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Full text of "School of Pharmacy Catalog 1965-1972"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



littp://archive.org/details/pharmacy72unse 



ItlRy: 

C 



THE 



IVERSITY of MARYLAND 



BULLETIN 




School of Pharmacy 



965-1966 



CATALOG AND 122nd ANNOUNCEMENT 



THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 



(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



1965-66 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 45, Number 1 
School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Contents 



Academic Calendar v 

Correspondence — Visitors . vi 

Board of Regents vii 

Officers of the University viii 
Standing Committees, 

Faculty Senate xii 

Faculty Council xiii 

Library Staff xvii 

The School 1 
AFROTC Program 5 
General Education Program 6 
Admission to the Profes- 
sional Program, Baltimore 6 
Enrollment in 

Pre-Professional Program 7 
Enrollment in 

Professional Program 7 

Tuition and Fees 8 

Academic Information 10 

Withdrawals 10 

Textbooks 11 

Changes in Curriculum 11 
Definition of Residence 

and Non-residence 12 

Academic Regulations , 12 

Attendance, Examinations 12 

Grading System 13 

Regulations for Promotion 

and Probation 14 

Regulations for 

Readmission 15 
Elective Programs at 

Baltimore 15 

Classification of Students 16 



Requirements for 

Graduation 17 

Transcripts of Records 17 
Registration with Maryland 

Board of Pharmacy 17 
Licensure Requirements, 

Maryland Board of 

Pharmacy 17 

Deportment 18 

Employment 18 

Housing 19 

General Information for 

Baltimore Union 19 

Parking 20 

Health Sciences Library . . 21 
Professorships, Graduate 

Fellowships and Grants 21 

Other Research Grants 22 

Special Grants, Assistantships 22 

Scholarships and Loans 23 

Honors and Awards 27 

Student Organizations, 

Baltimore Campus 30 

Alumni Association 31 

Professional Curriculum 32 

Description of Courses 34 

Roll of Students, 

Session 1964-65 45 

Roll of Graduates, 

June 6, 1964 51 

Honors 51 

Index 53 



III 



1965 1966 


JANUARY 1965 




JULY 1965 


JANUARY 1966 


JULY. 1966 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F S 




' 1 2 




1 2 3 






1 


1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 8 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 


25 26 27 


28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 








30 31 






31 


FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 




1 2 3 


4 5 


12 3 4 6 6 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 .26 27 


28 




29 


30 31 


27 28 






28 29 30 81 




MARCH 




SEPTEMBER 




MARCH 




SEPTEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


s 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 




12 3 4 




1 2 3 


4 5 


1 2 3 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


28 29 


30 31 


26 


27 28 29 30 


27 28 


29 30 31 




25 26 27 28 29 30 




APRIL 




OCTOBER 




APRIL 




OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 2 3 




1 2 






1 ? 


1 


4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


25 26 


27 28 29 30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 


26 27 28 


29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 




MAY 




NOVEMBER 




MAY 




NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 




12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 7 


12 3 4 5 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 


28 


29 30 


29 30 


31 




27 28 29 30 


30 31 


















JUNE 




DECEMBER 




JUNE 




DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 5 




12 3 4 




1 2 


3 4 


1 2 3 


6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 25 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


27 28 


29 30 


2G 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 


28 29 30 




25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



IV 



September 


14 


September 


20 


November 


24 


November 


29 


December 


21 


1966 




January 3 




January 20-26 



Academic Calendar, 1965-66 

First Semester — 1965 

September 13 Monday Third Year Registration — 9 a.m. 

Fourth Year Registration — 

10 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — 1 1 a.m. 
Orientation for all new students — 
2 p.m. 

Tuesday Graduate Registration — 9:30- 

11:30 a.m. 

Monday Instruction begins with first 

scheduled class 

Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at 

close of last scheduled period 

Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

. Tuesday Christmas recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period 

Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 
Thurs.-Wed First Semester examinations 

Second Semester 

February 1 Tuesday Third Year Registration — 9 a.m. 

Fourth Year Registration — 

10 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — 11 a.m. 

February 2 Wednesday Graduate Registration — 9:30- 

11:30 a.m. 

February 7 Monday Instruction begins with first 

scheduled class 

February 22 Tuesday Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

April 7 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of 

last scheduled period 

April 12 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period 

May 20-26 Friday-Thursday Fifth Year final examinations 

May 26-June 2 Thurs.-Thurs Second Semester final examina- 
tions 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day, Holiday 

June 4 Saturday Commencement Exercises 

Summer Session 

June 7 Tuesday Graduate Registration — 10 a.m.- 

12 noon 
All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration days. Students failing to 
comply with this regulation are charges a fee of $20.00. No student is normally 
permitted to register after Friday of the week in which instruction begins. 
The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily, Monday through Friday, 
form 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

V 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, Room 132, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to 
the respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



VISITORS 



Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on 
Saturday by appointment. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an ir- 
revocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. The 
University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student to 
withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests 

of the University. 



VI 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Bldg., 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
4101 Greenway, Baltimore, 21218 

vii 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 
PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins— fi.^., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.Phil. , 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— B.5., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE, RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig— ^.5., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Leslie R. Bundgaard— 5.5., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 

Georgetown University, 1954. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— 5.^., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
James T. Frye— S.5., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson AlgivQ—B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— 5.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 

Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

via 



k 



DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg— B. A.. University of Maryland. 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan — B.S.. University of Maryland. 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S.. University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison— B.5., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Joshua B. Zatman — A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1934. 



Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd — B.S., University^ of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S.. 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.5., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D. 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— fi.5., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D.. 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Donald W. O'Connell— B./4., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley— D.D.^., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minne.wta, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen — B.S.. Yale University, 1923; Registered Professional Engineer. 

ix 



DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont, 1926; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Selma F. Lippeatt — B.S., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of 
Tennessee, 1945; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Paul Wasserman— B.B.^., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), 
Columbia University, 1949; M.S. {Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan, 1960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 
EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 

William S. Stone — B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., {Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe — B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss— P/z.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley— B.^., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger — B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

ACTING DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Francis A. Gray — B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Helen E. Clarke — B.S., University of Michigan, 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 
1951; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 



DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Ahon—B.S.. University of Minnesota. 1933; M.S.. 1940; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956. 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut— B.5., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of IVashington, 
1930: Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ACTING DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 
John P. Menard — B.A., San Michael's College, 1954 

DIRECTOR, COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— fl.S.. Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock— 5.5., University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— 5.^., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L, Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 
HOSPITAL 

George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke— B.5., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 



1949. 



Division Chairmen 



CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— B.5., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— B .5., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924: Ph.D., 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Harold C. Hoffsommer— fl.5.. Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 

xi 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSEUNG OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



XH 



School of Pharmacy 
FACULTY COUNCIL 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW FRANK J. SLAMA 

DONALD E. SHAY NORMAN J. DOORENBOS, Secretary 

Faculty (1964-1965) 
Emerita 

B. OLIVE COLE, ProfcssoT Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
PHAR.D., University of Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

* NORMAN J. DOORENBOS, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.s. IN CHEM., University of Michigan, 1950; M.S., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

NOEL E. FOSS, Professor of Pharmacy 

PH.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

CASIMIR T. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

PH.G., University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

FRANCIS M. miller, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d.. Northwestern University, 1949. 

*t w. ARTHUR purdum, Profcssor of Hospital Pharmacy 

PH.G., University of Maryland, 1930; b.s. in pharm., 1932; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

DONALD E. SHAY, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 
1943. 

FRANK J. SLAMA, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

PH.G., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; M.S., 1930; 

PH.D., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin FRANK ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1937; PH.D., 1949. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



t Part time. 

'Resigned June 30, 1965 

'Died March 14, 1965 



Xlll 



University of Maryland 

LESLIE c. cosTELLO, Associate Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; PH.D., 1957. 

' HILDA E. MOORE, Librarian, Health Sciences Library and Associate Professor of 
Library Science 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 

School, 1937. 

'^ IDA MARIAN ROBINSON, Associate Professor of Library Science 

A.B., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Science, 1944. 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 

NICOLAS ZENKER, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

CD. sc. CH., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; m.a.. University of California, 
1953; PH.D., 1958. 

Assistant Professors 

Iadele b. ballman, Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

KENNETH E. EULER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Pittsburgh, 1959; M.S., 1962; ph.d.. University of 

Washington, 1965. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

' WALTER w. FREDERICKS, Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
B.A., LaSalle College, 1957; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1962. 

GEORGE N. KRYWOLAP, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

PETER P. LAMY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. IN PHARM., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; 

PH.D., 1964. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania . 

* DEAN E. LEAVITT, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957; m.b.a., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

JAMES LESLIE, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1956; ph.d., 1959. 



t Part time 

'Effective January 25, 1965 

'Retired December 31, 1964 

' Resigned June 30, 1965 

* Sabbatical leave, first semester 



XIV 



School of Pharmacy 
Instructors 

EARL F. BECKLR, JR., Instructor in Microbiology 

B.S., Muhlenberg College. 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

LOUIS DL\MOND. Instructor in Pharmacology 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Lecturers 

* LANDON w. BURBAGE, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
PH.B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

tRiCHARD D. DEAN, Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; m.ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 

■•■JOSEPH s. KAUFMAN, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Fellows 

LARRY L. AUGSBURGER, Noxzema Foundation Fellow in Pharmacy 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

PAUL c. BOSSLE, The H. A. B. Dunning Fellow in Chemistry and Research Fellow in 
Chemistry (National Cancer Institute) 

B.s. IN PHARM., Loyola University, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Louisiana 

SISTER JANE MARIE BROWN, Research Fellow in Chemistry 
(National Cancer Institute) 
B.A., College of Notre Dame, 1958. 

LANDON w. BURBAGE, Pvistol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration (Research) 
PH.B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

YALE CAPLAN, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellow in Phar- 
maceutical Chemistry 

B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

LILLIAN DARAGO, Predoctoral Research Assistant, Anatomy and Physiology 
A.B., Goucher College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

MARJORIE s. GOLDBERG, Predoctoral Research Assistant, Anatomy and Physiology 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

CHARLES L. GUYTON, Research Fellow in Chemistry 
(National Cancer Institute) 
B.s. IN PHARM., Mississippi State University, 1961. 



^ First Semester only, 
t Part time 



XV 



University of Maryland 

IRWIN A. HEYMAN, Research Fellow in Chemistry 
(U. S. Public Health Service) 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

M. DAVID RICHMAN, Stalfort Research Fellow in Pharmacy 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1960; M.S., 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

KENNETH R. SCOTT, Research Fellow in Chemistry 
{National Cancer Institute) 

B.s. IN PHARM., Howard University, 1956; M.S., University of Buffalo, 1959. 

Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

MARTIN E. STEIN, Fellow, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education and 
Sydnor Barksdale Penick Memorial Fellow for 1964-65 

B.S. IN PHARM., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1961; M.S., 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Massachusetts, Maryland. 

FRANCIS J. TINNEY, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Cancer Institute) 
B.S. IN PHARM., St. John's University, College of Pharmacy, 1959; M.S., 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

w. DOUGLAS WALKLING, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellow 
in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1963. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

THEODORE H. T. WANG, Postdoctorol Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Insti- 
tutes of Mental Health) 

B.S., Mukden Medical College, China, 1949; M.S., University of Nebraska, 1958; 

PH.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

ALBERT H. WARFIELD, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Mental 
Health) 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1960; M.S., 1963; PH.D., 1965. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

CLARA c. T. WHANG, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Mental 
Health) 

B.A., Clarke College, 1962. 
MU-TSU-wu, Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.sc, National Taiwan University, 1951; d.sc, Tohoku University, 1961. 

Graduate Assistants 

t LARRY L. AUGSBURGER, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

LAWRENCE H. BLOCK, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

YALE CAPLAN, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

t Part time 

xvi 



School of Pharmacy 

DICK T. K. FONG, Assistant in Pharmacy 

R.s. IN PHARM., Philidalphia College of Pharmacy and Sciences, 1963. 

+ GLORY LLEANDER, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Philippines, 1956; M.S., 1961. 

FRANCIS MEYER. Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. IN PHARM.. Loyola College of Pharmacy, New Orleans, 1963. 

R. ALLEN RHODES. Assistant in Chemistry 
B.A.. Bridgewater College, 1963. 

t M. DAVID RICHMAN, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1960; M.S., 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

KAKUBHAi M. voRA, Assistant in Chemistry 

B. PHARM., L. M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat Univ., 1961; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964. 



Laboratory Assistant 

t M. NEAL JACOBS, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



\ 



^ Part time 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Health Sciences Library 

t IDA MARIAN ROBINSON, A.B., B.s.L.s. — Librarian Emeritus 

* HILDA E. MOORE, A.B., A.B.L.s. — Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

EDITH M. COYLE, A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A. — Assistant Librarian for Technical Services 

ELEANOR M. MITTEN, B.S., B.S.L.S. — Assitant Librarian for Readers' Services 

SARAH L. ATKINS — Cataloging Assistant 

ELIZABETH A. FORNEY, A.B., M.s.L.s. — Reference Librarian 

wiLLARD T. FRAMPTON — Library Clark, Stacks 

NORMA E. HANDY — Acquisitions Assistant 

RUTH E. HANNA, A.B., M.S.L.S. — Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 

LORRAINE s. HLAViN — Scrials Assistant - 

siMONE c. HURST — Head, Circulation Department 



t Retired December 31, 1964 

* Appointment eflfective January 25, 1965 



XVll 



University of Maryland 

MARGARET M. JONES, A.B., M.S.L.S. — Catologer 
CHOONG HAN KIM, A.B., M.A.L.S., PH.D. — Cataloger 

HANS-GUENTHER R. LiSTFELDT, B.S., M.S.L.S. — Assistant Serials Librarian 

MARTHA L. LOCHARY — Cataloging Assistant 

BEATRICE MARRIOTT, B.A. — Reference Librarian 

ELIZABETH PALMER — Secretary to the Librarian 

LORENE s. PITA, A.B., M.A.L.s. — Reference Librarian 

R. KAE SARUBiN — Circulation Assistant 

ELWOOD STERLING — Library Assistant 

LENORE A. VARUOLA — Scrials Assistant 

School Of Pharmacy Office Of Administration 
Office Staff 

MARGARET E. BEATTY, Secretary 

AGNES M. FORESTELL, Secretary 

DAISY LOTZ CUE, Secretary 

DORIS M. KENNEDY, Secretary 



XVlll 



The School 



HISTORY AND PROGRAM 

The purposes of the school of pharmacy are to train students for 

the efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct stu- 
dents in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, 
express themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profes- 
sion and citizens of a democracy; to guide students into productive 
scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge and techniques 
in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20. 1840 by a progressive group of Mary- 
land phvsicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in 
Pharmacy to replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, 
incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 
In 1904. the College joined with a group of medical schools and the 
Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in 
the health sciences. The new institution was known as the University of 
Maryland. In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional schools was 
merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form the 
present University of Maryland. 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings constructed 
specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and class- 
rooms are equipped with the most modern apparatus and every aid to 
instruction and for research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
approximately 35,000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, 
the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty and The Johns Hop- 
kins University. The libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 
Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

A minimum of five academic years of satisfactory college work is required 
for the completion of the present pharmacy curriculum of the University of 
Maryland. This five year curriculum meets the minimum requirements 
established by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



University of Maryland 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School 
of the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the 
Graduate School. 

PROGRAM 

At the University of Maryland the five year program consists of two years 
of a pre-professional and a three-year pharmacy program. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

The pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore but may be 
obtained at the College Park Campus of the University or any other 
accredited university or college where appropriate courses are offered.* 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Only the three year professional program is offered in Baltimore. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
FIVE YEAR PROGRAM 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School 
and for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school in Maryland whose secon- 
dary record indicates probable success in the University will be admitted 
provided that: 

1. his scholastic average in major subjects in his last two years in high 
school has been satisfactory; 

2. his program has included the following: 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally ac- 
credited college or university. 



School of Pharmacy 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 
College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 

( 1 ) , plane geometry ( 1 ) and additional units in 

advanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, 

or advanced mathematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 

History and Social Sciences 2 1 

Biological Sciences 1 

Foreign Language — German or French 2 

Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 



Total 16 16 

3. he has had the test results of the American College Testing Program 
submitted to the University Admissions Office; 

4. he has a satisfactory general recommendation from his secondary school 
as to his character and abiUty. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland residents 
(see definition of Residence and Non-Residence, page 12) must also have 
the results of the American College Testing Program and complete high 
school records submitted to the Admissions Office. Only a limited number 
of well qualified out-of-state applicants can be considered for admission 
since first preference in admission is given to Maryland residents. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this 
publication may be obtained by writing to the Catalog Mailing Ofiice, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

AppUcation forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. Applications must be 
made to the Director of Admissions at College Park, Maryland 20742. 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for 
admission. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee 
is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

Beginning with applications for admission to the University for the Fall 
Semester 1965, a Late Application Fee of $25.00 will be assessed against 
those students who apply for admission after the cut-off date of July 15, 
1965. 



University of Maryland 

t Effective September 1, 1965: Annual costs of attending the University 
at College Park for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $250.00; 
instructional materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00; board, $420.00 and 
lodging, $320.00. Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee 
of $400.00 and lodging costs are $420.00. 

Program At College Park Division 



-Semester- 



FiRST Year / // 

Chemistry 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

English 1 — Composition 3 — 

Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics. ... 3 3 

or 
Math. 18, 19 — Introductory and Elementary Analy- 
sis 3 4 

Zoology 1 — General Zoology 4 — 

Botany 1 — General Botany — 4 

Elective (Social Science) * — 3 

Health 5 2 — 

Physical Education 1 1 

Total 17 15-16 



t The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges 
as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to 
the student as low as possible. 

♦Social Science Electfves 

G. and P. 1, American Government 
Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 
Sociology 1, Introduction to Sociology 
Anthropology 1, Introduction to Anthropology 

4 



School of Pharmacy 



Second Year 

English 3. 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 

History* 3 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis 4 
Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics . — 

Elective (Fine Arts or Philosophy)** 3 

Elective*** — 

Total 17 



16 



AFROTC Program 

Effective September 1, 1965 the AFROTC (Air Force Reserve Officer 
Training Corps) program is not required of students but may be vol- 
untarily elected by students whose undergraduate programs require a resi- 
dence of four academic years on the College Park campus. 

Since School of Pharmacy students on the College Park campus advance 
to the professional program at Baltimore after two academic years, it is 
generally not advantageous for them to participate in the program of the 
AFROTC. 



♦The student is required to distribute his work between United States and non-United 
States fields, with three credit hours in each field. Recommended courses are: 



United States History 
Hist. 21, History of the United States 

to 1865 
Hist. 22, History of the United States 

since 1865 
Hist. 23, Social and Cultural History 

of Early America 
Hist. 24, Social and Cultural History 

of Modern America 
Hist. 29, The United States in World 

Affairs 

**Fine Arts or Philosophy Elective. 
Art 10, Introduction to Art 
Art 60 or 61, History of Art 
Art 65 or 66, Masterpieces of Paint- 
ing 
Art 67 or 68, Masterpieces of Sculp- 
ture 
Art 70 or 71, Masterpieces of Ar- 
chitecture 
Art 80, History of American Art 
Dance 32, Introduction to Dance 



Non-United States History 

Hist. 31 or 32, Latin American His- 
tory 
Hist. 41 or 42, Western Civilization 
Hist. 51 or 52, The Humanities 
Hist. 53 or 54, History of England and 

Great Britain 
Hist. 61 or 62, Far Eastern Civiliza- 
tion 
Hist. 71 or 72, Islamic Civilization 



Music 20, Survey of Music Literature 
Speech 16, Introduction to the Theatre 
Philosophy 1, Introduction to Philoso- 
phy 
Philosophy 41, Elementary Logic and 
Semantics 

Ethics 

Philosophy in Litera- 



Philosophy 45, 
Philosophy 52, 

ture 
Philosophy 53, 



Philosophy of Religion 



♦♦♦Elective can be chosen from groups previously described. A fourth semester of 
college English or a 3 hour course in Public Speaking is also acceptable. 



University of Maryland 

General Education Program 

The University of Maryland has instituted a new series of related course 
requirements which together constitute a general education program. 

Essentially this program includes nine semester-hour-credits of English 
(three credits of composition, six of literature); six credits in history; six 
credits chosen from various fields of the social sciences; seven credits in 
science; three credits in mathematics; three credits in fine arts or in philos- 
ophy. 

Two semesters of physical education and a course in health education are 
required of all undergraduates. 

Students in the School of Pharmacy satisfy the mathematics, the science 
and three credits of the social science requirements by pursuing the courses 
identified in the curriculum. 

Greater detail will be found in the brochure: General and Academic 
Regulations, 

Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1 . From College Park Division f 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program at 
College Park with a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) and who 
are in good standing will qualify for advancement to the pharmacy pro- 
gram at Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the 
School of Pharmacy each student will be required to complete a form of 
intent and return it to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Baltunore. 

2. From Other Universities and Colleges t 
A. Prerequisites 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed 
successfully two academic years of work in an accredited college* of arts 
and sciences based upon the completion of a four year high school 
course or the equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course 
must consist of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit exclusive of 
physical education, health, military science or similar courses. The 60 

*Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally 
accredited college or university. 

tStudents who enrolled in a pre-professional pharmacy program before the sunmier 
session of 1964 will be asked to meet the general education requirements set forth 
as "The Program in American Civilization" described in the School of Pharmacy 
catalog (pages 4-5, 1963-64 edition) 



School of Pharmacy 

semester hours must include 9 hours of English, 6 hours of college 
level mathematics (modern mathematics or algebra, trigonometry and 
analytical geometry), 4 hours of botany and 4 hours of zoology (or 8 
hours of general biology), 8 hours of general inorganic chemistry (in- 
cluding qualitative analysis), 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours 
of physics, 3 hours of economics, 6 hours of history, 3 hours of social 
sciences, 3 hours of fine arts or philosophy and the remainder as electives 
from the non-science areas. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
must have attained a prior scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) 
when the lowest passing grade is D (1.0) or its equivalent, and must be 
in good standing. This average of not less than C (2.0) shall be based 
on all college courses previously undertaken by the applicant exclusive 
of credit in military science, physical education, health, hygiene or similar 
courses. 

Students must satisfy as well, any additional qualifications governing 
recommendations for transfer specified by the institution from which the 
student is seeking transfer. Transfer credit is given only for the courses com- 
pleted with a grade of C {2.0) or higher and which are a part of the 
pre-professional curriculum of the School of Pharmacy. 

B. Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore 
should write to the Director of Admissions and Registrations, University 
of Maryland, Room 132, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to 
their applications should communicate with the above office. 

Enrollment in the P re-Professional Program at College Park 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at 
College Park may obtain application blanks by writing to the Admissions 
Office at College Park. Students meeting the requirements for admission 
will receive letters of admission from the Admissions Office at College 
Park. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering 
from the Office of the Registrar at College Park a few weeks prior to 
the September registration period. 

There is a fee of $5.00 for changes in registration made after the first 
week of instruction. 

Enrollment in the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1 . FROM college PARK DIVISION 

Students who had filed with the Dean of the School Pharmacy at Balti- 
more a letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the 



University of Maryland 

curriculum and who have completed the requirements of the pre-profes- 
sional program will be notified by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
that they have qualified for advancement into the professional program. 

These students will receive detailed directions for registering from the 
Baltimore Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September regis- 
tration period. 

2. FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates 
of admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at 
Baltimore. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for regis- 
tering from the Office of the Registrar at Baltimore a few weeks prior 
to the September registration period. 

TUITION AND FEES (Baltimore Campus) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $ 1 35 .00 

Non-Residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 

^Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

"^ Special Fee (per annum) 10.00 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 

all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester are 
payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student Union fee 
and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of first registration. 
Students wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment of tui- 
tion charges must do so with the Financial Office at or prior to 
registration for the semester for which such charges are imposed. 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 

8 



School of Pharmacy 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only (Not applicable to students accepted from 
School of Pharmacy. College Park) 

Application fee (non-returnable) $7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition. ) 

For Candidates for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in 
excess of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each course. 
Fee for Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 

PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) $15.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 10.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 15.00 

Pharmacognosy 5.00 

Pharmacology 10.00 

Pharmacy 10.00 

Physiology 10.00 

* Student Union Fee (per annum) 6.00 

* Student Union Fee (Summer Session) 6.00 
Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 



*The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all 
full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus 
and is used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students 
enrolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student 
Union Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as 
much as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student Union 
Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 



University of Maryland 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Matriculation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) $10.00 

fTuition fee (per semester hour each semester) 18.00 
Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 

*Student Union Fee (per annum for full time students) 30.00 

* Special Fee {per annum for full time students only) 10.00 

''^Student Union Fee (Summer Session, all students) 6.00 

^Student Union Fee (per annum, part time students) 6.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree $10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 50.00 

An additional $10.00 as a penalty fee will be assessed against those students 
who fail to apply for graduation within the first eight weeks of a regular 
academic semester or the first three weeks of a summer session. 

Students who apply after the end of the twelfth week of a regular academic 
semester and those who apply after the end of the fourth week of a 
summer session will be required to wait for the next academic semester 
in order to obtain a diploma. 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Withdrawals from School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School he must 
file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. 
A student who does not comply with the above regulation is not issued 
an honorable dismissal and is not accorded any refund to which he might 
otherwise be entitled. 

Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent or guardian. 



♦The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 
tThe $18.00 rate applies to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without 
regard to the location at which the course is given and will apply to audited courses 
as well as courses taken for credit. 

10 



School of Pharmacy 



1. REFUND of fees UPON WITHDRAWAL. 



Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation Fee, Student Activ- 
ities Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition and any scholarship credit, are 
refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following sched- 
ule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 

2. GRADES 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Any student who ( 1 ) fails to withdraw from any course or from the school 
in the required manner or (2) who registers, does not attend classes and 
does not withdraw, will receive grades of F in all courses for which he has 
registered. 

Textbooks 

Each student is required to have his own textbooks. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 



Tuition and Fees for Pre-professional Program 
{College Park Campus) 

See pages 3 and 4 for summary statements and consult "An Adventure in 
Learning" which is available from College Park, Maryland. 

Changes in Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 



11 



University of Maryland 

Definition of Residence and Non-residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for 
at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six 
months. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be established by him prior to the 
registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services 
while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six^ 
months period referred to above except in those cases in which the adult 
was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into 
the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 



Academic Regulations {College Park Campus) 

Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in the 
official "University General and Academic Regulations." 

Academic Regulations {Baltimore Campus) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final exam- 
ination in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are nor- 
mally counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more 
than half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half 
a period are also construed as an absence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion 
of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

12 



School of Pharmacy 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant per- 
mission for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 


Interpretation 


Point Value 


A 


Excellent 




4 


B 


Good 




3 


C 


Fair 




2 


D 


Poor but passing 




1 


F 


Failure 







I 


Course work incomplete 


replaced by definite 








grade when course 








requirements have 








been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g. : 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


Chemistry 


4 


C 


8 


Microbiology 


4 


C 


8 


Pharmacognosy 


4 


B 


12 


Pharmacy 


4 


A 


16 


Pharmacy Administration 


3 


D 


3 



19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade point average of 2.47. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland are considered. 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE V^ARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Seven weeks after the beginning of each semester, 
the Dean warns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades 
of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to 
a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 

13 



University of Maryland 

because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the 
instructor enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above 
with an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases when 
this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by the 
instructor by the end of the next semester in which that subject is again 
offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeatmg the course. A student who repeats a course 
in which he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at 
the University, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, 
including regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he 
wiU not receive any additional credit for the course completed with a 
passing grade. 

K the work is completed at the University of Maryland his final mark 
will be substituted for the mark already recorded. Although the final 
mark received in the course will be used in determining credit for pro- 
motion and graduation, it does not apply to honors and awards. See 
applicable section imder "Honors and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the Dean to repeat the course or its 
equivalent, at another university or college, the regulations applicable to 
transfer of credit apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with 
a grade of C (2.0) or higher; for purposes of computing grade averages, 
transfer credit is considered as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in 
raising his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to 
withdraw from the School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student 
may be permitted with the written permission of the Dean and the head 
of the department giving the course, to repeat the course for the second 
time. Such permission can be given to the student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above 
regulation must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will 
be granted under unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall 
require the approval of the head of the department giving the course. 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who 
is permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements 
for the degree from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

All students are expected to maintain a grade average of not less than 
C (2.0) for each semester. Any student who fails to maintain a grade 

14 



ScHCX)L OF Pharmacy 

average of C (2.0) for any semester will be placed on probation during 
the next semester. Students in the Fifth Year Class must maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) to become eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semes- 
ter hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed 
on probation during the next semester. 

Any student on probation must pass all courses for which he is registered 
and must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) or he will be automat- 
ically dropped from the School of Phaimacy at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in any semester shall be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatis- 
factory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then 
obtains a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be 
automatically dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may 
apply in writing to the Dean for readmission after a lapse of at least one 
semester. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that 
semester. 

Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be 
readmitted only once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a recon- 
sideration of his particular case. 

♦elective PROGRAMS AT BALTIMORE 

1. Fourth Year Electives 

Students shall elect either the General Pharmacy Major or the Pre- 
Graduate Major by May 1 of the Third Year. 

Students to be eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major must have estabUshed 
the aptitudes for the successful pursuit of graduate work and must meet 

*The elective program must be approved by the Class Adviser and the Dean. For 
additional information consult with the Class Adviser and see the respective curricula 
on pages 32 and 33. 

15 



University of Maryland 

the necessary prerequisites. Those eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major 
may postpone the selection of this elective until the following year and 
thus will pursue the General Pharmacy Major during the Fourth Year. 

Students not qualifying for the Pre-Graduate Major will be required to 
pursue the General Pharmacy Major. 

2. Fijth Year Elect ives 

Students must make elective selections by May 1 of the Fourth Year. 

The General Pharmacy Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue 
with the General Pharmacy Major and choose between Pharmacognosy 
52, Animal Health Products and Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Derma- 
tological Preparations or (b), elect the prescribed Hospital Major pro- 
gram or (c) if approved as eligible, transfer to the Pre-Graduate Program 
and will enroll in Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus and Pharmacy 161, 162, 
Special Problems. 

The Pre-Graduate Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue 
with the Pre-Graduate Major, will enroll in Chemistry 187, 189, Physical 
Chemistry (Lectures) and choose between Chemistry 188, 190, Physical 
Chemistry Laboratory and Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems or 
(b) transfer to the Hospital Major and follow the prescribed program. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS—PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the Professional 
Program with a grade average of C (2.0) in addition to the Pre- 
Professional requirements will be classified as students of the Fourth 
Year Class. 

General Pharmacy Majors of the Fourth Year Class who have completed 
71 credit hours of the Professional Program with a grade average of 
C (2.0) will be classified as Fifth Year Students. Pre-Graduate Majors 
of the Fourth Year Class in order to advance in the Pre-G^-aduate Pro- 
gram and attain the classification of the Fifth Year Class must have 
completed 73 credit hours of the Professional Program with an academic 
quality indicative of the successful pursuit of graduate work. 

Students of the Fifth Year Class to be considered as candidates for 
graduation must have maintained a grade average of at least C (2.0) 
and have completed minimum credit hours of the Professional Program 
according to the following: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 credit hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the General Pharmacy Major 108 credit hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the Pre-Graduate Major 110 credit hours 

(d) Pre-Graduate Majors who have followed this 

elective area for one or two years .... 110 credit hours 

16 



School of Pharmacy 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon stu- 
dents who have successfully completed the pre-professional program and 
the three years required for the professional program in most of the ac- 
credited schools of pharmacy in the United States. At the School of Phar- 
macy at Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred 
upon students who have met successfully all the requirements and have 
spent at least the Fifth Year in residence at the School of Pharmacy at 
Baltimore. The student must have been accredited with instruction in the 
professional program as follows: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 semester hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the General Pharmacy Major 108 semester hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the Pre-Graduate Major 110 semester hours 

(d) Pre-Graduate Majors who have pursued 

this elective area for one or two years 110 semester hours 

In addition, all students must have attained the required grade point 
standings and must have met other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance 
of transcripts are as follows: one copy of a student's records is made 
without charge; for additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for 
each transcript. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions. Government agencies, etc., as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy and 
the honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

17 



University of Maryland 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this State shall not later than thirty days after enrolling, 
file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an applica- 
tion for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application 
he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may deem 
appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said appUcation, shall 
pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, 
at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit to the 
said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drug store experience 
acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE MARYLAND BOARD 
OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board 
of Pharmacy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the 
age of twenty-one years, is a graduate of an accredited school or college 
of pharmacy, and has completed one year as a registered apprentice in 
a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board of Pharmacy for such 
purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store 
or pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school 
or college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college 
of pharmacy. Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience 
as a registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from 
an accredited school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy 
approved by the Board for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy, 301 Wesi Preston Street, Baltunore, Mary- 
land 21201, for further information relative to the requirements for 
eligibility for licensure. 

DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detri- 
mental to his or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct 
is not satisfactory to the authorities of the University. 

Students of the last classification may be asked to withdraw even though 
no specific charge be made against them. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation 

18 



School of Pharmacy 

and completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of 
opportunities to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that 
students refrain from working during the school session. 

HOUSING 

1. WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the 
Louisa Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close prox- 
imity to the School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommo- 
dations and it is under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. 
Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, blankets, pillows, 
bureau scarves, curtains, desk lamp, iron, small rugs and a laundry bag. 
Students may obtain towels and bed linens through a designated commercial 
rental service. Although students may provide their own bed linens and 
towels they are not permitted to launder these items in Louisa Parsons 
Hall. The individual student assumes responsibility for all the dormitory 
property assigned to her. Any damage done to property other than that 
which results from ordinary wear and tear will be charged to the student 
concerned. 

The room rates are as follows: As of September 1, 1965, the cost of all 
accommodations (singles as well as doubles) will be the same — $160.00 
per semester. Single rooms generally are not available. The room charge 
will appear on the student's bill, payable at the time of registration. 

Meals may be purchased at the Baltimore Union Cafeteria or in nearby 
restaurants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in The Baltimore Union. 
For particulars, see section immediately below. 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accom- 
modations for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned 
building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, 
laundry facilities, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on 
each floor. Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made 
for rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The con- 
tract for accommodations covers the 1965-1966 academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

Double Room Rates: 

$160.00 per semester (per person) 

$ 80.00 per eight weeks summer session (per person) 

19 



University of Maryland 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 
Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book 
shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. Maid service 
will include cleaning of room twice per week and replacement of change 
of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's office. Mail service is 
also provided. 

The resident provides blankets, pillow, towels and linens of which 
the latter two must be rented through the designated commercial rental 
service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 

TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 



$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 



What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath towel, one face towel, one face cloth, 

soap and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

PARKING 

The expansion program for the Baltimore Campus places a premium on 
space for parking on University lots. 

Student use of parking facilities on a temporary basis in certain designated 
University areas is contingent upon the availability of space. Admission 
of students to University parking lots will be by authorized identification 
cards only. These cards bearing an expiration date are issued by the 
Office of the Dean. 

Parking rates are forty-five cents per day, payable daily. 
20 



School of Pharmacy 

THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

The library facilities are excellent. The new Health Sciences Library which 
serves the School of Pharmacy, as well as the Schools of Dentistry, Medi- 
cine, Nursing, and Social Work contains over 100,000 bound volumes 
and regularly receives approximately 2,200 scientific periodicals. 

The Rules and Regulations by the library are available for distribution 
to students at all times. 

PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. 
The first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thomp- 
son was designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was 
subsequently held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. 
Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of up to SI 800.00 for single persons or up to $2400.00 for 
married individuals who are promising graduate students desirous of 
doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
and pharmacognosy; students may also apply for an additional allowance 
up to 5600.00 for tuition, fees, and supplies. These fellowships are open 
only to citizens of the United States. Address applications directly to the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 777 Fourteenth 
Street, N.W., Washington 5, D.C.. between February 15 and March 15 
for consideration for the forthcoming September. 

The H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a distinguished alumnus of the School 

of Pharmacy, former associate professor of chemistry and prominent 
manufacturing pharmacist of Baltimore had bequeathed a sum of money 
to endow a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellow- 
ship previously supported annually, since 1930 by contributions from Dr. 
Dunning, is open to promising graduate students interested in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two 
fellowships for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, phar- 
maceutical chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

21 



University of Maryland 

The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the 
Faculty Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Edwin D. Staljort and Arthur /. Stalfort Memorial Grant 

In memory of Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort, the John C. 
Stalfort & Sons Company, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, has provided a 
grant of $4000.00 per annum to the Department of Pharmacy to support 
pharmaceutical research. A portion of this grant is to be utilized to 
provide a graduate fellowship. 

OTHER RESEARCH GRANTS 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has substantial grants from 
the National Institutes of Health. The Department of Anatomy and Physi- 
ology has been awarded grants as follows : one from the National Institutes 
of Health, and one from the National Aeronautics and Space Administra- 
tion. Through these grants, the School of Pharmacy is able to provide a 
number of research fellowships available to graduate and post-doctoral 
students in pharmaceutical chemistry and physiology. 

SPECIAL GRANTS 

The FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, has provided funds to 
the Department of Pharmacy for the procurement of specialized research 
equipment. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $2400.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to 
qualified students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching serv- 
ices to the departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually 
carry two-thirds of the normal graduate work. 

Residency in Hospital Pharmacy 

University (of Maryland) Hospital 

The Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital together with 
the School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland offer annually, to qualified graduate pharmacists, residencies 
in hospital pharmacy. The appointments beginning July 1 are for twenty- 
four months. During the period of appointment the resident divides 
his time between hospital pharmacy service and graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science degree granted by the University of Maryland 
and a certificate of residency to be awarded by the University Hospital. 
Full time training will be required during the summer of 1965. Two 
weeks of vacation are allowed during the term of appointment. The 

22 



School of Pharmacy 

University Hospital provides a stipend of $3000.00 per year for the 
first year as Assistant Resident. Completion of the Assistant Residency 
leads to appointment as Resident with a stipend of $3800.00 per year. 
Parking space, uniforms and laundering of uniforms are free of charge. 
The residents must pay the tuition, laboratory and other fees for graduate 
work in the University. 

Complete information on this program may be secured by addressing 
inquires to the Director of Pharmaceutical Services, University Hospital, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201, or to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and 
loans should be directed to: 

Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships* 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-profes- 
sional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. These schol- 
arships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarships* 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually 
scholarships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 
ness, moral character, scholastic achievement and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceding $500.00 per academic year 
is used in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These 
scholarships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships* 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several schol- 
arships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 

* These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in- 
Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of 
the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. 

23 



University of Maryland 

ness, scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year 
is applied to defray partially the fees and expenses at College Park, 
Maryland. Recipients must have been residents of the State of Mary- 
land for at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available 
consult the University bulletin "An Adventure in Learning" available from 
College Park, Maryland. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed 
to Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 2120L The selection of the 
recipients of the scholaships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunc- 
tion with a committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per 
semester to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their 
education. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes avail- 
able scholarships worth not less than $100.00 per semester to qualified i 
students of the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. ■ 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and alumni have made an endow- 
ment for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation Scholarship Sponsored by 
the National Association of Retail Druggists 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation sponsored by the National Association 
of Retail Druggists provides annually a scholarship m the amount of 
$200.00. The scholarship grant open to a qualified student of the Third, 
Fourth or Fifth Year Class is awarded on the basis of character, scholar- 
ship and financial need. 

24 



School of Pharmacy 

The J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarships 

In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, a former student of the 
School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jcannctte Joseph provided a generous 
bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who have 
maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial 
assistance. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually 
by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, to a Fifth Year student who has shown superior proficiency in 
practical and commercial pharmacy. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus 
of the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese 
Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be 
awarded annually to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The 
recipient of the award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The William J. Lowry Alumni Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of her late husband, Dr. William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus 
of the Maryland College of Pharmacy, Class of 1896, and in 1926 a prime 
motivator in the reorganization and reactivation of the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Mrs. William J. 
Lowry has provided the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy a 
sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The 
recipient of this award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund to provide two 
undergraduate scholarships of $500 each, open to citizens of the United 
States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc., 
may appoint a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed 
annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

The Paulson-Krostar Scholarship Fund 

In memory of their parents, David and Deborah Paulson and Jacob and 
Fannie Krostar, Mr. Aaron Paulson, alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, 

25 



University of Maryland 

Class of 1924 and Mrs. Rosalie Krostar Paulson contributed the sum 
of $600.00 as a scholarship fund. Awards are based on scholarship 
and need. 

Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association 
provides a scholarship in the amount of $200.00 to be awarded to a 
student who has maintained a superior academic record and who is in 
need of financial assistance. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharma- 
ceutical Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a 
student who has maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in 
need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 to $150.00 per semester 
to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory 
of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to 
qualified students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are 
made upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund 

The family of Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld have established a loan fund as 
a memorial to him. This fund is available fo qualified needy students. 
Loans from the fund are made upon the recommendation of the Dean 
and the Grants-in-Aid Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 

NDEA Student Loans 

The National Defense Education Act of 1958 provides funds for student 
loans. A student may borrow in one year a sum not exceeding $1000 and 
during his entire course of study may borrow a sum not exceeding $5000. 
The borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and 
repayment terms estabUshed by the University. Repayment of the loan 
begins one year after the borrower ceases to be a full time student and 
must be completed within ten years thereafter. No interest is charged 
on the loan until the beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after 
that date is to be paid at the rate of 3 per cent per annum. 

26 



School of Pharmacy 

Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation 

Loans up to $1,000.00 per year are available from many Maryland banks 
to students who are residents of the State of Maryland, have completed one 
year or more of study at the University of Maryland and are making normal 
progress toward graduation. Maximum interest on such loans is 6 per 
cent simple, and repayment is due within 36 months after the student 
ceases to be a full time student. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more 
than one-fifth of the graduating class in each college including the School 
of Pharmacy. The honor designations are listed in the commencement 
program and are recorded on the recipents' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two 
academic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or 
higher. Those in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors 
and those in the second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. 
Students whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
Academic Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if 
a student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned 
for these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fra- 
ternity for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at 
the University in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are 
eligible by invitation to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the 
first semester of the Third Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national Honorary pharmaceutical society, 
was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for 
chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or 
colleges who are members in good standing of the American Association 

27 



University of Maryland 

of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality and 
leadership. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general 
average, provided that this average is not below the grade of "B." Cer- 
tificates of Honor are awarded to the three students having the next 
highest general averages, provided these averages do not fall below the 
grade of "B." 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the 
Fourth Year Class having the highest general averages, provided these 
averages do not fall below the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered 
in awarding these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical 
and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. 
In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is 
guided in his judgment of the student's ability by observation and personal 
contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of phar- 
macy at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a 
gold medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a can- 
didate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior 
proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and 
dispensing pnarmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, 

28 



School of Pharmacy 

the income from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
of the School to the Fifth Year student who has done exceptional work 
throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late 
son, Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, 
Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner 
Brill, have provided a fund the income of which is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a Fifth Year student for meritorious academic 
achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink, '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
United States Dispensatory as a prize to the Fifth Year student recom- 
mended by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice 
of pharmacy. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha 
Zeta Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the 
Fifth Year student chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in 
pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
provides annually a key which is awarded to the Fifth Year student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy 
Administration. 

Merck Award 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offers a set of valuable 
reference books to the Fifth Year student who attains a high standing 
in pharmacy or pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc., Award 

A copy of Gould's "Medical Dictionary" is made available by Bristol 
Laboratories, Inc., to the Fifth Year student who has contributed the 
most to pharmacy through his extra-curricular activities. 

Rexall Award 

The Rexall Drug Company provides a Mortar and Pestle Trophy to the 
Fifth Year student who has demonstrated outstanding quaUties of both 
leadership and scholarship. 

29 



University of Maryland 



Extra Curricular Awards 



Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the 
School in extra curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the 
School of Pharmacy Convocations. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an or- 
ganization of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding 
in the internal administration of the school for organizing all extra curricu- 
lar programs and activities of the student body and for coordinating these 
programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administration to 
foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council of 
the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Govern- 
ment AUiance, the Presidents of the respective classes and one delegate 
elected from each undergraduate class. 

The American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association Student Chapter, University of Maryland, School 
of Pharmacy 

The purpose of the Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest and 
more liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as 
a profession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution 
of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the Constitution of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, respectively, especially in foster- 
ing education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its 
application and aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, 
Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy established the Inter-Professional Stu- 
dent Senate for purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships 
among the Professional Schools and the University Units at College Park. 
The Senate is comprised of representatives from each of the five profes- 
sional schools. 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association (1964-1965) 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 
1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing 
committee known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties 

30 



\ 



School of Pharmacy 

of this group are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to 
the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present mem- 
bers of the Committee are: 

Irving I. Cohen, Chairman 

James P. Cragg, Jr., Co-Chairman 
Paul R. Bergeron, II Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr. 

Stuart Friedel Gordon A. Mouat 

Ronald M. Hopkins Samuel I. Raichlen 

Aaron M. Libowitz Jacob H. Sapperstein 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its 
separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Association 
of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organization 
of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant until 
June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is more 
evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 

Officers (1964-1965) 

Alexander J. Ogrinz, Jr. (1934) Honorary President 

Robert J. Kokoski (1952) President 

Harold P. Levin ( 1943) 1st Vice President 

Aaron M. Libowitz (1932) 2nd Vice President 

Frank J. Slama (1924) Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield (1924) Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Milton A. Friedman (1934) — Chairman 

Maurice T. Commings (1951) 

John F. Fader, II (1963) 

Nathan I. Gruz (1939) 

Casimir T. Ichniowski (1929) 

Bernard B. Lachman (1945) 

Solomon Weiner (1924) 



31 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Course 


•1 
% 

5 


>» 

•§ 
^ 


1 


1 


•5 
u 
ei 
'V 

Q 




1 


5 


Third Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 


2 
3 


6 

4 


8 

7 


4 
4 










Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32, Principles 
of Organic Chemistry 


3 
2 


4 
6 


7 
8 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34, Quantitative 


4 


Pharmacy 31, Mathematics of the 


3 
3 
2 


._-_ 


3 

6 1 
2 


3 

4 

9 




Pharmacy 33, 34, Processes and Dosage Forms— 
Pharmacy 35, Professional Communications 


3 1 

1 


3 


6 


4 


--!— J 


3 1 
2 

1 


_____ 

1 


3 

5 1 

1 


3 












3 




1 
2 


— _— 


1 

1 1 

6 

1 






Fourth Year (Required) 


17 
_____ 


18 


Microbiology 41, Pharmaceutical Microbiology- 
Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology, 






1 




2 


4 



6 

1 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Principles of 

l-linpVipmi<5trv 


4 
2 

2 1 

1 


4 
3 

4 


8 
5 
6 


5 
3 
3 




Pharmacognosy 41, 42, General Pharmacognosy. 
Pharmacy 43, 44, Pharmaceutical Technology — 
Physiology 142 General Physiology 


2 
2 
3 


3 
4 
6 


5 
6 
9 


3 
3 
5 


fP.lorfivOQ 








3-4 


3-4 




3 




3 










JCElectives — General Pharmacy Major) 

Pharmacy Administration 41, Marketing 

Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 


18-19 
3 


18-19 


2 

4 
4 


3 
3 


5 
4 

7 




3 


J(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major) 
fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 

3 
1 
2 

2 

3 


3 
3 
3 


4 

6 
4 
5 

2 

3 


4 
2 
3 

2 

3 

5-6 



19-20 


4 


Fifth Year (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology 


6 


Pharmacy 153, 154, Dispensing 


2 
2 
3 


3 


5 

2 

s 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharma- 
ceutical Jurisprudence 


2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, 

Chemistry of Medicinal Products 


3 


tElectives 


5-6 
















18-19 


t(Electives — General Pharmacy Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists. 
Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


2 


3 


5 










3 

2 
2 




1 3 


3 
R 

5 

2 


3 


OR 
Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 


2 

2 
2 


3 


2 

5 
2 


2 

3 
2 


2 


t (Electives— Hospital Major) 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists- 
Pharmacy 157, Hospital Pharmacy 












Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 


2 
2 

3 

R 

4 


3 
6 


5 

2 

3 
I 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 158, Hospital Pharmacy 
Administration II 










2 


$ (Electives— Pre-Graduate Major) 

Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 


3 


6 


3 
6 


3 

1 
2 


2 

4 
2 


3 
2 


OR 

fPharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems 






1 

4 
1 


3 
--. 


4 

4 
4 


6 

. '~6~" 


6 

. 4 
6 


2 


J (Electives— Pre-Graduate Major) 

(Transfers from General Pharmacy Major) 

fMathematics 20, 21, Calculus 


4 


tPharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems 


2 



t Required of Fifth-Year students transferring from General Pharmacy Major to Prer 

Graduate Major. See pages 15 and 16. 
t The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM— REQUIRED PROGRAM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Coarse 


DidacUc 


Laboratory 


ToUl 


Credit Hoora 


Third Year 

Anatomy 31 


82 
96 
82 
48 
96 
32 
48 
32 


96 

128 

96 


128 

224 

128 

48 

192 

32 

48 

80 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 80. 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 84 


8 

4 
8 


Pharmacy 33, 34 


96 


8 




2 






8 


Pharmacy Administration 36 


48 


3 


Total 


416 

16 
32 
32 

64 
64 
64 
48 


464 


880 

16 
96 
96 
128 
160 
192 
144 


85 


Fourth Year 
First Aid 1 




Microbiology 41 


64 
64 
64 
9*5 
128 
96 


4 


Microbiolofiry 146 


4 


Phamaceutical Chemistry 149 

Pharmacognosy 41, 42 


5 
6 


Pharmacy 43, 44_- 


6 


Physiology 142 


5 


Total- 


320 

112 
16 
64 
64 
96 


512 

96 
48 
96 


832 

208 
64 

160 
64 
96 


30 


Fifth Year 

Pharmacology 155, 156 


9 




2 


Pharmacy 153, 154 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152___ 


4 
6 


Total 


352 


240 


592 


27 







PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM— ELECTIVE PROGRAMS* 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit Houra 


Fourth Year 

(General Pharmacy Major) 
Pharmacy Administration 41 


48 
32 

128 

32 

48 

32 
64 

32 
32 
32 
32 

96 




48 
80 

128 

80 
48 
r 

60 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 
192 

160 

128 
160 




Pharmac/' Administration 42 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 
Mathematics 20. 21 


48 




Fifth Year 

(General Pharmacy Major) 


48 








or 
Pharmacy 156 _ 


o 

48 




Pharmacy Administration 53, 54_ 




(Hospital Major) 


48 










48 




Pharmacy 158 _ 




(Pre-Graduate Major) 
Chemistry 187, 189 






Chemistry 188, 190 


192 

o 
144 




or 
Pharmacy 161, 162 


16 

128 
16 




(Pre-Graduate Major) 
(Transfers from General Pharmacy 
Major) 
Mathematics 20 21 


8 


Pharmacy 161, 162 


144 


4 



Fourth Year 

General Pharmacy Major. 

Pre-Graduate Major 

Fifth Year 
General Pharmacy Major- 



Hospital Major 

Pre-Graduate Major 



Pre-Graduate Major 

(Transfers from General Pharmacy 

Major) 



fTOTALS OF HOURS 

80 
128 

144 

128 
128 
96 

112 

144 



AND CREDITS 

48 



48 
or 

96 

96 

192 



144 
144 



128 
128 

192 

224 
224 

288 

256 



• The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 

t Minimum credit hour requirements of instruction in the Professional Curriculum are : 
(a) General Pharmacy Major, 108 credit hours; (b) Hospital Major, 108 credit hours; 

(c) Hospital Major (Transfers from Pre-Graduate Major), 110 credit hours; and 

(d) Pre-Graduate Major, 110 credit hours. Also, consult pages 15 and 17 concerning 
electives and requirements for graduation. 



Description of Courses 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 
ANATOMY 

31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Fredericks.) 
A study of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. The course 
is designed to provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 
particular emphasis on human structures. 

FIRST AID 

1. First Aid Course. (0) 

Fourth Year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson, 
instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

20, 21. Calculus. (4, 4) 

Fourth Year and Fifth Year, four lectures (Dean.) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 18, 19 and/or approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, 
kinematics, integration, geometric and physical application on integration, par- 
tial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. Sample space, events, 
probability and its basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random 
variables, distribution functions (continuous and discrete); typical distributions, 
expectations, moments, generating functions; transformations of random varia- 
bles, limit theorems. (Dean.) 

132. Introduction TO Statistics. (3) 

Second semester, three lectures and one hour of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 130. Sampling distributions, elements of point and set estima- 
tion, maximum likelihood principle, testing statistical hypotheses, standard 
tests. Neyman-Pearson lemma and problems of optimality of tests, linear 
hypotheses, sequential methods. (Dean.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology. (4) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay, Becker and Krywolap.) 

34 



School of Pharmacy 

Prerequisites. Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. This course is designed es- 
pecially for pharmacy students and includes practice and theoretical considera- 
tion of bacteria, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, viruses, rickettsia, yeasts 
and molds. 

Laboratory teaching includes methods of staining and the preparation of media; 
cultural characteristics of bacteria; emphasis is given to the study of disinfec- 
tants, antiseptics, germicides and sterilization, antibiotics and their antibacterial 
action, microbiological assay, sensitivity testing and virus techniques. Experi- 
ments are included for the bacteriological evaluation of milk, water, food and 
air. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health 

AND Parasitology. (4) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay, Becker and Krywolap) 
Prerequisite, Microbiology 41. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products such as sera, vaccines, toxins, 
toxoids, etc. Special attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and ani- 
mals to sensitizing substances, drug idiosyncracies, hay fever, food allergies, 
contact dermatosis, and animal inoculation. Part of the course is devoted to the 
study of Public Health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections, immunity, transmission, diagnosis, treat- 
ment and prevention of parasitic diseases. 

For Graduates 
200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1). 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media, (1, 1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

211. Public Health. (1-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite, Microbiology 41, 146. Lectures and discussions on the organiza- 
tion and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

399. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by the amount of work performed. (Shay.) 

35 



University of Maryland 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

30, 32. Principles of Organic Chemistry. (4, 4) 
Third Year, two lectures, one recitation, one laboratory. 

(Miller, Meyer and Rhodes) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry. 

34. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Zenker, Caplan and Vora.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32 or equivalent. A study of quan- 
titative analytical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
oflScial preparations with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, or equivalent. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. 

149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Fourth Year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Zenker, Caplan and Vora.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 34. Lectures and laboratory exer- 
cises devoted to the composition of living organisms and the chemical and 
physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A survey of the structural 
relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally of organic medici- 
nal products. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 19, 30, 32, Physics 10, 11, Mathematics 20, 21. A study 
of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two laboratories. (Leslie and Rhodes.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 187, 189 or concurrent registration. Quantitative ex- 
periments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and 
acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

210, 211. Techniques of Chemical Research. (3,3) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143, 187-190 or concurrent registration. Lectures 

36 



School of Pharmacy 

and laboratory exercises devoted to the systematic separation, characterization 
and identification of organic structures by chemical and instrumental methods, 
to the synthetis of organic structures of the more difficult types, including iso- 
topically labeled compounds, and to isotope counting techniques, 

230. Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of prog- 
ress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles of stereochemistry 
of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and synthesis of 
heterocyclic compounds. 

250. Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the synthesis and structure deter- 
mination of steroids and the application of modern chemical concepts to the 
chemistry of steroids. 

252. ALKALoros. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles involved in struc- 
ture determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alkaloidal classes. 

253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Doorenbos.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143, 151, 152 or permission of 
the instructor. A study of structural relationships and basic principles con- 
cerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, e.g., structure 
activity relationships, physical properties and biological activity, cellular trans- 
port, drug, protein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and physico- 
chemical mechanisms of drug action. 

271. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149; Chemistry 189. The application 
of physical chemistry principles to biological systems, and a discussion of the 
physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. 

272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of particular in- 
terest in the pharmaceutical sciences, including surface chemistry, colloids, 
kinetics, coUigative properties and absorption spectroscopy. 

37 



University of Maryland 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 
One laboratory. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are necessary for, 
and a part of, a larger research effort. 

281. Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 

Two lectures. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of the design, the 

mode of action at the enzymatic level and the metabolism of biochemical 
analogs. 

282. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. 
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of modem techniques and 
metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug metabolism. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

4L Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Jacobs.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of crude vegetable drugs with special emphasis on 
the physical and microscopical characteristics used in their identification and in 
the detection of adulteration. 

42. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama, Euler and Jacobs.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacognosy 41. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 41 with 
instruction covering drugs of animal origin and allergy-producing pollens. 
Special emphasis is placed upon official and non-official chemical tests used 
in the identification of drugs and their constituents. 

5L Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists. (3) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

A discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 
and the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; their 
recognition, life history, and methods of control. 

52. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42; Pharmacology 155. 
A study of principal pharmaceutical agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

38 



School of Pharmacy 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be 
given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. Lectures and laboratory work covering 
advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 
roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs 
and spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice 
in identification and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not 
ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be 
given to practical problems and to the identification and detection of adulter- 
ants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 



PHARMACOLOGY 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

155, 156. Pharmacology, General. (4, 5) 

Fifth Year, three lectures and one laboratory first semester; four lectures and 
one laboratory second semester. (Ichniowski and Diamond.) 

Prerequisites, Physiology 142; Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or consent of 
the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward 
effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156. A study of the methods of biological 
assay official in the United States Pharmacopeia and the National Formu- 
lary. 

39 



University of Maryland 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacology 171. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156, and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay 

Methods. (2-4), (2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the develop- 
ment of biological assay methods and comparative standards. 

399. Research in Pharmacology. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

PHARMACY 

31. Mathematics of the Pharmaceutical Sciences. (3) 

Third Year, first semester, three lectures. (Allen and Leslie.) 

