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Full text of "School of Pharmacy Catalog 1954-1960"

The School of 

PHARMACY 



1954-1955 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



Of ilnlversitij of Jnariflanx) Publication 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/pharmacy60unse 




p u b l ygSmSK t i o n 



Volume 34 X umber 1 

Catalogue and 
111th Announcement 

The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1954-1955 



IMPORTANT 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of 
Maryland. The University reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of 
residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, 
to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 
in the best interests of the University. 



32 SOUTH GREENE STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 



1954 



1955 



JANUARY 1954 
S M TWT F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 1415 16 
17 18 19 20 2122 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 
..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 



JULY 1954 
S M TWT F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 2122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



MARCH 
S M T W T F S 
.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 1213 
14 15 1617 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

APRIL 
S M TW T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 2122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 

MAY 

5 M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

910 11 12 13 14 15 

16 1718 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

JUNE 

5 M T W T F S 
.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 1011 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 

S M TWT F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 
OCTOBER 
S M TWT F S 
12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 2122 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
.. 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 1617 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 



JANUARY 1955 


JULY 1955 


S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


S M T W T F S 
12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


910 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 1213 14 15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 


31 

AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


..123456 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


27 28 


28 29 30 31 




SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SMTWTF S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


1112 13 1415 1617 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


27 28 29 30 31 ... . 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M TWT F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 






MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T WT F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


15 16 17181920 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T WT F S 


SMTWTF S 


12 3 4 


12 3 


5 6 7 8 91011 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 . . 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



SCH< H '1- I " PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CALENDAR VEAB 

1954-55 

First Semester 
1954 

September 14 Tuesday Freshman Orientation— 

8:30-10:00 a.m. 
Freshman Registration — 

10:30-12:00 a.m. 
Sophomore Registration — 

1:00-2:00 p.m. 

September 15 Wednesday Junior Registration— 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

Graduate Registration — 
1 :00-3 :00 p.m. 

September 20 Monday Instruction begins 

November 23 Tuesday, after last class . . .Thanksgiving recess begins 

November 29 Monday, 9 :00 a.m Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 17 Friday, after last class Christmas recess begins 

1955 

January 3 Monday, 9 :00 a.m Christmas recess ends 

January 22, 24-27 Saturday-Thursday First semester examinations 

Second Semester 

Februarv 2 Wednesdav Freshman Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Sophomore Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

February 3 Thursday Junior Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Senior Registration — 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration — 
1 :00-3 :00 p.m. 

February 7 Monday Instruction begins 

February 22 Tuesday Washington's Birthday, 

holiday 

April 7 Thursday, after last class . . Easter recess begins 

April 12 Tuesday, 9 :00 a.m Easter recess ends 

May 24-28 Tuesday-Saturday Second semester examina- 
tions 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 4 Saturday Commencement exercises 

Note— All students are expected to complete their registration, including the filing of 
class cards and payment of bills, on the regular registration days. Those who do not 
complete their registration during the prescribed days will be charged a fee of five 
dollars ($5.00). 

The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. This 
rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the Dean. 

The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M.. and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:00 P. M. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each year for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. The 
University General Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the 
President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, which controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions: 



College of Agriculture 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
Extension Service 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Business and Public 

Administration 
College of Education 
Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering 

and Aeronautical Sciences 
College of Home Economics 
Graduate School 



Summer Session 

College of Military Science 

College of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 
School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 
School of Nursing 
School of Pharmacy 
The University Hospital 
College of Special and Continuation 

Studies 



The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy, the Hospital 
and a branch of the College of Continuation and Special Studies, are located in 
Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets ; the others in College 
Park. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 



William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman 
Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 
Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer 

B. Herbert Brown 
Edmund S. Burke 
Edward F. Holter 
Louis L. Kaplan 
E. Paul Knotts 
Arthur O. Lovejoy 
Charles P. McCormick 

C. EWING TUTTLE 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 
Dr. Thomas B. Symons, Acting President, Chairman 
Dean Aisenberg, Mr. Algire, Col. Ambrose, Mrs. Azlein, Dean Bamford, 
Mr. Benton, Dr. Bishop, Mr. Brigham, Dr. Brueckner, Mr. Buck, Dean Cairns, 
Mr. Cissel, Dean Cotterman, Dean Devilbiss, Dean Ehrensberger, Dean 
Eppley, Dr. Faber, Mr. Fogg, Dean Foss, Dean Fraley, Dean Gipe, Dr. Gwin, 
Mr. Haszard, Dr. Haut, Dr. Hoffsommer, Dean Howell, Dr. Huff, Dean Long, 
Mrs. Low, Col. Miller, Mr. Morrison, Dean Mount, Dr. Nystrom, Dean Pyle, 
Mr. Rovelstad, Dean Smith, Dean Stamp, Dean Steinberg, Dr. Stone, Dr. 
Symons, Mr. Tatum, Mr. Weber, Dr. White, Dean Wylie, Dr. Zucker. 



Baltimore 


Expiration Date 
1958 


Baltimore 
Denton 


1956 
1957 


Baltimore 

Cumberland 

Middletown 


1960 
1959 
1959 


Baltimore 


1961 


Denton 
Baltimore 

Baltimore 


1954 
1960 
1957 


Baltimore 


1962 



SOU m .1 ( .1 I'll AKMAi V 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



« OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas B. Symons, D. Acr., Acting President of the University 

II. C. r.vKD. LL.D., D.Sc, President Emeritus 

Noel E. Foss, B.S., Ph.D., Deem 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.I... Secretary 

ii. Watson Aloire, M.S.. Director of Admissions and Registration 

Alma II. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar* 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Noel E. Foss, Dean 
George P. Hager Donald E. Shay 

Casimir T. Ichniowski Frank J. Slama 

A. W. Richesox B. Olive Cole, Secretary 1 

FACULTY 
EMERITUS 
B. Olive Cole Professor of Pharmacy Administration, Emeritus 1 

Professors 

William R. Amberson Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine 

Lafayette College, Ph.B. (1915) ; Princeton University, Ph.D. (1922). 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Professor of Physics 

Purdue University, B.S. in Ch.E. (1921); Ohio State University, M.S. (1922); Uni- 
versity of Pittsburg, Ph.D. (1932). 

Xoel E. Foss Professor of Pharmacy 

South Dakota State College. Ph.C, B.S. in Pharm. (1929) ; University of Maryland, 

MS. (1932); Ph.D. (1933). 
Registered Pharmacist— South Dakota, New York 

George P. Hager Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

University of Maryland, B.S., in Pharm. (1938) ; M.S. (1940) ; Ph.D. (1942). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

Casimir T. Ichxiovvski Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

University of Maryland, Ph.G., (1929) ; B.S. in Pharm. (1930) ; M.S. (1932) ; Ph.D. 

(1936). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 



The faculty is listed as constituted during 1953-54. Changes will be noted in sub- 
sequent catalogues. 

♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Retired November 30. 1953 with rank of Professor, Emeritus. 

2 Died February 28, 1954. 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



fW. Arthur Purdum Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Ph.G. (1930); B.S. in Pharm. (1932); M.S. (1934); Ph.D. 

(1941). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

*A. \Y. Richesox Professor of Mathematics 

University of Richmond, B.S. (1918); Johns Hopkins University, A.M. (1925); Ph.D. 
(1928). 

Emil G. Schmidt Professor of Biological Chemistry 

School of Medicine 
University of Wisconsin, B.S. (1921) ; Ph.D. (1924) ; University of Maryland, LL.B. 
(1934). 

Donald E. Shay Professor of Bacteriology 

Lebanon Valley College, B.S. (1937) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1938) ; Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Frank J. Slam a Professor of Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryalnd, Ph.G. (1924); Ph.C. (1925); B.S. in Pharm. (1928); M.S. 

(1930) ; Ph.D. (1935). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

*G. W. Wharton Professor of Zoology 

Duke University, B.S. (1935) ; Ph.D. (1939). 

tj. Carlton Wolf 1 Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, Phar.D. (1905); American International Academy. Washing- 
ton. D.C., B.S. (1921) ; Maryland Academy of Science, Sc.D. (1922) ; (Honorary). 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland 



Associate Professors 

Benjamin Frank Allen Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S., in Pharm. (1937) ; Ph.D. (1949). 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland 

Frederick P. Ferguson Associate Professor of Physiology, 

School of Medicine 
Wesleyan University, B.A. (193S) ; M.A. (1939) ; University of Minnesota Ph.D. 
(1943). 

Edward J. Herbst Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
University of Wisconsin, B.S. (1943); M.S. (1944); Ph.D. (1949). 

*Francis M. Miller Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Western Kentucky State College, B.S. (1946) ; Northwestern University, Ph.D. 
(1949). 

Ida Marian Robinson Associate Professor of Library Science 

Cornell University, A.B. (1924) ; Columbia University School of Library Service, 
B.S.L.S. (1943). 



Assistant Professors 

*Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

Goucher College, A.B. (1926) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1935). 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 
1 Leave of absence 1953-54. 



M ||, M .| . >F I'M \KM.\( Y 



Howard B. Bensusan issistani r>ot'c.s.<.o> <>i Biological 

School >'f Medicine 
Massachusetts Institute -f Technology, B.S. (1945); Purdue i't 
on Unh i rslty, Ph.D. (1 954 > 

Paul A. Pi mpian 1 Issistani Professor oj Pharmacy Administration 

erslty ol Maryland, B.S (1948); B.S. in Pharm. (1950); LL.B (1 
tered Pharmacist Maryland; Member "( the Maryland Bar 

Raymond 1". Vanderlinde 4ssistani Professor of Biological 

Chemistry, School of Medicine 
University, A.B (1944); M.S. (1947); Ph.D. <i:c>0). 

John [rving White 4ssistani Professor of Physiology, 

School oj Medicine 
University of Illinois, B.A. (1939); Rutgers University, Ph.D. (1950). 

Instructors 

Ann Virginia BROWN Instructor, Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
Goucher College, A.B. (1940). 

•Frank A. Dolle Instructor in Zooloqy 

University of Maryland, B.S. (1948) ; M.S. (1950). 

Samuel L. Fox Instructor in Physiology, School of Medicine 

University ol Maryland, Ph.G. (1934); B.S. in Unarm. (1936); M.D. (1938). 

Georgiaxxa S. Gittixger Instructor in Pharmacology 

Hood College, A.B. (1912); University of Virginia, M.A. (1924). 

William M. Heller Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Toledo, B.S. in Pharm. (1949) ; University of Maryland, M.S. (1951). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

Margaret Wong Lew Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. in Pharm. (1944). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

Harriet R. Noel Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland. Ph.G. (1934) ; B.S. in Pharm. (1935). 
-.stered Pharmacist— Maryland, Pennsylvania 

*Claire Strube Schradieck Instructor in Languages 

Goucher College, A.B. (1916) ; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. (1919). 

Mitzie Holex Schwartz" Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland. B.S. in Pharm. (1949). 
Registered Pharmae is t— Maryland 

Johx W. Steffe 3 Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. in Pharm. (1952). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

Louis R. Stezzi Instructor in Chemistry 

Temple University. B.S. in Pharm. (194S) ; M.S. (1951). 
Registered Pharmacist— Pennsylvania 



1 Effective September 1, 1953. 

-Appointed November 1. 1954. 

3 Resigned October 31, 1954. 

♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Eranch 

of the University. 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



William O. Williams Instructor in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. in Pharm. (1951). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 



Junior Instructor 

Jordan W. Kaufman Junior Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 

and Pharmacognosy 
University of Connecticut, B.S. in Pharm. (1951) ; University of Texas, M. S. (1953). 
Registered Pharmacist— Connecticut, Texas 

Visiting Lecturer 

Landon W. Burbage Visiting Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

Medical College of Virginia, Ph.B. (1909) ; Ph.G. (1910). 



Assistants 

♦Mario D. Aceto Assistant in Zoology 

Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, B.S. in Pharm. (1953). 
Registered Pharmacist— Rhode Island 

Allen G. Brickman Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. in Pharm. (1952). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, District of Columbia 

♦Edward B. Brucker Assistant in Physics 

Johns Hopkins University, B.E. (1952). 

Oscar S. DePaola 1 Assistant in Chemistry 

Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, B.S. in Pharm. (1953). 

Kaneo Hirano 2 Assistant in Chemistry 

Nagoya City University, B.S. (1953). 

Robert J. Kokoski Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland. B.S. in Pharm. (1952). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

W. Homer Lawrence Assistant in Pharmacology 

College of the Ozarks. B.S. in Pharm. (1950); University of Maryland, M.S. (1952). 
Registered Pharmacist— Arkansas 

Frank R. Milio Assistant in Pharmacy 

University of Maryland, B.S. in Pharm. (1952). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

Phillip A. Ouellette Assistant in Pharmacy 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, B.S. in Pharm. (1950). 
Registered Pharmacist— Maine 

Philip S. Portoghese 3 Assistant in Chemistry 

' Columbia University, College of Pharmacy, B.S. in Pharm. (1953). 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Resigned October 17, 1953. 

2 Appointed February 1, 1954. 

3 Resigned November 20, 1953. 



SCHOi >l I 'I- PHARMA( V 



John Roskos, Jr Assistant in Phon i 

Southern Collect of Pharmacy, B.fl ba Pharm (19 

Law kin. i miiiu' Assistant in I 

University ol Maryland. B.S. In Pharos (1969), 
Registered i 'harmaclat— Maryland 

Tullv J. Spi \kir Assistant in Chemistry 

■■ ira University, B.S. in Pharm. (1953). 
Registered 1 'harnoaclst— Maryland 

Fi wc;s A. Veltke Assistant in Bacteriology 

University ol Maryland, B.S. (1952) 



Library Staff 
Pharmacy-Dentistry 

Ida Mariax Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Associate Librarian 

Beatrice Marriott, A.B Reference Librarian 

Joanna R. Millett, B.A., M.A.L.S Periodicals Librarian 

Harriette W. S helton, B.A., B.S.L.S Cataloguer 

Alice M. Melvin, A.B Library Assistant 

Mary B. Lowber, A.B : Assistant to the Librarian 

Patricia C. Watkins Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 

Daisy Lotz Gue Secretary-Stenographer 

Margaret E. Beatty Senior Stenographer 

Loretta H. Shelley Senior Stenographer 



* Appointed December 7, 11)53. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, formerly the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, was organized on July 20, 1840, by a forward-looking group 
of apothecaries and physicians then practicing in the State of Maryland, who 
recognized the necessity for more thoroughly educated and better-trained pharmacists 
if this rapidly growing phase of medical service was to be properly developed. 
It was incorporated on January 27, 1841, and the first course of lectures was begun 
in November of the same year. The College continued to operate as an independent 
institution until 1904, when it was amalgamated with the group of professional 
schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. It became a 
department of the State University when the old University of Maryland was 
merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With but one short intermission 
just prior to 1856, it has continuously exercised its functions as a teaching institution. 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, the 
collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential in the 
education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants for the 
intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the facilities and 
instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the practice of the other 
branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical research. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The School occupies the building erected for it by the State at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, in Baltimore. This is a commodious six- 
story laboratory and classroom building especially designed to house the work of 
pharmacy. It is completely equipped throughout, and offers every facility for the 
undergraduate student to carry on the work necessary to acquire a thorough knowl- 
edge of pharmacy, and to the graduate student for the pursuit of research in the 
various fields of pharmacy, and the collateral sciences. 

Four lecture rooms seating 116 to 145 students, and four recitation rooms with 
a seating capacity of 35 to 40 students are available in this building. These are 
equipped with modern tables for lecture demonstrations in the sciences, with lanterns 
and screens and the other devices commonly used in lecture and recitation work. 

The building provides laboratory space for drug milling and the various courses 
in pharmacy ; for the several courses in chemistry ; for instruction in botany and 
pharmacognosy ; for work in the biological sciences, zoology, bacteriology, physiology, 
and pharmacology ; for the pursuit of research in any of these departments. 

The building also provides library facilities. It contains a well-lighted reading- 
room with accommodations for 100 students, and a stack-room space to accommodate 
12,000 volumes. At the present time the library contains more than 11,000 books 
and periodicals pertaining to pharmacy and the collateral sciences. Additional library 
facilities are available at the Medical School Library, which is only a few doors 
away, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the Peabody Library, and the libraries of the 
various departments of the Johns Hopkins University. 

RECOGNITION 

The school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education 
as a Class A School, and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. Its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Pharm.) is offered. The first three years of the curriculum are the same 



S< !i« n >l. < >1 PHARM \* V 11 



for all students talcing this course, but the work of the fourth yeai ma) be varied 
within the limits set forth on page 24. 

Advanced courses are offered in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacol- 
ogy, pharmacognosy, and bacteriology. The degree ot Mastei ol Science (M 
is conferred upon graduates of the four-year course who have completed at least 
one year of graduate work and have presented a jatisfactory thesis. I andidates for 
this degree maj take all of the work in the School 01 Pharmacy. ( andidates for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) may also take the major portion ol 
the required work in the School of Pharmacy. Ml candidal these degi 

however, must register in the Graduate School of the University and meet the 
requirements of that School. For detailed information concerning registration re- 
quirements for admission, etc., see the catalogue of the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the Ami i 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

New students are admitted only at the beginning of the Fall semester. 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certificate, 
or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission' by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by an 
accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for graduation not less 
than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects : Required sub- 
jects 8^2 units, elective 7^ units, total 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra \ l / 2 unitsf ; 
plane geometry, 1 unit ; history, 1 unit ; science, 1 unit. Total, 8^4 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 
general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agriculture, commercial 
drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign languages, mathematics, physical 
geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or preparatory 
school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. 
Total, iy 2 units, of which not more than four shall be vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, and 
constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre-supposes a 
school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and 
for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double laboratory periods in 
any science or vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class exercise. 
Normally, not more than three units are allowed for four years of English. If, 
however, a fifth course has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the certifi- 
cation requirements of the State Department of Education, or the Department of 
Education cf Baltimore City, will be considered for admission upon presentation of 
the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not fully meet these 
requirements may be required to present further evidence of ability to undertake 
college work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may include 
an appropriate examination. Such examination will be given during the first week 
of each of the months of June, July, August and September at College Park, Md. 
Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

tOne unit of algebra will meet the requirements for admission for high school students 
who graduate in 1952 or earlier. 

*The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit, whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Facu'.tv Council be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not located 
in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and should have attained the 
certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school does not have such quality 
grade, then the applicant's school grades must be at least ten points or one letter 
higher than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination : An applicant from a secondary school who is 
not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either of two 
types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for per- 
mission to report at the University for an examination, the result of which will be 
used in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine whether the 
applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on presenting evidence of 
having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations in the subjects required 
for graduation from an accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J., the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York, Albany, and the Department of Public 
Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applicants must be approved by the Director of Admissions, and must also 
meet the admission requirements established by the Committee on Admissions of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission with advanced standing must present official 
transcript of his high school and college records and a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal from the college from which he is transferring. If the transcript of his 
college record shows the average of the grades received to be at least a "C" or one 
letter higher than the minimum passing grade, and if he has satisfied all other 
admission requirements, he may be admitted and given advanced standing as follows : 

A student transferring from a college of pharmacy accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education may be admitted to advanced standing with- 
out examination and be given credit for that portion of the work of the first three 
years of the pharmacy curriculum which he may have completed. 

A student transferring from a recognized non-pharmacy college may be ad- 
mitted to advanced standing without examination and be given credit for the work 
completed in the general cultural or foundational subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. 

No more than one year of credit in time will be given to any student applying 
for advanced standing from any institution other than a college of pharmacy, unless 
such credit shall be for graduate work in applied subjects done in a recognized 
graduate school or other educational institution. 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may be equal 
to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he will be required to 
take those courses, which the class has completed but which he has not completed 
and such courses will be given precedence over the more advanced courses in prepar- 
ing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable classifica- 
tion than he would have received in the college from which he transfers. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the office of 
the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland or the Dean of Pharmacy. 
The form must be filled out in full with the names of all schools attended, signed 
by the applicant and returned to the office of the Director of Admissions with the 
required photographs and the five dollar investigation fee not earlier than October 
first preceding the desired year of admission. Do not send diplomas or certificates. 
The Director of Admissions will secure all necessary credentials after the applica- 
tion has been received. Do not make application unless reasonably certain that 
preparation is sufficient or unless intending to complete preparation if insufficient. 
Ample time should be allowed for securing credentials and investigating schools. 
If the applicant qualifies for the study of the profession, a certificate of entrance 
will be issued. 



SCIKX >!. or PHARMACY 1.J 



REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The- Maryland Pharmacy Law, aa amended in 1931, requires all itudenti enter- 
ing upon the study of Pharmacy in the Mate to file application with the Maryland 
Board oi Pharmacy. The law reads as foll< 

"Any person enrolling a-> a student in pharmacy in any school «>r colleg 
pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file with the 
Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application lot registration as 

a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall he required to furnish such 
information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of 
said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of phar- 
macy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit to the 
said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore experience acquired 
during the preceding vacation months." 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 
All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office of 
the Secretary of the School of Pharmacy during the registration period at the 
beginning of each semester. A student entering for the first time must matriculate 
before he will be permitted to register. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar on 
the days scheduled in the calendar. Under no condition will a student be permitted 
to enter classes before he has completed registration. Students who fail to register 
on the days scheduled are required to pay a late registration fee of five dollars 
($5.00). The last day for registration with the payment of the late registration 
fee is Saturday at noon following the last day scheduled for registration in the 
calendar. This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (With application) $ 7.50 1 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 135.00 

Xon-Residents 160.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 15.00 

Graduation fee ( Senior year) 15.00 

Special Fees : 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including the filing 
of class cards and payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those 
who do not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be charged 
a fee of $5.00. 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

A student registered for twelve semester hours or more will be charged the 

full fees. A student registered for less than twelve hours will be charged on a 

subject basis at the rate of $10.00 per semester hour plus the following laboratory 

fees per semester course: 

Bacteriology $10.00 Pharmacy $10.00 

Chemistry 10.00 Physics 4.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 Physiology 8.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 Zoology 8.00 

A student given the privilege of registering for more than the regularly 
scheduled work for a semester will be charged an additional fee for each extra 
course. 



(1) Effective July 1, 1954. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



In addition to the regular fees, there are other expenses. Each student is 
required to pay $7.50 each semester to the "Students' Activity Fund" which is 
used to defrav the cost of extra-curricular activities. The expenditure of approxi- 
mately $130.0*0 per academic year is necessary for the purchase of books, weights, 
dissecting instruments, and incidentals. 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee of £10.00. This is paid once only, upon first registration 
in the Graduate School. 

Fee per semester hour — $10.00. 

Diploma fee for Master's degree, $10.00. 

Graduation fee for Doctor's degree, including a hood, $35.00. 

PAYMENTS AND EXPLANATION OF FEES 

A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost of examining applicant's record. 
This fee should be sent in with the completed application blank. 

The Matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged but once. This fee and a deposit of 
$50.00 on tuition is required at the time the applicant is accepted for admission. 
This $60.00 is not returnable and will be forfeited if the applicant fails to register. 
Registration of a student in any school or college of the University is regarded as 
registration in the University of Maryland, but when such student transfers to a 
professional school of the University or from one professional school to another, 
he is required to pay the matriculation fee charged by the school to which he 
transfers. 

A tuition fee of $135.00 per semester is charged a student who is a resident of 
Maryland (See definition of resident student). A student who is not a resident 
of Maryland is charged an additional $25.00 per semester. The tuition fee must 
be paid during the registration period at the beginning of each semester. 

A laboratory fee of $15.00 per semester is charged to cover materials and 
apparatus used in laboratory work. This fee must be paid during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 is charged. This fee must be paid not later than the 
registration period for the last semester of the senior year. 

Special fees are charged as indicated in the preceding table. The penalty fee 
for late registration or non-payment of fees in full must be paid before the end 
of the semtsttr in which fees are due. The .fee for an examination to remove a 
condition or lor a special examination must be paid before the student takes the 
examination and the receipt for payment must be presented to the teacher giving the 
examination. 

The foregoing requirements with regard to the payment of fees will be rigidly 
enforced. Failure to meet any of the above conditions will automatically disbar a 
student from attendance in classes and from all other privileges of the School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the time 
of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at least 
one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this 
State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, the right 
of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident status must 
be established by him prior to the registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

The following interpretations or modifications of the above rules shall apply: 



SCHOOL OF PHARMAi V 



(a) The domicile of the wife shall be that of her husband, except in tb 

of ■ minor supported b) her parents, in which event the marital status will not be 
considered in determining the residence status. 

(b) Should the parents be separated, the domicile of the parent who furnishes 
the support shall determine the residence status of the child. 

(c) Should the support of a minor not be furnished by the parent 
guardians, the domicile of the person who furnishes the entire support shall deter 
mine the residence status of the child. 

(d) Should the support for a student be derived from a trust fund established 
specifically for his support and education, the domicile of the person who established 
the fund during the full year previous thereto shall determine the residence status of 
the student. 

(e) Should the parent or other person responsible lor a student be required 
to leave this State for business or military reasons, he shall not be deprived of his 
right to claim residence status it' it is evident that he intends to return to this State 
upon the completion of the special business or military assignment. 

(f) The non-resident status of an adult may be changed upon proof that he 
has purchased and has maintained a home in Maryland for at least one full year; 
that he has become a registered voter of this State; and that he intends to make 
tins State his domicile. These facts must be established prior to the registration 
period of the semester for which this change of status is requested. 

WITHDRAWAL AND RETURN OF FEES 
If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School at any time 
during the academic year, he should file a written request for withdrawal with the 
Dean. A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be en- 
titled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he 
might otherwise be entitled. In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted 
only with, the written consent of the student's parents or guardian. 
Grade designations for students who withdraw are as follows : 

WX — When withdrawing before five weeks and unable to evaluate grade 
WP — Passing, withdrawing after five weeks 
WF — Failure, withdrawing after five weeks 
The matriculation fee is not subject to return. Other fees will be returned 
in the case of the withdrawal of a student durii.g a semester, in accordance with. 
the following schedule : 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal 
is filed in the office of the Dean. 

The $60.00 deposit required of all entering students will not be returned 
under any circumstances. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 
Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic record from 
the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts are as 
follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; for additional 
copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when mare than 
one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged for the 
first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 
Transcript records are of two kinds : 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 

on request, to educational institutions, Government agencies, etc. as 

attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy 

and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any student 

or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy have not been 

satisfied. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have entered and be in attendance on the day the regular session 
opens and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which are given in 
the catalogue, to receive credit for a full session. 

A student may register and enter not later than five days after the beginning 
of the session, but such delinquency will be charged as absence from class. In case 
of serious personal illness, as attested by a physician, a student may register not 
later than the fifteenth day following the announced opening of the regular session. 

Regular attendance is demanded of all students. No student will be admitted 
to the final examination in any subject in which he or she has not attended at 
least 85 per cent, of the classes therein. Further absence will not be excused. 

A tardiness of one-half or more of a lecture or laboratory period will be 
counted as an absence. Two tardinesses of less than one-half of a lecture or 
laboratory period will be counted as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral examinations are given at different intervals throughout the 
session. Final examinations are held at the close of each semester. The final 
grade of a student in each subject is determined by these examinations. 

Examinations for the completion of the courses in which a student received 
a grade of "Incomplete" will be held only on the dates announced by the Dean. 

A student failing to present himself for examination in any course must re- 
port to the Dean as soon as practical. If the Dean is satisfied that the absence 
was justifiable, he will give permission for a deferred examination. 

SCALE OF GRADING 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following 
symbols: A, B, C, and D, passing; F, Failure; I, Incomplete. 

A denotes superior scholarship; B, good scholarship; C, fair scholarship; and 
D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, values in ''points" are assigned to the 
following grades: A =4; B=3 ; C=2; D=l ; F:=0. 

Grade F, Failed, obtained at the close of a course indicates insufficient atten- 
dance to take the final examination, discontinuance of the course without the consent 
of the Dean, or a record so poor that a student is required to repeat the work in 
class. 

Grade I, Incomplete, is given only to a student who has a proper excuse for 
not presenting himself for examination or for not completing the work of any 
course. It is not understood to signify work of an inferior quality. It will be 
replaced by a definite grade when all requirements for the course have been met. 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have a grade point average of not less than 1.5 for each year's 
work to be promoted to the second year class, and to the third year class. For 
the purpose of classification he will be considered as a member of the advanced 
class if he has met these requirements in not less than 30 of the scheduled semester 
credits per year. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



\ student must have completed all oi the icheduled work of the third year 
with' a grade poinl oi not leu than 2.0 to he- promoted to the fourth year. A grade 
point oi 2.0 is also required of the fourth year. 

I: a course is repeated, the final mark in the course is used in determining 
credit and in computing the over-all average. 

To obtain the- grade point average : 
1 i Multiply the grade points by the number oi credits. . 

2) Divide the resulting product by the sum of the total credits carried. 

In computing scholastic average, only those courses taken in residence at the 

School oi Pharmacy will be considered. 

\ student who tails to obtain passing grades in less than four-fifths of the 
scheduled work, will he placed on probation. A student, who fads to obtain passing 
grades in one-half of the scheduled work, will be required to withdraw. 

\ student on probation, who fails to obtain passing grades in all of the work 
for which he is scheduled with a grade count of not less than five points in excess 
of the number of credit hours represented, will be required to withdraw. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of pharmacy demands, and the School of Pharmacy requires, 
evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of a student in 
relation to his work and fellow students will be used by the faculty in determining 
the fitness of a student to enter into the confidence of the community as a profes- 
sional man. Integrity, truthfulness, sobriety, temperate habits, respect for authority 
and associates, and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be 
considered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a 
degree. 

Any offense against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the term, will 
render a student liable to disciplinary action, whether or not a formal rule against 
the offense has been published. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will be 
conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum (see page 24). The work of 
the last year must have been in courses offered in this school and must have 
been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point average of 
not less than 1.75. 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration to 
those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Pharmacy. 
Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty-one years, 
is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has completed one 
year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board 
of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of 
registration. 

A student may not obtain credit for practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or college 
of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. Effective 
January 1, 1957, four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a 
registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board 
for such purposes. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 2411 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 18, Maryland, for further 
information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should come prepared if possible, to sustain himself financially 
during the entire period of attendance, as all of the time available should be spent 
in the preparation and completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a 
number of opportunities to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended 
that students should refrain from working during the school session. The Secre- 
tary of the School maintains a register of positions available in drug stores during 
summer and other vacation periods. 

HOUSING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any housing or living accom- 
modations on the campus of the School of Pharmacy. However, the Secretary 
has on file a list of available rooms. In addition, there are the usual living 
accommodations offered by the Y. M. C. A. and other similar organizations. 

PARKING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on university 
parking lots for students. 

LIBRARY REGULATIONS 

Loan Regulations: 

Loan periods have been established according to demand for and protection 
o: books, journals and other materials: 

Reserve Books: 4 p. m.-ll a. m. Advance reserves accepted, but no 

renewals. 
Current Journals : One-day circulation for latest issue ; others, two weeks. 
Reference Books : Use in library only for specified reference material. 
All Other Books and Journals: Two weeks (plus one renewal of two 
weeks). 

Fines : 

Fines are imposed to assure that all students may have equal access to books : 
Reserve Books: 15$ for first hour; 54 for each additional hour, or fraction 

thereof. 
Other Loans : 5$ per day. 

Lost Books: List price of the book. (Losses should be reported im- 
mediately.) 

All books must be returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines paid 
before a student can finish the year in good standing. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, the well-known retail and manufacturing pharmacist 
of Baltimore, who was for a number of years associate professor of chemistry in 
the School, and whose interest in his Alma Mater is still active, has contributed 
$1,000.00 annually since 1930 to maintain a research fellowship in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. This fellowship is awarded annually to a student in pharmacy who has 
completed four years of college work, and who gives evidence of a special aptitude 
for investigational work in pharmaceutical chemistry. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 19 



American Foundation ro» Pharmaceutical Education Fello* bip« 

The \merican Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual fellow- 
ships for graduate students who desire to major in pharmacy, pharmaceutKal 
i ein stn pharmacolog) and pharmacognosy and who have been admitted or certified 
as eligible for registration in the Graduate School. These fellowships carry an 
annual stipend of from $1000.00 to $1500.00 for full time work, plus an allowance of 
up to $500.00 for tuition, fees and supplies for students not receiving G. I. benefits. 

Applications should be made directly to the American Foundation lor Pharmaceutical 
Education, 1507 M Street, N. VV., Washington 5, D. C. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

The amount o\ S2.796.50 was collected in connection with the celebration of 
the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the School of Pharmacy. This sum 
w 11 be used to provide two fellowships for research studies distributed over the 
following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, bacteriology 
and pharmacognosy. The selection of the recipients of these fellowships will be 
made by the faculty with the approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Co., of New York, has contributed funds sufficient to pro- 
vide a fellowship paying $1,000.00 annually for two years for research in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. This fellowship will be awarded for 
research, in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology or pharmacy. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy has agreed to deposit 
each year the sum of $100.00 with the School of Pharmacy as a research grant, to 
be placed to the credit of a student selected by the Committee on the Research 
Grant of the Alumni Association to enable him to engage in pharmaceutical research 
in the School of Pharmacy during the next scholastic year. The research conducted 
shall be of general pharmaceutical interest, and shall be submitted for publication 
in one of the pharmaceutical journals when completed and accepted. 

Assistantships 

A number of assistantships have been established by the School. The stipend 
for these is $1200.00 for the ten month academic year, and the remission of all 
graduate fees except the matriculation fee and the diploma fee. 

Assistants are required to render such service in laboratory and didactic work 
as are prescribed by the heads of the respective departments in which they are 
serving. The usual amount of services required does not exceed 14 clock-hours 
per week, which enables an assistant to carry two-thirds of a full graduate program. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

Several internships in hospital pharmacy are available annually. These are 
offered jointly by the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the 
University of Maryland, and the Pharmacy Department of The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Applicants must be graduates of recognized schools of pharmacy. Ap- 
pointments are for a period of twenty-two months, beginning each September 1st. 
Interns devote half time to graduate study and half time to work in the hospital 
pharmacy. Upon satisfactory completion of the internship and the course of study, 
Master of Science degrees are conferred by the University of Maryland and 
certificates of internship are awarded by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A stipend of $150.00 per month is provided by the Hospital and a reduction of 
25% in tuition fees is allowed by the School of Pharmacy. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing inquiries 
to the Chief Pharmacist, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 5, Maryland, or 
the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, who was for many years 
a loyal member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, who was active in 
pharmaceutical affairs in Maryland and neighboring states, and who was especially 
interested in the welfare and progress of worthy young people, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry endowed a scholarship to be awarded annually by the faculty to a fourth- 
year student who has shown superior proficiency in his or her work in practical 
and commercial pharmacy. The award amounts to approximately $100.00. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education will contribute an 
amount of $400.00 which will be matched with an equal amount of $400.00 by the 
School of Pharmacy. The amount provided by the Foundation is available only to 
juniors or seniors who rank in the upper quarter of their class. The amount pro- 
vided by the School is available to any undergraduate student who, as high school 
or college students, have maintained a rank in the upper quarter of their class. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, has contributed 
sufficient funds to provide several scholarships paying $100.00 per semester and has 
also contributed through the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
funds sufficient to provide one scholarship of $250.00 annually for students who meet 
the qualifications stated under the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion scholarships. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., a former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, and in keeping with the modesty, lack of ostentation, eagerness for service 
and helpfulness to others, which were striking characteristics of Professor Caspari, 
a number of friends and alumni have made an endowment fund in his name. 

L. Manuel Hendler Loan Fund 

On March 7, 1932, there was established by Mr. L. Manuel Hendler, of Balti- 
more, a fund to be loaned to needy students. This fund is available to undergrad- 
uate students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recommendation of 
the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 
School Awards 

General — A gold medal will be awarded annually to the candidate for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, whose deportment is creditable, and who has 
attained the highest general average, not below B. Certificates of Honor will be 
awarded to the three students having the highest general average, next to the 
winner of the general prize, provided this does not fall below B. 

Third Year — Honorable Mention will be made of the first three students hav- 
ing the highest general average, provided this does not fall below B. 

Only those courses taken in the University of Maryland will be considered in 
awarding honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years professor of chemistry 
in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal will be awarded by the Faculty to a 
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for" superior proficiency 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY -'1 



in the field of practical and analytical chemistry, The recipient must itand high 
in all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, the prof I 

chemistry will be guided in his judgment ol the student]* ability as much by 
observation and personal contact as by grades made in examinations. 

I'm Andrew o. DuMez Mi dal 

In memory of Dr, Andrew O. DuMez, a scientist and educator, who for 
twenty-two years was dean and professor of pharmacy in the School of Pharmacy, 
Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a sold medal to be awarded by the faculty 
to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, for superior 
proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams (Class of 1909) placed in trust the sum of ap- 
proximately §1,000,00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the Faculty 
oi the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having the highest general average 
throughout the course in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of the assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich (Class of 1882), placed in 
trust the sum of $500.00, the income therefrom to be awarded annually by the 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student who has done exceptional 
work throughout the course in Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen, Class of 1925, offers a new United States Dispensatory 
as a prize in memory of David Fink, Class of 1924, to be awarded annually by the 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to a senior student for proficiency in the genera] 
practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity has provided a cup in memory 
of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in the 
service of their country. This cup is to be awarded annually to the senior student 
selected by the Faculty as having exhibited outstanding qualities of character and 
leadership. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

The Kappa Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity has provided a prize 
to be awarded annually to the senior student chosen by the Faculty Council for 
proficiency in pharmacology. 

Merck Awards 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offers a set of valuable 
reference books to" the senior student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. 
A second set of books is given to the senior student who has a high standing 
in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories Inc. Award 

_ A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" has been made available by the 
Bristol Laboratories Inc. as an award to the senior student who has contributed the 
most to pharmacy through his extra-curricular activities. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students established for 
the purpose of supervising in a general way the social and extra-curricular activities 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of the student body, to assist in maintaining a proper decorum among students when 
in attendance upon instruction, and to foster and encourage a class spirit which will 
reflect honor on the splendid traditions of the School. The Executive Council is 
composed of the officers of the Student Government Alliance, the presidents of the 
Senior, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman classes, the Editor of the Terra Mariae, 
one representative elected by the fraternities, one representative elected by the soror- 
ity, four delegates at large (one to be elected from each class) and a Faculty 
Advisory Council consisting of the Dean and the four Class Advisers. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron chapter of the Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of 
this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges that are members 
in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility 
for membership in the Society is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, 
personality, and leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have 
completed 75 credit hours of college work, and must be approved by the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November, 1935. 

The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the participation of students in 
the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association to the end that their 
interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awakened and guided ; and to 
familiarize them with the conditions existing in and the problems confronting their 
profession. 

Officers (1953-54) 

President — Donald Helinski — Senior Class 

1st Vice-President — James Kdelen— Junior Class 

2nd Vice-President — William Grossman — Sophomore Class 

Secretary — Jonas Yousem— Senior Class 

Treasurer — Rudolph Winternitz — Senior Class 

Editor — Stuart Brager — Senior Class 

Executive Committee 

Frank Wesolowski — Sophomore Class 

Walter Zajac — Senior Class 

Edward Williams — Junior Class 

Faculty Advisor— Mr. Paul A. Pumpian 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association has been 
organized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

The purpose of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal 
manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance 
with the objectives stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, especially in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all 
of its branches and its applications and aiding in promoting the public health and 
welfare. 

Officers (1953-54) 

President— Robert Sinker— Senior Class 

Vice-President— Alan Settler— Junior Class 

Secretary— JoAnne Sandbower— Junior Class 

Treasurer— Dr. George P. Hager 

Faculty Advisor— Mr. Paul A. Pumpian 



SCHOOL OF PHARMAi Y 



ALUMNI ASSOCIA1 ION 

Alumni Association or mi School 01 Phaemacv 

or mi. University oi Maryland 

a meeting oi the graduates ol the School oi Pharmacy oi the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College oi Pha macy, was held on May 15. 1871. At 
this meeting there was organized tin- Society oi the Alumni oi the Maryland 
College oi Pharmacy. This society continued it> separate existence as *ueh or a-> 

the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, when 
the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was formed. 
Following the organization of the General Ahimni Association, the Society remained 
dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The active m 
ship of the Association is now approximately 600 and is growing steadily. The 
following are its officers : 

Officers I 1953-54) 

B. Olive Cole. Honorary President 

Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr.. President of the Association 

3300 Greenmount Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Louis Davidov, First Vice-President 

5117 Roland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Gordon Mouat, Second Vice-President 

3300 Greenmount Avenue, Baltimore Md. 

George P. Hager, Secretary 

32 S. Greene St.. Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, Treasurer 

1202 Argonne Drive, Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committer 

Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr., Chairman 

The Honorary President {Ex Officio) 

Samuel I. Raichlen 

Norman J. Levin 

Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 

George J. Stiffman 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in order to assist in advancement of 
pharmaceutical education, appointed a standing committee, known as the Committee 
on School of Pharmacy. The duties of this Committee are to represent the Asso- 
ciation in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical 
education. The following are the present members of the Committee : 

Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr., Chairman 

Lloyd N. Richardson, Co-Chairman 
F. Jackson Andrews L. M. Kantner 

C. D. Moon Simon Solomon 

James P. Cragg, Jr. Leo Muth 

John A. Crozier Howard L. Gordy 

Lester R. Martin 



24 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


o 

V 

08 

5 


>> 


"3 
o 
H 


9 

1 


'■S 

Q 

9 

5 




3 

o 




Freshman Year 
tChemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic and 


2 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 


4 




3 














3 
3 




3 

3 

1 


3 


{Modern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 

1 
2 




3 

1 
8 


3 

1 
4 




3 








1 




6 








2 


3 


5 


3 


Sophomore Year 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 

4 
7 
5 


18 

4 
2 

2 
5 

4 


17 




3 




3 

4 
7 
5 

7 


2 


tChemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 


4 
3 
2 


4 
3 
2 
3 


2 




4 
3 


4 
3 
4 




tPhysic6 10, 11, General 


4 






Junior Year 


2 


4 


6 


17 
4 


18 




2 
2 


4 
6 


6 

8 


4 


Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 










4 




4 
2 
2 

1 


4 
5 
6 


8 

7 
8 
1 


5 

4 
4 
1 






2 
2 


5 

6 


7 
8 


4 




4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 


3 
3 




3 
3 


3 


Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 


3 

1 
3 
2 

1 




3 
1 
7 
5 

4 


18 
2 




19 
2 


First Aid 1, Standard .... 










4 
3 
3 


4 
3 
2 


3 

2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacy 101, 102, Advanced Dispensing 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 62, Pharmacy 


3 




3 


3 










7 
18 

3 




5 


(Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 


2 


3 


5 








17 




3 
2 




3 

r 
5 


3 


or 










o 
3 


3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Adminis- 


2 

2 
2 




2 

r 
2 
2 


2 

2 
2 




or 


o 


























2 

3 

3 
3 




2 

3 

3 
3 

3 

4 


2 


(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
fEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 


3 

3 
3 




3 

3 
3 

3 

4 


3 

3 
3 

1 

2 




3 


or 
fLanguage 6, 7, Intermediate Scientific German 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 




3 






3 


(Electives — Special Cases) 


3 

4 


3 
4 


1 


Chemistry 112, 114, Chemistry of Medicinal 




2 






1 







t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
j The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



25 



CURRICULUM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS \NH < 1:1.1)11 S 



Cor 


Didactic 


Lahor.. 


Total 


Credit 
hour* 


1 i;i MINI w Y; \K 

Chemistry 1, 3 

English 1 2 


64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
64 


192 


256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 

208 


8 








:i 






3 






6 






2 


Zoology 1, 4 


H4 


7 


Total 

Sophomore Year 


448 

32 
96 


336 

96 


784 

128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 


35 

4 


Chemistry 35, 37 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


128 
96 
64 

48 


4 




128 
96 
64 


10 


Physics 10, 11 


8 
5 






Total 

Junior Year 


416 

32 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
16 
48 


432 

64 
64 
96 
64 
160 
192 


848 

96 

96 

128 

128 

224 

256 

16 

48 


35 
4 




4 




4 


Chemistry 153 


5 




8 


Pharmacy 51, 52 


8 

1 




3 








Total 


352 

96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224t 


640 


992 

96 

16 
224 
160 

64 

48 
384t 


37 


Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113 


4 


First Aid 






Pharmacology 81, 82 


128 
96 
48 


8 


Pharmacy 101, 102 


6 




2 




3 




1601 


12 






Total 


560 

32 
48 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 

96 
96 
96 


432 

48 


992 

80 
48 
80 
32 
32 
32 
32 

96 
96 
96 

96 
128 

784 
848 
992 
992 


35 


(Electiyes — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61 


3 


Pharmacognosy 62 or 


3 


Pharmacy 132 


48 


3 




o 


Pharmacy 81 




2 






2 






o 


(Electiyes — Pre-Graduate Major)) 
English 3, 4 or 




6 






6 


Mathematics 20, 21 




6 


(Electiyes — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99 


96 
128 

336 
432 

640 
432 


2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


SUMMARY' 
Freshman Year 


448 
416 
352 
560 


35 


Sophomore Year 


35 


Junior Year. 


37 


Senior Year 


35 






Total 


1,776 


1,840 


3.616 


142* 







t Average. 

* A minimum of 140 credits required for graduation. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 
BACTERIOLOGY 

1. Bacteriology, General — (4) Junior year, first semester, two lectures, two 
laboratories. Shay and Veltre. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the prevention 
and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Junior year, second semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories, Shay and Veltre. 

Prerequisite — Bacteriology 1. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (1, 1) One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) 
Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media — (1, 1) One Lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of bacteriological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health— (1-2) One lecture. Shay. 
Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of state and 
municipal health departments and private health agencies. The courses will also 
include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. Miller and Sheer. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, 
the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis 
of the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry— (2, 2) Sophomore year, two 
lectures. Miller and Speaker. 

, Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) Sophomore year, one lab- 
oratory. Miller and Speaker. 

*Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49- for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 
A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Qi \\rii\im Analysis (4) Sophomore year, first semester, two led 
and two laboratories. Hager, >tc// ; , and ftirano, 
Prerequisite— Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and their 
application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53, Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Junior year, second set 

ter. two lectures and two laboratories. Hager, Stczzi and Ilirano. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of 
official preparations. 

99. GLASSWORKING — (1-1) Laboratory, senior year, either semester. Hager. 
Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the bending, heating and blowing of glass, repair and 
construction of apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, three 
lectures. Hager and Stezzi. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, S3. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical properties 
of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, two lab- 
oratories. Hager and Stezzi. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical prop- 
erties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Any one or two semesters. 
Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 37, 38, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a study of 
the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic 
compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2, 2) One lecture, two 
laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. 
The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry— ( 5 ) Junior year, first semester, four lectures 
and one laboratory. Schmidt, Herbst, Yanderline, and Brown. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living organisms 
and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry— (3, 3)— Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic 
theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



188, 190. Physical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two lectures. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, steroids and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (2, 2) Two lectures. Hager. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically active 
bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and con- 
ferences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal 
chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis— (1-4) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to official, 
proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. Hager. 
Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. Hager and Miller. 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds (Advanced Course) — (2-4) 
Either semester. Two to four laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances and 
mixtures. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition— (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with a historical 
study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature — (3, 3) Elective, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign classics 
being read in translation. 



SCHOi »I. I IF PHARMACY 29 



SPEECH 

1. _\ Public Sh \ki\<. (1,1) Freshman year, one lecture. Ballma 

The principles ami techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; I 

ration and delivery oi > ; ■ hes; impromptu speaking; refer* 

readings, short reports, etc 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course— Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one 

demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Cliaptt r of the American Red I 

MATHEMATICS 

0. BASIC Mathematics — (0) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the 
qualifying examination for this course. 

The fundamental principles of algebra. 

10. Algebra — (3) Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and 
radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial theorem, and theory 
of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not 
offer one-half unit of 'trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addition formulas, 
solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic 
sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic equations, 
theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, logarithms, determinants 
and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second semester three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation 
of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and 
solid analytic geometry. 

20. 21. Calculus— (3, 3) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, 
curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applications of integration, 
partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

152, 153. Mathematical Statistics— (2, 2) Prerequisite, Mathematics 20, 21. 
Richeson. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis and corre- 
lation, theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical inference. Illustrations 
will be drawn from the biological sciences. Given in alternate years. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2. French— Elementary — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Not offered 1953-54. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The 
assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Rapid grammar review, exercises in pronunciation, reading of scientific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 
Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 
Grammar and the reading of technical prose. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, first semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Slama and Kaufman. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude vegetable drugs 
with special emphasis on the physician and microscopical characteristics used in 
their identification and in the detection of adulteration. 

52. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, second semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Slama and Kaufman. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, Pharmacognosy 51. 
A continuation of pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering animal drugs, 
antibiotics and allergy-producing pollens. 

61. Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists — (3). Senior year, first 
semester, two lectures and one laboratory. Slama and Kaufman. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and 
the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops ; their recogni- 
tion, life history, habits and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products — (3). Senior year, second 
semester, three lectures. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Physiology 22, Pharmacology 81. 

A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2, 2) One lecture and one 
laboratory. Given in alternate years. Slama. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMAi Y 31 



Prerequisite Pharmacognosy 51, 

A study oi the kindi of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work (in local flora. Instruction will be given >" ,lu ' preparation of an herbarium. 

111,112. Plant Anatomy (4,4) Two lectures and two laboratories. Slama. 
Prerequisite Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with 5] 
emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201. 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— (4, 4) Two lectures and 
two laK i] atories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and micro- 
chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of adulterants. 
Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy— (4, 4) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A btudy of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount and quality 
of work performed. Slama. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81. 82. Pharmacology, General — (4, 4). Senior year, three lectures and one 
laboratory. Ichniowski, Gittinger, Lawrence, and Roskos. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, including methods of biological assay, with special reference to the 
drugs and preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Form- 
ulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Ichniow : ski and Gittinger. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (4, 4) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 

A study of the more important unofficial methods for the assay of therapeutic 
substances. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies ix Pharmacodynamics — (4, 4) Lectures, assign- 
ments and two laboratories. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82 and the approval of the instructor. 

The methods involved in pharmacological analysis and in the determination of 
the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. Given in alternate year;. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (2-4), (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and comparative 
standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Ichniowski. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Pharmacy, General — (5, 5) Sophomore year, four lectures and one 
laboratory. Foss, Allen, Heller and Brickman. 

A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical 
calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical 
preparations. 

