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Full text of "School of Pharmacy Catalog 1960-1965"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/pharmacy65unse 



The provisions of this publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within tJie student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



Catalog and 
1 17th Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

Maryland CoNtge of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1901) 

1960-1961 




Volume 40, Number 1 
School of Pharnuk j 
636 West I ombaid Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



This catalog includes information applying to the terminal three years of 
the Four Year Pro-ram in Baltimore as well as the new Five Year Program which 
is mandatory in September 1960. 









196C 










1961 


JANUARY 1960 






JULY 1960 




JANUARY 1961 




JULY 1961 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


B 


M T W T F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


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S M T W T F S 






1 


2 




1 


2 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


1 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 9 


10 11 12 


LI 


14 


2/8 4 5 6 7 8 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


ir, 


22 18 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


9110 11 12 13 14 15 


17 18 


19 20 21 


II 


II 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


18 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 




16 27 U 


19 


M 


2 4 


25 26 27 28 29 


30 


29 30 


31 






23 24 25 26 27 28 29' 


31 








31 














30 31 


FEBRUARY 






AUGUST 




FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 


S M 


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F 


S 


a 


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S M 


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6 




12 3 4 5 


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1 3 


8 


4 


12 3 4 5 
6^7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 


9 10 11 


u 


11 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 


13 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 


12 18 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


18 14 15 16 17 18 19 


61 22 


23 24 25 


16 


27 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


80*11 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 


MARCH 






2s 


29 30 31 
SEPTEMBER 




26-27 


28 
MARCH 






27 28 29 30 31 
SEPTEMBER 


S M 


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5 6 7 8 9 


10 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 


18 


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12 13 14 15 16 


17 


12 18 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10/11 12 13 14 15 16 
17M8 19 20 21 22 28 


20 21 


22 23 24 


15 


26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


19 20 


21 22 23 


2 1 


IS 


27 28 


29 30 31 






27 28 29 30 




26 27 


28 29 30 


31 




21 2r, 26 27 28 29 30. 
OCTOBER 




APRIL 






a 


OCTOBER 






APRIL 






S M 


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1 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 


* 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


8/9 10 11 12 13 14- 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


SI 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


15U6 17 18 19 20 2L> 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 


It 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


22/23 24 25 26 27 28- 


24 25 


26 27 28 
MAY 


29 


30 


23 

30 


24 25 26 27 28 
31 

NOVEMBER 


29 


23,24 

30 


25 26 27 
MAY 


28 


2 'J 


29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 


S II 


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F 


a 


S 


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S 


S M 


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S M T W T F S 


1 2 


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6 


7 




12 3 4 


6 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


13 3 4 


8 9 


10 11 12 


is 


14 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 


18 


5^6 7 8 9 10 11 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


12^-13 14 15 16 17 18> 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


29 30 


31 
JUNE 






27 


28 29 30 
DECEMBER 




28 29 


30 31 
JUNE 






26 27 28 29 30 
DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


S 


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S M 


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S M T W T F S 




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1 


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1 2 


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1 


2 


3 


1 2 


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7 8 9 


10 


11 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


10* 11 12 13 14 16 16> 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


26 27 


28 29 30 






2.") 


26 27 28 29 30 


|] 


25 26 


27 28 29 


30 




24 25 26 27 28 29 80 
31 



* ii 



School of Vhmmac) 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1960-1961 

First Semester 
1960 

September 12 .... Monday Sophomore Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Junior Registration— 10:30-1 1 : 30 a.m. 
Senior Registration— 1 : 30-2: 30 p.m. 

September 13 ... .Tuesday Graduate Registration— 9:00-1 1 :00 a.m. 

September 19 .... Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

mber 23 . . . .Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close of the last 

scheduled period 

November 28 .... Mondav Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

December 20 .... Tuesday Christmas recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 



1961 

January 3 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

Januarv 25-31 . . . Wed.-Tues First semester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 7 Tuesday Sophomore Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 

Junior Registration— 10:30-1 1 : 30 a.m. 

Senior Registration— 1 : 30-2: 30 p.m. 

February 8 Wednesday Graduate Registration— 9:00-1 1 :00 a.m. 

February 13 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Wednesday Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

March 30 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

April 4 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

22-26 Monday-Friday . • .Senior final examinations 

May 26-June 1 . . . Friday-Thursday . . Second semester examinations 

May 30 Tuesday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 10 Saturday Commencement 

All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration dav. Students failing to 
comply with this regulation are charged a fee of five dollars. No student is normalK 
permitted to register after Saturday noon of the week in which instruction lx-^in>. 

The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily. Mondav through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



University of Maryland 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance to the upper three years of the Four 
Year Program in the School of Pharmacy should be addressed to the Director 
of Admissions, Building 520R, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Md. 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of the 
Five Year Program should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
Office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday 
by appointment. 



BOARD OF REG1A rS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Tent 
Expires 
Chabi Bfl P, M< Cobiogi 

rnutn • • 1966 

McConnkk and Company, 414 Li^ht Street, Baltimore 2 

i BB 

1968 

The National Grange, 1616 H Street. WW.. Washington 6 

B. I li RBHEX Brow \ 

1967 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

1 1 \ raw I I. XllTTLE 

^.irer 1966 

a ton 

Louis L. Kapi w 

eta rj 1961 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

G 1 WING TllTTLE 

start Treasurer 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Rk hard W. Case 1967 

Commercial Credit Building, 300 St. Paul Place, Baltimore 2 

Thomas W. Pangbobn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

W:i mam C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mbs. John I . Wihtehurst 1967 

4101 Green way, Baltimore 18 



Members of the Board were ippointed by the C". Pernor of the State for terms of 
nine years each, beginning the \.r< M nday in June. 

M mben I the Board appointed to serve after June 1, 1960 are limited to two con- 
secutive seven-year terms. 

The President of the University of Man land is hv law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Mankind 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Principal Administrative Officers 

wilson h. elkins, President 

b.a., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 

D. PHIL., 1936. 

albin o. KUHNj Executive Vice President 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1938; m.s., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

r. lee hornbake, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

b.s., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
ph.d., 1942. 

alvin e. cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

b.a., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

frank l. bentz, jr., Assistant, President's Office 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1942; ph.d., 1952. 

Emeritus 

harry c. byrd, President Emeritus 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son College, 1938; d.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

myron s. aisenberg, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

vernon e. anderson, Dean of the College of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d., University of Colorado, 1942. 

ronald bamford, Dean of the Graduate School 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Gordon m. cairns, Dean of Agricidture 

b.s., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

ray w. ehrensberger, Dean of University College 

b.a., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

noel e. foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

PH.C.J South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; ph.d., 1933. 

< vi 



School of PJian 

Lester If. fralf.y, Dean of the College of I .ition, Recreation, and 

Health 

b.a., Randolph-Macon College, 192S; m.a., 1937; rn.D., Peabody College, 1939. 

flo: cipBj Dean of (' 

b.s., Catholic University of America, 1937; m.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ed.d., University of Maryland, 1952. 

ladislaus F. CRAPSKi, Director of the University Hospital 

Mills School of Nuning, Bellevuc Hospital, \ .-.•.■ 1 rk, 1938; B.s., University 
of Denver, 1942; m.b.a. in Hospital Administration, University of Chicago, 1943. 

ip.vin C. HAUT, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, De p ar tme nt 

of Horticulture 

b.s., University of Idaho, 192S; m.s., State College of Washington, 1930; pii.d., 
University of Maryland, 1933. 

rocer howell, Dean of the School of Law 

b.a., Johns Hopkins Universitv, 1914; ph.d., 1917; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1917. 

wilbert J. huff, Director, Engineering Experiment Station 

b.a., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; d.sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

selma f. lippeatt, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

b.s., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; m.s., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
ph.d., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

Frederic T. mavis. Dcs.n of the College of Engineering 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1922; m.s., 1926; c.e., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

paul E. nystrom, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

b.s., University of California, 1928; m.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., 
Harvard University, 194S; d.p.a., 1951. 

j. freeman pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 
ph.b., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

leon p. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

University, 1919; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diplcme de l'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

william s. stone, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

b.s., University of Idaho, 1924; m.s., 1925; m.d., University of Louisville, 1929; 

ph.d., (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

I to! Administrative Officers 

c. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1930; m.s., 1931. 

vii ► 



University of Maryland 

Theodore r. aylesworth, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of 
Air Science 

b.s., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1936; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1949. 

norma j. azlein, Registrar 

b.a., University of Chicago, 1940. 

b. james dorreson, Executive Dean for Student Life 
b.a., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

david l. brigham, Director of Alumni Relations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. Wilbur cissel, Director of Finance and Business 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

william w. cobey, Director of Athletics 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1930. 

lester m. dyke, Director of Student Health Service 

b.s., University of Iowa, 1936; m.d., University of Iowa, 1926. 

geary F. eppley, Dean of Men 

b.s., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

harry d. fisher, Comptroller and Budget Officer 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

george w. fogg, Director of Personnel 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

Robert j. mccartney, Director of University Relations 
b.a., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

george w. morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant (Baltimore) 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

Howard rovelstad, Director of Libraries 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s. Columbia University, 1940. 

adele h. stamp, Dean of Women 

b.a., Tulane University, 1921; m.a., University of Maryland, 1924. 

george o. weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

john E. faber, jr., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

< viii 



School of Pharr 

HAAOLD C, liorisoMM! .division of So, ces 

tern University, 1921; ma.. 1923; vu.v., Cornell University, 1929. 

wilbeht j. bui p, Chairman of tlic Division of Physical Sdtnct 

b.a.. Ohio Northern University. 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
\. 1917; d.sc, (hon\), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

cn.wA i I ! white. Chairman of the Lower Division 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

ADOLF E. zucker, Chairman of the Division of Humanities 

b.a.. University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d., Universitv of Pennsylvania, 
1917. 



i.\ 



University of Maryland 

CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Dr. Ronald Bamford (Graduate School), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Russell G. Brown (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. Ronald Bamford (Graduate School), Chairman 

MITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Robert Rappleye (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Irvin C. Haut (Graduate School), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul Nystrom (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. Edward J. Herbst (Medicine), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Mr. B. James Borreson (Executive Dean for Student Life), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Charles Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles A. Taff (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Dr. L. Morris McClure (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. Franklin Cooley (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Dr. Allan J. Fisher (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Professor Louis E. Otts (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. Marvin H. Eyler (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. Clyne S. Shaffner (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Dr. Guy B. Hathorn (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Dr. Joseph C. Biddix (Dentistry), Chairman 



School of Pharmacy 
FACULTY COUNCIL 

NOEL E. FOSS, Dl\1H 
11MAMIN L. ALLEN IP. \NK J. SLAMA 

FRANCIS If, MILLER CASIMIR T. ICHNIOWSKI, Secretary 

Faculty (1959-1960) 
rita 

B. olive cole, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
phar.d., University of Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

*GAYLORD B. ESTABROOK, PwfeSSOr of PhySlCS 

b.s. in ch.e., Purdue University, 1921; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; ph.d., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

noel E. foss, Professor of P)iarmacy 

ph.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

M.rvland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist— South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

casimir t. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

fw. arthur purdum, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

*a. w. richeson, Professor of Mathematics 

b.s., University of Richmond, 1918; a.m., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
ph.d., 1928. 

donald e. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; m.s., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 

frank j. slama, Professor of Pliarmacognosy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; M.S., 

1930; ph.d., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



* Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 

xi ► 



University of Maryland 

Associate Professors 

uenjamin frank allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

norman j. doorenbos, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s. in chem., University of Michigan, 1950; m.s., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

edward j. herbst, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 
b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1943; m.s., 1944; ph.d., 1949. 

*francis m. miller, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d. Northwestern University, 1949. 

eda marian robinson, Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

guilford g. rudolf, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 

School of Medicine 

b.a., University of Colorado, 1940; M.S., Wayne State University, 1942; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Utah, 1948. 

Assistant Professors 

*adele b. ballman, Assistant Professor of English 

a.b., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

*leslie c. costello, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

Arthur j. emery, jr., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 

b.s., Bucknell University, 1947; ph.d., University of Rochester, 1954. 

Hilda e. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

*claire strube schradieck, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
a.b., Goucher College, 1916; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

ralph f. shangraw, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. en pharmacy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; m.s., 1954; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist— Vermont, Massachusetts. 



*Teachers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

<< xii 



School of Pharmacy 



Instructors 



eari \\\. JR., Instructor in Microbiol 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, I! Washington University, 1957. 

ann Virginia BROWN, Instructor in Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine 
a.b., Gouchcr College, 1940. 

*fCLARENCE T. Dl H .\\ i n. Instructor in Speech 

a.b.. Western Maryland College, 1930; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950. 

georcianna s. GiTTiNGER, Instructor in PJiarmacology 

a.b., Hood College, 1912; m.a., University of Virginia, 1924. 

robert j. kokoski, histructor in Pharmacognosy 

b.s. in pharm., University of Man-land, 1952; m.s., 1956. 
I Pharmacist— Maryland. 

CHARLES S. KUMKUM1AN, hlStTUCtOT tfl Chemistry 

B.s., Temple University. 1944; m.s., 1951. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Pennsylvania. 

dean E. leayitt. Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; m.s., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

phillip j. levine, Instructor in Pharmacy 

b.s., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955; m.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, Rhode Island. 

Lecturer 

Joseph s. kahfman, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Visiting Lecturers 

samuel L. fox. Visitino Lecturer in Physiology 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1934; b.s. in pharm., 1936; m.d., 1938. 

I nms c. layne, jr., Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

b.s., George Washington University, 1950; M.S., 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

Fellows 

lanpon \v. bhrbage, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration 
(Research*) 

run.. Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

*Teacher detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 



Xlll 



University of Maryland 

coxrad p. dorn, jr., American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellow 
in Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., University of Man-land, 1958. 

Robert e. havranek, Noxzema Foundation Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in PHARM., Columbia University, 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— California, Maryland, New York, Florida. 

hatif h. jalil, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

PH.CH.J Royal College of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Iraq, 1952; m.s., University of 
Maryland, 1955; ph.d., 1957. 

kenneth a. kerridge, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellcav in Cheicstry 

b. pharm., Chelsea College of Science and Technology, London, England, 1951; 
ph.d., 1955. 

vithalbbai c. patel, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

b. pharm., L. M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat University, India, 1956; m.s., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1959. 

harkishan singh, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

b. pharm., Punjab University, 1950; m. pharm., Banaras Hindu University, 1952; 
ph.d., 1956. 

*murray c. spear, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellow 
in Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1959. 

Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

c. richard tamorria, The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s., Georgetown College, 1954; m.s., 1957. 

mu-tsu-wu, Research Chemist 

b.sc. in chemistry, 1951, National Taiwan University. 

Junior Instructors 

xagindas k. patel, Junior Instructor in Pharmacy 

i.sc, Bharatiya Vidya Bhivan's College, 1952; b. pharm., L.M. College of Pharmacy, 
India, 1954; m.s., Temple University, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— India. 

arvind p. shroff, Junior Instructor in Chemistry 

b.sc, M. S. University, Baroda, India, 1954; m.s., Duquesne University, 1958. 

Graduate Assistants 

john w. becker, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



* Resigned February 12, 1960. 



xiv 



School of Pharmacy 

* STANLEY L. BECK1 \\. AsStSUmt in Zool 

in PHABlCj University >t Maryland, 1959. 

tered Pharmacist— Maryland. 
'\\n i\:n c hah r. Assistant iii Chem 

m PHABM.j Univeisit] I Maryland, 1959. 
d Pharmacist- Marvlaiul. 

wn i i\m j. i inn, Assistant in Pharmacology 
b.s in phabjCj Albany College of Pharmacy, 1959. 

Stered Pharmacist— \ T cnnont, Maryland. 

carl l. heifetz, Assistant in Pharmacd 
B.s. in I'Hakm., LInivcrsity of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland, District of Columbia. 

i BS r. hooper, jr., Assistant in Physics 
b.a., Dartmouth College, 1954. 

eduard marlowe. Assistant in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in phabii . Columbia University, 1956; m.s., 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist— New York, Maryland. 

-E G. reier, Assistayit in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Theodore n. t. wang, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.s., Mukden Medical College, China, 1949; m.s., University of Nebraska, 1958. 

Assistant 

james p. cragg, jr., Assistant in Practical Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1943. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

Library Staff 
Pharmacy -Dentistry 
ida marian robinson, Librarian 

A.B., B.S.L.S. 

Hilda E. moore, Associate Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S. 

Beatrice Marriott, Preference Librarian 

A.B. 



hers detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
\ the University. 

* 'Resigned Januarv 31, 1960. 



XV 



University of Maryland 

edith M. coyle, Periodicals Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S., MA. 

M AiijoRiE e. vilk, Cataloguer 

B.S. IN ED. 

marie martin, Library Assistant 
sarah L. atkins, Library Assistant 
Jacqueline b. clem, Assistant to the Librarian 
patricia b. potter, Assistant to the Cataloguer 

Assisting Staff 

daisy lotz gue, Secretary-Stenograyher 

Margaret e. BEATTY, Senior Stenographer 

Frances r. PLiTT, Senior Stenographer 
*judith a. shouse, Senior Stenographer 

* Effective February 2, 1960. 



\v 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
I [istory and Program 

Tm: PURPO6B8 OF IHH school OF PHARMACY arc to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students in 

general scientific and cultural Subjects so that they ^.m read critically, express 
themselves clearly, and think logically as members of B profession and citizens 
of a democracy; to RUlde students into productive scholarship and research for 
the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy! the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland 
physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in Pharmacy to 
replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on 
January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College 
joined with a group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental 
Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new insti- 
tution was known as the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Balti- 
more professional schools was merged with the Maryland State College at 
College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies buildings constructed specifically for pharmaceutical 
education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with the most modern 
apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts and for research in 
pharmacy is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 27,000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. ^ 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, the 
Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, and The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. These libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training. The American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy requires a Five Year Program and students entering the study of phar- 
macy in the Autumn of 1960 will be required to enroll in a Five Year Pharmacy 
cam. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharma- 
ceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. The diploma of the School is recognized by 
every board of pharmacy. 

I^-'rces 
o 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 

1 ► 



University of Maryland 

The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Programs Offered During the 1960-1961 Academic Year 

Properly qualified students may enroll in the the Sophomore Year of the four 
year educational program at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore in September 
1960. As a result of a decision by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, students beginning a pharmacy or pre-pharmacy curriculum on or 
after April 1, 1960 will be required to enroll in the academic program of not 
less than five years. At the University of Maryland the five year program will 
consist of two years of a pre-professional program and a three year pharmacy 
program. Only the three year pharmacy program will be offered in Baltimore. 
The pre-professional program will not be available in Baltimore but may be 
obtained at the College Park campus of the University or at any other accredited 
university or college where appropriate courses are offered.* 

Admission To Advanced Standing in the Four Year Program 

Onlv students who have completed all the requirements (except Pharmacy 
Orientation) for the Freshman year or more of the current four year program 
will be considered as transfer students to be admitted in September 1960. 

An applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts of his 
college record along with a certificate of good standing from the college he 
attended. His grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the college's 
grading system. 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education are given credit for the work of the first three 
years of the pharmacy curriculum which they have completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts 
subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given 
for work completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those 
courses in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the 
schedules for transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given 
preference over advanced work. 

*Courses approved by the University of Maryland in non-accredited junior colleges 
within the State of Maryland may be accepted for credit requirements by the University. 
I he year (not less than 24 hours of academic work) immediately prior to admission 
must be successfully completed in a regionally accredited college or university. 



School of Pharm 

Credit is not given for pharmaceutical work done in evening or corre- 
spondence schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other 
institutions if the school did not giant credit. 

In determining the grade-point Average of transfer students, only those 
courses taken at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland are used. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed to the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions of the Uni- 
versity in Baltimore. 

Requirements for Admission to the Five Year Program 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

The graduates of accredited secondary schools will he admitted by certifi- 
cates upon the recommendation of the secondary school principal. 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School and 
for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. The requirements for admission 
to the School of Pharmacy at College Park are, in general, the same as those 
for admission to the other colleges and schools of the University. Applications 
must be made to the Director of Admission, at College Park, Maryland. 

The following academic subjects are recommended and required for admis- 
sion to the Pre-Pharmacy program at College Park: 

Subjects Recommended Required 
Ush 4 Units 4 Units 
College Preparatory Mathematics— including algebra (1), 
plane geometry (1) and additional units in advanced 
algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, or advanced math- 
ematics 4 2 
Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 
History and Social Sciences 2 1 
Biological Sciences 1 
Foreign Language— German or French 2 
Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 

Total 16 16 

Annual costs of attending the University at College Park for Maryland 

residents include: fixed charges, $185.00; instructional materials (average lab- 

: >ry fees), $24.00; special Ices, $77.00, board, $400.00 and lodging, $170.00 

to $200.00. Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee of (300.00 and 

lodging costt are $220.00 to $250.00. 



University of Maryland 

A ice of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for ad- 
mission. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee is accepted 
in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this pub- 
lication may be obtained by writing to the Office of University Relations, North 
Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

The pre-professional program offered at College Park is as follows: 
COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

r- Semester—^ 

First Year 1 11 

Chemistry 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

""English 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Math. 10, 11— Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry 3 3 

or or 

Math. 18, 19-Elementary Mathematical Analysis 5 5 

Zoology 1— General Zoology 4 

Botany 1— General Botany . . 4 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Air Science 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 2 2 

Health 2, 4-Health (Women) 2 2 

fe, n Total 17-19 17-19 

Second Year 

""English 3, 4 or 5, 6-Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

* History 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Physics 10, 1 1 -Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Chemistry 19-Elements of Quantitative Analysis . . 4 

Economics 37— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

*Group I Elective or Government and Politics I 3 

Elective: 

Approved Elective from Group I or Group II of American 

Civilization Program • • 3 

Air Science 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-19 18-20 



*The Program in American Civilization. 



School of Pharm 

THE PROGRAM IX AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers it important for every student to achievi 

tppreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. It has 

therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civilization. I his 
;ram is also designed to provide the student with a genera] educational back- 
ind. 

\\ ik in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels, 
first level is required of all Freshmen ^nd sophomores at the University and 

is described below. 1 he second level is for undergraduate students wishing to 
carry a major in this field (sec catalog for the College of Arts and Sciences). I he 
third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this field (see catalog 
for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of Mary- 
land must (except as specific exceptions are -noted in printed curricula) obtain 
24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the American Civiliza- 
tion Program. Although the courses in the Program are prescribed generally, 
some choice is permitted, especially for students who demonstrate in classification 
tests good previous preparation in one or more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6). 

American History (6 hours, Hist. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, 
G. & P. 1) are required subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or 
all three of these areas by means of University administered tests are expected 
to substitute certain elective courses. Through such testing a student may be 
released from 3 hours of English (9 hours would remain an absolute requirement), 
3 hours of American History (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), 
and 3 hours of American Government. Students released from 3 hours of Eng- 
lish will take Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours 
of History will take Hist. 56 instead of I list. 5 and 6. Students who have been 
exempted from courses in English, American History, or American Government 
may not take such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required, students elect one 
course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics. (Not open to Freshmen. Students 
who may wish to take additional courses in economics should substitute 
Economics 31 for Economics 37.) 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 

(Students enrolled in the College of Business and Public Administration will 
normally meet this requirement by taking Economics 31 in the sophomore year.) 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours of otherwise required courses in English, American History or American 



University of Maryland 

Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these courses from 
any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the same de- 
partment as the required courses in which the student is excused, or (b) Elective 
Group I (see 2 above), provided that the same course may not be used as both 
a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. Group II consists of 
the following 3-hours courses: 

History 2, History of Modern Europe; either History 51 or 52, The Humani- 
ties; either Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of American 
Art; and Sociology 5, Anthropology. 

Admission to Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Maryland 

A. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program at 
College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C will qualify for ad- 
mission to the pharmacy program at Baltimore. 

B. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college * of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must consist of a minimum of 
60 semester hours of credit exclusive of physical education, military science or 
similar courses. The 60 semester hours must include at least 6 hours of English, 
6 hours of mathematics (algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry), 8 hours 
of general biology or botany and zoology, 8 hours of general inorganic chemistry, 
including qualitative analysis; 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours of 
physics, 3 hours of economics and the remainder as electives. The electives must 
be selected from non-science areas and may include additional courses in English 
and economics, courses in history, philosophy, political science, psychology, 
sociology, speech and foreign languages. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must 
have a scholastic average of not less than "C" (where the lowest passing grade 
is "D"), or its equivalent. This average shall be based on all college courses 
undertaken by the student in his pre-professional program, exclusive of credit in 
military science, physical education, hygiene or similar courses. 

Pharmacy Program 

The first year of the Pharmacy Program of the five-year curriculum will be 
offered beginning September 1961. This program along with the pre-pro- 
fessional courses is given in summary forms on pages 4, 6, and 3 1 . 

( urses approved by the University of Maryland in non-accredited junior colleges 
within the State of Maryland may be accepted for credit requirements by the University. 
The year (not less than 24 hours of academic work) immediately prior to admission 
must be successfully completed in a regionally accredited college or university. 

** 6 



School of I 



Admission And Costs 



mission nun BDURE I OB ai I. AFiM it wis [o ADVANC1 I) STANDING 
in mi POUR map, PROGRAM AT BALTIMORE 

1. Request the Director of Admissions <>r the I ) -: 1 . E tfa ! School of Pharmacy 
to send the preliminary application blank. Fill the blank out fully including 

Is and CoUeges which the candidate has attended. Sign 
'lank and return it with the required photographs and a seven dollar and 
fiftv cent investigation fee to the Director of Admissions. (This fee will not 
funded or credited on any subsequent bill.) 

2. Send the high school record blank which accompanies the application 
blank to the principal of the high school attended and request that he mail 
it promptly to the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the 
prospective student will be advised to: 

3. Report to the School of Pharmacy for entrance examinations and inter- 
views. The School seeks indications of aptitude for undertaking pharmacy studies 
by examining the school records of candidates, their scores in aptitude and 
achievement tests, and estimates of their interests, maturity, and personality. 
Entrance examinations and interviews are held in February, but subsequent 
opportunities are given. 

4. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the application of candi- 
dates whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, and 
the School of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory that they 
have been tentatively accepted. 

5. Students who are offered tentative admissions must immediately make 
a deposit of $60.00 ($10.00 matriculation fee plus $50.00 deposit on tuition) on 
their September tuition. This deposit is non-returnable if the student fails to 

rer in the autumn, but is credited against the first semester tuition charge 
of all students who enter. 

Registration And Fees 

MISSION PROCEDURE FOR ALL APPLICANTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

All students must enroll in person at the office of the School of Pharmacy 
at College Park during the registration period at the beginning of each semes- 
ter. On registration day the student fills out necessary forms and class cards 
and pays his fees. Detailed directions concerning dates and procedure^ 
mailed during the summer to students who arc eligible to enroll in the fall. 
All new students must matriculate. 

All students must complete their registration at the office of the 
upon the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter 



rshy of Maryland 

classes until he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and hours 
as announced arc required to pay a late registration fee of five dollars. 

1 here is a fee of $3.00 for changes in registration made after first week 
of instruction. 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester') 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

* Student Union Fee (per a?inum) 30.00 
^Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 10.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra 
Marine, all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, 
dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semes- 
ter are payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student 
Union fee and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of 
first registration. Students wishing to make arrangements for 
deferred payment of tuition charges must do so with the Finan- 
cial Office at or prior to registration for the semester for which 
such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 12 credit hours 
of work arc considered full-time students subject to this fee. 

All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 



School of Pharmacy 

Deposit upon tcceptance tot admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 
For Seniors 

Giadu&tioD Fee (To be paid in February of the Senior 
Year) $15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late 'ion Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage- Students are required to pay for all 
breakage in excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

' Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each 
course. 

Fee for Chanocs in Registration after first week 3.00 

PARI --TIMK UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 
Tuition fee Qor each semester hour per semester) $12.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Chemistry 10.00 

Microbiology 10.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Physics 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physiology 10.00 

Zoology 8.00 

^Student Union Fee (per annum) 6.00 

*Studo:t Union Fee CS um ™cr Session) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in d* 5 ':imore campus and is used 

to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. F I Students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Ice will be 
$15.00; the Special Ice will be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 12 credit hours 
rk are considered full-time students subject to th: 

All summer s^ nts will . ')() Student Union Fee. This Student 

Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, ;md book charges, etc. 

9 ► 



University of Maryland 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non- 
returnable) $10.00 
Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 12.00 
Tuition fee for students carrying 10 or more semester 

credit hours (per semester) 120.00 

Laboratory fee— Same as undergraduate schedule above 

^Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

*Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 

*Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and micro- 
filming of thesis) 50.00 



REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL (BALTIMORE CAMPUS ) 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, 
must file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do 
not comply with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are not 
accorded any refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the written 
consent of parent or guardian. Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation 
Fee, Student Activities' Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition, and any scholarship 
credit, are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools in the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 12 credit hours 
of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 

All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 

^ 10 



School of Pharmacy 



Text Hooks 



Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) for Pre-professional 
Program. Sec "Adventure in Learning/ 1 

Changes In Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State 
land for at least one vear. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, 
the ri"ht of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while stationed 
in Maryland will not he considered as satisfying the one year period referred to 
above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for 
at least one year prior to his entrance into the armed service end was not en- 
rolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examina- 
tion in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally 
counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than 
half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period 
. o construed as an absence. 

11 ► 



University of Maryland 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discre- 
tion of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission 
for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 

Grade Interpretation Point Value 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Fair 2 

D Poor but passing 1 

F Failure 

I Course work incomplete replaced by definite 

grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 

Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 



Suhjeet 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


Chemistry 4 
Microbiology 4 
Pharmacognosy 4 
Pharmacy 4 
Pharmacy Administration 3 


c 
c 

B 
A 
D 


8 
8 

12 

16 

3 



19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the students is 
found to have a grade point average of 2.47. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at 
the University of Maryland are considered. 

Scholarship Requirements (Baltimore Campus) 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 
Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 

M 12 



School of Pharmacy 
academic standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean 

warns and the Advisor interviews all students taming glades of D and 1 : . 

INOOMPl BTB WORK 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a 
student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other cireumstar. :id his control, he has been 

unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor 
enters on the class card a reason of the character Stated above with an estimate 
of the quality of the Student's work. In eases when this mark is given the 
student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the 
next semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
except bv repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he failed 
or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or else- 
where, must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular attend- 
ance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final mark will be substituted 
for the mark already recorded, but he will not receive any additional credit 
for the course. Although the final mark received in the course will be used in 
determining credit for promotion and graduation, it does not apply to honors 
and awards. See applicable section under "Honors and Awards". 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

\ -tudent receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in raising 
his ^rade after repeating the course once, will be required to withdraw from the 
School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student may be permitted, with the 
written permission of the Dean and the head of the department giving the course, 
to repeat the course for the second time. Such permission can be given to the 
student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above regulation 
must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will be granted under 
unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall require the approval of the 
head of the department giving the course. 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who is 
permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements for the 
m the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

REGULATIONS I or. PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

Students in the Sophomore year arc expected to maintain a grade point 
average of not less than 1.5 for each semester. Any student in the Sophomore year 

13 ► 



Universit y of Maryland 

who Fails to maintain a grade point average of 1.5 for any semester will be 
placed on probation during the next semester. 

Students in the Junior and Senior years are expected to maintain a grade 
point average of not less than 2.0 for each semester in these years. Any student 
in the Junior and Senior years who fails to maintain a grade point average of 
2.0 for any semester in these years will be placed on probation during the next 
semester. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semester hour 
credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on probation dur- 
ing the next semester. 

For promotion from Sophomore to Junior year a student must have main- 
tained a grade point average of 1.5 for the Sophomore year. 

For promotion from the Junior to Senior year a student must have maintained 
a grade point average of not less than 2.0 for the Junior year. Students in the 
Senior class must maintain a grade point average of not less than 2.0 to become 
eligible for graduation. 

Any student on probation for any semester is expected to pass all work 
for which he is registered in that semester with a grade point average of not 
less than 1.5 for the Sophomore year and a grade point average of not less 
than 2.0 for the Junior and Senior years. Any student on probation who fails 
to pass all courses for which he is registered and who fails to maintain the grade 
point average for his particular year will be automatically dropped from the 
School of Pharmacy, at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in any semester shall be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatisfactory 
scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester will be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

No student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted until at least one semester has elapsed. He shall, in the meantime, 
attend another school approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy and/or 
the Office of Admissions of the University of Maryland and he shall carry 
at least a minimum full load of work required by the school which he will 

* 14 



School of Pharmacy 

attend, but in no case sh.ill this be less than twelve semester hours. The 
■election of the course of study must be ip pro v ed by the Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. Before applying for readmission he must obtain the recommenda- 
tion of the Dean of the school which he has previously attended and he must, 
in addition, have B grade point average of not less than 2.0 in the work for 
which be was previously registered. 

All students shall be readmitted on probation for one semester. 

N l student who has been dropped for poor academic standing shall be 
readmitted more than once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
snbly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 

Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration 

of his particular case. 

GRADES OF STUDENTS WITHDRAWING FROM THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

Students having 30-64 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Sophomores. 

Students having 65-104 credit hours with a grade-point of 1.5 are classified 
as Juniors. 

Students having 105 or more credit hours with a grade-point average of 2.0 
in the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 in the work 
of the Senior year and have 144-146 credit hours to be considered as candidates 
for graduation, depending upon the year of their initial enrollment. 

SENIOR ELECTIVE PROGRAM — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

Students are required to elect either the RETAIL Major or the PRE- 
GRADUATE Major by May 1 of the Junior year. It is recommended that 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

students electing the Pre-Graduate program will have attained a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 for the three previous years. Those who elect this 
major should also indicate their choice of electives in the Retail Major in case 
tlu-ir average does not permit their election of the Pre-Graduate Major. The 
senior elective program must he approved hy the Class Advisor and the Dean. 

RETAIL Majors must choose between Pharmacy 81 and Pharmacy 121 and 
between Pharmacognosy 62 and Pharmacy 132. PRE-GRADUATE Majors, 
after 1959-1960, must take English 3, 4 and Mathematics 20, 21. 

For further information consult with Class Advisor and see the Curriculum 
on page 29 of the catalog. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School of 
Pharmacy, who having entered prior to September 1956, have been accredited 
144 semester hours instruction, or who having entered in September 1956 or 
thereafter, have been accredited with 146 semester hours instruction, and who 
have attained the required grade point standings and met the other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts are 
as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; for additional 
copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when more than 
one copy is requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged 
for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government agen- 
cies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at the School 
of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

Registration With The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

** 16 



School of Pharn 

"Arr. enrolling .is a Student in pharmacy in any school or college 

of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, ale 
with the S the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for n 

tration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall he required 
to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and Simul- 
taneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one 

dollar, all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent 

1 or college year, Submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all 
Kperience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

Licensure Requirements of The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Phar- 
macy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty- 
vears. is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has 
completed or. a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy ap- 

proved by said Board of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination given 
for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or 
college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. 
Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a registered ap- 
prentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized school or 
college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board for 
such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland, for fur- 
ther information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

Deportment 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of 
a Student onot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 

-.hose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her 
health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the 
authorities of the University. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though no 
specific charge he made against them. 

Employment 

•udent should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attend mce. as all of his time should he spent in the preparation and 
completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities 
tc secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that students refrain 
from working during the school session. 

17 ► 



Univ ers it y of Maryland 

Housing 

A limited number of girls may obtain housing accommodations in the Louisa 
Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close proximity to the 
School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommodations and it is 
under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. Bed linens, towels, 
pillows, blankets and curtains are provided as a part of the general furnishings 
of the room. Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, an extra 
blanket, bureau scarves, small rugs and a laundry bag. The individual student 
assumes responsibility for all dormitory property assigned to her. Any dam- 
age done to property other than that which results from ordinary wear and tear 
will be charged to the student concerned. Meals may be purchased at Uni- 
versity cafeterias or in nearby restaurants. 

General Information for The Baltimore Union 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommoda- 
tions for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned building which 
also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facilities, game 
room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. Double rooms are avail- 
able. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; meals are served cafeteria 
style on a cash basis. The contract for accommodations covers the 1960-61 
academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

The Rates are: 

$150.00 per semester per double room 

$ 80.00 per eight weeks summer session per double room 

Other: 

$ 45.00 per month 

Three single rooms are available. They will be assigned on the basis 

of length of residence in The Baltimore Union. 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 

Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book 
shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. 
Maid service will include cleaning of room twice per week and replace- 
nt of change of linen once each week. 

phone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's office. 
Mail service is also provided. 

M 18 



School of Plum,: 
The resilient provides blankets, towels, pillow and linens. Towels and linens 

must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Servi 

A small amount is available. ! mything other 

than luggage will not be available. 

TRANSE N PS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate eovers: 

The services will include one bath and one face towel, one face cloth, soap 
and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

MANAGER'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Parkin,; 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities on 
university parking lots for students on the Baltimore Campus. 

The Health Sciences Library 

The new Health Sciences Library will be opened for the Fall Term of the 
1960-1961 School Year. This new library building will include the collections 
of the Pharmacy, Dental, Medical, and Nursing Schools. 

The Rules and Regulations by the library will be available for distribution 
at the time of registration of students in the 1960 Fall Term. 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Grants 
The Emerson ProfessorsJiip of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson wis 
designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was subsequently 
held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the 
present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate 
students desirous of doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry. 
pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for 
an additional allowance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. 
Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, 1507 M Street, 'N. W., Washington 5, D. C. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, former 
associate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist of 
Baltimore, has contributed annually since 1930 a sum of money to maintain 
a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships 
for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candi- 
dates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty Assembly with the 
approval of the Dean. 

The Hudnut Sales Co. Fellowship 

The I ludnut Sales Company of New York contributes sufficient funds to 
provide a fellowship paying $1000.00 annually for research in pharmaceutical 
chemistry and the allied sciences. 

The Noxzema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund not to exceed 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens. A candidate 
will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by the Fellowship 
Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which 
the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting member. This fellow- 
ship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School 
each year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student 
selected by the Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association 
to enable the student to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of 

* 20 




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2. PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE PI 

3. MEDICAL BUILDING (DAVIDGE HALL) DH 

4. BRESSLER RESEARCH BUILDING BRB 

5. SCHOOL OF LAW-SL 

6. GRAY LABORAIORY-GL 

7. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY BUILDING MTB 
8 ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AB 

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0. DENTAL CLINIC-DC 



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SES RESIDENCE- NR 

OOL OF NURSING (WHITEHURST HALL) WH 
OOL OF PHARMACY (DUNNING HALL) DH 
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IENCES AND PHYSICAL PLANT 
KING GARAGE 







/ he Baltimore Union Building 



School of Phmw 
Pharmacy. I he research conducted must l>c of general phannaceuticaJ int. 

Bnd must be accepted upon completion lor publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals. 

Other Research Grants 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants from 
the l Winthrop Research Institute, Smith. Kline & French Laboratories 

and the National Institutes of Health. Through these grants, the School of 
Pharmacy is able to provide .1 number of research fellowships available to grad- 
uate and post-doctoral students in pharmaceutical ehemistry. 

Assistantships 

duate . [ssistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $1800.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified 
students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the depart- 
ments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds of the 
normal graduate work. 

Internships and Residencies in Hospital Pharmacy 

1. University (of Maryland) Hospital Residency 

1 he Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital, together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 
viand, offer a residency in pharmacy in 1960 to a qualified graduate 
of an accredited school or college of pharmacy. The appointment, begin- 
ning September 1, 1960, continues for twenty-two months. During 
the academic school year, the resident will devote half time to the 
hospital pharmacy training program and half time to graduate study 
at the School of Pharmacy leading to the Master of Science degree to 
be conferred by the University of Maryland and a certificate of residency 
to be awarded by the University Hospital. Full time training in the 
University Hospital will be required during the summer of 1961. The 
University Hospital will provide a stipend of $266.66 per month, 
parking space, uniforms and laundering of uniforms without charge. 
The resident must pay the tuition, laboratory and other fees for gradu- 
ate work in the University. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Director of Pharmaceutical Services, University 
pital, Baltimore 1, Maryland or to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 

University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

21 ► 



University of Maryland 

2. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy Internship 

1 he Pharmacy Department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 
ryland, offer annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several 
internships in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning Sep- 
tember first, run for twenty-two months. During twenty months, ap- 
pointees devote half time to hospital pharmacy service and half time 
raduate work leading to the Master of Science degree granted by 
the University of Maryland and a certificate of internship awarded by 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Full time training in the Johns Hopkins 
I Iospital Pharmacy is required for two (2) months during the sum- 
mer of 1961. Four weeks of vacation are allowed during the term of 
appointment. The Hospital provides a stipend of $200.00 per month and 
the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees for these candidates by 
25%. However, candidates must pay the regular laboratory fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 W. Lom- 
bard St., Baltimore 1, Maryland. The selection of the recipients of the scholar- 
ships and loans is made by a committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester 
to qualified sophomore, junior and senior students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance to 
complete their education. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified junior and senior students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or above and who are in need of 
financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

** 22 



School of Pharmacy 

Carroll Chemical Co mp a ny Scholarship 

The CanoU Chemical Company of Baltimore, Maryland, initiated in 1956 
i Fund to provide one undergraduate scholarship to a qualified sophomore 
student who has maintained a su] holastic average during the fresh- 

man year and who is in need of financial assistance. 'I his scholarship includes 

the COS! of tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment, not to exceed $500.00 per 
academic year. 

The Charles Caspars, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memorv of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, B number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment 
for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by 
the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, Uniyersity of Mary- 
land to a senior student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and 
commercial pharmacy. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing a fund to proyide one or 
two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens of 
the United States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 

lifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint 
a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed annually at the dis- 
cretion of the grantors. 

Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association 
Scholarship 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association con- 
tributes funds to provide a scholarship paying $100.00 per semester to a quali- 
fied sophomore, junior or senior student who has maintained a superior scho- 
lastic average and who is in need of financial assistance. 

Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., Scholarships 

The Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified SOphoTJ 
junior and senior students who have maintained a superior scholastic a\< 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

23 ► 



University of Maryland 

Rose Hendlcr Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendlcr and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendlcr for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean. 

NDEA Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 1958 provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $1000 and 
during his entire course of study may borrow a sum not exceeding $5000. The 
borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and repayment 
terms established by the University. Repayment of the loan begins one year 
after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and must be completed within 
ten years thereafter. No interest is charged on the loan until the beoirmin£ of 
the repayment schedule. Interest after that date is to be paid at the rate of 
3 per cent per annum. 

The National Defense Education Act contains a provision which provides 
that up to fifty per cent of a student loan plus interest may be cancelled in the 
event the borrower becomes a full time elementary or secondary school teacher. 
Such cancellation is to be at the rate of 10 per cent a year up to 5 years. 

Honors and Awards 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Stu- 
dents whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
academic medal at the Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a 
student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Plii Kappa PJii Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fraternity 
for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the University 
in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible by invitation 
to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester of the Junior Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 

+ 24 



School of Pharm 

of th aization arc granted only to groups In schools or colleges who arc 

members in good standing of the American Association of Colh Phar- 

macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship oality, and leadership. All candidates selected 

for membership must bave completed seventy-five credit hours of college work 
and must be approved by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

1 he Society also awards annually a Remington's "Practice of Pharmacy" to the 
sophomore student of high moral character who, having completed forty-eight 

credits hours of college work, has attained the highest scholastic average in his 

And a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general aver 
provided that this average is not below the grade of "B". Certificates of Honor 
are awarded to the three students having the next highest general average, 
provided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B". 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three junior students hav- 
ing the highest general average, provided this average does not fall below the 
grade of "B". 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in award- 
ing these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a 
student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment of 
the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the d< 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in phai 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 

25 ► 



University of Maryland 

annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student having the highest general average throughout the course in practical 
and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the in- 
come from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School 
to the senior student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in 
pharmacognosy. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the 
Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Phi Beta Chapter, Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup 

The Phi Beta Chapter of the Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity provides a cup in 
memory of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in 
the service of their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of 
character and leadership. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the senior student 
chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, hamhda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority pro- 
vides annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 

Pharmaceutical Association Award 

Books equivalent in value to $25.00 are made available by the Ladies' 
Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association, to 
the sophomore student who attains the highest general average. 

+ 26 



School of Phmrn 

Merck Awards 

Merck & Company, Inc.. Rahway, New Jersey, offer a set of valuable refer- 

^s to the senior student who attains a high Standing in phazmacy. A 
od set of books is given to the senior student who h riding in 

pharmaceutical chemistry. 

/ Laboratories Inc. Award 

A C py of Gould's 'Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol Labora- 
S, Inc., to the senior student who has contributed the most to pharmacy 
gh his extra-curricular activities. 

Rexofl Award 

1 he Rcxall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
senior student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both leadership 
and scholarship. 

.1 Curriciilar Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the annual Honors 
Day Convocation. 

Student Organizations (Baltimore Campus) 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance is an organization of students established 
for the purpose of aiding in the internal administration of the school, for organiz- 
all extra-curricular programs and activities of the student body and for co- 
ordinating these programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administra- 
tion to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council 
of the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Government 
Alliance, the Presidents of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore Classes, and three 
delegates at large, one elected from each undergraduate class. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

A Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association has been or- 
ganized in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. The purpose 
of the Branch is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner the ad- 
vancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance with the 
objectives stated in the Constitution of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
especially in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its 
branches and its application and aiding in promoting the public health and wel- 
fare. 

27 ► 



Uni versity of Maryland 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee known 
as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group are to 
represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy 
and pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Committee are: 

Frederic T. Berman, Chairman 
Stephen J. Provenza, Co-Chairman 
Francis S. Balassone H. A. B. Dunning 

Harry Bass Harold K. Goldman 

A. Lester Batie Howard L. Gordy 

Frank Block Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 

W. L. Brunnett Samuel I. Raichlen 

Jerome J. Cermak Henry G. Seidman 

Bernard Cherry Simon Solomon 

Irving I. Cohen Robert P. Stotler 

John A. Crozier John F. Wannenwetsch 

H. Nelson Warfield 

Alumni Association 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence as such or 
as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was formed. 
Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society re- 
mained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is 
more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 

Officers (1959-1960) 

Emory G. Helm Honorary President 

Victor 1 1. Morgenroth, Jr President 

Irving I. Cohen First Vice President 

James P. Cragg, Jr Second Vice President 

Frank J. Slama 'Executive Secretary 

Mrs. Frank M. Budaez Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Samuel Portney, Chairman 

Milton A. Friedman 

Samuel A. Goldstein 

John F. Neutze 

<* 28 



FOUR YEAR CURRICU1 L1M 
OOURS1 s. HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semest. 


sr 

k 


Second Semester 




Mrs. |>er Wee 


H 


rs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Courses 


■ 

s 


h 

3 i 


5 


3 
I 


.o 
'■^ 

1 

-3 

s 


i 


"3 


J 
E 


Freshman Ysftl 

< tmI Inorganic and 


1 

3 
3 
3 


6 


8 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 

3 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 


4 


•English ' n 


3 














3 

3 

1 
1 




3 

3 

1 
1 


3 


2, or 6. 7, French or 


3 

1 
1 
2 


_____ 


3 

1 
1 
8 


3 

1 
1 
4 


3 




1 


_' Public Speaking - - - - 


1 








2 


3 


5 


3 




2 
3 


6 

4 

3 
2 


8 
3 

4 

7 
5 







Sophomore Year 


19 

4 
2 

2 
5 

4 


18 


? Chemistry 35. 37, Elementary Organic 

IChemistry 36. 38, Elementary Organic 


3 

_____ 

3 
4 

2 


4 
3 
2 
3 

6 


3 
4 

5 

7 

8 


2 

2 


Pha- _2, General 


4 
3 


5 


tPhysies 10, n, General _ _ _ 


4 




5 















Junior Year 
Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


17 


18 
4 




4 
2 


4 
4 


8 
6 


5 
4 
















2 
2 
2 


4 
5 
6 


6 

7 


4 




2 
2 

1 


5 
6 


7 
8 
1 


4 

4 

1 


4 




4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 


3 
3 




3 
3 


3 




3 

1 
3 
2 

1 


_____ 

3 
3 


3 
1 

7 
5 
4 






Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 
Products _ 


18 
3 


19 
3 


First Aid 1, Standard 




Pharmacology 81. 82, General 


4 

3 


3 
2 


4 

3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacy 101. 102. Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 


3 


3 




3 


3 








7 


5 




2 


3 


5 










i'Electives— Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 


19 
3 


18 




3 

2 


3 


3 

r 
5 


3 


or 
Pharmacv 132. Cosmetics _ __ 










3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Admin- 


2 
2 


~~~o 


2 
2 


2 

2 
2 




or 










Pharmacy Administration 71. Management 

Pharmacy Administration 72, Drug Market- 
ing 










» 

3 

.1 


~~~~o 

3 

4 


2 

3 

r 
S 
3 

3 

4 


2 


.raduate Major) 
tEr.jrlish 3. 4. Composition and World 

-ature 


3 

3 
3 


o 

3 

4 


r 
3 
3 

3 

4 


3 
3 

1 

2 


3 


or 
:ntrrmf.liate Scientific German 
•.-matics 20, 21, Calculus 


3 
3 


(Elective* — Special Cases) 
•nistry 99. Glassworking . 


1 


Chemistry 112. 114, Chemistry of Medicinal 
Products 




2 









t Instruction in thosn courses given by the College of Arts and Sr:- 
i The e!<vtive* must bo apnrovod bv the Class Advisor and Dean. 

--es. formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Baltimore 
after 1959-60. 



FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Coarse 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


Freshman Year 

•Chemistry 1, 3 _ ._ 


64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 
64 


192 


256 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 
32 

208 


8 
6 


•English I, 2 _ 






3 
3 










6 


Pharmacy 1 ,2 

•Speech 1, 2 




2* 
2 




•Zoology 1, 4 


114 


7 


Total __ 


480 

32 
96 


336 
96 


816 

128 
96 
128 
224 
160 
112 


37 


Sophomore Year 


4 


Chemistry 35, 37 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 

Pharmacy 21, 22 


128 
96 
64 
48 


4 


128 
96 
64 

416 

32 
64 
32 
32 
64 
64 
16 
48 


10 


Physics 10, 11 


8 


Physiology 22 


5 


Total 


432 

96 
64 
64 
64 
160 
192 


848 

128 

128 

96 

96 

224 

256 

16 

48 


35 


Junior Year 

Chemistry 53 _ _ 


4 


Chemistry 153 _ 


5 




4 




4 




8 




8 




1 


Pharmacy Administration 37 




3 


Total 


352 

96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224f 


640 


992 

96 

16 
224 
160 

64 

48 
348f 
992 

80 
48 

80 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 

96 
128 

816 
848 
992 
992 


37 


Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113 _ 


6 


First Aid 






Pharmacology 81, 82 


128 
96 

48 


8 


Pharmacy 101, 102 _ 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 21 


2 
3 


Electives , 


160f 


12 


Total _ 


560 

32 

48 

32 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 


432 

48 


37 


(Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61 


3 


Pharmacognosy 62 _. 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 132 _. 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 121 


2 


or 
Pharmacy 81 _ 




2 






2 


Pharmacy Administration 72 _. 




2 


(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
English 3, 4 _ 




6 


or 
•Language 6, 7 _ 




6 


Mathematics 20, 21 . 




6 


(Electives — Special Cases) 
Chemistry 99 _ 


96 
128 

336 
432 
640 
432 


2 


Chemistry 112, 114 




4 


SUMMARY 
Freshman Year 


480 
416 
352 
560 


37 


Sophomore Year . 


35 


Junior Year _ _ 


37 


Senior Year 


37 


Total 


1,808 


1,840 


3,648 


146** 







t Average. 

t Required of students entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 

•Courses, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not olTcred at Baltimore 
1959-60. 
•• A minimum of 144 credits required for students entered prior to September 1956 and 
146 credits for those entering in September 1956 and thereafter. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


II 


ond Semesl 


er 

k 




Hr*. Per Week 


rs. Per \N « 


Title and Number of Courses 


o 
o 

CO 

~r 
Q 


3a 

i 


3 


2 

1 


j 


a 




3 

1 


1 irst Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 


2 
3 


6 

4 
3 


8 

3 

4 
6 
2 
3 


2 

2 
4 
2 
3 










Chemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 


3 
_____ 


4 
3 


3 

4 

6 


2 


Chemistry 3-'.. M, Elementary Organic 


2 


rharmncv 31 , 32, General Pharmacy __ 


3 
2 
3 


4 
















l'har: of Pharmacy _ 


3 

2 

2 


_____ 
6 


3 

5 

8 


3 


titration 36, Accounting _ 










3 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, Pharmaceutical 

t mg and Assaying __ __ _ 










4 




4 

2 


4 

4 


8 
6 






Second Year (Required) 


17 

5 
4 


18 


Microbiology 41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology 

biology 146, Serology, Immunology, 
Public Health and Parasitology 










2 
2 


4 
3 


6 
5 


4 


Pharmacognosy 41. 42, General Pharmacognosy. 


2 
2 


3 


5 
2 


3 
2 


3 


Pharmacy 44, Dispensing Pharmacy I 


3 
3 


3 

6 


6 
9 


4 


Physiology 142, General Physiology 










5 


JElectives _ 








3-4 


3-4 




3 




3 










J (Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacy Administration 41, Marketing 


17-18 
3 


19-20 


Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 
Management I _ 


2 
4 

4 

1 


3 
3 


5 

4 

7 
1 


3 


X i Electives — Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 

3 

1 

1 
2 

2 

3 


3 

3 
3 


4 

6 

1 

4 
5 

2 

3 


4 

4 

1 

2 
3 

2 

3 
5 

1 


4 


Third Year (Required) 
Pharmacology 155, 156. General Pharmacology- 
Pharmacy 55, 56, Pharmaceutical Formulation 
Problems 


5 
1 


or 
Pharrr Manufacturing Pharmacy 




Pharmacy 153, 154. Dispensing II, III 

Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharmaceuti- 
cal Jurisprudence 


2 
2 
3 


3 


6 
2 
3 


8 

2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, Chemistry 
of Medicinal Products _ _ _ __ 


3 


JElectives __ __ ._ 




5 




2 


3 


5 










t< Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists 


18-19 
3 


19-18 


Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


3 

2 
2 


3 


3 

5 
2 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
arations 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 
Management II, III 


2 

2 
2 


3 


2 

5 
2 


2 

3 
2 


2 


t< Electives — Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists 




Pharmacy 153, Hospital Pharmacy Administra- 
tion 










Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 


2 

2 
3 


3 
6 


5 
2 

3 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 158. Orientation to Hospital 
Administration 










2 


X< Electives— Pre-Graduate Major) 
Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 


3 


6 


3 
6 


3 
2 


3 
2 



t The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 

192 


Total 

256 
96 

128 

192 
32 
48 
48 
80 

128 


Credit 
hours 


First Year (Required) 
Anatomy 31 _ _ __ 


64 
96 


4 


Chemistry 86, 37 


4 


Chemistry 36, 38 


128 
96 


4 


Pharmacy 31, 32 _ 


96 
32 
48 
48 
32 
32 


8 


Pharmacy 33 


2 


Pharmacy 35 




3 


Pharmacy 38 




3 


Pharmacy Administration 36 

Pharmacy Administration 32 


48 
96 


3 

4 


Total _ _ 


448 

64 
32 
32 

64 

32 

48 

48 
104f 
424 

48 
32 

128 

112 
32 

16 
64 
64 
96 
120t 


560 

64 
64 
64 
96 


1,008 

128 
96 
96 

160 
32 
96 

112 

128f 


35 


Second Year (Required) 
Biochemistry 143 _ 


5 




4 




4 




6 


Pharmacy 43 


2 


Pharmacv 44 _ _ 


48 
64 
24t 
424 


4 


Physiology 142 _ 


5 


Electives 


6-8 


Total __ __ _ __ 


848 

48 
80 

128 

208 
32 
r 

64 

160 
64 
96 

240f 


36-38 


(Electives — Retatil Major) 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 42 

( Electives — Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20, 21 


48 


3 

8 


Third Year (Required) 

Pharmacol..;, -V 155, 156 


96 


9 


Pharmacy 55, 56 


2 


or 
Pharmacy 151 _ 


o 

48 
96 


2 


Pharmacv 153, 154 _ 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152 




6 


Electives 


120f 


10 


Total 


504 

32 

48 

32 
64 

32 
32 
32 
32 

96 


360 

48 


864 

80 
48 
r 

80 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 
192 

1,008 
848 
864 


37 


(Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51 


3 


Pharmacognosy 52 _ _ 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156 _ _ 


o 

48 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54 


4 


(Electives — Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 153 _ 


2 


Pharmacy 156 _ 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 158 


2 


( Electives — Pre-Graduate) 
Chem. 187, 189 _ 




6 


Chem. 188, 190 _ __ 


192 

560 
424 
360 


4 


SUMMARY 
First Year 


448 
424 
504 


35 




36-38 


Third Year 


37 


Total __ 


1,376 


1,344 


2,720 


108-110* 







t Average. 

