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Full text of "The Pickering genealogy : being an account of the first three generations of the Pickering family of Salem, Mass., and of the descendants of John and Sarah (Burrill) Pickering, of the third generation"

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1755064 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



' PUBLIC LIBRA 



3 1833 01419 4556 



THE 



PICKEPaTs^g GENEALOGY : 

i 

BEEsG A^f ACCOUNT OF THE 

jFtrst Cijvcr atncratious 

OF 

THE PICKEEING FAMILY 

OF SALEM, MASS., 

AND OF THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHN AND SARAH (BURRILL) 
PICKERING, OF THE THIRD GENERATION. 



BY 

HARRISON ELLERY 

CHARLES PICKERING BOWDITCH. 



Vol. II. 



Pages 2J 



PRIVATELY PRINTED. 

1897. 



1755064 



Copi/right, 1S97, 

By Charles 1'. Bowditcii. 



0>rE HUNDRED COPIES PRINTED. 



University Press : 

JOHM WfLSdN AND SoN, CAMBRIDGE. U.S.A. 



THE PICKERING GENEALOGY, 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

1. VII. 2. Loiiisa Lee [Thomas 1. VI. 1], probably bom in Salem, 
baptized there Dec. 13, 1772, died in Cambridge, Mass. 

I\[rs. Watorhouse was tall, with a commanding presence. A long 
obituary notice published in the Christian Register of Saturday, Dec. 12, 
1863, tells us more of her husband. Dr. Waterhouse, than of herself; but 
it speaks of her as being amiable and charitable. She was bm-ied at Mount 
Auburn. 

In her will she made the following bequests : To Harvard College, the 
portraits of her husband and of her kinsman, Dr. Benjamin Colman. To 
the Boston Athenreum, the picture of her kinsman, Sir Charles Hobby. 
To her kinsman Benjamin Colman Ward, the portraits of his and her great- 
gi-andfather and great-grandmother. To the Newport Public Library, 
R. I, the painting of the head and bust of her late husband, Benjamin 
Waterhouse, in Quaker dress, and the painting of the head of Gilbert Stuart, 
both by Stuart. To John Fothergill Waterhouse Ware, Allston's picture 
of his uncle, Andrew Waterhouse, when a boy. 

1. VII. 2. Benjamin JVaterhoiise, the husband of Louisa Lee, bom 
in Newport, R. I., died in Cambridge, Mass. A physician and author. 
Residence : Cambridge. 

Dr. Waterhouse, having received the groundwork of a good classical 
and medical education, was encouraged by his famous kinsman, Dr 
Fothergill, to go abroad and further pursue his studies. He arrived in 
London in April, 1775, and entered the University of Edinburgh in the 
ensuing autumn. The next season, he returned to London, re-entered the 
hospitals, and joined the anatomical, surgical, chemical, and medical classes 
of the most celebrated lecturers. It was a great advantage to him that he 



SEVENTH GEXERATION. 289 

lived with so eminent a man as Dr. Fothergill, whose house was the resort 
of the most distinguished naturalists and pliysicians. Dr. Waterhouse did 
not confine his attention strictly to medical lectures, but was deeply inter- 
ested in discourses on experimental philosophy, mineralogy, and botany. 
After having been three years in Great Britain, he was sent by Dr. Fother- 
gill to the University of Leyden. Here he spent four academical years, 
travelling during the vacations. He took his degree in April, 1780, and 
remained one session longer at Leyden, attending lectures not immediately 
connected with medicine. After leaving Leyden, he spent some time in 
travelling, and made a jom-ney to the West India Islands. He then re- 
turned to his native country, arriving there in June, 1782. 

Immediately after his arrival. Harvard University offered him the 
position of Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic, which he 
accepted. 

In 1786, the College of Rhode Island bestowed upon him the title of 
Professor of Natm-al History. 

In 1788, the Corporation of Harvard College requested him to give, 
annually, a course of lectures on Natural History, — a subject in which 
instruction had not previously been given. Dr. Waterhouse had to exert 
all his energies to excite a taste for this branch of science, and it was seven 
years before the number of students in that department exceeded a dozen. 
It should be remembered that Dr. Waterhouse worked alone and without 
the countenance of any congenial spirit on this side of the Atlantic. In 
the meantime he undertook, in co-operation with Dr. Lettsom, to make a 
collection of minerals. The splendid cabinet at Cambridge was the result 
of his efforts in this department. 

Dr. Waterhouse made himself famous by introducing vaccination into 
this country. He has been called the Jenner of xVmerica. His publica- 
tions on vaccination have been recognized in England as standard works. 
His high reputation at Cambridge was promptly achieved by his lectures 
on Natural History, wliich secured for him the honor of being the 
founder of the study of Natural History and Botany in Harvard Univer- 
sity. He wrote much, and was a member of numerous scientific bodies in 
the United States and in Europe. 



290 THE PICKERING GENE.ILOGY. 



He married bis fii'st wile, Elizabeth Oliver, in June, 1788. Their son, 

John Fotheegiu. Waterhouse, M. D., the physician, naturalist, and orator, was 

born Aug. 1, 1791, and died at Charleston, 
S. C, May 18, 1817.' 

Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse was a son of Timothy and Hannali (Proud) 
Waterhouse. His ancestry includes the following families: Waterhouse, 
Fernald, Moses, Proud, Fothergill. See -V-vcestey Tables Y- 

I. Vn. 3. George Gardner Lee [Thomas 1. YI. 1], probably bom 
in Salem, baptized there Dec. 11, 1774, died in Boston. A merchant. 
Eesideuce: Boston. 

Mr. Lee, H. C. 1792, was commissioned a lieutenant in the United 
States Navy on Dec. 2, 1799. He served on board the frigate Essex as 
third heutenant. He left the serv-ice March 6, 1805, but contmued to go 
to sea for one or two voyages more. In 1812, and for several years after- 
ward, he was colonel of the Cadets. 

He lived for a time in Salem ; but he afterwards removed to Boston, 
and went into business there as a merchant. He often represented the 
town in the General Court, and had just been re-elected, when, early one 
morning, he was found dead in his bed. 

Mr. Lee was a Tellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 
He possessed a great deal of mechanical ingenuity.^ The followung is an 
extract from his obituary which was printed in the Colimabian Centinel of 
Wednesday, May 15, 1816. 

" He was a citizen who ha3 sustained numerous offices with honor to himself and 
usefulness to the community. He attended Divine service on Sunday and was a 
corpse on Monday morning." 

His funeral sermon was preached by Dr. Channing, who held Mr. Lee 
in high esteem. 

» The Polyanthos, Vol. II. pp. 7.3-80, with portrait ; Dictionary of Biography, by 
Francis S. Drake, p. 960 ; obituary in the Boston Evening Transcript of Oct. 6, 1846 ; 
obituary of his wife in the Christian Register of Dec. 12, 1863, which is devoted chiefly 
to him ; and Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, Vol. VI. p. 386. 

» Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. X. part III. pp. 52, 58. 



GEORGE GARDNER LEE. 

[I. VII. 3.] 

From the Mimatire xow in the possession of Mrs. Ch.a 
J.\CKso.\ Paine, of Boston. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 291 

The miniature vf liini wliicli is here reproiluced, is in tlie possession of 
liis granddaughter, Mrs. Charles Jackson Paine. 

1. VII. 3^. Lydia Gerry, the first wife of George Gardner Lee, born 
in Marblehead, Mass., died in Salem.^ 

Mrs. Lee is spoken of in the Salem Gazette of Feb. 20, 1798, as a woman 
of an active mind, lovely in deportment, and of an uncommon equality of 
temper. 

She was a daug-hter of Colonel John and Sarah ("Wendell) Gerr^^, of 
Marblehead. UniiipJirri/ Drrercux [59. VI. 126} was her first cousin. Her 
ancestry includes the following families: Gerry, Greenleaf, Russell, El- 
bridge, Wendell, Du Trieux, Staets, Joehemse, De Key, Van Brugh, Jans, 
Quincy, Pares, Gookin, Bird, Dolling, Flynt, Hoar, Hincksman, Willet, 
Brown. See Ancestry Tables ^JJ. 

1. VII. (?-. Hannah Fnrnhani Saicyer, the second wife of George 
Gardner Lee, born in Xewbmyport, Mass., died in Boston.'^ An authoress. 
Residence : Boston. 

Mrs. Lee's first known publication was the appendix to Hannah Adams's 
Memoir of herself [Boston, 1832]. It was followed by " Grace Seymoiir" 
[New York, 183.5] ; "Three Experiments of Living" [1838] ; "Eleanor 
Fulton," a sequel to "Three Experiments of Living'' [1838]; "Familiar 
Sketches of the Old Painters" [1838]; "The Huguenots in France and 
America;" "The World Before You;" "Stories from Life" [1849]; 
"■ Memoirs of Pierre Toussaint " [1853] ; " History of Sculpture and 
Sculptors" [1854] ; " Rosanna, or Scenes in Boston;" "The Contrast, or 
Different Modes of Education;" "Rich Enough;" "Luther and his 
Times ; " " Cranmer and his Times; " besides many tracts and essays that 
were published anonymously. " Three Experiments of Living" was a work 
suggested by the commercial disasters of the time. It passed through 

* She is called " Mira " in John Leigh, of Agawam (Ipswich), llass., by William 
Lee, p. 50. 

" The (late of her death is given in the Boston Eecords, and by several other authori- 
ties, as Dec. 27, 1SG5, while it is given as Dec. 28, 1865, in the Dictionary of Americaa 
Biography, by Francis S. Drake. 



29i 



THE PICKEBING GENEALOGY. 



more tlian thirty editions in the United States, and as many as ten in 
England. It was esteemed her best work. Her works exercised a wide and 
healthful influence on the youth of the first quarter of the nineteenth century .^ 
Mrs. Lee was a delightful woman, and remarkably agreeable socially. 
The same was true of her sister, :\Irs. Schuyler, of New York. 

Hannah F. Lee was a daughter of Dr. Micajah and Sybil (Faraham) 
Sawyer, of Newburyport. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Sawyer, Titcomb, Pierpont, Lynde, Martin, Angier, Batt, Farnham. See 
Ancestry Tables ^L 

1. Vn. 4. William Colman Lee [Thomas 1. VI. 1], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Jan. 16, 1780, died in Boston. A merchant. 
Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Lee moved from Salem to Boston. A portrait of him by Corae, 
is now in the possession of Colonel Henry Lee [2. YHL 15]. It has 
been heliotyped for this work. 

1. VIL 4. Ann Theresa Bussy, his wife. 

Before her marriage, she lived in Boston, and after the death of her 
husband she appears to have lived in Cambridge, :\Iass. In the Marriage 
Intentions of Boston she is called x\nn T. M. Magdalen Bussy. Her 
parentage has not been ascertained. 
AxcESTKY Tables '^f. 

1. VII. 5. Deborah Lee [Thomas 1. VI. 1], probably bora in Salem, 
baptized there May G, 1781, probably died in Cambridge, Mass. 

She lived in the old Judge Lee house in Cambridge. By her will of 
Sept 22, 1855, which was proved Oct. 9, 1860, she bequeathed a consid- 
erable estate to various persons, particularly to clergymen. Among the 
bequests was the following : — 

" To iOss Agnes Austin, sister of my first husband I give one thousand dollars, 
but if said Agnes should died before me, said sum shall be paid and divided to and 
among the children of Joshua Austin of Newburyport." 

» Dictionary of American Biography, by Francis S. Drake, p. 538; The Cyclopcedia 
of American Literature, by Evert A. and George L. Duyckinck, Vol. 11. p. 295, and Apple- 
ton's ClyclopLcdia of American Biography, Vol. III. p. <362. 



WILLIAM COL^L\^■ LEE. • 

[I. VII. 4.1 

From ihe Portrait uy Corne, .now in the possession of 
Col. Henry Lee. of Boston. 



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BENJAMIN CARl'LNTllK. 

[.. VII. 5^] 

I'ot'lR^ir %.)\v IN lilt I'OiSESSION OF THE EAST INDIA 

Marine SiiMEiY, at Salem, Mass. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 293 

1. VII. J^ liichard Austin, the first husband of Deborah Lee, died 
in Boston. A pewterer. Residence : Boston. 

He had a sister Agnes ; but his parentage has not been ascertained 
Administration on his estate was granted to his ^vidow, March 31, 1817. 

Ancestry Tables ^-j'. 

1. \^I. 5'. Benjamin Carjieuter, tlie second husband of Deborah 
Lee, born in Newport, R. I.,' died in Cambridge, Mass. A merchant. 
Residence : Cambridge. 

In early life Captain Carpenter moved to Salem, and followed the 
sea for the greater part of thirty years. As he was a tory, he left Salem, 
at the beginning of the Revohition, and went to England, where he and 
his wife lived at Brampton Court. He applied, unsuccessfully, to the 
British Government for a pension. On the failure of his appHcation, he 
returned to Salem, and engaged in privateering against the British. He 
joined the crew of the Oliver Cromwell, Captain Benjamin Cole, comman- 
der, and afterwards commanded the first cartel sent to England with 
captured British officers. After the Revolution, he devoted himself to 
commercial pursuits, and was one of the pioneers of the East India trade. 
He is said to have been the first to cai-iy the stars and stripes around the 
Cape of Good Hope after the peace of 1783, and to have exhibited them as 
a cmiosity at St. Helena. He was one of the two or tliree sea-captains who 
founded the Museum of the East India Marine Society. He was an original 
member, when the Museum was founded in 1799 ; a member of the 
committee of observation from 1799 to 1806 ; and president in 1806, 1808, 
1811, and 1812.2 

The portrait of him, from which the accompanpng heliotype was taken, 
is now in the possession of the East India ]\larine Society in Salem. It 
was bequeathed to this society by his widow, Deborah. A portrait of his 
first wife, a companion picture to his own portrait, and evidently painted by 
the same artist, is now in the possession of Francis H. Lee [1. IX. 9], of 
Salem. 

* The inscription attached to his portrait states that he was born in Medford, while 
his obituary says in Xewport, K. I. 

» Boston Patriot of Wednesday, Oct. 1, 1823. 



294 THE nCKERIXG CEXEALOGV. 

Captain Carpeuter'ri first wife, whom lie married Doc. 1. 1774, was 
Esther Gerrish. She was born Feb. 16, 1751. By her he had the 
following children : — 

William Carpenteb, died young. 

George Carpenter, lost at sea on the ship Margaret in June, 1810. 

His second wife, whom he man-ied July 26, 1795, was Abigail Gerrish, 
who was born Jan. 16, 1743, and died at Cambridge, in October or 
November, 1822. Both his first and second wives were daughters of 
Benjamin and Margaret (Cabot) Gerrish, of Salem.^ 

Ancestry Tables ^5 . 

1. VII. 6. Joseph Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], born in Beverly, Mass., 
died in Boston. A merchant. Itesidence : Boston. 

Joseph Lee was a student at Phillips Academy, Andover, in 1779. In 
his early life Mr. Lee was interested, with his brother Henry Lee, in 
the East India trade. He had a remarkable talent for naval architecture, 
as a large fleet of vessels designed by him testified. He retired from busi- 
ness at an early age, and led a nomadic life as a bachelor. He was widely 
known as a humorous, and somewhat eccentric man, and many anecdotes 
are told illustrative of his peculiarities. He was very social, and it is said 
of him that he could do more talking and less work than any other man. 
A farm which he ovmed at Chestnut Hill is now divided up among the 
descendants of his brothers. 

The following description of Joseph Lee and his brothers is taken from 
a Memorial of John Clarke Lee [1. VIII. 11] : — 

" All, sons and daughters, inherited their father's masculine strength of mind and 
simplicity of heart ; only two, Mr. Joseph and Capt. George Lee, his talent for naval 
architecture which they exercised. Commodore Downes informed the writer that in 
the war of 1812 the ' Lee model ' was the favorite model in the Navy. None of them 
had his precision and love of order, and ability to regulate the details of family and 
business affairs for which he was eminent ; all shared his love of nature and skill in 
gardening, and like their father, the sons were sagacious enterprising merchants. 



1 Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. V. p. 29. 



JOSEPH LEE. 

[I. VII, 6.] 

From the Portrait ev John Popf., painted about 1S3S, nc 

posses<;ton- of Mrs. Sami-el Torrey Morse, of Eo.^tox. 



IN TI 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 295 

"Father and sons shunned display, declined public office, findinf^ resources in their 
books, their gardens and the constant society of a large circle of family and 
friends. 

" But while unwilling to take office, or te appear in public, they were interested in 
all political movements, awake to all public claims to which they responded liberally. 

" The children were of a more mercurial temperament than their father, had 
remarkable powers of conversation, full of wit and humor and a corresponding liability 
to depression ; their perceptive faculties were keen, they were alive to all the 
phenomena of nature, to all the qualities good and bad of their fellowmen, and their 
frank utterances were not alway relished. 

" President Kirkland, who for a time kept bachelors' hall with three of the Lee 
brothers, used to say ' that the Lee gentlemen were certainly hypocrites, for they took 
great pains to conceal their good qualities,' and this habit, due partly to shyness, 
partly to dread of effusiveness, conduced to a misunderstanding of their character 
beneath the assumed hardness or bantering." ^ 

The heliotype of Joseph Lee is from the portrait painted about the year 
1838, by John Pope. It is novv in the possession of his niece, Mrs. Samuel 
T. Morse, of Boston. 

1. VII. 7. Nathaniel Cabot Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], born in Beverly, 
Mass., died in Barbados, "\V. I. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Lee, H. C. 1791, was a student at Phillips Academy, Andover, in 
1779. He was a merchant of sagacity, probity, and punctuality, highly 
esteemed as a man and highly respected as a merchant. He stood well 
among his contemporaries, and counted among his friends the most respect- 
able men in the community. In the winter of 1805-6, he went to the Island 
of Barbados for his health, and died there.' 

He left a handsome estate. His house was in what was then called 
Tremont Place, opposite King's Chapel, Boston. 

1. VII. 7. Mary Ann Cabot, his wife, probably born in Salem, 
baptized there May 9, 1784, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Lee and her husband were first cousins. Her second husband, Francis 

• Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XV. p. 57. 

' Obituary in the Salem Gazette of Friday, Feb. 28, 1806, and Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. XV. p. 58. 



296 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

Blancliard, wiis her second cousin. His number in direct descent is [53. 
VII. 298]. Her number in direct descent is [48. VII. 263]. 

2. VII. 8. Elizabeth Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], born in Beverly. 
Mass., died in Beverly. 

Miss Lee is said to have been a woman of wit, and the general de- 
scription of her family applies well to her. For this description see pages 
294-295. 

2. VII. 9. George Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], born in Beverly, Mass., 
died in Cambridge, Mass. A sea-captain.' 

Captain Lee was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. As a 
young man he followed the sea, commanding ships for his father and 
brothers. The larger part of his life, however, he spent on shore in great 
retirement, giving himself up to shooting, fishing, and the care of his 
garden. He was a large and powerful man, very bashful, of great 
simplicity of character, a fmgal liver and a bountiful giver.^ See the 
description of the Lee family, on pages 294-295. 

2. VII. 10. Amelia Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], bom in Beverly, Mass., 
died in Boston, of consumption. 

Mrs. Jackson was a woman of delightful character. See the description 
of her family on pages 294-295. 

2. VII. 10. Charles Jackson f her husband, born in Newburyport, 
Mass., died in Boston. A lawyer. Residence : Boston. 

Judge Jackson was fitted for college by Nicholas Pike, of Newburyport, 
and at Dummer Academy. He graduated at Harvard in 1793, with the 
highest honors of his class, stiidied law under Theophilus Parsons, and was 
admitted to practice in the County of Essex in 1796. He rapidly rose to 
eminence in his profession. In 1803, he removed to Boston, where 
he attained the highest rank at the bar, although such men as James 
Sullivan, John Lowell, Christopher Gore, Rufus Amory, Harrison Gray 

* The date of his death is given as July 22, 1856, while it is given as June, 1S55, in 
John Leigh, of Agawam (Ipswich), Mass., by William Lee, p. 49. 
' Colonel Henry Lee. 



SEVEXTH GENERATION. 297 



Otis, Samuel Dexter, and "William Sullivan were his associates and competi- 
tors. He went into j^ai-tnersliip with the lion. Samuel Hubbard, and 
acquired probably the most lucrative practice that had ever been known in 
Massachusetts. In 1813, Governor Strong appointed him Judge of the 
Supreme Court. He discharged the duties of his office with eminent 
fidelity until 1823, when he resigned on account of ill health, and went to 
Europe. 

In 1820, he was a member of the convention for revising the 
constitution of the State. In 1832, Governor Lincoln appointed three 
commissioners to re%-ise the General Statutes of Massachusetts. The chief 
place on this board was given to Judge Jackson. Besides filling- a number 
of other positions of trust, the judge was a member of the Corporation of 
Harvard College, and represented Boston in the General Court, in 1808, 
1809, and 1812. His learning and legal capacity stand recorded in his 
reported judgments and in his text-book upon a difficult and profound 
branch of the Law.^ By the united testimony of all who remember him 
upon the Bench, he possessed every quality of a great judge.^ 

Dec. 31, 1809, Charles Jackson married his second wife, Frances Cabot, 
who was born Jan. 9, 1780, and died Feb. 15, 1868. She was a daughter 
of John and Hannah (Dodge) Cabot. By her he had the following 
children : — 

Frances Cabot Jackson, born March 8, 1812, and died Dec. 9, 1878. She married, 
Oct. 29, 1832, Charles Cushing Paine, who was born 
July 11, 1808, and died Jan. 4, 1874. Among 
their children were Charles Jackson Paine [1. IX. 
2'\ and Rohert Treat Paine [51. VIII. 573.'] 

Charles Jackson, born March 4, 1815, and died July 30, 1871. He married 

his cousin, Susan Cabot Jackson. 

Lucy Cabot Jackson, born March 4, 1815, and died Dec. 17, 1891. She mar- 

ried John Torrey Morse, who was born March 
27, 1813. 



' A Treatise on the Pleadings and Practices in Eeal Actions : with Precedents of 
Pleadings. Svo. Boston 182S. 

" Necrology of Alumni of Harvard College, by Joseph Palmer, pp. 70-72 ; Appleton's 
Cyclopsedia of American Biography, Vol. III. p. 389 ; also the Boston Daily Advertiser of 
Dec. 17 and 18, 1855. 



298 THE FICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

Amelia Li;k Jackson, born May 22, ISIS, and died Feb. G, 1888. She married, 

June 15, 1840, Oliver Wendell Holmes, who was born 
Aug. 29, 1809, and died Oct. 7, 1894. 

MARIA^'N•E Cabot Jacksox, born March 17, 1820, and died in 1846. 

Judge Jackson was a son of the Hon. Jonathan and Hannah (Tracy) 
Jackson. 2lari) Jachson [2. VH. 14'\ was his sister ; Francis Cabot Lowell 
[53. Vn. 303] and EUzahdh Cahot Jackson [.54. VII. oil] were his nephew 
and niece, and liohert Treat Paine [51. VIII. o73'] and Charles Jackson Paine 
[1. IX. 2] were his grandsons. His ancestry includes the following families : 
Jackson, Baker, Salter, Quincy, Pares, Gookin, Bird, Dolling, Flynt, Hoar, 
Hincksnian, "Willet, Brown, Tracy, Gookin, Bird, Dolling, Savage, Hutchin- 
son, Marbury, Tyng, Sears (?), Cotton, Hawkridge, Bradstreet, Dudley, 
Lake, Goodyear. See Amcestrt Tables ^^ 

2. VII. 12. Thomas Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2] born in Beverly, Mass., 
died in Boston. A merchant. Residences : Boston and Brookline, Mass. 

Thomas Lee was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover, and afterwards 
entered Harvard College with the class of 1798 ; but he left college before 
graduating. In 1SG6, however, he received a degree. 

Following his tastes, which were in the line of mercantile pursuits, he 
went into the counting-room of AVilliam Gray, the noted merchant, and, in 
the course of time, engaged in business on his own account. Having 
acquired a moderate fortune, while he was still a young man, he retired, 
and devoted the remainder of his life to books, friends, and the embellish- 
ment of his country-seat at Brookline, which he made a model of landscape 
gardening.^ He passed a portion of each year at his town house in Boston, 
and used his wealth to promote the interests of many worthy objects. 

In 1865, he presented to the city of Boston the granite statue of Alex- 
ander Hamilton, by Dr. Rimmer, which stands on Commonwealth Avenue. 
He also gave to the city a monument in the form of a fountain, which stands 
in the Public Gai'den. This monument is inscribed as follows : — 



* This place now forma a part of the estate of Professor Charles Sprague Sargent. 
For a description of it, see A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening 
adapted to North America, by A. J. Downing, p. 41. 



SEVENTn GENERATION. 299 

" IN GRATITUDE 

FOE THE BELIEF 

OF HUMAN SUITERING 

BT THE INHALING OF KTHEE 

A CITIZEN OF BOSTON 

HAS ERECTED THIS MONUMENT 

A. D. MDCCCLXVn. 



"THE GIFT OF THOMAS LEE 

Mr. Lee was simple, generous, courteous, and independent, with a mind 
so vigorous that age seemed hardly to weaken it, and with a strength of 
integrity which no modern fallacies of political or business expediency 
could deceive. He combined, to an unusual degree, marked individuality of 
opinion and unostentatious public spirit. His great interest in politics was 
shown by his large and frequent contnbutions to his party. He gave 
thirty-five thousand dollars to Harvard College, thirty thousand dollars 
to the city of Boston for statues, and to his servants forty-three thousand 
five hundred dollars. His nephews and nieces received the bulk of his 
estate.^ 

For a general description of his family, see pages 294-295. 

2. VII. 12. Elisa Buckniinster, his wife, born in Portsmouth, N. H., 
died in Brookline, Mass.^ An authoress. 

From her father and brother, she acquired a classical education and a 
fondness for literary pursuits. She published the following works : 
" Sketches of a New England Village " [1837] ; " Delusion " [1839] ; " Life 
of Jean Paul Eichter" [1842, translated from the German]; " Walt and 
Vult, or the Twins" [1845, translated from Richter] ; "Naomi, or Boston 
200 Years Ago" [1848]; "Memoirs of Rev. Dr. Buckminster and J. S. 
Buckmiuster " [1849] ; " Florence, the Parish Orphan " [1850] ; " Parthenia, 

^ Obituary notices in the Boston Journal of ]\Ionday, Dec. 16, 1867, and the Xew 
England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXII. p. 201. 

' The State Eecords give her age at death as 76 years. Her birth would therefore 
have occurred in 1788, but the Dictionary of American Biography, by Francis S. Drake, 
states that she was born about 1794. 



300 THE riCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

or the Last Days of Paganism" [1838]; and tlie "Barefooted Maiden" 
[1860, a translation] .1 

Mrs. Lee was a daiighter of the Rev. Joseph and Sarah (Stevens) Buck- 
minster. The liev. Josepli Stevens Buckminster was her brotlier. William 
S. n. Lntlirop [55. IX. llo4-^ is her grandnephew. Her ancestry inckides 
the following families : Buckminster, Clark, Shai-p, ^'ose, Lawson, Simp- 
son, Williams, Stalham, Park, Ilolgrave, Cotton, Hawkridge, Bradstreet, 
Dudley, Stoddard, Downing, AVinthrop, Warehani, Stevens, Ligalls, Osgood, 
Lynde, Davison, Midler, Belclier, Danforth, Gilbert, AVelles, Remington, 
Belcher, Danforth, Bradstreet, Dudley, AYoodbridge, Dudley. See A^-cESTBY 
Tables f. 

2. VII. 13. Nancy Lee [Joseph 1-2. YI. 2], bom in Beverly, Mass., 
died in Beverly. 

Miss Lee was a very witty and lively person. For a description of her 
family see pages 29-1-295. 

2. VII. 14. Henry Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], born in Beverly, Mass., 
died m Boston. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

Henry Lee was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover. He became 
a Boston merchant, and carried on an extensive trade with Calcutta, Madi-as, 
and Bombay. The goods which he received from these places he ex- 
ported to almost every considerable European port, and to the chief cities 
of the United States. From 1812 to 1815, he was in Calcutta, where he 
acquired the friendship of the great Enghsh houses in that city ; and such 
was their trust in him that, before the Barings furnished American merchants 
with letters of credit in India, all the young and some of the old and estab- 
lished merchants depended on a letter from iVIi-. Lee to substantiate their 
pecuniary responsibility. 

But it is as a collector and writer of commercial statistics, and as a zealous 
student of political economy, that Henry Lee is best known. His writings 
on these subjects were highly esteemed in England, where he was recognized 
as an authority by such economists as McCuUock, Tooke, and Villiers. He 

* Dictionary of American Biography, by Francis S. Drake, p. 537. 



HEXRY LEE. 

[2. VII. 14] 

From the Portrait by Gamtadklla, painted about 1840, no 
POSSESSION OF Mrs. Samuel Torrey Morse, of Boston 



.1 "' - I I.- ■ M.''if y..j > j>. ii! i i w<J-< i Bi!;gji'%ifAgp-l^'> l>jj 



:J\ 



X. 



■AM.:,^.'.a..-;-- J~a.^,^.I»....rf», 




SEVEXTE GENEEATTOy. 301 

{iitIvlJ at coiHliisiou.s entirely at vanance -with those advocated by the sup- 
porters of the so-called American system. He was a frequent contributor 
to the " Free Trade Advocate," of Philadelphia, and became widely known 
through his "■ Boston Report " as one of a " Committee of citizens of Boston 
and vicinity opposed to a further increase of duties on importations." The 
" Boston Report'' was published in Boston in 1827. It passed through four 
editions, and is considered one of the most masterly vindications of the 
pjinciples of free trade that has ever appeared in print. It was highly 
praised in the ro\"iews at the time of its appearance. 

At the "Free Trade Convention," in 1831, Henry Lee was associated 
with Alljort Giilla'.iu in preparing the memorial and statistical exposition of 
the etlects of the tariff. In 1&32, he was nominated for Vice-President of 
the United States by South Carolina, not because he had any sympathy 
w^ith mdlification, but as an expression of gratitude for his opposition to the 
high tariff. He was intensely interested in politics, and a commentator on 
all proposed measures ; but his extreme shyness prevented him from assum- 
ing any public position. His simplicity, his integrity, his cordiality, his 
eloquence in conversation, and his general information, contributed to place 
him in friendly relations with the whole community, and to win the respect 
and affection of all.^ 

We give a hcliotype of his portrait, painted about 1840 by Gambardella. 
It is now in the possession of Mr. Lee's sister, Mrs. Samuel Torrey Morse. 

2. VII. 14. 3Iary Jac1;son, the wife of Hemy Lee, born in Newbmy- 
port, Mass., died in Brookline, Mass. 

^Irs. Lee's manners were charming, and she was greatly beloved by a 
wide circle of friends. She was a daughter of the Hon. Jonathan and 
Hannah (Tracy) Jackson. Charles Jackson [2. VII. 10'\ was her brother; 
Francis Cahot LomU [53. VII. o03] was her nephew ; Elizalcth Cahot Jackson 
[54. VII. oil] was her niece; and Bobert Treat Paine [51. VIII. 573] and 
Charles Jackson Paine [1. IX. 3] were her grandnephews. Her ancestiy 

* Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. VI. p. 692 ; also obituary notices 
in the Boston Daily Advertiser of Feb. 7, 18G7, and the Boston Transcript of Wednesday, 
Feb. 6, 1SG7. 



302 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

includes tlic following:: families: Jackson, leaker, Salter, Quincy, Pares, 
Gookin, Bird, Dolling-, Flynt, Hoar, Hmcksman, "VVillet, Brown, Tracy, 
Gookin, Bird, Dolling, Sa^-age, Hutchinson, Marbury, Tyng, Sears (I), 
Cotton, Ha^vkridge, Bradstreet, Dudley, Lake, Goodyear. See Ai,-cE3TRr 

Tables ^^ 

2. VII. 16. Francis Lee [Joseph 1-2. VI. 2], born in Beverly, Mass., 
died in Charlestown, Mass. A merchant. 

Francis Lee was educated at Phillips xVcademy, Andover. He became 
a merchant of the most exact and intelligent type, and rapidly acquired a 
fortune. lie was an extremely disinterested and sympathetic man, and 
was much beloved by his family and friends. To their great grief, he 
became insane early in 1829, and was placed in the McLean Asylum, where 
he died. 

3. VII. 18. Esther Mackey [Esther 3-5. VI. 4], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there June 27, 1762, died m Salem. 

3. VII. IS. John Tage, her husband, born in Medford, Mass., died in 
Salem. ^ A ship-chandler. Residence : Salem. 

Colonel Page came to Salem in 1772, and was at one time a public 
weigher and ganger in the Salem custom-house. Afterwards he became 
a member of the firm of Page & Ropes,^ ship-chandlers. The fiiTQ con- 
tinued to do business for more than forty years. In the Revolutionary 
"War, he served as a volunteer in the Rhode Island expedition. In 1795, 
he was colonel of the Salem regiment, and for a short time he served as 
an officer in the United States Army. He was also a prominent member of 
the Essex Lodge of Salem.^ 

Colonel Page and his first wife, Sarah Porter, were married Nov. 25, 
1773. She was born Aug. 22, 1752, and died Oct. 6, 1791. By her he 
had the followinor children : ■ — 



1 The date of hia death is given as Dec. 1 and Dec. 2, 1838, by different authorities. 
" See account of Samuel Eopes [45. VI. 70], pp. 229-230. 
» Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. III. pp. 92-93. 



EDWARD WEST. 

[3- VII. m 

From thk Portrait by Bonhommk, now i.\ thk possession of the heirs 

OK THE LATE ALFRED AMOi AbBOIT, Eso., OE PeaBODV, MaSS. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 303 



Jonx Page, born April 25, 1774 ; married Marv TiPlaiul, who was born in Grafton, 
Mass., in 17^1.', and died iu Salem, iu ISJS. He died Oct. 21, 1S27. 

Saml'el Page, born iNIarch 30, 1770, and died June 11, 1777. 

JosiAH Page, born April 24, 1779, and died Jan. 22, 1780. 

JosiAH Page, born Sept. 1, 1781 ; married Eliza Whitney, of Beverly, Mass., and died 
June, 1810. 

Colonel Page and his third wife, Ruth Holman, were married July 10, 
1793. She was born June 15, 1761, and died Sept. 28, 1833. She was 
an aunt of Samuel Ilolman [23. VIII. ^oSI- By her he had the following 
children : — 

Samuel Page, born May 22, 1794; married Feb. 21, 1S31, Sarah Elizar 

beth Kelley. He died June, 18:;S. 
Wu.LiArM Page, born ^March 5, 1796; died in Lynn, ]\Iass., Sept. 9, 1844. 

Elizabeth Page, born Oct. 9, 1799 ; died, unmarried, in 1870. 

Henry Lawrence Page, born June 9, 1802 ; died May 29, 1803. 

Colonel Page was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Clark) Page, of 
Medford. His ancestry includes the following families : Page, Paine, 
Dunster, Lawrence, Morse, Phillips, Lawrence, Morse, Phillips, Rutter, 
Clark. See Ancestry Tables ^^ 

3. VII. 19. Elizabeth Mackey [Esther 3-5. VL 4], probably born 
in Salem, died in Andover, Mass. 

3. VII. 19. Bdward West, her husband, probably born in Salem,^ 
baptized there Aug. 31, 1760, died in Andover, Mass. A shipmaster. 
Residence : Andover. 

Captain West passed more than forty years of his life at sea, mostly as 
a shipmaster. He was distinguished for his skill and energy as an officer, 
and for the success of his voyages.''^ 

" In early life, being a privateer, he fell into the hands of the English, 
with whom he remained a prisoner till aftei' the Revolutionary War closed. 
Among the last incidents of his life at sea was his being taken by an 
English ship oiF Malta, in attempting to escape with Prince Lucien Bona- 

' The date of his birth is given by different authorities as Sept. 20, and Sept. 22, 
1759. 

' Obituary in the Salem Register of June 20, 1851. 



304 THE FICKERrXG GEXEALOGY. 

parte, wliom no bad underiaken to bring to tbi.s country aft^r bis sbip and 
cargo bad been confiscated at Naples." * 

Captain W^est's original borne was in Salem ; but be afterwards moved 
to Andover, wbere be spent tbe last tbirty years of bis life. He is said to 
have been a great beau in bis day. "We give a beliotype of bis portrait 
painted wbile be was abroad by Bonbomme. Tbe jjicture is now in tbe 
possession of bis great-grandson, Edward West Abbott. 

Captain West was a son of William and ]Mary (Beckford) West, of 
Salem. His brotbers, Ebenezer and Xatbaniel, were famous for tbeu* 
dai-ing and enterprising spirit. Tbe latter was a man of distingnisbed 
personal presence, and one of tbe most noted of tbe mercbant princes of 
Salem.^ Captain West's ancestry includes tbe following ftimilies : West, 
Merriam, Poor, Titcomb, Bartlett, Gale, Dixey, Beckford, Pinson, Green, 
Howard, Hardy. See A_N-cESTKr Tables ^^ . 

4. YII. 20. Margaret Mackey [Estber 3-5. VT. 4], probably born 
in Salem, baptized tbere Nov. 10, 1765, died in Andover, ]\[ass.^ 

Several of Mrs. Frye's brocade dresses are still in tbe possession of ber 
descendants. 

4. Vn. 20. Fredevick Frt/e, ber husband, born in Andover, Mass., 
died in New York. A soldier. Residence : Andover. 

On tbe nigbt before tbe battle of Bunker Hill, Frederick Frye, then a 
mere youtb, accompanied bis father's regiment to tbe field. He went in 
tbe capacity of a private in Captain Benjamin Farnum's Company. On 
the 24tb of January, 1781, be enrolled for three years, in Lovejoy's Com- 
pany, Johnson's Regiment, and on the 1st of February of the same year 
he was commissioned ensign in Captain John Miller's Company, Vose's 
Regiment, serving until Nov. 3, 1783. At the close of the war he became 
a lieutenant member of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. His 

1 New England Historical and Genealogical Eegister, Vol. V. p. 476. 

* The Journal and Letters of Samuel Curwen, An American in England from 1775 to 
17S3, by George Atkinson Ward, Fourth Edition, pp. 670-072. 

» We have giveu the date of her marriage as :May 9, 1789. Essex Institute His- 
torical Collections, Vol. HI. p. 175, gives it as June 0, 17S9. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 305 

certilicate of meinbLTsliip, signed by General Washington, president, and 
General Knox, secretary, is in possession of the family. 

On June 2, 1794, he was commissioned captain of the First United States 
Artillerists and Engineers, and was honorably discharged June 1, 1802. 
This commission is still in the possession of his descendants. They say that 
it is dated Dec. 2G, 1704, and signed by Washington. He at one time was 
stationed at Salem where he superintended the building of Fort Pickering, 
of which he was afterwards commandant. In 1812, he was the first com- 
mandant of Fort Jay on Governor's Island, N. Y. His granddaughter, 
Mrs. Ilanford Lyon, of Bridgeport, Conn., writes : " We have the com- 
mission of Capt. Frederick Frye, appointing him to the command of 
Governor's Island, signed by Col. Rochefontaine, 1798." During the 
War of 1812, he was stationed at West Point. He was also at Fort 
Mifflin in Pennsylvania, at Sullivan's Island, North Carolina, and at 
Fort Mackensie. He endured great hardships in some of these positions. 
After spending some time in travelling, he settled down at Andover in the 
old homestead in which he was bora. Here he became a magistrate and 
a prominent citizen. After his wife's death, the old homestead was sold out 
of the family, and he removed to Montgomery, N. Y. A picture of the 
house is on page 132 of the History of Andover. It is a very old house, 
and the north end of it is siipposed to have been the original house built 
by James Frye, a son of John Frye, the original settler.^ 

Frederick Frye was a son of Colonel James and Sarah (Cheever) Frye.^ 
Colonel James Frve was a very distinguished man. He served as an officer 
in both the French and Revolutionary Wars, and was also a selectman of 
Andover, and a representative in the General Court. The diff'erent com- 
missions that were issued to him are now in the possession of his great- 

• Jremorials of the ^Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, edited by James M- 
Bugbee, p. 201 ; Historical Eegister of the United States Army, by F. B. Heitman, p. 
279 ; Account by, and letter of Theophilus C. Frye, of Montclair, IST. J., of Aug. 23, 1884 ; 
also an account of the various military services of members of the Frye family, printed in 
the Salem Gazette in 1S76. See a pedigree of the Frye Family, in New England Historical 
and Genealogical Eegister, Vol. YIII. pp. 226-227. 

" His father's name is given as John in Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. III. 
p. 175, and in the Memorials of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. 

20 



306 THE nCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

great-graiuld;uightev, ^Irs. George C. AVuklo. Frederick Frye's ancestry 
includes the following families: Frye, Osgood, Clement, Sprague, Clieever, 
Latlirop, Bill, Baker. See Ancestry Tables '^^i. 

5. VII. 22. Samuel Gardner Mackey [Esther 3-5. VI. 4], probably 
born in Salem, died at sea. A shipmaster. Residence : Beverly, Mass. 

Captain Mackey removed from Salem to Beverly. He died from the 
breaking of a blood-vessel in the Canso Gut while on a fishing voyage for 
the recovery of his health.^ 

5. VII. 22. TllixabetU Stnith, his wife, bom in Beverly, Mass., died 
in Beverly. 

Mrs. Mackey was a daughter of Captain Elias and Thankful Smith, of 
Beverly. A^-cESTRV Tables 1.1^-. 

5. VII. 23. Nancy Lois Gardner Mackey [Esther 3-5. VI. 4.], 
probably born in Salem, died in Andover, Mass. 

On the death of her aunt, Mrs. Lois (Gardner) Baniard, whose property 
she inherited, she added "Lois Gardner" to her name. Her obituary, 
printed in the Salem Gazette of April 29, 1845, states that she died in 
Andover, and that she was the sole surviving child of the late Daniel 
Mackey, Esq., of Salem, and the last in direct descent to bear the name 
of a highly respectable family ; it adds that she was a true lady of the 
old school, who Avas held in high regard and honor In' a large circle of 
friends, and beloved by the poor for her benevolence and charity, 

5. VII. 24. Thomas Barnard [Lois 5. VI. 5], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

5. VII. 25. Sarah. Barnard [Lois 5. VI. 5], probably bom in 
Salem,^ died in Salem. 

5. VII. 2o. Bobert Emery, her husband, died in Springfield, Mass. 
A shipmaster. Residence : Springfield. 



Gazette of Friday, July 19, 1805. 
^ The date of her baptism is given as Aug. 15, 1775, in Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. IV. p. 274. The correct date is Autr. 12, 1775, as given on the Sheets, and in 
Eighteenth Century Baptisms, by James A. Emmerton, p. 8. 



ELIZABETH GARDNER. 

[5- VII. 2-.J 

From the Tortrait now in the possession ok Mr,. Gf.orgk Oliver .Sears, 
OF Boston. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 307 



Captain Emery entered Harvard College, but, owing to loss of property, 
did not graduate. After leaving college, he went to sea and made voyages 
fi-om Xewburyport, Salem, and Boston. In early life he lived in Salem, 
Captain Emery's first wife was Eunice Orne, of Salem, whom he married 
July 7, 1795. She was a daughter of Captain Jonathan and Mary 
(Bowditch) Orne. By her he had one child: — 

Maegabet Theresa EiiERV, born May 12, 1796 ; died, unmarried, in Hartford, Conn., 
August, 1865. 

After the death of his second wife, Captain Emery removed to Spring- 
field, Mass., v.-here he married, June 1, 1815, Mary Lyman. She was a 
daughter of the Hon. Samuel Lyman. By her he had the following five 
children : — 

Charles EiiERY, born July, 1816; died in Dorchester, jMass., Jan. 3, 1890; 

married Nov. 1, 1840, Susan Hilton Kelly. 
Egbert Ehert, died an infant. 

John Abbot Emeet, bora Sept. 20, ISIS ; died in E-^jeter, X. H., Oct. 8, 1842, during 

his senior year iu Harvard College. 
Robert Emery, died au infant. 

Maet Lymax Emery, boru Aug. 12, 1821 ; married, June, 1846, Charles B. Pierce, of 

Dorchester, ^Mass.' 

Captain Emery's aunt, Theresa Emery, was the second wife of Dr. 
Joseph Orne [49. YL 83'\. Robert Emery was a son of John and Margaret 
(Gookin) Emery. His ancestry includes the following families : Emery, 
Gowen, Chick, Ferryman, Dudley, Gil man, Clark, Treworgye, Shapleigh, 
Gookin, Bird, Dolling, Savage, Hutcliinson, Marbury, Tyng, Sears (?), 
Cotton, Hawkridge, Bradstreet, Dudley, Lake, Goodyear, Fitch, Mason, 
Peck, Appleton, Everard, Glover, Harris, Rogers, Crane, Denison, Dudley. 
See Anxestry Tables -jj. 

5. VH. 27. Elizabeth Gardner [Henry 5. VL 8], probably born in 
Salem, died in Enfield, ^lass. 

' Genealogical Eecord of Descendants of John and Anthony Emery, by the Eev. 
Eufus Emery, pp. 406 and 497 ; The Lyman Genealogy, by Lyman Coleman, D.D., p. 309. 
See Orne I'edigree, between pp. 68 and 69. 

12489G3 



308 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

The heliotype of Miss Gardner here given, -vvas tukun from her portrait 
now in the possession of her grandniece, Mrs. George Ohver Seai-s, of 
Boston. 

5. VII. 29. Mary Turner Gardner [Henry 5. VI. 8], probably 
bom in Salem, died in Enfield, Mass.^ 

5. VII. 30. Sarah Gardner [Henry 5. VI. 8], probably born in 
Salem, died in Belchertown, Mass. 
Mrs. Jones was baptized as " Sally." 

5. VII. SO. Eliphaz Jones, lier husband, born in Hebron, Conn., died 
in Springfield, Mass. 

Eliphaz Jones at one time engaged in teaching. He was also a book- 
keeper, and for a time a merchant and postmaster at Enfield, Mass. He 
became a resident of Southampton, Belehertown, Enfield, and Springfield, 
and was a justice of the peace for Hampshire County. 

His second wife, whom he man-ied about the year 1824 or 1825, was 
Eloise "Warner, a daughter of General Jonathan Warner, of Hardwick, 
Mass. She was born in Hardwick, in 1791, and died in Springfield, March 2, 
1872. By her he had two childi-en : — 

Sakah Joxes, who married John ]M. Wood, of Springfield, ^lass. 
Eliphaz Waenee Jones, of Chicago, 111. 

Eliphaz Jones was a son of Eliphaz and Levina (Barber) Jones, of 
Hebron, Conn. His ancestry includes the following families : Jones, Bush- 
nell, Sanford, Rockwell, Dibble, "Wakefield, Beach, Burt, Barber, Cass. See 
AircESTRY Tables ^. 

6. VII. 31. Maria Eliza Gardner [Henry 5. VI. 8], probably bom 
in Salem. 

5-5^ VII. 32. Nathaniel Gardner Dabney [Elizabeth .5-5^ VI. 9], 
born in Salem, died in Youngstowu, Ohio. A farmer. 

* Her grave3tone, as copied by her grandniece, !Mrs. George 0. Sears, gives the date of 
her death as Xov. 11, 1833, while the Salem Gazette of Xov. 22, 1733, states that she died 
oa the 14th inst. 



SEVENTH GENEEATION. 309 

Mr. Dabney k-ft liis home when he was a young man atid went to 
Pennsylvania, where he spent a year or more in travelling through the State, 
his headquarters being at Pittsburg. During one winter he taught school 
at Somerset, boarding at the house of a former named Keifer, whose 
daughter Mary he afterwards married. Sometime before 1797, lie started 
with a man from Pittsburg to settle in Ohio. On their arrival, they selected 
a large tract of land suitable for town lots, with the intention of laying out 
a town. Their plan was that Mr. Dabney should keep the store, and his 
partner the hotel ; but before they had carried out their plans the partner 
died, and Youngstown was laid out by a Mr. Young, on adjoining land. As 
the widow of his jnirtner did not wish to retain her interest in the land, Mr. 
Dabney was left with a large tract of laud on his hands, without the slightest 
knowledge of farming. He, however, concluded to settle there, and went 
back to Pennsylvania, got married, and returned to Ohio, finally settling 
on his land in 1797. 

The Yoimgstown Daily Register, of June 18, 1881, contains an account 
of this property and of tlie house built on it. The agreement to build the 
house was made Feb. 10, 1S03, and may be interesting as showing the 
character of the houses of that period. 

The house was to be 28x24 feet upon the ground, two stories high, the 
lower one to be nine feet and the upper one eight feet. It was to be 
built of logs hewn on four sides, and made square, to be laid within three 
inches of each other. "Wlien raised, all of the logs put up to be ten inches 
on the face at the smallest end. There were to be nine sleepers of a suitable 
size, and eleven joists between the two stories, to be hewn nine inches by four 
and a half, and to be let in on the inside of the fair plates. There were to 
be eleven pairs of rafters in the roof, and as many joists for them to rest 
upon. The pitch of the roof was to be as Mr. Dabney might direct, and the 
house was to be covered with rough boards laid close, and upon them good 
chestnut joint shingles were to be well nailed on. The gable ends were to 
be well clapboarded so as to keep out storms. This pioneer log-house was 
for more than half a century a prominent landmark on the north side of the 
"Warren Road, and in the western part of what is now the city of Youngs- 
town. Mr. Dabney owned large tracts of land on both sides of tlie road to 



310 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

"Warren, and hh farm extended west to near the Eagle Furnaee, and sonth 
to the Mahoning' River. 

Physically, Mr. Dabney was weak, but mentally he was perhaps stronger 
than any one else in the settlement. He was considered by his neighbors as 
a very wise and just man. Matters in dispute were usually referred to him, 
and his decisions generally gave satisfaction. He took a great interest in 
the early training- and education of his children. At the time of his death, 
he was preparing to return to the East on a visit to his mother, with his 
eldest daughter, whom he intended to leave there to fmish her education. He 
died of quick consumption, after an illness of but six weeks. 

b-b^.Wl. 32. Mary Keifer, his wife, probably born in Pennsyl- 
vania, died in Youngstown, Ohio. 

Mrs. Gardner was a woman of slight build, but she was strong and 
healthy. She had many difficulties to contend with incident to a new 
settlement ; but she kept her children together, and gave them the best 
advantages that Youngstown afforded. They grew to be men and women ' 
of character. 

She was the daughter of a Pennsylvania farmer with whom her husband 
boarded while he was teaching school in Somerset of that State.' 

Ancestey Tables Yj- 

5\ VII. 34. Fidelia Bridges [Elizabeth 5-5\ VI. 9], bom in An- 
dover, Mass., died in Dauvers, Mass., of consumption. 

5". VII. 34^. Elins Wai-nrr KcttcJI, her first husband, born in Dan- 
vers, Mass., died in Dauvers. Kesidence : Danvers. 

Mr. Kettell was a son of John and Lydia (Holton) Kettell, of Danvers. 
His ancestry includes the following families : Kettell, Allen, Hay ward, 
Corning, Batchelder, Hemck, Dodge, Raymond, Hull, Holton, IngersoU, 
Flint, Moulton, Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, "Weld, Clap, i\ritchelson, 
Bushell, Warner, Dane, Tuttle, Cogswell, Thompson, Prince, Haraden, 
Ellery, Coit, Stevens. See A>-cestry Tables -^5,. 

1 Letter of Sirs. Kate Everett Morrison, dated at YouiiMtown, Feb. 14, 1SS8. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 311 

5**. VII. tX^-. ^To7ni Uiidirott, the second husband of Fidelia Bridges, 
bom in Danvers, Mass., baptized there Nov. 1, 1767, died in Danvers. A 
sliipmaster. Residence : South Danvers. 

Captain Endicott went to sea at a very early age, and, up to the time of 
his retirement, he had made fifty voyages, most of them to the East Indies. 
He was a skilful and enterprising shipmaster, rigid in enforcing obedience, 
but at the same time kind, generous, and charitable. 

He retired from the sea many years before his death, and settled on the 
ancestral farm in Danvers, which had come down to him directly from 
Grovemor John Endicott. 

Captain Endicott represented Danvers several times in the Legislature.* 
By his first wife, ilary Putnam, he had the following children : — 

John Exdicott, born November, 1791, and died in April, 1803. 

Samuel Endicott, born Oct. 26, 1793; married Caroline Collins, of 

Salem. He died in May, 1828. 
Maria Cecelia Endicott, born Jan. 20, 1798 ; married, August, 1822, John 

Gardner, of Kio Janeiro. 
George Washington Endicott, born Jan. 15, 1800 ; married, May 5, 1834, Sarah S. 

Lawrence. 
Martha Endicott, born Jan. 17, 1803, and died November, 1816. 

John Endicott, born May 19, 1805; married, March, 1832, Martha T. 

Mansfield, -who died in New York, ]May 20, 1845.^ 

There is a portrait of Captain Jolm Endicott in the possession of a 
descendant. 

He was a son of John and ^lartha (Putnam) Endicott, of Danvers. 
I^Uza Endicott Fcabochj [53. VIII. Gl^'\ was his grandniece ; Samuel Endicott 
Peahodij [1. IX. .^] was his grandnephew; 3Ianj Peabody Sears [51. IX. 
lOoO'] was his great-grandniece, and Jacoh Cmcninsldeld Rogers Peabody [17. 
X. 312'] is his great-grandnephew. His ancestry includes the following 
families : Endicott, Felton, Tompkins, Endicott, Jacobs, Frost, Waters, 
Tompkins, Putnam, Hutchinson, Bosworth, Cutler, Leach, Flint, Putnam, 
Hutchinson, Bosworth, Bacon, Richardson, Giles. See Ancestry Tables -j"?.. 

» Salem Gazette of Dec. 2, 1834. 

" Endicott Genealogy, in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 
Vol. I. p. 340. 



312 THE PICKF.mXG GENEALOGY. 

5^. ^'1I. 3-). Henry Gardner Bridges [i:ii/.abetU 5-5^ VI. 9], 
born in North Andover, IMas^s., died in Macao, China. x\. shipmaster. 
Residence : ^^alein. 

In his youth Captain Bndge; wished to study medicine : but being 
opposed by his steptathtr. he left home at an early aye and went to sea. 
As captain of various mercliant ships, he visited nearly all the ports of 
Europe, Africa, and the East Indies. He Avas a member of the East India 
Society, and contributed largely to the Salem ^luscum. Captain Bridges 
was an excellent example of the best type of shipmasters. Ilis frame was 
muscular ; and he was such a noble man, morally and intellectually, that 
he won the esteem of all who sailed under him. He was also a person 
of artistic tastes, and some delicate bits of carving which he did in his 
leisure hours at sea are still in the possession of his descendants. 

In 1838, through the failure of a firm to whom he had intrusted 
funds, Captain Bridges lost his money and the money of his half-sister, 
Elizabeth Stevens, which had been intrusted to him. In consequence 
of this loss, he was obliged to sell " "Wire Hill " at Andover, which 
was a valuable portion of the estate he had iidierited from his grand- 
father. This he did to restore to his half-sister the money he had 
invested for her.^ 

5'^. VIT. 35. EU':a Charlivick, his wife, born in Salem, died in Salem. 
Mrs. Bridges was a daughter of Gilbert and Elizabeth (Kimball) 
Chadwick, of Salem. Ancestry Tables ^y. 

5^ \T:I. 3G. Elizabeth Stevens [Elizabeth 5-5*. VI. 9], probably 
born and died in Xorth Andover. Residence : North Andover. 

Miss Stevens's gravestone is still standing in North Andover. By her 
will, dated Sept. 11, 1837, and proved ]\[ay 18, 1841, she made several 
public bequests, and left the remainder of her property to her brother, 
Henry G. Bridges, and her sister, Fidelia Endicott." 

* Obituary in the Salem Gazette of March 22, 1850, and letters of his daughter, Fidelia 
Bridges. 

' Essex County Probate Records, Vol. 411, p. 9.5. 



r 



^"h 



ESTHER ORN'E (PAIXE) CABOT. 





[6. Yir. 3S.] 




[7 VII 46.1 


From the Mima 


CkF, BV Miss Sali.v Ai.i.f.n. now tn thf. possession 


Fr 


wcis Hknrv Lee, Esq., of Salem, Mass. 



SEVENTH GEXEEATIOX. 313 

6. VII. 37. Rebecca Cabot [Rebecca 6. VI. 11], probably born in 
S.'ilem, baptized there April 30, 17G9, died in Salem, at the age of ninety- 
oue years. 

6. VII. 38. Joseph Cabot [Rebecca 6. VI. 11], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. ^ A merchant. Residence : Salem. 

Joseph Cabot, H. C. 1788, became a merchant of Salem. He resided 
on Essex Street in the house which had belonged to his father. A helio- 
type of this house is given facing page 187. 

He probably worshipped at St. Peter's Church, Salem, as both of his 
children were baptized there. 

He and his wife were first cousins. 

6. VII. 3S. Esther Orne Paine, his wife, died in Salem, of heart 
complaint. 

An obituary notice of her was printed in the Salem Gazette of Jan. 31, 
1854. It pays a high tribute to her character. From it we learn that she 
enjoyed the advantages of the best education to be obtained in her day ; 
that she was gifted in mind and heart ; that her affections were strong 
and generous ; and that she possessed an unusual dignity of manner, 
which she retained to the end of her life. Both she and her sister, Mrs. 
Rose, always considered themselves as British subjects. 

Mrs, Cabot's second husband was Ichabod Tucker [7. VII. 46'\ His 
first wife was Maria Orne [49. VII. 266]. Mrs. Cabot's number in direct 
descent is [7. VII. 46]. 

6. VII. 39. EUzabeth Ome [Timothy 6. VI. 12], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 
Miss Ome was familiarly called Betsey. 

6. VII. 40. Margaret Orne [Timothy 6. VI. 12], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Perkins was familiarly called Peggy. 

' The date of his death is given by two authorities as Nov. 18, 1799, while it is given 
as Nov. 17, 1709, ia Essex lustitute Historical Collectious, Vol. III. p. 17.j. 



314 THE riCKErxixa gexealogy. 

&.Y11. 40- J'oscjtfi PrrJiius, litr husband, liorn in E».sex, Mass., 
died in Salem, of consumption. A lawyer. Residence : Salem. 

Joseph Perkins, II. C. 1794, spent a year at Phillips Academy, Andover. 
In college he was noted for his studious habits and proficiency in the learned 
languages. He was a popular writer and sprakor, and while in college 
several of his articles were printed in the Massachusetts Magazine. After 
graduating he spent about two years in teaching, studying law in the 
mean time. In the fall of 1796 he entered the law office of William 
Prescott, Esq., of Salem, as a student, and in 1797 was admitted to the 
bar, and the same year opened an olHce in Salem. lie was a communicant of 
St. Peter's Episcopal church, and his pastor, the Pev. Mr. Fisher, preached 
a sermon on the occasion of his deatli.^ 

Mr. Perkins was clear and cool in debate, and the tones of his voice 
were sweet and musical. He was patient and laborious in study, accurate 
in his investigations, of a penetrating mind, and had a retentive memory. 
In private life he was amiable and exemplary, of polished but retiring man- 
ners, and interesting and instructive in conversation. In his personal ap- 
pearance he was attractive and well calculated to embellish polite society. 
His funeral was attended by the officers of the First Regiment, of which 
he was a member.^ 

Joseph Perkins was a son of Joseph and ]\Iary (Foster) Perkins. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Perkins, Knight, Dodge, Eaton, 
Choate, Varney, Burnham, Foster, Choate, Vai-ney, Burnham. See A^-ce.?trt 
Tables ^^. 

6. VII. 41. Catherine Sewall Pynchon Orne [Timothy 6. VI. 
12], probably born in Salem, baptized there June 16, 1793, died in 
Salem. 

In the notice of her death printed in the Salem Gazette of Dec. 29, 1818, 
she is spoken of as " A woman of uncommon excellence, whose virtues 
endeared her to a very numerous acquaintance." 

A miniature of her painted by Verstille was owned by her son, the late 
Dr. William ]\Iack, of Salem. A heliotype of it is here given. 

> The History of the Town of Essex, by Eubert Crowell, pp. 255-259. 
* Obituary iu the Salem Gazette of March -i, 1803. 



CATHERINE SEWAI.L PVNCHON (ORNE) CLASHING. 

[6. VII. 4..] 

From thl Miniature f.\- X'trstilli:, formerly in the possession of 

THE LATE Wui.IAM M ACK, M.D., OF SaLEM, MaSS. 



-m 



{ I 1 



SEVENTH GENEEATION. 315 

6. VII. ^i'. Tliouias Cufiiiinff,\\cv i\i:£,i hudbaud, probably born in 
Boston, died in Salem. 

Mr. Cushing's first wife, whom he married May 22, 1782, was Lucy 
Wliitwell. They had a son, — 

Thomas John Hancock Cusiii.vg, horn in November, 1783, H. C. 1804. A physician. 
He died in June, 1S17, unmarried. 

Thomas Cushiiig- was a son of Thomas and Deborah (Fletclier) Cuslnng. 
Liike Baldwin [G. VIII. ol'] was his grandnephew ; Harriet Upham [55. 
VII. 0141 and Mar [I A. S. M. Baldwin [6. IX. G9'\ are his great-grandnieces. 
His father, 11. C. 1744, of wliom there is a portrait at the Essex Institute, 
Salem, was a member of the Continental Congress in 1774 and 1775, and 
was Lieutenant-Governor of Massachusetts.^ His ancestry includes the 
following families : Cushing, Pitcher, Hawke, Thaxter, Jacob, Bromfield, 
Danforth, Wilson, Fletcher, Cushing, Pitcher, Hawke, Thaxter, Jacob. 
See Ajs'cestry Tables -^L. 

1T550G4 

6. VII. 41^. Elisha 3Iack, the second husband of Catherine Sewall 
Pynchon Orne, bom in I\Iiddletield, Mass.,^ died in Salem. A lawyer. 
Residence : Salem. 

Elisha Mack, Williams College, 1804, began the study of law in the 
office of John D. Dickman, at Lansingburg, N. Y., and finished his studies 
in the office of Judge Samuel Putnam [54-55. VI. IDS']. He began the 
practice of his profession in Salem in 1808. In 1820, he removed to Wor- 
thington, Mass., returning to Salem in 1827. Judge Mack was for a short 
period an associate editor of the Boston Daily Advertiser. He was for 
several years a judge of the Police Court of Salem; was a representative to the 
General Court ; a member of the Common Council of Salem, from 1845 to 
1848, and at the time of his death he was the candidate of the coalition for 

* For an account of tlie Cushing Family, see the Heraldic Journal, Vol. II. p. 123 ; also 
a manuscript genealogy of the Cushing Family in possession of the Xew England Historic- 
Genealogical Society. 

' The date of his birth is given as May 25, 1783, in Esses Institute Historical Collec- 
tions, Vol. III. p. ISl, while the Almnni of Williams College, p. 257, gives it as May 25, 
1784. 



316 THE PICKER TXG GEXEALOGY. 

the oflice of Stute senator for Essex County. He belonged to a number 
of literary, agricultural, and benevolent associations ; and liis interest in 
these and his love for rural life made him a valuable member of the Essex 
Institute. 

Judge Mack's second wife, Harriet Clarke [7. VH. .5G], was first 
cousin of his first wife. For an account of her, see page 323. He lived 
on Chestnut Street, Salem, in a house which was built by Henry Pickering 
[58. VI. HI]. A heliotype of this house is given facing page 261. 

At a meeting of the Essex Bar held in Salem, Dec. 10, 1852, appropri- 
ate resolutions were adopted on his deatli.^ 

Judge JIack was a son of Colonel David and ^lary (Talcott) Mack. 
His father was a wealthy merchant of Middlefield, much in public life and 
a man of great influence. Elisha Mack's ancestry includes the following 
famiHes : Mack, Ellis, Talcott, Mott, Holyoke, Stockton, P;yTichon, Hollis- 
ter, Treat, Goodrich, Marvin, Burnham, Wright (?), Loomis, Moore, Wol- 
cott, Newbuiy, Appleton, Everard, Paine, Phelps. See Axcestey Tables |^^,. 

6. VII. 42. Sarall Pickman [Sarah 6. Yl. 13], probably born in Salem, 
baptized there Sept. 20, 1772, as Sally, died in Salem. ^ 

An obituary notice of Mrs. Osgood in the Salem Gazette of Aug. 16, 
1791, eulogizes her character. 

6. VII. 42. Isaac Osgood, her husband, bom in North Andover, 
Mass.,^ died in Xoi-th Andover. Residence : North Andover. 

Isaac Osgood received a common-school education, and in early life 
moved to Salem, where he became clerk of the Essex County Courts, and 

1 Alumni of Williams College, p. 257 ; an obituary notice in the Salem Eegister of 
Dec. 13, 1S52 ; and The Talcott Pedigree ia England and America, by S. V. Talcott, pp. 149, 
150. 

* The date of her marriage is given as Oct. 12, 1790, on the Salem Records, Tol. 4, 
p. 92, and by George R. Curwen, Esq. Mr. Osgood's grandson, John A. Loring, gives it as 
Oct. 20, 1790. 

' The date of his birth is given as July 15, 1756, on the Andover Records, and in The 
First Centenary of the Xorth Church and Society in Salem, p. 212; while his grandsons, 
John A. Loring and Isaac F. Osgood, and A Genealogy of the Descendants of John, Chris- 
topher, and William Osgood, by Ira Osgood, p. 87, give it as July 15, 1755. 



SEVENTH GENEEATIOX. 317 

where Lc aoquireJ, in an eminent degree, the confidence and respect of the 
public. A premature deafness obliged him to retire, and in 1803 he re- 
turned to North xVndovcr, ^vhere he devoted the remainder of his days to 
agriculture. 

Mr. Osgood was a well-read man, especially in theology. He was one 
of the early Unitarians, and was very decided in his religious opinions. In 
his life and bella^"ior he was a noble example of a Christian gentleman. 
Ilis brother, Samuel Osgood, was appointed by President Washington the 
first Postmaster-General under the Constitution.^ 

Mr. Osgood's second wife was Rebecca Taylor Pickman [G. VII. 43], 
the sister of his first vrifc. He married for his third wife Mary Toppan 
Pickman, June 28, 1803. She was a cousin of his first two wives, and was 
a daughter of Colonel Benjamin and Love (Rawlins) Pickman, of Salem.^ 
Mr. Osgood lived in the house on Essex Street, Salem, which formerly 
belonged to his wife's grandfather, Timothy Orne, and of which a heliotype 
has been given facing page 96. 

Isaac Osgood was a son of Peter and Sarah (Johnson) Osgood, of 
Andover, Mass. His family held a leading position in the town. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Osgood, Clement, Poor, Farnum, 
Russell, Johnson, Aslet, Ayer, Sprague. See ^\jn-cf,stkv- Tables y-^. 

6. VII. -13. Rebecca Taylor Pickman Sarah 6. VI. 13], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Dec. 13, 1772, died in Salem.^ 

An obituary notice of Mrs. Osgood which appeared in the Salem Gazette 
of Tuesday, Sept. 1, 1801, speaks of her as being highly distinguished for 
her beauty and accomplishments, and her modest and unassuming deport- 
ment. It speaks of her good sense, her amiable disposition, her candor, 
and the warmth and constancy of her attachments, and states that she 
was an utter stranger to scandal, and was greatly beloved in the domestic 
circle. 

' Obituary in the Salem Gazette of Oct. 8, IS-H. 

^ See tiie Pickman Pedigree between pages 188 and 189. 

' The date of her death is given by several authorities as Aug. 29, 1801 ; while it is 
given as Aug. 27, 1801, in A Genealogy of the Descendants of John, Christopher, and 
^yilliam Osgood, by Ira Osgood, p. 88. 



318 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

6. VII. 4-^- Isaac O.syood, lior luisbuud. 

His fii-rit wife was Sarah Pickmaii [6. VII. 42]. For an account of Lim 
see pages 316-317. 

7. VII. 46. Esther Orne Paine [Lois 7. VI. 15]. 
For an account of her see page 313. 

7. VII. 46^. Joseph Cabot, her fii-st husband. 

His number in direct descent is [6. VII. 38]. For an account of him 
see page 313. 

7. VII. 4^^. Ichabod Tucker, lier second husband, born in Leicester, 
Mass., died in Salem. A hiw}'er. Residence : Salem. 

Ichabod Tucker, 11. C. 1791, studied law with Dr. Dane, of Beverly. 
He began the practice of his profession in Haverhill, i\Iass., but afterwards 
removed to Salem, where he was clerk of the courts for Essex County for 
upwards of thirty years. He became president of the Essex Historical 
Society and of the Salem Athenteum, and never ceased to be interested in 
all historical and literary institutions. He was a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, of the American Antiquarian Society, and of 
other organizations. 

In the year ISOO, he built and occupied the w^ooden house on 
Chestnut Street, Salem, of which a heliotype is here given. It was 
afterward occupied by his adopted daughter, ^Irs. Nancy (Gay) Cole, 
until her death, which recently occurred at an advanced age. During 
Mr. Tucker's lifetime this house was the seat of a wide hospitality. Here 
gathered the eminent lawyers who gave distinction to the Essex Bar in the 
earlier years of this century. The best known clergymen of the vicinity of 
Salem, Boston, and Cambridge, particularly those of the Unitanan denomi- 
nation, became frequent visitors to his house. ^Ir. Tucker was an active 
member of the North Church, and a steadfast U})holder of religious institu- 
tions. He was well read, especially in the theological discussions of the 
day, and was both mentally and physically a powerful man.^ 

^ Obituary in the Salem Gazette of October, IS-tG, aud Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. IV. pp. 2S0-2S1, and Vol. XXVII. p. 1S9. 



ICHADOD TUCKER. 









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THE HOUiE OF ICIIADUD TUCKER AT SALE.M, .MASS. 

[7. VII. 4€-.] 
[49. VII. -36...] 







fifS^ ' iKiiLiii aa Si ' i^iiM^i 






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HARRIL-yr (PAIXF.) ROSE. 

[7. VII. 4S.] 

From the Miniature now in thi- po;?essi<.n of Fran"ci3 Henry Lee, 
i:sQ.. OF Sai.em, MA^i. 



SEVEXTTT GEXEllATIOX. 319 

Mr. Tuckor'8 tirst ^^ ife was Maria Orne [-J9. VTI. 2GG]. A portrait of 
him, painted by Osgood, a lieliotype of which is given, and a silliouette, 
are in the Essex Institute, Salem. 

Ichahod Tucker was a son of Benjamin and Martha (Davis) Tucker. 
His ancestry inchides the following families : Tucker, ■Williams, Stalham, 
"Wise, Thompson, AVarren, Davis, Pepper, Johnson, May, Scott. See 
Anckstry Tables jlK. 

7. VII. 48. Harriet Paine [Lois 7. VI. 15], bom in Newport, E. I, 
died in Salem. 

]y[rs. Rose lived with her daughter, Mrs. John C. Lee, of Salem, at whose 
house she died. She was a woman of great personal beauty in her youth, 
and was possessed of many virtues. She was the last person in Salem who 
■wore a turban. Her grandson, Francis H. Lee, has a pencil sketch of her 
with her turban on, drawn by her friend. Miss Sally Allen. He also owns 
the miniature from which the accompanying heliotype was taken. This 
miniature is, however, a very unsatisfactory likeness, and is said to give 
one no idea of her beauty.^ 

7. VII. 4S- JofiepTi Waynef Hose, the husband of Harriet Paine, born 
at St. Johns, Antigua, AVest India Islands, died in St. Johns. A merchant 
and planter. Residence : St. Johns, afterwards "Worcester, Mass. 

Mr. Rose was the general commercial agent for the United States at 
Antigua and the adjacent islands. He had a town house in St. Johns, and 
a plantation at the " Valley," six miles from St. Johns. This plantation, 
which he inherited from his father, John Rose, is now given np to pastur- 
age, and is no longer cultivated. Ruins of the old sugar-house and the 
cellar are .still seen. Tlie location is among the most picturesque on the 
island, and is still called the " Roses." After losing seven children, he 
brought his wife and two remaining children to the United States, and lived 
in "Worcester and Boston. In 1S24, he went to London to secure proper 
surgical treatment for his eyes. From there he returned to Antigua to 
settle up his aflPairs, but died soon after his arrival, and was buried Dec. 23, 

1 The Paine Family Records, edited by H. D. Paiue, M. D., Vol. I. p. 78. The 
Chandler Family, by George Chandler, M. D., p. 242. 



320 THE nCKEL'IXG GENEALOGY. 

1825, the day lullowing bis deutli, in the family tomb situated in the 
Cathedral Churchyard of St. Johns. The slaves he left on the island were 
emancipated after hi-; death by the Royal Decree of Aug. 28, 1833. 

Mr. Rose was a stout man, with a blonde complexion. He possessed 
considerable nuisical talent. The heliotype of him here given was taken 
from a miniature now owned by his grandson, Francis II. Lee, of Salem. 
Mr. Lee has also an oil portrait of him.^ 

Joseph Warner Rose was a son of John and Alice (Bacon) Rose, of St. 
Johns. His ancestry includes tlie following families : Rose, Bacon, Elliott. 
See Anckstry Tables ,J". 

7. VIL 49. William Fitz Paine [Lois 7. VI. 15], born in Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, died in Batavia, Java. A merchant. Residence : Batavia. 

Mr. Paine entered Harvard College in 1797, but left college before com- 
pleting his course, and went abroad and lived several years at Port Louis, 
in the island of ]\Iauritius. In 1821, he went to Batavia, where he organized 
with Mr. Forestier the firm of Forestier & Paine. In 1804, his name was 
changed, by an act of legislature, from William to William Fitz Paine.^ 

7. VIL 50. Elizabetli Fntnam Paine [Lois 7. VI. 15], born in St. 
John, N. B., or Halifax, N. S., died in Worcester, Mass. 

7. VIL 51. Frederick Vv^illiam Paine [Lois 7. VI. 15], bom in 
Salem, died in Worcester, Mass. A merchant. Residence : Worcester. 

Frederick W. Paine removed to Worcester with his father in 1793. He 
entered Harvard College in 1803, but left it after a stay of about nine 
months, to engage in commercial pursuits. In 1819, however, the college 
conferred on him the degree of A. M. In 1 806, and again in 1809, he made 
a voyage around the world, visiting China and the northwest coast of 
America. He went to Europe in 1818, and remained there about four 
years. During this time he was connected with the commercial house of 
James «S; Thomas 11. Perkins. About the year 1826, he became a perma- 
nent resident of Worcester. From the year 1832 he was president of the 

> The Cliandler Family, by Gfor-c Chandler, II. D., p. 24'2. 

' History of Worcester, by TV'illiam Liucolu, p. 271, and Faine Family Kecords, edited 
by H. D. Paine, M. D., Vol. I. p. 78. 



JOSEPH WARNER ROSE. 
[-. VII. 4^:] 

FruM THK MlNI.\TrKF- NOW IN THE POSSFSSIO.N OF Fr.\ 

Esij., OF .Salem, M.ass. 



^r\ 




SEVENTH GEXEBATIOX. 321 

Worcester Count}' Mutual Insurance Company. From the time of his 
taking up his permanent abode in Worcester, he was for the remainder of 
his life actively interested in its local affairs. He was a member of the first 
board of overseers of schools in 1823, and one of the selectmen of Worces- 
ter from 1827 to 1831, and for most of the time from 1838 to 1849, when 
the town was chartered as a city. Pie was an assessor of taxes for the town 
most of the time from 1829 to 1848, and his judgment as to the value of 
real estate was considered excellent. He represented the town in the 
General Court in 1829. 

Mr. Paine early manifested an interest in horticulture, and his garden 
on Lincoln Street was famous for its fruit and flowers. He was an active 
and influential member of the Worcester County Horticultural Society for 
many years, and during most of this time he was the treasurer. The 
Horticultural Society fully appreciated his services, and showed its regard 
by having his portrait painted for the Society Library. Mr. Paine was 
also a valuable member of the American Antiquarian Society, contribut- 
ing largely to its library, and serving as one of its councillors. He was 
also treasurer of the Worcester County Athenaeum. He was a man of 
literary tastes, and spent much of his time in reading. He had the faculty 
of mastering the contents of a book by skinmiing through its pages, and up 
to the time of his death kept himself thoroughly informed in contemporary 
literature. He had a most retentive memory, and was an authority in dates 
and historical events. At the time of his death his library was considered 
one of the largest private collections in the State. It numbered several 
thousand volumes, representing nearly every department of literature. 
When but fourteen years old he was employed to correct the proof-sheets 
of the first Greek Testament published in North America, which was issued 
from the press by Isaiah Thomas. 

Mr. Paine labored with untiring zeal to promote the best interests of 
Worcester, and but very few of its citizens can be compared to him in the 
solid service he performed. In his personal character he was honorable, and 
scrupulously honest in his dealings.^ 

> The Paine Family Records, edited by H. D. Paine, ^l. D., Vol. I. pp. 78-79 ; the 
Worcester Gazette of Sept. 16, 1869, and the Worcester Palladium of Sept. 22, 1869. 



322 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

Besides the portrait of Mr. L'aiiiu at the Horticultural Society, there is a 
fine one in possession of his son, the Rev. George S. Paine. 

7. VII. 51. Anue Cushing Sfurr/is, wife of Frederick William Paine, 
born in Boston, baptized there ]klay 21, 1797, died in Worcester, Mass. 

The baptism of Mrs. Paine was performed by the Rev. Dr. Jeremy 
Belknap, pastor of the Federal Street Church, Boston, who wrote Belknap's 
History of New Hampshire. Dr. Belknap died June 16, 1798, and it is 
thought to be an interesting and somewhat remarkable fact that a person 
who had lived into the nineties of tlie nineteenth century should have been 
baptized by liim. 

Mrs. Paine died at the old homestead on the summit of Lincoln Street 
Hill, where she had lived for seventy years. She was married in Boston, 
it being the first marriage ceremony performed there after it became a city. 
She was a member of the First Unitarian Chxn-ch. Her faculties were 
remarkably vigorous to the end of her long life. Her memory was clear 
and strong ; she was a pleasing talker, and her reminiscences were always 
interesting. She had a large acquaintance in Boston, and entertained a 
great deal.^ A portrait of her by Osgood is at tlie Essex Institute, Salem. 

Mrs. Paine was a daughter of the Hon. Russell and Elizabeth (Perkins) 
Sturgis. Her father was an eminent merchant of Boston. Russell Sturgis, 
of London, was her nephew. Heurij F. Sfunjis [7. VIII. 70], who married 
her daughter, was her nephew. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Sturgis, Russell, Paine, Freeman, Bacon, Perkins, Hudson, Frothingham, 
Lowden, Peck. See Axcestrt Tables ^j. 

7. VII. 54. Esther Orne Clarke [Esther 7. VI. IG], probably born 
in Boston, baptized there Oct. 17, 1784, died in Salem. 

7. VII. 04. Jfoum Fill is, her husband, probably born in Boston, died 
at sea, buried at Gloucester, ]\Iass. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Fillis was a son of John and Louisa (Lydu) Fillis. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Fillis, Stoddard, Lyde, AVheelwright, 

1 The Worcester Telegram of Jan. 6, 1S92, and the Bostou Transcript of Jan. 14, 1802. 



SEVEXTH GEXERATIoy. 323 

j Hutoliiuson, B}riL'IJ, Juxoii, Clarke, Belcher, Danfortli, Gilbert, Welles, 
' Partridge, Brown. See Ancestry Tables ^j. 

' 7. VII. 55. Charles Chauncy Clarke [Esther 7. VI, 16], bom in 

Boston, baptized there April 5, 1789, died in Salem. 

Mr. Clarke, H. C. 1808, was much interested in literary and historical 
j studies, and for several years was an ofhcer of the Salem Athenteum. He 
I was also an otlicer of the Salera Historical Society, and retained his position 
j from the org'anization of the society until his decease.' 

7. VII. 5n. Harriet Clarke [E>ther 7. VI. IG], probably born in 
Boston, baptized there March 18, 1792, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Mack was a ^voman of a highly cultivated mind, and of dignified 
and agreeable manners." She was first cousin of her husband's first 
wife. 

Her portrait, painted by Osgood, was in the possession of her step-son 
the late Dr. William Mack, of Salem. 

7. Vn. oG. EUsha JIacI:, her husband. 

His first wife was Catherine Sewall Pynchon Orne [6. VII. 41]. For 
an account of him see pages 315-31G. 

8. VII. 57. Samuel Diman [James 8. VI. 21], born in Stratham, 
N. H., died in St. Domingo. A shipmaster. 

Captain Diman sailed in the schooner Betsey, of Salem. 

8. VII. o7. Mercy Wigrjin Kenniston, his wife, born in Stratham, 
N. H., died in Rochester, X. II. 

Mrs. Diman's second husband, whom .she married in Salera, Jan. 17, 
1814, was Lowell Kenney. He was born in ^leredith, N. H., Sept. 10, 
1787, and died in Rochester, N. IL, Jan. 2G, 1855. He was a hotel-keeper 
and a storekeeper, and was also postmaster. He resided in Salem, and 
afterwai-d Rochester. By him she had the following children : — 



Essex Institute Historical Collections Vol. XV. p. .301. 

Obituary notice of Mrs. Mack in tire Salem Register of Nov. 23, 1848. 



324 TJIi: FICKERIXG GFXEALOGi'. 

Joseph Kenxey, born ia Sakm, Sept. I'l, 1814, mid died there Jan. 2, 1818. 

Samuel Dijian Kenney, born in Salem, Nov. 7, 1817, and died in Eochester, Nov. 

19, 18G7. 
'^LERCY -\-N'N Kenney, bom in Saleui, Jan 13, 1820. 

Eliza Jane Ivenney, born in Saleui, Aug. 2G, 1822. She married a Mr. Sargent 

and resided in Kochester. 

Mrs. Kenney was a daughter of Henry and Hannah (Odell) Kennis- 
ton. He was a hotel-keeper of Stratham, N. H. Ancestry Tables ^y. 

8. VII. 59. Mary Diman [James 8. VI. 21], born in Portsmouth, N. 
H., died in Hampton Falls, X. H. 

8. VII. 59. Stephen Dodge, her husband, born in Hampton Falls, 
N. H., died in Hampton Falls. A farmer. Residence : Hampton 
Falls. 

Stephen Dodge was a son of Nathaniel Hubbard and Sarah (Dodge) 
Dodge. His father was a manufacturer. His ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Dodge, Eaton, Faii-field, Skipperway, Plubbard, Dodge, Eaton, 
Fairfield, Skipperway, Thorne. See Ancestry Tables p|. 

8. VII. 60. Eunice Diman [James 8. VI. 21 J. 

8. VII. 61. Lois Diman [James 8. VI. 21]. 

8. VII. 62. James Diman [James 8. VI. 21]. 

8. VII. 63. Lydia Diman [James 8. VI. 21]. 

8. VII. 6.5. Da-vid Robinson Diman [James 8. VI. 21], died in 
South Newmarket, N. H. A farmer. 

8. VII. 65. Nancij Pipev, his wife, bom in Stratham, N. H., died in 
Stratham. 

Mrs. Diman was a daughter of John and Theodosia (Wiggin) Piper, of 
Stratham. See Ancestry Tables ^^. 

8. ^^I. f,Q. Priscilla Diman [James 8. VI. 21], died in South 
Newmarket, N. H. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 325 

Mi.ss Diman was Imrieil in Stratliam, X. II. Sho was tlio last survivor of 
her father's childrLTi, and was in possession of the family jjapers, which con- 
sisted of deeds, wills, and old sermons which belong-ed to her grandfather, 
the Rev. James Diman, of Salem. 

9. VII. 69. Ezra Green [Lois 9. VI. 24], born in Maiden, Mass., died 
in Lancaster, ilass. \ fanner. Residence : Lancaster. 

Mr. Green went to sea in early life, and sailed over a great part of the 
globe. He was with tlie famous United States Exploring Expedition, under 
Commodore Wilkes, which sailed around the world, starting in 1837, and 
returning in 18-12. 

On his marriage, in 1842, he gave up going to sea, and settled on 
the old homestead farm in Maiden. It w^as situated on Green Street, and 
was laid out in 1647, by his ancestor, James Green, in what was then called 
Mystic Fields. The house standing on the estate in 1842 was built early 
in the eighteenth century. Here most of his children were born. In 1858, 
he moved to Lancaster, Mass., where he occupied himself with farming until 
his death. 

9. VII. G9. Ehuina 3Iinet'vn Richardson, the wife of Ezra Green, 
born in Temple, N. H. Residence : Lancaster, Mass. 

Mrs. Green is a daughter of Ralph and Abigail (Child) Richardson, of 
Lando-rove, Vt. Her ancestry includes the following families : Richardson, 
Stimpson, Peacock, Stevens, Drury, Shattuck, Whitney, Reynolds, Blood, 
Longley, Parker, Symonds, xVndrews, Child, Greenwood, Ward, Trowbridge, 
Atherton, Wild, Winchester, Winship. See Axcestry Tables ^-^. 

9. VII. 71. James Diman Green [Lois 9. VI. 24], born in ]Malden, 
Mass., died in Cambridge, Mass. A minister. Residence : Cambridge. 

James Diman Green, H. C. 1817, was born at the old homestead on 
Green Hill. After leaving college, he taught school for a while, and then 
entered the ministry. On Nov. 3, 1824, he was settled over the Second 
Congregational Church in Lynn, Mass., where he remained for about four 
years. In 1830, he accepted a call from the ITnitarian Church in East 
Cambridge, and continued its pastor for ten years. In 1840, he retired 



320 THE PICKKUIXG GEXEALOGY. 



from thu niiiiittry, and took up lii> al.odcj in (JaiubrMiri', wliere lie soon 
beeanic actively eiiga^o<l in town affairs. lie served as selectman, and he 
was a representative in the General Court in l.'^41. 1^43, 1846, 1853, and 
1854. In 1846, when Canibridg-e was made a city, 3Ir. Green was chosen 
the first mayor. He was re-elected to that oOIce in 1S47, also in 1853, 
18G0, and 1861. Ilis manag-enicut of the city all'airs was noted for its 
economy and general honesty. During his public life in Cambridge he 
devoted his whole time to the interests of the city, and personally superin- 
tended each dei)artment, even gv.ing- so far as to exaniine and audit all the 
accounts, scrutinizinj^ each bill and item of expenditure with a minute 
attention, his unerring- eye detecting- at once all errors and overcharges. 
In all his dealings, public and private, during a long and eminently useful 
life, he maintained a character noted for its uncompromising honesty ; and 
to his wise counsels, practical sense, and thorough judgment, the citizens ot 
Cambridge were largely indebted, not only during the early days of the 
municipality, but up to the time when he relinquished all active business 
pursuits. 

For many years ]\Ir. Green -n'rote much and ably upon a vnriety of topics. 
He was a frequent contributor to our standard reviews. In 1849, he deliv- 
ered the oration on the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary ot 
the town of Maiden. His powers of oratory were of no mean order, and 
the address which he then delivered gave a broad and general view of the 
subject, and its value did not pass away with the occasion. He had given 
much attention to the records and traditions of the town, and had hoped to 
write its history. He was much interested in antiquarian pursuits, and 
prepared and presented to the Xew England Historic-Genealogical Society, 
of which he was a member, a large manuscript volume containing the records 
and memorials of his famil-v from his ancestor James Green, do-miward. 

By nature, Mr. Green was positive, botli in his thoughts and his dealings 
with the world. His mind and conscience demanded of him that his every 
act and thought should be just and right to the extremest possilde point; 
hence, he demanded of all men that they too should be just and honest in 
the smallest detail. He had a fine scorn of shams, aiul an uncompromising 
hostility to that which was WTong. When interested in conversation, he 



SEVENTH GEyEUATloN. 327 

was as ixnrescrvofl nnfl as unassuniinq- as a child, but at the same tune there 
was a quiet diynity of niaiiuer which was inherent in his cliaracter.^ 

9. VII. 71. Sarah Adeline Durell, the wife of James Diman Green, 
born in Dover, N. H., died in Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. Green was a daughter of the Hon. Daniel Meserve and Elizabeth 
(Wentwortli) Durell. Her father (D. C. 1794) was a leading lawyer of 
Dover, N. H., a representative, a cliief-justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas, and United States District-Attorney." Her ancestry includes the 
following families: Duda (which became Durell), Meserve, Wentworth, 
Knight (?), Leighton, Frost, Langdon, Slierburne, Gilman, Clark, Treworgye, 
Shaplcigh, Clark, Somerby, Greenleaf, Frost, Bowles, Howell, Pepperell, 
Bray, Colton, Gardner, Drake, Wolcott, Bliss, Leonard. See A^fCEsxRY 
Tables ^^^-. 

10. VII. 74. Lois Ome Adams [Lois 10. VL 26], bom in Lynufield, 
Mass., died in Northampton, Mass. 

10. Yll. 7Jf. David Damon, her husband, born in Xorth Reading. 
Mass., died in Northampton, Mass.^ A country merchant. Residence: 
Northampton. 

Mr. Damon removed from North Reading to Northampton, where he 
became a grain-dealer. 

A letter from his daughter, the late Lucilla 0. Damon, states that — 

" Capt. David Damou, stood minute man during the -war of 1812." 

David Damon was the son of Joshua and Hepsibah (Flint) Damon, 
His ancestry includes the following families: Damon, Sherman, Flint, 
Putnam, Hutchinson, Bosworth, Gowing, Flint, Putnam, Hutchinson, 
Bosworth, Burnap, Hunt, Redding, Todd, Sheldon. See Ancestry Tables ^'5. 

' The Xew England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXXVII. p. 94, and 
The Maiden City Press of Aug. 26, 1S82. 

' The Wentworth Genealogy by the Hon. John Wentworth, LL.D., Vol. IT. p. 459. 

' The date of his death was given by his daughter, the late Lucilla 0. Damon, and 
by the State Eecords, as JIarch 23, 1S76 ; and by the Springfield Republican as ]\Iarch 22, 
1876. 



328 THE PICKER IXG GEXEALOGY. 

10. VII. 77. John Ome Green [Eunice 10. VI. 27J, born in Maiden, 
Mass., died in Lowell, Mass. A pliysician. Residence : Lowell. 

Dr. Green, 11. C. 1817, received his preparatory training for college at 
the academy of Dr. Homans, in Jledford, ilass. During his college course 
he paid particular attention to tlieological studies, with the design of enter- 
ing the ministry, but afterwards abandoned the idea. x\fter graduating, he 
was for one year the principal of the Latin School at Castine, Me. He then 
studied medicine with Dr. Edward Reynolds, of Boston. Having attended 
the lectures at the Harvard Medical School, he received his degree of M. D. 
from that institution in 1822, and at once settled as a physician in the town 
of East Chelmsford, which afterwards became Lowell. Here he continued 
to live for the remainder of his long life, with the exception of a visit to 
Europe in 1847. He grew up with the place, and was intimately connected 
with many of its most important public and social interests. For more than 
fifty years he was vice-president of the Lowell Institution for Savings ; and 
he was afterwards its president. For fifteen years he was a member of the 
school-committee, and for nine years was its chairman, and wrote its reports. 
He was president of the Lowell Bank, and also of the Old Residents Associa- 
tion, in which he took a deep interest. He served the city as alderman and 
as health commissioner. He was president of the Middlesex District ^ledical 
Society, was made a councillor of the Massachusetts Medical Society in 1841, 
and was appointed its orator in 1847. He was a contributor to the Boston 
Medical and Surgical Journal, and to the American Journal of Medical 
Science. For many years he was senior warden of St. Anne's Episcopal 
Church, Lowell. 

Dr. Green's name is associated with the name of Colburn and Edson in 
the early struggle for educational reform, which they maintained with per- 
sistency against a fierce opposition, and which laid the foundation of the 
present public-school system of Lowell. In 1870, he delivered the address 
at the dedication of the Green School in Lowell, which was named in his 
honor. 

Dr. Green was a man of integrity, of intelligence, and of persevering 
industry, and always held a high position as a gentleman, citizen, and 
physician. He performed his professional labors almost uninterruptedly, 



SEVEXTH GENERATION. 329 



till within a short time of his death. The Middlesex North District Medical 
Society took action on the occasion of his death.^ 

10. VII. 77'. Jane Smith Thomas, the first wife of Dr. Green, bom 
in Tyngsborough, Mass., died in Lowell, Mass. 

Mrs. Green ^vas a daughter of Dr. Calvin and Elizabeth (Smith) Thomas, 
of Tyngsborough. Axcestet Tables j'y,. 

I 10. YII. 77". Jlinerva BucJcIin (S^^fer, the second wife of Dr. Green, 

I bom in Slatersville, E.. I., died in Lowell, Mass. 

I Mrs. Green was a daughter of John and (Bucklin) Slater, of Slaters- 

ville. He was a manufacturer. Ancestry Tables j"^,. 

; 10. VII. 77^. Jane McBurney, the third wife of Dr. Green, born in 

I Newtownards, County Down, Ireland, died in Lowell, Mass. 

Mrs. Green was a daughter of William and Mary (Patterson) McBurney, 
of Newtownards, County Down, Ireland, where her father was the first to 
start the manufacture of muslins, ginghams, and embroideries. Mary Burcl 
j Peah [10. VIII. IW] is her grandniece. Her ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families: McBurney, ^yarnock, Patterson, McKay, Scott (f). Seo 
Ajs'cestey Tables J^,. 

10. VII. 78. George Green [Eunice 10. VI. 27], bom in Maiden, 
Mass., died in New Orleans. A merchant. Residence : New Orleans. 
I 

10. VII. 79. Caroline Mackey Green [Eunice 10. VI. 27], bom 
in Maiden, Mass., died in New York.^ 

10. VII. 79. WllUam BlancJiard, her husband, probably born in 
"Wilmington, Mass., died in North Wilmington, Mass. A merchant. 

Mr. Blanchard was a son of William and Elizabeth (Ford) Blanchard, of 
Wilmington. He was the eldest of thirteen childi-en. Axcestet Tables |y. 

• The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. 114, pp. 24. 118-119, and the Boston 
Evening Transcript of Dec. 24, 1S85. 

^ The date of her marriage we have as May 10, ISoo, but it was announced in the Salem 
Gazette of May 13, 1836. 



330 THE PICKEUIXG GENEALOGY. 



10. VII. SI. Cliarles Reynolds Green [Eunice 10. VI. 27], bora 
in Maiden, ^lass. A merchant. Residences : New York City and Nabant, 
Mass. 

Mr. Green owned tlie crayon portraits, by Cheney, of hi? parents which 
have been heliotyped for this work, and wliich he gave to his nephew. Dr. 
J. Orne Green, of Boston. 

10. VII. 81. Charlotte Aitf/itsta Cooli(l(/c, his wife, born in Boston, 
died in New York. 

Mrs. Green was a daughter of Samuel F. and Ann (Sanderson) Coolidge, 
of Bost<m. Her father was a merchant. Ilcr ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Coolidge, Bright, Goldstone, Bond, Biscoe, Coolidge, Liver- 
more, Clarke, Randall, Stowell, Guiding, Sanderson, Eggleston, Bartlett, 
Fiske, Wyeth, Barnard, Fleming, Mr.rse, Peirce, Shattuck, Hagar, Bemis, 
Benjamin, Bigelow, Warren, Flagg, Livermore. Sec Ancestey Tables ^. 

11. VII. 82. Harriet Orne Nichols [Bridget 11. VI. 28], probably 
born in Boston, baptized there July 21, 1799.^ 

Mrs. Hall is said to have had much personal beauty. Her miniature is 
in the possession of her niece, ^Irs. George W. Embree, of New York City. 

11. VII. 82. Geori/e Washitujtoii Hall, her liusband, died in Ballston 
Spa, N. Y. 

Mr. Hall's first wife is thought to have been a Jliss Deming, of Litchfield, 
Conn. His third vi-ife was Emily Orne [11. VII. 91], a first cousin of his 
second wife : Amelia Warner was his fourth wife.^ 

AxcEsTRY Tables jg. 

11. ^^I. 83. Marianne Nicliols [Bridget 1 1. Yl. 28], born in Boston, 
baptized there March 1, 1801, as ^Mary Ann," died in New York. 

There is a miniature of 3Irs. Wells, which is in the possession of her 
daughter, Mrs. George W. Embree, of New York City. 

' The date of her birth is given as July 3, 1799, and July 7, 1799, by different 
authorities. 

' Mrs. George W. Embree. 

' The date of her birth is given as Feb. 20, ISIO, and Feb. 23, ISIO, by different 
authorities. 



SEVKXTH GKXERATION. 331 

11. VII. So. BdlpJi Wells, her hu^baml, born in Hartford, Conn., died 
in Hartford. A laAvyer. Residence : New York. 

Mr. Wells is said to have gradnated at the Litchfield Law School. 

He was a son of Dr. Sylvester and Eunice (\Yaterman) Wells, of Hart- 
ford, Conn. Ancestkv Tables j'J. 

11. VIL 84. Edward Henry Nichols [Bridget 11. VI. 28], probably 
born in Boston, baptized there Oct. 3, 1802. 

11. VII. 87. Adeline Francis Nichols [Bi-idget 11. VI. 28], piob- 
ably born in Boston. 

11. VII. 88. George Minot Nichols [Bridget 11. VI. 28], probably 
born in Boston. 

11. VII. 89. Pamela Orne [John 11. VI. 29], born in Lynnfield, 
Mass., died in Lynnfield. 

11. VII. 89. FranJdin Jefferson Starr, her husband, born in New 
Hartford, Conn., died in Nacogdoches, Texas. A lawyer. Residence : 
Nacogdoches. 

When he was quite young his parents removed to Ohio. He studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar at Columbus, Ohio. In 1833, he moved 
to McDonough, Henry County, Georgia, and opened a law office. The 
next year, in company with a friend, he visited Texas, at the instance of 
many citizens of Georgia who contemplated emigrating there. Early in 
1835, he returned to Georgia, but in the autumn of the same year he went 
back to Texas, and settled at San Felipe, on the Brazos River. His law 
partner was Colonel William Barrett Travis, who commanded the Texas 
forces that were all massacred in Fort Alamo, San Antonio. i\Ir. Starr was 
for a time in the Texas arm v. When the enemy threatened the Brazos 
country, he removed liis family to Nacogdoches, and practised law there. 
In the summer of 1837, he commanded a company of mounted men raised 
to pursue a body of Indians who were committing depredations on the 
frontier. The exposure of the campaign brought on the fever of which 
he died.^ 

• A History of the Starr Family, by Burgis P. Starr, p. 103. 



332 THE PICKER rXG GEXEALOGY. 

'Mr. Starr was a son of James and Persia (Shaw) Starr. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Starr, Brewster, Morgan, Vine, Street, 
Miles, Morgan, Starr, Brewster, Morgan, "\'ine, Street, 3[iles, Morgan, Shaw, 
Terry. See Ancestry Tables jj. 

11. VII. 90. Harriet Ome [John 11. VI. 29], bom in Lynnfield, 
Mass., died in Lynnfield. 

The heliotype here given is taken from a miniature of Mrs. Emerson, 
painted in Boston in 1S35. It is now in the possession of her daughter, 
Mrs. Frederick Haniden. 

11. VII. 90. Hubbard i: me rsoii, her husband, born in South Read- 
ing, Mass., died in Lynnfield, Mass. A merchant. 

For about thirty-five years Mr. Emerson was a merchant in Natchez, 
Miss. While still in business there, he bought the old Ome farm, in Lynn- 
field, for his family. He lived on it himself till his death, but, for many 
years, only in summer. The heliotype here given was taken from a min- 
iature of Mr. Emerson now in the possession of his daughter, Mrs. Frederick 
Hai-nden. 

Hubbard Emerson was a son of Captain Thomas and Ruth (Bancroft) 
Emerson, of Reading. His father was a brave and pati-iotic soldier of the 
Revolution.^ James Francis Emerson [11. VIII. 2J5] is his nephew. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Emerson, Bulklcy, Allen, Bout- 
well, Kendall, Bruce, Bancroft, Metcalf, Poole, Kendall, Pearson. See 
Ais'CESTRY Tables J^J 

11. VII. 91. Emily Orne [John 11. VI. 29], bora in Lynnfield, 
Mass,2 died at Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

Mrs. Hall was buried in Lynnfield, where her gravestone is still stand- 
ing. 

' Genealogical History of the Town of Eeading, Mass., by Lilley Eaton, p. 367. 

^ The Genealo.^y of the Preutice or Prentiss Family, by C. J. F. Biimey, p. 99, gives 
the date of her birth as April 1.3, 1805; while the Lynnfield records and other authorities 
give it as April 10, 1804. Mrs. George W. Enibree gives the date of her marriage as 
November, 1S27 : while Francis H. Lee gives it as 1S37. Several anthorities give the date 
of her death as Jan. 14, 1S42, while Mrs. Frederick Harnden gives it as 1841. 



HARRILT (ORXE) EMERSON". 



From the Mim\ilki, pmnted in 1S35. now i\ the possession oe 
Mr3. Frederick Harnden. 



^'S''" 






HURBARD EMEKSOX. 

[II. Vil. 90.] 



IE MlNt.\Tl-Rt NMW IN THE POSSESSION OF 

Mrj. Fkeherick Harnden. 






r 



SOPHIA BRIDGET PARKER (ORXE) SPENCER. 

[II. VII. 92.] 

From the Minlvti-rk nmw- in the possession of 
Mrs. Frkderi' k II.\knden. 



■•V \ 




From thi- Mi 



HEXRV PRINCE. 

[12. vir. 95.] 

OF S.-VI KM, M \SS. 



OF Mrs. Aarijn Noursk, 



SEVENTH GEXEBATIOX. 333 

11. \'II. 01. Gtorye Washington Mall, her husband. 
Mr. Hall's second wife, Harriet Orne Nichols [11. VII. 82], was a first 
cousin of his third Avife, Emily Onie. For an account of him see page 330. 

11. VII. 92. Sophia Bridget Parker Orne [John 11. VI. 29], bom 
in Lynnfield, ]\Iass., dit-d in Lynnfield.* 

A heliotype of her miniature, which was painted in New York, in 1830, 
is here given. It is in the possession of her niece, Mrs. Frederick Harnden. 

11. VII. 5*^. Amasa Spencer, her husband, born about 1795. A 
judge. Residence : Georgia. 

His miniature, which was painted in New York, in 1830, is now in pos- 
session of his wife's niece, Mrs. Frederick Harnden. 



12. VII. 95. Sarah Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Prince is said to have been a capable and energetic woman. 

12. VII. 5o. Henry Prince,h.ex husband, born in Ipswich, Mass., 
died in Salem. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Henry Piince went to Salem from Ipswich, when he was fourteen years 
old, and was apprenticed to Joshua Phippen, a cooper. When he was 
twenty-one, he went to sea, and soon rose to the command of a ship. He 
was master of the ship xVstrea when Nathaniel Bowditch was supercargo. 
He was one of the first American shipmasters who sailed for India. Captain 
Prince commanded one of Richard Derby's vessels on a voyage to Manila, 
and was verv successful, making seventy thousand dollars for the owners. 
On his return from this voyage he built a brick house on Derby Street, to 
which was attached a fine garden. During the latter part of his life he was 
in the custom-house. He was distinguished for the energy and persever- 
ance of his character. 

' The Genealogy of the Prentice or Prentiss Pamily, by C. J. F. Binney, p. 99, gives 
the date of her marriage as 1829 j while J. Orne Green and Francis H. Lee give it as on 

the Sheets, Aug. 2, 1830. 



33-4 THE PICKEEiyG GENEALOGY. 



Captain Prince's second wife, whom he married in April, 1832, was 
Elizabeth, widow of Samuel Kimball, of Salem, and daughter of Matthew 
and Mar}' (Ulmei-) Ilaynes. She was bom in Salem, Aug. 23, 1786, and died 
in 1867. Iler daughter by Mr. Kimball, 3Irs. Aaron Nourse, of Salem, 
has a fine miniature of Captain Prince. It was painted by Lovell, in 
Boston, in 1797, just before Captain Prince sailed for Batavia. A heliot}^e 
of this miniature is here given.^ 

Henr}" Prince was a son of Jonathan and jMary (Pollard) Prince. 
Ancestry Tables Jj. 

13. VII. 96. Jonathan Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Captain Millet was a shipmaster in the East India trade. There is a 
photograph in the possession of tlie Salem Marine Society which was taken 
from an outline drawing of Captain lilillet. His house was situated on 
Hardy Sti-eet.- 

13. VII. 96. Elizabeth Masuvy, his wife, born in Salem, died in 
Salem, of dropsy. 

The remains of ^Mrs. ]\[illet were buried in the tomb of Nathaniel Brown, 
in Salem. 

She was a daughter of Richard and Sarah (Beadle) ]\Iasury, of Salem. 
Ancestey Tables ^. 

14. VII. 97. Seeth Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31]. 

For an account of her see page 232. 

14. VII. 97. George Hopes, her husband. 

His number in direct descent is [47. VI. 74]. For an account of Mr. 
Ropes see pages 231-232. 

15. VII. 98. Nathan Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31], probably bom 
in Salem, died in Salem. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Captain Millet lived on the corner of Essex and Herbert streets. 

* Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. IV. pp. 86, 264 ; the Salem Register of 
Oct. 5, IStC, and the Ropes Bible. 

'' Record of the Parish List of Deaths, 1783-1810, by Rev. William Bentley, D.D., 
p. 86. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOy. 335 



15. VII. OS. Rebecca Jieck/'ord, his wife, probably born in Salem, died 
in Salem, of consumption. 

The obituary notice of Mrs. ilillet in the Salem Gazette of Nov. 6, 
179S, speaks of her sweet temper and lovely piety, and says that in her 
sickness she was an uncommon example of calm resolution. Bentley 
records of her that, " She was the pattern of Christian patience, and of 
a most amiable di^sposition." ^ 

Mrs. Millet was a daughter of Samuel and Anna (Gale) Beckford. Her 
ancestry includes the following families : Beckford, Pinson, Green, 
Howard, Hardy, Gale, Ropes, Wells, Warner, Grant. See Ancestry 
Tables |?i.. 

15. VII. 99. Benjamin Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of a fever. A hardware dealer. Residence : 
Salem. 

15. VII. 99. Mary Peele, his wife, probably born in Salem, and died 
in Salem. 

Mrs. Millet was a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Becket) Peele. 
Her father was a cooper of Salem. Her ancestry includes the following 
families: Peele, Wallis, Bartol, Bartlett, Becket, Sibley, Mason, Beadle, 
Hicks, Gillingham, Bly. See Ancestry Tables |?g-. 

15. VII. 100. Joseph Hardy Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31], probably 
bom in Salem, lost at sea. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

15. VII. 101. Mary Millet [Sarah 12-15. VI. 31], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem.^ 

15. VII. iW. Charles Frederick Wilson, her husband, died in 
Salem. A mariner or rigger. Residence : Salem. 
Mr. Wilson was called a Scotchman. 
Ancestry Tables ^'J. 

» Record of the Parisli List of Deaths, 1785-1819, by Rev. William Bentley, D.D., 
p. 45. 

' The date of he-r marriage is given as Aug. 30, ISOO, in the IMillet Bible, while the 
Salem Records give it as Aug. 31, 1800. 



336 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

16. VII. 102. Mary Collins [Seeth 16. VI. 32], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

16. VII. 102. Simon Gardner, her husband, probably born in Salem. 
Mr. Gardner was a son of Simon Stacy and Rebecca (Knapp) Gardner, 

of Salem. His ancestry includes the following families : Gardner, Frier, 
White, Herbert, Porter, Plathorne, Stacy, "Worcester, Buckley, Trow, 
Dowse, Edraands, Knapp. See -V^-cestrt Tables ^^. 

17. VII. 103. Thoriidike Proctor [Hannah 17. VI. 35], probably 
bom in Salem, died in Salem. A shipniaster. Residence : Salem. 

In the notice of Mr. Proctor's death printed in the Salem Gazette of 
March 20, 1792, he is spoken of as" an industrious master of a vessel." He 
was in prison at Quebec with his brother-in-law "William Ward. 

17. "V^I. 104. Robert Proctor [Hannah 17. VI. 35], probably born 
in Salem, died in Salem. A farmer. Residence : Salem. 

17. VII. 10:^. Lydia Kilhurn, his wife, died in Salem. 
Ancestry Tables '^\. 

17. VII. 105. Martha Proctor [Hannah 17. VI. 35], probably bora 
in Salem, died in Salem.^ 

The following obituary notice of Mrs. Ward appeared in the Salem 
Mercury of Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1788: — 

" On Thursday last was compassiouately rescued from the affliction of this world, 
by the indulgent hand of Heaven, Mrs. Martha Ward, consort of Capt. William 
Ward, aged 25, after sustaining a tedious and distressing illness with unusual serenity 
of mind, and a remarkable submission to the dispensation of her Maker. 
" Adieu blest shade, alas, too early fled ! 

Who knew the living but laments the dead ? 

A soul so calm, so free from every stain ; 

So try'd by sickness, so-wimoved by pain! 

W^ithout a groan, with mis'ry she strove 

Till Heaven removed her to the joys above ; 

By the same Hand, serenely kind, was given, 

To us a cherub, and a saint to heav'n." 



* The date of her death is given by her niece, ^frs. David Nichols, as Jan. 16, 178S, 
while the Saleia ^[ercury of Tuesday, Jan. 22, 17SS, says she died "on Thursday last," 
which was Jan. 17, 1788. 



WILLIAM WARD. 

[i7- Vir. 105.] 

From THE Portrait painteh kv Gilkert Sitari, now in ihe pos 
OF Sami'el Gray WarI', ue Wamiinuto.n, D.C. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 337 

17. VII. lOo. Williatn Ward, the husband of Martha Proctor, prob- 
ably born in Salem, died in Medford, Mass. A banker. Residence: 
Me'dford.i 

The life of "William Ward covered an eventful period of our history. 
Fie saw the beginning and the ending of both the Revolution, and the 
War of 1812. An autobiograpliical sketch of his exploits during the 
Revolutionary War has been preserved, and is now in the possession of 
his great-grandson, Thomas AYren Ward, of New York. It is from this 
paper chat the following abstract is made. 

When William Ward was but six years old, his father, who was called 
the " peace and good will of the family," died. The family was a numer- 
ous one, and hardly ten dollars was spent on William's education. 

As a boy, he early showed an adventurous spirit, and, in 1775, he ran 
away to the Battle of Lexington, where he saw the flash of guns. After 
the Battle of Bunker Hill, he found his way into the camp, but he soon 
came home. Finally, in 177C, with the spirit of adventure still unsubdued, 
he shipped on board of a vessel bound for France to get government stores ; 
and from this time forth he ever depended upon himself. On returning 
home from this voyage, he served on board several privateers. He was 
with Captain Jonathan Ilaradcn [9. VI. ^i?'], on a cruise in a vessel belonging 
to the State of Massachusetts ; then he sailed with Captain Sanmel Ingersoll 
in the Brig Monmouth, and took several prizes. He again enlisted in the 
" Harlequin," Captain Dennis, commander, taking several more prizes. 
The next cruise he made was in the " Lion," Captain Carnes, commander. 
They took but one prize, and were wrecked in trying to escape. Finally, 
he joined with thirty-nine other men and bought a vessel called the 
" Modesty." She started on a cruise, but was captured by an English 
man-of-war. The prisoners thus taken \verc exchanged in three weeks. 

After making a voyage to Hispaniola he embarked again in privateer- 
ing. This time he went in tlie " Harlequin," Captain Cleves, commander. 
The vessel was captured, and the prisoners were taken to Quebec, where 

* The date of his death is given as May 9, 1S27, in Hssex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. V. p. 212, and by other authorities ; while the same work, Vol. III. p. 175, 
gives it as May 12, 1S27. 



338 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

they were put aboard a transport and taken to England. lie was im- 
prisoned at Gosport for a year, and during that time was very ill. He 
was, however, much assisted by a philanthropic Dr. Wren, who helped 
prisoners. He appears to have become much attached to Dr. Wren, and 
having been asked by him to name a son hi his honor, he did so. Hence the 
name of Thomas Wren Ward. Much of his time in prison was spent by him 
in study. Finally, he was exchanged, but found that his friend Edmunds, to 
whom he had intrusted his money, in a venture, had been captured, and 
the money lost. He went to Grenada, and was again captured and taken 
to Bernuida. At that time Colonel William Browne, formerly of Salem, 
was governor of Bermuda. He treated young Ward kindly, and induced 
him to enter the " flag service." ^ 

At the close of the war he was twenty-two years old, and penniless. 
He obtained command of a vessel, went to England, where he found that 
his friend Dr. Wren had died. He continued in command of vessels, making 
many voyages to the West Indies, principally to Mauritius. He also sailed 
to India, and his last voyage was to China. 

Captain Ward moved from Salem to Medford, ^lass. He became presi- 
dent of the State Bank in Boston. His second wife was Joanna Chipman. 
They were raarned Nov. 14, 1790. She was baptized July 5, 1761, and 
was a daughter of John Chipman, Esq., barrister-at-law.^ Her sister Eliza- 
beth man-ied the Hon. William Gray, and her brother, the Hon. Ward 
Chipman (H. C. 1770), became a loyalist, and went to New Brunswick, 
where he became distinguished. By his second wife, Joanna, William 
Ward had the following children : — 

Lucy Ajsn Ward, baptized in Salem April 9, 1797, and died in Danvers, jVfass., 
June 28, IS.oS. She married, in Boston, Charles Lawrence 
(H. C. ISlo), born in Salem, Oct. 7, 1795, and died in Danvers, 



» Colonel William Browne (H. C. l"")-".) was colonel of the Essex Regiment and a 
judge of the Supreme Court. He felt it his duty to adhere to tlie government even at the 
expense of his great landed estate, all of which was confiscated. He was governor of 
Bermuda from 17S1 to 1790. His son William was an oificer in the British Army. See 
Journal and Letters of the late Samuel Curwen, by George A. Ward, pp. 500-501. 

* The Chipman Lineage, in Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XI. p. 295. 



SEVEXTH GENERATIOX. 339 

Deo. 21, 187',>. Me wa.^ much int.n-este'.l in farming. He 
removed from Salem to Danvers in 1S39. He was a son of 
Abel and Abigail (Page) Lawrence, of Salem. Tliey had no 
children that lived. 

"William Ward, baptized in Salem, Jan. 13, 1799. For many years he was the 
private secretary of General Cass, at Washington. 

Miles Ward, died unmarried. 

An obituary notice of Captain Ward of some length appeared in the 
Columbian Centinel of ifay 12, 1S27, which says: — 

" To great integrity, disinterestedness and untiring zeal for the moral and 
religious improvement of society he united that benevolence, candor, and forbear- 
ance so necessary to the happiness of social intercourse. Property he considered 
as a talent confided to his care for use, and sparing only on himself, he answered 
liberally all the demands of an enlightened sense of pu))lic and private duty." 

Captain "Ward's portrait, which was painted by Stuart, is in the posses- 
sion of his grandson, Samuel Gray Ward, of Washington, D. C. A helio- 
type of Captain Ward is here given. 

William Ward was a son of William and Ruth (Putnam) Ward, of 
Salem. His ancestry includes the following families : Ward, Flint, Massey, 
Wells, AVarner, Pickraan, Hardy, Lindall, Veren, Putnam, Prince, Putnam, 
Porter, Hathorne, Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, Weld, Clap, Mitchelson, 
Bushell. See Axcestey Tables |"-. 

17. VII. lOG. Benjamin Goodlme [Stephen 17. VI. 36], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. A yeoman. Residence : Salem. 

17. VII. 107. Martha Goodhtie [Stephen 17. Yl. 3C], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of consumption. 

17. VII. 107. Birhard WlieatJand, her husband, born in Wareham, 
England, died in Salem, i\rass. A merchant. Residence : vSalem. 

In early life Richard Wheatland left his home in Wareham, and went 
to London to learn a trade ; but he soon abandoned it and went to sea. 
During the American Revolution, he was three years in tlie English Navy. 
At tlie close of the war he was discharged. In 1783, he amved in Salem, 
and for a number of years sailed from that port in the various capacities of 
sailor, officer, and commander. He retired from the sea about the year 1803, 



340 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

and was therciifter engayed in the East India trade, until a few years 
before his death. He was universally esteemed as a public-spirited citizen, 
and as a kind and benevolent man.' 

His first wife was Margaret Silver, who was born June 11, 1765, and died 
June 9, 1789. She was a daughter of John and Isabel (Browne) Silver, and 
a great-granddaughter of James and Elizabeth (Pickering) Browne [1-70. 
III. 8]. Margaret Silver was an aunt of Mary Silver [47. VII. 252']. 

Richard Wheatland was a son of Peter and Bridget (Foxcroft) Wheat- 
land, of Wareham, England. A>-cestkt Tables ^\. 

18. VII. 108. Joseph Holman [Saj-ah IS. VI. 37], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there Feb. 10, 1765, probably died in Salem. A mariner. 
Residence: Salem. 

18. VII. lOS. Sarah Peirce, his wife, born in Salem, baptized there 
June 23, 1771,=^ died in Salem. 

Mrs. Holman's second husband was John Needham, to whom she was 
married March 8, 1800. 

She was a daughter of Nathan and Sarah (Allen) Peirce, of Salem. In 
early life her father was a tobacconist, but afterward he became a successful 
merchant. He built the brick house on Vine Street, Salem, which was after- 
ward occupied by his daughter. He owned Peirce's Wharf, since called 
Dodge's Wharf.^ Her ancestry includes the following families: Peirce, 
Allen. See Axcestry Tables ^. 

18. VII. 109. John Holman [Sarah 18. VI. 37], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there July 16, 1769, died in Ithaca, N. Y. A merchant. 
Residence : Ithaca.* 

» The Salem Gazette of :March 20, 1S;^0; The Prescott Memorial, by William Prescott, 
p. 92, and a letter from Dr. Henry Wheatland, dated March 25, 1S89. 

=■ Her name is erroneously given as Sarah Prime, and her birth is given as June 28, 
1771, in the History and Genealogy of the Goodhue Pamily in England and America, by 
Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 55. We have given her birth as June 23, 1771. 

» Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. IV. p. 78. 

* The date of his first marriage is given as 1806, while 1805 is given in the History 
and Genealogy of the Goodhue Family in England and America, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, 
p. 55. 



SEVEN in GEXERATIOX. 341 

John Ilolman was in all probability a seafaring man in early life, 
for in the History of Reading, Mass., he is called " Capt. John Hol- 
man of Salem, a naval commander." About the time of his second 
marriao-e he removed from Salem to Ithaca, N. Y., where he became a 
merchant. 

18. VII. 10D\ Lois NeJson, his first wife, died in Maiden, Mass. 

Mrs. Holman was a daughter of the Rev. Ebenezer Nelson of the First 
Baptist Church in Reading. Her father originally came from Middle- 
borough, Mass.^ Ancestry Tables |^^,. 

18. VH. 100-. Olive NeireTl, the second wife of John Holman, prob- 
ably born in Boston, died in Ithaca, N. Y. 

Mrs. Holman was a daughter of Andrew and Olive (Haskell) Newell, 
of Boston.^ Her ancestry includes the following families : Newell, Pitt, 
Larkin, Tuck, Nichols, Peirce, Stevens, Gammon, Jenner, Trerice, Russell, 
Pitt, Haynes, Haskell, Tarbell, Blood, Farnsworth, Prescott, Loker, Draper. 
See Ancestry Tables ^^,. 

18. VII. 10[P. Hannah H. Orne, the third wife of John Holman, 
died in Ithaca, N. Y. 

Ancestky Tables ^j,. 

19. VII. 110. Dorothy Goodhue [.lonatlmn 19. Yl. 38], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there March 2, 1777, died in Salem.^ 

By her will Mrs. Treadwell bequeathed four thousand dollars to the 
Barton Square Church in Salem.* She was familiarly called Dolly. 

' A Genealogical History of the To\\-n of Reading, by Lilley Eaton, pp. 3.3.5-337. 

* Ibid. p. 338, for an account of Jlrs. Xewell and her family. See also The Gene- 
alogies and Estates of Charlestown, by Thomas B. Wyman, Vol. II. p. 702. 

' Called Dorothea in the History and Genealogy of the Goodhue Family in Eng- 
land and America, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 56, where her marriage is given as 
March 4, 1804. It has been given by several authorities as June 7, 1804, which we 
have used. 

* The Salem Register of Feb. 4, 1853. 



342 THE riCKERIXa GENEALOGY. 

19. VII. 110. JoliH Dexter TreaiJivcll, her husLand, born in 
Lynn, JTuss., died in Salem, of heart disease. A physician. Eesidencc : 
Salem. 

Dr. Treadwell, II. C. ITSS, studied medicine \^ith Dr. Edward A. 
Holyoke. For two or tlu-ee years he practised in Marblchead, and then 
he moved to Salein, wlicre he continued to practise his profession until his 
death, attaining- considerable celebrity. 

He was pre-eminent in the science and erudition of his profession, 
thoroughly read in the ethical and mental philosophy of the ancients, as 
well as of the moderns, and particularly learned in all branches of knowl- 
edge connected with philology and the criticism of the Old and New 
Testament. 

Dr. Treadwell was a man of strong individuality and earnestness of char- 
acter. His frank and forcible remarks as he moved about among the fami- 
lies of his extensive practice were both suggestive and stimulating. His 
uncommon medical skill and his remarkable tenderness and attention to his 
patients will occasion his memory to be cherished long and affectionately.^ 

The following interesting account of Dr. Treadwell gives a very good 
picture of the peculiarities of his character : " — 

" The eminent physician, Dr. Treadwell, wouhl have a crowd at his heels if he 
should reappear in that high-crowned hat, suit of black, knee-breeches and square- 
toed shoes, -worn as he plodded from house to bouse on his daily round of visits. 
Nature endowed liiui with oddity ; a kind and clear head kept tlie display of it within 
bounds ; his quick perception and dry humor made him an amusing friend in his 
professional capacity, whenever he foiuid a patient who could appreciate these quali- 
ties, and he enjoyed serious discourse with any one interested in matters -worth talking 
about. He hid deep and tender feelincrs under the crusty manner in which he some- 
times, not always, indulged ; he would growl like a bear at anything that did not 
please him, and shed tears of sorrow over the little cliildron who, in his homely 
plirase, slipped through his fingers. He has slammed the door in the face of the 
tailor sent bj a bereaved family to take his measure for a mourning suit, with a 



* Obituary in the Salem Gazette of June 7, 1833, and Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. IV. p. 278, and Vol. IX. part IT. p. 23. 

« A Half Century in Salem, by M. C. D. Silsbee, pp. 74-75. 



SEVENTH GEyERATION. 343 

remark more lioiicst tliaii courteous: 'I don't want any clothes; £rot more now than 
my Dolly can take care of.' lie was a skilful practitioner and a thoughtful scholar ; 
he accumulated a valuable theological liijrary, was an able commentator on the 
Scriptures, and liked a discussion on doctrinal points. It was a sad day in Salem 
■when the bells tolled for his sudden death ; fortunately a portrait is preserved by a 
silhouette, which represents him almost as he was in life." 

Dr. Trcadwell was a son of the Hon. and Eev. Jolni and Meliitable 
(Dexter) Treadwell. Dorotliij Ashton [19. VI. SS'] was his lather's second 
wife, and therefore Dr. Treadwell's step-motlier. Tlie Rev. Mr. Treadwell 
was for a time settled in Lynn, Mass., but he afterwards removed to Salem, 
and became State senator and Judge of the Court of Common Pleas. 

John Dexter Treadwell's ancestry includes the following lamilies : 
Treadwell, Titcomb, Ixirtlett, Fowler, Kimball, Scott, Herrick, Laskin, 
Boardman, Dexter, Sprague, Putnam, Porter, Hathome. See Ancestkt 
Tables ^. 

19. YII. 111. Frances Goodlme [Benjamin 19. VI. 40], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Jan. 3, 1779, died in Salem. 

19. VII. 111. William Ashton, her Imsband, probably born in Salem, 
baptized there Oct. 5, 1777, died in Salem, of apoplexy. A shipmaster. 
Residence : Salem.' 

Captain Ashton was a son of Jacob and Susannah (Lee) Ashton, of 
Salem. Dorothy AsJifon [19. VI. oS^ was his aunt. His ancestry includes 
the following- families : Asliton, Dutch, Ropes, Wells, "Warner, Bartlett, 
Lee, Hibbard. See Axcestuy T.\bles I^. 

19. VII. 112. Sarali Goodhue [Benjamin 19. VI. 40J, probably born 
in Salem, baptized there in July, 1780, died in Salem. 

Miss Goodluie's obituary in the Salem Gazette of March 22, 1796, 
speaks of her as a young lady of enlarged understaiuling, of strong 
and sprightly powers of mind, of an open temper, and of agreeable 
manners. 

' The date of liis death is given as April 2, 1835 ; while the History and Genealogy of 
the Goodhue Family in England and America, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 56, gives it as 
AprU 2, 1825. 



344 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

19. VII. 113. Mary Goodlme [Bt-njainin 19. VI. 40], probably born 
in Siilem, baptized there in 1781, died in Salem. 

19. VII. IIJ. Benjamin Shreve, her husband, probably born in 
Alexandria, Va.,^ died in Salem, of heart disease. A merchant. Residence : 
Salem. 

Previous t<i his nuuTiage, Mr. Slureve had lived in Alexandria. He 
settled in Salem, and became treasurer of the Savings Bank of that place. 
He was highly esteemed for his moral worth and the respectability of his 
character. His life was spent in mercantile pursuits, and, amid the vicissi- 
tudes to which such a life is exposed, he gave unconmion proof of his stern 
integrity and high sense of honor. His death was spoken of as a great 
loss to the community.^ 

There is a miniature of him, painted by Malbone, in the possession of his 
nephew, Benjamin Shreve, of Salem. 

Benjamin Shreve was a son of Benjamin and Hannah Shreve, of Alex- 
andria, Va. His ancestry includes the following families : Shreve, French. 

See Ancestet Tables Yh 

19. VII. 114. Jonathan Goodline [Benjamin 19. VI. 40], probably 
bom in Salem, baptized there in June, 1783, died in New York. A mer- 
chant. Residence : New York City. 

Mr. Goodhue received his education at the Grammar School in Salem ; 
and in 1798 began his commercial career in the counting-room of the Hon. 
John Norris, of Salem, a merchant who was engaged in trade with Europe 
and the East Indies. After a few years spent in the counting-room, 
Jonathan Goodhue was sent abroad as a supercargo. 

In November, 1S07, he removed to New York City. On his arrival he 
was at once received by gentlemen of influence, and introduced into the 
most select societv of the city. He engaged in business ; but it was checked 
by the embargo, and the war which soon followed. After the peace of 

* The (late of his birth is given as Dec. 6, 17S0 ; while the History and Genealogy of 
the Goodhue Family in England and America, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 56, gives it as 
Dec. 9, 1780. 

» Obituary in the Salem Gazette of March 12, 1839. 



JONATHAN GOODHUE. 

[ly. Vir ,14.] 

From the Portrait by Walpci, i-aintei' ai!oi:t 1S17, now in the possession 
OF Mrs. Charles Clarkson Goodhie, of New York City. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 345 

181 1, liis business grew until it extended to all tlie commercial ports of 
Europe, the East Indies, Mexico, and South America. 

In 180'), he formed his first partnership, which was with Mr. Swett, under 
the style of Goodhue & Swett. He afterwards formed a partnership with 
Pelatiah Porit, under the name of Goodhue & Co., for the pm-pose of doing 
a general commission and commercial business. Their place of business 
was at No. 04 South Street. The growth of the house of Goodhue & Co. 
was slow but sure. Clerks of the firm who went out to distant parts of the 
world and formed coraraercial houses would first open a con-espondence 
with the firm of Goodhue & Co. As the firm did a strictly commission 
business, feting as .'igents for commercial firms in all parts of the world, it 
ran no risks. " It never deviated from its course, never speculated, and 
consequently stood firm as the rock of Gibraltar." After the death of Mr. 
Goodhue, the business was continued by his son. 

The public demonstration of gi-ief on the occasion of Mr. Goodhue's 
death was what might liave been expected from the feeling of soitow which 
pervaded the whole community. The shipping in New York harbor dis- 
played their colors at half-mast, and at a special meeting of the Chamber 
of Commerce and of merchants appropriate resolutions were adopted. Mr. 
Goodhue was a man of extensive reading, a Federalist in politics, an 
advocate of free-trade, and was liberal in his religious views. He was a 
very benevolent man, and of unspotted integrity. He was fond of children, 
and retained the playfulness and simplicity of a boy. The following 
account of his funeral is taken from " Tact, Push, and Principle," by ^yilliam 
M. Thayer : — 

" Wlien Jonathan Goodhue died the din of traffic was hushed in the streets, com- 
merce felt the loss keenly, and merchants and artisans crowded around his bier at the 
funeral. The ^Ma^yor and other officials were there. Jlcrchant-princes were there. 
The poor and unfortunate were there too. None were so high and none so lowly as 
not to do him reverence. His character drew them there. The speaker said on that 
occasion, ' It is the recognized worth of private character which has extorted this 
homage. It is the man himself — the pure, the high-uiinded, righteous man who 
adorned our nature, who dignified the mercantile profession, who was superior to his 
station, his riches, his exposures, and made the common virtues more respected and 
venerated than shining talents or public honors, who vindicated the dignity of common 



34G THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

life and carricJ a largo, high, and iiohle spirit into ordinary affairs, who made men 
recognize something inviohilile and awful even in tlio piirate conscience, and tlms 
gave sanctity and value to our commuii humanity. This was the power, this the 
attraction, tins the value of Jonatiiun Goodhue's life. He has made men believe in 
virtue. He has made them honor character more than station or wealth. He has 
illustrated the possiljle purity, disinterestedness, and elevation of a mercantile life. 
He has shown that a rich man can enter the kingdom of heaven. He stands up by 
acclamaiiun as the model Cliristian merchant.'" 

Jlr. Goodhue took considerable interest in his family history, and wrote 
out an account of his ancestors from the first settlement of the country to 
his own time. This account abouTids in personal reminiscences of his own 
parents and children. It was intended for private use only, and is now in 
the possession of the widow of his son, Charles Clarkson Goodhue, of New 
York. Mrs. Goodhue also has a portrait of Jonathan Goodhue, painted by 
Waldo about the year 1817. A heliotype of it is here given. There is also 
a painting of him at the Essex Institute in Salem. After his death, a marble 
bust of him was presented by the merchants of New York to the New York 
Chamber of Commerce.^ 

19. VII. ii^. Catherine Biitherford C?rti7.>oii, tlie wife of Jonathan 
Goodhue, probably born in New York City, died in New York City. 

Mrs. Goodhue's portrait was painted by Frothingham, about the year 
1828. The picture is now in the possession of the widow of her son, Mrs. 
Charles Clarkson Goodhue. A heliotype of it is here given. 

Mrs. Goodhue was a daughter of General Matthew and Sarah (Cornell) 
Clarkson, of New York. Her father served with distinction in the Revolu- 
tionary Army, and was afterwards made Assistant Secretary of War. He 
was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati.- Her ancestry includes the 
following families : Chirkson, Holcroft, Angler, Van Schaick, Lievens, Free- 
man, Van Schaick, Lievens, French, Philipse, Brockholles, Schrick, Verlet, 
Cornell, Doughty, Jackson, Mabson. See .Wcestrt Tables |y. 

* The Lives of American ]\[erchant5, by Freeman Hunt, Vol. I. pp. 345-3G6 ; also The 
Old Merchants of New York City, by Walter Barrett, Clerk, New York, :\IDCCCLXIII. 
pp. 22-26. 

" New York Genealogical Kecord, Vol. XII. p. 16. 



CATHERIXE RUTHERFORD (Cl.ARKSON) GOODHUE. 

[rg. VII in] 

From thf. Portrait by Fkothingham. painted about 1H2S, now in th 
PO^SESSIlJN OF Mrs. Charles Clark^on Gooiuick, of Nkw York City. 




x: 



'V 



i^' 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 347 

19. VII. 115. Beiijamiii Goodlliie [Benjamin 19. VI. 10], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there March 28, 1785, died in Salem. 

There is a silhouette of Mr. Goodhue in the possession of his nephew's 
widow, Mrs. €harles Clarkson Goodhue, of New York. 

19. VII. 116. Martha Hardy Goodhue [Benjamin 19. VI. 40], 
probably born in Salem, baptized there in April, 1787, died in Salem.^ 

19. VII. IIG. Gideon Tucker, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Salem. A merchant. Residence: Salem.^ 

Mr. Tucker entered early upon a commercial life, as one of Mr. Joseph 
Peabody's clerks, and advanced to a partnership in the concern. It was 
afterwards dissolved, and ilr. Tucker engaged in foreign commerce on his 
own account. For thirty -four years, he was either president or director of 
the Exchange Bank, of Salem, and he did not give up his connection with 
it luitil old age obliged him to retire. 

He was a man of singular method and punctuality, and rarely 
left his liabilities long unpaid. During the latter part of his life, 
he spent almost all of his surplus income in acts of charity, benevo- 
lence, and private generosity. He built the house on Essex Street, 
Salem (directly opposite the Essex Institute), in which he lived for so 
many years.^ 

Gideon Tucker was a son of John and Lydia (Jacobs) Tucker, of 
Salem. His ancestry includes the following families: Tucker, Jacobs, 
Frost, Dudley. See Axcestkt Tables j^j. 

19. VII. 118. Hannah Goodhiie [Benjamin 19. VI. 40], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there July 24, 1791, died in Salem. 

* The date of her marriage is given as June 21, ISOl ; while it is given as June 1, 
1804, in the History and Genealogy of the Goodhue Family in England and America, by 
Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 57. 

^ The same work gives the date of his birth as March 7, 1776, and the date of his 
death as Eeb. 1, 1S61. Several authorities give the date of his birth as March 7, 1778, 
and the date of his death as Feb. 18, 1861. 

* Obituary in the Salem Gazette of Feb. 22, 1861 ; Essex Institute Historical Collec- 
tions, Vol. IV. pp. 132-133. 



348 THE FICKFAUXG GENEALOGY. 

10. VII. 11L». Ann "Willard GoodliTie [Benjamin 19, VI. 40], born 
in Salem, died in Lancaster, Mass.^ 

19. VI. 119. Tlcnrij Wilder, her hnsliand, born in Lancaster, Mass., 
died in Lancaster. A civil engineer. Residence : Lancaster. 

During his early manhood ]\Ir. Wilder was an engineer for the location 
and building of the Eastern Railroad. After it was finished, he returned to 
Lancaster, and led the life of a farmer. He was familiar with much of the 
history of Lancaster, and was considered an autliority on notable events 
and on matters of genealogy. He devoted much of his time to reading. 
He was much hiterested in the natural sciences, especially geology, and 
gave a valuable collection to the town library, of which he was one of the 
original founders. He was also much interested in town affairs, and served 
as an assessor. In the year 184.5, he was the jjrime mover in obtaining a 
charter for the Lancaster Savings Bank ; and after the charter was granted, 
he was president of the bank for nearly thirty years. He was one of the 
suppoi'ters of the New Church (Swedenborgian). His second wife was the 
widow of a ^Ir. Hichens, and a daughter of Edward Savage.^ 

Henry AVilder was a son of Jonathan and Ruth (Prescott) "Wilder. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Wilder, White, Rice, Whitcomb, 
Waters, Linton, Prescott, Piatt, Hayne, W^hite, Rice. See Ancestry 
Tables ^i. 

20. VII. 120. Thomas Needham [Seeth 20. VI. 42], probably bom 
in Salem, died at Marshiield, ]\Iass., in a storm. A cabinet-maker. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

20. VII. 120. Lydia Lefavourf his wife, probably died in Salem. 
She is said to have been of Topsfield, Mass. 

' The Salem Register of Sept. .5, 1SG4, in announcing her death, calls her Anna. It is 
also given as Anna in the History and Genealogy of the Goodhue Family in England and 
America, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. .57. The State Eecords give her name as Anne. 

The date of her death is given as Sept. 1, 1864, by several authorities ; while it is 
given as Sept. 6, ISGl, in the History and Genealogy of the Goodhue Family in England 
and America, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 57. 

" Obituaries in the Clinton Courant of Saturday, Aug. 14 and Aug. 28, 1875. 



SEVFXTH GEXERATION. 349 

Mrs. Neeilhaiii uiarried her second husband, Captain "WiUiam Jenkins, 
Aug. 13, 1793. 

Ancestry Tables ^7- 

20. VII. 121. Seeth Needham [Seeth 20. VI. 42], probably bom 
in Salem. 

The Needhams are said to have removed to Boston. This is doubtless 
the Seeth Needham who is recorded on the Boston Records as having been 
married April 8, 1790, to William Arnold, by the Rev. Samuel Stillman. 
Both are described as belonging to Boston. Seeth Arnold mamed, as a 
second liusband, Dec. 16, 1804, Benjamin Callender. They were married 
by the Rev. Samuel Stillman, and are both called of Boston on the records. 

20. VII. 122. Natlianiel Needliam [Seeth 20. VI. 42], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

20. VII. 122. Sarah Cltcever, his wife. 
She is said to have come from Saugus, Mass. 
Ancestry Tables g^|. 

20. VII. 123. Sarah Needham [Seeth 20. VI. 42], probably born in 
Salem. 

She is said to have died lea\-ing childi'en. 

20. VII. 123. Alexander Moore, her husband. 
AxcESTRT Tables |5.. 

20. VII. 124. Daniel Needliam [Seeth 20. \^. 42], probably born 
in Salem. 

20. VII. 126. Elizabeth Needham [Seetli 20. VI. 42], probably 
born in Salem. 

20. VII. 127. Mary Needham [Seeth 20. VI. 42], probably born 
in Salem. 

20-21. \ai. 128. Seeth Phippen [Hardy 20-21. \^. 44], born in 
Marblehead, ]\Iass., died in Manchester, Mass., of lung fever. 



350 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

20-21. VII. US. Samuel Eduutnls, her husband, boru in Manches- 
ter, Ma.s.s., (lied in Manchester. A seaman. Residence : Manchester. 

