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Full text of "School of Pharmacy Catalog 1938-1954"

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Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 

VOL. 19 No. I 



Catalogue and 
95th Announcement of 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1938-39 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE. MD. 



Official Publication 



of 



The University of Maryland 



VOL. 19 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
95th Announcement of 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1938-39 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE. MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CALENDAR 

1938 

September 12 to 15 — Examination for the removal of conditions. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 20, Tuesday — Registration for first- and second-year students. 

September 21, Wednesday — Registration for all other students. 

September 22, Thursday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled 
period. 

November 23, Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins after the last 
scheduled period. 

November 28, Monday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled 
period. 

December 21, Wednesday — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

1939 

January 3, Tuesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 23 to January 28, Monday to Saturday inclusive — Registration 
for the second semester. 

January 28, Saturday — First semester ends after the last scheduled 
period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 30, Monday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 
February 22, Wednesday — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 
April 5, Wednesday — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 
April 12, Wednesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
June 3, 11:00 A.M., Saturday — Commencement. 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The 
last day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week 
in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be 
waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9 :00 A. M. to 5 :00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9 :00 A. M. to 12 :30 P. M., with the 
following exceptions : Monday, September 12, 1938, until 8 :00 P. M. ; Saturday, September 
24, 1938, until 5 :00 P. M. ; and on Saturday, January 28, 1939, until 5 :00 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine Re- 
gents appointed by the Governor, two each for a term of nine years. The 
administration of the University is vested in the President. The General 
Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the President. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its faculty of professorial rank. Each Faculty Council directs the 
policy of the group it represents. 

The University is co-educational in all its branches and has the follow- 
ing educational organization: 

School of Medicine. College of Agriculture. 

School of Law. College of Arts and Sciences. 

School of Dentistry. College of Education. 

School of Pharmacy. College of Engineering. 

School of Nursing. College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. Summer School. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Extension Service. 
Department of Military Science and Tactics. 
Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 
University Hospital. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Nursing are 
located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, the 
others in College Park. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman Term expires 1945 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary Term expires 1947 

W. Calvin Chesnut Term expires 1942 

William P. Cole, Jr Term expires 1940 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr Term expires 1943 

Harry H. Nuttle Term expires 1941 

J. Milton Patterson Term expires 1944 

John E. Raine Term expires 1939 

Clinton L. Riggs Term expires 1942 



president of the university 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D. 

general administrative board of the university 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Dean Rowland, Dean 
Howell, Dean DuMez, Dean Robinson, Dean Small, Dean Mount, 
Dean Appleman, Dean Steinberg, Dean Stamp, Dean Broughton, Dean 
Stevens, Dr. Cotterman, Colonel Patch, Dr. Lomas, Dr. Huff, Mr. 
Hillegeist, Miss Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Professor Metzger, Dr. Hale, 
Dr. Manny, Dr. White, Dr. Welsh, Professor Ikeler, Professor Eppley. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Officers of Administration 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., President of the University. 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Secretary. 

W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
E. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grubb 

Marvin R. Thompson J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 
emeritus professor 

David M. R. Culbreth, Emeritus Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1879) ; College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
M.D. (1883). 

PROFESSORS 

*L. B. Broughton Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1908), M.S. (1911) ; Ohio State University, Ph.D. (1926). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

*Charles G. Eichlin Professor of Physics 

Lafayette College, A.B. (1913), M.S. (1921). 

Walter H. Hartung Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918) ; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

*Norman E. Phillips Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916) ; Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

t Professor of Botany 

fMARViN R. Thompson Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Minnesota, Ph.C. (1926) ; George Washington University, B.S. (1930) ; 
Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1934). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Washing- 
ton, D. C, B.S. (1921) ^Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Honorary). 

The faculty is listed as constituted during 1937-38. Changes will be noted in subse- 
quent catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of 
the University. 

t Representative on the Graduate Council. 

t Appointment pending. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 5 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical 

Law. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Thomas C Grubb Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B. (1930) ; University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

*A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), Ph.D. 
(1928). 

Henry E. Wich .....Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Marvin J. Andrews Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1922), Ph.C (1923), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1931). 

*Edgar B. Starkey Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

*Guy P. Thompson Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

*E. G. Vanden Bosche Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 

Chemistry. 

Lebanon Valley College, A.B. (1922) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1924), Ph.D. 
(1927). 

INSTRUCTORS 

Amelia C. De Dominicis Instructor in Botany 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1931), M.S. (1932). 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Instructor in Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in C.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

"Gardner P. H. Foley Instructor in English 

Clark University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1926). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) ; University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

* Arthur C. Parsons Instructor in Modern Languages 

University of Maryland, A.B. (1926), A.M. (1928). 

W. Arthur Purdum Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934). 

J. Thomas Pyles Instructor in English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927). 

Frank J. Slama Instructor in Botany 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

ASSISTANTS 

Benjamin Frank Allen Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Frank Albert Bellman Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of 
the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



John M. Cross Assistant in Pharmacy 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1936). 

Theodore Thomas Dittrich Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933) ; B.S. (1934). 

Melvin F. W. Dunker Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933), B.S. (1934), M.S. (1936). 

Carroll Pross Foster Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

JLoamie Mercer Gilbert, Jr Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of North Carolina, B.S. (1936). 

Shirley M. Glickman Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Nathan Levin Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

*Russell H. Lyddane Assistant in Physics 

F. Rowland McGinity Assistant in Bacteriology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Bernard P. McNamara Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Thomas Andrew Moskey, Jr Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

*Bernice F. Pierson Assistant in Zoology 

Western Reserve University, A.B. (1928) ; Johns Hopkins University, M.A. (1937). 

John Anthony Raudonis Assistant in Pharmacy 

St. John's College, A.B. (1933) ; University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

fWoOTEN Taylor Sumerford Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Georgia, B.S. (1930) ; M.S. (1933). 

Charles Anthony Youch Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

§Bernard L. Zenitz Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

assisting staff 

Kathleen Hamilton Librarian 

Ann Beach Lemen Cataloger 

Margaret I. Latham Senior Stenographer 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of 
the University. 

t H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow. 
t Resigned January 16, 1938. 
§ Appointed February 1, 1938. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



HISTORY 



The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase 
of medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of professional 
schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. It be- 
came a department of the State University when the old University of 
Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has continuously exercised 
its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its ma- 
triculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also 
offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of profi- 
ciency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in phar- 
maceutical research. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially de- 
signed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped through- 
out, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to carry on 
the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of pharmacy, and to 
the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the various fields of 
pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for in- 
struction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological sci- 
ences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the pur- 
suit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and stack-room space 
to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library contains 
more than 6,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy and the 
collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at the Medi- 
cal School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various de- 
partments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of this Association is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education, and all institutions holding membership must 
maintain certain minimum requirements for entrance and graduation. 
Through the influence of this Association, uniform and higher standards 
of education have been adopted from time to time, and the fact that 
several states, by law or by Board ruling, recognize the standards of the 
Association is evidence of its influence. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B. S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 19. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M. S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in the 
School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph. D.) may also take the major portion of the required work in the 
School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, must 
register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the require- 
ments of that School. For detailed information concerning registration, 
requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue for the Graduate 
School. 

COMBINED CURRICULUM IN PHARMACY AND MEDICINE 

The combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy was discontinued in 1936. 

Students now in the University who have elected the combined course 
may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the 
first three years of the required work of the pharmacy curriculum to- 
gether with four semester hours in vertebrate zoology and the first three 
years of the work in medicine. 

Students, who hereafter desire to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence, may do so by acquiring in summer school the additional credit in 
the arts and sciences required for a combined degree (90 semester hours). 

To become eligible to take the medical work of the combined course, 
students must have completed the above work in pharmacy and the arts 
and sciences with an average grade of "B" or better. In addition, they 
must meet the other requirements for admission to the School of Medicine. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution Of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, 
civics, drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home eco- 
nomics, vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, 
physics, zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or preparatory 
school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university 
entrance. Total, 8 units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the State certification requirements will be admitted upon presentation 
of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not 
meet fully these requirements may be required to present further evi- 
dence of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the 
Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examination. 
Such examination will be given during the first week of each of the 
months of July, August and September at Baltimore and other conveni- 
ent places in the State. Applicants concerned will be notified when and 
where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and must 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the average of the appli- 
cant's school grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than 
the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examina- 
tion, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passes satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for graduation 
from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered by 
the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New 
York City, the Regents of the University of the State of New York, 
Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Penn- 
sylvania, Harrisburg. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy holding membership in the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, will receive credit for the 
courses which correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the 
first three years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced stand- 
ing, provided he presents an official transcript of his record and a proper 
certificate of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic in- 
stitution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary edu- 
cational requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to 
Freshman Class from Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter 
as a special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but 
will not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The 
Faculty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the prelimi- 
nary training of the applicant is sufficient. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photograph and the two 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the appli- 
cation has been received. Do not make application unless reasonably 
certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if unsufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, required all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application 
with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after 
enrolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said ap- 
plication he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board 
may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said applica- 
tion, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharma- 
cy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, sub- 
mit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drug store 
experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

A student registering for the first time must procure from the office of 
the School of Pharmacy a matriculation card before he will be permitted 
to register. The last day for matriculation is September 24, 1938. 

All students must register at the office of the Registrar. Under no 
conditions will a student be permitted to enter classes who has not com- 
pleted registration. The last days for registration without the payment 
of the penalty fee are as follows: First Semester, September 20, 1938, for 
first-and second-year students; September 21, 1938, for all other students; 
Second Semester, January 28, 1939, for all students. The last days for 
registration with the payment of the penalty fee, except as hereinafter 
stated, are: First Semester, September 24, 1938; Second Semester, Febru- 
ary 4, 1939. 

SUMMARY OF FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (First year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per year) : 

Residents of Maryland 200.00 

Non-Residents 250.00 

Laboratory fee (per year) 50.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per year) 10.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are tak- 
ing courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a year's work, will be 
charged the full yearly fees. Students taking less than this amount of 
work will be charged on a subject basis. Students taking extra work will 
be charged an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each stu- 
dent is required to pay annually $10.00 (Freshman students $9.00) to 
the "Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $30.00 per year 
is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting instruments, 
and incidentals. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registra- 
tion in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a 
professional school of the University or from one professional school to 
another, he will be required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 

A tuition fee of $200.00 per year is charged a student who is a resi- 
dent of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is 
not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $50.00 per year. One- 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



half of this fee must be paid during the registration period at the be- 
ginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $50.00 per year is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of the year. 

A fee and deposit of $10.00 is charged to cover locker rentals and ex- 
cessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each year. Any portion not used will be refunded at the 
end of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the second semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or nonpayment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will 
automatically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

REBATES 

The matriculation fee is not subject to rebate. In cases of withdrawal 
from the school prior to November first in the first semester, or March 
first in the second semester, the Dean may request the Comptroller to re- 
fund one-half the amount of the tuition and laboratory fee paid for such 
semester. In the case of illness, or other unusual circumstances, the Dean 
may, with the approval of the President of the University, make such re- 
fund as seems just. In all cases of withdrawal from school, immediate 
notice in writing must be given to the Dean. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



A student may register and enter not later than six days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence 
will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lec- 
ture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
session and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student re- 
ceived a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be 
held only on the dates scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates an- 
nounced by the Dean. A student who is conditioned in the first semester 
must remove the condition by the end of the succeding semester, but will 
not be permitted to take an examination within thirty days from the 
date on which the conditional rating was received. Conditions received 
in the second semester must be removed before the end of the first semes- 
ter of the succeeding session. Special examinations for the removal of 
these conditions will be held immediately preceding the opening of the 
regular yearly session. A condition which is not removed will become a 
failure, and the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100); B, Good (87-92); C, Fair (80-86); D, Passed 
(75-79); E, Conditioned (60-74); F, Failed (below 60); I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the foregoing grades: 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a passing grade, without repeating the course, by a sub- 
sequent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is re- 
quired to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing the 
work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an inferior 
quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all requirements for 
the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he receives passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all of 
the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths 
of the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the 
work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five 
points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be re- 
quired to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy re- 
quires evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of 
a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the 
faculty in determining the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence 
of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobri- 
ety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and honesty 
in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, 
will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal 
rule against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy ( B. S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (See page 19). . The 

work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 

count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the 
total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical expe- 
rience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



school or college of pharmacy is credited towards the practical experience 
required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of opportu- 
nities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions available in 
drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School where it 
may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

THE H. A. B. DUNNING RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing phar- 
macist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater has 
always been manifested, has provided for the payment of $1000.00 an- 
nually for a period of five years to establish a research fellowship in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. At the end of the period an endowment will be 
made by Mr. Dunning to perpetuate the fellowship. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

THE CHARLES LANDON HENRY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In the memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for 
many years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
who was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring 
states, and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of 
worthy young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to 
be awarded annually by the Faculty to a student who has completed the 
third year of the course and who has shown superior proficiency in his 
or her work in practical and commercial pharmacy. The stipend is ap- 
proximately $100.00. 

RESEARCH GRANT OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to de- 
posit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a re- 
search grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Com- 
mittee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to 
engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy during the 
next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of general pharma- 
ceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

THE FAIRCHILD SCHOLARSHIP (National) 

Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers a scholarship an- 
nually, amounting to $500.00 in cash, to pharmacy students of the United 
States. The scholarship is awarded on the basis of a competitive examina- 
tion to candidates who are high-school graduates and who have success- 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



fully completed at least three years' work in a school or college of phar- 
macy or department of pharmacy of a university, holding membership in 
the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Each school, college, 
or department of pharmacy is limited to two candidates. The examina- 
tion will be held at the School of Pharmacy on the second Monday of June. 

THE CHARLES CASPARI, JR., MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 

In the memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty and lack of osten- 
tation, and eagerness for services and helpfulness to others which were 
striking characteristics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and 
alumni have made contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans 
are made from this fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the 
recommendations of the Dean. 

L. MANUEL HENDLER LOAN FUND 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOOL AWARDS 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is cred- 
itable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below B. 

Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall be- 
low B. 

THE WILLIAM SIMON MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the 
faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. 
The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a student 
for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability as much by observation and personal contact as 
by grades made in examinations. 

THE L. S. WILLIAMS PRACTICAL PHARMACY PRIZE 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of ap- 
proximately $1000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by 
the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the 
highest general average throughout the course in this subject. 

THE CONRAD L. WICH BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY PRIZE 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), has placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP PRIZES 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to three students of the fourth-year class, selected 
by the Faculty, who have attained high standing in both theoretical and 
practical pharmacy. One of these awards has been endowed by Dr. E. F. 
Kelly, and the other two by the Baltimore Branch of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid traditions 
of the School. The Council consists of 12 active members, three elected 
by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the presidents 
of the respective classes, and a faculty adviser. 

RHO CHI HONORARY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and lead- 
ership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 75 
credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

STUDENTS' AUXILIARY OF THE MARYLAND PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

The following are the officers of the Auxiliary: 

OFFICERS (1937-38) 

President — Norman J. Levin, Fourth-Year Class 

First Vice-President — Irving L. Kamanitz, Third-Year Class 

Second Vice-President — Alphonse Poklis, Second-Year Class 

Secretary — Clarice Caplan, Second-Year Class 

Treasurer — Eugene Jacobs, Third- Year Class 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Harold Zerofsky, Fourth-Year Class 
Lawrence L. Lieberman, Third-Year Class 
Edward Miller, Second-Year Class 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued 
its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Associ- 
ation of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organi- 
zation of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant 
until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The active 
membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is growing 
steadily. The following are its present officers: 

OFFICERS (1937-38) 

Honorary President — D. M. R. Culbreth (Ex-Officio) 

President of the Association — John A. Strevig, 

3704 Elkader Road, Baltimore, Md. 

First Vice-President — David B. Getz, 
Belair, Md. 

Second Vice-President — Charles S. Austin, Jr., 

3036 Abell Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Secretary — B. Olive Cole, 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer — T. Ellsworth Ragland, 

2801 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

President John A. Strevig, Chairman, 
The Honory President (Ex-Officio), 
The Officers, 

Members-at-Large — Mrs. Frank M. Budacz 
Jacob Greenfeld, 
Otto W. Muehlhause, 
John F. Wannenwetsch 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE MARYLAND 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matter pertaining 
to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The following 
are the present members of this comittee: 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Chairman 

George A. Bunting 

H. A. B. Dunning 

Aquilla Jackson 

Andrew F. Ludwig 

Lloyd N. Richardson 

Simon Solomon 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



L9 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 

First Semester 



Second Semester 



Title and Number of Course 



First Year 

♦Botany Is, Structural 

fChemistry ly, Inorganic and Qualitative Analysis. 

fEnglish ly, Composition and Rhetoric 

fMathematies, 8f or llf 

fMathematics 10s 

tModern Language ly or 3y, French or German . . . 
tZoology If, General (1) 



Second Year 

Botany 2f , Pharmacognosy 

Botany 3s, Vegetable Histology . . . 

fChemistry 2y, Organic 

fEnglish 2y, Reading and Speaking. 

Pharmacy ly, Galenical 

f Physics ly, General 

Physiology Is, General 



Third Year 

*Bacteriology If, General 

*Bacteriology 2s, Serology and Immunology 

Chemistry lOlf, Medicinal Products 

*Chemistry 4s, Quantitative Analysis 

*Economics Is, Fundamentals of 

Pharmacology ly, Pharm., Toxicology and Therapeutics 

Pharmacy 2y , Dispensing 

Pharmacy 3y, History of 

Pharmacy 4f, Pharmaceutical Mathematics 



Fourth Year (Required) 



Bacteriology 3s, Public Health 

Chemistry 5f , Pharmaceutical Assaying and Testing 

Economics 2f , Pharmaceutical 

Law 3s, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations 

Pharmacy 10 ly, Manufacturing 

Pharmacy 6y, Pharmaceutical Practice (2) 

Electives 



Fourth Year (Electives) 

Botany 102y, Advanced Vegetable Histology 

♦Chemistry 102y, Physical 

♦Chemistry 103y, Physiological 

Chemistry 101s, Food Chemistry 

Chemistry 105y, Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis. . 

Pharmacology lOlf, Biological Assaying and Testing. . 
f Zoology 2s, Vertebrate Zoology 

Thesis 



Hrs. Per Wk. 



Hrs. Per Wk. 



8 



t Instruction in these courses is given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
* Additional courses approved by the College of Arts and Sciences for credit toward 
the fulfillment of medical school entrance requirements. 

(1) Students preparing to enter medical school should take Zoology 2s in addition to 
this course. 

(2) A total of 32 hours of hospital pharmacy practice is required. The laboratory 
periods are in reality two or more hours in length. 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 



First Year 

Botany Is 

Chemistry ly 

English ly 

Mathematics 8f or llf 

Mathematics 10s 

Modern Language ly or 3y 

Zoology If 

Total 

Second Year 

Botany 2f 

Botany 3s 

Chemistry 2y 

English 2y 

Pharmacy ly 

Physics ly 

Physiology Is 

Total 

Third Year 

Bacteriology If 

Bacteriology 2s 

Chemistry lOlf 

Chemistry 4s 

Economics Is 

Pharmacology ly 

Pharmacy 2y 

Pharmacy 3y 

Pharmacy 4f 

Total 

Fourth Year — (Required) 

Bacteriology 3s 

Chemistry 5f 

Economics 2f 

Law 3s 

Pharmacy lOly 

Pharmacy 6y 

Electives 

Total 

Fourth Year — (Electives) 

Botany 102y 

Chemistry 102y 

Chemistry 103y 

Chemistry 101s 

Chemistry 105y 

Pharmacology lOlf 

Zoology 2s 

Thesis 

Summary 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Total 

t Average. 



Di- Labor- 
dactic atory 



48 



48 

48 

128 

48 



512 

32 

96 
32 
96 
96 
32 



384 

32 
16 
48 
32 
48 



432 

32 
32 
32 
48 
64 
32 
135f 



375 

64 
96 
64 
32 

32 
48 



512 
384 
432 
375 



1,703 



Total 



Credit 
Hours 



48 
160 



304 

64 

64 

128 

128 
64 
48 



496 

64 
32 
64 
64 



128 



352 



96 

48 

64 

32 

330t 



570 

128 

128 

128 

64 

288 

64 

64 



304 
496 
352 
570 



256 

96 

48 

48 

128 

144 



816 



64 

224 

32 

224 

160 

80 



880 

96 
48 

112 
96 
48 
96 

221 
32 
32 



784 

32 

128 

80 

48 
128 

64 
465t 



945 

192 

224 
192 

96 
288 

96 
112 

64 

816 
880 
784 
945 



1,722 



,425 



35 
35 
35 
35 
140 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

If. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, two lectures, two laborator- 
ies. Grubb and McGinity. 

Classification and general characteristics of micro-organisms and the 
common protozoa, including the study of culture media and methods of 
isolation and cultivation. 

2s. Serology and Immunology — (2) Third year, one lecture, one labor- 
atory. Grubb and McGinity. 

Prerequisite — Bacteriology If. 

A study of the principles of immunity and of the preparation and prop- 
erties of serums, vaccines, etc. 

3s. Public Health — (2) Fourth year, two lectures or demonstrations. 
Grubb and McGinity. 

Practical applications of bacteriology as applied to public health prob- 
lems, with special reference to prophylaxis and control of infectious dis- 
eases. Field trips and visits will be made to local health, nitration, meat 
packing, canning and dairy establishments; and there will be special lec- 
tures by local health officers. 

BOTANY 

Is. Structural Botany — (3) First year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Slama and DeDominicis. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of plant structures. 

2f. General Pharmacognosy — (4) Second year, two lectures, two labor- 
atories. Slama and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany If. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, with 
special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in identification and 
in the detection of adulterations. 

3s. Vegetable Histology — (2) Second year, two laboratories. Slama 
and DeDominicis. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including prac- 
tice in the examination of the official powdered drugs. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101y. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2) one lecture, one laboratory. 
Slama. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Emphasis will be placed on official drug plants. 
Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. Elective for 
students who contemplate taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. 

* Courses for undergraduates are designed by numbers 1-99 ; courses for advanced 
undergraduates and graduates bv numbers 100-199, and courses for graduates, by numbers 
200-299. 

The letter following the numbers of a course indicates the semester in which it is 
offered : thus, course 1 f is offered in the first semester ; 1 s, in the second semester. The 
letter "y" indicates a full-year course. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued 
one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation period. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



102y. Advanced Course in Vegetable Histology — (8) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy, embed- 
ding of material in celloidin and paraffin, section cutting, etc., leading to 
research. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Course in the Study of Vegetable Powders — (8) Two 

lectures and two laboratories. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and 
micro-chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and the 
detection of adulterants. 

202y. Advanced Taxonomy of Vascular Plants — Credit dependent on 
work done. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacognosy lOly. 

203y. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to amount and 
quality of work performed. 

CHEMISTRY (BASAL COURSES) 

ly. General Inorgonic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (8) First 
year, three lectures, two laboratories. Vanden Bosche, Wich and Foster. 

A study of the non-metals and metals with emphasis on chemical theory 
and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with funda- 
mental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and 
the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid 
radicals. 

2y. Organic Chemistry — (8) Second year, three lectures, two labora- 
tories. Starkey and Levin. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry ly. 
General organic chemistry, including aliphatic and aromatic derivatives. 

CHEMISTRY (PHARMACEUTICAL) 

4s. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, two lectures and two labor- 
atories. Hartung, Wich, Sumerford and Zenitz. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry ly and 2y. 
A study of quantitative methods. 

5f. Pharmaceutical Assaying and Testing — (4) Fourth year, two lec- 
tures, three laboratories. Hartung, Wich, Gilbert and Levin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 2y. 

A study of the quantitive tests for the standardization of drugs and 
medicines, with special reference to the methods of the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

lOlf. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (3-5) Three lectures, two lab- 
oratories. Hartung, Dunker and Sumerford. 

A study of the more important medicinal plant products and of synthetic 
compounds. The laboratory work covers the isolation and identification of 
plant principles and the preparation of the simpler organic compounds 
used in medicine. 

101s. Food Chemistry — (4) Two lectures, two laboratories. Hartung, 
Dunker and Zenitz. 

A study of the composition of foods, their adulterants, and the methods 
employed by public health and industrial laboratories for the analytical 
examination of foods. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



105y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (3-6) Three laboratories. 
Hartung. 

The course may be elected for either or both semesters, and may be 
taken by undergraduates with the consent of the professor in charge. 

A laboratory study of the qualitative and quantitative analytical pro- 
cedures and methods as applied to official and commercial, natural and 
synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

For Graduates 

200y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Har- 
tung and Starkey. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reaction of selected groups of 
pharmaceutical^ and pharmacologically important groups of non-basic 
nature. 

201y. Chemistry of Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 
A survey of the chemical structure and the reactions of pharmaceuti- 
callv and pharmacologically important organic bases. 
(Not given in 1938-39). 

202y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses — (1-8) Laboratory work 
and conferences. Hartung. 

A study of fundamental and basic chemical procedures employed in the 
synthesis of various drugs and their intermediates, and a survey of their 
application. 

203y. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (2) Hartung. 

Reports of progress and discussion of the problems encountered in re- 
search and the presentation of papers which survey the recent develop- 
ments of pharmaceutical chemistry reported in the current literature. 

Required of all students majoring in the department throughout their 
period of matriculation. 

204y. History of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (2or 4) One lecture and 
assigned reading. Hartung. 

(Not given in 1938-39). 

A study of the development of pharmaceutical chemistry in relation to 
the history of- other sciences, industry and civilization. 

205y. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit to be determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung. 

CHEMISTRY (PHYSICAL) 

102y. Physical Chemistry — (8) Fourth year, three lectures, one labora- 
tory. Vanden Bosche and Dunker. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry ly, 2y and 4s and Physics ly. 
Fundamental concepts of physical and colloidal chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY (PHYSIOLOGICAL) 

103y. Physiological Chemistry — (8) Two lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson, Gittinger and McNamara. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry ly, 2y and 4s and Physiology Is. 

A study of the chemistry of metabolism, body fluids and secretions. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

Is. Elements of Economics — (3) Third year, three lectures. Cole and 
Glickman. 

A study of the general principles of economics — production, exchange, 
distribution, and consumption of wealth. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



2f. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Cole and Glickman. 

Business forms and practice applicable to pharmacy, including contracts, 
agency, insurance, with practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial 
statements. 

3s. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, three lectures. 
Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special refer- 
ence to the regulation of the practice of pharmacy; laws and regulations 
pertaining to the dispensing of poisons, narcotics and alcoholic liquors, 
and preparations. 

ENGLISH 

ly. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Pyles 
and Foley. 

Prerequisite — Three units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the 19th Century. Written themes, 
book reviews, and exercises. 

READING AND SPEAKING 

ly. Reading and Speaking — (2) Second year, one lecture. Pyles. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; the 
preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speaking; 
reference readings, short reports, etc. 

MATHEMATICS 

8f. Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One year of high school algebra. Required of those stu- 
dents who do not have the prerequisite for Math. llf. 

Quadratic equations, elementary theory of equations, combinations, per- 
mutations and probabilities, the binomial theorem, progressions, loga- 
rithms, elementary graphs, etc. 

10s. Plane Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, 
three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite— Math. 8f or llf 

Trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, equations and graphs. 
Principles of plane analytic geometry, the line and the circle, the ellipse, 
hyperbola and parabola, graphing of functions, empirical equations. 

llf. Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Required of those students who have completed high school algebra. 

Simultaneous solution of quadratic and higher equations; properties of 
polynomials; theory of equations; binomial expansion; progressions; com- 
binatorial analysis; logarithms; empirical equations; determinants. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

ly. French-Elementary — (8) First year, four lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but those whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 

3y. French-Second-Year — (8) First year, four lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — French ly or equivalent. 

Study of grammer continued, composition, conversation, translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

ly. German-Elementary — (8) First year, four lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose prepa- 
ration is not adequate for second-year German, receive half credit for this 
course. 

Elements of grammar, compositions, pronunciation and translation. 

3y. German-Second-Year — (8) First year, four lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German ly or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

No credit will be given for the first semester until the second semester 
has been completed. 

Eight hours credit in Spanish will be accepted in lieu of the foregoing. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

ly. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third year, 
three lectures. Thompson and McNamara. 

Prerequisite — Physiology Is. 

A study of the physiological action, toxicity and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances, with special reference to the drugs and preparations 
of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

lOlf. Biological Assaying and Testing — (4) Fourth year, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Thompson, McNamara and Gittinger. 

Prerequisites — Physiology Is and Pharmacology ly. 

A course in physiological drug assaying, with special reference to the 
methods of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Biological Assaying and Testing — (8) Two lectures, 
two laboratories. Thompson. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 10 If. 

A study of modern unofficial methods of physiological assaying applied 
to the evaluation of medicinal substances. 

202y. Special Studies in Pharmaco-Dynamics — (8) Two lectures, two 
laboratories. Thompson. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisite — Phaimacology lOlf. 

Chiefly a study of the stability of drugs and their corresponding phar- 
maceutical preparations by physiological assay methods. 

203y. Physiological Assay Methods — (8) Two lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 10 If. 

The development of physiological assay methods for drugs for which no 
satisfactory chemical or physiological methods are known, involving both 
library and experimental studies. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



204y. Research in Pharmacology and Therapeutics — Credit in propor- 
tion to the amount and quality of the work performed. 

PHARMACY 

ly. Galenical Pharmacy — (8) Second year, three lectures, two labora- 
tories. DuMez, Andrews, Cross and Dittrich. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations and the practical 
application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

2y. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Third year, three lectures, two labora- 
tory periods. Wolf, Cross and Moskey. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

3y. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, one lecture. DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special em- 
phasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

4f. Pharmaceutical Mathematics — (2) Third year, two lectures. Pur- 
dum. 

A study of weights and measures, and the mathematical calculations 
employed in pharmacy. 

6y. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and 30 hours of practical work in a hospital pharmacy. Wolf and 
Andrews. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Practical work in drug-store arrangement; the handling of drugs, medi- 
cines and drug sundries, and in dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101y. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures, one 
laboratory. DuMez, Andrews, Purdum, Moskey, Cross and Dittrich. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special ref- 
erence to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on 
a commercial scale. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lectures, two 
laboratories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plant; crude materials used, their collection, preservation, and 
transformation into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

202y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. DuMez. 

Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with spe- 
cial reference to the origin and development of the works of drug stand- 
ards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

203y. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. Dumez. 

Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries in Europe. 

204y. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



PHYSICS 



ly. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook and Lyddane. 

Prerequisites — Math. 8f and 10s or Math, llf and 10s. 
A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, mag- 
netism, electricity and light. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Is. Physiology — (3) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. Thomp- 
son, McNamara and Gittinger. 

Elementary anatomy and histology of the body, including a study of the 
functions of the various organs and of dietetics. 

ZOOLOGY 

If. General Zoology — (4) First year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Pierson. 

Dissection and study of typical animals of each of the various inverte- 
brate phyla, with emphasis on structure and functions of organs. Intro- 
ductory discourses on embryological principles, such as gametogensis, 
fertilization, cleavage, the origin and fate of the germ layers, etc. 

2s. Vertebrate Zoology — (4) Fourth year, three lectures, two labora- 
tories. Thompson and Pierson. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, study 
of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the general 
physiology and embryology of the principal organs and systems of the 
vertebrate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The books required in each course will be announced at the beginning of 
each semester by the teacher in charge. Each student will be required to 
have his own text-books. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The rules and conditions stated in this prospectus will govern students 
until the next succeeding issue, after which time they will be governed by 
the conditions stated in the latter. 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



SESSION OF 1937-38 



GRADUATE STUDENTSi 



Allen, Benjamin Frank Md. 

Alperstein, Reuben Robert Md. 

Bellman, Frank Albert Md. 

Cross, John Milton N.J. 

DeDomincis, Amelia Carmel Md. 

Dittrich Theodore Thomas Md. 

Dunker, Melvin Fred. William .... Md. 

Enten, Harry Md. 

Foster, Carroll Pross Md. 

■Gilbert, Loamie Mercer, Jr N. C. 

Glickman, Shirley Madelyn Md. 

*Hanna, William Melvin Md. 



Levin, Nathan Md. 

McGinity, F. Rowland Md. 

McNamara, Bernard Patrick Md. 

Moskey, Thomas Andrew, Jr D. C. 

Purdum, William Arthur Md. 

Raudonis, John Anthony N. H. 

SUMERFORD, WOOTEN TAYLOR Ga. 

Thompson, Paul Howard S. D. 

Tompakov, Sylvan Md. 

Youch, Charles Anthony Md. 

Zenitz, Bernard Leon Md. 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Aaronson, Alfred Irving Md. 

Beam, Merlin Ayler Md. 

Bixler, Richardson Stevenson Md. 

Cohen, Bernard Isaac Md. 

Colvin, Ralph Md. 

Combs, Joseph Lee, Jr Md. 

Edlavitch, Sam Md. 

Floyd, Melvin Luther Md. 

Fribush, Sidney Md. 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian . . . Md. 

Galley, Roland Paul Md. 

Gendason, Harry Benjamin Md. 

GlNAITIS, ALPHONSUS STEPHEN Md. 

Gregorek, Frank Julius Md. 

Hager, George Philip Md. 

Hamlin, Kenneth E., Jr Md. 

Heyman, Bernice Md. 

Hopkins, Carville Benson Md. 

Jarowski, Charles Md. 

Kaminkow, Joseph Md. 

Katz, Morton Md. 

Kelley Gordon William Md. 

Kobin, Bemjamin Md. 

Levin, Benjamin Samuel Md. 



Levin, Jacob Benjamin Md. 

Levin, Norman Jack Md. 

Levy, Bernard Md. 

Loftus, Howard Edmond Md. 

Matelis, Olga Pauline Md. 

MORGENSTERN, WILLIAM AUGUST Md. 

MUEHLHAUSE, RUTH VIRGINIA Md. 

Nurkin, Bernice Vivian Md. 

Oleszczuk, Melvin Joseph Md. 

Pearlman, Albert Md. 

Pressman, Isadore Md. 

Pucklis.. Frank Stanley Md. 

Rhode, John George Md. 

Richman, Jacob Louis Md. 

Stoler, Myer Md. 

Sussman, Bernard Md. 

Thompson, Robert Edward S. D. 

Wachsman, Irvin Louis Md. 

Waxman, Milton Malcon Md. 

Webster, Thomas Clyde Md. 

Wich, Joseph Carlton Md. 

Zerofsky, Harold Md. 

Zetlin, Henry Paul Md. 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Alessi, Alfred Henry Md. 

Baker, Daniel S. Md. 

Binstock, Albert Md. 

Dobropolski, Anthony Joseph Md. 

Dorsch, Joseph Urban Md. 

Feldman, Jack Md. 

Folus, Irving Herbert Md. 

Francik, Joseph Md. 

Freedman, Leonard Md. 

Glaser, Louis Lester Md. 

Golditch, Henry M Md. 

Gruz, Nathan I Md. 

Hackett, Angela Rose Md. 

Heneson, Irving Jerome Md. 

Ichniowski, William Marion Md. 

Jacobs, Eugene Md. 

Jones, Cyrus Francis Md. 

Kamanitz, Irving Leonard Md. 

LlEBERMAN, LAWRENCE LlPMAN Va. 

Mask, Jerome Md. 

Massing. David Md. 



Mendelsohn, Daniel Md. 

Miller, Manuel Md. 

MORGENROTH, VICTOR HUGO, JR Md. 

Mutchnik, Melvin Md. 

Okrasinski, Joseph Leon ; Md. 

Parker, Katherine Justina Md. 

Passen, Lillian Md. 

Rosenthal, Alvin Md. 

Rostacher, Harry Louis Md. 

Sabatino, Louis Thomas Md. 

Sachs, Albert Md. 

Sama, Mario Alfred Md. 

Sapperstein, Louis Md. 

Schneyer, Herbert D Md. 

Shalowitz. Marion Md. 

SlLVERSTEIN, BERNARD Md. 

Snyder, Nathan Morton Md. 

Stone, Harry Md. 

Wiener, Maurice Md. 

Young. George Ira Md. 



t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



29 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Berngartt, Elmar Bernard Md. 

'Bloom, Morris Md. 

Caplan, Clarice Md. 

Celozzi, Matthew Joseph Md. 

Cohen, Harry I Md. 

Cohen, Samuel Md. 

DiGristine, Mary Rosula Md. 

Ehudin, Herbert Md. 

Feinstein, Bernard Samuel Md. 

Ginsberg. Samuel Harry Md. 

Goldberg, Albert Md. 

Greenberg, Joseph Md. 

Gumenick, Leonard Md. 

Jaworski, Melvin Joseph Md. 

Kahn, Morton Md. 

Kamanetz, Irvin Md. 

Kasik, Frank Thomas, Jr Md. 

Kline, Sidney Md. 

Kursvietis, Anthony Joseph Md. 

Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Md. 



Lerman, Philip Harry Md. 

Levin, Leon Philip Md. 

Levy, Irving Md. 

Mayer, Maurice Victor Md. 

Miller, Edward Md. 

Poklis, Alphonse Md. 

Richman, Philip Frederick Md. 

Rosen, Donald Merle Md. 

Rosenberg, Morris Md. 

Sachs, Norman Robert Md. 

Sandler, Solomon Md. 

Schlaen, Mildred Md. 

Shook, Joseph William Md. 

Siegel, Harold Md. 

Silberg, Edgar Mano Md. 

Simonoff, Robert Md. 

Smith, Daniel E Md. 

Sowbel, Irving Md. 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Md. 

Zukerberg, Morris Md. 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Balassone, Francis Salvatore . . . W. Va. 

Blankman, Albert Julius Md. 

Buchwald, Eva Dina N. Y. 

BUFFINGTON, JAMES EDGAR Md. 

Cerny, Henry Frank Md. 

Cohen, Rose Md. 

°Collins, Thomas Franklin Md. 

DeGele, George Oscar Md. 

Fainberg, Alvin Jay Md. 

Frdzdman, Arnold Milton Md. 

Gassaway, Franklyn Drennan Ariz. 

Glaser, Abraham Ellis Md. 

Goodman, Leon Md. 

Hendin, Walter Md. 

Kahn, Reuben Md. 

Knode, Frances LaRue Md. 



Kreis, George Joseph, Jr Md. 

LlNDENBAUM, ALBERT Md. 

Martin, William Robert Md. 

Moser, John Taft Md. 

Norris, Muriel Elaine Md. 

Noveck, Irvin Md. 

Oken, Jack Md. 

Phillips, Emerson Carlyle Md. 

Rosenthal, Bernard Md. 

Rudoff, Oscar Md. 

Sarubin, Milton Md. 

°SCHKLOVEN, JUDAH CLEMENS Md. 

Steel, Irvin Md. 

Wienner, Herman David Md. 

Wlodkowski, Edward Michael John Md. 
Zerwitz, Irving Frank Md. 



SPECIAL STUDENT 

Dobbs, Edward Clarence 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 5, 1937 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHYt 



Cwalina, Gustav Edward Md. 

Grove, Donald Cooper Md. 

Hunt, William Howard Md. 



Jacobs, Marion Lee . 
Rice, Robb Vernon. 



N. C. 

Mont. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE; 

Miller, Howard Anthony 



N. Y. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Allen, Benjamin Frank Md. 

Alliker, Morris Joshua Md. 

Alperstein, Reuben Robert Md. 

Beck, Sylvan E Md. 

Bliden, Abraham Md. 

Brune, Richard C Md. 

Cermak, Jerome Jerry Md. 

Cohen, Hershel Md. 

Damico, Samuel Md. 

Dawson, Leroy Oldham Md. 

:*Dodd, William Anthony Md. 

:*Eichert, Arnold H Md. 

Einbinder, Sylvan Philip Md. 



Ellerin, Albert Abraham Md. 

Enten, Harry Md. 

Feret, Julius Walter Md. 

Fish, Herman Jesse Md. 

t*Fox, Samuel Louis Md. 

Friedman, Charles Steele W. Va. 

Glickman, Shirley M Md. 

Hanna, William Melvin Md. 

Hoffman, Sylvan Allan Md. 

J*Januszeski, Francis Joseph Md. 

Kaminski, Felix H Md. 

Karpa, Jerome Jay Md. 

Kellough, Elmer Robert, Jr Md. 



° Did not attend entire session. 

t Degree conferred by Graduate School. 

* Degree conferred September 1936. 

+ Combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine. 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY (Continued) 



*Laken, Benjamin Bernard Md. 

Levy, Abraham Maurice Md. 

Levy, Frank Ferdinand Md. 

Libowtitz, A. M Md. 

Lieb, Frank Joseph Md. 

Mayer, Alexander M Md. 

McGinity, F. Rowland Md. 

Merkel, Henry Md. 

Miller, Milton Md. 

Miller, Solomon Md. 

Mindell, Charles Md. 

Morgenstern, Emma Louise Md. 

Mouat, Gordon Anthony Md. 

Musacchio, Leo Milton Md. 

Myers, Irvin Louis Md. 

Neutze, John Frederick Md. 

Purdum, Frank Lewis Md. 

Rabinowitz, Irving Wolf Md. 

Rapoport, Leonard Md. 

Raudonis, John Anthony N. H. 



Rosenfeld, Israel Aaron Md. 

Rutkowski, Edward Vincent Md. 

Santoni, Daniel Anthony Md. 

Sapperstein, Edward I Md. 

Sborofsky, Isadore Md. 

Scherr, Melvin Gerald Md. 

Schumm, Frederick Albert Md. 

Seechuk, William Walter Md. 

Semer, Gerald Melvin Md. 

Silverman, Irvin Israel Md. 

Tompakov, Sylvan Md. 

Traband, Millard Tolson, Jr Md. 

Turner, Albert Franklin, Jr Md. 

J*Urlock, John Peter, Jr Md. 

Walb, Winfield Alexander Md. 

Wasilewski, Theodore John Md. 

Weiner, David Md. 

Weisburg, Ruth R Md. 

Winn, Solomon Md. 

Zenitz, Bernard Leon Md. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship Robb Vernon Rice 

Alumni Research Grant Paul Howard Thompson 

Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship Shirley M. Glickman 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Bernard Leon Zenitz 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize Leonard Rapoport 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Frank Joseph Lieb 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Bernard Leon Zenitz 



Leonard Rapoport 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

Frank Joseph Lieb 



Sylvan E. Beck 



HONORABLE MENTION (Third-Year Class) 

George P. Hager Robert Edward Thompson Kenneth E. Hamlin, Jr. 



* Degree conferred September, 1936. 

% Combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 20 



No. 1 



*- 



Catalogue and 
96th Announcement of 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1939-40 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 20 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
96th Announcement of 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1939-40 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CALENDAR 

1939 

September 11 to 14 — Examination for the removal of conditions. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 19, Tuesday— Registration for first- and second-year students. 

September 20, Wednesday— Registration for all other students. 

September 21, Thursday— Instruction begins with the first scheduled 
period. 

November 29, Wednesday— Thanksgiving recess begins after the last 
scheduled period. 

December 4, Monday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

December 20, Wednesday — Christmas recess begins after the last sched- 
uled period. 

1940 

January 2, Tuesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 22 to January 27, Monday to Saturday, inclusive — Registration 
for the second semester. 

January 27, Saturday — First semester ends after the last scheduled 
period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 29, Monday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

February 22, Thursday — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

March 20, Wednesday — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

March 27, Wednesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled 
period. 

June 1, 11:00 A. M., Saturday — Commencement. 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Satur- 
day at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M., with the 
following exceptions: Monday, September 11, 1939, until 8:00 P. M. ; Saturday, September 
23, 1939, until 5:00 P. M. ; and on Saturday, January 27, 1940, until 5:00 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine Re- 
gents appointed by the Governor, each for a term of nine years. The 
administration of the University is vested in the President. The General 
Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the President. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its faculty of professorial rank. Each faculty Council directs the 
policy of the group it represents. 

The University is co-educational in all its branches and has the follow- 
ing educational organizations: 

School of Medicine. College of Agriculture. 

School of Law. College of Arts and Sciences. 

School of Dentistry. College of Education. 

School of Pharmacy. College of Engineering. 

School of Nursing. College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. Summer School. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Extension Service. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 
Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 
University Hospital. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Nursing are 
located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, the 
others in College Park. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman Term expires 1945 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary Term expires 1947 

Rowland K. Adams Term expires 1948 

W. Calvin Chesnut Term expires 1942 

Wiliam P. Cole, Jr Term expires 1940 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr Term expires 1943 

Harry H. Nuttle Term expires 1941 

J. Milton Patterson Term expires 1944 

John E. Sem mes Term expires 1942 



president of the university 
H. C Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Dean Rowland, Dean 
Howell. Dean DuMez, Dean Robinson, Dean Small, Dean Mount, 
Dean Applkman, Dean Steinberg, Dean Stamp, Dean Brougiiton, Dean 
Stevens. Dr. Cotterman, Colonel Patch, Dr. Lomas. Dr. Huff, Mr. 
Hillegeist, Miss Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Professor Metzger, Dr. Hale, 
Dr. Joslyn, Dr. White, Dr. Welsh, Professor Ikeler, Professor Eppley, 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Officers of Administration 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University. 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Secretary. 

W. M. BTiLLEGEiST, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
E. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grubb 

Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR 

David M. R. Culbreth, Emeritus Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1879) ; College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
M.D. (1883). 

PROFESSORS 

*L. B. Broughton Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1908), M.S. (1911); Ohio State University, Ph.D. 
(1926). 

Clifford W. Chapman ~ Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, 
M.Sc. (1925); McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

*Charles G. Eichlin Professor of Physics 

Lafayette College, A.B. (1913), M.S. (1921). 

fWALTER H. Hartung Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918); University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Washing- 
ton, D. C, B.S. (1921); Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Honorary). 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1938-39. Changes will be noted in subse- 
quent catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

t Representative on the Graduate Council. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical 

Law. 
University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Thomas C. Grubb Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B. (1930); University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

♦Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916); Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

•A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), Ph.D. 
(1928). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Mabvln J. Andrews Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1922), Ph.C. (1923), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1931). 

Frank J. Slam a. Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

♦Edgar B. Starkey Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

•Guy P. Thompson Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

♦E. G. Vanden Bosche Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 

Chemistry. 

Lebanon Valley College, A.B. (1922); University of Maryland, M.S. (1924), Ph.D. 
(1927). 

INSTRUCTORS 

Amelia C. De Dominics - Instructor in Botany 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1931), M.S. (1932). 

♦Gaylord B. Estabrook Instructor in Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in C.E. (1921); Ohio State University, M.S. (1922); Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

♦Gardner P. H. Foley ., Instructor in English 

Clark University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1926). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger. Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912); University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

♦Arthur C. Parsons.. Instructor in Modern Languages 

University of Maryland, A.B. (1926). A.M. (1928). 

W. Arth ur Purdum Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934). 

♦J. Thomas Pyles Instructor in English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927); Johns Hopkins University. 
Ph.D. (1938). 

ASSISTANTS 

Benjamin Frank Allen Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Frank Albert Bellman Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



John M. Cross - Assistant in Pharmacy 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1936). 

Theodore Thomas Dittrich. Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933); B.S. (1934). 

Melvin F. W. Dunker Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933), B.S. (1934), M.S. (1936). 

Carroll Pross Foster Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Walter C. Gakenheimer Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Shirley M. Glickman Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Nathan Levin Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936), M.S. (1938). 

F. Rowland McGinity Assistant in Bacteriology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Bernard P. McNamara Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

§*Carroll Nash Assistant in Zoology 

George Washington University, B.S. (1934); University of Maryland, M.S. (1937). 

% *Bernice F. Pierson „ Assistant in Zoology 

Western Reserve University, A.B. (1928); Johns Hopkins University, M.A. (1937). 

John Anthony Raudonis Assistant in Pharmacy 

St. John's College, A.B. (1933) ; University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

f Arlo Wayne Ruddy Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Nebraska, B.S. (1936); M.S. (1938) 

*Thomas M. Snyder Assistant in Physics 

Robert Edward Thompson Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Charles Anthony Youch Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Bernard L. Zenitz Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

ASSISTING STAFF 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Ann B. Lemen-Clark Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Elizabeth Lotz Senior Stenographer 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

t H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow. 
t Resigned January 28, 1939. 
§ Appointed February 1, 1939. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the S-tate of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase 
of medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of professional 
schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. It be- 
came a department of the State University when the old University of 
Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has continuously exercised 
its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its ma- 
triculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also 
offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of profi- 
ciency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDEVG AND EQUIPiMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially de- 
signed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped through- 
out, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to carry on 
the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of pharmacy, and to 
the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the various fields of 
pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the various 
courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for instruc- 
tion in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological sciences, 
zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the pursuit of 
reasearch in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 6,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. The object of this Association is to promote the interests 
of pharmaceutical education, and all institutions holding membership 
must maintain certain minimum requirements for entrance and gradua- 
tion. Through the influence of this Association, uniform and higher 
standards of education have been adopted from time to time, and the fact 
that several states, by law or by Board ruling, recognize the standards of 
the Association is evidence of its influence. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B. S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 20. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M. S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in the 
School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work in the 
School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, must 
register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the require- 
ments of that School. For detailed information concerning registration, 
requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue for the Graduate 
School. 

COMBINED CURRICULUM IN PHARMACY AND MEDICINE 

The combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy was discontinued in 1936. 

Students now in the University who have elected the combined course 
may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the 
first three years of the required work of the pharmacy curriculum to- 
gether with four semester hours in vertebrate zoology and the first three 
years of the work in medicine. 

Students, who hereafter desire to obtain the degree of Bachelor of 
Science, may do so by acquiring in summer school the additional credit in 
the arts and sciences required for a combined degree (90 semester hours). 

To become eligible to take the medical work of the combined course, 
students must have completed the above work in pharmacy and the arts 
and sciences with an average grade of "B" or better. In addition, they 
must meet the other requirements for admission to the School of Medicine. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, 
civics, drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home eco- 
nomics, vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, 
physics, zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or preparatory 
school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university 
entrance. Total, 8 units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the State certification requirements will be admitted upon presentation 
of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not 
meet fully these requirements may be required to present further evi- 
dence of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the 
Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examination. 
Such examination will be given during the first week of each of the 
months of July, August and September at Baltimore and other convenient 
places in the State. Applicants concerned will be notified when and 
where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and must 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the average of the appli- 
cant's school grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than 
the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination : An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examina- 
tion, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for gradua- 
tion from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New 
York City, the Regents of the University of the State of New York, 
Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania, Harrisburg. 



10 UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy holding membership in the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, will receive credit for the 
courses which correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the 
first three years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced stand- 
ing, provided he presents an official transcript of his record and a proper 
certificate of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic 
institution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary edu- 
cational requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to 
Freshman Class from Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter 
as a special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but 
will not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The 
Faculty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the prelimi- 
nary training of the applicant is sufficient. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Any application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photograph and the two 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the appli- 
cation has been received. Do not make application unless reasonably 
certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application 
with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after 
enrolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said ap- 
plication he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board 
may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said applica- 
tion, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharma- 
cy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, sub- 
mit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drug store 
experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

A student registering for the first time must procure from the office of 
the School of Pharmacy a matriculation card before he will be permitted 
to register. The last day for matriculation is September 23, 1939. 

All students must register at the office of the Registrar. Under no 
conditions will a student be permitted to enter classes who has not com- 
pleted registration. The last days for registration without the payment 
of the late registration fee are as follows: First Semester, September 19, 
1939, for first-and second-year students; September 20, 1939, for all other 
students; Second Semester, January 27, 1940, for all students. The last 
days for registration with the payment of the late registration fee, except 
as hereinafter stated, are: First Semester, September 23, 1939; Second 
Semester, February 3, 1940. 

SUMMARY OF FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per year) : 

Residents of Maryland 220.00 

Non-Residents 270.00 

Laboratory fee (per year) 50.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per year) 10.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are tak- 
ing courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a year's work, will be 
charged the full yearly fees. Students taking less than this amount of 
work will be charged on a subject basis. Students taking extra work will 
be charged an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each stu- 
dent is required to pay annually $10.00 (Freshman students $9.00) to 
the "Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $30.00 per year 
is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting instruments, 
and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

Fixed charge of $6.00 per semester credit hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who 
will pay only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester credit hour). 
Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registra- 
tion in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a 
professional school of the University or from one professional school to 
another, he will be required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 

A tuition fee of $220.00 per year is charged a student who is a resi- 
dent of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is 
not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $50.00 per year. One- 
half of this fee must be paid during the registration period at the be- 
ginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $50.00 per year is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of the year. 

A fee and deposit of $10.00 is charged to cover locker rentals and ex- 
cessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each year. Any portion not used will be refunded at the 
end of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the second semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or nonpayment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will 
automatically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the' time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State, for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

REBATES 

The' matriculation fee is not subject to rebate. In cases of withdrawal 
from the school prior to November first in the first semester, or March 
first in the second semester, the Dean may request the Comptroller to re- 



1 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



fund one-half the amount of the tuition and laboratory fee paid for such 
semester. In the case of illness, or other unusual circumstances, the Dean 
may, with the approval of the President of the University, make such re- 
fund as seems just. In all cases of withdrawal from school, immediate 
notice in writing must be given to the Dean. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than six days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence 
will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a 
lecture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
session and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student re- 
ceived a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be 
held only on the dates scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates an- 
nounced by the Dean. A student who is conditioned in the first semester 
must remove the condition by the end of the succeeding semester, but will 
not be permitted to take an examination within thirty days from the 
date on which the conditional rating was received. Conditions received 
in the second semester must be removed before the end of the first semes- 
ter of the succeeding session. Special examinations for the removal of 
these conditions will be held immediately preceding the opening of the 
regular yearly session. A condition which is not removed will become a 
failure, and the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100); B, Good (87-92); C, Fair (80-86); D, Passed 
(75-79); E, Conditioned (60-74); F, Failed (below 60); I, Incomplete. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the foregoing grades: 

4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a sub- 
sequent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is re- 
quired to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing the 
work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an inferior 
quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all requirements for 
the course have been met. 



SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he receives passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all of 
the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths 
of the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the 
work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five 
points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be re- 
quired to withdraw. 



DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy re- 
quires evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of 
a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the 
faculty in determining the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence 
of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobri- 
ety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and honesty 
in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, 
will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal 
rule against the offense has been published. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (See page 20). The 

work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 

count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the 
total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical expe- 
rience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy is credited towards the practical experience 
required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of opportu- 
nities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions available in 
drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School where it 
may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

THE H. A. B. DUNNING RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing phar- 
macist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater has 
always been manifested, has provided for the payment of $1000.00 an- 
nually for a period of five years to establish a research fellowship in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. At the end of the period an endowment will be 
made by Mr. Dunning to perpetuate the fellowship. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

THE CHARLES LANDON HENRY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In the memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for 
many years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
who was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring 
states, and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of 
worthy young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to 
be awarded annually by the Faculty to a student who has completed the 
third year of the course and who has shown superior proficiency in his 
or her work in practical and commercial pharmacy. The stipend is ap- 
proximately $100.00. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RESEARCH GRANT OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to de- 
posit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a re- 
search grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Com- 
mittee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to 
engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy during the 
next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of general pharma- 
ceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

THE FAIRCHILD SCHOLARSHIP (National) 

Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers a scholarship an- 
nually, amounting to $500.00 in cash, to pharmacy students of the United 
States. The scholarship is awarded on the basis of a competitive examina- 
tion to candidates who are high-school graduates and who have success- 
fully completed at least three years' work in a school or college of phar- 
macy or department of pharmacy of a university, holding membership in 
the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Each school, college, 
or department of pharmacy is limited to two candidates. The examina- 
tion will be held at the School of Pharmacy on the second Monday of June. 



ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for the assistantships is $550.00 for the academic year, and the 
remission of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the 
diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and 
didactic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective depart- 
ments in which they are serving. The usual amount of services required 
does not exceed 12 to 14 clock hours per week, which enables an assistant 
to carry approximately a full graduate program. 



THE CHARLES CASPARI, JR., MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 

In the memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty and lack of osten- 
tation, and eagerness for services and helpfulness to others which were 
striking characteristics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and 
alumni have made contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans 
are made from this fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the 
recommendations of the Dean. 



L. MANUEL HENDLER LOAN FUND 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOOL AWARDS 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is cred- 
itable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below B. 

Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Tear — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall be- 
low B. 



THE WILLIAM SIMON MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In honor of the late Dr. William Sdmon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the 
faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. 
The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a student 
for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability as much by observation and personal contact as 
by grades made in examinations. 



THE L. S. WILLIAMS PRACTICAL PHARMACY PRIZE 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of ap- 
proximately $1000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by 
the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the 
highest general average throughout the course in this subject. 



THE CONRAD L. WICH BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY PRIZE 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), has placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 



AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP PRIZES 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to three students of the fourth-year class, selected 
by the Faculty, who have attained high standing in both theoretical and 
practical pharmacy. One of these awards has been endowed by Dr. E. F. 
Kelly, and the other two by the Baltimore Branch of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the spendid traditions 
of the School. The Council consists of 12 active members, three elected 
by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the presidents 
of the respective classes, and a faculty adviser. 



RHO CHI HONORARY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and lead- 
ership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 75 
credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. 



STUDENTS' AUXILIARY OF THE MARYLAND PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

The following are the officers of the Auxiliary: 

OFFICERS (1938-39) 

President — Victor H. Morgenroth. Jr., Fourth- Year Class 
First Vice-President — Joseph William Shook, Third-Year Class 
Second Vice-President — George Joseph Kreis, Jr., Second-Year Class 
Secretary — Miss Angela Rose Hackett, Fourth-Year Class 
Treasurer — Alphonse Poklis, Third-Year Class 
Editor — Daniel Mendelsohn, Fourth-Year Class 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Joseph U. Dorsch. Fourth-Year Class 
Samuel Cohen, Third-Year Class 
Walter Hen din, Second- Year Class 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATES 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society continued 
its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Associa- 
tion of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organi- 
zation of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant 
until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The active 
membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is growing 
steadily. The following are its present officers: 

OFFICERS (1938-39) 

Honorary President — Purnell F. Sappington 
President of the Association — David B. Getz, 

Bel Air. Md. 
First Vice-President — Charles S. Austin, 

3036 Abell Avenue. Baltimore, Md. 
Second Vice-President — T. Ellsworth Raglan d, 

2S01 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
Secretary — B. Olive Cole. 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, 

3138 O'Donnell Street, Baltimore, Md. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

President David B. Getz, Chairman 
The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 
The Officers, 

Members-at-Large — 

Jacob Greenfeld 
Otto W. Muelhause 
John A. Strevig 
John F. Wannenwetsch 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE MARYLAND 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matter pertaining 
to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The following 
are the present members of this committee: 

Lloyd X. Richardson % Chairman 

George a. Bunting 

IT. A. B .Dunning 

Aquilla Jacksois 

Guy C. Kkli.ey 

John C. Krantz. Jr. 

Andrew F. Ludwig 

William C. Powell 

Simon Solomon 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 

First Semester 



Second Semesteb 



Title and Number of Course 



First Year 

* Botany 1st, Structural 

tChemistry ly, Inorganic and Qualitative Analysis. 

t English ly, Composition and Rhetoric 

tEnglish 2y, Reading and Speaking 

tMathematics, 8f or llf 

tMathematics, 10s 

fModern Language ly or 3y, French or German. . . 
tZoology If, General (I ) 



Second Year 

Botany 2f, Vegetable Histology. . . 

Botany 3s, Pharmacognosy 

tChemistry 2y, Organic 

Pharmacy ly, Galenical 

fPhysics ly, General 

Physiology If, General 



Third Year 

'Bacteriology If, General 

'Bacteriology 2s, Serology and Immunology 

'Chemistry 4f, Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 5s, Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying 

Economics Is, Fundamentals of 

Pharmacology ly, Pharm., Toxicology and Therapeutics 

Pharmacy 2y, Dispensing 

Pharmacy 3f, History of 



Fourth Year (Required) 

Chemistry llOy, Medicinal Products 

Economics, 2f, Pharmaceutical 

First Aid Is, Standard 

Law 3s, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations. . 

Pharmacy lOly, Mnufacturing 2^. . 

Pharmacy 6s, Pharmaceutical Practice. . .-3 
Pharmacology HOf, Biological Assaying. . . . 
Electives 



./.. 



*.. 



Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 102y, Advanced Vegetable Histology 
Chemistry 101s, Food Chemistry. . . . „ 

♦Chemistry 102y, Physical Jp. T. 

♦Chemistry 103y, Physiological .W . 

Chemistry 105y, Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis. y. 
Chemistry Illy, Medicinal Products 

♦Language 15y, Scientific German. . . . ./. .0 

♦Mathematics 23y, Calculus 1.1 

Pharmacy HOf or s, Advanced Prescription Compounding 

tZoology 2s, Vertebrate Zoology. . . . . !~\ 



Hrs. Per Wk. 





1 
4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3 


2 


2 


3 



4 1 

6 



8 I 



6 I 3 

9 J 4 

2 | 2 

! — 

I 17 

i 

3 I 2 
5 I 3 

■ •■ 

4 I 3 

4 



3 
3 
4 
• f 



18 



Hrs 


Per Wk. 




o 










>> 


"3 


•5 








u 





iJ 


H 


o 



3 I 



4 | 4 
3 | 2 



I •• I 



1 . . 
3 I . . 

2 J 2 
2 I 2 



I •• I 



3 | 4 f 



t Instruction in these courses is given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
* Additional courses approved by the College of Arts and Sciences for credit 
fulfillment of medical school entrance requirements. 

(1) Students preparing to enter medical school should take Zoology 2s in addition to 



6 I 3 

8 | 4 

3 | 3 

1 I X 

3 J 3 

3 I 3 



17 



I" 5 I 



17 



I I 18 

I I 

| 3 | 2 



•• 



f 7 | 

I 6 | 

I 9 

I 4 



3 

4 i 

< : 



toward the 
this course. 



ft*-*£ ^s 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



21 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 



I 
Di- | Labor- 
dactic J atory 



Total 



Credit 
Hours 



First Year 

Botany Is 

Chemistry ly 

English ly 

English 2y 

Mathematics, 8f or llf 

Mathematics, 10s 

Modern Language, ly or 3y. . . 
Zoology 



Total. 



Botany 2f . . 
Botany 3s . . . 
Chemistry 2y 
Pharmacy ly 
Physics ly . . 
Physiology If 

Total. . 



Second Year 



Bacteriology, If. 
Bacteriology 2s . 
Chemistry 4f 
Chemistry 5s . . . 
Economics Is . . . 
Pharmacology ly 
Pharmacy 2y . . . 
Pharmacy 3y . . . 



Third Year 



Total. 



Fourth Year — (Required) 

Chemistry llOy 

Economics 2f 

First Aid 

Law 3s 

Pharmacy lOly 

Pharmacy 6y 

Pharmacology HOf 

Electives 



Total, 



Fourth Year — (Electives) 

Botany 102y 

Chemistry 101s 

Chemistry 102y 

Chemistry 103y 

Chemistry 105y 

Chemistry Illy 

Language 15y 

Mathematics 23y 

Pharmacy HOf or s 

Zoology 2s 



Summary 



First Year . 
Second Year 
Third Year . 
Fourth Year. 



Total 



48 


48 


96 


160 


96 




32 




48 




48 




96 


... 


48 


96 



512 



32 
96 

128 
96 
32 



384 



32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
96 
96 
32 



96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
214f 



534 



64 
32 



64 



48 



512 
384 
400 
534 



1,830 



304 



64 
64 
128 
128 
64 
48 



96 
256 
96 
32 
48 
48 
96 
144 



496 



64 
64 
96 
96 

96 
192 



608 



48 



64 

32 

64 

416f 



624 



128 

64 

128 

128 

288 
128 



128 
64 



304 
496 

608 
624 



64 
96 

224 
256 
160 

80 



880 



96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
288 

32 



1,008 



96 

80 

16 

48 
128 | 

64 

96 
630t I 



1,158 I 
I 
I 
192 
96 
224 
192 
288 
128 
96 
96 
128 
112 | 
I 



816 : 

880 
1,008 
1,158 



2,032 



3,862 



35 



35 



35 

4 
3 

1 

o 

6 

2 

4 

12 



35 



35 
35 
85 

85 



140 



t Average. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 

BACTERIOLOGY 

If. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology — (4) Third year, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Grubb and McGinity. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the 
study of pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects 
of prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

2s. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, two lectures, two lab- 
oratories. Grubb and McGinity. 

