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NEWMARKET, ONTARIO 




NEWMARKET, ONTARIO 




A RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL 
FOR BOYS 




PICKERING COLLEGE, 
founded in 1842 by the Soci- 
" ety of Friends, operating first 

near Picton, Prince Edward County, 
later at Pickering, and from 1909 
until 1917 at Newmarket when it 
was turned over to the Dominion 
Government for military hospital 
purposes, re-opened as a residential 
school for boys in September 1927. 

The experience of the past season has 
proven the wisdom and foresight of 
the men who selected the town of 
Newmarket for the school. It is ad- 
mirably located, thirty miles north 
of Toronto, sufficiently removed 
from the large city to avoid the 
many distractions, yet easily acces- 
sible either by motor car or railway. 
The site of the college, just on the 
outskirts of the town, makes possible 



Historical 
Outline 



Location 



PICKERING COLLEGE 



all the advantages of water supply, 
fire protection, good roads and many 



Environ- 
ment 
and 
Equipment 



The 

First 

Year 



other 



conveniences. 



The physical surroundings of Picker- 
ing College are ideal — 2 50 acres of 
rolling farm land, with a beautiful 
grove of cedar and a sparkling stream 
of crystal clearness. Equipment for 
farming, for gardening, for scientific 
work, music, etc., are generously sup- 
plied. Playing fields, tennis courts, 
a covered skating rink, a large new 
gymnasium, a craft shop well equip- 
ped for woodworking, draughting 
and metal working, help to make it 
a paradise for boys. 

The success achieved since the re- 
opening has surpassed the expecta- 
tions of the Board of Management. 
The dormitories have been well filled 
to the extent that it is necessary to 
make additional accommodation for 



PICKERING COLLEGE 


5 


next season. The hopes and desires of 
those who are responsible for the col- 
lege — that it might fill a real need in 
the development of young Canadian 
manhood — has been fully realized by 
the experience of last season. The 
enthusiasm shown by the students, 
along lines of endeavour selected by 
themselves, proves conclusively that 
Pickering College has struck the 
right mental and physical attitude 
with these boys. 

The college is operated for boys of 
fourth book standing to those pre- 
paring for the honor matriculation 
examinations. The work of the 
Junior School is so adapted as to pro- 
vide the necessary foundation for the 
University Entrance examinations. 
Work in the language subjects is be- 
gun with the Juniors and the French 
language is emphasized in order to 


Courses 



PICKERING COLLEGE 



Individual 
Attention 



Voluntary 
Activities 



develop a real facility in the spoken 
use of that language which is the 
mother tongue of over two million 
Canadian people. 

It is recognized that it is impossible 
for all the pupils to proceed at an 
equal rate in all subjects, consequent- 
ly valid and reliable tests are given to 
every boy to determine the amount 
of work that should be carried and 
the possible rate of progress. The 
work of the school is conducted by 
the small group and individual 
method. This system provides greater 
opportunity for thorough teaching 
by the staff, and a full appreciation 
and understanding of the work by 
the pupils. 

Every boy is given opportunity to 
pursue during his course, those acti- 
vities which have for him a spontan- 
eous interest and in which he has 



some degree of natural ability. The 
activities of the farm, wood working 
and metal working shop are so cor- 
related with the academic work as to 
provide a natural means of expres- 
sion for the more abstract ideas of 
the class room. 

A study of natural tendencies, abili- 
ties and aptitudes of the pupils 
coupled with an opportunity for 
consultation with the representatives 
of various occupations, enables the 
staff to render effective vocational 
direction. 

In the presentation of all the work of 
the school, the aim is to give the boy 
a true picture of the inter-relation of 
all branches of knowledge and the 
inter-dependence of all trades and 
professions in a normal society. The 
methods of instruction adopted are 
designed to develop in the pupils, 



Vocational 
Guidance 



A 

Social 
Outlook 



8 



PICKERING COLLEGE 



Religious 
Aims 
and 
Activities 



qualities of initiative, self-reliance, 
resourcefulnes and the ability to 
carry responsibility. 