51, 52. Pharmacy, Dispensing — (4, 4) Junior year, two lectures and two 
laboratories. Allen, Kokoski, Milio and Ouellette. 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy — (1) Junior year, first semester, one lecture. 
Heller. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis 
on the history of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy' Literature — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. 
Heller. 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy — (3, 3) Senior year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. Allen, Kokoski, Milio and Ouellette. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

A study of the compounding of new medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids 
used in modern professional pharmacy, including the preparation of some important 
classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Senior year, first semester, 
two lectures. Purdum. 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

132. Cosmetics — (3) Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one 
laboratory. Allen, Heller and Brickman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

A study of the composition and manufacture of cosmetic preparations including 
laboratory work in the formulation of these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Foss and Allen. 
Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. 

A study of manufacturing processes and equipment employed in the manufacture 
of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 



school OF PHARMACY 3.3 






203 204 Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) Two laboratory and 

Allen. 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 

Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important phama- 
ceuticals in large quantities. 

205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control— (3) Three lectin.-. Foss. Given 

in alternate years. 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling of 
drugs from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. 
Includes detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal Food, Drug and 
Cosmetic Act, and other laws affecting the production and distribution of pharma- 
ceutical products. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (1, 1) One lecture. Allen 
and Purdum. Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special refer- 
ence to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharma- 
ceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development — (2, 2) Two laboratories. Allen. 
Prerequisites— Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

A study of the development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics 
suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Purdum. 
Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) Each Semester. Foss and Allen. 
Required of students majoring in pharmacy. 

Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) Two 
laboratories. Allen and Purdum. 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. Foss, Purdum 
and Allen. 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

21. Accounting — (2) Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one laboratory. 
Pumpian and Kaufman. 

The fundamental principles of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping, 
banking and financial statements. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Junior year, second semester, three 
lectures. Pumpian. 

A study of the general fundamentals of economics — production, exchange, 
distribution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing govern- 
ment and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. Pharmacy Laws and Regulations — (3) Senior year, second semester, 
three lectures. Pumpian. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists ; with special reference to 
Federal and State Laws and regulations pertaining to the sale of poisons, narcotics, 
drugs, cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. 

71. Management — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. Pumpian. 
A study of the business problems arising in the operation of a retail pharmacy, 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



including ownership organization, financing, leases, insurance, negotiable instruments 
and property rights of the pharmacist. 

72. Drug Marketing — (2) Senior year, second semester, two lectures. 
Burbage. 

A study of the methods of marketing, channels of distribution, development of 
pharmaceutical specialties, types of retail pharmacies and their locations, purchasing, 
pricing, code marking and stock control of merchandise. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (4, 4) Sophomore year, three lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Estabrook and Brucker. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of the principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light and 
electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism — (3, 3) Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given according to demand. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics — (5, 5) Five lectures. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics — (2, 2) Two lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189. 
Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General — (5) Sophomore year, second semester, four lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Amberson, Bensusan, Dolle, Ferguson, Fox, and White. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 4. 

A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, including neurophysiology, 
the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney and endrocrine glands. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. Zoology, General — (4) Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Dolle and Aceto. 

A study of typical invertebrates with laboratory dissection and discussion of 
basic biological principles. The course stresses practical aspects relating to the 
fundamentals of parasitology, the development of organ systems and economic inter- 
relationships of invertebrates to man. 

4. Zoology, Vertebrate — (3) Freshman year, second semester, two lectures 
and one laboratory. Dolle and Aceto. 

A study of representative vertebrates with laboratory dissection emphasizing 
anatomy with concurrent microscopic study. Lecture material stresses the compara- 
tive anatomy and function of chordate organ systems. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a 
firm foundation for later required courses. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required in 
each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes in 
the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



SCHOl »l. < IF PHARMACY 



35 



ROLL 01 >l l DEN fS, SESSION 1953 54 



tGRADUA ll ; . S rUDENl S 



.. Mario i tomenico ... i iiii .<i« ■ islam! 
Al-Jaleel, Hatil Hammoody. Baghdad, [raq 

•Armao, Thomas Henrj New ifork 

Autiaii. John Pennsylvania 

Brlckman, Allen Gerald Maryland 

Brown, Richard Emery Maryland 

•Bryant, Harold Horn Maryland 

•Chertkoff, Marvin Joseph Maryland 

•DePaola, Oscar Stephen. . Massachusetts 

ESlkin, Samuel Pennsylvania 

i lergel, Stella Frosina ( >hio 

Gladhart, Wesley Robert Kansas 

•Glasser, Richard Lee Maryland 

( l l Hanker, Jacob Sylvanus Maryland 

Heller, William Mohn Maryland 

Hernandez, Tarsis New York 

Hirano, Kaneo rapan 

Jaffe, Jonah Jerry New Fork 

Josten, .John James Ohio 

Kaiser, ('aid Maryland 



Kaufman, Jordan William i ctlcul 

Kelgler. Norma Man Maryland 

Kokoski, Charles Joseph Maryland 

Kokoski, Roberl John Maryland 

Kramer, Stanley Phillip Maryland 

l Awrence, William 1 iomer V.rk 

Milio. Frank Remo Maryland 

Mnpsik. Herman Morris New J< 

» »m -ll. Mi.-. Philip Andrew Maine 

Pikor, .Jan Eugene Massachu 

►Portoghese, Philip Salvatore . . New York 
Roskos, John, Jr Georgia 

Sheer, Law fin*' Maryland 

Slnkoe, Eldr< d Albert Georgia 

Speaker, Tully Joseph New J< 

Swart/., Charles Judd Maryland 

Veltre, PranclS Anthony Maryland 

Weaver, Roberl Hlnchman . Wes1 Virginia 
'Wolpert. Arthur New York 



SENIOR CLASS 



Abrams, Rosalie Greenberg. . . .Maryland 

AnShell, Marvin Maryland 

Bogash. Philip Maryland 

Brager, Stanley Saul Maryland 

Brager, Stuart Harmon Maryland 

Burke, George James Maryland 

Cohen, Gilbert Maryland 

Coleman. Edward Ellis, Jr. . . . Delaware 

Edell, Marvin Lewis Maryland 

Felsenberg, Stanley Zui Maryland 

Gelblum. Samuel Maryland 

Goldstein, Eileen Fedder Maryland 

Grebow, Aaron Maryland 

Greenberg. Morton Maryland 

Greenfeld. David Don Maryland 

Handelman, Mayer Maryland 

Helinski, Donald Raymond Maryland 

Henderson, Charles Clarence Thomas 

Maryland 
Henretty, Frederick Joseph. . .Maryland 

Leavitt, Dean Ellis Maine 

Lennox. Willard James Maryland 

Levenson, Marvin Manes Maryland 



Levin. Daniel Melvin Maryland 

Levins, Arnold Isadore Maryland 

Magaziner, Frederick Maryland 

Mentzer, John Raymond, Jr Maryland 

Merwitz, Stanley Joseph Maryland 

Mutch. Richard John Maryland 

Prigal, Herman Maryland 

Rombro. David Meyer Maryland 

Scelsi, Joseph Vincent Maryland 

Scherr, Stanley Maryland 

Schwartz. Bernardine Marilyn . .Maryland 

Settleman, Jerome Maryland 

Sherr, Harold Maryland 

S'lverstein. Morton Israel Maryland 

Sinker, Robert Sidney Maryland 

Statter, Irvin Barry Maryland 

Thompson, Joseph Edward ... .Maryland 

Weingarten. John Harry Maryland 

Wille. Harry Maryland 

Winternitz. Rudoloh Franz Maryland 

Vousem Jonas Julius Maryland 

Zajac. Walter Chester Maryland 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Abrams, Lawrence Maynard. . .Maryland 

Baikstis, Anda Maryland 

Bailone, William Andrew Maryland 

Barnstein. Fred Sheldon Maryland 

Barone, Charles Carl New York 

Boeren. John Gilbert Maryland 

Bowen, Curtis Augustus Maryland 

Burgee, Sydney Lanier, Jr Maryland 

Chow. Jean Maryland 

Crystal, Howard Maryland 

Dagold, Donald Jack Maryland 

Davidson, Saul David Maryland 

Dawson. Thomas Charles Maryland 

Dobrowolskyi. Myron Roman .. .Maryland 

Durm, Noel Elton Maryland 

Edelen, James Adrian Maryland 

Engberg. John Joseph Maryland 

Friedman. Marvin Aaron Maryland 

Friedman, Sheldon Maryland 

Goldberg. Marvin Hersh Maryland 

Gordon, Marvin Maryland 

Heilman. Gerald Joseph Maryland 

Hoff. David Maryland 

Imbierowicz. Robert Raymond .Maryland 



Johns. Basil P Maryland 

Karmiol. Stanley Maryland 

Katz, Burton Lee Maryland 

Krans Richard Edward Maryland 

Lambros. Demetrios Simos ... .Maryland 

Left in, David Maryland 

Levy. Melvin Maryland 

Lowry. Ronald Henry. . .North Carolina 

Mendelsohn. Max Lewis Maryland 

Miller, Barbara Leigh Maryland 

Murphy, John Martin Maryland 

Myers. Richard Earl Maryland 

Norton. Gerald Lewis Maryland 

Ortt. James Bryan Maryland 

Patrick. Thomas Edward Maryland 

T>ollekoff. Sheldon Erwin Maryland 

Pra°r. Jules Benge Maryland 

Pycha. Richard Jerome Maryland 

Rns< nberg. Reuben Maryland 

Rubin, Melvin Norman Maryland 

Rubin, Murray Alvin Maryland 

Sacki. Kurt I^eo Maryland 

Sandbower. JoAnne Maryland 

Satisky, William Melvin Maryland 



t Registered in Graduate School. 

* Did not attend entire session. 

(1) Registered for second semester. 



36 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 






Schneider, Edwin Joseph Maryland 

Schwartz, Milton Maryland 

Seff, David Joseph Maryland 

*Sekuler, Stanley Harold Maryland 

Settler, Alan Lee Maryland 

Sienkielewski, Ramon Bautro ... Maryland 

Snyder. Robert Edward Maryland 

Starkey, Donald Emory Maryland 



Sulewski, Bernard Alfonsus. .. .Maryland 

Taylor, Gary Louis Maryland 

Toelle, Milton Frederick Maryland 

Venick, Marvin Leonard Maryland 

Welsh, Charles Robert Maryland 

Williams, Edward Bernard Maryland 

Wolfovitz, Martin Irvin Maryland 

Zamecki, Robert John Maryland 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abrams, Arthur Murray Maryland 

Abramson, Alfred Maryland 

Aronson, Donald Maryland 

♦Bark, Marvin Lee Maryland 

♦Baylus, Norman Gerald Maryland 

Blumson, Leonard Ronald Maryland 

Bronstein, Myer Maryland 

Brotman Ann Sue Maryland 

* Cohen, Joan Ellen Maryland 

Conrad. Marlene Elizabeth Maryland 

Dietrich, Joseph William Maryland 

Dorsey, Martha Lee Maryland 

Engel. Ralph Maryland 

Epstein, Irwin Bernard Maryland 

*Erdman, Allan Elliott Maryland 

Fine. Jerome Leonard Maryland 

Friedman, Julian Michael Maryland 

Frieman. Jack Maryland 

Gaver, Paul Glenn, Jr Maryland 

Grossman, Isaac William Maryland 

Hesson, Charles Edward Maryland 

Holtschneider, Douglas Wayne 

Maryland 

Katz, Laurence Lewis Maryland 

Klatsky, Stanley Albert Maryland 

Kwash. Herbert Maryland 

♦Levy, Carote Sylvia Maryland 

Lichtman, Albert Maryland 



Lindeman, Philip Douglas Maryland 

♦Marsiglia, Anthony George .... Maryland 

Merrill. John Ronald Maryland 

Metz, Richard August Maryland 

Miller, Richard Anthony Maryland 

♦Nasdor, Bruce Maryland 

Niznik, Paul Vincent Maryland 

Oed, Marvin LeRoy Maryland 

Oster, Walter Filmore Maryland 

Pertnoy, Edwin Maryland 

Plotkin, Herbert Maryland 

Plotkin, Richard David Maryland 

Pruss, Thaddeus Paul Maryland 

Richman, Emanuel Maryland 

Rofsky, Howard Earl Maryland 

Rosenbloom, Sanford Lawrence 

Maryland 

♦Rosenthal, Simon Maryland 

Sachs, Walter Harlan Maryland 

Schiff, Howard Robert Maryland 

Shemer, Stuart Maryland 

Siegel, Arnold Maryland 

Sophocleus, Gregory John Maryland 

Watkowski. Milton Raymond. .. .Maryland 

Wesolowski, Frank John Maryland 

Zapnulla, Santo Angelo Maryland 

♦Zelko, Robert Sidney Maryland 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Austraw, Geraldine Lee Maryland 

Bahr, Raymond Donald Maryland 

Balcerzak, Anthony Edwin. .. .Maryland 

Barke, Sheldon Saul Marvland 

Bell. Frank Maryland 

Berman, Gilbert Samuel Maryland 

Bressler, Eli Leon Maryland 

Bruggy, Loretta Jane Maryland 

Brunson, Gerald Neuman Maryland 

Capone. Guy Francis, Jr Maryland 

♦Cascio. Donald Harry Maryland 

Cohen, Jack Ronald Maryland 

Damasiewicz, Walter Michael. . .Maryland 

Davidov, Arnold Lee Maryland 

Deitch, Erwin Maryland 

Deitz. Emerson Lee Maryland 

Deming. Martin Maryland 

Dougherty, Leon Patrick Maryland 

♦Edwards. Joanne Carol Maryland 

Elliott, Paul Prag Maryland 

♦Feldstein, Marvin Irvin Maryland 

Gardner, James Harry Maryland 

Gilliece, Owen James Maryland 

Glassband. Herman Maryland 

Goldberg, Leonard Maryland 

Goldman. Sue Carolyn Maryland 

Golob. Stanley Paul Maryland 

Gradman, Lee Herbert Maryland 

Greenberg. Richard Earl Maryland 

Hayman. Thomas Johnson Maryland 

Heifetz, Carl Louis Maryland 

Heyman, Bernard Philip Maryland 

Johns, John Richard Maryland 

Kabik. Robert Joseph Maryland 

Katz. Reuben Maryland 

Keller, Charles Vincent de Paul. Jr. 

Maryland 



♦Krall, Rudolph Richard, Jr Maryland 

Lebowitz, Donald Leo Maryland 

Levenson, Sidney Maryland 

Levin, Arthur Irvin Maryland 

Levin, Esther Ruth Maryland 

MacLarty, David Collins Maryland 

Mahoney, Robert Weldon Maryland 

Mercer. Robert Victor Maryland 

Miller, Marvin Sidney Maryland 

Neighoff , Wilson Edward Marvland 

♦O'Keeffe. John C Maryland 

♦Otzelberger, Gerald Leo Maryland 

Palmer, William Richard Maryland 

Pass, Stacy Maryland 

Pessagno. Wilbur Joseph Maryland 

Pollack, Howard Maryland 

Potler. Howard Paul Maryland 

♦Prochaska. John William Maryland 

Pruce, Morton Sheldon Maryland 

♦Rice, James Edward Maryland 

♦Richmon. Bernard Maryland 

Ricks, George Solomon Maryland 

Roth, Martin Maryland 

Solar. Morton Jerome Maryland 

Seidman, Sidney Bernard Maryland 

Shein, Sidney Maryland 

Sherer, Gerald Maryland 

Sherman, Miriam Ray Maryland 

Siegel. Harold Maryland 

Singer, Bernard Sheldon Maryland 

Suter, Thomas Joseph Maryland 

Swartz, Irving Emanuel Maryland 

Tregoe, Charles Henry Maryland 

Ullman, Donald Allan Maryland 

Wagner, Frederick Henry Maryland 

Waitsman, Earle Stanley Maryland 

Young, Donald Roy Maryland 



Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



37 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Klugrrman, MaxwHl Robert .... Maryland Sultan, Walter Edward, Jr Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 6, 1953 
tDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

a mil < w BartUucci Maryland 

fMASTER OF SCIENCE 

Carl Kaiser Maryland Robert Eugene Lawson Maryland 

Charles Joseph Kokoski, Jr.. . .Maryland r.rrnard Misek New York 

Albert William Kossler. .. .Pennsylvania John Robert Stotts Arkansas 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Hillel Ruven Aarons Maryland 

Eugene Peter Balcerak Maryland 

Maurice Jerrold Herman Maryland 

Bernard Billian Maryland 

.1< rome Block Maryland 

Placldo Anthony Bonanno D. C. 

Alden Smith Bradstock, Jr Maryland 

John Gerald Bringenberg Maryland 

Herbert James Burns. Jr Maryland 

William Frank Carouge, Jr Maryland 

John Joseph Creamer Maryland 

Ralph John Crocamo Maryland 

Paul Edward Davis, Jr Maryland 

Benjamin Dickstein Maryland 

Frederick William Dreyer, Jr. .. Maryland 

Norman DuBois Maryland 

Paul Freiman Maryland 

Jerome Gaine Maryland 

John Edward Gavlinski Maryland 

Burton J. Goldstein Maryland 

Paul Lewis Goldstein Maryland 

Charles Albert Haase Maryland 

Francis Xavier Herold Maryland 

Milton Kahanowitz Maryland 

Philip Richard Karn Maryland 

Howard Charles Kerpelman. . .Maryland 

Morris Lewis Kessler Marvland 

Melvin Gilbert Kitt Maryland 

Stanley Howard Kramer Maryland 

Frank Paul Kratz, III Maryland 

Louis Henry Kraus. Jr Maryland 

Sidney Isaac Lerner Maryland 



Richard Leonard Levin Maryland 

Edward Earl Lyden. Jr Maryland 

Irwin Ernest Meyers Maryland 

Alvin Bernard Miller Maryland 

Florence Elizabeth Moorehead 

West Virginia 

Marie T. Murphy Maryland 

Faga P. Oshry Maryland 

John Padousis Maryland 

Charles Edward Pfeifer Maryland 

Donald J. Plank Maryland 

Edwin Plassnig Maryland 

Albert Prostic Maryland 

Arnold Jay Reiser Maryland 

Milton Charles Sappe Maryland 

Dorothy Freida Schaech Maryland 

Oscar Milton Schapiro Maryland 

Morton Bernard Scherr Maryland 

Norma Lee Scherr Maryland 

Henry E. Schmaus. Jr Maryland 

Morton Irvin Shear Maryland 

John H. Shellenberger Maryland 

Michael Anthony Shimkus Maryland 

Lawrence Ronald Siegel Maryland 

Werner Joachim Sommer Maryland 

John Jacob Strauch Maryland 

Bernard Howard Strauss Maryland 

Charles Judd Swartz Maryland 

Eugenia Carolyn Tatem Virginia 

Edward Willis Thron, Jr Maryland 

John Baker Wheeler, III Maryland 

Joan Helen Zulty Maryland 



HONORS 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Richard Leonard Levin 

The William Simon Memorial Prize Sidney Isaac Lerner 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize Francis Xavier Herold 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Melvin Gilbert Kitt 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Ralph John Crocamo 

The David Fink Memorial Prize Edward Willis Thron, Jr. 

The Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize John Gerald Bringenberg 

The Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize Milton Kahanowitz 



Sidney Isaac Lerner 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 
Charles Judd Swartz 



Milton Kahanowitz 



Daniel Levin 



HONORABLE MENTION (JUNIOR CLASS) 
Stuart Brager 



Donald Helinski 



t Degree conferred by Graduate School. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INDEX 
Subject Page 

Accreditation 10 

Administration, Officers of 5 

Administrative Board, General 5 

Administrative Organization 4 

Admission to Freshman Class 11 

Admission with Advanced Standing 12 

Alumni Association 23 

Application for Admission 12 

Attendance Requirements 16 

Board of Regents 4 

Buildings and Equipment 10 

Calendar 3 

Courses and Degrees 10 

Courses, description of 26-34 

Curriculum 24 

Deportment 17 

Employment 18 

Examinations 16 

Faculty 5 

Faculty Council 5 

Fees and Expenses 13 

Fellowships 18 

Grading Scale 16 

Graduates, Roll of 37 

Graduate Student Fees 14 

Graduation Requirements 17 

History 10 

Honors and Awards 20 

Housing 18 

Library Regulations 18 

Loan Funds 18 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 17 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Committee on School of 

Pharmacy 23 

Matriculation and Registration 13 

Parking 18 

Registration with Maryland Board of Pharmacy 13 

Residence and Non-Residence, Definition of 14 

Scholarships 18 

Scholarship Requirements 16 

Student Organizations 22 

Students, Roll of 35-36 

Transcripts of records 15 

Withdrawal and return of fees 15 




SEPARATE CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director 
of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

These catalogs and schools are: 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School 

At Baltimore 
Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 
tive schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. These professional schools are: 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 

At Heidelberg 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by addressing 
the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Park, 
Maryland. 



. 



1 




P U B L 



Volume 35 



Number 1 



The School of 



PHARMACY 



1955-1956 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



The School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 



The South's Oldest and Leading School of Pharmacy 
In the South's Leading Industrial Centre and Port 



IMPORTANT 

ie provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of 
Maryland. The University reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of 
residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, 
to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 
in the best interests of the University. 



See Outside Back Cover for List of Other Catalogs 




P U B L 



Catalogue and 
112th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1955-1956 



Volume 35 — Number 1 
Published by the University 
32 South Greene Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



1955 : 1956 


JANUARY 1955 


JULY 1955 


JANUARY 1956 


JULY 1956 


SMTWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


SMTWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


1 


12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 1011 12 13 14 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 1213 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 1617 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 


29 30 31 


30 31 


31 






FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


S M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


.... 12 3 4 5 


..123456 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


27 28 


28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 




MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


.... 12 3 4 5 


12 3 


1 2 3 


1 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 1617 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


910 11 12 13 14 15 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


161718 19 20 2122 


27 28 29 30 31 ... . 


25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


30 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


OCTOBER 


12 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


S M TWT F S 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


12 3 4 5 6 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


9 10 1112 13 14 15 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


7 8 910111213 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


161718 19 20 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


14 15 16171819 20 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 






30 31 




28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 


.... 12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


15 1617 18 19 20 21 


13 1415 1617 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 ... . 


25 2627 28 29 30.. 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


SMTWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 4 


12 3 


1 2 


1 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


1112 13 1415 1617 


1011 12 13 1415 16 


910 1112 13 14 15 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


161718 19 20 2122 


26 27 28 29 30 ... . 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 











1955 1956 

I055 !•'!' UK 

September 1 ( > Monday Freihman Orientation— 

9:30a.m. 

September 20 Tuesday Freshman Registration— 

9 00 10 :00 a.m. 

homore Registration — 
10:30 11 :30a.m. 

September 21 Wednesday ''Vm^mki'u m "" 

Senior Registration — 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration— 
1 :00-3:00 p.m. 

September 26 Monday Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 

November 23 Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins 

at close of last scheduled 
period 

November 28 Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

December 20 Tuesday Christmas recess begins at 

close of last scheduled 
period 

1956 

January 3 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

January 26-31 Thursday-Tuesday First semester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 7 Tuesday Freshman Registration— 

y 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Sophomore Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

February 8 Wednesday Junior Registration— 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

Graduate Registration — 
1 :00-3 :00 p.m. 

February 13 Monday Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 

March 29 Thursday Easter recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period 

April 3 Tuesday Instruction resumes with firsi 

scheduled period 

May 28- June 2 Monday-Saturday Second semester examina- 
tions 

May 30 Wednesday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 9 Saturday Commencement 



All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration day. Students failing to comply 
with this regulation are charged a fee of five dollars. No student is normally permitted 
to register after Saturday noon of the week in which instruction begins. 

The office of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, irom 
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 



SCHOi )1. (>!■ I'HAKMAl Y 



CORRESPOXDKNVK 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the School of Pharmacy should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 32 S. Greene St., Balti- 
more 1, Maryland : 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogues and Brochures, 

General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 

Housing of Students, Scholarships, Scholastic Standing of 

Students (Class Advisor), Transcripts of Records, 

Vocational Placement. 

VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy. The Dean's Office is open 
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment. 

OPEN HOUSE 

A guided tour of the laboratories and classrooms with an opportunity to see 
students and faculty at work is afforded at the Annual Open House held each 
Spring. A program will be mailed upon request. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each year for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. The 
University General Administrative Board acts in an advisory capacity to the 
President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, which controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions : 



College of Agriculture 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
Extension Service 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Business and Public 

Administration 
College of Education 
Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering 

and Aeronautical Sciences 
College of Home Economics 
Graduate School 



Summer Session 

College of Military Science 

College of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 
School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 
School of Nursing 
School of Pharmacy 
The University Hospital 
College of Special and Continuation 

Studies 



The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy, the Hospital 
and a branch of the College of Continuation and Special Studies, are located in 
Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets; the others in College 
Park. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 



William P. Cole, Jr., 


Chairman 


Baltimore 


Expiration Date 
1958 


B. Herbert Brown 




Baltimore 


1960 


Edmund S. Burke 




Cumberland 


1959 


Edward F. Holter 




Middletown 


1959 


Louis L. Kaplan 




Baltimore 


1961 


Arthur O. Lovejoy 




Baltimore 


1960 


Charles P. McCormick 


Baltimore 


1957 


Harry H. Nuttle 




Denton 


1957 


Thomas B. Symons 




College Park 


1963 


C. EWING TUTTLE 




Baltimore 


1962 


Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 


Baltimore 


1956 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President, Chairman 
Dean Aisexberg, Mr. Algire, Col. Ambrose, Mrs. Azlein, Dean Bamford, Mr. 
Benton, Dr. Bishop, Mr. Brigham, Dr. Brueckner, Mr. Buck, Dean Cairns. Mr. 
Cissel, Dean Cotterman, Dean Devilbiss, Dean Ehrensberger, Dean Eppley, 
Dr. Faber, Mr. Fogg, Dean Foss, Dean Fraley, Dean Gipe, Dr. Gwin, Dr. Haut, 
Dr. Hoffsommer, Dean Howell, Dr. Huff, Dr. Long, Mrs. Low, Col. Miller, 
Mr. Morrison, Dean Mount, Dr. Mystrom, Dean Pyle, Mr. Rovelstad, Dean 
Smith, Dean Stamp, Dean Steinberg, Dr. Stone, Mr. Tatum, Mr. Weber, 
Dr. White, Dean Wylie, and Dr. Zucker. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson H. Elkins, D. Phil., President of the University 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President Emeritus 

Noel E. Foss, B.S., Ph.D., Dean 

G. Watson Algire, M.S., Director of Admissions and Registration 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Noel E. Foss, Dean 
Adele B. Ballman C. T. Ichniowski 

George P. Hager Donald E. Shay 

Frank J. Slama, Secretary 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FACULTY 
EMERITA 
B. Olive Cole Professor of Pharmacy Administration, Emerita 

Professors 

William R. Amberson Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine 

Ph.B., Lafayette College, 1915 ; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1922. 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Professor of Physics 

B.S. in Ch.E., Purdue University, 1921 : M.S., Ohio State University, 1922 ; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

Noel E. Foss Professor of Pharmacy 

Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S. in Pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932 ; Ph.D., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York. 

George P. Hager Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., 1942. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Casimir T. Ichniowski Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S. in Pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

fW. Arthur Purdum Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930 ; B.S. in Pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934 ; Ph.D., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

*A. W. Richeson Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; A.M., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
Ph.D., 1928. 

Emil G. Schmidt Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1921; Ph.D., 1924; L.L.B., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

Donald E. Shay Professor of Bacteriology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937 ; M.S., University of Marvland, 1938 ; Ph.D., 
1943. 

Frank J. Slam a Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.C, 1925; B.S. in Pharmacy, 1928; 
M.S., 1930; Ph.D., 1935. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
tPart time. 



school OF PHARMA* V 9 



Benjamin Frank Allen issociate Pro 

In Pharm., University ol Maryland, L937 ; Ph.D., L949. 
stored Pharmaclsl Maryland. 

Frederick P. Ferguson Issociate Professor of Physiology, 

School <>f Mediane 
B \.. Wesleyan University, 1988; M.A., L989 ; Ph.D., University ol Minnesota, 1948. 

EDWARD I. HERBST Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
B.S., University ol Wisconsin, 1943; M.S., L944 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

♦FRANCIS M. Miller Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.8., Western Kentucky Stat. L946 ; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 

Ida M arian Robinson Associate Professor of Library Science 

A.B., Cornell University, 1924 ; B.S.L.S., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 



Assistant Professors 

*Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Goucher College, 1926; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 19:55. 



Paul A. Pumpian Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1948; B.S. in Pharm.. 1950; LL.B., 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland ; Member of the Maryland Bar. 

Raymond E. Vanderlinde Assistant Professor of Biological 

Chemistry, School of Medicine 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1944; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1950." 

John Irving White Assistant Professor of Physiology, 

School of Medicine 
B.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1950. 



Instructors 

Ann Virginia Brown Instructor, Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
A.B., Goucher College, 1940. 

♦Frank A. Dolle Instructor in Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., 1954. 

Samuel L. Fox Instructor in Physiology, School of Medicine 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1934 ; B.S. in Pharm., 1936; M.D., 193S. 



. *Tea c hers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Georgian n a S. Gittinger Instructor in Pharmacology 

A.B., Hood College, 1912 ; M.A., University of Virginia, 1924. 

Bernard F. Grabowski Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., Temple University, 1952 ; M.S., 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist— Pennsylvania. 

*Claire Strube Schradieck Instructor in Languages 

A.B., Goucher College, 1916; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

Joh n J. Sciarra Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., St. Johns University, 1951 ; M.S., Duquesne University, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— New York, Pennsylvania. 



Visiting Lecturer 

Landon W. Burbage Visiting Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

Ph.B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909 ; Ph.G., 1910. 

Assistants 

*Mario D. Aceto Assistant in Zoology 

B.S. in Pharm., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— Rhode Island. 

Allen G. Brickman Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1952. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, District of Columbia. 

Edward B. Brucker Assistant in Physics 

B.E., The Johns Hopkins University, 1952. 

David Robert Evans 1 Assistant in Physiology 

B.S., George Washington University, 1953. 

Beverly J. Goodman Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., Goucher College, 1954. 

Melania Guerrero Assistant in Pharmacognosy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of the Philippines, 1939; M.S., 1943. 
Registered Pharmacist— The Philippines. 

Paul Haubrick Assistant in Bacteriology 

B.A., Carroll College, 1950. 

Robert Kokoski Assistant in Pliarmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1952. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

i Effective March 21, 1955, 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



I HEODORE Kranzlfr Assistant m Pharmacy 

\ \. Qeorge Washington l T ni\ i-rsit y, L96S ', US. in I'harm., L954 

tered Pharmacist— Dlstrlcl ol Columbia. 

I )y w Ik wmt Assistant in Phaniuii v . Idniimstration 

B.S in Pharm., University ol Maryland. L954. 
i:. glstered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

W'm.lard Lennox Assistant in Pharnuk ology 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland. 1054. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

FlANK Milio Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm.. University of Maryland. 1952. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Sylvia Lichter Pollack ' Assistant in Physiology 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University. 104:?. 

John Roskos. Jr Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.S. in Pharm., Southern College of Pharmacy, 1953. 

TULLY Speaker Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., Rutgers University, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Myron Simon Weinberg Assistant in Chemistry 

B.A., New York University, 1950 ; B.S. in Pharm., Fordham University, 1954. 



Library Staff 
Pharmacy-Dentistry 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Associate Librarian 

Beatrice Marriott, A.B Reference Librarian 

Curtis C. Crom, A.B., M.S.L.S Periodicals Librarian 

Harriette W. Shelton, B.A., B.S.L.S Cataloguer 

Alice M. Melvin, A.B Library Assistant 

Elizabeth E. McCoach Assistant to the Librarian 

Patricia C. Watkins Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 

Daisy Lotz Gue Secretary-Stenographer 

Margaret E. Beatty .' Senior Stenographer 

Loretta H. Shelley Senior Stenographer 



1 Effective March 21, 1955. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
History and Program 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy are to train students for the efficient, 
ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy ; to instruct students in general scientific 
and cultural subjects so that they can read critically, express themselves clearly, 
and think logically as members of a profession and citizens of a democracy; to 
guide students into productive scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge 
and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest Pharmacy School of the South, 
was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland physicians 
and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in pharmacy to replace the out- 
dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave 
its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College joined with a group of medical 
schools and the Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer cooperative instruction 
in the health sciences. The new institution was known as the University of Maryland. 
In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional schools was merged with the Maryland 
State College at College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies a six-story building constructed specifically for phar- 
maceutical education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with the most 
modern apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts and for research 
in pharmacy is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection, now merged with 
the dental literature, contains over 27,000 books. 

Students have access to the Medical School Library, and the time-honored collec- 
tions of the Enoch Pratt, the Peabody, the Medical and Chiurgical Faculty, and 
The Johns Hopkins L T niversity. Most of these libraries are within walking distance 
of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery and 
the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy has 
expanded its period of training over the years from a one-year to a four-year course. 
The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy has now recommended a five- 
year course. However, such a program is in the future and students attending 
and entering the School of Pharmacy in the Autumn of 1955 will be required to take 
only the four-year course. 

The School of Pharmacy has always been a fully accredited Class A school and 
was again so rated at its last inspection in November 1953 by the Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Schools and Colleges and by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education. The diploma of the School is recognized by every state board of pharmacy. 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. The 
general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the 
University. For detailed information, see the catalogue of the Graduate School. 



SCHoi >L OF PHARMA( V 



ADMISSION rO i ill- I R] SHMAN ( LA 

Amount and Quality of Scholastic I' reparation 

\o be admitted to the School ol Pharmacy a candidate must be a gradual 
secondary school approved bj the Mate Board of Education of Maryland or a similar 
accrediting agenc) and must submit credentials acceptable to the Director of Admis- 
sionsj as proof of adequate preparatory-school training. 

Sixteen units of academic work are required of each applicant. 

The following work must have been completed: 

English- 4 units 

Algebra— V/ 2 units 

Plane Geometry— 1 unit Total 8j4 units 

History- -1 unit 

Science — 1 unit 

The remaining seven and one-half units may be in astronomy, biology, botany, 
chemistry, civics, economics, general science, geology, history, foreign languages, 
mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered for which 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Not more than four units 
may be vocational units (agriculture, commercial drawing, home economics, shop 
courses, etc.). 

Applicants who cannot fulfill the foregoing conditions may appeal to the Director 
of Admissions for permission to take a special examination. 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Director of 
Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy for a preliminary Application 
Blank and an illustrated brochure about the School arid literature about opportunities 
in pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill the requirements 
for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts of his college 
record along with a certificate of good standing from the college he attended. His 
grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the colleges' grading system. 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American Council on 
Pharmacutical Education are given credit for the work of the first three years of 
the pharmacy curriculum which they have completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given for work 
completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those courses 
in the school's curriculum which they have not completed. In the schedules for 
transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given preference over 
advanced work. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Direct all requests for application blanks and information to the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions. 



ADMISSION AND COSTS 
Admission Procedure for All Applicants 

1. Request the Director of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
to send the preliminary application blank. Fill the blank out fully including the 
names of all schools and colleges which the candidate has attended. Sign the blank 
and return it with the required photographs and a seven dollar and fifty cent 
investigation fee to the Director of Admissions not earlier than October first of the 
academic year prior to the proposed beginning of the candidates' studies at the 
school. (This fee will not be refunded or credited on any subsequent bill.) 

2. Send the high school record blank which accompanies the application blank 
to the principal of the high school attended and request that he mail it promptly to 
the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the prospective 
student will be advised to: 

3. Report to the School of Pharmacy for entrance examinations and interviews. 
The School seeks indications of aptitude for undertaking pharmacy studies by ex- 
amining the school records of candidates, their scores in aptitude and achievement 
tests, and estimates of their interests, maturity, and personality. Entrance examina- 
tions and interviews are held in February, but subsequent opportunities are given. 

4. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the application of candidates 
whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, and the School 
of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory that they have been 
tentatively accepted. 

5. Students who are offered tentative admission must immediately make a deposit 
of $60.00 ($10.00 matriculation fee plus $50.00 deposit on tuition) on their Sep- 
tember tuition. This deposit is non-returnable if the student fails to register in the 
autumn, but is credited against the first semester tuition charge of all students who 
enter. 



REGISTRATION AND FEES 

All students must enroll in person at the Dean's office during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. On registration day the student fills 
out necessary forms and class cards and pays his fees. Detailed directions concern- 
ing dates and procedure are mailed during the Summer to students who are eligible 
to enroll in the fall. All new students must matriculate. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar upon 
the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter classes until 
he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and hours printed in this 
catalogue are required to pay a late registration fee of five dollars. The last day 
for late registration is Saturday noon following the close of the normal registration 
period. This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 

TUITION AND LABORATORY FEES 

Full-time Undergraduate Students 

Tuition fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

Student Activities' Fee (per semester) 7.50 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 
to the weekly newspaper, Maryland Mortar, all expenses of 
School luncheons, picnics, dances, Honors Convocation) 

Incidental Charges 

For Nezv Students Only 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's tuition.) 

For Seniors 

Graduation Fee (To be paid in February of Senior Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in 
excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Books, stationery, weights, slide rule, dissecting instruments, 

etc. Approximately 130.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each course. 

Part-time Undergraduate Students 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered full- 
time students. Part-time students are charged as follows : 

Tuition fee (for each semester hour per semester) $10.00 

Laboratory fees (per semester) : 

Bacteriology $10.00 

Chemistry 10.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physics 4.00 

Physiology 8.00 

Zoology 8.00 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Graduate Students 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 10.00 

Tuition fee for students carrying 10 or more semester credit 

hours 100.00 

Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 
Graduation fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and microfilming of 

thesis) 50.00 

Return of Fees Upon Withdrawal 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, must 
file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do not comply 
with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are not accorded any 
refunds of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent 
or guardian. Fees are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal 
is filed in the office of the Dean. 

The $60.00 deposit required of all entering students will not be returned 
under any circumstances. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required in 
each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes in 
the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the time 
of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at least 
one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this 
State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, the right 
of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident status must 
be established by him prior to the registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. 



IOL OF PHARMACY 17 



rhe word da used in this regulation 

lie onlj one d< 

following interpretations or modifications of the above rule shall a 
rhe domicih o\ I »hall be that oi her husl 

a minor supported by her parents, in which event the marital 11 not be 

considered in determining the residence status. 

(b) Should the parents be separated, the domicile of the parent who tun 
ipport shall determine the residence status of the child. 
Should the support of a minor not be furnished I 
. the domicile of the person who furnishes the entire support shall deter- 
mine the residence status of the child. 

ul) Should the .support for a student be derived from a trust fund established 
specificall) for his support and education, the domicile of the person wl ished 

the fund during the full year previous thereto shall determine the residence status of 
the student. 

(e) Should the parent or other person responsible for a student be required 
to have this State for business or military reasons, he shall not be deprived of his 

. residence status if it is evident that he intends to return to this State 
upon the completion of the special business or military assignment. 

(f) The non-resident status of an adult may be changed upon proof that he 
has purchased and has maintained a home in Maryland for at least one full year; 
that he has become a registered voter of this State; and that he intends to make 
this State his domicile. These facts must be established prior to the registration 
period of the semester for which this change of status is requested. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
Attendance Requirements 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes and 
laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examination in that 
subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally counted with 
the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than half a period is con- 
strued as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period are also construed as an 
absence. 

Examinations 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion of 
the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester as scheduled 
on the calendar printed in this catalogue. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean imme- 
diately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission for a deferred 
examination. 

Grading System 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system : 



Grade 
A 
B 
C 


Interpretation 
Excellent 
Good 
Fair 


Point Value 
4 
3 
2 


D 

F 

I 


Poor but passing 

Failure 

Course work incomplete 


1 



replaced by definite 

grade when course 

requirements have 

been met 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the semester's 
work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received by the number of 
credit hours the course carries : 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


English 


3 


C 


6 


Speech 


1 


D 


1 


German 


3 


B 


9 


Mathematics 


3 


C 


6 


Chemistry 


4 


D 


4 


Zoology 


4 


B 


12 



18 38 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is found to 
have a grade-point average of 2.1. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at the 
School of Pharmacy are considered. 

Scholarship Requirements 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings. 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his academic 
standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean warns and 
the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 

Incomplete Work 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a student 
whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness 
or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been unable to complete the require- 
ment. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor enters on the class card a reason 
of the character stated above with an estimate of the quality of the student's work. 
In cases where this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by 
the instructor by the end of the next semester in which that subject is again offered 
or the mark becomes F. 

Raising Grade of D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he failed 
or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or elsewhere, 
must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular attendance, labora- 
tory work and examinations. His final mark will be substituted for the mark 
already recorded, but he will not receive any additional credit for the course. 
However, the final mark received in the course will be used in determining credit 
and in computing the over-all average. 

Promotion to the Next Class 

To be promoted to the next class freshmen and sophomores must make a grade- 
point average of 1.5 in the regularly scheduled work and juniors must make and 



SCHOOL Of PHARMACY 10 



maintain throughout their senior year a grade point average of 2.0 in the regularly 
scheduled work. 

Probation for Low Scholarship 

Any student who fails more than one-fifth of the semester credit hours for 
which he is registered is placed on probation. 

A student on probation must pass all the semester credit hours for which he is 
scheduled and attain a total «rade point value five in excess of the scheduled 
credit hours. 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 

Any student who fails more than half of the semester credit hours for which 
he is registered is dismissed from the School and is required to report to the Dean's 
Office for dismissal procedures. 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows : 

Before five weeks of the semester has passed WX 

After five weeks of the semester has passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After five weeks of the semester has passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

Classification 

Students having 0-29 credit hours are classified as Freshmen. 

Students having 30-65 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are classi- 
fied as Sophomores. 

Students having 65-105 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Juniors. 

Students having 105-139 credit hours with a grade-point average of 2.0 in 
the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 and have 140 credit 
hours to be considered as candidates for graduation. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon students 
who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School of Pharmacy, 
who have been accredited with 140 semester hours' instruction, who have attained 
a grade point average of 1.75 or above. 

Transcripts of Records 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts 
are as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; for addi- 
tional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when more 
than one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged 
for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Transcript records are of two kinds : 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish ; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions, Government agencies, etc., as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy and 
his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any student 
or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy have not been 
satisfied. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students enter- 
ing upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file with the 
Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for registration as 
a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required to furnish such 
information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of 
said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of phar- 
macy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit to the 
said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore experience acquired 
during the preceding vacation months.'"' 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration to 
those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Pharmacy. 
Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty-one years, 
is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has completed one 
year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board 
of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of 
registration. 

A student may not obtain credit for practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or college 
of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. Effective 
January 1, 1957, four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a 
registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board 
for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 2411 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 18, Maryland, for further 
information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a 
student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, or 
whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her health, 
or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities 
of the University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMA4 V 21 



Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though no 

specific charge be made against them. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should he prepared to finance his education during the entire period 

of attendance, as all of his time should he spent in the preparation and completion 
of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to secure suitable 
employment, but it is recommended that students should refrain from working 
during the school session. 

HOUSixr. 

The University of Maryland does not provide any housing accommodations in 
Baltimore. The School assists students in finding living accommodations. 

PARKING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on univer- 
sity parking lots for students. 

LIBRARY REGULATIONS 

Loan Regulations: 

Loan periods have been established according to demand for and protection 
of books, journals and other materials: 

Reserve Books: 4 p. m.-ll a. m. Advance reserves accepted, but no 

renewals. 
Current Journals : One-day circulation for latest issue ; others, two weeks. 
Reference Books : Use in library only for specified reference material. 
All Other Books and Journals : Two weeks (plus one renewal of two 
weeks). 

Fines : 

Fines are imposed to assure that all students may have equal access to books : 
Reserve Books: 15<£ for first hour; 54 for each additional hour, or fraction 

thereof. 
Other Loans : 5tf per day. 

Lost Books: List price of the book. (Losses should be reported im- 
mediately.) 

All books must be^ returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines paid 
before a student can finish the year in good standing. 

PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The Em-crson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy in 
1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The first 
appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was designated 
Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair has subsequently been held by 
Dr. Clifford W. Chapman and Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was 
appointed June 15, 1951. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual fellow- 
ships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate students 
desirous of doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
and pharmacognosy ; non-veteran students may also apply for an additional allow- 
ance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. Address applications 
directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 1507 M Street, 
N. W., Washington 5, D. C. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, sometime asso- 
ciate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist of Baltimore, 
has contributed since 1930 a sum of money annually to maintain a research fellow- 
ship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open to promising graduate 
students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the School 
of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships for research 
studies in the following fields : pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
bacteriology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candidates for these fellowships 
will be made by the faculty with the approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co, Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Company of New York contributes sufficient funds to provide 
a fellowship paying $1000.00 annually for two years for research in pharmaceutical 
chemistry and the allied sciences. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School each 
year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student selected by 
the committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable the student 
to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy. The research con- 
ducted must be of general pharmaceutical interest and must be accepted upon 
completion for publication in one of the pharmaceutical journals. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS AND INTERNSHIPS IN HOSPITAL PHARMACY 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying a 
stipend of $1350.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified students 
giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the departments in 
which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds of the normal 
graduate work. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy, together with the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland and the Pharmacy Department of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, offer 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 23 



annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several internships in hospital pharmacy. 
The appointments, beginning September 1st, run for twenty-two months. Appoint" 
ees devote half time to hospital pharmacy service- and half time to graduate work 
leading to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland 
and a certificate of internship awarded by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 
Hospital provides a stipend of $150.00 per month and the School of Pharmacy 
reduces tuition fees for these candidates by 25%. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing inquiries 
to the Chief Pharmacist, the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 5, Maryland, or 
the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Charles Land on Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a member 
of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry has en- 
dowed a scholarship worth SI 00.00 to be awarded annually by the Faculty to a senior 
student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and commercial pharmacy. 

American Foundation- for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available schol- 
arships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified junior and senior students who have 
maintained an average of "B" or above and who are in need of financial assistance 
to complete their schooling. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarship Fund 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified 
sophomore, junior and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes funds 
to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified sophomore, junior 
and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are 
in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. « 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, a jiumber of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment for a scholar- 
ship worth $100.00 annually. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified junior 
and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recommendation 
of the Dean. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students who 
have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Students whose 
names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's academic medal at the 
Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, was 
established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of this 
organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are members 
in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility 
for membership in the Society is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, 
personality, and leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have 
completed 75 credit hours of college work and must be approved by the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, provided 
that this average is not below tke grade of "B". Certificates of Honor are awarded 
to the three students having the next highest general average, provided these averages 
do not fall below the grade of "B". 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three Junior students having 
the highest general average, provided this average does not fall below the grade 
of "B". 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in awarding 
these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prise 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of chemistry 
in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by the Faculty to a 
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has done superior 
work in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand 
high in all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of 
chemistry is guided in his judgment of the student's ability by observation and 
personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
to be awarded annually by the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy, for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 

the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dispensing phar- 
macy. 

The I •' /-. li'i^h Pharmacognosy Price 

In appreciation of assistance winch the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund the income 
from which is awarded annually by the Faculty of the School to the senior student 
who has ilone exceptional work throughout the course in Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Price 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the Faculty 
for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity provides a cup in memory of 
Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in the service of 
their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty as having exhibited outstanding qualities, of character and leadership. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zela Omega Price 

The Kappa Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity provides a prize to 
be awarded annually to the senior student chosen by the Faculty for proficiency in 
pharmacology. 

Merck Azvards 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offer a set of valuable reference 
books to the senior student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. A second 
set of books is given to the senior student who has a high standing in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol Labora- 
tories, Inc. to the senior student who has contributed the most to pharmacy through 
his extra-curricular activities. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra-cunicular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the annual Honors Day 
Convocation. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students established for 
the purpose of aiding in the internal administration of the school, for organizing 
all extra-curricular organizations and activities of the student body, and for 
coordinating the activities of the student body with those of the Faculty and Admin- 
istration to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of the Student Alliance is composed of the officers of the Student Government 
Alliance, the Presidents of the Senior, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman Classes, 
and four delegates at large, one to be elected from each class and a Faculty 
Advisory Council consisting of the Dean and the four class advisors. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association has been 
organized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The purpose 
of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner the advance- 
ment of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance with the objectives 
stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical Association, especially 
in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its 
application and aiding. in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November 1935. The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the 
participation of students in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion to the end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awakened 
and guided and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in and the prob- 
lems confronting the profession. 



HANDBOOK OF SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The Student Alliance publishes a Handbook of the School of Pharmacy which 
is available to all students. This Handbook contains further information about 
student life at the School. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland was established in May 1871. This Association continued a separate ex- 
istence until the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was 
formed. Following the organization of it, the Society remained dormant until June 
1926 when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland. 

The following are its officers: 

OFFICERS (1954-55) 

Frank L. Black, Honorary President 

Louis Davidov, President 

Gordon A. Mouat, First Vice-President 

Norman J. Levin, Second Vice-President 

Dr. George P. Hager, Secretary 

Mrs. Frank Budacz, Treasurer 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

five Com mittej (Elected Members) 
Alexander J. Ogrinx, Jr. 
\ ictor 1 1. Morgenroth, Jr. 
George J. Stiffman 

Committee dm School op Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee known 
as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group are to rep- 
resent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy and 
pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Committee are: 
Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr., Chairman 
Frank Block, Co-Chairman 
F. Jackson Andrews Howard L. Gordy 

James P. Cragg, Jr. Carlton W. Hanks, Jr. 

