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Full text of "Picturesque New London and its environs : Grofton, Mystic, Montville, Waterford, at the commencement of the twentieth century"




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PICTURESQUE 

NEW LONDON 

AND ITS ENVIRONS 

— ©roton == mivstic == imontville == UUaterford — 

At the Commencement of the Twentieth Century 




fRotable jfeatures of Untcrcst 

OLD LANDMARKS AND FAMOUS PLACES — THE WHALING INDUSTRY — EARLY 

'^ COMMERCE— A FINE MILITARY AND NAVAL RECORD — HOMES — BEAUTIFUL 

SCENERY — PARKS AND OUTING SPOTS — CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS— HOTELS — 

TRANSIT SYSTEMS — MANUFACTORIES AND BUSINESS HOUSES — ADVANTAGES 

AS A COMMERCIAL, MANUFACTURING AND RESIDENTIAL CENTER 

ILLUSTRATED 

With Views ot tlie City and Its Environs and Portraits of Some of 
the Representative Men ot the Past and Present 

* 

NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT 
PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN BOOK EXCHANGE 

1901 

Printed by The Journal of Commerce Company, Providence, R. I. 

Copyrighted, 1901, by The American Book Exchange, Hartford, Connecticut. 




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THE GREAT RAILROAD DRAWBRIDGE SPANNING THE RIVER THAMES. 

The Drawbridge Across the River Thames. Between Groton and New London, is Just North of the City, 
and is One of the Largest Bridges of Liiie Character in the World. 



•flntroduction* 




New Lon- 
don is one of 
the 111 est ro- 
mantic and 
pleasing 
cities on the 
New Eng- 
land coast. 
Its location is 
line, and its 
harbor mag- 
nificent. Its 
liistoiy is a 
fascinating 
story, and it 
is one of the most delightful of sum- 
mer resorts. 

The manufacturing establishments 
in the city are doing a large and profit- 
able business, imparting vitality and 
strencfth to the conimunitv, adding to 
its wealth and fame. With the impetus 
given to all business, and to local and 
foreign commerce especially, by the 
present policy of the government at 
Washington, the increase in population 
during the last ten years has been 
about four thousand — in the next de- 



JOHN WINTHROP, 
Founder and Governor. 



StacK 
Annax 

5 
o>\\ 



cade it will probably be from eight to ten. 

"Picturesque New London and its 
Environs"' presents in acceptable style 
the claims of the city and its neighbors 
to the favorable consideration of home 
seekers and progressive business enter- 
prises. No point of interest has lieen 
neglected in either text or illustration 
that will help to give a correct im- 
pression of life hereabout. 

The thanks of the public and of the 
publishers are due to Messrs. Eugene 
L. Bailey, Charles E. Pratt, F. C. 
Washburn and F. L. Kenyon, of New 
London, and to George E. Tingley, of 
Mystic, Connecticut, photographers, 
and to .lohn McGinley, President of 
the New London Board of Trade, for 
courteous and able assistance in pub- 
lisliing the work. 

Without the aid of the business 
men and the liberal suliscriptions re- 
ceived for books and illustrations, so 
large and creditable a publication 
could not have been made. We thank 
the public-spirited citizens sincerely 
for their faith and support. 

The Publishers. 



Errata ; Page 10, Old Nathan Hale School Building has been removed to Ye Antientest Buriall Ground, 
and restored to its original style of architecture. Page 43. first date in title shonhl read 1773; not 1873. On 
page 46, tlie name Rev. EdwaVd Brown, should read Rev. Edward W. Bacon. Page 58, Charles F. Ednej^, 
formerly mana'.;er for F A. Rogers & Co., is now proprietor of the brokerage business in the offices previ- 
ously occupied by the Rogers Co. Pages 89 and 97, the name James H.'Newcomb, should read James 
Newcomb. 



2014937 




M. WILSON DART, 

Present Mayor of New London. 




AUGUSTUS BRANDEGEE. ROBERT COIT. 

CYRUS G. BECKWITH. 
RALPH WHEELER. GEORGE F. TL\KER 



EX-MAYORS OF NEW LONDON. 
5 








GEORGE E. STARR. jameS L. IOHNSTON. 

THOMAS M. WALLER. 
HIRAM WILLYS. h. S. WILLIANLS. 



EX-MAYORS OF NEW LONDON. 
C 



VIEW AT BROAD AND HUNTINGTON STREETS. 

At the Left of the Engraving is the Residence of Walter Learned. Broad Street, and at the Right, at the Junction of 
Broad and Huntington Streets. " Mount Vernon." Residence of Elisha S. Palmer. 



Contents. 



CHAPTER I — The Old New London — Sketch of New London From the Early Days to the 
Present — Story of a Famous Shipping Port of the Ohien Times — Golden Epoch of the 
Whalinp: Days — How the Old Town Displayed Her Patriotism in the War for Independence 

— The Bright Record of Her Sons in All the Nation's Wars 9-"J(> 

CHAPTER II — New Loni>on of To-Dav — Advantages of Location as a Port and Railroad Center 

— New London Harbor — General and Local Transportation Lines— Revival of Shipbuilding 
Interests 27-32 

CHAPTER III — New London of To-Dav -New London's First Educational Bequest— More 
Recent Endowments — Brief Sketch of the Public School System of To-Day — Its Etlicacy 
and Evolution — Introduction of New and Beneficial Features — Modern School Buildings — 
Special Incentives to Pupils- The Churches of a Community Indicative of Its Moral Tone 

— Outline of the History of the Oldest Keliffioiis Society in the City — Reference to Other 
Churches and Sacred Organizations — Some Eminent Divines Who Have Been Identified With 

New London — Portraits of the Present Pastors — The City's Fine Church Edifices 33-4i> 

CHAPTER IV — New London of To-Dav — Financial Institutions — Savings and National Banks 

— Bankers and Brokers — Postal, Telegraph, and Telephone Facilities 51-58 

CHAPTER V — New London of To-Day — The Manufactories of New London — Manufacturers 
Whose Ability, Courage, and Industry Have Aided in Building Up and Maintaining the City 
of To-Day 59-72 

CHAPTER VI — New London of To-Day — City Government — The New London Board of Trade 

— Distinguished Men of the Fast and Present — The New London Press 73-82 

CHAPTER VII — New London of To-Day — Some Elegant and Substantial Residences of the 

City and its Suburbs — Public Parks and Outing Spots — Places of Amusement 83-95 

CHAPTER VIII — New London of To-Day — Some Fine Residences on Main, Huntington, Jay, 
Franklin and Blackball Streets, Ocean, and Other Avenues — The Pequot Colony — Recrea- 
tions and Amusements 97-107 

CHAPTER IX — New L()ND0n of To-Day — Commercial Interests — New London as a Trade 
Center — Building Activity — Mercantile Enterprise — Principal Business Men and Promi- 
nent Concerns 109-122 

CHAPTER X — Principal Business Streets of New London — The City's Bright Commercial Outlook 

— Commercial and Mercantile Progress — Enterprising Concerns 123-132 

CHAPTER XI— Favorable Trade Influences — A Popular Summer Resort and Successful Com- 
mercial Center— Principal Hotels —Some Progressive Business Enterprises 133-144 

CHAPTER XII — Historic Gr()T<)n — Revolutionary Interest — Ruins of Fort Griswold and the 
Spot Where Ledyard Fell -The Groton Monument and Monument House — Note<l Men of 
Groton's Past — Brief Sketch of Colonel Ledyard, and of Anna Warner Bailey — Modern 
Groton — Villages Within the Township — Churches and Schools " 145-156- 

CHAPTER XIII — Groton of To-Dav — Contemidated Improvements — Noteworthy Residences 

— Mercantile Enterprises and Mercantile and Professional Men ' 157-162 

CHAPTER XIV — Environs of New London — Waterford — Montville — Norwich — Allyn's Point 

— Gale's Ferry — Navy Yard— Groton Station —Noank 163-171 

CHAPTER XV— Environs of New London- Mystii! —The Beautiful Scenery of a Charming 
American Coast Town— The l^elightful Land and Water Views — Noteworthy Churches — 
Homes and Points of General Interest — Portraits of Men Prominent in the Seafaring and 
Commercial Life of Mystic , 173-I8& 

CHAPTER XVI — Waterford, South — Jordan Village — Oswegatchie — Millstone— Pleasure Beach 

— East Lyme and Niantic —Crescent Beach — Blackball— Lyme— Saybrook Junction— The 
Connecticut Valley to Middletown and Hartford . , . . ' 187-192. 




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THE SHAW-PERKINS MANSION-BANK STREET. 

BUILT IN 1755. BY THE ARCADIANS. OR HUGUENOTS. FOR CAPTAIN NATHANIEL SHAW. 

Washington. After the Siege of Boston, by Appointment, and on Invitation from Nathaniel Shaw. Jr.. an Officer of the United 

Colonies. Holding Commission Under the Certificate of John Hancoclt. IVIet Here Commodore Esek Hopkins. 

First Commander of the American Navy, to Consider Naval Interests. John Paul Jones and 

Nathan Hale Have Been Guests Within Its Hospitable Walls. In 1824 LaFayette. 

on His Return Visit to America, Was Entertained in the Mansion. 

Ipicturesque 1Rew ILondon^ 

Chapter H* 

THE OLD NEW LONDON. 

SKETCH OF NEW LONDON FROM THE EARLY DAYS TO THE PRESENT- 
STORY OF A FAMOUS SHIPPING PORT OF THE OLDEN TIMES- 
GOLDEN EPOCH OF THE WHALING DAYS— HOW THE OLD TOWN DIS- 
PLAYED HER PATRIOTISM IN THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE— THE 
BRIGHT RECORD OF HER SONS IN ALL THE NATION'S WARS. 



New London, founded by John 
Winthrop in 1646, is an old town, 
old even for New England, and com- 
pared with the towns and cities of the 
newer civilization of the Western 
Hemisphere, moss-grown in antiquity. 
In the early days of the colonies the 
site of the city attracted the Pilgrims 
by its rugged beauty, obvious advan- 
tages, and promise of future growth 
and greatness in commerce. At every 
stage of its development the citj' has 
fulfilled the j^romise of those early 
days, though growth has been slow in 
outward and visible signs of prosjjerity. 



Great wealth, however, has been 
brought into the town by the adven- 
turous sailors who carried the flag of 
their country to the farthest ends of 
the earth and made the names and 
private signals of vessels, owners, and 
agents known on the coasts of all 
countries. The manifest destiny of 
New London has been towards com- 
merce and the various industries con- 
nected with its pursuit, and the peo- 
ple of New London iiave looked for 
many years with steadfast hope and 
belief that the day would come when 
the city should take tlie place which 



(2) 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew ILondon, 



Nature evidently destined it to occupy 
among the ports of the country. In 
our day it is difficult to realize the 
obstacles that confronted the early 
settlers, the hardy hand that came to 
the shores of the Thames to Imild a 
city, establish homes, and found a 
government in keeping with the tradi- 
tions and customs of tlie English home 
they had so lately left in order to 
enjoy the 
blessings 
of liberty 
w h i c h 
have ever 
been pur- 
chasable 
only b }■ 
great sac- 
rifice. 

J o H N 
WlNTH- 

R o p, the 
founder, 
\y a s the 
son of 
JohnWin- 
throp \vho 
led from 
England 
the sec- 
ond Puri- 
t a n enii- 
g r a t i o n 
and after- 
wards be- 
came governor of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony. His paternal grandfather was 
Adam Winthrop, of Suffolk, England. 
To the younger Winthrop undisput- 
ably belongs the title of founder of 
New London, for he determined the 
location of the town and promoted its 
inception with fervor and confidence, 
even to the extent of investing liis 
entire fortune in the enterprise. He 
was l)orn in Kngland, February 12tli, 
1605. Wiien only 16 years of age 
he entered the University of Dublin, 
where he I'emained for three years. 
Two yeare later he enlisted under the 
banner of the Duke of Buckingham 




OLD SCHOOL BUILDING -UNION 

AS IT APPEARS TODAY. 



The Old Union School. In Which Nathan Hale Once Taught, is One of the City's 

Interesting Objects. It Still Remains, a Reminder of New London's 

Heroic Part in the Stirring Times When All Other interests 

Were Sacrificed to the "Spirit of '76." 



in the useless attempt to succor the 
Protestants of Rochelle, France. He 
first arrived in America, November 
2nd, 1630, later returning to England, 
where he remained for about one 
year. In October, 163.5, he again came 
to America and at once interested 
himself in the affairs of the colonists. 
The name first given to New Lon- 
don — its Indian name— ^was Nameaug. 

I n d i a n 
nam e s 
were de- 
scriptive, 
and Nam- 
eaug was 
supposed 
to refer to 
fish, im- 
plying 
that the 
w a t e r s 
about the 
town af- 
forded 
good fish- 
i u g . It 
w a s also 
known as 
Pequot, 
after the 
t r i b e of 
I n d i a n s 
of that 
name,who 
under the 
Sachem Sassacus, or Tatobam, as 
he was often called, inhabited the 
region which lay to the southeast 
of the Connecticut River settlements. 
By these names the {)lantation was 
known until March 24th, 1658, when 
legislative permission was granted the 
inhabitants to call the town New Lon- 
don. For ten years previous to that 
time they had wished to show their 
affection for the land of their birth by 
naming their new place of abode 
London, in honor of England's prin- 
cipal city: and no doubt they were 
highly gratified l)y this concession of 
the Legislature. It was then in order 



lljlil lllll'' 



STREET. 



10 



Picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



to name " the fair river of the Mohe- 
gans " the Tliames, Imt at just what 
date it derived the name, hestowed in 
honor of its famous prototype in Eng- 
land, is not certain. 

The earliest inhabitants of New 
London came from Cape Ann, Massa- 
chusetts — Gloucester jjeople to whom 
the sea furnished a living, and to 
whom New London seemed homelike 
in that respect at least. Parson Rich- 
ard Blinman, who, previous to his im- 



tliis time something about the Indians 
whom they were to dispossess, but 
with whom they had little trouble, for 
the natives were in the main well dis- 
posed toward the palefaces when 
treated with any degree of fairness. 
Breaking ground for dwelling's and 
for agricultural purposes was a heart- 
breaking task, as one may readily un- 
derstand who is at all familiar with 
the rocky country which stretches 
back from the waterside to the bor- 




THE HEMPSTEAD HOUSE— OLDEST BUILDING IN NEW LONDON. 

HEMPSTEAD STREET. NEAR JAY. 

Built in 1678. by Sir Robert Hempstead, Who Came from England, and Was One of the Founders of Hempstead, 

Long Island. He Came to New London About 1643. The House Has Been in Possession of the 

Family and Descendants for Two Generations. It is Still Owned by One of the Family. 



migration to this country, occupied 
the pastorate in Chepstow, Monmouth- 
shire, England, was the spiritual and 
temporal head of the pioneers. The 
rule in early colonial days was obedi- 
ence to ecclesiastical authority, and it 
was cheerfully rendered as a matter of 
right in all things. 

The settlers came prepared for 
hardships and privations. They were 
accustomed to the rigors of the New 
England climate, and they knew by 



ders of the State of Coiniecticut. The 
early settler, however, was not a man 
to be dismayed by obstacles. The 
pioneers of that day were made of 
sterner stuff than that which gives in 
easily, and with a fixed purpose and 
an unalterable determination, they set 
about their work, and in compara- 
tively few years great headway had 
l)een made. In 1665, within the first 
quarter of a century of the life of the 
settlement, the home government was 



11 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




VIEW OF " THE TOWNE'S ANTIENTEST BURIALL GROUND." 

In the Left Background of the Picture is the Slight Elevation Formed by the Tomb of Jonathan Brooks. On September 

6th. 1781. Benedict Arnold, the Traitor. From This Spot. Watched and Directed the 

Destruction of the Town and the Homes of His Friends. 



petitioned to make Xew London a port 
of entry, but for some reason tlie jjeti- 
tion was never granted, nor were sub- 
sequent ones to the same end deemed 
worthy of consideration by the rulers 
over the sea, who seemed early to have 
laid aside all consideration for the col- 
onists, and planted the seed that about 
a century later grew to rebellion and 
successful revolution. New London 
persevered and began to build and 
employ small vessels for coasting to 
near-by ports, and soon the field of 
operations was extended, and Boston, 
Newport and New York — Manhattan 
then, as now — exchanged products 
with New London. Virginia later 
came into commercial connection with 
New London, and as years went by a 
more anilntious spirit took possession 
of the people, and New London ves- 
sels became known in the West Indies, 
in Spain, France and Great Britain. 
It was not all plain sailing. Of course 
there were difficulties to be overcome, 
losses to l)e met, such as always attend 



commerce on the sea, and the financial 
condition of the colonies liampered 
even the boldest spirits, for money 
was powerful in those days, as it is in 
ours. 

The people were not permitted to 
pursue uninterruptedly the paths of 
peace. There were ware with the 
Indians, war with the French, and 
trouble of various kinds that beset all 
of the colonists in New England ; and 
New London bore its full sliare in 
them all. As became the inliabitants 
of a seaport town, to whom danger 
was a part of their daily life, and to 
whom the adage, ■' nothing venture, 
nothing have," had more than com- 
mon significance, they were brave 
and venturesome. In all the wars, 
from the earliest times down to the 
Spanish war of 1898, New London 
men have borne more than their j^ro- 
portion of the burden in filling the 
ranks of the army and manning the 
ships of war. To the War of the Hevo- 
hition Connecticut sent more men pro 



12 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



rata than any other state, and New 
London was represented by more men 
proportionately than any other town in 
the State. It was the same in the Civil 
War, when New London made prompt 
and patriotic response to President Lin- 
coln's call for volunteers in April, 1861. 
The city sent a full company of men 
with the Second Connecticut Volun- 
teers, who went to the front under 
the command of Col. Alfred H. Terry. 
It was the color-bearing company of 
the regiment, and participated in the 
first battle of Bull Run. Many of the 
memljers of this company afterwartls 
distinguished themselves as officers of 
other regiments in the United States 
service. For the three years' period 
New London furnished full companies 
for the Fonrtli — afterwards the First 
Heavy Artillerj— the Fifth, the Tenth, 
Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth and 
Twenty-First ; and two companies for 
the Twenty-Sixth Connecticut, a nine 
months' regiment. In addition to 
these troops, a great many recruits 



were enlisted from the town and for- 
warded to the front to fill the ranks of 
depleted regiments. Aside from her 
officers and men who served in the 
navy, New London must Ije credited 
with nearly twelve hundred as her 
contriliution to the great Union armies 
of '61-'65. 