Mr. Edwards was a son of Samuel and Lydia (Allen) Edwards, of 
Manchester. His ancestry includes the following families : Edwards, 
Hooper, Gale, Allen, Bradley, Tuck, Pierce, Osment. See A^-cESTRY 
Tables ^I- 

21. Vn. 129. EHzatetli Pliippen [Hardy 20-21. VI. 44], probably 
born in Marblehead, Mass., died in Manchester, Mass. 

21. VII. 129. Abrahcnti Stone, her husband, born in Manchester, 
Mass., died in Port au Prince, Hayti, of yellow fever. A shipmaster. 
Residence : Jlan Chester. 

Ancestry Tables ^ 

22. VII. 130. Natlianiel Pliippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably 
bom in Salem, baptized there June 3, 1770, died in Salem, of consumption. 
A cooper. Residence : Salem. 

After his marriage Mi-. Phippen moved to Portsmouth, N. H. ; but he 
returned to Salem, and lived on Derby Street, between Hardy and Daniel 
streets. 

22. VII. 130. Anna Pickett, his wife, died in Salem. 
Mrs. Phippen is said to have come from Beverly, Mass. 
Ancestry Tables ^'i. 

23. VII. 133. Hannali Phippen [Jo.shua 22-24. VI. 45], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there June 3, 1770, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Hodges is said to have been a charming and handsome old lady. 

23. VII. 133. George ITodries, her husband, probably born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Captain Hodges died after a short illness. He was a useful citizen and 
a generous benefactor of the ponr.^ 

He was a son of John and ^lary (Manning) Hodges. His ancestry 

' Obituary in The Salem Register of July 30, 1827. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 351 

includes the following families : Hodges, Phippen, Wood, Williams, Skerry, 
Manning, Calley, Planning, Calley, Stone, Lambert, Brown (?), Brown. 
See A-vcEsTuv Tallk.s ^'g. 

23. VII. 134. Mary Pliippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably born 
in Salem, died in Salem, of consumption.^ 

23. VII. 134- Bevjdmin liahhidfje, lier husband, probably bom in 
Salem, died at sea. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Captain Babbidge retired from the sea with a considerable amount of 
property, but lost most of it owing to the disastrous speculations of Colonel 
S. Archer. In 1811, he went to sea again as a master of a vessel, and was 
never heard from. 

Captain Babbidge was a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Woodwell) 
Babbidge. His ancestry includes the following families : Babbidge, Jewett, 
Mallison, Marston, Peirce, Becket, Sibley, Mason, Woodwell, Gillingham. 
See Ancestry Tables ^y- 

23. VII. 135. Sarah Phippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there Dec. 13, 1772, died in Salem. 

23. VII, 135. Georffe Dean, lier husband, probably born in Salem, 
died at Port au Prince, Ilayti, of a fever. Residence : Salem. 

He was a son of Thomas and Mary (Cash) Dean, of Salem. His ances- 
try includes the following families : Dean, Daniell, Prince, Gillingham, Bly, 
Cash. See Ancestry Tables Y^. 

23. VII. 136. Joshua Phippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. A cooper. Residence : Salem. 

23. VII. 136. Anne TvasTi, his wife. 
She was familiarly called Xancy. 
Ancestry Tables ^~^. 

' Her death is recorded as of March 17, 1812, in The Eecord of tlie Parish List of 
Deaths, 17S5-1S19, by Eev. William Eentlej-, D.D.. p. 123, and is announced in The 
Essex Register, of IMarch 18, 1S12. It is given as INfareh 7, 1S12, in Essex Institute 
Historical Collections, Vol. Vf. p. 20s, and by the late George D. Phippen. 



352 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 



24. VII. 130. Hardy Pliippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably 
born in Salem, baptizLMl there, July 12, 1778, died In Salem. A ship- 
master. Residence : Salem. 

An obituary notice of Captain Phippen, printed in the Salem Register of 
Oct. 12, ISGS, states that before he retired from the sea, he had filled all 
stations, from boy to captain ; that he had traversed all oceans, and visited 
all parts within the reach of maritime adventure; that he was an active and 
worthy citizen from the beyinniiii,'- to the end, and that his faculties, intel- 
lectually and physically, were wonderfully preserved to the last. He 
followed the sea about twenty-five }ears, conunanding the ships of the 
most prominent merchants of Salem. He afterwards engaged in the 
grocery business in Salem. 

24. VII. 139. Ursula Knapp Sijmonds, the wife of Hardy Phippen, 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of lung fever. 

Mrs. Phippen was a daughter of Jonathan and Ursula (Knapp) Symonds. 
Her mother married, as her second husband, Joshua Phippen [22-24. VI. 45]. 
Ursula Knapp Chapman [13. \T^II. loD'] and Isaac Needham Chapman [24. 
VIII. 24S'\ were her niece and nephew. Her ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Symonds, Browning, Stone, Very, Woodice, Symonds, Knapp. 
See AxcESTRT Tables J^. 

24. VII. 140. Eunice Pliippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably 
bom in Salem, died in Salem, of consumption. 

The Salem Gazette of Dec. 24, 1799, contained an obituary notice of 
her which stated that she was of uncommon sweetness of disposition, of 
modest deportment, and greatly esteemed and beloved. 

24. VII. 141. Joseph Pliippen [Joshua 22-24. VI. 45], probably 
born in Salem, lost at sea. A mariner. Residence : Salem. 

24. VII. 14-1. Lois Fairfield, his wife, probably born and died in 
Salem. 

Mrs. Phippen was a daughter of Captain William and Rebecca (Becket) 
Fairfield, of Salem. Her ancestry inchules the following families: Fairfield, 
Becket, Sibley, Mason, Beadle, Hicks, Gillingham, Bly. See Ancestkt 

TABLE.S 5^1. 



,..:<'-,^'--^- 



€^ 












JOSE 


PH 


HARDV 


PEIRCI' 














[^ 


,-26. 


VII. 


.43-] 






From the 


\Va 


FA 


•C0L..1 


p.> 


KIR. 


IT, P.\ 


NTEll AHU 


CT 


iSoo, 


POSSESStON- 




- rnK 


IK. I p. 


OF 


THE L, 


VTE GrENV 


ILLE Me 


Esq.. 


OF r 


VI 


.N Ro 


T.E, 


l.\. 











SEVENTH GENERATION. 353 

25--2(;. VII. 14;i. Joseph Hardy Peirce [Joseph 25-27. VI. 47], 
bom in Boston, baptized there ilaicli 14, 1773, as Joseph, died at sea. 
Residence: Boston. 

Major Peirce was named for his father, but, about the year 1813, he added 
Hardy to his name. Early in life he was engaged with his father in busi- 
ness at number 58 Cornhill, the style of the firm being Josej)!! Peirce and 
Son. In 1800, he was in the ship-chandlery business, at number 56 State 
Street. lie also made several voyages as a supercargo, sailing to England, 
Spain, France, the East Indies, and South America. Very nuich of his time 
between 1792 and 1800 was spent in travelling between Boston and the 
State of I\lHine, acting as agent for his father's lands in that State. At a 
later period, from 1810 to 1812, the business connected with these lands 
required so much of his time that he was obliged to take up his residence 
at Camden, Maine, removing there with his family. From 1812 to 1814, he 
was Secretary of the Board of War of Massachusetts. In June, 1816, he was 
appointed Clerk of the Municipal Court. He held this position till 1830, 
and gave great satisfaction to Judge Dawes and Judge Quincy, under both of 
whom he served. In 1823 and 1824, he vras in Washington with his family, 
acting as the agent for prosecuting the claims of Massachusetts against the 
national government for the State ex[)enses incurred during the War of 1812. 
His family during this visit were the recipients of much social attention, 
and his five daughters attracted a great deal of notice by their beauty. 

In 1828, he was chosen into the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, 
to succeed his father, but omitted to qualify himself by making the usual 
declarations. He was always much interested in military affairs. In 1791, 
he was appointed ensign of the Second Regiment of the United States Army, 
but declined the appointment. lie commanded the Independent Corps of 
Cadets, with the rank of major, and Avas an aide-de-camp of Governor 
Brooks, of Governor Strong, and of two other governors. 

In December, 1831, he and his wife embarked on the schooner Alabama, 
bound from New York to ]\Iobile, to pay a visit to his son Constantius. 
The vessel is supposed to have foundered at sea, as she was never heard 
from after leaving New York. 

Major Peirce was a man of distinguished presence. He was about six 



354 THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

foot in height, very erect and very handsouie. He delighted in society, 
and was fond of music, he himself being a performer upon the clarinet. 

He was in possession of several interesting family miniatures and poi-- 
traits. Among them was a fine Stuart of his grandfather, Colonel Thomas 
Dawes. The miniatures he took South with him, and left them with his son 
Constantius. He also had a Family Bible which bears the imprint of Boston, 
1824. It is now in the possession of his great-grandson, Hamilton McKee 
Peirce, of New Orleans. It contains numerous records in his own hand- 
writing of the Peirces, Hardys, Cordises, and Pobinsons, with accounts of 
weddings and noteworthy events, etc. The Bible is now much worn, and 
many of its leaves missing, but those containing the records are all intact. 

The heliotype of Major Peirce was taken from a water-color portrait, 
painted about the year 1800. It is in the possession of his great-grandson, 
Hamilton McKee Peirce, of New Orleans. There is a fine silhouette of him 
taken later in life by Doyle, which is now owned by his granddaughter, Mrs. 
Harrison Ellery.^ 

25-26. VII. 14,3'. Frances Tem/tle Corrlis, the first wife of Major 
Peirce, born in Haverhill, Mass., died in Boston, of apoplexy. 

Mrs. Peirce and her sister, Mrs. Thomas (Cordis) Cordis, were both 
very beautiful women. Mrs. Pierce was about five and a half feet in 
height ; her complexion was fair ; and she had blue eyes and light brown 
hair. A fine silhouette of her, by Doyle, is in the possession of her grand- 
daughter, Mrs. Hamson Ellery. A beautiful miniature of her was burned 
at her grandson's residence, in Baton Rouge, La., during the late civil war. 

Mrs. Peirce was a daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Russell) Cordis, of 
Charlestown. Belecca liussell Lowdl [53. VI. lOl] was her second cousin. 
The father of Mrs. Peirce was a mercliant, and a prominent citizen of 
Charlestown, and afterwards of Reading, ^Mass. He was a justice of the 
peace, justice of the Court of Sessions, moderator of the town-meetings, and 
filled a number of other offices. He was a man of dignified presence, of 
intelligence, and of judgment, and made an excellent presiding officer.- 

* Family Paptrs ; Peirce Family Record, by Eihvavd W. West, p. 3 ; Biography of 
Henry A. Peirce, p. 4 ; Jlemorials of the ilassachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, edited 
by James Isl. Bugbee. p. 384. 

' Genealogical History of the Town of Beading, Mass., by Lilley Eaton, pp. 330-332. 



fi^- 



/ 



/ 



ANX (PKIRCK) LATHRUP. 
[27. VII. .44.] 
From the Portkait hv Johnson, painted about 1792, n 

POS3l:S~ION OF THE HoN. ]ollS LaTHROT. OF BoSD. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 355 

Her ance.-tiy iuclmles tlie fallowing faiuilies : Cordis, r)r(>\vn, Potter, 
EJmands, Brooks. Mason, Russell, Pitt, Curwen, Herbert, Chambers, 
Patefield, Gary, Ilawkins, Winsor, Martyn, Holyoke, Stockton, White, 
King, Swift, Capen. See .Vncestey Tables y'^,. 

26. VII. 14^3'-. Ahhif liohhison, the second wife of ilajor Peirce, 
probably born in Newport, R. I., died at sea. 

Mrs. Peirce had black eyes, dark hair, a small head, a pretty face, and 
pleasing- manners. She was a woman of a tine mind, with some talent for 
writing, and was very amiable, kind, and good. The author of the Robin- 
son and Hazard Families says that she was one of the fonr most beantiful 
and graceful women he ever knew.^ As she and her family belonged to 
the society of Friends, she was read out of church on the occasion of her 
marriage to Mr. Peirce. 

Mrs. Peirce w^as a daughter of William T. and Sarah (Franklin) Robin- 
son. Her father lived in Newport and in New York. He was a member 
of the firm of Franklin & Robinson, merchants, of New York, engaged in 
the East India ti'ade. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Robinson, Allen, Bacon, Gardiner, Remington, Richmond, Davis, Richard- 
son, Borden, Wanton, Freeborn, Brownell, Franklin. See Ancestry 
Tables Y2'. 

27. VII. 144. Ann Peirce [Joseph 25-27. VI. 47], probably born in 
Boston, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Lathrop is said to have been an accomplished woman. She was 
familiarly called Nancy. Her grnndson, Judge John Lathrop, owns a 
portrait of her wdiich was painted liv Johnson about the year 1702. On 
the back of the painting are some lines to her written by her Imsband. 
A heliotype of the portrait is here given. 

27. VII. 144- John Lathrop, the husband of xVnn Peirce, born in 
Boston, died in Georgetown, D. C.' 

1 Recollections of OlJea Times, by Thomas R. Hazard, p. 15.5. 

* The date of his death is given by his grandson, Judge Lathrop, as Jan. 31, 1820; 
while it is given in The Hundred Boston Orators, by James Spear Loriug, as Jan. 30, 1820. 



35S THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

Mr. Lathrop graduated at Harvard College, witli high honors, in 1789, 
and studied law with Christopher Gore. In 1797, he removed from Boston 
to Dcdliam, and, in 1798, became clerk of the couils for Norfolk County ; 
but soon afterwards he returned to Boston. He had literary talents, and 
was both poet and orator. He was also much interested in the education 
of youth. In 1799, he made a voyage to Calcutta, where he established 
a school. After a residence of ten years in India, he returned to America 
and taught a school in Boston, and also continued to follow his literary 
pursuits. He soon gave up his school, however, and removed to Washing- 
ton; at which place, and at Georgetown, he continued to act as an instructor 
as well as lecturer and writer. His addresses, poems, and contributions to 
the newspapers and periodicals were numerous. His best known poem was 
the " Speech of Canonicus." ^ 

Mr. Lathrop's second wife, whom he married in Calcutta, about 1801, 
was Jane Thompson. She was born in Calcutta, and died there Aug. 14, 
1802. She was a daughter of Edward Thompson. By Mr. Lathrop she 
had- 

Ja2,-e Anx Lathrop, who was born in Calcutta, Aug. 14, 1802, and who is still living 
in Dedham, Mass., unmarried. 

Mr. Lathrop's third wife, whom he married in Calcutta, about 1807, was 
Grace Eleanor Harrison, whose stepfather was "William Bell. By her he 
had the following children : — 

Mart Axx Lathrop, born in Calcutta about 1808, died in Calcutta in 

1822. 
Anna Sabixa Jacobi Lathrop, born in Calcutta, March 18, 1809, died in Boston 

about 1811. 
Elizabeth Checkley Lathrop, born in Boston about 1811, died in Washington, 

D. C, about 1S19. 
Grace Ellex Lathrop, born in Boston in 1813. She married Captain 

Ricketts, and at last accounts was still living in 

England. 



' The Hundred Boston Orators, by James Spear Loring, pp. 25.5-257 ; also A Genealog- 
ical Memoir of the Lo-Lathrop Family, by the Eev. E. B. Huntington, p. 242. 



SEVEXTII GEXEEATIOX. 357 



Jlr. Latlirop was a son of the Rev. John and Mary (Wheatly) Lathrop. 
His father was the pastor of the New Brick Church at the north end of 
Boston. His ancestry includes the following families : Lathrop, Scudder, 
Bliss, Kelly, Wheatly. See Axckstry Tables ^'^. 

27. Vn. 149. Isaac Peirce [Joseph 25-27. VI. 47], born in Boston, 
died in Boston. 

A long obituary of this youth appeared in the Columbian Centinel of 
April 20, 1793. It speaks of his amiable disposition, his pleasing manners, 
and the hopes of his parents for the future literary eminence of their son, 
occasioned by his remarkable scholarly habits. 

27. VII. 150. Hannah Dawes Peirce [Joseph 25-27. VI. 47], born 
in Boston, died in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Kettell was possessed of considerable literary ability, and contrib- 
buted many poems, over the signature of "Juliana," to the newspapers. 
She is said to have been a tine-looking woman, very kind and pleasant to 
the young as well as the old, and to have been excellent company. She 
was a member of the Old South Church, Boston, and was dismissed to the 
Union Church, Jan. 17, 1825. 

27. VII. loO. Thomas Prentice KetteJl, her husband, born in Boston, 
died in New York. A merchant. Residence : New York City. 

Mr. Kettell was a shipping merchant, and went with his family from 
Boston to Hamburg, Germany, and there transacted business for about five 
years ; but, being unsuccessful, lie returned to America and settled in New 
York City. A miniature of him was in the possession of his daughter, the 
late Mrs. Sanuiel W. Brown.^ 

He was a son of Deacon Joseph and Rebecca (Prentice) Kettell, of 
Boston. Ilis ancestry includes the following families : Kettell, Ward, 
Frothingham, Rand, Damon, Stimpson, Sweetser, Wigglesworth, Wyer, 
Johnson, Johnson, Maverick, Harris, Prentice, Batson, Austin, Bachelder, 
Sprague, Corbin, Crawford. See Axcestry Tables V\. 

1 The Merchants' Jlagazine and Commercial Review, conducted by Treeman Hunt, 
Vol. XX. p. 619 [18-49], and The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, by Thomas B. 
Wyman, p. 577. 



THE nCKlCniXG GEXEA L J '. 



27. Vll. ir)2. Elizabeth Somes Peirce [Josepli 25-27. VI. 47], 
probably born in ]5oston, died in or near St. Albans, Vt. 

The gravestone of Mrs. Putnam was standing in the churchyard at St. 
Albans a few years ago (18'J4). Her miniature was painted. She was 
familiarly known as Betsy. 

27. VII. iJJ. IltcJi Pool Ptttnnm, her husband, born probably in 
Charlestown, Ma.ss., baptized there May 28, 1786, died in Charlestown, of 
debility. 

Mr. Putnam was a sou of Dr. Aaron and Rebecca (IlalT) Putnam, of 
Charlestown, ]\Iass. Ilis ancestry im hides the following families : Putnam, 
Hutchinson, Bosworth, Putnam, Ingalls, Osgood, Emery, "Webster, Shats- 
well, Martin, Hall, Green, Sill, Belcher, Danforth, ^luzzey, Pool. See 
Ancestry Tables V" . 

27. VII. 153. Maria Peirce [Joseph 25-27. VI. 47], born in Boston, 
died in New York. 

28. VII. 155. Lydia Henfield [Joseph 28-20. VI. 55], probably 
born in Salem, baj)tized there Feb. 25, 1781, died in Salem. 

28. VII. loo. John Bott, her husband, probably born in Salem, died 
in Salem. A saddler. Residence : Salem. 

John Bott, whose house was on Esses Street, is spoken of in the Salem 
Gazette of Tuesday, April 5, 1825, as a worthy and respected citizen. Pie 
was a member of the Salem Charitable Mechanic Association. His sick- 
ness was a long and painful one. 

His second wife, whom he married March 1, 1812, was Sally (Briggs) 
Smith, widow of David Smith. By her he had — 

SusAx Briggs Bott, who was admitted to the First Church, June 5, 1837, at the age 
of 24 years. She died Sept. 13, 1839, aged 26 years, unmarried. 

He was a sou of James and Dorothy (Newhall) Bott, of Salem. Daniel 
Goodhue [33. VIII. 3071 ^^^^^ John Bott Goodhue [34. VIII. 322'] were his 
nephews, and Mary EU~aheth Goodhue [47. Mil. ol7] was his grandniece. 



SEVENTH (iEXERATlOX. 359 

John r>ott'.> father was a native of Tudbury, Eng-land. lie came to 
Salem about the year 1770, ami established himself as a chaise-maker, 
accimiulating considerable property. He died about the first of January, 
1830, aged eighty-four years. Botts Court, off of Essex Street, Salem, per- 
petuates the family name, and property in and about it is still owned by 
John B(jtt.\s descendants. John Butt's ancestry includes the following fami- 



28. VTI. 1.^6. Sarah Henfield [Joseph 28-29. VI. 55], born in Salem, 
baptized there Jan. 12, 1783, died in Salem.' 

28. VII. loG. Jonathan llaradcn, her husband, probably born in 
Gloucester, Mass.," died in Salem. A ropemaker. Residence : Salem. 

The Haraden Family Bible was in the possession of his daughter, the 
late Mrs. Henry Derby, in 1886. 

Mr. Haraden was a son of Andrew and Lydia (GrifHn) Haraden, of 
Gloucester, Mass. Jonathan Haraden [9. VI. 22-^ was his uncle. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Haraden, Giddings, Lawrence, 
Griffin. See Axcestey Tables VI. 

29. VII. 157. Joseph Hardy Henfield [Joseph 28-29. VI. 55], 
born in Salem, baptized there March 19, 1786, died in New London, Conn.^ 
A shipmaster. Residence : New London. 

Captain Henfield moved from Salem to New London, Conn. The fol- 
lowing adventure of Captain Henfield has been furnished by his grand- 
daughter, Mrs. James Howes, of Salem. 

"It is stated of Capt. Joseph Hardy Henfield that, during the war of 1812, his 
vessel was taken by the British, who then blockaded Long IsLand Sound. His vessel 



• The date of her death is given as Oct. 26. 1864, in the Haraden Family Bible ; while 
the State Eecords and a Salem newspaper give it as Oct. 27, 18(34. 

' The place of his birth is given as Salem on the State Eecords, Vol. 202, p. 206, 

where his death was recorded, and his parentage as Jonathan and Haraden. The 

parentage is wrong, as it is given in the Family Bible as Andrew and Ljdia (Griffin) 
Haraden. 

' The date of his death is given in the Henfield Bible as Jan. 17, 1824, and in the 
Haraden Bible as .Tan. 16, 1824. 



360 THE riCKEBTXG GENEALOGY. 

was broucrlit aluiigside the flagship as a prize. Being obliged to sign his name, he 
was invited to the cabin of the flagship to take a glass of wine with Admiral Hardy, 
who claimed him as a namesake, and recognized his gallantry with this affectionate 
farewell sentence : ' D you, don't you get taken again.' Capt. II., my grand- 
father, being a Hucnt, affable man, was treated with gentlemanly courtesy by the 
admiral. ITis disabled condition may have touched the admiral somewhat, because he 
had lost his leg while gaming, and had made himself a cork leg, which he was then 
wearing. The admiral dismissed him with his craft, probably a coaster." 

29. VII. lo7K Lydia Anne Goddard, the first wife of Joseph Hardy 
Henfield, born in New London, Conn., died in Lyme, Conn. 
She was a sister of Captain Henfield's second wife. 
Ancestry Tablks V^,, 

29. VII. lo7-. JElixa Goddard, the second wife of Joseph Hardy 
Henfield, born in New London, Conn., died in New London. 
She was a sister of Captain Henfield's first wife. 
Ancestry Tables y^,. 

29. VII. 158. John Henfield [Joseph 28-29. VI. 55], born in 
Salera,^ baptized there March 1, 1789, died in Salem, of paralysis. A tailor. 
Residence : Salem. 

29. VII. loS'. Clara Larrabee, his first wife, born in Lynnfield, 
Mass., died in Salem, of heart disease. 

IVIrs. Henfield was a daughter of Eben Larrabee. 

29. VII. Ir58-. Sarah B. Cole, his second wife, born in Essex, Mass., 
died in Salem, of heart disease. 

Mrs. Henfield was the widow of Henry Cole, and a daughter of Solomon 
and Ruth Poland. Ancestry Tables ^n ^_ 

29. VII. 159. Lydia Chapman [Lydia 29-34. VI. 56], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Sept. 27, 1772, probably died in Salem. 

* The date of his birth is given as June 17, 1789, in the Haraden Bible, which cor- 
responds with his age at death given by two other authorities ; while the date of his baptism 
is given as above in the Eighteenth Century Baptisms of Salem, by James A. Eramertou, 
p. 65. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 361 

29-32. VII. li_;0. Hannah Chapman [Lydia 20-3-4. YI. 56], born 
in Salera, baptized there Sept. 27, 1772, died in Salem. 

29-32. VII. IGO. Warwick Pal f rat/, lier husband, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A hatter. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Palfray v/as a son of ^yarwick and Hannah Palfray, of Salem. 
Plis ancestry includes the following fainilies : Palfray, Manning, Galley, 
Humlock, Beckford, Pinson, Green. See Axcestry Tables ^y. 

32-33. VII. 162. Sarah Chapman [Lydia 29-34. VI. 56], born in 
Salem, baptized there Sept. 27, 1772, died in Salem, of lung fever. 

32-33. VII. 1G3. Thomas Hunt, her husband, born in Salem, died 
in Salem. A cooper. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Hunt's place of business ^yas on Derby Wharf, Salem. 

He was a son of Thomas and Susanna (Palfray) Hunt. Thomas Hunt 
was a school-teacher, and came to Salem from Waterford, Ireland. His 
wife was the widow of Walter Jeffries. His ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Hunt, Palfray, ]\Ianning, Galley, Humlock, Brown. See 
Ancestry Tables ^^i 

33. VII. 163. Martha Chapman [Lydia 29-34. VI. 56], bom in 
Salem, baptized there Aug. 15, 1773, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Tucker's portrait is in the possession of her grandson, Lewis Ray- 
mond Tucker, of Boston. She was familiarly called Patty. 

33. VII. 168. Leivis Tucker* her husband, died in Salem. Residence : 
Salem. 

Mr. Tucker was the proprietor of the Sun Tavern, on Essex Street, 
Salem. A portrait of Mr. Tucker is in the possession of his grandson, 
Lewis Raymond Tucker, of Boston. 
Ancestry Tables ^-. 

33. VII. 165. Anna Chapman [Lydia 29-34. Yl. 56], born in Salem, 
baptized there Feb. 4, 1776, died in Salem, of paralysis. 
She was familiarly called Nancy. 



3G2 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

33. VII. iCJ. lictijainhi Loi'is, her hu.sbauJ, probably died in 
Jamaica, W. I. A shipmaster. Residence: Salem. 
Ancestry Tabli^'^ Vj. 

33. VII. 16fi. George Cliapman [Lvdia 20-34. VI. .5n], born in Salem, 
baptized there April 12, 1778, died in Salem, of old age. Residence: 
Salem. 

33-34. VII. 1G7. Lydia Chapman [Lvdia 20-34. VI. 5G], born in 
Salem, baptized there in November, 17S0, died in Salem, of old age. 

33-34. VII. i^7. Benja mi )i Cook, her husband, probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

It is probable that he was the Benjanun Cook who was baptized June 30, 
177G, and who was the son of Benjamin and Anna Cook. 

A^-cESTKT Tables ^. 

34. VII. 168. Polly Cliapman [Lydia 29-34. VI, 5G], born in Salem, 
baptized there in August, 1783, died in Salem, of old age. 

An obituary notice of Mrs. Pool which appeared in the Salem Register 
of Thursday, Aug. 20, 1868, describes her as a woman of a bright and 
cheerful disposition, and possessed of many virtues. It also states that she 
had been a widow for fifty-seven years. 

34. VII. i6'(S. Haven Pool, her husband, bom in Reading, Mass., 
died in Salem, of convulsions. A journalist. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Pool's house was situated on Pleasant Street, between Brown 
and Bridge streets. An obituary notice of Mr. Pool, printed in the Essex 
Register of July 1, 1811, states that he was one of the editors and pro- 
prietors of that paper, and speaks of his cheerful disposition, of his strong 
domestic attachment, and ardent friendship. It' also says that he was sick 
but three days, and that the Independent Coqis of Cadets, to which he 
belonged, attended his funeral. He was named for Rev. Mr. Haven, of 
Reading. 

Haven Pool was a son of Jonathan and Ann (Bancroft) Pool, of Reading. 
His ancestry includes the following fjimilies : Pool, Leman, Bancroft, Met- 
Calf, Pool, Lamson, Nichols, Parker, Policy. See Ancestry Tables ^. 



SEVENTH GEXEliATION. 363 

34. VII. 1G9. John Henfield [Edmuna 34. VI. 57], probably born in 
Salem, 

34. VII. 170. Sarah. Henfield [Edmund 34. VI. 57], probably born in 
Salem. 

34. VII. 171. Thomas Henfield [Edmund 34. VI. 57], probably 
born in Salem. A sea-captain. 

34. VII. 172. Jonathan Henfield [Edmund 34. VI. 57], probably 
born in Salem. A sea-captain. 

34. VII. 173. Edmund Henfield [Edmund 34. VI. 57], born in 
Salem, died in South Reading, ]Mass. A boot and shoe maker. Residence : 
North Reading. 

34. VII. 173. EJi^iahctJi JLtuiday, his wife, born in Salem, died in 
Salem. 

Mrs. Henfield was a daughter of "W^illiam and ^lary (Pease) Jlunday. 
Her father was a sea-captain who was lost at sea while coming into Salem 
Harbor. Ancestry Tables ^". 

35. VII. 174. Andrew Ward [Sarah 35-37. VI. 58], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there May 21, 1775, died in Salem. Residence: Salem. 

The Salem C4azette of Tuesday, Dec. 23, 1806, says that "He died 
without any previous illness as he was sitting in his chair on Sunday 
afternoon." 

35. VII. 174- Betsey Boivmnn, his wife, died in Lynn, ]\[ass. 
Mrs. "Ward's second husband, to whom she was married Sept. 27, 1812, 
was Joseph Chamberlain, of Lynn. By him she had three children. 
Ancestry Tables i-". 

35-36. VIT. 175. Nathaniel "Ward [Sarah 35-37. VI. 58], probably 
born in Salem, ^ died in Salem. Keeper of Baker Island Light. Residence : 
Salem. 

* The Ward Bible gives tbe date of his birth as June IG, 1776; while Family Eecords 
give it as 1777. The Salem Records give the date of his marriage as Aug. 18, 1799 ; 



3G4 THE PICKEEIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Nathaniel Ward was drowned wlule going to the hghthouse. The 
Salem Gazette of Friday, April 1, 1825, states that the bodies of Nathaniel 
"Ward, keeper of the lighthouse on Baker s Island, and his assistant, Mr. 
Marshall, were found dead on the north shore below the harbor, that they 
started for the island on Wednesday, just before night, in a small flat- 
bottomed boat deeply loaded with wood and stores ; and it was supposed 
that they were prevented by the storm from reaching the island, and were 
blown on the beach. It also states that Mr. Ward left a large family in 
hidigent circumstances. 

35-36. VII. 17-5. Jlory Cutler, the wife of Nathaniel Ward.^ 
Ancestry Tables J^. 

36. Vn. 176. Jonathan Ward [Sarah 35-37. YI. 58], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there June 29, 1778. 

36-37. VII. 177. John V^ard [Sarah 35-37. VI. 58], born in Salem, 
baptized there in July, 1781, died in Beverly, Mass. A pump and block 
maker. Residence : Beverly. 

36-37. VII. 177. lAicrj Moiv, his wife, born in Beverly, Mass., died in 
Salem, of a cancer. 

Her second husband was Jonathan Peirce, to whom she was manied 
Nov. 19, 1826. 

Ancestry Tables -jS. 

37. VII. 178. Sally Ward [Sarah 35-37. VI. 58], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there April 17, 1785, as Sally. 

37. VII. 17SK Aaron Tufts, her first husband, died in Salem. 
Ancestry Tables ^'-^-,. 

the Baldwin Bible gives it as Aug. 12, 1709, and it is given as Aug. IG, 1799, in A Cutler 
Memorial and Genealogical History, by Nahum S. Cutler, p. 312. The date of his death is 
given in the Salem Gazette of April 1, 1825, as Jfarch 30, 1825, while it is given as March 
31, 1825, in Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. V. p. 211. 

1 A Cutler Memorial and Genealogical History, by Xahum S. Cutler, p. 342, calls her a 
daughter of Dr. Jonathan Cutler, of South Dauvers, and says she was baptized Oct. 3, 1762, 
while a family record says she was born Nov. 19, 1777. 



SEVENTH GEXERATION. 3G5 

37. VII. 17^'. Moses Smith, liur second husband, die(l iu Salem. A 
baker. Residence : Salem. 
Ancestry Tables ■^''^„ 

37. VII. 179. Samuel Ward [Sarah 35-37. VI. 58], probably born 
in Salem, baptized therein December, 1787, died in Salem. A shoemaker. 
Residence: Salem. 

The following obituary of Mr. "Ward is taken from the Salem Register 
of April 28, 1842 : — 

"Mr. Ward, at the time of his death, was a member of the Common Council, it 
being the second year of Iiis election to that board. Ho was also a representative 
from this city in the Legislature of 1839, and in the discharge of the duties of both 
of these offices, he was remarkable for his punctuality and diligence. He was the 
representative, of whom it was related, that being asked [upon making up the pay 
roll] how much he had been absent, he replied with characteristic promptness ' not 
a day, not an hour, not a minute.' Previous to his being sent as a representative, it 
is believed that he never passed a night away from Salem ; and for upwards of thirty- 
six years he worked in the same shop, and most of the time with the same employers. 
In his youth, and for many years afterwards, he was subject to fits ; but at the time 
of the great explosion of rockets on Salem Common on the evening of the 4th of Julv, 
1823, when so many were dreadfully injured, Mr. Ward was severely wounded in 
the thigh, and had never had a recurrence of his former attacks since that period. 

" Mr. W. has ever been considered a very worthy man and a good citizen. As a 
politician he was an ardent, unwavering, and active Whig. Fond of reading and 
possessed of a memory remarkably retentive and accurate, he was particularly well 
versed in all matters relating to politics, and was always consulted with entire con- 
fidence in reference to the many and varied facts, dates, and statistics laid up in his 
well-stored mind. Indeed, he was a living, political manual, ready at all times to 
impart the fund of information he had acquired, to his numerous friends, who were 
ever eager to avail themselves of his knowledge and sound judgment. He will be 
strangely missed in the places where he has been accustomed to resort for so long 
a series of years, and his loss will be seriously fiilt. This is the second death that has 
occurred in the present City Council." 

37. VII. 181. Lydia Henfield Ward [Sarah 35-37. VI. 58], pro- 
bably born in Salem, baptized there Nov. 27, 1797, died in Portland, Me. 

37. VII. 181. William Scuf/ell, her husband, born in Newbury, Vt., 
died in Portland, Me. Residence : Portland. 



366 THE nCKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Mr. Scagc'll moved from Salem to Portland. His second wife, Elizabeth 
Diiston Ilartsliorn, survived him, and was living in Portland in 188G. 

William Scagell was a son of Elijah and Jane (Vance) Scagell. His 
father died at the battle of Sackett's Harbor. A>-cestry Tables ^^. 

38. VII. 182. Joshua Goodale [Mary 38-39. VI. 59], bom in Salem, 
died in Boston. A shipmaster. Residence : Boston.^ 

Mr. Goodale began his business life in the counting-room of the eminent 
merchant William Gray, and, in 1794, was sent by him to the West Indies 
as a supercargo. He afterwards became the agent for the Salem Iron Com- 
pany, and at one time was at New Orleans in business. On the decline of 
trade in Salem, he removed to Boston. 

Mr. Goodale was a man of spotless character, very temperate, and even 
abstemious in his habits. His form was erect, and his gait elastic to the 
last, while he retained the manners of a gentleman of the old school. He 
was inclined to reprove the errors in others, but always without harshness, 
and in a way peculiar to himself. At the time of his death Mr. Goodale 
was the oldest member of the Park Street Church, Boston.^ 

His portrait, which was painted while he was in New Orleans, is now 
in the possession of his daughter, ]^Iiss Eliza A. Goodale, of Highland 
Avenue, Newtonville, ^lass. 

38. VII. 183. Bebecca Page, the wife of Joshua Goodale, born in 
Danvers, Mass., died in Newton, Mass. 

Mrs. Goodale was a daughter of Captain Samuel and Rebecca (Putnam) 
Page, of Danvers. Laura Bclaml Page [26. IX. ^27] is her niece. Mrs. 
Goodale's fiither was a Revolutionary patriot. He enlisted at the breaking 
out of the Revolution, and took part in the battles of Lexington and of 

* The date of his marriage is given by his daughter as Oct. 27, 1805, and in Esses 
Institute Historical Collections, Vol. III. p. 178, as Oct. 28, 1805. The date of his death 
is given by the family as ^NLarch 4, 1850; wliile the Salem Register and the Puritan and 
Recorder of Jlarch 7, 1850, give it as i\rarch 3, 1850. Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. III. p. 178, gives it as ]\[arch, 1845, which is certainly wrong. 

" Obituary notice of :Mr. Goodale, in the Puritan Recorder of May 7, 1850; Essex 
Institute Historical Collections, Vol. III. p. 178, and a communication from the late Samuel 
H. Gooch, of Xe^vtou. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 367 

Monmouth, and was -w itli Wasliing-ton at the crossuig of the Delaware, and 
at Valley Forg-e. lie also served in the campaign of 1779, and was present 
with his company at tlie storming of Stony Point. After the wai', he 
became a successful merchant, tilled many public offices, and was distin- 
guished for his integrity and moral worth.' Mrs. Goodale's ancestry 
includes the following families : Page, Paine, Dunster, Lawrence, Morse, 
Phillips, Lawrence, ]\[orse, Phillips, Rutter, Andrew, Porter, Peabody, 
Foster, Andrew, Porter, Hatliorne, Putnam, Prince, Putnam, Porter, 
Hathorne, Perloy, Peabody, Foster, Osgood, Clement, Putnam, Hutchin- 
son, Bosworth, Cutler, Hutchinson, Bosworth, Gedney. See Ancestry 

38. VII. 183. Anna Goodale [Mary 38-39. VI. 59], bom in Salem, 
died in Boston. 

Mrs. Lamson is spoken of as an efficient wife and loving mother. Her 
remains were buried in the Goodale tomb, Salem. She was familiarly 
called Nancy. 

38. VII. 1S3. Thomas Lamson, her husband, born in Ipswich, -Mass., 
died in Boston. A commission-merchant. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Lamson was a deacon of the Congregational Churcli in Salem. He 
removed to Boston, where he was for many years in the commission lumber 
business on Broad Street. By his first wife he had four children, viz : — 

Thomas Lamson, who was in the commission lumber business with his father. He 
married Emily Marshall, of Elaine, and had at least one 
child. 

Mart Lamsox, married Oct. 28, 1841, a Mr. Hibbard; died :\rarch, 1845, s. p. 

Salome Lamsox, married Dec. 2, 1S24, .Joseph Johnson, and had one son; died 
December, 1891, aged 94 j-ears. 

Abigail Lamson", unmarried. " 

Thomas Lamson was a son of Paul and Abig'ail (Lord) Lamson, of 
Ipswich. His ancestry includes tlie following families: Lamson, Ayer (?), 
Perkins, Gould, Faulkner, Lord. See Axcestry Tables ^\. 

> Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. IV. p. 241. 
* Letter of iSanruel H. Gooch. 



368 TEE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

38. VII. 18,3. Lydia Goodale [Mury 3S-39. VI. 59], bora in Salem, 
died in Roxbuiy, ]\Iass. 

Of Mrs. Towno, her nephew, the Lite Samuel Heufield Gooch, wrote as 
follows : — 

"A lady of rare personal comeliness, inherited in a marked degree by her eight 
children. ITer executive ability was manifested in guiding a numerous family into 
paths of eminence and nsefulness, notwithstanding the long and frequent absences of 
her husband at sea, and her subsequent twenty-eight years of widowhood." 

Mrs. Towne's remains were buried in the Goodale tomb in Salem. 

38. VII. 185. Solomon Toivne, her husband, born in Boxford, Mass., 
died on the coast of Sumatra. A shipmaster. Eesidence : Salem. 

The childhood of Solomon Towne was passed on liis father's farm in 
Boxford ; but farming was distastefid to him, and he resolved to find some 
more congenial occupation. Having obtained the consent of his parents, he 
left home at an early age for Salem, where he found employment with 
"William Gray, the great merchant. On entering Mr. Gray's service, he 
made up his mind that it should be no fault of his if he did not advance in 
Mr. Gray's esteem. Beginning as a cabin boy, he rose through the various 
grades until lie was master and supercargo of one of the finest of Mr. Gray's 
ships tliat was employed in the East Indian trade. Captain Towne made 
most of his voyages in the employ of ^Ir. Gray, and won his entire confi- 
dence, — a favor enjoyed only by the most deserving. He lived in the house 
still standing on Chestnut Street, Salem, where five of his children were 
born, and whence he removed to Boston while they were quite young. His 
last voyage was made from Boston in the brig Congress, belonging to 
"William Goddard. He died on this voyage on the coast of Sumatra, and 
the vessel was brought home by his son, Joshua Towne, who was with 
him on this voyag^e. 

Solomon Towne was a thorough sea-captain, but at the same time he 
was mild and even paternal in the exercise of his authority, and was much 
beloved and admired by liis crew. He was one of the first shipmasters to 
banish liquors from on board ship. 

Captain Towne was a handsome and commanding-looking man. Tliere 



SOLOMON TOWNl 
[3S. VII. iSo] ■ 



■'"- '5 >'. 'q»-» ^;v j ;v. - jj- ' - ' 






m 



i-ni-faiiil 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 369 

is a fine p(.>rtrait of liini in tlie possession of his (laiiyliters. It was painted 
in Leg'lun-n, by Toci. The heHotvpe here given was taken from a 
daguerrotype.^ 

Solomon Towne w:us a son of John and Ann (Cununings) Towne, of 
Boxford. Joseph Towne [-40. VII. IDS'] was his nepliew. His ancestry 
incUides tlie following families: Towne, Blessing, Symonds, Smith, Rhodes, 
Cunnuings, Richardson, Underwood, Parrish, Blanchard, See Axcestrt 
Tables ™. 

39. VII. 186. Mary Goodale [Mary 38-39. VI. 59], bom in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

39. VII. ISC'. Tobias Lear Porter, her first husband, died at sea. 
A shipmaster. Residence: Salem. 

In 1811, Captain Porter sailed for St. Petersburg in the brig Success, 
Messrs. J. & S. AVhite, owners. On tlie return voyage the brig struck on 
Brant Rock, Marshfield Beach, and Captain Porter, his mate, and four of 
the sailors were lost. An account of this wreck was printed in the Salem 
Gazette of Tuesday, Nov. 26, 1811. It adds that Captain Porter was a 
very respectable and enterprising member of society, and that he possessed 
a kind and amiable disposition, and led a religious and moral life. 

He was a son of the Rev. Xatlianiel and Sarah (Stetson) Porter, of 
Conway, N. H. His ancestry includes the following families : Porter, 
Hathorne, Dorman, Jacobs, Frost, Waters, Tompkins, Stetson. See 
Ancestry Tables ^'I,. 

39. VII. ISir. Caleb Warner, the second luisband of Mary Goodale, 
born at Warner's ]\Iills, Ipswich, Mass., died in Salem. A silversmith and 
optician. Residence : Salem. 

In 1801, Caleb Warner left Ipswich for Salem, where he became 
established in business. 

His first wife, wliom he married Aug. 8, 1809, was Mary Pearson, a 
daughter of Enoch and Eunice (Choate) Pearson, of Ipswich. She was 

' Letter of his son, the Rev. Joseph Hardy Towne, to Francis H. Lee, dated Jan. 23, 
1884 ; also a letter of the late Samuel PL Gooch, dated November, 1892. 

24 



370 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

born July I'J, 1784, and died Oct. 5, 1817. By her he had four 
childreu : — 

Mary Peakson Wakxer, marrietl, June 14, 1S32, Abner Brooks, who died Dec. 5, 

1S4G. She died Dec. 7, 1755. 
Susan V. Warner, married, April 21, 1836, her first husband, George F. Flint, 

of Boston, who died May 5, 1842. She married, Nov. 

29, 1846, her second husband. Captain William C. 

Waters, of Salem. 
Edward Warxer, a civil engineer; married in November, 1842, Sarah Ellen 

Dashiell, of Washington, D. C. 
Caleb Hexry Warner, president of the Xational Bank of Commerce, Boston. 

He married, Dec. 25, 1S43, Elizabeth Bangs. She died 

in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 5, 1892. 

The third wife of Calel) "Warner, to whom he was married Jan. "28, 
1830, was Sarah Gould. She died, without issue by him, April 12, 1865.' 

Caleb Warner was a son of William and Susan (Palmer) Warner. His 
father was a clotliier and farmer of Ipswich, Mass. His ancestry includes 
the following families : Warner, Denne, Dane, Brown, Palmer. See 
Ancestry Tables ■^.. 

39. VII. 187. Thankful G-oodale [Mary 38-39. VI. 59], born in 
Salem, died in Lowell, ^lass. 

" She opened her mouth with wisdom, and the law of kindness was on 
her lips. She looked well to tlie ways of her household, and worked will- 
ingly with hev hands. Her children rise up and call her blessed."" 

39. VII. 1S7. yathan Green, her husband, boin in Portsmouth, N. 
H., died in Xew York. A sea-captain. Residence : Salem. 

Captain Green had the dash and daring so characteristic of Salem 
mariners of his generation. He conunanded the famous brig Grand Turk, 
on her short and memorable privateering cruise. Her log is well known 
to every one acquainted with the annals of Salem.^ 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. III. p. 210, and a letter of the late 
Samuel H. Gooch. 

' Letter of the late Samuel TI. Gooch. 

' Ibid., in which Mr. Gooch stated that Xatlian Green was born in Beverlj". 



SEVIjyill GENEBATIOy. 371 



Nathan Ciret-n was a sou of John Gret-U, a sea-captain of Salem. 
Ancestry Tables ^^. 

39. VII. 188. Hannali Goodale [.Mary 38-39. VI. 59], born in Salem, 
died in Brighton, Mass. 

39. VII. ISS. Samuel Gooch, her husband, born in Portsmouth, N. 
II., died in Boston, of lung fever. ResidL-nce : Boston. 

During tlie "War of 1812, Samuel Gooch served as an officer on board 
the United States Brig Enterprise. He was taken prisoner and subjected 
to many hardships. On the return of peace, Mr. Gooch engaged in trade 
between Boston and portions of ]Maine. Subsequently, he was engaged for 
several years in the cooperage, fish, and pork business. But his heart was 
never in trade except as a necessary means to an end. After a time his 
earnest longings were satisfied, and he entered the ministry. He was an 
acti%-e co-worker with the Rev. Dr. Tuckerman in establishing new schools, 
and visiting the sick and destitute in the neglected wards of the city of 
Boston. He felt a deep sympathy for the colored race, and on Aug. 3, 1833, 
wrote the letter to the Liberator in behalf of the African Church in Belknap 
Street, Boston, which was the first public suggestion of a national concert 
of prayer for the abolition of slavery. In this noble letter the master and 
the slave are both recognized with equal kindness and charity. " Open thy 
mouth for the dumb," and " Woe unto me if I preach not the gospel," were 
passages frequently on his lips, and were the controlling sentiments of his 
life. He was a man of uncommon physical endurance, and his muscular 
feats in early life were surprising.^ 

Mr. Gooch was a son of John and Mary (Whidden) Gooch, of Ports- 
mouth, N. H. His ancestry includes the following families: Gooch, Hobby, 
Sherburne, Whidden, Hill. See Axcestkv Tables Bi.. 

39. VII. 189. Nathan Goodale [Mary 38-39. VI. 59], born in 
Salem, died in New Orleans. A. sugar-refiner. Residence : New 
Orleans. 

' Obituary of Samuel Gooch, in The Christian "Watchman of Feb. 24, 1S37, by the 
Rev. William Collier, also a letter from his sou, the late Samuel tl. Gooch. 



372 TEE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Mr. Goodale was brought up in tlie counting-room of William Gray, 
the famous Salem merchant, and was afterwards a book-keeper for Sec- 
comb & Williams, of Salem, large dealers in drugs, groceries, &c. Early 
in life he went to New Orleans, where he became, in the course of time, a 
suo-ar-refiner on a large scale, his works covering a square in the suburbs 
of that city. In the latter part of his life, however, his business was ruined 
by the civil war, and he became poor. 

Mr. Goodale was for many years a member of the Fu-st Presbyterian 
Church in New Orleans, and afterwards a member, elder, and trustee of the 
Lafayette Presbyterian Church in the same city. His pastor, the Rev. Dr. 
T. R. Markham, wrote a long obituary of him, which was printed in the 
Southwestern Presbyterian. It consisted of an analysis of his high 
Christian character. The following are extracts from it. He was " a godly 
man whose views and habits were shaped and toned by the strict training 
of his youth, but in whom the hardness of that old austere type was 
softened and relieved by the presence and power of a grace in which he 
stood pre-eminent, — a very Saul among his brethren." " In the gi'ace of 
giving he ' abounded,' in its continued and unfailing manifestation exceed- 
ing any man whom the writer has ever known. Appeals for aid from 
every quarter met a ready response, and, above all, the poor were never 
sent empty away, hearing only the words ' be ye warmed and filled.' 
Indeed his spirit and manner impressed me, as one of the almoners of his 
bounty, as the nearest approach ever seen to that of the Great Giver who 
bestows without measure or stint. So characteristic and recognized was 
his readiness to help, that his friend of more than half a century remarked, 
* Mr. Goodale wears his purse outside his pocket, that every man may put 
his hand in it.' " 

There is a portrait of Mr. Goodale in the possession of his niece, Mrs. 
Tobias L. P. Lamson, of Lowell. 

39. VII. ISO^. Ann Eliza Walton, the wife of Nathan Goodale, died 
in New Orleans, La. 

She was from Philadelphia. The late Samuel Henfield Gooch wrote of 
her that, she was a plain, sincere woman, and very much beloved. 

Ancestky Tables L", . 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 373 

39. VII. icS'iy-. Josephine Littlcfli Id, the second \vife of Nathan 
Gooilale, born in New York, died in New Orleans. 

Mrs. Goodale's first husband was a Mr. Littlefield. 

She was a daughter of Samuel Lovette and Eliza (Woods) Waldo. 
Mr. Waldo was an artist of New York. Ajs-cestky Tables ^-'|„ 

39. VII. 190. Hannah Neal [IMartha 39-40. VI. 62], probably born 
in Salem, died in Salem, of consumption. 

39. VII. 100\ Asa KiUam, her first husband, probably born in 
Salem. 

He is probably the same Asa Killam, son of Asa and ]\Iary Killam, who 
was baptized by the pastor of the South Church, Salem, May 1, 1785. 

AxcESTRY Tables I?i,. 

39. ^^I. 190-. Stephen Richardson, her second husband. 
A_NCESTET Tables -|y,. 

40. VII. 191. John Dowst [Martha 39-40. VI. 62], probably born 
in Salem ; died in Salem. 

40. VII. 192. William Dowst [Martha 39-40. VI. 62], born in 
Salem, died in Salem.^ A baker. Residence : Salem. 

40. VII. 102. Lydia Davis JTcCarthij, his wife, bora in Salem, died 
in Salem, of heart disease. 

Mrs. Dowst was a daughter of Captain Justin McCarthy, a Salem ship- 
master, who was an Episcopalian, born in Cork, Ireland, and who came to 
America when he was ten years old. Axcestev Tables _Y^. 

40. VII. 193. Martha Dowst [:\Iartha 39-40. VI. 62], probably born 
and died in Salem. 

1 The State Records, Vol. 165, p. 260, state that he died Dec. 21, 1863, aged 71 years, 
5 mos. 3 days. If this is correct, his birth must have been on July IS, 1792, instead of 
July 15, 1792, as printed and as given by the family. If the date of his birth, July 15, is 
correct, his death must have occurred Dec. 18, 1862, as given by Mr. Azro M. Dows. 



374 THE rfCKinnxG g ex e a logy. 

40. VII. l'J4. David NealDowst [^[al•tlla 3'.)-40. VI. G-2], Lorn in 
Salem, died in Suleni. A baker. Residenca : Salem.' 

Mr. Dow.st's hou8e was on I'^s.sex Street, opposite Mr. John Silsbee's, and 
his bakery was in the yard behind his house. 

40. VII. 10^'. EUxdbeth P. Adiims, his first wife. 

Mrs. Dowst was a (huii;hter of Xatlian Adams, of Danvers. Her mother 
lived in the family vf Colonel Timothy Pickering [.".s. \'. 24]. Ancestry 
Tables -^- ,. 

40. VII. 104'. Mai-ij Heed, his second wife, born in Salem, died in 
Salem, of typhoid fever. 

Mrs. Dowst was the widow of Thomas Reed, and a daughter of John 
and Sarah (Bowditch) Ih-inley, of Salem. W'dUam Ilcnrij Archer [•_>2. IX. 
339] and Clara Eeiijield Boirditch [31. IX. r5ii] were her first cousins once 
removed. Her ancestry includes the following families : Brinley, Bowditch, 
Gardner, Frier, Porter, Turner, FIlll, Roberts, Kitchen, Saunders, Weld, 
Clap, Mitchelson, Bush.dl, Bancroft, Metcalf, Eaton, Kendall, Clark, Swain, 
Newhall, Potter, Farrar, Breed, Farrington. See AxcestryTabi.es j}\^. 

40. VII. 19.3. John Chapman [Ruth 40. VI. 64], born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A journalist. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Chapman entered the office of the Salem Register as an apprentice, 
in 1807, and continued there till his death, a period of sixty-six years. In 
1835, he became associate editor with the Hon. AVarwick Palfray, Jr. 
[29. VIII. 291], who was the senior editor, and who had entered the office 
when the paper was first estaldished. Mr. Chapman and Mr. Palfray 
married sisters ; and for twenty-eight years they were in the office of the 
Register together, during which time the pleasantest relations always 
existed between them. Mr. Palfray died in 183S, and was succeeded by 
bis son, Charles Warwick Palfray. 

Although ^Ir. Chapman was connected with a Republican paper, his 

' The date of liis birth is given as ^May 28, 1800, and the date of his death is given as 
Nov. IG, 1870, by the family; while The Driver Family, by Harriet Ruth (Waters) Cooke, 
p. 453, gives his birth as about 1804. and his death as about 1885. This same work omits 
his middle name, also the middle initial letter of his wife's name. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 375 

attachineiit to the old Federal partv was very marked ; and to his latest 
days he professed the greatest admiration for the men and principles that 
distinguished it. 

Mr. Chapman held many oftices of trust, and was so much in public 
life, and so active in his habits, that few citizens of Salem were as generally 
known as he. lie served as a private in the War of 1812. In 1838 and in 
1839, he was a member of the common council of Salem, and in 1842 and 
in 1843, he was a representative to tlie General Court. From 1847 to 
1<849, he was a member of the governor's council; and for the six years 
from 18G1 to 1807, lu^ was the ])ostmaster of Salem. He was an original 
member of tlie Salem Cliaritable 3Icchanio Association, which was organized 
in 1817; and for thirty-two years he was its treasurer. For forty-three 
years, he was clerk of the proin-ietors of the South Jleeting House. He 
was also one of the vice-presidents of the Five Cent Savings Bank, and 
held other responsible offices, into all of which he carried his chai-acteristic 
energy and efficiency. 

In the year 1823, he was admitted to membership in the South Church; 
and for half a centiu'v no one was a more constant attendant than he at all 
of its religious services. His health was so remarkable that he was never 
obliged to have a doctor but once, and his vigor and activity were often 
the subject of comment. He was a man of sterling integrity, of strong 
personal convictions, but was without obstinacy. He was loyal to the 
right, but ever ready to be convinced if he was wrong'. He could be 
neither frightened nor bought. lie was ever ready to relieve distress, and 
never failed to utter his testimony against the use of tobacco and intoxicat- 
ing liquors. 

His funeral services were attended by the mayor and members of the 
city government, representatives of the press, and citizens and friends from 
almost every walk in life. The Rev. E. S. At wood made an address which 
was a high tribute to Mr. Chapman's character.' 

40. VII. 10-5'. Abif/ail liouudij, the first wife of John Cliapman, born 
in Beverly, Mass., died in Salem, of pneumonia. 

' Obituaries in the Salem Register of April 21 and April 24, 1873. 



376 THE FICKERIXn- GEXEALOGY. 

An obituary of ^Irs. Cliapman, printed in the Salem Gazette, Jan. 25, 
1856, speaks of her as an excellent person of a cheerful temperament, 
benevolent and philanthropic, and one of whom the distressed have 
frequently said of her, " She stretches out her hand to the poor ; yea, she 
reaches furtli her hands to the needy." 

She was a dau^^-hter of Captain Nehemiah and Rebecca (Boynton) 
Roundy, of Salem and Beverly. Elizahtth Eouwhj [29. VIII. 291'] was 
her sisfi-r. Her ancestry includes the following- families: Roundy, Boynton, 
Abbot, fliandhr, llibliard. Bullard. See A.vcestky Tables ■^^^,. 

40. MI. WZ-. JPfiche Perkins, the second wife of John Chapman, 
born in Kcnutbiuikport, Me., died in Boston. 

She was a daug:!iter of Stephen and AHce (Stone) Perkins. Ancestry 

40. VII. lOG. Benjamin Chapman [Ruth 40. VI. 64], probably 
born in Sah-in, died in Manila. 

40. VII. l'J7. Jonathan Henfleld Cliapman [Ritth 40. VI. 64], born 
in Salem, died either at Bombay or on a voyage. A shipmaster. Resi- 
dence : Sah'ui. 

He sailed on voyages to the East Indies for Robert Brookhouse. 

40. VII. ll's. Lydia Chapman [Ruth 40. VI. 64], born in Salem, 
died in Salem, of dropsy. 

A short tribute to her character appeared at the time of her death in 
the Salem (la/.ette of Ausr. 12, 1862. 



in. VII. jns. Josej>7i Toivne, her husband, born in Andover, 
<lie<l in Siileiii, of heart disease. A book-keeper. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. T( I w lie was for a time in the grocery business in Salem. After- 
wards he was for many years a book-keeper for J. H. Moulton, of the 
S.ilem and Boston Express. He lived on BuflFum Street.^ 

He wruj a son of Asa and Polly (Lovejoy) Towne, of Andover, Mass. 
&Jomon Totrne [3S. VII. ISo] was his uncle. His ancestry includes the 
' The Salem Register of June 29, 1S74. 



SEVEXTH GEXERATIOX. 377 



following- families : Towne, Blessing-, Symonds, Smith, Rhodes, Cummings, 
Kichardson, Underwood, Parrish, Blanchard, Lovcjoy. See Ancestet 



40. VII. 200. Anna Henfield Chapman [Ruth 40. VI. 64], born in 
Salem, died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

41. Wl. 201. Benjamin Ropes [P^enjamin 41-42. VI. G5], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Oct. 16, 1774, died in Salem. A merchant. 
Residence : Salem.^ 

Mr. Ropes was a cooper by trade, and lived on William Street. He 
became engaged in foreign and coastwise trade in company with his 
brother, James Ropes, and his brother-in-law, William P. Symonds. In 
the War of 1812, he was a captain in Colonel ]\Iil]er's famous regiment, the 
Twenty-First United States Infantry, and took part in the brilliant affair at 
Lundy's Lane, in the sortie at Fort Erie, in the fighting at Chippewa, and 
in several other hard-fought battles. His meritorious ser-nces and gallant 
conduct often received especial xnention in the official despatches.^ 

41. VII. 201. Frances Wilkius, the wife of Benjamin Ropes, born in 
Middleton, Mass., died in Salem, of old age. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of Reuben and Polly (Gardner) Wilkins. 
Her ancestry includes the following families : Wilkins, Smith, Gardner, 
Smith. See A^-cestry Tables j^^. 

42. VII. 202. James Ropes [Benjamin 41-42. VI. 65], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Oct. 16, 1774, died in Salem. A merchant. 
Residence: Salem .^ 

Mr. Ropes was engaged in foreign and coastwise trade with his brother, 
Benjamin Ropes, and his brother-in-law, William P. Symonds. For a long 

* The Salem Records, Vol. 4, p. 149, give the date of his marriage as on the Sheets ; 
but a note states that the date was April 21, on Dr. Barnard's return. 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 252; The Salem Gazette of Aug. 
1, 1845; and the gravestone of Captain Eopes in Harmony Grove Cemetery, Salem. 

» The date of his death is given as July 21, 1840, by his son-in-law, Daniel P. Galloupe, 
and in the Essex Eegister of Thursday, July 23, 1840 ; while Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. \T:i. p. 252, gives it as July 22, 1840. 



37S THE PICKERIXG OENEALOGY. 

series of years he was on the board of assessors of Salem ; and he rehn- 
quished the office only when the infirmities of age rendered its duties too 
burdensome. 

42. VII. 202K Ziicij Grace, his first wife. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of Obadiah and Lucy (Houghton) Groce.^ 

AnCKSTKY TaKLKS y "-I. 

42. VII. 202-'. Hannah J^ei'kiiis,'^ his second wife, born in Salem, 
died in Salem, of consumption. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of Elijah and Ehzabeth (Stone) Perkins, of 
Topsfield, Mass. Her ancestry includes the following families: Perkins, 
Gould, Towne, Blessing, Symonds, Easty, Kimball, Cummings, Andrew, 
Towne, Perkins, Stone. See Axcestey Tables j-^\,. 

42. VII. 203. Peggy Ropes [Benjamin 41-42. VI. 65], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Feb. 22, 17 78, died in Salem.^ 

42. VII. 20o. WiJUnm PJupps Si/monds, her husband, probably born 
in Salem, baptized there Oct. 15, 1775, died in Salem. A shoe-dealer. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

Mr. Symonds lived on North Street, and was at one time engaged in 
foreign and coastwise trade with his brothers-in-law, Benjamin Ropes and 
James Ropes. 

He was a son of William and Eunice (Gardner) Symonds, of Salem. 
His ancestry includes the following families : Symonds, Browning, Stone, 
Phipps, Brackenbury, Anderson, Rouse, Peachie, Robinson, Gardner, Frier, 
White, Herbert, Porter, Hathorne, Pope, Folger, Morrill, Putnam. See 
Ancestry Tables y^"g. 

' Esse.\ Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 252, gives her name as Grace. 

" Her name is given as Lydia Perkins in the Salem Gazette, on the announcement 
of her marriage, Dec. 8, 1826. This is an error, as shown by the Salem Kecords and 
Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 2.52. 

' Her name is given as jMargaret in Esse.x: Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. 
p. 252; while it is given by the family and at her baptism as Peggy. The date of her 
birtli as printed was so given by Daniel P. Galloupe ; while Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. VII. p. 252, gives it as Oct. 3, no year being stated. 



SEVENTH GEXKIiATIOX. 379 

43. VII. 20,-). Joseph Adams Peirce [Sarah 43. VI. 68], probably 
boni in Salem, baptized there Dec. 20, 17 78, died at St. NiciioUis Mole, 
Hayti. 

43. VII. 207. Benjamin Peirce [Sarali 43. VI. 68], bom in Salem, 
baptized there Dec. 20, 1778, died in Cambridge, Mass. Iiesidence : 
Canibridg-e.^ 

Mr. Peirce graduated at Harvard College, in 1801, with the highest 
honors of his class. His own inclination would perhaps have led him to 
one of the learned professions ; but circumstances induced him to enter 
business with his father. His love of letters continued throughout his life, 
and when reverses in business came he was very willing to connect himself 
with the university. His familiarity with classic English literature well 
fitted him for the position of Librarian of Harvard College, to which he was 
appointed in 1826, and which he filled with ability and fidelity. 

He prepared a catalogue of the university library, which was published 
in four volumes. In addition to this work, he wrote a history of the college, 
which was published in 1833. A sketch of Mr. Peirce's life is appended to 
this history. 

Dming his residence in Salem, he represented the town several 
years in the General Court, and in 1811 he was elected senator for 
Essex County. 

Mr. Peirce was a man of the strictest integrity and of a high moral 
character.^ 

' The date of his marriage is given on the Sheets as Xov. 27, 1S03 ; while the Family 
Bible gives the date Dec. 11, 1S03. On the Salem Eecords the marriage is given with no 
date ; but it follows a marriage on Nov. 27, 1S03, and is followed by a marriage on Dee. 4, 
1803. On Dr. Barnard's original record, m possession of the ZSTorth CImrch in Salem, the 
date is plainly Xov. 27, 1S03; but it follows a marriage with the date Dec. 11, 1803. A 
notice of the marriage occurs in tlie Salem Gazette of Dec. 13, 1S03. The Peirce Genealogy, 
being the Eecord of the Posterity of John Pers, and Essex Institute Historical Collections, 
\"ol. XVIII. p. 171, give the date as Dec. 11, 1803 ; while the Xichols Family Eecords 
give it as Xov. 27, 1803. 

^ Peirce Genealogy, being the Eecord of the Posterity of John Pers, an early inhab- 
itant of Watertown, in New England, by Frederick C. Peirce, pp. 74-76 ; Harvard 
Reminiscences, by Eev. A. P. Peabody, p. GS, and Appleton's Cyclopedia of American 
Biography, Vol. IV. pp. 701-702. 



380 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

43. VII. 201. Lydia Hopes JVichoIs, his wife, born in Portsmouth, 
N. H., died in Cambridge, Mass.^ 

Mrs. Peirce was her husband's first cousin. Her number in dii-ect 
descent is [44. VII. 215]. 

43. VII. 20S. Sarah Peirce (Sarali 43. VI. 68), born in Salem, baptized 
there as Sally, Dec. 27, 1780, died in Salem. 

She and Mr. Nichols wore married on Sunday evening in her father's 
great eastern room, which had been hnislied and furnished only a short time 
before. The families of the bride and groom Avere the only persons 
present. The bride's sister Betsey and her sister-in-law, Charlotte Nichols, 
were the bridesmaids. The bridal dress was of beautiful and very 
delicate striped muslin. It had been made in Bombay for some distin- 
guished person, and Mr. Nichols had bought it in India. This mushn 
was worn over white silk. The bride's head-dress was a white lace 
veil put on like a turban. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols immediately went to 
housekeeping in a house on the corner of Washington and Federal streets. 
The week following the wedding was given up to recei\-ing guests, as 
was the custom at that period. 

When ^Irs. Nichols was sixteen years old, she worked the Peirce coat 
of arms which has been reproduced opposite page 225. It is framed, and 
hangs in the house occupied by her daughters on Federal Street.^ 

43. VII. 203. George Nichols, the husband of Sarah Peirce, born in 
Salem, died in Salem. A merchant. Residence : Salem.^ 

When he was about eleven years old, his father removed to Portsmouth, 
N. H. He entered Phillips Academy ; and, after leaving school, he went 
into his father's store, a wholesale grocery in Portsmouth. In 1793, his 

* The date of her death is given in the Nichols Family Records, and in the Boston 
Daily Advertiser of Oct. 24, 1S6S, as having occurred Oct. 22, 1868 ; while it is given in 
Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XYIII. p. 171, as having occurred Oct. 16, 
1868. 

* From an autobiographical sketch, dictated by George Nichols, her husband, in 
1858. 

' The date of his birth is given by several authorities as July 4, 1778 ; while it is given 
as July 4, 1777, in Esses Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 166. 



GEORGP: NICHOLS. 

[43. VII. SOS.] 

[43- VII. sn.] 

[44- VII. 214.] 
From thf. Porir.mt by O-Goon, now in the po< 

MlS^K.S XlCHOI.S. OF S-^LEM, M.\s-,. 



•> .-'^-'•^•«^.ia!«^.'< 



n 



CSS^Sj " 



\^ 



■3" \m:: ■ @^ 






THE HOUSK OF GFIORC 



)RG 


!•: NICHOLS AT 


SALEM, 


^L^SS 


[43- 


vn SOS.] 






[43- 


vn. 211.] 






[44. 


vn. 214.] 







SEVEXTH GENERATIOy. 381 

father yave up his bu.shiess and iX'turned to Salem, where he en^^aged in 
the West India trade with Captain Benjamin Hodges. For a year George 
Nichols was a clerk in their counting-room ; but, desiring to see more of the 
world, he went to sea, and continued in this pursuit for several years, 
making prosperous voyages as supercargo and master. He finally retired 
from the sea, and went into business with his brother-in-law, Benjamin 
Peirce, besides being interested with his father in the " Active " for several 
voyages. His business prospered, and when the War of 1812 broke out, he 
was worth at least forty thousand dollars. The war, however, proved 
disastrous to him, for every vessel in which he was concerned was captured, 
and he lost nearly a half of liis property. At the close of the war, he 
engaged in commerce again with Benjamin Peirce and others, and for 
several years with success ; but disasters and ruinous voyages took place, 
and in 1826, he found himself bankrupt, as was the case with his father-in- 
law and his father-in-law's two sons. With nothing but his own resources 
to rely upon, Mr. Nichols went into the auction and commission business, 
and in about fifteen years was able to pay his creditors about ten thousand 
dollars.^ 

Mr. Nichols was for many years treasurer and agent of the South 
Building Corporation (no^v known as Hamilton Hall). As an old man he 
was said to have been rather severe in his bearing. 

Mr. Nichols lived on Chestnut Street, Salem. A heliotype of the 
house is here given. There is a portrait of him which was painted abroad 
when he was a young man, and which is now in possession of his 
daughters. They also have one which was painted by Charles Osgood, of 
Salem, about the year 1845. A heliotype of this picture is here given. 
There is a better portrait of him which was painted by Finck about the 
year 1848. This picture is in the possession of his son, John H. Nichols, of 
Salem. 

Mr. Nichols's second wife was Betsey Peirce a sister of his first wife. 
Both were his first cousins. His number in direct descent is [44. YII. 214]. 

* Abstract of an autobiographical sketch, dictated by him when he vras nearly eighty 
years old, the original of which is in the possession of his grandson, Dr. Charles F. ^Nichols, 
of Boston. 



382 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 



43. VII. 211. Betsey Peirce [Siirah 43. VI. 08], piobubly born in 
Salem, baptized there ]\larcli 2-3, 17S7, probably died in Salem. 

Mrs. Nichols was an accomplislied woman, and painted very well. Several 
of the pictures which she painted are in the possession of her step-daughters, 
the Misses Nichols, of Salem. Her portrait painted by Osgood is also in 
their possession. A heliotype of it is here given. ^Mrs. Nichols was a sister 
of her husband's first wife, Sarah Peirce [43. VII. 208]. 

43. VII. en. George Nichols, her husband. 

His number in direct descent is [44. VII. 214]. For an account of Mr. 
Nichols SCO pages 3S0-381. 

43. VII. 212. Henry Peirce [Sarah 43. VI. 68], bom in Salem, 
baptized there Aug. IG, 1789, died in Salem, of consumption. Residence : 
Salem.^ 

Henry Peirce, H. C 1808, began the study of law in the office of 
Samuel Fidnam [54-55. VI. lOS], of Salem. After practising his profes- 
sion for one or two years, he accepted a clerkship in the State Bank in 
Boston. 

43. VII. 212. Catherine Calista Ainsivorth, his wife, died in Salem. 
In early life Mrs. Peirce lived in Boston with the family of her uncle, 

Thomas Green Fessenden, well known as a poet and political ^\Titer, and 
as the first editor of the Farmery's Almanac. 

She was a daugliter of Artemas and Catherine (Fessenden) Ainsworth, 
of Bethel, Vt. Amelia Anne Ainsworth [43. VIII. ^'57] was her sister, and 
Calvin C. Ainsicorth [43. VIII. ^J^] was her brother. Her ancestry 
includes the following families : Ainsworth, Howe, Haynes, Marble, Good- 
ale, Beacham, Fessenden, Cheney, Brown, P^aton, Woodbury, Dodge, 
Kendall, Tidd, Blodgett, Iggleden. See A^-cestry Tables y^'"^- 

44. VII. 213. John Nichols [Lydia 44. VI. GO], born in Salem, died 
at Point au Petre, Guadeloupe, W. I. 

» The date of his death is given on the Nichols Family Records, and by Mrs. George 
Xichols, as Oct. 30, 1863; while the State Records, Vol. 165, p. 258, give it as Oct 31, 
1803. 



BETSEV (PEIRCE) MCHOI.S. 

[43. VII. 2M.] 

From the Porirait by O^Ghod, now in the possession of the 
Misses Xichols, of Salem, Mass. 



-; it ww i .i ' "' 'aw^ij!f^ 



■<HilCl»,«i™i....ii,"i,^l.^..'^^ 



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r~' 






\ 



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I ' ^i wunwa 



..' ' c I /r/^^// 



ICHABOD NICHOLS. 

[44. vn. 217.] 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 383 

Tiie Saluju Gazette of Friday, July 13, 1708, contains an obituary notice 
of Mr. Nicliols. It speaks of him as a young gentleman of an amiable 
tem))er, of genteel accomplislmients, of agreeable manners, and of solid 
virtues, and states that he was preparing himself for a liberal and extensive 
mercantile business. 

44. \T:I. 214. George Nichols [Lydia 44. VI. 69]. 
For an account of Mr. Nicliols see pages 380-381. 

44. VII. 214'. Snrah Peirce, his first wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [43. VII. 208]. For an account of 
Mrs. Nichols see page 380. 

44. VII. 31 ^'\ Betsey Peifce, his second wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [43. VII. 211]. For an account of her 
see page 382. 

44. VII. 215. Lydia Ropes Nicliols [Lydia 44. VI. G9]. 
For an account of her see page 380. 

44. VII. 215. Benjamin Peirce, her husband. 

His number in direct descent is [43. VII. 207]. For an account of him 
see page 379. 

44. VII. 217. Ichabod Nicliols [Lydia 44. VL G9], bom in Ports- 
mouth, N. IL, baptized in Salem, Aug. 13, 1798, died in Cambridge, Mass. 
A minister. Residence : Cambridge.^ 

Dr. Nichols graduated at Harvard College, with the highest honors, in 
1802. In ISOo, he was appointed tutor in mathematics at Harvard. Here 
he continued until 1809, puvsuing his theological studies at the same time. 
On Jan. 7, 1809, he was ordained colleague of the Rev. Samuel Denne, 
D.D., of the First Church in Portland, Me. Dr. Deane died in 1814. 
From that time till within four years of his own death. Dr. Nichols re- 

* The date of his birth is given by the family and several other authorities ns July 
5, 1784; while Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 167, gives it as July 4. 
17S4. 



384 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

mained the sole pastor of the church. He discharged his duties with great 
ability, and very acceptably to the society. When at last he resigned his 
charge on account of feeble health, the church would not accept his resig- 
nation, and he remained nominally its pastor until his death, although 
relieved from all the duties of the otlice. \yhen he moved to Cambridge, 
the Rev. Horatio Stebbins was installed as his colleague. The installation 
service took place Jan. 31, 1855. 

Dr. Nichols was highly esteemed as a preacher and as a profound 
theologian. In 1831, he published " A Catechism of Natural Theology " 
which is considered a classic. He was the author of "Hours with the 
Evangelists," which contains an engraving of him. In 1821, he received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Bowdoin College, of which he was 
vice-president ; and in 1831, ho received the same degree from Harvard 
College. He was \'ice-president of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. He took an active part in the philanthropic and reformatory 
movements of the day, and was a devoted friend of the temperance cause, 
of the Bible Society, of the Sunday-school, and of all benevolent 
institutions. 

Dr. Nichols was a scholarly man, and kept abreast with the times, both 
in theological and scientific matters. Nothing in the way of discovery 
escaped his observation. He was gifted in conversation, and few surpassed 
him in this respect. No one could be in his society, even for a brief time, 
without being deeply impressed with the extent and variety of his knowl- 
edge and with his ease in communicating it. And yet, with these rare 
powers, he was perfectly simple, unaflFected, and impretending. There are 
several portraits of him. One of them hangs in Channing Hall, in the 
building of the American Unitarian Association, Boston.^ 

The engraving here given is from a plate in possession of the 
family. 

' The Salem Gazette of Jan. 7, 1S59 ; Necrology of Alumni of Harvard College, 
by Joseph Palmer, pp. 22.V229 ; The Christian Register of Jan. 15 and Feb. 12, 1859; The 
New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Yol. XIII. p. 281 ; Harvard Gradu- 
ates Whom I Have Known, by Rev. A. P. Peabody, D.D., L.L.D., pp. 111-122; Journals 
of the Rev. Thomas Smith and the Rev. Samuel Deane, by William Willis, pp. 396-399; 
The Gilman Family, by Arthur Gilman, A.JI., p. 151. 



SEYENTir GENERATIOX. 385 

44. Vll. 217'. J>orofIira Fol.som Gilniau, the first wife of Ichabod 
Nichols, born in Exeter, X. H., died in PortLand, Maine. 

Mrs. Nichols was note 1 for her beauty, her fine voice in singing, her 
extraordinary intellectual pifts, and her devotions to works of benevolence, 
both in and beyond her husband's parish. She had the jjower of attracting 
and pleasing both those in the humblest and those in the highest walks of 
life. 

She was a daughter of the Hon. John Taylor and Deborah (Folsom) 
Gilman, of Exeter, N. H. Iler father was governor of New Hampshire. 
He marched as a youthful volunteer to the battle of Lexington, was a 
member of the Committee of Safety, was elected to the first Federal 
Congress, and was otherwise distinguished.^ Helen Williams Gilman [44. 
IX. 846], is her first cousin once removed. Her ancestry includes the 
following families : Gilman, Clark, Treworgye, Shapleigh, Clark, Somerby, 
Greenleaf, Lord, Waite, Day, xVyer, Allen, Goodale, Taylor, Winslow, 
Chilton, Hutchinson, ]\Lnrbury, Hamby, Rogers, Crane, Denison, Dudley, 
Purkiss, Pemberton, ]\rarsliall (?j, Folsom, Gilman, Clark, Perkins, Ladd, 
Gilman, Clark, Treworgye, Shapleigh, Smith. See Axcestry Tables j-Y|.. 

44. Vn. 31?~. Mavihn SdUshnnj JTif/fjiitsoii, the second wife of 
Ichabod Nichols, born in Boston, died in Cambridge, ]Mass. 

Mrs. Nichols went to a boarding school in New York for several years, 
after which, up to the time of her marriage, she was actively engaged with 
her sister, Elizabeth Sewall Higginson, in writing and distributing educa- 
tional books for the poor, and in other charitable work.- 

She was a daughter of Stephen and Martha (Salisbury) Higginson. Her 
father was a merchant in Boston, noted for his benevolence and integrity. 
He fiiiled in business in 1S12, and removed to a farm in Bolton, Mass., 
where he lived for several years. He afterward became steward of PLarvard 
College. Thomas Wentworth Higginson was her half-brother, and Francis 
Tappan Kimhall [38. IX. 667'] was her first cousin once removed. Her 
ancestry includes the following families : Higginson, Whitfield, Sheafe, 

1 The Gilman Family, by Arthur Gilman, pp. 104-108 ; also letter of J. T. G. Nichols. 
' Family Memorials, by Edward E. Salisbury, p. 59; also letter of J. T. G. Nichols. 



38 G THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Savage, Smiuiics, Sewull, Hunt, Duuinier, Archer, Mitchell, Boradel, 
Cabot, Oriie, Thonipsun, ClevelaiKl, 'Winn, Wilson, Waters, Linton, Hud- 
son, Porter, Stanley, Cook, Westwood, Sewall, Hunt, Dummer, Archer, 
Mitchell, Boradel, Salisbury, Williams, Saunders, Munjoy, Elbridge, Sewall, 
Hunt, Dumnior, Archer, Hull, Quiiicy, Pares, Walley,Quincy, Pares, Gookin, 
Bird, Dollln--, Flynt, Hoar, Hincksnian, Willet, Brown, Wendell, Du Trieux, 
Staets, Joehemse, De Key, Van Brug-h, Jans. See Axcestky Tables ^Yj"- 

44. YII. 218. Benjamin Ropes Nichols [Lydia 44. VI. G9]. 
For an account of ^Ir. Nichols see pages 2G8-269. 

44. Vn. 21S. Morij Pic1;erln<i. his wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [58. VI. 117]. For an account of Mrs. 
Nichols see pages 267-2GS. 

44. VII. 219. Charlotte Nichols [Lydia 44. VI. 69], born in 
Portsmouth, N. 11., baptized in Salem Aug. 13, 1798,^ died in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

44. VII. JIO. diaries Snnders, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Cambridge, ^lass. A merchant. Residence : Cambridge. 

Mr. Sanders, II. C. 1802, belonged to a family which had been mer- 
chants for several generations, and he consented to go to college only on 
condition that after graduating he should be a merchant. In the autumn 
following his graduation, he entered tlie counting-room of Ebenezer Parsons, 
an eminent merchant of Boston, where he remained about fifteen months, so 
as to obtain a knowledge of business. lie then went as supercargo on a 
voyage to Europe and the East Indies. lie arrived home in May, 1805, 
after a successful voyage, and then establislied himself in business in Salem 
as a merchant. For a time he was president of the American Insurance 
Company, and for several terms he was a representative from Salem in the 
General Court. In 1827, he was asked by the Corporation of Harvard 
College to fill tlie position of steward, left vacant by Stephen Iligginson. 

' The date of her birth is given as Xov. 20, 17S.S. in the Nichols Family Records, and 
hi Essex Institute Historical Collections, Yo\. VII. [>. 167; while Eighteenth Century 
Baptisms in Salem, by .James A. Emmerton, p. So, gives it as Xov. 25, 17SS. 



SEVENTH GENEEATIOX. 387 

He accepted tlio office, ami held the position to the great advantage of the 
college nntil 1831, when he resigned, on account of ill liealth. 

By the standard of his own time ^Ir. Sanders was ricli. He was a man 
of literary taste, of great practical wisdom, and of rare precision in manner 
and habits. He lived simply :ind inexpensively. Childless himself, lie 
made the public his heir. Sanders Theatre represents liis bequest to 
Harvard College. He left legacies for pliilanthropic purposes to Cam- 
bridge, and also to Gloucester, Mass., the latter place having been the 
home of his ancestors for several generations. His famil}' was one of the 
most distinguished in that town.' 

Mr. Sanders was a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Elkins) Sanders, of 
Salem. His father was a wealthy merchant. Catherine Scolders [50. YII. 
S73] was his sister, and Leverett Saltonstall [1. IX. <S] and W'dUam Gurdon 
Saltonstall [1. IX. 12'] were his nephews. His ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families: Sanders, Curney, Skilling, Robinson, Haraden, Ingersoll, 
Smith, Glover, Eliot, Mountfort, Curwen, Herbert, \yinthrop. Forth, Read, 
Tyng, Elkins, Gutch, :\Iiles, Derby, Hilman, Haskct, Langdon, White, 
Sletcalf, Flint, Johnson, Maverick, Harris. See Axcestry Tables -^'f^. 

44. VII. 221. Henry Nichols [Lydia 44. YI. 09], born in Salem, 
baptized there Aug. 13, 1798, died in Boston. 

In early life Mr. Nichols made several voyages to Europe and the East 
Indies, as an officer of the vessel, or as commercial agent. In the "War of 
1812, he was captured by a British vessel, and carried into the Cape of 
Good Hope, Avhere he was long detained as a prisoner of war. This 
incident gave him a deep aversion to the British nation. 

In 1835, he went to Illinois, and purchased a farm on wliich he resided 
until about the year 1841. He then returned to Boston, where he was 
occupied as a clerk. Afterwards he was for man}' years in the collector's 
department of the city of Boston.- 

' Obituary of Mr. Sanders, in the Boston Daily Advertiser of Friday, Ajiril 15, 1S64, 
which was reprinted ; Harvard College Xecrology, in the Boston Daily Advertiser of July 
20, 1SC4; also Harvard Keminiscences, by the Bev. A. P. Peabody, D.D.. LL.D., pp. 68-70. 

For an account of the Sanders family, see tlie History of The Town of Gloucester, 
Cape Ann, by John J. Babson, pp. 241-244. 

' Letter of Benjamin White Nichols, July, 1S94. 



388 THE FICKEEIXG GENEALOGY. 

44. VII. 2Jr. Sarah Hardy Itoiws, lii.s first wife, probably boru in 
Salem, baptized there June 19, 179G, died in Salem. 

She and her husband were first cousins. Her number in direct descent 
is [14. VIII. 164]. 

44. VII. i?Ji-. Bebecca Anne Tliayer, the second wife of Henry 
Nichols, bom in Boston. Residence : Roxbury, Mass. 

Mrs. Nichols and her sister gave to the Boston Public Library the 
Thayer library, to which 3Irs. Nicliols afterwards added fourteen hundred 
and thirty-five volumes of raie and costly books. 

She is a daughter of Nathaniel Frederic and Susan Thayer (Soper) 
Thayer. Her father was a Boston merchant.^ Her ancestry includes the 
following families : Thayer, Wales, Faxon, Thayer, Niles, Sands, Codding- 
ton, Brinley, Hutchinson, Marbury, Hanib}', Thayer, Pray, Micall, Farr, 
White, Rogers, Bingley, Alden, Soper, Curtis, Thayer, Hayden, Hyde, 
Thayer, Wales, Faxon, Thayer, Miller, Belcher, Gill, Minot, Butler, Clark. 
See Ancestry Tables -^i^-,. 

44. VII. 222. Joseph Peirce Nicliols [Lydia 44. VI. 69], bom in 
Salem, baptized there Aug. 13, 1798, died at Lima. Residence: Salem.^ 
Mr. Nichols, H. C. 1813, was a supercargo of a merchant vessel.^ 

44. VII. 223. David Nicliols [Lydia 44. VI. 69], bora in Salem, 
baptized there Aug. 13, 1798, died in Salem. 

lyii-. Nichols was a student in Harvard College.* 

45. VII. 224. Samnel Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there Oct. 29, 1786, died in the Island of Cura^oa, of 
yellow fever. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Ropes sailed with Captain ]\Iacarthy as joint supercargo of the ship 

• The Thayer Memorial, by Bezaleel Thayer, pp. 111-112, in which this family is not 
extended. 

" The date of his birth is given by several authorities as Feb. 10, 1795; while Essex 
Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 167, gives it as Feb. 7, 1795. 
« Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 167. 

* Ibid. Vol. VII. p. 167. 



I WILLIAM ROPES. 

I 

I [45. VII. 2.6] 

I FrO.M TIIK roRTKMT HV Oils, P.\I\rED .^BOCT 1S2 

I or J(.iH.\ Coii.M.\N Ropes, Esri., o 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 389 

Henry, it being his first voyage. He was a very amiable and active young 
man of much promise.' 

45. VII. 22.3. Benjamin Ropes [Samuel 4.5. VI. 70], probably born 
in Salem, bai)tizeJ tliere Oct. 2'.), 1786, died in Salem. 

Mr. Ropes was second mate of the sliip Belisarius, and was killed as he 
was helping to lower the fore-topmast while the ship was lying at Union 
"Wharf, Salem. He is spoken of as au excellent young man.^ 

45. VII. 22G. "William Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], born in Salem, 
baptized there Oct. 29, 178(1, died in Boston. A merchant. Residence: 
Boston. 

After leaving school, ^Ir. Ropes went into the counting-room of Elias 
Hasket Derby, and while in his employ he made several voyages to 
Calcutta. He finally removed from Salem to Boston, where he was 
associated in partnersliip with Colonel Benjamin Pickman and his son. 
At one time he was in partnership with Thomas "Wren "Ward [17. VIII. 
183], the style of the firm being Ropes & '\\"ard ; he then went into business 
with :\Ir. B. T. Reed, as Ropes, Reed, & Co. Having met with business 
reverses, he went to St. Petersburg in 1829, via Cuba, in the ship Courser. 
There he made satisfactory business arrangements, and then returned to 
Boston. In 1832, he returned to St. Petersburg, taking with him his 
second wife and four of his children, where he established the firm of 
W. Ropes & Co. In 1842, the firm was transferred to Boston, with a 
branch house in St. Petersburg. In 1853, his son-in-law, Charles Hooper 
Trask, was admitted to the firm, and a branch office was opened in New 
York. Another branch was afterwards opened in London, under the style 
of "W. H. Ropes. A few years after the business w\as established in St. 
Petersburg, :\Ir. Ropes's eldest son, "William Hooper Ropes, became a part- 
ner in the firm, and at the time of his death, in 1891, he was the senior 
member of tlie firm. In 1846, Mr. Ropes's second son, Joseph Samuel 
Ropes, was admitted to the firm, and in 1894, he was the senior part- 
ner. Mr. Ropes's nephew, George Henry Prince, represented the firm 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 25.3. 
» Ibid. Vol. VII. p. 253. 



390 THE PICKEBIXG GEXEALOGY. 

in St. PctL'rsbur;^-, holding- tlieir full [jouer. Tlic Last to become a member 
of the tirin was Mr. luipes's grandson, William Hall Kopes, who had 
represented the firm at St. Petersburg up \o the time of his return to New- 
York in the fall of IS'j-J. At that time the firm oonsisted of Joseph Samuel 
Ropes, Charles Hooper Trask, and AVilliaiu Hall Ropes, with offices in 
London, St. Petersburg, and New York City. The Boston office has been 
discontinued. The firm is one of the few shipping- houses which kept their 
ships under the American flag throughout the civil war. It has maintained 
its mercantile credit without iuterru^.tion more tlian sixty years. 

In 1842, having spent five }-eors in St. Petersburg, and nearly five 
years in London, Mr. Ropes returned to Boston with his family. 

After he became prosperous, he paid all the debts he had incurred by his 
failure, in man}- cases with interest. He was an early and warm adherent 
of the old Republican party, and gave liberally towards its support, and 
towards the upholding of the cause of the Union during the civil war. 
He was also an active promoter and a generous benefactor of philanthropic 
and religious enterprises. He had a warm and healthful interest in the 
young, and in the atTairs of the day, a great love for active life, and a great 
deal of pride in being a merchant. In his early life he was a parishioner of 
the Rev. Dr. Chainiing ; but he sided Avith the Trinitarians in the Unitarian 
controversy. He was for many years connected with the Central Congre- 
gational Church, but in his later years was an attendant at Trinity Church. 
Whatever his creed, he was a man of a catholic spirit. 

There are two portraits of ^^Ir. Ropes belonging to his son, John Codman 
Ropes. One was painted in 1S19, by "Bally, eleve de David,'' one by 
Bass Otis, about the year 1825, and there are portraits of him by Alex- 
ander, painted about the year lS4.j, in the possession of other members 
of the family. The heliotype which we give is from the second of these 
three pictures.^ 

45. VII. 226^. Mnvtha Heed, the first wife of William Ropes, boni in 
Marblehead, Mass., died in Boston. 

» The Boston Daily Advertiser of March 12, 1SG9; and Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. YII. p. 2.53. The facts about his business -were furnished by his son, 
Joseph Samuel Eopes. 



SEl'EXTH GEXEHATIOX. 391 

]\[rs. IJopcs was u loN'oly wuinau of a marked character, of an amiable 
disposition, and an active Christian. 

She was a daugliter of Benjamin Tvler and ]\Iar\' (T)od;^e) Reed, of 
Marblehead. The Hon. "William Reed, of ^larblehead, was her brother. 
Pier ancestry includes the following families: Reed, Rowland, Snuth, Tyler, 
Blake, Messenger, Dodge, Katon, Fairfield, Skipperway, Apploton, Everard, 
Oliver, Lowell, Baker, Symonds, Read. See Ancestry Tables {f^i. 

45. VII. .??6'~. Jfarij Anne Codtnan, the second wife of William 
Ropes, born in ]joston, died in Jamaica Plain.^ 

A portrait of ^[rs. Ropes and her four children, John C, Francis C, 
Henry, and Marianne Ropes, is in the possession of her son, John Codman 
Ropes, of Boston. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of the Hon. John and Catherine (x\.mory) 
Codman. The Rev. John Codman, D.D. (H. C 1802), of Dorchester, was 
her half-brother. John Amory Loiccll [55. VII. Ji-?] was her first cousin. 
Her ancestry includes the following families : Codman, Randall, Barron, 
Foster, Brackenbury, Wiuslow, Chilton, Xowell, Gray, Soley, Shute, Viall, 
Coffin, Thember, Stevens, Severance, Gayer, Starbuck, Reynolds, Amory, 
Holmes, Wharf, Greene, Tattershall, Barton, Gould, Robinson, Stanbridge, 
Graves. See Axcestey Tables j^^^,. 

45. VII. 227. Sally Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there Ocr. 29, 178G, died in Salem, of consumption. 

45. VII. 228. Hardy Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], born in Salem, 
baptized there Oct. 19, 1788, died in Cambridge, Mass. A merchant. 
Residence : Camliridge. 

On Sept. 7, 1813, ;\Ir. Ropes removed from Salem to Boston, where he 
engaged in business with his brother William, till the year 1829, after 
which he became treasurer of the American Education Society, a position 
which he retained for a number of yeare. About the year 1842, on the 

^ For tlie Codman Family, see Wjman's Genealogies and Estates of CharlestoTvn, 
Vol. I. pp. 224-226. 



392 THE PICKERTXG GENEALOGY. 

return of his brother William to Jiosion, he became associated with him iu 
busiiieris.^ 

45. VII. 22S. Mary Ladd, his wile, born in Maiden, Mass. 

Mrs. Hopes was an excellent ^voIrKUl. She was well educated, very 
active, energetic, and business-like, as well as warm-hearted. 

She was ii daughter of William and Mary (Ilaskins) Ladd." Jolin 
Haskins [25. IX. 370'] was her first cou-in, and Annie Marvin Ladd [45. 
IX. S7o] was her grandniece. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Ladd, Tompkins, Allen, Bacon, Gray, Lettice, Church, Tucker, Gardiner, 
Haskins, Cook, Lamson, Upham, Wood, Mellens, Dexrer, Hill, Long, Bick- 
nell, Metcalf, Waite, Hills, Oakes, Sargent, Chipman, Howland, Tilley. 
See ANCESTRY Tables y^'j. 

45. VII. 229. Ruth Hardy Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], probably 
bom in Salem, baptized there July 3, 1791, died in Salem. 

The members of her family were Federalists, while those of her husband 
were Democrats. 

45. VII. 2J9. Jleui'ii Prince, her husband, probably born in Salem, 
baptized there Sept. 16, 1787, died in Newburyport, Mass. A shipmaster. 
Residence : Salem. 

During the War of 1812, Captain Prince was a lieutenant in the priva- 
teers America and Montgomery, and he afterwards commanded several 
United States cutters on the coast. He superintended the building of 
merchant ships for his brother-in-law, William Ropes, and was in command 
of some of his brother-in-law's vessels.^ His number in direct descent is 
[12. VIII. 140]. 

45. VIL 230. Louisa Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], born in Salem, 
baptized there ^lay 20, 1793, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Green is said to have been a woman of a sweet and lovely character. 

* Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. Yll. p. 253 ; also facts furnished by his 
nephew, Josppli Saumel Hopes. 

* The Ladd Family, by Warren Ladd, p. 291. 

» New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. YIIL p. 294. 



SEVENTH GEXERATION. 393 

45, VII. 2o0. Samuel Green, her husband, bom iu Stoneham, Mass., 
died in Boston. A minister. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Green, 11. C. ISIG, Avhen fifteen years of age, became an apprentice 
to a mason and bricklayer, clioosing- this trade because it would give him 
the long winters fi:>r study. After graduating, he studied theology for a term 
at the Andovor Theological Seminary, and finished his preparatory divinity 
com-se in 1819, while he was a tutor at Bowdoin College. He was ordained 
third pastor of the Old South Church in Reading, Mass., Sept. 20, 1820. 
His ministry in Reading was short, but successful. In Xovember, 1822, 
the Union Church of Essex Street, Boston, gave him a call, and, though 
the Reading Churcli refused to give him up, a renewal of the call prevailed, 
and he was installed pastor of the Union Church, March 2G, 1823. For ten 
years he labored there with great energy and success. His constant and 
untii-ing devotion to his duties was too great a tax on his strength, and lie 
was at last obliged to take a trip to Europe to regain his health. In this 
he was unsuccessful, and he returned home only to die. He was a simple, 
earnest, and holy man, and an impressive preacher. 

Several of ]Mr. G-reen's sermons were printed. The principal ones were, 
a sermon before the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Christian Knowl- 
edge, 1827; A Memorial Sermon at Plymouth, Dec. 22, 1828, and More 
Than One Hundred Arguments in Proof of the Supreme Divinity of 
Jesus Christ.^ 

He was a son of Thomas and Anna (Knight) Green, of Stoneham, Mass. 
His father was a farmer and carpenter of small property and was much 
respected for his industry and integrity. Mr. Green was a brother of the 
Rev. David Green (Yale Coll. 1821). Two of his uncles were captains in the 
Revolutionary Army. His ancestry includes the following families : Green, 
Knight, Ilolden. See Ancestry Tables -^^^. 

45. VII. 231. Joseph Ropes [Samuel 45. VI. 70], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there Oct. 2, 1796, died in Salem. 

* Genealogical History of tlie Town of Reading;, Mass., by Lilley Eaton, p. 217; also 
a sketch in the Congregationalist Quarterly, Vol. \'III. p. 22j-240, by Joseph S. Eopes. 
An engraving by H. Wright Smith accompanies this sketch. In 183G, the Kev. Dr. K. S. 
Storrs published a Memoir of Mr. Green. 



394 THE PICKER IXG GENEALOGY. 

45. Vll. 232. Joseph Leacll [Uuth 45. VI. 7-2], prububly burn and 
died in Salem. 

45. VII. 234. Charles Leach [Ruth 45. VI. 72], probably born in 
Salem. 

45. VII. 235. Ruth Leach [Rutli 45. VI. 72], probably bora in 
Salem, died in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

45. VII. 235. Joseph Larkin, her husband. 
Ancestkt Table.s ^^^-, 

45. VII. 23n. Mary Hardy Leach [Eutli 45. VI. 72], born in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

45. VII. 23G. Caleb Smith, her husband, born in Salem, baptized 
there Jan. 8, 1786, died in Salem, of old age. A merchant. Residence: 
Salem. 

The Salem Gazette of Nov. 11, 1870, speaks of him as a venerable 
citizen who was for many years engaged in active trade, and was distin- 
guished for a spirit of enterprise. 

His first wife was Betsey Winchester. She was born in South Danvers, 
March 22, 1791, and died in Salem, Oct. 21, 1849. By her he had the 
following children : — 

Mart ELizABExn Smith, born Dec. 17, 1811, and died 3Iay 0, 1S34. She married 

Matthew Stickuey. 
Elyixa Smith, born April 1.5, 1S13, and died Jan. 15, 1S43. She married, 

Xov. 15, 1837, George A. Osborne. 
Caleb Augustus Smith, born Oct. 9, 1S16. He married, April 13, 1840, Frances 

M. Wilkins. 
Henry Winchester Smith, born M.arch 15, 181S, and died Oct. 19, 1853. He married, 

Jlay 4, 1843, ^Marianne Wilkins. 
Eunice Winchester Smith, born June 20, 1S21, and died July 9, 1840. 
Maria Smith, born Jan. 13, 1824, and died Nov. 29, 1841. 

Francis Edward Smith [13. IX. 192'], born Sept. 1, 1828, and died Aug. 27, 1870. 
Charles Fredekick Smith, born Sept. 20, 18.34, and died May 5, 1855. 

Mr. Smith's own gravestone, and one on which is an inscription to his 
two wives, are standing in the Harmon}- Grove Cemetery in Salem. 
He was a son of Caleb Smith, of Salem. Ancestry Tables ySV. 



SEVEXTH generation: 395 

45. VII. 237. George Leacll [Piuth 45. VI. 72], probably born in 
Salem. 

45. VII. 238. Hardy Ropes Leach [Ruth 45. VI. 72], probably born 
in Salem, died in Newburyport, Mass. 

45. VII. 239. Joseph Ropes Leach [Ruth 45. VI. 72], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

An obituary notice of Mr. Ropes in the Salem Gazette of Oct. 7, 1817, 
states that he died after a .short but very painful illness, and that he was a 
youth whose virtuous dis})osition and amiable deportment had endeared 
him to his family and friends. 

45. VII. 240. Benjamin Ropes Leach [Ruth 45. VI. 72], born in 
Salem, died at Macao, China. ^ 

The Salem Gazette of Feb. 12, 1839, contains a notice of ]\Ir. Leach's 
death which was taken from the Canton Press of Sept. 8. It speaks of his 
having died after a brief illness. The Gazette adds, that he left home in 
July, 1836, and from that time had been engaged in mercantile operations 
in the East Indies until the time of his death. It also says, that perhaps 
no one of his age had ever acquired a more thorough knowledge of com- 
merce, particularly of the East Indies, or possessed superior powers for its 
practical conduct than he, and that his energy of character, untiring indus- 
try, perfect integrity, and uncommon intelligence had been commented on 
by all. 

46. VII. 241. Hannah Ropes [Hardy 46-47. VI. 73], born in Salem, 
baptized there April 6, 1788, died in ^Yest Amesbury, Mass." 

46. VII. '241- Benjamin Siraseij, her husband, born in Exeter, N. H., 
died in Le Roy, Minn. A Baptist minister. Residence : Le Roy. 

He lived in New England till about the year 1869, when he removed to 
Le Roy, Minu. 

* The d.ite of his birth has been printed by us as Dec. 6, 1802; while it is given as 
Dec. 16, 1S02, in Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 198. 

" The date of her marriage is given by the family as Xov. 14,1814; while Essex 
Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 254, gives it as Xov. 2G, 1814. 



396 THE PICKERTXG GENEALOGY. 

Ho was a son of Ebenezer and Molly (^Lyford) Swasey, of Exeter, N. H. 
His father was a farmer. Ancestry Tables ^^\. 

4fi. VII. 242. Hardy Ropes [Hardy 4G-47. VI. 73], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there Feb. S, 1780, died in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

At the time of his first marriage Mr. Ropes livud in Orford. N. H. He 
is said to have been divorced from his first wife, and to have removed to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where he man-ied again, and died leaving a wife and one 
son. If he had descendants, they have not been discovered by us. 

46. VII. 242^. PvisciUa Plaits, his first wife, to whom he was man-ied 
in Eockingham, \i. 

She was probably the Priscilla Platts who was born April 3, 1794, 
and who was a daughter of Ebenezer Platts, of Rindge, N. H.^ Ancestry 
Tables _™^,. 

46. VII. 24-3' ■ > liis second wife. 

Ancestry Tables y^^jj. 

46. VII. 243. Benjamin Ropes [Hardy 46-47. VI. 73], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there July 4, 1790, died in Eldorado, Iowa. A 
Baptist minister. Residence : Eldorado. 

Mr. Ropes was originally a clothier, but, in 1831, he became the pastor 
of a Baptist Society in Haverhill, N. H. He removed to Eldorado.^ 

46. VII. 243. Lucy Pusheef his wife, died in Dover Township, 
Fayette County, Iowa. 

She was called of Lyme, N. H. Ancestry Tables _^jig.. 

47. VII. 245. Joseph Elson Ropes [Hardy 46-47. VI. 73], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Jan. 11, 1795. 

47. VII. 246. Sarah Ropes [Hardy 46-47. VI. 73], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there June 25, 1797. 
Miss Ropes became insane. 

> History of the Town of Kindge, X. H., by Ezra S. Stearns, p. 640. 
' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 254 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 397 

47. VII. 247. Samuel Ropes [Ilunly 4G-47. VI. 73], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there March 21, 1799.^ 

'My. Ropes is said to have been married, and to have died in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, leaving a wife and children ; but another account says he died in 
Ohio, without children.^ 

47. Mil. 247. , his wife. 

Akcestey Tables -j^g. 

47. VII. 248. George Ropes [Hardy 4G-47. VI. 73], born in Orford, 
N. H., died in St. Jolmsbury, Vt. A cabinet-maker. Residence : New- 
bury, Vt. 

The following interesting letter dated, Xov. 5, 1884, was received from 
Mr. Ropes's daughter, Miriam Johnson Ropes : — 

" There is very little to say about my fatlier's business. He was a mechanic of 
hmited means, leading a very quiet life in a very quiet little villa.r^e nestled among the 
green hills of Vermont, on the banks of the Connecticut. When I was about three or 
four years old lie started West to seek his fortune — went as far as the State of Ohio, 
which in those days was considered a long, tedious journey, and almost out of the 
world. But, to the great relief of my mother, he returned disgusted with the western 
country, and settled down to work again in his cabinet shop, making furniture, which 
he sold often times for pay at the store, or the products of the farm. There was 
very little money to be had in those days. 

" There were many Scotch farmers living in the country round, and especially 
in Ryegate, the town adjoining N. on the north ; and occasionally there was a 
daughter to be married off, and the old red sleigh would cnmo into town, bringing the 
farmer and the daughter, and perhaps the mother or a sister to assist her in selecting 
her outfit. Then my father always expected to get at least half money for his wares, 
for many of tliosc Scotch farmers were ' well to do,' though they lived in a very plain 
way. 

" My father and mother were both members of the Congregational Church in 
Newbury, Yt., and the old Meeting House, built in 1790, stood right across the 
street. ... It was a great diversion to us children, on a Sabbath morning, to stand 



' The date of his birth is given as IMarch 25. 1799, in Essex Institute Historical Col- 
lections, Vol. YII. p. 254 ; while his baptism is given as ]\Iarch 21, 1799, in the Eighteenth 
Century Baptisms in Salem, "Mass., by James A. Emmerton, p. 98. 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 254. 



398 THE PICKEllIXG GENEALOGY. 

at the window and watch the crowd of vcliiclcs as they caino up to the doors, — there 
were three, north, siaith, and middle, — uidoad and then drive either across the street 
to a hitclung post, or into one of tlie long row of stalls built on the south side of the 
Meeting House. In winter time father always kept the kitchen stove full of solid 
maplewood to supply the foot stoves of the crowd of old ladies that thronged the 
kitchen as soon as the morning service was over. But the old Meeting House and 
the old house where we were all born are both gone now. . . . 

" ify father was of a very nervous temperament and very sensitive. . . . Both 
parents hud but few educational advantages, but improved what they did have, and 
were very anxious that their children should receive a liberal education, and gave them 
all the advantages that their limited means would allow." 

For two years Mr. liopes lived in Burnet, Yt., and he also lived in St. 
Johnsbury, Vt., for a time. 

47. VII. 24s. Miriam Johnson, his wife, born in Newbury, Vt., 
died in Newbury. 

Mrs. Ropes possessed a fine mind and excelled in conversation. She 
was a member of the Congregational Church in Newbury. 

She was a daughter of John and Abiah (Eaton) Johnson. Her father 
was a farmer. Ancestky Tables -^i-. 

47. VII. 249. Timothy Pickering Ropes [Hardy 46-47. VI. 73], 
born in Orford, N. II., died in Le Roy, Minn. A Baptist minister. Resi- 
dence : Le Roy. 

Mr. Ropes graduated at "Water\-ille College, Maine. After teaching- 
school for a time, he entered the ministry and preached in Lexington, Mass., 
Hampton Fulls, N. H., Raleigh, N. C, Virginia, Mississippi, and Minnesota.^ 

47. VII. 240. Elixa Keeleij, his wife, born in England, died in 
Missouri. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of the Rev. George Keeley, of Haverhill, 
Mass., who came over from England about the year 1818, and was settled 
over a Baptist Church in Haverhill, Oct. 7, 1818.^ .iVxcestry Tables -^\. 

' History of the Town of Lexington, ^lass., by Charles Hudson, p. 3G2 ; also Essex 
Institute Historical Collections, Vdl. \'II. p. 254. 

" The History of Haverhill, Mass., by George W. Chase, p. 588. 



SEVEXTH GENERATIOX. 399 

47. VII. 250. Meliitable Ropes [Hardy 4G-47. VI. 73], born in 
New Hampshire, probably in Orford, died in Boston, of consumption. 

47. VII. 251. Wimam Henry Ropes [Hardy 4G-47. VI. 73], born 
in Orford, N. IL, died in Palatka, Fla. A schoobnaster. Residence : 
Palatka. 

Mr. Ropes graduated at AVaterville College, Maine. From 1834 to 1835, 
he resided in Foxcroft, Maine, ^Yhere he was principal of the Foxcroft 
Academy. From 1836 to 1837, he was at Milton, Mass., and from 1838 to 
1848, at "Waltham, Mass., where he fitted boys for college. From 1848 to 
1850, ho lived in Bedford, Mass. After suffering intensely from asthma for 
years, he went to i*alatka, Fla., where he lived in comparative comfort 
from 1859 to 18GG. He was an acknowledged Union man throughout the 
war. 

47. VII. 251. Hannah Anilcvson Chandler, his wife, born in New 
Gloucester, Maine, died in Georgetown, D. C. 

During the civil war Mrs. Ropes was asked by the Sanitary Com- 
mission managers in Boston, to take charge of the Union Hospital at 
Georgetown, 1). C, which had been grossly mismanaged. She accepted 
the position, and corrected the abuses, saving many lives, but at the cost of 
her own. She died after three weeks' sickness in the Georgetown Hospital. 

Mrs. Ropes was the author of " Six Months in Kansas" [Boston, 1856], 
and of "Cranston House" [Boston, 1859], a novel. She lived in New 
Gloucester, ]\Iaine, till she was eighteen years old, and afterwards in 
Bangor and Foxcroft, ]\Iaine, in Milton, "Waltham, Cambridge, Bedford, and 
Boston, Mass., in Lawrence, Kansas, and in Georgetown, D. C. 

She was a daughter of Peleg and Esther (Parsons) Chandler, of New 
Gloucester, Elaine. 3[r. Chamllc-r was a lawyer of New Gloucester till 1825, 
and then he moved to Bangor. The Hon. Charles Parsons Chandler, of 
Foxcroft, Maine, Theophilus Parsons Chandler, Assistant United States 
Treasurer, of Boston, and Peleg W. Chandler, of Boston, were her 
brothers.^ Her ancestry includes the following families: Chandler, Hunt, 

' Winslow Memorial, by David P. Hulton, ^[.D., pp. 715-725; also letter of her 
daughter, llrs. Jairus L. Skinner, dated Feb. 20, 1SS5. 



400 THE PICKER rXG GENEALOGY. 

Phillips, BlaiRy, Wiuslow, ilillor, Snow, Warren, Baker, Parsons, Vinson, 
Plaskell, Tybbot, Brown, Burnhani, Tattle, Wells, Memll, Chase, Wheeler, 
Adams, Merrill, Clough. See Axckstiiy Tablks ^V'j. 

47. VII. 252. Timothy Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 76], born in Salem, 
died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

When he was a boy, Mr. Ropes was employed in a hardware store, and 
afterwards became a clerk in a commercial insurance office in Salem. About 
the time he became of age, he went on his first voyage to India as a super- 
cargo. It was succeeded by other foreign voyages, until about the year 
1829. He then gave up a sea-fai-ing life, and established himself in the 
crockery and hardware business in Salem, continuing in it till a short time 
before he died. His store on Essex Street during this period was the most 
important crockery and hardware store, if not the only one, in the city. 
Mr. Ropes was a well-read man, of a thoughtful mind, of quiet habits, and 
of great intelligence.^ 

47. VII. JoJ. 3Iary Silver, the wife of Timothy Ropes, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of James and Susanna (Howard) Silver, of 
Salem. James Broirne [1-70. III. <S'] was her great-great-grandfather, and 
Susan S'ilvtr [1.5. IX. 227'] was her niece. Iler ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Silver, Caton, Browne, Bartholomew, Pickering, Flint, Masury, 
Howard, Plielps. See Axcestey Tap-les -^f-^. 

47. VII. 253. Sally Grant Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 7G], born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

Until old age and failing health overtook her. Miss Ropes's long life was 
spent in household duties, in caring for her brothers and sisters, and in faith- 
fully ministering to the comfort and happiness of her parents.^ 

47. VII. 254. Thomas Holmes Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 76], born in 
Salem, died near Louisville, Ky. 

' The Salem Gazette of April 29. 1S73, for an obituary notice of Jlr. Ropes ; also a 
letter tlateJ Dec. 21, l.'^Ol. from his bvotlier, .Toscph Ropes, of Salem. 
^ Letter of Joseph Ropes, dated Dec. 21, 1S91. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 401 

Oil k'lu illy .school, Mr. Ropts learacd the art of bookbinding ; but, 
being- of a schohtrly turn and religiously disposed, he subsequently decided 
to study for the ministry, and for that purpose went to Andover. After a 
while, however, failing health compelled him to relinquish his design, and 
he returned to Salem and opened a school for boys. But his health was 
gone, and, as neither medicine nor a sea-voyage, which he took, could 
regain it, ho was obliged to give up teaching. He removed to Louisville, 
Ky., and went into the grocery business. He lived at Louisville for twelve 
or fifteen yuars.^ 

47. Vn. -255. Elizabeth Grant Ropes [Timothy 47. VL 76], born 
in Salem, died in Salem. Eesidence : Salem. 

Miss Ropes opened a shop in a quiet neighborhood of Salem for the sale 
of a variety of such articles as are constantly needed in every family. For 
many years her shop was an attractive resort for a wide circle of purchasers.^ 

47. VII. 25G. G-eorge Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 7G], born m Salem, 
died in Portland, ]\Iaine. A manufacturer. Residence : Portland. 

When he was fourteen years old, he entered the hardware store of Dean 
& Co., then the largest establishment of the kind in Salem. He remained 
with this firm five years, and then left to assist his brother Timothy in his 
new business. A year or two later he accepted a favorable offer to act as 
salesman for a firm engaged in the sale of hardware in Portland. On 
becoming of age, he set up for himself in the crockery and hardware busi- 
ness, and was soon joined by his brother David. 

The most important and far-reaching of his business projects was the 
starting a manufactory of knives and forks in the neighborhood of 
Portland. lie had secured patents on some designs which he had 
made, and expected by certain contrivances to effect a great reduction in 
the cost of manufacture. The business was perseveringly pursued by the 
firm of Gr. & D. N. Ropes, amid failures and discouragement, and although 
George Ropes did not live to realize his hopes, the manufactory was con- 
tinued after his death, by his brother David, and achieved a complete 

> Letter of Joseph Eoi.es, dated Dee. 21, 1891. » Ibid. 

20 



402 THE nCKEUIXG GENEALOGY. 

success. The factory \v;is reinovc-d to Merkleu, Conn., where to-day the 
Merklen Cutlery Company is conducting a very successful business in com- 
petition with imported and domestic cutlery. At the time that the ^Messrs. 
Ropes Comjjany was started there was only one manufactory of table 
cutlery in the United States, and that one was on a very confined scale, so 
that tliis successful enterj^rise may justly be considered the fij-st to compete 
with foreign trade in this important branch of manufacture.^ 

47. VII. 26G. Charlotte Bugyles^ the wife of George Ropes. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of Constant and Sally (Green) Ruggles, of 
liardwick, ^lass. L>j,lia LaiirJia Lc^Lce [47. VII. i?-75] is her niece. 
Her ancestry includes the following families: Ruggles, Fowle, "Wood- 
bridge, Dudley, White, Cogswell, Thom})son, Hawkes, Spooner, Pratt, 
Wing, Ewer, Ruggles, Gibson, Devotion, Green, Stone. See Axcestkt 
Tables ^^-, 

47. VII. 257. Mary Anne Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 76], born in 
Salem. Residence : Salem. 

A heliotype of Mrs. Bertram's residence is given facing page 254. It is 
the same house that was formerly occupied by Judge Samuel Putnam [54- 
55. VI. 102']. Mrs. Bertram owns the house on the corner of Munroe and 
Essex streets which was formerly the residence of her grandfather, 
Benjamin Ropes. 

47. VII. -'-J/. John Bertram, her husband, born in the Island of 
Jersey, died in Salem. A merchant. Residence : Salem.* 

John Bertram came to Salem when he was quite a lad, with his father. 
His family were residents of the Parish of St. Saviour in the Isle of Jersey, 
and had always belonged there as far back as ho was able to trace. They 
were of the middle class. His education began in a French school, but the 
year before he left Jersey he was a pupil in an English school. He was the 

> Letter of Joseph Kopes. dated Dec. 21. ISOl. 

^ The date of his birth is given as Feb. 11, ITDO, in the Salem Gazette of Jlarch 23, 
1S82, and in Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XV. p. 307, and Vol. XXI. p. 
83, while the same work, Vol. VIII. p. 49, gives it as Oct. 11, 179G. 



JOHN BERTRA.N[. 

[47. VII, :57.] 

From the F'orirait r.\ Epgak Tarker, now r\ the possession of the 
East India Mvrini Society, of Sai.em, Mass. 



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SEVENTH CEXERATIOy. 403 

only one of the family \\\\o mi'ler^tdod Enyllsli, and to the end of liis life 
he retahitjd lii.s knowledge of tlie two languages. 

The family eiubarkt'd in tlie ship "'Alert," bound for Baltimore, but 
owing to a leak in the vessel she was obliged to put into Boston, Sept. 1, 
1807. Here his father met Captain Pinel, of Salem, to whom he had 
brought letters of introduction, and who advised him to settle in Salem. 
He acted on this advice, and made Salem his home. 

John Bertram was sent to Master Hacker's school to finish his educa- 
tion. In 180I>, lie It-t't school to assist his fallier, but the work did not 
prove congenial. He had a strong desire to go to sea, and in December, 
1812, being then sixteen years old, he shipped o;i board tlie ship " Hazard," 
bound for xUexandria and Lisbon. His next voyage was on the private 
armed schooner '* ]\[orikey," Captain Glover. She sailed for Charleston, 
Nov. 27, 1813, but was hardly out of Salem harbor, when she was pm-sued 
by the enemy and chased into Gloucester, where she laid for several days. 
She finally started on her voyage, was again pursued, but succeeded in 
reaching her destination. Receiving his discharge, he shipped at Charles- 
ton, I\rarch 1, 1814, on board the privateer "Herald,'' a vessel of three 
hundred tons and carrying one luindred and twenty-five men and nine 
guns. Dnring hur crui^^e she capt\ired a British packet, and Mr. Bertram 
was put on board of her as one <.)f tlie prize crew. But they, in tum, were 
captured and carried to Berniuihi, where they were coniined in a prison 
ship, and finally sent to England ; but they arrived there too late to be 
sent to ])artmoor, peace having taken place. On returning to Salem, he 
resumed his sea-faring life, and, rising through the various grades, finallv 
became master of a vessel. After making many voyages which carried 
him over the greater i)a.rt of the world, he became a merchant, and a very 
successful one. He was about three years on the coast of Patagonia, and 
carried on trade in various ports of South America, at the Cape of Good 
Hope, at Zanzibar, at Mocha, and at Madagascar. He was extensively 
engaged ivi the rubber business at Para, and in the earlier California trade. 
To the day of his death, his house took the lead hi the imports from Mada- 
gascar, Zanzibar, and Mocha. In 18.5'^, he became interested in railroads. 
He bought large tracts of land in Towa, and was one of the projectors and 



404 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

buikler.-s of the Cliiea^o, Lnva, and Nebraska Eailroad, of which he was 
vice-president at the tune of his death. He carried into this new business 
the energy, caution, and foresight whicli had characterized him in his com- 
mercial enterprise, and he met with success. 

In 1827, he became a member of the Essex Lodge of Freemasons ; in 
May, 1829, of the Old Salem Marine Society, and in January, 1830, of 
the East India ^Marine Society. He kept up his membership in all the 
organizations until the time of his death. 

As a citizen. Captain Ixntram was without reproach. Although deeply 
interested in the prosperity of his adopted city, he was averse to holding 
ofHce, and several times declined to be a candidate for mayor of Salem. 
He did, however, serve in the Common Council in 1837 and 1838, and re- 
presented Salem in the General Court in 1857 and 18G3. 

He left a very lai-ge fortune. He was a very liberal man, and during 
his life every praiseworthy object was sure of his generous support. His 
two great gifts to the public were the Salem City Hospital and the Old 
Men's Home. On the first of December, 1887, his heirs offered to the city 
of Salem his fine residence on Essex Street, to be used as a public library. 
The offer was accepted. Ilis widow and daughters also gave the library 
a portrait of Captain Bertram painted by F. P. Vinton, of Boston. In 
private intercourse he was a genial and companionable man, and his 
reminiscences were both interesting and instructive. 

His first wife, whom he married Oct. 19, 1823, was :\rary C. Smith, 
who was born about the year 1800, and died April 18, 1837. By her he 
had the following childi-en : — 

John H. Ekrteam, born June, 1831, and died July 1, 1S32. 

Mary Jane Bertram, born March 27, 1837. She married, Oct. 7, 1863, George 
Eobinson Einmerton. 

His second wife, whom he married I\rarch 25, 1838, was Clarissa 
{McInti/re)MlIld [15. VIII. 17G]. By her he had the following children : — 

Augusta Bertram, died Sept. 13, IS-IS, aged 8 years. 

Claka M. Bertram, married David P. Kimball. 

AxNiE P. Bertram, married, April 23, 18C7, William George Webb. 



SEVENTH G EXE RATION. 405 

The heliotype iicre yivt-u of Captain Bertram is from a painting by 
Edgar Parker, in j)o,sse.s.sion of the East India Marine Society of Salem.^ 

Captain John Ik-rtrum was a son of John and Mary (Perchard) Bertram. 
His fatiier and mother were born in the Parish of St. Saviour, Isle of 
Jersey. Ancestry Tablks ^^s- 

47. VII. 25S. Joseph. Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 7G], bom in Salem. 
An artist. Ptesidence : Salem. 

After leaving scliool Joseph Ropes went into the bookstore of Whipple 
& Lawrence, where he was a clerk for seven years. In the year 1833, ho 
moved from Sah.-m to Portlanil, Maine, and set up with his bvotlior, George 
Ropes, in the hardware and crockery business. Mr. Ropes for many years 
had been passionately fond of art, and, about the year 1848, he went to 
New York and entered upon its study. He returned to Portland as an 
artist. From Portland he removed to Hartford, Conn., where he opened a 
studio, and remained there until 1855, when he was married and went to 
Italy. After staying in Italy for eleven years, spending most of his time 
in Rome and its vicinity, and devoting himself to landscape painting, he 
returned to America. He made his home for a few years in Philadelphia, 
and in Germantown. About 1880, ho returned to Salem, where he still 
resides and has a studio. 

47. VII. 25S. Mareia JEUzaheth Seivall, the wife of Joseph Ropes, 
born in Bath, Elaine, died in Italy. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of "William Dummer and Rachel Allen 
(Trufant) Sewall, of Bath, Maine. Her ancestry includes the following 
families: Sownll, Hunt, Hummer, Archer, Fesscndon, Batchelder, Dunning, 
Marsh, Trufant, Brooks, Lombard, Allyn. See Axcestkt Tables ^'j\. 

47. VII. 259. David Nichols Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 76], born in 
Salem, died in Orange, N. J. Residence : Orange. 

Mr. Ropes was early employed as a boy in one of the Salem banks, and 
afterwards as a clerk in his brother Timothy's store. Then he went to 

* The Salem Ret^'istor of March 23, 18S2 ; Esses Institute Historical Collections, Vol. 
XV. pp. 307-308, and Vol. XXI. pp. Sl-96. 



406 THE PTCKEniXG GENEALOGY. 

PortliUid, Maine, and worked iji his Lrotlicr George's store, and rose to be 
his partner in manufacturing table cutlery. He superintended the practical 
part of the business, first at Saccarappa, Maine, and then at Meriden, Conn., 
to which place tlio establishment was removed after the death of George 
Ropes. In ^It-riden, David Ropes brought his goods to a high degree of 
excellence, and competed successfully with foreign manufacturers. But a 
tempting offer caused him to dispose of his Meriden interest, and he became 
a partner in tlie firm of Po})penhusen & Co., of New York, large manufac- 
turers of rubber goods. 

From Meriden, ]\Ir. Ropes removed to Orange, N. J., where he became 
one of its leading citizens. He served in the city government as council- 
man and alderman, and was finally elected mayor. He invested largely in 
vacant lands, through which he laid out streets, and these streets are now 
constantlv being lined with dwellings. He was also instrumental in grad- 
ing and macadamizing the old streets, and added in many other ways to 
the attractiveness of the city. The high esteem in which he was held was 
expressed at his death by the eulogistic resolutions of public and other 
organizations. The New England Society of Orange, of which he was 
president for two years, say of him, in a long tribute to his memory, that 
few men have lived and died among us leaving a record of a purer and 
more useful life. He was the energetic man of business, the uncompromising 
advocate of tlie right, the friend of the slave, tlie helper of the needy, and 
the wise counsellor in matters of public policy and public welfare. In all 
the relations of public and private life he acted well his part, and in depart- 
ing has left lioliind him a reputation for uprightness, honesty, and charity, 
unsullied by a blemish to mar his character or lessen our respect.^ 

47. \T!I. 250. Lijdia Laurelia lii.shee, the wife of David Nichols 
Ropes, born in Hartford, Conn. Residence : Orange, N. J. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of the Rev. John and Mercy (Ruggles) Bisbee, 
of Hartford, Coim. Charlotte Euggks [47. VII. 256'] was her aunt. Her 
father gi-aduated at Brown University with the highest honors, studied law, 

* Obitiiary of :\rr. Ropes in the Orangp. N. .T.. Chronicle of July 27, 1889 ; also a 
letter of his brother, Joseph Eopes, of Dec. 21, 1891. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 407 



but became a Uuiversalist minister. Her mother married, for a second hus- 
band, Captain Daniel Jackson, of Plymouth, Mass. After Captain Jackson's 
death, she entered the New Enghind Female Medical College of Boston, 
although she was then fifty-two years old, took the two years' course, re- 
ceived her diploma, and practised for twenty-three years in Boston as a 
homoeopathic physician. She died Dec. 13, 1877.^ 

Mrs. Ropes's ancestry includes the following families : Bisbee, Brooks, 
Sampson, Nash, Soule, Standish, Alden, MuUins, Soule, Euggles, Fowle, 
"Woodbridge, Dudluv, ^Vllite, Cogswell, Thompson, Hawkes, Spooner, 
Pratt, Wing, Ewer, Ruggles, Gibson, Devotion, Green, Stone. See 
Ancestry Tables ^^"^j-. 

47. VII. 2G0. Henry Ropes [Timothy 47. VI. 76], born in Salem, 
died in Brooklyn, N. Y. A merchant. Residence: Brooklyn." 

On leaving school, he attempted to learn the trade of a cabinet-maker, 
but it proved detrimental to his health, so he gave it up, and went to 
Portland, where he became an assistant in the business of his brothers. 
After the death of his brother George, he was in some mechanical em- 
ployment for a time, and then became a travelling salesman for manu- 
facturers of fancy goods. He afterwards carried on a similar business in 
New York in his own name, not as agent for others, but as both purchaser 
and seller. He was an indefatigable worker, and did a large business. At 
his home in Brooklyn, he was especially known for his interest in ^Mission 
Sunday-schools and in benevolent enterprises of a similar character.'* 

47. VII. 260. Hart'iet Judson, the wife of Hemy Ropes, probably 
died in Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of Levi and Mary (Malcher) Judson, of 
Hudson, N. Y. 

» Letter of ilrs. David X. Eopes of Oct. 20, 1S92, and Family Eecords of Some 
of the Desceodants of Thomas Besbedge (Bisbee), by Willii.m B. Lapham, pp. 40—11, in 
which there are errors. 

^ The date of his death is given in the Salem Gazette of April 14, 1S91, as April 5, 
1891 ; while his sister-in-law, Mrs. Lydia L. Ropes, gives the date as April 6, 1891. 

■ Letter of his brother, Joseph Eopes, of Salem, dated Dec. 21, 1891. 



408 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

48. \I1. 202. Joiin Higginson Cabot [Aun 4S. \l. 80], probably 
bora in Salem, baptized tliere Aug-. 18, 1782, died in Marseilles, 
France. 

In 1803 and 1804, when Mr. Cabot was about twenty-one years old, he 
was established at the Isle of I'rancc as a merchant consifrnee, and as agent 
for Salem merchants. In 1S08, while he was on board the ship Creole, 
bound for Boston, John Williams, owner, tlie vessel was seized by the 
British, and 31 r. Cabot was taken off and carried to Fort St. George, 
Poonamallce, and was detained there as a prisoner of Avar for several months. 
No reason was assigned tor this high-handed proceeding; but, presumably 
he was supposed to have some connection with the French. His corres- 
pondence with the British authorities about his detention shows ability, 
coolness, and determination, and finally resulted in his release. He after- 
wards resided at Marseilles on account of ill health. 

He was a mail of high character and sound judgment. His wit, con- 
versational powers, and elegant manners made his society sought for 
by the most intelligent and cultivated people wherever he happened to 
be. Ho kept a diary, which is now in the possession of his nephew, John 
Higginson Cabot, to whom we are indebted for most of the material for 
this sketch. 

48. Yll. 263. Mary Ann Ca"bot [Ann 48. YI. 80]. 
For an account other see pages 295-2DG. 

48. VII. 263^. Xafhuuif'I Cabot Lee, her first husband. 
His number in direct descent is [1. VII. 7]. For an account of Mr. Lee 
see page 295. 

48. VII. 263'. Francis BlancJiartl, her second husband, died in 
Wenham, of consumption. A lawyer, ricsidence: Boston. 

Francis Blanchard. II. C 1802. began tlie study of law with Judge 
Charles Jackson [2. VIT. 10']. and finally became his partner. He was much 
esteemed for his good sense, and his legal acquirements were considered 
extraordinary for his age. He first opened a law office in Newburyport, 
but after practising there thi-ee months, he removed to Boston, Oct. 7, 1805. 



SEVEXTir GEXEEATION. 409 

At tlie tiaio of his death, he was one of the leading hnvyers in Boston. He 
was bui-ied in Wenhaiu.^ 

Mr. Blanchard and his wife were second cousins. His number in direct 
descent is [53. VII. 298]. 

48. VII. 2G4. Frederick Cabot [Ann 48. VI. SO], bom in Salem, died 
in Bfookhne, Mass., of old ago. A merchant. Residence : Brookline. 

About the year 1825, ^Iv. Cabot became interested in the establisliment 
of the Kllot 3Iills, in Xewton, and some time afterwards he took part in 
organizing- the Lowell ^Innufacturing Company, and was its first treasurer. 
He subsequently assisted in establishing a number of other cotton and 
woollen mills in Xew England. During the latter part of his life he 
livo in Brookline. 

There is a fine crayon portrait of Mr. Cabot, by Porter, in the posses- 
sion of his family.^ 

48. VII. 264- Marianne Cabot, the wife of Frederick Cabot, born in 
Milton, Mass., died in Brookline, Mass. 

Mrs. Cabot was educated at Miss Cushing's boarding school in Hingham, 
Mass. A fine crayon portrait of her, by Porter, is in the possession of her 
family. 

She was a daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Barrett) Cabot, of Boston. 
She and her husband were first cousins. EJizahdh Cahof [1-2. VI. 2^] was 
her aunt ; Joseph Cahof [6. VI. 11] and Francis Cahof [48. VI. SO] were her 
uncles; Elizahefh PerJdns Cahot [2. VIII. Id] is her niece; and Richard 
Clarke Cahof [51. IX. 1033] is her grandnephew. Her mother was a 
woman of much ability. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Cabot, Orne, Thompson, Higginson, "Whitfield, Sheafe, Savage, Symmes, 
Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, Boardman, Bull, Truesdale, Halton, Barrett, 
Barnard, Manning, GeiTish, Lowell, "Waldron, Noyes, Clarke, Appleton, 
Everard, Paine, "Whittingham, Lawrence, "Winslow, Chilton, Hutchinson, 
Marbury, Hamby, Peraberton. See Ancestry Tables -^1^. 

1 Gardner Family Records. 

' ilost of the facts here recorded were given by John H. Cabot. 



410 THE nCKKIUXG aEXEALOGY. 

48. MI. 2G.3. Eliza Cabot [Ann -is. \I. 80], probaLly bora and died 
in Salem. 

49. VII. 2G(.i. Maria Orne [Mary 41). VI. 83], probably born in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

It is stated tliat 3Irs. Tucker's death was caused by the shock she 
received on hearing- of the niurdtr of her In-other in the Ked Sea. 

The Salem Gazette of Fridav, Dee. Ill, 18()G, contains an obituary of 
Mrs. Tucker whii-li pays a higii tribute t<i her character. It says she was 
amiable, and tliat few deatlis have given so great cause of grief; that she 
was rich in every virtue that can odorn the saint or grace the woman, and 
that she had a soft and intelligent countenance. It also says that her con- 
versation was abvays seiisilde and enlivened with wit, and that she was 
a zealous member of the Salem Female Cliaritable Society. She adopted 
two children. 

9. VII. 266. Ichahod Tucker, the husband of Maria Orne. 
Mr. Tucker's second wife was Esther Orne Paine [7. VII. 46]. For 
account of Mr. Tucker see pages -318-319. 

49. VII. 267. Joseph Orne [Mary 49. VI. 83], probably born in 
Salem, died at sea. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Joseph Orne's father died when he was a child, and liis uncle, William 
Orne, a merchant of Salem, took him into his family to bring up. On 
leaving school, he was taken into his counting-room, and, after remaining 
there two or three years, he went to sea. He made several voyages in bis 
uncle's employ, the last of which was as captain of the ship Essex. On 
this voyage, as they were sailing np the Red Sea, bound to Mocha, for 
coffee. Captain Orne and his entire crew were murdered by some natives 
wdiom he had imjinulently taken on board. 

Tlie heliotype «>f Captain Onie here given was taken from a miniature 
now at the Essex Institute in Salem.^ 

49. VII. 268. Sarah White [Sarah 49. VI. 84]. 
For an account of her see pages 261-262. 
* Essex Institute Historical Cullectious, Vol. IV. p. 27C, and Xichols Family Records. 



JOSEPH ORXE. 

Ug. Vir. .^6;.] 

From the Miniature now in the posse'.^ion of ihe Essex Institute, 
Ai- Salem, M\5b. 



I jtjj j gjPK-' "^W^'" '-'?^ : ""^-P.WmitW i; " ! .* .it,- '"^ -''' 'v.iyy. ! >»,.^»j|i^ 



W MM t WJH-tM-M- i y i iS 



■^i 



MARY HEXL!:v (WHITE) GILE. 

U9- VII. 2&>] 

From the Portrait by Osooon, .now in the possession of 
John Pickering. Es^>., oe Salem, Mass. 



SEVEXTH GENET:ATIOX. 411 



49. VII. 2GS. John I'icket'lng, her husljand. 

His number in direct descent is [58. VI. 109]. For an account of Mr. 
Pickering see pages 25S-2G1. 

49. VII. 2G9. Mary Henley White [Sarah 49. VI. 84], born in 
Salem, baptized there May 9, 1779, as Mai'ia Hendley, died in Milton, 
I\Iass.i 

There is a portrait of Jlrs. Gile, painted by Osgood, hanging in the old 
I'ickering hou»e in Salem. A heliotype of it is here given. 

49. VII. 2G0. Samuel Gile, her husband, born in Plaistow, N. H., 
died in Milton, ]\Iass. A minister. Residence : Milton. 

Dr. Gile, Dartmouth College, 1804, studied divinity at Andover, 3Iass. ; 
and, on being licensed to preach, his services were eagerly sought after. 
On Feb. 18, 1807, he was ordained over the Congregational Church in 
Milton. His commanding presence, his courtly manners, his powerful 
voice, his rich style, and his extraordinary devotional powers made him a 
very popular preacher. He was distinguished above most men for his 
remarkable gift in prayer, and he applied the teachings of the gospel to the 
daily duties and minute concerns of life. He was very prudent and pacific 
in his actions. His conduct was uniform and consistent, and his disposition 
peculiarly amiable. There was a perfection, completeness, and symmetry 
to his nature which made him one of the most estimable of men. 

He lived and died in the belief of the evangelical doctrines ; but although 
firm in his religious sentiments, he was liberal toward those who differed 
from him, and continued to exchange with the Unitarians, after many of 
his brethren had refused to do so. 

Dr. Gile never manifested any fondness for pirblic life ; but he performed 
a number of public duties, and held several important offices in the religious 
community. He was called to preach before the Foreign Mission Society 
of Boston and vicinity, the Norfolk Education Society, the Society for 
Promoting Christian Knowledge, the Society for Propagating the Gospel, 
the Convention of Congregational ^Ministers in Massachusetts, etc. In the 

* She 13 recorded as Maria Hendley in the Eighteenth Century Baptisms in Salem, 
by James A. Emmerton, p. 122. 



412 THE nCKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 



education of indigent and pious young- men for the Christian ministry, he 
took the deepest interest. At the time of his death he was secretary of 
the Norfolk Auxihary ]'>ducation Society, and a member of the board of 
directors of the American Education Society. In 183G, he received the 
deg-ree of D.D. from the University of Vermont.^ 

Samuel Gile was a son of ]\rajor Ezekiel and Gertrude (Davis) Gile, of 
i'hiistow, N. II. His father was a brave officer of the Revolution. His 
ancestry includes the following families: Gile, Davis, Bradley, Heath, 
Davis. See Ancestisy Tables X:^\. 

49. VJI. :V('0. ITancy Payson [Sandi 49. VI. 81], died in Roxbury, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Adams was buried in the cemetery at Milton, Mass., where her 
gravestone M"as standing a few years ago. 

49. VII. 270. Nathaniel Adams, her husband, born in Portsmouth, 
N. H., died in Milton, Mass., of apoplexy. A chemist. Residence : Milton. 

Dr. Adams resided in Portsmouth until 181G and then moved to Salem. 
He finally removed to ^.lilton. 

He wa3 a son of Nathaniel and Eunice (Woodward) iVdams. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Adams, Ihigdon, Parker, Stanley, 
Grafton, AVoodward. See Axcestry Tables -^f-^. 

49. VII. 271. Eliza Leavltt Payson [Sarah 49. VI. 84], born in 
Haverhill, ^lass., died in Portland, Maine. 

Mrs. Goddard was a woman of great dignity and grace of manner, as 
well as lovely in her person and mind. She was of the blonde type, with 
beautiful blue eyes, and was famed for her remarkable complexion, which 
.she retained till she died. The heliotype of Mrs. Goddard is from a 
portrait in the possession of her grandson, General Henry G. Thomas, of 
Portland.- 

1 Eccollections of Ye Olden Time, by William ^l. Cornell, pp. 200-210. Funeral Ser- 
mon by the llev. John Coduian, D.D. ; The History of .Milton, edited \>y A. K. Teele, which 
contains a portrait of Mr. Gile, pp. 26.5-2G6 ; and The Genealogy and History of the Gile 
Family, by Charles Burleigh, pp. 219-251. 

' Conimuuieated by ilrs. Charles W. Goddard. 



ELIZABETH LEAVITT (PAYSON) GODDARD. 

[49. VII. 271.1 

From the Poriraii- n.jw in the ro-;sEsMON of General Hesry 
GoDn^Ku Thomas, OF Portland, Me. 