A study of the principles of immunity including the preparation and 
use of the biological products employed in the prevention and treatment 
of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 
201f. Chemotherapy— (1) One lecture. Grubb. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 
Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1939-40.) 

202s. Immuno-chemistry — (1) One lecture. Grubb. 
A study of the chemical nature of antigens, antibodies and the anti- 
body-antigen reactions. 

Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1939-40.) 

BOTANY 

Is. Structural Botany — (3) First year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Slama and DeDominicis. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of plant structures. 

2f. Vegetable Histology — (2) Second year, two laboratories. Slama 
and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany Is. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs. 

3s. General Pharmacognosy — (4) Second year, two lectures, two labor- 
atories. Slama and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany Is and 2f. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, 
with special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in identifica- 
tion and in the detection of adulterations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101y. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2) One lecture, one laboratory. 
Slama. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Emphasis will be placed on official drug plants. 
Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. Elective for 
students who contemplate taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. 

Given in alternate years. 



* Courses for undergraduates are designed by numbers 1-99: courses for advanced 
undergraduates and graduates by numbers 100-199. and courses for graduates, by 
numbers 200-299. 

The letter following the numbers of a course indicates the semester in which it is 
offered : thus, course 1 f is offered in the first semester ; 1 s, in the second semester. The 
letter "y" indicates a full-year course. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued 
one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



102y. Advanced Vegetable Histology — (S) Two lectures and two labor- 
atories. Slama. 

Advanced plant anatomy, embedding of material in celloidin and paraf- 
fin, section cutting, etc.. leading to research. 

For Graduates 

201 y. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and micro-chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. 

Given in alternate years. 

202y. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Slama. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

Given in alternate years. 

203y. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to amount and 
quality of work performed. 

CHEMISTRY (BASAL COURSES) 

ly. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (8) First 
year, three lectures, tw T o laboratories. Vanden Bosche, Wichand Foster. 

A study of the non-metals and metals with emphasis on chemical theory 
and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with funda- 
mental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and 
the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid 
radicals. 

2y. Organic Chemistry — (8) Second year, three lectures, two labora- 
tories. Starkey and Levin. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry ly. 
General organic chemistry, including aliphatic and aromatic derivatives. 

CHEMISTRY (PHARMACEUTICAL) 

4f. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, two lectures and two labor- 
atories. Hartung, Wich and Zenitz. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry ly and 2y. 
A study of quantitative analytical procedures and theory. 

os. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Hartung. Wich and Zenitz. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 4f. 

Quantitative chemical methods of analysis of drugs and medicines, 
with special reference to official products and procedures. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101s. Food Chemistry — (4) Two lectures, two laboratories. Hartung. 
Dunker and Zenitz. 

A study of the composition of foods, their adulterants, and the methods 
employed by public health and industrial laboratories for the analytical 
examination of foods. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



105y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis— (3-6) Three laboratories. 
Hartung. 

The course may be elected for either or both semesters, and may be 
taken by undergraduates with the consent of the professor in charge. 

A laboratory study of the qualitative and quantitative analytical pro- 
cedures and methods as applied to official and commercial, natural and 
synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

HOy. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Three lectures. Hartung, 
Dunker and Ruddy. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 2y. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the syntheses and chemical 
properties of the important medicinal products. 

(Not given in 1939-40.) 

Illy. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (1-4) Two laboratories. Har- 
tung, Dunker and Ruddy. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry HOy, or may be taken simultaneously with 
HOy. 

The isolation and identification of active plant products, the synthesis 
of simpler medicinal products, with special reference to methods and 
chemical principles employed. 

(Not given in 1939-40.) 

For Graduates 

200y. Surrey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Har- 
tung and Starkey. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reaction of selected groups of 
pharmaceutically and pharmacologically important groups of non-basic 
nature. 

(Not given in 1939-40.) 

20 ly. Chemistry of Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 
A survey of the chemical structure and the reactions of pharmaceutic- 
ally and pharmacologically important organic bases. 

202y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses — (1-8) Laboratory work 
and conferences. Hartung. 

A study of fundamental and basic chemical procedures employed in the 
synthesis of various drugs and their intermediates, and a survey of their 
application. 

203y. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (2) Hartung. 

Reports of progress and discussion of the problems encountered in 
research and the presentation of papers which survey the recent develop- 
ments of pharmaceutical chemistry reported in the current literature. 

Required of all students majoring in the department throughout their 
period of matriculation. 

205y Kesearch in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit to be determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung. 

CHEMISTRY (PHYSICAL) 

102y. Physical Chemistry — (8) Fourth year, three lectures, one labora- 
tory. Vanden Bosche and Dunker. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry ly, 2y and 4f and Physics ly. 
Fundamental concepts of physical and colloidal chemistry. 






SCHOOL OP PHARMACY 25 



CHEMISTRY (PHYSIOLOGICAL) 

103y Physiological Chemistry — (8) Two lectures, two laboratories. 
Chapman, Gittinger and McNamara. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry ly, 2y and 4f and Physiology If. 

A general survey of the subject, including a study of digestion, meta- 
bolism, excretion, enzymes, hormones, vitamines and other topics of 
pharmaceutical interest. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

Is. Elements of Economics — (3) Third year, three lectures. Cole and 
Glickman. 

A study of the general principles of economics — production, exchange, 
distribution, and consumption of wealth. 

2f. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Cole and Glickman. 

Business forms and practice applicable to pharmacy, including con- 
tracts, agency, insurance, with practice in bookkeeping, banking and 
financial statements. 

3s. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, three lectures. 
Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special refer- 
ence to the regulation of the practice of pharmacy; laws and regulations 
pertaining to the dispensing of poisons, narcotics and alcoholic liquors, 
and preparations. 

ENGLISH 

ly. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Pyles 
and Foley. 

Prerequisite — Three units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the 19th Century. Written themes, 
book reviews, and exercises. 

READING AND SPEAKING 

2y. Reading and Speaking — (2) First year, one lecture. Pyles. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference reading, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

Is. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, one lecture. 
Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

8f. Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One year of high school algebra. Required of those stu- 
dents who do not have the prerequisite for Math. llf. 

Quadratic equations, elementary theory of equations, combinations, 
permutations and probabilities, the binominal theorem, progressions, 
logarithms, elementary graphs, etc. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



10s. Plane Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Math. 81 or llf. 

Trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, equations and graphs. 
Principles of plane analytic geometry, the line and the circle, the ellipse, 
hyperbola and parabola, graphing of functions, empirical equations. 

llf. Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Required of those students who have completed high school algebra. 

Simultaneous solution of quadratic and higher equations; properties of 
polynomials; theory of equations; binominal expansion; progressions; 
combinatorial analysis; logarithms; empirical equations; determinants. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

23y. Calculus — (6) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisites — Math, llf, 10s. and approval of the instructor. 

Limits, derivatives and differentials; maxima and minima; curvature; 
evolutes and envelopes; the elements of curve theory; elementary theory 
of functions; partial derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals; multi- 
ple integrals; calculation of arcs, areas, volumes and moments; expansion 
in series; differential equations with applications to thermo-dynamics, 
to molecular and atomic phenomena, and to physical chemistry. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

ly. French-Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but those whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit 
for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

3y. French-Second- Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — French ly or equivalent. 

Study of grammer continued, composition, conversation, translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

ly. German-Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose prepa- 
ration is not adequate for second-year German, receive half credit for this 
course. 

Elements of grammar, compositions, pronunciation and translation. 

3y. German-Second-Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German ly or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

No credit will be given for the first semester until the second semester 
has been completed. 

Six hours credit in Spanish will be accepted in lieu of the foregoing. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



For Graduates and Undergraduates 

15y. Scientific German — (6) Three lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — German ly or equivalent, and approval of instructor. 
Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German 
grammar. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

ly. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third year, 
three lectures and one laboratory. Chapman, McNamara and Thompson. 

Prerequisite — Physiology If. 

A study of the physiological action, toxicity and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances, with special reference to the drugs and preparations 
of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HOf. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Chapman, McNamara and Gittinger. 

Prerequisites — Physiology If and Pharmacology ly. 

A course in the methods of biological assay prescribed by the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201y. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology HOf. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. 

Given in alternate years. 

202y. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (2-4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology HOf. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the de- 
termination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. 

203y. Special studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacology HOf, Pharmacology 201y. 

The development of biological assay methods and comparative standards 
for substances for which there are no satisfactory methods or standards. 

Given in alternate years. 

204y. Research in Pharmacology and Therapeutics — Credit in propor- 
tion to the amount and quality of the work performed. Chapman. 



PHARMACY 

ly. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and two 
laboratores. DuMez, Andrews, Dittrich and Gakenheimer. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



2y. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Three lectures and two laboratories. 
Wolf, Cross, Dittrich and Gakenheimer. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

3f. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, two lectures. DuMez. 
A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special em- 
phasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

6s. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and 32 hours of practical work in a hospital pharmacy. Wolf and 
Andrews. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Practical work in drug-store arrangement; the handling of drugs, medi- 
cines and drug sundries, and in dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101y. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures, one 
laboratory. DuMez, Andrews, Purdum, Cross and Gakenheimer. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special ref- 
erence to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on 
a commercial scale. 

lOlf or s. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (2-4) Two labora- 
tories. DuMez, Wolf and Andrews. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lectures, two 
laboratories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plant; crude materials used, their collection, preservation, and 
transformation into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

202y. Surrey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. DuMez. 

Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with spe- 
cial reference to the origin and development of the works of drug stand- 
ards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

203y. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 
Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries in Europe. 

204y. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

ly. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook and Snyder. 

Prerequisites — Math. 8f and 10s or Math llf and 10s. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, mag- 
netism, electricity and light. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



PHYSIOLOGY 

If. Physiology — (3) Second year, two lectures, one laboratory. Chap- 
man, McNamara and Gittinger. 

Elementary anatomy and histology of the body, including a study of 
the functions of the various organs and of dietetics. 

ZOOLOGY 

If. General Zoology — (4) First year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Pierson. 

Dissection and study of typical animals of each of the various inverte- 
brate phyla, with emphasis on structure and functions of organs. Intro- 
ductory discourses on embryological principles, such as gametogensis, 
fertilization, cleavage, the origin and fate of the germ layers, etc. 

2s. Yertebrate Zoology — (4) Fourth year, three lectures, two labora- 
tories. Thompson and Nash. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, study 
of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the general 
physiology and embryology of the principal organs and systems of the 
vertebrate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The books required in each course will be announced at the beginning 
of each semester by the teacher in charge. Each student is required to 
have his own text books. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The rules and conditions stated in this prospectus will govern students 
until the next succeeding issue, after which time they will be governed 
by the conditions stated in the latter. 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



SESSION OF 1938-39 



fGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Allen, Benjamin Frank Md. 

Bellman, Frank Albert Md. 

Cross, John Milton N. J. 

DeDominicis, Amelia Carmel Md. 

Dittrich, Theodore Thomas Md. 

Dunker, Melvin Fred. William . . . Md. 

^nten, Harry Md. 

Foster, Carroll Pross Md. 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian. .Aid. 

Glickman, Shirley Madelyn Md. 

Hamlin, Kenneth Eldred, Jr Md. 

Heyman, Bernice Md. 

Jarowski, Charles Md. 

Karel, Leonard Md. 



*Kelley, Gordon William Md. 

*Kennedy, George H N. J.' 

Levin, Nathan Md. 

McGinity, Francis Rowland Md. 

McNamara, Bernard Patrick Md. 

Purdum, William Arthur Md. 

Raudonis, John Anthony N. H. 

Ruddy, A. Wayne Nebr. 

Sussman, Bernard Md. 

Thompson, Robert Edward S. D. 

Wachsman. Iryin Louis Md. 

Youch, Charles Anthony Md. 

Zexitz, Bernard Leon Md. 



FOURTH- YEAR CLASS 



Alessi, Alfred Hexkv Md. 

Baker, Daniel S Md. 

Binstock, Albert Md. 

Dobropolski, Anthony Joseph. . . .Md. 

Dorsch, Joseph Urban Md. 

Feldman, Jack Md. 

Folus, Irving Herbert Md. 

Freedman, Leonard Md. 

Giller, Morris Md. 

Glaser, Louis Lester Md. 

Golditch, Henry M Md. 

Gruz, Nathan I Md. 

Hackett, Angela Rose Md. 

Heneson, Irving Jerome Md. 

Ichniowski, William Marion Md. 

Jacobs, Eugene Md. 

Jones Cyrus Francis Md. 

Kamanitz, Irvin Leonard Md. 

LlEBERMAN, LAWRENCE LlPMAN . . . . Va. 

Mask, Jerome Md. 

Massing, David Md. 



Mkxhkisoiix, Daniel Md. 

Morgenroth, Victor Hugo, jR....Md. 

Mutchnik. Melvin Md. 

Okrasinski, Joseph Leon Md. 

Parker, Katherine Justina Md. 

Passbk, Lillian Md. 

Roskxberg, Morris Md. 

Rosenthal, Alvin Md. 

Rostacheb, Harry Louis Md. 

Sabatino, Louis Thomas Md. 

Sachs, Albert Md. 

Sama, Mario Alfred Md. 

Sappersteix, Louis Md. 

Schneyer, Herbert David Md. 

Shalowitz, Marion Md. 

SlLVERSTEIN BERNARD Md. 

Snyder, Nathan Morton Md. 

Stone, Harry Md. 

Wiener, Maurice Md. 

Young, George Ira Md. 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Balassone, Francis Salvatore.W. Va. 

Caplan, Clarice Md. 

Celozzi, Matthew Joseph Md. 

Cohen, Harry I Md. 

Cohen, Samuel Md. 

Feinstein, Barnard Samuel Md. 

Ginsberg Samuel Harry Md. 

Goldberg, Albert Md. 

Greenberg, Joseph Md. 

Gumenick, Leonard Md. 

Kahn, Morton Md. 

Kamanetz, Irvin Md. 

Kasik, Frank Thomas, Jr Md. 

Kline, Sidney Md. 

Kramer, Bernard Md. 

Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Md. 

Lerman, Philip Harry Md. 

Levin, Leon Phillip Md. 



Levy. Irving Md. 

Mayer, Maurice Victor Md. 

Miller, Edward Md. 

Miller, Manuel Md. 

Poklis, Alphonse Md. 

Richman, Philip Frederick Md. 

Rosen, Donald Merle Md. 

Sachs, Norman Robert Md. 

Sandler, Solomon Md. 

Schlaen, Mildred Md. 

Shook, Joseph William Md. 

Siegel, Harold W Md. 

Silberg, Edgar Mano Md. 

Simonoff, Robert Md. 

Smith, Daniel E Md. 

Sowbel, Irving Md. 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Md. 

Zukerberg, Morris Md. 



t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



31 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Buohwaud, Eva Dina N. Y. 

Oodd, Francis Ignatius Md. 

Cohen, Rose p Md. 

DeGele, George Oscar Md. 

DiGristim:. Makv ROSULA Md. 

Fainbero, At.vix Jay Md. 

Friedman, Arnold Milton Md. 

Gassaway. Franklyn Drennan . . . Ariz. 

GiiASEB, Abraham Ellis Md. 

Goodman, Leon ■ .Md. 

Hendin, Walter Md. 

Kahx. Reuben Md. 

Kkii:<;kr, Martin Leonard Pa. 



Kreis, George Joseph, Jr Md. 

Krusvii.Tis, Anthony Joseph Md. 

LlNDENBAUM, ALBERT Md. 

Moser, John Taft Md. 

Noveck, Irvin Md. 

Okkn. Jack Md. 

PHIDLIPS, Emerson Carlyle Md. 

Rosenthal, Bernard Md. 

Rudoff, Oscar Md. 

Saeubin, Milton Md. 

Steel, Irvin Md. 

Wlodkowski, Edward Michael John Md. 
Zerwitz, Irving Frank Md. 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Burton, Harold Francis Md. 

Clyman, Sidney Gary Md. 

DeBoy, John Michael Md. 

Dziatkowski, Alice Rita Md. 

Eckes, Charles Frederick Md. 

Farley, Charles E Md. 

Feit. Abraham Md. 

Freeman, Emanuel G Md. 

Friedman, Jerome Samuel Md. 

Getka, Milton Stanley Md. 

Gitomer, Marie Md. 

Goldberg, Milton Md. 

Harrison, Alice Emily Md. 

Heyman. Shirley Md. 

Jankiewicz, Alfred Marion Md. 

Jernigan, John Mayo Md. 

KliAVENS, Sidney Raymond Md. 

Knode, Frances LaRue Md. 

Kuryk, Rubin Md. 

Landsman, Melvin Md. 



Levin, Evelyn Shirley Md. 

Myers, Morton Md. 

NoiiLAU, Elmer Wilson Md. 

Panamarow, Stephen Md. 

Pascuad, Juan Andres P. R. 

Pierpont, Edwin Lowell Md. 

Pippig, Howard August Md. 

Poulase, Guss Nicholas Md. 

Pritzker, Sherman Md. 

Ramsey, Wilbur Owen Md. 

Reisch, Milton Md. 

Rosenberg, Robert Md. 

Sacks, Sidney Md. 

Simon, Alder Md. 

Smulovitz, Sidney Md. 

Sober, Norman Md. 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Md. 

Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Md. 

: Wienner, Herman David Md. 

Wylie, Hamilton Boyd, Jr Md. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Dobbs, Edward Clarence Md. 

Gorman, Anne Marie Md. 



Jahn. Elsa Florence Wilma Pa. 

Muth, Mary Josephine Md. 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 4, 1938 

fMASTER OF SCIENCE 

Nathan Levin Md. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Aaronson, Alfred Irving Md. 

Beam, Merlin Ayler Md. 

Bixler, Richard Stevenson Md. 

Cohen, Bernard Isaac Md. 

Colvin, Ralph Md. 

Combs, Joseph Lee, Jr Md. 

tCRANE, Warren Eugene N. J. 

Edlavitch, Sam Md. 

Floyd, Melvin Luther Md. 

Fribush, Sidney Mdf 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian .Md. 

Galley, Roland Paul Md. 

Gexdason. Harry Ben.tamin Md. 

Ginaitis, Alphonsus Stephen. . . .Md. 

Gregorek, Frank Julius Md. 

Hager, George Philip Md. 

Hamlin, Kenneth Eldred, jR....Md. 

Heyman, Bernice Md. 

Hopkins, Carville Benson Md. 

Jarow.ski, Charles Md. 

Kaminkow, Joseph Md. 

Katz, Morton Md. 

Kelley, Gordon William Md. 

Kobin, Benjamin Md. 

JKosakowski, Chester Geo. Leonard Md. 



Levin, Benjamin Samuel Md. 

Levin, Jacob Benny Md. 

Levin, Norman Jack Md. 

Levy, Bernard Md. 

Loftus, Howard Edmond Md. 

Matelis, Olga Pauline Md. 

MORGENSTERN, WlLLIAM AUGUST... Md. 

Muehlhause, Ruth Virginia Md. 

$Novak, Arthur Francis Md. 

Nurkin, Bernice Vivian Md. 

Oleszczuk, Melvin Joseph Md. 

Pearlman, Albert Md. 

Pressman, Isadoee Marvin Md. 

PruKLis, Frank Stanley Md. 

Rhode, John George Md. 

Richman, Jacob Louis Md. 

Stoler, Myer Md. 

Sussman, Bernard Md. 

Thompson, Robert Edward. .. .S. Dak. 

Wachsman, Irvin Louis Md. 

Waxman, Milton Malcon Md. 

Webster, Thomas Clyde Md. 

Whit, Joseph Carlton Md. 

Zebofsky, Harold Md. 

Xetlin, Henry Pail Md. 



* Did not attend entire session. 

t Degree conferred by Graduate School. 

% Degree conferred September 1937. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship Wooten Taylor Sumerford 

Alumni Research Grant Bernard L. Zenitz 

Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship Benjamin Samuel Levin 

Gold Medal for General Excellence. George Philip Hager 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize Kenneth Eldred Hamlin, Jr. 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Walter Christian Gakenheimer 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Henry Paul Zetlin 

CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

Kenneth Eldred Hamlin, Jr. Walter Christian Gakenheimer 

Robert Edward Thompson 

HONORABLE MENTION (Third-Year Class) 

Eugene Jacobs Maurice Weiner Lawrence L. Lieberman 




School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland 



Cente 



nnia 



CATALOGUE 

AND 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

SESSION 1940-1941 



^22^v 




*'*^e«^ W e*sss* fSS5 



LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841-1904 

FIRST COURSE OF LECTURES 

The first course of lectures at the College began the first week in 
November, 1841, and ended the latter part of February, 1842. The 
lectures were delivered by members of the College, seven of whom par- 
ticipated. 



CARD OF FIRST MATRICULANT 



nad Sn/d c/r/i/ <yf&atti'cu/a£ed ad a ^stac/enf i?i //ie 



Mui|.ii\\ ri> ii 



FIRST GRADUATES — June 19, 1842 

Frederick A. Cochrane Maryland 

Alpheus P. Sharp Virginia 

William Silver Thompson Delaware 



FIRST COLLEGE BUILDING 




Asquith near Fayette Street — Occupied 1877- 1886 



School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY * 1841-1904 



MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 
Presidents 

(1841-1004) 

Thomas G. Mackenzie 1840-1842 

Benjamin Rush Roberts 1842-1844 

George W. Andrews 1844-1871 

J. Brown Baxley 1871-1872 

J. Faris Moore 1872-1873 

John F. Hancock 1873-1875 

Joseph Roberts 1875-1888 

Edwin Eareckson 1888-1890 

William S. Thompson 1890-1891 

Louis Dohme 1891-1897 

Charles E. Dohme 1897-1904 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

Dean of Faculty 

Charles Caspari, Jr 1896-1904 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

Deans of Faculty 

(After merger with the University of Maryland in 1904) 

Charles Caspari, Jr 1904-1917 

Daniel Base 1917-1918 

E. F. Kelly 1918-1920 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Deans 

(After consolidation of the University of Maryland with the Maryland 
State College of Agriculture in 1920) 

E. F. Kelly 1920-1926 

A. G. DuMez 1926-present 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 
First Board of Examiners 
(Discontinued after merger with the University of Maryland in 1904) 

Benjamin Rush Roberts 1840-1842 

Thomas T. Phillips 1840-1843 

David Stewart 1840-1845 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



Vol. 



21 



No. i 



Catalogue and 
97th Announcement of 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1940^1941 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CALENDAR 

1940 

September 16 to 18 — Examination for the removal of conditions. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 24, Tuesday — Registration for first- and second-year students. 

September 25, Wednesday — Registration for all other students. 

September 26, Thursday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled 
period. 

November 20, Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins after the last 
scheduled period. 

November 25, Monday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled 
period. 

December 21, Saturday — Christmas recess begins after the last sched- 
uled period. 

1941 

January 6, Monday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 27 to February 1, Monday to Saturday, inclusive — Registration 
for the second semester. 

February 1, Saturday — First semester ends after the last scheduled 
period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 3, Monday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

February 22, Saturday — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

April 9, Wednesday — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

April 16, Wednesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled 
period. 

June 7, 11:00 A. M., Saturday — Commencement. 

Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The 
last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday at noon of the week in which 
instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be waived only upon 
the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, from 
9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M., with the following 
exceptions: Monday, September 16, 1940, until 8:00 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine Re- 
gents appointed by the Governor, each for a term of nine years. The 
administration of the University is vested in the President. The General 
Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the President. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its faculty of professorial rank. Each faculty Council directs the 
policy of the group it represents. 

The University is co-educational in all its branches and has the follow- 
ing educational organizations : 

School of Medicine. College of Agriculture. 

School of Law. College of Arts and Sciences. 

School of Dentistry. College of Education. 

School of Pharmacy. College of Engineering. 

School of Nursing. College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. Summer School. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Extension Service. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

University Hospital. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Nursing are 
located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, the 
others in College Park. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman Term expires 1945 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary Term expires 1947 

Rowland K. Adams Term expires 1948 

W. Calvin Chesnut Term expires 1942 

William P. Cole, Jr Term expires 1940 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr Term expires 1943 

Harry H. Nuttle Term expires 1941 

J. Milton Patterson Term expires 1944 

John E. Semmes Term expires 1942 

president of the university 

H. C. Byrd, B. S., LL.D., D.Sc. 

general administrative board of the university 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Acting Dean Wylie, 
Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, Dean Robinson, Dean Benjamin, Dean 
Small, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean Steinberg, Dean Stamp. 
Dean Broughton, Dean Stevens, Dean Eppley, Dr. Cotterman, 
Colonel Finley, Dr. Savage, Dr. Huff, Mr. Hillegeist, Miss 
Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Dr. Hale, Dr. Zuker, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. 
White, Dr. Welsh, Professor Ikeler. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



J 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Officers of Administration 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University. 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Secretary. 

W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 

E. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grubb 

Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 

emeritus professor 

David M. R. Culbreth, Emeritus Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1879); College of Physician and Surgeons, M.D. 
(1883). 

professors 

*L. B. Broughton Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1908), M.S. (1911); Ohio State University, Ph.D. (1926). 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922); Medical School, London, Ontario, M.Sc. (1925); 
McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph. G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

*Charles G. Eichlin Professor of Physics 

Lafayette College, A.B. (1913), M.S. (1921). 

fWALTER H. Hartung of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918); University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905); American International Academy, Washington, 
D. C, B.S. (1921); Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Honorary). 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1939-40. Changes will be noted in subsequent 
catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of the 
University. 

t Representative on the Graduate Council. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical 

Law. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Thomas C. Grubb Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B., (1930); University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

^ *Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916); Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

*y *A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918); Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), Ph.D. (1928). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Marvin J. Andrews Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1922), Ph.C. (1923), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. (1931). 

Frank J. Slama Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. (1930) 
Ph.D. (1935). 

\/ *Edgar B. Starkey Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

* *Guy P. Thompson Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

\/ *E. G. Vanden Bosche Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 

Chemistry. 

Lebanon Valley College, A.B. (1922); University of Maryland, M.S. (1924), Ph.D. (1927). 

INSTRUCTORS 

Amelia C. De Dominicis Instructor in Botany 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1931), M.S. (1932). 

J *Gaylord B. Estabrook Instructor in Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in C.E. (1921); Ohio State University, M.S. (1922); University of 
Pittsburgh, Ph. D. (1932). 

^ *Gardner P. H. Foley Instructor in English 

Clark University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1926). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912); University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

/ *Arthur C. Parsons Instructor in Modern Languages 

University of Maryland, A.B". (1926), A. M. (1928). 

J *J. Thomas Pyles Instructor in English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927); Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1938), 

ASSISTANTS 

Benjamin Frank Allen Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Richard H. Barry Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Duquesne University B.S. (1939). 

Frank Albert Bellman Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland B.S. (1936). 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Art3 and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of the 
University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



JNevis Eugene Cook Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Georgia, B.S. (1934), B.S. in Pharmacy (1939). 

John M. Cross Assistant in Pharmacy 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1936), University of Maryland, M.S. (1939). 

Theodore Thomas Dittrich Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933); B.S. (1934). 

Joseph Urban Dorsch Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1939). 

Melvin F. W. Dunker William R. Warner Fellow in Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933), B.S. (1934), M.S. (1936), Ph.D. (1939). 

* *Guy M. Everett Assistant in Zoology 

University of Iowa, B.A. (1937). 

Carroll Pross Foster Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Walter C. Gakenheimer Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Shirley M. Glickman Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

George Philip Hager, Jr William R. Warner Fellow in Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Kenneth Eldred Hamlin William R. Warner Fellow in Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

e Charles Jarowski Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Nathan Levin Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936), M.S. (1938). 

F. Rowland McGinity Assistant in Bacteriology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Bernard P. McNamara Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936), M.S. (1939). 

John Anthony Raudonis Assistant in Pharmacy 

St. John's College, A.B. (1933); University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

|Arlo Wayne Ruddy Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Nebraska, B.S. (1936); M.S. (1938). 

Bernard Sussman. Fellow in Food and Drug Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Robert Edward Thompson Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

v/*James Kendall Thornton Assistant in Physics 

Bernard L. Zenitz Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

assisting staff 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Ann B. Lemen-Clark Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Lotz-Gue Senior Stenographer 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of the 
University. 

t H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow. 
j Resigned October 31, 1939. 
e Appointed November 1, 1939. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase 
of medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of profes- 
sional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its ma- 
triculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also 
offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially de- 
signed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped through- 
out, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to carry on 
the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of pharmacy, and to 
the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the various fields of 
pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for in- 
struction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of reseach in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 6,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, Inc., and holds membership in the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the 
interests of pharmaceutical education; and all institutions accredited by 
the Council or holding membership in the Association must maintain 
certain minimum requirements with respect to number and qualifications 
of faculty members, physical plant, laboratory and library facilities, 
curriculum, admission, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, 
and its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B. S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 22. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M. S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in the 
School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work in the 
School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, must 
register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the require- 
ments of that School. For detailed information concerning registration, 
requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Graduate 
School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., and the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 7 units. 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic credit, 
whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be detrimental to 
the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
economics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agri- 
culture, commercial, drawing, home economics, shops, etc.) foreign 
languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any 
subject offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which 
graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 
8 units, of which not more than four shall be vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon 
presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate 
who does not meet fully these requirements may be required to present 
further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion 
of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examina- 
tion. Such examination will be given during the first week of each of the 
months of Julv, August and September at College Park, Md. Applicants 
concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examina- 
tion, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for gradua- 
tion from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New 
York City, the Regents of the University of the State of New York, 
Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Penn- 
sylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., will receive credit for the 
courses which correspond in length and content to those prescribed for 
the first three years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced 
standing, provided he piesents an official transcript of his record and a 
proper certificate of honorable dismissal. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic 
institution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary edu- 
cational requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to 
Freshman Class from Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter 
as a special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but 
will not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The 
Faculty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the prelimi- 
nary training of the applicant is sufficient. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Any application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photograph and the two 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the appli- 
cation has been received. Do not make application unless reasonably 
certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application 
with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after 
enrolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said ap- 
plication he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board 
may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said applica- 
tion, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar ; all such students of pharma- 
cy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, sub- 
mit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drug store 
experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

A student registering for the first time must procure from the office of 
the School of Pharmacy a matriculation card before he will be permitted 
to register. The last day for matriculation is September 28, 1940. 

All students must register at the office of the Registrar. Under no 
conditions will a student be permitted to enter classes who has not com- 
pleted registration. The last days for registration without the payment 
of the late registration fee are as follows : First Semester, September 24, 
1940, for first-and second-year students; September 25, 1940, for all other 
students; Second Semester, February 1, 1941, for all students. The last 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



days for registration with the payment of the late registration fee, except 
as hereinafter stated, are: First Semester, September 28, 1940; Second 
Semester, February 8, 1941. 

SUMMARY OF FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per year) : 

Residents of Maryland 220.00 

Non-Residents 270.00 

Laboratory fee (per year) 50.00 

Graduation fee ( Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per year) 10.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are tak- 
ing courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a year's work, will be 
charged the full yearly fees. Students taking less than this amount of 
work will be charged on a subject basis. Students taking extra work will 
be charged an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each stu- 
dent is required to pay annually $10.00 (Freshman students $9.00) to 
the "Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $30.00 per year 
is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting instruments, 
and incidentals. 



FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

Fixed charge of $6.00 per semester credit hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who 
will pay only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester credit hour). 

Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registra- 
tion in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a 
professional school of the University or from one professional school to 
another, he will be required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A tuition fee of $220.00 per year is charged a student who is a resi- 
dent of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is 
not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $50.00 per year. One- 
half of this fee must be paid during the registration period at the begin- 
ning of each semester 

A laboratory fee of $50.00 per year is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of the year. 

A fee and deposit of $10.00 is charged to cover locker rentals and ex- 
cessive breakage It must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each year. Any portion not used will be refunded at the 
end of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the second semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or nonpayment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will 
automatically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State, for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

REBATES 

The matriculation fee is not subject to rebate. In cases of withdrawal 
from the school prior to November first in the first semester, or March 
first in the second semester, the Dean may request the Comptroller to 
refund one-half the amount of the tuition and laboratory fee paid for 
such semester. In the case of illness, or other unusual circumstances, the 
Dean may, with the approval of the President of the University, make 
such refund as seems just. In all cases of withdrawal from school, im- 
mediate notice in writing must be given to the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than six days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence 
will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a 
lecture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
session and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student received 
a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be 
held only on the dates scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates an- 
nounced by the Dean. A student who is conditioned in the first semester 
must remove the condition by the end of the succeeding semester, but will 
not be permitted to take an examination within thirty days from the 
date on which the conditional rating was received. Conditions received 
in the second semester must be removed before the end of the first semes- 
ter of the succeeding session. Special examinations for the removal of 
these conditions will be held immediately preceding the opening of the 
regular yearly session. A condition which is not removed will become a 
failure, and the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols : 

A, Excellent (93-100) ; B, Good (87-92) ; C, Fair (80-86) ; D, Passed 
(75-79) ; E, Conditioned (60-74) ; F, Failed (below 60) ; I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the foregoing grades: 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a sub- 
sequent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is re- 
quired to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper 
excuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he receives passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all 
of the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths 
of the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the 
work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five 
points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be re- 
quired to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy re- 
quires evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of 
a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the 
faculty in determining the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence 
of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobri- 
ety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and honesty 
in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in.the ordinary meaning of the term, 
will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal 
rule against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements : 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (See page 22). The 
work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the 
total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical ex- 
perience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy is credited towards the practical experience 
required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of opportu- 
nities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions available in 
drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School where it 
may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

THE H. A. B. DUNNING RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing phar- 
macist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater has 
always been manifested, has provided for the payment of $1000.00 an- 
nually for a period of five years to establish a research fellowship in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. At the end of the period an endowment will be 
made to perpetuate the fellowship. This fellowship is awarded annually 
to a student in pharmacy who has completed four years of college work, 
and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for investigational work in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. 

WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO. RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS 

On July 1, 1939, William R. Warner & Co., Inc., provided the funds 
to establish three fellowships to be known as The William R. Warner 
& Co. Inc. Fellowships in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Two of these 
are half-time fellowships paying $900.00 each per year, and are open 
to students who have completed their undergraduate work. The third is a 
full-time post-doctorate fellowship and carries with it a yearly stipend 
of $1800.00. The term of each fellowship is for one year, but may be 
extended for a longer period. 

THE FOOD AND DRUG FELLOWSHIP 

The Food and Drug Fellowship is established by friends of the School 
of Pharmacy to enable a student to pursue work toward an advanced 
degree. The stipend is $500.00 for the academic year. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE CHARLES LANDON HENRY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In the memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for 
many years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
who was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring 
states, and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of 
worthy young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to 
be awarded annually by the Faculty to a fourth-year student who has 
shown superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commer- 
cial pharmacy. The stipend is approximately $100.00. 

RESEARCH GRANT OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to de- 
posit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 
research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Com- 
mittee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to 
engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy during the 
next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of general pharma- 
ceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in one of the 
pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

THE FAIRCHILD SCHOLARSHIP (National) 

Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers a scholarship an- 
nually, amounting to $500.00 in cash, to pharmacy students of the United 
States. The scholarship is awarded on the basis of a competitive exam- 
ination to candidates who are high-school graduates and who have suc- 
cessfully completed at least three years' work in a school or college of 
pharmacy or department of pharmacy of a university, holding member- 
ship in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Each school, 
college, or department of pharmacy is limited to two candidates. The 
examination will be held at the School of Pharmacy on the second Monday 
of June. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for the assistantships is $550.00 for the academic year, and the 
remission of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the 
diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and 
didactic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective depart- 
ments in which they are serving. The usual amount of services required 
does not exceed 12 to 14 clock hours per week, which enables an assistant 
to carry approximately a full graduate program. 

THE CHARLES CASPARI, JR., MEMORIAL L04N FUND 

In the memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty and lack of osten- 
tation and eagerness for service and helpfulness to others, which were 
striking characteristics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and 
alumni have made contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans 
are made from this fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the 
recommendations of the Dean. 

L. MANUEL HENDLER LOAN FUND 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOOL AWARDS 

G •» era' — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is cred- 
itable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below B. 
Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Thirl Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall be- 
low B. 

THE WILLIAM SIMON MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the 
faculty to 3 candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. 
The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a student 
for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability as much by observation and personal contact as 
by grades made in examinations. 

THE L. S. WILLIAMS PRACTICAL PHARMACY PRIZE 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of ap- 
proximately $1000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by 
the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the 
highest general average throughout the course in this subject. 

THE CONRAD L. WICH BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY PRIZE 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882) , has placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP PRIZES 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to three students of the fourth-year class, selected 
by the Faculty, who have attained high standing in both theoretical and 
practical pharmacy. One of these awards has been endowed by Dr. E. F. 
Keliy, and the other two by the Baltimore Branch of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the spendid traditions 
of the School. The Council consists of twelve active members, three elected 
by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the presidents 
of the respective classes, and a faculty adviser. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RHO CHI HONONARY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and lead- 
ership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 75 
credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

STUDENTS' AUXILIARY OF THE MARYLAND PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

The following are the officers of the Auxiliary: 

OFFICERS (1939-40) 

President — Norman R. Sachs, Fourth-Year Class 

First Vice-President — Irvin Noveck, Third-Year Class 

Second Vice-President — George Joseph Kreis, Jr., Second-Year 

Class 
Secretary — Alice Emily Harrison, Second-Year Class 
Treasurer — Edgar Mano Silberg, Fourth-Year Class 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Bernard Kramer, Fourth-Year Class 
Editor — Donald M. Rosen, Fourth-Year Class 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Albert Goldberg, Fourth-Year Class 
Francis I. Codd, Third-Year Class 
Robert Rosenberg, Second-Year Class 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society continued 
its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Associa- 
tion of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organi- 
zation of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant 
until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The active 
membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is growing 
steadily. The following are its officers: 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



OFFICERS (1939-40) 

Honorary President — John A. Wager 

President of the Association — Charles S. Austin 

3036 Abell Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
First Vice-President — T. Ellsworth Ragland 

2801 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
Second Vice-President — Otto W. Muehlhause 

4943 Belair Road, Baltimore, Md. 
Secretary — B. Olive Cole 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Frank M. Budacz 

3138 O'Donnell Street, Baltimore, Md. 



executive committee 

President Charles S. Austin, Chairman 
The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 
The Officers, 

M ember s-at-Large — 

Frank J. Grau 
Jacob H. Greenfeld 
Frank R. Paul 
John A. Strevig 



committee on school of pharmacy of the maryland 
pharmaceutical association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matter pertaining 
to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The following 
are the present members of this committee: 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Chairman 
William F. Reindollar 
John C. Bauer 
Simon Solomon 
John A. Strevig 
Lloyd N. Richardson 
Fitzgerald Dunning 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Title and Number of Course 



First Year 

*Botany Is, Structural 

tChemistry ly, Inorganic and Qualitative 

Analysis 

tEnglish ly, Composition and Rhetoric 

tSpeech ly, Reading and Speaking 

fMathematics, 8f or llf 

-(-Mathematics, 10s 

fModern Language ly or 3y, French or 

German 

fZoology If, General (1) 



Second Year 

Botany 2f, Vegetable Histology. 

Botany 3s, Pharmacognosy 

tChemistry 2y, Organic 

Pharmacy ly, Galenical 

fPhysics ly, General 

Physiology If, General 



Third Year 

*Bacteriology If, General 

*Bacteriology 2s, Serology and Immunology 

^Chemistry 4f, Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 5s, Pharmaceutical Testing and 

Assaying 

^Economics Is, Fundamentals of 

Pharmacology ly, Pharm., Toxicology and 

Therapeutics 

Pharmacy 2y, Dispensing 

Pharmacy 3f, History of.. 



Fourth Year (Required) 

Chemistry llOy, Medicinal Products 

Economics, 2f, Pharmaceutical 

First Aid Is, Standard 

Law 3s, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations 

Pharmacy lOly, Manufacturing 

Pharmacy 6s, Pharmaceutical Practice 

Pharmacology, HOf, Biological Assaying.. 
Electives. 



Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 102y, Advanced Vegetable Histology 

^Chemistry 102Ay, Physical 

^Chemistry 102By, Physical 

*Chemistry 103y, Physiological 

Chemistry 105y, Advanced Pharmaceutical 

Analysis 

Chemistry Illy, Medicinal Products 

^Language 15y, Scientific German. 

*Mathematics 23y, Calculus 

Pharmacy HOf or s, Advanced Prescription 

Compounding 

tZoology 2s, Vertebrate Zoology 



Hrs. Per Week 



17 



Hrs. 


Per Week 




5 


J** 


"3 

o 


1 


3 

3 
3 

1 


3 

5 


6 

8 
3 

1 


3 

4 
3 




1 






3 
3 




3 
3 


3 




3 












17 


2 

3 
4 
3 


4 
4 
4 
2 


6 

7 
8 
5 


4 
4 
5 
4 








17 


2 


4 


6 


4 


2 
3 

3 
3 


6 


8 
3 

6 
9 


4 
3 


3 
6 


3 
4 


3 




3 


18 
2 






1 
3 
2 
2 




1 
3 
4 
4 


1 




3 


2 
2 


3 
2 








6 


2 
3 


4 


6 
3 
6 
6 

9 
4 
3 
3 

4 

7 


17 

4 
3 


6 

4 

9 

4 


2 


2 


4 
3 




2 


3 

3 


3 




3 


4 
4 


2 


3 


4 



t Instruction in these courses is given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
* Additional courses approved by the College of Arts and Sciences for credit toward the ful- 
fillment of medical school entrance requirements. 

(1) Students preparing to enter medical school should take Zoology 2s in addition to this 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



21 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Di- 
dactic 


Labor- 
atory 


Total 


Credit 
Hours 


First Year 


48 
96 
96 
32 
48 
48 
96 
48 

512 


48 
160 


96 

256 

96 

32 

48 

48 

96 

144 


3 




8 


English ly 


6 






2 


Mathematics, 8f or llf 




3 






3 






6 




96 


4 






Total 


304 

64 
64 
128 
128 
64 
48 


816 

64 

96 

224 

256 

160 

80 


35 


Second Year 
Botany 2f 


2 




32 
96 

128 
96 
32 


4 




8 




10 




8 




3 






Total 


384 

32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
96 
96 
32 


496 

64 
64 
96 
96 


880 

96 

96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
288 

32 


35 


Third Year 


4 




4 




4 




4 




3 




96 
192 


6 


Pharmacy 2y ... 


8 
2 








Total 


400 

96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
214 


608 


1,008 

96 
80 
16 
48 

128 
64 
96 

630t 


35 


Fourth Year — (Required) 


4 




48 


3 


First Aid 


1 


Law 3s 




3 




64 

32 

64 

416f 


6 




2 




4 




12 






Total 


534 

64 
96 


624 
128 


1,158 

192 

96 

192 

192 

288 

128 

96 

96 

128 

112 

816 

880 

1,008 

1,158 


35 


Fourth Year — (Elective3) 
Botany 102y 


8 


Chemistry 102 Ay 


6 


Chemistry 102By 


192 

128 
288 
128 


4 


Chemistry 103y 


64 


8 




6 






4 




96 
96 


6 






6 




128 
64 

304 
496 
608 
624 


4 




48 

512 
384 
400 
534 


4 


Summary 
First Year 


35 




35 


Third Year 


35 




35 






Total 


1,830 


2,032 


3,862 


140 



t Average. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 

BACTERIOLOGY 

If. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology — (4) Third year, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Grubb and McGinity. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of prevention 
and control of communicable diseases. 

2s. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, two lectures, two lab- 
oratories. Grubb and McGinity. 

A study of the principles of immunity including the preparation and use of 
the biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious 
diseases. 

For Graduates 

201f. Chemotherapy — (1) One lecture. Grubb. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 
Given in alternate years. 

202s. Immuno-chemistry — (1) One lecture. Grubb. 

A study of the chemical nature of antigens, antibodies and the antibody- 
antigen reactions. 

Given in alternate years. 

BOTANY 

Is. Structural Botany — (3) First year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Slama and DeDominicis. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification and 
physiology of plant structures. 

2f. Vegetable Histology — (2) Second year, two laboratories. Slama and 
DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany Is. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including practice 
in the examination of the official powdered drugs. 

3s. General Pharmacognosy — (4) Second year, two lectures, two labor- 
atories. Slama and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany Is and 2f. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, with 
special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in identification and in the 
detection of adulterations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101y. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2) One lecture, one laboratory. 
Slama. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local flora. Emphasis will be placed on official drug plants. Instruc- 
tion will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. Elective for students 
who contemplate taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. 

Given in alternate years. 

* Courses for undergraduates are designed by numbers 1-99; courses for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates by numbers 100-199, and courses for graduates, by numbers 200-299. 

The letter following the numbers of a course indicates the semester in which it is offered: 
thus, course 1 f is offered in the first semester; 1 s, in the second semester. The letter "y" indicates 
a full-year course. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one 
period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture or recitation 
period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



102y. Plant Anatomy — (8) Two lectures and two laboratories. Slama. 
Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special 
emphasis placed on the structures of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Slama. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and 
micro-chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection 
of adulterants. 

Given in alternate years. 

202y. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Slama. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identi- 
fication and detection of adulterants. 

203y. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to amount and quality 
of work performed. 

CHEMISTRY (BASAL COURSES) 

ly. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (8) First 
year, three lectures, two laboratories. Vanden Bosche, Wich and Foster. 

A study of the non-metals and metals with emphasis on chemical theory 
and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

2y. Organic Chemistry — (8) Second year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Starkey and Levin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry ly. 

General organic chemistry, including aliphatic and aromatic derivatives. 

CHEMISTRY (PHARMACEUTICAL) 

4f. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, two lectures and two laboratories. 
Hartung, Wich and Ruddy. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry ly and 2y. 

A study of quantitative analytical procedures and theory. 

5s. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Zenitz. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 4f. 

Quantitative chemical methods of analysis of drugs and medicines, with 
special reference to official products and procedures. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

105y. AdvancedXPharmaceutical Analysis — (3-6) Three laboratories. 
Hartung. 

The course may be elected for either or both semesters, and may be taken 
by undergraduates with the consent of the professor in charge. 

A laboratory study of the qualitative and quantitative analytical procedures 
and methods as applied to official and commercial, natural and synthetic drugs, 
their intermediates and derivatives. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HOy. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Three lectures. Hartung 
Ruddy and Barry. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 2y. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the syntheses and chemical prop- 
erties of the important medicinal products. 

Illy. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (1-4) Two laboratories. Hartung 
Ruddy and Barry. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry HOy, or may be taken simultaneously with HOy. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical 
properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

102Ay. Physical Chemistry (6) Three lectures. Vanden Bosche. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 2y and 4f and Physics ly. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in the 
laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, 
elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, 
etc. will be discussed. 

102By. Physical Chemistry (2-4) One or two laboratories. Vanden Bosche 
and Hamlin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 102Ay, or may be taken simultaneously with 
102Ay. 

The course consists of quantitative experiments designed to demonstrate 
physico-chemical principles, illustrate practical applications and acquaint the 
student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

117y. Organic Laboratory (2) One laboratory. Starkey. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry Illy. 

A course devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative analysis. 
The work includes the identification of unknown organic compounds. 

118y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2) One laboratory, Starkey. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry Illy. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogens are carried out, and representative synthesis, more diflcult than 
those of Chemistry 2y, are studied. 

200y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Hartung 

and Starkey. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry HOy and Illy. * 

A survey of the chemical structure and reaction of selected groups of phar- 

maceutically and pharmacologically important groups of non-basic nature. 

201y. Chemistry of Alkaloids- — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 
Prerequisites— Chemistry HOy and Illy. 

A survey of the chemical structure and the reactions of pharmaceutically 
and pharmacologically important organic bases. 
(Not given in 1940-41). 

202y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses — (1-8) Laboratory work and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 118y. 

A study of fundamental and basic chemical procedures employed in the 
synthesis of various drugs arid their intermediates, and a survey of their ap- 
plication. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



203y. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (2) Hartung. 

Reports of progress and discussion of the problems encountered in re- 
search and the presentation of papers which survey the recent developments of 
pharmaceutical chemistry reported in the current literature. 

Required of all students majoring in the department throughout their period 
of matriculation. 

205y. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit to be determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung. 

CHEMISTRY (PHYSIOLOGICAL) 

103y. Physiological Chemistry — (8) Two lectures, two laboratories. Chap- 
man, Gittinger and McNamara. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry ly, 2y and 4f and Physiology If. 

A general survey of the subject, including a study of digestion, metabolism, 
excretion, enzymes, hormones, vitamines and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

Is. Elements of Economics — (3) Third year, three lectures. Cole and Glick- 
man. 

A study of the general principles of economics — production, exchange, 
distribution, and consumption of wealth. 

2f. Pharmaceutical Economies' — (3) Fourth year, two lectures, one labor- 
atory. Cole and Glickman. 

Business forms and practice applicable to pharmacy, including contracts, 
agency, insurance, with practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial state- 
ments. 

3s. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, three lectures. Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special refer- 
ence to the regulation of the practice of pharmacy; laws and regulations per- 
taining to the dispensing of poisons, narcotics and alcoholic liquors, and prep- 
arations. 

ENGLISH 

ly. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Pyles and Foley. 

Prerequisite — Three units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. 

SPEECH 

ly. Reading and Speaking — (2) First year, one lecture. Pyles. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; the 
preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speaking; 
reference reading, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

Is. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, one lecture. 
Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MATHEMATICS 

8f. Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One year of high school algebra. Required of those students 
who do not have the prerequisite for Math. llf. 

_ Quadratic equations, elementary theory of equations, combinations, permuta- 
tions and probabilities, the binominal theorem, progressions, logarithms, 
elementary graphs, etc. 

10s. Plane Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Math. 8f or llf. 

Trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, equations and graphs. 
Principles of plane analytic geometry, the line and the circle, the ellipse, 
hyperbola and parabola, graphing of functions, empirical equations. 

llf. Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Required of those students who have completed high school algebra. 

Simultaneous solution of quadratic and higher equations; properties of 
polynomials; theory of equations; binominal expansion; progressions; come 
binatorial analysis; logarithms; empirical equations; determinants. 



For Graduates and Undergraduates 

23y. Calculus — (6) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisites — Math, llf, 10s, and approval of the instructor. 

Limits, derivatives and differentials; maxima and minima; curvature; 
evolutes and envelopes; the elements of curve theory; elementary theory 
of functions; partial derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals; multiple 
integrals; calculation of arcs, areas, volumes and moments; expansion in 
series; differential equations with applications to thermo-dynamics, to mole- 
cular and atomic phenomena, and to physical chemistry. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

ly. French-Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 
Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prepara- 
tion is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 
Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

3y. French-Second-Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — French ly or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

ly. German-Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 
Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year German, receive half credit for this course. 
Elements of grammar, compositions, pronunciation and translation. 

3y. German-Second-Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German ly or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. 
The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous 
training. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



No credit will be given for the first semester until the second semester has 
been completed. 

Six hours credit in Spanish will be accepted in lieu of the foregoing. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

15y. Scientific German — (6) Three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German 3y or equivalent, and approval of instructor. 

Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German grammar. 



PHARMACOLOGY 

ly. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third year, three 
lectures and one laboratory. Chapman, McNamara and Thompson. 

Prerequisite — Physiology If. 

A study of the physiological action, toxicity and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United 
State Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HOf. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman, McNamara, Gittinger and Thompson. 

Prerequisites — Physiology If and Pharmacology ly. 

A course in the methods of biological assay prescribed by the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 



For Graduates 

201y. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology HOf. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological assay 
and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay of therapeu- 
tic substances. 

Given in alternate years. 

202y. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (2-4) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology HOf. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the determina- 
tion of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. 

203y. Special studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacology HOf. Pharmacology 201y. 

The development of biological assay methods and comparative standards 
for substances for which there are no satisfactory methods or standards. 
Given in alternate years. 

204y. Research in Pharmacology and Therapeutics — Credit in proportion 
to the amount and quality of the work performed. Chapman. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHARMACY 



ly. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and two labor- 
atories. DuMez, Andrews, Dittrich, Gakenheimer and Dorsch. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathe- 
matical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manu- 
facture of galenical preparations. 

2y. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Three lectures and two laboratories. Wolf, 
Cross, Dittrich and Gakenheimer. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

3f. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, two lectures. DuMez. 
A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special emphasis 
on the history of American pharmacy. 

6s. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, lectures, demonstrations, 
and 32 hours of practical work in a hospital pharmacy. Wolf, Andrews, Allen, 
Bellman, Raudonis and Jarowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Practical work in drug-store arrangement; the handling of drugs, medicines 
and drug sundries, and in dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101y. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures, one labor- 
atory. DuMez, Andrews, Dorsch, Dittrich, Cross and Gakenheimer. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special reference 
to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a com- 
mercial scale. 

HOf or s. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (2-4) Two laboratories. 
DuMez, and Andrews. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding special 
prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lectures, two labor- 
atories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the standpoint 
of plant; crude materials used, their collection, preservation, and transformation 
into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

202y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. DuM ez. 

Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the original and development of the works of drug standards 
and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

203y. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 

Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries in Europe. 

204y. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



PHYSICS 

ly. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook and Thornton. 

Prerequisites — Math. 8f and 10s or Math llf and 10s. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, 
electricity and light. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

If. Physiology — (3) Second year, two lectures, one laboratory. Chapman, 
McNamara and Gittinger. 

Elementary anatomy and histology of the body, including a study of the 
functions of the various organs and of dietetics. 

ZOOLOGY 

If. General Zoology — (4) First year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Everett. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian 
form, with emphasis on animal development, structure and functions of organs. 
Introductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

2s. Vertebrate Zoology — (4) Fourth year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Everett. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, study 
of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the general 
physiology and embryology of the principal organs and systems of the verte- 
brate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The books required in each course will be announced at the beginning of 
each semester by the teacher in charge. Each student is required to have his 
own text books. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The rules and conditions stated in this prospectus will govern students 
until the next succeeding issue, after which time they will be governed by the 
conditions stated in the latter. 




30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



SESSION OF 1939-40 



fGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Allen, Benjamin Frank Md. 

Barry, Richard H. ... Pa. 

Bellman, Frank Albert Md. 

Bolth, Franklin Anderson Md. 

*Cook, Nevis Eugene. .. Ga. 

Cross, John Milton N.J. 

DeDominicis, Amelia Carmel Md. 

Dittrich, Theodore Thomas Md. 

Dorsch, Joseph Urban Md. 

Foster, Carroll Pross ..Md. 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian Md. 

Glickman, Shirley Madelyn Md. 

Hager, George Philip Md. 

Hamlin, Kenneth Eldred, Jr. ...Md. 



*Hewing, Ada Chamberlain Md. 

Heyman, Bernice Md. 

Jarowski, Charles Md. 

Karel, Leonard Md. 

Levin, Nathan Md. 

Loftus, Howard Edmond Md. 

McGinity, Frances Rowland Md. 

McNamara, Bernard Patrick Md. 

Raudonis, John Anthony N.H. 

Ruddy, A. Wayne Nebr. 

Sussman, Bernard Md. 

Thompson, Robert Edward S.D. 

Zenitz, Bernard Leon Md. 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Alessi, Alfred Henry Md. 

Balassone, Francis Salvatore W.Va. 

Caplan, Clarice Md. 

Celozzi, Matthew Joseph .....Md. 

Cohen, Harry I Md. 

Cohen, Samuel Md. 

Feinstein, Bernard Samuel Md. 

Glaser, Louis Lester Md. 

Goldberg, Albert Md. 

Greenberg, Joseph Md. 

Gumenick, Leonard Md. 

Kamenetz, Irvin Md. 

Kasik, Frank Thomas, Jr. Md. 

Kline, Sidney Md. 

Klotzman, Robert Harold Md. 

Kramer, Bernard Md. 

Kursvietis, Anthony Joseph Md. 



Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Md. 

Lerman, Philip Harry Md. 

Levin, Leon Phillip Md. 

Levy, Irving Md. 

Miller. Edward Md. 

POKLIS, Alphonse Md. 

Richman, Philip Frederick Md. 

Rosen, Donald Merle Md. 

Sachs, Norman Robert Md. 

Sandler, Solomon Md. 

Schlaen, Mildred Md. 

Shook, Joseph William Md. 

Silberg, Edgar Mano Md. 

Simonoff, Robert Md. 

Smith, Daniel E... Md. 

Sowbel, Irving Md. 

Zukerberg, Morris A. Md. 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



*Buchwald, Eva Dina..... Md. 

Codd, Francis Ignatius Md. 

Cohen, Rose P. Md. 

DeGele, George Oscar Md. 

DiGristine, Mary Rosula Md. 

Fainberg, Alvin ...Md. 

Ginsberg, Samuel Harry Md. 

Glaser, Abraham Ellis Md. 

Goodman, Leon Md. 

Hendin, Walter ...Md. 

Jernigan, John Mayo Md. 

Kahn, Reuben. Md. 



Kreis, George Joseph, Jr Md. 

Lindenbaum, Albert Md. 

Mayep. Maurice Victor Md. 

Miller, Manuel Md. 

Moser, John Taft Md. 

Noveck, Irvin Md. 

Rosenthal, Bernard Md. 

Rudoff, Oscar Md. 

Sarubin, Milton r Md. 

Siegel, Harold Md. 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Md. 

Zerwitz, Irving Frank Md. 



t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



31 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Bkrngartt, Elmar Bernard Md. 

Bi. an km an, Albert Julius Md. 

Ci.yman, Sidney Gary Md. 

DeBoy, John Michaki Md. 

Eckes, Charles Frederick Md. 

Ehudin, Herbert Md. 

*Fejt, Abraham Md. 

"Friedman, Jerome Samuel Md. 

Getka, Milton Stanley Md. 

Gitomer, Marie Md. 

Goldberg, Milton Md. 

Harrison, Alice Emily Md. 

Heyman, Shirley Md. 

Jankiewicz, Alfred Marion Md. 

Klavens, Sidney Raymond Md. 

Levin, Evelyn Shirley Md. 

Myers, Morton Md. 



Nollau, Elmer Wilson Md. 

Oken, Jack Md. 

Panamarow, Stephen Md. 

Pritzker, Sherman Md. 

Ramsey, Wilbur Owen Md. 

Reisch, Milton Md. 

Rosenberg, Robert Md. 

Sacks, Sidney Md. 

Shochet, Melvin Md. 

Simon, Alder Md. 

Smulovitz, Sidney Md. 

Sober, Norman Md. 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Md. 

Weinbach, Eugene Claytdn Md. 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr. Md. 

Wylie, Hamilton Boyd, Jr Md. 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Applebaum, Leonard N.C. 

Caldwell, John Regan Md. 

Carlisle, Elbert Bard Va. 

Carouge, Gilbert Morris Md. 

Cragg, James Phillip Md. 

FlNKELSTEIN, SIDNEY Md. 

Gordon, Max Md. 

Grave de Peralta, Raoul Cuba 

Haase, Frederick Robert Md. 

Hutchinson, William John Md. 

Hyman, Nathan Bernard. Md. 

Katz, Doris Adele ..Md. 

Klotzman, Alfred Md. 

Kremer, Beryle Philip Md. 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Md. 

Levin, Harold Paul Md. 

*Lockard, John Edwin... Md. 



"Minor, Frances Marie Md. 

Poulase, Guss Nicholas Md. 

Rice, Leonard Marcus Md. 

Rodman, Leonard ...Md. 

Scheinin, Benjamin Md. 

Schwartz, Nathan Md. 

Schwartz, Theodore Howard ...Md. 

Siegel, Alvin Morton Md. 

SlNDLER, MELVYN Md. 

Smith, Morton Md. 

Steinberg, Sherman... Md. 

Stockton, Walter Wood M'd. 

"Sussman, Raymond Abe Md. 

Totz, Bernard W.Va. 

Weiner, Earl Robert Md. 

Yarmosky, Jack Joseph Md. 

Yevzeroff, Benjamin Md. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Burton, Harold Francis Md. 

Dansereau, Harry Kirk N.H. 

*Fisher, David Md. 

♦Moffett, Virginia Merle Md. 



Rosenblatt, Hilda Kagan Md. 

TUCKERMAN, LOUIS N.Y. 

Wilson, Julia Elizabeth Md. 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 3, 1939 

fDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Dunker, Melvin F. W Md. Sumerford, Wooten Taylor Ga. 



Cross, John Milton. 



tMASTER OF SCIENCE 

N.J. McNamara, Bernard Patrick Md. 



* Did not attend entire session. 

t Degree conferred by Graduate School. 



32 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Baker, Daniel S. Md. 

JBaylus, Herman Herbert Md. 

J*Bernstein, Aaron Md. 

Binstock, Albert .Md. 

JCohen, Frank Samuel Md. 

Dobropolski, Anthony Joseph Md. 

Dorsch, Joseph Urban Md. 

Feldman, Jack... Md. 

Folus, Irving Herbert Md. 

J*Freed, Arnold Ulysses Md. 

t*GAVER, Leo Junior Md. 

Giller, Morris Md. 

J*Goldberg, Sylvan David Md. 

Golditch, Henry Mervin ...Md. 

Gruz, Nathan I...... Md. 

Hackett, Angela Rose.. ..Md. 

J*Hartman, Oscar ..Md. 

Ichniowski, William Marion Md. 

Jacobs, Eugene Md. 

Jones, Cyrus Francis Md. 

Kamanitz, Irvin Leonard..... Md. 

J*Kappelman, Melvin Daniel Md. 

Lieberman, Lawrence Lipman Va. 

JMarks, Irving Lowell Md. 



Mask, Jerome Md. 

Massing, David Md. 

Mendelsohn, Daniel Md. 

MORGENROTH, VICTOR HUGO, JR. Md. 

Mutchnik, Melvin Md. 

J*Nuttall, James Baker Md. 

Okrasinski, Joseph Leon Md. 

Parker, Katherine Justina Md. 

Passen, Lillian Md. 

J*Reimann, D xter LeRo Md. 

Rochester, Harry Louis N.Y. 

Rosenberg, Morris Md, 

Rosenthal, Alvin Md. 

Sabatino, Louis Thomas Md. 

J^Sadove, Max Samuel Md. 

S4MA, Mario Md. 

Sapperstein, Louis Md. 

Schneyer, Herbert David Pa. 

Shalowit£, M\rion Md. 

SlLVERSTEIN, BERNARD Md. 

Snyder, Nathan Morton Md. 

Wiener, Maurice Md. 

JWilder, Milton Jay Md. 

Young, George Ira, Jr. Md. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship Arlo Wayne Ruddy 

Alumni Research Grant Kenneth E. H\mlin, Jr. 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Maurice Wiener 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize Melvin Mutchnik 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize ..VICTOR HUGO MORGENROTH, Jr. 
Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Louis Thomas Sabatino 



CERTIFICATE OF HONOR 

Eugene Jacobs 



Mildred Schlaen 



HONORABLE MENTION (Third-Year Class) 

Bernard Samuel Feinstsin 



Leonard Gumenick 



Degree conferred September 1938. 
Combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine. 



The 


Official Publication 

of 

University of Maryland 


VOL. 11 




No. 1 



Catalogue and 
98th Announcement of 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy. 1841 to 1904) 

1941-1942 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



The 


Official Publication 

of 

University of Maryland 


VOL. 22 




No. 1 



Catalogue and 
98th Announcement of 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1941-1942 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CALENDAR 

1941 

September 17 to 19 — Examination for the removal of conditions. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

September 23, Tuesday — Registration for first- and second-year students. 

September 24, Wednesday — Registration for all other students. 

September 25, Thursday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled 
period. 

November 19, Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins after the last 
scheduled period. 

November 24, Monday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled 
period. 

December 20, Saturday — Christmas recess begins after the last sched- 
uled period. 

1942 

January 5, Monday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 26 to 31, Monday to Saturday, inclusive — Registration for the 
second semester. 

January 31, Saturday — First semester ends after the last scheduled 
period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, Monday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

February 23, Monday — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

April 1, Wednesday — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

April 8, Wednesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
June 6, 11:00 A. M., Saturday — Commencement. 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday 
at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. 
(This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9 :00 A. M. to 5 :00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9 :00 A. M. to 12 :30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 






THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine Re- 
gents appointed by the Governor, each for a term of nine years. The 
administration of the University is vested in the President. The General 
Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the President. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its faculty of professorial rank. Each faculty Council directs the 
policy of the group it represents. 