* A minimum of 108 credits required for students selecting either the Retail Major Course 
or the Hospital Major Course. A minimum of 110 credits required for students selecting the 
Pre-Graduate Course. 



School of Pharn 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES** 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

CHEMISTRY 

*1. 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis— (4, 4) 

:. hVO lecturer, two laboratory (Miller and Shroff.) 

ady ol the rnctals and non metals with emphasis on chemical theory and im- 

mt generalizations. The la borat o r y work deals with fundamental principles, the 

DRg) 1 purine.- kinds, and the systematic qualitative analysis of 

the DO ! anions. 

:':stry— (2, 2) 
v more year, two lectures (Miller, Chaiet, Jalil, and Kcrridge.) 

requisite— Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 3S. Elementary Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) 

v IT, one laboratory. (Miller, Chaiet, Jalil, Kcrridge.) 

Prere qui site— Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. A study of the gen- 
eral procedures used in organic laboratory. 

15. Quantitative Analysis— (4) 

Sophomore year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Kumkumian, and Wang.) 
Prerequisite— Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures 
and theory, and their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — C^D 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Kumkumian, and Wang.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. Quantita- 
tive methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of official preparations, 
with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99. Glassvrorking—O , I) 

Laboratory, senior year, either semester. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Consent of the instructor. Simple operations in the manipulation of 
glass, repair and construction of apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products— (3, 3) 

Senior year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 35, 37, 53. A survey of the structural relationships, the 
synthesis and chemical properties of medicinal products. 

f ■•rmcrly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Balti- 
more after 1959-60. 

intended primarily for sophomores are numbered 1-49; for juniors and 
• dvanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for grach: 
only 200-399. 

The which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 

I I week i :. A laboratory period is equivalent to one le. 

:i period. 

33 ► 



University of Maryland 

141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. An advanced study of the compounds of 
carbon. 

142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory— (2, 2) 

Any one or two semesters. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 37, 38 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 
difficult organic preparations and a study of the quantitative determination of carbon, 
hydrogen, nitrogen and halogen in organic compounds. 

146, 14S. Identification of Organic Compounds— (2, 2) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 113, 114, or equivalent. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry— (5) 

Junior year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Herbst, Rudolph, Emery, and Brown.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 37. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the 
composition of living organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur 
during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry-Q, 3) 

Three lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites-Chemistry 15, 35, 37, Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. A 
study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, chemical 
kinetics and electro-chemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry- (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
187, 189. Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

Chemistry 141, 143, or its equivalent is a prerequisite for any of the follow- 
ing courses, except Chemistry 230. 

230. Seminar— (I) 
Each semester. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of progress 
and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

240. Stereochemistry— (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

A study of the principles of stereochemistry of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry— (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

A study of the chemistry and synthesis of heterocyclic compounds. 

* 34 



School of Pharm 

250. Stcroids-Q2') 

(Doorenbos.) 
adv ol the synthesis ind structure determination of steroids and the applica- 
tion ol in nlern chemical concepts to the chemistry ol steroids. 

Alkaloids-^ 

(Miller.) 
A stttd] of the prineipi I in structure determination, chemistry and s\n- 

: tlkaloid da 

255. In strument* . ; s— (2) 

Lither & : lahorator (Doorenbos and Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chem 1S8, 189, 190 or equivalent. 

399. h m PJiarmaccutical Chemistry 

it determined hv the amount and quality of work performed. 

ENGLISH 

*1, 2. Survey and Composition— (1 , 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite— Four units of high school English. A study of style, syntax, spelling 

and punctuation, combined with a historical study of English and American literature 

of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature— (3, 3) 

Elective, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite— English 1, 2. Practice in composition. An introduction to world litera- 
ture, foreign classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

•1,2. Public Speaking-O, O 

Freshman year, one lecture. (De Haven.) 

"1 he preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; reports, etc. 

FIRST AID 

/. Standard First Aid Course 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Gregson, instructor from 

the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

*0. Basic Mathematics— (0) 

man year, first semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the qualify - 
□ f r this course. The fundamental principles of algebra. 

■Jvcn hv the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at I 
1959-60. 

35 ► 



University of Maryland 

*10. Algcbra-O) 

Freshman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— one unit of algebra. Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, 
linear equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, 
binomial theorem, and theory of equations. 

*11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not offer 
one-half unit of trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, 
graphs, addition formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight 
line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

*15. College Algebra-^ 

Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— High school algebra completed. Fundamental operations, variation, 
functions and graphs, quadratic equations, theory of equations, binomial theorem, com- 
plex numbers, logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

*17. Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. (Richeson.} 

Prerequisite— High school trigonometry and Mathematics 15. Coordinates, locus 
problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation of coordinates, conic sec- 
tions, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20, 2 2. Calcidus-O, 3) 

Three lectures. (Richeson.) 

Prerequisite— Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kinematics, 
integration, geometric and physical applications of integration, partial derivatives, space 
geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential equations. Given in alternate 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130. Probability. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, total, com- 
pound, and inverse probability, continuous distributions, theorems of Bernoulli and 
Laplace, theory of errors. (Staff.) 

Math. 132. Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distributions and 
their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of 
variance, statistical inference. (Staff.) 



*Courses, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Balti- 
more after 1959-60. 

^ 36 



School of Pharm 

MICROBIOLOGY 

1. Phart rO 

Junior year, fir>t semester, two lectures, two la b o r a t ories. (Shay and Becker.) 

Introduction to genera] microbiology with special emphasis on the study of patho- 
genic microorganisms, including the public health aspects of the prevention and con- 
trol of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

115. Serology and Immunology— Q4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Becker.) 

Prerequisite— Microbiology 1. A study of the principles of immunity, including the 
preparation and use of biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of 
infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy- <I, 1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media— V> O 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

211. Public Uealth-Ql-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite— Microbiology 1, 115. Lectures and discussions on the organization and 
administration of state and municipal health departments and private health agencies. 
The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

399. Research in Microbiology 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

•I, 2. Elementary French— (3, 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not 
adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. Elements of gram- 
mar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

*Courses, formerly given bv the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Bald- 
: : 1959-60. 

37 ► 



University of Maryland 

*l,2. Elementary German— (3, 3) 

Freshman year, three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is 
not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. Elements of 
grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The as- 
signment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 

*6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French— Q3, 3) 

Three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Prerequisite— French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Rapid grammar review, exercises in 
pronunciation, reading of scientific texts. 

*6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. (Schradieck.) 

Prerequisite— German 1 and 2 or equivalent. Review of grammar and reading of 
scientific texts. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

51. Pharmacognosy, General— (4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisities— Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of drugs of animal and vegetable origin with special emphasis 
on the physical, microscopical, and chemical characteristics used in their identification 
and in the detection of adulteration. 

52. Pharmacognosy, General— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51. A con- 
tinuation of Pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering antibiotics, allergy-producing 
pollens, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, weedicides, etc. 

61. Pharmacognosy. Entomology for Pharmacists— (3) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures, and one laboratory. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A study 
of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and in the industries, 
including those which attack farm and garden crops; their recognition, life history, 
habits, and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Animal Health Products— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Zoology 4; Physiology 22; Microbiology 1, 115; Pharmacology 81. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and preven- 
tion of the more important animal diseases. 

* Courses, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Balti- 
more after 1959-60. 

+ 38 



School of PJiartt: 

and Advanced Undergraduai 

101, 102. 1 n Plonte— (2, 2) 

one Laboratory. Ghren in alternate veto. (Slama.) 

Prerequisite— Phann 51, 52. A atndv of the kinds of seed plants and 

[ems, thai classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 

111, 113. Plmt Anatomy— (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

112, 114. Plant A>:.iiomy-Q2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 51, 52, Pharmacognosy 111, 113. Lectures and lab- 
:v work covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the 
structure of roots, stems, and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders-Q4, 4) 

I v lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and 
spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy— (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily 
studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical 
problems and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

2. Pharmacology, General— (4, 4) 
Senior year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

(Ichniowski, Gittinger, Finn and Heifetz.) 
Prerequisite— Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. A study of the pharmacology, 
toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal substances, including methods of biological 
assay, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay— (4) 

lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski and Gittinger.) 

Prerequisite-Pharmacology 81, 82. A study of the methods of biological assay 
official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

39 ► 



University of Maryland, 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay— (.4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics— Q4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. Offered 
in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods-(2A'), (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the instruc- 
tor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 
Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of 
biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

399. Research in Pharmacology 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

PHARMACY 

1,2. Pharmacy Orientation— (i, I) 

Freshman year, one lecture. (Levine.) 

An introduction to pharmacy for the beginning student. The course will include 
the various subject matter that a pharmacy student will undertake as well as the op- 
portunities in pharmacy. Guest lecturers will be invited from the various fields of 
pharmacy. 

21, 22. Pharmacy, General— (5, 5) 

Sophomore year, four lectures and one laboratory. (Levine, Reier, and Becker.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy 1, 2 or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 1, 2. 
A study of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical calcula- 
tions, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical prepa- 
rations. 

SI, 52. Pharmacy, Dispensing— (4, 4) 
Junior year, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shangraw, Patel, Reier, and Marlowe.) 
Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22. A study of the compounding and dispensing of 
prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy— (J) 

Junior year, first semester, one lecture. (Shangraw) 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis on the 
history of American Pharmacy. 

SI. Pharmacy Literature— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Levine.) 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

-4 40 



School of Pharmacy 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy— C3, 3) 

Senior year, two lectures and one labox&l (Allen, Paul, and Cragg.) 

■■ vjuisitics— Phannacv 21, 22, 51, 52. A study of the compounding of DC* 
medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids used in modern professional pharmacy, in- 
cluding the preparation of some important classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 
scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration— (2) 

SenJ r year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

A study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 

132. Cosmetics— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Allen, Marlowe, and Becker.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52, and 101. A study of the composition and 
manufacture of cosmetic preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of 
these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites— Pharmacy 101, 102, 132. A study of manufacturing processes and 
equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. 

203, 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy- (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 
Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharmaceuticals 
in large quantities. 

205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control— (3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Foss.) 

A study of the specifications, inspection, sampling, packaging and labeling of drugs 
from their receipt to their shipping by pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. Includes 
detailed consideration of sanitary standards, the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, 
and other laws affecting the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products. 

207, 20S. Physical Pharmacy-^, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisities— Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature— Ql , I) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special reference 
to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharmaceutical 
periodicals. 

41 ► 



University of Manhml 

215, 216. Product Development-^, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

Prerequisites-Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development of 
new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy --(2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar— (I) 

Each semester. (Allen.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and 
surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen and Purdum.) 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharmaceuticals 
and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, Allen, and Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

21. Accounting— (2) 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. (Leavitt and Marlowe.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. The analysis of financial and operating 
statements with a study of the fundamental principles of accounting, including prac- 
tice in bookkeeping. 

37. Fundamentals of Economics— (3) 

Junior year, second semester, three lectures. (Leavitt.) 

A study of the general fundamentals of Economics— production, exchange, distri- 
bution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing, government 
and the consideration of economic systems. 

62. jurisprudence— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
Regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 
Partnerships. 

71. Management— -(2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of the business problems aris- 
ing in the operation of a retail pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, 
leasing, insurance, purchasing, pricing, code marking and control of inventory. 

■< 42 



School of Pharm 

72. Dmg Marketing— (2} 

Seni i yttr, leoomd semester, two lectures. (Leavitk) 

Prerequisite— Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of marketing, marketing 
rch, advertising, selling and salesmansbip, merchandising, channels of distribution, 
wholesaling, retailing and personnel management. 

PHYSICS 
10, 11. General Physics— (4, 4) 

Sophomore year, three lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook and Hooper.) 

Prerequisites— Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. A study of the principles of mechanics, 
heat, wave motion, sound, light and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism— (3, 3) 

Two lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. Given according to demand. 

126. Kinetic Theory of Gases— (3) 
Three lectures a week. 

Prerequisites— Mathematics 21, and Physical Chemistry 189 and 190. Given ac- 
cording to demand. (Estabrook.) 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics- (JS, 5) 

Five lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Advanced standing in Physics. Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

22. Physiology, General— (5) 

Sophomore year, second semester, three lectures, two laboratories. 

(Costello and Becker.) 
Prerequisite— Zoology 1,4. A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, in- 
cluding neurophysiology, the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney, 
endocrine glands, muscle physiology, structure and permeability of the plasma mem- 
brane, and metabolism. 

For Graduates 

245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics— (2) 

lectures— First Semester. (Costello and Laync.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 153, Physiology 22, Consent of Instructor. The lectures 

will relate to the physical and chemical properties of protoplasm to the functional 

43 ► 



<sity of Maryland 

problems or the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, 
mitochondrial structure and their contributions to the integrated cellular activity. The 
physical and chemical phenomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

244. Current Problems in Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics— (i) 
One Lecture— Second Semester. (Costello and Layne.) 

Prerequisites— Physiology 243, Consent of instructor. A continuation of Physiology 
243 and designed to introduce the student to current thought processes of cellular 
phvsiology and cytogenetics. By means of lectures and assigned student discussion, 
current research trends in the field will be discussed in detail. 

399. Research in Physiology 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 

ZOOLOGY 

*1. Zoology, General— (4) 

Freshman, year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Becker.) 
This course deals with basic principles of animal life and uses a study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

*4. Zoology, Animal Kingdom— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Costello and Becker) 

A survey of the animal kingdom w r ith special emphasis on parasites, insects and 
other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a firm 
foundation for later required courses. 

* Courses, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Balti- 
more after 1959-60. 



< 44 



School of Phartn 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1959-60 
( Waduate Students t 

•i Florida 

"Becker, Bad Maryland 

aet, John Wilberi Maryland 

Becker, Stanley I e card Maryland 

n Q, I larrv James Maryland 

"•Chalet, Mclvin Maryland 

Chen, Su Chien China 

Darling, Macy Martin Maryland 

: . Jr Maryland 

Finn, William James Maryland 

*Ha\ ranek, Robert Edward New Y i k 

I leiietz. Carl Louis Maryland 

King, Stonewall Corput, Jr Georgia 

K k ^ki. Robert John Maryland 

Kumkumian, Charles Simon Maryland 

I ;ne. Phillip Julian Maryland 

Marlowe, Edward New York 

M rris i. John Oliver Pennsylvania 

. Nagindas K India 

Patch \ 'ithalbhai C India 

* *Paul, Janice L Wyoming 

Prouty. Richard W Maryland 

Reier, George Eugene Maryland 

Sacks, Sylvan Leonard Maryland 

Shroff, Arvin P India 

***Spear, Murray Charles Maryland 

Tamorria, Christopher Richard District of Columbia 

Thomas >n. Melvin Richard Colorado 

Wane;. Theodore H. T China 

Zdeoon, Alvaro Francisco Costa Rica 

Senior Class 

Bames, Attison Leonard, Jr Man land 

Belford, Stanley Harvey Maryland 

Ben, e Alvin Maryland 

***Bozrr.an, Kenneth Bennett Maryland 

Clayman, Jerome Harris Marvland 

G >nklin, Nancy Carole Marvland 

i William Marvland 

Friedman, L'uiis Joseph Marvland 

Glick, I lenry Joseph Mary land 

f Registered in Graduate School. 

*I • r only. 

stcr only. 
***I)id not attend entire session. 

45 ► 



University of Mar)hnd 



Senior Class (continued*) 



Goldner, Ronald Maryland 

Giebow, Martin David Man-land 

I landelman, Joseph Gold Maryland 

Hoffman, Malta Maryland 

I lorwits, Leonard Man-land 

Jordan, John Terence Maryland 

Kenney, Fern Eugene Maryland 

Kronsberg, Ronald Herbert Maryland 

Lee, Toon District of Columbia 

Lerner, Joseph Herman Maryland 

Levin, In-in Isaac Maryland 

Lichter, Samuel Man-land 

Minster, Howard Manuel Maryland 

Morton, Joseph Harris Maryland 

Nowakowsid, Ronald Joseph Maryland 

Palmere, Anthony Michael Maryland 

Pilquist, Richard Morris Maryland 

Plempel, Alfred Clair, Jr Man-land 

Raksin, In-ing Jacob Maryland 

Rapkin Han'ey Morton Maryland 

Raschka, Theodore Lee Maryland 

Richman, M. David Man-land 

Sadovvski, Leonard Joseph Maryland 

Scali, Peter Paul New 'York 

Sclar, Morton Jerome Maryland 

Shargel, Martin Chaim Maryland 

Sherr, Allan Robert Man-land 

Sherr, Bernard Erwin Maryland 

Shpritz, Esther Harriet Maryland 

Snyder, Larry Albert Maryland 

Stank, Kenneth Edward Maryland 

Tokar, Elliot Sanf ord Maryland 

Tracey, Jessie Lois Maryland 

Warfield, Albert Harry Maryland 

Warthen, John David, Jr Maryland 

Junior Class 

Amass, Arnold Leroy Maryland 

Barron, David D Maryland 

Blaustein, Arnold Lee Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Yale Maryland 

Chan, Kenneth Young Maryland 

Contrino, Gabriel Michael Maryland 

Cwynar, Frank Maryland 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

DiPaula, Vincent R Maryland 

Eng, June Maryland 

Evert, Helen Elaine Maryland 

46 



School of Pharmacy 



Junior Class (continued) 



n. Gerald Stanl rd Maryland 

1 ablate, llliott Maryland 

blatt, N ttOO Jod Maryland 

1 lamer, I [airy Maryland 

Heinrich, William Joseph Maryland 

J faber, c J© age I lerman • • Maryland 

kadi-h. Air n Maryland 

Knshnkk, Marvin Stanley Maryland 

Laner, Stephen LcBmn Marylaml 

Lemer, Beryl • • Maryland 

B, David Gerald Maryland 

Mas I r.mtine Nick Maryland 

McKenna, Richard Sterling Maryland 

M< V:'l. 1) Uglas Wells Man land 

Phillips, Janice Rae Maryland 

ber, I larvey Donaldson Maryland 

Robinson, Zoe Carroll Maryland 

D, Leon Maryland 

Sappe, Nancy Carol Maryland 

s Milda Irena Man land 

Silen. Irvin ^ Maryland 

Smith, Dennis Boyd Maryland 

Sopher, Martin Joseph Maryland 

Stiekman, Robert Benjamin Maryland 

Stime, Peyton Orenzo Mankind 

Struntz, James Patrick Maryland 

Tabak, William Maryland 

Tamberino, Frank Joseph Maryland 

Tinelli, Vito, Jr Man-land 

Turnbull, Andrew, Jr Maryland 

ding, Walter Douglas Manland 

Wankel, Richard Allan Mankind 

••Werner, Kenneth Sidney Maryland 

Weiner, Phillip Paul Maryland 

i, Irvin Manland 

Zenvitz, Warren Gerald Manland 

Sophomore Class 

Amcmick, Harmond Hersh Maryland 

Angsburger, Larry Louis Maryland 

I lenry I larrison Manland 

Baker, Herman Louis Man land 

Becker, Edward Philip Mankind 

**Bishow, Joseph Jesse Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Howard Man land 

man, Ernest Allan Maryland 

***Did not attend entire session. 

47 ► 



*** 






University of Maryland 

Sophomore Class (continued) 

"*Calas, Andre Maryland 

Clinger, Richard Graham Pennsylvania 

***Cohen, Sidney Irving Maryland 

Cornias, William N Man-land 

Gandcl, Stephen Jay Maryland 

Gibbon, Nancy Lee Maryland 

***Gross, Thomas Hollen Maryland 

Grubb, John Eastman Maryland 

Gubinsky, Louis Maryland 

1 Iamet, Sydney Herbert Maryland 

Harrison, Gordon Marshall Maryland 

Henderson, Robert Webb Maryland 

Jablon, Paul Allan Milton Maryland 

Kalb, Richard Paul Maryland 

Kantorski, Robert Richard Maryland 

Kempler, Jerold Allan Maryland 

Kleiner, Harold Stanley Maryland 

Konrad, James Gerard Maryland 

Levitt, Kelvin Ronald Maryland 

Losinsky, Barry Sheldon Maryland 

Loy, John Haywood, Jr Maryland 

Mackay, Walter Price Maryland 

Mackowiak, Frank John Maryland 

Maggitti, Ronald Francis Maryland 

Maleson, Howard Stanley Maryland 

Martin, Wallace O'Conor Maryland 

Mendelsohn, James F Maryland 

Miller, Stanley Maryland 

*Moore, Myrna Lee Maryland 

Newman, Jerome Maryland 

Perzynski, Paul Ronald Maryland 

Piann, George Alan Maryland 

Pilson, Robert Michael, Jr Maryland 

Plummer, Robert Mitchell Maryland 

Price Chester Lee Maryland 

Pristoop, Allan Sanr'ord Maryland 

Rosen, Allen William Maryland 

Rosenstein, Sol Maryland 

Roth, Edward Barry Maryland 

Sandler, Charles Allen Maryland 

Serpick, David Yale Maryland 

Sobczak, Valentine Raymond Maryland 

Sober, Julian Neal Maryland 

Sophocleus, Theodore John Maryland 

Spak, Allen Maryland 

* *Stevenson, Gordon Albert Maryland 

** Second semester only. 
***Did not attend entire session. 

I 48 



»** 



* * 



*** 



School of Pharmacy 



Sophomore Class (continued) 



> » 



» » 



» » 



man, I [enry • • Maryland 

1 haw ley, Patricia • • Marj land 

ink Janus Mar\ land 

\\ nlu'im. Arnold Robert • • Maryland 

v, . gn< r. I l t rl < n Charles Maryland 

* W Maryland 

\\ oer, Susan Siege] Maryland 

. I ) maid W. Maryland 

Zimmer, Reid Austin California 

/ reshman Class 

Abel, Walter I [oward Man-land 

Abra: Marjorie Sue Maryland 

Alvin Gordon Maryland 

son, Alan Joel Maryland 

*Asbell, Arlene Dee Virginia 

Attman. Fly Man land 

• . Jeanne Ann Maryland 

Banks, David Edwin Maryland 

Bartlebaueh, John Irvin Mankind 

Batt, William Henry Maryland 

q, Michael Theodore Maryland 

Blake, David Andrew Maryland 

Sanford Ernest Maryland 

Bradenbaugh. Don Lloyd Maryland 

Brownstein, Marshall Paul Maryland 

Bryan, J< seph Carrow, IV Maryland 

Caplan, Yale Howard Maryland 

Caple, Arthur Morris, Jr Maryland 

Chang, Gloria Man land 

Cohen, Michael David Maryland 

tad, John Wilmer Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony Leo Maryland 

Crosby, Deborah Frances District of Columbia 

Dockins, James Joseph Maryland 

Dubinsky, Barry David Maryland 

Epstein, Arthur Leon Maryland 

r. John Frederick, II Maryland 

Ir\in Maryland 

Foster, Barbara Ann California 

Friedel, Stuart Lee Maryland 

Gammerman, Marvin Inin Maryland 

tt, James 1 laxvey District of Columbia 

*Giudice, Angelo Raphael Maryland 

Goldberg, Man-in Maryland 

'••Did not attend entire session. 

49 ► 



* ** 



V * 



University of Maryland 

Freshman Class (continued) 

Goldman, William Ivan Maryland 

Hefternan, Michael Fitzpatrick Maryland 

1 [eyman, Irvin Ah in Maryland 

Holzknccht, Daniel Joseph Maryland 

Hopkins, Ronald Murray Maryland 

Jacobs, Martin Neal Maryland 

Keller, Thomas Henry, Jr Maryland 

***Kenney, William Michaels Maryland 

Levi, Henry Michael Maryland 

Levin, Stephen Paul Maryland 

***McCraw, Fredda Muriel North Carolina 

McLaughlin, McDonald Maryland 

*»»Moffett, Harry Wayne T Maryland 

Myers, John Edward Maryland 

Neiner, Carol Mary Maryland 

O'Donnell, Charles Edward Maryland 

Pariser, Joseph Maryland 

Peterson, Julia Foard Maryland 

* * * Piatt, Irvin ." Maryland 

Popov, Metodi Maryland 

Quick, Stephen Bradford Virginia 

Rachanow, Gerald Marvin Maryland 

Reinke, Budne Charles Maryland 

* * *Resnick, Melvyn Jay Maryland 

Ritchie, James Reed Maryland 

***Rubin, Ned Earle Maryland 

Sapperstein, Alan Edward Maryland 

Scholtz, Frank William Maryland 

Seechuk, William Walter Maryland 

Shaner, Daniel Stephen Maryland 

Shargel, Leon David Maryland 

Shaver, Carole Frances Maryland 

***Smerker, W. Kenneth Maryland 

Sullivan, Francis Joseph, Jr Maryland 

Tristani, Ettore Mario Maryland 

Ullman, Kenneth Charles Maryland 

Warfield, Carolyn Jane Maryland 

Welsh, James Joseph Maryland 

: * White, Richard Leroy Maryland 

Wilson, John Wesley Maryland 

Winakur, Stuart Maryland 

Woods, Dennis Scott Maryland 

Yee, Susan Maryland 

Special Student 
Hardy, Jerry David, Jr Maryland 

***Did not attend entire session, 
i 50 



* •-.• 



*** 



School of Phan . 

Pre Pharmacy Students at College Park 

Lemnah, David N. 
rr. Velmi A. Moeller, fohn II. 

M. *»Solloa\ Ralph M. 

>:m1!c W. ••Tannebaum, Stanley B. 

.'.Michael A. ••Wolfe n. I. David 

rt L. 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 6, 1959 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Samuel Ilkin Pennsylvania 

lid Francis Grabowski PennS) lvania 

Myron Simon Weinberg New York 

\ Lister of Science 

Robert Edward 1 Iavranck Xew York 

Stephen Bird killer j New York 

Judith Ann Laegeler Illinois 

Spvros A. Lazaris Greece 

Willard James Lennox Maryland 

Vitfaalbhai Chhotabhai Patel India 

Puar Suvanprakorn Thailand 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

J. )hn Wilbert Becker Maryland 

Stanley Leonard Becker Maryland 

Charles Joseph Berger, Jr Maryland 

Harry James Brown Maryland 

Vincent De Paul Burkhart Maryland 

Carl Michael Caplan Maryland 

Melvin Chaiet Maryland 

James Earl Crouse Maryland 

Manin Eugene Deming Maryland 

Paul Anthony Fleckenstein Maryland 

: 1 Freeman Maryland 

Paul Michael Friedlander Maryland 

Sheldon Allan Friedlander Maryland 

Paul Glenn Gayer, Jr Marx land 

Stanley Lester Goldberg Maryland 

William B. Gray Maryland 

Murray Gerald Greenberg Maryland 

Allen I lanenbaum Marvland 

nnd semester only. 
***I)id not attend entire session. 

51 ► 



University of Maryland, 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (continued*) 

Donald Charles King Maryland 

Earl Ephraim Klioze Maryland 

Patricia Phyllis Kostos Maryland 

Ellis Levi Maryland 

Barry Elliott Levin Maryland 

Nina Debra Levinsohn Maryland 

William Irving Loftier, Jr Maryland 

I larry Elliott Macks Maryland 

Antoinette Rosalie Malanowski Maryland 

Eugenie Wallace Marshall Maryland 

Arnold Jay Neuburger Maryland 

Thomas Milton Gosnell Penn Maryland 

Larry H. Pozanek Maryland 

William W. Resser Maryland 

David Ronald Richardson Maryland 

William Charles Richmond Maryland 

Herbert Allen Leonard Sachs Maryland 

Marvin Frederick Saiontz Maryland 

John D. H. Santoni Maryland 

Sorell Lee Schwartz Maryland 

Alfred Howard Schwartzman Maryland 

Anthony John Sniadowski Maryland 

Murray Charles Spear Maryland 

John Rushton Thomas Maryland 

Charles Henry Tregoe Maryland 

Honors (1958-59) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Murray C. Spear 

William Simon Memorial Prize Murray C. Spear 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal Larry H. Pozanek 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Marvin F. Saiontz 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Sheldon A. Friedlander 

David Fink Memorial Prize Murray C. Spear 

Phi Beta Chapter, Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup Alfred H. Schwartzman 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize Alfred H. Schwartzman 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize . . . .William B. Gray 

Certificates of Honor 

Marvin Frederick Saiontz Larry Herbert Pozanek 

Melvin Chaiet 

Honorable Mention (Junior Class) 

Martin Chaim Shargel Morton David Richman 

Peter Paul Scali 

* 52 



School of PharvLu 



DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMK EXCELLENCE 

(1958-59) 
Class of 1959 



John Becker 
Carl Ctplan 
Mclvin Chaiet 
Paul Friedlander 
Sheldon Friedlandei 
William Gray 

1'arl KbOK 

Barry 1 evin 



Stanley Be< ker 



Louis I rii dman 
1 lenry Click 
Ronald Goldner 
fosepfa I landefcnan 

lrvin Levin 



! / ttorahle Mention 



Class of 1960 



I l.irrv Mac ks 

I Ug| Die Marshall 

I , mek 

1 [erbert Sachs 

Marvin Saiontz 
St .rtl 1 Schwartz 

Alfred Schwartzman 
Murray Spear 



Murray Greenberg 



bving llaksin 
David Uichman 
Martin Shargel 
John Warthen, Jr. 



|ohn Jordan 
Peter 5 



June i 

I larvev Rt isenweber 



Arnold Amass 



Ciuhinskv 

Sydney Hamet 
Paul Jablon 



\ k-nrv An- 1 raw 



Honorable Mention 



Class of 1961 



Honorable Mention 

lrvin Yospa 

Class of 1962 



Honorable Mention 

bald (linger 



Bernard Sbexr 
Albert Warfield 



Vito Tinelli 
Douglas Walkling 



William Tabak 



Robert Kantorski 
AHen Pristoop 

ird Roth 



Jerold Kempiex 

53 ► 



U ni vers it y of Maryland 

INDEX 

Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 53 

Accreditation 1 

Administration, Officers of 

Principal Administrative Officers vi 

Emeritus vi 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges vi 

General Administrative Officers vii 

Division Chairmen viii 

Faculty Senate, Chairmen of Standing Committees x 

Admission Procedure 

All Applicants for Advanced Standing in the Four Year Program 

at Baltimore, Md 

All Applicants for Admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To Advanced Standing, Four Year Program 2 

To the Five Year Program 3 

Alumni Association 28 

American Civilization, The Program in 5 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 27 

Assistantships, Graduate 21 

Attendance Requirements 11 

Baltimore Union 18 

Board of Regents v 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1960 and 1961 ii 

Calendar, Academic ii i 

Correspondence iv 

Courses, Description of (Four Year Program) 33 

Curriculum, Four Year 

Changes in 11 

Courses, Hours and Credits 29 

Summary of Hours and Credits 30 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md 4 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

Other Than University of Maryland 6 

Curriculum, Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 31 

Summary of Hours and Credits 32 

Degrees 1 

Deportment 17 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 14 

^ 54 



Sclwol of Pharmacy 
1\I)1. \ (continue!) 

Dormitories (See Housing) 

Emerson 1 ship of Pharmacology 19 

Employment 17 

Examinations 12 

Faculty xi 

Faculty Council xi 

Fees and Expenses 

Graduate 10 

Full-time Undergraduate 8 

Part rime Undergraduate 9 

Fellowships And Giants 19 

Grade of 1 ). Raising 13 

Grade of F, Removal of an 13 

Grading System 12 

Grade Point Average 12 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 15 

Graduates, Roll of 51 

Graduation Requirements 16 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 

Honors and Awards 24, 52 

Hospital Pharmacy Internships 21 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 18 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 18 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 13 

Library, Health Sciences 19 

Staff xv 

Loans 24 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 17 

Registration with 16 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 28 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 12 

Office of Dean, Hours iv 

Office Staff xvi 

Parking 19 

Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 6 

From Other Universities and Colleges 6 

Probation for Low Scholarship 14 

UBS Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1960-1961 

Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 13 

55 ► 



Un i ver s i ty of Maryland 

INDEX (continued) 

Rcadmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 14 

Registration 7 

Requirements for Admission to Five Ye a Program 3 

Admission to Pre-professional Program at College Park 3 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 22 

Scholarship Requirements 12 

Senior Elective Program— Four Year Program 15 

Student Government Alliance 27 

Students, Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 15 

Roll of 45 

Students, Pre-pharmacy, College Park 51 

Textbooks 11 

Transcripts of Records K 

Tuition and Laboratory Fees (Baltimore Campus) 8 

Visitors iv 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 10 

Withdrawing Students, Grades of 15 



56 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



SCIENCES LIBR**J 
AND 






ataloe of 



School of Pharmacy 



961-1962 





IIVERSI ' DRYLAND 

BULLETIN 



The provisions of this publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



Cat Jog and 
1 I8di Announcement 



The School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College ol Phaimacy, 1841 to I l »i4) 

19614962 




Volume 41, Number 1 
School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



includes information applying to tin terminal two 
Program in Baltimore as well a* the new I ive Year Program which 
mandatory in September 1960. 



1961 : 1962 


JANUARY 1961 


JULY 1961 


JANUARY 1962 


JULY 1 


M TWTF S 


S M T WTF S 


S M T W T F S 


, SMTWTF S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


1 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6? 


8 9 in 11 12 13 14 


.345678 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 1" 17 18 192021 


1 910 11 1213 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 1920 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


1324 25 26: 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


21 222324252627 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


28 29 30 31 


29 3031 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


12 3 4 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 1617 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 .... 


25 26 27 28 


"28 29 30 31 .. 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


SMTWTF S 


S M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


SMTWTF S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 910 11 


1 2 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 


1 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


910 11 12 13 14 15 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


30 

OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


15 1617 18 1920 21 


15 16 17 18 1920 21 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


29 30 31 


29 30 . . .... 


28 29 30 31 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 

SMTWTF S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


SMTWTF S 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 4 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


7 8 91011 1213 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


14 15 16 17 18 1920 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


20 21 22 2?> 24 25 26 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 . . 


27 28 29 30 31 .... 


25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 




DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


SMTWTF S 


SMTWTF S 


M TWTF S 


1 2 


1 2 


1 


12 3 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


4 ? 6 7 8 910 


1011 12131415 16 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


9 10 11 1213 14 15 


11 121314151617 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 | 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


31 , 




30 31 



















School of Pharmacy 



September 19 . 

September 25 . 

nber 22. . 

mbex 27 

nber 20 

1962 

January 3 
January 24-30 



ACAD! MIC CALENDAR 

1961-1962 

First Semester 



1%1 

September 18 .. Monday 



Tuesday . . 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Wednesday 



Wednesday 
Wed.- fties. 



Junior (l"«>ur Year Program) Registration — 
"0-10.00 a.m. 

its Yeu Program) Registration — 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

Year (Professional Program) Registration 

1:00-2:00 p.m. 
Graduate Registration — 9:00-11:30 a.m. 
Instruction begins with first scheduled period 
Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 
. Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 
Christmas recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 



Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 
First semester examinations 



Second Semester 

Februarv 6 Tuesday Junior (Four Year Program) Registration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Senior (Four Year Program) Registration — 

10:30-11:30 a.m. 
First Year (Professional Program) Registration 

— 1:00-2:00 p.m. 

February 7 . . .Wednesday Graduate Registration — 9:00-11:00 a.m. 

Februray 12 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Thursday Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

April 19 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

April 24 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

May 21-25 Mon.-Fri Senior final examinations 

May 25-31 . . Fri.-Thurs Second semester examinations 

May 30 Wednesday ... .Memorial Day, Holiday 

Juae 9 Saturday Commencement 

Students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration day. Students failing to 
comply with this regulation are charged a fee of five dollars. No student is nurmallv 
permitted to regi o of the week in which instruction be. 

The trax and Cashier are open daily. Monday through Friday, 

from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



University of Maryland 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance to the upper two years of the Four 
Year Program in the School of Pharmacy should be addressed to the Director 
of Admissions, University of Maryland, Building 520R, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Md. 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of the 
Five Year Program should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of the 
Five Year Program should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, Building 520R, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, 
Maryland. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
Office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday 
by appointment. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Chari bs P. M< Cormick 

rman 1966 

McConnick and Company, 414 Lii;ht Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. I Iolter 

Vice Chairman 1968 

Fanners 1 fame Administration, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore 2. 
Man- land 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1967 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttlb 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1964 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

C. EWLNG TUTTLE 

Assistant Treasurer 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Richard W. Case 1970 

Commercial Credit Building, 300 St. Paul Place, Baltimore 2 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons . 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Libert)' Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Greenwav, Baltimore 18 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
;in« the G iy in June. Members mav serve only two 

cutive terms. 

ulcnt of the University of Maryland is, by law, executive Officer of the 
Board. 

that the Boar d its of the University of Maryland 

shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



rsity of Maryland 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Principal Administrative Officers 

wilson h. elkins, President 

b.a., University of Texas. 1^32; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D. PHIL, 1936. 

albin o. kuiin, Executive Vice President 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

r. lee hornbake, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

b.s., California State College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 
1936; ph.d., 1942. 

alvin e. cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

b.a., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

frank l. bentz, jr., Assistant, President's Office 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1942; ph.d., 1952. 

Emeriti 

harry c. byrd, President Emeritus 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son College, 1938; d.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

adele h. stamp, Dean of Women Emerita 

b.a., Tulane University, 1921; m.a., University of Maryland, 1924. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

myron s. aisenberg, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

vernon e. Anderson, Dean of the College of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

ronald bamford, Dean of the Graduate School 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Gordon m. cairns, Dean of Agriculture 

b.s., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

ray w. ehrensberger, Dean of University College 

b.a., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

noel e. foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

ph.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; ph.d., 1933. 



School of Pharm 

iiv; ralby, Dean of the C Physical E du c ati on, Recreation and 

Health 

b.a.. Randolph-Macon Coft m l, 1937j run. Peabody College, 1939. 

Florence m. got , Dean of the School of T\uj 

( tholic University of America, l l) -*~; U.S., U ni ver sity of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
in.n.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

I m ISLAUS F. CR.apski. Director of the llnivcrsit\ Hospital 

MilK School of Nursing, BeUevue Hospital, New York, 1938; B.a., U niv er sity 
of Denver, 1942; m.b.a., in Hospital Administration, University of Chicago, 1943. 

irvin c. HAiiT, Director, Agriculture Experiment Station and Head, D epa r tment 
ruculture 
b.s.. University of Idaho, 1928; m.s., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d., 
University of Maryland, 1933. 

roger howell, Dean of the School of Law 

b.a.. Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph. p., 1917; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1917. 

verl s. lewis. Dean of the School of Social Work 

a.b.. Huron College, 1933; m.a., University of Chicago, 1939; d.s.w., Western 
Reserve University, 1954. 

slim \ f. LiPPEATT, Dean of tJie College of Home Economics 

b.s., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
ph.d., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

Frederic t. mavis, Dean of the College of Engineering 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; c.e., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

paul e. nystrom. Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

b.s., University of California, 1928; m.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., 
Harvard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

j. freeman pyle. Dean of the College of Business and Public Admin stration, 
ph.b., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

leon p. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

b.a., Emory University, 1919; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928; PH.D., 1930; 
Diplome dc l'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

william s. STONE* Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical- 
Education and Research 

B.s., University of Idaho, 1^24; m.s.. 1925; M.n., University of Louisville, 1929; 

PH.D., CHOW.), University of Louisville, 1946. 



ral Administrative Officers 

of Admissions and Registrations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1930; m.s., 1931. 



vn 



University of Maryland 

Theodore r. avi BSWORTH, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of 
Air Science 

b.s., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1936; m.s., University of Pennsylvania, 

1949. 

b. james borreson, Executive Dean for Student Life 

b.a., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

david l. brigham, Director of Alumni Relations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. wilbur cissel, Director of Finance and Business 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

helen E. clarke, Dean of Women 

b.s., University of Michigan, 1943; m.a., University of Illinois, 1951; ed.d., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 

william w. cobey, Director of Athletics 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1930. 

lester m. dyke, Director of Student Health Service 
b.s., University of Iowa, 1936; m.d., 1926. 

geary F. eppley, Dean of Men 

b.s., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

harry d. fisher, Comptroller and Budget Officer 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

george w. fogg, Director of Personnel 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

Robert J. mc cartney, Director of University Relations 
b.a., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

george w. morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant (Baltimore') 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

Howard rovelstad, Director of Libraries 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

orval l. ulry, Director of Summer Session 

b.s., Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; ph.d., 1953. 

george o. weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 



Division Chairmen 

john e. faber, jr., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 



VTll 



School of Pharmacy 

in c. BOFFSOMMJ Ion of Social Sciences 

N i University, 1921; mljl, 192 11 University, 1929. 

CHAALBS i wn;i: ION of the Lower Division 

run., 1926. 

ADOLF E. zucker. Chairman of tlic Division of Humanities 

b.a., Unr \. 1913; run.. University <>f Pennsylvania, 

1917. 



University of Maryland 

CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

Dr. L. Morris McClure (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTC STANDING 

Dr. Kenneth O. Hovet (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. Charles E. Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Robert D. Rappleye (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA, AND COURSES 

Dr. Lucius Garvin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. Edward J. Herbst (Medicine), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn (Executive Vice President), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. William J. Svirbely (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles A. Taff (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM, AND TENURE 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

Dr. Robert L. Green (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Dr. Guy B. Hathorn (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich (Law), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

Dr. Harold F. Sylvester (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Dr. Augustus J. Prahl (Graduate School), Chairman 
** x 



Scliool nj Vliarmacy 

CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

ADJUNCT lOMMirnis OF TH1 OBNBHAJ COMMITTB] on STUDENT 

LIl 1 AMI \\ || l'AIU 

I Ac 1 IV1TIES 

Dr. Conrad I ink (Agriculture), Chairman 

SCJAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. Paul E. Nystrom (Agriculture), Chairman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Prof. Warren Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Redficld Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Dr. M. II. Iivlcr (Physical Education), Chairman 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Dr. A. J. Fisher (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFATRS 

Dr. Vemon E. Krahl (Medicine), Chairman 



University of Maryland 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

noel E. foss, Dean 

GAYLORD B. ESTABROOK FRANK J. SLAMA 

Francis m. miller casimir t. ichniowski, Secretary 

Faculty (1960-1961) 
Emcrita 

b. olive cole, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
phar.d., University of Maryland, 1913; llb., 1923. 

Professors 

*GAYLORD B. ESTABROOK, PwfeSSOT of PhySWS 

B.s. in ch.e., Purdue University, 1921: M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; PH.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

noel e. foss, Professor of Pharmacy 

ph.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; m.s., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

casimir t. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

fw. arthur purdum, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; m.s., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Donald e. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; m.s., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 

frank j. slama, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm,, 1928; m.s., 

1930; ph.d., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin frank allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

lesld= c. costello, Associate Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

norman j. doorenbos, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s. in chem., University of Michigan, 1950; M.S., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 



Teacher detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 
fPart time. 

•< xii 



School of Pharmacy 

francis it. mm 1 1 w. As so ciat e Pro fess or of Ckem istn 

Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ra d N rthwestern University, 1949. 

IDA marian ROBINSON, Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b.. Cornell University, 1924; B.sx.8., Columbia University School ol Library 

Assistant Professors 

f*ADELE b. r.AiiM.w, .Assistant Professor of English 

a.b.. Goucher Colli rn. iv. The Johns Hopkins U niv er si t y, 1935. 

hilda e. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b.. Randolph Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emorv University Library 
ol, 1937. 

ralph f. shangraw, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; m.s., 1954; pud.. Uni- 

versiv of Michigan, 1959. 

Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 

NBOOi as /iNKi r, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

BC CH., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; m.a., University of California, 
1953; ph.d., 1958. 

Instructors 

earl f. becker, jr., Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s.. Muhlenberg College, 1951; m.s., George Washington University, 1957. 

georgianna s. gittinger, Instructor in Pharmacology 

a.b., Hood College, 1912; m.a., University of Virginia, 1924. 

Robert j. kokoski, Instructor in Pharmacognosy 

b.s. in pharm., University of Man-land, 1952; m.s.. 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 

dean e. leavitt, Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm.. University of Maryland, 1954; m.s., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

phillip J. levine, Instructor in Pharmacy 

b.s., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Rhode Island. 

Lecturers 

Joseph s. KAUFMAN, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

b.a.. University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1953. 

*paul p. miller, Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.s., Tb I »pkins University, 1944; m.a., 1948. 



tPart time. 

died from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 



University of Maryland 

Visiting Lecturers 

samuel l. fox, Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

PH.G.J University of Maryland, 1934; b.s. in pharm., 1936; m.d., 1938. 

ennis c. layne, jr., Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

b.s., George Washington University, 1950; M.S., 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

Fellows 

Wolfgang buhler, L7. S. Puhlic Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

diplom-chem., University of Heidelberg, Germany, 1957; dr. rer. nat., 1960. 

landon w. burbage, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration (Re- 
search^) 

ph.b., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

conrad p. dorn, jr., National Science Foundation Cooperative Fellow 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1958. 

irvtng m. fried, National Science Foundation Cooperative Fellow 
b.s. in pharm., Temple University, 1958; M.S., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania 

**robert E. havranek, The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., Columbia University, 1956; M.S., University of Maryland, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — California, Maryland, New York, Florida. 

hatif h. jalil, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

ph. ch., Royal College of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Iraq, 1952; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1955; ph.d., 1957. 

***marion i. manion, Research Assistant in Chemistry 
b.s. pharmacy, Centro Escolar University, Manila, P. I., 1953. 

masako nakagawa, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s., Hokkaido University, Japan, 1958; M.S., 1960. 

vtthalbbai c. patel, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

b. pharm., L. M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat University, India, 1956; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1959. 

Eugene G. redhr, Noxzema Foundation Fellow in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

arvind p. shroff, Sterling-Winthro'p Fellow in Chemistry 

b.sc, M. S. University, Baroda, India, 1954; M.S., Duquesne University, 1958. 

harkishan singh, 17. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

b. pharm., Punjab University, 1950; m. pharm., Banaras Hindu University, 1952; 
ph.d., 1956. 



**Resigned December 31, 1960 to accept U.S. Public Health Service Fellowship. 
** 'Effective February 20, 1961. 



xiv 



School of Pharmacy 

RICHARD TAMORRIAj U. S. Public Healtl PeUoVf in Chemistry 

b.v I ( . 1957. 

THBODORE h. r. WANG, U. S. Public Health I'dlmc in Chemistry 

Mukden Medical ( bina, 194 Uniwrsity of Nebraska, 1958. 

john D. WARTHBN, JR., American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 

; . Univa ' tryland, 1960. 

Stered Pharmacist Maryland. 

Mu tsu uu. Research Chemist 

B.sc. in r, l c) ^l. Nation. ..1 Taiwan University. 

junior Instructor 

H m. \;>.\s k. i'atel. Junior Instructor in Pliarmacy 

Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan's College, 1952; b. pharm., L.M. College of Pharmacy, 
India, 1^4; M.S., lempk* University. 1957. 

Registered Pharmacist — India. 

Graduate Assistants 

***john w. becker, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.s. in PHARM., University of Maryland, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist -Maryland. 

Stanley l. becker, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in PHARM., University of Maryland, 1959. 
stered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

*harry j. brown, Assistant in Physiology 
b.s. in pharm., University of Man-land, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

****\villi\m j. Finn, Assistant m Pharmacology 
b.s. in pharm., Albany College of Pharmacy, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Maryland. 

carl L. heifetz Assistant in Pharmacology 

b.s. in pharm., Universitv of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, District of Columbia. 

*charles f. hooper, jr., Assistant in Physics 
b.a., Dartmouth College, 1954. 

Barbara h. konopik, Assistant in Chemistry 
a.b.. M es College, 1957. 



Teacher detailed from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Baltimore Branch 
of the University. 

"I tber 31, 1960. 

"'Resigned January 28, 1961. 
'•"Resigned February 4, 1961. 

xv ► 



University of Maryland 

marcela s. lo, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. IN pharm., Centre Escolar University, Philippines, 195 S; M.S., 1958. 

edvvard marlowe, Assistant in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., Columbia University, 1956; M.S., 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York, Maryland. 

**m. david richman, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.s. IN pharm., Universitv oF Marvland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland 

albert h. warfdeld, Assistant in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Assistant 

james p. cragg, jr., Assistant in Practical Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1943. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland 

Library Staff 
Health Sciences Library 
ida marlan robdnson, Librarian 

A.B., B.S.L.S. 

Hilda e. moore, Associate Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S. 

sarah l. atkins, Cataloging Assistant 
marie m. chaffman, Assistant Circulation Librarian 
Jacqueline b. clem, Secretary to the Librarian 
Edith m. coyle, Head, Serials Department 

A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A. 

ruth. e. hanna, Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 
A.B., m.s.l.s. 

simone c. hurst, Head, Circulation Department 

Florence R. ktrk, Reference Librarian 

Betty b. linkous, Cataloging Assistant 

hans-guenther R. listfeldt, Assistant Serials Librarian 

Beatrice marriott, Reference Librarian 

A.B. 



** Effective January 30, 1961 



School of Pharmacy 
.'. Catalog Department 

B.S., B.S.L.S. 

li wood sterling, Library Clerk 
marjorie f. vilk, Cataloger 

B.S. IN ED. 

Assisting Staff 
daisy lotz cue, Secretary-Stenographer 
marcaret e. BEATTY, Senior Stenographer 
*joan p. kavlick, Senior Stenographer 
Frances r. plitt, Senior Stenographer 



* Effective September 12. 1960 to April 15, 1961. 



XYU 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

.un 

Toy PHARMACT .ire to train students for the 
efficient; ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students in 

tine and cultural subject! so that they cm read critically, express 
themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profession and citizens 
of a democrat tide students into productive scholarship and research for 

the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pbarnUM 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was or^ani/ed on July 20, 1S40 by a progressive group of Maryland 
phvsicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in Pharmacy to 
replace the outdated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on 
January 2". 1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College 
joined with a group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental 
to offer ax)perative instruction in the health sciences. The new insti- 
tution was known as the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Balti- 
more professional schools was merged with the Maryland State College at 
College Park to form die present University of Maryland. 

The School now occupies buildings constructed specifically for pharmaceuti- 
cal education. The laboratories and classrooms are equipped with the most modern 
apparatus and every aid to instruction in the liberal arts and for research in 
pharmacv is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
'00 books is housed in the new I lealth Sciences Librarv. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, the 
Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, and The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. These libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training. The American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy requires a Five Year Program and students entering the study of phar- 
macy on or after the Autumn of 1960 are required to enroll in a Five Year 
Pharmacy Program. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharma- 
ceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacv. Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

1 ► 



University of Maryland 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Programs Offered During The 1961-1962 Academic Year 

The Junior and Senior Years of the four year educational program will be 
offered by the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore in September 1961. Only quali- 
fied students will still be considered for admission to these last two years of the 
four year program. 

As a result of a decision by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, students beginning a pharmacy or pre-pharmacy curriculum on or 
after April 1, 1960 are required to enroll in the academic program of not less than 
five years. At the University of Maryland the five year program consists of 
two years of a pre-professional program and a three year pharmacy program. 
Only the three year pharmacy program is offered in Baltimore. The pre-profes- 
sional program is not available in Baltimore but may be obtained at the College 
Park campus of the University or any other accredited university or college where 
appropriate courses are offered.* 

The first year of the professional program will be offered in Baltimore in 
September 1961. 

Admission to Advanced Standing in the Four Year Program 

Only students who have completed all the requirements for the Freshman 
and Sophomore Years or more of the current four year program will be considered 
as transfer students to be admitted in September 1961. 

In addition, an applicant for admission to advanced standing must fulfill 
the requirements for admission to the freshman class and present official transcripts 
of his college record along with a certificate of good standing from the college 
he attended. His grade average must be at least C or the equivalent in the 
college's grading system. Transfer credit is given only for those courses com- 
pleted with a grade of C or higher and which are part of the four year curriculum. 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education may be given credit for the work up through the 
first three years of the pharmacy curriculum which they have completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts 
subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given 
for work completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those 
courses in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the 
schedules for transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given 
preference over advanced work. 

^Courses approved by the University of Maryland in non-accredited junior colleges 
within the State of Maryland may be accepted for credit requirements by the University. 
The year (not less than 24 hours of academic work) immediately prior to admission 
must be successfully completed in a regionally accredited college or university. 



hool of Pharmacy 

Credit is not t;i\m tor pharmaci utical work done in evening 01 corre- 
spondence schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other 
institutions if the school did not grant credit. 

In determining the academic progress and standing ol students who have 
transferred from other institutions only those courses taken at the School of 
Pharmacy of the University of Maryland are applied. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed to the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admissions of the Uni- 
versity in Baltimore. 

Requirements for Admission to the 1 'ive Year Program 

ADMISSION TO PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

The graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certifi- 
cates upon the recommendation of the secondary school principal. 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School and 
for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this pub- 
lication may be obtained by writing to the Office of University Relations, North 
Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. The requirements for admission 
to the School of Pharmacy at College Park are, in general, the same as those 
for admission to the other colleges and schools of the University. Applications 
must be made to the Director of Admissions, at College Park, Maryland. 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for ad- 
mission. It a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee is accepted 
in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

The following academic subjects are recommended and required for admis- 
sion to the Pre-Pharmacy program at College Park: 

Subjects Recommended Required 
ish 4 Units 4 Units 
College Preparatory Mathematics— including algebra (1), 
plane geometry (1) and additional units in advanced 
algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, or advanced math- 
ematics 4 2 
Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 
History and Social Sciences 2 1 
Biological Sciences 1 
rman or French 2 
Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 

Total 16 16 



Universit y of Maryland 

Annual costs of attending the University at College Park for Maryland 
residents include: fixed charges, $185.00; instructional materials $24.00; special 

$77.00 to $82.00, board, $400.00 and lodging, $210.00 to $240.00. Non- 
resident students are assessed an additional fee of $300.00 and lodging costs 
are $260.00 to $290.00. 