Although the school was founded by 
the Society of Friends and its re- 
opening was made possible through 
the efforts of individual members of 
the Society, the activities of the 
school are entirely non- sectarian in 
character. The staff, however, holds 
that an appreciation of the great 
truths of the Christian religion is of 
the utmost importance to the devel- 
oping boy. Each day is begun with 
an informal inspirational and devo- 
tional period, and on Sunday evening 
a chapel service is held when the 
students have an opportunity of 
hearing religious leaders who are ac- 
quainted with boy life. The boys 
attend the Sunday morning services 
of the church of their choice in New- 



PICKERING COLLEGE 


9 


market. The older boys have group 
discussions on those problems which 
are common to adolescent boys. 

The character of the members of the 
staff is a matter of prime importance 
if there is to be a sympathetic and 
helpful comradeship between them 
and the boys in all the school activi- 
ties. To carry into effect the ideals 
of the school, the Board of Manage- 
ment chose Mr. Joseph McCulley, a 
graduate of the College of Education 
and of the University College in the 
University of Toronto, and of an 
honour course in Modern History at 
Oxford University. Mr. McCulley 
has had a valuable experience in work 
with boys. He was for some time a 
member of the staff of Toronto Pub- 
lic Schools and has carried consider- 
able responsibility in summer camps 
for boys, both with the Toronto 


The 

Head- 

master 

# 



10 



PICKERING COLLEGE 



The 

Teaching 
Staff 



Director 

of 

Character 

Education 



Y.M.C.A. and the Taylor Statten 
Camp in Algonquin Park. 

The balance of the teaching staff are 
all men with University educations 
— men young enough to understand 
and appreciate the growing boy's 
mental attitude on life and its prob- 
lems — but with sufficient experience 
of life for their point-of-view to 
command the whole-hearted respect 
of every member of the School. 

Mr. Taylor Statten, known through- 
out Canada as a specialist in Boys' 
Work, has been appointed to the staff 
as Director of Character Education. 
To this unique position he brings the 
experience of a lifetime in character 
development and inspirational work 
among boys. He is particularly re- 
lated to the departments of religious 
education, and vocational guidance, 



PICKERING COLLEGE 



11 



and is largely responsible for apply- 
ing the tested results of modern edu- 
cational psychology to the work of 
Pickering College. 



At the beginning of each term every 
boy receives a thorough medical ex- 
amination, and the resident masters 
report daily on the health of the boys 
in their charge. Minor ailments re- 
ceive the immediate attention of the 
college physician on his daily visit to 
the school. There is no extra charge 
for such ordinary medical attention. 

The annual fee is $750.00. This fee 
covers all regular tuition expenses, 
board and lodging and personal laun- 
dry. Instruction in music by special 
arrangement is an extra charge. All 
text-books and stationery are avail- 
able at the school at regular prices. 



Medical 
Attention 



Fees 



12 


PICKERING COLLEGE 


The 
Staff 


JOSEPH McCULLEY, B.A., Headmaster 
British and Canadian History 


TAYLOR STATTEN, Esq. 
Director of Character Education 




G. N. T. WIDDRINGTON, B.A. 
Classics and Ancient History 




T. C. SHORE, M.A. 
Modern Languages 




WM. R. McCULLEY, B.A. 
Chemistry and Biology 




R. E. K. ROURKE, B.A. 
Mathematics and Physics 




F. ST. L. DALY, B.A. 
English 




R. H. PERRY, B.A. 
Elementary Subjects 




J. A. MAITLAND, Esq. 
Director of Manual Arts 




MISS F. S. ANCIENT 
Matron-Nurse 




DR. W. P. FIRTH 




Who was Principal of the School from 1892 to 1917 maintains his 
association with the College as Principal Emeritus 




Physicians 




DR. ALFRED WEBB, Newmarket 
DR. J. M. BARTON, Toronto 


Board 

of 
Manage* 

ment 


ALBERT S. ROGERS, President 
DAVID P. ROGERS, Vice-President. WILLIAM HARRIS, Secretary. 
SAMUEL ROGERS, Treasurer. WM. P. FIRTH, M.A., D.Sc. 
WM. PAKENHAM, B.A., LL.D. PROF. A. G. DORLAND, Ph.D. 
WALTER D. GREGORY, Esq. ESLI TERRILL, Esq. 



•*. 



',