SEVEXTH GEXERATIOX. 413 

49. VII. 2i 1. llent'ij (J'xhlartl, her Imsband, born in Portsmouth, 
N. II., died in Purthind, Mahie. A merchant. Residence : Portland. 

Mr. Goddard was enga^^ed in the hardware business in Portsmouth, 
until 1820, when he removed to Portland, and established himself in the 
same business on Middle Street opposite Cross Sti-eet. He continued in 
business many years, until at last his infirmities compelled him to retire. He 
was a member of the Congregational Church at Portsmouth fifty years, 
and for many years a member of the High Street Church in Portland. He 
was honorable and high-minded, and a man of prominence in the community, 
although he would never accept a public office. 

Mr. Goddard was a man of considerable literary ability, and for a 
period of fifty years contributed to the Portland press articles in prose and 
verse. A number of these were gathered together by request and printed 
in a pamphlet entitled, " A Few of the Very Many Miscellaneous Articles 
in Poetry and Prose, written by Henry Goddard during the last half 
century" [1866] .^ 

Henry Goddard was a son of the Hon. John and Susannah (Heath) God- 
dard, of Portsmouth. Frances Dana Goddard [49. Ylll. o47'\ w\as his first 
cousin, and Manj Goddard Wigglcsworth [58. VII. 334] was his first cousin 
once removed. Mr. Goddard's father, the Hon. John Goddard (H. C. 1777), 
was born in Brookline, Mass., and was one of sixteen children. He studied 
medicine, but was obliged to give up his profession, from ill health. He 
then engaged in mercantile pursuits, in which he became distinguished for 
his integrity, method, and thoroughness. He was president of the Union 
Bank of Portsmouth, and a member of botli branches of the New Hampshire 
Legislature. He was also chosen as senator to Congress, but declined the 
office, and was more than once invited to be a candidate for governor of 
New Hampshire." The ancestry of Henry Goddard includes the follow- 
ing families: Goddard, Miles, Treadway, Howe, Jennison, Macomber, 
Stearns, Manning, Seaver, White, Weld, Heath, Weld, Bowen, Bridge, 
Crafts, Seaver, Ballard, Weld, Devotion, White, Drew, Drusse. See 
Ancestet Tables ^^V- 

^ The Boston Journal of December, 1871. 

"^ Obituary of Dr. Johu Goddard [Portland, 1854]. 



414 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

50. VII. 272. William Pickniaii [p:iiz;ibetli 50. VI. 85], probably 
boru in Salem, baptized there Oct. 10, 1777. 

50. VII. 273. Dudley Leavitt Pickman [Elizabeth 50. VI. 85], 
bora in Salem, baptized there May 2, 1770, died in Salem. A merchant. 
Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Pickman began his business life as a clerk in the office of his father, 
who was naval officer of the Port of Salem. Here he acquired a good 
knowledge of commerce, which he put to such good use that by his own 
exertions he acquired a princely fortune, a larger one than was ever, up to 
his time, possessed by any native of Salem. He early embarked with 
equal success in the great manufacturing enterprises of the day. He was 
distinguished for his sound, practical good sense and an inflexible regard for 
truth and justice, and bore the reputation of a high-minded, honorable, 
upright merchant. His intellectual powers were of a high order. He was 
eminent for his sagacity, sound judgment, and comprehensiveness of mind. 

Mr. Pickman's uncommon mental ability and integrity of character gave 
him merited influence in private life, and induced his fellow-citizens to call 
him on many occasions into the public service. He was for several years 
a member of both branches of the Legislature of Massachusetts. He 
was public spirited and upright in all the relations of life, and his bene- 
factions to literary, religious, and charitable institutions were numerous 
and liberal. He was a member, and one of tlie proprietors, of the Xorth 
Church, Salem. lie took a lively interest in the prosperity of the Unita- 
rian church, and the diffusion of its literature, and was a generous contribu- 
tor to its funds. He was a man of grave and dignified appearance.^ 

In 1819, ho built the house No. 27 Chestnut Street, Salem, a heliotype 
of which is here given. 

There is a fine portrait of Mr. Pickman, painted by Chester Harding, 
now in the possession of Mrs. William D. Pickman, of Boston. A heliotype 
of it is here given. 

* Obituary notices of IMr. Tickman in the Salem Gazette of Xov. 6, 184G, the Salem 
Register of Xov. 9, 1846, and tlie Christian Register of Nov. 14, 1846; also a letter of 
the Rev. Charles C. Sewall to Francis H. Lee, dated Dec. 13, 1884 ; and Essex Institute 
Historical Collections, Vol. XV. p. 303, and Vol. XXVII. pp. 194-19ci. 



DUDI.tA' I.EAVITT FICKMAX. 

[50. VII. 273-] 

From thf. Portrait by Chester Hariunc, now rx the possess-. 
Mrs. Wili.i.vm Uudlev Pickman, of Busion. 






•^ 






\ 




i^virfi^Mfi'm 



THF. HOUSE OF DUDLEY LE AVITT PICKMAX AT 
SALEM, ^L^SS. 

[50. vri. :73l 












f 



,^^^v?^:Sii»fr'"^^ 



e^- 



^> 










^i^' ;.^af^yi>-jf 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 415 

50. VII. J/V. Catht'rhie Sanders, the wife of Dudley L. Pickman, 
probably born in Salem, baptized there Aug. 29, 1784, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Pickman was a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Elkins) Sanders, 
of Salem. Charles Sanders [44. VII. 219] was her brother; Leverett 
Saltonstall [1. IX. 5] and WdUam G. Saltonstall [1. IX. 15] were her 
nephews. Her ancestry includes the following families : Sanders, Cumey, 
Skilling, Robinson, Ilaraden, Ingersoll, Smith, Glover, Eliot, ^Mountfort, 
Curwen, Herbert, AVinthrop, Forth, Read, Tyng, Elkins, Gutch, Miles, 
Derby, Hilman, Basket, Langdon, White, iletcalf, Flint, Johnson, Maverick, 
HaiTlS. See Ancestry Tables j-^\. 

50. VII. 274. Elizabetli Pickman [Elizabeth 50. VI. 85], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there February, 1782, died in Nashua, N. H. 

Mrs. Abbott, having lost her mother in infancy, resided much with her 
grandmother, the widow of Chief Justice Sargeant, in Haverhill. She had 
all the energy and decision of character which distinguished her grand- 
mother, and which peculiarly adapted her to the arduous situation of being 
one among the first settlers of a new village in one of the most unpromising 
and ban-en portions of New Hampshire. There she passed nearly the whole 
period of her life, and, from a few scattered houses, saw grow up one of the 
most flourishing maniifacturing towns. She exerted a wide influence in the 
place, and was greatly respected and beloved.^ 

50. VII. 274- Daniel Abbott, her husband, born in Andover, Mass., 
died in Nashua, N. H. A lawyer. Residence : Nashua. 

Mr. Abbott, H. C. 1797, studied law with Parker Noyes, of Salisbury, 
N. H., where he was fellow-student with Daniel Webster. In 1802, he 
began to practise law in Londonderry, N. H., removing to Dunstable, N. H., 
the same year, where he built a house and office on a barren plain, two 
miles out of town, where no bouse had stood before. This was the begin- 
ning of one of the largest settlements in New Hampshire, — the flourishing 
town of Nashua. He represented the town in the Legislature many years, 

» Obituary notices of Islvs. Abbott in The Salem Gazette of Friday, April 5, ISoO, and 
The Salem Register of Jloiulay, April S, 1S50. 



416 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

and was a member of the Senate and of the Constitutional Convention of 
New Hampshire. 

Mr. Abbott was president of the Nashua ^Manufacturing Company for 
several years ; president of the Nashua Bank many years ; president of the 
Nashua and Lowell Railroad Company for fourteen years after its incor- 
poration ; president of the "^Vilton Railroad from its organization till within 
a short time before his death; and for a long period a member of the Hills- 
borough County Bar. 

A high tribute to ilr. Abbott's private character appeared in the Christian 
Register at the time of his death. He is spoken of therein as courteous, 
philanthropic, and judicious, making no enemies, even in political life. He 
loved the Unitarian faith, and was an admirable proof of the power wdiich its 
truths possess to form a harmonious, beautiful, and holy character.^ 

Mr. Abbott was a son of Timothy and Sarah (Abbott) Abbott. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Abbott, Chandler, Graves, Knight, 
Foster, Jackson, Kimball, Scott, Abbott, Chandler, Barker, Crosby, Abbott, 
Chandler, Graves, Lovejoy. See Ancestry Tables Yii- 

51. Vn. 275. George Williams Lyman [Lydia 51-52. VI. 89], 
born in Kennebunk, IMaine, died in AValtham, Mass., of old age. A mer- 
chant and manufacturer. Residences : Boston and Waltham, Mass. 

Mr. Lyman, H. C. 180G, moved to Boston with his parents when he was 
but two years old. He was fitted for college at the Boston Latin School, 
and was a Franklin medal scholar. At his death, he was the last survivor 
of his class, and the oldest but one of the alumni. For several years he 
was engaged witb his father in the fur trade on the northwest coast of 
America, and in the West India and European trade, and subsequently he 
carried on an extensive business in the China trade. Later in life, Mr. 
Lyman, in association with the Appletons and Lowells, was largely inter- 
ested in the cotton manufactories of Lowell, Lawrence, and Holyoke, and 
he was treasurer of the Lowell Carpet Company and of the Hamilton and 

» Necrology of Alumni of Harvard College, by Joseph Palmer, p. 27. In this work 
his name is spelled with one " t," that being the more ancient and common form, and that 
which is approved in the Abbot Genealogy. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 417 

xVppIetou Mills, at Lowell, and later of tli- Lyman I^IIlls, uf Holyoke, Mass. 
It was under his fosteriny; care that the lute E. B. Eigelun's wonderful in- 
vention of the carpet louui was perfected and put into operation at the works 
of the Lowell 3Linufacturing Company in Lowell. 

Mr. Lyman was a director in the Columbian Bank, which he held to the 
last ; a director of the Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company ; a 
director of the Boston and Lowell Railroad ; trustee and president of the 
Massachusetts Society for the Promotion of Agriculture, besides holding 
other positions. 

In his ^-ouno-er days he was a captain of the New England Guards, and 
adjutant of the Boston Hussars. 

From the year 1839, he was largely interested in agriculture. At that 
time he came into possession, through the death of his father, of the beauti- 
ful estate in "Waltham, comprising nearly four hundred acres. 

Mr. Lyman was a man of broad and charitable views, as well as of great 
business ability, and he left a record of a useful life, the influence of which 
has extended through all the channels of trade and the varied walks of 
society.^ 

There is a fine portrait of ^Iv. Lyman, painted by Hunt, in the possession 
of his daughter, Mrs. Philip II. Sears. 

51. VII. Q7o^. JEJhfibcth Gray Otis, the first wife of George Williams 
Lyman, born in Boston, died in St. Croix, W. I." 

Mrs. Lyman was a daughter of the Hon. Harrison Gray and Sarah (Foster) 
Otis, of Boston. Sail II Otis [51. VIII. oGS] was her niece. The father of 
Mrs. Lyman was one of the leading citizens of Boston. He was born on 
the estate adjoining the Revere House, graduated at Harvard College in 
1783, studied law, and was constantly in the public service. He was a 
member of Congress, speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representa- 

1 The Boston Daily Advertiser of Sept. 25, 1880 ; also tlie Harvard Register for 
1880, p. 210. 

^ The date of her birth is given as May 21, 1791, in the Genealogy of the Lyman 
Family, by Lyman Coleman, p. 362; while it was given as :\[ay 31, 1701, by the late ^Mrs. 
Arthur T. Lyman. The latter agrees with the diary of George W. Lyman, which states 
that she was married on her 19th birthday. 

27 



418 THE FICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

tives, president of tlie Massachusetts Seuat..', judge of tlie Court of Common 
Pleas, mayor of Boston, and held a great reputation as an orator. He was 
distinguished for his noble bearing, graceful gestures, and courteous 
manners.^ 

Mrs. L}'Tuan's ancestry includes the following families : Otis, Jacob, 
Bacon, Mayo, All}Tie, Doten, Chu-k, Faunce, Morten, Gray, Harrison, 
Peirce, Lewis, Cheever, Dudson, Button, Vermaes, Foster, Ilanford, Hol- 
land, Bossinger, Banks, Gwin, Spear. Deering, Collier, "Willis, Tay, Xewell, 
l)0ardman. See Axcestky Tables x5^'- 

51. VII. 27o-. Annv Pratf, the second wife of George Williams Lyman, 
bom in Boston, died in Boston. 

A crayon of Mrs. Lyman, by Cheney, is in the possession of her son, 
Arthur Theodore Lyman. 

Iler number in direct descent is [52. VII. 2S2]. 

51. VIL 27G. Theodore Lyman [Lydia 61-52. VI. R9], born in 
Boston, died in Brookline, ^lass., of consumption. Residence: Brookline." 

General Lyman, H. C. 1810, was privately fitted for Phillips Exeter 
Academy by the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and entered in 1801. In 
1814, he went to Europe, and was at Paris while it was in occupation of 
the xVllied Powers. On his return home, he resumed the study of law, to 
wdiicli he had given some attention, rather as the completion of a liberal 
education than with any intention of engaging in its practice. His health 
failing, in 1817, he made a second tour to I^urope, passing some time with 
his uncle, Samii;.el Williams, in London, and then joining his friend, the 

* Sketch of Mr. Otis in the Memorial Biographies of the Xew England Historic- 
Genealogical Society, Vol. I. pp. 14G-1G0; also one in The Hundred Boston Orators, by 
James S. Loring, pp. lSS-217. 

^ The date of his birth is given in the Genealogy of the layman Family, by Lyman 
Coleman, p. 3G2, as Feb. 17, 1792, and on p. 3G1 of the same work as Feb. 20. 1792. This 
last date is given in The !^remo^ial History of Boston, Vol. ITT. p. 2.37; wliile it is given as 
Feb. 22, 1792. in The Hundred Boston Orators, p. C)9><. The date of his marriage is given 
as May 16, 1821, by the late Mrs. Arthur Theodore Lyman, and in the manuscript of the 
late Miss Sarah P. Pratt; while the Genealogy of the Lyman Family, ijy Lyman Coleman, 
and Theodore Lyman give it as May 15, 1S21. 



THKODORI:: LVMAX. 

[51- VH. 2:6.] 

rijKVKAtr pv Gkrard, r\iNTF.n ix iSiS, n.>\\- in thk pos^essk 
OF Mrs. TiiFopoRK I.ym \n, of Urookhnk. Mass. 



J^\ ( 



7^i»*^ 



\ 



>'\ 



SET Ey Til GENERATIOX. 119 

Hun. Eilwai'l l]vei\jtt, in ;iu L-xtuiulL-il tour in tliu .^outli and ea.>t of Euroj^e. 
On bis return to xVuiurica in the autumn of 181'J, General Lynum began to 
take an interest in jiublic life. Fruni 1820 to 182,5, lie .served in both 
bouses of the Legislature of 3Iassaeliusetts. lu 1820, be delivered the 
Fourth of July Oration in Boston. General Lyman had a taste for military 
affairs, and took an active interest in the volunteer militia of Massachusetts. 
He was an aide-de-camp of Governor Brooks, an officer of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery T'ompan}-, and a brigaldier-general in the first division 
of the ]Massachusetrs militia, lie was chosen major-general, but declined 
the office. In 1834 ;nid in 1835, ^Ir. Lyman was elected mayor of Boston ; 
and it was while he lield this ollico tluit the abolition riots and the bm-ning 
of the Ursuline Convent in Charlestown took })lace. In these trying times 
it is said that the vigilance and discretion of General Lyman were equal to 
the crisis. To him we are indebted for the planting of trees on Boston 
Common which, before his time, with the exception of the malls, contained 
no trees. 

On his retirement from office, he witlidrew to jjrivate life. lie bad be- 
come the owner of the beautiful estate of Governor Gore, at AYaltbam ; but 
he gave up this place after bis life's death, and bought an estate in Brook- 
line, formerly owned by the Hon. Jonathan Mason. It is one of the largest 
and most beautiful places in the vicinity of Boston, and is famous for its 
fine avenue and lawn. 

General Lyman was an active member of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society, and left a bequest to it in his will. He interested himself much 
in the public charities of Boston, and gave his time and attention to improv- 
ing the condition of the suffering classes. He v\-as president and a trustee 
of the Boston Asylum and Farm vSchool for Indigent Boys, to \\hicb institu- 
tion be left a liberal bequest. His great work, however, was the foundation 
of the State Refonn School at "Wes tborough, to which he gave at different 
times very large sums of money. 

General Lyman was fond of books, and collected a valuable library. 
When the Boston Athena}um was removed from Pearl Street, be took a 
leading part in its arrangement and decoration. He was the author of 
" Three Weeks in Paris" [Boston, ISU] ; "The Political State of Italy" 



420 THE PICKEIIIXG GENEALOGY. 



[1S20] ; " Account of the Ilartfurd Coin eiitiou " [1823] ; " The Diplumacy 
of the United States with Foreiiru Nations" [1820 and 1828]. 

He was a pei'son of hiyhly pulislied manners, great evenness of temper, 
exeraphiry in all the relations of life, and exact in all its duties.' General 
Lyman in his youno^er days appears to have been very fond of dress, and 
the following-, taken from a family book, is interesting as showing to what 
extent the dressing of the neck was carried: — 

" Theodore's passion for dress is in a degree worn off, still we have had to tie his 
cravat in various ways before the proper plait, alias Pliiladeliiliia fashion, could be 
imilatcJ. Three hi'ooclies are worn by some to keep tliis neck stiffeuer in place." 

A note added to this says : — 

"Mrs. Sam. Cabot tells me her husband used to wear two neckcloths of muslin, 
each \\ yards square." - 

His portrait, painted by Gerard of Paris, in 1818, has been engraved for 
volume three, page two hundred and thirty-seven, of the ilemorial History 
of Boston. A heliotype taken directly from the portrait is here given. 

bl.\\l.27G. Mavii Eli-aheth Jlendcr^ou, the wife of Theodore 
Lyman, probably born in Xew York, died in Waltham, ]\Iass. 

Mrs. Lyman was a lady of rare personal beauty and accomplishments. 
Her portrait, painted by Alexander, is in the possession of her son, 
Colonel Theodore Lyman. A heliotype of it is here given. 

She was a daughter of William and S.arah (Deraing) Henderson, of 
New York. Pier ancestry includes the following families : Henderson, 
Deming, Hawxhurst. See Ancestry Tables -yi§. 

> The Hundred Boston Orators, by James S. Loring, pp. .391-392, G98-700 ; Mem- 
orial Biographies of tlie Xew England Historic-Genealogical Society, Vol. I. pp. 109-198; 
The Memorial History of Boston, Vol. III. p. 237; Dealings with the Dead, by Lucius ]\[. 
Sargent, pp. 201-206; The History of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 
by Zachariah G. Whitman, pp. 400-401 ; Appletou's Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 
Vol. IV. pp. 61-02; Boston Herald, Oct. 23, 1SS2. Genealogy of the Lymau Family, by 
Lyman Coleman, pp. 364-360, with portrait. 

' Colonel Theodore Lyman's note-book. 



MARY ELIZABETH ( HEXDERSOX) LYMAN. 

I51. vil. -70.^ 

From the PuRrRvir f.y Ai.fxaxdkr, now in the possession of 
Mrs, Theodorf Lyman, of Hkookline. Mass. 




/ 



^1 



^ 



SEVFXTir GEXERATION. 421 



51. VII. 277. Charles Lyman [Lydia 51-52. VI. 89], born in Boston, 
died in Boston, of apoi)lexy, A man of leisure. Residences : Boston and 
Newport, I\. I. 

Mr. Lyman, II. C. 1S19, went to Europe in 1S20. There lie passed 
much of his time uiukr the inorit favorable circumstances, having excellent 
introductions, lie had a tliorough knowledge of French and Italian, and 
spoke both of these languages with purity, while his good memory gave 
him a fund of anecdote which rendered liis conversation most interesting. 
He was a man of liigh character, restrved, courteous to all, in speech and 
demeanor, and cliaritable both in word and deed. 

His long life was of an uneventful character, and was passed in the 
enjoyment of tliose pleasures whicli culture and wealtli give.' 

51. VII. ^rr. Susan JPoii-ell Warren, the wife of Charles Lyman, 
born in Boston, died in Boston, of a fever.^ 

Mrs. Lyman w%a3 a daughter of Dr. John Collins and Susan Powell 
(Mason) Warren, of Boston. John Collhis Warren [51. IX. lOJ^O'] is her 
nephew. Her fatlier was an eminent physician of Boston. Her ancestry 
includes the fulL >wing families : ^Yarren, Tucker, AVilliams, Stalham, Park, 
llolgrave, Ste\-ens, Collins, Avery, Lane, Little, "Warren, Sturdevant, 
Deming, Treat, Green, Mason, Pepper, Johnson, Scollay, Clark, Kilby, 
Simpkins, Pdcliardson, Powell, Dummer, Atwater, Blackman, Bromfield, 
Danforth, Wilson, Coney, Atwater, Blackman. See Axcestrv Tables ^^^. 

52. VII. 27S. Mary Lyman [Lydia 51-52. VI. ,s[)], born in Waltham, 
Mass., died at Forest Hills, Boston. 

Mrs. Eliot was a beautiful and accomplished woman, of a charming 
disposition. Her energy and decision of character were shown in the 
control of a large family and household ; and her dignified and refined 
manners fitted her for the responsible positions in which she was often 
placed. There is a portrait of her in the possession of her daughter, Mrs. 
Stephen H. Bullard.^ 

» Harvard Register for 18S1, p. 3Go. 

= The Boston Kecord of Deaths gives her name as Susan X. Lyman. 
* For these facts we are indebted to Mrs. Stephen H. Ballard. See also an obituary 
notice of Mrs. Eliot in the Christian Register of Saturday, Aug. 28, 1S75. 



422 THE PICKl-niXC GEXEALOGY. 

b2.\ll.27S. Samuel Ath-lns Eliot, her hiishand, Ldiu in Boston, 
died iu Caiubridg-e, ]\Iass, Residences : Boston and Xaliant, Mass.^ 

Mr. Eliot was fitted for college at the Boston Public Latin School, and 
graduated at Harvard College, with high honors, in 1817. He at once 
entered the Pivinity Sl-1ioo1 at Cambridge, and studied theology, but did 
not enter ujxtu tlie clerical profession. He was a gentleman of great 
personal worth, and of eminent public spirit. 

In 1831-35, ho was an alderman of Boston, a member of the school 
committee, and largely etlicient in the introduction of singing into the public 
schools. For many years he was president of the Boston Academy of Music. 

In 1837, 1838, and 1830, he was mayor of Boston, and suppressed with 
great promptness the Broad Street Riot, — a disturbance of threatening 
dimensions. He also re-organized the Boston Fire Department. In IS-tS, 
he was a State senator, and, in 1850—51, a member of Congress. From 
18-42 to 1853, he was treasurer of Harvard College. For a long time he 
was an active member of the Prison Discipline Society, and took a strong 
interest in many of the charities of Boston. He was for many years a 
warden of King's Chapel, and also had charge of the choir. 

In 1853, he joined tlie firm of Charles H. Mills & Co., a connection dis- 
solved by the failure of that firm in 1857. The fortitude and cheerfulness 
with which ]\Ir. Eliot met the loss of his whole property were a lesson to all 
who saw him. In 1856, he was chosen president of the Boston Gas Light 
Company. 

His unblemished moral character, his refined and intellectual tastes, his 
active temperament, and his incorruptible fidelity led his fellow-citizens to 
call him often to their service. The fluctuations of his popularity were many ; 
but he was always believed to be faithful to his highest conviction of right." 

* The date of his death is given as Jan. 29, 18G2, by several authorities; while it is 
given as Jan. 26, 1862, in the Dictionary of American Biography, by Francis S. Drake, 
and in the History of the Wingate Family, by Charles E. L. Wlngate, p. 194. Jan. 29 is 
undoubtedly correct. 

" Obituary in the Boston Daily Advertiser of Jan. 31, 1862 ; Xccrology of Alumni 
of Harvard College, by Joseph Palmer, p. 40G; also The ilemorial History of Boston, Vol. 
III. pp. 243-247, which contains his likeness ; also the same work, Vol. IV. pp. 7-8, for a 
notice of his father with portrait. Llany of the facts stated above were given by ilrs. 
Stephen H. BuUard. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 423 

>[r. Eliot w.!S a son of SaniUr.'l aii'l (Jatln'riiu- (Atkins) Eliot. Charles 
Eliot Guild [52. VIII. oSl] is his nephew, and Emma Bosalii: Guild [50. X. 
JOTS'] is his grandniece. His father was a Boston merchant who fonnded 
the Eliot Professorship of Greek Literatnre in Harvard College. Portraits 
of Samnel and Catherine P^liot, which were painted by Stuart, are in 
the possession of their grandson, President Eliot of Harvard College. 
Samuel Atkins Eliot's ancestry includes the followmg families: Eliot, 
"Woodier, Shattuck. Herrick, Luskin, Marshall, Atkins, Dudley, Dighton, 
Tyng, Sears (.'), Kent, Gookin, Bird, Dolling, Savage, Hutchinson, Marbury, 
Tyng, Sears (?). See A.vcestky Tables ^^^. 

52. YII. 279. WilUani Lyman [Lydia 51-52. YI. 89], probably 
bom and died in Boston. 

52. VII. 280. Mary Pratt [Mary 52. VI. 91], born in Boston, died 
in Boston. Residences : Boston and WatertOAvn, Mass. 

52. VII. 282. Anne Pratt [Mary .52. VI. 91]. 
For an accoimt of her see page 418. 

52. VII. 2S2. George WilUanis Li,nnn)i, her husband. 
His number in direct descent is [ol. VII. 275]. For an account of 
Mr. Lyman see pages 416-417. 

52. VII. 283. Elizabeth Pratt [^lary 52. VI. 91], born in Boston, 
died in Boston. Residence : Boston. 

52. VII. 284. George Williams Pratt [Mary 52. VI. 91], born 
in Boston, died in Boston. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Pratt, H. C 1821, engaged in business, and in later years became 
a stockbroker, having been one of the original founders of the Boston 
Stock Exchange. He was at one time president of the Oriental Bank. 
But it was as a man of cultivated tastes that Mr. Pratt was most distinguished. 
He was one of the founders of Mount Auburn, and one of the earliest and 
most earnest members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. His 
love for plants and flowers led him to procure from abroad new varieties, 
■which he freely gave to others interested in the same objects. He was 



424 THE FICKEBIXG GENEALOGY. 

niiK'li interested in the culture of the dalilia. lie "was a member of tlie 
Natural History Soeiety, and was mucii interested in Conclioloyy, and lie 
formed a valuable collection of shells, a cabinet of whicli his sister gave to 
the Boston Natural History Society. He was a resident member and one 
of the founders of the Boston Numismatic Society, and a resident member of 
the New England Historic-Genealogical Society. 

For many years ]Mr. Pratt was a constant attendant and vestryman of 
King's Chapel, where ho devoted himself to the cultivation of church music 
and to the preservation and restoration of the antiquities of that venerable 
church. He was one of the tirst to introduce and encourage the pleasing 
custom of decorating the altar and chancel with plants and flowers on 
church festivals. 

He was of a very obliging disposition, and of great amiability of 
character.^ 

52. Vn. 284. Mavy Barrow White, Xha wife of George Williams 
Pratt, born in Salem, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Pratt was a daughter of Joseph and Eliza (Story) "White, of Salem. 
She and her sisters were celebrated for their Ijeauty. Charlotte Story 
Forrester [59. YH. J^'.9] and Manj Stone Hodges [59. VHI. 755] were her 
first cousins, and William Story Saryoit [2(1. IX. ^-Zo] is her nephew. Her 
ancestry includes the following families : White, Metcalf, Flint, Johnson, 
Maverick, IlatTis, Muchmore, Browne, Perkins, Burnham, Barrow, Gill, 
Dowse, Rand, Holland, Story, Cooper, Marion, Eddy, Harrison, Peirce, 
Bridge, Pedrick, Brown, Chinn, Martin, Northey, Knott, Devereux, Stacy, 
Pedrick, Boden. See Axcicstry Tables ^j\. 

52. VII. 285. William Pratt [Mary 52. YI. 91], born in Boston, 
died from a fall on the ice. 

Mr. Pratt graduated from Harvard College in 1824. 

52. YIT. 286. Sarah Pickering Pratt [:^Iary 52. YI. 91], bom in 
Boston, died in Boston. 

Miss Pratt and her sisters lived in the family mansion on ^It. Vernon 

' The Boston Journal of Jan. 1.5, 1S7G ; the New England Historical and Genealogy 
Register, Vol. XXX. p. 24.C-2 17 ; and '• In :\remoriam," by Jeremiah Colburn, Feb. 15, 1876. 



SEVENTH GEXEEATIOX. 425 

Street, Boston. There is u cia}-on portrait of her, by Cheiiuy, in the 
possession of her niece,, Mrs. Phihp II. Sears. 

52. VII. 288. Mary WilUams [Stephen 52. VI. 93], born in Nortli- 
borong-li, Mass., died in Northborouyh. 

She and lier husband were tirst cousins. 

52. VII. 2S8. Edward Orne, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Hernando, Miss. Residence: Hernando. 

Mr. Orne, Bowdoin College, 181-i, at first studied medicine. On the 
return of peace he went to sea, and for twenty years was engaged in the 
China and East India trade ^vith but slight interruption. In 1827, he built 
a stone cottage in Xorthborough, where he lived some time. 

At the solicitation of a company in Boston and New York, he became 
their financial agent for the purchase and location of Chickasaw Indian 
claims in northern Mississippi. In this business he invested a large capital 
and acquired a good estate. His subsequent operations, however, were less 
successful ; and he died leaving as a legacy to his children little beside an 
untarnished reputation for honesty and generous liberality.^ 

His second wife was Eleanor A. Risher. They were married Feb. 5, 
1842. She died in Hernando, March IG, 18G2. By her he had the follow- 
ing children : — 

Ellen- M. Orne, bom Feb. 18, 1843. 
Edward Okxe, born July 23, 1844. 

Mr. Orne was a son of Josiah and Alice (Allen) Orne, of Salem. Alice 
Orne [52. VI. 93'] was his aunt ; Elizabeth Putnam Orne [52. VIII. 592''] 
and Anne Fishe Orne [Jy2. VIII. o92-] were his nieces, and Timotluj Orne 
[1-11. IV. 7] was his great-great-granduncle. His ancestry includes the 
following families: Orne, Thompson, Ingcrsoll, Felton, Elvins, Beadle, 
Palmer, Allen, Hodges, Phippen, Wood, "Williams, Skerry, Manning, 
Galley. See Ancestry Tables ■^^^. 

52. VII. 2S9. ISTancy "Williams [Stephen 52. VI. 93], bom in North- 
borough, Mass., died in Xorthborough. 

> ffistory of Bo^vdoin College, by A. S. Packard, p. 180. 



426 THE J'ICKi:ni.\G GEXEALOGY. 

An obituary notice of Miss Williams appeared in the Massachusetts Spy 
of March S, 1S2G. It speaks of her amiable and lovely character and 
aflfectionate nature. 

52. VII. 2lJ0. Elizaljetll Williams [Stephen 52. VI. 03], born in 
Northboroug-li, ilass., died in Boston, of consumption.^ 

52. VII. 290. Benjamin Dniclc TTVi/fJifi/, her husband, born in Rox- 
bury, Mass., died in Cambridge, Mass. A merchant. 

Iklr. Whitney, 11. C. 1828, lived at different times in Boston, New York, 
and Wasliington. 

His second wife was Charlotte E. Genella, of Vicksburg, Miss. They 
were man-ied Feb. 5, 18G3. By her he had one son: — 

Benjamin Whitney. 

Mr. Whitney was a son of Asa and Mary (Hammond) Wliitnoy. There 
is a fine Stuart portrait of Asa Whitney in possession of his granddaughters, 
the Misses Whitney, of Cambridge. His ancestry includes the following 
families : Whitney, Reynolds, Harris, Boughey, Curtis, Eliot, Polley, Dana, 
Bullard, Buckminster, Francis, Cooper, Smith, Hammond, Gay. See 
Ancestry Tables j iV- 

52. VII. 292. George Henry Williams [Stephen 52. VI. 93], born 
in Northborough, ^lass., died in Northborough. A farmer. Residence : 
Northboroiig'h. 

Mr. Williams in early life was a wholesale grocer in Boston ; but many 
years ago he moved to Northborough, where he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. 

52. VII. 293. Frances JEIhabeth Simes, his wife, born in Ports- 
mouth, N. H., died in Northborough, ^lass., of apoplexy. 

Mrs. Williams was a daughter of George and Nancy (Hardy) Simes, of 
Portsmouth, N. H., where both of her parents were born. Her ancestry 
includes the following families : Simes, Hardy, Muchmore. See Ajncestry 
Tables /|V- 

' The date of her death is given on the Boston Eecords and by other authorities as 
April 25, 1S49; while the Harvard CoUege Class Book of 1S2S gives it as .^lay 24, 1S61. 



SKVIJXTir GKXEliATIOX. 427 

52. VII. 293. Elizabetli Little [Elizabeth 52. VI. 94], probably 
born in Salem, died in Boston, of consumption. 

There is a miniature of Miss Little owned by Mrs. Philip H. Sears 
[5L VIIL571]. 

52. VII. 294. Henry Little [Elizal^eth 52. VI. 94], probably bom in 
Salem, died at sea, of consumption. 

Mr. Little, Harvard Medical School, 1825, M. D., is said to have been 
a very talented young man. He studied medicine with Dr. Jacob Bigelow, 
of Boston, and went to New Orleans, for his health, but he died on his 
passage home.^ 

52. VII. 295. Francis Little [Elizabeth 52. VI. 94], probably born 
in Salem, died in Newburyport, Mass., of consumption. 

53. VII. 297. Henry Blanchard [Elizabeth 53. VI. 99], died in 
Lexington, Mass. A merchant. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Blanchard entered Harvard College with his brother Francis in the 
clas.-; of 1802; but he was obliged to give up his college course from ill 
health, and spent two or three years in France. He became a merchant of 
Salem, and afterwards was a supercargo on two or three voyages to 
India.^ 

53. VII. 298. Francis Blanchard [Elizabeth 53. VI. 99]. 
For an account of Mr. Blanchard see pages 408-409. 

53. VII. 298. Mavij Ann Lee, his wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [48. VII. 263]. For an account of Mrs. 
Blanchard see pages 295-29G. 

53. VII. 300. Lucy Blanchard [Elizabeth 53. VI. 99], born in 
^Yenham, Mass., died in Wenham. 

The gravestone of Mrs. Orne was standing in the graveyard at Wenham 
a few years since. 

' Life of John Pickering, by Mary Orne Pickering, p. 289. 
' Gardner Family Records. 



428 THE nCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

53. VII. -JOO. C/tai-Ics Jlenrij Ovne, lier liu.sbunJ, probaljlv bom in 
Salem, died in Salom. A inercliaiit. Kesidence : Suloni. 

Mr. Orne's death was noticed by extended obituaries in tlie Salem 
Gazette of Friday, Deo. 27, 181(!, and the Essex Register of Dec. 28, 1816. 
He is spoken of as a man of delicate constitution and retiring disposition, 
whose premature death deprived society of a valuable and respecttible 
citizen. He was a benevolent man, and a liberal sup})orter of all charitable 
and religioiu-5 institutions. 

Mr. Orne was a son of William and Abigail (Ropes) Orne, of Salem. 
Joscpli Orue [40. VI. Sol ^^'^-^ ^^^^ luicle. His ancestry includes the following 
fiimilies : Orne, Thompson, Ingersoll, Felton, Putnam, Porter, Ilathorne, 
Putnam, Prince, Ropes, Wells, Warner, Pickman, Ilai'dy, Lindall, Veren, 
Sparhawk, Angier, Newman, Ileman, Porter, Stanley, Cook, Westwood, 
Sewall, Hunt, Dummer, Archer, ilitchell, Boradel. See Ancestry Tables j^-^\. 

53. VH. 301. Elizabeth Pickering Gardner [Samuel P. 53. VI. 
101], born in Boston, died in Boston. 

Verses to the memory of 3Irs. Gray, entitled " Peace to the Peaceful," 
are printed on page ninety-one of " The Blossoming Rod and Other 
Poems," by S. H. Palfray. Her portrait, which was painted by Rembrant 
Peale, is in the possession of her nephew, John C. Gray. 

53. Yll. 301. JoJni Chipman Gt'cnj, her husband, born in Salem, 
died in Boston. Residences : Boston and Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Gray graduated at Harvard College in 1811, while in his seventeenth 
year, receiving the degree of LL.D. in 1856. On leaving college he 
began the study of law, and was admitted to tlio bar, Dec. 23, 1818 ; but he 
never entered seriously on the practice of his profession, for his circum- 
stances did not require him to do so. In 1815, he went to Europe, and 
travelled extensively for about tlu-ee years. 

From 1824 to 1828, he was a member of the Boston Common Council. 
He was a representative in the State Legislature for many years, and for 
four years he represented Suffolk County in the State Senate. In 1832, he 
was a member of the governor's council. In 1853, he was a member of 
the convention called to revise the constitution of Massachusetts. 



SKVEXTH GEXETtATIOX. 429 

Mr. Gni}- was an able .spijakor. In ls2l, he was the orator fur the Phi 
]kta Kappa Society, and in 1S22 he deUvered the Fourth of July Oration 
before the city authorities. In 1804, he delivered an address before the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Though many instances of absent- 
mindedness are related of him, he was a great reader, a close thinker, a good 
debater, and a clear and able writer. He published, in 1856, " Essays Agri- 
cultural and Literary." Agriculture and horticulture were his fiivorite 
pursuits, and he pursued them practically as well as theoretically. 

He was a trustee and president of the old Massachusetts Society for the 
Promotion of Agi-iculture, and an original founder of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, in 1S20, and its vice-president from that date to 
1833. He was a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society. From 
18-i7 to 1854, he was a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard 
College, and, in 1855, he was made a fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences. 

In early life he was a moderate Federalist, and later in life he belonged 
to the anti-slavery wing of the Whig party, and was finally a Republican. 
In his religious views he was a Unitarian. 

For more than forty years he lived in winter on the corner of Sunmier 
Street and Otis Place, removing, in 18C6, to Xo. Gl Mt. Vernon Street, 
where he died. His summers were passed in Cambridge at his place on 
the corner of Brattle Street and Fresh Pond Lane. Verses to his memory, 
entitled " And Is He Gone," are in " The Blossoming Rod and Other 
Poems," by S. H. Palfray. His portrait, which was painted by Stuart, is 
in the possession of his nephew, John C. Gray.^ 

John Chipnian Gray was a son of the Hon. "William and Elizabeth 
(Chipman) Gray, of Boston. His father Avas a rich and famous merchant 
of Salem and Boston, and was lieutenant-governor of 3Iassachusetts. Horace 
Grarj [53. VH. 30;'\ and Ihnri) Gnv/ [25. Ylll. '253] were his brothers, 
and Lydia Gray [17. VIII. i6'J] was his first cousin. His ancestry includes 

» The Harvard Register (ISSl), p. 24." ; The Salem Register, March 7, ISSl ; The Hun- 
dred Boston Orators, by James S. Loring, pp. oOS-400 ; Massachusetts Historical Society 
Proceedings, Vol. XVIII. pp. 352-351, for remarks on his death ; the same work, second 
series, Vol. IV. pp. 22-27, contains a sketch of Jlr. Gray by John C. Eopes,witli a portrait. 



430 THE nCKEUIXG GENEALOGY. 

the iVillowiiig- families: Cniy, Williams, Galley, lUirrill, Ivory, South, 
Jarvis, Chipman, Ilowlaml, Tilloy, Cobb, Hinckley, Hale, Byley, Clark, 
Si)nierby, Greenleaf, Brown, Eaton, Woodbury, Dodge, Cotton, Hawkridye, 
Rossiter, Saltonstall, Gurdon, Ward, Edmonds. See Axcestkt TABLEs^^^'g. 

53. VII. 302. Mary Lowell Gardner [Samuel P. 53. VI. 101], bom 
in Boston, died in Waltbam, Mass. 

Her husband was her first cousin. There is a portrait of I\Irs. Lowell 
drawn by Cheney, and a small miniature, both of which are in the posses- 
sion of her daughter, Miss Georgina Lowell. 

53. VII. 303. Francis Cabot Lowell, her husband, born in Boston, 
died in Waltham, ]\Iass. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Lowell, H. C. 1821, spent some years in foreign travel, and then 
became a merchant. He devoted himself so thoroughly to the study of 
the principles that regulate commerce, that he was appealed to through life 
as an authority on all Cj^uestions of political economy and finance. He was 
instrumental in establishing the works of the Boston Chemical Company at 
Waltham, in which he was interested until the demolition of the buildings 
and the suspension of the business a few years ago. He was a large share- 
holder in the Glendon liolling Mills at East Boston, by the failure of which 
he lost a large part of his fortune. He was largely interested in the manu- 
facturing interests of Massachusetts, and was successively treasurer of the 
Amoskoag and of the Merrimac Jlanufacturing Companies, and was Actuary 
of the ^Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company. 

Mr. Lowell was a man of the highest character, a reserved, courteous, 
and refined gentleman with great kindness of manner. He was a fellow 
of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. There are crayon portraits 
of him by Ro^vse.' 

Francis Cabot Lowell was a son of Francis Cabot and Hannah (Jackson) 
Lowell, of Boston. John Lowell, who fomided the Lowell Institute of 

1 Obituary in the Boston Daily Advertiser, Saturday, Sept. 12, 1874. and The Centen- 
nial Celebration of the Wednesday Evening Club, pp. 92-9G, which contains an extended 
and high tribute to his character. Also Troceediugs of American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, May, 1S75, Vol. X., pp. 4S0-481. 



SEVENTH GEXEKATIOX. 431 

Boston v.ari his brother. Tlis father (IT. C. 1793) was hirycly iiistruineiitnl 
in introduchig- the nianutueture of cotton yoods in the United States, and 
the city of Lowell was named in his honor. Fuhecca BusscU Zoiccll [53. VI. 
101] vfixs his aunt ; JIari/ Lowell [64. VII. 307'] and John Amorj Lotvell 
[55. VII. 313] were liis hrst cousins. Charles Jackson [2. VII. 10] was his 
uncle; Mary Javlson [2. VII. I^] was his aunt; Elkaleth Cahof JacJison 
l5i.YlI.311] was his first cousin. Ilohert Treat Faine [51. VIII. o72] 
and Charles Jacksoi Paine [1. IX. 3] were his first cousins once removed. 
His ancestry includes the following families : Lowell, Sylvester, Torrey, 
Shaller, Champney, Bridge, Turrell, Moore, Hodges, Cabot, Orne, Thomp- 
son, Fitch, ;Mason, Peck, Appkton, Everavd, Glover, Harris, Rogers, Crane, 
Denison, Dudley, Jackson, Baker, Salter, Quincy, Pares, Gookin, Bird, 
Dolling, Flynt, Hoar, Hincksman, "Willet, Brown, Tracy, Gookin, Bird, 
Dolling, Savage, Hutchinson, Alarbury, Tyug, Sears (?), Cotton, Hawkridge, 
Bradstreet, Dudley, Lake, Goodyear. See Ancestry Tables -^f^. 

53. VII. 303. John Lowell Gardner [Samuel P. 53. VI. 101], bom 
in Boston, died in Brookline, Mass. A merchant. Residences : Boston 
and Brookline. 

Mr. Gardner, H. C. 1821, was a Boston Latin School scholar, 
and entered college at the age of thirteen. After graduating, he 
went into the office of the mercantile firm of Ropes & Ward. He subse- 
quently owned manv ships and was laigely interested in foreign trade. 
He later turned nnich of his attentioi^ and capital to real estate in Boston. 
He was wise, careful, and courageous in business matters, and was regarded 
as one of the ablest and most successful merchants in Boston. "When a 
young man, he was captain of the "Rifle Rangers" militia company, 
president of the Tremont Club, and a trustee of the Humane Society. He 
was natin-allv of a retiring disposition, and avoided public or political 
prominence. His character and will were strong, with great amiability and 
tact, and he was ver}- much respected and beloved by his family and friends. 
At the time of his death, he was president of the ^^Fassachusetts Hospital 
Life Insurance Company. He was much attached to his place in Brookline, 
where he passed his summers ; and for many years its care and cultivation 
were one of his "-reatest interests. He was a liberal man, and made many 



432 THE PICKEUIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Landsoine donations;. The iianio ''Gardner Hall" in the Pu-ookline Public 
Library perpetuates his memory. He was very fond of travel and of read- 
ing, and was remarkably intelligent and well informed. He was full of 
wit and humor, and his conversation was brilliant, especially in the family 
circle.^ 

bZ.Wl. 303. Caflifn-lne EJixahrtli Peahodn, the wife of Jolin 
Lowell Gardner, born in Salem, died in Brookline, ]\Iass. 

^Irs. Gardner was endowed with a rLinarkable union of qualities which 
prepared her equally for the wider and the narrower sphere of duty. The 
only daughtt-r of parents v.'ho could anticipate her every wish, and, through 
life, possessed of all the privileges of worldly prosperity, she was yet free 
from self-adulation, untouched by worldliness. She fulfilled with sincerity 
and grace the duties which wealth imposes, and accepted its cares. She did 
not allow it to restrict for her the enjoyments it cannot bestow. The 
refined luxury of the house over which she presided did not render it the 
less a home. Its brilliant hospitalities were consistent with sedulous and 
tender watchfulness over her children, with considerate judgment in their 
training, and with personal aid in their instruction. No view, however 
limited, of Mrs. Gardner's character and influence can fail to include her 
piety, always earnest and pervading, and never austere." 

Mrs. Gardner Avas a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Smith) Peabody, 
of Salem. Joseph Augustus Pcahodij [54. VII. 309'] was her brother ; Eliza 
Endicott Pealodi/ [53. VIII. G141 was her niece ; Samuel Endicott Peahody 
[1. IX. 4] is her nephew; and 2Iari) Peabody Scars [51. IX. 10-50'] was her 
grandniece. Her father was an eminent merchant of Salem. Her ancestry 
includes the following families: Peabody, Foster, Perkins, Knight, Smith, 
Morrill, ]\raverick, Harris, Burnap, Pearson, "Walton, Pdanchard, Ilassell, 
Hubbard, ^lerriam, Puce, King, Brown, Vinton. See Axcestey Tables ^^^. 

53. VII. 304. Sarali Russell Gardner [Samuel P. 53. VI. 101] born 
in Boston, died at Nahant, ]\Iass. Piesidence : Boston. 

1 Notices of Mr. Gardner in the Boston Daily Advertiser of July 25 and 2G, 18S4; 
also facts furnished by John L. Gardner. 

' From an account of JIr3. Gardner, by Mrs. Samuel R. Putnam. 



SEVENTH GENEBATIOX. 433 



ilrs. CJniy is said to liave been a very beautiful wouuin. Her portrait, 
wliicli was drawn by Cheney, is called an admirable likeness, and one of tbo 
best he ever drew. Tier home in Uoston was on Beacon Street. 

53. VII. 304- llovace Gray, her husband, Ijorn in Medford, Mass., 
died in Boston, of peritonitis. Kesidence : IJoston. 

Mr. Gray, H. C. 1819, early engaged in the East India ti-ade, but he 
subsequently went into the iron business under the firm name of Horace 
Gray & Co., which was continued until about 1853, when, having met with 
financial reverses, he retired from the active pursuits of life.' 

He was a fellow of the American Academy of xVrts and Sciences. There 
is a portrait of him, by William Hunt, in the possession of his son, Judge 
Horace Gray. 

Mr. Gray first mamed, in 1827, Harriet Upham, who was born June 5, 
1801, and died Sept. 22, 1834. She was a daughter of the Hon. Jabez 
Upham. By her Mr. Gray had the following children : — 

Horace Gray, born :\[arch 28, 1S2S, (II. C. 1S4.3),, Associate Judge of 

the iLassachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, 1864 ; 
Chief Justice, i\Iassachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, 
October, 1873; Associate Justice, United States Supreme 
Court, 1881. 

Elizabeth CinPMAx Gray, born Feb. 22, 1S30. 

Harriet Gray, born in 1832. 

Horace Gray wa« a son of the Hon. William and Elizabeth (Chipman) 
Gray, of Boston. John Cldpman Graij [53. VH. SOT\ and Hennj Gray [25. 
Vni. 2oo] were his brothers, and Lydia Gray [17. VHI. 1S3'\ was his first 
cousin. His ancestry includes the following families: Gra}-, Williams, 
Galley, Burrill, Ivory, South, Jarvis, Chipman, Howland, Tilley, Cobb, 
Hinckley, Hale, Byley, Clark, Somerby, Greenleaf, Brown, Eaton, AYood- 
buiy, Dodge, Cotton, Hawkridge, Rossiter, Saltonstall, Gurdon, AYard, 
Edmonds. See Axck^try Tables -^-i^. 

53. VII. 305. George Gardner [Samuel P. 53. VI. 101], bora in 
Boston, died in Boston. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

» The Salem Register of Aug. 4, 1873. 



431 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

Mr. Gardiifi" entered IIai-\':inl CuUego in ilie class of 1829, but left, in 
1828, to go into Lusiue.sri. He began his business life in the store of Lowell 
& Gardner. Ilis liome was on Beacon Sti-eet, Boston. 

53. VII. SO-j. Helen Jin via Head, his wife, born in Boston, died in 
Lakewood, N. J. 

Her portrait, painted by Staigg, is in possession of her daughter, Mrs. 
Shepherd Brooks. 

Mrs. Garchier was a daughter of James and Hannah (Palmer) Read. 
Her father was a merchant of Boston. Her ancestry includes the following 
families: Read, Batson, Stacey, Hicks, Sill, Goodwin, Palmer, Johnson. 
See AxcESTRY Tables -j jV- 

• 54. YII. 307. Samnel Raymond Ptitnam [Sarah 54-55. VI. 102], 
born in Salem, died in Boston, of paralysis. A merchant. Residences: 
Boston and Roxbmy, ^lass. 

Mr. Putnam, H. C. 1S15, chose a mercantile rather than a professional 
life, and entered the counting-room of Pickering Dodge [59. VI. 123], of 
Salem, of whom he spoke with great respect, and with whom he served an 
apprenticeship. 

He made several voyages to the East Indies as supercargo. For many 
years he was engaged in business in Europe, particularly in the city of 
Antwerp, where he established a house, and had as a partner an Englishman 
named Alfred BaiTOw. He conducted his business with skilful enterprise and 
success. He finally returned to Boston, where he continued as a merchant. 

His interest in the education of his children led him, in 1851, to return 
to Europe, where he remained more than seven years, living chiefly in 
France, Italy, and Germany. His prolonged stay in Europe was made 
chiefly on account of his children, and their progress was an ample source 
of happiness. But he also found in it pleasures and congenial occupations 
of his own. He studied the histones of the countries he visited and their 
actual condition. His love of art found continual gratification; and in the 
summer journeys made in the children's vacations, he enjoyed with them 
the pleasiu'es of natural scenerv, of which he was very susceptible. He 
returned to Boston in the autumn of 1858. Mr. Putnam was deeply inter- 



SEVEXTir GEXERATIOX. 435 

ested in the questions then agitating the country, his judgment and his 
sympathies being always on the side of freedom and right. He was a man 
of elevated character, of noble views, in conduct just, generous, compas- 
sionate, and indulgent.^ 

54. VII. 307. 3IfU'if LoiceJI, the wife of Samuel 11. Putnam, born in 
Boston, baptized there Feb. 17, 1811, as Mary Traill Spence. Residence: 
Boston. 

i\Irs. Putnam, witli her husband and children, passed more than seven 
years in Europe, Laving Boston for Liverpool in 1851, and returning 
thither in 1858. Since that time she has made several visits to Europe. 

She has always been interested in the study of philology, and is 
acquainted with many languages, several of which she speaks with fluency. 

Mrs. Putnam has published anonymously, " Records of an Obscure 
Man" [1861]; "Tragedy of Errors" [1862]; "Tragedy of Success" 
[1862]; "Fifteen Days" [1866]. She has written a memoir of her son, 
William Lowell Putnam ; a memoir of her father, the Rev. Charles Lowell, 
D.D., for the Memorial Biographies of the New England Historic-Genea- 
logical Society [1885]; " Guepin of Nantes, a French Republican," 
printed by the soldiers of tlie National Militar}- Home, Ohio [1874]. She 
has conti-ibuted to the North American Review articles on the literature of 
Poland and of Hungary, and to the Christian Examiner articles on the 
history of Hungary. 

Of late years ^Irs. Putnam has taken quite an interest in genealogical 
studies, and has made, personally, and through others, many investigations 
in England. Through her efforts the Russell and Pitt pedigrees have been 
extended and verified, and a pedigree of the latter has been made by the 
Heralds College, showing the connection of ^laud Pitt, wife of Richard 
Russell, with the family of the Earl of Chatham. Her home is on Beacon 
Street, Boston.^ 

1 The Salem Gazette of Dec. 27, ISGl ; The Boston Daily Advertiser of Dec. 30, 18G1. 
and Necrology of Alumni of Harvard College, by Josepli Palmer, pp. 403—105, and facts 
furnished by Mrs. Samuel II. Putnam. 

^ Appleton's Cyelopcedia of American Biography, Vol. V. p. 143 ; Dictionary of 
American Biograpliy, by Francis S. Drake, p. 74G, and Homes of American Authors. 



436 THE PICKEBIXG GENEALOGY. 

Mrs. Putnam is a daughter of the Rev. Cliarles and Harriet Bracket 
(Spence) Lowell Bchtcca llussdl Loiall [b'i.Xl. lOJ] was her aunt; 
Francis Cabot Lowell [53. VII. 303] and John Amory loiceU [55. VII. olJ} 
were her first cousins, and William Lowell Putnam [55. IX. lloTI is her grand- 
nephew. ]\Irs. Putnam's father, H. C. ISOO, was ordained minister of the West 
Church in Boston, Jan. 1, 180G. Her mother was a woman of superior intel- 
lect. The Hon. James Russell Lowell, late minister to the Court of St. .James, 
was her brother. Iler ancestry uieludes the iVJlowing families : Lowell, Syl- 
vester, Torrey, Shaller, Champiiey, Bridge, Turrell, Moore, Hodges. Russell, 
Pitt, Curwen, Herbert, Chambers, PateliL-ld, G-raves, Gray, Stedman, Avery, 
Sparhawk, Angier, Xewman, Spence, Blaw, Traill, Traill, Balfour, Baikie, 
Fea, Whipple, Repier, Cutt, Hoel, Hammond, Frost. See Ancestry Tables -^^\. 

54. VII. 308. Hannah P^itnam [Sarah 54-55. VI. 102], born in 
Salem, died in Beverly, ^lass. 

Mrs. Bancroft's mind, and her pursuits, bore evidence of the careful 
training which she had received at .Mr. Coles's school in Salem, and later 
from her father. Her memory was unusually strong, both for persons and 
events. An aflectionate sympathy in the joys and sorrows of others was 
one of her most marked characteristics, and served to brighten her life to 
the end.^ 

54. VII. oOS. Thomns Poi/uton Bancroft, her husband, born in 
Salem, baptized there Dec. 23, 179S, died in New Orleans. A merchant. 
Residence: Boston. 

Mr. Bancroft, Brown L'^niversity, 181G, was early left an orphan, and was 
brought up by his grandaunt, Mrs. Hannah Po}-nton, of Salem. After her 
death, he was consigned to the care of his uncle, ^Ir. Thomas P. Ives, of 
Providence, R. I. He returned to Salem, aud in 1838 became a resident 
of Boston. 

He early adopted a mercantile career, which he pursued with ability. 

During the latter part of his life, his business called him to New Orleans, 

where he passed a large part of each winter. His life was a busy one, and 

it was only in the later summers of his life, which were passed at his farm 

* From notes of Robert H. Tancroft. 



SEVEXTH GEXERATIOX. 437 

in Beverly, that he was able to gratify his stroiii^- taste for out-of-door life, 
and for the cultivation of fruits and flowers.' 

Mr. Bancroft was a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Ives) Bancroft. 
His ancestry includes the following families: Bancroft, ^letcalf, Eaton, 
Kendall, Taylor, Ives, .Aletcalf, Derby, Hasket, Hale, Byley, Clark, 
Somerby, Greeideaf, Giluian, Clark, Treworgye, Shapleigh, Coffin, Stevens, 
Thember, Starbuck, Bray, Collins, Cockerill, Lander, Driver, Glover, 
Gappy, Gray, Grover. See Amksti:!- Tauees -p^^. 

54. YII. 300. Louisa Putnam [Sarah 54-55. VI. 102], probably 
born in Salem, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Peabody was a beautiful and accomplished woman of distinguished 
manners. She was a good artist in crayons, and sang soprano in the choir 
of the North Church, Salem. 

54. YII. 300. Joseph AiKjnstns JPeahodi/, her husband, born in 
Salem, died in Salem. xV merchant. Residence: Salem. ^ 

Mr. Peabody, II. C. 181G, spent a few years in foreign travel, and, on 
his return to Salem, devoted himself to commercial pursuits with so much 
energy that his operations were of great benefit to the town. He also took 
an active interest in the literary and chai'i table institutions of Salem, in many 
of which he was an efficient officer. He was a man of high character, of 
scholarly accomplishments, of polished manners, and greatly esteemed in 
the communitv.^ His jiortrait^ painted by Stuart Newton, is in the pos- 
session of his daughter, Mrs. William G. Prescott. 

Mr. Peabody was a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Smith) Peabody. Her 
father Avas one of the merchant princes of Salem. Catlterine liUlzalit'tli Pea- 
lodij [54. VII. 30o] Avas his sister; Eliza EmViaAt Peabody [53. VIII. GW\ 
Avas his niece; Samuel Eiidicott Peabody [1. IX. 41 ^s his nephew; and 
Mary Peabody Sears [51. IX. lOoOl was his grandniece. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Peabody, Foster, Perkins, Knight, 
Smith, Morrill, Maverick, Harris, Burnap, Pearson, Walton, Blanchard, 

' From notes of Robert H. Bancroft. 

=■ The date of his death is June IS, 1S2S ; while it is given as Jan. 18. 1S2S, in Esses 
Institute Historical Collections, Vol. III. p. 212. 

» Obituary in the Salem Gazette of June 20, 1S2S. 



438 TftJ' riCK/:j:iXG genealogy. 

rias>t'll, Ilubbaii], ^feiTiuin, Rice, Kiny', Brown, Viutuii. See ^U'cESTisr 

TAbLES /^'j. 

54. VII. 310. Mary Ann Putnam [Sarah 54-55. VI. 102], born in 
Salem, died in Boston.^ 

Mrs. Loring sang sojirano in tlio clioir of the North Cliurch, Salem. 

54. VII. 310. Charles Greeley Loring, her husband, born in Boston, 
died in Beverly, JIass. A lawyer. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Loring was fitted for coHcge at the Boston Public Latin School, and 
graduated at Harvard L'ullege, in 1812, with honors, and received the degree 
of LL.D. from Harvard in ISoO. He studied law, and became one of the 
profoundest lawyers, and most eloquent and conscientious advocates of the 
Sutlblk Bar. More than once the highest positions among the Massa- 
chusetts judiciary were urged upon him. 

He represented Suffolk Count}- in the Senate in 1862, the only polhical 
office he ever held. Higher political distinction would have been awarded 
him had he been willing to enter piiblic life. He was president of the 
Suffolk Whig Committee, and also presiding officer of the Webster Whig 
Club. In his younger days he commanded the New England Guards, and 
he succeeded Mr. Everett as president of the Union Club. From 1838 to 
1857 he was one of the Corporation of Harvard College. 

He withdrew from his profession in 1857, and became actuary of the 
Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company, which position he held 
until his death. His influence was great, and he was ever ready to use 
tongue or pen in behalf of great principles that concerned the community 
or nation. 

His speeches in Faneuil HaU on various occasions, particularly during 
the Rebellion, were vigorous and effective. He contributed to the liter- 
ature of the war some of the most able papers that appeared. He published 
"Neutral Relations between the United States and England " [Boston, 
1863], and the '-Life of William Sturgis" [1864]. For nearly fifteen 

1 The date of her death is given as Thursday, April 10, 184.5. in The Boston Daily 
Advertiser of Tuesday, April 15, 1S45 ; while it is given as April 11, 1845, ou The Boston 
Kecords. 



SEl'KXTlf aiCXKUATIOX. 439 

years lie was .^upeviiilL'iiik'Ut of the Sabbatli School of tlie West Church. 
Ho was a meinljcr of the Aiuericau Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of 
the Srassachusetts Historical Society.^ 

There is a portrait of him in the possession of his daughter, JErs. Asa 
Gray, and a plaster cast in the possession of his grandson, AYilliam Calelj 
Loring. 

Mr. Lorings first \vife, \\hom he married xVpril 30, 1818, was Anna 
Pierce Brace. She was born Dec. 10, 1797, and died Dec. 24, 183G. By 
her he had the following children: — 

Caleb WiLLiAJt LoKiN'o, bora .Tuly, ?,\, 1S19 [54. VIII. G3S], for an account of 

wliom see pa^'es 720-721. 
Jane Latiikop Louing, born Aug. 21, 1S21 ; married Professor Asa Gray of 

Harvard College. 
ScsAx Maky LoRixG, born June 22, 1823; married, in ]May, 1848, Patrick 

Tracy Jackson, wlio died Xov. 10, 1891. 
Charles Greeley Loring, born July 22, 1828. 

Mr. Loring's third wife, whom lie married July 3, 1850, w-as Cornelia, 
daughter of Francis and Sarah (Kirkland) Amory, and widow of Mr. G. A. 
Goddard. She was born Sept. 27, 1810. By her he had the following- 
child : — 

KiRKE Loring, born in August, 1851, and died in Xovember, 1852. 

Mr. Loring was a son of Caleb and Ann (Greeley) Loring, of Boston. 
His ancestry includes the folloAving families : Loring, Newton, AYheatley, 
Lobdell, Bradford, Allen, Baker, Greeley, Hsley, Walker, Stubbs, Hich- 
born, Pateshall, Woody, Dexter, Fadre, Pitman. See Ancestry Tables -^'fj. 

54. Vn. 311. Charles Gideon Putnam [Sarah 54-55. VL 102J, 
born in Salem, died in Boston. A ])]iysician. Residence : Boston. 

Dr. Putnam, H. C. 1824, received his degree of 31. D. from the Harvard 

» Editorial on his death in the Boston Daily Advertiser of Oct. 10, 1867; also of Oct. 
15, 18G7, which contains the proceedings of the Suffolk Bar on his death, consisting of 
nearly two columns. The Hundred Boston Orators, by James S. Loring, pp. 393-397 ; Pro- 
ceedings of the :\Ia3sachusptts Historical Society, Vol. X. pp. 81-82, 88-89 ; New England 
Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXVIII. pp. 33G-337, and Appleton's Cyclo- 
paedia of American Biography, VoL IV. p. 27. 



440 THE riCKEETXG GEXEALOGY. 

Jledicul Selioul in lSi>7. He tlicii studied iiuMliciiio under Dr. A. L. 
Peirson, of Salem, and afterwards boi;an tlio practice of his profession in 
that town. About the year 1S.",3, lie moved to Boston, where he remained 
the rest of his life. He was especially interested in obstetrics, and was one 
of the founders, and for several years was the president, of tlie Obstetrical 
Society. He was considered unusually dexterous in obstetncal operations, 
and was often called in consultation in difficult cases. 

Dr. J. B. S. Jackson said of him : '•' Dr. Putnam Avas not a writer or 
a speaker, but was one of those who, in a quiet and pi/rsistent way, collect 
a great many facts and make observations to be connnunicatod to others 
and worked up by them for the benefit of the profession." ^Modest and 
silent, even shy in general society, he had a great sense of humor, and was 
capable of a righteous indignation ut anything he believed to be unjust. 
His chosen motto was, " Fiat justitia, ruat caelum ! " Too busy to take 
much share in public affairs, he Nvarmly espoused any cause that seemed to 
him to need support, and strongly advocated the claims of Dr. Morton, 
whose share in the discovery of ether he believed to be undervalued. His 
love of music was keen, and in his early life he sang bass in the choir of 
the Xorth Church in Salem. His absolute unselfishness, and his expectation 
that his children would maintain an equally high standaixl, was a well 
recognized influence in the family.^ 

He was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A 
crayon portrait of him at the age of thirteen, by Cheney, is owneil by ^Mrs. 
Asa Gray. 

54. VII. 311. Elizaheth Cabot JacLson, the wife of Charles G. Put- 
nam, born in Boston, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Putnam was a daughter of Dr. James and Elizabeth (Cabot) 
Jackson. Her father was a distinguislied physician of Boston. Charles 
Jackson [2. VII. 10] was her uncle; Jfuri/ Jachson [2. Yll. i^] was her 
aunt; Francis Cahot Loiccll [53. VII. oOJ] was her first cousiri. and Bohert 

1 Obituary in the Boston Daily Advertiser of Feb. 9. iSTo ; Essex Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. XY. p. oOO ; the Boston ^Medical and Surgical Journal of Feb. 11, 1S75 ; 
also a sketch in Vol. X. pp. 4S1-4S2, of the Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences. 



SEVEXTII GEXEIiATIOX. 441 

Treat Pulnr [f-l. VIII. J/V] and Charks Jackson Paine [1. IX. J] were lier 
first cousins once runioved. Mrs. Putnam's ancestry includes the following 
families : Jackson, ]>aker, Salter, Quiiicy, Pares, Gookin, Bird Dolling, 
Flynt, Hoar, Ilincksman, Willet, Brown, Tracy, Gookin, Bird, Dolling, 
Savage, Hutchinson, Marbury, Tyng, Sears (i), Cotton, Hawkridge, Brad- 
street, Dudley, Lake, Gootlyear, Cabot, Orne, Thompson, Iligginson, Whit- 
field, Sheafc, Savage, Symmes, Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, Boardman, 
Bull, Truesdale, Ilalton, Dodge, Conant, Horton, Larkin, Hale, RajTnond, 
Bishop, Woodbury, Dodge, Herrick, Laskiu, Leach, Fuller, Hayward. See 
Ancestry Tables y^^g. 

55. VII. 312. Elizabetli Cabot Putnam [Sarah 54-55. VI. 102], 
born in Salem, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Lowell is said to have been a very beautiful woman, and it is said 
that no likeness does her justice. 

55. VII. 313. John Amorrj LowcU, her husband, born in Boston, 
died in Boston. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Lowell entered Harvard College at the early age of twelve years, 
graduated in 1815, and received the degree of LL.D. in 1851. 

Choosing a mercantile career, he began his business life as an importer 
of English goods, and succeeded Mr. Patiick Jackson, a few years later, in 
the management of the Boston Manufacturing Company. In 1835, he 
built the Boott, and, in 1839, the ^lassachusetts Mills. He retained the 
treasurership of these companies until 1848. As president and director, he 
was connected A-sith many of the largest and most successful manufactur- 
ing enterprises in Lowell and Lawrence. As director of the Suftblk Bank, 
he inaugurated, in connection with William Lawrence, the Sufiblk Bank 
system for the redemption vi bank-notes. He was also long associated in 
the direction of the ^lassachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company and of 
the Provident Institution for Savings. 

For forty-two years he was the sole trustee of the Lowell Institute, 
founded by his cousin and brother-in-law, John Lowell, Jr. The funds of 
this institution increased tlireefold during his management, while the judg- 



442 Tin: riCKBRixa gexealogy. 



meat aud .--kill with wliicli he carried out the purpose of the founder have 
met the a2)pi-oval of the couununity. 

For forty years he was a member of the Corporation of Harvard College 
(1837-1877), and for many years chairman of its finance committee. As a 
member of the Liuniean Society, the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, aud the Massachusetts Historical Society, he has been recognized 
as a man of gi-eat culture, a thorough linguist in both the dead and living 
languages, an accomplished botanist, and an able mathematician.^ 

His first wife, whom he married Feb. 14, 1822, was his cousin, Susan 
Cabot Lowell, a daughter of Francis Cabot and Hannah (Jackson) Lowell. 
She was born in 1801, and died Aug. 15, 1827. By her he had the follow- 
ing children : — 

SusAx Cabot Lowell, born April 15, 1S23. She married, Oct. 13, 1S4G, William 
Davies Sohier, and died June 0, ISGS. 

JoHX Lowell, born Oct. 18, 1821, married, ]May 18, 1853, Lncy Bnckminster 

Emerson. He graduated at Harvard College in 1843, 
studied law, and was appointed Judge of tlie United States 
Circuit Court, Dec. 18, 1878. 

John Amory Lowell's house was on Park Street, Boston. 

Mr. Lowell was a son of John and Rebecca (Amory) Lowell, of 
Boston. Rehccca Russell Loirell [53. VI. lOll was his annt ; Francis Cabot 
Lowell [53. VII. 302'], Jlon/ Lowell [54. VII. 307], and J/a/v/ Ainie Codman 
[45. VII. 236^ were his cousins. His ancestry includes the following 
families : Lowell, Sylvester, Torrey, Shaller, Champney, Bridge, Turrell, 
Moore, Hodges, Higginson, Whitfield, Sheafe, Savage, Symmes, Sewall, 
Hunt, Dummer, Archer, Mitchell, Boradel, Cabot, Orne, Thompson, Amory, 
Holmes, "Wharf, Greene, Tattershall, Barton, Gould, Bobiuson, Stanbridge, 
Graves. See iVxcESTKV Tables y^'g. 

55. VII. 313. Sarah Gooll Putnam [Sarah 51-55. VI. 102], born in 
Salem, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Crowninshield, as a young lady, was considered very handsome, 

» Obituaries in the Boston Journal, Xov. 2, 1881 ; Boston Daily Advertiser, Nov. 2, 
1881 ; also The Harvard Eegister [1881], p. 397. 



SEVENTH GEXEEATIOX. 443 



being- of a slight figure, and liaving Llonde hair and blue eye.s. She 
Avas an excellent nuisician, sang- soprano, and also played the organ 
in church at Salem, beginning when only six or seven years old. Her 
love for music -^vas remarkable, and she possessed a natural po-u-er 
of harmonizing and reproducing on the piano any music she had 
heard, \yithout notes, she would play for hours to delighted listeners. 
She was fond of society, and took j^leasure in extending a wide 
hospitality. 

55. VII. t^JiJ. I'rancls Boavdma7i CrownlnsliieJd, the husband of 
Sarah Gooll Putnam, born in Salum, died in 3Iarblehead, 31ass. A lawyer. 
Residences : Boston and Marblehead. 

Mr. Crowninshield, H. C. 1829, studied law with the Hon. Leverett 
Saltonstall, and was admitted to the bar. In 1832, he moved from 
Salem to Boston, and the same year became a partner of Rufus Choate. 
As a public speaker, and as a lawyer, he will be remembered for his 
persuasive eloquence and his rare faculty of retaining the attention of the 
jury. 

He was a member of the Boston Common Council from 1842 to 1844. 
In 1846, he was a representative in the Legislature, and in 1848 and 1849, 
he was speaker of the House of Representatives. He was a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of Massachusetts in 1 853 ; a delegate to the 
Peace Convention at Baltimore in 1860; and in 1861 he went to Europe as 
agent of Massachusetts to purchase arms for that State, as well as for Con- 
necticut, Maine, and Ohio. 

He M-as connected with various corporations and societies. He left the 
practice of the law about 1849, and became president of the Old Colony 
Railroad, which ho found in a very bad condition, and which improved 
greatly under his management. He then became treasurer of the ]\Iem- 
mack Manufacturing Company. He was also president of the Boston and 
Lowell Railroad, a director in the Suffolk Bank, the Provident Institution 
for Savings, and president of the Humane Society of Massachusetts, of 
which he had been a tnistee for many years. He was a fellow of Harvard 
College from 1861 until his death, and -was a member of the "Wednesday 



444 THE nCKEErXG GEXEALOGV. 

Evenings Clul>, the Law Club, and prcsideut of the ►Soiiiertiet Club for 
several years. 

Sir. Crowniiishifld was a person of very decided opinions, and was 
always ready to stand forth fuark-ssly for what he felt was right. It is an 
authenticated fact that he weighed sixteen pounds at his birth.^ 

He was a niend)t*r of the famous class of 1829, and at their annual meet- 
ing, in January, 1878, his classmate, Oliver Wendell Holmes, wrote of 
him : — 

"The willow- bends unbroken when angry tempests blow, 
The stately oak is levelled, and all its strength laid low ; 
So fell that tower of nuiuhood, undaunted, patient, strong, 
White with the gathering snow-tiakes, who faced the storm so long." 

Francis Boardman Crowninshield was a son of the Hon. Benjamin 
Williams and Mary (Boardman) Crowninshield, of Salem. His father, v.-ho 
was a merchant, was much interested iu political aft'airs, and, besides tilling 
several town and State offices, he was appouited, in December, 1814, by 
President Madison, Secretary of the Navy. From 1823 to 1831, lie was a 
Representative in Congress. John Collins Warren [51. IX. 1049'] is his 
nephew ; Nathaniel SUshee [59. VII. So(r\ and Caroline Sllshee [50. VIII. 
55?] were his first cousins; and £11.- aheth Wadsworth Sparks [58. VIII. TOS] 
is his first cousin once removed. 

His ancestry includes the following families: Crowninshield, Allen, Clif- 
ford, Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, Derby, Hilman; Hasket, Langdon, 
Hodges, Phippen, Wood, Williams, Skerry, ^Manning, Calley, Boardman, 
Baker, Hodges, Phippen, Wood, Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, 
Manning, Calley, Stone, Lambert, Brown. See Ancestry Tables j^y. 

55. YII. 314. John Pickering PiTtnam [Sarah 54-55. YI. 102], 
born in Salem, died in Vevay, Switzerland. A commission-merchant. 
Residence : Boston. 

55. VII. 314. JTam'et Upham, his wife, born in Boston. Residence : 
Boston. 

> The Centennial Celebration of the Wednesday Evening Club, pp. 104-105 ; Boston 
Journal of Jlay 9, 1877; also the Boston Daily Advertiser of T^Iay 9, 1877; and facts 
furnished by his son, the late Benjamin W. Crowninshield. 



SEVEXTII GENERATION. 445 

Mrs. Putnam has a crayon likeness of herself, by Cheney. A portrait of 
her, painted by Alexander, is in the possession of her daughter, ^Irs. Horace 
J. Ilayden, of New York. 

^Irs. Putnam was a daughter of Phiueas and Mary Avery (Baldwin) 
Upham. Iler father was a member of the mercantile firm of Gussitt & 
Upham, from which he retirtd, and became president of the Old Boston 
Bank.' Luke Baldwin [G. YIII. ■51'] was her uncle ; 2Ianj Ann S. M. Baldwin 
[G. IX. GO'] is her cousin. 

Her ancestry includes the following families : Upham, "Wood, Mellens, 
Dexter, Hill, Long, Bicknell, Motoalf, Nichols, Buckminster, Clark, Sharp, 
Vose, Baxter, Paddy, White, Fiske, Gipps, Symmes, Sparhawk, Angier, 
Baldwin, Richardson, Fisk, Wilson, Flagg, Leppingwell, Cartel-, Burnham, 
Parkman, Trask, Adams, Champney, Hubbard, Avery, Lane, Little, Warren, 
Sturdevant, Doming, Treat, Green, Cushing, Pitcher, Hawke, Thaxter, 
Jacob, Bromfield, Danforth, Wilson, Fletcher, Cushing, Pitcher, Hawke, 
Thaxter, Jacob. See Axcestki- Tables ■^'^■^. 

56. VII. 315. Harriet Wiggin piary 56. VI. 104] , born in Stratham, 
N. H., died in Stratham. Eesidonce: Stratham. 

The gravestone of Miss Wiggin was standing in the graveyard of Strat- 
ham a few years ago. 

6G. VII. 316. Caroline "^Viggin [:\Iary 56. VL 104], born in Strat- 
ham, N. II., died in Stratham. Residence : Stratham. 

56. VII. 317. Andrew Paine Wiggin [Mary 56. VI. 104], born in 
Stratham, N. H., died in Canterbury, N. H. A physician. Residence: 
Stratham.2 

Dr. Wiggin was at one time a resident of Greenland, N. H. 

56. VII. 317. Olive Gilbert, his wife, born in Belfast, Maine, died in 
Greenland, N. H. 

• Upham Genealogy, by F. K. Upham, p. 199. 

' The date of his marriage is given as Jan. 26, 1S'21, by his niece, Miss Annie E. 
Wiggin ; while the History of the Wingate Family, by C. E. L. Wingate, p. 153, gives it as 
Jan. 23, 1S21. 



44 G TEE FICK.ERIXG GENEALOGY. 

By her fir.st hiiBbiuul, Lemuel Ransom Gilbert, whom she manied Dec. 
13, 1815, she was mother oi John II. Gilhvrt [57. VII. JJ6']. 

^Irs. Wiggin ^vas a daughter of Iluse. Ancestry Tables ^'^'JL. 

5G. VII. 318. Eliza Wigo-in [^ary 5G. VI. 104], born in Stratham, 
N. ir., died in Loudon, N. H. 

56. VII. 818. Andrew Taylor, her husband, born in Deerfield, X. H., 
died in Loudon, X. H. A farmer. Residence : Loudon. 

Jlr. Taylor was formerly a resident of Canterbury, X^. II. In 184G, he 
was a member of the X'ew Hampshire Senate. 

AxcESTRY Tables jl\. 

56. VII. 319. Calel) Wiggin [Mary 56. VL 104], born in Stratham, 
N. H., died in Stratham. A farmer. Residence : Stratham. 

Captain Wiggin received a conmion-school education, and was one 
year at Phillips Exeter Academy. He was a dignified man, respected by 
all, respectful and self-respecting. He was honest, thrifty, economical, and 
benevolent, seeking to aid worthy objects, and ever ready to respond to the 
appeals of charity. How to aid the church of his fathers seemed peculiarly 
bis solicitude ; and he regularly paid one sixth of the minister's salary. 
During the last year of his life he subscribed half the estimated cost toward 
the construction of the vestry, having pre^^ously given most of the 
parsonage. He united with the church in May, 1843, and his place in the 
sanctuary was never vacant, save in sickness. At his death, in his ninety- 
second year, he was the oldest man in town. 

His estate, undeeded from its settlement two hundred and fifty years 
ago, was the largest inherited estate in the town, and he increased and 
improved it.^ 

56. VII. 819'. Eliza Adams, the first wife of Caleb Wiggin, born in 
Stratham, X. IL, died in Stratham.^ 

' An Obituary in The Exeter News Letter of September, 18S7, copied from The Con- 
gregationalist. 

* The date of her death is given on her gravestone as Feb. 25, 1847; while her 
daughter, Annie E. Wiggin, and tlie History of the Wingate Family, by C. E. L. Wingate, 
p. 153, give it as Feb. 27, ISiT. 



SEVEXTH GEXEUATIOX. 447 

Ilur gravestone was standing- in the Strathani graveyard a few years 
since. 

I\rrs. Wiggin was a daughter of John and Anna (Folsom) Adams. Her 
ancestry includes the following families : Adams, Folsom, Gilman, Clark, 
Perkins, Wiggin. See Ancestkv Tables -^i\i. 

56. VII. 31D-. Amelia Iiobi)iso)i^ the second wife of Caleb Wiggin, 
born in Stratham, N. II., died in South Newmarket, N. H. 

Mrs. Wiggin was a daughter of Abednego and ilary (Sawyer) Robinson. 
Ancestry Tables j^^J-fi. 

56. VII. 321. Sarali Bartlett Wiggin [Mavj 56. VI. 104], born in 
Strathaui, N. 11. , died in Xewburyport, ]Mass. 

56. VII. SJl. Andrew WiUiam MiUimore, her husband, born in 
Stratham, N. II., died in Xewburypoi-t, Mass. A shipmaster. Residence : 
Xewburyport. 

Mr. j\Iiltimore was a son of the Rev. James and Dorothy (Wiggin) 
Miltimore. His ancestry includes the following families : Miltimore, 
Wiggin, Bradstreet, Dudley. See Axcestry Tables -X^^. 

56. VII. 322. Sarali Wingate [John 56-57. VI. 107], born in 
Stratham, X. H. 

56. VII. 323. Asa Pratt jParh-nian, her husband, born in Palmyra, 
Maine. A farmer. Residence : Palmyra. 
Ancestkt Tables j^yj- 

56. VII. 323. Mary "Wingate [John 56-57. VI. 107], born in 
Stratham, X. H. 

56. VII. 323. George WiUiam TJiompson, her husband, born in 
Portsmouth, X. H., died in Stratham, X. II. A minister. Residence : 
Stratham. 

Mr. Thompson was employed in mercantile business in his native city, 
until he attained his nuijority. lie then entered the Gilmanton Tlieological 
Seminary, and studied for the ministry, graduating with high honors in 



448 THE PICKEEIXG GEXE.iLOGY. 

18;;!'J. He lir.st preiicluMl at Kiuy.stou ; where, on April 9, 1840, lie was 
ordained over the Cnnyregatioiial Chnrch. After three years of faithful 
labor, he resigned to accept a pastorate at Dracut, Mass., and remained 
there two years. He then received a call from the church in Carlisle, 
Slass., where he served three years and a half, and then returned to his 
former charge in Dracnt, where he remained five and a half years. After 
preaching for eleven years, he retired from active service, and chose 
Stratham as his home, though he occasionally fdled the pulpits of churches 
■which were without pastors. 

He was a member and a director of the Amencan Peace Society, and 
was a life-long friend and supporter of the cause. 

lyir. Thompson ^vas an able preacher and a talented man, and had prob- 
ably officiated at more weddings and funerals, and made more wills, than 
any other clergyman in the vicinity of Stratham. He was generally con- 
sidered the young folks' friend and the aged peoples' staj-.^ 

He was a son of Ebenezer and ^lary (Weeks) Thompson, of Portsmouth, 
N. H. His ancestry includes the following families : Thompson, Emerson, 
Torr, Weeks, Haines, Xeate, Hubbard, Marcli. See Ancestry Tables ^l}^. 

57. Vn. 324. Elizabeth Wingate [John 56-57. YI. 107], born in 
Stratham, N. H., died in Exeter, N. H. 

Mrs. Clark, who was a member of the First Congregational Clmrch, was 
a chcei-ful, quiet, and faithful woman. She possessed literary tastes, and 
had written many poems of striking beauty and merit ; but she very seldom 
permitted their publication. She was buried in the family lot in Stratham.^ 

57. vn. S24. Boijamhi Franklin Clark, her husband, born in 
Stratham, N. H., died in Stratham. A farmer. Residence: Stratham. 

Mr. Clark was born on the old homestead on Stratham Ridge, where he 
lived most of his life, and where three generations of his family had pre- 
ceded him. An enthusiastic and accomplished musician, and possessed of a 
fine voice, ho conducted the music in the church of which he was a mem- 

' The American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, January and February, 1890; 
also tTie Exeter Xews Letter of Jan. 3, 1890. 
= The Exeter Xews Letter of July 6, 1888. 



SEVEXTFI GENERATION. 449 

ber for twenty-tlirL-e years. Fur sixty-tlireo year.s he was a tlevotcd cliurcli 
member, — tliirty-eiglit in connection with the church in Stralhani, and 
twenty-live witli the First Congrepatiunal Church in Exeter; and for neai'ly 
twenty years he was a superintendent in the Sabbatli School. 

Mr. Clark inherited strong- mechanical tastes from his ancestors, and 
devoted much time to the exercise of his marked inventive ability. He was 
a man of very strong convictions.^ 

He was a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Wiggin) Clark. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Clark, Dearl)orn, Wiggin, Bradstreet, 
Dudley, Sherburne, Marble. See Ax. estkv Tables ^-J-^. 

57. Vn. 325. John Paine Wingate [John 5G-57. VI. 107], born in 
Stratham, X. H., died in Stratham. A farmer. Residence : Stratham. 

57. VII. 325. Jlo)'!/ OJirta Folsom, bis wife, born in Exeter, N. H., 
died in Stratham, X. H. 

Mrs. "Wingate was a daughter of Peter and Hannah P. (Hook) P'olsora. 
Her father was a farmer of Stratham. Her ancestry includes the following 
families: Folsom, Gilman, Clark, Cousins, Gilraan, Clark, Treworg}-e, 
Shapleigh, Folsom, Gilman, Clark, Perkins, Ladd, Gilman, Clark, Tre- 
worgye, Shapleigh, Green, Hook. See Axcestkt Tables y?g. 

57. VII. 3-2G. Anna Homer Wingate [John 56-57. VI. 107], born 
in Stratham, X. H. 

Mrs. Gilbert had the care of her grandmother, Eunice Wingate, in her 
last days, and probably knew her better than any other grandchild. 

57. VII. JJG. John JTttsr Gilhcrl, her husband, born in Belfast, 
Maine. A farmer. Kesidence : Ipswich, ]Mass.^ 

Mr. Gilbert formerly lived in Stratham, X. H. He is a son of Lemuel 
Ransom and Olive (Iluse) Gilbert. Andrew Paine "Wiggin [pG. VII. 317] 
was his stepfather. Axcestky Tables -{W- 

1 The Exeter Gazette of May 23, 1S90. 

^ The date of his birth is given as Jan. 9, 1817 ; while the History of the Wingate 
Family, by C. E. L. Wingate, p. l.'G, gives it as Jan. S, 181G. 

29 



450 THE nCKEEIXG GENEALOGY. 

hi. VII. 3J7. Caroline Wiggin Wingate [John 5G-o7. VI. 107], 
born in Stratliani, N. TI., died in Exeter, X. II. 

]\Irs. Baker had lived iu Portsmoutli, Strathani, and Exeter, N. H. 
In the h\tter phice she had lived for the last twenty years of her life. 
She is spoken of in her obituary notice as a woman of beautiful 
character, of tlie utmost kindliness, and of many excellencies. She 
delighted in deeds of neighborly kindness, and from early girlhood 
was often called to minister to the sick and sufi'ering. She ordered 
her household well, and was one of the wisest and most affectionate of 
mothers.^ 

57. VII. 327. Samuel Baker, her husband, born in Beverly, Mass. 
A dentist. Residence : Portsmouth, X. H. 
Ancestry Tables y^^" 

57. VII. 328. George Wingate [.John 56-57. VI. 107], born in 
Stratham, X. H. A farmer. Residence : Stratham. 

Mr. Wingate has held a commission as justice of the peace, has been a 
selectman, and has held other positions of trust. 

57. VII. oJS. Clavinda Frost, his wife, born in Sanford, Maine, died 
in Stratham, X. H. 

An obituary notice of Mrs. Wingate appeared in one of the Exeter 
newspapers at the time of her death. It speaks of her family relations, and 
adds : " The deceased was a most estimable lady, a kind neighbor, and 
a loving wife and mother. She was a lady of remarkable intellectual 
qualities, and her demise will be a sad loss to the community." Before her 
marriage she was a school-teacher. 

Mrs. AVingate was a daughter of John and Hannah (Morrill) Frost, of 
Sanford, Maine. Her ancestry includes the following families : Frost, Gibbs, 
Bradish, Rice, Moore, Walker, ^lessinger. Mellows, Cheever, Woodhead, 
Messinger, ]\Iellows, Cheever, Woodhead, Corbett, Rockwood, Chapin, 
King, Thurston, Morrill, Littlefield. See Ancestry Taklfs ~l\. 

' The Exeter Xews Letter of Jau 22, 1892. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 451 

57. VII. oi'O. Heniy Pickering; Wingate [John 50-57. VI. 107], 
born in Stratlium, N. II. Ecsulence : Hamptou, N. H. 

Colonel Wingate has lived in Stratham and in Exeter, ZST. H. He has 
represented Strathain in the State legislature, has held a commission as 
justice of the peace, and has been a lieutenant-colonel in the old New 
Hampshire militia. 

57. VII. 3^9. Saf(fh Anti Pearson, his wife. 

Mrs. AVingate is a daug-hter of Samuel Moody and Elizabeth W. (Shannon) 
Pearson. Her ancestry includes the following families : Pearson, Thurston, 

Noyes, AVoodmau, Adams, Shannon. See Ancestry Tables jf^. 

57. VII. 330. Samiiel DanaWingate [John 56-57. VI. 107], born 
in Stratham, N. H., died in Exeter, N. II. A lawyer. Residence : 
Exeter. 

Mr. Wingate, who was educated at Hampton Academy, New Hampshire, 
went to California in January, 1849, in the Edward Everett. This was the 
first ship to sail from the East during- the mining excitement. He was in 
business in California throe years. He afterwards engaged in mercantile 
business in Cleveland, Ohio, and, on his return to Exeter, he entered into 
the dry goods business. On Jan. 1, 1857, he was appointed Register of 
Probate for Buckingham County for a term of live years, and was re- 
appointed Jan. 1, 18G2. "While holding this office he was admitted to the 
bar. Mr. Wingate represented Exeter in the State legislature in 1864 
and 1865.' 

57. VII. ooO. Orinnn MitilteJl. the wife of Samuel D. Wingate, 
born in Exeter, N. H., died in Exeter. R('siilence : Exeter. 

Her second husbnnd, whom she married Oct. 21, 1873, was James 
Munroe Lovering. He was born Oct. 12, 1817, and died in Exeter, N. II., 
Aug. 24, 1885. Residence: Exeter. He was an internal revenue collector 
and an officer in the Boston Custom House. 

Mrs. Lovering was a daughter of Lewis and Fannie Dearborn (Wedge- 
wood) Mitchell, of Exeter. Ancestry Tables j|y. 



1 Letters of C. E. L. Wingate and J. C. A. Wingate. 



452 THE PICKERING GEXE.iZOGY. 

f)7. VII. o.jl. Josepli Cliarles A■ag^^stus Wingate [Jolm 56-57. 
VI. 107], boni in Stratham, N. II. A farmer, licsideuce : Strathaiii. 

Mr. Wing-ate, Bowdoin College, 1S51, was fitted for college at Phillips 
Exeter Academy. He studied law with the Hon. W. W. Stickney and the 
Hon. Amos Tuck, of Exeter, practised law in Chester and Concord, N. H., 
and afterwards was for three years cashier of the Merrimack County Bank 
of Concord. 

He was appointed, April G, 18G3, United States consul at Swatow, 
China, and relinquished tlic otlice to his successor on Feb. 22, 1875. He 
was appointed United ^States consul at Foochow, Cliina, March 31, 1880, 
and held this position until April 22, 1889. He served as consul a longer 
term than any United States consul had previously served in China : and, in 
accepting his resignation of the consulship of Foochow, the Department of 
State, in writing to him, said, " Your long and faithful career in the foreign 
service of government merits the highest commendation." At Foochow he 
also held the office of acting German consul, upon retiring from which he 
received the thanks of the Imperial German Government. He is the owner 
of the farm which belonged to his grandfather, Paine "Wingate.^ 

57. VII. SJl. Mdvij Green, the wife of Joseph C. A. Wingate, born 
in Plymouth, N. H., died in Stratham, N. H. 

Mrs. Wingate was a daughter of William and Harriet (Kimball) Green, 
of Bristol, N. H. Ancestry Tables {j\. 

58. VII. 332. diaries Pickering [Timothy 58. VI. 110], born in 
Starucca, Susquehanna County, Pa., died in Boston, of pneumonia. A 
naturalist and ]ihysician. Residence : Boston. 

On the death of liis father, Charles Pickering was taken by his grand- 
father, Colonel Timothy Pickering, to "Wenham, and later to Salem, where 
he was brought up and educated. He entered Harvard College in the 
class of 1823, but he left the class before graduating. He studied medicine 
with Dr. Pierson, of Salem, and took the degree of ^I. D. at the Harvard 
Medical School in 1826. In 1827, he became a resident of Philadelphia, 

» History of Bo^yJoin College, by A. S. Packard, pp. 670-G71. 



CHARLF.S PICKERING. 
[58. VII. 3J2.] 









'Cjk.Jl^U^ J<.Cy/C-C.^f-i..y^ 



SEVEXTH GENEBATIOX. 453 

P;i., where lie practised luedicine for !>umc years, and then returned to 
Boston. On August 19, l.^o>!, he was appomted Zooh_->gist of the Wilkes' 
Exploring- Expedition, with which he remained till 1S42. 

Desirous of extending- his personal observations as far as possible, in 
October, 1843, he visited l\L;ypt, Arabia, the eastern part of Africa, and 
western and northern India, returning after an absence of twenty-two 
months. In 1848, he prepared his work on ''The Races of Man and 
their Geographical Distribution," being the ninth volume of the Reports of 
the Wilkes' Exploring Expedition. Sometime afterwards he prepared the 
fifteenth volume of the series, an extensive work on "The Geographical 
Distribution of Animals and Plants ; " but, no appropriation being made by 
Congi-css, its publication was suspended. Dr. Pickering brought out, in 1854, 
a small edition of the first part of his essay, and, in 1876, a large volume 
" On Plants and Animals in their Wild State." At the time of his death he 
was publishing, at his own expense, his large work, the result of many years' 
labor, entitled " Chronological History of Plants ; Man's Record of his own 
Existence, Illustrated through their Names, Uses, and Companionship." It 
was completed before his death, and five or six hundred pages were already 
in type. 

He was a member of the xVmerican Academy of Arts and Sciences, and 
for several years he was one of the most active officers of the Academy of 
Natural Science in Philadelphia.^ 

The engraving of Dr. Pickering is from a plate in possession of the 
family. 

58. VII. 332. Sarah Stoddard Hammond, the wife of Charles Picker- 
ing, born in Boston, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Pickering was the eldest child of Daniel and Sally (Stoddard) 
Hanmiond. Her father was a merchant of Boston. Cliarlotie Hammond [58. 
VII. 333'] was her sister. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Hammond, Stoddard, Mansfield, Joy. See Ancestry Tables ^^{j. 

* Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. XIII. pp. 441- 
444. The Salem Register, Thursday, :March 21, ls7S. A privately printed leaflet of three 
pages issued at his death ; also Appletoa's Cyclopsedia of American Biography, Vol. V. 
p. 4. 



45-t THE PICKEUIXG GENEALOGY. 

.')S. Vll. ;j3a. Edward Pickering- [Timuthy 5N. VI. 110], born in 
Wuiiliam, Maris., dit-d in Boston, of erysipelas. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Pickering- was educated in tSaleai, under tiie care of ]ii.s uncle, 
Henry Pickering, and graduated at Harvard College in 1S24, before he was 
seventeen years old. After two years spent in New York, lie began the 
study of law in the office of his uncle, Benjamin Ropes Nichols, in Boston. He 
passed the remainder of his life in Boston, occupying various offices of trust. 
Among the most prominent of tliese were the treasurersliips of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad, of the Taunton Branch Railroad, of the United States 
Hotel Company, and of the Boston Society of N"atural History. His con- 
nection witli the Taunton Branch Railroad extended over a period of thirty 
years. His management of these important trusts was cliaracterized by 
great accuracy, honesty, and punctuality. \\\ 1SG7, Mr. Pickering became 
a warden of King's Cliapel, where for fifty years he was a constant attendant. 
His private life was full of sweetness, peace, and charity, and he was much 
esteemed by his associates.' 

58. VII. 333. Charlotte Ilauimoiid, his wife, born in Boston. 
Residence : Boston. 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Daniel and Sally (Stoddard) Ham- 
mond. Her father was a merchant of Boston. Sarah Stoddard Hammond 
[58. VII. 333] was her sister. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Hammond, Stoddard, Mansfield, Joy. See A^-cestrt Tables j'|j. 

58. VII. 334. Hem-y Pickering [Octavitis 58. VI. 116], born in 
Boston. Residences : Boston and Manchester, Mass. 

Mr. Pickering, H. C. 1861, was in Europe from 1842 to 1849. He 
spent most of tliis time in England, where lie attended several schools for 
short periods. On his return home, he fitted for college under the Rev. S. 
F. Smith, at Newton Centre. In May, 1862, he began to study law with 
E. S. Rand, of Boston, and in September, 1862, he entered the Harvard 
Law School. In September, 18G3, he again became an office student in 

• The Salem Register, Xov. 27, 1S76 ; also The Unitarian Review and Eeligioua 
Magazine, Vol. VII. p. 196. 



SErEXTir GEXEKATIOX. 455 

Boston, and was soon after admitted to the kSulVolk Bar, and devoted himself 
to the practical .-tudy of the hiw of real estate. On June 7, lSG-1, he went to 
Washington to assist the wounded in the Armory Square Hospital. lie 
spent several months in Eurojiean travel and after his return opened an 
oftice in Boston as a conveyancer of real estate. On xYpril 15, 1867, he 
entered the firm of Horace !McMurtrie & Co., dealers in engines and general 
machinery. In 18!J5, he retired from business. Mr. Pickering- is a director 
of the United Stati'S Hotel C'unipanv, and for some fifteen years has been 
treasurer of the Braiiiard Milling Machine Company. 

He is interested in charitable work, and was formerly a manager of the 
Industrial Aid Societv, and has been, for more than fifteen years, treasurer 
of the Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute.^ 

Mr. Pickering possesses several interesting relics of the Pickering familv, 
among wdiich are an excellent pastel portrait in profile, cabinet size, and 
a daguerrotype of his grandfixther, Colonel Timothy Pickering; also a 
daguerrotype of his uncle, the Hon. John Pickering ; a beautiful large 
miniature of his father, Octa^•ius Pickering ; a lock of Colonel Timothy 
Pickering's hair, taken from his head on the morning of his decease, Thurs- 
day, Jan. 29, 1829 ; also his silver watch, made by Pitt of London, to which 
is attached a quaint silver seal with the Pickering coat of arms engraved 
thereon, a heliotype of which faces page 12 ; a pair of his knee-buckles and 
a pair of his shoe-buckles ; his testament, dated 17oG, and his music-book, 
dated 17G2 ; a book-plate of his uncle, Henry Pickering, engraved v^-itli a crest 
of a demidion ; a miniature of him taken by Richard, dated Paris, 1821, and 
two carnelian seals which belonged to him — one cpiartering the Pickering and 
White arms, and another engraved with the crest of a demidion and the 
monogram H. P. He has another seal with the same crest and the mono- 
gram 0. P. He has also a Pratt seal, with the crest of an elephant's head, 
given to him by his uncle, Samuel P. Pratt. He has miiuatures of Colonel 
James Hodgson and his wife, Harriet (Pratt) Hodgson. 

58. VII. 334- Mat'if Gnddard Wigyleswovth, the wife of Henry 
Pickering, born in Boston. 

» The Harvard College Class Book of 1S61, pp. 87-88. 



45G THE PICKEIIIXG GENEALOGY. 

Mrs. Pickeiiny is a daugliter of Edward and Henrietta ]May (Goddard) 
Wix-o-leswortli, of Boston. Frances Dum Goddard[A.\).\\l\.6.'r7'\ was lier aunt, 
and Ucnnj Goddard [49. VII. 371'] was lier first cousin once removed. Her 
ancestry includes the following- families : Wiggleswortli, Sparliawk, Angier, 
Newman, Coolidge, Frost, Andrews, Hill, Gushing, Pitcher, llawke, Thaxter, 
Jacob, Norton, Downing, Winthrup, Mason, Parker, Thaxter, Jacob, Gridley, 
Belknap, Fitch, Fosdick, Bligh, Andrews, Lincoln, Hawke, Loring, Newton, 
Wheatley, Baker, GoUier, Richmond, Goddard, Miles, Treadway, Howe, 
Jennison, IMacoudjer, Stearns, r^Ianiiing, Seaver, Ballard, "White, "Weld, Dana, 
Bullard, Sunnier, West, Baker, Tucker, Ma}-, Brewer, Bridge, liobinson, 
Davis, Mixer, Garlield. See Ancestry Tables /g'j. 

68. VII. 33G. Mary Elizabeth Pickering Dorsey [Elizabeth 58. 
VI. 118], born at "The ^lanor," Baltimore Gounty, Md. Residence: 
Edgewood, Elkridge, Howard County, Md. 

The first twenty years of ^Irs. Donaldson's life were spent in Boston 
with lier relatives, where she knew many young people Avho afterwards 
attained distinction, notalily, Dr. Holmes, Longfellow, Charles Sumner, and 
others. She once saw Aaron Burr; and she heard John Randolph, of 
Roanoke, talk after his return from the Russian Embassy, with his eccen- 
tricities something akin to madness. Her home, Edgewood, ^^ here she has 
always exercised a simple hospitality, stands on a few acres of her grand- 
father Dorsey's land in Howard County, near the boundary line of Baltimore 
County. 

Mrs. Donaldson is gifted in conversation, and her vivid memory of people 
and events are particularly interesting. She and her husband were first 
cousins. 

58. VII. 33G. llioiHiis JDonaldson, her husband, born in Baltimore, 
Md., died at Edgewood, Elkridge, Howard County, ]Md. A lawyer. Resi- 
dence : Edgewood, Elkridg-e, near Baltimore. 

Mr. Donaldson was fitted for college at Round Hill School, Northampton, 
Mass., graduated at Harvard College in lS3i, and began the btudy of law in 
Baltimore. Failing health, however, mndt,' him choose the more active duties 
of a civil engineer, and he was employed in the construction of various rail- 



SEVEXTTT GFXERATTOX. 457 

roads. On the re-establislunent of his liealth, he resumed tlio study of the 
law, was admitted to tlie Bar in 1843, and as a lawyer attained distinction. In 
1847 and in 1848, he was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates, 
serving' as chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means. He also took a 
determined stand against the pending measures of repudiation, and did more 
than any other man to defeat the scheme. In 1847, he had the satisfaction 
of seeing Maryland place herself among the solvent States of the Union. 
He took an active j)art in the Constitutional Convention called in 1850 to 
make a new constitution tor the State of Maryland. 

About the year 1843. he purchased several acres in a tract of land called 
Elkridge, eight miles from Baltimore. This place, which he made his home, 
lie called Edgewood. 

From tlie year 1851 to 18(U, Mr. Donaldson was actively engaged in 
the duties of his profession, and took no pai't in politics. In 1854, he was 
chosen director and also one of the counsel of the Philadelphia, "Wilming- 
ton, and Baltimore Railroad Company, and he held both of these offices as 
long as he lived. He was elected a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Peabody Institute of the city of Baltimore, some time after its establish- 
ment, and took an active interest in its affairs until his death. 

During the war for the preservation of the Union, Mr. Donaldson was 
an avowed Union man. In November, ISGl, he was elected a member from 
Howard County to the House of Delegates of Maryland, and, on the fourth 
of December, he took his seat at the extra session of the General Assembly 
called by Governor Hicks. On the seventeenth of the month, he submitted 
a series of joint resolutions which expressed his opinions on the political 
questions of the day. These resolutions were adopted by the House of 
Delegates, but were very materially altered in the Senate. 

Mr. Donaldson was a diligent reader to the end of his life. The great 
poets were his especial favorites, and their works were indelibly engraved on 
his memory. High tributes to his learning, culture, and character were paid 
him in the Evening Bulletin, and in the Baltimore American, by S. Teackle 
Wallis, and by George William I'rown, both of whom were his early friends 
and professional brethren. 

Mr. Wallis speaks of the excellence of his individual and personal quali- 



458 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

ties ; liid liiyli sense of duty, which eMU^ed hiiu to t'ldlU evciy professional 
obHg-iition, no matter how much it mig-ht entail of patient industry and 
labor; the amiable frankness of his temper, and the cordial kindness of his 
intercourse and manners. Chief Justice Ih-own speaks of him as dying in 
the maturity of his powers, with a still more distinguished cai'eer lying- 
immediately before him, and says that in Howard County, where he resided, 
he was universally beloved and honored, that he was the leader of the Bar, 
and was engaged in every import;uit case. 

Mr. Donaldson was the eldest son of John Johnston and Caroline 
(Dorsey) Donaldson. Ilainmond Borscij \')>^. VI. US'] was his uncle. His 
ancestors on both sides •were of Irish extraction.-* His ancestry includes the 
following families : Donaldson, Johnston, Dorsey, Ely, Warfield, Hill, 
Dorsey, Todd, Hammond, Bowan. See A^■c!;sTKY Tables y^'g. 

59. VII. 338. Pickering Dodge [Pickering 59. VL 123], born in 
Salem, died in Worcester, ^lass, Residence : Salem.- 

Mr. Dodge, H. C. 1823, was fitted for college at the private school of 
John Brazer Davis. On leaving college he studied law in the oifice of the 
Hon. John Pickering, of Salem. Here he remai)ied imtil January, 1824, 
■when he went with his uncle, William Lander, on a short tour in Europe. 
During this trip he kept a careful diary, which he afterwards transcribed 
into two large volumes. After his marriage, Mr. Dodge resided in Lpm, 
on a farm, where for a part of the time his father-in-law, the Rev. Henry 
Colman, lived. He returned to Salem in 1837, the Eastern Railroad having 
been carried through the entire length of his farm. 

From the death of his wife, in September, 1849, most of his time for the 
following four years was spent in European travel. In June, 1855, with 
his second wife and his daughter, ^Ir. Dodge made his fourth visit to 
Europe. He returned in June, 185G. 

^ A Skotch of The T.ife of Thomas Donaldson, by George William Brown ; also an 
obituary notice in the Salem Register of Oct. S, 1877, and the Harvard Class Book of 
1834, pp. 3.';-3r.. 

' The date of his birth is given as April 24, 1S04, in Essex Institute Historical Col- 
lections, Vol. III. p. 25G, and by his cousin, ilrs. Xathaniel Silsbee ; while it is given as 
March 24, 1804, by the Harvard College Necrology printed in the Boston Daily Advertiser 
of July 20, 1SG4. 



SICVEXTIT OEXEn.lTrOX. 459 



In lS4t;, he publi.sheJ, undur the signature of " T. C the compiler," his 
first printed volume, entitled, " A History of the Art of Painting." In 1849, 
he published a second volume, entitled " Sculpture and the Plastic Art." 

Mr. Dodge was a man of cultivated tastes with a great love of art. At 
his death he left a number of fine paintings, engravings, books, articles of 
virtu, etc., also several works in manuscript. Among these were: "A 
Universal History," prepared by him for his children; "A Tribute to the 
Memory of the DeparltMl Dead," on the death of his sou George; two 
volumes entitled " Sketelies in the South of Europe," the title-})age3 and 
ornamental lettering being done bv his wife ; "Journal of a Tour around 
Winnipiseogee in 1825 ;" "Journal of a Tour to the White Hills in 1828;" 
"Letters to my Children from Europe, Asia, and Africa, 1850-1851." ^Mr. 
Dodge owned the pictures of his grandfather and grandmother, Israel and 
Lucia Dodge, one of his father, Pickering Dodge, and one of Colonel 
Timothy Pickering, all by Erothingham ; also one of his mother, by 
Osgood, one of his first wife, one of his sou Charles, a group of his three 
children, Charles, Ellen, and Edward, and the portrait of his daughter, 
Georgiana.^ 

59. VII. 33S'. Anna Storer Colinon, the first wife of Pickering 
Dodge, died in Salem. 

An obituary notice of Mrs. Dodge, which appeared in the Salem Gazette 
of Sept. 18, 1849, pays a warm tribute to her character. 

She was a daughter of the Rev. Henry and Mary (Harris) Colman. 
Her father graduated at Dartmouth College in 1805, and is spoken of as 
a celebrated agi-iculturist. Her ancestry includes the following families: 
Colman, Brown, Jones. Whipple, Harris, Hills, Croswell, Upham, Dowse, 
Jewett, Piand, Edenden, Call, Kettell, Estabrook, Erothingham, Hett, Piand, 
Edenden, Wliiftemore. l^i)ham, Erost, ^[illor, Whittemore, l^pham, Hail, 
CoUicut, Pliipps, KL-ttc'll, Ilayden. See Ancestry Tables y^"y.. 

59. VII. J3S'. rjh.n Wehh Gllmnn, the second wife of Pickering 
Dodge, born in Cliarleston, S. C. Picsidence: Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Dodge's second husband, to whom she was married in September, 

> Harvard College Xecrology in the Boston Daily Advertiser, July 20, 1S61. 



460 THE FTCKEFlIXG GENEALOGY. 

18ti5, iri General Fraueis J. Lippitt, a lawyer, of Wa.-^liington. He was lj<:>ru 
in Provideiiee, Ii. I., July I'J, IS 12, and is a graduate of Brown Universiry. 
Mrs. Dodge is his second wife. 

She is a daughter of the Rev. Dr. Samuel and Caroline (Howard) 
Oilman. Her father (H. C. 1811) was a distinguished Unitarian clergy- 
man of Charleston, S. C, and her mother was an authoress.^ FiicJiarrl 
SiiUh'ait Fa>i [50. VIll. JJ-J] was her cousin. Her ancestry includes the 
following families: Oilman, Clark, I'reworgye, Shapleigh, Clark, Somerby, 
Oreenleaf, Iiobinson, Somes, Stanwood, Robinson, Ilaraden, Emerson, 
Symonds, Read, Batter, Oookin, Bird, Dolling, Jlecom, Howard, "Walling- 
ford, Travers, Tuttle, Ooffe, Sumner, West, Clement, Lillie, Frary, Eliot, 
Ruck, Clarke, Hutchinson, Marbury, Hamby, Tlawkins, Breck, Pateshall, 
Woody, Dexter, Thomas, Jacob, Ruck, Clarke. See Axckstrt Tables y|\, 

59. Vn. 340. Mary Jenks Dodge [Pickering 59. VI. 123], probably 
born and died in Salem.' 

A portrait of Mrs. Jenks, painted by Osgood, is in the possession of her 
sister, ^Irs. William A. Lauder, of Salem. A heliotype of it is here given. 

69. vn. 340. George W. Joihs. her husband, born in Salem, died in 
St. Louis, Mo. A merchant. Residence : St. Louis. 

There is a gravestone still standing in the Broad Street Burying Ground, 
Salem, on which is inscribed the death of George W. Jenks, his wife, and 
his parents. 

He was a son of John and Annis (Pulling) Jenks. Ancestry Tables /"^. 

59. vn. 34L Litcy Pickering Dodge [Pickering 59. VI. 123], 
probably born in Salem, died near Richmond, Va. 

A portrait of ^Irs. Allen, painted in Rome, and from which the heliotype 
here given was taken, is in the possession of her niece. Miss Lucy Allen 
Lander, of Salem. There is also a miniature of Mrs. Allen at Pontotoc, 
Miss. 

> The Oilman Family, by Arthur Oilman, pp. 145-149. 

^ Family records differ as to the date of her marriage, — one giving it as March 21, 
1831, and another as :Nrarch 24, 1S31. 



AFARV JKXKS (DODGE) JKiVKS. 

[59 VI L 340] 

KTRA.T RV OS,;,, or,, PA.NTFD XBOrP .S35, NOW rN' THE POSSLSS.ON 

OF Mrs. WiLUAM A. Lander, ok Salkm, Mass. 



I.UCV PICKi;RIN'r, (DODGF.) ai.len. 
[59. vn. 341] 

From the roKTR.UT tain rn, is Romk, Italy, n.iw in the PossEssro 
Of Mrs. William A. Lander, of Sallm, Mass. 



JOHN FISKF ALLEN. 

[59. VII. Sil.] 

From the Mi.vrAn:RK nuw iv the possession- ok thk East Immia 
M.ua.M. Socihn.SAi.LM, Mass. 



SEVENTH GEXERATIOX. 401 

59. VII. J^i. John Fishe Allen, her luisbuiid, bom in Salem, died 
in Salem. A meroliaiit. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. xVllen began liis business life as a book-keeper in the office of 
Pickering Dodge, whose daughter he afterwards married. After making 
several voyages to India as supercargo and as a shipmaster, he engaged in 
business with his brother, Edward Allen ; but in a few years they dissolved 
partnership. For forty -four years he was a member of the Salem East 
India Marine Society, of which he was secretary from 183-1: to 1836. 

^iv. Allen is best known, however, by bis devotion to horticulture in its 
higher branches, especially to the culture of the grape, of which he raised 
several new varieties. His published treatise on this fruit is regarded as an 
authorit}-, and has passed through three editions. His success in raising 
the Victoria Kegia, and his splendid monograph on that gorgeous flower, 
are well kuo-wn. He was an original member of the Essex Institute, and 
was for several years one of the curators of horticulture. He was also a 
vice-president of that institution from 1864 to 1807. He published the 
following works : "A Practical Trentise on the Culture and Treatment of 
the Grape Vine," New York, C. M. Saxton, 2d edition, 1848 ; 3d edition, 
1853 ; " Victoria Regia, or The Great Water Lily of America," Boston, 
Duttun & AVentworth, 1854.^ 

Mr. Aliens second wife was Mary Hodges Cleveland. They were 
manied Oct. 13, 1842. By her he had the following children: — 

Marion Allen, born Oct. 16, 184S. 

Elizaheth C. Allen, born Dec. IS, 1850. 

The heliotype of ^Fr. Allen is from a miniature in the possession of the 
East India ^Tarine Society, of Salem. 

He WHS a son of Edward and Anna (Fiske) Allen, of Salem. EJhahrth 
Putnam Orne [52. VIII. 502'^ and Ai,nc Fish' Orne [52. VIII. 59^'-^] were 
his nieces. His ancestry includes the following families: Allen, Hodges, 
Phippen, "Wood, Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, Fiske, Lanterce, 
Gipps, Symmes, Sparhawk, Angier, Gemsh, Lowell, Waldron, Higginson, 

> Salem Eegister of Thursday, Oct. 19, 1876; also Essex Institute Historical Collec- 
tions, Vol. XIV. p. 272. 



4G2 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

Whitfield, Slieafe, Savage, Symaies, Phippen, "Wood, Guppy, Palfray, 
Manning, Galley, Beckford, Pinson, Green. See Axcestrv Tables ^^L. 

59. YII. 342. Catlierine Elizabeth Dodge [Pickering 59. VI. 
123], probably born in Salem. 

Mrs. Lander has in her possession the following portraits : One of her 
father, Pickering Dodge, by Frothingham ; one of her mother, by Osgood ; 
and one of her sister,. Mrs. George AY. Jenks, by Osgood. 

59. VII. 342. William A. Landev, her husband, born in Salem, died 
in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Lander when a young man was in the ofiice of Pickering Dodge, 
whose daughter he afterwards married; and he was at one time connected 
with the Wenham Ice Company. He formerly owned the beautiful place 
in Danvers called Oak Knoll, which he laid out and planted with great 
taste. It has since been made famous by the visits of Whittier. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lander were first cousins. 

He was a son of William and Mary (Jenks) Lander. Behccca Jenks 
[59. VI. l-2o'] was his aunt. His ancestry includes the following families : 
Lander, i\Iorse, Brown, Jenks, Merriam, Barry, Xe^vhall, Potter, Farrar, 
Breed, Ballard, j\Iasury. See A^-cestry Tables -i^\. 

59. VIL 343. Rebecca Anne Dodge [Pickering 59. VI. 123], bom 
in Salem, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Silsbee was identified with very many of the charitable movements 
in Salem, and to her, perhaps more than to any other person, many of 
them owed their success. Probably no woman was better known to all 
classes of citizens, from the humblest to the highest ^valk in life, and none 
held more firmly their confidence and regard. To aid and cheer the poor 
and discouraged, was her delight, and she was widely known for her broad 
charity and noble work for the poor. 

Mrs. Silsbee was of a joyous nature, had a most original mind, and 
witty tongue, and was an ideal hostess, — charming and entertaining. She 
kept abreast with the times, and was interested in all musical and literary 
schemes. For years she was the head of a class of ladies who met together 



'^!v¥?S^!^,'\ ■»;"*^,".r:i«'=^''''-^^ 



«'S:" 



L 



''^/^^ 

■>»>.:.. 



W":Jl ....* 



iLi^ 



THK HOUSE OF Ji )HX HKXRV 
SALK.\t, MASS. 



[59. VII. 3S.3] 



SEVENTH GENEEATIOX. 463 

for the study of litLratuiX', tlio lueiulLT.-lup of \vliich was hiylily prized. 
She was for inauy years a member of the North (Unitarian) Church in 
Salem. Slie owned the portraits by Frothingham of her gnmdpareuts, 
Mr. and Mrs. Israel Dodge, and one of Colonel Timothy Pickering.^ 

59. VII. 34o. John Henry Silshee, the husband of Rebecca Anne 
Dodge, born in Salem, died in North Conway, N. H. A merchant. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

Jlr. Silsljee, H. C. 1S32, upon leaving college, entered upon a mercan- 
tile career in his father's counting-room. He was associated subsccpiently 
in the East India trade with the Stone brothers, of Salem, the firm being 
Stone, Silsbee, & Pickman. The firm was later succeeded by that of 
Silsbee, Pickman, & Allen, continuing as such iintil a very recent date. 
Mr. Silsbee was a man of generous impulses, of cnltivated tastes, of high 
literary attainment, and of quiet, unostentatious manners, and enjoyed the 
esteem and respect of his associates. He was a member of the North 
Church." A heliotvpe of his house is here given. 

He was a son of William and Mary (Hodges) Silsbee, of Salem. Ernest 
Francisco FcnoUnsa [13. X. 102'] is his nephew, and Xathaniel Silsbee [50. 
VII. ooO] and Caroline Silshee [50. VIII. oJ/"] were liis first cousins, and 
Elizabeth W. Sparks [5S. VIII. 703] is his first cousin once removed. 
His ancestiy includes the following families : Silsbee, Tompkins, Fowle, 
Paiue, Ingersoll, Felton, Coomes, Becket, Sibley, Mason, Beadle, Hicks, 
Gillingham, Bly, Hodges, Phippen, Wood, Williams, Skerry, ^Manning, 
Calley, Manning, Calley, Stone, Lambert, Brown, King, Gruy (I), Walker, 
Talmage, Barton, Roberts, Andrew, Grafton, Gardner, Frier, Higginson, 
Whitfield, Shcafe, Savage, Symmes, Gerrish, Lowell, Ruck, Spooner. See 
Ancestry Tablks ^Jj. 

59. VII. 34G. Jolni Hubbard Stone [Catherine 59. VI. 125], born 
in Salem, died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Jlr. Stone was educated in the Salem schools, and, at an early date, 

' The Boston Journal of April 19, 1S90 ; also Essex Institute Historical Collections, 
Vol. XXVir. pp. 199-2(»1. 

^ The Boston Evening Transcript, anel The Salcni Register of Sept. 21, 1891. 



4G4 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

Lo^an a bu.^l;ie.>s life as clerk iu the store ot" Kiniltall & Clark. Later, he 
went on a voyage to South America, and on his return removed to North 
]\eading-, where he engaged in business. Pie was afterwards in business in 
South Reading, now Wakefield, and in Calais, Maine. He returned to Salem 
in 1850, and was for a number of years in the Adjutant-General's office in 
Boston, and afterwarrls iu the Salem Custom House, under democratic 
administrations. For the latter part of his life, he was connected with the 
Essex Institute, being, at the time of his death, its librarian. He was inter- 
ested in historical and es|)ecially in genealogical matters, and was asso- 
ciated witli John Flint in preparing the Genealogy of the Descendants 
of Thomas Flint of Salem, besides preparing other work of a like character 
while at the Institute.^ 

59. Vn. J./C 1:1 iua Jane Flint, the wife of John Hubbard Stone, 
born in Xortli Keading, Mass., died in Salem. Residence: Salem. 

Mrs. Storie is spoken of as a very superior woman. She was a daughter 
of Addison and Sally (Upton) Flint, of North Reading. Her ancestry 
includes the following families: Flint, Putnam, Hutchinson, Bosworth, 
Burnap, Sav.ycr, Ricliards.m, Fuller, Tidd, Draper, Richardson, Pierson, 
Converse, Carter, Upton, Goodwell, Emerson, Underwood. See Ancestky 
Tables ^^f^. 

59. Vn. 347. Liicy Pickering Stone [Catherine 59. VI. 125], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mrs. Johnson was connected with many of the charitable institutions of 
Salem. For twelve years she was a manager of the Seamen's Orphan and 
Children's Friend Society. She was president of the Salem Female 
Employment Society, and, at the time of her death, was first directress 
(president) of the Salem Female Charitable Society, one of the oldest chari- 
table organizations in Salem. She attended the North (Unitarian) Church. 

Her portrait was painted by Osgood in 1838. A heliotype of it is here 
given. There is also a crayon portrait of her at the age of thirty-six years, 
by W. H. Furness.^ 

' We are indebted to .Tohn Robinson, of Salem, for most of these facts. 
^ From facts furnished by John Eobinson, of Salem. 



LUCY PICKERIM; (STONE) ROBINSON. 

159 Vn. 347.] 

From rut Portrait hy Osr.ooD, taimeI) in 1S3S, now in the 
OF JoH.N Ror.iN.soN, Esf),, OF Salkm, Mass. 



;r ""^ j^?f^?^*=^^ii?^:'!^'?^=sss, ;^:f^^ 



/ 



t''^taS.<di<..u%: 



^:*^4i*--.aadJ 



1 





i 

\ 


\ 



JOHN Ronixsox. 

[59. VII. 3P\] 

From thf Portrait rv O-r.oon, paintkd af.oi, r 1S45 ok 1S46, sov. i\ thk 
I'l'SSESitON OF ]r,',;s RoiiNSON, Em,>., of Saiim, Mass. 



SEVEXTH GEXERATIOX. 465 

59. \l\. 347^- John Itobinson, the first husbuiul of Lucy P. Stone, 
born in North Andover, Mass., died in Salem. A merchant. Residence : 
Salem. 

Mr. Robinson was born at the homestead of his mother's family near the 
Shawsheen River. He was educated in the old Franklin xVcademy at 
Andover ; but while yet a boy he went to Salem, where he became a clerk 
in stores and oilice-s. By the advice of his uncle, Nathan Robinson, a mer- 
chant of Salem, he went to sea. His first voyage was in the ship "Two 
Brothers," Captain Gilchrist, commander, for whom he was a clerk. She 
sailed from Salem, visiting Batavia and Antwerp, and returned to Salem 
after an absence of over two }-ears. This voyage was repeated during the 
following years ; and he afterwards continued to make voyages as super- 
cargo in several vessels. He finally closed his foreign career by a residence 
of considerable length in Canton, China, as factor for the firm of Bryant & 
Sturgis, of Boston. 

He retm-ned to Salem in 1839, and became treasurer of the New- 
market Manufacturing Company, which position he occupied until his 
death. 

Mr. Robinson's character was rather reserved, and his business success 
was from thouglitful conservative action rather than boldness. In all 
capacities, he labored to serve faithfully those in whose employ he was, 
and the interests of those associated with him. During his long voyages he 
devoted his time to i-eading, when not otherwise engaged, and possessed 
considerable knowledge of such foreign languages as were required in his 
business relations. 

A summary of his life between his first and last voyage, found in a care- 
fully written journal, gives an excellent idea of the character of the times, 
and the almost universal tendency in those days toward a life abroad. 
The follo\\ing memoranda are from his journal : — 

" At sea from Feb. 2, 1817, to Feb. 24, 1839, 3470 days, or 9 \-ears and 6 months. 
On sliore in the United States, Europe, Java. Sumatra, Manila, and China during the 
same period, 4587 days, or 12 years, G months, 22 days. 

" To Java, 11 voyages, remaining there 701 days ; llanila, 2 voyages, there 129 days ; 
China, 2 voyages, there 501 days ; Padang, 3 voyages, there 350 days ; Antwerp and 

30 



4G() THE nCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

tlie coiUineiit of ruropc, 12 times, tliero 911 Jays; Eiiirlaiul, 5 times, 50 days. In 
forciirn countries 2G42 days, or 7 years, 2 months, 24 days. In United States during 
this period also 1945 days, or 5 years, 4 months." 

I^Ir. Robinson's portrait was painted by Osg-ood, and is now owned by 
Ills son, John Kobinson. A lieliotype of it is here given. Mr. Robinson 
also lias a full length silhouette of his father. 

John Robinson was a son of Aaron, and Sarah (Poor) Robinson, of 
i\ndo".'er. His pute^'nal ancestors were all successful farmers, and had lived 
fi,ir several generations iuxVndover and Boxfurd, near where the line between 
the town passes nortli of the Croat Pond. His grandfatlier, ]Major John 
Robinson, was one of the niiruite-meu of the Revolutionary "War. He 
served under Vrashington, and was in the battles of Trenton and Brandy- 
wine. During the terrible winter at Valley Forge, he held the position of 
captain, and was instrumental in maintaining order amoug the troops. 
These services were recognized by the Commander-in-Chief, who presented 
him ^vith a sword, which is now in the possession of his great-grandson, in 
Salem, who bears his name.' The ancestry of John Robinson includes the 
following families : Robinson, Dane, Ingalls, Stevens, Abljot, Chandler, 
Ames, Wood, Andrew, Spofford, Scott, Hubbard, Wheeler, Wise, Peabody, 
Foster, Andrew, Pope, Tenney, Poor, Farnum, Adams, Pettingill, Ingersoll, 
Ijongfellow, Sewrdl, Hunt, Dununer, Archer, Barker, Dix, Gage, Farnum, 
Holt. See Axckstuy Takles -/IV- 

59. VII. 347". Samuel Johnson, the second husband of Lucy P. 
Stone, born in Nortli Andover, [Mass., died in Salem, of apoplexy. A 
physician. Residence : Salem. 

Dr. Johnson, H. C 1814, studied medicine with Dr. Thomas Kittredge, 
of North Andover, and settled in practice in Salem, where he was a leading 
physician from 1818 to 18G0. During this period he had a most extensive 
practice, and secured the confidence and esteem of his patients, his fellow- 
practitioners, and the community." 

Dr. Johnson's first wife, whom he married June 7, 1821, was Anna 

* From facts furuishod by John Rolnnson, of SaUnu. 
» Obituary in The Salem Eegister of June 1, 1S7G. 



SEVENTH GEXERAIION. 467 



Podge, who \v:iH born in Salem, Jan. 7, 1707, and died tlitTe Oct. 2-2, 1849. 
She was a daughter of Joshua and Ehzabeth (Crowninshiekl) Dodge, of 
Salem. By her he had the following children : — 

Samuel Johnson-, born Oct. 10, 1S22 ; died Feb. 19, 1SS2. 

Anna Johnson, born in 1824; died in 1S25. 

Anna Johnson, born Jan. l.j, 1S2G. She married, Dec. 24, 18C7, Eev. 

Augustus :^rellen Haskell (H. C. 1856). 
Joshua Johnson, born Feb. 13, 1827 ; died Feb. 2, ISSO. 

GroiiOE Johnson-, born Feb. 6, 182S. 

Elizabeth Johnson, born Jan. 5, ISuO. 

Catherine Johnson, born Tub. 14, 1831. 

James Johnson, born :\rarch 20, 1833 ; died Jan. 20, 1834. 

James Johnson, born Jan. 28, 1834 ; died Oct. 2, 1836. 

Martha Johnson, born Aug. 21, 1S3.5; died Sept. 29, 1836. 

Fkancis Dodge Johnson, born ?tlarch 3, 1842; died May 26, 1883. 

There are portraits of Dr. Samuel Johnson and his first wife in the 
possession of their daughter, Miss Catherine Johnson, of North Andover, 
Mass. 

Dr. Johnson was a son of Joshua and Martha (Spofford) Johnson, of 
North Andover. His father was a farmer. His ancestr}- includes the fol- 
lowing families: Johnson, Aslett, Aver, Sprague, Gage, Spofford, Scott, 
Bm-pee, Kelly, Stickney, Swan, Heseltine, Langhorue, Moody. See 
Ancestky Tables j^^j. 

59. VII. 348. Henry Orne Stone [Catherine 59. YI. 125], born in 
Salem. A farmer. Residence : Framinghara, Mass.^ 

i\rr. Stone, H. C. 1838, studied medicine, and, in 1841, received the degree 
of jM.D. from the Harvard Medical School. After his marriage, he resided in 
Concord, N. H., a few years, and then removed to Framingham, where he 
has since lived, owning a small farm, and devoting his time to its cultiva.- 
tion. He is much interested in sustaining the literarv institutions of the 
town, having been for many years a trustee of the public library, and 

* The date of his marriage is given as Xov. 12, 1S44, and it is also announced in the 
Salem Kegister of Xov. 15, 1844 ; while the Harvard College Class Book of 1S3S gives it 
as Jan. 12, 1844. 



4f)S THE nCKEBIXG GENEALOGY. 



holding positions in institutions of a siniiliar character. He lias never 
practised his profession except ])erhop3 occasionally.^ 

59. VII. 34^8. Mary Jiahlwhi Low, the wife of Henry 0. Stone, 
born in Boston, died in Franiingham, Mass. 

Jlrs. Stone was a daughter of Jolni Frazer and Anna D. Low, of Boston. 

A-N-CESTKY TaBLK.S y"^. 

59. VII. 3i9. George Humphrey Dovereux [Eliza 59. VI. 126], 
born in Salem, died in Sak'm. A lawyer. lu'sidence : Salem. 

General Devereux was fitted for college at the Latin Cn-amraar School, 
and graduated at Harvard College, with honoi-s, in 1829. He studied law 
in the office of the Hon. Leverett Saltonstall, and was admitted to the Bar, 
but eai-ly relinquished the profession. For several years he lived in the 
State of Maine, but his adventures there proved unfortunate, and he returned 
to Salem, where he continued to reside. In 1S34, he was elected captain 
of the Salem Light Infantry, and vras its commander for three or four years. 
In 1835, he was a representative from Salem in the General Court. From 
1848 to 1851, he was Adjutant-General of the Commonwealth. He was 
one of the most promising young men of his dav ; hut business misfortunes 
early repressed his progress, and made his life a long struggle for recovery. 
He was a fine classical scholar, and an eloquent and graceful speaker on all 
occasions. He was buried Avith military honors.^ 

59. VII. 3-^9. Charlotte Story Forrester, the wife of George H. 
Devereux, born in Salem, died in Salem, of apoplexy. 

Mrs. Devereux was admitted a member of the First Church, Feb. 1, 
1837. Her husband was admitted the same day. 

She was a daughter of John and Charlotte (Story) Fon'cster, of Salem. 
Mary Barrow Wliite [52. Yll. 3S4] was her first cousin, and WUUam Story 
Sargent [26. IX. -^io] is her first cousin once removed. Her ancestry 
includes the following families : Forrester, Haley, Hathorne, Gardner, 
Frier, Orne, Bowditch, Gardner, Frier, Porter, Phelps, Stoiy., Cooper, 

1 The Harvard Class Book, of hS.^S, p. 142. 
^ Salem Register of Oct. 2S, 1S7S. 



SEVENTH GENEUATIOX. 4G9 



Marion, Edd}-, liarri.son, Pciree, BrMgo. Pcdrii-k, l^rown, Chiun, ^Martin, 
Nortliey, Knott, Deveroiix, Stacy, Pedrick, Boden. See A.nckstry Tables 
ni 

59. VII. 3.10. Marianne Cabot Devereiix [Eliza 59. VI. 126], Lorn 
in Salem, died in Milton, ^lass. Residences : Boston and Jlilton. 

jMrs. Silsbee was one of tlie most striking and interesting of Salem's 
ffiatrons, gifted in conversation, with much originality, and possessed of a 
fund of anecdotes. She had a taste for writing, and wrote many "occa- 
sional verses " which were never collected. At the time of the Taylor 
Campaign, she wmte many campaign songs which enjoved considerable 
popularity. Slie used often to tell laughingly how one day on coming fronr 
Salem, where her life had lieen spent until the year 18G2, she was surprised 
to hear a fire couipany singing one of tlicse songs in front of the Eevere 
House. She compiled a book of poems under the title of " Memory and 
Hope," which was published by Ticknor, Reed, & Fields, Boston, 1851. 
She edited " Willie Winkle's Nursery Songs of Scotland," published by 
Ticknor & Fields, Boston, 1859. These intense Scotch dialect songs were 
in fact translations by her. At the age of seventy -five she published a 
book, written and finished within the yeai-, " A Half Century in Salem," 
which had run through four editions befo]-e her death, the last one contain- 
ing some few additions. It was published in Boston and New York, 
Houghton, Miftlin & Co., 1887. 

With her grandchildren Mi's. Silsbee was full of reminiscences, and 
talked much of her grandmother, Lucia (Pickering) Dodge. 

Her mother died while she was still a child, and some of her letters, 
which Mrs. Silsbee kept through her long life, and which are still in exist- 
ence, were the material from which one of the most interesting chapters in 
her book was written. 

On Saturday, Nov. 8, 1879 (the real anniversary was the following day), 
she and her husband celebrated their golden wedding at their Boston home. 

Her portrait was painted by Nichols, about 1844, and represents a beau- 
tiful woman. It is in the possession of her son, William E. Silsbee, of 
Boston.* 

• From facts furnished by the family. 



470 THE PICKLIiIXG GEXEALOGY. 

59. VII. odO. XatUfin id Sil.sJic', the liusbruid of 3Iariaune C. De\ ereux, 
bom in Salem, died in .Afilton, Ma.ss., of disease of the kidneys. A merchant. 
Residences : Boston and ]Milton. 

Mr. Silsbee, H. C. 1S24, was a prominent and public-spirited citizen of 
Salem. In li^jl, he was a member of the board of aldermen, and for the 
years 1849, ls50, 185S, and 1S59, he was mayor of Salem. In 1833, 1846, 
and 1848, he was a representative from Salem in the General Court. In 
politics he was an earnest "Whig-, and in the extra session of the Legislature 
of 1848 he was called to choose presidential electors. Between his terms of 
mayor he passed several years in Europe. He removed to Boston in 18G2, 
and in that year he was chosen treasurer of Harvard College, a position 
which he held for fourteen years. In 1869, he became a citizen of Milton, 
passing his winters in Boston.^ 

Mr. Silsbee's portrait was painted in 1842, by Healy, and is now in 
possession of his son, "William E. Silsbee, who also has an autobiography 
of Mr. Silsbee's father. 

He was a son of the Hon. Nathaniel and ]\Iary (Crowuinshield) Silsbee, 
of Salem. Elizahcth W. S^jarks [.38. YIII. 70S] is his niece; John II. 
Silshee [59. VII. 343], Caroline Silshce [50. VIII. So7], and Francis B. 
Crowninshield [55. VII. 313] were his first cousins; and John Collins 
Warren [51. IX. 1049] is his fust cousin once removed. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Silsbee, Tompkins, Fowle, Paine, Ingersoll, 
Felton, Coomes, Becket, Sibley, Mason, Jk^adle, Hicks, Gillingham, Bly, 
Crowninshield, Allen, Clitlbrd, "Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, Derby, 
Hilman, Hasket, Langdon, Hodges,' Phippen, Wood, Williams, Skerry, 
Manning, Calley. See Axcestry Tables -^'^^^. 

60. YII. 351. John Pickering Wellington [Hannah GO-62. VI. 
127]. 

Very little has been learned concerning the history of Mr. Wellington, 
save that he left home many years ago, and was never heard from. Several 
statements have been made about his disappearance. One account says he 

' The Salem Register, .July 11, ISSl ; also A Genealogic;il Account of Henry Silsbee 
and some of his Descendants, by James A. Emiuerton, pp. 41-12. 



SEVENTH GENEIIATION. 471 

died ill Louis\Illf, K) . Another, contained in a letter of his niece, Mrs. 
William E. Griilin, dated Aug. 1, ISSC, is that, " Jolm went West to buy 
cattle 48 years ago, and was never heard from. His wife waited for him 
seven years, tlieii married again." Another, made by an old resident of 
Andover, Vt., is that, " He went otf with a man, and was never heard from, 
and his widow married Bisliop Fuller." Still another, made by his niece, 
Mrs. Sidney ^I. Morse, is tliat, " Uncle John went to Kentucky, and was 
supposed to have died there, as he never came back. Of his family, if he 
left any, I know nothing." 

60. VII. Jol. Mavy Howard, liis wife, died in Andover, Vt. Eesi- 
dence: pntbably Anih^ver. 

She was called Polly. Her gravestone was standing in the graveyard 
at Windham, near Andover, a few years since. 

Her second husband was IJi.-hop Fuller. 

She was a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (French) Howard, of Andover. 
A:scESTRT Tables -^-^=1. 

60. VII. 352. Sarah Wellington [Hannah G0-G2. VI. 127]. 
The only information ■\^•e have been able to obtain concerning her where- 
abouts after her marriages is derived from her nephew and her niece. The 
former, Samuel A. Wellington, writes, under date of Dec. 2, 1SS6, tliat, " My 
brother says our Aunt Sarah lived at De Kalb, St. Lawrence Co., X. Y., 
when he was about six or eight years old, and came to our house visiting. 
That was probablv fortv years ago. He savs tlie Slaters were near the 
Keyes, and perhnps went with tliem to Grand Rapids, Michigan." ilrs. 
Sidney ]\1. Morse, lier niece, stated tliat, " Aunt Sarali went to Michigan, 
Grand Iwipids, I tliink. I know n(>tliing of lier family." 

60. VII. So2\ Lipnan I*eters, the first husband of Sarah Wel- 
lington. 

He is said to have died about 1815, in South Hero, Grand Isle County, 
Vt. 

A>'CESTRY Tables ,-^V.. 



472 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

GO. VII. o-jJ-'. Jonathan iHato; the second husband of Sarah Wel- 
Irngton. 

He is said to have removed to Michigan. 
Aj^-cestry Tables y "5 = . 

61. Vn. ooo. Eunice "Wellington [Hannah G0-G2. VI. 127]. 
Of her one of the faniil}- writes, ''Aunt Eunice died in Mississippi, 
-where nearly all her f;unily settled." 

61. VII. 000. Asa Wdslihurn, her husband. 

Of hint his niece, Mrs. William E. Griffin, writes, under date of 
Aug-. 3, 1886, " I think the children of Asa Washburn were born in 
Putney, Vt., as that was their home as long as I can remember, and when 
Uncle Asa wrote me last, he was there and wrote that he had come to 
the home of his youth to die. His chikb-en were all in Mississippi ; the 
girls had all married Southerners, and the sons and sons-in-law were all in 
the rebel army." 

Ancestry Tables y"|L. 

61. VII. 354. David Pickering Wellington [Hannah 60-62. VI. 
127], born in Brattleborough, Vt., died in Pierrepont, N. Y. A farmer. 
Residence : Pierrepont. 