L. M. Kantner Bernard Cherry 

Simon Solomon Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 

N. W. Chandler 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


•-3 
o 

Q 


>. 

h-1 


"3 
o 


-5 

6 


o 

5 


>> 

la 

►3 


o 
H 


2 


Freshman Year 
tChemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic and 


2 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 


2 
3 


6 


S 
3 


4 




3 














3 

3 

1 




3 

3 

1 


3 


fModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 
1 
2 

2 
3 




3 

1 
8 

8 
3 

4 
7 
5 


3 

1 
4 

18 

4 
2 

2 
5 
4 




3 








1 




6 

6 








2 


3 


5 


3 


Sophomore Year 


17 




3 




3 

4 
7 
5 

7 


2 


tChemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 


4 
3 
2 


4 
3 
2 
3 


2 


Pharmacy 1, 2, General 


4 
3 


4 
3 
4 


5 




4 




5 


Junior Year 


2 


4 


6 


17 
4 


18 


Bacteriology 115, Serology and Immunology 
Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


2 
2 


4 
6 


6 

8 


4 










4 




4 
2 
2 

1 


4 
5 
6 


8 

7 
8 
1 


5 
4 

4 
1 






2 
2 


5 
6 


7 
8 


4 




4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 




3 
3 




3 
3 


3 


Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 


3 

1 
3 
2 

1 




3 
1 
7 
5 
4 


18 




19 
2 










Pharmacology 81, 82, General 


4 
3 
3 


4 
3 

2 


3 
2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacy 101, 102, Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 


3 


3 




3 


3 








7 
18 

3 




5 


(Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 


2 


3 


5 








17 




3 
2 




3 

r 
5 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 132, Cosmetics 










o 
3 


3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Adminis- 


2 

2 
2 




2 
r 
2 
2 


2 

2 
2 




or 













Pharmacy Administration 71, Management.... 
Pharmacy Administration 72, Drug Marketing 
(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
tEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 














2 

3 

3 
3 




2 

3 

3 

3 

3 

4 


2 


3 

3 

3 




3 

3 
3 

3 

4 


3 

3 
3 

1 

2 




3 


or 
fLanguage 6, 7, Intermediate Scientific German 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 




3 






3 


(Electives — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99, Glassworking 


3 

4 


3 

4 




Chemistry 112, 114, Chemistry of Medicinal 




2 









t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
t The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



school OF PHARMACY 



29 



CURRICULUM 
BT7MMAB1 OF HOURS AND CREDITS 






!\(A\ Yi LB 

Chemistry 1, 3 

English 1. 2 

Mathematics 10, 15 

Mathematics 11, 17 

Modern Language 1, 2 or 6, 7. 



Zoology 1, 4 



Total 



Sophomore Year 

Chemistry 15 

Chemistry 35. 37 

Chemistry 3G, 38 

Pharmacy 1, 2 

Physic* 10, 11 

Physiology 22 



Total 



Junior Year 

Bacteriology 1 

Bacteriology 115 

Chemistry 53 

Chemistry 153 

Pharmacognosy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 61 

Pharmacy Administration 37. 

Total 



Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113 

First Aid 

Pharmacology 81, 82 

Pharmacy 101, 102 

Pharmacy Administration 21 

Pharmacy Administration 62 

Electives 



Total 

(Electives — Retail Major) 

Pharmacognosy 61 

Pharmacognosy 62 or 

Pharmacy 132 

Pharmacy 121 or 

Pharmacy 81 

Pharmacy Administration 71 

Pharmacy Administration 72 

(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major)) 

English 3, 4 or 

Language 6, 7 

Mathematics 20, 21 

(Electives — Special Cases) 

Chemistry 99 

Chemistry 112, 114 



SUMMARY 

Freshman Year 

Sophomore Year 

Junior Year 

Senior Year 



Total. 



Didactic 



til 
M 
is 
is 
M 
83 
til 



448 
32 



128 
96 
64 



416 

32 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
16 
48 



352 



96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224t 



560 

32 
48 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 



448 
416 
352 
560 



1,776 



Lahoratory 



192 



144 



336 
96 



128 
96 



48 



432 



64 
64 
96 
64 
160 
192 



640 



128 
96 
48 



160t 



432 

48 

'■'48' 



96 
128 



336 
432 
640 
432 



1,840 



Total 



256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 

208 



784 



128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 



848 



96 

96 

128 

128 

224 

256 

16 

48 



992 



96 

16 

224 

160 

64 

48 

384t 



992 



48 
B0 
32 
32 

32 
32 



96 
128 



784 
848 
992 
992 



3,616 



Credit 

hour* 



u 



86 



142* 



t Average. 

* A minimum of 140 credits required for graduation 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. Bacteriology, General— (4) Junior year, first semester, two lectures, two 
laboratories. Shay and Haubrick. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the prevention 
and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
115. Serology and Immunology— (4) Junior year, second semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories, Shay and Haubrick. 

Prerequisite — Bacteriology 1. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy— (1, 1) One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) 
Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media— (1, 1) One Lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of bacteriological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health — (1-2) One lecture. Shay. 
Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of state and 
municipal health departments and private health agencies. The courses will also 
include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. Miller and Goodman. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, 
the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis 
of the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (2, 2) Sophomore year, two 
lectures. Miller and Speaker. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Sophomore year, one lab- 
oratory. Miller and Speaker. 

♦Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 
A study oi the genera] procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitativ] Analysis — (4) Sophomoiv year, first semester, two led 

ihd two laboratories. I lager, Grabowski and Weinberg. 
Prerequisite Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and their 
application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Phakmacki thai. TESTING and Assaying — (4) Junior year, second semes- 
ter, two lectures and two laboratories. Hager, Grabowski and Weinberg. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of 
official preparations, with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99. Glass working — (1-1) Laboratory, senior year, either semester. Hager. 
Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the manipulation of glass, repair and construction of 
apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, three 
lectures. Hager and Grabowski. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical properties 
of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, two lab- 
oratories. Hager and Grabowski. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical prop- 
erties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) Any one or two semesters. 
Miller. 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 37, 38, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a study of 
the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic 
compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds— (2, 2) One lecture, two 
laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry— (5) Junior vear, first semester, four lectures 
and one laboratory. Schmidt, Herbst, Vanderline, and Brown. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 37 and Physiology 22. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living organisms 
and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry— (3, 3)— Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic 
theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



188, 190. Physical Chemistry— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed ^ which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two lectures. 
Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, steroids and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids— (2, 2) Two lectures. Hager. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically active 
bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and con- 
ferences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal 
chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis— (1-4) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Hager. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to official, 
proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. Hager. 
Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. Hager and Miller. 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds (Advanced Course) — (2-4) 
Either semester. Two to four laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances and 
mixtures. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition— (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with a historical 
study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature— (3, 3) Elective, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite— English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign classics 
being read in translation. 



school OF PHARMACY 33 



SPEECH 

1. J. Public Speaking (1,1) Freshman year, one lecture Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; the prepa- 
ration and delivery ol short original speeches; impromptu speaking; reft 
readings, shoi t reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. STANDARD FIRST Aid Course— Senior year, fir^t semester, one lecture, one 
demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

0. BASIC MATHEMATICS— (0) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the 
qualifying examination for this course. 

The fundamental principles of algebra. 

10. Algebra— (3) Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and 
radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial theorem, and theory 
of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not 
offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addition formulas, 
solution" of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic 
sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra— (3) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic equations, 
theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, logarithms, determinants 
and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second semester three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation 
of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and 
solid analytic geometry. 

20. 21. Calculus — (3, 3) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, 
curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applications of integration, 
partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

152, 153. Mathematical Statistics— (2, 2) Prerequisite, Mathematics 20, 21. 
Richeson. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis and corre- 
lation, theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical inference. Illustrations 
will be drawn from the biological sciences. Given in alternate years. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2. French — Elementary — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Not offered 1955-56. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The 
assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Rapid grammar review, exercises in pronunciation, reading of scientific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Review of grammar and reading of scientific texts. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, first semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Slama and Guerrero. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude vegetable drugs 
with special emphasis on the physician and microscopical characteristics used in 
their identification and in the detection of adulteration. 

52. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, second semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Slama and Guerrero. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, Pharmacognosy 51. 
A continuation of pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering animal drugs, 
antibiotics and allergy-producing pollens. 

61. Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists — (3). Senior year, first 
semester, two lectures and one laboratory. Slama and Kaufman. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and 
the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; their recogni- 
tion, life history, habits and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products — (3). Senior year, second 
semester, three lectures. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Physiology 22, Pharmacology 81. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2, 2) One lecture and one 
laboratory. Given in alternate years. Slama, 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 35 



Prerequisite— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation ol an herbarium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy— (4, 4) Two lectures and two laboratories. Slama. 
Prerequisite— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special 
emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201. 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— (4, 4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and micro- 
chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of adulterants. 
Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy— (4, 4) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A .^tudy of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount and quality 
of work performed. Slama. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81. 82. Pharmacology, General — (4, 4). Senior year, three lectures and one 
laboratory. Ichniowski, Gittinger, Lawrence, and Roskos. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, including methods of biological assay, with special reference to the 
drugs and preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Form- 
ulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Ichniowski and Gittinger. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (4, 4) Laboratory and conferences, 
first and second semesters. Ichniowski. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 
Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (4, 4) Laboratory and 
conferences, first and second semesters. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



221,222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods— (2-4), (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and comparative 
standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Ichniowski. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Pharmacy, General — (5, 5) Sophomore year, four lectures and one 
laboratory. Foss, Allen, Sciarra and Leavitt. 

A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical 
calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical 
preparations. 

51, 52. Pharmacy. Dispensing — (4, 4) Junior year, two lectures and two 
laboratories. Allen, Kokoski, Milio, Kranzler and Brickman. 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy — (1) Junior year, first semester, one lecture. 
Sciarra. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis 
on the history of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy Literature — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. 
Sciarra. 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy — (3, 3) Senior year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. Allen, Kokoski, Milio, Kranzler and Brickman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

A study of the compounding of new medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids 
used in modern professional pharmacy, including the preparation of some important 
classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Senior year, first semester, 
two lectures. Purdum. 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

132. Cosmetics — (3) Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one 
laboratory. Allen, Sciarra and Brickman. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52, and 101. 

A study of the composition and manufacture of cosmetic preparations including 
laboratory work in the formulation of these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Foss and Allen. 
Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. 

A study of manufacturing processes and equipment employed in the manufacture 
of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 



school OF PHARMACY 37 



204. Manufacturing Pharmac* (2, 2) Two laboratories. Foil and 
Allen. 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 

Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important phama- 
ceuticals in large quantities. 

205. MANUFACTURING PHARMACY CONTROI^-(3) Three lectures. Loss. Given 
in alternate years. 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling of 
drugs from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. 
Includes detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal hood, Drug and 
Cosmetic Act, and other laws affecting the production and distribution of pharma- 
ceutical products. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature— (1, 1) One lecture. Allen 
and Purdum. Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special refer- 
ence to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharma- 
ceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Allen. 
Prerequisites— Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

A study of the development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics 
suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy— (2, 2) Two lectures. Purdum. 
Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) Each Semester. Foss and Allen. 
Required of students majoring in pharmacy. 

Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) Two 
laboratories. Allen and Purdum. 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. Foss, Purdum 
and Allen. 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

21. Accounting — (2) Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one laboratory. 
Pumpian and Leavitt. 

Prerequisite^Pharmacy Administration 37. 

The Analysis of financial and operating statements with a study of the funda- 
mental principles of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics— (3) Junior year, second semester, three 
lectures. Pumpian. 

A Study of the general fundamentals of Economics — production, exchange, dis- 
tribution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing government 
and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. Jurisprudence — (3) Senior year, second semester, three lectures. Pumpian. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations ; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 
Partnerships. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



71. Management — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. Pumpian. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. 

A study of the business problems arising in the operation of a retail pharmacy, 
including ownership organization, financing, leasing, insurance, purchasing, pricing, 
code marking and control of inventory. 

72. Drug Marketing — (2) Senior year, second semester, two lectures. Burbage. 
A study of marketing, marketing research, advertising, selling and salesmanship, 

merchandising, channels of distribution, wholesaling, retailing and personnel manage- 
ment. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (4, 4) Sophomore year, three lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Estabrook and Brucker. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of the principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light and 
electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism — (3, 3) Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given according to demand. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics — (5, 5) Five lectures. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics — (2, 2) Two lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189. 
Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General — (5) Sophomore year, second semester, four lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Amberson, Ferguson, Fox, and White. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 4. 

A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, including neurophysiology, 
the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney and endrocrine glands. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. Zoology, General — (4) Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Dolle and Aceto. 

A study of typical invertebrates with laboratory dissection and discussion of 
basic biological principles. The course stresses practical aspects relating to the 
fundamentals of parasitology, the development of organ systems and economic inter- 
relationships of invertebrates to man. 

4. Zoology, Vertebrate — (3) Freshman year, second semester, two lectures 
and one laboratory. Dolle and Aceto. 

A study of representative vertebrates with laboratory dissection emphasizing 
anatomy with concurrent microscopic study. Lecture material stresses the compara- 
tive anatomy and function of chordate organ systems. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a 
firm foundation for later required courses. 



SCHOOL I »!• PHARM M Y 






ROLL OF STUDENTS. SESSION l<>54-55 



tGRADUATE STUDEN IS 



Aceto, Mark) Domenk Rhode Island 

AJ-Jale< i. HatU Hammoody Iraq 

••Anderson, Martin Maryland 

Brickman, Allen Gerald Maryland 

Brown, Richard Emmery Maryland 

Klkin. Samuel Pennsylvania 

Gergel, Stella Frosina Ohio 

Qoodman, Beverly June Maryland 

Grabowski, Bernard Francis, 

Pennsylvania 
Guerrero. Melania Andieo. . . .Philippines 

Hellnskl, Donald Raymond Maryland 

*Hensala, John David Maryland 

•Hirano, Kaneo Japan 

Jaffe, Jonah Jerry New York 

Kaiser, Carl Maryland 

Kaiser, Joseph Anthony Maryland 

Kallelis, Theodore Spiros. .Rhode Island 

Krister. Donald Lee West Virginia 

Kokoski. Charles Joseph Maryland 



Kokoskl, Roberi John Maryland 

Kramer, Stanley Phillip Maryland 

Kranzler, Theodore. . District of Columbia 

'Lawrence, William Homer Ulranaaa 

Leavitt, Dean Ellis Maine 

Lennox, Wlllard James Maryland 

Mastriani, Joseph Charles. .. .New York 

Milio. Frank Remo Maryland 

Morris, Martin Harold New J< 

Nemerow, Martin Wayne Florida 

Ouellette, Philip Andrew Maine 

Pikor, Jan Eugene Massachusetts 

Raff. Allan Maurice Pennsylvania 

**Rehak, Matthew rosepfa Maryland 

Roskos. John, Jr Georgia 

Sciarra, John J New York 

Speaker, Tully Joseph New J< 

**Swartz, Charles Judd Maryland 

Weaver, Robert Hinchman . . West Virginia 
Weinberg, Myron Simon New York 



SENIOR CLASS 



Abrams, Lawrence Maynard .. .Maryland 
Baikstis, Anda Maryland 

•Bailone, William Andrew Maryland 

Barnstein, Fred Sheldon Maryland 

Barone, Charles Carl New York 

Boeren. John Gilbert Maryland 

'Bowen, Curtis Augustus Maryland 

Burgee. Sydney Lanier, Jr Maryland 

Chow, Jean Maryland 

Crystal, Howard Maryland 

Dagold, Donald Jack Maryland 

Davidson, Saul David Maryland 

Dawson, Thomas Charles Maryland 

Dobrowolskyi. Myron Roman ... Maryland 

Durm, Noel Elton Maryland 

Edelen, James Adrian Maryland 

Engberg, John Joseph Maryland 

Enterline, Jo Anne Sandbower, 

Maryland 

Friedman, Marvin Aaron Maryland 

Goldberg, Marvin Hersh Maryland 

Gordon. Marvin Maryland 

Grebow, Aaron Maryland 

Heilman. Gerald Joseph Maryland 

Hoff. David Maryland 

Imbierowicz. Robert Raymond. Maryland 

Johns, Basil P Maryland 

Karmiol. Stanley B Maryland 

Katz, Burton Lee Maryland 

Lambros, Demetrios Simos ... .Maryland 
Leftin, David Maryland 



Levy. Melvin Maryland 

Lowry, Ronald Henry ... North Carolina 

Mendelsohn, Max Lewis Maryland 

Miller, Barbara Leigh Maryland 

Murphy. John Martin Maryland 

Myers, Richard Earl Maryland 

Norton, Gerald Lewis Maryland 

Ortt, James Bryan Maryland 

Patrick. Thomas Edward Maryland 

Pollekoff, Sheldon Erwin Maryland 

Prag. Jules Benge Maryland 

Pycha. Richard Jerome Maryland 

Rosenberg. Reuben Maryland 

Rubin, Melvin Norman Maryland 

Rubin, Murray Alvin Maryland 

Sacki. Kurt Leo Maryland 

Satisky. William Melvin Maryland 

Schneider, Edwin Joseph Maryland 

Schwartz. Milton '. Maryland 

Seff. David Joseph Maryland 

Settler. Alan Lee Mary'and 

Sienkielewski, Ramon Bantro. . .Maryland 

Snyder. Robert Edward Maryland 

Sulewski. Bernard Alfonsus ... .Maryland 

Taylor, Gary Louis Maryland 

Toelle, Milton Frederick Maryland 

Veni^k, Marvin Leonard Maryland 

Welsh, Charles Robert Maryland 

Williams. Edward Bernard Maryland 

Wolfovitz, Martin Irvin Maryland 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Abramson, Alfred Maryland 

Bell, Frank Kelly Maryland 

Bronstein, Myer Maryland 

Brotman. Ann Sue Maryland 

Conrad, Marlene Elizabeth Maryland 

Dietrich, Joseph William Maryland 



tRegistered in Graduate School. 
*Did not attend entire session. 
♦•Registered for second semester. 



Dorsey, Martha Lee Maryland 

Engel. Ralph Maryland 

Epstein, Irwin Bernard Maryland 

Fine. Jerome Leonard Maryland 

Friedman, Julian Michael Maryland 

Friedman, Sheldon Maryland 



40 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Frieman. Jack Maryland 

Gaver, Paul Glenn, Jr Maryland 

Grossman, Isaac William Maryland 

Hesson, Charles Edward Maryland 

Holtschneider, Douglas Wayne 

Maryland 
Keller, Charles Vincent de Paul, Jr., 

Maryland 

Klatsky, Stanley Albert Maryland 

Kraus, Richard Edward Maryland 

Kwash, Herbert . . . .District of Columbia 

Leonard, William Henry Maryland 

Lichtman, Albert Maryland 

Lindeman, Philip Douglas Maryland 

Metz, Richard August Maryland 

Miller, Richard Anthony Maryland 

Niznik, Paul Vincent Maryland 

Oed, Marvin LeRoy Maryland 

Oster, Walter Filmore Maryland 



Plotkin, Herbert Maryland 

Plotkin, Richard David Maryland 

Pruss, Thaddeus Paul Maryland 

Richman, Emanuel Maryland 

Rofsky, Howard Earl Maryland 

Sachs, Walter Harlan Maryland 

Schiff, Howard Robert Maryland 

Sekuler, Stanley Harold Maryland 

Shemer, Stuart Maryland 

Sherer, Gerald Maryland 

Siegel, Arnold Maryland 

Sophocleus, Gregory John Maryland 

Starkey, Donald Emory Maryland 

Swartz, Irving Emanuel Maryland 

Waitsman, Earl Stanley Maryland 

Watkowski, Milton Raymond. .. .Maryland 

Wesolowski, Frank John Maryland 

Zamecki, Robert John Maryland 

Zappulia, Santo Angelo Maryland 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abrams, Arthur Murray Maryland 

Anoff, Bernard Maryland 

Aronson, Donald Maryland 

Austraw, GeraJdine Lee Maryland 

Bahr, Raymond Donald Maryland 

Balcerzak, Anthony Edwin. .. .Maryland 

Barke, Sheldon Saul Maryland 

Barshack, Irwin Stanley Maryland 

Berman, Gilbert Samuel Maryland 

Brazius, Joseph Victor Maryland 

Bruggy, Loretta Jane Maryland 

Brunson, Gerald Neuman Maryland 

♦Capone, Guy Francis Maryland 

Cohen, Jack Ronald Maryland 

Damasiewicz, Walter Michael. . .Maryland 

Davidov, Arnold Lee Maryland 

Deitch, Erwin Maryland 

Dougherty, Leon Patrick Maryland 

Edwards, James Dolan Maryland 

Elliott, Paul Prag Maryland 

Gilliece, Owen James Maryland 

Glassband, Herman Maryland 

Goldberg, Leonard Maryland 

Goldman, Sue Carolyn Maryland 

Golob, Stanley Paul Maryland 

Gradman, Lee Herbert Maryland 

Greenberg, Richard Earl Maryland 

Hayman. Thomas Johnson Maryland 

Heifetz, Carl Louis Maryland 

Heyman, Bernard Philip Maryland 

♦Johns, John Richard Maryland 



Kabik, Robert Joseph Maryland 

Lebowitz, Donald Leo Maryland 

Levenson, Sidney Maryland 

Levin, Arthur Irvin Maryland 

MacLarty, David Collins Maryland 

Mahoney, Robert Weldon Maryland 

Mercer, Robert Victor Maryland 

♦Miller, Marvin Sidney Maryland 

Neighoff, Wilson Edward Maryland 

Palmer, William Richard Maryland 

Pass, Stacy Maryland 

Fertnoy, Edwin Maryland 

Pessagno, Wilbur Joseph Maryland 

Pollack, Howard Maryland 

Potler, Howard Paul Maryland 

♦Pruce, Morton Sheldon Maryland 

♦Ricks, George Solomon Maryland 

Rosenbloom, Sanford Lawrence, 

Maryland 
Roth, Martin Maryland 

♦Sclar, Morton Jerome Maryland 

Seidman, Sidney Bernard Maryland 

Shein, Sidney Maryland 

Sherman, Miriam Ray Maryland 

Siegel, Harold H Maryland 

Singer, Bernard Sheldon Maryland 

Suter, Thomas Joseph Maryland 

♦Tregoe, Charles Henry Maryland 

Ullman, Donald Allan Maryland 

Wagner, Frederick Henry Maryland 

Young, Donald Roy Maryland 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Abrahams, Nathan Held New Jersey 

Anstine, Clarence LeRoy Maryland 

♦Arnold, James Irvin West Virginia 

Bass, Harry Maryland 

Berman, Mitchell Maryland 

Bozman, Kenneth Bennett Maryland 

Brashears, Charles Luther .... Maryland 

Bressler, Eli Leon Maryland 

Brinsfield, Jay Royce Maryland 

Brown, William James Maryland 

♦Burkhardt, Bernard Thomas ... Maryland 
Burkhardt, Vincent de Paul. . . .Maryland 
Chan, Pearl Maryland 



♦Chance, Robert George Maryland 

♦Christian, Emmanuel Leon Maryland 

Clinger, William Theodore Maryland 

Cohen, Gerald Ivan Maryland 

Cooper, Harold Lee Maryland 

Crouse, James Earl Maryland 

Dagostaro, Philip Joseph Maryland 

Dorn, Conrad Peter Maryland 

Etzler, Edward Alvin Maryland 

Faulkner. Water Nelson Maryland 

Fisher, Thomas Luther Maryland 

Fleckenstein, Paul Anthony. . . .Maryland 
Foley, William Thomas, Jr Maryland 



•Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



11 



Friedman, Mehin Maryland 

ETuteral, trvln Jay Mur> land 

< leraghty, Jamea Timothy Maryland 

Hallam, Alan Maryland 

Hassell, Russell Fabian Maryland 

Hayes, Patricia Ann Maryland 

*Henson, William Thomas Maryland 

Holland, Edward Paul Maryland 

Home, William Scotl Maryland 

Hughes, Henry William Maryland 

Isaacson, Bernard Sh< Idon Maryland 

Mump. Samuel Carlton Maryland 

'KatZ, Reuben Maryland 

King, Donald Charles Maryland 

Kornblau, Maurice Jules. . . . Pennsylvania 

»s, i 'at ricla Phyllis Maryland 

Kronberg, Norman Jack Maryland 

Ltitvin, Bernhardt Maryland 

Loetell, Joseph Wllmer, Jr Maryland 

LotUer, William Irving Maryland 

Malanowski. Antoinette Rosalie . Maryland 

Mallonee, James Joseph Maryland 

M Kenny. Harry Joseph Maryland 

Mint/.. Martin Barry Maryland 

'Nelson. Delmar Edward Maryland 

kowski, Ronald Joseph. .. .Maryland 
Oken, Donald Moses Maryland 



raid Maryland 

i ' timer, Thorn i Maryland 

Penn Thomas .Milton Qosnell. . .Maryland 

•I'm. haska, John William Maryland 

Protokowlcs, Stanley Edward. .Maryland 

Redmond, Noble Philip Maryland 

Reed, Mary Eleanor Maryland 

Eugene Maryland 

Richmond, William Charles Maryland 

Rodell, Michael Byron Maryland 

i, stein. .Man Herberl Maryland 

child, Howard Leslie Maryland 

Ruppersberger, John Joseph. . . .Maryland 

Schoenfeld, Harvej Allan Maryland 

Schumer, Donald Avion Maryland 

Sherman, Alan District of Columbia 

Snyderman, Malcolm S Maryland 

St. John, Miles Eugene Maryland 

Swiss, N Maryland 

'mis Peter Maryland 

Turner, John A Maine 

Voxakis, George Chris Maryland 

W.i rr I jinwo >d, Jr. , . . Md. 

W :. r, Leon Maryland 

Witt ik. Jerome Sidney Maryland 

Zucker, Paul Maryland 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Sultan, Walter Edward, Jr Maryland 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 5, 1954 



J. Mehsen Joseph, 



tDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Ohio 



fMASTER OF SCIENCE 



Chawee Bunnag Thailand 

Wesley Robert Gladhart, Jr Kansas 



Tarsis Hernandez New York 

Francis Anthony Veltre Maryland 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Rosalie Greenberg Abrams 

Marvin Anshell 

Philip Bogash 

Stanley Saul Brage^r 

Stuart Harmon Brager...., 

George James Burke 

Gilbert Cohen 

Edward Ellis Coleman, Jr.., 

Marvin Lewis Edell 

Stanley Zvi Felsenberg 

Samuel Gelblum 

Eileen Fedder Goldstein.... 

Morton Greenberg 

David Don Greenfeld , 

Mayer Handelman 

Donald Raymond Helinski... 
Charles C. T. Henderson.., 
Frederick Joseph Henretty, 

Irene Leona Hilinski , 

Dean Ellis Leavitt 

Willard James Lennox 

Marvin Manes Levenson.... 



.Maryland 
Maryland 
.Maryland 
. Maryland 
Maryland 
.Maryland 
.Maryland 
Maryland 
Jew York 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
, Maryland 
.Maryland 
... Maine 
.Maryland 
Maryland 



Daniel Melvin Levin Maryland 

Arnold Isadore Levins Maryland 

Frederick Magaziner Maryland 

John Raymond Mentzer, Jr Maryland 

Stanley Joseph Merwitz Maryland 

Richard John Mutch Pennsylvania 

Herman Prigal Maryland 

David M. Rombro Maryland 

Joseph Vincent Scelsi Maryland 

Stanley Scherr Maryland 

Bernardine Marilyn Schwartz Maryland 

Jerome Settleman Maryland 

Harold G. Sherr Maryland 

Morton I. Silverstein Maryland 

Robert Sidney Sinker . .District of Columbia 

I. Barry Statter Maryland 

Joseph Edward Thompson Maryland 

John Harry Weingarten Maryland 

Harry Robert Wille Maryland 

Rudolph Franz Winternitz Maryland 

Jonas Julius Yousem Maryland 

Walter Chester Zajac Maryland 



t Degree conferred by Graduate School. 
*Did not attend entire session. 



42 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Stuart Harmon Brager 

The William Simon Memorial Prize Donald Raymond Helinski 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize Daniel Melvin Levin 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Walter Chester Zajac 

The Conrad L Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Eileen Fedder Goldstein 

The David Fink Memorial Prize Stanley Saul Brager 

The Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize Harry Robert Wille 

The Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize Frederick Magaziner 



Daniel Melvin Levin 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 



Walter Chester Zajac 



Donald Raymond Helinski 



HONORABLE MENTION (JUNIOR CLASS) 

Gary L. Taylor A.nda A. Baikstis 

William M. Satisky 



DEAN'S 



Stanley S. Brager 
Stuart H. Brager 
Stanley Felsenberg 
Donald Helinski 



George J. Burke 
Gilbert Coleman 



Anda A. Baikstis 
Jo Anne Sandbower 



Frederick Barnstein 
Sydney Burgee 
Jean Chow 
Howard Crystal 
David Hoff 



Ronald Blumson 
Sue Brotman 



Geraldine Austraw 
Raymond Bahr 
Sheldon S. Barke 
Gilbert S. Berman 
Walter Demasiewicz 
Erwin Deitch 



Anthony Balcerzak 



MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC 
CLASS OF 1954 



EXCELLENCE 



Frederick Magaziner 
HONORARY MENTION 

Mayer Handelman 
CLASS OF 1955 

Gary L. Taylor 
HONORARY MENTION 



CLASS OF 1956 



HONORARY MENTION 
Ralph Engel 

CLASS OF 1957 



HONORARY MENTION 
Sidney Levenson 



Daniel Levin 

Willard J. Lennox 

Rudolph Winternitz 

Walter C. Zajac 



Bernardine Schwartz 
Jonas J. Yousem 



William M. Satisky 
David Seff 



Barbara Miller 
Gerald Norton 
Richard Pycha 
Reuben Rosenberg 
Marvin Venick 



Isaac Grossman. 
Howard Schiff 



Martin Deming 

Sue Goldman 

Richard Greenberg 

Arthur Levin 

Esther Levin 

Miriam Sherman 



Bernard Heyman 



SCHOOL 01 PHARMACY 



INDEX 
Subject Page 

Academic Regulations 1" 

Accreditation '- 

Administration, General Board '> 

vers Of 7 

ganization 

Admissions, 1 'rocedurc H 

Requirements 

To Advanced Standing 13 

To Freshman Class 13 

To Graduate Study 12 

Alumni Association 26 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 26 

Application tor Admission 13 

Attendance Requirements 17 

Board of Regents 6 

Buildings and Equipment 12 

Calendar 3 

Classification of Students 19 

Correspondence 5 

Courses, description of 30-38 

Curriculum 28 

Degrees 12 

Deportment 20 

Dismissal for low Scholarship 19 

Employment 21 

Examinations 17 

Faculty 8-10 

Faculty Council 7 

Fees and Expenses, Graduate 16 

Part-time Undergraduate 15 

Undergraduate 15 

Fellowships, etc , 21 

Grading Scale 17 

Grade-Point Average 18 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 19 

Graduates, Roll of 41 

Graduation Requirements 19 

Handbook of School 26 

History and Program 12 

Honors and Awards 24 

Housing 21 

Incomplete Grades, removal of 18 

Library, Regulations 21 

Staff 11 

Loan Funds 23 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 20 

Registration With 20 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INDEX 

Subject Page 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 27 

Students' Auxiliary 26 

Matriculation 14 

Mid-semester Grade Warnings 18 

Office of Dean, Hours 5 

Staff 11 

Open House 5 

Parking 21 

Probation for Low Scholarship 19 

Professorships 21 

Promotion to next class 18 

Registration 14 

Residence and non-residence, definition of 16 

Scholarships 23 

Scholarship Requirements 18 

Student Alliance 25 

Students, Roll of .. .39-41 

Transcript of Record 19 

Visitors 5 

Withdrawal and Return of Fees 16 




SEPARATE CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University oi 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director 
of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

These catalogs and schools are: 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 

7. College of Home Economic* 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School 



At Baltimore 
Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 
tive schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The professional schools are: 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 

At Heidelberg 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by addressing 
the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Park, 
Maryland. 



MARYLAND ROOM 




Volume 36 



Number 1 



Tho 



CATALOG 

of the 

School off 

PHARMACY 

1956-1957 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



k& 



The School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 



The South's Oldest and Leading School of Pharmacy 
In the South's Leading Industrial Centre and Port 



IMPORTANT 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of 
Maryland. The University reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of 
residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, 
to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 
in the best interests of the University. 



See Outside Back Cover for List of Other Catalogs 




ITY Of 

ND 

T I O N 



Catalogue and 
113th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1956-1957 



Volume 36 — Number 1 
Published by the University 
32 South Greene Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



1956 : 1957 


JANUARY 1956 


JULY 1956 


JANUARY 1957 


JULY 1957 


S M TWT F S 


SMTWTF S 


S M TW T F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


..123456 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 1011 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 910 111213 


15 1617 18 19 20 21 


15 1617 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 1617 1819 


141516171819 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 31 .... 


28 29 3031 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M TW T F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 


12 


12 3 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


5 6 7 8 91011 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


1011 12 131415 16 


1112 1314151617 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


26 27 28 29 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


24 25 26 27 28 .. .. 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 


1 


12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 1011 12 13 14 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


910 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 1213 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 


APRIL 

S M TWT F S 






OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


S M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


..123456 


.... 12 3 4 5 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


7 8 9 10 111213 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 910 11 12 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


14 15 16171819 20 


1415 16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 1718 19 


29 30 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 






28 29 30 31 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


.... 12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 15 1617 1819 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


1011 12 13 1415 16 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


27 28 29 30 31 ... . 


25 26 27 28 29 30 .. 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M TWT F S 








12 


1 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 91011121314 


1011 12 13 1415 16 


910 1112 13 14 15 


910 111213 14 15 


1516171819 20 21 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


161718 19 20 2122 


161718 19 20 2122 


22 23 24 25 2627 28 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


29 30 31 




1 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1956-1957 
1956 FotST Semester 

September 17 .Monday Freshman Orientation— 

9:30 a.m. 

September 18 .Tuesday Freshman Registration— 

9:00-10 :00 am 

Sophomore Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

September 19 .Wednesday Junior Registration— 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

Graduate Registration — 
1:00-3:00 p.m. 

September 24 Monday Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 

November 21 .Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins 

at close of last scheduled 
period 

November 26 Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

December 19 Wednesday Christmas recess begins at 

close of last scheduled 
period 

1957 

January 2 Wednesday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

January 23-29 Wednesday-Tuesday First semester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 5 Tuesday Freshman Registration— 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Sophomore Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

February 6 Wednesday Junior Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Senior Registration— 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration — 
1 :00-3 :00 p.m. 

February 11 Monday Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 

February 22 Friday .Washington's Birthday, 

holiday 

April 18 Thursday Easter recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period 

April 23 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

May 29-June 4 Monday-Saturday .Second semester examina- 
tions 

May 30 .Thursday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 8 Saturday Commencement 

All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration day. Students failing to comply 
with this regulation are charged a fee of five dollars. No student is normally permitted 
to register after Saturday noon of the week in which instruction begins. 

The office of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, from 
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the School of Pharmacy should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 32 S. Greene St, Balti- 
more 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogues and Brochures, 

General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 

Housing of Students, Scholarships, Scholastic Standing of 

Students, Transcripts of Records, 

Vocational Placement. 

VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy. The Dean's Office is open 
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment 

OPEN HOUSE 

A guided tour of the laboratories and classrooms with an opportunity to see 
students and faculty at work is afforded at the Annual Open House held each 
Spring. A program will be mailed upon request 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, con- 
sisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each year for a term of nine 
years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, which controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions: 



College of Agriculture 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agricultural and Home Economics 

Extension Service 
Agricultural Services and Controls 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Business and Public 

Administration 
College of Education 
College of Engineering, Glenn L. Martin 

Institute of Technology 
College of Home Economics 



College of Military Science 

College of Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health 
College of Special and Continuation 

Studies 
Graduate School 
Summer Session 
School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 
School of Nursing. 
School of Pharmacy 
The University Hospital 



The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy, the Hospital 
and a branch of the College of Continuation and Special Studies, are located in 
Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets; the others in College 
Park. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman 


Baltimore 


Expiration Date 
1958 


B. Herbert Brown 


Baltimore 


1960 


Edmund S. Burke 


Cumberland 


1959 


Edward F. Holter 


Middletown 


1959 


Louis L. Kaplan 


Baltimore 


1961 


Charles P. McCormick 


Baltimore 


1957 


Harry H. Nuttle 


Denton 


1957 


Enos S. Stockbridge 


Baltimore 


1960 


Thomas B. Symons 


College Park 


1963 


C Ewing Tuttle 


Baltimore 


1962 


Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 


Baltimore 


1956 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson H. Elkins, D. Phil., President of the University 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President Emeritus 

Noel E. Foss, B.S., Ph.D., Dean 

G. Watson Algire, M.S., Director of Admissions and Registration 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Noel E. Foss, Dean 

Adele B. Ballman Francis M. Miller 

C. T. Ichniowski Donald E. Shay 

Frank J. Slama, Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FACULTY 
EMERITA 
B. Olive Cole Professor of Pharmacy Administration, Emerita 



Professors 

♦Gaylord B. Estabrook Professor of Physics 

B.S. in Ch.E., Purdue University, 1921 ; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922 ; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

Noel E. Foss Professor of Pharmacy 

Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; BS. in Pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932 ; Ph.D., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist— South Dakota, New York. 

Casimir T. Ichniowski Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S. in Pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

fW. Arthur Purdum Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930; B.S. in Pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

*A. W. Richeson Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; A.M., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
Ph.D„ 1928. 

Emil G. Schmidt Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1921; Ph.D., 1924; LL.B., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

Donald E. Shay , Professor of Bacteriology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 
1943. 

Frank J. Slam a Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.C, 1925; B.S. in Pharmacy, 1928; 
M.S., 1930; Ph.D., 1935. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



Associate Professors 

Benjamin Frank Allen Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Edward J. Herbst Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1943 ; M.S., 1944 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

•Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
tPart time. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



♦FfcANCIS M. Miller Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; Ph.D.. Northwestern University, 
1949. 

Ida Marian Robinson Associate Professor of Library Science 

A.B., Cornell University, 1924 ; B.S.L.S., Columbia University School of Library 
Bclence, 1944. 

Raymond E. Vanderlinde Associate Professor of Biological 

Chemistry, School of Medicine 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1944; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 



Assistant Professors 

♦Adele B. Ballman Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Qoucher College, 1928; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

♦Charles W. Foreman Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1949 ; M.A., Duke University, 1951 ; Ph.D., 
1954. 



Paul A. Pumpian Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; B.S. in Pharm., 1950; LLB., 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland ; Member of the Maryland Bar. 

♦Claire Strube Schradieck Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Goucher College, 1916; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

Frank D. Vasington Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
A.B., University of Connecticut, 1950; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

Instructors 

Bernard D. Blaustein Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S. Ch.E., University of Pennsylvania, 1950; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1951. 

Ann Virginia Brown Instructor, Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medxcine 
A.B., Goucher College, 1940. 

Samuel L. Fox Instructor in Physiology, School of Medicine 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1934; B.S. In Pharm., 1936; M.D., 1938. 

Georgianna S. Gittinger Instructor in Pharmacology 

A.B., Hood College, 1912; M.A., University of Virginia, 1924. 

Bernard F. Grabowski Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., Temple University, 1952 ; M.S., 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist— Pennsylvania. 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



John J. Sciarra Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., St. Johns University, 1951; M.S., Duquesne University, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— New York, Pennsylvania. 



Visiting Lecturer 

Landon W. Burbage Visiting Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

Ph.B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909 ; Ph.G., 1910. 



Assistants 

♦Mario D. Aceto Assistant in Zoology 

B.S. in Pharm., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— Rhode Island. 

Paul Haubrick Assistant in Bacteriology 

B.A., Carroll College, 1950. 

Jerald R. Izatt Assistant in Physics 

B.S., University of Utah, 1952. 

fTHEODORE Kallelis Assistant in Pharmacognosy 

B.S., Tufts College, 1935; B.S., in Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 

1952; M.S., Temple University, 1954. 

Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania. 

Robert Kokoski Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. In Pharm., University of Maryland, 1952. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Theodore Kranzler Assistant in Pharmacy 

A. A., George Washington University, 1952 ; B.S. in Pharm., 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist— District of Columbia. 

Dean Leavitt Assistant in Pharmacy Administration 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Willard Lennox Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Phillip Julian Levine Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Rhode Island. 

Barbara B. MacHamer Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., Goucher College, 1955. 



•Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University, 
(t) Half-time. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 



Frank Milio Assistant m Pharmacy 

B.S. In Pharm . University of Mar. kind, 1 952. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

*Jobn Roskos. Jr Assistant in Pharmat ology 

B.S. In Pharm.. Southern College of Pharmacy, 1953. 

Myron Simon Weinberg Assistant in Chemistry 

B.A.. New York University, 1950; B.S. in Pharm., Fordham University, 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



Library Staff 
Pharmacy-Dentistry 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Associate Librarian 

Beatrice Marriott, A.B Reference Librarian 

Curtis C. Crom, A.B., M.S.L.S Periodicals Librarian 

Harriette W. S helton, B.A., B.S.L.S Chief Cataloguer 

Marjorte E. Fluck, B.S. in Ed Assistant Cataloguer 

Marjorie H. Jarvis Library Assistant 

Elizabeth E. McCoach Assistant to the Librarian 

Patricia C. Watkins Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 

Daisy Lotz Gue Secretary-Stenographer 

Margaret E. Beatty Senior Stenographer 

Loretta H. Shelley Senior Stenographer 



♦Resigned January 31, 1956. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
History and Program 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy are to train students for the efficient, 
ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students in general scientific 
and cultural subjects so that they can read critically, express themselves clearly, 
and think logically as members of a profession and citizens of a democracy; to 
guide students into productive scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge 
and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the South, 
was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland physicians 
and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in pharmacy to replace the out- 
dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave 
its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College joined with a group of medical 
schools and the Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer cooperative instruction 
in the health sciences. The new institution was known as the University of Maryland. 
In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional schools was merged with the Maryland 
State College at College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies a six-story building constructed specifically for phar- 
maceutical education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with the most 
modern apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts and for research 
in pharmacy is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing over 
27,000 books, is now merged with the dentistry collection. 

Students have access to the Medical School Library, and the time-honored collec- 
tions of the Enoch Pratt, the Peabody, the Medical and Chiurgical Faculty, and 
The Johns Hopkins University. Most of these libraries are within walking distance 
of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery and 
the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy has 
expanded its period of training over the years from a one-year to a four-year course. 
The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy has now recommended a five- 
year course. However, such a program is in the future and students attending 
and entering the School of Pharmacy in the Autumn of 1956 will be required to take 
only the four-year course. 

The School of Pharmacy has always been a fully accredited Class A school and 
was again so rated at its last inspection in November 1953 by the Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Schools and Colleges and by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education. The diploma of the School is recognized by every state board of pharmacy. 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. The 
general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the 
University. For detailed information, see the catalogue of the Graduate School. 



SCHOOL OK PHARMACY 13 

ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 
Amount and Quality of Scholastic Preparation 

To be admitted to the School of Pharmacy, a candidate must be a graduate of a 
secondary school approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or a similar 
accrediting agency and must submit credentials acceptable to the Director of Admis- 
sions, as proof of adequate preparatory-school training. 

Sixteen units of academic work are required of each applicant. 

The following work must have been completed: 
English — 4 units 
Algebra — V/2 units 

Plane Geometry— 1 unit V Total 8 ^ un i ts 

History — 1 unit 
Science — 1 unit 

The remaining seven and one-half units may be in astronomy, biology, botany, 
chemistry, civics, economics, general science, geology, history, foreign languages, 
mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered for which 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Not more than four units 
may be vocational units (agriculture, commercial drawing, home economics, shop 
courses, etc.). 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Director of 
Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy for an Application Blank, an 
illustrated brochure about the School, and 'literature about opportunities in pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill the requirements 
for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts of his college 
record along with a certificate of good standing from the college he attended. His 
grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the college's grading system. 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American Council on 
Pharmacutical Education are given credit for the work of the first three years of 
the pharmacy curriculum which they have completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts subjects 
of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given for work 
completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those courses 
in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the schedules for 
transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given preference over 
advanced work. 

Credit is not given for pharmaceutical work done in evening or correspondence 
schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other institutions if 
the school did not grant credit. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

In determining the grade-point average of transfer students, only those courses 
taken at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland are used. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed to the Dean 
of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions. 

ADMISSION AND COSTS 
Admission Procedure for All Applicants 

1. Request the Director of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
to send the preliminary application blank. Fill the blank out fully including the 
names of all schools and colleges which the candidate has attended. Sign the blank 
and return it with the required photographs and a seven dollar and fifty cent 
investigation fee to the Director of Admissions not earlier than October first of the 
academic year prior to the proposed beginning of the candidate's studies at the 
school. (This fee will not be refunded or credited on any subsequent bill.) 

2. Send the high school record blank which accompanies the application blank 
to the principal of the high school attended and request that he mail it promptly to 
the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the prospective 
student will be advised to: 

3. Report to the School of Pharmacy for entrance examinations and interviews. 
The School seeks indications of aptitude for undertaking pharmacy studies by ex- 
amining the school records of candidates, their scores in aptitude and achievement 
tests, and estimates of their interests, maturity, and personality. Entrance examina- 
tions and interviews are held in February, but subsequent opportunities are given. 

4. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the application of candidates 
whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, and the School 
of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory that they have been 
tentatively accepted. 

5. Students who are offered tentative admission must immediately make a deposit 
of $60.00 ($10.00 matriculation fee plus $50.00 deposit on tuition) on their Sep- 
tember tuition. This deposit is non-returnable if the student fails to register in the 
autumn, but is credited against the first semester tuition charge of all students who 
enter. 

REGISTRATION AND FEES 

All students must enroll in person at the Dean's office during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. On registration day the student fills 
out necessary forms and class cards and pays his fees. Detailed directions concern- 
ing dates and procedure are mailed during the Summer to students who are eligible 
to enroll in the fall. All new students must matriculate. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar upon 
the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter classes until 
he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and hours printed in this 
catalogue are required to pay a late registration fee of five dollars. The last day 
for late registration is Saturday noon following the close of the normal registration 
period. This rule may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the 
Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 15 

TUITION AND LABORATORY FEES 

Full-time Undergraduate Students 

Tuition fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

Student Activities' Fee (per semester) 7.50 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 
to the weekly newspaper, Maryland Mortar, all expenses of 
School luncheons, picnics, dances, Honors Convocation) 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's tuition.) 

For Seniors 

(iraduation Fee (To be paid in February of the Senior Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in 
excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Books, stationery, weights, slide rule, dissecting instruments, 

etc. Approximately 130.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each course. 
Fee for Change in Registration after first week 3.00 

Part-time Undergraduate Students 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered full- 
time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition fee (for each semester hour per semester) $10.00 
Laboratory fees (per semester) : 

Bacteriology $10.00 

Chemistry 10.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physics 6.00 

Physiology 8.00 

Zoology 8.00 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Graduate Students 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 10.00 

Tuition fee for students carrying 10 or more semester credit 

hours 100.00 

Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 
Graduation fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and microfilming of 
thesis) * 50.00 

Return of Fees Upon Withdrawal 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, must 
file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do not comply 
with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are not accorded any 
refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent 
or guardian. Fees are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal 
is filed in the office of the Dean. 

The $60.00 deposit required of all entering students will not be returned 
under any circumstances. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required in 
each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Council reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes in 
the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the time 
of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at least 
one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this 
State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, the right 
of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident status must 
be established by him prior to the registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 17 



The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only otie domicile may be maintained. 

The following interpretations or modifications of the above rules shall a; 
U) The domicile ot the Wife shall be that ot her husband, except m the case 
oi a minor Supported by her parents, m which event the marital status will not be 

considered in determining the residence status. 

(b) Should the parents be separated, the domicile of the parent who furnishes 
the support shall determine the residence status of the child. 

I c ) Should the support of a minor not be furnished by the parents or 
guardians, the domicile of the person who furnishes the entire support shall deter- 
mine the residence status ot the child. 

id) Should the support for a student be derived from a trust fund established 
specifically for his support and education, the domicile of the person who established 
the fund during the full year previous thereto shall determine the residence status of 
the .student. 

(e) Should the parent or other person responsible for a student be required 
to leave this State for business or military reasons, he shall not be deprived of his 
right to claim residence status if it is evident that he intends to return to this State 
upon the completion of the special business or military assignment. 

(f) The non-resident status of an adult may be changed upon proof that he 
has purchased and has maintained a home in Maryland for at least one full year; 
that he has become a registered voter of this State; and that he intends to make 
this State his domicile. These facts must be established prior to the registration 
period of the semester for which this change of status is requested. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
Attendance Requirements 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes and 
laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examination in that 
subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally counted with 
the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than half a period is con- 
strued as absence ; two latenesses of less than half a period are also construed as an 
absence. 

Examinations 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion of 
the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester as scheduled 
on the calendar printed in this catalogue. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean imme- 
diately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission for a deferred 
examination. 

Grading System 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 
Grade Interpretation Point Value 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Fair 2 

D Poor but passing 1 

F Failure 

I Course work incomplete replaced by definite 

grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the semester's 
work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received by the number of 
credit hours the course carries : 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


English 


3 


C 


6 


Speech 


1 


D 


1 


German 


3 


B 


9 


Mathematics 


3 


C 


6 


Chemistry 


4 


D 


4 


Zoology 


4 


B 


12 



18 38 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is found to 
have a grade-point average of 2.1. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at the 
School of Pharmacy are considered. 

Scholarship Requirements 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings. 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his academic 
standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean warns and 
the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 

Incomplete Work 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a student 
whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness 
or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been unable to complete the require- 
ment. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor enters on the class card a reason 
of the character stated above with an estimate of the quality of the- student's work. 
In cases when this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by 
the instructor by the end of the next semester in which that subject is again offered 
or the mark becomes F. 

Raising Grade of D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he failed 
or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or elsewhere, 
must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular attendance, labora- 
tory work, and examinations. His final mark will be substituted for 'the mark 
already recorded, but he will not receive any additional credit for the course. 
However, the final mark received in the course will be used in determining credit 
and in computing the over-all average. 

Promotion to the Next Class 

To be promoted to the next class freshmen and sophomores must make a grade- 
point average of 1.5 in the regularly scheduled work and juniors must make and 



SCHOOL OK PHARMACY 19 

maintain throughout their senior year a grade-point average of 2.0 in the regularly 
scheduled work. 

Probation for Low Scholarship 

Any student who fails more than one-fifth of the semester credit hours for 
which he is registered is placed on probation. 

A student on probation must pass all the semester credit hours for which he is 
scheduled and attain a total grade point value rive in excess of the scheduled 
credit hours. 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 

Any student who fails more than half of the semester credit hours for which 
he is registered is dismissed from the School and is required to report to the Dean's 
Office for dismissal procedures. 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows : 

Before five weeks of the semester has passed WX 

After five weeks of the semester has passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After five weeks of the semester has passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Classification 

Students having 0-29 credit hours are classified as Freshmen. 

Students having 30-65 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are classi- 
fied as Sophomores. 

Students having 65-105 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Juniors. 

Students having 105-139 credit hours with a grade-point average of 2.0 in 
the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 and have 140 credit 
hours to be considered as candidates for graduation. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon students 
who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School of Pharmacy, 
who have been accredited with 140 semester hours' instruction, and who have attained 
a grade point average of 1.75 or above. 

