winters, Willia^ 27 

Wisdom, John 58 

Wise, Adam 60 

Withers, Berry 52 

Withers, James 12,60,62 

Withers, James, Jr 11,60 

Withers, John, Sr 62 

Withers, John 60, 62 

Withers, Peter (Petter) 62 

Withers, Stephen (Witters) 

(Steven) 60 

Wolts, Christopher 65 

Wood, Abraham 32,34,48 

Wood, Ahijah 52 

Wood, Amos 54 

Wood, Andrew (Hood) ... 32, 34, 48, 65 

Wood, Archibald (Archd.) 64 

Wood, Benjamin (Benj.) . .. .32, 34, 48 

Wood, Christopher 54 

Wood, George (Geo.) 48, 64 

Wood, Henry 60 

Wood, James 60,67 

Wood, John ( Jno. ) . 15, 27, 32, 34, 48, 52 

Wood, Joseph 33 

Wood, Nathaniel (Nathl.) 76 

Wood, Nicholas (Nichs.) 52 

Wood, Richard 32,34,48 

Wood, Robeit (Robt.) 68 

Wood, Samuel (Sammel) (Saml.)28,62 

Wood, Samuel, Jr. (Sammel) 28 

Wood, William, Sr 34 

Wood, William (Wm.) ... .32, 33, 48, 54 

Woodcock, Joseph 58 

Woodfolk, Augustin 40 

Woodfolk, Loyal (LowyeU) 52, 60 

Woodfolk, Saul (Soyl) 51 

Woodfolk, Richard 40 

Woodlay, William 78 

Woods, Adam 27, 64 

Woods, Ahijah 24,43 

Woods, Andrew 27 

Woods, Archibald (Archd.) 27 

Woods, David 27 

Woods, John 27, 78 

Woods, Michael (Mical) 58 



Woods, Peter 27 

Woods, Samuel, Jr 62 

Woods, Thomas 58 

Woods, William 58 

Woodruff, David (Woodroff ) 27 

Woodruff, John (Woodroof ) ... .24, 27 

Woodward, Chesley 60, 72, 84 

Woodward, John (Woodard) . . .65,72 

Woodward, Levi 54 

Wooldridge, Edmund (Woodridge) * 

(Edmond) 40,45 

Wooldridge, Edward (Edwd.).... 52 

Wooldridge, Elisha 52 

Wooldridge, John (Wooldreg) . . 15, 77 

Wooldridge, Josiah 43, 52 

Wooldridge, Robert 52 

Wooldridge, William 77, 84 

Worel, Apewell 55 

Workman, Daniel 55, 77 

Workman, Morris (Moris) 77, 78 

Worley, Caleb (C.) 60 

Worley, Caleb, Jr 52 

Worrel, WilUam 40 

Worrindon, Owen (Ohen) 27 

Worthington, B. . , 17 

Worthington, Edward (Edwd.). 43, 58 
Wothershead, Christopher 

(Chris.) 63 

Wrayley, James 60 

Wright, James 78 

Wright, John 65,66,72 

Wright, Samuel (Saml.) 66 

Wright, Thomas 60 

Writedge, Thomas 11 



Yager, Cornelius 6 

Yager, Jacob (Yauger) . . .32, 34, 48, 78 

Yager, Peter (Yawger) 49, 57, 78 

Yager, Philip (Yeiger) 60 

Yarbrough, John 60, 67, 78, 84 

Yamell, Jesse 84 

Yates, John (Yets) 84 

Yeatman, John 28 

Yoacom, George (Yoocom) 58 

Yoacom, Jacob (Yoocom) 58 

Yoacom, John (Yocam) 26, 27 

Yoacom, Matthew (Yocam) (Mat- 
thias)...'. 26,27,68 

Yoacam, Samuel (Yoahsun) 26 

York, EUjah 64 

York, Isaac 78 

York, Jeremiah (Jarama) 54, 78 

York, Jesse (Yeork) 84 

Young, Abner 63 



[ 281 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



List of Names 



Young, Ambrose 63 

Young, Henry 58 

Young, James 68,60,67,69 

Young, John 40, 63, 64, 63, 66, 87 

Young, John, Jr 62 

Young, Joseph 66 

Young, Lawrence 62 

Young, teonard (I<eo.) 40, 62, 67 

Young, Lewis 62 

Young, M 63 

Young, Reuben 62 

Young, Reuben, Jr 62 



Young, Richard (Richd.)..43,46, 

62,61,03 