61. VII. 3o4- Savah Howard, his wife, born in Andover, Vt., died in 
North Eaton, Lorain County, Ohio. 

Mrs. Wellington's second husband was a ]\Ir. Swift. She was a 
daughter of Antipas and Cloe (Darling) Howard. iV^ccEsxRv Tables J-^'^. 

62. VII. 355. Samuel WelKngton [Hannah 60-62. VI. 127]. 

His niece, Mrs. William E. Griffin, stated that he was killed by the 
falling of a tree ; and another niece, ^Irs. Sidney M. ilorse, stated that he 
was buried in Brattleboroitgh, Vt. 

62. VII. 356. Orin Pickering Wellington [Hannah 60-62. VI. 
127], born in Brattleborough, Vt., died in Castleton, N. Y. A manufac- 
turer. Residence : Castletou. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 473 

When he was cigliteen yeai-s old he loft home and went to Castleton 
to seek employment. Here ho found work in a brick-yard, and being 
a bright and industrious boy, he soon learned the trade. He then went to 
Philadelphia to learn to make pressed brick. Having accomplished this, 
ho returned to Castleton, hired a yard, and became a successful manu- 
facturer of bricks. He was a very enterprising man, and his early death 
was considered a great loss to the placo.^ 

62. VH. ooG. Jane Eliza Harper, his wife, died in Greenbush, 
N. Y., by drowning. 

Ou the evening of Aug. 16, 1876, Mrs. Zergason took a walk, missed 
her way, and fell olY the dock, which was only a short distance from the 
main street. She was the fourth of her father's family who Avere drowned, 
— three of them in tlie Hudson River. 

Her second husband was Joseph S. Zergason, whom she married in 
1844. He proved an excellent husband, and to her children was a kind 
father.'^ 

She was a daughter of Charles Lendric Harper, a shipbuilder of Bristol, 
now Maiden, N. Y. Ancestrt Tables -^f-^. 

62. VH. 3.57. Olive Wellington [Hannah 60-62. VI. 127]. Resi- 
dence : AVinchester, N. H.^ 

62. VH. So7. Asa French, her husband, born in Brattleborough, Vt. 
Mr. French was a son of Asa and Llercy (Rice) French, of Brattle- 
borough.' Ancestry Tables ^^j- 

62. VH. 358. Hannah Wellington [Hannah 60-62. VI. 127], died 
in "Watertown, N. Y. Residence : Watertown. 

62. VII. 358. liandall Duismore Bice, her husband, died in Water- 
town, N. Y. A paper manufacturer. Residence : Watertown. 

> Letter of Mrs. "William E. Griffin, dated at Greenbush, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1S86. 
^ Ibid. 

' The date of her birth is given by us as July 4, 1S03. It has also been given as 
July 6, 1804. 



474 Tin: PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

The second wife of Mr. Rice was living in feeble health at Watertown, 
in 1886. 

Ancestry Tahli:s ^Vj- 

62. VII. SfjO. Ebenezer Pickering [Natlianiel G2. VI. 128], born in 
Richmond, N. 11. 

62. VII. 360. Hannah Pickering [Nathaniel 62. VI. 128], born in 
Richmond, N. H. 

62. VII. 361. Tamar Pickering [Nathaniel 62. VI. 128], born in 
Richmond, N. H. 

62. VII. 362. Marinda Pickering [Nathaniel 62. VI. 128], probably 
born in Richmond, N. H. 

62. VII. 362. Langstaff, her husband. 

Ancestry Tables ^^. 

62. VII. 363. Edward Pickering [Nathaniel 62. VI. 128], probably 
born in Richmond, N. II. 

Mr. Pickering was called " Doctor." 

63. \^I. 364. George G-ale [Eunice 63. VI. 131], born in Barre, Vt., 
died in Albion, Mich.^ A hardware dealer. Residence : Albion. 

In 1821, Mr. Gale moved from Barre to L'Acadie, Lower Canada, and 
from there he removed to Montreal. He returned to Barre in 1827, and in 
September, 1835, he removed with his family to the "West. In the summer 
of 1836, he settled in Moscow^ Mich., where he afterwards established a 
foundry. In 18.52, he went to California, where he remained three years. 
In 1856, Mr. Gale removed to Albion, i\Iich., where he established a hard- 
ware store, and in which business his son, Orlando Charles Gale, was asso- 
ciated with him. He was an active and successful business-man, and was 
called Esquire Gale.^ 

' The date of his birth is given as July 7, 1798; while it is given as July 7, 1799, in 
The Gale Family Records, by George Gale, p. 111. 
' Ibid. pp. 149-150. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 475 

Go. \ll. SOf. Harriet Stone, his wife, born in Ruyulton, Vt., died in 
Albion, Mich. 

Mrs. Gale was a daughter of Nathan Stone, who died in Jackson County, 
Mich, Akcestky Tables /"j. 

63. VII. 3(35. Lncinda Gale [Eunice 63. YI. 131], born in Ban-e, 
Vt, died in ]\Ioscow, Mich. 

Slie is said to have been the perfect image of her g-randmother, Eunice 
Pickering. 

63. VII. 3Go. Josepli H. Bigelow, her husband. 

His father died in Barre, Vt. He may have been the Joseph, son of 
Ebenezer and Sally (Wales) Bigelow, who was born in "Winchendon, Mass., 
May 6, 1798,^ though the names of his children are not the same as those 
printed on the Sheets. Ancestry Tables ^\. 

63. VII. 366. Brooks G-ale [Eunice 63. VI. 131], born in Barre, Vt. 

63. VII. SG6. Betsetj Hale, bis wife. 

Mrs. Gale was a daughter of Apollas and Lucina (Adams) Ilale, of Barre, 
Vt, who were from Hartford, Conn. Ancestry Tables ^'^^ . 

63. VII. 3G7. Eunice G-ale [Eunice 63. VI. 131], born in Barre, Vt., 
died in Ban-e. Residence : probably Barre. 

63. VII. 3G7. Haxen L. Davis, her husband. 

Ancestry Tables ^5. 

63. VII. 3GS. Aurora Gale [Eunice 63. VI. 131], born in Barre, Vt., 
died in Moscow, Hillsdale County, Mich. 

63. VII. 06S. Walter Himtinrjton, her husband. 

It is not improbable that he is the same Walter Huntington, of Barre, 
Vt., cabinet-maker, who was a son of Eliphalet and Edna (Clement) Hunt- 
ington, of Plainfield, Vt., and who is mentioned in the Huntington Gene- 
alogy.^ Ancestry Tables /"^. 

' Genealogy of the Bigelow Family, by Oilman B. Howe, p. 4G5. 
' A Genealogical Memoir of the Huntington Family, by the Rev. E. B. Huntington, 
p. 203. 



476 THE PICKEHING GENEALOGY. 

G3. Vll. 0(i[). Orlando Convers G-ale [Eunice G3. VI. 131], born in 
Barre, Vt., died in ]MoriCOW, Hillsdale County, Mich.' 

63. VII. oGO'. Louisa Fiowh, his first wife, born in 15arre, Vt, died 
in Moscow, Hillsdale County, Mich. 

Mrs. Gale was a daughter of Maynard and Clarissa (Pollard) French, of 
Barre, Vt. Ancestky Tables j^V" 

63. VII. 3G0-. Jane HootJ, his second wife. 

i\Irs. Gale was a daughter of James and Catherine (McXelly) Hood. 
Her father died in Moscow, Jlich. Axcestky Tablks /J'^j,. 

64. VII. 370. William Ballou [Elizabeth 64-G5. VI. 132], born in 
Richmond, N. II., died in Springville, Erie County, X. Y. A blacksmith 
and farmer. Residence : Springville. 

William Ballou was a man of considerable local celebrity. It is claimed 
that he possessed a peculiar power of reveaUng hidden facts, and that he 
could point out the whereabouts of criminals and of lost or stolen articles. 

64. VII. 370. Eunice Cook, his wife, born in Richmond, N. H., died 
in Morton's Corner, Erie County, N. Y., nearly ninety-nine years old. 

Mrs. Ballou was a daughter of "William and Eunice (Mann) Cook, of 
Collins, Erie County, N. Y. Her father was a farmer. Her ancestry 
includes the following families: Cook, Ballou, Pike. "Whitman, Arnold, 
Peak, Smith, Carpenter, Arnold, Peak, Harris, ^lann, Cass, Brown. See 
Ancestry Tables jyV. 

65. VII. 371. John Ballou [Elizabeth 64-65. VI. 132], born in Rich- 
mond, N. H., died in Wallingford, Vt. Residence : W^allingford. 

Shortly after his first marriage he moved to Shrewsbury, \i., thence to 
Tinmouth, Vt., and finally to "Wallingford. 

65. VII. 371'. Alma Jones, his first wife.^ 
Ancestut Tables ^^[W.. 

* The date of his first marriage is given as June 17, 1841 ; while the Earre Town 
Records give it as June 20, IStl. His middle name is spelled witli a final "e" in the 
Gale Genealogy. 

"^ Called Almira in the History and Genealogy of the Ballous, by Adin Ballou, p. 927. 



SEVENTn GENERATIOX. 477 

65. VII. 371'. Sopliia Sabhi, his secoud wife. 
Ance^tuy Tables a™^'- 

65. VII. 372. Harty Ballou [Elizabeth 64-G5. VI. 132], probably 
bom in Richmoud, N. H., died in Tiimiouth, Vt. 

The grave.itoue of Mrs. Eddy was standing in the Walllngford cemetery 
a few years ago.^ 

65. VII. o7J. Joseph TAldy, her hu.-band, died in Starksborough, Vt. 
Residence; Tinmontli, Vt. 

Joseph Eddy was a son of James and (Ros.s) Eddy, of 

Wallingford, Vt. An-ci:.sti:y Tables -^'W. 

65. VII. 373. David Ballou [Elizabeth G4-65. VI. 132], born in 
Shrewsbury, Vt., died in Otto, Cattaraugus County, N. Y. A blacksmith. 
Residence : Ashford, Cattaraugus County, N. Y. 

65. VII. 373'. Elha Ann Barrett, his first wife, died in Ashford, N. Y.^ 
Mrs. Ballou was an adopted daughter of "William Barrett, a fiu-mer, of 
Ashford. Ax.'KSTRY Tables /i\.. 

65. VII. 373'. Manj Ullift, his second wife, born in Schuyler, Herki- 
mer County, X. Y., died in Ashford, N. Y. 

Mrs. Ballou was a daughter of John Finster, of Schuyler, N. Y. 
Ancestry Tables ^j,. 

65. VII. 374. Mary Ballon [Elizabeth 64-65. VI. 132], born in 
Shrewsbury, Vt., died in Wallingford, Vt. 

The gravestone of ]\Iiss Ballou was standing in the Wallingford cemetery 
a few years since.^ 

* Called Harty on her gravestone, as well as by several other authorities ; while she 
is called Ilattie, and is said to have been born in Shrewsbury, Yt., in the History and 
Genealogy of the Ballous, by A din Ballou, p. 92S. 

^ The date of her birth is given as Feb. 2.5, ISOj ; while it is given as Feb. 5, ISOj, in 
the History and Genealogy of the Ballous, by Adin Ballou, p. 9L'S. The same book gives 
the place of her death as Otto, X. Y. 

• The date of her birth is given as April 21, 1802, by her niece, Mrs. John ^Yells, and 
the History and Genealogy of the Ballous, by Adin Ballou, p. 9.31 ; while it is given 
on her gravestone as April 21, 1803. 



478 THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

G5. Vir. 37.';. Elizabeth Ballon [Elizabeth (U-Go. VI. lo2], born in 
Slirewsbury, Vt., died in Wallingford, \t} 

j\Iiss Ba.llou's gravestone was standing in tlie ^Yallingford cemetery a 
few years since. 

65. VII. 376. Eliakim Johnson Bailou [Elizabeth 64-65. VI. 132], 
born in Shrewsbury, Vt., died in Wallingford, Vt. A fai-mer. Residence : 
Wallingford. 

65. VII. 376^. BJiza Havens, his first wife, bom in Camden, Vt., 
died in "WaUingford, Vt. 
Aj^cestky Tables ^{5.. 

65. VII. 376^. AtherUnda ChestervlUe Jlotre, his second wife, 
bom in Ludlow, Vt. Residence : AValliugford, Vt. 

Ancestky Tables ^\2- 

65. VII. 377. James Bailou [EHzabeth 64-65. VI. 132], bora in 
Shre^^■sbury, Vt. 

He was a twin of Louisa D. Bailou [65. VII. 378]. 

65. VII. 378. Lonisa Delcena Bailou [Elizabeth 64-65. VI. 132], 
born in Slu-ewsbury, Vt., died in Wallingford, Vt." 
. She was a twin of James Bailou [65. VII. 377]. 

65. VII. 575. Liician Sf)'eete}%heY \msha.nd. 
Akcestrt Tables ^^6' 

65. VII. 379. Olivia Bailou [Elizabeth 64-65. VL 132], bom in 
Shrewsbury, Vt., died in Wallingford, Vt. 

Miss Bailou lived an intelligent and useful life.^ 

' The date of her death is given on her gravestone as Jan. 22, 1825 ; while it is given 
by her niece, Mrs. John Wells, as Jan. 12, 1S2.5; and in the History and Genealogy of 
the Ballous, by Adin Bailou, p. 931, as Jan. 19, 1825, aged 20 years, 7 mos. 6 days. 

' The date of her death is given on her gravestone as April 6, 1842, aged 33 ; while her 
niece, Mrs. John Wells, and the History and Genealogy of the Ballous, by Adin Bailou, 
p. 932, give her death as April 8, 1S42, aged 32 years, 11 mos. 23 days. 

* History and Genealogy of the Ballous, by Adin Bailou, p. 932. 



SEVEXTH GEXEHATIOX. 479 

GG. VU. oxO. Hannah Pickering [Theopliilus G(J. VI. 133], probably 
born in Kichmond or Wiucliester, X. H. 

GG. VII. oSO. Barney Downer, her husband, probably died in 
Lebanon, N. H. Residence : Lebanon. 
Akcestkv Tables Tr^py. 

GG. VII. 381. Susan Pickering [Theophilus C6. VI. 133], probably 
born in Winchester or Richmond, N. II., died in BaiTC, Vt. 

GG. VII. 382. Sarali Pickering [Theophilus GG. VI. 133], born in 
Winchester, N. 11., diud in Chelsea, Vl. 

66. VII. 3S3. Channcey Lathrop, her husband, born in Chelsea, Vt., 
died in Versliire, Vt. Resi lence : Chelsea. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Lathrop had an adopted dau^'hter. 

Mr. Lathrop was a son of Elias and Dorcas (Bohonon) Lathrop, of 
Chelsea, Vt. His father was engaged as a teamster in the Revolutionary 
War, and Avas present at the surrender of Burgoyne.^ His ancestry in- 
cludes the following families : Lathrop, Scudder, Bliss, Waterman, Sluman, 
Gurdon, Bohonon. See Axcestrt Tables ^Y^. 

66. VII. 383. Mary Pickering [Theophilus GG. VL 133], probably 
born in Winchester or Richmond, N. H. Residence : Burlington, Vt. 

GG. VII. 383. Albert Uletcalf, her husband. A carpenter. Resi- 
dence : Burlington, Vt. 
Ancestry Tables ^l^-^. 

66. VII. 384. Tkeopliilus Pickering [Theophilus GG. VI. 133], died 
in Burlington, Vt. 

66. VII. oX.-). Olivia IngersoU Pickering [Theopliilus GG. VI. 133], 
probably died in Burlington, Vt. Residence : Burlington. 

I 66. VII. 386. Brittannia Pickering [Theophilus 60. VI. 133], died 

in Barre, Vt. 

» A Genealogical :Nremoir of the Lo-Latlirop Family, by the Eev. E. B. Himtington, 
p. 170. 



480 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

QQ. VII. 3S7. Jolin Deiiison Pickerino- [Theuphilus 66. VI. 133]. 
Resilience : Burlington, Vt. 

ilr. Pickering was for several years superintendent of the Burlington 
watei--works. 

66. VII. o87\ Harriet Bissell, his first wife. 
AxcESTRT Tables ^"^(ji. 

G6. VII. oSr. Harriet T. Drew, his second wife. 
Ancestry Tables o^JV" 

GQ. VII. 387^. liosanna Uolden Feci:, his third wife. 
Ancestry Tables ^XJL,. 

QQ. VII. 387». Abner Gilman Tliiu^ber [Lois 66-66^ VI. 134], born 
in Cooperstown, N. Y., died in Jamaica, L. I. A hat-maker and afterwards 
a farmer. Residence : Cooperstown, N. Y., afterwards Delhi, N. Y. 

QQ. VII. 387'^. Lucy Dunham, his wife, bom in Cooperstown, N. Y., 
died in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Thurbor was a woman of great energy of character, whose strong 
sense of right and justice, and kindness of heart, endeared her to all. Ilev 
whole life was devoted to what she deemed to be her duty to God, to her 
family, and to her fellow-beings. Her industry and prudence were shown 
in the education of her children, under more than ordinary difficulties. 
From her girlhood she was a member of the Presbyterian Church.^ 

Mrs. Thurber was a daughter of Abner and Candace (Irons) Dunham. 
Iler father was a farmer, of Cooperstown, X. Y., who served as the colonel 
of a regiment during the War of 1812. His father was Dr. Obadiah Dun- 
ham, who came from Vermont, and was one of the earliest settlers of Otsego 
County, N. Y. See Ancestry Tables o^oVi- 

66". VII. 3S7^ Caleb Prentiss Thtirber [Lois 66-G6\ VI. 134], 
bom in Cooperstown, N. Y., died in O.xford, N. Y. 

» Obituary of :\rrs. Thurber in the Dry Goods Chronicle of Feb. C, 1S92, which has 
been reprinted in leatiet form. 



SEVEN Til GENERATION. 481 



CA7. VII. oS7''\ Jlaria UeiDtend, Lis fir.->t ^^•ife, <licd in Oxford, X. Y. 



66^. VTI. (557'". Alvira Dennend, hi.s second wife. 
She was a sister of her husband's first wife. 

A.N-tKSTUY Table.-! -^^^"-„ .,• 



G(^\ Vn. 3S7^ Horace Kinsley TliurlDer [Lois 6G-66\ VI. 13-4], 
n in Cooperstown, N. Y., died in Oswego, N. Y. A physician. 

66\ VII. 3S7"-K Jnilicent FeHjicld, his first wife. 



66". VII. 387"-^. Caroline ITawes, his second wife. 
Anckstky Tables ^Yo^uirr 

66". VII. 387^ Rensselaer Ferdinand Thnrber [Lois 66-GG\ VI. 
134], born in Cooperstown, N. Y., died in California. 

G6\ VII. 3S7'K VoUij McLean, his wife, died in Delhi, N. Y. 

Ancestry Tables -^-—n.. 

eG\ VII. 3S7'. Soplironia Thtirber [Lois 6G-GC\ VI. 134], born in 
Cooperstown, N. Y., died in Delhi, N. Y. 

66". VII. '387"- Dai'ld H. Pardee, her hnsband, born in Sharon, 
Conn., died in Delhi, X. Y. Residence: Delhi. 



QG\ VII. 387^ Lydia Ann Thnrber [Lois 66-66\ VI. 134], born 
in Cooperstown, X'. Y. 

QG'". VII. 388. Ennice Pickering [Tin^otliy GG\ VI. 135], born in 
Eichmond, X. H. 

GG*". Xll. 3SS. l^lUtii Howe, her husband, probably born in Richmond, 
N. II., died in Xew York City.^ 

» Called " Eli " in tlie History of the Town of Richmond, N. IL, by "WilUam Bassett, 
pp. 415, 4G4. 

31 



482 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

Mr. Howe was a son of Dr. Amos uii'l Caiidaee (I'uffum) Howe, of 
Richmond. His ancestry includes the following- families: Howe, Potter, 
Smith, Buli'um, Pope, Taft. See Amjestey Tables -A'^j-. 

Q^". VII. 389. Nathaniel Pickering [Timothy C6\ YI. 135], born 
in Richmond, N. H. A farmer. Residence : Cobden, Union County, 111. 

Mr. Pickering was formerly a carpenter and joiner, but for more than 
twenty-one years he was a farmer. 

&&". VII. 3S0. Dedveraiice Iliirst, his wife, born in Brookfield, 
Mass., died in Cobden, 111, of heart-disease. 

Mrs. Pickering was a sister of Leonard Russell, of Brookfield, Mass. 
AxcESTRY Tables ^1\. 

66^ VII. 390. Horace Kelton Pickering [Timothy G6\ VI. 135], 
born in Richmond, N. H., probably died in Eagle Grove, Iowa. A farmer. 
Residence : Eagle Grove. 

Horace K. Pickering began at the age of ten years to work at the house- 
carpenter's trade with his father, and continued in this employment until 
1840, when he gave it up, and became a farmer. In 1882, he went West. 
For a year and a half he ■svas located at Louisville, Ky. He then went to 
Hennepin, III, where he lived until 1840, at which time he returned to 
Winchester, N. H., and was married. He returned to Illinois in 1854, and, 
in 1881, he removed to Eagle Grove, where, in 1893, he was still residing. 

66^. VII. 390. Hannah EUza BooUtUe, his wife, born in Towns- 
end, Vt, died in Eagle Grove, Iowa. 

Jlrs. Pickering was a daugliter of Origen and Hannah (Barber) Doolittle. 
Her father was a f\n-mer. CuroVmo E. DooUftle [68. VH. 4IP] was lier 
sister. Ancestry Tables ^'^\^. 

66^ VII. 391. Martha Pickering [Timothy 6G\ VI. 135], born in 
Richmond, N. H., probably died in Richmond. 

66^ VII. 393. David Pickering [Timothy G6^ VL 135], probably 
born and died in Richmond, N. H. 



^EVEXTn GEXERATIOy. 483 

m^. Vll. o'J4. Alansou Pickering [Timothy G(i\ VI. 135], born in 
Richmond, N. II., died in Richmond. A carpenter. Residence : Rich- 
mond. 

Alanson Pickering's g-ravestone was standing in the Richmond South 
Graveyard, a few years since. 

66\ VII. 394. Phiunda Maria Ballon, his wife, born in Richmond, 
N. H., died in New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Benoni and Sarah (Buffimi) Ballou, 
of Richmond. Her fatlier was a farmer. Her ancestry inchides the fol- 
lowing families: Ballou, Latham, Buffum, Pope, Taft, Arnold. See 
Ancestry Tables o^Jj. 

6G\ Vn. 39.5. Sylpliina Pickering [Timothy 66\ VI. 135], prob- 
ably born in Richmond, N. H., died in Winchester, N. H. 

66*". VII. 395. Bansom Ingalls, her husband, probably bom in Rich- 
mond, N. H., died in Troy, X. H. A shoemaker. Residence : Troy. 

Mr. Ingalls formerly lived in Fitzwilliam, N. PI. He moved to 
Winchester, N. H., and finally to Troy. 

He was a son of Zimri and Parna (Howe) Ingalls, of Richmond. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Ingalls, Howe, Potter, Smith. 
See AxcESTRT Tables oVV- 

66\ VII. 39G. Olive B. Pickering [Timothy G6\ VI. 135], bom 
in Richmond, N. H. Residence : Richmond. 

Mrs. Norwood says : " That, just before the Civil War, she had a cousin 
William Pickering, come from the South to Richmond. He spoke in the 
Baptist Church of the condition of the slaves in the South, and said they 
were as well off as the whites. He owned no slaves hin:iself." 

6G^ VII. 39G\ Joseph liamJall Buffum, her first husband, born in 
Richmond, N. H. A farmer. Re.-idence : Richmond. 

Mr. BiitYum went to Ohio in 18G2, and never returned. He was a son 
of Joseph and Judith (xVldrich) Buftum, of Richmond. His father was a 
farmer. His ancestry includes the following families : ButTuni, Pope, Taft, 



•184 Till'] riCKERING GENEALOGY. 

Wiiislow, .^lillur, Wliltticd-e, Randall, Aldrlch, Cook, Randall, l.yon. 
See A^■CESTKy Tablks ..^J'gi. 

QG". VII. 306'. Charlrs Xot-ivood, the second luisliand of Olive B. 
Pickering-, born in Lynuileld, ^Lass., died in Richmond, N. H. A shop- 
keeper. Residence : Rirhnmnd. 

Mr. Norwood was a dealer in g-eneral merchandise, at the Four Corners, 
and held the office of postmaster of Richniond. His first wife was Maiy 
Hart, by whom lie had the following children: — 

Maky Xokwood, bom April 18, 1S40 ; died Jan. 1*, 1SG3. 
Ci-AEA Xokwood, born ]\Iaj- 2, 1842. 
Jonx E. XoRwooD, born June 28, 1S4G. 

Ilis second wife, to whom he was married Oct. G, 1852, was Phebe 
BoUes. By her he had the following children : — 

Flokexce Xoewood, born Feb. 6, 1855. 
Xellie Xokwood, born April 29, 1859. 

Charles Norwood was a son of James and Betsey (Peabody) Norwood, 
of Lynufield, Mass. Ajs-cestey Tables /jV'- 

&(;>''. VII. 307, Timotliy Pickering [Timothy QC?. VI. 135], prob- 
ably born in Richmond, N. H., died in Swansey, N. H. 

QQ". VII. 397. ArviUa Sfanlcu Williams, his wife. 

Her second husband was Sanford S. Wllber, of Worcester, Mass., who 
died in a hospital at New Orleans, July 20 or 21, 18G3. 

Sho was a daughter of Hubbard and Dolly (AVhitcomb) Williams. 
Ancestry Tables -s.Vj. 

6G^ VII. 3',)8. Jolm Pickering [Timothy 6G\ VI. 135], probably 
born in Richmond, N. II., died at Louisville, Ky. Residence : Cascade, 
Iowa. 

John Pickering died in the hospital on his way to join the army. 

GG''. VII. oOS. Uattie Eliza Wright, his wife, died in ^Monticello, 
Iowa. 



SEVKNTlf GEXF.RATIOX. 485 

Her second husbund was a ^Ir. Pond, of Uarllbid, Conu. A^■cESTI;v 
Tables ,p,\. 

66^ VII. 399. Van Rensselaer Pickering [Timothy GC\ VI. 135], 
born in liicliinond, N. H., died in Burrillville, R. I. An expressman. 
Residence: Pascoag, K. I. 

66^ VII. oDO. Mary Annah Curtis, his wife, born in Belhngham, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Pickering is a daughter of Scth and Mary (Wheeler) Curtis. 
Her ancestry includes the following families : Curtis, Cook, Wheeler. 
See Ancestry T.vblks o^-g-. 

6G\ VII. 400. Amaziah Kelton Pickering [Timothy 66\ VI. 
135], born in Kichmond, X. H. A farmer and stock-raiser. Residence: 
Eagle Grove, Iowa. 

6G\ VII. 400. narviet J. Grccnleaf, In's wife, born in Starks, 
Somerset County, Maine. 

She is a daughter of G-ason and Nancy H. (Joy) Greenleaf Her 
father was a farmer. Axcestet Tables -j^j^. 

GC?. VII. 401. Level Kelton Pickering [Timothy GG^ VI. 135], 
born in Richmond, N. 11., died in Philadelphia, Pa. A book-keeper. 
Residence : Philadelphia.^ 

6G^ VII. 401. Martha Jane CooK', his wife, born in Richmond, 
N. II. Rtsidence : West Gardner, Mass. 

Mrs. Pickering is a daughter of Nicholas and Judith (Capron) Cook, 
of Richmond. Her ancestry includes the following families : Cook, Jillson, 
Hix, Garnse}', Cajiron, Freeman, King. See Akce^tuy Taij.us .^J/j. 

67. VII. 402. Lotiisa Pickering [Jonathan I. G7. VI. 13G], born in 
Richmond, N. IL, died in Salem, Dent County, ^lo. 

67. VII. 402. Oran/je Grai/, her husband, born in New Fairfield, 
Conn., died in Coffeeville, Kansas. 

1 Members of his family give the dateof his birth as April 20 ami xVpril 30, 1834. 



486 THE FICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

Ho was ;i son of Gabriel Gray. His ancestry includes the following 
families: Gray, Frost, Meakcr, Disbrow, DIsbrow. See Ancestry Tables ts^V. 

67. VII. 403. Polly Pickering [Jonathan I. G7. VI. 13G], born in 
Richmond, N. II., died in All)any, N. Y. 

67. VII. Jfio. Afchihahl Grey Birch, her husband, died in Jefferson, 
N. Y. A physician. Residence: Summit, Worcester, and afterwards Jef- 
ferson, N. Y. 

Ancestkt Tables ^^^. 

67. VII. -104. Josiah Pickering [Jonathan I. G7. VI. 136], born in 
Richmond, X. H. A merchant. Residence : Smithborough, Tioga County, 
N. Y. 

]\Ir. Pickering has lived in Worcester, West Colesville, Elmira, and 
Smithborough, N. Y. He was a merchant and postmaster of West Coles- 
ville, K. Y., eight years. He was a justice of the peace in Worcester, and 
was a supervisor of the town of Tioga in 1874-1876. 

67. VII. 404- ChaUsta TAvingston, his wife, bom in Cobleskill, N. Y. 
She is a daughter of Derick and Susannah (Edwards) Livingston, of 
Worcester, N. Y. Ancestkt Tables /j^^. 

67. VII. 405. Justus Pickering [Jonathan I. 67. VI. 136], born in 
Richmond, iSl". H., died in Binghampton, N. Y. A marble dealer. Resi- 
dence : Einghanipton. 

Mr. Pickering formerly lived in Worcester and Albany, N. Y. He was 
at one time a cattle-broker in New York. 

67. VII. 40o'- TirxaJi Dic7<:inson, his first wife, born in Richraond- 
ville, N. Y., died in West Colesville, Broome County, X. Y. 

Mrs. Pickering's first husband was Francis Dickinson, Jr. 

She was a daughter of Fuller, of Cobleskill, N. Y. Ancestry 

Tables ^}\.. 

6l.Yll.4Oo-. Theresa JU. il«/>ti7f oh, his second wife. Residence: 
Binghampton, N. Y. 

Mrs. Pickering's first husband was Dr. Hamilton. 



SEVEXTH GENERATIOX. 48 7 

Slie was a daugliter of Colonel Bela and Rebecca (Bii,'-elow) Johnson, of 
■\Vorcester, N. Y. Her father was a farmer who was born in Lebanon, 
Columbia County, X. Y. A^-CEjTRY Tables ^'j\,. 

67. VII. 406. Albert Pickering [Jonathan I. 67. VI. 13G], born in 
Richmond, N. 11., died in Geneva, Iowa. A fanner and merchant. Resi- 
dence : Geneva. 

Mr. Pickering was sheriff of Franklin County, Iowa. 

67. VII. .^^. Zauni Toivler, his wife, born in Westford, N. Y. 
Mrs. Pickering is a daughter of Jedediah and Hannah (\Voodin) 
Fowler, of Worcester, N. Y. Anckstrv Tables /i'g. 

67. VII. 408. Diancy Pickering [Jonathan I. 67. VI. 13G], born in 
"Worcester, N. Y. 

67. VII. ^^5. Bcujaniiti Franklin Abbott, her husband, born in 
Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., died in Brooklyn, N. Y. A manu- 
facturer of cocoa in Brooklyn. Residence : Brooklyn. 

Mr. Abbott was formerly a merchant and manufacturer in Vermont, 
Boston, and New York. He had travelled through Europe and most of the 
United States. 

He was a son of Lester and Mehitable (Clark) Abbott. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Abbott, Chandler, Gray, Andrews, Flint, 
Clark. See Ancestry Tables /j^y. 

67. VII. 409. Mary Pickering [Jonathan I. 67. VI. 13G], born in 
Worcester, N. Y., died in Binghampton, N. Y. 

67. VII. .^.9. Lionel Aluradus S/ie?rZon. her husband, born in Wor- 
cester, N. Y., died in xVlbany, N. Y. A clothier and grocer. Residence: 
Albany. 

He was a son of Colonel Lionel Sheldon, of Worcester. Ancestkt 
Tables /|\. 

68. VII. 410. Ferdinand Pickering [Samuel 68. VI. 138], born in 
Richmond, N. II., died in Winchester, N. H. A mechanic. Residence: 
Winchester. 



4«8 THE PICKERIXG (lEXEALOGY. 

31r. rickfiiu^- wus killed on the railroad between AVincliester and Keene, 
N. II. He was a remarkably ingenious and inventive man. Without anv 
previous knowlod-c, he took up the manufacture of wind instruments, in 
which he became very skilt'ul. He was quite deaf, and anmsing- .stories are 
told of the talks between himself and father, who was also very deaf. Both 
carried ear-trumpets.^ 

68. VII. 410^. lietseif lUchardson Stone, his first wife, born in 
"Winchester, N. 11., died in Winchester. 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Daniel and Lydia (Wise) Stone, of 
Winchester. Anckstuy Tables J^'^.. 

68. VII. 410". Lucy irni. Ills second wife. 

She was a daughter of Joseph and 3Iary (Pomeroy) Hill. Axcestkt 
Tables ^f^.. 

68. VII. 411. Loring Pickering [Samuel 68. VI. 138], born in 
Richmond, X. H., died in San Francisco, C'al. A journalist. Residence : 
San Francisco. 

Mr. Pickering was a high type of the patient, practical, determined, 
self-made man, and his history illustrates forcibly the fact that everything 
yields to honest earnestness and persistent industry. At the early age 
of fourteen, he made the acquaintance of John Prentiss, editor of the 
New Hampshire Sentinel, and from him he imbibed the early taste for 
journalism which caused him subsequently to adopt that calling. In 
1832, he went West, with a view of settling there. He was a clerk in 
stores in Xew Orleans, Louisville, and St. Louis, and I'eturned to New 
Hampshire after an absence of a year or two. He married, and, taking 
with him his }'Oung wife and infant child, he again went West, settling 
at Hennepin, in Illhiois, where, for a time, he engaged in mercantile- 
pursuits. He so<;)n, however, engaged in jom-nalism, and published the 
Hennephi Journal. In 18-10, he was appointed postmaster of the town. 
Four or five years later, he sold out his business, and went to St. Louis. 
He joined with others and purchased two newspapers at St. Louis, called 

1 On the authority of Dr. rieree, of Winchester, X. II. 



SEVENTH GENEUATIOX. 489 

tlio lieporter and Missouriaii. These [lapers were the re])reseiitative3 of 
the two wings of the Democracy, ^ir. Pickering was at this time an 
e.irnest Democrat, and was well-known throughout the West. It Avas 
largely through his efforts that the rival factions united, and that a news- 
paper called the St. Louis Union was produced by the consolidation of 
tlio other two. Jlr. Pickering became one of the owners, and the chief 
editor of this j)a})er, and his prominent position in the State led to his 
election, by the legislature, as one of the directors of the State Bank. 
After meeting with success for several years, Mr. Pickering was obliged 
to make an assignment, nnd he started across the phuus for California. 
lie reached California in the fall of 18-19, prepared to begin life anew. 
For a while he lived Avith his delicate wife in a tent. Early in 1850, he 
went to Illinoistown in Placer County, and established a store. Here he 
continued until past midsummer, when he returned to Sacramento, and 
purchased an interest in the Placer Times, his partner being Joseph 

E. Lawrence. In 1851, this newspaper was consolidated with the 
Transcript. The latter was owned by George K. Fitch and Martin 

F. Grove, and here began the long partnership of Mr. Pickering and 
Mr. Fitch. Their business at once became prosperous, and, in 1852, 
Pickering, Fitch, and Lawrence bought j\Ir. Grove's interest in the 
paper, and moved the paper to San Francisco, where it became still 
more profitable. In 1853, they sold it, and i\Ir. Pickering established 
with Mr. Fitch a banking and stock-brokerage business. In two years, 
however, they closed out their venture and purchased the Alta California, 
which they sold in 1S5G, after nine months' trial. Mr. Pickering was 
a member of the Vigilance Committee of that year, and, after the sub- 
sidence of that troublesome period, he took a trip to Europe. He 
remained abroad four j'ears, for the most time living in Paris, where he 
studied the French language and the customs of tlie people. In 18(10, 
he returned to San Francisco. During his absence Jlr. Fitch had pur- 
chased an interest in the Evening Bulletin, and, in 1861, Mr. Picker- 
ing took an interest in that paper. From that time, ^Ir. Pickering was 
engaged in active work, interrupted only by short intervals devoted to 
travel. 



490 THE PICKEIUXG GENEALOGY. 

Althuugh all his lifu a Deiiiocrat, Jlr. Pickering believed, at the break- 
ing out of the war, that, to save tlie Union, democracy must be abandoned. 
To the cause of the Union, therefore, he devoted his best abilities. There 
was no more devoted Union man than he throughout the -war, and, when 
the conflict ended, his feelings left him a stanch Ifepublican, with which 
party he ever afterwards acted. 

About 1867, ho acquired an interest in tlio Morning Call, and its 
direction a ad control fell almost eiitirtly upon him. ]5otli the I'lulletin and 
the Call have been papers above the petty prejudices of politics, and they 
worked assiduously lor the general welfare. 

If the various articles %vritten by Mr. Pickering were collected and 
published in book form, the volumes would form a library of no small 
proportions. These articles show that his voice was never raised except 
for the public good, and that his courage and patience were inexhaustible. 
His influence was one of the powerful factors in the government of the 
city and State. Being incorruptible, and having high ideas of life and 
morals, his judgment and motives v.-ere respected, and carried with them 
great weiglit. 

When a young man, ho possessed a handsome figure. He was nearly 
six feet tall, and carried himself with military erectncss. In later years, he 
was still a fine-looking man. Among all who knew him, he was highly 
esteemed and venerated. To his employes, he was most kind and con- 
siderate, and his acts of kindness to tliose who had been disabled or grown 
old in his service were proverbial. Ills honesty is shown in the payment 
of every dollar of his early liabilities in St. Louis, after he had grown 
prosperous. 

IMr. Pickering was a member of the Society of California Pioneers, 
a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a Past Grand Master in the Odd 
Fellows. Tlie Templar Lodge No. 17, I. 0. 0. F. passed appropriate reso- 
lutions to his memory, and the Campaign Committee of the Citizens Non- 
partisan party of San Francisco did tlie same.^ 

' Sketches of ^tr. Pickering in "America's Advancement," published hy Virtue, in 
1876; in Prominent Californians, by Professor Phelps; also an obituary in the Evening 
Bulletin of San Francisco, Cal., of Dec. 2S, 1S92. 



SEVENTH GENERATIOX. 491 



68. VII. ^ii'. Caroline E. 2>oo?«f??(>, the first wife of Loring Picker- 
iiig, born in New Fane, Vt., died in San Francisco, Cal. 

Mrs. Pickering was a daug-liter of Origen and Hannah (Barber) Doolittle. 
Her father was a farmer. Hannah Eliza DooUttle \_G6. VII. 390^ was her 
sister. A_N-CESTRT Tables rr^^'- 

68. VII. .4^^'- jiTargarct Isabel Crothers, his second wife, born in 
Venice, Province of Quebec, Canada, died in ]3irming-ham, England. 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Robert and Mary (Foreman) Crothers, 
and sister of lier husband's tliird wife. Axcestey Tables -sW-,. 

68. VII. ^ii^. Rose Anna Crothers, his third wife, born in Canada. 
Residence : San Francisco, CaL 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Robert and Mary (Foreman) Crothers, 
and sister of her husband's second wife. Axcestry Tables ,^\,. 

68. VII. 412. Alcander Pickering [Samuel 68. VI. 138], born in 
Richmond, N. H., died in the West. 

Mr. Pickering moved from Winchester, N. H., to the West. 

68. VII. 412'. Candace JL. Pickett, his first wife, died in Winches- 
ter, N. H. 

Mrs. Pickering's gravestone was standing in the Winchester graveyard a 
few years ago. 

She was a ( 

68. VII. 412^- Vienna Peterson, his second wife. 
Ancestry Tables Jjj,. 

68. VII. 413. Elvira Pickering [Samuel GS. VI. 138], born in 
Richmond, N. II. 

68. VII. 4^'^- Lutlter Parker Rixford, her husband, born in Win- 
chester, N. II. A manufacturer. Residence : San Francisco, Cal. 

Shortly after his marriage, iMr. Rixford moved fi'om Winchester to 
East Ilighgate, Vt., where for some years he carried on the business 
of manufacturing scythes with his father. He afterwards carried on 
the same business with his brother, Oscar Stephen Rixford. In 1850, 



492 THE PICKEEIXG GENEALrtGY. 

he removed to Bedford, I'rovince of Quebec, Canada, where he pursued 
his business of manufacturing scytlies, axes, and so forth, until his removal 
to California in iSfiS-lSd'j. From his arrival in California in January, 
1860, until 1881, he was engaged in farming in Sonora County. He is 
now out of act'vo business. 

Pie is a son of Luther and Sarah (Hawkins) Kixford. Luther Rix- 
ford's father and grandfather were botli at tlie battle of Bunker Hill. The 
latter had also served in the French War. He diud at Crown Point, and 
w\ns buried there.^ His ancestry includes the following families: Rixford, 



68. Vn. 414. Sami^el Pickering [Sanmel G8. VI. 13S], proba- 
bly born in Richmond, X. H., died in Winchester, N. H. Residence; 
Winchester. 

Mr. Pickcj-ing's gravestone was standing in the Winchester gravej^ard a 
few years ago. 

68. vn. .^'i^^. Ilauuah P. linker , his first wife, died in Winches- 
ter, N. H. 

Mrs. Pickering's gravestone was standing in the Winchester graveyard 
a few years ago. 

Ancestkt Tables ■^^-^,. 

68. vn. 4'^ 4'- Susan Lavina Tisher, his second wife, probably born 
in Richmond, N. H.^ 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Kendall Fisher, Esq., for many years 
one of the leading men of Richmond. Her ancestrj' includes the following 
famiHes : Fislier. See A_kcestrt Tables /|V=- 

68. VII. 415. Emeline Pickering [David 08. VI. 130], born in 
Shrewsbury, \i., died in Providence, R. I. 

Mrs. Greene is said to have been fond of literary pursuits. 

» Letter of E. II. Eixford, of July 27, 1S03. 

* She is called Loriaa in the History of the Town of Richmond, N. H., by "William 
Bassctt, p. 485. 



SEVESTII GEXA'EATIOy. 493 



111. A real-estate dealer. 

Mr. Greene was formerly of Providence, R. I. 
ANCESTRY Tables 7," j. 

68. VII. 421. Caroline Elizabeth Pickering [David G8. VI. 139], 
born in Providence, 11. I. 

Mrs. Handy became greatly interested in Spiritualism, and went to Ohio 
to live with some community there. vShe gave away her four children to 
friends in Butternuts, N. Y., and married again.^ 

68. VII. .^3i^ BenoHi Handy, her first husband, probably born in 
Richmond, N. H. Residence: Butternuts, Otsego County, N. Y. 

The following information concerning Mr. Handy is contained in a letter 
sent by Mrs. Henry T. Kneeland : " Mr. Benoni Handy went to California 
in 1848 or 1849, returned after a time and died." 

He was a son of George and Ruth (Estes) Handy, of Richmond. His 
ancestry includes the following families: Handy, Estes. See Ancestry 

Taules 2^^-ji. 

68. VII. 421^ , her second husband. 

Ancestry Tables }^-^7. 

68. VII. 422. Charles Hartshorn Pickering [David G8. VI. 139], 
born in Providence, R. I. 

Mrs. Henry T. Kneeland writes of Mr. Pickering as follows : " I believe 
that Charles H. Pickering was in Nashville during the Civil "War, and at 
one time in command of a colored regiment." 

68. VII. 4?2. , his wife. 

Ancestry Tables ^'^^. 

68. VII. 424. David Pickering [David 68. VI. 139], born in Provi- 
dence, R I. 

* Letter from Mrs. Henry T. Kneeland. 



494 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

68. VII. 425. Angeline Pickering [David C8. VI. 139], born in 
Bufialo, N. Y. 

Mrs. Kneclaud was brouglit up by her mother's sister, Mrs. A. C. 
Moore. 

68. VI I. .^35. Henry Timothy Kncelaiid, her husband, bom in 
Rochester, N. Y. A commission merchant. Residence : Brooklyn, N. Y". 

Mr. Kneuland is of the firm of Henry T. Kneeland & Co., commission 
merchants, of New York. 

He is a son of Elisha Yale and Charlotte (Ball) Kneeland, of 
Buft'alo, X. Y. His father was engaged in furnace building and in other 
pursuits. His ancestry includes the following families: Kneeland. Pepoon, 
Tracy, Sprague, Ball, Cook, Xye, \Vest. See Ajs-cestry Tablp:s ^j. 

69. VII. 426. Mary Simonds [Hannah 69. VI. 141], bom in 
Warwick, ]\Iass. 

69. VII. ..^5(5. At'temas Jliirdoek, Jr., her husband. 

Ancestry Tabl?;.? ^^^j-. 

69. VII. 427. Sarali Simonds [Hannah 69. VI. 141], born in 
Warwick, Mass., died in Warwick. 

69. VII. ..^27. Henry Kirke Flagy, her husband. A minister and 
doctor. Residence : Lynn, Mass. 

Mr. Flagg is the eldest cliild of Samuel and Lucy (Howe) Flagg. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Flagg, Dakeu, Howe. See 
Ancestry Tables ^^-^. 

69. VII. 428. Montravillo Simonds [Hannah 69. VI. 141], bom 
in Warwick, Mass., died in San Francisco, Cal. 

69. VII. ^25. O. Cornelia Johnson, his wife. 
Mrs. Simonds was of Nahant, Mass. 
Ancestry Tables -^y^. 

69. VII. 429. '^Villiam Pickering Simonds [Hannah 69. VI. 141], 
born in Warwick, ]\Iass., died in Boston. Residence : Boston. 



SEVEXTn GEXERATIOX. 495 

CO. \ll.4~-^- Lijdiff -^"H Abbott, lii.s wife, bora iu Brookfield, Vt, 
died in Boston. 

Mrs. Simonds was a daugliter of Stephen and Betsey Abbott. Akcestky 

69. VII. 430. Harriet Simonds [Hannah 69. VI. 141], born in 
Warwick, Mass, 

69. VII. .^^-S^*. Caleb Davis, her husband, born iu Royalston, Mass. 
A fanner. Residence : Denver, Col 

Mr. Davis is a son of Captain Asahel and Deborah (Mason) Davis, of 
]\oyalston, Mas.-^. Her fatlier was a blacksmith. Ancestry Tables .^^\ . 

69. VII. 431. Hannah Mandana Simonds [Hannah 69. VI. 141], 
born in Warwick, Mass. Residence : Lynn, Mass. 

]\Irs. CLarke inherited from lier mother several heirlooms of the 
Pickering family. Among them are an old desk, a framed embroidered 
coat of arms of the Pickering family, and an embroidered landscape. 
Slio also has her father's family Bible. 

69. VII. 431. MeJancthon W. S. Clark^ her husband. A superin- 
tendent. Residence : Lynn, Mass. 

Mr. Clark removed from Royalston, ^lass., to Lynn. He was superin- 
tendent of the Gloucester Horse Railroad, Gloucester, Mass. 

Ancestry Tables t^j. 

69. VII. 432. Pickering [William 69. VI. 148]. 

69. VII. 433. Pickering [William 69. VI. 148]. 

69. VII. 434. Pickering [William 69. VI. 148]. 

69. VII. 435. Paifas Battles [Eunice 69-70. VI. 150], died in 
Boston. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Battles is said to have been in the Florida War. 

69. VIL4-J-5. Eli-abefh J. Emery, his wife. 
Mrs. Battles is said to have come from Poland, Maine. 
Ancestry Tables J^V. 



496 THE nCKEBIXG GEXE.ILUGY. 

61J. VII. loll. Calel) Battles [Eunice GU-70. VI. laU]. 

G9. VII. 437. Luther Battles [Eunice G9-70. VI. 150]. Resideuce: 
Tynj,^sboro, Canada. 

G9. VII. 4J7'. N^ducy Bat'tlett, his wife, died in Newburgh, N. Y. 
Mrs. Battles was a sister of John IBartlett, of K Street, Soutli Boston. 
Ancestry T.a.bles -J^i^i. 

69. VII. 437'- , liis second wife. 

Ai^CESTRY Tables t^j^-.. 

69. VII. 438. Hannali Battles [Eunice 69-70. VI. 150], born in 
Warwick, 31ass. 

69. VII. 4-^S. liufiis Lamb, her husband, l)orn in Oxford, Mass. A 
farmer. Residence : Westborough, Mass. 

Mr. Lamb formerly resided in Uxbridge, Mass. 

He is a son of Jesse and !Mary (Stephens) Lamb, of Charlestown, Mass. 
His father was a farmer. Ancestry Tables /j'^. 

69. VII. 440. Eunice Battles [Eunice 69-70. VI. 150], born in 
AVestmorelund, N. II., died in St. Albans, Vt. 

69. VII. 440- Charles Kibbij, her husband, bom in ]\Iorristown, Vt. 
A builder and carpenter. Residence : Chelsea, Mass. 

Mr. Kibby married Ins second wife, Lizzie Mason, of Clinton, Mass., 
July 13, 1871. By her he has had children. 

He is a son of Josiah and Xabby (Cheney) Kibby, of Randolph, Vt. 
Ancestry' Tables o^^'^. 

70. VII. 441. Mary E. Battles [Eunice 69-70. VI. 150], died in 
Wheaton, Du Page County, III 

70. VII. 4^1. Stillman Ward, her husband, born in Bradford, N. H. 
Residence : Wheaton, 111. 

Mr. Ward is a son of Isaac and Catherine (Davis) Ward, of Westmore- 
land, N. II. Ancestry Table.s t7|V- 



SEVEXTH GEXKUATIOy. 497 



70. Vll. \\-l. William Battles [Eunice G'J-7U. VI. 150]. 
Mr. Battles died in the army. 

70. VII. ^4-2. -f^'-'if Ann Hoivard, liis -wifo. 
j\Irs. Battles was of Saxon River, Vt. 

AxcESTKY Tables o"V- 

70. VII. 443. Sarah Battles [Eunice G9-70. VI. 150]. 

70. VII. 44-3- Spcnrer SiuitJi, her husband. 
An-ckstry Tables ^J-. 

70. VII. 444. James Henry Battles [Eunice C9-70. VI. 150], born 
in Westmoreland, X. II. A teamster. Residence: Brainard, ^liun. 

70. VII. .^..^T.'. Hannah Jlai-ia Barber, his wife, born in Leeds, 
England, died in Turner Junction, 111.^ 

Mrs. Battles was a daughter of James and Sarah (Woolford) Barber, of 
Turner Junction. Her father was a farmer. Ancestry Tables :^'l\. 

70. VII. 445. Lorenzo Denisen Battles [Eunice 09-70. VI. 150], 
born in Westmoreland, N. H. A locomotive engineer. Residence : Turner 
Junction, 111. 

Mr. Battles has been in the employ of the C. & N. W. R. R. Company 
for the past seventeen years. 

70. VII. 4.^1^. Mary liirh, his first wife. 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Ixittles separated. 

AXCESTKV TaP.I.E. Jf.r,. 

70. VII. 4t'^'- CcUa Hale, his second wife, born in Cayuga County, 
N. Y. 

Anci-.stky Tables J^^,-,. 

70. VII. 440. Edwin Battles [Eunice 09-70. VI. 150]. 
Jlr. Battles was in the army during the civil war, and was killed in 
battle. 

» The date of her death was given by the family as Peb. 23, 1SS3 ; while the under- 
taker's books state that she died Feb. 24, ISS'S. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

1. VIII. 3. Mary Anna Lee [George G. 1. VII. 3], born in Boston, 
died in Rhinobock, N. Y. 

Mrs. Bryant's sister, Georgina Gardner Lee, who was born in Boston, 
and died at sea, was her husband's first wife. 

1. VIII. o. John Bryant, her husband, born in Boston, died in 
Boston. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Bryant, 11. 0. 1830, spent about a year in an extended European 
tour, and on his return was admitted as a partner in the firm of Bryant & 
Sturgis. 

Soon after liis second marriage, he retired from business. His friend, 
tlie Hon. Jolm Lotlu'op ^Nfotlov, at the time of liis death, wrote a waiTn 
tribute to his memory, which is too extended for this sketch, and wliich 
speaks of him as surrounded by all which makes life desirable ; as prosper- 
ous, honored, beloved ; happy in all his social relations, gifted with a sweet 
and sunny temper, with a keen sense of enjoyment, with a merry heart 
wliose outpourings were so sparkling that he was not only happy himself 
but was the couse of happiness in others. 

His mind was no common one. It was quick, healthy, robust, accurate, 
sagacious. It had been cultivated by an excellent education, improved by 
much travel and intercourse -with the world, and imbued with a love of 
literature and v/ith an unaffected but refined and appreciating love of art. 

As he was a bold and manly thinker, so was he prompt, courageous, 
and resolute in action, and emphatically one of those who impress them- 
selves indelibly upon his fellow-men. He was a man of unsullied 
integrity and steadfast truth, of lofty principles and pure character, a brave 
spirit in a loyal breast.^ 

» Harvard Class Book, 1S30, pp. 19-21. 



-^--■'r- m 



JOHN CLARKE LEE. 

[I. VIII. II,] 
[7. VIII, til.] 

From thf, roRTR.\iT ev CiiE-iiER Harufng, p.mntfd about 1S32, now i> 
THf: rusSFSSio.v of FR,\N-cr., HtNRV Lke, K.sq., of Salem, Mass. 



EIGHTH GEXKRATIOX. 499 

John Bryant was a son of Jolm ami M;iry Clcaveland (Smith) 
Hryant. Amik Mason Grant [51. VIII. o79^ was his niece. His fatlier 
was one of the richest niereliants of Boston, being head of the eminent 
firm of Bryant & Sturgis. His ancestry includes the following families : 
Bry.ant, Noakes, Brown, Lincoln, ]\Iason, Parker, Stoddard, Stevens, Gam- 
mon, Symmes, Graves, Gray, Blowers, Belcher, Danforth, Smith, Poore, 
Hopkinson, Clarke, Sawyer, Poore, Thurlow, Morse, Merrill, Cleaveland, 
Winn, Bates, Paine, Snov;, Hopkins, Doane, Bangs, Hicks, Stevens. 
See Akcestry Tables ^^y. 

1, VIII. 11. John Clarke Lee [Nathaniel C. 1. VII. 7], born in 
Boston, died in Salem. A merchant. Residence : Salem. 

Islr. Lee, H. C. 1823, studied law for a time in the office of John 
Pickering [.58. VI. 109], but subsequently engaged in commercial busi- 
ness in Boston, being, from 182(3 to 1830, of the firm of i^Ierrick & Lee, 
wholesale dry-goods dealers. In 1848, with George Higginson [2. VIII. 
lf\, he founded the house of Lee, Higginson, & Co., bankers and 
brokers. 

Having lost both of his parents at the age of five years, when he was 
seven years old he went to Salem to live with his great-grandmother, 
Sarah (Pickering) Clarke. He also spent some time in ministers' families 
for educational advantages and care. Judge Charles Jackson, his uncle 
by marriafi'e, and who was his guardian, made a proposition to Mr. John 
Pickering, a kinsman of young Lee, that the latter should enter his 
family. ^Iv. Pickering accepted Judge Jackson's proposition, and accord- 
ingly John Clarke Lee, when he was twelve years old, took up his 
residence with ^Ir. Pickering. 

Here he remained dtn-ing his minority, attending a private classical 
school, and receiving the same care and attention from Mr. and Mrs. 
Pickering as was bestowed on their own children. The interest and 
attachment growing out of these associations continued throughout his 
life, and he often refen-ed with pleasure and gratitude to the advantages 
of home education and training which he received from them. 

Early in his married life he settled in Salem, devoting himself largely 



500 THE riCKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

to hoi'ticultuntl pursuits, at the same time filliuj^- various olUces of trust 

in the business and Hterary institutions of the city, in wliieh he was 

deeply interested. lie was a director of the National Exchange Bank 

of Salem, for many years a trustee and oflicer of the Salem Savings 

Bank, a director in the Eastern Raih'oad corporation, and was a represen- 

'\ tative of Salem in the General Court. He was deeply interested in the 

organization of the Essex County Natural History Society, now embraced 

in the Essex Institute, and was also a prominent member and officer of 

the latter institution, being chairman of the tinanee committee from its 

formation to the day of his death. ]\Ir. Lee was an active mover in 

forming the Harmony Grove Cemetery Association, of wliich he was 

! a trustee. He was a member of the American Academy of Arts and 

I Sciences, and for many years its treasurer. ]\Ir. Lee was of a singularly 

I independent character, but nevertheless he was held in the highest esti- 

' mation by those who knew him best. His abilities were of no ordinary 

i kind. He was a wide and intelligent reader, and on all tinancial c|uestious 

i he was thoroughly informed, and a safe and reliable guide.' 

' A portrait of him was painted by Chester Harding, about 1836, and 

one in later life by K. M. Staigg. Both of those pictures are in the family 

residence at Salem. The heliotype here given is from the Harding 

picture. 

L VIII. 11. Harriet raine Bose, the wife of John Clarke Lee, 
bom in St. Johns, Island of Antigua, ^y. I., died in North Conway, 
N. H. 

Mrs. Lee, whose father was a merchant and planter of Antigua, W. I., 
was placed by him, abrmt the year ISIG, at a school in Boston. "While 
living in Antigua, she stuilied music under ^Ir. Green, the organist of the 
cathedral, and she was often permitted by him to I'hiy the organ. He was 
a warm friend of the family, and his miniature is in the possession of !Mrs. 
Lee's son, Francis II. Lee, of Salem. 

» Essex Institute Historical Collections, Yol. XV. pp. o5-C.2 : an obituary in the 
Salem Re;^i3ter of Nov. 22, 1SS7 ; and Life of John Pickering, by .Mary Orne Pickering, 

pp. i.':i:-i.';3S. 



HARRIET PAINE (RUSE) LEE. 



[I. vm. //.] 
[-. VIII. 6;.] 



lu IN- iHK. po^s^:ssION■ of Francts Henrv Lk 
Esq., OF S.A.LEM, Mass. 



-4- I 



EIGHTH GEyKUATlOX. 501 



ller parents liiuilly niiuned permauouily tu this country, milking their 
residence at AVorcester, tlie native place of lier mother. Here she returned 
after lier education was tinislicd; and from the ohl Paine mansion, the 
home of her grandfather, she was married. 

Mrs. Lee was a woman most ha})})ily constituted by nature, and her 
hfe was an unusually fortunate one. She was born into competency, and 
possessed a large circle of friends and relatives among the most cultivated 
circles in social life, Avliere she always held a leading place. 

She was a blonde of a very delicate type, and retained, through the 
whole of her more than fourscore years, the rare personal beauty, the 
gracious manner, ai:il the kindly and considerate spirit which had charmed 
all who knew her in her earlier life.^ 

The heliotype here given is from a miniature painted about the year 
1816, by Miss Goodrich. It is in the possession of Mrs. Lee's son, Francis 
H. Lee, of Salem. Several other portraits of Mrs. Lee were painted. 
There was one painted when a child, representing her playing the piano at 
her home in Antigua. She disliked this picture, and destroyed it just 
before her first visit to Europe. Another portrait, taken in her early life, 
was painted by Osgood, of Salem, and another of her in later years was 
painted by R. M. Staigg. 

Mrs. Lee's number in direct descent is [7 .YIIL Gl]. 

2. VIII. 14. Mary Ca."bot Lee [Henry 2. VII. 14], born in Boston, 
died in West Cambridge, Mass. 

2. VIII. 14. George Higginson, her husband, born in Boston, died 
in Boston, of pneumonia. A banker. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Higginsi^n, when a young- man, went to New York, where he was 
engaged for some years in the East India trade, lie became as well- 
known in the business and social life of New York, as he subserpiently 
became in his native city. Returning to Boston, he, in 1S48, in connection 
with John C. Lee [1. VIII. 11], founded the banking house of Lee, 
Tligginson, & Co., which has continued with unchanged name to this day. 
Subsequently, his brother-in-law, Colonel Henry Lee, a cousin of John 

» Obituary in the Salem Gazette of Aug. IS, 1885. 



502 THE riCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

C. Lee, became a partner, and lie is now the head of the firm. In 1874, 
Mr. llig-ginson \vith(h'e\v tVoni tlie firm, and devoted himself to the care 
of his property, and to works of phihmthropy and charity, bestowing his 
gifts with great kindness and hberaUty. 

He was a trustee hi the Provident Institution for Savings, a director 
in the Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company, and a director 
in the Calumet and Ilecla Alining Company. For many years he was 
a vestryman of King's Chapel. He never took an active part in politics, 
and never held a political otllce. Daring the late war, hoAvever, he was 
intensely interested in the cause of the Union, and was a liberal contributor 
to, and for some time treasurer of, the Sanitary Commission. 

Jlr. Higginson was of a kind and generous nature. He was pre- 
eminent in those qualities which entitle a man to love and respect. He 
had been tried by adversity and prosperity, and subdued by neither. 
He was liberal with his money, and also with his time. He took the same 
generous view of his social, as of his pecuniary obligations ; and whether 
as father, friend, trustee, almoner, citizen, or patriot, his duties were 
rigidly and cheerfully discharged. His habit of living, like his habit of 
giving, was liberal and unostentatious. Au old-fashioned simplicity, in 
which he had been bred, he maintained through life, combined with an 
unbounded hospitality.^ 

George Higginson was a son of George and iMavtha fBabcock) Hig- 
ginson. DehontJi Cahot [2. VI. £?"] was his grandaunt, and Martha Sah'shuri/ 
Higginson [44. YII. 217'^ Avas his cousin. His ancestry includes the 
following families : Higginson, Whitfield, Sheafe, Savage, Symmes, Sewall, 
Hunt, Dummer, Archer, Mitchell, Boradel, Cabot, Orne, Thompson, Cleave- 
land, Winn, Wilson, Waters, Linton, Hudson, Porter, Stanley, Cook, West- 
wood, Sewall, Hunt, Dummer, Archer, Mitchell, Boradel, Babcock, Hubbard, 
Rogers, Crane, Leverett, Sedgwick, Russell, Pitt, MYHis, Haynes, Harlaken- 
den, Coit, Jenner, Harris, Chandler, Douglas, Mattle, Greene, Tattershall, 
Barton, Gould, Robinson, Gardiner, Wilemson, King, Ludlam. See 
A-vcE.sTRY Tables HL'. 

* Obituary in the Boston Daily Advertiser of April 29, 1SS9; also a printed leaflet by 
Colonel Henry Lee. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 503 



2. VIII. 15. Henry Lee [Henry 2. VII. 14], born in Bostou. A 
banker. Residence : Brookline, Mass. 

Colonel Ll'u, IT. C. 183(1, iuinieJiately after g-raduating, went into his 
father's counting-room, the firm being Ikillard & Leo, in tlie East India 
and the South American trade. After remaining in this business a number 
of years, he, in 1851, joined the banking house of Lee, Higginson, & Co., 
of Boston, of which he is now the head. Some thirty years ago he orig- 
inated the first safe deposit vault in Boston, of which he is manager, under 
the name of the Union Safe Deposit Vaults. Colonel Lee is connected, 
as director and otherwise, with many of the financial in.stitutions of Boston, 
among them the Provident Institution for Savings, of which he is 
president. 

During the Rebellion, he was one of those citizens of Boston who 
were especially distinguished for conspicuous and consistent loyalty. He 
was lieutenant-colonel and aide-de-camp on the staff of Governor Andrew, 
from January 12, 1861, to June 9, ISGI, and was distinguished for earnest 
service in the formation of regiments in 1861, and for lielpfulness through- 
out the war. He is a member of the third class of the Militaiy Order of 
the Loyal Legion of the United States, having been elected Sept. 1, 
1868. 

Colonel Lee is a rare combination of business ability and highly culti- 
vated tastes, and is one of the best-kno'^\Ti men in the business and social 
life of Boston. He is a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society; 
for twenty-eight years he has been one of the overseers of Harvard College ; 
for twenty years has been treasurer of tlie Old South Preservation Fund ; for 
some years a director of the Bunker Hill Association, and was one of the 
founders of the Union Club of Boston, of which he is president. 

Colonel Lee has a decided taste for historical and genealogical studies, 
and is always one of the foremost in defending the liistorical moimments 
of his native city from the encroachment of the inconoclast. 

Although not inclined to hold public office, there are few such disin- 
terested and public-spirited citizens as he. He represents, in a marked 
degree, many of the strong characteristics of the two noted families from 
which he descends — the Jacksons and the Lees. He is the fortunate 



504 THE PICKER IXG GENEALOGY. 

possessor of se\onil interesting' portraits of bis ancestors, among them 
being- one of Major Thomas Savage, who was a noted Bostonian in his 
day. 

Colonel Lee has a summer residence at Beverly. Farms, and until 
within a iQw years he also occupied a house on Beacon Street, Boston. 

2. VIll. iJ. FJixfilM'th refkhifi Cabot, liis wife, born in Boston.^ 
Mr. and ^Mrs. Lee are second cousins. ]\lrs. Lee is a daughter of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Perkins) Cabot, of Boston and Broohline. 2faii- 
(wne Cahnt [4S. \ll. 20^ was her nunt ; EU:ahdh Cabot [1-2. VL 'J'] was 
her gran.launt; JosqjJi Cahof [(J. VI. ii] and Francis Cahnt [48. VI. (^6*] 
were her granduncles ; and Biclianl Clarke Cabot [5L IX. 1032'\ is her 
nephew. Iler ancestry includes the following families : Cabot, Orne, 
Thompson, Iligginson, "Whitiield, Sheafe, Savage, Symmes, Gardner, Frier, 
Orne, Browne, Boardman, Bull, Truesdale, Halton, Barrett, Barnard, Man- 
ning, Gerrish, Lowell, Waldron, Xoyes, Clarke, Appleton, Everard, Paine, 
Whittingham, Lawrence, Winslow, Chilton, Hutchinson, Marljury, Hamby, 
Pemberton, Perkins, Hudson, Frothingham, Lowden, Cole, Peck, Eliot. 
See .-VxcKSTKY Tables "^™. 

2. VIII. 16. Elizabeth Cabot Lee [Henry 2. VII. 14], born in 
Boston. Residence : Boston. 

2. VIII. 10. Charles Eliot Ware, her husband, born in Cambridge, 
Mass., died in Winchendon, Mass. A physician. Residences : Boston, 
and Rindge, N. H. 

. Dr. Ware, II. C 1834, obtained his degi-ec of M.D. in 1837, and 
established himself as a physician in Boston, where he practised many 
years as one of the leading men in his profession. He finally retired from 
practice, and 1)ought a large farm in Rindge, X". II., ^vliere he re- 
sided for a large part of the year, during the remainder of his life. He 
was a visiting physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1857 
to 18G7. He was a trustee and member of the executive committee, and 
vice-president of the Boston Lying-in Hospital; and this institution owed 

' Erroneously called •' Elizabeth, rlaiic;hter of Col. Perkins," in John Leigh, of 
Asawam (Ipswich), Massachusetts, 1034-1071, by \Villiam Lee, p. 52. 



EIGHT n GENERATION. 505 



much to the active and iiitelHgent interest wliich he always manifested in 
its welfare. He served the Massachusetts ^ledical Society for six years, 
as secretary ; and for three years he was the secretary of the Boston 
Society for Medical Improvement. 

Dr. "Ware was well fitted for his calling by the clearness of his per- 
ceptions, by the soundness of his judgment, by his industrious habits, 
and by his unfailing courtesy and dignified deportment. He was well 
read in medical literature ; and while not departing from a wise conserva- 
tism, his mind was open to receive the new truths which are constantly 
presented by the rapid advaiice of medical science.^ 

Dr. Ware was a son of the Kev. Henry and Elizabeth (Bowes) "Ware, 
of Cambridge, ^Mass. WlUiani Lowell Putnam [55. IX. llo7~\ is his grand- 
nephew. His father, Henry Ware, was for forty years Hollis Professor of 
Divinity in Harvard College ; his brotlier, Henry Ware, Jr., was Professor 
of Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care for thirteen years, in Harvard 
College, and another brother, John Ware, was for twenty-six years Hersey 
Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic, in the same college, and 
one of the most eminent physicians of Boston. Dr. Ware's ancestry 
includes the following families: Ware, Hunting, Gay, AYood, Williams, 
Prentice, Dunton, Rand, Sharp (?), Edenden, Whitman, Peirce, Bowes, 
Champney, Bridge, Hancock, Prentice, Clark, Clark, Bulkier (?), Wendell, 
Du Trieux, Staets, Joehemse, Oliver, Bradstreet, Dudley, Tyng, Hunt, 
Richards, Torrey, Shrimpton. See A^-cESTBY Tables -^-^ 

2. Yin. 17. Francis L Lee [Henry 2. VII. 14], born in Boston, 
died in Westport, N. Y. Residences : Boston, and Westjiort, X. Y. 

Colonel Lee, H. C 1S43, never entered into active business except to 
carry out practical ideas in landscape gardening, an occupation of which 
ho was very fond, and to wliich he devoted much time at his country seat 
in Westport, which overlooked Lake Champlain. He was also a great 
admirer of the fine arts. 

1 Obituaries in the Boston Journal of Sept. 6, 1SS7 ; Boston Transcript of Sept., 
1SS7; notices in The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal of Sept. 22. 1SS7 ; and the 
Keport of the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, May 
23, 1888. 



50G THE PlCKi:niXG GENEALOGY. 

Colonel Leo look an interest in politics, but he never held public 
office. He was a man keenly alive to duty ; and, when in 1862, Governor 
Anikew issued a call ^ov nine-months volunteers, and appointed him 
colonel of the Foi-ty-fourth Regiment, he promptly accepted the command. 
He served under General Burnside in North Carolina ; and, at the close of 
his term of enlistment, he volunteered his services to Governor Andrew 
as aid without pay. He had an instinctive knowdedge of men, and the 
way of dealing with tliem, and he was a great aid in equipping and officer- 
ing regiments for the field. 

Ho was a man of such sterling worth and originality of idea that 
Governor Anch-ew became greatly attached to him, and held him in 
the warmest esteem to the hour of his death. 

Colonel Lee was n-iajor of the Fourth Battalion Infantry, M. V. IVL, 
in service of the United States, May 25, 1862. :\Iustered out June 1, 
1862. Colonel, Forty-fourth Infantry, M. Y. M., Aug. 29, 1862. Mustered 
Sept. 12, 1862. Mustered out, June 18, 1863. He was elected April 6, 
1869, a member of the first class of the Loyal Legion of the United States. 

He was connected with several of the charities of Boston, for many 
years being a visitor in the Provident Association. He was a very 
generous man, and gave largely to charities in a quiet way.^ 

2. YHL 17. Sarah Mary A, Wilson, his wife, bom in Keene, N. H. 
Mrs. Lee is a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Little) Wilson, of 

Keene, N. H. Ancestry Tables ^"'. 

2. Vni. 18. Harriet Jackson Lee [Henry 2. VH. 14], born in 
Boston. Residence: Boston. 

Mrs. Morse has beeninterested in the charities of Boston for many years. 

2. YHL 18. Samuel Torrci/ Morse, lier husband, born in Boston, 
died in Boston. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

I\Ir. Morse was at the Round Hill School, Northampton, Mass., from 
1823 to 1828, entering with his two brothers at the opening of the school. 

' ^Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, p. S3; obituaries in the 
Boston Transcript of Sept. 2, 188G, and the Boston Daily Advertiser of Sept. 3, 18S6. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 507 



He was afterwards at Mr. Ingraham s school in lioston. He fitted for 
Harvard Colleg-e ; but, owing to a change in the circumstances of his family, 
he thought he ought at once to begin to earn his own living. In 1S3G, he 
went on a voyage to Cuba, from there to Russia, reaching Boston in 
October; and in November of the same year he sailed for Calcutta as 
supercargo's clerk. He made two more voyages to India, whicli occupied his 
time until October, 1841. Soon after this he w^ent into business with Mr. 
I'rederic Gray, in wdiich he continued until the war checked the India trade- 

Mr. Morse became a member of the Union Club at its organization, and 
remained in it until a few years before his death. He was also a member 
of the Somerset (Jlub.^ 

He was a son of John and Frances Hicks (Torrey) Morse. His father 
(H. C. 1808) was a Boston merchant. His ancestry includes the following 
families : Morse, Phillips, Wood, Paine, Penniman, Bush, Barrett, Pond, 
Temple, Joslin, Eddy, Brown, Marks, Bronsdon, Torrey, Greene, Tatters- 
hall, Almy, Bridge, Torre}-, Cowell, Gore, Weld, Bowen, Kilby, Pinkney, 
Gretien. See Axcestrv Tables ^^ 

3. VIII. 19. Esther Mackey West [Elizabeth 3. VII. 19], bom in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

An obituary of Mrs. Abbott, in the Salem Gazette of Sept. 24, 1850, 
states that she possessed an active, intelligent' mind, a kindly heart, and that 
she was one whose cheerfulness neither age nor sickness could subdue. 

3. VIII. 19. Amos Abbott, her husband, born in Andover, Mass., 
died in Andover. Residence : Andover. 

Mr. Abbott was long in the public service, representing his native town 
in both branches of the Legislature ; and for three successive terms he was 
a member of Congress from tlie Essex North District. During tlie Rebel- 
lion, Mr. Aljbott was very active, serving on committees, addressing his 
fellow-townsmen on all occasions, and doing everything in his power to 
encourage the enlistment of men. In business, society, and public life he 
exhibited qualities that commanded respect. He was a man of spotless 

' Obituary in the Boston Post of Nov. 8, 1S90. 



508 THE riCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

integ-rit}-, of rare miMlest}-, und of gentle courtesy.^ In 1845, Thomas 
Bnclianan Pu-ad painted ^Ir. Abbott's portrait. It now bangs in Memorial 
Hall, Andover. 

Mr. Abbott was a son of Captain Jedntlian and Ilaimab (Poor) Abbott, 
of Andover. Plis ancestry includes tlie following families : xVbbott, Farnum, 
Lovejoy, Foster, Jackson, Kimball, Scott, I'igsby, Poor. See Ancestry 
Tables ^K 

4. VIII. 21. Frederick Lucius Quintus Ciiicinnatus Frye 
[Margaret 4. VII. 20], born in Andovt-r, 3[ass. 

Mr. Frye left New York in the year 1S20-1821, with the intention of 
settling in some of the Southern or Western States, and in 1822 was known 
to be in Tennessee. Since that time nothing has been heard from Lim. He 
was unmarried at the time of leaving home." 

4. VIII. 22. Daniel Mackey Frye [Margaret 4. VII. 20], born in 
Andover, Mass., died in New- York. A lawyer. Residence : New York 
City. 

Captain Frye, from 1S0.J to 1826, resided in ^Montgomery, Orange 
County, New York, and from the latter year until his dcatli he lived 
in the city of Xew York. lie served as a captain in the "War of 1812. 
He " was admitted a member of the Xew York Society of the Cincinnati 
in 183G, on condition of his paying ' into the fund of the society one 
month's pay, upon the rank held by his father in the Continental Army, 
previous to its dissolution.' He died in 1S59 withont complying with the 
conditions." ^ 

4. Vni. 23. Ann Butler, his wife, boni in Litchfield, Conn. 
Her second husband, to whom she was mamed Nov. 2, 1863, was 
Charles B. Ilubbell, of Bridgeport, Conn. He died May 22, 1873. 



* Obituary in the Salem Gazette of Xov. 6, 1868. 

' From an account written by Theophilus C. Frye, of ^fontclair, iN". J. 

* Memorials of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, edited by James JI. 
Bugbee, p. 204. 



EI GUT 11 GENEUATIOX. 509 

4. VIII. 25. Margaret E. O. Frye [Murgaret 4. VII. 20], born 
in Fort Jay, Governor's Island, N. Y., died in Pulaski, Oswej^^o County, 
N. Y. Residence : Pulaski. 

4. VIII. '2o. Alexander Forman, her husband, born in New Paltz 
N. Y., died in Pulaski, Oswego County, N. Y. A Methodist minister. 
Residence : Pulaski. 

Mr. Forman was a son of Josiali and Lucretla (Conckling) Forman. 
Ancestry Tables ^^3. 

4. VIII. 27. Nancy Mackey Frye [.Margaret 4. VII. 2u], born in 
Andover, Mass., died in Andover. 

There was a gravestone erected to her memory in the graveyard at 
Andover. 

5. VIII. 32. Mary Turner Jones [Sarah 5. VII. 30], born in 
Southampton, Mass., died in Bentonsport, Iowa. 

Mrs. Richards is said to have been a woman of great beauty. 

5. VIII. 32. Seth Blchards, her husband, born in Enfield, Mass. 
A merchant. Residence : Oakland, California. 

In 1837, Mr. Richards moved lo Iowa. He first settled at Fort 
Madison, where the Indian chiefs Black Hawk and Keokuk were often his 
guests. He transacted business at several places in the AYest, and finally 
established himself at Bentonsport, where a few years ago he still had 
a house. He has retired from active business, in which he acquired 
wealth. 

The marriage to his second wife, Cornelia Smith, took place Sept. 20, 
1849. She was born in South Hadley, Mass., May 3, 1819, and died 
Feb. 5, 1890, at Oakland, Cal. She was a daughter of David and Delia 
(Warner) Smith, of Enfield. Her father was a manufacturer of woollen 
goods.^ 

Seth Richards is a son of James and Sarah (Rich) Richards. His 
father was a contracting builder. His ancestry includes the following 

I A Genealogical Register of the DcsccnJauts of Several Ancient Puritans, by the 
Rev. Abner Morse, Vol. III. p. 81. 



510 TUE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

families: Richards, Faxon, Adams, Bailey, Perry, Iiich. Sco AiJCESTRv 
Tables Xin. 

6. VIII 33. Henry Gardner Jones [Sarah 5. VII. 30]. 

Mr. Jones is supposed to be dead, and it is not known by his relatives 
that he ever married. He travelled extensively for several years in South 
America, and elsewhere, and was last heard from in 1852. 

5. VITI. 33'. EUzabeth Gardner Dabney [Nathaniel G. 5-5^ VII. 
32], born in Youngstov\ni, Ohio, died in Farmington, Ohio. 

Mrs. Curtis was among the fir^t children born in the new settlement. 
She is said to have resembled her mother in her strength and activity, and 
to have occupied a high social position in West Farmington, which place 
was an educational centre of some note. 

5. VIII. 33^. Mansley Curtis, her husband, born in Farmington, 
Conn., died in Farmington, Ohio. A capitalist. Residence : Farmington. 

He v,-as a son of Zenas and Anna (Ledyard) Cm-tis. His father was 
a farmer of Farmington. A^'CESTEY Tables ^^^^. 

5^ VIII. 33\ Mary Dabney [Nathaniel G. 5-5". VII. 32], probably 
born in Somerset, Pa., died in Portsmouth, Ohio. 

]\Irs. Everett was of a delicate organization and lovely character. What 
was withheld physically, was given back in mind and heart. She is 
thought to have been born while her mother was visiting her parents in 
Somerset, Pa. 

5\ VIII. 33^. Peter Sherer Everett, her husband, born in Pennsyl- 
vania, died in Youngstown, Ohio. A farmer. Residence: Youngstown. 

He was a son of Thcophilus and Susan (Crone) Everett. His fatlier 
was a farmer of Canfield, Oliio, who emigrated from the vicinity of Harris- 
burg, Pa., when their son was nine years old. Ancestry Tables ^?n. 

5^ VIII. 33°. Sophia Dabney [Nathaniel G. 5-5". VII. 32], born in 
Youngstown, Ohio, died in Farmington, Ohio. 

She is said to have been a noble type of a pioneer woman, of high 
moral tone. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 511 



5^ Vlil. So'. Isaac Miller, her husband, born in iMillersburgli, 
Ohio, died in Johnson, Oliio. A farmer. Kcsidence: Johnson. 

Mr. Miller was a son of Matthew and ^Margaret Miller. His father was 
a fanner of Millersburg-h. Amcestey Tables \".v,a. 

5°. VIII. 33\ Gardner Dabney [Nathaniel G. 5-5". VII. 32], born 
in Youngstown, Ohio, died in Austintowu, Ohio. A manufacturer. Resi- 
dence : Austintown. 

Mr. Dabnev was extensively engaged in the manufacturing of woollen 
goods and edge tools at AustintoAvn. 

5°. VIII. 33'^. Kate Vanivye, his wife, born in Washingion County, 
Pa. 

Mrs. Dabney was a daughter of Charles and Jane (Cameron) Vanwyo. 
Her father was a farmer of Lordstown, Ohio. Ancestry Tables >^n_^_ 

5°. VIII. 33^ Jolm Dabney [Nathaniel G. 5-5^ VII. 32], bom in 
Youngstown, Ohio, died in Youngstown. Residence : Youngstown. 

Mr. Dabney is said to have been of a delicate organization, and of a fine 
character. Ho was not strong enough for manual labor. Of a kindly 
disposition and courtly presence, he was a favorite with the family. 

5°. VIII. 33'. Jane W/ieatlcij, his wife, bom in Nottingham, Eng- 
land, died in Warren, Oliio. 

Mrs. Dabney resided in Warren at the time of her marriage. 
Ancestry Tables ^Sv 

5'-b\ VIII. 33'. Ebenezer Dabney [Notlianiel G. 5-5^ VII. 32], 
probably born in Youngstown, Ohio. 

Mr. Dabney was a v^ell-to-do farmer, and was very prominent in 
Methodist circles. He gave liberally to good works ; and the needy who 
came to liini for help never went away empty. He was called the 
" banker " in the community in which he lived. 

5''-5''. VIII. 33''. ^fartJia Klncaid, his wife. 
Ancestry Tables y"„. 



512 THE ncKEnixa genealogy. 

5". VIII. 31. Fidelia Kettell [Fidelia 5'. MI. 34], born iu Dauvers, 
Mass., died in Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Miss Kettell resided in Brooklyn, during the last ten 3-ears of lier 
life. 

5*. VIII. 37. James Bridges Endicott [Fidelia 5^ VII. 34], bom 
in Dan vers, Mass., died in Hong Kong, China. X. merchant. Residence : 
Hong Kong. 

Mr. Endicott followed the sea in early life, and became commander of 
receiving ships for Russell & Co., China, being stationed at Cum-sing-morn, 
near Macoa. He remained in the emplo}- of the firm, having charge of its 
trade at this point, until about 1854, when, in connection with Mr. J. P. 
Cook, of Salem, he entered into partnership under the firm name of Thomas 
Hunt & Co., and engaged in the business of ship-chandlery, ships, and 
dock-yards. Tb.e firm also did a commission business, and had their main 
house at Hong Kong, with branches at Whampoa and Shanghai. Sir. 
Endicott was the owner of the steamer " Spark," the first American steamer 
running regularly on the Canton River. 

He was an enterprising and adventurous merchant, amassing a very 
large fortune, and also meeting with very great losses. "With the exception 
of a few years spent in European and American ta-avel, he lived in Hong 
Kong. 

Mr. Endicott was a large man, with a good deal of mental vigor. He 
had a high and quick temper, but was a delightfully genial companion, and 
had one of the most infectious laughs. He had a very off-hand manner, 
and, although he professed the most independent and republican feelings, 
he was proud of his descent from the first governor.' 

b'^. VIII. 37. Sarah Anne JRusseJl, his wife. Residence : Eng- 
land. 

Mrs. Endicott has married again. Her second husband is a Mr. 
McGregor. She is a daughter of Robert and Sarah Anne (Cork) Russell, 
of Brixton, County of Surrey, England. A^-cESTRT Tables ""I^^. 

> "We are indebted to Thomas F. Hunt, of Salem, for most of these facts. 



EIGITTir GEXJCRATIOX. 513 



; 5'. VI 11. 38. Henry Bridges Endicott [Fidelia 5'^ VII. 34], bom 

ill Daiivers, ^lass., died at sen. llesidence: LXiiivers. 

Mr. Endicott Wiis drowned at sea the first nig-ht out from joort, on what 
is thouglit to have been his first voyage. It was a fearful storm, the rigging- 
of the ship covered with ice, but all hands were needed on deck. In the 
morning he was missing.' 

5". VIII. 39. William Endicott [Fidelia 5". VII. 34], born in 
Danvers, Mass., died in Salem. xV shipmaster. Residence : London, 
England. 

^\v. Endicott was i'or many years in the mercantile house of Augustine 
Heard & Co., of China, being a captain of a receiving ship for them. Of 
late years he had lived between London and Xew York, having crossed the 
Atlantic more than fort}' times. 

He owned the old Endicott farni at Uanvers, and was the last male 
descendant of the Danvers branch of the famil}- in the direct line." 

5^ VIII. 41. Eliza Cliadwick Bridges [Henry G. 5^. VII. 3.o], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. Residence: Snlem. 

Ou the death of her parents. Miss Bridges, with her sister, Miss Elizabeth 
Gardner Bridges, opened a school for yonng ladies in Salem. In a few 
years she removed to I'rooklyn, N. Y. Miss Bridges was a woman of 
unusual intelligence and education, but she soon broke down, and returned 
to Salem to die.^ 

b". VIII. 43. Elizabeth Gardner Bridges [Henry G. 5". VII. 35], 
born in Salem, died in Xew York. Residence: New York. 

She was the twin sister of Gilbert Chadwick Bridges. Miss Bridges was 
engaged in teachino- with her sister, Eliza Chadwick Bridges, and kept up 
the school for many years after lier sister's return to Salem. 

5". VIII. 44. Gilbert Cliadwick Bridges [Henry G. 5'. VII. 35], 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of scarlet fever. 

He was the twin brother of Elizal leth Gardner Bridges. 

» Letter of :\riss Fi.lolia Bridges, dated April, 1S93. ' Ibid. April 6, 1S93. 

" Ibid. March 30, 1SS5. 

33 



514 THE riCKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

5^ VI II. 45. Anna Bridges [llonry G. .5^ Vll. o.'^], born in Salem, 
died iu Sideui, of scarlet fever. 

b\ VIII. 46. Fidelia Bridges [Henry G. 5'^ VII. 35], born in Salem. 
An arti.st. Residence : Canaan, Conn. 

Jliss Bridg-e.s was a resident of Salem until about 1855. From 18G0 to 

18G3, she .studied painting- with W. T. Richards, of Philadelphia, and, in 

1871 or 1872, she was elected a member of the American Water Color 

i Society, and an associate of the Natiitual Academy of Design. She is well 

I known for hei- faithful and charmin<4- studies of bits of out-door nature, and 

I 

': her works are highly prized by art-jiatrons. She is well represented at the 

exhibits in New York and Philadelphia. A New York paper speaks of her 
as a poet as well as painter. A fcAv years ago she gave to the Essex Insti- 
tute, Salem, a charming picture called " Pastures near the Sea." 

Miss Bridges owns portraits of her great-grandparents, ^Iv. and Mrs. 
Samuel Gardner, also one of her grandmother, ]\Irs. Elizabeth (Gardner) 
Bridges. They have been reproduced for this work.'' 
j 

b\ VIII. 47. Henry Gardner Bridges [Ilemy G. 5^ VII. 35], 
born in Salem. A man of leisure. Residence: London, England. 

Mr. Bridges left Salem at the age of seventeen, for London, where he 
spent three years studying tens in the house of Capel & Co. Thence, he 
went to China as tea-taster for the firm of Augustine Heard & Co., living in 
various parts of that country. In 18G4, while at Kiukiang. he was 
appointed consul of the United States, and at the same time served in that 
capacity for Russia, there being at that time no suitable Russian to hold the 
office at that port. After twelve years' residence in China, he returned to 
America, rL-m;iining unsettled for eight or ten years, living sometimes in 
England, sometimes in America, spending one year in Japan, and travelling 
in Europe. 
I Mr. Bridges is a man of fine tastes, and a connoisseur of Eastern art, 

choice specimens of which he takes great delight in collecting.^ 

* Daughters of America, by Phelio A. Ilanafurd, p. 279. 

» Letter of his sister, Miss Fidelia Bridges, dated ^March 30, 18S5. 



EIGHTH GEXERATION. 515 



5'*. VIII. 4'i'- ^[(i>'U Ann Montgonierij, his wife, born in Canterbuiy, 
England. 

Slio io a Jau;i'liter of William and Elizabeth (Silva) Montgomery. Her 
father is a government clerk. Ancestry Tables \'^'. 

6. VIII. 48. Joseph Sebastian Cabot [Joseph 6. VII. 3SJ, bom in 
Salem, died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Cabot, H. C. 1815, studied law for a while in the oflice of the Hon. 
Leverett Saltonstall, of Salem, but, having an ample fortune, did not pursue 
the study long. 

In 1829, he became president of the Asiatic Bank, and held the office till 
his death, except while he was bank commissioner, and during his two 
visits to Europe. 

In 1833, he was appointed by President Jackson a commissioner on the 
Naples Claims, serving with great acceptance. He was interested in the 
organization of Harmonv Grove Cemetery in 18-10, and was a trustee and 
president of this corporation until his decease. He was for a long time 
president of the Salem Savings Bank, and for many years he was on its most 
important committees. For several years he was president of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Societv, and was noted for his interest and taste in 
horticulture and kindred pursuits. During his European tours he com- 
municated several papers of value on his observations among foreign florists 
and fruit-growers. 

Mr. Cabot was originally a Federalist ; but when the contest came be- 
tween John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson, he joined the Democratic 
Party, and was often the candidate for representative in Congress from his 
district. He was, hovvever, never elected, as the Whi_g's were in the 
majority. 

In 1843 and 1844, he was an alderman, and, in 1845, 1846, 1847, 
and 1848, he was mayor of Salem, showing great elliciency in both 
positions. 

Mr. Cabot was a companionable, courteous man, and was greatly 
respected in Salem. He left a large fortune.^ 

» Salem FLpgistor of July 2, 1874. 



516 TJIK riCKEIUXG GEXEAIJiGY. 

C). VIII. ^S'. Jldftlid Ldurcns Steai-ns, his lirst wife, born in 
Lunenburg-, ]\Iads., died iu Sak-ni. 

Mrd. Cabot was a daughter of Thomas and PrisciUa (Cuslung) Stearns. 
Her father was major, justice of the peace, and farmer, of Lunenburg, Mass, 
Her ancestry inchules the following families : Stearns, Beers, Reed, Corey, 
Gushing, Pitcher, Ilawko, Jacob, Eussell, Chauncy, Eyre, Walley, Croade, 
Gushing, Pitcher, Hawke, Jacob, Kussell. See Ancestry Tables Y'-'i. 

6. VIII. ^■S-- Susan Burlcij Ilnires, his second wife, borii in Salem. 
Residences : Boston and Poverlv, 3Iass. 

Mrs. Cabot is a daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth (Burley) Howes, 
of Salem. 

Mr. Howes, a lawyer of Salem, was for several years president of 
the Salem Marine Insurance Company. He was also for many years 
an officer of the Salem Athenanim, and a trustee in 1824-1848, and 
treasurer, 1831-1S4S, of the Essex Historical Society. Mrs. Cabot's 
ancestry includes the following fiimilies : Howes, Burley, Conant, Horton, 
Walton, Piugree, Clement, Jewett, Burnham^ Farley. See Axcestrt Tables 

VIII 

XT'- 

6. VIII. 51. Elizabeth Orne Gushing [Catherine S. P. G. VII. 41], 
born in Newton, Mass., died in Brookline, Mass. 

6. VIII. 51. Lu7:e Baldwin, her husband, born in Brookfield, Mass., 
died in ^larengo, Iowa. A merchant. Residence : Marengo. 

For many years Mr. Baldwin was a commission merchant in Boston : 
but, in 1857, he moved to Iowa City and went into business there. About 
1S(J0, he removed to Marengo, where he was the first to begin a general 
business at the depot. 

Mr. Baldwin was a man of strict integrity, sociable in his nature, and 
pleasing in his manners. Politeness with him seemed to be as the breath 
of his life. He was greatl}^ respected and beloved by a wide circle of 
friends. 

In 1862 he married Mrs. H. S. Hall.^ 

1 The MareQi:;o Iowa Democrat, Nov. 3, 1SS7. 



El GHTJI G KXi:UA TIOX. o 1 7 

Mr. Jjuldwiu \v;is a sou of Luko and Mary (i\.^•ery) Baldwin, of Bo.ston. 
Thomas Cit^huig [U. VII. ^'i^] was Lis grandunclu ; and Harriet Upliam [55. 
VII. 014] and Muri/ Ain^ S. JI. liahlahi [}]. IX. ii'.)'] were his nieces. Ilis 
ancestry includes the following families : Baldwin, Kicliardson, Fisk, 
Wilson, Flagg, Lepjiiniiwell, Carter, Bundiaui, Parknian, Trask, xVdams, 
Clianipuev, IIul)bard, Avery, Lane, Little, Warren, Sturdevant, Deming-, 
Treat, Green, Cushiug, Pitcher, llawke, Thaxter, Jacob, Bromfield, Dan- 
fortli, Wilson, Fletcher, Cusliing, Pitcher, Hawke, Thaxter, Jacob. See 
An-cestry Tabi.f.s y'". 

(). Vill. 54. "William Mack [Catherine S. P. 6. VII. 41], bom in 
Saleui, died in Salem. A physician. Residence : Salem. 

Dr. Mack, H. C. 1S33, M.D. 18.38, was prepared for college at the 
Salem Latin Grammar School. The two years following his graduation 
were spent as a teacher in a school at Xew Bedford, Mass., of which his 
cousin, David Mack, was principal. Leaving New Bedford, he Ijegan the 
study of medicine with Dr. John C. WaiTen, of Boston. During the last 
year of his medical course, he was house-surgeon m the IMassachusetts 
General lIos})ital. 

Having passed two years in Europe, devoting his time principally to his 
professional stttdies in Paris, and in visiting the hospitals and schools 
of other countries, and in foreign travel, ho returned to this country; and, 
in 1841, he began practice in Salem, which he pursued uj) to within 
several months of his death, tnking a leading position among the stirgeons 
and physicians of that city and its vicinity. He was always interested in 
the scientific and literary institutions of Salem, and in some of tlieni he had 
held prontinent positions. He was also interested in several of the indus- 
tries tliat have from time to time been introduced into Salem with the 
view of promoting its prosperity and growth, and was among the largest 
taxpayers of the city. Dr. Mack took an active interest in the establish- 
ment of the Salem Hospital in 1873, and was one of its surgeons itntil his 
resignation in 1891. 

Dr. j\Iack bequeathed to the city of Salem the Mack farm, situated in 
Ward Six ; and to the American Unitarian Association, the sum mentioned 



518 THE nCKElxING GEyEALOGY. 

under the liead oi" his sisters, the Misses P^sther Chivke ]\[aek and ILirriet 
Orue Mack. He also made bequests to the Salem Fraternity and to the 
Essex Institute. 

Dr. Mack had a number of interesting heirlooms. Among them were 
an old thread-case which belonged to his sisters' great-grandmother Clarke; 
an old and beautifully worked linen petticoat which was made by his 
great-grandmother Rebecca (Taylor) Orne ; two old satin quilted petticoats ; 
an old Vest beautifully embroidered ; an embroidered pocket ; a pair" of 
shoes; and a sampler worked by Sarah (Pickering) Clarke. 

Tlio part of the Idock in wliirh Dr. Mack resided was built by Henrv 
Pickering [.")S. VI. 111]. The other part was built by John Pickering 
[58. VI. I(i9]. A heliotype of the block is given facing page 261.* 

6. VIII. 55. Mary Catherine Mack [Catherine S. P. 6. VII. 41], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

A tribute to Mrs. Wheatland's character appeared in the Christian 
Register of Feb. 25, 18G2. 

6. VIII. 53. Hoiry Wheatland, her husband, born in Salem, died 
in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Dr. Wheatland, H. C 1832, M.D. 1837, was fitted for college at the 
Salem Latin Grammar School, and entered college in 1828. Upon grad- 
uating he began the study of medicine, and received his degree ; but he 
never entered upon the practice of the profession, his interest being in the 
direction of nattn-al history and kindred studies. 

After leaving college, he made two or three voyages for his health, 
with his father, to South America and Europe, pursuing his favorite studies 
and making collections of natural objects which have enriched the cabinets 
of Salem. 

lie was a member, corresponding secretary, cabinet-keeper, and 
librarian of the Essex Historial Society, formed in 1820 ; was one of the 
organizers, secretary and treasurer of the Essex Count v Natural History 
Society, founded in 1833, and held that office rmtil 1848, when, chiefly 
through his efforts, the Essex County Natural History Society and the 
' Communicated by Dr. Henry Wheatland, January 12, ISSS. 



HKXRV WHK.VrLAXD. 



[6. VIII. 53.] 
[17. VIII. 1S9.I 



From thk Portr.ait ev Vinton, t.viniko in 1.SS7, now in the posses 

OF THE ESSE.X. INSTITUIE AT S.VLEM, M.\SS. 



L. 



EIGHTH GHXEILITIOX. 519 

Essex Historical Society became uniteil as tlie E5;sex Institute. To 
the building up of the Essex Institute, he untiringly gave up his life, and 
was at his deatli its president, Avhicli position he had held a number of 
years. During the latter part of his life he gave less attention to natural 
history, devoting hims.lf to local history and genealogy, and was one 
of the leading antiquaries of Essex County. 

He labored witli rare intelligence, in season and out of season, and 
gave tlie impetus to that marked scientific activity for which Salem has 
been noted, lie liad drawn about him from time to time, during tlie last 
forty years, groups (if studious and ambitious young men, many of whom 
he stimulated and promoted, and some of whom have become distinguished 
in the scientific -^vorld. 

Dr. ^^'^heatland was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences; one of the oldest members of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society ; an original trustee and secretary of the Board of the Peabody 
Museum of Archaeology and Etliuology at Cambridge ; a fellow and 
auditor for many years of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science; one of the original trustees and vice-president of the Peabody 
Academ^'of Science in Salem ; and was connected with other organizations 
literary and scientilic.^ 

Dr. Wheatland had a decided taste for genealogy, and had collected 
a large amount of matter relating to the Salem families, concerning the 
history of which he was considered an authority. With his material he was 
always generous, and was frequently aljle, with his remarkable memory, to 
give one's line of descent from the primitive settler down to the present gen- 
eration, lie was one of those most interested in the progress of this work, 
and to him, more than to any other person, are we indelited for assistance. 

On Dec. 28, 1800, he was stricken with paralysis ; but, in spite of this 
affliction, he was a remarkable example of cheerfulness and patience. The 
heliotype of Dr. Wheatland is taken from his portrait painted by Vinton, 
in the possession of the Essex Institute. 

His number in direct descent is [17. VIII. 189]. 

1 The Prescott Memorial, by William Prescott, p. 12S; The Salem Register of March 
2, 1893; The Salem Gazette of Peb. 27, 1893; The Salem Observer of March 4, 1893; 
and The Boston Herald of April IS, 1893. 



520 THE riCKF.niXG GEXHALOGY. 

6. Vlll. oG. Sally Pickmau Osgood [liebeecu T. G. VII. 43], 
born ill Sak-ni, died \v Aiulover, Mas.s. 

Mrs. Loriiig \v;i.s ;i woinun of rare social and intellectual endowments. 

6. VITI. 60. Bailci/ Loring. I'er luisband, born in Duxbury, Mass., 
died in North And<iver, ^lass. A minister. Kesidence : North Andover. 

i\Ir. Loring. l^roun University, li^OT, studied divinity with Dr. Allyn, 
of Du.xbury, and was settled over the First Church in Andover in 1810. 
He continued its pastor nearly forty years, resigning- Feb. 27, 1S.")0. For 
fifty years he was a resident of the i)arish. Two of his sermons were 
printed at the request of the society. 

]\Ir. Loring was one of the earliest advocates of the Unitarian doctrine, 
and his church maintained an honorable eminence in that denomination. 
As a preacher, he was distinguished for the clearness of his style, and for 
an earnest and commanding delivery, which made him one of the most 
popular speakers of his day. In the impressiveness of his devotional 
exercises he had few superiors.'^ 

The engra^'ing here given is from a plate in the possession of his sou, 
John Alden Loring. 

Mr. Loring was a son of William and Alithea (Alden) Loring, of Dux- 
bury. His ancestry includes the following families: Loring, Kewton, 
Jacob, Gushing. Pitcher, Hawke, Bailey, Alden, Mullins, Southworth, 
Collier, Sprague, Fames, Chillingworth, Thomas, Pitney, Ford, Dingley. 
See Ancestry Taklf.s j". 

6. VIII. .57. Gayton Pickman Osgood [Rebecca T. 6. VII. 43], 
born in Salem, died in North Andover, Mass. Pesidence : North 
Andover. 

llr. Osgood, IT. C. 181.5, was fitted for college at the Franklin Academy 
of North Andover. At college he hold a high raidv in his class. He 
studied law with Ik'njamin Merrill, of Salem, and began the practice of 
his profession there, but removed, in 1810, to North Andover. He pos- 
sessed an ample fortune, and led a retired life, with the exception of the 

1 Historical Sketches of Andover, :Mass., by Sarah Loriug Bailey, pp. 46.J-16S. 



BAILKV LORINc; 

[6. Vm. .5.-,] 



EIGHTH GEXEBATION. 521 



time when he was in pulilic service. He was several times elected to 
the Massachusetts Legislature, aud for one term, 1833-1835, was a 
representative in Congress. 

Mr. Os'Tood was a man of rare culture and scholarly hahits. Ho 
sought the pleasures of home, of his books, and genial companions, rather 
than the annoyance of active business or of political life ; and it was only 
at the earnest solicitation of friends that he allowed the use of his name 
as a candidate for office. 

Pie lived in a fine mansion that had been his fathers, on the Haverhill 
Eoad.i 

6. VIII. 57. Mavij Faiiihani, his wife, born in Andover, ^lass., died 
in North Andover, of a fever. 

Mrs. Osgood was a daughter of Isaac and Persis Farnham, of Andover. 
Ancestry Tables Y^. 

6. VIII. 58. Isaac Osgood [Eebecca T. 6. VII. 43], born in North 
Andover, ]\Ia<s., died at sea. A mariner, llesidence : North Andover. 

:\Ir. 0.^:good died otT the Island of Jnva, while in connnand of the ship 
Henry Tuke,. of Boston, on her passage from Java to Boston. 

6. VIII. oS. Charlotfe Adams, his wife, born in Andover, Mass., 
died in North Andover. 

Mrs. Osgood was a daughter of John and Dorcas (Faulkner) Adams. 
Her ancestry includes the following families: Adams,, Farnum, Osgood, 
Clement, Poor, Farnum, Piussell, Faulkner. See A.\cf.stiiy Takli:s V". 

7. VIII. Gl. Harriet Paine Rose [Harriet 7. VII. 48], born in 
the Island of Antigua, W. I., baptized there Feb. IG, 1804. 

For an account of her see pages 500—501. 

7. VIII. ^i. JoJtn Clarke Zee, her hu.^band. 

His number in direct descent is [1. VIII. 77]. For an account of him 
see pages 499-500. 

' Necrology of Alumni of Hnrvard College, by Joseph I'aliner, pp. 359-3G0. The 
Xewburyport Herald of July 2, ISCl, aud Historical Sketches of Andover, by Sarah 
Loriug Bailey, [<. 22. 



522 THE PTCKEIUXG CENEALOCY. 

7. VIII. C,^. Josephine Rose [Harriet 7. VII. 48], born at St. 
Johns, in the Island of Antigua, W. I., baptized there Feb. 13, 1815, died 
in Worcester, Mas.^. 

Mrs. Chandler was for many years very small and sickly, which was 
one cause of the family leaving the West Indies for Massachusetts. She 
was of a dark complexion, had dark hair and deep hazel eyes tinged with 
gold. Her kiudne.-s of heart and sympathetic feeling were very great. 
An oil painting of her bv M. Wight, in the possession of her chihlren, is a 
correct likeness, and makes a handsome picture of a lovely woman.^ 

7. VIII. 6S. George ChamUcr, hor husband, born in Pomfret, Conn., 
died in AVorcester, Mass. A physician. Residence : Worcester. 

Dr. Chandler, Union College, ISi'.), Yale College, M.D., 1831, lived 
at home on his father's farm until his seventeenth year. In 1823, he 
attended two terms of the academy at Dudley, and, in 1824, he attended 
the Leicester Academy. He spent some time in teaching, and, in 182G, 
entered Brown University, where he remained two years ; but on account 
of the disturbed state of the college, he went to Union College, Schenec- 
tady, X. Y. He studied medicine with his brother-in-law. Dr. Hiram Holt, 
of Pomfret, Conn., and attended courses of medical lectures at both Harvard 
and Yale. On receiving his degree, in 1831, he opened an office in 
Worcester. In March, 1833, he became Dr. S. B. Woodward's assistant 
at the State Lunatic Hospital, Worcester. In 1842, he was appointed 
superintendent of the New Hampshire State Lunatic Asylum, at Concord, 
which position he filled with great acceptance to the trustees, and wdiich 
he resigned much against their wishes. In 184G, he succeeded Dr. Wood- 
ward as superintendent of the State Lunatic Asylum in Worcester. His 
administration of the hospital, which lasted for ten years, was marked 
by great success. He retired at the expiration of that time, making his 
liome in Worcester, and giving up active practice, having devoted twenty- 
five years to the care of the insane. 

He was appointed, March 23, 1839, surgeon of the Regiment of Light 
Infantry, First Brigade of the Sixth Division, Massachusetts Militia. In 

» The Chandler Family, by George Chandler, p. 577. 



EIGHTH GEXEBATION. 



18G2, he responded to tlio call for volunteer surgeons, and went to Fortress 
Monroe, and returned in medical charge of a transport. In 1859, he was 
a representative in the Legislature, and, in 1862, was an alderman of 
Worcester. He was also a justice of the peace. 

Dr. Chandler, in 1872, compiled a genealogy of the Chandler Family, 
which is a volume of over thirteen hundred pages, and is one of the most 
complete and valuable works of the kind which has been pnnted. 

He travelled with his two daughters in Europe, Asia, and Africa, in 
1867, 18G8, and 1869. 

He married his second wife, Hilary Eliza Wheeler, April 8, 1874. She 
was the widow of Charles A. Wheeler, of Worcester, and daughter of 
Stephen and Nancy Howe Douglas, of Greenwich, Mass. That year he 
went to the Pacific coast and to Europe. 

Dr. Chandler was a member of tlie ]*Iassachusetts, New Hampshire, and 
Connecticut State medical societies, the American Antiquarian Society, the 
Worcester Fire Society, the New England Historic-Genealogical Society, 
and for a long time was inspector of the State Almshouse at Monson. 
Dr. Chandler was of a vigorous constitution, and, until he was eighty-three 
years old, rode horseliack regularly.^ 

He -was a son of Major John Wilkes and Mary (Stedman) Chandler. His 
father was a farmer of Pomfret, Conn. His ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Chandler, Douglas, Mattle, Perrin, Hodges, Andrews, 
Williams, Macy, Clapp, Gill, Otis, Stedman, Seaver, Ballard, Griffin, 
Chandler, Dane, Clark, Clary. See Axckstrv Tables "?". 

7. Vni. 69. William Russell Paine [Frederick W. 7. VII. 51], 
born in AVorcester, Mass., died in Fn'ookline, ^lass. A merchant. Resi- 
dence : Brookline. 

Mr. Paine attended the public schools of Worcester, and later, the 
Chauncy Hall School, Boston. He became a clerk in the office of B. C. 
Clarke, of Boston, and a partner in the firm of Winslow, Adams & Co. 

^ The Chandler Family, by George Chandler, pp. .577-579 ; the Worcester Gazette of 
May 17, 1893; the Worcester Telegram of May 18, 1893; the Worcester Spy and the 
Boston Herald of May IS, 1893. 



524 THE nCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

He made one voya;5e to Calcutta in tlic course of busincs.-. At tlic time of 
his death, he was agent of the (Jkl Colony Iron Company, of Taunton, and 
had his office in Boston.^ 

7. VIII. 6'.9. Frances Thomas Crocker, his Avife, born in Taunton, 
Mass., died in l>rookline, Mass., of cancer. 

Mrs. Paine was a daughter of William A. and Frances Church (Thomas) 
Crocker. Her ancestrv includes the following families : Crocker, Hinckley, 
liichards, ThacliL-r, Gorliam, Ilowland, Tilley, Allen. ]\ussell, Leonard, 
Gulliver, King, Whitman, Dcane, Leonard, Ingell, Thomas, Grant, Hill, 
Weld, Whiting, Wliite, Dorr, Church. See Ancestry TAntrs Y^. 

7. VIII. 70. Elizabeth Orne Paine [Frederick W. 7. VII. 61], 
born in Boston. Residence: Beverly, Mass. 

Mrs. Sturgis, at the time of her marriage, went to Manila to reside. 
She made a short visit to the United States in 1854, and spent the next two 
years in Euro|)e. In 1864, she spent six months there. She also passed 
six months in China. 

7. VIII. 70. ITcnrij Parkman Sturgis, her husband, born in 
Boston, died in London, England, A merchant. Residence: Boston. 

Mr. Sturgis, in company with George Robert Russell, about the year 
1825, founded the famous mercantile house of Russell & Sturgis, of Manila, 
Philippine Islands. He married his first wife, Georgiana Howard, of Cal- 
cutta, ]\rarch 5, 1835, and visited the I7nitcd States Avitli her about the year 
1843 or 1844, and then returned to Manila. He returned to this country 
permanently about the year 1847 or 1843, and took up his residence in 
Boston. His wife died in Ixjston, Feb. '2h, 1850, aged 33 years, and was 
interred in the family lot at Mt. Auburn. By her he had the following 
eight children : — 

George Kop.ert Fa-ssELL Sturgis, born :\ray 2o, ]8oG; died Dec. 11, 1S65. 
Mary How.vkd Sturgis, born Dec. 8, 1837 ; died Dee. 12, 1837. 

Hknry Howard Sturgis, born Nov. 5, 1838; married, ISTov. 5, 1863, 

Caroline Augusta ]Manson. 



• Communicated by the Rev. George S. I'aine and Jvlrs. H. P. Sturgis. 



EIGHTH GEXEnATIOX. 525 



J.vMKS I'liKKiNs Stukgis, boHi Oi't. 20, 1S30 ; died Sept. 8, IS-IO. 

James Peickins Sturgis, born Oct. 14, 1841; died Jan. 2, ISGl. 

CiiAKLES Ekwakd Sturgis, borii July 31, 1843 ; died Aug. 14, 1843. 

Fkedekick Kus.sell Stukgis, born July 7, 1S44 ; H. C, M.D. 1SG7. He 

married, April G, 1870, Martha De AVolf 
Hazard, of Xewport, E. I. 

ilART Howard Tri.vidada Stukgis, born July 26, 1845. She married, at Florence, 
Italy, Samuel G. C. 3Iiddlemore, of England, 
who died at Eome, Italy, Jan. 22, 1890. She 
died at Malvern, England, Fob. 11, 1890. 

In 1851, Mr. Sturg-is married Elizabeth Orne Paine, and went ao-ain to 
JIanila, returning to the United States in 1854 for a three months" visit. 
Tliey spent the following two years in European travel, and linallv returned 
to Boston in 1856, where they lived till 18G7. 

Mr. Sturgis was a knight of the order of Carlos III. of Spain. An 
obituary notice of him, which appeared in the Boston Daily Advertiser of 
Jan. 11, 1870, speaks of him as a man of kindly pleasant manners, and 
of a warm, affectionate heart, with natural peculiarities of character and 
temperament.* 

Mr. Sturgis was the son of Nathaniel Russell and Susan (Parkman) 
Sturgis. Anne Cushhui Sturgis [7. Vll. ol'] was his aunt. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Sturgis, Kussell, Paine, Freeman, Bacon, 
Perkins, Hudson, Frothingham, Lowden, Peck, Parkman, Trask, Adams, 
Breck, Wainwright, Shaw, Burt, Cheever, Lathrop, Bill. See Axcestry 

TAELE.S ^. 

7. VIII. 71. James Perkins Paine [Frederick W. 7. VII. 51], born 
in Worcester, Mass. xV man of leisure. Residence: Worcester. 

i\Ir. Paine has always lived on the old Paine Place in Worcester. He 
made three voyages to Calcutta and China between 1848 and 1851, for both 
pleasure and business. 

7. VIII. 71. Sarah Loriiig Turner, his wife, born in Chelsea, Mass. 

Mrs. Paine was a daughter of Otis and Sarah Loring (House) Turner, 

of Boston. Her ancestry includes the folloAving families: Turner, James, 

' Communicated by the Kev. George S. Paine. 



526 Tin: pickerixg genealogy. 

Hudson, PerrV; liandall, Little, Beiulrr, House, Loring, Newton, Ilawke, 
Vickeiy, I'hippen, Cronnvell, Vickery, Pike. See A.vtEaTKY Tables ^'^'^. 

7. VIII. 72. Mary Pickard Paine [Frederick W. 7. VII. 51], born 
in "Worcester, IMass., died in Worcester, of congestion of the lungs. 

7. VIII. 72. Allyii Weston, her husband, born in Duxbuiy, i\[ass., 
died in Xe^v York. A hr.vyer. Residence : Slilford, Mass. 

Mr. Weston, H. C. 184G, studied law, and engaged in its pi'actice in 
Milford, I^Inss., where he remained but a few }-ears. He removed to Jlilton, 
Mass., and from there went to Colorado, where he edited a newspaper, and 
also became interested in mining concerns. He was much interested in 
i\Iasonry, and a correspondent writes to his daughter as follows : — 

"Your father laid tlic founrlntiou of our masoinc structure broad and strong, and 
left the impress of his master hand upon tlic masonic life of our state. He was at 
one time Grand Master of the Grand Lod.iic of Colorado, and the ritual, with few 
alterations, that he was instrumental in introducing, is to this day used in subordinate 
lodges. A man of good bearing and intellectual attainments was rare among the 
early settlers. He was possessed of these, and well posted in Masonrj-, and the lodges 
of his day in his jurisdiction have him to thank for the energy he put into his -nork." 

During the last few years of his life he was much out of health.^ 
Mr. Weston was a son of Gershom Bi-adford and Judith (Sprague) 
Weston. Fnnicis FeJcg Sprague [55. VIII. 648'] is his first cousin. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Weston, Delano, Peterson, Hobart, 
Dewey, Wai'ren, Wilson, Wadsworth, Andrews, Wiswall, Alden, Mullins, 
Southworth, Collier, Bradford, May, Richards, Rogers, Bartlett, Warren, 
Pabodie, Alden, Mullins, Alden, Mullins, Southworth, Collier, Sprague, 
Chillingworth, Thomas, Ford, Sprague, Eames, Chillingworth, Thomas, 
Pitney, Ford, Dingley, Chandler, Sprague, Bassett, Sampson, Nash, Stan- 
dish, Alden, Mullins, Chandler, Bisbee. See Ancestry Tables ™^. 

7. VIII. 73. George Stvirgis Paine [Frederick W. 7. VII. 51], 
born in Worcester, Mass. A clergy num. Residence : Worcester. 

* Tjctters of his daughter, IMiss Annie S. Weston, dated Sept. 17, 1893, and Feb. 
2, Ksa4. 



EIGHTH GEXKRATIOX. 527 

Mr. I\iiiie, II. C. l^ao, travoUcil \\\ Eui'fipc after graduating, residing 
principally in Paris. On liis return, he devoted liinis-elt' mainly to theologi- 
cal studies. In 1S58, he again visited Europe, residing jirincipally in 
Rome. On his return, after a few months' residence at the General The- 
ological Seminary in New York, he was ordained to the Episcopal ministry 
by the Rt. Rev. ]^Ianton Eastburn, D.D., of Boston. Since then he has 
resided most of the time in Worcester, declining any local settlement, but 
iilling temporarily vacant parishes. 

;\Ir. Paine is a member of the American Antiquarian Society, and holds 
the degrees of Hon. A.M. Trinity College (Connecticut), 18G5, and Hon. 
A.M. Holy Cross College (Worcester), 1SG7. 

7. VIII. 7G. John L. Clarke [Esther 0. 7. YII. 54], born in Mai- 
den, Mass., died in Chicago, 111. A capitalist. Residence : Chicago. 

His name was legally changed from John Clarke Fillis to John L. 
Clarke. Up to 18-10 Mr. Clarke resided in Salem. In that }'ear he moved 
to Illinois, and settled in Kendall County. In 185G, he built the first one 
of the fine row of stone front houses on ]\nchigan Avenue, known before 
the Chicago fire as Terrace Row. After the fire he rebuilt on the old site, 
and lived there until his death. Mr. Clarke was a man of fine tastes and 
culture, and was a valuable citizen.' 

7. VIII. 7G. Ell.viibeth Jlafilda Shcpard, his wife, born in Salem. 
Residences : Chicago, 111., and Beverly, Mass. 

A miniature of Mrs. Clarke and one also of her father are in the posses- 
sion of her daughters. 

Mrs. Clarke was a daughter of Jeremiah and Ruth (Cheever) Shepard, 
of Salem. Her ancestry includes the following families: Shepard, Bora- 
del, WaiuAvright, Wade, Cogswell, Thompson, Hawkes, Pike, Orms, Webb, 
Bray, Collins, Cockerill, Saunders, Skerry, Lunt, Clieever. See Axck.stky 
Tablks y^, 

7. VIII. 77. Esther Clarke Mack [Harriet 7. VII. 56], bom in 
Worthington, Mass., died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

' The Chicago Tribune of Oct. 13, 1.S85. 



528 TI[E PICKEPJXG GENEALOGY. 

Jliss Mack was a woman of !?;ontle. and ongaghiy manners, and her hos- 
pitality was cordial and gi'acefnl. She was philanthropic, and was qnick to 
discover and to relieve the needy. She looked below the mere surface of 
things, and worked for remote, as well as immediate results, and sought to 
apply correctives to poverty, ignorance, idleness, and vice. She gave time 
and thought to the promotion of industrial education, and lent sympathetic 
aid to whatever measures and methods of social reform that gave the best 
promise of raising the standard of individual character.^ 

Miss i\rack left tlie bulk of her estate to her brother, William ^^lack, dur- 
ing his lii't:-, and at his death the sum of thirty-five thousand dollars was to 
be given to the xbncricau Unitarian Association, in order to carry out the 
wishes of her late sister, Harriet 0. ]\Iack, who, dying intestate, requested that 
at the decease of her Itrother and sister seventy thousand dollars of her prop- 
erty should be given to said association for the purpose of the ditfnsion of 
liberal Clu-istianity, it being the intention of her brother William to make 
over to the said association for the same purpose the remaining thirty-five 
thousand dollars required to make up the seventy thousand dollars afore- 
said. Miss Mack desired that tlie bequest be made in the name of her 
sister, Harriet 0. Mack. She gave to her brotlier William her portion of 
the estate in North Salem known as "Ledge Hill," trusting that he would 
bequeath said estate to the city of Salem for public grounds. She also pro- 
vided, after her brother's death, foi- the establishing in Salem of an indus- 
trial school for femnles ; but if a similar school should be established in 
Salem, then a " Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute." 

7. VHI. 78. Harriet Orne Mack [Harriet 7. VII. 56], born in 
Worthington, Mass., died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Miss Mack was possessed of a clear and vigorous intellect, and a distinct 
individn;ility of cliara.cter. She wn-^ rather devoted to the tranquil occupa- 
tions of home life, the companionship of books, and a limited circle of 
friends, than to the conventional routine of social life. To her the stimulat- 
ing conversation of strong thinkers and positive minds was more attractive 
than the colorless commonplaces of customary intercourse. Although her 

' Letter of Eev. Edinuud B. Willson. 



FIGHTH GEXEJIATIOX. 529 

sincere loyalty to truth caused her to l)e plain of speech, she was neverthe- 
less kimlly and generous in her judq-ments of personal conduct. Her sym- 
pathies went out wannly to all those engaged in the attempt to reform 
social abuses, and she answered without fail to the appeal made in behalf 
of the suffering or oppressed. Her response was never slow or doubtful/ 

Miss Mack died intestate. It appears from the will of her sister, Miss 
Esther C. Mack, that she requested that seventy thousand dollars of her 
estate be given to the xVnierican Unitarian Association, after the death of 
her sister, Esther C. ?tlack, and her brother, AVilliam 31ack. 

8. VIIT. 80. Maria Stuart Diman [Samuel 8. Vll. 57], born in 
Wolfborough, N. II., died in Dover, X. H. 

8. VIII. 80. WilUaui. jnUeft Henderson, her husband, born in 
Kochester, N. H., died in Dover, X. II. A cabinet-maker. Residence : 
Dover. 

In 1821, Mr. Henderson was apprenticed to Deacon Charles Dennett, of 
Kochester, to learn the cabinet-maker's trade. He lived for many years in 
Kochester, and finally moved to Dover. 

Ho was a son of William and ^Margaret (Roberts) Henderson, of Dover, 
N. II. His ancestry includes the following- families : Henderson, Roberts. 
See A^'CESTHY Tables ™^. 

8. VIII. 81. Hannah Diman [Samuel 8. VII. 57], born in Salem, 
died in Dover, X. H. 

8. VIII. i9i. WiUiani Blake <S'»j.*7/j, her husband, born in Rochester, 
N. IL, died in Dover, X. H. A hotel-keeper. Residence: Dover. 

Mr. Smith was for many years a hotel-keeper, and at one time he kept 
the Pearl Street House in Boston. He was postmaster of Dover, X. H., 
through the last six years of Jackson's administration. He married, Oct. 2, 
1S36, a second wife, ^I'M-y Augusta Hardy, who <lied Dec. 17, 18SS. 

Mr. Smith was a son of John r)lake and Betsey (Roberts) Smith, of 
Rochester, X. H. His ancestry includes the following families: Smith. 
Blake, Roberts. See A^-cestry Tables w". 

' Letter of Rev. EJmund B. Willson. 
34 



530 THE nCKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

8. VIll. 82. Pri^jcilla Dimon [Samuel 8. VII. 57], probably bora 
in Neu' Ilamp-sliire, died ia Dover, N. H. 

8. VIII. 83. Georrje Frederic Jioiid, her husband, born at Strawn 
TciTacc, I.sliiigton, Enyland, died on his passage to England. A general 
agent and hvgeist. Ecsidence : Dover, N. II. 

Mr. Bond was a son of George Simmons and ]\[ary (Longdon) Bond, 
of Frier Gate, Derby, England. His father was an accountant. Axcestrv 



8. VIII. S3. Sarah Dodge [Mary 8. VII. 50], probably born in 
Hampton I'alls, N. II. Residence : Hampton Falls. 

8. VIII. S3. Charles Xealley, her husband, born in Xorthwood, 
N. H., died in Muscatine, Iowa. Piesidence : ^Muscatine. 

Mr. Xealley's first wife was a daughter of Governor Lucas, of Burling- 
ton, Iowa. By her he had three children. 

AxcESTRY Tables 5'". 

8. VIII. 84. Eunice Dodge [:\rary 8. A"II. 59], born in Hampton 



8. A'lII. 84- Jcnnes Smith Sheafe, her husband, bom in Durham, 
N. H. A railroad agent. Residence : Elmira. X. Y. 

Mr. Shuafe's name was changed, in 1854, from James Slioafe Smith to 
James Smith Sheafe. lie was named for James Sheafe, of Portsmouth, 
N. H., his grandmotiior's brother. His children's names were also changed 
to Sheafe at the same time. Mr. Sheafe's second wife was Louisa Terry. 

He is a son of Eljenezer and Hannah (Ricliardson) Smith. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Snuth, Slieafe, Cotton, Sheafe, 
Webb, Walton, Seavcy, Richardson, Green, Hills, Upham, Wood, Briggs, 
Hanson. See Ancestry Tables "V'. 

8. VIII. 88. James Dinian Dodge [^lary 8. VIT. oP], born in 
Hampton Falls, N. H. A farmer and store-keeper. Residence: Hampton 
Falls. 



EIGUTIT GEXFRATiny. 53I 

8. Vlir. SS. Hal-rut F. ITmllrij, liis ^\ it'e, Lorn in Waterville, N. II., 
died in Hampton Falls, X. H. 



8. YIII. 90. Mary Adaline Diman [David R. 8. VII. 65], born in 
Strathani, N. H., died in South Xevrmarket, X. II. 

8. VIII. ,9(9. James Kimball, her husband, born in Wells, Maine, 
probably died in South Xewmarket, X. II. A carpenter. Residence ; 
South Xewmarket. 

Mr. Kimball was a son of Robert and Meribah (Siuart) Kimball, of 
AVells, Maine. Ancestry Tables ^''^ . 

8. VIII. 91. James Hervey Diman [David R. 8. VII. Go], born in 
Stratham, X. H. Real-estate agent. Residence : Minneapolis, Minn. 

i\Ir. Diman was formerly engaged in the nursery and greenhouse busi- 
ness in Stratham, X. H. He afterwards was a real-estate agent in Boston. 

8. VIII. 91. Sarah EUxahefh Sinclair, las wife. 

Mrs. Diman is a daughter of James and Mary (Leavitt) Sinclair, of 
Stratham, X. H. Her father was a carpenter. Axcestey Tables YF- 

9. VIII. 92. Bernard Richardson Green [I^zra 9. VII. G9], born 
in Maiden, Mass. A ci\-il engineer. Residence: AVashington, D. C. 

i\Ir. Green took the course in engineering at the Lawrence Scientific 
School of Harvard College, graduating in 18G3. For fourteen years (18G3- 
1877) he was engaged as a civil engineer on the construction of the coast 
defences and other public works of ]*Iaine, Xew Hampshire, and Massa- 
chusetts. From that time to the present he has, in the same profession, 
been chiefly engaged upon, and in local chnrge of, the construction of 
public buildings in Washington, D. C.. amorigst which are those for the 
State, War, and Xavy Department, and the Congressional Library. In 
1896, he succeeded General Casey as superintendent of construction of the 
latter building. He is a member and director of the American Society of 
Civil Enfnneers. 



532 Tin: J'ICKEFJXG GENEALOGY. 

9. Vlll. 02. Julia EHx<( Lincoln, lii.s wife, burn in Canterbury, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Green is a daii^'liter of Marvin and A»enatli (Brooks) Lincobi, of 
Maiden, Mass. Iler father is an artilicial-limli maker. Her ancestry 
includes the following- families: Lincoln, Jacob, lluntino-ton, Rockwell, 
Capen, Backus, Pratt, Stowell, Webb, Flint, Reed, Hall, Tilden, Brooks, 
Spencer, Bailey, Tryon. See Axckstry Tables ^'U . 

9. VIII. 94. Sarali Elizabeth Green [Ezra 9. VII. 09], born in 
Maiden, 3Ia6s. 

9. YIII. 9^. C/un-les Lewis Wilde); her husband, born in Lan- 
caster, Mass. A cotton broker. Residence : Jackson, ]\Iiss. 

Mr. Wilder is of the tirm of Wilder & Tuttle, cotton brokers, of Jack- 
son, ]\Iiss. 

He is a son of Charles Lewis and Harriet Ellen (Harris) Wilder. His 
father is a farmer and manufacturer of Ijancaster. Axcustky Tai;i,e3 y^. 

9. Ylll. 9,5. James Dirnan G-reene [Ezra 9. A'lT. G9], born in 
Maiden, Mass. A man of leisure. Residence : Newton, Mass. 

Mr. Greene is the only member of his father's family who has adopted 
the final " e" in his name. He has been engaged in mercantile and manu- 
facturing enterprises, but is now retired. He has spent some time in 
European travel. 

9. VIII. .9o. EUxnhcth Orne Damon, his wife, born in Boston. 
Her first husband was Edward Adams Damon [10. VIII. 113]. Her 
number in direct descent is [10. VIII. 121]. 

9. VIII. 96. G-eorge Ezra Green [Ezra 9. VII. G9], born in Mai- 
den, Mass., died in Lancaster, Mass. A grocer. Residence: Lancaster. 

9. VIII. 06. Jichecca Chapman Blancliard, his wife, born in Xew- 
buryport, ^lass. 

i\Irs. Green is a daughter of Frederick and ]\Iary Jane (York) Pdanchard, 
of ]\Ialden, I\Iass. Her father was a sailmaker and was born in Newbury- 
port. AxcESTKY Tables \^ . 



EIGHT H GENERATION. 533 

9. VIII. 98. Emelie Augusta G-reeu [Ezra 9. VII. G9], bom in 
Maiden, Mass. 

9. VIII. 9S. Jlevbert Josepli Hartvood, her husband, born in Lit- 
tleton, Mass. Superintendent of The Ilarwood Manufacturing Company, 
Boston, IMass. Kcsidence : Littleton. 

Mr. Ilarwood, II. C. 1877, has spent some time in travelling' in Europe 
and the United States. In 1882, he was on the staff of Governor Long, 
A. A. G. with rank of lieutenant-colonel. 

lie is a son of the Hon. Joseph Alfred and Lucy ^Maria (Hartwell) Ilar- 
wood. His father was a farmer and manufacturer, of Littleton, Mass. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Ilarwood, Fox, Stone, Prescott, 
Platts, Loker, Draper, Wheeler, Larkin, Kimball, Scott, Ilazeltine, Day, 
Pingree, Emerson, Grant, Toothaker, Allen, Little, Poor, Coffin, Thember, 
Stevens, Greenleaf, Clement, Ayer, Dutton, Hartwell, AVlieeler, Blanchard, 
*\Vood(?), Dix, Shattuck, Randall, Barron, Sherman, Palmer, Win.ship, 



9. Vin. 101. James Durell G-reene [James D. 9. VIL 71], born in 
Lynn, Mass. An inventor. Residence : Ann Arbor, Mich. 

General Greene, H. C. 1849, spent several years in Europe. He served 
with distinction during the late war. He was appointed lieutenant-colonel 
of the Fifth 31. V. M., April, 18(31, and lieutenant-colonel of the Seventeenth 
Infantry, U. S. A., May 14, 18G1. He was ordered to Portland, IMaine, to 
organize regiments; was in command of forts in the harbor until the spring 
of 1863 ; and served in the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. He 
was made colonel of the Sixth Infantry, U. S. A., Sept. 20, 18G3. He was 
provost-marshal general of Vrisconsin Jan. 1, 1864; was orrlered to Ohio 
July, 1864; was in command of Draft Picndczvous at Columbus, Ohio; 
rejoined his regiment in New York Februnry, li^Gn, and was ordered to the 
Department of the South in command of the district of Port Royal, S. C. 
He was brevetted brigadier-general of the United States Army, ]\[arch 13, 
18G5. He resigned June 25, 18G7.^ 

' Harvard University in the War of 1861-1SC5, p. 42. 



534 THE FICKEIUXG GENEALOGY. 



He is ;i nianufacturL'i- of breech-luadiiii;- unns, for which hf hohls several 
patents, lie adopted tlie final " e " in his name. 

9. VIII. 102. Nicholas St. Jolm Green [James D. 9. VII. 71], born 
in Dover, N. IL, dieil in Cambridij'e, Mass. A lawyer. Residence : Cani- 
bridg-e. 

Mr. Green, 11. C. 18.^1, LL.B. 1853, was a lawyer in practice in Boston. 
He was author of Green's Criminal I-aw Reports in two volumes; also of 
three volumes of Reports, 112 to 114, of Decisions of the Massachusetts 
Supreme Court. These last reports, thoug-h issued in the name of Albert 
G. Browne, Jr., were actually rei)Orted by Mr. Green. He w\as also a con- 
tributor of articles printed in the American Law Review. He was a lecturer 
in Harvard College, and in the Boston University Law School, 1872-1876, 
and was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Mr. Green was an important figure in the field of jurisprudence. In his 
early practice he acquired a critical knowledge of the criminal law. lie 
was a student of historv, political economy, psychology, and logic. The 
e"vidence of his ability was not confined to the lecture-room, for it is not too 
much to say that no man at the SuiTolk Bar produced a greater eftect upon 
the opinion of the Supreme Court in the cases Avhich he presented than he. 
His arguments, in addition to the qualities of substance which we have 
mentioned, had a terseness and beauty of form which it is impossible to 
compare with anv less distinguLshed models than those of Judge Curtis. 

He was paymaster in the United States Army, Aug. 31, 18G3, stationed 
at AVashington, D. C, and Xorfolk, Ya. He resigned May 19, 1865.^ 

9. VIIL 102. Cornelia Hcnshaw, his wife, born in Boston. Resi- 
dence : Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. Green is a daughter of John and Mary Ann (Lewis) Henshaw. 
Her ancestry includes the following families: Henshaw, Sumner, West, 
Clement, Webster, Hay, Bass, Alden, Mullins, Belcher, Sargent, Sprague, 
Goffe, Bunker, Mellows, Smith, Denny, Syer, Cook, Jones, Lewis, Shaw. 
See AxLESTKY Table,-, '5". 

' Harvard University in tlie War of IS6I-IS60, p. 51 ; also The American Law 
Eeview, Vol. XI. pp. 17.3-174. 



EIGHTH GEXER. ( TJOX. 



9. Vlir. 110. Cliorles Ezra Greeno [Jpmos D. M. VTT. 71], bom iu 
Cambridge, Mass. A civil eiig-inecr. Residence : Ann Ail)oi-, ^licli. 

Mr. Greene, TI. C 1.SG2, Institute of Teclmology, B. S. 1SG8, Univer- 
sity ol' Michigan, honorary degreu C. E. 1S81-, was fitted for college at the 
Cambridge High School and at Phillips Exeter Academy. From college 
he went to Millbury, Mass., engaging in the manufacture of ritles. Thence 
he went to Worcester, and engaged in the same business until Xovenilier, 
1863. In February, 18(14, he went to Reailville, as clerk in the depot 
quartermaster's dep;irtiiient, and remained tliere until October. He was 
appointed, Jan. 5. 18(jo, first lieutenant of the Seventh United States 
Eegiment of Colored Troo]is, aiul join.ed the n-giment in the field before 
Richmond, Va., as regimental quartermaster. He marched to Appomattox 
Court House in x\[}ril, 1865. and thence back to Petersburg and to Citv 
Point. He embarked for Texas, ^lay 25, where his regiment j^erformcd 
garrison duty at Imlianola, Port Lavaca, Victoria, and Goliad. He was 
discharged on resignation Aug. 13, 1S6G. In October of that year lie 
entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to pursue a course of 
study in ci\'il engineering, and graduated in May, 1SG8. He was assistant 
engineer of the Bangor & Piscataquis Railroad, Maine, 18G8-1870; civil 
engineer under the firm name of Greene & Danforth, Portland, Elaine, 1870- 
1871 ; and city engineer of Bangor, Maine, in 1871-1872. In October, 1872, 
he was appointed to the Chair of Civil Engineering in the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor. His publications are as follows: January. 1875, 
"A Graphical Method for the Anal3-sis of Bridge Trusses;" in 1876, 
" Trusses and Arches, Part I.," and " Graphical Analysis of Roof Trusses ;" 
April, 1879, "Trusses and Arches, Part II.," "Bridge Trusses," — an 
enlarged and rewritten edition of the book published in 1875 ; also, in 1879, 
'•'Trusses and Arches, Part III.," and "Arches," — the last of the series. 
All these books are devoted to the graphic method of treatment. He pub- 
lished Notes on Rankine's Civil Engineering, 1891. 

Mr. Green was chief engineer of the Toledo, Ann Arbor, & North ]\[ichi- 
gan Railroad, 1879-1880; superintending and consulting engineer of the 
Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad Bridge, Toledo, Ohio, 1881-1882: and 
engineer of the Ann Arbor Water Works, 1885. He was associate editor 



536 THE PICKERIXG GEXE.LLOGY. 

of the Engiueerini,' News in ISTC ;m(l 1877, and wns president of the 
Michigan Engineering Society in 1880 and 1882.^ He adopted the final 
" e" in his iiamo. 

9. VIII. 110. Florence Emerson, tlie wife of Charles Ezra Greene, 
bona in Bangor, Maine. 

Mrs. Greene is a daughter of Albert and Martha (Young) Emerson, of 
Bangor, Maine. Her ancestry includes the .following fanulies : Emerson, 
Burnham, Adams, Brigdon, l)e 3Ierrirt. Pitman, Randall, De Merritt, Buzzel, 
Gate, Young, Davis, Sleeper, Dudley, Gilman, Clark, Treworgye, Shapleigh, 
Folsom, Oilman, Clark, Perkins, Clark, Burnham, Colburn, Varnum, 
Nelson, Jewell, Burns. See Axcestrv Tables \"-. 

10. VIII. 112. Delia Augusta Damon [Lois 0. 10. VII. 74], born 
in Lynnlield, ilass. Pesidence : Northampton, Mass. 

10. VIII. 113. Ilenyij Dikenian, her husband, born in Hartford, 
Conn., died in Northampton, Mass. A hat and fur dealer. Residence: 
Northampton. 

In 1863, ^Ir. and Jlrs. Dikeman adopted Lily King, a grandniece of 
"old Jolni Brown." She was born in Waterbur}-, Conn., Dec. 24, 1857, 
and married, Sept. 11, 1883, Edwin ilill Banister. 

^tr. Dikeman was a son of Nathan and Cynthia (Osborne) Dikeman. 
Ancestry Tables ^^'^. 

10. VIII. 113. Edward Adams Damon [Lois 0. 10. VII. 74], 
born in North Reading, Mass., died in St. Louis, Mo. A wholesale grocer. 
Residence : St. Louis. 

10. VIII. US'. Abif/ail Eean!^ Holmes, his first wife, born in Til- 
ton, N. II., died in St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Damon was a daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah (Hoar) Holmes. 
He was a manufacturer of Tilton, N. H. Her family was of New Ipswich, 
N. IL, and was a branch of the Hoar family, of Concord, Mass. Ancestev 



' Harvard Collpcre Class Book, 1SG2, pp. 147, 148, aud Harvard University in the 
War of ISOl-lSO:., p. 18:i. 



EIGHTH GENEEATIOX. 537 

10. VIII. 113\ JJixabcth Orne Blanchavd, his second wife. 

She is his second cousin. Her second husband is James Diman Greene 
[!). VIII. 95]. 

Her number in direct descent is [10. VIII. 121]. For an account of 
her see pag-e 532. 

10. VIII. 117. Charles Pickering Damon [Lois 0. 10. VII. 7-1], 
born in North Reading-, 3rass. A merchant. Residence : St. Louis, ]\Io. 

i\Ir. Damon has a very quaint illustrated ]3ible whicli came down to him 
from the Ornes. 