Transcripts of Records 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts 
are as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; for addi- 
tional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when more 
than one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged 
for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions, Government agencies, etc., as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy and 
his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any student 
or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy have not been 
satisfied. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students enter- 
ing upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file with the 
Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for registration as 
a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required to furnish such 
information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of 
said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of phar- 
macy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit to the 
said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drugstore experience acquired 
during the preceding vacation months." 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration to 
those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Pharmacy. 
Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty-one years, 
is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has completed one 
year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board 
of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of 
registration. 

A student may not obtain credit for practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or college 
of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. Effective 
January 1, 1957, four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a 
registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board 
for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 2411 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 18, Maryland, for further 
information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a 
student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, or 
whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her health, 
or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities 
of the University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 21 



Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though no 
specific charge be made against them. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire period 
of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and completion 
of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to secure suitable 
employment, but it is recommended that students refrain from working during the 
school session. 

HOUSING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any housing accommodations in 
Baltimore. The School assists students in finding living accommodations. 

PARKING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on univer- 
sity parking lots for students. 

LIBRARY REGULATIONS 

Loan Regulations: 

Loan periods have been established according to demand for and protection 
of books, journals and other materials : 

Reserve Books: 3:50 p. m.-ll a. m. Advance reserves accepted, but no 

renewals. 
Current Journals: One-day circulation for latest issue; others, two weeks. 
Reference Books: Use in library only for specified reference material. 
All Other Books and Journals : Two weeks (plus one renewal of two 
weeks). 

Fines: 

Fines are imposed to assure that all students may have equal access to books: 
Reserve Books: 15tf for first hour; 5tf for each additional hour, or fraction 

thereof. 
Other Loans: 5tf per day. 

Lost Books: List price of the book. (Losses should be reported im- 
mediately.) 

All books must be returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines paid 
before a student can finish the year in good standing. 

PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy in 
1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The first 
appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was designated 
Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair has subsequently been held by 
Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was 
appointed June IS, 1951. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual fellow- 
ships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate students 
desirous of doing research in pharmacy; pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
and pharmacognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for an additional allow- 
ance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. Address applications 
directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 1507 M Street, 
N. W., Washington 5, D. C. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, sometime asso- 
ciate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist of Baltimore, 
has contributed since 1930 a sum of money annually to maintain a research fellow- 
ship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open to promising graduate 
students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the School 
of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships for research 
studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
bacteriology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candidates for these fellowships 
will be made by the Faculty with the approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Company of New York contributes sufficient funds to provide 
a fellowship paying $1000.00 annually for two years for research in pharmaceutical 
chemistry and the allied sciences. 

The Noxzema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing in 1956 a fund not to exceed 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens. A candidate will 
be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by the Fellowship Committee 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which the Noxzema 
Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting member. This fellowship may be 
renewed annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School each 
year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student selected by 
the committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association to enable the student 
to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of Pharmacy. The research con- 
ducted must be of general pharmaceutical interest and must be accepted upon 
completion for publication in one of the pharmaceutical journals. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS AND INTERNSHIPS IN HOSPITAL PHARMACY 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying a 
stipend of $1350.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified students 



SCHOOL OK PHARMACY 23 



giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the departments in 
which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds of the normal 
graduate work. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy, together with the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland and the Pharmacy Department of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, offer 
annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several internships in hospital pharmacy. 
The appointments, beginning September first, run for twenty-two months. Appoint- 
ees devote half time to hospital pharmacy service and half time to graduate work 
leading to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland 
and a certificate of internship awarded by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 
Hospital provides a stipend of $150.00 per month and the School of Pharmacy 
reduces tuition fees for these candidates by 25%. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing inquiries 
to the Chief Pharmacist, the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 5, Maryland, or 
the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Charles London Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a member 
of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry has en- 
dowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by the Faculty to a senior 
student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and commercial pharmacy. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available schol- 
arships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified junior and senior students who have 
maintained an average of "B" or above and who are in need of financial assistance 
to complete their schooling. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarship Fund 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified 
sophomore, junior and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Read Drug and Chemical Co. Scholarships 

The Read Drug and Chemical Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes funds 
to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified sophomore, junior 
and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are 
in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Fund 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, a number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment for a scholar- 
ship worth $100.00 annually. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing in 1956 a fund to provide one 
or two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens of the 
United States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational quali- 
fications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting 
member. This scholarship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified junior 
and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recommendation 
of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students who 
have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Students whose 
names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's academic medal at the 
Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, was 
established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of this 
organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are members 
in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility 
for membership in the Society is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, 
personality, and leadership. All candidates selected for membership must have 
completed seventy-five credit hours of college work and must be approved by the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

The Society also awards annually a United States Dispensatory to the sopho- 
more student of high moral character who, having completed forty-eight credit 
hours of college work, has attained the highest scholastic average in his class and 
a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, provided 
that this average is not below the grade of "B". Certificates of Honor are awarded 
to the three students having the next highest general average, provided these averages 
do not fall below the grade of "B". 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three Junior students having 
the highest general average, provided this average does not fall below the grade 
of "B". 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in awarding 
these honors. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 25 

'The William Simon Memorial Price 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of chemistry 
in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by the Faculty to a 
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has done superior 
work in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand 
high in all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of 
chemistry is guided in his judgment of the student's ability by observation and 
personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMes Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
to be awarded annually by the Faculty to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy, for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prise 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy to the senior student having 
the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dispensing ohar- 
macy. 

The Conrad L. IVich Pharmacognosy Prise 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund the income 
from which is awarded annually by the Faculty of the School to the senior student 
who has done exceptional work throughout the course in Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the Faculty 
for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity provides a cup in memory of 
Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in the service of 
their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty as having exhibited outstanding qualities of character and leadership. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prise 

The Kappa Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity provides a prize to 
be awarded annually to the senior student chosen by the Faculty for proficiency in 
pharmacology. 

Epsilon Graduate Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prise 

The Epsilon Graduate Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority provides 
annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by the Faculty for 
outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Merck Awards 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offer a set of valuable reference 
books to the senior student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. A second 
set of books is given to the senior student who has a high standing in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol Labora- 
tories, Inc. to the senior student who has contributed the most to pharmacy through 
his extra-curricular activities. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the annual Honors Day 
Convocation. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students established for 
the purpose of aiding in the internal administration of the school, for organizing 
all extra-curricular organizations and activities of the student body, and for 
coordinating the activities of the student body with those of the Faculty and Admin- 
istration to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council 
of the Student Alliance is composed of the officers of the Student Government 
Alliance, the Presidents of the Senior, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman Classes, 
four delegates at large, one to be elected from each class, a fraternity delegate, a 
publications delegate, and a Faculty Advisory Council consisting of the Dean, the 
Faculty Advisor to the Council, and the four class advisors. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association has been 
organized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The purpose 
of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner the advance- 
ment of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance with the objectives 
stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical Association, especially 
in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its 
application and aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November 1935. The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the 
participation of students in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion to the end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be awakened 
and guided and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in and the prob- 
lems confronting the profession. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 27 

HANDBOOK OF SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The Student Alliance publishes a Handbook of the School of Pharmacy which 
is available to all students. This Handbook contains further information about 
student life at the School. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland was established in May 1871. This Association continued a separate ex- 
istence until the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was 
formed. Following the organization of it, the Society remained dormant until June 
1926 when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland. 

The following are its officers: 

OFFICERS (1955-56) 

John Wannenwetsch, Honorary President 

Gordon Mouat, President 

Norman Levin, First Vice-President 

Nelson Warfield, Second Vice-President 

Francis Balassone, Secretary 

Mrs. Frank Budacz, Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 

Samuel Portney 

George J. Stiffman 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee known 
as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group are to rep- 
resent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy and 
pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Committee are : 

Lloyd N. Richardson, Chairman 
John F. Wannenwetsch, Co-Chairman 
Halcolm S. Bailey William C. McKenna 

Frank Block Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr. 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning Samuel I. Raichlen 

Lester R. Martin Simon Solomon 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Title and Number of Course 



and 



Freshman Year 
f Chemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic 

Qualitative Analysis 

fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 

fMathematics 10 or 15 

{Mathematics 11 or 17 

f Modern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 

German 

tSpeech 1, 2, Public Speaking 

fZoology 1, General 

fZoology 4, Animal Kingdom 



Sophomore Year 

Chemistry 15, Quantitative Analysis 

tChemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 

f Chemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 

Laboratory 

Pharmacy 1, 2, General 

tPhysics 10, 11, General 

Physiology 22, General 



Junior Year 

Bacteriology 1, General 

Bacteriology 115, Serology and Immunology 
Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 

Assaying 

Chemistry 153, Biological 

Pharmacognosy 51, 52, General 

Pharmacy 51, 52, Dispensing 

Pharmacy 61, History of Pharmacy 

Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 

of Economics 



Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 

Products 

First Aid 1, Standard 

Pharmacology 81, 82, General 

Pharmacy 101, 102, Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 
ElectivesJ 



(Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 
macists 

Pharmacognosy 62, Animal Health Products 
or 

Pharmacy 132, Cosmetics 

Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Adminis- 
tration 

or 

Pharmacy 81, Pharmacy Literature 

Pharmacy Administration 71, Management... 

Pharmacy Administration 72, Drug Marketing 

(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 

fEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 

Literature 

or 
•{Language 6, 7, Intermediate Scientific German 

fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 

(Electives — Special Cases) 

Chemistry 99, Glassworking 

Chemistry 112, 114, Chemistry of Medicinal 
Products 



Hrs. Per Week 



18 



Hrs. Per Week 



17 



17 



t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
t The electives must be approved by the Dean. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



29 



CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 



Didactic 



Laboratory 



Total 



Credit 

hour* 



Freshman Year 

Chemistry 1, 3 

English 1, 2 

Mathematics 10, IS 

Mathematics 11, 17 

Modern Language 1, 2 or 6, 7. 

Speech 

Zoology 1, 4 



Total 



8opnoMORE Year 

Chemistry 15 

Chemistry 35, 37 

Chemistry 36, 38 

Pharmacy 1, 2 

Physics 10, 11 

Physiology 22 



Total. 



Junior Year 

Bacteriology 1 

Bacteriology 1 15 

Chemistry 53 

Chemistry 153 

Pharmacognosy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 61 

Pharmacy Administration 37. 



Total. 



Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113 

First Aid 

Pharmacology 81, 82 

Pharmacy 101, 102 

Pharmacy Administration 21 

Pharmacy Administration 62 

Electives 



Total 

(Electives — Retail Major) 

Pharmacognosy 61 

Pharmacognosy 62 or 

Pharmacy 132 

Pharmacy 121 or 

Pharmacy 81 

Pharmacy Administration 71 

Pharmacy Administration 72 

(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major)) 

English 3, 4 or 

Language 6, 7 

Mathematics 20, 21 

(Electives — Special Cases) 

Chemistry 99 

Chemistry 112, 114 



SUMMARY 

Freshman Year 

Sophomore Year 

Junior Year 

Senior Year 



Total. 



128 
96 
64 



416 

32 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
16 
48 



352 



96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224f 



560 

32 

48 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 

96 
96 
96 



448 
416 
352 
560 



1,776 



192 



144 



336 



128 



432 

64 
64 
96 
64 
160 
192 



640 



128 
96 
48 



160f 



432 
48 
"48 



128 



336 
432 
640 
432 



1,840 



256 
W 
48 
48 
96 
32 

208 



784 

128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 



848 



96 

96 

128 

128 

224 

256 

16 

48 



992 



96 

16 

224 

160 

64 

48 

384t 



992 

80 
48 
80 
32 
32 
32 
32 



96 
128 



784 
848 
992 
992 



3,616 



U 



142* 



t Average. 

* A minimum of 140 credits required for graduation 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. Bacteriology, General — (4) Junior year, first semester, two lectures, two 
laboratories. Shay and Haubrick. 

Introduction to general bacteriology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the prevention 
and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Junior year, second semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories, Shay and Haubrick. 

Prerequisite — Bacteriology 1. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (1, 1) One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) 
Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media — (1, 1) One Lecture. (Given in alternate 
years.) Shay. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of bacteriological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in bacteriology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health— (1-2) One lecture. Shay. 
Prerequisites — Bacteriology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of state and 
municipal health departments and private health agencies. The courses will also 
include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Bacteriology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of the work performed. 

CHEMISTRY 
1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. Blaustein and MacHamer. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, 
the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis 
of the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (2, 2) Sophomore year, two 
lectures. Miller and Weinberg. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Sophomore year, one lab- 
oratory. Miller and Weinberg. 



♦Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49* for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199- and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 31 



Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 
A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Sophomore year, first semester, two lectures 
and two laboratories. Grabowski. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and their 
application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Junior year, second semes- 
ter, two lectures and two laboratories. Grabowski. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. 

Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of 
official preparations, with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99. Glassworking — (1-1) Laboratory, senior year, either semester. Miller. 
Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the manipulation of glass, repair and construction of 
apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, three 
lectures. Miller. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical properties 
of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, two lab- 
oratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical prop- 
erties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Any one or two semesters. 
Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 37, 38, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a study of 
the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic 
compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2, 2) One lecture, two 
laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. 
The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry — (5) Junior year, first semester, four lectures 
and one laboratory. Schmidt, Herbst, Vanderlinde, Vasington, and Brown. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 35, 37. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living organisms 
and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry — (3, 3) — Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic 
theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



188, 190. Physical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two lectures. 
Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, steroids and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (2, 2) Two lectures. Miller. 
Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically active 
bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and con- 
ferences. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal 
chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to official, 
proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. Miller. 
Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical -Chemistry — Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. Miller. 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds (Advanced Course) — (2-4) 
Either semester. Two to four laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances and 
mixtures. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Ballman. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling and punctuation, combined with a historical 
study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature — (3, 3) Elective, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign classics 
being read in translation. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 33 



SPEECH 
1, 2. Public Speaking — (1, 1) Freshman year, one lecture. Ballman. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; the prepa- 
ration ami delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speaking; reference 
readings, short reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one 
demonstration. 

Given by an instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

0. Basic Mathematics — (0) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the 
qualifying examination for this course. 

The fundamental principles of algebra. 

10. Algebra— (3) Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and 
radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial theorem, and theory 
of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not 
offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addition formulas, 
solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic 
sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra — (3) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic equations, 
theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, logarithms, determinants 
and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second semester three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation 
of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and 
solid analytic geometry. 

20. 21. Calculus — (3, 3) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, 
curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applications of integration, 
partial derivatives^ space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

152, 153. Mathematical Statistics— (2, 2) Prerequisite, Mathematics 20, 21. 
Richeson. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis and corre- 
lation, theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical inference. Illustrations 
will be drawn from the biological sciences. Given in alternate years. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

I, 2. French — Elementary — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Not offered 1955-56. 

1, 2. German — Elementary — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The 
assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Rapid grammar review, exercises in pronunciation, reading of scientific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Review of grammar and reading of scientific texts. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, first semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Slama and Kallelis. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. 

A study of the cultivation, collection and commerce of crude vegetable drugs 
with special emphasis on the physician and microscopical characteristics used in 
their identification and in the detection of adulteration. 

52. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, second semester, two lectures, 
two laboratories. Slama and Kallelis. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, Pharmacognosy 51. 
A continuation of pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering animal drugs, 
antibiotics and allergy-producing pollens. 

61. Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists — (3). Senior year, first 
semester, two lectures and one laboratory. Slama and Kallelis. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and 
the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops ; their recogni- 
tion, life history, habits and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products — (3). Senior year, second 
semester, three lectures. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Physiology 22, Pharmacology 81. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2, 2) One lecture and one 
laboratory. Given in alternate years. Slama. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 35 



Prerequisite— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local Rom Instruction will he given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

111. 112. Plant Anatomy — (4, 4) Two lectures and two laboratories. Slama. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special 
emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201. 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— (4, 4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and micro- 
chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of adulterants. 
Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4, 4) Two lectures and two labora- 
tories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A ttudy of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount and quality 
of work performed. Slama. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81. 82. Pharmacology, General — (4, 4). Senior year, three lectures and one 
laboratory. Ichniowski, Gittinger, Lennox, and Roskos. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, including methods of biological assay, with special reference to the 
drugs and preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Form- 
ulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4) Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Ichniowski and Gittinger. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay — (4, 4) Laboratory and conferences, 
first and second semesters. Ichniowski. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 
Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (4, 4) Laboratory and 
conferences, first and second semesters. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years, 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (2-4), (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and comparative 
standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Ichniowski. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Pharmacy, General — (5, 5) Sophomore year, four lectures and one 
laboratory. Foss, Allen, Sciarra, Kokoski, Kranzler and Milio. 

A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical 
calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical 
preparations. 

51, 52. Pharmacy, Dispensing — (4, 4) Junior year, two lectures and two 
laboratories. Allen, Kokoski, Milio, Kranzler and Levine. 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy — (1) Junior year, first semester, one lecture. 
Sciarra. 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis 
on the history of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy Literature — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. 
Sciarra. 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy — (3, 3) Senior year, two lectures 
and one laboratory. Allen, Kokoski, Milio, Kranzler and Levine. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

A study of the compounding of new medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids 
used in modern professional pharmacy, including the preparation of some important 
classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Senior year, first semester, 
two lectures. Purdum. 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

132. Cosmetics — (3) Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one 
laboratory. Allen and Sciarra. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52, and 101. 

A study of the composition and manufacture of cosmetic preparations including 
laboratory work in the formulation of these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Foss and Allen. 
Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. 

A study of manufacturing processes and equipment employed in the manufacture 
of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 37 



204 Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Fosi and 
Allen. 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201. 202. 

Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important phama- 
ceuticals in large quantities. 

205. MANUFACTURING Pharmacy Control— (3) Three lectures. Foss. Given 
in alternate years. 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling of 
drugs from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. 
Includes detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal Food, Drug and 
(.'osmetic Act, and other laws affecting the production and distribution of pharma- 
ceutical products. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature— ( 1 , 1) One lecture. Allen 
and Purdum. Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special refer- 
ence to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharma- 
ceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Allen. 
Prerequisites— Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

A study of the development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics 
suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Purdum. 
Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) Each Semester. Foss and Allen. 
Required of students majoring in pharmacy. 

Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) Two 
laboratories. Allen and Purdum. 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. Foss, Purdum 
and Allen. 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

21. Accounting — (2) Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one laboratory. 
Pumpian and Leavitt. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. 

The Analysis of financial and operating statements with a study of the funda- 
mental principles of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Junior year, second semester, three 
lectures. Pumpian. 

A Study of the general fundamentals of Economics — production, exchange, dis- 
tribution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing government 
and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. Jurisprudence — (3) Senior year, second semester, three lectures. Pumpian. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 
Partnerships. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



71. Management — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. Pumpian. 
Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. 

A study of the business problems arising in the operation of a retail pharmacy, 
including ownership organization, financing, leasing, insurance, purchasing, pricing, 
code marking and control of inventory. 

72. Drug Marketing — (2) Senior year, second semester, two lectures. Burbage. 
A study of marketing, marketing research, advertising, selling and salesmanship, 

merchandising, channels of distribution, wholesaling, retailing and personnel manage- 
ment. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (4, 4) Sophomore year, three lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Estabrook and Izatt. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of the principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light and 
electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism — (3, 3) Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given according to demand. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics — (5, 5) Five lectures. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics — (2, 2) Two lectures. Estabrook. 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189. 
Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General — (5) Sophomore year, second semester, four lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Foreman, Fox, Aceto. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 4. 

A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, including neurophysiology, 
the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney and endrocrine glands. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. Zoology, General — (4) Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Foreman and Aceto. 

This course deals with the basic principles of animal life and uses a study of 
the anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

4. Zoology, Animal Kingdom — (3) Freshman year, second semester, two 
lectures and one laboratory. Foreman and Aceto. 

A survey of the animal kingdom with special emphasis on parasites, insects and 
other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a 
firm foundation for later required courses. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



39 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1955-56 
fGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Aceto. Mario Domenico. .. .Rhode Island 

Al-Jaleel. Hatif Hammoody Iraq 

Anderson, Martin Maryland 

Elkin. Samuel Pennsylvania 

Grabowski, Bernard Francis, 

Pennsylvania 

Haubrick, Paul William Montana 

Helinski, Donald Raymond Maryland 

Jaffe, Jonah Jerry New York 

Kallolis, Theodore Spiros ... Rhode Island 

•Kelster, Donald Lee West Virginia 

Kokoski, Charles Joseph Maryland 

Kokoski, Robert John Maryland 

Kranzler, Theodore, District of Columbia 

Leavitt. Dean Ellis Maine 

Lennox, Willard James Maryland 

Leonard, Charles Brown. . . .New Jersey 



Levlne, Phillip Julien Rhode Island 

-M;l. ■Hamer, Barbara Bo wen. .. .Maryland 
.M.istrianl, Joseph Charles ... .New York 

Milio, Frank Remo Maryland 

Morris, Martin Harold Maryland 

Patel, Jayantilal Shankerbhal India 

Pikor, Jan Eugene Massachusetts 

*Roskos, John, Jr Georgia 

Sciarra, John Jack New York 

Sherwood, Margaret Frances Ohio 

♦Sinnreich, Frank Joseph, Jr.. . .Maryland 

Suriano, Joseph Robert New York 

Suvanprakorn, Puar Thailand 

Swartz, Charles Judd Maryland 

Weinberg, Myron Simon New York 

White, Harold Ray Pennsylvania 



SENIOR CLASS 



Abramson, Alfred Maryland 

Bailone, William Andrew Maryland 

*Bo\ven, Curtis Augustus Maryland 

Bronstein, Myer Maryland 

Conrad, Marlene Elizabeth Maryland 

Dietrich, Joseph William Maryland 

Dorsey, Martha Lee Maryland 

Engel. Ralph Maryland 

Epstein, Irwin Bernard Maryland 

Fine, Jerome Leonard Maryland 

Fine, Sue Brotman Maryland 

Friedman, Julian Michael Maryland 

Friedman, Sheldon Maryland 

Frieman, Jack Maryland 

Gaver, Paul Glenn, Jr Maryland 

Grossman, Isaac William Maryland 

Holtschneider, Douglas Wayne 

Marvland 
Keller, Charles Vincent de Paul, Jr., 

Maryland 

Klatsky, Stanley Albert Maryland 

Kraus, Richard Edward Maryland 

Kwash, Herbert District of Columbia 

Leonard, William Henry. .North Carolina 
Lichtman, Albert Maryland 



Lindeman, Philip Douglas Maryland 

♦Lowry, Ronald Henry .. .North Carolina 

Macek, Bernard Francis Maryland 

Metz, Richard August Maryland 

Miller, Richard Anthony Maryland 

Niznik, Paul Vincent Maryland 

Oed, Marvin LeRoy Maryland 

Oster, Walter Filmore Maryland 

Plotkin, Herbert Maryland 

Plotkin, Richard David Maryland 

Pruss, Thaddeus Paul Maryland 

Richman, Emanuel Maryland 

Rofsky, Howard Earl Maryland 

Sachs, Walter Harlan Maryland 

Schiff, Howard Robert Maryland 

Shemer, Stuart Maryland 

Sherer, Gerald Maryland 

Siegel, Arnold Maryland 

Sophocleus, Gregory John Maryland 

Starkey, Donald Emory Maryland 

Swartz, Irving Emanuel Maryland 

Waitsman, Earl Stanley Maryland 

Watkowski, Milton Raymond. .. .Maryland 

Wesolowski, Frank John Maryland 

Zameckl, Robert John Maryland 

Zappulla, Santo Angelo Maryland 



JUNIOR 

Abrams, Arthur Murray Maryland 

Anoff, Bernard Maryland 

Aronson, Donald Maryland 

Austraw, GeraJdine Lee Maryland 

Bahr, Raymond Donald Maryland 

Balcerzak, Anthony Edwin. .. .Marvland 

Barke, Sheldon Saul Maryland 

Barshack, Irwin Stanley Maryland 

Bell, Frank Kelly . Maryland 

Berman, Gilbert Samuel Maryland 



CLASS 

Brazius, Joseph Victor Maryland 

Brunson, Gerald Neuman Maryland 

Cohen, Jack Ronald Maryland 

Damasiewicz, Walter Michael. . .Maryland 

Davidov, Arnold Lee Maryland 

Deitch, Erwin Maryland 

Dougherty, Leon Patrick Maryland 

Edwards, James Dolan Maryland 

Elliott, Donald Brainard Maryland 

Geraghty, James Timothy Maryland 



tRegistered In Graduate School. 
•Did not attend entire session. 



40 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Gilliece, Owen James Maryland 

Glassband, Herman Maryland 

Goldberg, Leonard Maryland 

Goldman, Sue Carolyn Maryland 

Golob, Stanley Paul Maryland 

Gradman, Lee Herbert Maryland 

Greenberg, Richard Earl Maryland 

Hayman, Thomas Johnson Maryland 

Heifetz, Carl Louis Maryland 

Hesson, Charles Edward Maryland 

Heyman, Bernard Philip Maryland 

Hodges, James Elmer Maryland 

Kabik, Robert Joseph Maryland 

Keller, George Riland Maryland 

Levenson, Sidney Maryland 

Levin. Arthur Irvin Maryland 

Levin. Norman Lee Maryland 



MacLarty, David Collins Maryland 

Mahoney, Robert Weldon Maryland 

Mercer, Robert Victor Maryland 

Neighoff. Wilson Edward Maryland 

Pertnoy, Edwin Maryland 

Pessagno, Wilbur Joseph Maryland 

Pollack, Howard Maryland 

Rosenbloom, Sanford Lawrence, 

Roth, Martin Maryland 

Seidman, Sidney Bernard Maryland 

Shein, Sidney Maryland 

Sherman, Miriam Ray Maryland 

Siegel, Harold H. Maryland 

Suter, Thomas Joseph Maryland 

Ullman, Donald Allan Maryland 

Wagner, Frederick Henry Maryland 

Young. Donald Roy Maryland 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abrahams, Nathan Held New Jersey 

Anstine, Clarence LeRoy Maryland 

Arnold, James Irvin West Virginia 

Bass, Harry Maryland 

Berman, Mitchell Maryland 

Bozman, Kenneth Bennett Maryland 

Brashears, Charles Luther .... Maryland 

Brinsfield, Jay Royce Maryland 

Burkhardt, Vincent de Paul. . . .Maryland 

Chan, Pearl Maryland 

•Clark, James Elwood Wyoming 

Clinger. William Theodore. .Pennsylvania 

Cohen, Gerald Ivan Maryland 

Cooper, Harold Lee Maryland 

Crouse, James Earl Maryland 

Dorn, Conrad Peter Maryland 

Elliott, Paul Prag Maryland 

Esslinger. Edward Carroll Maryland 

Etzler, Edward Alvin Maryland 

Faulkner. Water Nelson Maryland 

Fisher, Thomas Luther Maryland 

Fleckenstein, Paul Anthony. . . .Maryland 

Foley, William Thomas, Jr Maryland 

Friedman, Melvin Maryland 

•Futeral, Irvin Jay Maryland 

•Goldsworthy, Marie Bane Maryland 

♦Has sell, Russell Fabian Maryland 

Hayes, Patricia Ann Maryland 

Heinritz, Colen Clifford Maryland 

•Holland, Edward Paul, Jr Maryland 

Hughes, Henry William Maryland 

Isaacson, Bernard Sheldon Maryland 

King, Donald Charles Maryland 

Kornblau, Maurice Jules. . . .Pennsylvania 

Kostos, Patricia Phyllis Maryland 

Kronberg, Norman Jack Maryland 

Lebowitz, Donald Leo Maryland 

Lisse, Allan New Jersey 

♦Litvin. Bernhardt Maryland 



Loetell, Joseph Wilmer, Jr Maryland 

Lottier, William Irving Maryland 

Lund, Robert Eugene Maryland 

Malanowski, Antoinette Rosalie . Maryland 

Mallonee, James Joseph Maryland 

McKenny, Harry Joseph Maryland 

•Mintz, Martin Barry Maryland 

Neuburger, Arnold Jay Maryland 

Nowakowski, Ronald Joseph Maryland 

Oken, Donald Moses Maryland 

Oster, Herbert Gerald Maryland 

Palmer, Thomas Rufus Maryland 

Palmer, William Richard Maryland 

Pass, Stacy Maryland 

Penn, Thomas Milton Gosnell . . . Maryland 
Protokowlcz, Stanley Edward. .Maryland 
Redmond, Noble Philip Maryland 

•Reed. Mary Eleanor Maryjand 

Reier, George Eugene Maryland 

Richmond, William Charles Maryland 

Rodell, Michael Byron Maryland 

Rothschild, Howard Leslie Maryland 

Ruppersberger. John Joseph. . . .Maryland 

•Shoenfeld, Harvey Allan Maryland 

*Schumer, Don Avron Maryland 

Sherman, Alan District ol Columbia 

Singer, Bernard Sheldon Maryland 

Snyderman, Malcolm S Maryland 

St. John, Miles Eugene Maryland 

Sultan, Walter Edward, Jr Maryland 

Swiss, Nancy Lee Maryland 

Tountas, Chris Peter Maryland 

Tregoe. Charles Henry Maryland 

Turner, John Albert Maryland 

Voxakis, George Chris Maryland 

Warrington, Clayton Linwood, Jr Md. 

Weiner, Leon Maryland 

Wittik, Jerome Sidney Maryland 

Zucker, Paul Maryland 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Adler, Cyrus New Jersey 

Becker, John Wilbert Maryland 

Becker, Stanley Leonard Maryland 

Berdiansky, Charles Solomon Maryland 

Berger, Charles Joseph Maryland 

Brown, Harry James Maryland 



Butler, Charles Maryland 

Caplan, Carl Michael Maryland 

Chaiet, Melvin Maryland 

•Chrusniak, Roman Nicholas Maryland 

dayman, Jerome Harris Maryland 

Da vies, Joseph William Maryland 



•Did not attend entire session. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



41 



Dettch, Morton Isaac Maryland 

•Ellis, Helen Mae Maryland 

Feldman, Allen Maryland 

Poland, Leonard Bile Maryland 

Fradin, Stanley Bernard Maryland 

Frledlander, Paul Michael Maryland 

Prledlander, Sheldon Allan Maryland 

Friedman, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Frieman, Daniel Gerald Maryland 

Glaeser, Jullanna Rita Maryland 

Goldberg, Leonard Harold Maryland 

Goldberg, Stanley Lester Maryland 

Greenberg, Murray Gerald Maryland 

•Hall, Martha Faye Maryland 

Haunt. Harry Maryland 

Hanenbaum, Allen Maryland 

Home, William Scott Maryland 

Jamison, Richard Joseph Maryland 

Jaslow. Marvin Ban Maryland 

Katz, Albert Maryland 

Katz. David Fred Maryland 

Keller, Chalmers Harry Maryland 

•Kenney, Fern Eugene Maryland 

Kern. Louis Reichert Maryland 

Klioze. Earl Ephraim Maryland 

Kronsberg, Ronald Herbert Maryland 

Levi. Ellis Maryland 

Levin, Marry Elliott Maryland 

Levinsohn, Nina Debra Maryland 

Macks, Harry Elliott Maryland 

Marshall, Eugenie Wallace Maryland 



Mats, Stanford Maryland 

M< K. una. Richard Stirling Maryland 

Payne. Michael Bar] Maryland 

PllqulBt, Richard Morris Maryland 

Posanek, Larry Herbert Maryland 

Raschka, Theodore Lee Maryland 

Resser, William Wolf Maryland 

Richardson, David Ronald Maryland 

Robinson, Zoe Carroll Maryland 

•Ruckle, Robert Eugene Maryland 

•Ruppersberger, George Louis. .. Maryland 
Sachs, Herbert Allen Leonard. .. .Maryland 

Salonts, Marvin Frederick Maryland 

Santonl, Geraldlne Anna Maryland 

Santoni, John David Henry Maryland 

Schwartz, Sorell Lee Maryland 

SchwartSman, Alfred Howard Maryland 

Shay, George Alan Maryland 

Shpritz, Esther Harriet Maryland 

•Silen, Samuel Maryland 

•Smith. Jay Rollin New Jersey 

Sniadowski, Anthony John Maryland 

Spear, Murray Charles Maryland 

•Steiner, Stuart Maryland 

Stratmann, Bruce Nevett Maryland 

Thomas, John Rushton Maryland 

*Tschickardt, Warren Melvin Maryland 

Weiner, Kenneth Sidney Maryland 

Weinstein, Ray Neil Maryland 

Zells, Ivin Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 4, 1955 
tDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



John Autian Pennsylvania 

William Mohn Heller Maryland 

Carl Kaiser Maryland 



Joseph Anthony Kaiser Maryland 

Stanley Philip Kramer Maryland 

William Homer Lawrence Arkansas 



tMASTER OF SCIENCE 



Mario Domenico Giulio Aceto, 

Rhode Island 
Hatif Hammoody Al-Jaleel Iraq 



Stella F. Gergel Ohio 

Jonah Jerry Jaffe New York 

Charles Judd Swartz Maryland 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Lawrence Maynard Abrams Maryland 

Anda Baikstis Maryland 

Fred Sheldon Barnstein Maryland 

Charles Carl Barone New York 

John Gilbert Boer en Maryland 

Sydney Lanier Burgee, Jr Maryland 

Jean Chow Maryland 

Howard Crystal Maryland 

Donald Jack Dagold Maryland 

Saul David Davidson Maryland 

Thomas Charles Dawson Maryland 

Myron Dobrowolskyj Maryland 

Noel E. Durm Maryland 

James Adrian Edelen Maryland 

John Joseph Engberg Maryland 

Jo Anne Sandbower Enterline. .. .Maryland 

Marvin Aaron Friedman Maryland 

Marvin Hersh Goldberg Maryland 

Marvin Gordon Maryland 

Aaron Grebow Maryland 

Gerald Joseph Heilman Maryland 

David Hoff Maryland 

Robert Raymond Imbierowicz. .. .Maryland 

Basil P. Johns Maryland 

Stanley Bennet Karmiol Maryland 

Burton Le*> Katz Maryland 

Demetrios Simos Lambros, 

District of Columbia 
David Leftin Maryland 



Melvin Levy Maryland 

Max Lewis Mendelsohn Maryland 

Barbara Leigh Miller Maryland 

John Martin Murphy Maryland 

Richard Earl Myers Maryland 

Gerald Lewis Norton Maryland 

James Bryan Ortt Maryland 

Thomas E. Patrick Maryland 

Sheldon Erwin Pollekoff Maryland 

Jules Benge Prag Maryland 

Richard Jerome Pycha Maryland 

Reuben Rosenberg Maryland 

Melvin Norman Rubin Maryland 

Murray Alvin Rubin Maryland 

Kurt L. Sacki Maryland 

William Melvin Satisky Maryland 

Edwin Joseph Schneider Maryland 

Milton Schwartz Maryland 

David Joseph Seff Maryland 

Alan Lee Settler Maryland 

Ramon B. Sienkielewski Maryland 

Robert Edward Snyder Maryland 

Bernard Alfonsus Sulewski Maryland 

Gary Louis Taylor Maryland 

Milton Frederick Toelle Maryland 

Marvin Leonard Venick Maryland 

Charles Robert Welsh Maryland 

Edward Benard Williams Maryland 

Martin Irvin Wolfovitz Maryland 



42 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



w 



HONORS 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Gary Louis Taylor 

The William Simon Memorial Prize Sydney Lanier Burgee Jr. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize Anda Baikstis 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Reuben Rosenberg 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Stanley B. Karmiol 

The David Fink Memorial Prize Thomas E. Patrick 

The Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize Jo Anne S. Enterline 

The Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize Barbara Leigh Miller 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR 



Reuben Rosenberg 



Anda Baikstis 



Sydney Lanier Burgee, Jr. 
HONORABLE MENTION (JUNIOR CLASS) 



I. William Grossman 



Howard R. Schiff 



Ann Sue Brotman 



DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 
CLASS OF 1955 



Anda Baikstis 
Sydney L. Burgee, Jr. 
David J. Hoff 
Stanley B. Karmiol 
Barbara L. Miller 



Reuben Rosenberg 

William M. Satisky 

David J. Seff 

Gary L. Taylor 

Marvin L. Venick 



Jean Chow 

Jo Anne S. Enterline 

Burton L. Katz 



Ralph Engle 



Alfred Abramson 
Douglas Holtschneider 



HONORARY MENTION 

Gerald L. Norton 
CLASS OF 1956 

Howard R. Schiff 
HONORARY MENTION 

William H. Leonard 

CLASS OF 1957 

Raymond Bahr 

HONORARY MENTION 



Jules B. Prag 

Edwin Schneider 

Robert E. Snyder 



I. William Grossman 



A. Sue Brotman 
Stanley Klatsky 



Geraldine Austraw 



Robert W. Mahoney 



CLASS OF 1958 



Harry Bass 
Pearl Chan 
William dinger 
Gerald Cohen 
Conrad Dorn 
Melvin Friedman 
James Mallonee 



David Oken 

Herbert Oster 

George Reier 

Michael Rodell 

Alan Rosenstein 

Miles E. St. John 

Alan Sherman 



Nathan Abrahams 
Clarence Anstine 
Jay Brinsfield 
Edward Etzler 
William Foley 
Patricia Hayes 



HONORARY MENTION 



Antoinette Malanowski 

Thomas Palmer 

Howard Rothschild 

Malcolm Snyderman 

Nancy Swiss 

Chris Tountas 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 43 

INDEX 

Subject Page 

Academic Regulations 17 

Accreditation 12 

Administration, General Board 6 

Organization 7 

Admissions, Procedure 14 

Requirements 13 

To Advanced Standing 13 

To Freshman Class 13 

To Graduate Study 12 

Alumni Association 27 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 26 

Application for Admission 13 

Attendance Requirements 17 

Board of Regents 6 

Buildings and Equipment 12 

Calendar 2 

Classification of Students 19 

Correspondence 5 

Courses, description of 30-38 

Curriculum 28-29 

Degrees 12 

Deportment 20 

Dismissal for low Scholarship 19 

Employment 21 

Examinations 17 

Faculty 8-11 

Faculty Council 7 

Fees and Expenses, Graduate 16 

Part-time Undergraduate 15 

Undergraduate 15 

Fellowships, etc 21 

Grading Scale 17 

Grade-Point Average 18 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 19 

Graduates, Roll of 41 

Graduation Requirements 19 

Handbook of School 27 

History and Program 12 

Honors and Awards 24 

Housing 21 

Incomplete Grades, removal of 18 

Library, Regulations 21 

Staff 11 

Loan Funds 24 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 20 

Registration With 20 



tl 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

INDEX 

Subject Page 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 27 

Students' Auxiliary 26 

Matriculation 14 

Mid-semester Grade Warnings 18 

Office of Dean, Hours 5 

Staff 11 

Open House 5 

Parking 21 

Probation for Low Scholarship 19 

Professorships 21 

Promotion to next class 18 

Registration 14 

Residence and non-residence, definition of 16 

Scholarships 23 

Scholarship Requirements 18 

Student Alliance 26 

Students, Roll of 39-41 

Transcript of Record 19 

Visitors 5 

Withdrawal and Return of Fees 16 










SEPARATE CATALOGS 
At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director 
of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 
These catalogs and schools are: 
1. General Information 

College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business and Public Administration 

College of Education 

College of Engineering 

College of Home Economics 

College of Military Science 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

College of Special and Continuation Studies 

Summer School 

Graduate School 



2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 



At Baltimore 
for the professional schools of the University 



Individual catalogs 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 



tive schools at the University 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 
13. School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 
School of Pharmacy 
School of Nursing 



of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
The professional schools are: 



14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



At Heidelberg 



The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by addressing 
the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Park, 
Maryland. 



VOL. 3 7 



O. 1 



1357-1958 




NIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE SCHOOL OF 



pharmacy 



AT BALTIMORE 




The School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland 



IMPORTANT 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of 
Maryland. The University reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of 
residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, 
to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 
in the best interests of the University. 



See Outside Back Cover for List of Other Catalogs 



^2tA,: 









ftfl 






BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick, Sr., Chairman, McCormick and Company, Inc., 

414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 ...... ...... 1957 

Edward F. Holter, Vice-Chairman, The National Grange, 744 Jackson 

Place, N.W., Washington 6 „ - 1959 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary, The Baltimore Institute, 12 West 
Madison Street, Baltimore 1 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer, Denton 1966 

Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 1961 

Edmund S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer, Kelly Springfield Tire Com- 
pany, Cumberland „ - 1959 

William P. Cole, Jr., 100 West University Parkway, Baltimore 10 1958 

Thomas W. Pangborn, The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., 

Hagerstown _ 1965 

Enos S. Stockbridge, 10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 1960 

Thomas B. Symons, Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, 

Takoma Park 1963 

C. Ewing Tuttle, 907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, 

Baltimore 2 _ 1962 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 




z 



u 

E 
u 



2 



r 



Catalog and 
114th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1957-1958 




Volume 37 — Number 1 
Published by the University 
32 South Greene Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



1957 



1958 



JANUARY 1957 


JULY 1957 


JANUARY 1958 


JULY 1958 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 .... 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


5 M T W T P S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 [ 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 

1 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1 957 L9 
First Semester 
1957 
September 1 6 Monday - P reshman Orientation — 

9:80 a.m. 
September 17 Tuesday Freshman Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Sophomore Registration 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
September 18 Wednesday . Junior Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Senior Registration — 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration — 

1:00-3:00 p.m. 
September 23 Monday . « Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 
November 27 Wednesday . Thanksgiving recess begins 

at close of last scheduled 

period 
December 2... Monday — Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 
December 20 - Friday Christmas recess begins at 

close of last scheduled 

period 
1958 
January 6 - ..... Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 
January 22-28 Wednesday-Tuesday - ....First semester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 4 Tuesday . _ Freshman Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Sophomore Registration — 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
February 5 - -Wednesday .Junior Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Senior Registration — 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration — 

1:00-3:00 p.m. 
February 10 - Monday - -^Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 
February 22..„ Saturday — Washington's Birthday, 

holiday 
April 3 Thursday ,Easter recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period 
April 8 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

May 19-23 Monday-Friday Senior final examinations 

May 23-29 Friday-Thursday Second semester examina- 
tions 

May 30 ..... v - Friday ....Memorial Day. Holiday 

June 7 „ Saturday ....Commencement 

All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration day. Students failing to comply 
with this regulation are charged a fee of five dollars. No students is normally permitted 
to register after Saturday noon of the week in which instruction begins. 

The office of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, from 
9 :00 a.m. to 4 :00 p.m. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the School of Pharmacy should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to 
the respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 32 S. Greene 
St., Baltimore 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 

General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 

Housing of Students, Scholarships, Scholastic Standing of 

Students, Transcripts of Records, 

Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy. The Dean's Office is open 
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday by appoint- 
ment. 






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 7 

The School of Pharmacy 

OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson h. Elkins, b.a.. m.a., Litt.B., D.Phil., / 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President Emeritus 

Noel E. Foss, B.S., Ph.D., Dean 

G. Watson Algire, M.S., Director of Admissions and Registration 

Norma J. AZLEIN, A.B., Registrar 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Noel E. Foss, Dean 

B. F. Allen A. W. Richeson 

C. T. Ichniowski Frank J. Slama, Secretary 

FACULTY (1956-1957) 

EMERITA 

B. Olive Cole Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 

Professors 

*Gaylord B. Estabrook Professor of Physics 

B.S. in Ch.E., Purdue University, 1921 ; M.S., Ohio State University. 1922 ; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

Noel E. Foss Professor of Pharmacy 

Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929 ; B.S. in Pharm., 1929 ; M.S., University of 

Maryland. 1932 : Ph.D., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York. 

Casimir T. Ichniowski Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929 ; B.S. in Pharm., 1930 ; M.S., 1932 : Ph.D.. 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

fW. Arthur Purdum .....Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930; B.S, in Pharm., 1932; M.S.. 1934; Ph.D.. 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



•Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

*A. W. Richeson jProfessor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; A.M., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
Ph.D., 1928. 

Emil G. Schmidt ....JProfessor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1921 ; Ph.D., 1924 ; LL.B., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

Donald E. Shay. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938 ; Ph.D., 
1943. 

Frank J. Slama Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1924 ; Ph.C, 1925 ; B.S. in Pharmacy, 1928 ; 
M.S., 1930; Ph.D., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



Associate Professors 

Benjamin Frank Allen Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1937 ; Ph.D., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Edward J. Herbst Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1943 ; M.S., 1944 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

*Francis M. Miller Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946 ; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1949. 

Ida Marian Robinson Associate Professor of Library Science 

A.B., Cornell University, 1924 ; B.S.L.S., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

Raymond E. Vanderlinde Associate Professor of Biological 

Chemistry, School of Medicine 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1944 ; M.S., 1947 ; Ph.D., 1950. 



Assistant Professors 

John Autian ....Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Temple University, 1950 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1952 ; 
Ph.D., 1955. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 






♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

♦Adele B. Ballman Assistant I' f EnglM 

A.r... Goucher College, 1926; Ph.D., The Johni Hopktni University, 1086. 

Norman .1. DOORENBOS i88l8tani Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

v.s. in Chem., University of Michigan, 1960; M.S.. 1951; Ph.D., 1958. 

♦Claire STRUBE Sciiradieck _...._ Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

a r... Goucher College, 1916; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

Frank D. Vasington Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 

School of Medicine 

A.r... University of Connecticut, 1950; M.S., 11)52; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 



Instructors 

Ann Virginia Brown Instructor, Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 
A.B., Goucher College, 1940. 

Leslie C. Costello » Instructor in Zoology and Physiology 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1952 : M.S., 1954. 

Georgianna S. Gittinger..... Instructor in Pharmacology 

A.B., Hood College, 1912 ; M.A., University of Virginia, 1924. 

Bernard F. Grabowskl Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., Temple University, 1952 ; M.S., 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

Dean E. Leavitt Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

John J. Sciarra Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., St. Johns University, 1951 ; M.S., Duquesne University, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland. 



Lecturers 

fLANDON W. Burbage 1 Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

Ph.B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909 ; Ph.G., 1910. 






*Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 
1 Effective February 1, 1957. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

fBERNARD S. Melnicove 1 . Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

LL.B., University of Baltimore, 1932. 



Visiting Lecturer 

Samuel L. Fox. Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1934 ; B.S. in Pharm., 1936 ; M.D., 1938. 

Junior Instructors 

♦fjAMES W. Hillis 1 .....Junior Instructor in Speech 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1952. 

Robert Kokoski Junior Instructor in Pharmacognosy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1952 ; M.S'., 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Frank Milio Junior Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1952 ; M.S., 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Graduate Assistants 

*Jerry D. Hardy, Jr. 2 Assistant in Zoology 

A.B., Elon College, 1954. 

Robert E. Havranek Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Columbia University, 1956. 

Registered Pharmacist — California, Maryland, New York, Florida. 

Francis X. Herold Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Jerald R. Izatt ....A ssis tant in Physics 

B.S., University of Utah, 1952. 

WiLLARD Lennox. Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.S 1 . in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Phillip Julian Levine Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Rhode Island. 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time 

1 Effective February 1, 1957. 
'Resigned, Effective January 31, 1957. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 11 

Barbara b. MacHamer, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., Gkracher Collect, 1955, 

♦John A. Polto 1 Assistant in Zoology 

B.8., Urslnus College, 1956. 

Thaddeus P. Pruss Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.S. In Pbarm., University of Maryland. 1956. 

Pail L. Zikoski Assistant in Microbiology 

B.S. In Biol., University of Scranton, 1953. 



Library Staff 
Pharmacy-Dentistry 

Ida Marian Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S m Associate Librarian 

Beatrice Marriott, A.B Reference Librarian 

Edith M. Coyle, A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A .....Periodicals Librarian 

Harriette W. Shelton, B.A., B.S.L.S - Chief Cataloguer 

Marjorie E. Fluck, B.S. in Ed _ ....._ _ . Assistant Cataloguer 

Rosalie C. Carroll. - Library Assistant 

Elizabeth E. McCoach Assistant to the Librarian 

Patricia B. Terzl Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 

Daisy Lotz Gue. Secretary-Stenographer 

Margaret E. Beatty _ Senior Stenographer 

Frances R. Plitt 2 ....... Senior Stenographer 



♦Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

1 Effective February 1, 1957. 

2 Effective September 16, 1956. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

History and Program 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy are to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students in 
general scientific and cultural subjects so that they can read critically, express 
themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profession and citizens 
of a democracy; to guide students into productive scholarship and research 
for the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland 
physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in pharmacy to 
replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College 
joined with a group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental 
Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new insti- 
tution was known as the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Balti- 
more professional schools was merged with the Maryland State College at 
College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies a six-stoy building constructed specifically for 
pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with 
the most modern apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts 
and for research in pharmacy is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 27,000 books, is now merged with the dentistry collection. 

Students have access to the Medical School Library, and the time-honored 
collections of the Enoch Pratt, the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty, and The Johns Hopkins University. Most of these libraries are within 
walking distance of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy, 
has expanded its period of training over the years from a one-year to a four- 
year course. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy has now 
recommended a five-year course. However, such a program is in the future 
and students attending and entering the School of Pharmacy in the Autumn 
of 1957 will be required to take only the four-year course. 

The School of Pharmacy has always been a fully accredited Class A school 
and was again so rated at its last inspection in November 1953 by the Middle 
States Association of Schools and Colleges and by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. The diploma of the School is recognized by every 
state board of pharmacy. 



SCllool. OF I'll iRM ICY LS 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate 
School. 

ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

Amount and Quality of Scholastic Preparation 

To be admitted to the School of Pharmacy, a candidate must be a gradu- 
ate of a secondary school approved by the State Board of Education of Mary- 
land or a similar accrediting agency and must submit credentials acceptable 
to the Director of Admissions, as proof of adequate preparatory-school 
training. 

Sixteen units of academic work are required of each applicant. 
The following work must have been completed: 

English — 4 units 

Algebra — 1 unit 

Plane Geometry — 1 unit . Total 8 units 

History — 1 unit 

Science — 1 unit 

It is strongly recommended that the candidate obtain V2 unit of trigo- 
nometry or an additional V2 unit of algebra. The remaining seven and one- 
half units may be in astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 
general science, geology, history, foreign languages, mathematics, physical 
geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered for which credit is granted 
toward college or university entrance. Not more than four units may be 
vocational units (agriculture, commercial drawing, home economics, shop 
courses, etc.). 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Director 
of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy for an Application 
Blank, an illustrated brochure about the School, and literature about oppor- 
tunities in pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts of 
his college record along with a certificate of good standing from the college 
he attended. His grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the 
college's grading system. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education are given credit for the work of the first three 
years of the pharmacy curriculum which they have completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts 
subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given 
for work completed at a liberal arts college. 