The pre-professional program offered at College Park is as follows: 



COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 



First Year 



Chemistry 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

^English 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 
Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry 

or 
Math. 18, 19 — Elementary i\ Mathematical Analysis 
Zoology 1 — General Zoology 
Botany 1 —General Botany 

Physical Activities 

Air Science 1, 2 — Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 
Health 2, 4— Health (Women) 



Total 



Second Year 

* English 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English 

Literature 

* History 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis 
Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

*Government and Politics I or Group I Elective 

Elective : 

Approved Elective from Group I or Group II of American 

Civilization Program 

Air Science 3, 4— Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 



i — Semester — t 


I 


II 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 




or 


5 


5 


4 






4 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


17-19 


17-19 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 




4 


3 




3 






3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


17-19 


18-20 



The Program in American Civilization. 



School of Plutfll 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers th.it it is important for every student to achieve U 
appreciative understanding of this country, its historv and its culture. It has 

therefore established a c omp r eh ensive program in American Civilization. 1 his 

pro gr am is also designed to provide the- student with a general educational back- 
ground. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required or" all freshmen anil sophomores at the University and 
is described below. 1 he second level is for undergraduate students wishing to 
Cany a major in this field ^scc catalog for the College of Arts and Sciences). The 
third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this field (see catalog 
for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of Mary- 
land must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) obtain 
24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the American Civiliza- 
tion Program. Although the courses in the Program are prescribed generally, 
some choice is permitted, especially for students who demonstrate in classification 
tests good previous preparation in one or more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American History (6 
hours, H. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are required 
subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or all three of these areas 
by means of University administered tests are expected to substitute certain 
elective courses. Through such testing a student may be released from 3 hours 
of English (9 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), 3 hours of American 
History (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), and 3 hours of 
American Government. Students released from 3 hours of English will take 
Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours of History will 
take, instead of H. 5 and 6, any one of the following three hour courses: H. 41, 
H. 42, H. 51, H. 52, H. 61, H. 62, H. 71, or H. 72. Students who have been 
exempted from courses in English, American History, or American Government 
may not take such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required, students elect one 
course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics. (Not open to Freshmen. 

Students who may wish to take additional courses in economics should 

substitute Economics 31 for Economics 37). 
Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 
Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 
Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 

rolled in the College of Business and Public Administration will 
normally meet this requirement by taking Economics 31 in the sophomore year.) 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours of otherwise- required courses in English, American Historv or American 

5 ► 



University of Maryland 

Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these courses from 
any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the same de- 
partment as the required courses in which die student is excused, or (b) Elective 
Group I (see 2 above), provided that the same course may not be used as both 
a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. Group II consists of 
the following 3-hours courses: 

H. 42, Western Civilization; either H. 51 or 52, The Humanities; either 
Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of American Art; and 
Sociology 5, Anthropology. 

Admission To The Professional Program (Of Five Year Curriculum) At 
Baltimore, Maryland 

The first year of the Professional Program of the five year curriculum 
will be offered beginning September 1961. This program along with the pre- 
professional courses is given in summary forms on pages 4, 6, and 32. 

1. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program at 
College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C will qualify for ad- 
mission to the pharmacy program at Baltimore. 

2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college* of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must consist of a minimum of 60 
semester hours of credit exclusive of physical education, military science or 
similar courses. The 60 semester hours must include at least 6 hours of English, 
6 hours of mathematics (algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry), 4 hours 
of botany and 4 hours of zoology, or 8 hours of general biology, 8 hours of general 
inorganic chemistry, including qualitative analysis; 4 hours of quantitative chemis- 
try, 8 hours of physics, 3 hours of economics and the remainder as electives. The 
electives must be selected from non-science areas and may include additional 
courses in English and economics, courses in history, philosophy, political science, 
psychology, sociology, speech and foreign languages. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must 
have a scholastic average of not less than "C" (where the lowest passing grade 
is "D"), or its equivalent. The average shall be based on all college courses 
undertaken by the student in his pre-professional program, exclusive of credit 
in military science, physical education, hygiene or similar courses. Transfer 



^Courses approved by the University of Maryland in non-accredited junior colleges 
within the State of Maryland may be accepted for credit requirements by the University. 
The year (not less than 24 hours of academic work) immediately prior to admission 
must be successfully completed in a regionally accredited college or university. 



hodi <>j Pharm 
□ only for the courses completed with a grade of C or higha and 

which arc a part of the pre pharmacy curriculum. 

- muni s 

'mission to the School of Plianii.nv in Baltimore should 
write to the Office of the Dean requesting an application form. Each applicant 
should fill out the form in its entirety ami mail it promptly, together with the 

application fee and photographs, to the Committee OO Admissions of the School 

of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Baltimore 1. Maryland Candidates from 

>ls other than the College Park Division of the University of Maryland 
must also request th< r higjl schools to furnish a transcript of their record to 
the Committee on Admissions. The Committee on Admissions will acknowledge 
the receipt of the application. If this acknowledgement is not received within 
ten days, the applicant should contact this committee immediately. Early filing 
of an application for admission is urged. Applicants wishing advice on .my prob- 
lem relating to their application should communicate with the Committee on 
Admissions. 

Promising candidates will he required to appear before the Committee on 
Admissions for interview. On the basis of all available information, the best 
possible applicants will be offered admission. 

A certificate of entrance will be offered to each successful applicant to 
permit him to matriculate and register in the class to which he has applied. 

Admission To Advanced Standing In The Four Year Program In Baltimore 

1. Request the Dean of the School of Pharmacy to send the preliminary 
application blank. Fill the blank out fully including the names of all schools and 
colleges which the candidate has attended. Sign the blank and return it with 
the required photographs and a seven dollar and fifty cent investigation fee to 
the Director of Admissions. (This fee will not be refunded or credited on any 
subsequent bill.) 

2. Request your high school(s) to send a transcript of your record(s) to the 
Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the prospective student 
will be advised. 

3. I issions Office acts continuously upon the applications of eandi- 
d.ires whose credentials- are complete, except for the final school record, and 
the School of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory that thev 
have been tentatively accepted. 

Qment In The Pre- Professional Program At College Park 

All students must enroll in person at the office of the School of Pharmacy 

at College Park during the registration period at the beginning of each scmes- 

tration dav the student fills out necessary forms and class cards 



University of Maryland 

and pays his fees. Detailed directions concerning dates and procedures are 
mailed during the summer to students who are eligible to enroll in the fall. 
All new students must matriculate. 

All students must complete their registrations at the Office of the Registrar 
upon the days scheduled in the calendar. No student is permitted to enter 
classes until he has done so. Students who fail to register on the days and hours 
as announced are required to pay a late registration fee of five dollars. 

There is a fee of $3.00 for changes in registration made after the first week 
of instruction. 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 

FULLTIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 
(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

* Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

* Special Fee Qver annum) 10.00 
^Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 
Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra 
Mariae, all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 
The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semes- 
ter are payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student 
Union fee and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of 
first registration. Students wishing to make arrangements for 
deferred payment of tuition charges must do so with the Finan- 
cial Office at or prior to registration for the semester for which 
such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only (Not applicable to students trans- 
ferring from School of Pharmacy, College Park) 
Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 12 credit hours 
of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 

All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 

M 8 



fiool of Pharm 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable^ 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 

For Seniors 

Graduation lee (To be paid in February of the Senior 

UtUtutuendes and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage— Students are required to pay for all 
breakage in excess of $5.00 per \ear 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each 
course. 

for Changes in Registration after first week 3.00 

PART TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester*) $12.00 
Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomv and Histology 10.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 11.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physiology 10.00 

*Student Union Fee (per annum) 6.00 

^Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Speeial fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Pro fessi onal Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling for 
the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Social Fee will be $S.00. All students carrying as much 11 12 credit hours 
i full-time students subject to this fee. 

All summer school students will .00 Student Union Ire. This Student 

Union Fee- is in addition to the tuition, laboratory lee,-, and Ixx.k eh.:: 



- 

GKADCATE STTJDE I 

Matncoladcn fee ^for new students only, nan- 



T : _ -. ~v * ^ , "i " . " ; . ~ - ~ , >:; : 


S 10.00 
POO 


Tuition fee for students c^mrfno 10 or mor^ s*T«'**eT 




uer semester) 
labors tnrv fee— Same as undergraduate schedule 

ient Union Fee Cper annum) 
•Student Union Fee ^Summer Session) 
per annum) 

■■BIB'S 1- jr. - 

Doctors c hiding hood and micmfil 
of thesis) 


.00 

above 

30.00 

6.00 

10.00 

10.00 
50.00 



REFUND OF FEES UPON WTTHDRAV. TTNIORE C 

Students with drawin g from Schoc rime during the academic 

must file a written request for withdri . me Dean. Students who do 

not comply with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are not 
accorded any refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the written 
consent of parent or giunliwi Fees, exchi- icarion Fee, Matriculation 

Fee, Student Activities' Fee, the S 50.00 deposit on tuition, and any scholarship 
credit, are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following 

Period from date instruction b: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks t "- 

': -- it- '.r.7-:~ .:: : _: ' ~.-.s 40% 

B U to ua Ebm i~£ Ewe weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

Th: ed in comparing refunds is the date the application for with- 

drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 

Text Books 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books lequired 
in ej*~h course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 



be Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools in the Baltimore Campos and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union B trilrH- payable by all full-time 

ymA-wc enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to Grnamr*- the i i] lijWTHl i wrd r d for the U For students enrolling for 

the first time at the Jwg iim mg of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
;ie Special Fee will be $5.00. AD students ca: much as 12 credit 

hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee, 

AD "■-"« ■ school itnA-nt* will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
n Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc 

** 10 



School of Pharmacy 

Tuition and Ices for Pre-proressi >nal Program (College Paris Campus) 

Sec paces 3 and 4 for summary statements and coosull "Adventure in 

Learning" which is available from College Park. Maryland. 

Changes In Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reser v e! die right to make, at any tunc, such changes 

in the curriculum as may he found necessary or desirable. 

Definition of Residence And Non Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Mary- 
land for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while stationed 
m Maryland will not he considered as satisfying the one year period referred to 
above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for~ 
at least one year prior to his entrance into the armed service and was not en- 
rolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 

Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in the 
official "University General and Academic Regulations." 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty -five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examina- 
tion in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally 
counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than 
half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period 
are also construed as an absence. 

11 ► 



University of Maryland 



EXAMINATIONS 



Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discre- 
tion of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission 
for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 


Interpretation 




Point Value 


A 


Excellent 




4 


B 


Good 




3 


C 


Fair 




2 


D 


Poor but passing 




1 


F 


Failure 







I 


Course work incomplete 


replaced by definite 








grade when course 








requirements have 








been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g. : 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


Chemistry 


4 


C 


8 


Microbiology 


4 


C 


8 


Pharmacognosy 


4 


B 


12 


Pharmacy 


4 


A 


16 


Pharmacy Administration 


3 


D 


3 



19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade point average of 2.47. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at 
the University of Maryland are considered. 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean 
warns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 



12 



School of Pharmacy 



INCOMPLETE WORK 



The mark of I (incomplete) b exceptional. It is to be given only to a 
student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 

bffgfllftf of illness or otluT circumstances beyond liis control, be has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor 
enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above with an estimate 
of the quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is given the 
student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the 
next semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
pt by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he failed 
or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or else- 
where, must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular attend- 
ance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final mark will be substituted 
for the mark already recorded, but he will not receive any additional credit 
for the course. Although the final mark received in the course will be used in 
determining; credit for promotion and graduation, it does not apply to honors 
and awards. See applicable section under "Honors and Awards". 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in raising 
his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to withdraw from the 
School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student may be permitted, with the 
written permission of the Dean and the head of the department giving the course, 
to repeat the course for the second time. Such permission can be given to the 
student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above regulation 
must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will be granted under 
unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall require the approval of the 
head of the department giving the course. 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who 
is permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements for the 
degree from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

All students, namely Juniors and Seniors of the four year program and all 
students in the professional program of the five year curriculum, at the School of 
Pharmacy are expected to maintain a grade point average of not less than 2.0 
for each semester. Any student in the above categories who fails to maintain a 
grade point average of 2.0 for any semester will be placed on probation during 
the next semester. Students in the last year of either the four or five year program 
must maintain a grade point average of 2.0 to become eligible for graduation. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one half, in semester 
hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on proba- 
tion during the next semester. 

Any student on probation must pass all courses for which he is registered 
and must maintain a grade point average of 2.0 or he will be automatically 
dropped from the School of Pharmacy at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in any semester shall be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatisfactory 
scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester will be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may apply in 
writing to the Dean for readmission after a lapse of at least one semester. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that semes- 
ter. 

Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be 
readmitted only once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration 
of his particular case. 

GRADES OF STUDENTS WITHDRAWING FROM THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS— FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

Students having 30-64 credit hours with a grade-point average of 1.5 are 
classified as Sophomores. 

^ 14 



School of Pharmacy 

Students having 65 104 credit boon with ■ grade-point of 1.5 are dawned 

as Juniors. 

Students having 105 or more credit hours with a grade point avenge of 2.0 

in the work of the Junior \ear are classified as Seniors. 

nor students must maintain I grade- point average of 2.0 in the wurk 
of the Senior year and have 144-140 credit hours to be considered as candidates 
graduation, depending upon die year of their initial enrollment. 

\U)R BLBCTTVfl PROGRAM— FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

Students are required to elect either the RETAIL Major or the PRE- 
GRADUATE Major by May 1 of the Junior year. It is recommended that 
students electing the Pre-Graduate program will have attained a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 for the three previous years. Those who elect this 
major should also indicate their choice of electives in the Retail Major in case 
their average does not permit their election of the Pre-Graduate Major. The 
senior elective program must be approved by the Class Advisor and the Dean. 

RETAIL Majors must choose between Pharmacy 81 and Pharmacy 121 
and between Pharmacognosy 62 and Pharmacy 132. PRE-GRADUATE Majors 
after the 1960-61 academic year, must take Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus, and 
mav be required to take Pharmacy 35. Professional Communications and Pharmacy 
38, History of Pharmacy, instead of English 3,4, Composition and World 
Literature. 

I or further information consult with Class Advisor and see the Curriculum 
on page 30 of this catalog. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION — FOUR YEAR PROGRAM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School of 
Pharmacy, who having entered prior to September 1956, have been accredited 
144 semester hours instruction, or who having entered in September 1956 or 
thereafter, have been accredited with 146 semester hours instruction, and who 
have attained the required grade point standings and met the other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts are 
as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without charge; fur additional 
copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, except when more than 
one requested at the same time. In that case, one dollar is charged 

for the hrst copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

TnDJCript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which mav Ixj obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government agen- 
cies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at the School 
of Pharmacy and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

Registration With The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this state shall, not later than thirty days after enrolling, file 
with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for regis- 
tration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required 
to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simul- 
taneously with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one 
dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent 
school or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all 
actual drugstore experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

Licensure Requirements of The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Phar- 
macy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty- 
one years, is a graduate of a reputable school or college of pharmacy, and has 
completed one year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy ap- 
proved by said Board of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination given 
for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or 
college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. 
Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a registered ap- 
prentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from a recognized school or 
college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board for 
such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland, for fur- 
ther information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

Deportment 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of 
a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 

^ 16 



V hool of Pharmacy 
or whoso continuance in die University would Ix* detrimental to his or her 

health, or the health of Others, or whoso OOodllCt is not satisfactory to the 

authorities of die University. 

Students of the last classification may Ix.- asked to withdraw even though no 
sjx'cihc charge be made against them. 

Employment 

\ student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and 
completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities 
to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that student* refrain 
from working during the school session. 

1 lousing 

1. WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the 
Louisa Parsons 1 [all, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close proximity to the 
School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommodations and it is 
under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. Bed linens, towels, 
pillows, blankets and curtains are provided as a part of the general furnishings 
of die room. Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, an extra 
blanket, bureau scarves, small rugs and a laundry bag. The individual student 
assumes responsibility for all dormitory property assigned to her. Any dam- 
age done to property other than that which results from ordinary wear and tear 
will be charged to the student concerned. The room rates are as follows: Double 
Room, $15.00 per month per person; Single Room, $20.00 per month; Single 
Room with bath, $25.00 per month. 

Meals may be purchased at the University Cafeterias or in nearby restau- 
rants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in the Baltimore Union. 
For particulars, see section immediately below. 

eral Information for The Baltimore Union 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Pro fess ional Schools at 621 West Lombard Strcrt. Accommoda- 
tions for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi air conditioned building which 
• tcna. fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facilities, game 

room, bookstore, barbel shop and lounges on each floor. Double rooms are avail- 
able. The cental agreement is made for rooms only; meals an- served cafeteria 

style on a eash Kims. I ho COntraCf l"r accommodations ui\rrs tin- l^ol 62 

17 ► 



Uni v ersit y of Maryland 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

Double Room Rates: 

$150.00 per semester (per person) 

$80.00 per eight weeks summer session (per person) 
Single Room Rai 

$45.00 per month 

The three single rooms available will be assigned on the basis of 

length of residence in the Baltimore Union. 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 

Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book 
shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. 
Maid service will include cleaning of room twice per week and replace- 
ment of change of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's office. 
Mail service is also provided. 

The resident provides blankets, pillow, towels and linens of which the latter 
two must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will wot be available. 

TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath towel, one face towel, one face cloth, soap 
and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

MANAGER'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Parking 

The University of Maryland does not provide any parking facilities en 
university parking lots for students on the Baltimore Campus. 

<+ 18 



hod of PImpim 

I lealth Sciences Libr 

The new Health s Library was opened for the Fall Term of the 

1960- Hoi School Year. This new library building includes the collections 
of the Pharmacy, Dental. Medical, and Nursing Schools. 

The Rules and Regulations by the library will he available for distribution 

at the tune of registration of students in the 1961 Tail Term. 

Professorships, Uowships and Grants 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Cantain Isaac L. 1 merson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in H2~. a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin H. Thompson was 
mated 1 merson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was subsequently 
held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T, Ichniowski, the 
present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

rican Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars to promising graduate 
students desirous of doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for 
an additional allowance of five hundred dollars for tuition, fees, and supplies. 
Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, 777 Fourteenth Street, N.W., Washington 5, D. C. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, former 
associate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist of 
Baltimore, has contributed annually since 1930 a sum of money to maintain 
a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships 
for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaeeutieal chem- 
istry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. The selection of candi- 
dates for these fellowships will Ik- made by the Faculty Assembly with the 
approval of the Dean. 

.i Foundation Fellow^ 

The No.\7.ema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a hind not to a 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citi/i -ns. A candidate 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by the Fellowship 
Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which 
the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting member. This fellow- 
ship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy gives to the School 
each year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a student 
selected by the Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni Association 
to enable the student to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of 
Pharmacy. The research conducted must be of general pharmaceutical interest 
and must be accepted upon completion for publication in one of the phar- 
maceutical journals. 

Other Research Grants 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants from 
the Smith, Kline & French Laboratories and the National Institutes of Health. 
Through these grants, the School of Pharmacy is able to provide a number of 
research fellowships available to graduate and post-doctoral students in phar- 
maceutical chemistry. 

Assistantships 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $2,000.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified 
students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the depart- 
ments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds of the 
normal graduate work. 

Residencies in Hosmtal Pharmacy 

1. University (of Maryland) Hospital 

The Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland offer annually, to qualified graduate pharmacists, residencies in 
hospital pharmacy. The appointments beginning July first are for twenty- 
four months. During the period of appointment the resident divides his 
time between hospital pharmacy and graduate study leading to the 
Master of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland and a 
certificate of residency to be awarded by the University I Iospital. Full 
time training will be required during the summer of 1962. Two weeks 
of vacation are allowed during the term of appointment. The University 
Hospital provides a stipend of $2400.00 per year for the first year as 
Assistant Resident. Completion of the Assistant Residency leads to ap- 
pointment as Resident with a stipend of $3000.00 per year. Parking space, 
uniforms and laundering of uniforms are free of charge. The residents 

^ 2 



School of Pharmacy 

must pa) the tuition, laboratory and other Ins Fox graduate work in 
the University. 

iplete information on this pr ogr am may be tecured bj addressing 
inquiries to the Director of Pharmaceutical Services, University I I<»s 
pital, Baltimore 1. Maryland or to the Dean of tlu- School of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore 1. Maryland. 

Johns Hopkins Hospital Phanna 

The Pharmacy Department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School ol the University of 
Maryland, oiler annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several 
residencies in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning Sep- 
tember iirst, run rot twenty- two months. During twenty months, ap- 
pointees devote halt time to hospital pharmacy service and half time 
to graduate work leading to the iMaster of Science degree granted by 
the University of Maryland and a certificate of residency awarded by 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Full time training in the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital Pharmacy is required for two (2) months during the sum- 
mer of 1962. Four weeks of vacation are allowed during the term of 
appointment. The Hospital provides a stipend of $200.00 per month and 
the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees for these candidates by 
I lowever, candidates must pay the regular laboratory fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, University 
of Maryland. Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and loans 
should be directed to: 

Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 

Alunr \ ol of Ph, 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-pharmacy students 
on the basis of worthiness, moral character, scholastic achievement and the need 
for financial assistance. 1 hese scholarships arc open only to residents of the 

ol Maryland. Each scholarship not exceeding S500.00 per academic year 

* I: tided by the Committee <>n Scholarship* and Grants- 

in-Aid of tlu- Urn land in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee 

of the Alumni As so ci a ti on <>f the School <>f Pharmacy ami the Maryland Phanna- 

eeutu .:ion. 

21 ► 



University of Maryland 

is applied in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarships* 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association make available annually scholar- 
ships to pre-pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. Each scholarship not 
exceeding $500.00 per academic year is used in partial defrayment of fees and 
expenses at College Park. These scholarships are open only to residents of the 
state of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships* 

The Reads Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several scholarships 
to pre-pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, scholastic achievement, moral 
character and the need for financial assistance. Each scholarship not exceeding 
$500.00 per academic year is applied to defray partially the fees and expenses 
at College Park, Maryland. Recipients must have been residents of the state of 
Maryland for at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available consult 
the University bulletin "Adventure in Learning" available from College Park, 
Maryland. 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 W. Lom- 
bard St., Baltimore 1, Maryland. The selection of the recipients of the scholar- 
ships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunction with a committee of the 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester 
to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who 
are in need of financial assistance to complete their education. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

*These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and GrantS- 
in-Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee 
of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

* 22 




jBti 

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Univerilty Hosp.tal— UH 

2. The Psychiatric Institute— PI 

3. Davidge Hall— DVH 

4. Bressler Research Building — I 

5. Law Bu.lding— LB 

6. Gray Laborotory — GL 

7. Medical Technology Building- 

8. Administration Building — AB 

9. Dentistry. Pharmacy Building— i 



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PUS 

RYLAND 
-DC 

R*t.d««ce IP«r»on» Hall)— PH 
I of N. rti Hall) — WH 

I o< Ph«rm« C y Du»»,r,q H„ll DH 

M«fr o' »l KM 

L.br.ry— HSL 
ti«o» 0«p«f«m.«t— OPD 

It rro'f U«'0« BU 

•9«r Ho««rd H«ll 




The Baltimore Hi 



kool of Pharv 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation Fat Pharmaceutical Education makes available 

scholarships worth $100.(H) ivr Bemestex to qualified junior and senior students 

who have maintained An avenge or' "IV or above and who are in need <>f 

financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

U Chemical Company Scholarship 

The Carroll Chemical Company of Baltimore, Maryland, initiated in 1956 
a tund to provide one undergraduate scholarship to a qualified student in the first 

of the professional program who has maintained a superior scholastic average 
and is in need of financial assistance. This scholarship includes the cost of 
tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment, not to exceed $500.00 per academic year. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment 
for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Charles London Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by 
the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land to a senior student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and 
commercial pharmacy. 

\. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus of 
the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein 
bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually to a 
resident of Allegheny County, Maryland. The recipient of the award is to be 
selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc. is contributing a fund to provide one or 
undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens of 
the United States. Candidates will he selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland to which the Nox/ema Foundation, Inc. mav appoint 
a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed annuallv at the dis- 
n of the grantors. 



23 



University of Maryland 

The Ladies Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a student who has 
maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified students 
who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of 
financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Lund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
junior and senior students only, and loans therefrom are made upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean. 

NDEA Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 1958 provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $800 and 
during his entire course of study may borrow a sum not exceeding $5000. The 
borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and repayment 
terms established by the University. Repayment of the loan begins one year 
after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and must be completed within 
ten years thereafter. No interest is charged on the loan until the beginning of 
the repayment schedule. Interest after that date is to be paid at the rate of 
3 per cent per annum. 

Honors and Awards 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Stu- 
dents whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
Academic Medal at the Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a 
student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fraternity 
for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the University 

** 24 



School of Pharv 

in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible by invitation 

to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester of the Junior Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Sod 

Omieron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, 
u.is established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of tins organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good Standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. All candidates selected 
for membership must have completed sc\enty-five credit hours of college work 
and must be approyed by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

The Society has awarded annually a Remington's "Practice of Pharmacy" to 
die sophomore student of high moral character who, having completed forty-eight 
credit hours of college work, has attained the highest scholastic average in his 
class and a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, 
provided that this average is not below the grade of "B". Certificates of Honor 
are awarded to the three students having the next highest general averages, 
provided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B". 

1 lonorable mention is made annually of the first three junior students hav- 
ing the highest general averages, provided these averages do not fall below the 
grade of "\V. 

Only courses taken at the University of Maryland are considered in award- 
ing these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending a 
student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment of 
the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

\ndrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pliar 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 

to Ik- awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree 

icy Foe sujx'rior proficiency in pharmacy. 



University of Maryland 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student having the highest general average throughout the course in practical 
and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy ex- 
tended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the in- 
come from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School 
to the senior student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in 
pharmacognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late 
son, Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Sadie 
S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill, have provided 
a fund the income of which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a 
senior student for meritorious academic achievement in pharmaceutical juris- 
prudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by the 
Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Phi Beta Chapter, Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup 

The Phi Beta Chapter of the Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity provides a cup in 
memory of Joseph J. Fine, Melvin S. Adalman and Albert Goldberg, who died in 
the service of their country. This cup is awarded annually to the senior student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of 
character and leadership. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the senior student 
chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority pro- 
vides annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 

^ 26 



School of Pharmacy 

■ 

Merck & Company, Inc., Railway, New Jeney, offers ■ id of valuable refer 

hooks to the senior Student who attains a high standing in pharmacy. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copv of Gould's "Medical Dictionary"' is made available by Bristol Labora- 
[nc, to tbe senior student who has contributed the most to pharmacy 
tra-curriculai activities. 

Rcxall Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
senior student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both leadership 
and scholarship. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the annual Honors 
Convocation. 

Student Organizations ^Baltimore Campus) 
Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an organiza- 
tion of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding in the inter- 
nal administration of the school, for organizing all extra-curricular programs and 
activities of the student body and for coordinating these programs and activities 
with those of the Faculty and Administration to foster mutual understanding 
and cooperation. The Executive Council of the Student Alliance is composed 
of the President of the Student Government Alliance, the Presidents of the 
respective classes, and one delegate elected from each undergraduate class. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

The purpose of the Student Branch is to encourage in the broadest and 
most liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a 
pro fe s si on in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, especially in fostering education in 
matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its application and aiding 
in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 

I he students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, 

Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy established the Inter -Professional Student 

ite for purp ordinating and facilitating relationships among the 

. hools and the University Units at College Park. 



Un ive rs it y of Maryland 

The Senate is comprised of representatives from each of the five professional 
schools. 



Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee known 
as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group are to 
represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of Pharmacy 
and pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Committee are: 

Frederic T. Berman, Chairman 
Stephen J. Provenza, Co-Chairman 
Samuel I. Raichlen, Co-Chairman 



Francis S. Balassone 
Harry Bass 
A. Lester Bade 
Frank Block 
W. L. Brunnett 
Jerome J. Cermak 
Bernard Cherry 
Irving I. Cohen 



John A. Crozier 
H. A. B. Dunning 
Charles W. Feldman 
Howard L. Gordy 
Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 
Henry G. Seidman 
Simon Solomon 
John F. Wannenwetsch 
H. Nelson Warfield 



Alumni Association 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence as such or 
as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was formed. 
Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the Society re- 
mained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is 
more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 

Officers (1960-61) 

Mrs. Frank M. Budacz Honorary President 

Irving I. Cohen President 

James P. Cragg, Jr. . First Vice President 

Samuel A. Goldstein Second Vice President 

Frank J. Slama Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield Treasurer 



28 



School of Pharviacy 



Executive ( omvii:: ted Members') 

Victor II. MofgeniOCh, Jr.. Chairman 

Milton A. Friedman 

Robert J. Kokoski 

John F. Neutze 



29 ► 



FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



First Semester Second Semester 




II rs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


V 

9 

o 
at 

— 

Q 

2 
3 
3 
3 




3 




3 

I 
1 

3 


a 
| 

5 




5 

o 


2 

1 

U 


Freshman Year 
•Chemistry 1, 3. General Inorganic and 
Qualitative Analysis 


6 


8 
3 
3 
3 


i 


6 


S 
3 


4 

3 
























3 

3 

1 

......... 

3 

......... 

3 
4 

2 




3 
3 

1 
5 

3 

4 
7 
5 
7 

8 


3 


♦Modern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 

1 
1 
2 




3 

1 
1 
8 


3 

1 
1 
4 




3 






1 






3 


1 




6 






3 


Sophomore Year 

♦♦Chemistry 15, Quantitative Analysis 

tChemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 

fChemistry 3G, 38. Elementary Organic 


2 
3 

4 
3 


6 

4 
3 
2 


8 
3 

4 
7 
5 


19 

4 
2 

2 
5 
4 


18 
...... 


4 
3 
2 
3 

6 


2 


♦♦Pharmacy 21, 22, General 


5 




4 


♦♦Physio' ogy 22, General 


5 


Junior Year 
Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 








17 


18 
4 




4 
2 


4 
4 


8 
6 


5 
4 










I 

2 


4 
5 
6 


6 

7 
8 


1 




2 
2 
1 


5 
6 




4 
1 


4 




4 






Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 




3 

3 




3 
3 


3 


Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 


3 

1 
3 
2 

1 




3 

7 
5 
4 


Is" 

3 




19 
3 












4 
3 
3 


4 
3 

2 


3 
2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacy 101, 102. Advanced Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62. Jurisprudence 


3 


3 




3 


3 








7 
19 

3 




5 


{'Elective*— Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 


2 


3 


5 








18 


Pharmacognosy 62, Animal Health Products 
or 


3 
2 




3 
r 
5 


3 










o 
3 


3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Adminis- 


2 

2 
2 

3 

3 
3 




2 

r 
2 
2 

3 

r 
3 
3 

3 

4 


2 

2 
2 

3 
3 

I 

2 




or 


o 














2 

3 

3 
3 




3 

r 
3 
3 

3 

4 


2 


X Elective — Pre-Graduate Major) 
tEnglish 3, 4, Composition and World 




3 


or 
♦Languace 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German 
tMatheinatics 20, 21, Calculus 


o 

3 
4 


o 


3 
3 


-Special Cases) 


3 

4 


1 


112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal 




2 









• I - lotion in these course.-, given by the College of Arts ;>. 

iThe electives mtu 1 by the Class Advisor and Dean. 

Course, formerlv given bv the College of Arts and Sciences, no longer offers 1 St H 
• offered after i'.tr>o-61 



School of Pharmacy 



J i \i: CURRICULUM 
BUIOCARY OF B 



Coi 


Did 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
hours 


•Chemist rv 1. 8 

h 1 2 


M 

48 
48 
96 




96 

83 

208 


8 
6 


' 




3 






3 






6 












•> 


ty l . 4 


144 


7 


Total 

Sophomore Ykab 


480 
U 


336 
N 


816 

128 
96 

128 

160 
112 


37 
4 


; 


4 


- 


96 
48 


4 


2 


96 
64 


10 


■ : 


8 


** Physiology 22 


5 


Total 


416 

32 
64 
32 

64 
64 
16 

48 


432 

96 
64 

64 
160 
192 


848 

128 

128 

96 

96 

224 

256 

16 

48 


35 


Junior Year 


4 




5 


! 


4 


. i .lopy 1 1 5 


4 




8 


Pharn. 


8 




1 




3 








Total 


352 

96 
16 
96 
64 
16 
48 
224t 


640 


992 

96 
16 

160 
64 
48 

384t 


37 


:or Yekr (Required) 


6 








Pharmacol 


96 
48 




Pharmacy 101. II . 


6 




2 




3 


Elective* 


160t 


12 






ToUl 


560 

32 
48 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 
96 
96 


432 

48 


992 

80 
48 
80 

32 

32 

96 
96 
96 

96 
128 

848 
992 


37 


—Retail Major) 


3 




3 


Pharmacv 132 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 121 or 


2 


Pbar 











2 


Pharmacy Administration 72 




2 


-Pre-Graduate Major) 
1 or 




6 






6 


..ematica 20. 21 




6 


tivea— Special Caaee) 
Chemist rv 99 


128 

336 
432 
M0 


2 






4 


KMART 

Freahman Y- 
Sophomore Year 
Junior Year. 
Senior Year 


480 
416 

560 


37 
35 
37 
37 


Total 


1.808 


1.840 


3.648 


146**« 



i<fre of Art* and S 1 at Baltimore. 

- 1956 and I 
ii these course* y. 



31 



University of Maryland 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES** 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

CHEMISTRY 

•I, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis— (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and im- 
portant generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, the 
preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis of 
the more common cations and anions. 

35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, two lectures (Miller and Warfield) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory— (2 , 2) 

Sophomore year, one laboratory. (Miller and Warfield) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. A study of the gen- 
eral procedures used in organic laboratory. 

***15. Quantitative Analysis— -(4) 

Sophomore year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos and Lo) 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures 
and theory, and their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos, Zenker, Lo and Konopik) 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. Quantita- 
tive methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of official preparations, 
with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

99. Glassworking-Q , I) 

Laboratory, senior year, either semester. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. Simple operations in the manipulation of 
glass, repair and construction apparatus. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products— (3, 3) 

Senior year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37, 53. A survey of the structural relationships, the 
synthesis and chemical properties of medicinal products. 



*Course, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at 
Baltimore. 

**Courses intended primarily for sophomores are numbered 1-49; for juniors and 
seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for graduates 
only 200-399. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation period. 

** 'Course not offered after 1960-61. 

** 34 



School of Pharm 

141, 143. Ode Chemistry— (2, 2) 

1 u . lectures. (MilleO 

Prerequisites Chemistry in advanced stiuly of tin- compounds of 

carbon. 

f42, 144. Advanced I < ol?orafory— (2, 2) 

Anv OB Miller.) 

Prere qu isite Chemistry J7, 38 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 
difficult organic preparations and a study of the quantitative determination o! carbon, 
hy drogen, n i trogen and halogen in organic compounds. 

14$. Identification of Organic Compounds— (2, 2) 
One lecture, two laboratories. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite Chemistry 113. 114, or equivalent. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

153. Biological Chemistry— (5) 

Junior year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Zenker and Konopik.) 
Prerequisites— Chemistry 35, 37. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the 
position of living organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur 
during health and in disease. 

187, 189. Physical Chcmistry-O, 3) 

Three lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites— Chemistry 15, 35, 37, Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. A 
study of laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chemical 
kinetics and electro-chemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry-(2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simultaneously with Chemistry 
187, 189. Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

Chemistry 141, 143, or its equivalent is a prerequisite for any of the following 
courses, except Chemistry 230. 

230. Seminar— (f) 
Bach semester. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of progress 
and survey <>i recent developments in chemistry. 

240. Stereochemistry— (2) 

lectures. (Miller.) 

A study of the principles of stereochemistry of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry— (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

tndy of the chemistry and synthesis of heterocyclic compounds. 



*5 



University of Maryland 

250. Steroids-^) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

A study of the- synthesis and structure determination of steroids and the applica- 
tion of modern chemical concepts to the chemistry of steroids. 

252. Alkaloids-^ 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

A study of the principles involved in structure determination, chemistry and syn- 
thesis of the major alkaloid classes. 

255. Instrumental Analysis— -(2) 

Either semester, two laboratories. (Doorenbos and Miller). 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190 or equivalent. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Credit determined by the amount and qualitv of work performed. 

ENGLISH 

*J, 2. Survey and Composition— (3, 3) 
Freshman year, three lectures. 

Prerequisite — Four units of high school English. A study of style, syntax, spelling 
and punctuation, combined with a historical study of English and American literature 
of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews and exercises. 

3, 4. Composition and World Literature— (3 , 3) 

Elective, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

Prerequisite — English 1, 2. Practice in composition. An introduction to world litera- 
ture, foreign classics being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

•I, 2. Public Sveaking-O, O 
Freshman year, one lecture. 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; reports, 
etc. 

FIRST AID 

I. Standard First Aid Course 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson, instructor 

from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

*0. Basic Mathematics— (0) 

Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the qualify- 
ing examination for this course. The fundamental principles of algebra. 



* Course, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, no longer offered 
at Baltimore. 

^ 36 



nool of Pharmacy 

MO. (3) 

tman year, first and second semesters, three lectures. 

piei one unit of algebra. Fundamental operations, factoring, Fractions, 

linear equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, 
binomial theorem, and theory of equations. 

*ll. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry— (3) 
man year, second semester, three lectures. 

Prerequisite Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those students who do not offer 
half unit of trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil. 
graphs, addition formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight 
hno and circle, conic sections and graphs. 

»I5. CoD *r»-(3) 

Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 

Prerequisite High school algebra completed. Fundamental operations, variation, 
functions and graphs, quadratic equations, theory of equation, binomial theorem, com- 
plex numbers, logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

*\7. Analytic Geometry— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. 

Prerequisite -High school trigonometry and Mathematics 15. Coordinates, locus 
problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation of coordinates, conic sec- 
tions, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20. 2/. Calcuhis-O, 3) 

Three lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minimi, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kinematics, 
integration, geometric and physical applications on integration, partial derivatives, space 
geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential equations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130. Probability. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, total, com- 
pound, and inverse probability, continuous distributions, theorems of Bernoulli and 
Laplace, theory of errors. (Staff.) 

ft, 132. Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

ad semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distributions and 
their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of 
variance, statistical inference. (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

/. Pharmaceutical Microbiology— (4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Becker.) 

Introduction to general microbiology with special emphasis on the studv of patho- 
misms, including the public health aspects of the prevention and con- 
trol ->f eoinmunuable dis<. . 

;rse. formerlv s^iven by the College of Arts and Sciences, no longer offered 
at Baltimore. 

37 ► 



. sitx of Maryland 

For Graduates and Advanced U nder graduates 

115. Serology and Immunology— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Becker.) 

Prerequisites — Microbiology 1. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products employed in the prevention and treat- 
ment of infectious diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy— U> O 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media- (I, J) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined by the 
amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

211. Public Health-O-2') 
One lecture. 

Prerequisite — Microbiology 1, 115. Lectures and discussions on the organization 
and administration of state and municipal health departments and private health 
agencies. The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

399. Research in Microbiology 

Credit determined by the amount of work performed. (Shay.) 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

*1, 2. Elementary French— (3, 3) 
Freshman year, three lectures. 

Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not 
adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. Elements of gram- 
mar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

•I, 2. Elementary German— (3, 3) 
Freshman year, three lectures. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is 
not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. Elements of 
grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The as- 
signment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Six semester hours College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Modern Language requirement. 



*Course, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, no longer offered 
at Baltimore. 

^ 38 



School of Pharmacy 

*6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French— (3, 3) 
■ 
Prerequi ch 1 and 2 or equivalent Rapid grammar review, exercu 

iciation, reading of scientific texts. 

■::j:c German (3, 3) 
Three lectures. 

Prerequisite German 1 and 2 or equivalent Review of grammar and reading of 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

> l . VI:., m. General— (4) 

Junior year, lir>t semester, two lectures and two labora t ories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites Zoolog; 4, Chemistry 35. 36, 37, 38. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, ami commerce oi drugs oi animal and vegetable origin with special emphasis 
on the physical, microscopical, and chemical characteristics used in their identification 
and in the detection of adulteration. 

52, Pharmacognosy, General— (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisite— Zoology 4; Chemistry' 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51. A con- 
tinuation or Pharmacognosy 5 1 with instruction covering antibiotics, allergy-producing 
pollens, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, weedicides, etc. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Entomology for P}iarmacists—(3*) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures, and one laboratory. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A 

study or the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and in the 

industries, including several which attack farm and garden crops; their recognition, life 

. habits, and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Animal Health Products— (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Physiology 22; Microbiology 1, 115; Pharmacology 81. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and preven- 
tion of the more important animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants-(2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisite Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
; ;i herbarium. 

Ill, 111. Plant Anatomy-Q2, 2) 

I w i lectures I week. (Slama.) 

Prerequi 51, 52. 



irse, formerly given \>y the College of Am and Sciences, no longer offered 

it Baltimore. 



University of Maryland 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy-Q2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 51, 52, Pharmacognosy 111, 113. Laboratory work 
rin^ advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 

ri*>ts, stems, and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and 
spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy— (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not 
ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be given to 
practical problems and to the identification and detection of adulterants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81, 82. Pharmacology, General- (4, 4) 
Senior year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

(Ichniowski, Gittinger, Finn and Heiferz.) 

Prerequisite — Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. A study of the pharma- 
cology, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal substances, including methods of 
biological assay, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

111. Official Methods of Biological Assay— (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski and Gittinger.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82. A study of the methods of biological assay 
official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay— (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate yean>. 

211, 212. Svecial Studies in Pharmacodynamics— (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. Offered 
in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods— (2-4), (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the instruc- 
tor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 
Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of 
biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

* 40 



School of PJiarv 

399. Research in Pharmacolo^ 

Proper l y qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichni m 

PHARMACY 

**/. 2. Pharmac) Orientation— (I, /) 

unan year, one lecture. (L<-\ 

An introduction to pharmacy for die begmning student The course will include 
the various subject matter that a phai lent will undertake IS well .is the op- 

portunities in pharmacy. Cuicst lecturers will be invited from the various fields of 
phanr 

••21, 22. PJ v™/-(5, 5) 

more year, four lectures anil one lal>oratory. (Levine, Becker, S. and Recker, J.) 
Prere qu isite — Pharmacy 1. 2 or may lx- taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 1, 2. 
ldv of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical calcula- 
tions, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical prepa- 
rations. 

SI, 52. PJiarmacy, Dispensing— Q4, 4) 

Junior year, two lectures and two laboratories. (Shangraw, Patel and Richman) 

Prerequisites -Pharmacy 21. 22 \ study of the compounding and dispensing of 
prescriptions. 

61. History of Pharmacy— (J) 

Junior year, first semester, one lecture. (Shangraw) 

tudy of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis on 
the historv of American Pharmacy. 

81. Pharmacy Literature— (1) 

Senior vear, tirst semester, two lectures. (Levine.) 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy— (3, 3) 

Senior year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen, Patel, and Cragg.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52. A study of the compounding of new 
medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids used in modem professional pharmacy, in- 
cluding the preparation of some important classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 
scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration— (2) 

r, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

pital pharmacy practice and administration. 

112. Cosmctics-O) 

:r, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen and Marlowe.) 
Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21. 22, 51, 52, and 101. A study of the composition and 



rse not offered afteT 1960-61. 

41 



University of Maryland 

manufacture of cosmetic preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of 
these products. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 101, 102. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications and the Federal Food, Drug and 
Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisite 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 
Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharmaceuticals 
in large quantities. 

201, 208. Physical Pharmacy-^, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites— Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature— (1 , J) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special reference 
to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharmaceutical 
periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development of 
new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

22 1, 222. History of Pharmacy- (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar— (J) 

Each semester. (Allen.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and 
surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen and Purdum.) 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharmaceu- 
ticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy 

C redit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, Allen, and Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

21. Accounting— (T) 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. (Leavitt and Marlowe.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. The analysis of financial and operating 

** 42 



School of Pharmacy 

statements with ■ study of the Fundamental prindpk unting, including prac- 

tice fas bookkeeping. 

Hentab of Economics— (3) 

Junior Cond semester, three lectures (Leavitt.) 

A studv ol the geneta] hmdamentals ol Eoooomia production, exchange, distri- 
bution and consumption ol wealth, together with methods ol financings K'^ernment 
and the consideration ol economic systems. 

62. Jurisprudence— (3) 

and semester, three lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law d imix>rtance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
dations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations, I m ol Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 

Partnerships. 

71. ' cnt— (2) 

Senior fear, first semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. A study or the business problems aris- 
ing in the operation t a retail pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, 
g, insurance, purchasing, pricing, code marking and control of inventory. 

72. Drug Marketing— (2) 

Senior year, second semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of marketing, marketing 
rch, advertising selling and salesmanship, merchandising, channels of distribution, 

wholesaling, retailing and personnel management. 

PHYSICS 

*10, 11. General Physics-(4, 4) 

Sophomore year, three lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook and Hooper.) 

Prerequi^ hematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. A study of the principles of 

mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism— (3, 3) 

lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. Given according to demand. 

126. Kinetic Theory of Gases— (3) 

Three lectures a week. 

Prerequisites- Mathematics 21. and Phvsjcal Chemistry 189 and 190. Given ac- 
og to demand. (Estabrook.) 

i or Graduates 

200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics— (5, 5) 

Five lectur (Estabrook.) 

Prerequi I standing in Physics. Given according to demand. 

-H ► 



University of Maryland 

PHYSIOLOGY 

**22. Physiology, General-^ 

Sophomore year, second semester, three lectures, two laboratories. 

(Costello and Becker.) 
Prerequisite — Zoology 1, 4. A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, in- 
cluding neurophysiology, the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney, 
endoctrine glands, muscle physiology, structure and permeability of the plasma mem- 
brane, and metabolism. 

For Graduates 

243. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics— (2) 

Two Lectures — First Semester. (Costello and Layne.) 

Prerequisites — Chemistry 153, Physiology 22, Consent of Instructor. The lectures 
will relate to the physical and chemical properties of protoplasm to the functional 
problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, 
mitochondrial structure and their contributions to the integrated cellular activity. The 
physical and chemical phenomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

244. Current Problems in Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics— (I) 

One Lecture — Second Semester. (Costello and Layne.) 

Prerequisites — Physiology 243, Consent of instructor. A continuation of Physiology 
243 and designed to introduce the student to current thought processes of cellular 
physiology and cytogenetics. By means of lectures and assigned student discussion, 
current research trends in the field will be discussed in detail. 

399. Research in Physiology 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 



ZOOLOGY 

*1. Zoology, General— (4) 

Freshman year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

This course deals with basic principles of animal life and uses a study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

*4. Zoology, Animal Kingdom— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

A survey of the animal kingdom with special emphasis on parasites, insects and 
other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a firm 
foundation for later required courses. 



*Course, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, no longer offered at 
Baltimore. 

** Course not offered after 1960-61. 



44 



School of Pliarmaey 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

I IRST YEAR PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

OF 

FIVE YEAR CURRICULUM 

Anatomy 31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4) 
lect u res and two laboratories. 

tudy of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. The course* is 
provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 

particular emphasis on human structures. 

5, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

1 wo lectures. 

A study of the Fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

mistry 36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory. (2, 2) 
One laboratory. 

Prere qui site — Chemistry 35, 37 or concurrent registration therein. A study of the 
general procedures used in organic chemistry. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying. (4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 

Prerequisite— Quantitative Chemistry; Chemistry 35, 36. A study of quantitative 
analvtical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and official prepara- 
tions with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

Pharmacy 31. General. (4) 
Three lectures and one laboratory. 

Orientation, brief historical introduction into the field of pharmacy, and a 
! consideration of physical — pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathe- 
matical calculations. 

Pharmacy 32. General. (4) 
Three lectures and one laboratory. 

A continuation of the theory of physical — pharmaceutical manipulations to the 
manufacture of galenical and other preparations. 

Pharmacy 33. Inorganic. (2) 
lectures. 
A study of the inorganic substances used in pharmacy with particular emphasis 
being placed upon the inorganic salts. Tins study includes physical and chemical 
properties, sources, preparation, uses and incompatibilities. 

Pharmacy 35. Professional Communications. (3) 
1 hree lectures. 

Pharmacy literature and expression. A survey of the literature of pharmacy. 
bibliographical methods, oral and written reports on subjects of pharmaceutical interest. 
The use ol audi -\isual aids. 

Pharmacy 38. History of Pharmacy. (3) 
lectures. 

J ol pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 

i pertinent to the interests ot the pharmacist Research 
required. 



45 



' 



University of Maryland 

Pharmacy Administration 36. Accounting. (3) 
Two lectures, one laboratory. 

The analysis of financial and operating statements, especially as it concerns retail 
drug stores and other drug establishments, with a study of the fundamental principles 
of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping. 



46 



School of Pha 



ROD OF STUDENTS, SESSION 196061 
oduate StuJcntsf 



I Jr. 
Becker, John W. 

I . 

Ml A. 

Block, Ronald I 
'Brown, 1 larrj J am 
Qian I . 

'Darling. Macy Martin 
and P., Jr. 

Finn. William ]. 

Rshbein, William N. 
. John M. 
Chester D. 

Fried, Irving M. 

r lavranek. Robert 

Hockley, Laura 
*Jurf, Amin N. 

Kilchenstein, Michael W. 

kokoski. Robert J. 

Konopik, Barbara H. 

Kopcho, Michael J. 

I esko, Stephen A., Jr. 

Levine, Phillip J. 

I v Marcela Sy 

Marlowe, Edward 

McMilBon, Cecil R. 

Nakagawa, Masako 
"O'Brien. Estele L. 

Patel, Nagindas K. 

Patch Vithalhhai C. 

Pfeiffer, Curtis B. 

Prouty. Richard W. 
*Qadir. Chaudhri G. 

Reicr, George E. 
*Richman, Morton D. . 
Ivan L. 

Schatanoff, David 

Schmukler. Morton 

Shroff, Arvin P. 
*Tamorria, C. Richard 

Thomas, George H. 

Thomason. Melvin R. 

Tocci, Paul M. 

beodore H. T. 
t.eld, Albert H. 
hen, John D., Jr. 

Zelcdon, Alvaro F. 



iiate School 

Only 
'*Second Semester Only 



M iryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
rland 
Distri mhia 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 
Maryland 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

New York 

Maryland 

Syria 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Philippines 

New York 

West Virginia 

Japan 

Cuba 

India 

India 

Maryland 

Alabama 

India 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

India 

District of Columbia 

Ohio 

Colorado 

New York 

China 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Costa Rica 



47 ► 



University of Maryland 



Senior Class 



Amass, Arnold L. . 
Block, Lawrence Y. . 
Bozman, Kenneth B. 
(' mtrino, Gabriel M. 
Cwj oar, Frank 
Diamond, Louis 
DiPaula, Vincent R. 
Evert, Helen E. ... 
Gordon, Gerald S. . . 
Greenblatt, Elliott 
Grossblatt, Norton J. 

Hamet, Harry 

Heinrich, William J. 
Huber, George H. . 
Kushnick, Marvin S. 
Lee, June Eng 
Lerner, Beryl 



Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

. . . Maryland 

Manland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Man-land 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Levin, David G Maryland 

Maschas, Constantine N Maryland 

McKenna, Richard S Maryland 

McNeill, Douglas W Maryland 

Reisenweber, Harvey D Maryland 

Robinson, Zoe C Maryland 

Sappe, Nancy C Maryland 

Silen, Irvin Maryland 

Sopher, Martin J Maryland 

Stank, Janice P Maryland 

Stiekman, Robert Benjamin Maryland 

Stime, Peyton O Maryland 

Struntz, James P Maryland 

Tabak, William Maryland 

Tamberino, Frank J Maryland 

Tinelli, Vito, Jr Maryland 

Walkling, Walter D Maryland 

Wankel, Richard A. . Maryland 

Weiner, Phillip P Maryland 

Yospa, Irvin Maryland 

Zenvitz, Warren G Maryland 



Junior Class 



Amernick, Harmond H. 
Augsburger, Larry L. 

*Barron, David 

Becker, Edward P. 
Blaustein, Arnold L. . . 
Block, Lawrence H. 



Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 



* First Semester Only 
48 



junior Class (continued 



man. Truest A. 

(\il.iv Andre T. 
Chan, Kenneth 
dinger, Richard G. 

hen J. 
Gibbon, Nancj I . 
Grubb, John E. 
Gubinskj . I ouis 
Hamet, Sydney H. 

rdon M. 
Henderson, Robert W. 
Jahlon, Paul A. M. 
**Kadish. A. iron 

. Bennett R. 
Kantorski. Robert R. 
Katz, Alfvrt 

ipler, Jerold A. 
Kern, Louis R., Jr. 
(Conrad, James G. 
Lauer, Stephen L. 
I evitt, Kelvin R. 
Lund, Robert E. 

kay, Walter Price 
M u kowiak, Frank J. 
Ma^itti. Ronald F. 
Mendelsohn, James 
Newman. Jerome 

ill R. 
Pfann. George A. 

n. Robert M.. Jr. 
Plummer, Robert M. 
Price, Chester Lee 
Pristoop, Allan S. 
Rosen, Leon 
Rosenstein, Sol 
Roth. Edward 
Samonovitch, Irwin L. 

Her, Charles A. 
Sermuksnis, Milda I. 
Serpick, David Y. 
Smith, Dennis B. 
Sober, Julian X. 

kocleus, Theodore J. 

. Allen 
Sugarman, Henry 
*Turnbull, Andrew, Jr. 
: I 

w. 

Zimmer, Reid A. 



School of Pfou 



Man land 

M Dryland 
M Dryland 
Pennsylvania 
Maryland 
Maryland 

M irvland 
M irvland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
M. irvland 
M irvland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
M. irvland 
Maryland 

Maryland 
M Dryland 

Mandand 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Marvland 

land 
Maryland 
. Maryland 
. Maryland 
Marvland 
Marvland 
Marvland 
Maryland 
Marvland 
M irvland 
Maryland 
Marvland 
M Dryland 
M inland 

land 
Maryland 
Mandand 

I md 

rnia 



only 

**Di I 1 entire session. 



49 



University of Maryland 



Abel, Walter H. 
Abramovitz, Marjorie S. 
Antwarg, Alvin G. 
Aronson, Alan J. 
' Baker, Herman L. 
Baker, Jeanne Ann 
Banks, David E. 
Bartlebaugh, John I. 
Batt, William Henry 
Benson, Michael T. 
'Berger, Norbourne Clay 

Blake, David A 

Bias, Sanford E 

Brandenbaugh, Don L. 
Brownstein, Marshall P. 

Caplan, Yale H 

Caple, Arthur N., Jr. 
Chang, Gloria . 
Cohen, Michael D. 
Conrad, John W 



Sophomore Class 

Maryland 

Maryland 

. . Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
. Maryland 

. Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

. Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Cornias, William N Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony L Maryland 

***Crosby, Deborah E District of Columbia 

Dockins, James J. Maryland 

Epstein, Arthur L. Maryland 

Fader, John F., II Maryland 

Foster, Barbara A California 

Friedel, Stuart L Maryland 

Gamerman, Marvin I Maryland 

Garrett, James H. District of Columbia 

Goldberg, Marvin Maryland 

*Goldman, William I Maryland 

Heyman, Irwin A. Maryland 

Hopkins, Ronald M. Maryland 

Jacobs, Martin N Maryland 

Keller, Thomas H., Jr Maryland 

Kuchinsky, Victoria W Maryland 

Levi, Henry M. . Maryland 

Levin, Stephen P. Maryland 

Losinsky, Barry S. Maryland 

Luskin, Robert S. Maryland 

***Mecchia, Vilma M. Maryland 

Myers, John E. Maryland 

Neiner, Carol M Maryland 

Pariser, Joseph Maryland 

Peterson, Julia F Maryland 

*Popov, Metodi Maryland 

"Quick, Stephen B Virginia 

* First Semester Only 
***Did not attend entire session. 