The Spanish-American War of 1898 
also gave opportunity for New London 
to show that the present generation is 
as ardent in its patriotism and love of 
country and liberty as were those gal- 
lant men of the past. Three compan- 
ies, A, D, and I, Third Regiment, Con- 
necticut Volunteers, responded to the 
call of President McKinley for men to go 
to Cuba and Porto Rico: and a number 
of the members of tiie ITnited States 
Signal Corps were also New Lon- 
doners. 

These evidences of patriotism may 
be regarded as tokens that the 
spirit of the early settlers, as to fight- 
ing at least, has survived to the pres- 
ent da}'. 




THE GROTON SHORE-LOOKING ACROSS THE HARBOR FROM NEW LONDON. 

Showing the Fort Griswold Monument on Groton Heights in the Right Background, and in the Foreground 
the Ferryboat. Colonel Lcdyard. which Plies Between New London and Groton. 

13 



Ipicturcsque 1Rcw London. 



The town possessed ■• chaiacters " 
in its early days, and of many and 
varied kinds they were, tlie ]{ogerrnes, 
for instance, who were continually in 
trouble with the constituted author- 
ities, and no sooner out of one conflict 
with the courts than they were in- 
volved in another. That sort of peo- 
ple, however, are inseparable from a 
community in which strength and 
tirnniess are necessities, and it was 
fiom such folk that sprang the men 



British Islands, who were not consid- 
ered foreigners in those days. French 
names particularly continue to this 
day. and will proViably be identified 
with New London until the end of 
time. The commerce of this city bore 
no small pioportion to that of New 
England up to the beginning of our 
troubles with the mother country, and 
it \\ as not long after the struggle for 
liberty and independence had ended 
in our favor, that the restless spirit of 




UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE-BANK STREET. 
THE CUSTOM HOUSE WAS BUILT IN 1833. 



who dared resist oppression from the 
Old Country, and later furnished the 
pioneers who penetrated the great 
West and laid the foundations, broad 
and deep, for the phenomenal growth 
and prosperity of that section of the 
United States. 

The city prospered iis time went on. 
Its natural advantages as a seaport at- 
tracted foreignei'S of condition, who 
came here to engage in trade with the 
countries of Europe, among them being 
many French, Spanish and Portuguese ; 
1)ut a greater proportion were from the 



New London was again engaged in 
making a new connection with the 
ports of the world. There were, at 
one time, about the opening of the 
present century, a fleet of about 100 
brigs — " jockeys "" they were called 
from the nature of their trade — plying 
between this port and those of the 
West Indies. They took out hoi'ses 
and mules, and returned with rum, the 
material for its manufacture, and mo- 
lasses. New England rum was an im- 
portant factor in those days at all 
social gatherings, and in the various 



14 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 



mechanical pursuits of the time, 
for nothing could be begun or 
properly ended without its due 
proportion of rum. The vessels 
were not all owned in this city, 
nor indeed the larger share of 
them, for New Haven, Middle- 
town, Hartford, Fairfield, and 
other places, used the port of 
New London, and were repre- 
sented here by agents in the 
" jockey " trade. The business 
tlius paid toll here, and coopers, 
ship carpenters, riggers, and men 
of kindred trades made their 
profits from the business. 

As the "jockey" trade lan- 
guished, the whaling industry 
took its place. The earliest 
mention of whaling in Connecti- 
cut appears to reach as far back 
as 1647, when the General 
Court at Hartford granted to 
one Whiting the privilege of 
catching whales within Connec- 
ticut waters. This privilege, 
which embraced a term of seven 
years, may be construed as the 
granting of a monopoly, for 
such permission was necessar}', 
and there is no record to show 
that a like grant was at that 
time conceded to any other than 
Mr. Whiting. 

Whales were at that date 
numerous near the Connecticut 
coast and off the Banks of New- 
foundland. As the colonies grew 
in capital and population, whal- 
ing voyages of considerable 
length were made, and by 17.50 
the business had assumed gen- 
erous and profitable proportions. 
The War of the Revolution, 
however, paralyzed the industry, 
until, in 178.5, it was revived by 
special incentive from the Leg- 
islature. Immediately subse- 
quent to this time there dawned 
what may be termed the golden 
era of the whaling days. Ships 
were thoroughly appointed, and 




15 



Ipicturesque 1Rew London. 




THE HUGUENOT HOUSE. 

BUILT ABOUT THE YEAR 1760. 

A Quaint Old Dwelling Place, at the Corner of Hempstead and Truman Streets. Built by the Huguenots lor Nathaniel 
Hempstead, a Descendant of Sir Robert Hempstead. 



manneil liv picked crews for dangerous 
but reiiuinerative voyages to distant 
seas : and the only contingency then 
likely to put a damper upon the calling 
■was the possible extinction of the 
whales. 

As a whaling port, Xew London 
rivalled New Bedford. There seemed 
no end to the money that was being- 
brought into the town l>y the whalers 
as they were called, and the general 
prosperity was great. Many were the 
New London ships which embarked on 
these perilous voyages, and many were 
the fortunes that were made. In 
sooth, the industry may be deemed the 
keystone to much of New London's 
success and thrift. 

An incentive to the faithfulness and 
vigorous energy of the whaling crews 
was the method of dividing the profits 
of a voyage. Not only the agents, 
but the officers and crew as well, came 
in for a share of the spoils. These 
shares were, of course, graded accord- 



ing to station and responsibility, but 
the division, always conducted with 
honesty and promptness, exerted a 
salutaiy influence upon the men. 

From 1S20 to ISol, inclusive, there 
were engaged in the capture of whales 
from the port of New London 677 
vessels. And during this period there 
were Ijrought into tlie port 111.158 
barrels of sperm and 775,432 barrels 
of whale oil. Wliiie this does not 
represent tlie total, results bj- any 
means, it conveys some idea of the 
magnitude and importance of the in- 
dustry. Had it not been for the finan- 
cial stringencj^ of 1857 and tlie break- 
ing out of the War of the Rebellion 
in IStil, all would probably have lieen 
to the good. About this time there 
was a decline in thewiialing industry, 
and after the war there was little done 
in this line. About the year 1870 
came a brief revival of interest, caused 
by tlie discovery of the repopulation of 
the seal rookeries in the South Geor- 



16 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



gias which created a business of tlie 
same nature and the prosecution of the 
sea-elephant fishing at Desohition 
Island. 

From the very earliest days fishing 
has naturally employed New London- 
ers, and for more tlian two centuries 
was an extremely important industry. 
Fifty years ago there were probably 
70 or 80 fishing smacks engaged in 
"banking" and in fishing up and 
down the coast, principally for cod and 
halibut. And to-day tliere is a large 
amount of capital invested and a 
great many men engaged in catching 
menhaden, wliicli furnish oil and fer- 
tilizer to the amount of many millions 
of dollars. 

From the settlement of the town of 
New London in 164tl, down to our day, 
there has lieen much of romance and 
adventure, light and shadow, and 
much that is quaint and curious in 
the lives of the men engaged in what 
in most conununities is but tlie dull 
and humdrum routine of earning a 
living. Naturally the atmosphere 



characteristic of New London pro- 
duced men of a different stamp from 
those of many other cities, and these 
indomitable souls were ready at hand 
when the California fever struck the 
Atlantic States. To such men the 
news that gold had been discovered in 
California acted like wine upon the 
imagination. To fit out a schooner 
and crowd her with daring spirits was 
no sooner thought of than accom- 
plished ; and in such frail cockle- 
shells many a " Forty-niner " set out 
from this port to brave the dangers of 
the long trip around Cape Horn to 
that Mecca of the adventurer, San 
Francisco. Ships followed as soon as 
tliey could equip, and there were few 
men in New London who had not 
something at risk in the many ven- 
tures connected with the California 
voyages of those stirring days. The 
Klondike craze was nothing to the 
California fever, nor has there been 
any popular excitement to compare 
with it except the enlistment fever of 
18(!1. Many fortunes were made. 




THE ARMORY— COIT AND WASHINGTON STREETS. 
Headquarters of the Third Regiment. National Guard of Connecticut. 

17 



Ipicturesque 1Rew ILondon^ 




U 

o 



s 



O 

z 

o 



> 



more were lost, and as a rule the 
New London Argonauts of '49 
gained more in expeiience than 
they acquired in jiocket. Out 
of tiie great nundjer of adven- 
turers who left fur California in 
"4'J and the few years succeed- 
ing, some by sea and others by 
the route across the Isthmus of 
Panama — after the shorter sea 
route was adopted — some re- 
mained. Others returned, and 
still others sought various quar- 
ters of the globe in search of 
adventure, for adventure was 
about all that most of them 
obtained for their labor and 
their pains. In San Francisco, 
to this day, even, are many 
New Londoners and their de- 
scendants. Indeed, the same 
may be said of all the cities of 
tlie United States. 

In the old days there was 
mucli that was quaint and curi- 
ous in tlie life of New ]>ondon. 
The Bride Brook marriage, fa- 
mous in her history, was an 
instance of the peculiarities of 
tlie laws governing the jurisdic- 
tion of officials of the different 
colonies. In the winter of 1640 
and '47 a young couple living 
in Saybrook elected to become 
miitcd in the holy bonds of wed- 
lock. Saybrook possessed no 
one capable of performing the 
ceremony, so a magistrate from 
one of the u[)per towns on the 
Connecticut was engaged to 
officiate. Unfortunately, how- 
ever, there came at the time 
appointed for the marriage, a 
prodigious fall of snow, which 
made it impossil)le for the magis- 
trate to reach Saybrook. Unless 
absolutely unavoidable the nup- 
tials must not be postponed, 
and Governor Winthrop was 
called upon to go to Saybrook 
anil perform tlie marriage rite. 
But Savbrook was bevond his 



18 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




A SATURDAY MORNING SCENE ON STATE STREET. 

The Diversity of Interests Centering in New London Presents a Pleasant Phase in this Picture 
Tal(en Near the Union Banl<. 



magisterial province, his autliority 
being vested l)y tlie Massachusetts 
Colony. The little stream, after- 
wards and by reason of this episode, 
called Bride Brook, marked, more or 
less certainly, the boundary between 
Pequot (New London) and Saybrook, 
and it was Wintliroi^'s suggestion that 
if the pair would meet him at this 
brooklet, he would accommodate them. 
His proposition was eagerly accepted, 
and on that winters day, beneath the 
blue vault of heaven and the swaying 
branches of the trees, John Winthrop 
performed one of the most unique 
marriage ceremonies on record. 

We, of to-day, necessarily realize 
that the customs of the early times 
differed very materially from those in 
vogue at present. In just what way they 
differed we do not all know. Altout the 
dead of that early period centered an 
interest vivid, sympathetic, and even 
personal. The settlers were few, and 
the loss of one of them was regarded 
as a calamity and common misfortune. 



Not alone that, but a funeral was an 
event of moment and importance. To 
the bedside of tlie dying came the 
town fathers, the minister, and the 
magistrate, to take down and witness 
his last testament, words and admoni- 
tions. The entire commnnity attended 
the funeral. Those who, while he 
was in life, had stood nearest to the 
deceased, bore him on their shoulders 
to the grave. Not frequently, and 
never unless the distance were great, 
was a horse litter used. Around the 
last resting place of the departed the 
rites were solenm. He was not at 
once forgotten ; the void he left was 
acutely felt. By many he was missed, 
by many sincerely mourned. His 
monument was in the hearts of those 
he left behind. 

With the conveniences of modern 
times at our disposal, it is well-nigh 
impossible to appreciate the disadvan- 
tages under which our early forebears 
struggled, nor is it easy for us to real- 
ize the actual extent of their poverty. 



19 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Their dwellings were not only rude, 
but often uncomfortable and inade- 
quate for their needs. Crevices ad- 
mitted the wind and cold. The tim- 
bers were rough-hewn and the Ijoards 
unplaned. Each mechanic was his 
own tool-maker ; the metal at his 
command was of inferior quality and 
his implements crude. Coffee and tea 
were luxuries too 
c o s 1 1 3' to be 
thought of, and 
even molasses 
and sugar were 
rarities at first. 

It is a far cry 
to those days of 
trials and l>uffet- 
ings in the wilder- 
ness — more than 
250 years. The 
colonists, w i t h 
Winthrop at their 
head, were as 
keen of eye, 
strong of limb, 
and hard}" and 
fearless of sonl as 
the Vikings of 
old. Winthrop's 
foresight was 
akin to propliecy. 
He looked ijito 
the future and 
saw the possibili- 
ties in store for 
the Indian-inhali- 
ited region whicli 
he proposed to 
develop along the 
lines of civilization. Not only did he 
look, he acted ; and upon the knowledge 
born of insight, secured Fisher's Island 
and as much of the mainland as possi- 
ble. Subsequent results have proved 
the almost infallibility of his judgment. 
A wise man in all things, he treated 
the Indians with equity and considera- 
tion ; and. altho>igh there was often 
cause for difference, retained the 
balance of power and gained the good 
will of the Mohegans and their allies. 



TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT MONUMENT. 

Erected by the State of Connecticut, and Located in the 

Section of IVIemorial Parl< Bordering on Broad 

and Hempstead Streets. 



But before this alliance could be ac- 
complished with an}' surety of perman- 
ence, it was necessary to conquer and 
subdue the fierce and hostile Pequots, 
that warlike tribe in wliose veins ran 
the aboriginal blood royal. 

In 1637 Captain John Mason, in 
command of a body of men from the 
towns on the Connecticut and under 
the guidance of 
tlie Narragan- 
setts and Mohe- 
gans, entered 
upon a war of 
subjugation 
against the Pe- 
quots that practi- 
cally resulted in 
a war of exter- 
mination. The 
Narrag ansetts 
and Mohegans 
welcomed with 
joy the opportun- 
ity afforded by 
the strained rela- 
tions V)etween the 
whites and the 
Pequots, to 
avenge them- 
selves upon a 
common foe. And 
w bile, from a hu- 
manitarian stand- 
point, their re- 
venge may ap- 
pear to have been 
almost too com- 
plete, their 
friendliness to 
the palefaces remained unbroken ; and 
\\ith the reign of peace which lasted 
for nearly 40 years, came a period of 
security and comparative prosperity. 

Tiie growth and occurrences in the 
plantation from the time of the Pequot 
war and the days of Winthrop. to the 
breaking out of the Revolution are 
matters of exhaustive history. Dur- 
ing the revolutionar}' period New 
London Avas a depot of supplies, a 
place from whicli to draft men for the 




20 



-n 3- 



= > S 



C5 := _ 



R 

D 
W 

H 
O 



w 

2 

P 
r 

I 

00 



li ^ 

si 5 

Z -^ ON 

=•* p 




K>icturesque 1Rew ILondon* 



army and nav}-, and, later on, the oIh 
ject of attack, and veiy nearly of com- 
plete destruction. The town did all 
and more than could have l)een asked 
of it. Its sons went forth to battle for 
liberty and independence, and did their 
duty well. Benedict Arnold, who had 
been a resident of Norwich, and who 
was well acquainted in New London, 
bore the town a grudge which he paid 
in full when he signalized his treachery 
to his countr}' by planning a descent 
upon New London and leading against 
her the military forces of the British. 
The story of that fell day of September 
6th, 1781, is known to every New 
Londoner and to all patriotic Ameri- 
cans, for the burning of the town was 
as marked an instance of wanton bru- 
tality and cold-blooded cruelty as was 
the heroic defence of Fort Griswold 
one of the most sublime and wonder- 
inspiring acts of heroism on record in 



the annals of the world's warfare. An 
eminent Italian, in writing of the de- 
fence of the fort, compares it to the 
defence of the Pass of Thermopylte by 
the Spartans. On that day Arnold sat 
upon liis horse near the house of a 
i\Irs. Hinman, wife of a naval officer. 
Mrs. Hinman, it is said, seized a mus- 
ket, and aiming it at the arch traitor, 
snapped the lock. The flint failed in 
its office, and "missed fire," making a 
noise which alarmed Arnold, who lost 
no time in escaping beyond range. He 
was watching the work of the British 
and, no doul)t, gloating over the ter- 
rible predicament of his former friends, 
whose homes, at his instigation, were 
being destroyed. 

The town in those days did not pos- 
sess many fine houses, as houses were 
then rated, for there were no wealthy 
people in New London. Yet they 
were superior to those which it was 







>^Jai^^4i^ 



A GROUP OF MEMBERS OF THE JIBBOOM CLUB AT ONE OF ITS 
ANNUAL OUTINGS. 

The Jibboom Club was Organized January 29th. 1891. It Has a Membership of Over Three Hundred. The Commodore 
of the Club is William H. Allen: Captain. E. Holloway : First Officer. E. D, Moxley : Second Officer. Charles Gray: 
Pilot. J. Luther: Purser. C. H. Niles : Boatswain. 0. W. Holloway: S. Q. N. H. Newbury; P. p.. George T. Gcer. 
Jr. The Club Meets the First and Third Saturdays in Each Month. October to April, at 7.30 p. m.: April to 
October. First Saturday Only, at 8 oclock, p. m.. at 88 Bank Street. 



22 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 




THE QTY HALL-STATE AND UNION STREETS. 
The Mayor's Office, the Office of the City Clerk, and the Council Chamber are Located in this Building. 



possible f Of the sutt'erers from tlie con- 
flagration to ie-bnil(l, impoverished as 
they were. Much of the irregulaiity 
of the town is due to the haste in 
which it was then re-constructed ; this 
irregularit}', liowever, is one of 
the chief clianns of the city of 
to-daj'. 