The University is co-educational in all its branches and has the follow- 
ing educational organizations: 

School of Medicine. College of Agriculture. 

School of Law. College of Arts and Sciences. 

School of Dentistry. College of Education. 

School of Pharmacy. Colege of Engineering. 

Sshool of Nursing. College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. Summer School. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Extension Service. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

University Hospital. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Nursing are 
located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, the 
others in College Park. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Chairman Term expires 1943 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary Term expires 1947 

Rowland K. Adams Term expires 1948 

W. Calvin Chesnut Term expires 1942 

William P. Cole, Jr. Term expires 1949 

J. Milton Patterson Term expires 1944 

John E. Semmes Term expires 1942 

Philip C. Turner Term expires 1950 

president of the university 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 

general administrative board of the university 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, Dean 
Robinson, Dean Benjamin, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean 
Steinberg, Dean Stamp, Dean Broughton, Dean Stevens, Dean 
Eppley, Dr. Cotterman, Colonel Wysor, Dr. Huff, Miss Preinkert, 
Miss Kellar, Dr. Zucker, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. White, Dr. Welsh, Dr. 
Wylie, Dr. Corbett, Mr. Casbarian, Dr. Long. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Officers of Administration 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc., President of the University. 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Secretary. 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
E. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grubb 

Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 
emeritus professor 

David M. R. Culbreth, Emeritus Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1879) ; College of Physicians and Surgeons, M.D, 
(1883). 

professors 

*L. B. Broughton Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1908), M.S. (1911) ; Ohio State University, Ph.D. (1926). 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, M.Sc. 
(1925) ; McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

*Charles G. Eichlin Professor of Physics 

Lafayette College, A.B. (1913), M.S. (1921). 

t Walter H. Hartung Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918) ; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Washing- 
ton, D. C, B.S. (1921) : Maryland Academy of Science ,Sc.D. (1922), (Honorary). 

associate professors 

B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical 

Law. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Thomas C. Grubb Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B., (1930) ; University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

The faculty is listed as constituted during 1940-41. Changes will be noted in subsequent 
catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of 
the University. 

t Representative on the Graduate Council. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



*Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916); Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

*A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond. B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), Ph.D. 
(1928). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Marvin J. Andrews Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland. Ph.G. (1922), Ph.C. (1923), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1931). 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Assistant Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in C.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

*Gardner P. H. Foley Assistant Professor of English 

Clark University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1926). 

*Arthur C. Parsons Assistant Professor of Languages 

University of Maryland, A.B. (1926), A.M. (1928). 

*J. Thomas Pyles Assistant Professor of English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927) ; Johns Hopkins University, 
Ph.D. (1938). 

Frank J. Slama Assistant Professor of Botanv and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

* Edgar B. Starkey Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

*Guy P. Thompson Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

*E. G. Vanden Bosche Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 

Chemistry. 

Lebanon Valley College, A.B. (1922); University of Maryland, M.S. (1924), Ph.D. 
(1927). 

INSTRUCTORS 

Amelia C. De Dominicis Instructor in Botany 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1931), M.S. (1932). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) ; University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

ASSISTANTS 

Benjamin Frank Allen Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Richard H. Barry Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Duquesne University B.S. (1939). 

Frank Albert Bellman Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

John M. Cross Assistant in Pharmacy 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1936), University of Maryland, M.S. (1939). 

Theodore Thomas Dittrich Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933) ; B.S. (1934). 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Brunch 
of the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Joseph Urban Dorsch Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1939). 

Carroll Pross Foster Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Walter C. Gakenheimer Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Shirley M. Glickman Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937), M.S. (1940). 

George Philip Hager, Jr. William R. Warner Fellow in Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938), M.S. (1940). 

Kenneth Eldred Hamlin, Jr. William R. Warner Fellow in Pharma- 
ceutical Chemistry. 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Charles Jarowski Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

-j-LeRoy Curtis Keagle Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1940). 

* Vernon Edward Krahl Assistant in Zoology 

University of Pittsburgh, B.S. (1939), M.S. (1940). 

°Norbert Gordon Lassahn Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

Nathan Levin Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936), M.S. (1938). 

§F. Rowland McGinity Assistant in Bacteriology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Bernard P. McNamara Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936), M.S. (1939). 

$John Anthony Raudonis Assistant in Pharmacy 

St. John's College, A.B. (1933) ; University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

xJoseph William Shook Assistant in Bacteriology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

Robert Edward Thompson Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

* James Kendall Thornton Assistant in Physics 

Bernard L. Zenitz Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 



ASSISTING staff 

xThelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S. Librarian 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Ann B. Lemen-Clark Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Lotz-Gue Senior Stenographer 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

t H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow. 
| Resigned October 15, 1940. 
° Appointed October 15, 1940. 
§ Resigned December 31, 1940. 
x Appointed January 1, 1941. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase 
of medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of profes- 
sional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its ma- 
triculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also 
offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially de- 
signed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped through- 
out, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to carry on 
the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of pharmacy, and to 
the graduate student i: or the pursuit of research in the various fields of 
pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for in- 
struction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 6,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, Inc., and holds membership in the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the 
interests of pharmaceutical education; and all institutions accredited by 
the Council or holding membership in the Association must maintain 
certain minimum requirements with respect to number and qualifications 
of faculty members, physical plant, laboratory and library facilities, 
curriculum, admission, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, 
and its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 22. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M.S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in 
the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work in the 
School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, must 
register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the require- 
ments of that School. For detailed information concerning registration, 
requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Graduate 
School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION * 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., and the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
economics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agri- 
culture, commercial, drawing, home economics, shops, etc.) foreign 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic credit, 
whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be detrimental 
to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any 
subject offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which 
graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 
8 units, of which not more than four shall be vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon 
presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate 
who does not fully meet these requirements may be required to present 
further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion 
of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examina- 
tion. Such examination will be given during the first week of each of the 
months of July, August and September at College Park, Md. Applicants 
concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examina- 
tion, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for gradua- 
tion from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New 
York City, the Regents of the University of the State of New York, 
Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Penn- 
sylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., will receive credit for the 
courses which correspond in length and content to those prescribed for 
the first three years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced 
standing, provided he presents an official transcript of his record and a 
proper certificate of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic 
institution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary edu- 
cational requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to 
Freshman Class from Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter 
as a special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but 
will not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The 
Faculty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the prelimi- 
nary training of the applicant is sufficient. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photograph and the two 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the appli- 
cation has been received. Do not make application unless reasonably 
certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application 
with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after 
enrolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said ap- 
plication he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board 
may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said applica- 
tion, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharma- 
cy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, sub- 
mit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore 
experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

A student registering for the first time must procure from the office of 
the School of Pharmacy a matriculation card before he will be permitted 
to register. The last day for matriculation is September 27, 1941. 

All students must register at the office of the Registrar. Under no 
conditions will a student be permitted to enter classes who has not com- 
pleted registration. The last days for registration without the payment 
of the late registration fee are as follows: First Semester, September 23, 
1941, for first- and second-year students; September 24, 1941, for all other 
students; Second Semester, January 31, 1942, for all students. The last 
days for registration with the payment of the late registration fee, except 
as hereinafter stated, are: First Semester, September 27, 1941: Second 
Semester, February 7, 1941. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



SUMMARY OF FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per year) : 

Resident? of Maryland 220.00 

Non-Residents 270.00 

Laboratory fee (per year) 50.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per year) 10.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are tak- 
ing courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a year's work, will be 
charged the full yearly fees. Students taking less than this amount of 
work will be charged on a subject basis. Students taking extra work will 
be charged an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each stu- 
dent is required to pay annually $10.00 (Freshmen students $9.00) to 
the "Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $40.00 per year 
is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting instruments, 
and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

Fixed charge of $6.00 per semester credit hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who 
will pay only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester credit hour). 

Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registra- 
tion in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a 
professional school of the University or from one professional school to 
another, he will be required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 

A tuition fee of $220.00 per year is charged a student who is a resi- 
dent of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is 
not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $50.00 per year. One- 
half of this fee must be paid during the registration period at the begin- 
ning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $50.00 per year is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of the year. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A fee and deposit of $10.00 is charged to cover locker rentals and ex- 
cessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each year. Any portion not used will be refunded at the 
end of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the second semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or nonpayment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will 
automatically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

REBATES 

The matriculation fee is not subject to rebate. In cases of withdrawal 
from the school prior to November first in the first semester, or March 
first in the second semester, the Dean may request the Comptroller to 
refund one-half the amount of the tuition and laboratory fee paid for 
such semester. In the case of illness, or other unusual circumstances, the 
Dean may, with the approval of the President of the University, make 
such refund as seems just. In all cases of withdrawal from school, im- 
mediate notice in writing must be given to the Dean. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than six days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No students will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence 
will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a 
lecture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
session and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student received 
a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be 
held only on the dates scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates an- 
nounced by the Dean. A student who is conditioned in the first semester 
must remove the condition by the end of the succeeding semester, but will 
not be permitted to take an examination within thirty days from the 
date on which the conditional rating was received. Conditions received 
in the second semester must be removed before the end of the first semes- 
ter of the succeeding session. Special examinations for the removal of 
these conditions will be held immediately preceding the opening of the 
regular yearly session. A condition which is not removed will become a 
failure, and the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100); B, Good (87-92); Fair (80-86); D, Passed 
(75-79); E, Conditioned (60-74); F, Failed (below 60); I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades: 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a sub- 
sequent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is re- 
quired to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper 
excuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he receives passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all 
of the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths 
of the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the 
work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five 
points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be re- 
quired to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy re- 
o.uires, evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of 
a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the 
faculty in determining the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence 
of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobri- 
ety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and honesty 
in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, 
will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal 
rule against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (See page 20). The 

work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 

count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the 
total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical ex- 
perience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical experience 
required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of opportu- 
nities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions available in 
drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School where it 
may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

THE H. A. B. DUNNING RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing phar- 
macist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is 
still active, has contributed $1,000.00 annually for a period of more than 
ten years to establish a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. 
This fellowship is awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has 
completed four years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special 
aptitude for investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO. RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS 

On July 1, 1939, William R. Warner & Co., Inc., provided the funds 
to establish three fellowships to be known as The William R. Warner 
& Co., Inc., Fellowships in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Two of these 
fellowships have been continued. They are full-time fellowships paying 
$900.00 each per year, and are open to students who have completed their 
undergraduate work. The term of each fellowship is for one year, but 
may be extended for a longer period. 

THE CHARLES LANDON HENRY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for 
many years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
who was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring 
states, and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of 
worthy young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to 
be awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth-year student who has 
shown superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commer- 
cial pharmacy. The stipend is approximately $100.00. 

RESEARCH GRANT OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to de- 
posit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 
research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Com- 
mittee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to 
engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy during the 
next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of general pharma- 
ceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in one of the 
pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

THE FAIRCHILD SCHOLARSHIP (National) 

Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers a scholarship an- 
nually, amounting to $500.00 in cash, to pharmacy students of the United 
States. The scholarship is awarded on the basis of a competitive exam- 
ination to candidates who are high-school graduates and who have suc- 
cessfully completed at least three years' work in a school or college of 
pharmacy or department of pharmacy of a university, holding member- 
ship in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Each school, 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



college, or department of pharmacy is limited to two candidates. The 
examination will be held at the School of Pharmacy on the second Monday 
of June. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for the assistantships is $550.00 for the academic year, and the 
remission of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the 
diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and 
didactic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective depart- 
ments in which they are serving. The usual amount of services required 
does not exceed 12 to 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant 
to carry approximately a full graduate program. 

THE CHARLES CASPARI, JR., MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty and lack of osten- 
tation and eagerness for service and helpfulness to others, which were 
striking characteristics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and 
alumni have made contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans 
are made from this fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the 
recommendations of the Dean. 

L. MANUEL HENDLER LOAN FUND 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOOL AWARDS 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is cred- 
itable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below B. 
Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall be- 
low B. 

THE WILLIAM SIMON MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the 
Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. 
The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a student 
for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability as much by observation and personal contact as 
by grades made in examinations. 

THE L. S. WILLIAMS PRACTICAL PHARMACY PRIZE 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of ap- 
proximately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by 
the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the 
highest general average throughout the course in this subject. 

THE CONRAD L. WICH BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY PRIZE 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP PRIZES 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to three students of the fourth-year class, selected 
by the Faculty, who have attained high standing in both theoretical and 
practical pharmacy. One of these awards has been endowed by Dr. E. F. 
Kelly, and the other two by the Baltimore Branch of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid traditions 
of the School. The council consists of twelve active members, three elected 
by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the presidents 
of the respective classes, and a faculty adviser. 

RHO CHI HONORARY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and lead- 
ership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 75 
credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

STUDENTS' AUXILIARY OF THE MARYLAND PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

The following are the officers of the Auxiliary: 

OFFICERS (1940-41) 

President — John Mayo Jernigan, Fourth-Year Class. 

First Vice-President — Elmar Bernard Berngartt, Third-Year Class. 

Second Vice-President — Morton Smith, Second-Year Class. 

oecretary — Beryle Philip Kremer, Second-Year Class. 

Treasurer — Francis Ignatius Codd, Fourth-Year Class. 

Editor — Alder Simon, Third-Year Class. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Robert Rosenberg, Third-Year Class. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Milton Sarubin, Fourth-Year Class. 

Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr., Third-Year Class. 

Nathan Bernard Hyman, Second-Year Class. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society continued 
its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Associa- 
tion of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organi- 
zation of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant 
until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The active 
membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is growing 
steadily. The following are its officers: 

OFFICERS 1940-41 

Honorary President — Samuel Y. Harris. 

President of the Association — T. Ellsworth Ragland, 
2801 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

First Vice-President — Otto W. Muehlhause, 
4943 Belair Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Second Vice-President — Jacob H. Greenfeld, 

Lafayette Avenue & Poplar Grove Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Secretary — B. Olive Cole, 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, 

3138 O'Donnell Street, Baltimore, Md. 

EXECUTIVE committee 

President T. Ellsworth Ragland, Chairman 
The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 
The Officers. 

Members-at-Large — 

Charles S. Austin 
Frank J. Grau 
Frank R. Paul 
Stephen J. Provenza 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE MARYLAND 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matter pertaining 
to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The following 
are the present members of this Committee: 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Chairman 

WILLIAM F. REINDOLLAR 

John C. Bauer 
Simon Solomon 
John A. Strevig 
T. E. Ragland 
Fitzgerald Dunning 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



19 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. 


Per Week 


w 

43 

O 


Hrs. 


Per Week 




Title and Number of Course 


s 


03 


o 


y 

5 


lb 


"e3 
O 


to 

■3 

0) 

U 


First Year 








+ 


3 

3 
3 

1 


3 
5 


6 

8 
3 
1 


T' 

3 ^ 


tChemistry ly, Inorganic and Qualitative 


3 
3 
1 
3 


5 


8 
3 

1 
3 


4 « 
3' 
1 * 
3^ 


4 


fEnglish ly, Composition and Rhetoric 


3 
1 


{Mathematics, 8f or 21f 






3 
3 




3 
3 


S^*"" 


tModern Language ly or 3y, French or German 


3 
3 


4 


3 
9 

4 


3^ 

4' 


3 




' 








Second Year 


18 
2v 


17 






2 
3 

' 4 

/ 3 


4 
4 
4 
2 


6 

7 
8 
5 


4 




3 
4 
3 
2 

2 


4 
4 
2 
3 

4 


7 
8 
5 
5 

6 


4| 
5 > 
4 , 
3 . 

18 

4' 


4 




5 




4 






Third Year 








17 




2 


4 


6 


4 




2 


6 


8 


4« 




Chemistry 5s, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


2 
3 


6 

3 
6 


8 
3 

6 
9 


4/ 












3 -^ 


Pharmacology ly, Pharm., Toxicology and 


3 
3 
2 

3 
2 


3 
6 


6 
9 
2 

3 
5 


3* 
4v 
2. 


3 




4 












3 




Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry HOy, Medicinal Products 


17 

2» 

3. 


18 
2 


First Aid Is, Standard 


/J 

2 

2 


"2 
2 


1 
3 
4 
4 


1 ' 


Law 3s, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations 










3 v 




2 


2 


4 


3- 


3 


Pharmacy 6s, Pharmaceutical Practice 


2 


Pharmacology HOf, Biological Assaying 


2 


4 


6 


4* 
6 










6 




2 


4 
3 

"*6' 
4 
4 

4 


6 
3 
3 
6 
6 
4 
3 
3 

4 


f 2 

"'s 

... 2 . 
"3 


4 

3 

"*6' 

4 
4 

4 
4 


6 
3 
3 
6 
6 
4 
3 
3 

4 

7 




Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 102y, Advanced Vegetable Histology. 
Chemistry 9f or s, Glassworking 


18 

4' 

1< 

3v 
2„ 
4' 
21 
3V 
3' 

2 


17 

4 
1 


♦Chemistry 102Ay, Physical 


3 


3 


♦Chemistry 102Bv, Physical 


2 




2 


4 


Chemistry lllv, Medicinal Products 


2 


♦Language 15v, Scientific German 


3 
3 


3 


♦Mathematics 23y, Calculus 


3 


Pharmacy HOf or s, Advanced Prescription 


2 






4 




( 











t Instruction in these courses is given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

* Additional courses approved by the College of Arts and Science for credit toward the 
fulfillment of medical school entrance requirements. 

(1) Students preparing to enter medical school should take Zoology 2s in addition to 
this course. 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 



Didactic 



Laboratory 



Total 



Credit 
Hours 



First Year 

Botany Is 

Chemistry ly 

English ly 

Speech ly 

Mathematics, 8f or 21f 

Mathematics, 10s or 22s 

Modern Language, ly or 3y 

Zoology If 

Total 

Second Year 

Botany 2f 

Botany 3s 

Chemistry 2y 

Pharmacy ly 

Physics ly 

Physiology If 

Total 

Third Year 

Bacteriology If 

Bacteriology 2s 

Chemistry 4f 

Chemistry 5s 

Economics Is 

Pharmacology ly 

Pharmacy 2y 

Pharmacy 3y 

Total 

Fourth Year (Required) 

Chemistry HOy 

Economics 2f 

First Aid Is 

Law 3s 

Pharmacy lOly 

Pharmacy 6y 

Pharmacology HOf 

Electives 

Total 

Fourth Year (Electives) 

Botany 102y 

Chemistry, 9f or s 

Chemistry 102Ay 

Chemistry 102By 

Chemistry 103y 

Chemistry Illy 

Language 15y 

Mathematics 23y 

Pharmacy, HOf or s .'..., 

Zoology 2s 

Summary 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Total 



512 



32 
96 
128 
96 
32 



384 



32 
32 
32 
32 
48 



32 



400 



96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
214f 



534 



64 



64 



48 



512 
384 
400 
534 



48 
160 



96 



304 



64 
64 
128 
128 
64 
48 



496 



64 
64 
96 
96 

96 
192 



608 



48 



64 

32 

64 

416f 



624 



128 
96 

192 
128 
128 



128 
64 



304 
496 
608 
624 



96 
256 
96 
32 
48 
48 
96 
144 



816 



64 

96 

224 

256 

160 

80 



880 



96 
96 

128 
128 

48 
192 
288 

32 



1,008 



96 

80 

16 

48 
128 

64 

96 
630f 



1,158 



192 

96 

96 

192 

192 

128 

96 

96 

128 

112 



816 

880 

1.008 

1,158 



35 



35 



35 



35 



1,830 



2,032 



3,862 



140 



Average. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

If. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology — (4) Third year, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Grubb and Shook. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study 
of pathogenic microorganisms, including* the public health aspects of 
prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

2s. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, two lectures, two lab- 
oratories. Grubb and Shook. 

A study of the principles of immunity including the preparation and 
use of the biological products employed in the prevention and treatment 
of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

201f. Chemotherapy — (1) One lecture. Grubb. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic 
value of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 
Given in alternate years. 

202s. Immuno-chemistry — (1) One lecture. Grubb. 
A study of the chemical nature of antigens, antibodies and the antibody- 
antigen reactions. 

Given in alternate years. 

203f and 204s. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Grubb. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology including 
library reading and conferences with the instructor. Credit determined 
by amount and quality of work performed. 

BOTANY 

Is. Structural Botany— (3) First year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Slama and DeDominicis. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of plant structures. 

2f. Vegetable Histology — (2) Second year, two laboratories. Slama 
and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany Is. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs. 

3s. General Pharmacognosy — (4) Second year, two lectures, two labor- 
atories. Slama and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany Is and 2f. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, with 
special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in identification and 
in the detection of adulterations. 



* Courses for undergraduates are designed by numbers 1-99 ; courses for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates by numbers 100-199. and courses for graduates, by numbers 200-299. 

The letter following the numbers of a course indicates the semester in which it is 
offered : thus, course If is offered on the first semester ; Is, in the second semester. 
The letter "y" indicates a full-year course. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued 
one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation period. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101y. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2) One lecture, one labor- 
atory. Slama. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Emphasis will be placed on official drug plants. 
Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. Elective 
for students who contemplate taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. 

Given in alternate years. 

102y Plant Anatomy — (8) Two lectures and two laboratories. Slama 
and DeDominicis. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with 
special emphasis placed on the structures of roots, stems and leaves of 
vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201y. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Slama. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and micro-chemical standpoints, included practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. 

Given in alternate years. 

202y. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two labor- 
atories. Slama. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

203y. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to amount and 
quality of work performed. 

CHEMISTRY (BASAL COURSES) 

ly. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (8) First 
year, three lectures, two laboratories. Vanden Bosche, Wich and Foster. 

A study of the non-metals and metals with emphasis on chemical 
theory and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with 
fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, 
and the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and 
acid radicals. 

2y. Organic Chemistry — (8) Second year, three lectures, two labora- 
tories. Starkey and Levin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry ly. 

General organic chemistry, including aliphatic and aromatic deriva- 
tives. 

CHEMISTRY (PHARMACEUTICAL) 

4f. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, two lectures and two labo- 
ratories. Hartung, Wich and Barry. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry ly and 2y. 
A study of quantitative analytical procedures and theory. 

5s. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Barry. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 4f. 

Quantitative chemical methods of analysis of drugs and medicines, 
with special reference to official products and procedures. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chemistry 9f or s. Glassworking — (1) One laboratory, fourth year 
either semester. Vanden Bosche, Starkey and Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of 
glass. 

HOy. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Three lectures. Har- 
tung and Zenitz. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 2y. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the syntheses and chemical 
properties of the important medicinal products. 

Illy. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (1-4) Two laboratories. Har- 
tung and Zenitz. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry HOy, or may be taken simultaneously with 

HOy. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chem- 
ical properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

102 Ay. Physical Chemistry — (6) Three lectures. Vanden Bosche. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 2y and 4f and Physics ly. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics, etc., will be discussed. 

102By. Physical Chemistry — (2-4) One or two laboratories. Vanden 
Bosche and Hamlin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 102Ay, or may be taken simultaneously with 
102Ay. 

The course consists of quantitative experiments designed to demon- 
strate physico-chemical principles, illustrate practical applications and 
acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

117y. Organic Analysis — (2) One laboratory. Starkey. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry Illy. 

A course devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative 
analysis. The work includes the identification of unknown organic com- 
pounds. 

118y. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2) One laboratory. Starkey. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry Illy. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of 
organic compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydro- 
gen, nitrogen and halogens are carried out, and representative synthesis, 
more difficult than those of Chemistry 2y, are studied. 

200y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Har- 
tung and Starkey. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry HOy and Illy. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reaction of selected groups of 
pharmaceutically and pharmacologically important groups of non-basic 
nature. 

201y. Chemistry of Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry HOy and Illy. 

A survey of the chemical structure and the reactions of pharmaceu- 
tically and pharmacologically important organic bases. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



202y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses — (1-8) Laboratory work 
and conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 118y. 

A study of fundamental and basic chemical procedures employed in 
the synthesis of various drugs and their intermediates, and a survey of 
their application. 

203y. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (2) Hartung. 

Reports of progress and discussion of the problems encountered in 
research and the presentation of papers which survey the recent develop- 
ments of pharmaceutical chemistry reported in the current literature. 

Required of all students majoring in the department throughout their 
period of matriculation. 

204y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory. Har- 
tung. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 117y and 118y. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as ap- 
plied to official and commercial, natural and synthetic drugs, their inter- 
mediates and derivatives. 

205y. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit to be deter- 
mined by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung. 

CHEMISTRY (PHYSIOLOGICAL) 

103y. Physiological Chemistry — (8) Two lectures, two laboratories. 
Chapman, Gittinger and McNamara. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry ly, 2y and 4f and Physiology If. 

A general survey of the subject, including a study of digestion, metab- 
olism, excretion, enzymes, hormones, vitamins and other topics of 
pharmaceutical interest. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

Is. Elements of Economics — (3) Third year, three lectures. Cole and 
Glickman. 

A study of the general principles of economics — production, exchange, 
distribution, and consumption of wealth. 

2f. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Cole and Glickman. 

Business forms and practice applicable to pharmacy, including con- 
tracts, agency, insurance, with practice in bookkeeping, banking and 
financial statements. 

3s. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, three lectures. 
Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special refer- 
ence to the regulation of the practice of pharmacy; laws and regulations 
pertaining to the dispensing of poisons, narcotics and alcoholic liquors, 
and preparations. 

ENGLISH 

ly. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Pyles 
and Foley. 

Prerequisite — Three units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



SPEECH 

ly. Reading and Speaking — (2) First year, one lecture. Pyles. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference reading, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

Is. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, one lecture. 
Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

8f. Elements of College Mathematics — (3) First year, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One year of high school algebra. Required of those 
students who do not have the prerequisite for Math. 21f. 

Quadratic equations; theory of equations; exponentials; logarithms; 
binomial theorem; permutations and combinations; trigonometric func- 
tions; solution of triangles; trigonometric equations and identities. 

10s. Elements of College Mathematics — (3) First year, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Math. 8f. 

Cartesian coordinates; the straight line; the circle and the ellipse; 
graphing of elementary algebraic, exponential and logarithmic func- 
tions; elementary theory of differentiation and integration. 

21f. College Algebra — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Foundations of algebra; binomial and multinomial expansions; progres- . 
sions; determinants; elements of the theory of numbers; combinatorial 
analysis and probabilities; complex numbers; theory of equations; ex- 
ponential functions and logarithms; principles of trigonometry. 

22s. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Math. 21f. 

Cartesian and polar coordinates; line and circle; curves of the 
second order; higher algebraic and transcendental curves; period- 
ograms; solid analytical geometry. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

23y. Calculus — (6) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisites — Math. 21f, 22s, and approval of the instructor. 

Limits, derivatives and differentials; maxima and minima; curvature; 
evolutes and envelopes; the elements of curve theory; elementary theory 
of functions; partial derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals; 
multiple integrals; calculation of arcs, areas, volumes and moments; 
expansion in series. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

ly. French-Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prep- 
aration is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



3y. French-Second- Year — (6) Fir:t year, three lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — French ly or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

ly. German-Elementary— (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year German, receive half credit 
for this course. 

Elements of grammar, compositions, pronunciation and translation. 

3y. German-Second- Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German ly or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral 
and written practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

No credit will be given for the first semester until the second semester 
has been completed. 

Six hours credit in Spanish will be accepted in lieu of the foregoing. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

15y. Scientific German — (6) Three lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — German 3y or equivalent, and approval of instructor. 
Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German 
grammar. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

ly. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third year, 
three lectures and one laboratory. Chapman, McNamara, Gittinger and 
Thompson. 

Prerequisite — Physiology If. 

A study of the physiological action, toxicity and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances, with special reference to the drugs and prepara- 
tions of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HOf. Official Methods of Biological Assay— (4) Fourth year, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, McNamara, Gittinger and 
Thompson. 

Prerequisites — Physiology If and Pharmacology ly. 

A course in the methods of biological assay prescribed by the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201y. Methods of Biological Assay— (fi) Two lectures and two labo- 
ratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology HOf. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. 

Given in alternate years. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



202y. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (2-4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 1 lOf . 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. 

203y. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) Two 
lectures and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacology HOf and Pharmacology 201y. 

The development of biological assay methods and comparative stand- 
ards for substances for Which there are no satisfactory methods or 
standards. 

Given in alternate years. 

WAy. Research in Pharmacology and Therapeutics — Credit in pro- 
portion to the amount and quality of the work performed. Chapman. 

PHARMACY 

ly. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and two 
laboratories. DuMez, Andrews, Dittrich, Gakenheimer and Dorsch. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

2y. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Three lectures and two laboratories. 
Wolf, Cross, Dittrich and Gakenheimer. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

3f. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, two lectures. DuMez. 
A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special 
emphasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

6s. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and 32 hours of practical work in a hospital pharmacy. Wolf, 
Andrews, Allen, Bellman, Jarowski and Lassahn. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Practical work in drugstore arrangement; the handling of drugs, 
medicines and drug sundries, and in dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101y. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures, one 
laboratory. DuMez, Andrews, Dorsch, Dittrich, Cross and Gakenheimer. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special 
reference to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals 
on a commercial scale. 

HOf or s. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (2-4) Two labora- 
tories. DuMez and Andrews. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy ly and 2y. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

For Graduates 

201 y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lectures, two 
laboratories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plant; crude materials used, their collection, preservation, and 
transformation into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



202y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. DuMez. 

Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with 
special reference to the original and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

203y. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 
Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries in Europe. 

204y. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

ly. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one labora- 
tory. Estabrook and Thornton. 

Prerequisites— Math. 8f and 10s or Math. 21f or 22s. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, mag- 
netism, electricity and light. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101s. Physics, Thermodynamics — (3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Physics ly, Mathematics 23y and Physical Chemistry 
102y. 

A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics and its appli- 
cation to physical and chemical problems. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

If. Physiology — (3) Second year, two lectures, one laboratory. Chap- 
man, McNamara and Gittinger. 

Elementary anatomy and histology of the body, including a study 
of the functions of the various organs and of dietetics. 

ZOOLOGY 

If. General Zoology — (4) First year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Krahl. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian 
form, with emphasis on animal development, structure and functions 
of organs. Introductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

2s. Vertebrate Zoology — (4) Fourth year, three lectures, two labo- 
ratories. Thompson and Krahl. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, 
study of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the 
general physiology and embryology of the principal organs and 
systems of the vertebrate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT BOOKS 

The books required in each course will be announced at the beginning 
of each semester by the teacher in charge. Each student is required to 
have his own text books. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The rules and conditions stated in this prospectus will govern students 
until the next succeeding issue, after which time they will be governed by 
the conditions stated in the latter. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



29 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



SESSION OF 1940-41 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Allen, Benjamin Frank Md. 

Barry, Richard H Pa. 

Bellman, Frank Albert Md. 

Bolth, Franklin Anderson Md. 

Cross, John Milton N.J. 

DeDominicis, Amelia Carmel Md. 

Dittrich, Theodore Thomas Md. 

Dorsch, Joseph Urban Md. 

Foster, Carroll Pross Md. 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian. . . .Md. 

Glickman, Shirley Madelyn Md. 

*Gumenick, Leonard Md. 

Hager, George Phillip, Jr Md. 

Hamlin, Kenneth Eldred, Jr Md. 

Heyman, Bernice Md. 



Jarowski, Charles Md. 

Karel, Leonard Md. 

Keagle, LeRoy Curtis N. J. 

Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Md. 

Levin, Nathan Md. 

*McGinity, Francis Rowland Md. 

McNamara, Benard Patrick Md. 

Shook, Joseph William Md. 

Simonoff, Robert Md. 

Sussman, Bernard Md. 

Thompson, Robert Edward S. D. 

*Tompakov, Sylvan Md. 

Waters, Kenneth Lee Md. 

Zenitz, Bernard Leon Md. 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Codd, Francis Ignatius Md. 

DeGele, George Oscar Md. 

DiGristine, Mary Rosula Md. 

Fainberg, Alvin Jay Md. 

Ginsberg, Samuel Harry Md. 

Glaser, Abraham Ellis Md. 

Goodman, Leon Md. 

Hendin, Walter Md. 

Jernigan, John Mayo, Jr Md. 

Kahn, Reuben Md. 

Kreis, George Joseph, Jr Md. 



Lindenbaum, Albert Md. 

Miller, Manuel Md. 

JMoser, John Taft Md. 

Noveck, Irvin Md. 

Rosenthal, Bernard Md. 

Rudoff, Oscar Md. 

Sarubin, Milton Md. 

Siegel, Harold Md. 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Md. 

Zerwitz, Irving Frank Md. 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Berngartt, Elmar Bernard Md. 

Blankman, Albert Julius Md. 

Clyman, Sidney Gary Md. 

DeBoy, John Michael Md. 

Ehudin, Herbert Md. 

Getka, Milton Stanley Md. 

Goldberg, Milton Md. 

Harrison, Alice Emily Md. 

Jankiewicz, Alfred Marion Md. 

Klavens, Sidney Raymond Md. 

Nollau, Elmer Wilson Md. 



Oken, Jack Md. 

Panamarow, Stephen Md. 

Pritzker, Sherman Md. 

Reisch, Milton Md. 

Rosenberg, Robert Md. 

Sacks, Sidney Md. 

Shochet, Melvin Md. 

Smulovitz, Sidney Md. 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Md. 

Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Md. 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr Md. 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Applebaum, Leonard N. C. 

Caldwell, John Regan Md. 

Carouge, Gilbert Morris Md. 

Cragg, James Phillip Md. 

Eckes, Charles Frederick Md. 

Finkelstein, Sidney Md. 

Gitomer, Marie Md. 

Haase, Frederick Robert Md. 

Hutchinson, William John Md. 

Hyman, Nathan Bernard Md. 

Klotzman, Alfred Md. 

Kkemer, Bekyle Phillip Md. 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Md. 

Levin, Evelyn Shirley Md. 

Levin, Harold Paul Md. 



*Rice, Leonard Marcus Md. 

Rodman, Leonard Md. 

Scheinin, Benjamin Md. 

Schwartz, Nathan Md. 

Schwartz, Theodore Howard Md. 

Shear, Joseph Md. 

Siegel, Alvin Morton Md. 

Simon, Alder Md. 

SlNDLER, MELVYN Md. 

Smith, Morton Md. 

Sober, Norman M<1. 

Steinberg, Sherman Md. 

Wylie, Hamilton Boyd, Jr Md. 

Yarmosky, Jack Joseph Md. 

Yevzeroff, Benjamin Md. 



t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 
X Deceased October 30, 1940. 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Blank, William Md. 

Bosch, Charlotte Thelma Md. 

Cohen, Bernard Stanley Md. 

Dubin, Martin Md. 

Freeman, Emanuel Md. 

Freiman, Joseph Md. 

Futeral, Nathaniel Md. 

Gaber, Jerome Md. 

Gelrud, Jack Md. 

Glushakow, Jay Md. 

Jaslow, Morris Marvin Md. 

Jernigan, Lane McDermott Md. 

Jokubaitis, Bruno Leonard Md. 

*Kahn, Milford Md. 

Kanowsky, Joseph Md. 

*Katz, Doris Adele Md. 

Kiel, August Md. 

*Klein, Theodore Md. 

*Kline, Douglas Theodore Md. 

Leatherman, Albert Gaver, Jr Md. 

Lichter, George Md. 

Marchuk, Nina Md. 

Massing, Emanuel Wolf Md. 



Mazer, Leonard Md. 

Meiser, Edward Taylor Md. 

Mercier, Maurice Weldon Md. 

Myers, Bernard Md. 

Napfel, Ferdinand Joseph Md. 

Nardone, Alfred Flavio Md. 

O'Hara. John James Md. 

Passaro, Edward Joseph Md. 

Pippig, Howard August Md. 

Roth, William Keen Md. 

Ruddie, Israel Morris Md. 

Sachs, Raymond Md. 

Savitz, Melvin Morris Md. 

Smith, Charles Irvel Md. 

Spittel, Robert John, Jr Md. 

Stockton, Walter Wood Md. 

Strauss, Leon Md. 

Wagner, Charles Hammond Md. 

^Wagner, Sadie Sugar Md. 

Weiner, William Md. 

Wlodkowski, Victor Thomas Md. 

Wong, Margaret Md. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Downs, Emma Md. 

*Hill, John Paul Md. 

Jahn, Elsa Florence Md. 



*Lerman, Philip Harry Md. 

Muth, Mary Josephine Md. 

Schacht, Harriet Eleanor Md. 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 1, 1940 

t DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ruddy, Arlo Wayne Nebraska 



t MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Glickman, Shirley Madelyn Md. 

Hager, George Philip Md. 

Heyman, Bernice Md. 



Sussman, Bernard Md. 

Thompson, Robert Edward S. D. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Alessi, Alfred Henry Md. 

Balassone, Francis Salvatore W. Va. 

Caplan, Clarice Md. 

CelOzzi, Matthew Joseph Md. 

Cohen, Harry I Md. 

Cohen, Samuel Md. 

Feinstein, Bernard Samuel Md. 

°Freedman, Leonard Md. 

Glaser, Louis Lester Md. 

Goldberg, Albert Md. 

Greenberg, Joseph Md. 

Gumenick, Leonard Md. 

°Heneson, Irving Jerome Md. 

t°H0PE, Daniel, Jr Md. 

J°Heyman, Albert Md. 

t°lNLOEs, Benjamin Harrison, Jr Md. 

Kamanetz, Irvin Md. 

J°Karns, James Roscoe Md. 

Kline, Sidney Md. 

Klotzman, Robert Md. 

Kramer, Bernard Md. 

J°Kurland, Albert Alexander Md. 

Kursvietis, Anthony J Md. 



Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Md. 

Lerman, Philip H Md. 

Levin, Leon Phillip Md. 

Levy, Irving Md. 

Miller, Edward Md. 

J°Pierpont, Ross Zimmerman Md. 

Poklis, Alphonse Md. 

Richman, Philip Frederick Md. 

i°RicHTER, Conrad Louis Md. 

Rosen, Donald Merle Md. 

°Sachs, Albert Md. 

Sachs, Norman Robert Md. 

Sandler, Solomon Md. 

Schlaen, Mildred -. . . . Md. 

Shook, Joseph William Md. 

Silberg, Edgar Mano Md. 

Simonoff, Robert Md. 

Smith, Daniel E Md. 

Sowbel, Irving Md. 

°Stone, Harry Md. 

t°SupiK, William Joseph Md. 

ZUKERBERG, MORRIS Md. 



f Degree conferred by Graduate Scbool. 

* Did not attend entire session. 

t Combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine. 

° Degree conferred September 1939. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship LeR)Y C. Keaci.e 

Alumni Research Grant Walter Christian Gakbnheimer 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Mildred Schlaen 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize Mildred Schlaen 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Alphonse POLKIS 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Bernard Samuel Feinstein 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

Bernard Samuel Feinstein Leonard Gumenick Philip H. Lerman 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 23 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 

99th Announcement 

Including Accelerated Wartime Program 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1942-1943 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ACCELERATED COURSE IN PHARMACY 

Owing to the increasing need for pharmacists in civilian life to replace those 
who are being inducted into the armed forces of the country, the course in 
pharmacy will be accelerated for the period of the war emergency to enable 
students to complete the regular four-year course in three years. This saving 
in time will be effected by eliminating Summer vacations and some of the 
holidays heretofore scheduled. Instruction in the accelerated course will be- 
gin with the opening of the Fall semester on October 5, 1942. 

Registration days for Fall semester, October 2 and 3, 1942. 



SUMMER COURSES PRIMARILY FOR PHARMACY STUDENTS 

The usual Summer courses in chemistry (inorganic and organic), English, 
mathematics, modern language, physics, zoology, etc., will be offered by the 
School of Pharmacy this Summer (that is, Summer of 1942). Instruction will 
begin on June 8, 1942, and extend over a period of six to eight weeks, depend- 
ing upon the length of the course taken. 

Registration days for Summer courses, June 5 and 6, 1942. 



SUMMER COURSES FOR PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS 

Instruction in the first semester of the second year of the Pre-Dental work 
will be offered by the School of Pharmacy this Summer. Instruction will begin 
on June 8, 1942, and end on September 25, 1942. 

Registration days for the first semester, June 5 and 6, 1942. 

The second semester of the second year of the Pre-Dental work will be 
offered in the Fall semester. Instruction will begin on October 5, 1942, and 
end on January 30, 1943. 

Registration days for the second semester, October 2 and 3, 1942. 






For complete calendar and information relative to courses, fees, etc., see 
catalogue of the School of Pharmacy, a copy of which may be obtained by 
forwarding your request to the following address: Secretary, School of Pharma- 
cy, 32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Information relative to the deferment of pharmacy students may be obtained 
from the Office of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 23 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 

99th Announcement 

Including Accelerated Wartime Program 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1942-1943 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR 

1942-1943 

Summer Semester 
1942 

June 5-6 Friday and Saturday Registration for Summer Semester. 

June 8 , .Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period. 

July 4 Saturday Independence Day — Holiday. 

September 7 Monday Labor Day — Holiday. 

September 25 Friday Summer Semester ends. 



September 23-25, incl Examinations for the removal of con- 
ditions. 



Fall Semester 

October 2-3 Friday and Saturday Registration for Fall Semester. 

October 5 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period. 

November 26 Thursday Thanksgiving Day — Holiday. 

December 19 Saturday Christmas recess begins after the last 

scheduled period. 
December 28 Monday Instruction resumes with the first 

scheduled period. 

1943 

January 1 Friday New Year's Day — Holiday. 

January 30 Saturday Fall Semester ends. 

Spring Semester 

February 5-6 Friday and Saturday Registration for Spring Semester. 

February 8 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period. 

February 22 Monday Washington's Birthday — Holiday. 

April 22 Thursday Easter recess begins after the last 

scheduled period. 
April 26 Monday Instruction resumes with the first 

scheduled period. 

May 28 Friday Spring Semester ends. 

May 29 Saturday Commencement. 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday 
at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. 
(This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 






ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The University General Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity 
to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its faculty of professorial rank; each Faculty Council controls the internal 
affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions : 

College of Agriculture Summer Session 

Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Military Science 

Extension Service and Tactics 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Dentistry 

College of Commerce School of Law 

College of Education School of Medicine 

College of Engineering School of Nursing 

College of Home Economics School of Pharmacy 

Graduate School The University Hospital 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and the 
Hospital are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets ; the others in College Park. 



Board of Regents 

Term Expires 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Chairman, Hagerstown 1943 

Rowland K. Adams, V ice-Chairman, Baltimore 1948 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary, Baltimore 1947 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, Baltimore 1944 

W. Calvin Chesnut, Baltimore 1942 

John E. Semmes, Baltimore 1942 

William P. Cole, Jr., Towson 1949 

Philip C. Turner, Parkton 1950 

President of the University 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 

The General Administrative Board 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Robinson, Dean Wylie, Dean Howell, 
Dean Dumez, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean Steinberg, Dean 
Stamp, Dean Broughton, Dean Stevens, Dean Benjamin, Dr. Cotterman, 
Colonel Wysor, Dr. Huff, Dr. Long, Miss Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Dr. 
Zucker, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. White, Dr. Corbett, Dr. Welsh, Dr. James, 
Dean Reid, Mr. Casbarian. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 

E. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grubb 

Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 

Emeritus Professor 

David M. R. Culbreth Emeritus Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1879); College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
M.D. (1883). 

Professors 

*L. B. Broughton Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1908), M.S. (1911); Ohio State University, Ph.D. 
(1926). 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922); Medical School, London, Ontario, 
M.Sc. (1925); McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

*Charles G. Eichlin Professor of Physics 

Lafayette College, A.B. (1913), M.S. (1921). 

Walter H. Hartung 1 Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918); University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905); American International Academy, Washing- 
ton, D. C, B.S., (1921); Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Honorary). 

Associate Professors 

B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical Law 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 
Thomas C. Grubb Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B., (1930); University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

The faculty is listed as constituted during 1941-42. Changes will be noted in 
subsequent catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of 
the University. 

(1) Representative on the Graduate Council. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



•Norma n E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916); Cornell University. Ph.D. (1931). 
*A. W, Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918); Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), 
Ph. D. (1928). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 

Assistant Professors 

♦Gaylord B. Estabrook Assistant Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in C.E. (1921); Ohio State University, M.S. (1922); Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

♦Gardner P. H. Foley Assistant Professor of English 

Clark University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1926). 
♦Arthur C. Parsons Assistant Professor of Languages 

University of Maryland, A.B. (1926), A.M. (1928). 

♦J. Thomas Pyles Assistant Professor of English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927); Johns Hopkins University, 
Ph.D. (1938). 

\Y. Arthur Purdum Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934), Ph.D. (1941). 

Frank J. Slama Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. 
(1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

*Edgar B. Starkey Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

♦Guy P. Thompson Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

*E. G. Vanden BosciiE..Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry 
Lebanon Valley College, A.B. (1922); University of Maryland, M.S. (1924), Ph.D. 
(1927). 

Instructors 

Amelia C. De Dominicts 1 Instructor in Botany 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930). B.S. (1931), M.S. (1932). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912); University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

Assistants 

Benjamin Frank Allen 2 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

♦Kenneth L. Andrew Assistant in Physics 

Friends University, A.B. (1940). 

Richard H. Barry Wm. R. Warner Fellow in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Duquesne University, B.S. (1939); University of Maryland, M.S. (1941). 

Frank Albert Bellman 2 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Theodore Thomas Dittrich < Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1933); B.S. (1934). 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Resigned April 15, 1942. 

2 On leave — United States Army. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Joseph Urban Dorsch Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1939). 

Walter C. Gakenheimer Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938), M.S. (1941). 

Shirley M. Glickman 1 Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937), M.S. (1940). 

Charles Jarowski Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

LeRoy C. Keagle H. A. B. Dunning Fellow in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1940). 

*Vernon Edward Krahl Assistant in Zoology 

University of Pittsburgh, B.S. (1939), M.S. (1940). 

Norbert Gordon Lassahn Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

George Allen Moulton, Jr Assistant in Pharmacology 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, B.S. (1939); Purdue University, M.S. (1940). 

John A. Scigliano Assistant in Bacteriology 

Creighton University, B.S. (1941). 

Joseph William Shook 2 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

Milton Wilbert Skolaut 3 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Tetfas, B.S. (1941). 

Frank Pierre Smith Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Buffalo, B.S. (1941). 

Robert Edward Thompson Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938); M.S. (1940). 

Bernard L. Zenitz Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Assisting Staff 

Thelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S Librarian 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Ann B. Lemen-Clark Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Lotz-Gue '. Senior Stenographer 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Resigned March 18, 1942. 

2 Resigned March 15, 1942. 

3 Appointed March 15, 1942. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a forward- 
looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in the State of 
Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly educated and 
better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of medical service was 
to be properly developed. It was incorporated on January 27, 1841, and the 
first course of lectures was begun in November of the same year. The College 
continued to operate as an independent institution until 1904, when it was amal- 
gamated with the group of professional schools in Baltimore then known as 
the University of Maryland. It became a department of the State University 
when the old University of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State 
College in 1920. With but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has 
continuously exercised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, the 
collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential in the 
education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants for the 
intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the facilities and 
instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the practice of the 
other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is a commodious 
six-story laboratory and classroom building especially designed to house the 
work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped throughout, and offers every 
facility for the undergraduate student to carry on the work necessary to acquire 
a thorough knowledge of pharmacy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit 
of research in the various fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation rooms with 
a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this building. These are 
equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstrations in the sciences, with 
lanterns and screens and the other devices commonly used in lecture and 
recitation worlc 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the various 
courses in pharmacy ; for the several courses in chemistry ; for instruction in 
botany and pharmacognosy ; for work in the biological sciences, zoology, bac- 
teriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the pursuit of research in any 
of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted reading- 
room with accommodations for 100 students, and stack-room space to accom- 
modate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library contains more than 
6,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy and the collateral sciences. 
Additional library facilities are available at the Medical School Library, which 
is only a few doors away, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, 
and the libraries of the various departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion, Inc., and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of phar- 
maceutical education; and all institutions accredited by the Council or holding 
membership in the Association must maintain certain minimum requirements 
with respect to number and qualifications of faculty members, physical plant, 
laboratory and library facilities, curriculum, admission, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and its 
diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of curriculum are the same 
for all students taking this course, but the work of the fourth year may be 
varied within the limits set forth on page 19. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, phar- 
macology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science (M.S.) is con- 
ferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have completed at least one 
year of graduate work and have presented a satisfactory thesis. Candidates for 
this degree may take all of the work in the School of Pharmacy. Candidates 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major 
portion of the required work in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for 
these degrees, however, must register in the Graduate School of the University 
and meet the requirements of that School. For detailed information concerning 
registration, requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Graduate 
School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., and the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY 

SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certificate, 
or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by 
an acredited agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for graduation 
not less than 15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Required 
subjects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 
general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agriculture, commercial, 
drawing, home economics, shops, etc.) foreign languages, mathematics, physical 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or 

preparatory school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or 

university entrance. Total, 8 units, of which not more than four shall be 
vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, and 
constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It presupposes a 
school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and 
for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double laboratory periods 
in any science or vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class 
exercise. Normally, not more than three units are allowed for four years of 
English. If, however, a fifth course has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the 
certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or the Depart- 
ment of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon presentation of the 
proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not fully meet these 
requirements may be required to present further evidence of ability to undertake 
college work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include 
an appropriate examination. Such examination will be given during the first 
week of each of the months of July, August and September at College Park, Md. 
Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not located 
in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should have attained 
the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school does not have such 
quality grade, then the applicant's school grades must be at least ten points or 
one letter higher than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission ey Examination : An applicant from a secondary school who is 
not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either of 
two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions 
for permission to report at the University for an examination, the result of 
which will be used in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine 
whether the applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on 
presenting evidence of having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations 
in the subjects required for graduation from an accredited secondary school. 
Such examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th Street, Xew York City, the Regents of the University of the 
State of Xew York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the 
State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director of 
Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty Council 
of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit for 
work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., will receive credit for the courses which 
correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the first three years 
of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced standing, provided he presents 
an official transcript of his record and a proper certificate of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student presenting 
evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic institution equal 
in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary educational 
requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to Freshman Class 
from Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does not 
desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a special student 
and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will not be eligible for 
graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty Council reserves the 
right to decide whether or not the preliminary training of the applicant is 
sufficient. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the office of 
the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the Dean of 
Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names of all schools 
attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office of the Director of 
Admissions with the required photograph and the two dollar investigation fee. 
Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Director of Admissions will secure 
all necessary credentials after the application has been received. Do not make 
application unless reasonably certain that preparation is sufficient or unless 
intending to complete preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed 
for securing credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies 
for the study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF 
PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows : 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file with 
the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for regis- 
tration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required 
to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simul- 
taneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one 
dollar ; all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent 
school or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and 
all actual drugstore experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office of 
the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. A student entering for the first time must matriculate 
before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar on 
the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a student be per- 
mitted to enter classes before he has completed registration. Students who fail 
to register on the days scheduled are required to pay a late registration fee of 
five dollars ($5.00). The last day for registration with the payment of the 
late registration fee is Saturday at noon following the last day scheduled for 
registration in the calendar. This rule may be waived only upon the written 
recommendation of the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 

SUMMARY OF FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 1 10.00 

Non-Residents 120.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 25.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per semester) 5.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are taking 
courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a semester's work, will be charged 
the full fees. Students taking less than this amount of work will be charged on 
a subject basis. Students taking extra work will be charged an additional fee 
for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student is 
required to pay $6.00 each semester (Freshmen students $5.00) to the "Students' 
Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extracurricular activities. The 
expenditure of approximately $20.00 per semester is necessary for the purchase 
of books, weights, dissecting instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

Fixed charge of $6.00 per semester credit hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who will pay 
only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester credit hour.) 
Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's record. 
This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at the time 
the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a student in any school 
or college of the University is regarded as registration in the University of 
Maryland, but when such student transfers to a professional school of the 
University or from one professional school to another, he will be required to 
pay the matriculation fee charged by the school to which he transfers. 

A tuition fee of $110.00 per semester is charged a student who is a resident 
of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is not a resident 
of Maryland is charged an additional $10.00 per semester. The tuition fee must 
be paid during the registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $25.00 per semester is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the regis- 
tration period at the beginning of each semester. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A fee and deposit of $5.00 per semester is charged to cover locker rentals and 
excessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration period at the begin- 
ning of each semester. Any portion not used will be refunded at the end of 
the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later than 
the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The penalty fee 
for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid before the end 
of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for an examination to 
remove a condition or for a special examination must be paid before the student 
takes the examination and the receipt for payment must be presented to the 
teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be rigidly 
adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will automatically 
disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other privileges of the 
School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at the 
time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State for at least 
one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his regis- 
tration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year ; provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this 
State by maintaining such residence for at least one full calendar year. How- 
ever, the right of the student (minor) to change from a non-resident to a 
resident status must be established by him prior to registration for a semester 
in any academic year. 

REBATES 

The matriculation fee is not subject to rebate. In cases of withdrawal from 
the school within thirty days from the beginning of instruction in a semester, 
the Dean may request the Comptroller to refund one-half the amount of the 
tuition and laboratory fees paid for such semester. In the case of illness, or 
other unusual circumstances, the Dean may, with the approval of the President 
of the University, make such refund as seems just. In all cases of withdrawal 
from school, immediate notice in writing must be given to the Dean. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regular 
session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which are 
given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the beginning 
of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence from class. In 
case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physician, a student may register 
not later than the fifteenth day following the announced opening of the regular 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be admitted 
to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has not attended at 
least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will be 
counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lecture or 
laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the session 
and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are held at the close 
of each semester, and the standing of a student in each subject is determined 
by the average of all the ratings received during the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student received a 
grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be held only on 
the dates scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates announced by the Dean. 
A student who is conditioned in the first semester must remove the condition 
by the end of the succeeding semester, but will not be permitted to take an 
examination within thirty days from the date on which the conditional rating 
was received. Conditions received in the second semester must be removed 
before the end of the next semester. Special examinations for the removal of 
conditions will be held immediately preceding the opening of the regular Fall 
session. A condition which is not removed will become a failure, and the course 
must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course must report 
to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the absence will permit. 
If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justifiable (as if due to illness or 
other exceptional circumstances) he will give permission for a deferred exami- 
nation in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following 
symbols : 

A, Excellent (93-100) ; B, Good (87-92) ; C, Fair (80-86) ; D, Passed 
(75-79) ; E, Conditioned (60-74) ; F, Failed (below 60) ; I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades : 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 
Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may be 
raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subsequent exami- 
nation on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient attend- 
ance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course without the 
consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is required to repeat 
the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper excuse for 
not presenting himself for examination or for not completing the work of any 
course. It is not understood to signify work of an inferior quality. It will be 
replaced by a definite grade when all requirements for the course have been met. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next succeeding 
year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled work of the pre- 
ceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will be considered to have 
attained this rank if he receives passing grades in not less than four-fifths of 
the scheduled work, except as hereinafter stated for promotion from the third 
to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all of the 
scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 70 for the 
work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of the 
scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails to obtain 
passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will be required 
to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the work 
for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five points in 
excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy requires, 
evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of a student in 
relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the faculty in deter- 
mining the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence of the community as 
a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobriety, temperate habits, respect 
for authority and associates, and honesty in the transaction of business affairs 
as a student will be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary 
to the granting of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, will 
render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal rule 
against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will be 
conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 19). The work of 
the last year must have been in courses offered in this school and must 
have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point count 
for each of the last two years of not less than twice the total semester 
hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE MARYLAND 

PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical experience 
for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized school or 
college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical experience required to the 
extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure employ- 
ment, if possible, before entering the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself financially 
during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available may be profit- 
ably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in the preparation of 
studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full need not be dismayed, 
however, as Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to secure suitable 
employment. A register of positions available in drug stores is kept in the office 
of the Secretary of the School where it may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 
Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharmacist 
of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor of chemistry 
in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still active, has con- 
tributed $1,000.00 annually for a period of more than ten years to establish a 
research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is awarded 
annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four years of college 
work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for investigational work in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. 

William R. Warner & Co. Research Fellowships 
On July 1, 1939, William R. Warner & Co., Inc., provided the funds to 
establish three fellowships to be known as The William R. Warner & Co., Inc., 
Fellowships in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. One of these fellowships has been 
continued. It is a full-time fellowship paying $900.00 per year, and is open to 
students who have completed their undergraduate work. The term of the 
fellowship is for one year, but may be extended for a longer period. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 
In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many years 
a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who was active 
in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, and who was 
especially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy young people, Mrs. 
Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be awarded annually by the 
faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown superior proficiency in his or 
her work in practical and commercial pharmacy. The award amounts to 
approximately $100.00. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to deposit 
each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a research grant, 
to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Committee on the Research 
Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to engage in pharmaceutical 
research in the School of Pharmacy during the next scholastic year. The 
research conducted shall be of general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be 
submitted for publication in one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed 
and accepted. 

The Fairchild Scholarship (National) 

Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers a scholarship annually, 
amounting to $500.00 in cash, to pharmacy students of the United States. The 
scholarship is awarded on the basis of a competitive examination to candidates 
who are high-school graduates and who have successfully completed at least 
three years' work in a school or college of pharmacy or department of pharmacy 
of a university, holding membership in the American Association of Colleges of 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Pharmacy. Each school, college, or department of pharmacy is limited to two 
candidates. The examination will be held at the School of Pharmacy on the 
second Monday of June. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The stipend 
for the assistantships is $550.00 for the academic year, and the remission of all 
graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didactic work 
as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in which they are 
serving. The usual amount of services required does not exceed 12 to 14 clock- 
hours per week, which enables an assistant to carry approximately a full 
graduate program. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 
In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eagerness 
for service and helpfulness to others, which were striking characteristics of 
Professor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made contributions 
to establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this fund to members 
of the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 
On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler of Balti- 
more, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available to junior 
and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recommendation 
of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 
School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is creditable, 
and who has attained the highest general average, not below B. Certificates of 
Honor will be awarded to the three students having the highest general average, 
next to the winner of the general prize, provided this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three students 
having the highest general average, provided this does not fall below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 
In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of chem- 
istry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the Faculty 
to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior 
proficiency in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. The recipient must 
stand high in all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, the pro- 
fessor of chemistry will be guided in his judgment of the student's ability as 
much by observation and personal contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 
The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of approxi- 
mately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the Faculty 
of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the highest general 
average throughout the course in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 
In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 1882), placed 
in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student who has done excep- 
tional work throughout the course in Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Membership Prizes 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year is 
awarded annually to three students of the third-year class, selected by the 
Faculty, who have attained high standing in both theoretical and practical 
pharmacy. One of these awards has been endowed by Dr. E. F. Kelly, and the 
other two by the Baltimore Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Council 

The student Council is an organization of students established for the purpose 
of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular activities of the 
student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum among students when 
in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and encourage a class spirit which 
will reflect honor on the splendid traditions of the School. The council consists 
of twelve active members, three elected by each of the four classes, four 
ex-officio members who are the presidents of the respective classes, and a 
faculty adviser. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges that are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 
Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment in 
scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. All candidates selected for 
membership must have completed 75 credit hours of college work, and must be 
approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of students in 
the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the end that their 
interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awakened and guided; and 
to familiarize them with the conditions existing in and the problems confronting 
their profession. 

The following are the officers of the Auxiliary : 

Officers (1941-42) 

President — Sidney Sacks, Fourth- Year Class. 

First Vice-President — Theodore Howard Schwartz, Third- Year Class. 

Second Vice-President — Emanuel Wolf Massing, Second- Year Class. 

Secretary — Evelyn Shirley Levin, Third- Year Class. 

Treasurer — Melvin Shochet, Fourth-Year Class. 

Editor — Alder Simon, Third- Year Class. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Leonard Rodman, Third- Year Class. 

Executive Committee 

Warren Eldred W r eaver, Fourth-Year Class. 
Beryle Phillip Kremer, Third- Year Class. 
Joseph Freiman, Second- Year Class. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This society continued its separate existence as such or 
as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was 
formed. Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the 
Society remained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 
The active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers : 

Officers 1941-42 

HONORARY PRESIDENT— Charles E. Sonnenburg 

PRESIDENT OF THE ASSOCIATION— Otto W. Muehlhause 

4943 Belair Road, Baltimore, Md. 

FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT— Jacob H. Greenfeld 

Lafayette Avenue and Poplar Grove Street, Baltimore, Md. 

SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT— Stephen J. Provenza 

109 E. Montgomery Street, Baltimore, Md. 

SECRETARY— B. Olive Cole 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

TREASURER— Mrs. Frank M. Budacz 

1744 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

CHAIRMAN— Otto W. Muehlhause 

The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 

The Officers 

MEMBERS-AT-LARGE : 

Frank J. Grau 

Frank R. Paul 

T. Ellsworth Ragland 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in the advancement 
of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing committee, known as the 
Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of this Committee are to repre- 
sent the Association in all matter pertaining to the School of Pharmacy and 
pharmaceutical education. The following are the present members of this 
Committee : 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Chairman Otto W. Muehlhause 

William F. Reindollar Stephen J. Provenza 

John C. Bauer L. M. Kantner 

Simon Solomon L. N. Richardson 

Charles S. Austin, Jr. Fitzgerald Dunning 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



19 



CURRICULUM 
COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



Fall, Summer 



Spring 





Hre 


. Per Week 


s 

E 

u 


Hrs 


. Per Week 




Title and Number of Course 


Q 


re 


1 


u 
re 

5 




1 


9 

•5 

U 


. First Year 










3 

3 
3 


3 

5 


6 

8 
3 


3^ 


-t. tChemistry If, s, Inorganic and Qualitative 


3 
3 
3 


5 


8 
3 
3 


4 

3 
3 


4^ 


3 tEnglish If, 8, Survey and Composition 


3 ^ 








i fMathematics, 9 or 22 




3 
3 




3 

3 

1 


3 /* 


b~ tModern Language If, 8 or 3 f, 8, French or 


3 

1 
3 




3 
1 
9 

4 


3 

1 
4 




3 ' 








1 -^ 


•Zoology 2, General (1) 


6 
4 
















Second Year 


18 

2 


17 






2 
3 
4 
3 


4 
4 

4 
2 


6 
7 
8 
5 


i"y 




3 
4 
3 
2 

2 


4 
4 

2 
3 

4 


7 
8 
5 
5 

6 


4 

5 
4 
3 


4 ^ 




5 -^ 




4 £ 
















Third Year 


18 

4 


17 




2 


4 


6 


4 ^ 




2 


6 


8 


4 




£> Chemistry 50, Pharmaceutical Testing 


2 
3 

3 
3 


6 


8 
3 

6 
9 


4' 












3 •■ 


3 Pharmacology 50f, 8, Pharm., Toxicology 


3 
3 
2 

3 
2 


3 
6 


6 
9 
2 

3 

5 


3 
4 
2 


3 
6 


3 ^ 




4 ^ 










3 




3 




Fourth Year (Required) 
•t Chemistry HOf, s, Medicinal Products 


17 

2 
3 


18 
2" 


i Economics 50, Pharmaceutical 


3 






A^O-*T First Aid 1, Standard 


1 

3 
2 
2 




1 

3 
4 
4 


i"'*< 


/ Law 51, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations... 












3 "^ 


_3 Pharmacy lOlf, s, Manufacturing 


2 


2 


4 


3 


2 
2 


3 ^ 


3- Pharmacy 52, Pharmaceutical Practice 


i~/ 


Pharmacology 110, Biological Assaying 


2 


4 


6 


4 

6 




Electives 








6 "^ 




1 
2 


2 

4 

3 


3 

6 
3 
3 
6 
6 
4 
3 
3 

4 


1 
2 


2 

4 

3 

6" 

4 
4 


3 

6 
3 
3 
6 
6 
4 
3 
3 

4 

7 




Fourth Year (Electives) 


18 

2 

4 

3 
2 
4 
2 
3 
3 

2 


17 
2 


Botany 102f, 8, Advanced Vegetable 


4 • 


Chemistry 109, Glassworking 


1 


•Chemistry 102Af, s, Physical 


3 


3 


3 . 