50 



School of Pharmacy 



Sophomore Class {co nti n u ed) 

Rachano*v, Gerald M. 
'Reches, Henry 
Reinke. Budne C 
Ritchie. James R. 
Sapperstein, Alan E. 
Scholtz, Frank W. 
Schult/, Lawrence M. 
Schwartzman, Allan M. 
Shaner, Daniel S. 
Shargel, Leon D. 
Shaver, Carole F. 
Sobczak, Valentine R. 

ni. Ettore M. 
Ullman, Kenneth C 
Welsh, lames J. 

q, John W. 

\\ T inakur, Stuart 

Woods, Dennis S. 

Yee, Susan 



Maryland 
Maryland 

Mar\ lain! 
Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 
Man-land 
Man. land 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

M tryland 
Maryland 
Man/land 
. Maryland 
Maryland 



"Fowble. Cvril 

McCreesh. Arthur 
*'Nollau, Elmer W. 



H 



Special Students 



California 

. Maryland 

Marvland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 

Freshman Class 

Ackerman. Neil Maryland 

Adams, Patricia Maryland 

-as, George Maryland 

*Biscoe, Charles F. Maryland 

*Blum, Jerold P. Maryland 

Boon, David Maryland 

Brundelre, Robert Maryland 

Burkhouse, Ronald Mankind 

Catlett, Leon Maryland 

James Maryland 

-katz, Harvey Mankind 

"Clemans, Da\id New York 

Cohen. Larry Maryland 

*Cohen, Michael Maryland 

k, Richard L. Maryland 

Frederick H. Mankind 

Dinsmore, Billy G. Maryland 

Semester Only 
*Second Semester Only 
*Did not attend entire session. 



51 ► 



University of Maryland 



Freshman Class (Continued) 



Dolecek, Gayle R. 
Drews, John T. 

Elliott. William R. 
"Fine, Norman 

Folus, Gary 

Frangakis, Mina 

Gibbs, Gary 

Glover, Wayne A. 
* 'Goldstein, Mark N. 

Gorrell, David J. 

Gribble, Joann 

Griver, Michael A. 

Heer, Roger G 

I Icnderson, Robert L. 
"Hill, Walter 

Hoffman, Robert W. . 

Hribar, Neal E 

Jaskowitz, Theodore J. 

Jones, Christina M. 

Katz, Melvin 
*** Kaufman, Warren J. . 

Kirk, Edward W. . 
* 'Kleiner, Harold 

Kotzin, Sheldon 

Kozak, Adrian S. 

Kroopnick, Robert B. 

Lambdin, James R. ... 
'Leasner, Charles F. 
'Lepore, Vincent 

Lessing, Melvin 

Libowitz, Suzanne J. 

Lindenbaum, Ronald 
'Lipman, Stanley L. 
'"Long, Carol G 

Lovera, Madeline C. . 

McLaughlin, Charles J. 

Martin, Lawrence L. 

Needel, Stephen .... 

Needelman, Gerald L. 

Owens, James G. 
'Peterson, William J. 

Phillips, Janet M. 

Poller, Buddy M. 
'Psaris, Manuel N. 

Rayman, Marsha 

Ryon, James X. 

Santell, Fredrica A. 



District of Columbia 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Man-land 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Mankind 

District of Columbia 
Maryland 
Mankind 

Maryland 

Maryland 

. . Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

Mankind 



'First Semester Only 
"Second Semester Only 
'"Did not attend entire session. 



52 



School of Pharmacy 

Freshman Class (continu 

I ooi, Charles M. Maryland 

einer, Regina J. Maryland 

des J. Maryland 

em, Edwin Maryland 

Ids. r..:r ; Man Kind 

:h. Paul Maryland 

d, Ralph M. Maryland 

Spuxas, Jenina 1). Maryland 

ner, Thomas E. Pennsylvania 

S Sj Ivan Maryland 

'Taksey, Aim Maryland 

r.mnckuiin. Stanley R. Maryland 

;>>r, Charles 1). Maryland 

M'illou. Joraye Maryland 

Walsh, Michael J. Maryland 

Webster, Bert H. District of Columbia 

WicMowson, Logan C. Maryland 

Williams. Cornelius B. Maryland 

Winston, Carl B. Maryland 

W >lfson, Israel Maryland 

Sophomore Class 

Del Castilho. Ronald M. Alabama 

Wynn, Richard L Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 4, 1960 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Chien Li Huang 



Formosa 



Master of Science 



Su Chien Chen 
Carl Louis Heifefz 
Stonewall Corput King, Jr. 
Thaddeus Paul Pruss 
Patrick William Ragozzino 
Venkatraya B. Gopal Shenoy 



China 
Maryland 

. . . Georgia 

Maryland 

Connecticut 

India 



nard B .rnes 
Stanley H. Belford 
Jerome Alvin Berger 
Jerome Harris dayman 

>le Conklin 
Joseph William I); 

Ti r Only 

cond Semester Only 



Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
■ Jr- 



Maryland 
Maryland 

land 
Maryland 

Maryland 

M inland 



53 



University of Maryland 

Louis Joseph Friedman Maryland 

I [enry Joseph Click Maryland 

Ronald Goldner Maryland 

Martin David Grebovv Maryland 

Joseph G. Handelman Man-land 

Marta I loffman Maryland 

Leonard Horwits Maryland 

John Terence Jordan Maryland 

Fern Eugene Kenney Maryland 

Ronald Herbert Kronsberg Maryland 

Toon Lee District of Columbia 

Joseph Herman Lerner Maryland 

Irvin I. Levin Maryland 

Samuel Lichter Maryland 

Howard Manuel Minster Maryland 

Joseph Harris Morton Maryland 

Anthony Michael Palmere Maryland 

Richard Morris Pilquist Maryland 

Alfred Clair Plempel, Jr Maryland 

Irving Jacob Raksin Maryland 

Harvey Morton Rapkin Maryland 

Theodore Lee Raschka Maryland 

Morton David Richman Maryland 

Leonard Joseph Sadowski Maryland 

Peter Paul Scali New York 

Morton Jerome Sclar Maryland 

Martin Chaim Shargel Maryland 

Allan Robert Sherr Maryland 

Bernard Erwin Sherr Maryland 

Esther Harriet Shpritz Maryland 

Larry A. Snyder Maryland 

Kenneth Edward Stank Maryland 

Elliot Sanford Tokar Maryland 

Jessie Lois Tracey Maryland 

Albert Harry Warfield Maryland 

John David Warthen, Jr Maryland 

Honors (1959-60) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Martin C. Shargel 

William Simon Memorial Prize M. David Richman 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal Henry J. Glick 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize M. David Richman 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize ... Joseph Lerner 

David Fink Memorial Prize Ronald Goldner 

Phi Beta Chapter, Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup Martin C. Shargel 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize Henry J. Glick 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize Irvin I. Levin 

Certificates of Honor 

M. David Richman J. David Warthen, Jr. 

Ronald Goldner 

^ 54 



I of Pharmacy 



June 



Honorable Mention (Junior (: 



linelli. Jr. 



Harvey RciMiuveber 



DEAN'S MI DAI S FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1959^60) 



Henry J. Click 
Ron. ill Goldner 

mer 
Irvin I 



Louis Friedman 



June Eng 



Class of 1960 

Irving Raksin 
M. David Richmond 
Martin Shtrgd 
Allan Sherr 

Honorable Mention 

Joseph Handdman 

Leonard Sadowski 

Class of 1961 

William Heinrich 
Walter Walkling 



Bernard Sherr 
Larrv Sn\der 
Albert Warfield 
J. David Warthen, 



Howard Minster 



Vito Tinelli, Jr. 



Lawrence Y. Block 



Louis Gubinsky 



John Grubb 
Sydney Hamet 



r ie Abramovitz 
ne Baker 
David Banks 

Marshall Brownstcin 



Honorable Mention 

Douglas McNeill 

Robert Stiekman 

Class of 1962 



Honorable Mention 

Gordon Harrison 
Paul Jablon 
James Konrad 

Class of 1963 

Yale Caplan 
Ronald Hopkins 
Stephen Levin 

Gerald Raehanow 



Harvey Reisenweber 



Herbert Wagner 



Walter Mackay 
Allan Pristoop 



Shargel 
Kenneth Llllman 
James Welsh 



Alvin Ant 

Bias 

I)' n Bradenbaugh 



Honorable Mention 

Gloria C!, 
Deborah Crosby 
John Fader 



Budne Reinke 

John W'i! 
Stuart Winakur 



SS 



University of Maryland 

INDEX 

Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 55 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 11 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 11 

Accreditation 1 

Administration, Officers of 

Principal Administrative Officers vi 

Emeritus vi 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges vi 

General Administrative Officers vii 

Division Chairmen . . . .« viii 

Faculty Senate, Chairmen of Standing Committees x 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants for Advanced Standing in the Four Year Program at 

Baltimore, Md 7 

Applicants for Admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 7 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore . 6 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To Advanced Standing, Four Year Program 2 

To the Five Year Program 3 

Alumni Association 28 

American Civilization, The Program in 5 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 27 

Assistantships, Graduate 20 

Attendance Requirements 11 

Baltimore Union 17 

Board of Regents v 

Breakage 9 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1961 and 1962 ii 

Calendar, Academic ii 

Correspondence iv 

Courses, Description of 34 

Curriculum, Four Year 

Changes in 11 

Courses, Hours and Credits 30 

Summary of Hours and Credits 31 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md 4 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

Other Than University of Maryland 6 

Curriculum, Professional Program At Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 32 

Summary of Hours and Credits 33 

Degrees 1 



56 



hool of Phan . 

INDEX Continued 

jpoftment 16 

,.} for I OW Scholarship 14 
Dfmitories Sec I lousing) 

n Professorship of Pharmacology 19 

ployment 17 

minations 12 

ulty >ii 

ulty Council xii 
aid Exp 

10 

Full-time Undergraduate 8 

Part-time Undergraduate 9 

Fellowships and Grants 19 

r.rade of D. Raising 13 

rede of F, Removal of an IB 

lino System 12 

radc Point Average 12 

trades of Withdrawing Students 14 

Graduates. Roll of 53 

Graduation Requirements 15 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy; Baltimore 1 

4onor Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi 24 

Rho Chi .25 

honors and Awards 24 

hospital Pharmacy Residencies 20 
Mousing, (Baltimore Campus) 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) .... 17 

The Baltimore Union (Men) ... 17 

ncomplete Grades. Removal of 13 

_ibrary, Health Sciences 19 

ff xvi 

icensure by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 16 

oans 24 

-land Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 16 

Registration with 16 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy ... 28 

Mid Semester Failure Warnings 12 

Office of Dean, Hours iv 

3ffice Staff xvii 

arking 18 
'harmacy Program at Baltimore. Admission to 

From College Park 6 

From Other Universities and Colleges 6 



57 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to tlirow light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



JN1VERSITY of MARYLAND 



BULLETIN 



School of Pharmacy 



*? 










1962-1963 



The provisions of this publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable cojitract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further resents the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



Catalog and 
119th Announcement 

The School of 
Pharmacy 

iMarvland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1962-1963 




Volume 42, Number 1 
School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore 1. Maryland 



This catalog includes information applying to the terminal vear of 
the Four Year Program in Baltimore as well as the new Five Year Program 
which wa* mandatory in September 1960. 



1962 1963 


JANUARY 1962 


JULY 1962 


JANUARY 1963 


JULY 1963 


S M T W T F S 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 31 


28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


SMTf TFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


5 6 7 8 91011 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 








MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


SMTf TFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


1 2 3 


1 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


29 30 


APRIL 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


OCTOBER 
SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


APRIL 
SMTWTFS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


OCTOBER 
SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


1 2 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


S M T \V T F S 


1 2 


1 


1 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


H 15 16 17 18 19 20 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 2 4 25 26 27 28 29 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 31 




30 31 


30 





I] 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1962-1963 
First Semester 
1962 

ember 17 Monday Senior (Fov Year Program) K«jii-tration — 

9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Fir-t Year (Profession!! Profiam) and 

Second Year iPruf.--n.nal Program) — 
Registration -10:30-11:30 a.m. 

Orientation for V w Studentl 2:00 p.m. 

September 18 Tuesday Gradoati R -iration— 9:00-11 :30 a.m. 

September 24 Monday Instruction begin- vMth tir-t -< dieduled period 

saber 21 Wednesday Thanksgiving receei begini at close of la-t 

•cheduled period 

rnber 26 Monday Instruction re-ume- with fir-t Bchedufc 

December 21 Friday Christmas receM begini at dose <>f last 14 heduled 

period 

1963 

January 3 Thursday [attraction n um< - with first scheduled period 

January 23-29 Wed.-Tues Fir>t lemester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 5 Tuesday Graduate Registration — 9:00-11:30 a.m. 

February 6 Wednesday First Year < Professional Program) — 

Registration— 9:00-10:00 a.m. 
Second Year (Professional Program) and 
Senior (Four Year Program) — 
Registration— 10:30-11:30 a.m. 

February 11 Monday Instruction begini with fir-t m heduled period 

February 22 Friday Washington'- Birthday. Holiday 

April 11 Thursday Easter recess begini at dost of la - 1 -cheduled 

period 

April 16 Tuesdaj Instruction mmmri irith fir-t -cheduled period 

May 20-24 Mon.-Fri Senior final examination- 
May 24-31 Fri.-Fri Second leaeeter examination- 
May 30 Thursday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 8 Saturday Commencement 

All itadeati are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
hill- and filing of Ha-- rani-, on the regular registration day. Stttdentl failing to 
cornpN VMth thi- regulation are charged a fee of five dollar-. No itudenl i- normally 
permitted t<> register af t«-r Saturday nwm of the week m which instruction begUM. 

The offices of the Kegi-trar and Cashier are open daily, Ifottdaj through Fl 
■from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



Ill 



University of Maryland 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance to the Senior year of the Four 
Year Program in the School of Pharmacy should be addressed to the Director 
of Admissions, University of Maryland, Building 520R, Room 201, Lombard 
and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Md. 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program 
of the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, Building 520R, Room 201, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed 
to the respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The 
Dean's office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on 
Saturday by appointment. 



IV 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Ch \ki es P, m< Cormick 

Chairman L966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Lighl Street, Baltimore 2 
Edward F, Holteb 

-Chairman 1968 

Farmers Home Administration, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore 2 

B. Herbert Brow \ 

tary 1967 

The Baltimore Institute. 10 West Chase Street. Baltimore 1 

HARR1 II. NUTTLE 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L Kaplan 

<tant Secretary 1964 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

C. E. Tuttle 

fUtni Treasurer 1962 

007 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Richard W. Case 1970 

Commercial Credit Building, Baltimore 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Stmons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whiteiiurst 1967 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 



iben of the Board arc appointed by the Governor of the State for term- of 

seven years each, beginning the fir-t Monday in June. Member- may fterre onl] 
■ utive terms. 

The I'r-~ ir]»-nt of the University of Maryland i-. by law. e\e» utive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Hoard of Regentl of the l T ni\er>ity of Maryland 
«hall con-titute the Marylaml S ird of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Principal Administrative Officers 

wilson h. elkins, President 

b.a., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; d. phil., 
1936. 

albin o. kuhn, Executive Vice President 

B.s., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; PH.D., 1948. 

r. lee hornbake, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

b.s., California State College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
ph.d., 1942. 

frank l. bentz, jr., Assistant to the President 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1942; PH.D., 1952. 

alvin e. cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and Development 
b.a., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

Emeriti 

harry c. byrd, President Emeritus 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickinson 
College, 1938; d.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

J. freeman pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration Emeritus 
ph.b., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; PH.D., 1925. 

adele h. stamp, Dean of Women Emerita 

b.a., Tulane University, 1921; m.a., University of Maryland, 1924. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

myron s. aisenberg, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

vernon e. Anderson, Dean of the College of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; PH.D., University of Colorado, 1942. 

ronald bamford, Dean of the Graduate School 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; PH.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

cordon m. cairns, Dean of Agriculture 

b.s., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; PH.D., 1940. 

ray w. ehrensberger, Dean of University College 

b.a., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; PH.D., Syracuse University, 
1937. 

NOEL e. foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

pii.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; ph.d., 1933. 



VI 



School of Pharmacy 



II m. FEALET, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation an, I Health 
b.a.. Randolph-Maron College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ni.u., Peahody College, 1^39. 

M. OR, Dean of the School of Nursing 
b.s.. Catholic University of America, 1 *>.i7 ; M.s., I'lmn-itv of Pennsylvania, L940; 
En.n., University of Maryland, 1952. 

LAM8LAUS i. i.K\rsKl, Dire, tor oj the I tur>rsit\ Hospital 

R.N.. Mills School of Nursing, Hellevue Hospital, New York, 1938; B.s., University of 
Denver, N12; M.u.v.. in Hospital Administration, University of Chicago, 1948. 

Iryin c. BAUT, Director, Agriculture Experiment Station and Head, Department of 
Horticulture 

b.s., University of Idaho, V)'l?,: m.s.. State College of Washington, 1980; rn.n., Uni- 

feftJtf of Maryland, 1933. 

rockk now ell. Dean of the School of Law 

B.\., Johns Hopkins University, 1911; PH.D., 1917; LL.B., University of Maryland, 1917. 

verl s. i BWIS, Dean of the School of Social Work 
a.b., Huron College, 1933; m.a., University of Chicago, 1939; d.s.yv.. Western Reserve 

University, lQot. 

skim v k. UPPBATT, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

b.s., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1 ( H.">; ph.d., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

frkdkric t. mavis, Dean of the College of Engineering 

University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; C.E., 1932; PH.D., 1935. 

PAUL f. NYSTROM, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

B.s., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a.. Harvard 
University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

Donald w. o'connell, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration* 
n.\., Columhia University, 1937; m.a., 1938; ph.d., 1953. 

james h. reid, Assistant Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 1 
B.s., University of Iowa, 1923; m.a., American University, 1933. 

leon p. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

b.a., Emory University, 1919; M.A., Universtiy of Chicago, 1928; PH.D., 1930; Diplome 
de ITnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

William s. stone. Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical Education 
and Research 

b.s.. University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; m.d., University of Louisville, 1929; 

ph.d. (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Olh 

c. watson alcire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
b.a.. University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 



'Appointment effective February 1, 1962. 

'A.ting Dean, July 1, 1961- February 1, 1962. 



in 



University of Maryland 

Theodore r. AYi.ESWORTH, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air Science 
b.s., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1936; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1949. 

b. james borreson, Executive Dean for Student Life 
b.a., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

david l. brigham, Director of Alumni Relations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. wilbur, cissel, Director of Finance and Business 

b.a., University of Man-land, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

helen e. clarke, Dean of Women 

b.s., University of Michigan, 1943; m.a., University of Illinois, 1951; ed.d., Teachere 
College, Columbia, 1960. 

william w. cobey, Director of Athletics 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1930. 

l. eugene cronin, Director of Natural Resources Institute 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943; PH.D., 1946. 

lester If. dyke, Director of Student Health Service 
b.s., University of Iowa, 1936; m.d., 1926. 

ceary f. eppley, Dean of Men 

B.s., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

harry d. fisher, Comptroller and Budget Officer 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1943; c.p.a., 1948. 

george w. focg, Director of Personnel 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

Robert J. mc cartney, Director of University Relations 
b.a., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

george w. Morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical Plant 
(Baltimore) 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

Howard rovelstad, Director of Libraries 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

orval l. ulry, Director of the Summer Session 

b.s., Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; ph.d., 1953. 

georce o. weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical Plant 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

john E. faber, jr., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; PH.D., 1937. 

harold c. hoffsommer, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

b.s., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; PH.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

charles e. white, Chairman of the Lower Division 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; PH.D., 1926. 

via 



School of Pharmacy 
CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GEN LRU. OOMMITTII OH EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Peter P, I ul Sciences), Chairman 

I1UWJU I IKK AND WELFARE 

L. Ifoirii McClure ( Education) , Chairman 

COMMIRH Oil ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

Kenneth 0. BofCfl (Education), Chairman 

GOMMtTTU Oil IN -l RUCTION AL PROCEDURES 

Charles E. Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Benjamin Massey (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA, AND COURSES 

James H. Reid (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Edward J. Herbst (Medicine), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Albin 0. Kuhn (Executive Vice President), Chairman 

COMMITTEES ON LIBRARIES 

Aubrey C. Land (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Carl Bode iArt> and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLECIATE COMPETITION 

John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM, AND TENURE 

Peter P. Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

Robert L. Green (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Guy B. Hathorn (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

mrra on minit^'p tiro upmsbntatioii 

G. Kenneth Reiblich (Law), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

Harold F. Syhmtei I Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON THE FLTLKE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

AngnstlM J. PnU "Graduate School), Chairman 



IX 



University of Mary hind 

CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

kOJUNCT COMMITTEE OF THE GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT 
LIFE AND WELFARE 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Richard F. Davis (Agriculture), Chairman 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

Paul E. Nystrom (Agriculture), Chairman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Redfield Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Theodore R. Aylesworth (AFROTC), Chairman 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

J. Allan Cook (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Vernon E. Krahl, (Medicine), Chairman 



School of Pharmacy 



FACULTY COUNCIL 



ROB v. POM, Dean 
PBAIH I- N HI] PRANK J. SI \M \ 

D p. BHA1 CASIMIR T. ICHMiiwsKi, Secretary 



Faculty (1961-1962) 



Emcrita 



B. Oi.iw COU, Profess* Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
pnvH.n.. University oi Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

ROB B. POM, Professor of Pharmacy 

ph.c. South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in piiarm.. 1929: M.S.. Univer-ity of 

Manland, 1932: ph.d.. 1933. 

R BgHtafed Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

c\simir t. ichmowski. Fmerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.c. University of Maryland, 1929: b.s., in pharm., 1930: M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland 

krancis m. mii.lkr. Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.s., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; PH.D., Northwestern University, 1949. 

v»s krthi R prpniM, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

ph.c. University of Maryland: 1930: B.s. in ph\rm.. 1932: M.S.. 1934: ph.d., 1941. 
RepUtered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

• : I p. >h \y. Professor of Microbiology 
b.s., Lehanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 
PBAKI J. slxmk. Professor of Pharmacognosy 

ph.c. University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925: b.s. in pharm.. 1928; M.S., 1930; 

ph.d.. 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin fr\nk ai.i. f.n. Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
b.s., in pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d.. 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

■ - ^ociate Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
B.s.. University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d.. 1957. 

- itsociate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s. in chkm., University of Michigan, 1950; m>.. 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

IDA marun R< I ssociate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Gonel] University, 1921; n.s.i.s.. Columbia U ni ver si ty School oi Library v 
1941 



t Part time. 



University of Maryland 

Assistant Professors 

fADEi.E B. n w.i.man. Assistant Professor of English 

a.b., Goucher College, 1926; PH.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

hiloa e. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936: a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

Jernst f. g. klesper, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

diplom-chemiker, University of Hamburg (Germany), 1951; dr. rer. nat., 1954. 

ralph f. SHANGRAW, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in PHARM., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., University 

of Michigan, 1959. 

Reigstered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 

nicolas Zenker, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

cd. sc. ch., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; M.A., University of California, 
1953; ph.d., 1958. 

Instructors 

earl F. becker, jr., Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

§georcianna s. CITTINCER, Instructor in Pharmacology 

a.b., Hood College, 1912; M.A., University of Virginia, 1924. 

Robert J. kokoski. Instructor in Pharmacognosy 

B.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1956. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

dean e. leavitt, Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

phillip J. levine, Instructor in Pharmacy 

b.s., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Rhode Island. 

Lecturers 

+ richard d. dean, Lecturer in Mathematics 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; m.ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 

Joseph s. kaufman, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Visiting Lecturers 

samuel l. fox, Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1934; b.s. in pharm., 1936; m.d., 1938. 

ennis c. layne, jr., Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 

b.s., George Washington University, 1950; M.S., 1953; PH.D., 1955. 



f Part time. 

§ Retired July 31, 1961. 

J Resigned June 30, 1962. 



Xll 



School of Pharmacy 



Research issociate 



mi -i«.; ur. Research (aj vote in Chemistry 
1; .-, . i\ ( hi ■ istry, 1951, X.it i«»iKil Taiwan University ; om .. rohoku University, Japan, 
L961. 

Fellows 

landom if. BUHBACB, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration {Research) 
m.it.. Medical I I Virginia, 1909; rn.<... 1910. 

•joiin v, . un kir, >'. />'. Penick A Co. Fellow iii Pharmacy 
B.s. in hi\i;m.. University of Maryland, 1959. 
itered Pharmacist Maryland. 

COlfBAD P. DORlf, Ji;.. U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pn\KM.. University of Maryland, 1958; m.s., 1961. 

p:\im. m. PRUD, I'. S, Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

. in i'hvkm.. Temple University, 1958; m.s., 1960. 
U< petered Pharmacist Pennsylvania. 

L HAVRANEK, U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
I, in ph \i!M„ Colombia University, 1956; M.S., University of Maryland, 1959. 
Registered Phaimacisl California, Maryland, New York, Florida. 

H \in h. ] \i.il, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry {National Institute of Mental Health) 
rn.ru.. Royal College of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Iraq, 1952; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1935; ph.d., 1957. 

Barbara h. KONOPDC, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institute of Mental 
Health) 

\.v... Mt St Agnes College, 1957. 

'< haklfs s. ki'MKCMiw, U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s., Temple University, 1944; M.S., 1951. 

-tered Pharmacist — Maryland, Pennsylvania. 

urn vun M \rlowe, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellow 
b.s. in pharm., Columbia University, 1956; M.S., 1958. 
istered Pharmacist — New York, Maryland. 

IMOH Mii.K.wiCH, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry (Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories) 
B.s., University of Buenois Aires Argentina, 1956: m.s., 1958; PH.D., 1959. 

MASAKO NAKAGAWa, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Cancer Institute) 
b.s., Hokkaido University, Japan, 1958; M.S., 1960. 

VRHAUHAl C PATEL, Research Fellow in Chemistry iXational Cancer Institute) 

n.i'H\i;M.. L M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat University, India, 1956; m.s., University 

of Maryland, 1959. 

I k. HUB, Noxsema Foundation Fellow in Pharmacy 
B.s. in inuiM., University of Maryland, 1958; M.S.. 1961. 
R< -•■ red Pharmacist Marj land. 



I Effective March 11. 1962: Resigned Jane 30, 1962. 
} \\< m§SU -<1 >« ptember 9, 1961. 

! December 18, 1%1 to iccepte Graduate Ataiatantsbip. 
• Effective May 7, 1962: Resigned Jane 16, 1962. 



Xlll 



University of Maryland 



1 \kvin p. shroff, Research Fellow in Chemistry {Sterling Winthrop, National Institute 
of Mental Health) 

B.sc, M. S. University, Baroda, India, 1951; M.S., Duquesne University, 1958. 

theouore H. i \v\N(.. Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institute of Mental 
Health) 

B.S., Mukden Medical College, China, 1949; M.S., University of Nebraska, 1958. 

\i.rert J!, w IRFIELD, The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s., in PHARM., University of Maryland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

John d. vvarthen, jr., U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Graduate Assistants 

-Stanley L. Becker, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

PAUL c. bossle, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.s., in pharm., Loyola University, Louisiana, 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Louisiana. 

louis diamond, Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.s., IN pharm., University of Maryland, 1961; Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

3 gerald s. Gordon, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Carl l. heifetz, Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, District of Columbia. 

4 stanley a. koch, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. IN pharm., George Washington University, 1956. 

•"'marion i. manion, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. in pharm., Centro Escolar University, Manila, P. I., 1953. 

*ceorge e. reier, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1958; M.S., 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

M. david richman, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.s. IN pharm., University of Maryland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist— Maryland. 



1 Resigned May 7, 1962 to accept Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry (U. S. Public 
Health Service). 

2 Kesigned December 16, 1961. 

3 Resigned February 2, 1962. 

4 Resigned June 30, 1962. 

5 Resigned February 7, 1962. 

* Effective December 18, 1961 . 



XIV 



School oj Pharmacy 



Francis j. rntNiY, issisitmi in Pharmt 

n imivkm.. St John'i University, L959; M.S., 1961. 
stered Pharmacist Men York, Maryland. 

Library StafT 

Health Sciences I.ihr<iry 

ID v MARIAK lOBINSON, Librarian 

S, 

mi it v i . n< •/«/(• /.//<•■ 

\.i;. v J i B. 

sajiah i. \ikin-. Cataloging issistant 

maris m. » h \ i ; m \ % . issistant Circulation Librarian 

JACQI 1 1 in i b. h.mi. Secretary to the Librarian 

Dim m. coylr, rf>orf, Serials Department 

km.. \.n.i. s.. \i.\ 

Kl r 1 1 h h\nn\. (ttUfa I t< ipnsitions Librarian 
A.B., M.S.L.S. 

LORRAOU b. in win. Serials issistant 

HBfOlfl . hi 1ST, Head. Circulation Department 
PLORKNCS h. KIRK, Reference Librarian 

UENTHER i:. USTFELOT, issistant Seria/s Librarian 

M> i A 

■BATRKI MARRIOTT, Reference Librarian 
LB. 

BLBAHOI M. mm i ; f, //-(/f/. Catalog Department 

B.S., B.S.L.S. 
KATHLEEU B. BCHELLRR, l.ataloging Assistant 
BLWOOO -1KKI.INC. Library Clerk 

M m: loun. r. mi.k. Catalog 
b.s. r> 

KATHRRnn if. R7HEATLEY, Serials issistant 

Office Staff 
oknvt LOTi '.ii. Secretary-Stenographer 
Margaret e. beatty, Senior Stenographer 
\i. RRRifRDT, Senior Stenographer 

•m.\n<i- i;. ii itt, Senior Stenographer 



i Appointed Aufast 28, 1961. 

pied January 12. 1962. 



XV 



The School of 
Pharmacy 



History and Program 

THE PURPOSES OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY ARE TO TRAIN 
students for the efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; 
to instruct students in general scientific and cultural subjects so that 
thrv can read critically, express themselves clearly, and think logically as 
members of a profession and citizens of a democracy; to guide students 
into productive scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge and 
techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland 
physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in Pharmacy to 
replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on 
January 27, loll, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College 
joined with a group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental 
Surgery to oiler cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new insti- 
tution was known as the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of 
Baltimore professional schools was merged with the Maryland State College 
at College Park to form the present University of Maryland. 

1 



University of Maryland 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings con- 
structed specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and class- 
rooms are equipped with the most modern apparatus and every aid to in- 
struction and for research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 30,000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, 
the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, and The Johns Hopkin- 
University. The libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 

Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training. The American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy requires a Five Year Program and students entering the study of 
pharmacy on or after the Autumn of 1960 are required to enroll in a Five 
Year Pharmacy Program. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Asso- 
ciation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School 
of the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate 
School. 

Programs Offered During The 1962-1963 Academic Year 

The Senior Year of the four year educational program will be offered 
by the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore in September 1962. Only qualified 
students will still be considered for admission to the last year of the four 
year program. 

As a result of a decision by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, students beginning a pharmacy or pre-pharmacy curriculum on 
or after April 1, 1960 are required to enroll in the academic program of not 
less than five years. At the University of Maryland the five year program 
consists of two years of a pre-professional program and a three year phar- 
macy program. Only the three year pharmacy program is offered in Balti- 
more. The pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore but may 



School of Pharmacy 

be obtained at the College Park campus of the I aiversit) "i anj other 
accredited onivereit] «>r college where appropriate courses are oiTered.* 

The first Near of the professional program iras offered in Baltimore iii 
September 1961. 

Admission To Advanced Standing In The Four Year Program 

Onl\ students who have completed all the requirements for the Fresh- 
man, Sophomore and Junior Years or more of the current four year pro- 
gram will he considered as transfer students to be admitted in September 
L962. 

In addition, an applicant for admission to advanced standing must 
ful till the requirements for admission to the freshman class and present offi- 
cial transcripts of his college record along with a certificate of good standing 
trom the college he attended. His grade average must be at least C or the 
equivalent in the college's grading system. Transfer credit is given only 
for those courses completed with a grade of C or higher and which are 
part of the four year curriculum. 

Transfers from colleges of pharmacy accredited by the American 
Council of Pharmaceutical Education may be given credit for the work 
up through the first three years of the pharmacy curriculum which they have 
completed. 

Transfers from liberal arts colleges are given credit for the liberal arts 
subjects of the pharmacy curriculum. Not more than a year's credit is given 
for work completed at a liberal arts college. 

All students admitted to advanced standing are required to take those 
courses in the School's curriculum which they have not completed. In the 
schedules for transfer students, elementary subjects not completed are given 
preference over advanced work. 

Credit is not given for pharmaceutical work done in evening or corre- 
spondence schools, nor is credit given by examination for work done at other 
institutions if the school did not grant credit. 

In determining the academic progress and standing of students who 
have transferred from other institutions only those courses taken at the 
School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland are applied. 

Requests for application blanks and information should be directed t<» 
the Dean of the School of Pharmacy or to the Director of Admission- of the 
University in Baltimore. 



• Not leaf than 21 lemeettt hour- of academir work Immediate!]! prior to admission 
t<> the Profecaiona] Program at Baltimore most be completed in a regional]) ■ocredited 

or univrr-ity. 



University of Maryland 

Requirements for Admission to the Five Year Program 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean 
of the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School 
and for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school in Maryland whose sec- 
ondary record indicates probable success in the University will be admitted 
provided that: 

1) his scholastic average in major subjects in his last two years in 

high school has been satisfactory; 

2) his program has included the following: 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 

College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 
(1), plane geometry (1) and additional units in ad- 
vanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, or ad- 
vanced mathematics 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 

History and Social Sciences 

Biological Sciences 

Foreign Language — German or French 

Unspecified academic subjects 

Total 16 16 

3) he has had the test results of the American College Testing Pro- 
gram submitted to the University Admissions Office; 

4) he has a satisfactory general recommendation from his secondary 
school as to his character and ability. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland residents 
(see definition of Residents and Non-Residents, page 12) must also have 
the results of the American College Testing Program and complete high 
school records submitted to the Admissions Office. Only a limited number 
of well qualified out-of-state applicants can be considered for admission since 
first preference in admission is given to Maryland residents. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be 
found in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of 
this publication may be obtained by writing to the Office of University 
Relations, North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admis- 
sions of the University of Maryland at College Park. Applications must 
be made to the Director of Admissions, at College Park, Marvland. 



4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 





2 





1 


8 



School of Pharmacy 

A i< | 0.00 mibt accompany a prospective student's application f-»r 
admission. If a studenl enrolls for the term for which lie applied, the tee 
opted in lieu of the matriculation Fee. 

Annual cost- of attending the I Diversity at College Park for Maryland 
residents include: fixed charj LOO; instructional materials, $24.00; 

177.00 to 182.00; board, 1400.00 and lodging, $230.00 t-. 
Non-resident students are asocss ed an additional fee of - 
and lodging coats an- $280.00 to S310.00. 

The pre-professionaJ program offered at College Park i> a- follows: 

COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

r- Senirstrr— N 
First Year I II 

Chemistry 1, 3 General Chemistry 4 i 

* 1 nglish 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry anil Analytical Geometry __ 3 3 
or or 

Math. 18, 19 — Elementary Mathematical Analysis 5 5 

1 — General Zoology 4 

Botany 1 — General Botany __ 4 

Physic*] Activities 1 1 

Air Science 1, 2— Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) ft 2 

Health 2, 4— Health (Women) 2 2 

Total 15io-19 17-19 

Second Year 

'English 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

•History 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis __ 4 

Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 

•Government and Politics I or Group 1 Elective 3 

Elective: 

Approved Elective from Group I or Group II of American 

Civilization Program __ 3 

-oience 3, 4— Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 2 K 

ncal Activities 1 1 

Total 17-19 1H 1R 1 -.. 



r.'^ram in American ( ivilizntMML 



University of Maryland 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. 
It has therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civiliza- 
tion. This program is also designed to provide the student with a general 
educational background. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic 
levels. The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the 
University and is described below. The second level is for undergraduate 
students wishing to carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College 
of Arts and Sciences). The third level is for students desiring to do grad- 
uate work in the field (see catalog for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of 
Maryland must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) 
obtain 24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the 
American Civilization Program. Although the courses in the Program are 
prescribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for students who 
demonstrate in classification tests good previous preparation in one or more 
of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American History 
(6 hours, H. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are 
required subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or all three 
of these areas by means of University administered tests are expected to 
substitute certain elective courses. Through such testing a student may be 
released from 3 hours of English (9 hours remaining as an absolute require- 
ment), 3 hours of American History (3 hours remaining as an absolute 
requirement), and 3 hours of American Government. Students released 
from 3 hours of English will take Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those 
released from 3 hours of History will take, instead of H. 5 and 6, any one 
of the following three hour courses: H. 41, H. 42, H. 51, H. 52, H. 61, H. 62, 
H. 71, or H. 72. Students who have been exempted from courses in English, 
American History, or American Government may not take such courses for 
credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required, students elect 
one course from the following group (Elective Group I) : 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics. (Not open to Freshmen. 
Students who may wish to take additional courses in economics 
should substitute Economics 31 for Economics 37). 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 



School of Pharmacy 

(Student! enrolled in the College of Bu>ine» and Public A«linini>t i a! i< >n will 
nonnallv meet this I e<|uireinent by taking Economics 31 in the sophomore 

Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released Erom • '». 6 01 
( > hours of otherwise required courses in Rnglish, American History or 
American Government (see 1 above), shaU select the replacements for tl 

COUTSea Erom an\ OX all oi the following groups: (a) more advanced com 
in tlu- same department as the required COUTSeS in which the student IS ex- 
cused, oi (b) Elective Group 1 (see 2 above), provided that the same course 
ma\ not he used m both a Group 1 and a Group II choice, or (ci Elective 
up 11. Group II consists of the following 3-hours cours. 

11. 42, Western Civilisation; either II. 51 or 52, The Humanities; either 
Music 20, Survej oi Music Literature or Art 22, History of American Art; 

and Sociology 5, Anthropology. 

Admission To The Professional Program ( Of Five Year Curriculum | 

At Baltimore. Maryland 

The first year of the Professional Program of the five year curriculum 
was offered for the first time beginning September 1961. This program 
with the pre-professional courses is given in summary forms on pages 5. 
36, and 37. 

1. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program 
at College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0 J will 
qualify for advancement to the pharmacy program at Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the 
S 'ol of Pharmacy each student will be required to complete a form of 
intent and return it to the School of Pharmacy Advisor at College Park. 

2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

\. Prerequisites 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed 
essfnll] two academic years of work in an accredited college* of arts 
and sciences based upon the completion of a four year high school course 
<.r the equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course must consist 
<<f a minimum of (>0 semester hours of credit exclusive of physical education, 
military science or similar courses. The 60 semester hours most include 
i -! hoars ol English, hours of mathematics (algebra, trigonometry and 



*.\<.t lati than 21 semester hours of academic work immcdiat.K prioi to u<I 
ii 1 1 — i * >n t" the Professional Program at Baltimore must h«- completed in a regionally 

oflege or univer-ity. 



University of Maryland 

analytical geometry), 4 hours of botany and 4 hours of zoology (or 8 hours 
of general biology), 8 hours of general inorganic chemistry (including quali- 
tative analysis), 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours of physics, 3 
hours of economics, 6 hours of history and the remainder as electives from 
the non-science areas. It is strongly recommended that the electives include 
political science and sociology although courses in philosophy, psychology, 
speech and foreign languages will be given consideration. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
must have a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) when the lowest 
passing grade is D (1.0), or its equivalent. The average shall be based on 
all college courses undertaken by the student in his pre-professional pro- 
gram, exclusive of credit in military science, physical education, hygiene, 
or similar courses. Transfer credit is given only for the courses completed 
with a grade of C {2.0) or higher and which are a part of the pre-professional 
curriculum. 

B. Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore 
should write to the Director of Admissions and Registrations, University of 
Maryland, Building 520R, Room 201, Lombard and Greene Streets, Balti- 
more 1, Maryland. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to 
their applications should communicate with the above office. 

Admission To Advanced Standing In The Four Year Program 
In Baltimore 

1. Request the Dean of the School of Pharmacy to send the preliminary 
application blank. Fill the blank out fully including the names of all 
schools and colleges which the candidate has attended. Sign the blank 
and return it with the required photographs and a seven dollar and fifty cent 
investigation fee to the Director of Admissions. (This fee will not be re- 
funded or credited on any subsequent bill.) 

2. Request your high school (s) to send a transcript of your record (s) 
to the Admissions Office. If these credentials appear satisfactory, the prospec- 
tive student will be advised. 

3. The Admissions Office acts continuously upon the applicants of can- 
didates whose credentials are complete, except for the final school record, 
and the School of Pharmacy notifies such candidates who appear satisfactory 
that they have been tentatively accepted. 

Enrollment In The Pre-Professional Program at College Park 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum 
at College Park may obtain application blanks by writing to the Admis- 
sions Office at College Park. Students meeting the requirements for admis- 
sion will receive letters of admission from the Admissions Office at College 

8 



v hool of Pharmacy 

Park. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering from 
the Office of tin* Registrar at College Park i few weeks prior to the Sep- 
tember registration period. 

There is a fee of $3.00 for changes in registration made after the first 
week of instruction. 

Enrollment In The Professional Program At Baltimore 

1. noil COLLEGE PARI DIVISION 

Students who had filed with the College Park Pharmacy Advisor a 
letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the curriculum 
and win* have completed the requirement! of the pre-professional program 

will be notified by the Dean <>f the School of Pharmacy that they have 
qualified for advancement into the professional program. 

These students will receive detailed directions for registering from the 
Baltimore Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the Septemher regis- 
tration period. 

'2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates 
of admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at 
Baltimore. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering 
from the Office of the Registrar at Baltimore a few weeks prior to the Sep- 
tember registration period. 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $135.00 

Non-residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 
(This one fee covers all laboratory courses i 

* Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

* Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 



•The Student Union fee is payable by all student* enrolled in the Pro fe s sion a l 

Is on the Baltimore Campus and i* need to pay interest OB and amortize the cost 
of construction of the Union Buildinp. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
Students enrolled in the Pioffmloinl Schools on the Baltimore campus and i- used 
to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students enrolling f°r 
the fir-t time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee wiD be 
$15.00: the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as mueh If 12 credit fa 
of work are considered full-time students subject to this ' 

All summer sehool Students will pay a $f>.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fee-, and b'»>k charges, etc. 



University of Mary lain! 

Student Activities Fee {per semester) 10.00 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 
all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester 
are payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student Union 
fee and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of first registra- 
tion. Students wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment 
of tuition charges must do so with the Financial Office at or prior to 
n uistration for the semester for which such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only (Not applicable to students accepted from 
School of Pharmacy, College Park) 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 

For Seniors 

Graduation Fee (To be paid in February of the Senior 
Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all 
breakage in excess of $5.00 per year 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 

semester's work will be charged additionally for each 

course. 

Fee for Changes in Registration after first week 3.00 

PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) $15.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 10.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 11.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physiology 10.00 

10 



School of Pharmacy 

* Student Union Fee (per annum* 6.00 

* Student Union Fee [Summer Session) 6.00 

Student Activities lee (per semester* MUX) 

CftADUATI STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee (foi new students Only, non- 

returnable) 110.00 

Tuition fee (per .remoter hour each semester) 15.00 

Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 

'Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

•Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 

'Special Fee (per annum I 10.00 

(Graduation Fee 

Master's degree 10.00 

Doctor's degree (including hood and microfilming 

of thesis) 50.00 

REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL (BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

Students withdrawing from School at any time during the academic year, 
must file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. Students who do 
UOi comply with this ruling are not issued an honorable dismissal and are 
not accorded any refund of tuition. Minors may withdraw only with the 
written consent of parent or guardian. Fees, excluding Application Fee, 
Matriculation Fee, Student Activities Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition, and 
any scholarship credit, are refunded to withdrawing students in accordance 
with the following schedule: 

Period jrom date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 8 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40 ' ■ 

Between four and five weeks 20 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for 
withdrawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 



•The Student Union fee is payable 1»> all students enrolled in the Professional 
■ U on the Baltimore Campus and i- used to pay interest on and unortiae the cost 
of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full-time 
students enrolled in the Professiona] Schools on the Baltimore campus and i- used 
to nuance the equipment needed far the Union Building. For student- enrolling for 
the fir-t tune at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union Fee will be 
$15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much a- 12 credil noun 
Of work are considered full-time student- subject to this fee. 

All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee, This Si 
f • i- in addition to the tuition, laboratory lees, and hook charges, etc. 

// 



University of Maryland 

Text Books 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

Tuition and Fees for Pre-professional Program 
(College Park Campus) 

See page 5 for summary statements and consult "Adventure in Learn- 
ing" which is available from College Park, Maryland. 

Changes In Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such 
changes in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at 
the time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State 
of Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. 
However, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status 
to resident status must be established by him prior to the registration period 
set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their 
registration they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed 
services while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the 
six-months period referred to above except in those cases in which the adult 
was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into 
the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the perma- 
nent place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 



Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in 
r 

12 



the official "University General and Academic Regulations." 



School of Pharmacy 
Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 

Mi; xi> w I REQUIKI Ml N ra 

Students who bare aol attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for am subject are not admitted t<» the una] examine* 
lion in thai subject Absences due to illness and late registration are n<>r- 
malh i'i! ted \n 1 1 1 1 the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness <>f more 
than half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses <>f less than half a 
period arc also construed a- an absence. 

Written and oral quizzes arc given throughout tin- Bemester at the 
discretion of the instructor. Pinal examinations are held a' the end of each 
scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the 
Dean immediately. When the ahsence is justifiable, the Dean will grant 
permission for a deferred examination. 

v!>ING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 

Grade Interpretation Point Value 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Fair 2 

D Poor but passing 1 

1 Failure 

I Course work incomplete replaced by definite 

grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 

3 inding in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
iter's work, lliis average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 



Su bject 
Chemistry 


Credit 
4 


Grade 
C 


Points 
8 


Microbiol 

Pharmacognosy 

Pharmacy 

Pharmacy Administration 


4 
4 
4 
3 


c 

B 
A 

D 


8 
12 
16 

3 



19 17 

Dividing the number <»f points by the number of credits, the student 
is found t<> have a grade point average of 2.\~. 

13 



University of Maryland 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence at 
the University of Maryland are considered. 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Six weeks after the beginning of each semester, the 
Dean warns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D 
and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a 
student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the in- 
structor enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above with 
an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is 
given the student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the 
end of the next semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I 
becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in 
which he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at the 
University, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, in- 
cluding regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he will 
not receive any additional credit for the course completed with a passing 
grade. 

If the work is completed at the University of Maryland his final mark 
will be substituted for the mark already recorded. Although the final mark 
received in the course will be used in determining credit for promotion and 
graduation, it does not apply to honors and awards. See applicable section 
under "Honors and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the Dean to repeat the course or its 
equivalent, at another university or college, the regulations applicable to« 
transfer of credit apply. Credit is given if the course is completed w r ith a 
grade of C (2.0) or higher; for purposes of computing grade averages, 
transfer credit is considered as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in 
raising his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to with- 

14 



School of Pharmacy 

draw from the School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, s student maj be per- 
mitted, with me written permission of the Dean and the head of the depart- 
ment giving the course, to repeal the course for the second time. Such per- 
•i be given to the student for only one coarse. 

appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above regu- 
lation must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception wiD be 
oted under unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall require 
the approval oi the head of the department giving the com 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who 

is permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements 
tor bV from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

LTIONS FOB PROMOTION IND I'liOBATION 

Ml students, namely Seniors of the four year program and all students 
in the professional program of the five year curriculum, at the School <-t 
Pharmacy are l ipected to maintain a grade average of not less than C (2.0) 
for each semester. Va) -indent in the above categories who fails to maintain 
ade average of C (2.0) for any semester will be placed on probation 
during the next semester. Students in the last year of either the four or five 
year program must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) to become eligible 
for graduation. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semester 
hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on 
pronation during the next semester. 

Any student on pronation must pass all courses for which he i- registered 
and must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) or he will be automatical^ 
: ped from the School of Pharmacy at the end of that semester. 

\ student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in an] semester Bhall be dismissed at the end of that semester f * » i unsatis- 
factory scholar-hip. 

\nv student who has been on probation for two semesters and then 
obtains a probation grade point average for a third semester will be auto- 
matically dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

i ! kTIONfl FOl U M'MISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC SI HIDING 

\ student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may apply 
in writing to th<* Dean foi readmission after a lapse of at l< semester. 

is 



University of Maryland 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that 
semester. 

Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be 
readmitted only once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsidera- 
tion of his particular case. 

GRADES OF STUDENTS WITHDRAWING FROM THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 
After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 
After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

Students having 105 or more credit hours with a grade average of C 
(2.0) in the work of the Junior year are classified as Seniors. 

Senior students must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) in the work 
of the Senior year and have 144-146 credit hours to be considered as candi- 
dates for graduation, depending upon the year of their initial enrollment. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS — FIVE YEAR CURRICULUM PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM 

Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the Professional 
Program with a grade average of C (2.0) in addition to the Pre-Professional 
requirements will be classified as Second Professional Year students. 

Retail Majors who have completed 71 credit hours of the Professional 
Program with a grade average of C (2.0) will be classified as Third Pro- 
fessional Year students. Pre-Graduate Majors in order to advance in their 
Elective Program and attain the classification of Third Professional Year 
students must have completed 73 credit hours of the Professional Program 
with an academic quality indicative of the successful pursuit of graduate 
work. 

Students in the Retail Major or Hospital Major must maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) during the Third Professional Year and have completed a 
minimum of 108 credit hours of the Professional Program to be considered 

16 



School oj Pharmacy 

as candidates for graduation. Pie-Graduate Majors n\ I i « > have completed a 

minimum of L10 credit boon with a grade average of al least C (2.0) will 
Dsidered as candidates for graduation. 

'SENIOR in I nVE PROCR Hi FOUR TEAR Ct RRI4 i LI M 

Student- are required to elect cither the RETAIL Major or the PRE- 
GRADl \ TE Major bj Mai I of the Junior year. It is recommended that 
students electing the Pre-Graduate program will have attained s grade 
point average oi at least 2.5 for the three previous jrears. [nose \sh<> elect 
this major should also indicate their choice of electives in the Retail Major 
in case their average does not permit their election of the Pre-Graduate 
Major. 

RETAIL Majors must choose between Pharmac) 81 and Pharmacy L21 
and between Pharmacognosy 62 and Pharmacy 132. PRE-GKAD1 \IL 
- after the 1960-61 aeademic year, must take Mathematics 20, 21, Calcu- 
lus, and nun be required to take Pharmacy 35, Professional Communica- 
tions and Pharmacy 38, History of Pharmacy, instead of English 3,4, Com- 
position ami World Literature. 

'ELECTIVE PROGRAM — FIVE YEAR CURRICULUM 

1. Second Professional Year Electives 

Students are required to elect either the Retail Major or the Pre- 
Graduate Major by May 1 of the First Professional Year. 

Students to be eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major must have academic 

standings indicative of aptitudes for the successful pursuit of graduate work 
and must meet the necessary prerequisites. Students not qualifying for the 
Pre-Graduate Major will be required to pursue the Retail Major. 

2. Third Professional Year Electives 

Students must make elective selections by May 1 of the Second Pro- 
fessional \ car. 

The Retail Major of the Second Professional Year may continue with 
the Retail Major program or elect the Hospital Major. Students continuing 
the Retail Major must i hoose between Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health 
Products and Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatologieal Preparati 

The Hospital Majors will follow the prescribed pro-ram. 

Student- in the Pre-Graduate Major will pursue Chemistrj L87, L89, 
188, L90, Physical Chemistry and Physical Chemistr) Laboratory. 



•The eh ran mu-t be tpprored by the Cla^- adriaoi and the Dean 

additional information on-ult with th< < tdvitOI and tee the retpecthri CUrricoll 

on pagei 54, 55, ■'/). and 37. 



17 



University of Maryland 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION — FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the senior year in residence at the School 
of Pharmacy, who having entered prior to September 1956, have been ac- 
credited 144 semester hours instruction, or who having entered in Septem- 
ber 1956 or thereafter, have been accredited with 146 semester hours in- 
struction, and who have attained the required grade point standings and 
met the other requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION — FIVE YEAR CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the Third Professional Year in residence 
at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore and have been accredited 108 
semester hours instruction in the Professional Program as Retail Majors 
or Hospital Majors or have been accredited 110 semester hours instruction 
in the Professional Program as Pre-Graduate Majors and who have attained 
the required grade point standings and met the other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of 
transcripts are as follows: one copy of a student's record is made without 
charge; for additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript, 
except when more than one copy is requested at the same time. In that 
case, one dollar is charged for the first copy and fifty cents for each 
additional copy. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 
alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 
warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc.. as attested evidence of the student's record at the 
School of Pharmacy and the honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

Registration With The Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

18 



School ot Pharmacy 

" \w\ person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in an\ school or college 
of pharmacy in this state shall, nut later than thirty days after enrolling, file 
with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for 
registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application he -hall be 
required to furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, 
ami simultaneously with the riling <>f said application, shall pa) the Board a 
fee of one dollar: all >uch students of pharmacy -hall, at the beginning of 
any subsequent school or college year, Bubmil to the -aid Board a sworn 
statement of am and all actual drugstore experience acquired during the 
preceding vacation month-."" 

Licensure Requirements of The Maryland Board ot Pharmacy 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registra- 
tion t" those persona deemed competent, alter examination, by -aid Board 
of Pharmacy. \n\ person of good moral character who ha- attained the 

of twenty-one years, i- a graduate of an accredited school or college of 
pharmacy, and ha- completed one year a- a registered apprentice in a 
drug >t<>re or pharmacy approved by said Hoard of Pharmacy f<»r such pur- 

- may -it for examination given for the purpose of registration. 

\ student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug Btore 
or pharmacy acquired prior to attendance a- a regular student in a Bchool 
oi college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of 
pharmacy, lour months of the required practical pharmacy experience a- a 
istered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from an 
accredited school or college of pharmacy, in a drug -tore or pharmacy ap- 
proved by the Board for Bucfa purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 

Board of Pharmacy. 301 West Preston Street. Baltimore J. Maryland, for 
further information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

Deportment" 

The I ni\er-it\ re-n\e- the ri-ht to request at any time the withdrawal 
I student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, "i win.-.- continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
hi- or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct i- not satisfac- 
tory t" the authorities of the I Diversity. 

Students of the la-t classification may be asked to withdraw even though 
n. » specific charge be mad.- against them. 

Employ incut 

\ student should be prepared t«» finance hi- education during the entire 
period <•! attendance, a- all of hi- time should be -pent in the preparation 
and completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number <»f op- 

l<> 



University of Maryland 

portunities to secure suitable employment, hut it is recommended that 
students refrain from working during the school session. 