Applied calculations in all fields of pharmaceutical sciences with emphasis on 
problem solving in systems of measurement, aliquot methods, alligation, HLB 
systems, isotonicity, chemical reactions, commercial problems, drug absorption, 
and the interpretation and evaluation of experimental data. 

33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms. (4, 4) 

Third Year, three lectures and one laboratory. (Lemy and Block.) 

Pharmacy 31 and 33 are prerequisites to Pharmacy 34. Commentary on the 
official compendia of pharmacy. Includes pharmaceutical manipulations and 
processes for preparing official dosage forms. Particular emphasis is placed on 
physical and chemical properties of ingredients, common nomenclature and 
synonyms, storage conditions and uses. 

35. Professional Communications. (2) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures. (Ballman.) 

Oral and written expression on subjects of pharmaceutical use and interest. 
Bibliographical methods, oral and written reports and communications, con- 
duct of discussion groups, audio-visual aids. 

38. History of Pharmacy. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

A survey of the history of pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 
those aspects of science most pertinent to the interests of the pharmacist. Re- 
search papers and reports required. 

40 



School of Pharmacy 
43, 44. Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3) 

Fourth Year, two lectures, one laboratory and one recitation. 

(Shangraw and Fong.) 
Prerequisites. Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. TTie physical-chemical principles in- 
volved in pharmaceutical systems and the application of this knowledge to the 
development, preparation and packaging of medicinal formulations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

151. Professional Pharmacy. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. 

(Shangraw and Lamy.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Preparation for the major fields of pharmaceutical 
specialization by rotation through the school model pharmacy and manufac- 
turing pharmacy laboratories as well as the inpatient and outpatient hospital 
pharmacy departments. 

153, 154. Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen, Block and Fong.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Professional laboratory practice and other special- 
ized activities pertaining to prescriptions, including an evaluation of com- 
pounding aids and commercial pharmaceuticals. 

156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Allen and Block.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 153. A study of the composition and manufacture of 
preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of cold cream, 
vanishing cream, protective cream, hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face 
powder, dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, toothpaste, deodorants, depilatories, 
suntan preparations, etc. The acid-mantle of the skin and hypoallergenic prep- 
arations are also emphasized. 

157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration I. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures. (Purdum and Lamy.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. The fundamentals of hospital pharmacy practice 
and administration. Includes a study of the history and development of hos- 
pital pharmacy, physical facilities, minimum standards, purchasing, the formu- 
lary, record keeping, and dispensing practices. 

158. Hospital Pharmacy Administration II. (2) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures. (Lamy.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 157. An orientation to the function of the hospital 
pharmacy within the hospital. A study of the administrative organization of 
a hospital and the interrelationship of the various hospital departments with 
the hospital pharmacy. 

161, 162. Special Problems. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 20, 21 or concurrent registration. Independent in- 
vestigations in the several pharmaceutical sciences, consisting of library and 
laboratory research and seminars. (Staff.) 

41 



University of Maryland 



For Graduates 



201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 153, 154. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications, patents and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. INDUSTRUL Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Phar- 
macy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and im- 
portant pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1, 1) 

One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the 
pharmaceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 156, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development 
of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Purdum.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. (Lamy.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research 
and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. (Allen.) 
A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 

(Foss, Purdum, Allen, Shangraw and Lamy.) 



42 



School of Pharmacy 



PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 



36. Accounting. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Leavitt and Augsburger.) 
A study of the fundamental principles of accounting, especially as it concerns 
the practice of community pharmacy. 

41. Drug Marketing. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, three lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Economics 37 or its equivalent. This is an introductory course 
in the field of marketing with special emphasis on the marketing of drug prod- 
ucts. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the 
forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing 
drug products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

42. Pharmacy Management I. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 41. A study of the application of 
accounting, marketing and merchandising principles to the operation of a com- 
munity pharmacy, including financial statement analysis, pricing, inventory and 
expense management and control. 

51, 52. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, 
Agency and Partnerships. 

53, 54. Pharmacy Management II, III. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 42. A study of the management prob- 
lems of community pharmacy, including organization, staffing, directing, plan- 
ning and control. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

142. General Physiology. (5) 

Fourth Year, second semester, three lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello and Fredericks.) 
Prerequisite, Anatomy 31. A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physi- 
ology including the structure and permeability of the cell membrane, neuro- 
physiology, muscle physiology, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, 
the digestive system, the excretory system, endocrinology, metabolism, and 
the special senses. 



43 



University of Maryland 



For Graduates 



245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester, three lectures. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Physiology 142. Consent of 
instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical properties 
of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, 
golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and their con- 
tributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemical phe- 
nomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

246. Radioisotope Technique. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, consent of instructor. A course concerned with the practical use 
of isotopes particularly as tracers in metabolic investigations. 

399. Research in Physiology. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed, (Costello.) 



44 



School of Pharmacy 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1964-65 
Graduate Students^ 

*Amodio, Frank Joseph New Jersey 

Aronson. Lawrence Dennis Maryland 

Augsburger, Larry Louis Maryland 

JAviram, Baruch Maryland 

Blake, David Andrew Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Howard Maryland 

Bossle. Paul Courtney Louisiana 

Brodeur, Richard Josephh Connecticut 

Brown, Sr. Jane Marie Maryland 

♦Brunton, Philip James Indiana 

Caplan, Yale Howard Maryland 

tCornelio, Ana Mercedes Maryland 

tCutcher, James Lawrence Maryland 

Darago, Lillian Louise Maryland 

JDavis, Jack Larmer Maryland 

Deckert, Elizabeth Ann Maryland 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

tDietz, Albert Joseph, Jr Maryland 

§Duffy, Thomas Edward Maryland 

Elliott, Donald Brainard Maryland 

§Finlay, Thomas Maryland 

Fong, Dick Tak-Kuen Maryland 

♦Gassier, Pauline Alice New York 

Goldberg, Marjorie Sue Maryland 

Goldstein, Aida Pennsylvania 

^Greenland, Roy Astaire North Carolina 

Guyton. Charles Lockett Mississippi 

Heyman, Irwin Alvin Maryland 

*Holtz. Albert Ira Maryland 

§Kaminski. Felix Hilary Maryland 

Karu, Alexander E Virginia 

Lleander. Glory Coronado Philippines 

Manudhane, Krisna Shankar India 

tMcKelvey, Cornelius Patrick Pennsylvania 

Meyer, Francis John Louisiana 

Milkowski, John David Maryland 

Murthy, Vadiraja Venkatesa India 

tProbst, Robert Theobald Maryland 

Rhodes, Robert Allen Maryland 

Richman, Morton David Maryland 

Rosen, Lawrence S New York 

Schaefer, John Ferdinand Maryland 

Scott, Kenneth Richard New York 

Siman, Fuad Sami Lebanon 

tSisca, Rodger Franklin Pennsylvania 

tRegistered in Graduate School 
*Did not attend entire session 
JFirst semester only 
§ Second semester only 

45 



University of Maryland 

Smith, Rodney Francis Maryland 

tSmith, Willard Newell Maryland 

Stein, Martin Edward Massachusetts 

Steraberger, Nancy (Mrs.) Pennsylvania 

Stiles, Horace McElreath Texas 

Tinney, Francis John New York 

Varricchio, Frederick E Maine 

Vora, Kakubhai M India 

Walkling, Walter Douglas Maryland 

Warthen, John David, Jr Maryland 

Whang, Clara C. T China 

Wynn, Richard Lee Maryland 



Fifth Year Class 

Brauner, Robert Paul New York 

Brundelre, Robert Maryland 

Caplan, Suzanne J. (Mrs.) Maryland 

Catlett, Leon Ray Maryland 

Cavoures, James Anthony Maryland 

Conrad, John Wilmer, Jr Maryland 

Cooney, John Robinson Maryland 

Cysyk, Richard Louis Maryland 

Dolecek, Gayle Robert Maryland 

Elliott, William Robert Maryland 

Frangakis, Mina Sylvia Maryland 

Gamerman, Marvin Irvin Maryland 

Glover, Wayne Allen Maryland 

Goldberg, Marvin Maryland 

Hoffman, Robert William Maryland 

Kroopnick, Robert Beck Maryland 

Miller, Harris Lee Maryland 

Mintz, Martin Barry Maryland 

Myers, Mary Lynn Maryland 

Rachanow, Gerald Marvin Maryland 

Schutz, Charles John Maryland 

Sollod, Ralph Morton Maryland 

Walsh, Michael Joseph Maryland 

Williams, Cornelius Bennett, Jr Maryland 

Wolfson, Israel David Maryland 

Fourth Year Class 

Avery, Carolyn Jane (Mrs.) Maryland 

Berry, John Thomas Maryland 

Bloom, Barry Louis Maryland 

Christian, Mitchell Alvin Maryland 

Cohen, Michael Jay Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony Leo . Maryland 

JFirst semester only 

46 



School of Pharmacy 



Dailey. John William Maryland 

Donnelly. John Allen Maryland 

Edmondson. William Henry Maryland 

Eng. Frederick Maryland 

Erdman. Sheldon Norman Maryland 

Fischer. Bernard Aloysius Maryland 

Fleischer. Charles Alexander Maryland 

Heer, Roger Glenn Maryland 

Hess. Gary Lee Maryland 

Hoffman, Ronald Harvey Maryland 

Johnson. Eugene Malcolm Maryland 

Lessing. Melvin ^ Maryland 

Lindenbaum. Ronald Lee Maryland 

Martin. Lawrence Leo Maryland 

Meyer. Howard Barry Maryland 

Moore, William Carlton Delaware 

Miisch. Robert Allen Maryland 

Myers. John Edward Maryland 

Neiner. Joan Marie Louisiana 

Pincus. Jack Howard Maryland 

Rayman. Marsha Jane District of Columbia 

Spuras. Jenina Danute Maryland 

Tannebaum. Stanley Bernard Maryland 

Taylor. Charles Dorsey Maryland 

Tims. John Marshall Maryland 

Via. David Martin Maryland 

Vykol, Frank James. Maryland 

Weiner. Myron Maryland 



Third Year Class 

Alpert. Charles Marvin Maryland 

Blitz, Alvin Michael Maryland 

Buckner, Stephen Louis Maryland 

Cohen. David Maryland 

David. Stephen Thomas Maryland 

DeNeale, Richard Jay District of Columbia 

Dubansky, Ronald Floyd Maryland 

Frankenfeld. Frederick Martin Maryland 

Freedman. Jerald Allan Maryland 

Gold. Daniel Martin Maryland 

Goodman. Richard Mark Maryland 

Grabush, Arnold Fred Maryland 

Griffiths. Robert Charles Maryland 

Groman. Alvin Daniel Maryland 

*Heer. Ronald Williams Maryland 

Hill. Carol Jane Maryland 

Hommerbocker, Barry Allan Maryland 

Jacobs. Lionel Harvey Maryland 

Jaskulski, Alan Joseph Maryland 

Kenny. James Estel Maryland 



♦First Semester only 



47 



University of Maryland 

Kovalsky, Paul Victor Maryland 

Lauer, Forest Edwin Pennsylvania 

Lehman, Allan Gus Maryland 

Majchrzak, Edward Robert Maryland 

McCabe, Stanley Erasure Maryland 

Needel, Stephen Maryland 

Newcomb, John Randolph Maryland 

Samios, William Arthur Maryland 

Sanford, Ronald Arthur Maryland 

Sherman, Howard Maryland 

Shnidman, Meira Katz Maryland 

Silver, Harold Victor Maryland 

Stromberger, Henry Richard Maryland 

Telak, Ronald Casimir Maryland 

JTraska, Alexander Wolodymyr Maryland 

Trost, Patrick Edgar Maryland 

Will, Marcia Ann Maryland 

tWilliams, Matt Edward Maryland 



AT COLLEGE PARK 

Second Year Class 

Balch, John H Maryland 

Barker, John P Maryland 

*Berglund, Richard L Maryland 

Bloom, Martin G Maryland 

tBolling, Thomas V Maryland 

*Branch, Arthur S Maryland 

Burkhardt, Charles T Maryland 

tCalabrese, Erma B Maryland 

*Cummins, Leroy J Maryland 

JDaley, Patricia Maryland 

Daniel, David J Maryland 

Davis, David M Maryland 

Demas, Chris T Maryland 

IDirnberger, Thomas T Pennsylvania 

*Dorazio, Anthony T Maryland 

*Duvall, Suzanne W Maryland 

Dyke, Wayne A Maryland 

*Edelman, Barry A Maryland 

JEpstein, Arthur L Maryland 

*Folus, Gary L Maryland 

*Foxwell, Lurman H Maryland 

*Goodman, Philip L Maryland 

Hanratty, Eugene J Maryland 

Hare, David F Maryland 

Honkofsky, Arnold J Maryland 

IDid not attend entire session 
*First Semester only 
I^Second Semester only 



48 



School of Pharmacy 

Howard, Leonard C Maryland 

Jones, Norman R Maryland 

*Kolkhorst, Kenneth A Maryland 

Krawiecki, Elizabeth A New York 

♦Lawrence, Barbara J Maryland 

*Lebson, Harvey Maryland 

♦Leister, Dennard L Maryland 

tLesser, Gary A. Maryland 

McConnell, Patricia S Maryland 

McSwiggin, Sue E Maryland 

Motsko, John M Maryland 

Nadell, Terry S Maryland 

Nash, Glenn W Maryland 

Neuman, Joann L Maryland 

Poklis, Alphonse Maryland 

tPolievka, Frank J District of Columbia 

♦Press, Howard A District of Columbia 

tPriller, Charles A Maryland 

*Rand, Jerome M Maryland 

Ricci. John R Maryland 

Rosenbluth, Karen S Alabama 

Savage, Joseph P Maryland 

*Smith, Earl T Maryland 

JStatter, William Maryland 

♦Streimer, Robert A Maryland 

Thomas, Phillip O Maryland 

Towers, Earl M Maryland 

Vonbergen, Eric W Maryland 

♦Watson, George W Maryland 

Wolff, Martin W Maryland 

First Year Class at College Park 

* Aghamolla, Djamchio Maryland 

♦Barlow, Franklin G Maryland 

Becker, John P Maryland 

Besser, Charles A Maryland 

Bright, Thomas A New Jersey 

Browning, Romanus G Maryland 

Carroll Philip M Maryland 

Carson, Janice E Maryland 

♦Collins, Colin Maryland 

Culp, James B Maryland 

♦Daniel, Norman Maryland 

♦Dirnberger, Thomas T Pennsylvania 

Fry, Richard N Maryland 

♦Gaffney, Michael J Maryland 

♦Galliher, Richard A Maryland 

Grossman, Paul New Jerey 

Harwell, Elsie Maryland 

♦First Semester only 
tSecond Semester only 

49 



University of Maryland 

♦Iwaszko, Roman Maryland 

*Jarrell, Lester B Maryland 

Kaniecki, Paul E Maryland 

Keller, James H Maryland 

Kirson, Alan B Maryland 

Krause, John F Maryland 

Lebrody, Susan E Maryland 

Limric, Julie E Maryland 

Liptz, Sheldon J District of Columbia 

♦Lohinski, Paul B Maryland 

Lunz, Kathleen M Maryland 

♦Maleson, Mark A Maryland 

♦Mandel, Philip Maryland 

Mariany, Louis J Maryland 

Miles, Pamela L Maryland 

Minkove, Carroll M Maryland 

♦Newman, Gail Maryland 

*Plott, Donald A Maryland 

Poole, Barry W New Jersey 

Purdin, Thomas R New Jersey 

Rawleigh, Peter R New York 

*Reinke, Robert M Maryland 

tRehwaldt, Don C Maryland 

Roberts, Ralph E New Jersey 

Robertson, Robert J Maryland 

Rochlin, David H Maryland 

Rosenwasser, David E Virginia 

§Ryan, Michael F Maryland 

Scarborough, Robert L Maryland 

Scheinin, Steven J Maryland 

Scherr, Allan Maryland 

♦Shear, Joseph G Maryland 

Spriggs, Dolores Maryland 

Stires, John C Maryland 

Sullivan, Celia S District of Columbia 

Taylor, Donald W Maryland 

Toronto, James F Maryland 

Walls, John G Maryland 

Walters, Gary J Maryland 

Weisbrod, Joel E New Jersey 

♦Whelan, Vernon M Maryland 

Yockelson, Norman R Maryland 

* Yorkilous, John C Maryland 

Special Students, 1964-65 

§Eaton, Robert Arthur Maryland 

tPopov, Metodi Maryland 

♦Porter, Sue Ellen Maryland 



♦First Semester only 

tSecond Semester only 

§Did not attend entire session 

50 



School of Pharmacy 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 6, 1964 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Reier, George E Maryland 

McMillion Cecil R West Virginia 

Master of Science 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

Koch, Stanley A District of Columbia 

Vora, Kakubhai M India 

Warfield, Albert H Maryland 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

DelCastilho, Ronald E Maryland 

Wynn, Richard L Maryland 

HONORS (1963-64) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Richard L. Wynn 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc. Award 

(Extra Curricular Activities) Ronald DelCastilho 

Rexall Drug Company Award (Outstanding Achievement) Richard L. Wynn 

DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1963-64) 

Class of 1964 

Richard L. Wynn 

Class of 1965 

Richard L. Cysyk Gerald M. Rachanow 

Charles J. Schutz 

Honorable Mention 

Michael J. Walsh Cornelius B. Williams, Jr. 

51 



University of Maryland 

Class of 1966 

Mitchell A. Christian Lawrence L. Martin 

John W. Dailey William C. Moore 

Frederick Eng John M. Tims 

Charles A. Fleischer David M, Via 

Eugene M. Johnson Myron Weiner 



Honorable Mention 

Carolyn Avery H. Barry Meyers 

John A. Donnelly Frank J. Vykol 



52 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar, 1965-1966 v 

Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 51, 52 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 12 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 12 

Accreditation 1 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants for admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 2 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at 

Baltimore 6 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To the College Park Program 2 

To the Baltimore Program 6 

Alumni Association 31 

American Civilization, The Program in 6 

Assistantships, Graduate 22 

Attendance Requirements 12 

Baltimore Union 19 

Board of Regents vii 

Breakage 9 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1965 and 1966 iv 

Calendar, Academic v 

Correspondence vi 

Courses, Description of 34 

Curriculum. Changes in 11 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md 4, 5, 6 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

other than University of Maryland 6 

Curriculum, Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 32 

Summary of Hours and Credits 33 

Degrees 2 

Deportment 18 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 14, 15 

Dormitories (See Housing) 19 

Elective Programs at Baltimore 15 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 21 

Employment 18 

Examinations 12 

Faculty (1964-1965) xiii 

Faculty Council xiii 



53 



University of Maryland 

INDEX (Continued) 

Fees and Expenses 

Changes in registration 9 

Graduate 10 

Late registration 9 

Part-time Undergraduate 9 

Pre-professional at College Park 4, 11 

Fellowships and Grants 21 

Grade of D, Raising 14 

Grade of F, Removal of 14 

Grading System 13 

Grade Point Average 13 

Grade of Withdrawing Students 11 

Graduates, Roll of 1964 51 

Graduation Requirements 17 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 

Honor Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi 27 

Rho Chi 27 

Honors and Awards 27 

Honors Recipients (1963-64) 51 

Hospital Pharmacy Residency 22 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 19 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 19 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 19 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 13 

Laboratory Fees 8 

Library, Health Sciences 21 

Staff xvii 

Loans 26, 27 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 18 

Registration with 17 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy (1964-1965) 30 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 13 

Office of the Dean, Hours vi 

Office Staff xviii 

Officers of the University viii 

Central Administrative Officers viii 

Deans of the Schools and Colleges ix 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs x 

Division Chairmen xi 

Emeriti ix 

Standing Committees, Faculty Senate xii 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee 

on Student Life and Welfare xii 



54 



School of Pharmacy 
INDEX (Continued) 

Parking 20 

Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 6 

From Other Universities and Colleges 6 

Probation for Low Scholarship 15 

Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1965-1966 

Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 14 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 15 

Registration by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 17 

Requirements for Admission 

To Pre-professional Program at College Park 2 

To Professional Program at Baltimore 6 

Residence and Non-Residence, Definition of 12 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 24 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 23 

Student Organizations, Baltimore Campus 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 30 

Student Chapter, The American Pharmaceutical Association 

and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 30 

Student Government Alliance 30 

Students, Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 16 

Roll of 45 

Students, Pre-professional, College Park 48-50 

Students, Special 50 

Textbooks 11 

Transcripts of Records 17 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 8 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) 4, 11 

Visitors vi 

Withdrawals, Baltimore Campus 

Procedure 10 

Refunds 11 

Grades 11 

Non-compliance to regulations 11 



55 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From *The State and the University' 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 




UAHyLANO 



THE 



IVERSITY of MARYLAND 



BULLhliN 




1 



School of Pharmacy 




1966-1967 



>Visiuns ol 



•d as an 



cable contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The 
University reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at 
any time within the student's term of residence. The University further 
reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it con- 
siders such actior 'o he in the best interests of the Univcr'^i^v 



CATALOG AND 123rd ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

1966-67 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 46, Number 1 
School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Contents 



Academic Calendar v 

Correspondence — Visitors . . vi 

Board of Regents vii 

Officers of the University viii 
Standing Committees, 

Faculty Senate xii 

Faculty Council xiii 

Library Staff xvii 

The School 1 

AFROTC Program 6 

General Education Program 7 
Admission to the Profes- 
sional Program, Baltimore 7 
Enrollment in 

Pre-Professional Program 8 
Enrollment in 

Professional Program 9 

Tuition and Fees 9 

Academic Information II 

Withdrawals 11 

Textbooks 12 

Changes in Curriculum . 13 
Definition of Residence 

and Non-residence 13 

Academic Regulations . . 13 

Attendance 13 

Grading System 14 

Examinations 14 
Regulations for Promotion 

and Probation 16 

Regulations for 

Readmission 16 
Elective Programs at 

Baltimore 17 



Classification of Students 17 
Requirements for 

Graduation 18 

Transcripts of Records 1 8 
Registration with Maryland 

Board of Pharmacy 19 
Licensure Requirements, 

Maryland Board of 

Pharmacy 19 

Deportment 20 

Employment 20 

Housing 20 
General Information for 

Baltimore Union 20 

Parking 22 

Health Sciences Library 22 
Professorships, Graduate 

Fellowships and Grants 22 

Other Research Grants 23 

Special Grants, Assistantships 23 

Scholarships and Loans 24 

Honors and Awards 29 

Student Organizations, 

Baltimore Campus 32 

Alumni Association 33 

Professional Curriculum 34 

Description of Courses 36 

Roll of Students, 

Session 1965-66 47 
Roll of Graduates, 

June 5, 1965 53 

Honors 54 

Index 55 



III 



19 6 6 


JANUARY 




FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 










MAY 




JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 


12 3 4 


1 2 


12 3 4 6 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 




26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 


28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


3 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 




23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


19 6 7 


JANUARY 




FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 


1 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


29 30 31 




26 27 28 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

AUGUST 


MAY 




JUNE 


JULY 


S M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


6 


12 3 


1 


12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 




25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



IV 



Academic Calendar, 1966-67 

FIRST SEMESTER— 1966 
SEPTEMBER 

12 Monday — Third Year Registration — 9 a.m. 

Fourth Year Registration — 10 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — II a.m. 
Orientation for all new students — 2 p.m. 

13 Tuesday — Graduate Registration — 9:30-11:30 a.m. 

14 Wednesday — Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last scheduled period 
28 Monday — Instruction resumes with first scheduled period i 

DECEMBER j 

21 Wednesday — Christmas recess begins at close of last scheduled period ► 

li 

1967 i 

JANUARY j 

3 Tuesday — Instruction resumes with first scheduled period i 

23-27 Monday-Friday — First Semester examinations % 

SECOND SEMESTER— 1967 > 

FEBRUARY \ 

1 Wednesday — Third Year Registration — 1 p.m. „ 

Fourth Year Registration — 2 p.m. i- 

Fifth Year Registration — 3 p.m. j 

2 Thursday — Graduate Registration — 9:30-11 :30 a.m. | 

2 Thursday — Instruction begins with first scheduled period | 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, Holiday [ 

MARCH 

23 Thursday — Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled period j 
28 Tuesday — Instruction resumes with first scheduled period j 

MAY " 

19 Friday — Last day of instruction for Fifth Year 

22-26 Monday-Friday — Second Semester final examination 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, Holiday 

JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises - 

SUMMER SESSION 

6 Tuesday — Graduate Registration — 10 a.m.- 12 noon 

All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration days. Students failing to 
comply with this regulation are charged a fee of $20.00. No student is normally 
permitted to register after Friday of the week in which instruction begins. 
The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily. Monday through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum at College Park should be addressed to the 
Director of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20740. The University's telephone number is 927-3800. 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional pharmacy 
program of the Five Year Curriculum offered at UMBC, should be 
addressed to the Registrar, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 
5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228. The Registrar's tele- 
phone number is 955-7825. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of 
the Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, room 132, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to 
the respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Bequests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 

The telephone number for the Dean's Office, School of Pharmacy, is 
955-7650. 

VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on 
Saturday by appointment. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. The 
University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student to 
withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests 
of the University. 



VI 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 
Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Building, 
4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Hon. Mary Arabian 

Municipal Court of Baltimore City, Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Vll 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins,— 5..4., University of Texas, 1932: M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936: D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn~5.5., University of Maryland, 1938: M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland. ^951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.— B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE, RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig— ^.5.. College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— fi.^.. University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
James T. Frye— B.5., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— J5.5., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— iB.^., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— 5.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 

Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schultz— B.5., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

via 



DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. A'non—B.S., University of Minnesota. 1933: M.S.. 1940; Ed.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1956. 

DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut— B.5., University of Idaho. 1928; M.S.. Stale College of Washington. 
1930: Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1933. 

DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

William F. Atchison — A.B.. Georgetown College, 1938; M.A., University of 
Kentucky. 1940: Ph.D., University of Illinois. 1943. 

DIRECTOR. COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D.. 1954. 

DIRECTOR. GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B .5., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D.. 1958. 

DIRECTOR. INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock — B.S.. University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A.. George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— B./i., University of Illinois. 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land. 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke— B.5., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University. 1950; M.S.. 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 

University. 1960. 

HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University. 
1949. 

Division Chairmen 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— B.5., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D.. 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— fi.5., University of Maryland. 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D.. 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Harold C. Hoffsommer- fi.5., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 

ix 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg— B.^.. University of Maryland. 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan— B.5., University of Maryland, 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 

PLANT 

George O. Weber— B.5., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland. 1927; E.E.. 1931. 

Emeriti 
PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byid—B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D.. Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc., Western Maryland College. 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— fi.5.. University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns- fi.5., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.5., Tufts College. 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D.. 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell— 5.^., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley— D.D.5., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Robert B. Beckmann — B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D.. University of Wis- 
consin, 1944. 



DEAN Oh hACUl lY — UNIVtRSIIY Oh MARYLAND. BAL 1 IMOKh COUN lY 
Homer W. Schamp. Jr. — A.B.. Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of \fichi- 
gan, 1947: Ph.D., 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S., University of Connecticut. 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont. 1926; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Erna Chapman — B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.S., University of Maryland. 
1936. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Paul Wasserman— B.fi./i., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.5.), 
Columbia University, 1949: M.S. (^Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan, I960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
William S. Stone— 5.5., University of Idaho, 1924: M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 

Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Marion Murphy — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., University of Michi- 
gan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss—Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley— fi.^., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— 5..4., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930: 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

EXECUTIVE DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Leslie R. Bundgaard— 5.5., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D.: 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

xi 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



Xll 



FACULTY COUNCIL 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean 

LESLIE C. COSTELLO DONALD E. SHAY 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW FRANCIS M. MILLER, Secretary 

Faculty (1965-1966) 

Emerita 

B. OLIVE COLE, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
PHAR.D., University of Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

LESLIE c. COSTELLO, Pfofessor of Anatomy and Physiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

NOEL E. FOSS, Professor of Pharmacy 

PH.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

CASIMIR T. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

PH.c, University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

FRANCIS M. MILLER, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d.. Northwestern University, 1949. 

DONALD E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 
1943. 

FRANK J. SLAM A, Professor of Pharmacognosy 
PH.C, University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; M.S., 1930; 
PH.D., 1935. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin frank ALLEN, Associote Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

HILDA E. MOORE, Librarian, Health Science Library and Associate Professor of 
Library Science 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 

School, 1937. 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. IN PHARM., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 

NICOLAS ZENKER, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

CD. sc. ch.. University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; m.a., University of California, 
1953; PH.D., 1958. 

• •• 
Xlll 



University of Maryland 
Assistant Professors 

ELIE ABUSHANAB, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.s. in Pharm., The American University of Beirut (Lebanon), 1960; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1962; ph.d., 1965. 

tADELE B. BALLMAN, Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Goucher College, 1926; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

CARL w. DRIEVER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.s. in Pharm., Purdue University, 1961; M.S., 1963; PH.D., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Indiana. 

KENNETH L. EULER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Pittsburgh, 1959; M.S., 1962; ph.d.. University of 

Washington, 1965. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

GEORGE N. KRYWOLAP, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

PETER P. LAMY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. IN PHARM., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; 

PH.D., 1964. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

DEAN E. LEAVITT, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957; m.b.a., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

JAMES LESLIE, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1956; PH.D., 1959. 

Instructors 

EARL F. BECKER, JR., Instructor in Microbiology 

B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

LOUIS DIAMOND, Instructor in Pharmacology 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Junior Instructor 

MARJORIE s. GOLDBERG, Junior Instructor in Anatomy and Physiology 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Lecturers 

tRicHARD D. DEAN, Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; m.ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 

tjosEPH s. KAUFMAN, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b.. University of Maryland, 1953. 



t Part time 

xiv 



School of Pharmacy 



Fellows 



LARRY L. AUUSBUR(JtR. American houndation for Fharmaceutical Education 

Fellow in Pharmacy and Albert H. Diebold Memorial Fellow for 1965-66. b.s., 
IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

LAWRENCE H. BLOCK. American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
Fellow in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM.. University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

LANDON w. BURBAGE, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration {Research) | 

PH. B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.c, 1910. j 

YALE CAPLAN. U. S. PubUc Health Service Fellow in Chemistry [ 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. ; 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. j 

hsi-chiang chiu, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) | 

B.S., Taipei Medical College, Taiwan, 1965. j 

LILLIAN darago, Predoctoral Research Assistant, Anatomy and Physiology, {National \ 

Institutes of Health) j 

A.B., Goucher College, 1955; M.S.. University of Maryland, 1962. 

JAMES G. FRANKLIN, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 

B.A., Kutztown State College, 1965. I, 

IRWIN A. HEYMAN, V . S. PubHc Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

GLORY LLEANDER, The H. A. B. Dunning Fellow in Chemistry and Research Fellow 
in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Philippines, 1956; M.S., 1961. 

JOHN D. MiLKOWSKi, U. S. PubUc Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S., Loyola College, 1962. 

R. ALLEN RHODES, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
B.A., Bridgewater College, 1963. 

M. DAVID RiCHMAN, Stalfort Research Fellow in Pharmacy 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1960; M.S., 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

KENNETH R. SCOTT, U. S. PubUc Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 

B.s. IN PHARM., Howard University, 1956; M.S., University of Buffalo, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

MARTIN E. STEIN, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
B.S. IN PHARM., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1961; M.S., 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Massachusetts, Maryland. 



XV 



University of Maryland 

FRANCIS J. TINNEY, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Chemistry {The Ortho Research 

Foundation) 

B.S., IN PHARM., St. John's University, College of Pharmacy, 1959; M.S., 1961; 
PH.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

KAKUBHAi M. VORA, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
B. PHARM., L. M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat Univ., 1961; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964. 

JOHN D. WARTHEN, JR., Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1960. 

CLARA c. T. WHANG, Research Fellow in Chemistry {National Institutes of Health) 
B.A., Clarke College, 1962. 

Graduate Assistants 

* LARRY L. AUGSBURGER, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

*LILLIAN DARAGO, Assistant in Anatomy and Physiology 
A.B., Goucher College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

DICK T. K. FONG, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Sciences, 1963. 

IRA J. FRANKEL, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.s. IN PHARM., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 1965. 

MARY ELLEN KITLER, Assistant in Pharmacy and Pharmacy Administration 
B.s. IN PHARM., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1961; M.S., 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Pennsylvania. 

BARRY N. LUTSKY, Assistant in Chemistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

CHARLES J. SCHUTZ, Assistant in Chemistry 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

FREDERICK H. WAGNER, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1957. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

*w. DOUGLAS WALKLING, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Laboratory Assistant 

*M. NEAL JACOBS, Assistant in Pharmacy 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 



* Part time 

xvi 



School of Pharmacy 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Health Sciences Library 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, B.A., M.A., B.s.L.s. — Director of Libraries and Professor of 
Library Science 

IDA MARIAN ROBINSON, A.B.. B.S.L.S. — Librarian Emerita 

HILDA E. MOORE, A.B., A.B.L.s. — Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

EDITH M. COYLE, A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A. — Assistant Librarian for Technical Services 

ELEANOR M. MITTEN, B.S., B.S.L.S. — Assistant Librarian for Readers' Services 

SARAH L. ATKINS — Cataloging Assistant 

MELAYN DORFLER., B.S., A.M.L.s. — Assistant Serials Librarian 

MARGARET s. c. FENG, B.A., B.L.s. — Assistant Cataloger 

ELIZABETH A. FORNEY, A.B., M.s.L.s. — Reference Librarian 

CHARJLES w. FOSLER III — Serials Assistant 

wiLLARD T. FRAMPTON — Library Clerk, Stacks 

NORMA E. H.'VNDY — Cataloging Assistant 

RUTH E. HANNA, A.B., M.S.L.S. — Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 

LORRAINE s. HLAVIN — Serials Assistant 

SIMONE c. HURST — Head, Circulation Department 

MARGARET M. JONES, A.B., M.S.L.S. Cataloger 

HANS-GUENTHER R. LiSTFELDT, B.S., M.S.L.S. — Serials Reference Librarian 

BEATRICE MARRIOTT, B.A. — Reference Librarian 

Luz V. osoRES — Acquisitions Assistant 

ELIZABETH PALMER — Secretary to the Librarian 

CAROL A. READY, B A. — Circulation Assistant 

MARYLAYNE E. ROTH, B.A., A.M.L.S. — Assistant Reference Librarian 

R. KAE SARUBIN — Circulation Assistant 

ELWOOD STERLING — Library Assistant 

School Of Pharmacy Office Of Administration 
Office Staff 

MARGARET E. BEATTY, Secretary 
AGNES M. FORESTELL, Secretary 
DAISY LOTZ GUE, Secretary 
DORIS M. KENNEDY, Secretary 

xvii 



The School 

History and Program 

The purposes of the school of pharmacy are to train students for 
the efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct stu- 
dents in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, 
express themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profes- 
sion and citizens of a democracy; to guide students into productive 
scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge and techniques 
in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Mary- 
land physicians and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in 
Pharmacy to replace the out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, 
incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 
In 1904, the College joined with a group of medical schools and the 
Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer cooperative instruction in 
the health sciences. The new institution was known as the University of 
Maryland. In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional schools was 
merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form the 
present University of Maryland. 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings constructed 
specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and class- 
rooms are equipped with the most modern apparatus and every aid to 
instruction and for research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing 
approximately 35,000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, 
the Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty and The Johns Hop- 



/ 



School of Pharmacy 

kins University. The libraries are within convenient distance of the School. 
Students also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

A minimum of five academic years of satisfactory college work is required 
for the completion of the present pharmacy curriculum of the University of 
Maryland. This five year curriculum meets the minimum requirements 
established by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth below. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School 
of the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the 
Graduate School. 



Program 

At the University of Maryland the five year program consists of two years 
of a pre-professional and a three-year pharmacy program. 

school of pharmacy, college park campus 

The pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore but may be 
obtained at the College Park Campus of the University or any other 
accredited university or college where appropriate courses are offered.' 

SCHOOL OF pharmacy, BALTIMORE COUNTY CAMPUS 

In enrolling at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) 
during the 1966 year, a student may select from among the courses offered 
at UMBC, those that are equivalent to the courses offered in the First Year 



' Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally ac- 
credited college or university. 



School of Pharmacy 

Pre-profcssional program at the School of Pharmacy, College Park Campus 
of the University. 

school of pharmacy, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Only the three year professional program is offered in Baltimore. 
Requirements For Admission To The Five Year Program 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School 
and for literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school in Maryland whose secon- 
dary record indicates probable success in the University will be admitted 
provided that: 

1. his scholastic average in major subjects in his last two years in high 
school has been satisfactory; 

2. his program has included the following: 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 
College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 

( 1 ) , plane geometry ( 1 ) and additional units in 

advanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, 

or advanced mathematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 

History and Social Sciences 2 1 

Biological Sciences 1 

Foreign Language — German or French 2 

Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 



Total 16 16 

3. he has had the test results of the American College Testing Program 
submitted to the University Admissions Office; 

4. he has a satisfactory general recommendation from his secondary school 
as to his character and ability. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland residents 
(see definition of Residence and Non-Residence, page 13) must also have 
the results of the American College Testing Program and complete high 
school records submitted to the Admissions Office. Only a limited number 
of well qualified out-of-state applicants can be considered for admission 
since first preference in admission is given to Maryland residents. 



University of Maryland 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled "An Adventure in Learning." A copy of this 
publication may be obtained by writing to the Catalog Mailing Office, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. Applications must be 
made to the Director of Admissions at College Park, Maryland 20742. 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for 
admission. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee 
is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. 



Deadlines For Applications 
College Park Campus 

FALL SEMESTER 

All Applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semes- 
ter at the College Park campus must be received by the University on or 
before June 1. Any student registered for seven or more semester hours 
of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, applications will be accepted between June 
1 and July 15. Applications for full-time attendance filing after June 1 will 
be required to pay a non-refundable $25 late fee to defray the cost of special 
handling of applications after that date. This late fee is in addition to the 
$10 application fee. 

All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attendance, 
and all supporting documents for an application for admission, must be 
received by the appropriate University office by July 15. This means that 
the applicant's educational records (except current summer school grades) 
ACT scores (in the case of new freshmen) and medical examination report 
must be received by July 15. 



SPRING SEMESTER 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Spring Semester is 
January 1. 

UMBC Campus 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semes- 
ter at UMBC campus must be received on or before July 15. Applicants 
for full-time attendance filing after July 15 will be required to pay a non- 



School of Pharmacy 

refundable $25.00 late fee to defray the cost of special handling of appli- 
cations after that date. This late fee is in addition to the $10.00 applica- 
tion fee. Any student registered for seven or more semester hours of work 
is considered a full-time student. 

Effective September, 1966': Annual costs of attending the University at 
College Park for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $270.00; in- 
structional materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00; board, $440.00 and 
lodging, $320.00. Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee of 
$400.00 and lodging costs are $420.00. 

Effective September, 1966': Annual costs of attending the University at 
the UMBC campus for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $270.00; 
instructional materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00. Non-residents are 
assessed an additional fee of $400.00. The UMBC campus does not in- 
clude residence halls or other living accommodations. Cafeteria facilities 
will be available on this campus. 



Program At College Park Division 



Semester- 



FmsT Year / // 

Chemistry 1 , 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

English 1 — Composition 3 — 

Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics ... 3 3 

or 
Math. 18, 19 — Introductory and Elementary Analy- 
sis 3 4 

Zoology 1 — General Zoology 4 — 

Botany 1 — General Botany — 4 

Elective (Social Science)^ — 3 

Health 5 2 — 

Physical Education 1 1 



Total 17 15-16 



^ The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges 
as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to 
the student as low as possible. 

' Social Science Electives 

G. and P. 1, American Government 
Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 
Sociology 1, Introduction to Sociology 
Anthropology 1, Introduction to Anthropology 



University of Maryland 

Second Year 

English 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

History * _ 3 3 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis 4 — 

Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics. ... — 3 

Elective (Fine Arts or Philosophy )'' 3 — 

Elective ' — 3 



Total 17 16 

AFROTC Program 

Effective September 1, 1965 the AFROTC (Air Force Reserve Officer 
Training Corps) program is not required of students but may be vol- 
untarily elected by students whose undergraduate programs require a resi- 
dence of four academic years on the CoUege Park campus. 

Since School of Pharmacy students on the College Park campus advance 
to the professional program at Baltimore after two academic years, it is 
generally not advantageous for them to participate in the program of the 
AFROTC. 



* The student is required to distribute his work between United States and non-United 
States fields, with three credit hours in each field. Recommended courses are: 

United States History Non-United States History 

Hist. 21, History of the United States Hist. 31 or 32, Latin American His- 

to 1865 tory 

Hist. 22, History of the United States Hist. 41 or 42, Western Civilization 

since 1865 Hist. 51 or 52, The Humanities 

Hist. 23, Social and Cultural History Hist. 53 or 54, History of England and 

of Early America Great Britain 

Hist. 24, Social and Cultural History Hist. 61 or 62, Far Eastern Civiliza- 

of Modern America tion 

Hist. 29, The United States in World Hist. 71 or 72, Islamic Civilization 
Affairs 

' Fine Arts or Philosophy Elective. 

Art 10, Introduction to Art Music 20, Survey of Music Literature 

Art 60 or 61, History of Art Speech 16, Introduction to the Theatre 

Art 65 or 66, Masterpieces of Paint- Philosophy 1, Introduction to Philoso- 

ing phy 

Art 67 or 68, Masterpieces of Sculp- Philosophy 41, Elementary Logic and 

ture Semantics 

Art 70 or 71, Masterpieces of Ar- Philosophy 45, Ethics 

chitecture Philosophy 52, Philosophy in Litera- 

Art 80, History of American Art ture 

Dance 32, Introduction to Dance Philosophy 53, Philosophy of Religion 
"* Elective can be chosen from groups previously described. A fourth semester of 

college English or a 3 hour course in Public Speaking is also acceptable. 



School of Pharmacy 

General Education Program 

The University of Maryland has instituted a new series of related course 
requirements which together constitute a general education program. 

Essentially this program includes nine semester-hour-credits of English 
(three credits of composition, six of literature); six credits in history; six 
credits chosen from various fields of the social sciences; seven credits in 
science; three credits in mathematics; three credits in fine arts or in philos- 
ophy. 

Two semesters of physical education and a course in health education are 
required of all undergraduates. 

Students in the School of Pharmacy satisfy the mathematics, the science 
and three credits of the social science requirements by pursuing the courses 
identified in the curriculum. 

Greater detail will be found in the brochure: General and Academic 
Regulations. 

Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1. From College Park Division' or UMBC Division 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program 
with a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) and who are in good 
standing will qualify for advancement to the pharmacy program at 
Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the 
School of Pharmacy each student will be required to complete a form of 
intent and return it to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

2. From Other Universities and College' 

A. Prerequisites 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having complete(l 
successfully two academic years of work in an accredited college" of a?^ 
and sciences based upon the completion of a four year high school 
course or the equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course 
must consist of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit exclusive of 
physical education, health, military science or similar courses. The 60 



' Students who enrolled in a pre-professional pharmacy program before the summer 
session of 1964 will be asked to meet the general education requirements set forth 
as "The Program in American Civilization" described in the School of Pharmacy 
catalog (pages 4-5, 1963-64 edition) 

* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally 
accredited college or university. 



University of Maryland 

semester hours must include 9 hours of English, 6 hours of college 
level mathematics (modern mathematics or algebra, trigonometry and 
analytical geometry), 4 hours of botany and 4 hours of zoology (or 8 
hours of general biology), 8 hours of general inorganic chemistry (in- 
cluding qualitative analysis), 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours 
of physics, 3 hours of economics, 6 hours of history, 3 hours of social 
sciences, 3 hours of fine arts or philosophy and the remainder as electives 
from the non-science areas. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
must have attained a prior scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) 
when the lowest passing grade is D (1.0) or its equivalent, and must be 
in good standing. This average of not less than C (2.0) shall be based 
on all college courses previously undertaken by the applicant exclusive 
of credit in military science, physical education, health, hygiene or similar 
courses. 

Students must satisfy as well, any additional qualifications governing 
recommendations for transfer specified by the institution from which the 
student is seeking transfer. Transfer credit is given only for the courses com- 
pleted with a grade of C (2.0) or higher and which are a part of the 
pre-professional curriculum of the School of Pharmacy. 

B. Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore 
should write to the Director of Admissions and Registrations, University 
of Maryland, Room 132, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to 
their applications should communicate with the above ofl5.ce. 

Enrollment in the Pre-Professional Program at College Park 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at 
College Park may obtain application blanks by writing to the Admissions 
OflBce at College Park. Students meeting the requirements for admission 
will receive letters of admission from the Admissions Ofi&ce at College 
Park. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering 
from the Oflfice of the Registrar at College Park a few weeks prior co 
the September registration period. 

There is a fee of $5.00 for changes in registration made after the first 
week of instruction. 

Enrollment in the Pre-Professional Program at UMBC Campus 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at 
UMBC may obtain application blanks by writing to the Registrar, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21228. 

8 



School of Pharmacy 

Enrollment in the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1. from college park division or umbc division 

Students who had filed with the Dean of the School Pharmacy at Balti- 
more a letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the 
curriculum and who have completed the requirements of the prc-profes- 
sional program will be notified by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
that they have qualified for advancement into the professional program. 
These students will receive detailed directions for registering from the 
Baltimore Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September regis- 
tration period. 

2. from other universities and colleges 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates 
of admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at 
Baltimore. Admitted students will receive detailed directions for regis- 
tering from the Office of the Registrar at Baltimore a few weeks prior 
to the September registration period. 

TUITION AND FEES {Baltimore Campus) 
full-time undergraduate students 
Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $ 1 35.00 

Non-Residents 160.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 
Student Union Fee (per annumY 30.00 

Special Fee (per annumY 10.00 

Student Union Fee (Summer SessionY 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 

all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester are 
payable at the time of registration therefor. The Student Union fee 
and the Special fee are payable in full at the time of first registration. 
Students wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment of tui- 
tion charges must do so with the Financial Office at or prior to 
registration for the semester for which such charges are imposed. 



' The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. AH students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 



University of Maryland 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only (Not applicable to students accepted from 
School of Pharmacy, College Park) 

Application fee (non-returnable) $7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's 
tuition. ) 

For Candidates for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in 
excess of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each course. 
Fee for Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 

PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All Students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) $18.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 12.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 15.00 

Pharmacognosy 7.00 

Pharmacology 12.00 

Pharmacy 12.00 

Physiology 12.00 

Student Union Fee (per annum)"" 6.00 

Student Union Fee (Summer Session)^" 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 



^° The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all 
full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus 
and is used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students 
enrolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student 
Union Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as 
much as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student Union 
Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 

10 



School of Pharmacy 

graduate students 

Matriciriation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) $10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester)" 24.00 
Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 

Student Union Fee {per annum for full time students)'' 30.00 

Special Fee (per annum for full time students only)'' 10.00 

Student Union Fee (Summer Session, all students) " 6.00 

Student Union Fee (per annum, part time students)'' 6.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee" 3.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree $10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 50.00 

An additional $10.00 as a penalty fee will be assessed against those students 
who fail to apply for graduation within the first eight weeks of a regular 
academic semester or the first three weeks of a summer session. 

Students who apply after the end of the twelfth week of a regular academic 
semester and those who apply after the end of the fourth week of a 
summer session will be required to wait for the next academic semester 
in order to obtain a diploma. 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Withdrawals from School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School he must 
file a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. 
A student who does not comply with the above regulation is not issued 
an honorable dismissal and is not accorded any refund to which he might 
otherwise be entitled. 

Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent or guardian. 

" The $24.00 rate applies to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without 
regard to the location at which the course is given and will apply to audited courses 
as well as courses taken for credit. 

'■ The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 
"Effective with the beginning of the 1966 Summer Session, all graduate students 
taking courses on the College Park campus, the Baltimore County campus and the 
Professional Schools campus in Baltimore city will be assessed an Auxiliary Facili- 
ties Fee in the amount of $3.00 for the Summer Session and $3.00 for each of the 
two academic semesters. 



University of Maryland 

1. refund of fees upon withdrawal. 

Fees, excluding Application Fee, Matriculation Fee, Student Activ- 
ities Fee, the $50.00 deposit on tuition and any scholarship credit, are 
refunded to withdrawing students in accordance with the following sched- 
ule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the Office of the Dean. 

2. GRADES 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Any student who ( 1 ) fails to withdraw from any course or from the school 
in the required manner or (2) who registers, does not attend classes and 
does not withdraw, will receive grades of F in all courses for which he has 
registered. 

Textbooks 

Each student is required to have his own textbooks. The books required 
in each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

Tuition and Fees for Fre-professional Program 
{College Park Campus) 

See page 5 for summary statements and consult "An Adventure in 
Learning" which is available from College Park, Maryland. 

Tuition and Fees for Pre-Professional Program 
(UMBC Campus) 

For summary statements consult the UMBC Campus Bulletin by writing 
to the Registrar, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 

12 



( 



School of Pharmacy 

Changes in Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

Definition of Residence and Non-residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for 
at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six 
months. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be established by him prior to the 
registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services 
while stationed in Maryland will not he considered as satisfying the six- 
months period referred to above except in those cases in which the adult 
was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into 
the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

Academic Regulations {College Park Campus) 

Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in the 
ofl&cial University General and Academic Regulations. 

Academic Regulations {Baltimore Campus) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes 
and laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final exam- 
ination in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are nor- 
mally counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more 
than half a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half 
a period are also construed as an absence. 

13 



University of Maryland 

examinations 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion 
of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Effective with the 1966-1967 academic year, final examinations are not 
required in the second semester only of the Fifth Year Class. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant per- 
mission for a deferred examination. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 

Grade Interpretation Point Value 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Fair 2 

D Poor but passing 1 

F Failure 

I Course work incomplete replaced by definite 

grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 

Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries, e.g. : 



Subject 


Credit 


Grade 


Points 


Chemistry 


4 


C 


8 


Microbiology 


4 


C 


8 


Pharmacognosy 


4 


B 


12 


Pharmacy 


4 


A 


16 


Pharmacy Administration 


3 


D 


3 



19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is 
found to have a grade point average of 2.47. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only those courses taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland are considered. 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. Seven weeks after the beginning of each semester, 

14 



School of Pharmacy 

the Dean warns and the Advisor interviews all students earning grades 
of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to 
a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the 
instructor enters on the class card a reason of the character stated above 
with an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases when 
this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by the 
instructor by the end of the next semester in which that subject is again 
offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course 
in which he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at 
the University, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, 
including regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he 
will not receive any additional credit for the course completed with a 
passing grade. 

If the work is completed at the University of Maryland his final mark 
will be substituted for the mark already recorded. Although the final 
mark received in the course will be used in determining credit for pro- 
motion and graduation, it does not apply to honors and awards. See 
applicable section under "Honors and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the Dean to repeat the course or its 
equivalent, at another university or college, the regulations applicable to 
transfer of credit apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with 
a grade of C (2.0) or higher; for purposes of computing grade averages, 
transfer credit is considered as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A Student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in 
raising his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to 
withdraw from the School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student 
may be permitted with the written permission of the Dean and the head 
of the department giving the course, to repeat the course for the second 
time. Such permission can be given to the student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above 
regulation must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will 
be granted under unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall 
require the approval of the head of the department giving the course. 

15 



University of Maryland 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who 
is permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements 
for the degree from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

All Students are expected to maintain a grade average of not less than 
C (2.0) for each semester. Any student who fails to maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) for any semester will be placed on probation during 
the next semester. Students in the Fifth Year Class must maintain a grade 
average of C (2.0) to become eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semes- 
ter hour credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed 
on probation during the next semester. 

Any student on probation must pass all courses for which he is registered 
and must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) or he will be automat- 
ically dropped from the School of Pharmacy at the end of that semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits 
in any semester sha^l be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatis- 
factory scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then 
obtains a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be 
automatically dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required 
to report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 



REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A Student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may 
apply in writing to the Dean for readmission after a lapse of at least one 
semester. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that 
semester. 

Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be 
readmitted only once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty 
Assembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a recon- 
sideration of his particular case. 

16 



School of Pharmacy 

ELECTIVE PROGRAMS AT BALTIMORE" 

1. Fourth Year Electives 

Students shall elect either the General Pharmacy Major or the Pre- 
Graduate Major by May 1 of the Third Year. 

Students to be eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major must have established 
the aptitudes for the successful pursuit of graduate work and must meet 
the necessary prerequisites. Those eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major 
may postpone the selection of this elective until the following year and 
thus will pursue the General Pharmacy Major during the Fourth Year. 

Students not qualifying for the Pre-Graduate Major will be required to 
pursue the General Pharmacy Major. 

2. Fijth Year Electives 

Students must make elective selections by May 1 of the Fourth Year. 

The General Pharmacy Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue 
with the General Pharmacy Major and choose between Pharmacognosy 
52, Animal Health Products and Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Derma- 
tological Preparations or (b), elect the prescribed Hospital Major pro- 
gram or (c) if approved as eligible, transfer to the Pre-Graduate Program 
and will enroll in Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus and Pharmacy 161, 162, 
Special Problems. 

The Pre-Graduate Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue 
with the Pre-Graduate Major, will enroll in Chemistry 187, 189, Physical 
Chemistry (Lectures) and choose between Chemistry 188, 190, Physical 
Chemistry Laboratory and Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems or 
(b) transfer to the Hospital Major and follow the prescribed program. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS — PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the Professional 
Program with a grade average of C (2.0) in addition to the Pre- 
Professional requirements will be classified as students of the Fourth 
Year Class. 

General Pharmacy Majors of the Fourth Year Class who have completed 
71 credit hours of the Professional Program with a grade average of 
C (2.0) will be classified as Fifth Year Students. Pre-Graduate Majors 
of the Fourth Year Class in order to advance in the Pre-Graduate Pro- 
gram and attain the classification of the Fifth Year Class must have 
completed 73 credit hours of the Professional Program with an academic 
quality indicative of the successful pursuit of graduate work. 



" The elective program must be approved by the Class Adviser and the Dean. For 
additional information consult with the Class Adviser and see the respective curricula 
on pages 34 and 35. 

17 



University of Maryland 

Students of the Fifth Year Class to be considered as candidates for 
graduation must have maintained a grade average of at least C (2.0) 
and have completed minimum credit hours of the Professional Program 
according to the following: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 credit hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the General Pharmacy Major 108 credit hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the Pre-Graduate Major 110 credit hours 

(d) Pre-Graduate Majors who have followed this 

elective area for one or two years .... 110 credit hours 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon stu- 
dents who have successfully completed the pre-professional program and 
the three years required for the professional program in most of the ac- 
credited schools of pharmacy in the United States. At the School of Phar- 
macy at Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred 
upon students who have met successfully all the requirements and have 
spent at least the Fifth Year in residence at the School of Pharmacy at 
Baltimore. The student must have been accredited with instruction in the 
professional program as follows: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 semester hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the General Pharmacy Major . . 108 semester hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the Pre-Graduate Major 110 semester hours 

(d) Pre-Graduate Majors who have pursued 

this elective area for one or two years 110 semester hours 

In addition, all students must have attained the required grade point 
standings and must have met other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance 
of transcripts are as follows: one copy of a student's records is made 
without charge; for additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for 
each transcript. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 

18 



School of Pharmacy 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which arc forwarded, 
on request, to educational institutions. Government agencies, etc., as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy and 
the honorable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy 
have not been satisfied. 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students 
entering upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to file application with 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows : 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college 
of pharmacy in this State shall not later than thirty days after enrolling, 
file with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an applica- 
tion for registration as a student of pharmacy in which said application 
he shall be required to furnish such information as the Board may deem 
appropriate, and simultaneously with the filing of said application, shall 
pay the Board a fee of one dollar; all such students of pharmacy shall, 
at the beginning of any subsequent school or college year, submit to the 
said Board a sworn statement of any and all actual drug store experience 
acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE MARYLAND BOARD 
OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration 
to those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board 
of Pharmacy. Any person of good moral character who has attained the 
age of twenty-one years, is a graduate of an accredited school or college 
of pharmacy, and has completed one year as a registered apprentice in 
a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board of Pharmacy for such 
purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store 
or pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school 
or college of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college 
of pharmacy. Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience 
as a registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from 
an accredited school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy 
approved by the Board for such purposes. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21201, for further information relative to the requirements for 
eligibility for licensure. 

19 



University of Maryland 

DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detri- 
mental to his or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct 
is not satisfactory to the authorities of the University. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire 
period of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation 
and completion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of 
opportunities to secure suitable employment, but it is recommended that 
students refrain from working during the school session. 

HOUSING 

1 . WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the 
Louisa Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close prox- 
imity to the School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommo- 
dations and it is under the general supervision of the Office of Student Life. 
Students are requested to bring their own bedspreads, blankets, pillows, 
bureau scarves, curtains, desk lamp, iron, small rugs and a laundry bag. 
Students may obtain towels and bed linens through a designated commercial 
rental service. Although students may provide their own bed linens and 
towels they are not permitted to launder these items in Louisa Parsons 
Hall. The individual student assumes responsibility for all the dormitory 
property assigned to her. Any damage done to property other than that 
which results from ordinary wear and tear will be charged to the student 
concerned. 

The room rates are as follows: As of September 1, 1965, the cost of all 
accommodations (singles as well as doubles) will be the same — $160.00 
per semester. Single rooms generally are not available. The room charge 
will appear on the student's bill, payable at the time of registration. 

Meals may be purchased at the Baltimore Union Cafeteria or in nearby 
restaurants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in The Baltimore Union. 
For particulars, see section immediately below. 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltunore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accom- 
modations for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned 

20 



School of Pharmacy 

building which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, 
laundry facilities, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on 
each floor. Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made 
for rooms only; meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The con- 
tract for accommodations covers the 1966-1967 academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

Double Room Rates: 

$160.00 per semester (per person) 

$ 80.00 per eight weeks summer session (per person) 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 
Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book 
shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. Maid service 
will include cleaning of room twice per week and replacement of change 
of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's office. Mail service is 
also provided. 