Young, Thomas (Thos.) 32, 34, 

63,90,91 

Young, William (Wm.).. .40,61, 

62,60,63,66,67 

Younger, Joshua 67 



Zechledge, William 68 

Zimmerman, Frederick (Zimer- 
man) (Fredk.) 66 



Names in Petition No. 1, are not included in this Index, unless they appear 
on later Petitions. 

The word "List" following the number 9, refers to list of persons killed 
and wounded at Boonesfort, according to Petition No. 9. 



Digitized by 



Google 



INDEX 



PAOB 

Alleghany Mountains 1,7,9,80 

Askins, John 96 

Augusta, West: 

Model for procedure in West Pincastle 38 



Bardstown: 

Proposed site for sitting of Supreme Court 124 

Baylor, Walker: 

Trustee of Stonford 94 

Beach Knobs 66 

Beal, Tavener 36 

Beallsborough, Nelson County 16 

Bedinger, Michael: 

His lands 128 

Big Sandy 90, 110, 118 

Bird, Captain: 

Invasion of Kentucky 168 

Blair, Alexander: 

Trustee of Stanford 94 

Blue Lick 73, 117 

Bogg's Fork (of Boone's Creek) 130 

Boone, Daniel 8, 49 

Capture at Blue Lick 73 

Request for treasury warrant for land 178 

Trustee of Washington and Maysville 92, 166 

Boone, Jacob: 

Trustee of Maysville 166 

Boone, Squire 61 

Boone's Creek 118, 130 

Boonesborough : 

Request for a town at 48 

Act to establish 62 

Proposed county seat 107 

Boonsfort: 

Seige of 44, 46 

Request from inhabitants of 48 

Slaves at 44, 49 

Botetourt, Baron de: 

Petition addressed to 36 

Bounty land 49 

Bourbon County: 

Act establishing 86 

Requests for division 89, 107, 108, 117, 130 

Protests against division 91, 110, 119, 131 

Acts for division 119 

Requests for towns 91, 121, 127, 147 

Requests for gristmills 144, 148, 160 

Protests against gristmills 146, 146 

Tobacco inspection 120, 162 

Recording deeds 166 

[ 233 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Index 

PAOB 

Bourbon Courthouse: 

Request for town at 121 

Bowman, John 157 

County Lieutenant in Lincoln County 168 

Bradley, Edward: 

Trustee of Boonesborough 52 

Bramlett's Lick 118, 146 

Brashiers, Marshem: 

Trustee of Louisville .' 55 

Brooke, G 186 

Brown, J.: 

Of Staunton, Virginia, a letter of 168 

Brown, John: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Buchanan, James 35 

Buchanan, William 104 

A deposition 45 

Bullitt, Alexander Scott: 

Trustee of Louisville 134 

Burks, Samuel 35 

Bush, William: 

His land 139 



Cabell, Frederick 35 

Cabell, Hector *. 35 

CabeU. John, Jr 35 

Cabell, Joseph, Jr 35 

Cabell, Nicholas 35 

Cabell, Sanders 35 

Cabell, William, Jr 35 

Calendar of State Papers 2 

Calloway, Richard: 

Trustee at Boonesborough 51, 52 

Campbell, John: 

Request to repeal act establishing Louisville 72 

Tobacco inspection in Jefferson County 174 

Campbellstown, Jefferson County 16 

Cartright, Robert 50 

Casey, Peter: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Caveats 76, 77, 124 

Chaplaine, Abraham: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Charlestown: 