The effects of tlie War of the Revo- 
lution were keenly felt by New Lon- 
don. I'nlike other towns further in- 
land, she had not the unhazardous and 
healthy resource of nianufactuiing to 
which to turn her attention. Essen- 
tially a seaport, dependent upon the 
sea for her connnerce, she must at 
that perturbed jieriod wrest from the 
sea the wherewithal necessary to her 
existence. The navy was in embryo, 
and was powerfully augmented by 
privateers. These privateers were not 
deserving of the opprobrium which fre- 
quently attached to them. Indeed, 
their occupation was as legitimate as 
that of the ships of the line, for they 
operated under what were known as 
letters of manpie; that is to say, their 



cruises were prosecuted under the un- 
written laws which then governed the 
conduct of armed vessels of belligerent 
nations. Credit for brave deeds, for 
acts of heroism and loyalty are due 
them more than censure for the so- 
called acts of jjiracy which they are 
said, by some, to have perpetrated. 
The}' were no more pirateers than 
were the regularly conunissioned ves- 
sels of the navy. They were a neces- 
sity of the times. As the British 
men-of-war depleted the merchant- 
marine of the colonists, some measure 
was necessary for the effective re- 
straint of tlieir depredations ; so priv- 
ate ships, formei'ly peaceful merchant- 
men, were armed and manned, and 
under letters of marque would swoop 
down upon the British vessels man- 
oeuvering in the Sound, and, what- 
ever the odds against them, liring a 
prize into port. The risk was enor- 
mous, but supreme contempt of fear, 
begotten of entire ignorance of its 
meaning, nearly always resulted in 
victory. 



23 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon. 




MASONIC TEMPLE— GREEN STREET, CORNER STARR. 
Home of Brainard Lodge. Number 102. F. and A. M. 



Many were the stout liearts and 
strong arms that enlisted in this free- 
for-all navy, which partook of the 
nature of a fraternity, and a ship that 
struck its colors while a sound man 
remained to fight, would have heen 
out of fellowship. Hailing from New 
London were many ships belonging to 
both the commissioned and privateer 
service that won glory, honor, and 
treasure in conflicts with the British. 
Among these were the Ijrig Defence, 
fourteen guns. Captain Samuel Smed- 
ley, commander: the Oliver Cromwell, 
a ship of twenty guns, commanded by 
Captain William Coit ; the brig Resist- 
ance, ten guns. Captain Samuel Chew : 
the Governor Trumbull, twenty guns. 
Captain Samuel Billings: the Confed- 
eracy, thirty-two guns. Captain Seth 
Harding : the Dean, twenty-nine guns. 
Captain Elisha Hinman : and the Put- 
nam, twenty-nine guns, commanded 
by Captain John Harmon, and later 
by Captain Natlianiel Saltonstall. 

During the second war with Great 
Britain, the war of 1S12. the port of 



New London was lilockaded uninter- 
ruptedly for nearlj- two 3'ears. The 
blockade at first had a more or less 
terrifying effect upon the inhabitants 
of the town, for thej' anticipated an 
attack from tlie British vessels in the 
harbor. Had New London been bom- 
barded by the hostile fleet, it must of 
necessity have suffered anotlier con- 
flagration and conse(juent demolition. 
Prepai'ations of defence and removal 
were effected, and for a time the town 
was in a state of ferment and anxiety. 
But it early became apparent that no 
bombardment was intended, and 
quiet was soon restored. Commodore 
Decatur, on the fourth day of Decem- 
ber. 1812, sailed into New London 
Harbor in tlie frigate United States, 
and in the harbor and the waters of 
the Thames River he was compelled 
to remain until the raising of the 
blockade in Februar}', 1815. 

New London was one of a small 
number of towns that early sought 
incorporation, and since 1789 has 
rejoiced in a city charter. Thus it 



24 



picturesque 1Rew London. 



will be olnserved that it antedates New 
York City in the possession of a city 
government. The growth of the city 
after the Kevohition was reasonahly 
rapid. When Water, or Beach Street, 
as it was originally named, was hlled 
witli hogsheads of whale oil, and the 
wharves of tlie merchants were loaded 
to the point of collapse with that 
commodity. New London was making 
money rapidly, and people of all sorts 
and conditions had their sliare in tlie 
general prosperity. In two buildings 
adjoining, one on the corner of Bank 
and State streets, and the other in the 
Granite Building, on Bank Street, 
was conducted a clothing, hat, and 
men's furnishing business, under the 
firm name of Lyon & Kobbins. 
Many other branches of mercantile 
trade flourished at that time, and all 
who were willing to work had little 
difhculty in securing employment. 

New London was not rated as a 
manufacturing city, yet thei'e were 
.some notable concerns here at what 



seems to us an early date. There 
were such firms as the Wilson Works 
— located where are now the buildings 
that make up the great "R. T. Palmer 
Quilt Plant — engaged in the manu- 
facture of a large and far famed 
variety of brass and iron goods ; the 
Albertson & Douglass ^bichine Com- 
pany, located on the site now occujjied 
by the round-house of the Stonington 
Division of the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railroad: the 
woolen mill on Water Street — still in 
existence — a manufacturing jeweler's 
shop on Jay Street, conducted bj' the 
late William Butler; and at one time, 
located on Fort Neck, was a glass 
factory. On Fort Neck also, and in 
the Imildings now occupied by the 
Hopson ct Chapin Company, the Nay- 
lor Compan}' had its existence. 



In 1.SS5 New London 



i)egan to take 
on a new form, and during the term of 
oifice of the late Mayor Charles 
Augustus Williams, a new era com- 
menced. The prosperity of the town 




SMITH MEMORIAL HOME— MASONIC STREET. 

The Smith Memorial Home for Aged. Indigent Ladies who have Resided in New London, was Founded by the Late Seth 

Smith, who Bequeathed the Greater Part of His Fortune for this Purpose. The Home 

Possesses Accommodations for Twenty-Five Inmates. 



(3) 



25 



{picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



refeived a fresh impetus, owing 
principally to a new spirit of enter- 
prise and progressiveness in its citizens 
and in its nmnicipal government. A 
Board of Trade was organized, which 
has accomplished a great deal that lias 
been for the good of the city. Ideas orig- 
inated b\- the Board of Trade were sure 
of respectful consideration hy the City 



during the past fifteen years under a 
l)uihling impulse that shows no ahate- 
ment. 

Any old resident who has been al)- 
sent from the city for no more than ten 
years even will be impressed by the 
changes it has undergone the moment 
he alights from the cars or leaves the 
boat. He must feel progression in the 




HOME OF THE THAMES CLUB — 284 STATE STREET. 

The Thames Club is the Principal Gentlemen's Social Organization in the City. The Officers of the Club are: 

C. Royce Boss. President: James R. Lindsley. First Vice-President: F. E. Parker, Second 

Vice-President: George T. Brown. Secretary: Edward T. Brown. Treasurer. 



Government. The latter body l)cing 
bound to proceed with due care and 
deliberation, were, nevertheless, nuich 
stimulated by the unauthorized body, 
and the results have proven nuitually 
beneficial. Xew and better streets 
liave succeeded the old; splendid 
school Ijuildings have svipplanted 
those of ancient design. Streets by the 
score have been opened, and entire sec- 
tions of the cit}- have grown up 



very atmospiiere as he views tiie 
Parade, with its noble monument to 
the soldiers and sailors of New Lon- 
don, the park about the monu- 
ment, the Neptune Building in place 
of the structure which formerly occu- 
pied its site, anil the stone pavement 
in place of the mud or dust of the old 
street. And throughout the entire 
city agreeal)le change and improve- 
ment meets tlie eye. 



20 




THE UNION DEPOT — FOOT OF STATE STREET. 



Chapter 1111. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION AS A PORT AND RAILROAD CENTER -NEW 
LONDON HARBOR — GENERAL AND LOCAL TRANSPORTATION LINES — 
REVIVAL OF SHIPBUILDING INTERESTS. 



New London is one of the 
most fortrnatelv situated cities 
in New England. It is very nearly 
eqvii-distant between New York and 
Boston, and is a railroad center of im- 
portance. Its harbor is one of the 
best in the world, being three miles in 
length, very wide, 'and possessing an 
average depth of about five fathoms. 
It is admirably sheltered and is an ab- 
solutely safe haven for vessels of every 
draught and description, even in the 
roughest weather. It never freezes. 

The city is located upon the west 
shore of the harbor, and extends in a 
northerly direction up the west bank 
of the River Thames, which foi- the 
largest vessels is navigable to Norwich. 
The population of New London is 
about twenty thousand, and is steadily 
increasing. 



Its general and local transportation 
facilities are unsurpassed. The New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Rail- 
road, and the Central ^"ermont, which 
operates the NeAv London and North- 
ern, center in New London, and the (dty 
is also reached by various lines of pas- 
senger and freight steamers. 

One of the most Invigorating 
Sails from New London in the sum- 
mer season is to Block Island and 
Watch Hill, on the fine steamer 
"Block Island" of the New London 
Steamboat CoMPiVNY. A visit to 
either of these famous resorts is sure 
to jirove a delight to the seeker after 
recreation. 

New London itself is one of the 
most delightful of summer resorts, and 
is easily accessible from all points 
reached by the Central Vermont and 



27 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



New York, New Haven and Hartford 
railroads and the Norwich Line of 
steamers and connections, and the 
steamer "Block Island." 

Watch Hill is a charming and 
bracing summer retreat. Situated on 
a bluff overlooking the sea, it has the 
full benefit of the pure air of the 
ocean. The view is grand and varied. 
The hotels are very fine indeed, and 
in their cuisine and appointments they 
excel. 

Block Island is a beautiful breeze- 
swept island fifteen miles from the 




STEAMER BLOCK ISLAND, 
Of The New London Steamboat Company. 



nearest mainland. Its climate is that 
of the Benuudas ; indeed, it has been 
called "The Bermuda of the North."' 
As a health-imparting summer resort 
it stands almost without a peer. The 
hotel accommodations are ample and 
excellent. 

The steamer "Block Island"' leaves 
Norwich and New London for Watch 
Hill and Block Island every morning 
during the season, and returns every 
afternoon. 

The New London Steamhoat 
Company was incorporated in 1882. 
Its officers are: President, A. Mc- 
^'ittie, Detroit, Michigan; Treasurer, 
liobert Coit: General Manager, D. 



MacKenzie ; General Passenger Agent, 
J. A. Southard. 

Several steamboat lines operate 
between New London and the various 
points of interest and commerce upon 
the harbor, sound and river. The 
steamer " Munnatawket," of the Fish- 
er's Island Navigation Company, has 
its wharf at the foot of State Street; 
it runs between New London and 
Fisher"s Island. The "Manhanset,"' 
of the New London and Long Island 
Steamboat Company, plies between 
New London. Greenport, and Sag 

Harbor. 
Between 
New Lon- 
don and New 
York, oper- 
a t i n g as 
freight lines, 
run the boats 
of the Nor- 
w i c h and 
New York 
P rope Her 
( " o mpany, 
and the 
"Mohawk" 
and "Mohe- 
i^an" of the 
line con- 
trolled by 
the Central 
V e r m o n t 
Railroad. The steamer "Gypsy"' 
runs between Norwich and Fort 
Griswold, touching at Montville, 
Gale's Ferry, the "Navy Yard,"" New- 
London, and Ocean Beach. The Fort 
Griswold and Pequot houses are easily 
reached b}' the "( )sprey."" which makes 
several daily trips. New London is 
brought into convenient access — by 
the steamboat "Sunmier (iirl" — with 
P>ushv Point, Xoank and Mystic, 
(iroton and New London are con- 
nected by the ferry-boat "Colonel 
Ledyard,"' of the Thames Ferry Com- 
pany, which makes trips of twenty- 
minute intervals between the two 
places throughout the entire year. 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew UoncJon* 



The Railroad and Steamboat 
Lines governed by the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford Railroad 
are numerous and extensive. ( )f these 
the Norwich Line of steamboats affords 
accommodations tliat are adequate and 
satisfying. The Nokwich Line, by 
its elegant steamers, the "City of 
Lowell," and the " City of Worcester," 



and business communities interven- 
ing, and points north and east, 
including Fitchburg, Gardner, Win- 
chendon, Keene, Bellows Falls, Nashua, 
Manchester, Concord, Rochester, Port- 
land, and points in the Maritime 
Provinces. 

The "City of Lowell" and the "City 
of Worcester" of this line are con- 




..^.iL'^^i^ 




VIEW OF NEW LONDON HARBOR ON REGATTA DAY. 

Showing the Steamer "City of Worcester." of the Norwich Line. 



furnishes ideal means of transporta- 
tion between New York City and 
New London, and forms a direct route 
from New York to the various im- 
portant points on and reached by the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford 
and the Central Vermont railroads 
from New London. It is also the 
most convenient water route between 
New York, New London, and Norwich, 
connecting by train with Plaintield, 
Putnam, Webster, Soutbl nidge, Wor- 
cester, and the numerous manufacturing 



structed of steel: they are fast, 
commodious, sumptuous in their ap- 
pointments, and a high standard of 
service is maintained upon them in 
every dfi>artment. They steer by 
steanr, and are lighted by electricity. 
Their trips between New London and 
New York are as follows: Steamers 
leave New London at 11 P. M., and 
are due at Pier oC), North River, New 
^'ork, at 7 A. M. Returning, leave 
Pier 3(i, foot of Spring Street, at 5.30 
P. M. Unless otherwise registered at 



29 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew Uondon. 



tlie Purser's office, all passengers are 
called at New London at 7 A. JI. 
Those desiring to be called for early 
trains from New London should notify 
tlie Purser. The fare between New 
London and New York, via the 
Norwich Line, is ^l.oO: staterooms. 
•S^LOO and •'?2.00 additional, according 
to location. 

An enterprise that will have con- 
siderable bearing upon the transporta- 
tion centering in New London Harbor 
is that being i)rojected by the Thames 
Tow Boat Companv, incorporated 
in 1865. On the west shore of the 
Thames River, about one and one- 
half miles north 
of the Great 
Draw-bridge, this 
Company is es- 
tablishing two 
sets of ilarine 
Railways, the 
larger one beini;- 
intended to haul 
out vessels of :250 
to 800 feet length 
of keel, and the 
smaller one, ves- 
sels of about 150 
feet length of 
keel. This yard is 
intended in the first place for hauling 
out and making repairs to the com- 
pany's vessels, tugs and barges, and 
incidentally, after being established, 
otiier business will be solicited. The 
Company own land enough, unoccu- 
pied by the Railways, to do such 
work as the}' may think proper from 
time to time for themselves and 
others. The principal office of the 
Company is rear of 24:0 Bank Street, 
New London, and branch office, 1 
Broadway, New York. The President 
and Treasurer of The Thames Tow 
Boat Company is F. H. Chappell. 

Two Electku- Trolley Roads 
afford the city comfortable and ade- 
quate service: The New London, 
Norwich and Montville street railway 
line, which runs between Norwich and 




STEAMER 

Captain Avery 



New London, and the lines operated 
by the New Loxdox Stkeet Rail- 
way Company. The distance from 
New London to Norwich is about 
fourteen miles. The running time is 
one hour. The route is in a northerly 
direction from New London, via Main 
and North Main streets and Mohegan 
Avenue, and extends through a 
delightful stretch of country. The 
starting points for the cai-s of this line 
are Franklin Square. Norwich, and the 
Parade, near the corner of State and 
Bank streets, in New London. 

The New London Street Railway 
Company was incorporated in 1886. 
It was chartered 
as a hoi'se railway. 
By an amendment 
to its constitution 
the use of electri- 
city as a motor 
power was ap- 
plied in 1893. 
The service ren- 
It^red the public 
iv its lines is reli- 
able and efficient. 
Its cars are of 
the modern vesti- 
' GYPSY." buled type, ea.sy- 

c. Smith. riding and com- 

fortable. Open cai-s are used as early 
in the summer and as late in the 
autumn as is consistent with health 
and safety. 

Two Ijelts, or loops, represent the 
routes travereed by the cars in the 
central and upper sections of the city. 
One of these is from the Parade, via 
AYilliams, State and Broad streets to 
the starting point. This is one portion 
of the route of the Montauk Avenue 
and Post Hill line. The other, the 
coui-se of the ^Yashington Street and 
Lewis Lane car, is from the Parade 
to Lewis Lane via State and Broad 
streets. The direction taken by the 
cai-s of these lines alternate, and the 
alternate trip of the \Vashington 
Street and Lewis Lane car is 
through State, Washington, Truman 



30 



{picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



and Blackball streets. Tlie 
portion of the city adjacent 
to Bank Street, Lower Bank 
Street and Montauk Ave- 
nue is accommodated by the 
Montauk Avenue line. On 
this line the cars run from 
the Parade, via Bank Stieet 
and Alontauk Avenue, to 
the corner of Montauk Ave- 
n u e a n d the Lowe r 
Boulevard in winter, and in 
the summer season — from 
June to October — to Ocean 
Beach. 

The New London Street 
Railway is well managed, 
and its corps of conductors 
and motormen are consider- 
ably above the average in 
point of efliciency, courtesy, 
and neatness of personal 
appearance. Its transfer sys- 
tem is convenient. One may 
secure a transfei' clieck from 
either distinct line to the 
other. The transfer point is 
the Parade, near the Union 
Bank. 

Owing to the carefulness 
of its employes, and the ca- 
pability of its management, 
it possesses a record singu- 
larly free from accidents and 
untoward features. The offi- 
cers of the Company are : 
President and Secretary, 
Walter I^earned: Treasurer, 
W. A. Tucker, of Tucker 
and Anthony, Boston ; Su- 
perintendent, Lorenzo Bent- 
ley. Dire c tors: Walter 
Learned, W. A. Tncdcei', 
John F. Perry. Billings 
Learned, James Hislop, and 
H. C. Learned. 