•Chemistry 102Bf, •, Physical 


6 
4 
4 


2 


•Chemistry 103 f, 8, Physiological 


2 


2 


4 i 


Chemistry lllf.s, Medicinal Products 


2' 


•Language 5f, s, Scientific German 


5 
3 


3 
3 


3 , 


•Mathematics 23f, s, Calculus 






3 , 


Pharmacy 102f, s, Advanced Prescription 
Compounding 


4 


4 
4 


2 • 


t'Zoology 4, Vertebrate Zoology 




3 


4 , 















flnstruction in these courses is given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

"Additional courses approved by the College of Arts and Science for credit toward the fulfillment of 
medical school entrance requirements. 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 



First Year 

Botany 1 

Chemistry If, s 

English If, 9 

Mathematics, 8 or 21 

Mathematics, 9 or 22 

Modern Language, If, s or 3 f, s.. 

Speech If, s 

Zoology 2 



Total. 



Second Year 



Botany 2 

Botany 3 

Chemistry 8f, s. 
Pharmacy If, 8.. 

Physics If, 8 

Physiology 1 



Total. 



Third Year 

Bacteriology 1 

Bacteriology 115 

Chemistry 4 

Chemistry SO 

Economics 31 

Pharmacology 50 f, 8 

Pharmacy 50 f, 8 

Pharmacy 51 



Total. 



Fourth Year (Required) 

Chemistry HOf, s 

Economics 50 

First Aid 1 

Law51 

Pharmacy lOlf, s 

Pharmacy 52 

Pharmacology 110 

Electives 



Total 



Fourth Year (Electives) 

Taxonomy lOlf, s 

Botany 102f, 8 

Chemistry, 109 

Chemistry 102Af, s 

Chemistry 102Bf, s 

Chemistry 103f, s 

Chemistry lllf, s 

Language 5f, 8 

Mathematics 23f, s 

Pharmacy, 102f, s 

Zoology 4 



First Year 

Second Year. 
Third Year... 
Fourth Year. 

Total 



Summary 



Didactic 



512 



32 
96 
128 
96 
32 



384 



400 



96 
32 
16 

48 
64 
32 
32 
214f 



534 



48 



512 

384 
400 

534 



,830 



Laboratory 



48 
160 



96 



304 



64 
64 
128 
128 
64 
48 



496 



96 
192 



608 



48 



64 

32 

64 

416t 



624 



64 

128 
96 



192 
128 
128 



128 
64 



304 
496 
608 
624 



2,032 



Total 



96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
144 



816 



64 
96 
224 
256 
160 
80 



96 

96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
288 

32 



1,008 



96 
80 
16 
48 

128 
64 
96 

630f 



,158 



96 
192 
96 
96 
192 
192 
128 
96 
96 
128 
112 



816 



1,008 
1,158 



3,862 



Credit 
Hours 



35 



140 



fAverage. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 
BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology — (4) Third year, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Grubb and Scigliano. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of prevention 
and control of communicable diseases. Fall, Summer. 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, two lectures, two labora- 
tories. Grubb and Scigliano. 

A study of the principles of immunity including the preparation and use of 
the biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious 
diseases. Spring. 

For Graduates 
200f, s. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. Grubb. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. Fall, Spring, Summer. 
Given in alternate years. 

201f, s. Special Problems in Bacteriology — Grubb. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology, including library 
reading and conferences with the instructor. Credit determined by amount and 
quality of work performed. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, three lectures, one laboratory. Slama 
and DeDominicis. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification and 
physiology of plant structures. Spring. 

2. Vegetable Histology— (2) Second year, two laboratories. Slama and 
DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including practice in 
the examination of the official powdered drugs. Fall, Summer. 

3. General Pharmacognosy— (4) Second year, two lectures, two labora- 
tories. Slama and DeDominicis. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1 and 2. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, with 
special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in identification and in the 
detection of adulterations. Spring. 



Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are number 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The letters following the number of a course indicates a full-year course. The 
absence of a letter indicates that the course runs for one semester only. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued 
one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one kcturc 
or recitation period. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

lOlf, s. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2) One lecture, one labora- 
tory. Slama. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local flora. Emphasis will be placed on official drug plants. Instruction 
will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. Elective for students who con- 
template taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. Fall, Spring, Summer. 
Given in alternate years. 

102f, s. Plant Anatomy— (8) Two lectures and two laboratories. Slama and 
DeDominicis. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special 
emphasis placed on the structures of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 
Fall, Spring, Summer. 

For Graduates 

201f, s. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and 
micro-chemical standpoints, included practice in identification and detection 
of adulterants. Fall, Spring, Summer. Given in alternate years. 

202f, s. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Slama. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identi- 
fication and detection of adulterants. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

203f, s. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to amount and 
quality of work performed. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

CHEMISTRY 

If, s. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (8) First 
year, three lectures, two laboratories. Vanden Bosche, Wich and Smith. 

A study of the non-metals and metals with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental prin- 
ciples, the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic quali- 
tative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. Fall, Spring, 
Summer. 

8f, s. Organic Chemistry — (8) Second year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Starkey, Keagle and Zenitz. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry If, s. 

General organic chemistry, including aliphatic and aromatic derivatives. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. 

4. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Hartung, Wich and Jarowski. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry If, s. and 8f, s. 

A study of quantitative analytical procedures and theory. Fall, Summer. 

50. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Jarowski. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 4. 

Quantitative chemical methods of analysis of drugs and medicines, with 
special reference to official products and procedures. Spring. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

109. Glassworking — (1) One laboratory, fourth year, either semester. 
Vanden Bosche, Starkey and Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of glass. 
Fall, Spring or Summer. 

102Af, s. Physical Chemistry — (6) Three lectures. Vanden Bosche. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 8f, s. and 4 and Physics If, s. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in the 
laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, 
elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, 
etc., will be discussed. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

102Bf, s. Physical Chemistry — (2-4) One or two laboratories. Vanden 
Bosche. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 102Af, s., or may be taken simultaneously with 
102Af, s. 

The course consists of quantitative experiments designed to demonstrate 
physico-chemical principles, illustrate practical applications and acquaint the 
student with precision apparatus. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

103f, s. Physiological Chemistry — (8) Two lectures, two laboratories. 
Chapman, Gittinger, Thompson and Moulton. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry If, s., 8f, s. and 4 and Physiology 1. 

A general survey of the subject, including a study of digestion, metabolism, 
excretion, enzymes, hormones, vitamins and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

HOf, s. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Three lectures. Hartung 
and Zenitz. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 8f, s. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the syntheses and chemical properties 
of the important medicinal products. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

lllf, s. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (1-4) Two laboratories, Har- 
tung and Zenitz. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry HOf, s., or may be taken simultaneously with HOf, s. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical 
properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

117. Organic Analysis — (2) One laboratory. Starkey. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry lllf, s. 

A course devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative analysis. The 
work includes the identification of unknown organic compounds. Fall, Spring, 
Summer. 

118. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2) One laboratory. Starkey. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry lllf, s. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic com- 
pounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen and 
halogens are carried out, and representative synthesis, more difficult than those 
of Chemistry 8f, s., are studied. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

For Graduates 

200f, s. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Har- 
tung and Starkey. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry HOf, s. and lllf, s. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reaction of selected groups of phar- 
maceutically and pharmacologically important groups of non-basic nature. (Not 
given 1942-43.) 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

201f, s. Chemistry of Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry HOf, s. and 11 If, s. 

A survey of the chemical structure and the reactions of pharmaceutical^ and 
pharmacologically important bases. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses — (1-8) Laboratory work and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 118. 

A study of fundamental and basic chemical procedures employed in the 
synthesis of various drugs and their intermediates, and a survey of their 
application. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

203f, s. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (2) Hartung. 

Reports of progress and discussion of the problems encountered in research 
and the presentation of papers which survey the recent developments of phar- 
maceutical chemistry reported in the current literature. 

Required of all students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry throughout 
their period of matriculation. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

204. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory. Hartung. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 117 and 118. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to 
official and commercial, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and 
derivatives. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

205. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit to be determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

31. Elements of Economics — (3) Third year, three lectures. Cole and 
Glickman. 

A study of the general principles of economics — production, exchange, dis- 
tribution, and consumption of wealth. Spring. 

50. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, two lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Cole and Glickman. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail phar- 
macies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including practice in 
bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. Fall, Summer. 

51. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, three lectures. 
Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special reference to 
the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and State laws and regu- 
lations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, cosmetics and phar- 
maceutical preparations. Spring. 

ENGLISH 

If, s. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Pyles and 
Foley. 

Prerequisite — Three units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an historical 
study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. Fall, Spring, Summer. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 

SPEECH 

If, s. Reading and Speaking — (2) First year, one lecture. Pyles. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible ; the 
preparation and delivery of short original speeches ; impromptu speaking ; 
reference reading, short reports, etc. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

FIRST AID 
1. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, one lecture. 
Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. Spring. 

MATHEMATICS 

8. Elements of College Mathematics — (3) First year, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One year of high school algebra. Required of those students 
who do not have the prerequisite for Math. 21. 

Quadratic equations ; theory of equations ; exponentials ; logarithms ; binomial 
theorem ; permutations and combinations ; trigonometric functions ; solution of 
triangles ; trigonometric equations and identities. Fall, Summer. 

9. Elements of College Mathematics — (3) First year, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Math. 8. 

Cartesian coordinates ; the straight line ; the circle and the ellipse ; graphing 
of elementary algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions ; elementary 
theory of differentiation and integration. Spring. 

21. College Algebra and Plane Trigometry — (3) First year, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Foundations of algebra ; binomial and multinomial expansions ; progressions ; 
determinants ; elements of the theory of numbers ; combinatorial analysis and 
probabilities ; complex numbers ; theory of equations ; exponential functions and 
logarithms ; principles of trigonometry. Fall, Summer. 

22. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 
Prerequisite — Math. 21. 

Cartesian and polar coordinates ; line and circle ; curves of the second order ; 
higher algebraic and transcendental curves; periodgrams; solid analytical 
geometry. Spring. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

23f, s. Calculus — (6) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisites — Math. 21, 22, and approval of the instructor. 

Limits, derivatives and differentials ; maxima and minima ; curvature ; evolutes 
and envelopes ; the elements of curve theory ; elementary theory of functions ; 
partial derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals ; multiple integrals ; calcu- 
lation of arcs, areas, volumes and moments ; expansion in series. Fall, Spring, 
Summer. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

If, s. French -Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

A student who offers two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, will receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

3f, s. French- Second- Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — French If, s. or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation of narra- 
tive and technical prose. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

If, s. German -Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

A student who offers two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year German, will receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, compositions, pronunciation and translation. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. 

3f, s. German-Second- Year — (6) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German If, s. or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The 
assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous 
training. 

No credit will be given for the first semester until the second semester has 
been completed. 

Six hours credit in Spanish will be accepted in lieu of the foregoing. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 
5f, s. Scientific German — (6) Three lectures. Parsons. 
Prerequisite — German 3f, s. or equivalent, and approval of instructor. 
Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German grammar. 
Fall, Spring, Summer. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

50f, s. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third year, 
three lectures and one laboratory. Chapman, Gittinger, Thompson and Moulton. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 1. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicity and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

110. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Thompson and Moulton. 

Prerequisites — Physiology 1 and Pharmacology 50f, s. 

A course in the methods of biological assay prescribed by the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. Fall, Summer. 

For Graduates 

201f, s. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 110. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological assay and 
a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay of therapeutic 
substances. Fall, Spring, Summer. Given in alternate years. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 

202f, s. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (2-4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 110. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the determination 
of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

203f, s. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacology 110 and Pharmacology 201f, s. 

The development of biological assay methods and comparative standards for 
substances for which there are no satisfactory methods or standards. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. Given in alternate years. 

204f, s. Research in Pharmacology and Therapeutics — Credit in pro- 
portion to the amount and quality of the work performed. Chapman. 

PHARMACY 

If, s. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and two 
laboratories. DuMez, Purdum, Gakenheimer and Dorsch. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical 
calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of 
galenical preparations. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

50f, s. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Three lectures and two laboratories. 
Wolf, Dittrich, Dorsch and Gakenheimer. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy If, s. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. Fall, Spring, 
Summer. 

51. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, two lectures. DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special emphasis 
on the history of American pharmacy. Fall, Summer. 

52. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, lectures, demonstrations, 
and 32 hours of practical work in a hospital pharmacy. Wolf, Purdum, Allen, 
Bellman, Lassahn and Skolaut. 

„ Prerequisite — Pharmacy If, s. and 50f, s. 

Practical work in drugstore arrangement; the handling of drugs, medicines 
and drug sundries, and in dispensing in hospital pharmacies. Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
lOlf, s. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures, one 

laboratory. DuMez, Purdum, Dorsch and Gakenheimer. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special reference 

to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 

scale. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

102f, s. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (2-4) Two laboratories. 
DuMez and Purdum. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy If, s. and 50f, s. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding special 
prescription and galenical preparations. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

For Graduates 
201f, s. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lectures, two 
laboratories. DuMez. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the standpoint of 
plant; crude materials used, their collection, preservation, and transformation 
into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

202f, s. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the original and development of the works of drug standards and 
the pharmaceutical periodicals. Fall, Spring, Summer. Given in alternate years. 

203f, s. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries in Europe. Fall, Spring, Summer. Given in alternate years. 

204f, s. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

If, s. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook and Andrew. 

Prerequisites— Math. 8 and 9 or Math. 21 or 22. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, 
electricity and light. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
101. Physics, Thermodynamics — (3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Physics, If, s., Mathematics 23f, s. and Physical Chemistry 

102Af,s. and Bf, s. 
A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics and its application to 

physical and chemical problems. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

1. Physiology — (3) Second year, two lectures, one laboratory. Chapman, 
Thompson and Gittinger. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology designed to meet the require- 
ments of students of pharmacy. Fall, Summer. 

ZOOLOGY 

2. General Zoology — (4) First year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Krahl. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian form, 
with emphasis on animal development, structure and functions of organs. Intro- 
ductory discourses on the basic biological principles. Fall, Summer. 

4. Vertebrate Zoology — (4) Fourth year, three lectures, two laboratories. 
Thompson and Krahl. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, study of 
the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the general physiology 
and embryology of the principal organs and systems of the vertebrate animal, 
with emphasis on the cat. Spring. 

TEXT BOOKS 
The books required in each course will be announced at the beginning of 
each semester by the teacher in charge. Each student is required to have his 
own text books. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 
The rules and conditions stated in this prospectus will govern students until 
the next succeeding issue, after which time they will be governed by the con- 
ditions stated in the latter. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



29 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 
Session of 1941-42 



f GRADUATE STUDENTS 



'Alien, Benjamin Frank Maryland 

Barry, Richard H Pennsylvania 

'Bellman, Frank Albert Maryland 

Bolth, Franklin Anderson Maryland 

Chiang, Ming Chien China 

Cross, John Milton New Jersey 

Dittrich, Theodore Thomas Maryland 

Dorsch, Joseph Urban Maryland 

Foster, Carroll Pross Maryland 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian... .Maryland 

'Glickman, Shirley Madelyn Maryland 

'Hager, George Philip, Jr Maryland 

Jarowski, Charles Ignatius Maryland 

Keagle, LeRoy Curtis New Jersey 



Krahl, Vernon Edward Pennsylvania 

Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Maryland 

Moulton, George Allen, Jr.. .New Hampshire 

Nusinow, Samuel Maryland 

Rath, Maurice Monroe New Jersey 

Scigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

*Shook, Joseph William Maryland 

Simonoff, Robert Maryland 

*Skolaut, Milton Wilbert Texas 

Smith, Pierre Frank New York 

Sussman, Bernard Maryland 

Thompson, Robert Edward....South Dakota 

Waters, Kenneth Lee Virginia 

Zenitz, Bernard Leon Maryland 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Berngartt, Elmar Bernard Maryland 

Clyman, Sidney Gary Maryland 

DeBoy, John Michael Maryland 

Getka, Milton Stanley Maryland 

Goldberg, Milton Maryland 

Harrison, Alice Emily Maryland 

Jankiewicz, Alfred Marion Maryland 

Klavens, Sidney Raymond Maryland 

Nollau, Elmer Wilson Maryland 

Oken, Jack Maryland 



Panamarow, Stephen Maryland 

Pritzker, Sherman Maryland 

Reisch, Milton Maryland 

Sacks, Sidney Maryland 

Shochet, Melvin W Maryland 

Smulovitz, Sidney Maryland 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Maryland 

Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Maryland 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr Maryland 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Applebaum, Leonard North Carolina 

Blankman, Albert Julius Maryland 

'Caldwell, John Regan Maryland 

Carouge, Gilbert Morris Maryland 

Cragg, James Phillip Maryland 

Ehudin, Herbert Maryland 

Haase, Frederick Robert Maryland 

Hyman, Nathan Bernard Maryland 

Klotzman, Alfred Maryland 

Kremer, Beryle Philip Maryland 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland 

Levin, Evelyn Shirley Maryland 

Levin, Harold Paul Maryland 

Myers, Morton Maryland 

Rodman, Leonard Maryland 



Rosenberg, Robert Maryland 

Scheinin, Benjamin Maryland 

Schwartz, Nathan Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Howard Maryland 

Shear, Joseph Maryland 

Siegel, Alvin Morton Maryland 

Simon, Alder Maryland 

Sindler, Melvyn Maryland 

Smith, Morton Maryland 

Sober, Norman Maryland 

Steinberg, Sherman Maryland 

Wylie, Hamilton Boyd, Jr Maryland 

Yarmosky, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Yevzeroff, Benjamin Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Bosch, Charlotte Thelma Maryland 

Cohen, Bernard Stanley Maryland 

Freeman, Emanuel Maryland 

Freiman, Joseph Maryland 

Futeral, Nathaniel Maryland 

Gaber, Jerome Maryland 

Gelrud, Jack Maryland 

Glushakow, Jay Maryland 

Hutchinson, William John Maryland 

Jaslow, Morris M Maryland 

Jernigan, Lane McDermott Maryland 

Jokubaitis, Bruno Leonard Maryland 

Kanowsky, Joseph Maryland 

Leatherman, Albert Gaver, Jr Maryland 

Lichter, George Maryland 

Marchuk, Nina Maryland 



Massing, Emanuel Wolf Maryland 

Mazer, Leonard Maryland 

Meiser, Edward Taylor Maryland 

Myers, Bernard Maryland 

O'Hara, John James Maryland 

Pippig, Howard August, Jr Maryland 

Ruddie, Israel Morris Maryland 

Sachs, Raymond Maryland 

Savitz, Melvin Morris Maryland 

Sifen, Paul Virginia 

*Silnutzer, Aaron M Pennsylvania 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Strauss, Leon Maryland 

Wagner, Charles Hammond Maryland 

Weiner, William Maryland 

Wong, Margaret Maryland 



t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 
FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Abarbanel, Morton Maryland 

Adalman, Melvin Solomon Maryland 

Berlin, Alvin Maryland 

Cohen, Benny Maryland 

Davis, Richard Glenn Maryland 

Dimarco, Vernon Anthony Maryland 

Eckhardt, Henry, Jr Maryland 

Fisher, Donald Ernst Maryland 

*Folk, Willie Margaret Maryland 

Friedman, Nathan Maryland 

Golombek, Leonard Harry Maryland 

Goodman, Irvin Maryland 

Greenberg, Herman Benjamin Maryland 

Hahn, Robert Roland Maryland 

•Henderson, Isaac Maryland 

Imber, Doris Maryland 

Klepfish, Milton A Maryland 

Kramer, Meyer Maryland 

*Kump, Erwin Henry Maryland 

Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

Magiros, John George Maryland 



Mercier, Maurice Weldon Maryland 

Meyers, Macy Herbert Maryland 

Miller, Jerome Maryland 

Mondell, Harold Daniel Maryland 

Padussis, Anthony Gus Maryland 

Parelhoff, Merrill Elliott Maryland 

Passaro, Edward Joseph Maryland 

Pats, Sidney Maryland 

Poggi, Gabriel Joseph Leo Maryland 

Pollack, Morton Leon Maryland 

*Rivas, Charles Maryland 

Silverman, Bernard Jerome Maryland 

Simmons, Harry Pershing Maryland 

Spike, Sidney Maryland 

Spittel, Robert John, Jr Maryland 

VandenBosche, August Harry. .Pennsylvania 
Voshell, Edward Asa, Jr Maryland 

*Weiner, Bernard Maryland 

Weiner, Morton Hyman Maryland 

Wright, Lealon Burgess, I IT Maryland 

Zentz, Charlotte Sue Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Gregory, Krikor Ohannes Maryland Jahn, Eisa Florence Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 7, 1941 
f DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Hamlin, Kenneth Eldred, Jr Maryland 

Karel, Leonard Maryland 



Levin, Nathan Maryland 

Purdum, William Arthur Maryland 



f MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Barry, Richard Henry Pennsylvania Gakenheimer, Walter Christian.. ..Maryland 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Codd, Francis Ignatius Maryland 

DeGele, George Oscar Maryland 

DiGristine, Mary Rosula Maryland 

Fainberg, Alvin Jay Maryland 

Ginsberg, Samuel Harry Maryland 

Glaser, Abraham Ellis Maryland 

Goodman, Leon Maryland 

Hendin, Walter K Maryland 

Jernigan, John Mayo, Jr Maryland 

Kahn, Reuben Maryland 

'Kasik, Frank Thomas, Jr Maryland 



Kreis, George Joseph, Jr Maryland 

Lindenbaum, Albert Maryland 

Mayer, Maurice Victor Maryland 

Miller, Manuel Maryland 

Noveck, Irvin Maryland 

Rosenthal, Bernard Maryland 

Rudoff, Oscar Maryland 

Sarubin, Milton Maryland 

Siegel, Harold W Maryland 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Maryland 

Zerwitz, Irving F Maryland 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship LeRoy C. Keagle 

Alumni Research Grant Richard H. Barry 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Alvin Jay Fainberg 

HONORABLE MENTION (Third- Year Class) 

Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. Warren Eidred Weaver Milton Reisch 



t Degree conferred by Graduate School. 

* Did not attend entire session. 

° Degree conferred August 2, 1940. 



ial Pubi cation 



The Universii of Maryland 



VOL. 24 



No. I 




ime ! !<)'_ rai 



ool oi '^harmac" 

olleee of Pharmacy. 1841 to 190- 

1943-44 




LOMBARD 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 24 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 

100th Announcement 

Including Accelerated Wartime Program 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1943-44 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CALENDAR 



1943 


1944 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


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SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
CALENDAR 



1943 



Summer Quarter 

June 25-26 Registration 

June 28 Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

July 5 Independence Day — Holiday 

September 6 Labor Day — Holiday 

September 13-16, incl Examinations 



Fall Quarter 

September 27-28 Registration 

September 29 Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

November 24 Thanksgiving recess begins after last scheduled period 

November 29 Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

December 15-18, incl Examinations 



1944 

Winter Quarter 

January 3-4 Registration 

January 5 Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

March 21-24, incl Examinations 



Spring Quarter 

March 31-April 1 Registration 

April 3 Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

April 7 Easter recess begins after last scheduled period 

April 11 Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

May 30 Memorial Day— Holiday 

June 19-22, incl Examinations 

Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday 
at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. 
(This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. .'. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, con- 
sisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of nine years. 
The administration of the University is vested in the President. The University 
General Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the President. 

Each school has its own .Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its faculty of professorial rank; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions: 

College of Agriculture Summer Session 

Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Military Science 

Extension Service and Tactics 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Dentistry 

College of Commerce School of Law 

College of Education School of Medicine 

College of Engineering School of Nursing 

College of Home Economics School of Pharmacy 

Graduate School The University Hospital 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and the 
Hospital are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets; 
the others in College Park. 



Board of Regents 



Term Expires 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Chairman, Hagerstown 1943 

Rowland K. Adams, Vice-Chairman, Baltimore 1948 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary, Baltimore 1947 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, Baltimore 1944 

W. Calvin Chestnut, Baltimore 1951 

John E. Semmes, Baltimore 1951 

William P. Cole, Jr., Towson 1949 

Phillip C. Turner, Park ton 1950 

Paul C. Knotts, Denton 1946 

Thomas Roy Brookes, Bel Air 1951 

Harry K. Nuttle, Denton 1951 

President of the University 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 

The General Administrative Board 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Robinson, Dean Patterson, Dean Wylie, 
Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean Steinberg, 
Dean Stamp, Dean Broughton, Dean Pyle, Dr. Cotterman, Colonel Wysor, 
Dr. Huff, Dr. Long, Miss Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Dr. Zucker, Dean Joyal, 
Dr. White, Dr. Corbett, Dr. Welsh, Dr. James, Dean Reid, Mr. Casbarian. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.D., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 

E. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grubb 

Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 

Emeritus Professor 

David M. R. Culbreth Emeritus Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1879); College of Physicans and Surgeons, M.D> 
(1883). 

Professors 

*L. B. Broughton Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1908), M.S. (1911); Ohio State University, Ph.D. (1926) 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922); Medical School, London, Ontario, M.Sc. (1925); 
McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

Walter H. Hartung 1 Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918); University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland. Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Washing- 
ton, D. C, B.S., (1921); Maryland Academy of Science Sc.D. (1922), (Honorary). 

Associate Professors 

B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical Law 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Thomas C. Grubb Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B. (1930); University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

The faculty is listed as constituted during 1942-43. Changes will be noted in subsequent 
catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of the 
University. 

(I) Representative on the Graduate Council. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



*Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916); Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

*A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925). Ph.D. 
(1928). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 

Assistant Professors 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Assistant Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921); Ohio State University, M.S. (1922); University 
of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

*Arthur C. Parsons Assistant Professor of Languages 

University of Maryland, A.B. (1926), A.M. (1928). 

*J. Thomas Pyles Assistant Professor of English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927); Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1938). 

W. Arthur Purdum Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934), Ph.D. (1941). 

Frank J. Slama Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), M.S. (1930) , 
Ph.D. (1935). 

*Edgar B. Starke y Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

*Gu y P. Thompson Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

Instructors 

*Richard H. Barry Instructor in Chemistry 

Duquesne University, B.S. (1939^; University of Maryland, M.S. (1941). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912); University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

Milton Wilbert Skolaut Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Texas, B.S. (1941). 

Assistants 

Benjamin Frank Allen 1 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Frank Albert Bellman 1 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Tracey Gillette Call Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Idaho, Southern Branch, B.S. (1940). 

*Edward M. Corson 2 Assistant in Physics 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 On leave — United States Army. 

2 Resigned February 8, 1943. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



*Margaret Louise Crespo Assistant in Zoology 

Barnard College, B.A. (1940); Cornell University, M.A. (1941). 

*Leo Diesendruck 3 Assistant in Physics 

University of Cincinnati, B.S. (1941). 

Salvatore Joseph Greco Assistant in Pharmacy 

Duquesne University, B.S. (1942). 

Bernice Hevman Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938); M.S. (1940). 

James O. Hoppe 1 Assistant in Pharmacology 

Montana State University, B.S. (1940); M.S. (1942). 

Harry K. I wamoto Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of California, B.S. (1938); M.S (1942). 

LeRov C. Keagle H. A. B. Dunning Fellow in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1940). 

Xorbert Gordon Lassahn Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

Albert McLean Mattocks . Assistant in Analytical Chemistry 

University of North Carolina, B.S. (1942). 

George Allen Moulton, Jr. 2 Assistant in Pharmacology 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, B.S. (1939); Purdue University, M.S. (1940). 

John A. Scigliano Assistant in Bacteriology 

Creighton University, B.S. (1941). 

Ruth Muehlhause Sippel Assistant in Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938). 

Pierre Frank Smith Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Buffalo, B.S. (1941). 

Robert Edward Thompson Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938); M.S. (1940). 

Eugene Clayton Weinbach Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1942). 

Assisting Staff 

Thelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S '. . . .Librarian 

Ann B. Lemen Clark Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Lotz Gue Senior Stenographer 






* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



1 Appointed March 1, 1943. 

2 Resigned February 28, 1943. 

3 Appointed February 8, 1943. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



HISTORY 



The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a forward-looking group 
of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in the State of Maryland, who recog- 
nized the necessity for more thoroughly educated and better-trained pharmacists if 
this rapidly growing phase of medical service was to be properly developed. It was 
incorporated on January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in Nov- 
ember of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent in- 
stitution until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of professional schools 
in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. It became a department 
of the State University when the old University of Maryland was merged with the 
Maryland State College in 1920. With but one short intermission just prior to 1856 
it has continuously exercised its functions as a teaching institution. 



AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, the col- 
lateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential in the education 
of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants for the intelligent practice 
of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the facilities and instruction necessary for 
the attainment of proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession 
and in pharmaceutical research. 



BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is a commodious six- 
story laboratory and classroom building especially designed to house the work of 
pharmacy. It is completely equipped throughout, and offers every facility for the 
undergraduate student to carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough know- 
ledge of pharmacy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the 
various fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation rooms with 
a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this building. These are equipped 
with modern tables for lecture demonstrations in the sciences, with lanterns and 
screens and the other devices commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the various courses 
in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for instruction in botany and 
pharmacognosy; for work in the biological sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, 
and pharmacology; for the pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted reading- 
room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room space to accommodate 
12,000 volumes. At the present time the library contains more than 9,000 books 
and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy and the collateral sciences. Additional 
library facilities are available at the Medical School Library, which is only a few 
doors away, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries 
of the various departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, 
Inc., and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 
The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of pharmaceutical education; 
and all institutions accredited by the Council or holding membership in the Associa- 
tion must maintain certain minimum requirements with respect to number and 
qualifications of faculty members, physical plant, laboratory and library facilities, 
curriculum, admission, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and its 
diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of curriculum are the same for 
all students taking this course, but the work of the fourth year may be varied within 
the limits set forth on page 19. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharma- 
cology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science (M.S.) is conferred 
upon graduates of the four-year course who have completed at least one year of 
graduate work and have presented a satisfactory thesis. Candidates for this degree 
may take all of the work in the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required 
work in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, must 
register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the requirements of that 
School. For detailed information concerning registration, requirements for admission, 
etc., see the catalogue of the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education, Inc., and the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certificate, 
or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by an 
accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for graduation not less 
than 15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Required sub- 
jects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects; English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 unit; 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit, Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 
general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agriculture, commercial draw- 
ing, home economics, shops, etc.) foreign languages, mathematics, physical geography, 
physics, zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or preparatory scnool 
for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 
8 units, of which not more than four shall be vocational units. 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient schola^.n- 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council ce 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, and con- 
stitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It presupposes a school 
year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each 
study four or five class exercises a week. Double laboratory periods in any science 
or vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, 
not more than three units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a 
fifth course has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the certi- 
fication requirements of the State Department of Education, or the Department of 
Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon presentation of the proper 
certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not fully meet these require- 
ments may be required to present further evidence of ability to undertake college 
work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appro- 
priate examination. Such examination will be given during the first week of each 
of the months of June, July, August and September at College Park, Md. Applicants 
concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not located 
in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should have attained the 
certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school does not have such quality 
grade, then the applicant's school grades must be at least ten points or one letter 
higher than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school who is not 
eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either of two types 
of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for permission to 
report at the University for an examination, the result of which will be used in con- 
junction with the secondary school record to determine whether the applicant should 
be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed 
satisfactorily other approved examinations in the subjects required for graduation 
from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New York City, the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York, Albany, and the Department of Public 
Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director of Ad- 
missions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty Council of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit for 
work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education, Inc., will receive credit for the courses which correspond 
in length and content to those prescribed for the first three years of the curriculum 
and be admitted with advanced standing, provided he presents an official transcript 
of his record and a proper certificate of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student presenting 
evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic institution equal in 
value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary educational 
requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to Freshman Class from 
Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does not 
desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a special student and 
pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will not be eligible for graduation 
and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty Council reserves the right to decide 
whether or not the preliminary training of the applicant is. sufficient. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank, for admission may be had by applying to the office of the 
Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the Dean of Pharmacy. 
The form must be filled out in full with the names of all schools attended, signed 
by the applicant and returned to the office of the Director of Admissions with the 
required photograph and the two dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas 
or certificates. The Director of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials 
after the application has been received. Do not make application unless reasonably 
certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete preparation 
if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing credentials and investi- 
gating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the study of the profession, a certificate 
will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students enter- 
ing upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file with the 
secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for registration as 
a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required to furnish such 
information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing 
of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of 
pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit 
to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore experience 
acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office of the 
Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration period at the beginning 
of each semester. A student entering for the first time must matriculate before he 
will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar on 
the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a student be permitted 
to enter classes before he has completed registration. Students who fail to register 
on the days scheduled are required to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). 
The last day for registration with the payment of the late registration fee is Saturday 
at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the calendar. This rule 
may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean. 

SUMMARY OF FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per quarter): 

Residents of Maryland 80.00 

Non-Residents 85.00 

Laboratory fee (per quarter) 20.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 1 5.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per quarter) 5.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



_ Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are taking courses 
equivalent to three-fourths or more of a quarter's work, will be charged the full fees. 
Students taking less than this amount of work will be charged on a subject basis. 
Students taking extra work will be charged an additional fee for each extra course 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student is re- 
quired to pay $4.00 each quarter (Freshmen students $3.50) to the "Students' 
Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extracurricular activities. The 
expenditure of approximately $45.00 per academic year is necessary for the pur- 
chase of books, weights, dissecting instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 
Fixed charge of $5.00 per quarter credit hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who will pay 
only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per quarter credit hour.) 

Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's record. This 
fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at the time 
the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a student in any school 
or college of the University is regarded as registration in the University of Mary- 
land, but when such student transfers to a professional school of the University or 
from one professional school to another, he will be required to pay the matriculation 
fee charged by the school to which he transfers. 

A tuition fee of $80.00 per quarter is charged a student who is a resident of 
Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is not a resident of 
Maryland is charged an additional $5.00 per quarter. The tuition fee must be paid 
during the registration period at the beginning of each quarter. 

A laboratory fee of $20.00 per quarter is charged to cover materials and apparatus 
used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the registration period at 
the beginning of each quarter. 

A fee and deposit of $5.00 per quarter is charged to cover locker rentals and 
excessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration period at the begin- 
ning of each quarter. Any portion not used will be refunded at the end of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later than 
the registration period for the last quarter of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The penalty fee 
for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid before the end of 
the quarter in which these fees are due. The fee for an examination to remove a 
condition or for a special examination must be paid before the student takes the ex- 
amination and the receipt for payment must be presented to the teacher giving the 
examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment cf ftts will be rigidly 
adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will automatically disbar 
a student from attendance upon classes and all other privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at the time 
of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State for at least one year. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his registration, 
he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; provided such residence 
has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this State 
by maintaining such residence for at least one full calendar year. However, the 
right of the student (minor) to change from a non-resident to a resident status must 
be estabished by him prior to registration for a quarter in any academic year. 

REBATES 

The matriculation fee is net subject to rebate. In cases of withdrawal from 
the school within thirty days frcm the beginning of instruction in a quarter, the 
Dean may request the Comptroller to refund one-half the amount of the tuition 
and laboratory fees paid for such quarter. In the case of illness, or other unusual 
circumstances, the Dean may, with the approval of the President of the University, 
make such refund as seems just. In all cases of withdrawal from school, immediate 
notice in writing must be given to the Dean. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regular 
session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which are given 
in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the beginning 
of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence from class. In case 
of serious personal illness, as attested by a physician, a student may register not 
later than the fifteenth day following the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be admitted 
to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has not attended at least 
85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will be counted 
as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lecture or laboratory period 
will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the session 
and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are held at the close of 
each quarter, and the standing of a student in each subject is determined by the 
average of all the ratings received during the quarter. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student received a grade 
of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be held only on the dates 
scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates announced by the Dean. A student 
who is conditioned in any quarter must remove the condition by the end of the 
succeeding quarter, but will net be permitted to take an examination within thirty 
days from the date on which the conditional rating was received. A condition which 
is not removed will become a failure, and the course must be repeated to obtain a. 
grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course must report 
to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the absence will permit. 
If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justifiable (as if due to illness or other 
exceptional circumstances) he will give permission for a deferred examination in 
place of the one missed. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100); B, Good (87-92); C, Fair (80-86); D, Passed (75-79); 
E, Conditioned (60-74); F, Failed (below 60); I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades: 

4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may be 
raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subsequent examination 
on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient attend- 
ance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course without the consent 
of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is required to repeat the work in 
class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper excuse for 
not presenting himself for examination or for not completing the work of any course. 
It is not understood to signify work of an inferior quality. It will be replaced by a 
definite grade when all requirements for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next succeeding 
year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled work of the preceding 
year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will be considered to have attained 
this rank if he receives passing grades in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled 
work, except as hereinafter stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all of the 
scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 105 for the work 
of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of the 
scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails to obtain passing 
grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the work 
for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five points in excess 
of the number of credit hours represented, will be required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy requires, 
evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of a student in re- 
lation to his work and fellow students will be used by the faculty in determining 
the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence of the community as a pro- 
fessional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority 
and associates, and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will 
be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a 
degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, will 
render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal rule against 
the offense has been published. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will be conferred 
upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 19). The work of the 
last year must have been in courses offered in this school and must have been 
done in residence at this school. 

2. A total quarter hour credit of not less than 210, with a grade point count for 
each of the last two academic years of not less than twice the total quarter 
hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE MARYLAND 
PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical experience 
for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized school or college 
of pharmacy is credited toward the practical experience required to the extent of 
not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure employ- 
ment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should ccme prepared, if possible, to sustain himself financially dur- 
ing the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available may be profitably 
spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in the preparation of studies. 
Those who cannot meet this condition in full need not be dismayed, however, as 
Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to secure suitable employment. A reg- 
ister of positions available in drugstores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the 
School where it may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharmacist 
of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor of chemistry in the 
School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still active, has contributed $1, 000.00 
annually for a period of more than ten years to establish a research fellowship in 
pharmaceutical chemistry This fellowship is awarded annually to a student in 
pharmacy who has completed four years of college work, and who gives evidence 
of a special aptitude for investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many years 
a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who was active in 
pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, and who was especially 
interested in the welfare and progress of worthy young people, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry endowed a scholarship to be awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth- 
year student who has shown superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and 
commercial pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to deposit each 
year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a research grant, to be 
placed to the credit of a student selected by the Committee on the Research Grant 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of the Alumni Association to enable him to engage in pharmaceutical research in 
the School of Pharmacy during the next scholastic year. The research conducted 
shall be of general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication 
in one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The stipend 
for the assistantships is $625.00 for the academic year, and the remission of all 
graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didactic work 
as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in which they are 
serving. The usual amount of services required does not exceed 12 to 14 clock- 
hours per week, which enables an assistant to carry approximately a full graduate 
program. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eagerness for service 
and helpfulness to others, which were striking characteristics of Professor Caspari, 
a number of friends and alumni have made contributions to establish a fund in his 
name. Loans are made from this fund to members of the fourth-year class upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler of Balti- 
more, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available to junior and 
senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment in creditable, and 
who has attained the highest general average, not below B. Certificates of Honor 
will be awarded to the three students having the highest general average, next to 
the winner of the general prize, provided this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three students hav- 
ing the highest general average, provided this does not fall below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of chemistry 
in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the Faculty to a can- 
didate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency 
in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high 
in all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry 
will be guided in his judgment of the student's ability as much by observation and 
personal contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of approximately 
$1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the Faculty of the School 
of Pharmacy to the senior student having the highest general average throughout 
the course in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



The Conrad L. Wich Botanv and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 1882), placed in 
trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student who has done exceptional 
work throughout the course in Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Membership Prizes 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year is awarded 
annually to three students of the third-year class, selected by the Faculty, who have 
attained high standing in both theoretical and practical pharmacy. One of these 
awards has been endowed by Dr. E. F. Kelly, and the other two by the Baltimore 
Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Council 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the purpose 
of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular activities of the student 
body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum among students when in attendance 
upon instruction, and to foster and encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor 
on the splendid traditions of the School. The council consists of twelve active mem- 
bers, three elected by each of the four classes, four ex-ofBco members who are the 
presidents of the respective classes, and a faculty advisor. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Societ\ 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of 
this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges that are members 
in good standing of the American Association or Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility 
for membership in the Society is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, 
personality, and leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have 
completed 75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was or- 
ganized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of students in 
the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the end that their 
interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awakened and guided; and to 
familiarize them with the conditions existing in and the problems confronting their 
profession. 

Officers (1942-43) 

President, Theodore Howard Schwartz, Fourth- Year Class. 

First Vice-President, Raymond Sachs, Third-Year Class. 

Second Vice-President, Leonard H. Golombek, Second-Year Class. 

Secretary, Evelyn Shirley Levin, Fourth-Year Class. 

Treasurer, Norman Sober, Fourth-Year Class. 

Editor, Alder Simon, Fourth-Year Class. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, Morton Myers, Fourth-Year Class. 

Executive Committee 



Leonard Applebaum, Fourth-Year Class. 
Charles H. Wagner, Third-Year Class. 
Melvin S. Adalman, Second-Year Class. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This society continued its separate existence as such or as 
the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when 
the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was formed. Following 
the organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant 
until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The active membership of the As- 
sociation is now approximately 600 and is growing steadily. The following are its 
officers: 

Officers (1942-43) 

Honorary President, Fred W. Dickson 

President of the Association, Jacob H. Greenfeld 
Lafayette Avenue and Poplar Grove Street, Baltimore, Md. 

First Vice-President, Stephen J. Provenza 
109 E. Montgomery Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Second Vice-President, Frank R. Paul 
. Calvert and Thirtieth Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

Secretary, B. Olive Cole 
32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Frank M. Budacz 
1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

Chairman, Jacob H. Greenfeld 
The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 

The Officers 
Members-at-Large 

Frank J. Grau 
Otto W. Muehlhause 
W. Arthur Purdum 
Raphael H. Wagner 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in the advancement of Phar- 
maceutical education, appointed a standing committee, known as the Committee on 
School of Pharmacy. The duties of this Committee are to represent the Association 
in all matter pertaining to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. 
The following are the present members of this Committee: 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Chairman Otto W. Muehlhause 

William F. Reindollar Stephen J. Provenza 

John C. Bauer L. M. Kantner 

Simon Solomon L. N. Richardson 

Charles S. Austin, Jr. Fitzgerald Dunning 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



19 



CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.S. IN PHARMACY 

The abbreviations D., L., and C, placed at the top of columns are to be inter- 
preted as didactic, laboratory, and quarter credit hours respectively. 



♦Botany 2 

fChemistry 1, 2 

fChemistry 3 

tEnglish 1, 2, 3 

fMathematics 10, 11, 12 or 
fMathematics 15, 16, 17 . 
fModern Language 

French 1, 2, 3 or 

French 6, 7, 8 or 

German 1, 2, 3 or 

German 5, 6, 7 

tSpeech 1, 2, 3 

tZoology 9, 10 



Botany 21, 22 

fChemistry 10, 11, 11B 

fChemistry 12, 13, 13B 

Pharmacy 1, 2, 3 

fPhysics 11, 12, 13 

Physiology 

♦Bacteriology 52 

♦Bacteriology 115 

♦Chemistry 7, 8 

Chemistry 53 

♦Economics 31 

Pharmacology 51, 52, 53 

Pharmacy 51, 52, 53 

Pharmacy 61 

15 15 18 11 21 17 11 21 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

Chemistry 111, 112, 113 3.. 2 3.. 2 3.. 2 

Economics 52 . . . . 3 4 5 

Law 63 

Pharmacy 101, 102, 103 2 2 3 

Pharmacy 71, 72, 73 1 1 1 

Pharmacology 111 3 4 4 

First Aid 1 

Electives ++ (estimated) 4 8 7 

13 15 17 13 14 18 14 10 17 



FIRST 


YEAR 














First Quarter 


Second Quarter 


Third Quarter 


D. 


L. 


C. 


D. 


L. 


C. 


D. 


L. 


C. 














4 


4 


5 


3 


6 


5 


3 


6 


5 


3 


6 


5 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


4 


3 


2 


4 


3 








15 


10 


18 


15 


10 


18 


17 


10 


20 


SECONE 


YEAR 














2 


5 


4 


2 


5 


4 








3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 




4 


1 




4 


1 




4 


1 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


5 


3 


2 


4 


3 


2 


4 


3 
3 


2 
4 


4 
5 


12 


15 


17 


12 


15 


17 


13 


14 


18 


THIRD 


YEAR 




















3 


6 


6 


3 


6 


6 


2 


6 


4 


2 


6 


4 


2 


6 


4 


4 




4 














3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


4 


3 


6 


4 


3 


6 


4 


3 




3 















2 
1 


2 
1 


3 
1 


4 
2 


'2 

1 


4 
3 

1 


4 


"l 


"l 


i 

3 


6 


1 
6 






ELECTIVES 

Botany 101, 102, 103 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 

Botany 111, 112, 113 2 2 2.. 2 2.. 2 

Botany 111A, 112A, 113A 4 2.. 4 2.. 4 2 

Chemistry 99 (either quarter) 3 1 3 1 3 1 

fChemistry 102A, 103A, 104A 3 3 3 3 3 .. 3 

fChemistry 102B, 103B, 104B 4 2 4 2 4 2 

Chemistry 114, 115, 116 4 2.. 4 2.. 4 2 

♦Chemistry 151, 152, 153 2.. 2 2.. 2 2.. 2 

♦Chemistry 154, 155, 156 4 2.. 4 2.. 4 2 

f English 4, 5. 6 3 3 3 . . 3 3 . . 3 

fGerman 9, 10, 11 3 3 3 . . 3 3 . . 3 

fMathematics 20, 21, 22 3 3 3 . . 3 3 3 

Pharmacy 111, 112, 113 6 2.. 6 2.. 6 2 

fZoology 13 4 6 6 

t Instiuction in these courses is given by the College of Arts and Science. 
* Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
** The electives must be approved by the Dean. 

Not less than one third of the electives must be in laboratory courses. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

52. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology — (6) Third year, second quarter, 
three lectures, three laboratories. Grubb and Scigliano. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of path- 
ogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of prevention and control 
of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology— (6) Third year, third quarter, three lectures, 
three laboratories. Grubb and Scigliano. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of bio- 
logical products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) Grubb. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

201. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Grubb. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit determined by 
the amount and quality of work performed. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Grubb. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

BOTANY 

2. General Botany — (5) First year, third quarter, four lectures, one labora- 
tory. Slama and Sippel. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including, classification and phys- 
iology of the plant structures, and the microscopic study of the structure of medicinal 
plants. 

21, 22. Pharmacognosy — (8) Second year, first and second quarters, two lec- 
tures, two laboratories. Slama and Sippel. 

Prerequisite — Botany 2. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, with special 
emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identification and in the detec- 
tion of adulterants. The laboratory work includes a study of the whole and the pow- 
dered drugs. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102, 103. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants— (2-6) Fourth year, one lec- 
ture and one laboratory each quarter. Elective for students who contemplate taking 
advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. Slama. 

* Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are number 1-49 ; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99 ; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199 ; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The quarter hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued 
one period a week for one quarter. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 



Prerequisite — Botany 2. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field work 
on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

Ill, 112, 113. Plant Anatomy — (2-6) Fourth year, two lectures per quarter. 

SI am a 

Prerequisite — Botany 2, 21 and 22. 

Lectures covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the 
structures of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

111A, 112A, 113 A. Plant Anatomy — (2-6) Fourth year, two laboratories per 

quarter. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 2, 22, 111, 112, 113, or may be taken simultaneously 
with 111, 112 and 113. 

Laboratory work covering Botany 111, 112, 113. 

For Graduates 

201, 202, 203. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-12) Two lectures 
and two laboratories each quarter. Slama. 

Prerequisite— Botany 111, 112, 113 and 111A, 112A, 113A. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and micro- 
chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of adulter- 
ants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212, 213. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-12) Two lectures and two lab- 
oratories each quarter. Slama. 

Prerequisite— Botany 111, 112, 113 and 111A, 112A, 113A. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identification 
and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to amount and quality 
of work performed. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 2. General Chemistry — (10) First year, first and second quarters, three 
lectures and two laboratories. Starkey, Wich, Barry and Smith. 

A study of the nonmetals and metals, their chief compounds and the laws and 
principles governing their chemical actions. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis — (5) First year, third quarter, three 
lectures and two laboratories. Starkey, Wich, Barry and Smith. 

A study of the reactions of the common cations and anions with reference to 
their separation and identification and to the general principles involved. 

7, 8. Quantitative Analysis — (8) Third year, first and second quarters, two 
lectures ard two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Mattocks. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 1, 2, 3 and Chemistry 11, 12 and 1 IB. 

A study of gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and their appli- 
cation to pharmaceutical analyses. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



10, 11, 11B. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (9) Second year, first, second 
and third quarters, three lectures. Starkey and Barry. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 2 and 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of Organic ChemistrY. 

12, 13, 13B. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (3) Second year, first, second 
and third quarters, two laboratories. Starkey and Barry. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 2 and 3. 

A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying— (4) Third year, third quarter, 
two lectures and two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Mattocks. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 8. 

Quantitative methods applied to chemical assay of crude drugs and of official 
preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either quarter. Starkey and 
Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of Instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of glass. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

102A, 103A, 104A. Physical Chemistry — (9) Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 8 and 11 and Physics 11, 12, 13. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic 
theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilib- 
rium, chemical kinetics, etc. 

102B, 103B, 104B. Physical Chemistry — (6) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistrv 102A — 104A, or mav be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 102A— 104A. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physico-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

Ill, 112, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (6) Three lectures, fourth 
year. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1 IB. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the syntheses and chemical properties 
of medicinal products. 

114, 115, 116. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2-6) Fourth year, two 
laboratories. Hartung and Mattocks. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 112, 113 or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 112, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical prop- 
erties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

120B, 121B. Advanced Organic Labortory — (3-6) Any one or two quarters. 
Starkey. 

Prerequisite — Pharmaceutical Chemistry 114, 115, 116 or equivalent. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a study of 
the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic 
compounds. 

151, 152, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (6) Two lectures. Chapman. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 3 and 11, Physiology 23. 

A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, metabolism, 
vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical interest. 

154, 155, 156. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (4or 6) Two laborator- 
ies. Chapman, Gittinger, Thompson, Moulton and Hoppe. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 8, 151, 152 and 153 or simultaneously with Chemistry 
151, 152, 153. 

Laboratory exercises mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the more im- 
portant procedures in physiological chemistry, qualitative and quantitative urin- 
alysis and blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 202, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (6) Two lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 112, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and of stereoisomerism. 

207B. Organic Qualitative Analysis — (3-5) First, second, third quarters. 
Three to five laboratories. Starkey. 

Prerequisite — Pharmaceutical Chemistry 114, 115, 116 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances and 
mixtures. 

211,212, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (6) Two lectures. Hartung 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 111, 112, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically active 
bases. (Not given 1943-44). 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses — (3-9) Laboratory and con- 
ferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 120B and 121B. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal 
chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical x<\nalyses — (2-6) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 207B. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to 
official, proprietary, natutal or synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1 credit each quarter) Hartung. 
Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 
Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical chem- 
istry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit determined by the amount 
and quality of work performed. Hartung and Starkey. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ECONOMICS AND LAW 



31. Elements of Economics — (4) Third year, first quarter three lectures. 
Cole and Heyman. 

A study of the general principles of economics — production, exchange, distri- 
bution and consumption of wealth. 

52. Pharmaceutical Economics — (5) Fourth year, second quarter, three lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Cole and Heyman. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail pharmacies, 
and the fundamental principles of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping, 
banking and financial statements. 

63. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (4) Fourth year, third quarter, four 
lectures. Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special reference to 
the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and State laws and regulations 
pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, cosmetics and pharmaceutical prep- 
arations. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2, 3. Survey and Composition I — (9) First year, three lectures. Pyles. 

Prerequisite — three units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an historical 
study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Written themes, book reveiws and exercises. 

4, 5, 6. Survey and Composition II — (9) Elective, three lectures. Pyles. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2, 3. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work covered in English 
1, 2, 3. An historical study of English literature from the beginnings to the nine- 
teenth century. Themes, reports, conferences. 

SPEECH 

1, 2, 3. Public Speaking — (3) First year, one lecture. Plyes. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; the prep- 
aration and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speaking; reference read- 
ing, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

1. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, third quarter, one lecture, 
one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross 

MATHEMATICS 

10, 11, 12. Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (9) First 
year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One year of high school algebra. Required of those students who 
do not have the prerequisite for Math. 15. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



Quadratic equations, theory of equations, exponentials, logarithms, binomial 
theorem, permutations and combinations; trigonometric functions, solution of tri- 
angles, logarithms, solution of trigonometric equations; cartesian coordinates, the 
straight line, the circle and the ellipse, graphing of elementary algebraic, exponential 
and logarithmic functions. 

15, 16, 17. College Algebra, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry and 
Analytic Geometry — (9) First year, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Foundations of algebra, binomial and multinomial expansions, progressions, 
determinants, elements of the theory of numbers, complex numbers, theory of 
equations, exponential functions and logarithms; trigonometric functions, solution 
of plane and spherical triangles, logarithms and solution of trigonometric equations, 
and the celestial sphere; cartesian and polar coordinates, lines and circle, curves 
of the second order, higher algebraic and transcendental curves. 

20, 21, 22. Calculus — Elective, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Math. 15, 16, 17 and approval of the instructor. 

Limits, derivaties, and differentials, maxima and minima, curvature, evolutes 
and envelopes, the elements of curve theory, elementary theory of functions, partial 
derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals, multiple integrals, calculation of arcs, 
areas, volumes, and moments, expansion in series. 

MODERN-LANGUAGES 

1, 2, 3. French — Elementary — (9) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is 
not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

6, 7, 8. French — Second Year — (9) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — French 1, 2, 3 or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation of narra- 
tive and technical prose. 

1, 2, 3. German — Elementary — (9) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second- year German, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of Grammar, compositions, pronunciation and translation. 

5, 6, 7. German— Second- Year — (9) First year, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German 1, 2, 3 or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and written 
practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The 
assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Nine quarter hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the Modern 
Language requirement. 

9, 10, 11. Scientific German — (9) Elective, three lectures. Parsons. 

Prerequisite — German 5, 6, 7 and approval of the instructor. 

Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German grammar. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52, 53. Pharmacology, Toxocologv and Therapeutics — (9) Third year, 
three lectures and one laboratory. Chapman Gittinger, Thompson, Moulton and 
Hoppe. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 23. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first quarter, 
three lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Thompson, Moulton and 
Hoppe. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52, 53. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202, 203. Methods of Biological Assay — (12) Two lectures and two 

laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological assay and 
a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay of therapeutic 
substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212, 213. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods— (4-12) Credits 
according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the instructor. 
Conference and laboratory work. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 201, 202, 203. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and compar- 
ative standards. 

221, 222, 223. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (3-9) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — The approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the determination 
of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in alternate years. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2, 3. Galenical Pharmacy — (15) Second year, four lectures and two labor- 
atories. DuMez, Purdum, Greco and Iwamoto. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathemat- 
ical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of 
galenical preparations. 

51, 52, 53. Dispensing Pharmacy — (12) Third year, three lectures and two 
laboratories. Wolf, Greco and Iwamoto. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 

Prerequisite Pharmacy 1, -, 3. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy — (3) Third year, first quarter, three lectures. DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special emphasis on 
the history of American pharmacy. 

71j 72, 73. Pharmaceutical Practice — (3) Fourth year, one lecture and 36 
hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. Wolf, Purdum, Skolaut, Lassahn, 
Weinbach and Call. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 3 and 51, 52, 53. 

Practical work in drugstore arrangement; the handling of drugs, medicines and 
drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102, 103. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (9) Fourth year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. DuMez, Purdum, Skolaut, Greco and Iwamoto. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special reference to 
the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 
scale. 

Ill, 112, 113. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (2, 4 or 6) Two labora- 
tories. DuMez, Purdum and Skolaut. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 3 and 51, 52, 53. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding special 
prescription and galenical preparations. 

For Graduates 

201, 202, 203. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (12) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the standpoint of 
plant; crude materials used; their collection, preservation, and transformation into 
forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

211, 212, 213. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (3) One lecture. 
DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special ref- 
erence to the original and development of the works of drug standards and the phar- 
maceutical periodicals. 

221, 222, 223. History of Pharmacy — (6) Two lectures. DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and the prin- 
cipal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

235. Research in Pharmacy— Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

11, 12, 13. General Physics — (12) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook, Corson and Diesendruck. 

Prerequisites— Math. 10, 11, 12 or 15, 16, 17. 

A study of mechanics, heat; wave motion, sound light; and electricity. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Thermodynamics — (4) (2 quarters) Two lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 11, 12, 13, Mathematics 20, 21, 22 and Physical Chemistry 
102A, 103A, 104A and 102B, 103B and 104B. 

A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics' and its application to 
physical and chemical problems. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

23. Physiology — (5) Second year, three lectures, two laboratories. Chapman, 
Gittinger and Thompson. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet the require- 
ments of students of pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 

9, 10. General Zoology — (6) First year, first and second quarters, two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Thompson and Crespo. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian form, 
with emphasis on animal development, structure and functions of organs. Intro- 
ductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

13. Vertebrate Zoology — (6) Elective, third quarter, four lectures and two 
laboratories. Thompson and CrespD. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, study of 
the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the general physiology 
and embryology of the principal organs and systems of the vertebrate animal, with 
emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT BOOKS 

The books required in each course will be announced at the beginning of each 
quarter by the teacher in charge. Each student is required to have his own text books. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The rules and conditions stated in this prospectus will govern students until 
the next succeeding issue, after which time they will be governed by the conditions 
stated in the latter. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



29 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Session of 1942-43 



fGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Barry, Richard H Pennsylvania 

Breuning, Charles Frederick Maryland 

Call, Tracey Gillette Wyoming 

♦Chiang, Ming Chien China 

*Grarius, Melba Agnes Pennsylvania 

Greco, Salvatore Joseph Pennsylvania 

Heyman, Bernice Maryland 

*Hoppe, James O Montana 

Iwamoto, Harry Kaoru California 

Keagle, LeRoy Curtis New Jersey 

Lassahn, Norbert Gordon Maryland 

Mattocks, Albert McLean . .North Carolina 



Monzon, Luis Beltran Guatemala 

*Moulton, Georga Allen, Jr.. .New Hampshire 

Scigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

Simonoff, Robert Maryland 

Skolaut, Milton Wilbert Texas 

Smith, Pierre Frank New York 

Thompson, Robert Edward. . . South Dakota 

Waters, Kenneth Lee Virginia 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Maryland 

Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Maryland 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe Maryland 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Applebaum, Leonard Maryland 

Blankman, Albert Julius Maryland 

Carouge, Gilbert Morris Maryland 

Cragg, James Phillip, Jr Maryland 

Ehudin, Herbert Maryland 

Haase, Frederick Robert Maryland 

Klotzman, Alfred Maryland 

Kremer, Beryle Philip Maryland 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland 

Levin, Evelyn Shirley Maryland 

Levin, Harold Paul Maryland 

Myers, Morton Maryland 

Rodman, Leonard Maryland 

Rosenberg, Robert Maryland 



Scheinin, Benjamin Maryland 

Schwartz, Nathan Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Howard Maryland 

Shear, Joseph Maryland 

Siegel, Alvin Morton Maryland 

Simon, Alder Maryland 

Sindler, Melvyn Maryland 

Smith, Morton Maryland 

Sober, Norman Maryland 

Steinberg, Sherman Maryland 

Wylie, Hamilton Boyd, Jr Maryland 

Yarmosky, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Yevzeroff, Benjamin Maryland 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Bosch, Charlotte Thelma Maryland 

Cohen, Bernard Stanley Maryland 

*Finkelstein, Sidney Maryland 

Freiman, Joseph Maryland 

Futeral, Nathaniel Maryland 

Gaber, Jerome Maryland 

Gelrud, Jack Maryland 

Glushakow, Jacob Maryland 

Hutchinson, William John Maryland 

Jaslow, Morris M Maryland 

Jernigan, Lane McDermott Maryland 

Kanowsky, Joseph Hendler Maryland 

Leatherman, Albert Gaver, Jr Maryland 

Lichter, George Maryland 



Massing, Emanuel Wolf Maryland 

Meiser, Edward Taylor Maryland 

Myers, Bernard Maryland 

O'Hara, John James, Jr Maryland 

Padussis, Anthony Gus Maryland 

Ruddie, Israel Morris Maryland 

Sachs, Raymond Maryland 

Sifen, Paul Virginia 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Strauss, Leon Maryland 

Wagner, Charles Hammond Maryland 

Weiner, William Maryland 

Wlodkowski, Edward Michael Maryland 

Wong, Marjarat Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Abarbanel, Morton Maryland 

Adalman, Melvin Solomon Maryland 

Berlin, Alvin Maryland 

Cohen, Benny Maryland 

Corasaniti, John Anthony Maryland 

Fisher, Donald Ernst Maryland 

Freidman, Nathan Maryland 

Golombek, Leonard Harry Maryland 

Goodman, Irvin Maryland 

Hahn, Robert Roland Maryland 

*Hayes, Edward Charles Maryland 

Imber, Doris Maryland 

Klepfish, Milton Applestein Maryland 

Litvin, Sidney Benjamin Maryland 

Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

Magiros, John George Maryland 

t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



Mercier, Maurice Weldon, Jr Maryland 

Meyers, Macy Herbert Maryland 

Mondell, Harold Daniel Maryland 

Parelhoff, Merrill Elliott Maryland 

Passaro, Edward Joseph Maryland 

Pats, Sidney Maryland 

Poggi, Gabriel Joseph Leo Maryland 

Pollack, Morton Leon Maryland 

Rossberg, William Charles Maryland 

Simmons, Harry Pershing Maryland 

Sister Mary Imelda Titus Maryland 

♦Spike, Sidney Maryland 

VandenBosche, August Harry Maryland 

Wolf, Ernest Simon Maryland 

Wright, Lealon Burgess.III Maryland 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Abrams, Marvin Hartford Maryland 

Berlin, Jerome Maryland 

Boellner, Otto Karl, Jr Maryland 

Bowers, Martin Rudolph Maryland 

*Cohn, Melvin Maryland 

Daley, William Joseph, Jr Maryland 

Epstein, Gilbert Maryland 

♦Fainberg, Edward Maryland 

Fields, Thomas Lynn Maryland 

Fishel, Clarence Edgar Maryland 

♦Freed, Meyer Nathan Maryland 

Gakenheimer, Herbert Eugene .... Maryland 

♦Gartrell, Carlos Lee Maryland 

Garvey, John Joseph Maryland 

Getka, Joseph Francis Maryland 

Golberg, Kenneth Maryland 

Gretes, James John Maryland 

Hertz, Selig Sidney Maryland 



Johnson, James William III Maryland 

Krall, Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Meyer Maryland 

Laohman, Bernard Benjamin Maryland 

Leatherman, Gordon Edward Maryland 

♦Mazer, Harold Herbert Maryland 

Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Pearlman, William Louis Maryland 

Shochet, Irving Edward Maryland 

♦Siegel, Charles Myron Maryland 

Siegel, Paul Maryland 

♦Silver, Benjamin Joseph Maryland 

Stagmer, Daisy Alverda Maryland 

Stark, Alvin Maryland 

Sterner, Kenneth Frederick Maryland 

Weiner, Alex Maryland 

Weiner, Bernard . . Maryland 

*Weintraub, Sol Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Barr, Sidney Fred Illinois 

Bonvini, Charles Joseph Connecticut 

Book staver, Nelson David New Jersey 

Bove, Charles Joseph, Jr Maryland 

Corn, Bernard ..Maryland 

Dillon, Rev. Charles Patrick Maryland 

♦Downs, Emma Maryland 

♦Feinstein, Bernard Samuel Maryland 

Hansen, George Gegner Maryland 

Jahn, Elsa Florence .Maryland 

Jurkiewicz, Maurice John Vermont 

Kania, Henry Stanley Connecticut 

♦Kratochvil, Clyde Harding Wisconsin 

♦McClaskey, Gail Edward Iowa 

Morin, Bernard George Massachuetts 



♦Miller, Edward Maryland 

♦Mines, Catherine Emma Maryland 

Nachlas, Hertz Maryland 

Nerenberg, Hurburt Maryland 

Piatt, Lois Irene Pennsylvania 

Proutt , Leah Miller Maryland 

♦Rodriguez-Somoza, Julio Nicaragua 

Reynolds, Nowland Edmundson Maryland 

Schwartz, Aaron Maryland 

Sudler, Olive Wright Maryland 

Towlen, Donald Charles Maryland 

Towlen, Lloyd George Maryland 

Ward, Philip Steele Pennsylvania 

Weinstein, Frederick Maryland 

♦Zetlin, Henry Paul Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, MAY 30, 1942 
fDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Dittrich, Theodore Thomas Maryland 

Foster, Carroll Pross Maryland 



Hager, George Philip, Jr 

McNamara, Bernard Patrick 



Maryland 
Maryland 



fM ASTER OF SCIENCE 

Bolth, Franklin Anderson Maryland SimonofT, Robert. 