AH students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those 
courses in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the 
schedules for transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given 
preference over advanced work. 

Credit is not given for pharmaceutical work done in evening or corre- 
spondence schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other 
institutions if the school did not grant credit. 

In determining the grade-point average of transfer students, only those 
courses taken at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland 
are used. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed to the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions of the Uni- 
versity in Baltimore. 

ADMISSION AND COSTS 
Admission Procedure* for All Applicants 

1. Request the Director of Admissions or the Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy to send the preliminary application blank. Fill the blank out fully 
including the names of all schools and colleges which the candidate has 
attended. Sign the blank and return it with the required photographs and a 
seven dollar and fifty cent investigation fee to the Director of Admissions 
not earlier than October first of the academic year prior to the proposed 
beginning of the candidate's studies at the school. (This fee will not be 
refunded or credited on any subsequent bill.) 

2. Send the high school record blank which accompanies the application 
blank to the principal of the high school attended and request that he mail 
it promptly to the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, 
the prospective student will be advised to: 

3. Report to the School of Pharmacy for entrance examinations and 
interviews. The School seeks indications of aptitude for undertaking pharmacy 
studies by examining the school records of candidates, their scores in aptitude 
and achievement tests, and estimates of their interests, maturity, and person- 
ality. Entrance examinations and interviews are held in February, but subse- 
quent opportunities are given. 

4. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the application of candi- 
dates whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, and 



SCIIooI. OF PHARMACY 16 

the School of Pharmacy notifies such candidate! who appear satisfactory that 
they have been tentatively accepted. 

5. Students who are offered tentative admissions must immediately make 
a deposit of $60.00 ($10.00 matriculation fee plus $50.00 deposit on tuition) on 
their September tuition. This deposit is non-returnable if the student fails to 
register in the autumn, but is credited against the first semester tuition charge 
of all students who enter. 

REGISTRATION AND FEES 

All students must enroll in person at the Dean's office during the registra- 
tion period at the beginning of each semester. On registration day the student 
fills out necessary forms and class cards and pays his fees. Detailed directions 
concerning dates and procedures are mailed during the summer to students 
who are eligible to enroll in the fall. All new students must matriculate. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the Registrar 
upon the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter 
classes until he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and 
hours printed in this catalog are required to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars. The last day for late registration is Saturday noon following the 
close of the normal registration period. This rule may be waived only upon the 
written recommendation of the Dean. 

There is a fee of $3.00 for changes in registration made after first week 
of instruction. 

TUITION AND LABORATORY FEES 

Full-time Undergraduate Students 

Tuition fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

Student Activities' Fee (per semester) 7.50 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra 
Mariae, all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, 
dances, Honors Convocation) 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Seniors 

Graduation Fee (To be paid in February of the Senior 
Year) $15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all 
breakage in excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Books, stationery, weights, slide rule, dissecting in- 
struments, etc. Approximately 150.00 
Students registering for more than a regularly 
scheduled semester's work will be charged addition- 
ally for each course. 
Fee for Change in Registration after first week 3.00 

i 

Part-time Undergraduate Students 

ft 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 

full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

r Tuition fee (for each semester hour per semester) $10.00 

(Laboratory fees (per semester) : 

J Chemistry 10.00 

Microbiology 10.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physics 6.00 

Physiology 10.00 

Zoology 8.00 

Graduate Students 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non- 
returnable) $10.00 
Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 10.00 
Tuition fee for students carrying 10 or more 

semester credit hours 100.00 

Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule 

above 
Graduation fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and micro- 
filming of thesis) 50.00 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY L7 

Refund of Fees Upon Wthdrawal 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, 

must, tile a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do 

not comply with this ruling arc not issued an honorable dismissal and are 
not accorded any refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the 
written consent of parent or guardian. Fees, excluding Application Fee, 
Matriculation Fee, Student Activities' Fee, the $50. 00 deposit on tuition, and 
any scholarship credit, are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance 
with the following schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less _ 80 % 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks _.... 40$ 

Between four and five weeks 20 % 

Over five weeks _ ...._ _ No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the office of the Dean. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State 
for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
year. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident 
status to resident status must be established by him prior to the registration 
period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their 
registration they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland or elsewhere. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be main- 
tained. 

The following interpretations or modifications of the above rules shall 
apply: 

(a) The domicile of the wife shall be that of her husband, except in the 
case of a minor supported by her parents, in which event the marital status 
will not be considered in determining the residence status. 

(b) Should the parents be separated, the domicile of the parent who fur- 
nishes the support shall determine the residence of the child. 

(c) Should the support of a minor not be furnished by the parents or 
guardians, the domicile of the person who furnishes the entire support shall 
determine the residence status of the child. 

(d) Should the support for a student be derived from a trust fund estab- 
lished specifically for his support and education, the domicile of the person 
who established the fund during the full year previous thereto shall determine 
the residence status of the student. 

(e) Should the parent or other person responsible for a student be re- 
quired to leave this State for business or military reasons, he shall not be 
deprived of his right to claim residence status if it is evident that he intends 
to return to this State upon the completion of the special business or military 
assignment. 

(f ) The non-resident status of an adult may be changed upon proof that 
he has purchased and has maintained a home in Maryland for at least one 
full year; that he has become a registered voter of this State; and that he 
intends to make this State his domicile. These facts must be established prior 
to the registration period of the semester for which this change of status is 
requested. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Attendance Requirements 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examina- 
tion in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally 
counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than 
half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period 
are also construed as an absence. 

Examinations 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discre- 
tion of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 



school OF PHARMAi I Lfl 

Students unable to appear for ana] examinations must report to the Dean 

Immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission 
for a deferred examination. 

Grading System 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



rode 


Interpretation 




Point Value 


A 


Excellent 




4 


B 


Good 




3 


C 


Fair 




2 


D 


Poor but passing 




1 


F 


Failure 







I 


Course work incomplc 


ite 


replaced by definite 
grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries: 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Poin 


English 


3 


C 


6 


Speech 


1 


D 


1 


German 


3 


B 


9 


Mathematics 


3 


C 


6 


Chemistry 


4 


D 


4 


Zoology 


4 


B 


12 



18 38 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade-point of 2.1. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at 
the School of Pharmacy are considered. 

Scholarship Requirements 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings. 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean 
warns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 

Incomplete Work 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the in- 
structor enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above with 
an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is 
given the student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the 
end of the next semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark 
becomes F. 

Raising Grade of D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in 
which he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at the 
University, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, in- 
cluding regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final 
mark will be substituted for the mark already recorded, but he will not receive 
any additional credit for the course. Although the final mark received in the 
course will be used in determining credit for promotion and graduation, it 
does not apply to honors and awards. See applicable section under "Honors 
and Awards". 

Regulations For Promotion And Probation 

Students in the Freshman and Sophomore years are expected to main- 
tain a grade point average of not less than 1.5 for each semester in these 
years. Any student in the Freshman or Sophomore years who fails to main- 
tain a grade point average of 1.5 for any semester of these years will be 
placed on probation during the next semester. 

Students in the Junior and Senior years are expected to maintain a grade 
point average of not less than 2.0 for each semester in these years. Any stu- 
dent in the Junior and Senior years who fails to maintain a grade point 
average of 2.0 for any semester in these years will be placed on probation 
during the next semester. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semester 
hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on 
probation during the next semester. 

For promotion from the Freshman to Sophomore year and from Sopho- 
more to Junior year a student must have maintained a grade point average 
of 1.5 for the Freshman year and a grade point average of 1.5 for the 
Sophomore year. 

For promotion from the Junior to Senior year a student must have 
maintained a grade point average of not less than 2.0 for the Junior year. 
Students in the Senior class must maintain a grade point average of not 
less than 2.0 to become eligible for graduation. 



SCI/ool. OF PHARMACY 21 

Any student on probation for any Bemester is expected to paei all work 
for which he is registered in that s< meeter with a grade point average of 

not less than 1.5 for the Freshman and Sophomo and a grade point 

average of not less than 2.0 for the Junior and Senior years. Any student 
on probation who fails to pass all courses for which he is registered and 
who fails to maintain the grade point average for his particular year will 
be automatically dropped from the School of Pharmacy, at the end of that 
semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
(including "0" credit courses) in any semester shall be dismissed at the 
end of that semester for unsatisfactory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then 
obtains a probation grade point average for a third semester will be auto- 
matically dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

Regulations For Readmission Of Students Dropped For Poor Academic 
Standing 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted until at least one semester has elapsed. He shall, in the meantime, 
attend another school approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy and/or 
the Office of Admissions of the University of Maryland and he shall carry 
at least a minimum full load of work required by the school which he will 
attend, but in no case shall this be less than twelve semester hours. The 
selection of the course of study must be approved by the Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. Before applying for readmission he must obtain the recom- 
mendation of the Dean of the school which he has previously attended and 
he must, in addition, have a grade point average of not less than 2.0 in the 
work for which he was previously registered. 

All students shall be readmitted on probation for one semester. 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted more than once. 

Regulations For Review 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsidera- 
tion of his particular case. 

Grades of Students Withdrawing from the School of Pharmacy 
The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Classification of Students 

Students having 0-29 credit hours are classified as Freshman. 

Students having 30-64 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Sophomores. 

Students having 65-104 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Juniors. 

Students having 105 or more credit hours with a grade-point average of 
2.0 in the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 in the work 
of the Senior year and have 144 credit hours to be considered as candidates 
for graduation. 

Senior Elective Program 

Students are required to elect either the RETAIL Major or the PRE- 
GRADUATE Major by May 1 of the Junior year. It is recommended that 
students electing the Pre-Graduate program will have attained a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 for the three previous years. Those who elect this 
major should also indicate their choice of electives in the Retail Major in 
case their average does not permit their election of the Pre-Graduate Major. 
The senior elective program must be approved by the Class Advisor and the 
Dean. 

RETAIL Majors must choose between Pharmacy 81 and Pharmacy 121 
and between Pharmacognosy 62 and Pharmacy 132. PRE-GRADUATE Majors 
must elect between English 3, 4 and Language 6, 7. 

For further information consult with Class Advisor and see the Cur- 
riculum on page 34 of the catalog. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School 
of Pharmacy, who having entered prior to September 1956, have been 
accredited 144 semester hours instruction, or who having entered in Septem- 
ber 1956 or thereafter, have been accredited with 146 semester hours instruc- 
tion, and who have attained the required grade point standings and met the 
other requirements. 

Transcripts of Records 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

transcripts are as follow.^: one copy of a student's record is mad.- without 
charge; for additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, 
except when more than one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, 
one dollar is charged for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government agen- 
cies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, 
file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application 
for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall 
be required to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, 
and simultaneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board 
a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of 
any subsequent school or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn 
statement of any and all actual drugstore experience acquired during the 
preceding vacation months." 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Phar- 
macy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of 
twenty-one years, is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, 
and has completed one year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or 
pharmacy approved by said Board of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for 
examination given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or 
college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of phar- 
macy. Effective January 1, 1957, four months of the required practical phar- 
macy experience as a registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

graduation from a recognized school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store 
or pharmacy approved by the Board for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Beard of Pharmacy, 2411 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 18, Maryland, for 
further information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satis- 
factory to the authorities of the University. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though 
no specific charge be made against them. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and 
completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities 
to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that students refrain 
from working during the school session. 

HOUSING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any housing accommoda- 
tions in Baltimore. The School assists students in finding living accommo- 
dations. 

PARKING 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on 
university parking lots for students. 

LIBRARY REGULATIONS 
Loan Regulations: 

Loan periods have been established according to demand for and protec- 
tion of books, journals and other materials: 

Reserve Books: 3:50 p. m-11 a. m. Advance reserves accepted, but no 

renewals. 
Current Journals: One-day circulation for latest issue; others two 

weeks. 
Reference Books : Use in library only for specified reference material. 
All Other Books and Journals: Two weeks (plus one renewal of two 

weeks) . 



SCIIool. OF PHARM \C) 



Pines: 



Finos are imposed to assure that all students may have equal access to 
books: 

Reserve Hooks: 154 for first hour; 54 for each additional hour, or 

fraction then of. 
Other Loans: ;.r per day. 

Lost Books: List price of the book. (Losses should be reported im- 
mediately.) 

All books must be returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines 
paid before a student can finish the year in good standing. 

PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was 
designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair has subsequently 
been held by Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present 
incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate 
students desirous of doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for 
an additional allowance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. 
Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, 1507 M Street, N. W., Washington 5, D. C. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, sometime 
associate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist 
of Baltimore, has contributed since 1930 a sum of money annually to maintain 
a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open 
to promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundreth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships 
for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, pharmacology, bacteriology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candi- 
dates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty Assembly with the 
approval of the Dean. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Company of New York contributes sufficient funds to 
provide a fellowship paying $1000.00 annually for two years for research in 
pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. 

The Noxzema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing in 1957 a fund not to 
exceed $1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens. A 
candidate will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by 
the Fellowship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting 
member. This fellowship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the 
grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School 
each year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student 
selected by the Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association 
to enable the. student to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of 
Pharmacy. The research conducted must be of general pharmaceutical interest, 
and must be accepted upon completion for publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS AND INTERNSHIPS IN HOSPITAL PHARMACY 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $1635.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified 
students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the 
departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two- 
thirds of the normal graduate work. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy, together with the Graduate School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the Pharmacy Department of The Johns Hopkins. 
Hospital offer annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several internships 
in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning September first, run for 
twenty-two months. Appointees devote half time to hospital pharmacy service 
and half time to graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree 
granted by the University of Maryland and a certificate of internship awarded 
by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Hospital provides a stipend of $200.00 
per month and the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees for these candi- 
dates by 25%. However, candidates must pay the regular laboratory fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacists, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 5,, 
Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 



SCHOOL OF PHARM LCI 27 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should bo addre sd 
to Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 82 8. 
Greene Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The selection of the recipients of 
the scholarships and loans is made by a committee of the Faculty of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

Freshman Scholarships 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships* 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually scholanships to freshman students with 
good scholastic records who can present the need for financial aid. These 
scholarships include tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment not to exceed the 
amount of $500.00 for the academic year. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship* 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually a 
scholarship to a freshman student with a good scholastic record who can 
present the need for financial aid. This scholarship includes tuition, fees, 
textbooks and equipment not to exceed the amount of $500.00 for the academic 
year. This scholarship is open only to residents of the state of Maryland. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarship 

Since the Noxzema Foundation Scholarship is not limited to any par- 
ticular year, it may be available to freshman in some years. For further 
information see below. 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation Scholarships* 

The Read's Foundation, Inc., makes available annually six scholarships 
to freshman students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, scholastic 
achievement, and the need of financial assistance. Each scholarship includes 
tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment not to exceed $500.00 for the academic 
year. Recipients must have been residents of the state of Maryland for at 
least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

Other Scholarships 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester 



*These scholarships are awarded by a Faculty Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation. These scholarship funds are reserved for students who are willing to repay the 
fund in the event they change professions. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

to qualified sophomore, junior and senior students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance to- 
complete their schooling. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified junior and senior students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or above and who are in need of 
financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Carroll Chemical Company Scholarship 

The Carroll Chemical Company of Baltimore, Maryland, initiated in 1956 
a fund to provide one undergraduate scholarship to a qualified sophomore 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average during the fresh- 
man year and who is in need of financial assistance. This scholarship in- 
cludes the cost of tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment, not to exceed $500.00 
per year. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment 
for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by 
the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land to a senior student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and 
commerical pharmacy. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing a fund to provide one or 
two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens of 
the United States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint 
a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed annually at the dis- 
cretion of the grantors. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 29 

Readme Drug Stores' Foundation Scholarsliijis 

The Read's Foundation, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes funds 

to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified sophomore, 
junior ami senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory 
of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 
The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Stu- 
dent whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
academic medal at the Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a 
student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attain- 
ment in scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. All candidates 
selected for membership must have completed seventy-five credit hours of 
college work and must be approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

The Society also awards annually a United States Dispensatory to the 
sophomore student of high moral character who, having completed forty-eight 
credit hours of college work, has attained the highest scholastic average in his 
class and a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general aver- 
age, provided that this average is not below the grade of "B". Certificates of 
Honor are awarded to the three students having the next highest general 
average, provided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B". 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three Junior students 
having the highest general average, provided this average does not fall below 
the grade of "B". 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in award- 
ing these honors. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a 
student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment of 
the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
tc be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student having the highest general average throughout the course in practical 
and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the in- 
come from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School 
to the senior student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in 
Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the 
Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity provides a cup in memory 
of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in the 
service of their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of 
character and leadership. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

The Kappa Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity provides a prize 
to be awarded annually to the senior student chosen by the Faculty Assembly 
for proficiency in pharmacology. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 81 

Epsilon Gra du ate Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Graduate Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
provides annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by 
the Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 

Merck A wards 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offer a set of valuable 
reference books to the senior student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. 
A second set of books is given to the senior student who has a high standing 
in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol 
Laboratories, Inc. to the senior student who has contributed the most to 
pharmacy through his extra-curricular activities. 

Rex all Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
senior student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both leadership 
and scholarship. 

Chemical Rubber Publishing Company Award 

An inscribed Handbook of Chemistry and Physics is made available by 
the Chemical Rubber Publishing Company of Cleveland, Ohio, to the student 
who attains the highest average in freshman chemistry. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the 
School in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the 
annual Honors Day Convocation. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students estab- 
lished for the purpose of aiding in the internal administration of the school, 
for organizing all extra-curricular programs and activities of the student 
body and for coordinating these programs and activities with those of the 
Faculty and Administration to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. 
The Executive Council of the Student Alliance is composed of the President of 
the Student Government Alliance, the Presidents of the Senior, Junior, 
Sophomore and Freshman Classes, and four delegates at large, one elected 
from each undergraduate class. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association has been 
organized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The pur- 
pose of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner 
the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance 
with the objectives stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, especially in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy 
in all of its branches and its application and aiding in promoting the public 
health and welfare. 

Students 7 Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November 1935. The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the 
participation of students in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association to the end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work 
may be awakened and guided and to familiarize them with the conditions 
existing in and the problems confronting the profession. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland was established in May 1871. This Association continued a separate 
existence until the General Alumni Association of the University of Mary- 
land was formed. Following the organization of it, the Society remained 
dormant until June 1926 when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

Officers (1956-1957) 

Lloyd N. Richardson, Honorary President 
Norman J. Levin, President 
H. Nelson Warfield, First Vice-President 
Samuel Portney, Second Vice-President 
Frank J. Slama, Executive Secretary 
Mrs. Bertha M. Budacz, Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Gordon A. Mouat, Chairman 
Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 
Samuel A. Goldstein 
James P. Cragg, Jr. 



SCHOOL OF PHARM \<) 

Committee on School of Pharmacy <>f the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of t In* state University in 
L920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing com- 
mittee known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this group are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the 
School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present members of 
the Committee are: 

John F. Wannenwetsch, Chairman 

Simon Solomon, Co-Chairman 

Halcolm S. Bailey Norman J. Levin 

Frederic T. Berman Lester R. Martin 

Frank Block Gordon A. Mouat 

N. \V. Chandler Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr. 

H. A. B. Dunning Samuel I. Raichlen 

Lloyd N. Richardson 



CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS' AND CREDITS 



FlHST S'EMESTER 



Second Semester 





Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Courses 


5 


2a 

►3 


© 


X 

s 


! u 

a 

5 


►3 


1 


5 


Freshman Year 
tChemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic and 

Qualitative Analvsis 


2 
3 

I 


1 

6 


8 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 

3 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 


4 


fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 


3 








fMatheruatics 10 or 15 












tMatheruaties 11 or 17 




3 

3 

1 
1 




3 

3 

1 
1 


3 


fModern Language 1, 2, or 6. 7. French or 
German 


3 

1 
1 
2 




3 

1 
1 
8 




3 

1 
1 

4 




3 






1 


tSpeech 1. 2. Public Speaking 






1 


fZoologv 1, General 


6 








2 


3 


5 


3 




2 
3 


6 


8 
3 

4 
7 
5 






Sophomore Year 


19 

4 
2 

2 
5 

4 




18 




3 


4 
3 
2 
3 

6 


3 

4 
7 
5 

7 

8 


2 


tChemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 


4 
3 
2 


2 


Pharmacy 21. 22. General 

fPhysics 10, 11, General 


4 
3 


4 
3 

4 

2 


5 
4 
5 















Junior Year 
Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


17 



18 
4 


Chemistry 153, Biological 


4 
2 


4 
4 


8 
6 


4 














1 
2 


4 
5 
6 


6 

7 
8 


4 




2 
2 

1 


5 
6 


7 
8 

1 


i 

l 


4 




4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 




! 3 
3 




3 
3 


3 




3 

1 
3 
2 

1 




3 
1 
7 
5 
4 


18 
3 






S'enior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 


19 
3 


First Aid 1 Standard 








Pharmacologv 81. 82, General 


4 
3 
3 


4 
3 
2 


3 
2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacy 101. 102, Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 


3 


3 




3 



3 








7 


.. 


5 




2 


3 


5 










t (Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 
macists 

Pharmacognosy 62, Animal Health Products 
or 


19 
3 


18 


3 
2 




3 

r 
5 


3 











o 
3 


3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Admin- 
istration 

or 


2 

2 
2 




2 
r 

2 

2 
1 



2 

2 
2 
















Pharmacy Administration 71. Management.... 
Pharmacy Administration 72, Drug Market- 














2 

3 

3 
3 






I 
2 

r 
3 
3 

3 

i 
4 
1 


2 


t (Elective* — Pre-Graduate Major) 
fEnclish 3. 4, Composition and World 


3 

3 
3 




3 

r 
3 

3 

3 

I 


3 

3 
3 

1 

2 




3 


or 
■{•Language 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German 

fMathematics 20, 21. Calculus 

(Electives — Special Cases) 








3 







3 


3 

1 

1 


3 

4 


1 









2 






1 





■{•Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
JThe electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 
•See Page 39 under Mathematics. 



CURRICULUM 

simmauy OF BOl Bfl ami CRBDI1 B 



COUBSl 



i.M.v.N Ykai: 

Chemistry l. :; 

Engl 1 8b 1. 2 

Mathematics i". 16 

Mathematics 11, it 

Modern Language l. 2 it <;. t . 

Pharmacy i . 2 

Speech l. 2 

Zoology l. 4 



Total 



B&PHOMOR1 Vim; 

Chemistry i"> 

Chemistry •">■">. ■"•7 

Chemistry 36, 38 

Pharmacy 21. 22 

Physics 10, 11 

Physiology 22 



Total 



Junior Yk \k 

Chemistry 53 

Chemistry 153 

Microbiology 1 

Microbiology 115 

Pharmacognosy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 51, 52 

Pharmacy 61 

Pharmacy Administration 37 



Total 



Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113 

First Aid 

Pharmacology 81, 82 

Pharmacy 101, 102 

Pharmacy Administration 21 

Pharmacy Administration 62 

Electives 



Total 

(Electives — Retail Major) 

Pharmacognosy 61 

Pharmacognosy 62 

or 

Pharmacy 132 

Pharmacy 121 

or 

Pharmacy 81 

Pharmacy Administration 71 

Pharmacy Administration 72 

(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 

English 3, 4 

or 

Language 6, 7 

Mathematics 20, 21 

(Electives — Special Cases) 

Chemistry 99 

Chemistry 112. 114 



SUMMARY 



Freshman Year . 
Sophomore Year 

Junior Year 

Senior Year 



Total 



Didactic 



'.Mi 

18 
48 
96 
82 
82 

(14 



180 



32 
96 



128 
96 
64 



416 



32 
64 
32 
32 
64 
64 
16 
48 



352 



96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224f 



560 

32 

48 

32 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 



480 
416 
352 
560 



1,808 



Laboratory 



192 



144 



836 



96 



12S 
96 

64 
48 

4:;2 



96 
64 
64 
64 
160 
192 



640 



128 
96 
48 



160i 
432 

48 



4S 



96 

128 



336 
432 
640 
432 



1.840 



Total 



96 

48 
48 
96 

.•{2 

:;2 

208 



816 



128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 



848 



128 

128 

96 

96 

224 

256 

16 

48 



992 



96 

16 
224 
160 

64 

48 
384f 



992 

80 

48 

80 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 

96 
128 



816 
848 
992 
992 



3,648 



Credit 

h'.urH 




2« 

2 

7 



4 

4 

4 

10 

s 
5 



35 



37 



37 

3 
3 

3 
2 

2 
2 
2 



37 
35 
37 
37 



146** 



•f-Average. 

•Required of students entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 
**A minimum of 144 credits required for students entered prior to September 1956 and 
146 credits for those entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 

CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (4, 4> 

Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. Miller and MacHamer. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory- 
and important generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (2, 2) Sophomore year, two 
lectures. Miller and Herold. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Sophomore year, one lab- 
oratory. Miller and Herold. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. 
A study of the general procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis — (4) Sophomore year, first semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Grabowski. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. 

A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures and theory, and 
their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) Junior year, second se- 
mester, two lectures and two laboratories. Grabowski. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. 
Quantitative methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of 
official preparations, with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99. Glassworking — (1-1) Laboratory, senior year, either semester. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. 

Simple operations in the manipulation of glass, repair and construction of 
apparatus. 



♦Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49 ; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99 ; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199 ; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one 
lecture or recitation period. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (8, 3) Senior year, three 

lectures. Doorenbos 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 37, 53. 

A survey of the structural relationships, the synthesis and chemical 
properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products — (2, 2) Senior year, two lab- 
oratories. Doorenbos. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 111, 113. 

Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical 
properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) Any one or two semes- 
ters. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 37, 38, or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to more difficult organic preparations and a study 
of the quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in 
organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds — (2, 2) One lecture, two 
laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. 
The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry — (5) Junior year, first semester, four lectures 
and one laboratory. Schmidt, Herbst, Vanderlinde, Vasington, and Brown. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry' 35, 37. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living 
organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health 
and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry— (3, 3) Three lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. 

A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chem- 
istry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with 
Chemistry 187, 189. 

Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry — (2, 2) Two lectures. 
Miller and Doorenbos. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A study of the terpenes, carotenes, steroids and stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids — (2, 2) Two lectures. Doorenbos. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113. 

A survey of the chemical structure and reactions of pharmacologically 
active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis — (2-6) Laboratory and con- 
ferences. Miller and Doorenbos. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 142, 144. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal 
chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis — (1-4) Laboratory and confer- 
ences. Doorenbos. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148. 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to 
official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and 
derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar — (1) Each semester. Miller 
and Doorenbos. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 
Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. Miller and Doorenbos. 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds (Advanced Course) — (2-4) 

Either semester. Two to four laboratories. Miller. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and mixtures. 

ENGLISH 

1, 2. Survey and Composition — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. 
Ballman. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMAi I 89 

Prerequisite Four units of high school English* 

a study of style, syntax, Bpelling and punctuation, combined with a His- 
torical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twen- 
tieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature — (3, 3) Elective, three lectures. 
Ballman. 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

1, 2. Public Speaking — (1, 1) Freshman year, one lecture. Ballman and 
Hillis. 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside read- 
ings; reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course — Senior year, first semester, one lecture, 
one demonstration. Sussman, instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the 
American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

0. Basic Mathematics — (0) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the 
qualifying examination for this course. 

The fundamental principles of algebra. 

10. Algebra — (3) Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lec- 
tures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — One unit of algebra. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents 
and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binomial theorem, and 
theory of equations. 

II. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second 
semester, three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not 
offer one-half unit of trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, addition 
formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line 
and circle, conic sections and graphs. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

15. College Algebra — (3) Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 
Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic equa- 
tions, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, logarithms, 
determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry — (3) Freshman year, second semester three 
lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and Mathematics 15. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcendental 
equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20, 21. Calculus — (3, 3) Three lectures. Richeson. 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical applications 
of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite 
series and differential equations. Given in alternate years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

152, 153. Mathematical Statistics — (2, 2) Prerequisite, Mathematics 20, 
21. Richeson. 

Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis and 
correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical inference. 
Illustrations will be drawn from the biological sciences. Given in alternate 
years. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

1. Pharmaceutical Microbiology — (4) Junior year, first semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories. Shay and Zikoski. 

Introduction to general microbiology with special emphasis on the study of 
pathogenic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the preven- 
tion and control of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology — (4) Junior year, second semester, two 
lectures, two laboratories. Shay and Zikoski. 

Prerequisite — Microbiology 1. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use 
of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious 
diseases. 






SCHOOL OF I'll iRM LCI U 

lOr Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy — (l, l) One lecture. (Given in alternal 

Shay. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media— (1, 1) One lecture. (Given in alternate 

years.) Shay. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents 
and media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology. Shay. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit de- 
termined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

211. Public Health— (1-2) One lecture. Shay. 

Prerequisite — Microbiology 1, 115. 

Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of state 
and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The courses 
will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Microbiology. Shay. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1, 2, Elementary French — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose prepara- 
tion is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 
Elements of grammar, composition, pronounciation and translation. 
Not offered 1957-1958. 

1, 2. Elementary German — (3, 3) Freshman year, three lectures. 
Schradieck. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose prepara- 
tion is not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. 
The assignment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous 
training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying 
the Modern Language requirement. 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — French 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Rapid grammar review, exercises in pronunciation, reading of scientific 
texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (3, 3) Three lectures. Schradieck. 

Prerequisite — German 1 and 2 or equivalent. 
Review of grammar and reading of scientific texts. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, first semester, two lec- 
tures and two laboratories. Slama and Kokoski. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. 

A study of the cultivation, collection, and commerce of drugs of animal 
and vegetable origin with special emphasis on the physical, microscopical, and 
chemical characteristics used in their identification and in the detection of 
adulteration. 

52. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) Junior year, second semester, two 
lectures and two laboratories. Slama and Kokoski. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51. 

A continuation of Pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering antibiotics, 

allergy-producing pollens, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, weedicides, etc. 

61. Pharmacognosy. Entomology for Pharmacists — (3) Senior year, 
first semester, two lectures, and one laboratory. Slama and Kokoski. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

A study of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 
and in the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; 
their recognition, life history, habits, and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Animal Health Products — (3) Senior year, second 
semester, three lectures. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Physiology 22; Pharmacology 81; Microbiology 
1, 115. 

A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treat- 
ment and prevention of the more important animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants — (2, 2) One lecture and one 
laboratory. Given in alternate years. Slama. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 



SCHOOL OF PHARM ICY 

A ludy of thfl kinds of Seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and 

field work on local flora, Instruction will be given in the preparation of an 
herbarium. 

111. 112. Plant Anatomy — (4, 4) Two lectures and two laboratories. 

Slama. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with 
special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vas- 
cular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders — (4, 4) Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and 
microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection 
of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy — (4, 4) Two lectures and two lab- 
oratories. Slama. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identi- 
fication and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy — Credit according to the amount and 
quality of work performed. Slama. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81, 82. Pharmacology, General — (4, 4) Senior year, three lectures and 
one laboratory. Ichniowski, Gittinger, Lennox, and Pruss. 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal 
substances, including methods of biological assay, with special reference to the 
drugs and preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National 
Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4) Two lectures and two lab- 
oratories. Ichniowski and Gittinger. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay— (4, 4) Laboratory and conferences, 
first and second semesters. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. 
Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (4, 4) Laboratory and 
conferences, first and second semesters. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods — (2-4), (2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with 
the instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. Ichniowski. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and com- 
parative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology. Ichniowski. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and 
hours. 

PHARMACY 

1, 2. Pharmacy Orientation — (1, 1) Freshman year, one lecture. Autian. 

An introduction to pharmacy for the beginning student. The course will 
include the various subject matter that a pharmacy student will undertake as 
well as the opportunities in pharmacy. Guest lecturers will be invited from 
the various fields of pharmacy. 

21, 22. Pharmacy, General — (5, 5) Sophomore year, four lectures and one 
laboratory. Sciarra, Milio, and Havranek. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy 1, 2 or may be taken simultaneously with 
Pharmacy 1, 2. 

A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathe- 
matical calculations, and the practical application of the theory to the manu- 
facture of galenical preparations. 

51, 52. Pharmacy, Dispensing — (4, 4) Junior year, two lectures and two 
laboratories. Autian, Milio, Levine, and Havranek. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21, 22 

A study of the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 45 

61. History of Pharmacy — (1) Junior year, first semester, one lecture. 
Sciarra. 

A study o( the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special 
emphasis on the history of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy Literature — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. 
Sciarra. 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned 
^vith subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102 Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy — (3, 3) Senior year, two lec- 
tures and one laboratory. Allen, Milio, and Levine. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52. 

A study of the compounding of new medicinal ingredients and dispensing 
aids used in modem professional pharmacy, including the preparation of some 
important classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) Senior year, first semester, 
two lectures. Purdum. 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

132. Cosmetics — (3) Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one 
laboratory. Allen and Sciarra. 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52, and 101. 

A study of the composition and manufacture of cosmetic preparations in- 
cluding laboratory work in the formulation of these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Foes and 
Autian. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. 

A study of manufacturing processes and equipment employed in the manu- 
facture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

203. 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Foss and 
Autian. 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 
201, 202. 

Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important 
pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control — (3) Three lectures. Foss and 
Autian. Given in alternate years. 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling 
of drugs from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing 
plants. Includes detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and other laws affecting the production and 
distribution of pharmaceutical products. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures a week. Autian. 

Prerequisites — Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. 

A study of pharmaceutical systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical 
chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (1, 1) One lecture. Allen 
and Purdum. Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and 
the pharmaceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development— (2, 2) Two laboratories. Allen. 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

A study of the development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cos- 
metics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy — (2, 2) Two lectures. Purdum. 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America 
and the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) Each semester. Foss and Autian. 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. 

Reports of (progress in research and surveys of recent developments in. 
pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology — (2, 2) Two- 

laboratories. Allen, Autian and Purdum. 

A study of technical problems in the stablization and preservation of 
pharmaceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

235. Research in Pharmacy — Credit and hours to be arranged. Foss, Pur- 
dum, Allen, and Autian. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 47 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

21. Accounting — (2) Senior year, first semester, one lecture and one 
laboratory. Leavitt. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. 
The analysis of financial and operating - statements with a study of the 
fundamental principles of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics — (3) Junior year, second semester, three 
lectures. Leavitt. 

A study of the general fundamentals of Economics — production, exchange, 
distribution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing 
government and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. Jurisprudence — (3) Senior year, second semester, three lectures. 
Melnicove. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State 
Laws and Regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cos- 
metics and pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instru- 
ments, Sales, Agency and Partnerships. 

71. Management — (2) Senior year, first semester, two lectures. Leavitt. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. 

A study of the business problems arising in the operation of a retail 
pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, leasing, insurance, 
purchasing, pricing, code marking and control of inventory. 

72. Drug Marketing — (2) Senior year, second semester, two lectures. 
Burbage. 

A study of marketing, marketing research, advertising, selling and sales- 
manship, merchandising, channels of distribution, wholesaling, retailing and 
personnel management. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics — (4, 4) Sophomore year, three lectures, one lab- 
oratory. Estabrook and Izatt. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. 

A study of the principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light 
and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism — (3, 3) Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. 
Given according to demand. 



48 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics — (5, 5) Five lectures. 
Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. 
Given according to demand. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics— (2, 2) Two lectures. Estabrook. 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189. 
Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General — (5) Sophomore year, second semester, four 
lectures, one laboratory. Costello and Levine. 

Prerequisite — Zoology 1, 4. 

A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, including neurophysi- 
ology, the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney and en- 
drocrine glands. 

ZOOLOGY 

1. Zoology, General — (4) Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and 
two laboratories. Costello and Hardy. 

This course deals with basic principles of animal life and uses a study of 
the anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

4. Zoology, Animal Kingdom — (3) Freshman year, second semester, two 
lectures and one laboratory. Costello and Polto. 

A survey of the animal kingdom with special emphasis on parasites, in- 
sects and other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a 
firm foundation for later required courses. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 






ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1956-57 



Graduate 
Al-Jaleel, Hatif Hammoody. ...Iraq 

Anderson, .Mai-tin Maryland 

Elkin, Samuel Pennsylvania 

Grabowski, Bernard Francis 

Pennsylvania 
Havranek, Robert Edward 

New York 
Herold, Francis Xavier. .. .Maryland 
Heyer, Ursula Elizabeth. .Wisconsin 
*Holtschneider, Douglas Wayne 

Maryland 
Kokoski, Robert John .... Maryland 

Leavitt, Dean Ellis Maine 

Leonard, Charles Brown. .New Jersey 

Lennox, Willard James. . . .Maryland 

Levine, Phillip Julian. .Rhode Island 

*Lomakin, Joseph T Maryland 



Students t 

MacHamer, Barbara Bowen 

.Maryland 

Milio, Frank Remo Maryland 

Morris, Martin Harold . . . .Maryland 
Patel, Jayantilal Shankerbhai 

India 

1'aul, Janice Lea Wyoming 

Pines, Thaddeus Paul ....Maryland 

Sciarra, John Jack New York 

Sherwood, Margaret Frances . . . Ohio 

Suvanprakorn, Puar Thailand 

Swartz, Charles Judd ....Maryland 
Tober, Theodore Wendel 

Connecticut 
Weinberg, Myron Simon . . New York 
White, Harold Ray . . . .Pennsylvania 
Zikoski, Paul Leonard. .Pennsylvania 



Senior Class 



Abrams, Arthur Murray . . Maryland 

Anoff, Bernard Maryland 

Aronson, Donald Maryland 

Austraw, Geraldine Lenore 

Maryland 
Bahr, Raymond Donald. . . .Maryland 
Balcerzak, Anthony Edwin 

Maryland 

Barke, Sheldon Saul Maryland 

Barshack, Irwin Stanley ..Maryland 

Bell, Frank Kelly Maryland 

Berman, Gilbert Samuel. .Maryland 
Brazius, Joseph Victor . . . .Maryland 

*Bronstein, Myer Maryland 

Branson, Gerald Neuman. .Maryland 

Cohen, Jack Ronald Maryland 

Davidov, Arnold Lee .... Maryland 

Deitch, Erwin Maryland 

Dougherty, Leon Patrick. .Maryland 
Edwards, James Dolan .... Maryland 
Elliott, Donald Brainard. .Maryland 
Geraghty, James Timothy. .Maryland 
Gilliece, Owen James Maryland 



Glassband, Herman Maryland 

Goldberg, Leonard Maryland 

Goldman, Sue Carolyn .... Maryland 

Golob, Stanley Paul Maryland 

Gradman, Lee Herbert .... Maryland 
Greenberg, Richard Earl. .Maryland 
Hayman, Thomas Johnson. .Maryland 

Heif etz, Carl Louis Maryland 

Hesson, Charles Edward. .Maryland 
Heyman, Bernard Philip . .Maryland 
Hodges, James Elmer .... Maryland 
Kabik, Robert Joseph ....Maryland 
Keller, George Riland .... Maryland 

Levenson, Sidney Maryland 

Levin, Arthur Irvin Maryland 

Levin, Norman Lee Maryland 

Mahoney, Robert Weldon. .Maryland 
Mercer, Robert Victor .... Maryland 
Neighoff, Wilson Edward. .Maryland 

Pertnoy, Edwin Maryland 

Pessagno, Wilbur Joseph .. Maryland 

Pollack, Howard Maryland 

Rosenbloom, Sanford Lawrence 

Maryland 



tRegistered in Graduate School 
*Did not attend entire session 



50 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Roth, Martin Maryland 

Seidman, Sidney Bernard. .Maryland 
Sekuler, Stanley Harold . . Maryland 

Shein, Sidney Maryland 

Sherman, Miriam Ray .... Maryland 
*Siegel, Arnold Maryland 



Siegel, Harold H Maryland 

Suter, Thomas Joseph . . . .Maryland 

Ullman, Donald Allan Maryland 

Wagner, Frederick Henry. .Maryland 
Young, Donald Roy Maryland 



Junior Class 

Abrahams, Nathan Held Kostos, Patricia Phyllis ..Maryland 

New Jersey Kronberg, Norman Jack . . Maryland 

Anetine, Clarence LeRoy. .Maryland Lebowitz, Donald Leo ....Maryland 

Bass, Harry Maryland Lisse, Allan New Jersey 

Berman, Mitchell Maryland Loetell, Joseph Wilmer . . . Maryland 

Brashears, Charles Luther Lottier, William Irving ...Maryland 

Maryland MacLarty, David Collins . . Maryland 

Brinsfield, Jay Royce .... Maryland Malanowski, Antoinette Rosalie 

Burkhart, Vincent dePaul . . Maryland Maryland 

Chan, Pearl Maryland Mallonee, James Joseph, Jr. 

Clinger, William Theodore Maryland 

Pennsylvania McKenny, Harry Joseph . . Maryland 

Cohen, Gerald Ivan Maryland Neuburger, Arnold Jay . . . Maryland 

Cooper, Harold Lee Maryland Nowakowski, Ronald Joseph 

Crouse, James Earl Maryland Maryland 

Damasiewicz, Walter Michael Oken, David Moses ...*.. Maryland 

Maryland Oster, Herbert Gerald .... Maryland 

Dorn, Conrad Peter Maryland Palmer, Thomas Rufus . . .Maryland 

Elliott, Paul Prag Maryland Palmer, William Richard. .Maryland 

Esslinger, Edward Carroll Pass, Stacy Maryland 

Maryland Penn, Thomas Milton Gosnell 

Etzler, Edward Alvin .... Maryland Maryland 

Faulkner, Walter Nelson. .Maryland Protokowicz, Stanley Edward 

Fisher, Thomas Luther . . . Maryland Maryland 

Fleckenstein, Paul Anthony Redmond, Noble Philip .... Maryland 

Maryland Reier, George Eugene Maryland 

Foley, William Thomas, Jr. Richmond, William Charles 

Maryland Maryland 

Friedman, Melvin Maryland Rodell, Michael Byron . . . .Maryland 

Hayes, Patricia Ann Maryland Ruppersberger, John Joseph 

Heinritz, Colen Clifford . . . Maryland Maryland 

Hughes, Henry William . . . Maryland Sherman, Alan 

Isaacson, Bernard Sheldon District of Columbia 

Maryland St. John, Miles Eugene . . . Maryland 

Jaslow, Marvin Ban Maryland Sultan, Walter Edward . . .Maryland 

King, Donald Charles . . . .Maryland Swiss, Nancy Lee Maryland 

Kornblau, Maurice Jules Tountas, Chris Peter Maryland 

Pennsylvania Tregoe, Charles Henry . . . .Maryland 



! Did not attend entire session 



school OF I'll VRMACY 



51 



Ynxakis, George Chrifl ....Maryland 
Warrington, Clayton Linwood 

Maryland 



Weiner, Leon Maryland 

Wittik, Jerome Sidney ...Maryland 
Zucker, Paul Maryland 



Sophomore Class 



*Adler, Cyrus New Jersey 

Becker, John Wilbert ....Maryland 
Becker, Stanley Leonard. .Maryland 
Berdiansky, Charles Solomon 

Maryland 
Berger, Charles Joseph, Jr. 

Maryland 
Bozman, Kenneth Bennett. .Maryland 

Brown, Harry James Maryland 

Caplan, Carl Michael ....Maryland 

Chaiet, Melvin Maryland 

dayman, Jerome Harris. .Maryland 

*Coumont, Donald Armand. .Maryland 

Davies, Joseph William .. .Maryland 

Deming, Martin Eugene ..Maryland 

*Feldman, Allen Maryland 

Freeman, Joseph Stafford. .Maryland 
Friedlander, Paul Michael . . Maryland 
Friedlander, Sheldon Allan 

Maryland 
Friedman, Louie Joseph ..Maryland 
Gaskins, John Thomas, Jr. 

Maryland 
*Glaeeer, Julianna Rita . . . .Maryland 
Goldberg, Stanley Lester . . Maryland 
Greenberg, Murray Gerald 

Maryland 

Hamet, Harry Maryland 

Hanenbaum, Allen Maryland 

Haransky, William Maryland 

Harvey, Jack Wayne Maryland 

*Katz, Albert Maryland 

Keller, Chalmers Harry . . Maryland 
Kern, Louis Reichert, Jr. .. Maryland 
Klioze, Earl Ephraim .... Maryland 
Kronsberg, Ronald Herbert 

Maryland 



Levi, Ellis Maryland 

Levin, Barry Elliott Maryland 

Levinsohn, Nina Debra ...Maryland 

Lund, Robert Eugene Maryland 

Macks, Harry Elliott ....Maryland 
Marshall, Eugenie Wallace 

Maryland 

Matz, Stanford Maryland 

McKenna, Richard Sterling 

Maryland 
Morton, Joseph Harris 

West Virginia 
Pilquist, Richard Morris. . .Maryland 
Pozanek, Larry Herbert. . .Maryland 
Raschka, Theodore Lee . . .Maryland 
Resser, William Wolf ....Maryland 
Richardson, David Ronald. .Maryland 
Robinson, Zoe Carroll ....Maryland 
Sachs, Herbert Allen Leonard 

Maryland 
Saiontz, Marvin Frederick 

Maryland 
Santoni, Geraldine Constance 

Maryland 
Santoni, John David Henry 

Maryland 

Schwartz, Sorell Lee Maryland 

Schwartzman, Alfred Howard 

Maryland 
Sclar, Morton Jerome ....Maryland 
Shpritz, Esther Harriet . .Maryland 
Sniadowski, Anthony John 

Maryland 

Spear, Murray Charles . . . Maryland 

Stratmann, Bruce Nevett. .Maryland 

Thomas, John Rushton . . . .Maryland 

*Zells, Ivin Maryland 



♦Did not attend entire session 



52 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Freshman Class 



Abrams, Alan Edward .... Maryland 
Ashburn, Franklin Glendon 

Maryland 
Barnes, Attison Leonard. .Maryland 
Belford, Stanley Harvey. . .Maryland 
Berger, Jerome Alvin Maryland 

♦Berk, James Leslie Maryland 

Conklin, Nancy Carole .... Maryland 
Deitch, Morton Isaac .... Maryland 
DelPrete, Robert Joseph . . Maryland 
DiPaula, Vincent Robert . . Maryland 
Duvall, William James ...Maryland 

Evert, Helen Elaine Maryland 

Glick, Henry Joseph Maryland 

*Gold, Bruce Robert Maryland 

♦Gold, Selma F Maryland 

Goldner, Ronald Maryland 

Gordon, Gerald Stanford . . Maryland 
Grebow, Martin David .... Maryland 
Handelman, Joseph Gold. .Maryland 
Hankin, Ellen Glenis Maryland 

♦Harrison, Gordon Marshall 

Maryland 

Hoffman, Marta Maryland 

Horwits, Leonard Maryland 

Kantorow, Bennett Ralph. .Maryland 
Kenney, Fern Eugene .... Maryland 

Kettell, Nadine Maryland 

Kushnick, Marvin Stanley. .Maryland 
Lasarko, Maria Anna .... Maryland 

Lerner, Beryl Maryland 

Lerner, Joseph Herman . . . Maryland 

Levin, David Gerald Maryland 

Levin, Irvin Isaac Maryland 



Lichter, Samuel Maryland 

Liszewski, Edward Henry. .Maryland 
Minster, Howard Manuel . . Maryland 
Palmere, Anthony Michael 

Maryland 
Petts, Mildred Louise .... Maryland 
Plempel, Alfred Clair . . . .Maryland 
Plummer, Robert Mitchell. .Maryland 

Presser, Carl Benson Maryland 

Raksin, Irving Jacob Maryland 

Reba, Howard Barry Maryland 

Richman, Morton David . . Maryland 
Sadowski, Leonard Joseph 

Maryland 
Samonovitch, Irwin Louis. .Maryland 
Scholnick, Fred Maurice. . .Maryland 
Shaffrey, Robert Michael . . Maryland 
Shargel, Martin Chaim .... Maryland 

Sherr, Allan Robert Maryland 

Sherr, Bernard Erwin .... Maryland 

Silen, Irvin Maryland 

Speert, Arnold Maryland 

Sprows, Janice Veronica. .Maryland 
Stank, Kenneth Edward . . Maryland 
Stiffman, Jeffrey Barry . . . Maryland 
♦Timmons, William Thomas 

Maryland 
Tokar, Elliot Sanford . . . .Maryland 

Tracey, Jessie Lois Maryland 

Warfield, Albert Hariy . . . Maryland 
Warthen, John David, Jr. . .Maryland 
Weiner, Kenneth Sidney. .Maryland 
Wisniewski, Robert John. .Delaware 



Special Students 

Dunlavy, Aletha Love Iowa Linkous, Joye Laveda ....Maryland 

Hackett, Edna Carolyn . . . Maryland 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 9, 1956 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Gordon Henry Bryan Montana Charles Joseph Kokoski. . .Maryland 

Jonah Jaff e Maryland 



'Did not attend entire session 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 






Master of Science 
Robert John Kokoski ....Maryland fPhilip Andrew Ouellette. .Maryland 

Joseph Charles Mastriani John Roekos, Jr Maryland 

New York fTully Joseph John Speaker 
Frank Remo Milio Maryland New Jersey 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Alfred Abramson Maryland 

William A. Bailone, Jr. ...Maryland 
Curtis Augustus Bowen ..Maryland 
Marlene Elizabeth Conrad 

Maryland 

J. William Dietrich Maryland 

M. Lee Dorsey Maryland 

Ralph Engel Maryland 

Irwin B. Epstein Maryland 

Jerome Leonard Fine .... Maryland 

Sue Brotman Fine Maryland 

Julian Michael Friedman. .Maryland 

Sheldon Friedman Maryland 

Jack Frieman Maryland 

I. William Grossman ....Maryland 
Douglas Wayne Holtschneider 

Maryland 
Charles Vincent dePaul Keller, Jr. 