Shipbuilding, in thk 
Closinc Yeaus of t h e 
Eighteenth Centuky and 
in the early part of the nine- 
teenth, was reckoned one of 
the important industries of 



r 
> 

H 

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2 

D 

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> 

D 
2 H 



I > 

o C/1 

I Z 

2-. W 

S X 

a 
C 
r 
O 

Z 



n 
o 

S 

> 

•z 
•< 




31 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



New London. But of late it has not 
entered conspicviousl}- into the hvisiness 
life of the city, although it has been 
carried on in a more or less desultory 
manner. 

The recent establishment, however, 
of the Eastern SHtPBriLDrsG Com- 
pany's Plant on the Groton side of 
the harlior, marks for this section a 
new era in marine architecture. The 
location chosen by this Company could 
not be more admirabl)^ suited to its re- 
quirements. The great and uniform 
depth of tlie harbor affords excellent 
docking and launching facilities, and 
the large area of the yards every oppor- 
tunity for ship construction on an im- 
mense scale. The ground of the ship- 
yardi too, is ideal for the purpose, 
being hrm and solid. The railroad 
facilities are adequate, and the situa- 
tion, while sufficiently close to the 
Metropolis, is yet far enough distant 
to eliminate its detrimental features. 
The land adjacent to the shipyard is 
elevated, and affords healthful places 
and opportunity of abode for many of 
the Conqiany's employes. 

The workshops are located close to 
the water front; and near them, but 
further inland, are the executive offices 
and draughting rooms, where the great 
ships are all planned out on paper be- 
fore the work of actual construction is 
couimenced. 

Invested in tliis vast enterprise are 
about half a million dollais. This 
amount will be steadily increased as the 
business of the plant progresses. 

The scope of operations contem- 
plated by the Eastern Shipliuilding 
Company is second to that of no con- 
cern of like nature in the world. It 
will contract for and build all classes 
of merchant and war vessels, of what- 
ever magnitude and complexity of 
specifications. No vessel that can be 
floated will be too large for the plant 
to handle exjieditionsly and well. 
Contracts for all grades of craft will 
receive attention, from the finest of 
steam yachts and liigh class, speedy 



passenger vessels, to tramp steamers 
and barges. 

Two sets of building ways are 
already constructed, TOO feet in 
length, and capable of accommodating 
ships of MO foot beam. The keels are 
laid for two vessels that, when com- 
pleted, will he the largest in the world, 
and will have a displacement of 33,000 
tons each. Thev are being built for 
the Great Northern Steamship Com- 
pany. 

The Eastern Shii)building Company 
was incorporated in Marcli. I'.'OO, and 
commenced active operations on the 
construction of its plant the latter 
part of the April following. For four 
months previous the Company occu- 
pied offices in tlic Neptune Building, 
where the work of draughting the 
ships was begun. 

In April, 1900. A. (). Goddard, the 
New London builder, was given the 
contract for the election of the Com- 
panj-'s buildings on the Groton side. 
The three largest of these were com- 
pleted in July. The structure con- 
taining the joiner shop and mold loft 
is 250 feet long, by TO feet in width. 
It is two stories in height. In the 
basement are the office of tlie yard 
superintendent, and a carpenter shop. 
The pipe, machine, and sheet iron 
workers' shops cover ground space ITO 
feet in length, by 60 feet wide. The 
shipyard plate shop is "il'l feet long, 
by MO feet in width. The boiler house 
and blacksmith shop occupy a large 
brick Imilding. from the west side of 
which, onto an extensive cast iron 
1)ending floor, emerge the plate and 
angle furnaces. 

The various shops are equipped 
with the best and most modern appur- 
tenances known to the art of ship- 
building. 

The President and (ieneral Mana- 
ger of the Eastern Shipbuilding Com- 
pany is Cliarles R. Hanscom : Treas- 
urer. John Sherman Hoyt; Naval 
Architect and Engineer, William A. 
Fairburn. 



32 




WILLIAMS MEMORIAL INSTITUTE BROAD STREET. 

HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

This School Was Founded and Endowed by the Late Mrs. Harriet P. Williams, a Resident of Norwich. Connecticut, in 

Memoriam of Her Son. Thomas W. Williams, a Prominent Citizen of New London. Who Died in 1855. The Building 

Occupies the Lot on Which He Was Contemplating Erecting a Private Residence. The Principal of the 

Institute is Colin S. Buel. A. M. Teachers : Mary Jane Turner. Mary F. Crofton. Marietta Jackson. 

A. B.. Madeline P. Freeman. A. B.. Mary E. Smith, and Alpha W. Barlow. 



Chapter 1I1I1I. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

NEW LONDON'S FIRST EDUCATIONAL BEQUEST — MORE RECENT ENDOW- 
MENTS-BRIEF SKETCH OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM OF TO- 
DAY—ITS EFFICACY AND EVOLUTION — INTRODUCTION OF NEW AND 
BENEFICIAL FEATURES— MODERN SCHOOL BUILDINGS — SPECIAL IN- 
CENTIVES TO PUPILS — THE CHURCHES OF A COMMUNITY INDICA- 
TIVE OF ITS MORAL TONE — OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF THE 
OLDEST RELIGIOUS SOCIETY IN THE CITY-REFERENCE TO OTHER 
CHURCHES AND SACRED ORGANIZATIONS -SOME EMINENT DIVINES 
WHO HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED WITH NEW LONDON— PORTRAITS OF 
THE PRESENT PASTORS — THE CITY'S FINE CHURCH EDIFICES. 



Tholtght FULLY regarded, the 
growth of our country in tlie com- 
paratively short time that has inter- 
vened since its independence was 
acknowledged, seems almost phenom- 
enal. In less than a century and a 
half, from a dependent English colony 
on American soil, has evolved a re- 



public which stands to-day among the 
greatest of the earth's great powers. 

In the evolution of her institutions, 
both civic and military, the nation 
has forged ahead with rapid strides. 
Particular attention has been paid to 
education. The public schools of the 
United States are admittedly progres- 



^i) 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew Uondon. 



sive in thoroughness and efficacy of 
method ; and in the erection of school 
buildings, labor and expense are of 
secondary consideration when weighed 
in the balance with good sanitation, 
ventilation, convenience, and modem- 
ness of arrangement and architecture. 
In matters educational New London 
is but a type of the average American 
city. Yet even where all are good, 
some must excel, and the assertion 



died in 1673, left a verbal will stipu- 
lating that his entire property should 
be devoted to the cause of public edu- 
cation. The first school to bear his 
name was the Bartlett Grammar 
School, so called until 1855, when it 
became the Bartlett High School. 
The present Robert Bartlett School 
on Broad Street, is so named in honor 
of that pioneer in the endowment of 
American educational institutions. 




BULKELEY HIGH SCHOOL— HUNTINGTON STREET, BETWEEN RICHARDS 
STREET AND BULKELEY PLACE. 

HIGH SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

The Buikelcy High School Was Founded and Endowed by the Late Leonard H. Bulkeley. Who Died in 1849. and Left the 

Greater Portion ot His Estate for that Purpose. Principal. Walter A. Towne. A. M. Teachers : Eugene 

B. Lawrence. A. B.. Robert T. Elliot, and Hervey F. Houghton. A. B. 



that New London's public school sys- 
tem possesses extraordinary merit, and 
that many of her school buildings are 
peculiarly well adapted to the pur- 
pose which they serve, is well sus- 
tained and warrantable. The New 
London (then Nameaug) of more than 
two centuries ago appears in some 
measure to have had at heart the 
scholastic interests of the community. 
And it is on record that one Robert 
Bartlett, a resident of the town who 



With this early evidence of public 
spirit to emulate, it is then no marvel 
that New London numbers education 
among her man}- excellent qualities. 

The public schools of the city 
are eight in number. The Nathan 
Hale Grammar School, the Win- 
throp, the Robert Bartlett, the 
Coit Street. the Nameaug, and 
the Harbor School are under the 
jurisdiction of the municipal Board of 
Education. The Bulkeley High 



.•54 




NATHAN HALE GRAMMAR SCHOOL— WILLIAMS STREET, NEAR WALLER. 

The Principal of the Nathan Hale Grammar School is Charles B. Jennings. A. M.. Acting School Visitor of New London. 

The Teachers are: Grade Eight, Teresa C. Crofton. Minnie G. Harris, and Minnie E. L. Caull(ins. 

Grade Seven. Nettie J. Bishop, Irene P. Bindloss, and Adelina S. Povey- 




WINTHROP SCHOOL, INTERMEDL^TE AND PRIMARY- 

TOWNE MILL. 



-NEAR YE OLDE 



Helen Bingham. Principal. Grade Six. Teachers: Grade Five. Alice L. Baker and Minnie G. Barker. Grade Four. 

Elizabeth F. Stark and Anna M. Crofton. Grade Three. Franc E. Barker and Louise R. Jeffery. 

Grade Two. Frances M. Shea and Anna M. Hewitt. Grade One. Gertrude Dakin, 

Gertrude S. MacNear. Pearl M. Rowland, and Clara Firth. 



35 



Iptcturesque 1Rew Hondon. 




ROBERT BARTLETT SCHOOL -BROAD STREET, NEAR CENTER. 

INTERMEDIATE AND PRIMARY. 

Maria F. Starr. Principal. Grade Six. Teachers: Grade Six, Mary E. Butler. Grade Five. Anna H. Ducy and Helen M. 

Champion. Grade Four. Charlotte P. Comstock and Susan P. Boss. Grade Three. Nellie P. Fuller and 

Ethel A. Kellogg. Grade Two. Julia A. Fitch and Agnes F. Allen. Grade One. Ruth May Jennings 

and Ethel A. Clark. Kindergarten. Grace H. Bowers and Mabel E. Greene. 



School for Hoys and the Williams Me- 
morial Institute — the latter a high 
school for girls — are especially en- 
dowed institutions, whose affairs are 
managed by trustees and corporators. 
In addition to the principals of the 
different schools, and the special in- 
.structors in music, drawing, physical 
and voice culture, there are 84 regular 
and four substitute teachers engaged 
in teaching the youth of New London. 
The principal of the Bulkeley High 
School is Walter A. Towne, A. M.; 
of the Williams Memorial Institute, 
Colin S. Buell, A. M. ; and of the 
Nathan Hale Grammar School, 
Charles B. Jennings. A. M. The 
principals of the minor grades are as 
follows : Winthrop School, Helen 
Bingham; Robert Bartlett Scliool, 
Maria F. Starr; Coit Street School, 
Teresa A. Brown ; Nameaug School, 
Josephine S. Rice; Harbor School, 
Frances E. Strickland. The special 



instructors are : Music, James A. 
VanKuren ; drawing and sloyd — 
wood carving — Martha W. Stearns ; 
physical and voice culture, M. Isa- 
phene Ives. Free kindergartens have 
recently been introduced into the 
Robert Bartlett, the Coit Street, and 
the Harbor schools. 

The Bulkeley High School for Boys 
is a fine stone building of generous 
and substantial architecture. It was 
erected in 1871 at a cost of about 
f 40.000. Its founder, Leonard H. 
Bulkeley, was born in New London in 
1791. He died in 1849 and devised 
the greater portion of his property for 
the founding and maintenance of a 
free high school for boys, to be called 
the Bulkeley School. The fund at 
the time of the death of the legator 
was about ^21,000. which was allowed 
to accumulate until 1871, when it had 
increased to the very considerable 
sum of •t70,000, a sufficient amount 



36 





REV. WALTER S. McINTYRE, 
Pastor Federal Street Methodist Episcopal Church. 



REV. ALFRED POOLE GRINT, PH. D. 
Rector St. James Episcopal Church. 





REV. THOMAS P. JOYNT, 
Pastor St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. 



REV. S. LEROY BLAKE, D. D., 

Pastor First Church ot Christ. 



37 



Ipicturcsquc 1Hcw ILondon. 



to warrant carrying into active effect 
the wishes of the testator. There 
have been two additional legacies, one 
from the estate of the late Asa Otis 
of $10,000, and one of $5,000 from 
that of the late Henry P. Haven. 
Through the generosity of Hon. 
George F. Tinker of New London, an 
assembly room and completely ap- 
pointed laboratories were added to the 
building in 1899. Mr. Tinker con- 
tributed a fund of more than *1 1,000 
for the purpose. The Board of Trus- 
tees of the Bulke- 
ley School is 
comprised of the 
following gentle- 
men: President, 
Nathaniel S. Per- 
kins: Secretary, 
Tracy Waller: 
Treasurer, Hon. 
William Belcher: 
J.Lawrence Chew 
and Charles B. 
Graves. 

The Williams 
Memorial Insti- 
tute is another 
monument to the 
noble spirit of 
generosity and the 
desire to mate- 
riall}^ assist in 
furthering the 
cause of educa- 
tion. It is an im- 




REV. JOHiN F. TUCKER. 
Minister Unitarian Society. 



posing structure of rough stone, with 
brown-stone trimmings, its style of 
architecture is pleasing, and by reason 
of this and its commanding site, 
it forms one of the conspicuous 
landmarks of New London. The 
cost of construction was about |iS5,000. 
The late Mrs. Harriet P. Williams, 
of Norwich. Connecticut, the founder 
and endower of the Institute, caused 
it to be erected in memoriam of her 
son, the late Thomas W. Williams, 
who was a prominent citizen of New 
London. The intent of the endow- 
ment fund is to provide a course 



of free high school training for girls 
residing in the city and adjacent 
townships. This privilege is not 
restricted to permanent residents; 
those of temporary residence within 
the prescriljed territory may enjoy the 
full benetits of the institution. The 
President of the Endowment Fund is 
]\Ir. 1). P. Learned: the Corporators 
are H. 1{. Bond, Charles Barns, 
Augustus Brandegee. Billings P. 
Learned, Thomas W. Williams, Frank 
L. Palmer, and William Williams. 

While the pro- 
gress shown by 
the public schools 
of New London 
has ever been 
along the lines of 
distinct evolution, 
the restilts of the 
past decade are 
especially gratify- 
ing, gratifying to 
the jiulilic. to the 
Board of Educa- 
tion, to the princi- 
pals and teachers, 
to the parents of 
children, and. as 
they have out- 
grown their school 
days and assumed 
their respective 
positions in the 
lausy life of the 
world, of gratifi- 
pupils themselves, 
but coincident that 
of good work have 
been passed under one Acting School 
Visitor. Yet. without favor aiul 
without adulation, it seems incum- 
bent upon us to note the zeal 
and efficiency of Charles B. Jennings, 
A. M.: the hearty co-operation, too, of 
the School Board, and the earnest 
faithfidness of the teachers under his 
charge is to l)e commended. And 
therein lies the admirableness of it 
all, for it is this co-effort, this 
"team-work,"' as it were, that is 



cation to tlie 
Possiblj^ it is 
these ten years 



38 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew ILondon* 




largely respon- 
sible for the 
laudable out- 
come. 

Since 1890 
the attendance 
of pupils at the 
public schools 
has increased 
nearly 8 0. 
Ten years ago 
there were but 
47 teachers: 
now the num- 
ber employed is 
nearly double 
that figure. 
Several new 
and valuable 
features have 
been inaugu- 
rate d, two of 
which (so far 
as concerned their introduction into 
public schools), originated in New 
London. The Ling system of physi- 
cal culture, and 
the method of 
interestingly illus- 
trating lessons in 
geography by the 
use of the stereop- 
ticon, are innova- 
tions of especial 
worth and agree- 
ableness. Kinder- 
garten work also, 
that incomparable 
method devised by 
a great philosopher 
who could appreci- 
ate the value ■ of 
rightly teaching 
little children how 
to think while at 
play, and without 
weariness to their 
unformed minds, 
has gained a firm 
foothold in the 
schools of New 
London. The grow- 



REV. JAMES W. BIXLER, 
Pastor Second Congregational Church 




REV. JOSEPH P. BROWN, 

Pastor of Second Baptist Church of New London 

From 1871 to 1877. 



ing popularity 
of the kinder- 
garten — or 
child garden 
— among those 
who once con- 
sidered it fi'i- 
volity, but who 
now realize its 
great impor- 
tance in the 
earliest train- 
ing of the 
mind, is a sign 
positive of the 
e du c ational 
progression of 
the age. 

The Nathan 
Hale Orches- 
tra, composed 
of past and 
present mem- 
bers of the Nathan Hale Grammar 
School, is an organization which has 
been accorded considerable notice and 
flattering attention. 
Its effect is benefi- 
cial, and it is well 
calculated to stim- 
ulate by example. 
A system, too, 
productive of very 
salutarj' results is 
that of prize giving 
for excellence at- 
tained in the vari- 
ous branches of 
school work. The 
prize in English, a 
f5 gold piece, 
offered several 
years ago by the 
late Hon. C. A. 
Williams, is con- 
tinued by his 
daughter. Miss 
Mary Williams. A 
perpetual annual 
prize of $5 for ex- 
cellence in penman- 
ship has been 



39 



picturesque 1Rew 5London, 



offered by a former graduate of the 
Nathan Hale Grammar School, Mr. 
Leroy P. Har- 



beck, President, and several private 
schools. The beneficial influence ex- 
erted by such 



wood. Mr. 
Herbert Cran- 
dall has prof- 
fered a prize of 
like amount 
for the best 
example of 
book-keeping. 
The Benjamin 
Armstrong 
prize of ■'j'lO 
for pre-emi- 
nence in gener- 
al scholarship, 
and one of #5 
for superiority 
in reading, 
recently con- 
ferred b}- Rev. 
J. W. Bixler, 
completes the 
list. That the 
award of such 

very practical rewards of merit is pro- Nltviber of Church Edifices of a 
ductive of superlative effort, who community are in great degree indica- 
(!an doubt? The "- " '-^~ -i-~" — 




REV. JOSEPH A. ELDER, 
Pastor Huntington Street Baptist Cliurch. 



institutions is 
g e n e r a 1 1 }• 
recognized, 
and when the 
various oppor- 
tunities for 
learning pos- 
sessed by New 
London are 
consid e r e d, 
there remains 
small room for 
wonder at 
the position 
it occupies 
among cities 
noted for excel- 
lence of their 
educational 
advantages. 

