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Full text of "The Phoenix"

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STOCKTON ARCHIVES 
CUM^UND UNtVERSITy 
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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/phoenix1916cumb 



OKe PHOENIX 

A YEAR BOOK 
I916 



PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 

CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY 

LEBANON, TENNESSEE 




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BENSON 
P R I NTI NG 

COM PANY 




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FOREWORD 



SCENES OF MY YOUTH ! AWAKE ITS SLUMBERING FIRE ! 
YE WINDS OF MEMORY, SWEEP THE SILENT LYRE, 
RAY OF THE PAST, IF YET THOU CANST APPEAR, 
BREAK THROUGH THE CLOUDS OF SENEX' WANING YEAR : 
CHASE FROM HIS HEAD THE THIN AUTUMNAL SNOW, 
AND BRING THOU BACK THE DAYS OF LONG AGO ! 

(Adaptation from Holmes) 



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Board of Tru^ees of Cumberland University 

Andrew B. Martin, LL.D President 

Mr. Amzi W. Hooker Secrelar\) 

Judge Edward E. Beard . . . . " Treasurer 



Class of 1916 



Judge Frank T. Fancher 
Rev. Robt. A. Cody, D.D. 



Sparta, Tenn. 
Meridian, Miss. 



Class of 1917 

Mr. Walter J. Baird Lebanon, Tenn. 

Mr. J. R. Harrison 



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an, 1 enn. 

Class of 1918 

Mr. Selden R. Williams Lebanon, Tenn. 

Mr. John E. Edgerton Lebanon, Tenn. 

Class of 1919 

Mr. James L. Wier Lebanon, Tenn. 

Mr. William M. Cosby Birmingham, Ala. 

Judge Warner E. Settle Frankfort, Ky. 

Class of 1920 

Andrew B. Martin Lebanon, Tenn. 

Judge Edward E. Beard Lebanon, Tenn. 

Mr. Amzi W. Hooker Lebanon, Tenn. 



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DEDICATION 

AS AN EXPRESSION OF OUR HIGHEST APPRECIATION FOR HIS 
NOBLE FRIENDSHIP AND FAITHFUL GENEROSITY, TO WHICH 
CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY OWES A DEBT OF DEEP GRATI- 
TUDE, WE RESPECTFULLY DEDICATE THIS VOLUME TO 

WIKfSTEAD PAINE BONE, A.B., D.D. 



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UNIVERSITY 



Campus Scenes 




BIRD S EYE VIEW OF LEBANON 




CARUTHERS HALL 




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THE HERMITAGE 




BASEBALL GROUNDS 




MAIN BUILDING 




PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



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UNIVERSITY J 





Samuel Andrew Coile, A.M., D.D. 

President 

A.B. Tusculum College; A.M. Tusculum '85; Graduate of Lane 
Seminary '83; Post-Graduate work in University of Chicago; D.D. 
Gail College; six years President of Tusculum College; twenty-six 
years active Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, having held three 
pastorales, Greeneville, Knoxville, and Lebanon. Accepted the Pres- 
idency of Cumberland University March, 1914, and assumed that 
office September, 1914. 



Oscar Newton Smith, A.M. 

Dean of College and Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

A.B. Westfield College, 111., '87; Superintendent of Public Schools 
and Professor of Latin, Sweetwater College ; Graduate work in 
Princeton University ; A.M. ibid. 01 ; Professor of Latin, Penning- 
ton Seminary. N. J.; Instructor of Modern Languages. Princeton 
Summer School; Associate Headmaster, '03. and Master Castle 
Heights. '09. 



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Homer Allin Hill, A.M. 

Professor of Biolo§y and Physics 

Took A.B. from Park College, Mo., '97; A.M. Missouri State '02; 
Graduate work University of Chicago '03; Instructor in Science, St. 
John's Military Academy "04-' 11; Laboratory Assistant at University 
of Chicago '11-'12; Member of Glee Club at University of Missouri, 
University of Chicago, and Cumberland University. 



Walter Hugh Drane, A.M. 

Professor of Malhemaiics and Engineering 

A.B. from University of Mississippi '94; A.M. ibid. '97; Professor 
of Mathematics, Jefferson College '97-'98; Graduate work at Har- 
vard; A.M. Harvard "00; Professor of Civil Engineering at Univer- 
sity of Mississippi '03-'l I ; Dean of Civil Engineering Department 
ibid. 06-1 I ; Professor at Cumberland and Consulting Engineer of 
Lebanon. Member of National Geographic Society. 



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Ernest Looney Stock.to> 

Professor of English 

A.B. Cumberland Universlly '12; LL.B. Cumberland Law Depart- 
ment '13; M.A. ibid. Teacher in Cumberland Preparatory Depart- 
ment four years. 



W. Patton Graham 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B. Emory and Henry; A.M. University of Virginia; Student at 
University of Grenoble; Student at University of Chicago; Professor 
of French in Lynchburg High; Modern Languages, Wesleyan Col- 
lege ; Modern Languages in Mercer University. 



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James Otto Graham 

Professor of Chemisir}) 



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Undergraduate work Leesville College and Clemson ; B.S. 

Clemson '09; Superintendent of Springfield Academy; M.S 

University of South Carolina '13; Instructor in Science, Orangeburg 
College; Chair of Chemistry C. U. '14-'16. 



Sue a. Chenoweth 

Director of School of Expression and Public Speal^ing 

Instructor of Expression, Ml. Olive H. S. and G. P. S., Nashville, 
Tenn., and Grove High School; Instructor in Expression and English, 
Morris Harvey and Martin College; Literary work in Buford Col- 
lege; Curry Course under Mrs. Arthur Ransom; Vanderbilt School 
of Expression 1911. Came to Cumberland 1914. 



Page twenty-four 



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UNIVERSITY 




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Mildred Clare Hungerford 

Professor of Home Economics 

B.S. Lincoln College '13; Student Rockford School of Drafting '14; 
Professor of Home Economics, Buena Vista College '13-' 15. Came 
to C. U. '15. 



Miss Alice Hanger 

Matron of C. U. Dormilor)) 

Matron Savannah '03-'05; Matron Pleasant Hill 
Cumberland University '14-' 16. 



'05-'14; Matron 



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SENIOR 




ASS 



Senior Literary Class 

Class Colors: Dark Blue and Orange Class Flower: Ward Rose 

Motto : Omnia optabilia nitendo obstinenda sunl 

Officers 

Robin Mace President 

Grace Holden yice-Presidenl 

M. S. McGregor Secretary 

Mary Bryan Treasurer 



Page tlvent\/-ntnc 




Paul Livingston Hollister Fairmont, Tenn. 

Graduate Student; Entered C. U. Prep. '10; A.B. '15; Y. M. C. A.: Amasa- 

gassean : Business Manager "Cumberland Weekly" '13-*14; Editor "Plioe- 
nix" '15. 



Walton Alice Alexander Lebanon, Te 

Enter C. L'. Prep. 11; .-V.B. 'If.; Y. W. C. A.; Amasagassean ; Co-ed Bas- 
ketball ■12-'13-14--15. 



John Erskin Beck, 1 A E Smith's Grove, Ky. 

Smith's Grove Institute '12; Enter C. U. '14; Y. M. C. A.; .\masagassean ; 
Football '15. 



Mary Eaton Bryan Lebanon, Tenn. 

Castle Heights School '12; Enter C. U. '13; A.B. 'IC; Y. W. C. A.; Amasa- 
gassean; Secretary Student Body Council '13-'14. 



Clifford Carleton Coile, 1' A E Lebanon, Tenn. 

Castle Heights School 12; Enter C. U. '12; .\.B. '1«; Y. M. C. A.: .Amasa- 
gassean. 



Leonard Speck Coile, 1' A E Lebanon, Tenn. 

Tusculum College '01-'07; C. V. '(|7-'0S; Re-enter C. U. 'l-i; .\.B. 16; 
Y. M. C. A.; Business Manager "Cumberland Weekly" '14-'15. 



Weaver Keith Eubank, Z A E Weatherford, Texas 

Weathel-ford College: Enter C. V. Prep. 'IJ; A.B. 'Iti; Editor "Cumberland 
Weekly" •13-'14: President Y. M. C. A. '14-'15. 

Nancy Grace Holden Wartrace, Tenn. 

state Normal '11-'12: Enter C. I". '11': A.B. 'lO; President Y. AV. r. A. i:.. 

Alexander Lodevyke Johnsonius Paris, Tenn. 

Grove High School lli; Enter C. L'. '12; .\.B. 'IG; Y. M. C. A.; Amasagassean. 

Robin Guthridge Mace, 1' A E Lebanon, Tenn. 

Castle Heights School "12; Enter C. T. '11'; A.B. "IC; President Senior Class. 

James Daniel Martin Ackerman, Miss. 

Enter C. U. Prep. 11; A.B. 'IC; Y. M. C. A.; Amasagassean. 

Mahlon Spencer McGregor, 1 A E Princeton, Ky. 

Princeton High School '12; Enter C. U. '13; A.B., 'IG; President Student 
Body Council '14-'15: Editor "Cumberland Weekly" '14-'15: Manager Base- 
ball 'IS-'lfi; Football '14-'1.5; Basketball '1S-'16; Y. M. C. A.; Amasagassean. 





Joseph Lawrence Milling Philadelphia, Miss. 

Philadelphia High School '10; Entor C. U. '11; A.B. '16; Y. M. C. A.; 
Amasagassean. 



Alliene Gordon Orman New Market, Ala. 

Ntw Market Training School '13; Enter C. U. 'la; A.B. '16; Y. W. C. A.; 
Ainasagassean; Graduate of Conservatory '15. 



Margaret Louise Palmer Lebanon, Tenn. 

Enter C. U. Prep. '11; A.B. 'lli; Co-etl Basketball '13-']4; Y. W. C. A. 



Melville Bliss Rankin 



. Fayetteville, Tenn. 



BoonviUe (Ind.) High School 'OU; Maryvllle College 'Oil-'ia; state Normal 
'13; Enter C. U. 15; A.B. '16; Y'. M. C. A.; .\masagassean; Editor "Phoe- 
nix" 1916. 



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UNIVERSITY 




Doxology of the Senior Class 




N the fall of 1912 there were three classes of 
students who entered Cumberland University. 
The first class were those who had been in the 
Cumberland Preparatory Department, and were already at 
home with the big bugs and the high moguls of the Univer- 
sity. Upon the heels of this class of students came those 
who had just taken their diplomas from some fashionable 
prep school. These were not quite as much at home as 
those of the first class, but felt a great superiority to those 
of the third class. This third class consisted of those poor 
unfortunates who had only attended some country school 
or academy. These students stood around like frightened 
rabbits and heaved sighs of relief when the ordeal of classi- 
fication and matriculation was over. 

This classification, however, did not continue throughout 
the year. In a few weeks there was an entirely different 
basis for classification. Some of all classes were weighed 
in the balance and found wanting. But there were some 
in each class who took up their burdens and pressed on 
toward the goal of 1916. There were again three classi- 
fications. The first class consisted of those who were here 
to get the most out of college life. Then came those who 



considered class distinction the only thing worth striving 
for. After this class came those who were here because 
they had nowhere else to go. We can truthfully say that 
both of the latter classes have fallen by the wayside. We 
are glad that every member of the Class of ' 1 6 is in college 
to get everything possible out of every activity of college 
life. Every member of the class is a live wire and right on 
the jump from the word "GO." 

Some of our number have struggled silently and steadily 
through the four dark and dismal years of undergraduate 
work right here in Cumberland. Others have come in to 
take up the places in our ranks of those who have left us 
for other fields of activity. 

We mourn that in the course of the passing years our 
dear "UNCLE US" was removed from our midst. May 
his memory ever be kept green, and may it be as great an 
inspiration and as great a force for good as was his life. 

We indeed regret that another of our class has been 
forced to leave us when so near the desired goal. We would 
say to him: "May your shadow never grow less." 

And now we must say "FAREWELL." Farewell to 
the schoolmates and friends. May they ever take us as an 



Page thirly-three 



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example. Farewell to the Faculty. May they long con- 
tinue in their work, and may they ever be successful. Last 
of all, we would say "Farewell" to Cumberland — Cumber- 
land with her inspiring associations — Cumberland with her 



high ideals — Cumberland with her history of good and 
noble deeds. May she not only live, but may she grow 
and prosper until every tongue shall sing the praises of 
Cumberland. 




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Colors: Lavender and Pink 



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unior Class 

Officers 



Flon>er : Sweet Pea 



Will White Colvert President Melvin J. Davis Secretary 

George V. Donnell • Vice-Praidcnl Mannie M. Clayton Treasurer 

Members 

Robert L. Bryan Clarence W. Phillips Hubert H. Rogers 

Elizabeth Bryan William R. Neece Elvin Shephard Grace L. Ragland 



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Soph 



omore 



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HE Sophomore Class of 1916 is composed of 
fourteen mtelligent, energetic, moral students. It 
has an excellent record of deportment. "Honest 
Injun," not a one of its members has been in jail for a 
serious offense. It is the cream of the University, for it 
furnishes most of the material for student activities. The 
five head officers of the Y. M. C. A., and the last three 
Presidents of the Amasagassean Literary Society were all 
Sophomores. The Sophomores defeated the Freshmen in 
debate, and came within an ace of defeating the Juniors. 
More could be said of its activities, but time and space are 
not available. 

The Sophomores are always in the thick of the fight. 
Science and art is their daily diet, and brains and poise is 
the result. They have a higher aim than merely making 
life miserable for the faculty and Freshmen. Nothing can 
feaze them, for they possess ready initiative and absolute 



self-confidence. The Sophomore Class holds the record 
for efficiency, punctuality and stickability. The Sophomore 
is efficiently thorough and intensely practical. Sentiment — 
well, sentiment of the sticky variety be hanged ; it has no 
place in his busy life. 

The Sophomore is the happy combination of qualities 
not possessed by the other classmen. He lacks the fearful 
timidity of the Freshman, the somber dignity of the Junior, 
the serious consideration of self of the Senior; therefore, is 
perfectly natural. He is truly an Oliver Twist in the great 
kitchen of knowledge, and has the audacity to be contin- 
ually asking for more information to store up in his ever- 
receptive cranium. 

Sophomores, live up to the best that is in you. There 
is nothing impossible for us. Golden opportunity knocks at 
our door. The world lies at our feet. We are heir of 
the ages. Let us dare, and dare to dare again. 



Members of the Sophomore Class 



Jesse L. Andrews, B.S • . . Watertown. Tenn. 

Ura a. Brocden, A.B Sparta, Tenn. 

Miss Margaret Campbell, A.B Lebanon, Tenn. 

Carloss J. Chamberlin, B.S Lebanon, Tenn. 

Miss Norma Mary Lashlee, A.B Camden, Tenn. 

Lorenzo D. Phillips, A.B Houston, Texas 

Charles W. Price, B.S Lebanon, Tenn. 



Sarah Ann Ransome, A.B Lewisburg, Tenn. 

Carver Donald Russell, A.B Cookeville, Tenn. 

Miss Margaret Terry. A.B Lebanon, Tenn. 

William F. Thweatt, B.S Balesville, Miss. 

Robert C. Sullivan, B.S Martha, Tenn. 

Roy p. Sullivan, B.S Martha, Tenn. 

Olney H. Wright, B.S Ml. Juhet, Tenn. 



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Freshman Class 



Class Florver : Carnation Colors : Lavender and Green 

Motto: B2 (Be square) 

Members 

Martha Bradshaw Earl Hennessee James McSpadden 

Anna Beck Nancy McCord Fred Page John Allison 

Mary Bradshaw Laura Caldwell Granville Freeman 

JuDsoN Bryan 

Hartsel Burns 

Benton Carlin 

Claud Campbell 

Leslie Cummins 

MuRRY Davis 

Oscar Gentry 

Porter Hamblin 

James Shannon 

W. F. Smith Sara Ransom Kate Turner 

B. R. Parks Lalla Smith A. F. Stratton 

Calvin Wallace 

Virgil Turner 

Julian Upton 

LiLLiE Upton 

Marie Weeks 

Ridley Wright 

Hattie Young 

• OSTEEN 

Mason 

Marbury Logan 



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FACULTY PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



Page forty 



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UNIVERSITY 



Faculty Preparatory Department 



Ernest L. Stockton 

Principal and Instructor in English 

A.B. Cumberland 1913; LL.B. ibid., 1914; Principal Lisbon 
School, Lisbon, Tenn.; Instructor Newbern High School, New- 
bern, Tenn; for three years Instructor in English and History 
Cumberland University Preparatory School. 



John A. Hyden 

Assistant Principal and Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B. Maryville College 1914. For two years instructor in 
Mathematics Cumberland University Preparatory School. 

Mary E. Bryan 

Instructor in German and Latin 
A.B. Cumberland 1916 



Paul L. Hollister 

Instructor in Languages and Science 

A.B. Cumberland 1915; Graduate Work in Chemistry, Cum- 
berland 1915-1916. 

Mahlon S. McGregor 

Instructor in Latin 
A.B. Cumberland 1916. For two years Instructor in Latin. 

M. B. Rankin 

Instructor in Physics and Physiography 
A.B. Cumberland 1916 

Hubert H. Rogers 

Instructor in History 

A.B. Cumberland 1917; Principal Malissa High School, 
Malissa, Texas 



Page forty-one 



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The Preparatory Department 

HE Cumberland Preparatory School maintains an efficient and consistent 

organization with definite aims and well-defined standards of scholarship. 

The administration has been unusually successful in creating an atmosphere 

that has inspired students with higher ideals in the performance of their 

many duties and activities. 

The faculty this year have been efficient and experienced, and fortunately have had 
an intelligent, appreciative, and responsive student body. 

This year closes with an increased knowledge of various text-books. Training has 
also been acquired from another source which is worthy of mention: The Amaveritian 
(truth loving) Literary Society includes every student of the Preparatory Department. 
It was organized in September, 1915, at the beginning of the scholastic year, with Mr. 
Stanley B. Farley, President. At the beginning of the second term, Mr. Finis K. 
Merchant, of Ashville, Ala., was elected President. The Society was full of enthusiasm 
from the very beginning, and an increased interest was shown at each meeting. Many 
interesting debates were hotly contested by the boys, while the girls exhibited talent in 
readings and music. Parliamentary law was not neglected. 

In addition to literary pursuits, the Cumberland Preparatory School boasts of a 
basketball team that was defeated only one time out of many games played. 

With assurances that the same faculty and most of the present student body will be 
back next year, the future for Cumberland Preparatory School looks brighter than 
ever before. 



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Judge Nathan Green 

Dean and Professor of Law 
Cumberland University, A.B., 1847; Cumberland University, LL.B., 
1849; Center College, Ky., LL.D., 1891. 



Judge Walter C. Caldwell 

Conslilutional LaTlt and Supreme Court Practice 

Cumberland University, LL.B., 1872; for sixteen years a Member 
of the Tennessee Supreme Court. 



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Andrew Bennett Martin 

Professor of Lalv 

Cumberland University, LL.B., 1858; Lincoln College (III.), LL.D., 
1882. 



Edward Ewing Beard 

Nisi Prius Judge 

Cumberland University, A.B., 1870; Cumberland University, LL.B., 
1871. 



Page fort\)-five 



JLJNIVERSITX.J C^ 




THEpnoENix 



Judge Nathan Green 




TUDENTS of Cumberland University Law 
School have certain privileges that students of 
other law schools do not possess in the rare in- 
struction given by our faculty. Judge Nathan Green, Dean; 
Dr. Andrew B. Martin and Judge Edward E. Beard, and 
we, the Senior Class of the Law School, here wish to pause 
and review the lives of these three men, who have so ear- 
nestly labored in our behalf, with a zeal and an enthusiasm 
hardly equaled in any similar institution. 

Judge Nathan Green was born in Winchester, Tenn., 
February 19, 1827. His early hfe was spent in a highly 
intellectual atmosphere, as his father, Nathan Green I, had 
been a member of the Supreme Court of the State of Ten- 
nessee, and a professor in Cumberland University Law 
School. Judge Green entered the Literary Department of 
Cumberland University in 1843, and graduated in 1847. 
In 1847 he entered the Law School of the University and 
graduated with the degree LL.B. in 1849. From 1849 
to 1856 he practiced law with great success, being a law 
partner of Robert Hatton, afterwards a distinguished Gen- 
eral of the Confederate States in the Civil War. Judge 
Green has had a remarkable legal career, both in practice 
and in the classroom, where he has probably taught more 
lawyers than any living professor of law in the United 



States, as he has taught law here continuously since 1856. 
He has the rare ability which enables him to present ab- 
struse legal problems to immature minds in such form and 
manner as is readily apprehended and remembered. Wis- 
dom is a union of knowledge and love, and these two 
attributes are shown forth in his life. It is a liberal education 
in itself to sit under Judge Green's gracious influence, even 
though we fail to understand the law which he so patiently 
teaches us. He is a man loved by all who come in contact 
with him, and a man who has known Judge Green for more 
than a half century has said he was the only man about 
whom he never heard an unkmd word spoken. As a type 
of the old Southern gentleman. Judge Green is a perfect 
example, gracious, dignified, just, and true. One of his 
boys, who graduated under him some forty years ago, has 
paid him this tribute, which we consider most fitting and 
appropriate: "Through this broad land are men whose 
memories wax grateful and tender when m leisure moments 
they recall the days spent at old Cumberland. The central 
figure in the picture which their imagination paints in such 
moments stands out clearly — it is the face and figure of 
Judge Nathan Green. . . . When the end comes to 
you, which it must before many years more have passed, it 
will deservedly be said of you: 'Well done, thou good and 



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faithful servant, . . . enter thou into the joy of thy 
Lord.' " Judge Green has been a devout Christian all of 
his life, and this reverence for the faith of his fathers has 
deeply impressed us all. We feel that all of "his boys" 



have been so impressed by the beauty of his own life that 
they will all put themselves in the keeping of the Great 
Advocate above, who has never lost a case committed to 
His care. 



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Dr. Andrew Bennett Martin 




N every group of men gathered together since 
time began, some men stand out pre-eminently, 
head and shoulders above their fellows. These men 
rise by sheer force of character and ability, and become 
our leaders in every art and calling. Such a man is Dr. 
Andrew B. Martin, professor of law, whose life has been 
closely associated with the life of Cumberland University, 
and whose efforts have been poured into the Law School 
of the University much as a labor of love, bringing it into 
the famous position it now occupies, the most famous law 
school in the South. 

Dr. Martin was born at Trousdale Ferry, Smith County, 
Tennessee, December 9, 1 836, his father being a prom- 
inent physician of Smith County, Dr. Matthew Moore 
Martin. At a very early age, the subject of this review 
came to Lebanon, where by his individual efforts he obtained 
a liberal education. He entered the Law School of Cum- 
berland University in 1856, taking the degree of LL.B. in 
1858. In 1882 he received the degree of LL.D. from 
Lincoln University of Illinois. For a number of years he 
was a law partner of the late Judge W. H. Williamson. 
He served as Lieutenant, Company H, Seventh Tennessee 



Infantry; Major on the Staff of General Robert Hatton; 
later on the staff of General George Dibrell, and finally on 
the staff of General Joseph Wheeler. On several occasions 
he has served as special Judge of the District Court. He 
was a member of the Tennessee Legislature, 1871-1872; 
Presidential elector of the State at large on the Hancock 
ticket. In I 866 he was elected to the Board of Trustees 
of Cumberland University, and has been President of this 
board since 1882. In 1878 he entered Cumberland Uni- 
versity as a professor of law, which chair he has occupied" 
continuously since that time. As a law professor, possibly 
Dr. Martin has no rival in the United States, and as a 
text-book writer he has immortalized his name in his Edition 
of Carruthers' "History of a Law Suit," which is widely 
known in the law schools of the country and the law pro- 
fession. Dr. Martin is a born teacher, and has the faculty 
of making law an intensely interesting subject. His Junior 
classes are well attended, and he has become so closely 
connected with the life of the Law School that to think of 
it, one unconsciously thinks of Dr. Andrew B. Martin. 
Above all, he stands out conspicuously as a Christian gentle- 
man, a profound student and teacher of the law, of which 
Cumberland University is justly proud. 



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Judge E. E. Beard 




I HE true glory of any university, as far as this 
world is concerned, is measured by the men who 
yearly go from its corridors and distinguish them- 
selves m the affairs of life. "By their fruits ye shall know 
them" is as applicable to universities as well as men. This 
being true, Cumberland University's chief glory is her long 
list of distinguished graduates. 

Among the learned and gifted men linked in the long 
chain of Cumberland Law School's alumni are many prom- 
inent and widely known figures ; men who by then- noble 
character, their power of intellect, and knowledge of the 
law, have risen above the common level, and attamed to 
eminent positions in the legal world, and honor and kindly 
affection in the hearts of their countrymen. In this galaxy 
comprising the celebrated sons of Cumberland, no star 
shines with a brighter radiance than that of Judge Edward 
Ewing Beard, the beloved Judge of our Moot Courts. 

Briefly, Judge Beard graduated from the Literary De- 
partment in 1870. The following year he was awarded 
his LL.B. degree from the same institution. He entered 
into the practice of law in Lebanon, Tenn., and has resided 
there ever since. During a period of thirty-three years he 
has served as Treasurer of his Alma Mater. Success has 



crowned his efforts, and honors have been showered upon 
him. He has been President of the American National 
Bank of his native Lebanon for many years. In 1910 
the Law Department of Cumberland University induced 
him to undertake the position as Judge of the Moot Courts, 
in which capacity he has distinguished and endeared him- 
self to the members of "the bar" of those courts. 

As a lawyer. Judge Beard has taken rank with the 
best; as a refined and cultured gentleman, he has few peers 
and no superior. As an instructor of legal principles of 
court practice, he has endeared himself in the hearts of 
many students, and has inculcated in them the lesson of 
patience and the dignity of the law. 

The career of this gentleman has not been spectacular. 
He has never courted honor, nor entertained ambitious de- 
signs for power in the political world. He has lived the 
simple life, and lived it well. He has made a success and 
a fortune in the practice of law. Had he entered into 
other fields of activity, as a reward for his efforts, no honor 
could have been bestowed upon him within the gift of his 
people of which he would not have been worthy. 

Judge Beard will be remembered by the students of the 



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Law Department not only as a lawyer of ability, but as 
a kind and wise instructor. The flight of years, nor the 
result of time, can efface this memory. 



Above all, he is a Christian. With our partial eyes 
we can see no blemish in his character. He is a type of 
the man ideal. 



"His life was gentle, and the elements 

So mixed in him that Nature might stand up 
And say to all the world, 'This was a man.' " 



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Fred Adams, Jr., LL.B., K - Lebanon, Tenn. 

B.S. Vand.ibilt University '15; Pan-Hellenic Council. 

H. C. Alford, LL.B Birmingham, Ala. 

Philomatheau Debating Society. 

M. L. Anderson, LL.B., — A E South Pittsburg, Tenn. 

Pan-Hellenic Council 

E. V. Arnett, LL.B Bells, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club: Philnmathean Debating- Society. 

Wallace Wright, LL.B Chattanooga Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee Jloot Court. 

Carlyle S. Baer, LL.B., J 2' Streator, 111. 

Editor Law School "Phot-nix" ; Pan-HeUenic Council. 



W. E. Baldwin, LL.B., J 1' <P Tazewell, Tenn. 

B.S. Lincoln Memorial T'niVfrsUy '\?>: Tennc-ssee Ciul-^: Pliilomathean 
Debatins: Society: Masonic Club. 

James G. Bare, LL.B Marion, Va. 

Pliilomathean Debating- Society. 

Logan Beasley, LL.B Nashville, Tenn. 

Philomatliean Deliatins -Society; Tennessee Club: Tennessee Moot Court. 

Forrest Bell, LL.B Booneville, Mo. 

Pliilomathean Di -bating Society. 

DuRwooD H. Bradley, LL.B., K — Fort Worth, Texas 

Texas Club President; Philomathean Debating Society. 

Lyon S. Brandon, LL.B., 2' A' Shelbyville, Tenn. 

(^Vashington and Lee Univeristy.) 





Horace T. Bray, LL.B Rogersville, Tenn. 

Tennessee Moot Court. 

Bethel C. Brown, LL.B., - A E Athens, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee jMoot Court. 

James R. Browne, LL.B., J - (P . Clinton, Mo. 

"■Phoenix" Staff; Pan-Hellenic Council. 

William N. Campbell, LL.B Galveston, Texas 

Texas Club. 

Howard Carroll, LL.B. Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 

I-^hiloniatliean Debating Society. 

Luther Carter, LL.B Detroit, Texas 

Texas Club. 



Wilkes Coffey, Jr., LL.B Lewisburg, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Couvt. 

CULLEN COLLINSWORTH, LL.B., J l(p Hartsville, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court. 

Roy D. Cooper, LL.B., ^^ lY Nashville, Tenn. 

Vandeibilt Univeisitj-; Philomathean Debatins" Society. 

G. W. Dannenburg. LL.B., J 2' <Z> Tulsa, Okla. 

Oklahoma. Moot Court. 

Thomas G. Drake, LL.B Spencer, Tenn. 

B.S. Burritt College '15; Philomathean Debating- Society; Tennessee Club; 
Tennessee Moot Court. 

C. E. ESKRIDGE, LL.B.. J Jf Winnsboro, Texas 

Texas Club. 





OssiE P. ESTES, LL.E . Calico Rock. Ark. 

Code Pleading Court. 

Charles W. Fanning. LL.E Cullman, Ala. 

Class Orator; Philomathean Debating Society: Code Pleadins; Moot Court. 

V. FORCUM, LL.B., K 1 Obion, Tenn. 

Pan- Hellenic Council 

W. M. FUQUA, Jr., LL.E Hermitage, Tenn. 

Philomathean Debating Society; Tennessee Club; Tennessee Mont Court. 

J. Henry GaRDENHIRE, LL.B Carthage, Tenn. 

Philomathean Debating .Society: Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court. 

W. Gardner Godwin, LL.B., K I Fort Worth, Texas 

Texas Club. 



C. J. Griffith. LL.B Birmingham, Ala. 

Philomathean Debating Society ; Alabama Club; Public Speaking Council. 

Glenn Earle Guthrie, LL.B Jasper, Ala. 

Pliilomathean Debating Society ; Masonic Club; Tennessee Club. 

Clifford C. Hall, LL.B., A I (P Tyler, Texas 

Philomathean Debating Society; Texas Club. 

Eugene J. Hall, LL.B., J 1 <I> Stuart, Okla. 

Oklahoma Moot Court. 

Clarence E. Haston, LL.B., A Z (P Spencer, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club: Tennessee Moot Court; UniA'ersity Orchestra; Philomathean 
Debating Society. 

Frank Y. Hill, LL.B.. A T Q Sparta, Tenn. 

fniversity of Tennessee: Philomathean Debating Society; Judge Tennessee 
M?ot Court : Tennessee Club; Assistant Editor-in-Cliief "Phoenix" ; Treas- 
urer "Phoenix" Board,"^ 





S. T. Holt, LL.B Carthage, Texas 

'Pexas t'lub: Class Liar: Philomatheau Debating Society-. 

W. J. Holt, LL.B., J I fP West, Texas 

LL.B. Cumberland "10: Texas Club. 

W. D. Hudson, LL.B Sparta, Tenn. 

Philomathean Debating^ Society; Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court. 

James Polk Ikard, LL.B Alto, Tenn. 

Philomathenn Debating Society: Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court. 

MaRSENE Johnson, Jr., LL.B., Z A E Galveston, Texas 

Trxas Club; University Quartette; Philomathean Debating Society; Var- 
sity Football Team. 

B. W. Johnson, LL.B., lAE Vernon, Texas 

University of Oklahoma; Business Manager "Phoenix"; Texas Club; Uni- 
versity Quartette; Philomathean Debating Society. 



D. A. Krener, LL.B Spokane, Wash. 

Graduate Columbia Collest-, Oregon; Philomathean Debating' Society. 

Frank G. Lea, LL.B., J 2' Lebanon, Tenn. 

Philomathean Debating Society: Tniversity Orchestra; Masonic Club. 

G. O. Lea, LL.B Livingston, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court ; Masonic Club. 

D. C. Lee, LL.B., A' 2' Carthage, Tenn. 

A.B. Carson-Newman CoUesf 'la: Philomathean Debathig- Society: Ten- 
nessee Club: Tennessee Moot Court. 

J. S. Marsh, LL.B Kenton, Tenn. 

B.?. Hall-^Ioody College "13: Tennessee Club: Philomathean Debating So- 
coiely. 

Ralph W. Miller, LL.B East St. Louis, 111. 





Graham Moore, LL.B., J 2" * Batesville, Ark. 

B. W. Morris, LL.B Obion, Tenn. 

I'hiloiiiathean Debating: Society; Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court. 

R. S. Morris, LL.B Obion, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court. 

Herbert H. Moses, LL.B., 1' A E Columbia, Tenn. 

A.B. University of North Carolina. 

C. F. McCoy. LL.B Lebanon, Tenn. 

G. C. McDonald, LL.B Bay City, Texas 

Tex^s Club. 



J. Gordon McKenzie, LL.B Dayton, Te 

Class Prophet: Pliilomathean Debating Society; Tennessee Club: Tennes- 
see Moot Court. 



Claude Pierce McReynolds. LL.B Pikeville, Tenn. 

Masonic Club; Tennessee Club. 



J. W. Norton, LL.B Honey Grove, Texas 

Texas Club: President Public Speaking Council, Resigned. 
Law Debating Team: Philomathean Debating Society. 

C. F. NUNNELLY, LL.B., 1' A E Hollow Rock, Tenn. 



Marshall Owen, LL.B Cleveland, Ohi^ 

Pliiloniatliean Debating Society: Tennessee Club: Tennessee Moot Court. 



Wright Patman, LL.B Hughes Springs, Texas 

Texas Club. 





J. A. Pendleton, LL.B., A 2 Lebanon, Tenn. 

Philomathean De-bating Society; Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court; 
Secretaiy-Treasurei- C. U. Athletic Association; Athletic Report, "Phoenix." 

A. C. Phillips, LL.B Watertown, Tenn. 

Tennessee Clul): Tennessee Moot Court. 

Dennis Reynolds, LL.B Wheeler, Texas 

Texas Club. 

Morgan Riddle, LL.B., J 1' <I> Dallas, Texas 

Texas Club; Pan-Hellenic Council: Philomathean Debating- Society. 

George T. Shires. LL.B., J 1^ fp West, Texas 

Philomathean Debating Society; Texas Club. 

A. H. Smith Winfield, Texas 

Texas Club. 



S. Irma Smith, LL.B Meridian, Miss. 

A'ice-President Senior Class; Philomathean Debating- Societ;-. 

Edward L. Snow, LL.B., A' -T Meridian, Miss. 

Pan-Hellenic Council: Philomathean Debating: Society. 

Fred A. Speakman, LL.B Wellston, Okla. 

President Senior Class; Philomathean Debating Society; Oklahoma Moot 
Court. 

J. A. Storey, LL.B Vernon, Texas 

Philomathean Debatins: Society; Texas Club, 

Edgar R. Sweeney. LL.B., J 2' Watertown, Tenn. 

Tennessee Club; Tennessee Moot Court ; Masonic Club. 

Edward E. Sweitzer, LL.B Muscatine, Iowa 

Philomathean Debating' Society. 





Cedric O. Taylor, LL.B., J Z Henrietta, Texas 

Texas Club; University Quartette. 

T. R. Tedder, LL.B., 2l A E Rockwood, Tenn. 

John Thompson, LL.B Sedalia, Mo. 

tDlvlahonia Jloot Court; Philomathean Debatins Society. 

W. E. Throgmorton, LL.B. Earle, Ark. 

('ode Pleadin.sf .Moot (_'ouit: Philoniatbean Debatins* Society, 

Jared Tre\'ATHAN, LL.B., 1' A E Batesville, Ark. 

Pan-Hellenic Council: University Quartette. 

Fred E. Wankan, LL.B Dexter, Texas 

Philomathean Debating: Society; Texas Club. 



Maurice A. Wear, LL.B Cassville, Mo. 

Phitomatheaii Debating Society. 

Charles Y. Welch, LL.B Medicine Mound, Texas 

Philomathean Debating Society; Texas Club. 

Thomas L. Whitfield, LL.B Fort Worth, Texas 

President Public Speaking Council; President Philomathean Debating So- 
ciety; Texas Club. 

Richard A. Wood. LL.B Bessmay, Texas 

Texas Club. 

Mack L. Wren, LL.B Clarksville, Texas 

Texas Club. 

L. H. ZwiSLER, LL.B., J 2 Geraldine, Mont. 

A.B. St. Paul University '07; Philomathean Debating' Society-. 







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J. D. C. Atkins, LL.B., K A Paris, Tenn. 

B. S., Vandetljilt Unn'frsit>'. 'l.'i. 

Richard M. Atkinson, LL.B Nashville, Tenn. 

Rascoe Bond, LL.B., i; A E Nashville, Tenn. 

F. E. Bowers, LL.B Nashville, Tenn. 

L. B. Brown, LL.B., Z A E Chattanooga, Tenn. 

I'an-Hi'llenif Council. 

T. J. Carey, LL.B Haleyville, Ala. 

Philoniatliean Dc-bating" Pncietj'. 

John A. Gregory, LL.B Eton, Ga. 

I'hilomathean Debatin.g Si)ciet>'; Code Pleading ]\[oot Court 

Ira M. Gurley, LL.B Alpena Pass, Ark. 

J. D. HankINS Hartsville, Tenn. 

A. W. Jackson, LL.B Eagleville, Tenn. 

Tennessee Moot Court; Tennessee Club; Phil<nnatliean 
Debating Societ>'. 

Charles C. Jackson, LL.B Alexandria, Tenn. 

J. A. JernIGAN, LL.B., K -V Paris, Tenn. 

I \"anderbilt X'niversity.) 

J, S. Johnston, LL.B., $ A Waynesboro, Ga. 

(Emoi-y Colleg'e.) 



S. C. KearleY, LL.B West Palm Beach, Fla. 

M. H. Meeks, LL.B., * A 9 Nashville, Tenn. 

I \'anderbilt University. I 

B. F. Paty, a K E Tullahoma, Tenn. 

( ['ni\'ersity of Nortli Cai-olina.) 

George Picue, LL.B Torkville, Tenn. 

Philomatliean Debating Soeiety. 

L. B. SinnarD, LL.B Arapho, Okla. 

oltlahoma Moot Court. 

G. M. Snider Hazel, Okla. 

C. B. Snow, LL.B., 2 A E Meridian. Miss. 

H. A. L. Stephenson, LL.B Timbell, Ark. 

Code Pleading Court. 

H. B. Vauchan, LL.B., 2 A E Columbia, Tenn. 

J. C. WanSLEE, LL.B Florence, Ariz. 

Philoniathean Debating* Society. 

Carey G. King, LL.B., A K E Corsicana, Texas 

(University of Mississippi); A.B., Cumberland University, 
'14; Texas Club. 

J. L. Brown, LL.B., 2 A E . . . . . . Veinon, Texas 

Texas Club. 



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Pay Tribute to Judge Green 

Cumberland Law Class of 1916 Observes Veteran's Eighty-Ninth Birthday 




HE eighty-ninth birthday of Judge Nathan Green, 
Dean of the Law School of Cumberland Univer- 
sity, was celebrated with a banquet on February 
1 9. The honor was bestowed by the members of the 
Senior Class, who desired to pay public tribute to their 
beloved instructor. This tribute was paid not only to the 
oldest law professor in actual work, in both years and 
length of service, in America, but to one who is recognized 
as one of the greatest and most renowned law instructors 
in the United States, not only by the present class, but by 
all who have come under his influence, including many of 
the ablest lawyers and jurists in the South. This year will 
close his sixty-third year as professor in the Law Depart- 
ment of Cumberland University. 

At the banquet table were seated ninety-seven members 
of the Senior Class, the honoree, and the following alumni 
and guests, who were guests of honor: Judge F. S. Wilson, 
Nashville; Chancellor J. W. Stout, Clarksville; Col. J. H. 
Acklen, Nashville; Judge B. D. Bell, Gallatin; Hon. Ben 
McKenzie, Dayton; Richard H. Yancey, Editor Nash- 
ville Banner; Judge Grafton Green, of the Supreme Court; 
Dr. S. A. Coile, President Cumberland University; Prof. 
O. N. Smith, Dr. A. B. Martm, Judge E. E. Beard, Prof. 



L. L. Rice, Capt. E. N. Macon, Hon. Nathan G. Rob- 
ertson, R. R. Doak, Mesdames A. B. Martin, Pearl Kirk- 
patrick. Misses Sarah Shields and Helen Buford, of Nash- 
ville. 

Following an elaborate five-course menu. Dr. A. B. 
Martin, as toastmaster, who is both witty and pleasing, 
read a number of telegrams from alumni who were unable 
to be present. The toastmaster then presented the speakers 
of the evening, in the order named, and their remarks and 
eulogies on the life and character of Judge Green, from 
the time he entered Cumbreland University in 1 846, seventy 
years ago, were beautiful and touching. The speakers 
were: W. M. Fuqua, Jr., "Sketch of Judge Green's Life;" 
Frank Y. Hill, "Honor Roll of Cumberland University;" 
Carlyle S. Baer, "Eulogy on Judge Green;" Hon. Ben 
McKenzie, "A Lawyer's Position as Defendant in Crim- 
inal Law;" Prof. L. L. Rice, "The Arts of a Teacher;" 
Judge J. W. Stout, "Equity;" Judge B. D. Bell, "Rem- 
iniscences;" Dr. Coile, "By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know 
Them;" Hon. J. H. Acklen, "Profession of Law;" Mr. 
Yancey, "Our Banner;" Judge F. S. Wilson, "Writ of 
Certiorari;" Miss Sarah Shields, "Sweethearts;" Judge 
Grafton Green, "My Daddy." 



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Fred Speakman, Class President, on behalf of the class, 
presented Judge Green a bouquet of eighty-nine white car- 
nations, and in the language of flowers, their color repre- 
sented the purity of his life, and their beauty, the example 
he sets for the young man under his charge. 

Judge Green responded with a deep sense of apprecia- 
tion and modesty. He thanked each of the speakers and 
members of his class for their expression. He said he felt 



that he was not entitled to one-tenth of the praise with 
which he had been bombarded, and he knew they were 
all "fibbing," but it made him feel happy anyhow. He 
said that whatever success had come into his life was due 
to his attention to small things. He admonished the mem- 
bers of the class to make the most of small things, despise 
them not, and in due time marry, and they would then have 
someone to help them to care for the "little things." — 
Nashville Banner, Feb. 21, 1916. 




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Junior Law Class 



Officers 

Thos. J. Murray President 

H. C. Stubblefield Vice-President 

J. R. Tube Second Vice-President 

Miss Sarah H. Buchanan Secretary 

H. Braden Treasurer 

E. E. Blackert Class Orator 

M. E. WaLGRON Class Prophet 

J. E. Stanley Class Critic 

RoBT. W. Brown Class Editor 



A. H. Smith Winlield, Texas 

A. H. Butler Nashville, Tenn. 

O. L. Crowell Shelbyville, Tenn. 

H. C. Stubblefield Richmond, Cah 

J. B. Braden Sapulpa, Okla. 

H. V. Smith Curwensville, Penn. 

J. R. Tube Sparta, Tenn. 

Ira O'Meara Carizo Springs, Texas 

R. H. Engler Henderson, Ky. 

W. H. BuTTRAM Huntsville, Tenn. 

E. N. Henson Philadelphia. Miss. 

C. W. Harris Saskatoon, Canada. 

EwELL Murphy San Angelo, Texas 

W. T. Shelton Ada, Okla. 



Members 

E. C. Hollow ay Smyrna, Tenn. 

E. E. Blackert Jackson, Tenn. 

Miss Sarah Shields Nashville, Tenn. 

W. G. Mallon Nashville, Tenn. 

P. R. Stewart Winchester, Tenn. 

RoET. W. Brown Gatesville, Texas 

S. K. Wasaff Britow, Okla. 

Miss S. L. Buchanan. . .Booneville, Miss. 

F. M. Johnson Pauls Valley, Okla. 

H. W. Walker Dallas, Texas 

J. E. Stanley Moscow, Texas 

A. H. TiSCH Roy, Wash. 

J. L. Roberts Columbia, Tenn. 

M. E. Walgron Tacoma, Wash. 

P. P. BoLAND Emeka, Mo. 

B. F. Paty Tullahoma, Tenn. 



T. W. HairsTON Silver City, Miss. 

H. M. Settle Jacksonville, Fla. 

J. D. Hankins Hartsville, Tenn. 

T. J. Murray Jackson, Tenn. 

G. W. Henri Texarkana, Texas 

C. S. Moore Dresden, Tenn. 

W. C. DoTSON Wes'moreland, Tenn. 

J. F. Robertson Lebanon, Tenn. 

C. A. Edwards : . . . .Savannah, Ga. 

G. M. Snider Hazel, Okla. 

G. E. Allen Okalona, Miss. 

W. A. Shoaf Covington, Tenn. 

A. E. Walden Thackerville, Okla. 

N. BowEN Franklin, Tenn. 



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Junior Class History 



Jf HE cry of man from the dark ages, down 
',^/i through the passing generations, has been a 

"Mil continuous clamor for hfe, hberty, and justice. 

^1 Still rings through the land of every nation 
that inborn cry, "JUSTICE." Heeding to the voice of 
man and endeavoring to gratify the civil desires of the 
coming generations, we have humbly and willingly given 
our lives to the uplifting of justice in the civil and criminal 
spheres of our national life. 

We gathered together as Juniors of Cumberland Law 
in the spring of nineteen hundred sixteen; forty-four in 
number, and representing, in all, thirteen states, from two 
national governments. Having the honor of being the 
largest Junior law class of any spring term in the history 
of our school, and with a national spirit, free from selfish 
desires and personal motives ; disbanded the personal ties 
of friendship, and initiatively filled every office with one 
of our most competent and able class members, and began 
our work in earnestness and sincerity. 



Realizing the possibilities of youth and the vast empires 
of opportunity that lie open before us, we have willingly 
submitted the molding of our intellects and characters to 
our honored professors. Dr. A. B. Martin, Judge N. 
Green, and Judge E. E. Beard, whose lives of consistent 
principles, public spirit, and private virtue have justly re- 
ceived our admiration and esteem. 

We believe that those who aspire to attain the heights 
of the civil profession must struggle with their subjects, 
and rise from the low, dusty horizon of suspicion to the 
star-lit heights of genius, kneeling at the feet of the Ruler 
of the Universe and studying Nature's laws from divine 
demonstrators. 

With our diligence and sincerity of purpose we are 
looking forward for January, nineteen hundred seventeen, 
when we will complete our course of study, and then, with 
others, some of whom have attained distinction and nobility, 
will dwell forever in the peaceful realms of the Alumni of 
Cumberland Law. 



Page sevenl^-lB>'i 



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Cumberland My Cumberland 



By G. Frank Burns 



My Cumberland is dear to me — 

Cumberland, my Cumberland. 
Her fame is known from sea to sea — 

Cumberland, my Cumberland. 
Her sons have won their laurels great, 
Her daughters prove a helpful mate. 
Her teachers' work does not abate, 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 



Her hardy sons are known afar — 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 

In churches, pews, and at the bar — 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 

They teach and preach and plead a case; 

Transform the black and yellow race. 

From every sin, from all that's base, 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 



Her servants toil from day to day — ■ 

Cumberland, my Cumberland. 
I el satisfaction comes their way — 

Cumberland, my Cumberland, 
with zeal and love they labor hard. 
Receive from students kind regard. 
Their deeds are praised by country's bard, 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 



Her daughters fair grace earthly halls- 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 

Obedient to their master's calls — 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 

They make a name in all the land. 

For truth and right securely stand; 

'Tis good, 'tis true, iheir life is grana, 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 



Up with the flog-maroon and white — 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 

Come, follow on and scale the height- 
Cumberland, my Cumberland. 

Cumberland, my mother, dear, 

1 love thee more from year to year, 
Thy name I speak both far and near, 

Cumberland, my Cumberland. 



Page sevenl^-threc 




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Conservatory 




HE Conservatory of Music of Cumberland University has for ten years been directed by Professor 
Robert Paul Gise, a native of Ohio. From early childhood he has shown marked musical talent. 
This innate quality was developed by study with master teachers, and broadened by mingling 
in the musical environment of the great art centers. After graduating with highest honors from an 
r Eastern conservatory, he had four years further study in Cincinnati 

with one of the foremost pianists of America, studying at the same 
time the pipe organ with a pupil of the celebrated Guilmont, of Paris. 
He is a master in his art, and brings to his work here a life rich 
in experience. As an instructor, through research and study of the 
masters, and through years of experience in the North, East, and 
South, he is well fitted for his work. In every sense, his talent and 
attainments are prominent. In the teaching of voice, he has developed 
a method that is based on the principle of correct, artistic use of the 
voice, following the lines of the foremost teachers of the day. 

As a conductor, his work is highly artistic. He leads his stu- 
dents to a keener appreciation of the true spirit of music, and to the 
R. P. GISE power of interpreting the works of great masters. His students go 

out from the Conservatory inspired by the high ideals and standards set forth in his teachings and by his 
own personality and musical temperament. 

Professor Gise is a student of human nature, and through his keen insight, is enabled to understand 
and deal with the individual needs of his students. He is more than a mechanical teacher, for he comes into 
intimate, personal touch with each of his students, and is to them a teacher, counselor, and friend. 




Page seventh-four 



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UNIVERSITY <^ 



Martha Martin Burke 

Violin 

Mrs. Burke has for four years been a member of the musical faculty 
of Cumberland University. After studying in Nashville, Tennessee, 
with the best teachers, she was in Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, 
and studied with Mr. Tirindelli, Later she went to New York, and 
for two years attended the Institute of Musical Art, the foremost 
music school of America. While there she had as teacher Mr. Louis 
Svescensi, a member of the famous Kneisel Quartette. During the 
time she has been connected with the University she has built up the 
Viohn Department until it has become prominent in the Conservatory. 
She is director of the University Orchestra, an important factor in 
the musical life of the University. In Lebanon and in adjoining 
towns this organization has won a popular place. 



Miss Lilla Mace 

Assislanl in Piano 

Miss Mace was a pupil of Herr Eugene Feuchtinger, who preceded 
Prof. Robert Paul Gise as Director of Music in the Conservatory of 
Cumberland University. Pursuing her study for two years under 
the direction of Prof. Gise, she graduated in 1910, after which she 
continued her study with him for one year as post-graduate. Miss 
Mace has the charm of winning young pupils. Through her keen 
insight into child life, she leaches her pupils to love the study of 
music. She has for three years been a member of the University 
Orchestra, and has shown marked ability as an accompanist. 



Page seventh-five 



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Alice Bone 

Ellen Chambers 

Elizabeth Doak 

LiNNiE Gibes 



Pupils of Robert Paul Gise 

Piano, Voice, Pipe Organ 

Piano 

Bessie Green Linnie Purnell 

Grace Humphreys Lalla Smith 

Norma Lashlee Gladys Springer 

Elizabeth Mitchell Winnie Tonemaker 



Voice 



Jesse Andrews 

P. O. Gentry 

McRGAN Green 

M. Johnson 

Norma Lashlee 



Everett Marler 
Mrs. D. E. Mitchell 
W. R. Neece 
Alliene Orman 
Lalla Smith 



Ernest Looney Stockton 



Pupils of Miss Lilla Mace 



Assistant in Piano 



J. K. Blackard 

Grady Dannenburg 

Dorothy Whittaker 

Frances Wilson 



Bertha Grissom 
L. M. Loveless 
Elvira Mace 



Eloise Vaughan 



Pupils of Martha Martin Burke 



Violin 



Sara Ransom 



Martha Ready Bone Frances Drane 

Robert Brown Eleanor Green 

Ellen Chambers Madeline Humphreys 

Alice Vaughn 



D. M. Sensing 



Fred Thompson 



Page seventh-six 







THEpnOELNII 



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UNIVERSirVJ 



Public Speaking and Expression 




NDER the direction of Miss Sue A. Chenoweth, of 
Vanderbilt University, the Department of Public 
Speaking and Expression, which was added to 
Cumberland University in 1914, has become a live factor in 
promoting interest in debating, oratory, expression and dra- 
matics. 

The course in public speaking includes a thorough study 
of the principles of argumentation and also training in the 
art of delivery. 



The course in expression is planned with a view to pre- 
paring advanced students for teachers of expression and plat- 
form entertainers, while the preparatory course emphasizes 
more the study of literature, the appreciation of it from a sub- 
jective standpomt. 

In addition to the courses mentioned, attention is given 
to the study of the drama, its history and technique. 

The rapid increase in the enrollment of this department 
is not the least manifestation of the interest taken in every 
phase of work which the department offers. 



Students of Public Speaking and Expression 



V. C. Allison 
W. Montcalm 

C. Chamberlain 
J. Upton 

D. Schlafman 
C. Price 

Morris Halliburton 
ZoRA Johnson 

Elizabeth Perkins 
Mary Shannon 
Maphis Cato 
Ruth Burton 



Gordon Halliburton 
John Martin 

William Carson 
Eugene Sloan 
Edward Burton 
Katie Turner 

Esther L. Davis 
Ruth Williamson 
Pauline Newby 
Claudie Ellis 

Ida B. Cooksey 

Martha Chenault 



Laura Caldwell 
Morgan Green 

Gladys Springer 
Valley Elam 

Margaret McCampbell 
Martha Bradshaw 
Della Peak 
Hazel Long 



Virginia Thaxton 



Southerland Marsh 
E. E. Hennessee 



Novella Dillard 
Geneva Hacan 

Katie Bradshaw 
Frank Gregg 

Mary E. Licgons 



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Public Speaking Class of Law Department 

It is only through perfect poise, repose and self-control that man conquers 




V. Allison Tennessee 

B. C. Brown Tennessee 

C. Boyd Tennessee 

Horace Bray Montana 



Sarah Buchanan Mississippi R. H. Engler. . 

N. Bowen Tennessee — Guthrie.... 

R. E. Cooper Tennessee C. C. Hall 

H. A. Entrekin Alabama J. D. Hankins. 



.Kentucky 
. .Alabama 

.... Texas 
. Tennessee 



A. W. Jackson Tennessee 

O. M. Lord Texas 

J. S. Marsh Tennessee 

T. J. Murray Tennessee 

G. Moore Arkansas 



M. Owen Missouri P. R. Stewart. 

A. ScHLOFFMAN Texas H. M. Settle 

W. T. Shelton Oklahoma J. Thompson... 

J. C. Wanslie Arizona 



. Tennessee 
.Florida 
. . Missouri 



MISS SHIELDS 



Page seveni^-eight 



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HOME ECONOMICS 



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Home Economics 

Motto: "Eat, drink and be merry." 



HE department of Home Economics has completed 
another year of record work, under the excellent 
'"^P^ll supervision of Miss Mildred Hungerford. 

Interest in this course is constantly growing, and only a 
visit is necessary to convince one of the efficient work of 
our different classes. 

It is the aim of the University to perfect this department 
in every way. And already a large step has been taken 



in that direction. To the courses in Cooking, Sewing, and 
Home Management of last year, have been added the 
studies of Home Nursmg, Personal Hygiene, Dietetics, and 
Textiles. 

Considering that Cumberland has only had this depart- 
ment two years, we feel greatly encouraged with our prog- 
ress, and feel we can, even now, compete with the depart- 
ments of longer standing in other universities. 



Class Roll 



DOMESTIC ART 

Oneda Bass 
Laura Caldwell 
Nancy McCord 
Norma Lashlee 
Della Peek 
Katherine Perkins 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Della Peek 
Katherine Perkins 
Margaret Terry 



HOME NURSING 

Walton Alexander 
Mamie Clayton 
Mary Bradshaw 
Norma Lashlee 
Della Peek 
Louise Palmer 
Grace Ragland 
LiLLiE Upton 
Annie B. Lame 



DIETETICS 

Mary Bradshaw 
Grace Ragland 
Della Peek 
Grace Hoden 

PERSONAL HYGIENE 
Mary Bradshaw 
Walton Alexander 
Grace Ragland 
Norma Lashlee 
Della Peek 



HOME MANAGEMENT 

Oneda Bass 
Grace F^gland 
Walton Alexander 
LiLLiE Upton 
Norma Lashlee 
Della Peek 
Esther L. Davis 

TEXTILES 

Della Peek 
Norma Lashlee 



Page eighty 




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c. 



UNIVERSITY 




Phoenix Staff, 1916 

M. B. Rankin Editor-m-Chief 

F. Y. Hill Associate Edilor 

B. W. Johnson Business Manager 

J. E. Beck Assistant Business Manager 

Sarah Ransom Marbury Logan W. R. Neece M. S. McGregor 

Fred Page John Story C. E. Baer L. D. Phillips 

J. D. Martin Arthur Pendleton W. D. Hudson J. R. Browne 

Alex Johnsonius Laura Caldwell Norma Lashlee P. L. Hollister 

Nancy McCord Stanley Farley 



Page eighl^-one 



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CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 



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Kappa Alpha Zeta 

Colors : Pea Green and Yellow Motlo : Nada a' hacer hasta manana 

Founded Cumberland University, 1913 

ZETA CHAPTER 

Emincnl Exalted Ruler Carey G. King 

Keeper of Exalied Ruler's Conscience Paul Stewart 

Grand Guardian of Sisters Gardner Godwin 

Exalted Keeper of Archives and Mixer of Beverages .... Homer Shannon 

Alumnus Adviser Peck Turner 

Sister Eii Cindad Miss Marie Weeks 

Members 

Gardner Godwin Paul Stewart Homer Shannon 

Carey King Miss Weeks Peck Turner 



Page eighty-five 




!;> 



UNIVERSITY 



TMEpnoENJix 







Marsene Johnson 



J. E. Trevathan 



C. O. Taylor 



B. W. Johnson 



Cumberland University Law Quartette 



Mr. Marsene Johnson Tenor 

Mr. J. E. Trevathan Second Tenor 

Over the Ocean Blue .... Pelrie-Robinson 

Swing Along Coole 

The Road to Mandalay Speal(s 

(From Kipling's "Barracks Rooms Ballads") 



Mr. C. O. Taylor Baritone 

Mr. B. W. Johnson Bass 

Roll Those Bones Adams 

You Remind Me of the Girl . . Johnson 

My Little Gypsy Sweetheart Coleman 

But They Didn't Rogers 



Page eighi^-six 



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Colors: Royal Purple and Old Gold 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity 

Founded at University of Alabama, March 6th, 1856 

Founders 



FloTvcr : Violet 



Noble Leslie Devotie Nathan Elams Cockrell 

John W. Kerr Samuel Martin Dennis 

John Barnett Rudolph Abner Edward Patton 

Wade H. Foster Thomas C. Cook 

Publications 

The Record Elmer B. Sanford, Editor 

Phi Alpha Clarence W. Stowell, Editor 



PROVINCE IOTA 



Kentucky-Tennessee 



Kenluc\)} Kappa — Central University Danville, Ky. 

Kenlucl^y Iota — Bethel College Russellvllle, Ky. 

Keniucl^y Epsilon — Kentucky Stale College Lexington, Ky. 

Tennessee Zeta — S. P. University Clarksvllle, Tenn. 



Tennessee Lambda — Cumberland University Lebanon, Tenn. 

Tennessee Nu — Vanderbilt University Nashville, Tenn. 

Tennessee /Cappa— University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tenn. 

Tennessee Omega — University of South Sewanee, Tenn. 



Tennessee Ela — Union University Jackson, Te 

Yell 

Phi Alpha AHcazee, Phi Alpha Allcazon, 
Sigma Alpha, Sigma Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Rah, Rah, Bon Ton, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Rah. Rah, Bon Ton, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Ruh. Rah, Ruh. Rah, Ruh Rah Ree. 
Ruh, Rah, Ruh, Rah, S. A. E. 



Page eighty-seven 




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Sigma Alpha Epsilon — Lambda Chapter 



Active Members 



J. E. Beck Smith Grove. Ky. 

B. W. Johnson Vernon, Texas 

B.C. Brown Athens, Tenn. 

C. J. Buell Rapid City, S. D. 

H. S. GiLLEYLIN Aberdeen. Miss. 

M. L. Anderson South Pittsburg. Tenn. 

H. B. Vaughan Columbia. Tenn. 

Wm. p. Smith Lafayette. Tenn. 

J. L. Brown Vernon. Texas 

J. E. TrevaTHAN Batesville. Ark. 

M. S. McGregor Princeton. Ky . 

C. B. Snow Meridian. Miss. 

L. B. Brown Chattanooga. Tenn. 

E. N. Hinson Philadelphia. Miss. 



Marsene Johnson Galveston. 

Ben Braden Sapulpa. 

J. R. Tedder Rockwood. 

H. H. Moses Columbia. 

Curry O. Dodson Lebanon. 

H. C. McCampbell Lebanon. 

James R. Tubb. Jr Sparta, 

Dudley E. Casey Lebanon, 

Robin Mace Lebanon. 

Clifford Coile. Lebanon, 

James Shannon , Lebanon. 

W. K. Eubank Weatherford. 

Stansell Whiteside Oklahoma City. 

Caude Nunnely Hollow Rock. 



Texas 
Okla. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Texas 
Okla. 

Tenn. 



Pledge 

W. D. Hudson Sparta. Tenn. 

History of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon has a membership of more than seventeen thousand and 
an active membership of more than 1 ,500. 

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity owns thirty-five chapter houses, and last 
year initiated more than six hundred members. 

The Tennessee Lambda Chapter, Cumberland University, was the third chapter 
installed, the charter being granted here on April 4, 1885. 

The Chapter, as a whole, this year is one of the best Tennessee Lambda has 
ever enjoyed, and with six strong men returning, our prospects for the coming year look 
very promising. 



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Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity 



Founded at the College of the City of New York, 1899 
Colors: White, Nile Green and White 

Publication: "The Carnation, Harry Axelroth, Editor 



Flower: While Carnation 



OMICRON CHAPTER 

Cumberland University 
Organized December 5th, 1912 

Frater in Facultate 

James Otto Graham 



Fratres in Universitate 



Frank G. Lea 
S. S. Chapman 
James A. Pendleton 
Carlyle S. Baer 
Louis H. Zwisler 
Cedric O. Taylor 
Edgar C. Eskridge 
Everett Marler 
Grady W. Dannenburg 
Harold Walker 
C. C. Campbell 
W. T. Shelton 

CULLEN CoLLINSWORTH 



J. Eugene Hall 
Morgan Riddle 
Clifford C. Hall 
Walter E. Baldwin 

Graham Moore 
James R. Browne 
Hubert H. Rogers 
Edgar R. Swinney 
William J. Holt 

F. M. Johnson 
George T. Shires 
Clarence E. Haston 

J. E. Standley 



Page ninety-one 



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UNIVERSITY 



Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity 

Roll of Chapters 

Alpha—CoWege of the City of New York New York City, N. Y. 

Beta — Columbia University New York City, N. Y. 

Comma — University of New York New York City, N. Y. 

Delta — Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Mass. 

Epsilon — Pennsylvania State College Slate College, Pa. 

Zeia — Washington and Lee University Lexington, Va. 

Eta — University of Texas Austin, Tex. 

Theta — Cornell University llhaca, N. Y. 

Iota — University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kappa — Alabama Polytechnic Institute Auburn, Ala. 

Lambda — Southern Methodist University Dallas, Tex. 

Mu — University of Chicago Chicago, III. 

yVu— Waynesburg College Waynesburg, Pa. 

Omicron — Cumberland University Lebanon, Tenn. 

Phi — St. Louis University St. Louis, Mo. 

Rho — North Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical College West Raleigh, N. C. 

5igma— Thiel College Greenville, Pa. 

Tau— Hillsdale College ;..... Hillsdale, Mich. 

Upsilon — Franklin & Marshall College Lancaster, Pa. 

"Hitgard" — University of California Berkeley, Cal. 



Page ninety-three 




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theDMOEINIX 






Wm^J^^i/^^tSrai^^Siiiii. 





Athletic Board 

M. S. McGregor PrcsiJenl S. S. Chapman Manager Football 

J. A. Pendleton Secreiar\)-Treasurer G. E, Allen Manager Basl^etball 

Prof. H. A. Hill Mr. A. B. Humphreys M. S. McGregor Manager Baseball 



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Kappa Sigma Fraternity 



Colors: Scarlet, White and Emerald Green 



Established October 7th, !887 

Founded 1400 at the University of Bologna 

Established in America 1868 at the University of Virginia 

Publication : "The Caduceus" and "The Star and Crescent" 



YELL 

Rah, rah, rah! 
Crescent and star! 
Viva la. viva la! 
Kappa Sigma 



George E. Allen 
John Burns 
Fred Adams, Jr. 
Edward L. Snow 
Andrew Blue 



Fratres in Universitate 

Benton Carlen 

Verne Forcum 

Thomas Marbury Logan 

C. D. Russell 

W. Gardner Godwin 

DuRwooD Bradley 



David C. Lee 
George W. Henri 
Thomas W. Hairston 
John L. Roberts 
John Fite Robertson 



E. E. Adams 
W. S. Faulkner 
L. L. Rice 
C. B. Brown 



Fratres in Urbe 



Harry Brown 
F. C. Stratton 
H. F. Stratton 
Geo. S. Golladay 



Thomas Henson 
R. W. Robertson 
Scott McClain 
C. C. Hamilton 



Fred M. Lewis 
Jno. Edgerton 
H. K. Edgerton 



Page ninety-five 



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UNIVERSITY 



Kappa Sigma Fraternity 



District I 
University of Maine 
Bowdoin College 
New Hampshire College 
Dartmouth College 
University of Vermont 
Massachusetts Slate College 
Harvard University 
Brown University 
Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 

District 2 
Cornell University 
New York University 
Syracuse University 
Swarthmore College 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Pennsylvania 
Bucknell College 
Lehigh University 
Dickmson College 



District 3 

University of Maryland 
University of Virginia 
George Washington University 
Randolph- Macon College 
Washington and Lee University 
William and Mary College 
Hampden-Sidney College 
Richmond College 

District 4 
Davidson College 
Trinity College 
University of North Carolina 
North Carolina A. & M. College 

District 5 
Mercer University 
Georgia School of Technology 
University of Georgia 
University of Alabama 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

District 6 
Cumberland University 
Southwestern Presbyterian Univ. 
University of the South 
Vanderbilt University 



District 7 
Ohio State University 
Case School of Applied Science 
Washington and Jefferson College 
Kentucky State College 

District 8 
University of Michigan 
Purdue University 
Wabash College 
University of Indiana 
University of Illinois 
Lake Forest University 
University of Chicago 
University of Wisconsin 

District 9 
University of Minnesota 
University of Iowa 
University of Nebraska 
Iowa State College 

District 1 
William Jewell College 
Missouri State University 
Washington University 
Missouri School of Mines 
Baker University 
University of Arkansas 
University of Oklahoma 
Washburn College 



District 1 1 

Millsaps College 
Louisiana State University 
Tulane University 
Southwestern University 
University of Texas 

District 12 
Denison University 
University of Denver 
Colorado College 
Colorado School of Mines 

District 13 
University of California 
Leland tSanford, Jr., University 

District 1 4 
University of Washington 
University of Oregon 
University of Idaho 
Washington Stale College 



Page ninety-seven 



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Amasagassean Literary Society 



Organized 1847 

Officers 

C. J. Chamberlain President 

Jesse L. Andrews Vice-President 

Nancv McCord Secretar}^ 

John Allison Treasurer 

M. S. McGregor Critic 

E. E. Hennessee Censor 

J. D. Martin Chaplain 



Members 



U. A. Brogden 

w. k. eubanks 

Kate Bailes 

p. l. hollister 

Anna Beck 

L. Loveless 



J. L. Milling 

Sarah Anne Ransom 
Roy Sullivan 

Julian Upton 

a. l. johnsonius 

Gladys Springer 



W. R. Neece M. B. Rankin 

Miss Mildred Hungerford 
N. M. Green F. W. Gregg 

W. F. Smith j. e. Beck 

C. C. Campbell Grace Holden 

Walton Alexander Jas. K. Blackard 

Grace Racland C. C. Coile 

Chas. W. Price Lily Upton 

Miss Alice Hanger Mary Bryan L. D. Philips 



Page ninety-nine 



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UNIVERSITY 



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President 
Vice-President . 
Secreiarjj 
Treasurer 
Sergeant-at-Arms 
Parliamenlarian . 
Critic .... 



Philomathian Law Literary Society 



Officers 

fall term winter term 

. Hugh McCrory Tom Marlin 

. D. C. Barnes E. E. Switzer . 

. Logan Beasley W. N. Fuqua . 

. J. W. Norton Wright Patman 

. R. B. KiLcoRE .' S. T. Holt . . 

. E. H. West G. E. Guthrie . 

. C. L. Boyd C. J. Griffith . 



SPRING TERM 

T. L. Whitfield 

. S. I. Smith 

Howard Carroll 

Clifford Hall 

. L. W. PiGUE 

John A. Storey 
. H. M. Settle 



Members 



Fred Speakman 
Frank Hill 
J. C. Wanslee 
J. W. Norton 

D. H. Bradley 
Fred Wankan 
Gordon McKenzie 

E. E. Switzer 
Marshall Owen 
H. C. Alford 
G. E. Guthrie 
M. Weir 

C. Y. Welch 
Clifford C. Hall 



S. I. Smith 
Roy Cooper 
W. E. Baldwin 
H. M. Settle 
F. W. Bell 
T. J. Murray 
W. D. Hudson 
L. B. Sinnard 
J. S. Marsh 
E. V. Arnett 
Samuel T. Holt 
C. J. Griffith 
Wright Patman 
R. W. Hayes 
Thos. L. Whitfield 
John A. Storey 
Logan Beasley 



W. N. Fuqua 
Arthur Pendleton 
C. C. Jackson 
A. W. Jackson 
E. L. Snow 
Pat Murphy 
J. W. Braden 
J. P. Ikard 
C. W. Harris 
Morgan Riddle 
Harold Walker 
CuLLEN Collingsworth 
Edgar Sweeney 
J. E. Standley 
Cedric O. Taylor 
L. W. PiGUE 
J. G. Bare 



Howard Carroll 

B. W. Johnson 
T. J. Carey 

C. E. EsKRIDGE 

B. W. Morris 

C. H. Fanning 
"Pi" Godwin 
John Thompson 
Rayman Boatwright 
P. R. Stuart 

H. V. Smith 
C. H. Haston 
Frank G. Lea 



Page one hundred one 



LUNIVERSITV 



r\ 



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Page one hundred two 



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"^^ J ; UNIVERSITY ,-' 




Public Speaking Council 

HE establishment of the Public Speaking Council in the early months of 1915 
grew out of the desire to produce conditions favorable to the development of 
forensic faculties. The success of the plan has been exemplified by the rapidly 
increasing interest displayed by students hitherto indifferent to this branch of liberal 
;ducation. 

Organized for the purpose of fostering oratory and debate, the Council has provided 
opportunities to participate in oratorical contests of widely differing nature and debates 
both interclass and intercollegiate. The progress made toward the end of interesting 
every student in some form of public speaking is exceedingly great in proportion to the 
length of existence of the Council. Under the supervision of capable men, the Public 
Speaking Council is demonstrating the many and essential educational values which 
come as the result of acquiring poise and naturalness and clear thinking from the platform. 

It belongs to the future achievements of this organization to make public speaking 
in all its branches a leading factor in University training, and thus influence the cultiva- 
tion of the latent talents. 

Officers of the year: Thos. L. Whitfield, President; L. D. Phillipps, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

Members: Prof. H. A. Hill, C. J. Griffith, M. S. McGregor. 



Page one hundred three 



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UN IVERSITY, j ^^ET-- 






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Page one hundred four 




THEpnoENix^ 



J ^UNIVERSITY 



•*-<aasaHrt«aaaKKM»"' 



^ 



Y. M. C A. 




HE beginning of the Young Men's Christian Association of Cumberland 
University is not definitely known. There is a tradition that it was first 
organized in 1856, with Gen. A. P. Stuart as its first President, 

•^^^ 1 and that it was the first college organization ever formed. This tradition 
is thoroughly in accord with the spirit that has always prevailed in Cumberland Univer- 
sity and with the character of the great man who is reported as the organizer of the 
Association. In 1 88 1 this Association was firmly established as a leading and potent 
factor in the University. 

The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is to strengthen the spiritual 
life of the University, to unite the students, to promote growth in Christian character 
and fellowship, and to help young men make definite decisions. The most important 
and most astounding question that confronts college men is, What shall I do with my 
life? Every true-hearted young man wants to build up in himself a worthy and noble 
manhood and make his life count for the most possible. The Young Men's Christian 
Association assists men in building up worthy and noble characters and gives them a 
vision of what is really worth while in life. 

Every student of the University should be a member of this organization. There 
are questions to be answered, not with lips, but with the life. These questions can be 
answered only as men come face to face with God and are taught of Him, and come to 
rely upon Him who is the source of all strength. There is no organization to which s 
student may belong that will help him to better live this life than the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 



Page one hundred five 




THEOnO 




Y. M. C. A. 



Officers 

L. D. Philips PresiJenl 

Ura a. BrOGDEN , . . Vice-President 

Carloss J. Chamberlain Secretary 

W. F. Smith . . _ Treasurer 

Finis K. Merchant • • • Religious Education 

Jesse L. Andrews Membership 

E. E. Hennessee Program 

Prof. E. L. Stockton Advisor 



Members 



Geo. E. Allen 
John Allison 
Jesse L. Andrews 
Jas. E. Blackard 
J. E. Beck 
Dr. W. p. Bone 
Ura a. Brogden 
John Burns 
H. O. Burns 
C. C. Campbell 
Dr. S. a. Coile 
L. S. Coile 
S. S. Chapman 
C. J. Chamberlain 



A. Johnsonius 

D. A. Keener 
Geo. V. Donnell 
Prof. W. H. Drane 
Clyde Ensor 

W. K. Eubank 
O. P. Gentry 
F. W. Gregg 
Prof. J. O. Graham 
Prof. W. P. Graham 
Morgan Green 
P. V. Hamblen 

P. L. HOLLISTER 

Prof. H. A. Hill 
Prof. J. A. Hyden 

E. E. Hennessee 

L. M. 



L. M. Logan 
Robin Mace 
J. D. Martin 
Finis K. Merchant 
J. L. Milling 
W. R. Niece 
Walter Oberst 
J. A. Pendleton 
Prof. O. N. Smith 
W. F. Smith 
Prof. E. L. Stockton 
Roy Sullivan 
Cecil Sullivan 
R. W. Wright 
R. H. Engler 
C. H. Wright 



W. F. Thweatt 
M. B. Rankin 
Hubert Rogers 
J. W. Rogers 
W. J. Upton 
G. Freeman 
L. D. Philips 
C. W. Price 
J. D. Reece 
B. R. Parks 
Horace Russel 
H. Smith 
M. S. McGregor 
Carlyle S. Baer 



Loveless 



Page one hundred six 






i^f^\fyaiiaa 




Younot Women's Christian Association 



Grace Holden 
Sara A. Ransom 



, . President Anna Beck Secretary 

Vice-President Nancy McCcrd Treasurer 



Active Members 



Alliene Orman 
Annie Barns Lamb 
Louise Palmer 
Mary Bryan 

Mrs. S. a. Coile 
Mrs. W. p. Bone 
Mrs. W. H. Drane 



Laura Caldwell 
Frances Wilson 
LiNNiE Purnell 



Marie Austin 
Ruth Thompson 
Della Peek 



Honorary Members 



Mrs. H. a. Hill 
Mrs. Walter Baird 
Mrs. W. p. Bonton 



Mrs. Martha Martin Burke 
Miss Sue A. Chenowith 
Miss Virginia Purnell 



Grace Ragland 
Manie Clayton 
Norma Lashlee 
Alice Bone 

Miss Alice Hanger 

Miss Mildred Hungerford 



We welcome you into an Association that spells OPPORTUNITY; and to be grasped, this means devotion to an aim. Our Y. W. C. A. 
stands, not for any mere sentiment, but for a devotion to. and a striving for, the best things physically, mentally, and spiritually. 
The Association is for YOU, and it is to be used by YOU; and without YOU and YOUR help it will not be a success. 



Page one hundred seven 



^NdI 



UNIVERSITY ^ > 



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Student Volunteer Band 



M. B. Rankin 

L. D. Phillips 
Alexander Johnsonius 



Leader 



Louise Palmer 
J. D. Martin 



W. K. Eubank 
John Allison 



Page one hundred eight 




THE 



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UNIVERSITV 




Ministerial Students 

"The Spiril of the Lord is upon me, because he halh anointed me lo preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broke 
hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised." Luke 4:18. 

Reading from lefl lo right— O. P. Gentry, Jas. K. Blackard, L. M. Loveless, A. Johnsonius, J. D. Martin, F. W. Gregg 
U. A. Brocden, J. L. Milling, Finis K. Merchant, L. D. Phillips 



W. F. Smith 

T. P. HOLIFIELD 

W. K. Eubank 



E. E. Hennessee 
Jas. E. Belcher 

F. T. Evans 



Drewey McCawlev 

C. C. Hall 

C. D. Eskridge 



Page one hundred nine 




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\ UNIVERSITY i 



Tennessee Law Club and Moot Court 

Officers 

W. M. FuQUA PresiJenl 

J. A. Pendleton Vice-President 

CuLLEN CoLLINSWORTH Secreiar\) and Treasurer 

W. E. Baldwin Editor to Annual 

A. W. Jackson Toastmaster 

Frank Y. Hill Judge 

Marshall Owen Clerln 

J. R. TuBB, Jr Sherijf 

Members '^ 

Wilkes Coffey, Jr. 

George Arnett R. S. Morris 

W. B. Baldwin Marshall Owen 

L. J. Beasley E. C. Holloway 

E. E. Blackert J. A. Pendleton 

B. C. Brown G. W. Picue 

C. Collinsworth G. O. Lea 

O. L. Crowell D. C. Lea T. J. Murray 

Henry Gardenhire L. B. Bowen L. B. Sinnard 

Frank Y. Hill W. A. Schoef . E. R. Sweeney 

George Hudson Wallace Wright James Tube, Jr. 

J. P. Ikard C. E. Haston 

A. W. Jackson Gordon McKenzie 

W. M. Fuqua a. C. Phillips 

J. S. Marsh W. G. Mallon 

B. W. Morris G. E. Guthrie 

C. P. McReynolds 



Page one hundred eleven 



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ARTHUR ^CHLOfnilN 

OREYNniDi 



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pnOEINIX^ 



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^ yNiVERSirvJ 




Masonic Club of Cumberland University 

W. E. Baldwin, President Shawnee No. 546 Tazewell, Tenn. 

W. E. Throgmorton, Vice-President . Crittenden No. 607 Earle, Ark. 

G. E. CuTHRIE, Secretary-Treasurer . . . Ervin No. 257 . . . . Jasper, Ala. 



Judge Nathan Green Lebanon No. 98 

Dr. Andrew B. Martin Lebanon No. 98 

Dr. S. a. Coile Lebanon No. 98 

Dean O. N. Smith ..." Lebanon No. 98 

O. P. Gentry Lebanon No. 98 

E. C. HoLLOWAY Sam Davis No. 



Lebanon. Tenn. 

Lebanon, Tenn. 

Lebanon, Tenn. 

Lebanon, Tenn. 

. ' Lebanon, Tenn. 

661 Smyrna, Tenn. 



Fletcher M. Johnson Valley No. 52 Pauls Valley 

G. O. Lea Livingston No. 259 Livingston, 

Claude P. McReynolds St. Elmo No. 437 Pikeville 

Herbert H. Moses Sweetwater No. 292 Sweetwater, 

Wright Patman Hughes Springs No. 671 Hughes Springs, 

A, C. Phillips Comer No. 417 Watertown, 



ENTERED APPRENTICES 

W. M. Fuqua McWhorterville No. 375 Hermitage, Tenn. 

Frank G. Lea Lebanon No. 98 Lebanon, Tenn. 

Fred A. SpeaKMAN Wellston No. 369 Wellslon, Okla. 

Edgar R. Sweeny Comer No. 417 Watertown, Tenn. 



Page one hundred fifteen 




UNIVERSITY 



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ARTH 



S. I. Smith 


E. E. SwEiTZER W. T. Shelton 


T 


hos. L. Whitfield 


No. 515 


No. 304 No. 1275 




No. 525 


Meridian. Miss. 


Muscatine, Iowa Ada, Okla 




Gainesville, Texas 


EwELL Murphy 






J. R. Browne 


No. 998 






No. 1034 


San Angelo, Texas 


Ouf Moiio: 

Their faults we write upon the sand, 
Their virtues upon the tablets of love. 




Clinton, Mo. 



S. I. SMITH 



Page one hundred sixteen 



ATHbBTIC3 







Vl^'"*"'*"'"^'""'" 






Book 4ie Fourtn 



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kUNIVERSIT^ 




Page one hundrcil nineteen 




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FOOTBALL SQUAD 1915 



Page one hundred (men/y 



A 



THEpnocNix;^ 





^Nd 



UNIVERSITY 



Football 1915 

Center Thweatt 

Tackles J. J, Burns, Eskridge, McGregor 

Guards Mace, Osbourne, Hightower, Beck 

Ends H. Rogers. Marlin, Ramsey, W. J. Rogers 

Quarierbacl( RussEL 

Halves Cummins, Johnson, Carlin 

Fullback H. Burns 



Page one hundred taenl\)-one 



>.2£!^nd1 P*^ the p n o cn I X 



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-vaaaiLiiTi5^^fe5aa!iam>itKi^aay.w?y.# ^«;^ ^ i^trrr Trir utr tny'^'^^^'i-irr-' 



Football 1915 




UST at the opening of the football season, the 
Athletic Association met a serious handicap when 
we learned that our manager would not be able 
to return. An election was held on the night of Septem- 
ber I 6, when G. E. Allen was elected to fill the vacancy. 
Although he had only a meager knowledge of the work of 
the former manager, he set to work with a vim. Accord- 
ing to "Fullback's" own statement, he wrote seventy-five 
letters within three days, and the team first felt the power 
of his talk when they met the Middle Tennessee Normal at 
Murfreesboro, but the athletic treasury had felt the strength 
of this "Line" when called upon to pay numerous telephone 
and telegraph accounts. 

We met them and this time played only a "normal" 
game, neither team scoring. 

His next impulse was to go to Sewanee, back home for 
ten days' practice, thence to Vanderbilt. Both of these 
teams sustained their records well, and Cumberland could 
only growl at the Tigers and failed to find the range of 
the Commodores. 

The next game was with S. P. U. at Clarksville. After 



an all night's ride, traversing parts of three States, we met 
the University of Tennessee at Knoxville on the day fol- 
lowing the S. P. U. game. At U. T. our boys were 
dubbed "The Carlisle Indians," because of their imitation 
of these famous men in playing at least one game every 
day and hardly resting on the seventh day, as they made 
their journey home on the T. C. 

At Clarksville we thought that we had almost won a 
game, as our opponents had not scored at the close of the 
first half. But the "jinx" was upon us and denied us the 
privilege of bringing home a victory. 

The team was thoroughly drilled for the next two veeks 
under the careful eye of Coach Anderson, while Manager 
Allen was perfecting his plans for a trip to the University 
of South Carolina at Columbia. They ruined us for fair, 
but on the third day we "came back," when eleven bruised 
and bleeding warriors met the Wofford eleven at Spartan- 
burg, S. C, and made their last stand for the season of 
1915. This was the hardest fought game of the year. We 
didn't score, but neither did they. The team came home 
feeling that they had defended well "A LOST CAUSE." 



Page one hundred tnienl^-lao 



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I'ogc one hundred iTuenty-lhree 






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BASKETBALL TEAM ' 1 5-' 1 6 



Page one hundred Inient^-four 



[^i®.THEpi-ioE:Nix 



^. . 





) UNIVERSITY 



Basketball, 1915-16 



hoT'a>ards 
Guards 




|UMBERLAND'S basketball season opened with 
glorious prospects. Before the team was well 
organized, we beat the strong team of the Lebanon 
Athletic Club by a score of 38 to 8. 

About two weeks later manager Allen gathered his 
husky squad and headed them towards Nashville to meet 
last year's Southern champions, the Y. M. C. A. Ramblers. 
To make a long story short, the Ramblers "rambled right 
along." 

A week later the Commodores came to the City of 
Cedars for their annual battle. This was one of the hardest 
games of the year, and was in doubt until the final whistle 
was blown, with Cumberland a few points behind. 

The first game after the holidays was staged at the 
Nashville Hippodrome. In anticipation of the great crowd 
which was expected to gather to see Vanderbilt play her 
ancient rival. After the game a dance was to be given, but 
because of the game, Cumberland's team was at home sleep- 
ing peacefully by midnight. 

Again the Ramblers, assuming their characteristic mood. 



. J. Burns, McGregor 

. H. Burns, Collins, Russell 

Hendrick, Carlin, C. Sullivan 

rambled over to Lebanon, incidentally carrying home a vic- 
tory won by a small score. 

The team next started "Alabama bound" on a stren- 
uous two-weeks trip throughout the Southern States. We 
first went against the Birmingham Athletic Club; next, the 
Birmingham Y. M. C. A., then Birmingham College. Hav- 
ing tried the strength of every team in that city, we next 
went to Tuscaloosa for two games, christening the new 
University of Alabama gymnasium. From there to South- 
ern University at Greensboro, Ala. Thence to Marion, 
Ala. After spending the Sabbath in Marion, where there 
were fortunately two girls' colleges, we went to Stockville, 
Miss. Our routing was from there to Jackson, Tenn., to 
Lebanon. Home with many a bruise both in spirit and 
in person. 

On coming home we found our former rep still here. 
We gave the Lebanon Athletic Club another defeat, then 
caused the West Kentucky State Normal to come to Leb- 
anon for a double defeat. 

Thus ended the basketball season for 1915-16. A 
good beginning — a good ending. 



Pa^c one hundred i'B>enly-five 




kUNlVERSITV 



A 



THEpnoEiNii:^^ 




AT the beginning of the school year the lovers of tennis met at Caruthers Hall and elected Prof. 
W. P. Graham President of the Tennis Club. The members then met in a body on the Univer- 
sity courts and with hoe, shovel and rake, put them in good shape for the season. A tournament 
for the championship among the members was arranged and some of the singles were played off. The 
weather, however, prevented the playmg of the doubles. 

An enthusiastic spirit for the spring has already b:en shown and all are looking forward to a good two 
month's playing. Many fast men are out and the prospects are for a very formidable team this spring. 



Page one hundred tTi>cnl\^-six 



[k.;^ .-. , 



THEpnoENix 



Sit^''^fewri»«;isi-. 






UNlVERSiry^^ 



Page one hundred trjcnl^-seven 



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^.m^VERSITYJ 



THEpnon:Ni>^/i 




BASEBALL 1916 



Page one hundred tmenl^-eight 




THEpnOEINIX^ 



Bea^'V«»stwset^< 




^Nd 



ij% 



UNIVERSITY* 



Baseball 1916 

John G. Burns Coach 

W. F. Thweatt Caplain 

M. S. McGregor Manager 




HE team which wears the Cumberland uniforms 
at present is the most promising squad sent out 
in many sessions. Although only the beginnmg 
games have been recorded in the official book, the per- 
centage column for these five games shows 1 .000. With 
this evidence of our ability to cope with other teams, no 
prophecy short of a most glorious season can be made. 

The cover was lifted on March 28 and 29 at home 
with Transylvania — resulting in the scoreless defeat for the 
visitors. This initial exhibition, although handicapped by 
lack of practice, demonstrated the growing power of the 
BURNS MACHINE. The excellent performance of 
Captain Thweatt from the mound aroused the most enthusi- 
astic and lasting support from the spectators. 

With these two victories to give confidence, we crossed 
bats with Roy Ellam's Nashville Vols in a game which, but 



for a bad inning, would have humiliated the professionals. 
The batting eye was working throughout the contest for the 
Maroons, and they showed remarkable strength with the 
willow by connecting with the visiting pitcher for ten hits. 

As the impatient printer frets for material, we stand him 
off to report the winning of a three-game series from the 
University of Chattanooga, the first two recorded in the 
victory column and the third a tie. 

Following close on the heels of this delightful episode 
came the two-ring circus with the Middle Tennessee State 
Normal. The first affair resulted in a beautiful victory 
for the sons of Cumberland. The second — well, Jupiter 
Pluvius must have seen what "Fullback" was going to do 
to those poor lads, for he staged a show that put the old 
ball game on the blink. 



Page one hundred tTvent}f-ninc 




ti 



^ 



UNIVERSITY 



THE 



pno 




Cumberland University Baseball Schedule 1916 

John G. Burns Coach 

W. F. Thweatt Captain 

M. S. McGregor .... Manager 



Mch. 24- 


-C. u. 


Mch. 28- 


-C. u. 


Mch. 29- 


-C. u. 


Mch.3I- 


-C. u. 


Apr. 4- 


-C. u. 


Apr. 6- 


-C. u. 


Apr. 1 1- 


-C. u. 


Apr. 12- 


-C. u. 


Apr. 13- 


-C. U. 


Apr. 22- 


-C. U. 


Apr. 25- 


-C. U. 


Apr. 26- 


-C. U. 


Apr. 27- 


-C. U. 


Apr. 28- 


-C. U. 


May ]- 


-C. U. 


»Two 


games. 



vs. Louisville American Association, ai Columbia 

vs. Transylvania, at Lebanon 

vs. Transylvania, at Lebanon 

vs. Nashville Vols, at Lebanon 

vs. Louisville American Association, at Lebanon 

vs. Middle Tennessee State Normal, at Lebanon* 

vs. University of Chattanooga, at Lebanon 

vs. University of Chattanooga, at Lebanon 

vs. University of Chattanooga, at Lebanon 

vs. Vanderbilt, at Nashville* 

vs. West Kentucky Slate Normal, at Bowling Green 

vs. West Kentucky State Normal, at Bowling Green 

vs. S. P. U., at Clarksville 

vs. S. P. U., at Clarksville 

vs. Birmingham College, al Birmingham 



May 2— C. 


U. 


May 3— C. 


U. 


May 4— C. 


U. 


May 5— C. 


u. 


May 6— C. 


u. 


May 8— C. 


u. 


May 9— C. 


u. 


May 10— C. 


u. 


May 12— C. 


U. 


May 13— C. 


U. 


May 15— C. 


U. 


May 20— C. 


U. 


May 27— C. 


U. 


May 30— C. 


U. 


May31— C. 


U. 



Birmingham College, at Birmingham 

University of Alabama, at Tuscaloosa 

University of Alabama, at Tuscaloosa 

Southern University, at Greensboro 

Marion Institute, at Marion 

Marion Institute, at Marion 

Millsaps, at Jackson 

Millsaps, at Jackson 

Mississippi College, at Clinton 

Union University, at Jackson 

Union University, at Jackson 

Middle Tennessee Slate Normal, at Lebanon* 

Vanderbilt, at Lebanon* 

West Kentucky State Normal, at Lebanon 

West Kentucky State Normal, at Lebanon 



Page one hundred ihirlX) 



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The Law Class contains the following zoological speci- 
mens: 

Two (2) Bears 
One ( 1 ) Camel 
One (1) Pig 
One (1) Drake 

Prof. J. O. : "What is the best way of extracting gold?" 
Freshman Logan: "Marriage." 

Prof. Hill (in biology lecture) : "Cells are where the 
monastaries used to live." 

WANTED TO KNOW: 

What will Dr. Bone do with his concrete Men? 
Who is the man with the "KISSABLE LIPS?" 
Who discovered the "GULF OF MEXICO?" 
Who cut Keener's flowing locks? 
Who are the "BEAUTIES AT COLLEGE?" 

(Ask J. O.) 
When did Cummins reform? 
What it is Miss Holden don't know? 
When Prof. Stockton will marry? 
What has become of Mr. Blackert, the Silver-Tongued 
Orator? 



0th 



erwise 



Why Miss Orman dropped English? 
What do you want me to take a bath for? I always 
take one when I go home. 
^ ^ ^ 

Prof. Hill (in Physics) : "A woman's speech has 
twice the frequency of that of a man." 

Chamberlain (in debate) : "That was the first mar- 
riage. They do it different nowadays, but they get there 
just the same." 

HcLLISTER (in Chem) : "You can use strong or con- 
centrated sulphuric acid, either one." 

The other day a Co-ed was overhead to remark: "I 
wonder if Mr. Hennessee's beauty is Artificial or Just 
Natural." 

WHERE LOVE LEAPS 
(Contributed by Elizabeth R. D.) 
Love is such a queer thing; 

It's shaped just like a lizard. 
First it leaps into your heart. 
And then into your gizzard. 



Pcea one hundred ihirly-ihrcc 



I^UNIVERSITV. / h^— .-• ^, ^ ^ , ^ ^ ^ y 




\ 



Prominent Charad:eri^ics of Literary Seniors 

Walton Alexander , . Somnolence 

John E. Beck Barb(e)rosit^ 

Mary Bryan Ostenlalion 

C. C. CoiLE Loquacity 

Leonard Coile Bovine Linguo 

W. K. Eubank Vascillation 

Grace Holden Affeclation 

Alex Johnsonius Fracliousness 

Robin Mace Dilaloriousness 

J. D. Martin Meeliness 

M. S. McGregor Ausierk}) 

J. L. Milling Effervescence 

AllIENE Orman Loving Devotion 

Louise Palmer Unconscious Sweelness 

M. B. Rankin Probity 

P. L. HoLLISTER Efficiency 



Page one hundred thirty four 



A 



tmeDMO 






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UNIVERSITY 



The Faculty Literary 



Names 
COILE 

Smith 

Bone 

Hill . . . 

Graham, W. P. 

Graham, J. O. 

Drake 

Stockton 

Hungerford 

Chenoweth 



Nicknames Favorile Sa\)ings 

Uncle Sam O-o-o-oh-h-h, well 

O. N. Feetball Sit tight and keep sweet 

Socrates Wait a minute, well now you know, you see 

Well, Now Dear ME! 

Peanut Join the Tennis Club 

J. O Well, I don't just know right now 

Daddy 1 dont' like it, it's no good 

Stock There's nothing like it, you just ought to try it 

Chubby We'll say it is anyhow 

Sue ■ . . . He looks promising 

(Contributed by a Freshman) 



Page one hundred tbirl\)-five 




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UNIVERSITY 



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Les Amoreux 




WAS Spring. They (he and she) were seated 
on the sofa before the opened window. The 
evening waned, the sun sank behind the western 
skies, and night came down. The lazy house cat purred 
contentedly on the hearth. The couple were busily engaged 
in conversation, ably assisted by facial and optical expres- 
sions, and each seemed delighted at the other's ready com- 
prehension of that which was vague even to themselves. A 
description of them is not necessary, for they are but two 
of the many victims of that dreadfully contagious disease, 
L'Amor. 

Time, place, everything was forgotten by them. Each 
was completely absorbed in the other, and lost to the world. 
The lovelight shone from their eyes. They were like cooing 
doves. The younger brother, while passing through the 
room, stopped, swore softly under his breath, and hurried 
out, nauseated at the very stickiness of it. He was un- 
noticed, for they were indifferent to the world without. 

With one accord they walked out into the garden. The 
moon had arisen, and had silvered the earth with its mellow 
radiance. The dewdrops sparkled like diamonds in the 
moonlight. The soft Southern wind rustled through the 
trees, and smoothed the hair back from the hot brows of 
the lovers, and brought peace to their troubled souls. The 
night was truly working magic. 



Slowly and silently they walked to the little rustic bench 
and sat down. Neither spoke, for they were enthralled by 
the weird beauty of the night and by the inexpressible long- 
ings of the heart. He looked down into those deep brown 
eyes for a long time and turned away. Both looked off 
into the distance with that dreamy, indescribable, far-away 
look on their faces. Theirs was the wordless blending of 
two kindred souls. Speech was unnecessary to express the 
deep love felt by each for the other. 

Finally, he moistened his lips to speak. Verily, Caesar 
was about to cross the Rubicon. In a faltering voice he 
told of his love for her, compared it to the boundless seas, 
and plighted his vows to her with all the fervor of youth. 
He acknowledged his own unworthiness, and asked her to 
be his lawful wife till death did them part. Silently she 
listened, face flushed in a coy, timid smile, and then in her 
heart surrendered to him her most priceless jewel — a 
woman's wonderful love. He told her that he was very 
poor and would be unable to support her as she deserved. 

In the meanwhile, the bearded, disreputable tramp, who 
had been asleep behind the bench, arose noiselessly to his 
feet and leeringly thrust his face between them. The girl, 
deeply touched by her lover's devotion, handed him that 
trite, time-worn, old saying: "Darling, I would be willing 



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to live on bread and water if only I might be near you." 
The psychological moment had come. The fires of love 
burned fiercely within them. Impulsively, in the ecstacy 
of the first kiss, they pressed their lips — not upon each 
other's, but upon the bearded face of the unfortunately 
intervening tramp. Like the lover of old who saw Helen's 
beauty in the dark, forbiddmg brow of Egypt, they were 
unmindful of the hairy growth upon the tramp's face. 
Reason had fled. Arcadia had been attained. 



The tramp disengaged himself in a way that ground 
his coarse bristles into their tender flesh. He had. a keor. 
sense of humor, and this was an opportunity never to be 
had again. To the girl's declaration of her willingness 
to live on bread and water if only she could be near him, 
he facetiously replied, "Very well, dear; you furnish ihe 
bread, and I'll get the water," and then stalked away into 
the night, chuckling at the amazed chagrin of ihf loNcrs. 

Carloss Chamberlako. 




Pa%n one hundred thirt])-scven 




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The Phoenix 




EGEND says the phoenix — an immoital bird, 
feathered with red and gold, yet resembhng an 
eagle — after soaring as it listeth for five hundred 
years, is burned to death on the altar of the temple at 
Heliopolis. Shortly a birdling arises from these ashes, 
and behold! on the third day, fully feathered, it flies away. 
Such was the idea that a former editor of the Phoenix 
in some peculiar manner gained. He was partly true, and 
m part he was grievously mistaken. Perhaps there was an 
excuse for the error. The poor man was no doubt worked 
to death, and his once brilliant mind had grown dim be- 
cause of the terrible strain of his office. The Phoenix does 
not rise every five hundred years. Ah, no; it lifts itself 
from the ashes of last year each succeeding year. Does 
it fly away and soar where it listeth? No, dear; it does 
not. It stays right here, and how it does hurt some people ! 
They do say that it is feathered with gold, and perhaps 
they are right. To be sure, it lives on gold ; it must have 
gold to live and grow. 'Tis easy to feed the park monkeys 
with peanuts. One delights to do it. But, oh, how sad 



a task it is to feed the poor old Phoenix its yellow ration. 
The monkey cares not one whit that you should say: "I 
think he is a punk specimen, a regular piece of cheese." 
The monk is as independent as the proverbial hog. Criti- 
cism affects his growth as little as it does the journey of 
the sun. Not so with the Phoenix. It is a sensitive old 
bird, and kicking is sure to rumple up his feathers and stunt 
his growth. 

To be serious, the Phoenix is an exact reflection of 
the student body. If you think the Phoenix is on the bum, 
don't say so to anybody but your own little self, for if you 
revile the Phoenix you merely revile yourself. One or ^^vo, 
or even three, persons cannot make a year book in the tune 
alloted to the task. It requires the pull of every one of the 
students. Then in the year to come and in the following 
years, you who will be in Cumberland, don't knock; if you 
don't like the year book of that year, take hold and make 
the next one better, bigger and a truer image of the Univer- 
sity, as it really is. Alumnus. 