Maryland 
Stanley Albert Klatsky . . . Maryland 
Richard Edward Kraus . . . Maryland 

Herbert Kwash Maryland 

William Henry Leonard 

North Carolina 

Albert Lichtman Maryland 

Philip Douglas Lindeman 

Maryland 



Ronald Henry Lowry 

North Carolina 

Bernard F. Macek Maryland 

Richard August Metz, III. .Maryland 
Richard Anthony Miller ..Maryland 

Paul Vincent Niznik Maryland 

Marvin LeRoy Oed Maryland 

Walter F. Oster Maryland 

Herbert Plotkin Maryland 

Richard David Plotkin .... Maryland 

Thaddeus Paul Pruss Maryland 

Emanuel Richman Maryland 

Howard Earl Rofsky Maryland 

Walter Harlan Sachs Maryland 

Howard Robert Schiff .... Maryland 

Stuart Shemer Maryland 

Gerald Sherer Maryland 

Gregory John Sophocleus. .Maryland 

Irving E. Swartz Maryland 

Earl Stanley Waitsman. . .Maryland 
Milton Raymond Watkowski 

Maryland 
Frank John Wesolowski. . .Maryland 

Robert John Zamecki Maryland 

Santo Angelo Zappulla .... Maryland 



Honors (1955-56) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Howard Robert Schiff 

The William Simon Memorial Prize I. William Grossman 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize Howard Robert Schiff 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Ralph Engel 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize — 

Douglas W. Holtschneider 

The David Fink Memorial Prize Walter F. Oster 

The Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize Stanley A. Klatsky 

The Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize . . . Bernard F. Macek 
Epsilon Graduate Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize — 

Irving E. Swartz 



pDegree conferred August 1955 



54 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Certificates of Honor 



Sue Brotman Fine 



I. William Grossman 



Honorable Mention (Junior Class) 

Raymond Bahr Geraldine Austraw 

Ervvin Deitch 



DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 
Class of 1956 



Ralph Engel 
Sheldon Friedman 
I. William Grossman 
Douglas W. Holtschneider 



Richard A. Miller 
Richard Plotkin 
Howard R. Schiff 



Honorary Mention 



Alfred Abramson 
M. Lee Dorsey 
Irwin Epstein 
Sue Brotman Fine 
Stanley A. Klatsky 
Herbert Kwash 



Bernard Macek 
Walter Oster 
Thaddeus Pruss 
Gregory Sophocleus 
Irving Swartz 



Raymond Bahr 



Class of 1957 



Donald Elliott 



Geraldine Austraw 
Gilbert Berman 
Erwin Deitch 



Honorary Mention 



Sue Goldman 
Charles Hesson 
Miriam Sherman 



Class of 1958 



Harry Bass 
Gerald I. Cohen 
Conrad Dorn 
Edward Esslinger 
Allan Lisse 



Mitchell Berman 
Jay Brinsfield 
William T. Clinger 
Edward Etzler 
William T. Foley, Jr. 



Honorary Mention 



James Mallonee 
George Reier 
Miles St. John 
Walter E. Sultan 



Melvin Friedman 
Colen C. Heinritz 
David Oken 
Herbert Oster 
Michael Rodell 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 55 



Class of 1959 



Stanley Becker Larry Pozanek 

Melvin Chaiet Marvin Saiontz 

Harry Macks Murray Spear 

Honorary Mention 

John Becker Earl Klioze 

Joseph Daviee Eugenie Marshall 

Marvin Jaslow Herbert Sachs 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

INDEX 

Academic Regulations 18 

Accreditation 12 

Administrative Organization 7 

Admissions, Procedure 14 

Requirements 13 

To Advanced Standing 13 

To Freshman Class 13 

To Graduate Study 13 

Alumni Association 32 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 32 

Application for Admission 14 

Assistantships, Graduate 26 

Attendance Requirements 18 

Board of Regents 1 

Buildings and Equipment 12 

Calendar 4 

Calendar, Academic 5 

Classification of Students 22 

Correspondence 6 

Courses, description of 36 

Curriculum 34 

Changes in 17 

Degrees 13 

Deportment 24 

Dismissal for low scholarship 21 

Employment 24 

Examinations 18 

Faculty 7 

Faculty Council 7 

Fees and Expenses, Graduate 16 

Part-time Undergraduate 16 

Undergraduate 15 

Fellowships, etc 25 

Grading System 19 

Grade-Point Average 19 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 21 

Graduates, Roll of 49 

Graduation Requirements 22 

History and Program 12 

Honors and Awards 29 

Hospital Pharmacy Internships 26 

Housing 24 

Incomplete Grades, removal of 19 

Library, Regulations 11 

Staff 11 

Loans 27, 29 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 57 
INDEX 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 

Registration with 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 33 

Students' Auxiliary \Yi 

Matriculation 14 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 19 

Office of Dean, Hours 6 

Staff 11 

Parking 24 

Probation for Low Scholarship 20 

Professorships 25 

Promotion to next class 20 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 21 

Registration 15 

Residence and non-residence, definition of 17 

Scholarships 27 

Scholarship Requirements 19 

Senior Elective Program 22 

Student Government Alliance 31 

Students, Roll of 49 

Textbooks 17 

Transcripts of Records 22 

Tuition and Laboratory Fees 15 

Visitors 6 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 17 



EDUCATION 



ii IMPLICATION does not 

M2j 

ing the youth the md the ti 

ag them to turn their arithmetic 
It means, on the contrary, training them Into 

continence of their bodies and souls. It is painful, continual and difficult 
to be done by kindness, by watching, by warning, by precedent, and by pi 
but above all — by example." — John Ruskin. 



"In our country no man is worthy the honored name of statesman, who 
does not include the highest practicable education of the people in all his 
plans of administration." — Horace Mann. 



"Promote, then, as an object of primary importance institutions for the 
general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government 
gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be 
enlightened." — George Washington. 



"The good education of youth has been esteemed by wise men in all ages 
as the surest foundation of the happiness both of private families and of com- 
monwealths." — Benjamin Franklin. 



"The whole people must take upon themselves the education of the whole 
people and be willing to bear the expense of it." — John Adams. 



"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it 
expects what never was and never will be." — Thomas Jefferson. 



"A popular government without popular information or the means of ac- 
quiring it, is but the prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or perhaps both." 

—James Madison 



"An educated man is never poor and no gift is more precious than 
education." — Abraham Lincoln. 



"Without popular education no government which rests on popular action 
can long endure; the people must be schooled in the knowledge and in the 
virtues upon which the maintenance and success of free institutions depend." 

— Woodrow Wilson 



'We have faith in education as the foundation of democratic government." 

— Franklin D. Roosevelt 




1 

il 

I 



SEPARATE CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Office 
of University Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

These catalogs and schools are: 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School 



At Baltimore 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 
tive schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The professional schools are: 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law- 
lS. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 

At Heidelberg 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by address- 
ing the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College 
Park, Maryland. 



THE SCHOOL OF 

pharmacy 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AT BALTIMORE 



The provisions of this 'publication are not to be regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between ike student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



SEE OUTSIDE BACK COVER FOR LIST OF OTHER CATALOGS 

I 



c atalog and 
1 Sth Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to L904) 

1958-1959 




Vollimi 58 Number 1 
Published by the University 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



• IKS; 



i 




f^ 



m 



III 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 

I tpiret 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holtbr 

Vice-Chairman 1959 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary * 1960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer \96b 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer I959 

Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Alvin L. Aubinoe 1958 

8000 Overhill Rd., Bethesda 

Thomas W. Pangbobn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangbom Blvd., Hagerstown 

Enos S. Stockbridge 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. Ewing Tuttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



1958 



1959 



JANUARY 1958 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

APRIL 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



JULY 1958 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 % 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 

DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



JANUARY 1959 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



JULY 1959 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14*15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 





SEPTEMBER 




s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


1G 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


27 


28 


29 


30 












OCTOBER 




S 


M 


T 


w 


T 
1 


F 

2 


S 
3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


1G 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


23 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



DECEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



School <>f Pharmacy 

ACADEMIC CAI ENDAR 

1958-1959 
First Semester 






September IS .... Monday Freshman Orientation-9:30 a.m. 

September 16 .... Tuesday Freshman Registration-9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Sophomore Registration 10:30-11:30 a.m. 

September 17 Wednesday Junior Registration-9: 00-1 0:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration-1 0:30-1 1 :30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration 1:00-3:00 p.m. 

Septembei 22 .... Monday Instruction begins with lirst scheduled : 

November 26 ....Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

December 1 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 

December 19 Friday Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

1959 

January 5 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
January 21-27 ...Wednesday-Tuesday .First semester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 3 Tuesday Freshman Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Sophomore Registration— 10:30-1 1 : 30 a.m. 
February 4 Wednesday Junior Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration-10: 30-11 :30 a.m. 

Graduate Registration— 1:00-3:00 p.m. 

February 9 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 23 Monday Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

March 26 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

March 31 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 

May 1 8-22 Monday-Friday Senior final examinations 

May 22-28 Friday-Thursday .... Second semester examinations 

May 30 Saturday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 6 Saturday Commencement 

All students are expected to complete their registration,, including the payment of 
bills and filing or class cards, on the regular registration day. Students failing to comply 
with this regulation are charged a tee of five dollars. No student is normally permitted 
to register after Saturday noon of the week in which instruction begins. 

The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



University of Maryland 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the School of Pharmacy should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students, Scholarships, Scholastic Standing of 
Students, Transcripts of Records, 
Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy. The Dean's Office is open 
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment. 






/ of I'll- 

llll SCHOOl 01 PHARMACY 
Officers of Administration 

wilson n. elkins, President of the U niversity 

B.A., M.A., B. LITT., D. PHIL. 

ALiuN o. kuhNj Executive Vice-President of the University 

B.S., M.S., PH.D. 

alvin e. cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

R. lee horn bake, Dean of the Faculty 

B.S., M.A., PH.D. 

frank l. bentz, jr., Assistant, President's Office 

PH.D. 

harry c. byrd, President Emeritus 

B.S., LL.D., D.SC. 

harold f. cotterman, Dean of the Eacidty, Emeritus 

B.S., M.A., PH.D. 

noel E. foss, Dean 

B.S., PH.D. 

G. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registration 

M.S. 

norma j. azlein, Registrar 
a.b. 



FACULTY COUiNCIL 

noel e. foss, Dean 

GAYLORD B. ESTABROOK FRANK J. SLAMA 

Francis M. miller donald e. shay, Secretary 

Faculty (1957-1958) 
Emerita 

b. olive cole, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
phar.d., University o£ Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 



5 ► 



University of Maryland 
Professors 



*gaylord b. estabrook, Professor of Physics 

b.s. in ch.e., Purdue University, 1921; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; ph.d., 
University or - Pittsburgh, 1932. 

noel e. foss, Professor of Pharmacy 

PH.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist— South Dakota, New York. 

casimir t. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

fw. Arthur purdum, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

*a. w. richeson, 1 Professor of Mathematics 

b.s., University of Richmond, 1918; a.m., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
ph.d., 1928. 

emil g. schmidt, Professor of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine 
b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1921; ph.d., 1924; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

donald E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; m.s., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 

frank j. slama, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; m.s., 

1930; ph.d., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin frank allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 

Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Edward j. herb st, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 
b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1943; m.s., 1944; ph.d., 1949. 

* Francis m. miller, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d., Northwestern University 1949. 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 
iSabbatical Leave 1957-1958. 



School of Pharmacy 

tDA MARIAN ROBINSON, Associate Professor of Library Science 

Cornell University, 1924; n.s.L.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

GUILFORD g. rudolf, Assoc'uitc Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 

b.a., University of Colorado, 1940; M.S., Wayne State University, 1942; PH.D., Uni- 
versity of Utah, 1948. 

Assistant Professors 

*adele b. ballman, Assistant Professor of English 

a.b., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

*leslie c. costello, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

norman j. doorenbos, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s. in chem., University of Michigan, 1950; m.s., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

Arthur j. emery, jr., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 
b.s., Bucknell University, 1947; ph.d., University of Rochester, 1954. 

Hilda e. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

*claire strube schradieck, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
a.b., Goucher College, 1916; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

Instructors 

ann Virginia brown, Instructor in Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine 
a.b., Goucher College, 1940. 

*t clarence T. de haven, Instnictor in Speech 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1930; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950. 

georgianna s. gittinger, Instructor in Pharmacology 

a.b., Hood College, 1912; m.a., University of Virginia, 1924. 

charles s. kumkumian, Instructor in Chemistry 
b.s., Temple University, 1944; m.s., 1951. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Pennsylvania. 

dean e. leavitt, Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; m.s., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 



I 



University of Maryland 

phillip j. levine, Instructor in Pharmacy 

b.s., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Rhode Island. 

frank r. milio, Instructor in Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

* Margaret zipp, bistructor in Mathematics 

b.sc, Douglas College, Rutgers, 1939; m.a., University of Pittsburgh, 1948. 

Lecturer 

Ibernard s. melnicove, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
ll.b., University of Baltimore, 1932. 

Visiting Lecturer 

samuel l. fox, Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1934; b.s. in pharm., 1936; m.d., 1938. 

Fellow 

Ilandon w. burbage, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration 
ph.b., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

Junior Instructors 



jy Robert j. kokoski, Junior Instructor in Pharmacognosy 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

nagindas k. patel, Junior Instructor in Pharmacy 

i.sc., Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan's College, 1952; b. pharm., L.M. College of Pharmacy, 
India, 1954; m.s., Temple University, 1957. 
Bi 

M Graduate Assistants 

*howard h. gendason, Assistant in Zoology 
a.b., Western Maryland College, 1957. 

Robert e. havranek, Assistant in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., Columbia University, 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— California, Maryland, New York, Florida. 



*Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 

* 8 



/ <>\ Pharmacy 

(ii.\i;iis i. BOOPBR, JR., Assistant in Physics 
B.A., Dartmouth College, 1954. 

i i mi wc .\ss;'n/u';// in Chemistry 
B.8., rohoku PharmaceuticaJ College, Japan, 1943; m.»., College of Medicine, Taiwan 
University, 1947; m.s., Butlex University, 1954. 

v. i! lard J. lennox. Assistant in Pharmacology 
B.s. in pharm., University of Maryland 1954. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 

Patrick w. ragozzino, Assistant in Pharmacology 
b.s., University or Connecticut, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Connecticut. 

c. richard tamorria, Assistant in Chemistry 
b.s., Georgetown College, 1954; M.S., 1957. 

paul l. zikoski, Assistant in Microbiology 
b.s. in biol., University of Scranton, 1953. 

Assistants 

james p. cragg, jr., Assistant in Practical Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland 



Library Staff 
Pharmacy-Dentistry 



ida marian robinson, Librarian 

A.B., B.S.L.S. 

hilda E. moore, Associate Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S. 

Beatrice Marriott, Reference Librarian 

A.B. 

edith m. coyle, Periodicals Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A. 

marjorie e. fluck, Cataloguer 

B.S. IN ED. 

rosalie c. carroll, Library Assistant 
sarah l. atkins, Library Assistant 

Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
ol the University. 



University of Maryland 

Elizabeth E. mc coach, Assistant to the Librarian 
Patricia b. ierzi, Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 
daisy lotz gue, Secretary Stenographer 
Margaret E. beatty, Senior Stenographer 
Frances r. plitt, Senior Stenographer 






10 



School of Pharmacy 

THE SCHOOL 01 PHARMACY 
History and Program 

Tm purposes OF THE school 01 PHARMACY are to train students lor the 
efficient, ethical practice or' all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students in 
general scientific and cultural subjects so that they can read critically, express 
themselves clearly, and think Logically as members of a profession and citi/ens 
of a democracy; to guide students into productive scholarship and research for 
the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland 
physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in Pharmacy to 
replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College 
joined with a group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental 
Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new insti- 
tution was known as the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Balti- 
more professional schools was merged with the Maryland State College at 
College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies buildings constructed specifically for pharmaceutical 
education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with the most modern 
apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts and for research in 
pharmacy is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 27,000 books, is now merged with the dentistry collection. 

Students have access to the Medical School Library, and the time-honored 
collections of the Enoch Pratt, the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty, and The Johns Hopkins University. Most of these libraries are within 
walking distance of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training over the years from a one-year to a four- 
year course. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy has now 
recommended a five-year course. However, such a program is in the future 
and students attending and entering the School of Pharmacy in the Autumn 
of 1958 will be required to take only the four-year course. 

The School of Pharmacy has always been a fully accredited Class A school 
and was again so rated at its last inspection in November 1953 by the Middle 
States Association of Schools and Colleges and by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. The diploma of the School is recognized by every 
state board of pharmacy. 

11 ► 



t. 



University of Maryland 

Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Admission To The Freshman Class 

AMOUNT AND QUALITY OF SCHOLASTIC PREPARATION 

To be admitted to the School of Pharmacy, a candidate must be a gradu- 
ate of a secondary school approved by the State Board of Education of Mary- 
land or a similar accrediting agency and must submit credentials acceptable 
to the Director of Admissions, as proof of adequate preparatory-school training. 

Sixteen units of academic work are required of each applicant. 

The following work must have been completed: 

English— 4 units 

Plane Geometry— 1 unit 

Algebra— 1 unit }» Total 8 units 

History— 1 unit 

Science— 1 unit 

It is strongly recommended that the candidate obtain l A unit of trigo- 
nometry or an additional V2 unit of algebra. The remaining seven and one- 
half units may be in astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 
general science, geology, history, foreign languages, mathematics, physical 
geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered for which credit is granted 
toward college or university entrance. Not more than four units may be voca- 
tional units (agriculture, commercial drawing, home economics, shop courses, etc.). 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Director 
of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy for an Application Blank x 
an illustrated brochure about the School, and literature about opportunities 
in pharmacy. 

Admission To Advanced Standing 

An applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts of his 
college record along with a certificate of good standing from the college he 
attended. His grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the college's 
grading system. 

-« 12 






o\ of Pharmacy 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited bj the American Counci] 
on Pharmaoeutica] 1 ducadon are given credit for the work ol the first three 
years of the pharmacy curriculum which the) have completed. 

Transfers From libera] arts colleges are given credit for the libera] 
subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a yea's credit is given 

for work completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those 
courses in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the 
schedules for transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given 
preference over advanced work. 

Credit is not given for pharmaceutical work done in evening or corre- 
spondence schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other 
institutions if the school did not grant credit. 

In determining the grade-point average of transfer students, only those 
courses taken at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland are used. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed to the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions of the Uni- 
versity in Baltimore. 



Admission And Costs 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE FOR ALL APPLICANTS 

1 . Request the Director of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
to send the preliminary application blank. Fill the blank out fully including 
the names of all schools and colleges which the candidate has attended. Sign 
the blank and return it with the required photographs and a seven dollar and 
fifty cent investigation fee to the Director of Admissions not earlier than October 
first of the academic year prior to the proposed beginning of the candidate's 
studies at the school. (This fee will not be refunded or credited on any sub- 
sequent bill.) 

2. Send the high school record blank which accompanies the application 
blank to the principal of the high school attended and request that he mail 
it promptly to the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the 
prospective student will be advised to: 

3. Report to the School of Pharmacy for entrance examinations and inter- 
views. The School seeks indications of aptitude for undertaking pharmacy studies 
by examining the school records of candidates, their scores in aptitude and 
achievement tests, and estimates of their interests, maturity, and personality. 
Entrance examinations and interviews are held in February, but subsequent 
opportunities are given. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

4. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the application of candi- 
dates whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, and 
the School of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory that they 
have been tentatively accepted. 

5. Students who are offered tentative admissions must immediately make 
a deposit of $60.00 ($10.00 matriculation fee plus $50.00 deposit on tuition) on 
their September tuition. This deposit is non-returnable if the student fails to 
register in the autumn, but is credited against the first semester tuition charge 
of all students who enter. 

Registration And Fees 

In order to finance the equipment for the Baltimore Union Building and 
to meet other financial needs in connection with this project, a Special Fee is to 
be paid by all full-time students of the Professional Schools. This fee will be 
effective July 1, 1958 and will be in the amount of $30.00 per annum to be 
paid at the time of first registration during the academic year. 

All students must enroll in person at the Dean's office during the registration 
period at the beginning of each semester. On registration day the student fills 
out necessary forms and class cards and pays his fees. Detailed directions con- 
cerning dates and procedures are mailed durina the summer to students who are 
Hi eligible to enroll in the fall. All new students must matriculate. 

y All students must complete their registration at the office of the registrar 

upon the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter 
classes until he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and 
hours printed in this catalog are required to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars. The last day for late registration is Saturday noon following the close 
of the normal registration period. This rule may be waived only upon the 
written recommendation of the Dean. 

There is a fee of $3.00 for chanoes in registration made after first week 
or instruction. 

Tuition and Fees 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester*) 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

Special Fee (jper annum) 30.00 

This Special Fee is payable at the time of Fall registration by all 

^ 14 



School of Phm 



Full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the 
Baltimore Campus. Full time students enrolled only lor the sec- 
ond semester will pay a SI 5.00 Special Fee. Proceeds from the 
Special Fee will be used to finance the needs for equipment, etc., 
for the Baltimore Union Building. 

Student Activities' Fee (jper semester) 7.50 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra 
Marine, all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, 
dances.) 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 

For Seniors 

Graduation Fee (To be paid in February of the Senior 
Year) $15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage— Students are required to pay for all 
breakage in excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Books, stationery, weights, slide rule, dissecting in- 
struments, etc., approximately 150.00 
Students registering for more than a regularly 
scheduled semester's work will be charged addition- 
ally for each course. 
Fee for Change in Registration after first week 3.00 



PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 
Tuition Fee Of or each semester hour per semester) $10.00 

Laboratory Fees (jper semester') 

Chemistry 10.00 

Microbiology 10.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

15 ► 



Unwersity of Maryland 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physics 6.00 

Physiology 10.00 

Zoology 8.00 

Special Fee Of or each semester hour per semester') 2.50 

Part-time students will be assessed at the rate of $2.50 per credit 
hour payable at the time of Fall registration. The minimum 
Special Fee will be $6.00 for part-time students registering in the 
first semester of any school year and $3.00 for any student regis- 
tering only for the second semester of any school year. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non- 
returnable) $10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 10.00 

Tuition fee for students carrying 10 or more semester 

credit hours (per semester) 100.00 

Laboratory fee— Same as undergraduate schedule above 

Special Fee 

For students carrying 10 or more semester credit hours 

per semester (per annum) 30.00 

For students carrying less than 10 semester credit hours per 
semester— same as undergraduate schedule above. 
Graduation fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and micro- 
filming of thesis) 50.00 

REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, 
must file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do 
not comply with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are not 
accorded any refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the written 
consent of parent or guardian. Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation 
Fee, Student Activities' Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition, and any scholarship 
credit, are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following 
schedule : 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 



Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 



16 



School of Pharmacy 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application foi with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 



Text Books 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

Changes In Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at 
least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 



Academic Regulations 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examina- 
tion in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally 
counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than 
half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period 
are also construed as an absence. 



17 ► 



University of Maryland 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discre- 
tion of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission 
for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 
The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 
A 


Interpretation 
Excellent 




Point Value 
4 


B 


Good 




3 


C 


Fair 




2 


D 
F 


Poor but passing 
Failure 




1 



I 


Course work incomplete 


replaced by definite 








grade when course 








requirements have 
been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 

Subject Credit Grade Points 

English 3 C 6 

Speech 1 D 1 

German 3 B 9 

Mathematics 3 C 6 

Chemistry 4 D 4 

Zoology 4 B 12 

18 38 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade-point of 2.1. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at 
the School of Pharmacy are considered. 

Scholarship Requirements 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 
Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 

^ 18 



School of Pharmacy 

academic standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean 
warns arul the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a 
Student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor 
enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above with an estimate 
of the quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is given the 
student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the 
next semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he failed 
or for which he has received credit for w r ork done at the University, or else- 
where, must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular attend- 
ance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final mark will be substituted 
for the mark already recorded, but he will not receive any additional credit 
for the course. Although the final mark received in the course will be used in 
determining credit for promotion and graduation, it does not apply to honors 
and awards. See applicable section under "Honors and Awards". 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMurion AND PROBATION 

Students in the Freshman and Sophomore years are expected to maintain 
a grade point average of not less than 1.5 for each semester in these years. Any 
student in the Freshman or Sophomore years who fails to maintain a grade 
point average of 1.5 for any semester of these years will be placed on probation 
during the next semester. 

Students in the Junior and Senior years are expected to maintain a grade 
point average of not less than 2.0 for each semester in these years. Any student 
in the Junior and Senior years who fails to maintain a grade point average of 
2.0 for any semester in these years will be placed on probation during the next 
semester. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semester hour 
credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on probation dur- 
ing the next semester. 

For promotion from the Freshman to Sophomore year and from Sophomore 
to Junior year a student must have maintained a grade point average of 1.5 
for the Freshman year and a grade point average of 1.5 for the Sophomore year. 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

For promotion from the Junior to Senior year a student must have maintained 
a grade point average of not less than 2.0 for the Junior year. Students in the 
Senior class must maintain a grade point average of not less than 2.0 to become 
eligible for graduation. 

Any student on probation for any semester is expected to pass all work 
for which he is registered in that semester with a grade point average of not 
less than 1.5 for the Freshman and Sophomore years and a grade point average 
of not less than 2.0 for the Junior and Senior years. Any student on probation 
who fails to pass all courses for which he is registered and who fails to main- 
tain the grade point average for his particular year will be automatically dropped 
from the School of Pharmacy, at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
(including "O" credit courses) in any semester shall be dismissed at the end 
of that semester for unsatisfactory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester will be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted until at least one semester has elapsed. He shall, in the meantime, 
attend another school approved by the Dean of tlie School of Pharmacy and/or 
the Office of AAmiedoxxo uf the University of Maryland and he shall carry 
at least a minimum full load of work required by the school which he will 
attend, but in no case shall this be less than twelve semester hours. The 
selection of the course of study must be approved by the Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. Before applying for readmission he must obtain the recommenda- 
tion of the Dean of the school which he has previously attended and he must, 
in addition, have a grade point average of not less than 2.0 in the work for 
which he was previously registered. 

All students shall be readmitted on probation for one semester. 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted more than once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration 
of his particular case. 

^ 20 



\ of I'll- 

GRADES o\ STUDENTS WITHDRAWING PROM TH1 
SCHOOL OP PHARMACY 

The record of students who withdraw is computed .is follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed \\ X 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade \VF 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students having 0-29 credit hours are classified as Freshman. 

Students having 30-64 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Sophomores. 

Students having 65-104 credit hours with a grade-point of 1.5 are classified 
as Juniors. 

Students having 105 or more credit hours with a grade-point average of 2.0 
in the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 in the work 
of the Senior year and have 144 credit hours to be considered as candidates 
for graduation. 

SENIOR ELECTIVE PROGRAM 

Students are required to elect either the RETAIL Major or the PRE- 
GRADUATE Major by May 1 of the Junior year. It is recommended that 
students electing the Pre-Graduate program will have attained a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 for the three previous years. Those who elect this 
major should also indicate their choice of electives in the Retail Major in case 
their average does not permit their election of the Pre-Graduate Major. The 
senior elective program must be approved by the Class Advisor and the Dean. 

RETAIL Majors must choose between Pharmacy 81 and Pharmacy 121 
and between Pharmacognosy 62 and Pharmacy 132. PRE-GRADUATE Majors 
must elect between English 3, 4 and Language 6, 7. 

For further information consult with Class Advisor and see the Curriculum 
on page 34 of the catalog. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School of 
Pharmacy, who having entered prior to September 1956, have been accredited 

21 ► 



University of Maryland 

144 semester hours instruction, or who having entered in September 1956 or 
thereafter, have been accredited with 146 semester hours instruction, and who 
have attained the required grade point standings and met the other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts are 
as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; for additional 
copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when more than 
one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged 
for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government agen- 
cies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at the School 
of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

Registration With The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file 
with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for regis- 
tration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required 
to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simul- 
taneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one 
dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent 
school or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all 
actual drugstore experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

Licensure Requirements of The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Phar- 
macy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty- 

M 22 






ScJiool of Pharmacy 

one years, is a graduate o£ a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has 

completed one year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy ap- 
proved by said Board of Pharmacy lor such purposes may sit for examination given 
For the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or 
college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. 
Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience is a registered ap- 
prentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized school or 
college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board for 
such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 2411 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 18, Maryland, for 
further information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

Deportment 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of 
a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 
or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her 
health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the 
authorities of the University. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though no 
specific charge be made against them. 

Employment 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and 
completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities 
to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that students refrain 
from working during the school session. 

Housing 

The University of Maryland does not provide any housing accommodations 
in Baltimore. The School assists students in finding living accommodations. 

Parking 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on 
university parking lots for students. 

23 ► 



University of Maryland 

Library Regulations 
loan regulations: 

Loan periods have been established according to demand for and protection 
of books, journals and other materials: 

Reserve Books: 3:50 p. m-11 a. m. Advance reserves accepted, but no 

renewals. 
Current Journals: One-day circulation for latest issue; others two weeks. 
Reference Books: Use in library only for specified reference material. 
All Other Books and Journals: Two weeks (plus one renewal of two 

weeks). 

FINES : 

Fines are imposed to assure that all students may have equal access to books: 

Reserve Books: 15<? for first hour; 5^ for each additional hour, or 
fraction thereof. 

Other Loans: 5c" per day. 

Lost Books: List price of the book. (Losses should be reported im- 
mediately.) 

All books must be returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines paid 
before a student can finish the year in good standing. 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Grants 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was 
designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair has subsequently 
been held by Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present 
incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Eelloivships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate 
students desirous of doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for 
an additional allowance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. 
Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, 1507 M Street, N. W., Washington 5, D. C. 

** 24 



ScJinol <>f Pharnuu y 
The 11. .1. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. II. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, sometime 

associate pr o fessor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist o! 
Baltimore, has contributed since 1930 a sum of money annually to maintain 
a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships 
for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candi- 
dates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty Assembly with the 
approval of the Dean. 

The Hitch mt Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Company of New York contributes sufficient funds to 
provide a fellowship paying $1000.00 annually for two years for research in 
pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. 

The Noxzema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund not to exceed 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens. A candidate 
will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by the Fellowship 
Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which 
the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting member. This fellow- 
ship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School 
each year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student 
selected by the Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association 
to enable the student to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of 
Pharmacy. The research conducted must be of general pharmaceutical interest 
and must be accepted upon completion for publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals. 

Assistantships and Internships In Hospital Pharmacy 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 

25 ► 



University of Maryland 

a stipend of $1800.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified 
students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the 
departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds 
of the normal graduate work. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy, together with the Graduate School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the Pharmacy Department of The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital offer annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several internships 
in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning September first, run for 
twenty-two months. Appointees devote half time to hospital pharmacy service 
and half time to graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree granted 
by the University of Maryland and a certificate of intership awarded by The 
Johns Hopkins Hopsital. The Hospital provides a stipend of $200.00 per month 
and the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees for these candidates by 25%. 
However, candidates must pay the regular laboratory fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing in- 
quiries to the Chief Pharmacist, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 5, 
Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Scholarships and Loans 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 W. Lom- 
bard St., Baltimore 1, Maryland. The selection of the recipients of the scholar- 
ships and loans is made by a committee to the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships* 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to freshman students with good 
scholastic records who can present the need for financial aid. These scholarships 
include tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment not to exceed the amount of 
$500.00 for the academic year. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship* 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually a scholar- 

* These scholarships are awarded by a Faculty Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation. These scholarship funds are reserved for students who are willing to repay the 
fund in the event they change professions. 

^ 26 



School of Pharmacy 
ship to a freshman student with a good scholastic record who can present the 

need foi financial aid. 1 his scholarship includes tuition, fees, textbooks and 
equipment not to exceed the amount of $500.00 for the academic year. 1 his 
scholarship is open only to residents of the state of Maryland. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarship 

Since the Noxzema Foundation Scholarship is not limited to any par- 
ticular year, it may he available to freshman in some years. For further informa- 
tion see below. 

Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., Scholarships* 

The Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., makes available annually six 
scholarships to freshman students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement, and the need of financial assistance. Each scholarship 
includes tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment not to exceed $500.00 for the 
academic year. Recipients must have been residents of the state of Maryland for 
at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester 
to qualified spohomore, junior and senior students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance to 
complete their education. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified junior and senior students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or above and who are in need of 
financial assistance to complete their schooling. 



* These scholarships are awarded by a Faculty Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation. These scholarship funds are reserved for students who are willing to repay the 
fund in the event they change professions. 

27 ► 



Unwersity of Maryland 

Carroll Chemical Company Scholarship 

The Carroll Chemical Company of Baltimore, Maryland, initiated in 1956 
a fund to provide one undergraduate scholarship to a qualified sophomore 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average during the fresh- 
man year and who is in need of financial assistance. This scholarship includes 
the cost of tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment, not to exceed $500.00 per 
academic year. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment 
for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by 
the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land to a senior student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and 
commercial pharmacy. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing a fund to provide one or 
two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens of 
the United States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint 
a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed annually at the dis- 
cretion of the grantors. 

Piead Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., Scholarships 

The Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified sophomore, 
junior and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory cf 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean. 

< 28 



Si hool of Pharm 

1 [onors and Awards 
/ he Dean's I lonor I 1st 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Stu- 
dents whose names appeal on the list both semesters receive the School's 
academic medal at the Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a 
student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. All candidates selected 
for membership must have completed seventy-five credit hours of college work 
and must be approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

The Society also awards annually a United States Dispensatory to the 
sophomore student of high moral character who, having completed forty-eight 
credits hours of college work, has attained the highest scholastic average in his 
class and a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, 
provided that this average is not below the grade of "B". Certificates of Honor 
are awarded to the three students having the next highest general average, 
provided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B". 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three Junior students hav- 
ing the highest general average, provided this average does not fall below the 
grade of "B". 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in award- 
ing these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by 

29 ► 



University of Maryland 

the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a 
student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment of 
the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in pharmacy. , 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student having the highest general average throughout the course in practical 
and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the in- 
come from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School 
to the senior student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in 
Pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the 
Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Cup 

The Beta Chapter of the Phi Alpha Fraternity provides a cup in memory 
of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in the 
service of their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of 
character and leadership. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the senior student 
chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

<+ 30 



School of Pharmacy 

EpsUon Alumnae Chapter, I ambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The EpsiloD Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority pro- 
vides annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Award 

A United States Pharmacopoeia and a National Formulary are made available 
by the Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association, to the freshman student who attains the highest general average. 

Merck Awards 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offer a set of valuable refer- 
ence books to the senior student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. A 
second set of books is given to the senior student who has a high standing in 
pharmacetuical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol Labora- 
tories, Inc., to the senior student who has contributed the most to pharmacy 
through his extra-curricular activities. 



Rexall Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
senior student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both leadership 
and scholarship. 

Chemical Rubber Publishing Company Award 

An inscribed Handbook of Chemistry and Physics is made available by the 
Chemical Rubber Publishing Company of Cleveland, Ohio, to the student who 
attains the highest average in freshman chemistry. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the annual Honors 
Day Convocation. 



31 



University of Maryland 

Student Organizations 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students established 
for the purpose of aiding in the internal administration of the school, for organiz- 
ing all extra-curricular programs and activities of the student body and for co- 
ordinating these programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administra- 
tion to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council 
of the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Government 
Alliance, the Presidents of the Senior, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman Classes, 
and four delegates at large, one elected from each undergraduate class. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association has been or- 
ganized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The purpose 
of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner the ad- 
vancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance with the 
objectives stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
especially in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its 
branches and its application and aiding in promoting the public health and wel- 
fare. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November 1935. The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the 
participation of students in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation to the end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be 
awakened and guided and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting the profession. 

Alumni Association 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence as such or 
as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was formed. 
Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society re- 
mained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is 
more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 

+ 32 



School of Pharmacy 

Officers (1957-1958) 

Charles S. Austin, Jr Honorary President 

1 1. Xdson Warfield President 

Samuel Portney first Vice-President 

\ 7 ictor H. Morgenroth, Jr Second Vice-President 

Frank J. Slama Executive Secretary 

Mrs. Bertha AI. Budacz Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members^) 

Norman J. Levin, Chairman 

Samuel A. Goldstein 

Irving Cohen 
James P. Cragg, Jr. 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee known 
as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group are to 
represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy 
and pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Committee are: 

Morris L. Cooper, Chairman 

Halcolm S. Bailey, Co-Chairman 

Francis S. Balassone Norman J. Levin 

Frederic T. Berman Gordon A. Mouat 

Frank Block Samuel I. Raichlen 

Les Brunnet Simon Solomon, 

H. A. B. Dunning John F. Wannenwetsch 

Elmer R. Kellough, Jr. Morris R. Yaffe 



33 



CURRICULUM 
COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Courses 


o 

5 


>> 




u 
O 


o 
5 


>> 
h-j 


cS 
■(-> 

o 


1 


Freshman Year 

fChemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic and 


2 
3 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 

3 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 


4 


fEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 


3 










.__ 


fMathematics 11 or 17 _ 


3 

3 

1 
1 




3 

1 
1 
_ 


3 


fModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 
1 

1 
2 


::::: 

6 


3 


3 


3 




1 1 1 
1 1 1 
8 1 4 


1 


fSpeech 1, 2, Public Speaking _ 


1 







fZOology 4, Animal Kingdom _ 






2 


3 


5 


3 




2 
3 


6 

4 
3 
2 


8 
3 

4 
7 
5 






Sophomore Year 


19 

4 
2 

2 
5 

4 


18 


fChemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 

fChemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 


3 

_____ 

3 

4 

2 


4 
3 
2 
3 

6 


3 

4 
7 
5 

7 

8 


2 
2 


Pharmacy 21, 22, General _. 


4 
3 


5 


fPhysics 10, 11, General 

Physiology 22, General _ _ 


4 
5 














Junior Year 

Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 
Assaying 


17 


18 

4 




4 
2 


4 

4 


8 
6 


5 

4 














Microbiology 115, Serology and Immunology 


2 
2 
2 


4 
5 
6 


6 

7 
8 


4 


Pharmacognosy 51, 52, General 


2 

2 

1 


5 
6 


7 
8 

1 


4 
4 

1 


4 
4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 
of Economics 


3 
3 




8 

3 


3 




3 
1 
3 
2 

1 


_____ 

3 
3 


3 

1 
7 
5 
4 






Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 
Products 


18 
3 


19 
3 


First Aid 1, Standard . 




Pharmacology 81, 82, General 

Pharmacy 101, 102, Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 


4 
3 
2 


3 
2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 
3 


3 




3 


3 










7 


5 




2 


3 


5 












+ (Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 


19 
3 


18 


Pharmacognosy 62, Animal Health Products 


3 
2 


o 
3 


3 

r 
5 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 132, Cosmetics 










3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Admin- 


2 

2 
2 







1 
2 9. 




or 


r 
2 
2 


2 
2 




















Pharmacy Administration 72, Drug Market- 


2 

3 

3 
3 


_____ 

3 

4 


2 

3 
r 
3 
3 

3 

4 


2 


±(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
fEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 

Literature _ _ _ 


3 

3 
3 


o 

3 

4 


1 

3 | 3 

r 1 

3 I 3 

3 3 


3 


or 
fLanguage 6, 7, Intermediate Scientific German 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


3 
3 


(Electives — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99, Glassworking 


3 

4 


1 
2 


1 


Chemistry 112, 114, Chemistry of Medicinal 




2 









f Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
% The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 
* See Page 39 under Mathematics. 



C U1UUC UI.LI.M 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


Freshman Year 

Chemistry 1, 3 


64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 
64 


192 


256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 

208 


8 


English 1 " 


6 






3 






3 






6 






2* 


Speech 1 2 




2 


Zoology 1, 4 


144 


7 


Total _ 


480 

32 
96 


336 
96 


816 

128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 


37 


Sophomore Year 


4 




4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


128 
96 
64 
48 


4 


Pharmacy 21, 22 


128 
96 
64 


10 


Thvsics 10, 11 _ 


8 


Physiology 22 


5 


Total 


416 

32 
64 
32 
32 
64 
64 
16 
48 


432 

96 
64 
64 
64 
160 
192 


848 

128 

128 

96 

96 

224 

256 

16 

48 


35 


Junior Year 


4 




5 




4 




4 




8 




8 




1 


Pharmacy Administration 37 




3 


Total _ _ 


352 

96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224f 


640 


992 

96 

16 
224 
160 

64 

48 
348f 


37 


Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113 _ 


6 








Pharmacology 81, 82 _. 


128 
96 

48 


8 


Pharmacy 101, 102 _. 


6 




2 
3 


Electives , 


160f 


12 


Total _ __ 


560 

32 

48 

32 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 


432 

48 


992 

80 
48 

80 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 

96 
128 

816 

848 
992 
992 


37 


(Electives — Retail Major) 


3 




3 


or 
Pharmacy 132 , 


48 


3 
2 


or 




2 






2 






2 


(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
English 3, 4 _ 




6 


or 




6 






6 


(Electives — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99 _ 


96 
128 

336 

432 
640 
432 


2 


Chemistry 112, 114 _ _ 




4 


SUMMARY 
Freshman Year 


480 
416 
352 
560 


37 
35 




37 


Senior Year 


37 


Total __ _ 


1,808 


1,840 


3,648 


146** 







f Average. 

* Required of students entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 
** A minimum of 144 credits required for students entered prior to September 1956 and 
146 credits for those entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 



University of Maryland 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES" 
CHEMISTRY 

1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis— (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. (Miller and Tammoria.) 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and im- 
portant generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, the 
preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis of 
the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, two lectures. (Miller and Havranek.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, one laboratory. (Miller and Havranek.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. A study of the gen- 
eral procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15 Quantitative Analysis— (4) 

Sophomore year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Kumkumian, and Huang.) 
Prerequisite— Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures 
ana theory, and their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Kumkumian, and Huang.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. Quantita- 
tive methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of official preparations, 
with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99 Glassworking—Ql , I) 

Laboratory, senior year, either semester. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Consent of the instructor. Simple operations in the manipulation of 
glass, repair and construction of apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products— (3, 3) 

Senior year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 35, 37, 53. A survey of the structural relationships, the 
synthesis and chemical properties of medicinal products. 

* Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for 
graduates only 200-299. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lec- 
ture or recitation period. 

^ 36 



ol of Pharmacy 
H2, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal I -(2, 2) 

Senior year, two laboratories. I) renbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
111, 113. Laboratory exereises dealing with important and characteristic chemical 
properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) 

Any one or two semesters. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 37, 38 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 
diflicult organic preparations and a study of the quantitative determination of carbon, 
hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 14S. Identification of Organic Compounds— (2 , 2) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry— (5) 

Junior year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Schmidt, Herbst, Rudolph, Emery, and Brown.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 37. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the 
composition of living organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur 
during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry-(3 , 3) 

Three lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37 and Physics 10, 11. A study of the laws and 
theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elemen- 
tary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics and electro- 
chemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry-(2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 

187, 189. Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (?vliller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 111, 113. A study of the terpenes, carotenes, steroids and 
stereoisomerism . 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids-(2 , 2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 111, 113. A survey of the chemical structure and reactions 
of pharmacologically active bases. 

37 ► 



University of Maryland 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis— (2-6} 

Laboratory and conferences (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 142, 144. Application of synthetic procedures in the prepa- 
ration of various medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis— (1-4} 

Laboratory and conferences. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 146, 148. A laboratory study of the analytical procedures 
and methods as applied to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their inter- 
mediates and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar— (I) 

Each semester. (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of progress 
and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

(Miller and Doorenbos.) 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds (Advanced Course")— (2-4} 
Either semester. Two to four laboratories. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to the 
identification of pure organic substances and mixtures. 

ENGLISH 

1,2. Survey and Composition— (3 , 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite— Four units of high school English. A study of style, syntax, spelling 

and punctuation, combined with a historical study of English and American literature 

of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature— (3 , 3) 

Elective, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite— English 1, 2. Practice in composition. An introduction to world litera- 
ture, foreign classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

1,2. Public Speaking— (1, I) 

Freshman year, one lecture. (DeHaven.) 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

1. Standard First Aid Course 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Gregson, instructor from 

the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

M 38 



School of Pharmacy 

MATH IMA I1CS 

0. 11 hematics— (0*) 

! reshman year, first semester, three lectures. (ZippO 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the qi: 
ing examination tor this course. The fundamental principles of algebra. 

10. Algebra-(3°) 

Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. (Zipp.) 

Prerequisite— one unit of algebra. Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, 

linear equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, 
binomial theorem, and theory of equations. 

11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. (Zipp.) 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not offer 
one-half unit of trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, 
graphs, addition formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight 
line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algebra-O*) 

Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. (Zipp.) 

Prerequisite— High school algebra completed. Fundamental operations, variation, 
functions and graphs, quadratic equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, com- 
plex numbers, logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. (Zipp.) 

Prerequisite— High school trigonometry and Mathematics 15. Coordinates, locus 
problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation of coordinates, conic sec- 
tions, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20,21. Calculus-O, 3) 

Three lectures. (Zipp.) 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kinematics, 
integration, geometric and physical applications of integration, partial derivatives, space 
geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential equations. Given in alternate 
years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

152, 153. Mathematical Statistics— (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 20, 21. (Zipp.) 

Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, 
theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical inference. Illustrations will be drawn 
from the biological sciences. Given in alternate years. 

39 ► 



University of Maryland 

MICROBIOLOGY 

1. Pharmaceutical Microbiology— (4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Zikoski.) 

Introduction to general microbiology with special emphasis on the study of patho- 
genic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the prevention and con- 
trol of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology— Q4^) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Zikoski.) 

Prerequisite— Microbiology 1. A study of the principles of immunity, including the 
preparation and use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy-Q, I) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media— Ql, -0 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

2i0. Special Problems in Microbiology 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined by the 

amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 



; 



211. Public Health-U-2) 
One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite— Microbiology 1, 115. Lectures and discussions on the organization and 
administration of state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. 
The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

221. Research in Microbiology 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1,2. Elementary French— Q3, 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not 
adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. Elements of gram- 
mar, composition, pronunciation and translation. Not offered 1958-1959. 

^ 40 






School of Pharmacy 

1.2. / lententar) German— (3, 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (SchnvtifJrkQ 

Students who offer two units in German fat entrance, but wlu.se preparation is 

not adequate Cor second-year German receive half credit lor this course. Elements of 

grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The as- 
signment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Prerequisite— French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Rapid grammar review, exercises in 
pronunciation, reading of scientific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Prerequisite— German 1 and 2 or equivalent. Review- of grammar and reading of 
scientific texts. 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General— -(4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisities— Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of drugs of animal and vegetable origin with special emphasis 
on the physical, microscopical, and chemical characteristics used in their identification 
and in the detection of adulteration. 

52. Pharmacognosy, General— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51. A con- 
tinuation of Pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering antibiotics, allergy-producing 
pollens, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, weedicides, etc. 

61. Pharmacognosy. Entomology for Pharmacists— (3) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures, and one laboratory. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A study 
of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and in the industries, 
including those which attack farm and garden crops; their recognition, life history, 
habits, and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Animal Health Products— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Physiology 22; Pharmacology 81; Microbiology 1, 115. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and preven- 
tion of the more important animal diseases. 

41 ► 



University of Maryland 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants— (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 

Ill, 113. Plant Anatomy-(2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

112,114. Plant Anatomy— (2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 51, 52, Pharmacognosy 111, 113. Lectures and lab- 
oratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the 
structure of roots, stems, and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— Q4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. ( Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and 
spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy— (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily 
studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical 
problems and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

220. Research in Pharmacognosy 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81, 82. Pharmacology, General— (4, 4) 
Senior year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

(Ichniowski, Gittinger, Lennox, and Ragozzino.) 
Prerequisite— Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. A study of the pharmacology, 
toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal substances, including methods of biological 
assay, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay— (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski and Gittinger.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 81, 82. A study of the methods of biological assay 
official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

** 42 



ScJiool of Pharmacy 

Tor Graduates 
201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay— (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics—^, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. Offered 
in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods- (2-4), (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the instruc- 
tor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 
Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of 
biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

250. Research in Pharmacology 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

PHARMACY 

1,2. Pharmacy Orientation— (1 , I) 

Freshman year, one lecture. (Levine.) 

An introduction to pharmacy for the beginning student. The course will include 
the various subject matter that a pharmacy student will undertake as well as the op- 
portunities in pharmacy. Guest lecturers will be invited from the various fields of 
pharmacy. 

21, 22. Pharmacy, General— (5 , 5) 

Sophomore year, four lectures and one laboratory. (Levine and Patel.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy 1, 2 or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical calcula- 
tions, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical prepa- 
rations. 

51, 52. Pharmacy, Dispensing— (_4, 4) 

Junior year, two lectures and two laboratories. (Milio and Patel.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22. A study of the compounding and dispensing of 
prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy— (i) 

Junior year, first semester, one lecture. (Levine.) 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis on the 
history of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy Literature— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Levine.) 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

43 ► 



University of Maryland 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy— (3, 3) 

Senior year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen, Milio, and Cragg.) 

Prerequisities— Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52. A study of the compounding of new 
medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids used in modern professional pharmacy, in- 
cluding the preparation of some important classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 
scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

132. Cosmetics— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen and Levine.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52, and 101. A study of the composition and 
manufacture of cosmetic preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of 
these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. Given in alternate years. (Foss.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. A study of manufacturing processes and 
equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

203, 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Foss.) 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 
Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharmaceuticals 
in large quantities. 

205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control— (3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Foss.) 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling of drugs 
from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. Includes 
detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, 
and other laws affecting the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy- (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. ( .) 

Prerequisities— Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature— (I, I) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen and Purdum.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special reference 
to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharmaceutical 
periodicals. 

< 44 



School of Pharmacy 

215, 216. Product Develcfment-(2, 2) 

i w i laboratories. AllenO 

Preiequitites— Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study ol the development oi 
new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222, Histor) of Pharmacy— Q2, 2) 

1 w,» lectures. (Purdum.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar— (2) 

Each semester. (Allen.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and 
surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen and Purdum.) 

A study of technical problems in the stablization and preservation of pharmaceuticals 
and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

235. Research in Pharmacy 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, and Allen.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

2 1 . Accounting— (2 ) 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. The analysis of financial and operating 
statements with a study of the fundamental principles of accounting, including prac- 
tice in bookkeeping. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics— -(3) 

Junior year, second semester, three lectures. (Leavitt.) 

A study of the general fundamentals of Economics— production, exchange, distri- 
bution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing, government 
and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. jurisprudence— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Melnicove.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
Regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 
Partnerships. 

71. Management— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of the business problems aris- 
ing in the operation of a retail pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, 
leasing, insurance, purchasing, pricing, code marking and control of inventory. 