Sheets, towels and pillow cases must be rented from the designated linen 
service. The resident may provide his own pillow and blankets or rent 
them as well at additional cost. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 

TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath towel, one face towel, one face cloth, 

soap and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

how to apply for a room assignment 
Write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

21 



University of Maryland 

PARKING 

The expansion program for the Baltimore Campus places a premium on 
space for parking on University lots. 

Student use of parking facilities on a temporary basis in certain designated 
University areas is contingent upon the availability of space. Admission 
of students to University parking lots will be by authorized identification 
cards only. These cards bearing an expiration date are issued by the 
Office of the Dean. 

Parking rates are forty-five cents per day, payable daily. 

In the event students may reside in The Baltimore Union and may require 
continuous parking privileges, such students must use student lots only 
and will be required to pay the parking fee weekly, in advance, at the rate 
of $3.15 per week. Parking on lots adjacent to the Union Dormitory 
Building will be permitted on nights and weekends, for which parking fees 
will not be applicable. Cars parked on these lots after 7 a.m. daily (except 

. Saturdays and Sundays) will be towed away. Admittance to these lots will 

; I be possible after 6 p.m. 



THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

The Ubrary facilities are excellent. The new Health Sciences Library 
which serves the School of Pharmacy, as well as the Schools of Dentistry, 
Medicine, Nursing, and Social Work, contains over 100,000 bound volumes 
and regularly receives over 2,500 scientific periodicals and annual publica- 
tions. 

The Rules and Regulations of the Ubrary are available for distribution to 
students at all times. 

PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. 
The first appointment was made m 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thomp- 
son was designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was 
subsequently held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. 
Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual 
fellowships of up to $1800.00 for single persons or up to $2400.00 for 
married individuals who are promising graduate students desirous of 
doing research in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 

22 



University of Maryland 

and pharmacognosy; students may also apply for an additional allowance 
up to $600.00 for tuition, fees, and supplies. These fellowships are open 
only to citizens of the United States. Address applications directly to the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, 777 Fourteenth 
Street, N.W., Washington 5, D.C., between February 15 and March 15 
for consideration for the forthcoming September. 

The H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a distinguished alumnus of the School 
of Pharmacy, former associate professor of chemistry and prominent 
manufacturing pharmacist of Baltimore had bequeathed a sum of money 
to endow a research fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellow- 
ship previously supported annually, since 1930 by contributions from Dr. 
Dunning, is open to promising graduate students interested in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two 
fellowships for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, phar- 
maceutical chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the 
Faculty Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort Memorial Grant 

In memory of Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort, the John C. 
Stalfort & Sons Company, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, has provided a 
grant of $4000.00 per annum to the Department of Pharmacy to support 
phannaceutical research. A portion of this grant is to be utilized to 
provide a graduate fellowship. 

OTHER RESEARCH GRANTS 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has grants from the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health and the Ortho Research Foundatio'n. The De- 
partment of Anatomy and Physiology has grants from the National Insti- 
tutes of Health, and from the National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration. Through these grants, the School of Pharmacy is able to provide 
a number of research fellowships to graduate and post-doctoral students 
in pharmaceutical chemistry and physiology. 

SPECIAL GRANTS 

The FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, has provided funds to 
the Department of Pharmacy for the procurement of specialized research 
equipment. 

23 



University of Maryland 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $2600.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to 
qualified students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching serv- 
ices to the departments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually 
carry two-thirds of the normal graduate work. 

HOSPITAL PHARMACY RESIDENCY 

The University of Maryland's School of Pharmacy and Hospital are pleased 
to present a combined Graduate Study-Residency Program in Hospital 
Pharmacy, leading to the Master of Science degree and a Certificate of 
Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. Appointments to the residency are for a 
period of two academic years beginning each July 1 . During the academic 
year, the resident divides his time between hospital pharmacy and graduate 
study. Full time training in University Hospital will be required during the 
summers of 1966 and 1^67. University Hospital will provide a stipend of 
$3200 per year for the lirst year as Assistant Resident. Completion of the 
Assistant Residency leads to appointment as Resident with a stipend of 
$4000 per year. Parking space, uniforms and laundry of uniforms are free 
of charge. 

Acceptable hospitalization insurance must be carried and Blue Cross is 
available as a payroll deduction. 

Applicants must be graduates of accredited colleges or schools of pharmacy 
and have all prerequisites for admission to the graduate school. 

There is no formal application blank. All appUcants are requested to sub- 
mit full details: date and place of birth, citizenship, health, marital status, 
education, pharmaceutical experience, a small recent photograph, and an 
official transcript of undergraduate work completed to date. He should also 
ask his Dean and two of his college faculty to write to the Director of 
University Hospital in support of his application. 

The application should be addressed to the Office of the Director, University 
of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS— Pre-Professional Program 

(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and 
loans should be directed to: 

Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20740. 

24 



School of Pharmacy 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships'^ 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-profes- 
sional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. These schol- 
arships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarships'^ 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually 
scholarships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 
ness, moral character, scholastic achievement and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceding $500.00 per academic year 
is used in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These 
scholarships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships''' 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several schol- 
arships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthi- 
ness, scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year 
is applied to defray partially the fees and expenses at College Park, 
Maryland. Recipients must have been residents of the State of Mary- 
land for at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available 
consult the University bulletin "An Adventure in Learning" available from 
College Park, Maryland. 

(UMBC CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships and loans should be 
directed to the Registrar, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 
5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOANS— Professional Program 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed 
to Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The selection of the 



'"These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in- 
Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of 
the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. 

25 



University of Maryland 

recipients of the scholaships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunc- 
tion with a committee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per 
semester to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic 
average and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their 
education. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharaiaceutical Education makes avail- 
able scholarships worth not less than $100.00 per semester to qualified 
students of the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. 

; i 

;[ j The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charies Caspari, Jr., fonner Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and alumni have made an endow- 
ment for a scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 



Ill 



II I The John W. Dargavel Foundation Scholarship Sponsored by 

J the National Association of Retail Druggists 

I The John W. Dargavel Foundation sponsored by the National Association 

; of Retail Druggists provides annually a scholarship in the amount of 

$200.00. The scholarship grant open to a qualified student of the Third, 

;' f Fourth or Fifth Year Class is awarded on the basis of character, scholar- 

' ship and financial need. 

The J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarships 

In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, a former student of the 
School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeannette Joseph provided a generous 
bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who have 
maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial 
assistance. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a 
member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard 
Henry has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually 
by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, to a F&th Year student who has shown superior proficiency in 
practical and commercial pharmacy. 

26 



ScHCX)L OF Pharmacy 

A.M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus 
of the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese 
Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be 
awarded annually to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The 
recipient of the award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The William J. Lowry Alumni Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of her late husband. Dr. William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus 
of the Maryland College of Pharmacy, Class of 1896, and in 1926 a prime 
motivator in the reorganization and reactivation of the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Mrs. William J. 
Lowry has provided the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy a 
sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The 
recipient of this award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund to provide two 
undergraduate scholarships of $500 each, open to citizens of the United 
States. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational 
qualifications by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc., 
may appoint a non-voting member. This scholarship may be renewed 
annually at the discretion of the grantors. 

Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharm- 
acist for over fifty years, the late Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed 
a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The 
recipient of the award will be selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and scholarship. 

Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association 
provides a scholarship in the amount of $200.00 to be awarded to a 
student who has maintained a superior academic record and who is in 
need of financial assistance. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharma- 
ceutical Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a 

27 



h 



i 



University of Maryland 

student who has maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in 
need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
funds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 to $150.00 per semester 
to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average 
and who are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Health Professions Student Scholarship Program 



Public Law 89-290 of 1965 has a provision for granting annual scholar- 
ships not exceeding $2500 to talented students from low income families 
who without such financial aid could not undertake a course of study in 
pharmacy. The School of Pharmacy is participating in this program of 
► scholarships which for the academic year 1966-67 may be awarded only 

f to students admitted into the Third Year Class of the School of Pharmacy. 

\ It is expected that these scholarship grants will be continued so that in the 

I succeeding academic years of 1967-68 and 1968-69, students eligible for 

consideration will be in the classes graduating in 1969, 1970 and 1971. 

To determine that a student can not pursue a full time course of required 
study without scholarship aid, it will be necessary to assess all other financial 
resources available and the expenses the student will incur. Financial re- 
sources which should be assessed include the assistance available from 
J parents; the student's own and, if applicable, his (her) spouse's earnings 

1 and savings; other scholarships and private grants administered by the 

I School of Pharmacy and loans available under the Health Professions 

I Student Loan Program. 



Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory 
of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to 
qualified students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are 
made upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund 

The family of Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld have established a loan fund as 
a memorial to him. This fund is available to qualified needy students. 
Loans from the fund are made upon the recommendation of the Dean 
and the Grants-in-Aid Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 

Health Professions Student Loan Program 

Public Law 89-290 of 1965 has a provision for loans to pharmacy stu- 
dents enrolled in the professional program of the pharmacy curriculum. 
The School of Pharmacy is participating in this program of assistance to 

28 



School of Pharmacy 

students who document financial need and are seeking an education lead- 
ing to an undergraduate degree in pharmacy. 

Individual loans up to $2500 a year may be made and are repayable over 
a ten year period beginning three years after graduation. The borrower 
must sign a note for the loan and agree to the interest and repayment terms 
established by the University. No interest is charged on loans until the 
beginning of the repayment period during which the interest will be 
charged at the current federal rate which for borrowers obtaining their first 
loan in 1966-67 will be 45/8%. 

It is expected that the federal loan program will extend through fiscal 
year 1972. 

Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation 

Loans up to $1000 per year are available from many Maryland banks 
to deserving students who are residents of the State of Maryland and who 
have been accepted for enrollment or who are in good standing. Maximum 
interest on such loans is 6% simple and repayment begins the first day of 
the tenth month after the student leaves school. The repayment period 
may be extended to ten years. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more 
than one-fifth of the graduating class in each college including the School 
of Pharmacy. The honor designations are listed in the commencement 
program and are recorded on the recipents' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two 
academic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or 
higher. Those in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors 
and those in the second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students 
who have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. 
Students whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's 
Academic Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if 
a student repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned 
for these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 



29 



University of Maryland 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fra- 
ternity for honor students in all branches of learning, was estabUshed at 
the University in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are 
eligible by invitation to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the 
first semester of the Third Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national Honorary pharmaceutical society, 

p was established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for 

I chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in schools or 

colleges who are members in good standing of the American Association 

of Colleges of Pharmacy. EUgibility for membership in the Society is 

^1 based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality and 

■' leadership. 

m The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

i\ 

;;; A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 

"'' Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general 
Si; average, provided that this average is not below the grade of "B." Cer- 

tificates of Honor are awarded to the three students having the next 
highest general averages, provided these averages do not fall below the 
|; grade of "B." 

1 1 Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the 
■' Fourth Year Class having the highest general averages, provided these 
averages do not fall below the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered 
in awarding these honors. 






.ii 



The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of 
chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical 
and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. 
In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is 
guided in his judgment of the student's ability by observation and personal 
contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of phar- 
macy at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a 

30 



School of Pharmacy 

gold medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a can- 
didate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior 
proficiency in phannacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and 
dispensing pnarmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, 
the income from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
of the School to the Fifth Year student who has done exceptional work 
throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late 
son, Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, 
Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner 
Brill, have provided a fund the income of which is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly to a Fifth Year student for meritorious academic 
achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink, '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
United States Dispensatory as a prize to the Fifth Year student recom- 
mended by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice 
of pharmacy. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha 
Zeta Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the 
Fifth Year student chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in 
pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
provides annually a key which is awarded to the Fifth Year student 
selected by the Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy 
Administration. 



31 



* 



I! 



University of Maryland 



John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize 



In memory of her late brother, Dr. John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished 
alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, Miss Mary H. Wannenwetsch has 
provided a fund, the income of which is to be used for a prize to be awarded 
to the graduating student majoring in General Pharmacy who has exhibited 
exceptional performance and promise in the practice of community 
pharmacy. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the 
School in extra curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the 
School of Pharmacy Convocations. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

Student Government Alliance 

I ! The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an or- 

;jji| ganization of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding 

^;;; in the internal administration of the school for organizing all extra curricu- 

"•' i lar programs and activities of the student body and for coordinating these 

|. programs and activities with those of the Faculty and Administration to 

jiji foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council of 

" 1 the Student Alliance is composed of the President of the Student Govem- 

• ment Alliance, the Presidents of the respective classes and one delegate 
elected from each undergraduate class. 

i,[l The American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland Pharma- 

'i\ ceutical Association Student Chapter, University of Maryland, School 

,\ of Pharmacy 

The purpose of the Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest and 
more liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as 
a profession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution 
of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the Constitution of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, respectively, especially in foster- 
ing education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its 
application and aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, 
Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy established the Inter-Professional Stu- 
dent Senate for purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships 
among the Professional Schools and the University Units at College Park. 
The Senate is comprised of representatives from each of the five profes- 
sional schools. 

32 



School of Pharmacy 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
A ssociation ( / 965-1 966) 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 
1920, the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing 
committee known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties 
of this group are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to 
the School of Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present mem- 
bers of the Committee are: 

Irving I. Cohen, Chairman 

James P. Cragg, Jr., Co-Chairman 

Paul R. Bergeron, II Gordon A. Mouat 

Thomas J. Hayman Samuel I. Raichlen 

Aaron M. Libowitz Jacob H. Sapperstein 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on 
May 15, 1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the 
Alumni of the Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its 
separate existence as such or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy until 1907, when the General Alumni Association 
of the University of Maryland was formed. Following the organization 
of the General Alumni Association, the Society remained dormant until 
June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. Each year it is more 
evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not only maintained, 
but is growing. 

Officers (1965-1966) 

Hyman Davidov (1920) Honorary President 

Harold P. Levin (1943) President 

Aaron M. Libowitz (1932) 1st Vice President 

Casimir T. Ichniowski (1929) 2nd Vice President 

Frank J. Slama (1924) Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield (1924) Treasurer 

Executive Committee {Elected Members) 

Robert J. Kokoski (1952), Chairman 

John F. Fader, II (1963) 

PaulG. Gaver (1959) 

Nathan I. Gruz (1939) 

Bernard B. Lachman (1945) 

Solomon Weiner (1924) 

Harry R. Wille (1954) 

33 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

COURSES, HOURS AND CREDITS 



Hi! 

null 



t 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Hrs. Per Week 


Hrs. Per Week 


Title and Number of Coarse 






H 


2 


.2 
o 




1 


5 

1 


Third Year (Required) 
Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and 

Histology 


2 
3 


6 

4 


8 

7 


4 
4 










Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. Principles 


3 

2 


4 
6 


7 
8 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34, Quantitative 
Pharmaceutical Analysis 


4 


Pharmacy 31, Mathematics of the 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 


3 

3 1 

2 1 


1 

1 


3 
6 
2 


3 

4 
2 




Pharmacy 33, 34, Processes and Dosage Forms— 
Pharmacy 35, Professional Communications _ _ 


3 


3 

1 


6 


4 


Pharmacy 38, History of Pharmacy 


3 1 
2 

1 


_____ 

1 


3 
5 

1 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 36, Accounting 










3 




1 
1 
2 


..___ 


1 
6 






Fourth Year (Required) 
First Aid 1, Standard 


17 


18 


Microbiology 41, Pharmaceutical Microbiology 


4 




1 


_| 




Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology, 

Public Health and Parasitology _ 


2 


i 
4 


6 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Principles of 
Biochemistry _ _ _ 


4 
2 
2 


4 
3 
4 


8 
6 
6 


5 
3 
3 




Pharmacognosy 41, 42, General Pharmacognosy. 
Pharmacy 43, 44, Pharmaceutical Technology.. 
Physiology 142, General Physiology 


2 
2 
3 


3 
4 
6 


6 
6 
9 


3 
3 

5 


Electives " 








3-4 


3-4 




3 




3 










(Electives — General Pharmacy Major)" 
Pharmacy Administration 41, Marketing 


18-19 
3 


18-19 


Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 

Management I . 


2 

4 
4 


3 
3 


5 

4 

7 


3 


(Electives— Pre-Graduate Major)" 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus". 


4 

3 

1 
2 

2 

3 


3 
3 
3 


4 

6 
4 
5 

2 

3 


4 

4 
2 
3 

2 

3 

5-6 


4 


Fifth Year (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology 

Pharmacy 151, Professional Pharmacy 


6 




2 
2 
3 


3 


6 
2 
3 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharma- 


2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, 

Chemistry of Medicinal Products 


3 


Electives" __. 


5-6 




















19-20 
3 


18-19 


(Electives — General Pharmacy Major)" 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists 


2 


3 


5 










Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


3 

2 
2 


""6 

1 
1 3 


3 

R 

i 

1 5 
1 
2 


3 


OR 

Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations _ 










3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 


2 

2 
2 


3 


2 

6 
2 


2 

3 
2 


2 


(Electives— Hospital Major)" 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists- 
Pharmacy 157, Hospital Pharmacy 












Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 


2 
2 

3 

r"" 

4 


3 
6 


5 
2 

1 3 
6 


3 


Pharmacy 158, Hospital Pharmacy 
Administration II, 




1 
1 






2 


(Electives — Pre-Graduate Major)" 

Chemistry 187. 189, Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 
Laboratory 


3 


1 

6 


3 
6 


3 

2 


2 

4 
2 


3 
2 


OR 

Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems " 

( Electives— Pre-Graduate Major ) " 
(Transfers from General Pharmacy Major) 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus'*' 






1 

4 

1 


3 


4 

4 
4 


6 
.___. 


6 

4 
6 


2 
4 


tPharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems 


2 















"^ Required of Fifth- Year students transferring from General Pharmacy Major to Pre-Graduate 

Major. See pages 17 and 18. 
" The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM -RLQUlRtD PROGRAM 
SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



COVM 


Didactic 


LaboratoiT 


Total 


Credit Hoars 


Third Y««r 

Anatomy 31 __ 


82 
96 
32 
48 
96 
32 
48 
32 


96 

128 

96 


128 

224 

128 

48 

192 

82 

48 

80 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30. 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34 


8 

4 
8 


Pharmacy 33, 34 


06 


8 




2 






8 


Pharmacy Administration 36 


48 


S 


Total 


416 

16 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
48 


464 

64 
64 
64 
96 
128 
96 


880 

16 
96 
96 
128 
160 
192 
144 


86 


Fourth Year 
First Aid 1 




Microbiology 41 


4 


Microbiologry 146 


4 


Phamaceutical Chemistry 149 


6 
6 


Pharmacy 43, 44 


6 


Physiolosry 142 


6 


ToUl 


820 

112 
16 
64 
64 
96 


612 

96 
48 
96 


832 

208 
64 

160 
64 
96 


80 


Fifth Year 

Pharmacolosry 155, 166 


9 


Pharmacy 151 


2 


Pharmacy 153, 154 _ _ _ 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 51 52 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152___ 




6 


Total 


352 


240 


592 


27 







PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM— ELECTIVE PROGRAMS 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


DidacUe 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit Hoars 


Fourth Tear 

(General Pharmacy Major) 
Pharmacy Administration 41 


48 
32 

128 

32 

48 

82 

64 

32 
32 
82 
32 

96 




48 
80 

128 

80 
48 
r 

BO 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 
192 

160 

128 

160 




PharmacjT Administration 42 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 
Mathematics 20 21 


48 




Fifth Year 

(General Pharmacy Major) 


48 




Pharmacognosy 52 




or 
Pharmacy 156 


o 
48 








(Hospital Major) 


48 








Pharmacy 156 _ 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 158 


2 


(Pre-Graduate Major) 
Chemistry 187, 189 






Chemistry 188, 190 


192 

o 
144 




or 
Pharmacy 161, 162 


16 

128 
16 




(Pre-Graduate Major) 
(Transfers from General Pharmacy 

Major) 
Mathematics 20. 21 




Pharmacy 161. 162 


144 





TOTALS OF HOURS AND CREDITS" 



Foarth Tear 

General Pharmacy Major 


80 
128 

144 

128 
128 
96 

112 
144 


48 


128 
128 

192 

224 
224 

288 

256 
288 


6 


Pre-Graduate Major _ 


8 


Fifth Tear 

General Pharmacy Major 


48 

or 

96 

96 
192 

o 
144 
144 


10 


Hospital Major 


10 
10 


Pre-Graduate Major 


10 


Pre-Graduate Major 


10 
12 


(Transfers from General Pharmacy 

Major) 





" The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 

»» Minimum credit hour requirements of instruction in the* Professional Curriculum are : 
(a) General Pharmacy Major. 108 credit hours; (b) Hospital Major, 108 credit hours; 

(c) Hospital Major (Transfers from Pre-Graduate Major), 110 credit hours; and 

(d) Pre-Graduate Major, 110 credit hours. Also, consult pages 17 and 18 concerning electi^ 
and requirements for graduation. 



Description of Courses 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 
ANATOMY 

31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello, Darago and Goldberg.) 
A study of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. The course 
is designed to provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 
particular emphasis on human structures. 

FIRST AID 

1. First Aid Course. (0) 

Fourth Year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson, 
instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

20, 21. Calculus. (4, 4) 

Fourth Year and Fifth Year, four lectures (Dean.) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 18, 19 and/or approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, 
kinematics, integration, geometric and physical application on integration, par- 
tial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

First sem.ester. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. Sample space, events, 
probability and its basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random 
variables, distribution functions (continuous and discrete); typical distributions, 
expectations, moments, generating functions; transformations of random varia- 
bles, limit theorems. (Dean.) 

132. Introduction TO Statistics. (3) 

Second semester, three lectures and one hour of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 130. Sampling distributions, elements of point and set estima- 
tion, maximum likelihood principle, testing statistical hypotheses, standard 
tests. Neyman-Pearson lemma and problems of optimality of tests, linear 
hypotheses, sequential methods. (Dean.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology. (4) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay, Becker and Krywolap.) 

36 



School of Pharmacy 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30. 32. This course is designed es- 
pecially for pharmacy students and includes practice and theoretical considera- 
tion of bacteria, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, viruses, rickettsia, yeasts 
and molds. 

Laboratory teaching includes methods of staining and the preparation of media; 
cultural characteristics of bacteria; emphasis is given to the study of disinfec- 
tants, antiseptics, germicides and sterilization, antibiotics and their antibacterial 
action, microbiological assay, sensitivity testing and virus techniques. Experi- 
ments are included for the bacteriological evaluation of milk, water, food and 
air. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health 

AND Parasitology. (4) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay, Becker and Krywolap) 
Prerequisite, Microbiology 41. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products such as sera, vaccines, toxins, 
toxoids, etc. Special attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and ani- 
mals to sensitizing substances, drug idiosyncracies, hay fever, food allergies, 
contact dermatosis, and animal inoculation. Part of the course is devoted to the 
study of Public Health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections, immunity, transmission, diagnosis, treat- 
ment and prevention of parasitic diseases. 

For Graduates 
200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1). 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1, 1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

211. Public Health. (1-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite, Microbiology 41, 146. Lectures and discussions on the organiza- 
tion and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

399. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by the amount of work performed. (Shay.) 

37 



University of Maryland 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

30, 32. Principles of Organic Chemistry. (4, 4) 
Third Year, two lectures, one recitation, one laboratory. 

(Miller, Frankel and Whang.) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry. 

34. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Zenker and Lutsky.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32 or equivalent. A study of quan- 
titative analytical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
official preparations with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, or equivalent. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. 

149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Fourth Year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Zenker, Schutz and Lutsky.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 34. Lectures and laboratory exer- 
cises devoted to the composition of living organisms and the chemical and 
physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Abushanab.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A survey of the structural 
relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally of organic medici- 
nal products. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 19, 30, 32, Physics 10, 11, Mathematics 20, 21. A study 
of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two laboratories. (Leslie and Lutsky.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 187, 189 or concurrent registration. Quantitative ex- 
periments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and 
acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 
210, 211. Techniques of Chemical Research. (3,3) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143, 187-190 or concurrent registration. Lectures 

38 



School of Pharmacy 

and laboratory exercises devoted to the systematic separation, characterization 
and identification of organic structures by chemical and instrumental methods, 
to the synthesis of organic structures of the more difficult types, including iso- 
topically labeled compounds, and to isotope counting techniques. 

230. Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of prog- 
ress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles of stereochemistry 
of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and synthesis of 
heterocyclic compounds. 

250. Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the synthesis and structure deter- 
mination of steroids and the application of modern chemical concepts to the 
chemistry of steroids. 

252. Alkaloids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles involved in struc- 
ture determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alkaloidal classes. 

253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143, 151, 152 or permission of 
the instructor. A study of structural relationships and basic principles con- 
cerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, e.g., structure 
activity relationships, physical properties and biological activity, cellular trans- 
port, drug, protein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and physico- 
chemical mechanisms of drug action. 

271. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149; Chemistry 189. The application 
of physical chemistry principles to biological systems, and a discussion of the 
physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. 

272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of particular in- 
terest in the pharmaceutical sciences, including surface chemistry, colloids, 
kinetics, colligative properties and absorption spectroscopy. 

39 



University of Maryland 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are necessary for, 

and a part of, a larger research effort. 

281. Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 
Two lectures. (Zenker.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of the design, the 
mode of action at the enzymatic level and the metabolism of biochemical 
analogs. 

282. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. 
ii ! Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of modern techniques and 

Jjij metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug metabolism. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

4L Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Euler.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of crude vegetable drugs with special emphasis on 
the physical and microscopical characteristics used in their identification and in 
the detection of adulteration. 

42. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Euler.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacognosy 41. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 41 with 
instruction covering drugs of animal origin and allergy-producing pollens. 
Special emphasis is placed upon official and non-official chemical tests used 
in the identification of drugs and their constituents. 

5L Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists. (3) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

A discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 
and the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; their 
recognition, life history, and methods of control. 

52. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42; Pharmacology 155. 
A study of principal pharmaceutical agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

40 



School of Pharmacy 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacognosy 41, 42. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work, on local flora. Instruction will be 
given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. Lectures and laboratory work covering 
advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 
roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs 
and spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice 
in identification and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Euler.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not 
ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be 
given to practical problems and to the identification and detection of adulter- 
ants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy, 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 



PHARMACOLOGY 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
155, 156. Pharmacology, General. (4, 5) 

Fifth Year, three lectures and one laboratory first semester; four lectures and 
one laboratory second semester. (Ichniowski, Driever and Diamond.) 

Prerequisites, Physiology 142; Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or consent of 
the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward 
effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156. A study of the methods of biological 
assay oflacial in the United States Pharmacopeia and the National Formu- 



lary. 



41 



University of Maryland 



For Graduates 



201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacology 171. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156, and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

5,j 221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay 

!: Methods. (2-4), (2-4) 

fcjl Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 

li!; instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 

Sll Prerequisites, Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the develop- 

H!' ment of biological assay methods and comparative standards. 



[ii| 399. Research in Pharmacology. 

!;•] Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

Sf-ii (Ichniowski.) 

t 

;,., PHARMACY 

;;;; 31. Mathematics of the Pharmaceutical Sciences. (3) 
4,1 Third Year, first semester, three lectures. (Allen and Leslie.) 

Applied calculations in all fields of pharmaceutical sciences with emphasis on 
problem solving in systems of measurement, aliquot methods, alligation, HLB 
systems, isotonicity, chemical reactions, commercial problems, drug absorption, 
and the interpretation and evaluation of experimental data. 

33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms. (4, 4) 

Third Year, three lectures and one laboratory. (Lamy, Fong and Kitler) 

Pharmacy 31 and 33 are prerequisites to Pharmacy 34. Commentary on the 
official compendia of pharmacy. Includes pharmaceutical manipulations and 
processes for preparing official dosage forms. Particular emphasis is placed on 
physical and chemical properties of ingredients, common nomenclature and 
synonyms, storage conditions and uses. 

35. Professional Communications. (2) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures. (Ballman.) 

Oral and written expression on subjects of pharmaceutical use and interest. 
Bibliographical methods, oral and written reports and communications, con- 
duct of discussion groups, audio-visual aids. 

38. History of Pharmacy. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

A survey of the history of pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 
those aspects of science most pertinent to the interests of the pharmacist. Re- 
search papers and reports required. 

42 



School of Pharmacy 

43, 44. Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3) 

Fourth Year, two lectures, one laboratory and one recitation. 

(Shangraw and Fong.) 
Prerequisites. Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. The physical-chemical principles in- 
volved in pharmaceutical systems and the application of this knowledge to the 
development, preparation and packaging of medicinal formulations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
151. Professional Pharmacy. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. 

(Shangraw and Lamy.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Preparation for the major fields of pharmaceutical 
specialization by rotation through the school model pharmacy and manufac- 
turing pharmacy laboratories as well as the inpatient and outpatient hospital 
pharmacy departments. 

153, 154. Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Alien, Jacobs and Wagner.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Professional laboratory practice and other special- 
ized activities pertaining to prescriptions, including an evaluation of com- 
pounding aids and commercial pharmaceuticals. 

156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Allen and Jacobs.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 153. A study of the composition and manufacture of 
preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of cold cream, 
vanishing cream, protective cream, hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face 
powder, dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, toothpaste, deodorants, depilatories, 
suntan preparations, etc. The acid-mantle of the skin and hypoallergenic prep- 
arations are also emphasized. 

157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration I. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures. (Lamy.) 

Prerequisite. Pharmacy 44. The fundamentals of hospital pharmacy practice 
and administration. Includes a study of the history and development of hos- 
pital pharmacy, physical facilities, minimum standards, purchasing, the formu- 
lary, record keeping, and dispensing practices. 

158. Hospital Pharmacy Administration II. (2) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures. (Lamy.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 157. An orientation to the function of the hospital 
pharmacy within the hospital. A study of the administrative organization of 
a hospital and the interrelationship of the various hospital departments with 
the hospital pharmacy. 

161, 162. Special Problems. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 20, 21 or concurrent registration. Independent in- 
vestigations in the several pharmaceutical sciences, consisting of library and 
laboratory research and seminars. (Staff.; 

43 



University of Maryland 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 153, 154. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications, patents and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Phar- 
macy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and im- 
portant pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 

»... 207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

i;; ! Two lectures a week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
{ijl systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

Ill; 211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1, 1) 

gf| I One lecture. Given in alternate years. (Allen.) 

*' Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 

^'1 1 reference to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the 

^ ' pharmaceutical periodicals. 

If 

•^^ - 215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

~'h Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 156, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development 



I 



"; of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 



221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and 
.J;i!| the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 
Each semester. (Lamy.) 
Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research 
and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Allen.) 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 

(Foss, Allen, Shangraw and Lamy.) 



44 



School of Pharmacy 



PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 



36. Accounting. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Leavitt and Augsburger.) 
A study of the fundamental principles of accounting, especially as it concerns 
the practice of community pharmacy. 

41. Drug Marketing. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, three lectures. (Leavitt and Kitler.) 

Prerequisite, Economics 37 or its equivalent. This is an introductory course 
in the field of marketing with special emphasis on the marketing of drug prod- 
ucts. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the 
forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing 
drug products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

42. Pharmacy Management I. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 4L A study of the application of 
accounting, marketing and merchandising principles to the operation of a com- 
munity pharmacy, including financial statement analysis, pricing, inventory and 
expense management and control. 

51, 52. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, 
Agency and Partnerships. 

53, 54. Pharmacy Management II, III. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 42. A study of the management prob- 
lems of community pharmacy, including organization, staffing, directing, plan- 
ning and control. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
142. General Physiology. (5) 

Fourth Year, second semester, three lectures and two laboratories. 

(Costello, Darago and Goldberg.) 
Prerequisite, Anatomy 31. A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physi- 
ology including the structure and permeability of the cell membrane, neuro- 
physiology, muscle physiology, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, 
the digestive system, the excretory system, endocrinology, metabolism, and 
the special senses. 



45 



University of Maryland 



I 






13 i 



For Graduates 



245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 
First semester, three lectures. (Costello.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Physiology 142. Consent of 
instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical properties 
of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, 
golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and their con- 
tributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemical phe- 
nomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

246. Radioisotope Technique. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, consent of instructor. A course concerned with the practical use 
•J'i' of isotopes particularly as tracers in metabolic investigations. 

Jliil 399. Research in Physiology. 

jjllj: Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 



46 



School of Pharmacy 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1965-66 
Graduate Students^ 

♦Anoff, Bernard Maryland 

Augsburger, Larry Louis Maryland 

Block, Lawrence Howard Maryland 

Brown, Sr. Jane Marie Maryland 

Caplan, Yale Howard Maryland 

Chiu, Hsi-chiang Taiwan 

Darago, Lillian Louise Maryland 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

Fong, Dick Tak-Kuen Hong Kong 

*Frankel, Ira Jeffrey New York 

Franklin, James Gordon Maryland 

JHeyman, Irwin Alvin Maryland 

Hynniman, Clifford Elton Pennsylvania 

Kitler, Mary Ellen Pennsylvania 

Lleander, Glory Coronado Philippines 

Lutsky, Barry Neal Maryland 

Manudhane, Krisna Shankar India 

JMcKelvey, Cornelius Patrick Pennsylvania 

Milkowski, John David Maryland 

Rhodes, Robert Allen Virginia 

JRichman, M. David Maryland 

Schutz, Charles John Maryland 

tScott, Kenneth Richard New York 

Siman, Fuad Sami Lebanon 

JStein, Martin Edward Massachusetts 

Vora, Kakubhai M India 

tWagner, Frederick Henry Maryland 

Walkling, Walter Douglas Maryland 

Whang, Clara C. T China 

§WUde, Kenneth D Maryland 

Fifth Year Class 

Avery, Carolyn Jane (Mrs.) Maryland 

Berry, John Thomas Maryland 

Bloom, Barry Louis Maryland 

Christian, Mitchell Alvin Maryland 

Cohen, Michael Jay Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony Leo Maryland 

Dailey, John William Maryland 

Donnelly, John Allen Maryland 

Edmondson, William Henry Maryland 

Eng, Frederick Maryland 

Erdman, Sheldon Norman Maryland 



fRegistered in Graduate School 
*Did not attend entire session 
tFirst semester only 
§ Second semester only 



47 



University of Maryland 

Fischer, Bernard Aloysius, III Maryland 

Fleischer, Charles Alexander Maryland 

Heer, Roger Glenn Maryland 

Hess, Gary Lee Maryland 

Hoffman, Ronald Harvey Maryland 

Johnson, Eugene Malcolm Maryland 

Lessing, Melvin Maryland 

Lindenbaum, Ronald Lee Maryland 

Meyer, Howard Barry Maryland 

Moore, William Carlton Delaware 

Miisch, Robert Allen Maryland 

!j! I Neiner, Joan Marie Louisiana 
jj ^ Pincus, Jack Howard Maryland 

lii Rayman, Marsha Jane District of Columbia 

Spuras, Jenina Danute Maryland 

Tannebaum, Stanley Bernard Maryland 

Tims, John Marshall Maryland 

Via, David Martin Maryland 

Weiner, Myron Maryland 



lf»> 



Fourth Year Class 



Alpert, Charles Marvin Maryland 

Blitz, Alvin Michael Maryland 

Buckner, Stephen Louis Maryland 

, I Cohen, David Maryland 

8 ! David, Stephen Thomas Maryland 

DeNeale, Richard Jay District of Columbia 

Dubansky, Ronald Floyd Maryland 

Frankenfeld, Frederick Martin Maryland 

Freedman, Jerald Allan Maryland 

Gold, Daniel Martin Maryland 

Golob, Jerrold Jay Maryland 

Goodman, Richard Mark Maryland 

Grabush, Arnold Fred Maryland 

Groman, Alvin Daniel Maryland 

Hill, Carol Jane Maryland 

Hommerbocker, Barry Allan Maryland 

Jacobs, Lionel Harvey Maryland 

Jaskulski, Alan Joseph Maryland 

Kovalsky, Paul Victor Maryland 

Lehman, Allan Gus Maryland 

McCabe, Stanley Brasure Maryland 

Needel, Stephen Maryland 

Newcomb, John Randolph Maryland 

Sanford, Ronald Arthur Maryland 

Sherman, Howard Maryland 

IShnidman, Meira Katz Maryland 



JFirst semester only 

48 



School of Pharmacy 

Stromberger. Henry Richard Maryland 

Taylor. Charles Dorsey Maryland 

Telak. Ronald Casimir Maryland 

Trost. Patrick Edgar Maryland 

Vykol. Frank James Maryland 

Will, Marcia Ann Maryland 

Third Year Class 

Ackman, Joseph Maryland 

Adams, Robert William Maryland 

Balch. John Howard Maryland 

Barker, John Paul, Jr Maryland 

Bohle, George Charles Maryland 

Cohen, Steven Saul Maryland 

Dirnberger, Thomas John Pennsylvania 

Dyke, Wayne Alden Maryland 

Edelman, Barry Alan Maryland 

Feldman, Neil Maryland 

Gerstein. Robert Bruce Maryland 

Ginsberg, Murray Phillip Maryland 

Griffiths, Robert Charles Maryland 

Hill, Pamela Marie Maryland 

Hirsch, Charles Benjamin Maryland 

Honkofsky, Arnold Jay Maryland 

Howard, Leonard Charles, Jr Maryland 

JKenny, James Estel Maryland 

Krawiecki, Elizabeth Ann New York 

*Larkin, Patrick Wallace Maryland 

Lawrence, Barbara Josephine Maryland 

Lesser, Gary Allen Maryland 

Majchrzak, Edward Robert Maryland 

Mierzwicki, Leo Anthony Maryland 

Motsko, John Michael Maryland 

Nash, Glenn Wilson Maryland 

Neuman, Joann Lynne Maryland 

Pfeiffer, Paul Russell Maryland 

Pironis, Uldis Verners Maryland 

Priller, Charles August Maryland 

Ricci, John Robert Maryland 

Rolf, Larry Joe Missouri 

Rosenbluth, Karen Sue Alabama 

JSamios, William Arthur Maryland 

Smith, Earl Thomas Maryland 

Sohmer, Herbert Marshall Maryland 

Solomon, Larry Paul Maryland 

Statter, William Maryland 

Welsh, Patrick George Maryland 

Wolff, Martin William, Jr Maryland 

*Did not attend entire session 
fFirst Semester only 
tSecond Semester only 

49 



University of Maryland 

AT COLLEGE PARK 

Second Year Class 

Adler, Richard M Maryland 

Appel, Michael J Maryland 

JBabb, James D Maryland 

Berrett, Judith L Maryland 

Berry, James C Maryland 

Besser, Charles A Maryland 

Boiling, Thomas V Maryland 

fBurkhardt, Charles T Maryland 

^ , \ fCarroll, Phillip M Maryland 

Jjii ' Carson, Janice E Maryland 

^?'' fChemblin, Susan L Maryland 

j; , I JCrooks, Clint R Maryland 

*... I Culp, James B Maryland 

JSl I tCummins, Leroy J Maryland 

, fDaley, Patricia Maryland 

Ijlii Davis, David M Maryland 

*•*" JDowling, Edward G Maryland 

£i^ i ; Epstein, Arthur L Maryland 

51 : JFitzgerald, Thomas H Maryland 

® 1 1 fFoxwell, Lurman H Maryland 

t„Ki I Grossman, Paul New Jersey 

*5«' ' fHanratty, Eugene J Maryland 

Hare, David F Maryland 

fHarwell, Elsie R Maryland 

^'1 fHeagy, Ronald W Maryland 

iSIl Helfand, Carl Maryland 

|[ fHightow, Dennis A Maryland 

iiiji Hogue, George L Maryland 

JJacob, Melvin A Maryland 

|,, I JJarkowski, Leonard Maryland 

^J|i Kaniecki, Paul E Maryland 

*•";! JKern, Edward G Maryland 

|5|i Kestler, Robert L Maryland 

fKirson, Alan B Maryland 

Klebrowski, Stephen C Maryland 

Krause, John F Maryland 

fLebrody, Susan E Maryland 

Limric, Julie E Maryland 

JLipov, Richard S Maryland 

Liptz, Sheldon J District of Columbia 

Lunz, Kathleen M Maryland 

Mallonee, Melvin R Maryland 

*Mariany, Louis J Maryland 

fMcConnell, Patricia S Maryland 

fMiles, Pamela L Maryland 






*Did not attend entire session 
fFirst semester only 
JSecond semester only 

50 



School of Pharmacy 

Minkove, Carroll M. Maryland 

Poole, Biirry W. New Jersey 

Purdin, Thomas R New Jersey 

fRawlcigh, Peter R New York 

tReese, William A Maryland 

Reinke, Robert M Maryland 

Roberts, Ralph E New Jersey 

tRobertson. Robert J Maryland 

Rochlin, David H Maryland 

fRosenwasser, David E Virginia 

*Samios, William A Maryland 

Sandler, Ronald D Maryland 

fScarborough, Robert L Maryland 

fScheinin, Steven J Maryland 

Schneider, Ronald Maryland 

JSiegel, Jack M Maryland 

Spriggs, Dolores Maryland 

fSullivan, Celia S District of Columbia 

Taylor, Donald W Maryland 

fToronto, James F Maryland 

JTreffner, Maria M Maryland 

VonBergen, Eric W Maryland 

Walls, John G Maryland 

fWalters, Gary J Maryland 

fWeisbrod, Joel D New Jersey 

JWilliams, Joan P New Jersey 

Yorkilous, John C Maryland 

First Year Class at College Park 

Abate, James J Maryland 

Abel, Lois Maryland 

Abramson, Edward J New York 

Alcorn, William E Maryland 

Becker, John P Maryland 

fBohm, Roger A Maryland 

fBondorf. Fred C Maryland 

fBrotkowski, Gerald L Maryland 

JBrowning, Romanus G., Jr Maryland 

fBurkhouse, Ronald T Maryland 

Clark, Annie M Maryland 

Cocoros, Alice Maryland 

fCoIlins, Colin Maryland 

JCooke, Conrad N Maryland 

Cornell, John M Maryland 

Coulter, Eileen C Maryland 

JDavis. Janis K Maryland 

fDavis, Lawrence G District of Columbia 

Dooley, George T. Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session 
tFirst semester only 
JSecond semester only 



57 






ml 



University of Maryland 

Dotson, Allan L Maryland 

Farkas, Victor L Maryland 

Firthj^ Pamela J Maryland 

Gallagher, Thomas C New York 

Gendason, Herbert Maryland 

Gutkowski, Stanley W Maryland 

Hall, Donna L Maryland 

fHammond, James I Maryland 

Hastmann, Paul S Maryland 

Holdefer, Gary P Maryland 

Hopkins, David R Maryland 

Hunt, John H New Jersey 

Hunt, Roger W Maryland 

Jones, David H Maryland 

Klein, Ira D Maryland 

Ji; , fKosinski, David A Maryland 

|r>ii ' Krastel, Raymond J Maryland 

^j... : Lane, Thomas E Maryland 

ii I Lawrence, Granville P Maryland 

Levi, Mark A Maryland 

Luzuriaga, Michael Maryland 

JLynch, Whitmel H Maryland 

Misowitz, Edward A Maryland 

Moss, Jo Ann Maryland 

Paulick, Carol M Maryland 

Principio, Louis J Maryland 

JPryor, Douglas M Maryland 

r. I Purzitsky, Marvin E Maryland 

iil| Rejonis, Robert A Maryland 

Riley, Arthur N Maryland 

![ ; Scher, Dana L Maryland 

fScherr, Allan Maryland 

Schumchyk, Diane C Maryland 

fSherman, Sonia Maryland 

Snellinger, John E Maryland 

Snoops, Dorothy L Maryland 

fSroka, John D Maryland 

Stires, John C Maryland 

Tauben, Michael New Jersey 

Thacker, Karen L Maryland 

Travers, Charles K Maryland 

fViola, Josephine M Maryland 

Welk, Paul C Maryland 

Wright, Harold E Maryland 

Zapresko, Albert M Maryland 

Zimmerman, Wililam J Maryland 



p., i> 



fFirst semester only 
JSecond semester only 



52 



School of Pharmacy 

Special Students, 1965-66 

Crook, James Edward Maryland 

Weiman, Dolores Toledo Maryland 



ROLL OF GRADUATES, JUNE 5, 1965 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Fox, C. David New York 

Heifetz, Carl L Michigan 

Morris, Martin H Maryland 

Wang, Theodore H. T China 

Warfield, Albert H Maryland 

Master of Science 

Augsburger, Larry L Maryland 

Bossle, Paul C Louisiana 

Brodeur, Richard J Connecticut 

McDonald, Donald E Pennsylvania 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Brauner, Robert Paul New York 

Brun Del Re, Robert Maryland 

Caplan, Suzanne Joan Maryland 

Catlett, Leon Ray Maryland 

Cavoures, James Anthony Maryland 

Conrad, John Wilmer, Jr Maryland 

Cooney, John Robinson Pennsylvania 

Cysyk, Richard Louis Maryland 

Dolecek, Gayle Robert Maryland 

Elliott, W. Robert Maryland 

Frangakis, Sylvia Mina Maryland 

Gamerman, Marvin Irvin Maryland 

Glover, Wayne Allen Maryland 

Goldberg, Marvin Maryland 

Hoffman, Robert William Maryland 

Kroopnick, Robert Beck Maryland 

Miller, Harris Lee Maryland 

Mintz, Martin Barry Maryland 

Myers, Mary Lynn Maryland 

Rachanow, Gerald Marvin Maryland 

Schutz, Charles John Maryland 

Sollod, Ralph M Maryland 

Walsh, Michael Joseph Maryland 

Williams, C. Bennett, Jr Maryland 

Wolfson, Israel David Maryland 



53 



University of Maryland 



I 



111 



l^iiii 



HONORS (1964-65) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Gerald Marvin Rachanow 

Certificates of Honor to holders of next highest average Richard Louis Cysyk 

Charles John Schutz 
Michael Joseph Walsh 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Gerald Marvin Rachanow 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) Gerald Marvin Rachanow 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Richard Louis C^syk 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Cornelius Bennett Williams, Jr. 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize Michael Joseph Walsh 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Cornelius Bennett Williams, Jr. 

Phi Alpha Chapter, Rho Pi Phi Fraternity Cup (Leadership) . . Richard Louis Cysyk 
Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize (Pharmacology) . . . Charles John Schutz 
Epsilon Alumnae (Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) William Robert Elliott 

Merck Award (Pharmacy) Ralph Morton Sollod 

Rexall Drug Company Award (Outstanding Achievement) . Michael Joseph Walsh 






ll! 



DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1964-65) 



Class of 1965 



Richard L. Cysyk 
Sylvia M. Frangakis 
Gerald M. Rachanow 



Charles J. Schutz 
Ralph M. Sollod 
Michael J. Walsh 
Cornelius B. Williams, Jr. 



Honorable Mention 



Robert P. Brauner 
Robert Brun del Re 
Suzanne L. Caplan 



John W. Dailey 
Charles A. Fleischer 



Eugene M. Johnson 



John W. Conrad, Jr. 
Marvin Goldberg 
Harris L. Miller 



Class of 1966 



I 



Lawrance L. Martin 
Jack H. Pincus 



Honorable Mention 



Ronald L. Lindenbaum 
John M. Tims 



David Cohen 
Stephen T. Davis 



Jerald A. Freedman 
Arnold F. Grabush 



Class of 1967 

Richard J. DeNeale 
Meira K. Shnidman 

Honorable Mention 

Henry R. Stromberger 
Patrick E. Trost 



54 



Index 



Academic Calendar, 1966-67 v 

Academic Excellence, Dean's Medals for 54 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 13 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 13 

Accreditation 2 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants for admission to the Pre-professional Program at 

College Park 3 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at 

Baltimore 7 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 2 

Admission Requirements 

To the College Park Program 3 

To the Baltimore Program 7 

Alumni Association 33 

Applications, Deadlines For 

College Park Campus 4 

UMBC, Baltimore County Campus 4 

Assistantships, Graduate 24 

Attendance Requirements 13 

Baltimore Union 20 

Board of Regents vii 

Breakage 10 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1966 and 1967 iv 

Calendar, Academic v 

Correspondence vi 

Courses, Description of 36 

Curriculum, Changes in 13 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program at College Park, Md 5 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program From UMBC Division 7 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges 

other than University of Maryland 7 

Curriculum, Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses, Hours and Credits 34 

Summary of Hours and Credits 35 

Degrees 2 

Deportment 20 

Dismissal for Low Scholarship 16 

Dormitories (See Housing) 20 

Elective Programs at Baltimore 17 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 22 

Employment 20 

Examinations 14 

55 



lb*.' i 



University of Maryland 

INDEX (Continued) 

Faculty Council xiii 

Faculty (1965-1966) xiii 

Fees and Expenses 

Changes in registration 10 

Graduate 11 

Late registration 10 

Part-time Undergraduate 10 

Pre-professional at College Park 5, 12 

^ , Pre-professional at UMBC Campus 5 

fil ' Fellowships and Grants 22 

5«i I Grade of D, Raising 15 

Grade of F, Removal of 15 

Grading System 14 

S" ' Grade Point Average 14 

Grade of Withdrawing Students 12 

Graduates, Roll of 1965 53 

Graduation Requirements 18 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 

Honor Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi 30 

Rho Chi 30 

Honors and Awards 29 

Honors Recipients (1964-65) 54 

Hospital Pharmacy Residency 24 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 20 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 20 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 20 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 15 

Laboratory Fees 10 

Library, Health Sciences 22 

Staff xvii 

Loans 24, 25 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 19 

Registration with 19 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy (1965-1966) 33 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 14 

Office of the Dean, Hours vi 

Officers of the University viii 

Central Administrative Officers viii 

Deans of the Schools and Colleges ix 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs x 

Division Chairmen xi 

Emeriti ix 

Standing Committees, Faculty Senate xii 

56 



il 



School of Pharmacy 
INDEX (Continued) 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee 

on Student Life and Welfare xii 

Parking 22 

Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 7 

From UMBC Campus 7 

From Other Universities and Colleges 7 

Probation for Low Scholarship 16 

Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1965-1966 

Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 16 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 16 

Registration by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 19 

Requirements for Admission 

To Pre-professional Program at College Park 2 

To Pre-professional Program at UMBC Campus 7 

To Professional Program at Baltimore 7 

Residence and Non-Residence, Definition of 13 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 25 

Scholarships and Loans (UMBC Campus) 25 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 24 

Student Organizations, Baltimore Campus 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 32 

Student Chapter, The American Pharmaceutical Association 

and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 32 

Student Government Alliance 32 

Students, Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 17 

Roll of 47 

Students, Pre-professional, College Park 50-52 

Students, Special 53 

Textbooks 12 

Transcripts of Records 18 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 9 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) 4, 5, 12 

Tuition and Fees (UMBC Campus) 5, 12 

Visitors vi 

Withdrawals, Baltimore Campus 

Procedure 11 

Refunds 12 

Grades 12 

Non-compliance to regulations 12 



57 



pill 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance age ' society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



hUMI 



1 iif Sialc aiui 



the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins. 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



cisiiy 



ERSITY orMARYLAN 



School of Pharmacv 



FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION . . 

Admission to All Undergraduate 

Colleges at College Park director, office of admissions 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Housing DIRECTOR, HOUSING OFFICE 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Scholarships, Grants-in-aid, Loans, 

and Student Employment director, office of student aid 

NORTH administration BUILDING 
university of MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Student Life Information executive dean for student life 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Counseling university counseling center 

SHOEMAKER BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Specific Program Information office of the dean of the 

RESPECTIVE COLLEGE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Graduate School vice president for graduate studies 

AND research 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

Summer School director, summer school 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

University of Maryland at 

Baltimore County the registrar, umbc 

5401 WILKINS AVENUE 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 21228 

For Copies of this Publication or 

College Park Catalogs catalog mailing room 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

For Copies of Catalogs for the 

Professional Schools in Baltimore office of the dean of the 

RESPECTIVE COLLEGE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 21201 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves the right 
to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of 
residence. The University further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to 
withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interest of the University. 



I 



CATALOG AND 124th ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy. 1841 to 1904) 

1967-1968 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 47, Number 1 
School of Phannacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



% 



/y^ 



^ 



9^\. 




r 






f 





>^. ,,.4 




Contents 



Academic Calendar v 

Correspondence — Visitors vi 

Board ol Regents vii 

Orticers of the University viii 
Standing Committees, 

Facility Senate xiv 

Faculty Council xv 

Library Staff xviii 

The School 1 

AFROTC Program 5 

General Education Program 6 
Admission to the Profes- 
sional Program, Baltimore 6 
Enrollment in 

Pre-Professional Program 7 
Enrollment in 

Professional Program 7 

Tuition and Fees 8 

Academic Information 10 

Withdrawals 10 

Textbooks 11 

Changes in Curriculum 1 1 

Definition of Residence 

and Non-residence 11 

Academic Regulations 12 

Attendance 12 

Examinations 12 

Grading System 13 
Regulations for Promotion 

and Probation 14 
Regulations for 

Readmission 15 
Elective Programs at 

Baltimore 15 



Classification cif Stutlcnts 15 
Requirements tor 

Ciradiiation 16 

1 ranscripts of Records 16 
Registration with Maryland 

Board of Pharmacy 17 
Licensure Requirements, 

Mar\land Board of 

Pharmacy 17 

Deportment 17 

Employment 17 

Housing 18 
General Information for 

Baltimore Union 18 

Parking 19 

Health Sciences Library 19 
Professorships, Graduate 

Fellowships and Grants 20 

Other Research Grants 21 

Special Grants, Assistantships 21 

Scholarships and Loans 22 

Honors and Awards 26 
Student Organizations,, 

Baltimore Campus 32 

Alumni Association 30 

Professional Curriculum 31 

Description of Courses 33 
Roll of Students, 

Session 1966-1967 43 
Roll of Graduates. 

June 4, 1966 49 

Honors 50 

Index 5 1 



III 



19 6 8 



JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 








MARCH 










APRIL 




S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 








1 


2 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


28 29 


30 31 
MAY 






25 


26 


27 28 29 
JUNE 






24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 
JULY 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 
AUGUST 




S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 




1 2 


3 


4 










1 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 


2 3 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


26 27 


28 29 30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 31 






25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 31 


SEPTEMBER 








OCTOBER 






NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


IM 


T W T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 






1 2 3 


4 


5 








1 


2 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 7 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 14 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 21 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 28 


29 30 








27 


28 


29 30 31 






24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 





1969 



JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 








MARCH 










APRIL 




S M 


T W T 

1 2 


F 

3 


S 
4 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 

1 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 
1 


s 


M 


T W T 
1 2 3 


F S 
4 5 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


S 9 10 


11 12 


12 13 


14 15 16 


16 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


IS 19 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 26 


26 27 


28 29 30 
MAY 


31 




23 


24 


25 26 27 
JUNE 


28 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 
JULY 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 
AUGUST 




S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 




1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 






1 2 3 


4 


5 








1 2 


4 r, 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


S 9 10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


IX 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


17 


IS 


19 20 21 


22 23 


25 26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 


30 








27 


28 


29 30 31 






24 
31 


25 


26 27 2S 


29 30 


SEPTEMBER 






OCTOBER 








NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 2 


3 


4 










1 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


7 S 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


S 


7 


S 


9 10 11 


12 13 


14 1.-) 


16 17 IS 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


16 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


ir, 


14 


15 


16 17 IS 


19 20 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


IS 19 20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


2.S 29 


30 






26 


27 


2S 29 30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


2S 


29 


2S 


29 


30 31 





IV 



Academic Calendar, 1967-1968 

FIRST SEMESTER— -1967 

SEPTEMBER 

18 Monday — Third Year Registration — 9 am. 

Fourth Year Registration — 10 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — ^11 a.m. 
Orientation for all new students — 2 p.m. 

19 Tuesday— Graduate Registration— 9:. ^0 to 11:30 a.m. 
25 Monday — Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

NOVEMBER 

22 Wednesday — Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last scheduled period 
27 Monday — Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

DECEMBER 

20 Wednesday — Christmas recess begins at close of last scheduled period 

1968 

JANUARY 

2 Tuesday — 'Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 
22-26 Monday-Friday — First Semester Examinations 

SECOND SEMESTER— 1968 

FEBRUARY 

1 Thursday — Third Year Registration — 9 a.m. 

Fourth Year Registration — 10 a.m. 
Fifth Year Registration — 11 a.m. 

2 Friday — Graduate Registration — 9:30-11:30 a.m. 

5 Monday — Instruction begins with first scheduled class 
22 Thursday — Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

APRIL 

1 1 Thursday — Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled period 
16 Tuesday — Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

MAY 

24 Friday — Last day of instruction for Fifth Year 

May 27-June 3 — Monday-Monday — Second Semester final examinations 

30 Thursday — Memorial Day, Holiday 

JUNE 

8 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION 

11 Tuesday — Graduate Registration — 10 a.m.-12 noon 

All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration days. Students failing to 
comply with this regulation are charged a fee of $20.00. No student is normally 
permitted to register after Friday of the week in which instruction begins. 
The offices of the Registrar and Cashier are open daily. Monday through Friday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional Program of the 
Five Year Curriculum at College Park should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740. The Uni- 
versity's telephone number is 454-0100. 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the Pre-professional pharmacy program 
of the Five Year Curriculum offered at UMBC, should be addressed to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228. The Registrar's telephone number is 744-7800, 
Ext. 292. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the Professional Program of the 

Five Year Curriculum should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, 

University of Maryland, room 132, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Requests, Public Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic Standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 



The telephone number for the Dean's Office, School of Pharmacy, is 955-7650. 