Housing 

1. WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in 
the Louisa Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close prox- 
imity to the School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommodations 
and it is under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. Bed linens, 
towels, pillows, blankets and curtains are provided as a part of the general 
furnishings of the room. Students are requested to bring their own bed- 
spreads, an extra blanket, bureau scarves, small rugs and a laundry bag. 
The individual student assumes responsibility for all dormitory property 
assigned to her. Any damage done to property other than that which results 
from ordinary wear and tear will be charged to the student concerned. The 
room rates are as follows: Double Room, $15.00 per month per person. 
Single Room, $20.00 per month; Single Room with bath, $25.00 per month. 

Meals may be purchased at the University Cafeteria or in nearby restau- 
rants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in The Baltimore Union. 
For particulars, see section immediately below. 

General Information for The Baltimore Union 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommo- 
dations for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned build- 
ing which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry 
facilities, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. 
Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; 
meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for accommo- 
dations covers the 1962-63 academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

Double Room Rates: 

$150.00 per semester (per person) 

$80.00 per eight weeks summer session (per person) 

Single Room Rates: 
$45.00 per month 

The three single rooms available will be assigned on the oasis of 
length of residence in The Baltimore Union. 

20 



School of Pharmacy 

What the Kate covers: 

The rata shown above ii pax person and includes the following: 

Room Furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, i loset, 
book shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chaii and desk lamp. 
Maid service ^n i 1 1 include cleaning <d room twice per week and 
replacement of change oi linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac 
Telephone Company. Cos! of the telephone is nol included in the 
room rate information can be obtained from the Manager's office. 
Mad sen ice is also proi ided. 

The resident provides blankets, pillow, towels and linens <d which the 
latter two must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 

\ small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 

rRANsn n ra 

The Rates are: 

S 4.00 per clay 
|2 1.00 per wet k 

W hat the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath towel, one face towel, one face cloth. 
- tap and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

MANAGER'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Parking 

The I Diversity of Maryland does not provide any parkin- facilities on 
university parking lots for students on the Baltimore Campus. 

The Health Sciences Library 

Hi-' neu Health S. iences Library was opened for the Fall Term of 
the 1960-1961 School Year. This new library building includes the collec- 
tion- of the Schools of Pharmacy, Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and Social 

Work. 

I he Rules and Regulations by the library arc available for di stributi on 
t'. Student! at all times. 

21 



University of Maryland 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Grants 
The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was 
designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was subsequently 
held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the 
present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of up to $1500.00 for single persons or up to $1800.00 for mar- 
ried individuals who are promising graduate students desirous of doing 
research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and phar- 
macognosy; non-veteran students may also apply for an additional allow- 
ance up to S600.00 for tuition, fees, and supplies. Address applications 
directly to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 777 
Fourteenth Street, N.W., Washington 5, D. C, between February 15 and 
March 15 for consideration for the forthcoming September. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Felloivship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, former 
associate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing pharmacist 
of Baltimore, has contributed annually since 1930 a sum of money to 
maintain a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fellowship 
is open to promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chem- 
istry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellow- 
ships for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical 
chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. The selection 
of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty Assembly 
with the approval of the Dean. 

The Noxema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund not to exceed 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens. A candi- 
date will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications by the 
Fellowship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc. may appoint a non-voting mem- 

22 



School of Pharmacy 

bar. Thifl fellowship maj be renewed annually at tin- discretion of the 
grantors. 

Research Grant of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Uumni Association <>f tin- School of Pharmacy gives to the School 
each Near the sum of $100.00 t<. be used a- a research granl for a stndenl 
-elected h\ the Committee on the Research Granl of the Alumni Association 
to enable the student to engage in pharmaceutical research in the School of 
Pharmacy. The research conducted must he of general pharmaceutical in- 
teresl and must he accepted upon completion for publication in one of the 
pharmaceutical journal-. 

Other Research Grants 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants 

from the Smith. Kline & French Laboratories, the National Institutes of 
Health and Cancer Chemotherapy National Service Center. The Department 
of \nat«>m\ and Physiology has been awarded a National Science Founda- 
tion Research Grant Through these grants, the School of Pharmacy is able 
to provide a number of research fellowships available to graduate and post- 
dot total students in pharmaceutical chemistry and physiology. 

Special Grants 

The Atomic Fnergy Commission has allotted funds to the Department of 
tnatomy and Physiology to equip a radioisotope laboratory for the School 
of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

The Smith. Kline & French Foundation has provided funds to the 
Department of Pharmai \ for the procurement of specialized research equip- 
ment. 

Vssistantships 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistant-hips, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carry- 
ing a stipend of $2,000.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to 
qualified students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services 
to the departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry 
two-thirds "f the normal graduate work. 

Residencies in Hospital Pharmacy 

1. University (of Maryland) Hospital 

Tne Department of Pharmacj of the Universitj Hospital together 
with the School of Pharmacj and the Graduate School of the I ai« 
\<r-it\ of Maryland oiTer annually, to qualified graduate pharma- 
cists, residencies in hospital pharmacy. The appointments beginning 

July first are for twent \ -f.nir months. During the period <.f ap- 

23 



University of Maryland 

pointment the resident divides his time between hospital pharmacy 
and graduate study leading to the Master of Science degree granted 
by the University of Maryland and a certificate of residency to be 
awarded by the University Hospital. Full time training will be re- 
quired during the summer of 1963. Two weeks of vacation are 
allowed during the term of appointment. The University Hospital 
provides a stipend of $2400.00 per year for the first year as Assist- 
ant Resident. Completion of the Assistant Residency leads to appoint- 
ment as Resident with a stipend of $3000.00 per year. Parking space, 
uniforms and laundering of uniforms are free of charge. The resi- 
dents must pay the tuition, laboratory and other fees for graduate 
work in the University. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by address- 
ing inquiries to the Director of Pharmaceutical Service, University 
Hospital, Baltimore 1, Maryland or to the Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

2. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy 

The Pharmacy Department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, together 
with the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the I ni- 
versity of Maryland, offer annually to qualified graduate pharmacists 
several residencies in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, be- 
ginning September first, are for twenty-two months. During twenty 
months, appointees devote half time to hospital pharmacy service 
and half time to graduate work leading to the Master of Science de- 
gree granted by the University of Maryland and a certificate of 
residency awarded by the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Full time train- 
ing in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy is required for two 
(2) months during the summer of 1963. Four weeks of vacation 
are allow r ed during the term of appointment. The Hospital provides 
a stipend of $200.00 per month for the first year and $250.00 per 
month thereafter and the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees 
for these candidates by 25%. However, candidates must pay the 
regular laboratory and other fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by address- 
ing inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
Baltimore 5, Maryland, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and 
loans should be directed to: 

Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 



24 



hool oj Pharmacy 

Alumni IsSOCiatlOn of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships * 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-profes- 
rional pharmacy stadents <>n me basis of irorthiness, moral character, scho- 
lastk schieyemenl and tin- need for financial assistance. These scholarships 
are open only to residents of the state of Maryland. Each scholarship not 
exceeding 1500.00 per academic Near Is applied in partial defrayment of 
at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutic 'ciution Scholarships * 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually 

scholarships to pre-professiona] pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 

i, moral chars scholastic achievement and the need for financial 

stance. Each scholarship m>t exceeding $500.00 per academic Mar is 

used in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These 

scholarships are open only to residents of the state of Maryland. 

uFs Drug Stores Foundation ScholarsJiips * 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contrihutes annually several schol- 

sips to pie-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, 
scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial assistance. 

i scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied to 
defray partially the fees and expenses at College Park. Maryland. Recipients 
must have been residents of the state of Maryland for at least one year prior 
to the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available 
consult the University bulletin "Adventure in Learning" available from 
College Park. Maryland. 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be ad- 

ssed to Dean Noel K. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 

636 W. Lombard St., Baltimore 1, Maryland. The selection of the recipients 

of the scholarships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunction with a 

committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Asi m School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
<>f Maryland makes available annually scholarships Sfortfa $100.00 p< r 

•These scholar-hips are awarded by the Committee <»n Scholaxshipi and G 

in-Aid of the I "niv.-r-ity of Maryland in coop .-ration with the Scholarship (lorn: 
of the Alumni A-«o< iation of the School ol Pharm icy and the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

25 



University of Maryland 

semester to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their edu- 
cation. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes avail- 
able scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to qualified seniors of the four 
year curriculum and students of the second and third years of the profes- 
sional program of the five year curriculum. 

Carroll Chemical Company Scholarship 

The Carroll Chemical Company of Baltimore, Maryland, initiated in 
1956 a fund to provide one undergraduate scholarship to a qualified student 
in the first year of the professional program who has maintained a superior 
scholastic average and is in need of financial assistance. This scholarship 
includes the cost of tuition, fees, textbooks and equipment, not to exceed 
$500.00 per academic year. 

The Charles Caspar i, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and Alumni have made an endowment 
for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annual I \ 
by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland to a senior student who has shown superior proficiency in prac- 
tical and commercial pharmacy. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband. A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus 
of the School of Pharmacy. Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese 
Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded 
annually to a resident of Allegheny Count). Maryland. The recipient of the 

26 



s hool of Pharmacy 

award is to bfl selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholar- 
ship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxsemi Foundation, Inc. is contributing ■ fund to provide one 

or two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citiffnf 

of the United Mates. Candidates will he selected on the basifl «»f their 

educational qualification* bj the Scholarship Committee of the School of 
Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, 

Inc. ma) appoint a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed 
annuall\ at the discretion of the grantors. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary. Prince Georges-Montgomery County 

Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' \u\iliarv. Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharma- 
ceutical Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average and who i< j n 
need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified stu- 
dents who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in 
need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory 
of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
seniors of the four year curriculum and students of the second and third 
yean "f the professional program of the five year curriculum, and loans 
therefrom are made upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

\ DP t Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 195o provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $800 and 
during hi- entire course <>f study may borrow a Bum not exceeding 15000. 

borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and repay- 
ment term- established 1»n the I Diversity. Repayment of the loan begins 



*Th< -»• scholarshipi raided by the Committee on Scholarships and <-rant«- 

in - A i«i <>f the University <»f Maryland in cooperation frith tin- Scholar-hip Committee 
<.f the Alumn tion of the School «>f Pharmacy and th<- Maryland Phaima« 

:i"n. 

27 



University of Maryland 

one year after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and must be 
completed within ten years thereafter. No interest is charged on the loan 
until the beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after that date is to 
be paid at the rate of 3 per cent per annum. 

Honors and Awards 

University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more 
than one-fifth of the graduating class in each college including the School 
of Pharmacy. The honor designations are listed in the commencement 
program and are recorded on the recipients' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least 
two academic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or 
higher. Those in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors 
and those in the second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Deans Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Stu- 
dents whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
Academic Medal at the Honors Day Convocation held in June of each year. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a 
student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fra- 
ternity for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the 
University in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible 
by invitation to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester 
of the Junior Year of the four year curriculum and the end of the first semes- 
ter of the First Professional Year of the five year curriculum. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national Honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters 
of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship, character, personality, and leadership. 

28 



s hool of Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

\ gold medal is awarded annuall] to the candidate for the degree <>f 
Science in Pharmac] who has attained the highest general Aver- 
age, proTided thai this average is not below tin- grade oi U B M . Ccrtificatei 
oi Honor arc swarded to thr three students having the aexl highest genera] 

irovided these averages do aot fall below the made <»f *T> . 

Honorable mention i> made annualK of the first three junior students 

having the highs ral averages, provided these averages do not fall 

below the grade of *T»". 

Onlj courses taken at the Univereit) oi Maryland are considered in 

awarding these honor-. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty yean a professor of 
listrv in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by 
Pacult] Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and ana- 
lytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recom- 
mending a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his 
judgment oi the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well 
as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of phar- 
macy at the School of Pharmacy. Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a 
gold medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in 
pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the senior 
student having the highest general average throughout the course in practical 

and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College oi Pharmac) 
extended to him as s young man. Mr. Conrad L Wich provided a fund, the 
income from which is swarded annually 1>\ the Faculty Assembly oi the 
- tool to the senior student who has done exceptional work throughout the 

M tn pharmacoL't, 



University of Maryland 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late 
son, Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. 
Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill, 
have provided a fund the income of which is awarded annually by the Faculty 
Assembly to a senior student for meritorious academic achievement in phar- 
maceutical jurisprudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
United States Dispensatory as a prize to the senior student recommended by 
the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Phi Alpha Chapter, Rho Pi Phi Fraternity Cup 

The Phi Alpha Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi Fraternity provides a cup 
to be awarded annually to the senior student selected by the Faculty As- 
sembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of character and leader- 
ship. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha 
Zeta Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the senior 
student chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
provides annually a key which is awarded to the senior student selected by 
the Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administra- 
tion. 

Merck Award 

Merck & Company, Inc., Railway. New Jersey, offers a set of valuable 
reference books to the senior student who attains a high standing in phar- 
macy or pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary'' is made available by Bristol 
Laboratories, Inc., to the senior student who has contributed the most to 
pharmacy through his extra-curricular activities. 

30 



School of Pharmacy 



Rexall Award 



The Rexall Drug Compan) provides a Mortar and Pestle Troph) to the 
senior student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both leadership 
and scholarship. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given [reel) of their time for the betterment of tin 1 
School in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the an- 
nual Honors Daj Convocation. 

Student Organizations (Baltimore Campus) 
Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an or- 
ganisation of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding 
in tin* internal administration of the school for organizing all extra-curricular 

programs and activities of the student body and for c dinating these 

programs and activities with those of tin* Faculty and Administration t<> 
foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council of the 
Student Alliance is composed of the President <»f the Student Government 
Alliance, the Presidents of the respecti\e classes, and one dele-ate elected 
from each undergraduate class. 

Student Brunch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

The purpose of the Student Branch is to encourage in the broadest and 
most libera] manner the advancement of pharmac) a- a science and a- a 
profession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution of 
the American Pharmaceutical Association, especiallv in fostering education 
in matter- involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its application and 
aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools <»f Dentistry, Law. 
Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy established the [nter-Professional Student 

ite for purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships among the 
Professional Schools and the I niversit) I nits at College Park. 

'I'll'- Senate i- comprised »>f representatives from each of the five pro- 
fessional schools. 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of (he Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association I 1961-1962) 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part <>f the State I niversit) in 
I, t!,-- Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing com- 

31 



University of Maryland 

mittee known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of 
this group are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the 
School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present members 
of the Committee are: 

Irving I. Cohen, Chairman 

James P. Cragg, Jr., Co-Chairman 

Francis S. Balassone Samuel I. Raichlen 

Frederic T. Berman Henry G. Seidman 

Frank Block Simon Solomon 

Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr. John F. Wannenwetsch 

Stephen J. Provenza H. Nelson Warfield 

Alumni Association 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 
1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence 
as such or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
until 1907, when the General Alumni Association of the University of Mary- 
land was formed. Following the organization of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the Society remained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was 
reorganized as the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy, University 
of Maryland. Each year it is more evident that interest in the Alumni 
Association is not only maintained, but is growing. 

Officers (1961-1962) 

Simon Solomon Honorary President 

James P. Cragg, Jr President 

Samuel A. Goldstein First Vice-President 

Milton A. Friedman Second Vice-President 

Frank J. Slama Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Irving I. Cohen, Chairman 

Harold P. Levin 

Robert J. Kokoski 

Vito Tinelli, Jr. 



32 



FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

and 
FIVE YEAR CURRICULUM 



FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second 


Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


2 

- 

c 

— 

s 


JQ 

a 


I 


■ 
_. 


o 

B 

g 
~ 

Q 


_2 

C 


Is 


2 

• 

O 


Freshman Year 
♦Chemistry 1, 3, General Inorganic and 


2 


6 


8 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 

3 


2 
3 


6 


8 
3 


4 


'English 1, 2. Survey and Composition 


3 
3 


3 




3 












3 
3 

1 




3 


3 


•Modern Language 1, 2, or 6, 7, French or 


3 

1 




6 


3 

1 

8 


3 

i 

4 


1 
3 3 




1 
1 


1 




1 
2 


1 








2 


3 


5 


3 




6 

4 

3 
2 


8 
3 

4 

7 
5 






Sophomore Year 


19 

4 
2 

2 
5 

4 


18 


♦♦Chemistry 35, 37, Elementary Organic 

♦♦Chemistry 36, 38, Elementary Organic 

Laboratory 

**Pharmacv 21, 22, General 


.1 

4 
3 


3 
_____ 

4 
2 


4 
3 
2 
3 

6 


3 

4 
7 
5 

7 

8 


2 

2 
5 


♦Phvsics 10, 11, General _ _ 


4 




5 














Junior Year 
§Chemistry 53, Pharmaceutical Testing and 


17 


18 
4 


^Chemistry 153, Biological 


4 
2 


4 
4 


8 
6 


5 

4 










jj Microbiology 1, Pharmaceutical 

jJMicrobiology 115, Serology and Immunology 

S Pharmacy 51, 52, Dispensing 


2 
2 
2 


4 
5 
6 


6 

7 
8 


4 


2 
2 

1 


5 
6 


8 

1 


4 
4 

1 


4 
4 




3 
3 




3 
3 




§ Pharmacy Administration 37, Fundamentals 


3 


of Economics 

Senior Year (Required) 

Chemistry 111, 113, Chemistry of Medicinal 


3 

1 
3 
2 

1 


_____ 

3 
3 


3 

1 
7 
5 
4 


18 

8 

_____ 

\ 


19 
3 


First Aid 1, Standard _ _ 


3 
2 


4 
3 


7 
5 


4 


Pharmacologv 81, 82, General 


3 


Pharmacv 101, 102, Advanced Dispensing 




Pharmacy Administration 21, Accounting 

Pharmacy Administration 62, Jurisprudence 


3 




3 


3 

5 


Electivest _ 








7 













2 


3 


5 


18 


+ ( Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 61, Entomology for Phar- 


19 
3 




Pharmacognosy 62, Animal Health Products 


3 
2 


_____ 
3 


3 1 5 


or 
Pharmacv 132, Cosmetics _ __ 










r 

5 i 3 


Pharmacy 121, Hospital Pharmacy Admin- 


; 