45 ► 



University of Maryland 

72. Drug Marketing— (2) 

Senior year, second semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

A study of marketing, marketing research, advertising, selling and salesmanship, 

merchandising, channels of distribution, wholesaling, retailing and personnel manage- 



ment. 



PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics-Q4, 4) 

Sophomore year, three lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook and Hooper.) 

Prerequisites— Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. A study of the principles of mechanics, 
heat, wave motion, sound, light and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism— (3, 3) 

Two lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. Given according to demand* 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics— QS, 5) 

Five lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Advanced standing in Physics. Given according to demand. 

208, 209. Thermodynamics-^, 2) 

Two lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189. Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General— (5) 

Sophomore year, second semester, three lectures, two laboratories. 

(Costello and Ragozzino.} 
Prerequisite— Zoology 1, 4. A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, in- 
cluding neurophysiology, the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney, 
endocrine glands, and muscle physiology. 

ZOOLOGY 

J. Zoology, General— -(4) 

Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Gendason.) 
This course deals with basic principles of animal life and uses a study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

** 46 






School of Pharmacy 

4. Zool . .. / Kingdom— 03 

Freshnnm md semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Costello and GendasonO 

A survey oi the anima] kingdom with spcci.il emphasis on parasite, insects and 

Other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a firm 
roundati □ I i later required courses. 












47 



University of Maryland 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1957-58 
Graduate Students f 



Bachur, Nicholas Robert Maryland 

Crippen, Raymond Charles. . .Maryland 
Grabowski, Bernard Francis 

Pennsylvania 
Havranek, Robert Edward . . . New York 

''Heifetz, Carl Louis Maryland 

Heyer, Ursula Elizabeth Wisconsin 

Huang, Chien Li China 

Keister, Donald Lee West Virginia 

Kistler, Stephen B New York 

Kokoski, Robert John Maryland 

Kumkumian, Charles Simon 

Pennsylvania 
Laegeler, Judith Ann Illinois 



Lazaris, Spyros A Greece 

Lennox, Willard James Maryland 

Levine, Phillip Julian. . . .Rhode Island 

Milio, Frank Remo Maryland 

Morris, Martin Harold Maryland 

Patel, Nagindas K India 

Pat el, Vithalbhai C India 

Paul, Janice Lea Wyoming 

Purvis, Matthew Robert, Jr. . . Maryland 
Ragozzino, Patrick William . Connecticut 

*Suvanprakorn, Puar Thailand 

Tamorria, Christopher Richard 

District of Columbia 
Weinberg, Myron Simon .... New York 



Senior Class 



Abrahams, Nathan Held .... New York 
Anstine, Clarence LeRoy . . . . Maryland 

'Aronson, Donald Maryland 

Bass, Harry Maryland 

Berman, Mitchell Maryland 

Brashears, Charles Luther. .. .Maryland 

Brinsfield, Jay Royce Maryland 

Chan, Pearl Maryland 

Clinger, William Theodore 

Pennsylvania 

Cohen, Gerald Ivan Maryland 

Cooper, Harold Lee Maryland 

Damasiewicz, Walter Michael, Jr. 

Maryland 

Dorn, Conrad Peter Maryland 

Elliott, Paul Prag Maryland 

Esslinger, Edward Carroll .... Maryland 

Etzler, Edward Alvin Maryland 

Foley, William Thomas, Jr. 

Maryland 

Friedman, Melvin Maryland 

Hayes, Patricia Ann Maryland 

Heinritz, Colen Clifford Maryland 

Hughes, Henry William Maryland 

Isaacson, Bernard Sheldon .... Maryland 

Jaslow, Marvin Ban Man-land 

Kornblau, Maurice Pennsylvania 

Kronberg, Norman Jack Maryland 



Did not attend entire session 



Lisse, Allan Maryland 

Loetell, Joseph Wilmer, Jr. . . Maryland 
MacLarty, David Collins .... Maryland 
Malanowski, Antoinette Rosalie 

Maryland 

Mallonee, James Joseph Maryland 

McKenny, Harry Joseph Maryland 

Oken, David Moses Maryland 

Oster, Herbert Gerald Maryland 

Palmer, Thomas Rufus Maryland 

Pass, Stacy Maryland 

Protokowicz, Stanley Edward. .Maryland 
Redmond, Noble Philip, Jr. . . Maryland 

Reier, George Eugene Maryland 

Rodell, Michael Byron Maryland 

Ruppersberger, John Joseph . . Man-land 

Sekuler, Stanley Harold Maryland 

Sherman, Alan. . . .District of Columbia 

St. John, Miles Eugene Maryland 

Sultan, Walter Edward Maryland 

Swiss, Nancy Lee Maryland 

Tountas, Chris Peter Maryland 

Voxakis, George Chris Maryland 

Warrington, Clayton Linwood, Jr. 

Maryland 

Weiner, Leon Man-land 

Wittik, Jerome Sidney Maryland 

Zucker, Paul Maryland 

fRegistered in Graduate School 



48 



School of l'lim 



junior 

Becker, John Wilbert Maryland 

Becker, Stanley Leonard Maryland 

Berger, Charles Joseph Marxian I 

Bozman, Kenneth Bennett .... Maryland 

Broun, Harry James Maryland 

Burkhart, \ T incent de Paul. . . .Maryland 

Caplan, Carl Michael Maryland 

Chaiet, Melvin Maryland 

dayman, Jerome Harris Maryland 

Grouse, James Earl Maryland 

Davies, Joseph William Maryland 

Deming, Martin Eugene. ... Maryland 
Fleckenstein, Paul Anthony . . Maryland 

Freeman, Joseph Stafford Maryland 

Friedlander, Paul Michael. . .Maryland 
Friedlander, Sheldon Allan . . Maryland 

Goldberg, Stanley Lester Maryland 

Gray, William B Maryland 

Greenberg, Murray Gerald. . . .Man-land 

Hanenbaum, Allen Maryland 

*Haransky, William Maryland 

King, Donald Charles Maryland 

Klioze, Earl Ephraim Maryland 

Kcstos, Patricia Phyllis Maryland 

Levi, Ellis Maryland 

Levin, Barry Elliott Maryland 



( lass 

Levinsohn, Nina Debra Maryland 

Lottier, William Irving Maryland 

Macks, Harry Elliott Maryland 

Marshall, Eugenie Wallace. • .Maryland 
McKenna, Richard Sterling. .Maryland 
Morton, Joseph Harris. . . .West Virginia 

Neuburger, Arnold Jay Maryland 

Xowakowski, Ronald Joseph . Maryland 
Penn, Thomas Milton Gosnell 

Maryland 

Pozanek, Larry Herbert Maryland 

Raschka, Theodore Lee Maryland 

Resser, William Wolf Maryland 

Richardson, David Ronald . . . Maryland 
Richmond, William Charles . . Maryland 
Sachs, Herbert Allen Leonard 

Maryland 
Saiontz, Marvin Frederick . . . Maryland 
Santoni, John David Henry. .Maryland 

Schwartz, Sorell Lee Maryland 

Schwartzman, Alfred Howard . Maryland 

Sclar, Morton Jerome Maryland 

Sniadowski, Anthony John . . . Maryland 

Spear, Murray Charles Maryland 

Thomas, John Rushton Maryland 

Tregoe, Charles Henry Maryland 



Sophomore Class 






* Abernathy, David William . . . Maryland 

*Abrams, Alan Edward Maryland 

Barnes, Attison Leonard, Jr. . . Maryland 

Belford, Stanley Harvey Maryland 

Berdiansky, Charles Solomon . Maryland 

Berger, Jerome Alvin Maryland 

Butler, Charles Maryland 

*Calas, Andre Thomas Maryland 

Conklin, Nancy Carole Maryland 

*Deitch, Morton Isaac Maryland 

DiPaula, Vincent Robert .... Maryland 

*Duvall, William James Maryland 

Evert, Helen Elaine Maryland 

Friedman, Louis Joseph Maryland 

*Gaskins, John Thomas Maryland 

Glick, Henry Joseph Maryland 

Goldner, Ronald Maryland 



Grebow, Martin David Maryland 

Hamet, Harry Maryland 

Handelman, Joseph Gold. . . .Maryland 

*Hankin, Ellen Glenis Maryland 

Hoffman, Marta Maryland 

Horwits, Leonard Maryland 

Jordan, John Terence Maryland 

Kantorow, Bennett Ralph .... Maryland 

Kenney, Fern Eugene Maryland 

Kern, Louis Reichert, Jr Maryland 

Kettell, Nadine Maryland 

Kronsberg, Ronald Herbert .. Maryland 
Kushnick, Marvin Stanley. . . .Maryland 

Lasarko, Maria Anna Maryland 

Lee, Toon District of Columbia 

Lerner, Beryl Maryland 

Lerner, Joseph Herman Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session 



49 ► 



University of Maryland 



Sophomore Class (continued^) 



Levin, David Gerald Maryland 

Levin, Irvin Isaac Maryland 

Lichter, Samuel Maryland 

Minster, Howard Manuel .... Maryland 
Palmere, Anthony Michael . . . Maryland 

Petts, Mildred Louise Maryland 

Pilquist, Richard Morris Maryland 

Plempel, Alfred Clair, Jr Maryland 

*Plummer, Robert Mitchell Maryland 

*Presser, Carl Benson Maryland 

Raksin, Irving Jacob Maryland 

Rapkin, Harvey Morton Maryland 

Richman, Morton David. . . .Maryland 
Sadowski, Leonard Joseph .... Maryland 
Samonovitch, Irwin Louis. . . .Maryland 

Scali, Peter Paul Maryland 

*Shaffrey, Robert Michael Maryland 



Shargel, Martin Chaim Maryland 

Sherr, Allan Robert Maryland 

Sherr, Bernard Erwin Maryland 

Shpritz, Esther Harriet Maryland 

*Silen, Irvin Maryland 

Snyder, Larry Albert Maryland 

Speert, Arnold Maryland 

*Sprows, Janice Veronica. . . .Maryland 
Stank, Kenneth Edward Maryland 

*Timmons, William Thomas . . Maryland 

Tokar, Elliot Sanf ord Maryland 

Tracey, Jessie Lois Maryland 

Warfield, Albert Harry Maryland 

Warthen, John David, Jr. . . . Maryland 
Weiner, Kenneth Sidney .... Maryland 
Wisniewski, Robert John .... Maryland 



Freshman Class 



Amernick, Harmond Hersh . . . Maryland 

Bennett, Charles Rodney Maryland 

Blaustein, Arnold Lee Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Yale Maryland 

*Bloom, Abrian Earl Maryland 

Chan, Kenneth Young Maryland 

Cwynar, Frank Maryland 

^Daniels, Lowman Gillespie. . .Maryland 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

Eng, June Maryland 

'* Fernandez, Manuel Benjemen 

Maryland 

*Foland, Sheldon Maryland 

Forman, Allan Stuart Maryland 

*Gage, Kenneth Dale Maryland 

*Galinn, Joel Maryland 

Gordon, Gerald Maryland 

Greenblatt, Elliott Maryland 

Grossblatt, Norton Joel Maryland 

Heinrich, William Joseph .... Maryland 
Huber, George Herman Maryland 

* Jones, Theodore Thomas Maryland 

Juliao, Egbert Netherlands- Antilles 

Kadish, Aaron Maryland 

Lauer, Stephen LeBrun Maryland 

Lee, Lois Mae Maryland 



Maschas, Constantine Nick . . . Maryland 

Misler, Wayne Marvin Maryland 

* O'Neill, Thomas Michael Maryland 

*Pember, Ellen Margaret. .. .Wisconsin 

Pfann, George Alan Maryland 

Phillips, Janice Rae Maryland 

Pilson, Robert Michael, Jr Maryland 

*Plotkin, Jay Maryland 

*Reches, Henry Maryland 

Reisenweber, Harvey Donaldson 

Maryland 

Rosen, Allen William Maryland 

Rosen, Leon Maryland 

Sappe, Nancy Carol Maryland 

Schwartzman, Allan Morton . Maryland 

Smink, Sheila Carol Maryland 

Smith, Dennis Boyd Maryland 

Sollod, Stuart Howard Maryland 

Sopher, Martin Joseph Maryland 

Sophocleus, Theodore John . . . Maryland 

Spring, Allen Russell Maryland 

Stiekman, Robert Benjamin. .Maryland 

Stime, Peyton Orenzo Maryland 

Struntz, James Patrick Maryland 

Tabak, William Maryland 

Tamberino, Frank Joseph .... Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session 

M 50 



School of Pharmacy 



Freshman Class (continued*) 



Tinclli, Vito, Jr Maryland *Warthen, Shirley Ann Maryland 

Turk, Arthur Allen Maryland Weaver, George Willard. .. .Maryland 

Turnbull, Andrew, Jr Maryland WViner, Phillip Paul Maryland 

Vitale, Richard Alan Connecticut Weslock, Lawrence F Maryland 

Vykol, Frank James Maryland Yospa, Irvin Maryland 

Walkling, Walter Douglas. . .Maryland Zerwitz, Warren Gerald Maryland 

Wankel, Richard Allan Maryland 

Special Student 

Logan, Donald Arthur Maryland 

Physical Therapy Students 
Benson, Edward Hayes Maryland Garner, Joseph Bernard Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session 






51 



- 



University of Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 8, 1957 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Theodore Spiros Kallelis. .Rhode Island John J. Sciarra New York 



Master of Science 



Theodore Kranzler 



Dean Ellis Leavitt 



District of Columbia Phillip Julian Levine 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Maryland 

. . Rhode Island 



Arthur Murray Abrams Maryland 

Bernard Anoff Maryland 

Geraldine Lenore Austraw .... Maryland 

Raymond Donald Bahr Maryland 

Anthony Edwin Balcerzak . . . . Maryland 

Sheldon Saul Barke Maryland 

Irwin Stanley Barshack Maryland 

Frank Kelly Bell Maryland 

Gilbert Samuel Berman Maryland 

Joseph Victor Brazius Maryland 

Myer Bronstein Maryland 

Gerald Neuman Brunson .... Maryland 

Jack Ronald Cohen Maryland 

Arnold Lee Davidov Maryland 

Edwin Deitch Maryland 

Leon Patrick Dougherty Maryland 

James Dolan Edwards Maryland 

Donald Brainard Elliott, Jr.. Maryland 
James Timothy Geraghty .... Maryland 

Owen James Gilliece Maryland 

Herman Glassband Maryland 

Leonard Goldberg Maryland 

Sue Carolyn Goldman Maryland 

Stanley Paul Golob Maryland 

Lee Herbert Gradman Maryland 

Richard E. Greenberg Maryland 

Thomas Johnson Hayman. . . .Maryland 



Carl L. Heifetz Maryland 

Charles Edward Hesson Maryland 

Bernard Philip Heyman Maryland 

James Elmer Hodges Maryland 

Robert Joseph Kabik Maryland 

George Riland Keller Maryland 

Sidney Levenson Maryland 

Arthur Irvin Levin Maryland 

Norman Lee Levin Maryland 

Robert Weldon Mahoney .... Maryland 

Robert Victor Mercer Maryland 

Wilson Edward Neighoff .... Maryland 

Edwin Pertnoy Maryland 

Wilbur Joseph Pessagno Maryland 

Howard Pollack Maryland 

Sanford Lawrence Rosenbloom 

Maryland 

Martin Roth Maryland 

Sidney Bernard Seidman .... Maryland 

Sidney Shein Maryland 

Miriam Ray Sherman Maryland 

Arnold Siegel Maryland 

Harold H. Siegel Maryland 

Thomas Joseph Suter Maryland 

Donald Allan Ullman Maryland 

Frederick Henry Wagner .... Maryland 
Donald Roy Young Maryland 



Honors (1956-57) 

Gold Medal tor General Excellence Raymond D. Bahr 

The William Simon Memorial Prize Raymond D. Bahr 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize E. Wilson Neighoff 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Raymond D. Bahr 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Donald B. Elliott, Jr. 

The David Fink Memorial Prize Arthur I. Levin 



52 



School of Pharmacy 



Honors (continued) 



The Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize Richard E, Greenherg 

The Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize Miriam \\. Sherman 

The Epsilon Graduate Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

Donald B. Elliott, jr. 

Certificates of Honor 

Geraldine L. Austraw Gilbert S. Berman 

Erwin Deitch 

Honorable Mention (Junior Class) 

Conrad P. Dorn Harry Bass 

Gerald I. Cohen 



53 



University of Maryland 



DEAiN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1956-57) 



Geraldine Austraw 
Raymond Bahr 
Sheldon Barke 
Donald Elliott 
Sue Goldman 



Bernard Anoff 
Irwin Barshack 
Gilbert Berman 
Myer Bronstein 



Harry Bass 
W. Theodore Clinger 
Gerald Cohen 
Conrad Dorn 
Edward Esslinger 
Colen Heinritz 



Pearl Chan 
Walter Damasiewicz 
Paul Elliott 
Edward Etzler 
Melvin Friedman 



Carl Caplan 
Melvin Chaiet 
Joseph Morton 

Stanley Becker 
Louis Friedman 



Nancy Conklin 
Henry Glick 
Ronald Goldner 



Morton Deitch 
Martin Grebow 
Samuel Lichter 
Anthony Palmere 
Mildred Petts 
Leonard Sadowski 



Class of 1957 



Honorable Mention 



Class of 1958 



Honorable Mention 



Class of 1959 

Honorable Mention 
Class of 1960 

Honorable Mention 



Bernard Heyman 
Arthur Levin 
Miriam Sherman 
Donald Ullman 



Owen Gilliece 
Richard Greenberg 
Carl Heifetz 
Robert Kabik 



Allan Lisse 
Herbert Oster 
Eugene Reier 
Michael Rodell 
Miles St. John 
Walter Sultan 



Marvin Jaslow 
James Mallonee 
Chris Tountas 
Paul Zucker 



Larry Pozanek 
Marvin Saiontz 
Murray Spear 

Murray Greenberg 
Eugenie Marshall 



Morton D. Richman 
Fred Scholnick 
John Warthen, Jr. 



Irwin Samonovitch 
Martin Shargel 
Kenneth Stank 
Jeffrey Stiffman 
Lois Tracey 
Albert Warfield 



54 



School of Pharmacy 



IN DFX 



Academic Regulations 17 

Accreditation 11 

Administrative Organization 5 

Admissions, Procedure 13 

Requ ir ements 12 

To Advanced Standing 12 

To Freshman Class 12 

To Graduate Study 12 

Alumni Association 32 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 32 

Application for Admission 13 

Assistantships, Graduate 25 

Attendance Requirements 17 

Board of Regents 1 

Buildings and Equipment 11 

Calendar 2 

Calendar, Academic 3 

Classification of Students , 21 

Correspondence 4 

Courses, description of 36 

Curriculum 34 

Changes in 17 

Degrees 12 

Deportment 23 

Dismissal for low scholarship 20 

Employment 23 

Examinations 18 

Faculty 5 

Faculty Council 5 

Fees and Expenses, Graduate 16 

Part-time Undergraduate 15 

Undergraduate 14 

Fellowships, etc 24 

Grading System 18 

Grade-Point Average 18 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 21 

Graduates, Roll of 48 

Graduation Requirements 21 

History and Program 11 

Honors and Awards 29 

Hospital Pharmacy Internships 26 

Housing 23 

Incomplete Grades, removal of 19 

Library, Regulations 24 

Staff 9 

55 ► 



University of Maryland 



INDEX (continued) 



Loans 26, 28 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 22 

Registration with 22 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 33 

Students' Auxiliary 32 

Matriculation 13 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 18 

Office of Dean, Hours 4 

Staff 10 

Parking 23 

Probation for Low Scholarship 19 

Professorships 24 

Promotion to next class 19 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 20 

Registration 14 

Residence and non-residence, definition of 17 

Scholarships 26 

Scholarship Requirements 18 

Senior Elective Program 21 

Student Government Alliance 32 

Students, full-time 15 

Students., part-time 15 

Students, Roll of 48 

Textbooks 17 

Transcripts of Records 22 

Tuition and Laboratory Fees 14 

Visitors 4 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 16 



56 






—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University," 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 




SEPARATE CATALOGS AVAILABLE 



AT COLLEGE PARK 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Office of Uni- 
versity Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. Department of Air Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by 
addressing the Dean, College of Special and Continuation 
Studies, College Park, Maryland. 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School Announcements 



AT BALTIMORE 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective 
schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 





of F^tasr^ 



£kt Bolt 



^f *V^.^ T 



1 + ^r r^f X/Tci^,^^.^^! 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



Catalog and 
116th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

19594960 




Volume 39— Number 1 
School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



All information as given in this Catalog applies to the Four Year 
Program on the Baltimore Campus, unless otherwise specified 



1959 



1960 



JANUARY 1959 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 

APRIL 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



JULY 1959 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 
1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



JANUARY 1960 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 

APRIL 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 43 14 16 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



JULY 1960 



S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



11 



School of Pharmacy 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1959-1960 
First Semester 



1959 



September 14 . . . .Monday Freshman Orientation— 9:30 a.m. 

September 15 . . . .Tuesday Freshman Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Sophomore Registration 10:30-11:30 a.m. 

September 16 . . . .Wednesday Junior Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration— 10:30-11 : 30 a.m. 
Graduate Registration 1:00-3:00 p.m. 

September 21 ... .Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

November 25 .... Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close or last 

scheduled period 

November 30 .... Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 

December 18 .... Friday Christmas recess begins at close or last 

scheduled period 

1960 

January 4 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
January 20-26 .... Wednesday-Tuesday . First semester examinations 

Second Semester 
February 2 Tuesday Freshman Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Sophomore Registration— 10:30-11 : 30 a.m. 
February 3 Wednesday Junior Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Senior Registration- 10: 30-1 1:30 a.m. 

Graduate Registration— 1 : 00-3: 00 p.m. 

February 8 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Monday Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

April 14 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

April 19 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 

May 16-20 Monday-Friday Senior final examinations 

May 20-26 Friday-Thursday .... Second semester examinations 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 4 Saturday Commencement 

All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration day. Students failing to comply 
with this regulation are charged a fee of five dollars. No student is normally permitted 
to register after Saturday noon of the week in which instruction begins. 

The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

iii ► 



University of Maryland 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the School of Pharmacy should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students, Scholarships, Scholastic Standing of 
Students, Transcripts of Records, 
Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy. The Dean's Office is open 
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment. 



IV 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 1968 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1960 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

Enos S. Stockbridge 

Assistant Treasurer 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. Ewing Tltttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

V ► 



University of Maryland 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Principal Administrative Officers 

wilson h. elkins, President 

b.a., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.PHIL., 1936. 

albin o. kuhn, Executive Vice President 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

alvin E. cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

b.a., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

r. lee hornbake, Dean of the Faculty 

b.s., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
ph.d., 1942. 

frank l. bentz, jr., Assistant, President's Office 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1942; ph.d., 1952. 

Emeriti 

harry c. byrd, President Emeritus 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son College, 1938; d.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

*harold f. cotterman, Dean of the Faculty, Emeritus 

b.s., Ohio State University, 1916; m.a., Columbia University, 1917; ph.d., American 
University, 1930. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

myron s. aisenberg, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

vernon e. Anderson, Dean of the College of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d., University of Colorado, 1942. 

bonald bamford, Dean of the Graduate School 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Gordon m. cairns, Dean of Agriculture 

b.s., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

ray w. ehrensberger, Dean of the University College 

b.a., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 



Deceased. 



VI 



School of Pharnt 

mill E. Foss, Dean of tlic School of PJuirm. 

PH.G., South Dakota St;ito College, 1929; d.s., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; ph.d., 1933. 

LB8TBB m. fraley, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health 

b.a., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Peabody College, 1939. 

Florence M. gipe, Dean of the School of Nursing 

b.s., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ed.d., University of Maryland, 1952. 

ladislaus f. grapski, Director of the University Hospital 

r.n., Mills School of Nursing, Bellevue Hospital, New York, 1938; b.s., University 
of Denver, 1942; m.b.a. in Hospital Administration, University of Chicago, 1943. 

irvin c. haut, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Department 
of Horticulture 

b.s., University of Idaho, 1928; m.s., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

roger howell, Dean of the School of Law 

b.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph.d., 1917; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1917. 

wilbert J. huff, Director, Engineering Experiment Station 

b.a., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale University, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; d.sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

selma f. lippeatt, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

b.s.e., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
ph.d., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

Frederic T. mavis, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; c.e., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

paul E. nystrom, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

b.s., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., 
Harvard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

j. freeman pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 
ph.b., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

LEON p. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

b.a., Emory University, 1919; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diplome le l'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

William s. stone, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

b.s., University of Idaho, 1924; m.s., 1925; m.d., University of Louisville, 1929 

ph.d., (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

vii *■- 



University of Maryland 

General Administrative Officers 

g. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

norma j. azlein, Registrar 

b.a., University of Chicago, 1940. 

b. james borreson, Executive Dean for Student Life 
b.a., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

david l. brigham, Director of Alumni Relations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. wilbur cissel, Director of Finance and Business 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

william w. cobey, Director of Athletics 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1930. 

lester m. dyke, Director of Student Health Service 

b.s., University of Iowa, 1936; m.d., University of Iowa, 1926. 

geary F. eppley, Dean of Men 

b.s., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

george w. fogg, Director of Personnel 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

Robert e. kendig, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air Science 
a.b., William and Mary College, 1939. 

robert j. mccartney, Director of University Relations 
b.a., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

george w. morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant (Baltimore') 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

Howard rovelstad, Director of Libraries 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

adele h. stamp, Dean of Women 

b.a., Tulane University, 1921; m.a., University of Maryland, 1924. 

george o. weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

john e. faber, jr., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

-< viii 



School of Pharmacy 

harold c. iioffsommer, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

b.s., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

wilbert j. huff, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

b.a., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; d.sc, (iion.)> Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

charles E. white, Chairman of the Lower Division 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1923; m.s., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

adolf E. zucker, Chairman of the Division of Humanities 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d., University of Pennsylvania, 
1917. 



IX 



University of Maryland 

CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. Ronald Bamford (Graduate School), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Robert Rappleye (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Irvin C. Haut (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Nathan L. Drake (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. Horace S. Merrill (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Mr. B. J. Borreson (Executive Dean for Student Life), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Russell G. Brown (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles A. Taff (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Dr. Charles N. Cofer (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Prof. George F. Batka (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Stanley Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. Clyne S. Shaffner (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Prof. Laurence M. Jones (Law), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. Monroe H. Martin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Dr. Gladys A. Wiggin (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Dr. William Hahn (Dentistry), Chairman 
<* x 



School of Pharmacy 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

noel E. foss, Dean 

A. W. RICHESON FRANK J. SLAMA 

gaylord b. estabrook donald e. shay, Secretary 

Faculty (1958-1959) 
Emerita 

b. olive cole, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
phar.d., University of Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

* GAYLORD B. ESTABROOK, ProfeSSOr of PhySWS 

b.s. in ch.e., Purdue University, 1921; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; ph.d., 
University or' Pittsburgh, 1932. 

noel e. foss, Professor of Pharmacy 

ph. a. South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist— South Dakota, New York. 

casimir t. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

tw. arthur purdum, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

*a. w. richeson, Professor of Mathematics 

b.s., University of Richmond, 1918; a.m., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
ph.d., 1928. 

Jemil g. schmidt, Professor of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine 

b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1921; ph.d., 1924; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

donald e. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; m.s., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 

frank j. slama, Professor of Pharmacogjiosy 

ph.g., Universitv of Marvland, 1924; ph.c., 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; M.S., 

1930; ph.d., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



^Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 
{Deceased, September 26, 1958. 



XI 



University of Maryland 
Associate Professors 



benjamin frank allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

norman j. doorenbos, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s. in chem., University of Michigan, 1950; m.s., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

Edward j. herbst, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 
b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1943; m.s., 1944; ph.d., 1949. 

^Frances m. miller, 1 Associate Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d. Northwestern University, 1949. 

IDA marian robinson, Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

Guilford g. rudolf, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 

b.a., University of Colorado, 1940; m.s., Wayne State University, 1942; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Utah, 1948. 

Assistant Professors 

* frank p. avonda, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
b.s., City College of New York, 1948; a.m., Columbia University, 1949; ph.d., Ohio 
State University, 1953. 

*adele b. ballman, Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

*leslie c. costello, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

Arthur j. emery, jr., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 

b.s., Bucknell University, 1947; ph.d., University of Rochester, 1954. 

Hilda E. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

*clahie strube schradieck, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
a.b., Goucher College, 1916; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 



"Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

Sabbatical Leave, 1958-1959. 



Xll 



School of Pharmacy 

ralph f. shancraw, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharmacy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; m.s., 1954; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 

Instructors 

ann Virginia brown, Instructor in Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine 
a.b., Goucher College, 1940. 

*t clarence t. de haven, Instructor in Speech 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1930; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950. 

georgianna s. GiTTiNGER, Instructor in Pharmacology 

a.b., Hood College, 1912; m.a., University of Virginia, 1924. 

charles s. kumkumian, Instructor in Chemistry 
b.s., Temple University, 1944; m.s., 1951. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Pennsylvania. 

dean E. leavitt, Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; m.s., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

phillip j. levine, Instructor hi Pharmacy 

b.s., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955; m.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Rhode Island. 

Lecturer 

fBERNARD s. melnicove, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
ll.b., University of Baltimore, 1932. 
fPart time. 

Visiting Lecturers 

Samuel l. fox, Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1934; b.s. in pharm., 1936; m.d., 1938. 

ennis c. layne, jr., Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

b.s., George Washington University, 1950; m.s., 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

Fellows 

landon w. burbage, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration 
(Research*) 

ph.b., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

*Teacher detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 

xiii ► 



University of Maryland 

Robert e. havranek, Noxzema Foundation Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., Columbia University, 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— California, Maryland, New York, Florida. 

chien li huang, Sterling-W 'inthrof Fellow in Chemistry 

b.s., Tohoku Pharmaceutical College, Japan, 1943; m.d., College of Medicine, Taiwan 
University, 1947; m.s., Butler University, 1954. 

venkatraya b. g. shenoy, Hudnut Sales Company Fellow in Chemistry 

b.sc, Khalsa College, 1952; University Dept. of Chemical Technology, b.sc. tech. 
(Pharmaceuticals and Fine Chemicals), 1954. 

harkishan singh, U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

b. pharm., Punjab University, 1950; m. pharm., Banaras Hindu University, 1952; 
ph.d., 1956. 

c. richard tamorria, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fel- 
low in Chemistry 

b.s., Georgetown College, 1954; m.s., 1957. 

Junior Instructors 

Robert j. kokoskt, Junior Instructor in Pharmacognosy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

nagindas k. patel, Junior Instructor in Pharmacy 

i.sc, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan's College, 1952; b. pharm., L.M. College of Pharmacy, 
India, 1954; m.s., Temple University, 1957. 

Graduate Assistants 

tjosEPHiNE m. de lisle, Assistant in Microbiology 
b.s. in pharm., St. John's University, 1958. 

Jcarl l. heifetz, Assistant in Microbiology 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, District of Columbia. 

*charles f. hooper, jr., Assistant in Physics 
b.a., Dartmouth College, 1954. 

edward marlowe, Assistant in Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., Columbia University, 1956; m.s., 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist— New York, Maryland. 

*charles e. mehling, Assistant in Zoology 
a.b., Loyola College, 1954. 

*Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fResigned 12/31/58. 
j Appointed 1/1/59. 

■< xiv 



School of Pharmacy 

**vithalbhai c. patel, Assistant in Chemistry 

B. PHARM., L. M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat University, India, 1956. 

THADD] US P. priiss, Assistant 'ni Vliarmacology 
i\ PHARM., University of Maryland, 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Patrick w. ragozzino, Assistant in Pharmacology 
b.s., University of Connecticut, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Connecticut. 

Eugene g. reier, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

arvind p. shroff, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.sc, M. S. University, Baroda, India, 1954; M.S., Duquesne University, 1958. 

***mu-tsu wu, Assistant in Chemistry 

b. sc. in chemistry, 1951, National Taiwan University. 

Assistants 

james p. cragg, jr., Assistant in Practical Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1943. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Library Staff 
Pharmacy-Dentistry 
ida marian robinson, Librarian 

A.B., B.S.L.S. 

hilda e. moore, Associate Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S. 

Beatrice marriott, Reference Librarian 

A.B. 

edith m. coyle, Periodicals Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A. 

marjorie e. fluck, Cataloguer 

B.S. IN ED. 

marie martin, Library Assistant 
sarah l. atkins, Library Assistant 

**Appointed 2/1/59. 
***Resigned 1/31/59. 



xv ► 



University of Maryland 

Jacqueline b. clem, Assistant to the Librarian 
Patricia b. terzi, Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 
daisy lotz gue, Secretary -Stenographer 
Margaret E. beatty, Senior Stenographer 
Frances r. PLiTT, Senior Stenographer 









XVI 



School of Pharmacy 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
History and Program 

The purposes of the school of pharmacy arc to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students in 
general scientific and cultural subjects so that they can read critically, express 
themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profession and citizens 
of a democracy; to guide students into productive scholarship and research for 
the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland 
physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in Pharmacy to 
replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College 
joined with a group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental 
Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new insti- 
tution was known as the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Balti- 
more professional schools was merged with the Maryland State College at 
College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies buildings constructed specifically for pharmaceutical 
education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with the most modern 
apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts and for research in 
pharmacy is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 27,000 books, is now merged with the dentistry collection. 

Students have access to the Medical School Library, and the time-honored 
collections of the Enoch Pratt, the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty, and The Johns Hopkins University. Most of these libraries are within 
walking distance of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training over the years from a one-year to a four- 
year course. However, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy has 
now reommeended a five-year course and students entering the study of phar- 
macy in the Autumn of 1960 will be required to enroll in a five-year course. 
Students attending and entering the School of Pharmacy in the Autumn 
of 1959 will be required to take only the four-year course, with a five-year 
course optional. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharma- 
ceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. The diploma of the School is recognized by 
every board of pharmacy. 

1 ► 



University of Maryland 

Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Programs Offered During the 1959-60 Academic Year 

Students may enroll in the four year educational program at the School of 
Pharmacy at Baltimore in September 1959. As a result of a decision by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, students beginning a pharmacy 
or pre-pharmacy curriculum on or after April 1, 1960 will be required to enroll 
in the academic program of not less than five years. At the University of 
Maryland the five year program will consist of two years of a pre-professional 
program and a three year pharmacy program. Only the three year pharmacy 
program will be offered in Baltimore. The pre-professional program will not 
be available in Baltimore but may be obtained at the College Park campus of 
the University or at any other accredited university or college where appropriate 
courses are offered.* 

Requirements for Admission to the Four Year Program 

AMOUNT AND QUALITY OF SCHOLASTIC PREPARATION 

To be admitted to the School of Pharmacy, a candidate must be a gradu- 
ate of a secondary school approved by the State Board of Education of Mary- 
land or a similar accrediting agency and must submit credentials acceptable 
to the Director of Admissions, as proof of adequate preparatory-school training. 

Sixteen units of academic work are required of each applicant. 

The following work must have been completed: 

English— 4 units 
Plane Geometry— 1 unit 
Algebra— 1 unit 
History— 1 unit 
Science— 1 unit 



-I 



It is strongly recommended that the candidate obtain r A unit of trigo- 
nometry or an additional A unit of algebra. The remaining seven and one- 
half units may be in astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, economics, 



* Courses approved by the University of Maryland in non-accredited junior colleges 
within the State of Maryland may be accepted for credit requirements by the University. 



School of Phamtac) 

general science, geology, history, foreign Languages, mathematics, physical 
geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered for which credit is granted 
toward college' or university entrance. Not more than four units may be voca- 
tional units (agriculture, commercial drawing, home economics, shop courses, etc.). 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Director 
of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy for an Application Blank, 
an illustrated brochure about the School, and literature about opportunities 
in pharmacy. 

Admission To Advanced Standing 

Only students who have completed all the requirements (except Pharmacy 
Orientation) for the Freshman year or more of the current four year program 
will be considered as transfer students to be admitted in September 1960. 

An applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts of his 
college record along with a certificate of good standing from the college he 
attended. His grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the college's 
grading system. 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education are given credit for the work of the first three 
years of the pharmacy curriculum which they have completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts 
subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given 
for work completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those 
courses in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the 
schedules for transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given 
preference over advanced work. 

Credit is not given for pharmaceutical work done in evening or corre- 
spondence schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other 
institutions if the school did not grant credit. 

In determining the grade-point average of transfer students, only those 
courses taken at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland are used. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed to the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions of the Uni- 
versity in Baltimore. 

Requirements for Admission to the Five Year Program 

The University of Maryland makes optional the pre-professional program 

3 ► 



University of Maryland 

in September 1959 in order for students to take advantage of the expanded gen- 
eral educational program developed within the five year curriculum. 

A. ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

The graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certifi- 
cates upon the recommendation of the secondary school principal. The require- 
ments for admission to the School of Pharmacy at College Park are, in general, 
the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools of the Univer- 
sity. Applications must be made to the Director of Admissions, at College 
Park, Maryland. 

The high school program should include four years of college preparatory 
mathematics (algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry and more advanced mathe- 
matics if available) and also chemistry and physics. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this pub- 
lication may be obtained by writing to the Office of University Relations, North 
Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

The pre-professional program offered at College Park is as follows: 

COLLEGE PARK DIVISION r-Semester-, 

First Year I II 

Chemistry 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

^English 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Math. 10, 11— Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry 3 3 

or or 

Math. 18, 1 9— Elementary Mathematical Analysis 5 5 

Zoology 1— General Zoology 4 

Botany 1— General Botany . . 4 

Phvsical Activities 1 1 

Air Science 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 2 2 

Health 2, 4-Health (Women) 2 2 

Total 17-19 17-19 

Second Year 

^English 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

* History 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Physics 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Chemistry 19— Elements of Quantitative Analysis . . 4 

Economics 37— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

* Group I Elective or Government and Politics I 3 

Elective : 

Approved Elective from Group I or Group II of American 

Civilization Program . . 3 

Air Science 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-19 18-20 

*The Program in American Civilization. 

^ 4 



School of Pliar)*. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers it important for every student to achieve an 
appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. It has 
therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civilization. I his 
program is also designed to provide the student with a general educational back- 
ground. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the University and 
is described below. The second level is for undergraduate students wishing to 
carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College of Arts and Sciences). The 
third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this field (see catalog 
for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of Mary- 
land must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) obtain 
24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the American Civiliza- 
tion Program. Although the courses in the Program are prescribed generally, 
some choice is permitted, especially for students who demonstrate in classification 
tests good previous preparation in one or more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6). 

American History (6 hours, Hist. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, 
G. & P. 1) are required subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or 
all three of these areas by means of University administered tests are expected 
to substitute certain elective courses. Through such testing a student may be 
released from 3 hours of English (9 hours would remain an absolute requirement), 
3 hours of American History (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), 
and 3 hours of American Government. Students released from 3 hours of Eng- 
lish will take Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours 
of History will take Hist. 56 instead of Hist. 5 and 6. Students who have been 
exempted from courses in English, American History, or American Government 
may not take such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required, students elect one 
course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics. (Not open to Freshmen. Students 
who may wish to take additional courses in economics should substitute 
Economics 31 for Economics 37.) 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 

(Students enrolled in the College of Business and Public Administration will 
normally meet this requirement by taking Economics 31 in the sophomore year.) 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours of otherwise required courses in English, American History or American 



University of Maryland 

Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these courses from 
any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the same de- 
partment as the required courses in which the student is excused, or (b) Elective 
Group I (see 2 above), provided that the same course may not be used as both 
a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. Group II consists of 
the following 3 -hours courses: 

History 2, History of Modern Europe; either History 51 or 52, The Humani- 
ties; either Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of American 
Art; and Sociology 5, Anthropology. 

Admission to Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Maryland 

A. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program at 
College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C will qualify for ad- 
mission to the pharmacy program at Baltimore. 

B. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college * of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must consist of a minimum of 
60 semester hours of credit exclusive of physical education, military science or 
similar courses. The 60 semester hours must include at least 6 hours of English, 
6 hours of mathematics (algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry), 8 hours 
of general biology or botany and zoology, 8 hours of general inorganic chemistry, 
including qualitative analysis; 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours of 
physics, 3 hours of economics and the remainder as electives. The electives must 
be selected from non-science areas and may include additional courses in English 
and economics, courses in history, philosophy, political science, psychology, 
sociology, speech and foreign languages. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must 
have a scholastic average of not less than "C" (where the lowest passing grade 
is "D"), or its equivalent. This average shall be based on all college courses 
undertaken by the student in his pre-professional program, exclusive of credit in 
military science, physical education, hygiene or similar courses. 

Pharmacy Program 

The first year of the Pharmacy Program of the five-year curriculum will be 
offered beginning September 1961. This program along with the pre-pro- 
fessional courses is given in summary forms on pages 4, 6 and 3 1 . 

* Courses approved by the University of Maryland in non-accredited junior colleges 
within the State of Maryland may be accepted for credit requirements by the University. 



School of Pharmacy 

Admission And Costs 

ADMISSISON PROCEDURE FOR ALL APPLICANTS FOR THE FOUB \ I \\\ 
PROGRAM AT RALTIMORE 

1. Request the Director of Admissions or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
to send the preliminary application blank. Fill the blank out fully including 
the names of all schools and colleges which the candidate has attended. Sign 
the blank and return it with the required photographs and a seven dollar and 
fifty cent investigation fee to the Director of Admissions. (This fee will not 
be refunded or credited on any subsequent bill.) 

2. Send the high school record blank which accompanies the application 
blank to the principal of the high school attended and request that he mail 
it promptly to the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the 
prospective student will be advised to: 

3. Report to the School of Pharmacy for entrance examinations and inter- 
views. The School seeks indications of aptitude for undertaking phannacy studies 
by examining the school records of candidates, their scores in aptitude and 
achievement tests, and estimates of their interests, maturity, and personality. 
Entrance examinations and interviews are held in February, but subsequent 
opportunities are given. 

4. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the application of candi- 
dates whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, and 
the School of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory that they 
have been tentatively accepted. 

5. Students who are offered tentative admissions must immediately make 
a deposit of $60.00 ($10.00 matriculation fee plus $50.00 deposit on tuition) on 
their September tuition. This deposit is non-returnable if the student fails to 
register in the autumn, but is credited against the first semester tuition charge 
of all students who enter. 

Registration And Fees 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE FOR ALL APPLICANTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

All students must enroll in person at the Dean's office at College Park during 
the registration period at the beginning of each semester. On registration day the 
student fills out necessary forms and class cards and pays his fees. Detailed 
directions concerning dates and procedures are mailed during the summer to 
students who are eligible to enroll in the fall. All new students must matriculate. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the registrar 
upon the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter 



University of Maryland 

classes until he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and 
hours printed in this catalog are required to pay a late registration fee of five 
dollars. The last day for late registration is Saturday noon following the close 
of the normal registration period. This rule may be waived only upon the 
written recommendation of the Dean. 

There is a fee of $3.00 for changes in registration made after first week 
of instruction. 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester') 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

^Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

* Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

Student Activities Fee (per annum) 7.50 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra 
Mariae, all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, 
dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semes- 
ter are payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student 
Union fee and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of 
first registration. Students wishing to make arrangements for 
deferred payment of tuition charges must do so with the Finan- 
cial Office at or prior to registration for the semester for which 
such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 



The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Special Fee wall be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 12 credit hours 
of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 

<* 8 



School of Pharmacy 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 

For Seniors 

Graduation Fee (To be paid in February of the Senior 
Year) $15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage— Students are required to pay for all 
breakage in excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Freshman and New Students 

Books, stationery, weights, slide rule, dissecting in- 
struments, etc., approximately 150.00 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Students approximately 50-100 
Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each 
course. 

Fee for Charges in Registration after first week 3.00 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus') for pre-professional 
Program. See "Adventure in Learning." 

PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 
Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) $12.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Chemistry 10.00 

Microbiology 10.00 

Pharmacognosy 5 .00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Physics 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physiology 10.00 

Zoology 8.00 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non- 
returnable) $10.00 
Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 12.00 
Tuition fee for students carrying 10 or more semester 

9 ► 






University of Maryland 

credit hours (per semester) 120.00 

Laboratory fee— Same as undergraduate schedule above 

^Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

^Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and micro- 
filming of thesis) 50.00 

REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL (BALTIMORE CAMPUS ) 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, 
must file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do 
not comply with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are not 
accorded any refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the written 
consent of parent or guardian. Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation 
Fee, Student Activities' Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition, and any scholarship 
credit, are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following 
schedule : 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 
Text Books 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

Changes In Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 12 credit hours 
of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 

** 10 



School of Pharmacy 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at 
least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while stationed 
in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the one year period referred to 
above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for 
at least one year prior to his entrance into the armed service and was not en- 
rolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

Academic Regulations 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examina- 
tion in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally 
counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than 
half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period 
are also construed as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discre- 
tion of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission 
for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 
The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 

11 ► 



University of Maryland 



Grade 
A 


Interpretation 
Excellent 


Point Value 
4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Fair 


2 


D 
F 


Poor but passing 
Failure 


1 



I 


Course work incomplete 


replaced by definite 
grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 

semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 

Subject Credit Grade Points 

English 3 C 6 

Speech 1 D 1 

German 3 B 9 

Mathematics 3 C 6 

Chemistry 4 D 4 

Zoology 4 B 12 



18 



38 



Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade-point of 2.1. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at 
the School of Pharmacy are considered. 

Scholarship Requirements — Four Year Program 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean 
w r arns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a 
student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor 
enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above with an estimate 
of the quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is given the 



12 



School of Pharmacy 

student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the 
next semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he failed 
or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or else- 
where, must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular attend- 
ance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final mark will be substituted 
for the mark already recorded, but he will not receive any additional credit 
for the course. Although the final mark received in the course will be used in 
determining credit for promotion and graduation, it does not apply to honors 
and awards. See applicable section under "Honors and Awards". 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

Students in the Freshman and Sophomore years are expected to maintain 
a grade point average of not less than 1.5 for each semester in these years. Any 
student in the Freshman or Sophomore years who fails to maintain a grade 
point average of 1.5 for any semester of these years will be placed on probation 
during the next semester. 

Students in the Junior and Senior years are expected to maintain a grade 
point average of not less than 2.0 for each semester in these years. Any student 
in the Junior and Senior years who fails to maintain a grade point average of 
2.0 for any semester in these years will be placed on probation during the next 
semester. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semester hour 
credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on probation dur- 
ing the next semester. 

For promotion from the Freshman to Sophomore year and from Sophomore 
to Junior year a student must have maintained a grade point average of 1.5 
for the Freshman year and a grade point average of 1.5 for the Sophomore year. 

For promotion from the Junior to Senior year a student must have maintained 
a grade point average of not less than 2.0 for the Junior year. Students in the 
Senior class must maintain a grade point average of not less than 2.0 to become 
eligible for graduation. 

Any student on probation for any semester is expected to pass all work 
for which he is registered in that semester with a grade point average of not 
less than 1.5 for the Freshman and Sophomore years and a grade point average 
of not less than 2.0 for the Junior and Senior years. Any student on probation 
who fails to pass all courses for which he is registered and who fails to main- 
tain the grade point average for his particular year will be automatically dropped 
from the School of Pharmacy, at the end of that semester. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
(including "O" credit courses) in any semester shall be dismissed at the end 
of that semester for unsatisfactory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester will be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted until at least one semester has elapsed. He shall, in the meantime, 
attend another school approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy and/or 
the Office of Admissions of the University of Maryland and he shall carry 
at least a minimum full load of work required by the school which he will 
attend, but in no case shall this be less than twelve semester hours. The 
selection of the course of study must- be approved by the Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. Before applying for readmission he must obtain the recommenda- 
tion of the Dean of the school which he has previously attended and he must, 
in addition, have a grade point average of not less than 2.0 in the work for 
which he was previously registered. 

All students shall be readmitted on probation for one semester. 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted more than once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration 
of his particular case. 

GRADES OF STUDENTS WITHDRAWING FROM THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

* 14 



Scliool of Pharmacy 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

Students ha\ ing 0-29 credit hours are classified as Freshman. 

Students having 30-64 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Sophomores. 

Students having 65-104 credit hours with a grade-point of 1.5 are classified 
as Juniors. 

Students having 105 or more credit hours with a grade-point average of 2.0 
in the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 in the work 
of the Senior year and have 144-146 credit hours to be considered as candidates 
for graduation, depending upon the year of their initial enrollment. 

SENIOR ELECTIVE PROGRAM — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

Students are required to elect either the RETAIL Major or the PRE- 
GRADUATE Major by May 1 of the Junior year. It is recommended that 
students electing the Pre-Graduate program will have attained a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 for the three previous years. Those who elect this 
major should also indicate their choice of electives in the Retail Major in case 
their average does not permit their election of the Pre-Graduate Major. The 
senior elective program must be approved by the Class Advisor and the Dean. 

RETAIL Majors must choose between Pharmacy 81 and Pharmacy 121 
and between Pharmacognosy 62 and Pharmacy 132. PRE-GRADUATE Majors 
must elect between English 3, 4 and Language 6, 7. 

For further information consult with Class Advisor and see the Curriculum 
on page 29 of the catalog. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School of 
Pharmacy, who having entered prior to September 1956, have been accredited 
144 semester hours instruction, or who having entered in September 1956 or 
thereafter, have been accredited with 146 semester hours instruction, and who 
have attained the required grade point standings and met the other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts are 
as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; for additional 
copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when more than 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged 
for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government agen- 
cies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at the School 
of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

Registration With The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file 
with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for regis- 
tration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required 
to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simul- 
taneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one 
dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent 
school or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all 
actual drugstore experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

Licensure Requirements of The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Phar- 
macy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty- 
one years, is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has 
completed one year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy ap- 
proved by said Board of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination given 
for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or 
college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. 
Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a registered ap- 
prentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized school or 

-« 16 







School of Pharmacy 

college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board for 
such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 300 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland, for fur- 
ther information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

Deportment 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of 
a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 
or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her 
health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the 
authorities of the University. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though no 
specific charge be made against them. 

Employment 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and 
completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities 
to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that students refrain 
from working during the school session. 

Housing 

A limited number of girls may obtain housing accommodations in the Louisa 
Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close proximity to the 
School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommodations and it is 
under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. Bed linens, towels, 
pillows, blankets and curtains are provided as a part of the general furnishings 
of the room. Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, an extra 
blanket, bureau scarves, small rugs and a laundry bag. The individual student 
assumes responsibility for all dormitory property assigned to her. Any dam- 
age done to property other than that which results from ordinary wear and tear 
will be charged to the student concerned. Meals may be purchased at Uni- 
versity cafeterias or in nearby restaurants. 