The Char- 
acter AND 



Board of Education 
consists of John G. 
Stanton, M.D., Presi- 
dent: P. Hall Shurts, 
Secretary; Frank E. 
Barker, Treasurer: 
M. Wilson Dart, 
]\Iayor, ex-officio, Har- 
old H. Hyer, M. D., 
Charles J. Hewitt, 
Colin S. Buell, Henry 
P. Bullard, Frederick 
S. Newcomb, and 
Arthur Eggleston. 
The Acting School 
Visitor is Charles B. 
Jennings, A. M., 
Principal of the 
Nathan Hale firam- 
mar School. 

In addition to her 
public schools, the city has the New 
London Business College, R. A. Bru- 




REV. FRANKLIN G. McKEEVER, 
Pastor First Baptist Church. 



tive of its religious 
and moral tone. The 
churches of New 
London are many, 
and in the variety of 
their architectural 
style, and in the 
dates of their organi- 
zation, denote the 
early attention paid 
to religion by the 
town, and its subse- 
quent rapid growth. 
Approaching the 
city through the 
waters of the har- 
bor, the observant 
stranger is sure to 
be impressed by the 
towering spires of 
several of its more 
modern temples of 
worship. And after a tour of inspection 
about its streets he may vouchsafe 



40 



(picturesque 1Hew ILondon* 





FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST — CORNER STATE AND UNION STREETS. 

The First Church of Christ is Congregational in Denomination, and is the Oldest Religious Society in the City. Organized in 

Gloucester, Massachusetts, in 1642, Removed to New London in 1651. The Present House of Worship was First 

Used in 1851. Sunday Services ; Preaching at 10.45 A. M.: Sunday School at 12.15 : Meeting of the 

Junior Endeavor Society at 3.30 P. M.: Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor 

Meeting at 6.15 P. M.: Preaching at 7.30. Weekly Meeting. Friday 

Evening at 7.30 o'clock. Pastor. Rev. S. Leroy Blake. 0. D. 



expression to the thought that New 
London should be a good town; and so 
it should, if an abundance of churches 
is to be regarded as a criterion. 

Some of the church organizations 
are of exceeding early origin. The 



First Church of Christ (Congrega- 
tional) is the oldest. Its inception is 
directly attributable to the Puritan 
desire for freedom of worship, that 
fundamental principle from which 
sprang the very being and existence 



41 



Iptcturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH — HUNTINGTON STREET. 

Organized in 1725. First Cliurch Completed in 1732 : the Second Consecrated 1787: the Third and Present Edifice 

was Consecrated June 11th. 1850. Rector. Rev. Alfred Poole Grint. Sunday Services : 8 A. M.. Holy 

Communion: 10.45 A. M.. Preaching: 12.30. Sunday School: 7.30. Evening Service. 

Holy Day Services at 10 A. M. Friday Morning Service. 10 o'clock. 



of our nation. This society was or- 
ganized in Gloucester, Massachusetts, 
in 1642, and removed to New London 
under the guidance of its first pastor, 



Ricliard Bliniuan, in 1651. Its first 
place of worship in New London was 
in a large barn which stood on what is 
now Hempstead Street, near the south 



42 



I 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




FEDERAL STREET METHOUIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH— FEDERAL STREET, 

NEAR UNION. 

Organized 1793. Present Edifice Erected in 1855. Pastor. Rev. Walter S. IMclntyre. Public Services : Sunday. 10.45 A. M. 

and 7.30 P. M., Public Service with Sermon: 12.15 P. M.. Bible School: 4.30 P. M.. Junior League 

Meeting ; 6 P. M.. Meeting of the Epworth League. Wednesday Evening, at 7.30 P. M.. Midweek 

Service of Prayer. Song, and Testimony : Friday Evening. Class Meeting. 



corner of Granite. We of to-day little 
realize what the privilege of worship 
in their accepted belief meant to 
those God-loving pioneers; their re- 
ligion was their life. Those residing 
at a distance were glad of the oppor- 



tunity to rise early and walk miles, 
even, to hear the Word of God freely 
expounded. The members of the 
settlement within hearing distance of 
the meeting-house were called to 
service by beat of drum. Few of the 



43 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon, 




FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH— STATE STREET, CORNER OF WASHINGTON. 

Pastor, Rev. Franklin G. McKeever, Church Organized in 1804. Present Building Dedicated IVIarch 13. 1856. Society 

Incorporated In 1885. Services as follows: Sunday. 10.45 A. M.. Morning Worship : 12 M.. Sunday School : 

3.15 P. M.. Junior Christian Endeavor Meeting ; 6.15 P. M.. Christian Endeavor Meeting. 

7.30 P. M.. Evening Worship. Week Day Meeting, Friday Evening. 



settlers possessed horses: those who 
(lid would on Sabbath days share the 
blessing with others less fortunate 
than thej', after the unique method 
known as "the ride and tie system." 
The goodman would mount and set 
out for the meeting-house with his 
wife and perchance another memlier 
of the family "up behind." After 
having accomplished, perhaps, half 
the journey, they would dismount 
and tie the animal by the roadside for 
the benefit of some other worshiper, 
foot-weary and belated. But even 



the luxury of this method of church 
going was far from universally en- 
joj-ed. 

Parson Blinman's flock continued 
to worship in the old barn until 1655, 
when it removed to a meeting-house of 
its own, located on the site now occu- 
pied by the Bulkeley High School. 
Three years were consumed in build- 
ing this church, which was commenced 
in 1(!.t2. There were no regular 
craftsmen, and the inhabitants were 
obliged to take turns in carry- 
ing forward the work of con- 



44 



Iptcturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



struction, which progressed slowly 
in consequence of tlie press of 
individual duties. On the north side 
of this meeting-house was the lot re- 
served for burial purposes. A town 
ordinance of 1653 decreed that it 
should never be disturbed, and it is to- 
day known as " The Towne"s Antient- 
est Buriall Ground," and is the oldest 
graveyard in New London County. 
One Cumstock was sexton of the first 
meeting-house, as this old record 
shows : " Old Goodman Cumstock is 
chosen sexton, whose work is to order 
youth in the meeting-house, sweep the 
meeting-house, and beat out dogs, for 
which he is to have 40 shillings a 
year : he is also to make all graves : 
for a man or woman he is to have 4 



shillings, for children, 2 shillings a 
grave, to be paid by survivors." 

Three subsequent edifices occupied 
the same site on Bulkeley Square. 
The present elegant structure opposite 
the Post Office was first used in 1851. 
Located on an eminence, which lends 
additional height to its lofty spire, con- 
structed of gray granite, and on a 
generous scale, it is one of the finest 
examples of church architecture in the 
State. 

The history of the occupation of the 
pastorate of the society is as follows : 
Its first Pastor — and until 1658 — 
Richard Blinman ; 1661tol6G5, Ger- 
sliom ]5ulkeley: then Simon Brad- 
street, who died in office in l(>8o, 
and during whose occupancy of the 




SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH — BROAD, HEMPSTEAD AND 

FEDERAL STREETS. 

The Pastor of the Second Congregational Church is Rev. James W. Bixler. The Church Dates Its Organization From 

April 1835. Services as Follows; Sunday. 10.45 A. M., Preaching by the Pastor: Sunday School at 12 M.: 3.30 P.M.. 

Meeting of the Junior Society of Young People's Christian Endeavor: at 6.30 P. M.. Meeting of the Endeavor 

Society Proper: 7.30 P. M.. Regular Sunday Evening Service: Friday Evening Meeting at 7.30. 



45 



picturesque 1Hew Uondon. 



pastorate it was that the famous sect 
known as " Rogerenes " was in evi- 
dence. Gurdon Saltonstall was the 
next Pastor, from liiOl to 1708, when 
he was elected Governor of the State. 
Then in 1709 Eliphalet Adams, whose 
work in connection with the church 
was terminated by death in 1753. In 
1757 the Rev. Mather Byles, Jr., was 
called to fill the pulpit, his term of 



duty. Dr. McEwen died September 
7th, 18(50. at the venerable age of 80 
years. This was his only parish, as 
he came to New London immediately 
after having completed his theological 
studies. Dr. Field was Pastor until 
187(!, and was followed by Rev. Ed- 
ward W. Brown, under whose juris- 
diction the church remained until the 
autumn of lS8fi. In the spring of 




ST. MARY'S STAR OF THE SEA ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, 
HUNTINGTON STREET. 

The First House of Worship Occupied by This Church was a Small Chapel. Erected by the Society in 1843. It 

Worshipped in a Larger Church. St. Patrick's, on Truman Street. Which Was Consecrated in March. 1855. 

The Structure Shown in the Engraving Was Dedicated in May. 1876. Services: Sunday Masses 

at 8. 9.15. and 10.30 A. M.; Vespers at 3 P. M. Week Day Masses Every Morning at 8 o'clock. 

Pastor. Rev. Thomas P. Joynt: Assistants. Rev. David O'Donneli. and Rev. John F. Quinn. 



Then 



service extending to 1768. The next 
Pastor was Ephraim Woodbridge, who 
oihciated until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1770. There was then an 
interim of eleven years, in which the 
pastorate was vacant, after which 
Henry Channing was Pastor — 1787 
until 1800 — when Rev. Dr. Abel 
McEwen, D. D.. was installed. Dr. 
McEwen's pastorship was of remark- 
able duration. In 1856 Rev. Thomas 
P. Field was chosen as his Associate 
Pastor, and he was released from active 



1887 the present Pastor, Rev. S. Leroy 
Blake, D. D., accepted a call to the 
church. The Deacons are Jesse H. 
Wilcox, George E. Starr, Henry 
Ivufier, William Belcher, Cliarles W. 
Chapin, and Pliny 'SI. Harwood. The 
Superintendent of the Sunday School 
is (reorge F. Tinker. Bethany Chapel, 
located on lower Bank Street, is an 
auxiliary to the church. Its services 
are Sabbath School at 9 A. M., and 
a Sunday evening meeting at 7.30 
o'clock. 



46 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew 1London» 



The Second Congregational Church 
of New London was organized in 
April, 1835. Its inauguration was 
the result of a colonizing from the 
First Church of Christ. The first 
meeting house was a white wooden 
building with square belfry and front 
porticoes. Its cost was about $12,000. 
It occupied the southwest corner 
of Huntington and .lay streets, and 



is built of rough granite, and is one 
of the finest buildings in the city ; its 
architecture is unique, and it presents 
a most substantial and solid appear- 
ance. In size it is commodious and 
generous. It occupies a conspicuous 
position on the crest of the hill op- 
posite the Park, on Broad Street. The 
present Pastor of the church is Rev. 
James \V. Bixler, who commenced his 




HUNTINGTON STREET BAPTIST CHURCH - 

NEAR JAY. 



-HUNTINGTON STREET, 



The Huntington Street Baptist Cliurch was Organized in 1849. Pastor, Rev. iosepli A. Elder. Sunday Services; 

10.45 A. M., Preaching by the Pastor : lUeeting of the Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor at 6 P. M.: 

Evening Meeting at 7.30 o'clock. Prayer Meetings on Wednesday and Saturday Evenings. 



was dedicated in April, 1835. On 
March 13th, 1868, it was burned to 
the ground, and that soon after the 
expenditure upon it of •$10,000 for 
repairs. The corner stone of the 
present structure was laid in ( )ctober, 
1868. The edifice was completed and 
dedicated in June, 1870. Its entire 
cost was more than $140,000. It 



pastorate in October, 1891. The 
Deacons are William H. Chapman, 
Newton Fuller, Francis N. Braman, 
and P. Hall Shurts. 

In 1897 a new parsonage was erected 
at No. 5 Broad Street by Mrs. Martha 
S. Harris, in memory of her late hus- 
band, Hon. Jonathan Newton Harris, 
who was a deacon of the church. It 



47 



(picturesque 1Rew TLondon. 



is a fine residence of Pompeiian brick, 
and forms a fitting memorial to Mr. 
Harris — whose beneficence was wide- 
spread — besides being an ornament to 
the city. 

The Society of the St. James Epis- 
copal Church was organized in 172.5. 
Its first church building was erected in 
1732, on the Parade, foot of State 
Street. It was burned by Benedict 
Arnold on the oth of September, 1781. 
In 1787 the next house of worship was 
constructed ; it stood on Main Street, 
at the corner of Church, and served 
the Society until 18.50. The present 
edifice, located at the corner of Hunt- 
ington and Federal Streets, was con- 
secrated in .lune, 1850. It is a fine 
brown-stone building of ornate archi- 
tecture, with minarets and a lofty 
spire. 

The St. James Episcopal Church in 
New London has numbered among its 
pastors such eminent divines as Rev. 
James McSparren, D. D., and the Rt. 
Rev. Samuel Seabury, D. D., one-time 
Bishop of Connecticut and Rhode 
Island. Beneath the shelter of the 
north wall of St. James Church is a 
stone talilet to his memory, which re- 
cords that beneath it his body once 
rested for a time, and that he was a 
man of good deeds and many sacrifices. 

The Rector of St. James Church is 
Rev. Alfred Poole Grint, Ph. D. : 
Senior Warden. Thomas P. Bindloss ; 
Junior Warden. John McGinle^' : Ves- 
trymen, Elisha L. Palmer, Daniel J. 
McAdams, Charles H. Goss, Fitch D. 
Crandall, Charles B. Ware, W. F. M. 
Rogers, and A. C. Woodruff. 

The First Baptist Church of New 
London was organized in 1804, by a 
colony from the Baptist Church of 
Waterford. It was incorporated in 
1885. The first meeting-house was 
erected in ISOtJ, on Pearl Street, near 
Union. Prior to that time services 
were held in the Court House. The 
present structure, a fine brick building 
with two towers of unequal height, is 
located at tiie corner of State and 



Washington streets. It was dedicated 
March 18th, 1856. The Pastor is 
Rev. Franklin G. McKeever; Deacons, 
James Newcomb, Leonard F. Lester, 
Charles A. Benjamin, Hiram Hold- 
ridge, Joseph Starr, and H. D. 
Stanton. 

The Second Baptist Church, Union 
Street, opposite Golden, was organized 
in 1840. Its pastorate is at present 
unoccupied. 

The Huntington Street Baptist 
Church, located on Huntington Street, 
near Jay, dates its organization from 
IMarch"l2th, 1849. The building 
occupied by the Society is a commodi- 
ous one, fashioned somewhat after the 
Colonial style, with large pillars and a 
broad portico. Within the past year 
it has undergone important repairs, at 
an outlay of about #1,200. The 
Pastor is Rev. Joseph A. Elder; 
Deacons, J. Coleman Williams, Iler- 
liert L. Avery, George Crandall, 
William E. Greene, John Winslow, 
Henry B. Dwyer, and Charles F. 
Potter. 

The Shiloh Baptist Church (color- 
ed; on High Street, has been in ex- 
istence since 1894. Its Pastor is 
Rev. T. L. Crocker; Deacon, A. 
Moseley. 

Methodism was introduced into 
New London September 2nd, 1789, 
by a sermon preached by Rev. Jesse 
Lee at the Court House. In October, 
1793. the first Methodist class was 
formed. In 1798 the first Methodist 
Episcopal Church was erected on the 
northwest corner of Union and 
Methodist streets. In 1855 the buihl- 
ing now in use on Federal Street was 
constructed. It is a large and credit- 
able edifice, and has just been re- 
paired and completely renovated at an 
expense of about •'?4.2(H). The jircs- 
ent parsonage, (37 Hempstead Street, 
was purchased by the Ladies' Aid 
Society in 1882. The Pastor of the 
t'ederal Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church is Rev. Walter S. Mclntyrc: 
Trustees, F. E. Barker, D. E. Whiton, 



4S 



Ipicturesque *fRcw ILondon* 



B. F. Starr. H. F. Rogers, J. A. 
Southard, J. H. Root, H. B. Smith, 
George H. Holmes, and G. A. Ed- 
ge rton. 

The home of St. Mary's Star of the 
Sea Roman Catholic Church is an 
elegant and ample granite structure, 
located on Huntington Street, near 
Washington. It was completed in 
1876, to replace St. Patrick's Church, 
on Truman Street, which had become 



Church is Rev. Thomas P. Joynt. 
The Assistant Pastors are Rev. David 
O'Donnell and Rev. John F. (Juinn. 

The Unitarian Society, Minister, 
Rev. John Foster Tucker ; President, 
George P. Fenner, conducts a service 
of preaching every Sunday evening at 
7.30 o'clock in Lyric Hall, No. 241 
State Street. 

In addition to New London's active 
chun'hes, whose pastorates are regu- 




HOME OF THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION — STATE STREET. 

The Young Men's Christian Association in New London Was Organized in 1867. In the Rear of the Building Shown in the 

Accompanying Illustration is the Gymnasium, a Fine Brick Structure, the Gift to the Association of Hon. George 

F. Tinker. It is Well Equipped With Gymnasium Apparatus, and By Reason of Its Size and Arrangement 

Forms an Excellent Place in Which to Hold Socials and Entertainments. The President of the 

Association is Hon. George F. Tinker: Vice-Presidents. A C. Woodruff. H. D. Stanton. 

and George C. Strong ; Secretary. P. Leroy Harwood : General Secretary. 

Richard W. Mansfield : Treasurer. Frank E. Barker. 



inadequate to the demand made upon 
it by the increasing congregation. 
Just south of the church is the house 
occupied by the Pastor and his assist- 
ants; on its nortliern side is the fine 
brick building of the Sisters of Mercy. 
At the west of the latter institution 
is the school building of the parish, a 
modern structure of commodious de- 
sign. The Pastor of St. Mary's 

(5) 49 



larly supplied, are several church and 
religious bodies. The People's Chris- 
tian Church, the Central Mission 
School, the Bradley Street Mission, 
the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and others, are local organiza- 
tions whose efforts along the lines of 
Christian work are productive of 
much that is for the common good 
and welfare of the city. 