Request for town at 100 

Act to establish 100 

Charlton, Edward: 

Notary at Williamsburg 45 

Cherokees 36, 37, 48 

Christian, Turner: 

Party to law suit 163 

Christian, William: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Claims, law for settling 171 

[ 234 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Index 



Clark, George Rogers : 

References to 39, 40, 43, 100, 157, 169, 168, 186, 187, 188 

Requests for pay for services 67, 178 

A memorial 172 

His papers 174 

Lands for his soldiers 60 

Clark's Run 84 

Cleveland, Eli: 

His lands 132 

Collins, Henry: 

Tory landholder 70 

Colonial Governor, petition addressed to 36 

Commissions, military 42 

Commissioners : 

For Western accotmts 159, 171 

Court of 74 

To settle claims 100 

Act to create 102 

Act to extend powers of 102 

Congress, Continental 38, 64 

Conn, Notley: 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

Connolly, John: 

Tory land-owner 54, 72 

Constitution 62,64 

Continental Congress 38, 68 

Convention, petitions addressed to 36, 38 

Conway, Miles W. : 

Trustee of Washington and Charlestown 92, 100 

Counties, division of: 

Request for, in Fincastle County 36, 38 

Request for, in Kentucky County 65 

Request for, in Bourbon County 89, 107, 108, 117, 130 

Request for, in Fayette County 85, 107, 114, 130 

Request for, in Lincoln County 84, 141 

Cotu^, General, of Virginia 12 

Courts: 

Request for Supreme Court 65, 66, 67 

Act to establish 66 

Acts to amend , 98, 136 

Request for removal 124 

Protest against removal 135 

Docket of 124 

Courts, county 41, 67 

Cowan, John: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Craig's Creek 105 

Crow's Sinking Spring 84 

Crow's Station 159 

Cumberland, Falls of: 

Request for sixty thousand acres of land at 35 

Currency, paper, depreciation of 64, 154 



Danville, seat of Supreme Court 121.124 

Davis, John 35 

[ 235 ] 



Digitized by 



Google 



Index 

PAOB 

Deeds: 

Request to extend time for recording 166 

Act to extend time 157 

Dick's River 84 

Delawares 40 

Detroit: 

Kentucky captives in 46, 169 

District of Kentucky: 

Act to establish 66 

Douglass, James 138 

Dry Run 76 

Dumfries 185 

Duncan, James: 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

Dunmore, Lord: 

His land policy 7, 36 

Dutch Station, near Louisville 157 

Eagle Creek 86 

Bdmtmd, John, Clerk of Bourbon County 105 

Education: 

Lands for public 69, 137 

Interest in 70 

Transylvania Seminary 72, 112, 160, 161, 162 

Edwards, John: 

Clerk of Bourbon County 118, 120, 146 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

Elections) 

Difficulty of attendance 109 

Method at Boonesborough 60 

Elkhom Creek 61 

Emerson, Ash: 

Employe of Lytle 74, 76 

Emigrants on Ohio River 153 

Ervin, Mary: 

Request to waive escheat 96 

Act to waive 97 

Escheat: 

Of lands 69, 70, 72 

Location of lands 138 

Act for 71, 137 

Estill, James: 

Trustee of Boonesborough 51 

Express to Pittsburgh 42 

Palls of the Ohio: 

Requests of inhabitants at (see Louisville, Jefiferson 

County) 53,54,66 

Payette County: 

Requests for division 86, 107, 114, 130 

Protest against division 116 

Acts to divide 86, 116 

Tobacco inspection 98, 102, 105, 113, 132, 139 

Por town at Lexington 60, 106 

Complaints about land , . . 66 

Concerning clerks 169 

[ 236 ] 



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Index 

PAGB 

Perries: 

Requests to establish : 

Across Kentucky River 63,87,88,89 

Across Cumberland River 170 

Acts to establish 63, 88 

Pincastle County: 

Its extent 39 

Pincastle, West: 

Request of inhabitants for jurisdiction of Virginia and es- 
tablishing of coimty. 36, 38 