2 
5> 


"~"o 


2 

r 
2 
2 


2 
I 


1 


or 

Pharmacv 81. Pharmacy Literature 








Pharmacy Administration 71, Management 










Pharmncy Administration 72, Drug Market- 


2 

3 

3 
3 


~~~o 

3 
4 


2 

3 
r 
1 
1 

3 

4 


2 


Si Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
tEnglish 3, 4. Composition and World 


3 

3 
3 


""o 

3 
4 


3 

r 
3 
3 

3 

4 


3 

3 
3 

1 

2 


3 


or 
'Language 6, 7, Intermediate Scientific Germnn 


I 

3 


■ •tives— Special Cases) 


1 


^Chemistry 112. 114. Chemistry of Medicinal 


2 









t Instruction in these courses given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
t The electives must be approved bv the Class Advisor and Dean. 

♦Courses, formerly given bv 'he College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at Baltimore. 
♦♦Course not offered after 1960-61. 
§ Course not offered after 1961-62. 



POUR U'.AK ( l RRIC1 II M 

SI MM AliY OF HOIKS AND CREDITS 



Courw 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Freshman Year 


64 
96 
48 
48 
96 
32 

64 


192 


'English 












•Modern Laaguai • 










'Zoology l. 4 


111 


Total 


480 
96 


336 


Sophomore Year 


96 


••Ch< n 87 - 




••Chemistry M 38 


128 


"Pharmacy 11, U 

'Physics 10, 11 •— 

••Pbj ' ._ 


128 
96 

64 


96 
64 
48 




416 

32 
64 
32 
32 
64 
64 
16 
48 


432 




Junior Year 


96 




64 




64 




64 




1G0 


;l'h:irm:icy 51. 52 _ _ 


192 






| Pharmacy Administration 37 








352 

96 
16 

64 

16 

48 

224 r 


640 


Senior Year (Required) 
Chemistry 111, 113 








Pharmacology 81, 82 


128 


Pharmacy 101. 102 


96 


Pharmacy Administration 21 

Pharmacy Administration 62 

Electives 


48 


160 c 


Total 


560 

32 

48 

32 
32 

32 
32 
32 

96 

96 
96 


432 


J (Electives — Retail Major) 


48 






or 
Pharmacv 132 


48 






or 




Pharmacy Administration 71 

Pharmacy Administration 72 

t" Electives— Pre-Graduate Major) 
lish 3, 4 . _ 






1 ~ 


or 
•Language 6. 7 










Ji Electives — Special Cases) 
mistry 99 


96 


tChemtetrj H-. 114 .. 




128 


SUMMARY 
Freshman Y<>ar 


4 SO 
416 
352 
560 

1.808 


336 


more Year . 


432 


Junior Year 


640 




432 


! 


1.840 



Total 



256 
96 
48 
II 
96 
32 
32 

208 



B 1 8 



128 
96 

128 

K4 

160 
112 



Mfl 



128 

128 

96 

96 

224 

256 

16 

48 

9'J 2 



96 
16 
224 
160 
64 
48 



Credit 
hourn 



96 
128 



816 
848 

992 



B6 



6 
2 
3 
12 

37 

3 
I 



37 
35 

37 

37 



'•s given by Collar of Ar'- and S. iince. 
Class Advisor and D« •an. 
• n liy th<- College of Artfl and B *1 Baltimore. 

|A minimum of 144 m- lit s required f<>r students, entered 1 ■ r i< .!• to Beptember, L0M and 146 

credr 

-ajre. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM OF FIVE YEAR CURRICULUM 

COURSES. HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 
Hrs. Per Week ~" 


Second Semester 
Hrs. Per Week " 


Title and Number of Course 


o 

1 
g 

5 

2 
3 


>> 
jo 

i 

6 
4 




1 
£ 

8 
7 


5 

! 

O 

4 
4 


I 
5 


a 


\ 


| 




First Professional Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 

Histology _ . 




Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32, Principles 


_ _ 

3 
2 


4 
6 


7 
8 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34, Quantitative 


4 


Pharmacy 31, Introduction to the Profession 
of Pharmacy _ . 


2 
3 
3 


_____ 


2 
6 
3 


2 
4 
3 




Pharmacy 23, 34, Processes and Dosage Forms.. 


3 


3 


6 


4 


Pharmacv 38, History of Pharmacy 


8 

2 


_____ 


3 
5 


3 












3 




1 
2 


_____ 


1 
6 






Second Professional Year (Required) 
First Aid 1, Standard _ 


17 


18 




4 










Microbiology 14(5, Serology, Immunology, 


2 


4 


6 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Principles of 


2 
2 


4 
3 

* 




8 
5 
6 

_ 


8 

3 




Pharmacognosy 41, 42, General Pharmacognosy. 
Pharmacy 43, 44, Pharmaceutical Technology.. 
Phvsiology 142, General Physiology _. 


2 

2 
3 


3 

4 
6 


5 
6 
9 


3 
3 
5 










3-4 


3-4 




3 




3 










"1 (Electives — Retail Major) 


18-19 
3 


18-19 


Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 


2 
4 

!: 


3 
3 


5 

4 

7 
1 


3 


% (Electives— Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 

3 

1 

1 
2 

2 

3 


3 

3 

3 


4 
6 

1 

4 
5 

2 

3 


4 

4 

1 

2 
3 

2 

3 

5 


4 


Third Professional Year (Required) 
Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology- 
Pharmacy 55, 56, Pharmaceutical Formulation 
Problems 


6 

1 


or 

Pharmacy 151, Manufacturing Pharmacy 

Pharmacy 153, 154, Dispensing 




9 

8 


_ 

3 






5 
2 
3 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharmaceuti- 
cal Jurisprudence _ 


2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, Chemistry 
of Medicinal Products 


3 




5 




2 


3 


5 










$( Electives — Retail Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists. 


18-19 
3 


19-18 


1 3 

2 
2 




3 


3 

5 
2 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 


2 

2 
2 


3 


2 

5 
2 


2 

3 

2 


2 


% (Electives — Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists- 
Pharmacy 153, Hospital Pharmacy Administra- 












Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 


2 


3 

G 


5 

3 

6 


3 


Pharmacy 158, Orientation to Hospital 










2 


2 


Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 


3 


6 


3 

6 


3 
2 


3 

2 



X The electives must be approved by tho Class Advisor and Dean. 



>■>[ of Pharmacy 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM ov FIVE YEAR CURRK ULUW 

SUMMARY OF BOUBfl AND CKKDITS 



urit 


Didactic 

96 

32 
96 
48 
48 

«. 

16 
32 

n 

64 

04 

104t 
111 

48 
32 

128 

112 
32 

16 
64 
64 
96 

120+ 
504 

82 

48 

32 
64 

82 
32 
32 
32 

96 


Laboratory 

N 

96 


Total 

128 

192 
48 
48 
80 

880 

16 
96 
96 

128 
160 
192 
144 

: 
960 

4^ 

80 
128 

208 
32 
r 

64 

160 
64 
96 

2401 


Credit 
houra 


f.-ssional Year (Required) 


4 


raaceutieaJ Chemistry 30. 11 
maceutical 1 ^4 


8 

4 






8 




3 






3 


-.ition 86 

Total 


48 
464 


3 

35 


Second Professional Year (Required) 






64 
64 
64 

128 
96 

536 


4 




4 





6 




6 




5 








• 




• -dives— Retail Major) 

Pharmacy Administration 42 

< Eiectives— Pre-Graduate I 
Mathematics 20, 21 -_ _ 


3 


48 


3 
8 


Third Year (Required) 


96 


9 
2 


or 

Pharmacy 151 


48 
9b 


2 




6 




4 






6 


Eiectives . .. 


120t 
360 

48 


1U 


Total __ _ 


864 

80 

4S 
r 

80 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 
192 

880 
960 
864 


37 


%( Eiectives— Retail Major) 


3 




3 


or 


o 

48 


3 


Pha-- 4 __ 


4 


t( Eiectives— Hospital Major) 


48 


3 


Pharmacv l."3 _. . 


2 




48 


3 


Pharmacy 158 .... 


2 


X < Eiectives— Pre-Graduate) 
Cher 189 




6 


Chemistry 188. 190 


192 

464 
536 
M 

1360 


4 


SUMMARY 

First Professional Year __ 

•id Professional Year 

Third Professional Year 


416 

424 

504 

1344 


85 

36-38 
87 


Total 




110* 



rage. 
..e eiectives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 
rv.inimum | \s required for Students Bt-lectinc either the Retail Major Course 

or the Hospital Major Course. A miriimura of 110 credits required for students selecting the 
Pre-Graduate Course. 






I Diversity of Maryland 



Description of Courses 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

*1, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — (4, 4) 
Freshman year, two lectures, two laboratories. 

A study of the metals and non-metals with emphasis on chemical theory and im- 
portant generalizations. The laboratory work deals with fundamental principles, the 
preparation and purification of compounds, and the systematic qualitative analysis of 
the more common cations and anions. 

*35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry — (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, two lectures (Miller and Bossle) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 3. A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. 

*36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory — (2, 2) 

Sophomore year, one laboratory. (Miller and Bossle.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 35, 37 or current registration therein. A study of the gen- 
eral procedures used in organic laboratory. 

$75. Quantitative Analysis — (4) 

Sophomore year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Doorenbos and Lo) 
Prerequisites — Chemistry- 1, 3. A study of the gravimetric and volumetric procedures 
and theory, and their application to pharmaceutical analyses. 

§53. Pharmaceutical Testing and Assaying — (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Zenker, Koch and Manion.) 
Prerequisites — Chemistry 15, 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. Quantita- 
tive methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and of official preparations, 
with an introduction to instrumental methods. 

§99. Glassworking—(l, 1) 

Laboratory, senior year, either semester. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite — Consent of the instructor. Simple operations in the manipulation of 
glass, repair and construction apparatus. 



* Courses, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, not offered at 
Baltimore. 

fCourses intended primarily for sophomores are numbered 1-49; for juniors and 
seniors 50-99; for advanced undergraduates and graduates 100-199; and for graduates 
only 200-399. 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pur- 
sued one period a week for one semester. A laboratory period is equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation period. 

JCourse not offered after 1960-61. 

§Course not offered after 1961-62. 

38 



School of Pharmacy 
For Graduates and Advanced I ndergraduatea 

111, 113. Ckemutr) 0/ Medicinal Product* 

Senior year, three loci (Doorenboo.) 

Prerequisite Chemistrj \ rarvej oi the structural relationships, the 

synthesis ami chemicoJ properties 0! medicinal products. 

Ml, 143. Advo sonic Chemistr) (2, 2) 

Two lectures, ' Miller.) 

Prerequisites Chemistr] in advanced stud) oi the compound! ol 

•arbon. 

idvanced Organic Laboratory (2) 
Two laboratoii ' Miller) 

Pre requi site Chemistry or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 

complicated organic preparations. 

llo. 148, Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite Chemistry 141. 143, or equivalent. The systematic identification oi 
• ■ compounds. 
*153. Biological Chemistry — ( 5 > 
Junior year, tir-t semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

i Zenker, ECocfa and Manion. i 

Prerequisites Chemistry 35, 37. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the 
composition o! living organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur 
during health and in disease. 

189. Physical Chemistry < 3, 3) 

Three led u I Klesper. I 

Prerequisites Chemistry 15, 35, 37, Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20. 21. A 
study of lau- and theories of chemistry, including the lm- laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solution-, elementary thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics 
and electro-chemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Klesper.) 

equisites -Chemistry 187, 189 or may b<- takm simultaneously with Chemistry 
187. 18'^. Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

230. Seminar — (\) 
semester. 

:ir»-d of students majoring in pharmaceutica] chemistry. Reports of pi 
and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

mic Syntl 
laboratori < Miller. > 

Prerequisite Chemistry 111. Library and laboratory work designed to i Fei ex« 
in the more difficult organic syntheses and in nen techniques. 



■ offered after 



University of Maryland 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry — (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 111, 143. A study of the principles of stereochemistry of 
organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry— (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite— Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and synthesis of hetero- 
cyclic compounds. 

250. Steroids— (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the synthesis and structure determina- 
tion of steroids and the application of modern chemical concepts to the chemistry of 
steroids. 

252. Alkaloids— (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles involved in structure 
determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alkaloidal classes. 

253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 111, 113 and Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143 or per- 
mission of the instructor. A study of structural relationships and basic principles con- 
cerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, e.g., structure-ac- 
tivity relationships, physical properties and biological activity, cellular transport, drug, 
protein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and physico-chemical mechanisms of 
drug action. 

255. Instrumental Methods of Analysis — (2) 

Either semester, two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190 or equivalent. 

271, 272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry— (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Klesper.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of particular interest 
in the pharmaceutical sciences, including colloids, surface chemistry, kinetics, absorption 
spectroscopv, dipole moments and the behavior of molecules in electric and magnetic 
fields. 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory — (1) 

One laboratory. (Klesper.) 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are necessary for, and 
a part ©f, a larger research effort. 

281. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry — (2) 

Two lectures. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of the relationships 
between drugs and enzymes, with emphasis on drug action at the enzymatic level and on 
drug metabolism. 

282. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry Laboratory — (2) 

Two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. Lab- 

to 



s hool of Pharmacy 

oratory experiments designed to illustrate the u-e ol modem techniques and metabolic 

method- in the studs oi drug action and dlUg mctabo!. 
Hch in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Credit determined l>v the amount and quality oi \%ork performed. 

ENGLISH 

*1, 2. S::nr\ and ('ompositi.'- 
Freshman >ear. three lectures. 

P rereq u isite Four units of high school English. A study ol style, -\utax. spelling 

and punetuation. comhined with a histories] Study of English and American literature 
of the nineteenth and twentieth ccnturic-. Written their.-, hook re\i<\s- and I 

3, 4. Composition and fTorld Literature — (3, 3) 

Elective, three lectures. (Ballmanj 

Prerequisite English 1. 2. Practice in composition. An introduction to world litera- 
ture, for. a being read in translation. 

SPEECH 

V. 2. Public Speaking— (I, 1) 

hman year, one lecture. 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; reports, 
ete. 

FIRST AID 

1. Standard First Aid Course 

Senior year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson, instructor 

from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

*0. Basic Mathematics— (0) 

r reshman year, first semester, three lectures. 

Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 and who fail the qualify- 
ing examination for this course. The fundamental principles of algebra. 

*10. Algebra— (3) 

Freshman year, fir-t and second semesters, three lectures. 

Prerequisite — one unit of algebra. Fundamental operations, factoring, fraction-, 
lnear equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, bi- 
nomial theorem, and theory of equations. 

*11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry — (3) 
r, serond semester, three lectures. 
Prerequisite Mathematics 10 or 15. Required of those student- who do not offer 
one-half unit of trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, 
. Idition formulas, solution of triangle-, coordinates, locus problems, the straight 
line and circle, conic sections and graphs. 



*Cour-e. formerly given by the College <>f Arts and Sciences, no longer ol 
at Baltimore. 

41 



University of Maryland 

•IS. College Algebra— (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, three lectures. 

Prerequisite — High school algebra completed. Fundamental operations, variation, 
functions and graphs, quadratic equations, theory of equation, binomial theorem, com- 
plex numbers, logarithms, determinants and progressions. 

*17. Analytic Geometry — (3) 

Prerequisite — High school trigonometry and Mathematics 15. Coordinates, locus 
problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, transformation of coordinates, conic sec- 
tion-, parametric equations, transcendental equations, and solid analytic geometry. 

20. 21. Calculus— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Available only to seniors in 4-year curriculum. (Dean) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minma, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kinematics, 
integration, geometric and physical applications on integration, partial derivatives, space 
geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential eauations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130. Probability. (3) 
Freshman year, first semester, three lectures. 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, total, com- 
pound, and inverse probability, continuous distributions, theorems of Bernoulli and 
Laplace, theory of errors. (Staff.) 

Math. 132 Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distributions and 
their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of 
variance, statistical inference. (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

t/. Pharmaceutical Microbiology — (4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Becker.) 

Introduction to general microbiology with special emphasis on the study of patho- 
genic microorganism, including the public health aspects of the prevention and con- 
trol of communicable diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

''(II.). Serology and Immunology — (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures, two laboratories. (Shay and Becker.) 

Prerequisites — Microbiology 1. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products employed in the prevention and treat- 
ment of infectious diseased. 



*Course, formerly given by the College of Arts and Sciences, no longer offered 
at Baltimore. 

fCourse not offered after 1961-62. 

42 



School of Pharmacy 

l ; oi ( Graduates 

motkerapi (1,1) 
One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shi) I 

\ stud] oi the chemistry, to\ieit\. pharmacology and therapeutic false of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

■ nts and Media (1,1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate rears.) (Shay.) 

\ itucrj of the methods of preparation and nse of microbiological reagents and 

media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology 

A laboratory coarse on lelected problem! in microbiology. Credit determined by the 

amount and quality of ^«>rk performed. 'Shay.) 

211. Public Health— (1-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 1, 115. Lecture- and discussions on the organization 

and administration of state and municipal health department- and private health 
agencies. The courses will also include a Study of laboratory method-. 

A'- learca in Microbiology 
Credit determined by the amount of work performed. -hay.) 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

*1, 2 Elementary French— (3, 3) 
tan M-ar. three lectures. 
Students who offer two units in French for entrance, hut whose preparation i- not 
adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for tin- course. Elements of pram- 
mar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

'/. 2. Elementary German — (3, 3) 
Freshman yrar. three lectures. 

Students who offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is 
not adequate for second-year German receive half credit for this course. Element- oi 
grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation. 

Students will be assigned to one of the two languages by the department. The as- 
signment will ordinarily be made on the basis of the student's previous training. 

Sfa semester hour- College credit in Spanish will be accepted as satisfying the 
Mod.rn Lan^uape requirement. 

7. Intermediate Scientific French — (3, 3) 

lectures. 
Prerequisite French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Rapid grammar review, exercises in 

pronunciation, reading of scientific text-. 

•6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German — (3, 3) 

Thn -• !•■< ; . 

Prerequisite German 1 and 2 or equivalent. Review of grammar and reading oi 



*< "ur-e. formerly given hy the College of Art- and Sciences, no longer offered 

Itimore. 

me not offered after 196142. 

13 



University of Maryland 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

'\51. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) 

Junior year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. A study of tlie cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of drugs of animal and vegetable origin with special emphasis 
on the physical, microscopical, and chemical characteristics used in their identification 
and in the detection of adulteration. 

if 52. Pharmacognosy, General — (4) 

Junior year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51. A con- 
tinuation of Pharmacognosy 51 with instruction covering antibiotics, allergy-producing 
pollens, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, weedicides, etc. 

61. Pharmacognosy. Entomology for Pharmacists — (3) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures, and on elaboratory. (Slama and Kokoski.) 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38; Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A 
study of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household and in the 
industries, including several which attack farm and garden crops; their recognition, life 
history, habits, and methods of control. 

62. Pharmacognosy. Animal Health Products — (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. jSlama.) 

Prerequisites — Zoology 4; Physiology 22; Microbiology 1, 115; Pharmacology 81. 
A study of the principal therapeutic agents that are used in the treatment and preven- 
tion of the more important animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants— (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacognosy 51, 52. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 

111, 113. Plant Anatomy— (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 51, 52. 

112, 114. Plant Anatomy— (2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 51, 52, Pharmacognosy 111, 113. Laboratory work 

covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 
roots, stems, and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders— (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and 
spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identifica- 
tion and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 



f Course not offered after 1961-62. 

44 



School of Pharmacy 

2!1. 212. Adranccd Pharmacognosy — (4, 4) 

Two lecturer and two laboratories (SIim&.) 

Prerequisites Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drogi no! 

ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy P 0UIS CS. Special attention Will be pivon to 
practical proUemt and to the identification and deteeton <>f adulterants. 
399. Research in Pharmacog- 

the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

81. 82. Pharmacology, General — (4. l> 

Senior vear. three lectures and one laboratory. I Ichniowski, Diamond and HeifetS.) 

P rereq u isite Physiology 22, Biological Chemistry 153. A study of the pharma- 

v, toxicology and therapeutic uses of medicinal substances, including methods of 
biological assay, with special reference to the drugs and preparations of the United 

- Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

777. Official Methods of Biological Assay — (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81, 82. A study of the methods of biological assay 
official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201. 202. Methods of Biological Assay— (4, 4) 

itory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate years. 

277. 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics — (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniow-kiJ 

Prerequisite — Pharmacology 81 and 82 and the approval of the instructor. Offered 
in alternate years. 

221. 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods— (2-4) , (2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the instruc- 
tor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 
Prerequisite— Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of 
bio l ogical a—ay methods and comparative standards. 

399. Research in Pharmacology 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniow-ki. | 

PHARMACY 

-. Pharmacy Orientation— (\, 1) 

nan year, one le ctur e. (Levine.) 

An introduetion to pharmacy for the bepnnin? student. The COOIse aril] include 
the various lubjed matter that a pharmacy student will undertake as well a« the op- 
portunities in pharmacy. Guest le ctnr c i s will he invited bom the varkms field- ,,{ 
pharn 

is 



University of Maryland 

f27, 22. Pharmacy, General — (5, 5) 

Sophomore year, four lectures and one laboratory. (Levine, Becker, S. and Becker. J.) 
Prerequisite — Pharmacy 1, 2 or may be taken simultaneously with Pharmacy 1, 2. 
\ Btudy of all theory of pharmaceutical manipulations, including mathematical calcula- 
tion-, and the practical application of the theory to the manufacture of galenical prepa- 
ration-. 

t51, ):'. Pharmacy. Dispensing— (4, 4) 

Junior year, two lectures and two laboratories. (Shangraw, Patel and Richinan.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21, 22. A study of the compounding and dispensing of 
prescriptions. 

%61. History of Pharmacy — (1) 

Junior year, first semester, one lecture. (Shangraw) 

A study of the history of pharmacy from its beginning, with special emphasis on 
the history of American Pharmacy. 

87. Pharmacy Literature — (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Levine.) 

A study of important periodicals and currently published papers concerned with 
subjects of interest to pharmacists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy — (3, 3) 

Senior year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen, Patel, and Cragg.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52. A study of the compounding of new 
medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids used in modern professional pharmacy, in- 
cluding the preparation of some important classes of pharmaceuticals on a commercial 
scale. 

121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration — (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

\ study of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 
132. Cosmetics — (3) 
Senior year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen and Marlowe.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52, and 101. A study of the composition and 
manufacture of cosmetic preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of 
these products. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy— (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 101. 102. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications and the Federal Food, Drug and 
( losmetic Act. 



fCourse not offered after 1960-61. 
JCourse not offered after 1961-62. 



46 



School of Pharmacy 

204. Manufacturing Pharmacy '2. 2) 
Two laboratory (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisite 201, ~o~. <.r may be token simultaneously with Pharmacy 201, 202. 

1 abontorj work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharmaceutical! 
in large quantities. 

Physical Pharmacy— (2, 2) 
T\%<> lectures ■ week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A itudj ol pharmaceutical 
-\-t<-in« utilising tin- fandamentals of physical chemistry. 

211. 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature — (1, 1) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. I Mien.) 

Lectures and topics <>n the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special reference 
to th.- origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharmaceutica] 
periodicals. 

275, 216. Product Development— (2, 2) 

Two laboratoi : I Allen.) 

Prerequisites Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development of 
new pharmaceutica] preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

22i, 222. History oi Pharmacy <2, 2) 

lectures. ' I'urdum.) 

I tuies and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 

principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar — (1) 

Eai h semester. ' Mien.) 

[uired of Btudents majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progre s s in research and 
surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

2 11. 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology — (2. 2) 

laboratory (Allen and Purdnm.) 

\ study of technical problem-* in the stabilization ami pre se rv a tion of pharmaceu- 
ticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharn. 

• and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, Allen, and Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

1 counting 

■. first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 

lite Pharmacy Administration 37. The analysis of fmaneial and operating 
statements with a study of the fundamental principles of accounting, including prac- 
. bookkeeping. 

Fundamentals of Economics — (3) 
Juaioi ond semester, three lectures. ivitt.) 

\ study of the general fundamentals of Economics production, exchange, distri- 
bution and consumption of wealth, together with methods of financing, government and 
use consideration of economic systems. 



arse not offered after 1961-62. 

17 



University of Maryland 



62. Jurisprudence — (3) 

Senior year, second semester, three lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State Laws and 
Regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and pharma- 
ceutical preparations. Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, Agency and 
Partnerships. 

71. Management — (2) 

Senior year, first semester, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of the business problems aris- 
ing in the operation of a retail pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, 
leasing, insurance, purchasing, pricing, code marking and control of inventory. 

72. Drug Marketing— (2) 

Senior year, second semester, two lectures. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 37. A study of marketing, marketing 
research, advertising, selling and salesmanship, merchandising, channels of distribution, 
wholesaling, retailing and personnel management. 

PHYSICS 

*10, 11. General Physics— (4, 4) 

Sophomore year, three lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook and Hooper.) 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 10, 11 or 15, 17. A study of the principles of 
mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light and electricity. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

*104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism— (3, 3) 

Two lectures, one laboratory. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites — Physics 10, 11 and Mathematics 20, 21. Given according to demand. 

*'126. Kinetic Theory of Gases — (3) 
Three lectures a week. 

Prerequisites — Mathematics 21, and Physical Chemistry 189 and 190. Given accord- 
ing to demand. (Estabrook.) 

For Graduates 

*200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics— (5, 5) 

Five lectures. (Estabrook.) 

Prerequisites — Advanced standing in Physics. Given according to demand. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

•\22. Physiology, General— (5) 

Sophomore year, second semester, three lectures, two laboratories. 

(Costello and Becker.) 

Prerequisite — Zoology 1, 4. A course in the fundamentals of human physiology, 

including neurophysiology, the heart and circulation, respiration, digestion, the kidney, 



*Course, formerly given by Arts and Sciences, no longer offered at Baltimore. 
fCourse not offered after 1960-61. 



48 



School of Pharmacy 



endocrine glands, muscle physiology, itmctnre and permeability <»f th<- plasma mem* 
branei and metabolism. 

For Graduates 

MS, Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics — (3) 

Fir-t viiir-tcr, three lecture-;. (Costello.) 

Prerequisite! Pbarmaceutica] Chemistry 149, Physiology 11-. Consenl oi instructor. 
The lectures will relate to the physical and ehemii\il properties of protoplasm to the 

functional problems of the plasma membrane. Cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, microsomes, 

nucleus, mitochondria] structure and their contributions to the integrated cellular 

activity. The physical and chemical phenomena <>f cell division and inheritance will be 
discussed. 

i'/o. Radioisotope Technique — (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

Pre r eq u isites Consenl of instructor. A course concerned with the practical use of 
isotopes particularly as tracers in metabolic investigations. 
399. Research in Physiology 
Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 

ZOOLOGY 

*1. — Zoology, General — (4) 

Freshman year, fir>t BCmester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

This course deals with basic principles of animal life and uses a study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates to demonstrate these principles. 

*4. Zoology, Animal Kingdom — (3) 

Freshman year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

\ surrey of the animal kingdom with special emphasis on parasites, insects and 
other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. 

Both courses in zoology are intended to be practical in nature and act as a firm 
foundation for later required courses. 



•Course, formerly given 1>\ the College of Ait- and Sciences, no longer offered .»t 

Baltimore. 

19 



University of Maryland 

phasis is placed upon official and non-official chemical tests used in the identification 
of drugs and their constituents. 

Pharmacy 43, 44 — Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3) 
Two lectures, one laboratory and one recitation. 

Prerequisites — Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. The physical-chemical principles involved 
in pharmaceutical systems and the application of this knowledge to the development, 
preparation and packaging of medicinal formulations. 

Pharmacy Administration 41 — Drug Marketing. (3) 
Three lectures. 

Prerequisite — Economics 37 or its equivalent. This is an introductory course in the 
field of marketing with special emphasis on the marketing of drug products. Its purpose 
is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, institutions 
employed, and methods followed in marketing drug products, natural products, services, 
and manufactured goods. 

Pharmacy Administration 42 — Pharmacy Management I. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory. 

Prerequisite — Pharmacy Administration 41. A study of store arrangement, window 
and interior display, advertising, merchandising, selling and salesmanship, and public 
and professional relations. 

Physology 142 — General Physiology. (5) 
Three lectures and two laboratories. 

Prerequisite — Anatomy 31. A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physiology 
including the structure and permeability of the cell membrane, neuro-physiology, muscle 
physiology, the circulatory system, the respratory system, the digestive system, the ex- 
cretory system, endocrinology, metabolism, and the special senses. 



52 



School of Pharmacy 
ROLL OF STUDENTS. SESSION 1961-62 

Graduate Students t 

Becker. John \V Maryland 

• Becker, Stank? I Maryland 

Rednanvyk, Leonard R Maryland 

P.. ech, John A England 

Block, Ronald Lee District of Columbia 

Boaale, Paul C Louisiana 

DeSchepper, Paul J Belgium 

Diamond, Loom Maryland 

Don, Conrad P., Jr Maryland 

Fi-hbein. William N Maryland 

Pes, Cheater D New York 

Fried. Erring M Pennsylvania 

Goldsmith. Robert B Maryland 

'Gordon, Gerald S Maryland 

Hammel, Claire L District of Columbia 

Havranek, Robert E New York 

Henderson, Edward G Connecticut 

Hockley, Laura Maryland 

Kilchenstein, Michael W Maryland 

Koch, Stanley A District of Columbia 

(Kokoaki, Robert Maryland 

K'nopik, Barbara H Maryland 

Kopcno, Michael J New Jersey 

Lesko, Stephen A., Jr Pennsylvania 

l.ine, Phillip J Rhode Island 

*Manion, Marian I Philippine Islands 

Marlowe, Edward New York 

McMillion, C. Robert West Virginia 

Nakagawa, Masako Japan 

Patel, Yithalbhai C India 

Reier, George E Maryland 

Richman, Morton D Maryland 

Ringe, Ingrid Germany 

•Rivera-Martinez, Rafael Puerto Rico 

Sacks, Sylvan Maryland 

Si -hmuklf -r. Morton Maryland 

Scott, Kenneth R Maryland 

Shroff, An in P India 

Thomas, George H Ohio 

Tinney, Francis J ISYw "l r oik 

<i, Paul M New York 

Wagner, Frederick H Maryland 

-.:... W iltrr I) Maryland 

I I. T China 

1 trfield, Albert H Maryland 

Wartnen, John I)., Jr Maryland 

•Did not attend <ritir<- leanon 
tBegJStered in Graduate School 
^Second S ■ nly 

53 



University of Maryland 



Senior Class 



Amernick, Harmond H Maryland 

Augsburger, Larry L Maryland 

Becker, Edward P Maryland 

Blaustein, Arnold L Maryland 

Block, Lawrence H Maryland 

Boatman, Ernest A Maryland 

Calas, Andre T. Maryland 

Clinger, Richard G Pennsylvania 

Contrino, Gabriel M Maryland 

Gandel, Stephen Maryland 

Gibbon, Nancy L Maryland 

Grubb, John E Maryland 

Gubinsky, Louis Maryland 

Hamet, Sydney H Maryland 

Harrison, Gordon M Maryland 

Jablon, Paul A Maryland 

Kantorow, Bennett R Maryland 

Kantorski, Robert R Maryland 

Katz, Albert Maryland 

Kempler, Jerold A Maryland 

Kern, Louis R., Jr Maryland 

Konrad, James G Maryland 

Lauer, Stephen L Maryland 

Levitt, Kelvin R Maryland 

Mackay, Walter P Maryland 

Mackowiak, Frank J Maryland 

Maggitti, Ronald F Maryland 

McKenna, Richard S Maryland 

Plummer, Robert M Maryland 

Pristoop, Allan S Maryland 

Rosen, Leon Maryland 

Rosenstein, Sol Maryland 

Roth, Edward B Maryland 

Samson, Irwin L Maryland 

Sandler, Charles A Maryland 

Sermuksnis, Milda I Maryland 

Serpick, David Y Maryland 

Smith, Dennis B Maryland 

Sophocleus, Theodore J Maryland 

Sugarman, Henry Maryland 

Wagner, Herbert C Maryland 

Wankel, Richard A Maryland 

Wolff, Donald W Maryland 

Junior Class 

Abel, Walter H Maryland 

Abramovitz, Marjorie S Maryland 

Antwarg, Alvin G Maryland 

Baker, Jeanne A Maryland 

Banks, David E Maryland 

Barron, David D Maryland 

54 



School of Pharmacy 

Batt, William H. Maryland 

-on, Michael T Mankind 

Klakr. Rmd \ Maryland 

Bradenbaogh, Don 1 Maryland 

imstem, Marshall P Man land 

II Maryland 

• N, Maryland 

Gloria Mar viand 

Cohen, Michael D Maryland 

ra.!. John W Maryland 

rniaa, William V Maryland 

'Coupes, Anthony I Maryland 

Pader, John F Maryland 

■a A California 

Frirdrl. Stnarl I Man land 

Henderson, Robert \\ Maryland 

Heyman, Irwin A Maryland 

kins, Ronald M Maryland 

Jacoba, M. Ned Maryland 

K liah, Aaron C Maryland 

Kefler, Thomaa EL, Jr Maryland 

Kochhuky, Victoria W Maryland 

'Lebowita, Donald L Maryland 

1 i .!. Henry M Maryland 

I fin, Stephen P Maryland 

Lund. Robert E Maryland 

■kin. Robert S Maryland 

Mendelsohn, James F Maryland 

* V-iner, Carol M Maryland 

Newman, .!< rome Maryland 

Pariaer, Joseph Maryland 

Percy n-ki. Paul R Maryland 

Pfann. George A Maryland 

PS -on. Robert M., Jr Maryland 

Price, I beater L Maryland 

JRachanow, Gerald Maryland 

Reinke, Budne C Maryland 

Ritchie. James R Maryland 

Sap; Man E Maryland 

- ,dtz, Frank W Maryland 

M Maryland 

*S. hwart/man, Allan M Mankind 

Shaner, Daniel S Maryland 

D Maryland 

Mankind 

Sobc/ak, Valentine R Maryland 

Sober, Julian N Maryland 

It, Allen Maryland 

Tri-tani. Ft tore M Maryland 

t aan, Kenneth C Maryland 

J., Jr Maryland 



*Fir-t Seaaeater only 

r only 



55 



I nil ersity of Maryland 

Wilson, John W Maryland 

Winakur, Stuart Maryland 

Wood-. Dennis S Maryland 

Yee, Susan Maryland 

Zimmer, Reid A Maryland 

First Professional Year 

DelCastilho, Ronald E Maryland 

W win. Richard L Maryland 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 

Sophomore Class 

Ackerman, Neil R Maryland 

Adams, Patricia M Maryland 

Alatzas, Ceorge T Maryland 

Boon, David D Maryland 

Brundelre, Robert Maryland 

Catlett, Leon R Maryland 

Cavoures, James A. Maryland 

JConrad, John Maryland 

Cysyk, Richard L Maryland 

*Dinsmore, Bill G Maryland 

Dolecek, Gayle R District of Columbia 

*Doolan, Kenneth F Maryland 

Dunn, Carolyn J Maryland 

Elliott, Ruth E Maryland 

Elliott, William R Maryland 

Frangakis, Mina S Maryland 

Gamerman, Marvin I Maryland 

*Gibbs, Gary L Maryland 

Glover, Wayne A Maryland 

Goldberg, Marvin Maryland 

Goldman, William I Maryland 

Goldstein, Mark N Maryland 

*Gribble, Joann District of Columbia 

Gull, Michael Maryland 

Heer, Roger G Maryland 

Henderson, Robert L Maryland 

Hoffman, Robert W Maryland 

Hoffman, Ronald H Maryland 

Hribar, Neal E Maryland 

JHughes, Edward L Maryland 

Kirk, Edward W Maryland 

*Kobin, David A Maryland 

*Kozak, Adrian S • Maryland 

Kroopnick, Robert B Maryland 

*Lambdin, James R Maryland 



* First Semester only 
JSecond Semester only 



56 



School of Pharmacy 

$LibowitS, Suzanne Maryland 

Iindcnhaum. Ronald I Maryland 

•l.mrra. Madeline C. Maryland 

Martin, I BWrenCC I.. Mankind 

Martin. \\ alla.c Maryland 

Matthews, Roberta Maryland 

(Meyer, Howard 1> Maryland 

Miller, Harris I Maryland 

Moore, Ronald S Maryland 

\ edle, Stephen Maryland 

N iner, Carol Maryland 

Potior, Buddy M Maryland 

Quick, Stephen B Virginia 

Rayman, Marsha J District of Columbia 

Saiittll, Frederics A Maryland 

SchutS, Charles J Maryland 

link. William Maryland 

tSeff, Gerald I Maryland 

Spuras, Jenina D Maryland 

Tannebaum, Stanley 15 Maryland 

Taylor, < Iharles D Maryland 

Walsh, Mkhael J Maryland 

Williams, Cornelius B. Maryland 

(Williams, Matt E. Maryland 

'WoUson, brael D Maryland 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 

Freshman Class 

A 1 pert, Charles Maryland 

(Altgenug, Gerald Maryland 

Baer, Carol Maryland 

Bloom. Harry Maryland 

Blum, Jerold Maryland 

Bosh, Francis District of Columbia 

*Coh<n, David Maryland 

Cohen. Michael Maryland 

I Ironin, Dennis R Maryland 

Dangherty, Margaret L Maryland 

Diekrrman. JorgS Honduras 

'Donahue, ( Cecilia Maryland 

Dotmelly, John Maryland 

Enpli-h, David District of Columbia 

Erdman, Sheldon Maryland 

Fine, Norman Maryland 

Fischer, Bernard Maryland 

F l e is c h e r , diaries Maryland 

FohlS, Gary Mars land 

Gandel, Larry Maryland 



*Fir-t Semester only 
aester onrj 



57 



University of Maryland 



Gordon, David Maryland 

*Gorrell, David J Maryland 

Greek, David C Connecticut 

*Greenberg, Henry I Maryland 

Heer, Ronald W Maryland 

Hess, Gary Maryland 

Hill, Carol Jane Maryland 

*Jacobson, Robert A Maryland 

Janofsky, Stephen L Maryland 

*Jaskowitz, Theodore J Maryland 

Jones, Christina M Maryland 

*Kavanagh, Mildred A Maryland 

Keefer, David M Maryland 

*Kessler, Stanton C Maryland 

Lane, Douglas V Maryland 

*Langley, Janet E Maryland 

Lazarus, Marc R Maryland 

Lehman, Allan G. Maryland 

Lessing, Melvin Maryland 

Levay, Francis Maryland 

MacConney, Charles S Maryland 

McCabe, Stanley B Maryland 

Morton, Jacquelin G Maryland 

*Musotto, Domenic J Maryland 

Naughton, Charles E Maryland 

Neiner, Joan M Maryland 

*Ormrod, Roland S Maryland 

Owens, James G Louisiana 

Pawelczyk, Thomas W Maryland 

Pincus, Jack H Maryland 

Pletka, George J Maryland 

Polievka, Frank J District of Columbia 

Porter, Irving C Maryland 

JRehwaldt, Don C Maryland 

jSexton, Ronald A Maryland 

Sherman, Howard Maryland 

Shure, Joanna C. Maryland 

Statter, William Maryland 

"'Sugarman, Sylvan Maryland 

Sweeney, Dennis J District of Columbia 

Telleysh, Ronald Virginia 

Theil, Kenneth W, Jr Maryland 

*Thomas, Susan M New York 

Tims, John M Maryland 

Trinkley, Kenneth P Maryland 

♦Webster, Bert H. District of Columbia 

Weiner, Alan Maryland 

Weiner, Herbert R Maryland 

Weiner, Myron Maryland 

Welsh, Patrick G Maryland 

Wilson, Thomas W Maryland 



* First Semester only 
JSecond Semester only 



58 



School of Pharmacy 

ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 10, 1961 
Doctor of Philosophy 

I bud Tamorria Dietrict ol Colombia 

Master of Scii 

Connd P. Don, Jr Maryland 

Refer Maryland 

Zeledoo Coata Rica 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Arnold LerOJ A-na-s Maryland 

Lawrence Yak Block Maryland 

Kenneth Bennett Boaman Man-land 

Frank Felix Cwynar. Jr Maryland 

Look Diamond Maryland 

Vincent Robert DiPaula Maryland 

D Flaine Evert Mai . 

1 Stanford Gordon Maryland 

Elliott Creenblatt Maryland 

Norton Joel Grossblatt Maryland 

Ilarr> Hamet Maryland 

William J. Heinrieh Maryland 

e Herman Huber Maryland 

Marvin Stanley Ku-hnirk Maryland 

lg Lee Maryland 

I Lamer Maryland 

. 1 Gerald Levin Maryland 

Constantino Nick Maschas Maryland 

McNeil] Maryland 

Harvey Donaldson Reisenweber Maryland 

Zoe Carroll Robinson Maryland 

Nancy ( iarol Sappe Maryland 

Irvin Silen Maryland 

Martin Joeepb Sopher Maryland 

Janice Rae Stank Maryland 

rt Benjamin Stiekman Maryland 

Peyton Orenzo Stirne Maryland 

James Patrick Struntz Mar] land 

William Tabak Maryland 

Frank Joeepb Tamberino Maryland 

Yit<> Tinelli, Jr Maryland 

Walt<r Dooglai Walkling Maryland 

Phillip Paul Weiner Maryland 

farm Yoapa Maryland 

1 -raid Zenrita Maryland 

Honors (1960-61) 

Medal for General Excellence Walter DougUfl Walkling 

William Sim.-n Memorial Prize Walter Don u Walkling 

Andrew C. DoMea Medal Vita Tin. -in, Jr. 

50 



University of Maryland 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Walter Douglas Walkling 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize William Joseph Heinrich 

David Fink Memorial Prize William Joseph Henrich 

Phi Beta Chapter, Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup Harvey Donaldson Reisenweber 

kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize Vito Tinelli, Jr. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize Peyton Orenzo Stime 



Vito Tinelli, Jr. 



Certificates of Honor 

Harvey Donaldson Reisenweber 
June Eng Lee 



Honorable Mention (Junior Class) 



Louis Gubinsky 



Sydney H. Hamet 



Herbert C. Wagner 



DEANS MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1960-61) 

Class of 1961 



Lawrence Y. Block 
Louis Diamond 



Constantine N. Maschas 
Douglas W. McNeill 
Peyton 0. Stime 



Vito Tinelli, Jr. 
Walter D. Walklins 



Norton J. Grossblatt 



Honorable Mention 



Harvey D. Reisenweber 



Louis Gubinsky 
Sydney H. Hamet 



Class of 1962 



James G. Konrad 
Herbert C. Wagner 



Walter P. Mackay 



Honorable Mention 



James Mendelsohn 



Jeanne A. Baker 
David A. Blake 
Don L. Bradenbaugh 



Class of 1963 



Gerald M. Rachanow 
James J. Welsh 



Marjorie S. Abramovitz 
Ronald M. Hopkins 
Stephen P. Levin 
Budne C. Reinke 



Honorable Mention 



James R. Ritchie 

Leon D. Shargel 

Valentine R. Sobczak 

Kenneth C. Ullman 



60 



School of Pharmacy 
INDEX 

Icademfc Excellence, Dean's Medals for 59 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 13 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) L2 

Accreditation 2 

Administration. Officers of 

Principal Administrative Officers vi 

Emeritus vi 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges \i 

Genera] Administrative Officers vii 

Division Chairmen viii 

Faculty Senate, Chairmen of Standing Committees i\. I 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants lot Advanced Standing in the Four Year Program at 

Baltimore, Md. o 

Applicants for Admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park P> 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 7 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To Advanced Standing, Four Year Program 3 

To the Five Year Program 4 

Alumni Association 32 

American Civilization, The Program in 6 

American Pharmaceutical Association. Student Branch 31 

Issistantships, Graduate 23 

Attendance Requirements 13 

Baltimore Union 20 

Board of Regents v 

Breakage 10 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1962 and 1963 ii 

Calendar, Academic iii 

Correspondence i\ 

Courses, Description of 38 

Curriculum, Four Year 

Charier- in 12 

Courses, Hours and Credits 34 

Summary <»f Hours and Credits 35 

Curriculum. Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md. 5 

Currieulum. Pre-professiona] Program bom I Diversities and 

Colleges Other Than University of Maryland 7 

Curriculum. Professional Program At Baltimore, Md. 

Courses. Hour- and Credits 36 

Summary oi Hours and Credits 17 

I >- . ' - i 2 

61 



University of Maryland 

INDEX (continued) 

Deportment 19 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 15 

Dormitories (See Housing) 
Electives Programs 

Four Year Curriculum 17 

Five Year Curriculum 17 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 22 

Employment 19 

Examinations 13 

Faculty xi 

Faculty Council xi 

Fees and Expenses 

Graduate 11 

Full-time Undergraduate 9 

Part-time Undergraduate 10 

Pre-professional at College Park 5, 12 

Fellowships and Grants 22 

Grade of D, Raising 14 

Grade of F, Removal of an 14 

Grading System 13 

Grade Point Average 13 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 16 

Graduates, Roll of 1961 59 

Graduation Requirements — 

Four Year Curriculum 18 

Five Year Curriculum 18 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy; Baltimore 1 

Honor Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi 28 

Rho Chi 28 

Honors and Awards 28 

Hospital Pharmacy Residencies 23 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 20 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 20 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 14 

Library, Health Sciences 21 

Staff xv 

Licensure by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 19 

Loans 27 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 19 

Registration with 19 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 31 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 14 



62 



School of Pharmacy 



INDEX (continued) 



Office of Dean, Hours h 

Office Stall n 

Parking 21 

Pharmac] Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 

From Other Universities and Colleges 

Pronation for Lou Scholarship '■» 

Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1962-1963 

\ ademic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 15 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 15 

Registration by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 19 

Requirements for Admission to Five Year Program 4 

Admission to Pre-professional Program at College Park 4 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 25 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 2 1 

Student Organizations, Baltimore Campus 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 27 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 31 

Student Government Alliance 31 

Students, Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 16 

Roll of 53 

Students, Pre-professional, College Park 56 

Textbooks 12 

Transcripts of Records 18 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 9 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) 5 

Visitors iv 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 1 1 

Withdrawing Students, Grades of H> 



63 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From 'The State and the University 1 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



WBW 



RS1TY of MARYLAND 



BULLETIN 





*,bjll 


Jni ? 


kJ9 






[ffiSiJ 


f L-"j£ §&? 



1963-1964 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



CATALOG AND 120th WNOUNCEMENT 

THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

(Maryland College oi Pharmacy. 1S41 to 1904) 

1963-1964 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



VOLl Ml 43. \i MBER 1 

School of Pharmacy 

West Lombard street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



I his catalog includes information applying to the Five > c.ir Program which I 

mandator) in September. I960. 



1963 1964 


JANUARY 1963 


JULY 1963 


JANUARY 1964 


JULY 1964 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 


6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


18 14 


15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


21 28 


29 30 31 


28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 2 


1 2 3 


1 


1 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


24 25 


26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 




MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


24 25 
31 


26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 




APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


1 2 3 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


28 29 


30 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


26 27 


28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


29 30 




JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 31 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


30 











ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1963-64 



First Semester — 1963 

September 16 Monday 



Fifth Year Registration —9:00- 

10:00 a.m. 
Fourth Year Registration— 9:00- 

10:00 a.m. 

Third Year Registration -10:30- 
11:30 a.m. 

Orientation for New Students — 

2:00 p.m. 
Graduate Registration -9:00- 

11:30 a.m. 
Instruction begins with first 

scheduled period 

Thanksgiving recess begins at 
close of last scheduled period 

Instruction resumes with first 
scheduled period 

Christmas recess begins at close 
of last scheduled period 

Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 
First Semester examinations 



Graduate Registration — 9:00- 
11:30 a.m. 

Third Year Reeistration— 9:00- 
10:00 a.m. 

Fourth and Fifth Year Registra- 
tion— 10:30-1 1 :30 a.m. 

Instruction begins with first 
scheduled period 

Washington's Birthday, Holida) 

Easter recess begins at close of 
last scheduled period 

Instruction resumes with first 
scheduled period 

Fifth Year final examinations 

Second Semester examinations 

Memorial Day, Holida\ 

Commencement 

All students arc expected to complete their registration, including the pa\ merit of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration <Aa\ . Students failing 10 
comply uith this regulation are charged a tee of ten dollars. No student is norm. ills 
permitted to register after Saturday noon of the ucek in uhich instruction begins. 
The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Mondav through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



September 17 


Tuesda) 


September 23 


Monday 


November 27 


Wednesday 


December 2 


Monday 


December 20 


Friday 


1964 

January 6 


Monday 


January 27-31 


Monday-Friday 


Second Semester 




February 4 


Tuesday 


February 5 


Wednesday 


February 10 


Monday 


February 22 
March 26 


Saturday 

Thursday 


March 31 


Tuesday 


May 20-26 
May 26-June 1 
May 30 
June 6 


Wednesday-Tuesday 

Tuesday-Monday 

Saturday 

Saturday 



/// 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, Building 520R, Room 201, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to 
the respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 



Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on 
Saturday by appointment. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an ir- 
revocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. The 
University further reserves the irght at any time, to ask a student to 
withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests 

of the University. 



IV 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Cham bs P. McCormigk 

VicCormick and Company. Inc., 4/4 Light Street, Baltimore 2/202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, 103 South day Street, Baltimore 21202 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 2/201 

TREASURER 
Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 
Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 
Baltimore 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Bldg., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, I akoma Park 

Wn i [am C Walsh 

liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. WlflTEHURST 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 2/218 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Principal Administrative Officers 

WILSON H. ELKINS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.Phil.. 1936. 

ALBIN O. KUHN, Executive Vice President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S.. 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.S., California State College, Pa., 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 1936; 
Ph.D.. 1942. 

FRANK L. BENTZ, JR., Assistant to the President 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ALVIN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College. 1933; LL.B., Cornell University, 1936. 

Emeriti 

HARRY C. BYRD, President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 1936; LL.D., 
Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc., Western Maryland College, 1938. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women Emerita 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 1924. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

EDWARD W. AITON, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

RONALD BAMFORD, Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

WILLIAM P. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of the School of Law 

A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 1948. 

RAY W. EHRENSBERGER, Dean of University College 

B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; Ph.D., Syracuse 

University, 1937 

NOEL E. FOSS. Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland. 
1932; Ph.D., 1933. 



17 



LESTER \1 PRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, 

and Health. 

B \. Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M \. 1937; Phi). Peabodj College. 1939. 

FLOREN* I M OIPE, Dean of the School of Nursing 
B.S.. Catholic Universit) of America, 1937; M.S., LToivertit) of Pennsylvania 

1940; Hd.D., University of Maryland. 1" 

LADISLAUS F. GRAPSKI. Director of the University Hospital 

K\. Mills School of Nursing. Bellevue Hospital, N Vorl - B.S., 

University of Denver. 1942; MM \. in Hospital Administration. Universit) ol 
Chicago, 1943. 

IRYIN C. HALT. Director. Agriculture Experiment Station, and Head. 
trtment Of Horticulture 
B.S.. Universits o\ Idaho, 1928; MS.. State College oi Washington. l l ^(>; PhD. 

I'niversin o\ Maryland, 1933. 

VERL S. LEWIS. Dean of the School of Social Work 

A.B . Huron College. 1933; M.A.. University of Chicago. 1939; D.S.W.. Western 
Reserve University, 1954. 

SELMA F. LIPPEATT, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S.. Arkansas State Teachers College. 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee. 1945; 
Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State University, 193 

CHARLES MANNING, Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.S.. Tufts College. 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D.. University of 
North Carolina, 1950. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; C.E.. 1932; Ph.D., 1935. 

DONALD W. O'CONNELL, Dean of the College of Business and Public 
Administration 

B.A.. Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D.. 1953. 

JOHN J. SALLEY, Dean of the School of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

WILLIAM S. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of 
Medical Education and Research 

B.S.. University of Idaho. 1924; M.S.. 1925; M.D., University of Louisville. 1929; 

Ph.D. (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

(. WATSON ALGIRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University o\ Maryland, 1930; M.S.. 1931. 

B. JAMES BORRESON, Executive Dean for Student Life 
B.A.. University of Minnesota. 1944. 

( WILBUR < ISSl I . Din, lor of I inane e and Business 

B \. i m\ersit> of Maryland, 1932; M v. 1934; (PA. 19 

vii 



HELEN E. CLARKE, Dean of Women 

B.S., University of Michigan. 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 1951; Ed.D., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 

WILLIAM W. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

L. EUGENE CRONIN, Director of Natural Resources Institute 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
Ph.D., 1946. 

LESTER M. DYKE, Director of Student Health Service 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Dean of Men 

B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

HARRY D. FISHER. Comptroller and Budget Officer 
B.S.. University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

GEORGE W. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE W. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer, 
Physical Plant (Baltimore) 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

VERNON H. REEVES, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air 
Science 

B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949. 

WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT, Director, Computer Science Center 

Dipl. Math., University of Heidelberg, 1952; Dr. Rer. Nat., University of Freiburg, 

1955. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 1940. 

CLODUS R. SMITH. Director of the Summer Session 

B.S.. Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell University, 
1960. 

GEORGE O. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 



Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

HAROLD C. HOFFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

mi 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTFFS. FACULTY SENAT1 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAI POl ICY 

Monroe H. Martin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT 1 II E AND WEI FARE 

Clarence A. Newell (Education), Chairman 

( OMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 
Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Thomas G. Andrews (Arts and Sciences). Chairman 

( OMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Richard H. Byrne (Education). Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS. CURRICULA, AND COURM S 

V. R. Cardozier (Agriculture). Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

James A. Hummel (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Donald W. O'Connell (Business and Public Administration). Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Walter E. Schlaretzki (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
Mark Keeny (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Robert B. Beckmann (Engineering), Chairman 

( oMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
WD TENURE 
George Anastos (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

I oMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS. PROMOTIONS, AND SA1 \RIES 

Stanley B. Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

( OMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFAkf 
John M. Brumbaugh (Law), Chairman 

( OMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 
l Fees (Pharmacy), Chairman 

( OMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

Mar\ K. Carl (Nursing). Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTUR1 01 I Ml UNIVERSITY 

Homer L'lnch (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 



IX 



Adjunct Committees of the General Committee of Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Gayle S. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 
A. B. Hamilton (Agriculture), Chairman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

George F. Batka (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Bryce Jordan (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Ellen Harvey (Physical Education), Chairman 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

J. Allan Cook (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Calvin Gaver (Dentistry), Chairman 



Schooi oi 1*1 1 \km m \ 



FACULTY COUNCIL 



NO! L E. 1 OSS, Dean 

I RAM Is If, Mil 1 I K I K\NK I s| \\1 \ 

DONALD E. BHAI ( \siMIK i. ICHNIOWSKI, Stirctarx 



Faculty (1962-1963) 



Emerita 



S. oii\i COLE, Processor linerita of Pharmacy Administration 
phar.d.. University of Maryland, 1913; LL.B., 1923. 

Professors 

NOEL E. FOSS. Professor of Pharmacy 

ph.c. South Dakota State College. 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; m.s.. University ol 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York. Maryland. 

I \simir t. ichniowski. Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.g.. University of Maryland. 1929; b.s.. in pharm., 1930; m.s.. 1932; pun.. 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

FRANCIS M. MILLER, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.s.. Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d., Northwestern University. 1949. 

w \rthlr PURDUM, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 
ph.g., University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; M.S.. 1934; ph.d . 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Donald E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland. 193K; ph.d.. 
1943. 

fr^nk .j. si ama. Professor of Pharmacognosy 

ph.g.. University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c. 1925; b.s. in pharm.. 192S; m.s . 1930; 

ph.d.. 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin irwk allen. Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
Ms. is PHARM., l'nivcrsit\ of Maryland, 1937; PH.D.. 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist — Mars land. 

1 I si n (. COSTELLO. Associate Professor of Anatomx and Pfnsiai, 
B.S., U nr f Wl tJ Of Maryland. 1952; ms. 1954; pud.. 1957. 



Pari time. 

xi 



University of Maryland 

norman J. doorenbos, Associate Professor Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s. in chem., University of Michigan, 1950; M.S., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

IDA Marian robinson, Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

Assistant Professors 

j, adele b. ballman, Assistant Professor of English 

a.b., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

Robert J. kokoski, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957; ph.d., 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

hilda E. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School. 1937. 

ralph F. shangraw, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., Massacuhsetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 

*ruth F. weiner, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1956; M.S., 1957; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1962. 

NICOLAS Zenker, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

CD. sc. ch., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; m.a., University of California, 
1953; ph.d., 1958. 

Instructors 

earl f. becker, jr., Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

LILLIAN darago, Instructor in Anatomy and Physiology 

a.b., Goucher College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

tcARL L. heifetz, Instructor in Pharmacology 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, District of Columbia. 

dean e. leavitt, Instructor in Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

phillip J. levine, Instructor in Pharmacy. 

b.s., Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Rhode Island. 



t Part time. 

xii 



SCHOOI OP Pharmacy 



Lecturers 



hUCHAKD n. H IK, Lecturer in Mathematics 

us. l'niversit\ o\ Maryland, 1950; mid.. The Johns Hopkins I nivcrsity. 1954, 

tjOSI pm s k\ii\uv. lecturer in Pharmacx Administration 

bk.. l'ni\ersit\ o\ Maryland. 1950; LL.B., UnivciMt\ o\ Maryland, 19 

Visiting Lecturers 

swu 1 1 i fo\. Visiting Lecturer in Physiology 
ph.g.. University of Maryland, 1934; b.s. in phaem . i l >^: m.i> . 

Research Associate 

hiroshi ov\. Research Associate in Physiology 
B.s.. Tokyo University, 1953; ph.d.. 1959. 

Fellows 

.ii \Niro B. abcede, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
B.s. in pharm.. University of Philippines, 1936; m.s.. University of Michigan. 
1951; PH.D.. 1955. 
Registered Pharmacist — Philippines. 

put c. BOSSLE, The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow in Chemistry and /?< 
Fellow in Chemistry (National Cancer Institute) 
b.s. in pharm.. Loyola University, 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Louisiana, Maryland. 

landon w. burbage, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration (Research) 
ph.b.. Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

Conrad p. dorn, jr.. U.S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm.. University of Maryland, 1958; m.s.. 1961. 

irmng m. fried, U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm.. Temple University, 1958; M.S., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

ROBERT E. HAVBANEK, U.S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

b.s. in PHABM., Columbia University, 1956; M.S.. University of Maryland, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — California, Maryland, New York. Florida. 

Barbara H. KONOPIK. Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institute of Mental 
Health) 

a.b.. Mt. St. Agnes College. 1957. 

LEON MILEWICH. Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry [Smith. Kline and French 
Laboratories ) 

b.s.. University of Buenos Aires. Argentina, 1956; m.s.. 1958; ph.d.. 1959. 

m\s\ko nakagawa. Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Cancer Institute) 
b.s.. Hokkaido University. Japan, 1958; M.S., 1960. 



I Part time. 

xiii 



University of Maryland 

mihalbhai C. patel, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Cancer Institute) 
b.pharm., l.m. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat University, India, 1956; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1959. 

george E. reier, Noxzema Foundation Fellow in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1958; M.S., 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

robfrt J. scott, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry (Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories) 

b.sc, Queens University, Belfast, 1959; ph.d., University of London, 1962. 

Registered Pharmacist — Britain, North Ireland. 

arvin p. shroff, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry (U. S. Public Health Service) 
b.sc, M. S. University, Baroda, India, 1954; M.S., Duquesne University, 1958; 
ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1962. 

martin e. stein, Fellow, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education and 
Sydnor Barksdale Penick Memorial Fellow for 1963-64 

b.s. in pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1961; M.S., 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Massachusetts, Maryland. 

Francis J. tinney, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Cancer Institute) 
b.s. in pharm., St. John's University, College of Pharmacy, 1950; M.S., 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

Theodore H. T. wang, Research Fellow in Chemistry (Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories) 

b.s., Mukden Medical College, China, 1949; M.S., University of Nebraska, 1958. 

JOHN D. warthen, JR., U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Graduate Assistants 

larry L. augsburger. Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

eugene r. blau, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., Fordham University, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — 'Maryland. 

Lawrence H. BLOCK, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

louis diamond. Assistant in Pharmacology 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1961; Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Charles L. GUYTON, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., Mississippi State University, 1961. 



XIV 



School of Pharmacy 



SYDNFY RAM I. ttltiltmtt in Pharmacy 

B.s. in pharm.. University ot Maryland. 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist— -Mankind. 

m. damp rich m vs. Astistmti in Pharmacy 

B.s. in pharm.. University of Maryland. 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Mar> land. 

kakibhm if. \or\. Assistant in Chemistry 

B. pharm.. Gujarat University. India. 1961. 

clara c. T. \v(- tUaU in Chemistry 

b.a.. Clarke College. 1962. 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Health Sciences Library 
u>\ Marian robinson. Librarian 

A.B.. B.S.L.S. 

hilda E. moore, Associate Librarian 
A.B., a.b.l.s. 

sarah L. atkins. Cataloging Assistant 

edith m. coyle. Head, Serials Department 
A.B.. a.b.l.s., m.a. 

flizabeth a. forney, Assistant Reference Librarian 
A.B., m.s.l.s. 

iola r. glock, Cataloger 

B.S., M.S.L.S. 

ruth e. hanna. Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 
a.b., m.s.l.s. 

Lorraine s. hlavin, Serials Assistant 

siMONi c. hurst, Head, Circulation Department 

Florence r. kirk. Reference Librarian 

hans-guenther r. listfeld, Assistant Serials Librarian 

B.S., M.S.L.S. 

Beatrice Marriott. Reference Librarian 
a.b. 

Eleanor m. MITTEN. Head, Catalog Department 

B.S., B.S.L.S. 
JACQUELINE B. PFEIFFER. Secretary to the Librarian 
kae sarubin, Assistant Circulation Librarian 



XV 



University of Maryland 

ELWOOD stfrling, Library Clerk 
martha L. sullivan, Cataloging Assistant 
katherine M. wheatley, Serials Assistant 

Office Staff 

daisy LOTZ GUE, Secretary-Stenographer 
m \rgaret e. beatty, Senior Stenographer 
doris M. Kennedy, Senior Stenographer 
nancy r. Hawkins, Senior Stenographer 



XVI 



THE SCHOOL 



HISTORY AND PROGRAM 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy arc to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students 
in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, 
express themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profes- 
sion and citizens of a democracy; to guide students into productive 
scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge and techniques 
in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Mary- 
land physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in 
Pharmacy to replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, 
incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 
In 1904. the College joined with a group of medical schools and the 
Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in 
the health sciences. The new institution was known as the University of 
Maryland. In 1920. this group of Baltimore professional schools was 
merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form the 
present University of Maryland. 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings constructed 
specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and class- 
rooms are equipped with the most modern apparatus and every aid to 
instruction and for research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 30.000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt. 
the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, and The Johns Hop- 
kins University. The libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 
Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery, 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training. The American Association of Collej 
of Pharmac> requires a Five Year Program and students entering the 
study of pharmacy on or after the Autumn of 1960 are required to enroll 
in a Five Year Pharmacy Program. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



University of Maryland 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School 
of the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the 
Graduate School. 



PROGRAM 

As a result of a decision by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, students beginning a pharmacy or pre-professional curriculum 
on or after April 1, 1960 are required to enroll in the academic program 
of not less than five years. 

At the University of Maryland the five year program consists of two years 
of a pre-professional and a three-year pharmacy program. The first year 
of the professional program was offered in Baltimore in September 1961. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

The pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore but may be 
obtained at the College Park Campus of the University or any other 
accredited university or college where appropriate courses are offered.* 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Only the three year professional program is offered in Baltimore. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
FIVE YEAR PROGRAM 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School 
and for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school in Maryland whose secon- 
dary record indicates probable success in the University will be admitted 
provided that: 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally ac- 
credited college or university. 



School of Pharmacy 

1. his scholastic average in major subjects in his last two years in high 

school has been satisfactory ; 

2. his program has included the following: 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 
College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 

( 1 ). plane geometry ( 1 ) and additional units in 

advanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, 

or advanced mathematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 

HistOI) and Social Sciences 2 1 

Biological Scien, 1 

Foreign Language — German or French 2 

Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 



Total 16 16 

he has had the test results of the American College Testing Program 
submitted to the University Admissions Office; 

4. he has a satisfactory general recommendation from his secondary school 
as to his character and ability. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland residents 
(see definition of Residents and Non-Residents, page 11) must also have 
the results of the American College Testing Program and complete high 
school records submitted to the Admissions Office. Only a limited number 
of well qualified out-of-state applicants can be considered for admission 
since first preference in admission is given to Maryland residents. 

\ complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this 
publication may be obtained by writing to the Catalog Mailing Office, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park. 
Maryland. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. Applications must be 
made to the Director of Admissions at College Park, Maryland. 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for 
admission. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee 
is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

\nnual costs of attending the University at College Park for Maryland 

residents include: fixed charges, $200. 00; instructional materials. $24.00; 
special fees. $77.00 to $82.00; board. $400.00 and lodging. $270.00 to 

I he L'ni\ersit\ reserves the right to make sueh changes in fees and other charges 
.is m.t\ he found necessary, although ever) effort will he made to keep the cost to 
the student as km as possible. 



University of Maryland 

$300.00. Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee of $350.00 
and lodging costs are $320.00 to $350.00. 

t Effective September 1, 1964: Annual costs of attending the University 
at College Park for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $250.00; 
instructional materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00; board, $420.00 and 
lodging, $290.00 to $320.00. Non-resident students are assessed an addi- 
tional fee of $400.00 and lodging costs are $340.00 to $370.00. 

COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

r- Semester— > 

First Year / // 

Chemistry 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

* English 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Math. 10, 1 1 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 3 

or 

Math. 18, 19 — Introductory and Elementary Analysis 3 4 

Zoology 1 — General Zoology 4 

Botany 1 — General Botany 4 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Air Science 2, 3— Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 2 2 

Health 2, 4— Health (Women) 2 

Total 

Second Year 

♦English 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 

*History 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Physics 10, 1 1 — Fundamentals of Physics 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis 

Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

♦Government and Politics 1 or Group I Elective 

Elective: 

Approved Elective from Group I or Group II of 

American Civilization Program 

Physical Activities 

Total 17 18 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. 
It has therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civili- 
zation. This program is also designed to provide the student with a general 
educational background. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the University 



17 


17-18 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 




4 


3 




3 






3 


1 


1 



'The Program in American Civilization. 

f The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges 
as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to 
the student as low as possible. 



School of Pharm \< \ 

and is described Mow. The second level is for undergraduate students 
wishing to carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College of Arts 
and Sci enc es). The third level is for students desiring to do graduate 

work in the field (see catalog for the Graduate School)/ 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of 

Maryland must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed cur- 
ricula) obtain 24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses 
Of the American Civilization Program. Although the courses in the 
Program are prescribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for 
students who demonstrate in classification tests good previous preparation 
in one or more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4), American History (6 hours. 
H. 5, 6). and American Government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are required 
subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or all three of these 
areas by means of University administered tests are expected to substi- 
tute certain elective courses. Through such testing a student may be 
released from 3 hours of English (9 hours remaining as an absolute 
requirement), 3 hours of American History (3 hours remaining as an 
absolute requirement), and 3 hours of American Government. Students 
released from 3 hours of English will take Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 
and 2. Those released from 3 hours of History will take, instead of 
H. 5 and 6, any one of the following three hour courses: H. 41, H. 42, 
H. 51, H. 52, H. 61. H. 62, H. 71/or H. 72. Students who have been 
exempted from courses in English, American History, or American Gov- 
ernment may not take such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required, students elect 
one course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics. (Not open to Fresh- 
men. Students who may wish to take additional courses in 
economics should substitute Economics 31 for Economics 37). 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 

Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

Students who, one the basis of tests, have been released from 3. 6 
or 9 hours of otherwise required courses in English, American Historv 
or American Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements 
for these courses from any or all of the following groups: (a) more 
advanced courses in the same department as the required courses in 
which the student is excused, or (b) Elective Group I (see 2 above), 
provided that the same course may not be used as both a Group I and 
a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. Group II consists of the 
following 3-hours courses: 

H. 42. Western Civilization: either H. 51 or 52. The Humanities; either 
Musie 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, Historv oi American 
Art; and Sociology 5, Anthropology. 

5 



University of Maryland 

ADMISSION TO THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 
AT BALTIMORE 

1. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program 
at College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) will 
qualify for advancement to the pharmacy program at Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the 
School of Pharmacy each student will be required to complete a form 
of intent and return it to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

A. Prerequisites 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed 
successfully two academic years of work in an accredited college* of arts 
and sciences based upon the completion of a four year high school course 
or the equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course must con- 
sist of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit exculsive of physical 
education, military science or similar courses. The 60 semester hours 
must include 12 hours of English, 6 hours of college level mathematics 
(algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry), 4 hours of botany and 
4 hours of zoology (or 8 hours of general biology), 8 hours of general 
inorganic chemistry (including qualitative analysis), 4 hours of quanti- 
tative chemistry, 8 hours of physics, 3 hours of economics, 6 hours of 
history and the remainder as electives from the non-science areas. It 
is strongly recommended that the electives include political science and 
sociology although courses in anthropology, philosophy, psychology, and 
speech will be given consideration. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must 
have a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) when the lowest pass- 
ing grade is D (1.0), or its equivalent. The average shall be based on 
all college courses undertaken by the student in his pre-professional pro- 
gram, exclusive of credit in military science, physical education, hygiene, 
or similar courses. Transfer credit is given only for the courses completed 
with a grade of C (2.0) or higher and which are a part of the pre-profes- 
sional curriculum. 

B. Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admisison to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore 
should write to the Director of Admissions and Registrations, University 

*Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admis- 
sion to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally 
accredited college or university. 



School of Pharmacy 
of Maryland. Building, 520R, Room 201, Lombard and Greene Streets, 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Applicants wishing advice on an) problem 

relating to their applications should communicate with the above office. 



ENROLLMENT IN THE PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 
AT COLLEGE PARK 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at 
College Park may obtain application blanks by writing to the Admissions 
Office at College Park. Students meeting the requirements for admission 
will receive letters of admission from the Admissions Office at College 
Park. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering 
from the Office of the Registrar at College Park a few weeks prior to 
September registration period. 

There is a fee of $5.00 for changes in registration made after the first 
week of instruction. 



ENROLLMENT IN THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 
AT BALTIMORE 

1. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who had filed with the Dean of the School Pharmacy at Balti- 
more a letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the 
curriculum and who have completed the requirements of the pre-profes- 
sional program will be notified by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
that they have qualified for advancement into the professional program. 

These students will receive detailed direction for registering from the 
Baltimore Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September regis- 
tration period. 

2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates 
of admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at 
Baltimore. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for regis- 
tering from the Office of the Registrar at Baltimore a few weeks prior 
to the September registration period. 

TUITION AND FEES (BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland (135.00 

Non-Residents 160.00 



University of Maryland 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 
* Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

^Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 

all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester are 
payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student Union fee 
and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of first registration. 
Students wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment of tui- 
tion charges must do so with the Financial Office at or prior to 
registration for the semester for which such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only (Not applicable to students accepted from 
School of Pharmacy, College Park) 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition.) 

For Candidates for B.S. in Phramacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 10.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage 
in excess of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's v work will be charged additionally for each course. 
Fee for Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 



:: The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 

8 



School of Pharm \C\ 



PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 

full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows; 



Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) 
Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 

Chemistry 

Microbiolog> 

Pharmaeognosy 

Pharmacology 

Pharmacy 

Physiology 

* Student Union Fee (per annum) 

* Student Union (Summer Session) 
Student Activities Fee (per semester) 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Matriculation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 
tTuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 
Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 
^Student Union Fee (per annum for full time students) 
*Special Fee (per annum for full time students only) 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session, all students) 
^Student Union Fee (per annum, part time students) 

Graduation Fee 
Master's Degree 
Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 



$15.00 



10.00 


12.00 


15.00 


5.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


6.00 


6.00 


10.00 


$10.00 


15.00 


30.00 


10.00 


6.00 


6.00 


10.00 


50.00 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable h> all 
full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus 
and is used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students 
enrolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student 
Union Fee will be SI 5.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students earning as 
much as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this ice 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student Union 
Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 

T The present $15.00 fee per credit hour for students enrolled in the Graduate School 
will be increased to $18.00. Effective September 1. 1964. the $18.00 rate will appl\ 
to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without regard to the location at 
which the course is gi\en and will appK to audited courses as well as courses taken 
for credit. 



University of Maryland 

WITHDRAWALS FROM SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
AT BALTIMORE 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School he must 
file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. 

A student who does not comply with the above regulation is not issued 
an honorable dismissal and is not accorded any refund to which he might 
otherwise be entitled. 

Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent or guardian. 

1. REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL. 

Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation Fee, Student Activ- 
ities Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition and any scholarship credit, are 
refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following sched- 
ule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 



2. GRADES 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Any student who ( 1 ) fails to withdraw from any course or from the school 
in the required manner or (2) who registers, does not attend classes and 
does not withdraw, will receive grades of F in all courses for which he has 
registered. 



TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

10 



Schooi of Pharmacy 

TUITION AND FEES FOR PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM (COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

Sec page 3 for summary statements and consult "Adventure in Learning" 
which is available from College Park. Maryland. 



CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for 
at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six 
months. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be established by him prior to the 
registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services 
while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six- 
months period referred to above except in those cases in which the adult 
was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into 
the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in the 

official "University General and Academic Regulations. 91 

// 



University of Maryland 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final exam- 
ination in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are nor- 
mally counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more 
than half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half 
a period are also construed as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion 
of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant per- 
mission for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 


Interpretation 


Point Value 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Fair 


2 


D 


Poor but passing 


1 


F 


Failure 





I 


Course work incomplete replaced by definite 






grade when course 






requirements have 






been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 

Subject Credit Grade Points 

Chemistry 4 C 8 

Microbiology 4 C 8 

Pharmacognosy 4 B 12 

Pharmacy 4 A 16 

Pharmacy Administration 3 D 3 



19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade point average of 2.47. 

12 



Sghooi op Pharmacy 

When, for anv reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland are considered. 

MIIVSEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Seven weeks after the beginning of each semester, 
the Dean warns and the Advisor Interviews all students earning grades 
of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to 
a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the 
instructor enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above 
with an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases when 
this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by the 
instructor by the end of the next semester in which that subject is again 
offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course 
in which he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at 
the University, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, 
including regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he 
will not receive any additional credit for the course completed with a 
passing grade. 

If the work is completed at the University of Maryland his final mark 
will be substituted for the mark already recorded Although the final 
mark received in the course will be used in determining credit for pro- 
motion and graduation, it does not apply to honors and awards. See 
applicable section under "Honors and Awards. " 

If the student is authorized by the Dean to repeat the course or its 
equivalent, at another university or college, the regulations applicable to 
transfer of credit apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with 
a grade of C (2.0) or higher; for purposes of computing grade averages. 
transfer credit is considered as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in 

raising his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to 
withdraw from the School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student 

13 



University of Maryland 

may be permitted, with the written permission of the Dean and the head 
of the department giving the course, to repeat the course for the second 
time. Such permission can be given to the student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above 
regulation must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will 
be granted under unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall 
require the approval of the head of the department giving the course. 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who 
is permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements 
for the degree from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

All students are expected to maintain a grade average of not less than 
C (2.0) for each semester. Any student who fails to maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) for any semester will be placed on probation during 
the next semester. Students in the Fifth Year Class must maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) to become eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semes- 
ter hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed 
on probation during the next semester. 

Any student on probation must pass all courses for which he is registered 
and must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) or he will be automat- 
ically dropped from the School of Pharmacy at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in any semester shall be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatis- 
factory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then 
obtains a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be 
automatically dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may 
apply in writing to the Dean for readmission after a lapse of at least one 
semester. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that 
semester. 

Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be 
readmitted only once. 

14 



School of PHARMACY 

Rf (iULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 

toemblj of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a recon- 
sideration of his particular case. 

♦ELECTIVE PROGRAMS AT BALTIMORE 

1. FOURTH YEAR ELECTIVES 

Students are required to elect cither the General Pharmacy Major or 
the Pre-Graduate Major by May 1 of the Third Year. 

Students to be eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major must have estab- 
lished the aptitudes for the successful pursuit of graduate work and must 
meet the necessary prerequisites. Students not qualifying for the Pre- 
Graduate Major will be required to pursue the General Pharmacy Major. 

2. FIFTH YEAR ELECTIVES 

Students must make elective selections by May 1 of the Fourth Year. 
The General Pharmacy Major of the Fourth Year Class may continue 
with the General Pharmacy Major or elect the Hospital Major. Students 
continuing the General Pharmacy Major must choose betwen Pharma- 
cognosy 52, Animal Health Products and Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and 
Dermatological Preparations. 

The Hospital Majors will follow the prescribed program. Students in 
the Pre-Graduate Major will pursue Chemistry 187, 189, 188, 190 
Physical Chemistry and Physical Chemistry Laboratory. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS— PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the Professional 
Program with a grade average of C (2.0) in addition to the Pre-Pn : 
sional requirements will be classified as students of the Fourth Year 
Class. 

General Pharmacy Majors who have completed 71 credit hours of the 
Professional Program with a grade average of C (2.0) will be classified 
as Fifth Year students. Pre-Graduate Majors in order to advance in their 
Elective Program and attain the classification of Fifth Year Class must 
have completed 73 credit hours of the Professional Program with an 
academic quality indicative of the successful pursuit of graduate work. 

General Pharmacy Majors or Hospital Majors must have maintained B 
grade average of C (2.0) during the Fifth Year and have completed a 

minimum of 108 credit hours of the Professional Program to be con- 



*The elective programs must be ippTOVed b> the Class Adviser and the Dean ( 
additional information consult with the (lass Adviser and see the respective curricula 
on pages J2 an>! 

15 



University of Maryland 

sidered as candidates for graduation. Pre-Graduate Majors who have 
completed a minimum of 110 credit hours of the Professional Program 
with a grade average of at least C (2.0) will be considered as candi- 
dates for graduation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the Fifth Year in residence at the 
School of Pharmacy at Baltimore and have been accredited 108 semester 
hours instruction in the Professional Program as General Pharmacy 
Majors or Hospital Majors or have been accredited 110 semester hours 
instruction in the Professional Program as Pre-Graduate Majors and 
who have attained the required grade point standings and met the other 
requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance 
of transcripts are as follows: one copy of a student's records is made 
without charge; for additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for 
each transcript. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions, Government agencies, etc., as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy and 
the honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 



REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD 
OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this State shall not later than thirty days after enrolling, 
file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an applica- 
tion for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application 
he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may deem 

16 



Schooi op Pharmacy 

appropriate, and sinuiltancousK With the filing of said application, shall 
pa) the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmac\ shall. 

at the beginning o\ an) subsequent school or college year, submit to the 

said Board a sworn statement of an) and all actual drug store experience 

acquired during the preceding vacation months.* 1 



LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board 
of Pharmacy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the 
age oi twenty-one years, is a graduate of an accredited school or college 
of pharmacy, and has completed one year as a registered apprentice in 
a drug store or pharmacy approved b) said Board of Pharmacy for such 
purposes ma) sit for examination given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store 
or pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school 
or college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college 
of pharmacy. Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience 
as a registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from 
an accredited school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy 
approved by the Board for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore. Mary- 
land 21201, for further information relative to the requirements for 
eligibility for licensure. 



DEPORTMENT 

The Universit) reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detri- 
mental to his or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct 
is not satisfactory to the authorities of the University. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though 
no specific charge be made against them. 



EMPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation 

17 



University of Maryland 

and completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of 
opportunities to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that 
students refrain from working during the school session. 



HOUSING 

1. WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the 
Louisa Parsons Hall. 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close prox- 
imity to the School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommo- 
dations and it is under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. 
Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, blankets, pillou^. 
bureau scarves, small rugs and a laundry bag. Students may obtain 
towels and bed linens through a designated commercial rental sen-ice. 
Although students may provide their own bed linens and towels they are 
not permitted to launder these items in Louisa Parsons Hall. The indivdual 
student assumes responsibility for all the dormitory property assigned to 
her. Any damage done to property other than that which results from 
ordinary wear and tear will be charged to the student concerned. 

The room rates are as follows: Double Room per person, $90.00 per 
semester; Single Room $120.00 per semester; Single Room with Bath 
SI 50.00 per semester. The room charge will appear on the student's bill 
payable at the time of registration. 

Meals may be purchased at the Baltimore Union Cafeteria or in nearby 
restaurants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in The Baltimore Union. 
For particulars, see section immediately below. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE 
BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accom- 
modations for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned 
building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, 
laundry facilities, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on 
each floor. Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made 
for rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The con- 
tract for accommodations covers the 1963-1964 academic year. 

18 



Schooi of Pharmacy 



\r\m MIC > 1 \K 



Double Room Rates: 

$150.00 per semester (per person i 

LOO per eight weeks summer session (per person) 

What the Rate OOVeiS: 

The rate shown above is per person and Includes the following: 
Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, hook 
shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. Maid service 
will include cleaning oi room twice per week and replacement of change 

of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 

Information can be obtained from the Manager's office. Mail service is 

also pro\ided. 

The resident provides blankets, pillow, towels and linens of which 
the latter two must be rented through the designated commereial rental 
service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 

I KWSIENTS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The scr\iees will include one bath towel, one face towel, one face cloth, 

soap and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



PARKING 



The Univenit) ot Maryland does not provide an\ parking taeilitu 
university parking lots for students on the Baltimore Campus. 



19 



University of Maryland 

THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

The library facilities are excellent. The new Health Sciences Library which 
serves the School of Pharmacy, as well as the Schools of Dentistry, Medi- 
cine, Nursing, and Social Work, contains over 88,400 bound volumes and 
regularly receives approximately 2,000 scientific periodicals. 

The Rules and Regulations by the library are available for distribution 
to students at all times. 



PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 
AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. 
The first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thomp- 
son was designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was 
subsequently held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. 
Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of up to $1800.00 for single persons or up to $2400.00 for 
married individuals who are promising graduate students desirous of 
doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
and pharmacognosy; students may also apply for an additional allowance 
up to $600.00 for tuition, fees, and supplies. Address applications directly 
to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 777 Four- 
teenth Street, N.W., Washington 5, D.C., between February 15 and 
March 15 for consideration for the forthcoming September. 

The H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, an alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, former 
associate professor of chemistry, and prominent manufacturing phar- 
macist of Baltimore, has contributed annually since 1930 a sum of money 
to maintain a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. The fel- 
lowship is open to promising graduate students interested in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two 

20 



V B0O1 01 PHARM \( 1 

fellowships for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, phar- 
maceutical chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the 
Facilh) Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Noxzema Foundation Fellowship 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc.. is contributing a fund not to exceed 
$1600.00 for a graduate fellowship open to United States citizens \ 

candidate will be selected on the basis of his educational qualifications 
by the Fellowship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation. Inc.. ma\ appoint a 
DOn-VOting member. This fellowship may be renewed annualK at the 
discretion of the grantors. 

arch (Irani of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmac> gi\cs to the School 
each year the sum of $100.00 to be used as a research grant for a 
student selected by the Committee on the Research Grant of the Alumni 
Association to enable the student to engage in pharmaceutical research 
in the School of Pharmacy. The research conducted must be of general 
pharmaceutical interest and must be accepted upon completion for publi- 
cation in one of the pharmaceutical journals. 

The Edwin D. Staljort and Arthur J . Staljort Memorial Grant 

In memory of Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort. the John C. 
Stalfort & Sons Company, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, has provided a 
grant of $4000.00 per annum to the Department of Pharmacy to support 
pharmaceutical research. A portion of this grant is to be utilized to 
provide a graduate fellowship. 



OTHER RESEARCH GRANTS 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants from 
the Smith. Kline & French Laboratories, the National Institute of Mental 
Health and the National Cancer Institute. The Department of Anatorm 
and Physiolog\ has been awarded grants as follows: two from the 
National Science Foundation and one each from the National Institutes 
of Health and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Through these grants, the School of Pharmac\ is able to provide a 
number of research fellowships available to graduate and post-doctoral 
students in pharmaceutical chemistry and physiology. 



21 



University of Maryland 

SPECIAL GRANTS 

Grant funds allotted by the Atomic Energy Commission to the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy and Physiology contributed substantially to the equip- 
ping of a radioisotope laboratory for the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
for training and research purposes. 

The American Viscose Corporation has provided funds to the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy for the procurement of specialized research equipment. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $2,000.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to 
qualified students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching serv- 
ices to the departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually 
carry two-thirds of the normal graduate work. 

Residencies in Hospital Pharmacy 

1. University (of Maryland) Hospital 

The Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland offer annually, to qualified graduate pharmacists, residencies 
in hospital pharmacy. The appointments beginning July 1 are for twenty- 
four months. During the period of appointment the resident divides 
his time between hospital pharmacy service and graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland 
and a certificate of residency to be awarded by the University Hospital. 
Full time training will be required during the summer of 1964. Two 
weeks of vacation are allowed during the term of appointment. The 
University Hospital provides a stipend of $2400.00 per year for the 
first year as Assistant Resident. Completion of the Assistant Residency 
leads to appointment as Resident with a stipend of $3000.00 per year. 
Parking space, uniforms and laundering of uniforms are free of charge. 
The residents must pay the tuition, laboratory and other fees for graduate 
work in the University. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Director of Pharmaceutical Service, University Hospital, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201, or to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

2. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy 

The Pharmacy Department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 

22 






School of PHARMACl 

Mar\land. offet annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several resi- 
dencies in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning September 
1. are for twenty-two months. During twenty months, appointees di- 
vide their time between hospital pharmacy ser\ice and graduate stud\ 
leading to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of 
Maryland and a certificate of residency awarded by the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Full time training in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmac> is 
required for two (2) months during the summer of 1964. Four weeks 
o\ vacation are allowed during the term of appointment The Hospital 
provides a stipend of $200.00 per month for the first year and $250.00 
per month thereafter and the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees 
for these candidates b\ 25%. However, candidates must pay the regular 
laboratory and other fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21205, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and 
loans should be directed to: 

Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships* 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-profes- 
sional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. These schol- 
arships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarships* 

The Mar\land Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually 

scholarships to prc-profcssional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 



I hese scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and (irants-in- 

•\id of the University o\ Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship ( ommittec of 

the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmac\ and the Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal AssiKiation. 



University of Maryland 

ness, moral character, scholastic achievement and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceding $500.00 per academic year 
is used in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These 
scholarships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships* 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several schol- 
arships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 
ness, scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year 
is applied to defray partially the fees and expenses at College Park, 
Maryland. Recipients must have been residents of the State of Mary- 
land for at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available 
consult the University bulletin "Adventure in Learning" available from 
College Park, Maryland. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed 
to Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The selection of the 
recipients of the scholaships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunc- 
tion with a committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per 
semester to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their 
education. 

Alumni Association University of Maryland Scholarship 

The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Association pro- 
vides a scholarship in the amount of $250.00. The award is based on 
scholarship, leadership and need. 



*These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants- 
in-Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Commit- 
tee of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

24 



SCHOOl OF PHARM \< v 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes avail- 
able scholarships worth SI 00. 00 per semester to qualified students of the 

Third. Fourth and Fifth Years. 

The Charles Caspori, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari. Jr.. former Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number oi his friends and alumni have made an endow- 
ment for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The Henry B. Gilpin Company Scholarship 

The Henry B. Gilpin Company, Baltimore Division, Maryland, contrib- 
uted a scholarship for the 1963-64 academic year in the amount of 
5400.00 to a student who has maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who is in need of financial aid. 

The Charles Land on Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually 
h\ the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, to a Fifth Year student who has shown superior proficiency in 
practical and commercial pharmacy. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus 
of the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese 
Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be 
awarded annually to a resident of Allegany County. Maryland. The 
recipient of the award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund to provide one or 
two undergraduate scholarships not to exceed $500 each, open to citizens 
of the United States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their 
educational qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School 
Of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland to which the Nox/cma Foun- 
dation. Inc.. may appoint a non-voting member. This scholarship ma> 
be renewed annual]) at the discretion oi the grantors. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prim Montgomery County 

Pharmaceutk ai A ssociation Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Cieorgcs-Montgomcr\ County Pharma- 

25 



University of Maryland 

ceutical Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in 
need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 per semester to qualified 
students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are 
in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory 
of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to 
qualified students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are 
made upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

NDEA Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 1958 provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $800 and 
during his entire course of study may borrow a sum not exceeding $5000. 
The borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and 
repayment terms established by the University. Repayment of the loan 
begins one year after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and 
must be completed within ten years thereafter. No interest is charged 
on the loan until the beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after 
that date is to be paid at the rate of 3 per cent per annum. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more 
than one-fifth of the graduating class in each college including the School 
of Pharmacy. The honor designations are listed in the commencement 
program and are recorded on the recipents' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two 
academic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or 
higher. Those in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors 
and those in the second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. 

26 



School of Pharmacy 

Students whose names appear on the list both semesters reeeive the School's 
Academic Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if 
I student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned 
for these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fra- 
ternity for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at 
the University in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are 
eligible by invitation to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the 
first semester oi the Third Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national Honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for 
chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or 
colleges who are members in good standing of the American Association 
of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general 
average, provided that this average is not below the grade of "B." Cer- 
tificates of Honor are awarded to the three students having the next 
highest general averages, provided these averages do not fall below the 
grade of t4 B." 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the 
Fourth Year Class having the highest general averages, provided these 
averages do not fall below the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered 
in awarding these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree o\ Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical 
and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. 
In recommending a student for the pri/e. the professor of ehemistr\ is 

27 



University of Maryland 

guided in his judgment of the student's ability by observation and personal 
contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of phar- 
macy at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a 
gold medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a can- 
didate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior 
proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and 
dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, 
the income from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
of the School to the Fifth Year student who has done exceptional work 
throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late 
son, Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, 
Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner 
Brill, have provided a fund the income of which is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a Fifth Year student for meritorious academic 
achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink, '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
United States Dispensatory as a prize to the Fifth Year student recom- 
mended by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice 
of pharmacy. 

Phi Alpha Chapter, Rho Pi Phi Fraternity Cup 

The Phi Alpha Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi Fraternity provides a cup to 
be awarded annually to the Fifth Year student selcted by the Faculty 
Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of character and 
leadership. 

28 



School of Pharmacy 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha 
. Omega Fraternity provide a pri/e to be awarded annually to the 
Fifth Year student chosen by the Faculty Assembl) for proficiency in 
pharmacology 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
provides annually a key whieh is awarded to the Fifth Year student 
selected by the Faeulty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharm. 
Administration. 

Merck Award 

Merck & Company. Inc.. Rahway, New Jersey, offers a set of valuable 
reference books to the Fifth Year student who attains a high standing 
in pharmacy or pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc.. Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol 
Laboratories, Inc., to the Fifth Year student who has contributed the 
most to pharmacy through his extra-curricular activities. 

Rexall Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
Fifth Year student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both 
leadership and scholarship. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the 
School in extra-curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the 
School of Pharmacy Convocations. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an or- 
ganization of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding 
in the internal administration of the school for organizing all extra-curricu- 
lar programs and activities of the student body and for coordinating these 
programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administration to 

29 



University of Maryland 

foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council of 
the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Govern- 
ment Alliance, the Presidents of the respective classes, and one delegate 
elected from each undergraduate class. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 

The purpose of the Student Branch is to encourage in the broadest and 
most liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a 
profession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution of 
the American Pharmaceutical Association, especially in fostering education 
in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its application and 
aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, 
Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy established the Inter-Professional Stu- 
dent Senate for purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships 
among the Professional Schools and the University Units at College Park. 
The Senate is comprised of representatives from each of the five profes- 
sional schools. 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association (1962-1963 ) 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 
1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing 
committee known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties 
of this group are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to 
the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present mem- 
bers of the Committee are: 

Irving I. Cohen, Chairman 
Joseph U. Dorsch, Co-Chairman 

Halcolm S. Bailey Aaron M. Libowitz 

James P. Cragg, Jr. Gordon A. Mouat 

Clinton W. Englander Samuel I. Raichlen 

Milton A. Friedman Henry G. Seidman 

Robert E. Lawson Morris R. Walman 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its 

30 



Sch(X)I. of Pharmacy 

separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association oi the Maryland 
College of Pharmac\ until 1907, when the General Alumni Association 
of the l'niversit\ of Maryland Was formed. Following the organization 
oi the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant until 
June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the 

School oi Pharmacy, University oi Maryland. Each year it is more 

evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
hut is growing. 

Oflkers (1962-1963) 

Georgianna S. Gittinger Honorar\ President 

Sam ^A. Goldstein (1930) President 

Milton A. Friedman (1934) 1st Vice President 

Robert J. Kokoski ( 1952 ) 2nd Vice President 

Frank J. Slama (1924) Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield (1924) Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

James P. Cragg, Jr. (1943) — Chairman 

Milton J. Brownstein (1934) 

Thomas C. Dawson (1955) 

Nathan I. Gruz (1939) 

Casimir T. Ichniowski (1929) 

Harold Levin (1943) 

Vito Tinelli, Jr. (1961) 



31 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


■ 

5 


>> 

JO 

4 


3 


3 

1 

E 


w 

1 

5 


4 


3 

i 


3 

•3 

■ 

u 

o 


Third Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 


2 fi 1 


1 

8 4 


i 






Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32, Principles 


3 


4 


7 


4 


3 
2 


-. _ 

4 
6 


7 I 

8 I 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34, Quantitative 


4 


Pharmacy 31, Introduction to the Profession 


2 
3 
3 


1 

1 

3 



2 
6 
3 


2 
4 
3 




Pharmacy 33, 34, Processes and Dosage Forms 


3 


3 

__ _ 


6 1 


4 




3 

2 




3 


3 1 

5 1 


3 












3 


Fourth Year (Required) 

First Aid 1, Standard 


1 




1 
6 


17 


18 




2 I 4 


4 










Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology, 


2 


4 


6 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Principles of 


4 | 4 
2 ! 3 
2 | 4 


8 
5 
6 


5 
3 

3 




Pharmacognosy 41, 42, General Pharmacognosy. 
Pharmacy 43, 44, Pharmaceutical Technology.. 


2 
2 
3 


3 

4 
6 

_. _ 


5 
6 
9 

_ _ 


3 
3 
5 








3-4 

18-19 

3 


3-4 


X ( Electives — General Pharmacy Major) 


3 ' 


3 








18-19 


Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 
Management I _ _ 






2 
4 

4 

1 


3 
3 


5 

4 

1 7 

1 
1 


3 


t (Electives— Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 

3 

1 

1 
2 

2 

3 


3 

3 

1 3 


4 

6 

1 

4 
5 

2 

3 


4 

4 
1 

2 

1 3 

2 

1 3 

1 5 

18 19 

1 3 


4 


Fifth Year (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology.. 
Pharmacy 55, 56, Pharmaceutical Formulation 
Problems ._ __ 


5 
1 


or 




Pharmacy 153, 154, Dispensing 


2 
2 
3 


3 


1 5 
1 2 

1 3 

1 — 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharma- 
ceutical Jurisprudence _ _ __ 


2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, 
Chemistry of Medicinal Products _ 


3 


X Electives 


5 


X (Electives — General Pharmacy Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists. 
Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


2 


1 3 


1 5 






| 


19-18 


3 

2 
2 


3 


> 

1 
1 5 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 
Management II, III _ _ __ 


2 

2 
2 


1 3 


1 2 

5 

I 2 


1 2 

1 3 
1 2 


1 

| 1 2 

1 1 

1 

— 


2 


t( Electives — Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists- 
Pharmacy 157, Hospital Pharmacy 






1 
1 | 




Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations __ 


2 
2 

3 


1 

1 3 | 5 

1 

| 1 2 

| 1 3 

1 1 
I 6 i 6 


8 


Pharmacy 158, Orientation to Hospital 
Administration __ 










1 2 


t ( Electives— Pre-Graduate Major ) 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 


3 


1 6 


3 
6 


1 3 
1 2 


3 
2 



t The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



Schooi OF PHARM \( \ 



PROI f SS|()\ \i ( i RR|( i | i \i 
\ky 01 HOURS and CREDITS 



( ourie 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit 
Hours 


Third Vf»r (Required) 

my HI 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry BO, 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry M 


n 

96 

u 

32 
96 
48 
18 
82 
416 

16 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
48 
104 + 


96 
L2fl 

96 


128 

224 

II 

192 

w 

48 
80 


4 
8 

4 

| 


Pharm 


96 


8 






rhHrnuifv - ._ 




3 


Pharmacy Administration 36 


48 




Total --- 


464 


880 

16 

96 

96 
128 
160 
192 
144 
128f 




Fourth Year (Required) 

First Aid 1 






64 

64 
64 
96 
128 
96 
24f 


4 




4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 

Pharmacognosy 41. 42 . 

Pharmacy 4S. 44 . . 


5 
6 
6 




5 





6-8 


Total ... 


424 

4- 
32 

128 

112 
32 

16 
64 
64 
96 

120t 


536 


960 

48 
80 

128 

208 
32 

r 

64 

160 

64 

96 

240t 


36-38 


♦ (Electives — Gen. Pharm. Major) 

Pharmacy Administration 41 

Pharmacy Administration 42 

:tivefl Pre-Graduate) 
Mathematics 20. 21 


3 


48 


3 
8 


Fifth Year (Required) 
Pharmacology 155, 156 


96 


9 


Pharmacy 55, 56 


2 


or 
Pharmacy 151 .. 


o 

48 
96 


2 


Pharmacy 153. 154 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52 . 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152_. 




6 


1 Electives 


120t 


10 




504 

32 

48 

32 
64 

32 

32 
32 
32 

96 


360 

48 


864 

S.I 

48 
r 

80 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 

192 

960 
864 


37 
3 


:< Electives — Gen. Pharm. Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51 


Pharmacognosy 52 .. 


3 


or 
Pharmacy 156 


o 

48 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54 


i 


1 lectives— Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51 _ 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 157 


2 


Pharmacy- 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 158 . 


2 


tives— Pre-Graduate Major) 
Chen 189 




6 


Chemistry 


192 

464 
536 
360 


4 


SIMMARY 
Third Year 


416 
424 


35 


' : 


.••iT 


Fifth Year 






Total 


1844 


1360 


108-110* 







t Average. 

• • approved by the cias^ Advisor and I 1 
minimum ! for itudi her the General Pharmacy 

Major I Major Course. A minimum of 11<» credits required for students 

•electing tr 



33 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

ANATOMY 

31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Darago.) 
A study of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. The course 
is designed to provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 
particular emphasis on human structures. 

FIRST AID 

0. First Aid Course. (0) 

Fourth Year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson, 
instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

20, 21. Calculus. (4, 4) 

Fourth Year, four lectures. (Dean.) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 15 and 17 and approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kine- 
matics, integration, geometric and physical application on integration, partial 
derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
130. Probability. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, 
total, compound, and inverse probability, continuous distribution, theorems of 
Bernoulli and Laplace, theory of errors. (Staff.) 

132. Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distribution 
and their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, 
analysis of variance, statistical inference. (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology. (4) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay and Becker.) 

34 



Schooi oi Pharmacy 

Prerequisites. Pharmaceutical Chemistry 10, ; 2. i his course in designed ee- 
peaaik for pharmacy students and includes practice and theoretical consider a- 

tion oi bacteria, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, viruses, rickettsia. \ easts 
and molds. 

I aboratorv teaching includes methods of staining and the preparation of media, 
cultural characteristics of bacteria; emphasis is given to the stiuh of disinfec- 
tants, antiseptics, germicides and sterilization, antibiotics and their antibacterial 
action, microbiological ISSay, sen\itivil\ testing and virus techniques. \ xpen 
ments are included for the bacteriological evaluation of milk, water, (ood and 
air. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health 

and Parasitology. (4) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay and Becker.) 
Prerequisite. Microbiology 41. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products such as sera, vaccines, toxins, 
toxoids, etc. Special attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and ani- 
mals to sensitizing substances, drug idiosyncracies, hay fever, food allergies, 
contact dermatosis, and animal inoculation. Part of the course is devoted to the 
study of Public Health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections, immunity, transmission, diagnosis, treat- 
ment and prevention of parasitic diseases. 

For Graduates 
200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1). 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1, 1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Sha\> 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

211. Public Health. (1-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite. Microbiology 41. 146. Lectures and discussions on the organiza- 
tion and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The courses will also include a study of laboratorv methods 

399. Resear( h in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by the amount of work performed. (Shay.) 

35 



University of Maryland 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

30, 32. Principles of Organic Chemistry. (4, 4) 

Third Year, two lectures, one recitation, one laboratory. (Miller and Whang.) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry. 

34. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Zenker and Vora.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32 or equivalent. A study of quan- 
titative analytical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
official preparations with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, or equivalent. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. 

144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 37, 38 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 
complicated organic preparations. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds. (2, 2) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143, or equivalent. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Fourth Year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 34. Lectures and laboratory exer- 
cises devoted to the composition of living organisms and the chemical and 
physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A survey of the structural 
relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally of organic medici- 
nal products. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Weiner and Guyton.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 15, 35, 37, Physics 10, 11, Math. 20, 21. A study 
of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 

36 



SCHOOl OF PHARMAC1 
! B8, 190. PHYSICAl ("hi mistry. (2. : ) 

Fifth Year, tWO laboratories. (Werner and OuytOO.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry ,s ". 189 or concurrent registration. Quantitative ex- 
periments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and 
acquaint the student uith precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 
230. Seminar, (l) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of prog- 
ress and Rirve) o\ recent developments in chemistry. 

232. Advanced Organic Synthesis. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Miller and Doorcnbos. | 

Prerequisite. Chemistry U4. I ibrary and laboratory work designed to offer 
experience in the more difficult organic syntheses and in new techniques. 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141. 143. A study of the principles of stereochemistry 
of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocylic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite. Chemistry 141. 143. A study of the chemistry and synthesis of 
heterocyclic compounds. 

250. Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos . i 

Prerequisites. Chemistry 141. 143. A study of the synthesis and structure deter- 
mination of steroids and the application of modern chemical concepts to the 
chemistry of steroids. 

252. A I KALOIDS. (2) 

Two lectures. | Miller.) 

Prerequisites. Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles involved in struc- 
ture determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alkaloidal clas 

253. 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2. 2) 
Two lectures. (Doorenbos ,) 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 151, 152 and Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141. 143 or 
permission of the instructor. A study of structural relationships and bask 
principles concerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, 
e.g., structure-activity relationships, physical properties and biological activity, 
cellular transport, drug, protein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and 
physico-chemical mechanisms of drug action. 

255. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. (2) 

Either semester, two laboratories. I Zenker.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistr\ 187, 188, 189. 190 or equivalent 

37 



University of Maryland 

271, 272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 
Two lectures. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of particular inter- 
est in the pharmaceutical sciences, including colloids, surface chemistry, kinetics, 
absorption spectroscopy, dipole moments and the behavior of molecules in elec- 
tric and magnetic fields. 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are necessary for, 

and a part of, a larger research effort. 

281. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of the relationships 

between drugs and enzymes, with emphasis on drug action at the enzymatic 
level and on drug metabolism. 

282. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. 
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of modern techniques and 
metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug metabolism. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

41. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisites, Anatomy 31, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A study of the 
cultivation, collection, and commerce of crude vegetable drugs with special 
emphasis on the physical and microscopical characteristics used in their identi- 
fication and in the detection of adulteration. 

42. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacognosy 41. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 41 with 
instruction covering drugs of animal origin and allergy-producing pollens. 
Special emphasis is placed upon official and non-official chemical tests used 
in the identification of drugs and their constituents. 

51. Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists. (3) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Kokoski.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 
A discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 

38 



School of Pharm sot 
and the industries, including those which attack ("arm and garden crops; their 

recognition, lite history, and methods of control. 

52, Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41, 42: Pharmacology 155. 

A stud\ o\ principal pharmaceutical agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41. 42. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be 
given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

111. 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41. 42. Lectures and laboratory work covering 
advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 
roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs 
and spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice 
in identification and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211. 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not 
ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be 
given to practical problems and to the identification and detection of adulter- 
ants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. ( Slama. | 



PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
155, 156. Pharmacology, General. (4, 5) 

Fifth Year, three lectures and one laboratory first semester: four lectures and 

one laborator) lecond semester. (Ichniowskj and Staff.) 

39 



University of Maryland 

Prerequisites, Physiology 142; Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or consent of 
the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward 
effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156. A study of the methods of biological 
assay official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formu- 
lary. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacology 171. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156, and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay 
Methods. (2-4), (2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the develop- 
ment of biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

399. Research in Pharmacology. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 



PHARMACY 

31. Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy. (2) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures and one recitation. (Levine.) 

Orientation, brief introduction to the nature and ethical relations of pharmacy 
to the health professions and the public as well as a consideration of pharma- 
ceutical calculations. 

33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms. (4, 4) 

Third Year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

(Levine, Richman, Block and Augsburger.) 
Pharmacy 31 and 33 are prerequisites to Pharmacy 34. Commentary on the 
official compendia of pharmacy. Includes pharmaceutical manipulations and 
processes for preparing official dosage forms. Particular emphasis is placed on 
physical and chemical properties of ingredients, common nomenclature and 
synonyms, storage conditions and uses. 

40 



SCHOOL of Pharmacy 
35. Professions Communications. (3) 

Third Year, first semester, three lectures | Mailman and Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy literature and expression. A survey of the literature of pharmacy, 
bibliographical methods, oral and written reports on subjects o\ pharmaceutical 
interest. The use of audio-visual aids. 

38. History of Pharmacy. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, three lectures. (Kokoski.) 

A survey of the histOf) of pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 
those aspects of science most pertinent to the interests of the pharmacist. Re- 
search papers and reports required. 

43. 44. Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3) 

Fourth Year, two lectures, one laboratory and one recitation. 

(Shangraw and Augsburger.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. The physical-chemical principles in- 
volved in pharmaceutical systems and the application of this knowledge to the 
development, preparation and packaging of medicinal formulations. 

55, 56. Pharmaceutical Formulation Problems. (1, 1) 

Fifth Year, one lecture. (Allen.) 

Prerequisite. Pharmacy 44. Practical work in solving problems dealing with 
weights and measures employed in pharmacy during the handling of drugs and 
medicines. Special emphasis is given to problems useful in the manufacture of 
pharmaceuticals. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
151. Manufacturing Pharmacy. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. 

(Shangraw and Staff.) 
Prerequisite. Pharmacy 44. Limited to students having a grade point average 
of 2.5 or above. A study of manufacturing processes and equipment. Special 
attention is given to tablet compression and coating, solid and liquid mixing, 
aerosol, emulsion and ointment type products, and control procedures in the 
production of pharmaceuticals. 

153. 154. Dispensing Pharmacy. (3,3) 

Fifth Year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen and Staff.) 

Prerequisite. Pharmacy 44. Professional laboratory practice and other special- 
ized activities pertaining to prescriptions, including an evaluation of com- 
pounding aids and commercial pharmaceuticals. 

156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(AJlen and Staff.) 
Prerequisite. Pharmacy 153. A study of the composition and manufacture of 
preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of cold cream. 
\anishing cream, protective cream, hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face 
povsder. dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, toothpaste, deodorants, depilatoi ies, 
suntan preparations, etc. I he acid-mantle of the skin and hypoallergenic prep- 
arations are also emphasized. 

41 



University of Maryland 

157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. The fundamentals of hospital pharmacy practice 
and administration. Includes a study of the history and development of hos- 
pital pharmacy, physical facilities, minimum standards, purchasing, the formu- 
lary, manufacturing, record keeping and dispensing practices, with supervised 
practical experience in selected hospital pharmacies. 

158. Orientation to Hospital Administration. (2) 
Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures. 

The increasing role of the hospital in general health facilities and the in- 
creasing responsibility of the pharmacist in hospital activities necessitate some 
orientation in hospital administration. The course will consist of a discussion 
of the history and development of hospitals, classification of hospitals, or- 
ganization, governing authorities, the administrator, the medical staff, and 
special departments of the hospital, including pharmacy, nursing, dietary, 
engineering, accounting, housekeeping, laundry, purchasing, public relations 
and personnel. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 153, 154. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications, patents and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Phar- 
macy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and im- 
portant pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw,) 

Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1,1) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the 
pharmaceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 156, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development 
of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

42 



School of Pharmacy 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. ( 1 ) 

Each semester. (Allen.) 

Required of rtwtfHtl majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progr ea i ill research 

and mrveyi of recent developments in pharm 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2,2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss. Purdum. Allen, and Shangraw.) 



PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

36. Accounting. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Leavitt and Augsburger.) 
The analysis of financial and operating statements, especially as it concerns 
retail drug stores and other drug establishments, with a study of the fundamen- 
tal principles of accounting, including practice in bookkeeping. 

41. Drug Marketing. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, three lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite. Economics 37 or its equivalent. This is an introductory course 
in the field of marketing with special emphasis on the marketing of drug prod- 
ucts. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the 
forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing 
drug products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

42. Pharmacy Management I. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 
Prerequisite. Pharmacy Administration 41. A study of store arrangement, win- 
dow and interior display, advertising, merchandising, selling and salesmanship, 
and public and professional relations. 

51, 52. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (2. 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Kaufman ) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments. Sales, 
Agency and Partnerships. 

53. 54. Pharmacy Management II, III. (2. 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Leavitt) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 42. A study of the business problems 
of retail pharmacy, including ownership organization, financing, leasing, in- 
surance, purchasing and inventory control. 

43 



University of Maryland 
PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

142. General Physiology. (5) 

Fourth Year, second semester, three lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Darago.) 
Prerequisite, Anatomy 31. A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physi- 
ology including the structure and permeability of the cell membrane, neuro- 
physiology, muscle physiology, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, 
the digestive system, the excretory system, endocrinology, metabolism, and 
the special senses. 

For Graduates 

245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester, three lectures. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Physiology 142. Consent of 
instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical properties 
of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, 
golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and their con- 
tributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemical phe- 
nomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

246. Radioisotope Technique. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, consent of instructor. A course concerned with the practical use 
of isotopes particularly as tracers in metabolic investigations. 

399. Research in Physiology. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 



44 



Schooi of Pharmacy 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1962-63 
Graduate Student 



Augsburger, I an) l 

Barnett. 1 isa 

Bednarczyk, Leonard R. 

DGO, Henr\ J.. Jr. 

gBlau, Eugene R. 

*Block. i au rence H. 
Boule, Paul C. 

Broun. Sister Jane M. 

I lllian L 

DeSchepper, Paul 

Diamond. Louis 

Doane, m irshall G 

Duda, Marija 

Duffy, Thomas 

Fox, Chester D. 

Fried. Irving M. 

Goldsmith. Robert H. 

Guyton, Charles L. 
§ Harriet. Sidnev H. 
tHeifetz, Carl 

Henderson. Edward G 

Inguanti. Luciano 

Kocfa, Stanley A. 

konopik. Barbara H. (Shroff) 
xkosmicke. Joan 

I esko, Stephen A.. Jr 

Levine. Phillip J. 

Milkouski. John D. 

McDonald, Donald E. 

Mc Million. C. Robert 

Nakagawa, Masako 

Reier. George E. 

Richman, M- David 

Ringe. Ingrid 

Scott. Kenneth R. 

Simon. Stuart H. 

Smith. Rodne\ I 

Smith. Willard N. 

Stein. Martin E. 

Tinney. Francis J. 

Tocci. Paul M 

Vora. Kakubhai M 
acr, Frederick H. 

u . kling Waltei D 



Mary land 
Marj land 
Maryland 
Mar) land 
New York 
Mar) land 
Louisiana 

Maryland 
Mar) land 

Belgium 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Mississippi 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

Nebraska 

Penns\ lvania 

Rhode Island 

Maryland 

Penns\ lvania 

Maryland 

Japan 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New York 

District of Columbia 

Illinois 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

India 

M.ir\ land 

Maryland 



\ DkI not attend entire session 

ffld Semester onl> 

• Registered m Graduate School 



45 



University of Maryland 

Wang, Theodore S. T China 

Warfield, Albert H Maryland 

Warthen, John D Maryland 

Whang, Clara District of Columbia 



Senior Class (Four Year Program) 

Abel, Walter H Maryland 

Abramovitz, Marjorie S Maryland 

Adair, Carole S Maryland 

Antwarg, Alvin G Maryland 

Baker, Jeanne A Maryland 

Banks, David E Maryland 

Barron, David D Maryland 

Batt, William H Maryland 

Benson, Michael T Maryland 

Blake, David A Maryland 

Bradenbaugh, Don L Maryland 

Brownstein, Marshall P Maryland 

Caplan, Yale H Maryland 

Caple, Arthur N Maryland 

Chang, Gloria Maryland 

Cohen, Michael D Maryland 

Cornias, William N Maryland 

Fader, John F Maryland 

Friedel, Stuart L Maryland 

Henderson, Robert W Maryland 

Heyman, Irwin A Maryland 

Hopkins, Ronald M Maryland 

Jacobs, M. Neal Maryland 

Kadish, Aaron C Maryland 

Keller, Thomas H., Jr Maryland 

Kuchinsky, Victoria W Maryland 

Levi, Henry M Maryland 

Levin, Stephen P Maryland 

Mendelsohn, James F Maryland 

Newman, Jerome Maryland 

§Nowakowski, Ronald Maryland 

Pariser, Joseph Maryland 

Patel, Barbara F California 

Perzynski, Paul R Maryland 

Pilson, Robert M., Jr Maryland 

Price, Chester L Maryland 

Reinke, Budne C Maryland 

Ritchie, James R Maryland 

Sapperstein, Alan E Maryland 

Scholtz, Frank W Maryland 

Schultz, Lawrence M Maryland 



§ Did not attend entire session 

46 



S( BOOL OF Pharm KC\ 

Shaner. Daniel S. Maryland 

Shared. I con I). Maryland 

Sobc/.ik. Valentine R. Maryland 

Sober. Julian N. Maryland 

Soak, Allen Maryland 

IrM.ini. Effort M. Maryland 

I llman. Kenneth C. Maryland 

WeKh. James j. Maryland 

Wilson. John W. Maryland 

Winakur. Stuart Maryland 

Woods. Dennis S. Maryland 

> ee, Susan Maryland 

Zimmer. Reid A. Maryland 



Fourth Year (Five Year Program) 



DelCastilho. Ronald E. 
Wvnn. Richard L. 



Maryland 
land 



Third Year (Five Year Program) 



*Adams, Patricia M. 
Brauner. Robert P. 
Brundelre. Robert . . . 
Catlett. Leon R. 
Cavoures. James A. 
Conrad. John W. 
Cooney. John R. 

■ k. Richard L. 
Dolecek. Gayle R. 
Elliott. William R. 
Francakis. Mma S. 
Gamerman. Marvin I. 
Glover. Wayne A. 
Goldberg. Marvin 
Goldman. William I. 
Goldstein. M.irk N. 
Henderson. Robert I . 
Hoffman. Robert W. 
Kroopnick. Robert B. 
Libowitz. Suzanne J. 
Miller. Harris L. 
Mintz. Martin B. 

Myers, Mary L. 

K c han ow, Gerald M 

k.i\ man. Martha J. 



Mar\land 

New York 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Mar\land 
Maryland 
Mankind 
District of Columbia 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Man land 

Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 

Mar> land 

Maryland 
Mar) land 

Mar\land 

Maryland 

Maryland 

District o\ Columbia 



* First semester only 



47 



University of Maryland 

Schutz, Charles J Maryland 

Sollod, Ralph M Maryland 

*Tannebaum, Stanley B Maryland 

Walsh, Michael J Maryland 

Williams, Cornelius B Maryland 

Wolfson, Israel D Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 
Second Year 

*Alatzes, George T Maryland 

Baer, Carol A Maryland 

Bloom, Barry L Maryland 

*Blum, Jerold P Maryland 

Bush, Francis E District of Columbia 

Christian, Mitchell A Maryland 

Cohen, Michael J Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony L Maryland 

Davidson, Harvey S Maryland 

Donnelly, John A Maryland 

Edmondson, William H Maryland 

Eng, Frederick Maryland 

Erdman, Sheldon N Maryland 

Fahres, Michael H Maryland 

Fine, Norman F Maryland 

Fischer, Bernard A Maryland 

Fleischer, Charles A Maryland 

*Gorrell, David J Maryland 

Goulden, James R Maryland 

Greek, David C Connecticut 

Heer, Roger G Maryland 

Heer, Ronald W Maryland 

Hess, Gary L Maryland 

♦Hill, Carol J Maryland 

"Hoffman, Ronald H Maryland 

Hughes, Edward L Maryland 

Jaskowitz, Theodore J Maryland 

Johnson, Eugene M Maryland 

1 Kovalsky, Paul Maryland 

*Legum, Gary Maryland 

Lehman, Allan G Maryland 

Lessing, Melvin Maryland 

■'Lindenbaum, Ronald L Maryland 

'- ; MacConney, Charles S Maryland 

Martin, Lawrence L Maryland 

McCabe, Stanley B Maryland 

Meyer, Howard B Maryland 

* First semester only 
t Second semester only 

48 



School of Pharmacy 



Delaware 

Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

PillCUS, Jack H. Maryland 

Pletka, George J. Maryland 

Robinson. I am D. Maryland 

R\on. lames N. Maryland 

Santell, Fredrica A Maryland 



Moore. William C. 
Morton. Jacquelin G. 
Muach, Robert A. 
Myers, John E. 
Myers, Ronald J. 

Neiner. Joan M. 
OwettS, James 



Seechuk. William W. 
*Seff. Gerald L. 

Sherman. Howard 
'Shure. Joanna C. 
*Spuras. Jenina D. 
•Taylor, Charles D. 

Theil. Kenneth W. 

Tims. lohn M. 

Trinkley. Kenneth P. 
T Via. David 

VykoJ, Frank J. 

Werner. M\ron 

Welsh. Patrick G. 

Williams. Matt E. 
♦Wilson. Thomas W. 



Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 

First Year 

'Alpert, Charles M Maryland 

Balch. John H Maryland 

Berglund, Richard L Maryland 

Blitz. Alvin M Maryland 

Bloom. Martin G. Maryland 

Boyer. Wayne S. Maryland 

Branch. Arthur S. Maryland 

T Cohen. Marvin Maryland 

•Cronin. Dennis Maryland 

David. Stephen T. Maryland 

Dondero. David L. Maryland 

Efner. I innea D. Maryland 

1 rkis. Michele R. Maryland 

Feldman. Neil Maryland 

Frankenfeld, Frederick M. Maryland 

r, Harold A. Maryland 



First semester only 
7 Second semester only 



49 



University of Maryland 

Golob, Jerrold J Maryland 

Goodman, Philip L Maryland 

: Gordon, David L Maryland 

Griffiths. Robert Maryland 

Groman, Alvin D Maryland 

::: Gull, Michael A Maryland 

Harper. Robert D Maryland 

Heymann. Richard W Maryland 

•Hoffman. Sheldon Maryland 

Hommerbocker, Barry A Maryland 

Honkofsky, Arnold J Maryland 

Horwitz, Michael R Maryland 

*Janofsky, Stephen L Maryland 

Jaskulski, Alan J Maryland 

Kirchner, Theodore N District of Columbia 

Leister. Dennard L Maryland 

:: Levin, Denyse B Maryland 

• Nadell, Terry Maryland 

:: Naughton, Charles E Maryland 

Oliver, Patricia A Maryland 

Pailthorp, Charles J Maryland 

Polievka, Frank J District of Columbia 

Rehwaldt, Don Maryland 

" ; Ricci, John Maryland 

Samios, William A Maryland 

*Sexton, Ronald A Maryland 

Skalinski, Richard A Maryland 

Sklaroff, Mark N Maryland 

Smith, Earl T Maryland 

Stromberger, Henry R Maryland 

*Swain, George B Maryland 

"Trakas, George J Maryland 

Uphoff, Frederick G Maryland 

Walman, Eugene S Maryland 

Watson, George W Maryland 

Weiner, Alan I Maryland 

Will, Marcia A Maryland 

: 'Zolenas, Stanley P Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 9, 1962 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Patel, Nagin K India 

Shroff, Arvin P India 



"First semester only 
^Second semester only 

50 



Sch(X)l of Pharmacy 

Master of Science 

Kopcho, Michael J. New Jersey 

ThomatOO, McKin R. Colorado 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Amernick. Harmond Hcrsh Maryland 

Augsburger. I arr> Louis Maryland 

Becker. Edward Philip Maryland 

Blaustein. Arnold I ee Maryland 

Block. I aw react How ard Maryland 

Boatman. Ernest Allan Maryland 

Galas, Andre Thomas Maryland 

Clinger. Richard Graham Pennsylvania 

Contrino. Gabriel Michael Maryland 

Gandel. Stephen J a\ Maryland 

Gibbon, Nancy Lee Maryland 

Grubb. John Eastman Maryland 

Gubinsky. Louis Winn Maryland 

Hamet, Sydney Herbert Maryland 

Harrison, Gordon Marshall Maryland 

Jablon. Paul Allan Milton Maryland 

Kantorow, Bennett Ralph Maryland 

Kantorski. Robert Richard Maryland 

Katz, Albert Maryland 

Kempler. Jerold Allan Maryland 

Kern. Louis Reichert, Jr Maryland 

Konrad, James Gerard Maryland 

Lauer. Stephen LeBrun Maryland 

Levitt, Kelvin Ronald Maryland 

M.ickay, Walter Price Maryland 

Mackou-iak. Frank John Maryland 

Maggitti, Ronald Francis Maryland 

Mckenna, Richard Sterling Maryland 

Plummer, Robert Mitchell Maryland 

Pristoop, Allan Sanford Man. land 

Rosen, Leon Maryland 

Rosenstein, Sol Maryland 

Roth, Edward Barry Maryland 

Samson. Irwin Louis Maryland 

Sandler. Charles Allen Maryland 

Sermuksnis. Milda Irena Maryland 

Serpick, David Yale Maryland 

Smith, Dennis Boyd Maryland 

Sophocleus, Theodore John Maryland 

Sugarman. Henry Maryland 

Wagner, Herbert Charles Maryland 

Wankel, Richard Allan Maryland 

Wolff, Donald Willard Maryland 

51 



University of Maryland 

HONORS (1961-62) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Louis Gubinsky 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Louis Gubinsky 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) Sydney H. Harriet 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Herbert C. Wagner 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Ernest A. Boatman 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize Lawrence H. Block 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Allan S. Pristoop 

Phi Beta Chapter. Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity Cup (Leadership) Sydney H. Hamet 
Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize (Pharmacology) Sydney H. Hamet 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter. Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Herbert C. Wagner 

Merck Award (Pharmacy) James G. Konrad 

Bristol Laboratories. Inc. Award (Extra Curricular Activities) Nancy L. Gibbon 

Rexall Drug Company Award (Outstanding Achievement) Allan S. Pristoop 



Certificates of Honor 



Herbert C. Wagner 



Paul A. M. Jablon 



Sydney H. Hamet 



Honorable Mention (Junior Class) 



Marjorie S. Abramovitz 



Jeanne A. Baker 



Yale H. Caplan 



DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1961-62) 
Class of 1962 



Lawrence H. Block 
Nancy L. Gibbon 
Louis Gubinsky 
Sydney H. Hamet 



Paul A. M. Jablon 
Allan S. Pristoop 
Edward B. Roth 
Herbert C. Wagner 



Honorable Mention 



Larry L. Augsburger 
Stephen J. Gandel 
lohn E. Grubb 



James G. Konrad 

Charles A. Sandler 

David Y. Serpick 



52 



Class of 1963 



School op Pharmacy 



Marjone S. Abr.tmovii/ 
Jeanne A. Baker 
David A. Blake 
Don 1 . Bradenbaugh 
Yale H. (apian 



Ronald M. Hopkins 

Stephen P. Levin 

Kenneth C. Ullman 

James J. Welsh, Jr. 

Stuart Winakur 



Honorable Mention 



Barbara Foster Patel 



Irwin A. Heyman 



Leon D. Shargel 



Class of 1964 
Honorable Mention 

Richard L. Wynn 



53 



INDEX 



Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 52 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 11 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 11 

Accreditation 1 

Administration, Officers of 

Principal Administrative Officers vi 

Emeriti vi 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges vi 

General Administrative Officers vii 

Division Chairmen viii 

Faculty Senate, Chairmen of Standing Committees ix, x 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants for admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 2 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at 

Baltimore 6 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To the College Park Program 2 

To the Baltimore Program 7 

Alumni Association 30 

American Civilization, The Program in 4 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch 30 

Assistantships, Graduate 22 

Attendance Requirements 11 

Baltimore Union 18 

Board of Regents v 

Breakage 8 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1963 and 1964 ii 

Calendar, Academic iii 

Correspondence iv 

Courses, Description of 34 

Curriculum, Changes in 11 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md 4 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

other than University of Maryland 6 

Curriculum, Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 32 

Summary of Hours and Credits 33 

Degrees 

Deportment 17 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 14 

Dormitories (See Housing) 18 

Elective Programs at Baltimore 15 

54 



University of Maryland 

INDEX (Continued) 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacolog\ 20 

Employment 1 7 

Examinations 12 

Faculty xi 

Faculty Council xi 
Fees and Expenses 

Graduate 9 
Full-time Undergraduate 

Part-time Undergraduate 9 

Pre-professional at College Park 3,4, 10 

Fellowships and Grants 20 

Grade of D, Raising 1 3 

Grade of F, Removal of 13 

Grading System 12 

Grade Point Average 12 

Grades of Withdrawing Students 10, 

Graduates, Roll of 1962 50 

Graduation Requirements 16 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 
Honor Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi 27 

Rho Chi 27 

Honors and Awards 26 

Honors Recipients (1961-62) 52 

Hospital Pharmacy Residencies 22 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 18 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 18 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 18 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 13 

Laboratory Fees 8 

Library, Health Sciences 20 

Staff \iv 

Licensure by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 17 

Loans 24 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 17 

Registration with 16 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 30 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 1 3 

Office of Dean, Hours i\ 

Office Staff xv 

Parking 19 
Pharmacv Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 7 

From Other Universities and Colleges 7 

Probation for Low Scholarship 14 

55 



School of Pharmacy 



INDEX (Continued) 



Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1963-1964 

Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 14 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 14 

Registration by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 16 

Requirements for Admission 

To Pre-professional Program at College Park 2 

To Professional Program at Baltimore 2 

Residence and Non-Residence, Definition of 11 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 24 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 23 

Student Organizations, Baltimore Campus 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 30 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association 30 

Student Government Alliance 29 

Students, Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 15 

Roll of 45 

Students, Pre-professional, College Park 48, 49 

Textbooks 10 

Transcripts of Records 16 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 7 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) 3, 4 

Visitors iv 

Withdrawals, Baltimore Campus 

Procedure 10 

Refunds 10 

Grades 10 

Non-compliance to regulations 10 



56 









arc 



ND 




School of Pharmacy 



1964-1965 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



CATALOG AND 121st ANNOUNCEMENT 



THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 



(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1964-1965 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 44, Number 1 
School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



This catalog includes information applying to the Five Year Program which became 
mandatory in September, 1960. 



1964 1965 


JANUARY 1964 




JULY 1964 


JANUARY 1965 


JULY 1965 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 




12 3 4 




1 2 


1 2 3 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 


28 29 30 31 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 
31 


26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 




1 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 


11 12 IS 14 16 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 


23 

30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 
31 


28 




29 30 31 




MARCH 




SEPTEMBER 




MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 




12 3 4 5 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


29 30 


31 


27 


28 29 30 


28 29 


30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 




APRIL 




OCTOBER 




APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 




12 8 




1 2 3 


1 2 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


26 27 


28 29 30 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 


27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 




MAY 




NOVEMBER 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 2 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 




1 


12 3 4 5 6 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 26 26 27 


24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


29 


30 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 


31 








30 31 








JUNE 




DECEMBER 




JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 




12 3 4 5 




12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


28 29 


30 


27 


28 29 30 31 


27 28 


29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR, 1964-1965 



First Semester — 1964 
September 14 Monday 



September 15 


Tuesday 


September 21 


Monday 


November 25 


Wednesday 


November 30 


Monday 


December 22 


Tuesday 


1965 
January 4 


Monday 


January 21-27 


Thursday-V 


Second Semester 
February 2 


Tuesday 



February 3 

February 8 

February 22 
April 15 

April 20 

May 21-27 
May 27-June 3 
May 31 
June 5 



Third Year Registration — 

9:00 a.m. 
Fourth Year Registration — 

10:00 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — 

11:00 a.m. 
Orientation for all new students 

—2:00 p.m. 
Graduate Registration — 9:30- 

11:30 a.m. 
Instruction begins with first 

scheduled class 
Thanksgiving recess begins at 

close of last scheduled period 
Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 
Christmas recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period 



Instruction resumes with first 
scheduled period 
Thursday- Wednesday First Semester examinations 



Third Year Registration — 

9:00 a.m. 
Fourth Year Registration — 

10:00 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — 

11:00 a.m. 
Graduate Registration — 9:30- 

11:30 a.m. 
Instruction begins with first 

scheduled class 
Washington's Birthday, Holiday 
Easter recess begins at close of 

last scheduled period 
Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 
Fifth Year final examinations 
Second Semester examinations 
Memorial Day, Holiday 
Commencement Exercises 



Wednesday 

Monday 

Monday 
Thursday 

Tuesday 

Friday-Thursday 
Thursday-Thursday 
Monday 
Saturday 



All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular reg. .tration day. Students failing to 
comply v,ith this regulation are charged a fee of ten dollars; this fee will be increased 
to $20.00 beginning with the 1965 Summer Session. No student is normally per- 
mitted to register after Friday of the week in which instruction begins. 
The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Hi 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, Building 520R, Room 201, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to 
the respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 



Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on 
Saturday by appointment. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an ir- 
revocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. The 
University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student to 
withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests 

of the University. 



IV 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 
Edward F. Holter 
Hartwick Building, 4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, Maryland, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 

Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park, 20012 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore, 21218 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



Principal Administrative Officers 

WILSON H. ELKINS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.Phil., 1936. 

ALBIN O. KUHN, Executive Vice President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.S., California State College, Pa., 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 1936; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

FRANK L. BENTZ, JR., Assistant to the President 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ALVIN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College, 1933; LL.B., Cornell University, 1936. 

Emeriti 

HARRY C. BYRD, President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 1936; LL.D., 
Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women Emerita 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 1924. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Dean of Men Emeritus 
B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

EDWARD W. AITON, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

RONALD BAMFORD, Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; Ph.D.. 
Columbia University, 1931. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

WILLIAM P. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of the School of Law 
A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 1948. 

RAY W. EHRENSBERGER, Dean of University College 

B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University, 1937. 

vi 



NOEL E. FOSS, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College. 1928; MA, 1937; Ph.D., Peabody College. 1939. 

FLORENCE M. GIPE, Dean of the School of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 
1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

IRVIN C. HAUT, Director, Agriculture Experiment Station, and Head, Department 
of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

VERL S. LEWIS, Dean of the School of Social Work 

A.B., Huron College. 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; D.S.W., Western 
Reserve University, 1954. 

SELMA F. LIPPEATT, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

CHARLES MANNING, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina, 1950. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; C.E., 1932; Ph.D., 1935. 

DONALD W. O'CONNELL, Dean of the College of Business and Public 
Administration 

B.A., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

JOHN J. SALLEY, Dean of the School of Dentistry 

D.D.S.. Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

WILLIAM S. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of 
Medical Education and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929; 

Ph.D. (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director of Finance and Business 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., 1934; C.P.A., 1939. 

HELEN E CLARKE, Dean of Women 

B.S. University of Michigan. 1943; MA, University of Illinois. 1951; Ed.D.. 
Teachers College. Columbia University, 1960. 

WILLIAM W. COBEY. Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland. 1930. 

vii 



L. EUGENE CRONIN, Director of Natural Resources Institute 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
Ph.D., 1946. 

LESTER M. DYKE, Director of Student Health Service 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

HARRY D. FISHER, Comptroller and Budget Officer 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

GEORGE W. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

FRANCIS A. GRAY, Acting Dean for Student Life 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

GEORGE W. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer, 
Physical Plant {Baltimore) 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

VERNON H. REEVES, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air 
Science 

B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949. 

WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT, Director, Computer Science Center 

Dipl. Math., University of Heidelberg, 1952; Dr. Rer. Nat., University of Freiburg, 
1955. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 1940. 

CLODUS R. SMITH, Director of the Summer Session 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell University, 
1960. 

GEORGE O. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

JOSHUA B. ZATMAN, Director of University Relations 
A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1934. 

Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

HAROLD C. HOFFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 
B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 



Vlll 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

1964-65 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Allan G. Gruchy (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

Joseph F. Mattick (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 
Raymond Thorberg (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Edgar P. Young (Agriculture). Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Donald C. Gordon (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS. CURRICULA AND COURSES 

James H. Humphrey (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

James A. Hummel (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 
Donald W. O'Connell (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Walter E. Schlaretzki (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
Mark Keeny (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 
Robert B. Beckmann (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

John M. Curtis (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

Stanley B. Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 
Charles T. G. Looney (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 
Noel E. Foss (Pharmacy), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 
Mary K. Carl (Nursing), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 
George Anastos (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 



IX 



Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Edward W. Aiton (Agriculture), Chairman 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

Alvin W. Schindler (Education), Chairman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Donald Malcy (Education), Chairman 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Thomas J. Aylward (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Harry E. Hickey (Engineering), Chairman 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Gayle Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Calvin Gaver (Dentistry), Chairman 



School of Pharmacy 



FACULTY COUNCIL 



noel e. foss, Dean 

FRANCIS M. MILLER RALPH F. SHANURAW 

donald e. shay casimir T. ichniowski, Secretary 

Faculty (1963-1964) 

E merit a 

B. olive cole, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
phar.d., University of Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

NORMAN J. doorenbos, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

b.s. in chem., University of Michigan, 1950; M.S., 1951; PH.D., 1953. 

NOEL E. FOSS, Professor of Pharmacy 

ph.c., South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

casimir t. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; PH.D., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Francis M. miller, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

b.s., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d., Northwestern University, 1949. 

*w. arthur purdum, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

donald E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; PH.D., 
1943. 

frank J. SLAM a, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; M.S., 1930; 

ph.d., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin frank allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



t Part time. 

xi 



University of Maryland 

Leslie c. costello, Associate Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

IDA Marian robinson, Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

Ralph F. shangraw, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., Massacuhsetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 

NICOLAS Zenker. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

CD. sc. ch., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; m.a., University of California, 
1953; ph.d., 1958. 

Assistant Professors 

Iadele b. ballman, Assistant Professor of English 

\.b., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

peter p. lamy, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; 

ph.d., 1964. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

dean E. leavitt, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

James Leslie, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

b.sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1956; ph.d., 1959. 

hilda E. moore, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

Instructors 

earl F. becker, jr., Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

Lillian darago, Instructor in Anatomy and Physiology 

a.b., Goucher College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

LOUIS diamond, Instructor in Pharmacology 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Lecturers 

tRicHARD D. dean, Lecturer in Mathematics 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; m.ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 



tPart time 

xii 



School of Pharmacy 

t Joseph s. Kaufman. Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Research Associate 

hiroshi oya, Research Associate in Physiology 
b.s., Tokyo University, 1953; ph.d., 1959. 

Fellows 

JUANITO B. ABCEDE, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
b.s. in pharm., University of Philippines, 1936; M.S., University of Michigan, 
1951; ph.d., 1955. 
Registered Pharmacist — Philippines. 

PAUL C. BOSSLE, The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow in Chemistry and Research 
Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
b.s. in pharm., Loyola University, 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Louisiana, Maryland. 

landon w. burbage. Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration {Research) 
ph.b., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.c, 1910. 

YALE caplan, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellow in 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

hikmat t. fikrat, Post Doctoral Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
b.a., American University of Beirut, 1952; M.S., University of California, 1956; 
ph.d.,, 1959. 

Irving M. fried, U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
b.s. in pharm., Temple University, 1958; M.S., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

Charles L. guyton, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., Mississippi State University, 1961. 

LEON milewich, Postdoctoraie Fellow in Chemistry {Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories) 

b.s., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1956; M.S., 1958; ph.d., 1959. 

masako nakagawa, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
b.s., Hokkaido University, Japan, 1958; M.S., 1960. 

M. David richman, Assistant in Pharmacy 

b.s. IN pharm.. University of Maryland, 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

kfnneth r. SCOTT, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
b.s. in pharm., Howard University, 1956; M.S., University of Buffalo, 1959. 



tPart lime 

xiii 



University of Maryland 

Robert J. scott, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry (Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories) 

b.sc, Queens University, Belfast, 1959; ph.d., University of London, 1962. 

Registered Pharmacist — Britain, North Ireland. 

arvin P. shroff, Postdoctorate Fellow in Chemistry (U. S. Public Health Service) 
b.sc, M. S. University, Baroda, India, 1954; M.S., Duquesne University, 1958; 
PH.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

martin e. stein, Fellow, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education and 
Sydnor Barksdale Penick Memorial Fellow for 1963-64 

b.s. in pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1961; M.S., 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Massachusetts, Maryland. 

francis J. tinney, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
b.s. in pharm., St. John's University, College of Pharmacy, 1950; M.S., 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

w. douglas walkling, American Foundation of Pharmaceutical Education Fellow in 
Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Theodore H. T. wang, Research Fellow in Chemistry (Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories) 

b.s., Mukden Medical College, China, 1949; M.S., University of Nebraska, 1958. 

clara c. T. whang, Assistant in Chemistry 
b.a., Clarke College, 1962. 

Graduate Assistants 

i.arry L. augsburger. Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Lawrence H. block, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

don L. bradenbaugh, Assistant in Pharmacy 
b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

irwin a. heyman, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

glory lleander, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 

b.s in pharm., University of Philippines, 1956; M.S., 1961. 

francis MEYER, Assistant in Chemistry 

b.s. in pharm., Loyola College of Pharmacy, New Orleans, 1963. 

R. ALLEN RHODES, Assistant in Chemistry 
b.a., Bridgewater College, 1963. 

xiv 



School of Pharmacy 



LIBRARY STAFF 
Health Sciences Library 
IDA Marian ROBINSON, Librarian 

A.B., B.S.L.S. 

Hilda E. moore, Associate Librarian 

A.B., A.B.L.S. 

sarah l. atkins, Cataloging Assistant 
edith M. coyle, Head, Serials Department 

A.B.. A.B.L.S., M.A. 

Elizabeth a. forney, Reference Librarian 

A.B., M.S.L.S. 

Charles w. fosler, in, Serials Assistant 
wiLLARD T. frampton, Library Clerk, Stacks 
kl in e. hanna. Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 

A.B., M.S.L.S. 

Lorraine s. hlavin, Serials Assistant 

simone c. hurst, Head, Circulation Department 

Margaret M. jones, Cataloger 

A.B., M.S.L.S. 

hans-guenther R. listfeld, Assistant Serials Librarian 

B.S., M.S.L.S. 

Beatrice Marriott, Reference Librarian 

A.B. 

eleanor M. mitten, Head, Book Acquisitions and Cataloging 

B.S., B.S.L.S. 

kae sarubin, Circulation Assistant 
1 1 wood sterling, Library Assistant 
Martha L. sullivan, Cataloging Assistant 

Office Staff 

Margaret E. BEATTY, Secretary 
agnes m. forestell, Secretary 
daisy LOTZ CUE, Secretary 
doris M. KENNEDY, Secretary 



XV 



THE SCHOOL 



HISTORY AND PROGRAM 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy are to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students 
in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, 
express themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profes- 
sion and citizens of a democracy; to guide students into productive 
scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge and techniques 
in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Mary- 
land physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in 
Pharmacy to replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, 
incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 
In 1904, the College joined with a group of medical schools and the 
Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in 
the health sciences. The new institution was known as the University of 
Maryland. In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional schools was 
merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form the 
present University of Maryland. 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings constructed 
specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and class- 
rooms are equipped with the most modern apparatus and every aid to 
instruction and for research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
over 30,000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, 
the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, and The Johns Hop- 
kins University. The libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 
Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery, 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

Like all professions devoted to education in the health sciences, pharmacy 
has expanded its period of training. The American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy requires a Five Year Program and students entering the 
study of pharmacy on or after the Autumn of 1960 are required to enroll 
in a Five Year Pharmacy Program. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



University of Maryland 
DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School 
of the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the 
Graduate School. 



PROGRAM 

As a result of a decision by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education, students beginning a pharmacy or pre-professional curriculum 
on or after April 1, 1960 are required to enroll in the academic program 
of not less than five years. 

At the University of Maryland the five year program consists of two years 
of a pre-professional and a three-year pharmacy program. The first year 
of the professional program was offered in Baltimore in September 1961. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

The pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore but may be 
obtained at the College Park Campus of the University or any other 
accredited university or college where appropriate courses are offered.* 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Only the three year professional program is offered in Baltimore. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
FIVE YEAR PROGRAM 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally ac- 
credited college or university. 



School of Pharmacy 

the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School 
and for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school in Maryland whose secon- 
dary record indicates probable success in the University will be admitted 
provided that: 

1. his scholastic average in major subjects in his last two years in high 
school has been satisfactory; 

2. his program has included the following: 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 
College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 

( 1 ) , plane geometry ( 1 ) and additional units in 

advanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, 

or advanced mathematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 

History and Social Sciences 2 1 

Biological Sciences 1 

Foreign Language — German or French 2 

Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 



Total 16 16 

3. he has had the test results of the American College Testing Program 
submitted to the University Admissions Office; 

4. he has a satisfactory general recommendation from his secondary school 
as to his character and ability. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland residents 
(see definition of Residence and Non-Residence, page 12) must also have 
the results of the American College Testing Program and complete high 
school records submitted to the Admissions Office. Only a limited number 
of well qualified out-of-state applicants can be considered for admission 
since first preference in admission is given to Maryland residents. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this 
publication may be obtained by writing to the Catalog Mailing Office, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. Applications must be 
made to the Director of Admissions at College Park, Maryland 20742. 



University of Maryland 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for 
admission. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee 
is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

Beginning with applications for admission to the University for the Fall 
Semester 1965, a Late Application Fee of $25.00, instead of the normal 
$10.00 fee, will be assessed against those students who apply for ad- 
mission after the cut-off date of July 15, 1965. 

t Annual costs of attending the University at College Park for Maryland 
residents include: fixed charges, $250.00; instructional materials, $24.00; 
special fees, $72.00; board, $420.00 and lodging, $290.00 to $320.00. 
Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee of $400.00 and lodg- 
ing costs are $340.00 to $370.00. 

t Effective September 1, 1965: Annual costs of attending the University 
at College Park for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $250.00; 
instructional materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00; board, $420.00 and 
lodging, $320.00. Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee 
of $400.00 and lodging costs are $420.00. 



PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 



-Semester- 



First Year / // 

Chemistry 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

English 1 — Composition 3 — 

Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 3 

or 
Math. 18, 19 — Introductory and Elementary Analy- 
sis 3 4 

Zoology 1 — General Zoology 4 — 

Botany 1 — General Botany — 4 

Elective (Social Science)* — 3 

Health 5 2 — 

Physical Education 1 1 

Air Science 11, 12 (Men only) 1 2 



Total 17 (Women) 15-16 (Women) 

18 (Men) 17-18 (Men) 



+ The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges 
as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to 
the student as low as possible. 

♦Social Science Electives 

G. and P. 1, American Government 
Psychology I, Introduction to Psychology 
Sociology 1, Introduction to Sociology 
Sociology 5, Anthropology 



School of Pharmacy 



Si ( OND Yi \R 

English v 4 Composition and World 1 iteraturc 1 3 

HtttOTJ 5,6 HistoiA of American Civilization 3 3 

PhysiCI 10, 11 Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis 4 — 

Economics 37 — Fundamentals o\ Economics — 3 

Elective (Fine Arts or Philosophy)** 3 — 

Elective*** — 3 



Total 17 16 



GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The University of Maryland has instituted a new series of related course 
requirements which together constitute a general education program. 

Essentially this program includes nine semester-hour-credits of English 
(three credits of composition, six of literature); six credits in history of 
which three must be in American History; six credits chosen from various 
fields of the social sciences; seven credits in science; three credits in 
mathematics; three credits in fine arts or in philosophy. 

Two semesters of physical education and a course in health education are 
required of all undergraduates. 

Students in the School of Pharmacy satisfy the mathematics, the science 
and three credits of the social science requirements by pursuing the courses 
identified in the curriculum. 

Greater detail will be found in the brochure: General and Academic 
Regulations. 



Fine Arts or Philosophy Elective 
Art 9, History of Art 
Art 22, History of American Art 
Speech 16, Introduction to the Theatre 
Muk 20, Survey of Music Literature 
Philosophy i. Introduction to Philosophy 
Philosophy 45, Ethics 

•Elective can be chosen from groups previousK described. A fourth semester of 
college English or a 3 hour course in Public Speaking is also acceptable. 



University of Maryland 

Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1 . From College Park Division f 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program at 
College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) and who 
are in good standing will qualify for advancement to the pharmacy pro- 
gram at Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the 
School of Pharmacy each student will be required to complete a form of 
intent and return it to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

2. From Other Universities and Colleges f 

A. Prerequisites 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed 
successfully two academic years of work in an accredited college* of arts 
and sciences based upon the completion of a four year high school 
course or the equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course 
must consist of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit exclusive of 
physical education, health, military science or similar courses. The 60 
semester hours must include 9 hours of English, 6 hours of college 
level mathematics (modern mathematics or algebra, trigonometry and 
analytical geometry), 4 hours of botany and 4 hours of zoology (or 8 
hours of general biology), 8 hours of general inorganic chemistry (in- 
cluding qualitative analysis), 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours 
of physics, 3 hours of economics, 6 hours of history, 3 hours of social 
sciences, 3 hours of fine arts or philosophy and the remainder as electives 
from the non-science areas. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
must have attained a prior scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) 
when the lowest passing grade is D (1.0) or its equivalent, and must be 
in good standing. This average of not less than C (2.0) shall be based 
on all college courses previously undertaken by the applicant exclusive 
of credit in military science, physical education, health, hygiene or similar 
courses. 

Students must satisfy as well, any additional qualifications governing 
recommendations for transfer specified by the institution from which the 



*Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally 
accredited college or university. 

^Students who enrolled in a pre-professional pharmacy program before the summer 
session of 1964 will be asked to meet the general education requirements set forth 
as "The Program in American Civilization" described in the School of Pharmacy 
catalog (pages 4-5, 1963-64 edition) 



School of Pharmacy 

student is seeking transfer. Transfer credit is given only for the courses com- 
pleted with a grade of C (2.0) or higher and which are a part of the 
pre-professional curriculum of the School of Pharmacy. 

B. Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore 
should write to the Director of Admissions and Registration, University 
of Maryland, Building, 520R, Room 201, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Applicants wishing advice on any problem 
relating to their applications should communicate with the above office. 

ENROLLMENT IN THE PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 
AT COLLEGE PARK 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at 
College Park may obtain application blanks by writing to the Admissions 
Office at College Park. Students meeting the requirements for admission 
will receive letters of admission from the Admissions Office at College 
Park. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering 
from the Office of the Registrar at College Park a few weeks prior to 
the September registration period. 

There is a fee of $5.00 for changes in registration made after the first 
week of instruction. 



ENROLLMENT IN THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 
AT BALTIMORE 

1. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION 

Students who had filed with the Dean of the School Pharmacy at Balti- 
more a letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the 
curriculum and who have completed the requirements of the pre-profes- 
sional program will be notified by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
that they have qualified for advancement into the professional program. 

These students will receive detailed directions for registering from the 
Baltimore Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September regis- 
tration period. 

2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates 
of admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at 
Baltimore. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for regis- 
tering from the Office of the Registrar at Baltimore a few weeks prior 
to the September registration period. 



$135.00 


160.00 


15.00 


30.00 


10.00 


6.00 


10.00 



University of Maryland 

TUITION AND FEES (BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland 

Non-Residents 
Laboratory Fee (per semester) 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 
^Student Union Fee (per annum) 
^Special Fee (per annum) 
^Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 
Student Activities Fee (per semester) 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 

all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester are 
payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student Union fee 
and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of first registration. 
Students wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment of tui- 
tion charges must do so with the Financial Office at or prior to 
registration for the semester for which such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only (Not applicable to students accepted from 
School of Pharmacy, College Park) 

Application fee (non-returnable) 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition. ) 

For Candidates for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 

8 



School of Pharmacy 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 10.00 

(Beginning with the Summer Session 1965, this fee will 

be increased to $20.00.) 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in 

excess of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each course. 
Fee for Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 

PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) $15.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 10.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 15.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physiology 10.00 

*Student Union Fee (per annum) 6.00 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 



•The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all 
full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus 
and is used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students 
enrolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student 
Union Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as 
much as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student Union 
Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 



University of Maryland 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



$10.00 
18.00 


30.00 

10.00 

6.00 

6.00 


$10.00 
50.00 



Matriculation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 
tTuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 
Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 
^Student Union Fee (per annum for full time students) 

* Special Fee (per annum for full time students only) 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session, all students) 
*Student Union Fee (per annum, part time students) 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 

Effective beginning the Summer Session of 1965, an additional $10.00 as 
a penalty fee will be assessed against those students who fail to apply 
for graduation within the first eight weeks of a regular academic semester 
or the first three weeks of a summer session. 

Students who apply after the end of the twelfth week of a regular academic 
semester and thosp who apply after the end of the fourth week of a 
summer session will be required to wait for the next academic semester 
in order to obtain a diploma. 



WITHDRAWALS FROM SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
AT BALTIMORE 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School he must 
file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. 
A student who does not comply with the above regulation is not issued 
an honorable dismissal and is not accorded any refund to which he might 
otherwise be entitled. 

Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent or guardian. 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 
iThe $18.00 rate applies to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without 
regard to the location at which the course is given and will apply to audited courses 
as well as courses taken for credit. 

10 



School of Pharmacy 



1. REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL. 



Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation Fee, Student Activ- 
ities Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition and any scholarship credit, are 
refunded to Withdrawing students in accordance with the following sched- 
ule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 



2. GRADES 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Any student who ( 1 ) fails to withdraw from any course or from the school 
in the required manner or (2) who registers, does not attend classes and 
docs not withdraw, will receive grades of F in all courses for which he has 
registered. 



TEXT BOOKS 

Each student is required to have his own text books. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

TUITION AND FEES FOR PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM (COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

See page 4 for summary statements and consult "Adventure in Learning'' 
which is available from College Park, Maryland. 



CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



University of Maryland 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for 
at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six 
months. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be established by him prior to the 
registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services 
while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six- 
months period referred to above except in those cases in which the adult 
was domiciled, in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into 
the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in the 
official "University General and Academic Regulations." 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final exam- 
ination in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are nor- 
mally counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more 
than half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half 
a period are also construed as an absence. 



12 



School of Pharmacy 



EXAMINATIONS 



Written and oral quizzes arc given throughout the semester at the discretion 

of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant per- 
mission for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 


Interpretation 


Point Value 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Fair 


2 


D 


Poor but passing 


1 


F 


Failure 





I 


Course work inco 


mplete replaced by definite 
grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


Chemistry 


4 


C 


8 


Microbiology 


4 


C 


8 


Pharmacognosy 


4 


B 


12 


Pharmacy 


4 


A 


16 


Pharmacy Administration 


3 


D 


3 



19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade point average of 2.47. 



When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland are considered. 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student i> assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Seven ueeks after the beginning of each semester. 

13 



University of Maryland 

the Dean warns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades 
of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to 
a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the 
instructor enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above 
with an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases when 
this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by the 
instructor by the end of the next semester in which that subject is again 
offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course 
in which he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at 
the University, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, 
including regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he 
will not receive any additional credit for the course completed with a 
passing grade. 

If the work is completed at the University of Maryland his final mark 
will be substituted for the mark already recorded. Although the final 
mark received in the course will be used in determining credit for pro- 
motion and graduation, it does not apply to honors and awards. See 
applicable section under "Honors and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the Dean to repeat the course or its 
equivalent, at another university or college, the regulations applicable to 
transfer of credit apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with 
a grade of C (2.0) or higher; for purposes of computing grade averages, 
transfer credit is considered as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in 
raising his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to 
withdraw from the School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student 
may be permitted, with the written permission of the Dean and the head 
of the department giving the course, to repeat the course for the second 
time. Such permission can be given to the student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above 
regulation must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will 
be granted under unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall 
require the approval of the head of the department giving the course. 

14 



School of Pharmacy 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who 
is permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements 
for the degree from the Sehool of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

All students are expected to maintain a grade average of not less than 
C (2.0) for each semester. Any student who fails to maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) for any semester will be placed on probation during 
the next semester. Students in the Fifth Year Class must maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) to become eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semes- 
ter hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed 
on probation during the next semester. 

Any student on probation must pass all courses for which he is registered 
and must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) or he will be automat- 
ically dropped from the School of Pharmacy at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in any semester shall be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatis- 
factory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then 
obtains a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be 
automatically dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may 
apply in writing to the Dean for readmission after a lapse of at least one 
semester. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that 
semester. 

Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be 
readmitted only once. 



REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a recon- 
sideration of his particular case. 

15 



University of Maryland 

♦ELECTIVE PROGRAMS AT BALTIMORE 

1 . FOURTH YEAR ELECTIVES 

Students shall elect either the General Pharmacy Major or the Pre- 
Graduate Major by May 1 of the Third Year. 

Students to be eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major must have established 
the aptitudes for the successful pursuit of graduate work and must meet 
the necessary prerequisites. Those eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major 
may postpone the selection of this elective until the following year and 
thus will pursue the General Pharmacy Major during the Fourth Year. 

Students not qualifying for the Pre-Graduate Major will be required to 
pursue the General Pharmacy Major. 

2. FIFTH YEAR ELECTIVES 

Students must make elective selections by May 1 of the Fourth Year. 

The General Pharmacy Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue 
with the General Pharmacy Major and choose between Pharmacognosy 
52, Animal Health Products and Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Derma- 
tological Preparations or (b), elect the prescribed Hospital Major pro- 
gram or (c) if approved as eligible, transfer to the Pre-Graduate Program 
and will enroll in Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus and Pharmacy 161, 162, 
Special Problems. 

The Pre-Graduate Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue 
with the Pre-Graduate Major, will enroll in Chemistry 187, 189, Physical 
Chemistry (Lectures) and choose between Chemistry 188, 190, Physical 
Chemistry Laboratory and Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems or 
(b) transfer to the Hospital Major and follow the prescribed program. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS— PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the Professional 
Program with a grade average of C (2.0) in addition to the Pre- 
Professional requirements will be classified as students of the Fourth 
Year Class. 

General Pharmacy Majors of the Fourth Year Class who have completed 
71 credit hours of the Professional Program with a grade average of 
C (2.0) will be classified as Fifth Year Students. Pre-Graduate Majors 
of the Fourth Year Class in order to advance in the Pre-Graduate Pro- 
gram and attain the classification of the Fifth Year Class must have 
completed 73 credit hours of the Professional Program with an academic 
quality indicative of the successful pursuit of graduate work. 

*The elective program must be approved by the Class Adviser and the Dean. For 
additional information consult with the Class Adviser and see the respective curricula 
on pages 34 and 35. 

16 



School of Pharmacy 

Students of the Fifth Year Class to be considered as candidates for 
graduation must have maintained a grade average of at least C (2.0) 
and have completed minimum credit hours of the Professional Program 
Recording to the following: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 credit hours 

(h) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the General Pharmacy Major 108 credit hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the Pre-Graduate Major 110 credit hours 

(d ) Pre-Graduate Majors who have followed this 

elective area for one or two years 110 credit hours 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have spent at least the Fifth Year in residence at the School 
oi Pharmacy at Baltimore and have been accredited with instruction in 
the Professional Program as follows: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 semester hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the General Pharmacy Major 108 semester hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the Pre-Graduate Major 110 semester hours 

( d ) Pre-Graduate Majors who have pursued 

this elective area for one or two years 1 10 semester hours 

In addition, all students must have attained the required grade point 
standings and must have met other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance 
of transcripts are as follows: one copy of a student's records is made 
without charge; for additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for 
each transcript. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions. Government agencies, etc.. as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School o\ Pharmacy and 
the honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of anv 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmac'\ 
have not been satisfied. 

17 



University of Maryland 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD 
OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this State shall not later than thirty days after enrolling, 
file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an applica- 
tion for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application 
he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may deem 
appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, shall 
pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, 
at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit to the 
said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drug store experience 
acquired during the preceding vacation months." 



LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board 
of Pharmacy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the 
age of twenty-one years, is a graduate of an accredited school or college 
of pharmacy, and has completed one year as a registered apprentice in 
a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board of Pharmacy for such 
purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store 
or pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school 
or college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college 
of pharmacy. Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience 
as a registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from 
an accredited school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy 
approved by the Board for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21201, for further information relative to the requirements for 
eligibility for licensure. 



DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 

18 



School of Pharmacy 

scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detri- 
mental to his or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct 
is not satisfactory to the authorities of the I'niversity. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though 
no specific charge be made against them. 



I MPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation 
and completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of 
opportunities to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that 
students refrain from working during the school session. 



HOUSING 

1. WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the 
Louisa Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close prox- 
imity to the School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommo- 
dations and it is under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. 
Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, blankets, pillows, 
bureau scarves, small rugs and a laundry bag. Students may obtain 
towels and bed linens through a designated commercial rental service. 
Although students may provide their own bed linens and towels they are 
not permitted to launder these items in Louisa Parsons Hall. The indivdual 
student assumes responsibility for all the dormitory property assigned to 
her. Any damage done to property other than that which results from 
ordinary wear and tear will be charged to the student concerned. 

The room rates are as follows: Double Room per person, $120.00 per 
semester; Single Room $160.00 per semester; Single Room with Bath 
$190.00 per semester. The room charge will appear on the student's bill 
payable at the time of registration. 

Effective September 1, 1965 the room rate per person, per semester will 
be $160.00. 

Meals may be purchased at the Baltimore Union Cafeteria or in nearby 
restaurants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in The Baltimore Union. 
For particulars, see section immediately below. 

19 



University of Maryland 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE 
BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accom- 
modations for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned 
building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, 
laundry facilities, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on 
each floor. Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made 
for rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The con- 
tract for accommodations covers the 1964-1965 academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

Double Room Rates: 

$150.00 per semester (per person) 

$ 80.00 per eight weeks summer session (per person) 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 
Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book 
shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. Maid service 
will include cleaning of room twice per week and replacement of change 
of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's office. Mail service is 
also provided. 

The resident provides blankets, pillow, towels and linens of which 
the latter two must be rented through the designated commercial rental 
service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 

TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath towel, one face towel, one face cloth, 

soap and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

20 



School of Pharmacy 



HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore I'nion 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore. Maryland 21201 



PARKING 



The expansion program for the Baltimore Campus places a premium on 
e for parking on University lots. 

Student use of parking facilities on a temporary basis in certain designated 
University areas is contingent upon the availability of space. Admission 
of students to University parking lots will be by authorized identification 
cards only. These cards bearing an expiration date are issued by the 
Office of the Dean. 

Parking rates are forty-five cents per day, payable daily. 



THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

The library facilities are excellent. The new Health Sciences Library which 
es the School of Pharmacy, as well as the Schools of Dentistry. Medi- 
cine, Nursing, and Social Work, contains over 95,000 bound volumes and 
regularly receives approximately 2,200 scientific periodicals. 

The Rules and Regulations by the library are available for distribution 
to students at all times. 



PROFESSORSHIPS. GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 
AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmac> 
in 1927, a sum of mone> to establish a professorship of Pharmacologv 
The first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thomp- 
son was designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was 
subsequently held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir I 
Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

21 



University of Maryland 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of up to $1800.00 for single persons or up to $2400.00 for 
married individuals who are promising graduate students desirous of 
doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
and pharmacognosy; students may also apply for an additional allowance 
up to $600.00 for tuition, fees, and supplies. Address applications directly 
to the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 777 Four- 
teenth Street, N.W., Washington 5, D.C., between February 15 and 
March 15 for consideration for the forthcoming September. 

The H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a distinguished alumnus of the School 
of Pharmacy, former associate professor of chemistry and prominent 
manufacturing pharmacist of Baltimore had bequeathed a sum of money 
to endow a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellow- 
ship previously supported annually, since 1930 by contributions from Dr. 
Dunning, is open to promising graduate students interested in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two 
fellowships for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, phar- 
maceutical chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 
The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the 
Faculty Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort Memorial Grant 

In memory of Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort, the John C. 
Stalfort & Sons Company, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, has provided a 
grant of $4000.00 per annum to the Department of Pharmacy to support 
pharmaceutical research. A portion of this grant is to be utilized to 
provide a graduate fellowship. 



OTHER RESEARCH GRANTS 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants from 
the National Institutes of Health. The Department of Anatomy and Physi- 
ology has been awarded grants as follows: one from the National Science 
Foundation, one from the National Institutes of Health, and one from 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Through these grants, 
the School of Pharmacy is able to provide a number of research fellow- 
ships available to graduate and post-doctoral students in pharmaceutical 
chemistry and physiology. 

22 



School of Pharmacy 

SPECIAL GRANTS 

Grant funds allotted by the Atomic Energy Commission to the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy and Physiology contributed substantially to the equip- 
ping of a radioisotope laboratory for the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
for training and research purposes. 

The American Viscose Corporation has provided funds to the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy for the procurement of specialized research equipment. 



ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $2200.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to 
qualified students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching serv- 
ices to the departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually 
carry two-thirds of the normal graduate work. 

Residencies in Hospital Pharmacy 

1. University (of Maryland) Hospital 

The Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland offer annually, to qualified graduate pharmacists, residencies 
in hospital pharmacy. The appointments beginning July 1 are for twenty- 
four months. During the period of appointment the resident divides 
his time between hospital pharmacy service and graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland 
and a certificate of residency to be awarded by the University Hospital. 
Full time training will be required during the summer of 1965. Two 
weeks of vacation are allowed during the term of appointment. The 
University Hospital provides a stipend of $2800.00 per year for the 
first year as Assistant Resident. Completion of the Assistant Residency 
leads to appointment as Resident with a stipend of $3600.00 per year. 
Parking space, uniforms and laundering of uniforms arc free of charge. 
The residents must pay the tuition, laboratory and other fees for graduate 
work in the University. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Director of Pharmaceutical Service, University Hospital, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201, or to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

2. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy 

The Pharmacy Department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 

23 



University of Maryland 

Maryland, offer annually to qualified graduate pharmacists several resi- 
dencies in hospital pharmacy. The appointments, beginning September 
1, are for twenty-two months. During twenty months, appointees di- 
vide their time between hospital pharmacy service and graduate study 
leading to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of 
Maryland and a certificate of residency awarded by the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Full time training in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Pharmacy is 
required for two (2) months during the summer of 1965. Four weeks 
of vacation are allowed during the term of appointment. The Hospital 
provides a stipend of $200.00 per month for the first year and $250.00 
per month thereafter and the School of Pharmacy reduces tuition fees 
for these candidates by 25%. However, candidates must pay the regular 
laboratory and other fees. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquiries to the Chief Pharmacist, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21205, or the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and 
loans should be directed to: 

Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships* 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-profes- 
sional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. These schol- 
arships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarships* 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually 
scholarships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 

*These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in- 
Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of 
the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. 

24 



School of Pharmacy 

ness, moral character, scholastic achievement and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceding $500.00 per academic \ 
is used in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These 
scholarships are open only to residents of the State of Mai \ land. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships* 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several schol- 
arships to pro-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 
ness, scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year 
is applied to defray partially the fees and expenses at College Park. 
Maryland. Recipients must have been residents of the State of Mary- 
land for at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available 
consult the University bulletin "Adventure in Learning" available from 
College Park, Maryland. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed 
to Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The selection of the 
recipients of the scholaships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunc- 
tion with a committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per 
semester to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their 
education. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes avail- 
able scholarships worth not less than $100.00 per semester to qualified 
students of the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. 



*These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and (.rants- 
in-Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation uith the Scholarship Commit- 
tee of the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

25 



University of Maryland 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and alumni have made an endow- 
ment for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation Scholarship Sponsored by 
the National Association of Retail Druggists 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation sponsored by the National Association 
of Retail Druggists provides annually a scholarship in the amount of 
$200.00. The scholarship grant open to a qualified student of the Third, 
Fourth or Fifth Year Class is awarded on the basis of character, scholar- 
ship and financial need. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually 
by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, to a Fifth Year student who has shown superior proficiency in 
practical and commercial pharmacy. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus 
of the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese 
Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be 
awarded annually to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The 
recipient of the award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The William J. Lowry Alumni Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of her late husband, Dr. William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus 
of the Maryland College of Pharmacy, Class of 1896, and in 1926 a prime 
motivator in the reorganization and reactivation of the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Mrs. William J. 
Lowry has provided the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy a 
sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The 
recipient of this award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund to provide two 
undergraduate scholarships of $500 each, open to citizens of the United 
States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc., 

26 



School of Pharmacy 

may appoint a non-voting member This scholarship may be renewed 
annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

The Paulson- Krostar Scholarship Fund 

In memory of their parents, David and Deborah Paulson and Jacob and 
Fannie krostar. Mr. Aaron Paulson, alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, 
Class of 1924 and Mrs. Rosalie Krostar Paulson contributed the sum 
of $600.00 as a scholarship fund. Awards are based on scholarship 
and need. 

Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association 
provides a scholarship in the amount of $200.00 to be awarded to a 
student who has maintained a superior academic record and who is in 
need of financial assistance. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharma- 
ceutical Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in 
need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 to $150.00 per semester 
to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory 
of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to 
qualified students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are 
made upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund 

The family of Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld have established a loan fund as 
a memorial to him. This fund is available to qualified need> students. 
Loans from the fund are made upon the recommendation of the Dean 
and the Grants-in-Aid Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 

SDEA Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 1958 provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $800 and 
during his entire course of study may borrow a sum not exceeding $5000. 
The borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and 

27 



University of Maryland 

repayment terms established by the University. Repayment of the loan 
begins one year after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and 
must be completed within ten years thereafter. No interest is charged 
on the loan until the beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after 
that date is to be paid at the rate of 3 per cent per annum. 

United Student Aid Funds 

Loans up to $1,000.00 per year are available from many Maryland banks 
to students who have completed one year or more of study at the 
University of Maryland, and are making normal progress toward gradua- 
tion. Maximum interest on such loans is 6 per cent simple, and repay- 
ment is due within 36 months after the student ceases to be a full time 
student. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more 
than one-fifth of the graduating class in each college including the School 
of Pharmacy. The honor designations are listed in the commencement 
program and are recorded on the recipents' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two 
academic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or 
higher. Those in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors 
and those in the second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. 
Students whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
Academic Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if 
a student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned 
for these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fra- 
ternity for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at 
the University in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are 
eligible by invitation to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the 
first semester of the Third Year. 

28 



School of Pharmacy 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi. national Honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for 
chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or 
colleges who are members in good standing of the American Association 
leges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality, and 
leadership. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general 
average, provided that this average is not below the grade of "B." Cer- 
tificates of Honor are awarded to the three students having the next 
highest general averages, provided these averages do not fall below the 
grade of "B." 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the 
Fourth Year Class having the highest general averages, provided these 
averages do not fall below the grade of k4 B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered 
in awarding these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical 
and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. 
In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is 
guided in his judgment of the student's ability by observation and personal 
contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of phar- 
macy at the School of Pharmacy. Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a 
gold medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a can- 
didate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior 
proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 

29 



University of Maryland 

having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and 
dispensing pnarmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, 
the income from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
of the School to the Fifth Year student who has done exceptional work 
throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late 
son, Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, 
Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner 
Brill, have provided a fund the income of which is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a Fifth Year student for meritorious academic 
achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink, '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
United States Dispensatory as a prize to the Fifth Year student recom- 
mended by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice 
of pharmacy. 

Phi Alpha Chapter, Rho Pi Phi Fraternity Cup 

The Phi Alpha Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi Fraternity provides a cup to 
be awarded annually to the Fifth Year student selcted by the Faculty 
Assembly as having exhibited outstanding qualities of character and 
leadership. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha 
Zeta Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the 
Fifth Year student chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in 
pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
provides annually a key which is awarded to the Fifth Year student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy 
Administration. 

30 



School of Pharmacy 



Merck Award 



Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offers a set of valuable 
reference books to the Fifth Year student who attains a high standing 
in pharmacy or pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc., Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol 
Laboratories, Inc., to the Fifth Year student who has contributed the 
most to pharmacy through his extra-curricular activities. 

Rexall Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
Fifth Year student who has demonstrated outstanding qualities of both 
leadership and scholarship. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the 
School in extra curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the 
School of Pharmacy Convocations. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an or- 
ganization of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding 
in the internal administration of the school for organizing all extra curricu- 
lar programs and activities of the student body and for coordinating these 
programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administration to 
foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council of 
the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Govern- 
ment Alliance, the Presidents of the respective classes, and one delegate 
elected from each undergraduate class. 

The American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association Student Chapter, University of Maryland, School 
of Pharmacy. 

The purpose of the Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest and 
more liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as 
a profession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution 
of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the Constitution of the 

31 



University of Maryland 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, respectively, especially in foster- 
ing education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its 
application and aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, 
Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy established the Inter-Professional Stu- 
dent Senate for purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships 
among the Professional Schools and the University Units at College Park. 
The Senate is comprised of representatives from each of the five profes- 
sional schools. 



Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association (1963-1964) 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 
1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing 
committee known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties 
of this group are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to 
the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present mem- 
bers of the Committee are: 

Irving I. Cohen, Chairman 
Morton J. Schnaper, Co-Chairman 

Halcolm S. Bailey Aaron M. Libowitz 

James P. Cragg, Jr. Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 

Joseph U. Dorsch Gordon A. Mouat 

Clinton W. Englander Samuel I. Raichlen 

Milton A. Friedman Henry G. Seidman 

Carleton W. Hanks Morris R. Walman 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its 
separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Association 
of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organization 
of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant until 
June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is more 
evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 

32 



Officers (1963-1964) 
Melville Strashurger (1900) 
Milton A. Friedman (1934) 
Robert J. Kokoski (1952) 
Harold P- Levin (1943) 
Frank J. Slama (1924) 
H. Nelson Warfield (1924) 



School of Pharmacy 

Honorary President 

President 

1st Vice-President 

2nd Vice-President 

Executive Secretary 

Treasurer 



Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Sam A. Goldstein (1930) — Chairman 

Thomas C. Dawson (1955) 

Casimir T. Ichniowski (1929) 

Aaron M. Libowitz (1932) 

Alan Settler (1955) 

VitoTinelli, Jr. (1961) 

Solomon Weiner (1924) 






33 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Coarse 


i 

5 


1 


1 


3 
1 


1 

5 


a 


I 


3 

1 


Third Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 


2 
3 


6 
4 


8 

7 


4 
4 










Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32, Principles 


3 
2 


4 
6 


7 
8 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34, Quantitative 


4 


Pharmacy 31, Mathematics of the 


3 
3 
2 


_____ 


3 
6 
2 


8 

4 
2 




Pharmacy 33, 34, Processes and Dosage Forms— 
Pharmacy 35, Professional Communications 


8 


3 


6 


4 


3 
2 




_____ 


3 

5 


8 












3 




1 
2 


_____ 


1 
6 






Fourth Year (Required) 


17 


18 


Microbiology 41, Pharmaceutical Microbiology 

Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology, 


4 










2 


4 


6 


4 




4 
2 
2 


4 
3 

4 


8 
6 
6 


5 
3 
3 




Pharmacognosy 41, 42, General Pharmacognosy. 

Pharmacy 43, 44, Pharmaceutical Technology 

Fhysiology 142, General Physiology 


2 
2 
3 


3 

4 
6 


5 
6 
9 


3 
3 
5 


lElectives . 








3-4 


3-4 




3 




3 










t(Electives — General Pharmacy Major) 


18-19 
3 


18-19 


Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 

Management I 


2 
4 

4 


3 
3 


5 

4 
7 


3 


t(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
tMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 




4 

6 

1 4 


4 

4 
2 


4 


Fifth Year (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology.. 
Pharmacy 151, Professional Pharmacy _ 


1 

3 | 3 

1 i 3 

2 j 3 

2 i 

3 


5 


Pharmacy 153, 154, Dispensing 

Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharma- 
ceutical Jurisprudence 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, 

Chemistry of Medicinal Products.. 


1 5 | 3 
1 

2 | 2 

3 8 


2 

2 
3 


3 




5 

2 

3 


3 
2 
3 


tElectives _ ._ __ _ __ 








5-6 
19-20 


5-6 








___ 








18-19 


t(Electives — General Pharmacy Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists. 


2 


3 




5 


3 










Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


3 

2 
2 


.___. 
3 


3 
R 

5 

2 


3 


OR 

Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 
Management II, III 


2 

2 
2 


3 


2 

5 
2 


2 

3 

2 


2 


t(Electives — Hospital Major) 




Pharmacy 157, Hospital Pharmacy 










Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 


2 
2 

3 

r" 

4 


3 
6 


5 
2 

3 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 158, Orientation to Hospital 
Administration __. 










1 2 


$(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 
Laboratory . 


3 


6 


8 
6 


8 

2 


2 

4 

2 


3 
2 


OR 






fPharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems. 


1 

4 
1 


3 
_____ 


4 

4 
4 


6 
_____ 


6 

4 

6 


2 


t ( Electi ves — Pre-Graduate Major ) 
(Transfers from General Pharmacy Major) 
tMathematics 20, 21, Calculus. 


4 


tPharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems 


2 



t Required of Fifth-Year students transferring from General Pharmacy Major to Pre-Grad- 
uate Major. See page 16. 
t The elective* must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



rKUrt^lUINAL LUKKILULUM — Kt^UIKhU J'KUORAM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



ComrM 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit Hoars 


Third Y«»r 


32 
96 
32 
48 
96 
32 
48 


96 

128 

96 


128 

224 

128 

48 

192 

32 

48 

80 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry SO. 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34 


8 

4 
3 




96 


g 




2 






3 


Pharmacy Administration 86 


48 


8 




416 

16 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
48 


464 


16 
96 
96 
128 
160 
192 
144 


35 


Fourth Year 
First Aid 1 






64 
64 
64 
96 
128 
96 


4 




4 


Phamaceutical Chemistry 149 


6 
6 




6 


Physiology 142 


6 


Total __ 


320 

112 
16 
64 
64 
96 


512 

96 
48 
96 


832 

208 

64 

160 

96 


30 


Fifth Year 
Pharmacology 165, 156 


9 




2 




6 




4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151. 152.__ 




6 


Total 


352 


240 


592 


27 







PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM— ELECTIVE PROGRAMS * 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Coarse 



Didactic 



Fourth Year 
(General Pharmacy Major) 

Pharmacy Administration 41 

Pharmacy Administration 42 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 

Mathematics 20. 21 

Fifth Year 
(General Pharmacy Major) 

Pharmacognosy 51 

Pharmacognosy 52 

or 

Pharmacy 156 

Pharmacy Administration 53. 54 

(Hospital Major) 

Pharmacognosy 51 

Pharmacy 157 

Pharmacy 156 

Pharmacy 158 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 

Chemistry 187. 189 

Chemistry 188. 190 

or 

Pharmacy 161. 162 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 

(Transfers from General Pharmacy 

Major ) 

Mathematics 20. 21 

Pharmacy 161. 162 



Laboratory 



128 



Total 



M 



II 



4h 



48 



II 



128 
16 



4S 



192 
144 



144 



tTOTAL8 OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Fourth Year 
(ieneral Pharmacy Major. 

Pre-Graduate Major 

Fifth Year 
General Pharmacy Major. 



Hospital Major 

Pre-Graduate Major 



Pre Graduate Major 

(Transfers from General Pharmacy 

Major i 



128 



144 



128 
128 



112 
144 



4- 



48 
or 
96 
96 
192 

144 
144 



4.v 



128 



11 



192 
160 



128 
160 



128 



224 
224 

288 

256 
288 



Credit Hours 



• The elective* must be approved by the Claas Advisor and Dean. 

| Minimum credit hour requirements of instruction in the Professional Curriculum are: 
(a) General Pharmacy Major. 10K credit ohurs ; (b) Hospital Major. 108 credit hours 
|C) Hospital Major (Transfers from Pre-Graduate Major.. 110 credit hours; and 
(d) Pre-Graduate Major. 110 credit hours. Also, consult pages 16 and 17 concerning 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 
ANATOMY 

31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Darago.) 
A study of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. The course 
is designed to provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 
particular emphasis on human structures. 

FIRST AID 

1. First Aid Course. (0) 

Fourth Year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson, 
instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

20, 21. Calculus. (4, 4) 

Fourth Year and Fifth Year, four lectures (Dean.) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 18, 19 and/or approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, 
kinematics, integration, geometric and physical application on integration, par- 
tial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. Sample space, events, 
probability and its basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random 
variables, distribution functions (continuous and discrete); typical distributions, 
expectations, moments, generating functions; transformations of random varia- 
bles, limit theorems. (Dean.) 

132. Introduction to Statistics. (3) 

Second semester, three lectures and one hour of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 130. Sampling distributions, elements of point and set estima- 
tion, maximum likelihood principle, testing statistical hypotheses, standard 
tests. Neyman-Pearson lemma and problems of optimality of tests, linear 
hypotheses, sequential methods. (Dean.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology. (4) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay and Becker.) 

36 



School of Pharmacy 

Prerequisites. Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 12. I his course is designed es- 
pecially for pharmacy students and includes practice and theoretical considera- 
tion of bacteria, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, viruses, nckettsia. \ casts 
and molds. 

Laboratory teaching includes methods of staining and the preparation of media; 
cultural characteristics o\ bacteria, emphasis is given to the study of disinfec- 
tants, antiseptics, germicides and sterilization, antibiotics and their antibacterial 
action, microbiological assay, sensitivity testing and virus techniques. Experi- 
ments are included for the bacteriological evaluation of milk, water, food and 
air. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health 
and Parasitology. (4) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay and Becker.) 
Prerequisite. Microbiology 41. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products such as sera, vaccines, toxins, 
toxoids, etc. Special attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and ani- 
mals to sensitizing substances, drug idiosyncracies, hay fever, food allergies, 
contact dermatosis, and animal inoculation. Part of the course is devoted to the 
study of Public Health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections, immunity, transmission, diagnosis, treat- 
ment and prevention of parasitic diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1). 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1,1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

211. Public Health. (1-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite. Microbiology 41, 146. I ectuies and discussions on the organiza- 
tion and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. 'I he courses v. ill also include a study of laboratory methods. 

399. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by the amount of work performed. (Shay.) 



37 



University of Maryland 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

30, 32. Principles of Organic Chemistry. (4, 4) 

Third Year, two lectures, one recitation, one laboratory. (Miller and Meyer.) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry. 

34. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Zenker, Heyman and Rhodes.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32 or equivalent. A study of quan- 
titative analytical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
official preparations with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, or equivalent. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. 

144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Miller.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 37, 38 or equivalent. Laboratory work devoted to more 
complicated organic preparations. 

146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds. (2, 2) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143, or equivalent. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Fourth Year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Zenker and Heyman) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 34. Lectures and laboratory exer- 
cises devoted to the composition of living organisms and the chemical and 
physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A survey of the structural 
relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally of organic medici- 
nal products. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 15, 35, 37, Physics 10, 11, Mathematics 20, 21. A study 
of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 

38 



School of Pharmacy 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two laboratories. (Leslie and Rhodes.) 

Prerequisites. Chemistry 187, 189 or concurrent registration. Quantitative ex- 
periments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and 
acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

230. Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of prog- 
ress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

232. Advanced Organic Synthesis. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Miller and Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite. Chemistry 144. Library and laboratory work designed to offer 
experience in the more difficult organic syntheses and in new techniques. 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites. Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles of stereochemistry 
of organic compounds. 

242 Heterocyclic Chemistry (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and synthesis of 
heterocyclic compounds. 

250. Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisites. Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the synthesis and structure deter- 
mination of steroids and the application of modern chemical concepts to the 
chemistry of steroids. 

252. Alkaloids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles involved in struc- 
ture determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alkaloidal classes. 

253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2, 2) 
Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143, 151, 152 or permission of 
the instructor. A study of structural relationships and basic principles con- 
cerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, e.g., structure 
activit> relationships, physical properties and biological activity, cellular trans- 
port, drug, protein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and physico- 
chemical mechanisms of drug action. 

255. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. (2) 

Either semester, two laboratories. (Zenker and Leslie.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190 or equivalent. 

39 



University of Maryland 

271. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149; Chemistry 189. The application 
of physical chemistry principles to biological systems, and a discussion of the 
physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. 

272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of particular in- 
terest in the pharmaceutical sciences, including surface chemistry, colloids, 
kinetics, colligative properties and absorption spectroscopy. 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are necessary for, 

and a part of, a larger research effort. 

281. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of the relationships 

between drugs and enzymes, with emphasis on drug action at the enzymatic 
level and on drug metabolism. 

282. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. 
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of modern techniques and 
metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug metabolism. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

41. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Lleander) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of crude vegetable drugs with special emphasis on 
the physical and microscopical characteristics used in their identification and in 
the detection of adulteration. 

42. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Lleander.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacognosy 41. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 41 with 
instruction covering drugs of animal origin and allergy-producing pollens. 
Special emphasis is placed upon official and non-official chemical tests used 
in the identification of drugs and their constituents. 

40 



School of Pharmacy 

51. PHARMACOGNOSY, Entomology for Pharmacists. (3) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Meander ) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

A discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 
and the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; their 
recognition, life history, and methods of control. 

52. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41. 42; Pharmacology 155. 

A study of principal pharmaceutical agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41. 42. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be 
given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41, 42. Lectures and laboratory work covering 
advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 
roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs 
and spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice 
in identification and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not 
ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be 
given to practical problems and to the identification and detection of adulter- 
ants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 



41 



University of Maryland 
PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

155, 156. Pharmacology, General. (4, 5) 

Fifth Year, three lectures and one laboratory first semester; four lectures and 
one laboratory second semester. (Ichniowski and Diamond.) 

Prerequisites, Physiology 142; Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or consent of 
the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward 
effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156. A study of the methods of biological 
assay official in the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formu- 
lary. 

For Graduates 
201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacology 171. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156, and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay 

Methods. (2-4), (2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the develop- 
ment of biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

399. Research in Pharmacology. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 



PHARMACY 

31. Mathematics of the Pharmaceutical Sciences. (3) 

Third Year, first semester, three lectures. (Lamy.) 

Applied calculations in all fields of pharmaceutical sciences with emphasis on 
problem solving in systems of measurement, aliquot methods, alligation, HLB 
systems, isotonicity, chemical reactions, commercial problems, drug absorption, 
and the interpretation and evaluation of experimental data. 

42 



School of Pharmacy 
33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms. (4, 4) 

Third Year, three lectures and one laboratory. (Lamy. Block and Augsburger.) 
Pharmacy 31 and 33 are prerequisites to Pharmacy 34. Commentary on the 
official compendia of pharmacy. Includes pharmaceutical manipulation! and 
processes for preparing official dosage forms. Particular emphasis is placed on 
physical and chemical properties of ingredients, common nomenclature and 
lynoaymt, storage conditions and uses. 

35. Professional Communications. (2) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures. (Ballman.) 

Oral and written expression on subjects of pharmaceutical use and interest. 
Bibliographical methods, oral and written reports and communications, con- 
duct of discussion groups, audio-visual aids. 

38. History of Pharmacy. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

A survey of the history of pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 
those aspects of science most pertinent to the interests of the pharmacist. Re- 
search papers and reports required. 

43, 44. Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3) 

Fourth Year, two lectures, one laboratory and one recitation. 

(Shangraw, Block and Augsburger.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. The physical-chemical principles in- 
volved in pharmaceutical systems and the application of this knowledge to the 
development, preparation and packaging of medicinal formulations. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
151. Professional Pharmacy. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. 

(Shangraw, Lamy.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Preparation for the major fields of pharmaceutical 
specialization by rotation through the school model pharmacy and manufac- 
turing pharmacy laboratories as well as the inpatient and outpatient hospital 
pharmacy departments. 

153, 154. Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen.) 

Prerequisite. Pharmacy 44. Professional laboratory practice and other special- 
ized activities pertaining to prescriptions, including an evaluation of com- 
pounding aids and commercial pharmaceuticals. 

156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 153. A study of the composition and manufacture of 
preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of cold cream, 
vanishing cream, protective cream, hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face 
powder, dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, toothpaste, deodorants, depilatories, 
suntan preparations, etc. The acid-mantle of the skin and hypoallergenic prep- 
arations are also emphasized. 



43 



University of Maryland 

157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. The fundamentals of hospital pharmacy practice 
and administration. Includes a study of the history and development of hos- 
pital pharmacy, physical facilities, minimum standards, purchasing, the formu- 
lary, manufacturing, record keeping and dispensing practices, with supervised 
practical experience in selected hospital pharmacies. 

158. Orientation to Hospital Administration. (2) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures. (Staff.) 

The increasing role of the hospital in general health facilities and the in- 
creasing responsibility of the pharmacist in hospital activities necessitate some 
orientation in hospital administration. The course will consist of a discussion 
of the history and development of hospitals, classification of hospitals, or- 
ganization, governing authorities, the administrator, the medical staff, and 
special departments of the hospital, including pharmacy, nursing, dietary, 
engineering, accounting, housekeeping, laundry, purchasing, public relations 
and personnel. 

161, 162. Special Problems. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 20, 21 or concurrent registration. Independent in- 
vestigations in the several pharmaceutical sciences, consisting of library and 
laboratory research and seminars. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 153, 154. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications, patents and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Phar- 
macy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and im- 
portant pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw,) 

Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1,1) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the 
pharmaceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 156, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development 
of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

44 



School of Pharmacy 

221, 222. History of PHARMACY. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Purdum.) 

I actum and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate yean. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar, (l) 

Each semester. (Shangrau i 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research 
and surve\s of recent developments in pharm 

231. 232. Special Problems in PHARMACEUTICAL Technology. (2,2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, Allen, and Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

36. Accounting. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Leavitt and Augsburger.) 
A study of the fundamental principles of accounting, especially as it concerns 
the practice of community pharmacy. 

41. Drug Marketing. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, three lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Economics 37 or its equivalent. This is an introductory course 
in the field of marketing with special emphasis on the marketing of drug prod- 
ucts. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the 
forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing 
drug products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

42. Pharmacy Management I. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. il eavitt.) 

Prerequisite. Pharmacy Administration 41. A study of the application of 
accounting, marketing and merchandising principles to the operation of a com- 
munity pharmacy, including financial statement analysis, pricing, inventory and 
expense management and control. 

51, 52. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (2. 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts. Negotiable Instruments. Sales. 
Agency and Partnerships. 

54. Pharmacy Management II, III (2. 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. vut ) 

Prerequisite. Pharmacy Administration 42. A stud\ o\ the management prob- 
lems of community pharmacy, including organization, staffing, directing, plan- 
ning and control. 

45 



University of Maryland 
PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

142. General Physiology. (5) 

Fourth Year, second semester, three lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Darago.) 
Prerequisite, Anatomy 31. A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physi- 
ology including the structure and permeability of the cell membrane, neuro- 
physiology, muscle physiology, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, 
the digestive system, the excretory system, endocrinology, metabolism, and 
the special senses. 

For Graduates 

245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester, three lectures. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Physiology 142. Consent of 
instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical properties 
of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, 
golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and their con- 
tributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemical phe- 
nomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

246. Radioisotope Technique. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, consent of instructor. A course concerned with the practical use 
of isotopes particularly as tracers in metabolic investigations. 

399. Research in Physiology. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 



46 



School of Pharmacy 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1963-64 

Graduate Students t 

Augsburger, Larr\ L. 
Batt. William H. 
• Barnett. Lisa 
Bcals. P. Loring 
Block. Lawrence H. 
Hossle. Paul C. 



* Bradenbaugh, Don L 
Brodeur. Richard J. 
Brown. Sister Jane Marie 
Caplan. Yale H. 

(ditcher, James L. 

Darago. Lillian L. 

Dietz. Albert J.. Jr. 
'Doane. Marshall G. 
§Duda. Marija M. 

* Duffy, Thomas E. 
Fox, Chester D. 

'Fried. Irving M. 

Goldsmith. Robert H. 

Guyton. Charles L. 
•Hammel, Claire L. 
§Heifetz, Carl L. 

Heyman. Irwin A. 

Inguanti, Luciano 
§Kanhour. Anisa I. 

Lleander. Glory C. 

McDonald. Donald E. 

McKelvey, Cornelius P. 

McMillion. Cecil Robert 

Meyer. Francis J. 

Milkowski. John D. 

Murthy. Vadiraja Nenkatesa 

Probst. Robert T. 

Rhodes. Robert A. 

Richman. If. David 

Scott, Kenneth R. 

Smith. Willard N. 

Stein. Martin E. 

Tinney. Francis J. 

Vora. Kakubhai If. 

Wagner. Frederick H. 

Walking. Walter D. 

Wang, Theodore 

Warfield. Albert H. 

Warthen. J. David. Jr. 
•Webb. George Schettler 

Whang. Clara 



+ Registered in Graduate School. 
•Did not attend entire session. 
§Second Semester only. 



Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Idaho 
Maryland 
Louisiana 
Maryland 
Connecticut 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New York 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Mississippi 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Iraq 

Philippines 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

India 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

Maryland 

New York 

India 

Maryland 

Maryland 

China 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 

China 



47 



University of Maryland 

Fifth Year (Five Year Program) 

DelCastilho, Ronald E Maryland 

Wynn, Richard L Maryland 

Fourth Year (Five Year Program) 

Brauner, Robert P New York 

Brundelre, Robert Maryland 

Catlett, Leon R Maryland 

Cavoures, James A Maryland 

Conrad, John W., Jr Maryland 

Cooney, John R Maryland 

Cysyk, Richard L Maryland 

Dolecek, Gayle R Maryland 

Elliott, William R Maryland 

Frangakis, Mina S Maryland 

Gamerman, Marvin I Maryland 

Glover, Wayne A Maryland 

Goldberg, Marvin Maryland 

*Goldman, William I Maryland 

Hoffman, Robert W Maryland 

Kroopnick, Robert B Maryland 

Libowitz, Suzanne J. Maryland 

Miller, Harris L Maryland 

Mintz, Martin B Maryland 

Myers, Mary L Maryland 

Rachanow, Gerald M Maryland 

Schutz, Charles J. Maryland 

Sollod, Ralph M Maryland 

Walsh, Michael J Maryland 

Williams, Cornelius B Maryland 

Wolfson, Israel D Maryland 

Third Year (Five Year Program) 

Alatzas, George T. Maryland 

Avery, Carolyn J. Maryland 

Berry, John T Maryland 

Bloom, Barry L Maryland 

Christian, Mitchell A Maryland 

Cohen, Michael J Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony L. Maryland 

Dailey, John W Maryland 

*DonBullian, Ronald F. Maryland 

Donnelly, John A Maryland 

Edmondson, William H Maryland 

Eng, Frederick Maryland 

Erdman, Sheldon N Maryland 

Fine, Norman F Maryland 

* First semester only 

48 



School of Pharmacy 



her. Bernard A.. Ill 

Fleischer. Charles A. 

Garfield. Anne Mirk 

Heer. Roger G. 

Hess, Gary L. 

HotTman. Ronald H. 

Johnson. Eugene If. 

Lehman. Allan G. 

Lessing. Melvin 

Lindenbaum, Ronald L. 

Martin. I aurence L. 

Meyer, Howard B. 

Moore. William C. 
•Morton. Jacqueline G. 

Match, Robert A. 

Myers. John E. 

Needel, Stephen 

Neiner, Joan M. 

Pincus. Jack H. 
§Popov, Metodi 

Rayman. Marsha J 

Spuras, Jenina D. 

Tannenbaum. Stanley B. 

Taylor. Charles D. 

Tims, John M. 

Traska, Alexander W. 

Via. David M. 
•Volcjak. Frank J. 

Weiner, Myron 

Williams, Matt E 



District 



Maryland 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
: viand 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Delaware 
Maryland 
Maryland 

. . Maryland 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

Maryland 

of Columbia 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 

Second Year 



Alpert. Charles M. 

Balch, John H. 

Berglund, Richard L. 

Blitz. Alvin M. 
^loom. Martin G. 

Branch. Arthur S. 
*Buckner. Stephen L. 

David. Stephen T. 
^Davidson. Harvey S. 
T Deneale, Richard J. 



Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 

Man land 

Maryland 



• First semester only 

§ Did not attend entire session. 

f Sccond Semester only. 



49 



University of Maryland 

Dondero, David L Maryland 

§Dubansky, Ronald F Maryland 

Feldman, Neil Maryland 

tFolus, Gary L Maryland 

Golob, Jerrold J Maryland 

♦Goodman, Philip L Maryland 

§Goodman, Richard M Maryland 

*Grabush, Arnold F Maryland 

Griffiths, Robert C Maryland 

Groman, Alvin D Maryland 

Heer, Ronald W Maryland 

*Hili, Carol J Maryland 

Hommerbocker, Barry A Maryland 

Honkofsky, Arnold J Maryland 

Jaskulski, Alan J Maryland 

Kolkhorst, Kenneth A Maryland 

Kovalsky, Paul V Maryland 

Lawrence, Barbara J Maryland 

tMarks, Robert A Maryland 

McCabe, Stanley B Maryland 

♦Nadell, Terry S Maryland 

Oliver, Patricia A Maryland 

*PoIievka, Frank J District of Columbia 

*Ryon, James N Maryland 

Samios, William A Maryland 

Sanford, Ronald A Maryland 

Smith, Earl T Maryland 

Solomon, Larry P Maryland 

Stromberger, Henry R Maryland 

Towers, Earl M Maryland 

Trinkley, Kenneth P Maryland 

*Walman, Eugene S Maryland 

Watson, George W Maryland 

Will, Marcia A Maryland 

Wolff, Martin W Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AT COLLEGE PARK 

First Year 

§AghamolIa, Diamchid Maryland 

♦Barrie, Bernard H Maryland 

*Blair, Gary S Maryland 

♦Boteler, Charles E Maryland 

Burkhardt, Charles T Maryland 

Cummins, Leroy J Maryland 

Daniel, David J Maryland 

Davis, David M. Maryland 



♦First Semester only. 

§Second Semester only 

tDid not attend entire Session. 

50 



School of Pharmacy 



Duvall, Suzanne W. 

l)\ke, Wayne A. 
§Edelman. Barry A. 
+ Farano, Ralph J. 

\ oxuell. Lurman H. 

GaffDey, Michael J 
•Galliher. Richard H. 
'Goldstein, Richard C. 

'Haute, John H. 

§Hanratty. Eugene J. 

Hare, David F. 
f Harmon. George C. 
' Hcrbst, Joseph A. 
•Horuitz. Michael R. 
§Howard. Leonard C. 
§Jones, Norman R. 

Kirson, Alan B. 

Kxawiecki, Elizabeth A. 

Lebson. Harvey J. 

Leister. Dennard L. 

McConnell. Patricia S. 

McSwiggin. Sue E. 

Meadors, Richard C. 

Motsko, John M 

Neuman. Joann L. 

Newman, Gail D. 
♦Nickel. David W. 
♦Pailthorp, Charles J. 

Pasman. Arnold K. 

Polkis, Alphonse 

Press, Howard A. 

Rand. Jerome A. 

Rehwaldt. Don C. 

Ricci, John R. 

Rosenbluth. Karen S. 

Savage. Joseph P. 
+ Schall. Arthur B. 
+ Stern. Daniel 

Thomas. Philip O. 

VonBergen. Eric W. 

Wright. Richard T. 

Yorkilous, John C. 



Maryland 
Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 
Maryland 
Mar\ land 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
New York 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
District of Columbia 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Alabama 
Maryland 
Mankind 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Mar> land 
Maryland 
Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 8, 1963 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Dorn. Conrad Peter, Jr. 
Havranek. Robert Edw-ard 



•First Semester only. 

§Second Semester only. 

+ Did not attend entire Session. 



New Jersey 
Missouri 



51 



University of Maryland 

Kokoski, Robert John Maryland 

Kumkumian, Charles Simon Pennsylvania 

Levine, Phillip Julian Rhode Island 

Marlowe, Edward Pennsylvania 

Patel, Vithalbhai Chhotabhai India 

Master of Science 

Becker, John W. Maryland 

Block, Ronald Lee District of Columbia 

Fox, Chester David New York 

Richman, Morton David Maryland 

Ringe, Ingrid New York 

Walkling, Walter Douglas Maryland 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Abel, Walter Howard Maryland 

Abramovitz, Marjorie Sue Maryland 

Adair, Carole Shaver Maryland 

Antwarg, Alvin Gordon Maryland 

Baker, Jeanne Ann Maryland 

Banks, David Edwin Maryland 

Barron, David D Maryland 

Batt, William Henry Maryland 

Benson, Michael Theodore Maryland 

Blake, David Andrew Maryland 

Bradenbaugh, Don Lloyd Maryland 

Brownstein, Marshall Paul Maryland 

Caplan, Yale Howard Maryland 

Caple, Arthur Norris, Jr Maryland 

Chang, Gloria Maryland 

Cohen, Michael David Maryland 

Cornias, William N Maryland 

Fader, John Frederick, II Maryland 

Friedel, Stuart Lee Maryland 

Henderson, Robert Webb Maryland 

Heyman, Irwin Alvin Maryland 

Hopkins, Ronald Murray Maryland 

Jacobs, M. Neal Maryland 

Kadish, Aaron Chaim Maryland 

Keller, Thomas Henry, Jr Maryland 

Kuchinsky, Victoria Wilhelmina New Jersey 

Levi, Henry Michael Maryland 

Levin, Stephen Paul Maryland 

Mendelsohn, James Frank Maryland 

Pariser, Joseph Maryland 

Patel, Barbara Ann Foster Pennsylvania 

Perzynski, Paul Ronald Maryland 

Pilson, Robert Michael, Jr Maryland 

Price, Chester Lee Maryland 

Reinke, Budne Charles Maryland 

52 



School of Pharmacy 

Ritchie. James Reed Maryland 

Sappcrstein. Alan Edward Maryland 

Scholtz. Frank William Maryland 

Schult/. Lawrence Michael Maryland 

Shaner. Daniel Stephen Maryland 

Shared. I eon David Maryland 

SoKzak. Valentine Raymond Maryland 

Sober, Julian Neal Maryland 

Spak. Allen Maryland 

Iristani. Ettore Mario Maryland 

Ullman. Kenneth Charles Maryland 

Welsh. James Joseph Maryland 

Wilson. John Wesley Maryland 

Winakur. Stuart Maryland 

Woods. Dennis Scott Maryland 

Yee. Susan Maryland 

Zimmer. Reid Austin Maryland 

HONORS (1962-63) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Marjorie S. Abramovitz 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Marjorie S. Abramovitz 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) Yale H. Caplan 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize David A. Blake 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Chester L. Price 

rier Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize David A. Blake 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Jeanne A. Baker 

Kappa Chapter. Alpha Zeta Omega Prize (Pharmacology) Stephen P. Levin 
Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Thomas H. Keller. Jr. 

Phi Alpha Chapter. Rho Pi Phi Fraternity Cup (Leadership) Yale H. Caplan 

Merck Award (Pharmacy) Marjorie S. Abramovitz 

Merck Award (Pharmaceutical Chemistry) Stephen P. Levin 

Bristol Laboratories. Inc. Award David A. Blake 

(Extra Curricular Activities) 

Rexall Drug Company Award (Outstanding Achievement) Jeanne A. Baker 



Jeanne A. Baker 



Certificates of Honor 

James J. Welsh 



Yale H. Caplan 



53 



University of Maryland 

DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1962-63) 

Class of 1963 

Marjorie S. Abramovitz Stuart L. Friedel 

Jeanne A. Baker Stephen P. Levin 

David A. Blake Barbara A. Patel 

Don L. Bradenbaugh Chester L. Price 

Marshall P. Brownstein Kenneth C. Ullman 

Yale H. Caplan James J. Welsh 
Stuart Winakur 

Honorable Mention 

Michael D. Cohen Robert M. Pilson, Jr. 

Irwin A. Heyman Ettore M. Tristani 

M. Neal Jacobs John W. Wilson 

James F. Mendelson Susan Yee 

Class of 1964 
Honorable Mention 

Richard L. Wynn 

Class of 1965 

Richard L. Cysyk Gerald M. Rachanow 

Charles J. Schutz 

Honorable Mention 

Robert P. Brauner Robert W. Hoffman 

John W. Conrad Ralph M. Sollod 

Gayle R. Dolecek Michael J. Walsh 

Cornelius B. Williams 



54 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar, 1964-1965 iii 

Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 54 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 12 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 12 

Accreditation 1 
Administration, Officers of 

Principal Administrative Officers vi 

Emeriti vi 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges vi 

General Administrative Officers vii 

Division Chairmen viii 

Faculty Senate, Chairmen of Standing Committees (1964-1965) ix 
Admission Procedure 

Applicants for admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 2 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at 

Baltimore 6 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To the College Park Program 5 

To the Baltimore Program 6 

Alumni Association 32 

American Civilization, The Program in 4 

Assistantships, Graduate 23 

Attendance Requirements 12 

Baltimore Union 19 

Board of Regents v 

Breakage 9 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1964 and 1965 ii 

Calendar, Academic iii 

Correspondence iv 

Courses, Description of 36 

Curriculum. Changes in 11 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md. 4, 5 
Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

other than University of Maryland 6 
Curriculum, Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 34 

Summary of Hours and Credits 35 

Degrees 2 

Deportment 18 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 1 5 

Dormitories (See Housing) 19 

Elective Programs at Baltimore 16 



55 



University of Maryland 

INDEX (Continued) 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 21 

Employment 19 

Examinations 13 

Faculty (1963-1964) xi 

Faculty Council xi 

Fees and Expenses 

Changes in registration 9 

Graduate 10 

Late registration 9 

Part-time Undergraduate 9 

Pre-professional at College Park 4, 1 1 

Fellowships and Grants 21 

Grade of D, Raising 14 

Grade of F, Removal of 14 

Grading System 13 

Grade Point Average 13 

Grade of Withdrawing Students 11 

Graduates, Roll of 1963 51 

Graduation Requirements 17 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 

Honor Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi 28 

Rho Chi 29 

Honors and Awards 28 

Honors Recipients (1962-63) 53 

Hospital Pharmacy Residencies 23 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 19 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 19 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 19 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 14 

Laboratory Fees 9 

Library, Health Sciences 21 

Staff xv 

Loans 24, 25 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 18 

Registration with 18 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy 32 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 13 

Office of Dean, Hours iv 

Office Staff xv 

Officers of the University vi 

Parking 21 

Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 6 

From Other Universities and Colleges 6 

56 






School of Pharmacy 

INDEX (Continued) 

Probation for Low Scholarship 15 
Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1964-1965 

Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 15 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 15 

Registration by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 18 

Requirements for Admission 

To Pre-professional Program at College Park 2 

To Professional Program at Baltimore 2 

Residence and Non-Residence, Definition of 12 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 25 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 24 

Student Organizations, Baltimore Campus 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 32 
Student Chapter, The American Pharmaceutical Association 

and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 31 

Student Government Alliance 31 

Students. Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 16 

Roll of 47 

Students, Pre-professional, College Park 49, 50 

Textbooks 11 

Transcripts of Records 17 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 8 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) 4 

Visitors iv 

Withdrawals, Baltimore Campus 

Procedure 10 

Refunds 11 

Grades 11 

Non-compliance to regulations 11 



57