VISITORS 



Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday 
by appointment. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The Uni- 
versity reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any 
time within the student's term of residence. The University further reserves 
the right at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers 
such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



VI 



i 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company. Inc., 414 Lii^'ht Street, Baltimore 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 
Edward F. Holter 
Route 5, Frederick 21701 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 21201 

TREASURER 
Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, One Charles Center — 17th Floor 

Baltimore 21201 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

Harry Boswell Associates 

6505 Belcrest Rd., Hyattsville 20782 

William B. Long, M.D. 
Medical Center, Salisbury 21801 

Mrs. Gerald D. Morgan 
Route 3, Gaithersburg 20760 

George B. Newman 

The Kelly-Springfield Tire Co., Box 300, Cumberland 21502 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park 20740 



Vll 



Officers of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins— fi.^., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— 5.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr.— B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Edmund C. Mester — B.A., University of Maryland, 1948; M.A., 1949 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, ]r.—A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd — B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— 5 5., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 

Deans and Principal Academic Officers 

Deans 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Gordon M. Cairns— 5.5., Cornell University, 1936; M.S.. 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

John William Hill, B.A., Rice University, 1951; B. Arch., 1952; M. Arch., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1959. 

via 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— fl..S.. 7////.V ColU'in-. 192<^: M.A.. Harvard University. I^^JH; rii D 
University of North Carolina. 1950. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Donald W. O'Connell— fl./l.. Columbia University. 1937: M.A.. 19JS: Ph.D.. /95.? 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley— D.D.5.. Meiiical Collci^c of Virijinia. 1951: Ph.D.. University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. 1954. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson— fl.5.. University of Minnesota, 1930: M.A.. 1936: Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Colorado. 1942. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Robert B. Beckmann — B.S.. University of Illinois, 1940: Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1944. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY— DEAN OF FACULTY 
Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944: M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan 1947: Ph.D., 1952. 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Marjory Brooks — B.S., Mississippi State College, 1943: M.S., University of Idaho. 
1951: Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1963. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944: LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Paul Wasserman— fi.5./i.. College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), 
Columbia University, 1949: M.S. (Economics) Columbia University, 1950: Ph.D.. 
University of Michigan, 1960. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL EDUCATION AND 
RESEARCH 

William S. Stone— B.5., University of Idaho. 1924: M.S., 1925: M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1929: Ph.D., (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Marion I. Murphy — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1936: M.P.H., University of Michi- 
gan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss—Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S., 1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 
Lester M. Fraley— fi./l., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Daniel Thursz— B.^., Queens College, 1948; M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955: 
D.S.W., 1959. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— 5./1., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930: 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

ix 



Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C, Haut — B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Alfred J. Hanlon, Jr. — A.B., Harvard University, 1939; M.S., Georgetown College, 
1966. 

DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

William F. Atchison — A.B., Georgetown College, 1938; M.A., University of 
Kentucky, 194G; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1943. 

DIRECTOR, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Robert E. Wagner — B.S., Kansas University, 1942; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B .5., Iowa State College, 1948; M.A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 

H. Gerthon Morgan — B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 
1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

Joseph T. Vanderslice — B.S., Boston College, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, 1952. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND APPLIED 

MATHEMATICS 
Monroe H. Martin — B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 

1932. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— B.^., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR, THE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 

Eugene B. Brody — A.B., M.A., University of Missouri, 1941; M.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1944. 

DIRECTOR, SUMMER SCHOOL 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

DIRECTOR, PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 
HOSPITAL 

George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1929. 



Gcncnil .idniinistrcUivc Officers 

(RcprcsTntini: Central Ailniitiisinitivc Di\isU)ns) 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECIOR OF STUDENT I IFE 
Francis A. Gray, Jr. — B.S., Vnivcrsity of Maryland, 1943. 

ASSISTANT FOR EACH ITIFS PI ANNINCi 

Robert E. Kendig — i.B.. Collciic of William and Mary. 1939; M.A.. George ]Vasli- 
i/iiiton University, 1965. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ENDOWMENT AND GIFTS 

Richard D. Wagner— Z^..S.. Bradley University. I960; M.P.A., University of Pittsburgh. 
1962: Ph.D., 1967. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— B.5.. University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR, ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson A\g'ire—B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

DIRECTOR, ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schiitz— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

DIRECTOR, ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey— .^.fi., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR, FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cisse\—B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., 1934; C.P.A., 1939. 

DIRECTOR, PERSONNEL 

George W. ¥ogg—B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

DIRECTOR, PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY 

Clayton R. Plummer — B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1936; M.Ed., Springfield 
College, 1940. 

DIRECTOR, SERVICE AND CONTROL PROGRAMS, STATE BOARD OF 
AGRICULTURE 

Charles P. Ellington — B.S., University of Georgia, 1950; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1952; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1964. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
PLAJST 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison— B.5., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

REGISTRAR AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF REGISTRATIONS 

James P. Hill— B.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University 
of Michigan, 1963, 

xi 



Directors of Bureaus and Special Services 

DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 
John W. Dorsey — B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; Certf.. London School of Eco- 
nomics, 1959; M.A., Harvard University, 1962; Ph.D., 1644. 

DIRECTOR, FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION 

Joseph R. Bachtler — B.S., University of Southern California, 1956. 

DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF GOVERNMENTAL RESEARCH 

Franklin L. Burdette — A.B., Marshall College, 1934; M.A., University of Nebraska, 
1935; M.A., Princeton University, 1937; Ph.D., 1938; LL.D., Marshall College, 
1959. 

DIRECTOR, LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

Thomas Alvin Ladson — V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1939. 

DIRECTOR, MARYLAND TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE 
Daniel R. Thompson — B.A., Queens College, 1950; LL.B., Georgetown University, 
1960. 

DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT AID 

H. Palmer Hopkins — B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1936; Ed.M., University of 
Maryland, 1948; Ed.D., George Washington University, 1962. 

DIRECTOR, HOUSING 

Miss Margaret C. Lloyd — B.S., University of Georgia, 1932; M.Ed., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE 
Robert J. Spence 

DIRECTOR, WIND TUNNEL 

Donald S. Gross — B.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 

DIRECTOR, HEALTH SERVICES 

Lester M. Dyke— S.5., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR, COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth College, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 
1951; Ph.D., 1954. 



Xll 



Co/}iniiffccs 
Standing Committees. Facuitv Si nate 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

STUDENT LIFE, WELFARE. RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBII ITIFS 

ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

FACULTY RESEARCH 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

LIBRARIES 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS AFFAIRS 

THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on 
Student Life, Welfare, Rights and Responsibilities 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS STUDENT AFFAIRS 



xiu 



i 



FACULTY COUNCIL 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean 

LESLIE C. COSTELLO DEAN E. LEAVITT 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW FRANCIS M. MILLER, Secretary 

Faculty (1966-1967) 
Emerita 

B. OLIVE COLE, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
PHAR.D., University of Maryland, 1913; ll.b., 1923. 

Professors 

LESLIE c. COSTELLO, Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

NOEL E. FOSS, Professor of Pharmacy 

PH.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s. in pharm., 1929; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1932; ph.d., 1933. 

Registered Pharmacist — South Dakota, New York, Maryland. 

CASIMIR T. iCHNiowsKi, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

PH.G., University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., in pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

FRANCIS M. MILLER, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d.. Northwestern University, 1949. 

DONALD E. SHAY, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 

1943. 

FRANK J. SLAM A, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

PH.G., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.c, 1925; b.s. in pharm., 1928; M.S., 1930; 

PH.D., 1935. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Associate Professors 

BENJAMIN FRANK ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm.. University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 

Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, 

JAMES LESLIE, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1956; ph.d., 1959. 

HILDA E. MOORE, Librarian, Health Science Library and Associate Professor of 
Library Science 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 

School, 1937. 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s. in pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1959. 
Registered Pharmacist — Vermont, Massachusetts. 



NICOLAS ZENKER, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

CD. sc. ch., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; m.a., University of Californi 
1953; PH.D., 1958. 



XIV 



i 



Assistant Professors 

ELIE ABUSHANAB, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.s. in Pharm.. The American University of Beirut (I ehanon). 1960; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 1962; PH.D., 1965. 

tADELE B. BALLMAN, Assistant Professor of Enf^lisfi 

A.B., Goucher College. 1926; PH.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

EARL F. BECKER. JR., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957; PH.D., 
University of Maryland, 1966. 

DAVID A. BLAKE, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 
B.s. IN PHARM.. University of Maryland, 1963; ph.d., 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

CARL w. DRIEVER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.s. in Pharm.. Purdue University, 1961; M.S., 1963; PH.D., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Indiana. 

KENNETH L. EULER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Pittsburgh, 1959; M.S., 1962; ph.d., University of 

Washington, 1965. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

GEORGE N. KRYWOLAP, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

PETER P. LAMY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. IN PHARM., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; 

PH.D., 1964. 

Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania. 

DEAN E. LEAVITT, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957; m.b.a., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

ARNOLD A. LIEBMAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

b.s. IN PHARM., University of Minnesota, 1956; PH.D., 1961. 
Registered Pharmacist — Minnesota, Louisiana. 

Instructors 

LILLLVN DARAGO, Instructor in Anatomy and Physiology 

A.B., Goucher College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

LOUIS DIAMOND, Instructor in Pharmacology 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1961; M.S., 1964. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Lecturers 

tTHEODORE J. BENYA, Lecturer in Hospital Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Michigan, 1955; m.s. in hospital pharm., 1958. 
Registered Pharmacist — Texas, Michigan, Maryland. 

fRlCHARD D. DEAN, Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; m.ed.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 

t Part time 

XV 



fHENRY J. DEREWicz, Lecturer in Hospital Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM,, University of Pittsburgh, 1958; M.S. in hospital pharm., 1960. 
Registered Pharmacist — Pennsylvania, Maryland. 

t JOSEPH s. KAUFMAN, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; ll.b., 1953. 

fPAUL J. LESAGE, Lecturer in Hospital Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1954. 
Registred Pharmacist — Massachusetts. 

Fellows 

LARRY L. AUGSBURGER, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 

Fellow in Pharmacy and Albert H. Diebold Memorial Fellow for 1966-67; b.s., 
IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

LAWRENCE H. BLOCK, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
Fellow in Pharmacy 

b.s. in PHARM., University of Maryland, 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

sister jane MARIE BROWN, The H. A. B. Dunning Fellow in Chemistry 
B.A., College of Notre Dame, 1958. 

LANDON w. BURBAGE, Bristol-Myers Fellow in Pharmacy Administration (.Research) 
PH. B., Medical College of Virginia, 1909; ph.g., 1910. 

YALE CAPLAN, U. S. PubUc Health Service Fellow in Chemistry 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1963. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

HSI-CHIANG CHiu, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 
B.s,, Taipei Medical College, Taiwan, 1965. 

JAMES g. FRANKLIN, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 
B.A., Kutztown State College, 1965. 

GLORY LLEANDER, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 
B.S. IN PHARM., University of Philippines, 1956; M.S., 1961. 

BARRY N. LUTSKY, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

KRISHNA S. MANUDHANE, Stalfort Research Fellow in Pharmacy 
B.sc, Bombay University, India, 1951; m.sc. 1954. 

JOHN D. MiLKOWSKi, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 

B.S., Loyola College, 1962. 
R. ALLEN RHODES, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 

B.A., Bridgewater College, 1963. 

FRANCIS J. TINNEY, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Chemistry (The Ortho Research 
Foundation) 

B.S., IN PHARM., St. John's University, College of Pharmacy, 1959; M.S., 1961; 

PH.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

Registered Pharmacist — New York. 

KAKUBHAI M. VORA, Research Fellow in Chemistry (National Institutes of Health) 
B. PHARM., L. M. College of Pharmacy, Gujarat Univ., 1961; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964. 

fPart time 
xvi 



Graduate Assistants 

fLARRY L. AUGsniiRcrR, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM.. University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

AVINASH M. CONTRACTOR. Assistant in Chemistry and Pharmacy 
B.s. (PHARM.). Gujarat University. 1954; M.S., 1961. 

LARRY I. CORMAN. Assistant in Chemistry 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1966. 

WILLIAM L. DAVIES, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Rhode Island, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Rhode Island 

CHARLES A. FLEISCHER, Assistant in Pharmacology 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

EUGENE M. JOHNSON, JR., Assistant in Chemistry 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

MARY ELLEN KITLER, Assistant in Pharmacy and Pharmacy Administration 
U.S. IN PHARM., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1961; M.S., 1962. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland, Pennsylvania. 

HOWARD B, MEYER, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

CHARLES w. OLSEN, JR., Asistant in Chemistry 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Rhode Island, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Rhode Island. 

EMORY w. PARSONS, JR., Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Rhode Island. 

SHELDON s. SONES, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.s. IN PHARM., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 1966. 

MYRON WEINER, Assistant in Pharmacology 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

Laboratory Assistant 

fMlTCHELL A. CHRISTIAN, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
B.s. IN PHARM., University of Maryland, 1966. 
Registered Pharmacist — Maryland. 

tPart time 

jcvi7 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Health Sciences Library 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, B.A., M.A., B.s.L.s. — Director of Libraries and Professor of 

Library Science 

IDA MARIAN ROBINSON, A.B., B.S.L.S. — Librarian Emerita 

HILDA E. MOORE, A.B., A.B.L.s. — Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

EDITH M. COYLE, A.B., A.B.L.S., M.A. — Assistant Librarian for Technical Services 

FLEANOR M. MITTEN, B.S., B.S.L.S. — Assistant Librarian for Readers' Services 

MARLAYNE R. ANCES, B.A., A.M.L.s. — Assistant Reference Librarian 

KATHRYN F. DEAN, L.R.S.M., A.T.C.M., L.R.T.C, M.s.L.s. — Reference Librarian 

Appointment pending. Begins August 7, 1967 
MELAYN DORFLER., B.S., A.M.L.S. — Assistant Serials Librarian 
RUTH E. HANNA, A.B., M.S.L.S. — Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 
MARY B. HASKELL, A.B., M.S.L.S. — Assistant Cataloger 
LORRAINE s. HLAViN — Serials Assistant 
SIMONE c. HURST — Head, Circulation Department 
MARGARET M. JONES, A.B., M.S.L.S. — Head, Cataloging Department 
CECILIA J. KYLER — Serials Assistant 
DENYSE B. LEVIN, B.A. — Circulation Assistant 

HANS-GUENTHER R. LISTFELDT, B.S., M.S.L.S. — Head, Serials Department 
MARY w. O'BRIEN — Cataloging Assistant 
ELIZABETH PALMER — Secretary to the Librarian 
SYDNAE M. STEINHART, B.S., M.S.L.S. — Assistant Reference Librarian 
ELWOOD STERLING — Library Assistant 
PATRICIA YANG, B.A. — Acquisitions Assistant 
Assistant Catloger — Appointment pending 
Cataloging Assistant — Appointment pending 
Circulation Assistant — Appointment pending 
Head, Reference Department — Appointment pending 
Library Clerk, Stacks — Appointment pending 
Serials Assistant — Appointment pending 

School Of Pharmacy Office Of Administration 
Office Staff 

MARGARET E. BEATTY, Secretary 
* AGNES M. FORESTELL, Secretary 
DAISY LOTZ GUE, Secretary 
DORIS M. KENNEDY, Secretary 
fBELLE R. PALMISANO, Secretary 



♦Died March 9, 1967 
tEffective April 3, 1967 

xviii 



The School 

History and Program 

The purposes of the school of pharma( y arf to train students for 
the efficient, ethical practice of all branches o{ pharmacy; to instruct students 
in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, express 
themselves clearh, and think logically as members of a profession and citizens 
of a democracy; to guide students into productive scholarship and research for 
the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the wSouth, 
was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland physicians 
and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in Pharmacy to replace the 
out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on January 27, 
1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College joined with a 
group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer 
cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new institution was known as 
the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional 
schools was merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form 
the present University of Maryland. 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings constructed 
specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and classrooms are 
equipped with the most modern apparatus and every aid to instruction and for 
research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

The library facilities are excellent. The pharmacy collection containing approxi- 
mately 36,000 books is housed in the new Health Sciences Library. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, the 
Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty and The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. The libraries are within convenient distances of the School. Students 
also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery and the Balti- 
more Museum of Art. 

A minimum of five academic years of satisfactory college work is required for 
the completion of the present pharmacy curriculum of the University of Mary- 
land. This five year curriculum meets the minimum requirements established 
by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and the American Coun- 
cil on Pharmaceutical Education. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharma- 
ceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Association 
of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set forth 
following. 



2 • University of Maryland 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the 
University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Five-Year Program 

At the University of Maryland the five-year program consists of two years of 
a pre-professional and a three-year pharmacy program. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

The pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore but may be obtained 
at the College Park Campus of the University or any other accredited university 
or college where appropriate courses are offered.^ 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE COUNTY CAMPUS 

In enrolling at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) a 
student may select from among the courses offered at UMBC, those that are 
equivalent to the courses offered in the First Year Pre-professional program 
at the School of Pharmacy, College Park Campus of the University. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Only the three year professional program is offered in Baltimore. 

Requirements For Admission To The Five-Year Program 

ADMISSION TO PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School and for 
literature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school in Maryland whose secondary 
record indicates probable success in the University will be admitted provided 
that: 

1. his scholastic average in major subjects in his last two years in high school 
has been satisfactory; 

2. his program has included the following: 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 

College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 

(1), plane geometry (1) and additional units in 

advanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry, 

or advanced mathematics 
Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 
History and Social Sciences 
Biological Sciences 

Foreign Language — German or French 
Unspecified academic subjects 
Total 



4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 





2 





1 


8 


16 


16 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally ac- 
credited college or university. 



S( nOOI. Ol PHAKMA( Y • 3 

3. he has had the College Fntrance Fxaniinalinn Hoard's Scholastic Aptitiulc 
Test results submitted to the Counseling Center. University of Maryland, 
College Park. Maryland. 

4. he has a satisfactor\ general recommendation from his secondary school as 
to his character and ability. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland resitients (see 
definition of Residence and Non-Residence, page I 1 ) must also have the 
College Entrance Examination Hoard's Scholastic Aptitude Test results and 
complete high school records submitted to the Admissions OfVice. Only a limited 
number of well qualified out-of-state applicants can be considered for admission 
since first preference in admission is given to Maryland residents. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the publication entitled An Adventure in Learnini,'. A copy of this publica- 
tion may be obtained by writing to the Catalog Mailing Office, North Adminis- 
tration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Application forms may be obtained only from the Director of Admissions of 
the University of Maryland at College Park. Applications must be made to the 
Director of Admissions at College Park, Maryland 20742. 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for admis- 
sion. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee is accepted 
in lieu of the matriculation fee. 



Deadlines For Applications 

College Park Campus 

FALL SEMESTER 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semester 
at the College Park campus must be received by the University on or before 
June 1. Any student registered for seven or more semester hours of work is 
considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, applications will be accepted between June 1 
and July 15. Applications for full-time attendance filing after June 1 will be 
required to pay a non-refundable $25 late fee to defray the cost of special 
handling of applications after that date. This late fee is in addition to the $10 
application fee. 

All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attendance, 
and all supporting documents for an application for admission, must be received 
by the appropriate University office by July 15. This means that the applicant's 
educational records (except current summer school grades) SAT scores (in 
the case of new freshmen) and medical examination report must be received 
by July 15. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Spring Semester is January 1. 



4 • University of Maryland 

UMBC Campus 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semester 
at UMBC campus must be received on or before July 15. Applicants for full- 
time attendance filing after July 15 will be required to pay a non-refundable 
$25.00 late fee to defray the cost of special handling of applications after that 
date. This late fee is in addition to the $10.00 application fee. Any student 
registered for seven or more semester hours of work is considered a full-time 
student. 

Effective 19672; Annual costs of attending the University of Maryland at Col- 
lege Park for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $270.00; instructional 
materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00 board, $470.00 and lodging, $320.00. 
Non-resident students are assessed an additional fee of $450.00 and lodging costs 
are $420.00. 

Effective September, 1967^: Annual costs of attending the University at the 
UMBC campus for Maryland residents include: fixed charges, $270.00; instruc- 
tional materials, $24.00; special fees, $72.00. Non-residents are assessed an 
additional fee of $450.00. The UMBC campus does not include residence halls 
or other living accommodations. Cafeteria facilities will be available on this 
campus. 

Program At College Park Division 

, Sem ester v 



First Year / // 

Chemistry 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

English 1 — Composition 3 — 

Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics ... 3 3 

or 
Math. 18, 19 — Introductory and Elementary Analy- 
sis 3 4 

Zoology 1 — General Zoology 4 — 

Botany 1 — General Botany — 4 

Elective (Social Science)^ — 3 

Health 5 2 — 

Physical Education 1 1 



Total 17 15-16 



- The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges 
as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to 
the student as low as possible. 

' Social Science Electives 

G. and P. 1, American Government 
Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 
Sociology 1, Introduction to Sociology 
Anthropology 1, Introduction to Anthropology 



I 



S<. HOOL Ol PHARMA( Y 



Second Year 

English 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 
History * _ 3 

Physics 10. 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 

Chemistry 19 — Elements of Quantitative Analysis 4 
Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 

Elective (Fine Arts or Philosophy)' 3 

Elective "' — 



Total 



17 



16 



AFROTC Program 

The AFROTC (Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps) program is not 
required of students, but may be voluntarily elected by students whose under- 
graduate programs require a residence of four academic years on the College 
Park campus. 

Since School of Pharmacy students on the College Park campus advance to the 
professional program at Baltimore after two academic years, it is generally 
not advantageous for them to participate in the program of the AFROTC. 



The student is required to distribute his work between United States and non-United 
States fields, with three credit hours in each field. Recommended courses are: 



United States History 
Hist. 21, History of the United States 

to 1865 
Hist. 22, History of the United States 

since 1865 
Hist. 23, Social and Cultural History 

of Early America 
Hist. 24, Social and Cultural History 

of Modern America 
Hist. 29, The United States in World 

Affairs 



Non-United States History 

Hist. 31 or 32, Latin American His- 
tory 
Hist. 41 or 42, Western Civilization 
Hist. 51 or 52, The Humanities 
Hist. 53 or 54, History of England and 

Great Britain 
Hist. 61 or 62, Far Eastern Civiliza- 
tion 
Hist. 71 or 72, Islamic Civilization 



Fine Arts or Philosophy Elective. 
Art 10, Introduction to Art 
Art 60 or 61, History of Art 
Art 65 or 66, Masterpieces of Paint- 
ing 
Art 67 or 68, Masterpieces of Sculp- 
ture 
Art 70 or 71, Masterpieces of Ar- 
chitecture 
Art 80, History of American Art 
Dance 32, Introduction to Dance 



Music 20, Survey of Music Literature 

Speech 16, Introduction to the Theatre 

Philosophy 1, Introduction to Philoso- 
phy 

Philosophy 41, Elementary Logic and 
Semantics 

Philosophy 45, Ethics 

Philosophy 52, Philosophy in Litera- 
ture 

Philosophy 53. Philosophy of Religion 



' Elective can be chosen from groups previously described. A fourth semester of 
college English or a 3 hour course in Public Speaking is also acceptable. 



6 • University of Maryland 

General Education Program 

The University of Maryland has instituted a new series of related course 
requirements which together constitute a general education program. 
Essentially this program includes nine semester-hour-credits of English (three 
credits of composition, six of literature); six credits in history; six credits chosen 
from various fields of the social sciences; seven credits in science; three credits 
in mathematics; three credits in fine arts or in philosophy. 

Two semesters of physical education and a course in health education are 
required of all undergraduates. 

Students in the School of Pharmacy satisfy the mathematics, the science and 
three credits of the social science requirements by pursuing the courses identified 
in the curriculum. 

Greater detail will be found in the brochure: General and Academic Regulations. 

Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1. From College Park Division^ or UMBC Division 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program with a 
scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) and who are in good standing will 
qualify for advancement to the pharmacy program at Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the School 
of Pharmacy each student will be required to complete a form of intent and 
return it to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

2. From Other Universities and College"^ 

A. Prerequisites 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college^ of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must consist of a minimum of 
60 semester hours of credit exclusive of physical education, health, military 
science or similar courses. The 60 semester hours must include 9 hours of 
English, 6 hours of college level mathematics (modern mathematics or algebra, 
trigonometry and analytical geometry), 4 hours of botany and 4 hours of 
zoology (or 8 hours of general biology), 8 hours of general inorganic chem- 
istry (including qualitative analysis), 4 hours of quantitative chemistry, 8 hours 
of physics, 3 hours of economics, 6 hours of history, 3 hours of social sciences, 
3 hours of fine arts or philosophy and the remainder as electives from the 
non-science areas. 



■ Students who enrolled in a pre-professional pharmacy program before the summer 
session of 1964 will be asked to meet the general education requirements set forth 
as "The Program in American Civilization" described in the School of Pharmacy 
catalog (pages 4-5, 1963-64 edition) 

^ Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the Professional Program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally 
accredited college or university. 



Scnool oi Pharmacy • 7 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must have 
attained a prior scholastic average of not less than C (2.0) when the lowest 
passing grade is D (1.0) or its equivalent, and must be in good standing. TTiis 
average of not less than C (2.0) shall be based on all college courses previously 
undertaken by the applicant exclusive of credit in military science, physical 
education, health, hygiene or similar courses. 

Students must satisfy as well, any additional qualifications governing recom- 
mendations for transfer specified by the institution from which the student is 
seeking transfer. Transfer credit is f^iven only for the courses completed with a 
grade of C (2.0) or higher and which are a part of the pre-professional cur- 
ricuium of the School of Pharmacy. 

B. Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore should 
write to the Director of Admissions and Registrations, University of Maryland, 
Room 132, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to their applications 
should communicate with the above office. 

Enrollment in the Pre-Professional Program at College Park 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at College 
Park may obtain application blanks by writing to the Admissions Office at 
College Park. Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive 
letters of admission from the Admissions Office at College Park. Admitted 
students will receive detailed directions for registering from the Office of the 
Registrar at College Park a few weeks prior to the September registration 
period. 

There is a fee of $5.00 for changes in registration made after the first week 
of instruction. 

Enrollment in the Pre-Professional Program at UMBC Campus 

Students applying for the first two years of the Pharmacy curriculum at UMBC 
may obtain application blanks by writing to the Registrar, University of Mary- 
land, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 



Enrollment in the Professional Program at Baltimore 

1. FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION OR UMBC DIVISION 

Students who had filed with the Dean of the School Pharmacy at Baltimore a 
letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the curriculum and 
who have completed the requirements of the pre-professional program will be 
notified by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy that they have qualified for 
advancement into the professional program. 

These students will receive detailed directions for registering from the Baltimore 
Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September registration period. 



$135.00 


160.00 


15.00 


30.00 


10.00 


6.00 


10.00 


10.00 



8 • University of Maryland 

2. from other universities and colleges 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates of 

admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at Baltimore. 

Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering from the Office 

of the Registrar at Baltimore a few weeks prior to the September registration 

period. 

TUITION AND FEES {Baltimore Campus) 

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee {per semester) 

Residents of Maryland 

Non-Residents 
Laboratory Fee {per semester) 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 
Student Union Fee {per annum)^ 
Special Fee {per annum)^ 
Student Union Fee {Summer Session)^ 
Student Health Fee {per annum) 
Student Activities Fee {per semester) 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 

all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

Student Health 

Effective 1967, the Baltimore Campus of the University will maintain a Student 
Health Service for a fee of $10.00 per annum, payable at registration in Sep- 
tember. A student's wife or child, or other members of his family, are not eligi- 
ble for Health Care service unless the wife, too, is a student and has paid the 
fee for herself. At the beginning of the entering year, each student will be 
given a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is located on the first floor of Howard Hall 
(660 W. Redwood Street), and will be open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. When the office is closed, students may report to the 
emergency room of the University of Maryland Hospital, if absolutely necessary. 
If this is a true emergency the Health Service will pay the emergency room 
fee. Otherwise, the student will be billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue Cross hospitalization insurance (or its 
equivalent). In addition, it is recommended that all students be covered by Blue 
Shield or its equivalent to cover physicians' and surgeons' fees. 
Additional information regarding the Student Health Service may be obtained 
in the Office of Administration of the School of Pharmacy. 



' The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 



School oi Pharmacy • 9 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester arc 
payable at the lime oH registration therefore. The Student Union fee and 
the Special fee are payable in full at the time of first registration. Students 
wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment of tuition charges 
must do so with the Financial OfTice at or prior to registration for the 
semester for which such charges are imposed. 

Incidental Chorines 

For New Students Only {Not applicable to students accepted from 
School of Pharmacy, Colic i^e Park) 

Application fee (non-returnable) $ 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's tuition.) 
For Candidates for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in excess 
of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled semester's 
work will be charged additionally for each course. Fee for 
Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 

PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students registered for twelve semester hours or more are considered full- 
time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee {for each semester hour per semester) $18.00 
Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 12.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 15.00 

Pharmacognosy 7.00 

Pharmacology 12.00 

Pharmacy 12.00 

Physiology 12.00 

Student Union Fee {per annum)^^ 6.00 

Student Union Fee {Summer Session)^^ 6.00 

Student Activities Fee {per semester) 10.00 



'"The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all 
full-time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus 
and is used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students 
enrolling for the first time at the beginnint, of the second semester, the Student 
Union Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as 
much as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student Union 
Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees, and book charges, etc. 



10 • University of Maryland 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Matriculation fee (for new students only, non-returnable) $10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester hour each semester) ^^ 24.00 
Laboratory fee — Same as undergraduate schedule above 

Student Union Fee {per annum for full time students)'^^ 30.00 

Special Fee {per annum for full time students only)'^- 10.00 

Student Union Fee {Summer Session, all students) ^- 6.00 

Student Union Fee {per annum, part time students)'^- 6.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee^'^ 3.00 

Student Health Fee {per annum) 10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree $10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 50.00 

An additional $10.00 as a penalty fee will be assessed against those students 
who fail to apply for graduation within the first eight weeks of a regular aca- 
demic semester or the first three weeks of a summer session. 
Students who apply after the end of the twelfth week of a regular academic 
semester and those who apply after the end of the fourth week of a summer 
session will be required to wait for the next academic semester in order to 
obtain a diploma. 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Withdrawals from School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the School he must file 
a written request for withdrawal with the Dean. 

A student who does not comply with the above regulation is not issued an 
honorable dismissal and is not accorded any refund to which he might other- 
wise be entitled. 



" The $24.00 rate applies to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without 
regard to the location at which the course is given and will apply to audited courses 
as well as courses taken for credit. Non-resident graduate students are assessed at the 
rate of $30.00 per semester hour each semester. 

'■ The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The Special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
Fee will be $15.00; the Special Fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much 
as 12 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All summer school students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee. This Student 
Union Fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 

" Effective with the beginning of the 1966 Summer Session, all graduate students 
taking courses on the College Park campus, the Baltimore County campus and the 
Professional Schools campus in Baltimore city will be assessed an Auxiliary Facili- 
ties Fee in the amount of $3.00 for the Summer Session and $3.00 for each of the 
two academic semesters. 



SC HOOI OI l»HARMA( Y • 1 I 

Minors may withdraw only with the written eonsent oi parent or guardian. 

1. REFUND OF FEES UPON WITHDRAWAL. 

Fees, cxckiding Application Fee. Matriculation Fee, Student Activities f-ee, the 
$50.00 deposit on tuition and any scholarship credit, are refunded to with- 
drawing students in accordance with the following schedule: 
Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No return 

The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal 
is filed in the Office of the Dean. 

2. GRADES 

The record of students who withdraw is computed as follows: 

Before eight weeks of the semester have passed WX 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of passing grade WP 

After eight weeks of the semester have passed, 

if work has been of failing grade WF 

Any student who ( 1 ) fails to withdraw from any course or from the school 
in the required manner or (2) who registers, does not attend classes and does 
not withdraw, will receive grades of F in all courses for which he has registered. 

Textbooks 

Each student is required to have his own textbooks. The books required in 
each course will be announced at the beginning of each semester. 

Tuition and Fees for Pre-professional Program 
(College Park Campus) 

See page 4 for summary statements and consult "An Adventure in Learning" 
which is available from College Park, Maryland. 

Tuition and Fees for Pre-Professional Program 
(UMBC Campus) 

For summary statements consult the UMBC Campus Bulletin by writing to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkins Avenue, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 

Changes in Curriculum 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make, at any time, such changes 
in the curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 

Definition of Residence and Non-residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for at 
least six months. 



12 • University of Maryland 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by hirrj prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while 
stationed in Maryland will not he considered as satisfying the six-months period 
referred to above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 
Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into the armed service 
and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 

Each entering student is subject to the rules and policies published in the official 
University General and Academic Regulations. 



Academic Regulations {Baltimore Campus) 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have not attended eighty-five percent of scheduled classes and 
laboratory periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examination 
in that subject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally 
counted with the fifteen percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than half 
a period is construed as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period are 
also construed as an absence. 



EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion 
of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester 
as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Effective with the 1966-1967 academic year, final examinations are not required 
in the second semester only of the Fifth Year Class. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission for 
a deferred examination. 



Grade 


Interpretation 


A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Fair 


D 


Poor but passing 


F 


Failure 


I 


Course work incomplete 



Credit 


Grade 


Points 


4 


C 


8 


4 


C 


8 


4 


B 


12 


4 


A 


16 


3 


D 


3 



School oi Phakmacy • 13 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 

Point i'dliie 
4 
3 
2 

1 



Replaced by definite 
grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 
Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the semester's 
work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received by the number 
of credit hours the course carries, e.g.: 
Subject 
Chemistry 
Microbiology 
Pharmacognosy 
Pharmacy 
Pharmacy Administration 

19 47 

Dividing the number of points by the number of credits, the student is found 
to have a grade point average of 2.47. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 
In computing scholastic averages only the grades earned in those courses taken 
in residence at the University of Maryland are considered. 

MID-SEMESTER FAILURE WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a Class Advisor who counsels him on his academic 
standing. Seven weeks after the beginning of each semester, the Dean warns and 
the Advisor interviews all students earning grades of D and F. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The Mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a student 
whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of 
illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been unable to com- 
plete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor enters on 
the class card a reason of the character stated above with an estimate of the 
quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is given the student 
must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the next 
semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

RAISING GRADE OF D 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 
except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he 
failed or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or 
elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular 
attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he will not receive any addi- 
tional credit for the course completed with a passing grade. 



14 • University of Maryland 

If the work is completed at the University of Maryland his final mark will be 
substituted for the mark already recorded. Although the final mark received 
in the course will be used in determining credit for promotion and graduation, 
it does not apply to honors and awards. See applicable section under "Honors 
and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the Dean to repeat the course or its equivalent, 
at another university or college, the regulations applicable to transfer of credit 
apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with a grade of C (2.0) or 
higher; for purposes of computing grade averages, transfer credit is considered 
as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

REMOVAL OF AN F GRADE 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in raising 
his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to withdraw from the 
School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student may be permitted with the 
written permission of the Dean and the head of the department giving the course, 
to repeat the course for the second time. Such permission can be given to the 
student for only one course. 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above regulation 
must be submitted to the Faculty Council. Such exception will be granted 
under unusual and extraordinary circumstances and shall require the approval 
of the head of the department giving the course. 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also to the student who is 
permitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements for 
the degree from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTKDN AND PROBATION 

All Students are expected to maintain a grade average of not less than C (2.0) 
for each semester. Any student who fails to maintain a grade average of C (2.0) 
for any semester will be placed on probation during the next semester. Students 
in the Fifth Year Class must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) to become 
eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail more than one-fifth and less than one-half, in semester hour 
credit, of their scheduled work for any semester will be placed on probation 
during the next semester. 

Any student on probation must pass all courses for which he is registered and 
must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) or he will be automatically dropped 
from the School of Pharmacy at the end of this semester. 

A student who fails in one-half or more of his scheduled academic credits in 
any semester shall be dismissed at the end of that semester for unsatisfactory 
scholarship. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required to report 
to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 



SC HOOI Ol I^HARMACY • 15 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STDOFNTS DROPPHD 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may apply in 
writing to the Dean lor readmission after a lapse of at least one semester. 
Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that semester. 
Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be read- 
mitted only once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty Assembly 
of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. Any student 
may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration of his 
particular case. 

ELECTIVE PROGRAMS AT BALTIMORE^^ 

1 . Fourth Year Electives 

Students shall elect either the General Pharmacy Major or the Pre-Graduate 
Major by May 1 of the Third Year. 

Students to be eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major must have established the 
aptitudes for the successful pursuit of graduate work and must meet the neces- 
sary prerequisites. Those eligible for the Pre-Graduate Major may postpone the 
selection of this elective until the following year and thus will pursue the Gen- 
eral Pharmacy Major during the Fourth Year. 

Students not qualifying for the Pre-Graduate Major will be required to pursue 
the General Pharmacy Major. 

2. Fifth Year Electives 

Students must make elective selections by May 1 of the Fourth Year. 
The General Pharmacy Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue with 
the General Pharmacy Major and choose between pharmacognosy 52, Animal 
Health Products and Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological Prepara- 
tions or (b), elect the prescribed Hospital Major program or (c) if approved 
as eligible, transfer to the Pre-Graduate Program and will enroll in Mathe- 
matics 20, 21, Calculus and Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems. 
The Pre-Graduate Major of the Fourth Year Class may (a) continue with 
the Pre-Graduate Major, will enroll in Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry 
(Lectures) and choose between Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry Labo- 
ratory and Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems or (b) transfer to the Hospital 
Major and follow the prescribed program. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the Professional Program 
with a grade average of C (2.0) in addition to the Pre-Professional requirements 
will be classified as students of the Fourth Year Class. 

General Pharmacy Majors of the Fourth Year Class who have completed 71 
credit hours of the Professional Program with a grade average of C (2.0) will 
be classified as Fifth Year Students. Pre-Graduate Majors of the Fourth Year 
Class in order to advance in the Pre-Graduate Program and attain the classifica- 



" The elective program must be approved by the Class Adviser and the Dean. For 
additional information consult with the Class Adviser and see the respective curricula 
on pages 31 and 3? 



16 • University of Maryland 

tion of the Fifth Year Class must have completed 73 credit hours of the Pro- 
fessional Program with an academic quality indicative of the successful pursuit 
of graduate work. 

Students of the Fifth Year Class to be considered as candidates for graduation 
must have maintained a grade average of at least C (2.0) and have completed 
minimum credit hours of the Professional Program according to the following: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 credit hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the General Pharmacy Major 108 credit hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred from 

the Pre-Graduate Major 110 credit hours 

(d) Pre-Graduate Majors who have followed this 

elective area for one or two years 110 credit hours 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon stu- 
dents who have successfully completed the pre-professional program and the 
three years required for the professional program in most of the accredited 
schools of pharmacy in the United States. At the School of Pharmacy at Balti- 
more, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon students who 
have met successfully all the requirements and have spent at least the Fifth 
Year in residence at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. The student must 
have been accredited with instruction in the professional program as follows: 

(a) General Pharmacy Majors 108 semester hours 

(b) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the General Pharmacy Major 108 semester hours 

(c) Hospital Majors who have transferred 

from the Pre-Graduate Major 110 semester hours 

(d) Pre-Graduate Majors who have pursued 

this elective area for one or two years 110 semester hours 

In addition, all students must have attained the required grade point standings 
and must have met other requirements. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar. The University rules regarding the issuance of transcripts 
are as follows: one copy of a student's records is made without charge; for 
additional copies, there is a fee of one dollar for each transcript. 

Transcript records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus for 
such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are forwarded, on 
request, to educational institutions. Government agencies, etc., as attested 
evidence of the student's record at the School of Pharmacy and the hon- 
orable dismissal therefrom. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any student 
or alumnus whose financial obligations to the School of Pharmacy have not 
been satisfied. 



School of Pharmacy • 17 

REGISTRATION WITH THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in \^)}\, requires all students enter- 
ing upon the study of Pharmacy in the State to hie application with the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this Slate shall not later than thirty days alter enrolling, file with 
the Secretary o( the Mar\land Board o\' Pharmacy, an application for registra- 
tion as a student o( pharmacy in which said application he shall be required to 
furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simultaneous- 
ly with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; 
all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school 
or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all 
actual drug store experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS OF THE MARYLAND BOARD 
OF PHARMACY 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration to 
those persons deemed competent, after examination, by said Board of Pharmacy. 
Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty-one 
years, is a graduate of an accredited school or college of pharmacy, and has 
completed one year as a registered apprentice in a drug store or pharmacy ap- 
proved by said Board of Pharmacy for such purposes may sit for examination 
given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a regular student in a school or college 
of pharmacy or while in attendance at said school or college of pharmacy. Four 
months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a registered apprentice 
must be acquired subsequent to graduation from an accredited school or college 
of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved by the Board for such 
purposes. 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will give full credit to students of pharmacy 
who have gained their experience needed for qualification to take the State 
Board Examination in a hospital pharmacy licensed by the Board. 
Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland Board 
of Pharmacy, 2305 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, for further 
information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

DEPORTMENT 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a 
student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 
or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her 
health, or the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the 
authorities of the University. 

EMPLOYMENT 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire period 
of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and comple- 
tion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to se- 
cure suitable employment, but it is recommended that students refrain from 
working during the school session. 



18 • University of Maryland 
HOUSING 

1 . WOMEN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the Louisa 
Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close proximity to the 
School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommodations and it is 
under the general supervision of the Office of Student Life. Students are re- 
quested to bring their own bedspreads, blankets, pillows, bureau scarves, cur- 
tains, desk lamp, iron, small rugs and a laundry bag. Students may obtain towels 
and bed linens through a designated commercial rental service. Although stu- 
dents may provide their own bed linens and towels they are not permitted to 
launder these items in Louisa Parsons Hall. The individual students assumes re- 
sponsibility for all the dormitory property assigned to her. Any damage done to 
property other than that which results from ordinary wear and tear will be 
charged to the student concerned. 

The room rates are as follows: The cost of all accommodations (singles as well 
as doubles) is the same — $160.00 per semester. Single rooms generally are 
not available. The room charge will appear on the student's bill, payable at 
the time of registration. 

Meals may be purchased at the Baltimore Union Cafeteria or in nearby restau- 
rants. 

2. MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in The Baltimore Union. For 
particulars, see section immediately below. 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located adjacent 
to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommodations for 
195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned building which also 
contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facilities, game 
room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. Double rooms are 
available. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; meals are served 
cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for accommodations cover the 
1967-1968 academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

Double Room Rates: 

$160.00 per semester (per person) 

$ 80.00 per eight weeks summer session (per person) 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: Room furnish- 
ings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book shelves, desk, 
medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. Maid service will include clean- 
ing of room twice per week and replacement of change of linen once each 
week. 



Scuooi oi Pharmacy • 19 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone 
Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. Information 
can be obtained from the Manager's oflice. Mail service is also provided. 
Sheets, towels and pillow cases must be rented from the designated linen service. 
The resident may provide his own pillow and blankets or rent them as well at 
additional cost. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other than 
luggage will not be available. 

TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 
$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath towel, one face cloth, and change of linen 
once a week. 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

PARKING 

The expansion program for the Baltimore Campus places a premium on space 

for parking on University lots. 

Student use of parking facilities on a temporary basis in certain designated 

University areas is contingent upon the availability of space. Admission of 

students to University parking lots will be by authorized identification cards 

only. These cards bearing an expiration date are issued by the Office of the 

Dean. 

Parking rates are forty-five cents per day, payable daily. 

In the event students may reside in The Baltimore Union and may require con- 
tinuous parking privileges, such students must use student lots only and will be 
required to pay the parking fee weekly, in advance, at the rate of $3.15 per 
week. Parking on lots adjacent to the Union Dormitory Building will be per- 
mitted on nights and weekends, for which parking fees will not be applicable. 
Cars parked on these lots after 7 a.m. daily (except Saturdays and Sundays) 
will be towed away. Admittance to these lots will be possible after 6 p.m. 

THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

The library facilities are excellent. The new Health Sciences Library which 
serves the School of Pharmacy, as well as the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, 
Nursing, and Social Work, contains over 108,000 bound volumes and regularly 
receives over 2,700 scientific periodicals and annual publications. 
The Rules and Regulations of the library are available for distribution to stu- 
dents at all times. 



20 • University of Maryland 

PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy in 
1927, a sum of money to establish a professorship of Pharmacology. The first 
appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was designated 
Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was subsequently held by the 
late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present incum- 
bent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual fellow- 
ships of up to $1800.00 for single persons or up to S2400.00 for married in- 
dividuals who are promising graduate students desirous of doing research in 
pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; stu- 
dents may also apply for an additional allowance up to $600.00 for tuition, 
fees, and supplies. These fellowships are open only to citizens of the United 
States. Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education, 777 Fourteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005, 
between February 15 and March 15 for consideration for the forthcoming 
September. 

The H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a distinguished alumnus of the School of 
Pharmacy, former associate professor of chemistry and prominent manufactur- 
ing pharmacist of Baltimore had bequeathed a sum of money to endow a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship previously sup- 
ported annually, since 1930 by contributions from Dr. Dunning, is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the School 
of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide tv/o fellowships for re- 
search studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty 
Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort Memorial Grant 

In memory of Edwin D. Stalfort and Arthur J. Stalfort, the John C. Stalfort & 
Sons Company, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, has provided a grant of $4000.00 
per annum to the Department of Pharmacy to support pharmaceutical research. 
A portion of this grant is to be utilized to provide a graduate fellowship. 

Abbott Laboratories, Scientific Divisions 

The Department of Pharmacy received a grant of approximately $10,000.00 
from Abbott Laboratories for studies in the area of environmental control. 



S(HOoi oi Pharmacy • 21 



Carter Products 

The Carter ProJiicls Division of Carter-Wallace. Inc.. and The A. E. Staley 
Manufacturing Company have each provided a grant of $1000.00 for the pro- 
curement oi tablet coating and compression equipment. 

Sniifh Kline and French Foundation 

The Smith Kline and French Foundation awarded a grant of $4500.00 to the 
Department of Pharmacy to be used for equipment in the biopharmaceuticals 
laboratory. 

OTHER RESEARCH GRANTS 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry has grants from the National 
Institutes of Health and the Ortho Research Foundation. The Department of 
Anatomy and Physiology has grants from the National Institutes of Health, and 
from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Through these 
grants, the School of Pharmacy is able to provide a number of research fellow- 
ships to graduate and post-doctoral students in pharmaceutical chemistry and 
physiology. 

SPECIAL GRANTS 

The FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, has provided funds to the 
Department of Pharmacy for the procurement of specialized research equip- 
ment. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying a 
stipend of $2700.00 for a ten-month academic year, are available to qualified 
students giving fourteen hours of laboratory and teaching services to the depart- 
ments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds of 
the normal graduate work. 

HOSPITAL PHARMACY RESIDENCY 

The University of Maryland's School of Pharmacy and Hospital are pleased to 
present a combined Graduate Study-Residency Program in Hospital Pharmacy, 
leading to the Master of Science degree and a Certificate of Residency in 
Hospital Pharmacy. Appointments to the residency are for a period of two 
academic years beginning each July 1. During the academic year, the resident 
divides his time between hospital pharmacy and graduate study. Full time 
training in University Hospital will be required during the summers of 1967 
and 1968. University Hospital will provide a stipend of $3900 per year for 
the first year as Assistant Resident. Completion of the Assistant Residency 
leads to appointment as Resident with a stipend of $4700 per year. Parking 
space, uniforms and laundry of uniforms are free of charge. 
Acceptable hospitalization insurance must be carried and Travelers Health 
Insurance is available as a payroll deduction. 



22 • University of Maryland 

Applicants must be graduates of accredited colleges or schools of pharmacy and 
have all prerequisites for admission to the graduate school. 

There is no formal application blank. All applicants are requested to submit 
full details: date and place of birth, citizenship, health, marital status, education, 
pharmaceutical experience, a small recent photograph, and an official trans- 
script of undergraduate work completed to date. He should also ask his Dean 
and two of his college faculty to write to the Director of University Hospital in 
support of his application. 

The application should be addressed to the Office of the Director, University 
of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS— Pre-Professional Program 
(COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning College Park scholarships and loans 
should be directed to: 
Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships '" 
The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-professional 
pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, scholastic 
achievement and the need for financial assistance. These scholarships are open 
only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholarship not exceeding 
$500.00 per academic year is applied in partial defrayment of fees and ex- 
penses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship''' 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually scholarships 
to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral char- 
acter, scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. Each 
scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is used in partial defray- 
ment of fees and expenses at College Park. These scholarships are open only 
to residents of the State of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships '" 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several scholarships 

to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, scholastic 

achievement, moral character and the need for financial assistance. Each 

scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied to defray 

partially the fees and expenses at College Park, Mar>iand. Recipients must 

have been residents of the State of Maryland for at least one year prior to 

the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available consult 

the University bulletin "An Adventure in Learning" available from College 

Park, Maryland. 



'■'These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in- 
Ak\ of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of 
the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. 



School oi Pharmacy • 23 
(UMBC CAMPUS) 

All requests for infornialion concerning scholarships and loans should be di- 
rected to the Registrar. University of Maryland. Baltimore County 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue. Baltimore. Maryland 21228. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOANS — Professional Program 

(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dean Noel E. Foss. School of Pharmacy. University of Maryland, 636 W. 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The selection of the recipients 
of the scholarships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunction with a com- 
mittee of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to 
qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who 
are in need of financial assistance to complete their education. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth not less than $100.00 per semester to qualified students of 
the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. 

The Charles Caspar i, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former Dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, a number of his friends and alumni have made an endowment for a 
scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The H. J. {Jack) Custis, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Class of 1951, a fund has been estab- 
lished for the purpose of awarding scholarships on the basis of reasonable need 
and academic ability to students in the professional program on the Baltimore 
Campus of the School of Pharmacy. Students eligible for the Custis Memorial 
Scholarship shall be residents of one of the nine Eastern Shore Maryland 
Counties. The amount of each Custis Memorial Scholarship shall not exceed 
$300.00 in any one year. The recipient of each Scholarship and the amount 
of each Scholarship awarded shall be determined by the Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy and the School's Financial Aid Committee with the President of 
the Eastern Shore Pharmaceutical Society serving in an advisory and ex-oflficio 
capacity. 

The John W . Dargavel Foundation Scholarship Sponsored by 
the National Association of Retail Druggists 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation sponsored by the National Association of 
Retail Druggists provides annually a scholarship in the amount of $200.00. 
The scholarship grant open to a qualified student of the Third, Fourth or Fifth 
Year Class is awarded on the basis of character, scholarship and financial need. 



24 • University of Maryland 

The J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarships 

In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, a former student of the School 
of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeannette Joseph provided a generous bequest to 
endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance. 

The Charles Landon Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a member 
of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry has 
endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by the Scholar- 
ship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, to a Fifth 
Year student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus of the 
School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein 
bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually 
to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The recipient of the award is to 
be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

The William J. Lowry Alumni Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of her late husband. Dr. William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus of 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, Class of 1896, and in 1926 a prime motiva- 
tor in the reorganization and reactivation of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Mrs. William J. Lowry has 
piovided the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy a sum of money 
to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The recipient of this award 
is to be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

The Noxzema Foundation Scholarships 

The Noxzema Foundation, Inc., is contributing a fund to provide two under- 
graduate scholarships of $500 each, open to citizens of the United States. 
Candidates will be selected on the basis of their educational qualifications by 
the Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland to which the Noxzema Foundation, Inc., may appoint a non-voting 
member. TTiis scholarship may be renewed annually at the discretion of the 
grantors. 

Frederick William Koeni<^ Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharmacist 
for over fifty years, the late Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a sum of 
money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The recipient of the 
award will be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 



S( iiooi oi Pharmacy • 25 

Prince Gcori^cs-Monti^o/ticry County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Prince Cleorges-Montgoniery ("ounty Pharmaceutical Association provides 
a scholarship in the amount of $200. 00 to be awarded to a student who has 
maintained a superior academic record and who is in need of financial assistance. 
The Ladies Auxiliary, Prince Georiies-Mont^omery County 

Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a student who 
has maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in need of financial aid. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes funds 
to provide scholarships paying $100.00 to $150.00 per semester to qualified 
students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in 
need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

Health Professions Student Scholarship Program 

Public Law 89-290 of 1965 has a provision for granting annual scholarships 
not exceeding $2500 to talented students from low income families who without 
such financial aid could not undertake a course of study in pharmacy. The 
School of Pharmacy is participating in this program of scholarships which for 
the academic year 1967-68 may be awarded only to students admitted, for the 
first time, into the Third and Fourth Year Classes of the School of Pharmacy. 
It is expected that these scholarship grants will be continued so that in the suc- 
ceding academic year of 1968-69, students eligible for consideration will be 
in the classes graduating in 1969, 1970 and 1971. 

To determine that a student can not pursue a full time course of required study 
without scholarship aid, it will be necessary to assess all other financial resources 
available and the expenses the student will incur. Financial resources which 
should be assessed include the assistance available from parents; the student's 
own and, if applicable, his (her) spouse's earnings and savings; other scholar- 
ships and private grants administered by the School of Pharmacy and loans 
available under the Health Professions Student Loan Program. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund 

The family of Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld have established a loan fund as a 
memorial to him. This fund is available to qualified needy students. Loans 
from the fund are made upon the recommendation of the Dean and the 
Grants-in-Aid Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 



26 • University of Maryland 

Health Professions Student Loan Program 

Public Law 89-290 of 1965 has a provision for loans to pharmacy students 
enrolled in the professional program of the pharmacy curriculum. The School 
of Pharmacy is participating in this program of assistance to students who 
document financial need and are seeking an education leading to an under- 
graduate degree in pharmacy. 

Individual loans up to $2500 a year may be made and are repayable over a 
ten year period beginning three years after graduation. The borrower must 
sign a note for the loan and agree to the interest and repayment terms estab- 
lished by the University. No interest is charged on loans until the beginning 
of the repayment period during which the interest will be charged at the cur- 
rent federal rate which for borrowers obtaining their first loan in 1967-68 
will be AVat % . 

Additional loans made to previous borrowers shall continue to be made at the 
interest rate which prevailed when they received their first loan under these 
programs. 

It is expected that the federal loan program will extend through fiscal year 1972. 

Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation I 

Loans up to $1000 per year are available from many Maryland banks to de- 
serving students who are residents of the State of Maryland and who have 
been accepted for enrollment or who are in good standing. Maximum interest 
on such loans is 6% simple and repayment begins the first day of the tenth 
month after the student leaves school. The repayment period may be extended 
to ten years. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

University Scholarship Honors B 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more than one- 
fifth of the graduating class in each college including the School of Pharmacy, 
The honor designations are listed in the commencement program and are 
recorded on the recipients' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two aca- 
demic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or higher. Those 
in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors and those in the 
second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Dean's Honor List 

The Dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students who 
have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Students 
whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's Academic 
Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a student 
repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for these 
courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 



Sc iiooi. c)i Pharmacy • 27 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter ot Phi Kappa Phi. a national fraternity 
for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the University 
in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible by invita- 
tion to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester of the 
Third Year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pliannacciitical Society 

Omicron Chapter oi Rho Chi, national Honorary pharmaceutical society, was 
established at the Uni\ersity of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of 
this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who arc 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship, character, personality and leadership. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmac> who has attained the highest general average, provided 
that this average is not below the grade of "B." Certificates of Honor are 
awarded to the three students having the next highest general averages, pro- 
vided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B." 
, Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the Fourth 
i Year Class having the highest general averages, provided these averages do 
not fall below the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered in 
awarding these honors. , 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

1 In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of chem- 
istry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by the 
Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending 
a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold 
medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded an- 
nually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 



28 • University of Maryland 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended 
to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the income 
from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of the School to 
the Fifth Year student who has done exceptional work throughout the course 
in pharmacognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late son, Mr. 
Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Sadie S. 
Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill, have provided 
a fund the income of which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to 
a Fifth Year student for meritorious academic achievement in pharmaceutical 
jurisprudence. 

David Fink Memorial Prize 

In memory of David Fink, '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new United 
States Dispensatory as a prize to the Fifth Year student recommended by the 
Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the Fifth Year 
student chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority provides 
annually a key which is awarded to the Fifth Year student selected by the 
Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in Pharmacy Administration. 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize 

In memory of her late brother. Dr. John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished 
alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, Miss Mary H. Wannenwetsch has pro- 
vided a fund, the income of which is to be used for a prize to be awarded to 
the graduating student majoring in General Pharmacy who has exhibited ex- 
ceptional performance and promise in the practice of community pharmacy. 

Extra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extra curricular activities, receive extra curricular keys at the School of 
Pharmacy Convocations. 



SCHOOI Ol PH\RMA( V • 29 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
(BALTIMORH CAMPUS) 

Student Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an organization 
of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding in the internal 
administration of the school for organizing all extra curricular programs and 
activities oi the student body and for coordinating these programs and activities 
with those oi the Faculty and Administration to foster mutual understanding 
and cooperation. The Executive Council of the Student Alliance is composed 
of the President of the Student Government Alliance, the Presidents of the 
respective classes and one delegate elected from each undergraduate class. 

The American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association Student Chapter, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy 

The purpose of the Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest and more 

liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession 

in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution of the American 

Pharmaceutical Association and the Constitution of the Maryland Pharmaceu- 

I tical Association, respectively, especially in fostering education in matters in- 

I volving pharmacy in all of its branches and its application and aiding in 

j promoting the public health and welfare. 

, Inter-Professional Student Senate 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, 
[ Nursing and Pharmacy established the Inter-Professional Student Senate for 
■ purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships among the Professional 

Schools and the University Units at College Park. The Senate is comprised of 

representatives from each of the five professional schools. 

Committee on School of Pharmacy of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
(1966-1967) 

When the School of Pharmacy became a part of the State University in 1920, 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association appointed a standing committee 
known as the Committee on the School of Pharmacy. The duties of this group 
are to represent the Association in all matters pertaining to the School of 
Pharmacy and pharmaceutical education. The present members of the Com- 
mittee are: 

Nicholas S. Lykos, Chairman 

Harold P. Levin, Co-Chairman 
Morris Bookoff Gordon A. Mouat 

Irving I. Cohen Chester L. Price 

James P. Cragg, Jr. Stephen J. Provenza 

John F. Fader, II Jacob H. Sapperstein 

Aaron M. Libowitz Morton J. Schnaper 

Simon Solomon 



30 • University of Maryland 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence as such 
or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was 
formed. Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the 
Society remained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. 
Each year it is more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not 
only maintained, but is growing. 