Although the University does not provide any housing accommodations for 
male students in Baltimore, it is expected that the new Baltimore Union Building, 
which will provide accommodations for 198 students, will be completed in the 
spring of 1960. In the meantime, the School of Pharmacy assists students in 
finding suitable living accommodations. 

Parking 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on 
university parking lots for students. 

17 ► 



University of Maryland 

Library Regulations 

loan regulations: 

Loan periods have been established according to demand for and protection 
of books, journals and other materials: 

Reserve Books: 3:50 p.m.-ll a.m. Advance reserves accepted, but no 

renewals. 
Current Journals: One-day circulation for latest issue; others two weeks. 
Reference Books: Use in library only for specified reference material. 
All Other Books and Journals: Two weeks (plus one renewal of two 

weeks). 

fines: 

Fines are imposed to assure that all students may have equal access to books: 

Reserve Books: 15^ for first hour; 54 for each additional hour, or 
fraction thereof. 

Other Loans: 5$ per day. 

Lost Books: List price of the book. (Losses should be reported im- 
mediately.) 

All books must be returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines paid 
before a student can finish the year in good standing. 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Grants 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was 
designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair has subsequently 
been held by Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present 
incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate 
students desirous of doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for 
an additional allowance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. 
Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, 1507 M Street, N. W., Washington 5, D. C. 

^ 18 



School of Pharmacy 

The U. .\. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, former 
associate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist of 
Baltimore, has contributed annually since 1930 a sum of money to maintain 
a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships 
for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candi- 
dates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty Assembly with the 
approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The Hudnut Sales Company of New York contributes sufficient funds to 
provide a fellowship paying $1000.00 annually for two years for research in 
pharmaceutical chemistry and the allied sciences. 

The Noxzema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund not to exceed 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens. A candidate 
will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by the Fellowship 
Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which 
the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting member. This fellow- 
ship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School 
each year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student 
selected by the Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association 
to enable the student to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of 
Pharmacy. The research conducted must be of general pharmaceutical interest 
and must be accepted upon completion for publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals. 

Other Research Grants 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants from 
the Sterling-Winthrop Research Institute, Smith, Kline & French Laboratories 
and the National Institutes of Health. Through these grants, the School of 
Pharmacy is able to provide a number of research fellowships available to grad- 
uate and post-doctoral students in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

Assistantships and Internships In Hospital Pharmacy 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $1800.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified 
students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the 
departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds 
of the normal graduate work. 

Internships in Hospital Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy, together with the Graduate School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the Pharmacy Department of The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital offer annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several internships 
in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning September first, run for 
twenty-two months. During twenty months, appointees devote half time to hos- 
pital pharmacy service and half time to graduate work leading to the Master 
of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland and a certificate of 
internship awarded by The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Full time training in The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy is required for two (2) months during the 
summer of 1960. Four weeks of vacation are allowed during the term of 
appointment. The Hospital provides a stipend of $200.00 per month and the 
School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees for these candidates by 25%. How- 
ever, candidates must pay the regular laboratory fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing in- 
quiries to the Chief Pharmacist, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 5, 
Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Scholarships and Loans — Baltimore Campus 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 W. Lom- 
bard St., Baltimore 1, Maryland. The selection of the recipients of the scholar- 
ships and loans is made by a committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships* 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to freshman students with good 

* These scholarships are awarded by a Faculty Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
(Baltimore) of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. These scholarship funds are reserved for students who are 
willing to repay the fund in the event they change professions. 

^ 20 




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Zeta Beta Tau 






Phi Kappa Gamma 






Tau Epsilon Phi 











;-5 





■I 



2: ^- 






If i I ■! 



§ 
1 


1 !■« 

4 



School of Pharmacy 

scholastic records who can present the need for financial aid. These scholarships 
include tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment not to exceed the amount of 
$500.00 for the academic year. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship* 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually a scholar- 
ship to a freshman student with a good scholastic record who can present the 
need for financial aid. This scholarship includes tuition, fees, textbooks and 
equipment not to exceed the amount of $500.00 for the academic year. This 
scholarship is open only to residents of the state of Maryland. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarship 

Since the Noxzema Foundation Scholarship is not limited to any par- 
ticular year, it may be available to a freshman in some years. For further informa- 
tion see below. 

Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., Scholarships* 

The Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., makes available annually six 
scholarships to freshman students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement, and the need of financial assistance. Each scholarship 
includes tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment not to exceed $500.00 for the 
academic year. Recipients must have been residents of the state of Maryland for 
at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester 
to qualified sophomore, junior and senior students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance to 
complete their education. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

These scholarships are awarded by a Faculty Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
(Baltimore) of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. These scholarship funds are reserved for students who are 
willing to repay the fund in the event they change professions. 

21 ► 



University of Maryland 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified junior and senior students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or above and who are in need of 
financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Carroll Chemical Company Scholarship 

The Carroll Chemical Company of Baltimore, Maryland, initiated in 1956 
a fund to provide one undergraduate scholarship to a qualified sophomore 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average during the fresh- 
man year and who is in need of financial assistance. This scholarship includes 
the cost of tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment, not to exceed $500.00 per 
academic year. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment 
for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by 
the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land to a senior student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and 
commercial pharmacy. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing a fund to provide one or 
two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens of 
the United States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint 
a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed annually at the dis- 
cretion of the grantors. 



Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association 
lax ship 



Scholc vc 



The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association con- 
tributes funds to provide a scholarship paying $100.00 per semester to a quali- 

-< 22 



School of Pharmacy 

fied sophomore, junior or senior student who has maintained a superior scho- 
lastic average and who is in need of finaneial assistance. 

Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., Scholarships 

The Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified sophomore, 
junior and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean. 

NDEA Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 1958 provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $1000 and 
during his entire course of study may borrow a sum not exceeding $5000. The 
borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and repayment 
terms established by the University. Repayment of the loan begins one year 
after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and must be completed within 
ten years thereafter. No interest is charged on the loan until the beginning of 
the repayment schedule. Interest after that date is to be paid at the rate of 
3 per cent per annum. 

The National Defense Education Act contains a provision which provides 
that up to fifty per cent of a student loan plus interest may be cancelled in the 
event the borrower becomes a full time elementary or secondary school teacher. 
Such cancellation is to be at the rate of 10 per cent a year up to 5 years. 

Honors and Awards 
The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Stu- 
dents whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
academic medal at the Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a 
student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fraternity 

23 ► 



University of Maryland 

for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the University 
in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible by invitation 
to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester of the Junior Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. All candidates selected 
for membership must have completed seventy-five credit hours of college work 
and must be approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

The Society also awards annually a Remington's "Practice of Pharmacy" to the 
sophomore student of high moral character who, having completed forty-eight 
credits hours of college work, has attained the highest scholastic average in his 
class and a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, 
provided that this average is not below the grade of "B". Certificates of Honor 
are awarded to the three students having the next highest general average, 
provided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B". 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three junior students hav- 
ing the highest general average, provided this average does not fall below the 
grade of "B". 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in award- 
ing these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree "of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a 
student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment of 
the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 

^ 24 



School of Pharmacy 

at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student having the highest general average throughout the course in practical 
and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the in- 
come from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School 
to the senior student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in 
pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the 
Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Phi Beta Chapter, Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup 

The Phi Beta Chapter of the Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity provides a cup in 
memory of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in 
the service of their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of 
character and leadership. 

Alpha Tjeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the senior student 
chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority pro- 
vides annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 

The Ladies Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Award 

A United States Pharmacopoeia and a National Formulary are made available 

25 ► 



University of Maryland 

by the Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association, to the freshman student who attains the highest general average. 

Merck Awards 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offer a set of valuable refer- 
ence books to the senior student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. A 
second set of books is given to the senior student who has a high standing in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol Labora- 
tories, Inc., to the senior student who has contributed the most to pharmacy 
through his extra-curricular activities. 

Rexall Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
senior student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both leadership 
and scholarship. 

Chemical Rubber Publishing Company Award 

An inscribed Handbook of Chemistry and Physics is made available by the 
Chemical Rubber Publishing Company of Cleveland, Ohio, to the student who 
attains the highest average in freshman chemistry. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the annual Honors 
Day Convocation. 

Student Organizations 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students established 
for the purpose of aiding in the internal administration of the school, for organiz- 
ing all extra-curricular programs and activities of the student body and for co- 
ordinating these programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administra- 
tion to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council 
of the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Government 
Alliance, the Presidents of the Senior, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman Classes, 
and four delegates at large, one elected from each undergraduate class. 

< 26 



ScJiool of Pharmacy 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association his been or- 
ganized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 1 he purpose 
of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner the ad- 
vancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance with the 
objectives stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
especially in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its 
branches and its application and aiding in promoting the public health and wel- 
fare. 

Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

The Students' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association was 
organized in November 1935. The object of the Auxiliary is to provide for the 
participation of students in the activities of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation to the end that their interest in pharmaceutical association work may be 
awakened and guided and to familiarize them with the conditions existing in 
and the problems confronting the profession. 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee known 
as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group are to 
represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy 
and pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Committee are: 

Halcolm S. Bailey, Chairman 
James P. Cragg, Jr., Co-Chairman 
Francis S. Balassone Norman J. Levin 

Frederic T. Berman Robert V. Mercer 

Lester Brunnet Anthony Petralia 

Irving I. Cohen Samuel Portney 

Morris L. Cooper Samuel I. Raichlen 

H. A. B. Dunning Simon Solomon 

Elmer R. Kellough H. Nelson Warfield 

John F. Wannenwetsch 



27 



University of Maryland 

Alumni Association 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence as such or 
as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was formed. 
Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society re- 
mained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is 
more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 



Officers (1958-1959) 

William J. Lowry Honorary President 

Samuel Portney President 

Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr First Vice-President 

Irving I. Cohen Second Vice-President 

Frank J. Slama Executive Secretary 

Mrs. Bertha M. Budacz Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members*) 

H. Nelson Warfield, Chairman 

Joseph L. Combs 

James P. Cragg, Jr. 

Samuel A. Goldstein 



28 



FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 
COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semc-strr 


Sifond Semp*t«r 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Courses 


B 

Q 


>> 

as 
-1 


1 


2 

1 


o 

E 
I 

Q 


1 


a 


2 

| 


Freshman Year 

fChemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic and 


2 
3 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 

3 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 


4 


tEnglish 1, 2, Survey and Composition 


3 














3 

3 
1 

1 




3 

3 

1 
1 


3 


tModern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 
1 
1 
2 


_____ 


3 

1 
1 
8 


3 

1 
1 
4 


3 




1 


tSpeech 1, 2, Public Speaking 


1 








2 


3 


5 


3 




2 
3 


6 

4 
3 
2 


8 
3 

4 
7 
5 






Sophomore Year 


19 

4 
2 

2 
5 
4 


18 


fChemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 

fChemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 


3 

_____ 

3 
4 

2 


4 
3 

2 
3 

6 


3 

4 
7 
5 
7 

8 


2 
2 


Pharmacy 21, 22, General _ _ _ _ 


4 
3 


5 


tPhysics 10, 11, General 


4 


Physiology 22, General _ 


5 














Junior Year 

Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 

Assaying _ _ _ 


17 


18 

4 




4 
2 


4 
4 


8 
6 


5 

4 














Microbiology 115, Serology and Immunology 


2 
2 
2 


4 
5 
6 


6 
7 
B 


4 




2 
2 

1 


5 
6 


7 
8 
1 


4 
4 

1 


4 


Pharmacy 51, 52, Dispensing 


4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 
of Economics _ _ 


3 

3 




3 
3 


3 




3 

1 

2 

1 


_____ 

3 
3 


3 

1 
7 
5 

4 






Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 


18 
3 


19 
3 


First Aid 1, Standard 




Pharmacology 81, 82, General 


4 
3 
2 


3 

2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacy 101, 102, Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 


3 


3 




3 


3 










7 


5 




2 


3 


5 










:{: (Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 
macists _ 


19 
3 


18 


Pharmacognosy 62, Animal Health Products 


3 

2 


o 
3 


3 

r 
5 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 132, Cosmetics _ 










3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Admin- 
istration _ _ _ _ 


2 

2 
2 


~"o 


2 

r 
2 
2 


2 

2 
2 




or 

Pharmacy 81, Pharmacy Literature 




















Pharmacy Administration 72, Drug Market- 
ing _ 


2 

3 

3 
3 


~~"o' 

3 

4 


2 

3 

r 
3 
3 

3 

4 


2 


t ( Electives — Pr e-Graduate Major ) 
tEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 

Literature _ _ _ 


3 

3 
3 


o 

::::: 

3 

4 


3 

r 

3 
3 

4 


3 

3 

1 
2 


3 


or 
tLanguage 6, 7, Intermediate Scientific German 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


3 
3 


(Electives — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99, Glassworking 


1 


Chemistry 112, 114, Chemistry of Medicinal 
Products 




2 









t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
t The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 
* See Page 36 under Mathematics. 



FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


Freshman Year 

Chemistry 1, 3 


64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 
64 


192 


256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 

208 


8 


English 12 


6 






3 






3 


Modern Language 1, 2 or 6, 7 




6 




2* 






2 


Zoology 1, 4 


144 


7 


Total 


480 

32 
96 


336 
96 


816 

128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 


37 


Sophomore Year 


4 


Chemistry 35, 37 _ 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


128 
96 
64 
48 


4 


Pharmacy 21, 22 _ 


128 
96 
64 


10 


Physics 10, 11 


8 


Physiology 22 


5 


Total 


416 

32 
64 
32 
32 
64 
64 
16 
48 


432 

96 
64 
64 
64 
160 
192 


848 

128 

128 
96 
96 
224 
256 
16 
48 


35 


Junior Year 


4 


Chemistry 153 


5 


Microbiology 1 


4 
4 




8 




8 




1 


Pharmacy Administration 37 




3 


Total — 


352 

96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224f 


640 


992 

96 

16 
224 
160 

64 

48 
348f 


37 


Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113 


6 


First Aid 






Pharmacology 81, 82 _ _ __ 


128 
96 

48 


8 


Pharmacy 101, 102 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 21 

Pharmacy Administration 62 


2 
3 


Electives , 


160f 


12 


Total 


560 

32 

48 

32 
32 

32 
32 
82 

96 

96 
96 


432 

48 


992 

80 
48 

80 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 

96 
128 

816 
848 
992 
992 


37 


(Electives — Retail Major) 


3 


Pharmacognosy 62 _ 


3 


or 

Pharmacy 132 , 

Pharmacy 121 


48 


3 
2 


or 
Pharmacy 81 _ 




2 


Pharmacy Administration 71 




2 






2 


(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
English 3, 4 




6 


or 




6 


Mathematics 20, 21 




6 


(Electives — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99 _ _ 


96 
128 

336 

432 
640 
432 


2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


SUMMARY 
Freshman Year _ 


480 
416 
352 
560 


37 


Sophomore Year 


35 




37 


Senior Year 


37 


Total _ _ _ _ 


1,808 


1,840 


3,648 


146** 







t Average. 

* Required of students entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 
**A minimum of 144 credits required for studnts entered prior to September 1956 and 
146 credits for those entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM CURRICULUM 
COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First S< 


>mester 
r Week 


s«-« 

B 


one] Semester 




Hrs. Pc 


rs. P« Week 


Title and Number of Courses 


5 


i 


3 

i 


1 

* 


y 

i 

Q 


a 


I 


| 

1 
U 


First Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 


2 
3 


6 


8 

3 

4 
6 
2 
3 


4 

2 

2 
4 
2 
3 










Chemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 


3 
_____ 


4 
3 


3 

4 

6 


2 


Chemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 




4 
3 


2 




3 


4 




2 
3 






Pharmacy 35, Professional Communications 










3 

2 

2 


_____ 
6 


3 
5 

8 


3 












3 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, Pharmaceutical 








1 


4 




4 
2 


4 

4 


8 
6 






Second Year (Required) 

Biochemistry 143, Principles of Biochemistry 

Microbiology 41, Pharmaceutical Microbiology 

Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology, 


17 

5 
4 , 


18 










2 
2 


4 
3 


6 
5 


4 


Pharmacognosy 41, 42, General Pharmacognosy. 


2 

2 


3 


5 

2 


3 
2 


3 




3 
3 


3 1 6 
6 9 

1 


4 






' 






5 


^Electives _ _ 








3-4 


3-4 




3 




3 








$ (Electives — Retail Major) 

Pharmacy Administration 41, Marketing 

Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 


17-18 
3 


19-20 


2 

4 

4 
1 


3 5 


3 


t (Electives— Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 

3 

1 

1 
2 

2 

3 


3 

3 
3 


4 

6 

1 

4 
5 

2 

3 


4 

4 

1 

2 
3 

2 

3 

5 


3 


4 

7 

1 


4 


Third Year (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology- 
Pharmacy 55, 56, Pharmaceutical Formulation 
Problems . 


5 
1 


or 

Pharmacy 151, Manufacturing Pharmacy 

Pharmacy 153, 154, Dispensing II, III 

Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharmaceuti- 
cal Jurisprudence _ _ _ _. 




2 

2 
3 


3 


5 
2 
3 


3 

2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, Chemistry 
of Medicinal Products 


3 




5 




2 


3 


5 










$ (Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists. 
Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


18-19 


19-18 


1 


3 

2 
2 


1 3 

1 
1 
3 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 
Management II, III _ 


2 

2 

2 


3 


2 

5 
2 


2 

3 

2 




2 


2 


t (Electives — Hospital Major) 




Pharmacy 153, Hospital Pharmacy Administra- 
tion 










Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations _ _ _ 




! 2 
2 

3 


3 
6 


5 
2 

3 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 158, Orientation to Hospital 
Administration _ 










2 


J (Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 

Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 


8 


6 


3 
6 


3 

2 


3 
2 



i The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


First Tear (Required) 

Anatomy 31 


64 
96 


192 


256 
96 

128 

192 
32 
48 
48 
80 

128 


4 


Chemistry 35, 37 _ 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 _ 


128 
96 


4 


Pharmacy 31, 32 _ _ _ 


96 
32 
48 
48 
32 
32 


8 


Pharmacy 33 _ _ 


2 


Pharmacy 35 _ _ 




3 


Pharmacy 38 




3 


Pharmacy Administration 36 

Pharmacy Administration 32 


48 
96 


3 

4 


Total __ _ _ __ __ __ _ 


448 

64 
32 
32 
64 
32 
48 
48 
104f 


560 

64 
64 
64 

96 


1,008 

128 
96 
96 

160 
32 
96 

112 

128f 


35 


Second Year (Required) 


5 


Microbiology 41 _ 


4 


Microbiology 146 _ _ 


4 




6 


Pharmacy 43 _ 


2 


Pharmacy 44 


48 
64 

24| 


4 


Physiology 142 


5 


Electives 


6-8 


Total 


424 

48 
32 

128 

112 
32 

16 
64 
64 
96 
120f 


424 


848 

48 
80 

128 

208 
32 
r 

64 

160 
64 
96 

240f 


36-38 


(Electives — Retatil Major) 
Pharmacy Administration 41 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 42 

( Electives — Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20, 21 


48 


3 

8 


Third Tear (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156 


96 


9 


Pharmacy 55, 56 


2 


or 
Pharmacy 151 


o 

48 
96 


2 


Pharmacy 153, 154 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152 _ 




6 


Electives , 


120f 


10 


Total 


504 

32 

48 

32 
64 

32 
32 
32 
32 

96 


360 

48 


864 

80 
48 

r 

80 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 
192 

1,008 
848 
864 


37 


(Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51 _ 


3 


Pharmacognosy 52 _ _ 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156 __ 


o 

48 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54 


4 


(Electives — Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 153 


2 


Pharmacy 156 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 158 


2 


(Electives — Pre-Graduate) 
Chem. 187, 189 




6 


Chem. 188, 190 


192 

560 
424 
360 


4 


SUMMART 

First Tear __ 


448 
424 
504 


35 


Second Tear _ 


36-38 


Third Tear 


37 


Total _ 


1,376 


1,344 


2,720 


108-110* 







t Average. 

* A minimum of 108 credits required for students selecting either the Retail Major Course 
or the Hospital Major Course. A minimum of 110 credits required for students selecting the 
Pre-Graduate Course. 



School of Pharmacy 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES* 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

CHEMISTRY 

1,3. General biorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis— (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. (Avonda and Shroff.) 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and im- 
portant generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, the 
preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis of 
the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, two lectures. (Avonda, Havranek and Tamorria.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, one laboratory. (Avonda, Havranek and Tamorria.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. A study of the gen- 
eral procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis— (4) 

Sophomore year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Kumkumian, and Wu.) 
Prerequisite— Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures 
and theory, and their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Kumkumian, and Patel.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. Quantita- 
tive methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of official preparations, 
with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99. Glassworking-Q, I) 

Laboratory, senior year, either semester. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Consent of the instructor. Simple operations in the manipulation of 
glass, repair and construction of apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products— (3 , 3) 

Senior year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

*Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1-49; for 
juniors and seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for 
graduates only 200-399. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lec- 
ture or recitation period. 

33 ► 



University of Maryland 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 35, 37, 53. A survey o£ the structural relationships, the 
synthesis and chemical properties of medicinal products. 

112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products— (2, 2) 

Senior year, two laboratories. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 111, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
111, 113. Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical 
properties of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) 

Any one or two semesters. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 37, 38 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 
difficult organic preparations and a study of the quantitative determination of carbon, 
hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds— (2, 2) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

J 53. Biological Chemistry— (5) 

Junior year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Schmidt, Herbst, Rudolph, Emery, and Brown.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 37. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the 
composition of living organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur 
during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry-O, 3) 

Three lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites-Chemistry 15, 35, 37, Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. A 
study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, chemical 
kinetics and electro-chemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry-Q2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
187, 189. Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 111, 113. A study of the terpenes, carotenes, steroids and 
stereoisomerism. 

211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids— {2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

M 34 



School of Pharmacy 
Prerequisite— Chemistry ill, 113. A survey of the chemical itructure ind reactioos 

of pharmacologically active bases. 

220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis— C2-6) 

Laboratory and conferences, (Doorcnbos.) 

Prerequisite -Chemistry 142, 144. Application of synthetic procedures in the prepa- 
ration of various medicinal chemicals and their intermediates. 

222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis-" CMJ 

Laboratory and conferences. (Doorcnbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 146, 148. A laboratory study of the analytical procedures 
and methods as applied to official, proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their inter- 
mediates and derivatives. 

230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar— (I) 

Each semester. (Doorcnbos.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of progress 
and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

258. The Identification of Organic Compounds {Advanced Course^)— (2-4) 
Either semester. Two to four laboratories. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 146, 148 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to the 
identification of pure organic substances and mixtures. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

ENGLISH 

1,2. Survey and Composition— (3 , 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite— Four units of high school English. A study of style, syntax, spelling 

and punctuation, combined with a historical study of English and American literature 

of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature— (3, 3) 

Elective, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite— English 1, 2. Practice in composition. An introduction to world litera- 
ture, foreign classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

1,2. Public Speaking— (] , i) 

Freshman year, one lecture. (De Haven.) 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

1. Standard First Aid Course 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Gregson, instructor from 

the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

35 ► 



University of Maryland 

MATHEMATICS 

0. Basic Mathematics— (0) 

Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the qualify- 
ing examination for this course. The fundamental principles of algebra. 

10. Algehra-O) 

Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— one unit of algebra. Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, 
linear equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, 
binomial theorem, and theory of equations. 

11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not offer 
one-half unit of trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, 
graphs, addition formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight 
line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

15. College Algehra-O') 

Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— High school algebra completed. Fundamental operations, variation, 
functions and graphs, quadratic equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, com- 
plex numbers, logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

17. Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— High school trigonometry and Mathematics 15. Coordinates, locus 
problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation of coordinates, conic sec- 
tions, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20, 21. Calculus-O, 3) 

Three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kinematics, 
integration, geometric and physical applications of integration, partial derivatives, space 
geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential equations. Given in alternate 
years. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

152, 153. Mathematical Statistics— (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 20, 21. (Richeson.) 

Frequency distributions and their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, 
theory of sampling, analysis of variance, statistical inference. Illustrations will be drawn 
from the biological sciences. Given in alternate years. 

^ 36 



ScIiikjI oj Pharmacy 

MICROBIOLOGY 
I, Pharmaceutical Microbiology'- C4J 

Junior year, lirst semester, tWO lectures, tWO laboratories. Sin. ,md I Iriirtz.) 

Introikictiuii to genera] microbiology with specie] emphasis on the study "I patho- 
genic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the prevention and con- 
trol or communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology— (4} 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Heiietz.) 

Prerequisite— Microbiology 1. A study of the principles of immunity, including the 
preparation and use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy-^!, 2) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media-O, O 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

220. Special Problems in Microbiology 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined by the 

amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

22 2. Public Health-U-2^ 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite— Microbiology 1, 115. Lectures and discussions on the organization and 
administration of state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. 
The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 
399. Research in Microbiology 
Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

1,2. Elementary French— (3, 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not 
adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. Elements of gram- 
mar, composition, pronunciation and translation. Not offered 1959-1960. 

37 ► 



University of Maryland 

1, 2. Elementary German— (J>, 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is 
not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. Elements of 
grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The as- 
signment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Prerequisite— French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Rapid grammar review, exercises in 
pronunciation, reading of scientific texts. 

6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Prerequisite— German 1 and 2 or equivalent. Review of grammar and reading of 
scientific texts. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General— (4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of drugs of animal and vegetable origin with special emphasis 
on the physical, microscopical, and chemical characteristics used in their identification 
and in the detection of adulteration. 

52. Pliarmacognosy, General— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51. A con- 
tinuation of Pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering antibiotics, allergy-producing 
pollens, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, weedicides, etc. 

61. Pharmacognosy. Entomology for Pharmacists— (3) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures, and one laboratory. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A study 
of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and in the industries, 
including those which attack farm and garden crops; their recognition, life history, 
habits, and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Animal Health Products— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Physiology 22; Microbiology 1, 115; Pharmacology 81. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and preven- 
tion of the more important animal diseases. 

<1 38 



School <jf Pharmacy 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of tlic Higher Plants— (2, 2) 

One lecture md one laboratory. Given in alternate y* CSlai 

quisifc Phannacognosy 51, 52. A study of the kinds of seed plant! and 
(ems, theil classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 

111, IJ3. Plant Anaiomy-O-, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

112, 114. Phm Anatomy— Q2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 51, 52, Pharmacognosy 111, 113. Lectures and lab- 
oratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the 
structure of roots, stems, and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. ( Slama. ) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and 
spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

21 1, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy— Q4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily 
studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention wall be given to practical 
problems and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81, 82. Pharmacology, General— (4, 4) 

Senior year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

(Ichniowski, Gittinger, Pruss, and Ragozzino.) 
Prerequisite— Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. A study of the pharmacology, 
toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal substances, including methods of biological 
assay, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay— (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski and Gittinger.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 81, 82. A study of the methods of biological assay 
official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

39 ► 



University of Maryland, 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay-Q4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics— (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. Offered 
in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods- (2-4) , (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the instruc- 
tor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 
Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of 
biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

399. Research in Pharmacology 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

PHARMACY 

1,2. Pharmacy Orientation— Q , I) 

Freshman year, one lecture. (Levine.) 

An introduction to pharmacy for the beginning student. The course will include 
the various subject matter that a pharmacy student will undertake as well as the op- 
portunities in pharmacy. Guest lecturers will be invited from the various fields of 
pharmacy. 

121, 22. Pharmacy, General— (5, 5) 
Sophomore year, four lectures and one laboratory. (Levine, Patel and Marlowe.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy 1, 2 or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical calcula- 
tions, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical prepa- 
rations. 

51, 52. Pharmacy, Dispensing— (4, 4) 

Junior year, two lectures and two laboratories. (Shangraw, Patel and Reier.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22. A study of the compounding and dispensing of 
prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy— (I) 

Junior year, first semester, one lecture. (Shangraw) 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis on the 
history of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy Literature— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Levine.) 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

M 40 



1 






School of Pharmacy 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy '—(3, 3) 

Senior year, tWO lec tur es ami one laboratory. (Allen, Patel, Heicr rod OtaggO 

Prerequisities— Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52. A study of tin- compounding oi new 

medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids used in modern profe s si on al pharmacy, in- 
cluding the preparation of some important classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 
scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

i32. Cosmetics— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Allen, Levine and Marlowe.) 
Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52, and 101. A study of the composition and 
manufacture of cosmetic preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of 
these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy- (2, 2) 

Two lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. A study of manufacturing processes and 
equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

203, 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 
Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharmaceuticals 
in large quantities. 

205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control— (3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Foss.) 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling of drugs 
from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. Includes 
detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, 
and other laws affecting the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy-(2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites— Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature— (I , I) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen and Purdum.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special reference 
to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharmaceutical 
periodicals. 

41 ► 



University of Maryland 

215,216. Product Develcypment-(2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

Prerequisites-Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development of 
new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar— (I) 

Each semester. (Allen.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and 
surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen and Purdum.) 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharmaceuticals 
and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, and Allen.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

2 1 . Accounting— (2 ) 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. The analysis of financial and operating 
statements with a study of the fundamental principles of accounting, including prac- 
tice in bookkeeping. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics— -(3) 

Junior year, second semester, three lectures. (Leavitt.) 

A study of the general fundamentals of Economics— production, exchange, distri- 
bution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing, government 
and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. jurisprudence— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Melnicove.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
Regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 
Partnerships. 

71. Management— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of the business problems aris- 
ing in the operation of a retail pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, 
leasing, insurance, purchasing, pricing, code marking and control of inventory. 

< 42 



School of Pharmacy 

72. Drug Marketing (2) 

: year, second semester, two lectures. L tvitt.) 

Prerequisite -Pharmacy Admiriistratioo 37. A study of marketing, marl 
research, advertising, selling and salesmanship, merchandising, channels ox distribution, 
wholesaling, retailing and personnel management. 

PHYSICS 

10, 11. General Physics-Q4 } 4) 

Sophomore year, three lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook and Hooper.) 

Prerequisites— Mathematics 10, 1 1 or 15, 17. A study of the principles of mechanics, 
hear, wave motion, sound, light and electricity. 

lor Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism— (3, 3) 

Two lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. Given according to demand. 

126. Kinetic Theory of Gases— (3) 
Three lectures a week. 

Prerequisites— Mathematics 21, and Physical Chemistry 189 and 190. Given ac- 
cording to demand. (Estabrook.) 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics— (5, 5) 

Five lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Advanced standing in Physics. Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General— (5) 

Sophomore year, second semester, three lectures, two laboratories. 

(Costello and Ragozzino.) 
Prerequisite— Zoology 1, 4. A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, in- 
cluding neurophysiology, the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney, 
endocrine glands, muscle physiology, structure and permeability of the plasma mem- 
brane, and metabolism. 

For Graduates 

243. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics— (2) 

Two Lectures— First Semester. (Costello and Layne.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 153, Physiology 22, Consent of Instructor. The lectures 

will relate to the physical and chemical properties of protoplasm to the functional 

43 ► 



University of Maryland 

problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, 
mitochondrial structure and their contributions to the integrated cellular activity. The 
physical and chemical phenomena of cell division and inheritance wall be discussed. 

244. Current Problems in Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics— (1) 
One Lecture— Second Semester. (Costello and Layne.) 

Prerequisites— Physiology 243, Consent of instructor. A continuation of Physiology 
243 and designed to introduce the student to current thought processes of cellular 
physiology and cytogenetics. By means of lectures and assigned student discussion, 
current research trends in the field will be discussed in detail. 

ZOOLOGY 

J. Zoology, General— (4) 

Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Mehling.) 

This course deals with basic principles of animal life and uses a study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

4, Zoology, Animal Kingdom— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Costello and Mehling.) 

A survey of the animal kingdom with special emphasis on parasites, insects and 
other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a firm 
foundation for later required courses. 



M 44 



School of Pharmacy 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1958-59 
Graduate Students t 



Bachur, Nicholas Robert Mai) land 

"Benslay, \)on Nolan Maryland 

Chen, Su Chien Taiwan 

Crippen, Raymond Charles. . .Maryland 

Davis, Jack I Maryland 

Economon, Straty Harry Maryland 

Havianek, Robert Edward. . . .New York 

I [eifetz, Carl Louis Maryland 

Huang, Chien Li Formosa 

King. Stonewall Corput, ]i Georgia 

Kist'ler. Stephen B New York 

Kokoski, Robert John Maryland 

Kumkumian, Charles Simon .. Maryland 

Laegeler, Judith Ann Illinois 

Lazaris, Spyros A Greece 



I c\ ine, Phillip J Maryland 

Marlowe, Edward 

"Mehling, Charles Eugene Maryland 

*Milio, 1 tank Remo Maryland 

Patel, Nagindas K India 

Patcl, Vithalbhai C India 

Prouty, Richard W Maryland 

Pruss, Thaddeus Paul Maryland 

Ragozzino, Patrick William. . .Maryland 

Reier, George Eugene Maryland 

Shenoy, Venkatraya B. Cropal. . . .India 

Shroff, Arvind Pranlal Maryland 

Tamorria, Christopher Richard 

District of Columbia 
*Wu, Mu Tsu Formosa 



Senior Class 



Becker, John Wilbert Maryland 

Becker, Stanley Leonard Maryland 

Berger, Charles Joseph Maryland 

Bozman, Kenneth Bennett .... Maryland 

Brown, Harry James Maryland 

Burkhart, Vincent de Paul .... Maryland 

Caplan, Carl Michael Maryland 

Chaiet, Melvin Maryland 

Crouse, James Earl Maryland 

Davies, Joseph William Maryland 

Deming, Martin Eugene .... Maryland 
Fleckenstein, Paul Anthony . . Maryland 

Freeman, Joseph Stafford Maryland 

Friedlander, Paul Michael . . . Maryland 
Friedlander, Sheldon Allan . . Maryland 

Gaver, Paul Glenn, Jr Maryland 

Goldberg, Stanley Lester Maryland 

Gray, William B Maryland 

Greenberg, Murray Gerald .... Maryland 

Hanenbaum, Allen Maryland 

King, Donald Charles Maryland 

Klioze, Earl Ephraim Maryland 

Kostos, Patricia Phyllis Maryland 

Leva, Ellis Maryland 

Levin, Barry Elliott Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session. 
fRegistered in Graduate School. 



Levinsohn, Nina Debra Maryland 

Lottier, William Irving Maryland 

Macks, Harry Elliott Maryland 

Malanowski, Antoinette Rosalie 

Maryland 
Marshall, Eugenie Wallace . . . Maryland 
Morton, Joseph Harris .... West Virginia 

Neuburger, Arnold Jay Maryland 

Nowakowski, Ronald Joseph . Maryland 
Penn, Thomas Milton Gosnell 

Maryland 

Pozanek, Larry Herbert Maryland 

Resser, William Wolf Maryland 

Richardson, David Ronald. . .Maryland 
Richmond, William Charles . . Maryland 
Sachs, Herbert A. Leonard .... Maryland 
Saiontz, Marvin Frederick . . . Maryland 
Santoni, John David Henry . . Maryland 

Schwartz, Sorell Lee Maryland 

Schwartzman, Alfred Howard . Maryland 

'Sekuler, Stanley Harold Maryland 

Sniadowski, Anthony John . . . Maryland 

Spear, Murray Charles Maryland 

f Starkey, Donald Emory Maryland 

Thomas, John R Maryland 

Tregor, Charles Henry Maryland 



45 



University of Maryland 



Junior Class 



Barnes, Attison Leonard Maryland 

Belford, Stanley Harvey Maryland 

Berdiansky, Charles Solomon . Maryland 

Berger, Jerome Alvin Maryland 

Clayman, Jerome Harris Maryland 

Conklin, Nancy Carole Maryland 

*DiPaula, Vincent Robert Maryland 

Evert, Helen Elaine Maryland 

Friedman, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Glick, Henry Joseph Maryland 

Goldner, Ronald Maryland 

Grebow, Martin David Maryland 

Hamet, Harry Maryland 

Handelman, Joseph Gold. .. .Maryland 

Hoffman, Marta Maryland 

Horwits, Leonard Maryland 

Jordan, John Terence Maryland 

Kantorow, Bennett Ralph. . . .Maryland 

Kenney, Fern Eugene Maryland 

Kern, Louis Reichert, Jr Maryland 

Kronsberg, Ronald Herbert. .Maryland 
Kushnick, Marvin Stanley. . . .Maryland 

Lee, Toon District of Columbia 

Lerner, Beryl Maryland 

Lerner, Joseph Herman Maryland 

Levin, David Gerald Maryland 

Levin, Irvin Isaac Maryland 



Lichter, Samuel Maryland 

Lund, Robert Eugene Maryland 

Minster, Howard Manuel .... Maryland 
Palmere, Anthony Michael . . . Maryland 

Petts, Mildred Louise Maryland 

Pilquist, Richard Morris Maryland 

Plempel, Alfred Clair, Jr Maryland 

Raksin, Irving Jacob Maryland 

Rapkin, Harvey Morton Maryland 

Raschka, Theodore Lee Maryland 

Richman, Morton David. . . .Maryland 
Sadowski, Leonard Joseph .... Maryland 
Samonovitch, Irwin Louis .... Maryland 

Scali, Peter Paul Maryland 

Sclar, Morton Jerome Maryland 

Shargel, Martin Chaim Maryland 

Sherr, Allan Robert Maryland 

Sherr, Bernard Erwin Maryland 

Shpritz, Esther Harriet Maryland 

Snyder, Larry Albert Maryland 

Stank, Kenneth Edward Maryland 

Tokar, Elliot Sanf ord Maryland 

Tracey, Jessie Lois Maryland 

Warfield, Albert Harry Maryland 

Warthen, John David, Jr. . . . Maryland 

*Weiner, Kenneth Sidney Maryland 

Wisniewski, Robert John .... Maryland 



Sophomore Class 



Amass, Arnold Leroy Maryland 

Barron, David D Maryland 

Blaustein, Arnold Lee Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Yale Maryland 

Chan, Kenneth Young Maryland 

Contrino, Gabriel Michael .... Maryland 

Cwynar, Frank F Maryland 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

Eng, June Maryland 

r 'Erdman, Allan Elliott Maryland 

Forman, Allan Stuart Maryland 

Gordon, Gerald Stanford Maryland 

Greenblatt, Elliott Maryland 

Grossblatt, Norton Joel Maryland 

Heinrich, William Joseph .... Maryland 
Home, William Scott Maryland 



Huber, George Herman Maryland 

Hyatt, Stanley Elliott Maryland 

Kadish, Aaron Maryland 

Lauer, Stephen LeBrun Maryland 

* Lee, Lois Mae Maryland 

Maschas, Constantine Nick . . . Maryland 
McNeill, Douglas Wells Maryland 

*Misler, Wayne Marvin Maryland 

Pfann, George Alan Maryland 

Phillips, Janice Rae Maryland 

Pilson, Robert Michael, Jr. . . . Maryland 
Reisenweber, Harvey Donaldson 

Maryland 
Robinson, Zoe William Maryland 

* Rosen, Allen William Maryland 

Rosen, Leon Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session. 



46 



School of Plun 



Sophomore Class (continued) 



Sappe, \.;;k\ Carol Maryland 

Sennuksnis, Milda Irena Maryland 

Silen, Irvin Maryland 

Smith. Dennis Boyd Marj 1 tnd 

"Sollod, Stuart Howard Maryland 

r, Martin Joseph Maryland 

Stiekman, Robert Benjamin. .Maryland 

Stime, Peyton Orenzo Maryland 

Struntz, James Patrick Maryland 

Tabak, William Maryland 

Tamberino, Frank Joseph. .. .Maryland 



1 inelli, VitO Maryland 

TumbuU, Andrew, Jr Maryland 

1, 1 rank J unej Maryland 

VValkling, Walter I I 

Wankel, Richard Allan Maryland 

Weaver, George Willard Maryland 

We in r. Phillip Paul Maryland 

'Weslock, Lawrence F Maryland 

Yospa, Irvin Maryland 

Zerwitz, Warren Gerald Maryland 



Freshman Class 



Amernick, Harmond Hersh . . . Maryland 

Augsburger, Larry Louis Maryland 

Austravv, Henry Harrison Maryland 

Baker, Herman Louis Maryland 

Becker, Edward Philip Maryland 

Bishow, Joseph Jesse Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Howard Maryland 

Bradford, William Herbert, Jr. 

Maryland 
Bryan, Joseph Carrow, IV. . . .Maryland 
Clinger, Richard Graham . . Pennsylvania 

Cornias, William Nick Maryland 

Debes, George Gerard Maryland 

Gandel, Stephen Jay Maryland 

*Gemora, Joseph Michael Delaware 

Gibbon, Nancy Lee Maryland 

Gibbons, Hugh MacFarlane, Jr. 

Maryland 

Gross, Thomas Hollen Maryland 

Grubb, John E Maryland 

Gubinsky, Louis Maryland 

Hamet, Sydney Herbert Maryland 

Henderson, Robert Webb Maryland 

Jablon, Paul Allan Milton Maryland 

Kalb, Richard Paul Maryland 

Kantorski, Robert Richard .... Maryland 

Kempler, Jerold Allan Maryland 

Kleiner, Harold Stanley Maryland 

Konrad, James Gerard Maryland 

Levitt, Kelvin Ronald Maryland 

*Liggett, Robert Allan Maryland 

Losinsky, Barry Sheldon Maryland 

Loy, John Haywood, Jr Maryland 

Mackay, Walter Price Maryland 

Mackowiak, Frank John Maryland 

Maggitti, Ronald Francis Maryland 



Maleson, Howard Stanley Maryland 

Martin, Wallace O'Conor Maryland 

Miller, Stanley Maryland 

Moore, Myrna Lee Maryland 

Newman, Jerome Maryland 

Norfleet, James Maryland 

Perzynski, Paul Ronald. New Hampshire 
Porterfield, Robert Edward .... Maryland 

Price, Chester Lee Maryland 

Pristoop, Allan Sanford Maryland 

Resnick, Melvyn Jay Maryland 

*Ring, Barry Jay Maryland 

Rosenstein, Sol Maryland 

Roth, Edward Barry Maryland 

Sandler, Charles Allen Maryland 

Schmidt, Elizabeth Grace Maryland 

Schultz, Harriet Nadine. . . .New Jersey 

Serpick, David Yale Maryland 

Shaweevongse, Chirapa Thailand 

Siegel, Susan Joyce Maryland 

Sobczak, Valentine Raymond . . Maryland 

Sober, Julian Neal Maryland 

Spak, Allen Maryland 

Stevenson, Gordon Albert .... Maryland 
Sugarman, Henry Maryland 

*Sushko, Jaroslaw George Maryland 

Taylor, Robert Lee Maryland 

Thawley, Patricia Ellen Maryland 

Tondora, Frank Joseph Maryland 

Wagenheim, Arnold Robert. . .Maryland 

*Wayland, Frederick William. .Maryland 
Weiner, George Wayne Maryland 

* Weinstein, Jay Michael Marvland 

Wolff, Donald W Maryland 

Zimmer, Reid Austin Maryland 



'Did not attend entire session. 



47 



University of Maryland 



Special Students 

fGoldberg, Carroll H Maryland * Welsh, Charles Robert Maryland 

Schleifer, Fred Sheldon Maryland 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 7, 1958 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Hatif Hammoody Al-Jaleel Iraq Charles Judd Swartz Maryland 

Master of Science 

Ursula Elizabeth Heyer Wisconsin Margaret Frances Sherwood Ohio 

Jayantilal Shankerbhai Patel India Theodore Wendel Tober. . . .Connecticut 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Nathan H. Abrahams New York 

Clarence LeRoy Anstine Maryland 

Donald Aronson Maryland 

Harry Bass Maryland 

Mitchell Berman Maryland 

Charles Luther Brashears Maryland 

Jay Royce Brinsfield Maryland 

Pearl Chan Maryland 

William Theodore dinger . Pennsylvania 

Gerald Ivan Cohen Maryland 

Harold Lee Cooper Maryland 

Walter Michael Damasiewicz, Jr. 

Maryland 

Conrad Peter Dorn, Jr Maryland 

Paul Prag Elliott Maryland 

Edward Carroll Esslinger Maryland 

Edward Alvin Etzler Maryland 

William Thomas Foley, Jr. . . . Maryland 

Melvin Friedman Maryland 

Patricia Ann Hayes Maryland 

Colen Clifford Heinritz Maryland 

Henry William Hughes Maryland 

Bernard Sheldon Isaacson .... Maryland 

Marvin Ban Jaslow Maryland 

Maurice J. Kornblau Pennsylvania 

Norman Jack Kronberg Maryland 



Allan Lisse Maryland 

Joseph Wilmer Loetell, Jr Maryland 

James Joseph Mallonee, Jr Maryland 

Harry Joseph McKenny Maryland 

David Collins McLarty Maryland 

David M. Oken Maryland 

Herbert Gerald Oster Maryland 

Thomas R. Palmer Maryland 

Stacy Pass Maryland 

Stanley Edward Protokowicz . . Maryland 
Noble Philip Redmond, Jr. . . . Maryland 

George Eugene Reier Maryland 

Michael Byron Rodell Maryland 

John Joseph Ruppersberger . . .Maryland 

Miles Eugene St. John Maryland 

Alan Sherman D. C. 

Walter Edward Sultan Maryland 

Nancy Lee Swiss Maryland 

Chris Peter Tountas Maryland 

George Chris Voxakis Maryland 

Clayton Linwood Warrington, Jr. 

Maryland 

Leon Weiner Maryland 

Jerome Sidney Wittik Maryland 

Paul Zucker Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session. 
fSecond semester only. 



48 



School of Pharmacy 



Honors (1957-58) 



Gold Medal for General Excellence Conzad P. Doxn, Jr. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize Raymond D. B mr 

'1 he Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize James J. MaUonee 

Tne 1.. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 1 [any Baal 

The Conzad I.. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize Walter E. Sultan 

The David link Memorial Prize Allan Lisse 

The Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize Miles E. St. John 

The Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize Michael B. Rodell 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize, 

Colen C. Heinritz 

Certificates of Honor 

Harry Bass Allan Lisse 

George E. Reier 

Honorable Mention (Junior Class') 

Murray Spear Marvin Saiontz 

Larry Pozanek 



49 ► 



University of Maryland 

DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1957-58) 



Harry Bass 
Pearl' Chan 
Gerald Cohen 
Conrad Dorn 
Melvin Friedman 
Colen Heinritz 
Marvin Jaslow 
Allan Lisse 
James Mallonee 



Clarence Anstine 
Mitchell Berman 
Paul Elliott 



Carl Caplan 
Melvin Chaiet 
Larry Pozanek 



Stanley Becker 
Paul Friedlander 
William Gray 
Murray Greenberg 



Joseph Handelman 
David Richman 
Peter Scali 



Henry Glick 
Ronald Goldner 
Martin Grebow 
John Jordan 



Lawrence Block 

June Eng 

Lois Lee 

Harvey Reisenweber 

Robert Stiekman 



Class of 1958 



Honorable Mention 



Class of 1959 



Honorable Mention 



Class of 1960 



Honorable Mention 



Class of 1961 



Honorable Mention 



Herbert Oster 
Thomas Palmer 
George Reier 
Michael Rodell 
John Ruppersberger 
Alan Sherman 
Miles St. John 
Walter Sultan 



Edward Etzler 
William Foley 



Marvin Saiontz 
Murray Spear 



Earl Klioze 
Herbert Sachs 
S or ell Schwartz 
Alfred Schwartzman 



Martin Shargel 
John Warthen 



Toon Lee 
Joseph Lerner 
Anthony Palmere 
Kenneth Stank 



Sheila Smink 
Vito Tinelli 
Douglas Walkling 



George Weaver 



^ 50 



School oj Pharmacy 

INDEX 

Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 50 

AccreditatioD 1 

Administration, Officers of 

Principal Administrative Officers \i 

Emeriti \i 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges I i 

General Administrative Officers viii 

Division Chairmen viii 

Faculty Senate, Chairmen of Standing Committees x 

Admission Procedure 

All Applicants for the Four Year Program at Baltimore, Md 7 

All Applicants for Admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 7 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To the Four Year Program 2 

To Advanced Standing, Four Year Program 3 

To the Five Year Program 3 

Alumni Association 27 

American Civilization, The Program in 5 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 27 

Assistantships, Graduate 20 

Attendance Requirements 11 

Board of Regents v 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1959 and 1960 ii 

Calendar, Academic iii 

Classification of Students 15 

Correspondence iv 

Courses, Description of (Four Year Program) 33 

Curriculum, Four Year 

Changes in 10 

Courses, Hours and Credits 29 

Summary of Hours and Credits 30 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md 4 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

Other Than University of Maryland 6 

Curriculum, Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 31 

Summary of Hours and Credits 32 

Degrees 2 

Deportment 17 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship '. 14 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 18 

Employment 17 

51 ► 



University of Maryland 



INDEX (continued') 



Examinations 11 

Faculty xi 

Faculty Council xi 

Fees and Expenses, Graduate 9 

Part-time Undergraduate 9 

Undergraduate 8 

Fellowships and Grants 18 

Grade of D, Raising 13 

Grading System 11 

Grade Point Average 12 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 14 

Graduates, Roll of 45 

Graduation Requirements 15 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 

Honors and Awards 23, 49 

Hospital Pharmacy Internships 20 

Housing 17 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 11 

Library Regulations 18 

Staff xv 

Loans 23 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 16 

Registration with 16 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 28 

Students' Auxiliary 27 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 12 

Office of Dean, Hours iv 

Office Staff xvi 

Parking 17 

Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 6 

From Other Universities and Colleges 6 

Probation for Low Scholarship 13 

Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1959-60 

Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 13 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 14 

Registration 7 

Requirements for Admission to Five Year Program 3 

Admission to Pre-professional Program at College Park 4 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 20 

Scholarship Requirements 12 

Senior Elective Program— Four Year Program 15 



< 52 



School of Pharmacy 



INDEX (continued) 



Student Government Alliance 26 

Students, full-time 8 

part-time 9 

Students, Roll of 45 

Textbooks 10 

I ranscripts of Records 15 

Tuition and Laboratory Fees (Baltimore Campus) 8 

Visitors iv 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 10 

Withdrawing Students, Grades of 14 



53 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland.