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Full text of "The Phoenix"

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GUY CARLETON THACKSTON 
Editor in Chief 

THOMAS EARL THOMPSON 
Business Manager 



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There are many interesting and brilliant chapter.? 
in the gloriously written history of Cumberland Uni- 
versity. Each year a new chapter is added, new char- 
acters are portrayed, fresh scenes are painted, and 
jireater and nobler achievements are recorded. Dur- 
ing our years of study at Cumberland we have read 
that story, and in reading there have been born and 
nurtured in our minds and hearts new dreams, new 
ambitions, and new h'opes that we, the Class of 1931. 
may, in our long pilgrimage toward distant goals, 
continue more gloriously than ever the story of our 
Alma Mater. 

If, when we grow weary of our journey, we stop to 
rest and chance to turn these pages, and if, in turn- 
ing them, old times and old memories are recalled to 
mind and our faith is strengthened and we gain re- 
newed courage to take up our journey again, then 
this book will have served its intended purpose. We 
content ourselves now with offering as nearly as pos- 
sible an exact copy of the eighty-ninth chapter of 
Cumberland's history. 



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^fMrationl 



TO 



DR. W. P. BONE 

who, during almost a half century of distin- 
guished service to Cumberland, has labored 
tirelessly and has given generously of his 
time and efforts to the end that the Univer- 
sity might serve her rightful purpose and 
maintain her high place among the institu- 
tions of higher learning in the South. 

His ideals are Cumberland's traditions. 
His clear vision, firm faith, and noble char- 
acter have served as an inspiration and a 
challenge to all of us. We feel that we shall 
be able to live more fruitful and profitable 
lives because of having known him. That 
we may, in some way, express our love and 
appreciation of the scjioiar and of the man, 
we most respectfully dedicate to him this, 
the 1931 volume of The Phcenix. 



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OENIX 



THE PHCENIX 



The Editors of Cumberland's first yearbook, in casting about to select a 
name for the new annual student publication, could have made no choice 
more appropriate or expressive of the institution whose activities it was 
intended to portray than The Phcenix. 

Most celebrated among the ancient fables of Egypt is the story of the 
Phoenix, a sacred bird revered by the citizens of civilization's earliest king- 
dom. The Phoenix was believed to live on the earth five hundred years, 
and at the end of that period lade its wings with spices and burn itself. 
As the old bird died among the flames and incense, a new Phoenix arose 
from the ashes to begin a sacred existence of five centuries. Thus the 
Phoenix has become mythology's most honored emblem of immortality. 

In 1843, after a difficult struggle, there was erected on the present Cum- 
berland campus what is now known as the Old College Building, which 
housed all departments of the University, the Law School, the College of 
Arts and Sciences, and the School of Theology. In 1863, in the midst of 
the other tragedies of the dark, lean Civil War era, the structure was de- 
stroyed by fire. 

An alumnus, looking on the heap of ashes and rubbish, wrote "Resur- 
gam" on a fallen pillar. 

"Resurgam" it was, and E cineribus resurgo — "from the ashes I arise" — 
became the guiding motto as the weakened University arose, Phcenixlike, 
to continue its record of service to the cause of Southern and national edu- 
cation. 

It is indeed fitting and proper that the Phoenix, ever living, ever dying, 
ever rising over opposition to continue its scared existence on and on, should 
provide the name of a yearbook of an institution whose history has been 
one so similar to that of the celebrated bird of immortality. 




31 




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CARUTHERS HALL 
Home of College of Law 




RESIDENCE HALL FOR WOMEN 




CAMPUS VIEW 
"Her tail towers whispering enchantments" 




CAMPUS VIEW 



HOENIX 




ADMINISTRATION 



Loyalty, efficiency, and vision — these three words describe Cumberland's administra- 
tion and those who direct and execute its policies. 

At the head of the University is a man to whom these three words particularly apply. 
The loyalty of Dr. Ernest L. Stockton has been indelibly imbedded during his long and 
varied connection with this institution, as a student, as head of the English department, 
as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and now as President. The progress of 
the school during the four years he has directed its course is an eloquent tribute to his 
efficiency. And the Endowment Drive which President Stockton is directing, more 
sure of success than ever before, which will fulfill his ambition of bringing Cumberland 
to her own, bespeaks the vision he has for the institution whose future he holds closest 
to his heart. 

To the University Secretary, Andrew Jackson Cash, is assigned the challenging task 
of financing the activities of the University through its most pressing era of "hard 
times." The task, thankless and discouraging as it is, has been attacked with vigor, 
and his success should win the admiration of the most critical. 

Perhaps the most loyal of Cumberland alumni is Charles R. Williamson, President of 
the Alumni Association, who moved into the administrative offices this year that he 
might devote his full time and effort to the endowment drive. Besides awarding the 
Williamson Scholarship and sponsoring the Williamson Oratorical Contest, as well as 
contributing liberally to the drive himself, Mr. Williamson has always shown himself 
to be a loyal son of his Alma Mater through his influence and administrative ability. 

Robert W. Adams, Alumni Secretary, has received wide commendation from the 
alumni for the effective way he has edited The Alummis since he was elected last year. 
Combining journalistic ability with a keen insight into what it takes to make an alumni 
magazine what it should be, he is producing a monthly pericdical of which Cumberland 
and her graduates may justly be proud. 

Judge William R. Chambers, venerable Dean of the Law School, continues to com- 
mand the admiration of the future barristers under his supervision, both as professor 
and administrator. And Prof. Will D. Young, who, like President Stockton, has stepped 
from the student ranks to a professorship and then to the position as Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, has proved that he can conduct a college as well as he can teach 
history. 

The others connected with the administrative offices — Registrar Thomas E. Bryant, 
Miss Sarah Hardison, Miss Aileen Ccok, and the secretaries to the Deans and Regis- 
trar — all deserve commendation for their service. 

If students and alumni will combine their loyalty with the loyalty and efficiency of the 
administration, the realization of the vision of our "Prexy" is assured. 




31 



17 




ENIX 





PRESIDENT ERNEST L. STOCKTON 




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18 




A.B., M.A. 

Dean of College of Arts and Sciences 
Professor of History 

A.B., M.A., Cumberland University; Graduate 
Work, Peabody Colleg:e. 




WILLIAM R. CHAMBERS 

A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 

Dean of Laiv School 

A.B,, Cumberland University: LL.B., Vanderbilt 
University ; LL.D., Cumberland Univer.sity. 




19 



OENI 




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WINSTEAD P. BONE 

A.B., M.A., B.D., D.D. 

Professor of Biblical Literature 

A.B., M.A.. Trinity College : B.D., D.D.. Cumber- 
land University ; Union Theological Seminary ; 
Univej-sity of Berlin; University of Chicago. 



RALPH T. DONNELL 

A.B., M.A. 

Professor of Mathematics 

A.B.. Cumberland University ; M.A.. University of 
Tennessee. 




JAMES 0. BAIRD 

A.B., M.A., LL.B, 
Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., M.A., LL.B.. Cumberland University; Grad- 
uate Work, Peabody College, Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 




KOBEKT J. WHERRY 

A.B., PH.D. 

Professor of Economics and Psychology 

A.B., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



20 




PHOENIX 




MABEL C. JONES 

A.B., M.A. 

Professor of English 

A.B., M.A., Cumberland University : Graduate 
Work, Peabody College and Co- 
lumbia University. 




p-'LOYD U. WILLIAMS 

A.E., M.A., TH.B. 

ProfeHsor of Latin and Greek 

l\..H.. Cumberland University; A.M., Th.R.. Prince- 
ton XJniveriiity ; Graduate Work at 
Vanderbilt Univerrtity. 




A. J. CASH 

A.E. 

University Secretary 
A.B., University of West Virginia 



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MRS. Y. P. WOOTEN 

A.C, M.A. 

Professor of E'diuMtion 

A.I*., Pealiody College: M.A.. Cumberland Univer- 
sity; Graduate Work. I'eahody Colle^rt*. 



21 




OENIX 





JUDGE A. B. NEIL 

A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Laiv 

Winchester Normal College ; LL.B., Cumberland 
University. 



MRS. MAY GREGORY ROUSSEAU 

Instructor in Dramatic Art 

Graduate Work at Schuster School of Public Speak- 
ing and Dramatics; Flowers Academy of Speech 
and Dramatic Art, Cincinnati, Ohio. 




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AGNES TILLEY 

A.B. 

Instructor in Typewriting and Shorthand 

A.B., Cumberland University; Graduate Work 
at Temple University. 



E. GEORGRE SAVERIO 

A.B., M.A., PH.D. 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A B.. M.A.. College of Montana ; Ph.D., University 
of Texas. 



22 




ENIX 





LAURENCE M. DICKERSON 

B.S., M.S., PH.D. 

Professor of Biology 

E.S., William and Mai-y : M.S., Univer.sity of 
Virginia ; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 



MATTIE AURELIA CROWE 

A.B., M.A. 

Voice 

A.B., Cumberland University ; M.A., Peabody 

College : Voice Certificate, Nashville 

Conservatory of Music. 





SUE FINLEY 

A.B., E.M. 

Instructor in Piano 

AM.. Cumbr.Tland University; B.M.. Nashville 
Conservatory of Music. 



THOMAS E. BRYANT 

A.B. 

Registrar 

A.M., CuniljcrUuul University. 



23 




ENIX 




ROBERT W. ADAMS 

A.B., LL.B. 

Alumni Secretary 

A.C, LL.B.. Cumberland University. 




MRS. WEST 
Matron of Girls' Dormitory 





MRS. HILL 
Matron of Men's Dormitory 



MRS. REED 
Matron of Girls' Dormitory 



24 




PHOENIX 







MISS SARAH HARBISON 
Latv Librarian 





MISS AILEEN COOK 
Secretary to the President 





MISS iMARTHA HARRIS 
Librarian 



MISS MADGE HARDISON 
Assiitant to tite University Secretary 



25 




OENIX 



YESTERDAY-TODAY-TOMORROW 



Cumberland was founded in 1842. Almost a century of distinguished service is the 
record of which Cumberland University is justly proud. No college of like size in the 
United States can boast of so great contributions to the nation as can this little Univer- 
sity located at Lebanon, Tenn. Nearly twenty-one thousand young men and young 
women have studied here. They have gone out to all parts of the world to enrich the 
lives of others. Cumberland graduates have taken leading parts in every phase of 
national life. Supreme Court justices, Senators, Congressmen, Governors, judges, 
ministers, and business men claim Cumberland as their "Alma Mater." Cumberland's 
inestimable contributions and achievements can best be appreciated by a comparison 
with other schools. She has always lacked the material resources, endowment, and 
physical equipment of larger schools, but has carried on continuously in spite of these 
disadvantages. Cumberland's noble efforts in the cause of higher education is a rich 
heritage with which every graduate is endowed. 

September 10, 1930, marked the beginning of the eighty-ninth year of Cumberland's 
history. Space does not permit us to mention the plans, hopes, and ambitions that have 
been born on the campus this year. There are, however, some significant events and 
changes that have taken place during the year that will have an important bearing on 
Cumberland's future progress. Most important of all is the recognition of Cumber- 
land's scholastic status by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
This coveted honor came to the University on December 4, when she was placed on the 
approved and accredited list by a vote of the Commission of Higher Institutions of the 
association at its regular meeting at Atlanta, Ga. This will prove of great benefit to 
the University and students as well. Credits secured at Cumberland will be accepted in 
all the schools of the South. Cumberland's recognition and fame in the past has been 
due, in large part, to the high standards of her faculty. With the addition of several 
new members, the faculty this year has been unquestionably strengthened. For loyalty, 
efficiency, competence, and Christian ideals the faculty that we now have takes rank 
with those of much larger institutions. The high standards of scholarship of the Uni- 
versity's staff of instructors is her best recommendation. 

As proud as we are of our "Alma Mater's" record of service, our interest does not lie 
primarily in the advancement of the past, but rather in the program of service for the 
future. In June, 1927, the Trustees and Administrative Officers of Cumberland adopted 
plans for an expansion program which called tor the projection of a campaign with an 
ultimate objective of a million dollars. Since that time they have been working tire- 
lessly and unceasingly toward the success cf this undertaking. Men of vision, courage, 
and determination are directing the affairs at Cumberland. Their unquestioned loyalty 
and love for this old institution gives us every reason to believe that the future holds 
greater progress and advancement for "Alma Mater." I'^ineteen hundred thirty-two 
will mark an epoch-making period of Cumberland University. It will be its ninetieth 
anniversary. Let every student and alumnus work toward the end that this celebration 
will mean the realization of dreams long cherished — "A Greater Cumberland." 




31 



26 





27 



*T^'% 




SENIOR CLASS 

COLLPIGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



LELAND D. BRADLEY, A.B. 

Brush Creek, Tennessee 

Delta Kappa Phi. 

Leland Bradley is one of the quiet workers 
who carries responsibility seriously and who is 
to be relied on to do his share in any enterprise. 
He has fine, positive qualities, and has the love 
and confidence of his friends. He is conscien- 
tious and accurate, and raises the level of hv- 
ing in any group of which he is a part. 



MILDRED LEONA BRYANT. A B. 
Flat Creek, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega : Secretary, Amasa- 
s:assean Literary Society ; Basketball, 
28, '29, '30, '31. 

Mildred Bryant has a happy temperament 
and makes friends easily. She is very respon- 
sive to the sun of love and kindness, and is 
most generous. "Polly" has a happy blending 
of the physical, mental, and spiritual in her 
personality. She ought to be a teacher of ath- 
letics, provided she would be allowed room for 
her love of romance. 



ANNETTA GERNT, B.S. 

Allardt, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega. 

Annetta Gernt is an ambitious, vigorous per- 
sonality, willing to work for what she wins. 
She is observant and accurate, and has an ex- 
cellent memory. She has a mathematical fac- 
ulty also. She is so reserved about her own af- 
fairs that not many people know her inti- 
mately, but there are, and always will be, many 
who admire and respect her. 



ESTHER FLORENCE GERNT, A.B. 

Allardt, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega. 

Esther Gernt is a friendly, couragEous soul. 
She is loyal to her school, and is a character we 
like to see, because we feel that college has de- 
veloped her in the way we like to see women 
grow. Love permeates her actions, although 
she does not say so much about what she feels, 
nor is she particularly demonstrative in show- 
ing her affection. 



28 



SENIOR CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



JOSEPHINE REA HARRIS. A B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega: Collegian Staff; 
Phcenix Staff : Basketball, '30 ; Zebra 
Club; Cardinal Club. 

Josephine Harris is rather conventional in 
her ideas and has wholesome awe for traditions 
and customs. She is a young lady so trained 
and equipped that if she happened to marry a 
man of wealth* she would be socially at ease 
and capable of making her home a delightful 
place to visit. She is particularly well fitted 
for a grand-opera singer both in artistic tal- 
ent and appearance. 

MARTHA DESHA JONES, A.B. 
Orunda. Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Sigma: Phcenix Staff; 
International Relations Club. 

Martha Jones is an unaffected young woman, 
with a gentle, loving disposition. She is so un- 
assuming that few people realize until they 
work with her what a determination she has 
and how direct in her attack against any prob- 
lem she faces. Sh*j has the grace of courtesy 
and traits of character which bind others to 
lier because of genuine worth and not through 
a surface charm alone. Of all careers open to 
women, she is best fitted for that of matrimony. 

VIRGINIA MAJOR, A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega : Associate Editor, 
Collegian; International Relations Club. 

Virginia Major is an imaginative person, 
with an appreciation for tha beautiful. She 
has great literary ability, and has been h-on- 
ored with important positions while in college. 
She enjoys a good time, and is the type of per- 
son who would enjoy giving hospitality to oth- 
ers. There is a sweet sanity about her, and, 
given a big cause, we believe that she could bs 
roused to big action. 



WALTER SCOTT MASON, A.B. 
Mayfield, Kentucky 

President. Senior Class : President, 
Lambda Chi Alpha : Collegian Staff ; 
Kentucky Club ; Vice President, Philo- 
mathean Literary Society. 

Walter Scott Mason is a friendly, much- 
admired person wh'o is interested in people 
and projects. He is talented and resourceful, 
and has a pleasing personality. He has splen- 
did literary and executive ability, and can labor 
in harmony with others. "Scotty" is capable of 
assuming burdens, and this fact will help him 
when he squares his shoulders to the Atlas load 
which comes to every man and woman who 
does his or her part of th'3 world's work. 




2\) 




SENIOR CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



I '^ 



CLARA LaVELLE PAYNE, A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Cecilia Club, '28. '29. '30; Cecilia Sex- 
tette, '30 ; Aniasagassean Literary So- 
ciety. 

Clara LaVelle Payne has dramatic and mu- 
sical ability, and, with her sense of romance, 
would find life on the stage congenial. She is 
a lovable person, and it is to be hoped that it 
may be possible for her to really choose some 
form of service in which her gift of human 
understanding and her interpretative powers 
may reveal to others tbe glory of the higher 
life. 

ATHENS CLAY PULLIAS, A.B. 
Castalian Springs, Tennessee 

Athens Clay PuUias is a person who likes to 
see in what ways he may put his knowledge 
acquired at college to practical use. We look 
to him for sane judgment and decisions, and 
we are seldom, if ever, disappointed. He is 
fitted for scholarly research, teaching, or so- 
cial work. We wish him well. 



FOUNT L. ROBISON, A.B. 
Wink, Texas 

President, Sigma Alpha Epsilon ; Vice 
President. Senior Class ; Football, '28. 
'29, '30; Basketball, '28, '29, '30, '31. 

Fount Robison is a mature character. Capa- 
ble, clear-headed, and ambitious, and with such 
a well-balanced personality, he sh'ould be suc- 
cessful anywhere. Fount shows kindliness and 
courtesy to people of every age and rank in 
life : and wherever he may be. he does not for- 
get that he has certain traditions and principles 
to uphold. "He leaves here a name that will 
not perish.'' 



FLORENCE ROGERS, A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Florence Rogers is not at all sure whether 
her head or h'er heart rules— and, indeed, no 
one else knows which is in command at the 
present time. She is ambitious and has high 
ideals. Florence is interested in other people, 
and takes pleasure in seeing them develop. Her 
college training has given her a wider knowl- 
edge of the powers of her own intellect, and 
there are many possibilities open to her in 
choosing a career. 



30 



SENIOR CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



E. W. ROSS, JR., B.S. 
Savannah, Tenin'Essee 

E. W. Ross, Jr., is a friendly and sociable 
student and a wise judge of character. He has 
a happy, sunny nature, is full of quips and 
cranks, and makes merry even on the dreariest 
day. "Lige" is clever and has ability, and wins 
lasting friendship by his many deeds for others. 



JOHN J. ROSS. A.B. 
Savannah, Tennessee 

John J. Ross is a versatile person with va- 
ried interests. He has the happy faculty of 
doing: his share in any undertaking, and more 
if called on. He has a happy, genial disposi- 
tion, and is best fitted for some profession in 
which his creative faculty may be of use. 
Good-looking, clever, original, and endowed 
with business ability, he has a promising fu- 
ture. 

KATHRYN ANNE SCOGGIN. B.S. 

RUSSELLVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Delta Phi Omega ; Treasurer, Senior 
Class. 

Kathryn Seoggin is a happy being, always 
finding fun in every situation. She appears at 
first to be a charming, irresponsible person. 
but those who live close to her know that she 
does all sorts of kind deeds for those who need 
her help. She has great facility in making 
friends, and ought to do distinctive work in 
her chosen field. "To live in hearts we leave 
behind is not to die." 

THOMAS E. THOMPSON, A.B. 
LEB.A.NON, Tennessee 

Amasagassean Literary Society : Cardi- 
nal Club ; Football. '28, '29 ; Basketball, 
'30 ; Business Manager, Phcenix. 

Thomas E. Thompson is one who can be 
trusted and relied upon. He is well fitted for 
physical work, being athletic, also for business 
details. Earl is practical in many ways, and 
has had sufficient experience in meeting the 
problems of life to give sane judgment and 
advice. He is a red head, but the kind of 
friend who wears well. 

H. T. WRIGHT, E.S. 
Murray, Kentucky 

Vice President, Amasagassean Literary 
Society. 

H. T. Wright is a person with a well-trained 
mind and a determination to succeed in what- 
ever he undertakes. He is honest and friendly, 
and has a host of friends here in Cumberland. 
He has reai talent for teaching, with enough 
executive ability and human understanding to 
be the head of some institution of learning. 




i>*>,-*;? 



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ENIX 









ALMA MATER 



On old Lebanon's Western Border, 

Reared against the sky, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

As the years roll by. 



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Chorus 
Forward ever be our watchword, 

Conquer and prevail; 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Cumberland, all hail! 

Cherished by thy sons and daughters, 
Sweet the memories throng 

Round our hearts, Oh, Alma Mater, 
As we sing this song. 



Thruugh whose portalu many young lives have 
come and gone, greatly enriched 'with intellectual and 
spiritual gains. 




COLLEGE OF LAW 



In 1826, fourteen years after the United States had definitely become a nation in the eyes of the world, 
the Cumberland Presbyterian Church established at Princeton, Ky., the institution of Cumberland College. 
After some years of trouble and difficulty, the Trustees decided to make a change in location, and asked for 
bids from towns in Tennessee to determine where the college should locate. Lebanon, Tennessee, made the 
most satisfactory bid, and it was to that town that Cumberland College was moved in 1843, to become Cum- 
berland University. 

On February 27. 1845, the Law Sch'ool had its inception, upon the drawing up, by the Trustees, of the 
following resolution: "Resolved, That Hon. N. Green be appointed Professor of Law and Political Economy 
in Cumberland University." However. Hon. N. Green declined, and it was not until 1847 that the Law 
School was established, following a recommendation by a committee appointed by the Board which read: 
"1. That a Department of Law be now established in the University, and that it be opened for the reception 
of students the first Monday in October following, if fifteen pupils can be obtained."' 

Hon. Abraham Caruthers was elected as th-e first Professor of Law, and delivered his inaugural address 
in July, 1847. This address was printed in the New York Legal Jourtial at the time. 

The Law School of Cumberland University was opened in October, 1847. TTie first recitation was held 
in the law office of Judge Robert L. Caruthers, seven students being present the first day and thirteen for 
the first term. It was just at this time that Judge Abraham Caruth-ers was getting out his first edition of 
"The History of a Lawsuit," a text used in practically every school in the State of Tennessee, up to the 
present day. 

The Law School grew rapidly, having twenty-five students the second term and forty during the third. 
Prior to the Civil War it was the largest law school in the United States, there being 181 students in 1857-58. 

In 1848, Hon. Nathan Green, Sr., was elected Professor of Law. He was at that time a member of the 
Tennessee Supreme Court. He resigned his position as member of this court in 1852, to become full Pro- 
fessor of Law until his death in 1866. Judge Bromfield L. Ridley, one of the chancellors of the State, was 
also elected in 1848 and served until 1852. In 1856, Nathan Green, Jr., was added to the law faculty, to 
continue in this position for a period of sixty-three years. John Cartwright Carter was made an addi- 
tional Professor of Law, in which position he labored for one year. He became a brigadier general in the 
Civil War and was killed in the battle of Franklin in 1864. 

After the Civil War, on the first Monday in September, 1865, the Law Sch'ool reopened with twenty stu- 
dents and Nathan Green, Sr., and Nathan Green, Jr., as professors. The former died in 1866. Hon. 
Henry Cooper, at that time a judge of the Circuit Court, was appointed Law Professor. 

In 1868, Hon. Robert L. Caruthers was elected to full professorship in the Law School. He was the 
leading spirit in the founding of both Cumberland University and the Law School, and was one of thra 
most prominent public men in the State. 

Dr. Andrew B. Martin was Law Professor from 1878 to 1920. Hon. Edward Ewing Beard was Professor of 
Law from 1912 to 1923. Judge William R. Chambers was elected Law Professor in 1920, and has acted as 
Dean of the Law School since Judge Beard's death. Judge Albert Williams was elected professor in 1923, 
and served two years. Hon. Julian Faxon was made Professor of Law in 1925, and served until 1930. 

In 1930, Judge A. B. Neil, Judge of the Circuit Court, was elected Professor of Law, and he still holds 
this position. 

Thus the Law School of Cumberland University has grown through the teaching and training of teachers, 
great both in character and in accomplishments. Cumberland Law School has sent out many of the finest 
men that have ever graced the bench and bar, and yearly her graduates have added to her reputation. Cum- 
berland University has a heritage of great and illustrious graduates and teachers, whose prominence has 
made the reputation of Cumberland Law School not only State-wide, but nation-wide. We who graduate 
in the Class of '31 are a small but vital part of those inspired young men and women v/ho have streamed 
through the doors of the Law School for eighty-six years. We accept the task of carrying on Cumber- 
land's former accomplishments humbly ; but with* such a heritage to inspire us, we shall not fail. 




31 



ri^^j^ i^vtf. r^ JSf^T f '^/>f*»*«^W*'^«(^f?^';¥*^*'^'^' 




COLLEGE OF LAW 

JANUARY CLASS 



THOMAS HUGHLON AKIN. LL.B. 
Jackson, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Philomathean Literary 
Society. 

FRED ALBERT, LL.B. 
Shawnee, Oklahoma 

Sigma Delta Kappa: President, January Law 

Class; Philomathean Literary Society; 

Oklahoma Club. 



PERRY N. BRYAN, LL.B. 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Sigma Alpha Epailon. 

WALTER MAXWELL BOYKIN. JR.. LL.B. 
Mobile. Alabama 



Sigma Alpha Epsllon. 



WILLIAM CHESTER BOWEN. LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 



JAMES W. BYRNE, LL.B. 
Ironton, Ohio 



LeROY COLLINS, LL.B. 
Tallahassee, Florida 

Sigina Alpha Epsilon ; Viec President, Senior 
Class. 

REYNOLD E. CONNOR. LL.B. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 



FRED D. CUNNINGHAM, LL.B. 
Hobart, Oklahoma 

H. B. DUDLEY. LL.B. 

West Palm Beach. Florida 

President, Philomathean Literary Society. 



34 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

lANUARY CLASS 



JAMES KEPLY EATON, LL.B. 

Okmulgee, Oklahoma 

Philomath can Literary Society : OklahoTna Club. 

ROBERT AUGUSTUS ELLIOTT, LL.B. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Kappa Ei^silon Pi. 



LEE A. ENOCH, JR.. LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 



SARAH RUTH FRAZIER. LL.B. 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

lota Tau Tau; PhiJo^natheait Literary Society; 
Portia Club. 



DAVID FRIERSON FLEMING. LL.B. 

Columbia, Tennessee 

Kajypa Alpha; Sigma Delta Kappa. 



CLYDE GORE, LL.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Philomathcan Literary 
Society. 



JOHN F. GREEN, LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

CHARLES E. HAGAN, LL.B. 
Pulaski, Tennessee 

Kappa Epsilon Phi; Philomathcan Literary 
Society. 



B. J. HAGAN. LL.B. 
Lebanon. Tennessee 



JOHN S. HALE. LL.B. 
Duncan, Oklahoma 




35 




COLLEGE OF LAW 

JANUARY CLASS 



LOUIS M. HITCH. LL.B. 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

GALEN T. HOPKINS, LL.B. 

Paragould, Arkansas 
Philomathean Literary Society. 



BRADLEY J. JOHNSON. LL.B. 
Ardmore, Alabama 



SCRAP B. JOHNSON, LL.B. 
Ardmore, Alabama 



ARTHUR JOUANOU. LL.B. 
San Francisco, California 

Sif/ma Delta Kappa; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Senior Law Class; Chairman, Philo- 
mathean. Literary Society. 

PIERCE KEESEE, LL.B. 
Pikeville, Kentucky 
Sigma Delta Kappa. 



W. R. KERSHAW, LL.B. 
Muskogee, Oklahoma 

Sigma D(dta Kappa: Philomathean Literary 
Society. 

EDWARD BOUDINOT LEVEE, JR., LL.B. 
Texarkana, Texas 

Sigma Delta Kappa: Vice President, Philoma- 
thean Literary Society ; Secretary, Texas 
Club ; Historian, Senior Class. 



J. CLARK LIPPART. LL.B. 

Washington, District of Columbia 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

RONALD G. Mackintosh, ll.b. 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 



36 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

JANUARY CLASS 



KENNETH MAINARD, LL.E. 
Wewoka, Oklahoma 
Sigma Delta Kappa. 

WALTER SCOTT MASON, JR, 
Mayfield, Kentucky 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



H. E. MITCHELL. LL.B. 
Cullman, Alabama 

M. CHADWICK MOUSLEY, LL.B. 

Walpole, New Hampshire 

Sigma Delta Kappa. 



DORRIS E. MOUSLEY, LL.B. 

Walpole, New Hampshire 

lota Tail Tail. 

JACK NEILL. LL.B, 
Lindsay, Oklahoma 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Philomathean Literary 
Society; Oklahoma Club. 



MELVIN W. NELSON. LL.B. 
Tampa, Florida 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; President, Philomathean 
Literary Society. 

R. E, NELSON, LL.B. 
Blytheville, Arkansas 



J. ALEXANDER OAKLEY, LL.B. 
Livingston, Tennessee 

ATHENS CLAY PULLIAS. LL.B. 
Castalian Springs, Tennessee 




37 



,;^Y 




COLLEGE OF LAW 

JANUARY CLASS 



GEORGE L. RADFORD. LL.B. 
Mount Ida, Arkansas 

HAROLD R. RATCLIFF, LL.B. 
Memph'is. Tennessee 



JAMES B. REAGAN, LL.B. 
Jamestown, Tennessee 

VERLON B. RODDY, LL.B. 

Black Oak, Arkansas 

Delta Kappa Phi; Sigma Delta Kappa. 



SOLOMON SEGAL. LL.B. 

Berlin, New Hampshire 

Member, I. O. B. B.; Mason, Fourteenth Degree. 

RAYMOND S. SEFF. LL.B. 
Bradford, Pennsylvania 

Zeta Beta Tau; Sigma Delta Kappa: Critic, 

Philomathean Society; Associate Editor, 

Collegian, '30 and '31. 

W. LANGSTON SMITH, LL.B. 
Austin, Texas 



H. D. STRINGER, LL.B. 

Memphis, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Kappa; President, Texas Club. 

JAMES P. WATLINGTON. LL B. 
Texarkana, Texas 



JACK W. WIECH. LL.B. 

Browsnville, Texas 

Pkilomathean Literary Society; Texas Chib. 

MONTY C. WORTHINGTON, LL.B. 
Frederick, Oklahoma 

Delta Kappa Phi; Philoniathean Literary 
Society; Oktahoma Club. 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 



LOUISE ADAMS, LL.B. 

Punxsutawney. Pennsylvania 

Iota TaiL Tau; PhUotnathcan Literary Society. 

ELMER HOUGHTON AKIN. LL.B. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

CLIFFORD P. ALLEN. JR., LL.B. 
Washington, District of Columbia 

Philomathean Literary Society: Critic of Law; 
Public Speaking Class. 

JULIA MARY ALLEN. LL.B. 
Thomasville, Alabama 

GEORGE WILLIAM ALLISON. LL.B. 
Athens, Texas 

Philomathean Literary Society; Texas Club; 
Reporter for Cumberland Cardinals. 

DONALD HERBERT AKIN. LL.B. 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

JAMES A. AMIS. JR.. LL.B. 
Emory, Texas 

Member, Texas Club; Philomathean Literary 
Society. 

T. R. ANDERSON. LL.B. 
Mercedes, Texas 

WILLARD D. ANDERSON, LL B. 
McPherson, Kansas 
Sigma Delta Kappa. 

ANTHONY A. ASPERO. LL.B. 

Worcester, Massachusetts 

Delta Kappa Phi. 

LEO C. BUCKLEY, LL.B. 

Refugio, Texas 

Philomathean Literary Society; Texan Club. 

HENRY R. BURKITT. LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Delta Kappa Phi; Football. '29-' SO; Cumberland 

Cardinalii : Y. M. C. A. ; SQuare and CainpaaH 

Club; Tennessee Clvb ; PhiloTnathean 

Literary Society. 







COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 



MELVIN BABB, LL.B. 
Joplin. Missouri 



IRL BABB. LL.B. 

Poteau. Oklahoma 

Pkilomathfan Literary Society. 



CARLOS A. BABILONIA, LL.B. 
Atjuadilla, Porto Rico 

DENNIS E. BEAUCHAMP. LL.B. 
Grove, Oklalroma 



■^ i 



i^S 



,'-%-i'- 





T^^: 







CHARLES LYON BECKLER. LL.B. 

Rochester, New York 

Pkilomathean Literary Society. 

HARRY BINDLER, LL.B. 
Tyler, Texas 



N. B. BIRGE. LL.B. 
Sherman, Texas 

UPTON S. BLACK, LL.B. 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Philomathcan Literary Society ; Oklahoma Club. 



OSCAR LEE BLACK, LL B. 
Springfield. Missouri 



JAMES M. BOLDING, LL.B. 
Hamilton. Texas 



JOSEPH GLADSTONE BOWEN. JR., LL.B. 
Mobile, Alabama 

ED S. BRITTON, LL.B. 

Quitman, Texas 

Philomatheav Literary Society; Texas Club. 



40 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 

LISLE G. BREWER, LL.B. 

Amarillo. Texas 

Sigma Alpha EpaUon. 

SHIELDS CAGLE 
Etowah. Tennessee 



"W. B. CAHOON. JR.. LL.B. 
Jaeksonvilie. Florida 



BRADLEY CARL CASSETTY, LL.B. 
Gainesboro, Tennessee 



RICHARRD H. COCKE, LL.B. 

Wellington, Te.xas 

Philomathean Literary Society; Texas Club. 

THEO. W. COLEMAN, LL.B. 
Valdosta. Georgia 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philmnathean Literary 
Society. 



WALTER L. GOLLARD, LL.B. 
Fort Worth, Texas 

BRENT CRAWLEY, LL.B. 

Austin, Oklahoma 

PhiloTnathean Literary Society. 



A. F. CURRY, JR., LL.B. 

Tulia, Texas 

Sigvia Alpha Epsilon. 

GEORGE W. DAGLEY, LL.B. 
Petros, Tennessee 

J. N. DANIEL, LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

J. MATHIS SCOTT DAWSON, LL.B. 
Fort Payne, Alabama 

Chattanooga Colleue of Law, 'SO; Member, 
Tennessee Bar, 





Ifv'A'fc; fC- 



^''■^ 



<*■ 




41 









COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 



DOROTHY DONALDSON, LL.B. 
Morristown, Tennessee 

lota Tan Tau; H<yn.orarij D. P. O.; Zebra Club; 

Law Editor, Phosnix ; Philomathean Lit- 

r.rary Society; Chi Omega; Uin- 

versity of Tennessee. 

DENNIS GRIFFIN DRXJGSWALL, LL.B. 
Marshaltown, Iowa 

OPIE B. ELLIS, LL.B. 
Greenville, Texas 

Philomathean Literary Society ; Cumberland 
Cardinals. 

FRANCIS B. ENGEMAN. LL.B. 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

W. W. FARMER. JR.. LL.B. 
Louing. Texas 

ANTONIO M. FERNANDEZ, LL.B. 
Raton, New Mexico 



JAMES HENRY FISHER, LL B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

W. C. FORESYTH, JR., LL.B. 

San Antonio, Texas 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



CATHERINE GANN. LL.B. 
Brink Haven, Ohio 



LOUIS SOLANO GARCIA, LL.B. 
Havana, Cuba 



WILLIAM G. GARDINER. LL.B. 
Chicago, Illinois 

GARLAND GIBBS, LL.B. 
Elmwood, Tennessee 



42 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 



LAURA F. GILMORE. LL.B. 
Douglas. Arizona 

SAMUEL PATRICK GILSTRAP. LL.B. 
Oklahoma City. Oklahoma 

Kappa Sigma; Pres^ldcvt. Oklahoma Club. 



THEODORE GOLDMAN, LL.B. 

Texarkana, Arkansas 
Philoinathcan Literary Society. 

FLOURNOY C. GOODMAN. LL.B. 
Biloxi. Mississippi 

Sigma Alpha Epsilwi ; PhUomathean Literary 
Society; Tenuis Club. 

HERBERT BLAIN GORDON, LL.B. 

Hamilton, Texas 

Philoviuthean Literary Society. 

LESTER O. GOSS. LL.B. 

0.->ceola Mills, Penn.'sylvaiiia 

PhUomathean Literary Society. 



GEORGE W. GRIFFITH, LL.B. 
Liberty, Tennessee 

JOHN GUESS, LL.B. 
Carthage, Tennessee 



EDWARD WARD HARRIS, LL.B. 

Spring HiU, Tennessee 

PhUomathean Literary Society. 

STEWART W. HELLMAN. LL.B. 

Fort Worth, Texas 

PhUomathean Literary Society; Texas Club. 



KENNETH HOCKENEURY, LL.B. 

Grinnell, Iowa 

PhUomathean Literary Society. 



EDGAR HOLMES HUMPHREYS. LL.B. 
Lakeland, Florida 




43 




COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 





^ .iSft: *i 








JOE HUTCHISON, LL.B. 

Panama City, Florida 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

WALTER D. JONES. LL.B. 

Merigold, Mississippi 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

C. A. KENNEDY, LL.B. 
Columbia, Tennessee 

President, Junior Class; Tennessee Club; 

PhiloTnathean Literary Society ; 

Member, American Legion. 

E. L. LAMBERT, LL.B. 
Cherokee, Oklahoma 

BRANDON LEWIS, LL.B. 
Dover, Tennessee 

Alpha Ta-u Omega; Philomathean Literary 
Society; Tennessee Club. 

JOHN GILBERT LOFGREN, LL.B. 
Missouri Valley, Iowa 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Philomathean Literary 
Society; Cumberland Cardinals. 

L. BUCHANAN LOSER, LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Philomathean Literary 
Society; Director of Athletics. 

J. A. MANISCALCO, LL.B. 
Houston, Texas 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philomathean Literary 
Society; Texas Club. 



GAINES ESTON MAXWELL. LL.B. 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

AUGUST GLEN MARLOWE, LL.B. 
Shawnee, Oklahoma 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philomathean Literary 

Society; Vice President, Okla- 

ho-ma Bar Club. 

VICTOR N. MARSICO. LL.B. 
Denison, Texas 

WILEY KENNETH MATTHEWS, LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philomathean Literary 
Society; Tennis Club. 



44 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

lUXE CLASS 



FRED E. MAUPIN. LL.B. 
Staunton, Virginia 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Sigma Nu; Pkilomathean 
Literarif Society. 

NELSON A. MILES, LL.B. 
Holland, Michigan 



THOMAS E. MITCHELL, LL.B. 
Jonesboro, Tennessee 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philomathean Literary 

Society; Tennessee Club; Citm- 

herland Cardinals. 

HERMAN H. MYERS. LL.B. 

Decatur, Indiana 
PhUoTnathean Literary Society. 



E. P. McCALLUM. JR., LL.B. 
Memphis, Tennessee 

W. L. McCRARY. LL.B. 

Woodbury, Tennessee 

Tennessee Chtb. 

JOHN HOUSTON McCARTT, LL.B. 
Oakdale, Tennessee 

PhU&mathean Literary Society; Vice President. 
Tennessee Club. 

J. D. McGUIRE, LL.B. 
San Antonio, Texas 



J. ROSS McKINNY, LL.B. 
Cedar Grove, Tennessee 



MERRILL E. NAISMiTH, LL.B. 
Saginaw. Michigan 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philoviathcav. Literary 
Society. 



FRANKLIN PARK. LL B. 
Jefferson City. Tennessee 

WRIGHT PATTON. LL.B. 
Oxford. Mississippi 

Alpha Tau Omega; PhiloTnalheaa Literary 
Society. 




..■:l^ 



45 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 



"!V i¥» ' 



TRAVIS J. PEPPER. SR., LL.B. 
Nashville. Tennessee 



"<<.^. 



RICHARD H. PETERS, LL.B. 

St. Joseph, Missouri 
Philomathean Literary Society. 



■ ^' 



MRS. MARGARET W. PETERS. LL.B. 

Beatrice, Nebraska 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

R. H. J. PHILLIPS, LL.B. 
New Albany, Indiana 

Siftma Delta Kappa; Sports Editor, Collegian; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Philomathean Lit- 
erary Society; Vice President, June Cla^s. 






%j 



m 




NELSON PHILLIPS, LL.B. 
Grinnell, Iowa 

SARAH RAUCH. LL.B. 
Memphis. Tennessee 

Phi Delta Delta; Philomuthcan Literary 
Society. 

JOE SHEPPARD REDD, LL.B. 
Florence, Alabama 

Sicima Alpha Epsilon; Sipnia Delta Kappa; 

Manai/cr. Intramural Athletics; President, 

Alabama Club; President, Cumberland 

Cardinals: Philomathean Literary 

Society; Phcenix Staff. 

CLYDE E. REED, LL.B. 

Brownsville. Kentucky 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

MERCER J. REYNOLDS, LL.B. 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Tejinc^see Club; Tennis Club; Philomathean 
Literary Society. 

JAMES P. ROACH. LL.B. 

St. Louis, Missouri 

Kappa Epsilon. 

W. A. ROBERTS, LL.B. 

Livingston. Tennessee 

Tennessee Club: Philomathean Literary Society. 

S. T. ROEBUCK, LL.B. 

Newton, Mississippi 

Philomathean Literary Society. 



46 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

[UNE CLASS 



JOHN J. ROSS, LL.B. 
Savannah. Tennessee 

PAUL WILLIAM RUBLE. LL.B. 

Okmulg:ce, Oklahoma 

Philamathcayi Literary Society; Oklahoma Club. 

WELDON S. SANDERS, LL.B. 

Center, Texas 

Philomathean Literary Society; Texas Club. 

LOUIS R. SCHUBERT. LL.B. 
Wartburg, Tennessee 

SifjinO' Alpha Epsilon; Philomathean Literary 
Society, Tennessee Club. 

HOLLIS R. SIMMONS. LL.B. 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 

RONALD SMALLWOOD, LL.B. 

Lubbock, Texas 

Sigma Delta Kappa. 

ROBERT EVERETT STEWART, LL.B. 
Kirbyville, Texas 

GLENN H. STEPHENS, LL.B. 

Williamsburg, Kentucky 

Sigma Delta Kappa. 

CONLY K. STEVENS, LL.B. 
Dallas. Texas 

Texas Chib ; PhiloTtiathean Literary Society; 

Cumberland University Ex- 

Service Men's Club. 

FRANZ E. SWATY, LL B. 
Fordyce, Arkansas 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philomathean Literary 
Society; Tennis. 

W. S. THOMPSON, LL.B. 

Columbus, Mississippi 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

MARK W. TUCKER. LL.B. 

Crossville, Tennessee 

President, Tennessee Club. 

GEAN H. TURNER. LL.B. 
Cleburne, Texas 

Sigma Delta Kappa: Philomathean Literary 
Society. 



^SPJ 








\ 






47 




COLLEGE OF LAW 

JUNE CLASS 

R. W. VAN HORN, JR.. LL.B. 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



JAMES STARK WARNER, LL.B. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

RALPH PIERCE WATKINS, LL.B. 
Atlanta. Georgia 

JAMES B. WATSON, LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Tennessee Club; Tennis Club; Philomathean 
Literary Soeicty. 

CLAYTON J. WEIR. LL.B. 

Groveland, Florida 

Philomathean Literary Society. 

MARY WEST, LL.B. 
Batesville, Texas 

Jcta Tau Tail; Vice President, Texas Club; 
Philomathean Literary Society. 

WELDON BAILEY WHITE, LL.B. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

G. A. WILGAND. LL.B. 

San Antonio, Texas 

Texas Club. 

ROSS H. WILLIAMS. LL.B. 
Wartburg,, Tennessee 

Tennessee Club; Philo-mathean Literary 
Society. 

ISHAM L. WILLIAMS. LL.B. 
Tompkinsville, Kentucky 

IRVING V. WOERNER. LL.B. 
Jackson, Tennessee 

ALONZO C. WOOD. LL.B. 

Wheeler, Texas 

Texas Club; Philomathean Literary Society. 

DONALD D. YAHOLA, LL.B. 

Wetumka, Oklahoma 

Delta Kappa Phi. 



SdiiJvi* 



48 





49 



PHOENIX 





JUNIOR CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



LILBURN SYDNEY BULLINGTON, A.B. 
Lebanon. Tennessee 

Iloneat good humor is the oil and wine of a merry 
meetirig. 



AMY JO BYARS. B.S. 
McMinnville, Tennessee 

Collegian Staff; Honor Roll. '29. '30; International 
Relations Club. 

Apply your ability, and success is yours for the asking. 



PERRY PHILLIPS DAVIS. B.S. 

Watertown, Tennessee 

Y. M. C. A. ; Amasagassean Literary Society. 

As merry as the day is long. 



ELIZABETH FREEMAN. A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Sigma ; International Relations Club ; 
Basketball. '29, '30, '31. 

The secret of being loved is in being lovely. 

And the secret of being lovely is in being unselfish. 



VIRGINIA GOLLADAY. A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Sigma ; Basketball, '30 ; Zebra Club ; 
Amasagassean Literary Society. 

Those who paint her truest praise her most. 



31 



JUNIOR CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



JAMIE A. LAINE, A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

Jatnie — whovi to know aright is to love. 



CARLETON H. LEROY. B.S. 
Dansville, New York 

Manager, Basketball ; President, International Rela 

tions Club ; Vice President, Y. M. C. A. ; Sports 

Editor, Phcenix ; Delta Kappa Phi. 

Muck study is a weariness to the flesh. 



HELEN LIGON, A.B. 

Mount Pleasant, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Sigma ; Basketball, '30, 

Her beauty begins to please. 
Her grace completes the charvi. 



STEWART LIGON. A.B. 

Mount Pleasant. Tennessee 

President, Sigma Delta Sij?ma- 

Sweet remembra-ytces grow from good services. 



JOHN T. McCULLY, A.B. 
Louisville. Mississippi 

President, Mississippi Club ; Amasagassean Literary 
Society. 

A wholcHome, level-headed individual, whom to see i» 
invigorating and encouraging. 




19 



51 




ENIX 



pT- ,- --'^-;s,T-<. •'■j',1 •/, , 




JUNIOR CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



HARRY PHILLIPS, A B. 
Watertown, Tennessee 

Editor in Chief, CoUeftiav : Debating Team ; Interna- 
tional Relations Club; Phcenix Staff; Winner. 
State W. C. T. U- Oratorical Contest, 
'30 : Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Few tliinps are hnpossible to diligence and skill. 



WILLIAM J. SKAGGS, A.B. 
Romont. West Virginia 

Cheerful people live longer on earth and live longer in 
our meiriories. 



GUY C. THACKSTON, A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

-Editor in Chief. Ph(ENIX ; President, Junior Class; 
Baseball, '28, '29. 

Character nrakea its own destiny. 



MATTIE MEDORA WALKER. A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega ; Amasagassean Literary Societj'. 

Rare is the union of beauty and virtue. 



ELIZABETH WILSON, B.S. 

Sparta, Tennessee 

Delta Phi Omega ; Cardinal Club. 

Thy modesty is a, candle to thy merit. 





31 





5;.! 




ENIX 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



EARL F. BAKER. A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 
Y. M. C. A. ; Amasaeaasean Society. 

IRENE BRATTON, A.B. 

Liberty, Tennessee 



ELIZABETH RAY CLARK, B.S. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

ROBERT DONNELL, B.S. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Lambda Chi Alpha ; Football, '29 ; Basketball, '29. 



ROSS W. DYER, A.B. 
Halls. Tennessee 
Delta Kappa Phi. 

LESTER F. ENOCH, B.S. 

Watertown, Tennessee 

Y. M. C, A. ; Amasagassean Society. 



MARY MARGARET HAMBLEN. A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 

ROBERT H. HARALSON, JR., B.S. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 



JULIA JANE HEREFORD, A.B. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 
Life Service Group. 

ELSIE MARGARET IVY, A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Amasagrassean Society. 




54 



P H O E 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



WINIFRED ENGLISH JONES. A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Sigma Delta Signia ; Amasagassean Society ; Most 
Popular Girl, '30. 

WALTER EVERETTE KING. B.S. 
Louisville, Mississippi 

Business Manager. Collegian ; Mississippi Club ; Ama- 

sagassean Society ; Manager, Freshman 

Basketball. '30. 



JAMES P. LANIER. A.B. 
Newbern. Tennessee 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

HARRY McCORD, A.B. 
Corinth. Mississippi 

Y. M. C. A. ; Life Service Group ; Mississippi Club ; 
Amasagassean Society. 



JOHN DILL NIX. A.B. 
Watertown, Tennessee 

Amasagassean Society ; Y. M. C. A. ; Freshman 
Basketball. '30. 

LEWIS ROBERTSON, A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Delta Kappa Phi. 



GEORGE N. SADKA. A.B. 

Meridian. Mississippi 

Delta Kappa Phi ; Mississippi Club. 

WALTER SMITHWICK. B S. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Delta Kappa Phi ; Amasagassean Society. 



JAMES K. SPECK. A.B. 
Blue Springs, Mississippi 

Freshman Basketball. '30: Life Service Group: Vice 
President, Class, '29-'30 ; Amasagassean Society. 

BENNIE LEE SPERRY, A.B. 
Mount Juliet, Tennessee 
Amasagassean Society. 





31 



HOENIX 





SOPHOMORE CLASS 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



MARIE THACKSTON, B.S. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 
Sigma Delta Sigma. 

MAX E. TILGHMAN. A.B. 
Kenton. Tennessee 

Delta Kappa Phi; Y. M. C. A.; Freshman Basketball, 
'30 ; Amasagassean Society. 



JOHN A. TROXLER. A.B. 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon ; President, Class ; Freshman 
Basketball, '30 : President, Y. M. C. A. ; Amasa- 
gassean Society ; Life Service Group ; Treas- 
urer, Class, '29-'30 ; CoUcgian Staff. 

TOMMIE ALLENE VANTREASE, A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Amasagassean Society. 



MARY PORTER VIVRETTE, A.B. 
Mount Juliet, Tennessee 

ALLIE D. WILLIAMS, A.B. 

Union City, Tennessee 
President, Life Service Group. 



ELSIE ELMA "WINFREE, A.B. 

Silver Point, Tennessee 

Basketball, '30-'31 ; Amasagassean Society. 

MILTON WINHAM, A.B. 

Portland, Tennessee 

Delta Kappa Phi ; I. R. C. ; Amasagassean Society. 



ESTER ELISABETH YOUNG, A.B. 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Amasagassean Society ; I. R. C. 



19 




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:^a&&^^^4^ 



56 




M(^ 



pn 




'^M 



57 



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PHOENIX 




FRESHMAN CLASS 



OFFICERS 

William Karr Bassett President 

Joe Brown Cummings Vice President 

Lucy Connell Secretary 

Sarah Flowers Treasurer 



ROLL 



Alcott, Arthur Lebanon, Tenn. 

Bassett, William Providence, Ky. 

Bandy, Katherine Lebanon, Tenn. 

Beauchamp, Beaulah Lebanon, Tenn. 

Bullington, Margaret Lebanon, Tenn. 

Connell, Lucy Eads, Tenn. 

Crawford, Hooper Cookeville, Tenn. 

Cummings, Joe McMinnville, Tenn. 

Davis, Ben Watertown, Tenn. 

Davis, Helen La Guardo, Tenn. 

Davis, Mabel Watertown, Tenn. 

Derryberry, James Kenton, Tenn. 

Dyer, Ross Hails, Tenn. 

Flowers, Sarah Kenton, Tenn. 

Grigsby, Bess Lebanon, Tenn. 

Hancock, Mildred Lebanon, Tenn. 

Herrera, Miquel Salvador, C. A. 

Hewgley, Dorothy La Guardo, Tenn. 



HiBBETT, Emma Lebanon, Tenn. 

Humphreys, Burton .Lebanon, Tenn. 

Jennings, Lyndon Lebanon, Tenn. 

Layne, Clyde Lebanon, Tenn. 

Matherly, Claire Lebanon, Tenn. 

Ott, Robert Terra Haute, Ind. 

Patton, James Watertown, Tenn. 

Prehoda, David Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Rink, Julia La Fayette, Ga. 

Rink, Mary La Fayette, Ga. 

RoBisoN, Shannon Wink, Texas 

SiMMS, Alma Watertown, Tenn. 

Swain, Frances Gladeville, Tenn. 

SwANN, Ray Watertown, Tenn. 

Tramel, Reba Lebanon, Tenn. 

Yahola, Lyman Okmulgee, Okla. 

Tilley, Mrs. Vance Lebanon, Tenn. 




19 C 



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PHOENIX 



AVE ATQUE VALE 



That Day of days — awaited long with keen 

Anticipation — dawns at last; this day, 

Cumberland, we say good-by to all 

Those scenes associated with thy name — 

The time spent here, though long it once did seem, 

Assumes proportions brief in retrospect. 

From far and wide we came, a helpless brood, 
And under thy protecting wing we found 
Safe shelter. Taught by thee, we now would try 
Our pinions, fly from out the nest to scar 
To those far-distant heights which beckon us. 

To leave will not be to forget! As days 
Do lengthen into weeks and months then years, 
Our thoughts will oftentimes return to thee; 
We'll live again in reveries these days 
That now have passed but ne'er can fade away 
Completely. 

Fame and fortune may be ours 
In future years, but, as we thrive, we hope 
To bring fresh glory and renown to thee 
As well, and take our rightful place among 
Thy noted sons and daughters and enrich 
The goodly heritage bequeathed to us. 

The hour of parting has arrived, and we 
Our valedictory in Roman words 
Do make : 

"All hail, O Cumberland, farewell!" 

Irving V. Woerner, 
Law, '31. 



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PHOENIX 






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PHOENIX 




SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



Founded at the University of Alabama 
March 9, 1856 

TENNESSEE LAMBDA CHAPTER 

I'-oundcd 1S«) 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Dean Will D. Young 
Coach Buchanon Loser 



Floiver: Violet 



FRATRES IN 

Alcott, a. a., Jr Tennessee 

Bassett, Willtam Kentucky 

BoYKiN, Max Alabama 

Brewer, Lyle Texas 

Collins, LeRo y Florida 

CuMMiNGS, Joe Brown Tennessee 

Curray, Alfred F., Jr Texas 

FoRESYTHE, Carl Texas 

Galligan, George Illinois 

Goodman, G. C Mississippi 

Hitch, Louis M Texas 

Humphreys, Burton Tennessee 



UNIVERSITATE 

LippERT, Joe Pennsylvania 

Patton, James Tennessee 

Phillips, Harry Tennessee 

ReddEjJoe Alabama 

RoBisoN, Fount L Texas 

RoBisoN, Shannon Texas 

Scott, Cooper Mississippi 

Shubert, Louis Ten ncssee 

Trimble, Francis Oklahoma 

Troxler, John Tennessee 

Voorhies, Clifford Florida 

Williams, Robert B., Jr Tennessee 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Anderson, Alexander Green, William 



Armstrong, Col. Harry L. 
Askew, Robert 
Doak, Rufus 
Elam, James 

EVERSTON, C. B. 



Grissim, J. H. 
Humphreys, Allison, Jr. 
Shannon, Homer 
Turner, Sam R. 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the oldest fraternal organization represented on the Cumberland 
campus, and Tennessee Lambda is the fourth oldest active chapter in S. A. E. Tennessee 
Lambda was organized in 1860, four days after the fraternity was born at the Univer- 
sity of Alabama. Dying during the war, when her entire membership joined the ranks 
of the gray, and rising up again soon after Appomattox, the chapter celebrated her sev- 
entieth birthday in the fall of 1930. Tennessee Lambda has at present more than seven 
hundred alumni, outnumbering those of any other chapter in Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



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PHOENIX 




DELTA KAPPA PHI 



Founded at Marshall College 
April S, 1929 

TENNESSEE EPSILON CHAPTER 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

E. George Saverio 

R. J. Wherry 
Revell Williams 



BuRKiTT, Henry R Tennessee 

Dyer, Ross Tennessee 

LeRoy, Carlton H New York 

Prehoda, David Pennsylvania 

Prehoda, James Pennsylvania 

Robinson, Louis Tennessee 

Roddy, Verlon B Arkansas 

Rosamond, Denton Mississippi 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Sadka, George N.__ Mississippi 

Sinclair, J. Clark Mississippi 

Smithwick, Walter Tennessee 

TiLGHMAN, Max E Tennessee 

Watson, James B., Jr Tennessee 

WiNHAM, Milton Tennessee 

WoRTHiNGTON, MoNTY Oklahoma 

Yahola, Donald D Oklahoma 



Miller, Victor 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Muse, Losey T. 



TiLLEY, Vance W. 




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PHOENIX 




LAMBDA CHI ALPHA HOME 




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PHOENIX 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



Founded at Boston University 
1909 



Colors: Purple, Green, and Gold 



ALPHA SIGMA ZETA 

Established at Cumberland University 
April 17, 1917 



Flower: Violet 



Ralph T. Donnel 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Bennett, James 
BuRTs, Sam N., Jr. 
CoLEMEN, T. Wade 
Daniels, J. Newton 
Davis, Raymond O. 
DoNNELL, Robert 
Green, Harry 
Hearne, J. Shelton 
Lanier, James P. 
Maniscalco, Joseph A. 
Martin, Deane 



Martin, James 
Martin, Thomas 
Mason, Walter S. 
Marlowe, A. Glenn 
Matthews, Wiley K. 
Naismith, Merrill E. 
SwATY, Franz E. 
Taylor, Robert 
Van Horn, Russell W. 
Wolfenden, Ernest W. 



James O. Baird 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Adams, Robert Paty, W. Ralph 

Bone, Winstead P. Smith, E. E. 

Bryan, Jimmie Wilkinson, Dr. R. Dean 

Donnell, Comer Vaughan, R. Gwynn 



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3) 



70 




PHOENIX 



SIGMA DELTA KAPPA 



INTERCOLLEGIATE LAW FRATERNITY 



Founded at University of Michigan 
1914 

PI CHAPTER 

Established at Cumberland University 
February 5, 1924 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Judge A. B. Neil 

FRATRES IN URBE 

VV. C. Buchanan 



FRATRES IN 

Akin, Thomas Hughlon Jackson, Tenn. 

Albert, Fred Shawnee, Okla. 

Anderson, Willard McPherson, Kan. 

Cornish, William McAlester, Okla. 

Fowler, Richard _.VVewoka, Okla. 

Galligan, George M Marion, 111. 

Gore, Clyde B Lebanon, Tenn. 

Jouanou, Arthur San Francisco, Calif. 

Kershaw, William R. Muskogee, Okla. 

Keeset, F. Pierce Pikeville, Ky. 

Levee, Edward B Texarkana, Texas 

Lewis, William Brandon Dover, Tenn. 

Lippart, J. Clark Clearfield, Pa. 

LoFGREiN, John G Missouri Valley, Iowa 

Mainard, Kenneth Wewoka, Okla. 

Martin, E. Snow Tampa, Fla. 



UNIVERSITATE 

Maupin, Fred E Roanoke, Va. 

Mousley, M. Chadwick _Walpole, N. H. 

Maxwell, G. Eston Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Neill, Jack .-Lindsay, Okla. 

Peters, Richard H St. Joseph, Mo. 

Roddy, Verlon Black Oak, Ark. 

Seff, Raymond Seymour Bradford, Pa. 

Smallwood, George R Lubbock, Texas 

Stephens, Glenn Williamsburg, Ky. 

Stringer, H. D Memphis, Texas 

Strong, William A Jackson, Tenn. 

Trimble, Francis K Sayre, Okla. 

Turner, Gean H Cleburne, Texas 

Warner, J. Stark Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

WiECH, Jack Brownsville, Texas 




31 



PHOENIX 




SIGMA DELTA KAPPA 



INTERCOLLEGIATE LAW FRATERNITY 



ROLL OF 

University of Michigan 
Valparaiso University 
Chattanooga College of Law 
Detroit College of Law 
Northwestern University 
Ohio Northern University 
San Francisco Law School 
Minnesota College of Law 
University of Alabama 
Chicago-Kent College of Law 
Westminster Law School 
University of Louisville 
Knoxville College of Law 
University of Baltimore 
Wake Forest College School of Law 
Los Angeles College of Law 



CHAPTERS 

Benjamin Harrison Law School 
Indiana Law School 
Atlanta Law School 
National University 
University of Georgia 
Cumberland University 
DePauw University 
Hastings College of Law 
St. Joseph Law School 
University of Hlinois 
St. John's College of Law 
John R. Neal College of Law 
University of Tennessee 
Lake Erie School of Law 
Columbia University School of Law 
Des Moines College of Law 



Atlanta Chapter 
Chicago Chapter 
Indianapolis Chapter 
Minneapolis Chapter 
Knoxville (Tennessee) Chapter 
Brooklyn Chapter 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Detroit Chapter 
Washington (D. C.) Chapter 
San Francisco Chapter 
Maryville (Tennessee) Chapter 
Chattanooga (Tennessee) Chapter 




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PHOENIX 




MEMBERS 



Dorothy Donaldson . 
Mattie Walker 
Virginia Golladay 

Jo Harris . 



Most Rov: 



Lord High Horse 
Most High Horse 
Keeper of Documents 
Trainer in Chief of Horses 



Umpteen years ago several girls with "vision" at the University of Tennessee formed 
a club soon to be famed far and wide for its name, Zebra; its colors, black and white; 
and its members, who oft were wont to bow low and cry three times, "Zebra Be Praised." 
This noble club, with its so far unascertainable purpose, so impressed four co-eds of 
Cumberland, who heard of it from a U. T. Zebra alum., that they immediately organized 
Beta Chapter. The club fosters love of parties and wholesome cooperation to that end. 




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V / 



DELTA PHI OMEGA 





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PHOENIX 




DELTA PHI OMEGA 



Founded at Cumberland University 
November 30, 1926 




Colors: Orchid and Silver 



TENNESSEE ALPHA CHAPTER 



SPONSOR IN URBE 

Miss Agnes Tilley 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Floorer: White Rose 



Bryant, Mildred Tennessee 

CoNNELL, Lucy Tennessee 

Flowers, Sarah Tennessee 

Gernt, Annetta Tennessee 

Gernt, Esther Tennessee 

Harris, Josephine. . Tennessee 



Harrison, Margaret. 

Johnson, Lois 

Major, Virginia 

McDaniel, Rebecca.. 

ScoGGiN, Kathryn 

Vaughan, Catherine. 



.Tennessee 
.Tennessee 
.Tennessee 
.Tennessee 
.Kentucky 
.Tennessee 



Walker, Mattie Tennessee 

SORORE HONORARIA 

Mrs. Vance Tilley Dorothy Donaldson 

SORORES IN URBE 

Paty, Mrs. Ralph Miller, Mrs. Victor 

Freeman, Ruth Cooksey, Mrs. Vann 




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PHOENIX 




SIGMA DELTA SIGMA 



Colors: Rose and Silver 



Founded at Cumberland University 
November 9, 1926 

ALPHA CHAPTER 



Flower: Sweetheart Rose 



Mrs. Robert Adams 
Julia Humphreys 
RuBYE Nell Thackston 



SORORES IN URBE 



Mrs. Winstead P. Bone, Jr- 
Mrs. Will D. Young 
Elsie Mae Alexander 



SOROR IN FACULTATE 

Miss Mabel C. Jones 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Jones, Martha Freeman, Elizabeth 

Troxler, Rebekah Thackston, Marie 

GoLLADAY, Virginia Jones, Winifred 

Ligon, Helen Ligon. Stewart 



PATRONESSES 



Mrs. George Golladay 
Mrs. Allison Humphreys 
Mrs. Minerva Fenton 
Miss Virginia Adams 
Mrs. John Hooker 



Mrs. Charles Williamson 
Mrs. Elmer McAdoo 
Mrs. Ed Graham 
Mrs. G. R. Jones 
Mrs. Dan Ingram 



Mrs. Neal McClain 



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PHOENIX 





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PHOENIX 



IOTA TAU TAU 



NATIONAL LEGAL HONOR SORORITY 

Founded at Southwestern University 
Los Angeles, California, 1925 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



ZETA CHAPTER 

Established at Cumberland University 
May 21, 1929 



Flowers: Violet and Yellow Rose 



SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Adams, Louise Pennsylvania 

Allen, Julia Mary Alabama 

Donaldson, Dorothy Tennessee 

Frazier, Sarah Ruth Tennessee 

Hardison, Sarah Tennessee 

MousLEY, Doris B. . New Hampshire 

West, Mary Texas 

OFFICERS— 1930 

MousLEY, Doris B Dean 

Frazier, Sarah Ruth Associate Dean 

Allen, Julia Mary Secretary 

West, Mary Treasurer 

Donaldson, Dorothy Reporter 

Adams, Louise Historian 

OFFICERS— 1931 

West, Mary Dean 

Allen, Julia Mary Associate Dean 

Adams, Louise Secretary and Treasurer 

Clouse, Eunetta National Historian 




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PHOENIX 





CUMBERLAND CARDINALS 



The Cumberland Cardinals is an organization composed of the red-headed members 
of Cumberland University's student bcdy. Its purpose is to promote the need and use 
of red hair, and its motto is: "United, We Stand; Divided, We Fall." When a bunch 
of determined students get together, and on top of that are auburn-haired, the combina- 
tion is similar to effects resulting from close association to that gentle explosive known 
as T.N.T. 

OFFICERS 

Joe Redd President 

Lucy Connell Vice President 

Josephine Harris Secretary and Treasurer 

George Allison Reporter 



Allison, George W. 
BuRKiTT, Henry 
Byars, Amy Jo 
Connell, Lucy 
Ellis, O. B. 
Engeman, Francis B. 



MEMBERS 

Harris, Josephine 
Mitchell, Thomas E. 
Speck, James C. 
Thompson, Thomas Earl 
Wilson, Elizabeth 
Williams, Robert 




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PHOENIX 





LIFE SERVICE GROUP 



Requirement for Membership 
All students who puri^ose to entei' some form of Christian Life Service 

Purpose 
To unite all those of this common purpose in fellowship with Clirist and each other 



OFFICERS 



Allie D. Williams 
John Troxler . 
Julia Hereford 

Revell Williams 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 

. Faculty Advisor 



Crawford, Hooper 
Hereford, Julia 
Speck, James 
Troxler, John 



MEMBERS 

Williams, Allie D. 

Williams, Revell 

Yelton, Charles 

McCoRD, Harry (Honorary 
Member) 




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PHOENIX 






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PHOENIX 



THE AMASAGASSEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



NOS PALMA MANET 

Organized, 1837 

The Amasagassean Literary Society can truly claim the distinction of being the old- 
est organization on the campus. It was founded six years before old Cumberland Col- 
lege was transferred to Lebanon under the name of Cumbe"land University. Five 
charter members were included in the society when it was established in 1837 in the 
early days of Cumberland at Princeton, Kentucky. The youthful organization became 
a permanent part of this institution in 1848, when a new charter was obtained from the 
General Assembly of Tennessee, six years after its removal to Lebanon. Judge Robert 
L. Caruthers was chosen to deliver the first address, and Judge Nathan Green, Sr., was 
elected first honorary member. 

As the Amasagassean Society approaches the century mark, it shows no sign of ad- 
vancing old age; in fact, its birthday last fall, when ninety-three candles betokened its 
long, enviable record as a part of Cumberland University, was one of the liveliest and 
most favorable ever enjoyed in its history. Twice in succession has the society produced 
the winner of the State W. C. T. U. Oratorical Contest. It contributed two members 
of the debating team of 1930, and several members of the debating class this year. 
Eighteen thousand students have passed directly or indirectly under its influence during 
the past ninety-three years; and now Nos Palma Manet — "the palm awaits us" — is more 
truly than ever before the motto of the organization. The palm of victory is awarded 
for worth-while service. 

OFFICERS 

Earl Thompson President 

H. T. Wright Vice President 

Mildred Bryant Secretary 

Walter Smithwick Treasurer 

Guy C. Thackston Critic 



Baker, Earl 
Bassett, William 
Bratton, Irene 
Bryant, Mildred 
CoNNELL, Lucy 
CuMMiNGS, Joe Brown 
Davis, Ben Clay 
Derryberry, James 
Enoch, Lester 
Flowers, Sara 
Ivy, Margaret 
Jennings, Lyndon 
Jones, Winifred 



ROLL 

Layne, Clyde 
McCoRD, Harry 
McCuLLY, John 
McDaniel, Rebecca 
Nix, John 
Ott, Robert 
Patton, James 
Phillips, Harry 
Robertson, Lewis 
RoBisoN, Shannon 
Speck, James 
Smithwick, Walter 



Thackston, Guy 
TiLGHMAN, Max 
Thompson, Earl 
Troxler, John 
Vantrease, Aleen 
Thackston, Marie 
Walker, Mattie 
Winham, Milton 
Winfree, Elsie 
Wright, H. T. 
Young, Esther 
Yelton, Charles 




31 



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OENIX 

























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84 



PHOENIX 




PHILOMATHEAN DEBATING SOCIETY 



The Philomathean Debating Society liolds a meeting every Tuesday evening with the 
aim of malving its members more proficient in the art of speaking before an audience. 
Debating and extemporaneous tallying are especially emphasized. 

A Bacheloi' of Oratory degree is awarded to each member who attends regularly and 
takes part on programs a sufficient number of times. 

The Philomathean Society was organized in 1847, and has been continuously active 
since that time in training law students in public speaking and argumentation. 



OFFICERS 

Hugh B. Dudley, Martin Nelson, James Bolding . 

Walter Scott Mason, E. B. Levee, Jr., Con Stephens 
Mrs. Doris B. Mouslev, Louis \l. Hitch, Roger Phillips 



Presidents 
. Vice Presidents 
Secretary-Treasurers 



ROLL 



Adams, Louise 
Akin. Elmer 
Akin. Donald 
Albert, Frf.d 
Allison. G. VV. 
Allen. Clifford 
Amos, J. A. 
Anderson, T, R. 
Anderson, VV. D. 
Aspero, Anthony 
Barcus, John M, 
Babb, 1. 
Babb, Melvin 
Beckler, C. L. 
Bendler, Harry 
BOYKIN, W. M. 
Bryan, Perry 
Britton, E. S. 
BOWEN. J. G. 
Brewer. L. G. 
Buckley, George C. 
Black, Oscar L. 
Burts, Sam N. 
Burkitt, H. R. 
Black, Upton S. 
Bryant, .Pauline 
Cahoos, W. B. 
Cagle, Shields 
Crawley, Brent 
Chf-Lf, L. T. 
Conner, R. E. 
Cornish, William 
Coleman, T. W, 
Curray, a. D., Jr. 
BoLDiNC, James 
Collard, W. L. 
Dawson, Georgk T. 
Dudley, H. B. 
Daniels, J. M. 
Dawson, Jok M. 



Donaldson, Dorothy 
Drugswall, Dennis 
Kadane, Jack 
Engeman, Francis 
Ellis, O. B. 
Farmer, W. W., Jr. 
Fernandez, A. M. 
Fisher, James 
Foster, H. T. 
Forsythe, Carl 
Franklin, John 
Frazer, Sarah 
Gann, Katherine 
Galligan, George 
Gardiner, W. G. 
Gilstrap, S. p. 
Fleming, Dave 
Gore. Clyde 
Gordon, H. B. 
Goss, L. O. 
Goldman, T. 
Goodman, F. C. 
Griffith, G. W. 
Hopkins, Glen 
Eaton, James 
Harris, Ward 
Humphreys, E. H. 
Hengley, Walter 
Hearn, J. S. 
Hare, W. C. 
Hellman, Stewart 
Hockenbury, Kenneth 
Hutchinson, Joe 
Johnson, B. J. 
Johnson, Mrs. B. J. 
JouANou, Arthur 
Kershaw, Bill 
Keesee, F. p. 
Jones, W. D. 



Kirk, Boyden 
Kennedy, C. A. 
Locke, R. H. 
LippART, Joe 
Louis, W. B. 
Lofgren, Fred 
Redde, Joe 
Trimble. Francis 
Maupin, Fred 
Martin, Snow 
Mason, W. S. 
Smith, Langston 
Hale, M. C. 
Mitchell, T. E. 
Marlow, Glen 
Myers, Herman 
Miller, J. W. 
Matthews, W. K. 
Maniscalco, J. a. 
Maynard, K. E. 
Mousley, Chadwick 



MousLEY, Mrs. D, 
Leonard, William 
McCart, John 
McMuRRY, T. C. 
McGee, D. H. 
McKinney, J. R. 
McGuire, Joe D. 
Lofgren, J. G. 
Nainsmith, E. 
Neal, Jack 
Nelson, R. E. 
Phillips. R. H. 
Peters, Mrs. M. 
Patton, Wright 
Powell, D. S. 
Peters, Richard 
Phillips, N. 
McIntosh. Ronald 



B. 



W- 



Roddy, V. 
Seff, R. S. 
Stephens, G. H. 
Segal, Solomon 
Warner. J. S. 
v-aden, j.a,mes 
Roebuck, S. T. 
Rauch, S.-vrah 
Reed. Clyde 
RuBLF, Paul 
Reynolds, M. 
Roberts, W. A. 
Smallwood, Ronald 
Scott, W. C, Jk. 
Shubert. L. R. 
S,\iith, Ford 
Swaty, Fran>" E. 
Stewart, R. E. 
Stephens. Conley K, 
Simmons, Holly 
Saunders, W. S. 
Thom' son, Scott 
Turner, G. 
Schaul, Gordan a. 
Tucker, Mark 
Watson, J. B., Jr. 
Wood, A. C. 
Wiech, J. W. 
West, Mary 
worthington, montey 
Weir, J. Clayton 
Wilkinson, Means 
Wolfenden, Ernest 

WiEGAND, G. A. 

Williams, Ross 
Williams, James 
Williams, LI. 
White, F.. J. 
Yahola, Don 




31 



PHOENIX 





YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



The Y. M. C. A. is one of the oldest organizations on the Cumberland campus. It was 
organized in 1856, and has not been out of existence since that date. The Association 
has for its aim: Bringing young men to Christ and sharing with them the joys of Chris- 
tian fellowship. 

The Y. M. C. A. was the only active Christian organization for the students this year. 
And to take care of this need was the special efforts of the leaders. The active group 
was small, but they carried the spirit of the "Y" and were of much help on the campus 
in this way. 

The local unit was active in district and State work the past year, and next year there 
will be a State "Y" conference held at Cumberland. 

OFFICERS 

John A. Troxler ..." President 

Charles Yelton Vice President 

James Speck Secretary and Treasurer 

Professor Revell Williams Faculty Sponsor 



Baker, Earl 
Crawford, Hooper 
Davis, Perry 
King, Everette 
McCoRD, Harry 
iVIcCuLLEY, John 



MEMBERS 

LeRoy, Carlton 
Nix, John D. 
Phillips, Harry 
RoBisoN, Fount 
RoBisoN, Shannon 
Speck, James C. 



Skaggs, W. J. 
Troxler, John A. 
Williams, Prof. Revell 
Wright, H. T. 
Yelton, Charles 




31 



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PHOENIX 





EX-SERVICE CLUB 



Front Row, left to right: 
Ross H. Williams, Theodore Goldman, Galen T. Hopkins, Geokge W. Dagley 

Second Row: 
Hubert E. Mitchell, Ralph P. Watkins, Conley K. Stephens, C. A. Kennedy, 
James Stark Warner 

Third Row: 
H. B. Dudley, William C. Bowen, Sarah Ruth Frazier, Walter Keith Crawford, W. G. Gardner 

MEMBERS 

William C. Bo\\t;n Berea, Ky S. A. T. C. 

Walter Keith Crawford CookeviUe, Tenn U. S. Army 

George W. Dagley Petros, Tenn 317 U. S. M. P. 

H. B. Dudley West Palm Beach, Fla 139 U. S. Inf. 3Sth Div. 

Sar,\h Ruth Frazier Chattanooga, Tenn Red Cross, U. D. C. Hospital 

W. G. Gardner St. Petersburg, Fla U. S. Marines 

Theodore Goldman Texarkana, Ark U. S. Navy 

Galen T. Hopkins Paragould, Ark U. S. Infantry 

C. A. Kennedy Columbia, Tenn U. S. Infantry 

Hubert E. Mitchell Cullman, Ala S. A. T. C. Infantry 

Conley K. Stephens Dallas, Te-xas U. S. Cav. Officers Training School 

Ralph P. Watkins Atlanta, Ga 116th Field Artillery 

James Stark Warner Wilkes-Barre, Pa U. S. Navy 

Ross H. Williams Wartburg, Tenn U. S. Infantry, 90th Div. 

The above group of law students represents thirteen World War veterans of various 
branches of service and one Red Cross worker. During the 1930-31 terms, members of 
the Ex-Service Club participated in various patriotic events, including the Armistice 
Day celebration, parade, and speaking, and the Christmas "Big Brothers" newspaper 
sale for charity, sponsored by the American Legion of Lebanon. 



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PHOENIX 




9 




88 



PHOENIX 




THE TEXAS CLUB 



The "Lone Star State" is known for doing things in a big way, and this year at Cum- 
berland there was, as usual, a larger aggregation of Texans than any other denomina- 
tion. The "Longhorns" met early during the first semester and organized under a 
constitution which stated as the purpose of the club: "To promote the general welfare 
of Texas law students attending Cumberland University; to better qualify the students 
for the practice of law in Texas; and to create, promote, and maintain social and pro- 
fessional ties." 

In pursuance of this program, classes were held by the Texas Club three nights each 
week during the first term for the study of Texas statutes, conducted by Jack Wiech, a 
member of the Texas bar. Moot court was held once each week, presided over by Judge 
A. C. Wood, wherein the laws of Texas were followed and practiced by the participants. 

Much practical knowledge was gained by the students who were active in the work 
of the Texas Club, but most prized of all for the students were the friendships made 
with their future practitioners at the bar. 



H. D. Stringer 
Mary West 
E. B. Levee, Jr. 



OFFICERS 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Allison, G. W. 
Anderson, T. R. 

BlNDLER, H. 
BoLDING, J. M. 

Brewer, L. G. 
Britton, Ed S. 
Buckley, L. C. 
CocKE, R. H. 

COLLARD, W. L. 

CuRRAY, A. F., Jr. 
DeLee, a. a. 
Elus, O. B. 



MEMBERS 

Farmer, W. W., Jr. 
Foresyth, William C, 
Gordon, H. B. 
Hale, J. S. 
Hellman, S. W. 
Hitch, L. M. 
McGuire, J. D. 
McA^URRAY, T. C. 
Maniscalco, J. A. 
MoRisco, Victor 
Petty, J. L. 



Sanders, VV. S. 
Saverio, George E. 
Smallwood, R. 
Smith, Langston 
Stevens, C. K. 
Stewart, R. E. 
Turner, G. 
Watlington, J. P. 
Wiech, J. W. 
WiEGAND, G. A. 
Wood, A. C. 




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PHOENIX 





INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 



OFFICERS 
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

C. H. LeRoy President Elizabeth Freeman 

Harry Phillips Vice President Winifred Jones 

Elkabeth Freeman Secretary and Treasurer Esther Young 



The International Relations Club is the only scholastic organization on the Cumber- 
land campus. The requirements for membership are one year's study in Cumberland 
and a general average of 87 M; per cent in all studies. This club is a chapter of the 
International Relations Clubs sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace. Meetings are held bimonthly, and talks by members or by special speakers are 
given. The club has at its disposal a number of books on subjects pertaining to the 
interests of the club. 



Gernt, Annetta 
Golladay, Virginia 
Freeman, Elizabeth 
Byars, Amy Jo 
Jones, Martha 



MEMBERS 

Phillips, Harry 
LeRoy, Carleton 
Majors, Virginia 
Hereford, Julia 
Jones, Winifred 



Winham, Milton 
Young, Esther 
McDaniel, Rebecca 
Thackston, Guy 



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PHOENIX 




"THE CIRCLE" 



MEMBERSHIP 

Officers of First Period Officers of Second Period 

Theodore Goldman President J. VV. Miller 

W. VV. Farmer, Jr Vice President A. A. De Lee 

E. H. Humphreys Secretary-Treasurer J. H. Franklin 

W. D. Jones Program Committeeman Leo C. Buckley 



Fisher, J. H. 
Cameron, J. C. 
Scott, W. C, jr. 
Flyn, J. W. 



Harris, E. W. 
Hewgley, Walter 
Roebuck, S. T. 
Lambert, E. H. 



Phillips, Pete N. 
Allison, H. W. 
Drugswall, D. G. 
Thompson, Thomas E. 



The purpose of this organization is to promote and encourage the art of public speak- 
ing among its members, and certainly that art is undoubtedly one of the primary re- 
quirements of a young lawyer. 

"The Circle" is limited to a membership of twenty in order that each person may 
speak at least once every week. Frequent talking before an audience is desired because 
of the realization that the ability to speak extemporaneously and impromptu is acquired 
only as a result of constant practice. 



31 




91 



PHOENIX 









'^^LAwm^^^ 



19 -c 



fflfe^a 




31 



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PHOENIX 



PUBLIC SPEAKING CLASS 



Natural poise, a feeling of ease, the ability to think clearly and rapidly, and to con- 
struct and properly arrange a speech while standing before an audience are primary 
aims of a class of this nature. When these purposes may have been accomplished, pol- 
ishing touches may then be added here and there as a further development of the art of 
oratory. And if by diligent and persistent endeavor students have constantly kept 
apace with the substantial and technical points suggested during the class instruction, 
they are inevitably the beneficiaries of an invaluable art that will continually reap untold 
promotions to a happier and a more successful life. 

Merely to mention the benefits derived through the jovial association of the class 
members is to mention an ample and satisfying accomplishment. The enthusiasm, the 
"pep," the willingness to attempt the apparently impossible, the fervent desire for the 
progress of fellow students, the good nature in accepting criticism, the readiness to do 
anything for the betterment of the entire class, and the regular class spirit maintained 
at every instant are all stones which have builded this highway of happy association. 

MEMBERSHIP 
Officers of First Period Officers of Second Period 

Ed Levee Texas • President W. L. Collard Te.\as 

Dorothy Donaldson Tennessee Secretary-Treasurer Dorothy Donaldson Tennessee 

Jack Neal Oklahoma Reporter Theodore Goldman Arkansas 

GuY' Thackston Tennessee Bess Grigsby Tennessee 

Milton Winham Tennessee C. R. Allen Washington, D. C. 

Mary West Texas F. E. Swaty Arkansas 

The Literary Class of Public Speaking, being similar in every respect to the Law 
Public Speaking Class, has also heaped laurels upon each and every student pursuing 
its course. In accordance with convenience, a few of its members have been associated 
with the Law Public Speaking Class. 



19 




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PHOENIX 






94 



31 




PHOENIX 





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PHOENIX 





DEBATING TEAM 



In the spring of 1930 Cumberland entered her first team in the field of intercollegiate 
debating. Her reward was a record of five victories and two defeats. 

Encouraged by this splendid showing, a large number of students have taken an active 
interest this year. As The Phoenix goes to press, Cumberland debaters have already 
won four out of their five encounters, defeating Waynesburg College, McKendree Col- 
lege, Purdue University, and Milligan College, and losing to E. T. S. T. C. 

The Cumberland teams are coached by Prof. Ralph Donnell, head of the Mathematics 
Department, and trained by Mrs. May G. Rousseau. H. T. Wright, Harry Phillips, Joe 
Brown Cummings, Guy Thackston, John McCart, Hooper Crawford, and Theodore Gold- 
man have served in intercollegiate encounters. The chain-store and free-trade ques- 
tions have been used this year. 

The entire schedule is as follows: 

Waynesburg College (Pa . ) Here February 20 

McKendree College (Ohio) Here March 1 7 

Purdue University (Indiana). Here April 1 

East Tennessee Teachers Here April 7 

Milligan College Here April 10 

Tennessee Tech Dual April 17 

Johnson Bible College Dual April 21 

East Tennessee Teachers Johnson City April 22 

Milligan College Milligan College, Tenn April 23 

Lincoln Memorial University Harrogate, Tenn April 24 




31 



PHOENIX 





BUCHANAN LOSER, Coach 
Although this is Coach's first year at Cumberland, he has already endeared himself to every student on 
the campus who knows him. Assuming his new duties in September. Coach Loser set about his work with 
an enthusiasm and determination that made the least observant think that he had always been a Cumber- 
land Bulldog. Relieved o£ the duties of coaching a football team, Coach began early to work with his bas- 
ketball candidates. How well he did his work is evidenced by the loyalty shown by the student body during 
the entire season. The familiar appellation of "Buck" is a pretty good indication that Buchanan Loser is 
one of the most popular as well as capable athletic directors Cumberland has had in many years. 

JOE REDD, Student Manager of Athletics 
The small, nicely dressed, red-headed young man that you have seen dashing about the campus all year 
with a seorebook in his hand is Joe Redd. As Student Manager of Athletics, Joe has acquitted himself in 
a manner that elicits praise from the whole student body. Efficiency, dependability, and loyalty has char- 
acterized his work. Joe was always wiUing to help when there was a problem to be solved and work to be 
done. We can think of no student athletic manager in recent years that was more popular on the Cumber- 
land campus than Joe Redd has been. 

PROF. RALPH DONNELL, Chairman of Faculty Athletic Committee 
•"Prof," as ho is familiarly known to almost every student, is an untiring worker. His enthusiasm and loy- 
alty stamps him as a true son of Cumberland. He organized the Alumni Athletic Association, which has 
been responsible for our ltl30-31 athletic program. Professor Donnell's interestedness in student activities 
would indicate that he is just as much a student as any of us. We are of the opinion that the University 
administrators could not have decided more wi.sely than when they chose "Prof." Donnell as Chairman of 
the Faculty Athletic Committee. 




31 



PHOENIX 




GRRRR 

In years past, it has always been the pride of Cuniberlanders to turn to this page of The 
Phcenix -with the expectation of seeing the pictures of maroon and white-clad football 
players. If the chain of Cumberland's athletic tradition has been broken, it is because 
the bulldog, emblem of the University's athletic prowess; did not growl on Kirk Field in 
1930. 

During the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of our University in June, 
1930, they saw fit, and wisely, to withdraw their financial support of intercollegiate ath- 
letics from the University's budget. Although enthusiastic lovers of football and loyal 
followers of the bulldog sought by every available means to put a football team on Kirk 
Field, they were unsuccessful, because the financial burden was too great. 

For the past few months probably no other subject has been so widely discussed in 
American colleges as college athletics. Many university presidents believe that football 
is being overemphasized. It is not for the writer to enter into any such controversy, 
but he does believe that college athletics should have an important place on the Univer- 
sity calendar of student activities. We are proud to state in this connection that our 
own President, Dr. E. L. Stockton, is a firm believer in athletics as a means of develop- 
ing alert minds and strong bodies. 

As a substitute for intercollegiate athletics, a plan of intramural competition was in- 
troduced on the Cumberland campus this year. The plan has worked satisfactorily to 
all concerned. Greater numbers of students have been able to participate in sports. 
This should be the primary aim of college athletics. 

Cheer up, Cuniberlanders! If you were denied the thrills, excitement, and the pride 
of a football team this year, you are privileged to dream of days to come — days when 
the bulldog will growl again. When Cumberland shall have been adequately endowed, 
the familiar bark of signals, the thud of a punted pigskin, an intercepted pass, a touch- 
down, and the enthusiastic yells of Cumberland students are scenes that will reign once 
more on Kirk Field. 




31 



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PHOENIX 





VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 



FIRST GAME 

The Cumberland Bulldogs opened their season with the Burk Terrors. This game 
was hotly contested, the aftray being much better than the score indicated. At the end 
of the half the score was 16 to 17 in favor of the visitors, but during the second half the 
Terrors showed their eye for the basket was considerably keener than the Bulldogs'. 
Final score: Terrors, 42; Cumberland, 27. 

SECOND GAME 

Rockvale came to Cumberland to match their five with the Bulldogs, and the final 
score of this game was as much in our favor as the first game was for the Terrors. The 
score at the end of the half was: Cumberland, 20; Rockvale, 17. But in the second half 
the visitors were swept off their feet. The final whistle came with the first victory for 
Cumberland with a score of 45 to 17. 

THIRD GAME 

With such an overwhelming victory in the second game, the Bulldogs decided to play 
Vandy, at that time a favorite in the Southern Conference. This game was played in 
the West End Gym, Nashville. It goes without saying the Bulldogs sustained another 
defeat. However, you can put it down in this resume that the boys really gave them 
plenty fight, even if Bill Schwartz, all-Southern football selection, was on the team. 
Final score: Vandy, 50; Cumberland, 26. 

FOURTH GAME 

With another week's hard practice, the Bulldogs clashed with the Ideal Aces, from 
the capital city. This game appeared to be a crip for the Aces. Their floor work and 
passing were unexcelled. Three of our most important cogs had three personal fouls 
at the end of the game. Final score: Aces, 42; Cumberland, 22. 



31 




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99 



PHOENIX 





FIFTH GAME 

Bethel College Cagers, from Russellville, Kentucky, journeyed down to exchange 
goals with the Bulldogs, and before the game the two. teams were doped to be evenly 
matched; or if there were any odds, I g'uess Cumberland had a fair edge. At the end 
of the first half the Bulldogs were trailing a few points, and during the second period 
the score steadily increased for the Kentuckians. Final score: Bethel, 40; Cumber- 
land, 26. 

SIXTH GAME 

Again the Burk Terrors came over to carry back the bacon in the second match with 
the Bulldogs. But they anticipated too much. This game was one of the roughest 
games of the season, as both teams were putting all they had into the game. At the 
end of the half the score was 21 to 18 in favor of Cumberland, and during the second 
half both teams did a great deal of scoring, but the Bulldogs won out by a slight margin. 
Final score: Cumberland, 35; Terrors, 33. 

SEVENTH GAME 

The second game with Bethel College was played in Russellville, Kentucky. The boys 
left the University to avenge themselves of the last game with the Kentuckians. It 
wasn't a bad game, either, as the boys fought hard and steady through both halves. 
The score at the end of the half was 14 to il in favor of Bethel. The second twenty 
minutes passed rapidly, and both teams made many points. At the sound of the official's 
whistle the score indicated that the Bulldogs had been defeated again by a small score. 
The final score: Bethel, 28; Cumberland, 24. 

EIGHTH GAME 

Again the Rockvale team came oack to even up the score with the Bulldogs, Cumber- 
land having won the second game of the season from them by a score of 20 to 17. The 
visitors gave the boys more trouble in this game than they did in the first. To be frank, 
the members of the Bulldog squad really had to extend themselves to defeat them. 
Cumberland at the end of the half was behind four points, the score being 8 to 12 in 
favor of Rockvale. During the last period of the game we got our eye on the basket 
and won the game. Final score: Cumberland, 31; Rockvale, 24. 



19 




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PHOENIX 




NINTH GAME 

David Lipscomb was the next game on the schedule, and it was a real game of basket- 
ball. Cumberland was boiling over with the old fight that was ever predominant on the 
court. The visitors were only four points behind at the end of the half, and it was any- 
body's game until the last ff the second half. The Bulldogs started shooting-, and it 
looked as if they couldn't miss. The final score: Cumberland, 31; David Lipscomb, 21. 

TENTH GAME 

Tennessee Polytechnic Institute had one of the best teams in the Mississippi Valley 
Conference, and the game we played them that night was one of the best games played 
during the season, in spite of the fact that the visitors defeated us by a fairly large 
score. At the end of the half T. P. L was 16 points ahead; but when the Bulldogs came 
in from the half, they showed the spirit and fight of a new team. The boys were just a 
little outclassed, and the game was not a victory for Cumberland. Final score: T. P. L, 
44. Q u. 35. 

ELEVENTH GAME 

This was the second game with the Cagers, from T. P. L; and, to be fair, the Bulldogs 
were outplayed and outclassed in every phase of the game. The fouling in this game 
was bad; and when a shot was attempted, it was doubtful whether it would get to the 
backboard or not. The T. P. I. team showed beautiful form, speed, and accuracy. The 
whistle blew, and it was good for the Bulldogs, for the visitors couldn't miss. The final 
score was: T. P. L, 69; Cumberland, 24. 

TWELFTH GAME 

The first game with the Tidwell Stars was played in Father Ryan Gym, Nashville. 
The Bulldogs played a wonderful game up to the end of the first half, the score being 
10 to 6 in favor of the Stars. When the second half started, the Stars shot with devas- 
tating accuracy, which won them the game by a big score. Final score: Tidwell Stars, 
3.5; Cumberland, 23. 




31 



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PHOENIX 





THIRTEENTH GAME 

The Cumberland University Basketball Team journeyed over to play the David Lips- 
comb Cagers. This game was hard fought from the initial sound of the official's whis- 
tle. The score at the end of the first haff clearly indicated that the Bulldogs were play- 
ing a little better brand ball, but during the second half the Nashvillians staged a 
decided comeback and won the game by a fair score. Final score: David Lipscomb, 37; 
Cumberland, 25. 

FOURTEENTH GAME 

The Tidwell Stars again came to Cumberland to do battle with the Bulldogs, after 
having been defeated in their first affray in their local gym at Nashville. At the end 
of the half the Bulldogs were trailing by 2 points, the score being 22 to 20. At the 
beginning of the second half the Tidwell Stars came back to win the game to the tune of 
a big score. Final score: Stars, 56; Cumberland, 3L 

FIFTEENTH GAME 

The last game of the season was a play-off between Burk Terrors and the Bulldogs. 
Each team had won one game each, and this game was arranged to break the deadlock. 
It was said by many of the spectators that this last game was the best of the season — 
that there was more fight and real sportsmanship than any other game they had seen. 
It was in this game that Shannon Robison sustained a head laceration and had to be 
taken from the court in the last few minutes of play. The Terrors won by a big score. 
Final score: Terrors, 58; Cumberland, 35. 

SEASON ENDED 




31 



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PHOENIX 





C. U. CO-EDS, 63; B. T. I., 37 

On December 13 the Co-Eds of Cumberland opened their basketball season on the 
home court with a whirlwind attack against B. T. I., of Nashville. The supremacy of 
the local sextette was never cnce threatened, as they secured a lead eariy in the game 
and held it throughout. When the final whistle blew, the contest ended with the score 
63 to 37 in favor of our girls. Connell, Lib Freeman, and Vaughan played the forward 
berths, while Ligon, Bullington, and Winfree held down the guard positions. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 23; AUSTIN PEAY NORMAL, 28 

On January 16 the girls' team met as their opponent Austin Peay Normal, of Clarks- 
ville; and in one of the most poorly played games of the season, on the home court, the 
Cc-Eds met defeat by the score of 28 to 23. The girls seemingly had not recovered from 
the effects of the Christmas holidays. They simply failed to get started. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 30; WSM, 35 

The girls next met the highly touted WSM sextette, from Nashville, on January 24. 
The game proved to be one of the most thrilling combats of the whole season. Strength- 
ened by the acquisition of Ruth Freeman, the team showed splendid teamwork. But the 
insurance girls happened to be on the long end of a 35-to-30 count when the last whistle 

blew. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 18; ACETTES, 44 

In the first game played on a foreign court, January 28, our Co-Eds met a decisive 
defeat, the largest score of the season being piled up on them by the Acettes, from Nash- 
ville. This game resembled a free-for-all battle more than it did a well-refereed basket- 
ball game. Lib, Ruth, and Lucy attempted to play forward positions, while Vaughan, 
Ligon, and Winfree tackled guard berths. Coach Troxler was glad to simply get his 
team home safe and sound. 




31 



HOENIX 





F uzA^Am-c. ^^B.BN Caar. -^ 



mwEWNf Vbuqhn - V. jwewer BuLuneioH- a. 
- — <i V . . V '^"l) 



C. U. CO-EDS, 22; DUPONT, 36 

Another disheartening game on a foreign court ensued when the Co-Eds clashed with 
Dupont on January 31. The girls never woke up. Everything went wrong, and the Old 
Hickory girls won a decisive victory by a 36-to-22 score. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 32; ACETTES, 35 

What a game! Cumberland fans and backers declared that this was one of the best 
games that they had ever seen in the C. U. Gym. The Co-Eds were determined to show 
those Acettes they could play basketball, if not a free-for-all. So on the night of Feb- 
ruary 12 the girls invited the Acettes to Lebanon. The teamwork was almost perfect. 
Capt. Lib Freeman, Cousin Ruth, and Kitty Vaughan just about equally shared scoring 
honors. Red Connell, Maggie Bullington, and Elsirus Winfree did some splendid guard- 
ing. The fans yelled and shouted themselves hoarse, more pep and spirit being mani- 
fested at this game than any other, either girls or boys, of the entire season. The 
Acettes won the game by three points, but our girls felt that they had gotten sweet 
revenge. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 27; AUSTIN PEAY NORMAL, 42 

On February 13 the girls — that is, some of them — motored to Clarksville to play Aus- 
tin Peay Normal. Tired out by the long journey, one or two first-string men absent, 
and thoroughly exhausted by the encounter with the Acettes the night before, the Co- 
Eds fell before the onslaughts of the Clarksville team 42 to 27. Coach Troxler felt that 
he should have won the two encounters with the Normal, but somehow his girls just 
didn't meet them at the right time. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 37; DAVID LIPSCOMB, 21 

On the night of February 23 the girls came into their own and mopped up with the 
David Lipscomb sextette in the home gym, 37 to 21. Ruth and Lib Freeman and Red 
Connell shared scoring honors, while Ligon, Winfree, and Bullington did some excellent 
guarding. 




31 



104 



PHOENIX 





C. U. CO-EDS, 36; WSM, 45 

February 26 the Co-Eds met WSM in the Nashville Gym and played one of the best 
games of the season on a foreign court. The team had excellent teamwork, but lacked 
ability to ring points in the last quarter. The score was tied many times throug'hout 
the encounter. The game ended with the score 45 to 36 in favor of WSM. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 25; DAVID LIPSCOMB, 29 

The Co-Eds next met David Lipscomb in Nashville on March 3, and were defeated 
28 to 25. The girls should have won this game, but failed to click. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 59; B. T. I., 31 

Again the Co-Eds played in Nashville, this time against B. T. L, and won 59 to 31. 
The date of the game was March 5, and was the last played on a foreign court. Every 
member of the team played good ball. 

C. U. CO-EDS, 34; INDEPENDENT LIFE, 13 

The last game of the season was played on March 10, and it marked another victory 
for the Co-Eds. The score was 34 to 13. Ruth Freeman was responsible for most of 
C. U.'s points, and Connell, Bullington, and Winfree put up excellent opposition for the 
opposing forwards. 

The Co-Eds won only four out of twelve games, but scored 406 points to their oppo- 
nents' 396. The season was a success, broadly speaking, and we predict for the Co-Eds 
a glorious season in 1932. 

Seven players and Coach Troxler were awarded sweaters at the annual banquet. 
Margaret Bullington, guard of '31, was elected to lead the Co-Eds in 1932. 




105 




PHOENIX 





106 



31 



PHOENIX 




INTRAMURAL SPORTS 



■ The ambition of the Department of Intramural Atheltics of Cumberland University 
is to make it possible for every student to have an opportunity to indulge in athletic 
competition of some sort or other. We want every student to know the joy and thrill of 
spirited competition in sport and to realize the lasting benefits that may be derived from 
healthy outdoor play. 

Not every student can be a candidate for varsity athletics, but every student can find 
a sport to his liking in our intramural program. It is as important that we secure 100 
per cent participation in this program as it is to have championship teams. On practi- 
cally every campus where you find a well-carried-out program you will find large squads 
of well-trained men out for the various teams, and an active, intelligent interest toward 
sports in the entire student body. 

The men of Cumberland University made a fine record this year when a large per- 
centage of their number participated in the intramural schedule. P.ay the game you like 
and learn to play that you may become stronger, hea.thier men who will be a credit to 
Cumberland University and the nation. 

In the season of 1930-31 the Intramural Department was pleased with the record of 
intramural athletics, which indicates that a great percentage of the enrollment of the Uni- 
versity has competed in some form of athletic competition this year. Gradually the 
department is enlarging its program in athletic sports, and is planning to add any activ- 
ity that the student will benefit from. 

The benefits derived from intramural sports are immeasurable. It is safe to say that 
wise participation in intramural sports has a beneficial effect on scholarship as well as 
on the physical development of the individual. This improvement comes indirectly from 
a healthful recreation which builds up one's energy rather than dissipates it. By com- 
parison it is found that students who take an active part in some sort of intramu- 
ral athletic competition rank high in the scholastic standings. Without more scien- 
tific investigation for intramural work there must be some truth in the old adage, "A 
sound mind in a sound body," that has persisted throughout the ages. Intramural ath- 
letics have for their objectives: recreation, group spirit, social benefit, better health, de- 
velopment of interest in sports, and scholarship. 

Men who have not been athletes, or rather have net discovered their ability before com- 
ing to college, have, through intramural sports, seen their possibilities and have made 
good on their teams. 

Special emphasis has been placed on intramural work at Cumberland during the cur- 
rent year. Fraternity and class leagues were organized in all sports, and caused con- 
siderable interest among the men students. Intramural competition started in the fall 
with golf and tennis tournaments, was followed by basketball, and terminated in the 
spring with baseball. 



19 




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PHOENIX 





S. A. E. QUINT WINNER OF CUMBERLAND 

UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL 

CHAMPIONSHIP 



First Row 
Harry Phillips, Fount Robison, Johnnie Troxler 

Second Row 
Red Williams, Shannon Robison, Chauncy Alcott, William Bassett 

The S. A. E. quint won high hcnoi'S in the most lively intramural haskethall tournament 
ever held on the campus. The Sig Alphs clinched the trophy by downing the Inde- 
pendents twice in succession in the play-off. 

The Sig Alph five went through the season with a spotless record until the final game, 
when the Independents upset the dope bucket and trounced them 25 to 12. The Sig 
Alphs came back in the play-off and won twice — 31 to 23 and 22 to 18. 

Fount Robison, Captain of the S. A. E. team, scored forty-two points in the tourney, 
and his lanky brother. Shannon, led the team with forty-five. Red Williams, forward, 
scored thirty-eight points. Fount was chosen Captain of the all-tourney team, and 
Shannon also won a place on the honorary five. 

There were six teams competing in the tourney — S. A. E.s, Lambda Chis, Sigma 
Delta Kappas, Delta Kappa Phis, Stray Greeks, and Independents. The silver basket- 
ball trophy presented to the S. A. E. team is a rotating one, with the team winning two 
out of three tournaments holding it permanently. 




31 



108 



PHOENIX 





INDEPENDENT BASKETBALL TEAM 

(RUNNER-UP) 



Front Row 
"Parson" Speck, Lyndon Jennings, Shabby Haralson 
Back Row 
Hooper Crawford, Perry Davis, John Nix, Lilburn Bullington, Brent Crawley 

Captained by Lyndon Jennings, Freshman in the Literary School, the Independent 
Baslvetball Club gave the champions and all other teams they played the keenest compe- 
tition, winning every game played until the decisive play-off series with the S. A. E.s. 

"Parson" Speck, who has a dead eye for the basket, was high-point man for the Inde- 
pendents, scoring sixty-two points. 

Dave Prehoda, member of the Delta Kappa Phi Fraternity, was the only man to chalk 
up more scores than "Parson," his total being seventy-four points. 

Below is a summary of the outstanding players on the various teams that participated 
in the Cumberland University Intramural Basketball Tournament: 

Player Team Position Points 

D. Prehoda D. K. P Forward 74 

Speck Independant Forward 52 

MousLEY -S. D. K Forward 48 

S. Robinson S. A. E Guard 45 

F. Robinson S. A. E.. Center 42 

Williams .S. A. E Forward 38 

j. Martin Lambda Chi Forward 33 

T. Martin _ Lambda Chi Forward 31 

J. Prehoda D. K. P Forward 30 



31 




109 




PHOENIX 



^"^^^iSf^.^"^^^r 





TENNIS CLUB 



gaa« 



RICHARD FOWLER 
University Champion 

RONALD Mcintosh 

Runner-Up 



Richard Fowler, 
to \v;n the indi- 



In the intramural tennis tournament 
Junior Lawyer, drove his way throufjh 
vidua] championship of the University. 

Fowler, through all his matches, exhibited a masterful 
touch and court generalship that proved too much for his 
opponents. 

Ronald Mcintosh, with whom the champion played ths 
final match of the tournament, stubbornly contested the 
bid for th'a coveted crown. Fowler's hard smashes were 
returned by Mcintosh only to have the champ play them 
back with hard drives scarcely clearing the net. 

The first set was exciting: from the initial serve, as both 
players tried to outmatch the other in every art of the 
game. Fowler finally pushed through the first set, win- 
ning 7-5. In the second affray Mcintosh made a deter- 
mined stand, but to no avail, as Fowler's hard strokes 
continued to clear the net with destructive accuracy, 
finally winning 6-4. 

In the semi-finals Fowler defeated Goodman — 6-1, 6-3 — 
the loser rallying in the second period and forcing Fow- 
ler to extend himself to win. 

Mcintosh won his semi-finals easily, taking straight 
sets from Hare- — -6-1, 6-0. 

The quarter-finals saw Goodman defeat Smithwich" — 
6-4, 6-3. Fowler defeated Williams — 6-2, 2-6, 6-3 — the 
champion being swept off his feet in the second set, but 
recovering in time to nose out in the last set. 

Hare defeated Matthews — 6-2, 6-2. 




31 



no 



PHOENIX 





GOLF CLUB 

With an entry list of thirty-four aspirants for the Uni- 
versity golf crown, the tournament was the best in years. 
Upsets of every kind featured th'3 early rounds. 

The announcement that the golf tournament would start 
just as soon as the course could be reworked and put in 
excellent condition was met with a great deal of enthu- 
siasm by the student body. Clubs of every kind could be 
seen on the shoulders of the caddies — new and shiny sets 
belonging to the egotistical beginner and the old, rusty 
clubs owned by the retired golfer who could not resist the 
temptation to try again. There was quite a bit of spirit 
in the air, too, judging from th-e number of foursomes 
meeting in the afternoon. The fact that the workmen 
were actually engaged in building new sand greens and 
bunkers, that scorecards were being printed, brought the 
boys to realize that there would be some real sport in 
this game called "golf." 

Gordon Schaul, of the Junior Law Class, won the golf 
crown and was awarded a beautiful loving cup presented 
by the C. U. A, A. at general assembly. 

Bob Adams, C. U. Alumni Secretary, played Schaul one 
of the tightest match-es of the season. Some say it was 
the best golf that has ever been played on the University 
course. 

H. B. Dudley, of the Senior Law Class, was runner-up 
in the tournament, and proved to be one of the most con- 
sistent (JToIfers Cumberland has ever had. 

Roger Phillips, one of the heavy favorites to wage war 
with the irons, was eliminated in the first round by Dud- 
ley. 





GORDON SCHAUL 

University Champion 

H. B. DUDLEY 

Runner-Up 



31 




PHOENIX 



BASEBALL 



Baseball is the one sport in which Cumberland has always been able to compete on 
even terms with the larger schools of the South. To call to mind the names of Byrd 
Douglas, Minis Tyner, and a host of others who have performed brilliantly on the dia- 
mond is to indulge in reminiscences of the days when Cumberland was to be reckoned 
with in Southern intercollegiate baseball circ.es. The team of 1929, the last to per- 
form for Cumberland, though not the best in recent years, was an example of the possi- 
bilities that we have on the campus every spring for a winning team. The above- 
mentioned team showed a neat balance in the win column at the end of the season. 

We regret not being able to show the pictures of another winning team in 1931. In- 
tercollegiate baseball competition was discontinued in 1931, but perhaps it is not so bad 
after all, because the University's program of intramural competition has taken care of 
the national pastime on the campus in a way that is entirely satisfactory. 

Never before has the baseball season been ushered in on Kirk Field with more wide- 
spread interest and enthusiasm among the students than was the case this spring. 
Every afternoon the athletic field was alive with would-be Ruths, Hornsbys, Wilsons, 
Groves, and who have you, working for positions on one of the seven teams entered in 
the intramural league. 

The teams which are competing for the championship are: Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, Delta Kappa Phi, Sigma Delta Kappa, Stray Greeks, Independents, and 
the Faculty. The dark horse among the teams is, of course, the Faculty entry. In 
their only start thus far the old timers showed the youngsters a few tricks about how 
the game of baseball ought to be played, and that they could still rattle the boards and 
run the bases as they did when they wore Bulldog uniforms. 

Interest is kept alive and competition made keener by the offer of a pennant to the 
winning team by the C. U. A. A. Each team must meet every other team, and the 
aggregation having- the highest percentage at the end of the season will be presented 
with the trophy. 

INTRAMURAL BASEBALL SCHEDULE 





S. A. E. 


L. X. A. 


D. K. P. 


S. D. K. 


Ind. 


Fac. 


S. G. 


S. A. E. 


KEEP 
UP 


Monday 
April 13 


Thursday 
April 16 


Tuesday 
April 21 


Wednesday 
April 29 


Thursday 
March 26 


Monday 
March 23 


Lambda Chi 


Monday 
April 13 


WITH 
YOUR 


Wednesday 
April 22 


Tuesday 
March 31 


Tuesday 
March 24 


Wednesday 
April 15 


Thursday 
April 9 


D. K. P. 


Thursday 
April 16 


Wednesday 
April 22' 


FAVOR- 
ITE 


Wednesday 
March 25 


Wednesday 
April 1 ■ 


Monday 
April 27 


Thursday 
April 30 


S. D. K. 


Tuesday 
April 21 


Tuesday 
March 31 


Wednesday 
March 25 


TEAM 


Tuesday 
April 14 


Tuesday 
April 28 


Wednesday 
April 15 


Independents 


Wednesday 
April 29' 


Tuesday 
March 24 


Wednesday 
April 1 


Tuesday 
April 14 


IN 
THE 


Monday 
April 20 


Monday 
April 27 


Faculty 


Thursday 
March 26 


Wednesday' 
April 15 


Monday 
April 27 


Tuesday 
April 28 


Monday 
April 20 


CUMBER- 
LAND 


Monday 
May 30 


Stray Greeks 


Monday 
March 23 


Thursday 
April 9 


Thursday 
April 3d 


Wednesday 
April 15 


Monday 
April 27 


Monday 
March 30 


COLLE- 
GIAN 




31 



112 




CLEON JENNINGS 
Miss Cumberland, 1939 




FOUNT ROBISON 
Bachelor of Ugliness, 1930 




MARTHA DESHA JONES 
Miss Cumberland 




LEROY COLLINS 
Bachelor of Ugliness 





MILDRED HANCOCK 
Prettiest Girl 




VIRGINIA MAJORS 
Colieg^ian Sponsor 



.^s^T""'"'"^.- 




■i|^ /9ffli»- 



AMY JO BYARS 
Phoenix Sponsor 



liLDRED Bryant 

Sponsor 
egeofArts and Science 




Dorothy Donaldson 

Sponsor 
College of law 




PHOENIX 





122 



31 




PHOENIX 






V^OST POI»Ull 



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31 



124 




PHOENIX 



GREEK LETTER GUIDE TO RUSHEES OF 
CAMPUS FAMILIES 



Windows 
Get your 



Sif/nia Alpha Epsilon : Our motto is, "Every member married by the end of school." Typical bachelors 
need not apply. Only the fact that we are on probation prevents us from throwing bigger and better par- 
ties. We only pledge before athletic contests, in a fraternity meet. This is the "Sleep and Eat" Club. 
We also press clothes and take orders for soda pop. Our aim is to have an S. A. E. in every home by 1932. 
Fifty million Freshmen can't be wrong. Get your pledge pin at the post office — one thrown in with every 
book of stamps. 

Delta Phi Omega: Our motto is, "Every sister for herself." We are not expecting many members back 
next year, as most of us are Seniors ; but guess we will pull through, for cats always come back. We 
pledge everybody to keep the Sigma Delts from getting them and then break the ones we don't want. We 
can't win elections, but that's not our fault. D, P. O. stands for d — poor organization. We have cars in 
abundance, so rides on rainy days guaranteed if your sisters don't see you first. See the Registrar for 
pledge pins. No liability will attach unless the sisters feel amiable enough to pass you. Main asset is that 
we are the only sorority on campus giving a banquet. 

Sigma Delta Kappa: We never sleep. Open day and night. Chapters everywhere, some inactive. George 
Washington was a brother, as well as Ford Smithe. You can't go wrong, so join our throng, and we'll 
take care of you in any condition. We guarantee entrance to all doors, whether open or locked. "" 
don't count — in fact, we like them best through practice. B. O. degree easy with us bebind you 
pledge pins from General Hatton, Number 1, Public Square. 

Sigma Delta Sigma: Our name is "Some Dumb Sisters." We are loyal unto the death of the D. P. O.s. 
Our firm name is Jones and Golladay. Man was not made so Jhat he could resist our organized efforts. 
Bigger and better fraternity pins are our motto. We have the only house conveniently off the beaten path. 
We are so exclusive that we only initiate every other year or so. We will bring our pledge pins to you at 
the hospital. 

Delta Kappa Phi: We take them all. No race or age restrictions. Officially known as Red Burkitt's 
Cosmopolitan Brigade. Public goating a pleasure. We have several chapters here and there, whose motto 
is. "All men are equal." We have two h-andsome cars belonging to worthy brothers, a house as yet un- 
tainted with numerous portraits of the departed brothers of yesteryear. We throw national conventions, 
parties, and "possum hunts. Particularly strong on faculty brothers. Our facilities include an adjoining 
golf course, tea room, and what-have-you. Our rates are reasonable. 

Iota Tau Tan: We are so exclusive that co-eds fight to keep out. We beg each law co-ed to join, because 
we are so hard up. Our sorority is unique, because almost any sort or type of girl can be exhibited on 
short notice. Every member guaranteed an office within one month of pledging. Elections run exclusively 
by the Alumnje and Librarian. Our motto is. "Peace at any price." Together, we purr; divided, we 
scratch. All parties are stag. Our social prominence became so great that the authorities forced us to 
give up a meeting a year, cutting our program to one meeting a month. 

Lambda Chi Alpha: We gave the best dances in school until threatened with expulsion. Each member 
of our fraternity is a man without a doubt, although there are a good many pins out. We are compara- 
tively young, but lusty. Scotty Mason and Sam Burts are the men who lay traps for unsuspecting Fresh- 
men and see that proper publicity is given. If you want drugs on credit, or flowers wholesale, and a place 
to hang your hat. and throw ball, pledge this fraternity. Our only drawback as a national fraternity is 
that we have a pay phone. Our best rushing point: that we don't eat in the house, and thus avoid the 
dread plague of beans, with which* other fraternities are infested. 

Stray Greeks: We are the minute men of the campus. We spend hours comparing the merits of deah 
old Rho Dammit Rho, at Siwash and Podunk. We are the brotherhood of Panhellenic. We can be recog- 
nized at a distance of ten feet by our large and assorted seal rings. We sing the college songs if not forci- 
bly restrained, on all occasions. We sigh for the days that were. Join our forces, and lie safely about your 
fraternity's national standing. 

The worm was digging away in dead earnest. Poor Ernest! 

Kissie: "What do you call your fraternity pin?" 

Jack Ross; "The soldier." 

Kissie: "Why?" 

Jack: "Because it's been on so many fronts." 

Miss Jones : "Have you read 'Kenilworth ?' " 
Mattie Walker : "No, I hate dog stories." 

Polly: "Doc's moustache makes me laugh." 
Stewdie : "Yes, it tickles me too." 

Esther Young: "The minute Smallwood kissed me I knew he played the trombone." 

Attorney Roebuck: "Then you think our fair defendant. Miss Rauch. is assured of victory in this case?" 
Attorney Oscar Lee Black: "Yes, she could win with one leg tied behind h'er." 

Dr. Dickerson ; "Have you seen any rats around here?" 
Lois Johnson: "Gnaw." 

Then there was the absent-minded professor's wife, who found the professor kissing one of his prettiest 
and youngest students, and she laughed and laughed, because she knew the professor was so absent- 
minded. 




125 



31 



PHOENIX 








LEBANON CHURCHES 




31 



126 




PHOENIX 




SCENES IN AND NEAR LEBANON 




I Q ^.>^#* 



31 



127 



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University Training is the 
Foundation of Success and 

CUMBERLAND 
UNIVERSITY 



Founded in 1842 

Offers you not only the many educational advantages obtain- 
able at other colleges, but additional training in special courses 
in different lines, that will thoroughly and properly prepare you 
for the greatest success in your particular vocation or chosen 
profession. The greatest success cannot be made without the 
proper foundation. College-Trained Men Succeed Best. 

Situated thirty miles east of Nashville, in an un- 
usually fine community, with a beautiful campus 
of fifty acres, attractive, well-appointed buildings. 



Management — Tlioroughlv reli- 
able, efficient. Christian nistruc- 
tion in moral. Christian atmos- 
phere. 

Departments — The College of 
Arts offers courses leading to the 
degrees of A.B. and B.S. Excel- 
lent advantage for undergraduate 
work. Law School offering course 
leading to the degree of LL.B. 
Music, Ptiblic Speaking, School 
of Commerce and Administration 
and Summer School. Laborato- 



ries for Chemistry, Physics, Bi- 
ology, a Museum of Natural His- 
tory, a Museum of Missions, and 
a Library of 15,000 volumes be- 
speak the splendid equipment. 

Athletics — Clean, fair athletics, 
free from professionalism and 
commercialism. 

Entrance Requirements — Fifteen 
units. Standard four-year course. 
Bible study of all regular students. 



Expenses Approximately $362.50 a Year 

For catalogue or further information, write 

CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY 

LEBANON, TENNESSEE 



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Quality 



Service 



J. L. Shannon & Sons 

LEBANON. TENN. 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 



Phone 180 



Phone 345 



Lebanon Shoe 



Co., I 



nc. 



Shoes for the Family 
We Can Fit You 

Exclusive Agents 

Ault-Williamson and 
Brown Bilt Shoes 

TIES 

SHOES 

SHIRTS 

HOSIERY 

PAJAMAS 

UNDERWEAR 



Cleaning 



Pressing 



Reich Tailoring Co. 

Altering and Repairing 

"And We Mean We Clean" 
Day Phone 120 Night Phone 42 



A I Q 



Baird and Crips 
Latf Books 



■^ 

■Hot" 















•Hoy 



let 
"5ef 
"Set 

"5st 
let 



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You Are Always 


Welcome to Student 


Headquarters 


at 


Independent 


Drug Store 



Lea Tailoring 
Company 

Odorless Dry Cleaners 

"Where You Naturally 
Expect the Best" 

Phone 362 

East Main Street 



West Side Barber 
Shop 

Clean, Courteous Service 
Students' Headquarters 



City Cafe 

"We Feed the Town" 

Home of Good Things 
to Eat 

Student Headquarters 



Cash Drug 
Company 

We Appreciate Student 
Trade 

Our Prices Are Right 



WATERMAN PENS 
NORRIS CANDIES 

West Side of Q 



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Bryan-Rushing 

Lebanon, Tennessee 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Ready-to-Wear 
and Millinery 



White Way Barber 
Shop 

Students' Trade Appreciated 

Haircuts — Shaves 
Shampoos 



The 

Nonie-Marie 

Tea Room 

Open from 
7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Special Rates 

TO 

Students 



Stories Cafe 

100% for Cumbetland 



We Specialize in Coffee 
and Pies 



Groceries and Fresh Meats 
Bakery 

ESKEW'S 

Telephones 104, 105, 314 



^ 1 , \cJ^ 

"V^ I ■- ' ^1 — o 



PRINCESS 
THEATRE 

"The Beauty Spot of 
Lebanon" 

RESERVATIONS FOR 
THEATRE PARTIES 



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WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS 



Seat's Studio 

Photographs That Please 






Lebanon, Tennessee 



SCHOOL WORK A SPECIALTY 



McClain & 
Smith 

"The College Store" 



Society Brand Clothes 

Dobbs Hats 

Florsheim Shoes 

Vassar Underwear 



Frank Taylor 


The Tailor 


DRY CLEANERS 


"We Clean" 



C. J. 


Axelson 


FLORIST 


169 PARK AVENUE 


Memb 


er F. T. D. 


Flowers by 


Wire-- Anywhere 


Phone 109 


Lebanon. Tenn. 



X 


















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Castle Heights 
Military Academy 

One of the Nation's Best Schools 
foe Boys 



LEBANON, TENNESSEE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



The 

Southwestern Salesmen 

Pleasure — Travel — Rare Experiences 
Large Profits 

School Representatives 

Earl Thompson Harry Phillips 

Garland Jennings Robert Haralson 

Lyndon Jennings Otis Reid 

Harly Wilks W. W. Farmer. Jr. 

"TRAVEL WITH US" 



X 

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MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM 









W. S. Sciieuerman 

Perfection Ice and 
Ice Cream 












Pastries, Bread and 
Bakery Supplies 



Watson 

Jewelry Store 

"The Jeweler" 

Student Trade Appreciated 

GIFTS FOR EVERY 
OCCASION 



East Main Cafe 

BREAKFAST — DINNER 
SUPPER 

Student Trade Solicited 

East Main Street 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

AMERICAN BANK « TRUST CO. 



LiNDSLEY Mcdonald 

"Nu-Art Signs and Show Cards" 



HANKINS « PERKINS 

"Clean, Fresh Groceries" 



THE WEST SIDE HOTEL 



LOYD SHOE SHOP 

"We Solicit Your Trade" 



MCDOWELL'S SERVICE STATION 
















exAnnual 



IN THE SOUTHERN 
YEAR-BOOK FIELD 
IS THE RESULT OF 
PERSONAL SERVICE 



THE CAPITOL 

ENQRAyiNQ 

COMPANY 

Has haJ more than Went^? ■Jean of 
successful experience in lear-BooK 
Designing and Engra^Jing. The;? 
ere recognized as tKc leaders in tKe 
creation and production of tKe lietter 
clasi of annuals. Their experience, 
equipment, corps of artists, designers 
Bnd engravers are entirely at 
- your disposal 



Capitol Enqraving Co 

- g».|ia.l)viw FOURTH AVENUE. NORTH 

NASHVILLE 
T£NN. 



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