Officers (1966-1967) 

Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez Honorary President 

Aaron M. Libowitz (1932) President 

Casimir T. Ichniowski (1929) 1st Vice President 

Nathan I. Gruz (1939) 2nd Vice President 

Frank J. Slama (1924) Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield (1924) Treasurer 

Executive Committee {Elected Members) 

Harold P. Levin (1943), Chairman 

John F. Fader, II (1963) 

Paul G. Gaver, Jr. (1959) 

Herman Kling (1925) 

Anthony Padussis (1944) 

Solomon Weiner (1924) 

Harry R. Wills (1954) 

i 

ROBERT L. SWAIN MODEL PHARMACY ' 

Dedication of the $35,000 Robert L. Swain Model Pharmacy, a gift to the University 
of Maryland School of Pharmacy from the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
was held on March 2, 1967. The project was made possible by funds collected from 
alumni, pharmacists, industry and other friends of the School of Pharmacy. The 
1100 square foot area is fully stocked through the generosity of more than 120 manu- 
facturers of drugs, cosmetics and pharmaceutical and hospital supplies. The model 
pharmacy includes a complete ophthalmic laboratory, a drug information center and 
ten prescription compounding and dispensing stations. The facility is to be used ex- 
clusively for the teaching of pharmacy students and the evaluation of new systems 
relating to professional drug distribution. 




PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 
COURSES. HOURS AND CREDITS 





FJr<^t Semester 




»r 

k 




Mrs. Per We«k 


Hra. Per Wee 


Title and Number of Courae 






1 


s 


u 
Q 


>* 

un 

^ 


1 


a 

1 


Third Year (Required) 

Anatomy 31. Mammalian Anatomy and 


2 
3 


6 
4 


8 

7 


4 
4 








Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30. 32. Principles 


3 
2 


1 

4 1 

6 


1 

7 1 
1 

8 1 
1 
1 


4 


Phnrmaceutical Chemistry 34, Quantitative 
Pharmaceutical Analysis - 


4 


Pharmacy 31. Mathematics of the 


3 

3 

2 


..__- 


3 


a 




Pharmacy 33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms__ 

Pharmacy 35. Professional Communications 

Pharmacy 38 History of Pharmacy 


6 4 
2 2 


3 


3 


6 1 

1 


4 


3 
2 

_ 


1 

3 1 

- -1 


3 1 
5 1 

1 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 36 Accounting _ 








3 


Fourth Year (Required) 
First Aid 1 Standard 


1 
2 




4 


1 
1 1 
6 1 


17 


18 


Microbiology 41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology-- 
Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology. 

Public Health and Parasitology. _ _ 


4 




1 


- 1 






2 


1 
4 


1 
6 

_ 1 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Principles of 
Biochemistry 


4 
2 
2 


4 
3 

4 


8 1 5 

5 1 3 

6 3 




Pharmacognosy 41, 42. General Pharmacognosy- 
Pharmacy 43, 44, Pharmaceutical Technology.. 
Physiology 142, General Physiology 


2 
2 
3 


3 

4 
6 

__ 


5 1 

6 

9 

_ - 


3 
3 
5 


Electives »• - - .- . 








3-4 

18-19 

3 


3-4 


(Electives— General Pharmacy Major)" 
Pharmacy Administration 41. Marketing.. 


. __ 
3 


_ 



__ 
3 






-. 


18-19 


Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy 

Management I _ __ ._ 


1 
- 1 


2 

4 
4 


3 
3 


5 

4 


3 


(Electives— Pre-Graduate Major)" 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus^^. 


4 

3 

1 
2 

2 

3 




3 
3 
3 




1 

1 

4 1 4 


4 


Fifth Year (Required) 

Pharmacology 155, 156, General Pharmacology.. 
Pharmacy 151. Professional Pharmacy 


6 

4 
5 

2 

3 


4 
2 
3 

2 

3 

5-6 

19-20 
3 


5 




2 
2 
3 


1 3 






5 
2 
3 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, Pharma- 


2 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, 


S 


Electives" _ . 


5-6 
















18-19 


(Electives — General Pharmacy Major)" 


2 


1 3 

1 


1 
1 5 




1 

1 






Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 


3 

2 
2 


i-o 
1 

1 3 

1 

1 

1 


3 

R 

5 

1 
1 2 

1 
1 
1 


3 


OR 
Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations 




1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


_. 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54, Pharmacy 


2 

2 
2 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 3 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 
1 2 

1 5 
1 
2 


___ 
2 

3 
2 




1 2 


(Electives— Hospital Major)" 
Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists- 
Pharmacy 157. Hospital Pharmacy 
Administration I 


1 

1 




1 

1 


1 

1 


1 
1 


Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations - 


2 
2 

3 

4 


1 
3 

1 

1 

1 
6 


1 

1 5 
1 
1 2 

1 3 
6 


1 
1 3 


Pharmacy 158. Hospital Pharmacy 
Administration II. 




1 
1 


1— - 




1 
1 2 


(Electives— Pre-Graduate Major)" 

Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 188, 190, Physical Chemistry 
Laboratory 


3 


1 
1 6 


3 

1 
1 6 


3 

2 



2 

4 
2 


I 
1 

1 3 
1 
1 2 


OR 






Pharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems ^^ 

(Electives— Pre-Graduate Major)" 
(Transfers from General Pharmacy Major) 
Mathematics 20 21 Calculus^® 


1 

4 

1 


3 


4 

4 

4 


6 
_____ 


6 

4 
6 


1 2 

1 

4 


tPharmacy 161, 162, Special Problems 


2 



" Required of Fifth-Year students transferring from General Pharmacy Major to Pre-Graduate 

Major. See pages 15 and 16. 
" The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM— REQUIRED PROGRAM 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit Hours 


Third Year 


32 
96 
32 
48 
96 
32 
48 
32 
416 

16 
32 
32 
64 
64 
64 
48 


96 

128 
96 


128 

224 

128 

48 

192 

32 

48 

80 


4 
8 
4 
3 
8 
2 
3 
3 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34 

Pharmacy 31 __ _ 


Pharmacy 33, 34 _ _ 


96 




Pharmacy 38 




Pharmacy Administration 36 


48 


Total 


464 


880 

16 
96 
96 
128 
160 
192 
144 
832 

208 
64 

160 
64 
96 


35 


Fourth Year 

First Aid 1_ 


Microbiology 41 _ 


64 
64 
64 
96 
128 
96 


4 


Microbiology 146 


4 


Phamaceutical Chemistry 149 


5 
6 


Pharmacy 43, 44 _ 


6 


Physiology 142 


5 






Total . 


320 

112 

16 
64 
64 
96 


512 

96 
48 
96 


30 


Fifth Year 

Pharmacology 155, 156 


9 




2 


Pharmacy 153, 154 


6 


Pharmacy Administration 51 52 


4 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152___ 




6 


Total- _ 


352 


240 


592 


27 







PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM— ELECTIVE PROGRAMS 

SUMMARY OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Course 


Didactic 


Laboratory 


Total 


Credit H 


Fourth Year 

(General Pharmacy Major) 


48 
32 

128 

32 

48 

32 
64 

32 
32 
32 
32 

96 




48 
80 

128 

80 
48 
r 

80 
64 

80 
32 
80 
32 

96 
192 

160 

128 
160 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 42 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 
Mathematics 20 21 


48 


3 

8 


Fifth Year 

(General Pharmacy Major) 


48 


3 




3 


or 


o 

48 


3 


Pharmacy Administration 53, 54 

(Hospital Major) 


4 


48 


3 




2 


Pharmacy 156 


48 


3 


Pharmacy 158 


2 


(Pre-Graduate Major) 
Chemistry 187, 189 




6 


Chemistry 188, 190 


192 

o 
144 


4 


or 
Pharmacy 161, 162 

(Pre-Graduate Major) 

(Transfers from General Pharmacy 

Major) 


16 

128 
16 


4 
8 


Pharmacy 161, 162 


144 


4 



TOTALS OF HOURS AND CREDITS 



Fourth Year 

General Pharmacy Major. 

Pre-Graduate Major 

Fifth Year 
General Pharmacy Major. 



Hospital Major 

Pre-Graduate Major 



Pre-Graduate Major 

(Transfers from General Pharmacy 
Major) 



80 
128 

144 

128 
128 
96 

112 
144 



48 



48 
or 

96 

96 

192 

144 
144 



128 
128 


6 
8 


192 


10 


224 

224 
288 


ooo 


256 
288 


10 
12 



'8 The electives must be approved by the Class Advisor and Dean. 

"Minimum credit hour requirements of instruction in the Professional Curriculum are: 
(a) General Pharmacv Major, 108 credit hours: (b) Hospital Major. 108 credit hours; 

(c) Hospital Major (Transfers from Pre-Graduate Major), 110 credit hours; and 

(d) Pre-Graduate Major. 110 credit hours, also consult pages 15 and 16 concerning electives 
and requirements for graduation- 



School oi Pharmacy • 33 

Description of Courses 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 
ANATOMY 

31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

A study of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. 1 he course 
is designed to provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 
particular emphasis on human structures. 

FIRST AID 

1. First Aid Course. (0) 

Fourth Year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. Mr. Gregson. 
instructor from the Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

MATHEMATICS 

20, 21. Calculus (4, 4) 

Fourth Year and Fifth Year, four lectures (Dean.) 

Prerequisite — Mathematics 18, 19 and or approval of instructor. Limits, deriva- 
tives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, 
kinematics, integration, geometric and physical application on integration, par- 
tial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series and differential 
equations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. Sample space, events, 
probability and its basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random 
variables, distribution functions (continuous and discrete); typical distributions, 
expectations, moments, generating functions; transformations of random varia- 
bles, limit theorems. (Dean.) 

132. Introduction to Statistics. (3) 

Second semester, three lectures and one hour of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 130. Sampling distributions, elements of point and set estima- 
tion, maximum likelihood principle, testing statistical hypotheses, standard 
tests. Neyman-Pearson lemma and problems of optimalily of tests, linear 
hypotheses, sequential methods. (Dean.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology. (4) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay, Becker and Krywolap.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. This course is designed es- 
pecially for pharmacy students and includes practice and theoretical considera- 
tion of bacteria, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, viruses, rickettsia, yeasts 
and molds. 



34 • University of Maryland 

Laboratory teaching includes methods of staining and the preparation of media; 
cultural characteristics of bacteria; emphasis is given to the study of disinfec- 
tants, antiseptics, germicides and sterilization, antibiotics and their antibacterial 
action, microbiological assay, sensitivity testing and virus techniques. Experi- 
ments are included for the bacteriological evaluation of milk, water, food and 
air. 

For Graduates dnd Advanced Undergraduates 

146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health and Parasitology. (4) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(Shay, Becker and Krywolap.) 
Prerequisite, Microbiology 41. A study of the principles of immunity, including 
the preparation and use of biological products such as sera, vaccines, toxins, 
toxoids, etc. Special attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and ani- 
mals to sensitizing substances, drug idiosyncracies, hay fever, food allergies, 
contact dermatosis, and animal inoculation. Part of the course is devoted to the 
study of Public Health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections, immunity, transmission, diagnosis, treat- 
ment and prevention of parasitic diseases. 

For Graduates 

200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Shay.) 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of drugs 
employed in the treatment of parasitic diseases. 

202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1,1) 

One lecture. (Given in alternate years.) (Becker.) 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of microbiological reagents and 
media. 

210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

A laboratory course on selected problems in microbiology. Credit determined 
by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 

211. Public Health. (1-2) 

One lecture. (Shay.) 

Prerequisite, Microbiology 41, 146. Lectures and discussions on the organiza- 
tion and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The courses will also include a study of laboratory methods. 

399. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by the amount of work performed. (Staff.) 



PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

30, 32. Principles of Organic Chemistry. (4, 4) 

Third Year, two lectures, one recitation, one laboratory. 

(Miller, Olsen and Gorman.) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry. 



1 



School oi Pharmacy • 35 

34. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

(I.iebman, Johnson and Olscn.) 
Prerequisites. Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30. 32 or equivalem. A study of quan- 
titative analytical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
official preparations with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, or equivalent. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. 

149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Fourth Year, first semester, four lectures and one laboratory. 

(Zenker, Johnson and Contractor.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 34. Lectures and laboratory exer- 
cises devoted to the composition of living organisms and the chemical and 
physical processes which occur during health and in disease. 

151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Abushanab.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32, A survey of the structural 
relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally of organic medici- 
nal products. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, three lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 19, 30, 32, Physics 10, 11, Mathematics 20, 21. A study 
of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic theory, 
liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, 
chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two laboratories. (Leslie and Franklin.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 187, 189 or concurrent registration. Quantitative ex- 
periments are performed which demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and 
acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

210, 211. Techniques of Chemical Research. (3, 3) 

One lecture, two laboratories. (Liebman.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143, 187-190 or concurrent registration. Lectures 
and laboratory exercises devoted to the systematic separation, characterization 
and identification of organic structures by chemical and instrumental methods, 
to the synthesis of organic structures of the more difficult types, including iso- 
topically labeled compounds, and to isotope counting techniques. 

230. Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of prog- 
ress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 



36 • University of Maryland 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles of stereochemistry 
of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and synthesis of 
heterocyclic compounds. 

250. Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the synthesis and structure deter- 
mination of steroids and the application of modern chemical concepts to the 
chemistry of steroids. 

252. Alkaloids. (2) 

Two lectures. (Miller.) 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles involved in struc- 
ture determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alkaloidal classes. 

253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143, 151, 152 or permission of 
the instructor. A study of structural relationships and basic principles con- 
cerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, e.g., structure 
activity relationships, physical properties and biological activity, cellular trans- 
port, drug, protein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and physico- 
chemical mechanisms of drug action. 

271. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149; Chemistry 189. The application 
of physical chemistry principles to biological systems, and a discussion of the 
physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. 

272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite. Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of particular in- 
terest in the pharmaceutical sciences, including surface chemistry, colloids, 
kinetics, colligative properties and absorption spectroscopy. 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory. (Leslie.) 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are necessary for, 
and a part of, a larger research effort. 

281. Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 

Two lectures. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of the design, the 

mode of action at the enzymatic level and the metabolism of biochemical 
analogs. 



School oi Pharmacy • 37 

282. Advanced Biochemistry LABORAroRv. (2) 

Two laboratories. (Zenker.) 

Prerequisite. Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. 
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of modern techniques and 
metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug metabolism. 

399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

41. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Euler.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. A study of the cultivation, 
collection, and commerce of crude vegetable drugs with special emphasis on 
the physical and microscopical characteristics used in their identification and in 
the detection of adulteration. 

42. Pharmacognosy, General. (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Slama and Euler.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacognosy 41. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 41 with 
instruction covering drugs of animal origin and allergy-producing pollens. 
Special emphasis is placed upon official and non-official chemical tests used 
in the identification of drugs and their constituents. 

51. Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists. (3) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

A discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 
and the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; their 
recognition, life history, and methods of control. 

52. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, three lectures. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42; Pharmacology 155. 

A study of principal pharmaceutical agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. A study of the kinds of seed plants and 
ferns, their classifications, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be 
given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. Lectures and laboratory work covering 
advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of 
roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 



I 



38 • University of Maryland 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories, (Slama.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs 
and spices from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice 
in identification and detection of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Euler.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study of many crude drugs not 
ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special attention will be 
given to practical problems and to the identification and detection of adulter- 
ants. 

399. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

1-55, 156. Pharmacology, General. (4, 5) 

Fifth Year, three lectures and one laboratory first semester; four lectures and 
one laboratory second semester. 

(Ichniowski, Driever, Diamond, Fleischer and Weiner.) 
Prerequisites, Physiology 142; Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or consent of 
the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward 
effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156. A study of the methods of biological 
assay official in the United States Pharmacopeia and the National Formu- 
lary. 

For Graduates 

201. 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacology 171. Offered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 
Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. 

(Ichniowski and Driever.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmacology 155, 156, and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods. (2-4), (2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. (Ichniowski.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the develop-_ 
ment of biological assay methods and comparative standards. 



i 



School of Pharmacy • 39 

230. Principles of Biochemical Pharmacology. (3) 

Two lectures. Laboratory work consists of eight 6-hour periods. Second semes- 
ter. (Staff.) 
Prerequisites. Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, 282 and Pharmacology 155, 156 
or equivalents and consent of the instructor. A study of the biochemical mech- 
anisms involved in drug action with primary emphasis on drug metabolism. 

399. Research in Pharmacology. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

PHARMACY 

31. Mathematics of the Pharmaceutical Sciences. (3) 

Third Year, first semester, three lectures. (Allen and Leslie.) 

Applied calculations in all fields of pharmaceutical sciences with emphasis on 
problem solving in systems of measurement, aliquot methods, alligation, HLB 
systems, isotonicity, chemical reactions, commercial problems, drug absorption, 
and the interpretation and evaluation of experimental data. 

33, 34, Processes and Dosage Forms. (4, 4) 

Third Year, three lectures and one laboratory. (Lamy, Kitler and Parsons.) 
Pharmacy 31 and 33 are prerequisites to Pharmacy 34. Commentary on the 
official compendia of pharmacy. Includes pharmaceutical manipulations and 
processes for preparing official dosage forms. Particular emphasis is placed on 
physical and chemical properties of ingredients, common nomenclature and 
synonyms, storage conditions and uses. 

35. Professional Communications. (2) 

Third Year, first semester, two lectures. (Ballman.) 

Oral and written expression on subjects of pharmaceutical use and interest. 
Bibliographical methods, oral and written reports and communications, con- 
duct of discussion groups, audio-visual aids. 

38. History of Pharmacy. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, three lectures. (Ballman.) 

A survey of the history of pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 
those aspects of science most pertinent to the interests of the pharmacist. Re- 
search papers and reports required. 

43, 44. Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3) 

Fourth Year, two lectures, one laboratory and one recitation. 

(Shangraw and Sones.) 
Prerequisites, Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. The physical-chemical principles in- 
volved in pharmaceutical systems and the application of this knowledge to the 
development, preparation and packaging of medicinal formulations. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

151. Professional Pharmacy. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, one lecture and one laboratory. 

(Shangraw and Lamy.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Preparation for the major fields of pharmaceutical 
specialization by rotation through the school model pharmacy and manufac- 
turing pharmacy laboratories as well as the inpatient and outpatient hospital 
pharmacy departments. 



40 • University of Maryland 

153, 154. Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Fifth Year, two lectures and one laboratory. (Allen, Parsons and Davies.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Professional laboratory practice and other special- 
ized activities pertaining to prescriptions, including an evaluation of com- 
pounding aids and commercial pharmaceuticals. 

156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Allen, Sones.) 
Prerequisite, Pharmacy 153. A study of the composition and manufacture of 
preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of cold cream, 
vanishing cream, protective cream, hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face 
powder, dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, toothpaste, deodorants, depilatories, 
suntan preparations, etc. The acid-mantle of the skin and hypoallergenic prep- 
arations are also emphasized. 

157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration I. (2) 

Fifth Year, first semester, two lectures. (Lamy.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. The fundamentals of hospital pharmacy practice 
and administration. Includes a study of the history and development of hos- 
pital pharmacy, physical facilities, minimum standards, purchasing, the formu- 
lary, record keeping, and dispensing practices. 

158. Hospital Pharmacy Administration II. (2) 

Fifth Year, second semester, two lectures. (Lamy.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy 157. An orientation to the function of the hospital 
pharmacy within the hospital. A study of the administrative organization of 
a hospital and the interrelationship of the various hospital departments with 
the hospital pharmacy. 

161, 162. Special Problems. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 20, 21 or concurrent registration. Independent in- 
vestigations in the several pharmaceutical sciences, consisting of Hbrary and 
laboratory research and seminars. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 153, 154. A study of manufacturing processes, control 
procedures and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a 
commercial scale, including new drug applications, patents and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with Phar- 
macy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and im- 
portant pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 



I 



SCHOOL oi Pharmacy • 41 

211. 212. Survey of Pharmaceuticai Litkrature. (1, 1) 

One lecture. Ciiven in alternate years. (Allen.) 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special 
reference to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the 
pharmaceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. (Shangraw.) 

Prerequisites. Pharmacy 156, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the development 
of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. (Staff.) 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and 
the principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. (Lamy.) 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research 
and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy, 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. (Allen.) 
A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharma- 
ceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399. Research in Pharmacy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 

(Foss, Allen, Shangraw and Lamy.) 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

36. Accounting. (3) 

Third Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

(Leavitt and Augsburger.) 
A study of the fundamental principles of accounting, especially as it concerns 
the practice of community pharmacy. 

41. Drug Marketing. (3) 

Fourth Year, first semester, three lectures. (Leavitt and Kitler.) 

Prerequisite, Economics 37 or its equivalent. This is an introductory course 
in the field of marketing with special emphasis on the marketing of drug prod- 
ucts. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the 
forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing 
drug products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

42. Pharmacy Management L (3) 

Fourth Year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 41. A study of the application of 
accounting, marketing and merchandising principles to the operation of a com- 
munity pharmacy, including financial statement analysis, pricing, inventory and 
expense management and control. 



42 • University of Maryland 

51, 52. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Kaufman.) 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; Federal and State laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, 
Agency and Partnerships. 

53, 54. Pharmacy Management II, III. (2, 2) 

Fifth Year, two lectures. (Leavitt.) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacy Administration 42. A study of the management prob- 
lems of community pharmacy, including organization, staffing, directing, plan- 
ning and control. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

142. General Physiology. (5) 

Fourth Year, second semester, three lectures and two laboratories. (Costello.) 
Prerequisite, Anatomy 31. A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physi- 
ology including the structure and permeability of the cell membrane, neuro- 
physiology, muscle physiology, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, 
the digestive system, the excretory system, endocrinology, metabolism, and 
the special senses. 

For Graduates 

245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester, three lectures. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Physiology 142. Consent of 
instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical properties 
of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, 
golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and their con- 
tributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemical phe- 
nomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

246. Radioisotope Technique. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. (Costello.) 

Prerequisites, consent of instructor. A course concerned with the practical use 
of isotopes particularly as tracers in metabolic investigations. 



\ 



399. Research in Physiology. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. 



(Costello.) 




School of Pharmacy • 43 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1966-1967 
Graduate Students* 

Augsburger. Larry Louis Maryland 

Block. Lawrence Howard Maryland 

Brown. Sr. Jane Marie Maryland 

Caplan. "^'ale Howard Maryland 

Chiu, Hsi-chiang Taiwan 

Clark. James Frederick District of Columbia 

Contractor, Avinash M India 

tCorman. Larry Irwin Maryland 

Davies, William Lincoln Rhode Island 

DeHaven, Anne Lee Maryland 

Diamond, Louis Maryland 

Fleischer, Charles Alexander Maryland 

Franklin, James Gordon Maryland 

Hynniman, Clifford Elton Pennsylvania 

Johnson, Eugene Malcolm, Jr Maryland 

Kitler, Mary Ellen Pennsylvania 

Lleander. Glory Coronado Philippines 

Lutsky, Barry Neal Maryland 

Manudhane, Krishna Shankar India 

fMeyer, Howard Barry Maryland 

Olsen, Charles Wold, Jr New Jersey 

Pang, Charles E Maryland 

Parsons, Emory Warren, Jr Pennsylvania 

Rhodes. Robert Allen Virginia 

Sones, Sheldon S New York 

Vora, Kakubhai M India 

Weiner, Myron Maryland 

Wilde, Kenneth David Maryland 

Wynn, Richard Lee Maryland 

Fifth Year Class 

fAIpert, Charles Marvin Maryland 

Blitz, Alvin Michael Maryland 

Buckner, Stephen Louis Maryland 

Cohen, David Maryland 

David, Stephen Thomas Maryland 

DeNeale, Richard Jay District of Columbia 

Dubansky, Ronald Floyd Maryland 

Fischer, Bernard Aloysius, III Maryland 

Frankenfeld, Frederick Martin Maryland 

Freedman, Jerald Allan Maryland 

Goodman, Richard Mark Maryland 

Grabush, Arnold Fred Maryland 

Groman, Alvin Daniel Maryland 

Hill, Carol Jane Maryland 

Hommerbocker, Barry Allan Maryland 

Jaskulski, Alan Joseph Maryland 

♦Registered in Graduate School 
fDid not attend entire session 
tSecond semester only 



44 • University of Maryland 

Kovalsky, Paul Victor Maryland 

Lehman, Allan Maryland 

McCabe, Stanley Erasure Maryland 

Needel, Stephen Maryland 

Newcomb, John Randolph Maryland 

Sanford, Ronald Arthur Maryland 

Sherman, Howard Maryland 

Stromberger, Henry Richard Maryland 

Taylor, Charles Dorsey Maryland 

Telak, Ronald Casimir Maryland 

Trost, Patrick Edgar Maryland 

Vykol, Frank James Maryland 

Will, Marcia Ann Maryland 

Fourth Year Class 

Adams, Robert William Maryland 

Balch, John Howard Maryland 

Barker, John Paul Maryland 

Bohle, George Charles, Jr Maryland 

Cohen, Steven Paul Maryland 

Dirnberger, Thomas John Pennsylvania 

Dyke, Wayne Alden Maryland 

fEdelman, Barry Alan . Maryland 

Feldman, Neil Maryland 

Ginsberg, Murray Phillip Maryland 

Gold, Daniel Martin Maryland 

Golob, Jerrold Jay Maryland 

Griffiths, Robert Charles, Jr Maryland 

Hirsch, Charles Benjamin Maryland 

Honkofsky, Arnold Jay Maryland 

Howard, Leonard Charles, Jr Maryland 

Jacobs, Lionel Harvey Maryland 

Kenny, James Estel Maryland 

Krawiecki, Elizabeth Ann New York 

Lesser, Gary Allen Maryland 

Majchrzak, Edward Robert Maryland 

Nash, Glenn Wilson Maryland 

Neuman, Joann Lynne Maryland 

Pfeiffer, Paul Russell Maryland 

Pironis, Uldis Verners Maryland 

Priller, Charles August Maryland 

Ricci, John Robert Maryland 

Rolf, Larry Joe Missouri 

Rosenbluth, Karen Sue Alabama 

Samios, William Arthur Maryland 

Smith, Earl Thomas Maryland 

Sohmer, Herbert Marshall Maryland 

Solomon, Larry Paul Maryland 

Statter, William Maryland 

Welsh, Patrick George Maryland 

Wolff, Martin William Maryland 



fDid not attend entire session 



School of Pharmacy • 45 
Third Year Class 

Adier, Richard Michael Maryland 

Appel, Michael Jay Maryland 

*Berrett, Judith Louise Maryland 

Besser, Charles A.. Ill Maryland 

Block, Harold Jack Maryland 

Boiling, Thomas Vance Maryland 

Caplan, Stanley Maryland 

Carson, Janice Elaine Maryland 

Chason, David Ross Maryland 

Cooper, William Keith Maryland 

fCorman, Larry Irwin Maryland 

Crooks, Clint Richard Maryland 

Culp, James Bernard Maryland 

Davis, David Mayer Maryland 

Delcher, Morrell Charles Maryland 

fDixon, Dolores Spriggs (Mrs.) Maryland 

Dowling, Edward Guy Maryland 

Filar, Mary Anne Maryland 

Gerstein, Robert Bruce Maryland 

Grossman, Paul New Jersey 

Harrison, Harold Douglas Maryland 

*Helfand, Carl Maryland 

tHill, Pamela Marie Maryland 

Hogue, George Lawrence Maryland 

*Jacob, Melvin Arthur Maryland 

Jarkowski, Leonard, Jr Maryland 

Kandel, Kenneth Lee Maryland 

Kaniecki, Paul Edward Maryland 

Kern, Edward George Maryland 

Kestler, Robert Lee Maryland 

Klebrowski, Stephen Maryland 

Krause, John Francis Maryland 

^Lawrence Barbara Josephine Maryland 

Leikach, Henry David Maryland 

Limric, Julie Eileen Maryland 

Lipov, Richard Sylvan Maryland 

Lunz, Kathleen Marie Maryland 

Mierzwicki, Leo Anthony Maryland 

Motsko, John Michael Maryland 

*Parran, Joel Lee Maryland 

Poklis, Alphonse Maryland 

*Reese, William Albert Maryland 

Roberts, Ralph E New Jersey 

Rochlin, Howard Maryland 

Rosser, Edward Walter, Jr Maryland 

Sandler, Ronald David Maryland 

Schneider, Ronald Maryland 

Siegel, Jack M Maryland 

*Silgalis, Raymond Louis Maryland 

Smith, Bonnie Faye Maryland 



*Did not attend entire session 
fFirst Semester only 
^Second Semester only 



46 • University of Maryland 

*StoflF, Alan Richard Maryland 

Taylor, Donald Wayne Maryland 

Trunk, Charles Francis Maryland 

Von Bergen, Eric Walter Maryland 

Yorkilous, John Charles Maryland 

Special Students 

tEdelman, Barry Alan Maryland 

Li, Jean Peh-Chen China 

Schott, Charles Donald Maryland 

AT COLLEGE PARK 
Second Year Class 

fAbate, James J Maryland 

Abel, Lois Maryland 

JAbrams, Harold L Maryland 

fAbramson, Edward J New York 

JAlperstein, Arnold R Maryland 

Babb, James D Maryland 

Becker. John P Maryland 

fBrown, William C District of Columbia 

Clark, Annie M Maryland 

Cocoros, Alice Maryland 

fCollinson, Marsha W Maryland 

Conklin, Sandra L Maryland 

fCooke, Conrad N Maryland 

Cornell, John M Maryland 

Coulter, Eileen C Maryland 

fDahan, Virginia A Maryland 

fDavis, Janis K Maryland 

Dooley, George T Maryland 

Firth, Pamela J Maryland 

Friedman, Sanford R Maryland 

Gendason, Herbert Maryland 

Gutowski, Stanley W Maryland 

Holdefer, Gary P Maryland 

fHopkins, David R Maryland 

JHunt, Roger W Maryland 

tingles, Richard O Maryland 

Jones, David H Maryland 

Kadan, Douglas M Maryland 

Kalmanson, Martin Maryland 

JKessler, Jeffrey R Maryland 

Kiang, Nancy Maryland 

Klein, Ira D Maryland 

KrasteK Raymond J Maryland 

tLacher, Vernon R Maryland 

Lane, Thomas E Maryland 



tFirst semester only 
iSecond semester only 



School oi Pharmacy • 47 

Lawrence. Granville P Maryland 

fLeister, Dennard Maryland 

Levi. Mark A. Maryland 

fLiptz. Sheldon J. District of Columbia 

Luzuriaga. Michael Maryland 

Lynch, Whitmel H. Maryland 

fMariany. Louis J. Maryland 

fMcConnell. Patricia vS. Maryland 

fMinkove, Carroll M Maryland 

Paulick, Carol M Maryland 

Pletka, George J Maryland 

Poole. Barry W New Jersey 

fPrincipio, Louis J Maryland 

fPristoop. Susan G Maryland 

Pryor, Douglas M Maryland 

*Rejonis, Robert A Maryland 

Riley, Arthur N Maryland 

JRudin, Ronald J New Jersey 

Scher, Dana L Maryland 

Silver. Harold V Maryland 

fSnellinger. John E Maryland 

Snoops. Dorothy L Maryland 

fStires, John C Maryland 

Sullivan, Celia S District of Columbia 

Swan, Teri E APO, New York 

JTamres, Cary M Maryland 

fTauben, Michael New Jersey 

Thacker, Karen L Maryland 

fToronto, James F Maryland 

fWalters, Gary J Maryland 

Welk, Paul C Maryland 

West, Robert L Maryland 

JWhite. Gary L Maryland 

JWiatrak, Emil J New Jersey 

fWilliams, Joan P Maryland 

Yockelson, Norman R Maryland 

Zapresko, Albert M Maryland 

Zimmerman, William J Maryland 

First Year Class 

Anderson, Walter E Maryland 

*August, Henry J., Jr Maryland 

Berman, Janis B Maryland 

fBobick, Kenneth A Maryland 

Brown, James V Maryland 

Bulmash, Gerald Maryland 

fButtion, Linda A Maryland 

Carr, James E Maryland 

Collins, Don A Maryland 

JDavey, William F District of Columbia 

fDebonis, Sharon L Maryland 



♦Did not attend entire session 
fFirst semester only 
JSecond semester only 



48 • University of Maryland 

Docimo, William J Maryland 

Evans, Harold W North Carolina 

Fruchtbaum, Marsha E Maryland 

fGaines, John W Maryland 

fGrube, Steven G Maryland 

Hanna, Donald B Virginia 

Hinkes, Mark P Maryland 

Hodges, Richard A Maryland 

$Hunt, John H Maryland 

Johnson, Eric M Maryland 

JKupersmith, Roy I New York 

fLoomis, William A Maryland 

fManning, Mark D Maryland 

Mason, Jerry A Maryland 

McMahon, Darlene F Maryland 

Miller, Linda L Maryland 

Morris, Alicia A Maryland 

*Owens, Joseph W Maryland 

fPage, Tanya L Maryland 

fPascal, Michael I New Jersey 

Reynolds, Charles D Maryland 

fRobinson, Frank H Maryland 

*Sauer, Robert S Maryland 

JSchocken, Mark J New Jersey 

Simko, Steven M Maryland 

Six, William R Maryland 

JSmith, Roger R Maryland 

JSolomon, Gerschon Maryland 

Stevenson, Joseph M Maryland 

Teets, Charles E Maryland 

Terborg, James L Maryland 

Wagner, Dennis M Maryland 

Young, Marina J Maryland 

Young, Susan K Maryland 



'•'Did not attend entire session 
fFirst semester only 
JSecond semester only 




School oi Pharmacy • 49 

ROLL OF GRADUATES JUNE 4, 1966 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Richman. Morton David Maryland 

Scott. Kenneth Richard New York 

Smith. Willard Newell Maryland 

Stein. Martin Edward Massachusetts 

Tinney. Francis John New York 

Warthen, John David. Jr Maryland 

Master of Science 

Goldberg, Marjorie Sue (Mrs.) Maryland 

Wynn, Richard Lee Maryland 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Avery, Carolyn Jane (Mrs.) Maryland 

Berry, John Thomas Maryland 

Bloom, Barry Louis Maryland 

Christian, Mitchell Alvin Maryland 

Cohen, Michael Jay Maryland 

Courpas, Anthony Leo Maryland 

' Dailey, John William Maryland 

I Donnelly, John Allen Maryland 

! Edmondson, William Henry Maryland 

i Eng, Frederick Maryland 

\ Erdman, Sheldon Norman Maryland 

\ Fleischer, Charles Alexander Maryland 

Heer, Roger Glenn Maryland 

Hess, Gary Lee Maryland 

Hoffman, Ronald Harvey Maryland 

Johnson, Eugene Malcolm Maryland 

Lessing, Melvin Maryland 

1 Lindenbaum, Ronald Lee Maryland 

! Martin, Lawrence Leo, Jr Maryland 

Meyer, Howard Barry Maryland 

Moore, William Carlton Delaware 

Musch, Robert Allen Maryland 

Neiner, Joan Marie Louisiana 

Pincus, Jack Howard Maryland 

Rayman, Marsha Jane District of Columbia 

Spuras, Jenina Danute Maryland 

Tannebaum, Stanley Bernard Maryland 

Tims, John Marshall Maryland 

Via, David Martin Maryland 

Weiner, Myron Maryland 



50 • University of Maryland 

HONORS (1965-1966) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Lawrence Leo Martin, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor to holders of next highest average John William Dailey 

Myron Weiner 
Charles Alexander Fleischer 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Lawrence Leo Martin, Jr. 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) John William Dailey 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Lawrence Leo Martin, Jr. 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Jack Howard Pincus 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize William Henry Edmondson 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) David Martin Via 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize (Pharmacology) 

Sheldon Norman Erdman 
Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) David Martin Via 

DEAN'S MEDALS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 

(1965-1966) 
Class of 1966 

John W. Dailey Jack H. Pincus 

Sheldon N. Erdman David M. Via 

Lawrence L. Martin, Jr. Myron Weiner 

Honorable Mention 

Carolyn J. Avery Frederick Eng 

Barry L. Bloom Charles A. Fleischer 

William H. Edmondson John M. Tims 

Class of 1967 

David Cohen Arnold F. Grabush 

Richard J. DeNeale Patrick E. Trost 

Honorable Mention 

Stephen T. David Alvin D. Groman 

Meira K. Shnidman 

Class of 1968 

Leonard C. Howard, Jr. Herbert M. Sohmer 

John R. Ricci Patrick G. Welsh 

Honorable Mention 

John P. Barker Larry Joe Rolf 

Charles A. Priller Martin W. Wolff, Jr. 



School of- Pharmacy • 51 



Index 



Academic Calendar, 1967-1968 V 

Academic Excellence. Dean's Medals for 50 

Academic Regulations (Baltimore Campus) 12 

Academic Regulations (College Park Campus) 12 

Accrediatation 1 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student Life and Welfare . . iv 
Admission Procedure 

Applicants for admission to the Pre-professional Program at College Park 6 

Applicants for Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 6 

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 1 

Admission Requirements 

To the College Park Program 2 

To the Baltimore Program 6 

Alumni Association 30 

Applications. Deadlines For 

College Park Campus 3 

UMBC, Baltimore County Campus 4 

Assistantships, Graduate 21 

Attendance Requirements 12 

Baltimore Union 18 

Board of Regents vii 

Breakage 9 

Buildings and Equipment 1 

Calendar 1967 and 1968 iv 

Calendar, Academic 5 

Central Admistrative Officers viii 

Committees xiii 

Correspondence vi 

Courses. Description of 33 

Curriculum, Changes in 11 

Curriculum. Pre-professional Program at College Park. Md 7 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program From UMBC Division 7 

Curriculum, Pre-professional Program from Universities and Colleges other 

than University of Maryland 8 

Curriculum. Professional Program at Baltimore, Md. 

Courses. Hours and Credits 31 

Summary of Hours and Credits 32 

Deans and Principal Academic Officers ix 

Degrees 1 

Deportment 17 

Directors of Bureaus and Special Services xii 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs X 

Dismissal for Low Scholarsrip 14 

Dormitories (See Housing) 18 

Elective Programs at Baltimore 15 

Emeriti viii 

Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 20 

Employment 17 

Examinations 12 

Faculty Council xv 

Faculty (1966-1967) xv 

Fees and Expenses 

Changes in registration 9 



52 • University of Maryland 

INDEX (Continued) 

Graduate 10 

Late registration 9 

Part-time Undergraduate 9 

Pre-professional at College Park 4, 11 

Pre-professional at UMBC Campus 4, 11 

Fellowships and Grants 20 

General and Administrative Officers xi 

Grade of D, Raising 13 

Grade of F, Removal of 14 

Grading System 13 

Grade Point Average 13 

Grade of Withdrawing Students 11 

Graduates, Roll of June 4, 1966 49 

Graduation Requirements 16 

History and Program of the School of Pharmacy, Baltimore 1 

Honor Societies 

Phi Kapa Phi 27 

Rho Chi 27 

Honors and Awards 26 

Honors Recipients ( 1965-1966) 50 

Hospital Pharmacy Residency '. 21 

Housing (Baltimore Campus) 18 

Louisa Parsons Hall (Women) 18 

The Baltimore Union (Men) 18 

Incomplete Grades, Removal of 13 

Laboratory Fees 8 

Library, Health Sciences 19 

Staff xix 

Loans 22, 23 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Licensure Requirements 17 

Registration with 17 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 

Committee on School of Pharmacy (1966-1967) 46 

Mid-Semester Failure Warnings 13 

Office of the Dean, Hours vi 

Officers of the University viii 

Parking 19 

Pharmacy Program at Baltimore, Admission to 

From College Park 6 

From UMBC Campus 6 

From Other Universities and Colleges 6 

Probation for Low Scholarship 14 

Programs Offered by School of Pharmacy During the 1966-1967 Academic Year 2 

Promotion to the Next Class 14 

Readmission of Students Dropped for Poor Academic Standing 15 

Registration by Maryland Board of Pharmacy 17 

Requirements for Admission 

To Pre-professional Program at College Park 2 

To Pre-professional Program at UMBC Campus 7 

To Professional Program at Baltimore 7 

Residence and Non-Residence, Definition of 11 

Scholarships and Loans (Baltimore Campus) 23 

Scholarships and Loans (UMBC Campus) 23 

Scholarships and Loans (College Park Campus) 22 



School oi F'harmacy • 53 

INDEX (Continued) 

Standing Committees, Faculty vSenate xiv 

Student Health 8 
Student Organizations, Baltimore Campus 

Inter-Professional Student Senate 29 

Student Chapter, The American Pharmaceutical Association 

and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 29 

Student Government Alliance 29 

Students, Baltimore Campus 

Classification of 15 

Roll of 43 

Students, Pre -professional. College Park 46, 48 

Students, Special 46 

Textbooks 11 

Transcripts of Records 16 

Tuition and Fees (Baltimore Campus) 8 

Tuition and Fees (College Park Campus) 11 

Tuition and Fees (UMBC Campus) 11 

Visitors vi 

Withdrawals, Baltimore Campus 

Procedure 10 

Refunds 11 

Grades 11 

Non-compliance to regulations 11 



i 



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THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It Hves in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From 'The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins 
January 20, 1955 
College Park, Maryland 



school of 
pharmacy 



:^ ' 



Y OF MARVI.AM) l',( I.IJ.] l.\ 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time 
to time in the general regulations and in the academic requirements. There are estab- 
lished procedures for making changes, procedures which protect the institutions in- 
tegrity and the individual student's interests and welfare. A curriculum or graduation 
requirement, when altered, is not made retroactive unless the alteration is to the 
student's advantage and can be accommodated within the span of years normally 
required for graduation. When the actions of a student are judged by competent 
authority, using established procedure, to be detrimental to the interests of the Uni- 
versity community, that person may be required to withdraw from the University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

Catalog and 125th Announcement 

1968-1970 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Volume 48 



January, 1970 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

636 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Number 1 



2 • University of Maryland 

Contents 

Pages 
I. THE SCHOOL 

History and Program 7 

Health Sciences Library 7 

Accreditation 7 

Degrees 8 

Correspondence 8 

Visitors 8 

IL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Five-year Program 9 

Registration with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 9 

A. Pre-Professional Program 10 

Enrollment in Pre-Professional Program 

(College Park or UMBC) 11^ 

Application Forms 12 

Deadlines for Applications 12 

Tuition and Fees 13 

Financial Aid 14 

B. Professional Program 15 

Admission 15 

Enrollment in the Professional Program at Baltimore .... 16 

Application Procedures 16 

Licensure Requirements of the Maryland Board 

of Pharmacy 17 

Fees and Expenses 17 

Financial Aid 19 

in. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 25 

IV. STUDENT LIFE 31 

V. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 35 

VI. STUDENT HEALTH 35 

VII. HONORS AND AWARDS 36 

VIII. PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM I 39 

IX. PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM II 40 

X. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 

XI. OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 58 

XII. FACULTY 58 

XIII. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 64 

XIV. GRADUATING CLASS, HONORS AND AWARDS 64 

XV. BOARD OF REGENTS 68 

XVI. OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 69 

XVII. INDEX 76 



School of Pharmacy 




4 • University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 
Academic Calendar, 1968-1969 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1968 



SEPTEMBER 



9 Monday 





11 


Wednesday 




16 


Monday 


NOVEMBER 


27 


Wednesday 


DECEMBER 


2 


Monday 




20 


Friday 


JANUARY 


6 


1 

Monday 




20-24 


Monday-Friday 



9 a.m. — Third Year Registration 

10 a.m. — Fourth Year Registration 

11 a.m. — Fifth Year Registration 
2 p.m. — Orientation for All New 

Students 

Graduate Student Registration 

Instruction begins with first scheduled 
period 

Thanksgiving recess begins at close of 
last scheduled period 

Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 



1969 



Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
First Semester Examinations 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1969 



FEBRUARY 


6 


Thursday 




10 


Monday 




10 


Monday 




22 


Saturday 


APRIL 


3 


Thursday 




8 


Tuesday 


MAY 


23 


Friday 



MAY 26 - JUNE 2 
JUNE 7 



9 a.m. — Third Year Registration 

10 a.m. — Fourth Year Registration 

11 a.m. — Fifth Year Registration 

Graduate Student Registration 

Instruction begins with first scheduled 
period 

Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

Easter recess begins at close of last 
scheduled period 

Instruction resumes with the first 
scheduled period 

Last day of instruction for Fifth Year 

Monday-Monday Second Semester Examinations 

Saturday Commencement 



School of Pharmacy 



School of Pharmacy 
Academic Calendar, 1969-70 



FIRST SEMESTER. 1969 



SEPTEMBER 



8 Monday 

9 Tuesday 





10, 11 


Wed.-Thurs. 




15 


Monday 


NOVEMBER 


26 


Wednesday 


DECEMBER 


1 


Monday 


1 rt'TA 


19 


Friday 


1970 
JANUARY 


5 


Monday 




22-27 


Thurs.-Mon. 
SECOND 


FEBRUARY 


4, 5 


Wed.-Thurs. 




6 


Friday 





9 


Monday 


MARCH 


26 


Thursday 




31 


Tuesday 


MAY 
JUNE 


22 

25-29 

6 


Friday 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday 



Orientation Program for all new students 

Orientation Program continued 9-12 a.m. 

1 p.m. — Registration for Third Year 

Class 

2 p.m. — Registration for Fourth Year 

Class 

3 p.m. — Registration for Fifth Year 

Class 
Graduate Student Registration 

(alphabetical) 
Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period 
Thanksgiving recess begins at close of 

last scheduled period 
Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 



Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
First Semester Examinations 



Graduate Student Registration 
(alphabetical) 
9 a.m. — Registration for Third Year 
Class 

10 a.m. — Registration for Fourth Year 

Class 

1 1 a.m. — Registration for Fifth Year 

Class 
Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period 
Easter recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 
Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
Last day of instruction for Fifth Year 
Second Semester Examinations 
Commencement 



All students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of 
bills and filing of class cards, on the regular registration days. Students failing to 
comply with this regulation are charged a fee of $20.00. No student is normally 
permitted to register after Friday of the week in which instruction begins. 








ECBQ 






1 IkJll »mm%*>^^ ^^H-^0^ 






School of Pharmacy 



The School 

History and Program 

The purposes of the school of pharmacy are to train students for 
the efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy; to instruct students 
in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, express 
themselves clearly, and think logically as members of a profession and citizens 
of a democracy; and to guide students into productive scholarship and research 
for the increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the South, 
was organized on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Maryland physicians 
and apothecaries to provide systematic instruction in pharmacy to replace the 
out-dated apprenticeship training. The College, incorporated on January 27, 
1841, gave its first lectures in November. In 1904, the College joined with a 
group of medical schools and the Maryland College of Dental Surgery to offer 
cooperative instruction in the health sciences. The new institution was known as 
the University of Maryland. In 1920, this group of Baltimore professional 
schools was merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form 
the present University of Maryland. 

The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore now occupies buildings constructed 
specifically for pharmaceutical education. The laboratories and classrooms are 
equipped with the most modern apparatus, and every aid to instruction and for 
research in pharmaceutical sciences is available. 

Health Sciences Library 

Library facilities are excellent. The Health Sciences Library, which serves 
the School of Pharmacy as well as the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, 
and Social Work, contains moit than 128,000 bound volumes and regularly 
receives 2,600 scientific periodicals and annual publications. 

During the academic year, the library is open 87 hours per week (six nights 
per week until 11:00 p.m.), with staff trained to give reference service on duty 
most of these hours. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, the 
Peabody, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty and The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. The libraries are within convenient distances of the School. Students 
also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery and the Balti- 
more Museum of Art. 

Accreditation 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharma- 
ceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Association 
of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



8 • University of Maryland 

Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy ofTers courses leading to the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set forth 
in the folowing paragraphs. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon stu- 
dents who have successfully completed the pre-professional program and the 
three years required for the professional program in most of the accredited 
schools of pharmacy in the United States. At the School of Pharmacy at Balti- 
more, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon students who 
have met successfully all the requirements and have spent at least the Fifth 
Year in residence at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the 
University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Correspondence 

All correspondence prior to entrance into the pre-professional program of the 
five-year curriculum at College Park should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. The 
University's telephone number is 454-0100. 

All correspondence prior to entrance in the pre-professional pharmacy program 
of the five-year curriculum offered at UMBC should be addressed to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228. The Registrar's telephone number is 744-7800, 
Ext. 291. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the professional program (last three 
years) if the five year curriculum should be addressed to the School of Phar- 
macy, University of Maryland, 636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. 

Correspondence relating to the following topics should be addressed to the 
respective departments in care of the School of Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201: 

Alumni Affairs, Business Matters, Catalogs and Brochures, 
General Matters, Gifts and Requests, Pubhc Relations, 
Housing of Students (Baltimore), Scholarships (Baltimore), 
Scholastic standing of Students (Baltimore), Transcripts of 
Records (Baltimore), Vocational Placement. 

The telephone number for the Dean's Office, School of Pharmacy, is 955-7650. 

Visitors 

Visitors are welcome at the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore. The Dean's 
office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday 
by appointment. 



School oi Pharmacy 



Academic Prosrams 



General Statement. The University of Maryland, in all its branches 
and divisions, siibseribes lo a policy of equal educational opportunity 
for peoples of all races, creeds and ethnic origins. 



Five-Year Program 

A minimum of five academic years of satisfactory college work is required for 
the completion of the present pharmacy curriculum of the University of Mary- 
land. This five-year curriculum meets the minimum requirements established 
by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education. 

At the University of Maryland the five-year program consists of two years 
of pre-professional work and a three-year pharmacy program. The pre-pro- 
fessional program is not available in Baltimore, but may be obtained at the 
College Park or Baltimore County (UMBC) campuses of the University of 
Maryland or at any other accredited university, junior or senior college where 
appropriate courses are offered.^ 

Registration with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

The academic program of the School of Pharmacy is supplemented with an 
internship program governed by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy. During 
this time the student acquires practical experience in the application of his 
academic work. 

The Maryland Pharmacy Law, as amended in 1931, requires all students enter- 
ing upon the study of pharmacy in the State to file application with the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy. The law reads as follows: 

"Any person enrolling as a student in pharmacy in any school or college of 
pharmacy in this State shall not later than thirty days after enrolling, file with 
the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, an application for registra- 
tion as a student of pharmacy in which said application he shall be required to 
furnish such information as the Board may deem appropriate, and simultaneous- 
ly with the filing of said application, shall pay the Board a fee of one dollar; 
all such students of pharmacy shall, at the beginning of any subsequent school 
or college year, submit to the said Board a sworn statement of any and all 
actual drug store experience acquired during the preceding vacation months." 

The Board will accept drug store experience of students enrolled in accredited 
colleges and junior colleges if this State, provided students enrolled in such a 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission 
to the professional program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally accred- 
ited college or university. 



10 • University of Maryland 

program fulfill the legal requirement of being registered with the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy on a form supplied by it. 

Pre-Professional Program 

The pre-professional curriculum is designed to provide the student with those 
courses that satisfy his needs for a more liberal education as well as the 
scientific prerequisite courses for entrance into the professional program. The 
following course listing contains the course numbers from the College Park 
campus and are offered for comparison with other school catalogs. The follow- 
ing program can be taken at the University of Maryland College Park or 
Baltimore County campuses, or at any other accredited university, senior or 
junior college: 

FIRST YEAR 

Chemistry 1, 3 (General) 8 credits 

Mathematics 10, 11 (Introduction) or Mathematics 18, 19, 

(Introductory and Elementary Analysis) 6-7 credits 

Zoology 1 (or Biology) 4 credits 

English 1 (Composition) 3 credits 

Elective (Social Sciences) 3 credits 

Elective (non-specific) 3 credits 

Health and Physical Education as required 

27-28 credits 

SECOND YEAR 

Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38 

(Elementary Organic Chemistry) 8 credits 

Physics 10, 1 1 (Fundamentals) 8 credits 

History 6 credits 

English 3, 4 (Literature) 6 credits 

Economics 3 credits 

Elective (Fine Arts or Philosophy) 3 credits 

34 credits 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write to the dean of the 
School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School and for 
lite»-ature about the opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 



Recommended 


Required 


4 Units 


4 Units 


in 




4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 





2 





1 


8 


16 


16 



School of Pharmacy • 1 1 

RccojuuiouU'd Higli School Preparation 

The completion of an academic program containing the following courses is 
required for enrollment in the School of Pharmacy: 

Subjects 
English 
College Preparatory Mathematics — including algebra 

(1), plane geometry (1) and additional units in 

advanced algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry 

or advanced mathematics 
Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 
History and Social Sciences 
Biological Sciences 

Foreign Language — German or French 
Unspecified academic subjects 
Total 



Enrollment in the Pre-Professional Program at the 
University of Maryland (College Park or UMBO) 

Admission from secondary school is based upon evidence indicating the appli- 
cant's probable success in the program of his choice. By the word "evidence" 
the University means that: 

1. The applicant's scholastic average in college preparatory subjects during 
the last two years in high school has been satisfactory; 

2. The applicant's high school principal has recommended him for admission; 

3. The applicant will have graduated from high school before his first regis- 
tration with the University; 

4. The applicant has successfully completed the high school subjects required 
for the college and curriculum for which he is applying (the recommended 
program for each applicant would include three or four years of college 
preparatory mathematics); 

5. The applicant has completed the Scholastic Aptitude Test and has re- 
quested that the results be submitted to the University. He should take 
the SAT before the end of the Fall Semester preceding his enrollment at 
the University in order to assure the completion of the processing of his 
application. The applicant should apply in writing to the Educational 
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, to request to take the test. 
In order to have the test results sent to the University of Maryland at 
College Park, the applicant must indicate the College Park Campus code 
number, 5814, in the proper places on the test. In order to have the test 
results sent to UMBC, the applicant must indicate code number R-5835 
On the testing registration forms. 

Applicants for the September term who are found to meet admission require- 
ments may be sent an offer of admission, and they are then required to submit 



12 • University of Maryland 

the enrollment deposit of $50 within three weeks after the date of this offer. 
Failure to submit the enrollment deposit within the required time limit will be 
taken as evidence that the applicant is not seriously interested in admission, 
and the offer will be cancelled. 

Refunds of the $50 enrollment deposit will be made, provided the request 
for the refund is received by the Admissions Office on or before June 1, 1970. 



Application Forms 



COLLEGE PARK 

Application forms may be obtained from the Director of Admissions of the 
University of Maryland at College Park or your high school counselor. Appli- 
cation must be made to the Director of Admissions at College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

UMBC 

Application forms may be obtained from the Registrar, University of Maryland, 
Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228, at any 
time after you have completed your junior year in high school. 



Deadlines for Applications 



COLLEGE PARK 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the fall semester 
must be submitted to the University between October 1st and June 1st. High 
school students are encouraged to file their applications for admission during 
the fall months of their senior years. Any student registered for nine or more 
semester hours of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, applications will be accepted between June 1 
and July 15. Applicants for full-time attendance filing after June 1 will be 
required to pay a non-refundable $25 late fee to defray the cost of special 
handling of applications after that date. This late fee is in addition to the $10 
application fee. 

All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attendance, 
and all supporting documents for an application for admission, must be re- 
ceived by the appropriate University office by July 15. This means that the 
applicant's educational records (except current summer school grades), SAT 
scores (in the case of new freshmen), and medical examination reports must 
be received by July 15. 

Foreign students are required to submit applications six months in advance. 

Applicants may be admitted early in their senior year, provided a "B" average 
was earned in academic subjects taken during the 11th grade, or provided the 
the applicant ranked in the upper quarter of his class at the end of his junior 
year. Any admission granted during a student's senior year will be considered 
as provisional, pending satisfactory completion of his senior year and gradua- 
tion from high school. 



School of Pharmacy • 13 

UMBC 

Fall Semester. All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the 
Fall Semester must be received on or before July 15. Any student registered 
for nine or more semester hours of work is considered a full-time student. 

All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attendance, and 
all supporting documents for an application for admission, must be received 
by August 15. This means the applicant's educational records, SAT scores, and 
medical examination report must be received by August 15. 

Winter Session. The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Winter 
Session is December 15. 

Spring Semester. The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Spring 
Semester is January 1. 

Summer Session. The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Summer 
Session is May 15. 

Applicants may be admitted early in their senior year, provided a "B" average 
was earned in academic subjects taken during the 11th grade, or provided the 
the applicant ranked in the upper quarter of his class at the end of his junior 
year. Any admission granted during a student's senior year will be considered 
as provisional, pending satisfactory completion of his senior year and gradua- 
tion from high school. 

Tuition and Fees 

COLLEGE PARK AND UMBC 

The following table summarizes the fixed charges, mandatory fees, and room 
and full contract board charges for students enrolled in the undergraduate pro- 
grams in the University of Maryland at College Park for the 1969-70 academic 
year: 

First Second 

Semester Semester Total 

Maryland Residents 

1. Not living in the University 
residence halls $298 $208 $506 

2. Living in the University 
residence halls $748 $658 $1,406 

Residents of the District of Columbia, 
other States, and other Countries 

1. Not living in the University 
residence halls $548 $458 $1,006 

2. Living in the University 
residence halls $1,048 $958 $2,006 

Full-time undergraduate students who register for the second semester, but 
who were not full-time undergraduate students in the first semester, are required 
to pay additional fees of $45. 



14 • University of Maryland 

Special course fees, book costs, and personal expenses are not included. 
All fees are due and payable in full at time of registration. 

For complete information concerning fees, see Appendix A of ^?i Adventure 
in Learning available on request from the Catalog Mailing Office, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Fees for Residents and Non-Residents for 1969-70 academic year: 

Maryland Residents 

First Second 

Semester Semester Total 

Fixed Charges $195.00 $195.00 $390.00 

Instructional Materials Fee 13.00 13.00 26.00 

Athletic Fee 20.00 20.00 

Student Activities Fee 15.00 15.00 

Special Fee 15.00 15.00 

Recreational Facilities Fee 40.00 40.00 



Total for Residents $298.00 $208.00 $506.00 

Residents of the District of Columbia, Other States and Counties 

Tuition Fee $250.00 $250.00 $ 500.00 

Total for Residents of Other 



States and Countries $548.00 $458.00 $1,006.0C 



Financial Aid 

All requests for information concerning scholarships and loans in the pre-pro- 
fessional program at College Park or UMBC should be directed to the following 
offices : 

College Park— UMBC— 

Director, Student Aid Registrar, UMBC 

University of Maryland 5401 Wilkens Avenue 

College Park, Maryland 20742 Baltimore, Maryland 21228 



The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mary 
land makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-professional phar 
macy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, scholastic achieve 
ment and the need for financial assistance. These scholarships are open only tc 
residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholarship not exceeding $500. 0( 
per academic year is applied in partial defrayment of fees and expenses ai 
College Park. 