50 




NEW LONDON POST OFFICE— STATE STREET, CORNER UNION. 
Postmaster. John McGinley : Assistant Postmaster, Franklin W. Dow. 

Chapter 1lt). 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS — SAVINGS AND NATIONAL BANKS — BANKERS 
AND BROKERS— POSTAL, TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE FACILITIES. 



Upon its Financial Institutions 
■A city or town depends largel}- for much 
of its prosperit}', growtli, and desir- 
ability as a business or manufacturing 
center. Tlie healthy condition of its 
financial organizations, and its ade- 
quate banking facilities are frequently 
(lemonstrative of the general prosperity 
and business status. 

In her banks and other monetary in- 
stitutions, New London, the banking 
cfenter of tlie adjacent towns and 
countrysides, is particularly fortunate. 
Her bank officers are in most instances 
representatives of the first and best 
known New London families. The 
facilities offered the various business 
concerns and manufacturing industries 
are extensive, aiid the accommodations 



and privileges as liberal as is compati- 
ble with consistent banking. The 
bank buildings are of either stone or 
brick, substantial and secure ; and their 
vaults are strong, impervious to fire, 
and supplied with modern appliances 
for convenience and absolute security. 
I'heir boards of directors are composed 
of business men and manufacturers 
who have at heart the city's best in- 
terests of business prosperity, enter- 
prise and progression ; men who stand 
ready to serve the reliable firms of the 
present, and to further the establish- 
ment of future reputable and wide 
awake concerns. 

The history of New London's banks, 
as compared with those of other cities, 
is unique. New London was among 



51 



Ipicturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



the first six cities in the country to 
number a l)anking house among their 
otlier business enterprises. Witli tlie 
birth of the whaling industry as a 
prominent factor in the city's business 
life, came the necessity of financially 
assisting many of the wlialing agents 
and captains. Then to the fore came 
the banks of New London, and the 
wisdom of extending such assistance, 
and the great benefit it has been to the 
connnunit}-, is attested by the import- 
ance to which the city attained as a 
whaling port, and by the wealth and 
consequent prosperit}' brought into it 
by tiiose engaged in the industry-. 

While none of the banks of the city 
are of more recent origin than 18(37, 
the Union Bank, and the New London 
City National Bank, are the two oldest. 
The L'nion Bank, with a like institu- 
tion in Hartford and New Haven, 
chartered at the same session of the 
Legislature, is the oldest in the State. 
It is credited, however, with having 
secured possession of its charter some- 
^^•hat earlier than either the Hartford 
or New Haven Bank. Its first Presi- 
dent was Jedediah Huntington: its 
first Cashier, .John Hallani. 

The New London Citj' National, 
next in point of age, was incorporated 
in May, 1807. Its first President was 
Elias Perkins: first Cashier, Anthony 
Thatcher. Then followed the Savings 
Bank of New London, which dates its 
existence from 1827, with Ezra Chap- 
pell its first President: the National 
Whaling Bank, 1833, with Coddington 
Billings President, and Peter C. Tur- 
ner Cashier; the National Bank of 
Commerce, September, 18.52, first Pre- 
sident Acors Barns, first Cashier, 
Charles Butler, present President, 
Charles Barns, present Cashier, 
George B. Prest : and in 1867, the 
Mariners' Savings P>ank of New Lon- 
don, first President, Captain Daniel 
Latham, first and present Treasurer, 
John E. Darrow. 

The Connecticut Building and Loan 
Association, of Hartford, the Co- 



operative Building Bank, of Ne\\' 
Yoi'k, F. H. Parmelee, Secretary and 
Treasurer ; the l)rokerage firm of P. A. 
Rogers & Company — C. F. Edney, 
local manager' — and the general insur- 
ance agencies of James H. Hill & 
Company, J. C. Learned & Sons, 
James R. May and others, together 
with many insurance companies of 
local representation, add materially to 
the city's financial atmosphere and 
activity. 

The Postal, Telegraph, and 
Telephone Facilities of New Lon- 
don are sufficient and commendable. 
The Post Office Building, at the cor- 
ner of State and Union streets, is com- 
modious and well appointed, and the 
clerical and carriers" force efficient 
and courteous. The Postmaster is 
John McGinley ; Assistant Postmaster, 
Franklin W. Dow. 

New London's position as a pro- 
minent railroad center affords super- 
lative advantages in the matter of 
prompt and effective telegraphic com- 
munication. This city was among those 
early to avail themselves of the tele- 
graph. In 1847. shortly after tJie suc- 
cessful completion of the invention, a 
company, formed of New London and 
Norwich citizens, connected the two 
cities l)y wire. The telegraph com- 
l^anies now operating in New London 
are the Western Union, which has its 
offices in the L^nion Depot, and a sum- 
mer office at the Pequot House, and 
the Postal Telegraph Caljle Company, 
with offices at 5 Bank and 174 State 
Street. 

New London is furnished -Hith local 
and long distance telephone conveni- 
ences by the Southern New England 
Telephone Company, which has its 
division headquarters in the Neptune 
Building. 20 State Street. Other public 
telephone stations in New London 
have their locations as follows : Hotel 
Winthrop, 10 State Street; Crocker 
House, 174 State Street : and the State 
Armory, 41 Washington Street. 



52 



[picturesque fRew Uondon* 



Tims it is apparent that in her 
financial institutions and in her oppor- 
tunities of local and outside comnumi- 
cation, as well as by reason of her nu- 
merous other municipal jirivileges and 
accommodations, New London stands 
well to the front with cities of similar 
population and advMUtages. 

The Union Bank is one of the 
oldest financial institutions in the 
country. At 
the time of its 
incorporation 
but five banks 
were in exist- 
ence in t h e 
United States; 
one each in the 
cities of New 
York, Boston, 
Philadelphia, 
Baltimore and 
Providence. As 
early as Feb- 
ruary 10, 1792, 
a meeting was 
held at Miner's 
Tavern on 
Bank Street, 
when a com- 
mittee CO m- 
posed of men of 
property inter- 
ests and busi- 
ness standing 
was appointed to 
institute a l)ank 
in New London 
and obtain suIh 

scriptions to the stock. At the May 
session of the Connecticut legislature 
in 1792, a charter was obtained, pro- 
viding for a capital of .1100,000, and 
an authorized capital of .^500, 000. 
The bank at once began business in a 
brick building on the upper part of 
Water Street, owned at the time by 
Edw. Hallam & Company. During 
the year, seven other banks in various 
parts of the country ol)tained tlieir 
charters. 




THE UNION BANK — bl STATE STREET. 
Established in 1792. 



Li 1818 the bank built the stone 
building it now occupies on State 
Street. On March 28, 1865, it was 
voted to convert the Ijank into a 
National Banking Association, under 
the general banking law of the LTnited 
States, but later, on January 10, 1882, 
it liquidated as a National institution, 
and the business since that period has 
been conducted as a State bank by 
the resumption of its charter of 1792. 

Up to the pres- 
ent time, 1901, 
the bank has 
had but seven 
presidents and 
seven cashiers. 
Mr. Robert 
Coit, the pres- 
ent incumbent, 
assumed the 
Presidency in 
1893. J. Law- 
rence Chew, the 
[)resentCashier, 
was elected to 
that office in 
188.5. 

This old insti- 
t u t i o n, the 
Union Bank, 
e n joys in a 
marked degree 
the confidence 
of the pulilic on 
the ground of 
present useful- 
ness alone, 
apart from any 
consideration 
which may be due to its extreme ag-e 
or the services it has rendered 
business comnamity in the pjist. 



the 



New London in 1807 was the only 
city in Connecticut that had two banks 
— the New London B.\nk, incor- 
porated in May of that year, and the 
Union, incorporated in 1792 — Hart- 
ford, New Haven, Middletown, Nor- 
wich and Bridgeport being each served 
by one bank only. The population of 



53 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



New London was then less than 3.300 : 
and the desire of the community for 
greater hanking facilities than the 
Union Bank could afford must have 
grown out of the fact that this city 
was then just fairly beginning to en- 
gage in whale fishing, and the future 
importance and magnitude of that 
trade could even then be foreseen. 
The building and fitting out of whale 
ships required the use of large sixms of 
money ; and, during the long vo3-ages 
of one, two or three j'ears, the banks 
had often virtually to carry some of 
the ship owners and some of the local 
merchants. It is not easy to over- 
estimate the value of the assistance 
rendered by the banks of New London, 
not only in the whaling ventures, but 
in other enterprises that have tended 
to promote the steady, healthy growth 
which New London has enjoyed during 
the last hundred years. 

The record of the New London 
Bank has been an excellent one during 
the 93 years of its existence. Within 
that period it has weathered many 
financial storms, and its management 
has been proved to be wise and capa- 
ble in a very marked degree. A list 
of those who have been officers of this 
bank would include many of New 
London's most prominent and success- 
ful citizens. Henry P. Haven. Presi- 
dent of the bank in 1876, J. N. Harris, 
its President from 1876 to 1896, and 
Asa Otis, a Director from 1834 to 18.59 
are allwidelyknown for the many public 
benefactions that have come from their 
large fortunes. Elias Perkins, Elisha 
Denison, Jacob B. Gurlej-, Ezra Chap- 
pell. Elijah F. Duttoul Albert N. 
Ramsdell and Richard N. Belden each 
occupied the office of President of the 
bank : and the Cashiei-s have been 
Anthonv Thatcher. Elijah F. Dutton. 
Rielianl X. Behlen. Edwin R. Belden 
and William H. Rowe. Of these, four 
have served in that capacity for twenty 
years or more. 

Among othei-s, who liave been 
directors of this bank, mav be men- 



tioned Edward Hallam. William 
Williams. William P. Cleveland, 
Isaac Thompson. Coddington Billings, 
Thomas W. Williams, Noyes Barber, 
Jonathan Coit, N. S. Perkins, Noyes 
Billings, William H. Chapman, Eras- 
mus D. Avery and Richard H. Chapell. 
To one familiar with the old New 
London families, names like these in- 
tlicate how f ulh- our foremost business 
men have been identified witli the 
bank. 

In 1865 this institution was re-or- 
ganized under the Fnited States laws 
and became the New London City 
National Bank. Its most recent state- 
ment shows its capital, surplus and 
profits to be about •>160,000 and its 
deposits about >=350,000. Its present 
officers are William Belcher, Presi- 
dent; Herliert L. Crandall, Vice- 
President; William H. Rowe, Cashier; 
and, associated with these as Directoi-s, 
Walter Learned, Philip C. Dunford, 
George C. Strong, S. A. Goldsmitli. 
F. S. Newcomb, Samuel Belden, 
Arthur Keefe. The other officers are 
Frank E. Barker, Assistant Cashier; 
Frank S. Greene. Teller : John R. 
Latham, Clerk. 

The stone building on Bank Street, 
occupied by the New London Citj" 
National Bank, has perhaps been 
longer used for banking purposes than 
any other in the State. Erected in 
1820. of native granite, it stands to- 
ilay as sturdy and strong as when first 
completed, and presents now probably 
much the same outward appearance 
tliat it did then. It is indeed one of 
the quaint features of Picturesque 
New London. Very characteristic it 
is of tlie old town — the building and 
the way in which it has been dealt with 
by its owners. In every pai't it shows 
its age : and yet it is not thrown aside 
and discarded. It has been kept in 
use and made comfortable and con- 
venient for the needs of to-day. Its 
vaidt is the original structure, built of 
immense granite slabs — top and sides 
and floor, but brought up to all modern 



54 



jpicturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



requirements by the best steel lining, 
by massive doors, a time lock and an 
electric burglar alarm. And the man- 
agement of the bank, too, is typical of 
the New London business man: pru- 
dent, conservative, slow to change, 
proud of the city's past and of all 
that has been good and creditable in 
her history, and yet alive to the 
opportunities of the present, and reach- 
ing out to get a share of the prosper- 
ity that has of late been coming to 
New London in the rapid growth of 
her popula- 
tion and the 
extension of 
her indus- 
tries. 

The Sav- 
ings Bank 
OF New Lon- 
don was in- 
corporated in 
May, 1827. 
There were 
at this time 
but three 
S a V i n g s 
Banks in the 
State of Con- 
n e c t i c u t : 
The Society 
for Savings, 
in Hartford ; 
The Middle- 
town Savings 
Bank ; and The Norwich Savings 
Society. The incorporators met in 
June of that year, and Ebenezer 
Learned was chosen President of the 
Bank and Robert Coit Treasurer. 
The business of the Bank was tran- 
sacted in tlie l)anking room of The 
LTnion Bank. 

In 1852, the Bank having outgrown 
the limited accommodations which 
could be afforded by the Union Bank, 
the Trustees built on Main Street, on 
the site now occupied by the Bank. 
Tlie new building proving inadeipiate, 
in 189.5 one addition was made and in 




WILLIAM 
President New Londo 



1898 the capacity of the Bank was 
doubled by another addition. The 
Bank's growth has overtaken this in- 
creased capacity, and within a year or 
two another addition will be put on. 

The financial growth of the Savings 
Bank of New London has been steady 
and rapid. Its gain during the past 
fiscal year was 1445,954. Its deposit- 
ors number about 9865. 

From the outset the Directors of 
the Bank have been citizens of New 
Lon<lon conspicuous for tlieir business 

al)ility, and 
to that fact 
much of the 
success of the 
Bank is due. 
'J'lie Presi- 
dents of the 
liank have 
been Ezra 
(' h appe 11, 
K b e n e z e r 
Learned. 
Robert Coit, 
and the pres- 
ent incum- 
bent, William 
H. Chapman. 
The Treas- 
urers have 
been Robert 
Coit, Joseph 
C. Sistare, 
Francis C . 
Learned, 
Joshua C. Learned, and the present 
Treasurer, Walter Learned. The de- 
posits of the Bank are now over 
•'16,500,000. 

It is worthy of note that the present 
Assistant Treasurer, George Whitney, 
is the great grandson of the second 
President of the Bank. 

It has been conservative in its 
management, and even in times of 
panic it has promptly paid to its de- 
positors, on demand. 

It is now seventh in size among the 
banks of the State, and is second to 
none in its financial stabilit}'. 



BELCHER, 

n City National Banlt 



55 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



Captain William H. Allen, who 
resides on Thames Street, in Grot on, 
is a familiar figure in tliis section of 
Connecticut. He unassuming!}- bears 
the fame of having made the most suc- 
cessful voA'age on record in the annals 
of the whaling industry. This was in 
186.3, when, in command of the good 
ship " Onward," he cruised in the 
Eastern Sea. and the Yellow, Japan, 
and Okhotsk seas, and off the Cali- 
fornia coast. On 
this voj^age he 
captured 134 
whales, the catch 
netting 6,837 
barrels of oil, and 
62.000 pounds of 
whalebone. Thi> 
cargosold for tin- 
princely sum o1 
$417,000, of 
which Captain 
Aliens share 
was •*39,836. 
Many of Captain 
Allen's voy- 
ages have been 
fraught with 
adventures 
strange and thril- 
ling, but aboni 
these lie is mod- 
est and reticent. 
Of his 45 3'ears 
of active sea- 
faring life, he 
was 2.5 years a 
commander. And 
through many a tempestuous gale, 
through many imminent and unfoi^een 
perils of the deep, he has piloted his 
ship with the instinct of the true sailor 
and the knowledge of the experienced 
navigator. 

The Captain has made whaling 
cruises from New Bedford and New 
London. He speaks very highly of 
the firms in whose interest,s he made 
his voyages. Of the light in which 
they regarded him he modestly refrains 
from speaking. But his worth and 




sterling qualities could not be hidden. 
They have been particularly manifest 
since his leaving the sea a number of 
years ago, and settling down to a less 
hazardous, but quite as useful life 
ashore. 

Captain Allen is the son of Gris- 
wold and Betsey Allen. He was born 
in Lebanon, Connecticut, October 9th, 
1826. In his early 1)oyhood days he 
worked at farming until 14 or 15 
years of age, 
when he em- 
barked as cucik 
aV)oard a fishing 
smack. This fos- 
tered within him 
such a fondness 
for the sea, that 
at 16 years of 
age he shipped 
in the whaler 
"Robert Bowne" 
and his first 



step in a 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM H. ALLEN, 
President Mariners' Savings Banl< of New London. 



life of 
successful sea- 
manship was 
taken. In Aug- 
ust. 1858, he 
married Georgi- 
ana daughter of 
Olando Bailey, of 
(rroton. They 
have two sons 
and one daughter 
living : one son 
died in infancy. 
In matters af- 
fecting the good 
Captain Allen is 
He has represent- 



of his connnunity, 
zealous and faithful 
ed his town in the General Assembly, 
and for 12 years has served on the Gro- 
ton Board of Selectmen. He is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, a member of the 
Order of the Mystic Shrine of Bridge- 
port, Connecticut, and Commodore of 
the famous Jibboom Club of New 
London, which numbers on its rolls 
323 members. Since retiring from 
the sea he has shown the same integrity 
and foresight in business affairs that 



:>{j 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew Uondon. 



characterized liis maritime pursuits. 
He is President of the Mariners' Sav- 
ings Bank, of New London, one of the 
strongest financial institutions in the 
State ; and, tor the matter of tliat, one 
of the strongest in many states. 

The Mariners' Bank was establislied 
in 1867, and derived its name from 
the fact that it was originally intended 
to benefit seafaring men, although, of 
course, the intention was not that its 
deposits should be exclusively con- 
fined to mar- 
iners. Since 
its estab- 
lishment, 
nearly, this 
Bank has 
had for its 
S e ore tary 
and Treas- 
u r e r , 'Sir. 
John E. Dar- 
r o w . T h e 
Bank's con- 
dition and 
the facts sur- 
rounding it 
are remark- 
able. Its de- 
posits, No- 
vember 1st, 
1900, were 
.$2,190,000. 
Its surplus 
at that date, 
113 9,600. 