Maryland 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Berngartt, Elmar Bernard Maryland 

Clyman, Sidney Gary Maryland 

DeBoy, John Michael Maryland 

Getka, Milton Stanley Maryland 

Goldberg, Milton Maryland 

Harrison, Alice Emily Maryland 

Jankiewicz, Alfred Marion Maryland 

Klavens, Sidney Raymond Maryland 

Nollau, Elmer Wilson Maryland 

f Degree conferred by Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



Panamarow, Stephen Maryland 

Pritzker, Sherman David Maryland 

Reisch, Milton Maryland 

Sachp, Sidney Maryland 

Shochet, Melvin Maryland 

Smulovitz, Sidney Maryland 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Maryland 

Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Maryland 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe.Jr Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship LeRoy Curtis Keagle 

Alumni Research Grant Robert Edward Thompson 

Gold Medals for General Excellence Warren Eldred Weaver 

Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Warren Eldred Weaver 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Milton Reisch 

CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

Milton Reisch Sidney Gary Clyman Alice Emily Harrison 

HONORABLE MENTION (Third-year Class) 
Morton Smith Joseph Shear Benjamin Scheinin 






Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 25 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
101st and 102nd Announcements 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 184 1 to 1904) 

1 944 -1 946 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



NOTICE 

This catalogue covers the two year period 1944-46. A catalogue was not 
issued in 1944-45. 



Please note that the so-called accelerated program of instruction instituted 
as a war measure will be discontinued at the end of the Spring Quarter in 1945, 
and that the regular program of instruction, scheduled on the semester basis, 
will begin with the opening of the Fall Session in 1945. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 

VOL. 25 No. 1 

Catalogue and 
101st and 102nd Announcements 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 184 1 to 1904) 
1944- I946 




LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



CALENDAR 



1944 


1945 


1946 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


SMTWTFS 


S M T W T F S 


SMTWTFS 














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AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


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S M T W T F S 


SMTWTFS 


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SEPTEMBER 


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S M T W T F S 


SMTWTFS 


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19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 












1 


2 












1 


2 














1 














1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


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15 


16 


10 


11 


12 


13 


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9 


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11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 


2C 


21 


22 


23 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


6 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


23 


24 


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27 


28 


29 


31 




























30 


31 












30 















SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR 

1944-45 

Summer Quarter 

1944 

July 1 and 3 Saturday, Monday. Registration 

July 5 _ Wednesday Instruction begins 

September 4 Monday Labor Day, Holiday 

September 25, 26, 27, 28 .—Monday-Thursday — . Examinations 



Fall Quarter 

September 29 and 30 Friday, Saturday Registration 

October 2 Monday Instruction begins 

November 23 _ Thursday Thanksgiving, Holiday 

December 19, 20, 21, 22 Tuesday-Friday Examinations 

Winter Quarter 
1945 

January 5 and 6 Friday, Saturday Registration 

January 8 Monday Instruction begins 

February 22 Thursday Washington's Birthday, 

Holiday 
March 27, 28, 29, 30 Tuesday-Friday Examinations 



Sprixg Quarter 

April 6 and 7 Friday, Saturday Registration 

April 9 Monday ...Instruction begins 

May 30 Wednesday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 26, 27, 28, 29 Tuesday-Friday Examinations 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or day.- 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Satur- 
day at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean. ) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR 

1945-46 

Fall Semester 
1945 

September 20-21 — Thursday, Friday Registration 

September 24 -Monday Instruction begins 

November 22-25, Thursday-Sunday Thanksgiving Recess 

December 22-January 2 Saturday-Wednesday ..Christmas Recess 

January 28-30, 1946 Monday- Wednesday Examinations 

Spring Semester 
1946 

February 4-5 _ Monday, Tuesday Registration 

February 6 _ Wednesday Instruction begins 

February 22 Friday _ Washington's Birthday, 

Holiday 

April 19-23 Friday-Tuesday Easter Recess 

May 30 Thursday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 3-5 _ Monday- Wednesday.... Examinations 

June 8 Saturday Commencement 

Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Satur- 
day at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The University General Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity 
to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and mem- 
bers of its faculty of professorial rank; each Faculty Council controls the 
internal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions: 

College of Agriculture Summer Session 

Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Military Science 

Extension Service and Tactics 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Dentistry 

College of Commerce School of Law 

College of Education School of Medicine 

College of Engineering School of Nursing 

College of Home Economics School of Pharmacy 

Graduate School The University Hospital 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and the 
Hospital are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets; the others in College Park. 

Boahh of Regents 

Term Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, Baltimore 1949 

Mas. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary, Baltimore 1947 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, Baltimore 1944 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton 1945 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton 1950 

Philip C. Turner, Parkton 1950 

John E. Semmes, Baltimore 1951 

Thomas Roy Brookes, Bel Air 1952 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Baltimore 1952 

Glenn L. Martin, Baltimore 1951 

President of the University 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 



The General Administrative Board 

President Byrd, Dean Symons, Dean Robinson, Dean Patterson, Dean 
Wylie, Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean 
Steinberg, Dean Stamp, Dean Pyle, Dean Reid, Dean Cotterman, Dean 
Joyal, Colonel Griswold, Director Huff, Dr. Long, Miss Preinkert, Miss 
Kellar, Dr. Zucker, Dr. James, Dr. White, Dr. Spears, Mr. Benton, 
Dr. Brueckner, Ddiector Kemp. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc., President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 

tE. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D., Advisory Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D.j LL.D., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 
Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 

tE. F. Kelly Thomas C. Grube 2 

Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartttng Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

FACULTY 

Professors 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922); Medical School, London, Ontario, 
M.Sc. (1925) ; McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

Walter H. Hartung 1 Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918) ; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Wash- 
ington, D.C., B.S., (1921) ; Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Hon- 
orary). 

Associate Professors 

B. Olive Cole— Associate Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical Law 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Thomas C. Grtjbb 2 Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Hamilton College, A.B. (1930) ; University of Chicago, Ph.D. (1933). 

•Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916) ; Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

*A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), 
Ph.D. (1928). 

Donald E. Shay 3 - Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1938), Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1943-45. Changes will be noted in subse- 
quent catalogues. 

*Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch of 
the University. 

Representative on the Graduate Council. 

2 Resigned January 31, 1945. 

8 Appointed March 1, 1945. 

fDeceased October 27, 1944. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Assistant Professors 

*Adele B. Ballman 1 - - Assistant Prof essor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1936). 

•Gaylord B. Estarrook Assistant Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; 
University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

*Georqe Philip Hager, Jr., 2 

Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938), M.S. (1940). Ph.D. (1942). 

W. Arthur Purdum Assistant Prof essor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934), Ph.D. (1941). 

*J. Thomas Pyles 3 -Assistant Professor of English 

University of Maryland, B.A. (1926), M.A. (1927) ; Johns Hopkins University, 
Ph.D. (1938). 

Frank J. Slama —Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1926), B.S. in Phar. (1928), 
M.S. (1930.) Ph.D. (1935). 

*Edgar B. Starkey 4 Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1921), M.S. (1922), Ph.D. (1926). 

*Guy P. Thompson 5 .Assistant Professor of Zoology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1923), A.M. (1929). 

Instructors 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) ; University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

*LeRoy C. Keagle 6 Instructor in Chemistry 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1940) ; University of Maryland, Ph.D. (1944). 

*Robekt Anthony Littleford 7 Instructor in Zoology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1933), M.S. (1934) ; Ph.D. (1938). 

Milton Wilbert Skolaut Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Texas, B.S. (1941). 

Assistants 

Benjamin Frank Allen 8 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Frank Albert Bellman 8 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Tracey Gillette Call 9 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Idaho, Southern Branch, B.S. (1940) ; University of Maryland, 
M.S. (1944). 

•Margaret Louise Crespo 10 Assistant in Zoology 

Barnard College, B.A. (1940) ; Cornell University, M.A. (1941). 

*Leo Diesendruck 11 Assistant in Physics 

University of Cincinnati, B.S. (1941). 

♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

Appointed September 1, 1944. 
2 Appointed December 1, 1944. 
3 Resigned August 31, 1944. 
^Resigned January 15, 1944. 
'Resigned December 31, 1943. 
"Resigned November 30, 1944. 
7 Appointed January 24, 1944. 
8 On leave— United States Army. 
•Resigned September 15, 1944. 
10 Resigned December 31, 1943. 
"Resigned January 31, 1944. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Bernice Hetmak Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland. B.S., (1938), M.S. (1940). 

James O. Hoppe Assistant in Pharmacology 

Montana State University, B.S. (1940), M.S. (1942). 

Harry K. Iwamoto 1 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of California, B.S. (1938), M.S. (1942) ; University of Maryland 
Ph.D. (1944). 

Joseph Paul LaRocca 2 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Colorado, B.S. (1942) ; University of North Carolina, M.S. (1944). 

Leo Badek Lathroum, Jr Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1943). 

Albert McLean Mattocks Assistant in Analytical Chemistry 

University of North Carolina, B.S. (1942); University of Maryland, Ph.D. (1944). 

Luis Beltran Moxzox Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Guatemala, Chem.Phar. (1942). 

John A. Scigliano 3 Assistant in Bacteriology 

Creigh*on University, B.S. (1941) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1944). 

Pierre Frank Smith 4 .. H. A.B. Dunning Fellow in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
University of Buffalo, B.S. (1941). 

Eugene Clayton Weinbach 2 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1942). 

Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. 5 , 

The Wm. 8. Merrill Company Fellow in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
University of Maryland, B.S. (1942), M.S. (1944). 



Assisting Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S ....-Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Lotz Gue Senior Stenographer 



designed September 30, 1944. 
2 On leave — United States Army. 
'Resigned October 14, 1944. 
4 Resigned September 15, 1944. 
"Resigned June 10, 1944. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a forward- 
looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in the State of 
Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly educated and 
belter-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of medical service 
was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on January 27, 1841, and 
the first course of lectures was begun in November of the same year. The 
College continued to operate as an independent institution until 1904, when it 
was amalgamated with the group of professional schools in Baltimore then 
known as the University of Maryland. It became a department of the State 
University when the old University of Maryland was merged with the Mary- 
land State College in 1920. With but one short intermission just prior to 
1856 it has continuously exercised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, the 
collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential in the 
education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants for 
the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the facilities 
and instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the practice of 
the other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is a commodious 
six-story laboratory and classroom building especially designed to house the 
work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped throughout, and offers every 
facility for the undergraduate student to carry on the work necessary to 
acquire a thorough knowledge of pharmacy, and to the graduate student for 
the pursuit of research in the various fields of pharmacy, and the collateral 
sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation rooms 
with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this building. 
These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstrations in the 
sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices commonly used in 
lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the various 
courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for instruction in 
botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological sciences, zoology, bac- 
teriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the pursuit of research in any of 
these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room space 
to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library contains more 
than 9,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy and the collateral 
sciences. Additional library facilities are available at the Medical School 
Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the 
Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various departments of the Johns 
Hopkins University. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

RECOGNITION 
The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion, and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of pharmaceu- 
tical education ; and all institutions accredited by the Council or holding mem- 
bership in the Association must maintain certain minimum requirements with 
respect to number and qualifications of faculty members, physical plant, labora- 
tory and library facilities, curriculum, admission, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 
A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the curriculum are the 
same for all students taking this course, but the work of the fourth year may be 
varied within the limits set forth on page 24. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, phar- 
macology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science (M.S.) is 
conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have completed at least 
one year of graduate work and have presented a satisfactory thesis. Candi- 
dates for this degree may take all of the work in the School of Pharmacy. 
Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) may also take the 
major portion of the required work in the School of Pharmacy. All candi- 
dates for these degrees, however, must register in the Graduate School of the 
University and meet the requirements of that School. For detailed information 
concerning registration, requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue 
of the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American Association of Col- 
leges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certificate, 
or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by 
an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for graduation 
not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Required 
subjects 8 units, electives 8 units, total, 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit, Total, 8 units. 



♦The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 
general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agriculture, commercial 
drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign languages, mathematics, phys- 
ical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or 
preparatory school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or 
university entrance. Total, 8 units, of which not more than four shall be voca- 
tional units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, and 
constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It presupposes a 
school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and 
for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double laboratory periods 
in any science or vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class 
exercise. Normally, not more than three units are allowed for four years of 
English. If, however, a fifth course has been taken, an extra unit will be 
granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the 
certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or the De- 
partment of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon presentation 
of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not fully 
meet these requirements may be required to present further evidence of ability 
to undertake college work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, 
this may include an appropriate examination. Such examination will be given 
during the first week of each of the months of June, July, August and Septem- 
ber at College Park, Md. Applicants concerned will be notified when and 
where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not located 
in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should have attained 
the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school does not have 
such quality grade, then the applicant's school grades must be at least ten 
points or one letter higher than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination : An applicant from a secondary school who is 
not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either of 
two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for 
permission to report at the University for an examination, the result of which 
will be used in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine 
whether the applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on pre- 
senting evidence of having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations 
in the subjects required for graduation from an accredited secondary school. 
Such examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th Street, New York City, the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the 
State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director of 
Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty Council 
of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must present official 
transcripts of his high school and college records and a certificate of honorable 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



dismissal from the latter. Upon the satisfactory fulfillment of these require- 
ments, the applicant may be admitted and given advanced standing as fol- 
lows: 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the Amer- 
ican Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to advanced 
standing without examination and bg given credit for that portion of the 
work of the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum which he may have 
completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be 
admitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit for 
the work completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects of the 
pharmacy curriculum. 

No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student apply- 
ing for advanced standing from any institution other than a college of phar- 
macy, unless such credit shall be for graduate work in applied subjects done 
in a recognized graduate school or other educational institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may be 
equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he will be 
required to take those courses, which the class has completed but which he 
has not completed and such courses will be given precedence over the more 
advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does not 
desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a special student 
and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will not be eligible for 
graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty Council reserves the 
right to decide whether or not the preliminary training of the applicant is 
sufficient to permit admission under these conditions. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 
An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the office of 
the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the Dean of 
Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names of all schools 
attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office of the Director 
of Admissions with the required photograph and the two dollar investigation 
fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Director of Admissions will 
secure all necessary credentials after the application has been received. Do 
not make application unless reasonably certain that preparation is sufficient or 
unless intending to complete preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be 
allowed for securing credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant 
qualifies for the study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file 
with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for 
registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be 
required to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, 
and simultaneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a 
fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any 
subsequent school or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn state- 
ment of any and all actual drugstore experience acquired during the pre- 
ceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office of 
the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration period at 
the beginning of each semester. A student entering for the first time must 
matriculate before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar 
on the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a student be 
permitted to enter classes before he has completed registration. Students who 
fail to register on the days scheduled are required to pay a late registration 
fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day for registration with the payment 
of the late registration fee is Saturday at noon following the last day sched- 
uled for registration in the calendar. This rule may be waived only upon the 
written recommendation of the Dean. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 2.00, 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 110.00 

Non-Residents 135.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 25.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per semester) 5.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Students who are not following the regular schedule, but who are taking 
courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a semester's work, will be 
charged the full fees. Students taking less than this amount of work will be 
charged on a subject basis at the rate of $8.00 per semester hour plus $1.00 
per semester hour of laboratory work carried. Students taking extra work 
will be charged an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student is 
required to pay $6.00 each semester (Freshmen students $5.00) to the "Students' 
Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extracurricular activities. 
The expenditure of approximately $45.00 per academic year is necessary for 
the purchase of books, weights, dissecting instruments, and incidentals. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

Fixed charge of $7.50 per semester hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who will pay 
only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester hour.) 

Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 
A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's record. 
This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at the 
time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a student in any 
school or college of the University is regarded as registration in the University 
of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a professional school of the 
University or from one professional school to another, he will be required to 
pay the matriculation fee charged by the school to which he transfers. 

A tuition fee of $110.00 per semester is charged a student who is a resident 
of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is not a resi- 
dent of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semester. The tuition 
fee must be paid during the registration period at the beginning of each 
semester. 

A laboratory fee of $25.00 per semester is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the regis- 
tration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A fee and deposit of $5.00 per semester is charged to cover locker rentals 
and excessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. Any portion not used will be refunded at the end 
of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later than 
the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The penalty 
fee for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid before 
the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for an examina- 
tion to remove a condition or for a special examination must be paid before 
the student takes the examination and the receipt for payment must be pre- 
sented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will auto- 
matically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other privi- 
leges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 
A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at the 
time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State for at 
least one year. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his regis- 
tration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full calendar year. 
However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a non-resident to a 
resident status must be established by him prior to registration for a semester 
in any academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for with- 
drawal, bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with the Dean. 
A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained from the office 
of the Secretary of the School. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written 
consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be entitled 
to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he 
might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the School within five days after the beginning 
of instruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all charges less a 
deduction of $10.00 to cover cost of registration. 

Students withdrawing from the School after five days and before the end of 
three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester will receive a 
pro-rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $10.00 to cover cost of reg- 
istration. After the expiration of the three-week period referred to, refunds 
will be made only in those cases in which the circumstances are exceptional 
and the president of the University has authorized the making of such refunds. 

* TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic record 
from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so furnished, but 
for each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions, Government agencies, etc. as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy 
and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy have 
not been satisfied. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 
A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regular 
session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which are 
given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the beginning 
of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence from class. In 
case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physician, a student may 
register not later than the fifteenth day following the announced opening of 
the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has not 
attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence will not 
be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will be 
counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lecture or 
laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the session 
and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are held at the 
close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each subject is deter- 
mined by the average of all the ratings received during the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student received a 
grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will be held only on 
the dates scheduled in this catalogue and on the dates announced by the Dean. 
A student who is conditioned in the first semester, must remove the condition 
by the end of the succeeding semester, but will not be permitted to take an 
examination within thirty days from the date on which the conditional rating 
was received. Conditions received in the second semester must be removed 
before the end of the next semester. Special examinations for the removal of 
conditions will be held immediately preceding the opening of the regular Fall 
session. A condition which is not removed will become a failure, and the 
eourse must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course must 
report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the absence will 
permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justifiable (as if due to 
illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will give permission for a 
deferred examination in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following 
symbols : 

A, Excellent (93-100) ; B, Good (87-92) ; C, Fair (80-86) ; D, Passed (75-79) ; 
E, Conditioned (60-74) ; F, Failed (below 60) ; I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades : 

4 points for each hour of grade A 

3 points for each hour of grade B 

' 2 points for each hour of grade C 

1 point for each hour of grade D 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may be 
raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subsequent exami- 
nation on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course without 
the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is required to 
repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper excuse for 
not presenting himself for examination or for not completing the work of any 
course. It is not understood to signify work of an inferior quality. It will be 
replaced by a definite grade when all requirements for the course have been 
met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

• A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next succeeding 
year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled work of the pre- 
ceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will be considered to 
have attained this rank if he received passing grades in not less than four- 
fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter stated for promotion from 
the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all of the 
scheduled wcrk of the preceding year with a grade point count of 70 for the 
work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of the 
scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails to obtain 
passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will be required to 
withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the 
work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five points 
in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be required to 
withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy requires, 
evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of a student in 
relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the faculty in deter- 
mining the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence of the community 
as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobriety, temperate habits, 
respect for authority and associates, and honesty in the transaction of busi- 
ness affairs as a student will be considered as evidence of good moral char- 
acter necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, will 
render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal rule 
against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will be 
conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 24). The work of 
the last year must have been in courses offered in this school and must 
have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point count 
for each of the last two academic years of not less than twice the total 
semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE MARYLAND 

PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical experience 
for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recognized school or col- 
lege of pharmacy is credited toward the practical experience required to the 
extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself financially 
during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available may be 
profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in the prepara- 
tion of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full need not be dis- 
mayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to secure 
suitable employment. A register of positions available in drug stores is kept 
in the office of the Secretary of the School where it may be consulted upon 
request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharmacist 
of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor of chemistry 
in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still active, has con- 
tributed $1,000.00 annually for a period of more than ten years to establish a 
research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is awarded 
annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four years of college 
work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for investigational work 
in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

The Wm. S. Merrell Co. Research Fellowship 

The Wm. S. Merrell Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, has established a research fel- 
lowship in antibiotics for one year. This is a post-graduate fellowship paying 
$1,500.00 per year, $1,200.00 of which is paid to the fellow. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient to 
provide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for research in 
pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellowship will be 
awarded for research in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology or pharmacy. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to deposit 
each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a research grant, 
to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Committee on the 
Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to engage in pharma- 
ceutical research in the School of Pharmacy during the next scholastic year. 
The research conducted shall be of general pharmaceutical interest, and shall 
be submitted for publication in one of the pharmaceutical journals when com- 
pleted and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The stipend 
for the assistantships is $720.00 for the academic year, and the remission of all 
graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didactic 
work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in which 
they are serving. The usual amount of services required does not exceed 12 
to 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant to carry approximately 
a full graduate program. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many years 
a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who was active in 
pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, and who was espe- 
cially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy young people, Mrs. 
Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be awarded annually by the 
faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown superior proficiency in his or 
her work in practical and commercial pharmacy. The award amounts to 
approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education has contributed a 
sufficient amount to provide two scholarships of $200.00 each annually for 
students in need of financial assistance and whose scholastic record in high 
school places them in the upper levels of their classes. 

Vice Chemical Co. Scholarship 

The Vick Chemical Co., of New York, N. Y., has contributed sufficient funds 
through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education to provide 
one scholarship paying $365.00 per year to a needy student who has attained 
a high scholastic record in high school. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed 
sufficient funds to provide one scholarship paying $450.00 annually and has 
also contributed through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
cation funds sufficient to provide two scholarships of $250.00 each annually for 
students who meet the qualifications stated under the American Foundation 
for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Henry B. Gilpin Co. Scholarships 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed sufficient 
funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education to 
provide for one scholarship of $300.00 and one of $200.00 annually for students 
who meet the qualifications stated above under American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eagerness for 
service and helpfulness to others, which were striking characteristics of Pro- 
fessor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made contributions to 
establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this fund to members of 
the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of Bal- 
timore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available to junior 
and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is creditable, 
and who has attained the highest general average, not below B. Certificates of 
Honor will be awarded to the three students having the highest general aver- 
age, next to the winner of the general prize, provided this does not fall 
below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three students 
having the highest general average, provided this does not fall below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of chem- 
istry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the Faculty 
to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior 
proficiency in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. The recipient 
must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, 
the professor of chemistry will be guided in his judgment of the student's 
ability as much by observation and personal contact as by grades made in 
examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmact Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of approxi- 
mately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the Faculty 
of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the highest general 
average throughout the course in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 
In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy- 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 1882), placed 
in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student who has done excep- 
tional work throughout the course in Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Membership Prizes 
Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year is 
awarded annually to three students of the third-year class, selected by the 
Faculty, who have attained high standing in both theoretical and practical 
pharmacy. One of these awards was endowed by Dr. E. F. Kelly, and the 
other two by the Baltimore Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Associ- 
ation. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Council 
The Student Council is an organization of students established for the pur- 
pose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular activities 
of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum among students 
when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and encourage a class 
spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid traditions of the School. The 
council consists of twelve active members, three elected by each of the four 
classes, four ex-officio members who are the presidents of the respective classes, 
and a faculty advisor. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 
Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges that are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attain- 
ment in scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. All candidates 
selected for membership must have completed 75 credit hours of college work, 
and must be approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of students 
in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the end that 
their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awakened and 
guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in and the prob- 
lems confronting their profession. 

Officers (1944-45) 
President — Bernard Benjamin Lachman, Fourth-Year Class. 
First Vice-President — Harold B. Singer, Third- Year Class. 
Second Vice-President — Louis M. Bickel, Second- Year Class. 
Secretary — Vivian Schoen, Third-Year Class. 
Treasurer — Josephine P. DiGristine, Second-Year Class. 
Editor— Charlotte Z. Lister, Third- Year Class. 
Sergcant-at-Arms — Meyer Oxman, Fourth- Year Class. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Executive Committee 

William Joseph Daley, Jr., Fourth- Year Class 
Irvin Friedman, Third- Year Class. 
Howard Sidney Sirulnik, Second- Year Class 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Faculty Adviser 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This society continued its separate existence as such 
or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was 
formed. Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the 
Society remained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 
The active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers: 

Officers (1943-44) 

Eugene W. Hodson, Honorary President 

Stephen J. Provenza, President of the Association 

109 E. Montgomery Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Raphael H. Wagner, First Vice-President 
400 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Marvin J. Andrews, Second Vice-President 
5505 Stuart Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 
32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 
1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

Stephen J. Provenza, Chairman 
The Honorary President (Ex-Oflicio) 

The Officers 

ME MBERS- AT-L ARGE 

Amelia C. DeDominicis 

Samuel W. Goldstein 

Jacob H. Greenfeld 

Mathias Palmer 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 
1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in the 
advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing committee, 
known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of this Com- 
mittee are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School 
of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The following are the present 
members of the Committee: 

Robert J. Spittel, Chairman Earl M. Norris 

John A. Crozier Lloyd N. Richardson 

H. A. B. Dunning Simon Solomon 

John C. Krantz, Jr. T. N. Weatherby 
Otto W. Muehlhause 



24 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First S 


EMESTEft 


Second Semester 




Hi 

V 

d 

s 


s. Per Week 




Hr> 


. Per Week 




Title and Number of Course 


>> 

h3 


o 


to 

G) 

o 





2a 

4 


o 


-3 

03 
hi 


First Year 
*Botany 1, Structural 








2 

2 
3 
3 
3 

3 


4 
6 


6 

8 
3 
3 
3 

3 

1 


3 


•fChemistry 1, 3, Inorganic and Qualitative 


2 
3 

3 

3 
1 
2 

2 


6 


8 
3 
3 

3 

1 
8 

6 


4 
3 
3 

3 

1 

4 

18 
4 


4 


fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 

tMathematics 10 or 15 

tMathematics 11 or 17..™ 

fModern Language 1, 2, or 5, 6, French or 

German 

fSpeech 1, 2, Reading and Speaking 


3 


6 
6 




3 
3 

3 

1 








Second Year 
Botany 21, Macroscopical 








17 


Botany 22, Microscopical 


3" 


6 


6 
3 

4 
8 
5 
6 


2 


•{"Chemistry 36, 37, Organic 

fChemistry 32, 34, Organic 


3 




3 

4 
8 
5 


3 

1 
5 
4 


3 


4 
4 
2 


4 
4 
2 
4 


1 


Pharmacy 1, 2, Gaienical 

fPhysics 10, 11 General 

Physiology 22, General 


4 
3 


4 
3 
2 


5 
4 
3 




2 


4 


6 







Third Year 


17 
4 


18 


*BacterioIogy 115, Serology and Immunology 


2 


4 


6 


4 


♦Chemistry 15, Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 
Assaying 


2 


6 


8 


4 




2 
3 

2 
2 


6 


8 
3 

6 

8 


4 




2 
2 

2 

3 
2 


4 
6 


6 
8 
2 

3 

5 


3 
4 
2 

17 

2 
3 


3 


Pharmacology 51, 52, Pharm., Toxicology 


4 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 51, 52, Dispensing 

Pharmacy 61, History of _ 

Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry, 111, 113, Medicinal Products 


4 


3 

"i" 

3 

2 
2 




3 

i '" 

3 
4 

4 


18 
2 


3 







First Aid 1 Standard _ 


1 




2 








3 


Pharmacy 101, 102, Manufacturing.. 


2 


4 


3 


9, 
2 


3 
2 


Pharmacology 111, Biological Assaying 


2 


4 


6 


4 
6 

18 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 

2 








3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 

6 

9 


6 


Fourth Year (Electives) 

Botany 101, 102, Taxonomy — 

Botany 111, 113, Plant Anatomy 

Botany 112, 114, Plant Anatomy 


1 
2 


2 


3 
2 

4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 

6 


1 
2 


2 


17 

2 

2 


4 

3 

4 

......... 


4 
3 
4 


2 






1 






3 

T 

3 
3 
3 

2 


2 


fChemistry 187, 189, Physical 

fChemistry 188, 190, Physical 


3 


3 


6 


2 


♦Chemistry 151, 153, Physiological 

♦Chemistry 152, 154, Physiological 

fEnglish 3, 4, Survey and Composition — 

fLanguage 7, 8, Scientific German 

tMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


2 

_.„... 

. 3 
3 


2 


4 


4 


2 
3 






3 




6 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 111, 112, Advanced Prescription 

Compounding 

fZoology 5, Comparative Vertebrate Mor- 
phology „ 


6 


2 
4 



f Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

* Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

J The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



25 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND GREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


First Year 
Botany 1 


3" 
64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 


64 
192 


96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
128 


3 


Chemistry 1, 3 

English 1, 2 


8 
6 


Mathematics 10, 15 




3 


Mathematics 11, 17 




3 


Modern Language 1, 2 or 5, 6 „ 

Speech 1, 2 




6 
2 


Zoology 1 


96 


4 


Total. „ 

Second Year 
Botany 21 


448 
32 


352 

96 
96 


800 

128 

96 

96 

128 

256 

160 

96 


35 

4 


Botany .2 


2 


Chemistry 35, 37 


96 


6 


Chemistry 32, 34 


128 

128 

64 

64 


2 


Pharmacy 1, 2 

Physics 10, 11 

Physiology 22 ' 


128 
96 
32 


10 
8 
3 


Total 


384 

32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
64 
64 
32 


576 

64 
64 
96 
96 


960 

96 

96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
256 

32 


35 


Third Year 
Bacteriology 1 

Bacteriology 115 


4 
4 


Chemistry 15 

Chemistry 53.... 


4 
4 


Economics 37 


3 


Pharmacology 51, 52.._ 

Pharmacy 51, 52 


128 
192 


6 

8 


Pharmacy 61 


2 








Total 

Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113.. 


336 

96 
3: 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
96f 


640 


976 

96 

80 

16 

48 v 
128 

64 

96 
384t 


35 
4 


First Aid 1 

Law 62 


48 


3 

1 
3 


Pharmacy 101, io2 

Pharmacy 72 " .." .... 

Pharmacology lll.._ . ..,,' 

Elective^ " 


64 

32 

64 
288f 


6 

2 

4 

12 


Total 

Botany 101, 102 


416 
32 


496 
64 


912 

96 
64 

128 
96 

128 
96 

192 
64 

128 
96 
96 
96 

192 

144 

800 
960 
976 
912 


35 
4 




4 


Botany 112, 114 


128 

96 

128 


4 


Chemistry 99 




2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


Chemistry 187, 189. 




6 


Chemistry 188, 190. 


192 
128 


4 


Chemistry 151, 153 


64 


4 


Chemistry 15£, 154 


4 


English 3, 4 

Language 7, 8 


96 
96 
96 

32 

448 
384 
336 
416 


6 
6 


Mathematics 20, 21 




6 


Pharmacy 111, 112 

Zoology 5 

Summary 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 


192 
96 

352 
576 
640 
496 


4 
4 

35 
35 
35 

35 


Total 


1,584 


2,064 


3,648 


140 







+ AveraKi 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, first semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Shay. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic* microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the pre- 
vention and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, second semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories. Shay. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious 
diseases. 

For Graduates 

200. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. (Given in alternate years). Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

201. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit deter- 
mined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, second semester, two lectures, 
one laboratory. Slama. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification and 
physiology of the plant structures. 

21. Pharmacognosy (Macroscopical) — (4) Second year, first semester, 
two lectures, two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, with 
special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identification and 
in the detection of adulterations. 



♦Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued 
one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



22. Pharmacognosy (Microscopical) — (2) Second year, second semester, 
two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including prac- 
tice in the examination of the official powdered drugs and adulterants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2-4) Fourth year, one lec- 
ture and one laboratory. Elective for students who contemplate taking 
advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation of an 
herbarium. 

111, 113. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two lectures. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21, 22. 

Lectures covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on 
the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 1, 21, 22, 111, 113 or may be taken simultaneously 
with 111, 113. 

Laboratory work covering Botany 111, 113. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and 
microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection 
of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the iden- 
tification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount and 
quality of work performed. Slama. 

CHEMISTRY 
1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (8) First 
year, two lectures, two laboratories. Hager and Wich. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory 
and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (6) Second year, three lec- 
tures. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

32, 34. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2) Second year, two labora- 
tories. Hager and Mattocks. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, first semester, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Mattocks. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and their 
application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

S3. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, second sem- 
ester, two lectures and two laboratories. Hartung, Wich and Mattocks. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of 
official preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either semester. Hager 
and Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of glass. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Fourth year, three lec- 
tures. Hartung. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical proper- 
ties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2-4) Fourth year, two 
laboratories. Hartung and Mattocks. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113 or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical 
properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



142. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2-4) Any one or two semesters. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a study 
of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen 
in organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2-4) One lecture, two 
laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry — (6) Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochem- 
istry, equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry — (4) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physico-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

151, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, meta- 
bolism, vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical interest. 

152, 154. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (4) Two laboratories. 
Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe and Monzon. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 151, 153, or may be taken simultaneously 
with Chemistry 151, 153. 

Laboratory exercises mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the more 
important procedures in physiological chemistry, urinalysis and blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. 
Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and stereoisomerism. 

258. Organic Qualitative Analysis — (2-4) Either semester. Two to four 
laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and mixtures. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal 
chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analyses — (1-4) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to 
official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and 
derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1 credit each semester). 
Hartung. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. Hartung and Hager. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Third year, second semester, three 
lectures. Cole and Heyman. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, exchange, 
distribution and consumption of wealth. 

51. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, first semester, two lec- 
tures and one laboratory. Cole. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail phar- 
macies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including practice in 
bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, second semester, 
three lectures. Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special reference 
to the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and State laws and 
regulations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Ballman. 
Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with an his- 
torical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twen- 
tieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Survey and Composition — (6) Elective, three lectures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work covered in English 
1, 2. An historical study of English literature from the beginning to the 
nineteenth century. Themes, reports and conferences. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (3) First year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; the 
preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speaking; 
reference readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, second semester, one lec- 
ture, one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

10. Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents 
and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binominal theorem, 
and theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second sem- 
ester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not 
offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addition 
formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line 
and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. Riche- 
son. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic equa- 
tions, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, logarithms, 
determinants and progressions. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



17. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transfor- 
mation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcendental 
equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20, 21. Calculus — (6) Elective, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applications 
of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite 
series and differential equations. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 
1, 2. French — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Ballman. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 
Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

5, 6. French — Literary — Second Year — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — French, 1, 2 or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. Ballman. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose prepara- 
tion is not adequate for second-year German, receive half credit for this 
course. 

Elements of grammar, compositions, punctuation and translation 

5, 6. German — Literary — Second Year — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — German 1, 2 or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. 
The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous 
training. 

Six semester hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 
7, 8. Scientific German — (6) Elective, three lectures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — German 5, 6 and approval of the instructor. 
Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German grammar. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY S3 



PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third year, 
two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe and Monzon. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first sem- 
ester, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe and 
Monzon. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological assay 
and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay of thera- 
peutic substances. Given in alternate years. . 

211,212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (8) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52 and the approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the determina- 
tion of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in alter- 
nate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) Credit 
according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and com- 
parative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and 
hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Gaienical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and two 
laboratories. DuMez and Purdum. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathe- 
matical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manu- 
facture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Third year, two lectures and two 
laboratories. Wolf and Heyman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy 1, 2. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History op Pharmacy — (2) Third year, first semester, two lectures. 
DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special em- 
phasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

72. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, second semester, one 
lecture and 36 hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. Wolf, Purdum, 
Skolaut and Lathroum. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Practical work in drug store arrangement; the handling of drugs, medicines 
and drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
101, 102. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures and 
one laboratory. DuMez, Purdum and Heyman. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special refer- 
ence to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale. 

Ill, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (6) Two laboratories. 
DuMez, Purdum and Heyman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding spe- 
cial prescription and galenical preparations. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the standpoint of 
plant; crude materials used; their collection, preservation and transformation 
into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. 
DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the original and development of the works of drug standards 
and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. DuMez. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 35 



PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Thermodynamics — (3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 187, 189, 188, 190. 

A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics and its application 
to physical and chemical problems. 

121, 122. Electricity and Magnetism — (6) Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisite — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 

Given in alternate years. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology — (3) Second year, second semester, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe and Monzon. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 1. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet the 
requirements of students in pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. General Zoology — (4) First year, first semester, two lectures and two 
laboratories. Littleford. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian form, 
with emphasis on animal development, structure and function of organs. 
Introductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — (4) Elective, second semester, 
two lectures and two laboratories. Littleford. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, study of 
the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the general physi- 
ology and embryology of the principal organs and systems of the vertebrate 
animal, with emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required in 
each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



36 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, MAY 29, 1943 
tDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Barry, Richard H Pennsylvania 

Cross, John Milton New Jersey 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian _Mary land 



Jarowski, Charles Ignatius.— Maryland 

Thompson, Robert Edward S. Dakota 

Zenitz, Bernard Leon Maryland 



tMASTER OF SCIENCE 

Chiang:, Ming Chien China 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Applebaum, Leonard 

Blankman, Albert Julius.. 
Carouge, Gilbert Morris .... 
Cragg, James Phillip, Jr. 

Ehudin, Herbert __ 

Haase, Frederick Robert.. 

Klotzman, Alfred 

Kremer, Beryle Philip 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr. 

Levin, Evelyn Shirley— 

Levin, Harold Paul 

Myers, Morton. ... 

Rodman, Leonard 

Rosenberg, Robert 



.North Carolina Scheinin, Benjamin Maryland 

Maryland Schwartz, Nathan... -...Maryland 

— Maryland Schwartz, Theodore Howard ...Maryland 

Maryland Shear, Joseph Maryland 

Maryland Siegel, Alvin Morton... Maryland 

Maryland Simon, Alder Irvin Maryland 

Maryland Sindler, Melvyn M Maryland 

Maryland Smith, Morton Maryland 

Maryland Sober, Norman Maryland 

Maryland Steinberg, Sherman Maryland 

Maryland Wylie, Hamilton Boyd, Jr Maryland 

Maryland Yarmosky, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Maryland Yevzeroff, Benjamin Maryland 

Maryland 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship 

Gold Medal for General Excellence... 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

Conrad L. Wich, Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 



LeRoy Curtis Keagle 

Joseph Shear 

Morton Smith 



Sherman Steinberg 

.Gilbert Morris Carouge 



Morton Smith 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

Benjamin Scheinin 



Beryle Philip Kremer 



HONORABLE MENTION (Third- Year Class) 
Charles Irvel Smith Jerome Gaber George Lichter 



tDegree conferred by Graduate School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



37 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 

Session of June 1943-April 1944 

tGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Call, Tracey Gillette Wyoming Monzon, Luis Beltran Guatemala 

Dillon, Rev. Charles Patrick— Maryland Scigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

Heyman, Bernice Maryland Simonoff, Robert— ..Maryland 

Hoppe, James Oliver Montana Skolaut, Milton Wilbert Texas 

Iwamoto, Harry Kaoru California Smith, Pierre Frank New York 

Keagle, LeRoy Curtis .New Jersey *Waters, Kenneth Lee Virginia 

LaRocca, Joseph Paul Colorado Weaver, Warren Eldred -Maryland 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Maryland 

Mattocks, Albert McLean North Carolina Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr. ..Maryland 

FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS 

Bosch, Charlotte Thelma Maryland Massing, Emanuel Wolfe Maryland 

♦Cohen, Bernard Stanley Maryland Meiser, Edward Taylor Maryland 

Freiman, Joseph Maryland Myers, Bernard Maryland 

Futeral, Nathaniel Maryland Padussis, Anthony Gus Maryland 

Gaber, Jerome Maryland Ruddie, Israel Morris.. Maryland 

Gelrud, Jack Maryland Sachs, Raymond Maryland 

Glushakow, Jacob Maryland Sifen, Paul Virginia 

Hutchinson, William John Maryland Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Jaslow, Morris M. Maryland Strauss, Leon — Maryland 

•Jernigan, Lane McDermott Maryland Wagner, Charles Hammond Maryland 

Kanowsky, Joseph Hendler Maryland Weiner, William Maryland 

Leatherman, Albert Gaver, Jr. Maryland Wlodkowski, Edward Michael J. Maryland 

Lichter, George Maryland Wong, Margaret Maryland 

THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS 

Abarbanel, Morton _ -Maryland Mercier, Maurice Weldon Maryland 

Adalman, Melvin Solomon Maryland Meyers, Macy Herbert Maryland 

Berlin, Alvin Maryland Mondell, Harold Daniel Maryland 

Cohen, Benny Maryland O'Hara, John James, Jr Maryland 

Friedman, Nathan Maryland *Parelhoff, Merrill Elliott Maryland 

Golombek, Leonard Harry Maryland Passaro, Edward Joseph Maryland 

Goodman, Irvin Maryland Pats, Sidney Maryland 

•Hahn, Robert Maryland Poggi, Gabriel Joseph Leo Maryland 

Imber, Doris Maryland Pollack, Morton Leon Maryland 

Klepfish, Milton Applestein Maryland Simmons, Harry Pershing .Maryland 

Litvin, Sidney Benjamin Maryland Sister Mary Imelda Titus Maryland 

Magiros, John George Maryland Wolf, Ernest Simon Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Abrams, Marvin Hartford Maryland 

Berlin, Jerome Maryland 

Boellner, Otto Karl, Jr Maryland 

Bowers, Martin Rudolph Maryland 

Coleman, Mary Ann Maryland 

Corasaniti, John Anthony... Maryland 

Daley, William Joseph, Jr. ...Maryland 

•Davis, Richard Glenn Maryland 

Epstein, Gilbert Maryland 

•Gakenheimer, Herbert Eugene ..Maryland 

Hayes, Edward Charles Maryland 

Hertz, Selig Sidney Maryland 

Krall, Joseph . Maryland 



Kramer, Meyer -....Maryland 

Kurtz, Milton Charles- Maryland 

Lachman, Bernard Maryland 

Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Pearlman, William Louis Maryland 

Rossberg, William Charles _ Maryland 

*Rubin, Samuel Benjamin ..Dist. of Col. 

Shochet, Irving Edward Maryland 

Spittel, Robert John, Jr Maryland 

Weiner, Alex Mary Ian d 

Weiner, Bernard _ Maryland 

Zentz, Charlotte Sue Maryland 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Davidov, Marvin David... Maryland 

Edenfield, Charles Howard Maryland 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland 

Gretes, James John Maryland 

Hennessey, Lawrence John Maryland 

•Hoy, Robert Gordon ...Maryland 



tRegistered in Graduate School. 
•Did not attend entire session. 



•Johnson, Joseph LeGrand Maryland 

•Kammer, Franklin Daniel Maryland 

♦Leavey, Herbert J Maryland 

Schoen, Vivian .Maryland 

Singer, Harold Bernard Maryland 

•Smith, George Charles _ —Maryland 



38 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS (Enrolled January 1944) 



Bickel, Louis Michael. 
Clyman, Daniel 



.Maryland 
-Maryland 



DiGristine, Josephine Pauline Maryland 

•Losinski, Julia Marie Maryland 



♦Sansalone, Aldo Dominic... 
Sirulnik, Howard Sidney. 
Weiner, Marian Nita 



Dist. of Col. 

Maryland 

Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



•Barr. Sidney Fred 

Bentz, Alice Ruth 

* Boone, William Thomas 

♦Cowan, Joseph Robert 

Figueroa, Rene Emilio 

Law, Ruth M. Black well- 
Levin, Bettie Anne 



Illinois 

Maryland 

North Carolina 

Maryland 

Porto Rico 

Maryland 

Maryland 



♦McCauley, Betty Jane Maryland 

McClaskey, Gail Edward Iowa 

Proutt, Leah Miller Maryland 

Quintero, Eneas Canal Zone 

Starkey, Nell Myrtle Georgia 

Uncles, Sonya Reeves Maryland 

Unitas, Anthony John_ Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, MARCH 25, 1944 
fMASTER OF SCIENCE 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, APRIL 18, 1944 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Bosch, Charlotte Thelma Maryland 

Freiman, Joseph Maryland 

Futeral, Nathaniel Maryland 

Gaber, Jerome Maryland 

Gelrud, Jack Maryland 

Glushakow, Jacob _ Maryland 

Hutchinson, William John Maryland 

Jaslow, Morris _ ..Maryland 

Kanowsky , Joseph Maryland 

Leatherman, Albert G., Jr... Maryland 

Lichter, George... Maryland 

Massing, Emanuel Wolfe Maryland 



E. Taylor Meiser Maryland 

Bernard Myers Maryland 

Padussis, Anthony Gus Maryland 

Ruddie, Israel Morris Maryland 

Sachs, Raymond. _ Maryland 

Sifen, Paul Virginia 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Strauss, Leon Maryland 

Wagner, Charles Hammond Maryland 

Weiner, William Maryland 

Wlodkowski, Edward M. J Maryland 

Wong, Margaret _ Maryland 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



H. A. B. Dunning Fellowship Pierre Frank Smith 

Gold Medal for General Excellence ... Charles Irvel Smith 

William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize Charles Irvel Smith 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize. .— Anthony Gus Padussis 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize _ _ George Lichter 



Jerome Gaber 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

Morris Jaslow 



William Weiner 



HONORABLE MENTION (Third-Year Class) 
Milton Applestein Klepfish 



tDegree conferred by the Graduate School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



39 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION OF APRIL-DECEMBER 1944 
(GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Banker, Jane Louise Pennsylvania 

'Call. Tracey Gillette Wyoming 

Dillon, Rev. Charles Patrick Maryland 

Greenspan, Joseph Maryland 

Heyman, Bernice Maryland 

Hoppe, James Oliver, „ Montana 

Iwamoto, Harry Kaoru .California 

Keagle, LeRoy Curtis. .New Jersey 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland 

Mattocks, Albert McLean.„.North Carolina 



Monzon, Louis Beltran Guatemala 

JScigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

Simonoff, Robert Maryland 

♦Skolaut, Milton Wilbert.. Texas 

JSmith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

t Smith, Pierre Frank. _ New York 

♦Weaver, Warren Eldred Maryland 

iWeinbach, Eugene Clayton Maryland 

JWhaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr. Maryland 



Abarbanel, Morton 

JAdalman, Melvin Solomon. 
JBerlin, Alvin 

Cohen, Benjamin 



Friedman, Nathan 

•Golombek, Leonard Harry... 

Goodman, Irvin 

Imber, Doris 

Klepfish, Milton Applestein. 
JLitvin, Sidney Benjamin 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 

Maryland Meyers, Macy Herbert Maryland 

-Maryland $Mondell, Harold Daniel. — Maryland 

Maryland JO'Hara, John James, Jr. Maryland 

Maryland JPassaro, Edward Joseph Maryland 

Maryland tPats, Sidney -.Maryland 

Maryland Poggi, Gabriel Joseph Leo.. ...Maryland 

Maryland J Pollack, Morton Leon ..Maryland 

Maryland Simmons, Harry Pershing Maryland 

Maryland Sister Mary Imelda Titus Maryland 

Maryland "Wolf, Ernest Simon Maryland 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS (Enrolled October 1944) 



tBoellner, Otto Karl, Jr Maryland 

Corasaniti, John Anthony Maryland 

Daley, William Joseph, Jr ..Maryland 

Kelman, Nathan Allen Connecticut 



Lachman, Bernard Benjamin Maryland 

Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Weiner, Bernard Maryland 



JAbrams, Marvin Hartford— 

IBerlin, Jerome 

SBoellner, Otto Karl, Jr 

JBowers, Martin Rudolph 

Coleman, Mary Ann. 



Corasaniti, John Anthony..- 
Daley, William Joseph, Jr.... 

Hayes, Edward Charles 

t Hertz, Selig Sidney 

tKrall, Joseph 



THIRD-YEAR-CLASS 

.Maryland Kramer, Meyer Maryland 

.Maryland Lachman, Bernard Benjamin Maryland 

Maryland Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

Maryland Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Maryland tPearlman, William Louis Maryland 

Maryland Rossberg, William Charles Maryland 

Maryland ±Shochet, Irving Edward Maryland 

Maryland *Spittel, Robert John, Jr Maryland 

Maryland i Weiner, Alex Maryland 

Maryland Weiner, Bernard - Maryland 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS (Enrolled October 1944) 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland Schoen, Vivian Maryland 

Lister, Charlotte Zentz Maryland Singer, Harold Bernard Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



tEdenfield, Charles Howard. —.Maryland 

iEpstein, Gilbert — Maryland 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland 



Schoen, Vivian Maryland 

Singer, Harold Bernard .Maryland 

Zentz, Charlotte Sue — . Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS (Enrolled October 1944) 



Bartholomay, Carolyn Mary Maryland 

Bickel, Louis Michael Maryland 

DiGristine, Josephine Pauline Maryland 



Iwamoto, Sayuri Ishida ... 
Sirulnik, Howard Sidney. 



California 
. Maryland 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 

Bickel, Louis Michael Maryland Sirulnik, Howard Sidney. 

Clyman, Daniel Maryland * Weiner, Marian Nita 

DiGristine, Josephine Pauline Maryland 

t Registered in Graduate School. 
•Did not attend entire session, 
t Withdrew to enter Military Service. 



.Maryland 
Maryland 



40 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 

Altevogt, Albert Charles Maryland 

° Bruno, Tillie Ann— Pennsylvania 

Deckelbaum, Joseph Maryland 

Dembeck, Bernard John Maryland 

*°Dubin, Theodore Maryland 

Eppel, David Manuel .Maryland 

♦Feit, Leon Maryland 

Geist, Gene Natalie Maryland 

♦Greenberg, Albert Gordon Maryland 

Johnson, Joseph LeGrand, Jr.—. Maryland 



(Enrolled October 1944) 

°Keiser, Alvin _ Maryland 

° Meyers, Jacob Sholom -.Maryland 

Pyles, Robert Everett — Maryland 

"Rosenthal, Leon Ephraim Maryland 

Shenker, Norman Leonard Maryland 

°Sezzin, Macy Maryland 

Shpritz, Stuart Maryland 

°Shulman, Shirley S Maryland 

°Waldman, Alvin Melvin Maryland 

°Weber, Thaddeus Marion Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



tEisenberg, Edwin Frederic .Maryland 

♦Figueroa, Rene Emilio Puerto Rico 

♦Law, Ruth M. Black well.— Maryland 

♦Levin, Bettie Anne —Maryland 



*Quintero, Eneas _ _ Panama 

Unitas, Anthony John -Maryland 

Varipatis, Matina Stella. _ ..Maryland 



SPECIAL PRE-DENTAL AND PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS 

(Summer Quarter) 



Bloxom, William Randolph Virginia 

Bond, Donald B Marylan. 

Brigada, Carl Paul Massachusetts 

Bullock, Matt H North Carolina 

Carl, Mary Kathryn Maryland 

Chelton, Louis G. Maryland 

♦Dandelake, Charles Augustus... N. Carolina 

Dykes, Dick California 

Friedman, Bernard ..Maryland 

Gold, David Isidore New York 



Heininger, Paul Lehmann Vermont 

Heller, Leonard— — Maryland 

Holloway, William J Maryland 

Newell, Edward A Maryland 

♦Provenza, D. Vincent Maryland 

Rapp, Edwin Read. — Maryland 

Rudolph, Robert Lee _ Ohio 

Scherr, Merle S.- West Virginia 

Sirkis, Alvin L. - - Maryland 

Wojtkelewicz, Albert Stephen Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 28, 1944 

tDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Iwamoto, Harry Kaoru California 



Call, Tracey Gillette. 



tMASTER OF SCIENCE 

— Wyoming Scigliano, John Anthony. 



Nebraska 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, DECEMBER 22, 1944 

tDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Keagle, LeRoy Curtis — New Jersey 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Abarbarnel, Morton Maryland 

Cohen, Benjamin Maryland 

Friedman, Nathan Maryland 

Goodman, Irvin Maryland 

Imber, Doris Maryland 



Klepfish, Milton Applestein. 

Meyers, Macy Herbert 

Poggi, Gabriel Joseph Leo_ 
Simmons, Harry P 



Sister Mary Imelda Titus 



...Maryland 
—Maryland 
—Maryland 
...Maryland 
—Maryland 



HONORS 



Gold Medal for General Excellence.. _ 

The William Simon Memorial Chemistry Prize. 



.Milton Applestein Klepfish 
Milton Applestein Klepfish 



$ With drew to enter Military Service. 
♦Did not attend entire session. 
"Special students during summer quarter. 
tDegree conferred by Graduate School. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 26 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
1 3 rd Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1946-1947 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 26 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
103rd Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1946-1947 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR 

First Semester 
1946 

September 18-20 Wednesday-Friday....Registration 

September 23 Monday Instruction begins 

November 28-30* Thursday-Saturday...Thanksgiving recess 

December 23- January 1*.. Monday-Thursday Christmas recess 

January 27-29, 1946 Monday-Wednesday..First semester 

examinations 



Second Semester 



1947 



February 3-5 Monday- Wednesday-Registration 



February 6 Thursday. 

February 22 Saturday.. 



April 4-8* Friday-Tuesday 

May 30 Friday 

June 4-6 Wednesday-Friday. 

June 7 Saturday 



.Instruction begins 

.Washington's Birthday, 
Holiday 

.Easter recess 

.Memorial Day, Holiday 

.Second semester 
examinations 

.Commencement 



* Holidays begin at end of last class of preceding date and terminate at end of last 
date indicated. 

Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Sat- 
urday at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registra- 
tion period. (This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Re- 
gents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each for a 
term of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in 
the President. The University General Administrative Board acts in an 
advisory capacity to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and 
members of its faculty of professorial rank; each Faculty Council con- 
trols the internal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions: 

College of Agriculture Summer Session 

Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Military Science 

Extension Service and Tactics 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Dentistry 

College of Commerce School of Law 

College of Education School of Medicine 

College of Engineering School of Nursing 

College of Home Economics School of Pharmacy 

Graduate School The 'University Hospital 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and 
the Hospital are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and 
Greene Streets; the others in College Park. 

Board of Regents 

Term Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, Baltimore 1949 

Thomas R. Brookes, Vice-Chairman 1952 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, Baltimore 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton 1954 

Glenn L. Martin, Baltimore 1951 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton 1950 

Philip C. Turner, Baltimore 1950 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Baltimore 1947 

Charles P. McCormick, Baltimore 1948 

Millard E. Tydings, Washington 1951 

President of the University 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 



The General Administrative Board 

President Byrd, Dean Appleman, Mr. Benton, Dr. Brechbill, Dr. 
Brueckner, Dean Cotterman, Dean DuMez, Dean Eppley, Colonel 
Griswold, Dean Howell, Director Huff, Miss Kellar, Director Kemp, 
Dr. Long, Dean Mount, Dean Patterson, Miss Preinkert, Dean Pyle, 
Dean Robinson, Dr. Sayles, Dean Stamp, Dean Steinberg, Dean 
Symons, Dr. White, Dean Wylie. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.S'c, President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LLD., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
Clifford W. Chapman J. Carlton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

Frank J. Slama Donald E. Shay 

FACULTY 

Professors 
Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, 
M.Sc. (1925); McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

Walter H. Hartung 1 Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918); University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pliarmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905); American International Academy, Wash- 
ington, D.C., B.S., (1921); Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Hon- 
orary) . 

Associate Professors 

B. Olive Cole ....Associate Professor of Economics and 

Pharmaceutical Law 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

*Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916); Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

W. Arthur Purdum 2 Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930), B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934), Ph.D. (1941). 

*A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), 
Ph.D. (1928). 

Donald E. Shay , Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937); University of Maryland, M.S. (1938), Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Frank J. Slama Associate Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), 
M.S. (1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

Henry E. Wich.... , Associate Professor of Inorganic and 

Analytical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1945-46. Changes will be noted in sub- 
sequent catalogues. 

*Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

Representative on the Graduate Council. 

2 Resigned November 30, 1945. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Assistant Professors 
♦Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926); Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1935). 

♦Gaylord B. Estabrook Assistant Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921); Ohio State University, M.S. (1922); 
University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

♦George Philip Hager, Jr., 

Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938), M.S. (1940), Ph.D. (1942). 



Instructors 
Benjamin Frank Allen 1 Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912); University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

♦Robert Anthony Littleford ....Instructor in Zoology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1933), M.S. (1934), Ph.D. (1938). 

Milton Wilbert Skolaut Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Texas, B.S. (1941). 

Assistants 
Morton Abarbanel 2 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1944). 

Jane Louise Banker 3 h Assistant in Chemistry 

Cornell University, B.A. (1942). 

Melba Agnes Grafius 4 Assistant in Pharmacy 

Temple University, B.S. (1942). 

James 0. Hoppe Assistant in Pharmacology 

Montana State University, B.S. (1940), M.S. (1942). 

Milton A. Klepfish 5 Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1944). 

Joseph Paul LaRocca 6 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Colorado, B.S. (1942); University of North Carolina, M.S. (1944). 

Leo Baden Lathroum, Jr. 7 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1943). 

Luis Beltran Monzon Assistant in Pharmacology 

University of Guatemala, Chem.Phar. (1942). 

Assisting Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Daisy Lotz Gue Senior Stenographer 

Returned from duty in U. S. Army December 1, 1945. 

2 Appointed August 30, 1945. 

3 Appointed September 15, 1945. 

4 Appointed February 1, 1946. 

5 Appointed April 15, 1945; resigned June 30, 1945. 

•On leave — U.S. Army. 

7 Resigned November 30, 1945. 



UNIVERSITY OiF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of 
medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of pro- 
fessional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856 it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its 
matriculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it 
also offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially 
designed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped 
throughout, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to 
carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of pharm- 
acy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the vari- 
ous fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for 
instruction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 10,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical 
Education, and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions accredited by the Council 
or holding membership in the Association must maintain certain minimum 
requirements with respect to number and qualifications of faculty mem- 
bers, physical plant, laboratory and library facilities, curriculum, admis- 
sion, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, 
and its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work, of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 19. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M.S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in 
the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work 
in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, 
must register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the 
requirements of that School. For detailed information concerning regis- 
tration, requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Grad- 
uate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American As- 
sociation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 8 units, elective 8 units, total, 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 8 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agricul- 
ture, commercial drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign lan- 
guages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject 
offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 8 units, of 
which not more than four shall be vocational units. 



*The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 
to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. 
Double laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are consid- 
ered as equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three 
units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course 
has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon 
presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate 
who does not fully meet these requirements may be required to present 
further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the dis- 
cretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate 
examination. Such examination will be given during the first week of 
each of the months of June, July, August and September at College 
Park, Md. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to re- 
port. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek, entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examina- 
tion, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for grad- 
uation from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are 
offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th 
Street, New York City, the Regents of the University of the State of 
New York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the 
State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must present offi- 
cial transcripts of his high school and college records and a certificate of 
honorable dismissal from the latter. Upon the satisfactory fulfillment 
of these requirements, the applicant may be admitted and given advanced 
standing as follows: 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to 
advanced standing without examination and be given credit for that por- 
tion of the work of the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum 
which he may have completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be 
admitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit 
for the work completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student 
applying for advanced standing from any institution other than a col- 
lege of pharmacy, unless such credit shall be for graduate work in ap- 
plied subjects done in a recognized graduate school or other educational 
institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may 
be equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he 
will be required to take those courses, which the class has completed but 
which he has not completed and such courses will be given precedence 
over the more advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Fac- 
ulty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary 
training of the applicant is sufficient to permit admission under these 
conditions. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photographs and the two 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the 
application has been received. Do not make application unless reason- 
ably certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file applica- 
tion with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after en- 
rolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said appli- 
cation he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may 
deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, 
shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy 
shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit 
to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore ex- 
perience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office 
of the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. A student entering for the 
first time must matriculate before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Regis- 
trar on the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

student be permitted to enter classes before he has completed registra- 
tion. Students who fail to register on the days scheduled are required 
to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day for 
registration with the payment of the late registration fee is Saturday 
at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the calendar. 
This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) ... 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 110.00 

Non-Residents 135.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 25.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per semester) 5.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

A student who is not following the regular schedule, but is taking 
courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a semester's work, will be 
charged the full fees. A student taking less than three-fourths of a 
semester's work, will be charged on a subject basis at the rate of $8.00 
per semester hour plus an additional $1.00 per semester hour for courses 
requiring laboratory work. A student given the privilege of taking 
more than the regularly scheduled work for a semester will be charged 
an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student 
is required to pay $6.00 each semester (Freshmen students $5.00) to the 
"Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $45.00 per aca- 
demic year is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting 
instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Matriculation fee of $10.00. 
Fixed charge of $7.50 per semester hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who 
will pay only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester hour.) 

Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $20.00. 
PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registration 
in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a pro- 
fessional school of the University or from one professional school to an- 
other, he will be required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 

A tuition fee of $110.00 per semester is charged a student who is a 
resident of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who 
is not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semes- 
ter. The tuition fee must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $25.00 per semester is charged to cover materials 
and appartus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A fee and deposit of $5.00 per semester is charged to cover locker 
rentals and excessive breakage. It must be paid during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. Any portion not used will be 
refunded at the end of the year. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will auto- 
matically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents hcve been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 
If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with 
the Dean. A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained 
from the office of the Secretary of the School. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parents or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be 
entitled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the School within five days after the be- 
ginning of instruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all 
charges less a deduction of $10.00 to cover cost of registration. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Students withdrawing from the School after five days and before the 
end of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester 
will receive a pro-rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $10.00 
to cover cost of registration. After the expiration of the three-week 
period referred to, refunds will be made only in those cases in which the 
circumstances are exceptional and the president of the University has 
authorized the making of such refunds. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic 
record from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so 
furnished, but for each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc. as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further ab- 
sence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lec- 
ture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
session and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student re- 
ceived a grade of "Incomplete*' and for the removal of conditions will 
be held on the dates announced by the Dean. A student who is con- 
ditioned in any semester must remove the condition by the end of the 
succeeding semester, but will not be permitted to take an examination 
within thirty days from the date on which the conditional rating was 
received. A condition which is not removed will become a failure, and 
the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100); B, Good (87-92); C, Fair (80-86); D, Passed 
(75 79); E, Conditioned (60-74); F, Failed (below 60); I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades: 

4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subse- 
quent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is 
required to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he received passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all 
of the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of 
the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of 
the work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than 
five points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be 
required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy 
requires, evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct 
of a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by 
the faculty in determining the fitness of a student to enter into the con- 
fidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be con- 
sidered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting 
of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the 
term, will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a 
formal rule against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements* 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 19). The 
work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140. with a grade point 
count for each of the last two academic years of not less than twice 
the total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE MARYLAND 

PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical 
experience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recog- 
nized school or college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical expe- 
rience required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of oppor- 
tunities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions avail- 
able in drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School 
where it may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS. AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharm- 
acist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still 
active, has contributed $1,000.00 annually since 1930 to maintain a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

The Wm. S. Merrell Co. Research Fellowship 

The Wm. S. Merrell Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, has established a research 
fellowship in antibiotics for one year. This is a post-graduate fellowship 
paying $1,500.00 per year, $1,200.00 of which is paid to the fellow. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient 
to provide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for re- 
search in pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellow- 
ship will be awarded for research in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharma- 
cology or pharmacy. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to 
deposit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 
research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the 
Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable 
him to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy 
during the next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of 
general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in 
one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for the assistantships is $720,00 for the academic year, and the 
remission of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma 
fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didac- 
tic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in 
which they are serving. The usual amount of services required does not 
exceed 12 to 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant to carry 
approximately a full graduate program. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many 
years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who 
was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, 
and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy 
young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be 
awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown 
superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education has contrib- 
uted a sufficient amount to provide two scholarships of $200.00 each 
annually for students in need of financial assistance and who as high 
school graduates maintained a rank in the upper one-quarter of their 
classes, and college students who have established evidence of compe- 
tency and ability to maintain an average of "B" as a minimum. 

Vick Chemical Co. Scholarship 

The Vick Chemical Co., of New York, N. Y., has contributed sufficient 
funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
to provide one scholarship paying $365.00 per year to a needy student 
who has attained a high scholastic record in high school. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contrib- 
uted sufficient funds to provide one scholarship paying $450.00 annually 
and has also contributed through the American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education funds sufficient to provide two scholarships of $250.00 
each annually for students who meet the qualifications stated under the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

Henry B. Gilpin Co. Scholarships 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed suffi- 
cient funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



cation to provide for one scholarship of $300.00 and one of $200.00 
annually for students who meet the qualifications stated above under 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eager- 
ness for service and helpfulness to others, which were striking character- 
istics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made 
contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this 
fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is 
creditable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below 
B. Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall 
below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by 
the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommend- 
ing a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in 
his judgment of the student's ability as much by observation and persona] 
contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of 
approximately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually 
by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 
the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



American Pharmaceutical Association Membership Prize 
Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to a student of the third-year class, selected by the 
Faculty, who has attained high standing in both theoretical and practical 
pharmacy. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Council 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid tradi- 
tions of the School. The council consists of twelve active members, three 
elected by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the 
presidents of the respective classes, and a faculty advisor. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society 
is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 
75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

Officers (1945-1946) 
President — Harold B. Singer, Fourth- Year Class. 
First Vice-President — Louis M. Bickel, Third-Year Class. 
Second Vice-President — Stuart Shpritz, Second- Year Class. 
Secretary — Charlotte Zentz Lister, Fourth- Year Class. 
Treasurer — Alvin Reiser, Second- Year Class. 
Editor — Gene Natalie Geist, Second- Year Class. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Howard Sirulnik, Third- Year Class. 

Executive Committee 
Vivian Schoen, Fourth-Year Class. 
Howard A. Pippig, Third- Year Class. 
Jacob S. Meyers, Second- Year Class. 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Faculty Adviser. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held 
on May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of 
the Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society con- 
tinued its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni 
Association of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the 
organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained 
dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The 
active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers : 

Officers (1945-1946) 

Charles Stevens, Honorary President 

Raphael H. Wagner, President of the Association 
400 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Marvin J. Andrews, First Vice-President 
5505 Stuart Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Mathias Palmer, Second Vice-President 
916 East Thirty-sixth Street, Baltimore, Md. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 
32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 
1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 
Raphael H. Wagner, Chairman 
The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 

The Officers 

Amelia C. DeDominicis 

.Samuel W. Goldstein 

Stephen J. Provenza 

W. Arthur Purdum 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matters pertain- 
ing to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The fol- 
lowing are the present members of the Committee : 

Andrew F. Ludwig, Chairman Simon iSolomon 

John A. Crozier Elmer W. Sterling 

Otto W r . Muehlhause George E. Wolf 

Stephen J. Provenza Walter F. Wargell 
Lloyd N. Richardson 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



19 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Title and Number of Course 



First Year 

•Botany 1, Structural 

tChemistry 1, 3, Inorganic and Qualitative 

Analysis 

tEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 

tMathematics 10 or 15 

tMathematics 11 or 17 

fModern Language 1, 2, or 5, 6, French or 

German 

tSpeech 1, 2, Reading and Speaking 

fZoology 1, General 



Second Year 

Botany 21, Macroscopical 

Botany 22, Microscopical 

tChemistry 35, 37, Organic 

tChemistry 32, 34, Organic 

Pharmacy 1, 2, Galenical 

tPhysics 10, 11, General 

Physiology 22, General 



Third Year 

•Bacteriology 1, General 

•Bacteriology 115, Serology and Immunology 

•Chemistry 15, Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 

Assaying 

•Economics 37, Elementary 

Pharmacology 51, 52, Pharm., Toxicology 

and Therapeutics 

Pharmacy 51, 52, Dispensing 

Pharmacy 61, History of 



Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry, 111, 113, Medicinal Products. 

Economics 51, Pharmaceutical 

First Aid 1, Standard 

Law 62, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations.. 

Pharmacy 101, 102, Manufacturing 

Pharmacy 72, Pharmaceutical Practice 

Pharmacology 111, Biological Assaying.... 
ElectivesJ 



Fourth Year (Electives) 

Botany 101, 102, Taxonomy 

Botany 111, 113, Plant Anatomy 

Botany 112, 114, Plant Anatomy 

Chemistry 99, Glassworking 

Chemistry 112, 114, Medicinal Products 

tChemistry 187, 189, Physical 

tChemistry 188, 190, Physical 

•Chemistry 151, 153, Physiological 

•Chemistry 152, 154, Physiological 

tEnglish 3, 4, Survey and Composition 

tLanguage 7, 8, Scientific German 

tMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 

Pharmacy 111, 112, Advanced Prescription 

Compounding 

tZoology 5, Comparative Vertebrate Mor- 
phology 



Hrs. Per Week 



18 



17 



Hrs. Per Week 



17 



18 



t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

• Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

X The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


First Year 
Botany 1 


32 
64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 


64 
192 


96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
128 


3 


Chemistry 1, 3 


8 


English 1, 2 


6 


Mathematics 10, 15 




3 


Mathematics 11, 17 




3 






6 


Speech 1, 2 




2 


Zoology 1 


96 


4 






Total 


448 
32 


352 

96 
96 


800 

128 

96 

96 

128 

256 

160 

96 


35 


Second Year 
Botany 21 


4 


Botany 22 


2 


Chemistry 35, 37. 


96 


6 


Chemistry 32, 34 


128 

128 

64 

64 


2 


Pharmacy 1, 2 


128 
96 
32 


10 


Physics 10, 11 


8 


Physiology 22 


3 






Total 


384 

32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
64 
64 
32 


576 

64 
64 
96 
96 


960 

96 
96 

128 
128 

48 
192 
256 

32 


35 


Third Year 
Bacteriology 1 


4 




4 


Chemistry 15 


4 


Chemistry 53 


4 




3 


Pharmacology 51, 52 


128 
192 


6 


Pharmacy 51, 52 


8 


Pharmacy 61 


2 








Total 


336 

96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
96t 


640 


976 

96 

80 

16 

48 
128 

80 

96 
384 f 


35 


Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113 . . 


4 


Economics 51 


48 


3 


First Aid 1 


1 


Law 62 




3 


Pharmacy 101, 102 


64 
48 
64 

288 1 


6 


Pharmacy 72 


2 


Pharmacology 111 


4 


Electives 


12 






Total 


416 

32 
64 


512 
64 


928 

96 
64 

128 
96 

128 
96 

192 
64 

128 
96 
96 
96 

192 

128 

800 
960 
976 
928 


35 


Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 101, 102 


4 


Botany 111, 113 .... 


4 


Botany 112, 114 .. 


128 

96 

128 


4 


Chemistry 99 




2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


Chemistry 187, 189 


96 


6 


Chemistry 188, 190 


192 


4 


Chemistry 151, 153 


64 


4 


Chemistry 152, 154 


128 


4 


English 3, 4 


96 
96 
96 


6 






6 


Mathematics 20, 21 ... 




6 


Pharmacy 111, 112 


192 
96 

352 
576 
640 
512 


4 




32 

448 
384 
336 
416 


■ 4 


Summary 


35 




35 


Third Year 


35 


Fourth Year 


35 


Total 


1,584 


2,080 


3,664 


140 







t Average. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, first semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories. Shay. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the 
study of pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects 
of the prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, second semester, 
two lectures, two laboratories. Shay. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and 
use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) 
Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

201. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit de- 
termined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health — (2) One lecture. Shay. 
Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of 
state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The 
course will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, second semester, two lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Slama. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of the plant structures. 

21. Pharmacognosy (Macroscopical) — (4) Second year, first semes- 
ter, two lectures, two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, 
with special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identi- 
fication and in the detection of adulterations. 



*Cour8es intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and 
for graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

22. Pharmacognosy (Microscopical) — (2) Second year, second 
semester, two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs and adulter- 
ants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2-4) Fourth year, 
one lecture and one laboratory. Elective for students who contemplate 
taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. 
Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation 
of an herbarium. 

111, 113*. Plant Anatomy— (2-4) Fourth year, two lectures. Slama. 
Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21, 22. 

Lectures covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis 
placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy— (2-4) Fourth year, two laboratories. 
iSlama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 1, 21, 22, 111, 113 or may be taken simultane- 
ously with 111, 113. 

Laboratory work covering Botany 111, 113. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 

and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount 
and quality of work performed. Slama. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
(8) First year, two lectures, two laboratories. Hager and Wich. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical 
theory and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with 
fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, 
and the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and 
acid radicals. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry— (6) Second year, three 
lectures. Hager and Banker. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 
A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



32, 34. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2) Second year, two 
laboratories. Hager and Banker. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, first semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Hartung and Wich. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and 
their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, sec- 
ond semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Hartung and Wich. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry, 15, 35, 37. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
of official preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either semester. 
Hager and Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of 
glass. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Fourth year, 
three lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical 
properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2-4) Fourth year, 
two laboratories. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemi- 
cal properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — -(2-4) Any one or two 
semesters. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112. 114, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work, devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a 
study of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds— (2-4) One lecture, 
two laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry— (6) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry— (4) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with 

Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio- 
chemical principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

151, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, 
metabolism, vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. 

152, 154. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (4) Two labora- 
tories. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe and Monzon. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 151, 153, or may be taken simultan- 
eously with Chemistry 151, 153. 

Laboratory exercises mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the 
more important procedures in physiological chemistry, urinalysis and 
blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. 
Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and stereoisomerism. 

258. Organic Qualitative Analysis — (2-4) Either semester. Two 
to four laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic sub- 
stances and mixtures. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
^active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various 
medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied 
to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates 
and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1 credit each semes- 
ter). Hartung. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung and Hager. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Third year, second semester, 
three lectures. Cole. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, ex- 
change, distribution and consumption of wealth. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



51. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, first semester, 
two lectures and one laboratory. Cole. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail 
pharmacies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including 
practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, second 
semester, three lectures. Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special 
reference to the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and 
State laws and regulations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, 
cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition— (6) First year, three lectures. Ball- 
man. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Survey and Composition — (6) Elective, three lectures. Ball- 
man. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work covered in 
English 1, 2. An historical study of English literature from the begin- 
ning to the nineteenth century. Themes, reports and conferences. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (3) First year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture, one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

10. Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. ( 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, expo- 
nents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binominal 
theorem, and theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who 
do not offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addi- 
tion formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the 
straight line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

15. College Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic 
equations, theory of equations, binominal theorem, complex numbers, 
logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second semester, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20, 21. Calculus — (6) Elective, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applica- 
tions of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple inte- 
grals, infinite series and differential equations. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2. French — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prep- 
aration is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

5, 6. French — Literary — Second Year — (6) First year, three lec- 
tures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — French 1, 2 or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year German, receive half credit 
for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, punctuation and translation. 

5, 6. German — Literary — Second Year — (6) First year, three lec- 
tures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — German 1, 2 or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral 
and written practice. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

Six semester hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying 
the Modern Language requirement. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 
7, 8. Scientific German — (6) Elective, three lectures. Ballman. 
Prerequisite — German 5, 6 and approval of the instructor. 
Readings from scientific texts and journals. Review of German grammar. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 

PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third 
year, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe 
and Monzon. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances, with special reference to the drugs and prepara- 
tions of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first 
semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe 
and Monzon. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay— (8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52 and the approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in 
alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation 
with the instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and 
comparative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit 
and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and 
two laboratories. DuMez. Purdum and Allen. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Third year, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Wolf and Allen, 

Prerequisites. — Pharmacy 1, 2. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



61. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures. DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special 
emphasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

72. Pharmaceutical Practice: — (2) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture and 36 hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. Wolf, 
Purdum, Allen, Skolaut, Abarbanel and Grafius. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Practical work in drug store arrangement; the handling of drugs, medi- 
cines and drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. DuMez, Purdum and Allen. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special 
reference to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale. 

Ill, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (6) Two labora- 
tories. DuMez, Purdum and Allen, 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. DuMez. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plant; crude materials used; their collection, preservation and 
transformation into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. 
DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with 
special reference to the original and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. 
DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one labor- 
atory. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Thermodynamics — (3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189, 188, 190. 

A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics and its appli- 
cation to physical and chemical problems. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 

121, 122. Electricity and Magnetism — (6) Two lectures, one labor- 
atory. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 

Given in alternate years. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology — (3) Second year, second semester, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Chapman, Gittinger, Hoppe and Monzon. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 1. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet 
the requirements of students in pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. General Zoology — (4) First year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Littleford. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian 
form, with emphasis on animal development, structure and function of 
organs. Introductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — (4) Elective, second se- 
mester, two lectures and two laboratories. Littleford. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, 
study of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the 
general physiology and embryology of the principal organs and systems 
of the vertebrate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books re- 
quired in each course will be announced at the beginning of each 
semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, WINTER QUARTER, 

JANUARY-MARCH 1945 

fGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Dillon, Rev. Charles Patrick. . .Maryland Mattocks, Albert McLean. North Carolina 

Heyman, Bernice Maryland Monzon, Luis Beltran Guatemala 

Hoppe, James Oliver Montana Simonoff, Robert Maryland 

Klepfish, Milton Applestein. .. .Maryland Siguitan, Sofronio O.. Philippine Islands 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland 

FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 

Corasaniti, John Anthony ....Maryland Lachman, Bernard Benjamin. .Maryland 

Daley, William Joseph Maryland Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Kelman, Nathan Allen Connecticut Weiner, Bernard Maryland 

THIRD- YEAR CLASS 

Coleman, Mary Ann Maryland Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland Rossberg, William Charles. . . .Maryland 

"Kramer, Meyer Maryland Schoen, Vivian Maryland 

Lister, Charlotte Zentz Maryland Singer, Harold B Maryland 

SECOND-YEAR CLASS 

Bartholomay, Carolyn Mary .. .Maryland Iwamoto, Sayuri Ishida California 

Bickel, Louis Michael Maryland Sirulnik, Howard Sidney Maryland 

DiGristine, Josephine Pauline. .Maryland 

FIRST-YEAR CLASS 

*Altevogt, Albert Charles Maryland Meyers, Jacob Sholom Maryland 

Bruno, Tillie Ann Pennsylvania Pyles, Robert Everett Maryland 

Deckelbaum, Joseph Maryland Schenker, Norman Leonard. . . .Maryland 

Dembeck, Bernard John Maryland Shpritz, Stuart Maryland 

Eppel, David Manuel Maryland Shulman, Shirley S Maryland 

Geist, Gene Natalie Maryland Waldman, Alvin Melvin Maryland 

Johnson, Joseph LeGrand, Jr. .Maryland Weber, Thaddeus Marion Maryland 

Keiser, Alvin Maryland 

SPECIAL .STUDENTS 

Hayes, Edward Charles Maryland Varipatis, Matina Stella Maryland 

Unitas, Anthony John Maryland 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, MARCH 26, 1945 
^DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Mattocks, Albert McLean. North Carolina 



fRegistered in Graduate School. 
*Did not attend entire session. 
°Withdrew to enter Military Service. 
^Degree conferred by Graduate School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, SPRING QUARTER, 

APRIL-JUNE 1945 
fGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Hoppe, James Oliver Montana Monzon, Luis Beltran Guatemala 

Klepfish, Milton Applestein. . . .Maryland Simonoff, Robert Maryland 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland Siguitan, Sofronio O. .Philippine Islands 

FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 

Daley, William Joseph, Jr Maryland Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Kelman, Nathan Allen Connecticut Weiner, Bernard Maryland 

Lachman, Bernard Maryland 

THIRD- YEAR CLASS 

Coleman, Mary Ann Maryland Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

Corasaniti, John Anthony Maryland Rossberg, William Charles .... Maryland 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland Schoen, Vivian Maryland 

Lister, Charlotte Zentz Maryland Singer, Harold Bernard Maryland 

SECOND- YEAR CLASS 

Bickel, Louis Michael Maryland Sirulnik, Howard Sidney Maryland 

DiGristine, Josephine Pauline. .Maryland 

FIRST-YEAR CLASS 

Bruno, Tillie Ann Pennsylvania Meyers, Jacob Sholom Maryland 

Deckelbaum, Joseph Maryland Pyles, Robert Everett Maryland 

Dembeck, Bernard John Maryland Schenker, Norman Leonard .... Maryland 

Eppel, David Manuel Maryland Shpritz, Stuart Maryland 

Geist, Gene Natalie Maryland Shulman, Shirley S Maryland 

Johnson, Joseph LeGrand, Jr. .Maryland Waldman, Alvin Melvin Maryland 

Keiser, Alvin Maryland Weber, Thaddeus Marion ....Maryland 

SPECIAL (STUDENTS 

Alvarado, Luis Honduras Hayes, Edward Charles Maryland 

Bartholomay, Carolyn Mary. . .Maryland Unitas, Anthony John Maryland 

Chang, Yen-tsai China Varipatis, Matina Stella Maryland 

Eichberg, Daniel Moses Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 27, 1945 
JDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Waters, Kenneth Lee Pennsylvania Simonoff, Robert Maryland 

JMASTER OF SCIENCE 

Rev. Charles Patrick Dillon 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

Daley, William Joseph, Jr Maryland Oxman, Meyer Maryland 

Kelman Nathan Allen Connecticut Weiner, Bernard Maryland 

Lachman. Bernard Maryland 



fRegistered in Graduate School. 
^Degrees conferred by Graduate School. 



32 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION OF 1945-46 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Amin, Raomanbhai C Bombay Hoppe, James Oliver Montana 

Banker, Jane Lonise Maryland Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland 

*Bellman, Frank Albert Maryland Monzon, Luis Beltran Guatemala 

*Dobres, Robert Morton Maryland Suguitan, Sofronio O. .Philippine Islands 

Ellin, Robert Isadore Maryland *Ward, Fred Chester Maryland 

*Grafius, Melba Agnes ....Pennsylvania *Wimpfheimer, Paul Maryland 

FOURTH- YEAR CLASS 



r Oken, Jack Maryland 

Passaro, Edward Joseph Maryland 

Rossberg, William Charles. .. .Maryland 

Schoen, Vivian Maryland 

Singer, Harold Bernard Maryland 



Coleman, Mary Ann Maryland 

Corasaniti, John Anthony . . . .Maryland 

Hayes, Edward Charles Maryland 

Lister, Charlotte Zentz Maryland 

Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 

^Moscati, Marius Anthony ....Maryland 

THIRD-YEAR CLASS 

''Abrams, Marvin Hartford . . . .Maryland *Kahn, Morton Maryland 

Bickel, Louis Michael Maryland Pippig, Howard August Maryland 

DiGristine, Josephine Pauline. .Maryland Sirulnik, Howard Sidney Maryland 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland Weiner, Alex Maryland 

SECOND- YEAR CLASS 



Friedman, Arnold Milton Maryland 

Friedman, Jerome Samuel Maryland 

Geist, Gene Natalie Maryland 

Johnson, Joseph LeGrand, Jr. . . Maryland 

Reiser, Alvin Maryland 

Marshall, Barbara Idella Maryland 

Meyers, Jacob Sholom Maryland 



Morgenroth, Hans Maryland 

Rosenstadt, Aaron Maryland 

Schenker, Norman Leonard . . . Maryland 

Shpritz, Stuart Maryland 

Shulman, Shirley S Maryland 

Waldman, Alvin Melvin Maryland 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Angster, Jerome Maryland 

Baker, William Nelson, Jr. ...Maryland 
Blalock, Adelaide Winterly . . .Maryland 

Blumenthal, Bernard Maryland 

Bruff, Mary Clay Maryland 

Cohen, Harry Carl Maryland 

Cohen, Morton Bernard Maryland 

Cooper, Clifford Dale Maryland 

*Curry, William McClain Alabama 

Demarest, Dudley Alvin Maryland 

Dennis, Clay Ebenezer Maryland 

Diamond, Seymour Richard . . . Maryland 
Dougherty, John Herbert, Jr. . . Maryland 

Eichberg, Daniel Moses Maryland 

Fryer, Kenneth Wesley. . .West "Virginia 

Geser, Alvin Nathan Maryland 

Glaeser, Henry John, Jr Maryland 

Gray, William Bernice Maryland 

Greenberg, Leon Maryland 

Griffith, Ethel Marie Maryland 

Hackett, Frances Ellen Maryland 

Heinritz, June Rose Maryland 

Holen, Mitzie Marion Maryland 

Kaiser, Carl Arwid Maryland 

Kelly, Charles Washington .... Maryland 
London, Seymour Lewis Virginia 

"Long, Bernard Aloysius Maryland 



Mendelsohn, Ronald Edward. . .Maryland 
"Michael, Nicholas Alphonse ...Maryland 

Miller, Lila Maryland 

Nave, Jackson Moore Maryland 

Nemzek, Albert August, Jr. .. .Maryland 

"Newman, Albert Mayer Maryland 

"Petralia, Anthony John Maryland 

*Petratis, John Carl Iowa 

Pruce, Irving Morton Maryland 

Quasney, Emil, Jr Maryland 

Robson, Gertrude Jeppie Maryland 

Rubinstein, Charlotte Harriett .Maryland 

Schwartz, Jerome Maryland 

*Silver, Benjamin Joseph Maryland 

Smith, Rudolph Martin John Jr.. 

Maryland 

*Snapp, John Randolph Maryland 

Steinhilber, Richard Lee Maryland 

Stratmann, George Mervin .... Maryland 

Sugar, Victor Jerome Maryland 

Wagner, Betty Gayle Maryland 

Waldsachs, Joseph John Marvland 

Weinberger, Sally Degan .... Maryland 
Werley, LeRoy Delbert, Jr. . . . Maryland 
Wirth, Ferdinand Francis .... Maryland 

*Wooden, Mary Rose Maryland 

Wright, Myron Joseph Maryland 



SPECIAL .STUDENTS 



k Adams, Walter Eugene. .. .Pennsylvania 

''Alvarado, Luis Honduras 

''Celozzi, Matthew Joseph .....Maryland 
^Edenfield, Charles Howard ...Maryland 

^Finnerty, Logan Trudelle Maryland 

Jahn, Elsa Florence Maryland 

''Ketcham, Anabel Dunbar Maryland 

Klitenic, Simon Maryland 

Kramer, Howard Calvin Maryland 



McClaskey, Gail Edward 

*McClaskey, Josephine Cammer 

West 

*Moscati, Allean Herndon 

Schwatka, Charles Taylor . . . . 

*Seeman, Isadore 

*Seippel, George Frederick 

*Weiss, William Wagner 



, Iowa 



Virginia 
.Virginia 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 



'Withdrew to enter Military Service. 
*Did not attend entire session. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 27 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
104th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1947-1948 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 27 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
104th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1947-1948 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR 

First Semester 

1947 

September 17-19 Wednesday-Friday. ...Registration 

September 22 Monday Instruction begins 

November 27-30* Thursday-Sunday Thanksgiving recess 

December 24-January 4*. .Wednesday-Sunday. .Christmas recess 

January 28-30 Monday-Wednesday..First semester 

examinations 

Second Semester 

1948 

February 2-4 Monday-Wednesday Registration 

February 5 Thursday .Instruction begins 

February 23 Monday Washington's Birthday, 

Holiday 

March 26-30* Friday-Tuesday Easter recess 

May 31 Monday Memorial Day, 

Holiday 

June 1-4 Tuesday-Friday Second semester 

, examinations 

June 5 Saturday Commencement 



* Holidays begin at end of last class of preceding date and terminate at end of last 
date indicated. 

Note— A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Sat- 
urday at noon of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registra- 
tion period. (This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean.) 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Re- 
gents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each for a 
term of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in 
the President. The University General Administrative Board acts in an 
advisory capacity to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and 
members of its faculty of professorial rank; each Faculty Council con- 
trols the internal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions : 

College of Agriculture Summer Session 

Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Military Science 

Extension Service and Tactics 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Dentistry 

College of Commerce School of Law 

College of Education School of Medicine 

College of Engineering School of Nursing 

College of Home Economics School of Pharmacy 

Graduate School The University Hospital 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and 
the Hospital are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and 
Greene Streets; the others in College Park. 

Board of Regents 

Term Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, Baltimore 1949 

Thomas R. Brookes, Vice-Chairman, Bel Air 1952 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, Baltimore 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton 1954 

Glenn L. Martin, Baltimore 1951 

Charles P. McCormick, Baltimore 1948 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton 1950 

Philip C. Turner, Baltimore 1950 

Millard E. Tydings, Washington, D. C 1951 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Baltimore 1947 

The General Administrative Board 
President Byrd, Chairman 
Miss Preinkert, Secretary 

Dean Appleman, Dean Benjamin, Mr. Benton, Mr. Brigham, Pro- 
fessor Brown, Dr. Brueckner, Dr. Burnett, President Byrd, Mr. 
Cobey, Dr. Corbett, Dean Cotterman, Dean DuMez, Dean Eppley, 
Mr. Fogg, Colonel Griswold, Mr. Haszard, Dean Howell, Dr. Huff, 
Dr. Jenkins, Miss Kellar, Director Kemp, Dr. Long, Dean Mount, 
Miss Preinkert, Dean Pyle, Dean Robinson, Dean Stamp, Dean 
Steinberg, Dean Symons, Mr. Weber, Dr. White, Dean Wylie, 
Dr. Zucker. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar. D., LL.B., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph. D., Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
Clifford W. Chapman J. Carleton Wolf 

Walter H. Hartung Henry E. Wich 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary A. W. Richeson 

Frank J. Slama Donald E. Shay 

FACULTY 

Professors 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, 
M.Sc. (1925) ; McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

Walter H. Hartung 1 Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918) ; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

J. Carlton Wolf Prof&ssor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Wash- 
ington, D.C., B.S., (1921) ; Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Hon- 
orary) . 

Associate Professors 
B. Olive Cole Associate Professor of Economics and 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). Pharmaceutical Law 

*Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916) ; Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

*A. W. Richeson Associate Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925), 
Ph.D. (1928). 

Donald E. Shay Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1938), Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Frank J. Slama Associate Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), 
M.S. (1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

Henry E. Wich Associate Professor of Inorganic and 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1909). Analytical Chemistry 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1946-47. Changes will be noted in sub- 
sequent catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branqh 
of the University. 

1 Representative on the Graduate Council. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Assistant Professors 
♦Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1935). 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Assistant Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; 
University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

*George Philip Hager, Jr Assistant Professor of Inorganic 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938), and Organic Chemistry 

M.S. (1940), Ph.D. (1942). 

Instructors 
Benjamin Frank Allen Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

*John H. Applegarth Instructor in Zoology 

San Jose State College, A.B. (1935) ; Stanford University, M.A. (1938). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) ; University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

Norbert G. Lassahn 1 Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

Augusta Soladar Neistadt 2 Instructor in Pharmacy 

New Jersey College of Pharmacy. Ph.G. (1913). 

Harriet R. Noll 3 Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1934) ; B.S. (1935). 

*Claire Strube Schradieck Instructor in Languages 

Goucher College, A.B. (1916) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1919). 

Assistants 
♦James F. Battey Assistant in Physics 

Brown University, Sc.B. in Physics (1943). 

Frank A. Bellman 4 Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1936). 

Ursula T. Biermacher Assistant in Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Grand Rapids, B.S. (1941). 

Kenneth Eugene Dailey Assistant in Bacteriology 

Creighton University, B.S. (1941). 

Joseph Paul LaRocca 4 Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Colorado, B.S. (1942) ; University of North Carolina, M.S. (1944). 

Herman M. Mupsik Assistant in Pharmacy 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1941). 

Pierre F. Smith 4 H. A. B. Dunning Fellow in Pharmaceutical 

University of Buffalo, B.S. (1941). Chemistry 

Eugene C. Weinbach 4 Wm. S. Merrell Company Fellow in 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1942). Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Alex Weiner 5 Assistant in Pharmacy 

Paul R. Young Assistant in Pharmacology 

George Washington University, B.S. (1942). 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Resigned February 15, 1947. 

2 Appointed April 7, 1947. 

3 Appointed February 12, 1947. 

* Returned from duty in Armed Forces October 1, 1946. 
5 Resigned February 7, 1947. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Assisting Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Rebecca S. Elam, A.B., B.S.L.S Cataloger 

Daisy Lotz Gue 1 Senior Stenographer 

Virginia Monouydas 2 Senior Stenographer 

Josephine R. Tacchetti 3 Senior Stenographer 



Resigned December 31, 1946. 
Appointed March 24, 1947. 
Appointed April 25, 1947. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

IJISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of 
medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of pro- 
fessional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856 it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its 
matriculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it 
also offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially 
designed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped 
throughout, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to 
carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of phar- 
macy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the vari- 
ous fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for 
instruction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. . It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 10,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical 
Education, and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions accredited by the Council 
or holding membership in the Association must maintain certain minimum 
requirements with respect to number and qualifications of faculty mem- 
bers, physical plant, laboratory and library facilities, curriculum, admis- 
sion, graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Educa- 
tion, and its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 20. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M.S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in 
the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work 
in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, 
must register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the 
requirements of that School. For detailed information concerning regis- 
tration requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Grad- 
uate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American ^As- 
sociation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 8 units, elective 8 units, total 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 8 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agricul- 
ture, commercial drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign lan- 
guages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject 
offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 8 units, of 
which not more than four shall be vocational units. 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council he 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 
to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. 
Double laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are consid- 
ered as equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three 
units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course 
has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon 
presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate 
who does not fully meet these requirements may be required to present 
further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the dis- 
cretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate 
examination. Such examination will be given during the first week of 
each of the months of June, July, August and September at College 
Park, Md. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to re- 
port. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examin- 
ation, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for grad- 
uation from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are 
offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th 
Street, New York City, the Regents of the University of the State of 
New York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the 
State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must have made 
an average grade of C in the college from which he is transferring and 
must present official transcripts of his high school and college records 
and a certificate of honorable dismissal from the latter. Upon the satis- 
factory fulfillment of these requirements, the applicant may be admitted 
and given advanced standing as follows: 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to 
advanced standing without examination and be given credit for that por- 
tion of the work of the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum 
which he may have completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be 
admitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit 
for the work completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student 
applying for advanced standing from any institution other than a col- 
lege of pharmacy, unless such credit shall be for graduate work in ap- 
plied subjects done in a recognized graduate school or other educational 
institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may 
be equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he 
will be required to take those courses, which the class has completed but 
which he has not completed and such courses will be given precedence 
over the more advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Fac- 
ulty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary 
training of the applicant is sufficient to permit admission under these 
conditions. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photographs and the two 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the 
application has been received. Do not make application unless reason- 
ably certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file applica- 
tion with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after en- 
rolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said appli- 
cation he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may 
deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, 
shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy 
shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit 
to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore ex- 
perience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office 
of the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. A student entering for the 
first time must matriculate before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Regis- 
trar on the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



student be permitted to enter classes before he has completed registra- 
tion. Students who fail to register on the days scheduled are required 
to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day for 
registration with the payment of the late registration fee is Saturday 
at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the calendar. 
This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 110.00 

Non-Residents 135.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 35.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

A student who is not following the regular schedule, but is taking 
courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a semester's work, will be 
charged the full fees. A student taking less than three-fourths of a 
semester's work, will be charged on a subject basis at the rate of $8.00 
per semester hour plus an additional $1.00 per semester hour for courses 
requiring laboratory work. A student given the privilege of taking 
more than the regularly scheduled work for a semester will be charged 
an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student 
is required to pay $6.00 each semester (Freshman students $5.00) to the 
"Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $75.00 per aca- 
demic year is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting 
instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 
Fixed charge of $10.00 per semester hour. 

(This fee is required of all graduate students except assistants, who 
will pay only a laboratory fee of $5.00 per semester hour.) 
Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00 
Doctor's degree — $20.00 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $2.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as a registra- 
tion in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a 
professional school of the University or from one professional school to 
another, he will be required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A tuition fee of $110.00 per semester is charged a student who is a 
resident of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who 
is not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semes- 
ter. The tuition fee must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $35.00 per semester is charged to cover materials 
and apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will auto- 
matically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with 
the Dean. A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained 
from the office of the Secretary of the School. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parents or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be 
entitled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the School within five days after the be- 
ginning of instruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all 
charges less a deduction of $10.00 to cover cost of registration. 

Students withdrawing from the School after five days and before the 
end of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester 
will receive a pro-rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $10.00 
to cover cost of registration. After the expiration of the three-week 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



period referred to, refunds will be made only in those cases in which the 
circumstances are exceptional and the president of the University has 
authorized the making of such refunds. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic 
record from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so 
furnished, but for each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcript records are of two kinds : 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc. as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further ab- 
sence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lec- 
ture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
seesion and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of courses in which a student re- 
ceived a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will 
be held on the dates announced by the Dean. A student who is con- 
ditioned in any semester must remove the condition by the end of the 
succeeding semester, but will not be permitted to take an examination 
within thirty days from the date on which the conditional rating was 
received. A condition which is not removed will become a failure, and 
the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100) ; B, Good (87-92) ; C, Fair (80-86) ; D, Passed 
(75-79) ; E, Conditioned (60-74) ; F, Failed (below 60) ; I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades: 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subse- 
quent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is 
required to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he received passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all 
of the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of 
the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of 
the work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than 
five points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be 
required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy 
requires, evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct 
of a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by 
the faculty in determing the fitness of a student to enter into the con- 
fidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, 
sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be con- 
sidered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting 
of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the 
term, will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a 
formal rule against the offense has been published. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 20). The 
work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for each of the last two academic years of not less than twice 
the total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT OF THE MARYLAND 

PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical 
experience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recog- 
nized school or college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical expe- 
rience required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of oppor- 
tunities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions avail- 
able in drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School 
where it may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharm- 
acist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still 
active, has contributed $1,000.00 annually since 1930 to maintain a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

The Wm. S. Merrell Co. Research Fellowship 

The Wm. S. Merrell Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio has established a research 
fellowship in antibiotics for one year. This is a post-graduate fellowship 
paying $1,500.00 per year, $1,200.00 of which is paid to the fellow. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient 
to provide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for re- 
search in pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellow- 
ship will be awarded for research in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharma- 
cology or pharmacy. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 

School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to 

deposit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 

research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable 
him to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy 
during the next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of 
general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in 
one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for the assistantships is $900.00 for the academic year, and the 
remission of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma 
fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didac- 
tic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in 
which they are serving. The usual amount of services required does not 
exceed 12 to 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant to carry 
approximately a full graduate program. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many 
years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who 
was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, 
and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy 
young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be 
awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown 
superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education has contrib- 
uted a sufficient amount to provide two scholarships of $200.00 each 
annually for students in need of financial assistance and who as high 
school graduates maintained a rank in the upper one-quarter of their 
classes, and college students who have established evidence of compe- 
tency and ability to maintain an average of "B" as a minimum. 

Vick Chemical Co. Scholarship 

The Vick Chemical Co., of New York, N. Y., has contributed sufficient 
funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
to provide one scholarship paying $365.00 per year to a needy student 
who has attained a high scholastic record in high school. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contrib- 
uted sufficient funds to provide one scholarship paying $450.00 annually 
and has also contributed through the American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education funds sufficient to provide two scholarships of $250.00 
each annually for students who meet the qualifications stated under the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

Henry B. Gilpin Co. Scholarships 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed suffi- 
cient funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
cation to provide for one scholarship of $300.00 and one of $200.00 
annually for students who meet the qualifications stated above under 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eager- 
ness for service and helpfulness to others, which were striking character- 
istics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made 
contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this 
fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 
School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is 
creditable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below 
B. Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall 
below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by 
the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommend- 
ing a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in 
his judgment of the student's ability as much by observation and personal 
contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of 
approximately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually 
by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 
the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Membership Prize 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to a student of the third-year class, selected by the 
Faculty, who has attained high standing in both theoretical and practical 
pharmacy. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Council 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid tradi- 
tions of the School. The council consists of twelve members, three 
elected by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the 
presidents of the respective classes, and a faculty advisor. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society 
is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 
75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

Officers (1946-47) 
President — Louis M. Bickel, Fourth-Year Class 
First Vice-President — Stuart Shpritz, Third-Year Class. 
Second Vice-President — Seymour L. London, Second-Year Class. 
Secretary — Josephine P. DiGristine, Fourth-Year Class. 
Treasurer — Ronald E. Mendelsohn, Second-Year Class. 
Editor — Leon Greenberg, Second- Year Class. 
Sargeant-at-Arms — Kenneth W. Fryer, Second- Year Class. 

Executive Committee 
Howard S. Sirulnik, Fourth-Year Class. 
Barbara I. Marshall, Third-Year Class. 
William B. Gray, Second-Year Class. 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Faculty Adviser. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held 
on May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of 
the Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society con- 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



tinued its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni 
Association of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the 
organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained 
dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The 
active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers: 

Officers (1946-47) 

John C. Krantz, Sr., Honorary President 

Marvin J. Andrews, President of the Association 

5505 Stuart Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Mathias Palmer, First Vice-President 

916 East Thirty-Sixth Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Joseph Cohen, Second Vice-President 

3740 Dolfield Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 
32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 
1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

Marvin J. Andrews, Chairman 

The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 

The Officers 

Amelia C. DeDominicis 

Samuel W. Goldstein 

W. Arthur Purdum 

Raphael H. Wagner 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matters pertain- 
ing to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The fol- 
lowing are the present members of the Committee: 

Harry S. Harrison, Chairman 
Marvin J. Andrews Lloyd N. Richardson 

Hyman Davidov Simon Solomon 

Andrew F. Ludwig Raphael Wagner 

Stephen J. Provenza Walter F. Wargell 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


o 

5 


lb 
at 


3 

o 


5 
o 


"■5 
o 

s 




3 
o 


•3 

£ 


First Year 










2 

2 
3 
3 
3 

3 


4 
6 


6 

8 
3 
3 
3 

3 

1 


3 


fChemistry 1, 3, Inorganic and Qualitative 


2 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 


4 


fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 


3 








3 








3 


fModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 
1 
2 

2 




3 

1 
8 

8 


3 
1 

4 




3 












6 
6 
















Second Year 
Botany 21, Macroscopical 


18 
4 


17 


Botany 22, Microscopical 


......... 

........ 

3 

2 


6 


6 
3 

4 
8 
5 
6 


2 


fChemistry 35, 37, Organic 


3 




3 
4 
8 
5 


2 
2 
5 

4 


2 


fChemistry 36, 38, Organic 


4 
4 
2 


4 
4 
2 

4 


2 




4 
3 


5 


fPhysics 10, 11, General 


4 




3 




2 


4 


6 






Third Year 


17 
4 


18 


♦Bacteriology 115, Serology and Immunology 


2 


4 


6 


4 


2 


6 


8 


4 




Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


2 
3 

2 
2 


6 


8 
3 

6 
8 


4 












3 


Pharmacology 51, 52, Pharm., Toxicology 


2 
2 
2 

3 
2 


4 
6 


6 
8 
2 

3 

5 


3 
4 
2 


4 
6 


3 




4 










3 




3 




Fourth Year (Required) 


17 

2 
3 


18 
2 




3 






First Aid 1, Standard 


1 
3 
2 

2 




1 
3 
4 
5 


1 














3 




2 


2 


4 


3 


2 
3 


3 




2 




2 


4 


6 


4 
6 












6 




1 
2 


2 


3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 

6 


2 


2 


3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 

6 

8 




Fourth Year (Electives)J 
Botany 101, 102, Taxonomy 


18 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 

2 


17 
2 




2 




4 
3 

4 


4 

3 

4 

......... 

.......... 

6 
6 


2 








1 








2 


fChemistry 187, 189, Physical 


3 


3 
........ 

......... 

3 
3 


3 


fChemistry 188, 190, Physical 


6 


2 




2 


2 




4 
6 


2 




3 
3 
3 


3 


f Language 6, 7, Scientific German or French.. 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


3 
3 


Pharmacy 111, 112, Advanced Prescription 


2 


fZoology 5, Comparative Vertebrate Mor- 




2 


4 















f Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

* Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

t The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



21 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


First Year 


32 
64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 


64 
192 


96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
128 


3 




8 


English 1, 2 


6 






3 






3 






6 


Speech 1, 2 




2 


Zoology 1 


96 


4 






Total 


448 
32 


352 

96 
96 


800 

128 
96 
96 

128 

256 

160 

96 


35 


Second Year 
Botany 21 


4 


Botany 22 


2 


Chemistry 35, 37 


96 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


128 

128 

64 

64 


4 


Pharmacy 1, 2 


128 
96 
32 


10 


Physics 10, 11 


8 


Physiology 22 


3 






Total 


384 

32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
64 
64 
32 


576 

64 
64 
96 
96 


960 

96 

96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
256 

32 


35 


Third Year 


4 


Bacteriology 115 


4 




4 




4 


Economics 37 


3 


Pharmacology 51, 52 


128 
192 


6 


Pharmacy 51, 52 


8 


Pharmacy 61 


2 








Total 


336 

96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
96t 


640 


976 

96 
80 
16 
48 

128 
80 
96 

384f 


35 


Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113 


4 


Economics 51 


48 


3 


First Aid 1 


1 


Law 62 




3 


Pharmacy 101, 102 


64 

48 

64 

288f 


6 


Pharmacy 72 


2 




4 




12 






Total 


416 

32 
64 


512 
64 


928 

96 
64 

128 
96 

128 
96 

192 
64 

128 
96 
96 
96 

192 

128 

800 
960 
976 
928 


35 


Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 101, 102 


4 


Botany 111, 113 


4 


Botany 112, 114 


128 

96 

128 


4 


Chemistry 99 




2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


Chemistry 187, 189 


96 


6 


Chemistry 188, 190 


192 


4 


Chemistry 151, 153 


64 


4 


Chemistry 152, 154 


128 


4 


English 3, 4 


96 
96 
96 


6 


Language 6, 7 




6 


Mathematics 20, 21 




6 


Pharmacy 111, 112 


192 
96 

352 
576 
640 
512 


4 


Zoology 5 


32 

448 
384 
336 
416 


4 


Summary 
First Year 


35 


Second Year 


35 


Third Year 


35 


Fourth Year 


35 






Total 


1,584 


2,080 


3,664 


140 







tlAverage. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures, two laboratories. Shay and Dailey. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the 
study of pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects 
of the prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, second semester, 
two lectures, two laboratories. Shay and Dailey. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and 
use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit de- 
termined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health — (2) One lecture. Shay. 

Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of 
state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The 
course will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, second semester, two lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Slama and Biermacher. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of the plant structures. 

21. Pharmacognosy (Macroscopical) — (4) Second year, first semes- 
ter, two lectures, two laboratories. Slama and Biermacher. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, 
with special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identi- 
fication and in the detection of adulterations. 

22. Pharmacognosy (Microscopical) — (2) Second year, second 
semester, two laboratories. Slama and Biermacher. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 



* Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49 ; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99 ; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199 ; and 
for graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs and adulter- 
ants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2-4) Fourth year, 
one lecture and one laboratory. Elective for students who contemplate 
taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. 
Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation 
of an herbarium. 

111, 113. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two lectures. Slama. 
Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21, 22. 

Lectures covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis 
placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two laboratories. 
Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 1, 21, 22, 111, 113 or may be taken simultane- 
ously with 111, 113. 

Laboratory work covering Botany 111, 113. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Slama. . 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount 
and quality of work performed. Slama. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
(8) First year, two lectures, two laboratories. Hager, Wich and Smith. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical 
theory and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with 
fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, 
and the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and 
acid radicals. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (4) Second year, two 
lectures. Hager and Bellman. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (4) Second year, two 
laboratories. Hager and Bellman. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis— (4) Third year, first semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Hartung and LaRocca. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and 
their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, sec- 
ond semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Hartung and LaRocca. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
of official preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either semester. 
Hager and Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of 
glass. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Fourth year, 
three lectures. Hartung and LaRocca. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical 
properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2-4) Fourth year, 
two laboratories. Hartung and LaRocca. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemi- 
cal properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2-4) Any one or two 
semesters. Hager and LaRocca. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work -devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a 
study of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2-4) One lecture, 
two laboratories. Hager and LaRocca. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114. 
The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry — (6) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry — (4) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with 

Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio- 
chemical principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

151, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, 
metabolism, vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. 

152, 154. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (4) Two labora- 
tories. Chapman, Gittinger, and Young. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 151, 153, or may be taken simultan- 
eously with Chemistry 151, 153. 

Laboratory exercises mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the 
more important procedures in physiological chemistry, urinalysis and 
blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. 
Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and stereoisomerism. 

211,213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various 
medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied 
to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates 
and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1 credit each semes- 
ter). Hartung. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung and Hager. 

258. Organic Qualitative Analysis — (2-4) Either semester. Two 
to four laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic sub- 
stances and mixtures. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Third year, second semester, 
three lectures. Cole. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, ex- 
change, distribution and consumption of wealth. 

51. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, first semester, 
two lectures and one laboratory. Cole. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail 
pharmacies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including 
practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, second 
semester, three lectures. Cole. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special 
reference to the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and 
State laws and regulations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, 
cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. 

ENGLISH 
1, 2. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Ball- 
man. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Survey and Composition — (6) Elective, three lectures. Ball- 
man. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work covered in 
English 1, 2. An historical study of English literature from the begin- 
ning to the nineteenth century. Themes, reports and conferences. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (3) First year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture, one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 
10. Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, expo- 
nents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial 
theorem, and theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry — (3) First year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who 
do not offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addi- 
tion formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the 
straight line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic 
equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, 
logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second semester, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates^ conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



20, 21. Calculus — (6) Elective, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applica- 
tions of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple inte- 
grals, infinite series and differential equations. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2. French — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prep- 
aration is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit 
for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, punctuation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

Six semester hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying 
the Modern Language requirement. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Translation, grammar, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scien- 
tific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Reading of technical prose, with grammar review. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third 
year, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, and Young. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances with special reference to the drugs and prepara- 
tions of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first 
semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger and 
Young. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52 and the approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in 
alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation 
with the instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and 
comparative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit 
and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and 
two laboratories. DuMez, Allen and Mupsik. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Third year, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Wolf, Allen and Mupsik. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures. DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special 
emphasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

72. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture and 36 hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. Wolf, 
Allen, Noll and Neistadt. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Practical work in drug store arrangement; the handling of drugs, med- 
icines and drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. DuMez and Allen. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special 
reference to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale. 

Ill, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (6) Two labora- 
tories. DuMez and Allen. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. DuMez and Allen. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plant; crude materials used; their collection, preservation and 
transformation into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. 
DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with 
special reference to the original and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. 
DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one labor- 
atory. Estabrook and Battey. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
101, 102. Thermodynamics — (3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189, 188, 190. 

A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics and its appli- 
cation to physical and chemical problems. 

121, 122. Electricity and Magnetism — (6) Two lectures, one labor- 
atory. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given in alternate years. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology — (3) Second year, second semester, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Chapman, Gittinger and Young. 
Prerequisite — Zoology 1. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet 
the requirements of students in pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. General Zoology — (4) First year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Applegarth. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian 
form, with emphasis on animal development, structure and function of 
organs. Introductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — (4) Elective, second se- 
mester, two lectures and two laboratories. Applegarth. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, 
study of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the 
general physiology and embryology of the principal organs and systems 
of the vertebrate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books re- 
quired in each course will be announced at the beginning of each 
semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



31 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1946-47 



fGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Amin, Raomanbhai C India 

Bellman, Frank Albert Maryland 

Biermacher, Ursula T Michigan 

♦Counts, Jules Behrend Maryland 

Dailey, Kenneth Eugene Nebraska 

Edberg. Lawrence John, Jr Maryland 

Ellin. Robert Isadore Maryland 

Escabi, Rodolfo Segundo Puerto Rico 

Gadekar, S. Manmohan India 

Grafius, Melba Agnes Pennsylvania 

Greco, Salvatore Joseph Pennsylvania 

♦Greenspan, Joseph Maryland 

Hoshall, Edward Melchoir Maryland 

Jackson, Lloyd Charles Dist. Columbia 

King, Hsu Hua China 

Klioze, Oscar Maryland 



*Koegel, Robert Joshua Maryland 

♦Kramer, David Nathan Maryland 

LaRocca, Joseph Paul Maryland 

Lathroum, Leo Baden, Jr Maryland 

Mupsik. Herman Morris New Jersey 

Pasquale, Daniel Mario New Jersey 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Smith, Pierre Frank New York 

♦Tawab, Abdel Salah Ahmed Egypt 

Truitt, Edward Byrd, Jr Virginia 

Ward, Fred Chester Maryland 

Weaver, Warren Eldred Dist. Columbia 

Weinbach, Eugene Clayton Maryland 

Whaley, Wilson Monroe, Jr. Dist. Columbia 
Young, Paul Roscoe Maryland 

♦Yu. Pei Chi China 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Abrams, Marvin H Maryland 

Berlin. Alvin Maryland 

Bickel, Louis Michael Maryland 

Boellner, Otto Karl, Jr Maryland 

DiGristine, Josephine P Maryland 

Friedman, Irvin Maryland 

Kahn. Morton Maryland 

♦Litvin, Sidney Benjamin 



Mercier, Maurice Weldon, Jr Maryland 

Mondell, Harold Daniel Maryland 

O'Hara, John James Maryland 

Pats, Sidney Maryland 

Pippig, Howard August Maryland 

Pollack, Morton Leon Maryland 

Sirulnik. Howard Sidney Maryland 

♦Weiner, Alex Maryland 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Berlin, Jerome Maryland 

Bowers, Martin Rudolf Maryland 

Caldwell, John Regan Maryland 

Francik, Joseph Maryland 

Friedman, Arnold Milton Maryland 

Friedman, Jerome Samuel Maryland 

Gakenheimer, Herbert Eugene.. ..Maryland 

Geist, Gene Natalie Maryland 

Hertz, Selig Sidney Maryland 

Johnson, Joseph LeGrand, Jr Maryland 

Krall, Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Meyer Maryland 



"Magiros. John George Maryland 

Marshall, Barbara Idella Maryland 

Meyers, Jacob Sholem Maryland 

Morgenroth, Hans Maryland 

Pearlman, William Louis Maryland 

Rosenstadt, Aaron Maryland 

Schenker, Norman Leonard Maryland 

Shochet, Irving Edward Maryland 

Shpritz, Stuart Maryland 

Shulman, Shirley Maryland 

Waldman, Alvin Melvin Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Angster, Jerome Maryland 

Blair, Luther Rhodes Virginia 

Bruff, Mary Clay Maryland 

Cohen, Harry Carl Maryland 

Cohen. Morton Bernard Maryland 

'Cooper, Clifford Dale Maryland 

Crook, James Washington Maryland 

Custis, Harry Jackson, Jr Maryland 

Douprherty, John Herbert, Jr Maryland 

Eichbere, Daniel Moses Maryland 

Exler. Samuel Harvey Maryland 

Freeman, Emanuel Gottlieb Maryland 

Fryer, Kenneth Wesley W. Virginia 

Getka. Joseph Francis Maryland 

Glaeser, Henry John. Jr Maryland 

Gray. William Bernice Maryland 

Greenberg. Leon Maryland 

Hahn, William Albert Maryland 

Hanks, Carleton William, Jr Maryland 

Heinritz, June Rose Maryland 

Holen, Mitzie Marion Maryland 

Johnson, James William, III Maryland 

Kelly. Charles Washington Maryland 

Kexel, Leroy Everett Maryland 

Levine. Milton Maryland 

t Registered in Graduate School. 
* Did not attend entire session. 



London, Seymour Lewis Virginia 

Mendelsohn, Ronald Edward Maryland 

Miller, Lila Maryland 

Nave. Johnson Moore Maryland 

Pruce, Irving Morton Maryland 

Quasnev, Emil, Jr Maryland 

Rice, Leonard Marcus Maryland 

Robson, Jeffie Gertrude Maryland 

Rubinstein, Charlotte Harriett.. ..Maryland 

Savitz, Melvin Morris Maryland 

Schwartz. Jerome Maryland 

Siegel, Paul Maryland 

Silver, Benjamin Joseph Maryland 

Smith, Rudolph Martin John. ...Maryland 

Spike, Sidney Maryland 

Steinhilber, Richard Lee ^Tfu-ylarid 

Stratmann, George Mervin Maryland 

Suerar. Victor Jerome Maryland 

= Usher, William Frederick Maryland 

Wagner, Betty Gayle Maryland 

Waldsachs, Joseph John Maryland 

Ward, Francis Xavier Maryland 

Weinberger, Sally Degen Maryland 

Werlev, LeRoy Delbert. Jr Maryland 

Wright, Myron Joseph Maryland 



32 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Allen, Claris Murray Maryland 

Appel, William Joseph Maryland 

Basik, Harvey Edwin Maryland 

*Berger, Solomon Rueben Maryland 

Bosch, Noel Joseph Maryland 

*Bridner, Alvin Benton, Jr Maryland 

Brill, Maurice Erwin Maryland 

Brooks, Harold Herschel Maryland 

Caplan, Robert Marvin Maryland 

Carter, Paul Milton Maryland 

Cassidy, Elizabeth Clarke Maryland 

*Clark, John King Maryland 

Cohn, Melvin Maryland 

Crane, Richard Robert Maryland 

Cunzeman, John Leroy, Jr Maryland 

Davidov, Marvin David Maryland 

Davis, Alfred Lee Maryland 

Dayton, LeRoy Elree Maryland 

Deems, John Thomas, Jr Maryland 

Donaldson, William Clair Maryland 

*Donohue, William Robert, Jr Maryland 

Edenfield, Charles Howard Maryland 

Eisenberg, Edwin Fredric Maryland 

Evans, Frank Barton Maryland 

Fainberg, Edward Maryland 

Fisher, Philip Edward Maryland 

Freed, Mayer Nathan Maryland 

Fried, Burton Maryland 

Friedman, Herbert Maryland 

Gazda, John Joseph Pennsylvania 

*Gigeous, Mason Paul Maryland 

Gould, Clarendon Lloyd Maryland 

*Greager. Robert Lamar Pennsylvania 

Greenberg, Albert Gordon Maryland 

Gronert, Warren Alvin Maryland 

Hanauer, Robert Wilbur Maryland 

Harman, Richard Thomas Maryland 

Harnish, Robert Antis Maryland 

*Hartka, Albert Francis Maryland 

Hoy, Robert Gordon Maryland 

Jackson. William Benton, Jr Maryland 

* Jones, William Thomas Russell....Maryland 

Kelly, George Leo Maryland 

Kelly, Robert Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Morton David Maryland 

Lachman, Marvin Marcus Maryland 

Lambdin. Edward Clement, Jr Maryland 

Leavey, Herbert Sack Maryland 

Levy, Donald Maryland 



Lindenbaum, Louis Maryland 

*Lyden, Edward Earl Maryland 

Lyon, James Hopper Maryland 

Macek, Walter Peter Maryland 

Mandel, Howard Earl Maryland 

Martin, Edward Leroy Maryland 

Maseth, William Everd Maryland 

♦Matthews, Ralph Jewell Virginia 

Mazer, Harold Herbert Maryland 

McDougall, Bernard Charles Maryland 

*Michael, Nicholas Alphonse Maryland 

*Minick, James Russell Maryland 

Mittuch. Joseph Emery New Jersey 

Moler, Robert Kenneth Maryland 

Moscati, Adrian Maryland 

*Nowakowski, Joseph John Maryland 

Papiermeister, Joseph Maryland 

*Pats, Albert Maryland 

Payne, Harry Maryland 

Petty. Huie Wilbert Illinois 

Raichlen, Isador Maryland 

*Rathell, William Jerome Maryland 

Regimenti, Vincent John Maryland 

Rosenbach, Hans John Maryland 

*Rowe, Claud Clinton Maryland 

Royce, Robert Francis Dist. Columbia 

Sachs, Sylvan Leonard Maryland 

Sanford. Gordon Asbury Maryland 

Schwartz, Henry Maryland 

Sears, Edward DeForest Maryland 

Shapiro, Albert Aaron Maryland 

Shenker, Allan Bernard Maryland 

Simon, Alvin Maryland 

*Smith, Owen Crouse, Jr Maryland 

Smith, William Ward Maryland 

Spahn, James Anthony, Jr Maryland 

*Spiker, Margaret Regina Maryland 

*Spittel, James McAleer Maryland 

Stauffer, Howard Carl Maryland 

Sullivan, Howard Dean Virginia 

Turner, Zach III Maryland 

Urspruch, William Gordon Maryland 

Vodenos, Philip Maryland 

Wagner, Phyllis Hinda Maryland 

Warren, Jerome Bernard Maryland 

*Weber, Thaddeus Marion Maryland 

Weiner, Morton Hyman Maryland 

Williamson, Richard Jackscn Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Aronson, Sanford Wilbur New Jersey 

"Blalock, Adelaide Maryland 

'Boggio. Joseph Paul Maryland 

Courtney, John Edgar W. Virginia 

'Cox, Nelson Roger Maryland 

Hicks, Hugh Francis Maryland 

Hurst. Orville Clayton Maryland 

Jahn, Elsa Florence Maryland 



Noel, John Andrew Pennsylvania 

Rassmussen, Edward Thomas..W. Virginia 

*Romoser, George Lynn Maryland 

*Stallings, William Richard Maryland 

Van Oss, Adrian James Maryland 

*Waynick, George Elder N. Carolina 

*Wellslager, John Adam Maryland 

Worden, Mary Ellen Maryland 



Heyman, Bernice 



^DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Maryland Hoppe. James Oliver. 



.Montana 



^MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Monzon, Luis Beltran Guatemala 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Coleman, Mary Ann Maryland 

Corasaniti, John Anthony Maryland 

Hayes. Edward Charles Maryland 

Jernigan, Lane McDermott Maryland 

Lister, Charlotte Zentz Maryland 

Lubins, Raymond Albert Maryland 



* Did not attend entire session, 

± Degrees conferred by Graduate School. 



Oken, Jack Maryland 

Passaro, Edward Joseph Maryland 

Rossberg, William Charles Maryland 

Schoen, Vivian Maryland 

Singer, Harold Bernard Maryland 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 28 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
lOJth Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1948-1949 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE - 1, MD. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 28 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
105 th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1948-1949 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE - 1. MD. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR YEAR 

1948-1949 



First Semester 



1948 

September 22-24 Wednesday-Friday Registration 

September 27 Monday Instruction begins 

November 25 Thursday Thanksgiving holiday 

December 23-January 2* Wednesday-Sunday ...Christmas recess 
January 21-26 Friday-Wednesday Semester examinations 



Second Semester 



1949 



January 31-February 2 Monday-Wednesday Registration 

February 3 Thursday Instruction begins 

February 22 ' Tuesday Washington's Birthday 



holiday 



April 15-19* Friday-Tuesday Easter recess 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day Holiday 

May 27- June 2 Friday-Thursday Semester examinations 

June 4 Saturday Commencement 



Summer Session 

1949 

June 9-10 Thursday-Friday Registration 

June 13 ...Monday Instruction begins 

August 5 Friday Summer session ends 

* Holidays begin at end of last class of the day preceding the beginning of the 
holiday period and terminate at end of the day specified. 

Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days, 
specified will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00.) 
The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday at noon of the 
week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. This rule 
may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean. 

The officers of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., and on Saturday from 9: 00 -A.M. to 12:30 P.M. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Re- 
gents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each for a 
term of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in 
the President. The University General Administrative Board acts in an 
advisory capacity to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, which controls the internal 
affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions: 

College of Agriculture Department of Military Science 
Agricultural Experiment Station and Tactics 

Extension Service School of Dentistry 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Law 

College of Commerce School of Medicine 

College of Education School of Nursing 

College of Engineering School of Pharmacy 

College of Home Economics The University Hospital 

Graduate School College of Continuation and 
Summer Session Special Studies 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, the 
Hospital and the College of Continuation and Special Studies, are located 
in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets; the others 
in College Park. 



Board of Regents 

Term Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman 1949 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 1953 

Edward F. Holter 1952 

E. Paul Knotts 1954 

Glenn L. Martin 1951 

Charles P. McCormick 1948 

Harry H. Nuttle 1950 

Philip C. Turner 1950 

Millard E. Tydings 1951 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1956 

President of The University 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 

General Administrative Board 

President Byrd, Chairman Dean Appleman, Dr. Bamford, Dean Ben- 
jamin, Mr. Benton, Mr. Brigham, Dr. Brueckner, Dr. Burnett, Mr. 
Cobey, Dr. Corbett, Dean Cotterman, Dean DuMez, Dean Eppley, Mr. 
Fogg, Colonel Griswold, Mr. Haszard, Dean Howell, Dr. Huff, Dr. 
Rabat, Miss Kellar, Director Kemp, Dr. Long, Dean Mount, Miss 
Preinkert, Secretary, Dean Pyle, Dean Robinson, Dean Stamp, Dean 
Steinberg, Dean Symons, Mr. Weber, Dr. White, Dr. Wylie, Dr. 
Zucker. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd., LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., Ph.D., Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar. D., LL.B., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
Clifford W. Chapman Donald E. Shay 

Walter H. Hartung A. W. Richeson 

Frank J. Slama J. Carleton Wolf 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 

FACULTY 

Professors 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, 
M.Sc. (1925) ; McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

B. Olive Cole Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical Law 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913), LL.B. (1923). 

Andrew G. DuMez Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904), B.S. (1907), M.S. (1910), Ph.D. (1917). 

Walter H. Hartung 7 Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Minnesota, B.A. (1918) ; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. (1926). 

W. Arthur Purdum Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930) ; B.S. (1932) ; M.S. (1934) ; Ph.D. (1941). 

*A. W. Richeson Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925). 
Ph.D. (1928). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Wash- 
ington, D. C., B.S., (1921); Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922), (Hon- 
orary). 

Associate Professors 
*Gaylord B. Eastabrook Associate Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; 
University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

*Norman E. Phillips Associate Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916) ; Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

Donald E. Shay Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937); University of Maryland, M.S. (1938), Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Frank J. Slama Associate Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924), Ph.C. (1925), B.S. in Phar. (1928), 
M.S. (1930), Ph.D. (1935). 

The faculty is listed as constituted during 1947-1948. Changes will be noted in sub- 
sequent catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Representative on the Graduate Council. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Assistant Professors 
♦Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1935). 

*George Philip Hager, Jr. Assistant Professor of Inorganic and 

University of Maryland, B. S. (1938), Organic Chemistry 

M.S. (1940), Ph.D. (1942). 

Instructors 
Benjamin Frank Allen Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

♦John H. Applegarth Instructor in Zoology 

San Jose State College, A.B. (1935) ; Stanford University, M.A. (1938). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) j University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

Augusta Soladar Neistadt Instructor in Pharmacy 

New Jersey College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1913). 

Harriet R. Noll Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1934); B.S. (1935). 

♦Claire Strube Schradieck Instructor in Languages 

Groucher College, A.B. (1916) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1919). 

Kenneth E. Stahl Instructor in Chemistry 

Carthage College, B.A. (1938) ; University of Iowa, B.S. (1941); M.S. (1941). 

Alex Weiner Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1947). 

Assistants 
♦James F. Battey Assistant in Physics 

Brown University, Sc.B. in Physics (1943). 

Ursula T. Biermacher Assistant in Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Grand Rapids, B.S. (1941). 

Joseph Paul Boggio Assistant in Pharmacology 

Loyola College, B.S. (1943). 

Jen-yah Hsie Assistant in Bacteriology 

Army Veterinary College, B.S. (1938) ; Michigan State College, M.S. (1947). 

Elsa Florence Jahn Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1947). 

Morton Kahn Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1947). 

John Morgan Mattingly 1 Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Loyola College, B.S.I. (1947). 

Herman M. Mupsik Assistant in Pharmacy 

Rutgers University, B.S. (1941). 

♦Bernard H. Reincke Assistant in Zoology 

William Charles Rossberg Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1946). 

Bernice Heyman Ruskin2 Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938) ; M.S. (1940) ; Ph.D. (1947). 

Paul R. Young Assistant in Pharmacology 

George Washington University, B.S. (1942). 

♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1. Resigned November 14, 1947. 

2. Appointed March 19, 1948 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Assisting Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S. Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Rerreca S. Elam, A.B., B.S.L.S. Cataloger 

Virginia Monouydas Senior Stenographer 

Josephine R. Tacchetti Senior Stenographer 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



HISTORY 



The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of 
medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
instituton until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of pro- 
fessional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856 it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 



AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its 
matriculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it 
also offers facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially 
designed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped 
throughout, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to 
carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of phar- 
macy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the vari- 
ous fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for 
instruction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 10,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors awav, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. It is registered with the New York Department of Educa- 
tion, and its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 20. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M.S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in 
the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work 
in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, 
must register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the 
requirements of that School. For detailed information concerning regis- 
tration requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Grad- 
uate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American As- 
sociation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY 

SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission By Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 8 units, elective 8 units, total 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 8 units. 

Elective Subects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, eco- 
oomics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agricul- 
ture, commericial drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign lan- 
guages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject 
offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 8 units, of 
which not more than four shall be vocational units. 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 
to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. 
Double laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are consid- 
ered as equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three 
units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course 
has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon 
presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate 
who does not fully meet these requirements may be required to present 
further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the dis- 
cretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate 
examination. Such examination will be given during the first week of 
each of the months of June, July, August and September at College 
Park, Md. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to re- 
port. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission By Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admission for permission to report at the University for an examin- 
ation, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for grad- 
uation from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are 
offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th 
Street, New York City, the Regents of the University of the State of 
New York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the 
State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must present 
official transcript of his high school and college records and a certificate 
of honorable dismissal from the college from which he is transferring. 
If the transcript of his college record shows the average of the grades 
received to be at least a "C", or one letter higher than the minimum 
passing grade, and if he has satisfied all other admisson requirements, he 
may be admitted and given advanced standing as follows : 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to 
advanced standing without examination and be given credit for that por- 
tion of the work of the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum 
which he may have completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be 
admitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit 
for the work completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student 
applying for advanced standing from any institution other than a col- 
lege of pharmacy, unless such credit shall be for graduate work in ap- 
plied subjects done in a recognized graduate school or other educational 
institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may 
be equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he 
will be required to take those courses, which the class has completed but 
which he has not completed and such courses will be given precedence 
over the more advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student aud pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Fac- 
ulty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary 
training of the applicant is sufficient to permit admission under these 
conditions. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photographs and the five 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the 
application has been received. Do not make application unless reason- 
ably certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate of entrance will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file applica- 
tion with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after en- 
rolling, file with the secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said appli- 
cation he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may 
deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, 
shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy 
shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit 
to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore ex- 
perience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office 
of the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. A student entering for the 
first time must matriculate before he will be permitted to register. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



All students must complete their registration at the office of the Regis- 
trar on the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a 
student be permitted to enter classes before he has completed registra- 
tion. Students who fail to register on the days scheduled are required 
to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day for 
registration with the payment of the late registration fee is Saturday 
at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the calendar. 
This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendaton of the 
Dean. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 5.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 115.00 

Non-Residents 140.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 35.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of a condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

A student who is not followng the regular schedule, but is taking 
courses equivalent to one-half (9 semester hours) or more of a semester's 
work, will be charged the full fees. A student taking less than one-half 
of a semester's work, will be charged on a subject basis at the rate of 
$9.00 per semester hour, plus an additional $1.00 per semester hour for 
courses requiring laboratory work. A student given the privilege of 
taking more than the regularly scheduled work for a semester will be 
charged an additonal fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student 
is required to pay $6.00 each semester ( Freshman students $5.00) to the 
"Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $90.00 per aca- 
demic year is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting 
instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

General fee of $10.00 per semester hour required of all graduate stu- 
dents except assistants, who will pay a fee of $5.00 per semester hour in 
laboratory courses only. 

Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree — $25.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

The Matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registration 
in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a pro- 
fessional school of the University or from one professional school to an- 
other, he is required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the school 
to which he transfers. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A tuition fee of $115.00 per semester is charged a student who is a 
resident of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who 
is not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semes- 
ter. The tuition fee must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $35.00 per semester is charged to cover materials 
and apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will auto- 
matically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for 
withdrawl, bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with 
the Dean. A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained 
from the office of the Secretary of the School. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parents or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be 
entitled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the School within five days after the be- 
ginning of intruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all 
charges except the matriculation fee and a charge of $5.00 to cover cost of 
registration. 

Students withdrawing from the School after five days and before the 
end of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester 
will receive a pro-rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $10.00 
to cover cost of registration. After the expiration of the three-week 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



period referred to, refunds will be made only in those cases in which the 
circumstances are exceptional and the president of the University has 
authorized the making of such refunds. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic 
record from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so 
furnished, but for each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent of the classes therein. Further ab- 
sence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lec- 
ture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral tests are given at different intervals throughout the 
session and the ratings received are recorded. Final examinations are 
held at the close of each semester, and the standing of a student in each 
subject is determined by the average of all the ratings received during 
the semester. 

Examinations for the completion of the courses in which a student re- 
ceived a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will 
be held on the dates announced by the Dean. A student who is con- 
ditioned in any semester must remove the condition by the end of the 
succeeding semester, but will not be permitted to take an examination 
within thirty days from the date on which the conditional rating was 
received. A condition which is not removed will become a failure, and 
the course must be repeated to obtain a grade. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as the circumstances which caused the 
absence will permit. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence was justi- 
fiable (as if due to illness or other exceptional circumstances) he will 
give permission for a deferred examination in place of the one missed. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100) ; B, Good (87-92) ; C, Fair (80-86) ; D, Passed 
(75-79); E, Conditioned (60-74; F, Failed (below 60); I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades: 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subse- 
quent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is 
required to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he received passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all 
of the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. A grade point count of 70 is also 
required for the fourth year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of 
the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student, on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of 
the work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than 
five points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be 
required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy 
requires, evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct 
of a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by 
the faculty in determining the fitness of a student to enter into the con- 
fidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, 
sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be con- 
sidered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting 
of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the 
term, will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a 
formal rule against the offense has been published. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 20). The 
work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for each of the last two academic years of not less than twice 
the total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical 
experience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recog- 
nized school or college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical expe- 
rience required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of oppor- 
tunities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions avail- 
able in drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School 
where it may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharm- 
acist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still 
active, has contributed $1,000.00 annually since 1930 to maintain a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

The Sterling-Winthrop Research Institute Fellowship 

The Sterling-Winthrop Institute for Research has provided a grant 
of $1500.00 for the purpose of supporting investigations in synthetic 
organic chemistry. This fellowship will be awarded by the faculty to a 
graduate student who possesses the qualifications required by the re- 
search studies to be undertaken. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

The amount of $2,796.50 was collected in connection with the celebration 
of the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the School of Pharmacy. 
This sum will be used to provide two fellowships for research studies 
distributed over the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, bacteriology and pharmacognosy. The selection of the 
recipients of these fellowships will be made by the faculty with the 
approval of the Dean. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient 
to provide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for re- 
search in pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellow- 
ship will be awarded for research in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharma- 
cology or pharmacy. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to 
deposit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 
research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the 
Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable 
him to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy 
during the next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of 
general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in 
one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for the assistantships is $900.00 for the academic year, and the 
remission of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma 
fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didac- 
tic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in 
which they are serving. The usual amount of services required does not 
exceed 12 to 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant to carry 
approximately a full graduate program. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many 
years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who 
was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, 
and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy 
young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be 
awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown 
superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education has contrib- 
uted a sufficient amount to provide two scholarships of $200.00 each 
annually for students in need of financial assistance and who as high 
school graduates maintained a rank in the upper one-quarter of their 
classes, and college students who have established evidence of compe- 
tency and ability to maintain an average of "B" as a minimum. 

Vick Chemical Co. Scholarship 

The Vick Chemical Co., of New York, N Y., has contributed sufficient 
funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
to provide one scholarship paying $365.00 per year to a needy student 
who has attained a high scholastic record in high school. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contrib- 
uted sufficient funds to provide one scholarship paying $450.00 annually 
and has also contributed through the American Foundation for Pharma- 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



ceutical Education funds sufficient to provide two scholarships of $250.00 
each annually for students who meet the qualifications stated under the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

Henry B. Gilpin Co. Scholarships 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed suffi- 
cient funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
cation to provide for one scholarship of $300.00 and one of $200.00 
annually for students who meet the qualifications stated above under 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eager- 
ness for service and helpfulness to others, which were striking character- 
istics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made 
contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this 
fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean, 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is 
creditable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below 
B. Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 
highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall 
below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by 
the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommend- 
ing a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in 
his judgment of the student's ability as much by observation and personal 
contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of 
approximately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually 
by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 
the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1882), placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Membership Prize 

Membership in the American Pharmaceutical Association for one year 
is awarded annually to a student of the third-year class, selected by the 
Faculty, who attained high standing in both theoretical and practical 
pharmacy. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Council 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 
encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid tradi- 
tions of the school. The council consists of twelve members, three 
elected by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the 
presidents of the respective classes, and a faculty advisor. 

Rhe Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society 
is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 
75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of The Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

Officers 1947-48 

President — Norman L. Schenker, Fourth-Year Class. 

First Vice-President — Ronald E. Mendelsohn, Third-Year Class. 

Second Vice-President — Bernard C. McDougall, Second- Year Class. 

Secretary — Barbara I. Marshall, Fourth-Year Class. 

Treasurer — Donald O. Fedder, Second-Year Class. 

Editor — Leon Greenberg, Third-Year Class. 

Executive Committe 

Martin R. Bowers, Fourth-Year Class 
Samuel H. Exler, Third-Year Class 
Richard R. Crane, Second-Year Class 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Faculty Adviser 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held 
on May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of 
the Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society con- 
tinued its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni 
Association of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the 
organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained 
dormant until June 4, 1926, when is mas reorganized as the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The 
active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers: 

Officers (1947-48) 

Marion L. Elliott, Honorary President 

Mathias Palmer, President of the Association 

916 East Thirty-Sixth Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Joseph Cohen, First Vice-President 

3740 Dolfield Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 

1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

Mathias Palmer, Chairman 

The Honorary President (Ex-Officio) 

Marvin J. Andrews 

Frank Block 

William M. Gould 

Raphael H. Wagner 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matters pertain- 
ing to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The fol- 
lowing are the present members of the Committee: 

Harry S. Harrison, Chairman 
Marvin J. Andrews Lloyd N. Richardson 

Hyman Davidov Simon Solomon 

Andrew F. Ludwig Raphael H. Wagner 

Stephen J. Provenza Walter F. Wargell 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 
COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Title and Number of Course 



Hrs. Per Week 



First Year 

♦Botany 1, Structural 

fChemistry 1, 3, Inorganic and Qualitative 

Analysis 

fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 

fMathematics 10 or 15 

{Mathematics 11 or 17 

fModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 

German 

tSpeech 1, 2, Reading and Speaking 

fZoology 1, General 



Second Year 

Botany 21, Microscopical 

Botany 22, Microscopical 

fChemistry 85, 87, Organic 

fChemistry 36, 38, Organic 

Pharmacy 1, 2 Galenical 

fPhysics 10, 11, General 

Physiology 22, General 



Third Year 

♦Bacteriology 1, General 

♦Bacteriology 115 Serology and Immunology 

♦Chemistry 15 Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 

Assaying 

♦Economics 87, Elementary 

Pharmacology 51, 52, Pharm., Toxicology 

and Therapeutics ... 

Pharmacy 51, 52, Dispensing 

Pharmacy 61, History of 



Fourth Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113, Medicinal Products 

Economics 51, Pharmaceutical 

First Aid 1, Standard 

Law 62, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations.. 

Pharmacy 101, 102, Manufacturing 

Pharmacy 72, Pharmaceutical Practice 

Pharmacology 111, Biological Assaying 

JElectives 



Fourth Year (Electives) J 

Botany 101, 102, Taxonomy 

Botany 111, 113, Plant Anatony 

Botany 112, 114, Plant Anatomy 

Chemistry 99, Glassworking 

Chemistry 112, 114, Medicinal Products 

fChemistry 187, 189, Physical 

fChemistry 188, 190, Physical 

♦Chemistry 151, 153, Physiological 

♦Chemistry 152, 154, Physiological 

f English 3, 4, Composition and World 

Literature 

fLanguage 6, 7, Scientific German or French... 

fMatbematics 20, 21, Calculus 

Pharmacy 111, 112, Advanced Prescription 

Compounding 

fZoology 5, Comparative Vertebrate Mor- 
phology 



17 



Hrs Per Week 



17 



f Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

* Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences . 

% The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



21 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


First Year 

Botany 1 

Chemistry 1, 3 


32 
64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 


64 
192 


96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
128 


3 

8 


English 1, 2 


6 


Mathema lies 10, 15 


3 
3 


Modern Language 1, 2 or 6, 7 

Speech 1, 2 


96 "" 


6 
2 


Zoology 1 


4 


Total .. 


448 
32 


352 

96 
96 

128 '" 

128 
64 
64 


800 

128 

96 

96 

128 

256 

160 

96 


35 


Second Year 

Botany 21 

Botany 22 


4 
2 


Chemistry 35, 37 


96 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


4 




128 
96 
32 


10 


Physics 10, 11 

Physiology 22 


8 
3 






Total 

Third Year 

Bacteriology 115 

Chemistry 15 


384 

32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
64 
64 
32 


576 

64 
64 
96 
96 

128 

192 


960 

96 

96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
256 

32 


35 

4 
4 

4 


Chemistry 63 


4 


Economics 37 


3 




6 


Pharmacy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 61 


8 
2 






Total 


336 

96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
96f 


640 

"48 


976 

96 
80 
16 

48 
128 

80 

96 
384t 


35 


Fourth Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113 

Economics 51 


4 
3 
1 


Law 62 

Pharmacy 101, 102 

Pharmacy 72 


""'64 

48 

64 

288f 


3 
6 
2 

4 


Elective* 


12 






Total 

Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 101 102 


416 

32 
64 


512 

64 

" 128 " 

96 

128 

.... _g. ... 


928 

96 
64 

128 
96 

128 
96 

192 
64 

128 
96 
96 
96 

192 

128 

800 
960 
9^6 
928 


35 
4 


Botany 111, 113 


4 


*ntany 112, 114 


4 


Chemi«t:y 99 




2 


ChemMrv 112. 114 




4 


Chemistry 187, 189 

Chemistry 188, 190 


96 


6 

4 


Chemistry 151, 153 


64 


4 


Chemistry 152, 154 


128 


4 


English 3, 4 


96 
96 
96 

' 32 

448 
384 
336 
416 


6 


Language 6, 7 


6 


Mathematics 20, 21 




6 


Pharmacy 111, 112 

Zoology 5 


192 
96 

352 
576 
640 
512 


4 

4 


Summary 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 


35 
35 
35 


Fourth Year 


35 


Total 


1,584 


2,080 


3,664 


140 



t Average 



22 UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures, two laboratories. Shay and Hsie. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study 
of pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of 
the prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, second semester, 
two lectures, two laboratories. Shay and Hsie. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and 
use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit de- 
termined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health — (2) One lecture. Shay. 
Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and adminstration of 
state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The 
courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 



BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, second semester, two lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Slama and Biermacher. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of the plant structures. 

21. Pharmacognosy (Macroscopical) — (4) Second year, first semes- 
ter, two lectures, two laboratories. Slama and Biermacher. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, 
with special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identi- 
fication and in the detection of adulterations. 

22. Pharmacognosy (Microscopical) — (2) Second year, second 
semester, two laboratories. Slama and Biermacher. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 



* Courses intended primarily for freshman and sophomores are numbered 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and 
for graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs and adulter- 
ants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2-4) Fourth year, 
one lecture and one laboratory. Elective for students who contemplate 
taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. 
Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation 
of an herbarium. 

111, 113. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two lectures. Slama 
Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21, 22. 

Lectures covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis 
placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two laboratories. 
Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 1, 21, 22, 111, 113 or may be taken simultane- 
ously with 111, 113. 

Laboratory work covering Botany 111, 113. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of powdered vegetable brugs and spices from the structural 
and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories, Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount 
and quality of work performed. Slama. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
(8) First year, two lectures, two laboratories. Hager and Stahl. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical 
theory and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with 
fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, 
and the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and 
acid radicals. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (4) Second year, two 
lectures. Hager and Jahn. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 
A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

30, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (4) Second year, two 
laboratories. Hager and Jahn. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, first semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Hartung and Mattingly. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and 
their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, sec- 
ond semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Hartung and Ruskin. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
of official preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either semester, 
Hager and Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of 
glass. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Fourth year, 
three lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical 
properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2-4) Fourth year, 
two laboratories. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory excercises dealing with important and characteristic chemi- 
cal properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2-4) Any one or two 
semesters. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a 
study of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen in organic compounds. 

146,148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2-4) One lecture, 
two laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry — (6) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry — (4) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with 

Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demostrate physio- 
chemical principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

151, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, 
metabolism, vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



152, 154. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (4) Two labora- 
tories. Chapman, Gittinger, and Boggio. 

Perrequisties — Chemistry 35, 37, 151, 153, or may be taken simultan- 
eously with Chemistry 151, 153. 

Laboratory exercises, mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the 
more important procedures in physiological chemistry, urinalysis and 
blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. 
Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various 
medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hartung. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied 
to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates 
and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. 
Hartung. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceuical Chemistry — Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hartung and Hager. 

258. Organic Quatitative Analysis — (2-4) Either semester. Two 
to four laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic sub- 
stances and mixtures. 

ECONOMICS AND LAW 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Third year, second semester, 
three lectures. Cole and Kahn. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, ex- 
change, distribution and consumption of wealth. 

51. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, first semester, 
two lectures and one laboratory. Cole and Kahn. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail 
pharmacies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including 
practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, second 
semester, three lectures. Cole. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fundmentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special 
reference to the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and 
State laws and regulations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, 
cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Compositin — (6) First year, three lectures. Ball- 
man. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4, Composition and World Literature: — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (3) First year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture, one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

10. Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, expo- 
nents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial 
theorem, and theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry — (3) First year, 
second semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who 
do not offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addi- 
tion formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the 
straight line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic 
equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, 
logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second semester, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



20, 21. Calculus — (6) Electives, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applica- 
tions of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple inte- 
grals, infinite series and differentia lequations. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1,2. French — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prep- 
aration is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose prepa- 
ration is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, punctuation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

Six semester hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satifying 
the Modern Language requirement. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Prerequisite— French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Translation, grammar, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scien- 
tific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 
Reading of technical prose, with grammar review. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third 
year, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, and Young. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances with special reference to the drugs and prepara- 
tions of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first 
semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger and 
Young. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequiste — Pharmacology 51, 52 and the approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in 
alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation 
with the instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and 
comparative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit 
and hours. 



PHARMACY 

1, 2. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and 
two laboratories. DuMez, Allen, Mupsik and Rossberg. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Third year, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Wolf, Allen, Mupsik and Rossberg. 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures. DuMez. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special 
emphasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

72. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, second semester, 
two lectures and 36 hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. Wolf, 
Allen, Noll and Neistadt. 

Prerquisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Practical work in drug store arrangement ; the handling of drugs, med- 
icines and drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. DuMez and Allen. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special 
reference to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale. 

Ill, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (6) Two labora- 
tories. DuMez and Allen. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

120. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Two lectures. Pur- 
dum. A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. DuMez and Allen. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plant; crude materials used; their collection, preservation ano^ 
transformation into forms suitable for their therapeutic use. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. 
DuMez. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with 
special reference to the original and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. DuMez. 
Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. 
DuMez. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (8) Second year, three lectures, one labor- 
atory. Estabrook and Battey. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Thermodynamics — (3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189, 188, 190. 

A study of the fundamental theory of thermodynamics and its appli- 
cation to physical and chemical problems. 

121, 122. Electricity and Magnetism — (6) Two lectures, one labor- 
atory. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given in alternate years. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology — (3) Second year, second semester, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Chapman, Gittinger and Boggio. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 1. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet 
the requirements of students in pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. General Zoology — (4) First year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Applegarth and Reincke. 

Dissection and study of typical invertebrate animals and a mammalian 
form, with emphasis on animal development, structure and function of 
organs. Introductory discourses on the basic biological principles. 

5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — (4) Elective, second se- 
mester, two lectures and two laboratories. Applegarth and Reincke. 

Introduction to the Chordata, outline of the principles of Genetics, 
study of the gross anatomy of several vertebrate types, lectures on the 
general physiology and embryology of the principal organs and systems 
of the vertebrate animal, with emphasis on the cat. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books re- 
quired in each course will be announced at the beginning of each 
semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found nescessary or desirable. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



31 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1947-1948 



f GRADUATE 

Amin, Anubhai Harilal India 

Amin, Raomanbhai C India 

Biermacher, Ursula T Michigan 

Bird, Joseph Gordon Maryland 

Boggio. Joseph Paul Maryland 

Counts, Jules Behrend Maryland 

Edberg, Lawrence John, Jr Maryland 

Ellin, Robert Isadore Maryland 

Gadekar, S. Manmohan India 

Greco, Salvatore Joseph Pennsylvania 

Healy, Roland Greig Winconsin 

Hsie, Jen-yah China 

Jahn, Elsa Florence Maryland 

Job, Betty Katherine Indiana 

Klioze, Oscar Maryland 

Konicov, Monte Maryland 



STUDENTS 

Kramer, David Nathan Maryland 

LaRocca, Joseph Paul Maryland 

•Mattingly, John Morgan, Jr Maryland 

Mupsik, Herman Morris New Jersey 

Pasquale, Daniel Mario New Jersey 

Perdomo, Cecila Hartmann So. America 

Piala, Joseph Joseph Winconsin 

Pope, Louise M Oklahoma 

Schmersahl, George Wilfred New Jersey 

Scigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Smith, Vivien Bessie New Jersey 

Stahl, Kenneth Hottenstein Pennsylvania 
Tawab, Abdel Salah Ahmed Egypt 

•Truitt, Edward Byrd, Jr. Virginia 

Young, Paul Roscoe Maryland 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Berlin, Jerome Maryland 

Bowers, Martin Rudolph Maryland 

Caldwell, John Regan Maryland 

Francik, Joseph Maryland 

Freidman, Arnold Milton Maryland 

Freidman, Jerome Samuel Maryland 

Gakenheimer, Herbert E Maryland 

Geist, Gene Natalie Maryland 

Hertz, Selig Sidney Maryland 

Johnson, Joseph LeGrand, Jr. Maryland 

Krall, Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Meyer Maryland 



Margiros, John George Maryland 

Marshall, Barbara Idella Maryland 

Meyers, Jacob Sholom Maryland 

Morgenroth, Hans Maryland 

Pearlman, William Louis Maryland 

Rosenstadt, Aaron Maryland 

Schenker, Norman Leonard Maryland 

Shochet, Irving Edward Maryland 

Shpritz, Stuart Maryland 

Shulman, Shirley S. Maryland 

Waldman, Alvin Melvin Maryland 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Angster, Jerome Maryland 

Blair, Luther Rhodes Virginia 

Brill, Maurice Erwin Maryland 

Cohen, Harry Carl Maryland 

Cohen, Morton Bernard Maryland 

Crook, James Washington Maryland 

Dougherty, John Herbert, Jr. Maryland 

Edenfield, Charles Howard Maryland 

Eichberg, Daniel Moses Maryland 

Exler, Samuel Harvey Maryland 

Freeman, Emanuel Gottlieb Maryland 

Fryer, Kenneth Wesley W. Virginia 

Getha, Joseph Francis Maryland 

Glaeser, Henry John, Jr. Maryland 

•Gray, William Bernice Maryland 

Greenberg, Leon Maryland 

Hahn, William Albert Maryland 

Hanks, Carleton William, Jr. Maryland 

Heinritz, Jane Rose Maryland 

Holen, Mitzie Marion Maryland 

Johnson. James William III Maryland 

Kelly, Charles Washington Maryland 

Kexel, Leroy Everett Maryland 

tRegistered in Graduate School. 
•Did not attend entire session. 



Levine, Milton Maryland 

London, Seymour Lewis Virginia 

Mendelsohn, Ronald Edward Maryland 

Miller, Lila Maryland 

Nave, Jackson Moore Maryland 

Pruce, Irving Morton Maryland 

Quasney, Emil, Jr Maryland 

Rice, Leonard Marcus Maryland 

Robson, Jeffie Gertrude Maryland 

Rubenstein, Charlotte Harriett Maryland 

Savitz, Melvin Morris Maryland 

Schwartz, Jerome Maryland 

Siegel, Paul Maryland 

Silver, Benjamin Joseph Maryland 

Spike, Sidney Maryland 

•Steinhilber, Richard Lee Maryland 

Stratmann, George Marvin Maryland 

Wagner, Betty Gayle Maryland 

Waldsachs, Joseph John Maryland 

Ward, Francis Xavier Maryland 

Weinberger, Sally Degan Maryland 

Werley, Leroy Delbert, Jr. Maryland 

Wright, Myron Joseph Maryland 



32 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Allen, Claris Murray Maryland 

Appel, William Joseph Maryland 

Basik, Harvey Edwin Maryland 

Bergofsky, Irvin Jack Maryland 

Borgman, Alice Jean Maryland 

Bosch, Noel Joseph Maryland 

Brooks, Harold Herschel Maryland 

Caplan, Robert Marvin Maryland 

Carter, Paul Milton Maryland 

Cassidy, Elizabeth Clarke Maryland 

Cavallaro, Joseph William Maryland 

Cohn, Melvin Maryland 

Crane, Richard Robert Maryland 

Cunzeman, John Leroy, Jr Maryland 

Custis, Harry Jackson, Jr Maryland 

♦Dagostaro, SaKatore Joseph Maryland 

Davidov, Marvin Davidson Maryland 

Davis, Alfred Lee , Maryland 

Dayton, LeRoy Elree Maryland 

Deems, John Thomas Maryland 

Demarest, Dudley Alvin Maryland 

♦Determan, Francis Leo Maryland 

Donaldson, William Clair Maryland 

Edwards, Paul Hubert Maryland 

Eisenberg, Edwin Fredric Maryland 

Evans, Frank B. Maryland 

Fainberg, Edward A Maryand 

Fedder, Donald Owen Maryland 

Fisher, Philip Edward Maryland 

Freed, Mayer Nathan Maryland 

Fried, Burton Maryland 

Friedman, Herbert Maryland 

Gazda, John Joseph Pennsylvania 

Geser, Alvin Nathan Maryland 

Gould, Clarendon Lloyd Maryland 

Greenberg, Albert Gordon Maryland 

Gronert, Warren Alvin Maryland 

Harman, Richard Thomas Maryland 

Harnish, Robert Antis Maryland 

Hoy, Robert Gordon Maryland 

Jackson, William Benton, Jr Maryland 

Kaiser, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Kantorow, Gerald Sol Maryland 

Kelly, George Leo Maryland 

Kelly, Robert Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Morton David Maryland 



Lachman, Marvin Marcus Maryland 

Lambdin, Edward Clement, Jr Maryland 

Leavey, Herbert Jack Maryland 

Levy, Donald Maryland 

Lindenbaum, Louis Maryland 

Lyon, James Hopper Maryland 

McDougall, Bernard Charles Maryland 

Macek, Walter Peter Maryland 

Mandel, Howard Earl Maryland 

Maseth, William Everd Maryland 

Mazer, Harold Herbert Maryland 

•Michael, Nicholas Alphonse Maryland 

Mittuch, Joseph Emery New Jersey 

Moler, Robert Kenneth Maryland 

Moscati, Adrain P. Maryland 

Papiermeister, Joseph Maryland 

Pats, Albert Maryland 

Payne, Harry Maryland 

Petty, Huie Wilbert Illinois 

Price, Charles Paul Maryland 

Pumpian, Paul Allen Maryland 

Raichlen, Isador Maryland 

Regimenti, Vincent John Maryland 

Rosenbach, Hans John Maryland 

Royce, Robert Francis Dist. Columbia 

Sachs, Sylvan Leonard Maryland 

Schwartz, Henry Maryland 

Sears, Edward DeFrost Maryland 

Shapiro, Albert Aaron Maryland 

Shenker, Allan Bernard Maryland 

Simon, Alvin Maryland 

Smith, Rudolph Martin John Maryland 

Smith, William Ward Maryland 

Spahn, James Anthony, Jr Maryland 

Stark, Alvin Maryland 

Stauffer, Howard Carl Maryland 

♦Sugar, Victor Jerome Maryland 

Sullivan, Howard Dean Virginia 

Turner, Zach III Maryland 

Urspruch, William Gordon Maryland 

Vodenos, Philip Maryland 

Wagner, Phyllis Hinda Maryland 

Warren, Jerome Bernard Maryland 

Weiner, Morton Hyman Maryland 

Williamson, Richard Jackson Maryland 

Yaffe, Stanley Jay Maryland 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Ayd, John Joseph Maryland 

Bailey, Halcolm South Maryland 

Bakas, James Angelo Maryland 

Baranowski, Thomas Leo Maryland 

Boyer, Gary Howard Maryland 

Brodie, Stanley Alan Maryland 

Brooks, William Leroy Maryland 

Chertkoff, Marvin Joseph Maryland 

Chick, Stephen Maryland 

Chodnicki, Marion Roman Maryland 

♦Did not attend entire session. 



Christopher, Joseph Thomas Maryland 

♦Cleaver, John Breckenbridge Maryland 

Colclough, John James — Maryland 

Connelly, Mary Wallace Maryland 

♦Cooper, Oliver James Maryland 

♦Cox, William Edwin Maryland 

♦Coyle, Ellen Nora Maryland 

Crispens, Warren Edward Maryland 

Cummings, Maurice Thomas Maryland 

Czapiewski, Eugene George Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 33 



Danziger, David Gerd Maryland Mulford, Thomas Spencer Maryland 

Dvorak. Charles August, Jr Maryland Neary, Kathleen Teresa Maryland 

Einbrod, Donald Gilbert Maryland Newman, Albert M Maryland 

Esslinger, Robert Richard Maryland O'Neil, John Leonard Maryland 

Fiastro. Attilio Ettore Maryland *Owings, Henry Pettibone Maryland 

Franey, John Patrick, Jr. Maryland Ravita, Salvatore Joseph Maryland 

Frankle, Harold N Maryland Rendel, Morris Maryland 

Freedman, Harold Gersin Maryland Robinson, Benno Maryland 

Gagliardi, Joseph Anthony Maryland Rosenthal, Herbert Theodore Maryland 

Gluckstern, Wilfred Howard Maryland Sachs, Michael Maryland 

•Gordy, Robert King [Maryland Samorodin, Estelle Gilda Maryland 

Greenwalt, Jacqueline Jean Maryland Santoni, Henry Anthony Maryland 

Hammar, Vincent Coy Maryland Schapiro, Oscar Milton Maryland 

Hlavac, Franklin Norman Maryland Schonfeld, Gerald Maryland 

Jarvis, Charles Lindsay Virginia Sirota, Leo Robert Maryland 

Keiser. Alvin Maryland Snellinger, John Ernest Maryland 

Kelly, John Richard Maryland Sosnoski, Walter Joseph Maryland 

Kokoski, Charles Joseph Maryland Taylor, Charles Clinton Pennsylvania 

Roller, Elmer Curtis, Jr Maryland Tennant, Richard Westerman Maryland 

Kostas, George W. Virginia Teramani, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

♦LeBrun, Jack Melvin Maryland *Truitt, Mary Ellen Maryland 

LeCompte, Donald Griffith Maryland Voshell, LaRue Estelle Maryland 

Levin, Norman Maryland Voshell, William Frederick, Jr. ...Maryland 

*Luber, John George Maryland Walter, James Beverly, Jr. Maryland 

McNew, Frank Henry Maryland Walter, Norman Wallis Maryland 

Maseth, Earle George Maryland *Webner. Raymond Karl Maryland 

Matthews, Layton Ray, Jr Maryland Winces, Vernon Anthony Maryland 

Mintiens, John Donald Maryland 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Aronson, Sanford Wilbur New Jersey Lichtman, Harry Maryland 

Bryant, Harold H Maryland McKinnon, Cyril J Michigan 

Diehl, Robert C Maryland Rasmussen, Edward Thomas... W. Virginia 

Hurst, Orville Clayton Maryland Van Oss, Adrian James Maryland 

Konig, Joseph Myer Maryland 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 7, 1947 

f DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Pierre Frank Smith New York Eugene Clayton Weinbach Maryland 

Warren Eldred Weaver ...Dist. of Columbia Wilson Monroe Whaley Dist. of Columbia 

t MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Ramanbhai Chaturbhai Amin India Daniel Mario Pasquale Maryland 

Hsu Hua King China Rodolfo S. Escabi Perez Puerto Rico 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARHACY 

Marvin H. Abrams Maryland Maurice Weldon Mercier, Jr. Maryland 

Alvin Berlin Maryland Harold Daniel Mondell Maryland 

Louis Michael Bickel Maryland John James O'Hara, Jr Maryland 

Otto Karl Boellner, Jr Maryland Sidney Pats Maryland 

Josephine Pauline DiGristine Maryland Howard August Pippig, Jr. Maryland 

Irvin Friedman Maryland Morton Leon Pollack Maryland 

Morton Kahn Maryland Howard Sidney Sirulnik Maryland 

Sidney Benjamin Litvin Maryland Alex Weiner.... .Maryland 

HONORS 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Irvin Friedman 

The William Simon Memorial Prize Alex Weiner 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Harold Daniel Mondell 

•Did not attend entire session. 
tDeorees conferred by Graduate School. 






^ 



"^Op-A-*-^— -e-*-— ' J7 / 




Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 29 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
106th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1949-1950 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



Official Publication 

of 

The University of Maryland 



VOL. 29 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
106th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

19494950 




32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR YEAR 

1949-50 
1949 
September 12-15, incl. — Examinations for the removal of conditions. 

First Semester 
1949 

September 21-23 Wednesday-Friday Registration 

September 26 Monday Instruction begins 

November 23 Wednesday, after last class.. Thanksgiving recess 

begins 

November 28 Monday, 9.00 A.M Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 20 Tuesday, after last class Christmas recess begins 

1950 

January 3 Tuesday, 9:00 A.M Christmas recess ends 

January 30-February 2. ..Monday-Thursday Semester Examinations 

Second Semester 
1950 

February 6-8 Monday-Wednesday Registration 

February 9 Thursday Instruction begins 

February 22 Wednesday Washington's Birthday, 

Holiday 

April 6 Thursday, after last class.... Easter recess begins 

April 11 Tuesday, 9:00 A.M Easter recess ends 

May 30 Tuesday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 1-6 Thursday-Tuesday Semester Examinations 

June 10 Saturday Commencement 

Summer Session 
1950 

June 15-16 Thursday-Friday Registration 

June 19 Monday Instruction begins 

August 11 Friday Summer session ends 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00.) 

The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. This 
rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean. 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Re- 
gents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each for a 
term of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in 
the President. The University General Administrative Board acts in an 
advisory capacity to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, which controls the internal 
affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions : 

College of Agriculture Department of Military Science 

Agricultural Experiment Station and Tactics 

Extension Service School of Dentistry 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Law 

College of Commerce School of Medicine 

College of Education School of Nursing 

College of Engineering School of Pharmacy 

College of Home Economics The University Hospital 

Graduate School College of Continuation and 

Summer Session Special Studies 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, the 
Hospital and the College of Continuation and Special Studies, are located 
in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets; the others 
in College Park. 

Board of Regents 

Term Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman 1949 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 1953 

Peter W. Chichester 1951 

Edward F. Holter 1950 

E. Paul Knotts, M.D 1954 

Charles P. McCormick 1957 

Harry H. Nuttle 1957 

Philip C. Turner 1950 

Millard E. Tydings 1951 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1956 

PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D. D.Sc. 
GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 
President Byrd, Chairman, Dean Bamford, Dean Benjamin, Mr. Ben- 
ton, Dr. Bishop, Mr. Brigham, Dr. Brueckner, Mr. Cissel, Dean Cole, 
Dr. Corbett, Dean Cotterman, Dean Eppley, Mr. Fogg, Miss Gipe, 
Colonel Griswold, Dr. Hoffsommer, Dean Howell, Dr. Huff, Dr. 
Kabat, Miss Kellar, Director Kemp, Dr. Long, Dean Mount, Miss 
Preinkert, Secretary, Dean Pyle, Dean Robinson, Colonel Stadtman, 
Dean Stamp, Dean Steinberg, Dean Symons, Mr. Weber, Dr. White, 
Dean Wylie, Dr. Zucker. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Andrew G. DuMez, B.S., Ph.D., Dean 1 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Acting Dean 2 and Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 
B. Olive Cole, Acting Dean and Secretary 
Clifford W. Chapman Donald E. Shay 

George P. Hager A. W. Richeson 

Frank J. Slama J. Carlton Wolf 

FACULTY 

Professors 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, M.Sc. 
(1925) ; McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

B. Olive Cole Professor of Economics and Pharmaceutical Law 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913) ; LL.B. (1923). 

Andrew G. DuMez 1 Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Wisconsin, Ph.G. (1904) ; B.S. (1907) ; M.S. (1910) ; Ph.D. (1926). 

George P. Hager Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938) ; M.S. (1940) ; Ph.D. (1942). 

♦Norman E. Phillips Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916). Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

W. Arthur Purdum Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930). B.S. (1932) ; M.S. (1934) ; Ph.D. (1941). 

*A. W. Richeson Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925) ; 
Ph.D. (1928). 

J. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Wash- 
ington, D. C, B.S. (1921) ; Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922) ; (Hon- 
orary) . 

Associate Professors 
♦Gaylord B. Estabrook Associate Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; 
University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

Donald E. Shay Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1938) ; Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Frank J. Slama Associate Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924) ; Ph.C. (1925) ; B.S. in Phar. (1928) ; M.S. 
(1930) ; Ph.D. (1935). 

The faculty is listed as constituted during 1948-1949. Changes will be noted in sub- 
sequent catalogues. 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Died September 27, 1948. 

2 Appointed October 6. 1948. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Assistant Professors 
*Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1935). 

*Glenn S. Weiland 1 . Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1928) ; M.S. (1930) ; Ph.D. (1933). 

Instructors 
Benjamin Frank Allen Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937). 

*John H. Applegarth Instructor in Zoology 

San Jose State College, A.B. (1935) ; Stanford University, M.A. (1938). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) ; University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

Margaret Wong Lew 2 Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1944). 

Augusta Solodar Neistadt Instructor in Pharmacy 

New Jersey College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1913). 

Harriet R. Noel Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1934) ; B.S. (1935). 

*Claire Strube Schradieck Instructor in Languages 

Goucher College, A.B. (1916) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1919). 

Kenneth H. Stahl Instructor in Chemistry 

Carthage College, B.A. (1938) ; University of Iowa, B.S. (1941) ; M.S. (1941). 

Assistants 
Martha Lovell Adams Assistant in Chemistry 

College of William and Mary, B.S. (1946). 

Francis S. Balassone Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

*James F. Battey Assistant in Physics 

Brown University, Sc.B. in Physics (1943). 

Joseph Paul Boggio Assistant in Pharmacology 

Loyola College, B.S. (1943). 

Gordon H. Bryan Assistant in Pharmacology 

Montana State University, B.S. (1940) ; M.S. (1947). 

Robert I. Ellin Assistant in Chemistry 

Johns Hopkins University, B.A. (1946). 

Jen-Yah Hsie Assistant in Bacteriology 

Army Veterinary College, B.S. (1938) ; Michigan State College, M.S. (1947). 

John G. Magiros Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

Jacob Sholom Meyers Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

Paul Allen Pumpian Assistant in Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

*Bernhardt H. Reincke 3 Assistant in Zoology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

William Charles Rossberg Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1946). 

Shirley Shulman. Assistant in Economics 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Resigned February 1, 1949. 

2 Appointed November 1, 1948. 

3 Resigned December 3, 1948. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Assisting Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Rebecca S. Elam, A.B., B.S.L.S Cataloguer 

Elizabeth Crouse Library Assistant 

Margaret E. Beatty Senior Stenographer 

Daisy Lotz Gue Senior Stenographer 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



HISTORY 



The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of 
medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of pro- 
fessional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its 
matriculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it 
also offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially 
designed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped 
throughout, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to 
carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of phar- 
macy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the vari- 
ous fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for 
instruction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 11,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical 
Education, and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. It is registered with the New York Department of Educa- 
tion, and its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 22. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology and pharmacognosy. The degree of Master of Science 
(M.S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have 
completed at least one year of graduate work and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of the work in 
the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the required work 
in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these degrees, however, 
must register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the 
requirements of that School. For detailed information concerning regis- 
tration requirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Grad- 
uate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American As- 
sociation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

_ An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 8 units, elective 8 units, total 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 8 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agricul- 
ture, commercial drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign lan- 
guages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject 
offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 8 units, of 
which not more than four shall be vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. 
Double laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are consid- 
ered as equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three 
units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course 
has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon 
presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate 
who does not fully meet these requirements may be required to present 
further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the dis- 
cretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate 
examination. Such examination will be given during the first week of 
each of the months of June, July, August and September at College 
Park, Md. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to re- 
port. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examin- 
ation, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for grad- 
uation from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are 
offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th 
Street, New York City, the Regents of the University of the State of 
New York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction of the 
State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must present 
official transcript of his high school and college records and a certificate 
of honorable dismissal from the college from which he is transferring. 
If the transcript of his college record shows the average of the grades 
received to be at least a "C" or one letter higher than the minimum 
passing grade, and if he has satisfied all other admission requirements, 
he may be admitted and given advanced standing as follows: 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to 
advanced standing without examination and be given credit for that por- 
tion of the work of the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum 
which he may have completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be 
admitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit 
for the work completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student 
applying for advanced standing from any institution other than a col- 
lege of pharmacy, unless such credit shall be for graduate work in ap- 
plied subjects done in a recognized graduate school or other educational 
institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may 
be equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he 
will be required to take those courses, which the class has completed but 
which he has not completed and such courses will be given precedence 
over the more advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Fac- 
ulty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary 
training of the applicant is sufficient to permit admission under these 
conditions. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photographs and the five 
dollar investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The Di- 
rector of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the 
application has been received. Do not make application unless reason- 
ably certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate of entrance will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file applica- 
tion with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after en- 
rolling, file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said appli- 
cation he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may 
deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, 
shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy 
shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit 
to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore ex- 
perience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office 
of the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. A student entering for the 
first time must matriculate before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Regis- 
trar on the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



student be permitted to enter classes before he has completed registra- 
tion. Students who fail to register on the days scheduled are required 
to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day for 
registration with the payment of the late registration fee is Saturday 
at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the calendar. 
This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 5.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 115.00 

Non-Residents 140.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 35.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of a condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

A student who is not following the regular schedule, but is taking 
courses equivalent to three-fourths or more of a semester's work, will be 
charged the full fees. A student taking less than three-fourths of a 
semester's work, will be charged on a subject basis at the rate of $9.00 
per semester hour plus an additional $1.00 per semester hour for courses 
requiring laboratory work. A student given the privilege of taking 
more than the regularly scheduled work for a semester will be charged 
an additional fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student 
is required to pay $6.00 each semester (Freshman students $5.00) to the 
"Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $90.00 per aca- 
demic year is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting 
instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

General fee of $10.00 per semester hour required of all graduate stu- 
dents except assistants, who will pay a fee of $5.00 per semester hour in 
laboratory courses only. 

Non-resident fee — $12.50 per semester hour. 
Diploma fee — Master's degree — $15.00. 
Doctor's degree — $25.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

The Matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. It must be paid at 
the time the applicant is accepted for admission. Registration of a stu- 
dent in any school or college of the University is regarded as registration 
in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a pro- 
fessional school of the University or from one professional school to an- 
other, he is required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the school 
to which he transfers. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



A tuition fee of $115.00 per semester is charged a student who is a 
resident of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who 
is not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semes- 
ter. The tuition fee must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $35.00 per semester is charged to cover materials 
and apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly adhered to. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will auto- 
matically disbar a student from attendance upon classes and all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become- 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with 
the Dean. A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained 
from the office of the Secretary of the School. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parents or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be 
entitled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the School within five days after the be- 
ginning of instruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all 
charges except the matriculation fee and a charge of $5.00 to cover cost 
of registration. 

Students withdrawing from the School after five days and before the 
end of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester 
will receive a pro-rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $10.00 
to cover cost of registration. After the expiration of the three-week 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



period referred to, refunds will be made only in those cases in which the 
circumstances are exceptional and the president of the University has 
authorized the making of such refunds. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic 
record from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so 
furnished, but for each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcript records are of two kinds : 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc. as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further ab- 
sence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lec- 
ture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral examinations are given at different intervals 
throughout the session. Final examinations are held at the close of 
each semester. The final grade of a student in each subject is deter- 
mined by these examinations. 

Examinations for the completion of the courses in which a student 
received a grade of "Incomplete" and for the removal of conditions will 
be held only on the dates scheduled in this catalogue or on the dates an- 
nounced by the Dean. A student who is conditioned in the first semester 
must remove the condition during the college year, but will not be per- 
mitted to take an examination within thirty days from the date on 
on which the conditional rating was received. A condition received in 
the second semester must be removed on the dates scheduled during the 
week preceding the opening of the subsequent college year. (See page 3 
of the catalogue.) 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as practical. If the Dean is satisfied 
that the absence was justifiable, he will give permission for a deferred 
examination. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: 

A, Excellent (93-100) ; B, Good (87-92) ; C, Fair (80-86) ; D, Passed 
(75-79) ; E, Conditioned (60-74) ; F, Failed (below 60) ; I, Incomplete. 

The following values in "points" are assigned to the following grades: 
4 points for each hour of grade A 
3 points for each hour of grade B 
2 points for each hour of grade C 
1 point for each hour of grade D 

Grade E, Conditioned, indicates a record below passing, but which may 
be raised to a higher grade, without repeating the course, by a subse- 
quent examination on the subject-matter. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is 
required to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student, to be advanced to full standing in the class of the next 
succeeding year, must have satisfactorily completed all of the scheduled 
work of the preceding year, but, for the purpose of classification, he will 
be considered to have attained this rank if he received passing grades 
in not less than four-fifths of the scheduled work, except as hereinafter 
stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student, to be promoted to the fourth year, must have completed all 
of the scheduled work of the preceding year with a grade point count of 
70 for the work of the third year. A grade point count of 70 is also 
required for the fourth year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of 
the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in less than one-half of the scheduled work, will 
be required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of 
the work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than 
five points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be 
required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy 
requires, evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct 
of a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by 
the faculty in determing the fitness of a student to enter into the con- 
fidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, 
sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be con- 
sidered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting 
of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the 
term, will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a 
formal rule against the offense has been published. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 22). The 
work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for each of the last two academic years of not less than twice 
the total semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical 
experience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recog- 
nized school or college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical expe- 
rience required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

• 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain* himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
may be profitably spent in the completion of the scheduled work and in 
the preparation of studies. Those who cannot meet this condition in full 
need not be dismayed, however, as Baltimore offers a number of oppor- 
tunities to secure suitable employment. A register of positions avail- 
able in drug stores is kept in the office of the Secretary of the School 
where it may be consulted upon request. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharm- 
acist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still 
active, has contributed $1,000.00 annually since 1930 to maintain a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education provides sev- 
eral research fellowships for graduate students in pharmacy who have 
been admitted to the Graduate School. The stipend varies from $900 to 
$1500, with an allowance for tuition, fees and supplies. 

The Sterling-Winthrop Research Institute Fellowship 

The Sterling-Winthrop Institute for Research has provided a grant 
of $400 for the purpose of supporting investigations in synthetic organic 
chemistry. This fellowship will be awarded by the faculty to a graduate 
student who possesses the qualifications required by the research studies 
to be undertaken. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

The amount of $2,796.50 was collected in connection with the celebra- 
tion of the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the School of Pharmacy. 
This sum will be used to provide two fellowships for research studies 
distributed over the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, pharmacology, bacteriology and pharmacognosy. . The selection of 
the recipients of these fellowships will be made by the faculty with the 
approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient 
to provide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for re- 
search in pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellow- 
ship will be awarded for research in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharma- 
cology or pharmacy. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to 
deposit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 
research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the 
Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable 
him to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy 
during the next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of 
general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in 
one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for these is $900.00 for the academic year, and the remission 
of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and di- 
dactic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective depart- 
ments in which they are serving. The usual amount of services required 
does not exceed 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant to 
carry approximately a full graduate program. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

Several internships in hospital pharmacy are available annually. These 
are offered jointly by the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School 
of the University of Maryland, and the Pharmacy Department of The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital. Applicants must be graduates of recognized 
schools of pharmacy. Appointments are for a period of two years, be- 
ginning each July 1st. Interns devote half time to graduate study and 
half time to work in the hospital pharmacy. Upon satisfactory comple- 
tion of the internship and the course of study, Master of Science degrees 
are conferred by the University of Maryland and certificates of intern- 
ship are awarded by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

A stipend of $100 per month is provided by the Hospital and a reduc- 
tion of 25% in tuition fees is allowed by the School of Pharmacy. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Maryland. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many 
years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who 
was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, 
and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy 
young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be 
awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown 
superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education will con- 
tribute an amount of $400.00 which will be matched with an equal 
amount of $400.00 by the School of Pharmacy. The amount provided by 
the Foundation is available only to juniors or seniors who rank in the 
upper quarter of their class. The amount provided by the School is avail- 
able to any undergraduate student who, as high school or college stu- 
dents, have maintained a rank in the upper quarter of their class. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has con- 
tributed sufficient funds to provide two scholarships paying $250.00 an- 
nually and has also contributed through the American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education funds sufficient to provide one scholarship of 
$250.00 annually for students who meet the qualifications stated under 
the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

Henry B. Gilpin Co. Scholarships 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed 
sufficient funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education to provide for one scholarship of $100.00 annually for a stu- 
dent who meets the qualifications stated under American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eager- 
ness for service and helpfulness to others, which were striking character- 
istics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made 
contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this 
fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is 
creditable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below 
B. Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall 
below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by 
the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommend- 
ing a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in 
his judgment of the student's ability as much by observation and personal 
contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of 
approximately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually 
by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 
the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen, Class of 1925, offers a new United States 
Dispensatory as a prize in memory of David Fink, Class of 1924, to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to a senior 
student for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity has provided a cup in 
memory of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, 
who died in the service of their country. This cup is to be awarded an- 
nually to the senior student selected by the Faculty as having exhibited 
outstanding qualities of character and leadership. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

The Kappa Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity has provided 
a prize to be awarded annually to the senior student chosen by the 
Faculty Council for proficiency in pharmacology. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Council 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid tradi- 
tions of the School. The council consists of twelve members, three 
elected by each of the four classes, four ex-ofncio members who are the 
presidents of the respective classes, and a faculty advisor. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society 
is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 
75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

Officers (1948-49) 
President — William Hahn, Fourth-Year Class. 
First Vice-President — John L. Cunzeman, Third-Year Class. 
Second Vice-President — Harry A Santoni, Second-Year Class. 
Secretary — Miss LaRue Voshell, Second-Year Class. 
Treasurer — Robert F. Wolf, First-Year Class. 
Editor— Paul Edwards, Third-Year Class. 

Executive Committee 
William Hanks, Fourth-Year Class. 
Richard J. Williamson, Third-Year Class. 
Gordon Crispens, Second-Year Class. 
John Clark, First-Year Class. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held 
on May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of 
the Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society con- 
tinued its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni 
Association of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the 
organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained 
dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The 
active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers: 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 

Officers (1948-49) 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, Honorary President 

Joseph Cohen, President of the Association 

3740 Dolfield Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Wilmer J. Heer, First Vice-President 

1504 East 33rd Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Frank Block, Second Vice-President 

4007 Liberty Heights Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 

32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 

1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

Joseph Cohen, Chairman 

The Honorary President (Ex Officio) 

Frank Balassone 

William M. Gould 

Mathais Palmer 

Samuel I. Raichlen 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matters pertain- 
ing to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The fol- 
lowing are the present members of the Committee: 

Harry S. Harrison, Chairman 
Marvin J. Andrews L. M. Kantner 

John L. Asbill Harry R. Meagher 

Joseph Cohen Stephen J. Provenza 

Irving Freed Raphael H. Wagner 



22 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 







First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Numper of Course 


a 

a 

5 


>> 

lb 
ce) 


3 

c 


CO 


w 

u 

ctf 

5 


>> 
lb 

3 


3 

o 


2 
1 


First Year 
*Botany 1, Structural 










2 

2 
3 


4 
6 


6 

8 
3 
3 
3 

3 
1 


3 

4 

3 
3 


tChemistry 1, 3, Inorganic and Qualitative 


2 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 


4* 
3 * 
3" 


fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 


fMathematics 10 or 15 






fMathematics 11 or 17 




3 

3 

1 




3 


fModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 
German 


3 

1 
2 

2 




3 

1 
8 

8 


3 • 

1 * 

4 r 

18 

4« 




3 


fSpeech 1, 2, Reading and Speaking 








fZoology 1, General 


6 
6 






Second Year 
Botany 21, Macroscopical 








17 


Botany 22, Microscopical 




6 


6 
3 
4 
8 
5 
6 


2 


tChemistry 35, 37, Organic 


3 




3 

4 
8 
5 


2 ' 
2 « 
5« 
4 » 


3 


2 


fChemistry 36, 38, Organic 


4 
4 
2 


4 
4 
2 
4 


2 




4 
3 


4 
3 
2 


5 
4 
3 


fPhysics 10, 11, General 


Physiology 22, General 




2 


4 


6 






Third Year 
•Bacteriology 1, General 


17 


18 


•Bacteriology 115, Serology and Immunology 


2 


4 


6. 


4 


•Chemistry 15, Quantitative Analysis 


2 


6 


8 


4 * 




Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


2 
3 

2 
2 


6 


8 
3 

6 

8 


4 


•Economics 37, Elementary 










3 


Pharmacology 51, 52, Pharm., Toxicology 


2 
2 
2 

3 
2 


4 
6 


6 
8 
2 

3 
5 


3 * 

4 « 
2 * 


4 
6 


3 




4 


Pharmacy 61, History of 






3 




3 




Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113, Medicinal Products 


17 

2* 
3 • 


18 
2 


Economics 51, Pharmaceutical 


3 






First Aid 1, Standard 


1 
3 
2 
2 




1 
3 
4 
5 


1 


Law 62, Pharmacy Laws and Regulations 












3 




2 


2 


4 


#*• 


2 
3 


3 


Pharmacy 72, Pharmaceutical Practice 


*l 


Pharmacology 111, Biological Assaying 


2 


4 


6 


4 * 
6 










6 




2 


2 


3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 

3 
3 
3 

6 

2 


1 
2 


2 


3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 

3 
3 
3 

6 




Fourth Year (Electives)J 
Botany 101, 102, Taxonomy 


18 

2 
2 
2 

1 • 
2 

3 
2 
2 
2 

3 * 

3 

3« 

2 « 


17 
2 




2 




4 
3 

4 


4 
3 
4 


2 








1 


Chemistry 112, 114, Medicinal Products 






2 


fChemistry 187, 189, Physical 


3 


3 


3 


tChemistry 188, 190, Physical 


6 


6 


2 




2 


2 


2 


•Chemistry 152, 154, Physiological 


4 


4 


2 


tEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 


3 
3 
3 


3 
3 
3 


3 








3 


tMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 






3 


Pharmacy 111, 112, Advanced Prescription 


6 


6 


2 


Pharmacy 120, Hospital 


2 






tZoology 5, Comparative Vertebrate Mor- 




2 


6 


8 


4 








1 







t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

* Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

t The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



23 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


First Year 


32 
64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 


64 
192 


96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
128 


3 


Chemistry 1, 3 


8 


English 1, 2 ... 


6 






3 


Mathematics 11, 17 ... 




3 






6 


Speech 1, 2 




2 




96 


4 






Total 


448 
32 


352 

96 
96 


800 

128 
96 
96 

128 

256 

160 

96 


35 


Second Year 
Botany 21 


4 


Botany 22 


2 


Chemistrv 35, 37 


96 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


128 

128 

64 

64 


4 




128 
96 
32 


10 


Physics 10, 11 


8 


Physiology 22 


3 








384 

32 
32 
32 
32 
48 
64 
64 
32 


576 

64 
64 
96 
96 


960 

96 

96 
128 
128 

48 
192 
256 

32 


35 


Third Year 


4 




4 




4 




4 




3 


Pharmacology 51, 52 ~ 

Pharmacy 51, 52 


128 
192 


6 
8 




2 








Total 


336 

96 
32 
16 
48 
64 
32 
32 
96f 


640 


976 

96 

80 

16 

48 
128 

80 

96 
384f 


35 


Fourth Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113. ... 


4 


Economics 51 


48 


3 


First Aid 1 


1 


Law 62 




3 


Pharmacy 101, 102 


64 
48 
64 

288f 


6 


Pharmacy 72 


2 


Pharmacology 111 


4 




12 






Total 


416 

32 
64 


512 
64 


928 

96 
64 

128 
96 

128 
96 

192 
64 

128 
96 
96 
96 

192 
32 

128 

800 
960 
976 
928 


35 


Fourth Year (Electives) 
Botany 101, 102 


4 


Botany 111, 113 


4 


Botany 112, 114 


128 

96 

128 


4 


Chemistry 99 




2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


Chemistry 187, 189 


96 


6 


Chemistry 188, 190 


192 


4 


Chemistry 151, 153 


64 


4 


Chemistry 152, 154 


128 


4 


English 3, 4 


96 
96 
96 


6 






6 


Mathematics 20, 21 




6 


Pharmacy 111, 112 


192 


4 


Pharmacy 120 


32 
32 

448 
384 
336 
416 


2 


Zoology 5 


96 

352 
576 
640 
512 


4 


Summary 
First Year 


35 


Second Year 


35 


Third Year 


35 


Fourth Year 


35 






Total 


1,584 


2,080 


3,664 


140 







t Average. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures, two laboratories. Shay and Hsie. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the 
study of pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects 
of the prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, second semester, 
two lectures, two laboratories. Shay and Hsie. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and 
use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (2) One lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media — (2) One Lecture. (Given in alter- 
nate years.) Shay. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of bacteriological 
reagents and media. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit de- 
termined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health — (2) One lecture. Shay. 

Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of 
state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The 
courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, second semester, two lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Slama and Pumpian. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of the plant structures. 

21. Pharmacognosy (Macroscopical) — (4) Second year, first semes- 
ter, two lectures, two laboratories. Slama and Pumpian. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, 
with special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identi- 
fication and in the detection of adulterations. 



* Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49 ; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99 ; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199 ; and 
for graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



22. Pharmacognosy (Microscopical) — (2) Second year, second 
semester, two laboratories. Slama and Pumpian. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs and adulter- 
ants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2-4) Fourth year, 
one lecture and one laboratory. Elective for students who contemplate 
taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. 
Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation 
of an herbarium. 

111, 113. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two lectures. Slama. 

Prerequisite— Botany 1, 21, 22. 

Lectures covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis 
placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy — (2-4) Fourth year, two laboratories. 
Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 1, 21, 22, 111, 113 or may be taken simultane- 
ously with 111, 113. 

Laboratory work covering Botany 111, 113. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4-8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4-8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites— Botany 111, 113, 112, 114. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount 
and quality of work performed. Slama. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
(8) First year, two lectures, two laboratories. Hager and Adams. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical 
theory and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with 
fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, 
and the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and 
acid radicals. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (4) Second year, two 
lectures. Hager and Stahl. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (4) Second year, two 
laboratories. Hager and Stahl. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 
A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, first semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Weiland, Magiros and Ellin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and 
their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, sec- 
ond semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Hager, Magiros and 
Ellin. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
of official preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either semester. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of 
glass. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (4) Fourth year, 
three lectures. Hager. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical 
properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2-4) Fourth year, 
two laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemi- 
cal properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2-4) Any one or two* 
semesters. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a 
study of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2-4) One lecture, 
two laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry — (6) Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



188, 190. Physical Chemistry — (4) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously 
with Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio- 
chemical principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

151, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. Chapman. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, 
metabolism, vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. 

152, 154. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (4) Two labora- 
tories. Chapman, Gittinger, and Bryan. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 151, 153, or may be taken simultan- 
eously with Chemistry 151, 153. 

Laboratory exercises mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the 
more important procedures in physiological chemistry, urinalysis and 
blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (4) Two lectures. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (4) Two lectures. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various 
medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied 
to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates 
and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. 
Hager. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hager. 

258. Organic Qualitative Analysis — (2-4) Either semester. Two 
to four laboratories. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic sub- 
stances and mixtures. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

37. Fundamentals op Economics — (3) Third year, second semester, 
three lectures. Cole and Shulman. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, ex- 
change, distribution and consumption of wealth. 

51. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, first semester, 
two lectures and one laboratory. Cole and Shulman. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail 
pharmacies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including 
practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, second 
semester, three lectures. Cole. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special 
reference to the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and 
State laws and regulations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, 
cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition — (6) First year, three lectures. Ball- 
man. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with a 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature — (6) Elective, three lec- 
tures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (3) First year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course: — (1) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture, one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

10. Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, expo- 
nents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial 
theorem, and theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry — (3) First year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who 
do not offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addi- 
tion formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the 
straight line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic 
equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, 
logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second semester, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

Math 20, 21. Calculus — (6) Electives, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applica- 
tions of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple inte- 
grals, infinite series and differential equations. Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math 152, 153. Mathematical Statistics (2, 2) — Prerequisites, 
differential and integral calculus. 

Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis 
and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical 
inference. Illustrations will be drawn from the biological sciences. Given 
in alternate years. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2. French — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prep- 
aration is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (6) First year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit 
for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, punctuation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

Six semester hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying 
the Modern Language requirement. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Translation, grammar, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scien- 
tific texts. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (6) Elective, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 
Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 
Reading of technical prose, with grammar review. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (6) Third 
year, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Bryan and 
Boggio. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances with special reference to the drugs and prepara- 
tions of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first 
semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger and 
Bryan. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (8) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (8) Two lectures 
and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52 and the approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in 
alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (4-8) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation 
with the instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and 
comparative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit 
and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Galenical Pharmacy — (10) Second year, four lectures and 
two laboratories. Allen, Rossberg and Meyers. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Dispensing Pharmacy — (8) Third year, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Wolf, Allen, Rossberg and Balassone. 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



61. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures. Balassone. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special 
emphasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

72. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, second semester, 
two lectures and 48 hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. Wolf, 
Allen, Noel, Neistadt and Lew. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Practical work in drug store arrangement; the handling of drugs, med- 
icines and drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (6) Fourth year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. Allen and Balassone. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special 
reference to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale. 

Ill, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (6) Two labora- 
tories. Allen and Meyers. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

120. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Two lectures. Pur- 
dum. . 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (8) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Purdum and Allen. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes, equipment and 
physical plant arrangement. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (2) One lecture. 
Purdum. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with 
special reference to the original and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (4) Two lectures. Purdum. 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America 
and the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) Each semester. Purdum. 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. 

Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent developments in 
pharmacy. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. Pur- 
dum. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics— (8) Second year, three lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Estabrook and Battey. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of the principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light 
and electricity. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

121, 122. Electricity and Magnetism — (6) Two lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates 

200,201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics — (10) Five lectures. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics — (4) Two lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 188, 190. 

Given in alternate years. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology — (3) Second year, second semester, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Chapman, Gittinger and Boggio. 
Prerequisite — Zoology 1. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet 
the requirements of students in pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 
1. General Zoology — (4) First year, first semester, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Applegarth and Reincke. 

A study with laboratory dissection, of typical invertebrate and verte- 
brate animals, with an introductory discourse on basic biological prin- 
ciples. This course is intended to be cultural and practical with special 
emphasis on a foundation for future related courses. 

5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — (4) Elective, Second se- 
mester, two lectures and two laboratories. Applegarth. 

A comparative study of the principal organ system of representative 
Chrodates with laboratory dissection and demonstration. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books re- 
quired in each course will be announced at the beginning of each 
semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



33 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1948-1949 
fGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Adams, Martha Lovell Maryland 

Amin, Anubhai Harilal India 

Anker, Pierre Maurice Switzerland 

Boggio, Joseph Paul Maryland 

Brown, Carl Harry Texas 

Bryan, Gordon Henry Maryland 

Burgison, Raymond Merritt Maryland 

Edberg, Lawrence John, Jr Maryland 

Ellin, Robert Isadore Maryland 

Gadekar, Shreekrishna Manmohan India 

Grant, Harry Clifford, Jr Maryland 

Hanker, Jacob Sylvanus Pennsylvania 

Hanna, William Melvin Maryland 

Hsie, Jen-Xah China 

Jahn, Elsa Florence Maryland 

Job, Betty Katherine Indiana 

Kapusta, Dolores A Ohio 

Klioze, Oscar Maryland 

Konicov, Monte . Michigan 



Kramer, David Nathan Maryland 

Liu, Wei-Chin China 

Magiros, John George Maryland 

McKinley, James Daniel, Jr Texas 

McKinnon, Cyril J Maryland 

Mupsik, Herman Morris New Jersey 

♦Pasquale, Daniel Mario New Jersey 

♦Peng, Gzu Hsun China 

Perdomo, Cecilia Hartmann.. South America 

Piala, Joseph Wisconsin 

Pope, Louise M Oklahoma 

Schmersahl, George Wilfred New Jersey 

Scigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

Silverman, Teresa Virginia 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Maryland 

Stahl, Kenneth Hottenstein....Pennsylvania 
Tawab, Abdel Salah Ahmed Egypt 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Angster, Jerome Maryland 

Blair, Luther Rhodes Virginia 

Brill, Maurice Ervin Maryland 

Cohen, Harry Carl Maryland 

Crook, James Washington Maryland 

Dougherty, John Herbert, Jr Maryland 

Edenfield, Charles Howard Maryland 

Eichberg, Daniel Moses Maryland 

Exler, Samuel Harvey Maryland 

Freeman, Emanuel Gottlieb Maryland 

Getka, Joseph Francis Maryland 

Glaeser, Henry John, Jr Maryland 

Greenberg, Leon Maryland 

Hahn, William Albert Maryland 

Hanks, Carleton William, Jr Maryland 

Heinritz, June Rose Maryland 

Holen, Mitzie Marion Maryland 

Johnson, James William, III Maryland 

Kelly, Charles Washington Maryland 

Kexel, LeRoy Everett Maryland 



Levine, Milton Maryland 

London, Seymour Lewis Maryland 

Mendelsohn, Ronald Edward Maryland 

Morgan, Lila Miller Maryland 

Nave, Jackson Moore Maryland 

Pruce, Irving Morton Maryland 

Rice, Leonard R Maryland 

Robson, Jeffie Gertrude Maryland 

Rubinstein, Charlotte Harriett Maryland 

Savitz, Melvin Morris Maryland 

Schwartz, Jerome Maryland 

Siegel, Paul Maryland 

Silver, Benjamin Maryland 

Stratmann, George Mervin Maryland 

Wagner, Betty Gayle Maryland 

Waldsachs, Joseph John Maryland 

Ward, Francis Xavier Maryland 

Weinberger, Sally Degen Maryland 

Werley, LeRoy Delbert, Jr Maryland 

Wright, Myron Joseph Maryland 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Allen, Claris Murray Maryland 

Basik, Harvey Edwin Maryland 

Bergofsky, Irvin Jack Maryland 

Borgman, Alice Jean Maryland 

Bosch, Noel Joseph Maryland 

Caplan, Robert Marvin Maryland 

Carter, Paul Milton Maryland 

Cassidy, Elizabeth Clarke Maryland 

Cavallaro, Joseph William Maryland 

Cohen, Morton Bernard Maryland 

Cohn, Melvin Maryland 



Crane, Richard Robert Maryland 

Cunzeman, John LeRoy, Jr Maryland 

Custis, Harry Jackson, Jr Maryland 

Davidov, Marvin David Maryland 

Davis, Alfred Lee Maryland 

Dayton, LeRoy Elree Maryland 

Deems, John Thomas Maryland 

Demarest, Dudley Alvin Maryland 

Edwards, Paul Hubert Maryland 

Eisenberg, Edwin F Maryland 

Evans, Frank B Maryland 



Registered in Graduate School. 
Did not attend entire session. 



34 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fainberg, Edward Maryland 

Fedder, Donald Owen Maryland 

Fisher, Philip Edward Maryland 

Freed, Mayer Nathan Maryland 

Fried, Burton Maryland 

Friedman, Herbert Maryland 

* Fryer, Kenneth Wesley West Virginia 

Gazda, John Joseph Pennsylvania 

Geser, Alvin Nathan Maryland 

Greenberg, Albert Gordon Maryland 

Gronert, Warren Alvin Maryland 

Harman, Richard Thomas Maryland 

Harnish, Robert Antis Maryland 

Hoy, Robert Gordon Maryland 

Jackson, William Benton Maryland 

Kaiser, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Kantorow, Gerald Sol Maryland 

"Keiser, Alvin Maryland 

Kelly, George Leo Maryland 

Kelly, Robert Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Morton David Maryland 

Lachman, Marvin Marcus Maryland 

Lambdin, Edward Clement Maryland 

Leavey, Herbert S Maryland 

Levy, Donald Maryland 

Lindenbaum, Louis Maryland 

Lyon, James Hopper Maryland 

McDougall, Bernard Charles Maryland 

Macek, Walter Peter Maryland 

Maseth, William Everd Maryland 

Mandel, Howard Earl Maryland 

Mazer, Harold H Maryland 

Mittuch, Joseph Emery New Jersey 

Moler, Robert Kenneth Maryland 

Moscati, Adrian P Maryland 



Papiermeister, Joseph Maryland 

Pats, Albert Maryland 

Payne, Harry Maryland 

Petty, Huie Wilbert Maryland 

Price, Charles Paul Maryland 

Pumpian, Paul Allen Maryland 

Quasney, Emil, Jr Maryland 

Raichlen, Isador Maryland 

Regimenti, Vincent John Maryland 

Rosenbach, Hans John Maryland 

Royce, Robert Francis Dist. of Columbia 

Sachs, Sylvan Leonard Maryland 

Schwartz, Henry Maryland 

Sears, Edward Deforest Maryland 

Shapiro, Albert Aaron Maryland 

Shenker, Allan Bernard Maryland 

Simon, Alvin Maryland 

Smith, Rudolph Martin John Maryland 

Smith, William Ward Maryland 

Spahn, James Anthony, Jr Maryland 

Spike, Sidney Maryland 

Stark, Alvin Maryland 

Stauffer, Howard Carl Maryland 

*Steinhilber, Richard Lee Maryland 

Sugar, Victor Jerome Maryland 

Sullivan, Howard Dean Maryland 

Turner, Zach. Ill Maryland 

Urspruch, William Gordon Maryland 

Vodenos, Philip Maryland 

Wagner, Phyllis Linda Maryland 

Warren, Jerome Bernard Maryland 

Weiner, Morton H Maryland 

Williamson, Reinard Jackson Maryland 

Yaffe, Stanley Jay Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Alpern, Edwin Herschel Maryland 

Appel, William Joseph Maryland 

Ayd, John Joseph Maryland 

Bailey, Halcolm Sough Maryland 

Bakas, James Angelo Maryland 

Baranowski, Thomas Leo Maryland 

Boyer, Gary Howard Maryland 

Brodie, Stanley Alan Maryland 

Chertkoff, Marvin Joseph Maryland 

Chick, Stephen Maryland 

Chodnicki, Marion Roman Maryland 

Christopher, Joseph Thomas Maryland 

Clarke, David Champ Maryland 

Colclough, John James Maryland 

Connelly, Mary Wallace Maryland 

Crispens, Warren Edward Maryland 

Cummings, Maurice Thomas Maryland 

Czapiewski, Eugene George Maryland 

Danziger, David Gerd Maryland 

Divico, Joseph Francis Maryland 

Einbrod, Donald Gilbert Maryland 

Esslinger, Robert Richard Maryland 



Esterson, Nimrod Earl Maryland 

Fiastro, Attilio E Maryland 

Foer, Robert Dist. of Columbia 

Frankle, Harold Maryland 

Freedman, Harold Gersin Maryland 

Gagliardi, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Gluckstern, Wilfred Howard Maryland 

Gotkin, Jerry Maryland 

Gould, Clarendon Lloyd Maryland 

Greenawalt, Jacqueline Jean Maryland 

Hammar, Vincent Coy Maryland 

Jarvis, Charles Lindsay Maryland 

Kaiser, Carl Maryland 

•'Kelly, John Richard :... Maryland 

King, Gerald Maryland 

Kokoski, Charles Joseph Maryland 

Koller, Elmer Curtis Maryland 

LeCompte, Donald Griffith Maryland 

Lemler, Stephen Morton Maryland 

Levin, Norman Maryland 

Lichtman, Harry Maryland 

McNew, Frank Henry, Jr Maryland 



Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



35 



Maseth, Earl George Maryland 

Matthews, Layton Roy Maryland 

Meyers. Albert Temin Maryland 

Mulford, Thomas Spencer Maryland 

Newman, Albert M Maryland 

O'Neal. John Leonard Maryland 

Piatt. Marvin Stanley Maryland 

Ravita, Salvatore Joseph Maryland 

Rendel. Morris Maryland 

Robinson. Benno Maryland 

Rosenthal. Herbert Theodore Maryland 

Sachs, Michael Maryland 

Samorodin. Estelle Gilda Maryland 

Santoni, Henry Anthony Maryland 

Sappe, Milton Charles Maryland 



Schapiro, Oscar Milton Maryland 

Schonfeld, Gerald Maryland 

Sirota, Leo Robert Maryland 

Snellinger, John Ernest Maryland 

Sosnoski, Walter Joseph Maryland 

Teramani, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Voshell, LaRue Estelle Maryland 

Voshell, William Frederick, Jr Maryland 

Wanner, George William Maryland 

Walsh, Richard John Maryland 

Walter, James Beverly, Jr Maryland 

Walter, Norman Wallis Maryland 

Williams, William Owen Maryland 

Wirth, Ferdinand Francis, Jr Maryland 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Albeit, Irvin Jack Maryland 

Baer, Adolph Maryland 

Baroti, Ethel Maryland 

Beam, John Howard Maryland 

Benkovic, George Maryland 

Bishop, Davis Nelson Maryland 

-Bolton, Joseph William Maryland 

Bookoff, Morris Maryland 

Boulles, Costa George Maryland 

Bradstock, Alden Smith, Jr Maryland 

Brocato, Joseph John Maryland 

Browning, Thomas Dwight Maryland 

Buck, Robert Lee Maryland 

Bullinger, Raymond Alozsious Maryland 

Campbell, Robert Eugene Virginia 

Chojnowski, Milton Anthony Maryland 

Clark, John King Maryland 

Clayman, Jerome Harris Maryland 

Crispens, Gordon Melvin Maryland 

Crowley. Paul Gabriel Maryland 

Davis, Paul Edward Maryland 

Dembeck, Bernard John Maryland 

'Dubin, Leon Maryland 

'Dvorak, Charles August, Jr Maryland 

Elliott, Donald Brainard Maryland 

Fink, Irvin Maryland 

Fowble, George Vernon Maryland 

-Friedmann, Donald Charles Maryland 

Goldberg, Marvin Bennett Maryland 

Goden, Stanley Maryland 

? Heavener, John Jacob Maryland 

Holthaus, Robert Walter Maryland 

Inman, Thomas Hensley Maryland 

Japko, Albert Martin Maryland 

-Kaiser, John Raymond Maryland 

Knecht, Mary Joseph Maryland 

Kohlhepp, George Albert, Jr Maryland 

Kokoski, Robert John Maryland 

Kramer. Stanley Howard Maryland 

-Kunkel, Joseph Irvin Maryland 

Lane, Edward Milton Maryland 



Levine, Jay Elliott Maryland 

Lichter, Raymond Maryland 

*Long, Norman Louis Maryland 

Lyden, Edward Earl, Jr Maryland 

Lykos, Nicholas Cosmas Maryland 

Macek, Bernard Francis Maryland 

Machovec, Frank James Maryland 

Martello, Herbert Augustus Maryland 

Miden, Julian Irvis Maryland 

Milio, Frank Remo Maryland 

Nadol, Beverly Sonia Maryland 

Naplachowski, Stanley Anthony. .Maryland 

Papiri, Theresa Genevieve Maryland 

Pasenker, Hilda Jean Maryland 

Pearlman, David Maryland 

Petralia, Anthony John Maryland 

Pickus, Sigmund Bernard Maryland 

Rice, Howard Sheldon Maryland 

Ross, Earl Robert Maryland 

Rouchard, Mathilde Dorothea Maryland 

Shellenberger, John Horning Maryland 

Schenker, Philip Maryland 

Schmaus, Henry Edward Maryland 

Schuster, Gerald David Maryland 

Sheer, Lawrence Maryland 

Shifrin, Sidney Maryland 

Silver, Paul Robert Maryland 

Sllverstein, Sheldon Louis Maryland 

Sommer, Werner Joachim Maryland 

Steffe, John Wilson Maryland 

Steinberg, Norman Fred Maryland 

Strauch, Joseph Maryland 

Sfreett, Mechem Eugene Maryland 

'■'Taylor, Norman David Maryland 

Wagner, Howard Joel Maryland 

Wagner, Karl Gordon Maryland 

Wheeler, John Baker Maryland 

Williams, Beryl Lee Maryland 

Wlodkowski, Arthur Matthew Maryland 

•Wolf, George John Maryland 

Wolf, Robert Francis Maryland 



Did not attend entire 



36 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Hurst, Orville Clayton Maryland 

*McTaggart, Thomas Joseph Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Proutt, Leah Miller Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 5, 1948 
fDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Joseph P. LaRocca Dist. of Columbia 



Ramanbhai Chaturbhai Amin India 

Salvatore J. Greco Pennsylvania 



tMASTER OF SCIENCE 



Anubhai H. Amin India 

Kenneth E. Dailey Nebraska 



Melbia Agnes Grafius Pennsylvania 

Leo B. Lathroum Maryland 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Jerome Berlin Maryland 

Martin Rudolph Bowers Maryland 

John Regan Caldwell Maryland 

Joseph Francik Maryland 

Arnold M. Friedman Maryland 

Jerome S. Friedman Maryland 

Herbert Eugene Gakenheimer Maryland 

Gene Natalie Geist Maryland 

Selig Sidney Hertz Maryland 

Joseph LeGrand Johnson, Jr Maryland 

Joseph Krall Maryland 

Meyer Kramer Maryland 



John George Magiros Maryland 

Barbara Idella Marshall Maryland 

Jacob S. Meyers Maryland 

Hans Morgenroth Maryland 

William Louis Pearlman Maryland 

Aaron Rosenstadt Maryland 

Norman Leonard Schenker Maryland 

Irving Edward Shocket Maryland 

Stuart Shpritz Maryland 

Shirley Shulman Maryland 

Alvin Melvin Waldman Maryland 



HONORS 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Shirley Shulman 

The William Simon Memorial Prize John George Magiros 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Joseph Francik 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize William Louis Pearlman 

The David Fink Memorial Prize Jerome Berlin 

Beta Chapter of Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup Norman L. Schenker 

CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 

William Louis Pearlman Aaron Rosenstadt 

HONORABLE MENTION (Third-year Class) 

G. Jeffie Robson Mitzie M. Holen Ronald E. Mendelsohn 



* Did not attend entire session. 

t Degrees confererred by Graduate School. 







VOL 30 



No. 1 



Catalogue and 
107th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 



(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



19504951 



The School of Pharmacy reserves the right to change any pro- 
vision or requirement in this catalogue at any time. The School 
further reserves the right to ask a student to withdraw at any 
time it considers such action to be in the best interests of 
the School. 



32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 



CALENDAR FOR 1950 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 - 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 






MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 
-12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 - 




•• •- 1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 '-• •• 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 






SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 - - 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 & 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 











CALENDAR FOR 1951 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 
-12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S VI T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 







MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


5 M T W T F S 
- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 - - 


S M T W T F S 
12 

3 4 S 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 - 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
IS 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 








SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 - 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 
-- 1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


2 3 4 S 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 


30 31 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR YEAR 

1950-51 
1950 
September 6-8, incl. — Examinations for the removal of conditions. 

First Semester 
1950 

September 18-20 Monday-Wednesday Registration, 

First Semester 

September 25 Monday Instruction begins 

November 21 Tuesday, after last class Thanksgiving recess 

begins 

November 27 Monday, 9 A.M Thanksgiving recess 

ends 

December 21 Thursday, after last class Christmas recess 

begins 
1951 

January 3 Wednesday, 9 A.M Christmas recess 

ends 

January 29-February 1.. Monday-Thursday Semester Examinations 

Second Semester 

February 6-9 Tuesday-Thursday Registration, 

Second Semester 

February 12 Monday Instruction begins 

February 22 Thursday Washington's Birthday, 

Holiday 

March 22 Thursday, after last class Easter recess begins 

March 27 Tuesday, 9 A.M Easter recess ends 

May 30 Wednesday Memorial Day, Holiday 

May 31-June 5 Thursday-Tuesday Second Semester 

examinations 

June 9 Saturday Commencement 

exercises 

Summer Session 
1951 

June 14-15 Thursday-Friday Registration 

June 18 Monday Instruction begins 

August 10 Friday Summer session ends 



Note — A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days 
specified will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00.) 

The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. This 
rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean. 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:00 P. M. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Re- 
gents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each for a 
term of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in 
the President. The University General Administrative Board acts in an 
advisory capacity to the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, which controls the internal 
affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions: 

College of Agriculture Department of Military Science 

Agricultural Experiment Station and Tactics 

Extension Service School of Dentistry 

College of Arts and Sciences School of Law 

College of Commerce School of Medicine 

College of Education School of Nursing 

College of Engineering School of Pharmacy 

College of Home Economics The University Hospital 

Graduate School College of Continuation and 

Summer Session Special Studies 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy, the 
Hospital and a branch of the College of Continuation and Special 
Studies, are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets; the others in College Park. 

Board of Regents 

Term Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman 1958 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 1953 

Peter W. Chichester 1951 

Edward F. Holter 1952 

E. Paul Knotts 1954 

Charles P. McCormick 1957 

Harry H. Nuttle 1950 

Philip C. Turner 1950 

Millard E. Tydings 1951 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1956 

PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc. 
GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 
President Byrd, Chairman, Dean Bamford, Dean Benjamin, Mr. Ben- 
ton, Dr. Bishop, Mr. Brigham, Dr. Brueckner, Mr. Cissel, Dean Cot- 
term an, Dean Eppley, Dr. Faber, Mr. Fogg, Dean Foss, Dean Fraley, 
Miss Gipe, Colonel Griswold, Dr. Hoffsommer, Dean Howell, Dr. 
Huff, Miss Kellar, Dr. Kemp, Dr. Long, Dean Mount, Colonel Pitch- 
ford, Miss Preinkert, Secretary, Dean Pyle, Dean Robinson, Colonel 
schroeder, dean smith, dean stamp, dean steinberg, dean symons, 
Mr. Weber, Dr. White, Dean Wylie, Dr. Zucker. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Noel E. Foss, B.S., Ph.D., Dean 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Secretary 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 
Noel E. Foss, Dean 
Clifford W. Chapman George P. Hager 

Gaylord B. Estabrook Frank J. Slama 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 

FACULTY 

Professors 

Clifford W. Chapman Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Western Ontario, B.A. (1922) ; Medical School, London, Ontario, M.Sc. 
(1925) ; McGill University, Ph.D. (1934). 

B. Olive Cole Professor of Business Administration 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1913) ; LL.B. (1923). 

Noel E. Foss Professor of Pharmacy 

South Dakota State College, Ph.C, B.S. (1929) ; University of Maryland, M.S. 
(1932) ; Ph.D. (1933). 

George P. Hager Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1938) ; M.S. (1940) ; Ph.D. (1942). 

♦Norman E. Phillips Professor of Zoology 

Allegany College, B.S. (1916) ; Cornell University, Ph.D. (1931). 

tW. Arthur Purdum Professor of Hosjrital Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930) ; B.S. (1932) ; M.S. (1934) ; Ph.D. (1941). 

*A. W. Richeson Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918) ; Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925) ; 
Ph.D. (1928). 

Donald E. Shay Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1938) ; Ph.D. 
(1943). 

fj. Carlton Wolf Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905) ; American International Academy, Wash- 
ington, D. C, B.S. (1921) ; Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922) ; (Hon- 
orary) . 

Associate Professors 
♦Gaylord B. Estabrook Associate Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921) ; Ohio State University, M.S. (1922) ; 
University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D. (1932). 

Frank J. Slama Associate Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1924) ; Ph.C. (1925) ; B.S. in Phar. (1928) ; M.S. 
(1930) ; Ph.D. (1935). 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1949-1950. Changes will be noted in sub- 
sequent catalogues. 

♦ Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

t Part time. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Assistant Professors 
Benjamin Frank Allen Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1937) ; Ph.D. 1949. 

*Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1935). 

*Francis Marion Miller Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Western Kentucky State College, B.S. (1946) ; Northwestern University, Ph.D. 
(1949). 

Lecturers from School of Medicine 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D Professor of Physiology 

Frederick P. Ferguson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Edward J. Herbst, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Dietrich Conrad Smith, Ph.D.. Professor of Physiology 

Instructors 
♦John H. Applegarth Instructor in Zoology 

San Jose State College, A.B. (1935) ; Stanford University, M.A. (1938). 

Georgiana S. Gittinger Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

Hood College, A.B. (1912) ; University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

Margaret Wong Lew Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1944). 

Augusta Solodar Neistadt Instructor in Pharmacy 

New Jersey College of Pharmacy, Ph.G. (1913). 

Harriet R. Noel Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1934) ; B.S. (1935). 

*Claire Strube Schradieck Instructor in Languages 

Goucher College, A.B. (1916) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1919). 

Kenneth H. Stahl Instructor in Chemistry 

Carthage College, B.A. (1938) ; University of Iowa, B.S. (1941) ; M.S. (1941). 

Assistants 
MarthA Lovell Adams Assistant in Chemistry 

College of William and Mary, B.S. (1946). 

Francis S. Balassone Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1940). 

*Charles Leroy Beckel Assistant in Physics 

University of Scranton, B.S. (1948). 

Joseph Paul Boggio Assistant in Pharmacology 

Loyola College, B.S. (1943). 

Robert I. Ellin Assistant in Chemistry 

Johns Hopkins University. B.A. (1946). 

Junior Mehsen Joseph Assistant in Bacteriology 

West Virginia University, A.B. (1948) ; M.S. (1949). 

Morton Kahn Assistant in Business Administration and Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1947). 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 7 

John G. Magiros Assistant in Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

*Karl M. Morgenstein Assistant in Zoology 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1949). 

Joseph J. Piala ^.ssistaiit in Pharmacology 

University of Wisconsin, B.S. (1947). 

Paul Allen Pumpian Assistant in Botany and Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948). 

William Charles Rossberg Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1946). 

Library Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Clara Louise Meckel, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Rebecca S. Elam, A.B., B.S.L.A Cataloguer 

Charlotte Wilson Assistant to Cataloguer 

Elizabeth Crouse Library Assistant 

Assisting Staff 

Margaret E. Beatty Senior Stenographer 

Daisy Lotz Gue Stenographer-Secretary 

* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a 
forward-looking group of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in 
the State of Maryland, who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly 
educated and better-trained pharmacists if this rapidly growing phase of 
medical service was to be properly developed. It was incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun in November 
of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of pro- 
fessional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the State University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission just prior to 1856, it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essen- 
tial in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its 
matriculants for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it 
also offers the facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of 
proficiency in the practice of the other branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the 
northwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is 
a commodious six-story laboratory and classroom building especially 
designed to house the work of pharmacy. It is completely equipped 
throughout, and offers every facility for the undergraduate student to 
carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of phar- 
macy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the vari- 
ous fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation 
rooms with a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this 
building. These are equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstra- 
tions in the sciences, with lanterns and screens and the other devices 
commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the vari- 
ous courses in pharmacy; for the several courses in chemistry; for 
instruction in botany and pharmacognosy; for work in the biological 
sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, and pharmacology; for the 
pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted 
reading-room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room 
space to accommodate 12,000 volumes. At the present time the library 
contains more than 11,000 books and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy 
and the collateral sciences. Additional library facilities are available at 
the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors away, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the various 
departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical 
Education as a Class A School, and holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Its diploma is recognized by all 
the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the cur- 
riculum are the same for all students taking this course, but the work of 
the fourth year may be varied within the limits set forth on page 22. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, pharmacognosy, and bacteriology. The degree of Master 
of Science (M.S.) is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course 
who have completed at least one year of graduate work and have pre- 
sented a satisfactory thesis. Candidates for this degree may take all of 
the work in the School of Pharmacy. Candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion of the 
required work in the School of Pharmacy. All candidates for these 
degrees, however, must register in the Graduate School of the University 
and meet the requirements of that School. For detailed information 
concerning registration requirements for admission, etc, see the catalogue 
of the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American As- 
sociation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by cer- 
tificate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a 
secondary school which is approved by the State Board of Education of 
Maryland or by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which 
requires for graduation not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Re- 
quired subjects 8 units, elective 8 units, total 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 8 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agricul- 
ture, commercial drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign lan- 
guages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject 
offered in a standard high or preparatory school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Total, 8 units, of 
which not more than four shall be vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. 
Double laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are consid- 
ered as equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three 
units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course 
has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or 
the Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be considered for 
admission upon presentation of the proper certificate from the principal. 
A graduate who does not fully meet these requirements may be required 
to present further evidence of ability to undertake college work. At the 
discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include an appropriate 
examination. Such examination will be given during the first week of 
each of the months of June, July, August and September at College 
Park, Md. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to re- 
port. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the 
school does not have such quality grade, then the applicant's school 
grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the lowest 
passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school 
who is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through 
either of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of 
Admissions for permission to report at the University for an examin- 
ation, the result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary 
school record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted, or 
(2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfac- 
torily other approved examinations in the subjects required for grad- 
uation from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are 
offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, 
N. J., the Regents of the University of the State of New York, Albany, 
and the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, 
Harrisburg. 

Applicants must be approved by the Director of Admissions, and must 
also meet the admission requirements established by the Committee 
on Admissions of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must present 
official transcript of his high school and college records and a certificate 
of honorable dismissal from the college from which he is transferring. 
If the transcript of his college record shows the average of the grades 
received to be at least a "C" or one letter higher than the minimum 
passing grade, and if he has satisfied all other admission requirements, 
he may be admitted and given advanced standing as follows: 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to 
advanced standing without examination and be given credit for that por- 
tion of the work of the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum 
which he may have completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be 
admitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit 
for the work completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student 
applying for advanced standing from any institution other than a col- 
lege of pharmacy, unless such credit shall be for graduate work in ap- 
plied subjects done in a recognized graduate school or other educational 
institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may 
be equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he 
will be required to take those courses, which the class has completed but 
which he has not completed and such courses will be given precedence 
over the more advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who 
does not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Fac- 
ulty Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary 
training of the applicant is sufficient to permit admission under these 
conditions. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the 
office of the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the 
Dean of Pharmacy. The form must be filled out in full with the names 
of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office 
of the Director of Admissions with the required photographs and the five 
dollar investigation fee not earlier than October first preceding the 
desired year of admission. Do not send diplomas or certificates. The 
Director of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the 
application has been received. Do not make application unless reason- 
ably certain that preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete 
preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the 
study of the profession, a certificate of entrance will be issued. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all stu- 
dents entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file applica- 
tion with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or col- 
lege of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after en- 
rolling, file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an 
application for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said appli- 
cation he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may 
deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, 
shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy 
shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit 
to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore ex- 
perience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office 
of the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. A student entering for the 
first time must matriculate before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Regis- 
trar on the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



student be permitted to enter classes before he has completed registra- 
tion. Students who fail to register on the days scheduled are required 
to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day for 
registration with the payment of the late registration fee is Saturday 
at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the calendar. 
This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 5.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 115.00 

Non-Residents 140.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 35.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) 15.00 

Special fees: 

Penalty for late registration or non-payment in full of fees 

when due 5.00 

Examination for removal of a condition 1.00 

Special examination 2.00 

A student registered for twelve semester hours or more will be charged 
the full fees. A student registered for less than twelve hours will be 
charged on a subject basis at the rate of $9.00 per semester hour plus 
an additional $1.00 per semester hour for courses requiring laboratory 
work. A student given the privilege of registering for more than the 
regularly scheduled work for a semester will be charged an additional 
fee for each extra course. 

In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student 
is required to pay $6.00 each semester (Freshman students $5.00) to the 
"Students' Activity Fund" which is used to defray the cost of extra- 
curricular activities. The expenditure of approximately $100.00 per aca- 
demic year is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, dissecting 
instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Matriculation fee of $10.00. 

General fee of $10.00 per semester hour required of all graduate stu- 
dents except assistants, who will pay a fee of $5.00 per semester hour in 
laboratory courses only. 

Non-resident fee — $12.50 per semester hour. 
Diploma fee — Master's degree — $10.00. 
Doctor's degree— $30.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's 
record. This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

The Matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. This fee and 
a deposit of $50.00 on tuition is required at the time the applicant is 
accepted for admission. This $60.00 is not returnable and will be for- 
feited if the applicant fails to register. Registration of a student in 
any school or college of the University is regarded as registration in 
the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a pro- 
fessional school of the University or from one professional school to 
another, he is required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the 
school to which he transfers. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 13 



A tuition fee of $115.00 per semester is charged a student who is a 
resident of Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who 
is not a resident of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semes- 
ter. The tuition fee must be paid during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $35.00 per semester is charged to cover materials 
and apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later 
than the registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The pen- 
alty fee for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid 
before the end of the semester in which these fees are due. The fee for 
an examination to remove a condition or for a special examination must 
be paid before the student takes the examination and the receipt for pay- 
ment must be presented to the teacher giving the examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be 
rigidly enforced. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will auto- 
matically disbar a student from attendance in classes and from all other 
privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student who is a minor is considered to be a resident student if, at 
the time of his registration, his parents have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

An adult student is considered to be a resident if, at the time of his 
registration, he has been a resident of this State for at least one year; 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least 
one full calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to 
change from a non-resident to a resident status must be established by 
him prior to registration for a semester in any academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with 
the Dean. A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained 
from the office of the Secretary of the School. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parents or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be 
entitled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the School within five days after the be- 
ginning of instruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all 
charges except the matriculation fee and a charge of $10.00 to cover cost 
of registration. 

Students withdrawing from the School after five days and before the 
end of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



will receive a pro rata refund of all charges except the matriculation 
fee and a charge of $10.00 to cover cost of registration. After the 
expiration of the three-week period referred to, refunds will be made 
only in those cases in which the circumstances are exceptional and the 
President of the University has authorized the making of such refunds. 
The $60.00 deposit required of all entering students will not be refunded 
under any circumstances. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic 
record from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so 
furnished, but for each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcript records are of two kinds : 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc. as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regu- 
lar session opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for 
which are given in the calendar in this catalogue, to receive credit for a 
full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the be- 
ginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence 
from class. In case of serious personal illness, as attested by a physi- 
cian, a student may register not later than the fifteenth day following 
the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be 
admitted to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has 
not attended at least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further ab- 
sence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will 
be counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lec- 
ture or laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral examinations are given at different intervals 
throughout the session. Final examinations are held at the close of 
each semester. The final grade of a student in each subject is deter- 
mined by these examinations. 

Examinations for the completion of the courses in which a student 
received a grade of "Incomplete" will be held only on the dates sched- 
uled in this catalogue or on the dates announced by the Dean. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course 
must report to the Dean as soon as practical. If the Dean is satisfied 
that the absence was justifiable, he will give permission for a deferred 
examination. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 



SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the fol- 
lowing symbols: A, B, C, and D, passing; F, Failure; I, Incomplete. 

A denotes superior scholarship; B, good scholarship; C, fair scholar- 
ship; and D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, values in "points" are assigned to 
the following grades: A = 4; B = 3; C = 2; D = l; F = 0. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient 
attendance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course 
without the consent of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is 
required to repeat the work in class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper ex- 
cuse for not presenting himself for examination or for not completing 
the work of any course. It is not understood to signify work of an in- 
ferior quality. It will be replaced by a definite grade when all require- 
ments for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have a grade point average of not less than 1.5 for 
each year's work to be promoted to the second year class, and to the 
third year class. For the purpose of classification he will be considered 
as a member of the advanced class if he has met these requirements in 
not less than 30 of the scheduled semester credits per year, except as 
hereinafter stated for promotion from the third to the fourth year. 

A student must have completed all of the scheduled work of the third 
year with a grade point of not less than 2.0 to be promoted to the fourth 
year. A grade point of 2.0 is also required of the fourth year. 

A student, who fails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of 
the scheduled work, will be placed on probation. A student, who fails 
to obtain passing grades in one-half of the scheduled work, will be 
required to withdraw. 

A student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of 
the work for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than 
five points in excess of the number of credit hours represented, will be 
required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy 
requires, evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct 
of a student in relation to his work and fellow students will be used by 
the faculty in determing the fitness of a student to enter into the con- 
fidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, truthfulness, 
sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority and associates, and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be con- 
sidered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting 
of a degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the 
term, will render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a 
formal rule against the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 22). The 
work of the last year must have been in courses offered in this 
school and must have been done in residence at this school. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
average of not less than 1.75. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND PHARMACY LAW 

The Pharmacy Law of Maryland requires four years of practical 
experience for registration as a pharmacist. The time spent in a recog- 
nized school or college of pharmacy is credited toward the practical expe- 
rience required to the extent of not more than three years. 

In view of this requirement, prospective students are advised to secure 
employment, if possible, before entering the School. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared, if possible, to sustain himself finan- 
cially during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available 
should be spent in the preparation and completion of the scheduled work. 
Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to secure suitable employment, 
but it is recommended that students should refrain from working during 
the school session. The Secretary of the School maintains a register of 
positions available in drug stores during summer and other vacation 
periods. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 
The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharm- 
acist of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor 
of chemistry in the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still 
active, has contributed $1,000.00 annually since 1930 to maintain a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has completed four 
years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude for 
investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Educations offers 
annual fellowships for graduate students who desire to major in phar- 
macy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacognosy and 
who have been admitted or certified as eligible for registration in the 
Graduate School. These fellowships carry an annual stipend of from 
$1000.00 to $1500.00 for full-time work, plus an allowance of up to 
$500.00 for tuition, fees and supplies for students not receiving G. I. 
benefits. Applications should be made directly to the American Founda- 
tion for Pharmaceutical Education, 330 West 42nd Street, New York 
18, N. Y. 

Bristol Laboratories Inc. Fellowship in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

The Bristol Laboratories, Inc. has contributed funds sufficient to pro- 
vide a fellowship paying $1200.00 annually for the purpose of support- 
ing investigations in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship will be 
awarded by the faculty to a graduate student who possesses the qualifica- 
tions required by the research studies to be undertaken. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

The amount of $2,796.50 was collected in connection with the celebra- 
tion of the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the School of Pharmacy. 
This sum will be used to provide two fellowships for research studies 
distributed over the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, pharmacology, bacteriology and pharmacognosy. The selection of 
the recipients of these fellowships will be made by the faculty with the 
approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient 
to provide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for re- 
search in pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellow- 
ship will be awarded for research in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharma- 
cology or pharmacy. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to 
deposit each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a 
research grant, to be placed to the credit of a student selected by the 
Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable 
him to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy 
during the next scholastic year. The research conducted shall be of 
general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication in 
one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The 
stipend for these is $1000.00 for the academic year, and the remission 
of all graduate fees except the laboratory fees and the diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and di- 
dactic work as are prescribed by the heads of the respective depart- 
ments in which they are serving. The usual amount of services required 
does not exceed 14 clock-hours per week, which enables an assistant to 
carry half of a full graduate program. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

Several internships in hospital pharmacy are available annually. These 
are offered jointly by the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School 
of the University of Maryland, and the Pharmacy Department of The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital. Applicants must be graduates of recognized 
schools of pharmacy. Appointments are for a period of twenty-two 
months, beginning each September 1st. Interns devote half time to 
graduate study and half time to work in the hospital pharmacy. Upon 
satisfactory completion of the internship and the course of study, Master 
of Science degrees are conferred by the University of Maryland and 
certificates of internship are awarded by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

A stipend of $100.00 per month is provided by the Hospital and a 
reduction of 259c in tuition fees is allowed by the School of Pharmacy. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many 
years a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who 
was active in pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, 
and who was especially interested in the welfare and progress of worthy 
young people, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry endowed a scholarship to be 
awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth-year student who has shown 
superior proficiency in his or her work in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education will con- 
tribute an amount of $400.00 which will be matched with an equal 
amount of $400.00 by the School of Pharmacy. The amount provided by 
the Foundation is available only to juniors or seniors who rank in the 
upper quarter of their class. The amount provided by the School is avail- 
able to any undergraduate student who, as high school or college stu- 
dents, have maintained a rank in the upper quarter of their class. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has con- 
tributed sufficient funds to provide two scholarships paying $250.00 an- 
nually and has also contributed through the American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education funds sufficient to provide one scholarship of 
$250.00 annually for students who meet the qualifications stated under 
the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

Henry B. Gilpin Co. Scholarships 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed 
sufficient funds through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education to provide for one scholarship of $100.00 annually for a stu- 
dent who meets the qualifications stated under American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education scholarships. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Loan Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eager- 
ness for service and helpfulness to others, which were striking character- 
istics of Professor Caspari, a number of friends and alumni have made 
contributions to establish a fund in his name. Loans are made from this 
fund to members of the fourth-year class upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of 
Baltimore, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available 
to junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is 
creditable, and who has attained the highest general average, not below 
B. Certificates of Honor will be awarded to the three students having the 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



highest general average, next to the winner of the general prize, provided 
this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three stu- 
dents having the highest general average, provided this does not fall 
below B. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by 
the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy for superior proficiency in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommend- 
ing a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry will be guided in 
his judgment of the student's ability as much by observation and personal 
contact as by grades made in examinations. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of 
approximately $1,000.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually 
by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 
the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Phar- 
macy extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 
1882), placed in trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Botany 
and Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen, Class of 1925, offers a new United States 
Dispensatory as a prize in memory of David Fink, Class of 1924, to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to a senior 
student for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity has provided a cup in 
memory of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, 
who died in the service of their country. This cup is to be awarded an- 
nually to the senior student selected by the Faculty as having exhibited 
outstanding qualities of character and leadership. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

The Kappa Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity has provided 
a prize to be awarded annually to the senior student chosen by the 
Faculty Council for proficiency in pharmacology. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Council 

The Student Council is an organization of students established for the 
purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular 
activities of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum 
among students when in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



encourage a class spirit which will reflect honor on the splendid tradi- 
tions of the School. The council consists of twelve members, three 
elected by each of the four classes, four ex-officio members who are the 
presidents of the respective classes, and a faculty advisor. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical 
society, was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters 
for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges that are members in good standing of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society 
is based en high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have completed 
75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
was organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of stu- 
dents in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the 
end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awak- 
ened and guided; and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting their profession. 

Officers (1949-50) 
President — James H. Lyon, Fourth-Year Class. 
First Vice-President — William W. Williams, Third-Year Class. 
Second Vice-President — Howard Wagner, Second-Year Class. 
Secretary — Gordon Crispens, Second- Year Class. 
Treasurer — Vincent C. Hammar, Third-Year Class. 
Editor — Melvin Cohn, Fourth-Year Class. 

Advisory Committee 
William B. Jackson, Jr., Fourth-Year Class. 
Carl Kaiser, Third-Year Class. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held 
on May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of 
the Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This society con- 
tinued its separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni 
Association of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the 
organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained 
dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The 
active membership of the Association is now approximately 600 and is 
growing steadily. The following are its officers: 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 

Officers (1949-50) 

Judson H. Sencindiver, Honorary President 

Wilmer J. Heer, President of the Association 

1504 East 33rd Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Frank Block, First Vice-President 

4007 Liberty Heights Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Francis S. Balassone, Second Vice-President 

140 Denison Street, Baltimore, Md. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary 
32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 
1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee 

Wilmer J. Heer, Chairman 

The Honorary President (Ex Officio) 

Joseph Cohen 

Henry Golditch 

George P. Hager 

Samuel I. Raichlen 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University 
in 1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in 
the advancement of pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing com- 
mittee, known as the Committee on School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this Committee are to represent the Association in all matters pertain- 
ing to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The fol- 
lowing are the present members of the Committee: 

Harry S. Harrison, Chairman 
Joseph Cohen Harry R. Meagher 

Wilmer J. Heer Gordon A. Mouat 

L. M. Kantner Stephen J. Provenza 

J. L. Kronthal Simon Solomon 



22 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


+3 
w 
od 

3 


>> 

ja 

rt 
■J 




H 


s 

>- 

u 


5 


>> 

>3 


o 
Eh 


9 

u 


First Year 










2 

2 
3 


4 
6 


6 

8 
3 


3 


fChemistry 1, 3, Inorganic and Qualitative 


2 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 


4 


fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 


3 


fMathematics 10 or 15 








fMathematics 11 or 17 




3 
3 




3 

3 

1 


3 


fModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 
German 


3 

1 
2 

2 




3 

1 
8 

8 


3 
1 

4 




3 


tSpeech 1, 2, Reading and Speaking 






1 




6 
6 
















Second Year 
Botany 21, Pharmacognosy, Macroscopical .... 


18 
4 


17 


Botany 22, Pharmacognosy, Microscopical 




6 


6 
3 
4 
8 
5 
6 


2 




3 




3 

4 
8 
5 


2 

2 
5 
4 


3 


2 


fChemistry 36, 38, Organic 


4 
4 
2 


4 
4 

2 
4 


2 




4 
3 


4 
3 
2 


5 


fPhysics 10, 11, General 


4 




3 




2 


4 


6 






Third Year 


17 
4 


18 


'Bacteriology 115, Serology and Immunology 


2 
3 


4 


6 
3 


4 


'Business Administration 37, Economics, 










3 




2 


6 


8 


4 






Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


2 

2 
2 


6 

4 
6 


8 

6 
8 


4 


Pharmacology 51, 52, Pharm., Toxicology 


2 
2 
2 

2 


4 
6 


6 
8 
2 

5 


3 

4 
2 


3 




4 








3 










Fourth Year (Required) 
Business Administration 51, Economics, 


17 
3 


18 


Business Administration 62, Law, Pharmacy 


3 
3 

1 
2 
2 




3 
3 

1 
4 
5 


3 




3 




3 


2 


2 


First Aid 1, Standard 










2 


2 


4 


3 


2 
3 


3 




2 




2 


4 


6 


4 
6 












6 




1 
2 


2 


3 

2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 

3 
3 
3 

6 

2 


1 

2 


2 


3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
4 

3 
3 
3 

6 




Fourth Year (Electives)J 
Botany 101, 102, Taxonomy 


18 

2 
2 
2 

1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 

3 
3 
3 

2 

2 


17 
2 




2 




4 
3 

4 


4 
3 

4 

""a" 


2 








1 








2 


fChemistry 187, 189, Physical ... 


3 


3 


3 


fChemistry 188, 190, Physical ... 


6 


2 




2 


2 


2 


'Chemistry 152, 154, Physiological 

fEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 


4 


4 


2 


3 
3 
3 


3 
3 
3 


3 


f Language 6, 7, Scientific German or French.. 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 






3 






3 


Pharmacy 111, 112, Advanced Prescription 


6 


6 


2 


Pharmacy 120, Hospital 


2 






fZoology 5, Comparative Vertebrate Mor- 




9 


6 


8 


4 

















f Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

* Additional courses approved for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

t The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



23 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 



First Year 

Botany 1 

Chemistry 1, 3 

English 1, 2 

Mathematics 10, 15 

Mathematics 11, 17 

Modern Language 1, 2 or 6, 7. 

Speech 1, 2 

Zoology 1 



Total. 



Second Year 

Botany 21 

Botany 22 

Chemistry 35, 37 

Chemistry 36, 38 

Pharmacy 1, 2 

Physics 10, 11 

Physiology 22 



Total. 



Third Year 

Bacteriology 1 

Bacteriology 115 

Business Administration 37. 

Chemistry 15 

Chemistry 53 

Pharmacology 51, 52 

Pharmacy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 61 



Total. 



Fourth Year (Required) 

Business Administration 51 

Business Administration 62 

Chemistry 111, 113 

First Aid 1 

Pharmacy 101, 102 

Pharmacy 72 

Pharmacology 111 

Electives 



Total. 



Fourth Year (Electives) 

Botany 101, 102 

Botany 111, 113 

Botany 112, 114 

Chemistry 99 

Chemistry 112, 114 

Chemistry 187, 189 

Chemistry 188, 190 

Chemistry 151, 153 

Chemistry 152, 154 

English 3, 4 

Language 6, 7 

Mathematics 20, 21 

Pharmacy 111, 112 

Pharmacy 120 

Zoology 5 



First Year 

Second Year. 
Third Year ... 
Fourth Year. 

Total ... 



Summary 



Didactic 



448 



32 



128 
96 
32 



384 



32 
32 
48 
32 
32 
64 
64 
32 



336 



32 
48 
96 
16 
64 
32 
32 
96f 



416 



64 



448 



336 
416 



1,584 



Laboratory 



64 
192 



96 



352 



128 

128 

64 

64 



576 



96 

96 

128 

192 



640 
48 



Total 



64 
48 
64 

288t 



512 



64 



128 

96 

128 



192 
128' 



192 



96 



352 
576 
640 
512 



96 
256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
128 



800 



128 

96 

96 

128 

256 

160 

96 



960 



96 
96 
48 
128 
128 
192 
256 
32 



976 



80 

48 

96 

16 
128 

80 

96 
384| 



2,080 



928 



96 
64 

128 
96 

128 
96 

192 
64 

128 
96 
96 
96 

192 
32 

128 



800 
960 
976 
928 



3,664 



Credit 
hours 



35 



35 



35 



35 



140 



t Average. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology — (4) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures, two laboratories. Shay and Joseph. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the 
study of pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects 
of the prevention and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Third year, second semester, 
two lectures, two laboratories, Shay and Joseph. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and 
use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (1, 1) One lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media — (1, 1) One Lecture. (Given in 
alternate years.) Shay. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of bacteriological 
reagents and media. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit de- 
termined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health — (1-2) One lecture. Shay. 

Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of 
state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The 
courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

BOTANY 

1. Structural Botany — (3) First year, second semester, two lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Slama and Pumpian. 

A course in structural botany (organography) including classification 
and physiology of the plant structures. 

21. Pharmacognosy (Macroscopical) — (4) Second year, first semes- 
ter, two lectures, two laboratories. Slama and Pumpian. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude drugs, 
with special emphasis on the physical characteristics used in the identi- 
fication and in the detection of adulterations. 



* Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49 ; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99 ; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199 ; and 
for graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 



22. Pharmacognosy (Microscopical) — (2) Second year, second 
semester, two laboratories. Slama and Pumpian. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1. 

A microscopic study of the structure of medicinal plants, including 
practice in the examination of the official powdered drugs and adulter- 
ants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2, 2) Fourth year, 
one lecture and one laboratory. Elective for students who contemplate 
taking advanced work in pharmacognosy. Given in alternate years. 
Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 
field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation 
of an herbarium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy — (4, 4) Fourth year, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Botany 1, 21, 22. 

Lecturers and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with 
special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of 
vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4, 4) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 111, 112. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4, 4) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Botany 111, 112. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharma- 
cognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems 
and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount 
and quality of work performed. Slama. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Third year, second semester, 
three lectures. Cole and Kahn. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, ex- 
change, distribution and consumption of wealth. 

51. Pharmaceutical Economics — (3) Fourth year, first semester, 
two lectures and one laboratory. Cole and Kahn. 

A study of the marketing of drug products, the management of retail 
pharmacies, and the fundamental principles of accounting, including 
practice in bookkeeping, banking and financial statements. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Fourth year, second 
semester, three lectures. Cole. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists, with special 
reference to the regulations of the practice of pharmacy; Federal and 
State laws and regulations pertaining to sale of poisons, narcotics, drugs, 
cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
(4, 4) First year, two lecturers, two laboratories. Miller and Adams. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical 
theory and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with 
fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, 
and the systematic qualitative analysis of the more common metals and 
acid radicals. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (2, 2) Second year, two 
lectures. Miller and Ellin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Second year, two 
laboratories. Miller and Ellin. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 
A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Third year, first semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Hager, Stahl and Magiros. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and 
their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Third year, sec- 
ond semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Hager, Stahl and 
Magiros. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
of official preparations. 

99. Glassworking — (1-2) Laboratory, fourth year, either semester. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, sealing, blowing and grinding of 
glass. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Fourth year, 
three lectures. Hager, 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical 
properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Fourth year, 
two laboratories. Hager and Stahl. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemi- 
cal properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Any one or two 
semesters. Miller. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 



Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a 
study of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2, 2) One lec- 
ture, two laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 112, 114. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry — (3, 3) — Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. 

188,190. Physical Chemistry — (2,2) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously 
with Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio- 
chemical principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

151, 153. Physiological Chemistry — (2, 2) Two lectures. Chap- 
man, Schmidt and Herbst. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

A general survey of the subject including a discussion of digestion, 
metabolism, vitamins, hormones and other topics of pharmaceutical 
interest. 

152, 154. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory — (2, 2) Two lab- 
oratories. Chapman, Gittinger, and Piala. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 151, 153, or may be taken simultan- 
eously with Chemistry 151, 153. 

Laboratory exercises mostly quantitative, designed to illustrate the 
more important procedures in physiological chemistry, urinalysis and 
blood analysis. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two lec- 
tures. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, sterols and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaliods — (2, 2) Two lectures. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various 
medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and 
conferences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied 
to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates 
and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. 
Hager. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. Hager. 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds (Advanced Course) — 
(2-4) Either semester. Two to four laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic sub- 
stances and mixtures. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition — (3, 3) First year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with a 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature — (3, 3) Elective, three 
lectures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (1, 1) First year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu 
speaking; reference readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — (1) Fourth year, second semester, 
one lecture, one demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

10. Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, expo- 
nents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial 
theorem, and theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who 
do not offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 



Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addi- 
tion formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the 
straight line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) First year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic 
equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, 
logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) First year, second semester, three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

Math 20, 21. Calculus — (3, 3) Electives, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applica- 
tions of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple inte- 
grals, infinite series and differential equations. Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math 152, 153 Mathematical Statistics — (2, 2) Prerequisites, 
Mathematics 20, 21. Richeson. 

Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis 
and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical 
inference. Illustrations will be drawn from the biological sciences. Given 
in alternate years. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2. French — Elementary — (3, 3) First year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prep- 
aration is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (3, 3) First year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose 
preparation is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit 
for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the depart- 
ment. The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's previous training. 

Six semester hours credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying 
the Modern Language requirement. 

For Graduates and Undergraduates 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (3, 3) Elective, three lec- 
tures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Translation, grammar, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scien- 
tific texts. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (3, 3) Elective, three lec- 
tures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 
Reading of technical prose, with grammar review. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

51, 52. Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics — (3, 3) Third 
year, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger and Boggio. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of 
medicinal substances with special reference to the drugs and prepara- 
tions of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) Fourth year, first 
semester, two lectures and two laboratories. Chapman, Gittinger, Piala 
and Boggio. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (4, 4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 

The application of statistical methods to the problems of biological 
assay and a study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay 
of therapeutic substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (4, 4) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 51, 52 and the approval of the instructor. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in 
alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (2-4), 
(2-4) Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after con- 
sultation with the instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. 
Chapman. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and 
comparative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Chapman. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit 
and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Galenical Pharmacy — (5, 5) Second year, four lectures and 
two laboratories. Allen, Rossberg and Kahn. 

A study of the theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including 
mathematical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to 
the manufacture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Dispensing Pharmacy — (4, 4) Third year, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Wolf, Allen, Rossberg and Kahn. 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



61. History of Pharmacy — (2) Third year, first semester, two lec- 
tures. Balassone. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning with special 
emphasis on the history of American pharmacy. 

72. Pharmaceutical Practice — (2) Fourth year, second semes- 
ter, two lectures and 48 hours of practical work in hospital pharmacy. 
Wolf, Allen, Noel, Neistadt and Lew. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Practical work in drug store arrangement; the handling of drugs, med- 
icines and drug sundries, and dispensing in hospital pharmacies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (3, 3) Fourth year, two lec- 
tures and one laboratory. Allen and Balassone. 

A continuation of the course given in the second year, with special 
reference to the methods employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale. 

Ill, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding — (2, 2) Two lab- 
oratories. Allen, Balassone and Kahn. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Advanced laboratory study of the various methods of compounding 
special prescriptions and galenical preparations. 

120. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Two lectures, first 
semester. Purdum. 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology — (4, 4) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Foss, Purdum and Allen. 

A study of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes, equipment and 
physical plant arrangement. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (1, 1) One lec- 
ture. Purdum. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with 
special reference to the original and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy— (2, 2) Two lectures. Purdum. 
Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America 
and the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) Each Semester. Foss and 
Purdum. 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. 

Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent developments in 
pharmacy. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. Pur- 
dum. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (4, 4) Second year, three lectures, one 
laboratory. Estabrook and Beckel. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of the principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light 
and electricity. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism — (3, 3) Two lectures, one 
laboratory. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics .10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics — (5, 5) Five lec- 
tures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics — (4) Two lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189. 

Given in alternate years. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology — (3) Second year, second semester, two lectures, one 
laboratory. Chapman, Amberson, Smith, Ferguson, Gittinger, Apple- 
garth and Morgenstein. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 1. 

A short course in the fundamentals of physiology, designed to meet 
the requirements of students in pharmacy. 

ZOOLOGY 
1. General Zoology — (4) First year, first semester, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Applegarth and Morgenstein. 

A study with laboratory dissection, of typical invertebrate and verte- 
brate animals, with an introductory discourse on basic biological prin- 
ciples. This course is intended to be cultural and practical with special 
emphasis on a foundation for future related courses. 

5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — (4) Elective, Second se- 
mester, two lectures and two laboratories. Applegarth. 

A comparative study of the principal organ system of representative 
Chrodates with laboratory dissection and demonstration. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books re- 
quired in each course will be announced at the beginning of each 
semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



33 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1949-1950 
tGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Amin. Anubhai Harilal India 

Boggio, Joseph Paul Maryland 

*Bourbeau, Gustave Canada 

Burgison. Raymond Merritt Maryland 

Chow. Lee Ming China 

Edberg, Lawrence John, Jr Maryland 

Ellin, Robert Isadore Maryland 

Glassman, Nathan Maryland 

Hanker. Jacob Sylvanus Pennsylvania 

Hanna. William Melvin Maryland 

Harmon. John B Maryland 

Heller. William Mohn Illinois 

Jahn. Elsa Florence Maryland 

Joseph, Junior Mehsen West Virginia 

Kapusta, Dolores A Ohio 

Konicov, Monte Michigan 

Kramer. Stanley Philip Maryland 



Kregiel, Ludmila Poland 

Langston, Jeffie Robson Maryland 

*Ling, Chi Shau China 

Liu, Wei-Chin China 

McKinley, James Daniel, Jr Texas 

Magiros, John George Maryland 

*Mellott, Margaret Elizabeth Maryland 

Mupsik, Herman Morris New Jersey 

Piala, Joseph Joseph Wisconsin 

Scigliano, John Anthony Nebraska 

Silverman, Teresa Virginia 

Smith, Charles Irvel Maryland 

Spangler, Kenneth Gordon Maryland 

Stahl, Kenneth H Pennsylvania 

: Venditti, John Michael Maryland 

Wajert, Agnes P Pennsylvania 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Allen. Claris Murray Maryland 

Basik. Harvey Edwin Maryland 

'Bergofsky, Irvin Jack Maryland 

Bosch. Noel Joseph Maryland 

Caplan, Robert Marvin Maryland 

Carter, Paul Milton Maryland 

Cassidy, Elizabeth Clarke Maryland 

Cavallaro, Joseph William Maryland 

Cohen, Morton Bernard Maryland 

Cohn, Melvin Maryland 

Crane. Richard Robert Maryland 

Cunzeman. John LeRoy, Jr Maryland 

Davis, Alfred Lee Maryland 

Dayton, LeRoy Elree Maryland 

Deems, John Thomas Maryland 

Demarest, Dudley Alvin Maryland 

Edwards. Paul Hubert Maryland 

Eisenberg. Edwin F Maryland 

Evans. Frank Barton Maryland 

Fainberg, Edward Maryland 

Fedder, Donald Owen Maryland 

Fisher, Philip Edward Maryland 

Freed, Mayer Nathan Maryland 

Fried, Burton Maryland 

Friedman, Herbert Maryland 

Geser, Alvin Nathan Maryland 

Greenberg. Albert Gordon Maryland 

Gronert, Warren Alvin Maryland 

Harman, Richard Thomas Maryland 

Harni>h, Robert Antis Maryland 

Hoy, Robert Gordon Maryland 

Jackson, William Benton, Jr Maryland 

Kaiser, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Kantorow. Gerald Sol Maryland 

Kelly. George Leo Maryland 

Kelly, Robert Joseph Maryland 

Kramer, Morton David Maryland 

Lachman, Marvin Marcus Maryland 

Lambdin, Edward Clement, Jr Maryland 



Leavey, Herbert Jack Maryland 

Levy, Donald Maryland 

Lindenbaum, Louis Maryland 

Lyon, James Hopper Maryland 

Macek, Walter Peter Maryland 

Mandel, Howard Earl Maryland 

Maseth, William Everd Maryland 

Mazer, Harold H Maryland 

McDougall, Bernard Charles Maryland 

Mittuch, Joseph Emery New Jersey 

Moler, Robert Kenneth Maryland 

Moscati, Adrian P Maryland 

Papiermeister, Joseph Maryland 

Pats, Albert Maryland 

Payne, Harry Maryland 

Pumpian, Paul Allen Maryland 

Quasney, Emil Maryland 

Raichlen, Isador Maryland 

Regimenti, Vincent John Maryland 

Rosenbach, Hans John Maryland 

Sachs. Sylvan Leonard Maryland 

Schwartz, Henry Maryland 

Sears, Edward DeForest Maryland 

Shapiro, Albert A Maryland 

Shenker, Allan Bernard Maryland 

Smith, William Ward Maryland 

Spike, Sidney Maryland 

Stark, Alvin Maryland 

Stauffer, Howard Carl Maryland 

Sugar, Victor Jerome Maryland 

Sullivan, Howard Dean Maryland 

Turner, Zach. Ill Maryland 

Urspruch, William Gordon Maryland 

Vodenos, Philip Maryland 

Warner, Phyllis Linda Maryland 

Warren, Jerome Bernard Maryland 

Weiner, Morton Hyman Maryland 

Williamson, Richard Jackson Maryland 

Yaffe. Stanley Jay Mai viand 



f Registered in Graduate School. 
' : Did not attend entire session. 



34 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS 



Alpern, Elwin Herschel Maryland 

Appel, William Joseph Maryland 

Ayd, John Joseph Maryland 

Bailey, Halcolm South ...Maryland 

Bakas, James Angelo Maryland 

Boyer, Gary Howard Maryland 

Brodie, Stanley Alan Maryland 

Chertkoff, Marvin Joseph Maryland 

Chick, Stephen Maryland 

Chodnicki, Marion Roman Maryland 

Christopher, Joseph Thomas Maryland 

Clarke, David Champ Maryland 

Colclough, John James Maryland 

Connelly, Mary Wallace Maryland 

Crispens, Warren Edward Maryland 

Cummings, Maurice Thomas Maryland 

Custis, Harry Jackson, Jr Maryland 

Czapiewski, Eugene George Maryland 

Danziger, David Gerd Maryland 

*Davidov, Marvin David Maryland 

Esslinger, Robert Richard Maryland 

Esterson, Nimrod Earl Maryland 

:;: Fiastro, Attilio E Maryland 

Foer, Robert Dist. of Columbia 

Frankle, Harold Maryland 

Gazda, John Joseph Pennsylvania 

Gluckstern, Wilfred Howard Maryland 

Gotkin, Jerry Maryland 

Gould, Clarendon Lloyd Maryland 

Greenawalt, Jacqueline Jean Maryland 

Hammar, Vincent Coy Maryland 

Jarvis, Charles Lindsay Maryland 

Kaiser, Carl Maryland 

King, Gerald Maryland 

Kokoski, Charles Joseph Maryland 

Koller, Elmer Curtis Maryland 



LeCompte, Donald Griffith Maryland 

Lemler, Stephen Morton Maryland 

Levin, Norman Maryland 

Lichtman, Harry S Maryland 

Maseth, Earle George Maryland 

McNew, Frank Henry, Jr Maryland 

Meyers, Albert Temin Maryland 

Newman, Albert Mayer Maryland 

O'Neal, John Leonard Maryland 

Petty, Huie Wilbert Maryland 

Piatt, Marvin Stanley Maryland 

Price, Charles Paul Maryland 

Ravita, Salvatore Joseph Maryland 

Rendel, Morris Maryland 

Robinson, Benno Maryland 

Rosenthal, Herbert Theodore Maryland 

Royce, Robert Francis Maryland 

Sachs, Michael Maryland 

Samorodin, Estelle Gilda Maryland 

Santoni, Henry Anthony Maryland 

Sappe, Milton Charles Maryland 

Schonfeld, Gerald Maryland 

Simon, Alvin Maryland 

Sirota, Leo Robert Maryland 

Smith, Rudolph Martin John Maryland 

Snellinger, John Ernest Maryland 

Sosnoski, Walter Joseph Maryland 

Spahn, James Anthony, Jr Maryland 

Teramani, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Voshell, LaRue Estelle Maryland 

Voshell, William Frederick Maryland 

Wagner, George William Maryland 

Walsh, Richard John Maryland 

Walter, James Beverly, Jr Maryland 

Walter, Norman Wallis Maryland 

Williams, William Owen Maryland 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Adkins, Robert Thomas Maryland 

Albert, Irvin Jack Maryland 

Baer, Adolph Maryland 

Baroti, Ethel Maryland 

Beam, John Howard Maryland 

Benkovic, George Joseph Maryland 

Bishop, Davis Nelson Maryland 

Blatt, Thomas Harry Maryland 

Bookoff, Morris Maryland 

"Boulles, Costa George Maryland 

Bradstock, Alden Smith, Jr Maryland 

Brocato, Joseph John Maryland 

Buck, Robert Lee Maryland 

Bullinger, Raymond Aloysious.... ..Maryland 

*Clark, John King Maryland 

Crispens, Gordon Melvin Maryland 

Davis, Paul Edward Maryland 



Dembeck, Bernard John Maryland 

*Einbrod, Donald Gilbert Maryland 

Elliott, Donald Brainard Maryland 

Feit, Leon Maryland 

Fink, Irvin Maryland 

Fowble, George Vernon Maryland 

*Freedman, Harold Gersin Maryland 

Friedmann, Aaron Jacob Maryland 

Gagliardi, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Goden, Stanley Maryland 

Golberg, Marvin Bennett Maryland 

Greenberg, Harvey Maryland 

Halpern, Samuel Meyer Maryland 

Haransky, William Maryland 

Holthaus, Robert Walter Maryland 

Japko, Albert Martin Maryland 

Kelly, Thomas Joseph Maryland 



Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



35 



Knecht. Mary Joseph Maryland 

Kohlhepp. George Albert, Jr Maryland 

Kokoski. Robert John Maryland 

Kostas, George Agapioa West Virginia 

Kramer. Stanley Howard Maryland 

Lane. Edward Milton Maryland 

Levine, Jay Elliott Maryland 

Lichter, Raymond Maryland 

Lyden, Edward Earl, Jr Maryland 

Lykos, Nicholas Cosmas Maryland 

Macek, Bernard Francis Maryland 

Machovec, Frank James Maryland 

Martello. Herbert Augustus Maryland 

Miden, Julian Irvis Maryland 

Milio, Frank Remo Maryland 

Morgenstein. Karl M Maryland 

Nadol, Beverly Sonia Maryland 

Naplachowski, Stanley Anthony. .Maryland 

Papiri. Theresa Genevieve Maryland 

Pasenker, Hilda Jean Maryland 

Pearlman, David Maryland 

Petralia, Anthony John Maryland 

Pickus, Sigmund Bernard Maryland 



Pyles, Robert Everett Maryland 

Rice, Howard Sheldon Maryland 

Ross, Earl Robert Maryland 

Rouchard, Mathilde Dorothea Maryland 

Schenker,