" These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in 
Aid of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee o: 
the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceuti 
cal Association. 



School of Pharmacy • 15 

maryland pharmaceutical association scholarshh's '"' 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually scholarships 
to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral char- 
acter, scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. Each 
scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is used in partial defray- 
ment of fees and expenses at College Park. These scholarships are open only 
to residents of the State o( Maryland. 



The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several scholarships 
to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, scholastic 
achievement, moral character and the need for financial assistance. Each 
scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied to defray 
partially the fees and expenses at College Park, Maryland. Recipients must 
have been residents of the State of Maryland for at least one year prior to 
the awarding of the scholarship. 

For information concerning other scholarships and the loans available consult 
office of Student Aid, Room 222, North Administration Building, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Professional Program 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Only the three-year professional program is offered in Baltimore. 

Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore 

Students of all races, colors and creeds are equally admissable. It is the ob- 
jective of the University of Maryland, Baltimore City campus to enroll students 
with diversified backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more 
meaningful for each student. 

FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION OR UMBC DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program with a 
scholastic average of not less than C (2.0), and who are in good standing, will 
qualify for advancement to the pharmacy program in Baltimore, subject to the 
decision of the Admissions Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 
[n the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the School 
Jf Pharmacy, each student will be required to file a letter of intent with the 
Dean's Oflfice of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. 

"ROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 



° These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in- 
\id of the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of 
he Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
al Association. 



16 • University of Maryland 

fully the required pre-professional program in an accredited college of arts and 
sciences* based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the 
equivalent in entrance examinations. The college program must consist of a 
minimum of 60 semester hours of credit exclusive of physical education, health, 
mihtary science, or similar courses. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must 
have completed each of the courses in the prescribed pre-professional program 
with a grade of not less than 'C when the lowest passing grade is 'D'. or its 
equivalent, and must be in good standing. 

Provisional admission will be offered students who have successfully completed 
the science core (Math, Chemistry or Zoology. Biology and Physics) and all 
except one or two of the non-science courses of the pre-professional program 
on the understanding that these courses must be completed before graduation 

Enrollment in the Professional Program at Baltimore 

FROM COLLEGE PARK DIVISION OR UMBC DIVISION 

Students who have filed with the Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 
a letter of intent to continue with the professional program of the curriculum 
who have completed the requirements of the pre-professional program, anc 
been recommended by the Admissions Committee of the School of Pharmacy 
will be notified by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy that they have qualifiec 
for advancement into the professional program. 

These students will receive detailed directions for registering from the Baltimore 
Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September registration period 

FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates o 
admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at Baltimore 
Admitted students will receive detailed directions for registering from the Offic( 
of the Registration at Baltimore a few weeks prior to the September registratioi 
period. 



Application Procedures 



Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore shoul( 
write to the Dean's Office. University of Maryland, School of Pharmac; 
636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Applicants wishing ad 
vice on any problem relating to their application should communicate with thi 
above office. 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admissio] 
to the professional program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally accred 
ited college or university. 



School oi Pharmacy • 17 

Lici'usuri' Ri'(i}iiri'U}('}Us of flic 
Marylfind lUxnd of Plunnuicy 

The Maryland Hoarel ol Pharmacy will grant a certificate of registration to 
those persons deemed competent, after examination, by saiti Board of Pharmacy. 
Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty-one 
years, is a graduate of an accredited school or college of pharmacy, a citizen 
of the United States, and has completed one year as a registered apprentice 
in a drug store or pharmacy approved by said Board of Pharmacy for such 
purposes may sit for examination given for the purpose of registration. 

A student may not obtain credit or practical experience in a drug store or 
pharmacy acquired prior to attendance as a pre-pharmacy student in an ac- 
credited school or college or while in attendance at school or college of 
pharmacy. Four months of the required practical pharmacy experience as a 
registered apprentice must be acquired subsequent to graduation from an ac- 
credited school or college of pharmacy, in a drug store or pharmacy approved 
by the Board for such purposes. 

The Maryland Board of Pharmacy will give full credit to students of pharmacy 
who have gained their experience needed for qualification to take the State 
Board Examination in a hospital pharmacy licensed by the Board. 

Prospective students are advised to contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 2305 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, for 
further information relative to the requirements for eligibility for licensure. 

Fees and Expenses 

BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS— 1969 ACADEMIC YEAR 
t FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland 

Non-Residents 
Laboratory Fee {per semester) 

(This one fee covers all laboratory courses) 
Student Union Fee {per annum) 
Special Fee {per annum) 
Student Union Fee {Summer Session) 
[^Student Health Fee {per annum) 
Student Activities Fee {per semester) 

(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook, Terra Mariae, 

all expenses of School luncheons, picnics, dances.) 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester are 
payable at the time registration. Student Union fee and the special fee are 
payable in full at the time of first registration. Students wishing to make 
arrangements for deferred payment of tuition charges must do so with the 

'm Financial Office at or prior to registration for the semester for which such 

^^ charges are imposed. 



$195.00 


295.00 


15.00 


30.00 


25.00 


6.00 


10.00 


10.00 



18 • University of Maryland 

Incidental Charges 

For New Students Only {The application and matriculation fees are not 
applicable to students accepted from School of Pharmacy, College Park 
and U.M.B.C.) 

Application fee (non-returnable) $ 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's tuition.) 
For Candidates for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in excess 
of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled semester's 
work will be charged additionally for each course. Fee for 
Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 

Health Insurance Requirement 

Hospital insurance is required for all full-time students (9 or more semester 
hours). Each student must provide proof of such membership to his dean at 
the time of registration. A representative of Blue Cross will be available prior 
to registration for those students who do not have Blue Cross insurance or 
equivalent insurance coverage. 

Part-Time Undergraduate Students 

All students registered for nine semester hours or more are considered full- 
time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee {for each semester hour per semester) $20.00 

Laboratory Fees {per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 12.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 15.00 

Pharmacognosy 7.00 

Pharmacology 12.00 

Pharmacy 12.00 

Physiology 12.00 



School or Pharmacy • 19 

Student Union Fee (per annum) 6.00 

Student Union Fee {Summer Session)* 6.00 

Student Activities Fee {per semester) 10.00 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
charges as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep 
the cost to the student as low as possible. 

Financial Aid—ScJiolarsliips and Loans 

(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dr. C. T. Ichniowski, Assistant Dean, School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land, 636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The selection of 
the recipients of the scholarships and loans is made by the Dean in conjunction 
with a committee of the faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester to 
qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who 
are in need of financial assistance to complete their education. 

AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth not less than $100.00 per semester to qualified students of 
the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. 

THE CHARLES CASPARI, JR., MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, a number of his friends and alumni have made an endowment for a 
scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

THE H. J. (jack) CUSTIS, JR., MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

In memory of H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Class of 1951, a fund has been estab- 
lished for the purpose of awarding scholarships on the basis of reasonable need 
and academic ability to students in the professional program on the Baltimore 
campus of the School of Pharmacy. Students eligible for the Custis Memorial 



^The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in the Professional 
Schools on the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the 
cost of construction of the Union Building. The special fee is payable by all full- 
time students enrolled in the professional schools on the Baltimore campus and is 
used to finance the equipment needed for the Union Building. For students en- 
rolling for the first time at the beginning of the second semester, the Student Union 
fee will be $15.00; the special fee will be $5.00. All students carrying as much as 
9 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this fee. 
All Summer School students will pay a $6.00 Student Union fee. This Student Union 
fee is in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 



20 • University of Maryland 

Scholarship shall be residents of one of the nine Eastern Shore Maryland 
Counties. The amount of each Custis Memorial scholarship shall not exceed 
$300.00 in any one year. The recipient of each scholarship and the amount 
of each scholarship awarded shall be determined by the Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy and the School's Financial Aid Committee with the president of 
the Eastern Shore Pharmaceutical Society serving in an advisory and ex-officio 
capacity. 

THE JOHN W. DARGAVEL FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP SPONSORED BY 
THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF RETAIL DRUGGISTS 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation, sponsored by the National Association of 
Retail Druggists, provides annually a scholarship in the amount of $200.00. 
The scholarship grant open to a qualified student of the Third, Fourth or Fifth 
Year Class is awarded on the basis of character, scholarship and financial need. 

THE J. GILBERT JOSEPH SCHOLARSHIPS 

In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, a former student of the School 
of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeannette Joseph provided a generous bequest to 
endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance. 

THE CHARLES LANDON HENRY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In memory of her husband, Charles Landon Henry, for many years a member 
of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry has 
endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by the Scholar- 
ship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, to a Fifth 
Year student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and commercial 
pharmacy. 

A. M. LICHTENSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP 

In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus of the 
School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein 
bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually 
to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The recipient of the award is to 
be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

THE WILLIAM J. LOV^RY ALUMNI MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

In memory of her late husband, Dr. William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus of 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, Class of 1896, and in 1926 a prime motiva- 
tor in the reorganization and reactivation of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Mrs. William J. Lowry has 
provided the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy a sum of money 
to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The recipient of this award 
is to be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM KOENIG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

In memory of her husband, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharmacist 
for over fifty years, the late Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a sum of 
money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The recipient of the 
award will be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 



School of Pharmacy • 21 

PRINCF GEORCnS-MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCLVTION SCHOLARSHIP 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association provides 
a scholarship in the amount of $200.00 to be awarded to a student who has 
maintained a superior academic record and who is in need of financial assistance. 

THE ladies' auxiliary, PRINCE GEORGES-MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a student who 
has maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in need of financial aid. 

read's drug STORE FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes funds 
to provide scholarships paying $100.00 to $150.00 per semester to qualified 
students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in 
need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Public Health Service Act as amended under the Health Manpower Act 
of 1968 has a provision for granting annual scholarships, not exceeding $2,500 
to qualified students of exceptional financial need who require such financial 
assistance to pursue a course of study. The School of Pharmacy is participating 
in this financial aid program for students in the professional program who are 
on a full-time basis and in good standing. 

In determining and establishing the financial status and need for scholarship 
aid, it will be necessary to assess all other financial resources available and the 
expenses of education the student will incur. Financial resources which should 
be assessed include the assistance available from parents or guardians; the stu- 
dent's own and, if applicable, his (her) spouse's earnings, savings and other 
financial resources; support from other scholarships and private grants ad- 
ministered by the School of Pharmacy; aid under the Health Professions Student 
Loan Program; and support available from other sources such as prizes, other 
scholarships or loans and veterans' benefits. 

ROSE HENDLER MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are made upon 
the recommendation of the Dean. 

BENJAMIN SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL PHARMACY LOAN FUND 

The family of Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld has established a loan fund as a 
memorial to him. This fund is available to qualified needy students. Loans 
from the fund are made upon the recommendation of the Dean and the 
Grants-in-Aid Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 



22 • University of Maryland 

health professions student loan program 

The Public Health Service Act as amended under the Health Manpower Act 
of 1968 has a provision for loans to pharmacy students enrolled in the profes- 
sional pharmacy curriculum. The School of Pharmacy is participating in this 
program of assistance to qualified full-time students in good standing who docu- 
ment financial need and are seeking an education leading to an undergraduate 
degree in pharmacy. 

Individual loans up to $2,500 a year may be made and are repayable after 
graduation. The borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to the repay- 
ment in accordance with Federal regulations and policies governing this loan 
program. 

Interest rate on all loans made after June 30, 1969, will be at the uniform rate 
of three percent per year. 

On loans made prior to July 1, 1969, the interest rate in effect at the time that 
the loan was made shall be maintained. (Those interested in the particulars of 
these prior interest rates are advised to consult with the Assistant Dean). 

MARYLAND HIGHER EDUCATION LOAN CORPORATION 

Loans up to $1000 per year are available from many Maryland banks to de- 
serving students who are residents of the State of Maryland and who have 
been accepted for enrollment or who are in good standing. Maximum interest 
on such loans is 7% simple and repayment begins the first day of the tenth 
month after the student leaves school. 






>J 




IT. 



'^^. 



\ 




School of Pharmacy • 25 



Academic Regulations 

Grading System 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 


Interpretation Point Value 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Fair 


2 


D 


Poor but passing 


1 


F 


Failure 





I 


Course work incomplete 


Replaced by definite 
grade when course 
requirements have 
been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the semester's 
work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received by the number 
of credit hours the course carries. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only the grades earned in those courses taken 
in residence at the University of Maryland are considered. 



Examinations 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the discretion of 
the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester as sched- 
uled on the calendar printed in this catalog, and may not be required in the 
second semester only of the fifth year class. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean im- 
mediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission for 
a deferred examination. 



Attendance Requirements 



Students who have not attended 85 percent of scheduled classes and laboratory 
periods for any subject are not admitted to the final examination in that sub- 
ject. Absences due to illness and late registration are normally counted with 
the 15 percent allowable absence. Lateness of more than half a period is con- 
strued as absence; two latenesses of less than half a period are also construed 
as an absence. 



26 • University of Maryland 

Academic Warnings 

Each student is assigned to a class advisor who counsels him on his academic 
standing. 

Academic warnings are sent only when a student's work is sufficiently poor as 
to cause serious doubt of his ability to pass a course. Warnings may be sent 
out anytime during the first 10 weeks of school. The Dean's office will mail 
the warning to the student. 

Incomplete Work 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a student 

whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of 
illness or other circumstances beyond his control he has been unable to com- 
\ plete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor enters on 

I the class card a reason of the character stated above with an estimate of the 

quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is given the student 
j must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the next 

I semester in which that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

Raising Grade of D 

J Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher mark 

except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course in which he 
failed or for which he has received credit for work done at the University, or 
elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, including regular 
attendance, laboratory work, and examinations, but he will not receive any addi- 
tional credit for the course completed with a passing grade. 

If the work is completed at the University of Maryland, his final mark will be 
substituted for the mark already recorded. Although the final mark received 
in the course will be used in determining credit for promotion and graduation, 
it does not apply to honors and awards. See applicable section under "Honors 
and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the dean to repeat the course, or its equivalent, 
at another university or college, the regulations applicable to transfer of credit 
apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with a grade of C (2.0) or 
higher; for purposes of computing grade averages, transfer credit is considered 
as the equivalent of a grade of C (2.0). 

Removal of An F Grade 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in raising 
his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to withdraw from the 
School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student may be permitted with the 
written permission of the Dean and the head of the department giving the course 
to repeat the course for the second time. Such permission can be given to the 
student for only one course. 



School of Pharmacy • 27 

An appropriately supported petition for any exception to the above regulation 
must be submitted to the Faculty Committee on Admission and Scholastic 
Standing. Such exception will be granted under unusual and extraordinary cir- 
cumstances and shall require the approval of the head of the department giving 
the course. 

The above rules on removal of an F grade apply also the student who is per- 
mitted to take the course at another institution to meet requirements for the 
degree from the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 

Rt'gul(itio7is for Promotion and Probation 

All students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade average of not less 
than C (2.0). Any student who fails to maintain this average will be placed on 
probation during the next semester. Students in the fifth year class must main- 
tain a grade average of C (2.0) to become eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail one or more courses will be subject to being placed on pro- 
bation or academically dismissed, dependent on an academic review of their 
record by the Faculty Committee on Admission and Scholastic Standing of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required to report 
to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 

Regulations for Readmission of Students Dropped 
For Poor Academic Standing 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may apply in 
writing to the dean for readmission after a lapse of at least one semester. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that semester. 
Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may be read- 
mitted only once. 

Regulations for Review 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty Assembly 
of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. Any student 
may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration of his 
particular case. 

Classification of Students 

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM (1970 & 71 GRADUATING CLASSES) 
Students who have completed 31-70 credit hours of the professional program 



28 • University of Maryland 

with a grade averao:e of C (2.0), in addition to the pre-professional require- 
ments, will be classified as students of the fourth year class. 

General pharmacy majors of the fourth year class who have completed 71 
credit hours of the professional program with a grade average of C (2.0) will 
be classified as fifth year students. Pre-graduate majors of the fourth year 
class in order to advance in the pre-graduate program and attain the classifica- 
tion of the fifth year class must have completed 73 credit hours of the pro- 
fessional program with an academic quality indicative of the successful pursuit 
of graduate work. 

Students of the fifth year class to be considered as candidates for graduation 
must have maintained a grade average of at least C (2.0) and have completed 
minimum credit hours of the professional program according to the following: 

(a) General pharmacy majors 108 credit hours 

(b) Hospital majors who have transferred from 

the general pharmacy major 108 credit hours 

(c) Hospital majors who have transferred from 

the pre-graduate major 110 credit hours 

(d) Pre-graduate majors who have followed this 

elective area for one or two years 110 credit hours 

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

(1972 AND SUBSEQUENT GRADUATING CLASSES) 

Students who have completed 33 to 68 credit hours of the professional pro- 
gram in addition to the pre-professional requirements will be classified as stu- 
dents of the fourth year class. Students who have completed 69 credit hours 
of the professional program with a grade average of C (2.0) will be classified 
as fifth year students. 

Transcripts of Records 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain them 
from the Registrar upon written request, provided the student's financial obliga- 
tion to the University has been satisfied. 

Withdrawals from School of Pharmacy at Baltimore | 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the University for any 
cause at any time during the academic year, he should secure an application for 
withdrawal from the Dean's Office, obtain the proper signature as indicated on 
the form and file it in the Registrar's Office. Withdrawal is not official, as far as 
refunds and grades are concerned, until the form is filed in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent or guardian. 

A student withdrawing from the University during the first eight weeks of class 
should be given a grade of "WX" in his courses. A student withdrawing after 
this time shall receive a grade of "WP" in each course in which his work has 
been passing and a grade of "WF" in any course in which his work has 



School of Pharmacy • 29 

not been passing. A student withdrawing after the last day of instruction shall 
be given a grade of "F" in any course in which he has not been doing passing 
work. 



Change in Registration 

(DROP AND/OR ADD COURSES) 

A student may drop a course without an "F" grade during the first three 
weeks of classes with the approval of the student's advisor and Dean. A student 
may drop a course without an "F" grade after the third week of classes only 
upon written approval of the Dean. Such authorization shall be granted by 
the dean only under extraordinary circumstances; unsatisfactory scholarship 
in itself will not be considered an extraordinary circumstance. 

Changes in registration are not official until the form is filed in the Office of 
the Registrar. 

A fee of $5.00 is charged for changes made after the first week of classes. 

Courses may not be changed from credit to audit after the third week of classes. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all charges, 
less the application and matriculation fee in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Third week 60% 

Fourth week 40% 

Fifth week 20% 

After five weeks 




.^- 



School of Pharmacy • 31 



Student Life 

Housing 



WOMFN 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the Louisa 
Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, which is in close proximity to the 
School of Pharmacy. It offers comfortable living accommodations and it is 
under the general supervision of the Office of Student Life. Students are re- 
quested to bring their own bedspreads, blankets, pillows, bureau scarves, cur- 
tains, desk lamp, iron, small rugs and a laundry bag. Students may obtain towels 
and bed linens through a designated commercial rental service. Although stu- 
dents may provide their own bed linens and towels they are not permitted to 
launder these items in Louisa Parsons Hall. The individual students assumes re- 
sponsibility for all the dormitory property assigned to her. Any damage done to 
property other than that which results from ordinary wear and tear will be 
charged to the student concerned. 

The room rates are as follows: The cost of all accommodations (singles as well 
as doubles) is the same — $180.00 per semester. Single rooms generally are 
not available. The room charge will appear on the student's bill, payable at 
the time of registration. 

Meals may be purchased at the Baltimore Union Cafeteria or in nearby restau- 
rants. 

MEN 

Housing accommodations are available for men in the Baltimore Union. For 
particulars, see section immediately below. 



General Information for the Baltimore Union 

The Baltimore Union for students of the professional schools is located adjacent 
to the professional schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommodations for 
195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air conditioned building which also 
contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facilities, game 
room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. Double rooms are 
available. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; meals are served 
cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for accommodations cover the 
1969-70 academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 



Double Room Rate: 

$180.00 per semester (per person) 



32 • University of Maryland 

What the rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: Room furnish- 
ings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book shelves, desk, 
medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. Maid service will include clean- 
ing of room twice per week and replacement of change of linen once each 
week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone 
Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. Information 
can be obtained from the manager's office. Mail service is also provided. 

Sheets, towels and pillow cases must be rented from the designated linen service. 
The resident may provide his own pillow and blankets or rent them as well at 
additional cost. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other than 
luggage will not be available. 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Deportment 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a 
student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 
or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her 
health, or the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the 
authorities of the University. 



Employment 

A student should be prepared to finance his education during the entire period 
of attendance, as all of his time should be spent in the preparation and comple- 
tion of the scheduled work. Baltimore offers a number of opportunities to se- 
cure suitable employment, but it is recommended that students refrain from 
working during the school session. 



Parking 

The expansion program for the Baltimore campus places a premium on space 
for parking on University lots. Student use of parking facilities on a temporary 
basis in certain designated University areas is contingent upon the availability 
of space. 

Parking rates are $.50 per day, payable daily. 



School or Pharmacy • 33 

Definition of Rcsidrncr and Non-rcsidcnce 

Students who arc minors arc considered ti> be resident if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for at 
least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while 
stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the six-month period 
referred to above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 
Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into the armed service 
and was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

Textbooks 

\ Each student is required to have his own textbooks. The books required in 
' each course will be available in the campus Bookstore located in the basement 
of the Baltimore Union. 



School of Pharmacy • 35 



Student Organizations 
(Baltimore Campus) 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ALLIANCE 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an organization 
of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding in the internal 
administration of the School for organizing all extra curricular programs and 
activities of the student body and for coordinating these programs and activities 
with those of the faculty and administration to foster mutual understanding 
and cooperation. The Executive Council of the Student Alliance is composed 
of the president of the Student Government Alliance, the presidents of the 
respective classes and one delegate elected from each undergraduate class. 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION AND MARYLAND 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION STUDENT CHAPTER 

The purpose of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest and 
more liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a pro- 
fession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution of these two 
Associations, especially in fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in 
all of its branches and its application and aiding in promoting the public health 
and welfare. 

INTER-PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SENATE 

The students of the Baltimore Professional Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, 
Nursing, and Pharmacy established the Inter-Professional Student Senate for 
purposes of coordinating and facilitating relationships among the professional 
schools and the University schools and colleges at College Park. The Senate is 
comprised of representatives from each of the five professional schools. 



Student Health 

The Baltimore campus of the University maintains a Student Health Service 
for a fee of $10.00 per annum, payable at registration in September. A student's 
wife or child, or other members of his family, are not eligible for health care 
service unless the wife, too, is a student and has paid the fee for herself. At the 
beginning of the entering year, each student will be given a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is located on the first floor of Howard Hall 
(660 W. Redwood Street), and is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. When the office is closed, students may report to the 
emergency room of the University of Maryland Hospital, if absolutely necessary. 



36 • University of Maryland 

If this is a true emergency the Health Service will pay the emergency room 
fee. Otherwise, the student will be billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue Cross hospitalization insurance, or its 
equivalent. In addition, it is recommended that all students be covered by Blue 
Shield, or its equivalent, to cover physicians' and surgeons' fees. 

Additional information regarding the Student Health Service may be obtained 
in the Office of Administration of the School of Pharmacy. 



Honors and Awards 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more than one- 
fifth of the graduating class in each college, including the School of Pharmacy. 
The honors designations are listed in the commencement program and are 
recorded on the recipients' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two aca- 
demic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy with an average grade of B (3.0) or higher. Those 
in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors and those in the 
second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

THE dean's HONOR LIST 

The dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students who 
have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Students 
whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's Academic 
Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a student 
repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for these 
courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

PHI KAPPA PHI HONORARY FRATERNITY 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national fraternity 
for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the University 
in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible by invita- 
tion to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester of their 
third year. 

RHO CHI HONORARY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, was 
established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of 
this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attainment 
in scholarship, character, personality and leadership. 



School of Pharmac y • 37 



THE school of PHARMACY GOLD MEDAL 



A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, provided 
that this average is not below the grade of "B." Certificates of Honor are 
awarded to the three students having the next highest general averages, pro- 
vided these averages do not fail below the grade of "B." 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the fourth 
year class having the highest general averages, provided these averages do 
not fall below the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered in 
awarding these honors. 

THE WILLIAM SIMON MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for 30 years a professor of chem- 
istry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by the 
Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending 
a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by grades. 

THE ANDREW G. DUMEZ MEDAL 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold 
medal to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for :he 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

THE L. S. WILLIAMS PRACTICAL PHARMACY PRIZE 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded an- 
nually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and dis- 
pensing pharmacy. 

THE CONRAD L. WICH PHARMACOGNOSY PRIZE 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended 
to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the income 
from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to the fifth year 
student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

THE WAGNER PHARMACEUTICAL JURISPRUDENCE PRIZE 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late son, Mr. 
Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Sadie S. 
Wagner and her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill, have provided a fund the 
income of which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a fifth year 
student for meritorious academic achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 



1 



38 • University of Maryland 



DAVID FINK MEMORIAL PRIZE 



In memory of David Fink, Class of '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
United States Dispensatory as a prize to the fifth year student recommended by 
the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

ALPHA ZETA OMEGA FRATERNITY PRIZE 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the fifth year 
student chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

EPSILON ALUMNAE CHAPTER, LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA SORORITY PRIZE 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority provides 
annually a key which is awarded to the fifth year student selected by the 
Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in pharmacy administration. 

JOHN F. WANNENW^ETSCH MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In memory of her late brother, Dr. John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished 
alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, Miss Mary H. Wannenwetsch has pro- 
vided a fund, the income of which is to be used for a prize to be awarded to 
the graduating student majoring in general pharmacy who has exhibited ex- 
ceptional performance and promise in the practice of community pharmacy. 

EXTRA CURRICULAR AWARDS 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the School 
in extracurricular activities receive extracurricular keys at the School of 
Pharmacy Convocations. 

BRISTOL LABORATORIES, INC., AWARD 

A copy of Gould's Medical Dictionary is made available by Bristol Laboratories, 
Inc., to the fifth year student who has contributed the most to pharmacy through 
his extracurricular activities. 

MARYLAND SOCIETY OF HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS AWARD 

The Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists provides an award to the fifth 
year student who shows superior aptitude in the area of hospital pharmacy. 

MERCK AWARD 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rah way, New Jersey, offers a set of valuable reference 
books to the fifth year student who attains a high standing in pharmacy or 
pharmaceutical chemistry. 



School of Pharmacy 



39 



Professional Curriculum I 

(1970 AND 1971 GRADUATING CLASSES) 





First Sem. 


Second Sem. 




Hrs. Per Wk. 


Hrs. Per Wk. 


TITLE AND NUMBER OF COURSE 


•i 






«o 


.o 






to 




<3 


?\ 


a 


"ts 


^ 


7^ 


o 


T3 




t3 


^ 




(b 


T3 


■<5 




<;> 






« 


o 


> 




CI 


o 


> 




Q 


►^ 


K 


O 


(^ 


►"J 


l^ 


u 



or 
2 

2 
2 
3 

3-4 



16-19 



THIRD YEAR 

Anatomy 31, Mammalian Anatomy and Histology 2 6 8 4 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30. 32, 

Principles of Organic Chemistry 3 4 7 4 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 34, 

Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis 

Pharmacy 31, Mathematics of the 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 3 — 3 3 

Pharmacy 33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms 3 3 6 4 

Pharmacy 35, Professional Communications 2 2 2 

Pharmacy 38, History of Pharmacy 

Pharmacy Administration 32, Marketing 

17 
FOURTH YEAR 
First Aid 1, Standard 1 __ 1 __ 

Microbiology 41, Pharmaceutical Microbiology 2 4 6 4 

Microbiology 146, Serology, Immunology, 

Public Health and Parasitology 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, 150, 

Principles of Biochemistry 4 4 8 5 

3 3 3 

Pharmacognosy 41. 42. General Pharmacognosy 2 3 5 3 

Pharmacy 43, 44. Pharmaceutical Technology 2 4 6 3 

Physiology 142, General Physiology 

Electives 

(ELECTIVES)** 

Mathematics 20, 21. Calculus 4 __ 4 4 4 

Pharmacy Administration 45, Accounting 2 3 5 3 

Pharmacy Administration 46, Pharmacy Management I 3 

FIFTH YEAR 

Pharmacology 155, 156. General Pharmacology 3 3 6 4 4 

Pharmacy 151. Professional Pharmacy 13 4 2 

Pharmacy 153. 154, Dispensing 2 3 5 3 2 

Pharmacy Administration 51, 52, 

Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 2 2 2 2 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152, 

Chemistry of Medicinal Products 3 3 3 

Electives** 

(ELECTIVES) •• 
Mathematics 20, 21, Calculus 4 __ 4 4 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143, 

Advanced Organic Chemistry 2 2 2 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 187, 189, Physical Chemistry— 3 __ 3 3 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 188, 189, 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory 6 6 2 

Pharmacognosy 51, Entomology for Pharmacists 2 3 5 3 

Pharmacognosy 52, Animal Health Products 

Pharmacy 55, Parapharmaceuticals 

Pharmacy 156, Cosmetics and 

Dermatological Preparations 

Pharmacy 157, 158, Hospital Pharmacy 

Administration I, II 2 __ 2 2 

Pharmacy 161. 162. Special Problems 13 4 2 

Pharmacy Administration 53. 54, 

Pharmacy Management II, III 2 2 2 

•♦The electives must be approved by the class advisor and Dean. 



3 
4-7 



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17-20 



40 • University of Maryland 



Professional Curriculum II 



(BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 1969) 





First Sem. 


Second Sem. 




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THIRD YEAR 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 31 

Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 133, 134, 

Biochemistry I, II 

Pharmacognosy 32, Pharmaceutical 

Microbiology I 

Pharmacology 31, 32, Anatomy and 

Physiology I, II 

Pharmacy 31, Introduction to Pharmacy 

and Health Care 

Pharmacy 33, 34, Basic Pharmaceutics I, II 

Pharmacy Administration 32, Drug Marketing 

FOURTH YEAR 

Computer Science 190, Introduction to 

Biostatistics and Computer Methodology 

Pharmacognosy 43, Pharmaceutical Microbiology II 

Pharmacognosy 141, 142, General 

Pharmacognosy I, II 

Pharmacy Administration 44, Social Sciences 

in Pharmacy 

Pharmacy Administration 48, 

Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 

Principles of Drug Action 7, II : 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry 145, 146, 

Chemistry of Medicinal Products I, II 

Pharmacology 145, 146, Pharmacodynamics I, II 

Pharmacy 143, Biopharmaceutics . 

(ELECTIVE9)** 

Mathematics 42, Applied Calculus I 

or 
Pharmacy Administration 42, Pharmacy Management I 



16 



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FIFTH YEAR 

The final year will be devoted to clinical experiences and didactic work. The student will serve 
a clinical clerkship which will involve various types of institutional and community practice 
Advanced courses in pharmaceutical and medical sciences as well as electives in specialized 
professional areas will be taken. The exact structuring of this final school year will be 
determined during 1969-71 through the use of experimental programs. 



Changes in Curriculum 



The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make at anytime, such changes in the curriculxim 
as may be found necessary or desirable. 



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School of Pharmacy • 43 



Courses of Instruction 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor: Zenker. 

Associate Professors: Krikorian, Leslie. 

Assistant Professors: G. Wright, J. Wright. 

30, 32. Principles of Organic Chemistry. (4, 4)* 
Third year, two lectures, one recitation, one laboratory. 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry. 

31. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4)** 
Third year, first semester, three lectures, one laboratory. 

A study of the principles of quantitative analysis with special emphasis on tech- 
niques applicable to the separation and analysis of compounds and products of 
pharmaceutical interest. 

34. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4)* 

Third year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32 or equivalent. A study of quanti- 
tative analytical methods applied to the chemical assay of crude drugs and 
official preparations with emphasis on instrumental methods. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

133, 134. Biochemistry I and II. (3, 3)** 

Third year, first semester, three lectures; second semester, two lectures, one 

laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 35-38 (Organic Chemistry). 

Physical and chemical properties of the components of living systems and of 

the metabolic processes in health and disease. 

141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2)* 
Two lectures. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38 or equivalent. 
An advanced study of the compounds of carbon. 

145, 146. Chemistry of Medicinal Products I and II. (3, 2)** 

Fourth year, first semester, three lectures; second semester, two lectures. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 35-38 (Organic Chemistry). 

A survey of chemical properties, structure activity relationships and metabolism 
of organic medicinal products. 

149, 150. Principles of Biochemistry. (3, 3)* 

Fourth year, first semester, three lectures; second semester, two lectures, one 

laboratory, or (1970) first semester, four lectures, one laboratory. (5 credits) 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 34. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living organisms 

and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health and in 

disease. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
♦* Professional Curriculum II 



I 



44 • University of Maryland 

151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3)* 
Fifth year, three lectures. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. 

A survey of the structural relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, 
principally of organic medicinal products. 

187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3)* 
Fifth year, three lectures. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 19, 30, 32; Physics 10, 11; Mathematics 20, 21. 
A study of the laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, kinetic 

f theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equili- 

brium, chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. 

188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2)* 
Fifth year, two laboratories. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 187, 189, or concurrent registration. 
Quantitative experiments are performed which demonstrate physicochemicai 
principles, and acquaint the student with precision apparatus. 

For Graduates 

210, 211. Techniques of Chemical Research. (3, 3) 
One lecture, two laboratories. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 141, 143, 187-190 or concurrent registration. Lectures 
and laboratory exercises devoted to the systematic separation, characterization 
and identification of organic structures by chemical and instrumental methods, 
to the synthesis of organic structures of the more difficult types, including 
isotopically labeled compounds, and to isotope counting techniques. 

230. Seminar. (1) 
Each semester. 

Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Reports of progress 
and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 
Two lectures. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 141, 143. 
A study of the principles of stereochemistry of organic compounds. 

242. Heterocyclic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 141, 143. 

A study of the chemistry and synthesis of heterocyclic compounds. 

253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2, 2) 
Two lectures. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 141, 143, 151, 152 or permission of 
the instructor. 

A study of structural relationships and basic principles concerned with the phy- 
sical and chemical mechanisms of drug action, e. p., structure activity relation- 
ships, physical properties and biological activity, cellular transport, drug, pro- 
tein binding, biological receptors, lipid storage and physicochemicai mechan- 
isms of drug action. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



I 



School of Pharmacy • 45 

271. Biophysical Chfmistry. (2) 
Two lectures. 

Prerequisite: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149; Chemistry 189. 

TTic application of physical chemistry principles to biological systems, and a 

discussion of the physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. 

272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 
Two lectures. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 189. 

A discussion of selected topics of particular interest in the pharmaceutical 
sciences, including surface chemistry, colloids, kinetics, colligative properties 
and absorption spectroscopy. 

274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 
One laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 190. 

Selected experiments which are necessary for, and a part of, a larger research 
effort. 

281. Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 
Two lectures. 

Prerequisite: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. 

A discussion of the design, the mode of action at the enzymatic level and the 

metabolism of biochemical analogs. 

282. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 
Two laboratories. 

Prerequisite: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission of the instructor. 
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of modern techniques and 
metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug metabolism. 

399, 499. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

Professors: Blomster, Shay, Slama. 
Instructor: Hodge. 

32. Pharmaceutical Microbiology L (3)** 

Third year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 35-38. (Organic Chemistry) 
This course is designed specifically for pharmacy students and includes intro- 
ductory studies on the practical and theoretical considerations of bacteria, 
molds, yeasts, viruses and rickettsiae, sterilization, immunity, epidemiology and 
disease production. 

MICROBIOL. 41. Pharmaceutical Microbiology. (4)* 

Fourth year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. 

This course is designed especially for pharmacy students and includes practice 

and theoretical consideration of bacteria, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, 

\ viruses, rickettsia, yeasts and molds. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



46 • University of Maryland 

41. Pharmacognosy, General. (3)* 

Fourth year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32. 

A study of the cultivation, collection, and commerce of crude vegetable drugs 

with special emphasis on the physical and microscopical characteristics used in 

their identification and in the detection of adulteration. 

42. Pharmacognosy, General. (3)* 

Fourth year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Pharmacognosy 41. 

A continuation of Pharmacognosy 41 with instruction covering drugs of animal 

origin and allergy producing pollens. Special emphasis is placed upon official 

and non-official chemical tests used in the identification of drugs and their 

constituents. 

43. Pharmaceutical Microbiology II. (2)** 
Fourth year, first semester, two lectures. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacognosy 32. 

A study of the transmission, treatment, diagnosis, prevention, and etiological 
agent of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, molds, yeasts and 
rickettsiae. Part of the course is devoted to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections. 

51. Pharmacognosy, Entomology for Pharmacists. (3)* 
Fifth year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

A discussion of the principal types of pests commonly found in the household 
and the industries, including those which attack farm and garden crops; their 
recognition, life history, and methods of control. 

52. Pharmacognosy, Animal Health Products. (3)* 
Fifth year, second semester, three lectures. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 41, 42; Pharmacology 155. 

A study of principal pharmaceutical agents that are used in the treatment and 
prevention of animal diseases. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herb- 
arium. 

Ill, 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) j 

Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special 
emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

141. Pharmacognosy, General. (3)** 

Fourth year, first semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 35-38; Pharmacognosy 32. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



ScHOOi OF Pharmacy • 47 

A study of drugs from natural sources with emphasis on ihe therapeutic, chemi- 
cal and physical properties of purified phytoconstituents and discussion of their 
economic and sociological importance and practical application in pharmacy. 
Nomenclature, history, source, extraction, identification and biosynthesis of 
carbohydrates, glycosides, tannins, volatile oils, lipids and enzymes are con- 
sidered. 

142. Pharmacognosy. Giniral. (3)** 

Fourth year, second semester, three lectures. 

A continuation of Pharmacognosy 141, to include alkaloids, resins, haliuci- 
nogenic plants, harmful plants and certain aspects of allergy and allergenic 
plants. An intensive study of antibiotics and immunizing biologicals, discussing 
their utilization and relationship to appropriate infections and pathological 
diseases, is presented. 

MICROBIOL. 146. Serology. Immunology, Public Health and 
Parasitology. (4)* 
Fourth year, second semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisite: Microbiology 41. 

A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products such as sera, vaccines, toxins, toxoids, etc. Special attention 
is given to hypersensitivity of humans and animals to sensitizing substances, 
drug idiosyncracies, hay fever, food allergies, contact dermatosis, and animal 
inoculation. Part of the course is devoted to the study of public health. Time 
is given to the study of medical parasitology, pathology and parasitic infections, 
immunity, transmission, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of parasitic diseases. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and micro- 
chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of 
adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 111, 112. 

An in depth study of compounds obtained from natural sources and a discus- 
sion of modern methods and theories that are useful in the identification of the 
more important phytoconstituents. 

399, 499. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professors: Kinnard, Ichniowski, Carr, Provenza, 

Associate Professors: Blake, Cascorbi. 

Assistant Professors: Buterbaugh, Fletcher, Furth, Jurf, Sisca. 

31, 32. Anatomy and Physiology I and II. (4, 4)** 

Third year, three lectures and one laboratory, both semesters. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



48 • University of Maryland 

A comprehensive course in mammalian anatomy, histology and physiology 
with emphasis on structural and functional relationships of basic physiological 
systems. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PHYSIOL. 142. General Physiology. (4)* 

Fourth year, second semester, three lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Anatomy 31. 
[ A course in the fundamentals of mammalian physiology including the structure 

and permeability of the cell membrane, neurophysiology, muscle physiology, the 
circulatory system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, the excretory 
system, endocrinology, metabolism and the special senses. 

145, 146. Pharmacodynamics I and II. (3, 4)** 

Fourth year, three lectures first semester; three lectures and one laboratory 
second semester. 

Prerequisites: Pharmacology 31, 32 and Pharmaceutical Chemistry 133, 134 or 
consent of the instructor. 

A comprehensive study of pharmacodynamics leading to the rational thera- 
peutic application of drugs. 

155, 156. Pharmacology, General. (4, 5)* 

Fifth year, three lectures and one laboratory first semester; four lectures and 
one laboratory second semester. 

Prerequisites: Physiology 142; Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or consent of 
the instructor. 

A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward effects, precau- 
tions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacology 155, 156. 

A study of the methods of biological assay official in the United States Phar- 
macopeia and the National Formulary. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacology 171. Off"ered in alternate years. 

211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 
Laboratory and conferences, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacology 155, 156, and the approval of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods. (2-4), (2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Conferences and laboratory work. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. 

Special problems in the development of biological assay methods and com- 
parative standards. 

* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



School of Pharmacy • 49 

230. Principlfs of Biochemical Pharmacology. (3) 

Two lectures. Laboratory work consists of eight six-hour periods. 

Second semester. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 and 282, Pharmacology 155 and 

156 or equivalents; and consent of the instructor. 

A study of the biochemical mechanisms involved in drug action with primary 

emphasis on drug metabolism. 

245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3)* 
First semester, three lectures. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Physiology 142, consent of 
instructor. 

The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical properties of protoplasm 
to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, golgi ap- 
paratus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and their contributions to 
the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemical phenomena of cell 
division and inheritance will be discussed. 

246. Radioisotope Technique. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

A course concerned with the practical use of isotopes particularly as tracers in 

metabolic investigations. 

399, 499. Research in Pharmacology. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

PHARMACY 

Professor: Shangraw. 

Associate Professors: Allen, Lamy. 

Assistant Professors: Augsburger, Fletcher. 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Burgee, Derewicz, LeSage, Skolaut. 

Instructor: SEroMAN. 

31. Mathematics OF the Pharmaceutical Sciences. (3)* 
Third year, first semester, three lectures. 

Applied calculations in all fields of pharmaceutical sciences with emphasis on 
problem solving in systems of measureinent, aliquot methods, alligation, HLB 
systems, isotonicity, chemical reactions, commercial problems drug absorption, 
and the interpretation and evaluation of experimental data. 

31. Introduction to Pharmacy and Health Care. (1)** 
Third year, first semester. 

An orientation program designed to acquaint students with the role of phar- 
macy together with the other members of the health professions in the delivery 
of health care services — 'past, present and future. 

33, 34. Processes and Dosage Forms. (4, 4)* 
Third year, three lectures and one laboratory. 
Pharmacy 31 and 33 are prerequisites to Pharmacy 34. 

Commentary on the official compendia of pharmacy. Includes pharmaceutical 
manipulations and processes for preparing official dosage forms. Particular 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



50 • University of Maryland 

emphasis is placed on physical and chemical properties of ingredients, common 
nomenclature and synonyms, storage conditions and uses. 

33, 34. Basic Pharmaceutics I and II. (4, 4)** 
Third year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

A study of the basic technology involved in small and large scale production 
of pharmaceutical dosage forms (first semester: solid and semisolid dosage 
forms; second semester: solutions and liquid disperse systems). It is also de- 
signed to increase the understanding of physical-chemical principles involved in 
pharmaceutical systems and to encourage an appreciation of and the ability to 
apply ingenuity and creative thinking to the basic pharmaceutics involved in 
drug distribution and drug intelligence. 

35. Professional Communications. (2)* 
Third year, first semester, two lectures. 

Oral and written expression on subjects of pharmaceutical use and interest. 
Bibliographical methods, oral and written reports and communications, conduct 
of discussion on groups, audio-visual aids. 

38. History OF Pharmacy. (3)* 

Third year, second semester, three lectures. 

A survey of the history of pharmacy and the allied sciences, with emphasis on 
those aspects of science most pertinent to the interests of the pharmacist. 
Research papers and reports are required. 

43, 44. Pharmaceutical Technology. (3, 3)* 

Fourth year, two lectures, one laboratory, and one recitation. 

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 31, 33 and 34. 

The physical-chemical principles involved in pharmaceutical systems and the 

application of this knowledge to the development, preparation and packaging 

of medicinal formulations. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

143. BlOPHARMACEUTICS. (3)** 

Fourth year, first semester. 

A study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors which influence drug 
action with an emphasis on the choice of dosage forms and formulation to 
optimize therapeutic effect. 

151. Professional Pharmacy. (2)* 

Fifth year, first semester, one lecture, and one laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Pharmacy 44. 

Preparation for the major fields of pharmaceutical specialization by rotation 

through the school model pharmacy and manufacturing pharmacy laboratories, 

as well as the inpatient and outpatient hospital pharmacy departments. 

153, 154. Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3)* 

Fifth year, two lectures and one laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Pharmacy 44. Professional laboratory practice and other spe- 
cialized activities pertaining to prescriptions, including an evaluation of com- 
pounding aids and commercial pharmaceutcals. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



School of Pharmacy • 51 

155. Parapharmacfi'TICais. (2)* 

Fifth year, second semester, two lectures. 

A discussion of prescription accessories and related items to enable the pharma- 
cist to act as consultant to members of the health care team and his patients. 
Emphasis will be placed on design, composition, proper use and contrain- 
dications. 

156. COSNUTICS AND Dl RMATOI OGICAL PRI PARATIONS. (3)* 

Fifth year, second semester, two lectures, and one laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 153. 

A study of the composition and manufacture oi preparations, including labora- 
tory work in the formulation of cold cream, vanishing cream, protective cream, 
hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face powder, dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, 
toothpaste, deodorants, depilatories, suntan preparations, etc. The acid-mantle 
of the skin and hypoallergenic preparations are also emphasized. 

157. Hospital Pflarmacy Administration I. (2)* 
Fifth year, first semester, two lectures. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 44. 

The fundamentals of hospital pharmacy practice and administration. 
Includes a study of the history and development of hospital pharmacy, physical 
facilities, minimum standards, purchasing, the formulary, record keeping, and 
dispensing practices. 

158. Hospital Pharmacy Administration II. (2)* 
Fifth year, second semester, two lectures. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 157. 

An orientation to the function of the hospital pharmacy within the hospital. A 
study of the administrative organization of a hospital and the interrelationship 
of the various hospital departments with the hospital pharmacy. 

161, 162. Special Problems. (2, 2)* 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 20, 21 or concurrent registration. 

Independent investigations in the several pharmaceutical sciences, consisting of 

library and laboratory research and seminars. 

For Graduates 

201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 
Three lectures. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacy 153, 154. 

A study of manufacturing processes, control procedures and equipment em- 
ployed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale, including 
new drug applications, patents and the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

203, 204. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. 

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Pharmacy 201, 202. 

Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharma- 
ceuticals in large quantities. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
'* Professional Curriculum II 



52 • University of Maryland 

207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 
Two lectures a week. 

Prerequisites: Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190. 

A study of pharmaceutical systems using the fundamentals of physical chem- 
istry. 

211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1, 1) 
One lecture. Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special refer- 
ence to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the 
pharmaceutical periodicals. 

215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. 

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 156, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

A study of the development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics 
suitable for marketing. 

221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 
Two lectures. 

Lectures and assignments on the development of pharmacy in America and the 
principal countries of Europe. Given in alternate years. 

230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 
Each semester. 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research 
and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of phar- 
maceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

399, 499. Research in Pharmacy. 
Credit and hours to be arranged. 



PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

Associate Professor: Leavitt. 
Assistant Professor: Millette. 
Lecturer: Kaufman. 

32. Drug Marketing. (3)** 

Third year, second semester, three lectures. 

Prerequisite: Economics 37 or its equivalent. 

A study of the pharmaceutical industry and the distribution of drug products 

and pharmaceutical services. Special emphasis is placed on the patient and on 

the institutions involved in supplying health care to the patient. 

42. Pharmacy Management L (3)** 
Fourth year, three lectures. 

A study of the generation and utilization of accounting information in the 
management of a community or institutional practice. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



School of Pharmacy • 53 

44. Social Sciencfs in Pharmacy. (2)** 
Fourth year, second semester, two lectures. 

A study of the application of the principles of the social sciences to patient 
care and health care systems. 

45. Accounting. (3)* 

Third year, second semester, two lectures and one laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental principles of accounting, especially as it concerns 

the practice of community pharmacy. 

46. Pharmacy Managhment I. (3)* 

Fourth year, second semester, three lectures. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacy Administration 45. 

A study of the application of accounting, marketing and merchandising prin- 
ciples to the operation of a community pharmacy, including financial state- 
ment analysis, pricing, inventory and expense management and control. 

48. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (3)** 
Fourth year, second semester, three lectures. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; federal and state laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poison and pharmaceuti- 
cal preparations. 

51, 52. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (2, 2)* 
Fifth year, two lectures. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; federal and state laws and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poisons, cosmetics and 
pharmaceutical preparations; Law of Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales, 
Agency and Partnerships. 

53, 54. Pharmacy Management II, III. (2, 2)* 
Fifth year, two lectures. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacy Administration 42. 

A study of the management problems of community pharmacy, including or- 
ganization, staffing, directing, planning and control. 



Non-Departmental Courses 
ANATOMY 

31. Mammalian Anatomy and Histology. (4)* 

Third year, first semester, two lectures and two laboratories. 
A study of the gross anatomy and histology of mammalian types. The course 
is designed to provide an understanding of the various anatomical systems, with 
particular emphasis on human structures. 



FIRST AID 

1. Standard. (0)* 

Fourth year, first semester, one lecture, one demonstration. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 



54 • University of Maryland 

MATHEMATICS 

20, 21. Calculus. (4, 4)* 

Fourth year and fifth year, four lectures. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 18, 19 and/or approval of instructor. 
Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, rates, 
curvature, kinematics, integration, geometric and physical application on inte- 
gration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series 
and differential equations. 

42. Applied Calculus. (4)** 

Fourth year, second semester, four lectures. 

An introduction to elements of differential and integral calculus as preparation 

for elementary physical chemistry and the pharmaceutical sciences. 



* Professional Curriculum I 
** Professional Curriculum II 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CMSC 190. Introduction to Biostatistics and Computer 
Methodology. (3)** 

Fourth year, first semester, three lectures. 

The application of statistics to the biomedical and behavorial sciences. 



Graduate Program 



Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the 
University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

Tuition and Fees 

Admission Fee (New Students) $10.00 

Payable with application to the Graduate School 
Tuition per credit hour: 

Residents of Maryland 34.00* 

Non-Residents 40.00* 

Maryland Teacher 30.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee 4.00 

Baltimore Union Fee (Full-Time) 15.00 

Baltimore Union Fee (Part-Time) 3.00 

Special Fee (Full-Time) 12.50 

Health Fee (Full-Time) 10.00 



*The $34.00 rate applies to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without 
regard to the location at which the course is given and will apply to audited courses 
as well as courses taken for credit. Non-resident graduate students are assessed at 
the rate of $40.00 per semester hour each semester. 



1 



School of Pharmacy • 55 

♦♦Hospital Insurance (Blue Cross) Individual Plan 17. «8*^^ 

Family Plan 61. 6«**^ 

Late Registration Fee, charged on and after September 12 20.00 

Change Fee, charged for each change in program after 

September 19 5.00 

Graduate students may drop a course without penalty during the 
first eight weeks of classes. 

Graduation Fee: 

Masters Degree 10.00 

Doctoral Degree 50.00 

(A late application fee of $10.00 will be assessed against students 
who fail to apply for graduation on or before November 7.) 

Full-Time Registration 9 or more credits 

Maximum Credit Registration 15 credits 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Lectureships 

THE EMERSON PROFESSORSHIP OF PHARMACOLOGY 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy in 
1927 a sum of money to establish a professorship of pharmacology. The first 
appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was designated 
Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was subsequently held by the 
late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the present incum- 
bent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION FELLOWSHIPS 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual fellow- 
ships of up to $1800.00 for single persons or up to $2400.00 for married in- 
dividuals who are promising graduate students desirous of doing research in 
pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; stu- 
dents may also apply for an additional allowance up to $600.00 for tuition, 
fees, and supplies. These fellowships are open only to citizens of the United 
States. Address applications directly to the American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education, 777 Fourteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005, 
between February 15 and March 15 for consideration for the forthcoming 
September. 

THE H.A.B. DUNNING RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP 

The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a distinguished alumnus of the School of 
Pharmacy, former associate professor of chemistry and prominent manufactur- 
ing pharmacist of Baltimore, bequeathed a sum of money to endow a re- 



**Hospital insurance is required of all full-time students (9 or more semester 
hours). Each student must produce certified proof of such membership to his dean 
at the time of registration. A representative for Blue Cross will be available prior to 
registration for those students who do not have Blue Cross insurance or equivalent 
insurance coverage. 

***Subject to change 



56 • University of Maryland 

search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship, previously sup- 
ported annually since 1930 by contributions from Dr. Dunning, is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

CENTENNIAL RESEARCH FUND FELLOWSHIPS 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the School 
of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships for re- 
search studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the Faculty 
Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

THE ANDREW G. DUMEZ MEMORIAL LECTURESHIP 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lectureship was endowed by Mrs. Andrew 
G. DuMez as a memorial to her late husband, Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, dean of 
the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy from 1926 to 1948. The re- 
cipient of the lectureship is selected by a joint committee of the members of 
the faculty and student body of the School of Pharmacy, and is a distinguished 
leader in pharmacy or the related health professions. The lectureship is held 
at the beginning of the academic school year. 

Assistantships 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying a 
stipend of $2800.00 for a 10-month academic year, are available to quali- 
fied students giving 14 hours of laboratory and teaching services to the depart- 
ments in which they serve. Such assistants can usually carry two-thirds of 
the normal graduate work. 

Hospital Pharmacy Residency 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HOSPITAL 

The University of Maryland's School of Pharmacy and Hospital present a com- 
bined Graduate Study-Residency Program in Hospital Pharmacy leading to the 
Master of Science degree and a Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. 
Appointments to the residency are for a period of two academic years begin- 
ning each July 1. During the academic year, the resident divides his time be- 
tween hospital pharmacy and graduate study. Full time training in University 
of Maryland Hospital will be required during the summers. The University of 
Maryland Hospital provides a stipend of $6500 per year for the first year as 
assistant resident. Completion of the assistant residency leads to appointment as 
resident with a stipend of $7700 per year. In addition, the University of Mary- 
land has waived all tution and laboratory fees. Parking space, uniforms and 
laundry of uniforms are free of charge. 

Acceptable hospitalization insurance must be carried, and Blue Cross is avail- 
able as a payroll deduction. 



School of Pharmacy • 57 

Applicants must be graduates of accredited colleges or schools of pharmacy and 
have all prerequisites for admission to the Graduate School. 

There is no formal application blank. All applicants are requested to submit 
full details: date and place of birth, citizenship, health, marital status, education, 
pharmaceutical experience, a small recent photograph, and an official transcript 
of undergraduate work completed to date. 

The required information should be submitted as soon as possible, since only 
a limited number of applicants will be accepted. 

Applications for the residency should be directed to the Director of Pharmacy 
Services, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Con- 
current applications for the master's degree should be directed to the Chairman 
of the Committee on Graduate and Post-doctoral study, School of Pharmacy, 
636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

THE JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital present a combined graduate study residency program in hospital 
pharmacy leading to the Master of Science degree and a certificate of residency 
in Hospital Pharmacy. 

Applicants are asked to contact the Director of Pharmaceutical Services at 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21205. 



58 • University of Maryland 

Officers of 

The School of Pharmacy 

Wilson H. Elkins, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B. Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D. Phil., 1936. 

Albin O. Kuhn, Chancellor, Baltimore Campuses 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Dean and Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity, 1957. 

Casimir T. Ichniowski, Assistant Dean and Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S. in Pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 
1936. 



Faculty (1969-1970) 

Emerita 

B. Olive Cole, Professor Emerita of Pharmacy Administration 
Phar. D., University of Maryland, 1913; LL.B., 1923. 

Professors 

Ralph N. Blomster, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1953; M.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1958; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1963. 

*C. Jelleff Carr, Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. •■ 

*D. Vincent Provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; Ph.D., 1952. \ 

Ralph F. Shangraw, Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan, 1959. 

*DoNALD E. Shay, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 
1943. 

Frank J. Slam a, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.C, 1925; B.S. in Pharm., 1928; M.S., 
1930; Ph.D., 1935. 



♦Part-time 



School of Pharmacy • 59 

Nicolas Zi nki r. Professor of Pharmaceutical Cheniisiry 

CD.SC.CH., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; M.A.. University of Cali- 
fornia. 1953; Ph.D.. 1958. 



Associate Professors 

Benjamin F. Allfn. Associale Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

David A. Bi aki\ Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

♦Helmut F. Cascorbi, Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

Cand. Med., University of Lubingen, Germany, 1954; M.D., University of Munich, 
Germany, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

S. Edward Krikorian. Jr.. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.Sc. in Chem., Brown University, 1951; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1967. 

Peter P. Lamy, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

Dean E. Leavitt, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957; M.B.A., 1964; 
Ph.D., Purdue University, 1968. 

James Leslie, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.Sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 



Assistant Professors 



Larry L. Augsburger, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965, Ph.D., 1967. 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Chemistry, Iowa State University, 1965; M.S., University of Iowa, 1967; 
Ph.D., 1969. 

H. Patrick Fletcher, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 
B.S., Purdue University, 1961; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 

*Mary S. Furth, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; M.D., 1957. 

Amin N. Jure, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1959; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1966. 

Ruth L. Millette, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Connecticut, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1967; 
Ph.D., 1969. 

*RoDGER SisCA, Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955; D.D.S., 1962; M.S., 1963, Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1967. 



* Part-time 



60 • University of Maryland 

George Wright, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Illinois, 1963; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1967. 

Jeremy Wright, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S., University of Manchester, England, 1961; Ph.D., Chelsea College, University 
of London, England, 1965. 