Recorded on its books are 4,195 open 
accounts. The average individual de- 
posit is i585. It has less than 90 
accounts that exceed #-3,000, and but 
one that is in excess of #10,000. These 
facts speak for themselves. The Direct- 
ors of the Mariners' Savings Bank are 
William H. Allen, W. L. Peckham, 
Charles W. Strickland, Thomas A. 
Miner, Frederick S. Neweoml), George 
C. Strong, John Hopson, Richard C. 
Morris, James P. Johnston, Horace C. 
Lamphere, Albert R. Darrow, Isaac 
W. Thompson, Frederick S. Parmelee, 
and George E. Starr. 




SEBASTIAN D. 
President of the Natio 



(;)ne of the Oldest and Best 
Known of New London's financial in- 
stitutions is the National Whaling 
Bank, located on Bank Street, near 
State. It dates its existence from 
1833, when it was chartered as a 
State bank. In 1865 it was changed 
from a State to a National l)ank. 

At the time of the organization of 
the National Whaling Bank in 1833, 
and for some years subsequent to that 
time. New London figured prominently 

as a whaling 
port, and as 
the industry 
called for 
increased 
banking fa- 
cilities and 
grew in im- 
portance, it 
seemed ap- 
propriate to 
name in its 
honor one of 
the principal 
1) a n k i u g 
liouses of the 
city. 

The Whal- 
i n g Ban k 
occupies its 
own build- 
ing, a sub- 
LAWRENCE, s t a n t i a 1 

nal Whaling Bank. structure, 

w h i c h i n 
point of solidity and security tyi)i- 
fies the qvuilities possessed by the 
institution proper. Some conception 
of its sound status, and of its success- 
ful past may be gathered by a con- 
sideration of the following statement. 
Capital, 1150,000 ; surplus, #40,000 ; 
undivided profits, #114,000 ; annual 
dividends for the jjast 40 years, 10 per 
cent. The President of the National 
Whaling Bank is Sebastian D. Law- 
rence; Cashier, Belton A. Copp. The 
Directors are S. D. Lawrence, S. H. 
Miner, B. A. Copp, C. J. Viets, and 
D. N. Copp. 



57 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw Uondon. 



Mr. Charles Fkederick Edney, 
manager for F. A. Rogers & Company, 
commission stock brokers, 18 ami 11' 
Neptune Building, New London, is a 
native of Weyljridge, Surrey County. 
England, wliere he was Ijorn in 1875. 
He is the son of Thomas Randall 
Edney, of the old Somerset family of 
that name. 

In 1884. with his parents, he located 
in Canada, and received his education 
in the pul^lic schools of Sherbrooke, 
(Quebec. At an 
early age he was 
in theSherl)rooke 
Works of the 
Edison Electric 
Companj'. 

He entered the 
employ of the 
Great North- 
western Tele- 
graph Companv 
in 188 8, anil 
there learnf<l 
t e 1 e g r a p h \ . 
rapidly master- 
ing that profes- 
sion. He is an 
operator of great 
speed and accu- 
racy, and has 
held manj' re- 
sponsible posit- 
ions. His first 
position in the 
['nited States 
was with the 
Western In ion 
Telegraph Company, at White River 
Junction, Vermont, where he was 
emploj-ed for three years. In 1892 
he was in the service of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad as ticket agent 
at Lakeport, New Hampshire, and 
later as station agent at West Leb- 
anon. He was with the Postal 
Telegrapii Companv in Bostou, in 
1898, and on the Boston Globe staff 
in 1X94, operating their special New 
York wire. Subsequently he accepted 
a position with the Associated Press, 



CHARLES 

Manager for F. A. 



his first location with them being 
Hartford, Connecticut. He soon ac- 
quired a national reputation as an 
expert telegrapher. 

In 1898 he again entered the em- 
ploy of the Associated Press, and 
worked their heaviest circuit out of 
New York. In the same year, at the 
national telegraphic contest held at 
Madison Square Garden, New York 
City, he was awarded the first prize 
for rapid sending. 

Mr. Edney be- 
came connected 
with the brok- 
erage firm of F. 
A. Rogers & 
C o m p a n y i n 
1S99. and opened 
their New Lon- 
(1 I ) n Ifi c e in 
.1 u n c of that 
year. This firm's 
leased wire sys- 
tem is the most 
extensive of that 
in operation by 
any similar con- 
c e r n in New 
England. Their 
offices connected 
liy private wires 
are about fifty in 
number. Thej- 
have also numer- 
ous correspond- 
F. EDNEY, snts at various 

Rogers & Company. points in the 

United States 
Their advices on cotton are largely 
(luotcd by papers in the cotton belt. 
The New York offices of the firm are 
at 38 Wall street, and their Boston 
offices are located in the Ames Building. 
In ()ctol)er, 1900, Mr. Edney was 
married to Miss Cora Esther Palmer, 
daughter of Frank Hazen Palmer, a 
well known manufacturer of Brooklyn, 
New York. Their residence is on 
Willett* Avenue. He is a member of 
the Thames and Entre Nous clubs, of 
New London. 




58 



Chapter \t). 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 



THE MANUFACTORIES OF NEW LONDON — MANUFACTURERS WHOSE 
ABILITY, COURAGE AND INDUSTRY HAVE AIDED IN BUILDING UP 
AND MAINTAINING THE QTY OF TO-DAY. 

does both, and in her exten- 
sive, well equipped larger fac- 
tories, in the busy, ambitious 
enterprise of her smaller 
manufacturing plants, as well 
as by her admiralile location as 
a port and watering place, her 
position is extremely fortun- 
ate and congratulatory. 

Closely identified with 
manufacturing in New Lon- 
don are men of public spirit, 
energy, progressiveness and 
foresight. Men who are 
anxious to place their citj' 
on a plane with others, whose 
industrial activity and scope 
have won for them renown 
and wealth. And it is safe 
to say that most of tliem en- 
tertain solicitude regarding 
New London's standing as a 
commercially productive 
community, as well as for the con- 
dition of their business and per- 
sonal bank accounts. Because of this 
desire to see the city grow in import- 
ance and in touch with the various 
trade channels of the world, and by 
reason of the growing tendency to 
liberality evinced by the Municipal 
Government, and by the praiseworthy 
efforts of The New London Board of 
Trade along the lines of modern busi- 
ness progression. New London is in- 
dustrially advancing. Slowly it may 
be, bat surely and with certainty, 
nevertheless, the growth goes on. To 
the unobservant eye this progress may 
not be particularly apparent. The 




ISRAEL F. BROWN, 
Founder of the Brown Cotton Gin Company. 

New London, from the days of its 
early history a seaport, and in the 
summer season of tlie present a resort 
of the pleasure-seeker, has not the 
fame as a manufacturing center that 
attaches to many of the inland cities 
of New England. But it does not 
follow that the city is without valu- 
able manufacturing industries; indeed, 
manufactories it has of variety and 
It is with municipalities 

with individuals ; to few may be 
ascribed all the attributes. Not often 
does a city enjoy a wide reputation as 
a summer outing place, and at the 
same time stand for a manufacturing 
center of importance. New London 



magnitude 



oQ 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew Uondon* 



erection, in rapid sequence, of manu- 
factory after manufactory is not tiie 
necessary immediate effect of healthy, 
steady growth, although additional 
factory buildings must be the ulti- 
mate result. The present increase is 
cliiefly in the additional facilities, ex- 
tent and business of the concerns 
already active here. It is true also 
that firms from abroad have recently 
located in New London and its envi- 
rons. They are of great importance' 
and will play a strong part in the 
manufacturing evolution of the city. 
Others will come, and will be wel- 
come, more than welcome : and on 
them much will depend. But the 
foundations laid by the manufacturers 
of the past, the additions to and re- 
erections on those foandations b^- their 
earnest successors of the present, must 
be regarded as the "backbone," as 
the assurance of permanence, and as 
the sure and healthy basis on which 
shall rest the manufacturing future of 
New London. 

Compared with otiier lines of manu- 
facture, that of modern printing press 
construction is re j) resented by very few 
cities. Prominent among these is New 
London. The fine presses manufac- 
tured here bear a world-wide reputa- 
tion, aiul carry the name of New 
Jjondon, as a city of manufactures, to 
many quarters of the globe. 

Manj' large manufactories, whose 
products are widely sold and well 
known for their excellence, have their 
offices and plants in New London. 
The factories of the Brainerd & Arm- 
strong Company, silk manufacturers, 
have their location on Church and 
Union streets, nearly in the center of 
the city, and at the junction of Coit 
and Canal streets. This company was 
established in 1867. Its officers are : 
Ira Dimock, President ; L. O. Smith, 
Vice-President; Benjamin A. Arm- 
strong, Treasurer, and Benjamin L. 
Armstrong, Secretary. Its manufac- 
tures comprise wash eml)roidery silks, 
spool sewing, stamped linens, knitting 



and crochet silks, eomnion embroidery 
silk, machine and button-hole twist, 
skein sewings, silk serges, Merveilleux, 
Satin de Chines, and plain and change- 
able Taffetas. The company has sales- 
rooms in New York City, Philadel- 
phia, Boston and Baltimore, and selling 
agents in Chicago, St. Louis, Cincin- 
nati, San Francisco, and St. Johns, 
Province of Quebec, Canada. In its 
employ are more than 800 factory 
handsl Its capital is f640,0(M). 

Located on Pequot Avenue, south 
of the junction of Willett's Avenue, 
Shaw and Howard streets, are the 
works of the Brown Cotton Gin Com- 
jjany, iron founders, machinists and 
woodworkers. President and Treas- 
urer, Edward T. Brown : Secretary, 
Geoige T. Brown. The Brown Cot- 
ton Gin Company was incorporated in 
May, 1865, by Israel F. Brown, Dr. 
Charles Osgood of Michigan, Gilbert 
Osgood and Jolin L. Devotion. It 
manufactures cotton gins and linting 
machines for oil mills. It is one of 
the principal concerns of its kind in 
the L^nited States and employs about 
300 skilled mechanics. 

The R. T. Palmer Company, largest 
manufacturers of bed comfortables in 
the world, was incorijorated in 1888. 
Its immense plant, bordering on Wash- 
ington and Metliodist streets, com- 
prises eight large brick buildings. 
The President of The R. T. Palmer 
Company is Tyler R. Palmer, of New 
York; Treasurer and Secretary, Reu- 
ben T. Palmer, Jr., of New London. 
The Directors are : Tyler R. Palmer, 
Reul)en T. Palmer. Sr., Reuben T. 
Palmer, Jr., and E. H. Hamilton. 

J ust south of Shaw's Cove, on Ham- 
ilton, Oak and Howard streets, are 
the offices, foundry and machine works 
of the Hopson & Chapin Manufactur- 
ing Company, established in 1878. It 
is engaged in founding, and in the 
manufacture of boilers and radiators 
for heating liy the hot water system. 
The shops of The Hopson & Chapin 
Compau}- are extensive. Its products 



60 




61 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rcw Uondon. 



are high grade, and \videl3' and most 
favorably known. Tlie President and 
Treasurer of tlie eonipany is John 
Hopson; Secretary, Chas. W. Chapiu; 
Superintendent. William T. Hopson. 

The D. E. Whiton Machine Com- 
pany, 59 Howard Street, was founded 
in West Stafford, Connecticait, in 1856, 
by David E. Wliiton. The concern 
removed to New London in 18S6, and 
was incorporated in the same year. 
Its fine offices and shops on Howard 
Street were erected in 1886, and by 
their extent and admirable neatness 
of appearance, reflect credit upon the 
Company. The Whiton Company 
manufactures gear cutting and center- 
ing machines, and drill and lathe 
chucks, for which it finds a market 
throughout the entire country. Its 
President is David E. Whiton ; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, L. E. Whiton. 

In 1853 The New London Gas Com- 
pany, now The New London Gas and 
Electric Company, was incorporated, 
with the privilege, granted by the 
Municipal Government, of exclusively 
supplying the city with gas for fifteen 
years from the date of its incorpora- 
tion. The results attained to by the 
company, however, were so gratifying 
as to secure to it the entire subsequent 
lighting. As successors to the Oneco 
Manufacturing Company, it also oper- 
ates as engine builders, and in general 
machine work and engine repairing. 
Its offices are at 29 Main Street ; its 
gas and electric plant, and machine 
shop and docks are located on Water 
Street. Robert Coit is President of 
the Company: Vice-President, Au- 
gvistus Brandegee ; Treasurer, A. JNI. 
Young; General Manager, A. G. H. 
Hunt. 

In nearly any grocery, j^rovision 
store or bakery dealer's establishment 
— in whatever section of the country — 
one may happen to enter, if he be a 
New Londoner, he is almost certain 
to be reminded of home by some box 
or barrel bearing the legend "C. D. 
Boss & Son, New London, Conn." 



The goods of this lirm of cracker 
manufacturers are known from New 
Brunswick to Key West, and clear to 
the Pacific coast. The business was 
established in 1831 by the late C. D. 
Boss, father of C. D. Boss, the present 
sole proprietor. The buildings it oc- 
cupies have a frontage on Water 
Street, and cover in extent an entire 
block. Everything in the line of 
crackers, Inscuit, bread and cake is 
manufactured here, of a (j^uality and 
excellence unsurpassed. 

After a long experience with lead- 
ing granite firms in the wholesale and 
retail trade, and realizing that New 
London demanded, and afforded par- 
ticular advantages for, the establish- 
ment of a marble and granite concern, 
Frank M. Ladd founded in June, 
1900, an industry of that nature at 
204 Bank Street. Mr. Ladd has had 
under his supervision some of the 
linest granite and marble construction 
in the country. He has installed in 
his present works special, improved 
machinery. Competent designers and 
workmen are employed to bring the 
product manufactured up to the high- 
est standard. That this is being ac- 
complished is evidenced by the large 
amount of ornamental stone work that 
has been turned out and erected since 
the inception of tlie business. 

The Morgan Iron Works, incorpor- 
ated in 1893, has its plant and ship- 
yard at Fort Neck. The President of 
the Company is Ricardo R. Morgan; 
Secretary, Elias F. Morgan. 

The manufacture in New London 
of artificial ice on a large scale is c'ar- 
ried on l)y the New London Brewing 
Companv — wliich was incorporated 
October' 4th, 1899 — at its Winthrop 
Spring Hygeia Ice Plant, incorporated 
and in operation one year previous. 
The officers of the Company are : 
Rudolph F. Haffenreffer, Jr., Presi- 
dent: Henry Stender, Vice-President; 
C'harlcs H. Leinert, Treasurer and 
General Manager, and Frank L. 
George, Secretary. 



02 



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63 



HMcturesque *fRew 5Lonclon» 



As FINE Printing Machinery as 
CAN BE BUILT is made in New Lou- 
don, by The Babcock Printing Press 
Manufacturing Company, located on 
Pequot Avenue. Organized in 1882, 
by men tliorouglily conversant with 
tiie business, their products have been 
of such excellent quality, so accurate 
in mechanical construction and so 
complete in original design, that they 
have forced themselves into the front 
rank of Press Builders, and their ma- 
cliines are found in many of the best 
printing offices in the United States, 
Canada, Mexico, 
South America, 
England, Scandi- 
navia, Russia, 
China, Australia 
and the Sandwich 
Islands. 

The name of the 
Babcock Com- 
pany has become 
a synonym for 
the highest grade 
of printing ma- 
chinery, honestly 
built and fairly 
sold. 

They bull d 
mam' kinds and 
sizes of cylinder 
presses, for all 
grades of print- 
ing, from their 
smallest press, 

weighinor two and one-half tons, to the 
big web newspaper machine, weighing 
sixteen tons. There is no clearness of 
type, delicacy of tint or strength of 
color known to the printer's art that 
cannot be produced with the Babcock 
Presses. 

Trade names, which are known 
wherever good printing is done, have 
been given to the different presses. 

The illustration represents a section 
of the press room of Harper & Bros.. 
New York, showing a line of " Opti- 
mus" presses. The " Optimns " is 
one of the most popular 



made by the Babcock Company, and 
is the best two-revolution press built. 
Some of the finest printing done by 
Harper & Bros., who are noted for 
fine w(u-k. is done ujdou the Babcock 
"Optimus" presses. This Press was 
exhibited at the Paris Exposition in 
1900, and awarded a gold medal. The 
Company also received the highest 
award for their exhiltit at the World's 
Fair, Chicago, in 1893. 

The President of the Companj- is 
Mr. George P. Fenner, of New Lon- 
don. Mr. Natlian Babcock, of West- 




SECTION OF THE PRESS-ROOM OF HARPER & BROTHERS, 

NEW YORK. 



erly, is the Secretary and Treasurer. 
The New York office of the Company 
is at 38 Park Row. Barnhart Bros, 
i^' Spindler, Chicago, General Western 
Agents. .John Haddon & Co., Lon- 
don, England, Agents for Great Brit- 
ain. Agents for Scandinavia, Finland 
and Russia, Aktiebolaget Mekanikus. 
Stockholm, Sweden, ilexican Agents, 
Fundicion ISIexicana de Tipos, Cit}- of 
Mexico. Tlie results obtained fi"om 
tliis company's presses are such that 
for firnuiess of impression, accuracy in 
register, and excellence of distribution, 
they leave nothing to be desired. 



maclunes 



64 




(6) 



65 




A SPECIMEN OF GRANITE CARVING DONE WITH PNEUMATIC TOOLS. 

FRANK M. LADD. 204 BANK STREET. NEW LONDON. CONNECTICUT. 

MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF GRANITE. 

MARBLE AND FREESTONE. 