Ployd, John: 

His survey 61 

Trustee of Louisville 66 

Pox, Arthur: 

Trustee of Washington and Maysville 92, 166 

Prankfort: 

Tobacco inspection by James Wilkinson 171 

Gamett, Thomas 186 

Garrard, James: 

Surveyor of Bourbon County 104 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

Gass, David 61 

Georgetown, Woodford Coimty 16 

Gilmore, John: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Gloster Town 174 

Grant, John: 

Trustee of Charlestown 100 

Green, Willis: 

Clerk of Lincoln County 86, 88, 94 

Greenup, Christopher: 

Clerk of Supreme Court 97 

Gristmills: 

Requests for 144, 148, 160 

Protests against 146, 146 

Gutridge, John: 

Trustee of Washington 92 

Hains, Benjamin 36 

Hains, Joseph 35 

Hamilton, Lieutenant Governor: 

Instigation of Indians 45 

His capture 186 

Hammond's Creek 66 

Hancock, Stephen 61 

Hand, Edward: 

Brigadier General 43 

Harman, Thomas 35 

Harmon's Lick 84 

Harris, Edward 35 

Harris, John 36 

Harris, Thomas 35 



[ 



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Index 

PAOX 

Harrod, James: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Harrodsburg: 

Request of inhabitants for jurisdiction of Virginia 36, 38 

Request for town at 82 

Act to create (see Lincoln Coitnty) 83 

Hart, Nathaniel: 

Complaints against 49, 60 

Hay, William 164 

Henderson, David 89 

Henderson, Richard: 

Complaints against 49 

Reference to petition from 35 

Henderson, William: 

Trustee of Lexington 62 

Hening, Statutes: 

Authority for acts quoted in this book 2 

Henry, Patrick 3 

Herod's Station: 

Place of Hamilton's captivity 187 

Hickman's Creek 87, 99 

Hines, Andrew: 

Trustee of Louisville 65 

Hinkson's Fork of Licking River 144, 145, 150, 176 

Hite, Abraham 35 

Hite, Abraham, Jr 35 

Hite. Isaac 35 

Hite. Isaac, Jr 35 

Hite, Joseph 35 

Holder, John 51 

Holder's Landing 139 

Holloway, James: 

Services in Revolution 92 

Holston River 104 

Company raised on 168 

Hopewell : 

Request for town at 127 

Act to establish 128 

Changed to Paris 148 

Hopkins, James 35 

Hopkins, William 35 

Hopson, Henry 35 

Hord, William: 

His lands 170 

Homsby, Joseph 35 

Horsley, John 35 

Horsley, Robert 35 

Horsley, William 35 

Howard's Creek 86, 139 

Hudson, William 188 

Hughs, John 35 

Illinois: 

Request of claimant to land in 151 

Indians: 

Depredations 41,62,85,93, 109, 153 

Prisoners 165 

[ 238 ] 



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Index 

PAGB 

Innes, Harry: 35 

To present request for separation from Virginia 81 

Innes, Hugh 35 

Innes, James 35 

Attorney-General 163 

Innes, Robert 35 

Irwin, WiU: 

Clerk of Mason County 119 

Irwin, Joseph 176 

Jack's Creek 88 

JefFerson, Thomas: 

Committee in House of Delegates 3 

JefFerson County: 

Complaint about land 66 

Request for separation from Virginia 79 

For division of Kentucky County (seeLouisville and Falls of 

the Ohio) 55 

Shipments of tobacco from 175 

Johnston, William: 

Clerk of JefFerson County 134 

Johnson, Robert, Surveyor (see facsimile map) 62,72, 115 

Jones, John Gabriel 37, 39, 40 

Journal : 

Of House of Burgesses 1 

Of Convention 1 

Of House of Delegates 2 

Kanawha: 

Battle of the Great 37 

Kaskaskia 57 

Kennedy, John: 

Trustee of Boonesborough 52 

Kennedy, William: 

Trustee of Hisurrodsburg 83 

Kentucky: 

Separation from Virginia .27, 62, 66, 78, 79, 82, 91, 121, 122, 141, 165 

Kentucky County: 

Request of inhabitants for defense, Act creating 41 

Development of salt springs 43 

Relief in land troubles 45, 62 

Request for division of coimty 55 

Tobacco inspection 128 

Act for division of county 57 

Kentucky District: 

Act creating 66 

Request of inhabitants for circuit courts 76 

For settlement of claims by county courts 100 

To increase places for Supreme Court 124 

Protest against removal of Supreme Court 134 

To give Supreme Courts power to establish tobacco 

inspection 129 

To amend act for separation from Virginia 140 

To extend time for registration of survey 164 



[ 



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Index 

FAOB 

Kiccapoos 40 

Elimburlin, John: 

His lands 177 

Earkham, Captain Samuel : 

Indian scout 177 



Lamb» William: 

Trustee of Washington ffi 

Land laws: 

References to 7,8,36,51,59,60,63 

Acts 47, 48, 62 

Amendments 48, 77 

Land office 36, 46^ 47, 60, 68 

Lanier, James: 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

Lapsley, Samuel: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Lawrence's Creek » 100 

Lee, Henry: . 

Trustee of Washington, Charlestown, and May8yille.92, 100^ 156 

Leestown 61 

Lee's Town Bottom 171 

Lexington Station 66 

Lexington: 

Request for town at 60, 106 

Act to establish town 62 

Request for corporate body 106 

Request for added powers 143 

Act to grant added powers 144 

Licking River 61 

Navigation of 144,146,146,148,160 

Limestone Settlement 62, 80, 92, 106, 110, 117 

Lincoln County: 

Complaint of inhabitants over land troubles 66 

Request for laws on marriage, etc 68 

Request for towns at Harrodsburg and Stanford «8% 98 

Request for division of county 84, 141 

Act to divide 86 

Litigation, extent of 64, 76, 77 

Little, James: 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

Logan, Benjamin: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Lands in Lincoln County 93 

Trustee of Stanford 94 

Regarding Indian prisoners 167 

Logan, John: 

Trustee of Stanford 94 

Long knives 40 

Louisa River (Kentucky) 38 

Louisville: 

Request for town at 63 

Act to establish town.". 66 

Request to repeal act creating town 72 

Act to repeal 73 

Request for trustees living in town 133 

Act to add trustees 134 

(See Falls of the Ohio and Jefferson County.) 

[ 240 1 



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Index 

. PAOB 

Luttrell, John: 

Complaint against 49 

Lyne, Edmund 101 

Trustee of Washington 92 

Machir, John: 

Trustee of Charlestown 100 

Madin, George 50 

Madison, James: 

Committee in House of Delegates 3 

Madison County: 

Act to create 85 

Request for division 107 

Marriage: 

Request for civil 69^ 

Act f<Mr civil 69 

Martin, Captain John, Indian scout 51, 177 

Mason County: 

Act to establish 119 

Maxwell, John: 

A deposition , 61 

Maysville: 

Request for town at 155 

Act to establish town 156 

McAfee, James: 

Claim f#r supplies 171 

McConnell's Station 56 

McCowwald, William: 

Trustee of Lexington 62 

McCraw, Samuel 168 

McDonel, John 35 

McDowell, Samuel: 

President of Convention for Separation 141 

McKee, Alexander 70 

McKenzie, Robert: 

Tory landholder 70 

Megginson, William 35 

Mercer County: 

Act to create 86 

Meriwether, George: 

Trustee of Louisville 55 

ItGlford, George: 

Trustee of Mairsville 156 

miford: 

Act to create town in Madison County 128 

MiUtia 42,55,56,68 

Enumerations 91, 111, 114 

Mississippi River 6, 46, 176 

Mitchell, Ignatius: 

Site of Charlestown 100 

Mitchell, WilUam: 

Trustee of Lexington 62 

Monongahala 176 

Moore, James F. : 

Affidavit 159 

Morrison, Major 176 

Morris, Richard: 

Party to law suit 163 

[ 341 ] 



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Index 

PAOB 

Mosby, Robert: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Moyers : 

Settlement on State Creek 132 

Muster, general 66 

Muter, George: 

To present request for separation from Virginia 81 



Navigation of Licking River 144, 146, 146, 148, 150 

Nelson County: 

Request for separation from Virginia 79 

New Market : 

Mercer Coimty 16 

Noe, John: 

Justice of Peace in Harlan County 188 

Norbome, Baron de Botetourt 36 



Obache (Wabash) 67 

Opost 40 

Orphans, request for law to care for 68 



Paint Lick 84 

Pamphlet on "Public Good" 64 

Parberry, James 103 

Paris: 

Act to change from Hopewell 148 

Patterson, R 61 

Patterson, Robert: 

Trustee of Lexington 62 

Pauling, Henry: 

Trustee of Stanford 94 

Payne, Edward 116 

Pendleton, John: 

Auditor Public Accounts 163, 171, 178 

Petitioning, the process 2 

Petitions, references to some not in this book 16, 36 

Pittsburgh 42, 43 

Pope, William: 

Trustee of Louisville 66 

Powell, Levin: 

Trustee of Boonesborough 62 

Powell's Valley 36 



Quartermaster of Illinois Department 167 

Quit rents, attitude of settlers to 6 



Randle, Abel 36 

Randell, Chilton 186 

Rankin, Robert: 

Trustee of Washington 92, 100 

Rations : 

Bill for and price 167 

Ravin Creek 86 

[ 242 ] 



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Index 

PAOB 

Rawlings, Pemberton 61, 52 

Religion, prevailiiig forms 69 

Reserve lands for soldiers in Lincoln County 141 

Richmond: 

Capital of Virginia 2, 123, 164 

Roads: 

Great Kanawha to Lexington 19 

Limestone to Lexington 103 

Winchester to Fort Pitt 177 

Robinson's Fork of Boone's Creek 130 

Rockcastle River 84 

Ross, Philip 35 

Ruddle's MUl 120 

Russell. William 115, 176 

Saint Asaph's 179 

Salt: 

Development of springs 43 

Acts for conservation of 44 

Claim for sale of 162 

Salt Spring of Licking 61 

Sandy Creek 86 

School, public: 

Escheated lands for 69 

Interest in 70 

Law for escheated lands 137 

Scott, General Charles 105 

Scouts, claims for service 177 

Separation of Kentucky from Virginia: 

Account of 27 

Suggested 62,66,78,91 

Requested 79 

Protest against 121 

Acts for 82, 122, 141 

Titles after separation 165 

Severn, Ebenezer 35 

Seymour, Felix 35 

Shannon, William: 

Claim as Quartermaster to Illinois Department 157 

Act to settle claim 160 

Shelby, Isaac: 

Trustee of Stanford 94, 101 

Silver Creek 118 

Simon, Joseph: 

Partner of John Campbell 72 

Sinclair, M. P 186 

Slaughter, George: 

Trustee of Louisville . . •. 55 

Slaves: 

At Boonsfort 44, 49 

Brought to Kentucky without notice 126 

Act regarding 127 

Provisions concerning in will 183 

Smith, Charles, Jr. : 

Trustee of Charlestown 100, 128 

Smith, James: 

Early explorations. 1767-1773 154 

Smith, John: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

[ 248 ] 



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Index 

FAOB 

South, John 51 

Stanford: 

Request for town at 9S 

Act to create town 04 

Stanwix, Treaty of Port 37 

Stote Creek 132 

Staunton, Virginia 167 

Steel, Andrew: 

Trustee of Lexington 02 

Steel. William: 

Trustee of Lexington 62 

Stone, William 185 

Stone Lick Creek lia 

Stoner^ Pork of Ucking River 108, 110, 144, 145, 148, 160 

Strays, request for laws 09 

Stuart, Henry, journey down Ohio 170 

SulUvan, James: 