Instructors 

William R. Hodge, Instructor in Pharmacognosy 

B.S. in Pharm., The George Washington University, 1951; M.S., 1967. 

♦Henry Seidman, Instructor in Pharmacy 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930. 

Clinical Assistant Professors of Pharmacy 

*Sydney L. Burgee, Jr. 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1955. 

♦Henry J. Derewicz 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Pittsburgh, 1958; M.S., University of Michigan, 1960. 

♦Paul J. LeSage 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1954. 

♦Milton W. Skolaut 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Texas, 1941. 

Lecturers 

♦Richard D. Dean, Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.Ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 

♦Joseph S. Kaufman, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
B.A., University of Maryland; LL.B., 1953. 

Assistant 

♦Ruth V. Pape, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1938. 

Graduate Assistants 

Avinash M. Contractor, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 

B.S. (Pharm.), Gujarat University, India, 1954; M.S., 1961; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1969. 

Clint R. Crooks, Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1969. 

William J. Heinrich, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1961. 



♦Part-time 



Ij 



School of Pharmacy • 61 

JEdward p. Kano, Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

B.S., University of Southern California. 1966; M.S., Howard University, 1968. 

Hyo Y. Kim, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.Sc, Seoul National University, Korea, 1956; M.S., Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy and Science, 1967. 

Victor H. Morgenroth, III, Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S., Mount St. Mary's College, 1970. 

John W. Ormsby, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1967. 

Richard D. Savello, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1968. 

Milton W. Simmons, Assistant in Pharmacology 
B.A., Mankato State College, 1965. 

Myron Weiner, Assistant in Pharmacology 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1966. 



Faculty (1968-69) 

(IN ADDITION TO 1967-68 LISTING) 

Dean 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Ph.D, Dean and Professor of Pharmacology 

Professors 

Ralph N. Blomster, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacognosy 

*D. Vincent Provenza, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 

Assistant Professors 

♦James A. Vick, M.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
George Wright, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Jeremy Wright, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Instructors 

Eugene M. Johnson, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Chemistry 
Richard L. Wynn, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology 

Lecturer 

♦Arthur F. Michaelis, Ph.D., Lecturer in Pharmacy 
♦Part-time 



62 • University of Maryland 

Clinical Assistants in Pharmacy 

♦Morris Bookoff, B.S. in Pharm. 
*Paul Freiman, B.S. in Pharm. 
♦Wilfred Gluckstern, B.S. in Pharm. 
♦Victor Morgenroth, Jr., B.S. in Pharm. 

Graduate Assistants 

AvANiSH M. Contractor, M.S., Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
William R. Hodge, M.S., Assistant in Microbiology 
Edward P. Kang, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
John N. Ormsby, B.S., in Pharm., Assistant in Pharmacy 
David R. Savello, B.S. in Pharm., Assistant in Pharmacy 
Ten A Yu-siNG Tang, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 



Faculty (1967-68) 

(IN ADDITION TO 1966-67 LISTING) 

Assistant Professors 

♦C. Edward Eden, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
♦Roberto Narbaitz, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
♦Louis E. Schneider, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
♦Rodger F. Sisca, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Instructor 

♦Amin N. Jure, Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy and Physiology 

Fellows 

James F. Clark, B.S. in Pharm., Research Fellow in Chemistry (U.S. Public 
Health Service) 

Avanish M. Contractor, M.S., Stalfort Research Fellow in Pharmacy 

Sandor G. Kulcsar, B.S. in Pharm., Research Fellow in Chemistry (U.S. Public 
Health Service) 



♦Part-time 



School of Pharmacy • 63 

Assistcmt 

*RuTM N. P.MM . B.S. in Pharm.. A.s.siManr in Pluirnuuo^nosy 

Gnidudte Assistants 

JamfiS Frankiin, B.A„ Assistant in Chemistry 

Ravindar Girotra. M. Pharm., Assistant in Chemistry 

Alan J. Jaskulskl B.S. in Pharm., Assistant in Phamiarv 

Hyo Y. Kim. B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy 

Richard L. Wynn, M.S., Assistant in Anatomy and Physiology 



*Part-time 



Health Sciences Library 



(Of thirty-two full-time staff members, only heads of departments most closely 
involved in serving the School of Pharmacy are listed.) 

♦Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S., Librarian and Associate Professor of 
Library Science 

Margaret M. Jones, A.B., M.S.L.S., Head, Cataloging Department 

Clarice F. Lee, A.B., Head, Circulation Department 

Mary S. Listfeldt, B.L.S., Head, Reference Department 



♦Certified Medical Librarian 



64 • University of Maryland 



Alumni Association 

A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 1871. 
At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence as such 
or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy until 1907, 
when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland was 
formed. Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, the 
Society remained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized as the 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland. 
Each year it is more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not 
only maintained, but is growing. 

Officers (1969-1970) 

Charles E. Spigelmire (1929) Honorary President 

Harry R. Wille (1954) President 

Robert O. Wooten ( 1921 ) . 1st Vice President 

Frank J. Slama (1924) Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield (1924) . Treasurer 

Executive Committee (Elected Members) 

Nathan I. Gruz (1939), Chairman 

David A. Blake (1963) 

Donald A. Fedder (1950) 

Nancy S. Lubman (1961) 

Anthony Padussis (1944) 

Charles H. Tregoe (1959) 

Morris R. Yaffe (1939) 

1968-1969 President Nathan I. Gruz (1939) 

1967-1968 President Casimir T. Ichniowski (1929) 



Graduating Class, Honors and Awards 

Roll of Graduates— June 3, 1967 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Paul Courtney Bossle John David Milkowski 

Lillian Louise Darago Walter Douglas Walkling 

Charles Lockett Guyton 



School of Pharmac y 



65 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Lawrence Howard Block 
Sister Jane Marie Brown 
Dick T. K. Fong 



Fund Simaan 

Frederick Henry Wagner 

Clara C. T. Whang 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Alvin Michael Blitz 
Stephen Louis Buckner 
David Cohen 
Stephen Thomas David 
Richard Jay DeNeale 
Donald Floyd Dubansky 
Bernard Aloysius Fischer, III 
Frederick Martin Frankenfeld 
Jerald Allan Freedman 
Richard Mark Goodman 
Arnold Fred Grabush 
Alvin Daniel Groman 
Carol Jane Hill 
Barry Allan Hommerbocker 



Alan Joseph Jaskulski 

Paul Victor Kovalsky 

Allan Lehman 

Stanley Brasure McCabe 

Stephen Needel 

John Randolph Newcomb 

Ronald Arthur Sanford 

Howard Sherman 

Henry Richard Stromberger 

Charles Dorsey Taylor 

Ronald Casimir Telak 

Patrick Edgar Trost 

Frank James Vykol 

Marcia Ann Will 



Honors (1966-1967) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence David Cohen 

Certificates of Honor to holders 

of next highest averages Richard Jay DeNeale 

Arnold Fred Grabush 
Patrick Edgar Trost 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) David Cohen 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Patrick Edgar Trost 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosv Prize Ronald Casimir Telak 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize Stephen Louis Buckner 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Marcia Ann Will 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Alvin David Groman 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

(Pharmacology) Arnold Fred Grabush 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Alan Joseph Jaskulski 



Roll of Graduates— June 8, 1968 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Larry Louis Augsberger 
Louis Diamond 
Mary Ellen Kitler 



Glory Coronado Lleander 
Krishna Shankar Manudhane 



66 



University of Maryland 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

James Gordon Franklin 
Clifford Elton Hynniman 



Barry Neal Lutsky 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



Robert William Adams 
Charles Marvin Alpert 
John Howard Balch 
John Paul Baker, Jr. 
Karen Rosenbluth Blender 
George Charles Bohle, Jr. 
Steven Saul Cohen 
Thomas John Dirnberger 
Wayne Alden Dyke 
Neil Feldman 
Murray Philip Ginsberg 
Daniel Martin Gold 
Jerrold Jay Golob 
Robert Charles Griffiths, Jr. 
Arnold Jay Honkofsky 
Leonard Charles Howard, Jr. 
Lionel Harvey Jacobs 
James Estel Kenny, Jr. 



Gary Allen Lesser 
Edward Robert Majchrzak 
Glenn Wilson Nash 
Joann Lynne Neuman 
Elizabeth Krawiecki Newcomb 
Paul Russell Pfeiffer 
Uldis Verners Pironis 
Charles August Priller 
John Robert Ricci 
Larry Joe Rolf 
William Arthur Samios 
Earl Thomas Smith 
Herbert Marshall Sohmer 
Larry Paul Solomon 
William Statter 
Patrick George Welsh 
Martin William Wolff, Jr. 



Honors (1967-1968) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Leonard Charles Howard, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor 

to holders of next highest averages Herbert Marshall Sohmer 

John Robert Ricci 
Patrick George Welsh 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize John Robert Ricci 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) Herbert Marshall Sohmer 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize William Statter 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) . . . .Leonard Charles Howard, Jr. 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize Uldis Verners Pironis 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) . . . .Patrick Georse Welsh 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Martin William Wolff, Jr. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

(Pharmacology) Patrick George Welsh 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Herbert Marshall Sohmer 

Roll of Graduates— June 7, 1969 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Lawrence H. Block 
Yale Caplan 
Jacob S. Hanker 



Robert Allen Rhodes 
Kakubhai M. Vora 



ScHooi OF Pharmacy • 67 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

James Clark 

Avinash M. Contractor 



William L. Davies 
Hsi Chiang Lin 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



III 



Joseph Ackman 
Michael Jay Appel 
Mary Anne Balcer 
Charles Alfred Besser, 
Harold Jack Block 
Thomas Vance Boiling 
William Keith Cooper 
Clint Richard Crooks 
James Bernard Culp, Jr. 
Morrell Charles Delcher 
Edward Guy Dowling 
Barry Alan Edelman 
Robert Bruce Gerstein 
Paul Grossman 
Janice Elaine Hastings 
Pamela Marie Hill 
Charles Benjamin Hirsch * 
George Lawrence Hogue 
Leonard Jarkowski, Jr. 
Kenneth Lee Kandel 



Paul Edward Kaniecki 
Edward George Kern 
Robert Lee Kestler 
Stephen Carl Klebrowski 
John Francis Krause 
Henry David Leikach 
Julie Eileen Limric 
Richard Sylvan Lipov 
John Michael Motsko, Jr. 
Alphonse Poklis 
Ralph Earl Roberts, Jr. 
David Howard Rochlin 
Edward Walter Rosser, Jr. 
Ronald Schneider 
Jack Marvin Siegel 
Bonnie Faye Smith 
Donald Wayne Taylor 
Charles Francis Trunk 
Kathleen Lunz Trunk 
John Charles Yorkilous 



♦Degree awarded January 1969 



Honors (1968-1969) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Charles Alfred Besser, III 

Certificates of Honor 

to holders of next highest averages Thomas Vance Boiling 

John Francis Krause 
Clint Richard Crooks 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Thomas Vance Boiling 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) Bonnie Faye Smith 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Charles Alfred Besser, III 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Charles Alfred Besser, III 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize Pamela Marie Hill 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Harold Jack Block 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) James Bernard Culp, Jr. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize 

(Pharmacology) Charies Alfred Besser, III 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Edward Walter Rosser, Jr. 



68 • University of Maryland 



Board of Regents and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 



CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

3900 North Charles Street, Apartment 1317, Baltimore 21218 

vicechairman 
George B. Newman 
The Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Box 300, Cumberland 21502 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 21201 

treasurer 
Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 21629 

assistant secretary 

Mrs. Alice H. Morgan 

4608 Drummond Avenue, Chevy Chase 20015 

assistant treasurer 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, One Charles Center, 17th Floor, Baltimore 21201 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

Harry Boswell Associates, 6505 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville 20782 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 21215 

William B. Long, M.D. 
Medical Center, Salisbury 21801 

F. Grove Miller, Jr. 

R. D. 1, Box 133, North East 21901 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 20740 



School of Pharmacy • 69 



Officers of the University 



Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins— B.^.. University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kiihn— 5.5.. University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jt.—B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D.: 
State University of Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.—B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

J. Winston Martin— 5.5., University of Missouri, 1951; M.Ed., 1956; Ed.D., 1958. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, }t.—A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd— B.5., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland. 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley — B.S., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 

DIRECTOR, ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS EMERITUS 

G. Watson Algire— 5./4., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 



70 • University of Maryland 

Deans and Principal Academic Officers 

Deans 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— 5.5.. Cornell University, 1936: M.S., 1938; Ph.D.. 1940. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

John William Hill— 5.^., Rice University, 1951; B. Arch., 1952; M. Arch., University 

of Pennsylvania, 1959. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning — B.S.. Tnjts College. 1929: M. A.. Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D. 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Donald W. O'Connell— 5.^., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley — D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Robert B. Beckmann — B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1944. 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Marjory Brooks — B.S., Mississippi State College, 1943; M.S., University of Idaho, 
1951: Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1963. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School. 

1948. 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Paul Wasserman— 5.B.^., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S., (L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949; M.S., {Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, 1960. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL EDUCATION AND 

RESEARCH 
John H. Moxley — A.B., Williams, 1957; M.D., University of Colorado School of 

Medicine, 1961. 



School of Pharmacy • 71 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Marion I. Murphy— fl.5.. University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.IL. l/nnriMtv of Michi- 
gan. 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

William J. Kinnard. Jr.— Z?.5., University of Pittsburgh, 1953: M.S., 1955; Ph.D.. 
Purdue University, 1957. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. RECREATION AND HEALTH 
Lester M. Fraley— B./l.. Randolph-Macon College, 1928: M.A., 1937: Ph.D.. Pea- 
hody College, 1939. 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK AND COMMUNITY PLANNING 

Daniel Jhmsz—B.A., Queens College, 1948: M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955: 
D.S.W., 1959. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— 5.^., Wabash College, 1929: M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY— VICE CHANCELLOR 
FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Homer W. Schamp. Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan 1947: Ph.D.. 1952. 



Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Robert E. Wagner — B.S., Kansas University, 1942; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut — B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

HEAD. DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Alfred J. Hanlon, Jr. — A.B., Harvard University, 1939; M.S., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1966. 

DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

William F. Atchison — A.B., Georgetown College, 1938; M.A., University of 
Kentucky, 1940; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1943. 



72 • University of Maryland 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Melvin Bernstein — A.B., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; B.Mus., 1948; M.Mus., 
University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 
1964. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 

H. Gerthon Morgan — B.A., Fiirman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 
1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

Robert Munn — B.S., University of Bristol, 1957; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS 
AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

Langdon T. Crane, Jr. — A.B., Amherst College, 1952; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1959. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad — B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR, NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR, THE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 

Eugene B. Brody — A.B., M.A., University of Missouri, 1941; M.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1944. 

DIRECTOR, SUMMER SCHOOL 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University, 1960; M.S., 1955;'£d.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

DIRECTOR, PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1929. 



General Administrative Officers 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR TO THE VICE PRESIDENT 
FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Francis A. Gray, Jr. — B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

ASSISTANT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS (Facilities Planning) 
Robert E. Kendig— ^.fi., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 



School of Pharmacy • 73 

COMPTROI.I.ER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— fi.5.. University of Maryland. 1943: C.P.A.. 194S. 

DIRECTOR. ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Donald \V. (iitlin — B.A., University of California, 1950; M.A., Vanderhilt Univer- 
sity, 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

DIRECTOR, ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— fi.5.. University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

DIRECTOR, ATHLETICS 

James H. Kehoe — B.S., University of Maryland, 1940. 



DIRECTOR, FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— B./4., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., 1934; C.P.A., 1939. 

DIRECTOR, GRADUATE RECORDS 

Carl L. Seidel— fi.5., University of Maryland 1963. 

DIRECTOR, PERSONNEL 

Bernard J. Williams— fi.^.. University of Chicago, 1957; M.A., 1959. 



DIRECTOR, PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY 

Clayton R. Plummer — B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1936; M.Ed., Springfield 
College, 1940. 



DIRECTOR, MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS 

Charles P. Ellington — B.S., University of Georgia, 1950; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1952; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1964. 



DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 



ACTING DIRECTOR, PHYSICAL PLANT (Baltimore) 
Frances X. Duggan 

REGISTRAR AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF REGISTRATIONS 

James P. Hill— 5.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University 
of Michigan, 1963. 



74 • University of Maryland 

Directors of Bureaus and Special Services 

DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 
John W. Dorsey — B.S., University of Maryland, 1958: Certf., London School of Eco- 
nomics, 1959; M.A., Harvard University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

DIRECTOR. BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND FIELD 
SERVICES 

James D. Raths— 5.5., Yale University, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., New York Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF GOVERNMENTAL RESEARCH 

Franklin L. Burdette — A.B., Marshall College, 1934; M.A., University of Nebraska, 

1935; M.A., Princeton University, 1937; Ph.D.. 1938; LL.D., Marshall College, 

1959. 

DIRECTOR, CENTER OF MATERIALS RESEARCH 

Ellis R. Lippincott — B.A., Earlham College, 1943; M.A., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1944; Ph.D., 1947. 

DIRECTOR, FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION 

Joseph R. Bachtler — B.S., University of Southern California, 1956. 

DIRECTOR, LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

Thomas Alvin Ladson — V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1939. 

DIRECTOR, MARYLAND TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE 
Daniel R. Thompson — B.A., Queens College, 1950; LL.B., Georgetown University, 
1960. 

DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT AID 

H. Palmer Hopkins — B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1936; Ed.M., University of 
Maryland, 1948; Ed.D., George Washington University, 1962. 

DIRECTOR, STUDENT HOUSING 

Miss Margaret C. Lloyd — B.S., University of Georgia, 1932; M.Ed., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

Miss Beth Wilson — B.A., University of Nebraska, 1930. 

DIRECTOR, WIND TUNNEL 

Donald S. Gross — B.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 

DIRECTOR, HEALTH SERVICE 

U. Robert Merikangas— fi.5., University of Vermont, 1928; M.D., 1931. 



I 



DIRECTOR, COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A.. Dartmouth College, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 
1951; Ph.D. 1954. 



ScHooi. oi- Pharmacy • 75 

Stafidifii^ Committees, Faculty Senate 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE. WELFARE. RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

Adjunct Committees: Student Activities 

Financial Aids and Self-Help 

Student Publications and Communications 

Religious Life 

Student Health and Safety 

Student Discipline 

ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

FACULTY RESEARCH 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

LIBRARIES 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS AFFAIRS 

Adjunct Committee: Baltimore City Campus Student Affairs 

THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 



76 • University of Maryland 



Index 



Academic Calendar 1968-1969 4 

Academic Calendar 1969-1970 5 

Academic Programs 9 

Academic Regulations 25 

Academic Warnings 26 

Accreditation 7 

Admission to Professional Program at Baltimore 

From College Park or UMBC 15 

From Other Universities and Colleges 15 

Alumni Association 64 

Application Forms for Pre-Professional Program 12 

Application Procedures for the Professional Program 16 

Assistantships 56 

Attendance Requirements 25 

Board of Regents and Maryland State Board of Agriculture 68 

Change in Registration 29 

Changes in Curriculum 40 

Classification of Students 27 

Correspondence 8 

Courses of Instructions 43 

Deadlines for Applications 12 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 33 

Degrees 8 

Deportment 32 

Employment 32 

Enrollment in Pre-Professional Program at University of Maryland 

(College Park of UMBC) 11 

Examinations • • 25 

Faculty 58 

Fees and Expenses for Professional Program 17 

Financial Aid (Pre-Professional Program) 14 

Financial Aid — Scholarships and Loans: Professional Program 19 

Five-year Program 9 

General Information for the Baltimore Union 31 

Grading System 25 

Graduate Program 54 

Graduate Tuition and Fees 54 

Graduating Class, Honors and Awards 64 

Health Sciences Library 7 

Health Sciences Library Staff 63 

History and Program of the School 7 

Honors and Awards 36 

Hospital Pharmacy Residency . 56 



SC MOOl Ol 1^1 ARM A( Y • 77 



INDEX (Continued) 

Housing 31 

Incomplete Work 26 

Index 76 

licensure Requirements of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 17 

Non-Departmental Courses 53 

Orhcers of The School of Pharmacy 58 

Otlicers of the University 69 

Parking 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry Courses 43 

Pharmacology Courses 47 

Pharmacy Courses 49 

Pharmacy Administration Courses 52 

Pharmocognosy Courses 45 

Pre-Professional 10 

Professional Curriculum I 39 

Professional Curriculum II 40 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Lectureships 55 

Raising a Grade of D 26 

Recommended High School Preparation 11 

Registration with the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 9 

Regulations for Promotion and Probation 27 

Regulations for Readmission 27 

Regulations for Review 27 

Removal of an F Grade 26 

Student Life 31 

Student Health 35 

Student Organizations (Baltimore Campus) 35 

Textbooks • • 33 

Transcripts of Records 28 

Tuition and Fees (Pre-Professional Program) 13 

Visitors 8 

Withdrawals from School of Pharmacy at Baltimore 28 



m 



"The purpose of a university is to perform at a 
high level in all of its endeavors and to elevate 
the individual and society. It should rennain a 
place where new ideas can be expounded and 
nurtured. It should lead in the discovery of the 
truth and in the orderly discussion of contro- 
versial issues. Just as it teaches tolerance, it 
should tolerate lawful dissent and expect rest- 
lessness and innpatience. The University, however, 
should not be an activist organization. Rather its 
proper role is to examine the issues, thereby en- 
abling individuals to arrive at conclusions and to 
act or not to act as they believe is right. A public 
university cannot be independent of government 
but its governing board should be autonomous, 
and it should resist with all its will and rising in- 
fluence any effort toward political control. A uni- 
versity must be free in the proper sense of free- 
dom." 



From "Issues and Rumblings in Higher Education"- 

The President's Convocation Address of 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

April 19, 1967 

College Park, Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY / THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
636 West Lombard Street / Baltimore, Maryland 21201 




J 




m^msm 



.^^S^SK 




Scho ol of Pharmacy 



u n i versn76T m a rylai 
at baltimore 
1970-72 




Students of all races, colors, and creeds are equally 
admissible to the School of Pharamcy. It is the ob- 
jective of the School to enroll students with diversi- 
fied backgrounds in order to make the educational 
experience more meaningful for each individual as 
well as to provide pharmacists to ail segments of 
the community. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between 
the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such 
action to be in the best interests of the University. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 

Catalog and 126th Announcement 

1970-1972 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Volume 49 



September, 1971 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Number 1 



2 / School of Pharmacy 



Contents 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 3 

THE SCHOOL 

Aims and Objectives 4 

History 5 

Health Sciences Library 6 

Accreditation 7 

Degrees 7 

Correspondence 7 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Five-Year Program 9 

Registration and Licensure Requirements of the 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy 9 

Pre-Professional Program 10 

Information and Application Forms 11 

Financial Aid 11 

Professional Program 141 

Application Procedure 14 

Admission Notification 15 

Fees and Expenses 15 

Financial Aid, Scholarships and Loans 17' 

Graduate Program 22 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Lectureships 23 

Assistantships 24 

Hospital Pharmacy Residency 24 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND STUDENT AFFAIRS I 

Academic Regulations 257 

Student Life 30 

Student Organizations 31 

Student Health 32 

Honors and Awards 33 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 37 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 44 

BOARD OF REGENTS 56 

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 57 

OFFICERS FOR CENTRAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 57 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 59 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 66 

GRADUATING CLASSES, HONORS AND AWARDS 67 



University of Maryland / 3 



Academic Calendar, 1971-1972 



FALL TERM 

30-31 Graduate Student Registration 

31 Orientation 

1 Undergraduate Registration (morning) 

1 Instruction Begins (afternoon) 

6 Labor Day, Holiday 

25 Study Day (Fifth Year Students) 

26-29 Final Examinations (Fifth Year Students) 

25-28, inc. Thanksgiving Recess 

15 Study Day (Third and Fourth Year and Grad- 

uate Students) 
16-22 Final Examinations (Third and Fourth Year and 

Graduate Students) 



4 
28 



WINTER TERM 

Registration (Fourth and Fifth Year and Grad- 
uate Students) 
Instruction Begins 
Final Examinations 



March 31 - April 3, inc. 

May 15-16 

May 16 

May 17-19 



SPRING TERM 

28 Registration (Third, Fourth and Fifth Year Stu- 

dents) 
2-3 Registration (Graduate Students) 

31 Instruction Begins 

21 Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

21 Study Day (Section A-Fifth Year Students) 

22-24 Final Examinations (Section A— Fifth Year Stu- 

dents) 
Spring Recess 

Study Days (Third and Fourth Year and Grad- 
uate Students) 
Study Day (Section B— Fifth Year Students) 
Final Examinations (Section B— Fifth Year Stu- 
dents) 
17-23 Final Examinations (Third and Fourth Year and 

Graduate Students) 
2 Commencement 



4 / School of Pharmacy 



The School 

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF 
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

As the only school of pharmacy In Maryland and as a part of the State 
University, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy accepts definite 
responsibilities for undergraduate, graduate and continuing education of 
pharmacists and those interested in the pharmaceutical sciences, and the 
conduct of original research to advance scientific and professional knowl- 
edge. Graduates of the School serve as community, hospital and industrial 
pharmacists and their educational background qualifies them for professional 
service in educational and governmental regulatory or environmental con- 
trol agencies. Pharmacy graduates are uniquely qualified to pursue ad- 
vanced study in the bio-medical and other health-care related sciences. 
Recent developments suggest that the pharmacist will become a patient- 
oriented drug expert. The School accepts this concept of an emerging new 
role of the pharmacist and the curriculum is designed to enable the graduate 
to take a more meaningful part in health care at the institutional and com- 
munity level. 

In meeting its teaching obligations, the School provides a curriculum and 
faculty capable of offering students an educational experience beyond train- 
ing for the practive of pharmacy. In addition to acquiring the facts and 
techniques for pharmaceutical practice, graduates are able to employ the 
new advances in the medical sciences as they relate to the recent trends to 
meet the growing needs for health care. 

The new role of the pharmacist requires training not only in chemistry, 
physical chemical properties, stability and pharmaceutical nature of drugs, 
but advanced training in clinical pharmacy and pharmacology. The School 
of Pharmacy has modernized its curriculum to permit its graduates to 
play an important part with the physician in drug selection and monitoring 
of drug administration through a course of patient therapy, with early 
recognition of potential adverse drug effects. 

The aims and objectives of the clinical program in pharmaceutical educa- 
tion in the School include the opportunity for interaction with other students 
and professional people in the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, 
Social Work and Community Planning, and Law. This interaction will enhance 
the opportunities for development of the informational role of the pharmacist 
to bring him closer to the physician as a recognized source of dependable 
information about drugs and therapeutic agents. Familiarity with the literature 
and methods of information retrieval and distribution are considered indis- 
pensable to a modern practitioner of pharmacy. 

The School accepts Its responsibility for recruiting and training programs 
for minority groups or disadvantaged students to bring them to the education- 



I 



University of Maryland / 5 

a\ level required for the practice of pharmacy. Without lowering admission 
standards or modifying the educational requirements, representatives of these 
groups in our society can be trained to take their professional place in provid- 
ing health care services. 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has had a long tradition 
of providing outstanding graduate programs and recognizes its obligation to 
continually strengthen and modify them on the basis of the needs of the 
scientific community and society. A strong graduate program is essential to 
attracting outstanding faculty and to their continuing development as scien- 
tists and teachers. In addition, a strong graduate program fulfills a basic 
goal of the university in terms of elucidating new knowledge through various 
types of basic and applied research and supplying graduate level scientists 
to government, industry and education. 

One of the major strengths of graduate programs in the various depart- 
ments of the School of Pharmacy is the interrelatibility of course work and 
research interests. Interdisciplinary approaches to graduate education and re- 
search ore and will continue to be stressed. Taking cognizance of the present 
concerns of graduate education, in terms of quality and quantity, the School 
of Pharmacy will continue to emphasize programs of limited size but high 
quality. 

Inherent in the activities of the School is the obligation to serve as the 
focal point of leadership for the profession of pharmacy in Maryland, and 
to provide expertise to the community in related fields. The School is 
continuing to meet its public responsibilities as an information source, train- 
ing orofessionals, and operating a drug abuse education program, a poison 
information center and a therapeutic drug information registry. In all these 
services it is not only fulfilling the needs of the citizens of the State but it 
is contributing to knowledge in the healing arts. 



HISTORY 

The first suggestion of a College of Pharmacy in Baltimore emanated 
from William F. Fisher, M.D., who established a pharmacy in the city 
about 1 834. He was Professor of Botany in the School of Arts and Sciences, 
University of Maryland (Baltimore) and in 1837, was made Professor of 
Chemistry in the School of Medicine. Of Dr. Fisher's "plan" we know 
nothing further than that he had formed one and that it met with favor 
among his medical colleagues (a sudden illness prevented his participation 
in its execution). Also, in 1837, a convention of Eastern Shore physicians in 
Easton, Maryland made a demand on the General Assembly of Maryland for 
the establishment of a college of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school of the 
South, was organized in the City of Baltimore on July 20, 1840 by a 
progressive group of Baltimore physicians (several were associated with 
the University of Maryland) and apothecaries to provide systematic instruc- 
tion in pharmacy and related sciences. The College, incorporated on January 
27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 



6 / School of Pharmacy 

During a brief association (1844-1847) of the old Maryland College of 
Pharmacy with the old, privately-owned and operated University of Maryland 
in Baltimore City (northeast corner of Lombard and Greene Streets), the 
first professorship in pharmacy in the United States was established. David 
Stewart, M.D., an alumnus of the School of Medicine (1844) was elected 
Professor of Pharmacy (1844-1846). 

From 1848-1903, the old College operated as an independent institution 
at various locations in the city. In 1904, the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
became the Department of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland (Balti- 
more). In 1920, the Baltimore professional schools (University of Maryland) 
merged with Maryland State College (College Park) to form the State 
University. 

From the very beginning, the school has made many noteworthy contribu- 
tions to the advancement of pharmacy. In addition to the first separate 
professorship in the theory and practice of pharmacy (1844), some other 
"firsts" include the establishment of a chair of analytical chemistry (1872) and 
an obligatory course in analytical chemistry for the pharmacy student. 

Alpheus Phineas Sharp, one of the first graduates from the newly-opened 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, read the first scientific paper before the 
American Pharmaceutical Association in New York City (1855). Merck, Sharp 
& Dohme can trade its origin to the 1 845 opening of his apothecary shop in 
Baltimore. 

In 1870, the college called the first convention of representatives of 
pharmacy schools to formulate uniform standards for the graduation of 
students. The convention was held in Baltimore. Many of the early pharma- 
ceutical laws enacted by the Legislature of the State of Maryland were 
initiated and fostered by the school. 

The school was one of the first in America to give a special course in 
prescription compounding, consisting of both lectures and laboratory work 
and the first to add a separate chair of commercial pharmacy and dispensing 
(1900). 

Graduate courses were first outlined in 1928 and this inaugrated a 
graduate work era of high grade which added much to the development and 
prestige of the school. 

This school was among the first schools of pharmacy to have a fulltime 
pharmacology department (1930) and the first laboratory in a pharmacy 
school for instruction in bio-chemical assays. 



HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

Library facilities are excellent. The Health Sciences Library, which serves 
the School of Pharmacy as well as the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, 
and Social Work and Community Planning, contains more than 147,000 
bound volumes and regularly receives 2,800 scientific periodicals and 
annual publications. 

Students have access to the time-honored collections of the Enoch Pratt, the 
Peabody Libraries, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty and The Johns Hopkins 



University of Maryland / 7 

University. The libraries are within convenient distances of the School. Stu- 
dents also have access to the art collections at the Walters Art Gallery and 
the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

ACCREDITATION 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The School holds membership in the American Associ- 
ation of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees! 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students ore 
set forth in the following paragraphs. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon 
students who have successfully completed the pre-professional program and 
the three years required for the professional program in most of the ac- 
credited schools of pharmacy in the United States. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate 
School. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence referring to entrance into the pre-professional program 
of the School should be directed to the accredited junior or senior college hav- 
ing pre-professional programs. In the case of the University of Maryland 
campuses, correspondence should be directed to the following: 

College Park: 

Director of Admissions 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

University of Maryland, Baltimore County Campus: 
Office of Admissions and Registration 
University of Maryland, Baltimore County 
5401 Wilkens Avenue 
Dorm 2 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

University of Maryland, Eastern Shore: 
Director of Admissions 
University of Maryland, Eastern Shore 
Room 311, Maryland Hall 
Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the professional program (lost 
three years) of the five year curriculum should be addressed to the School 
of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. 




Maryland Poison Control Center of the University of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy provides services to all areas 
of the State and also serves as an educational center for 
students on the Baltimore Campus. 






University of Maryfond / 9 



Academic Prosrams 



General Statement. The University of Maryland, in all its branches and 
divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal educational opportunity for peoples 
of all races, creeds and ethnic origins. 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

A minimum of five academic years of satisfactory college work is re- 
quired for the completion of the present pharmacy curriculum of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. This five-year curriculum meets the minimum require- 
ments established by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 
and the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. 

At the University of Maryland the five-year program consists of two 
years of pre-professional work and a three-year pharmacy program. The 
pre-professional program is not available in Baltimore, but may be obtained 
at the College Park, Baltimore County (UMBC) or Eastern Shore (UMES) 
campuses of the University of Maryland or at any other accredited uni- 
versity, junior or senior college where appropriate courses are offered.^ 

REGISTRATION AND LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 
OF THE MARYLAND BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Students enrolling in the School of Pharmacy shall, within 30 days, file 
with the Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy an application for 
registration as a student of pharmacy. The fee for this is one dollar. The 
students are required to submit sworn statements of all internship experiences 
to the Board upon their request. The Board recognizes the six months pro- 
fessional experience program of the School as satisfying their internship 
requirements. 

Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of twenty- 
one years, who shall present satisfactory evidence to the Maryland Board 
of Pharmacy that he or she has had at least four years standard high school 
training or its equivalent, and is a graduate of a reputable school or 
college of pharmacy approved by said Board and accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the Board shall adopt 
the approved list as published on July 1 of each year, subject to amend- 
ment, and who after examination by the said Board be by it deemed com- 
petent, shall be registered as a pharmacist and be given a certificate of such 



^ Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission to the 
professional program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally accredited college or 
university. 



70 / School of Pharmacy 

registration, provided, however, that an internship program to be regulated 
by said Board be served. Such person shall make application to the secre- 
tary of said Board, at least ten days before any stated meeting of the 
Board and shall pay to the said Board fee of forty dollars. 

For further information, please contact the Secretary of the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy, 610 N. Howard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The pre-professional curriculum is designed to provide the student with 
those courses that satisfy his needs for a more liberal education as well as the 
scientific prerequisite courses for entrance into the professional program. 
The following programs can be taken at the University of Maryland, College 
Park, Baltimore County or Eastern Shore campuses, or at any other accredited 
university, senior or junior college: 

FIRST YEAR Credits 

General Chemistry 8 

Mathematics (Introductory and Elementary Analysis) 6-7 

Zoology (or Biology) 4 

English (Composition) 3 

Elective (Social Sciences) 3 

Elective (non-specific) 3 

27-28 

SECOND YEAR 

Organic Chemistry 8 

Physics 8 

History 6 

English (Literature) 6 

Economics 3 

Elective (Fine Arts or Philosophy) 3 



34 

RECOMMENDED HIGH SCHOOL PREPARATION 

The completion of an academic program containing the following courses 
is required for enrollment in the School of Pharmacy: 

Subjects Recommended Required 

English 4 Units 4 Units 

College Preparatory Mathematics— includ- 
ing algebra (1), plane geometry (1) and 
additional units in advanced algebra, solid 
geometry, trigonometry, or advanced 
mathematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) 2 1 



University of Maryland / ? 1 



2 


1 


1 





2 





1 


8 



History and Social Sciences 
Biological Sciences 

Foreign Language— German or French 
Unspecified academic subjects 

Total 16 16 



INFORMATION AND APPLICATION FORMS 
(PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM) 

College Park 

Application forms may be obtained from the Director of Admissions of 
the University of Maryland at College Park or your high school counselor. 
Application must be made to the Director of Admissions at College Park, 
Maryland 20742, after October 1st of your senior year in high school. 

UMBC 

Application forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and 
Registration, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue, Dorm 2, Baltimore, Maryland 21228, and accepted after October 
1st of your senior year in high school. 

UMES 

Application forms may be obtained from the Director of Admissions, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Eastern Shore, Room 311, Maryland Hall, Princess Anne, 
Maryland 21853, and accepted after October 1st of your senior year 
in high school. 

FINANCIAL AID (Pre-Professlonal) 

All requests for information concerning scholarships and loans in the 
pre-professional program at College Park, UMBC or UMES, should be directed 
to the following offices: 

College Park — Director, Student Aid, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742 UMBC - Director of Financial Aid, UMBC, 5401 
Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228 UMES — Office of 
Student Financial Aid, Business Office, UMES, Princess Anne, Mary- 
land 21853 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships ^ 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified pre-professional 
pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, scholastic 
achievement and the need for financial assistance. These scholarships are 
open only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholarship not ex- 



12 I School of Pharmacy 

ceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied in partial defrayment of 
fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceuiical Associafion Scholarships ^ 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually scholar- 
ships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral 
character, scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. Each 
scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is used in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These scholarships are open 
only to residents of the State of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundafion Scholarships ^ 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually several scholar- 
ships to pre-professional pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, 
scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial assistance. 
Each scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied to 
defray partially the fees and expenses at College Park, Maryland. Recipients 
must have been residents of the State of Maryland for at least one year 
prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

William J. Lowry-Alex Weiner Alumni Memorial Scholarship Fund ^ 

In memory of Dr. William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, Class of 1896, and in 1926, a prime motivator in 
the reorganization and reactivation of the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy, University of Maryland and in memory of Alex Weiner, alum- 
nus of the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1947, and member of the School 
of Pharmacy faculty, Mrs. William J. Lowry and friends and associates of 
Alex Weiner, respectively, have provided funds to endow an annual scholar- 
ship grant. This joint scholarship is available to a qualified pre-professional 
pharmacy student enrolled at UMBC. The recipient of this grant award is 
selected on the basis of financial need, character and academic achieve- 
ment. 

UMES Scholarship 

The School of Pharmacy makes available annually a $500 scholarship 
to partially defray fees and expenses at the UMES for pre-professional 
student. 



^ These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Ald of 
the University of Maryland in cooperation with the Scholarship Committee of the Alumni As- 
lociation of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association. 




Student education within the Robert Swain Pharmacy in 
the School of Pharmacy provides for a greater knowl- 
edge of drug distribution systems in community practice. 



14 I School of Pharmacy 



Professional Program 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 
Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore 
should write to the Dean's Office, University of Maryland, School of Phar- 
macy, 636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Applicants 
wishing advice on any problem relative to their application should com- 
municate with the above office. 

Admission To The Professional Progrann At Baltimore 

Students of all races, colors and creeds are equally admissible. It is the 
objective of the University of Maryland, Baltimore City campus to enroll 
students with diversified backgrounds in order to make the educational ex- 
perience more meaningful for each student. 

FROM COLLEGE PARK, UMBC or UMES DIVISION 

Students who have completed the prescribed pre-professional program 
with a scholastic average of not less than C (2.0), and who are in good 
standing, will be considered by the Admission Committee for advancement 
to the pharmacy program in Baltimore. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore division of the 
School of Pharmacy, each student will be required to file an application with 
the Dean's Office of the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore. No application 
fee is required of students registered in a division of the University of 
Maryland. 

FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed 
successfully the required pre-professional program in an accredited college 
of arts and sciences* based upon the completion of a four-year high school 
course or the equivalent in entrance examinations. The college program must 
consist of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit exclusive of physical 
education, health, military science, or similar courses. 



* Not less than 24 semester hours of academic work immediately prior to admission to the 
professional program at Baltimore must be completed in a regionally accredited college or 
university. 



University of Maryland / 1 5 

All applicants for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore must 
have completed each of the courses in the prescribed pre-professional pro- 
gram with a grade of not less than 'C when the lowest passing grade is 
'D'. or its equivalent, and must be in good standing. 

Provisional admission will be offered students who have successfully com- 
pleted the science core (Math, Chemistry or Zoology. Biology and Physics) 
and all except one or two of the non-science courses of the pre-professional 
program on the understanding that these courses must be completed before 
entrance into the fifth year of the curriculum. 

Admission Notification 

FROM COLLEGE PARK, UMBC OR UMES: 

Students will be notified by the School of Pharmacy that they hove 
qualified for advancement into the professonol program. 

FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES: 

Students meeting the requirements for admission will receive certificates 
of admission issued by the Director of Admissions and Registrations at 
Baltimore. 

All students will receive detailed directions for registering from the Balti- 
more Office of the Registrar a few weeks prior to the September registration 
period. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Baltimore City Campus— 1971 Academic Year 
Full-Time Undergraduate Students 
Tuition Fee (per semester) 

Residents of Maryland $230.00 

Non-Residents 425.00 

Laboratory Fee (per semester) 15.00 

(This one fee covers all lab courses) 
Special Fee (per annum) 25.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00** 

Student Health Fee (per annum) 10.00 

Student Union Fee (per annum) 30.00 

The tuition, laboratory and student activities fees for each semester are 
payable at the time of registration. Student Union fee and special fee are 
payable in full at the time of first registration. 

Students wishing to make arrangements for deferred payment of tuition 
charges must do so with the Financial Office at or prior to registration for 
the semester for which such charges are imposed. 

**(This fee covers subscription to the yearbook. Terra Mariae, all expenses of School 
luncheons, picnics, dances.) 



7 6 / School of Pharmacy 

Incidenfal Charges 

For New Studerits Only (The application and mafriculafion fees are not ac- 
cepted from School of Pharmacy, College Park, UM.B.C, or U.M.E.S.) 

Application fee (non-returnable) $ 7.50 

Matriculation fee (non-returnable) 10.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission 50.00 

(This fee will be credited against the first semester's tuition.) 

For Candidates for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Delinquencies and Breakage 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Breakage— Students are required to pay for all breakage in 
excess of $5.00 per year. 

Other Expenses 

Books and supplies, approximately 75-150.00 

Students registering for more than a regularly scheduled 
semester's work will be charged additionally for each course. 
Fee for Changes in Registration after first week 5.00 

Health Insurance Requirement 

Hospital insurance is required for all full-time students (9 or more semester 
hours). Each student must provide proof of such membership to his dean at 
the time of registration. A representative of Blue Cross will be available prior 
to registration for those students who do not have Blue Cross insurance or 
equivalent insurance coverage. 

Part-Time Undergraduate Students 

All students registered for nine semester hours or more are considered 
full-time students. Part-time students are charged as follows: 

Tuition Fee (for each semester hour per semester) $20.00 

Laboratory Fees (per semester) 

Anatomy and Histology 12.00 

Chemistry 12.00 

Microbiology 15.00 

Pharmacognosy 7.00 

Pharmacology 12.00 

Pharmacy 12.00 

Physiology 12.00 



Universify of Maryland / 1 7 

Student Union Fee (per annum) 6.00 

Student Union Fee (Summer Session) ^ 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (per semester) 10.00 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
charges as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to 
keep the cost to the student as low as possible. 

FINANCIAL AID— SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

(BALTIMORE CAMPUS) PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

All requests for information concerning scholarships should be addressed to 
Dr. C. T. Ichniowski, Assistant Dean, School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, 636 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The selection 
of the recipients of the scholarships and loans is made by the Dean in con- 
junction with a committee of the faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

The Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships worth $100.00 per semester 
to qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and 
who are in need of financial assistance to complete their education. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education makes available 
scholarships worth not less than $100.00 per semester to qualified students 
of the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of Prof. Charles Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, a number of his friends and alumni have made an endowment for a 
scholarship worth $100.00 annually. 

The H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Class of 1951, a fund has been estab- 
lished for the purpose of awarding scholarships on the basis of reasonable 



^The Student Union fee is payable by ail students enrolled in the Professional Schools on 
the Baltimore Campus and is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of 
the Union Building. The special fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in the pro- 
fessional schools on the Baltimore campus and is used to finance the equipment needed for 
the Union Building. For students enrolling for the first time at the beginning of the second 
semester, the Student Union fee will be $15.00; the special fee will be $5.00. All students 
carrying as much as 9 credit hours of work are considered full-time students subject to this 
fee. 

All Summer School students will pay a $6.00 Student Union fee. This Student Union fee is 
in addition to the tuition, laboratory fees and book charges, etc. 



18 I School of Pharmacy 

need and academic ability to students in the professional program on the 
Baltimore campus of the School of Pharmacy. Students eligible for the 
Custis Memorial Scholarship shall be residents of one of the nine Eastern 
Shore Maryland Counties. The amount of each Custis Memorial scholarship 
shall not exceed $300.00 in any one year. The recipient of each scholarship 
and the amount of each scholarship awarded shall be determined by the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy and the School's Financial Aid Committee 
with the president of the Eastern Shore Pharmaceutical Society serving in 
and advisory and ex-offico capacity. 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation Scholarship Sponsored by 
The National Association of Retail Druggists 

The John W. Dargavel Foundation, sponsored by the National Association 
of Retail Druggists, provides annually a scholarship in the amount of $200.00. 
The scholarship grant open to a qualified student of the Third, Fourth or Fifth 
Year Class is awarded on the basis of character, scholarship and financial 
need. 

The J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarships 

In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, a former student of the 
School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeannette Joseph provided a generous 
bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who have 
maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial 
assistance. 

The Charles London Henry Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Charles London Henry, for many years a mem- 
ber of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Mrs. Nora Howard Henry 
has endowed a scholarship worth $100.00 to be awarded annually by the 
Scholarship Committee of the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
to a Fifth Year student who has shown superior proficiency in practical and 
commercial pharmacy. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, A.M. Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus of the 
School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein 
bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually 
to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The recipient of the award 
is to be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing phar- 
macist for over fifty years, the late Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a 
sum of money to endow a scholarship to be awarded annually. The re- 
cipient of the award will be selected on the basis of financial need, character 
and scholarship. 



Universify of Maryland / 19 

^rince Georges-Montgomery County 
^hormaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association pro- 
'ides a scholarship in the amount of $200.00 to be awarded to a student 
vho has maintained a superior academic record and who is in need of 
inancial assistance. 

he Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County 
Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association provides a scholarship in the amount of $50.00 to a student who 
las maintained a superior scholastic average and who is in need of financial 
jid. 

lead's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships 

The Read's Drug Stores Foundation of Baltimore, Maryland, contributes 
unds to provide scholarships paying $100.00 to $150.00 per semester to 
jualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and 
vho are in need of financial assistance to complete their schooling. 

iealth Professions Student Scholarship Program 

The Public Health Service Act as amended under the Health Manpower Act 
)f 1968 has a provision for granting annual scholarships, not exceeding 
\)2,500 to qualified students of exceptional financial need who require 
uch financial assistance to pursue a course of stody. The School of Pharmacy 
s participating in this financial aid program for students in the professional 
)rogram who are on a full-time basis and in good standing. 

In determining and establishing the financial status and need for scholar- 
hip aid, it will be necessary to assess all other frnancial resources available 
jnd the expenses of education the student will incur. Financial resources 
vhich should be assessed include the assistance available from parents or 
juardians; the student's own and, if applicable, his (her) spouse's earnings, 
avings and other financial resources; support from other scholarships and pri- 
'ate grants administered by the School of Pharmacy; aid under the Health 
Professions Student Loan Program; and support available from other sources 
iuch as prizes, other scholarships or loans and veterans' benefits. 

lose Hendler Memorial Loan Fund 

L. Manuel Hendler and Family have established a loan fund in memory of 
lArs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is available to qualified 
itudents of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom are made upon 
he recommendation of the Dean. 

lenjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund 

The family of Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld has established a loan fund as a 
nemoriol to him. This fund is available to qualified needy students. Loans 



I 



20 I School of Pharmacy 

from the fund ore made upon the recommendation of the Dean and the 
Grants-in-Aid Committee of the School of Pharmacy. 

Health Professions Sfudent Loan Program 

The Public Health Service Act as amended under the Health Manpower Act 
of 1968 has a provision for loans to pharmacy students enrolled in the profes- 
sional pharmacy curriculum. The School of Pharmacy is participating in this 
program of assistance to qualified full-time students in good standing who 
document financial need and are seeking an education leading to an under- 
graduate degree in pharmacy. 

Individual loans up to $2,500 a year may be made and are repayable 
after graduation. The borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to the 
repayment in accordance with Federal regulations and policies governing 
this loan program. 

Interest rate on all loans made after June 30, 1969, will be at the uniform 
rate of three percent per year. 

Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation 

Loans up to $1000 per year are available from many Maryland banks to 
deserving students who are residents of the State of Maryland and who have 
been accepted for enrollment or who are in good standing. Maximum interest 
on such loans is 7% simple and repayment begins the first day of the tenth 
month after the student leaves school. 



I 




Graduate research in indusfriai pharmacy leads to im- 
proved drug products for the patient's use at the hospital 
bedside or in the patient's home. 




22 / School of Pharmacy 



Graduate Prosram 



Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of 
the University. For detailed infornnation, write: Office of the Dean, School of 
Pharmacy, 636 W. Lombard St., Baltimore, Md., 21201, and also see the 
catalog of the Graduate School. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Matriculation Fee $ 1 0.00 

Tuition — Per Credit 

Residents of Maryland 38.00* 

Non-Residents 48.00* 

Maryland Teacher 34.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee 4.00 

Continuous Registration Fee 10.00 

Special Fee — (Full-time) 1 2.50 

Student Health Fee — (Full-time) 5.00 

Student Health Fee — (Part-time) 2.00 

Student Union Fee — (Full-time) 15.00 

Student Union Fee — (Part-time) 3.00 

Hospital Insurance —(Full-time) Optional 

**Student Health Care Program - Individual 38.16*** 

Dormitory Fee 215.00 

Late Registration Fee, Charged on and after September 1 . . . 20.00 
Change Fee, Charged for each change in program after 

Sept. 9 5.00 

Graduate students may drop a course v/ithout penalty during the first 
eight weeks of classes. 
Graduation Fee: 

Masters Degree 1 0.00 

Doctoral Degree 50.00 

(A late application fee of $10.00 will be assessed against students who foil 
to apply for graduation no later than the third week of the semester or the 
second week of the Summer Session.) 

Full-time Registration 9 or more credits 

Maximum Credit Registration 15 credits 



*The $38.00 rate applies to all students enrolled in the Graduate School without regard 
to the location at which the course is given and will apply to audited courses as well as 
courses taken for credit. Non-resident graduate students are assessed at the rate of $48.00 
per semester hour each semester. 
**Hospital insurance is required of all full-time students (9 or more semester hours). EachI 
students must produce certified proof of such membership at the time of registration. 
***Subject to change. ■ 



University of Maryland / 23 

PROFESSORSHIPS. GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 
AND LECTURESHIPS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharmacology 

Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927 a sum of money to establish a professorship of pharmacology. The 
first appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. Marvin R. Thompson was 
designated Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. The chair was subsequently 
held by the late Dr. Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. Ichniowski, the 
present incumbent, was appointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceuiical Educafion Fellowships 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers annual fellow- 
ships of up to $1800.00 for single persons or up to $2400.00 for married 
individuals who are promising graduate students desirous of doing research 
in pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacognosy; 
students may also apply for an additional allowance up to $600.00 for 
tuition, fees, and supplies. These fellowships are open only to citizens of the 
United States. Address applications directly to the American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education, 777 Fourteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20005, between February 15 and March 15 for consideration for the forth- 
coming September. 

The H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellowship 

The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a distinguished alumnus of the School of 
Pharmacy, former associate professor of chemistry and prominent manufactur- 
ing pharmacist of Baltimore, bequeathed a sum of money to endow a re- 
search fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship, previously sup- 
ported annually since 1930 by contributions from Dr. Dunning, is open to 
promising graduate students interested in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Centenn/o/ Research Fund Fellowships 

At the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected to provide two fellowships 
for research studies in the following fields: pharmacy, pharmaceutical 
chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

The selection of candidates for these fellowships will be made by the 
Faculty Assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Andrew G. Dumez Memorial Lectureship 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lectureship was endowed by Mrs. Andrew 
G. DuMez as a memorial to her late husband, Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, dean of 
the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy from 1926 to 1948. The re- 
cipient of the lectureship is selected by a joint committee of the members of 
the faculty and student body of the School of Pharmacy, and is a distinguished 



24 I School of Pharmacy 

leader in pharmacy or the related health professions. The lectureship is held 
at the beginning of the academic school year. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition and laboratory fees and carrying 
a stipend of $2800 or $3360 per year for a ten or twelve month appointment, 
are available to qualified students giving laboratory and teaching services 
to the department in which they serve. This service will consist of assisting in 
the undergraduate labs and teaching services. Such assistants can usually 
carry two-thirds of the normal graduate work. The stipend for Teaching 
Assistants is $3100 for the second year (or beyond) and $3300 for those 
who have been admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. Applications for 
assistantships should be made directly to the department in which the appli- 
cant will study. 



HOSPITAL PHARMACY RESIDENCY 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy offers a combined Grad- 
uate Residency Program in Hospital Pharmacy leading to the Master of 
Science degree and a Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. Ap- 
pointments to the residency are for a period of two academic years beginning 
each July 1 . During the academic year, the resident divides his time between 
the hospital and graduate study. Full time training in the hospital is required 
during the summers. 

Applicants must be graduates of accredited colleges or schools of phar- 
macy and have all prerequisites for admission to the Graduate School. 

The School of Pharmacy currently cooperates with three hospitals, i.e., 
the University of Maryland Hospital, Maryland General Hospital and The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. Each hospital offers a yearly stipend: 

U. of Md. Md. Gen. Hopkins 

1st year $8,200* $9,000 $8,500 

2nd year $9,000* $9,500 $9,500 

For graduate school application, please contact the Director, Institutional 
Pharmacy Programs, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy. For ap- 
plication forms for the individual residency programs, please contact the 
appropriate Director of Pharmacy Service. 

Applications should be submitted as early as possible in the academic 
year as only a limited number of applicants can be accepted. 



''Tuition and laboratory fees are waived at this institution. 



Universify of Maryland / 25 



Academic Resulations 



GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of Maryland grading system: 



Grade 


Interpreiation 


Point Value 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


c 


Fair 


2 


D 


Poor but passing 


1 


F 


Failure 





1 


Course work incomplete Replaced by definite 






grade when course 






requirements have 






been met 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the grade-point average for the 
semester's work. This average is found by multiplying the grade received 
by the number of credit hours the course carries. 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only the grades earned in those courses 
taken in residence at the University of Maryland are considered. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given throughout the semester at the dis- 
cretion of the instructor. Final examinations are held at the end of each 
semester as scheduled on the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final examinations must report to the Dean 
immediately. When the absence is justifiable, the Dean will grant permission 
for a deferred examination. 

ACADEMIC WARNINGS 

Each student is assigned to a class advisor who counsels him on his 
academic standing. 

Academic warnings are sent only when a student's work is sufficiently poor 
as to cause serious doubt of his ability to pass a course. Warnings may be 
sent out anytime during the first 10 weeks of school. The Dean's office will 
mail the warning to the student. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. It is to be given only to a student 
whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of 



26 I School of Pharmacy 

illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been unable to com- 
plete the requirement. Whenever the mark I is used the instructor enters on 
the class card a reason of the character stated above with an estimate of the 
quality of the student's work. In cases when this mark is given the student 
must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the next 
semester in wfiich that subject is again offered or the mark I becomes F. 

All I marks must be completed before the student will be permitted to 
enter the Fifth Year of the program. 

REMOVAL OF D OR F GRADE 

If G course is retaken at the University of Maryland because of an original 
mark of D or F, the final mark will be substituted for the mark already 
recorded. Although the final mark received in the course will be used in 
determining credit for promotion and graduation, it does not apply to honors 
and awards. See applicable section under "Honors and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the dean to repeat the course, or its 
equivalent, at another university or college, the regulations applicable to 
transfer of credit apply. Credit is given if the course is completed with a 
grade of C (2.0) or higher; for purposes of computing grade overages, 
transfer credit is considered as the equivalent of a grade of C(2.0). 

A student receiving an F grade in any course and if not successful in raising 
his grade after repeating the course once, will be required to withdraw from 
the School of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student may be permitted with 
the written permission of the Dean and the head of the department giving 
the course to repeat the course for the second time. Such permission can be 
given to the student for only one course. 

REGULATIONS FOR PROMOTION AND PROBATION 

All students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade average of not 
less than C (2.0). Any student who fails to maintain this average will be 
placed on probation during the next semester. Students in the fifth year 
class must maintain a grade average of C (2.0) to become eligible for 
graduation. 

Students who fail one or more courses will be subject to being placed on 
probation or academically dismissed, dependent on an academic review 
of their record by the Faculty, of the School of Pharmacy. 

Any student who has been on probation for two semesters and then obtains 
a probation grade point average for a third semester shall be automatically 
dropped at the end of that semester. 

Any student who is dismissed from the School of Pharmacy is required to 
report to the Dean's Office for dismissal procedures. 



Universify of Maryland / 27 

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION OF STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student who has been dropped for poor academic standing may apply 
in writing to the dean for readmission. 

Any student who is readmitted shall be placed on probation for that 
semester. Any student who has been dropped for poor academic standing 
may be readmitted only once. 

REGULATIONS FOR REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules and regulations, the Faculty As- 
sembly of the School of Pharmacy shall act as the final Board of Review. 
Any student may apply in writing to the Faculty Assembly for a reconsideration 
of his particular case. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcripts of scholastic records may obtain 
them from the Registrar upon written request, provided the student's financial 
obligation to the University has been satisfied. 

WITHDRAWALS FROM SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
AT BALTIMORE 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the University for 
any cause at any time during the academic year, he should secure an appli- 
cation for withdrawal from the Dean's Office, obtain the proper signature 
as indicated on the form and file it in the Registrar's Office. Withdrawal is 
not official, as far as refunds and grades are concerned, until the form is 
filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

Minors may withdraw only with the written consent of parent or guardian. 

A student withdrawing from the University during the first eight weeks of 
class should be given a grade of "WX" in his courses. A student withdrawing 
after this time shall receive a grade of "WP" in each course in which his 
work has been passing and a grade of "WF" in any course in which his work 
has not been passing. A student withdrawing after the last day of instruction 
shall be given a grade of "F" in any course in which he has not been doing 
passing work. 

CHANGE IN REGISTRATION 

(DROP AND/OR ADD COURSES) 

A student may drop a course without an "F" grade during the first three 
weeks of classes with the approval of the student's advisor and Dean. A 
student may drop a course without an "F" grade after the third v/eek of 



28 I School of Pharmacy 

classes only upon written approval of the Dean. Such authorization shall be 
granted by the dean only under extraordinary circumstances; unsatisfactory 
scholarship in itself will not be considered an extraordinary circumstance. 

Changes in registration are not official until the form is filed in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

A fee of $5.00 is charged for changes made after the first week of classes. 

Courses may not be changed from credit to audit after the third week of 
classes. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all 
charges, less the application and matriculation fee in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Third week 60% 

Fourth week 40 % 

Fifth week 20% 

After five weeks 




\ 



/ 







M 



Increasing number of women ore choosing pharmacy as 
a career, both at the undergraduate and graduate level. 



30 I School of Pharmacy 



Student Life 

HOUSING 
Women 

A limited number of women may obtain housing accommodations in the 
Louisa Parsons Hall, 622 West Lombard Street, and the Baltimore Union 
Building, 621 W. Lombard Street, which are in close proximity to the School 
of Pharmacy. They offer comfortable living accommodations and are under 
the general supervision of the Office of Student Life. For particulars, write: 

Resident Manager 
Parsons Hail 

622 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Housing accommodations are available for men in the Baltimore Union, 
621 W. Lombard Street. For particulars, write: 

Manager's Office 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



DISMISSAL 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of 
a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholar- 
ship or professional ability; whose continuance in the University would be 
detrimental to his or her health, or the health of others; or whose conduct 
is not satisfactory to the authorities of the University. 



PARKING 

The expansion program for the Baltimore campus places a premium on 
space for parking on University lots. Student use of parking facilities on a 
temporary basis in certain designated University areas is contingent upon 
the availability of space. 



1 



Universify of Maryland / 31 



Student Organizations 
(Baltimore Campus) 

S+udenf Government Alliance 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an organi- 
zation of undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding in 
the internal administration of the School for organizing all extra curricular 
programs and activities of the student body and for coordinating these pro- 
grams and activities with those of the faculty and administration to foster 
mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive Council of the Student 
Alliance is composed of the president of the Student Government Alliance, 
presidents of the respective classes and one delegate elected from each 
undergraduate class. 

American Pharmaceutical Association and Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association Student Chapter 

The purpose of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest 
and more liberal manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as 
a profession in accordance with the objectives stated in the Constitution of 
these two Associations, especially in fostering educaton in matters involving 
pharmacy in all of its branches and its application and aiding in promoting 
the public health and welfare. 



32 I School of Pharmacy 



Student Health 



The Baltimore campus of the University maintains a Student Health Service 
for a fee of $10.00 per annum, payable at registration in September. A 
student's wife or child, or other members of his family, are not eligible for 
health care service unless the wife, too, is a student and has paid the fee 
for herself. At the beginning of the entering year, each student will be given 
a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is located on the first floor of Howard 
Hall (660 W. Redwood Street), and is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. When the office is closed, students may report to the 
emergency room of the University of Maryland Hospital, if absolutely neces- 
sary. 

If this is a true emergency the Health Service will pay the emergency room 
fee. Otherwise, the student will be billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue Cross hospitalization insurance, or 
its equivalent. In addition, it is recommended that all students be covered by 
Blue Shield, or its equivalent, to cover physicians' and surgeons' fees. 

Additional information regarding the Student Health Service may be ob- 
tained in the Office of Administration of the School of Pharmacy. 



I 



University of Maryland / 33 



Honors and Awards 



University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more than 
one-fifth of the graduating class in each college, including the School of 
Pharmacy. The honors designations are listed in the commencement program 
and are recorded on the recipients' diplomas. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two 
academic years of resident work at Baltimore applicable to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy with an average of B (3.0) or higher. Those 
in the first tenth of the class will graduate with High Honors and those in the 
second tenth of the class, with Honors. 

The Dean's Honor List 

The dean publishes at the end of each semester a list of those students who 
have maintained an average of "B" or better during the semester. Students 
whose names appear on the list both semesters receive the School's Academic 
Medal at the School of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a stu- 
dent repeats more than one course in any year, both grades earned for 
these courses will be averaged in determining grade point standing. 

Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity 

The University of Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a notional fraternity 
for honor students in all branches of learning, was established at the Univer- 
sity in 1920. Qualified students at the School of Pharmacy are eligible by 
invitation to join this honorary fraternity at the end of the first semester of 
their third year. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, was 
established at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of 
this organization are granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are 
members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the Society is based on high attain- 
ment in scholarship, character, personality and leadership. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general aver- 



34 I School of Pharmacy 

age, provided that this average is not below the grade of "B." Certificates 
of Honor are awarded to the three students having the next highest general 
averages, provided these averages do not fall below the grade of "B." 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the fourth 
year class having the highest general averages, provided these averages do 
not fall below the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered 
in awarding these honors. 

The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for 30 years a professor of chem- 
istry in the School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by the 
Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the field of practical and analytical 
chemistry. The recipient must stand high in all subjects. In recommending 
a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is guided in his judgment 
of the student's ability by observation and personal contact as well as by 
grades. 

The Andrew G. Dumez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy 
at the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez has provided a gold medal 
to be awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy for superior proficiency in phar- 
macy. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded an- 
nually by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in practical and 
dispensing pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
extended to him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the 
income from which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to the fifth 
year student who has done exceptional work throughout the course in phar- 
macognosy. 

The Wagner Pharmaceufical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late son, 
Mr. Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Sadie 
S. Wagner and her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill, have provided a fund 
the income of which is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a fifth 
year student for meritorious achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 



Universily of Maryland / 35 



)avid Fink Memorial Prize 



In memory of David Fink, Class of '24, Mr. Samuel I. Raichlen gives a new 
Jnited States Dispensatory as a prize to the fifth year student recommended 
)y the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in the general practice of pharmacy. 

\lpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta 
Dmega Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded annually to the fifth year 
tudent chosen by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in pharmacology. 

•psilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter of the Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority pro- 
ides annually a prize which is awarded to the fifth year student selected by 
he Faculty Assembly for outstanding proficiency in pharmacy administration. 

ohn F. Wannenwetich Memorial Prize 

In memory of her late brother, Dr. John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished 
ilumnus of the School of Pharmacy, Miss Mary H. Wannenwetsch has pro- 
'ided a fund, the income of which is to be used for a prize to be awarded 
the graduating student majoring in general pharmacy who has exhibited 
jxceptional performance and promise in the practice of community phar- 
nacy. 

fxfra Curricular Awards 

Students who have given freely of their time for the betterment of the 
Ichool in extracurricular activities receive extracurricular keys at the School 
>f Pharmacy Convocations. 

Ir/sfo/ Laboratories, Inc. Award 

A copy of Gould's Medical Dictionary is made available by Bristol Labor- 
itories. Inc., to the fifth year student who has contributed the most to phar- 
nacy through his extracurricular activities. 

Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists Award 

The Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists provides on award to the 
Ifth year student who shows superior aptitude in the area of hospital phar- 
nocy. 

^erc/c Award 

Merck & Company, Inc., Rahway, New Jersey, offers a set of valuable 
eference books to the fifth year student who attains a high standing in 
Dharmacy or pharmaceutical chemistry. 



I 




Clinical pharmacy improves pafienf care through a closer 
coordination of health services by all members of the 
h&alth care team. 



University of Maryland / 37 



Professional Curriculum 



.CADEMIC SESSIONS 

The School calendar operates on a three term basis. The Fall Term is 
)ur months in length and is completed prior to the Christmas recess. The 
/inter Term is one month (January) in length. Its purpose is to allow students 
) avail themselves of tutorial services or elective courses on the Professional 
r UMBC campuses of the University. The Spring Term, four months in length, 
egins during the first week in February. 



)RGANIZATION OF THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The three year professional program as offered on the Baltimore campus 
□s been divided into two parts; the first two years of the program being a 
asic science sequence, and the final year primarily clinical in design. By 
ividing the program in this manner it is hoped that students, upon completion 
f the two year basic science program, will make career option selections 
hich will enable them to move into the final professional year to receive 

B.S. in Pharmacy and fulfill requirements for licensure, or move into a 
roposed Doctor of Pharmacy program. 

The clinical year consists of six months of professional experience or 
inical clerkship (14 credits) plus 9 credits of required course work and 11 
edits of professional electives. The required course work includes courses 
I therapeutics, pharmacy practice, and clinical toxicology. The six months 
f professional experience is divided into three months of required time 
lus three months of elective time. The three month required clerkship is 
ivided equally between community pharmacy, institutional pharmacy, and 
lerapeutics and patient care. The final three months are elective in that 
rea that the student desires to follow as a career. The community practice 
jgment will be served in a community pharmacy under a preceptor who 
as faculty rank as a clinical instructor in the School. This pharmacist is 
elected by the School and his practice must achieve certain requirements to 
e accepted. The student follows a structured program in the preceptor's 
ractice, and his performance is evaluated by both the preceptor and the 
chool. The institutional practice centers around distributive functions in 
ospitals ranging from the University of Maryland Hospital and The Johns 
opkins Hospital to community hospitals throughout the State. The segment 
f therapeutics and patient care is hospital experience time in patient care 
reas. Students will be involved in developing drug histories of patients, 
verseeing drug adminstration to the patient, noting adverse drug reactions, 
oing on rounds with medical staff, providing drug information to the phy- 
cian, and other specialized conference activities. This program is under 
le supervision of the clinical pharmacy service which has been established 



k 



38 I School of Pharmozy 

in the University Hospital. Other patient care areas would involve the counsel- 
ling of patients in the out-patient clinic, the dental clinic, and other patient 
care facilites in Baltimore. Completion of the professional experience program 
will be accepted by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the intern- 
ship requirements necessary for licensure. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 



Title and Number of Course 


Hours/Week J 






Lee. 


Lob. Cred. 




THIRD YEAR 






¥q\\ Term 








MCHM 331 


Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis 




3 4 


MCHM 431 


Biochemistry 1 




3 


PCOL 331 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 




3 4 


PHAR 331 


Introduction to Pharmacy and Health Care 




- 1 


PHAR 333 


Basic Pharmaceutics 1 




3 4 

16 



Winter Session 



Spring Term 

MCHM 432 

PCOG 332 

PCOL 332 

PHAR 334 

PADM 332 



No courses offered 



Biochemistry II 

Pharmaceutical Microbiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
Basic Pharmaceutics II 
Drug Marketing 



Universify of Maryland / 39 



Title ond Number of Course 



Hours/Week 
Lcc. Lab Cred 



Fall Term 

CMSC 498 

PCOG 343 

PCOG 441 



FOURTH YEAR 

Introduction to Biostatistics and Computer 

Methodology 
Pharmaceutical Microbiology II 
General Pharmacognosy I 



Principles of Drug Action I: 



MCHM 441 
PCOL 441 
PHAR 441 



Winter Session 
Optional Elective: 
PCOG 440 



Chemistry of Medicinal Products I 
Pharmacodynamics I 
Biopharmaceutics 



3 

4 
3 

18 



Community and Environmental Health 



Spring Term 

PCOG 442 

PADM 340 

PADM 342 

PHAR 344 



General Pharmacognosy II 

Social Sciences in Pharmacy 

Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 

Introduction to Drug Products and Dispensing 



2 


3 


3 


2 


- 


2 


3 


- 


3 


Var. 


Var. 


1 



Principles of Drug Action II: 



MCHM 


442 


PCOL 


442 


(Eiectives) 




PHAR 


342 


PADM 


344 



Chemistry of Medicinal Products II 
Pharmacodynamics II 



Applied Calculus 

or 
Pharmacy Management 



4 - 4 

3 - 3 

17orl8 



40 I School of Pharmacy 
Title and Number of Course 



Hours/Week* 
Lee. Lab. Cred. 



FIFTH YEAR 
Summer Term (June-August) 

Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 



PHAR 360 
PHAR 361 


Community Practice 1 
Institutional Practice 1 


- 


2 
- 2 


Fall Term 








Required Courses: 








PHAR 461 
PHAR 450 
PCOL 451 


Therapeutics 
Pharmacy Practice 
Clinical Toxicology 


8 
4 
4 


- 4 

- 2 
2 


Electives (Select one): 






PHAR 454 
PADM 351 
MCHM 453 


Institutional Pharmacy 1 

Community Pharmacy Management II 

Physical Chemistry 1 


4 
4 
6 


- 2 

2 
3 



PHAR 


362 


PHAR 


368 


PHAR 


369 


PHAR 


378 


PHAR 


363 



Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) (November-January) 
(Select two courses in three month period) 

Therapeutics and Patient Care I 
Community Practice II 
Institutional Practice II 
Therapeutics and Patient Care II 
Special Studies 



Total credits for Fall Term 

Winter Term (January) 

OPTIONAL ELECTIVE 
PCOG 440 Community and Environmental Health 



lOorll 



4 
2 
2 
2 
2 

4or6 
18-21 



* Hours/Week for two months (September & October) 



Universiiy of Maryland / 4 1 



Tifle and Number of Course 



Hours/Week* 
Lee. Lab. Cred. 



Spring Term 



PHAR 460 



REQUIRED COURSE 
Pharmacy and Therapeutics Colloquium 



PHAR 


451 


PHAR 


452 


PHAR 


455 


PHAR 


462 


PADM 


352 


PADM 


354 


PCOG 


452 


PCOL 


452 


MCHM 


420 


MCHM 


455 


PHAR 


457 


PHAR 


351 


PHAR 


352 


PHAR 


451 


PHAR 


452 


PHAR 


453 


PHAR 


456 


PADM 


352 


PADM 


452 


PCOG 


454 


PCOL 


352 


MCHM 


451 


MCHM 


452 


PHAR 


458 



ELECTIVES (Select Minimum of Nine Credits 
Sec. A (February-March) 

Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulation and 

Compounding 
Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulation and 

Compounding Laboratory 
Institutional Pharmacy II 
Pharmacy and The Health Care System 
Community Pharmacy Management III 
Drug Abuse Education 
Antibiotics 

Principles of Toxicology 
Instrumental Methods of Pharmaceutical 

Analysis 
Physical Chemistry II 
Special Problems I 



Sec. B (April-May) 

Parapharmaceuticals 
History of Pharmacy 
Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulation 

and Compounding 
Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulation 

and Compounding Laboratory 
Cosmetics and Dermatological 

Preparations 
Cosmetics and Dermatological 

Preparations Laboratory 
Community Pharmacy Management III 
Institutional Pharmacy Management 
Diagnostic and Clinical Microbiology 
Contemporary Non-Medical Drug Use 

and Abuse 
Intermediate Organic Chemistry 
Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory 
Special Problems II 



Var 



- 


6 1 




2 




2 




2 




-lto3 




2 




6 3 




6 3 




3 


~ 


Var. 2 


4 


2 


2 


1 


4 


2 


- 


6 1 


4 


2 


_ 


6 1 


4 


2 


6 


3 


4 


6 3 


4 


2 


4 


2 


- 


6 1 


- 


Var. 2 



42 / School of Pharmacy 

Title and Number of Course Hours/Week* 

Lee. Lab. Cred. 



Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

Sec. A (April-May) Sec. B (February-March) 

(Select Two Courses) 



PHAR 


362 


Therapeutics and Patient Care 1 


PHAR 


368 


Community Practice II 


PHAR 


369 


Institutional Practice II 


PHAR 


378 


Therapeutics and Patient Care II 


PHAR 


363 


Special Studies 



.1 



- 2 

- 2 

- 2 

- 2 

4or6 
Total Credits for Spring Term 14-16 

Minimum total credits for fifth year 34 

* Hours per week for two months. 

Minimum total requirements for completion of professional program (3 years) = 102 credits 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

The Faculty Assembly reserves the right to make at anytime, such changes In the 
curriculum as may be found necessary or desirable. 




Faculty Members in Pharmacognosy conduct research to 
isolate and identify the various active principles found 
in naturally occurring drugs. 



44 I School of Pharmacy 

Courses of Instruction 

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (MCHM) 

Professor: Zenker (Chairman) 

Associafe Professors: Krikorian, Leslie 

Assisfanf Professors: G. Wright, J. Wright 

Adjuncf Staff: Professor Von Korff, Assistant Professor Mader 

MCHM 331. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis. (4) 
Third year, fall term, three lectures, one laboratory. 

A study of the principles of quantitative analysis with special emphasis on techniques 
applicable to the separation and analysis of compounds and products of pharma- 
ceutical interest. 

For Advanced Uridergraduafes and Graduates 

MCHM 420. Instrumental Methods of Pharmaceutical Analysis (3) 

Two lectures, one laboratory, spring term. 

Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis. 

A Survey of electrometric, spectroscopic, and chromatographic methods of chemical 

analysis as applied especially to the analysis of materials of pharmaceutical interest. 

Basic principles and applications of the various techniques will be stressed so that the 

student will gain an appreciation of the scope and utility of the methods discussed. 

MCHM 431. 432. Biochemistry I and II. (3, 3) 

Fall term, three lectures; spring term, two lectures, one laboratory. 

Prerequisite: 1 year of organic chemistry. 

Physical and chemical properties of the components of living systems and of the 

metabolic processes in health and disease. 

MCHM 435. Clinical Chemistry. (2) 
One lecture, one laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 1 year biochemistry. 

A discussion of the metabolic background and physiological significance of the 
methods of clinical chemistry. The laboratory will demonstrate traditional and modern 
methods of clinical analysis. 

MCHM 441. 442. Chemistry of Medicinal Products I and II. (3, 2) 
Fall term, three lectures; spring term, two lectures. 
Prerequisite: 1 year organic chemistry. 

A survey of chemical properties, structure activity relationships and metabolism of 
organic medicinal products. 



t' 



Universify of Maryland / 45 

MCHM 451. Intermediate Organic Chemistry. (2) 
Four lectures (*), spring term. 
Prerequisite: 1 year organic chemistry. 
Discussion of modern organic reactions and synthetic methods. 

MCHM 452. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory (can only be taken concurrently with MCHM 451) spring term. Labor- 
atory practice in synthetic techniques and organic analysis. 

MCHM 453. 455. Physical Chemistry I and II. (3, 3) 
Fall and spring term. Six lectures per week for two months. 
Prerequisite: Calculus. 

I. An Introduction to Thermodynamics. The laws of thermodynamics and their appli- 
cation to chemical and phase equilibria, surface chemistry, and electrochemistry 
will be discussed. 

II. An Introduction to Kinetics and Quantum Mechanics. 

For Graduafes 

MCHM 741. Physical Organic Basis of Medicinal Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures, fall term. 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry, MCHM 451. 

A discussion of atomic structure, bonding, resonance, kinetics and mechanisms of 

organic reactions; stereochemistry and conformation analysis. 

MCHM 769. Topics in Structure Activity Relationships. (2) 
Two lectures, spring term, odd years. 
Prerequisites: MCHM 441, 442, 741. 

Discussions of drug-receptor interactions, and of the known chemicol factors which 
mediate drug action, including a discussion of the current quantitative concepts of 
structure activity relationships in Medicinal Chemistry. 

MCHM 773. Biological Kinetics. (2) 
Fall term, even years. 
Prerequisite: MCHM 455. 

Kinetics of complex systems applicable to drug distribution, medicinal and metabolic 
systems. Derivation of equations, mathematical models and application of experimental 
data to equations and models. 

MCHM 781. Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 
Two lectures, fall term, odd years. 
Prerequisite: MCHM 431, 432. 

A discussion of the design, the mode of action at the enzymatic level, and the meta- 
bolism of biochemical analogs. 

MCHM 783. Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory (can only be taken concurrently with MCHM 781), fall term, odd 

years. 

Laboratory experiments or projects illustrating basic techniques in enzyme methodology, 

including enzyme inhibition in vitro and in vivo. 



(*) Per week for two months 



46 / School of Pharmacy 

MCHM 739. Seminar (1) 
Each semester. 

Required of students majoring in Medicinal Chemistry. 
Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

MCHM 799. Thesis Research (Masters Level), (variable credit) (Staff) 

MCHM 899. Dissertation Research (Doctoral Level), (variable credit) (Staff) 



PHARMACOGNOSY (PCOG) 

Professors: Blomster (Chairman) 

Assistant Professors: Hurley, Rosier 

Instructor: Heinrich 

Adjunct Staff: Professor Shay; Associate Professor Worthley 

PCOG 332. Pharmaceutical Microbiology I. (3) 

Third year, spring term, two lectures and one laboratory. 

Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry and MCHM 431. 

Ths course is designed specifically for pharmacy students and include introductory 

studies on the practical and theoretical considerations of bacteria, molds, yeasts, 

viruses and rickettsiae, sterilization, immunity, epidemiology and disease production. 

PCOG 343. Pharmaceutical Microbiology II. (2) 
Fourth year, spring term, two lectures. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacognosy 332. 

A study of the transmission, treatment, diagnosis, prevention, and etiological agent 
of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, molds, yeasts and rickettsiae. Part 
of the course is devoted to the study of medical parasitology, pathology and parasitic 
infections. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PCOG 411. 412. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. 

Lectures and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis 
placed on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. 

PCOG 421. 422. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 
One lecture and one laboratory. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field work in 
local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

PCOG 440. Community and Environmental Health. (2) 
Eight lectures/week/one month term; Winter term. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. 
A study of the public health facilities in the community; their relationship to the 



Universify of Maryland / 47 

practices of the allied health sciences and their impact on health care, and the 
disease state as well as the role of ecosystems in the health care package. The ap- 
plication of statistical and epidemiological methods to health problems will be ill- 
ustrated through lectures and demonstrations. 

PCOG 441. Pharmacognosy, General I. (3) 
Fourth year, fall term, three lectures. 
Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry, MCHM 431, 432. 

A study of drugs from natural sources with emphasis on the therapeutic, chemical 
and physical properties of purified phytoconstituents and discussion of their economic 
and sociological importance and practical application in pharmacy. Nomenclature, 
history, source, extraction, identification and biosynthesis of carbohydrates, glyco- 
sides, tannins, volatile oils, lipids and enzymes are considered. 

PCOG 442. Pharmacognosy, General II, (3) 

Fourth year, spring term, two lectures and one laboratory. 

A continuation of Pharmacognosy 441, to include alkaloids, resins, hallucinogenic 
plants, harmful plants and certain aspects of allergy and allergenic plants. An in- 
tensive study of antibiotics and immunizing biologicals, discussing their utilization 
and relationship to appropriate infections and pathological diseases, is presented. 

PCOG 452. Antibiotics. (2) 

Four lectures/week/two months; Spring term. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. 

The study of antibiotic substances, history, methods of detection, production, biosyn- 
thesis, mechanism of action, extraction and assay together with the chemical, phar- 
maceutical, and chemotherapeutic properties of these compounds. 

PCOG 454. Diagnostic and Clinical Microbiology. (3) 

Four lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods/week/for two months; spring term. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 442 or special permission of the Instructor. 
Theory and techniques involved in clinical and diagnostic applied microbiology, par- 
ticularly in routine serology, diagnostic microbiology, immunoelectrophoresis, with quality 
control of parenteral solutions and other pharmaceutical preparations with emphasis 
on sterility methods in the unidose concept. 



For Graduafes 

PCOG 811. 812. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural and micro-chemical 
standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of adulterants. Given 
in alternate years. 

PCOG 841. 842. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. 

An in depth study of compounds obtained from natural sources and a discussion of 
modern methods and theories that are useful in the identification of the more 
important phytoconstituents. 



48 I School of Pharmacy 

PCOG 799. Thesis Research (Masters level), (variable credit) (Staff) 

PCOG 899. Dissertation Research (Doctoral level), (variable credit) (Staff) 

PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY (POOL) 

Professors: Ichniowski, Kinnard 
Associate Professors: Blake (Chairman) 

Assisfanf Professors: Brov/n, Buterbaugh, Chapman, Louis-Ferdinand 
Adjunct Staff: Professor Carr; Associate Professors Cascorbi, Freimuth; 
Assistant Professors Barrett, Furth 

PCOL 331. 332. Anatomy and Physiology I and II. (4, 4) 

Third year, three lectures and one laboratory. Fall and spring terms. A comprehensive 
study of structural and functional relationships in the human body with special em- 
phasis on aspects of disease processes and sites of drug action. 

PCOL 352. Contemporary Non-Medical Drug Use and Abuse. (2) 
Fifth year, four lectures/week for two months. 

An in depth discussion of pharmacological, psychological and sociological factors con- 
tributing to contemporary self-administation of drugs. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PCOL 441. 442. Pharmacodynamics I and II. (4, 3) 

Fourth year, three lectures and one laboratory, fall term; three lectures second 

semester. 

A comprehensive study of pharmacodynamics leading to the rational therapeutic 

application of drugs. 

PCOL 451. Clinical Toxicology. (2) 

Fifth year, fall term, four lectures/week for two months. 

Deals with the clinical classes of poisoning and includes pharmacological principles 
in treatment of acute poisoning, mechanism of toxic actions of drugs and household 
products and responsibilities of poison control officer. 

PCOL 452. Principles of Toxicology. (3) 

Fifth year, spring term, four lectures/week for two months, with conferences and 
laboratory projects equivalent to one laboratory. Deals with basic principles of in- 
vestigative toxicology and includes toxic effects on organ, cell and enzyme systems, 
forensic toxicology and toxicity of classes of compounds. 

for Graduates 

PCOL 643. 644. Pharmacodynamics I, II. (5, 4) 

Comprises the lectures of PCOL 441, 442 (For Pharmacy Students) together with 
weekly conferences and special laboratory exercises. 

Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology (PCOL 331, 332) and Biochemistry (MCHM 
431, 432) or equivalent and consent of the course director. 



University of Maryland / 49 

PCOL 601. 602. Advanced Toxicology. (3, 4) 

Prerequisites: Biochemistry (MCHM 431, 432), Physiology (PCOL 331, 332) or equiva- 
lent and consent of the Instructor. 

Lectures with conferences and laboratory experiments dealing with the mechonisms 
of toxicity. A two semester course, either semester may be taken separately. PCOL 
601 (Fall) Clinical and Environmental Toxicology deals with the clinical classes of poi- 
soning and includes the pharmacological principles in the treatment of acute poisoning, 
mechanism of toxic action, toxic interactions, safety testing, chemical carcinogenesis, 
teratogenesis, mutagenesis and pesticides. The conferences and laboratories concern 
the biochemical methods utilized in investigation of drug interactions. PCOL 602 
(Spring) Principles of Investigative Toxicology deals with basic principles of investi- 
gative toxicology which includes toxic effects on organ, cell and enryme systems; for- 
ensic toxicology and the toxicity of classes of compounds. The laboratories cover the bio- 
chemical methods utilized in investigativve toxicology. 

PCOL 707. Principles of Biochemical Pharmacology. (3) 
Offered in alternate years. Two lectures, one laboratory weekly. 

Prerequisites: PCOL 441, 442, MCHM 431, 432 or equivalent and consent of the 
Instructor. 

A theoretical and practical approach to the study of the cellular and sub-cellular 
actions of drugs and the relationship of these actions to the pharmacological proper- 
ties of medicinal agents in the intact organism. 

PCOL 747. Physiological Disposition of Drugs. (3) 

Offered in alternate years. Two hours of lecture weekly and laboratory projects equiva- 
lent to one laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: Physiology (PCOL 331, 332 or equivalent). Pharmacology (PCOL 441, 
442 or equivalent), Calculus and consent of the Instructor. 

A detailed study of the principles of drug transport, distribution, biotransformation, 
binding and excretion with emphasis on quantitative aspects and measurement of 
these processes. 

PCOL 829 A-D. Advanced Pharmacodynamics. (3) 

A coordinated series of four (4) one semester courses involving two (2) hours of 

lecture weekly together with conferences and special laboratory exercises. Offered 

in alternate years. 

Prerequisite: PCOL 441, 442 or equivalent. 

A-Neuropharmocology. B-Autonomic Pharmacology. C-Cardiovasular Pharmacology. 

D-Renal and Endocrine Pharmacology. 

PCOL 858. 859. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (2-4) 

Each semester. Laboratories and conferences. Credit according to the amount of 
work undertaken after consultation with the instructor. 
Prerequisite: PCOL 441, 442 or equivalent. 

PCOL 889. Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. Reports on current literature or research in progress. 

Prerequisites: Consent of the Department staff member designated as responsible for 

seminar. 

PCOL 799. Thesis Research (Masters Level), (variable credit) (Staff) 

PCOL 899. Dissertation Research (Doctoral Level), (variable credit) (Staff) 



50 I School of Pharmacy 

PHARMACY (PHAR) 

Professor: Shangraw (Chairman) 

Associate Professors: Allen, Lamy 

Assistant Professors: Augsburger, Fletcher, Modes, Kushner, Patrick 

Instructors: Kerr, Ross 

Associates: Edmondson, Michocki, Roffman, Walters 

Adjunct Staff: Professor Yolles; Associate Professors Heller, Macek; 
Assistant Professor Sewell; Instructor McKelvey 

Clinical Staff: Professor Woodward; Associate Professors Fox, Rapoport; 
Assistant Professors Austin, Birmingham, Burgee, Burk- 
hart, Derewicz, Fortner, Parisi, Rusche, Seidman, Snyder, 
Standiford, Wentz; Instructors Abarbanel, Baker, Baylis, 
Biaiek, Biasini, Block, Bookoff, Brodeur, Cohen, Connel- 
ly, Conrad, Culp, Dorsch, Elliott, Fedder, Freiman, Hen- 
derson, Johnson, Lachman, tubman, Metz, Mintz, Mor- 
genroth, Mowrey, Padussis, Price, Roth, Rubin, Schwartz, 
Thomas, Tinelli. 

PHAR 331. Introduction to Pharmacy and Health Care. (1) 
Third year, fall term, one lecture. 

An orientation program designed to acquaint students with the role of pharmacy 
together with the other members of the health professions in the delivery of health 
care services — past, present and future. 

PHAR 333. 334. Basic Pharmaceutics I and II. (4, 4) 
Third year, three lectures and one laboratory. 

A study of the basic technology involved in small and large scale production of 
pharmaceutical dosage forms (first semester: solid and semi-solid dosage forms; 
second semester: solutions and liquid disperse systems). It is also designed to in- 
crease the understanding of physical-chemical principles involved in pharmaceutical 
systems and to encourage an appreciation of and ability to apply ingenuity and 
creative thinking to the basic pharmaceutics involved in drug distribution and drug 
intelligence. 

PHAR 344. Introduction to Drug Products and Dispensing. (1) 
Fourth Year, spring term, lecture and laboratory (var.) 

A presentation of the important dosage forms of commercial drug products in each 
pharmacological classification including the procedures involved in the storage, dis- 
pensing, record keeping and the provision of relevant drug information. 

PHAR 351. Parapharmaceuticals. (2) 

Fifth year, spring term, four lectures/week for two months. 

A discussion of prescription accessories and related items to enable the pharmacist 
to act as consultant to members of the health care team and his patients. Emphasis 
will be placed on design, composition, proper use and contraindications. 

PHAR 352. History of Pharmacy. (1) 

Fifth year, spring term, two lectures/week for two months. 

A survey of the history of pharmacy with emphasis on those aspects more 

pertinent to the practice of pharmacy in America and Maryland. 



I 



Universify of Maryland / 51 

>HAR 360. Community Practice I. (2) 
Fifth year, summer 

A required four week professional experience program designed to acquaint the 
pharmacy student with basic concepts of community practice. 

>HAR 361. Institutional Practice I. (2) 
Fifth year, summer. 

A required four week professional experience program designed to acquaint the phar- 
macy student with basic concepts of institutional practice. 

>HAR 362. Therapeutics and Patient Care I. (4) 
Fifth year. 

A required four week professional experience program designed to acquaint the phar- 
macy student with disease states and related therapeutics by involvement in hospital 
patient care. 

'HAR 363. Special Studies. (2) 

Fifth year (by permission of Pharmacy Department). 

An elective four week professional experience in a specialized health care service or 

related area. 

>HAR 368. Community Practice II. (2-6) 
Fifth year (2 credits/ four weeks). 
Advanced professional experience in community practice. 

>HAR 369. Institutional Practice II. (2-6) 
Fifth year (2 credits/four weeks). 
Advanced professional experience in institutional practice. 

>HAR 378. Therapeutics and Patient Care 11. (2-6) 
Fifth year (2 credits/four weeks). 
Advanced professional experience in therapeutics. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

'HAR 441. Biopharmaceutics. (3) 
Fourth year, fall term. 

A study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors which influence drug 
action with an emphasis on the choice of dosage forms and formulation to optimize 
therapeutic effect. 



^HAR 450. Pharmacy Practice. (2) 

Fifth year, fall term, four lectures or discussions/week for two months. A presentation 
of the essential components of specialized areas of study as they apply to pharmacy 
practice, including an analysis of the health professions and the health care system, 
methods of drug distribution and control, radiopharmaceuticals, parapharmaceuticals, 
non-prescription drugs, cosmetics, drug stability packaging and administration. 



52 / School of Pharmacy 

PHAR 451. Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulations and Compounding. (2) 
Fifth year, spring term, four lectures/week for two months. 

A study of the ingredients and techniques involved in the extemporaneous or small 
scale bulk compounding of pharmaceutical formulations utilized in community and 
hospital pharmacy. 

PHAR 452. Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulations and Compounding 
Laboratory. (1) 
Fifth year, spring term, laboratory. 

PHAR 453. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (2) 
Fifth year, spring term, four lectures/week for two months. 

A study of the composition and manufacture of preparations; including cold cream, 
vanishing cream, protective cream, hand lotion, hair tonic, shampoo, face powder, 
dusting powder, lipstick, mascara, toothpaste, deodorants, depilatories, suntan prepara- 
tions, etc. The acid-mantle of the skin and hypoallergenic preparations are also 
emphasized. 

PHAR 454. Institutional Pharmacy I. (2) 

Fifth year, fall term, four lectures/week for two months. 

Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and administration with emphasis 
on hospital and nursing homes. Includes physical facilities, standards, purchasing, 
formulary, record keeping, drug distribution and control systems. 

PHAR 455. Institutional Pharmacy II. (2) 

Fifth year, spring term, four lectures/week for two months. 

A study of the administrative organization of health care institutions and interrelation- 
ship of various units with the pharmacy. Includes, in depth, individual study of one 
particular aspect of institutional pharmacy practice. 

PHAR 456. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations Laboratory. (1) 
Fifth year, spring term, laboratory. 
An elective laboratory correlated with PHAR 453. 

PHAR 460. Pharmacy and Therapeutics Colloquium. (1) 
Fifth year, spring term, two hours/week for two months. 

Discussions of case studies from professional experience program and current develop- 
ments in pharmacy. 

PHAR 461. Therapeutics. (4) 

Fifth year, fall term, 8 lectures/week for two months. 

Introduction to the basic pathophysiology of various disease states and the associated 

drug therapy with emphasis on rationality. 

PHAR 462. Pharmacy and The Health Care System. (2) 
Fifth year, spring term, four lectures/week for two months. 
(Undergraduates with permission of the Instructor.) 

A course designed to familiarize pharmacists with the total health care environ- 
ment; to introduce applicable, analytical and technical skills, such as systems analysis 
and computer science; to identify the various social, political, economic and profes- 



University of Maryland / 53 

sional pressures which are influencing developments in health care and to increase 
the pharmacist's oppreciation of the changes affcctmg the health care system 



For Graduates 

PHAR 601. 602. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1, 1) 
One lecture. Given in alternate years. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, with special reference 
to the origin and development of the works of drug standards and the pharmaceutical 
periodicals. 

PHAR 701. 702. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 
Three lectures. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacy 451. 

A study of manufacturing processes, control procedures and equipment employed 
in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale, including new drug 
applications, patents and the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

PHAR 703. 704. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. 

Prerequisites: PHAR 701, 702, or may be taken simultaneously with PHAR 701, 702. 
Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and important pharmaceuticals 
in large quantities. 

PHAR 705. 706. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. 

A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation of pharmaceuticals 
and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

PHAR 709. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 
Each semester. 

Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and 
surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. 

PHAR 801. 802. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 
Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites: MCHM 453, 455. 
A study of pharmaceutical systems using the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 

PHAR 803. 804. Product Development. [2, 2) 
Two laboratories. 

Prerequisites: PHAR 453, 701, 702, 703, 704. 

A study of the development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable 
for marketing. 



P 



PHAR 799. Thesis Research (Masters Level), {variable credit) (Staff) 
PHAR 899. Dissertation Research (Doctoral Level), variable credit) (Staff) 



54 / School of Pharmacy 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION (PADM) 

Associaie Professors. Knapp, Leavitt (Chairman) 
Lecfurers: Fader, Kaufman 

PADM 332. Drug Marketing. (3) 
Third year, spring term, three lectures. 
Prerequisite: ECON 205, or its equivalent. 

A study of the pharmaceutical industry and the distribution of drug products and 
pharmaceutical services. Special emphasis is placed on the patient and on the institu- 
tions involved in supplying health care to the patient. 

PADM 340. Social Sciences in Pharmacy. (2) 
Fourth year, spring term, two lectures. 

A study of the application of the principles of the social sciences to patient care 
and health care systems. 

PADM 342. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. (3) 
Fourth year, spring term, three lectures. 

Fundamentals of law of importance to pharmacists; federal and state lows and 
regulations pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poison and pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

PADM 344. Pharmacy Management I. (3) 
Fourth year, spring term, three lectures. 

A study of the generation and utilization of accounting information in the management 
of a community or institutional practice. 

PADM 351. 352. Community Pharmacy Management II, III. (2, 2) 
Fifth year, fall and spring terms, four lectures/week for two months. 
Prerequisite: PADM 344. 

A study of the management problems of community pharmacy, including organization, 
staffing, directing, planning and control. 

PADM 354. Drug Abuse Education. (1-3) 
Fifth year, spring term. 

Practice and training in the dissemination of drug information, especially drug abuse 
information to the public. 

PADM 452. Institutional Pharmacy Management. (3) 
Fifth year, spring term, six lectures/week for two months. 

A study of the application of management principles to the institutional environment 
with emphasis on the management systems applicable to the hospital and extended 
care facility pharmacy. 



University of Maryland / 55 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

PHAR 342. Applied Calculus. (4) 
Fourth year, spring term, four lectures. 

An introduction to elements of differential and integral calculus os preparation for 
elementary physical chemistry and the pharmaceutical sciences. 

PHAR 457. 458. Special Problems I and II. (Var.) 
Fifth year. (By permission of Department). 

Independent investigation in the several pharmaceutical sciences, consisting of library 
and laboratory research and seminars. 

CMSC 498. Introduction to Biostatistics and Computer Methodology. (3) 
Fourth year, fall term, three lectures. 
The application of statistics to be biomedical and behavorial sciences. 



56 / School of Pharmacy 



Board of Regents and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

Chairman 

DR. LOUIS L. KAPLAN 

3505 Fallstaff Road, Balfimore 21215 

Vice Chairman 

RICHARD W. CASE 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 17th Floor, One Charles Center, Baltimore 21201 

Secretary 

B. HERBERT BROWN 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 21201 

Treasurer 

HARRY H. NUTTLE 

Denton 21629 

Assistant Secretary 

MRS. ALICE H. MORGAN 

4608 Drummond Avenue, Chevy Chase 20015 

Assistant Treasurer 

F. GROVE MILLER, JR. 

Route No. 1, Box 133, North East 21901 

MRS. MICHAEL J. DEEGAN, JR. 

9939 Good Luck Road, Apartment 204, Seabrook 20801 

GEORGE C. FRY 
Cec/7fon 2197 3 

DR. SAMUEL H. HOOVER 

507 Chadwick Road, Timonium 21093 

EDWARD V. HURLEY 

Commission on Human Relations, Mount Vernon Building, 

701 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 21202 

HUGH A. McMULLEN 

Geppert and McMullen, 21 Prospect Square, Cumberland 21502 

L. MERCER SMITH , 

Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company of Maryland 

320 St. Paul Place, Baltimore 21202 ^ 

DR. EMERSON C. WALDEN 

4200 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore 21229 



University of Maryland / 57 



Officers of the University of Maryland 
At Baltimore 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Wilson H. Elkins 

B A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Lin., Oxford University, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

Albin 0. Kuhn 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

THE PRINCIPAL ACADEMIC OFFICERS 

John J. Salley, Dean, School of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1954. 

John P. Lambooy, Dean, Graduate Studies and Research 

B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1937; M.S., 1938; M.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1942. 

William P. Cunningham, Dean, School of Law 

A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 1948. 

John H. Moxley, III, Dean, School of Medicine 

A.B., 1957, Williams College; M.D., University of Colorado, 1961. 

Marion I. Murphy, Dean, School of Nursing 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., University of Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Dean, School of Pharmacy 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

Daniel Thursz, Dean, School of Social Work and Community Planning 

B.A., Queens College, 1948; M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955; D.S.W., 1959. 

George H. Yeager, Director, University of Maryland Hospital 

B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of Maryland, 1929. 



OFFICERS FOR CENTRAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 

W. Jackson Stenger 

B.A., Washington College, 1949; M.A., Georgetown University, 1959; Ph.D., 1965. 



58 I School of Pharmacy 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 

Roy Borom 

B.A., Wooster College, 1949; M.S.S.A., Western Reserve University School of Applied 
Social Sciences, 1951. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS SERVICES 
Robert C. Brown 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 
Wayne A. Smith 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 
John L O'Neill 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; M.S., George Washington University, 1968. 

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL PLANT 
Robert L. Walton 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938. 

DIRECTOR, STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 
Wilfred H. Townshend 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 1940. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Beth Wilson 
A.B., University of Nebraska, 1930. 

LIBRARIAN AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 
Hilda E. Moore 
B.A., Randolph-Macon Womens College, 1936; B.S., Emory University Library School, 
1937. 

DIRECTOR, HEALTH SCIENCES COMPUTER CENTER 
Robert L. Jones 
A.B., Hiram College, 1958; M.S., Syracuse University, 1961. 



University of Maryland / 59 



University of Maryland 
Central Administration 



President 

Wilson H. Elklns-B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

Vice President For Academic Affairs 

R. Lee Hornboke— B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., 
Ohio State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

Vice President For General Administration 

Walter B. Waet|en — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 
1942; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1951. 

Vice President For Graduate Studies and Research 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr.-B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1941. 

Vice President For Agricultural Affairs 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.-B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 



Officers of The School of Pharmacy 



WILSON H. ELKINS, President 

B.A. University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B. Litt., Oxford University, 1936; D. PhlL, 
1936. 

ALB IN 0. KUHN, Chancellor of the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

WILLIAM J. KINNARD, JR., Dean and Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

CASIMIR T. ICHNIOWSKI, Assistant Dean and Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S. in Pharm., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 

HENRY G. SEIDMAN, Director of Continuing Education 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930. 



60 / School of Pharmacy 



Faculty (1971-1972) 

Emeritus 

NOEL E. FOSS, Dean Emeritus 

Ph.C. and B.S. in Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, 1929; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

Professors 

RALPH N. BLOMSTER, Professor of Pharmacognosy 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1953; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1958; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1963. 

RALPH F. SHANGRAW, Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan, 1959. 

NICOLAS ZENKER, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 

CD. SC. CH., University of Louvain (Belgium), 1948; M.A., University of California, 1953; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

Associate Professors 

BENJAMIN F. ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

DAVID A. BLAKE, >^ssoc/ofe Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

DAVID A. KNAPP, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Administration 
B.S. in Pharm., Purdue University, 1960; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

S. EDWARD KRIKORIAN, JR., Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 

B.Sc. in Chem., Brown University, 1951; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1967. 

PETER P. LAMY, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 
1964. 

DEAN E. LEAVITT, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Administration 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1957; M.B.A., 1964; Ph.D., Purdue 
University, 1968. 

JAMES LESLIE, Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 

B.Sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

Assistant Professors 

LARRY L. AUGSBURGER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., 1965; Ph.D., 1967. 

DAVID A. BROWN, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 

B.S., Cornell University, 1958; M.S., University of California (Berkeley), 1967; D.Sc, Harvard 
University, 1970. 



University of Maryland / 61 

GARY G BUTERBAUGH, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 

B S., Chemistry, Iowa State University, 1965; M.S., University of Iowa, 1967; Ph.D , 1969 

SHARON K CHAPMAN, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 

B.S. in Education, Kansas State College, 1961; Ph.D, University of Florida, 1970. 

H. PATRICK FLETCHER, >4s5/sfonf Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S., Purdue University, 1961; M.S., 1963; Ph.D, 1965. 

BENJAMIN HODES, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S., Union University, 1960; M.S., University of Michigan, 1971; Ph.D., 1972. 

LAURENCE H HURLEY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy 

B.S , Bath Univ. of Technology, England, 1967; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1970. 

HERBERT KUSHNER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

A B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1956; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1960. 

ROBERT LOUIS-FERDINAND, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S., St. Francis College, 1959; M.S., University of Rhode Island, 1969; Ph.D., 1970. 

THOMAS E. PATRICK, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1955. 

KARL-HEINZ ROSLER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Pharmazeutisches Stoatsexamen, University of Munich, Germany, 1956; Dr. rer. not., 
1960. 

GEORGE WRIGHT, Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Illinois; Ph.D., 1967. 

JEREMY WRIGHT, Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 

B.S., University of Manchester, England, 1961; Ph.D., Chelsea College, University of 
London, England, 1965. 

Instructors 

WILLIAM J. HEINRICH, Instructor in Pharmacognosy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1961. 

ROBERT A. KERR, Instructor in Pharmacy 

A.B., University of California (Davis), 1966; Pharm. D., University of California (San 
Francisco), 1970. 

HELEN 0. ROSS, Instructor in Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharm., Howard University, 1965. 

Associates 

WILLIAM H. EOMONDSON, Associate in Pharmacy and Coordinator of Professional Ex- 
perience Programs 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1966, 

ROBERT J. MICHOCKI, Associate in Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1971. 

DAVID S. ROFFMAN, Associate in Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1970. 

J. KENNETH WALTERS, Associate in Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1971. 



62 / School of Pharmacy 

Lecturers 

ALAN H. DORFMAN, Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.A., St. John's College, 1963; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1968. 

JOHN F. FADER II, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1963; LL.B., 1968. 

JOSEPH S. KAUFMAN, Lecturer in Pharmacy Administration 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; LL.B., 1953. 

ADJUNCT STAFF-PROFESSORS 
C. JELLEFF CARR, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
DONALD E. SHAY, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology 
RICHARD W. VonKORFF, Ph.D., Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 
SEYMOUR YOLLES, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 
HELMUT F. CASCORBI, M.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
HENRY C. FREIMUTH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
WILLIAM M. HELLER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
THOMAS J. MACEK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
THOMAS G. WORTH LEY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacognosy 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
CHARLES P. BARRETT, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
MARY S. FURTH, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
WILLIAM J. MADER, M.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Medicinal Chemistry 
WINIFRED SEWELL, B.S. in Library Science, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS 
CORNELIUS P. McKELVEY, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacy 

CLINICAL STAFF-PROFESSORS 
THEODORE E. WOODWARD, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pharmacy 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 
SAMUEL L. FOX, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
MORTON L. RAPOPORT, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
PERRY AUSTIN, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
PATRICK H. BIRMINGHAM, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 



Universify of Maryland / 63 

SYDNEY L BURGEE, JR., B S in Pharm., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

VINCENT DcPAUL BURKHART, B.S in Pharm , Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

HENRY J. DEREWICZ, M.S , Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

CLARENCE L. FORTNER, M.S., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

ALFRED PARISI, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

EDWARD RUSCHE, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

HENRY G. SEIDMAN, Ph.G., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

ROBERT E. SNYDER, B.S., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

HAROLD G. STANDIFORD, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

DENNIS WENTZ, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS (Directors of Institutior^al Pharmacy Services) 
ADOLPH BIASINI, B.S. in Pharm., CVmical Instructor in Pharmacy 
RICHARD J. BRODEUR, B.S. in Pharm., M.S., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
MARY CONNELLY, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
KENT JOHNSON, B.S. in Pharm., M.S., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
DOUGLAS R. MOWREY, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS (Community Pharmacists) 
MORTON ABARBANEL, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
DANIEL BAKER, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
RICHARD BAYLIS, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
SAMUEL BIALEK, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
JEROME BLOCK, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
MORRIS BOOKOFF, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
GERALD COHEN, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
JOHN CONRAD, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
JAMES GULP, JR., B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
JOSEPH DORSCH, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
DONALD ELLIOTT, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
DONALD O. FEDDER, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
PAUL FREIMAN, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
ROBERT HENDERSON, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
MARK LACHMAN, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
RONALD LUBMAN, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 



64 / School of Pharmacy 

RICHARD METZ, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical instructor in Pharmacy 

MARTIN MINTZ, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

VICTOR H. MORGENROTH, JR., B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

ANTHONY PADUSSIS, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

CHESTER L. PRICE, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

EDWARD ROTH, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

MELVIN RUBIN, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

IVRING SCHWARTZ, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

JOHN THOMAS, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

VITO TINELLI, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

ASSOCIATES 
KAREN T. COLLINS, B.S. in Pharm., Clinical Associate in Pharmacology and Toxicology 

Assistant 

* RUTH V. PAPE, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1938. 

Graduate Assistants 

TARIQ ANDREA, Assistant in Medicinal Chemistry 

B.Sc. in Pharm., College of Pharmacy, University of Baghdad, 1967. 

CARROLL D. ARNETT, Assistant in Medicinal Chemistry 
A.B. in Chem., Duke University, 1968. 

HO CHUNG, Assistant in Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S., Wisconsin State University, 1962. 

STEPHEN M. GERARDI, Assistant in Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S., Point Park College, 1971. 

STEPHEN L. HILBERT, Assistant in Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1971. 

ANIL M. SALPEKAR, Assistant in Pharmacy 

Bachelor of Pharm., University of Saugar, India, 1964; M.S., University of Iowa, 1967. 

DAVID R. SAVELLO, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharm., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1968. 

SUSAN L. SMITH, Assistant in Pharmacognosy 
B.S. in Pharm., University of Maryland, 1971. 



* Part-time 



1 



Universiiy of Maryland / 65 



KENNETH S. SUMIDA, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S in Pharm , Albany College of Pharmacy, 1965. 



Healfh Sciences Library 

(Of the more than forty full-time staff members, only heads of departments most closely 
involved in serving the School of Pharmacy are listed.) 

* HILDA E MOORE, A.B., A.B.L.S., Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 
MARGARET M. JONES, A.B., M.S.L.S., Head, Cataloging Department 

CLARICE F. LEE, AS., Head, Circulation Department 

* MARY S. LISTFELDT, B.L.S., Head, Reference Department 
WINIFRED SEWELL, B.S.L.S., Coordinator of Drug Information Services 



* Certified Medical Librarian 



66 I School of Pharmacy 



Alumni Association 



A meeting of the graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, then the Maryland College of Pharmacy, was held on May 15, 
1871. At this meeting there was organized the Society of the Alumni of the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy. This Society continued its separate existence 
as such or as the Alumni Association of the Maryland College of Pharmacy 
until 1907, when the General Alumni Association of the University of Maryland 
was formed. Following the organization of the General Alumni Association, 
the Society remained dormant until June 4, 1926, when it was reorganized 
as the Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land. Each year it is more evident that interest in the Alumni Association is not 
only maintained, but is growing. 



OFFICERS (1971-72) 

Morris L. Cooper (1926) Honorary President 

Anthony G. Padussis (1 944) President 

Ronald A. Sanford (1967) 1st Vice President 

Charles H. Tregoe (1959) 2nd Vice President 

Frank J. Slama (1924) Secretary Emeritus 

Dorothy Lee Levi (1970) Executive Secretary 

H. Nelson Warfield (1924) Treasurer 

Execufive Commitiee (Elected Members) 

Harry R. Wille, (1954), Chairman Charles A. Sandler (1962) 

Mary W. Connelly (1951) Arnold L. Amass (1961) 

Nicholas C. Lykos (1952) David Y. Serpick (1962) 

Marvin I. Goldberg (1965) 

1969-1970 President Harry R. Wille (1954) 

1971-1972 President Harry R. Wille (1954) 



Universify of Maryland / 67 

Graduating Classes, Honors and Awards 

Roll of Graduates— June 5, 1970 

Doctor of Philosophy 
James G. Franklin 
Richard L. Wynn 

Master of Science 
George Keller 



Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Dennis M. Ackerman 

Richard Michael Adier 

Steven Agapis 

Arnold Roy Alperstein 

John Paul Becker 

Pamela Firth Brown 

Stanley Caplan 

Barry Marc Caplis 

Max Cohen 

Sandra Lee Conklin 

Paul Thomas Cuzmanes 

David Mayer Davis 

Patricia Margaret Marns De Michaelis 

George Triplett Dooley 

Jack Harris Freedman 

Thomas Eugene Goelz 

Stanley Walter Gutowski 

Roy Addison Hoff 

David Howard Jones 

Martin Kalmanson 

Nancy Kiang 

Donald Mark Kirson 

Ira Dennis Klein 

Raymond Joseph Krastel 



Thomas Edward Lane, Jr. 
Dorothy Snoops Levi 
Mark Allan Levi 
Michael Luzuriaga 
Leo Anthony Mierzwicki 
Carol Mae Paulick 
George John Pletka, Jr. 
Arthur Norman Riley 
David Sheldon Roffmon 
Ivan Isaac Rotkovitz 
Dana Lynn Scher 
Alan Richard Stoff 
George William Swope 
Karen Lee Thacker 
Eric Walter Von Bergen, Jr. 
Shirley Arlene Weber 
Bernard Allan Weisman 
Frederic Marshall Weiss 
Paul Conrad Welk, III 
Robert Lee West 
Emil Joseph Wiatrak, Jr. 
Joan Patricia Williams 
Kaye Johnson Wolf 
William John Zimmerman 



68 I School of Pharmacy 

Honors (1969-1970) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Carol Mae Paulick 

Certificates of Honor to holders 

of next highest averages Dorothy Lee Levi, 

David Howard Jones, 
Robert Lee West 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) John Paul Becker 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize Carol Mae Paulick 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Thomas Eugene Goelz 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Carol Mae Paulick 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize Paul Thomas Cuzmanes 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize 

(Pharmacy) Thomas Edv/ard Lane, Jr. 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Robert Lee West 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

(Pharmacology) Michael Luzuriaga 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Jack Harris Freedman 

Merck Award (Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Chemistry) .... Dorothy Lee Levi 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc., Award (Extracurricular Activities) . . . Robert Lee West 

Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists Award 

(Hospital Pharmacy) David Sheldon Roffman 

Honorable Mention Dana Lynn Scher 



Universiiy of Maryland / 69 
Roll of Graduates— June 4. 1971 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Avinash M. Contractor 

Eugene M. Johnson 

Hyo Yong Kim 



Master of Science 

Cornelius P. McKelvey 

C. Donald Schott 

Tena Tang 



Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Lee Albin Ahlstrom 
Jurate Valeria Austra 
Thomas Lee Bennett 
David Ross Chason 
Don Alfred Collins 
James Eugene DiPaula 
Dolores Dixon 
Herbert T. Fee 
Catalina Mercedes Franco 
Marsha Ellen Fruchtbaum 
Herbert Gendason 
Jeffrey Carroll Hahn 
Leroy George Hausler 
Stephen Lester Hilbert 
Richard Allan Hodges 
Douglas Miles Kadan 
Margaret Karsch 
Thomas Wendle Kearney 
David Burton Knauer 
Dennis Paul Lee 
Jerry Allen Mason 
Darlene Frances McMahon 
Francis Joseph Mecler 
Robert John Michocki 



Marsha Lynn Miller 
Philip B. Miller 
Martin Terry Paul 
Barry W. Poole 
Douglas Miles Pryor 
Robert Allan Rejonis 
Charles Davis Reynolds 
Michael Collier Roberts 
Mark J. Schocken 
Teri Swan Shewchuk 
Steven Michael Simko 
Ronald Joseph Smith 
Susan Lake Smith 
Ronald Jack Spector 
Joseph Michael Stevenson 
James Louis Ter Borg 
Steven Aaron Tompakov 
Angelo Christopher Voxakis 
Dennis Michael Wagner 
James Kenneth Walters, Jr. 
Marie M. H. Wong 
Norman Ralph Yockelson 
Marina J. Young 



70 I School of Pharmacy 

Honors (1970-1971) 

Gold Medal for General Excellence Ronald Jack Spector 

Certificates of Honor to holders 

of next highest averages Philip Braxton Miller, 

Mark J. Schocken, 
Herbert Tolford Fee 

Andrew G. DuMez Medal (Pharmacy) Joseph Michael Stevenson 

L. S. Williams Practice Pharmacy Prize Ronald Jack Spector 

Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize Susan Lake Smith 

William Simon Memorial Prize (Chemistry) Philip Braxton Miller 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize James Kenneth Walters, Jr. 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Jerry Allen Mason 

David Fink Memorial Prize (Pharmacy) Francis Joseph Mecler 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize 

(Pharmacology) Herbert T. Fee 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize 

(Pharmacy Administration) Joseph Michael Stevenson 

Merck Award (Pharmacy and Medicinal Chemistry) Herbert T. Lee 

Bristol Laboratories, Inc., Award 

(Extra-Curricular Activities) Dennis Paul Lee, 

Martin Terry Paul 
Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists Award 

(Hospital Pharmacy) Marsha Ellen Fruchtbaum 



I 



The seven separate circles represent the six schools 
—dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social 
work and community planning— and the University 
Hospital, The interlocking pattern they form repre- 
sents the total identity of the University of Maryland 
at Baltimore. 



School of Pharmac 



^^^^Irai^Jlffatlaitimore 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201