10. VIII. 117. Base EicaUJ, his wife, born in St. Louis, Mo. 
Mrs. Damon is a daughter of Dr. Philip and Katherine (Fathj Ewald, 
of St. Louis, Mo. ^^^'CESTKY Tables '^fl. 

10. VIII. lis. Jolm Orne Green [Jolm 0. 10. VII. 77], born in 
Lowell, !Mass. A physician. Residence : Boston. 

Dr. Green, H. C. 18G3, M.D. 1866, went to Europe and studied for two 
years (1865-18G8) in Berlin, Vienna, Wilrzbuj-g, and Paris. 

He is one of the leading aurists of Boston. He was president of the 
American Otological Society in 1881, 1882, and 1883, has been Clinical 
Instructor in Harvaid College, and is now Clinical Professor of Otology in 
the same university. 

His literar}' labors have been entirely professional, having Avritten many 
papers, five of whicli were contributions to the American Jnurnal of OtologA', 
of which he was one of the editors. He has also translated two books from 
the German, viz., " Scliwartze's Pathological Anatomy of tlie Ear," and 
"Troeltsch on Ear Disease in Children."^ 

Dr. Green owns the crayon portraits of his grandpnreuts, tlie Rev. 
Aaron and Eunice Green, wliicli have been heliotyped for this work. 

10. VIII. 119. George Thomas Green [Jolm O. 10. VII. 77], 
born in Lowell. Alass. A member of the Xew York Stock Exchange. 
Residence : Englewood, X. J. 

» Harvard Class Book, 1S63, pp. 42-43. 



538 TFTE PICKEJilXG GENEALOGY. 

10. VIII. 110. Mary Bard Pcale, his wife, born in Philadelphia. 

She is her husband's first cousin once removed. 

Mrs. Green is a daughter of Dr. James Ihird and Mary Clarissa 
(McBurney) Peale, of Philadelphia, Pa. Jam McBnr»>nj [10. VII. rr'l was 
her grandaunt. Iler ancestry includes the following families : Peale, 
McBurney, Warnock, Patterson, ^McKa}', Scott (?), Lyman. See Ancestry 
Tables \"J,. 

10. VIII. 121. Elizabeth Orne Blancliard [Caroline M. 10. 
VII. 79]. 

For an account of her see page 532. 

10. VIII. 12V. Edwards Adams Damon, her first husband. 
His number in direct descent is [10. VIII. 113]. For an account of 
him see page 53G 

10. VIII. 121'. James Dimaii Greene, her second hu.sband. 
His number in du-ect descent is [9. VIII. 95]. For an account of him 
see page 532. 

10. VIII. 12G. Florence Green [Charles R. 10. VII. 81], born in 
Nahant, Mass., died in Newport, R. I., of typhoid fever. 

Mrs. "Whiting was well known in Newport and New York society, and 
had been a summer resident of Newport for a number of years.^ 

10. VIII. 12G. Augustus IVhitint/, her husband, born in Newport, 
R. I., died in Newport, of diabetes. A man of leisure. Residence: 
Newport. 

Mr. Whiting was a son of Augustus and Sarah S. Whiting. Ancestry 
Tables -j". 

11. VIIL 130. Ralph WeUs [:vrarianne 11. VII. 83], born in New 
York City. A man of leisure. Residence : New York City. 

11. VIII. 130. Sarah Fisher Adams, his wife, born in New York 
City. 

' The Boston Daily Advertiser of Nov. 23, ISSS. 



EIGHTH GENFAIATIOX. 539 



Mrs. Wells is a daughter of Jolm and Anno (Glover) Adams. Mr. 
Adams came to America in 1 S( )( ) from Strabanc, Ireland. lie was first a 
merchant in Xe\v York, and then for forty years president of the Fulton 
]5anh, a governor of the New York Hospital and Bloomingdale Asylum, 
and director in many of the charitable institutions of New York. His wife's 
father, Stephen Glover, was a New York merchant. Anckstry Tables Y" ■ 

11. VIII. 131. Fanny AVells [.Marianne 11. VII. S3], born in New 
York City. Residence: New York City. 

Mrs. Embree has some heirlooms of the Orne family, among others, a 
very curious silver pepper-box, marked with the names of Timothy and 
Lois Orne. 

11. VIII. 131. George W. Embree, her husband, born in Flushing, 
L. L, died in New York City. A physician. Kesidence : New York City. 

Mr. Enibree was a son of John L. and Deborah (Lawrence) Embree, of 
the society of Friends, Flushing, L. I. Axcestky Tablks Y" 

11. VIII. 137. Pamela Orne Emerson [Harriet 11. VII. 90], born 
in Lynnfield, !Mass. 

j\Irs. Bond is now the owner of Orne Place, Lynnfield, of which a helio- 
type is given facing page 203. 

11. VIII. 137. Ilenry Frederic Bond, her husband, born in Boston. 
A retired minister. Residences : West Newton, ^lass., and Lynnfield, ^lass. 

Mr. Bond, H. C. 1840, Harvard Divinity School, 1845, was ordained 
Jan, 7, 1846, over the Unitarian Society in Barre, Mass., and at various 
times has been settled over parishes in Northborough, Mass., Dover, N. IL, 
and Omaha, Neb. 

From 1859 to 1869 he was engaged in the manufacture of machinery in 
Waltham, Mass. From 1874 to 1876 he was United States Indion Agent 
in Colorado; and for four and a half years, from 1886 to 1890, he was 
superintendent of the Montana Industrial School for Indians, near Blakeley, 
Montana, under the auspices of tlie American Unitarian Association. 

Mr, Bond's first wife, Maria Jackson Foster, whom ho mai-ried Oct. 1, 



540 THE PICKER ryO GENEALOGY. 

1846, was born Oct. 2, 1825, and Jiud in 18G9. By her he bad the follow- 
ing cbiltU-en : — 

Fkancis IIknry PJiiXD, born July 27, 1847. 
CuAKLE.s Edwabu Boxd, borii Jlay 18, 1S49. 
Bo-VD. 

Mr. Bond is a son of George and Ann Sigourney (Hammett) Bond. 
His father was a merchant of Boston from early life until bis death in 
1842. His ancestry includes the following families: Bond, Biscoe, Wool- 
son, Hyde, Spring, iJartlett, Cutting, Patterson, Stephenson, Myrick, 
Trowbridge, Atberton, Wales, Sigourney, Germaine, Tileston, Uammett. 
See Ancestry Tables ^.i . 

11. Vni. 138. Harriet Orne Emerson [Harriet 11. VII. 90], born 
in Lynnfield, Mass., died in ^Vakefleld, Mass. 

11. VIII. 138. James Francis JEmerson, her husband, born in 
Wakefield, Mass. A manufacturer. Residence : Wakefield. 

Mr. Emerson is a member of the firm of Thomas Emerson & Sons, shoe 
manufacturers, of 'W^ikefield. He has been a capiain in the State militia, 
and town treasurer of Wakefield for twenty-five consecutive years. He 
married for his second wife, May 8, 1889, Lucie Knight, daughter of Abner 
and Tamzene (Twining) Knight. 

He is a son of the Hon. Thomas and Betsey (Hartshorne) Emerson. 
Huhhanl Emerson [11. VII. 90'] was his uncle. His father, the Hon. 
Thomas Emerson, was for many years the most extensive and successful 
shoe mamifacturer of the place. He was the founder of the firm of Thomas 
Emerson & Sons, and was president of the National Bank of South Read- 
ing and Wakefield from its organization till his death in 1871. He was 
also a committeeman, selectman, representative, senator, justice of the 
peace, captain of cavalrv, etc.^ Mr. Emerson's ancestry includes the fol- 
lowing families : Emerson, Bidkley, Allen, Boutwell, Kendall, Bruce, Ban- 
croft, Metcalf, Pool, Kendall, Pearson, Hartshorne, Browne, Osgood, 

' A Genealogical History of the Town of Keading, ilass., by Lilley Eaton, pp. 313, 
344, 663. 



EIGHTH GEXEIIATIOX. 541 

Boutwell, Kendall, Swain, Sinith, JUirnap, Hopkuisoii, Bancroft. See 

AnCESTKY TaKLKS ^g"j. 

11. VIII. 131). Mary Cliaille Emerson [Harriet 11. \l\. 90], born 
in Lynnfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Harnden has miniatures of her parents, and of Judge and Mrs. 
Spencer. Those of her parents and of ^Irs. Spencer have been heliotyped 
for this work. 

11. VIII. IJO. Frederick Harnden, her husband, born in Reading, 
Mass. Residence: AVashington, D. C. 

Mr. Harnden ^ya3 formerly a manufacturer, of Reading, ^lass. For a 
number of years he has \)QQ\\ a clerk in the United States Department of 
Labor, Washington, D. C, and for most of the time is in the field gathering 
statistical information for the department. 

He is a son of Sylvester and Mary Elizabeth (Sherman) Harnden, of 
Reading, Mass. His ancestry includes the following families : Harnden, 
Pierce, Pratt, Sherman, Parlcer, [Mellen, Pratt, Parmontcr, Prentice, Stanton, 
Lord, Foster, Hanford, Holland. See Ancestry Tables ^i- 

11. VIII. 140. Riifus Hubbard Emerson [Harriet 11. VIL 90], 
born in Lynnfiuld, ^Mass. A manufacturer. Residence: Jackson, Mich, 
Mr. Emerson is engaged in manufacturing, and also in mining enterprises. 

1\. Wll. 140\ Anna Mereh S'fro'i^^/cZ-, his first wife, born in Troy, 
N. Y., died in Pittsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Emerson was a daughter of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Renouf) 



1\. YIU. J40-. Margaret Duncan McCandlcss, his second wife, 
born in Pittsburg, Pa., died in Pittsburg. 

Mrs. Emerson was a daughter of Wilson and Sarah N. (CV)llins) ]\Ic- 
Candless. He was United States district judge for the Western District of 
Pennsylvania. Her ancestry includes the following families: ]\[cCandless, 
Elliott, Collins, Lowrey, Spencer, Selden, Church, Eatton, Wardell. See 
Anpestrv Tables VU,. 



542 THE FICKKRING GEXEALOGY. 

11. Vlll. 7,;^/'. Zclie B. rassai-ant, Lis third wife, born in Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Mrs. Eincrsnii is a daugliter of the Kev. ]\Ir. Passavant, a Lutheran 
minister, of Pittslmrg, Pa. Axckstry Tables \'".. 

ll.YIII. 1-U. Emily Orne Spencer [Soi)hia B. P. 11. YIL 92], 
born in ]\IcDonoug]i, Georgia, died in Birnam Wood, xVrk. 

I\rrs. Harris taught in tlie public schools of South Reading, Mass., and 
in a private seliunl in Pepperell, Mass. In 1853-1854, she was an assistant 
in tli(^ Dedhani High School, and afterwards, until her marriage, she was a 
teacher in the Hancock School in Boston.^ 

11. YHI. i^7. Datus Whtttah-er Harris^, \\(^Y\ms\mTidi. A planter. 

Residence : Birnam Wood, Ark. 
Ancfstky Tai;li;.s ^i- 

12. Vni. 145. Sarah Prince [Sarah 12. YH. 95], bom in Salem, 
baptized there Oct. 2, 1785, died in Salem. Residence: Salem. 

The one hundredtli anniversary of Mrs. Osgood's birtliday was cele- 
br;itod Sept. 21, 18s5, at the summer residence of her son, George P. 
Osgood, at Weidiani Neck, where she had passed the summer months for 
four years. i\Irs. Osgood had a fondness for poetry, and on this occasion 
she ^\•as well and bright enough to be able to repeat the whole of one of 
her fa^•orite hymns, — that of "Contentment," from Dr. Bentley's collec- 
tion. This she did without the prompting of a single word, and by no 
means in a mechanical wa\ or tone, but with the sincerest feeling and 
appropriate expression, although the voice was broken with age, and the 
movement w^as measured and slow. Mrs. Osgood was of rather a nervous 
tempei'ament, at least in her movements, which Avere formerly quick. Her 
speech was energetic and earnest, and her eyes had a flashing, glancing, 
and brilliant cxj)ression. She was very methodical in her ways, and not 
easily diverted from the fixed habits in which her life ran. She continued in 
a serene old age, bearing no wrinkle upon her placid face, even at the great 
age of ninety-two, and with scarcely a sick day in all her declining years. 

' Historical Catalogue of the Dedhani High School, p. 10. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOy. 543 

She reineuibered with great distinctness the Frencli Revohition, the execu- 
tion of Marie Antoinette, the inauguration of all the Presidents of tlie United 
States, and the incidents of the "War of 1812. She lived with her son, 
George Prince Osgood, on Chestnut Street, Salem.^ 

12. VIII. 1^0. John Williams Osgood, the husband of Sarah Prince, 
Lorn in Salem, died in Salem. A merchant. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Osgood was in early life cashier of the Commercial (afterwards the 
First National) Bank in Salem. He resigned that position, and, in 1.S20, 
moved to Fjaltimore, Md., where he became established in mercantile busi- 
ness. He afterwards engaged in business in Xew York, and resided on 
Staten Island. He returned to Salem about 185S, and continued to reside 
there up to the time of his death." 

Mr. Osgood was a son of John and Rebecca (Messervy) Osgood, of 
Salem. Joint BvUolpli [1-70. III. J] was his great-great-grandfather. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Osgood, Clement, Ayer, Allen, 
Goodale, Buttolph, Gardner, Frier, Orne, Pickering, Flint, Wilhams, Ged- 
ney, Clarke, Messervy, Wellman, Scarlet. Aa-cestky Tables 'y". 

12. YIII. 14G. Henry Prince [Sarah 12. VII. 95]. 
For an account of Henry Prince see page 392. 

12. VIII. 146. Tluth nardu Jiopes, his wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [45. VII. 229]. For an account of her 
see page 392. 

12. VIII. 149. Mary Prince [Sarah 12. VTI. 95], probably born in 
Salem, baptized there Sept. 6, 1795, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Ropes was a persevering, energetic woman, and the mother of a 
large family. By her industry and econom}' she was enabled to give her 
children many accomplishments. She could read French fluently, and 

1 Notices of :Mrs. Ossood in the Salem Gazette of Tuesday, Sept. 22, ISS.", the Boston 
Journal of the same date, and the Salem Observer of Dec. 12, l.'Srfu. 
^ The Salem Observer of Sept. 22, ISS.j. 



544 THE PICKEBIXG GENEALOGY. 

when her son Henry S. Ropes was at llarvurd College she translated a 
work which was highly praised by the faculty of the college.' 

12. VIII. 14-0. Hcnru Hopes, her husLand, born m Salem, baptized 
there Oct. 2, 17'Jl, died in Salem. A shipmaster, llesidence : Salem. 

Mr. Ropes made many successful voyages to India until his health 
failed. He held the office of treasurer in the Salem Savings Bank for more 
than t^venty years. He was a persevering man of an estimable character, 
— the type of lionesty and faithfulness. 

An ivory miniature of ^Ir. Ropes, painted abroad v.hen he was twenty- 
one years old, is in the pos.^ession of his granddaughter, Mrs. Charles T. 
Ripley.^ Mr. and ^Irs. Ropes were first cousins. His number in direct 
descent is [14. VIII. 1C2]. 

12. VIII. 1.50. John. Prince [Sarah 12. VII. 95], born in Salem, bap- 
tized there xVpril 1, 1798, died in Columbus, Georgia. 

Mr. Prince was drowned Avlule bathing in the Chattahoochee River. An 
obituary of him, in the Salem Gazette of Aug. 5, 1831, states that he was a 
man of strict integrity and moral worth, and that he was highly esteemed. 

12. VITI. 151. Joseph Hardy Prince [Sarah 12. VII. 95], born in 
Salem, baptized there June 28, 1801, died in Boston. A lawyer. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

Mr. Prince, II. C 1819, studied law in the office of the Hon. John Pick- 
ering [58. VI. 109], and began his practice in Salem. He represented 
Salem in the Legislature in 1825. In 1834 he was appointed an inspector 
in the Boston Custom House, and in 1835 he was private secretary to Com- 
modore Elliott of the frigate Constitution, on the voyage to France. On 
his return lie resumed the practice of his profession, in which he continued 
until 1848, when he received an appointment in the surveyors' depai-tment 
in the custom hou^^e. On leaving that office, he continued the practice of 

^ Obituary in the Salem Observer of Feb. 8, 1873; also communication by :Mrs. 
Charles T. Ripley. 

- Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 254; also a communication from 
Mrs. Charles T. Kipley, 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 545 

his profession until the cml of his Hfe. He was a stanch Democrat, being 
an early supporter of iVudrew .Tackson. He delivered a Fourth of July 
Oration before tlie Washington Society in 182SJ 

12. VHI. 151. Mary Maria Hunt, his wife, born in Cliarlestown, 
Mass., died in Salem, of congestion of the brain. 

She was a daughter of Frederick and Hannah (Kane) Hunt. Pier 
ancestry includes the following families: Hunt, Stone, Willard, Lakin, 



13. VIII. 154. Jonatlian Millet [Jonathan 13. VII. 9C], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Dec. 19, 1790, died at sea. Residence : 
Salem. 

13. VIII. lo4- Mart/ Porter, his wife, born in Salem, died in Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Her second husband was a Mr. Brickett. She was a daughter of Aaron 
and Eunice (Ilathorne) Porter. Her ancestry hichules the following fam- 
ilies: Porter, Dodge, llerrick, Laskin, "Woodbury, Tyler, Rea, Peabody, 
Foster, Rogers, Ilathorne. See Axckstry Tablks \;'" . 

13. VIII. 155. Charles Millet [Jonathan 13. VII. 96], born in 
Salem, baptized there May 12, 1793, died in Salem. A shipmaster. 
Residence : Salea:i. 

Captain Millet was one of the oldest and most enterprising shipmasters of 
Salem. He was for many years engaged in the trade with Madagascar, 
Muscat, Mocha, Zanzibar, the Feejec, and other Pacific Islands ; also with 
New Holland, Canton, Manila, and other ports. He had been a member 
of the Salem East India ^larine Society for fiftv-six years. In 1855, he 
retired from the sea, and, from 185G to 1858, he was naval officer of the port 
of Salem. After that time he lived in retirement.^ 

' Necrology of Alumni of Harvard College, b^v Joseph Talnicr, pp. 41S-419. 

^ The Salem Register of .Juue 10, 1S7S, gives his experience while in command of 
the brig Ann. For liis ability shown on that occasion, he was presented with a silver tea 
and coffee set by the lUKlerwriters. 



54G THE PICKER IXG GENEALOGY. 

13. Vlll. loo'. Until Driver, liis first wife, born in Salem, died in 
Salem. 

Mrs. Millet was a daughter of Stephen and Ruth (Metcalf) Driver. Her 
ancestry includes the following families: Driver, Glover, Guppy, Gray, 
Grover, Bray, Collins, Cockerill, Lander, ^Metcalf, Smith, Flint, Hart, 
Flint, Johnson, Maverick, Harris, Xeal, Lawes, Bufl'um, Elsey, Daland, 
Hodges, Hudson, Peters. See Axcestky Tables Y".. 

13. Vni. loo~. Sarah Archer, his second wife. Lorn in Salem, died 
in Salem. 

Mrs. Millet was a daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah (Bechford) Archer, 
of Salem. John Bnttolph [1-70. HI. 5] was her great-great-great-grand- 
father. Her ancestry includes the following families : Archer, Osgood, 
Clement, Massey, Wells, "Warner, Cook, Birdsall, Buxton, Dean, Cheever, 
Haley, Elkins, Osgood, Clement, Ayer, Buttoli)h, Gardner, Frier, Orne, 
Pickering, Flint, Beckford, Pinson, Green, Howard, Hardy, King, Guy (?), 
Walker, Talmage, Marston, Pearce, Gerrish, Lowell, AYaldron, Higginson, 
Whitfield, Sheafe, Savage, Symmcs. See Axcestky Tables \-"... 

13. VHL 159. Nathan Millet [Jonathan 13. VIL OC], born in 
Salem, bajttized there April 13, 1800, died in Salem. A tailor, and gov- 
ernment and municipal officer. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. ]\rillet carried on his business in early life in a shop at the corner of 
Elm and Essex streets, Salem. He was a very well-known and respected 
citizen, and, from 1845 to 1857, he was an inspector in the Salem Custom 
House. Although a Democrat in politics, he held the office for some years 
under a Whig administration. From 1870 to 1880, he was a city-measiirer 
of bark. 

Mr. Millet was a regular attendnnt at the East Church, and was very 
loyal to its doctrines. Fie was an interesting man to talk with, and he loved 
to talk al)out his early recollections of I)r. Bentley, and the '\'\'ar of 1812, 
and about his custom house experiences at the time when Ha^vthorne was 
an official. Fie is thought never to have been sick until he reached eighty 
years of age.' 

» The Salem Gazette of Jan. IS, 18S7. 



EIGHTH GEKEBATION. 



13. Vlll. lo9. I tstila Kuapp Chapman, Lis wife, born in Salei:^. 
died ill Saluiu, of cousuniption. 

Mrs. 3Iillet was a daughter of Isaac Xeedliam and Rebecca (Symonc>' 
Chapman. Isaac Xccdham Chapnvdi [24. VIII. J^5] was her brother; Urs:.'...i 
Symomls [24. VI. ^J-] was her grandmother ; Joltn Cluqimau [40. VI. 64-^ w,-.s 
lier uncle; Ursula Knaj'}) Symojids [24. VII. iJ.9] was lieraunt; and Geor:-: 
Chapman [20-34. VI. oG'\ was her granduncle. Her ancestry includes the 
following families : Chapman, Cook, Birdsall, Buxton, Dean, Danie'.^. 
Prince, Piuck, Spooncr, Bufium, Pope, Needham, Farrington (?), Symonc.s. 
Browning, Stone, Very, Woodice, Symonds, Knapp. See x\ncests\- 
Tai;i.i:s ^^. 

13. VIII. 160. Joseph Hardy Millett [Jonathan 13. A'll. 96], born 
in Salem, baptized there xVng. 21, 1803, died in Boston. A shipmaster. 
Residence : Salem. 

Captain Millett was a well-known shipmaster who sailed principally for 
the Goddards and the Hemenways, of Boston, and for John Bertram, of 
Salem. His voyages between Valparaiso and Xew York and Boston ■s\-ere 
noted for their speed. He commanded the ship Witch of the "Wave on liis 
last voyag-e from China to London, making- one of the quickest passa^ios 
that had ever been made. The Illustrated London News of May 1, 18r>2. 
contained a cut of this vessel and an account of her passage and cargo. The 
latter, consisting of nineteen thousand chests of the choicest teas, Avas or.e 
of the largest cargoes that ever entered the port of London. 

Captain Jlillett was a man of artistic tastes, and was fond of painting. 
lie was very genial and fond of a joke. He gave up going to sea, and 
became superintendent of 3Ir. Augustus Hemenwa} 's ships in Boston : 
and while engaged in his duties, he slipped on tlie rail of a vessel, fell into 
the water, and fractured his skull, from which accident he died at th.o 
Massachusetts General Hospital. He was a very much respected citizen 
of Salem. ^ 

13. VIII. IGO. Mary Savory, his wife, born in Salem, died in Salem, 
of pneumonia. 

> The Salem Register of Pec. 1-f, ISGS. 



548 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

i\Ii-3. Milk'lt ^v;ls a dau^^liter of Ividiaul and Betsey (Lewis) Savory, of 

Salcin. A.NCESTKV Taules \'j. 

14. VIII. IGl. George Ropes [Soeth 14. VII. 07], }x>ni in Salem, 
baptized there ^la}" 25, 1788, died in Salem, of consumption. An artist. 
Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Ropes was a deaf-mute of considerable artistic ability. Several of 
his paintings are in Salem. X large one of Phillip's Wliarf, painted about 
1807-1808, is owned by the Essex Institute. lie studied with Corne, while 
that artist was in Salem. On one occasion when the parlor in the house of 
Jcrailnneel Ptircc [43. VI. GS] was being papered, it was found there w^as 
not enough, and, it being an imported paper, more could not be obtained. 
He irudertook to tlnisli it by painting, which he did so accurately that it 
was impossible to tell where his work began or where it ended. ^ 

Mr. Ropes was a man of man}' virtues. Dr. Bentley wrote of him : 
"Died of consumption, deaf and dumb, a painter [artist], active, acute, 
cii'cumspect, and esteemed. Had a free use of signs and of his pen. Essex 
opposite Pleasant Street." ^ 

14. VIII. 1C2. Ueiivy Ropes [Seeth 14. VIT. 97]. 
For an account of Henry Ropes see page 544. 

14. VIII. 16 J. Ma)'!/ Fi'incc, his wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [12. VIII. 149]. For an account of 
her see pages o 13-544. 

14. VIII. 163. Benjamin Mansiield Ropes [Seetli 14. VII. 97], 
born in Salem, baptized there Feb. 2, 1794, died in Salem, of dropsy. A 
painter. Residence : Salem. 

i\Ir. Ropes lived in the family of his brother, Henry Ropes.^ 

14. VIII. 1G4. Sarali Hardy Ropes [Seeth 14. VII. 97]. 
For an account of Mrs. Nichols see page 388. 

* The Salem Gazette of J.-in. 2G. 1819; also letter of John H. Nichols to Francis H. 
Lee, dated Januar\-, 1SS4. 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. p. 254. 

' The name of his mother is erroneously given as Leeth, instead of Seeth, on the 
Massachusetts Stale Itecords, Vol. 238, p. 251. 



EIGIITn GEXERATIOX. 549 



14 VJII. 10^. Uetinj Xirhols, licr liusljand. 

His number in direct descent is [44. A'll. 2-21]. For an account of 
liira see page 387. 

14. VIII. 1G5. ElizalDeth. Kopes [SeetU 14. VII. 'J7], probably bom 
in Salem, died in Salem, of In-onchitis. Re:;idence : Salem. 

14. VIII. IGo. Ephvaun Feltfh.QX husband, born in Salem, died in 
Salem. A merchant. Kesidencc : Salem. ■ 

^l\\ Felt entered tlie eountiny-room of Pickering- Dodge [59. VI. 123]. 
He afterwards carried on the dry goods business in Salem up to 1S2S, when 
he removed to Utica, X. Y., where ho engaged in the same business. He 
returned to Salem in 1^34, and entered the office of the Eastern Kailroad, 
as bookdvceper and cleric, and later he was ticket-seller on the same road till 
1858. He was an inspector in the Salem Custom House from 1861 to 1869. 

In politics he was early inclined to the Federal Party, but became a 
Democrat, and later a Republican. He was much interested in the militia, 
and at an early age performed guard duty in the War of 1812 in connection 
■with the Salem Light Infantry. 

Mr. Felt was a son of John and Mary (Porter) Felt, of Salem. Ilis 
ancestry includes the following families : Felt, Wilkinson, Andrews, Pur- 
chase, Silsbee, Pickering, Cromwell, Skerry, Lunt, Silsbee, Tompkins, 
Porter, Herrick, Laskin, Redington, Gould, Kimball, Scott, Witt, Raymond, 
Scruggs, Woodbury, Dodge. See .^-cestey Tables ^g'v. 

14. VIII. 16G. Jonathan Millet Ropes [Seeth 14. VII. 97], born in 
Orford, N. H., died in Elizabeth, X. J. Residence: Elizabeth. 

Judge Ropes was for some years a shipmaster in the foreign ti'ade of 
Salem. He moved from Sak-m to Utica, X. Y., and thence to Elizabeth, 
N. J., where he became prominently identihed with manufacturing and 
other interests, and where he was judge of the police court. 

When the Rebellion broke out, Judge Ropes sent all four of his sons and 
his son-in-law into the U^nion Armv, and he, then over sixty years of age, 
proffered his services, but they were declined.^ 

* Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VII. pp. 251-255; also the Boston 
Journal of Sept. C, 1SS7. 



550 TH£ PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

14. Vlil. IGO. Jlai-ij Jlil/cr, his wife, born in reterborough, N. II., 
died in New Providence, X. J. 

^[rs. Ropes was a daughter of General James and ^Martha (Ferguson) 
Miller, of Temple, X. II. 

In 1.S14, General 3Iiller connnandcd, as colonel of the Twenty-first 
Infantry, at Lundy's Lane, and made the memorable reply, " I'll try, sir!" 
to General Brown when asked if lie coukl capture the British battery. He 
led the bloody and successful charge, for Avhich brilliant achievement 
Congress voted him a gold medal, and the State of Xew York presented him 
with a sword. General Miller was a lawyer by profe.^sion. In 1819, he 
was appointed Governor of Arkansas, and, in 1824, he was appointed collec- 
tor of the prirt of Salem and Beverly, which position he held for a great 
many years.^ Mrs. Ropes's ancestry includes the following families : Miller, 
Gregg, Ferguson, McDaniel, Wilson. See Axcestry Tablks "|\ 

14. YIII. 168. Mary Y^ilson Ropes [Seeth 14. VII. 97], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there April 10, 1803, died in Salem, of consump- 
tion. Residence : Salem. 

Miss Ropes was deaf, and her speech was very imperfect. Her 
deficiency, however, was made up by great energy of character and 
capability. 

15. VIII. 171. Elizabeth Millet [Nathan 15. VII. 98], probably 
born in Salem, baptized there Oct. 23, 179G, probably died in Salem. 

15. VIII. 171. JVathaniel Broivn, her hn.sband, born in Salem, died 
in Salem. A shipmaster. Residence : Salem. 

Captain Brown was a son of Nathaniel and ^larv (Pickering) Brown, of 
Salem. Jane //o?'% [1-70. III. ^] was his great-great-grandmother. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Brown, Messervy, Welhnan, 
Scarlet, Pickering, Flint, Ilobl)y, Symonds, Browning, Foster, Stuart, Hen- 
derson. See ANCf>-TKy Ta!U.F.3 g'". 

15. VIII. 174. Sarah Millet [Benjamin 15. VII. 99], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there March 3, 1799, probably died in Salem. 
* Communicated by the lute Mrs. Mary M. Ropes. 



EiailTH GEyERATloy. 551 



lo. VIIl. 174- Jerrniiali Stdxij'oi-d I'erhlns, licv luisbaiid, Luiu in 
Ipswich, Mass., died in Salem. A tailor and public olHcial. Piesidence : 
Salem. 

Captain Perkins went to Salem from bis native town when sixteen 
years old, and learned tbe tailor's trade, subsequently establisbiny- bimself 
in this business in Salem. 

lie was nuieb inturestud in military atlairs, and, in 1815, became a mem- 
ber of Colonel liutman's regiment, and,, from 181G to 1834, was a member 
of the ]\Iechanic l^ig-ht Infantry, holding the commission of captain of the 
company several years prior to his resignation. At the time of his death 
ho was senior captain of the Veteran Association. 

Captain Perkins was a representative in the Legislature in 1837. In 
1842, he was a member of the common council of Salem, lie was ap- 
pointed, March 8, 1847, superintendent of burials, and as late as August, 
1885, he was at the burial of General Oliver, as interested and as alert 
as ever. lie joined the Salem Mechanic Association in 1828, and was one 
of the founders of the Naumkeag Fire Club. He was an original member 
of the Barton Square Church, having been connected with it for sixt}--two 
years. 

lie always took a lively interest in public affairs, and was a faithful 
citizen, an earuust patriot, and genial companion. 1'he City Ilall was 
closed, and its flag hung at half mast during his funeral. 

He married for his second wife Elizabeth Millet, a sister of his first wife. 
See page 553. 

Captain Perkins was a son of Aaron and Sarah (Staniford) Perkins, of 
Ipswich. His ancestry includes the following families : Perkins, Kinsman, 
Boardman, Smith, Treadwell, Staniford, Potter, "Whipjde, Kimball, Brad- 
street, Appleton, Fowler, Kimball, Scott, Ilutton, I>alch, Gardner, Frier, 
Batchelder, Perkins. Sec Axcestry Tables Vff • 

15. YIII. 175. Benjamin Millet [Benjamin 15. VII. 99], born in 
Salem, baptized there March 29, 1801. 

15. VIIL 17o. Sarah ClarJ:, his wife, born in Danvers, ^lass., died 
in Danvers, of influenza. Residence : Danvers. 



552 THE riCKEIUXG GENJCALOGY. 

Mid. Millet was a daughter of Caleb and Sarah Clark. Axcestry 
Taislks ^'" . 

15. Vlll. 17G. Joseph Hardy Millet [Ikmjamin 1.5. VII. 99], born 
in Salem, baptized there May 6, 1S04. A shipmaster. Residence: 
Salem. 

15. VIII. 17G. Clarissa Mclntijre, his wife, born in Salem, died in 
Salem. 

Mrs. Millet's second husband was John Bertram [47. VII. 357], whom 
she married ^larcli •2."», 1838. Fov an account of him see pages 402— 105. 

She was a daughter of Nathaniel and Hannah 31clntyre. Ancestey 
Tablks V!v- 

15. VIII. 17 7. Mary Hardy Millet [Benjamin 15. VII. 99], bom 
in Salem, baptized there May 4, 1806, died in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

15. VIII. 177. William P Lauder, her husband, born in Salem, 
died in Brooklyn, X. Y. A gold refiner. Residence: Brooklyn. 

Mr. Landers Christian name was originally Peter, but there were so 
many Peter Landers in Salem that lie had his name changed by act of 
Legislature to WiUiani P Lander, his midult initial representing the letter 
only. 

Mr. Lander lived in Salem until about 1829-1830, when he moved to 
New York, where he engaged in the manufacture of white lead and in gold 
refining. In Salem he was in the brewing business with David Farrington. 
From 1840 to 18G0 he lived in Bufl:alo, N. Y., where he was engaged in the 
gold-beating business. He removed to Brooklyn, N. Y., in 18G0, and 
engaged in the gold-rehning business. In 1849, he organized and led a 
mining party to California. He retired from business in 1872. 

Mr. Lander's first wife, whom he married in Salem in April, 1824, was 
Hannah Francis. She was born in Salem in 1805, and died in New York 
City, Jlay 31, 1833. She was a daughter of Captain John and ]\Iary (Alex- 
ander) Francis, of Salem. By her ^Ir. Lander had the following children: 

William Farxswoktii Lander, born in Snl.^ii, July 7, 1S25; died in Buffalo, N. Y., 
Jan. 9, 18 tG. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 553 

Ellex Mabia Lander, born in Saloni, June 11, 1S27. Slie married in 

ButTalo, X. Y., Dec. 20, 1S4G, John JI. Cornwell. 

Mary Elizabeth Lander, born Oct. 20, 182S ; died in Buffalo, X. V., Oct. 27, 

1S47. 

Lucy Francis Lander, born in Xew York city. 

Hannah Lander, born in Xew York city; died there June, 1833. 

Mr. Lander was a son of Cajitain William and Hannah (Davis) Lander, 
of Salem. His ancestry includes the following families: Lander, Hender- 
son, Luscomb, Henderson, Beadle, Davis. Sec Ancestry Tabi.i.s ^y. 

15. VHL ITS. Elizabeth Millet [Benjamin 15. \ll. !)[)], born in 
Salem, baptized there Oct. 30, 1808, died in Salem. 

15. Vni. i75. Jei'emiah Sfaniford -P<'/'/.-/jks, her husband. 

Mr. Perkins's second wife was Sarah ^lillet, a sister of his first wife. 
For an account of him see page 551. 

16. VIII. IT'J. Rebecca Gardner [Mary IG. VII. 102], born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

16. VIII. 179. John Dalrijuiple, her husband, born in Temple- 
patrick, North of Ireland, died in Salem. A silversmith. Residence : 
Salem. 

When John Dalrymple came to this country, his brother James was 
already established in Salem as a w^atchmaker. He removed to Portland, 
Maine, but returned to Salem shortly before his death.^ 

Ancestry Iables =^. 

16. VIII. 180. Simon Gardner [Mary 16. VII. 102], bom in Salem, 
died in Boston, of brain fever. A journalist. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Gardner was the proprietor and editor of the Boston Commercial 
Gazette. He was a very industrious and enterprising man, who gradually 
rose from the station of an apprentice to be sole owner and director of an 
extensive printing establishment. He was a lieutenant in the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company. He was an honorable man, mild and 
obliging, and bv nature free and generous.^ 

> Record of the Farish List of Deaths, 1785-1819, by Kev. William Bcntley, p. 169. 
^ The Salem Gazette of Friday, April IG, 1«24. 



554 THh: PICKEIUXG GEXEALOGY. 

IG. VIII. J.SI. Mdi'ij Jackson JJchino, his wife, born in Boston, 
died in C;iinbrid^-e, Mass., of old agx-. 

Mrs. Gardner lived to tlie great age of ninety-four years, having been a 
widow sixty-one years. 

She was a daughter of Josepli and Sarah (Reed) Delano. Iler ancestry 
includes the following families: Delano, Reed, Peirce, Johnson, Wiswall, 
Smith, Converse, Long, Carter, Sawyer, Prescott, Wright, Dix. See 
Ancestry Tables "". 

17. VIII. 182. Martha Ann Proctor [Robert 17. VIl. 104], born 
in Salem, died in Salem, pneumonia. Residence : Salem. 

17. VIII. 182. David XicJioIs, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Salem. A tanner. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Nichols was a son of Stephen and Abigail (]\roulton) Nichols. 
Ichahod Nklwls [44. VI. 09'] was his granduncle His ancestry includes 
the following families: Nichols, ]\loulton, Gaskill, Southwick, Gardner, 
Frier, Pope, Folger, Buffington, Buffum, Pope, Moulton, See Ancestry 



17. VIII. 183. Thomas Wren Ward [Martha 17. VII. 105], born 
in Salem, died in Boston, of heart disease. A banker. Residence : Boston. 

After his mother's death, Thomas Wren "Ward was sent, at an early 
age, to ^Ir. Foster's school at Andover, Mass., a superior school for those 
days. On leaving school, he went to sea, and at eighteen, as second 
officer, brought home his ship from China, the master and first officer being 
disabled. After ha\'ing made one or two voyages to China as captain, be 
married at the age of twenty-four, left the sea, and went into business in 
Boston. The times being unfavorable, he moved to New York, and, with 
his mother's cousin, Jonathan Goodhue, established the house of Goodhue 
& Ward. Though successful in New York, he preferred to return to 
Boston, which he did in 1817. lie bought the house on Park Street, in 
which he lived until his death, in 1858. 

About the year 1S24, being fond of books, and having a fair compe- 
tence, he retired from business for several years. During- this time he 



THOMAS WREN WAR I J. 

['7 VHL 1S3.] 

From a 1>ho; ..oRArii in thk r"j,,F.3sioN of Samth. Gkav Ward, Es 
OF Washington. IX C. 



r/,. ^\ 



'1 



j^'-' V3\? 



'^>\. "^ 



LVDIA (GRAV) WARD. 

[17. VIII. l^J.\ 

From a PhotugraI'H ix thk hossk.ssio.n- uf Samiki. Gray Warp, Esq., 
OF Washinu i^.>.\, U. C. 



EIGHTH GEXEnATTOX. 555 

vi>iti-(l lii-s iVIeiid, Joshua IJates, in London, a partner of Baring Brotliers 
».'i Co., wlio proposed to liini that he should become the American agent 
of his firm. A year or two later he accepted their proj)osition, and 
carrii'd on all the American business of the Barings until his retirement 
in 1852. 

From 1830 to 1842, he was treasurer of Harvard College. In 1843, 
the college conferred on him the honorary degree of A.M. A portrait of 
him by Page hangs in Memorial Hall. 

j\lr. Ward was a man of great influence, and of the highest character. 
He was an intimate friend of Channing, Bowditch, Ticknor, Chief Justice 
.Shaw, and otlKrs. He was named for a Dr. "Wren, of lilngland, who had 
befriended his father while he was imprisoned in ])artmoor prison. His 
portrait, painted by "William Hunt, is in the possession of his son, Samuel 
Gray Ward, of A^'ashington, D. C. The heliotype here given is from a 
daguerrotyj)e.^ 

17. Vni. 1S3. Lijdia Gray, the wife of Thomas AY. Ward, born in 
Salem, baptized there Aug. 4, 1788, died in Canton, ^lass. 

The heliotype of Mrs. Ward here given is from a ])hotograph. 

Mrs. AYard Avas a daughter of Samuel and Nancy (Orne) Gray, of Med- 
ford, Mass. John C. Gray [53. VII. SOI], Horace Gray [53. YII. 304\ 
Henry Gray [25. AHII. 2o3'], and Alice Orne [52. AH. Do] aa ere her first 
consins; Edward Orne [52. A"II. 28S] AA-as her first cousin once removed; 
Timotlnj Onic [1-11. lA'. 1] was her great-grandimcle. Her ancestry 
includes the following families: Gray, AAllliams, Calley, Burrill, Ivory, 
South, Jarvis, Orne, Thompson, Ingersoll, Felton, Elvins, Beadle. See 
AxcESTRY Tables \-'^- 

17. AHII. 184. Stephen Wlieatland [Alartha 17. VII. 107], born in 
Salem, died at sea. Residence : Salem. 

Air. Wheatland, H. C 1816, entered upon a sea-faring life, and died at 
sea on boanl the ship Perseverance, while on his second voyage. He Avas 
very fond of music, and Avas a good performer on several instruments, 

» Letter of Samuel Gray Ward, dated Sept. 25, 1893. 



556 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

especially upon the Hute. He was a great fa\orite, and very popular with 
liis companions at school and in college.^ 

17. VIII. 185. Kicliard Goodlme Wlieatland [Martha 17. VII. 
107], 1)orn in Salem, diud in Salem. A merchant. Kesidenco: Salem. 

Mr. Wheatland, II. C. 1818, was known in early life as Richard Whcat- 
hmd, 3rd. There were two other Richard Wheatlands in Salem who lived 
till 1830, and both Mere commanders of vessels. After leaving college, he 
spent about a year in the counting-room, and then went to sea. He con- 
tinued through life interested in commercial pursuits, either as owner or as 
commander of vessels. In 1837, he came home with impaired health, hav- 
ing lost his ship, the " Boston," on the Bahamas. Mr. Wheatland was con- 
fined to his chamber for nearly five years, gradually failing, though his 
mind was bright and clear. During his confiiiement he took pleasure in 
seeing and conversing with his friends, and he also Avas able to conduct 
some business operations connected with other parties. 

17. VIII. ISo. Mavy Bemis Tlichardson, his wife, probably born 
in Xewton, 3Iass., died in Newton. 

Mrs. Wheatland was a daughter of John and Anna (Bemis) Richardson. 
Her father was a successful merchant of Boston. He removed to Newton.^ 
Hannah Bemis EicJiardson'^ [11. VIII. 1S7] was her half-sister and first 
cousin; Jlan/ Eddy Bemis [17. VIII. ISC'] and Bohcrt Eddy Bemis [17. 
VIII. 1S8~\ were her first coushis. Her tincestry includes the folio wing- 
families : Richardson, Champney, Swan, Pratt, Swan, Palfrey, Holden, 
Fosdick, Chenery, Stratton, Traine, Bemis, Harrington, George, Livermore, 
Sherman, Bridge, Danforth, Bright, Goldstone, Coolidge, Barron, Bowman, 
Sherman, Porter, Barnard, Fleming. See Ancestry Tables y-J. 

17. VIII. 186. Benjamin Wheatland [Martha 17. VII. 107], born 
in Salem, died in Salem. A lawyer. Residence: Salem. 

» Obituary in the Salem Gazette of Xov. 10, 1S18; also a letter of Dr. Henry 
\Ylieatlanct, dated February, 1888. 

- The Kichardson ]\[emorial, by John A. Vinton, pp. 97-98. 
* John Fdchardson's two wives were sisters. 



EIGHTH GENEEATIOX. 557 



Jlr. Wheatland, II. C. ISU', was fitted lor college in the private grammar 
school on Chestnut Street, Salem, as were his brothers. He studied law in 
tiie otlice of the Hon. Leverett Saltonstall, was admitted to the Essex Bar, 
and practised his profession several years in Salem. He then removed to 
Newmarket, N. II., where he resided for about twenty years as agent of 
the manufacturing company in that town. He was then chosen treasurer 
of the same company, and returned to Salem. He continued to hold this 
position until within a few months preceding his death. 

After his return to Salem, he interested himself in municipal affairs, and 
was a member of the common council in 1<S4S, 1849, I80O, and 1851, and 
was president of that body in 1849, 1850, and 1851. He also fdled official 
positions in various institutions in Salem.^ 

17. VIII. 1S6. JIari/ Eddu Bern is, his wife, born in Watertown, 
Mass., died in Salem. 

Mrs. Wheatland was a daughter of Luke and Hannah (Eddy) Bemis, 
Robert FaIcIij Bemis [17. VIII. IBS'] was her brother; 3Iary Bemis Ricliard- 
son [17. VIII. ISo] and Ilamtah Bemis Eichanhon [17. VIII. 187] were 
her first cousins. Her ancestry includes the following fnmilies: Bemis, 
Harrington, George, Livermore, Sherman, Bridge, Danforth, Bright, Gold- 
stone, Coolidge, Barron, Bowman, Sherman, Porter, Barnard, Fleming, 
Eddy, Brown, Marks, Bronsdon. See Axcestey Tables "5. 

17. VIII. 187. George Wheatland [Martha 17. VII. 107], born in 
Salem, died in Salem. A lawyer. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Wheatland, H. C. 1824, gradnated with honors, and studied law in 
the office of the Hon. Leverett Saltonstall, of Salem. He was admitted to 
the Essex Bar in 1828, and continued in active practice up to the time of 
his death, at which time he was the sole survivor of his class. He was one 
of the best-known citizens of Salem, and was eminent in his profession. He 
was a man of vigorous health, and made almost daily visits to Boston up to 
the time of his last sickness. 

He was interested in public atTairs, and served in the common council 

' The I'rescott jremorial, by William Prescott, p. 12S ; Xecrology of Alumni of Har- 
vard College, by Joseph Palmer, p. 53 ; and letter of Dr. Henry Wheatland. 



558 THE I'lCKFniXG GENEALOGY. 

in I'^n, and was an aldcnnan in 1842 and 1843. He altso was a member 
of l)(>tli hrauclie- uf tin.- ^iassachusetts Legislature for five terms, three in the 
House, ls42, 184;;., 1844, and two in tlie Senate, 1845 and 1846. For 
sevcial years he was a trustee of the Saknii Lyceum, and at the time of his 
death was a trus'ee of the Asiatic National Bank, and of the LLirmony 
Grove Cemetrv. Uq. was one of the founders of the hitter, and had been its 
president since 1874. In tlie Superior Court on the Tuesday following- his 
death the Hon. ^^'i]lianl D. Xorthend, in behalf of tlie Bar Association, paid 
a high tribute to ^Ir. Wheatland, and the court adjourned to Thursday.^ 

17. VIII. 1S7. IlaniHiJi Bonis liicJiardson, his wife, born in New- 
ton, ^lass., died in Salem. 

Mrs. Wheatland was a daughter of John and Hannah (Bemis) Richard- 
son, of Newton. 2Lirij B. Fiiclianlson [17. VIII. ISo] was her half-sister 
and first cousin; and 3Tarij Edchj Bemis [17. VIII. ISC'] and Bohcrt Eddi/ 
Bemis [17. Vlll. ISS] were her first cousins. Her ancestry includes the 
following families: Richardson, Champney, Swan, Pratt, Swan, Palfrey, 
Holden, Fosilick, Chenery, Stratton, Traine, Bemis, Harrington, George, 
Livermore, Sherman, Bridge, Danforth, Bright, Goldstone, Coolidge, Barron, 
Bowman, Sherman, Porter, Barnard, Fleming. See Axcestey Tables "^y. 

17. VIII. 188. Martlia Wheatland [Martha 17. VH. 107], born in 
Salem, died in Chicopee. Mass. 

17. VIII. ISS. Jiobci't Eddy Bemis, her husband, born in Water- 
town, Mass., died in Chicopee, Mass. 

Mr. Bemis entered Harvard College in 1814, but left Cambridge in his 
sophonjore year, and went into a merchant's counting-room in Boston. At 
different times lie resided in Watertown, Lowell, and Chicopee ; and he was 
connected with various industries in those places. The most important of 
the positions wliich he held was the agency of the Cabot Manufacturing 
Company of Chicopee, which he continued to hold for many years. 

He was a son of Luke and Hannah (Eddy) Bemis. Marij Eddy Bemis 

' The Prescott :Memorial, by WilliaiQ Prescott, p. 12S; The Salem Gazette of Feb. 20, 
1893; and The Salem Kegister of Feb. 2.3. 1S93. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 



[17. VIII. ISO] was his sister; and Miirij llvmis llkhnnlson [17. VIII. i6"J] 
aiul Ilaintah Bonis Richardson [17. VIII. 1S7'\ were his first cousins. Ilis 
ancestry includes the following families : Bemis, Harrington, George, Liver- 
more, Sherman, Bridge, Danforth, Bright, Goldstone, Coolidge, Barron, 
Bowman, Sherman, Porter, Barnard, Fleming, Eddy, Brown, ilarks, Brons- 
don. See -\_n-ci:stkv Tahlls "". 

17. VIII. 189. Henry Wheatland [Martha 17. VII. 107]. 
For an account of him see pages 018-519. 

17. MIL ISO. Marij Catherine MacJc, his wife. 

Her number in direct descent is [6. VIII. 55]. For an account of Sirs. 
Wheatland see page 518. 

18. VIII. 100. Sarah Goodhtie Holman [Joseph 18. VII. 108], 
born in Salem, died in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

18. VIII. 100. WiUkuii Froctcr, her husband, bom in Salem, died 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. A merchant. Eesidence : Brooklyn. 

Mr. Procter was a clerk of Pickering Dodge, and afterwards was a 
merchant on his own account. He was one of the original members and 
sergeant of the Washington Rangers, of Salem. He was also recording- 
secretary of the Essex Historical Society. He moved to New Yoi-k.'' 

!Mr. Procter was a son of Captain William and Elizabetli (Masury) 
Procter. Bohtrf Proctor [17. VI. o-5] was his granduncle. His ancestry 
includes the following families : Procter, Thorndike, Felton, Wilson, 
Shillaber, Foster, Buxton, Masury. See Axcestky Tables '^j. 

19. VIII. 198. John Goodhue Treadwell [Dorothy 19. VII. 110], 
bom in Salem, died in Salem. A physician. Pesideiice : Salem. 

Dr. Treadwell, H. C. 1825, :\I.D. 1828, graduated with distinguished 
honors, having held a high rank in his class. He studied medicine with 
Dr. William J. Walker, of Charlestown, Mass., attended courses of medical 
lectures in Boston and in New York, and spent one season in a dissecting 
room in Baltimore. In xVugttst, 1829, lie went to Em-ope, visiting London, 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VI. p. 207. 



5G0 THE PICKEniNG GEXEALOGY. 

Duljliii, .uid J'ari.s. llu returned liuiuc in Novomhor, 1830, and established 
himself as a ph}sieian in Salem, uhcrc ho soon stood at tlie head of his 
profession. He was enthusiastically fond of his profession, and the deep 
stores of his knowledge were ojien to young- students and brother physi- 
cians ; and many a young man, rising in liis profession, owed his first success 
to Dr. Treadwell's plain and sensible advice. He was an eccentric man, 
very honest and very kind-liearted. By his will he bequeathed to Harvard 
College his valuable library, containing all the latest medical publications, 
and about tifty thousand dollars to establisli a free course of lectures, the 
gift to talce eli'ect after liis mother's decease. In case the college should not 
accede to the conditions of the bequest, it was to go to tlie Massachusetts 
General Hospital without conditions. The college, however, declined to 
receive the bequest, owing to the unusual and embarrassing conditions 
attached to it, and it was accepted by the Massachusetts General Hospital. 
It amounted to over thirty-eight thousand dollars. He also left to the 
Barton Square Church, of Salem, a valuable theological library for the use 
of the pastor, and to the Essex Agricultural Society he left a fine farm of 
seventy acres in Topsfield, Mass., for experimental purposes.^ 

19. Vni. 201. Frances G-oodlme Asliton [Frances 19. VH. Ill], 
born hi Salem, died in New York City. 

19. Vin. 201. James Ferguson de I*eijster, her husband, born in 
New York City, died in New York City. Residence : New York City. 

I\Ir. de Peyster, although a soldier in early manhood, spent the greater 
part of his long life in working for the benevolent institutions of his native 
city. For sixty years he was president and secretary of the New York 
Dispensary, and treasurer and warden of St. IMichael's Church ; while for 
forty years he was governor of the liospital, treasurer and trustee of the 
New York Savings Bank, and trustee of the Public School Society. He 
succeeded his father, Frederic ile Peyster, as treasurer of the Society for 
Promoting Religion and Learning in the State of New York. The office 

^ Xecrologj- of Aluiuni of Harvard College, by Joseph Palmer, pp. 1-10^141 ; obituary 
in the Salem Gazette of Aug. S, 1S5G; and Appleton's Cyclopcedia of Aniericau Biography, 
Vol. VI. p. la.l. 



EIGIITIT GEXr.nATION. 5G1 

reinninod in tlio family from ili,^ time it was foundfd by Triiiit}- C'liurcli, 
after the Revolution, until it was resigned by his son, Frederic James de 
Fevster, in 1S75. 

In the "War of 18F2, Mr. de Peyster was captain of the Forty-second 
Kog-imeut Regulars, United States Army. 

He was a son of Frederic and Helen Livingston (Hake) de Peyster, of 
New York. His ancestors were loyalists tluring the Revolutionary War, 
and the family was one of the leailing families of New York. His ancestry 
includes the following families : de Peyster, Lubbertse, de Peyster, Van 
Cortland, Loockermans. Philipse. Reade, Hake, Livingston, Fleming, 
Schuyler, Van Slichtenhorst, Beekman, do I'ough, Loper, McPheadres. 
Sec Ancestry Tables "". 

10. VHL 202. Frances Ann Clarkson Goodhue [Jonatlian 19. 
Vn. 114], born in New York City, died in Lenox, Mass. 

A portrait of Mrs. Livingston is in the possession of her niece, Mrs. 
Percy R. King, of New York City. 

19. VIH. Q02. JRohcrt Livingston, her husliand, born at Clermont, 
on the Hudson River, died at Rome, Italy. A man of leisure. Residence: 
New York City. 

Mr. Livingston is said to have had some skill as an artist. 

He was a son of Robert L. and Margaret Maria (Livingston) Livingston, 
and a grandson, on liis mother's side, of the famous Chancellor Kobert R. 
Livingston. His ancestry includes the following families : Livingston, 
Fleming, Schuyler, Van Slichtenhorst, Van Brugh, Thong, Schuyler, Living- 
ston, Fleming, Schuyler, Van Slichtenhorst, Howarden, Beekman, de Bough, 
Loper, Li\nngston, Scluuler, Van Slichtenhorst, Stevens, Campbell, Alex- 
ander, Sprat, de Peyster, Lubbertse. See .\_xcestry Tables "^-j". 

19. VIII. 203. William Clarkson Goodline [Jonathan 19. VII. 
114], born in New York City, died in New York Cit}-. A man of leisure. 
Residence : New York City. 

A siliiouette of him as a child is in the possession of his mother. 



562 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

1!J. VIII. 201. Robert Clarkson Goodluie [Joiuulian 19. VII. 
114], born in New York City, died in New York City. A merchant. 
Residence : New York City. 

Mr. Goodhue became a member of the firm of Goodhue & Co., of New 
York City, after his father's death. He retired from the firm Jan. 1, 1862, 
on account of ill health. On June 5, 1859, he became a member of the New 
York Cluimber of Conmierce, and continued prominently connected with it 
up to the time of his death. 

He was beloved and respected for his urbanity and integrity, for the con- 
scientious discharge of his duties as a citizen, and for a strong conviction of 
the character that ought to distinguish tlie profession to whicli he belonged, 
and to v,-]iich he was an honor. The flags, at his death and funeral, were 
displayed at half-mast as a mark of respect for his memory. Dr. Bellows 
conducted the funeral ser\-ices, and paid a high tribute to his character.^ 

A portrait of Mr. Goodhue, and a silhouette as a child, are in the 
possession of lils sister-in-law, Mrs. Charles Clarkson Goodhue. 

19. VIII. 206. Henry Clarkson Goodlme [Jonathan 19. VII. 
114], born in Bloomingdale, N. Y., died at Eio Janeiro. A man of leisure 
Residence : New York City. 

Mr. Goodhue graduated at Harvard College in 1845. 

19. VIII. 207. Charles Clarkson Goodlme [Jonathan 19. VII. 
114], born in Bloomingdale, N. Y., died in Ne^v York City. A retired mer- 
chant. Residence : New York City. 

Mr. Goodliue was for a short time in the firm of Goodhue & Co., but 
retired from it in 1862, not having taken an active part in the business after 
1850, on account of ill health. A portrait of him is in the possession of 
his widow. 

19. VIII. -207. Sarnh CJinndlcr Parker, his wife, born in Milton, 
Mass. Residences : New York City and New Brighton, Staten Island, New 
York. 

' Obitiinry notices of ]\Ir. Goodhue in the Xcw York Tiibuue of April 9 and 10, 
18G2; also The Christian Register of May 24, 1S62, which contains Dr. Bellows' remarks 
at his funeral. 



EIGHTH GEXEHATTOX. 563 

Mrs. Cioddluie is a slaughter of James and Anna (Tucker) Parker, of 
Hostoii. Miuu EUea Parhr [f);}. VIII. GOS^ is her sister. Her ancestry 
includes tlie following- families : Parker, Holman, Wiswall, Jackson, Cura- 
mings, Payson, Eliot, 'Winchester, Phillips, Sanford, Long, Tidd, Sears, 
Lenimon, Staines, Maverick, Plan-is, Smith, Bill, Mattocks, Tucker, Dalton, 
Alden, Chandler, Douglas, Mattle, Raymond, Smith, Bourne, Church, "Warren, 
Soutluvorth, Collier, Paine, Kainsford, Sunderland, Griswold, Wolcott, 
Hyde, Lee, Lee, Ue Wolf, Wolcott, Saunders, Pitkin, Drake, Wolcott, 
Clarke, Newbury. See Axcestrt Tablks ^l'. 

20. VIII. 208. Thomas Needham [Thomas 20. VII. 120], born in 
Salem, died in Salem, of consumption. A cabinet-maker. Residence : 
Salem. 

Mr. Needham was a member of the Salem Common Council from 1844 
to 1850, inclusive. He was also public administrator of estates. 

20. VIII. 20S'. Mary Bell, his first wife, probably born in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

Mrs. Needham was a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Peele) Bell, of 
Salem. An-cestry Tables ^l'.. 

20. VIII. 20S-. Ahiyail Buffum, his second wife, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

^[rs. Needham's first husband, whom she married Aug. 30, 1795, was 
Joshua Buffum, of Salem. She was a daughter of Sibley. Ancestry 



20. VIII. 215. Samuel Ed\7ards [Seeth 20-21. VII. 128], born in 
Manchester, Mass., died at sea. A sailor. Residence : Manchester. 

20. VIII. Bio. Sarah Jane Allen, his wife, born in i\Iancliester, 
Mass., died in Manchester. 

Mrs. Edwards was a daughter of Aaron and Sally (Crafts) Allen, of 
Manchester, Mass. Bdhia Fn.sfpr Croft.^ [20. VIII. BIC] was her first 
cousin. Her ancestry includes the following families : Allen, P)radley, 
Tuck, Pierce, Hoojier, Edwards, Crafts, Seaver, Ballard, Harris, Sawyer, 



564 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

Clioate, Williams, Stalhaui, Wise, Tlioniitsou, Allen, IJiadley, Tuck, Pierce, 
Hibbard. See Ancestky Tables ^I'. 

20. VIII. 210. Jolui Girdler Edwards [Seoth 20-21. VII. 128], 
born in Manchester, Mas.s., probably died in Rockland, Maine. A sail- 
maker. Residence : Rockland. 

20. VIII. ^76'. Bitliia Foster Cr(ffts,h\s wife, born in Manchester 
Mass., probably died in Rockland, Maine. 

Mrs. Edwards was a daughter of David and Anna (Foster) Crafts. 
SaraJt Jane Allen [20. VIII. 21o'\ was her first cousin. Her ancestr}- includes 
the following- families : Crafts, Seaver, Ballard, Harris, Sawyer, Choate, 
Williams, Stalham, Wise, Thompson, Allen, Bradley, Tuck, Pierce, Hibbard, 
Foster, Stuart, Jacobs, Frost, Woodbiuy, Bennett. See Ancestkt Tables ^. 

20. Vin. 220. Ann Edwards [Sooth 20-21. VII. 128], born in Man- 
chester, ]\Iass. 

20. VIII. '230. WiUiam Henry IliUs, her husband, born in Roches- 
ter, England, died in St. John, N. B. A sailmaker and rigger. Residence : 
Manchester, ^tass. 

Mr. Hills came from Maidstone, Kent, England, to Rockland, Maine, 
whence he removed to Mftnchester. He was murdered in St. John, N. B. 

He was a son of William and Sarah (Harvey ) Hills. His father was in the 
Royal Navy. Ancestry Tables I'". 

21. VIII. 221. Mary Elizabeth Edwards [Seeth 20-21. VII. 128], 
born in Manchester, Mass., died in Manchester. 

21. VIII. 221. JoJin JLurraij, her husband, born in ]Manchcster, 
Mass., died in ^Manchester. A cabinet-maker. Residence : Manchester. 

Mr. Murray went to sea in early life. 

He was a son of John and Lydia (Crowcll) Murray, of Salem. His 
ancestry includes the following iamilios : ^Murray, Crowell, Allen, Bradley, 
Tuck, Williams, Bear. See. Ancestry Tables W. 



EIGHTH GENEBATIOX. 565 

21. VIII. 223. Abraham Stone [Elizabeth 21. VII. 120], bom in 
Mancliester, Mass., died in Port-au-Prince. A mate of a vessel. Piesi- 
dence : Manchester. 

21. VIII. 223. PrisciUa Daniels, his wife, born in IManchester, Mass., 
died in 15oston. 

Mrs. Stone was a daughter of Asa and Nabby Daniels, Ancestry 
Tables '^-^'y. 

21. VIII. 224. Betsey Stone [Elizabeth 21. VII. 129], born in Man- 
chester, Mass., died in ^lanchestcr. 

21. VIII. 224- John Girdler, her husband, born in Manchester, Mass., 
died in I^Ianchester. A shipmaster. Re.sidence : Manchester. 

i\Ir. Girdler was a son of John S. and Joanna (Allen) Girdler. His 
ancestry includes the following families: Girdler, Allen, Bradley, Tuck, 
Pierce, Osment. See Ancestry Tables "^'. 

21. VIII. 225 John Stone [Elizabeth 21. VII. 129], probably born 
in Manchester, Mass., died in Manchester. A seaman. Residence : 
Manchester. 

21. VIII. 22o. Salli/ Morgan Andrews, his wife, born in Gloucester, 

Mass., died in Beverly, ]Mass., of apoplexy. Pvesidence : Manchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Stone was a daughter of John and Nancy (Piowe) xVndrews, of 



21. VIII. 226. Samnel Stone [Elizabeth 21. VII. 129], l)orn in Man- 
chester, Mass., died in JIanchester. A cabinet-maker. Residence : 
JIan Chester. 

21. VIII. 226. Hannah Morgan, his wife, born in ^lanchester, Mass., 
died in ^Manchester. 

She married again. Her second husband was Charles Bailey, a cabinet- 
maker, of [Manchester. She was his second wife. He was born in Fram- 
inghara, Mass., and died in ^lauchester, Jan. 14, 1891, aged 84 years, 11 



566 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

months, and 14 days. He was a son of Josepli and 3Iar} (Kendall) iKiiley, 
of Framingham. 

Mrs. Bailey was a daughter of Benjamin Morgan. Axce.stry Taklks "y^. 

21. VIII. 2-27. "V^illiam Stone [Elizabeth 21. VII. 129], born in 
Manchestei', Mass., died in Manchester, of bronchitis. A cabinet-maker. 
Residence : Manchester. 

21. VIII. 227. Mavu YVilmouton, his wife, born in Manchester, Mass., 
died in ^Manchester, of pncmiKmia. 

Mrs. Stime was a daughter of Charles and Sally (]M organ) Vilmonton. 
Her father came to America from England. Ancestry Tables "^"j'. 

22. VIII. 229. Samiiel Pliippen [Nathaniel 22. VII. 130], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

22. VIII. 229. Sally Burns, his wife, probably born and died in 
Salem. 

Mrs. Phippen's second husband, whom she married ]\Iarch 21, 1824, 
was William Hall, of Salem. By him she had the following children : 

William PIexrt Hall [40. VIIT. ,'0.;], born Dec. 5, 1S24. 
Mary Ellkx }Iall [ 40. VIII. ^OJ], born June 17. 1S27. 

Elizabeth Hall. She married Ilonr}- Austin, and was the 

motlier of Carrie Austin [40. IX. 719]. 

I\Irs. Hall was probably a daughter of Edward and Sail}' (Gale) Byrne 
or Burn.s, of Salem. Ancestry Tables "g. 

22. VIII. 230. Benjamin Phippen [Xathaniel 22. VII. 130], born 
in Portsmouth, X. II., died in Salem. A cooper. Eesidence : Salem. 

22. VIII. 230. Marij Monniufj Wells, his wife, born in Beverly, 
Mass., died in Salem, liesiilence : Salem. 

i\Irs. Phippen lived in the old Phippen house on Ilardv Street, of which 
a hehotype is given facing page 211. She owned an old Phippen family 
Bible. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 567 



Slio was a chmg-litcr of Natlianiel and Sarah (Lakeinan) ^Vells. See 
Anck.stkv Tables yI\. 

22. Vlll. 2ol. Nathaniel Pliippen [Natlianiel 22. VII. 130], born 
in Portsmouth, X. 11., died in Salem, of consumption. A cooper. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

22. VIII. 231. Martha Curtis ClarJ:, his wife, born in Salem, died 
in Salem, of exhaustion. 

3[rs. Phi_ppon was a daughter of Isaac and Alice Clark, of Salem. 
ANcKvncy Tablks J^\. 

22. VIII. 232. Joshua Pliippen [Natlianiel 22. VII. 130], born in 
Salem, died in Brookline, Mass. Residence : Boston. 

22. VIII. 232'. JEU-^a Htuumoyid Howard, his first wife, died in 
Boston. 

Ancestry Tables j™|i. 

22. VIII. 232-. Ann ITnnimctt, his second wife, born in Boston, 

died in Arliii,L;t(»n, ]ilas3., of c(»ngostion of tlie lung'S. 

]\lrs. Phippen was a daughter of Benjamin and Mary llammett. 
Ancestry Tables ^~^^.r,. 

23. VIII. 23.'.. Charlotte Phippen [Nathaniel 22. VII. 130], born 
in Salem, died in Annisquam, Gloucester, ]\Iass. 

Mrs. Lane was a woman with old-time manners. She was possessed 
of a gracious dignity, and was somewhat reserved and serious. She liad a 
good memory, stored with varied reminiscences of her experience, and of 
her voyages with her husband in her early womanhood.^ 

22. VlII. 235. Oliver Griffin Lane, her husband, probaldy born in 
Gloucester, Mass., died in Gloucester. A .shipmaster. Residence : Annis- 
quam, Gloucester. 

Captain Lane was a son of Gideon and Hannah (Griffin) Lane, of Annis- 
([uam. Ilis ancestry includes the following families : Lane, Wallis, Ilara- 

' Amiisquam correspondent of a Gloucester newspaper at the time of her death. 



568 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

den, Norwood, Coldiim, Pierce, Babson, Hill, Clark, Ehvell, Collins, Batman, 
Robinson, Ilaraden, Ilaraden, Giddings, Lawrence, Coit, Jenner, Stevens, 
Davis, Batchelder, Gritiin. See AxcEsxRi- Tables -^J/j. 

23. VIII. 23ij. Lydia Hodges [Hannah 23. VII. 133], probably born 
in Salem, baptized there Nov. 23, 1800, died in Amesbury, Mass.^ 

23. VIII. '23G. Samuel Ilolniaii, her husband, born in Salem, bap- 
tized there in December, 17'J2, died in North Andover, JIass. A merchant. 
Residence : Salera. 

Captain Hohnan kept a ship-chandler's store near Peabody's wharf, 
Salem. He was at one time a commander of the Salem Light Infantry. 

He was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (King-) Ilolman, of Salem. Gahriel 
Hohnan [18. VI. 37'] was his grandmicle. His ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Hohnan, Reeves, Collins, Cockerill, Hunt, Palfrey, Boardman. 
Bowditch, Gardner, Frier, Porter, King, Guy(?), "Walker, Talmage, Mars- 
ton, Pearce, Northey. See Axcestry Tables l™-^. 

23. VIII. 239. Mary PMppen Hodges [Hannah 23. VIL 133], 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of paralysis. 

23. VIII. 230. Joseph Vincent Browne, her husband, born in 
Salem, died in Salem, of congestion of the lungs. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Browne's energetic and active business capacity and prominence in 
political and business circles caused his loss to be greatly felt in the com- 
munity. His abihties and indefatigable industry were frequently called 
into requisition by the national government, which he had served in the 
Kavy Agency and other positions in Boston, San Fi-ancisco, and other 
places. He was made the Collector of Internal Revenue for the district ot 
Salem, on the establishment of that office. His mercantile education was 
of the first order, and it enabled him to till with usefulness nnd the highest 
acceptance to the government everv office in which he was employed. 
The occasional abruptness of his manners, and his palpable detestation of 
hypocrisy, not infrequently gave offence to those with whom he was 

' The ]\Iassachusetts State Records state she ^vas boru in Amesbury, Mass. 



EIGHTH GENERATIOX. 569 

))roiight in contact; but his heart was tender as a woman's and his acts of 
kindness were numerous. Pie was the originator and founder of the Salem 
J-'ivo Cents Savings' Bank, and he filled the othees of trustee, secretary, and 
treasurer of that institution.^ 

Mr. Browne was a son of James and Lydia (Vincent) Browne, of Salem. 
Jiinus Broicnc [1-70. III. 6'-] was his great-great-grandfathi-r ; and Boijnmhi 
F. Brrnnw [2.S. Mil. 370'] and Joseph Chl^holm [29. VIII. ~2So] were his 
tir.st cousins. Tlis ancestry includes the h.llowing families : Browne, 
15artliolomew, Pickering, Flint, Frost, Searl, White, Shelote, Vincent. 

See A^ryZSTV.Y yXVLV.:, y^l. 

23. VIII. 242. John Peirce BabMdge [.Mary 23. VII. 134], born 
in Portsmouth, X. II., baptized in Salem, Feb. 22, 1795, as John, died at 
City Point, Va., of yellow fever. A shijimastcr. Residence : Salem. 

He had gone to City Point to take chorge of the ship " Saco." Pie was 
the fourth captain of the Salem Plangers. There is a miniature of him in 
tlie possession of his granddaughter, Annie F. Swasey. 

23. VPII. 2;3. Sarah Fulsi/er, his wife. 

Mrs. Babbidge was a daughter of P'^raiicis and Plannah (Trask) Pulsifer. 
Her father was a cabinet-maker, of Salem. Axcestkv Tadi.ks jlj"g. 

23. VIII. 24.5. Ann Phippen [Joshua 23. VII. 13G], probably born 
in Salem, died in Beverly, Mass. 

23. VIII. 340. Dennison W. Brown, her husband, probably born in 
Beverly, Mass., died in Beverly. A butcher. Residence : Bevcrl3\ 

!Mr. Brown was a son of Wallace and Hannah (Cole) Brown, of Beverly. 
His father was a farmer. Anckstry Tables -^y^. 

23. VIII. 24(';. Hannah Phippen [Joshua 23. MI. 13G], born in 
Salem, died in Danvers, ]Mass. 

23. VIII. 346. Tristram Woodbarij, her husband, born in Plamil- 
ton, Mass., died in P^ast Danvers, Mass. A butcher. Residence: East 
Hanvers. 

» The Salem Register, Aug. 31 aud Sept. 3, 1S68. 



570 THE FICKERiya V.ENEALOCY. 



Mr. Woodbiuy was a son of AiHlre\v and Lydia (]iro\sn) "Woodbury, of 
Hamilton, Mass. His father v.-as a fiirnier. A-n-cestky Tables -J'J^-. 

24. VIII. -247. Joseph Hardy Pliippen [Hardy 24. VII. 139], bom 
in Salem. A retired bank cashier. Ixosidciicc: Salem. 

Mr. Phippen went into the g-rocery store of liis father as clerk when a 
boy, and he remained there until he -was nearly twenty-one. He then 
entered the Salem post-office as clerk, \,here he remained until October, 
1828, when he was appointed book-keeper of the ]\Lercantilo Bank. On 
April 20, 1852, he was made cashier of the same bank, now the Mercantile 
National Bank. He resigned this position on FeL. 2'!, 18r)3. 

He served for several years on the school committee of Salem. 

24. VIII. ^.^Z-'. Susan Harris JLord, his first vrife, born iii Saleoa, 
died in Salem. 

Jlrs. Phippen was a daug-hter of David and Lucy (Harris) Loi'd. Her 
father was a carpenter, of Salem. Emeline Lord, her Juisband's second 
wife, is her sister. Ancestry Tables y J'^i. 

24. VIII. 247~. Emeline Lord, his secoiid wife, born in Salem. 

Mrs. Phippen is a daughter of David and Lucy (Harris) Lord, of Salem. 
Susan Harris Lord, her husband's first wife, w\as Jier sister. Akckstry 
Tables ff-^,. 

24. VHT. 248. Ursula S^nmonds Phippen [Hardy 24. Vll. 139], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

24. Vni. 24s. Isaac Xeedham Chax>uian, her husband, bom in 
Salem, died in Salem. A shipmaster. Eesidence : Salem. 

Mr. Chapman was a son of Isaac X. and Rebecca (Syrnonds) Chapman. 
Ursula K. Chapmnn [13. VIII. loO'] was his sister; John Chapman [40. VI. 
G4'\ was his uncle ; George Chap»>an [:'9-34. VI. SG] was his granduncle ; 
Ursula K. Sijmonils [24. VII. 1S9'] ^\as his aunt; and Ursula Si/nionds 
[24. VI. .^?-] was his grandmother. His ancestry includes the following 
families: Chapman, Cook, F.irdsall, Buxton, Dean, Daniell, Prince, Ruck, 
Spooncr, Bufl'um, Pope, Needham, Fni'rington (.'), Syrnonds, Browning, 
Stone, Very, Woodice, Symouds, Knapp. See Anckstky Tables j]" . 



EIGHTH Gi:yi:R.\TiON. 571 

24. VllL 240. Joshua Pliippen [Hardy 24. VII. 139], bom in 
Salem, died in a car of tli(j Eastern Railroad ou his passage to Salem. A 
cashier. Residence: Salem. 

j\Ir. Phippen entered business life as a clerk in the Asiatic Bank, Salem, 
and he was afterwards chief clerk in the office of Thomas P. Pingree, who 
was engaged in the Para trade. On Mr. I'ingree's retirement, Jlr. Phijipen 
succeeded to the business in company with Captain Charles Endicott, the 
sts'le of the firni being Phi})pL-n & Endicott. During the last twenty-eight 
years of his life he was cashier in the oflice of the State Treasury, entering 
the office during the late General Oliver's term. 

Mr. Phippen was an active member of the Salem Light Infantry, and 
a member of the Veteran Association. For many years he was a member 
of St. Peter's Church, and during a portion of the time a warden. He 
was a quiet and unostentatious citizen, and had no inclination for political 
life.^ 

24. Vni. 2JfO\ Betsey Bow Hoi man, his first wife, born in Salem, 
died in Salem, of disease of the kidneys. 

]\Ir.s. Phippen was a daughter of Jonathan and Eetsey (Barr) Ilolman, 
of Salem. Gahriel Holnion [18. VI. 57] was her grandfather. Her ancestry 
includes the following families : Holman, Reeves, Collins, Cockerill, I^Ians- 
field, Needham, Williams, Collins, Stocker, Proctor, Tliorndike. Felton, 
Wilson, Ban-, Ropes, Ingersoll, Felton, Dean, Flint, Hart, Carlton, Jewett, 
Osgood, Belknap, Stevens, Abbot, Chandler, Hunt, Palfrey, Boardman, 
Bowditch, Gardner, Frier, Porter. See A^cESTnY Iablks 7"-,. 

24. VIIl. ^^'.T, Euniee Louisa Daniels, the second wife of Joshua 
Phippen, born in South I)anvcrs, Mass. Residence : Salem. 

JFrs. Phippen is a daughter of David Daniels, of South Danvers. 
Ancestry Taiu.ks ffj,. 

24. VIIl. 250. George Dean Phippen [Hardy 24. VII. 130], born 
in Salem, died in Salem. A cashier. Residence: Salem. 

In 1838, ^[r. Phippen became a book-keeper in the Salem National Bank, 

' The Salem Eegister of Oct. 13, 1800. 



672 THE nCKERING GENEALOGY. 



and twenty years later he became its casliier, a position he held at the time 
of his deatli. 

He was a man of a retiring- disposition, which always led him to undei'- 
rate his own ability in the lines of literary and scientific pursuits. He 
became at an early period interested in the study of natural history, and 
was a co-laborer with T3r. Wheatland in the Essex County Natural History 
Society. He was officially connected with the Essex Institute ever since 
its formation, and was one of its most earnest workons. Especially inter- 
ested ill botany, he generally made that the topic of his talks at the Field 
Meetings of the Institute, and liaving the happy faculty of expressing 
himself simply, with as few technical terms as ])ossible, ho was always 
interesting and instructive. He wrote for the Essex Institute Bulletin 
several papers, one being the result of a short \-isit to Texas, giving a 
description of the flora of that State. This paper met with a flattering 
reception from those experts who were most qualitied to judge of its merits. 
Mr. Phippen was always interested in floriculture, and his garden in Salem 
liad for many years more than a local fame. It became a favorite resort of 
lovers of flowers, and has been pictured as "an old-fashioned garden " by 
artists, its wildness and wealth of bloom and rich coloring making it an 
ideal sul^ject for the brush. 

Mr. Phippen's interest in local historical research naturally included a 
taste for genealogy. His manuscript Phij^pen Genealogy, the work of his 
leisure time, is beautifully engrossed and illuminated with coats of arms, etc. 
It was the basis of that portion of the Pickei'ing Sheets which relates to the 
Phippens. He also has several other genealogies which relate to his own 
descent, and he prepared a Saltonstall Pedigree which was printed. 

Mr. Phippen was an interesting talker and writer. He never held public 
office outside of histoiical and scientific .societies, and in connection with the 
Tabernacle Cliurch, of which society he had always been a prominent 
member. Mr. and ]\Irs. Phippen celebrated their golden wedding in 1890.^ 

24. VIII. '3o0. liLfirf/aret Barton, the wife of George D. Phippen, 
boi-n in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

' T. Fi-ankliu Hunt ; also The Salem Evening News of Dec. 27, 1895, and Jan. 8, 1896- 



EIGHTH GENERATIOX. 573 

Mrs. riiip])Gu is a diiugliter of Captain John ami 3!ary (Webb) Barton, 
of Salem. Iler ancestry includes tlie following- families : Barton, Roberts, 
Jfarston, Rog-ers, Crane, Denison, Dudley, Gardner, Frier, White, Herbert, 
Porter, Ilathorne, Gardner, Frier, Orne, BroAvne, Weld, Clap, Mitchelson, 
Bushell, Webb, Bray, Collins, Cockerill, Saunders, Skerry, Lunt, King, 
Guy (]), Walker, Tahnage, Barton, Roberts, Andrew, Grafton, Gardner, 
Frier, Higginson, Whitfield, Sheafe, Savage, Synimes, Gerrish, Lowell, 
Ruck. See Ancestry Tables j^\. 

24. Vni. 2,-^l. Louisa S. F. Phippen [Joseph 24. VII. 141], bom 
in Salem, died in Salem, of cancer. 

24. VIII. 2ol^. Andrew Jameson, her first husband. 
Ancestry Tables ^i\%. 

24. VIII. 251-. Peter JEatou TTehsfer, her second husband, born in 
Salem, N. H., died in Salem, Mass., of brain disease. xV merchant. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

Mr. Webster's first wife, whom he married April 25, 1813, ^vas Rebecca 
Cliapman. His second wife, whom he married Sept. 9, 1822, was Nancy 
Baker. She died June 27, 1847, aged 49 years. She was a widow of 
Thomas Baker, and the daughter of Pelatiah and Hannah Brown. 

Mr. Webster had the following children by his first two wives : — 

Mary Augusta Webster. She married, Xov. 7, 1S3G, Daniel C. Stan wood, of ' 

Augusta, IMaiue. 

IVIakgaret Symonds Webster. She married, JIarch 5, 1S39, Horatio G. Iv. Calef, of 
Boston. 

Abigail Eatox Wef.ster. 

Elizabeth WEiiSTr.K. She married, in ISll, Hiram Grimes, of the Sand- 

wich Islands. 

Sarah Beckfoed Webster. She married a ]\rr. Grant. 

Caroline Prescott Webster. She married, Julj- G, 1S42, Samuel G. Reed, of 
Boston. 

Mr. Webster came to Salem in 1813. He was a son of Jesse and Abi- 
gail (Eaton) Webster. Axcestky Tables jj\,. 



574 THE nCKKRIXG GENEALOGY. 



25. VIII Tsl. Joseph Peirce [Joseph II. 25-2G. VII. 143], Lorn in 
Boston, diL'd in Buenos Ayros;, S. A. 

Mr. Peirce \v;is ;i handsome man, with dark hair and eyes. He was 
engaged to be married to Miss Homer, of Boston. 

25. VIII. 253. Frances Peirce [Joseph 11. 25-2G. VII. 143], born in 
Boston, died in Koxburv, Mass. 

Mrs. Gray was a blonde distinguished for her beai;ty. Joseph Bona- 
parte, afterwards king of Spain, whom she met at a ball given in Pliihi- 
delphia, ]ironounced lier the most beautiful woman he had seen in America, 
and, as such, lie presented her with a regard ring, so called, consisting of a 
ruby, a diamond, and an emerald.^ 

A very liandsome miniature of ^Irs. Gray, which was in the possession 
of the family of her brotlier Constantius, at Baton Rouge, I^a., was destroyed 
by fire. An ivory miniature of her, painted in 1820, by H. Williams, is 
owned by her children. 

25. VIII. '2o3. Ileiirij Gran, ^er husband, born in Salem, died in 
New York City. 

Mr. Gray studied law^ with Artemas "Ward, of Charlestown, Mass., but 
he never entered upon its practice. He was a ship-owner, engaged in an 
extensive foreign business, and was a director in the Massachusetts State 
Bank. He resided at Dorchester, Mass., and was a member of the Rev. Dr. 
Codman's Church. He was a liberal benefactor of the Andover, and other 
religious orthodox institutions. He afterwards lost his fortune, and removed 
to New York." 

There was a miniature of Mr. Gray in the possession of his wife's 
nephew, Colonel Pfamilton ^McKee Peirce, of Baton Rouge, La. There is 
still another in the possession of 3Ir. Gray's children, which was painted by 
H. Winiamsin 1821. 

Henry Gray was a son of the Hon. William and Elizabeth (Chipman) 
Gray, of Boston. His father was a famous merchant, and Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor of ^Massachusetts. John Chipman Gray [53. VII. 3011 and Horace 

' The Aristocracy of Boston, by T. V. L. (1S4S) - Ibid. 



EIGHTH GEXERAIIOX. bll 



Gray [53. VII. JU^'] were his Lrutht-ivs and Lydla Gr^i;i [17. Mil. 1S3'\ \v;is 
Ills iirjit cousin. His ancestry includes the following families: Gray, 
Williams, Galley, Burrill, Ivory, South, Jarvis, Chipman, Ilowland, Tilley, 
Cobb, Hinckley, Hale, Byley, Clark, Somerby, Greenleaf, Brown, Eaton, 
Woodbury, Dodge, Cotton, Hawkridge, Rossiter, Saltonstall, Gurdon, Ward, 
Edmonds. See Ancestry Tables -j'"^. 

25. YIII. 254. DoHa Peirce [Joseph H. 25-2G. YII. 143], born in 
Boston, died in West Medford, Mass. 

Mrs. Ameo had a strong personality, with a bright and clear mind, and 
she showed it in all the experiences of a long and useful life. She was a 
very iridustrious woman, and a neat hoitsekeeper. Whatever she did at all, 
she did well. Her life was an unselfish one, devoted to the hiterests of 
others. She was faitliful in lier friendships, and showed her love for family 
ties in assumhig charge of her father's household and caring for her numer- 
ous brothers and sisters on her mother's death. Her home, after her hus- 
band's death, was with her sister, Mrs. Edward F. Hall. 

Lines to her memory appeared in the Boston Journal at the time of her 
death. 

Mrs. Amee and her four sisters, Marcia, Laura, Ann, and Mary Eliza- 
beth, spent the season of 1823-1824 in Washington with their ftitlier, and 
were present at the famous ball given by Mrs. Adams on Jan. 8, 1824. 
The ball was commemorated by" Orlando" (Mr. Agg) in verses entitled 
" Mrs. Adams' Ball," and among those mentioned therein were : — 

" The Peirces with their heavenly faces 
And eyes like suns that dazzle thro'." 

On the departure of these young ladies for Boston, the following lines 
were wiitten by Tliomas Bultinch, author of the " x\ge of Fable,'' &c., on 
board the schooner Zephyr, at Alexandria, Va., May 13, 1824: — 

"Brave vessel ! know'st thou what a freight 
Thy gallant timbers soon shall bear ? 
The famed Venetian bark of state 
Xe'er bore a freight so rich and rare. 



576 THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

"Fair Drlia witli tlie iliiupled cheek 
And Marcia -witli the pensive brow. 
And Laura with the eyes that speak 
Ere from her iips the aceeut flows. 

"And Ann the conqueror of hearts, 
Who charms at will — a very fairy, 
And then arra_yod in Beauty's darts, 
Hebe — (the mortals call her Mary). 

"Brave vessel, may thy oaken sides 
Cleave old rotomac's Lillov.-y breast, 
And homeward speed as swift as glides 
The parent swallow to her nest. 

«T. B." 

25. VIII. 2o4- Josiah Lee Carroll Aniee, her husband, born in 
Boston, died in Bostun. Residence : Boston. 

General Aniee was in early life a sail-maker, and for many years he was 
engaged with his fatlier in that business in Boston. At the time of his 
second marriage he was engaged in the real-estate business. He was very 
much interested in military aflairs, and entered the Massachusetts Militia as 
a private soldier. On Aug. 3, 1S3G, he had attained the I'auk of brigadier- 
general. In 1861, he was appointed chief of police of the city of Boston, 
and he held the ollice for two years. During the war he entered the United 
States service, and served as cpiartermaster under General Sheridan's com- 
mand, and was with him in the Slienandoali Valley, and afterwards in 
Texas. For several years he was an officer in the Boston Custom House. 

In the several notices of liini which appeared at the time of his death, 
he is spoken of as a faithful and conscientious ofHcer, filling the various 
positions he held with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the authori- 
ties. He is also spoken of as a genial, companionable man, zealous, gener- 
ous, and ardent in his attachments.^ A portrait of him was in the possession 
of William A. Amec, of Cambridge, Mass., a few years ago. 

General Amee's first wife, whom he married Nov. 28, 1822, was Salome 

1 The New England Historical and Genealogical Eegister, Vol. XXI. p. 183; also the 
Boston Post of Feb. 5 and Feb. G, 1SG7. 



EIGHTH GENEIiATION. 577 

Smith. She was born in C)ranye, Mass., Feh. 2G, 1799, and died in 15o;5ton, 
Jan. 2G, 1849, aged 49 years and 11 months. 
By her he liad one child : — 

Charlotte Augusta Amee, born in Boston, Nov. 28, 1823. She was married to 
Charles Caldwell, of Barre, Mass., June 8, 1841, and 
died at St. Thomas, W. I., A^iril 12, 1851. 

General Amee was a son of Jacob and jMary (Carroll) Amee, of Boston. 
His ancestry includes the following families : Amee, Gullison, Babbe, 
Cloug-h, Xorris, CarroU. See Ancestry Tables ~^^\. 

27). YIII. 255. Marcia Peirce [Joseph H. 25-2G. VIT. 143], born 
in Boston, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Blanchard was an intelligent woman of much business capacity, 
and was of great assistance to her husband, whose life was to a great extent 
absorbed in his inventions. See the account of the Misses Peirce under 
[25. YIII. 254] pages 575-57G. 

25. VIII. 2o6. Thomas Blanchai'd, her husband, born in Sutton, 
Mass., died in Boston. An inventor. Residence: Boston. 

Mr. Blanchard was undoubtedly one of the most remarkable inventors 
which this counti-y has produced. Others have made single inventions 
which have attracted more public notice than any one of his, but probably 
no other inventor has produced so many different labor-saving machines 
that have contributed largely to the common necessities of litV. There is 
not an armor\' in this country or in England where guns are made, hardly 
a human being who wears boots or shoes, scarcely a vessel that sails upon 
the ocean, not a school where slates are used, not a caiiiet laid down, that 
does not owe tribute to the genius of Thomas Blanchard. The same may 
be said of innumerable other articles in common use. 

He was brought up on his father's farm, and he was not considered a 
very promising youth by his neighbors, owing possibly to his habit of 
staiinneriiig-. When he was thirteen years old he showed some signs of his 
genius by inventing an apple-parer. When he was eighteen years old he 
entered his brother Stejihen's tack factory at West ^Millljurv. Here he was 
put to heading tacks by liand. But this method was too slow for him, and 



578 THE FICKERING GENEALOGY. 

in a few months lie luul invented a machine that made tacks at one motion. 
So perfect was this macliine in design and constrnction that it was operated 
over twenty years ; and no essential imjirovemcnt has since been made 
upon it. This invention drew towards him the attention of Asa "Waters, 
whose armory ^vorks were bnt a few miles distant, and who was then engaged 
in improving the English mode of making gun-barrels. He had succeeded 
in turning them so far as they were round, but to turn the irregular shape 
of the butt batlied him. At length he sent to Blanchard to come to his 
ai-mory. His unprepossessing appearance did not create a favorable im- 
pression on those present. He was shown the machine, however, and told 
what was wanted. Glancing his eye over it, ho very soon suggested an 
additional cam-motion, simple, but wholly original, which, on being applied, 
was found to relieve the difficulty, and which proved a perfect success. Mr 
Waters was delighted, and, turning to him, said: ""Well, Thomas, I don't 
know what you won't do next. I would not be surprised if you turned a 
gunstock," naming that as the most impossible thing in mechanics he could 
think of. Blanchard stammeringly answered: " W^ell, I'll try that,'' which 
caused a loud laugh from the workmen assembled. This cam-motion was 
introduced into all the armories in the United States, and has been in use 
ever since, and saves at least a half a dollar on everv gun made. So far as 
can be learned, Blanchard never gained much profit from this invention. 

The germ of the stocking machine foi- making gunstocks lay in that cam- 
motion ; and it was then, as he afterwards said, that the idea of his world- 
renowned machine for turning irregular forms first flashed through his mind, 
although it required some months to elaborate it. Blanchard was soon 
called to tlie Springfield armory to adjust similar cam-motions, and it was 
on his return, when alone in his carriage, that the perfection of his machine 
dawned upon him, and he was heard by passers-by to exclaim, " I 've got it ' 
1 've got it ! I 've got it ! " He sold his tack machine for five thousand dol- 
lars, built a shop, filled it with tools, and kept himself locked in it for two 
years. At last he emerged and brought to the armory at ilillbury a min- 
iature model of his machine for making gunstocks. A full-sized working 
machine was made in Millbury. and set up in the armory, Avhere it con- 
tinued in operation about twenty years. One was built ami set up at the 



EIGHTH GEXLRATIOX. 579 



Xational Armory at Spriiintiuld ; and .several of the niacliincs were ordered 
bv the Briti.s]i goveniment. and continued in succes-sful operation for many 
voars. Bkmchard was somu requested by the "War Department to take the 
whole supervision of stocking tlio g-uns at the Springfield armory. He pro- 
ceeded to make contrivances for mortising into the stock each part of the 
gun. To mortise in the lock by a machine was declared an impossibility; 
but he accomplished it. The contrivance he made was a marvel of in- 
genuity, especially the cutter. The number of uses now made of this 
contrivance in making impressions to any given model in die-sinking, etc., 
is legion. 

llis lathe was soon brought into use for all irregular form. At the 
Exhibition Universelle in Paris, in 1857, he exhibited his machine ; and 
nothing in the whole exhibition excited more sui-prise than the use he put 
it to in turning out marble busts of life-size, or any size, of the nobilities of 
France. Like most inventors, he was continually harassed by infringe- 
ments of his patent, and all Europe was scoured by the counsel of the 
infringers to find evidence of a similar motion. But in no age, and in no 
country, could a trace be found of a revolving cutter working to any given 
models like Blanchard's. 

Having mastered the job of stocking guns wholly by machinery, he left 
the armory and devoted himself to other inventions. He invented a new 
construction of steamboats to tide over rapids and shallow waters, by means 
of which hundreds of miles were added to the navigable waters of our 
AVestern rivers. He then removed to Boston, and bought the house on Tre- 
mont Street formerly occupied by Judge Story, where he spent the 
remainder of his days. He devised a process to bend heavy timber for 
•ship-building. He attained such a perfection in this machine that it would 
bend a shingle to a right angle and leave it as strong at the angle as in any 
])art. He invented the oval slate-frame now in common use. He intro- 
duced a mode of making tlie handles of shovels by steam-bending-, which 
saved just one half the timber and made a far more durable handle. The 
eccentric lathe proved to be far more than the invention of a simple machine 
for a single purpose, as is the reaper and the sewing-machine ; for it had a 
general and unlimited application. It was really a discovery of a new prin- 



580 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

ciplc ill niccliaiiifs, \\ iiL-rcb}' the iiiaclunc works out a clesign of any given 
model, be it round or square, straight or crooked, and reproduces the origi- 
nal form in every case. All of the work done by his machines bad perfect 
uniformity ; and, after their introduction into the national armory, they led 
to an entirely new system of manufacture called the "uniformity system." 
This system has since been adopted by the several watch companies. An 
expert of long- experience in patent cases writes, '• It wtndd be difficult, and, 
so far as I know, entirely impracticable to make small arms ... to have 
their parts interchange without Blanchard's invention," and this view is cor- 
roborated by the fact that tliev are iVmnd in every establishment wdiere 
such arms are made. For some of his contrivances, such as mortising the 
locks, no substitute has ever been found. 

Eventually the impediment of his speech was overcome, and, by the aid 
of books and social intercourse, the disadvantages of his early education 
were surmounted.^ 

By his first wife, Laura Soger, wdio died in Springfield, ]\rass., he had 
the following children : — 

Laura Seger Blaxcuaijd, born in Springfield; died in Springfield. 

Georof. \Y. I!laxchai;d. born in Springfield; died in California. 

Sar.ui Seger Bi.axciiaru, born in Springfield in 1822; died in I'ahner, ;^ras.s., June 
28, 1850. She was the first wife of :Mr. Blanchard's 
nephew, Eranldin IJlanchanl [2*3. IX. -JOQ-]. 

The third wife of Thomas Blanchard, Laura Shaw, is still living in 
Springfield, Mass., having married, second, a Mr. Holland, and, third, a Mr. 
Ilaynes. 

Thomas Blanchard was a son of Samuel and Susanna (Tenney) Blan- 
chard. His father ^vas a farmer of Millbury, 3[ass. FrauMin Blanclianl 
[26. IX. 400'\ was his nephew. His ancestr\' includes the following 
families : Blanchard, l^rewer, Tenney, Dickinson, Nelson, Lowell, Goodalc. 
See AxcESTKY Tables y^g. 

' Harper's :\ronthly Magazine of July, 1S81, Vol. 63, pp. 2.54-2GO, with portrait; New 
England Historical aud Genealogical Kegister, Vol. XVIII., p. 2'JG ; Hi-,toiy of American 
Manufactures, 1608-lSCO, by J. Leander Bisliop; ^Memoirs of the INIost Eminent American 
Mechanics, by Henry Howe, pp. 197-210; also Boston newspapers at the time of his 
death. 



ETOHTir GENERATION. 581 

25. VIII. 25G. Marcus Tullius Peirce [Joseph H. 25-2G. VII. 
14.'3], bora in Boston, died in Darien, Ga. A shipmaster. Eesideuce : 
Boston. 

In 1824, Mr. Peirce commanded tlie brig Griffon, engaged in the north- 
west coast trade, and owned by Bryant & Sturgis, of Boston. He is said to 
li.ive been a man of fine quaUties, and of great personal beauty of a dark 
type. 

25. VIII. 2d6. Sarah Catltoliiio: JJU-.a JVoorJ, his wife, probably 
horn in Georgia, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Peirce was a daughter of Judge "Wood of Savannah, Georgia, a 
planter of Lirge weahh, who spent his summers at Newport, R. I. 

Anckstry Tables y\'l. 

25. VIII. 257. Constantius Peirce [Joseph H. 25-26. VII. 143], 
born in Buston, died near San Jacinto, Texas. A planter. Residence : 
Ilnton Rouge, La. 

Colonel Peirce was a})pointed, April 18, 1818, third lieutenant in the 
United States Army. lie was commissioned second lieutenant of artillery, 
April 20, 1818, and lirst lieutenant, Sept. 3, 1820. On June 1, 1821, he 
was transferred to the First Infantry, and he resigned June 30, 1825. 
During the Texan war he was caj)tain of volunteers, and was killed near 
San Jacinto, Texas, while colonel of his regiment. 

After his marriage he became a planter, and is said to have owned five 
plantations near Baton Rouge ; but he lost most of his property. He was 
a very handsoiue man, with brown hair and blue eyes. A miniature of 
him is in the possession of one of his descendants in the Soutli, and a fine 
copy of it was owned by his sister, the late Mrs. Laura P. Holland. He 
owned tlie Peirce Family Bible, which is very full of records. It is now in 
the possession of his grandson, Hamilton McKee Peirce, of New Orleans.^ 

25. VIII. 2o7. Manj Steer, tlie Avife of Constantius Peirce, died near 
Baton Rouge, La. 

* Complete Regular Army Register of the United States for One Hundred Years, by 
Thomas H. S. Hamersly, p. 692; also Peirce Family Records, 16S3-1SG4, by Edward W. 
West. 



582 THE nCKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Mrs. Peirce was au heii'L-ss, ami a ward uf tliu iliuor family of Louisiana. 
Iler children, after the duatli of her luisband, -were cured for by this family. 

She \Yas a daughter of Samuel and 31ary (Lintot) Steer. Samuel Steer, 
her father, is said to have been a wealthy EngHshman who migrated to this 
country and became a jilanter near Baton Kongo, ller ancestry includes 
the following families : Steer, Lintot, Trotter. See Ancestry Tables Yl\. 

25. Yin. 2.^8. Isaac Peirce [Joseph 11. 25-20. VIL 143], born in 
]3oston. 

lie was in the United States Navy. The only information that has been 
gained about him is that he left Boston in the latter part of the year 1838 
for New York, to go on board of the receiving ship Ohio. 

26. YIII. 251). LaiTra Peirce [Joseph IT. 25-2G. YIL 143], born in 
Boston, died in Chelsea, Mass., of heart disease. Residence: Chelsea. 

Mrs. Holland's childhood and early married life were passed in her 
native city. Having lost their property, she and her husband moved to 
New York City ; but, after liis death, she returned with her children to 
Boston. Here she continued to live until the month of August, 1844, when 
she removed to Chelsea, and slie continued to reside there in the same 
house until her death, a period of nearly half a century. 

Mrs. Holland was a notable housekeeper, and she had great fondness for 
gardening as v/ell as for animals. She was hospitable, and loved to be 
surrounded by her kindred and friends : and they all loved to be near her, 
for she had an tmcommon power of attracting and pleasing. This power 
was felt by those in the hmnblest as well as by those in the highest walks 
of life. She vi-as never idle. When not engaged in the management of her 
household aifairs, she was either employed wntli her needle, with which she 
was very skilful, in reading, or in writing to abswit kindred or friends. 
Her correspondence was continued up to the last week of her life, and the 
number of letters she wrote was surprising. 

Mrs. Holland had remarkable powers of observation, and these, com- 
bined witli an excellent memory, made her a very entertaining companion. 
Her reminiscences of old Boston were very interesting. She was a constant 
reader of the Boston Evening Transcript, and took great pleastire in occa- 



EIGHTH GEXEUATIOX. 



tiioiially contributing to its Notes and Queries colunm, over the sig-nature of 
" (Mr.s.) L. P. 11." 

Physically, ^Irs. Holland ^vas a very strong woman, and was perfectlv 
erect until within a few years of her death. She was tall and of command- 
ing presence, embodying in an unusual degree the old time dignity and 
grace. She never lost hur charm of manner, her beautv, or the rare sweet- 
ness of her disposition. All these seemed to increase with age. Ikit age was 
never associated with her in the minds of her friends, for her interest in 
passing events, aiul in the young-, added to by her bright, buovant spirit, 
never ceased. The dignity and strength of her character were felt by all 
who came into her presence. 

Mrs. Holland passed through life uncomplainingly, and bore its vicissi- 
tudes witb.out a murmur. She never under any circumstance lost her self- 
respect, and her heroic spirit was admired by all.^ 

See the account of the Misses Peirce under [25. VIII. 254], pages 575-576. 

2G. YIII. 250. Samuel Jla;/ IloUand, the husband of Laura Peirce, 
born in Boston, died in New York City. A shipmaster. Residence: 
Boston. 

Captain Holland entered Harvard College, but left his class before 
graduating. He M-ent to sea, and was shortly given conunand of one of 
his father's ships. After his marriage he gave up a sea-faring life and 
engaged in business. But lie was unsuccessful, and lost his jjortion of that 
part of his father's estate which had been divided among the heirs. He 
removed to New A^ork a slioil time before his death. 

He was a son of Captain John and Sarah (Alay) Holland, of Boston. 
Edtcard Aurjusfus West [20. VIII. 26(T\ was his iirst cousin. His father, 
Captain John Holland, was an excellent specimen of a self-made man. He 
went to sea before the mast without a cent, and bv his integrity and energv 
became a wealth}- ship-owner of Boston. He was noted for his thorough- 
ness, he himself setting an example which he expected others to follow. 
Mrs. John Holland was an original, independent, religious, and generous 

' Obituary notices in the Boston Evenini,' Transcript of Friday, Dec. IG, 1S92, and in 
tlie Christian Kegister of Thursday, ^Mai-ch 9, 1893; also private letters. 



584 THE riCKEKIXG GENEALOGY. 

wouian, utterly regardless of praise or blame. Samuel May Holland's 
ancestry includes the following families: Holland, Fallass, May, IJrewcr, 
Bridge, Robinson, Gore, Gardner, Crook, "Williams, Stalliam, Wise, Thomj)- 
son, Davis, Kinsman, Torrey, Smith, Howell, White, Deming, Treat. See 
Ancestky Taulks '\^l\- 

26. Vni. 2t]0. Aim Peirce [Joseph H. 25-2G. VH. 143], born in 
Dorchester, Mass., died in Brooklyn, X. Y. Residence : Brooklyn. 

As a girl, ]\lrs. West was noted for her beauty. See an account of the 
Misses Peirce under [2,j. ^'I^. 254], pages 575-576. 

26. Vni. '260. l^dirard Aiif/iistus West, her husband, born in Bos- 
ton, baptized there Nov, 25, 1804, died in Bergen Point, N. J. A clerk. 
Residence : Brooklyn, X. Y. 

In early life Mr. West lived in Boston, but he afterwards moved to 
New Y'ork. 

He was a son of Captain Joseph and Ann (Holland) W^est, of Boston. 
Smniiel May Holland [26. VHI. 239'] was his first cousin. His ancestry 
includes the following families : West, Jenney, ]\Iacomber, Holland, Fallass. 
See AxcESTRY Tables ^'"g- 

26. VHI. 261. Mary Elizabetli Peirce [Joseph H. 25-26. VH. 
143], born in Dorchester, Mass., died in West Medford, Mass. Residence: 
West Medford. 

Mrs. Hall as a young lady v/as celebrated for her beauty and grace. 
These she retained until far advanced in life. Her golden wedding was 
observed in 1876. See under [25. VIII. 254], pages 575-576, the account 
of the Misses Peirce. 

26. VIII. 201. Edward Fitch IlalL her husband, born in Medford, 
Mass., died in West Medford, of pneumonia. A commission merchant. 
Residence : W^est Medford. 

Colonel Hull at the time of his death was the oldest auctioriecr in 
Boston, being the last survivor of thirty-seven men avIio were licensed as 
auctioneers in 1833. For nearly fifty years he was engaged in the com- 
mission and auction business of dry goods, his store for many years being 



EIGHTH GKXERATIOX. 585 

uii Kilby ^Mrect. In his business relations ho was noted for his honorable 
(Iralinys, and was higiily esteemed by all his mercantile aiid social 
acquaintances. 

Colonel Hall was always much interested in military affairs, and received 
his commission as colonel of the Third Kegiment of the Massachusetts 
^"olunteer Militia from Governor I'lverctt. For forty years he Avas a 
member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, and during- 
that time h'_' held most of the otlices of the companv, and was its treasurer 
fir some years. Ilis last appearance v^'ith the company was after he was 
eighty years old. During tlie greater })art of his life he was a resident of 
Boston ; but he returned to his native town several A-ears before his death. ^ 

Ho was a son of Andrew and Eunice (Fitch) Hall. Hull Curtis [69. 
YHl. TSol is his tlrst cousin once removed. The Hall family has always 
been one of the oldest and most important fann'lies of ]Medforil. His 
ancestry includes the following families: Hall, Green, Sill, Belcher, Dan- 
forth, "Walker, Read, Fowle, Carter, Jones, Potter, Edmunds, Chandler, 
Symonds, Hayward, Treadwell, Hartwell, Wheeler, Fitch, Sweetser, 
Clark, Clark, Anderson (?), Browne, Smitli, Curwen, Herbert, Burroughs, 
Turner, Hill, Roberts, Kitchen, Saunders, Weld, Clap, Mitchelson, Bushell. 
See Ancestry T.\p.i.e.> -f'^j. 

26. Ylll. 262. Henry Augustus Peirce [Joseph H. 25-26. VH. 
143], born in Dorchester, Mass., died in San Francisco, Cal. A merchant. 
Residence : San Francisco. 

Mr. Peirce received his education in the public and private schools of 
Boston, and when about fourteen years old entered the office of his father, 
who was then clerk of the courts in Boston. He had, however, a desire to 
visit foreign countries; and on Oct. 24, ls24, being tlien sixteen j-ears old, 
he shipped as a ^^iKiQw hand on board the brig Griffon, of which his brother 
Marcus was master, bound on a five years' voyage in the fur trade, upon the 
northwest coast of America. On their arrival at the Hawaiian Lslands, he 
was promoted to ship's clerk, in charge of the stores and goods to be used 

' The Boston Evening Transcript of Dec. 11, ISS-l ; Tlie Boston Journal of Friday, 
Doe. 12, 1SS4; and the Saturday Evening Gazette of Dec. 13, 1884. 



586 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

in trade witli the natives. For tliree and a half years the Griftbn continued 
her trading among tlie harbors, ishinds, and straits along the coast of British 
Columbia and Alaska. During this voyage he made a careful study of the 
natives, and of the natural resources, climate, etc., of the countries which 
he visited. On her return to Honolulu, young Peirce left the vessel, and 
entered the niercantlle house of James Ilunnewell, of Honolulu, as clerk. 
In 1830, Mr. Hiuinewell returned home to Charlestou-n, Mass., and Mr. 
Peirce continued the business upon liis own account for many years, and 
with great profit. In December, 1835, a co-partnership was formed by Mr. 
Peirce and Captain Charles Brewer, who had commanded Mr. Peirce's ves- 
sels in their voyages to China and the Russian possessions. The firm of 
Peirce & Brewer conducted a general merchandise and commission business 
at Honolulu until the year 1843, when Mr. Peirce retired with an accumu- 
lation of one hundred thousand dollars, being then but thirty-five 3'ears old. 
He returned to Boston, and from 1842 to 1849 he was largely engaged in 
foreign ti-ade in that city. He afterwards entered into a partnership with 
James Hunnewell and Charles Brewer, and engaged in the Honolulu and 
San Francisco trade. The partnership continued four years. The begin- 
ning of the civil war, in 1861, found Mr. Peirce with a fleet of ships scat- 
tered upon every sea. Subsequent disaster to this class of property aft\-cted 
his financial affairs. During the civil war he assisted Go^■ernor Andrew 
and others in recruiting several regiments and in sending them into the 
field. Among these regiments may be named the Ninth, Twelfth, Four- 
teenth, and Fiftv-third, and the Fifty-fourth, colored. 

Despairing of recovering his fin-tune in mercantile business, and anxious 
to demonstrate the jiracticability of the free labor of the emancipated colored 
people of the South, he, in company with his old friends, R. B. Forbes and 
John P. Cushing, of Boston, bought a plantation in Mississippi; but the 
venture was not successful. 

In 1837, Mr. Peirce was appointed, b}' the Govermnent of Peru, Peruvian 
Consul at Honolulu. This position he held until 1841. From 1856 to 
1869, he was consul of the Hawaiian Kingdom at the ports of Boston, 
Portsmouth, X. H., and Portland, Elaine. In May, 1869, he was appointed 
United States Minister, resident at the Hawaiian Islands. His official resi- 



FA GUT IT GKXE RATION. 587 



donee there was marked l)y l)riiig'ing' tlie two nations into close and fi-iondlv 
dii)lomatic intercourse, and binding them in reciprocal couunercial rela- 
tions, lie was invited hy King Kalakaua to accompany him on his visit 
to tliis country in l.*^74, whicdi ]\Ir. T'eirce accepted. 

Mr. Peirce retained his otlice of minister in Honolulu until October, 
1877, and in the following February, King Kalakaua apjxiinted him minis- 
ter of foreign affairs for the Hawaiian Kingdom. He resigned the office, 
liowever, on the iir-;t of the following- July, and returned to J5oston. But 
the change of climate told upon his health, and he soon returned to San 
Francisco, where, with tlie exception of several visits Ivist, he contiiuied to 
reside until his death. 

IMr. Peirce made a visit to Europe in 184-1. In 185(), he succeeded his 
father as a mendjer of the Ma-sachi;setts Society of the Cincinnati, and was 
its assistant treasurer from ISiI.t to 1867. He was a man of liigli integrity, 
of good conversational powers, of cultivated tastes, and of agreeable 
manners.^ 

2G. Vin. 2(j2. Susan liif/bi/ Thompson, the wife of Henry A. 
Peirce, born in Charlestown, Mass, died in Charlcstown, of heart 
disease. 

Mrs. Peirce was gifted in conversation, and was a woman of fine 
presence. 

She was a daughter of Joseph and Susan (Pratt) 'I'homjison, of Charles- 
town, Mass. Her ancestry includes the following families: Thompson, 
Ijlodgett, Whitmore, Harty, Snow, Peirce, Cole, Bacon, Frothini^liam, 
Hett, Rand, Edenden, Whittemore, Upham, Frost, Jliller, Pand, Carter 
Bridgden, Barrett, Xurse, Hill, Stower, I'ratt. See A.\ci:sTnY Tablf.s -J V'.. 

20. VHL 200. John Dorr Peirce [Joseph IL 20-20. YII. 14;]]. 
born in I'oston, died in Cincinnati, Ohio. Pesidence : Cincinnati. 

* Biography of ILnry Augustus Peirce, printed by A. L. Bancroft & Co., San Francisco, 
1S80, with portrait, from which this sketch is taken; also The INfeniorials of the :\rassa- 
chusetts Society of the Cincinnati, by James M. Bugbee, pp. 3S.j-3Sr> ; The I'aciiie Com- 
mercial Advertiser of Saturday. July 27, 187S ; and obituary notices in The Alta Cali- 
fornian, of July, ISSa, ami The Boston Journal, of July 30, 1SS5. 



588 THE PICKi:niXG GEXEALOGY. 

His middle iiainc -was dropped by an act of the Massacliusetts General 
Court, Marcli 4, 1821). Ilis remains were buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, 
Chelsea, 31ass., in tlie lot of his sister, Mrs. Laura 1'. Holland. 

26. VIII. 2G3. Until Smith, his wife, born in Bridgeport, Ohio, died 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Her first husband's name was Stockton. 
An-cestry Taijlin j}\. 

2G. VIII. 2G4. Hardy Peirce [Joseph II. 25-2G. VII. 143], born in 
Boston, died in Santa Barbara, Cal. A seaman. 

Hardy Peirce was a seaman in the East India trade. lie went to the 
Sandwich Islands, and from there, in 183.5, to California, where he died of 
a disease incident to the climate of Batavia. In 1828, he wa.s one of the 
crew of the ship Danube, commanded by the late R. B. Forbes, and is 
spoken of by him as a " fine boy." 

27. VIII. 2G9. John Peirce Latlirop [Ann 27. VII. 144], born in 
Boston, died in Philadelphia. A clergyman. Ivesideuce : Boston. 

Mr. Lathrop was ordained a deacon in the Episcopal Church in Boston, 
in 1837, and a priest in Burlington, N. J., March 15, 1839. He taught 
school for a tiiue in Boston, and afterwards became rector of Christ 
Church, Bordentown, X. J. In an obituary notice which appeared in The 
Churchman of Jan. 13, 1844, he is spoken of as "An exemp)lary and much 
beloved clergyman.'' At the time of his sudden death, he v/as chaplain of 
the United States steam frigate Princeton, which was about sailing for the 
Mediterranean. A painting of him is owned by his daughter, Mrs. Thomas 
L. Wakefield, of Dedhara. 

27. VIII. (200. 2laria Mavfiaretta Long, his wife, born in Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., died in Dedhani, ^lass. 

A miniature of 31rs. Lathrop is in the possession of her daughter, i\Irs. 
Thomas L. Wakefield, of Dedham. 

She was a daughter of Thomas C. and Frances Hungerford (Griffin) 
Long. Ancestry Tahi.es j"'^. 



EIGHTH GENERATIOX. 589 

•J7. \'lir. 271. Jo^jspll Kettell [Ilaunuh D. 27. VII. 150], born in 
Bo.ston, baptized there Feb. 2r», ISOO, died in St. Augu.^tine, Fla. Resi- 
dence : New York. 

^Jlr. Kettell had a very iutelhyent mind, and ^yas a num of great natural 
abihties and amiable qualities. Owing to the extreme delicacy of liis con- 
stitution, he was unable to engage in any regular profession or business, 
and was obliged to go to Florida for his health.^ 

27. VIII. -H. Jane Ter/<?,'Hc, his wife. 

AXCKSTRY TaELKS fl\. 

27. VIII. 272. Thomas Prentice Kettell [Hannah D. 27. VII. 
ir«0], born in Boston, died in vSan Francisco, Cal. k. journalist. Resi- 
dence : Ne^y York. 

"When quite young, Jlr. Kettell went with his father on several voyage??, 
wliicli enlarged his views of the operations of general commerce. On leav- 
ing school, he entered the wholesale hardware store of J. & E. Phillips, of 
Boston, where he continued for many years, until his desire for a more 
extended business induced him to visit Europe. After visiting most of the 
capitals of Europe in the irivestigatio'.i of the course and general operations 
of international commerce, with a view to reconcile the practical workings 
of trade with the principles of the economist, he returned and settled in 
New York. It was a time when his natural qualities, enlarged and matured 
by extensive observation and untiring research, enabled him to appreciate 
with great accuracv the position of financial atTairs throughout the world, 
and particularly the unhealthy state of affairs which existed in this country. 
At this tune he began a series of articles in the New York Herald upon 
the monetary atfairs of the comitry. These displayed an ability that soon 
attracted general attention, not only throughout the United States, but in all 
the commercial cities of the world ; and during six 5-ears, down to the close 
of 1843, they acquired an almost oracular authority. The clearness of his 
dictiiin, the accuracy of his views, and the sagacity of his remarks, fully 
and promptly sustained by events as they transpired, tixed the attention of 

' The ^iterchants' Magazine and Commercial Eeview, conducted by Freeman Hunt, 
Vol. XX. p. G21. 



590 THE picki:rixg gexealogy. 

tlio coininorcial public, iind fli.'\- ra})i(11\' iuci-r;i<>,-il the circulation of the 
paper. The interest which ^Ir. Kettell imparted to the snbject of financial 
reports caused thcrn to become an essential feature of every daily paper. 

In 1840, ^\v. Kettell started the Gazette, a daily journal advocating the 
principles of free trade, of which he had always been an ardent and efficient 
supporter. He then edited the .Morning News until he took charge of the 
Democratic Plevio^\^ lie contrilnited to the Merchants' ^lagaziue articles 
on the " Commercial Treaties of the ITiited States," etc., and a series of 
articles upon " The Debts and f^inances of the several States." He was for 
several years the coinmerciul correspondent of the AVoshington Union. He 
was considered one of the most forcible writers on political economy in the 
country.! 

27. YHI. 272. Jlidh CogsiveU, the wife of Thomas P. Kettell, born 
in Boston. 

Mrs. Kettell is a ilaughter of Jonathan and Mary (Gaubert) Cogswell. 
Her father was a manufacturer, and her mother was of a Maine familv. 
Her ancestry includes the following families : Cogswell, Wyer, Johnson, 
Johnson, Maverick. Harris, Xewell, Larkin, Phillips, Foster, Drackenbury, 
Gaubert. See Anckstky Tables jlj'e- 

27. Vni. 273. George Frederick Kettell [Hannah D. 27. VH. 
150], born in Boston, ba})tized there Xov. 9, 1817, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
of heart disease. A minister. Residence : Brooklyn. 

When he was twelve years old, Mr. Kettell went to Germany with his 
parents, and he remained there for five years. On his return, he removed 
to Danbiuy, Conn,, where he studied for the ministry. When he was 
twentv-one years of age, he became an itinerant ]\Iethodist minister. He 
bought a place in Poughkeepsie, X. Y., and lived there about ten years. 
About 1860, he was made presiding elder of the Rhinebeck District. In 
18G6, he was appointed United Slates Consul to the Grand Duchy of Baden, 
an olfice which he held three years. Picturning to this country, he became 

' The ]^rercliants' ^iFacrazine and Commercial Keview, conducted by Freeman Hunt, 
Vol. XX. p. 01 S, which also contain an engraving of ^Ntr. Kettell which is said to be an 
excellent likeness. American Biographical Sketch Book, by William Hunt. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 591 

a riRinlier of tlie Xlmv York \\A^t ConfL-ix-nco, iuid wa^ pastor, first, of 
the Siuuls Street Methodist Episcopal Church, and then of the Suinroer- 
fiehl Church, iu IJruoklyn, X. Y. lie was afterward presiding ekler of 
tlio New York district for tlirec years, and at the time of his deatli 
lio was serving in liis fourth year as presiding elder of the Brooklyn 
district. 

I\[r. Kettell was a man of fine abilities, of extraordinary energy, and of 
un amiable disposition. lie ranked among the ablest ministers of his de- 
nomination, and was universally successful in all the work committed to 
him by the church. lie was a member of the Managers of the Missionary 
Society and of the standing conmiittee of finance. 

Dr. Kettell had a remarkable clearness of intellect, unusual felicity of 
statement, a wide range of tliouglit, abundance of instructive anecdotes, 
unfailing good temper, rare conversational powers, and a courteous refine- 
ment of manner. A philosophic and senii-lmmanitarian vein ran through 
his preaching, which made it very interesting to the intellectual, but dimin- 
ished its immediate effects. Fear in the utterance of what he believed true 
he seemed never to know.* 

27. VIII. 273'. Lucretia Ilaa-leij, the first wife of George F. Kettell, 
born in Danbury, Conn., died in Pouglikeepsie, X. Y. 
Ancestry Tables y^V'* 

27. YIII. 273'. Mary Austin Andrews, the second wife of George F. 
Kettell, born in Eichmond, 3Iass. 

Mrs. Kettell is a daughter of Truman Bishop and Mary Ann (Austin) 
Andrews. Ancestry Tables y^-V'- 

27. VITI. 27-i. Annie Peirce Kettell [Hannah D. 27. YII. 150], 
born in Boston, baptized there Nov. 19, 1820, died in Passaic, N. J. 

27. VIII. 274'. Alexander Kissam, her first hu.sband, born in New 
York City, died in New York City. A lawyer. Residence: probably 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1 Thi Christian Advocate of March 22 and 29. 1SS3. 



592 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

Mr. Ki&.-ani siinlied law in the otiice of Cyrus P. Suiilli, of New York, 
was admitted to the bar, and afterwai'ds became his partiK-r. 

His first wife, whom he marritjd J\Iay I'J, ISo'J, was Chirissa Majniard. 
Slie died March 28, 1843. By her he had the following children: — 

Edgar Kissam, born Jan. 31, 1S40. He married Cecilia Mackey. 

Clai'.i.ssa Stoxe Ki.ssaji, born Jan. lo, 1S42 ; died Aug. 24, 1S63. 

Mr. Kissam's second wife, whom he married Aug. 29, 1843, was Louisa 
Maria 3Iaynard. Slie died April G, 1S46. 13y her he had the following 
children : — 

Albert Kissam, born :*ray 29. 1844; died Sept. 1, 1844. 

Walter Kissam, born Feb. IS, 184G. He married, Oct. 13, 1S68, Sarah Jaue 
Birdsall. 

His first and second wives were sisters, daughters of Samuel and Clarissa 
(Stone) ^laynard, formerly of Boston. 

Alexander Kissam was a son of Joseph and Hannah (Bartow) Kissam, 
of Jersey Citv, X. J.^ His ancestry includes the following families: 
Kissam, Searing, Bartow, Reed, Yardell, Tiebout. See Axcestky Tables y-jj.. 

27. YIII. 27^-. Samuel WaJsiein Broivn, the second husband of 
Annie Peirce Kettell, died in Passaic, N. J. Residence : Passaic. 

Mr. Brown was a son of F.noch and Melinda (Padelford) Brown. His 
ancestry includL-s tlie following families : BroAvn, Sawyer, Woodbridge, 
Dudley, Rogers. Crane, Hubbard, Emery, Torrey, Padelford, Blandford, 
Flint, King, Whitman, Dennis. See Axcf.stky Tables ™|,. 

27. YHI. 275. Cliarles Fitcli Putnam [Elizabeth S. 27. YH. 152], 
probably born in Boston, died at sea. A mariner. Residence: Boston. 

27. Yin. 27o. FJiuiheth r. Gould, his wife, born in South Boston, 
died in South Bo.ston. 

Sirs. Putnam was a daughter of Abraham and Susanna (Foster) Gould, 
of South Boston. Her father Avas a farmer. Ancestry Tables ^V-\. 

* Bartow Genealogy, by E. B., pp. 164-166; also letter of Walter Kissam of Jan. 
18, 1895. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 593 

27. VTII. 27G. Elizabeth Peirce Putnam [i:iizabctli S. 27. VII. 
152], probably Ijorn in lj(>.stoii, (li(.'(l in Fairfield, Vt. 
Mrs. Soule had miniatures of her parents. 

27. VIII. 2'76\ lUynolds, her first husband. 

AXCESTKV T.\BLI:S J 2 5-1. 

27. VIII. 27G-. Albert G. Soule, her second huslnmd, died probably 
in >\iirfield, Vt. A country merchant. Kesidence: Fairfield. 

Mr. Soule at one time lived in St. Albans, Vt. He returned to Fairfield, 
where he was of tlie firm of A. G. & C. L. Soule &: Co., dealers in g'eneral 
merchandise. 

AxcESTRY Tables yj^.. 

27. VIII. 277. Edward Pitch Putnam [Elizabeth S. 27. VII. 
152], born in Boston, baptized in Charle.stown, Mass., Sept. 5, 1819, died 
in St. Albans, Vt., of consumption. A clergyman. Kesidence : Mont- 
pelier, Vt. 

I\ir. Putnam was educated at the General Theological Seminary in New 
York. For some six or seven years he was rector of Christ Church, in 
Montpelier, Vt., and gave up his charge only a few months before his death, 
from ill health. He is spoken of as a very lovable man, and is still re- 
membered with aiTection by some of his old parishioners. He was a bright 
man, and is said to have been a fine preacher. A monument to his memory 
is in the graveyard at St. Albans.^ 

27. VIH. 277- Jfcleii Hamilton Stamvood, his wife, born in Hop- 
kinton, N. H., died in llopkinton. 

Mrs. Putnam was a daughter of Joseph and Louisa Ayer (Perkins) 
Stanwood. Her father was a merchant of no})kinton. Axcesti-.y Tables y!/f. 

28. VIII. 279. Sally Bott [Lydia 28. VII. 155], probably born and 
died in Salem. 

■ The Freeman. :^Tontpe]ie^, Vt., of .Tune S, l.S.^l; also letters from the Eev. Thomas 
I'.urgfss, of St. Albans, Vt., dated Jan. 4 and IS, 1SS(3. 



594 THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 



'I^.YIW. 370. Jienjauiin FrederieJi Uroiaie, lier husband, bom 
in Salem, baptized there July It, 1793, died in Salem, of paral} tiis. An 
apothecary. Residence : Salem. 

Dr. l.rowne began his business life in the apothecary shop of 
Edward S. Lanir, <>f Sak-m, Avherti he remained five }'ears. During the 
War of 1812, wliile still in his minority, he became assistant surgeon 
of the privateer " Alfred," and subsequently made two cruises in tlie 
" Frolic " as captain's clerk, purser, and sergeant of marines. On his 
last cruise he was captured and taken to Dartmoor Prison. England. In 
tjie month of Xoveniber, ISIG, he went into the apotliecary business with 
William Stearns. lie continued as an aputhecaiy in Salem in various 
situations until Jan. 1, 18C0, when he retired from business after a long 
and sttccessful career. 

He always took great interest in the public oi-gauizations of his native 
city. He was for nearly fifty years connected with the Independent Con- 
gregational Church in Barton Square. He was master of the Essex Lodge 
of Free Masons from 1824 to 1827; commander of the Cadets from 1825 
to 1828; representative to the General Court in 1S31 ; Slate senator in 
1843; i)05tmaster of Salem from 1845 to 1849; and several times a candi- 
date for mayor of Salem. 

Dr. l^rowne possessed extensive information, and was a frequent and 
valuable contributor to the local press, and was an occasional contributor 
to the Essex Institute Historical Collections. " The Papers of an Old Dart- 
moor Prisoner," written by him for the Democratic Review in 1846, had 
peculiar merits. In the fire Avhich burned his store in 1SG2, he lost notes 
containing the woi'k of many years.^ 

Dr. Browne was a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Andrew) Browne. 
James Browne [1-70. HI. S'], was his great-great-grandfatliei-, and Joseph 
Vincent Browne [23. VIII. 0o9], was his first cousin. His ancestry includes 
the following families: Browne, Bartholomew, Pickering, Flint, Frost, 
Searl, White, Sholote, Andrew, Grafton, Gardner, Frier, Higginson, Whit- 
field, Sheafe, Savage, Symmes, Gerrish, Lowell, Ruck, Spooner, Gardner, 

^ Obituary in tlie Salem Gazette of Xor. 2.5, JS73, and a Memoir in the Essex Insti- 
tute Historical Collections, Vol. XIII. pp. S1-S9. 



EIGHTH GEXKRATIOy. 595 

]''rifi', Wliitt^, Herbert, I'orter, HatliDrue, Ganlner, Frier, Oi'iie, Browne, 
Weld, Clap, ]\Iitelielsoii, r>u>liell. See Anckstky Taules If.^. 

28. VIII. 280. Lyclia Hardy Bott [Lydia 28. VII. 155], born in 
rialem, died in Salem, of inflammation of the lung-.s. 

28. VIII.. ^5a Thomas llitssell Snfford, her husband, probably 
])orn and died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

^Ir. Safford was a son of William and Sarah B. (Colcord) Safford. 
Ancestry Tables y "j. 

28. VITI. 281. Sarali Hardy Haraden [Sarah 28. VII. 156], born 
in Salem, died in Salem, of brain disease. 

28. Vril. 2S1. Williani Sleuniaii Iiose, her husband, born in Salem, 
died in Salem, of consumption. A mariner. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Koso was a son of Joseph and Hannah Rose. Axcestky Tables y"j. 

28. VIII. 282. Lydia Ann Haraden [Sarah 28. VII. 15G], born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

2S.Ylll.2S3. HettJcDnin Hale Ives, her husband, born in Srdem, 
died in Saleui. A bookseller. Residence : Salem. 

]\[r. Ives was of the lirm of Ives & Putnam. An obituary of him in the 
Salem Reg-ister of Jan. 30, 1837, pays a high tribute to his character. 

He was a son of "William and Polly (Bradshaw) Ives, of Salem. His 
ancestry includes the following- families: Ives, Metcalf, Derby, Hasket, 
Ward, Flint, 3Iassey, Wells, Warner, Webb, Becket, Phippen, Wood, Crom- 
well, Bradshaw, Mansfield. See Axcestky Tables l^{\. 

28. VIII. 283. Andrew Haraden [Sarah 28. VII. 156], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of heart disease. An expi'essman. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

Mr. Haraden went to sea in early life, and became an officer of a ship ; 
but for many ^-ears betore his death lie was a package exjwessman between 
^alem ami Boston. The banks had great conlidence in him, and frequently 
intrusted parcels of great value to his care.* 

* The Salem Kegistcr of Juue 28, 1S77. 



596 THE riCKEUIXG GENEALOGY. 

28. YIII. 35J. Augusta C. Ober, his wife, probably born in Salem, 
died in Salem, of heart disease. 

Mrs. llaraden was a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Robinson) 
Ober. An-cksti-.v Tablks -^ 3 g-. 

28. VIII. 2S4. Mary Haraden [Sarah 28. VII. 156], born in Salem, 
died in Salem, of pneumonia. Residence : Salem. 

28. VIII. CS.^'. Henry Derbtj, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Danvers, ]\Iass. An insurance agent. Residence : Danvers. 

Mr. Derb}- was a son of Samuel and Bethia (^yatts) Derby. Sarah A. 
Dcrhii [;U. \'lli. 319'] was his niece. His ancestry includes the following 
families: Derby, Ililman, Youngs, Biidd, Williams, Watts, Dalaud, Hedges, 
Hudson, Peters, llilliard. See Ancestry Tables "jl- 

29. VIIT. 285. Lydia Ann Henfield [Jose^jh II. 29. VII. 157], born 

in Now London, Conn., died in Salem. 

29. VIII. 2So. Joscpli Chisholm, her husband, born in Salem, died 
in Salem. A rope-maker. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Chisholm was for fifty-three years secretary of the Naumkeag Club. 
He was a well-read man of much intelligence, of a very social and genial 
disposition, witli a touch of dry humor that was very agreeable. He was a 
good citizen, and much respected. He was one of seventeen children.'' 

He was a son of William and Martha (Vincent) Chisholm. His fiither 
was of Scotch descent, being of the ancient Clan Frazer. Joseph Vincent 
Browne [23. VIII. 230'] was his first cousin. Ancestry Tables ~™g. 

29. VIII. 287. George Hardy Henfield [Joseph H. 29. VII. 157], 
born in Nev,^ London, Conn., died in San Francisco, Cal. A coppersmith 
a7id ironworker. Residence : San Francisco, Cal. 

29. VIII. 2S7. Xancy Harris Howard, his wife, born in New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Mrs. Henfield was a daughter of John and Nancy (Harris) Howard, of 
New London. Her father was a pilot. Ancestry Tables ^^\. 
* Tlio Salcra Gazette of Oct. 13, 1885. 



EIGHTH OENERATJOX. b'M 



29. Vlll. 290. Joseph Heiificld [John 29. VII. IfjS], bom in Sak'!n, 
died in Salem. Eesidence : Salem. 

29. VIII. '200. SaraJi Broioie, his wife, born in Salem. Residence: 
Salem. 

Pier second husband i^ Joseph Percival Clout man [28. IX. ./J6'-]. For an 
account of him see pages 881-882. Her number in direct descent is [28. 
IX. 45G]. 

29. VI IT. 291. Wamvick Palfi'ay [Hannah 29-32. VII. IGO], born 
in Salem, baptized there October, 1787, died in Salem. An editor and 
publisher, licsidence : Salem. 

For tliirty-three years Mr. Palfray was editor of the Essex liegister ; and 
the paper was edited and published by his son, Charles W. Palfray, until May 
23, 1893, when it was merged in the Beverly Citizen. He was a member 
of the Salem Common Council in 1836, 1837, and 1838, and represented 
Salem in the General Court in 1827, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1834, and 1835, 
and Essex County in the Senate in 1836, 1837, and 183S. He was an 
original member of the Salem Charitable Sociel}', and its vice-])resident at 
the time of his deatli. 3Ir. Palfray was a man of high private character, 
and was very much respected in Salem. ^ 

29. VIII. 291. JEU:^aheth lioumJy, his wife, born in Pevci'ly, ]Mass., 
died in Salem. 

Mrs. Palfray was a daughter of Captain Xeliemiah and Rebecca (Boyn- 
ton) Roundy. Abigail Rouudij [40. Vll. X9^] was her sister. Her ances- 
try includes the following families : Roundy, Boynton, Abbot, Chandler, 
Hibbard, Bullard. See Axckstry Taklks ^"p 

29. VIII. 292. George Palfray [Hannah 29-32. VII. IGO], born in 
Salem, baptized there July, 1789, died in Saco, Maine. A sailuiaker. 
Residence : Salem. 

29. VIII. 203. Mary Archer, his wife, born in Salem, died in Lynn, 
Mass. 

» The Salem Gazette of Aug. 2-1, 1S38. 



598 THE riCKEiiiyc gexealogy. 



Mi-ri. Palli-ay w<is a tlauylitLT of William aud Mary (Dalaiid) Archer, of 
Salem. Iler ancestry iucludes the foUowing- families : Archei', Osgood, 
Massey, Wells, Warner, Eopes, Wells, Warner, Bartlett, Wood\\ell, Gilling- 
ham, Dalaiul, Hodges, Hudson, Peters, Hilliard, Cook, Birdsall, Buxton, 
Cox, Pope, Smith. See Axckstky Tables -J^" . 

30-31. VIII. 203. Lydia Palii'ay [Hannah 20-32. VII. IGO], bom 
in Salem, baptized there March 11, 17'J2, died in Chelsea, ]\Iass. 

30-31. VIII. J03. Jonathan Daris JJosson, her husband, born in 
Salem, died iu 3Iarlborouph, Mass. An upholsterer. Pesidence: Chelsea. 

Mr. Bosson learned the trade of a tanner and currier, which he followed 
for some years in his native town. In l!^20, he moved to Boston, and en- 
gaged in the leather and upholstering Ijusiness, having at one time as ]3art- 
ner the late Deacon Moses Grant. About 18-10, he removed to Chelsea, 
where he was tor many years engaged in the manufacture of mattresses. 
As a citizen, he was much respected, and his venerable figure was one of 
the most familiar ol)jects upon the streets of Chelsea. 

He took an interest in military affairs, and for over seventy years ho was 
a member of the Salem Cadets, having joined the company in 180G. He 
regularly appeared with them at the annual fall paiades, until within four 
years of his deatli. On these occasions his appearance in the i-anks, with firm 
step, erect and vigorous, was one of the most striking features of the parade. 

In the early part of the War of 1S12, he was on board one of the Salem 
privateers which had an engagement with the eneniy. On his return from 
privateering, he resumed his connection with the Cadets, and was frequently 
drafted or detailed for coast-guard dut}-, to which the militia were then 
subject. 

Mr. Bosson was one of the oldest admitted momliors of St. Peters Epis- 
copal Church, Salem, but he afterwards became identified with the Baptist 
Church. 

The golden wedding of Mr. and ]\Irs. Bosson was celebrated ; and for 
that occasion the Rev. Dr. S. F. Smith, the author of " America," wrote an 
original hymn. 

Mr. Bosson's death was the result of an accident which occurred while 



EinriTH GEXiniATiox. 599 



ho ^vas on a vi>it to liis Jau-hter, .Mrs. William William.^ of :\rai-lborouoli. 
At the time he was in the enjoyment of perfrct health, and ha.d only rccc^ntly 
celebrated the '.Uth anniversary of his birth, in whieh he was able to par- 
ticipate with his accnstomed activity and enjoyment. To the end of his 
days, he was very active in his habits, taking delight in ont-of-door life, and 
enjoying remarkably good health.^ 

lie was a son of Jonathan Davis and Martha (Young) ]^)osson. His 
ancestry inclndes the following families: Bosson, Partridge, Young. See 
Ancestry Tables x-l\- 

31. VIII. -204. Hannah Palfray [Hannah 20-32. VII. IGO], born in 
Salem, died in Lynn, Mass. 

31. VIII. 204.^. John ncifff/ett AitwiU, her first husband, born in 
Lynn, Mass., died in Lynn. x\. shoe manufacturer and merchant. Lesi- 
dencc: Lynn. 

Mr. Attwill was extensively engaged in the manufacture of shoes in 
Lynn. He had stores for their sale successively in Baltimore, Md., Peters- 
fnirg-, and Pichmund, Va., and Charleston, S. C 

He was interested in military matters, and for three years was in the 
Massachusetts ^Militia with the rank of major. His father and elder brother 
were in the Pe\olution. 

Mr. Attwill's first wife, whom he married Nov. 18, 1704, was ]\Iartha 
Jngalls. She was born March 2, 177o, and died July 3, 1817. She was a 
daughter of Jacob and Martha (Lewis) Ingalls, of Lynn. By her he had 
the following children : — 

Tatty Aitwili,, born Jlarch, 20, 1797. She married Jonathan Wat- 

son, and died April 23, IS 12. 

Nelson- ItEr.n Attwill, born Sept. ], 1708. He married Aliby S. Ward, and 

died Dee. 30, tSGl. 

JoHX Daggbit Attwill, born May 1, ISOO. He married, Oet. 7, 1S24, Ann 

Burroucjhs. and died Feb. 9, lSo2. 