Page one hunared thirty-eight 



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»K^..--SttiK=:;iSiB£*'"'^l^^ 







The University Club 

By Robert Paul Gise 




HE University Club was organized on the after- 
noon of October 16, 1913, and has enjoyed three 
years of uninterrupted development along lines not 
only intellectual but social. 

Interest in the bi-monthly meetings continue to grow, 
and the regular attendance of a large number of the mem- 
bers attests their appreciation of the valuable information 
brought to the Club, through the papers that are read at 
each meeting and the discussions which follow. Music and 
readmgs by some member or friend of the Club are a part 
of every program, and add much to the enjoyment. Among 
the valuable papers read before the Club this year was one 
by Captain Macon, of the United States Army, on a sub- 
ject of peculiar interest to us just at this time. He took as 
his theme "The United States Army," and gave the Club 
much valuable information, as well as the latest statistics. 
An open meeting of the Club on the evening of February 
the twenty-fourth, to which the public was invited, was held 
at the Presbyterian Church. 



Dr. Chas. Alexander, of Columbia, Tenn., a former 
member of the Club, addressed the assembly on the sub- 
ject of "The Church of th,e Future," and presented in his 
usual charmmg manner a splendid address replete with 
suggestions and plans for work for both the clergy and the 
laymen. A brilliant social event of the year was enjoyed 
on Thursday evenmg, the twenty-nmth of Febri'.ary, when 
the Club entertained at the spacious home of Prof, and 
Mrs. O. N. Smith. It being a purely social affair, bril- 
liant conversation enthralled the members present in groups 
large and small. Music and delightful refreshments rounded 
out a happy evening, and the Club proved its value as a 
social, as well as an intellectual body. 

Through the efforts of the President, Prof. H. A. Hill, 
the program committee composed of Prof. Drane, Mrs. 
Burke, and the Secretary, Miss Mary Jenkins, the Club has 
enjoyed another year of profitable work, and looks to the 
future for a broader development and continued growth. 



Paee one hunared fcrt)) 



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THIS BOOK IS A SAMPLE OF OUR WORK 

CHE HOUSE OF BENSON is a printing plant specially equipped — a complete organization, 
artists, designers and workmen — whose thought and inspiration is concentrated in the pro- 
duction of college annuals and school literature. Each year annuals are printed for such 
institutions as Vanderbilt, Tulane, Alabama, Sewanee, Cumberland, Trinity College, Mississippi 
A. & M., Kentucky State, Transylvania, Marietta College, La. State University, and many others. 



College Annuals, Booklets, 
Catalogs, ProQrams 



mu^Mfm 




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Samples and Prices Cheerfully 
Furnished Upon Request 




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UNIVERSITY^' 



We Extend a Cordial Invitation to All Varsity Men 
to Make Our College Room Your Headquarters 
I I When in Nashville. I i 




HUDDLESTON-COOPER CO 

THE HOME OF BETTER CLOTHES 
CHURCH STREET AND FIFTH AVE. 



Page one hunareJ forl\)-lkrce 



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^^UNIVERSITY ^ 



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ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC 

WORK IN THIS BOOK 

WAS DONE BY 



VERALL'S 
STUDIO 





LEBANON, TENNESSEE 




NASHVILLE HEADQUARTERS 
FOR CUMBERLAND AND 
CASTLE HEIGHTS STUDENTS 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

AT 

JOE MORSE 
& COMPANY 

619-621 CHURCH ST. FACING 
CAPITOL BOULEVARD 



WE ALWAYS SHOW THE NEW 
STYLES FIRST 



Page one hundred fort^-four 



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UNIVERSITY 



Qmerican 
Qational ©ank 




LEBANON, TENNESSEE 



Established 1873 



A. H. PETTING 



Manufacturer 



Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry 

213 North Liberty St. BALTIMORE, Md. 

Factory Entrance 2 1 2 Little Sharp St. 



Eslahlished 1872 



Excelled by None 



E. A. Wright Bank Note Co. 

Engravers — Printers — Stationers 

Manufacturer of 
Class and Society Pins, Medals, Commencement 
Invitations, Dance Programs, Menus, Leather 
Novelties, Wedding Invitations, Stationery, Di- 
plomas, Year Book Inserts, Novelties, Calling 
Cards 

Office and Factory, Broad and Huntingdon Sts. 

Central Store, 1 2 1 8 Walnut 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



For 

Prompt and Efficient 

Service 



call the 



Lebanon 
Steam Laundry 



Page one hundred forly-frvc 



UNIVERSITV 



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I 




THE YOUNG MAN WHO KNOWS WEARS 

Stratford Clothes 

$20, $25, $30 

KNOX HATS— HABERDASHERY 

Spring Styles Ready 

CHAS. E. COOPER 



217 Fourth Ave., N. 



Nashville 



MAXWELL HOUSE 

Nashville, Tenn. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

THE MOST CENTRALLY LOCATED 

HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

L. M. GIBSON, Manager 



W. W. WILSON 

Kuppenheimer Clothes 

HOWARD & FOSTER 

and 

J. p. SMITH CO. SHOES 

ARROW AND EAGLE BRAND SHIRTS 
STETSON HATS 



LEBANON 



TENNESSEE 



COAPLEN'S 
BARBER SHOP 



First-Class Barbers 

PATRONAGE 

OF CUMBERLAND BOYS 

SOLICITED 



Pa^e one hundred forly-six 






TMEpnoEiNi^ 



aUiasswaasaaaas^ *-^ 



BwassssHn^^sa 



We Are Known for Best Shoe Repairs 
satisfaction guaranteed 

LEWIE LEFKOVITZ 

Practical Shoemaker 
all kinds of second-hand shoes for sale 

Lebanon, Tennessee 



106 S. CUMBERLAND ST 

Next to Custer TKeatre 



JACK WHARTON 

Confectioner — Fruits, Tobacco, Cigars 
"The Students' Store" 



LEBANON 



TENNESSEE 



LEBANON DEMOCRAT 

Printers and Publishers 

The Home of Quality Printing, Engraving, 

Embossing and Plain Printing 

Near N. & C. Depot East Gay Street 



SOUHR-LOVELL-HAMPTON 
COMPANY 

CLOTHIERS, FURNISHERS 

AND HATTERS 

424 Church Street NASHVILLE, Tenn. 








t-> 



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I^UNlVTJ^ITr^ 



GEORGE R. CALHOUN & CO. 

JEWELERS 

SILVERSMITHS, OPTICIANS 

STATIONERS 

Fifth Ave., Corner Union Nashville, Tenn. 



M. E. DERRYBERRY & CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

1 16- n 8- 120- 122 Second Avenue, North 

Nashville, Tenn. 



TAXICABS 

THE CITY GARAGE 



Telephone 462 



LEBANON 



TENNESSEE 



ASKEW 

STUDENTS- 


& COOK 

HEADQUARTERS 


DRINKS, CIGARS AND TOBACCO 
Next to West Side Hotel 



Page one hundred /or/p-sevn 



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^Nd 



UNIVERSITY 




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I 




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ATHLETIC 
GOODS 



WE HAVE THE LARGEST, BEST 
ASSORTED. AND MOST UP-TO- 
DATE STOCK IN THE SOUTH 



•^t(* 



STUDENTS ARE INVITED TO VISIT US 

GRAY & DUDLEY HDW. CO. 

SECOND AND THIRD AVENUES 
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 









VISIT 



"FRANK^S PLACE" 

MOST UP-TO-DATE BILLIARD HALL 
IN TOWN. EVERYTHING NEW 



COMPLETE LINE OF 

CIGARS and 
TOBACCOS 



Headquarters for Students 



NEXT TO SOUTHERN EXPRESS OFFICE 
FRANK HALLUM, Manager 



Page one hundred forl\)-eight 




TMEpnoEN 




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yjNIVERSITVj 



"^iTor that smart, swinging style, satis- 
^2|l factory fit, lasting workmanship 
and durable fabric. You will settle 
your clothes troubles for all time by letting 
us take your measurements. You get 
satisfaction or you don't get your suit. 



.^^ 



HOPKINS 
THOMPSON & GEBER 

TAILORS 



410 Church St. Maxwell House Nashville, Tenn. 



CHE circumferences, below, represent the 
relative protection offered to depositors 
by the five best banks in WILSON COUNTY. 



qoO^oopRot.^ 




^^^^ONNM^S^ 



Pa£2 one hundred fo ly-ninc 



O' 



JNIVER:SITX, ^ . ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ,^ „ ^, ^;^ 




Hotel 
Hermitage 



F 



F 



250 Rooms — 250 Baths 



$2 Per Day up 

Excellent Restaurant 
MODERATE PRICES 

Meyer Hotel Co. 

ROBT. R. MEYER. President 
HOMER WILSON. Manager 



e 



STUDENT HEADQUARTERS 

Nashville, Tennessee 



INDEPENDENT 
DRUG STORE 



Jno. Cowan and Alex McGlothlin 
Proprietors 

Telephone 500 

"TENNESSEE'S HANDSOMEST 
DRUG STORE" 

WHERE 
CUMBERLAND BOYS 

ARE 
ALWAYS WELCOME 

A LINE OF 

DRUGS AND SUNDRIES 

UNEXCELLED 

Our Fount Service Is the Pride of our Store 
Luncheonette Service 



Page one hundred fifty 



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^JJNIVERSITY e 



J.E.EDGERTON. J.T.AMES. R.D.POWELL. 

Pres. and Gen. Mgr. Vice-President Sec. and Supt- 


Capital Stock $100,000.00 


Lebanon Woolen Mills 


INCORPORATED 


Manufacturers 


Woolen Blankets 


LEBANON TENNESSEE 



Phone 479 



Res. Phone 474 



DR. H. H. FLY 

DENTIST 

Office 120!/i E. Main St. LEBANON, TeNN. 



The Starr Piano Co. 

Factory Distributing 
Wareroom 

240-242 Fifth Avenue, N., Nashville. Tenn. 



LEADING CLOTHIERS 



Since 1843 



^ CO y 



THE MOST COMPLETE SPORTING GOODS 
DEPARTMENT IN THE SOUTH 

416-422 Church St., Next to Maxwell 



Page one humlred fifly-one 




t, 






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^ JJNIVERSITV ^ ; 



THE 



pnOEINIX^ 



/~^ IS 



.7if\-« 



"THE DOOR OF THE UNIVERSITY" 



REGISTER AT 

T Ke Wooten-Baira Drug Compan}? 



"ALL THAT A DRUG STORE SHOULD BE" 



Headquarters for LAW BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

Distributors for HUYLER'S CANDIES 
WATERMAN FOUNTAIN PENS 



OUR SODA FOUNTAIN is a 

aeligntful place to meet and 
talk things over 



SOUTH SIDE OF SQUARE 

Telepnones, No. 32 or 450 



Page one hundred fifly-tvo 




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^Nd 



FOR ANYTHING IN SHOE REPAIRING GO TO THE 

Electric Shoe Hospital 

RUBBER HEELS FROM 30c UP 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 



Lebanon Furniture Co. 

QUEENSWARE, FLOOR COVERINGS 

AND 
DRAPERIES, STOVES AND RANGES 



"CALL THE TAXICAB" 

R. E. GRIMMET 

Phone Day 135 Phone Night 258 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



DR. J AS. H. SHAW 



CORBITT 



►HOTOGRAPHERS 



415i CHURCH STREET 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 



George Mitchell 



A. M. Mitchei: 



GEO. MITCHELL & SON 

TAILORS 

21 7 Sixth Ave., North Nashville, Tenn. 



JOY'S 



WILL SUPPLY YOUR FLOWER WANTS 

IN NASHVILLE 

Sixth Avenue and Church Street 



STARK GOODBAR 

Manhattan Shirts 

John B. Stetson Hats 

Stetson Shoes 

Standard Lines of Everything a Student Wears 



Page one hundred fifly-lhree 



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■JKS^ "'^SSSSSKKiSiiilir, 



John Decker & Son 

Manufacturers of 

Ice Cream, Cakes and 
Fine Candies 

We Deliver in the City and Ship to All Points 
Frappe and Punches for All Occasions 

1411 Church Street, Church and Sixth Ave. 
Nashville, Tennessee 



Cumberland Students' Patronage Solicited 

Custer Theatre 

N. E. Scales, Proprietor 



_ T _ 



Splendid Program 

Changed Daily 




Announcement 



McCl 



ain 



Tail 



oring 



Co. 



Announce 
that they have been appointed ex- 
clusive representatives in Lebanon 
and adjacent territory for the 
celebrated 

Society Brand 
Clothes 



For fifteen years the name has been identified 

with all that is best in America's 

artistic and industrial 

development. 



Remember If It Is For Men 
We Have It 



'■■"\ 



Page one hundred fift^-four 



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^it henever you 

see an Arrow 

think of 

Ccca-Cola 



Take a tip from the men -who top all the 
average tables. Drink 




They hno-w it's good to train on— to worh 
on. The one best, out-and-out thirst- 
quencher— full of refreshment, pleasure 
and -wholesomeness. 

Delicious — Refreshing 
Thirst- Quenching 




Shannon's Drug 
Store 



Headquarters for Students 



UNIVERSITVj 



C 




Lebanon Banner 
Printing Co. 

Printers and 
Publishers 



Publishers of Lebanon 

Banner and School 

Journals 

Headquarters for Students' 
Printing 

No. 30 PUBLIC SQUARE 
LEBANON, TENN. 



The Home of Quality and Service 

Stationery, Pennants, Sporting Goods 
Picture Frames 

PRESCRIPTIONS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
OUR FOUNT IS THE PRIDE OF OUR STORE 



Pa^e one hundred fiff^-five 



ISEI 



UNIVERSITY 



Pi. 



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/ 



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^.THEpnoniNi 




;J31a^,„,n^i_i,_„ Hi JdirSSS^ 



The 


B. 


H. 


Stief Jewelry 


Co. 






Diamond Merchants 












Silversmiths 












Stationers 












Opticians 
Jewelers 






Stief s Corner. Ch 
Capitol Bou 


urcK St 
evard 


Nash 


ville, 


Tenn. 



Best for the Money 



WRIGHT'S $2 HATS 

5 1 Church Street Fourth Avenue and Union 

Nashville, Tennessee 



^<n>° ^ 



is. 




'(SSb^^-' C& 



ATRONIZE OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



1. 


B 


. TAYLOR 

RESTAURANT 




Good Eats at All Hours 


YOUP 


business will be appreciated 

1 



Compliments of 



Pocket Billiard Company 

Students' Headquarters 
Lebanon, Tenn. 



Page one hundred jft^-six 



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