Trustee of Louisville 56 

Supreme Court: 

Request to remove 1% 124 

Protest against removal 135 

(Sec Courts.) 
Survejrs: 

Request for extension of time to record 102, 164 

Act to extend time 104, 10^ 170 

Tate's Creek 128 

Taxes: 

Tobacco used for 102, 105 

Payable in specie only 123 

Tax on clerks of court 170 

Act regarding 170 

Taylor, Edmund: 

Trustee of Boonesborough 52 

Taylor, Emanuel 36 

Taylor, Richard 101 

Taylor, Samuel: 

Trustee of Harrodsburg 83 

Thomas, Cornelius 36 

Thomas, James, Jr 36 

Thomas, John 35 

Thornton, Thomas, of Predericksburg: 

His will 182 

Thruston, Buckner: 

Trustee of Louisville 134 

Thruston, Charles: 

Trustee of Boonesborough 52 

Thurston, John 174 

Tobacco: 

Requests for inspection: 

In Fayette County 98, 102, 106, 113, 132, 139 

In Bourbon County 120, 162 

At Tate's Creek 128 

At Prankfort 171 

Protest against inspection 129 

Acts to establish inspection 99, 120 

Use for taxes 102, 106 

Use for currency 103, 172 

Shipments from Jefiferson County 175 

[ 244 ] 



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Index 



Todd estate 96, 142 

Act to create tru s tee s for 96 

Amendment 143 

Todd, J. N 51 

Todd, Jane, widow of John Todd 95, 142 

Todd, John: 

Trustee of Lexington 62 

Todd, John, Jr. : 

Trustee of Louisville 65 

Todd, Levi: 

Clerk of Fayette County 86, 87, 169, 170 

Todd, Mary Owen 96 

Todd, Robert 139 

Executor of estate 96, 142 

Tories: 

Law to escheat lands 187 

Cases of men 54,09,70,72 

Towns, request for establishment of, at: 

Boonesborough 48 

Louisville 63 

Lexington 60, 106 

Harrodsburg 82 

Stanford 93 

Washington 91 

Charlestown 100 

Bourbon Courthouse 121 

Hopewell 127 

Paris 148 

Maysville : 156 

(See respective towns.) 

Towns: 

Lists of trustees 50, 61, 62, 65, 62, 83, 92, 94, 100, 128, 134, 156 

Transylvania Company 8 

Characterization of policy 36 

Transylvania Seminary: 

List of trustees 72 

Act to grant escheated lands 72 

Request for surveyor's fees 112 

To secure fimd by lottery 160 

Act to grant lottery right 161 

Request for reduction of trustees 161 

Act to grant reduction 162 

Trigg, Stephen: 

Trustee of Louisville 65 

Trustees: 

Of escheated lands for school 69 

For towns 60,51,62,64, 62, 71, 83, 92, 94, 100, 128, 137, 156 

Turner, Joseph 36 



Unity Station 56 



Vincennes (Saint Vincents) 67 

Van Meter, Garret 36 



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Index 

PAQB 

Waller, Edward 92 

Trustee of Washington and Hopewell 128 

WaUace, Caleb 160 

Warberton, Benjamin 35 

Warberton, John 35 

Warren, Thomas: 

Trustee of Charlestown 100 

Warwick, Lincoln Coimty 16 

Washington County line 66 

Washington: 

Request for town 91 

Act to create 92 

Welch's Fork of Boone's Creek 130 

West, Thomas: 

Trustee of Hopewell 128 

West Indies 171 

Wilkinson, Gary 35 

Wilkinson, James: 

Trustee of Louisville 134 

Request for tobacco inspection 171 

Williams, Captain John 186 

Williamsburg, capital of Virginia 2 

William and Mary College, too distant from Kentucky 23, 112 

Wilson's Station 84 

Woodford County: 

Act to establish 116 



Young, Richard: 

Justice of Fayette County 116, 116 



[ 246 ] 



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