1 The Salem Register of Feb. 10, ISSO; Boston Tost of Feb. 17, ISSO ; and The Chelsea 
Pioneer of Feb. 21, l.'^SO. 



600 THE FICKERiyG GENEALOGY. 

Maky Attwill, born April r">, ls02. She iiiarrietl, June 2, 1822, 

James Cutler AVard [35. VI IT. 337], and died 
March 3, 1S2G. 

Betsey Fullerton Attwill, born Feb. 4, ISO I. She married, Sept. 30, 1S22, 
Benjamin Ward [35. VIII. 334], and died JIarch 
19, 18^2. 

Alfrkd Attwill, born Jan. 29, 1S06 ; died, unmarried, in 1849. 

GusTAVUs Attwill, born Jlay 22, ISOS. He married, first. Almira 

Mudge, seeond, Almira Burrill, and died Aug. 18, 
1873. 

Edw.vrd Attwu.l, born Aug. 7, 1810; died, unmarried, Dec. 19, 18C4. 

Richard In(>ali.s Attwill, bc>rn July 17, 1S12 ; died unmarried. 

William Anu-sTrs Attwilt,, boru March 22, 1814; died Feb. 20, 1827. 

Jacob Attwill, born March 26, 1816; died April 4, 1816. 

Joseph Warren Attwill, born July 2, 1817; died, unmarried, April C, 1866. 
He was twin brother of the following child. 

Bexjamin Franklin Attwill, born July 3. 1817. He was twin brother of the fore- 
going child. He married Xancy Winslow, and died 
April 5, 1866. 

The above twin brotliers, during their life, ^^■ere almost inseparable, and 
were so alike iu form and feature that few could distinguish between them. 
Tliey also had the same sentiments, o{)inions, tastes, nnd habits. Joseph, 
who preceded his brother some four hours in his birth, followed him in death 
in about twenty hours. While apparently in his usufd health, lie was called 
to attend his brother in a sliort sickness, and when Ins brother died, Joseph's 
nervous system became entirely shattered, and he died also.^ 

Mr. Attwill was a son of William and Lydia (Ilicks) Attwill, of Lynn. 
His ancestry includes the following- families : Attwill, Ilicks, "West, Sill, 
Green, Mitchclson, Bushell, Daggett, Scollay. See Axcestky Tables jf-^.. 

31. VIII. 'JOJr'- Jacob JPhillips, the second husband of Hannah 
Palf)-ay, born iu Lynn, Mass., died in Lynn, of paralysis. A fisherman. 
Residence: Lynn. 

Mr. Phillips was a son of Walter Phillips, who was a native of Lynn." 
Ancestky Tables ^j\'- 

* Abstract of an account of these brothers furnished by Eicbard I. Attwill. 
" For the family to which Jacob Phillips probably belonged see Phillips Genealogies, 
by Albert IM. Phillips, pp. 159-lGl. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 601 



31. VIII. 296. Nancy Palfray [ITaniK.li 20-32. VII. IGO], bom in 
Saloin, baptized there May 20, ITO'J, died in Salem. 

31. VIII. '2DG. Youny Flint Wahleii, her husband, born in Danvers, 
]\Ia.ss., died ill Salem. A currier. Residence: Salem. 

i\[r. Walden's lirst wife, whom he married Nov. 3, l.'^ll, was Susan 
Tucker. Ilis second wife, whom he married Aug. 15, 1824, was Lucy 
l)ickson. By tliese wives he had children. 

lie was a son of Joseph and Lydia Waldcn, of Danvers. Anckstky 



31. VIII. 200. Edward Palfray [Hannah 20-32. VII. IGO], born in 
Sak'in, died in Worcester, 3Iass., of disease of the brain. An editor and 
pubh>]ier. Residence: Salem. 

For man}' years ^Mr. Palfray was the editor and jmblisher of the Salem 
Advertiser. lie was afterwards surveyor of the Port of Salem, and later an 
ofticer in the Boston Custom Ilouse.^ 

31. VIII. 200. JEJixa Cummings, his wife, died in Chelsea. 

AXCESTKY TaK.LKs y^l. 

32. VIII. 302. Sarah Hunt [Sarah 32-33. VII. 162], probably born 
in Salem, died in Salein. 

32. VIII. 303. James FcUon, her husband, born in 3Iarblehead, 
Mass., died in Salem, of consumption. A sailmaker. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Felton married, March 6, 1828, as his second wife, Sally Dodd. 
She was born Oct. 21, 1806, and died Aug. 14, 1850. 

He was a son of James and Ruth (Smith) Felton. His ancestry includes 
the following families: Felton, Skelton, Orne, Foot, Turner, Smith. See 
AscvsTP.Y Tables \^^\- 

32. VIII. 303. Elizabeth Hnnt [Sarah 32-33. VII. 162], born in 
Salem, died in Sak^m. Residence : Salem. 

^Irs. Stanley's father died when she was quite young, and she took up 
• The Salem Register of April 16, 1S4G. 



602 THE nCKERIXa GENEALOGY. 

her residence at L5akor's Island. During- the AVar ol' 1S12, site was one day 
wandering- about the island, when she espied an English man-of-war makingf- 
into Salem Harbor. She succeeded in alarming the residents of the town ; 
and the British captain, hnding that his presence was no secret, immediately 
left. For years she was hailed as a heroine.^ 

An obituary of Mrs. Stanley, in the Salem Observer of Dec. 23, 1893, 
speaks of her, in addition to other facts, as follows : — 

"Mrs. Stanley was remarkably smart for one of her extreme age, and attended 
service at tlie Cromliie Street Church regularly e\'ery Sunday until within a very few 
\cars. She w;'.-; uf a \ory liriglit. vivacious manner, and was always fu'st and foremust 
in all the good works of the church, in which she was deeply interested." 

32. VIII. 303. John Stanlcij, her husband, born in Liverpool, Eng., 
died at St. Helena. A mate of a ship. Residence : Salem. 
AxcESTRv Tables j^\. 

32. VIII. 304. Mary Hunt [Sarah 32-33. VII. 1G2], born in Salem, 
died in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mrs. Earring-ton was one of the most venerable inhabitants of Salem, 
having entered her ninety-third year. She possessed an uncommonlv 
lively and cht-crful temperament, was interested in the events of the day, 
and ]-etained her vigor and elasticity to a wonderful degree." 

32. VIII. 804- Edward Farritigton, her husband, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A cordwainer. Residence: Saleti]. 

Jlr. Earrington was a sou of AVilliam and Mary W. Earrington. 
Ancestry Tables j^p 

32. VIII. 3().j. Susanna Palfray Hunt [Sarah 32-33. VII. 1C2], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

32. VIII. oOo. Samuel M. Fo;/e, her husband, born in Salem, died 
in Salem, of constunption. A ropemakor. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Eoye was a son of "William and Mary C. Eoye, of Salem. Ancestry 
Tables ^f^. 

' The Boston Transcript of Dec. 22, 1S93. 
= The Salem Ite-ister of Amr. 1, 1S'J2. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. fi03 



33. VIII. oOG. Thomas H-ant [Sarah ;12-;;;;J. VII. 1(j2J, bom in 
Salem, died in Salem. A merchant. lves>idcnce : Salem. 

]\Ir. Hunt's early life was spent at sea. lie was one of the cyoay of the 
famous ship " George," a vessel from which so many of Salem's shipmasters 
graduated. He afterwards cugaged in the New Orleans, Liverpool, Russian, 
African, and East India trade. He entered the employ of A. A. Low, and 
was chief officer under Captain N. B. Palmer, of the ship Hongua, on her 
first voyage to Canton, China. His ship was one of the earliest of the clip- 
per ships. In l.'^42, he left the Hongua and started an express boat for 
carrying de^-})atches between Canton and its i)ort, Wliampoa, a distance of 
some twebe miles on the river. The river was thickly invested with 
pirates, and the ordinary ship's boats were attacked and robbed. ^Mr. 
Hunt won the conildence of the mercantile comnmnity, and by his 
fearlessness and tireless energy, condjined vv'ith his tact in dealing with 
the natives, he soon gained such a I'eputatlon tlir.t his boats were seldom 
attacked either night or day. From this beginning, he entered into the 
ship-chandlery business, with hulks for storage, and packet boats between 
Hong Kong, Whamjioa, and Canton. About 1851, he returned home 
with an ample foi'tune, having sold his business to James llridges Endi- 
cott [5. VITT. 37] and J. P. Cook, both from Salem. Following the 
example of many who made their wealth in the Orient, he lost a large 
portion of it at home. He returned to China in iNaO-lSGO, and entered 
into the employ of Augustine Heard tt Co., at Hong Kong. After re- 
maining there three years, he returned to Salem, making but one more 
visit to China, and that for pleasure, a year or two previous to his death. 
i\Ir. Hunt was a man of marked characteristics. He had an active mind 
and keen perceptions, and overcame the want of his early educational 
advantages by wide reading, and b}- his interest in all the progressive 
movements in the political and sociological \vorIi|. His warm and hearty 
nature endeared him to his friends, and to all who came in r(~intact with 
him. He held no public office except as marshal of the United States 
Consulate at Canton.^ 



Letter of T. F. Huut, dated July, 1S03. 



60-1 THE nCKEBIXG GJLXEALOOY. 

3.'i. VIII. uUO. Eli^abcih Cook Keen, liis wii'o, probably born iu 
Salo.n. 

Mrs. Hunt i^; a daughter of John Cook Keen, of Salem, who was called 
Jolni Cook, and all ofwho.se daughters, exccj)t Mrs. Hunt, were married by 
the name of C<tok, she beiiig married by her riglit name. Her brother 
also dropped tlie name of Keen. ANcrsx]:v T.ujlks {g'j. 

33. VIII. 307. Lydia Ciiapman Hunt [Sarali 32-33. VII. 162], 
born in Salem, died in New York City. 

33. VIIT. .^'yT. J)anie} Goodhue, her Imsband, bom iu Salem, died 
at sea. A seaman. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Goodhue was a son of Abner and Frances (Bott) Goodhue. His 
father was a blacksmith, of Salem. John Pudt Goodhw [3-i. VIII. S22'] was 
his brother; ]\Ltrij EUzali'th GooJIme [47. VIII. /)17] is his niece; and 
John Bott [28. VII. .7JJ] wa> his uncle. His ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families: Goodhue, Watson, Whipple, Sherwiu, Larason, Eott, Kewhall, 
Potter. See Axcestkv Tablks \V\. 

33. VIII. 310. Louisa Hunt [Sarah 32-33. VII. 162], born in 
Salem. Residence : Salem. 

33. VIII. 310. Gamaliel Everard Ward, her husband, born in 
Salem. A shipmastei-. Residence : Salem. 

I\Ir. Ward Avas a son of Nathaniel and Sarah (Trask) Ward. His 
ancestry includes the follo^ving families : Ward, Flint, Massey, Wells, 
Warner, Derby, Hilman, Youngs, Rudil, Hodges, Phippen, Wood, Williams, 
Skerry, Manning, Calley, Webb, Pray, Collins, Cockerill, Trask. See 
Ancestry Tablks us- 

33. VIII. 311. Sarah. Tucker [jlarlha 33. VII. 163], born in Salem, 
died in Boston. 

33. VIII. JIV. SoJonion Smifli Whipple, lier first husband, born in 
Hamilton, Mass., died in Boston. A lawyer. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Whipple, Dartmouth College, 1811, taught school in that year in 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 60,' 



lAiin. ]Ic afterwards rt^aJ law \vitli iiruniineut la\vyer.s of Essex Comity, 
and began its practice in Saleui in 1810, removing to Boston in 1839.^ 

lie was a son of ^latthew and Elizabeth (Sniitli) "Whipple, of Hamilton. 
Akci-stky Tablks 1 sV'- 

33. VIII. 31I-. James Tiavkev, her second husband, born in Haver- 
hill, Mass., died in Boston. Kesidence : Boston. 

Idr. ]>arker was a son of James and Elizabeth Barker. Axcestky 

„, VIII 

lABLKS 15 v>- 

33. VJIl. 313. Lewis Tucker [Martha 33. VII. KJS], born in Salem, 
died in Boston, of dropsy. A merchant. Kesidence : Boston. 

33. VIII. 313. Susan Tucker Cohh, his wife, born in Boston, died in 
Boston. 

I\rrs. Tucker was a daughter of Elias and Susan Cobb. Ancestry 
Tables ^"V- 

33. VIII. 311. ]^Tancy Cook Levis [Anna 33. VII. 165], probably 
born and died in Salem. 

33. VIII. 0I4. EUioit Smith, her husband, born in Beverly, Mass., 
probably died in Salem. 

Mr. Smith was a son of Francis and Jane (Elliot) Sniith, of Beverly. 
His ancestry includes the following families : Smith, Grover, Barney, "Wood, 
Smith, Hayward, Elliot. See Anxestky Tables ^""y. 

33. VIII. 315. Abigail Cliapman Levis [Anna 33. VII. 165], prob- 
ably burn and died in Salem. 

33. VIII. 31'J. Samuel Clutych, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Salem, of heart disease. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Church married for his second wife Lucy Ropes [42. VIII. 42S]. 
For an account of her see page 638. 

He was a son of Lemuel and Hannah (Ropes) Church. His ancestry 

' Sketches of the Alumni of Dartmouth College, by the Rev. George T. Chapman, 
p. 168. 



GOG THE PICKETS IXG GENEALOGY. 

iiicliule.s tlio t'ollowini,' familiL'S : CIuu-cli, liope.s, Iiigvr.soll, Collins, Sniitli, 
Luscomb, BrewL-r, ]jeal, Ashby, Felt, AVilkinsoii, Andrews, Bonfield, Brad- 
street. See AxrrsTuv Tables j'"|y. 

33. VIII. 317. George Chapman Cook [Lydia 33-34. VII. 1G7], 
born in Salem, died in Daiivorsport, Mass. A tailor. Residence : Dan- 
versport. 

33. VIII. 317. WliindsopJie)' Waters, ]n"s wife, born in Salem. 

Mrs. Cook is a daughter of Captain John and Eleanor (Shales) Waters, of 
Beverly. Ca})tain John Waters \vas a coppersmith, of Sak-m. Tliontas Sludcs 
Waters [34. VIll. JJ^'] was her brother. Iler ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families: "Waters, "Worthylake, Porter, l^yram, Shaw, Ford, Dingluy, 
Calef, King, JcAvett, How, Ilojjkinson, I'earson, Shales, Elliot, Woodier, 
Browne, Porter, llathorue, Groves. See Axcestky Tables j]}\. 

34. VIII. 318. James Kennedy Cook [Lydia 33-34. VII. 167], 
born in Salem, died in Andover, Mass. A printer. Residence : Andover. 

34. VIII. 3IS. Catherine Pond Ware, his wife, born in Salem. 
Residence : St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Cook is a daughter of Erastus and Clarissa Dillaway (Wardwell) 
Ware, of Marbkdiead. Her ancestry includes the following families : Ware, 
Manu(?), Wardwell. See A^-cESTRY Tablis l"^. 

34. VIII. 311J. Samuel Kennedy Cook [Lydia 33-34. VII. 167], 
born in Salem, died in Gloucester, Mass., of paralysis. A merchant. Resi- 
dence : Gloucester. 

ilr. Cook became a resident of Gloucester in 1834, and engaged in 
business with a ^\\\ Bates, under the stylo of Bates & Cook, as merchant 
tailors. On the dissolution of the firm, ^^Ii'. Cook continued the business 
until 1849, when he went to California. He returned home, and was cm- 
ployed in business until his health failed. He was a genial man of ready 
wit, and a general favorite with all who knew him.^ 

34. VIII. 310. Sarah Atldnaon DerVy, his wife, born in Salem. 

' Obituary iu tlie Cape Ami Advertiser of July S, 1SS7. 



EIGITTII GEXJjn.lTTOX. G07 



]\Irs. Cook is a cLuii^litfr ol" Julm ami Suftau (Atkinson) Deri)}', of Salem. 
Jlatnj Bcrhu [2s. VIII. JS^-'] was her uncle. Her ancestry includes the fol- 
lowing- families : Derby, Ililnian, Youngs, Budd, Williams, Watts, Daland, 
Hodges, Hudson, Peters, Ililliard, Atkinson. See Axoe.stky Tables l^{\. 

31 Vin. 322. Lydia Ann Cook [Lydia 33-34. VII. IGT], bom in 
Salem, died in Salem, of inflammation of the bowels. 

34. VIIT. JJ^^. Jo/ni JJott GoofUme, her husband, born in Salem, 
died in Hamilton, 3Iass. A senman and painter. Eesidence : Hamilton. 

j\ir. Goodhue's second wife, Avhom he married April 4, ] Sr)2, was Sarah 
Ann Comery. She was living in Hamihon, Mass., in 18S(J. By her he had 
the following children : ^ — 

Harriet Ef.xnet Goodhue, born Dec. 28, 1852. 

Fkank Tuttlh Goodhue, boru Jan. 20, 1854. 

Samuel Gedxey Goodhue, born Feb. 4, 18,35. 

Charles Abxer Goodhue, born June S, 1S5G ; died Oct. 3, 1857. 

John- Walter Goodhue, born April 10, 1858. 

Sarah Frances Goodhue, born June 1, 1859. 

William Adams Goodhue, born Jan. 19, 1SG3. 

James Arthur Goodhue, born Aug. 29, 1SG4. 

Mr. Goodhue was a son of Abner and Frances (Bott) Goodhue, of 
Salem. John Boft [28. VII. lo5'\ was his uncle; Do.iiieJ GorxJhne [33. VIII. 
oOT] was his brother; and j\Iari/ Elimhcfl/ GooJliue [47. VIII. ■517'] is his 
niece. His ancestry includes the following families: Goodhue, Watson, 
AVhipple, Sherwin, Lamson, Bott, Xewhall, Potter. See Ancestry Takles ~}^l\. 

34. VIII. 324. Mary Abigail Cook [Lydia 33-34. VII. 1G7], born 
in Salem, died in Salem. 

34, VIII. JJ.^. Tliomas SJiaJps TJV^f^r,'?^ her husband, born in Salem, 
jirobably died in Salem. A coppersmith. Pesidence : Salem. 

]\Ir. Waters was a son of Captain John and Eleanor (Shales) Waters. 
Whbidsophcr Wattrs [33. VIII. 317'] is his sister. His ancestry includes 
the following families: Waters, Worthylake, Porter, Byram, Shaw, Ford, 

' History and Genealogy of the Goodliue Family, by Jonathan E. Goodhue, p. 5.3. 



THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 



Ding-lev, Calef, King-, Juwett, How, Ilopkiiison, Pearson, Sliales, Elliot, 
Woodier, In-owiie, Porter, ilathorue, Groves. See Antestky Tables "gy. 

34. VIII. 327. Martha Tucker Pool [Polly 34. VII. 1G8], probably 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

The Salem Gazette of Feb. 6, 1837, contains an obituary eulogistic of 
her character. 

34. VIII. 327. Xathan Smith, her husband, born in Marblehead, 
Mass., died in Salem, of dropsy. A sea-captain. Piesideuce: Salem. 

At the time of his ilvst marriage lie ihanjjX'd his name to Pool. 

His second wife ■was ]\Iatilda L'ool, a sister of his first wife. His third 
wife, -whom he married in 1843, was Maria ]Mahala Pool, who was born in 
Charlestown, Mass., April 27, 1810. Slie is a daughter of Lot and Lydia 
(Parker) Pool. By her he had the following child: — 

Lydia Parker Pool, born in Salem, Sept. 18, 1845; married, in 1800, Oliver Ober, 
who died in 1S63. She married again, in 1876, Owen B. 
Stone, and died Aug. 9, 1885. 

Mr. Pool was a son of ]\Ioses and Rachel (Proctor) Smith. His father 
was born in Ipswich, 31ass., and his mother in Marblehead, Mass. Akcestey 
Tables ^. 

84. Vni. 328. Matilda Pool [Polly 34. VII. 1C8], probably born in 
Salem, died in Salem, of consumption. 

34. VIII. 323. Xathan [Smith] Pool, her husband. 
For an account of him see above. 

34. ^^^. 329. Joseph Henfield [Edmund 34. VII. 173], born in 
Salem, died in Lynnfield, 3Iass. A farmer. Pesidence : L3-nnfield. 

34. VIII. 320. EU^iaheth Green Swectser, his wife, born in South 
Reading, Mass., died in Lynnfield, Mass. 

Jlrs. Henfield was a daughter of John Sweetser, who was a shoemaker. 
Axc>:sTi;v Talles \™-^. 

34. VIII. 330. Mary Henfield [Edmund 34. VII. 173], born in 
Salem, died in 'Wakefield, 3Iass. 



EIGHTH GEXEIiATIOX. 609 

34. Vlll. ooO. Olicer linnhtt, her LtsLoikI, born in "Wakftkld, 
Mass., died iu ^Vakefield, of lung- fever. A Khoemaker. Residence: 
Wakefield. 

Mr. Burdett bad a second \Yife, by whom he had the followinf-- 
children: — 

Ol.IVKR r>URDF.TT. 

Joseph BuRDriT. 

He was a son of Michael and Pully (Dix) liiirdrtt. Ak- ksify Tablks y'J^j. 

34. VIIT. 331. Sally Henfield [Ednuuid 34. VII. 173], bom in 

Salem, died in Lynrifield, Mass. 

34. VIII. 331. IJdirayd Doirniur/, her husband, born in Greenland, 
N. IT., died in Lynnfield, Mass. A shoemaker. Residence : Lynnfield. 

Mr. Downing- was a son of Thomas and 3Iartha (Xorris) Downing. His 
father was a farmer. See Axcestry T.^bles yl" . 

34. VIII. 333. John Henfield [Ednnnid 34. VII. 173], born in 
Salem, died in Salem, of typho-malarial fever. A shoemaker. Residence : 
Salem. 

34. VIIT. 333. Dorcas HaskeU, his -wife, born in Salem. Residence : 
Salem. 

i\Irs. Henfield is a danghter of William and Dorcas (Larrabee) Ha.?kell. 
Her father was a cabinet-maker, of Salem. Her ancestry includes the 
following- families : Haskell, Buxton, Larrabee. See Ancestky Tables ~ I"-. 

35. VIII. 334. Benjamin Ward [Andrew 35. VII. 174], born in 
Salem, died in Lynn, ]\Iass. A shoemaker. Residence : Lynn. 

35. Vlll. 334- Jictsey FuV.cyto}i Attic ill, his wife, born in Ijvnn, 
Mass., died in Lvnn. 

i\[rs. Ward was a daughter of John Da//fjrff AftiviU [31. Vlll. '304'] and 
Martha (Ingalls) Attwill, of Lynn. 2I'(inj AthviU [35. Vlll. 337'] was her 
sister. Her ancestry includes the following families: Attwill, Hicks, West, 
Sill, Green, I^Iitchelson, Bushell, Da.ggett, Scollay, Ingalls, Hacker, Tucker, 
Lewis, ^larshall, Bruer, Breed, Xewhall, Potter, Farrar, Potter. See 
AxcESTUY Tables t'Ut. 



610 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

35. VIII. 0;]o. Fvicliard BowmLin Wiird [Andrew 35. VII. 174], 
born in Salem, died in Xew \oi-k C'ity. 

35. VIII. J->5. Cfttlicriiie J/ooiv, his wife. 

She lived in Exeter, N. II., at the time of her marriage. 

Ancestry Tables \ys- 

35. VIII. 33G. Eliza"beth "W^arcl [Andrew 35. VII. 174], probably 
born in Salem. Residence: Lynn, Mass. 

35. VIII. SoG^. jyatiiniiiel Bin-rUl, Iter first Im.sband, born in Lynn, 
j\Iass., died in Lyim. A slioe manufacturer. Residence: Lynn. 
Mr. Burrill is described as being "a man full of jokes." 
He was a son of Micajah and 3Iercv (Ingalls) liurrili. Micajah Burrill 
was a shoe manufacturer, of Lynn. Cliarlvs F. Barrill [29. X. J6'i] is his 
nephew, and Gcorghuta Burrill [20. X. JJ/j] is his first cousin once re- 
moved. His ancestry includes the following families : Burrill, Ivory, 
South, Farrington, Hills, Xewhall, Potter, Farrar, Fowle, Richardson, 
Green, Ingalls, Pratt. See Akcestky Tables -j'"!-.. 

35. VIII. 5JC'. Ira Sfnihoi'ii, her second husband, born in Sanboru- 
ton, N. II., died in Lynn, Mass. A shoemaker. Residence: Lynn. 

Mr. Sanborn was a son of Joseph and Mary (Sanborn) Sanborn, of 
Sanbornton, X. H. His ancestrv includes the following families: Sanborn, 
l\icke, Moulton, Philbrick, Sanborn, ]\Ioulton, Marston, Roby, Ilobbs, 
Sanborn, Tucke, Moulton, Philbrick, Sanborn, Moulton, Marston, Roby, 
Gate, Mason. See Axcestrv Tables jl;\^- 

35. VIII. 337. James Cutler Ward [Nathaniel 35-36. VII. 175], 
born in Salem, died in Everett, Mass. A shoemaker. Residence : Everett. 

35. VIII. JJ7'. ]ffa>'i/ AftH'ilJ, his first wife, born in Lynn, Mass., 
died in Lynn. 

Mrs. Ward was a daughter of ./"///; Dcu/udt AtfwiU [31. VIIL 094^] and 
]\Iartha (Ingalls) Attwill. Betsci/ FiiUerlou Atfivill [35. AHII. oJ4] was her 
sister. Her ancestry includes the following families: Attwill, Hicks, West, 
Sill, Green, Mitchelson, Bu.shell, Daggett, Scollay, Ingalls, Hacker, Tucker, 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 611 

Lewis, ]\Iar»li;ill, l>ruer, IJretd, Now hull, Pottex', Farrur, Potter. See 
Ancestry J-Aulls ^ - j-.. 

35. VIII. oo7'- EiiicUne Brown, his second wife, Ijoni in Nelson, 
N. H., dit'd in Everett, Mass. 
Ancesthv T.A.BLES xrV'- 

35. Vin. 339. Mary Ann Ward [Nathaniel 35-30. VII. 175], born 
in Salem, died in Everclt, ^lass. 

35. VIll. oJ9. Isaac JJaldwin, lier husband, born in Everett, ]Mass., 
died in Evui'ett. A carpenter. Poftidcnce : Eveivtt. 

Mr. Baldwin was a son of Jonathan and 3Iary (Sargent) l>aldwin, of 
Everett. Clioflcs Bahlniii [35. VIII. o.;0], WHUam Buldu:ui [3(j. Xlll. 341\ 
and Frcderk']; Bahhvhi [35. IX. oOS] were his brothers, and George Ediv'oi 
Baldwin [3o. IX. GOJ'] is his nephew. ITis ancestry includes the fullowing- 
families: Baldwin, Coley, Grover, Sweetser, Green, Green, Cook, Sargent, 
Hyllier, Green, Bucknam, Knowcrs, Peabody, Green, "Wheeler, Green, 
Cook, Bucknam, Worth, Sprague, Goffe, Chitt<,-nden. See ^i^-cESTKv 
Tables ^\. 

35. Viri. 340. Sarah VT'ard [Nathaniel 35-3G. VII. 175], probably 
born in Salem, died in Everett, Mass. 

35. WM. 340. Charlt'S Baldwin, her husband, born in Everett, 

Mass., died in liiverett. Kcsidence : Everett. 

Mr. Baldwin was a son of Jonathan and Mary (Sargent) Baldwin, 
of Everett. For his ancestry and relationship see above, under the 
head of his brother, Isaac Bahliria [35. VIIL SoO']. See Ancestry 
Tables ^T^-. 

3G. VITI. 341. Elizabeth Cntler Ward [Nathaniel 35-36. VII. 
175], prolnibly born in Salem, died in Evei'ett, ^lass. 

36. VIII. 341. William Baldwin, her husband, born in Everett, 
Mass., died in Everett. A silk dyer. Piesidenoe : Everett. 

Mr. Baldwin was a son of Jonathan and ^lary (Sargent) Baldwin, of 



612 TIIK riCKKRLNG GEXEALOGY. 

Everett. For his aueestiy and relutioiisliip see under the head of his 
hrother, Isaac Bahholn [35. VIII. o-j')\ on pag-e GU. See xVncfstkv Tath.ks f^^. 

3G. Vlll. 343. Nathaniel Ward [Xatlianiel 35-3G. VII. 175], prob- 
ably born in Sulem. 

A twin brother of Andrew Ward [3G. MIL 342]. 

3G. VIII. J,/J. Janv Ailnms,\\\'i,\\'\{Ki. Residence: Everett, ]\Iass. 
j\Irs. "Ward married, for Iier second husband, William Johnson. 
Ajtckstkv Taiim:-; -^'HL. 

36. VIII. 344. Samuel V/ard [Nathaniel 35-36. VII. 175], born in 
Salem, died in ^lalden, 3Iass. A dyer. Residence: Maiden. 

He owned llie records of birth of his father's family, from which the 
births of the childien were t;iken, who appear on the Sheets of this work. 

3G. VIII. oJ^Ji? . MartJin Grusli, ]ns lirst wife, born in Ro.xburv, Mass., 
died in Chelsea, 3Iass. 

Her husband's second Avife is her sister. She was a daughter of Job T. 
and Abigail (Badger) Grush, of Cambria, N. Y. Axcestky Tacm.s "^ j.. 

36. VIII. 344^. Bniihj Gvush, his second wife, born in Roxbury. Mass. 
Tier husband's first wife was her sister. She is a daughter of Job T. and 
Abigail (Badger) Crush. Axcestrt Tables i|'j -•• 

30. VIII. 3-15. Lucy Af.gtista Ward [John 3G-37. VII. 177], born 
in Beverly, .Mass., died in Washington, I). C. 

An obituary notice of Mrs. Lemon, which appeared in The Sunday 
Herald of Washington, of Api'il 17, 1881, states that she had been a resident 
of Wasliington since the vear l83s, and that she celebi'ated her golden wed- 
ding in 1S80. It also states that she was a noble woman in every respect, — 
affectionate, charitable, and hopeful ; that doing good was her religion, and 
that her facidties were unimpaired to the last. 

36. VIII. 34o- Charles Licmou, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Washington, D. C. A bookbinder. Residence : Washington. 

For forty-eight years 'Mw Lemon was a resident of Washington. Before 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 013 



tlie present governinent bindery was establislied, 3Ir. Ijenion had cliarg-o of 
the binding work done for tlie United States by Juhn Sargent, and subse- 
quently by the firm of Alexander A: Cook. Wlien the control of the work 
was assumed by the government, ^h: Lemon entered the United States 
service, and from that time until his death he was constantly em])loyed by 
them. lie was the senior employee of the government bindery. lie 
invented a cutting table for preparing the cloth for covers which was 
adopted bv tlie bindej-y, and saved the government at least seventy-five 
thousand dollars. He was an Odd Fellow of forty-six years' standing, a 
past grand in the order, and, at his death, a member of Excelsior Lodge of 
"Washington. Ho was the second president of the Bookbindei's' Associa- 
tion. He was conspicuous for fair dealing and honorable conduct, quiet 
and modest in the performance of his duties, and greatly respected for his 
sterling qualities.^ 

Mr. Lemon was a son of William and ]\Lary (Gardner) Lemon. John 
Gardner [53. V. 20'\ was his uncle, and Samuel Gardner [3-5. V. 5] was his 
granduncle. His father was an uph(dsterer by trade, and carried on the 
business in Salem and Boston until his death in 1827. He was born in 
Ballyhalbert. County of Down, Leland, in 1TG3, and came to this country 
with his two brothers, John and Charle.^, in the P.rig Eliza, Captain "William 
Fairfield, landing at Salem, ^Lass., Aug. S, 171)5. Charles Lemon's an- 
cestry includes the following families : Lemon, ^IcKelvy, Gardner, Frier. 
Orne, Browne, Weld, Clap, Mitchelson, Bushell, Peale. See Axcestkv 
Tables ^f^. 

37. VHL 34G. Sarali Henfield Ward [John 36-37. VH. 177], 
born in Ik-verly, Mass., died in Boston. 

37. VHL 346. Peter Low, her husband, born in London, Eng., died 
in Boston, from an overdose of laudanum. An ornamental bookbinder. 
Residence : Boston. 

He was a son of Peter and Bessie (A'ickery) Low, of Aberdeen, Scot- 
land. Ancestkv Tables ~"j. 

' The National Republican of Wa-^hingtoa, D. C, of June 11, ISS.^j. 



614 THE riCKEBIXG GEXEALOGY. 



37. VIII. 3-17. Andrew Ward [Julm 3G-37. VII. 177], l.um in 
Beverly, Mass., died in Lynn, ^lass. A slioeniaker. Residence : Lvnn. 

37. VIII. J^7^. Iltnuiah li. Clarragc, his first wife. 

AxcEsTiiv T,VEr.i:s -^yV'- 

37. VIII. J4.7-. Rehccca Ellen Williauts, liis second wife, born in 
Lymi, Mass. 

Mrs. Ward is a daugliter of Thomas I'rown and Sophronia, (Avery) 
Wilhams, of Lynn. J/tovy Ilafhatcm/ Willkiins [37. YIll. J^O] is her sister. 
AxcKsTKY Tabli;s y"^=. 

37. VIII. 348. Martlia Dowst Ward [John 36-37. VII. 177], born 
in Beverly, 3Iass. Residence : Brookhii, X. Y. 

37. VIII. o4S. William S. Hiltx, lier hnsband, born in Salem, died 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. A Ijookbinder. Resi(k'nce : Brooklyn. 

Mr. Ililtz was a son of Jacob and Hannah (Noble) Ililtz, of Salem. 
A.N-CF,.,TRY Tables \'l\. 

37. VIII. 340. John Henfleld Ward [John 36-37. VII. 177], born 
in Beverly, Mass., died in Lynn, Mas.s. A shoemaker. Residence: Lynn. 

37. VIII. J-r'.9. Jldvij Ilatliaicaij 7r/??<o>;is, his wife, born in Lynn. 

Residence: Lynn. 

She is a dau^'hrer of Thomas Brown and Sophronia (Averv) Williams. 
Hchccca Ellen WiUiams [37. VIII. 347''\ is her sister. Axckstry Tables m\. 

37. VIII. 3.50. Mary Ann Tnfts [Sally 37. VII. 178], born in 
Salem, died in Salem, of apoplexy. Residence : Salem. 

37. VIII. J-^^-'. Beiijnniin JrcCallister Tiiclun-ds. her first hus- 
band, born in Salem, died in Salem. A seaman. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Richards was a son of Benjamin and Mary (Fowle) Richards. 
AxcESTKv Tables |"V'- 

37. VIII. ooO.' James ArHnr/ton, her second hnsband, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A shi})master. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Arriii;'ton's first wife was his cousin, Elizabeth R. Arrinnton. 



EIGHTH GEXA'ILITIOX. G15 



He was a tion of James and I)rborali (Kii-liards) Arriniiton, of Salem. 
Jane n<ihh>j [1-70. 111.,/] was his great-gTcat-grandmotlier. Ilis aucestrv 
inchules the following families: Arrington, Pickenng, Flint, HolA)y, 
Symonds, Browning-, Foster, Stnart, Richards. Sec Axcestry Tables {^{\,. 

37. Vlll. 351. Elijali Scagell [Lydia II. 37. VII. 181], born in 
Salem, died in Portland. .Alaine. li._->Idence : Portland. 
Mr. Scagell formerly lived in Salem. 

37. VIII. ool. JLartliu Jttnc JJain, liis wife, born in Lisbon, Maine. 
Kesidenee : Portland, Elaine. 

Mrs. Scag-ell is a danghter of Jolm and Hannah (Proctor) l)ain, of Port- 
land. Ancestry T.\m.i:s j"'g. 

38. VIII. 3o2. Josliua Saflord Goodale [Josluia .3S. VII. 182], born 
in Salem, died in Klamath Conntv, C'alit'ornia. A Ijocik-keepcr. 

In early life Mr. Goodale followed his uncle, Nathan Goodale, to New 
Orleans, and was with him many years in his sugar refinery. He returned 
to Salem, an.d, from 184.') to 184S inclusive, was a clerk in the office of his 
brothei'-indaw, Adjutant-General Henry K. Olixor. Subsec[uentlv he went 
to California on business.-* 

38. VIII. So?. Efhabeth Chcver Cool:, his wife, born in Salem, 
died in Aurora, 111. 

Mrs. Goodale was a daughter of Captain Samuel and f^arah (Chever) 
Cook. Her father was a wealthy retired shipmaster of Salem, who resided 
on Federal Street. Her sister, Sally Cook, maiTied Adjutant-General 
Henry K. Oliver, the celebrated composer of popular cluu'ch melodies, one 
of which was named, in compliment to his wife, " Federal Street." Others 
had characteristic titles, as "Chestnut Street" and "Harmony Giove." 

Mrs. Goodale's ancestry includi-s the following families: Cook, Chever, 
Browne, Cox. See Ax. esti:y Tadle.s -~j. 

38. VIII. 3.54. Rebecca Putnam Goodale [.Joshua 38. VII. 182], 
born in Salem, died in Newton, ^lass. Residence: Newton. 

' Letter of General Henry K. Oliver, of Salem, dated :\rarcli 9, 1SS5. 



GIG TJfE nCKERLXG GENEALOC Y. 



Miss GooJale was nauied for her maternal i^raiuliuother, who was a 
niece of General Israel Putnam. 

38. VIII. 0.35. Mary Henfield Goodale [,J(.>liua o.S. YII. 182], 
born in Salem, died in Xt\\ ton, Mass. 

Mrs. Cotfin was naiiK'd tV.r her paternal grandmr.tlier, :\Iary (Ilenfield) 
Ooodale, whom she remarkalily reseinl)]ed in personal beauty. 

An obituary notice in tlio Newton Graphic of Jan. 11, 181>0, speaks of 
her unostentatious works of charity, and i)ays a just tribute to her 
memory.^ 

38. VIII. 3o-V. Mdvcns ComeraU, her first husband, born in Boston, 

died in New ( (rk-aus. A commission merchant. Residence: New Orleans. 

He was a son of John and Sarah (Belknap) Comerais, of Boston 

Ancestry Tabll.s y-Jj.. 

38. VIII. 365-. Ehen S. Coffin, her second husband. 
Mr. Cf.ffln followed the sea for many years. ITe "bore the character 
of a Christian gentleman.''^ 
Ancestky Tables -j tJV'- 

38. YIII. 35fi. Saimiel Page Goodfvle [Jo.hua 38. VII. 182], born 
in Salem, died in Sing-apore. 

Samuel P. Goodale was a member of the class of 1830-1833, of the 
English High School of Boston. On leaving school, he entered the store 
of Henry Homes & Co., the leading hardware dealers in Boston. He after- 
wards went to tlie East Indies to seek his fortitne, and was successful in his 
undertakings. He was for several years in business in C'anton, China; and 
Avas about establishing himself in Bankok, Siam, when ho had a severe 
illness. He took a sea voyage to Singapore for tlie recovery of his health, 
and died there. 

An obituary notice speaks of hitn as the late American Consul at 
Bankok, Siam, who "during a long residence abroad estaldished a char- 
acter of rare business integrity and high moral excellence. The promise of 

1 Letter of the late Samuel H. Goocli, dated Xovember, IS'JI.'. ^ Ibid. 



EICUTII GKNEnATION. CAl 



liis early manlioud at home was nobly fuhilled amid the trials and tempta- 
tions of a foreign life."^ 

38. VIII. 357. Eliza Ann Goodale [Joshua 38. VII. 182], born in 
Danvcrs, JIass. Residence: Newton, Mass. 

jAIiss Goodale is a lady of culture. She is the author of several Sunday- 
school books, and also of many occasional poems, said to be of rare merit.'-^ 

38. VIII. 360. Tobias Lear Porter Lamson [Anna 38. Vll. 183], 
horn in Salem, died in Lowell. Mass. Kesidence : Lowell. 

Mr. Lamson was a member of the English High School, of Boston, of the 
class of 1826-1829. He began his business life in the store of Andrew 
J. Allen, stationer, of Boston. He subsequently became paymaster of the 
Lawrence Mills, Lowell, which position he held until his death, a period of 
thirty-nine years. He was an upright, conscientious, and retiring ujun Avho 
never sought or accepted public office.^ 

38. VIIT. SGO. Mary Goodale Green, his wife, born in Salem. 

A member of the family writes that the best rccoi-d of hci- life that can 
be given is the foUovring : '' She looketh well to the wa}-^ of her household 
and eateth not the bread of idleness." 

She was her husband's cousin. Her number in direct descent is [39. 
VIII. 377]. 

38. VIII. 361. Anna Gooclale Lamson [Anna 38. VII. 183], born 
in Salem, died in Springfield, 3Iass. 

38. VIII. 3G1. Benajali Cross, her husband, born in Danvers, Mass. 
A pianoforte-maker. Residence : Roxbury, Mass. 
Ancestry Tables xlvj. 

38. VIII. 363. ISTatlian Paul Lamson [Anna 38. VII. 183], born in 
Salem, died in ]')oston. An accountant. Residence: I5oston. 

Mr. Lamson first went into business with his cousin, William Warner. 

* Letter of the late Samuel H. Gooch, dated Xovember. 1S92. ' Ibid. 

' Letter of the late Samuel H. Gooch, dated Nov. 30, 1892. 



CIS THE FICKEKIXG GEXEALOOV. 

He was at'terwnnls a book-keeper in llie Bank of the Republic, Boston, and 
tiicn cashier of the Everett Bank, Boston. He was also treasurer of the 
]5oston Penny Savings Bank. He resigned these positions, and engaged in 
the note and stock brokerage business. Later, lie became an expert ac- 
countant, in wliich profession he achieved distinction. His services were in 
demand for straightening out complicated accounts. 

Mr. Lamson, during his whole life, was closely identified with religious in- 
terests, es[)eei:dly SabbiUh schools ; first, with the Pine Street Congregational 
Church, and later with the Shawmut Avenue Church. For the last eleven 
years of his life, he w;)s one of the deacons of tlie Highland Congregational 
Church. He was a member of the Old School Boys' Association, and the 
Pilgrim Society of Plymouth. He died shortly after his return from a 
voyage to Europe, which he took for his health. 

SS.Ylll.oGo. FAixahefh ChnrchiU Weston, the wife of Nathan P. 
Lamson, born in Plymouth, Mass. Eesidence: Maiden, Mass. 

Mrs. Lamson was a daughter of Beiijamin aud Joanna (AVashburn) 

Weston. AXCESTRY TaI!LES ^'"^. 

38. VHL 305. Josepli Hardy To-wnie [Lydia 3S. VH. 185], born 
in Salem. A retired clergyman. Residence : Andover, Mass. 

Ml-. Towne, Yale College, 1827, studied law for one year in Salem, with 
the Hon. John Pickering [58. VL 100]. Subsequently he entered the 
ministry. He was pastor of the Salem Street Congregational Church, 
Boston, from 1S37 to 1843; and afterwards was pastor of the Green Street 
Church, Boston. After leaving Boston, he was settled in Lowell, Mass., 
Bridgeport, Cunn., and Milwaukee, Wis. For several years he lived in 
North Hampton, N. H. 

He was a clergyman of promincui-o, and a puljiit orator of rare endow- 
ment. His countenance once seen was never forgotten." Tn later years he 
lost his utterance by throat disease, and retired from public service. He 
was present at the laying of the corner-stone of the I'.unker Hill Monument, 
June 17, 1825, in company with his paternal grandfather, John Towne, 
who was a survivor of the battle in 1775. The Revolutionary veteran, 



EIGHTH GKXERATIOX. (U? 

tlien 85 years okl, rock' in a chaise from Boxford, Mass., to Charlciiowii, 
with his grandson, John Towne.^ 

38. Vlll. -j/jJ. Ji7/-.« Jackson Child THV^y, his wife, born in Lvnn, 
Mass., died in Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. 'i'owne was a danghter of Caleb and Eliz^djeth Jackson ^Child) 
Wiley. Iler father was a n\ercliant, of Lynn." Ilt-r ancestrv inchides tlie 
following- families : Wiley, Child, Greenwood, Ward, Ti'owbridge, AtLvrton, 
Wales, Jackson, Patten, Larkin. See Axcestky Tables {™^. 

38. VIIT. 3G'>. Mary Ann Towne [Lydia 38. VII. ISo], lorn in 
Salem, died in Weston, Mass. Residence, Weston. 

38. VIII. 366. George Baker, her husband, born in Ipswich, Alass., 
died in Providence, P. I. xV jeweller. Residence : Providence. 

I\Ir. Baker learned the trade of a jeweller in Snlem, and afterwards 
established himself in that business in Providence. He was president of 
the Providence ^Itttual Life Insurance Company, and was an active mem- 
ber of the Historical Society, and of the ^lechanic's Institute, of Providence. 
He was a ver}- well known and highly respected citizen of tliat citA-. and 
was a man of decided literary and scientific tastes. He married, first, 
September, LSI 4, Ednah Hale, of Newbury, Mass." 

Mr. Baker was a son of Asa and Hannah (Xewhall) Baker. His ancestr}' 
includes the following;- families: Bnker, Xe^'\hall, Potter, Green. Hills, 
Dunster, Sai'gent, Ilyllier, Green, Babson, Hill, Clark, Elwell, Collins, 
Butman, Robinson, Haraden, Smith. See Axcestky Tables y^^. 

38. VITL oC,l. Joshua Goodale To\\me [Lydia 38. VII. L^o], born 
in Salem, died in Wolf, Nevada County, Cal. 

]Mr. Towne was a pupil at the En;:'li-;h High School, Boston, of the 
class of L'^24-LS27. He had the offer from his father of a collegiate course, 
but chose a seafaring life. On the breakin;'- out of the gold fever, in 1849, 

' Letter of Samuel II. flooeli, dated Die. 10. 1S02. 

■ Genealogy of the Child, Cliilds, aud Cldldo Families, by Elias Child, p. 71^. 
' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. VI. p. 207 ; also letter of t-amuel H. 
Gooch, dated December, 1S92. 



620 THE PICKErjXG GEXEALOGY. 



]iG went to California and joined liis younger brother, William. lie never 
returned East. 

38. VIII. 368. Lydia Towne [Lydia 38. VII. 185], born in Salem, 
died in Ca-antvillc, ^la^.s., of consumption. 

38. VIII. SGS. Samuel Jams Hastings, her husband, died at sea. 
A shipmaster. Piesidence : Boston. 

Captain Hastings died on board the ship Serampore, off the coast of 
Central America. Some of his voyages to the Northwest coast were three 
years long. He died just when his predictions of the future of California 
were about to be realized. 

He was a son of Benjamin and Sally (Jarves) Hastings. His ancestry 
includes the following families: Hastings, Cheney, Coolidge, Barron, 'J'ayn- 
tor, Guy, Stone, Lush, Allen, Jarves, Seabury. See Axcestrv Tables ^^\. 

38. VIII. 369. Elizabeth Saiford Towno [Lydia 38. VII. 185], 
bom in Boxford, Mass., died in Weston, Mass., of pneumonia. 

38. VIII. SG9. Bevjajiiin Faxon Field, her husband, born in Bos- 
ton, died in Weston, Mass. A retired merchant. Bosidence : AVeston. 

Mr. Field was a pupil at the 3Iayhew School, Boston, and afterward at 
the Boylston School on Fort Hill, where he received a Fi-anklin Medal in 
1820. On leaving school, he entered the counting-room of Atkinson & 
Rollins, East India and Dutch merchants, and he rose to be a book- 
keeper. At the age of twenty-five, he made his first voyage in their employ, 
as joint supercargo of the ship ^lalabar, bound to Sumatra. During the 
followhig ten years, he made five voyages to that coast. For over forty 
years he was actively engaged in shipping cargoes of merchandise to and 
from commercial points in every part of the world. During these years he 
made many j(iurnevs through southern, northern, and western Europe. 

At the beginning <tf the gold fever, in 1849, he despatched several of the 
earliest cargoes to San Francisco, with very profitable results. In 1852, he 
Itecame connected with Fredenck Tudor in the ice trade. In 1887, Mr. 
Field published, for private circulation, a volume entitled " Eemiuiscences 



EIGHTH GJ-XERATIOX. G21 

of a liostiiii Mi.rc]iant," being- an itinerary uf lil.s adventures by sea and 
land for over half a century. 

He was a son of Silas and Piuth Bryant (Faxon) Field. His ancestry in- 
cludes the fullowing families: Field, Gilbert, ^fattoon, Field, Mattoon, Faxon, 
Adams, Crane, Kinsley, Tolman, Allen, Bryant. See Ancestry Taules jI"-. 

38. VIII. 370. Martha EUen Towne [Lydia 3S. VII. 185], born in 
Salem. Residence : "Woston, Mass. 

38. VIII. 371. William Henry Tovvnie [Lydia 38. VII. 185], born 
in Boston, died in Wolf, Nevada County, Cal. A fruit-grower. Residence : 
Wolf. 

Mr. Towne was a pupil of the Boston Eng'lish High School, of the class 
of 1836-1839. His tastes inclined him to a literary life; and, when quite 
young, he became a member of the ^Mercantile Library Association, in 
which he was deeply interested. 

On April 7, 1849, ho availed himself of an opportunit}' to go to Cali- 
fornia in the Alciope, one of the vessels of his brother-in-law, Benjamin F. 
Field. A year later, his brother Joshua followed him. It was their inten- 
tion to return in two or three years; but they decided to malie their home 
in Califoi'uia. 

38. VIII. 372. Lucy Jolmson Tov/ne [Lydia 3>;. VII. 185], born in 
Boston. Residence : Weslon, Mass. 

38. VIII. 373. Esia Forristall Wood, her husband, born in Millbury, 
Mass., died in Roxbury, Mass. A wholesale shoe and leatlier dealer. 
Residence : Roxbur}-. 

At an early age, Mr. ^\'ood went to Savannah, Ga. He remained there 
until a short time before the civil war, when he transferred his business to 
San Francisco, Cal., where the firm became S. A. "Wood & Co., he at that 
time taking charge of the firm's atl'airs in Boston, under the firm name of 
E. F. Wood & Co. 

Mr. Wood was a son of Amasa and Sarah (Forristall) Wood, of Mill- 
bury, Mass. His ancestrv includes the tollowing fimilies: Wood, Goodale, 
Hol])rook, Forristall, Ileyward. See ANCE.sTnr T.auli:. -jyt 



G22 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 

39. Vin. 374. Aima Goodale Warner [Mary 39. YIl. l^n], born 
in Salem. 

39. VIII. jr^. Jlichavd Jlatt/icws, her liu.sband, born in Yarmoutli, 
Mass., died in ^lalden, Mass. A shipmaster. Residence : Cambridg-e, 
Mass. 

Captain Mattliews was for a number of years a resident of Salem, and 
removed thence to Cand)ridg'eport. lie made many successful voyages, 
having commanded some of the finest merchant vessels afloat. In 1861, he 
took the position of superintendent of the Massachusetts Nautical Branch 
of the State lielorm School lor Bciys, and for several years commanded the 
old School Sliip Massachusetts, and afterwards the George M. Barnard. 

He was a man of the strictest probity and honor, and in his social rela- 
tions was tVank, kind-hearted, and true. His manner was most cordial and 
affectionate. He was a devout, but unostentatious Christian, and ready to 
aid most generousl}- every philanthro})ic Avork. A notice of liim in the 
Salem Gazette of Jan. 18, 1894, saj-s : "The facts di'awn out by his death 
show clearly that nothing too good can be said of the captain. liis sterhng- 
qualities, uncompromising honevSty, and kindly nature seem to have im- 
pressed everv one who had an acquaintance with him, and these little 
tributes to the worth of a good man are particularly gratifying to those of 
us who were so intimately connected with him." ^ He was a meniber of the 
Boston ^Marine Society. 

Captain ^latthews' first wife, whrim he married Nov. 19, 1833, was 
Eunice B. Bangs. She vas born in South Dennis, ^Mass., July 7, 1812, and 
died in Yarmouth, 3Iass.^ July 19, 1843. By her he had the following son : 

FEiiDixAXD ^Matthews, Lorn in Yarmouth, June 13, 1S43 ; died in hospital, Newbern, 
X. C, June 10, 1862, while a member of the Twenty-third 
Eegiment of the Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. 

Captain !Matthe\vs was a son of Sanuiel and Sabra (Sears) Matthews. 
His ancestry includes tlie following f nnilles : Matthews, Sears, Crosby, 
Nickerson, Godfrey. See Axcestry Tai;les y^^. 

> Notices of Captain IVtatthews in the Cambridge Cluonicle of Dec. IG, 1893; The 
Salem Daily Gazette of Dec. 26, 29, and 30. 180:3. and Jan. 4 and 18, 1894. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. G23 

39. Vlll. 37r>. William WarncT [.Mury 3;i. VII. 18G]. b.a-u in 
Salem. A sliijjmastor. liesidence : San Francisco, Cal. 

Captain Warner was for many veai's the connnander of a steanier sail- 
ing' betueen San Francisco and Pctalmna. lie is now in the onice of the 
San Francisco and Xurtli Pacific luiilroad Company. 

39. VIII. 37'j'. Caroline Quaflcs, his fii-.st wife, bom in Salem, died 
in Salem. 

Mrs. Warner was a daughter of Benjamin and 3Iary A. Daland, and 
was an adopJed child of Samuel and Eliza (Dehmd) Quarks. a_\cf.stky 
Tables T^^.. 

39. VIII. o7'j-. SalUe navt, the second wife of AYilliam Wariier. 

Mrs. "Warner was the widow of Mr. Hart, and a daughter of 

Cook. AxcESTRY Tables tJ^x'- 

39. Vni. 377. Mary Goodale Green [Thankful 39. VII. 1S7]. 
For an account of her see page G17. 

39. VlII. .^T/. Tohias Lear Sorter if??.'/.s'Oi/. her husband. 
His number in direct descent is [38. Vlll. 3GU]. lor an account of 
him see page G17. 

39. VIII. 378. Nathan Goodale Green [Tliankful 39. VII. 187], 
born in Salem. A real estate-agent. liesidence : Postoii. 

Mr. Green was a Franklin Medal scholar at the Fraidclin Schnol. Boston, 
in 1834. For many years he was with George X. Black, lumber dealer, of 
Boston ; afterwards he was in the real-estate business. He was the twin 
brother of a child who died at birth. 

39. Vlll. 382. Samiiel Henficld Goocli [Hannah 39. Vll. 188], 
Ijorn in Boston, died in Newton, Mass. A retired coal dealer. Residence: 
Newton. 

Mr. Gooch was a Franklin ]\ledal scholar at the Boylston School, in 
1832, and was of the class of 1832-183."), of tlie English Higli School. 
He beji'an his business life in the store of Edwards & Stoddard, of Boston. 



G2-1 TiFE riCKERixG gt:^^ealogy. 



tSubsequfUtly he avus .-■ecretiiry ol" a m;iiiu!';u-tnriiig company, and ho 
afterwards en_Q-ag-od in tho M'hole.sale coal busine.'^s, in Ijo.-ton. lie reth-ed 
from business in 1S82, and devoted his leisure time to literary pursuits. 
He was a frecjuent writer for the press, and compiled several unpublished 
family genealog-ies. lie also contributed to this work a large portion of 
the material from wliich tho sketches of the descendants of Joshua and 
Mary (Ilenlield) Goodalc liave been made. His obituary in tlie Boston 
Evenmg Transcript of Jan. 11, 1S9G, states that he had the wit of a bril- 
liant mind, and th.e genial sweetness of a rare spirit. 

39. VIll. J6J. IjIH]! Ann Cnnn.infjhinn, his Avife, born in Newton, 
Mass. Residence: Newton. 

Mrs. Gooch was educated at the Townsend Feniale Seminar}-. 

She is a daughter of Cyrus and Eebekah (Ware) Cunningliaui, and the 
adopted daughter and niece of Charles Cunningham, of Boston. A.vcestky 
Taelks ^. 

39. YIIT. 3^3. Joshua Goodale Qoocli [Hannah 39. VH. 188], 
born in Jonesborough, ]\raine. Kesidence : Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Gooch received a Franklin ^ledal at tho Franklin School, Boston, 
in 1831, and was of the class of 1834-1837, at the Enghsh High School, 
Boston. 

From 1843 to 184G, he was a member of the firm of Smitli & Gooch, 
and of their successors, J. G. (t N. G. Gooch. They had their lumber 
wharf at Brighton, Mass. Mr. Gooch has resided in Boston, "Watertown, 
and Cambridge, ]\rass. 

He was a member of tlie Watertown board of selectmen for seven years, 
between the A'ears 1856 and 186G. He was in the Cambridge Common 
Council in 1872 and 1873, an alderman in 1877 and 1878, and the principal 
assessor of VAirds One and Five of Cani1)ridge, for nine years, from 1833 to 
1892. Mr. Gooch was one of the original founders of the Old Cambridge 
Baptist Church, organized in 1844. 

39. VIIL 383. Sarah Gates Coolidfje, his wife, born in Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Gooch was educated at the Townsend Female Seminary, and is 



FAGHTII GEXKHATIOX. 625 

a woman of literary attainnients. Sho is tlie author of occasional patriotic 
odes, and other poems of merit.^ 

She is a daughter of Deacon Josiah and Mary (Ilastino-s) Coolidge, of 
Camljridge, Mass. EUtii Cooliihjc Dana [39. Mil. JiW] is her cousin. 
Her ancestry includes the following- families : Coolidge, Barron, Rouse, 
Sanderson, Bartlett, Stratton, Stratton, Traine, Norcross, Brooks, Shattuck, 
Barstow, Abbot, Farnuni, Child, Xorcross, Thacher, Hastings, Cheney, Cool- 
idge, Barron, Tavnt(n-, Guv, Stone, Cuolidge, Barron, Eouse, Sanderson, 
I'.artlett, Stratton, Clark, Inu-nard, Wellington. See Axcestki- TAia,i:,s 7]"^. 

39. \U\. 387. Maria Millard Goocli [Hannah 39. VII. 1^8], born 
in Boston. 

Mrs. Stone seems to have inherited much of the spirit and character of 
her father, and to walk instinctively in his footsteps. She graduated at the 
Charlestown Female Setuinarv, in the class of I80I, and has since been 
very active, in connection with her husband, in city mission work, in Sab- 
bath schools among the destitute, and, especially in later years, anamg the 
indigent colored people. Dm-ing four years she was engaged in establish- 
ing a homo for the aged colored people, and a sewing-school lor colored 
children, in Jirooklyn, X. Y.^ 

39. Vin. oS7. Geoiujc Hoivi/ Stone, her husband, born in Provi- 
dence, Iv. I. A real-estate operator. Residence: Brooklyn, X. Y. 

]\Ir. Stone began his business life in the firm of L}-tle t^ Sione, after- 
wards Stone & AViswall, lumber dealers, in Xew York. He sulisequently 
removed to Brooklyn, where for many years he has been an extensive and 
successful builder and operator in real estate. He has been for thirty years 
a superintendent of Sabbath schools, iifteen of which wei'e in the Faith 
Mission Chapel, an outpost in the Eastern District of Brooklyn. He was 
one of the original founders of these schools. 

Mr. Stone is a son of James and Xancy (Pigeon) Stone, of Watertown, 
Mass. His ancestry includes the following families: Stone, AVhipple, 
Trowbridge, Atherton, Wales, Bond, Biscoe, Coolidge, Livermore, Stone, 

' Letter of the Lite Samuel H. Gooeh, dateil Xov. 10. tS02. 

'■ Letter of tlie late Samuel H. Gooch, dated Xov. 2, l.S'J2. 

40 



C2G THE PICKEF.INCr GEXEALOCY. 

AVhipple, Kice, Ik-ers, Lccinied, Stearns, Faiiiiiny, ^Fasou, Fiske, Wyetli, 
Wliite, Sanderson, Jackson, Patton, Pigeon, Ross, Dumaresq, Parker, Bird, 
Palmer. See Axoestky Tablks _y-|/l. 

3D. VIII. :38s. Nathan Goodale Gooch [Hannah 39. VII. 188], 
born in Boston. A wholesale coal dealer. Residence : Cambridge, 3Iass. 

i^Ir. Gooch graduated at the Plopkins Classical School in Cambridge. 
He began his business life in the firm of J. G. & N. G. Grooch, lumber 
dealers, Brighton, ^lass., and contiiuu'd as partner for twenty-six j-ears. 
Since 18GG, ho has been iu the wholesale coal business in Boston. For 
five years, ho w:is in the Canibridge Common Council, and for three years 
he was an alderman of Canibridge. He has been for many yeai's a 
trustee of the Cambridge Savings Bank. 

Mr. Gooch has been superintendent of the Old Cambridge Baptist 
Sunday school for fifteen years, and a deacon of that church since 1875. 
lie is a very genial, open-handed, and public-sjiirited man.^ 

39. VIII. oSS. Ellen Coolidge Dana, his wife, born in Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Gooch is a daughter of John Jjridge and Ann (Coolidge) Dana. 
Sarah Gales CooVuhje [39. Vlll. J&'J is her fn-st cousin. Her father was 
for many years cashier of the Chai-les River National Bank, of Old Cam- 
bridge, and of tlie Cambridge Savings Piank, and was a deacon of the 
Baptist Churcli. Her ancestry includes tlie following families: Dana, 
Bullard, Buckminster, Francis, Cooper, Sparhawk, Angier, Smith, Xorcross, 
Brooks, Abbot, Farnum, Child, Norcross, Thacher, Coolidge, Barron, Rouse, 
Sanderson, Bartlett, Stratton, Stratton, Traine, Norcross, Brooks, Shattuck, 
Barstow, Abbot, Farnum, Child, Xorcross, Thacher. See Ancestry Tables Jj^. 

39. VIII. 3S0. Josepliine Waldo Goodale [Nathan 39. VII. 189], 
born in New <_h-]eans, died in Clinton, La. Residence: Clinton. 

i\Iiss Goodale was a teacher of Ihigli>h in the Silliman Institute, of 
Clinton, for about three years. At an early period she became a con- 
tributor to newspa])ers and magazines. 

> Letter of tlie late Samuel H. Gouch, dated Nov. 10, 1892. 



EIGHTH GEXEBATIOX. 627 

31). VI U. 31)1. Mary Green Goodale [Xutli^ui 3;j. VII. IS'J], bom 
ill Xew Orleans. Iifsidence: Louisiana. 

At the Iiistaiire of the Board of PVireiyii Missions of the Soiitliern Pres- 
byterian Chureli, 3[rs. AVihle went a.s a teaclier and as a missionary to Brazil. 
Slie returned in iss.'j. At an early period she became a contributor to 
newspapers and magazines. 

39. VIII. 301. WnUain Camtniiig Wilde, her luisband, born in 
Georgia, died in Bdue Hill, La. 

i\[r. Wilde was a poet, scholar, and soldier. 

lie was a son of the Hon. lliihard Henr}' "Wilde, the well-known 
Southern poet. Aviestry Tables -T^"gi. 

39. YIIT. 398. Mary Killarj. [Hannah 39. VII. 190], probably born 
and died in Salem. 

39. VIII. SOS. Mattheiv Mansfield Cavnes, her husband, probably 
born and died in Salem, of dysentery. A mariner. Residence: Salem. 

He was ;i son of Thonuis and Elizabeth Carnus. Anct.strt Tables ^^\. 

40. Vni. 402. Jnstin McCarthy Dov.^st [William 40. VII. 192], 
born in Salesn. A watchman. Residence : Salem. 

40. VIII. 40-i- CJuiflotte Abbott Paijson, his wife, born in Trenton, 
i\Iaine, died in Salem, of a cancer. 

Mrs. Dowst was a daughter of Joseph W. and Susan (Cousins) Payson. 
jVxcestry Tables m\. 

40. VIII. 403. Dcxvid Broirn Dowst [William 40. VII. 192], born 
in Salem, died iu Salem, of cholera morbus. A police oliicer. Residence: 
Salem. 

40. VIII. 403. Mary FAlen Jlall, his wife, born in Salem. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

]\Irs. Dowst is a daiigliter of William and Sally (Burns) Hall, of Salem. 
Salhj Burns [22. VIII. J20'] was her mother; WUUam llrnrij Hall [40. 



G28 THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

VIII. 404-l[ "■i^-"' ^'<-'i" brother, iukI Carrie Aii-ifhi [4(.). IX. 719'] is liur niece. 
Ancestuy Tables ^V/Ij^. 

40. VIII. 404. Martha Pool Dowst [William 40. VII. 192], born 
in Siilem. 

40. VIII. ^04- William Ilcnry MaU. lier liusband, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A mariner. Kedidence : Salem. 

Mr. Hall was a >on of William and Sally (jiui'ns) ITall, of Salem. SaJlii 
Burns [22. VIII. 220] u-as liismotlier; .Very FAlcn Hall [40. VIII. ^03] 
is his sister; and Carrie Avslin [40. IX. 710] is his niece. x\xck.stj;y 
Tablks ^i\. 

40. VIII. 405. "Lesley Barton Dowst [William 40. VII. 192], 
born in Salem, died in 3Ierced, Cal. Residence: Merced. 

The following- obituary of 3Ir. Dowst is taken from the Salera Register 
of July 6, 1885. It was copied from a California pajier: — 

"Mr. Wesley Barton Dowst, a native of Salem, died at Merced, California, on 
Thursday morning, June 18, after suffering for montlis with rheumatism, ilr. Dowst 
was a pioneer stage-driver of the Yosemite Stage Company, and during his long 
experience lie made the acquaintance of many celebrities from all parts of the world, 
and tourists visiting the Yosemite for the second time would frequently send woid 
in advance, requesting that Jlr. Dowst should take them through. He was genial 
in temperament, travelled with his eyes open, had an almost inexhaustible fund of 
illustrative anecdote, and knew how to tell a story. His retentive memory of mcTi 
and incidents made him a sort of standard in matters of local liistory, and he was 
often appealed to in order to settle questions in doubt as to historical matters relative 
to the Yosemite region ; and nobody thought of doubting any statement received 
from him. He could tell of the distinguished parties he had conducted, and relate 
what they had said of their impressions of the famous valley and its approaches, 
and give quantity of entertaining stories of C}iisoJes which had come within his 
exjierience or oliservation." 

Mr. Dowst went to California in 1849, and is probably the "Wesley 
Dowst" who is named in an article on the "Strong Men of Salem in the 
Past," printed in the Salem Observer of Aug. 4, 1877. In that article an 
account is given of the great strength of his granduncle William Dowst. 
Of W^esley Dowst, it states that he lives in Stockton, Cah, and measures 



FAG U Til GEXEUATION. 020 



nearly seven leet in Iiei^ht, and weigli.s tlu'ee liundreil pounds. For an 
abstract of that artude .see pa;4-es 223-224. 

40. VIII. ^^aJ. Susan , his wife. Residence: Merced, Cal. 

AXCKSTRY TaIII.KS ",". . 

40. ^'1II. 40G. Lydia Aiinall Dowst [William 40. MI. 11I2], prob- 
ably burn and died in Salem. 

40. VIII. IfOG. Thomas IFenrij T(7///rn»,so>j, her husband. A cooper. 
Ivesidence : Salem. 

i\[r. Vrilliamson worked in one shop In Salem for forty-three years. 
AxcEsTRY Tables tJjt, . 

40. VIII. 408. Josluia Wells Downing- Dowst [William 40. VII. 
102], l)orii in Salem, died in Salem, of lieart disease. X painter. Eesi- 
donce : Salem. 

40. VIII. ,;6'>S'. Sarah rJrcior J7rff?oo;j,, his wife, liorn in Northfield. 
Jlrs. Dowst is a daughter of Warren and Kmeline ^lattoon. 
Anoestuy Tabli;s }'j'-I[-. 

40. VIII. 410. Mary Elizabeth Dowst [David K. 40. VII. 194], 
born in Salem. 

40. VIII. 410. William But man Clarl\ her huslfand, born in Rut- 
land, \t. A leather-dresser. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Clark moved to the West. For his second marriage see below. 
Ancestry Tables -J'/|. 

40. VIII. 412. Lncy Ann Dowst [David N. 40. VII. 191], born in 
Salem. 

40. VIII. ..,^2^. William JiuDnan CVrn-/.-, her hu.sband. 
For an account of him and his first wife see above. 

40. VIII. 41.",. Martlia Henfield Dowst [David N. 40. VII. 194], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 



C30 THE PICKEniXG GEXEALOGY. 

40. VIII. 414. John Oliver Cliapman [Julin 40. VII. 195], born 
ill Salem. Residence : Sak-ni. 

Mr. Chapman ^vas formerly engaged v,'\\.\\ bis father on the Salem 
Register. For nearly tliirty years he was assistant postmaster of Salem. 
lie has retired from active business. 

40. VIII. 414^- l^fi'^dbeth Barnard Glover, bis first wife, born in 
Salem, died in Salem. 

]\Irs. Chapman ^Y;ls a daughter of Captain John Hill and Lucy (Ti-afton) 
Glover. Iler ancestry includes the following families: Glover, Smifli, 
Hinckley, blichards, jiarsh, AVbito, King, Baker, Bird, Hill, Osborne, 
Cooke, Trafton. See AxrEsiRY Tables 4'"V'- 

40. VIII. 41'r- Charlotte Augusta Croshy, his second wife, born in 
Portsmonth, N. H., died in Salem. 

Mrs. Chapman was a daughter of John and Seeth Mansfield (Collins) 



40. VIII. 415. George Rouiidy Cliapman [John 40. VII. 195], 
born in Salem, died in Xew York City, of heart disease. Residence : 
Boston. 

Before his removal to Boston, Mr. Chapman was a prominent citizen of 
Salem. He was a member of the Salem Common Council from 1859 to 
1862, and also in 1871, and was a member of tlie Board of Aldermen from 
1863 to 18G5, also in 1872, 1873, 1875, and 1876. lie was a member of 
the Water Board in 1872 and 1873. For about twenty years, Islv. Chap- 
man was treasurer of the South Church Parish, of Salem, and for a number 
of years he was one of the standing committee of the Old South Church, 
Boston. 

During his life he was connected with various coi'porations. He was 
for twenty-two ycai's head clerk of the 3Ianchester Mills, and was after- 
wards treasurer of the Hamilton ^lanufacturing Company. From 1871 
to 1887, he was cashier of the Merchants National liank, of Boston. He 
was treasurer of the Ohio & "Western Coal & Iron Company, Boston, until 
the company dissolved. 



EIGHTir GEXEBATIOX. 631 



Mr. CIiapiTi;Tn was a man of deop and sincere religious feeling-. He was 
of a very genial nature, and was very much beloved by a wide circle of 
friend.s, both in business and social life. 

40. VIII. ^iJ^ Ann Freeman Snow, his iirst wife, born in Saco, 
Maine, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Chapman was a daughter of Xathaniel and Alice (FV'rkins) Snow, 
of Kemiebunkport, >[aine. Her ancestry includes the following families: 
Snow, Crocker, Perkins, Stone. See ^\_\(;estpv Tables tJ'"^,. 

40. VIII. T^i-5-. Luey Gray Snntr, his second wife. Residence: 
Boston. 

Mrs. Chapman is a sister of her husband's iirst wife. For her parentage 
and ancestry see above. See Axle^tky Tables ""3=. 

40. VIII. 417. Joseph Hardy ToAvne [Lydia 40. VII. 1!)S], born 
in Salem. A banker. Residence: Sal -m. 

Mr. Towne has been connected Avith the Xaundvcag National Bank, of 
Saleni;, for more than fift}- years. He has tilled the positions of cashier, 
^'ice-president, and president in tliat institiition. In 1850, he was au alder- 
man of Salem. 

40. VIII. ^ir. Jiosina Clifford 7»'/r//fn'(7so», his wife, born in Salem. 

She is a daughter of Jeremiah and Nancy Glazier (Sweetser) Richard- 
son. Her father was a boot and shoe dealer, of Salem. Her ancestry 
incluiles the following- families: Richaidson, Pierson, Convei-se, Carter, 
Wyman, Read, Hancock, Prentice, Richardson, Perkins, Sweetser. See 

AXCESTKY Taf.LKS fl\. 

40. VIII. 418. John Chapman To\^ie [Lydia 40. VII. 198], born 
in Salem, died in Salem. A bank-teller. Residence : Salem. 

After leaving the Salem High School, 'llw Towne learned the ]irintei-s' 
trade in the office of the Salem Register, of which his uncle, for whom he 
was named, was the senior proprietor. He continued there for seven or 
eight years, doing his duty faithfully. He then accepted a position as dis- 
count clerk in the Xaundvcag National Bank, where he continued until his 
death, for the last few years acting as teller. 



632 THE riCKERJXG GENEALOGY. 

Mr. Towiie was in the Salem Coiuuiuii Council two years, and for three 
years or more was an overseer of the poor. He was for many }'ears, and 
at his death, clerk of the South Parish, and treasurer of the Association for 
the Relief of Ag-ed and Destitute Women. For several years he was an 
active member of the Second Corps of Cadets, and retained his connection 
with the Veteran Association from its organization, lie was an earnest 
Republican, and i'or nearly twenty-six years had been a member of the 
Republican Citv Committee. Ho was strongly interested in everything- 
concerning- his native citv, and took great pains to collect material illus- 
trative of its progress and its history. 

Mr. Towne was of a most genial and companionable nature, tender- 
hearted, hospitable, and generous, and was a great favorite in Salem, 
where he was very much respected.^ 

40. Vni. ^18'. MlvUtin PlicJps Sanudevs, his first wife, born in 
Boston, died in Salem. 

Mrs. Towne assumed her maternal uncle's name. She was a daughter 
of Thomas and Rebecca (Saunders) Phelps, of Boston. ?Ier mother was 
from Devonshire, Eng. Ajs-ckstky Tables -|"i.. 

40. Vni. ^IS-. 3Iarij Woodward, his second wife, born in Boston. 
Mrs. Towne is a daughter of Frederick Reboycr and Huldah Pei'kins 

(Crosby) W^oodward, of Boston. Axcestky 'J'ables ^'J-j.. 

41. Vin. 420. Benjamin Gardner Ropes [Benjamin 41. VII. 201], 
born in Salem, died in Port Chester, X. Y. A merchant. Residence: New 
York City. 

From early manhood 3Ir. Ropes was engaged, witli his birothers, in the 
shipping business between New York and Buenos Ayi-es. Many years of 
his life were spent abroad. 

41. VIII. 420\ CaroUue SUsh]/, his first wife, died at sea. 
Mrs. Ropes and her son Henry Rojjcs were drowned b}- the sinking of 
the steamship Arctic, while on the voyage from Liverpool to New York. 

' The Salem Register of April 27, 1SS.3. 



EIGHTH GENFAiATlON. r;33 



Till-' <li>;istur wa> tlio result of ;i cuUisiuu wliieh took place Sept. 27, 185-1, 
■with the I'^rench .steauishij) Vista, while olT Capo liaco/ 

Slie was a dau-'hter of l':!i(.ch and Alice (Xeedliam) Silsl,y, of Boston. 
]Ier ancestry includes the tulluwing- families : Siisby, Bassett, Burt, Collins, 
Collins, Needham. See Ancestlv T.u;li;s _yVU. 

41. VIII. J^2(f. Mary Jaur Piwdij, his second ^vife, horn in Rye, 
N. Y. 

31rs. Pvopes niarricd, for her second h unhand, a Mr. Clapp. 
She is a dau-hter of Nathaniel and .Alary ( IJnnks) 1'urdy, of Rye, N. Y. 
Her father was a fanner. Anosikv Taiji.f.s .,\'", ,.. 

41. VIII. 421. Frances ^'^ilkins Ropes [Benjamin 41. VI 1. 201], 
born in Salem, died in New York City. 

41. VIII. 4-1- Ocorrie Manniiui. her husband, born in Ipswich, 
Alass., died in Brooklyn, X. Y., (if consumption. A merchant. 

iMr. Manning- was a son of Richard and Abigail Mamnng, of Ipswich. 

AXCE-TKY TaKLKS ^™^. 

41. VIII. 422. Henry James Ropes [Benjamin 41. VII. 201], born 
in Salem, died in Buenos Ayres. X merchant. Residence: Buenos 
Ayrcs. 

Jlr. Ropes was a member of the shipjiing fn-m of R. W. Ropes & Co., 
and was for many 3'ears established as a representative of tlie business in 
Buenos Ayres. lie was noted for his integrity and ([uiet attention to busi- 
ness, and he gained the good will of all for his many sterling- qualities." 

41. VIII. 4-'- Jlai'ceniiia Grimau, his wife, born in Bnenos Ayres. 
Residence : Buenos A_vres. 
Axn-^TiiY TAia.i:s -;^V|, 

41. VIII. 423. Amelia Ropes [Benjamin 41. VII. 201], born in 
Salem, died in kowell, ]\Iass. 

' Gravestone in tlie family lot, TTavmony Grove C'l^metery, Salem. 
^ Obituary in The Salem Tiegister of Sept. IS, 1S7?., copied from The Buenos Ayres 
]>aily :News of July ,"0. 1S73. 



634 THE riCKEEING CENEALOGY. 

41. VIII. ^,iJ. Jomes Dimon, her lmsb;iiiLl, born in Boston, died iu 
Fairfield, Conn. A merchant. Eusidence : FairliL-ld. 

Mr. Dinion was a sun of David and Anmi (3lar,ston) Dimon, of Boston. 
His ancestry includes the follo\vino- families: Dimon, AVard, Pinkney, Burr, 
Wakeman, Sturges, .Marston. 6ec Anci-stky Tahles .J"l. 

41. Vin. 424. Reuben Wilkins Ropes [Benjamin 41. VII. 201], 
born in Salem, died in Saratop'a, N. Y. A merchant. Residence: Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

After Icavino- schnok Mr. IJopos entered upon the business in which 
liis father was engag-ed ; and, in 1830, formed the shipping firm of Ii. W. 
Kopes & Co., in which his brothers were associated with him. The firm 
operated a line of jjacket ships between Salem, Philadelphia, and Baltimoi'o, 
and carried on an extensive trade with South America in wool and hides. 
One of the brothers, Henry James Piopes, was stationed at ])uenos Ayres, 
to look after the interests of the firm in those parts. In 1835, the firm 
removed to Xew York, where it did a lucrative and constantly increasing 
business, under the firm name of R. W. Hopes, the '• Co." having been 
dropjied, although Mr. Kopes's brothers still remained members of it. Be- 
tween these broth<3rs there al^^-ays existed a bond of sympathy and union 
much closer and firmer than is commonh- found, and when they were 
separated, not a day was allowed to go by without a letter passing between 
them. 

Mr. Ropes combined with a spirit of business, ]dnlanthropy, Christian 
kindness, and love, the traits of thrift, energy, industry, perseverance, and 
public spirit. His simple and unaffected manner was marked by a cheerful 
gi'avity, a genial dignity, and a sympathetic spirit ; and the same wise 
judgment and sterling integrity that he In-rmght to his business, he 
consecrated to tlic societies and to the church with Avhich he was 
connected. 

Though an ardent Republican, "Mr. Ropes never took an active part in 
politics ; for his life, especially since his I'etirement from active business, 
which took place ten years before his death, was devoted to charitable 
works. 



EIGHTH GHNERATIOX. 635 

"When Ileury Wanl Beechcr begiui prc-;ic]iin;j,- in ]^)rookh-n, in 1847, ]\Ir. 
EoiiCd ^v;ls greatly impressed by liini, and joined Pl}-niontli Clmrcli ; and lie 
remained connected with it until his dt-ath. He was one of its trustees and 
deacons, and was a cmistant attendant on the church service. Mr. Beecher 
said of him that he had not in his congregation a man with a more beautiful 
character. 

The many acts of charity performed by Mr. Ropes were done without 
ostentation. He supported many poor families through pei'iods of distress, 
or particular crises in tlieir affairs, often going among the poor and search- 
ing out the cases whc-re his sympathy and money would bring relief. 

Mr. Ropes was prominently connected with several societies. He was 
a member of the Association for Tmjjroving the Condition of the Poor, being 
an active member of its board for thirty-four years, and its ju-esident for 
twenty-six years. He was a memljer of the Seauian's Friend Society, and 
of the Eye and Ear Hospital. Of the latter, he Avas one of the founders, and 
a director from its organization until his death. He was on the board of 
regents, and for nearly thii-ty years, was the vice-president of The Long 
Island College Hospital. A paper on his death was read before the Xew 
England Society.^ 

41. Vni. 4-4-^ • yci^icij Wlieaton liecd, his first wife, born in Attle- 
borough, Mass., died in Brookl}^^, X. Y. 
An-cestuy Tables -o^e'- 

41, YHI. 4^-^'- ^J^nt'in Liicinda Thompso}i , his second wife, born 
in ^lonson, Mass., probably died in Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daughter of Jacob and Hadassah (Stone) Thompson. 
Her father was a justice of the peace, of Monson, Mass. AN-iEsxEr 

TAIiLES ^,. 

41. YHI. 42G. Charles Attgustiis Ropes [l^onjamin 41. YII. 201], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. A merchant. Residence : Salem. 

Years ago, Charles A. Ropes was associated in business in Xew York 

> In Meinoriam, lieiibcn Wilkins Eopcs, ISlo-lSOO ; also the Boston Evening Tran- 
script, July 3J, 1890. 



G3G TJIE FICKERING GENEALOGY. 



and Salem, ^\itl^ liis brutlieiv<, in the Bueiios Ayres trade, importing and 
exporting, and dtMliug largcl\- in liidc's. Tliuir place of business in Salem 
was Peabodv's Wharf, uhencu their freight packet sailed. Dmiug their 
earlier partnership, -Mr. Kopes went to Buenos Ayres, in which city his 
brother Henry attended to the business of the firm. During, or soon after, 
the civil war, -^[^. liopes engaged in business OJi his own account ; and of 
late years he conducted the grain, ha}-, and tlour business on a large scale, 
in company with his sous, in Salem. 

Mr. liopes was v^xdl known throughout Essex County, and was one of 
the leading men in the Democi-atic party. 

Although he had mnny opportunities, he never accepted public ofnce, 
except wlien it was thrust upon him. He was a member of the Salem 
Common Council m 1858-18.39, and a member of the school committee 
from 18G3 to 1872, inclusive, taking a very active part in the deliberations 
and work of both bodies. For years he was a mendjer and officer of the 
Salem Cadets, in winch corps he always maintained a livel}- interest. 

Mr. Iiopes was for many years a devoted member of the Universalist 
Society. He was a corporator and trustee of the Salem Hospital, ^vas 
officially connected with the Old Ladies' Home, and took a great mterest 
in all the charitable institutions of Salem. He v.-as a man of integrity, of 
character, and of great industry, and was ahvays interested in the business 
welfare of his native town, being an active member of its first Board of 
Trade. 

j\Ir. Eo])es was strongly devoted to his friends and rclati-\-es. He v/rote 
a letter nearly every day to his brothers in New York, and they to him. 
He was a man of strong and decided opinions.^ 

41. Vin. .^i'6'-'. Mary Anne BarA-c>',hh first wife, born in Salem, 
died in Salem. 

^Irs. liopes was a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Hitchings) Barker, of 
Salem.^ Ancestry Tablks |"l,. 

' Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XXVII, pp. 196-198 ; also The Boston 
Herald of March 20, I=;00. 

' Margaret is given as the mother's name on the State Records, Vol. 75, p. 155. 



ET Gil Til geni:i;atiox. G37 



A\.\i\i. 4^2G\ Lucindti iVhipple, his second wile, })robably boru 
in Salem. 

Mrs. "Wliii)ple is a daughter of Jonatliau and Mary (CMontnian) Whipple. 
Her ancestr}- includes the following families: Whipple, "W'hiiiple, Reyner, 
Apjdeton, Everard, Oliver, Lowell, Appleton, Kverard, Oliver, Lowell, 
Perkins, Cloutman, Smith. See Ancestry Tai-.i.ls T'JV'- 

4L Vin. 427. Eleazer 'VVheelock Riplej^ Ropes [Pjenjamin 41. 
Vll. 201] (known as Pipley Ropes), born \n Salem, died in Ih'ooklyn, 
N. Y. A merchant. Residence : Brooklyn. 

When Ripley Ropes wa.>. twenty yeai'S old, he engaged in commercial 
business witli his eldest brother, the firm being well established in Salem. 
The remarks made in the previous pages of this work in regard to the busi- 
ness relations of his brothers will apply to hinj. 

Mr. Ropes lived in Salem until 1863, when he moved to Brooklyn. Li 
Salem he was an active citizen. He was snperlntendeid. of the East Church 
Sunday school; ^vas a member of the Connnon Council in 1853 and 18G3; 
and \vas a member of the Board of Aldermen in 1857 and 1859. Li Brook- 
lyn, also, Mr. Ropes shoAved the same inter..'st in public affairs. In 1872, 
he v,-as an aldennan of that city, and for three years he was chairmiui 
of the finance committee. Li 1877, he became a member of the State 
Board of Charities for King's County, and was instrumental in re- 
ducing expenditures about one-half, without impairing the usefulness 
and efficiency of the department. In 1881, Mr. Ro])es was nominated 
as the citizens' candidate for mayor, at a mass meeting at which the 
Rev. Henry Ward Bcecher made a stirring speech. He accepted this nom- 
ination ; but he afterwards withdrew in favor of the Hon. Scth Low. The 
same year he was appointed by 3Iavor Low commissioner of ])tddic v.orks. 
Eor fifteen years lie Avas president of the Brooklyn Tru^.t Company. He 
was a director of the Union Eerry Company, of the Brooklyn Savings 
I'aidc, of insurance companies and railroads, and a tritstee of the Packer 
Institute. 

In the death of 31r. Ropes, Brooklyn lost one of her greatest philan- 
thropists. During a long j)ub]ic caix-er, he was a leader in every move- 



G38 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

raeiit liuviug- for its object tlie ivfonnatiou of abuses, and the advancement 
of Brooklyn and its citizens.^ 

41. VIII. 427. JjJlr.dbcfh Graves, tlie wife of Eleazer W. R. Ropes. 
Mr.s. Ropes is a daughter of Samuel and Grace Graves. A^-cESTRY 

Tables ^. 

42. VIII. 428. Lucy Ropes [James 42. VII. 202], born in Salem, 
died in Sah-iu, of a canc-r. 

42. VJII. 4JS. Sinunel CJnirch, her husband. 

Mr. Church's fir.-,i wilo was Abigail C. Lovis [^60. VIII. 310]. For an 
accouiit of him see pages 605-60G. 

42. VIIT. 429. James Ropes [James 42. VII. 202], born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A merchant and lawyer. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Ropes was a member of an old and successful mercantile establish- 
ment of Salem until the beginning of the Rebellion. He was frequently 
called on to fill otiicfs of trust. He was a member of the Salem Common 
Council in 1841, 1858, IS.'jO, and 18G0, and was on the board of assessors 
from April, 18.54, to 3Jarch, 1855, Vihen he resigned. He was appointed 
Registei- of Probate for Essex County, and took the oath of office March 3, 
1855. He continued to fdl the position about two years, when he was suc- 
ceeded by .Ttmathan Parley. 3Ir. Ropes was apjtointed As.sistant Register of 
Probate and Ins<dvencv for Essex Countv, took the oath of office Jan. 5, 
1859, an.d resigned the position Aug. 29, 1870. He filled these offices 
with abilitv. He was a man of good judgment and real worth, and greatly 
esteemed by all who knew him." 

42. VIII. ^J.9. Sn.-^an Marin CoJlji/, hi.s wife, born in Weare, N. H. 
Mrs. Ropes is a daughter of Judge Simon Perkins and Betsey (Wood) 

^ Essex lustitute Historical Collections. A'ol. XXVII. pp. 19S-199; The Salem Eegis- 
ter of April 1.3, ISSlJ, and The Brooklyn Advance of April, 1SS2, which contains a portrait 
and sketch of ISlv. Eopes. 

• Obituary notices of ^Ir. Ropes in the Salem Register of ^March 8, 1S75, and the 
Salem Gazette of :\Iarch 5, 187.3; letter of D. P. Galloupe, dated June 11, 1SS4; and 
letters uf Ezra D. Ilines, of Salem, of Jftn. '2'1 and 24, 1895. 



EIGHTH GEXHKATIOX. G39 



Colby. lie was a very pioinint-iit citizen of Weare, X. II. Iler ancestry 
includes the following families: Colby, Perkins^ Wood, Burpee. Sec 

AXCESTKY TakLES ^"5. 

42. VITI. 432. Mary Ropes [James 42. VII. 202], born in Salem, 
died in Lowell, ^lass. 

It is stated that ^Mrs. Galloupe made bequests to the Old Ladies' Home 
in Lowell, and to the Topsfield Public Library.^ 

42. VIII. .^JJ. Daniel Poricv Galloupe, her husband, born in 
Topsfield, 3Iass., died in Lowell, ]\Iass. A teacher. Kesldence : Lowell. 

Mr. Galloupe graduated from the Topsfield Academy in 1830. At the 
age of twenty-two he began his career as a teacher at Beverly, Mass. Ho 
spent several years in teaching at other places, and, in 1S36, went to Salem, 
and took charge of the Hacker School, where, for seventeen years, he acted 
as its principal to the general satisfaction of the people, lie was su])erin- 
tendent of the Crombie Street Sunda}- school for many years, was inter- 
ested in the various literary and educational societies of Salem, and was 
highly esteemed as a citizen. In April, 1853, he removed to Lowell, and 
was for twenty-five years principal of the A^arnum School of that city. In 
1880, he ^vas elected superintendent of the Dracut scliciols, retaining that 
position until within three years of his death, when he closed his school life, 
after more than a half century of service. He served on the Lowell school 
committee for four years. In his earlier years, he was interested in the 
American Institute of Instruction, was one of the original members of the 
Essex County, and Middlesex County, Teachers' Associations, and vras one 
of the founders of the ]\Iassachusetts State Teachers' Association. His will 
contained several public bequests.- 

Mr. Galloupe was a son of Israel and Betsey (Poss) Galloupe, of Tojis- 
field, iiass. His ancestry includes the following families: Galloupe, Lake, 
Head, Harris, Lake, Pead, Smith, Porter, Poss, Burnham, Wells, Choate, 
Smith, Smith. See Axck^tiiy Tables V-l\. 

» Salem Gazette of April 17, 1S91. 

'^ Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XXVII. pp. 191-192; also a letter from 
Mr. Galloupe, dated June 11, lss4. 



64.0 THE riCKEFUXG OESEALOGY. 

42. VI n. 4.14. Sarali Sopliia Kopes [James 42. VII. 202], born in 
Sak-iii, died in Salem. 

42. VIII. ^'J^. Jrnncs Zjjton, her husband, born in Salem, died in 
Salem, of paralysis. A niorchant. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Ui)t(:ni vras pre]);u'ed to enter college; but he ])referred a mercantile 
life, and, in ls27, entrred his father's counting-room as clerk and book- 
keeper, fdling- tliese ]iositions for seven years. In 1835, owing to ill health, 
he made a voyage to Para, in Brazil, as supercargo. From 183G, he was 
actively and largely engogod in business with his father and others; but on 
the breaking out of the civil wai', he withdrew from foreign trade. From 
that time until 1865, he was a special partner in the hide and leather busi- 
ness, in Boston, vrith his brother Franklin and John F. Nichols, under the 
firm of U}Ui.in & Nichols. He closed his connection with this firm and 
its succe-siirs ir, 1878. Through the larger part of Mr. Upton's protracted 
mercantile career he -^^as successful ; but he met with reverses toward 
the close of his life. Ilis character as a merchant was beyond reproach, 
and he wa> hoM in the highest esteem by all with v.'hom he had any 
intercourse, ^fr. Upton v.as called upon to fill numerous positions of 
trust and responsibility. Prominent among these vras that of trustee of 
the Newton Theological Institution. ]*^or nearly fortv-six years, he was 
a membi-r of the First Baptist Clnu'cli in Salem, and, for thirty years, 
he served his church as its clerk, and its records attest his accuracy and 
neatness. 

From early life 3T.r. Ui)ton manifesiod much taste for music, which he 
im])roved by jtractice and study. In 1872, he printed, for i)rivate circula- 
tion, a collectiun of original sacred musical compositions, entitled " 3Iusical 
Miscellarioa." 

In his early manhood, Mr. Upton paid considerable attention to the 
cultivation of I'ruit-trces, and was for several j^ears vice-president of the 
llorticultui-al d.^jiartment of tlie Essex Institute. For twenty years, he had 
an orchard, in North Salem, of five hundred pear-trees, consisting of one 
Imndred v;nieties. His papers on pear culture, read before the meetings of 
the Institufi'. were printed in Volume II. of their proceedings. He gave 



EIGHTH GEXKRATION. 641 

to tlie Iiibtitiite, of \vli:<'li 111' was a meinljcr, ;aul lur many ycMr.-> vice-presi- 
dent, a copy of Downin^'s " Fruits and Trees of America," to which he had 
added his ubservatiuns in his own orchai'd, and all the confirmations, cor 
rcctions, or c.intradietiuns oi the text which his reading, inquiries, and ex- 
perience had furni>hed him. 15esides this, he had a lai-i;e nuudjer of blank 
leaves added to the book, and on these leaves he drew, with his own pen, tlie 
figures of two hundred and eighty-five specimens of pears not furni^-hed by 
]\rr. Downing. 

Mr. Uptun was a liberal man, independent iu his opinions and actions, 
intelligent, but unassunn'ng. 

His first wife, whom lie married Oct. 27, l-'^SG, ^vas Emily Collins 
Johnson. She died Nov. li, IS 13. 13y her he had two children : * — 

Emily Cakolixk Uptox, born June 10. 1S3S. 

James IIexky Upxux, born Aug. S, 1840 ; died :\rarcli l.J, ISll. 

He was a son of Robert and Lucy (Doyle) Upton, of Salem. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Upton, Maber, Wheelock, Doyle, 
Perry. See Ancestry Tables -o-j^. 

42. Vni. 435. William Pliipps Sjonoiids [Peggy 42. YTT. 203], 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of dropsy. A shoo manufacturer. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

42. VIII. ^'J-3. Xanoj riielps, his wife, born in Salem, died in 
Somerville, 3Iiiss. 

Mrs. Symonds was a daughter of Joshua and Xancy (Holman) Phelps, 
of Salem. Her father was a carpenter, and was born in Shirley, ilass. 

AXCK-^TRY TaBLKS ^?l\ . 

42. VIH. 43!b Benjamin Ropes Symonds [Peggy 42. YH. 203], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. A cordvrainer, afterwards a grocer. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

1 Memoir of ^Ir. Upton, by the Eev. R. C. .Mills, in the Esses Institute Historical 
Collections, Vol. XVI. pp. Sl-Ss, 

■il 



C42 THE nCKERTNG GEXEALOGY. 

42. Mil. ,^'J6'. Hlha SliotswcU, his iir.-t wife, died in Salem, of 
inflammation of the bov/els. 
Ancestky Tables ^^^i. 

42. VIII. 4-^G-. Mehitahle KetteUc, hi.s .second wife, born in Methuen, 
.^las.s., died in Salem, of old age and a cancer. Residence: Salem. 

Jlrs. Synionds was a daughter of Samuel and Mehitahle (liamblelt) 
Harris, of Methuen. Anci:strv Tables T-^jj. 

42. VIII. 437. Timothy Sjanonds [Peggy 42. VII. 203], born in 
Salem, died in Salem. A shoemaker. Eesidence: Salem. 

42. VIII. 438. George Washington Symonds [Peggy 42. VII. 
203], born in Salem, died in Salem, by drowning. A cordwainer. Resi- 
dence : Salem. 

42. VIll. 430. Margaret Symonds [Peggy 42. VII. 203], born in 
Salem, died in Newton, Mass. Residence : Salem. 

42. VIIl. 440. Ephraim Gardner Symonds [Peggy 42. VII. 203], 
born in Saleui, died in Salem, of paralysis. Residence: Salem. 

^2.Y\ll. 440- JPriscilla Eleanor ()<f/»e>', his wife, born in Beverly, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Symonds was a daughter of I'enjamin and Hannah (Ilerriclv) 
Quincr, of Beverly. Ancestry Tables ^'"l. 

42. VIII. 441. Calvin Synionds [Peggy 42. VII. 203], born in 
Salem, died in Salem, of paralj'sis. A clerk. Residence: Salem. 

42. VIII. 442. Joseph Symonds [Peggy 42. VIL 203], born in 
Salem, died in Xewton, ]^Iass. A jeweller. Residence : i^fewton. 

42. VIII. 44-^- Sarah Jane Ewing, his wife, born in Pleasant Town- 
ship, near Lancaster, Ohio, died in Xewton, Mass. 

Mrs. Symonds was a daughter of David and Jane Eliza (Ainsworth) 
Ewing. Ancestry Tables T^'g. 



EIGHTH GEXEUATIOX. 643 



4-2. \'ill. 44a. James Munroe Sjaiiouds [l'i--y 42. Vll. 203], 
born in baluiu, died in Salem, of heart disease. A naiiister. Eesidence : 
Salem. 

Mr. Symonds, Brown, 1845, won .«everal prizes for excellence in diiler- 
ent studies, and graduated with distinction. In the autumn following his 
graduation, he entered the Newton Theological School, and remained there 
until 1848. lie then accepted an invitation to sup})ly the pulpit of the 
Baptist Church of Salisbu.rv and Aniesburv. Ilis services gave so nutch 
satisfoction, that he received from the society an unanimous vote to become 
their pastor, and he was ordained as such Jtnie 14, 1841*. Ilis labors, how- 
ever, were of short duration, for he died in three months. While at the 
Theological School, 3Ir. Symonds found time to do some literary work; 
and he was regarded bv the professors of that institution as among the 
ablest students that had ever left the school. Few young men have 
entered the ministry so well cpialified, and with greater prospects of use- 
fulness. He had a taste for genealogy, and gathered much material 
toward a genealogy of the Symonds family, lie was of a gentle disposi- 
tion, and his piety was far froni being theoretical.^ 

43. VIII. 447. Benjamin Peirce [Benjamin 4-3. VII. 207], born in 
Salem, died in Cambridge, ]\rass. A mathematician. Besidence : 
Cambridge. 

Professor Peirce, PI. C. 1829, devoted himself deeply to mathematics 
while in college, carr\-ing his study far beyond the then narrow limits of 
the college course. He attended the lectures of Francis Grand in the 
higher mathematics; and he frequently visited Dr. Bowditch, from whom 
he received most valuable instruction in geometry and analysis, as well as 
important direction in the development of his scientific powers. At this 
lime Dr. Bowditch employed the young scholar to read the ])ro<ifs of his 
translation of La Place's "Mecanicjue Celeste," and predicted that he would 
l>ecome the iirst mathematician of his age. It was said that in the class- 
room he not infrequently gave demonstrations that were not in the text- 
book, but were more direct, summary, or pin-ely scientific than those in the 

' Obituary which appeared in a newspaper at the time of hia death. 



6-i-i THE PTCKEinXG GEXFALOGY. 

lesson of tlic (l;iy. After grailuatiiig-, he taught two years at the luumd 
Hill School, Xort]ianiiit(.in. In IS,'.!!, lie was appointod tutor in luallie- 
raatics in Harvard Colleg-e, and, in iN^o, he ^vas promoted to the position 
of professor of niatheuialics and natural philosophy. In 1842, on tlie 
establishment of the Perkins Professorship of 3Iathematics and Astronomy, 
he was appointed to that chair, which he held until his death. At tliat 
time he had been connected \\\\\\ the university for a longer period tlian 
any other person except Ilenr}' Flynt, whose term of otifice was fifty-five 
years, — his beinir nearly fifty years. 

The pursuit ('f niatheinatics as a living science was the ambition of his 
life. lie was frequeiuly called upon to assist in niatters connected with the 
United States coast siu'vey. In 1850, on the foundation of the American 
Ephemeris and Xautical Almanac, by the United States Government, he 
was made the director of the theoretical department of tliat work, with the 
title of consulting astronomer. This positioti he lield until 1867. From 
1852 to 18G7, he had the direction of the longitude determination of the 
United States coast survey. In 186 7, he was appointed to the oflice of 
superintendent, and in 1874, he resigned, vrhen he was appointed consulting 
geometer to the survey. 

l^rofessor Peirce's books include: "Elementary Treatise on Plane 
Trigonometiy " [Poston. 1835], and "Elementary Treatise on Spherical 
Trigonometry" [1836]. publislied in a single volume in later editions; 
" Elementary- Treatise on Sound " [1836] ; '' Elementary Treatise on Plane 
and Solid Geometry" [1837] [printed for the blind, 1840]; "Elementary 
Treatise oii Algebra" [1837]; " Elementary Treatise on Curves, Functions, 
and Forces" [2 vols., 1841-1846]; "Physical and Celestial Mechanics, 
Developed in Four Systeius of Analytic ^lechanics, Celestial Mechanics, 
Potential Physics, and Auahtic Morphology," of which the " xVnalytic 
Mechanics" only was published [1855]; " Einear Associative Algebra" 
[Washington, 1870]. and "Ideality in the Physical Sciences" [Boston, 
1881], besides many contributions to scientific periodicals, and to the jiub- 
lications of learned societies. Among these may be specitied his memoirs 
on the discovery of Xeptune, the investigations of the orbit aitd mass of 
that planet, by Professor Pelrce and Mr. S. C. Walker, several papers on 



EIGHTH GENKRATIOX. 645 



the constitution of 

;in<l on the criterion for tlie rejection of <h)ubtful observation. 

In 1S47, the University of Xortli Carolina conferred on Professor 
Peirce tlie degree of LL.D., ;nid IIar\anl cont'erred the same distinction in 
ISny. He was an honorary fello^\ of the University of St. Whidiniir, at 
Kiev; a feHow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; a mendier 
of the American Piiilosophical Society ; of the American Association lor 
the Advancement of Science, of which lie was president in l^^o" ; of the 
Royal Societies of London, Edinburgh, and Clottinyen, and of the Ivoyal 
Astronomical Society.^ 

43. A^III. 4.^7. Sarah limit Mills, the wife of Professor Peirce, 
born in Northampton, Mass., died in Cauibridge, ^lass. 

Mrs. Peirce was a daughter of the Hon. Elijah Hunt and Harriet (i'lake) 
Mills. Pier father was a representative and senator in Congress. Georrjc 
Bail) BlaJ:c [o.5. VHU GoOl was her first cousin once removed. Her an- 
cestry includes the following families: Mills, Pembroke, Thorne, Hunt, 
Webster, Hosmer, AVilliams, Stalliam, Park, Sti'ong, Ford, Stel.)l>ins, 
Partlett, Blake, Pope, Arnold, 'Welland, Smith, Hinckley, Chii)man, How- 
land, Tilley, Skiffe. See AxcEiTKY Tables -o Ij'V- 

43. VIH. 44s. Charles Henry Peirce [Benjamin 43. VH. 207], 
l)orn in Salem, died in Cambridge, Mass. A physician. Residence: 
Cambridge. 

Dr. Peirce, H. C. 1833, studied medicine with Dr. Shattuck three years, 
and, in lS3l), received the degree of M.D. fi-om the Harvard ^ledical School. 
He practised for a short time in Buffalo, X. Y., but returned to Boston in 
1837. Here he practised until June, 1838, when ho removed to Salem. 
Ho continued the })i-actice of his profession in Salem until 1847, when he 
removed to R.^xlmry, 3Iass. He finally gave up medicine, and entered tlie 
chemical department of the Lawrence Scientific School. 

^ Harvard Book, Vol.1, pp. 172-17.5; Peirce Genealogy, being the Record of the 
Posterity of John Pers of Watertown in Xow England, by Frederick C. I'eirce, pp. 11S-1P.I ; 
The Harvard Re-isr.T, Vol. T. i-p. 91-92; Harvard Keminisconces, by A. P. Peabody, 
pp. 180-lSG; Appleton's Cyclopanlia of American P.iography, Vol. IV. p. 701; also 
A Memorial, by Moses King. 



G-16 THE PICKEniXG GEXEALOGY. 

In 1850, he was appointed United States examiner of drug-s, and dis- 
cliarg-ed his duties Avitli great skill and iiilelity. lie superintendL<l the 
translation from the Gi'rman of Stockhardt's " Pri!K-i})les of Chemi.^try,'' 
and prepared a work entitled " Examination of Drugs, ^ledieines, etc.," 
giving- some of the results of his otiieial labors.^ 

lie was an amiable man, and remarkable for his love of truth and for 
his disinterested generosity. 

43. Ylll. -140. Sarah Peirce Nicliols [Sarah 43. VII. 20S], bom in 
Sakm, died in S.deni, of consumption. Kesidence : Sak-m. 

The Salem Kegister of Jan. 13, IbTO, contains the following account of 
]\riss Xichols, copied from the Salem Gazette : — 

"The appearance of Miss Sarah Nichols — -whose decease at tlie age of seventy- 
fonr years was i-(-eorded in our last — vras familiar to most of the early risers -s\-ho for 
the last fifty years have met her in their -walks. She commenced lier -walks for tlie 
benefit of her licalth, in 1S2S, and continued the hahit until near the end of 1878. 
In that period she walked 149,074 miles, — beginniuL!; with twenty miles a day, and 
reducing the distance uutil the last month of her life, wlien she walked five miles 
a day." 

43. VIII. 4ol. Lydia Ropes Nicliols [Sarah 43. Vll. 208], born in 
Salem. Kesiilence : Salem. 

Miss Nichols occupies the old Peirce house in Salem, a heliotype of 
which is given facing page 22G. 

43. VIII. 452. George Nicliols [Sarah 43. VII. 208], born in 
Salem, died in Cambridge, Mass. Residence : Cambridge. 

George Nichols, II. C. 1828, graduated at the Divinity School in 1831. 
Ho ])reached in various places, but was never settled over any society. He 
becanie a private tutor in the Huidekoper family of Mcadville, Pa., and, in 
1833, returned to Cambridge, where, with Mr. .lames Munroe, he bought 
the Universitv rx-iokstore. In 1842, with others, he bought the University 
Press in Cambridge. He was remarkable for the extreme accuracy with 
which he did his work, and as a proof-reader his reputation was widespread. 

' Harvard Class Book of 1S3.3, pp. 33-34 ; also Appleton's Cyclopa"'dia of American 
Biography, \o\. IV. p. 702. 



EIGHTH GEXEEATIOX. 047 

Mr. Nichols was well kii._»\vu ud tlu.; cJitor of Burke's works, published 
by Little, In-ou'ii et Co., and also of tlui couiplete works of Charles Sumner, 
which, he considered the work of his life. 

His residence on Brattle Street, Cand.)ridg-e, which he l)on2,-ht in ISGO, 
was the lar^x' and old mansion bought, in 1728, by Judge Joseph Lee, a 
brother of Tho)nas Lcc [1-2. \. ^y 

43. YIII. ^'JJ. Susan Fai'loi/ TrcadiceK, the wife of George Nichols, 
born in Salem, died in Cambridge. 

Mrs. Nichols was a daughter uf John ^Vhite and Susan Kendall (Farle}-) 
Treadwell. Ilei- father was a prominent n.nd inHuential citizen of Salein, 
and was president of the Merchants Bank of Salem. Her ancestry includes 
the following families: I'readwell, Smith, Cheney, Adams, White, 3Ietcalf, 
Flint, Johnson, 3Iaverick, Harris, Blaney, Dean, Flint, Hart, Farlev, Burn- 
ham, Tattle, Baker, Perkins, SynKmds, Bead, Choa.te, Berkins, Kinsman, 
Boardman, Kendall, Tidd, Blodgett, Iggleden, Walker, Beirce, Converse, 
Perkins, Kinsman, Boardman, Fellows. See Ancestry Tables T^\. 

43. VIII. 4.53. John H. Nichols [Sarah 43. VJl. 20S], born in 
Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Nichols was for some years connected in business with his father as 
broker, auctioneer, and commission merchant, and afterwards with his 
brother Charles. lie was a resident of Salem until ISGG, when he moved 
to New York. In 1876, he became a residc-ni of South AViltcn, Conn., and 
a few years since he returned to Salem. In iS-lf), he bought of Y'illiam A. 
Lander the house in Chestnut Street, Salem, which had formeily belonged 
to Mr. Nichols's father, and which he occupied until his removal to New 
York. 

Mr. Nichols is to some extent interested in genealogy, and has fur- 
nished niateriiJ for the sketches of members of his branch of the family 
for this work. 

43. YIII. ^c'7-5. Sarah Aiif/iista Leach, his wife, born in Salem, died 
in South ^Yilton, Conn. 

' The Salem Ecgister of July 13, 1RS2, copied from the Boston Herald; also an 
account of his house iu the Boston Post of Oct. 24, 1S92. 



CIS TJI1-: rJCKElUXG gexealogy. 

Mrs. Xicliuls ^v;ls a danpliter of Sauiut-] and Surah Hasty (Xecdham) 
Loach. ,\x( KMKY Tahles ^yij. 

4:3. VI II. 454. Elizabeth Peirce Nichols [Sarah 43. VJl. 208], 
born in Salem. 

43. VIII. .^■)4- CaU'in ChaniherJain Ainsworth, Ik-v luisband, born 
in Ik'thol, Vt. A broker. Kesidence : S;ileni. 

He is son of Artenias and Catherine ( Fessenden) .\insworth, of Eetliel, 
Vt. Catlio-ine Calishi Abisicmih [43. VII. ..7 J] and Awelin Auuc Ahisicorth 
[43. YllL^'y/'] five liis sisters. His ancestry inchules tlie following- fami- 
lies: Ainsworth, Howe, ILivnes, Marble, Goodale, Be;ichani, Fessenden, 
Cheney, Ih'uwn, Eaton, AA'o(idl.)ury, l^)odg'e, Kendall, Tidd, Blodgett, 
Iggleden. See AxcrsTuv Tmua:. ^^\. 

43. VIII. 455. Mary Jane Nichols [Sarah 43. VII. 208], born in 
Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Miss Nichols occupies the old Peirce house in Salem, a heliot}'pe of 
which is gi\cn o])posite page 22(3. 

43. VIII. 45G. Henry Peirce Nichols [Sarah 43. VII. 208], born 
in Salem, died in Boston, of concussion of the brain. A bookseller and 
publisher. Residence: Boston. 

jMr. Nichols lived in Salem imtil 1844, when he moved to Boston. In 
1848, he foundtd, with Williaui Crosby, the publislnng house of William 
Crosby and H. P. Nichols. The firm name was changed some ten years 
later to Crosby, Nicliols & Co., 3Ir. Joseph Ainsworth being admitted as a 
partner. For tAventy years they were located on "Washington Street. 
I^ater William Lee was admitted as a partner, and the firm name then 
became Crosby, Nichols, Lee & Co. ,\fter continuing a few }-ears, the 
firm failed, nnd from it two ne\v firms were made, Crosby & Ainsworth 
succeeding- to tlie wholesnle, and Nichols & Noves to the retail depart- 
ment, both continuing at the old stand on Washingldn Street. Subse- 
quently Nichols & Noyes dissolved, nnd the firm of Nichols, Holmes cv Co. 
succeeded to the business. !Mr. Nichols, while retiring as a partner, con- 
tinued with them, and with their success' >rs, nntil his death. L)uring the 



EIGHTH GliXERATIOX. 649 



l)iislncss career of" Messrs. Crosliy, Xicliols & Co., \\wx publislied muiieroiis 
l.iooks aiul magazines, anioiiL;- tlieiii bein^• the Xuilli Aiiieriraii l^eview, tlie 
("liribtiau Ilxaiuiner and lieliyiuus ]\Iiscellaiiy, Cliaiiiiiiig-'s works, and tlie 
works of Martiueau. 

Jlr. Nicliols was a man of quiet and retiring di?i)Osition, and was held in 
the liighest esteem by tliose wlio knew him, and was an lionor to the pul)- 
lisliing- fraternity of Boston. He was jiossessed of beautiful and delicate 
traits of ehavacter. Tenderness toward all kinds of sutTering, and humility 
v.'cre his strongest traits, and made up in 2)art his deepK" religinus (diaracter. 
llis great generosity Nvas known only to tlie recipient^, his wil'o, and himself. 
B}' his will he made a number of public bequests.^ 

43. Vin. 4o6. Anna Elisahetli Gamble, tli' wife of ITenry P. 
Nicliols, born in Boston. IJesidence : Boston. 

Mrs. Nichols is a daughter of George and Mary Danforth (15rown) 
Gamble, of Boston. Her father was of English parentage, and the ordy 
member of his family born in this country. lie was an artist, his sjiecially 
being wood carving, for ^^•llich he made his own beautiful designs. Mrs. 
Nichols's ancestry includes the following families: Gamble, Brown, l^an- 
fortli. See Axcestut Tables l^\. 

43. VIII. 457. Charles Sanders Nichols [Sarah 43. VII. 208], 
born in Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Nichols v,as for some time a clerk with his fatlier, and ^^ as after- 
wards a partner with his brother, Jolni II. Nichols, in the stock brokerage 
and lire insurance business. 

43. VIII. 4o7. Amelia Anne AinstrortJi. his wife, born in r)Othel, Vt. 

Mrs. Nichols is a daugliter of Artemas and Catherine (Fessenden) Ains- 
worth, of Bethel. Caller n)c Callsta Ainsivortli [43. VIL JIT] and fV/- 
vhi Chamlirrlo.bi Aiiisworfh [43. VIII. 4-^4] ^i'^ li(?i' lister and brother. Iler 
ancestry includes the following families : Ainsworth, Howe, Haynes, 
Marble, Goodale, Beacham, Fessenden, Cheney, Brown, Eaton, Woodbury, 
Dodge, Kendall, Tidd, Blodgett, Iggleden. See Axcestuy Tarlks ^J^'!,-. 

' The Toston Evening Transcript, Jan. 12, ISOO, ami family letters. 



650 THE FICKF.BTXG GENEALOGY. 

44. VIII. 450. George Henry Nichols [Icliab.xl 41. VII. 217], 
born in Portland, 3Iaine, died in Cambridge, Mass. A physician. Resi- 
dence : Boston. 

Dr. Nichols, H. C. 1833, was prepared for college at the Exeter 
Academy. He studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and 
received the degree of ^I.D., in 1S3'J, from that institution. lie practised 
his profession in Bulfalo, N. Y., for about a year and a half, and in June, 
1S30, lie moved to Staudish, Maine, where he practised medicine for twenty 
years. In June, ISoO, he remo^•ed to Boston, and continued to practise 
his profession until a short time previous to his death.^ 

44. VIII. ,^-5i^. Sarah Atherton, his wife, born in Portland, Elaine, 
died in Boston, of pneumonia. 

Mrs. Xichols was a daughter of Abel Willard and ^Margaret ("Weelcs) 
Atherton. Her father was a merchant, of Portland. Her ancestry in- 
cludes the following families : Atherton, Gulliver, Kinsley, Wright, "Weeks, 
Clap, Sumner, W^est, Clement, Tukey, Gooding, Crabtree. See Axcestky 
Tablls ^. 

44. A' III. 460. John Taylor Gilman Nichols [Ichabod 44. VII. 
217], born in Portland, Maine. A minister. Eesidence : Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Dr. Nichols, H. C. 1836, graduated at the Harvard Divinity School in 
1842, and, in 1ST4, received the degree of D.D. from Bowdoin College. 
He took charge of the Second Parish Church, Saco, ]\Iaine, in 1842, and 
was ordained there April 13, 1843. Dr. Nichols resigned his charge on 
April 13, 1888, but has continued his connection with the society up to the 
present time, as pastor emeritus. In February, 1890, he removed to 
Cambridge, Avhere he still resides. 

44. WW. 400. Caroline Matilda Tuclcer, his wife, born in Boston. 

Mrs. Niehols is alfectionatcl}' and gratefully remembered by her hus- 
band's parisli, to whom she faithfully devoted herself for nearly forty 
years. 

' Harvard College Class Book, 1833, pp. 131-132. 



FAGHTII GEXERATIOX. 651 

She iri a uauj^litcr of William and Mary Ann (Kiikby) Tucker. Her 
father \va.s a well-known merchant of IJoston, and had an olhcc for thirtv- 
eight successive years on Central Wluirf, Boston. Her ancestry includes 
the following fomilies : Tucker, Sumner, West, Josselyn, Clap, Houghton, 
Adams, Wadsworth, Twichell, llolbrook, Wood, i'airbanks, Bullard, Bul- 
lard, Fairbanks, Atherton, Kirkby. See Axcestky Taijli;,s T^'^. 

44. Ylll. 463. Liicy Orne Nicliols [Benjamin R. 44. VII. 218], 
born in Salem, died in Boston. 

The life of ^Irs. ]3o\vditch was almost purely a domestic one. She 
inherited strong traits of character, and ihoiigh she passed scarcely a day 
of her married life free from pain, she never alloAved her own feelings to 
interfere with the happiness of others. Devotiiig herself to her mother, 
husband, and children, she Avas never weary in caring for tlieir welfare, 
and afforded an example of the purest unselhslmess and self-abnegation. 
Her sympathy for the poor was shown by the interest which she took in 
establishing, with the assistance of others, the Industrial Home for Girls. 

44. Vill. -;:'6''5. Jonathan Iiif/crsoU Jioicdlfc/i, her husband, born 
in Salem, died in Boston. IJesidence : Boston. 

Mr. Bowditch iidierited, more ampl)' than any other member of his 
family, his father's love and aptness for mathematical science ; but after his 
school days were over, he entered upon a mercantile career, which for 
many yean left him scanty leisure for scientific pursuits, except when at 
sea, and then, of course, with limhed access to books and none to teachers. 

On or about the time of the removal of the famil}' from Salem to Boston, 
in 1823, he began business as a clerk in the counting-room of ^Messrs. Ropes 
& Ward, East India merchants, and iii their service he made several 
voyages as supercargo. During these voyages }>h\ I'^owditch made diligent 
iise of his father's '' Practical Navigator," taking observations and keeping 
the shi})'s reckoning. At the same time, bv well chosen books and well 
directed courses of reading, he supjdied in no small degree what in his 
earlier culture fell short of a liberal education. 

In 1836, he became president of the American Insurance Company in 
Boston, and held that office until Jan. 1, 1SG4, retaining his place on the 



THE riCK/.'R TXG GEXEA L O Q Y. 



boanl of directors until 1884. lie was a member of the Massacluisotts 
Hospital Lite Insiu'anco Company, a member of its finance conunittee, and 
at times acted as its actuary. Of this company, liis fatlier had been one of 
the founders and its first actuary. 

]\Ir. I'owditch was distinL;-ui.-hed as a man of business, not only by integ- 
rity (if the most ri^id tyjje, but diually by promptness, energy, efficiency, 
and a practical wisdom closely akin to intuition. For these qualities his 
services were sought as a director in institutions of all kinds, financial, 
industrial, and charitable; and, mimerous as were the trusts thus devolved 
upon him, lie never sul'lered one of them to be a sinecure, though very 
many of them involved the gratuitous bestowal of a large amount of time 
and labor. In addition to all these public interests, Mr. Bowditch for 
many years had tlie management of large and important private trusts, 
and especiallv of estates of widows and orphans. 

After his father's death, ^iv. Bowditch assumed the editorship of frequent 
successive editions of the " Practical Xavigator," making such corrections 
and new calculations as were needed, until the copyright was purchased by 
the United States Government, and so became public property. He erected 
a private astronomical observatory at his sunnner residence at Canton, and 
early interested himself in the Observatory of Harvard College, and ren- 
dered important aid to its administration. He also took an active mterest 
in various other departments of tlie university, — in the erection of Memo- 
rial Hall, and in the ^fedical and I'ivinity Schools. Tlie university recog- 
nized Mr. hiowditch's long and varied services, and his claim to high regard 
for scholarly and scientific attainments, by conferring on him the degree of 
blaster of Arts in 1849, and that of Doctor of Laws on its two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary, in 1887. 

^Ir. Bowditch was a member of the Corporation of the iNlassachusetts 
Institute of Technology, and a member of its ilnancial committee. He was 
deeply interested in the Boston Asylum and Farm School, and served botli 
as its president and treasurer. During the Irish famine of 184(1 and 1847, 
ho was a very active member of the relief committee, and its treasurer. Ihu 
it would l)e ditlicult to name any puldic charity or any enter]irise for the 
welfare of the cunununity which has not had aid and furtherance from 



KinilTH GEXEUATIOX. 053 



Mr. iJowdltch. \l(; was a liljoial gi\ei-, aiul in a good cause he knew lio\v 
to elicit gifts even tVoiii tliose whose s\-mpat]iics are not ea>ily moved. 
Honor and p\irity were always manifested in his relations with society and 
the outside world, and in the more intimate circle of home, kindred, and 
friends. Impulsive, but only with generous impulses, free-spoken, but 
with the freedom of one who has nothing to hide, with quick indigna- 
tion, but only for meanness and depravity, he left the memory of a trul\- 
noblo life.^ 

Mr. Eowditch was a son of Xathauiel and 3[ary (Ingersoll) Bowditch. 
Uannalt Tngcrsoll [GO-68. V. ■JO'] was his grandaunt. His ancestry includes 
tlie following families : IJowditch, Gardner, Frier, Porter, Turner, Hill. 
Pioberts, Kitchen, Saunders, "Weld, Clap, Mitchelson, Bushell, Ingersoll, 
Felton, Coomes, Hasket, Langdon, Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, Weld, 
Clap, Mitchelson, Bushell, Ingersoll. Felton, Coomes, Hasket, Langdon, 
Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, ^^'eld, Clap, 3Iitchelson, Bushell, Hodges, 
Phippen, Wood, "Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calle}, Webli, Bray, Collins, 
Cockerill. See ^Vz.-cestry Tables J"';. 

44. VIII. 4G5. Berijamin White Nichols [Ik'njamin E. 44. MI. 
218], born in Salem. Residence: Boston. 

Mr. Nichols, II. C. 1842, studied law at the Harvard Faw School, and 
received the degree of LL.B. in lS4.j. The same year he was admitted to 
the bar. 

44. VIII. 4GG. Mary Pickering Nichols [Benjamin R. 44. YH. 
218], born in Boston. Residence : Boston. 

Miss Nichols is the translator from the German into Fnglish of a work 
entitled "Piano and Song" [1875], by F. Wieck, the father of Clara 
Schumann, the distingui.shed pianist, who was the wife of Robert Schu- 
mann. She has also made a metrical translation from the Middle-High 
German into Fnglish of the mediitval epic poem of "Gudrun" [Boston, 
1889]. 

* Prooeedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. XXIV. pp. 4."5- 
437, from which the above is almost entirely taken; The Harvard Register, Vol. III. 
p. 412; The Boston Post of Feb. 21, 18S0; and The Boston Journal of Feb. 21, 1SS9. 



654 'J'ilJ-^ I'ICKEniXG GENEALOGY. 



Mi.s.s Xieliul.-. inatoi'i:i.ll}- a.-sis^tud her ntpliew, 3Ir. Charles P. Bowditcli, 
in tlie publicutiuu of the Sheets of the rickeriiig Gencidogy, in collecthig 
iufuniuitiun, prt-paviug- copy for the printer, and in proof-reading-. 

-li. VIII. 4(;7. Elizabetli Pickering Niclaols [Benjamin E. 44. 
VII. 21 s], born in Boston, llusidence : Milwaukee, Wis. 

44. VIII. 4'ji'- Cyrus Frcdcrirl; Kitff/Jit, her luisband, born in 
Marblehead, 3Iass., died in Milwaukee, Wis. A clergyman. Residence: 
Milwaukee. 

Bishop Kniglit entered Burlington Ccdloge, N. J., in January, 1850, 
where he thruw two years' work into one, enlering v/ith special interest upon 
the study of languages, for which he had much taste and aptitude. In 
1851, he entered the General Theological Seminary, New York. He 
graduated in ls54, and was ordained deacon, July 2, of the same year, in 
Trinity Church, New York, b}' the Bight Bev. Bishop Y7ainwright. He 
spent some time as assistant to tlie Rev. Dr. Rodney, of St. Luke's Church, 
Germantown, Pa., and was oi'dained there to the priesthood by the Eight 
Eev. Bishop Alonzo Potter, in ISuo. Soon after this, he went to England, 
travelling there and on the continent, and attending several courses of 
lectures at Oxford. Yddle in England, he was offered a living by the 
then Duke of Northumberland, who, with his duchess, extended to him 
marked courtesies. On his return to America, in 1857, he became rector of 
St. Mark's Clmrch, Boston, after some service at the Cluirch of the Advent. 
E[e found St, ^Marie's in a decayed condition, but his energy, taste, and 
skill soon accomplished a much needed reform. A new chiuxdi Avas in 
time built, VN-hicli he was able to leave, at the end of his rectorship, unen- 
cumbered by debt. 

A noticeable feature of his character was the conti'ast between his minute 
care as to the accessories of Avorship and his apparel, and his perfect indif- 
ference to dress on secular occasions. No care was too great when he was 
to serve in the chancel, but on other occasions he cared little whether his 
dress was threadbare or not. 

In the year 1870, Mr. Knight accepted the rectorship of the parish of 
the Incarnation (now that of St. James), in Hartford, Conn. Here he made 



EIGHTH GEXKUATIOX. Gn5 

uiuny warm tVicuds. In 1877, lie becaiiK' roetor of ^t. James's Cliurcli, in 
Lancaster, Pa. On the 2(Jth of ^larch, lysO, he was consecrated Bishop of 
ililwaidcee, in the cathedral of that city. 

Bishop Kni;^'ht was many times elected de}nity to the General Con- 
vention, beginning- in his early life in 31assachnsetts, and served many 
years as a member of the committee of finance in that bodv. lie was 
twice sent as a representative of the American Chnrch to the Canadian 
Svuod. In ISiiO, he was made Master of Arts by Ihshops' College, 
Canada, and, in 1885, Doctor of Civil Law by the same college. The 
degree of Doctor of Saci'ed Tlieolog}- ^vas conferred up.in him 1j\- t^vo 
American colleges. 

Bishop Knight was distinguished for his zeal and ability in the 
advancement of the Episcopal Chnrch in America ; and in Church 
liistory, or ecclesiastical law, there was very little which he did not fully 
understand. 

In person. Bishop Knight was not over middle height. His features 
were singularlv well chiselled. His eyes were dark blue, sparkling with 
kindliness, or, as was very often the case, lighted up v.ith humor, v/hile 
his voice had remarkable richness and snK)Ot]iness, and there was much 
magnetic power in it.^ 

Bishop Knight ^Yas a son of Cyrus and Lucy (Prince) Smith, of ^larble- 
liead, lie having changed his name. His ancestry includes the following- 
families: Smith. Stearns, Gibson, Lawrence, Crispe, Hastings, Cheney, 
Hammond, Harrington, George, Bemis, Prince, Swett, AVeare, Page, Wood- 
bury. See AxcESTEY Tables ^™^. 

'io. VIII. 468. Mary Tyler Ropes [William 4.5. YJI. 226], born in 
i'.oston, baptized there Dec. 20, 181:?, died in Chigwell, Essex, Eng. 
Pesldence: The Alanor House, ChigAvell. 

45. VIII. 40S. WiUiam CJarl: GeUihraud, her husband, born in 
England, died in Stapleford Abbots, Essex, Eng. A merchant. Eesi- 
denco : Albyns, Stapleford Abbots. 

' Sermon preaclioil at a ^Memorial Service commemorative of Bisliop ]vniglit, and 
I'vint^d in ISOl. 



65G THE piCKEnixG genealogy. 

My. Gi'lHIji-uiid was ilie lifail of the iiieiTuntlle house of l']gertoii llul)- 
banl, of St. Pfter^^bur^-. He retired from bu.'<iues<, and left St. i'eter.slJur^■ 
just before ilie Criin._-an "War. After travelliuij;- on the continent witli lii.s 
wife, lie went to P>nL;]and, and lor a time hired liradeuham i'ark, in Xor- 
folk. lie then hired Alliyns, tlie seat of the Abdy family, in the county of 
Essex, -where lie re.>ided nearly thirty years. lie was a fine s})ecinien (.if 
the Eng'lisli gentleman. Al'ter his death his widow removed to Chigwell, 
Essex.i 

ANrl:STi:Y TAELrs J"V- 

45. Vin. 4G9. Willin.m Hooper Ropes [William 45. VII. 226], 
born in Boston, baptized in Koxbury, died in Tenby, Wales. A merchant. 
Residence : Tenby. 

^Ir. liopes was a student at the Latin School m Boston, and subseqnentl}- 
at the ]\ft. I'leasaut Academy in Amlierst, Mass. In 1829, he went to St. 
Petersburg ^Aith his father, and on his return he entered the wholesale dry- 
goods store of Henry Rice, of Boston. On the removal of his father to St. 
Petersburg in 1832, lie went Avith him. He entered his father's counting- 
room hi that city, and about 1835 was admitted to tlie firm. He continued 
to reside in St. Peters1nn-g until tlie Crimean War, when he left Paissia with 
his family, and travelled on the continent. About 1855, he made England 
his residence, settling in the neighborhood of London, and frnall)' establish- 
ing himself at Upper Clapton, where he continued to reside for a number of 
years. About IST'.J, he removed to Avranches, in Xormandy, where he 
lived ten years, and ilieii removed to Tenby. 

He was a very active and energetic man. From Sept. 24, 1850, to 1854, 
he was United States Consul at St. Peters1)urg. At the time of his death, 
he was senior member of the firm of W. Pojies &i Qo? 

45. YIII. 4G0. mU'u Harriet JTall, the wife of William H. Ropes, 
born in Leeds, Yorkshire, Eng. Pesidence: TenbA', Wales. 

Mrs. Popes is a woman of great musical talent, and is a fine pianist. 
Her musical ability is inherited by her children. 

' Ciimmunicated by Joseph S. Ropes. 

' CommuniL-aU'J by Juseph S. Eopes ; also the F.ostoii Transcript of Xov. IS, 1S91. 



EIGHTH GENERATIOX. C57 



6he is Ji tUiug'hter of Isaac Diinkrow and (raikiiLson) Uiill, of 

England. ANrKsinv Tables o"V- 

•15. VIll. 471. Joseph Samuel Hopes [William -if). VII. 22(i], born 
in L'oston. A merchant. Ivosidence: oS'urwich, Conn. 

In 1832, Mr. liopcs went to St. Peter^bnrg-. In 1S34, he entered the 
Third Gymnasium of that city, find, in l.s;j7, the univerriitv, whei-e he 
graduated in ls41. In 18 U>, ho returned to Boston, and Avas admitted to 
the firm of W. IiO])e.-^ it Co., of wliieli he \va>. in 18D2, tlie senior member. 
He ^yent back to liu>~ia, but, in 1847, lie settled permanently in Boston, 
making his home at dilVerent times in Boston. l!(ixbur\-, and Jamnica, ria.in. 
In 1892, he removed to Norwich, Conn. He was a member of the 3Iassa- 
chusetts House of liepresentatives in 1875 and 187G, and of the Senate in 
1878 and 1879. 

I\rr. Eopes has taken great interest hi banking and currency, and has 
Avritten a, pamphlet on those subjects, and many articles for the Boston 
Daily Advertiser, the Boston Transcript, the Banker's Magazine, The Xow 
Englandci-, and other journals. He is president of the Homestead Co- 
operative Inink of Boston, and has been a ti'ustee in various public insti- 
tutions. 

Mr. Eopes is a gentleman of great intelligence, varied reading, and of 
agreeable manners. 

45. VIII. .^77. Anna Ilionscy Poit, his -wife, ]>orn in Philadelphia, 
died in Boston. 

There is a portrait of Mrs. Ropes in the possession of her brother-in-law, 
John C. Piopes, of Boston. 

Mrs. liopes was a daughter of John "\A'ebster and ^laig-aretta (Dunlap) 
Pcrit. Her father was born in Xorwich, Corm. He became a merclumt of 
Philadelphia, and was engaged in the East India trade. His brother, 
Pelatiah Perit, was a member of the firm of Cioodhue & Co., of New York. 

AXCE.STKV T.\EU:S -^y-g- 

45. VIII. 472. Sarah Louisa Eopes [William 45. Vll. 22G], bom 
in Dorchester, 3Iass., baj)tized in October, 1819. Residence: London, 
En^. 



G58 TIII-J FICKFRING GENEALOGY. 

Mis^, lujpf.s reskled in Bustun until IKVl, wlicu slio went to !St. Peters- 
burg, Russia, with her lather. She has since lived partly iu Bu.■^tun and 
partly in England. 

45. VIII. 475. Martha Keed Ropes [William 45. VII. 22G], born 
in Boston, baptized there Oct. S, I82(j, died in Boston. 

45. VIII. ^7o. Charles Jroopev T)'((sl,', her husband, born in ]\ran- 
chester, ^lass. A mci'chant. Kesidence : Morristown, X. J. 

Mr. Trask, Yale ColleLz-e, ls4G, was pre])ared for collei^'e at the Leicester 
Aca'leiny, Leicester, 3[ass., and entered Amherst Colleg'C in the clnss of 
1845; but he was oblig'ed to leave at the end of the Sophomore year, on 
account of a serious throat trouble. lie went to Europe, and returned in 
August, 1844, when he entered the Junior class at Yale. He had a part 
assigned to him at connnencement, but was excused from speaking in 
consequence of the deatli of his father. The two years following his 
graduation he spent at the Andover Theological Seminary ; but, in con- 
sequence of impaired health, he was compelled to give up professional 
pursuits for a more active occupation. lie began his mercantile life in 
1851, and in 1853 established in Xew York City a branch of the firm 
of W. Ivopcs it Co., of Boston and St. Petersburg. He is now tiie man- 
aging partner of this concern. Mr. Trask is a man of great business 
ability, and is a trustee and director in various institutions. He is a 
member of the Xew York Cliamber of Commerce, and of the Xew York 
Produce Exchange. During the civil war he was an active member of 
many public committees, and was also a member of the Union League 
Club. 

'Mr. Trask is one of the original members of the Madison Square Pres- 
byterian Church, and lias been a member of its session for more than thirty 
years. He is a manager of the American Bilde Society ; the president of 
the American Seaman's Friend Society; a member of the American Geo- 
graphical Society; and a member of the Xew York Society of the Sons of 
the American Pievolution. He has frequently been a contributor to 
religious newspapers.^ 

^ Q'he University ilagazine, p. 614. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 659 



Mr.Tra.sk marriou, July 1,"., ISOO, for liis second wife, KUen GflH- 
brand Ropes, whose number in direct descent is [45. IX. S70]. She is a 
niece of liis first wife. 

Mr. Trask is a son of Richard and Abigail (Hooper) Trask, of ^Fan- 
chester, Mass. His father, wliose name was oriyinallv Ivieliard Tink. 
assumed his mother's name of Trask. His ancestr}- inchides tlie follow- 
ing families: Tink, Trask, Hoopt-r. See Axcesti:v Tables ^^I'Jt- 

45. VJTT. 470. John Coclman Ropes [William 45. YH. 226], born 
in St. rctt-r-burg, Russia. A lawyer. Residence: Ronton. 

John C. Ropes, H'. C. 1857, entered the Law School at Cambridge in 
1858, aiul remained tliere until ^larch, 1859. In the following April he 
went to Europe, and remained there until Xovembev. On his return to 
Boston, he went into the law oflice of Messrs. 1'. AV. Chandler and G. 0. 
Shattuck. In 1860, he returned to the Law School, where he remained 
until July, 1861, taking the degree of LL.B. He leturued to the office of 
Messrs. Chandler and Shattuck, and remained tliere until he was admitted 
to the bar, Nov. 28, 1861. From that time until the present he has 
practised law in Boston, and is the senior member of the firm of Ropes, 
Gray, Sc Loring. 

Mr. Ro})es has been a director, treasurer, and vice-i)i-esident of the 
Union Club, of which he became a member in 1864. He is a member of 
the Loyal Legion of the United States ; of the ]\Iasiachusetts Historical 
Society, and was one of the founders of the Military Historical Society of 
Massachusetts. He has also been one of the overseers of Harvard College. 
For more than thirty years he has been a vestryman of Trinity Church, 
and has several times been a delegate from that parish to the L)iocL^";an Con- 
vention, and, in 1876, he was one of the speakers at the Episcopal Congress 
held in Boston. In June, 1878, he was appointed by President IlaAes one 
of the board of visitors to the ^Military Academy at AYest Point. 

Mr. Ropes has visited Europe many times, and has travelled in most of 
its countries. He has written much on military matters; and he delivered 
a course of lectures on Xapoleon, before the Lowell Institute, which was 
published under the title of "The First Xapoleon." He also wrote the 



6G0 TJIE PICKER LXG GENEALOGY. 

fourth volume of the Sci-iLiier .Suii.-.-^ uf Cain|.i.iii;nri of tlie Civil War, 
entitled " The Army uu<ler Pope." He has contributed articles, chieflv 
in discussi(,n uf topics coiniccted Avith the AVar of the Rebellion, to the 
Atlantic Mouthlv and other magazines. In 1893, he wi-ote an elaborate 
work, entitled "The Campaign of Waterloo." He has written an admir- 
able memoir of General Devens. His most recent work is entitled " The 
Story of the Civil War/' ' 

AlthouL''h 'Mw Ropes was unable to take part in the civil war, he was 
an ardent supporter of the North at that period, and his knowledge of the 
campaigns was accurate and thorough. 

Besides the porti'aits of several members of his father's family which 
have been mentioned under their respective heads. ]\Ir. Ropes has the fol- 
lowing portraits: A fann'ly group, painted by Francis Alexander, consisting 
of his mother and her four children, John Codman Rdpes, Francis Codman 
Ropes, Henry Ropes, and I\Iarianne Riopes ; a copy, by Bass Otis, of 
Copley's portrait of his grandfather, the Hon. John Codman, of Boston ; 
portraits, by Stuart, of John ^IcLean, the founder of the McLer.n Asvlum 
for the insane, and of his wife, Ann (Amory) McLeai], ^vho was a grand- 
aunt of ^Ir. Ropes. 

45. YHI. 4S0. Francis Codman Ropes [William 45. VH. 226], 
born in Islington, London, Eng., died in Boston. A physician. Resi- 
dence : Boston. 

Dr. Ropes. H. C. 1857, studied medicine at the Medical College, 
Boston, and at the Harvard ]^Iedical School, and was house surgeon in the 
Massachusetts General Hospital from 1859 to 1860. He graduated in 
medicine, and took his degree of A.M. in Julv, ISiiO. The same month 
he sailed for Europe, whi":re he applied himself diligently to studv. He 
received two diplomas, constituting him liceiitiaie of the Royal College of 
Physicians of Edinbnrgli (L. R. C. P. E.), and of the Royal College of 
Surgeons of Edinburgh (L. R. C. S. E.). In August, 1864, he was chosen 
fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (F. R. C. S. E.). Re- 

1 Harvard College Cla?s T'.ook of 18.", pp. 110 112-, r.c.?ton of To-day, ],. 374, and 
Appleton's Cyclopasdia of American Biography, Vol. Y. p. "i-'O. 



EIGHTH GEyi:RATlOX. GGl 



turning- home, he was appointcJ acting n^isistaht surgeon, U.S.A., stiitioneJ 
at the United States Army General Hospital, lieaclville, Mass., where ho re- 
miiined until Ju.l\- 'I'd, isij'.'). He began the practice vi medicine in Boston, 
Oct. 1, 1SG5. He was attending physician nnd surgeon of the Boston Dis- 
pensary ; surgXMiU to out-patients of the Boston City Ho^]»ital, and a visit- 
ing- surgeon of the same. He was also a mendicr of varions medical 
sooietios. He had a taste for music, and played the pimio and the organ. 
There is a crayon portrait of him, by Ixowse, owned by his brother, Jolm 
C Ropes.^ 

45. YHI. -ISl. Henry Pvopes [William 4,0. VII. 2-2G], l)orn in Isling-- 
ton, London, Eng., died at Gettysburg-. I\esidence : Boston. 

Lieutenant rvO})e<, II. 0. 18ri-2, was fitted for college bv Sidney 
"Willard. He took a great interest in boating and athletic sports, and 
was in the representative boat of the college during some of hci- proudest 
triumphs. 

He was commissioned a second lieutenant of the Twentieth Massachu- 
setts Kegiment, Nov. 2."), ISGl, and as lirst lieutenant Oct. 2, 18G2, and 
was \\\i\\ the regiment until his death. During the several battles they 
■n-ere in he was never wounded until he met his deatli at the battle of 
Gettysburg." 

A crayon portrait of him, by Rowse, is in the possession of his brother, 
John C. Ropes. 

45. VIII. 482. Marianne Ropes [William 45. VII. 22G], born in 
Roxbury, died in Boston. 

Miss Ropes is spoken of as a very lo^■ely woman, and of an amialde 
character. A crayon portrait of her, by B. C. Porter, is in the posses- 
sion of her brother, John C. Ropes. 

45. VIII. 483. William Ladd Ropes [Hardy 45. VII. 22s], boj-n 
in Newton, Mass. A librarian. Residerice : Andover, ^lass. 

:\Ir. Ropes, H. C. 184G, became a teacher that year in the Boston Public 
Latin School, which position he held until the summer of 1848. He 

■ Ilarvrird Colloge Class Book, 1S57, pp. 107-109. " IbiJ., 1S02, p. ITS. 



G62 THE PICKKinXG GICNEALOGY. 

stui.liLil for llie ininisiiy at the Aiulover Theoli>gic;il Seniinarv, gniduatiiirr 
tliure in ls.j"2. Ho was settled over the Cougregational Church at Wreu- 
tham, Sejit. 14, 1S.")3, and continued there as the pastor until 18G2. In 
18GG, he was appointri] liljrarian of the Andover Theological Sennnary, 
which position he held in 1803. 

45. YIII. ,,'cS'J. Ilavfiet Lfarvoicc Pcirson, his wife, born in Salem, 
died ill Andover, 3[ass. 

Mrs. Ropes was a daugliter of Dr. Abel Lawrence and Harriet (Law- 
rence) P.'irson, of Salem. Her ancestry includes the following families: 
Peirson, Cox, I'age, Paine, Diinstcr, Lawrence, Morse, Phillips, Lawrence, 
Morse, Phillips, Putter, Clark, Lawrence, Morse, Phillips, Tarbell, Longley, 
Prescott, Platts, Loker, Draper, Bulkley, Allen, Wheeler, Jones, Page, Paine, 
Dunstei-, Lawrence, ]\Lorse, Phillips, Lawrence, Morse, Phillips, Putter, 
Clark. See Axcestrt Takles m\. 

4G. YIIL 400. Mary Elizabeth Sv/asey [Hannah 4G. VIL 241], 
born in E>:eter, X. H. 

AG. N Ml. 400. George WasJihif/tou Little, her husband, born in 
West Amesburj-, Mass., died in West Amesbury. A can-jage-buiklci'. 
Residence : West Ameshniry. 

Mr. Little was a son of John and Susannah (Kendrick) Little, of West 
Amesbury. His father was a carriage-builder. His ancestry includes the 
following families: Little, Poor, Collin, ThendjCi', Stevens, Greenleaf, 
Jacques, Knight, l^luminer, Kipp, Rowell, Kendrick. See Axcestey 
Tables |y^ 

4G. Yin. 491. Hannah Ropes Swasey [Hannah 46. YH. 241], 
born in (Jj-ford, N. H. 

4G. YIH. 401. Horace Harbor, her husband, born in Canaan, N. H., 
died in Le Poy, 31inn. A cabinet-maker and farmer. Residence: Le 
Roy. 

Mr. Barbor lived at various times in Kew Hampshire, Illinois, and 
Minnesota. 



EiGiirn GENEHAriox. 6G3 



lie ^vas a .-(in of Xathaniol and Xcllio (Webster) Barbor, of Canaan. 
Ancestry Taples J'Jj- 

AG. VIII. -l:i4. George Henry Sv/asey [Hannah 4G. VII. 241], 
born in Lyme, N. H. A carriage-maker. Ivcsidence : 3Iinneapolis, 3Iinn. 

4G. VIII. 4^1.^'. JTranccs Jld)'!/ I*carsoii, liis fir.st a\ Ife, born in Ports- 
niouth, X. II., died in Le Roy, .Minn. 

!JIrs. Swa-^ey was a hidf-^Lstor of her husljand'.s second wife. She was a 
daughter of Deacon John and Mary (Carhon) Pearson, of Newbm'vport, 
Mass. Pier fatlirr was a baker. Her ancestry inchnh's tlie fo]lo\viuo,- 
families: Pearson, Hazen, 3Iix, Atkinson, Wyatt, Carhon. See Axcestky 
Tables m^ 

46. VIII. 4''^)4'. lElivabcfli Stow Pecrrsoii, Ins second wife, born in 
Exeter, N. II. 

Mrs. Swasey is a lialf-sister of lier Imsband's first wife. Slie is a 
daughter of Deacon John and X'ancy (Lydston) Pearson. Her ancestry 
includes the foUowIng families : Pearson, Hazen, Mix, Atkinson, "^A'yalt, 
Lydston. See Ancestky Tables P^\,. 

4G. VIII. 40.-). Lucy Maria Swasey [Hannah 46. A^II. 241], born 
in Waterbury, Vt. A milliner. Pesidence : Le Poy, Minn. 

46. VIII. ..^.^ J. WillUn?} I::>(Stis Biu-nham, her husband, born in 
Essex, ]\Iass.. died in lilssex. A minister. Pesidence: Essex. 

Mr. Buridiam at one time lived in Lawrence, 3Iass. He married Eliza- 
beth Langmaid for his first wife. She died in Essex in 3Iarch, 18.")4. By 
her he had at least one daughter, who was living with her stepmother a 
few years ago. 

He was a son of Abner and Anna Burnham, of Essex, Mass. Ilis 
fi\ther was a sailor in early life, and later a shoe-dealer. Akcestky 
Tables -J^j. 

4G. VIII. -10^. Benjamin Hardy Ropes [Benjamin 4G. VII. 2 13], 
born in Bradfonl, Vt., died in Roxbury, Mass. Residence: Roxbury. 



664 TJIE riCKKlUNG GEXEALOGY. 

Mr. IiOjics came to Boston about ISoj, and "went into tlie .store of ^lark 
Dow, on Winter Street. lie at'terward.s eng-agx-d in tlie baking bu>incss, 
on Wa.shington Street, .succeeding tlie late 3Irs. Ihindiam. 'J'he tirni 
Wentwortli, Ropes & Co. built the first steam baker}- in Boston, on the 
land now occuj.ied by the Dearborn Street School. In ISfii, his health 
being podr, ho went West, and entered into business at Eldorado, Iowa, 
where he became a ]irominent citizen. For nineteen }-ears he was the post- 
master of th.'it town. He was instrument.al 'in building the fine iron bridge 
which crosses the Turkey liive]' at ]^ld(.irado, and in jilacing the i-oads in 
that vicinity in good condition. During liis residence in Boston, he was a 
member of the Federal Stiect and of the Dudley Street l^aptist Churches.^ 

46. VIII. .4--^5'-'- AnianiJa Prudence Bowei's, his first wife, born in 
Leominster, Mass., died in Dorchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Eopes was a daughter of John and Nancy (Carter) Bowers. Her 
father was a comb-iuaker, of Leominster. Jolt)) Wo.Uace Bonos [46. YIII. 
SOI] is her brother. Her ancestry includes the following families : 
Bowers, Carter, Brooks, 3[ousall, Wilder, Sawyer, Hough, England. See 

46. Ylll. 4^'^'- Jilavu Ann Trarij, Ids second wife, born in Albany, 
Vt., died in Eldorado, Iowa, of lung fever. 

Mrs. luipes's first husband was Albert Tracy, by whom she had 
children who died in infancy. She was a daughter of James W. and 
Nancy (Chaudjerlain) Rogers. Axckstky Tables ^"V-- 

46. VIII. 41)0. Cliarles Baker Ropes [Benjamin 46. YII. 243], 
born in Barry, Yt., died in Eldorado, Iowa. A mercliant and post- 
master. Residence : Eldoiado. 

46. VIII. 4^>0. Jxcherca Stevens, his wife, born in Boston, died in 
Eldorado, Iowa. 

Mrs. Ropes ^vas a daughter of John and Lucy (Thomas) Stevens. 
AxcESTKY Tables ^^V- 

' The Boston Transcript of Aucust, 1S84. 



KIGIITH CLXELWTION. 6fi5 

4G. VllT. 501. Eiaily Ropes [lirnjamin -iG. VII. 24;:!], born in 
llavcrliill, N. IL, died in East Dnn-his, Mass. 

AC^.WM. oOl. John Wdllacc liotro-s, lier liiisband, born in Leo- 
minster, 3Iass. A master mechanic and inventor. Kesidence : East 
j)ouglas, ]\Iass. 

:Mr. Bowers is a son of Jolui and Nancy (Carter) I'>owers, of Leo- 
minster. Atnanda rnnlri/ce Bowers [40. VIIL ^''^6'] is his sister. His 
ancestry inchules the follovring families: Bowers, Carter, J3rooks, Mousal!, 
^\'ilder, Sawyer, Hougli, England. See Axcestrt Taet.e.^ t!"^. 

47. VIIL 002. Haunali Elsoii Ropes [George 47. YIl. 2 IS], born 
in Xewbury, Yt. 

47. YllL oOJ. George JPerkiiis Cnmminfifi, lier husband, born in 
jMorgan, A^t. A civil engineer. Residence: Marcjuette, 3Jieh. 

Mr. Cunnniugs has been an elder in the Presbyterian Chm-cli of ^Lir- 
(juette, ever since its organization, more than twenty-five years ago. He 
has i)assed his winters in Barnwell, S. C. 

He is a son of Charles and Jerasha (Litrle) Cuinniings, of Morgan, Yt. 
His fother -svas a farmer and surveyor. His ancestry includes the following 
i'amilies: Cummings, Howlett, Sliedd, Farwell, Senter, Liitle, Poor, Collin, 
Thember, Stevens, Greenleaf, Hale, Ilutchin-on, Bosworth, Xorthend, 
Jjrown, Emery, "Webster, Shatswell. 31ilk, Scollav, Ih-own, Ihnerv, AVeb- 
ster, Shats\vell, 15mbeck, ^lilk, Scollay, Marvel. See A>,-ce<tj:y Tahlks f-}\,. 

47. YIII. 503. Miriam Johnson Ropes [C4eorge 47. YIL 248], 
born in Xewbury, Yt.. A school-teaclier. Residence : Ishpeming, 3Iich. 

Miss Ropes has taught schools in New Hampshire, Yerinont, and 
Michigan. 

47. YIII. 504. George Ropes [George 47. YIL 24S], born in New- 
bury, Yt. An architect. Residence : St. Louis, 3Io. 

Mr. Roiics formerly lived in Boston, and was the architect of the Girls' 
High School, the Normal Scliool, the State Prison at Concord, and other 
I'ublic buildings. He has done good work on the State cajjitol at Topeka, 
Kansas. 



666 THE PICKERING OEXEALOGY. 

-17. VIII. 'JU^. S<>i>hi({ Amelia Taft, liis wife, born in Bcston. 
Mrs. Uopis is a danglitrr of Samuel Juil^on and Lucy Churcliill (Hay- 
ward) Taft, of l)Oston. ANri;sTKY Tablks J"^. 

47. VIII. r)OG. Julius Ropes [Cieorge 47. VII. 248], born in New- 
bury, Vt. A clieniist and dru^-Li-ist. liei^iduuce: Ishponiing-, ]\Iicli. 

When he was iiftuen ye;nN old, -Mr. Kopes nioved to St. Johnsbury, Vt., 
where lie attended the academy for several terms. In 1856, lie went to 
Boston, wJK.re he engaued in building: opcia.tions until 1860. In the latter 
year he removed to ^rarquette, !Mich., and there engaged in a general mer- 
chandise bn.sines/, in -whicli he contiiuied for two years. In 1864, he 
enteiX'd the drug and chemical business, and establislied a laboratory for 
analytical work. In 1807, lie removed to Ishpeming, Mich., of which town 
he was the postmaster from 1868 to 1886. 

From tliis point he made trips of exploration in search of mineral 
deposits. In 18^1^ lie discovered veins of rich gold and silver bearing 
quartz; and, in 1882, the Kopes Gold and Silver Alining- Company was 
formed for tlieir develoi)nient. Of this company ^Ii. liopes became the 
president. In 1895, he opened a laborator}- in Rainy Lake City. 

47. VIII. WG. Eituice Louisa House, his wife, born in Jackson, 
Mich. 

Mrs. Ropes is a daughter of John and xVnn (Foster) Rouse, of Lockport, 
N. Y. Her fatlier is a commission merchant. Axcestky TAiiLEs 'o"\. 

47. VIII. .■)07. Arthur Ropes [George 47. VII. 248], born in New- 
bur}-, Vt. A journalist. Residence: ?»Iontpeliei', Vt. 

Mr. Ropes obtained his early educational training in tlie common schools, 
and at the St. Johnsbury Academy, and was for a time a member of the 
class of 1864 in Dartmouth College. He became a teaclier in the common 
schools of A^ennont, then an assistant in St. Johnsbury Academy, and 
afterwards was promoted to be the ])rincipal of the high school of that 
village. He was for some time teller in the Passum]isic Bank at St. Johns- 
bury, and aftci'wards was made cashier of the Northfield National Bank of 
Northfield, Vt. At one time he was engaged in manufacturing at "Water- 
bury, and subsequentl}- at Alontpelier, A't. 



EIGHTH GEXERATTON. CG7 



111 ISSQ, lie enieixd ihe biishii??;? ntlice of the \'ernioiit "Watcliman, at 
^rontpelicr, and soon became a writer upon the editorial staff of that paper. 
Ill 1S.'^G, he beg'an tlie puldicatlon of the Kural \'crmonter, at Montpelier ; 
and, in ItiSS, he \\'as iiirfiruniental in the formation of an association of 
business men in Montpelier and Wasliing-ton Comit}', entitled The Watch- 
man Publishing- C'oinpanv, for the purpose of jnu-chasing- the "Watcliman 
and uniting- with it the Vermonter. This was accomplished, and Mr. Ropes 
has since filled the editorial chair of the "Watchman, and is the business 
manager of the company, of wliich he is a director and the clerk. He is 
rocog-nized b'jtli as a slrong- \vriter and an able business manager.^ 

47. Vlll. o07. Jlary Jane Ilut'hins, the wife of Arthur Ropes, 
born in Waterburv, ^'t. 

Mrs. Ropes is a daugditer of George Washington and Charlotte 
(McXider) Ilutchins. Her father is a retired merchant of Waterbury, 
\t. AxcEsiHY Tables -Jl" . 



47. Vni. oOy. Ellen Hopes [George 47. Yll. 24S], bom in New- 
bur}-, Vt. 

4:1. YIll. oOO. Charles Le lioy Sheldon, lier Imsband, born in 
Rochester, Mich. A .shoe-dealer. Residence : Is]i])eming, Mich. 

ilr. Sheldon during the civil war served, in l.s(;i-18'i2, as a musician 
in the First Michigan Cavalr}'. In lSGi-18G5, he was a member of the 
Ih-igadc Iknid, Fourth Division of the Twenty-third Army Corps. He is 
an elder in the Presbyterian Church of Ishpeniing, and is spoken of as an 
honorable business man. 

He is a son of Robert Livingston and Sarah (Lc Rov) Sheldon. His 
fither was a merchant of Fentonville, 3Iich. His ancestry includes 
the following families: Sheldon, Pitts, Le Roy, Fobes. See Ancestuy 

■n VI 11 

lABLKS r-.Q^. 

47. VITT. ,^,11. Edward Elson Ropes [William H. 47. VII. 251], 
born in ]\Iilton, Mass. An orange-grower. Residence: Lake View, 
Volusia, Fla. 

• Men of Vermont, p. 3i2. 



G68 THE FJCKERING GEXEALOGY. 



!Mr. Eopes was pre^c•llt at the attack made upon Lawrence, Kansas 
by bonier ruffians under Atcliiswn and Strinytelluw, on May 25, 185G, and 
served under General James IT. Lane on various occasions in the Free 
Soil movement in Kansas in that )-ear. He also saw active service durin;^-- 
the Rebellion, lie enlisted, June 2(), l.'^62, in Company D of the Second 
MassacluHotts Infantry, and was in action at Cedar ]\lountain, Antietam, 
Chancellors\ ille, I'everly Ford, Gettysburg, and elsewhere, and joined in 
the March to the Sea under General Sherman, lie received his discharge 
June 13, ISG.").^ 

47. VI 11. 513. Alice Slieplierd Ropes [William H. 47. VII. 251], 
born in "Waltham, Mass. 

47. VIII. olo. Jairus Leando' Skiimei; her husband, born in 
Jamaica, Vt. A salesman. Uesidence: Sacramento, Cal. 

Mr. Skinner formerly resided in Amherst, Mass., where he was piost- 
master for nearly twelve years. He resigned this office Jan. 1, 1881, and 
removed to California on account of the health of his familv. 

During the IJebellion he raised Company D, Twenty-seventh Massa- 
chusetts ^\-•lunteer Infantry, at Andierst, and enlisted in it as a private, 
Sept. 6, 18ni. He was appointed orderly sergeant of the same company 
Oct. 1, 18G1 : commissioned second lieutenant July 1, 1862 ; first lieutenant 
May 29, 1863, and captain Sept. 29, 18G4. He resigned, and was honor- 
ably discharged Dec. 31. 1SG4. He was captured at Drury's Bluff, Va., 
May 16, 18G4; and was impri-oned in the Libl)y Prison in Richmond, in 
ilacon, Ga., in Charleston, S. C, and in Columbia, S. C He escaped 
from the latter place, and was recaptured ; but his second attempt, on Nov. 
29, 18G4, was successful. 

He is a son of Jairus and Mary (Sti'eeter) Skinner, of Plantsville, Conn.^ 

Ancestky Ta};li:s -og:j. 

47. VIII. 517. Edv.-ard Dellionde Ropes [Timothy 47. VII. 252], 
born in Salem. A merchant. Residence : Salem. 

1 WiiislcAv :\reinorial, by David-Farsous llolton, Vol. II. p. 724. 

^ AViiislow Memorial, by David-Par.?ons Holton, Vol. II. p. 725; also statement of 
Captain Skinuer. 



EIGHTH GEXEnATlOy. CC9 

Mr. Kupcs was a iiieinber of thu linn ot" IiOjhs, Kniniertoii & Co., of 
.Saloui, engaged in foreign trade wiili I'last Africa, Madagascar, and Arabia. 
The firm \va:j dissolved Jnl}- 30. IbUO. lie became jire^ident of oncof tlie 
Salem Banks in 1893, and was a member of the Salem Common Council 
from 187G to 1S78, inclusive. 

47. VIII. 517. Mary Hlhuhcth Goodhue, his -wife, born in Salem. 

Mrs. Kopes is a daughter of Abner and Luc}- (Lu^>comb) Goodhue, of 
Salem. Batdd Goodhue [;]3 YIll. 307] and JoJoi JU.it Goodliue [34. VIII. 
J,J,'] were her uncles. Her ance>trv includes tlie fullouing families: 
Goodhue, AVatson, Vriiiji|)le, Sherwin, Lamso]i, liott, Xewhall, I'utter, 
Luscomb, Henderson, IJeadle, Cook, Cook, Cox, 31ansfield, AVilliams, 
Stocker, Eamsdell, AA'ard, Flint, 3Iassoy, Wells, Warner, Derb}-, Ililman, 
Youngs, Budd. See Axck^tjjy Tables -J"l-. 

47. VIII. 518. George Ropes [George 47. VII. 25G], born in Port- 
land, Maine, died in Lincoln, Mass. A merchant. IJesidence : Lincoln. 

i\Ir. Eopes formerly lived in Salem, where he was engaged in foreign 
trade -with Joltn Bviiram [47. VJI. 2o7]. He was a member of the Salem 
Common Council in 1SG9 and 1870. About the year 1872, he moved to 
Boston, and engaged extoisively in trade Avith Zanzibar, Madagascar, and 
East Africa, on his own account. He afterwards devoted his attention to 
manufacturing, and Avas treasurer and manager of the Dickinson Ivory 
Company of Peterborough, X. IL' 

47. VIll. 51S. Jlarif Jlinot CJarl;, his wife, born in Boston. 

Mrs. Popes is a daughter of Dr. Luther and Selina Cranch (]\Iinot) 
Clark, of Boston. Iler ancestry includes the following families : Clark, 
Bird, Athci'ton, Wales, Cutting, Harrington, Creorge, Harrington, George, 
AVhitney, Peynolds, Greeu'A-ood, Ward. Jackson, Trowbridge, Atherton, 
Wales, Stearns, ryfanning, Dix, Barnard, Sandersmi. Eggleston, Ixirtlett, 
Fiske, AVyeth, Barnard, Fleming, ^lorse, Peirce, Sliattuck, Ilagar, ]5emis, 
IVvijamin, Allen, Bigelov,-, Warren, Flagg, Livennore, ^linot, I'lutler, 
Wheeler, Brooks, Bruoks, Masun, Potter, Fdnuinds, Martyn, Hulyoke, 

' The IJuston Tnmscript of Aug. 17, 1^0(1 



670 THE nCKEUIXa GEXEALOGY. 



Stockton, Wliite, Kini^', Swift, Cupen, ^lurrilt, Kiclmnlson, Bradish, Bond, 
See Anckstky Tai;lks T"^. 

47. Vin. :>r,». Eliza Paiggles Ropes [George 47. VII. 25C], bom 
in rortlaiid, Maine. 

47. VIII. •;7i.9. Simon JioJivav JJ>?/<e>*e?^ her husband. 

Anckstj:y T.vr.Lv.s .}o'V- 

47. VIII. TiiM. Josepli Aiigustns Ropes [Georg-e 47. VII. 25G], 
born in Poriknul, Maine, riesidence : Boston. 

47. A''1II. o21. Jlary B. Gill, his \vile, born in Vrorcester, Mass. 
Mrs. Ropes is a daughter of George W. and Sarah (l\[cFarland) Gilh 

AxcESTKY Tabi.i-s '.T j-^i • 

47. VIII. .".24. Horace Ropes [Joseph 47. VII. 2.58], born in Kome, 
Italy. A civil engineer. Residence : Las Graces, New Mexico. 

Mr. Ropes was educated in the public schools of Philadelphia. On 
leaving- the High School, he entered the Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
at Worcester, ]\Iass., and took the usual three years' course in civil 
engineering-. He graduated in 1S78, and immediately obtained a position 
on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad, and was afterwards pro- 
moted to the othce of assistant engineer. In tliat capacit}- he has superin- 
tended the surveying and construction, of several long and important 
lines of railroad on that and other roads, chiefly in New Mexico, Colorado, 
and Arizona. 

47. VIII. oli Katharine Fall, his wife, born in Nashville, Tenn. 
]\lrs. Rojies is a daughter of William Robinson and Edmonia Louisa 
(Taylor) Fall. ILr father is a teacher. AxrEsiKv Taeles ^^\n. 

47. VIII. 525. Mary Sewall Ropss [Joseph 47. VII. 258], born in 
Rome, Italy. 

47. VIII. o2o. Gcovfje Gleason Jlinnphvey, her Imsband. A 
manufacturer in Now York City. Residence : Englewood, N. J. 

Mr. Humphrey is a son of Jeffrey and Julia (Mcrrinian) Humphrey, of 
Englewood, N. J. His father is a manufacturer. Axckstuy Tables ""g. 



EIGHTU GEXERATIOX. 671 

47. VIIL 52G. Charles Franklin Ropes [Duvid N. 47. VII. 2.59], 
l)iira ill Meriileii, Conn. A liardware dealer. Kesidence : Sacra- 
mento, Cal. 

Mr. Ropes graduated from the Pieiisselaer Polytoclmic Institute, 
Troy, N. Y., iu 1871. lie was interested in mining- and other business 
at Nevada, Cal.^ 

47. VIIL 62G. Sadie WalJcci', his wife, horn in Iowa. 
j\Irs. Ropes is a daughter of Samuel R. and Almira (Chirk) Walker, of 
Sacramento, Cah ,\nci;<trv Taulf.^ tJ'". 

47. VIIL 527. Clara Ropes [David N. 47. VII. 259], born iu ileri- 
dcn, Conn. 

47. VIIL o37. Charles Je)i7:his Preseott, her husband, born in 
Vassalborough, Elaine. A teaclier. Residence: Orange, X.J. 

Mr. Prescott, Colby University, 1855, was principal of the Hebron 
Academy in Maine for two years, lie afterwards taught in 3Iobile, Ala. 
When the civil war Ijroke out he returned to the North, and l^ecame con- 
nected witli tlie Eagk'swood Mihtary Academy at Pertli Andjoy, N. J. At 
the ch^se of the war, he became principal tif the Essex Hall School, in 
Orange, N. J., and afterwards of the public schools of Jersey City. Here 
ho continued until 1S92, when he entered the United States Customs 
service in New York. 

He is a son of the Hon. Oliver and Lydia (Chandler) Prescott, of Vas- 
salborough. His father was a ph3'sician, and for two jears was in the 
Maine Senate. His ancestry includes the following families: Prescott, 
Ikiulter, Marston, Sanliorn, Bachiler, Carter, Davis, Brown, French, 
Chandler, Brewer, Phelps, Burge, Taylor, Streeter. See Akcesthv 
Tatu,ks Jj'I. 

47. VIIL 5.31. An-tlnir Dudley Ropes [David N. 47. VII. 259], 
born in Orange, N. -J. A civil engineer. Residence : I\Ieh'ose, Mass. 

' Records of William Spooner, of riyinoutb, and his Descendauls, by Thomas 
Spoouer, p. 294. 



G72 THE PICKER JXG GENEALOGY. 

After gnuliiating' from tlie lligli School in 1881, Mr. Kopcs entered an 
arcliitect's office in Ne\\- Yuik. In 1887, he removed to Boston, and took a 
special conr*.' of two years in architecture at the Institute of Technology. 
After foliouing- that profession for a year, lie took a {position in tlie 
engineer corps of the Boston and Maine Kailroad, v/hich he continues 
to hold. 

48. VIII. 534. Eliza Cabot Blanchard [Mary A. 48. YIT. 2C3], 
born in Boston, died in Boston, of consumption. 

Having lost both of jici- parents in early childhood, Mrs. Winthrop was 
brought up in the family of h.er granduncle, and guardian, S;unuel Picker- 
ing Gardner, of Boston. 

Tlio following is quoted from an obituary notice of Mrs. Winthrop 
which was printed in the Boston Daily Advertiser of June 17, 1842: 

" Mrs. Winthrop possessed an intellect of uncommon clearness and brightness, an 
acuteness of perception, a decision of purpose, and a correctness of judgment that are 
rarely found united; and \\-ithal there was a vivacity of manner and a brilliancy of 
thought which rendered lior an object of extreme interest to all who have listened to 
her i-ieh and varied conversation." 

A miniature of Jlrs. "Winthroj), b}' Hill, is in the possession of her 
family. 

48. VIII. oSJf- Itohevt Charles Winthrop, her husband, born in 
Boston. Hesidcnces : Boston and Brookline, Z\Iass. 

Mr. "Winthrop was educated at the Boston Latiii School and at Harvard 
College, where he graduated, with high honors, in 1828. After studying 
law with Ihmiel Webster, he was admitted to the bar in 1831, but .soon 
after, he entered public life. He n-as much interested in the Massachusetts 
Militia, and served as the commander of the Boston Light Infantry, as an 
ofHcer of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, and as aide-de- 
camp of Governors D:ivis, Armstrong, and Everett. From 1835 to 1840, 
he was a member of the I^Iassachusetts House of Representatives, and 
during the last three years he was chosen its speaker. In 1840, he was 
elected to Congress from Boston (then a single district), whicli he continued 
to represent until 1850, with the exception of a few months in l.'^42, when 



EIGHTH GEyEBATIOX. 673 



a family alllictiuii caufttjd him tenipttrarily to rutire. He was Speaker of 
tlie ThirtiL'th Congress (1847-1 >^ti)j, but failed of a re-election after a pro- 
tnioted contest. In July, 1S.VJ, he succeeded Welister in the United States 
Senate, but he lost his seat in that body the following- year, owing- to a 
coalition of Democrats and Free-soilers in the .Massachusetts Legislature 
which sent Charles Sumner in his place. In the autumn of 1851, he was 
the Whig candidate for governor, and received a large plurality of the 
popular vote, but the constitution then requiring a majoi-ity over all other 
candidates, the election was thrown into the Legislature, where Mr. "\Vin- 
throp was defeated by the same coalition. In 1852, he was cliairman of 
the Electoral College which cast the vote of Massachusetts for General 
Scott. He declined to be again a candidate foi' governor or senator, thoun-h 
both offices were subsequently within his reach. Upon the dissolution of 
the "Whig party, he })referred to retire permanentlv from public life, and 
devote himself to historical, philanthropic, educational, and religious under- 
takings. In the presidential campaign of ISGO and 18C4, however, ho 
actively supported John Bell and General McClellan ; but after that time 
he took no part in politics. 

Asa representative of ^lassachusetts in Washington, he was opposed to 
the extension of slavery, and supported the right of petition to Congress. 
But valuing the Union of the United States above all things, not believing 
in the Free Soil views, he could not bring himself to support the Repub- 
lican partv, when that partv came into existence. He was naturally a con- 
servative, and, exempt as he wa.s from Impulses which carry men on untried 
paths, he deplored the breach between the North and the South which 
ended in the civil war. 

For thirty years ]\Ir. Winthrop was president of the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, for twenty-iive years president of the Boston Provident 
Association, for eight years president of the Alumni of Harvard College, 
besides serving as an overseer of the university, as chairman of the Over- 
seers of the Poor of Boston, and in many other posts of dignity and useful- 
ness. He was the chosen counsellor of the late George Peabody In several 
of his public benefactions, and was, iVom Its foundation, at the head of the 
great Peabody Trust for Southern Education, and of the Peabody Museum 



TJ[E FICKEEIXG GENEALOGY. 



ofArcluToloyy and JLtliuoloyy at Canibrid-e. Mr. Wintlirop early acquired 
a reputation I'or eloquence, and was long- associated in the public mind as a 
favorite orator on great historical anniversaries. Among the most admired 
of his productions were, his address on laying the corner-stone of the 
National Monxunent at Wasliington, in 1848, and one on the completion of 
the same moniuncnt. in 1885; his oration on the 250th Anniversary of the 
Landing of the Pilgrims, delivered at Plyniontli, in 1870; his Boston 
Centennial Oration, July 4, 187G ; his address on unveihng the statue of 
Colonel ^yilliam Pi'escott at Puid^er Hill, in ISSl, and in the same year his 
orntion on the anniversary of the surrender of Co'nwaliis at Yorktown, 
delivered by invitation of Congress. He also excelled in shorter and less 
formal utterances, and a patriotic hymn anonymously printed by him during 
the war obtained a wide circulation. lie was the author of four volumes 
of Addresses and Speeches [1S52-18SG], of two volumes of the Life 
and Letters of John Winthrop [18G4-18G7]. of '-Washington, Bowdoin, 
and Franklin" [1S7G], and of numerous occasional productions, some of 
wliich are printed in the Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society. The degree of LL.D. was conferred on ^Ir. Winthrop by Boav- 
doin College in 1840, by Harvard College in 1855, and by the University 
of Cambridge, England, in 1874. 

He married, for his second wife, Nov. 6, 1849, Elizabeth Laura "Welles, 
widow of Arnold F. Welles, of Boston, and daughter of John and Eleanor 
(Coflin) Derb}-, of Salem. She was born in Salem, Feb. 0. 1811, and died 
in Boston, April 26, 1861. His third wife, whom he married Nov. 15, 1865, 
was Cornelia Adeline Thayer, widow of John Eliot Thayer, of Boston, and 
daughter of tlie Hon. Francis Granger, of Canandaigua, N. Y. She died at 
Brookline, June 16, 1892. He had issue by his iirst marriage only. 

The Winthro}) family Is undoubtedly the most historic family of New 
England, and has furnished men of distinction in each generation, from the 
first governor, John Whithrop, of Massachusetts, down to his distinguished 
descendant, the subject of this sketch.^ 

' Applcton'.s Cyclopanlia of American Biogra])hy, Vol. YI. p. .576; One of a Thousand, 
by .John C. Eand, pp. C6.5-G67; Tlie History of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany, by Zachariah G. Whitman, p. 424; the Boston newspapers at the time of his death, 
and a letter of his son, Ilobert C. 'WinthroT). 



EIGHTH GF.XEEATinx. 675 



Mr. A\'iiitlirop was a sou of the IIou. Thomas iJtiilall and Kllzalicth 
iiowdoin (Temple) Wintliroji, of l>u>t(>n. His fatlier was Lioutenant-Gov- 
(.-rnnr of Massachusetts, and his raothei- was a dau^liter of Sir John Temple, 
baronet. Cltarles A. Wintltrop [25. IX. J6V] was ids first cousin onco 
removed. His ancestry includes the following families: Winthrop, Forth, 
Kead, Ih-owne, Smith, Dudley, Dighton, Tyng, Sears (?), P.orland, Neil, 
Lindall, Veren, Poole, Brenton, Tiui-ton, Temple, Lee, Nelson, Temple, 
Lee, Tailer, Bowdoin, Portage, Lynde, Newgate, Erving, See Ancestrv 
Tablks I^V- 

48. YILT. .53,5. Frederick Samuel Cabot [Frederick 48. YIL 264], 
l)orn in Boston, died in Boston. Pesidence : Boston. 

;Mr. Cabot was secretary of the ]\lill Owners' ilutual Firo Lisurance 
Company, of Boston. 

48. VIIL o35. Jlai'ij Ilersei/ Lincoln, his wife, born in Ilingham, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Cabot is a daughter of Barnabas and Pachel (Lincoln) Lincoln. 
Her father was a shipmaster, and afterwards a manufacturer, of Ilingham. 
Her ancestry iiicludes the following families : Lincoln, Lane, Ford, Stodder, 
l^ane, Macvarlo, Pussell, Cook, Bull, Damon, Gilbert, Sprague, Fames, 
l^artlett, "Warren, Fearing, AVilder, Fames, Lincoln, Hawkc, Lincoln, Lane, 
Feaiing, llersey, I'V-aring, Hawke, Jacob, Fames, Fearing, Wilder, Fames, 
Gibbs, Tupper, Ma}hew. See Axcl^^tky Tables Jl"-. 

48. VIIL 537. Francis Cabot [Frederick 48. VII. 2C4], born in 
Newton, Mass. A treasurer. Residence : Brookline, i^Iass. 

48. Vin. 537. LoKsia Hif/r/insou, his wife, born in Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. Cabot is a daughter of Dr. Francis John and Susan Cleveland 
(Channing) Higginson, of Brattleboro, Vt. Iler ancestry includes the fol- 
lowing families: Higginson, Whitfield, She;ife, Savage, S}-nnnes, Sewall, 
Hunt, Dummer, Archer, Mitchell, Boradel, Caljot, Orno, 'i'hompson, 
Cleveland, Winn, WiUou, Waters, Linton, Hudson, Porter, Stanley, Cook, 
Westwood, Sewall, Hunt, Dumn:er. Archer, ]ilitcliell, Boradol, Storrow, 
Appleton, Everard, Paine, Whittingham, Lawrence, Gerrish, Lowell, 



GIG THE nCKElilXG GEXEALOGY. 

Waldroii, Xoyes, AW-iitwnrtli, ]>fiiiuii^\ lliuilvinii-, Ihill, t'liaiininy, Antrani, 
Chaloiirr, KUery, Viusnii, Wilkins, (iold, Almy, Cornell, Lawtuii, Talhnau. 
Eeijuii-ton, Belcher, Dauforth, l>radstreet, DiuUey, Woodbridge, Dudley. 
Iligg-insnn, Wliittleld, .Slieate, Savage, Syniuies, Sewall, Hunt, Dumnior, 
Archer, ^^iitehell, IJuradel, Cabot, Ornc, Thompson, Cleveland, Winn, 
"Wilson, ^\'aters, Linton, lludsun. Porter, Stanley, Cook, Westwood, Sewall, 
Hunt, Dunimer, Archer, Mitchell, Ijoradel. See Anccstky Tai;les J"^. 

48. Wll. :.Ui. John Higginsoii Ca"bot [Frederick 18. VH. 264], 
born in Dj-acut, ^las-;. A man of leisure. Residence: Crookliue. 
Mr. Cabot, H. C;. l':^50, i.s an amateur actor of great aliility. 

48. VIII. .542. William Furness Cabot [Frederick 48. VII. 264], 
born in Philadelphia, died in Boston. A merchant. Residence : Boston. 

J^Ir. Cabot was a member of the firm of Whittemore, Cabot, & Co., of 
Boston, dry-goods commission-mercliants, and solliiig agents for mills. 

48. MIL 0-^-3. Caroline BaJccr Whitncij, his wife. 

j\Irs. Cabot is a daughter of the Pev. George and Ann Greenougli 
(Gray) Whitney. Her ancestry includes the following iamilios : Whitney, 
Coldam, Knight, Baker, Lambert, Lincoln, Ilawke, Lincoln, Lane, Fearing, 
Hersey, Fearing, llawke, Jacob, Fames, Fearing, Wilder, Ivames, Gibbs, 
Tupper, ^lavhew, Grav, Fllis, Hall, Davis, WW is, Tay, Saunders, Munjoy, 
Elbrldge, Stilhnan, ^loi'gan. Biles. See Ancestry Taelcs Jl";. 

48. VIII. 544. Folleu Cabot [Frederick 48. Vll. 264], born in Boston. 
A clerk. Residence : Brookline, Mass. 

48. VIII. Oy'^'. CdroUne Stttre/is Otaiuung, hh v,i^Q, born in Con- 
cord, ?>ra>s. 

Mrs. Cabot is a daughter of William I'dlery and Ellen Kelshaw (Fuller) 
Channing. Her ancestry includr-s the follo\ving families : Channing, 
Antram, Chalout-r, Fllery, Vinso)i, Wilkins, Gold. Ahny, Cornell, Lawton, 
Tallman, Remington, P.elcher, Danforth, ]^>rad>treet, Dudley, Woodbridge, 
Dudley, Perkins, Hudson, Fi-othingham, Lowden, Cole, Peck. Higginson, 
Whitiield, Sheafe, Savage, Symmes, Sewall, Hunt, Dunnner, xVrclier, 



MARY ORXE PlCKl-RIXG 

[40. VIII. 543-1 



Ir MlMUlRK y.\- Al.VAN < 
,L ijMS "1 IIIF. HEIKS Ut 



PAIN 11. D IN iS::S, NOW IN 



EIGHTH GEXERATWX. 677 

Mitchell, Boratkl, Cabot, Oiiie, Tliompson, Clevoland, Winn, Wilson, 
Waters, Linton, lludsun, rorti-r, Stanloy, Cook, WestAvuod, Scwall, Hunt, 
Piiinnier, Archor, Mitchell. Doradrl, Fuller, Tidd, 15acon, Hohon, Williams, 
Ward, Breck, W'ainwrig'lit, lluckunnoter, Clark, Sharp, Vose, Lawson, Simp- 
son, Crane, Vose, I'ulTer, Farnsworth, Lyon. Hee Axckstrv Tables J"'g-. 

40. VI II. 545. Mary Orne Pickering [Sarah 40. VII. 2Cs], bom 
in Salem, died in SaL^ni. Eesidonce : Salem. 

Mi.-s Pickoriny pa>.-ed tu'o vears of her childhood in the family of her 
aunt, ]\irs. Xathanird Adams, of Portsmouth, X. XL, for the purj)0se fif 
rL'ceivin^' musical in-irnction, ^\hi'li Cduld not be obtained in Salem at that 
time. She inlicritcd, in a marked deu'ree, the literary talents of hei' father, 
and was distinguished for hi-'h literary cultni-e. She A^■^^s a thoroutdi 
student and an exce})tionallv accurate sclndar. She wrote the life of her 
father, John Pickcrinu', ^\•hich v,-as printed for piivatc distribu.tion in I8f>7. 

]\[iss Pickcrinc': was one of the last survivors of the famous Salem society 
of iifty years ago, which was one of the most brilliant coteries of its day.^ 

Tlie miniature of ]\]iss Pickering here reproduced was painted at the age 
of twenty-three, hy Alvan Clark-, of Boston. It is in the possession of lier 
niece, ]\Hss ^Mary (Jrno Pickerhig, of Salem. 

49. VIII. 5 IG. Jolm Pickering [Sarah 40. VII. 2(;8]. born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A stock-broker. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Pickering. IT. C. ISSO, was fitted for college by Mr. Simoon Put- 
nam, of North Andover, Mass. He had a fondness and an aptitude for 
acquiring the cla->ical and modern languages; and for a year after g-raduat- 
ing he was a teacher of the Greek, Latin, and Spani.sh languages in 
Chauncy Hall School, l>oston. He afterwards studied law in his father's 
office, and was admitted to the bar. He remained with his father till the 
latler's death, wlien he gave up his profession to enter active business. In 
1S51, 3Ir. Pickering was elected a member of the Boston Stock Exchange, 
and established himself as a note and stock broker in Boston. Some 
years before his death he had a junior partner, 3Ir. Charles W. Moseley, 

1 The Salem Gazette of Oct. 12, 1SS6 ; The Boston .Journal of Oct. 13, 18S6 ; also 
A Half Century in Salem, by Mrs. M. C. D. Silsbee, pp. 9S-9'J. 



678 THE PICKET! IXG GENEALOGY. 

under the Lusiiiess n;iUR' of John I'ickei'iiig- ct ^loscley. during the 
more than thu-ty years that lie devoted to Inisiness, he was recognized 
as a man of sterhng intLgrit}- and honor. He was greatly respected, and 
won a strong personal attachment from his business associates, which was 
shown in the fueling tribute to his memory by the memljers of the Boston 
Stock Exchange. 

i\Ir. dickering was a member of tlie Essex Institute and of the Essex 
Agricultnr.il Suciety, and was much interested in th^ir objects and advance- 
nient. He was a mendicr of the I\rassnchusetts Society of the Cincinnati, 
the memlx-rship drscendiiig to him as the oldest son of his father. He 
lived in thu old Pickering house in Salem. 

Islv. Pickering was very fond of music, and in college was a member of 
the Pierian Sodality.' 

49. Vni. o/^G. MeJi liable Stnitli Cox, his wife, born in Salem, died 
in Salem. 

Mrs. Pickering was a daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Smith) Cox, of 
Salem. Her ancestry includes the following families : Cox, Daland, Very, 
AVoodicc, Syr.ionds, Browning, Robinson, Beckford, Pinson, Green, How- 
ard, Hardy, Smith, Orne, Eden, West. See Axcestry Table.s fi\:. 

49. Vni. 547. Heniy Wliite Pickering [Sarah 49. VH. 268], 
born in Salem. Piesidences: Boston and Beverly, Mass. 

Mr. Pickering, H. C. 1831, was for many years a stock -broker, and has 
been connected with the Old Boston Baidc for many year.s. He v:as presi- 
dent of the bank from Jan. 11, 1870, to January, 1891, and has been one 
of its directors from 1876 to the present time. He was a member of the 
pjoston Connnon Council in 186S, 18G9, 1872, and 1873, and was a mem- 
ber of the hrst license conuuission of I'oston, appointed in 1875. He was 
an overseer of the poor from 1875 to 1884." 

49. YIII. 047. Frances Dana Goddard, his wife, born in Bostou, 
died in Boston. 

' Harvaiil University ^Memoirs, p. 95; also the Salem Register of Jan. 23, 1SS2. 
= The Boston Ilerald of Jan. SO, ISOl; 



EIGHTH G£yFi:ATIOX. 679 

^Ir;!. i'iclv(,TJ!ig' was ;i d;iu<^litor of >\,itli;uiicl aiul Lucretia (Dai, a) God- 
(lanl. ITt-T fallier was a IjDStou lUfi-rhaut. Munj CoJilurd ]Vt'ijlrsicort]i 
[fiS. VII. oJ4] i^ liei- niece, and ILnry Godilard [49. Ml. 27T\ was lier iiivt 
cousin. Her ancestry includes the iV.llowing families: Goddard, 3Iiles, 
'IVeadwav, Ihnve, JciniisDn, Maconiber, Stearns, ^Manning, Seaver, Hallard, 
White, Weld, Dana, Dullard, Sumner, West, Baker, H^irker, :\Iay, r.re\\ er, 
Ih'idg-e, l\oliiuson, Davis, Mixer, Garfield. See Ax(Est):v Tablks i'l'V- 

49. VIII. r.4.S. Mary Pickering Gile [Mary II. 49. VII. 2(;9], 
l)o)-n in j\tiiton. Mass., died in Milton. 

49. VIII. o^S. lA'U'is Tifcker, her husband, born in ^Lilioii; ]\Iass., 
died in IJoston. A cabinet-maker. Eesidence: Milton. 

Mr. Tucker's first wife, whoni he married Juue G, lS"2n, was Susanna 
Jacobs, who was born May 3, 1798, and died Oct. 10, ls37. V,y her he 
had childivn. 

He was a son of Samuel and Abigail (Vose) Tucker, of !Milton. His 
ancestry includes the following families: Tucker, Sumner, West, Josselvn, 
I^eeds, Hayward, Vose. See Anci:.stky Tav.i.ts -yj\. 

49. VTII. 65(:i. John Goddard [rj.iza L. 49. All. 271], bom in 
Portsmouth, X. H., died in Cape Eliz'sbelh, [Maine, of heart disease. A 
lumberman. Residence: Cape Elizabeth. 

Colonel C^|'dl.l:Jrd at the age of eighloen carried on a farm in the town 
of Limerick, Elaine, where he also owned a tannery. Soon after his mar- 
riage, he began buying cattle for the Brigliton market, in which business he 
continued for some time. About 1834 or 1835, he engaged in the lumber- 
ing business, removing to Grenn, where he lived on the farm which in 1870 
v/as occupied by the Agricultural College. His lumbering operations 
gradually extended on tlie Kennebec, I'euobscot, and St. Jidni rivers, until 
he became one of the wealthiest and most ])rominent lumbermen in the 
State. For many years he employed four or live hundred men in his busi- 
ness, and at tlie time of his death he owned one hinidi-ed and twenty thou- 
sand acres of land in New Eruns-wick. 3Iost of his Inisiness was afterwards 
carried on in the Provinces, where he owned the largest steam-mill in thi.s 



680 THE ncKEBiya genealogy. 

pra-t of the \\orlJ. Foi- the last seventeen years ]ircceding his death, his 
liorae was at Cape Ehzabeth. 

Colonel Goddard owed his military title to his connection with the 
famous First Maine Cavalry. The delay of this regiment in taking the 
field, with the pressing demands of his business, induced him to resign 
before his regiment saw an\' active service. 

Colonel Goddard was widely known throughout the State of ]Maine. 
lie was a man of great })hysical, as well as of great intellectual strength, of 
strong individuality and indomitable will. In addition to his other acquire- 
ments he might be termed an amateur lawyer, for he argued m;iny of ttie 
almost numberless cases in which his extensive business relations involved 
him ; and he was oftener successful than otherwise.^ 

49. VIII. doO. Lydin Lcavitt Johnson, his wife, born in Parson- 
field, Maine. Uesidence : Cape Elizabeth, ]\Iaine. 

Mrs. Goddard is a daughter of David and Lydia (Batchelder) Johnson, 
of Parsonfield, Maine. Her father was a farmer. A^cEsa■Er Tables -J'"^. 

49. VIII. 551. Elizabatli Wliito Goddard [Eliza L. 49. VII. 271], 
born m Portsmouth, X. II.,. died in Portland, Maine. 

Mrs. Thomas was a very sweet and lovable woman, — gentle, kindly, 
and cultivated. She devoted much time to charities, in whicli she was 
deeply interested. She was greatly l)eloved, and her name was always 
spoken of with great respect in Portland.^ 

49. VIII. ool. Win lam. Wldf/cri/ Thomas, her husband, born in 
Portland, Maine. Residence : Portland. 

Mr. Thomas, who was still president of the Canal National Bank, of Port- 
land, at the age of ninetv, is a man c>f superior business qualities, with a repu- 
tation for uprightness in all his iran.-actions. lie has been prominently 
identified with the affaii-s of his native city, and at the time of the great fire 
was mayor of Portlaml. He was proffered the State treasurership, but 

' Obituary in a Portlaud, ^Maiue, newspaper, and a communication from :\Irs. Charles 
W. Goddard. 

' Communicated by Mrs. Charles W. Goddard. 



EIGnTH GEXEBATTOX. 68 1 



declined the office. lie is a ineinLer of the Second Church. No man in 
Porthmd has given more to charities than he. ^Ir. Thomas is a man ol" 
distinjjl-ui.-rjlied and imjiressive presence.^ 

lie is a son of EHas and Elizabeth (Widgeiy) Thomas, of Portland, 
Maine. His ancestry i)icludes the fcdhtwino- families : Tliomas, Cox, Daven- 
port, Andrews, Proctor, Bassctt, Ikii't, Prackett, Prake, Widgerj-, Randall. 
See Anckstkv Tables ^?l\. 

49. VIIT. 552. Mary Pickering Goddard [Eliza T>. 49. YIP 271]. 
born in Portsmouth, N. IP, died in Portland, Main.-. 

Miss Go>ld;u\l v,-as a woman of a clear intidlect, moulded nnd ripened 
by studv and travel. She had ready vit and keen humor, which made her 
a welcome guest in the social circle. For many years she Avas an invalid, 
and bore all her sutleriiigs with great fortitude. She was greatly beloved 
for her many rare qualities.^ 

49. VHP 553. Plenry Vv^arre:i Goddard [Eliza L. 49. VIP 271], 
born in Portsmouth, X. H., died in Augusta, Maine. A farmer. Resi- 
dence : China, Maine. 

49. VHP ooo. Jlarij Perley Gordon, his wife, born in Poitland, 
Maine. Residence : Portland. 

Mrs. Cloddard is a cultivated, rclined vroman. She is blind, and is a 
model of patience under her afiliction.^ 

She is a daughter of Captain Joshua and Susan (Kimbnll) Gordon. 
Her grandfather, Xathaniel Gordon, v/ith two brothers, came over from 
Scotland with their mother, their father dying on the passage. Axcestkt 
Tabu:s ^^V 

40. VIIT, 554. Cliarles V/illiam Goddard [Eliza P. 49. VIP 271], 
born in Portland, Elaine, died in Portland. A lawyer. Residence : 
Portland. 

Judge Goddard, Bowdoin College, 1844, studied law with Howard & 

' Coimnunicated b}- !Mr3. Charles W. GoJdard. 

'^ " A Memory," printed in leaflet forni. 

' Comaiuuieated by Mrs. Charles ^Y. Goddard. 



682 Til?: FiCKEnixa GFXEALncv. 

Sheplcy, of Portlam], Elaine, and was aJinitted to the bar in November, 
1846. After three years' practiee in Porthand, lie removed to Lewiston, 
]\Iaiiie, where he ])ursiied his profession for sixteen years, except from 18C1 
to 1864, when he was consul-px-ncral to Constantinople. In 1SG6, he 
formed a copartnership with the TTun. T. II. llasktdl, and removed to Port- 
land, where he resided nutil his death. 

Judge Goddard was attorney for Androscoggin County for one year. 
He was a member of the State Senate in 185S and 18;'>n, and president of 
the Senate in the latter year. In 1867, ho was made a justice of the Supe- 
rior Court of Cumbeiland County, which j.iositiou ho held until ISTl, when 
lie was n}ipointed postmaster of Poi'tland, tilling that ofiice for three terms. 

In 1872, Judge Goddard was appointed by the president and faculty of 
the Medical School in Bowdoin College to the lectureship of medical juris- 
prudence, and was subsequently chosen professor of the same. For some 
years he was a director of the American Peace Society, and was a member 
of the Association for the Pieform and Codification of the Law of Nations, 
of the Bowdoin Club, and of the Harvard Club in Maine. In 1881, he 
was appointed sole commissioner to revise the statutes of Maine, which Avas 
a laborious -work of three years. 

Judge Goddard always took d^ep and intelligent interest in public 
aflfairs, and, by his frequent communications in the papers of the State, con- 
tributed largely to secure a careful consideration of many measures touch- 
ing the welfare of Maine. 

He was accustomed to read the New Testament in the original Greek, 
and is said short!}' before his death to have read from the first of ]\Iatthew 
to the last of Revelation in the original tongue. 

His most prominent characteristics were great mental energy and 
acti%-ity, combined with untiring persistency. He devoted his whole 
thought to any matter that interested him, resting neither night nor day 
until he had mastered the subject, ilost men would have given up in 
disgust and disappointment where he fought to tlie end. 

He had a veiy large inheritance of old-fashioned Puritanism, — great 
respect for the theories and scrupulous practice of the men who made New 
England a hundred years ago, and still he had a large infusion of liberal 



EIGHTH GEXElLiTlOX. 683 



ideas. He was a strong and devoted friend, and at the sanio time a good 
liater. IJeady in speech and thouglit, even to brilliancy, full of original ideas, 
suggestions, and illustrations, he was always interesting and instructive.^ 

49. VIII. Or5.y. Caroline J'oblson Little, tlie first wife of Charles 
W. Goddard, born in 3Iinot, Maine, died in Dnnville, ]\Iaine. 

]Mrs. Goddard was a daughter of the Hon. Thomas Brown and Eunice 
(Thrasher) Little, of Auburn, Maine. Her ancestry includes the following 
families : Little, Poor, Coffin, Thember, Stevens, Greenleaf, Jaccjucs, Knio-ht, 
Plunmier, Bailey, Emery, Emery, Webster, Coffin, Tlicmber, Stevens, 
Greenleaf, Atkinson, Mirick, Toppan, Taylor, Sewall, Huiit, Dummer, 
Archer, "Wigglesworth, ^iludge, Bailey, Emerv, Emerv, AA'ebster, Coffim, 
Thember, Stevens, Greenleaf, Atkinson, Mirick, L-rown, Johnson, Iluse, 
Chenej', Lowell, Merrill, Thrasher. See Axckstry Tablks ^'V',.. 

49. VIII. 6o4^'. jRoweiia CaroJine 3IorriU, the second wife of 
Charles W. Goddard, born iu Madison, ^^laine. Eesidenco : Boston. 

Mrs. Goddard is a daughter of tlie Hon. Anson P. and Eov.ena Williams 
(Richardson) 3Iorrill. Her father was governor of Maine. The lion. Lot 
Morrill, of Maine, is ilrs. Goddard"s uncle. Axcestky Tables -J|-V,. 

50. VIII. 555. 'Luoy Grafton Picltman [Dudley L. 50. YII. 273] 
(Her name was changed to Catherine Sanders Pickmau), born m Salem. 
Residences : Boston and Lynn, [Mass. 

Mrs. Fay has a beautiful miniature of her grandmother, Elizabeth 
(Leavitt) Pickman, but she thought it not of sufficient interest to warrant 
its appearance in tliis work. 

60. VIII. JJJ. Itichard SaUii'an Fay, her liusband, born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., died iu Liverpool, Eng., of heart disease. A lawyer. Resi- 
dences : Boston and Lynn, Mass. 

Mr. Fay, H. C. 1825, was prepared for college in the schools of Cam- 
bridge. He graduated with distinction as a scholar, and entered upon the 

' History of Bowdoin College, by Xoheniiah Cleavelnnd and Alpheiis S. Packard, pp. 
506-597 ; also The Portland Argus of March 9 and 13, 1SS9, and tlio Maine Farmer of 
March M, ISSa 



684 THE PICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

study of l;i\v, at tlitj Lnv school in Xortluunptoii, 3iass. lie aftenvard,-i 
established himself in business in Boston in connection with Jonathan 
Chapman, and continued to nside there many years in the practice of liis 
profession. In l.'^4s, he went with his family to Europe, and, after an 
extensive journey on the continent, he took up his residence in England, 
where lie resided several \-ears on an estate in Shrop.-hire known as Moor 
I'ark. lie returned hon:e in isr)3. 3[r. Eay was an ardent lover of rural 
life, a taste which was doubtless increased by his residence in England. 
In 1847, before his visit to Europe, lie had purcliasod a largo estate in 
Essex Count v known as the Lvnn Mineral Spring Hotel. This, v»ith tlie 
adjoining lands, consisted of live hundred acres. He called tlie place 
Lynnmere, and at once entered upon its improvement. He imjiorted large 
quantities of trees, and succeeded in converting that part of the estate which 
consisted of barren pastures into a forest of magnificent trees. The place 
is one of the most picturesque in New England, and is a memorial of the 
taste and genius of the man. Mr. Fay also encouraged by precept and 
practice many of the most important branches of agriculture. lie devoted 
much attention to sheep husbandrv, and was considered an authority on 
that subject. He had a sincere love of rural life, and, althouglx connected 
from time to time with Inisiness enterprises, he never forgot that agriculture 
is the foundation of our prosperity. He was a trustee of the ^Massachusetts 
Society for Promoting Agriculture, and edited the first issue of the records 
of the society. He was also president of tl:e Essex Agricnltui'al Society. 

Mr. Fay was a memlier of the x\ncient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany, and bore the title of captain. Enrlv in the breaking out of the civil 
war, he organized, at his own exiiensc, a company known as the Fay 
Guards. It was attacheil to the Tliirtv-eighth licgiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry, and did good service during the Rebellion. 

Mr. Fay was a man of great deterndnntion, of strong inipidso and wide 
observation. There is a fine steel portrait of Mr. Fay in the History of 
Essex County, Massachusetts.^ 

' Histoxy of l'"ssex County, ^Lissachusetts, compiled under the supervision of 1). 
Hamilton Huvd, Vol. T. pp. 353-354 ; also History of Lynn, :Mass., by Alonzo Lewis and 
James E. Xewhall, pp. 71-72. 



RICHARD SAI.-lOXsTAi.L ROHERS. 

[50. VI! I. .5,y;.J 

From thi'. P.iRXRvir \o\v [\ the p.i.-.M;s3ri.\ or iiit: E\sr India Ma 
Society -\t Saifm, Mass. 



FAG urn GEXELATIOX. 685 



IIo was a sou of Samuel Prc-cott Phillips aud Harriet (Howard) Fay. 
Ell:a W,hb Gihma [rVJ. ^'1I. JJS'] is his cou.^in, aud Hnrnd MeJxshirf Ftvj 
[l;i. IX. SJQ'] is hi. niece. Hi.> father, II. C. ITLis, whs Judge of Probate 
fcir the County of Middlesex for thirty-ilve years, and was greatly esteemed 
and respected. His ancestry includes the following families: Fay, Brig- 
liam, Wellington, PaKgrave, Sweetman, Child, AVarren, Barron, Frencli, 
Lothro]), Learned, Phillips, Prescott, Platts, Hoar, Bnlkley, Allen, Wheeler, 
I'.rigliam, llurd, Howard, Wallingford, Travers, Tuttle, Gofie, Sumner, 
Wesi, Clement, Lillie, Frary, Eliot, Puck, Clarke, Ilntchinson, Marlnny, 
Hamby, Hawkins, Breck, Pateshall, Woody, Dexter, Thomas, Jacob, Ruck, 
Clarke. Sco Axcestry Tables ^\" . 

50. MIT. 556. Eliza Leavitt Pickrnan [Dudley L. 50. VII. 273], 
born in Salem, died in Salem, of censumption. 

An obituary of ]\Irs. Pogers, which appeared in the Salem Gazette of 
Sept. 20, 1853, states that slio was an active and highly useful member of 
that conunnnity; that she was possessed of strong traits of character, and 
of an energy and disposition to use them; that she was hospitable in the 
social circle, and had a talent to promote the pleasure and happiness of her 
friends, wliile the higher and more enlarged views of benevolence and 
chai-ity did not escape her. 

60. VIII. 5o6. liicliard Saltonstall Hogers, her hn.sbaud, born in 
Salem, baptized there Aug. 19, 1792, died in Salem. A merchaut. Eesi- 
dence : Salem. 

j\[r. Rogers was for many years extensively engaged in the East India 
trade, being of the firm of N. L. Rogers & Brothers. This ilrm, previous 
to 1837, ranked amor<g tlie most eminent of Salem. They were known the 
world over for their commercial enterprise, and were the pioneers and 
founders in tlie United States of the Zanzdjar and New Holland trades. 

Mr. Rogers was a member of the East India Mai'ine Society in 1819, 
and its president from 1836 to 1839. He was a representative of Salem in 
the Legislature in 1827, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1837, 1838, and 1839, and of 
Essex County in the Senate in 18-12. He was a member of the Salem 



()SG 



TIFE I'lCKKRiya GEXEALOGY. 



Coniinoii CotUKil In 1831!, 1837, and 1838, and \v;i.s its president in 
1838.^ 

Ilis first wife, -wliom lie married ^lay 14, 1822, was Sally Gardner 
Crowninslncld. She was a daughter of the Hon. Jacob and Sail}' (Gardner) 
Crowninshield. She was born in Salem, June 18, 1800, and died there 
July 12, 1835. By her he had the following children: — 

William Crowxixshield Eogehs, born July 2G, 1823. He married, July G, 1S71, 
JIary Iiigersoll Eowrtitch, a daughter of Na- 
thaniel 1. Bowditcl), and died July 1, 18S8. 

born July 2."5, 1824. ilo raarried, April 2, IS.jl, 
I^IarLha Endicott I'eabody. 

born Oct. 7, 1828. He marriod Elizabeth Putnam 
Peabody. 

born Dtc. \o, 18.34. He married, March 15, 1SG9, 
Annie Eodman Xichols. 

died young. 

died young. 



Richard Dexjsox Kogers, 
Jacob CKo^v^•l^■.s!IIELD Eogek 

AkTHUR SaLTOX^TALL ElOGEES 



Sarah Eogers, 
George Rogers. 



Mr. Rogers was a son of Xathaniel and Abigail (Dodge) Rogers, of 
Salem. Ilcbecca Uoijers [17. X. JiJ] is his, granddaughtur by his first wife. 
The Rogers fimiily has been a distinguished one from the first settlement of 
ISTew England. His ancestry includes the following families : Rogers, 
Crane, Denison, Dudley, Whittingham, Plubbard, Lawrence, Burnliam, 
Tuttle, Boardnion, Dodge, Eaton, Fairfield, Skipperway, Appleton, Evcrard, 
01i^•er, Lowell, Baker, Symonds, Read, Cogswell, Thompson, Hawkes, 
Hutchinson, Goodhue, "Watson, Dane, Ligalls. See Axi-estkv Tajiles "^'j. 

50. VIII. 557. William Dudley Plckman [Dudley L. 50. YII. 
273], born in Salem, died in Boston. A mei'chant. Residences : Boston 
and Beverly, Mass. 

Mr. Pickraan was educated in the Salem schools, and, ver^' early iii life, 
entered upon an active mei-conlilu career. He sailed one vo3'age as super- 
cargo to Calcutta, and then went into his father's counting-room. In 1839, 
he formed a copartnership with Benjamin Stone and the ^lessrs. Silsbee, 
and from that time until his death, fin- more than lialf a century, the 



The Salem Eegister of June 12, 1$73 ; also the Boston Journal of June 11, 1S73. 



EIGHTH gexehatiox. 687 

firiu continued In trade witli Calcutta and other parts of India. Aiuonrr 
the ships owned by the firUi vrere the xVurora, Suniati-a, Sooloo, and i\Iin- 
dora. It is said that the lirm of Silsbee & Pickman was the onl}- one left 
iu the country which carried on the East India business iu the old way, 
\vith its own ships. Mr. Stone retired from the firm some years a!j-(->, and 
afterward ilr. Pickman was associated with Messrs. John H. Silsbee, Geoi-ye 
Z. Silsbee, his son, Dudley L. Pickman, and i\Ir. George H. Allen. The 
lirm always retained a counting-room in Salem, even after its business was 
transferred to Ponton. Mr. Pickman moved to Poston in 18G5. 

He had great mental activlrv, and Avas able to plan wisely and to exe- 
cute promptly. He was a man of high integrity, and was possessed of a 
fund of wit and humor.' 

50. VIII. 6o7. Cayolhic Silsbee, the Avife of William D. Pickman, 
born in Salem. Pesidences : Poston and Poverly, Mas?. 

Mrs. Silsbee is a daughter of Zachariali F. and Sarali (Poardman) Sils- 
bee. Jolin Ilenrii Silsbee [50. VII. 343], Xathcudel Silshee [59. VII. ^?J'C], 
and F.fa.ticis B. Croiv mush kid [55. VII. SIS'], were her first cousins; Eliza- 
hith W. Sparks [58. VIII. 708], John- C. Warren [51. IX. ICUO], and Ernest 
F. FcnoUosa [13. X. 103], are her first cou.ins once removed. Mrs. Sils- 
lio-e's ancestry includes the following faunlies : Silsbee, Tompkins, Fovv'le, 
I'.ilne, Ingersoll, ]'\dion, Coomes, Pecket, Sibley, Mason, Peadle, Ilicks, 
Oillinghara, Ply, ]j>iardmon, Paker, Hodges, Phippen, "Wood, "Williams, 
Skerry, Manning, Galley, Mamnng, Callc}', Stone, Land^ert, Prown. See 
Ancestry Tables -o'Jr- 

50. VIII. 5G0. William Pickman Abbott [Elizabeth 50.VIL27-i], 
liiiru in Xashua, X. H., died in Keene, X. II. A merchant. Eesidence : 
Jveeue. 

Early in life Mr. Abbott shipped for the East Indies. lie subsecpiently 
took command of a vessel, and for seven years was connected with the 
Sumatra trade. lie afterwards carried on business in Poston. In 185-1, he 

' Essex Tnstitutp Historical Collections, Vol. XXVIT. pp. 191-19"; The Salem News 
"f Mivch C, lS9n ; The Salem Gazette of :\raiv-li 4, IS'JO ; the Salem Eegister of :traroli 3, 
1-^ >|1 ; and the Boston Journal of March 1, 1890. 



688 THE FICXL'L-IXG GENEALOGY. 

roinuvcil to Keene, N. II., and bOon identified liiinself witli the interests of 
that place, beconiin^Li- selectuuui, overseer of the poor, rei)resentativG to the 
Leyishiture, and suljsequeiirly uhh'ruian. Fur eighteen years he was effi- 
ciently connected with the Cheshire Provident Institution for Sa\'inos, — 
a jjai't of the time as vice-president. 

lie was a menil)cr of the Unitarian Society of Keene, and for some 
years was its treasurer. He took the same jdcasure that his father had 
taken in caring fur this church. lie was a man of decision and energy, 
and those traits wei'o blended with loving'-kindness and synipatliy.^ 

50. A^ITI. oG0\ Abhij A):u ChaiiiUsr, his first v.dfe, died in Boston. 
Jlrs. Abbott was an adopted child. 
AxcESTKY Tables jy^,. 

50. VIII. oGO'. Ilavrict Mead Ilandermn, liis second wdfc, born 
in Chesterfield, N. TL, died in Keene, N. H. 

Mrs. Abbott was a daughter of Phineas and Hannah (]\Iead) Handerson, 
of Keene. Her father was a la\\'yer. Axr estky Tables I-jV'- 

50. YIII. 561. Charles Diulloy Abbott [Elizabeth 50. YII. 27-1], 
born in Nashua, N. IL. died in Nasluia. A merchant. Residence : Nashua. 

50. VIII. f561. Laurinda Holbrook, his wife, died in Nashua, N. H. 

She was a daughter of Adin and Polly (Warren) Holbrook. Her father 
was a manufacturer of Lowell, Mass. Her ancestry includes the following 
families : Holbroolc, Warren, Abbot, Chandler, Hibbert, Blanchard, Barker, 

See Ax'-ESTRY Tables |"V- 

50. VIII. 5G2. Catlierine Piclnnan Abbott [Elizabeth 50. VIL 
27-i], born in Nashua, N. H., died in Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Fox is spoken of as " a Avoman of I'emarkable grace of raanne)' and 
excellent life." 

50. VIII. oG3\ Charles James Fox, her first husband, born in 
Antrim, N. H., died in Nashua, N. II. , of consumption. A lawyer. Resi- 
dence : Nashua. 

1 Keeue, N. II., newspaper, of Sept. 2, 1S80. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 689 

Mr. I'ox, Dartnioulh Colk-ge, 1.^31, was fiUol Ibr colleg-e al the Frauces- 
tf)\vn Academy, ami under the j)rivate tuition of" the Kev. Arehiljald 
I'uir^-oss, of Ilancoel;, N. H. On h^aviny colh^-^'e he at once entered u[)on 
the study of the hiw, and was admitted to tlic bar in JSepteudjcr, 1831. 
'I'he hist year of prejiaration for liis profession ^vas passed at Xaslma, in the 
olliee of the Hon. Daniel Abhott, whose daughter he afterwards married. 
Mi became Mr. Abbott's partner iu 1834, and continued as such until he 
died. 

^Iv. Fox was count_y solicitor tVom 1835 to 1844; a representative in 
tlie l^cg'islature in 1S37, and one of a commitLee to revise ihe New Ilamp- 
sliire statutes in 18 11 and 1842. He -was also li-easurer of the Nashua and 
Lowell Railroad, and a connnissiorjer of bankruptcy. His name, in fact, is 
connected with all tlie pttblic improvements of his State at tliat time. He 
was an earnest friend of popular education, and employed his i)en and voice 
assiduously in its behalf. The asylum for the iiisanc at Concord owes as 
much to him for its success as to any n^an in the Stale. He was much 
interested in the condition of criminals and the modes of treaiing- them, and 
availed himself of his experience as county solicitor to collect facts upon 
prison discipline, and especially to urge the importance of providing- 
ajjpropriato places for juvenile offenders, ai)ai't from the society of men 
hardened in crime. The first railroad of the State was indebted much to 
him for his zeal in i-emoving- obstacles to its completion, and fidelity in dis- 
charging the duty of one of the most important of its offices. The revising 
the laws of Xew Hampshire was an arduous task, the burden of which fell 
upon the two junior commissioners, and ^Ir. Fox perforiued his portion 
witli faithfulness and ability. 

lu connection with the Rev. Samuel Osgood, minister of the Unitarian 
Church at Nashua, he undertook the compilatic.n of the ''New Hampshire 
liook," wliich was intended to give specimens of the literature of that 
^iatc. Mr. Fox sliowed great research in the materia'i which he furnished 
l"r this volume. It was published in 1842. He wrote the "History of 
the Old Township of Dunstal4e," which was published iu 1S4G, and was 
the autlior of the " 'i'own Officer." 

Mr. I-'ox intellectually was remarkable for his accuracy and for the 



(190 Tin: riCKERixG gexealogy. 

breadth of his infonnation. He was a man of extensive learning, ahke in 
legal lore and in elegant literature. Few young men were better veised in 
the old English poets than he, and he wrote many poems. His religious 
convictions were very decided. He was for years the earnest teacher of a 
class of youths of advanced age in the Sunday school, and after they had 
left the school, he watched over their course with great interest.^ 

Mr. Fox was a son of Jedediah and Sarah (^Yheekn■) Fox, of Antrim, 
N. H. His ancestry includes the followhig families : Fox, Stone, Merriam, 
Dudley, Wheeler, Brooks, Butlertield. See Axcestey Tables {™-^u 

50. Vin. oG2^. Samuel Dinsnioov, her second husband, born in 
Keene, N. H., died in Keene. X lavs-yer. Residence : Keene. 

Governor Dinsmoor, Dartmouth College, 1814, was a precocious scholar, 
and was prepared for college at the age of ten years, but waited till he w as 
eleven years old before he entered. He read law with his father, aud was 
admitted to the bar in 1818. In 1819, he went to Arkansas, and remained 
there for some time. From 18'J6 to 1831, he was clerk of the Senate of 
New Hampshire. For manv j'ears he was cashier of tlie Ashuehit Bank of 
Keene. In 18-19, he was elected governor of Ne\v Hampshire, and was 
chosen to the same office in 1850, but declined a re-election. He filled the 
office of governor three terms. 

Governor Dinsmoor was of a pccidiarlv genial temperament, and his 
society was sought by the cultivated and thoughtful." 

His first wife, whom he married in September, 1844, was Ann Eliza 
Jarvis. She was born June 30, 1818, and died Jitlv IT, 1849. By her 
he had the following children : — 

William Jakvis Divsjiooi:, born April 17, 1846. He married Lizzie TV. Strong. 
Saiicel Jaryis DixsiiooK, boni Aug. 22, 1817. He niarriecl Helen Louise Johnson. 



' The Christian Examiner, Vol. XLI. pp. 1S-.33 ; History of the Town of Antrim, 
N. H., by Kev. W. E. Cochrane, pp. 501-503 ; also Sketches of the Alumni of Dartmouth 
College, by Eev. George T. Chapman, p. 257. 

' Appleton's Cj-clopatdia of American Biography, Vol. II. p. 181 ; also the History 
of Windham, in Xew Hampshire, by Leonard A. Morrison, pp. 502-504, which contains 
his portrait. 



EIGHTH GL-yEL-ATinX. G91 



GoNcriiur Dinsuioor ^v;l.s u sou of GoveMi<)r Suiiiuol ami ^Favy Boyd 
( R.-id) Dinsinoor. Ilis father, L'. C. ITSD, was a governor of No\v Hanip- 
.vliire. Tlie auces^try of (Jovernor Samuel Dinsmooi-, Jr., includes the fol- 
lowing families: Dinsmoor, Orr, Cochran, Arwin, McKeen, Roid, "Woodburn, 
lloyd. See Ancestrv Tap.lks ^"fj,. 

51. VIII. oGG. Elizabeth Otis Lyman [Goorg-e W. 51. A'll. 275], 
l)orn in Boston, died in Charleston, S. C 

f>l.Ylll.oOO. Francis i>*ooff, her husband, born in Boston. A musi- 
cal composer. Kesidence : Boston. 

]\lr. Boott lived in Boston most of the time, nntil tlie death of his wife. 
lie went to Florence, Ital}*, with his infant daughter, where he remained 
some eighteen or twenty years pursuing- his nmsical studies. 

He is a son of Francis and ]\Iary (Tunaley) lioutt. They were both 
born in England. Axcestrv Tables -^"'^,-. 

51. VIII. 5G7. Mary Ellen Lyman [George W. 51. VII. 275], 
born in Boston, died near Savannah, Ga. 

51. VIII. oOT^. Jaittcs Amorij Appleton, her fii'st husljand, born in 
]M)-:.ton, died in Brookline, ]\lass. 

Mr. Appleton was associated in business with his father. In a long- 
obituary notice of liim, printed in tlie Boston Daily Advertiser of July 1, 
18-13, it is slated that he led an active commercial life rather liy the circum- 
stances in which he was placed than by his own tastes or desires. It also 
>i>eaks of his integrity, his manly npi'ightness and honor, and of his shigu- 
larly gentle nature and puritv of mind. 

lie was a son of tln^ llun. William and MarA- Ann (Cutler) Ajinleton, of 
Boston. Thomo.s Jefferson Cnnlhhic [5;'.. IX. 777-9] is his nejdiew ; Susan 
Ma-son Laicrence [54. IX. 777^] is his niece; and J'JjHinor Brouls [1. X.I?J] 
is his grandnicce. His ancestry includes the following families: xVppleton, 
Fverard, Oliver, Lowell, Baker, Symomls, Pvcad, Sawyer, Littlefield, Dennis, 
Hook, French. Win.slow, Batchelder, Cutler, Cowell, :\Iinar (?), Clark, 
Kilby, Simpkins, Richardson, Snllivan, Odiorne, Johnson, Bassum, Adams, 
Winborn. See Axcestkv Tables ^^\^. 



692 THE FICKERIXG GENEALOGY. 

51. VIII. J6'7-. Charles Stiuirt Arnold, her second liu.sbaud, died 
iu New York City. lie.sidence : Savannali, Ga. 
Ancestky Tables J'/g-^ 

51. VIII. 5G8. G-eorge Tlieodore Lyman [George AV. 51. VII. 
275], born in Paris, France. A merchant. Residence : Bellport, Long 
Island, X. Y. 

51. VIII. 563. SaJhj Otis, Ins wife, born in Boston, died in Bellport, L. I. 

iMrs. Lyman was a danghter of James AVilliam and Martha (Churcli) 
Otis. i:n.~nht(h Graij Oils [51. VII. IJTo^] was her aunt. Her ancestry 
includes the following families: Otis, Jacob, Bacon, ilayo, Allyne, Doten, 
Clark, Fauuce, ^^lorton, Gray, Harrison, Peirce, Lewis, Cheever, Dudson, 
Button, Vermaes, Foster, Hanford, Holland, Bossinger, Banks, Gwin, Spear, 
Leering, Collier, "Willis, Tay, Newell, Boardman, Church, Tucker, Shaw, 
Stonard, Woodworth, Ward, Mauran, Bicknell, Smith, Lyon, Bicknell. 
See Axcii-TRY Tables -Jf j. 

51. VIII. 5(39. William Pratt Lyman [George W. 51. VII. 275], 
born in Boston, died in Boston. A merchant. l\osidence : Bostoji. 

51. VIII. -5(7.9. Ahbtj Jifaura/i Church HuinpJtrey, his wife, born 
in Pro^-idence, P. I., died in Boston. 

Mrs. L}-man was a daughter of AYalker and Olivia (Mauran) Humphrey, 
of Providence, R. I. Axckstkt Tadlt:. ^. 

51. VIII. 570. Arthnr Theodore Lyman [George W^ 51. VII. 
275], born in Boston. A manufacturer. Residences : Boston and Wal- 
tham, Mass. 

Mr. Lyman, H. C. lSo3, was in Europe from June, 1S55, to August, 
185G, and visited Constantinople and the Crimea at the time of the siege 
of Sebastopol. He visited Europe again ii; 1885. 

From 1853 to 1855, he was in the counting-room of Samuel and 
Edward Austin; from 1S56 to 1859, lie was engaged in the East India 
trade; from 1860 to 18G2, he was treasurer of the Appleton and Hamilton 
]\Ianufacturing Com]ianies, of Lowell, Alass. ; from 1862 to 1863, a partner 



ElGllTH G-EXERA Tl OX. 



G93 



of J. W- Paige & Co., of JJoston ; froiu ISG'G to I.SS'J, treasurer of the Ha.l- 
ley Company, of llulyuke; and, since 18S1, treasurer of the Lowell Manu- 
fat'turing- Com2)an}', of Lowell. 

He is a director in the Massachusetts National Bank, of the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company, of many mannf icturino- com- 
panies, and a tmstee of the ijoston Athenanim. From L<^7(> to 1S79, he 
was on Uie statf of Gov. Alexander IL ltico,\viih the rank of colonel. 

Mr. Lyman ov/jis the bcaTititul estate in AValtham, which belonged to 
his graadlather, Theodore Lyman. 

oL VLIL j;y. EUen Banvro/'t Lou-cU, the wife of Arthur ']\ 
Lyman, born in Boston, cbed in ]5oston. 

]\L-s. Lyman was a woman of a lovely and gi-acious presence, and her 
death caused great grief to a wide circle of relatives and friends. To those 
associated with her in however slight a degree, .she left the imj)ression of a 
fn-m, but gentle and devout woman. There was no dut\-, ho\vever .slight, 
that she ignored; no person, however humble, who apjilicd to her, but 
received Iter sympathy and help. Her manifold charities were not formal 
duties to be hurried over, l)ut \vero occasions of ministering to tlie weari- 
ness of the spirit, as vrell as the necessities of the bodj-. A gentle courtesy 
and a disinclination for controversy hid in some degree a strong character, 
and a mind of broad and intellectual vie\vs. Iler unassuming demeanor, 
her patience and selfcontrol, and her charitable spirit, were all the 
attributes of a noble personality."' 

Ller number in direct descent is [55. VHL 649]. 

5LVirL57L Sarah Pratt Lyman [George W. 5L VIL 275], 
born in Bosti->n. 

5L VIII. -Jri. I*h!li}) Ilojccfi Sears, her htisband, born in Brcv^'- 
ster, Mass. A lawyer. Iiesidences: Boston and AValtham, 3Iass. 

Mr. Sears, H. C. L^44, was iitted for college at Phillips Academv, An- 
dovcr, Mass. On graduating, he taught school two years, and then studied 

' The Boston l\u]\ Advertiser of March 31, ISO t, and the Costou EveiUDg Transcript 
of April 5, ISW. 



G94 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

law in the olllces of Hon. Charles G. Loriiig, of Boston, and Josiali Paitter, 
Esq., of AValtham. For three terms he was in the Dune Law School, and 
took the degree of LL 1>. iu ltS4!j. He then formed a parnier.ship with 
Josiah Rutter, Esq., of ^\'altham, a part of his duties being- tlie trial of cases 
in court. In IS")!, he formed a j.artnership with Horace A. Scudder, of 
Boston, which contintieil two years, and in Xovember, 1853, he opened 
a separate ofiice in that city. In 1S5S, ]\Ir. S^'Ui's was a nientber of the 
lioston Common Council. In ISGO and 18G1, ho was a representative in 
the Legislature frum Itoston. In 1859, he was a trustee of the Boston 
Public Librarv, and, from 1859 to 18t;5, he was an overseer of Harvard 
College. He has made, with his famil}-, several tours in foreign countries. 
Mr. Sear.s's personal tastes have been toward study, and several of his 
articles and addresses have been printed.^ 

He is a son of John and ^lercy (Howes) Seai's, of Brewster, ^lass. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Sears, Willard, Freeman, Prince, 
Sparrow, Bangs, Llowes, Joyce, Se-ai's, "Willard, Freeman, Prince, Sparrow, 
Bangs, Sears, "Willard, Ma^'o, Lumpkin, E^-der, Howes, Bassett, l^urt, 
AVillison, Bomme, Haliett, Skifie. Jennings. See Axcestkt Tablus ff-^. 

51. VIII. 572. Lydia Williams Lyman [George \Y. 51.YII. 275], 
born in Boston. 

51. VIII. 372. Robert Trent JPnine, her husband, born in Boston. 
A lawyer. Residences : Boston and Waltham, ]\Iass. 

Mr. Paine, H. C. 1855, graduated at the Boston Latin School at the age 
of fifteen. He graduated from college with honors, and then spent one 
year in the sttidv of law, after which he passed two years in Eitropean 
travel. On his return, in 1858, he resumed his laAv studies in the ofiice of 
R. H. Dana and Francis E. Parker; and, in 1859, lie was admitted to the 
bar. He practised his profession until 1870, when he retired and devoted 
himself to various benevolent enterpi'ises. 

In 1884, Mr. Paine was a representative from Waltham in the Legis- 
lature, and in the same year he was the candidate of the Independent and 

» narv;!rd College Class Book of 1811, pp- J 12-115. 



EIGHTH GFXHBATIOX. QOo 



Deinucratic party us ;i reprcjontative in Cony'iX's.s IVuiu tlio Filth Mas.^acliu- 
setts District. 

For rudre tlian lii'teeii years, Mr. Paine has been a nienilit-r of the vestry 
of Trinity Chnn-li. lie was one of the sub-eoinniiitee of tliree wlio hail 
charae of tlie Ijuihlinj^- of Trinity Cluirch, and, from 1872 to ISTC, lie 
devoted nmch of his time to that work, lit- is a member of tlie execntivu 
committee of tlie Episcopal Citv Mission, and also of tin,' '\\"atcli and Ward 
Society, and is one of the Tiai>tecs of Donations to the I'roiestanl ]--])i.scoj);d 
C'hnrch. lie was tlit- first prc-^id^'nt of the /Associated Cliariries, tind con- 
tinues to hold lliat ohice. In ISTO, he organized the Wulls .Aiemorird 
Institute, raised the various sid_iscri})tions towaids its support, and b-joame 
its first president. lie is president of the Working-men's Co-operative I'lank, 
of the Working-men's Building Association, of the Loan ^Association, and of 
the Congress of 'Working-men's Clubs. In ISST, ^Tr. I'aine endowed a 
fellowship in Harvard College, for the study of "The l->hica.l I'l-oljlems of 
Society, the elTccts of legislation, governnieutal administration and jirivate 
phil;(nthroi)y to ameliorate the lot of the mass of mankind." He has pub- 
lished some twenty-ilve pamjilik-ts, and made many addix'sses on philan- 
thropic subjects.' 

He is a son of Charles Cnshing and I'ainiy Cabot (Jackson) Paine. 
Charles Jackson I'ahic [1. IX. .^] is his brother; Charles Jackson [2. Vll. 
W] Avas his grandfather; 2Iar[i Jackson [2. YII. 1^] was his grandaunf -. and 
Francis Cahot JoivcU [53. VII. oOJ] and Ellzahctli Cahot Jackson [54. MI. 
311'\ were his first cousins once removed. Mr. Paine's grandfather, Pobert 
Treat Paine, was one of the signers of the Declaratiiin of Indepemlence. 
His ancestry includes the following families: Paine, Snow, IIo])kins, 
Thacher, Y\'inslow, Ijcuirne, Treat, Tapp, Willard, Sharp, Sherman, Launce, 
Cobl:>, AYiUis, ITodgkins, Whitman, B^Tam, Shaw, Leonard, Martin. Gulli- 
ver, Kinsley, Cashing, Pitcher, Jacob, Loring, Xev.-ton, Jacob, Cotton, 
Hawkridge, Piossiler, Sturtevant, Winslow, Bourne, Sumner, West, Baker, 
Clap, Ford, Leeds, Sharp, Vose, White, Cogswell, Thompson, Ilawkes, 
Hutchinson, Jackson, Baker. Salter, Quincy. Pares, Gookin, Bird, D.;.lling, 
Flyut, Hoar, Hincksman, AVillet. Bi'own, Tracy, Gookin, Bird, Dolling, 
' Cue of a Tliousand, by John C. ItanJ, p. 4oo. 



C96 



THE rJCKETUXG GENEALOGY. 



Savage, Ilutchiiisou, Marburv, Tvng', Sears (?), Cotton, llawkridge, Brad- 
street, Dudley, Lake, Goodyear, Cabot, Ornc, Tlionip^ion, Higginsou, AVliit- 
fu'ld, Sheafe, Savage, Sy mines, Gardner, Frier, Orne, Browne, Boardraan, 
Bull, Truesdale, Halton, Dodge, Conant, Ilorton, Larkin, Hale, Eaymond, 
Bisliop, Woodbury, Dodge, llerrick, Laskin, Leach, Fuller, Hay ward. See 
k^cv.ATiiy Tablk> m\. 

5L YIII. jTG. Cora Lyman [Theodore 5L VIL 2VG], born iu Bos- 
ton. Residences : Boston and Beverly, I\Iass. 

51. VIIL olG. Gavdhier Howland Shaw, her husband, born in 
Boston, died at Toulouse, France. xV man of leisure. Besidence: Ijoston. 

Mr. Shaw, H. C. 1838, was, during the late war, both active and gen- 
erous for the public good, lie was reserA ed, of exceptional grace of person 
and manner, and very prominent in the social life of Boston.^ 

He was a son of Fiobert Gould and Flizabeth Willard (Parkman) Shaw, 
His father was an eminent and rich mercliant, of Boston. EIi.:ahctli liussell 
[.")1. YHL <D/T] is his niece, and Lonis Agassb Slunv [l.X.Jo'] was his 
nephew. His ancestry includes the following fan.nlies: Sliaw, Burt, 
Chee^■er, Lathrop, Bill. Xichol, Breck, Pate.:;hall, V^oody, Dexter, Thomas, 
Jacob, Buck, Cla.rke, Parkman, Trask, Adams, Bred:, Wainwright, Rogers, 
Crane, Denlson. Dudley, Ap})leton, Fvcrard, Glover, Harris, Ruggles, 
Woodbridge, Dudley, Whiting, St. John, Chester. See Axcfstry Taklf.^ ^. 

61. YHL 577. Tlieodore L^mian [Theodore 51. YH. 27G], born in 
Waltham, ]\Ia;s. Residence : Brookline, Mass. 

Colonel Lyman, H. C. 1855, graduated from college with high honors. 
After studyirig for tliree years tinder Louis Agassiz, he received, hi 1858, the 
degree of S. B. He afterwards devoted mticli time to the study of natural 
science. Li ISGO, he became an assistant iu Zoology at the ]\Iuseuni of 
Comparative Zoologv in Camljridge, his chief work being on radiated 
aninuils. In that conneetion he has publi.slied "Illustrated Catalogue of the 
Ophiuridie and Astrophytid;f in the ]\[useum of Contparative Zoology" 
[1865]; Supplement [1871]; "Report on Ophiiu-idie and xVstrophytidce 

' Tlie Wednesday Evening Clab, p. 102. 



rJGTITH QEXEBATIOX. G97 



dretlged by Louis F. do rourtales " [Ib'GO]; "Old ar.d Xew Ophiurida^ 
and Astropliytiiljv, " [l'?74] ; '' Ophiund;e and Astropliylida} of the Ilassler 
Expedition " [1S75] ; " Dredp'ing Operations of the U. S. Steamer Bhtke ; " 
"Ophiurans" [1ST5]; "Prodrome of tlie Ophiuridir and Astropliytida? of 
the Challenger Expedition"' [I'art L 1S78; Part II. lS7iJ], and " Rejjort on 
the Ophiurid;e dredg'ed by H. M. S. Challeng-er, during the years 1.S73-G" 
[London, 1SS2]. He also contributed minor articles to scientific journals, 
and published "Papers relating to tlie Garrison Molj " [1870]. 

In ISCl, ho \Yent to Europe, travellirig vritli his family, and pursuing' 
his studies. He returned in June, 1SG3 ; and on the iit'teenth of the fi'llow- 
ing August he was coivnuissioned lieutunant-cohmfl, and, by special ^anction 
of the Secretary of War, was appointed volunteer aide-de-camp on the staff 
of Major-Gencral ^^leade. He resigned as vohnitecr aide-de-camp April 20, 
L865, and was promoted colonel and assistant adjutant-general I\-c. 8, 1865, 
when he resigned. Colonel Lyman served with distinction in many of the 
great battles in Virginia, and finally, with General Grant, in ihe pursuit 
and capture of Lee's army, and was on.e of the few officers ^vho were 
allowed to ride through the Confedeiaie lines after ihe siirrendcj'. 

Immediateh' after the war, Colonel Lvman was appointed comnussioner 
of inland fisheries of Massachusetts, which office he held for seventeen 
}'ears. In this position he rendered valuable service, and the annual 
Ifeports of the Commission on Inland Fisheries of Massachu.-utts during 
his admini>u-itiou were wholly, or in part, written by him. 

Colonel Lyman was elected to Congress in L882, as an Inde})endent for 
the Ninth District, and served until ^Larch 3, 1885. He has been identified 
in the management of important trusts; and as treasurer of several public 
institutions he has .shown thorough knowledge and capacit}'. 

From 1850 to 18G0, he was a tru.-iee of the Stall- Peform School, and 
for several years he was president of the Boston Asylum and Farm School, 
a charity with which his family have been identified for many years. He 
has been a tnistee of the National Peabody Educational Fund, and of the 
Pcabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, and was an overseer of 
Harvard College from 18G8 to 1880, and from 1881 to 1888. He was one 
of the largest contributors in time and money to the Memorial Hall of 



698 THE riCKErxIXG GFXEALOGY. 

TIarvarJ Collegx', and lias Ijet'ii a proiiiinent benefactor and promoter of 
tliG Museum of Comparative Zoiilogy. 

lie is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a mem- 
ber of tlie National Academy of Science, an honorary member of tlie New 
York Academy of Science, a member of the ^lassacliusetts Historical 
Society, and a member of the iirst class of the 3Iilitar\' Order of the Loyal 
Leg-ion of the L'nited States. He is also a member of foreign societies. 

His residence, ir> Broukline, nhich was built by his fatlier, has long been 
known as one of the finest esT;ites in New England. It is described in 
])owning's Landscape Gardening.' 

51. VIII. o77. Elixahetli lUisscll, the wife of Theodore Lyman, born 
in La Boissiere, near Geneva, Switzerland. 

Mrs. Lyman is a daughter of George Robert and Sarah Farkman (S]la^Y) 
Russell. Gardiner Hoaiand Shaiv [oL YIII. o76^ was lier uncle, and Louis 
Agassis Shaw [1. X. 2o'\ was her cousin. Her ancestry includes the follow- 
ing families : Russell, C'liampiiey, Condy, Russell, Ammidon, Shaw, Burt, 
Cheever, Lathrop, Bill, Nichoi, Breck, Patcshall, "Wood}', Dexter, Thomas, 
Jacob, Ruck, Clarke, Parkman, Trask, xVdams, Breck, "Wainwright, Rogers, 
Crane, Denison, Dudlev, Appleton, Everard, Glover, Harris, Ruggles, 
AVoodbridge, Dudle}', Whiting, St. John, Chester. See Axc-e.-^try Tables ^-^\. 

5L VIIL 579. Cliarles Frederick Lyman [Charles 51. YII. 277], 
born in Boston, died in Newport, R. I. A man of leisure. Residences: 
Boston and Newport. 

Mr. Lyman, H. C. 1855, served as a volunteer aid on the stall' of the 
French General jiaurier during the Italian war of 1859. Much of 31r. 
Lyman's later life was snent abroad, several years being passed in Paris. 
He was a man of culrivatcd tastes, and v/as vcell read." 

51. VITI. JT'/A Annie JIason Grant, liis wife, born in Boston, died 
in Boston, of lym])hangitis. 

' Appleton's Oyclopredia of Aiviorican RiogTapliv, Vol. IV. pp. 61-02; The Lyman 
Genealogy, l)y Lyman Coleman, p. .300 ; and thr- lioston Herald of Oct. 23, 1SS2. 
' The Boston Evening Transcript of July 20, ISSO. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. fi99 

A crayon portrait of Mr,-,. Lyman, by Clieney, avhs iu the po^-session of 
\\vY father. 

i^Irs. Lyman was a daughter of Patrick and Lhzaljcth (Bryant) Grant. 
Her f;xthcr was a mercliant of J3o.stnn. John Brijaitt [1. MIL J] was her 
uncle. Her ancestry inchides tlie iullowiny famiht-s : Grant, Grant, Grant. 
Grant, Wliyte, Mason, Pepper, Johnson, ScoUay, Chirk, Kill)}-, Simpkins, 
Pichardson, Powell, Diunnier, Atwator, Blackman, Ihv-iinheld, Danforth, 
Wilson, Conev, Atwat<'r, Blackman, Bryant, Nuakes, ]!row)i, Lincoln, 
JIason, Parker, Stoddiird, Stevens, Gammon, Symnies, Graves, Gi-ay, 
lllowers, Belciier. Danfonh, Smilli, Poore, Hopkinsoa, Clarke, Sawyer, 
I'oore, Thurlow, Morse, ]\lerrill, Cleavoland, Winn, Bates, Paine, Snow, 
Ilopkin.s, Doane, Bangs, ITicks, Stevens. See Axcrsmv T.ua.Ks .J{Jj-. 

52. VIIL oSL Mary Lyman Eliot [Mary 5^'. VTL 278], born in 
Boston. 

52. VIIL o-f^i. Charles EUot Giiih?, her hu>,band, born in Boston. 
An insurance nyent. Residence: Brookline, Mass. 

jMr. Guild, H. C. 1846, was engagod in the Calcutta trade, from 1850 to 
1858, and made two voyages to Cfdcutta, returning; overland tln'ough 
I'Airope. F]-om 1S5S to 18(34, he was an insurance agent and broker, and 
from 1864 to 1873, he was president of the American Tn.sui-ance Company. 
He became the Boston manager of the Liverpool & Londijn & Glcdjc Insur- 
ance Company in 1873, and is now of the firm of Guild ct Eastman, of 
l^ostou.^ 

Mr. Guild and his wife are first cousins. lie is a son of Benjamin and 
I'diza (Eliot) Guild. His father was a lawyer, of B'lston. Soiimi Athiiis 
FAiot [52. VII. 278] was his uncle, and Emma Ilosalh: GuilJ [50. X. lOTS] 
is his niece. His ancestry includes the Adlowing families: Guili!, Crooke, 
I'isher, Faxon, Foster, Stuart, Graves, Quincy, Pares, Gookin, ]5ird. Dull- 
ing, Flynt, Hoar, Hincksman, W'illel, Brown, Waldron, Vaughan, Cutt, 
Allen, Eliot, Woodier, Shnttuck, Herrick, Laskin, ilarshall, Athi)is, Hud- 

' The Genealogy and History of the Guiia, Guile, ami Glle Family, by Charles Bur- 
leii,'li, pp. 198-199; also a communieatiou from Charles E. Guild. 



700 THE PICKEBIXG GKXEALOGY. 



ley, Dightoiij Tyiig, Sc;i)-s (?), Kent, Cookin, Bird, Dolling, Savage, 
Hutchinson, 3Iarbuiy, Tyng, Sears (?). See Axcestkv Tables jy^^^-. 

52. VIIJ. 5S3. Elizabeth Ljinaii Eliot [Mary 52. Vll. 278], born 
in Boston. 

52. VIII. oS3. Stephen JIoj)hl)i.<i BiiUai'd, her husband, born in 
Richmond, Va., died in ^lanchestcr, M;is.s., of disease of the brain. A mer- 
chant. Residences: Boston and Mancliester. 

^Ir. Bullard was engaged in the East India trade, being of tlie firm of 
]3ullard, Lee & Co. ITis i>;!r-mers were his brotljer, .Air. 'William S. Bullard, 
and Colonel llemy Lee [2. Vlll. 15]. I'or the ten years preceding his 
death, he was president of the Mercantile Marine Insurance Company. He 
was a treasurer and a manager of the Boston As}'luni and Farm School. 

Mr. Bullard was a man of high character, remarkably conscientious in 
the discharge of his duty, and of courteous manners.^ 

He was a son of John and Eliza (Story) Bullard. Idis ancestry includes 
the following families: Bullard, Story, Cooper, Appletoii, Everard, Oliver, 
Lowell, Baker, Symonds, Read, Gra}-. See Axck.stkv Tables m\. 

52. VIII. 584. diaries William Eliot [Mary 52. VII. 278], bom 
in Boston. Resilience: Cambridge, 3Iass. 

Mr. Eliot, H, C. 1853_, was appointed tutor of mathematics in Harvard 
College in 185-1, and in 1857 he lectured on cheniistry at the Medical 
School in IjosLon. In 1858, he v/as ai)pnirited assistant jn'ofessor of mathe- 
matics and clicnaistry for five vears, and in 18G1-18'J3 he was in charge of 
the chemical department of the Lawrence Scientific School. In 1863, he 
went to Europe, studying chemistry and acquainting himself with the 
o)-ganization of pulslic instruction in France, Germany, and England. In 
1865, ]Mr. Eliot was appointed professor of analytical chemistry in the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a position which he held until 1867, 
when he again went abroad, spending' fourteen months in France. In 
the spring of 1860, he was chosen president of Harvard College, wdiich 
position he si ill holds. 

' The Boston Daily Advertiser of July S, 1S73; also the Boston Journal of July 8, 
1873. 



EIGHTH GEXEIiATIOX. 701 

Under his adiuini.-tratiun, the elective syslein lias been developed, and 
Harvard has come to resemble in its methods the yreat European univer- 
sities, and has doubled in numljcrs, and trebled in \\ealth. He is an inde- 
pendent thinker and an eilicient ot'tieer. He is an elYective speaker, and 
his public addresses are noted for terseness and strength. President Eliot 
received the degree of LE.D. from Williams and Princeton Colleges in 
18G9, and from Yale in 1870. 

Ho i> a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Historical Society, of the American Pliilosophical 
Society, and of many literary and scientific bodies. 

Besides chemical memoirs, essays on educational topics, and economic 
ciuestions of the hour, and his annual reports as }n-esident of Harvard Col- 
lege, he has written two text-books on chemistry.^ 

52. VIII. oS;'. Ellen JJerbi/ rcahoOy, the first wife of Charles W. 
l']liot, born in Dayton, Ohio, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Eliot was a daughter of the Rev. Dr. Epln-aim and ^lavy Jano 
(Derby) Peabody, of Boston. Her ancestry includes the fdloAving fam- 
ilies: Peabody, Foster, Hale, Hutchinson, Jjoswoi'th, Picddington, Cole, 
Ilutchiuson, Abbot, Chandler, Barker, Harnden. Fiske, Abbot, Chandler, 
Farnum, Abbot, Farnum, Lovejoy, Derby, Hilman, Hasket, Langdon, 
Hodges, Phippon, "Wood, "Williams, Skerry, Manning, Cnlley, Crownin- 
shicld, Allen, Clifford, Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, Cullin, Thendjer, 
Stevens, Greerdeaf, Brocklebank, Co'eenleaf, Coflin, Thember, Steveris, 
Somerby, Knight, Coftley, Hale, Lowell, Juques, Knight, Dole, Foster, 
Brackeidjury, Winslow, Chilton, Xowell, Gray, AVyer, Johnson, Jenncr, 
Trerlce. See Axcr.sTin- TAbLEs 41tt'- 

52. VIII. dS4"- Grace 2TeJ}en llopldnsvu, the second ^^ ife of Charles 
W. Eliot, liorn in Lov/ell, Mass. 

Mrs. Eliot is a daughter of the Hon. Thomas and Corinna Aldrich 
(Prentiss) Ilopkinson. He was a lawyer and prominent citizen, of Lo\vell.'- 

^ Harvartl Epsister for ISSl, p. 397; A Skt-tcli of the Eliot Family, by Walter G. 
Eliot, pp. 91-93 ; and One of a Thousand, by John C. Eand, p. 199. 

^ The History and Genealogy of the Prentice, or I'rentis-; Family, by C. J, F. Binney, 
p. 13G; also Harvard Eemiuiscences, by A. P. Peabody, pp. 192-194. 



702 THE riCKKKlXG GEXEALOGY. 



Fi-anci'--< Stuiic Iloiihimon \J)2. IX. lOiO'] is hrr iiifce, and J\uiiria Prentiss 
[11. W. JO'] was licr yraiidauiit. Tier aucestr}' includes tlie followin;i- 
fiuuilies: Ilupkiiison, Alk-ii, Prentiss, Duntini, l?aud, Edenu<'n, Wliitman, 
Peirce, Whittoniore, Seult, Ilieks, Sill, Green, Mitelielson, P.uslifll, ]\Ielle]i, 
Pratt, Parmenter, Prentiss, Stantim, f.ord, Foster, Ilanford, Kglin, Holland, 
Aldrich. See Axcksthv Tai;lf.s l\]\:. 

f)2. VIIT. 585. Catlierino Atkins Eliot [},[nry 52. VTT. 278], born 
in Boston, died in Boston. 

52. Vin. oSo. Fraiiciti lliinipIircijH Stover, lier husband, born iu 
Boston. A chemist. Pesidence : Boston. 

Professor Storer entered the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard 
College in 1850, becoming an assistant of Professor Cooke in 1851 ; and 
at the Harvard Medical School in Boston he instructed a private class in 
chemical analysis. In 1853, he was appointed chemist to the United States 
North Pacific Exploring Expedition. On his return, he completed his 
course at the Lav^-rencc Scientitlc Seliool, received his degree in 1855, and 
then went abroad, studving under Bunsen in Heidelberg, Picliter in Frei- 
berg, Stockhardr iu Tliarandt, and with Jilmile Kopp in Paris. He returned 
in 1857, and was chemist for the Boston Gas Light Company until 1871. 
He also opened a private laboratoiy as an analytical and consulting 
chemist. 

In 1865, he was appointed Professrir of General and Industrial Chemistry 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Teclmology. He spent several montlis 
abroad in 18G7, studying the chemical departments of the World's Fair in 
Paris. In 1870, he was called to the chair of agricultural chemistry at 
Harvard, which he still (1893) ilUs, and is I'ean of the Bussey Institution. 

Professor Storer is a member of scientific societies at home and abroad. 
His papers exceed one hundred in number. For some time he was the 
American editor of the " Pepertoire de Chimie Applicpiee," and has con- 
ducted the " Bulletin of the Bussey In.stitution." In book-form he has pub- 
lished '' Dictionary of tlie Solubilities of Chemical Substances" [Candn-idge, 
18G4:]; with President Charles ^V. Eliot, "Manual of Inorganic Chemistry" 



EIGHTH G EXEBA TIOX. 



[Xow York, ISilSj; ;uiJ " .Alaiuuil of QualiuttiNx- C'liemisli-y Analysis" 
[18G0] ; " Cyclojia'dia of Quantitative Analy.-is,'' in two parts [Ijoston, 
1S70-18T;;] ; and " Agrirulturo in some of its delations witli Chemistry" 
[2 vols., New York, KSS?].' 

Professor Storer is a son of Dr. David Humphreys and Abby Jane 
(Brewer) Storer, of JJoston. His father was an eminent physician. Joint 
JTioitphrci/s Sforcr [51. IX. 104^] is his nepliew, and JuJi/i Sio)ic [59. VI. 
iJJJ was his granduiK-le. His ancestry includes the folknvinu' families: 
Storer, Starbnek, Ilil!. Crass, Dill, Langdon, Slierburne, Hubbard. Hall, 
Dudley, Woodbur}-, I'liliut, Bo}-d, Li\-ingstone, Thompson, Coliin, Tliendjor, 
Stevens, Greenleat", ISi-ocklebank, 3Iorss, Brewer. I'and, "Ware, Fallass, 
Black, Stone, Garrad, Howe, Moore, Brown, Stone, Stearns, Jones, Reed, 
Jennison, Peirce, Cole, Hubbard, Merriam, Eice, King, Conant, Horton, 
Walton, Paymond. See Axcrsxiii- Tablf.s -j^L 

52. YIH. 5SC. Frances Anne Eliot [^lary 52. YII. 278], born in 
Boston. Residences: Boston and Magnolia, Mass. 

52. YIH. oSG. llvnyy WUder Foote, her hnsband, born in Salem, 
died in Boston, of heart disease. A minister. Residences : Boston and 
Magnolia. 

]\Ir. Foote, H. C. 1858, Divinity School, 1S(H, was setth/d over King's 
Chapel, Boston, whei'o he remained until his death. During his loi!g 
pastorate of twenty-seven years he won and kr j.t tlie devoted atlVction of 
liis parishioners. Y'hile most faithful to every duty of his oftice and pro- 
fession, his public spirit led him to give time and thonglit to organizations 
and charities in Boston, and his ^visdom in practical matters was cordially 
recognized by his colleagnes. He was mncli interested in historical and 
genealogical matters, and pnbli.shed "The Annals of King's Chapel, "N'ol. I." 
He was a member of tlie ^lassachnsetts Historical Society." 

^Ir. Foote was a son of the Hon. Caleb and :\lary Yrilder (Y'hite) 
Foote, of Salem. His father was for sixtv-tliree 3-ears the editor and pub- 

' Appleton's CyclopaHlia of American Biogip.Y'l'y. Vol. V. p. 707. 
^ The Boston Daily Advertiser of Friday, :\iay 31. 1SS9. 



70-1 THE PICKEEIXG GENEALOGY. 

li.sber of the Salem Gazette. His ancestry incluiles the following families: 
Foote, Jc-gglus, ] 'aimer, Gilbert, Fowler, Ingalls, Dedman, Hodges, 
Phijipen, Wood, Goodhue, West, Merrium, Poor, I'itconib, Gale, Dixey, 
Massey, Young, White, French, Gilman, Clark, Treworgye, Shapleigh, 
Phillips, Sargent, Appleton, Everard, Emerson, Symonds, Read, Haynes, 
^loulton. Page, Harriman, Clement, Wilder, Houghton, Gardner, Broughton, 
Flagg, Leppingwell, Pitson. See Axcestrv Tables j"j. 

52. VIIL yss. George Williams Pratt [George W. 52. YII. 284], 
born, in Boston, died in Florence, Italy. 

ilr. Pratt went to Italy in \i\'M, and, immediately upon bis arrival, 
enrolled himself in the Tuscan army; but he soon joined the army of 
Garibaldi, and made the campaign of Sicily and Naples, after which he 
returned to Florence, which he made his residence.-' 

52. YIII. 589. William Pratt [George W. 52. YII. 284], born in 
Boston, died in Xew York City. A man of leisure. Eesidence : Man- 
chesier, Mass. 

Ilv. Pratt was educated at the English High School and at the private 
school of David B. Towers. On leaving school, he entered the employ of 
Charles B. Fessendcn, and afterwards made a voyage around the world in 
one of Mr. Fessenden's vessels. He served in the Union xirmy during the 
Kebellion. On Sept. 2, 1861, he was commissioned as captain of the 
Twentv-fourth ^las^achusetts Infantry, and served with his regiment 
duririg the expedition of General Burnside, participating in the battles of 
that campaign. Dunng his services he contracted rheumatic troubles, 
which were the final cause of his death. He received his discharge, June 
26, 1863, having been appointed captain and assistant adjutant-general of 
United States Yolunteers, June 24, 18G3, serving on the staff of General 
Thomas G. Stevenson. He resigned his commission April 2, 1864. On 
Dec. 4, 1SG7, he Avas elected a member of the New York Commandery of 
the Loyal Legion, and afterwards was transferred to become a charter 

' Privately printed pamphlet, translated from a tribute, to him which was priuted in 
" La Nazione," of Florence, dated June 5, 1SG5. 



EIGHTH GHXHL'ATWX. 705 



iiieinbLT o'L the jla.-.^achuisettd Coiuinaudery, in ^^'lli^.•il iir held a fir.st-chiss 
menibcr.-:;hip.^ ;\fuch of Mr. Pratt's tiuio wos spent in foreig-n travel. 

52. VIII. O'SU. A)iitf( Powell Jones, Iiis wife, born in Bo.ston. 

Mrs. i'ratt is a danghter of John ColKn and 3Ianu'jla (Carrillo) Jones, of 
Boston. Her aneestry inidiides the tVillowing- families : Jones, Stone, 
Treadway, Howe, Coffin, Theiuber, Stevens, GreenlL-af, l^^rocklebank, Oreen- 
leaf, Coffin, Thember, Stevens,, Somerby,. Knig-ht, Cufiley, Chaniplin, 
Doni-on, Boradel. Gorhani, Ilovrland, Tillo}', Hill, Carrillo, Xoriego. See 
Akcestky Tablks 5^':^ 

52. VIII. 5^0. Robert Marion Pratt [George W. 52. A'll. 28-1], 
bom in Boston. A man of leisnre. Residences: Boston and Watertowii, 
^lass. 

Mr. Pratt 0T\'ns the beantiful estate, " Oakley," at Watertown, Avhicli 
belong-ed to his grandfather, William Pratt, and Mhioh was qnile famous 
when such places were not as common as now. It has always been cele- 
brated for its fine trees, and the character of the place has been n)aintaiued 
b)- Mr. Pratt. 

Jlr. Pratt has several valuable portraits by Copley and other artists. 

He is a member of the Somers. 1 Clnb, and of the Nev: England His- 
toric-Genealogical Society. He is much interested in genealogy, and has 
collected data concerning families from whom he is descended. 

52. VIII. 592. Henry Angnstiis Orne [Mary 52. VII. 2.ss], born 
in Salem, died in ]\Iemphis, Tenu. A lawyer. Picsidenci^ : ^Memphis. 

^Ir. Orne studied law, and established himself in Pontotoc, 3[iss. He 
continued to practise his pi-ofession in that place until 1850, when lie 
removed to Memphis, Tenn., and engaged in business as a cotton broker. 
Iri the autumn of 1855, he resumed his profession, and continued in its 
practice at i\Iemphis until his death. 

52. VIII. 5.9J\ JElhahrth VHtnaui Orne, his first -nife, born in 
Salem, died in Pontotoc, Miss. 

* The Eo-ston nemld of IMarch, 1S93 ; also the Kegister of the ^Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion of the Uuited States, p. 100. 

45 



TOG THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Mr. and 31r.-;. Urnc wvw lir>t cousins. She was a daughter of Richard 
Elvin.s and Anne Fiske (AlU-ul ()rne, of Salem. Alhc Ornc[i)2.\\.9o'] 
was lier gi-andaunl. and Kdirard Orne [52. VII. ■2SS'] and John Fishc Allrit 
[59. Vll. o4T\ were her uncles. ITer ancestry includes the following fanii- 
lies: Orne, Tho'.njjson, In^^ei'^oll. Folton, Elvins, Beadle, Palmer, Allen, 
liodges, Plil|.)pen, \Yood, AVilliams, Skerry, Manning, Galley, Allen, 
Hodges, Phippen, Wood, Williams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, Fiske, 
Lanterce, Gip])S, S\ nnnes, S])arhawk, Angier, Gerrish, Lowell, "Waldi'on, 
Higginson, Wliitlield, Slu-at'e, Savage, S^'mnies, Phippen, AVood, Guppy, 
Palfray, 3Iamni)g, Galley, l^eckford, Pinson, Green. See A.nlestky 
Tables ^^l.. 

52. VIII. o02~. Anne J'tske Orne, the second wife of Henry A. 
Orne, born in Salem, died in Pontotoc, 3Iiss. 

Mrs. Orne was a daughter of Richard Elvins and Anne Fiske (Allen) 
Orne, of Salem. Her husband's first v.-ife was her sister. Her connections 
and ancestry are given abo\X' under Elizabeth Putnam Orne. Akckstky 
Tables ^?^J 

62. Yin. o92^. Annie Meri-iU, the third wife of Homy A. Orne, 
born in Pittsfield, Mass. Residence : liidgewood, N. J. 

Mrs. Orne is a daughter of Justus and ]\Iarv (Clap})) ^\]errill. He is a 
farmer, of Pittsfield, 31ass. Her ancestry includes the following families: 
Merrill, Stucklln, Skinnei-, Phillips, Cla])p. ^\■^\■berr^^ ]3artlett, Baldwin, 
Strong, Holton, Eartlett, Baldwin, Lvman, Plumb, Sheldon, Allen, Parsons. 
See Ancestry Tables ^^'jj. 

52. VIII. 593. CharlGs Tv^illiams Orne [Mary 52. VII. 288], bo)-n 
in Northborough, 3[ass., died in New York City. 

]\[)-. Orne Avas educnted at Plilllips Exeter Academy. For a time he was 
in the sub-treasury de]iartment at Wasliington, D. G. About 1849, he went 
to Ghina, where he obtained a })Osition in the tea house of Russell &. Go. 
He returned home in ISliO, his health having been somewhat impaired by 
the climate. He afterward made several trips to Ghina, remaining there 
only a few years each time.' 

^ Counuunication of ]Mis3 Mary E. Onio. 



EIGTITII GEXKRATIOX. 707 



r)2. \\[\. :);;(;. Annie Williams Whitney [i:iizabotli 52. All. 
2;mi], Ix-irn in ]-.o.<ton, died in Caniln-id--^, ]*Iass., of t\plioid ibver. 

^h-.s. Wyinan'i; baptismal name is said lo have l)een Nancy "Williams, 
but she ^vas al\vay.s called Annie "Williams. 

62. VJII. J.%'. Jejf'ries Wi/ntan. her husband, bcn-n in C'lielmsford, 
Mass., died in Bethlehem, N. 11. xV comparative anatomist. Residence : 
Cambridge, ^lass. 

Profe.ssor Wyraan was educated at Phillips Aeademv, Exeter. Gradu- 
ating from Harvard College in 1833, he becamo honse [ilivsician in tlie 
31assachusetts General Hospital in IhoG, and, in iSo'i, he received the 
degree of 31.1). Irom Harvard College. He settled in Ikiston. and became 
demonstrator of anatomy under Dr. John C. Warren, avIlo Avas then Hei'sey 
Professor of Anatomy and Sm-gery in Harvard College. In 1839. he was 
appointed curator of the Lo-\vell Institute; and, in 1S40 and 1841, he de- 
livered a course of twelve lectures on comparative anatomv and physiology. 
He then went to Europe, and studied human anatomy- in the School of 
Medicine and Comparative Anatomy at the Jardin des Plantes in Paris, 
after which he spent some time at the Poyal College of Surgeons in Lon- 
don. In 18-13. lie returned to P.ostou, and accepted the Prol'essor^hip of 
Anatomy and Pliysiology in Hampden Sidney College, "\'irginia. He held 
this position lor five years. In 1847, he A'\as appointed Ilersev Professor 
of Anatomy in Harvard College, and remained at tlie heaal of that dc])avt- 
nient of the college umil his death. To illustrate two lectm-es, he began 
the formation of that Museum of Comparative Auatorny which was one of 
tlie earliest in this country, and to which he gave the best energies of Ids 
life, and which to-day remains a memorial of his skill and industry. Aftei' 
his death, it l»ecame the ]n'opert.y of the hjoston Xalui'al History Society. 
Ho was a mendjor of the facult)' of the 31useum of Comparative Zoology, 
and he taught anatomy in the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard 
College. On the foundation of the Peab(^d\- I\Iuseum of American 
Etlmology and Archreology, he was named as one of the seven trustees, 
and was chosen its curator. During liis winters in Elorida, whither he Avas 
obliged to go for many years on account of ill health, ho investigated the 



708 THE riCKEBIXG GEXEALOGY. 

ancient slioll-la'a]).s tliere ; and in Nc'\v lung-land he niada similar investirra- 
tions. lie iniblislied several papei-s on this sul.)joct in tlie " xVnierican 
Naturali'-r,"' and in the lieports of tlio Trustees of tlio Peabod\- ]\lnscuni ; 
but his results are more fully given in a posthumous memoir on the " Fresh- 
water Shell-mounds of the St. Johns River, Florida." 

Ho made several voyayes, partly with the object of making additions to 
his collections, one of which was to Lnbrador. In lSo4, ho went to 
Europe, and again in 1<S70. In l^nG,, he visited Surinam, and he made a 
voyage to the river La Plata in 18."i8-l.'^r)9. 

Among his publications are the f(;>lloning: ''On the External Character, 
Habits, and Osteology of the Gorilla" [1817]; "On. ihe Nervous System 
of the Bull-Frog" [1853]; "Observations on the Development of the 
Skate" [18G4] ; " Observations and Experiments on Living Organisms in 
Heated Water" [1867]. lie was also the author of a series of papers on 
the anatomy of the blind fish of the ?^lammoth Cave. A full list of his 
publications consists of one hundi'ed and seventy-five titles. 

Professor Wyman's relations with tlie Boston Society of Natural History 
were very close. From 1839 to 1811, he was its recording secretary, 
afterwards curatiiir of various departments, and from ISoG to 1870, he ^^'as 
its president. In 185G, he was choseii ]-)resideut of the American Associa- 
tion for the Promotion of Science, an.d Avas one of the coi-porate membei's 
of the National Academy of Science. He Avas a fellow and councillor of 
the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, ami a corj'cs])ondlng member 
of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadel}>l!!a. He AAas also a 
member of the Linna\an Society of London, nnd of the Anthropological 
Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 

Professor AVyman's first vrife, wliom he married Dec. 19, 1850, Avas 
Adeline Wheel Avrighf. dn tighter of "William aiid Susanna Cunningham 
(Minns) "\\' herd Wright, of Boston and New York. She was born in New 
York, Aug. 8, 1825, and died in Cand)ridge, Mass., June 25, 1855. By her 
he had the folloAving children : — 

SusAx Wymax, Lorn in Cambridge, Sept. '[?>, iS.jl. 

Mary MoKiaLL Wyjiax, bom in Cambridge, ^Jlay 15, lS.r>5. 



EIGHTH GEyEEATION. 709 



Sketches of Professor W}-inau's life liuve l>eL'ii publislied l)y Alpheus 8. 
J^ickard, .\sa Gray, 01iv.,r Wciulrll Holmes, S. Weir -Alitcliell, Frederic 
Wurd PiUnam, and Jjurt G. Wilder. James Iviusell Lo-ivell A\rote a 
memorial sonnet.' 

Professor Wyman ^vas a son of Poifns and Amio (Morrill) Wyuuui. Ilis 
ancestry includes the following- families: Wyman, Kead, Hancock, Pren- 
tice, Peirce, Cole, Paccjn, Johnson, "Wyman, Pead, Hancock, Prentice, 
Sa.wyer, ^[oiTill, Glover, Smith, Hinckley, Picliards, 3Iarsli, Simpson, 
Agon. See Axcestky Tallks ^"-g. 

52. YHl. GOO. Stephen Williams Wliitney [Fdizaheth 52. VH. 
290], born in Poston. A merchant. Pesidenco: Xew Yorlc City. 

Mr. Whitney, H. C. isiil, attended the Hojikins Classical School, 
Cambridge, ]\Piss., and was lltted for college at the Cand)ridge High 
School. 

On Aug. 2G, 18(11, he went to Vicksburg, IMiss., and engaged in busi- 
ness with liis father; and on ^lay 12, 1SG2, he eidisted in the Tliii'ty-seventh 
Tennessee Pegiment of tlie Pebel army. His health failing, he Avas detailed 
for the connuissary department; and, in the spring of 1SG3, he was appointed 
acting brigade connnissnrv, and starioned in Vicksburg, where he remained 
until the surrender of the city to the Union army. In P\d)i'uary, 18G4, he 
was commissioned captain and ass.istant connrnssnry, and vras assigned to 
duty with the cavalry command of Major-General S. D. Lee, who appointed 
him assistant chief commissary of the departmc-nt of Alabama, I\lississippi, 
and East Louisiana. On May 10, 18Go, at ]\[eridia,n, Miss., he gave his 
" parole not to serve in the Confederate States Army until dul}- exchanged, 
etc.,'' and returned to his father's house in Vicksburg. 

He began business in Xew York City in June, 1868, at first ^vith Pobeii. 
M. Davis, of Xew Orleans, under the style of Stephen ^\ . Whitney li Co., 
commission mercharits. The firm was dissolved April 30, 1874, and Mr. 
Whitney engaged in business as bank-agent and correspondent." 

' Appleton's Cyclopa-dia of American Eiography, Vol. VI. pp. 632-G33 ; also Harvard 
College Class Book of 18.33, pp. fiO-C(3. 

= Harvard College Class Book of ISCl, p. 130. 



710 THE J'lCKEUiyG GENEALOGY. 

5:?. VIII. go:.. Ellen Williams [George 11. 52. Vll. 292], bom in 
Nortliboi-ou;^li, -Mas.s. Ive^iJuiice : Xortliborougli. 

^li-ss AVilliauis is a trustee of the Free Librar}' of Xoilliborougli. 

53. VIII. COS. George Gardner Lowell [3Iavy L. 53. VII. 302], 
born in Boston, JiiMl in Boston, of Bi-ight's disease. Besldeiice : Boston. 

■Mr. Lowell graduated at Harvard College in 1S50, and then studied 
medieine. 

53. VIII. COS. Mary Ellen l*ar]:ey, his wife Ijoin in Boston. 
Residence : Boston. 

Mrs. Lowell is a daughter of James and Anna (Tucker) Parker, of Bos- 
ton. Sarah CJiaiuUer Parker [ll.l. Vlll. ^Y);] is her sister. Her ancestry 
includes the follo\ving families: Parker, Ilohuan, Wiswall, Jackson, Cum- 
mings, Payson, Khot, "Winchester, Phillips, Ranford, Long, Tidd, Scars, 
Lemmon, Staines. Maverick. Harris, Smith, Bill, jiattocks, Tucker, Dalton, 
Alden, Chandler, Dongla-, Matfle, Pvaymond, Smith, Bourne, Church, "War- 
ren, South worth, Collier, Paine, Rainsford, Sunderland, Griswold, Wolcott, 
Hyde, Lee, Lee, DoAVolf, Wolcott, Saunders, Pitkin, Drake, W^olcott, 
Clarke, Xewbury. See Axcestry Tablks ~^j\. 

53. Viri. 60i). Mary Lov/ell [Maay L. 63. VIL 302], born in 
W^altham, Mass. 

53. VIII. 609. JJijernoii Coolidf/e, her husband, born in Boston. A 
])hysician. Piesidencc: Boston. 

Mr. Coolidge graduated at the Harvard Medical School in 1853. 

He is a son of Joseph and Elliaiiora Wayles (Randolph) Coolidge, of 
Boston. Joseph Ilaiulolplt CooUdgc [53. VIII. G19~\ is his brother, aud Tlionias 
Jeff'erbvn CooJulje [53. IX. 1119] is his nephew. His anceslry includes the 
follo-\ving families: Coolidge, Rice, King, Ingraham, Olivier, Boyer, Juhon- 
not, Sigourney, Bulfinch, Bulhncli, Cohnan, Hobb}-, Apthoi'p, Ward, East- 
wick, Lloyd, Randolph, Ryland, Isham, Page. Luckin, ]\iann, W^ormeley, 
Cary, Ilobson, Taylor, Randoljjh, Pyland, Isham, Boiling, Rolfe, Kennon, 
Jefferson, Field, Randolph, Ryland, Isham, Rogers, Wayles. See A^tcestry 



FAG JIT H GEXKUATIOX. 711 



.03. VIII. iJil. Edward Jackson Lov.xU [Mary L. f>;). VTl. ;]• )•_'], 
born in Boston, ilicd in I'otail, ^las.s., of dis^e;isu of the bniin. lu'sitlcnce : 
Boston. 

Mr. Lowell, II. C ISHT, spent several years in Knro[)C, and then 
entered upon tlie practice ot" law in Boston. Daring tlic later yeais of 
his life he devoted his time to literar}' work, lie was the autluir of 
"The Hessians and the other German Auxiliaries of Great Fnitain in the 
IJevolutionary War" [IS^-J-], and "The I'^-e of the French Revolution" 
[ls;fJ]. lie al-:o contributed various articles to Scriljncr's .Magazine and 
Uy the Atlantic }Jnnthh'. He made UKUiy visits to Eui'ope. lie was a 
trustee of the l^o.^tun Athen;eum, and spent a large poi'tion of his time 
in that library. Ho was a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
tlie American Historical Association, the New York Historical Society, and 
the American Academy oi Arts and Sciences.'' A tribute tu his character 
appeared in the Bi^^ston Evening Transcri])t of ^lay lo, iSM-i. 

63. YIII. Gll\ Mavy TTolcott Goodrich, liis fiir.-.t wife, born in l>os- 
ton, died in Boston. 

ilrs. Loneli was a daughter of Samuol Griswold a^id I\Iary (Boott) 
Goodrich. Her .incestry includes the following families : Goodrich, Mar- 
vin, Wright, Chittenden, Sheafe, Boardman, Hubbard, 3Ierriam, Chauncy, 
Eyre, Strong, Ford, Judsou, Porter, Wells, Tuttle, Griswold, Ely, Worth- 
ing'ton, Bunce, Graves, Church, Gallup, Lake, Iiead, Cheseboi-ough, 
Stevenson, Boott. See Axcestkt Table:- ""p,. 

53. VHI. Gll^. FAh^ahetli Gilbcrf Jones, his second wife. liesi- 
dence: Boston. 

Mrs. Lowell is a daugliter of George- and Sarah (Gilbert) Jones. Her 
ancestry includes the following families: Jones, I)avi.--j Clilbert, Betts. Sec 

A.VCKSTKY Tap.I.KS ^'jJ^'- 

53. VIIT. 613. Joseph Peabody Gardner [John L. 53. AMI. 303], 
born in Boston, died in Beverly, Mass. Residences : P.oston and Beverly. 

» ITarvard College Class liool: of ISGT, p. 20, and Appleton's Cyclopa'dia of Aiuericaii 
liiosraphy, Vol. IV. p. -1-t. 



712 THE PICKFniXO O EXE A LOGY. 

Mr. Gardner, 11. C 1847, was for a fe^y years in partnorshi]) in foreign 
and domestic business with T. Jeft'ersoa CoolidL;^. Afterwards he was 
engaged in shipping, and in the East India trado : and lie also assisted his 
father in the care of his business and property. He was a trustee of the 
Humane Society of ^lassachusetts, and he ix-ceived their medal for saving 
life at the risk of his own. lie took great interest in yachting, and was 
one of the founders of the Eastern Yacht Club. He was a man of the 
highest character, and had many warm friends. 

53. Yin. GJJ. Harriet Sears Ainori/, his wife, born in Boston, 
died in Boston. 

Mrs. Gardner vras a daughter of "\YilIiain and Anna Powell Grant 
(Sears) Amory, of Boston. C/wrhs WaUer Ji.,on/ [53. YIIl. G36] is her 
brother; WiUiani Gardiner Prcscutt [.Vi. MIL C^i] and Munj Pcaloihj Scars 
[51. IX. 10-jO] were her first cousins; and GcrfncJc Laivrcuce [1. X. 11] is 
her first cousin once reinoved. Her ancestry includes the following 
families: Amory, Holmes, "\Yharf, Coffin, Thember, Stevens, Severance, 
Gayer, Starbuck, Reynolds, Holmes, "\Yharf, Linzee, Inman, Sparsman, 
Sears, "NYillard, Howes, Freeman, Pi'ince, ^Icriick, Dinnriick, Bursley, 
Sturgis, Winthr(>p, Fortli, Read, Ib-ov/ne, Smith, Dudlev, I)i,<jhton, T}-ng, 
Sears (.'), Borland, Xeil, Lindall, Yeren, Poole, Brenton, Mason, Pepper, 
Johnson, Scollay, Clarlc, Kill)y, Siinpkins, Richai-dson, Powell, Dummer, 
Atwater, IMackman, Bromfield, Danforth, ^Yilson, Coney, Atwater, Black- 
man. See Ancestky Tables ^\" . 

53. YIIL fill. George Aiigvistiis Gardner [John L. 53. YIL 
303], l)orn in Boston. Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Gardner, H. C. 1^40, for a number of years conducted his father's 
aflairs, and, since giving up acti-\-e Viiv-Inoss, he lia^ continued in the care of 
trust and other property. He is a director of the ^rassachuselts Hospital 
Life Lisurance Conijiany, and has been an influential director of many of 
the most imjiortant cor|iMvations. He has made very lil.ieral contributions 
to charitable and other institutions and gave to the ^lassachusetts General 
Hospital the building for contagious cases, ^iv. Gardner is a man of 
high character and standinff in Boston, 



EIGHTH GEXEllATIOX. 713 



53. VIII. G14- IJfi^ft Jj^ndicott Peiibodii, his Avii'e, Lorn in Salem, 
died in Boston. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Avere first cousins. 

Mrs. Gardner was a daughter of George and Clara (Eiidicott) Peabody. 
Her father was a -wealtliy mercliant, of Salem. Cdihvrnic J'JI~ahctli Peahod// 
[r)3. VII. oOJ] was lier aunt; Josrph Anijditas Fcalodi/ [.34. \'II. SOD] was 
lier uncle ; Sd/iiiirl Etidkott reaoodij [1. IX. 4'] f'' her cousin ; ^Tdrii Pcidjodij 
Sears [ol. IX. lOoO'] was her niece; and John E)idicoll [.">'. \ll. S4'] was 
her granduncle. Her ancestry includes the following fimilio^: Peabody, 
Foster, Perkins, Knight, Siuith, Morrill, Maverick, Harri.-, Purnap, Pear- 
son, "Walton, Blauchard, Hassell, Hubbard, ^lerriam. Pice, King, P.rown, 
Vinton, Endicott, Felton, Tompkins, Endicott, Jacobs, Frost, Waters, 
Tompkins, Putnam, Hutchinson, Bosworth, Cutler, Leach, Flint, Putnam, 
Hutchinson, Bos-^vorth, Bacon, Richardson, Giles, Putnam, Porter, Ila- 
thorne, Perley, Pcabodv, Foster, Osgood, Clement, Puln.im, Hutchinson, 
Bosworth, Cutler, Hutchinson, Bosworli], Geduey. See A^cEiTKY 
Tablks Pl\. 

53. VIII. G17. John Lowell G-arclner [John L. 53. VII. 303], 
born in Boston. Residences: Boston, Brookline, and Beverly, Mas.s. 

Mr. Gardner entered Harvnrd College, nnd was a member of the class 
of 185S ; but he k-ff college in his sophomore year to accomp;;ny his parents 
in a long visit to Europe. He is not in active business, liut is occu])ied 
with the management and care of property. He is a diixctor of the 
Chicago, Burlington, and Quin.cy Railroad Compnuy, nnd of other impor- 
tant corporations. He is also the treasurer of the ]\tuseum of Fine Arts of 
Boston, and a trustee of the Humane Society of Mas.-uchusetts. ^Ir. 
Gardner has travelled much atid in many countries. He now owns his 
fatlier's place in Brookline, in the care of -which he is gi-e;itly interested. 

53. VIII. G:l7. Ifi.ahcUa Stcirnrt, his wife, born in New York City. 

i\Irs. Gardner, ^vho is distinguished as a leader of society in Boston, is 
celebrated as bringing together at her entertainments persons famous in 
art, literature, music, and the drama. She is a patron of genius and the 
iino arts, possesses rare conversational power, and her houses evidence a 



714 THE PICKEEIXG GEXEALOGY. 

liiylily cultivated taste. She is a woman of many charities, and has been 
a liberal benetaetor to numerous churches and other objects. She has 
travelled extensively in Kurope and other parts of thu \'s-orld. Her 
portrait was painted by Sargent in 1888. 

Mrs. Gardner is a daughter of David and Adelia (Smith) Stewart. Her 
father was a wealtliy merchant, of New York. Her ancestry includes the 
following- families : Stewart, Stewart, Todd, Kent, Dudley, Dwiglit, Par- 
tridge, Kellogg, Hinsdale, Chester, Treat, Smith, Carpenter. See Axckstky 
Tables ^^. 

63. \m. G19. Julia Ga^'cTr'.er [John L. .53. YD. 303], born in 
Boston. 

Mrs. Coolidge is one of the nianngers of the Boston Female Asylum. 

53. Yni. 619. Joseph ItaudoIj>h Coolidge, her husband, born in 
Boston. A hnvyer. Kesidences : B'.iston and Brooklinc, Mass. 

Mr. Coolidge was educated in Eiu'Ope, and graduated at the Har^■ard 
Law School in 1854. 

He has a portrait of his great-grandfather, the second Joseph Coolidge, 
painted by Stuart. 

He is a son of Joseph and Ellianora ^Yayles (Randolph) Coolidge, of 
Boston. Ahicrmn Coolidge [53. YIII. 6'00'\ is his brother, and Thomas 
Jefferson CooUdge [53. IX. 1110~\ is his nephew. His ancestiy includes the 
following- families : Coolidge, Rice, King, Ingrahani, Olivier, Boyer, 
Johonnot, Sigourney, Bulfinch, Bulfinch, Colman, Hobby, Apthorp, Vt^'ard, 
Eastwick, Lloyd, Kandoliih, Ryland, Isham, Page, Luckin, Mann, "\Yorme- 
ley, Cary, Hobson. Taylor. Randolph, Ryland, Isham, Boiling, Rolfe, 
Kennon, Jefferson, Field, Randolph, Ryland, Isham, Rogers, ^Yayles. See 
AxcF.sTKT Tables ji"j. 

53. YHI. 621. Eliza Blancharcl Garclnor [John L. 53. VII. 303], 
born in Brookline, Mass. 

53. YIII. 621. Francis Sldnner, her husband, born in Boston. 
Residence : Boston. 

Mr. Skinner graduated at Harvard College in 1SC2. 



EIGHTH G Kyi: RAT J ON. 715 

lie is a sou ol' Francis and Elixabctli Skinner. Hi.-: lather was ;i well- 
known merchant, of Boston. Ancestky T.vi;lk.s l™^^. 

53. VIll. r;22. John Cliipman G.vay [Sarah \\. 53. VII. 30 1], born 
in J^righton, 3Iass. A lawyer. Residence : Boston. 

^[r. Gray, IT. (J. 1859, LL.lk ISm, is a nicnibor of the k-nv firm 
(if ltO]jes, Gray & Luring-, of Boston. F)-om 1875 to 1SS3, he was Story 
Professor of Ijaw in Harvard College, and, in 18S3, h.e wa.-> ajniointed 
Boyall I'rofe-sor of Law. 

Daring the Bebellion, lie was commissioned, Oct. 7, 18G2, second lieu- 
tenant of tlie rorty-first ?dassachusetls A^cdunteei' Infantry (afterwards the 
Third ^lassachusetts Volunteer Cavahy), and served as aide-de-camp to 
Genei-al Gordon. He was appointed major and judge advocate of the 
United States Volunteers, Sept. 20, ISCL He was on duty in the depart- 
ment of the Smith, first under jlajor-Gencral Foster, and afterwards 
under Major-Genei-al Gillmore. He resigned July \\, ]SG5. 

IMr. Gray is a trustee of the ]^)Oston Athena?um, and of the Social Law 
Library, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

63. \'1H. G'3. Anna Sophia Li/man JiJ.at-.oiiy his wife, born hi 
Boston. 

Mrs. Gray is a daughter of the Piev. Charles and Hannah. Huntington 
(Lj-man) Mason, of Boston. Elhahcih 21asoii [48. IX. 044'] ^^^ ktr cousin. 
Her ancestry includes the following families: Mason, Peck, Denison, Weld, 
Hobart, Dewey, Whiting, St. John, Clark, Fitch, Mason, Feck, Sherwood, 
Denison, Boradel, Lay, Stanton, Lord, Gardner, Means, ^McGregor, Gargib 
Boyd, Lyman, Osborne, Cole, Loomis, Scott, Clark, Huntington, Baret, 
Clark, Clark, Hinckley, Eichards, Pope, Jenney, Tufts, Peirce, Cotton, 
Hav/kridge, P.radstreet, Dudle)-, 'Welsli, I'pham, ^lousall. Pichardson, 
11 ard, Wilson, Tufts, Lynde, Strong, Foi'd, Clapp, Clapp, Stobbins, Wright, 
l)orchestcr, L}-man, Osljonie, Plum, Slieldon, V^oodford, Blott, AVorner. 

See AXCKSTKY 'J'.VI;L1:S 3xJ- 

53. Vin. 623. Paissell Gray [Sarah P. 53. VII. 304], f,orn in 
P>nston. A la-w-yer. Pesidence : Boston. 

Air. Gray, II. C. 18G0, is a trustee of the kJoston Atheiueum. 



716 THE FICKEEIXG GENEALOGY. 

53. \i\\. OJJ. Am (J Heard, his wife, born in Uo^ton. 

Mrs. Gray is a daugliter of Augustine and June L. (de Coninck) Heard. 

AXCESXKY rAU].i:s ^x&i' 

63. VJII. G24. Helen Read Gardner [George 53. VII. 305], born 
in Boston. Eesidence : Boston. 

53. \[ll. G24. Juincs Fvceinan Curtis, lier husband, born in 
Boston, died in Boston. 

Mr, Curtis was iitted for Harvard College by ^h\ Theodore Tebbets, 
and cnlereil in 1857 ; but lie kft college at the end of his freshman year. 
In 18G0, lie went to China, where for about live years he served as a clerk 
in the house of Augustine Heard & Co. He returned to Boston in 1865, 
and was a real-estate agent for ten or twelve years. He afterwards formed 
the firm of Gliddcn & Curtis, managers of the Pacific Guano Company, 
which did a large business. 

Mr. Curtis -was an invalid for se's'eral j-ears before liis death, during 
vhich time he retained his cheerful and bright disposition.^ 

He was a son of Thomas Buckminster and Laura (Greenough) Curtis, 
of I)Oston. His mother was a sister of Greenough, the sculptor. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Curtis, Eliot, I'oHy, Gore, 
Gardner, Crook, Buckminster, Clark, Sharp, A'ose, Lawson, Simpson, 
Pelham, T^der, Greenough, Swift, Capen, Gross, Clark, Whittingham, 
Bronsdon, Dillingham, Bender, Coast, Brigham, Hurd, Howe. See 
Ancestry Tatsles ^y^-- 

53. ATH. 625. Francis LoweH Gardiier [George 53. YII. 305], 
horn in BostoJi, died at Cotuit Port, ^lashpee, Mass., of diphtheria. 

I^Ir. Gardner was a member of the class of 1862, in Harvard College. 

53. VIH. 626. Eli.zabetli Gardner [George 53. YH. 305], born in 
Boston. 

53. YHl. G2G. Cliarles Walter .Iv/zoj'//^ her husband, born in Boston. 
A treasurer. Eesidence : Brookline, Alass. 

' Harvard College Class Book of 1861, p. 1.38. 



EIGHTH GF.NER.ITIOX. T^ 

Mr. Amory, II. C. 1^C?>, was fitted for college at the Boston Latin 
Scliool, and at the school of Messrs. Lane and Lovering-, in Camliridjre, 
^lass. He served in the Ik-bcllion, and Mas connjiissioned, A})ril 9, 1SG4, 
as second lientcnant in tlie .Second ^Massachusetts Cavalry. He was cap- 
tured by the enemy, July G, 18G4, and was paroled from Charleston, S. C, 
Oct. 1, 1864, having- been promoted to first lieutenant, Sept. 9, 1804. He 
rejoined his regiment at ^Vinchester, Va., Dec. 27, 1864, and served under 
Sheridan during the following- spring. He was promoted to captain June 
'\G, 1865. lie pas:^ed in revievv- before tlie President and General Grant in 
"Washington, and was mustered out Aug. 1, 1865. 

Mr. Amory Aisited Europe in 1865, and again in 1S7.3. On his return 
from his first visit, he was for a while with Messrs. Haughton, Perkins, & 
Co., dry-goods dealers, of Boston. He formed a copai-tnershi}) with Henry 
C. Wainwright, Jan. 1, 1868, under the style of Wainwright & Amory, as 
stock-brokers. In February, 1880, Mr. Amory was elected treasurer of the 
Amory 3Ianufacturing Companv, and, Oct. 4, 188"2, he vras elected treasurer 
of the Langdon Manufacturing Company.^ 

i\Ir. Amorv is a^son of AVilliam ajid Arma Powell Grant (Sears) Amorv, 
of Boston. Ilo.rrltt Sears Ainorij [53. ^"111. Glo] vras his sister ; M'ilJ'Kan 
Gardiner I'rcscolf [54. YIII. G4I'] and JL'ru PeahoJy Scars [51. IX. lOJCq 
were his first coubins ; and Gertrude Lawre/tce [1. X. 11] is his first cousin 
once removed. His ancestry includes the following families : Amory^ 
Holmes, Vv'harf, Coffin, Thember, Stevens, Severance, Gayer, Starbuck, 
Reynolds, Holmes, Wharf, Linzee, Inman, Sparsman, Sears, Willard, 
Howes, Freeman, Prince, ]\Ierrick, L)immick, Bursley, Stui-gis, Winthrop, 
Forth, Read, B;-owne, Smith, Dudley, Dighton, Tyng, Sears (?), Borland, 
Neil, Lindall, Yeren, Poole, Brenton, Mason, Pepper, Johnson, Scollay, 
Clark, Kilbv, Simpkins, Richardson, Powell, Dummer, Aiwaler, Blackman, 
Bromfield, Danforth, Wilson, Coney, AtNvaler, Blackman. See Anckstky 
Tables ^xt- 

53. VIII. 627. Clara G-ardner [George 53. AMI. 305], bom in 
Boston. 

1 Harvard College Class Book of 1SG3, pp. 13-11. 



718 THE riCKEEIXa GENEALOGY. 

53. ^'IIl. G27. Sltejihcrd Ih-ool.s, \\rr liusbaiiJ, horn ia Uahiiuoro, 
:\ia. Residences: IJoston j.ihI West .M.jilford, Mas.s. 

My. r.rools's, II. C is.")?, -wlie!! about a year old, removed ^vit]l liis 
parents to West Mediord. He lias never Leeu in active business, and is 
very much interested in rural lite. In 1858, he went to Europe, where ho 
spent two years travelling, and he again visited Europe at a later date.^ 

Mr. Brooks is a son of Ciorham and Ellen (Shepherd) Brooks, ncnry 
Shhieij Ecerett [bO. IX. lOni] is his cousin ; Fronds Ediranl Bacon [.35. VIII. 
G'jo'] is his lirst cousin once removed ; and IJlcanor Brooks [1. X. i?-3'] is his 
niece, llis ancestry includes the following families : Brooks, Atkinson, 
Boylston, Gardner, Smith, l>outwell, Kendall, Brown, Sherman, Woodlnrry, 
Dodge, Cotton, llawkridge, Piossiter, Saltonslall, Gurdon, Ward, Edmonds, 
Gorhaiu, HowLuul, Tilley, Otis, Gardner, Frier, Starbuck, Reynolds, 
Coffin, Thembei-, Stevens, Soley, Shute, A^iall, Coflin, Thember, Stevens, 
Severance, Ga}-er, Starbuck, Reynolds, Call, Kettcll, Wai'd, Wail:e, Stimp- 
son, Sweetser, Wigglesworth, Wyer, Johnson, Johnson, Maverick, Ilai-ris, 
Shepherd, Van ]\reter, Strode, Ilamihon, Gorham, Ilowland, Tilley, Otis, 
Jacob, Crocker, Bursley, IIovNdand, Tilluy, Lee, Sturgis, Taylor, Thacher, 
Winslow, Bourne^ Hedge, Latlirop. See AxcrsTRv Tablks ^^"^r. 

54. VIII. G-28. Alfred Lowell p-atoam [Samuel R. 54. VII. 307], 
born in Boston, died in Ferrara, Italy. 

The friends of Mr. Putnam formed foi- him the happiest expectations, 
justihed l)y his character, al:)ilities, and atrainnients. A monument has beeu 
raised to his memory at Ferrara, by his friend Edward James Plardcastle. 

54. VIII. G29. Georgina Lowell Putnam [Samuel R. 54. VII. 
307], born in Boston. Residence: Boston. 

The life of Miss Putnam has been one of active usefulness; but she 
has sometimes allowed herself the recreation of the pen. A story of hers, 
" The Two Legacies," was printed for a fail-, lield in behalf of a public 
object, and gave great pleasure to many readers, particularly to her uncle. 
James Russell Lowell, who wrote her a very complimentary letter, expres.s- 
ing his pleasure in reading it. 

■ Harvard Colleire Class Book of 1S57, p. It. 



EIGHTH GEXH RATION. 719 



64. Vlil. C30. William Lowell Putnam |\Saimiel K. ol. YTI. 
307], Ijoru in Boston, mortally wounded at Dall's I'dulF, Va. Kesidences : 
]5o3ton and Ivoxbnry, ^las.s. 

Lieutenant Putnam went to Europe, when ele\en years old, for his 
education, and remained, there more tliiin seven years, passed chiefly in 
France, Germany, and Italy, with occa:^ional jouniL'^'s into other countries. 

Announcing- his death to his friends in France, \h-. Guepin, of Nantes, 
thus writes of him : — 

"Lowell Piiliiaiu was tiiirteeu years olJ wheri we saw liiui for the first time. lit- 
was channing iti person, I'u!! of life, and of so remarkable a loyalty tluit lie did not 
think falsehood possible. . . . We made a tour thruugii JJi-ittany with William and 
his parents. During the whole excursion, ho inspired us with the liveliest interest. 
. . . One asked which would at last take the ascendancy in him, love of art, or the 
sjiirit of investigation, imagination or philosophy. ... Ho left France for Germany, 
very well prepared; already knowing several languages, and acquainted with tlie 
origin of the European peoples, and their migrations. His studies in Germany and 
Italy wei'e serious, llis letters to us from this latter country, u])on the Etruscans, 
ujion Rome and the Campagna, upon Naples, were much beyond his years." 

His knovrlodge of Etruscan art was perhaps not excelled by any 
Aiuerican scliolar. 

After his return to the United States in the autumn of ISoS, lio applied 
hiiuself to acquirino- a knowledge of his own land, witli the same zeal and 
method with which he had studied foreign countries. After two years 
spent in study and travel, he began reading hnv, ;ind, in ^Farch, ISGl, 
entered the Harvard Law School. 

On the breaking out of the civil war, lie volunteered his services, and 
was conuuissionod second lieutenaiU of the Tweutieth IJegiment of .Uassa- 
chusetls Volunteers, July 10, 1861. He fell in the battle of Ball's Tduff, 
Va., Oct. 21, 1S61. In the official report of tlie battle. Adjutant-General 
Scliouler records his death in these words : " Lieut. Putnam, 'the ye^'ung, 
the beautiful, and the bi'ave,' was killed."^ 

His portrait, by Powse, is in the possession of his family. 

' Heroes and :Martyrs, Xotable Men of the Time, by Frank :\roore [New York, 1802] ; 
also account of his funeral services, by the Eev. Dr. P.avtol, in the Boston Daily Adver- 
tisor, Oct. 31, ISGl ; also Appiotoa"s Cyclopx-dia of American Biography, Vol. Y. p. 14.'>. 



720 THE PICKERING GEXEALOGY. 

54. VIII. 033. Sarah Ellen Bancroft [llauiKih 54. VII. 308], boin 
in Salem, died in Salem. 

An obituary of Miss liancrot't, printod in the Saleni Gazette of June 9, 
1837, speaks of her as a most interesting child, intelligent, disinterested, 
and affectionate. 

54. VIII. G37. Roloert Hale Bancroft [Hannah 54. VII. 308], 
bom in Boston. A man of leisure. Kesidences : Boston and Beverly, 
Mass. 

Mr. Bancroft graduated at Harvard Coll'^ge in 18G5. 

54. VIII. G37. IJUse Jlilligaii, his wife, born in Baltimore, ?dd. 

Mrs. Bancrcji't is a daughter of George Bakhvin and Sophia Gough 
(Carroll) Milliu;an, of Baltimore. Hui' ancestrj- includes the following 
families: Milligan, Baldwin, Jones, Cartwell, Uvcr, Levy, i\lorvis, Pearse, 
Ward, Carroll, Sewall, Maccubins, Carroll, Dunn, Blake, Lloyd, Gough, 
Pue, Dorsey, Ely, Warfield, Hill, Buclianan, Dor.sey, Ely, Warfield, Hill. 
See AxcESTKY Table 5]";. 

54. VIII. 63S. Elizabeth Smith Peabody [Louisa 54. VII. 309], 
born in Salem, died in Boston. 

Mrs. Loring was noted for her skill as a musician. 

54. VIII. G-JS. Caleb JViUia»t Loring, her husband, born in Bos- 
ton. A lawyer. Pesidence : Bcverlv, ]\Iass. 

Mr. Loring, H. C. 1839, Harvard Law School, LL.B. 184:7, was admitted 
to the Suffolk Ikir, and afterwards to the bar of the Supreme Court at 
Washington, where he argued some important cases. In early life, he had 
a large practice, and tried a great manj- important cases, especially in the 
branch of insurance. During later venrs, ho has devoted his time as 
trustee and attorney to the care and management of estates, i^lr. Loring 
is one of the dii-ectors of the Fifty Associates, and of several large mills, 
and is the president of the Plymouth Cordage Com])any.' He published, 
in 1893, a book on "Nullification, Secession, and Webster." 

' Boston of To-day, pp. 29o-29G. 



EIGHTH GKXERATIOX. 721 

A ci'uyon of liim, Ijy (.'heiiey, is in tlio po.-sossioii of his (laughter 
Miss Kutliarine P. Loi'iiig-. 

Mr. Loving is a son of the Hon. Cl^arlcs G. Lnniuj [At. VIT. Ji^], Lv 
his first wife, Anna Pierce (lirac-). His anecstr_\- inchides lliu folluwin"- 
families: Poring, Nuwton, Whcath;} , PobihJl, J^railfurd, Allen, Baker, 
Greeley, P.sley, Walker, Stubhs, Hichborn, Pjieshall, Woody, Dexter, 
Fadre, I'itman, Brace, Collier, Woodruff, Pierce, Patteson. See Axcestky 
Tabj.es ^^. 

54. ^H^. 641. Josephine Aiigiista PeaLody [Louisa 54. All. 309] 
born in Saleni. 

h-\:.\Y\\. 641. WiUiam GanJlnn' Pre^roit, her husband, born in 
Boston, died in Pepperell, ^lass. Anion of leisnrt.'. Pesidoico: Pepperell. 

Mr. Prcscott, H. C. 1844, entered the Harvard Law School in 1S45, and 
received the degree of LL.B. in 1S4 7. He iir.-icliscd law for a short time, 
and then passed several years in Europe. On liis return, he engaged in 
business, from which he afterwards retired. 

He was a rnan of cultivated tastes, verv fond of books, and a constant 
reader. 

Mr. Prescott resided on the family estate at Pepp^^rell, whicl; Is an entailed 
one, having descended in the family f)-om the original settler. The ])resent 
bouse was built by ^Ir. Prescotfs great-grandfather, the hero of l^unker 
Plill, and it has come down to him through his grandfather, A\'illiam 
Prescott, the distinguished jurist, II. C, 1783, and his father, William 
Hickling P]-escott, H. C. 1814, the historian. 3P-. Prescott was named 
for his father's ft-iend, Aniliam Ho^vard Gardiner.^ 

He is a son of William Hickling and Susan (Amorv) Prose*. tt, of Ijoston. 
Ilarrkf Scars Amoni [53. VHT. GIJ] and Clwrks IVulLr A}uov>i [53. VHl. 
6'J6'] are his cousins ; and GerfnuJc Lutcreacc [1. X. i/] is his niece. His 
ancestry includes the following families: Pi'escurv, Platts. Loker, Draper, 
Oliver, Newgate, Wilson, Crafts, Hale, Hutchinson, IV.sworth, Palmer, 
Pearson, Tuttle, Burnham. Ward, Hiclding, Sale, 'l^nvnsend, Penn, Adding- 
ton, Leverett, Greene, Tattershall, Barton, Cbnild, Pobinson, Stanbridge, 

' Harvard College Class Look for 1S44- ; also a comuuuiicatiuu of Eoger Wolcott. 
iG 



722 TJIE I'lCKEUIXG ClEXEALnUY. 

Graves, Amoiy, Ifolnies, Wharf, Collin. Thomber, f^tevens, Severance, 
Gayei', Starbuek, l^eynolds, liuhnes, ^Vllar^, Linzee, Inman, S^iar.snian. 
Sec Ancestky Tables j^q-. 

54. VIII. G-12. Elizabeth Cabot Putnam [C!i;irles G. 5-1. VII. 
311], boi'nin lUisron. Kcsidiiaice : lioston. 

3Ii.ss Putnam lakes a deep interest in tlic charitable and industrial insti- 
tutions of ]\rassachusetts. From 18(j(J to 187H, islie was a nunuiq-er of the 
Indnstrial School for Girls, in Dorchester. In 1879, slie suggested the 
plan of securiuL'- lhe volunteer services of about fifty women to act as 
auxiliary visitor.- in caring t'nr girls placed out in familios, the visitors to be 
appointed bv, and to serve imder. the direction of the Massachusetts State 
Ijoard of Health, Lunacy, and (.'harity. 'idiis plan was adopted by tlie 
board, and a l;ir'_';e nundjer of the visitors ^\ ere secured by ]\Iiss Putnam in 
cities and tow.is in all parts of the State. Since 1880, she has been one tif 
the trustees of the State Primary and Pefoi-m Schools. 

5-1. VIII. i\\n. diaries Pickering Putnam [Charles G. 54. VII. 
31-1], born in ]')o-;ton. A ph.)-sician. Pesidence : lioston. 

Dr. Putnam spent three vears at the IViston Laliri School, and three 
years in Mr. I'.pes Sargent Dixwelhs private school, lie graduated from 
Harvard College in 18(^5, and from the Harvard ^ledical School in ISGO. 
Ho spent one year as house officer at the ]*lassachusetts Genei-al Hospital, 
and afterward two years of study in I^irope, mainly in A'iunna. in 1871, 
he entered upoi^ the practice of medicine in Boston, in winch he still con- 
tinues. He is attending physician at the ilassachusetts Infant Asylum. 
In 1892, he was appointed a mendDer of a comniitreo to visit the public 
instituti()ns of P.oston ; and, in 18!i3, he vras a])pointed a member of a board 
of visitors to visit the pul.ilic institutions of Ijoston. 

54. VIII. 6'.,'-'X Lucij Wnshhn)')), his wife, born in lioston. 

]\Irs. Putniim is a daiiLilitt-r of ^Vi]li:in"i Kounseville Pierce and Susan 
Ellen (Tucker) Washburn. Her father was a lawyer, of Ibston and 3Iiddle- 
borough, Mass. XalhaiiUI Pcaslce Sargeaui [50. V. 1S^'\ was her great- 
granduncle. Her ancestrv includes the following;- hnnilics : "Washburn, 



KIGJITIf G KXI-RATIOX. 



Mitclicll, ISi.u.leii, I'ic'ive, liootli, Ifo.kiiis, lliucb', Cnswrll, Cio.UVey, 
Tiii'iior, Kichmonil, riouiisi-villt', Ilowljiml, M;icuiul>fr, Evan.-., "\\'illiains, 
Dig-liton, Pion-ers, Tucker, "Warren, Thorn, Wial, Sari;-oaiit, Perkins, IJarnois, 
Stevens, Peaslee. BariiarJ, Kimball, Scott, Wyatt, ^^larsb, Cutler. See 
Ax. i:sTiiv Tai;i,v:s j"^!. 

5-1. VIII. G4G. James Jackson Putnam [Cliarles G. 51. VII. 311], 
bom in Bo>ton. xV plivsician. Residence : Jioston. 

Dr. Putnri'.n was prepared lor oolleye :it the Boston Latin School. He 
praduated fruiu Harvard Colleg-e in IsHii, and from the Harvard Medical 
School in ISTc. ,\l'ier .--pending- one > e;ir as bouse ollicer in tlie ]\iassa- 
cbusetts General Hospital, he went abi'oad and studied two year.s, mainly 
in Vienna and Berlin. On bis return to Boston, he e^tablislurd himselt', in 
1S72, as a phvsician. Soon after, he vras appointed physician to out- 
patients in the nervous department at the Massachu:;eu,> General Hospital, 
and not long after, be Avas appointed Instructor iit Nervous IHseases in 
the Harvard Medical School. In 18i'3, be was appointed Professor of 
Nervous Diseases in the .same school. 

54. VIII. f)^0. Jlffrhdi Cahoi, his wife, born in P)Oston. 
Mrs. Putnam's number in direct descent is [-18. IX. 053]. 

55. VIII. GIT. Augustus LoA\-ell [Elizabeth 0. 55. VII. 312], born 
in Boston. Pe-idences : ]!!oston and Brookliue, ilass. 

i\Ir. LtMvelh H. C. 1S50. is prominently identllied Avith many corjiora- 
tlons and institutions of I'.oston. He sticceeded bis father, John Antory 
Lowell, as trustee of the Lov.-ell Institute, which was foimdcd by his father's 
cousin and brother-indaw, John Lowell, Jr., of Boston. He is a tiatstee of 
the 3Iuseum of Fine Arts, is on the executive committee of the Institute of 
Technology, is a manager of the Eye and Ivtr Inttrmarv, a director in the 
Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Companv, a mcmlier of the finance 
connnittee of the Provident Iitstitution for Savings, and has Iieen treasurer 
of the Merrima.ck and Boott Mills. 

55. VIII. G-^7. Katharine Bigclota Laicreiice, his wife, born in 
Boston, died in Boston. 



724 THE PICKERIXG GEXEALOGY. 



]\rrs. Lowell was a (lnii-lit<T of tl,.' IToii. ALlioU aiid Ivatli;iriiie (lligelow) 
Lawi-once. licr tatlwr was an (•miueiU mercliaiit, of Pxiston, a I'oprcsfnta- 
tive to Congress, and Minister rieriipotentiary to Cereal Britain. Gcrtnuk: 
Lan-rence [1. X. 7i] and Jl'isiniiutnl LihcrLiicc [1. X. iJ] are her nieces, and 
John Lairroirc [l.X. 7.-^] is her nej)lie\v. Her ancestry- inchules tlie follow- 
ing-families: Lawrence, Moi'se, Phillips, 'Farbell, Longley, Abbot, Farniun, 
Lovf:joy, I'^isIl-'-, Jackson, Iviniball, Seott, Parker. Kemp, Big-clo\v, V^arren, 
Flngrr. Whitney, Hag-ar, Pobinson, A)idrew.s, Pankin, L-ving, Prescott, 
Platts, Loker, Draper, 01i\-ei-, Xew-ate, Wilson, Crafts, Baldwin, Pichard- 
son, Fiske, Wilson, Jen)uson, Macomber. See Axclsiky Tabi.ks -3-"!,-. 

55. YUL G!8. Elizabetli Eeoscca Lowell [Elizabeth C. 55. YIL 
312], born in Boston. 

55. VDl. GJ/S. I'rajtc's Pelcg >j]tru<iue. her husband, born in AVash- 
inyton, D. C. A physician. Residence : Boston. 

Dr. Spragme, Harvard Medical School, 1857, passed three years in 
Em'ope, from 1S5G to 1850, and has also been there several times since for 
short period.^. Dming the Pebellion, ho was foj- eighteen monihs, from 
September, 18(i2, to March, 1864, acting assistant-surgeon in the hospitals 
at Washington. For t-wenty-seven yeai's he has been a surgeon of the Mas- 
sachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear liilirniary. 

Y)\\ Si»'agu<^ is a son of the Hon. Peleg and Sarah (Deming) Sprague, 
of Boston. His hither Ava.s an eminent lawyer, L^nited Stales senator, and 
judge. Allijn Wcsion [7. Ylll. 73] was his first cousin. His ancestry 
includes the following families: Sprague, Earaes, Chillingworth, Thomas, 
Pitno}', Ford, Dingley, Chandler, Sprague, Bassett, Sampson, Kash, Standisb, 
Alden, Mullins, Chandler, I'^isbee, Deming. See Axce.-tky Tablks j"?,-. 

55. YIII. G49. Ellen Bancroft Lowell [Elizabeth C. 55. YIL 312]. 
For an account of Mrs. Lvman see y.\'sq GUo. 

55. Ylll. 6:;.9. Arihnr Theodore Liiman, her husband. 
His number in direct descent is [5L Ylll. 570]. For an account of 
i^Ir. Lyman see pages G02-G93. 



EIG ri TJl GFXER. 1 77 OX 



55. Mil. t;50. Sara Putnam Lowell [E!iz;ibetli C. 55. VII. 312], 
born ill Koxbury, ]\Iass. 

Mrs. lUako ij iLk'iitifiL-d with ^(-vcral cliai'ities and societies of Boston, 
among wliicli arc tlie L>o.-ton Sc\vinL;- Circle, (jl'\\liich she is treasnrei-, and 
tlio "Widows Society of IJosion, of which slie is a manager. 

She has been in Enrupe many times, from the time wlien she was a 
child. 

55. VTll. GoO. Gcorcjc liafi/ Bhilce, licr ]iii-1)and, born in Boston, 
died in Boston. A banker. Be>idence : Boston. 

^h: I'lake, II. C. ]s."^'J, liad a taste and talent for business, and becanu} 
a member of the banking house of IHake Brotliers & Co., of B(.islon, in 
-which lionse ho continued after his lather's death. lie Avas a fivqnent 
visitor to Europe, and was a man trank and npriglit in hi.-? cliaracter, and 
of a genial disposition.^ 

Mr. Blake's first wife, wliom he married Jan. 15, 18G7, was TTarriet 
Davis Johnson. She was born December, 1836, and died in. ?vliiton, Mass., 
June 2, 1872. By her he had two sons : — 

Geoimk liAxr BLAiu;, born Sept. 28, 1870. 

Fkaxcis Staxtox Blake, bora ^ifay 26,. 1872. 

Mr. Blake was a son of Geoi-ge Baty and Anne Hull (Blake) Blake. 
Sarah Hunt JliUs [43. \']II. 447] ^vas his first cousin once removed. His 
ancestry includes the following families : Blake, Pope, Arnold, Welland, 
Smith, Hinckley, Chipman, Howland, Tdley, Skifl'e, Jones, Blake, Poi)e, 
Arnold, Welland, Baty, Stanton, Chandler, Douglas, .Alatlle, Piaymond, 
Smith, Bourne, Gardiner, Wilemson, King, Ludlam, Church, "\^'arren, South- 
worth, Collier, Paine, Rainsford, Sunderland. See Axcestky Tahlks ^'"l. 

55. Ylll. C53. Benjamin Vv^'illiam Crowninslnelcl [Sarah G. 55, 
VII. 313], born in Bostou, died in Eome, Italy. Piesidences : Boston and 
Marblehead, 3Iass. 

Colonel Crownin.Jiield, IT. C. 1S5S, went to Europe directly after leaving 
college, and remained there for two years. At later periods of his life he 

1 The Boston Daily Advertiser of June 10 and 21, 183 1. 



THE PICK En ING GE XE. I LOG V. 



inarlc several other ^•i.sits to luirupe. In llio lioljfllion lie -a as commissioned 
as second lieutenant in the First :\[assachnsctts Cavalry, Nov. G, 18G1 ; as 
first lieutenant. Dec. 10, ISIJI ; as caiitnin, 3Iarch 20, ISHi ; and as major, 
Aug'. 10, 1NG4. lie served as aide-de-camp on the stai'f of General Philip 
11. Sheridan tVoni July to Xovemliei-, ISlJl, and as })rovost marshal-general 
of the middle military division, lie was nnistercd cmt Nov. G, 1 .'^G4, having- 
been in about fifty engagements, never liaving been wounded, lie was 
brevetted colonel of United States Volunteers, June 17, iSGo. 

After the war he went into Imsiness. and, from ISGG to 1872, he was 
junior partner \\ ith Sprague, C'(^ll>nrn, <,t Co., of Xew York City ; and, 
from 1872 to 187i;>, he was of the iirm of Y\'heel\vright, Anderson, tt Co., of 
Boston. For several )'ears before his death, he had not been actively 
engaged in business, except as organizer and president of the Realtv Com- 
pany of Boston. He was a trustee and chairjnan of the standing committee 
of the Humane Society of Massachusetts, — a society vi ith whicli his family 
has been identified since its foundation, in 1785, to tlie present time. 

Colonel Crowninshield was a man of cultivated tastes. He was fond of 
yachting, and was connnodore of the Corinthian Yaclit Club, of Marble- 
head. He was an amateur musician, having iidierited the niusicid talent of 
liis mother. Ho studied the cello under AVnlf Fries, of Boston, and also in 
Europe, and was connected widi the Boston Orchestral Club. He had an 
excellent knowledge of liis own family history, and rendered considerable 
assistance in tlie work of compiling a iauiily genealogy. He read a paper 
on the famous yacht, Cleopatra's Barge, owned by liis granduncle. Captain 
George Crowninshield, of Salem, befoi'e the Bostonian Society and before 
the Essex Institute. This papei- was afterwards printed in pamphlet form- 
He wrote "A History of the First liogiment of Ylassacluisetts Cavalry 
Volunteers" [b>l:U]. and ho contrilmted fin article on Boating, and an 
article on Tiie Xavy Club to The Harvard Book. 

Colonel Crownin.shield was a man of distinguished presence, and was 
greatly beloved liy a wide circle of friends for his many (Estimable Cjualities 
of mind and heart. He was particularly attractive and cordial in his 
manner, and was iirominent in the social life nf Ijoston.' 



' Boston Evouiiig Trausciipl of .Jan. IS, 1S02. 



EIO mil GEXERA TIOX. 



55. ^"Jll. C-JS. K((thnrine jr((>j JiraiNcc, tlw Avil'c of Iknijuuin W. 
C'rowninslueld, Ijurii in Ijostuii. lu.sideuce : Boston. 

Mrs. Crowniii<liic-l(l is a (l;uu;litcr of James Ijowdoin and 'Maw Pfrrin 
(May) Bradloi-. llrv fatlier was a ^vr;dtlly nicivlianr of P..,ston. .Insiah 
BnuUce [55. \\U. 6'J.^] is her con^iH. Her ancestry in.dndes tlie f.illuwini^ 
families: ]^>radlee, Evans, Andrews, Goard, Jlowes, Lord, Putnam, ]')-ini'e, 
Putnam, Porter, Ilatliorne, Urann, Staeey, Hall, Cu'eon, Sill, Belidier, 
J)anfortli, Walko)-, Pead, fVnvlc, Carter, J,mes, Polter, 1':dnuinds, Chandler, 
Svmonds, IlaAward, 'rread\\'ell. ilart\\ell, Wheeler, iiav, Brewei', Bridi;-e, 
nol)inson, (iore, Gardner, Crook, Perriii, AVai];er, Ido, Srarborou;:;h, Smith, 
'^\''iliiams, Stalham, Park, 31av, P)re\^er, ScarborouLdi, Smith, AViiliajiis, 
Stalham, Park, May, Brewer, Ilolbrook, "Warnei', Kin^^sbury, Ayer, 
Squire. See Anckstky T.vulks I'JV- 

55. VIII. G54. Alice Crowninsliielcl [Sarah G. 55. VIT. ni?.], born 
in Boston. 

55. VIII. Go4. Josiah Bradlee, lier husband, born in Boston. A 
man of leisui-e. Residence: Boston. 

Mr. Bradlee, II. C. 185S, went to Europe on g-raduatinp-, whei-e he 
remained several years making a serious stud}' of nnisic. lie is a man of 
cultivated tastes. 

lie is a son of Frederic Hall and Lucretia (Yf ain\vrlL;-ht) ]>radlee. 
Ki;fh('.y'uie JIo^i Lnidhc [55. VIIl. Od-j] is his cousin. His ancestry includes 
the followinn' iamilies : Bi'adlee, Evans, Andrews, C>'oai-d, Howes, Lord, 
Putnam, Princi.", I'utuam, Porter, Ilathoj'no, Ih'ann, Stace}-, Hall, (ireen, 
Sill, Belcher, Danforth, AValker, Read, Fowle, Carter, Jones, Potter, 
Edmunds, Chandler, Symonds, Hayward, Tread^vell, Hartwell, 'Wdieeler, 
Vv^ainwright. See Axcrsxin- 'J ables j"l-. 

55. VII I. G55. Lonisa Crowniiisliield [Sarah G. 55. VJI. olo], bom 
in Boston. 

Mns. Bacon inherited her mother's strong musical taste. She has been 
an active member of the Society of Decorative Arts from its beoinning, and 
has been a pupil of the School of Drawing and Painting at the ^Museum of 



Till' I'lCKr.iuxG gi:nj:alogy. 



Fine Arts. Sho is ti nicmbor of the ISosion Art.-? Students Associaticm, 
tile l?o^toni;lu Societv, and t!ie MavHo\ver Club tor ladies. 

55. \'I1I. 6'J-X Francis IJdward Jiaroii, her husband, born in ]5os- 
ton. A nierehant. EerfidencL-s : iJoston and 31attapoisrtt, Mas.s. 

j\Ir. ]5acon entered business at the age of twenty-one, with In'.s Ijrothers, 
under the name of D. G. ct AV. V>. Bacon, in the East India trade. Several 
years afterwards he rL'tirod fnun this llrni, and went into the counnission 
and brokerag-e business. In 1^75, he ^vent to Europe to try to introduce 
American cotton manufactures in competition with those of Enndand. 
Being only jKirtialK" sueccsshd, he turned his aiiention to buying 
goods for toreign markets, and print-cloths for the print works of this 
country, under the iirm name of Francis E. Bacon & Co., in Boston. He 
has since retired from business. 

In 1855 and 185G, [Mr. Bacon made a voyage around the v^'orld, and, in 
18G0 and 18G1; he travehed in Europe for eight months, and has since 
visited Euro})e, the West Indies, and California. 

He is a son v( Daniel Carpenter and Desire Taylor (Gorhara) Bacon. 
His father was a merchaid. Shepherd Bronhs [53. Ylil. G27'] is Ins iirst 
cousin once removed. His ancestry iiicludes the lo]lov^•ing fannlies : 
Bacon, Mayo, Hinckley, Eiehards, Loring, Taylor, ?darston, Chichester, 
Stacy, Worcester, Goodspeed, Dayton, Crowcll, Jenkiiis, Gorham, Howland, 
Tilley, Otis, Jacob, Crocker, Bursley. Howland, Tilley, Dee, Sturgis, 
Taylor, Thaolicr, Winslo^v, Bourne, Hedge, Dathrop. See A.\ci:stbv 
Tables ^. 

55. YIH. G5S. Mary Upham Putnam [John P. 55. VII. 3Di], 
born in Boston. 

55. VIII. GoS. C/iai-Ics Frederirl: Fearing, her luisband, born in 
Nevr York. A stock-breaker, of Xew York. 

Mr. Fearing entered Harvard College in 18G3, but did not finish the 
full course.^ 

He is a son of Charles X. and Mary (Swan) Fearing. Axcfstry 
Tables ^. 

' Harvard College Class Book of 1SG3, p. 205. 



EIGHTH CHXL'L'A TIOX. 



05. VlTl. 65!t. Harriet Putnam [Jolm P. 55. \'1I. 314], bom in 
Boston. 

55. VIII. Go9. JToracc Joint Jlainlcn, her luisband, born in Boston. 
Besi JL'nce : New York City. 

Mr. TLiyden, II. C. ISGO, after graduating-, studied law in tlio office of 
Horace Gray, Jr., and '\^'ilder iJwight, of Bii.ston. 

He \va.s in active service during- the Bebellion, having been appointed 
second lieufenant of the Third United Stales Artillery, Aug. 5, 18G1. On 
l-'eb. 5, 18G2, he was a[)})ointt-d lirst lioutuiiaut, the eonnuission dating back 
to Aug. 5, l.SGl. He was in ?^lajor-General Sykcs's dix-isiun during the 
whole IVninsula campaign, and v^'as wounded at Gaines ^Jill. He was 
also in the battles of Antietam and Fredc-rieksburg, and took part in 
Sherman's campaign against Jackson, Mis.--. In the fall of ISGo, he served 
in Biirnside's campaign in Kentucky and Teiniessee, and was present at the 
siege of Knoxville. He was brevetted captain and major of the United 
States Artillery, Oct. 2, 1865. He resigned from the regular army Oct. 
31, 1868.1 

In 1868, he entered the service of the Chicago, Bui-liiiL'ton, and Quincy 
Bailroad Company, and from December of that year until December, 1872, 
lie v.-as general freight and passenger agent of the 3iissouri liivei-, Fort 
Scott, & Gulf Bailroad, at Kansas City, Mo. In 1873, he became general 
freight agent of tlie Boston ct Albany Bailroad at Boston, and, in 1880, 
general traffic manager of tlie New York Central et Hudsiiu Biver Bailroad 
at Xew York; and, since 18'^5, he has been the second vice-president of 
that road. 

Major Hayden was a son of John Cole and Susan Ann Buckminstcr 
(Williams) Hayden. His ancestry includes the fnllowiniv fa-uiilies: Hayden, 
Cole, Williams, Ward, Bred:, Wainwright, Buckminsier, Clark, Sharp, 
Vose, Lawson, Simpson, Atwood. See Ancestry T.viir.rs -Jl'jj. 

55. VIII. 660. John Pickerin^^ Putnam [John B. 55. VII. 314], 
born in Boston. An architect. Residence : Boston. 

' Har.-ard University in the "War of ISCl-L^Gr.. l,y Francis H. BroTrn, pp. 140-141. 



730 THE PICKEIIIXG GEXEALOGY. 

Mr. Piitnani, II. C 18G8, entered L'Ecole des Beaux Arts, Pari.s, in 
IsGO, and after a year's preparation at the Royal Academy of Areliitecture, 
in lu'vlin, in 1870, began the practice of architecture in jioston in 1871. 

In 1883, lie be-an a special course of study and investigation into the 
subject of house drainage, and founded tlie Sanitas 3Ianufacturing Company. 

He was for some years a member of the American ]\retrological Society, 
tlie American S[)elHng Pieform Association, the Boston Society of Archi- 
tects, and various other social and scientiiic societies. 

He ha? pul>lished ''"Idie Metric System of "\Veii;hts and Measures" 
[18S:.']; "Le.Muroson tlio Principles of House Drainage" [1885]; "Tlie 
(Jl)en Fire-Phico in All Ages" [1886]; "Improved Plumbing AppUances " 
[18S7]. He has also contriliutod many articles on sanitaiy matters to the 
building journals, and has lectured on house drainage before various 
societies.^ 

55. VIII. G60. Grace Cornelia Stevens, tlie wife of John P. 
Putnam, born in Lexington, Mass. 

i^lrs. Putnam is a daughter of I'^dward Otis and Elizabeth (Lowe) 
Stevens. Her father is an accountant, of New York City. A^•cEsTKY 

r,x VIII 

55. YIII. GCl. Sarah Gooll Putnam [.John P. 55. VII. 314], born 
in Boston. Residence : Boston. 

IMiss Putnam studied as an artist in Munich in tlie Avinter of 1888. She 
has painted many portraits of pi-oininent Boston ])eople, and a loan exhibi- 
tion of her work was held at Chase's art gallery in Jaiuniry, 1895. Her 
portraits are noted for their fidelity in portraying the impression of 
character and of mind.^ 

5G. VIII. 6G-2. Andrew Bartlett Taylor [Eliza 56. VII. 318], born 
in Canterbury, X. H. A farmer. Residence : Pittsfield, N. II. 

50. VIII. 663. Hada.^sah E. IIarrunan,\i\fi.w-ii^e, born in Plaistow, 
N. H. 

' One of a Thousand, by John C. Rand, p. 495. 
■ Boston Evening Transciiiit of Jan. 0, 1S95. 



EIGHT If GENEUATIOX. 731 

3ri>-. Taylur is ■^ UMUyhti;!- of VMvv Jolni ;ni(l ]\;iclirl (CHlc) Ilarriman. 
Her ancestry includes the fulluwing families: lian-iiuan, Gile, Davis, 
]ira(lley, Heath, Davis. Sec An-kstuv Tables ^^. 

oC. VIII. (Jti.-^. Caroline Anna Parkman [Sarali hO. MI. 322], 
boni in Palmyra. Elaine. 

5G. VIII. COS. Daniel I\ Cook, her husband, born in Brighton, 
Maine. Ke-sidence : Newport, Maine. 
AxrK-iTiiY Tabled ^^'li- 

5G. VIII. G70. Sarah Elizatetli Parkman [Sarali r»fi. VIT. 322], 
born in I'almyra, Maine, died in Palmyra. 

56. VIII. 67ft Erasmus LitUcfieJd, her httsband. 



66. Vlll. 672. George Wingate Parkman [Sarali 56. YIl. 322], 
born in Palmyra, Maine. xV farmer. Pesidence : Stratliam, X. 11. 

Mr. Parkman lias represented Stratliam in the Kev/ Hampshire 
Legislature. 

56. VIII. 072. Melissa Jj\ Ii.ohi}ison, his v.-ife, born in Stratliam, 
N. H. 

AxcESTKY Tables 35" . 

56. VIII. 677. Laura Jnnetta Bartlett Parkman [Sarah 56. 
VIL 322], born in Palmyra, ]\Iaine. 

56. VIII. 677^ Frederic]: Euf/ene Flanders, her lirst husband, 
born in Palmyra, 3Iaine, died in Chicago, 111. 

'Mv. Flanders Avas a son of Frederick and Sarah Flanders. Axcestey 

taules ^yv- 

56. VIII. 677- . Joel JfiUer EarJcnian, her second husljand, born 
in Corinna, 31aine. A farmer. Ivesidence: Palmyra, Maine. 

Mr. Parkman is a son of Nathan Taylor and Sabrina Sophia Parkman. 
Anckstky Tables jj'gi. 



732 TITE nCKEJUXG GEXEALOGY. 



[,7. Vl]l. CV:^. Jolm Wingate Clark [r.lizr.bctli 57. VII. 324], 
)ioru ill Stnitliau!, N. II. A ]u\v}-or. ResiLlence : Exeter, N. II. 

]\rr. Clark Uits educated ;it J'hilllps Exeter Academy, and at the Normal 
Inriliuite, Reed's Ferry, N. II. lie taught school several years, reading 
];iAv ;it the same ^iine in the oflice of his uncles, ^Messrs. Daniel & D. J. 
Ca^tr];, at MaiicLester, N. II., and with Messrs. Stickney & Tuck, in Exeter. 
Tie vv-as admit fed to the Ixu- Nov. 10, 1855, and soon after entered 
upon the praciice of his profession at Exeter. In 1SG2, he was ap- 
poi'fled eloii: to tlie United Strifes Senate Committee on Claims. This 
ofncc lie resi-nod in DecemlKr, ISGG, and removed with his family to 
Jlauchestor, where he entered upon the practice of la^^'. 

In 18G7; he returned to Yv'asliing-tou, having received the appointment 
of clerk to the Committee of Accounts in the House of Representatives, 
lie afterwards became a clerk in the United States Treasury Department, 
and remained in office until LS8G. In Washington, he held several posi- 
tions of local iiijpOitance, such as trustee of the public schools, etc. 

57. VIII. G7S. Martha FJJea Sarah I'hilbrich; his wife, born in 
Bradtx>rd, Vt., died in Washington, D. C. 

I\lrs. Clark v.'as educated in the public schools of Manchester, N. H., and 
at ilie Normal Institute at Reed's Ferry, N. H. From ISGS until her dealli 
she v/as the AYaslungton correspondent of the Manchester Union. She also 
wrote for other papers. 

Mrs. Clark was a daughter of William C. and Mehitable (Stevens) Phil- 
brick. Axcr.sTEY Tables ^j\. 

57. VIII. GSO. Mary Elizabeth Clark [Elizabeth 57. VII. 824], 
bo)-u in Stratliam, N. II., died in Exeter, N. H., of consumption. 

liliss Clark was educated in the schools of Siratham and Exeter, and at 
the Abl^ott Female Seminary, of Andover, Mass. 

57. VIII. GSl. Sarali Caroline Clark [Elizabeth 57. VII. 324], 
born in Stralham, N. II. Residence : Exeter, N. 11. 

Miss Clark \vas educated in the schools of Stratliam and Exeter. On 
Jan. 9, 1883, she v.'as elected secretary and treasurer of the Union Five 
Cents Saving Rank, of Exeter, N. IT., which position she still holds. 



KIGUTIT CEXEn.lTrOX. 733 

57. Vlll. (;x3. Benjamin Franklin Clark [lllizr.lirtli .07. Yll. 
324-], bom in Strath.ini, X. II., JI^mI in Tranrivcr, X. II., of niening-itis. 

'My. Clark was piv^.ared for collucj-e at I'iiillijis Exeter Academy. Pie 
entered I'owdoin College, but left at the end fif \\\a fir.st vear l)v the advice 
of Lis physician. He entered the sophomore class of 1873 at Dartmouth 
Colleg'C, but died two months before graduation. 

57. Vlll. GSG. Anna Olive Gilbert [Anna H. 57. VII. 32G], born 
in Stratham, N. IT. 

67. YIII. GSG. Cl(n'c}ice Jaf/itstxs JVoiiso)!, her husband, born in 
Gloucester, Mass. A house and ship jiainter. Residence: Gloucester, 
Mass. 

Mr. Wonson is n son of Addison Plummer and Judith Atkins (^loore) 
Wonson, of Gloucester. His ancestry includes the follov.ing families: 
Wonson, Tarr, liowe, Moore. See AxcrsTKv Tables g^'i". 

57. YIII. G93. Dana Wing-ate Baker [Caroline W. 57. All. 327], 
born in Portsmouth, X. II. A shoe-dealer and stationer. Residence : 
Exeter, X. H. 

57. VIII. 6'i?J. I'anuie Ellr.aheih Frcuch, lu's -wife, born in 
Danville, X. II. 

Mrs. Baker is a daughter of James Morrill and Hannah J. (Collins) 
French, of Danville. Her father is a farmer. Axn stky Tai;i.i;> v "i. 

57. VIII. (i'J 4. Elizabeth Homer Baker [Caroline ^\. 57. VII. 
327], born in Portsmouth, X. H. 

Miss Baker is a teacher in the Pobinson Seminary, Exeter, X. II. 

57. VIII. G06. G-eorge Frederick Wingate [George 57. VII. 
328], born in Stratham, X. IT., died in Stratham. 

j\Ir. Wingate graduated hi the scientific department of Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1878, high in rank, but poor in health. In September, 1880, ho 
began teaching in the public schools of 'Washington, D. C On Xov. 8, 
1880, ho Avas appointed third assistant executive in the United States 
Patent Office. In October, 18S1, lie was appointed second assistant in 



734 THE PICKERING GENEALOGY. 



the same oilier-. In April, l.^"S-2. lie lesi^-iied, frum ill licaltli. He was 
a man of rare intellectual powers, steady, honest of purpose, and kindlv 
of lieart.^ 

57. VIIl. 703. James Dana Paine Wingatc [Samuel D. 57. \\\. 
330], born in l-^xeter, X. II. Publisher of tlie Ivxeter, N. II., Gazette-. 
Kcsidence : Exeter. 

f)7. VIIL 70j. Helen Wooahuvii Lncl-e, his wife, born in Ports- 
niontli, N. 11. 

Mrs. WiiV'.alo is a dnui^diter of "Woodbury and Jane (Smith) Loclce. 

A.\r:i:sTEY TABirs 3-'"i. 

57. A'lll. 70G. Charles Edgar Levvas 'V^^incate [Samuel D. 57. 
VII. 330], born in Exeter, N. II. A journalist. Pesidonce : Winchester, 
Mass. 

Mr. Wingate, II. C. 18S3, graduated at Pliillips Exeter Academy in 
1879. On leaving college, he at once entered the oHice of the Boston 
Journal, wlici-e he has served at various times as secretar}' to the editor, 
and as assistant to the general managci'. lie has also Ijeen the ransieal and 
dramatic critic uf the Journal, and sinco Oct. 5, 1892, he has been the 
raaiioging editor of that paper. 

lie has written the ]-)sychological iiovel entitled " An Impossible 
Possibility; Can Such Things Be:"" originally printed in Belford's 
Magazine, and rcjniblished in book-form; " 'i'he Play-goer's Year 
Booh;" "Shakespeare's Heroines on the Stage;" " Sliakespeare's Heroes 
on the Stage;" and has edited with F. E. McKay, "Famous American 
Actors of To-Day." He has also written articles for the Cosmopolit;in 
Magazine, Lipi)incott's Magazine, and (Jur Young Folks. Mr. Wingale 
is tlie Bost=/n correspondent of Tlie Critic, a Ne^v York literary paper. 
In Harvard, ho was one of the editors of the Dail)' Echo, the first daily 
ever published at that college, and also of its successor, the Daily Herald, 
now called tlie Daily Crimson. j\Ir. Wingate, in 188G, compiled and 

^ Sixth Annual Eepuit of Class of 1S7S, Academical and Scientific Department, Dart- 
i.iouth College, p^p. 25-2G. 



EIGHTH GEXF.llA TIOX. 



issued tlio "Ili.siory of tho Wiuyate Family in l^ngluud and America, 
with Geiicalog-ical Table.?." He has assisted iu furnishing data of his 
branch of the Pickering family fir this work. 

57. YIII. 700. JIdhel JS'uk')'so)i, his wife, born in Boston. 

Mrs. Wingate is a daughter of John Freeman and Susan Sophia 
(Ivobinson) Xickerson. of Buston. Tier father is a broker. Her ancestry 
inchidcs tlie following families: Nickerson, Eoblnson, Gould, l-'oster, 
Ea.-5te, AVales. See An-ces-jky TAja.Es I™.,. 

h'i. VITI. TOT. Ellen Hammond Pickering [Edward 58. VII. 
333], born in P)u.-..ton, died in Vralerio\Nn, ]\[i!ss. 

An obituary notice of 3Iiss Pickering, which appeared in the Christian 
Register of July 21, 1861, speaks of the remarkable purity, sweetness, and 
refinement of her character. 

5S. YIII. Tos. Edward Cliaiies Pickering [Edward 58. YII. 
333], born in Boston. An astronomer. Piesidcnce : Caudjridge, 31ass. 

Professor Pickering graduated in the civil engineering course of the 
Lawrence Scientific School in J8G5, and from 18G5 to 18C7 he taught 
mathematics in the same sciiool. From 1SG8 to 187T, lie was professor 
of jdiysics in the Massachusetts Institute of TecIinolog\-. In 18T6, ho 
Avas appointed Director and Philli]is Professor of Astronomy in the 
Astronomical Observatory of Harvard College; and, in 1S87, lie Avas 
apjpointed Director and Paine Professor in the Observator)', a position 
which he still holds. Professor Pickering devised plans foi' the physical 
laboratory in the Institute of Teclnmlogv, and introduced the experi- 
mental methods of teaching ph\sics, at a time when this mode of instruc- 
tion had not been adopted elsewhere. His scientiiic AMok while there 
consisted largely of researclics in physics, chiefly in the jiolarization of 
light and the laws of its reflection and dispersion. He also described a 
new form of sp>,-ctrum telescope, and, in IS TO, invented a sound- 
receiver which he exhibited at one of a course of eighteen lectures on 
Sound, which he delivered in the Lowell Free Course at the Institute 
of Technology, during the winter of 1860-1870. He ol>served the total 
eclipse of the sun Aug. T, ISGO, at Mount Pleasant, loAva, with a scien- 



73G THE riCKERIXa GEXEALOGY. 

tific party sent for tliat purpose, and was a meuibcr of tlie United States 
Coast Survey Expedition \o Spain to observe the ei-lipse of the sun in 
LSTO. lie went to Europe in 18S3 to attend the meeting of the Astrono- 
mische Gesellschaft in Vienna, and to visit observatories. While under his 
management, tlie Abtroi^miical Observatur}' at Cambridge has become one 
of tlie foremost in the world. Its endowment and income has quadrujded, 
and Professor Pickering now has forty assistants under his direction. His 
principal work since his connection -with the Observatory has been the 
determination of the bnghtness of the stars, and the .successful application 
of pliotography to astronomical research. He has prepared catalogues 
giving the brightness of about thirty-eight thousand stars. He has also 
made photometric measurements of Jupiter's satellites, and of the sat- 
ellites of Mars. Professor Pickering has also interested himself in deter- 
mining the height of mountains, the i-esult of which have in part been 
contributed to the Appalachian Club, of which he was president in 1877 
and in 1882. He has received five gold medals, viz. : one from the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Mechanic Association for great progress in stellar pho- 
tometry; one, in 1886, from the Roval Astronomical Society of London for 
a catalogue on " Lights of Stars," which was the work of three years ; one, 
in 1887, from the Photographic Congre.ss of Vienna; in 1887, the Draper 
Medal from the National Academy of Science, for his work on astronomi- 
cal physics; and, in 1891, the Piumford 3Iedal from the American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences. Professor Pick:rii;g's .scientitl': writings are numer- 
ous and valuable, "Elements of Physical Manipulation" [1ST3-187G], 
being among them. 

He received the honorar}- degree of A.^I. from Harvard College in 
1880, and that of LL.D. from the University of California in ISSC, and 
from the University of Michigan in 1887. He is a fellow of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences ; a mendjer of the X;itional Academy of 
Science ; of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of 
which he was elected vice-president in 187G; and an honoraiy member 
of the Pioyal Astronomical Society of London, and of other foreign and 
American scientific societies.^ 

' Appletoirs Cyclo]xijJi:t of American Biography, Vol. V. p. 4; also One of a Thou- 
sand, by John C. Iland, p. 47S. 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 737 



58. VIIT. 70S. Elt.ahcth Wadsn-orfh Sporlr, rhe uile of Edward 
C. Pickering-, born in Caniln-id^-o, ]\Iass. 

.Mr?. Pickering- is a diuigliter of .Tared and ^Marv r'lownin.-lueld (Sllsbee) 
Sparks, of Canibridg-e, ^lass. Her father ^^ as a niiiii-trr, chaplain of the 
Senate, biograjibL-r, and lii.-mrian, and president of Harvard College from 
1849 to 185-2. Kathnnid Stlshcc [59. VII. 3dU'\ was hrr nncle; CaroUne 
SUshce [50. VIII. oo7'], Join Henry Slhhee [59. \U. J^J], Fmi'ds B. 
Croioiinshichl [55. VII. SIS'] v/ere her hrst oonsins once removed ; and 
J^:ni':st F. FcHoUom [13. X. 19J] and John C. Wanxjt [51. IX. 10.;0'] are 
her second cousins. Her ancestry inclndes the follo\N ing families : Sparks, 
Silsbce, Tompkins, i'owlc, Paine, Ingersoll, Felton, Coomes, Becket, 
Sibley, Mason, Beadle, llicks, Gillingham, Bly, Crowninshield, Allen, 
Clifford, Williams, Skerry, ^fanning, Calley, Derby, llilman, flasket, 
Lang'don, Hodges, Phippun, Wood, Williams, Skerr\-, Manning-, Calley. 
Bee AycKSTEY Tables -J^'-j. 

08. Vin. 709. William Henry Pickering []■:d^var.^ 58. VII. ,333], 
boru in Boston. A physicist and astronomer. Piosidence : Can:bridg'-e, 
JIass. 

Professor Pickering- ga-aduated at the Massachuselr-- Institute of Tecli- 
nology in 1879. From ISSO to 1887, he was instructor of physics in that 
institution, and In ".March, 1S87, he was made assistant in astronomy at the 
Harvard College Observatory, and, in 1890, assistant professor. While 
at the Institute of Technolog-y, he devoted much time to the study of 
])hotograpliy and other departments of physics. He also gave a great 
deal of attention to the study of mountains, publishing the most complete 
map of the M'ount Washington Range ever issued. Since his connection 
with the Observator}', he has made great advances in this science. His 
work has been pa-Incipally in connection v/ith the Pioyden Fund for the 
establishment of observatories at high altitudes. He h.as devoted himself 
more particularly to studies of the planets, and to the application of 
photography to astronomy, and takes a verv high stand in that branch of 
science. In 1878, he observed the total solar eclipse in Coloi-ado ; in 188G, 
ho conducted an expedition to the West Indies to observe the total eclijise 

47 



THE PirKERiyG CrXEALOGY. 



(>f tiie sun, olitaiiiiiiy intere.^lhi;:;' results; :uh1, in L'^S'.i, lif went to Calit'urnia 
for tlio same purjtose. In 1S',)0, lie went to Peru to tuund the astronomical 
station of the Observatory near Arequijia. In 1894, he superintended the 
erection of the Lowell Observatory in Arizona, and conducted an extended 
series of observations there, lie has made many mountain ascents, the 
most important being- El Mlsii, lli,-l:(.)U leet, in Peru, and established what 
■\\;is al that time the hi^rliest mcteorolog'ical station in the woidd on 
Chiirchani, UnHuO feot, in Pei'u. He has also ascended the South Dome 
of the Yosemiie Valley, California. 

In addition to articles on astronomy and on photography in technical 
periodicals, and in the transaction of the American Acailomy of Arts and 
(Sciences, he has published a "Walking Guide to the White Mountains," 

58. VIII. 709. Anne At wood Butts, his wife. 

Mrs. Pickering is a daugliler of Isaac and Eliza (Thurston) Butts, of 
lioston. Her ancestry incliides the following families: Butts, Bradford, 
^lay, Richards, L'ogers, Pabodie, Morse, At\vood, Xicliols, Thurston, Mott, 
Tripp, Sisson, Borden, Piobinson, Allen, Gardiner, Remington, Brown, 
]'>ruce, Smitli, Thurston, Mott, Pearco, Hart, Cottrell, Babcock. See 
AxrKsxKY Tables ^^'V. 

58. VIII. 710. Caroline Donaldson [Mary E. P. 58. VII. 3oG], born 
in Baltimore, Md., died in Boston. 

58. VIII. 710. Foxhatl AJc.icandcr J'arl-er, Iier husband, born in 
Xc\v York Cit}-, died in Anna]-)olis, ]Md. 

Commodore Parker was appointed in the Xavy from Virginia. March 
n, 1839. lie was attached to the sloop Levant, of the West India 
Srpiadron, in 1^40, and served in Florida against the Indians. He Avas 
promoted to passed niid-.lii])man, June 29, 1843; served on the steamer 
^Michigan on iho Lakes in 1841 and 1845; on the coast survey in 1848; and 
in the 3Iediterranean Scpiadrun in 1849 and 1850. He was commissioned 

' Appl.jtoii's Cyclop.i?dia of American Biograpliy, Vol. V. p. 4; also the Boston Daily 
Globe of Septcmbfi, 1S02. 



ETGIITir GEXERATinx. 73; I 



as licuteiiaut, Sept. 2^', l.^fiO ; ;iii 


1 SL'IA 


of tlie East India Squadron, in 


S51 : 


1854 and 185.3. lie was unenij 


)!.>yed 



1 on tlii.' steam iVi;;ato Sus(|aelianna; 
d 1853; and in the i;o;ist survey in 
in 185G and 1850. Ife served with 
the Pacitic Squadron from 1859 to 18G1. lie was at the navy-yard in 
Washinii'ton as executive otlicer in I8til and I8n2, dr)In.i;- duty witli tln^ 
navy on the Potomac, and with the army at Ah.xanih'Ia. AVliilu attaclied 
to the navy-yard at Washiington, lie Avas ordered, two days after the battle 
of Bull Run, to Fort Ellsworth, with two hundred and lil'ty seamen and 
marines, lo protect it from the alt;iek of General Beaure,i:;ard, who ^vas 
expected to storm it, and, by his pronipt ar.d vi^-oron.s action, contributed 
greatly to the safetv of Alexandria, and to rallj'ing the men from their 
demoralization after the defeat of ]ju11 Piun. 

He was commissioned as commander July IC, 1SC2. He commanded 
the steam-gunboat 3Iahaska in 1863; and was in command of the naval 
battery on Morris Island at the bondjardment of Fort Sumter, from tlie 
17th to the 23d of August, 1863. He was engaged in skirmishes, -with bat- 
teries on the Potomac, and the En[)pahannock Paver, and olV AVilmington, 
N. C, and vrith rebel troops on shore, while commanding the Mahaska in 
1863, and the Potomac Flotilla in 18G1 and 1SG5. 

He was a member of the Bureau of Navigation in 1866. He was com- 
missioned as captain July 25, LSG6, and was assigned to special duty in 
Hartford, Conn., in 1867 and 1868. He was stationed at the navy-yard. 
Boston, in 1869 and 1870, and commanded the frigate Franklin^ of the 
European Squadron, in 1870 ;uid 187E He was a member of the Board 
of Examiners in 1872. 

He was commissioned as conniiodore Xov. 25, 1872, and was chief of 
staff to the North Atlantic Fleet in 1872. He was oi-dered to s),ccial duty 
at Washington, Aug. 7, 1872, to draw mp a code of signals for sioam taciics. 
and was chief signal oflicer of the navy from 1873 to 1876. ]n 1863, he 
prepared, by order of the Navy Department, systems of "Fleet Tactics 
under Steam," and "Squadron 'J'actics under Steam," and, in 1865, "The 
Naval Howitzer Afloat," and, in 1866, "The Naval Howitzer Ashore," all 
of which are textJiooks at the Naval Academy. He Avas one of the 
founders of the Uinted States Naval Institute, organized Oct. 9, 1873, at 



740 THE nCKFlUXG OEXEALOGY. 

AniK'ipolis, fur tlie advancL-mcr.t of }>i'ores-.ional and scientific knowledge in 
the navy. In Docc-mljer, 1871, C'uniinodoi'c Pavker was ajipointed cliief of 
staff of tiie nnited fleets, -whlrli ■wt-re assenif)K'd off Florida nnder command 
of Admiral Case, for instruction in tactics. lie was in connnand of the 
navy-yai'd at IJoston, !Mass., in 1877 and ]S78; and snperintendent of the 
Naval Academy in 1878 and 187'J.' 

His first -wife was Mary Greene, of Ehode Island. By her he had one 
son : — 

WiLLiAii IIakwak Fakker, v.-bo grailuatorl at the United States ^Military Academy 
in ISGG, and at Lia death, in IS'Jl', was a lieutenant 
eoDimaudei' in the navy. He luavried l^liso Jenkins, 
daughter of llear-Aduiiial Tliorntoii Jeukins of the 
United States Xavy. 

Commodore Parker's second wife was Annie ^ilallor}-. By her he had 
the follo^^■ing children : — 

Eliza Lawrezcce I'akker. 

FOXHALL Al.EXAXiJER PaEKEK. 

Comnrodore Paiker was a son of Connnodore Foxhall Alexander and 
Sara Jay (Bogardns) Pai'ker. Eis ancestry includes the follovidng finm- 
ilies: Parker, Sturman, Bogardus. See .-Ln-cestrv Tables -yl/ip. 

58. VIII. 716. John Jolnistoii Donaldson [Mary E. P. 58. YII. 
336], born in IIo\vard County, ]\Id. A lawyer. Eesidence : Baltimore 
County, Jld. 

Mr. Donaldson entered Harvard College, but left his class before 
graduating, to assist his father in his law office. lie is one of the 
trustees of the Peabody Institute, and is chairman of the library committee. 
At one time he was president of the Bar Association of Baltimore. 

58. A^II. 710. EUcn ShoriiiaL-cr, his wife. 

Mrs. Donaldson is a daughter of Samuel ^bior and Augusta Chambers 
(Eccleston) Shoemaker, of Bnltimore. He was president of the Adams 
Express Company in Baltimore. Her ancestry includes the following 

' Haraersly's Xaval Eueyclopa'ilia, p. 635. 



El GIT Til GFXi:/LiTIOX. 741 



families: SLoei/uiker, llen<lricks, Coates, Gile.s. Dorscy, Falls, Ecclestoii, 
Houston. See Axcrs-ruY Taiuj-.s yj[. 

58. VIII. 710. Frederic];. Brtiiie Dorxaldson [Mary E. P. 5S. VII. 
330], born in liouard Count}-, 3Id. A clerk. lit-.-idence : liouaid 
County. 

58. VIII. 719. Sophie Augusta Davis, his ^vife, born in Saruly 
Hill, X. Y. 

Mrs. Donald^ori is a Jau^luer of Arthur jh'ce?e and Charlotte (Proal) 
Davis. He is a nu'a'chant, of 8;indy Hill, X. Y. Her ancestry includes 
tlie folloiving- f;irniliL-s: I)a\is, IJrcCse, Proal, Livingston. See Axcestky 
TAiu,rs ^"il. 

5S. AMII. 720. Ethel Donaldson [Mary E. P. 58. A^I. 33G], born in 
Howard Countv. Md. 

58. VIII. 7J0. Ilobcrf Sar/e Sloan, her husl>and, born in Oswego, 
N. Y. A manufacturc-r. Residence : Oswego. 

Mr. Sloan entered the United States X"rival Academy as a cadet mid- 
shipman, June 21, 1875, and g;radnated June 10, 1870. He ^vas ordered 
to the United St;ites Steanishi}) Alert at Mare Island Xavy-Yard, California, 
and joined the Asintic S(iuadron. He served for a year on the United 
States Steamship Ale)-I, and fi year on the United States Steamship Ivich- 
mond, the flag-ship of the squadron. He was appointed nudshipman, June 
10, 1881, and, aftor several years' service orj sea and land, he resig-ncd from 
the navy on Sept. 9, 1883. He is now a manufacturer in Oswego. 

ilr. Sloan is a son of the Hon. George Beale and Ann Coffin (S-\^ett) 
Sloan, of Oswego. His father has been a State seriator and Speaker of the 
House of x\,ssembly. A.ntf.stky T.vi'.t.t:s ~^^\. 

59. AHII. 721. Charles Henry Dodge [Pickering 59. VII. 338], 
born in Salem, died in Salem. 

His portrait appears in a family grou'p painted by Osgood. 

59. VIII. 722. Ellen Barry Dodge [Pickering 59. VII. 338], born 
in Salem, died in Snlem. 

Her portrait app'ears in a family gronp pointed by Osgood. 



THE J'ICKI.niXG GEXKALOGY. 



59. Vlll. 723. Edward Pickerino- Dod^'e [Pickering- 59. VII. 33s], 
born in Salem, died in Calitnrnia. 

His portrait appears in a family groiqi painted by Osgood. 

50. VIII. 72."). Georgiana Storer Dodge [Pickering SO.VII. 33S], 
born in Salem, died in Framingliam, ilass. 

59. VIII. 72o. JEdwayd lUellen, lier lius])and, boi'n in Wayland, 
Mass., died in AA^iylanel. A bookseller and stationer. Kesidence : "Way- 
land. 

Mr. ^lellen cariied on busine.-s at Worcester, Mass., llien removed to 
Framingham, and engaged in farming, finally removing to Wayland. 

He was a son of Edward and Sophia (^^'hitney) Mellen, of Worcester. 
His father was a lawver, and chief-justice of the Court of C'onimon Pleas of 
Massachusetts. His ancestry includes the following families: Mellen, 
Corney, Whitney, Viles. See .-Vncestry Tablt-s ^™-^. 

59. VIII. 72G. Frank Pickering Dodge [Pickering 59. VII. 33S], 
born in Xaples, Italy, Residence : Washington, I). C. 

Mr. Dodge dropped the name of Frank about twent}' years ago. He 
was in the class of 1879 in IIar\ ard College, but left Cambridge after two 
years, and went to Buenos Ayres, where he engaged in. business. He is 
now (ls93) a stenogi-apher and typcwi'iter in the office of the chief engineer 
of the army. 

59. VIII. 726. Harriet E. JrcHiceu, his wife. 

Ancestry Iaeles aiij'- 

59. VIII. 727. Rebecca Gilman Dodge [Pickering 59. VII. 338], 
born in Worcester, ^lass. 

59. VIII. 737. CharJes Whife.^ifle Hac, her husband, born in Hart- 
ford, Conn. Picsidenco: Anna})olis, 3[d. 

'Mr. Rae graduated at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, 
X. v., in 1866. receiving the degree of C. E. In 1868, he graduated from 
the United States Xaval Academv, and was commissioned as lieutenant of 



FAGIITJl GEXFJIATIOX. 74;; 



the Enyineer Corps of tin' U^nited State.--. Xavy. \\r is now cliiei' en«i-ineri- 
and head of the departiueiit of steam engineering- at the Naval Acadeui} , 
Annapolis, Md. 

lie is a sun of the Kev. Luzerne and ]\[artha Corbin (Whiteside) Kae, 
of Hartford, L'onn. His ancestry includes the following- families: ]Jae, 
Geoi-g-e, Pell, Cooper, ritcli. Turner, Whiteside, Coo])er, ludjerlson, ;\loorc, 
Owen, Loomis, Co)-l)in, Cabot, Marston, \'ercn, Dwight, Flynt, I'artrido-e, 
Crow. See Ax(i;sthy TAr.r.i.s ^"'yii- 

59. YIIT. T-2S. Pickering Dodge Allen [Lucy P. 59. VII. oil], 

born in y;dem, died at Bi-nshoar Citv, La. 

Mr. Allen was educated at private schools and under private teachers. 
In Xovembor, L'^oO, he sailed from Xew York for San Francisco, thence to 
China and Jap;m, and came home by the way of Eui-ojje. 

lie was always interested in military aifairs, and held a connnission in 
the Salem Lig-lit Infantry. When the civil -war broke out, he was in 
Europe. As soon as he heard of It, he hastened home, arriving in Salem 
June 12, LSGL In October of that year he enlisteil, and ^yas nuistered into 
service Dec. 17, IJ^GI. He was second lieutenant of cavalrv stationed in 
Louisiana, ar.d, vrliile serving- Tipon the staff of G'-'ueral Weitzel, he died 
from the effects of a wound received in battle. There is a portrait of him 
in possession of his sisters.^ 

59. VIIL 734. William Hodges Silsbee [Ik-becca A. 59. Yll. 
343], born in Salem. A man of leisure. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Silsbee is interested in natural history, especially in our native 
flowers. 

59. YIIL 735. Alice Dodge Silsnee [Eehecca A. 59. YII. 343], 
born in Salem. 

59. YIIL 7oo. Hnll Curtis, her l)usband, born in Boston. A phy- 
sician. Pesidenco : Boston. 

Mr. Curtis, H. C. 1854, studied medicine, and received the degree of 
M.D. in 1857. 

' Esse.x Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XIV. p. 1'73. 



744 ^v/y; riCKEinxG genealogy. 



]Ie is a son of ^'arllaniel and Kmily ^Matilda (Hall) Ciu'iis. Ediinrd 
FiUh IIall\2C,. YIII. J(JI] was his first cousin once removed. His ancestry 
includes tlie following families: Curtis, I'^liot, Tolly, Crafts, Scaver, 13al- 
]:ird, Toplitre, Curtis, J':ii()t, Polly, Gore, Gardnci-, Crook, ]>ass, Alden, 
Mullins, r.elclier, Breck, Wisewell, Oliver, Reed, Hall, Green, ^^-ill, Ik-lclier, 
Danforth, Walker, Kead, Fowle, Carter, Jones, Potter, Ednuuids, Chand- 
ler, Synionds, Ilayward, Treadwell, liartwell, Wheeler, Brasher, Gasheuic, 
Kort\vrig-hl, Cannon. See Anxestry TAbLEs ^5'^. 

59. VllT. 737. Henry Hadclifi.'e Stone [John IT. 59. YIT. 346], 
born in N(>nh Iieadi'ic;-, Mass., died in Salem, of epile})3y. A clerk. l\csi- 
dence : Salem. 

Mr. Stone was educated in the Salem schools, and beg'an his business 
b"fe as a book-keeper in Salem. During the Rebellion, he was in the Pro- 
vost Marshal's office, lie afterwards ^Yent to Manila, and remained for a 
number of years in the mercantile house of Messrs. Peele, Hubbell, & Co. 

59. MIT. 739. Frank Stone [John H. 50. VIT. 340], born in Salem, 
died in Salem. A cleric. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. Stone was for some years an inspector in the Boston Custom 
House. 

59. VIIT. 743. Jolm Robinson [Lncy P. 59. YII. 347], liorn in 
Salem. Residence : Salem. 

Mr. Robinson received his education in the public schools of Salera and 
under a private tutoi'. After leaving school, he spent several years as clerk 
in a bushiess office in Boston, but Jibandoned this situation to accept a 
position more in line \\h]\ his tastes. While yet a lad he became interested 
in the v,-ork of the Essrx Institute, and perhaps he is one of the best 
examples of (he influence exercised by the late Dr. Wheatland [17. VIII. 
189] in leading- young men to take up scientific and histoi-ical pursuits. 
Ijegbming- as a youtlifnl collector of coins and articles of local historical 
interest, he became interested in the study of botany, and soon became 
prominent in this line of research. His papers, prepared for the Institute, 
niade his name known outside of Essex County ; and his volume on the 



EIGHTH GEXERATIOX. 745 



Flora of Essex County, \\\\\\q stiU fuithti- eniiancing his reputation, became 
a model on wliich nian_y other siniihir puLlicatioiis have since been fovmcd. 
lie attended lectures at Cambridg-e by IVofes,?or.s Gray, Goodale, and 
Farlow, and received some laboratory instruction. He was an assistant to 
Charles Sprag-ue Sarp-ent at the Arnold Arlioretum, and for some 3-ears 
devoted himself to the scientific study of trees and the arrangiuL;- of cabinet 
specimens. He left tlie Arboretum, and accepted the treasurership of the 
board of trustees of the Peabody Academy of Science, of wliich board lie 
was a member, and as'-nuncd charge of its museum and collections. Coming 
to this work as he iliu with the exporionco gained by his connection vrith 
the Institute and its methods, and without any of the prejudices and limita- 
tions whicii are the natural outcome of the work of a specialist, he pro- 
ceeded to entirely rearrange the collection of this museum, and to change 
the character of its woik, so that from being a place where a few specialists 
could pursue their investigations, it became a great edu.calional establisli- 
ment for the public. In a surprisingly short space of tinie, he, with tlie 
hearty co-operation of Professor E. S. ]\Iorse, the scientific liead of the Acad- 
emy, brought this institution into touch with the people, ^■.•it]lout in any way 
lowering' its standing from a scientific point of view. This has been done 
by the introduction of lectures at low prices, by the establishment of 
classes on special subjects, and by the exhibition of objeels in which there 
may be special local interest. 

Mr. Robinson's taste and happy faculty, in tlie arrangements of speci- 
m6n.s for public exhibilion, make the additions of this nniseum particularly 
attractive, and tliis is increased by a simple form of lalielling, so that per- 
sons not gifted with a kno\v]edge of scientific terms can still know wluit 
tliey are looking at, and can see wliat books to consult at the Public 
Library, if they -wish to pursue any further i-esearch. 

For fifteen years Islw Robinson was Professor of l<otany and Vegetable 
Physiology of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. I'or two j-ears he 
Avas a trustee of the Essex Agricultural Society, and iV)r one year of the 
Salem Ifosj.iital. For several years he v>-as treasurer and mendoer of the 
Boston Xumismatic Society. For three years he has been vice-ipresident of 
the Salem Fraternit}-, an organization furrued to furnish a reading and play 



7-lC) TITK riCKFIUXG G F.NE AJ.nGY. 



room for Lovs. lit- i.s ;i maiiajn r (>!' tlie (_)lil J.adios Home in ^?alt'm, and u 
trusteo of tlie Salem Public Libraiy. From 18x2 to 188G, he was a member 
of the Salem Common Counril, ami during- tlie last two terms lie was its 
president. lie was also chairman of tlie Board of Health for two years, and 
for three years was a member of the school connnittee. 

IMr. Piobinson's litei'ar)- work has been chiefly devoted to the subject of 
natural history, and, besides minor papers and addresses at agricultural 
meetings, ho has published "Ferns in Their Homes and Ours," "Flora of 
Essex County," " Ti'ces of Essex Ciumty," and "Ferns of J'ssex County 
and Our Trees." He wiites easily and pleasantly, and his vvorks have had 
a widespiead circulaiion. 

50. VIII. Z4'i. Eir^ahcih Boll Ins Kemhle; the v,ife of John Robin- 
son, jirobabh- born in Salem. 

Mrs. Eobinson is connected with the "Yfon!an's Bureau" and the 
sewing- guild of " Cheerful Woi-kers." 

She is a daughter of the Hon. Edmund and ilary "White (Beckford) 
Kimball. Ider ancestry includes tlie follo-\ving- families : Kimball, Scott, 
Totter, Whipple, Gil bei-t, Cross, Poi'ter, Beckford, Eamsdell, White, Sletcalf, 
Flint, Johnson, ]\Iaverick, Harris, I\luchmore. See Ancestev Tat.les j™^. 

59. VIII. 744. Mcary Isabella Stone [Henry 0. oP. TIE 348], 
probably born in Salem. 

Miss Stone has done some literar}- work, including several acceptable 
book-reviews ; but having- been an invalid for several years, this work has 
been largely given up. 

59. AHII. 745. George rorrester Devereiix [George IE 59. YII. 
349]; born in Salem. A farmer. Eesidence : Eed Oak, Iowa. 

Mr. Devereux was living in Scotland, Mo., Feb. 4, 1888. He served in 
the Union Army during the civil war, from the three months' campaign to 
the end. 

59. VIII. 74o'- Jfary A. Niecewanfjer, his first wife, born in 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Ancestev Tables vo'l'- 



EIGHTH GESKTlAriOX. 747 



Tin. VI 11. T-^-J'- ^lOfij Jane Xortou, liis secoml Avifc. 
She v.-as a Avitlow at the time of lier uiarriag-e to Mv. I'evoreux. By lier 
former husbniul slio liad cliildren. 
Axrrs-riiY Tables ^f,,. 

fiM. VIII. 746. John Forrester Devererix [Georc^e II. 59. VII. 
349], born in Salem, died in lujd Oak, Iowa. A lawyer. Residence: 
lied Oak. 

]\Ir. Dcvereux, II. C 1S.5G, studied lav/, and was admit! ed to the bar 
June 23, 18.">9. At the openin:^- of the late war he was a member of tlu^ 
Salem Light Infa^ilry, and, on A|iril 30, ISlJl. he enlisted as a pi-ivate in 
the Eighth Massachusetts A'olunteer ]\Lilitia. On Dec. 21, ISGl. he was 
commissioned captain of the Eleventli ^Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, 
and was present at all the battles of the Army of the Potomac, except 
Antietam. lie was wounded sligldly at the batth' of the Wilderness. He 
brought the flag of his regiment ofl' tlie field afver it had been shot from the 
staff at the second battle of Dull Kun, and performed t!i8 same act at 
Gett3^sburg. He was mustered out Sept. 14, 1803. He was commissioned 
captain of the Sixth United States Colored Troops, November, 1864, and 
was present at the capture of Fort Fisher, and at the surrender of John- 
ston at Ro.leigh. He was mustered out Sept. 25, lSiJ5. He afterwards 
removed to Eed Oak, Iowa, where he practised law. He was a man of 
considerable abilit)-, and was the author of the ''Roll of Honor," a series 
of poeiiis published some years ago.^ 

59. VlII. 747. A.rtlnir Forrester Devereitx [George H. 59. VII. 
349], born in Salem. A civil engineer. Eesidence: Cincinnati, Ohio. 

General Devereux entered AVest Point Military Academy, where he 
ranked among tlie Hrst five of his class in scholarship. For an infringement 
of the rides of tlie academy he was sentenced to suspension for six months, 
and to join the next lower class at the expiration of the .suspension. On 
account of this sentence, ho resigned his cadetslup. 

He took a course at the Lawrence Scientilic Scliool, Harvard College, 

> Harvard Universiiy in tlic War of 18G1-18C.3, by Francis II. Brown, p. 91; also a 
npwspaper cuttinc,'. 



7-lS Tin- riCKETlING GENFALOGY. 

aiul, ill 1854, vrent to Cliicago, in the employ of the C"hicag-o and Oalenu 
Union Eaih-oad. lie afterwards went into bujine<'« with E. E. Ellswortli 
(v.-ho achieved fame as colonel in the war of the Tvohcllion) as solicitor 
and promoter of patents, and had a large interest in an estahlislnncnt for 
nianufactnring stamp machines. I'he panic of 1857, however, was dis- 
astrous to the enterprise, and he retiu-ned East, and engaged in book-heop- 
ing- until the breaking out of the war. In Chicago, General Devereux 
joined the National Guard Battalion, and v^-as appointed sergeant-major. 
He afterwards became adjutant, and in this position he -svas put in charge 
of the bod}- of young men ^vho afterwards traversed the country previous 
to the war, as the famous " Ellsworth Zouaves.'' He had the entire choige 
of their instruction and discipline. On his return to ^lassachusetts. he vras 
elected, one year before the Eebellion, to the conunand of the Salem Light 
lufo.ntry. Here he pursued the same course of discipline and instruction as 
he had in Chicago, usiiig his own manual and tactics. This company 
became famous for its proficiency, and was known as " Deverenx's Salem 
Zouaves." 

On the breaking out of the civil war. Governor Andrew transferred him 
to the Eighth Regiment, wdn'ch, with the Sixth Regiment, were the first 
troops in the country to start for the defence of Washington. After three 
months' service, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Nineteenth 
Eegiment. Under General Devereux the Nineteenth Regiment became 
famous for its drill, discipline, and cliaracter, and was constantly engaged 
in a succession of conflicts. At the Second Bull Run Battle, General 
Devereux was wounded in the left knee, which has since caused him 
much suffering. At Antietam his hoi'se was shot, and when on foot he 
was shot in the arm. At Gettyslnirg also he was in conunand of liis 
regiment. During this battle the Nineteenth maintained its reputation for 
high soldiership and discipline, and at its conclusion General Deveieux 
carried on his arm the four colors of Armistead's Brigade, the Eifty-seventh, 
Fifty-third, Fourteenth, and Nineteenth Virginia, all captured by his own 
regiment. On tliis battletield a bronze tablet to General Devereux lias 
been raised by ^Massachusetts, inscribed with tlio quotation from Hancock's 
official report speaking of his action, and reading as follows: "fleeting 



EIGHTH GEXEn.iTIOy. 749 



liero Col. Deveroux, 10th ^fn^-s., a ni;ui -wanting- to Ije in the right phicc, 
he asked pennission to move his Keg' to the riglit and Fixmt." 

After Gettysburg, General Devereux -was sent home to ^Massachusetts, 
and placed in connnand of the Conscii}>t C';-inip. After serving in that 
capacity two months, he -^vas ordered to the connnand of the Second 
Brigade, Second Division, Second Army (Jorp'S. The winter after " 3[ine 
Run'' he resigned his coniuiission for inipei'ative fanjily reasons. Souie 
time later lie -ivas brevetted brigadier-general. 

After leaving the service, he established himself in Ijusiness in Eoston, 
as a dealer and cuntroctor in railroad and mill supplies. He later trans- 
ferred his business to Xeu' York, and cunllnucd to bo engaged in largo 
enterprises. He afterwards -went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and was in tlie 
employ of the Cleveland, Cohunbus, Cinciirnati, & Indianapolis Thiilroail 
for two years. He vras engaged on the survey and construction of the 
Marion Braiich of the National Soldiers" Home until its completion, and 
■v\-as its first governor. He served a two }-ears' term in the Ohio Legisla- 
ture. In 1SG7, and for several succeeding years, lie ^vas nominated for 
Auditor of State in Massachusetts by the Democratic Cojivention.^ 

59. YHI. 747. Clara Anna lUhahcili ForhvHh Tn'cli, the -wife, 
of Arthur Forrester Devereux, born in East Boston. 

Mrs. Deverc-ux is a daughter of Zohoih and Blrrebe Anne (Bro-vvne) 
Rich. Her father is a contractor and builder. Her ancestry includes the 
following families : Rich, Browne, Winslovv', Smith. See Axckstky 

TABI.K.S m- 

59. Vni. 748. Charles ITpliam Devereux [George H. 59. VH. 
349], boni in Salem. 

59. Yin. 74s. Jane Jjcweij JEnsifsr,, his -wife. 

B}' her second husband, Charles i-htckingham, she has no issue. 

Jlrs. Buckingham is a daughter of Edward and ■ • (Dewey) Ensign. 

-•U-CESTRY TaIBLKS ^"^. 

' This .sketch is marie from material furnished hy General "Devereux. 



750 TJllJ nCKETHXa GENEALOGY 



50. VIII. T."i2. Cliarlotte Story ^'orrester DeAeroux [Geur;^-c II. 
59. VII. 340], born in Sak-m. 

50. VI] r. 7o2. JTrfntcis Qnai-lcs Story, hor hu.sband, born in 
"Waukeslia, ^Vis. xV merchant. Ketfidenoe : Allianibra, Cal. 

Jlr. Story i.s a son of John Patten and Elizabeth (Quarles) Story. His 
ancestry inchides the folluuiiig" families: Story, Cooper, Marion, Eddv, 
Harrison, Peii-ce, Bridge, Kmldock, Drinker, Patten, Quarles, Hutchinson, 
P.aker, Fascitl, Ireland, Greenland. See A>;civ?tiu- Tarles ^J^^-. 

50. VIII. 753. Francis Bclmn Dorereny [George H. 50. VII. 
310], born in Salem. X stock-raiser, liesidence : Pha^nix, Arizona. 

Jlr. Devereux was appointed, July 1, 1893, Assistant Secretary of State 
of Arizona, Avhich position he still holds. 

59. VIII, 7o3. Adclla Jloi'tnn Seaman, his wife, born in Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. 

Mrs. Devereux is a daughter of Geoige Ilorton and Martha E. (Horton) 
Seaman, of IV^ughkeepsie. Her father was for many years in tlie insurance 
business. Ancestuy Tables -j^' j. 

59. VIII. 755. Katlianiel Devereux Silsbee [Marianne C. 59. VII. 
350], born in Salem. A merchandise broker. Residences: Boston and 
Cohasset, Mass. 

Mr. Silsbee, H. C. 1S5:?, was engaged as an l']asi, India importer from 
1853 to 185.'-'. From 1859 to 1864, he was a chemical manufacturer, and 
fi'om 1865 to 1804, a merchandise broker. He went to the East Indies in 
1852, and Irom there to Europe, returning home to Salem in 1853. He 
wo,3 commander of the Salem Light Infantry in 1850, having been a lieu- 
tenant of the cornpan}" for the six previous ) ears. 

Mr. Silsbee has a manuscript autobiography of his graiidfather, Nathaniel 
Silsbee, who was a sliipmaster, merchant, representative and senator in 
Congress, and ])resident of the [Massachusetts Senate. 

60. VIII. 7-7-5. Mavij Stogie Ilochjcs, his wife, born in Salem. 



riGurir cexeuation. 751 



Mrs. Silh^boo is a daiii^htor of George Atkin.-on a-Ml AlMg-ail l-^lizaljoth 
(White) Hodges. Manj JJnrrow While [ij'2. VII. L'S.;] \x;^< her lirsi cousin, 
and William btonj Surycnl [l?G. IX. 4^5'] is lier first cousin once removed. 
Her ancestry includes the following families: Hodges, Phippen, Wood, 
AVilliams, Skerry, Manning, Calley, Webb, Bray, Collins, Cockei'ill, K'opes, 
Wells, Warner, Pickman, Hardy, Lindall, ^\•ren, SpnrlKnvk, Angier, Xew- 
rjian, Ileman, Porter, Slanh/v, Cook, ^Vest wood, S(•^\;lll, Hunt, Dmnmer, 
Archer, Mitchell, r.omdel, White, ]\letc;df, Flint, Jolmson, Alaverick, Hai-ris, 
lUuchmore, Urowne, Perkins, Ijurnhnm, Barrow, Gill, Dowse, Ivaiid, Hol- 
land. See ANcijTia' Tabli- 



vni 



50. VIII. ToC. Georg'o Deveren-: Silsbee [Marianne C. hi). VII. 
330]. probably born find died in Salem. 

A portrait of him is in the possession of his brother, "William E. Silsbee. 

50. VIII. 750. Mary Crowninsliielcl Silsbee [Marianne C. 59. 
VII. 350], probably born in Salem. 

50. VIII. 7o'J. FredciucI: Augustas WhitweU, hei- husband, born in 
Boston. A man of leisure, liesldences : Boston find ?d.ill.on, libiss. 

Mr. Wliitwell is a memb.er (if the j^Iassachusetts Society of the Cincin- 
nati, in right c»f his graudfatlier, Dr. Samuel Whitwell. 

Ho is a son of Samuel and Sophia (Stoiy) AVhit^\\]i. His fathci- was a 
merchant, of Boston, of the firm of Whil v/ell & Bond. 1 1 is ancestry includes 
the following families; AVhitwell, Archor, Kelsey, 'i'yler, Story, Cooper, 
Appleton, Evei'ard, Oliver, Lowell, Bidcer, Symonds. Re;id, Bradstreet, 
Dudley, AVoodbridge, Dudley, Long, Xowell, Gray, Hills. See Axcestky 
T..v..Lrs ^-I'V- 

50. VIII. VCi. William Edward Silsbee [I\Iarianne C. 50. VIT. 
350], probaldy born in Snlem. A man of leisure. Pesidences : Ikiston 
and Jlilton, ?\!oss. 

Mr. Silsbee, H. C. 18G7, studied law in Cnmbridge, P.orlin, and Boston, 
but never practised his profession. He is a member of the Boston Athletic 
Association. 



752 THE PICKFniXG GEXEAinOY. 

Besiiks iiiutli Uni: ol'l family funiiture, Mr. Sil>ijee has several familv 
portraits, llr Las cme of liis ^randfatlier, the Hon. Nathaniel Silsbec, ;\ii.l 
a miniature of his g-i'iunlmotlier, the Hon. 3Ir. Silshee's uife. He also h.is 
several samplers, iiiarl;ed as follows: " Mary WinJet," "Lucia Pickeriui: 
her sampler made in the twelfth year of her age 175D," "Eliza Devereux,'' 
" Mary Aim Cabot Devereux."' 

60. VIII. 76G. Laura Lestina Wellington [John P. GO. VII. 
351], probably born and died in Andover, Vt. 

There i-' a ^n'J^vestone erected to her memory in the graveyard of the 
adjoining- I'^.Vv n of Windliam. 

61. VUl. 770. Elizabetli Waslibnrn [Eunice 61. VII. 353], burn 
in Putney, Vt., probably died in the South. 

61. VIII. 770. JllUon SJiirJc, her husband. A clergyman. Eesi- 
deuce : Kear Xew Orleans. 

It is said that 3Ir, Shirk has a seminary ner.r Xew Orleans. He 
married, for his second wife, Hannah Emmeliiie Washburn [61. VIII. 
777], a .sister of his first wife.^ 

Axci:3-n;i: T.\blks ^"^. 

61. VIII. 777. Hannah Emmeline Washburn [Eunice 61. VII. 
353], born in Putney, Vt. 

Gl.Yril.777 Milton SJiirJ:, her husband. 

His first v;ife was Elizabeth AVashburn [61. VIII. 770], a sister of his 
second v.'ife. For an account of hiui cee above. 
AxcESTiiY Tablks }y\- 

61. VIIT. 771). Mary Melissa \Yellington [David P. 61. VII. 
354], born iii Andover, Vt., died in Potsdam, X. V. 

61. VIII. 770. Alfred Balder CoUins, her husband, born in Parish- 
ville, X. Y. A carpenter. Residence: Potsdam, X. Y. 

' Conmiunication of ^Irs. Sidney >r. :\Iorse and town-elerk of Putney, Vt. 



EIGHTH OrXFJiATIOX. 



}lv. C'ollins is a son of Abialiani and Expci-ience (JJakir) Collins. 
AxnosTKV Tai;li:. Jl" . 

Gl. Ylll. TS2. Susannali Abi^rail Wellhipjton [David P. 61. VII. 
354]. 

Gl. VIII. 7SJ. Joi/iter liftcCf her liusbaiid. A iarinei-. liesidt- nee : 
OljL-flin, Ohio. 

}h\ Race is a son of William and Vinnio (Jojner) Race. Axcesti:y 

n\ VIH 

Iablks ^^3-. 

Gl.Vni.Ts4. Sarah Ann Vv'ellington [David P. Gl. VII. 3:D], 
born in Pari>liville, N. Y. 

]\[rs. Thompson has her mother's fa.mily Bil)le, from whicli she fnrni.shed 
the records of her mother's children. 

61. VIII. 7S4- John A}i(Jrci!' TIio)iiVf<o)} , her husband, born in 
Moriah, X. Y., or Andover, Vt. A farmer. Residence: Elyria, Ohio. 

Mr. Thompson is a son of John xVndrew and Thcanna (Ho-\vard) 
Thompson. Axcestry 'J'ablf.s 5"^-. 

61. VIII. 787. Richard Howard 'vYellington [David P. 61. VII. 
354], born in Sr. Lawrence County, N, Y. A lumberman. Residence: 
St. Paul, Minn. 

61. VIII. 7ST. JiuVfh Fi-anccs C'typenfe}', his wife, h^rcn in Pols- 
dam, X. v., died in St. Paul, ]\tinn. 

l^Irs. Wellington was a daug-htcr of Ralph and Sylvia (Colib) Carpenter. 
Her father was a farmer, of St. Lawrence Count}-, IsT. Y. Ancesti'v 
Taz^i.es ^\. 

Gl. VIII. 789. Sianuel Antipiis V7ellington [David P. Gl. VII. 
354], boi-n in Pierrepont, N. Y. Residence: St. Paul, Minn. 

Gl. VIII. 7S9. CeJia Catherine Cliiic, his wife, born in Colton. 
N. Y. 

Mrs. Wellington is a daughter of John and Catherine (McGarry) Cline. 

AXCESTKY TaIU.KS ^ '/t. 



754 THE nCKERIXG OEXEALOGY. 

i\2. VITl. 'i'M. Hani.aii Elizabelli Wellhigto)! [Grin P. G2. YII. 
'3:>rq, l.orn ill Castleton, N. Y. 

C2. VIII. 7/V.,'-'. r.dirartl Mull, her fust husbaiul, born at Scliodack 
Lauding, N. Y., died in Castleton, N. Y., of consumption. A sea-captaiu. 
Kesidenee: Scliodack Landin^T. 

Mr. Mull v.'as a son of 3Iindard and ^lary Ann (Huyck) ilull. His 
fatlic'i- was a farmer, of Scliodack Lauding. Axcestky Tables ^t'^i. 

G2. VIII. 7U.i-\ WiUUnn Edward Grif/hi, her second hu.sband, born 
in 2farlboroupli. X. Y. An undertaker. Eesideuce : Greenbush, N. Y. 

Antcestkv Tables |y\,=. 

62. Ylll. 103. Ma,ria Louisa Wellinfiton [Orin P. G2. VIL 356], 

jirobably boni in Castleton, X. Y. 

62. YUL 706. Xortjuni liockcfcller, her husband, born in Kinder- 
liook, X. Y. A locomolivG ong-ineer. Kesidenee : Bath, N. Y. 

Mr. Rockefeller is a son of ^yillia^n T. and Eliza (Miller) Rockefeller. 

AXCKSTRT Til.Ltj ^'"V- 

62. VIll. 797. Elizalistli Ann Prencli [Olive 62. VIL 357]. 

62. VIII. 797. Sldueij 7irilto)i Uro'F.e, her husband, born in Win- 
chester, N. Ji. A farmer. Residence: "Winchester. 

Mr. I^Ioi'se is a son of John Gilmorc and Sybil (Kingman) Morse. 

Akckstrt Tahi rs ^^\-. 

62. YIIL 708. AiigiTstus Wellington French [Ohve 62. VIL 
357]. Residence: Springfield, Mass. 

62. YIIL 798. Helen Youuff, his v/ife, died in Albany, N. Y. 
Mrs. Frendi was a daughter of PTorace Young. Ancestry Tables ^%. 

62. VIII. 807. Celia 1/Iaria Rice [Hannah 62. VIL 358], probably 
born in Nevr York State, died in Mankato, Minn. 

62. VIII. ,S07. Willi fiiit Jrh':-ja Wells, her husband, liorn in Honing- 
ton, Lincolnshire, Eng. A farmer and gardener. Residence : Lincoln, 
Neb. 



EiGiini gt:xei:atiox. 755 



lh\ Wells left Liverp(^ul, En-., fur New Yoik, Junu IV, 1.^-14. He 
was engag-ed in Iju.siiic^h Ijc-fun:- \\h marriag-e. l>iiriiig- tlie civil way he was 
a sutler .statiosK-d a.t Tcrre Haute, aiul Indiauajiolis, lud. Ho was for 
several )ears towu-ckik of Jauie.-tov,n, lilue Harlli Criunt}-, Minn., and 
for several years he was SLdiool elerk of the Sugar Grove District of the 
same countv. He married again. 

Ho is a son of Jacuh and Sophia "Holmes (Bicker) AVells, of I)onington, 
Eng. His father was a merchant, also an assessor and collector of 
Houington. Anci:stky Taklks j^l. 

fiS. YHL 814. Orlando Charles Gale [George C3. \U. 3G1], 
born in L'Acadie, Lower Canada. A hardware dealer and manufacturer 
of farm implements. Eesidence : Albion, 3Iich. 

Mr. Gale was formerly associated v.dtli his fatlier in business. He is a 
member ol; the Provisional Board of Control of Alljion College. 

63. YHL SI4. AdaU.ie C. Smith, his wife, born in Rochester, N. Y. 
Mrs. Gale is a daughter of Alplieus Webster and Harriet (Kellogg) 
Smith. Axc):5iRY Tablus |"i^. 

63. YHL 816. ITathan Brooks G-ale [George 63. YH. 3G4], born 
in Barre, A^t. A mechanic. Besidence: Albion, Mich. 

63. YILL <S'i6'. Aiif/Xfita IVooJcott, his wife, born in Spring Arbor, 
Mich., died in Jonesvillc, 2d_ich. 

Mrs. Gale was a daughter of Solomon AYoolcott, a farnier, of Spring 
Arbor. AxcE.sxr.v Tables ^'-"t. 

63. YHL 817. Clara E. Gale [George 63. Yll. 364], born in Barre, 
Yt. Eesidencc : Albion, 3Iich. 

63. YIlL<S'i7. lUioit TV. HoUiiu'strorfh, her husband, died in 
Albion, Mich., of paralysis. A hardware dealer. Besidence: .\i!iion. 

Colonel Holling-swortli held a commission as lieutenant in the Missis- 
sippi Regiment, vrliich vras connnanded bv Jetterson Davis, during tlie 
Mexican war, and was in tlie battles of !Monterev and Buena Yista. On 
the breaking out of the Bebollion, he received the commission of lieutenant- 



75G 77/i; ncKinuxG gexeat.ogy. 



coloHi'l of tlie Xiiieti oiili ULi^'iiiiciii. of Ohio Vohinteers, and was in tiio 
battles of liich ]\I(iuutain, Laurel Hill, MurfrL't'sljorouLi-li, aii<l in several 
other battles. For nearly three years he avjis for most of the time in 
command of the regiment, his colonel being acting brigadier-general. 

He was a son of Ferris and Hannah (^Voodbridge) Hollingsworth. 
His father was a farmer. An-cksthy Tables l^\. 

G3. VTIT. 818. An.gust-as G-ale [George 63. VH. 304], born in 
Moscow, .^Iieh. A mannfacturer of farm implements. Residence: Albion, 
3[ich. 

G3. VUI. SIS. Annie MoHci/, his wife, born at Sodiis Point, N. Y. 
Mrs. Gale is a daughter of Captain and Polly (Kellogg) Morley, of 
Sodus. AxcESTKT Tables -^f j. 

C3. YIII. 819. Lucina H. Gale [George 63. VII. 361], born in 
Ptoyalton, X. Y. 

63. YIII. SIO. Fredericli V/, Sheldon, her Imsband. A grocer and 
tanner. liesideuce : Albion, Mich. 

J\lr. Slicldon is a son of James and Harriet (Patterson) Sheldon. His 
father is a farmer, of xVlbion. Axcf.stky Tablks ^"j. 

63. YIII. 820. Koratio Gale [George 03. YII. 364], born in Moscow, 
Mich. An inventor and manufacturer. Eesidence: Albion, Mich. 

63. VIII. 820. Flora F. BJunchard, his wife. 

Mrs. Gale is a daughter of Cdiarles and Maria (Crane) Blancliard. 



63. YIII. 8-1-i. Converse Allen Gale [Orlando C 63. VII. 369], 
born in }.Ioscow, ^ilich. A grocer and provision dealer. Eesidence : 
Council (J rove, Kansas. 

63. VIII. 844. ^<l(i(Mfie Jror7ce.<!, his wife. 

Mrs. Gale is a daughter of Adam and Anna Maria S. (Adriance) Markes. 
AxcESTRT Tables ^[%. 



EIGUTir GEXERATIOX. Tfi? 



i]\. VIII. >^\(\. Laura Eunice Ballou i William C 1. Vll. 370], hom 
in Wallinytunl, Vr. ri>.>.si(U'iK'e : .Morton's Corners, N. Y. 

Gi. VIII. S4G. John T. Ifclfs, lier hu.-^band, bnrii in Sliarun, 
N. Y., died in Morton'-s Corners, N. Y. A I'urnier. IleslJenco: Morton's 
Corners. 

Mr. Wells was a son of Azzan and Anna (Turner) Wells. Ilis lather 
was a shoemaker. Axrr..>TKv Tahi.k.s -"j-^. 

61. VIII. 848. John Ballon [William Gi. MI. 370], horn at Zoar, 
N. Y. A larmer. liesidence: 3iorton's Corners, X. Y. 

Mr. Ikdlou 'was an assessor, iVoni 1S70 to 1873, for thu west part of 
Concord, X. Y. 

Gi. VIII. SrS. Martj I>eri<jo, his wife, horn in Clai-endon, Vt. 

Mrs. Ballou is a dau.L;Iiter of I-)-man and 8u.>an (Jones) I'ei-iyu. Her 
father was a tanner and boot and shoe maker in his early life. Amestky- 
Tables ^l. 

C-i. YJII. 849. William Piclrering Ballou [William 64. VII. 370], 
born in Collins, N. Y. A jeweller. iLCsldence : Do Kalb, 111. 

64. VIII. S;D. Louisa Evans, liis wife, born in Siirlngvllle, N. Y. 
Mrs. Ballou is a daughter of Jose^di E\ans, a farmer and nicchanlc, of 
Springville, X. Y. Axcestjiy Taiu.k.-, -j""^.. 

64. VIII. 850. Olivia Ballon. [William 64. VII. 370], bom in 
Zoar, N. Y. 

64. VIII. c^5a Bavid ShuJtcs Jiei/iwJds, lier husband, l)orn in 
Springville, N. Y. An in.spoetor of customs. Re.Mdence : Bulfalo, X. Y. 

Mr. Reynolds worked at tlie trade of painting in.un 1S10 to iSoi'. lie 
afterwards went info the police dciiartment, and served unlll 1S70 as a 
detective, and for four years as superintendent. lie has since been in the 
treasury departmunl, and chief inspector of euslonns. 

lie is a son of Jairus and Eliza (Shultes) Keynolds. Anck.stkv 
Tai;les ^yi. 



758 THE J'JCKEL-LXG GENEALOGY. 

65. VIII. S5V. V/^illiam Sabin BalJoii [John G5. Yil. 371], born 
in ^Yal]ingford, Yt. Eesidence: AYallingfoid. 
Mr. Ballou lias cattle interests in AYyoniing. 

C5. YIII. 8-7/. EstJiev Amanda Ait((ren.'s, liis wife, born in \Yall- 
ingforil, Y't. 

j\fr.s. Ballou is a dangliter of Lincoln and Esther (Ilulett) Andrews. 
Her father is a fa.rnicr, of Y/ahingford, A">. Ancestky Tables {^l^^. 

G5. A'lII. .';r;i. Orlanclo Luce Ealion [David 05. YH. 373], born 

in AVorcester, 1\. Y. A carponler. Iicsidence : Chicago, 111. 

65. YIII. S(U. Jlarij I, Jiroau, his ^^ife, died in East Otto, Is". Y. 

Sirs. Ballou is a daughter of Ichabod and (Bartliolomew) Brown. 

Her fa.ther was a farmer and a cooper, of Eo<i ()ito. Ancestry Tables g-'-"o. 

65. YIII. SGo. Mary Matilda Ballou [David G5. YII. 373], bora 
in Worcester, N. Y. 

65. YIII. 8G3. WllUam Carl Bunnals, li.er husband, born in I^Ientor, 
Ohio. A mcrchnnt. Residence : Otto, N. Y. 

Mr. llunnals was formerly a farmer of Eliicottville and East Otto, N. Y. 

He is a son of James and Eebecca (Love-joy) Paumals. His ancestry 
includes the follo\^-ing families: Ruunals, Smith, Dimond, Lovejoy. See 
AxcE.STKT Tables -^'/-^ 

65. YIII. 867. Charles rrederick Ballon [David Gh. YII. 373], 
born in East Otto, N. Y. A custom-house officer. Eesidence : Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ' I 

Mr. Ballou -was left an orphan at an curl}' age, and resided with his 
sister until he vros nineteen years old, and then taught school during the 
winter months. On Sept. 17, 1861, he enlisted, at Albany, X. Y., in Com- 
pany I, of the Fortv-fourth Ecgiment, New York Yolunteer Infantry His 
regiment soon joined the Army of the Potomac, and he was in the battles 
of the Siege of Y'orktown, Hanover Court House, Gaines Mill, Malvern 
Hill, the Second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. At Bull Run 
he v.as taken prisoier by the Confederates, starved five days, "was then 



7.7 r; HTii a exi:j:a ti ox. 



paioltd, ciu(], \vitli li\ e cuiiuMiles, was st-nt into the Federal lineti near York- 
town. At the battle of lu-tt} sbui-g lie was .severely v.ouiided. He received 
jiis discharge, Dec. 21, ]K(;3, for dijahility. He is a storekeeper in the 
New York Custom House.' 

65. VIIT. 807. JI(n-!/ J.7?/.s-, his A\ife, born in Ashford, X. Y. 

Mrs. Ballon is a dau-htfr of William and Mary (Finster) Fllis. Her 
father is a farnier, of Ashford, X. Y. I'robably it was 3Irs. Ixdlou's mother 
who became tliO second v/ifu of Charles F. Ballou's father, David Ballon. 
AxcrsxnT T.via.y:,^ :^\". 

65. VUL 8GH. Herbert Eiigene Balloii [David Go. YD. 373], 
born in Ashford, X. Y. A taxidermist. Residence : Ellicottville, X. Y'. 

"When ]\Ir. Ballon was l.iut sixteen years old, he enlisted in tlie Union 
Army. He joined Company A, of the One Hundredth Hegiment, of Xew 
Y^'ork Volunteer Iniantrv, Ccl. 8, 18G], and served with his regiment in the 
b.attles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, in the Seven Days' Battles, in the 
Siego of Charleston, S. C, besides many other actions and skirmishes 
during Grant's campaigns around Iiichmond. He served out his enlist- 
ment of three years, bui was retained several nionths longer, and was 
jiualiy discharged in February, 18G5. During his service he v/as never 
wounded." 

65. Y'lIL SOS'. CharlDj Veddcr, his first wife. 
Ancestry T.\dlf.s -}j\i- 

65. Vni. SOS\ 2laiic Fox, his second wife. 
AxcESTRT Tables j\\'. 

66. VTIL 87 7. Ecls'ar Albert Metcalf [Mary O-C,. YTT. 3>;3], prob- 
ably born in Burlington, Yt. Residences: St. Louis, 31o., and afterward 
Houston, Texas. 

When the civil war brolce out, Mr. ^fetcalf enlisted in the army, and 
served in the comnn'ssary department of a ]\Iissou)'l regiment. 

1 The History aii.l Geuoalogy of the Ballous, by A.lin Ballon, j,. 030. 
^ Ibid., pp. 928-930. 



rCO THE FICKEnrXG G EXE A LOGY. 



i^G. VIII. Sr:. — -— , liis wife. 

G6. VIII. sso\ Lj^clia Ann Tluirbsr [Abner G. G6. YII. 387"]. 
born in Delhi, N. Y. 

GG. VIII. SS'l--. Alfred Morton Webster, her lm.sbancl, born in 
Stanitbril. N. Y. A i-etired larincr. 17esidenee : Now York City. 

Mr. Webster is a son of Jared and IsabeHa (Gennnoll) Y\^b.ster. His 
father was a farmer, of Dellii, X. Y. Axcestky Tadlks t"^,. 

GG. VIII. SsiT'. Cliarles Stewart Timrbco: [Abnov G. GG. VII. 
387'], i)robably burn in Delhi, X. Y. 

66. VIII. SSO-. AdnJitic Marij I?ogers, his wife, riesidence: Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 

Mrs. Thurlter is a daughter of Thomas Sanford and I*-Iargarette (Edicic) 



GG. Vill. S80^ Candace Tiif.rber [Abner G. 66. Vil. Sb7"], born at 
Delhi, X. Y. 

I^Jrs. Wlieeler is one of the founders of the Associated Artists of Xew 
York, and has for ten or fifteen years been in eharge of the department of 
textile fabrics and interior decorations. She was the originator of the 
"Woman's Hotel project in Xevr York. She was in charge of the decora- 
tion of tlie Woman's Building at the World's Fair in Chicago. She has 
written e.xtensively for the magazines on the sabiect of art embroidery and 
textile fabrics. 

66. VIII. cScSC^". TJiomas Ma.'ion JVhecler,]\Qv\\\\<lKi\A. Residence: 
Xe^^' York City. 

From 1867 to 1877, Mr. and Mrs. VHieeler passed a large part of their 
time in Europe. 

AXCF.SXKY TabLICS ^7ln.- 

GG. VIII. SSO". Horace Kinsley Thnrber [Abricr G. GG. YII. 
387"], born m Oswego, X. X. i\. merchant. Residence: Xew York 
City. 



ElGHTir GF.yKUATTOX. 7G1 

Mr. Tlmrbei- lia.-^ for niaiiy } cars been prominent in trade circles in 
New York Citv. lie lias been jHvsident of the Soutli American Steamship 
Line, and is president of one of the New "^'orl: l)anks. He Avas at one time 
asked to accej)t tlie independent nomination for Mayor of Now York. 

CO. VIII. SSO'\ Nanoj JlcCIauf/Iirci/, his wife, born in Kortright, 
N. Y. 

.Mrs. Tluirber is a danglner o^ William and Jiles (^IcAilhnr) :\IeClang-h- 

rCy. AxCE.>TaY T.AKLKS -^"Viv 

GG. MIL Ssir. Lucy Dunha.m Tlrarbsr [Abnei G. GG. Yll. 387^], 
born in Delhi, N. Y., died in IiJinca, N. Y. 

Mrs. Harris has published a rmmber of sitort stories, under the name of 
Lucy Howard. 

66. Vlll. S'SO". 0.<isiau Grcfjorij JTozcnrd, her first husband, born 
in Hobart, N. Y., died in lihaca, N. Y. A lawyer. Eesidence : Ithaca. 

Mr. Howard v,-as a son of Calvin and Sarah (Gregory) Howard. His 
fhtliL'r was a physician, of Delhi, N. Y. Axo^stky Taklks ^-^^v- 

66. VIH. SSiJ-. Gcortjc IVUliani Jlai'Vis, her 5-eeo;ul husband. 

]\Ir. Harris is from Pictnu, Nova Scotia. He is librarian of Cornell 
L'nivorsitv, and an authority on bibliogi'apln"cal maticis, and is a con- 
tributor to the Nov.- York Nation and oilier journals. 



66. YIII. 880'. Abner Dunham Tliurber [Abner G. 66. YII. 387^, 
born in Delhi, N. Y. A wholesale grocer. Residence; Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GG. Ylll. SSO'. Aitiiff Maria FovO, Ills wife, bor)i in Dover, N. Y. 
]Mrs. Thurber is a daugliter of James and Charity Ford (Kitchel) Ford. 
He is a farmer, of Dover. A.vcj:sti:y Tai-.l!-.-; f"5j„. 

GG. YIII. 8.^0\ Trancis Beattie Thurber [Abner G. 66. YIL 
387^'], born in Delb.i, N. Y. A merchant. Residence: New York City. 



7G2 THE riCKEKIXG GEXEALOfJY. 

Mr. Tlmrbor is proniiiiciit in tnide circle? in Xesv York, and is president 
of tlie stock company known as the TJuivber, Wliyland Company, of New 
York. lie was tlie foundt-r of The Anli-^lonojtoly League, and the Xew 
York Board of Trade and Transportation. lie is a rncndjer of the New York 
Chamber of Co;nmerce, thu Union Lengue, the ^Icrchants' IJeform, llie 
Lotos and thr^ ^lanliattaii Chdjs, of New York. He is ;dso a niernber of 
varions otlier sucieties of New Y'ork City. 

G(j. YIII. SSO''. Jcfnnictlc JIc>/cs\:, his v.dfe, bnrn in New Yoik City. 

Mrs. Thnrl.ier is the founder of the National Conservatory of llusir, (,f 
America. 

Slie is a daughter of M'at]jew H. and Anne Maria (Price) Mej'crs. lie 
is a merchant, of New Y'ork Cicy. Axchstky Ta];li:-; ^\'\,„. 

GG\ YIIT. SO0\ Jtiliette Tliiirber [Eenssehier F. C6\ Yil. 3S7''], 
born in Duliii, N. Y. 

6G\Yin.6'.5^;'. JoJr.t Ahcl I'avslndh her husband, born in Coopers- 
town, N. Y. A. in'inter. Pn'sidence : Di.Tii, N. Y. 

Mr. Parsjiidl is a son of ^liner Par-Jiall, of Otsego, N. Y". Ancestrt 
Tables {f,^,,. 

6G^ yjJi. 880'. Sophronia Pardee Tlinrbei- [Eeusscdaer F. GQ\ 
VII. 387'=], bom in Delhi, N. Y., died in Dellii. 

6G^ A'lII. S80'. Edivhi. Jilorc, her Jiusband, born in Koxbury, N. Y. 
A retired lawyer. Eesidence : Clinton, lo^va. 

From July 1, 1847, to Dec. 31, 1851, Mr. More was judge of Delaware 
County, N. Y. 

Lie is a son of John S. and Anna (Goudd) jlore. His father Avas a tavo'n- 
keeper and farmer. Ancestky Tables :^j"^:iv 

GG\ Yin. 880\ David Pardee Thrirber [Eensselaer F. CG^ YIL 
387"*], born in Delln, N. Y. A merchant tailor. Pesidence: Delavan, ^Yis. 

GG". YIII. SSO'. Cavohjne Elha lUdley, his wife, born in Bovina, 
N. Y. 



EIGHTH GENKHATIOX. 763 



]\[rs. Tluirljcr is ;i (lau;jhtLT uf Joel Mo!itL;Oiiiery and 31uluilc r.mineline 
(Caiinaii) Bailey, of Dflavau, Wis. Axcestky T^llks ^V ■,..„• 

6G^. VIII. x^'^f. Charles Hatlia^vay Tlnirbcr [Iloiisselaer F. G6\ 
VII. 387''], born in Delhi, X. Y.. died in Chicag-o, 111. 

Mr. ThurLer served in the army dnring- the late civil war. 

€G\ VIII. 8S'r. Eva l-ord, his wife. 

C6\ VIII. 882. Herbert Leslie Pickering [Horace K. Q,&'. VII. 
390], l)orn in Yrin,::lr;.-ter, X. II. xi iVirmor and siock-raiser. Hesidence : 
Eagh- Grove, lo-'.va. 

G6^ VIII. SS2-. , his first wife. 

AxcrsTRY T.vi'L'cs :5 y^>. 

66^ VIII. SSJ\ JJra E. Seclij, his second wife, born in Bristol, 111. 
Mrs. Pickerin- is a daugluer of David :^L and Eliza (Peck) Seely. lie 
is a cooper, of Eailville, 111. Ax' !:sti;v Taeli;-; -^jx;'- 

GG''. VIII. 883. Mattie Lovina Pickering [Horace K. GQ\ VII. 
390], burn in V'iiidiest>:-,r, X. ]I. 

Gn\ VIII. SSJ. Cicero A. Stouf/Jrfcn, her Iiusband, born in Hart- 
ford, Conn. A farmer. Residence: Ogden, Iowa. 

Sir. Stoughton is a son of Samuel W. and Erjiily Stoughron, of Challiam, 
Ohio. AxcESTiiv Taj^lks ^^\. 

GG^ VIII. SS5. Abbie Eliza Pickering [Horace K. G6^ VII. 390], 
born in V'inchest^r, X. II. 

GG*". VIII. 55-y. Chainilnff JToo'Ti/. her Imsluind, boin in Xcw York 
City. A farmer. Pesidence: Pn.-rkley, lovra. 

3lr. Moody is a son of Silas and Mary E. (\Yilder) 3Ioody, of Perry, 
loNva. ANCESTRY Taiu.es -Jo'y. 

GG\ VIII. 887. Charles Franklin Pickering [Alanson G6^ VII. 
394], born in Piclunond, X. II. A painter. Residence: Richmond. 



JQ-l: Tin: riCKERiXG gf.xealogy. 



&(}'■. \m. SSI'. Mai-if Cof:s<;d(f.'t>r JU-hiis, liis lirst wile, Loni in 
DuniiKcrston, "\'t., died in Kichiuond, N. IT. 

Mrs. Pickcniii;- \'-as a dauuliler of llai-iy and Amelia (Carter) Benils. 
He was a carponn'r, of DuiinHcr.-ton. Vt. Axcesxky Tables ^o'.u 

6Cr. VIIl. SS7'. Ifhi 7t[arlah H'heehir, liis second %vifc, born in 
Riclmiond, N. IJ. 

Mrs. Pickerino; is a danglncr of Jonas a-nd Ellen ]\1. (^Veeks) Wlieeler. 
Ho is a farmer, o'' Kiclimond, Iv H. AscE^my Tables ^'^s,. 

Giy'. VIlI. 8?S. 'Warren Alanson Pickering [Alanson G(^\ YIT. 
391], born in Richmond, N. II. A policeirian. Kesidencc: Kew llavei:i, 
Conn. 

Mr. Piokeriu^;'s middle name was Arnold, but after his father's death it 
^A'a^^ changed to Alanson. 

66''. YUl. SSS. lusther Jmiiis Wriglit, hi.s -wife, Ijorn in Swansey, 
N. II. 

AxcESTEV Tables :f™,. 

6G^ YIII. S90. Cliarleo I'rederick Ik galls [Sylphina G^^ A^II. 
39a], boru in I""itzwilliani, X. 11., died in Marlliorough, N. II. A head 
finisher in woohon mills. Ecsidence; Marlborough. 

Jlr. Ingalls liad h'ved hi Trov, Fitzwilliam, and Hillsboron.gh Bridge, 
N. IT, 

G&'\ VIIL SOO. Mlaru FAlxa Spofford, Iiis ^Yife, born in Fitzwilliam, 
N. IL 

Ivlri?,. Ingalls is a daughter of Abijah and Betsey (Swoetser) SpofiO]-d. 
He was a farm.-r, of Fitzwilliam. ITer ancestry includes the following 
families: Spofford, Scott, Y\nieeler, Frcetho, Cheney, Towne, Taggart, 
Sweetser. See Axcestky Tables ^V-^. 

GG^ YIII. Rn-2. Helen Jane Buffam [Olive B. CQWYL 39G], born 
in liichmond, X. II. 

QCi^. YIII. S03. Josepli WilUani White, her husband, born in Y'hit- 
ingham, Yt. A grocer. Residence: Athol, Mass. 



TjaUTTI OEXERATIOy. 7G5 

^\v. White is a sun of ^\'ill;a1u aii.l Liiry (Warren) White. His father 
is a fanner, of Whitinyham, Vt. Axcksiky Tauli:.s -j-Vj. 

G6^ VIII. S'J3 Mary Eliziabetli BnlTum [OliNe I!. 6l;\ VII. 39C], 
probably born in Richmond, N. II. 

■ GG^ VIII. 5.9J. Wales Jilf/t'Iotv J?.";n/^'.7. lier liusbaiul, burn in Rich- 
mond, N. n. A cooper. Residence: ^leridcn, Conn. 

3!r. I'ennett is a son of Amos and Lno'ctia (IhiiTnm) Ijennett. His 
father is a farmer, of Richmond. Anci:st)'A' T.vlli:s -J.V'^.. 

66^ MIL S9C. Albort Pickering' ry.,,! Renssehier GG'. VII. 399]. 
An engineer. Rejidence : New London, Coini. 

GG\ VIII. S9G. Phebe II. Fcn'jnr, his wife, born in Now London, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Pickering is ca daughter of Christoplier C. and Charlotte C. (Harris) 
Fengar. He is a bridge-tender. Axcestky Tables ^™^,. 

6G^ VIH. R9S. Frederic I. Pickerina^ [Van Rensselaer GG'\ VII. 
399], born in Richmond, N. II. A locomotive engineer. Residence: 
Providence, R. I. 

6G^ VIII. SOS. Mary A. Ilacl-cft, his Avife, born in Halifax. 
Mrs. Pickering is a daughter of ^licliael and Martha Hackett. Ayti;sTi:r 
Tables ^,,. 

G6^ VIII. 900. Byron Ernest Pickering [Amn/iah K. GG*'. VII. 
400], born in Sliaron, ]\rass. A farmer. Residence : Fi-cmont, Iowa. 

CG'. VIII. 000. Carrie Luircila Jlii/hce, liis v;ife, born in Auslin- 
Lurg, Ohio. 

]\[rs. Pickering is a daughter of Edward D. and Jeruslia Lorinda (I'erry) 
Iligbee. He is a farmer, of TroA', lov/a. See A^■cK^TUY 'J'aui.ks ^o"-,„. 

G7. VIII. 910. Sarali L. G-ray [Louisa GT. VIL 4u2], born in 
Ward's Grove, 111. 



7C6 THE nCKEEIXG GENEALOGY. 



67. YIII. OJO'. Vi'Uson I'v/lcU, her first husband, horn in Norwich, 
N. Y., diL-iI in S;ileni, Mo. A physician and dnigg-ist. Residence: Salem. 

Mr. l\-llett was a son of iJavirl and Aurora (Arnohl) Pellett. Jlis 
father was a farmer and uioneyduaner, of Norwich. Ancksiky Tables {!j'\,. 

G7. VIII. .9/(>^ Joseph Jictiri/ Wilcox, her second liusband, born 
in Warwick County, Ind. A Uve-stock dealer. Kesidence : Cofleyville, 
Kansas. 

Mr. AVih;ox is a son of Samuel Sibley and Sarah Euiily (Deforest) 
"Wilcox. His father was a merchant, of Shenandoah, lov/a. Axcestky 
Taeles {^^,. 

67. A'lII. 911. George Arcliibald Birch [Polly 67. \ll. 403], 
born in Sunnnit, N. Y., died in Albany, N. Y. A Avholesale grocer. 
Kesidence : Albany. 

]\lr. Birch -was the senior member of the firm of G. A. Birch & Co., of 
Albany. He held tlie office of shcrilT. 

67. YIII. 91]^. Mart/ Ann .Pierce, his first wife, born in AVorcester, 
jnT. Y., died in Albany, N. Y. 
Axc-KSTRT Tables ^i\o- 

67. VIII. 91T\ Sarah C'oolc, his secon.d wife. 

Mi'S. Birch is a dauyhter of Zobulou and ?iiargaret (Van Patten) Cook. 
lie is a farmer, of Charlton, N. Y. Axcestry Tables g-"^^\.=. 

67. VIII. 912. Mary Birch [Polly 67. VII. 403], born in Summit 
N. Y., died in Chicago, 111. 

67. VIII. Oli. John Cloi"es Tiavisoi:, her husband, born in Brad- 
ford, Eng. A mei-cliant. Besiilence: Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Davison is a son of the Pev. John and Charlotte (Temperton) 
Davison, of ^Poronto, Ontario. .;V>,-cestj:y Tables ^^\. 

67. VIII. 913. Carlton Emmons Pickering [Jo.siah 67. YIT. 404], 
born in Worcester, N. Y. A real-estate broker. Kesidence: llornclls- 
ville, N. Y. 



EIGHTH GEXEBATIOX. 767 

G7. VIII. OJo. Luci'cltff Jiid!, liis wltV, bom in I'owanda, Pa. 

Mrs. Pickeri!!-- is ii dau-hlii- of Colonel D. M. and Safronia (Patric) 
Bull. Her ancestry includes the follo\vin_:4' families: Bidl, Ballard, Patric. 
See AxcKSTKY T.iia.Ks -^y^. 

G7. VIII. 915. Josiali Pickerina; [Jur^iah 67. VII. 404], born in East 
Worcester, X.Y. A connnercial traveller. Pesidence : P.inylianipton, N. Y. 

Mr. Pickering has resided in Sniithborouyh, Tioga Centre, and Ouego, 

N. y. 

C7. VIII. 91o. Jfai'if I'i'ancls MacdonaJd, his wife; born in luch- 
monilville, N- Y. 

Mrs. Pickering is a daugliter of Dr. Charles II. Macdonald, of East 
Worcester, N. \". Axcestrv Taiu.ks \^^\. 

67. VIII. 920. Jwlius A. Pickering [Albert 67. VII. 406], born in 
Worcester, N. Y. A fanner. Residence: Geneva, Iowa. 

67. VIII. 920. Lof/xsta Gates, his wife, born in Painesville, Ohio. 
I^lrs. Pickering is a daughter of Dr. Isaac and Aiuinda (Millett) Gates, 
of :\IorsGville, 111. Axcestry Tablf^ :^^V- 

G7. VIII. 9-2n. George Eircli A.Wjott [Diancy 67. VII. 40S], born 
in Brookfleld, Vt. A law3'cr. Pcsidence : Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. Abbott, Williams, 1S72, was prepared for college at the Brooklyn 
Polytechnic and the Collegiate Institute. After graduating he travelled in 
Europe, and on his return to lliis country he studied law with the Hon. 
Abraliani P. Lawreiiee. In JS74, he received the degree of LL. B. fj-om 
the Cohnnbia Law School, and shortly afterwards was admitted to the bar. 
Two }X'ar3 later, he 1)ec:une counsel to the Public Administrator in King's 
Couniv, X. Y., and from that tinie Ids practice was confmed ahnost exclu- 
sively to Brooklyn. In A]n'Il, B'^81, he was appointed, and, in April, 1S86, 
was reappointed, Puldic Administrator in King's County, and, on Eeb. 9, 
1889, he was appointed Surrogate of King's County to fdl the vacancy 
caused by the death of Abralianr Lott. The following Xovember he was 
elected to this olllce for six years, and at the close of his term he was 
re-elected. 



7GS THE PICKKIUXG GEXLALOGY. 

C7. Vill. !>..!-j. Ecd TopjuiKj J.'ecre, liis \viU\ lioni in I'rooklyii, X. Y. 
]\rrs. Al.ibutt is a d;ui-liter of llciu-y Gardner and Louit^a S. (Topping; i 
Rcevo. ]Ie is a mcrcluiut, of Broukl) n, X. Y. Axckstkv Tai.i.es ^y^- 

67. Vni. 925. Alice May Abl:ott [Diancy C7. Vll. 40S], bom in 
Brookfiuld, Vt. 

G7. Vlll. .935. John Lcicis SciahJcr, lier husband, born in "Wallaju- 
nug-g-a, Judia. xV clergyman, liesidunee : Jersey City, N. J. 

Mr. Scudder is a son of the Eev. Henry 31artin and I'^mny (Lewis) 
Scuddcr, of Chicago, III Axcustuy Tables ^^{\. 

G7. VilL 929. Mary Elizabetli Slieldoii [ilary 67. VII. 409], 
born in Albany, N. Y., died in Albany. 

She married verv young, and removed to the ^Vest witlj her husband, 
but left Inra and returned to Albany. 

67. VlII. 9J9. Bishop Pei'h-ins, her husband. 

ANCr.SlIlY lAP.LF.S iiZ- 

GS. Vill. 931. Edv.^ard Alexander Pickering: [Ferdinand GS.A'IT. 
410], 1>orn in Wincliester, X. H. A ]}ainter. Eesidence : 'W inchestcr. 

68. Mil. 9J1\ Mary EJlis, his first wife, born in Ilardwick, Mass. 
]\Irs. Pickering was a daughter of Emory B. and Mary (Stimpson) Ellis. 

AncesIky Taiiles I'^V'- 

68. VIII. 93T. Emili! B. JRichardsou, his second wife, born in 
Ashuelot, N. II. 

Mrs. Pickering is a daughter of Samuel and Lucretia (Fleming) Hill. 
AxcESTKY Iables -I'i'-i'-- 

GS. Vin. 938. Granville ITapoleon Pickering [Alcander 6S. YTl. 
412], probably born and died in AYinchester, X. II. 

Mr. Pickering served in the army during the early part of the Rebellion. 

68. VIII. 941. Gulian Pickering Rixford [Elvira 08. VII. 413], 
born in East Ilighgate, Vt. A journalist. Eesidence : Sau Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



Fianrii gexeuation. 769 

}Ar. Rivturd gT,iiln;itea, 'Max 3, 1SG4, in civil fn--ineering- at the McGill 
Univ(,')>ity, ^Montreal, I'roviuce uf Quebec, and was regularly aclniitted, 
July lo, 1S(J4, Ijy the -xvfnunc-nt lioavd of cxuiiiiii(.TS, as a provincial land 
surveyor, at Quebec, V. Q. lie [iractised his profession ut Ix-'lfurd, P. Q., 
move or less, unlil 18ij7, and, during the last two }'ears, he was engag'cd in 
.1 niaiiufacturing- l;)usine>s at the same place. In LSOT, he \vent to Cali- 
fornia, and ^}lent the first }-ear after his arrival i)i a niacliine-shop in San 
Francisco. He then acce})ted a p(.i:^ition on the editorial staff of the Even- 
ing- Bulletin, and afterward he wa-- (ov several }-ears the commercial editor 
of the Daily MorniiiL;- rail, lie became the business manayer i»f the San 
Francisco Evening Bulieiin. and, afier thirteen years of service in that 
position, he resigned it, to attend to his private interests. He is now 
devoting his attention to tlie Invo Marble Conijiany, of v>-]iich he has been 
manager for two years, and of which he is still treasurer, and one of the 
board of directors. 

68. VIII. i'.^i. CaraJine C'orcij, his wife, born at Stanbridge, P. Q., 
Canada. 

Mi's. Pixfoid is a daughter of Ilii'ani and ]\rary Anne (Palmer) Corey, 
of Stanbridge. lie is a pi-nvincial land snrveyor. Antestuy Tables j^-^j. 

68. A'lII. 042. Emmet Hawkins Rixford [Elvira G8. Yll. 413], 
born in East Ilighgate, Vt. A lavryer. Residence : San Francisco. Cal. 

Jlr. Pixford entered tlie University of Vermont, at Burlinglon, in 1S60, 
but left it at the end of his sophomore year. He took the degree of 
P. C. L. in the law depnrrmr-nt of tlie ]\IcGill University, 3Iontreal, in 3Iay, 
1865, and v,-as admitted to the bar at 3Iont)-eal, Canada, Nov. G, 18G.i. In 
January, 1869, he went to California, where lie was admitted to l:he bar in 
1870, and vrhere he continues to practise his profession. He is connected 
v/itli one of the leading savings-banks of San Francisco, as attorney. 

During his leisure hours he has deAOted his attention to gra])C-growing 
and wine-making. He is the author of a Iiook entitled "The "Wine Press 
and the Cellar, a 3Ian.nal for the "Wine 3Iaker and the Cellarman " [1883]. 

68. VIII. 043. Calliarine Tilnnf/Iidst Ilafsci/, his wife, born in 
Lodi, N. Y. 



770 thj: riCKKi;L\G genealogy. 



Mrs. Kixford is u niember of tlio 3Iariii Kip ()r]jlKiuage, of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

She is a daughter of Judge Charles and Juha (Leake) Ilal.sey. lie was 
a judge of the Superior Court, of San Francisco. Her ancestry includes 
the fullowing fauiilies: lialsey, Leake, Tillinghast, Lamb. See Akcestuv 
Tables ^^^. 

G8. VIIL 9-17. Ellen Louisa G-reene [Emeline 68. VIL 416], born 
in J'rovidcnce, E. L, died in Chicago, 111. 

68. VIII. 047. Jdnies Guest Dtccn, her luisband, born in Athy, 
County of Kildare, Ireland. A real-esiale dealer. Residence: Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Dwen is a .son of John and Elizabeth (Ghiest) Dwen. Axcestkt 
Tables -f{\. 

69. VIIL 972. Ella Deborah Davis [Harriet 69. VIL 430], born in 
Eoyalston, 3Iass. 

69. VIIL 972. Ira David Marvison, her luisband, born in Prince- 
vllle, 111. A I'lirnier. Residence: Mackslnu'g, Io\va. 

Mr. Harrison is a son of James and ^Lu-y Susan (Evens) Harrison. 
His father was a hlacksinith. Axcestkv Taf.lf.s ^'■^\. 

69. VIII. 977. Abby Eugenia Davis [Harriet 69. VII. 430], born in 
Royalston, Ma.ss. 

69. VIII. 977. Jesse WilUani. ITnJe, her husband, born in Schuyler 
County, 111. A fanner. Residence: Littletoii, LI. 

Mr. Llale is a son of Joshua and Elizabeth (Lartlon) Hale. Ancestry 
Tables ^'^^. 

69. VHl. 984. Charles Snmncr Clark [Hannah M. GO. VIL 431]. 
born in A\"arwick, r\Iass. A shoe-packer. Residence : Lynn, Mass. 

69. VIII. 954. Jmu J. 21iU>nfu, his wife, born in Xe^^■ Brunswick. 
Mrs. Clark is a daughter of John and Mary Milburn. Anxestkv 



EIGIITH GKXEJIATIOX. Ill 



(39. Vlil. Obj. Mary Josephine Clark [ilauinili xM. GO. VII. 431], 
born in "Warwick, Mass. 

69. VIII. D8o. I'l'anlc i:imcr Stone, her husband, born in Peabody, 
Mass. A shoe-cultor. Kesidence : Lynn, Mass. 

Mr. Stone is a son of Daniel and Hannah 0. Stone, of Peabody, Mass. 
AxcFSTEY Tables \^l\- 

60. VITI. 991. E-mma Jane Lamb [Hannali 69. VII. 4.38], born in 
Sutton, Mass. 

69. YIII. DOl. Gcorr/c JJo'bert Mogers, lier husband, born in Up- 
ton, Mass. An ice-dealer. Ivesidence : Vrestboroupli, Mass. 

Mr. Rogers is a son of George Gould and Sophia Taft (Southland) 
Rogers. His father is a fanner, of "Westliorough. Axcestrv Tables ^"^. 

69. VIII. 994. Ella Eva Cora Kibby [Eunice 69. VII. 440], born 
in Chelsea, Mass. 

69. VIII. 904. J- -^^(^'^oii Ilaaaivay, her husband, born in Chelsea^ 
Mass. 

Mr. Iladavray is a son of Jolni T. and Catherine E. (Carter) ITadaway, 
of Chelsea. His father was formerly a custom house ofticer. Axc?;etky 
Tables ^"x- 

69. Vill. 905. Frank Curtis Kibby [Eunice 09. VII. 440], born in 
Chelsea, Mass. A jeweller. Residence : Chelsea. 

69. VIII. 905. Mattie Jfcnj StudJeij, his -^^•ife, born in Tlingham, 
Mass. 

j\Irs. Kibl)V is a dauL;-hter of George and ^Martha Augusta (Hurapln-ey) 
Studley. lie is an undoi'taker, of Chelsea, Mass. Ancestky Tables :j-'^V. 

70. VIII. 997. Herman Eiigene Ward [.Alary E. 70. Vll. 441], 
born in Putney, Vt. A freight brakemari. Residence: Wheaion, 111. 

70. VIII. 007. Marij I'rancis JIarsetUes, his wife, born in New 
York City. 



772 THE riCKJ:L-iyG G/'XJCJLOGY: 

Mrs. "Ward is a daughter cif Adrino and Hester (Gfovdon) Marsuillrj. 
lie is a book-keeper, of New York City. A.xcEb-iRY Tai;li;s .;'''';-. 

70. VTII. 1001. Minnie Halia Battles [Jame.s IT. VO. VH. 444], 
born in Xininger, Minn. 

70. \'III. 100^. John C(arL-c, her husbraid, born in Montreal, Can- 
ada. A boiler-maker. Eesidc-nce: Brainord. Minn. 

Mr. Clarke is. a sou uf Heiny and Annu (Dixon) Clarke. His fal'ier is 
a spring-maker, of Iji'ainerd, Minn. A^ci;sii:x Tables 7^ ;.'y. 

70. Vni. 1005. Nettie Elizabeth Battles [James II. 70. VII. 414], 
born in Turner Junction, 111. 

70. VIII. lOO-j. IVlUiai)} Jlorton Jl'oohjyidge, lier husband, born 
in Lo)idon, Eng. A railroad agent and telegraph operator. Residence: 
Dawes, i\ront. 

Mr. Wooldridge is a son of ]»Iorton and Catherine (Calahau) TVooldiidge. 
AxcESTKY Tables l'i\. 

70. VIII. 1006. Jessie Jane Battles [James H. 70. VII. 4-14], born 
in St. Charles, 111. 

70. VIII. 1003. David Scon ZittlchaleA, her husband, born in Gar- 
den Grove, lovra. A machinist. Eesidence : Mandari, North Dak. 

Mr. Littlehalcs has been an alderman of the city of Jiandan. 

lie is a son of John "Williain and Mary Scott (Suter) Littlehales. Kis 
father is a machinist, of Rawlins, Wyo. AxcESTEr Tables ^pg. 



5676