66 



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Iptcturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



Tlie Bingham Paper Box Cnnipany, 
12 Mountain Avenue, was establislied 
in 1887. It manufactures all kinds 
of paper boxes, and operates a print- 
ing department, in which is carried 
on an extensive business in every 
variety of book and job printing. 
The President and Treasurer is A. 
Kingsbury, of South Coventry, t'on- 



incorporated in .luly, 1893. Its Presi- 
dent is Henry Lewis, of Philadelphia; 
Treasurer, Robert McLean, of New 
York ; Secretary, Jules A. Montant, 
of Xew York : Agent and Superin- 
tendent, Alonzo W. Sholes, of New 
London. 

The New London Wash Silk Com- 
pany, 30 Hempstead Street, dates its 




PLANT OF THE BINGHAM PAPER BOX COMPANY -12 MOUNTAIN AVENUE. 

Printers, and Manufacturers of Paper Boxes. 



neeticut: General Manager, William 
Kingsbury, of New London. 

In the Harris Building, 59 State 
Street, are the offices of The Palmer 
Brothers Company, incorporated in 
1899. President," Frank L. Palmer: 
Vice-President, Elisha L. Palmer: 
Secretary and Treasurer, George S. 
Palmer. The Palmer Brothers are large 
manufacturers of quilts, with mills at 
Montville, Oakdale and Fitchville. 

The New London Steam Woolen 
Mill (Company, Wetter Street, was 



inrorporation from January, 18 94. 
President and Treasurer, C. C. Knowl- 
ton, of Brooklyn, New York ; \'ice- 
President and Manager, Robert Smith, 
of New London : Secretary, George 
A. Hannnond. of Putnam, Conn. 

The I..3'on Lmbrella Company was 
incorporated in January, 1900. Its 
President is Fraidc .\. Miinsey; 
\'ice-President, Amasa Lyon, of New 
York ; Secretary, Bernard C. Lyon of 
New York : Treasurer, John Fogler of 
New London. 



68 



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71 




72 



Chapter D1I. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

CITY GOVERNMENT-THE NEW LONDON BOARD OF TRADE— DISTINGUISHED 
MEN OF THE PAST AND PRESENT— THE NEW LONDON PRESS. 

witli the City Government, and takes 
a ffincere interest in everthing which 
will advanee the welfare of this 
growing city. 

The Senior Alderman, who presides 
over the Board in the Mayor's absence, 
and who would succeed him in case of 
death, is elected annually liy the 
Aldermen. Alfred 11. Chai)j)ell, one 
of the progressive and most expe- 
rienced members of the Board, was 
elected to the position in October, 1900. 

The members of the Board are: 
R. H. (iunn. E. M. Sweeney and H. 
P. Bullard from the First Ward; 
C. H. Morris, C. Royce Boss and A. 
H. Chappell from the Second; P. C. 
Eggleston, G. C. Morgan and James 
R^May from the third: W. P. 
McBride, T. R. Murray and H. S. 
Dorsey from the Fourth: F. M. Ladd, 
C. D. Twome}- and (ieorge H.Thomas 
from the Fifth Ward, and Charles 
Prentis, Edwin L. DaSilva and Chaun- 
cey B. McCreery, Aldermen-at-Large. 
The New London Boakd of Trade 
was organized in 1885. The progres- 
sive men of New London very generallj^ 
joined it, and its officers have been 
chosen from the class favoring an 
enterprising policy in public and busi- 
ness affairs. The origin of many 
favoraljle changes are attributable to 
the Board. Its officers are: John 
McGinley, President: Edward S. 
Neilan, First Vice-President; Francis 
N. Branian, Second Vice-President; 
Walter Fitzmaurice, Secretary; George 
B. Prest, Treasurer. 

To the country's roll of distin- 
guished, eminent, and able men New 
London has added her quota. Among 
them have been John Winthrop, Jr., 
the founder of the town of New 




JOHN McGINLEY, 

Journalist. Editor. Postmaster of New London, and 
President of ttie New London Board of Trade. 

New London is an inde[)endent city 
ill politics. One party carries the mu- 
nicipal election about as frequently as 
the other. City officers are elected 
annually the first Monday in October. 
Tiie Mayor. City Clerk, and Treasurer, 
and the members of the Board of 
Aldermen, liold office three years. 
One-third of the Board is elected 
yearly, the others holding over. There 
are five wards, each entitled to three 
Aldermen. In addition, to cover a 
State law, three Selectmen are elected 
annually . Under the city charter they 
are, ex-offieio, memljers of the Board, 
and are known as Aldermen-at-Large. 

The present Mayor, Hon. M. Wilson 
Dart, was elected in October, 1900. 
He has been for some vears connected 



(7) 



-n 



(picturesque 1Rew ILondon* 



London, and Govenior of the Colony: 
Gurdon Saltonstall. who was also 
Governor in 1708 : Bishop Samuel Sea- 
burv, Bishop of Connecticut and Rhode 
Island, the first American Bishop: Cap- 
tain Nathan Hale, the jaatriot: General 
Jedediah Huntington, first Collector 
of the Port of New l^ondon, a soldier 
of the Revolution and Aid to (General 
Washington. Gen. Joseph A. Mower, 
one of the bravest of Slierman's com- 
manders on "The 
March to tlie 
Sea," and a noted 
Indian fighter, 
was of New Lon- 
don birth, (ien- 
eral Grant ranked 
him second only 
to General Sher- 
man in fighting 
a hi 1 ity and in- 
trepidity. Hon. 
Henry P. Haven, 
to whom the city 
is indeljted for 
its fine Pul)lic 
Library, was a 
merchant whose 
ships had sailed 
over many a sea. 
c a r r jr i ng the 
name of Ncax 
London into all 
ports of the 
world. Jonathan 
Newton Harris, 
another success- 
ful New London 
merchant, by the gift of f 10,000 for 
the founding of Memorial Hospital, 
lai'ge bequests to the Second Congre- 
gational Church, placing the income 
from the Harris Building in the hands 
of trustees to be distributed l)y them for 
beneficent purposes; Jonathan Coit, 
by his gifts, amounting to $42,000, 
to the poor and to the churches : 
Ezra Chappell, by many acts of benev- 
olence; Asa Otis, in generously 
bequeathing $1,150,000 to the Ameri- 
can Board of Foreign ]\Iissions, in 




THE LATE HENRY P. HAVEN, 

Founder of the New London Public Library. 

Reproduced from a Bronze Relief. Executed by Augustus 

St. Gaudens. and Inserted in a Panel of the 

Porch, near the Library Entrance. 



addition to several local bequests, and 
Dr. Seth Smith, a wealthy druggist, 
who left *250,000 to endow the Old 
Ladies" Home, have won a large niche 
in the Temple of Fame, Kindly Re- 
membrance and Gratitude. The late 
Charles Augustus Williams, j\Iayor of 
New London from 188o to 1888, whose 
personal efforts in effecting the removal 
of tlie graves from the old cemetery 
wliich once occupied the ground at 
the corner of 
Broad and Hemp- 
stead streets — 
now Williams 
Memorial Park — 
resulted in giving 
the public a 
charming outing 
spot, was a bene- 
factor who cannot 
be forgotten. 

The name of 
Sebastian D. 
I^awrence repre- 
sents a line of 
r e n o w n e d and 
honored mer- 
chants whose 
enterprises have 
added much to 
the wealth of 
New London. 
His public gifts 
show his love for 
the city: The 
S 1 die rs' and 
Sailors' Monu- 
ment, on the 
Parade, and the Firemen's Monument, 
at the head of State Street, are fine 
tributes to the heroic men of the past, 
and objects of special interest to 
everyone. The bequests of Hon. 
(ieorge F. Tinker to the Bulkeley 
School, Memorial Hospital, and Young 
Men's Christian Association, entitle 
him to the warm corner lie holds in 
tlie affection of the people of New 
London. Miss Frances Manwarino; 
Caulkins, in writing and pul)lishing 
Iter admirable "Historj' of New 



Ipicturesque 1Rew 3London» 



London," honored the city and lier- 
self . Mr. J. Lawrence Cliew has given 
the public much pleasure in sharing 
with them the fruits of liis research 
among the romantic traditions and 
memories of old New London. Mr. 
Walter Learned, President of the 
New Loudon Street Railway Company 
and Treas- 
urer of the 
Savings 
Bank of 
New Lon- 
don, is a 
writer of 
consideral)le 
distinction. 
His histori- 
cal address, 
delivered on 
the occasion 
of the Two 
Hundred 
and Fiftieth 
A n n i V e r - 
sary of New 
London, in 
1896, was a 
s c h o 1 a r 1 y 
oration. 
Rev. S. Le- 
Roy Blake, 
I). D., pastor 
of the First 
Church of 
Christ, is 
also entitled 
to honorable 
m e n t i o n 
among local 
his tor ic al 
writers. 
He now has in press an exhaustive 
history of the First Church of Christ. 
Ex-Governor Thomas M. Waller, and 
the Hon. Augustus Brandegee, by 
reason of the positions they have 
attained in the community and the 
country at large, through their legal 
abilities, statesmanlike qualities and 
strong personalities, may also be men- 
tioned with pride by New Londoners. 




THE LATE 

Mr 



Honorable Jonathan Newton 
Harris died in October, 189(;. He 
was for many years a distinguished 
citizen of New London. His belief in 
tlie high destiny of the city was 
evinced by the numerous charities he 
generously endowed, in the substan- 
tial business block on State Street, 

which Ijeais 
his name, in 
tlie elegant 
residence he 
occupied 
on B r o a d 
Street, and 
in the many 
li a n kin g, 
commercial, 
and manu- 
facturing- 
interests 
w ii i c h he 
aided with 
both means 
and counsel. 
He was 
born in Sa- 
lem, Conn., 
Nov. 18 th, 
1815, and 
was the 
sixth in de- 
scent from 
James Har- 
ris who re- 
sided in Bos- 
ton, Mass., 
in 1666, and 
who after- 
wa r ds lo- 
cated i n 
New Lon- 
don about the year 1690 with his wife 
and three sons, James, Asa, and 
Ephraim, dying here in 1715 at the 
age of 74 jears. 

Mr. Harris came to New London in 
1836 when about twenty years of age. 
He had received a thorough mercan- 
tile training, and after two years' 
further experience here with the 
leading business house of that day, 



HON. JONATHAN NEWTON HARRIS. 



Harris was One of New London's Foremost Business 
IMen and Philanthropists. 



75. 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon. 



conimeneetl his career as a iiiercliant. 
Tlie original tiriii name was J. N. 
Harris, cliangin;^ in after years to 
Harris & Brown, Harris, Ames iV Co., 
and Harris, Williams & Co. In ISlio 
Mr. Harris retired, to be at liberty to 
care for other and larger linancial 
interests. In 1848 he fonnded the 
firm of J. N. Harris & Co., of Cincin- 
nati, and, associated with other gentle- 
men, did a large bnsiness with the 
merchants of the Snntli and West. 

In 1862. and tlie years fullowing. 
in conjunction with Mr. Hill, of Phila- 
delphia, he operated very successfully 
the Hill & Harris Coal Mines at 
Mahoney City, Penn. He was also 
one of the organizers, and for several 
years President, of The Medical Man- 
ufacturing Co. at Montreal, and a 
director in the Davis & Lawrence Co. 
of that city. For over twenty years 
he was President of the New London 
City National Bank, a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Bank of 
Commerce of this city for several 
years, and an active director of the 
New London & Northern Railroad, 
the New London Steamboat Company, 
and of several other important enter- 
prises. While engaged in the duties 
connected with these varied industries 
he yet found time to serve the public 
interest as a member of the city gov- 
ernment for a numl)er of years, as a 
popular Mayor of New London from 
1856 to 1862, as Representative to 
tlie State Legislature in 1855, and as 
Senator in the Upper House in 1864. 
He served as Chairman of the Joint 
Standing Committee on Banks during 
this session. An act was passed en- 
abling the State banks to organize 
under the National banking law while 
still retaining their rights under their 
old charters, so that they might at any 
time thereafter, without further legis- 
lation, withdraw from the National 
organization and return to their pre- 
vious methods. His wide financial 
experience was of inestimable value 
at this particular junc'ture, in shap- 



ing the legislation of the period. 

While Mr. Harris was jNIayor of the 
City, in 1861, the Civil War "broke out 
between the North and South. He 
was enabled by virtue of his position 
to render the most valuable assistance 
to the Government, and more particu- 
larly to Governor William A. Buck- 
ingham, and the State of Connecticut. 

He was a man of strong religious 
nature, and took a deep interest in 
everything tending to uplift and benefit 
the fallen and down-trodden. During 
the Reliellion, when Fort Trumbull 
was the rendezvous for recruits gath- 
ered for the United States Army, Mr. 
Harris gave his best tlioughts and 
efforts to the Sunday services which 
were held at this fortification. He 
was an earnest friend to the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and 
Chairman of the Connecticut State 
Executive Committee in 1875. He 
was an early friend and ardent sup- 
porter of the late Dwight L. Moody, 
and aided substantially in founding 
the Mount Hermon Scliool and the 
Northfield Seminary. In 18U3 he was 
President of the school. His zeal 
found field for further expression in 
helping religion and education in 
Japan. In 1889 he founded and 
endowed the Harris School of Science 
at Kioto, Japan, with a munificent 
gift of one hundred thousand dollars. 

His chui-ch home was the Second 
Congregational, where he was one of 
the deacons. The help which he gave 
privately to many people in their 
times of need was almost unbounded. 
The Memorial Hospital, on Garfield 
Avenue, the Harris Building, on State 
Street — the net income from which is 
devoted to educational, charitable, and 
religious purposes — are enduring- 
monuments to his thoughtful care 
for others. 

Mr. Harris was a man of exception- 
ally prepossessing personal appearance, 
blessed with a strong, intellectual 
face, a fine physique, and a dignified 
and courtly bearing. 



76 



[picturesque 1Rew 3London« 



Di:. W. W. Sheffield, son of Rev. He stood at the head of his piofess- 

John Shefifield, was born in North ion in New England, and in time, as 
Stonington on April 2:!d, 18"27. He his name and skill liecanie known in 
came to New London in 1852, and a wider field, he took rank with the 
began his career as a dentist in the most prominent dentists in the United 
office and under the tutelage of Dr. J. States. Of his practice it may be 
A. G. Comstock of this city, and later said that it embraced the entire 
on was in the offices of and received country, his patients coming from all 
i n s t r u c- 
tion from 
Dr. Char- 
les Allen 
and Dr. 
D.H.Por- 
t e r of 
New York 
City, two 
of the 
most emi- 
nent men 
in the 
dental 
profession 
at that 
period, 
and un- 
question- 
ably the 
best au- 
thority at 
that time. 
He was 
after- 
wards 
graduated 




THE LATE DOCTOR WASHINGTON W. SHEFFIELD. 



sections. 
He pos- 
sessed 
inventive 
genius of 
a high or- 
der, and 
with h >s 
na t ur al 
abilities, 
t r a i n e d 
andbroad- 
e n e d by 
scientific 
study, his 
great use- 
fulness 
w as much 
augment- 
ed ; a n d 
to him the 
d e n t a 1 
profession 
is greatly 
indebted. 
He was 
a man of 



from the Ohio College of Dentistry, striking appearance, distinguished 

the first dental college established in manners, and genial kindness. He 

the United States. His success as a carried his years lightly until stricken 

practitioner is too well known to need with paralysis, from whicli he never 

comment; his name and fame were recovered. 

national, and his practice grew to large He died full of years, loved and 

proportions. honored by all who knew him. 



(picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 



New London is Favored with 
remarkably good newspapers. One of 
the leading institutions of the city is 
THE DAY. printed each evening, 
which was founded in July. 1881, by 




THEODORE BODENWEIN, 
Proprietor of the New London Day. 

the late John A. Tibbets. The Day 
originally was a morning paper and saw 
many changes and viscissitudes in the 
early part of its life, always, however, 
extending its repntation. 

In 1891 it was purchased by Theo- 
dore Bodenwein, and since then has 
made steadj' progress in business, 
circulation and influence. The Day 
is equipped with one of the best 
mechanical plants to be found in the 
State, and is thoroughly up-to-date in 
every way. It has a speciallj- leased 
wire of the Associated Press and 
covers Eastern Connecticut very thor- 
oughly with a large staff of reporters. 

Few papers are as thoroughly read 
in their field as The Day. It is esti- 
mated that one of every seven of the 
inhabitants of the section which it 
legitimately can claim as its Held, buys 
the paper each evening. 

It is Republican in politics and 
wields considerable political influence. 

The business of The Day establish- 
ment is located at 240 Bank Street. 



in a building especially erected for its 
accommodation by the Chappell Com- 
pany. It occupies three floors of this 
structure. 

The Morning Field of New Lon- 
don and adjacent territoiy is success- 
fully catered to by THE .AR)RN1NG 
TELEGRAPH, which was founded 
in 1885. 

The Telegraph has always been 
Democratic in its politics, in fact it is 
the only Democratic paper that has 
been successfully maintained in East- 
ern Connecticut in the past quarter of 
a century. 

The field for a morning paper in 
New London and surrounding towns 
is an excellent one, and recent changes 
in the management of the paper denote 
that this field will be carefully looked 
after in the future. 

The Telegraph receives the complete 
report of the Associated Press over its 
own leased wires and prints all the 
world's news while it is fresh, and 
frequentl)^ in advance of the big 
metropolitan papers. 

Its offices and editorial rooms are 
very conveniently located at 8 Green 
Street, a few doors from State Street, 
the main thoroughfare of the city. 

Since the recent inauguration of 
new methods and the use of modern 
mechanical facilities, the circulation 
of The Telegraph has been increasing 
very rapidly, and it is evident that the 
held of the paper's influeni'C and value 
is being greatly extended. 

The New England Aljianac and 
Farmers' Friend, commonly known 
as "Daboll's Almanac," is conqiiled by 
David A. Daboll, of Center Groton, 
and piiblished by L. E. Daboll, 94 
State Street. New London. It has 
been published annually for over one 
hundred years by some descendant of 
the original publisher, Nathan Daboll. 
It is widely used and relied upon by 
the mariners and farmers cif .Southern 
New Ensi'land. 



78 




THE DAY BUILDING — HOME OF THE NEW LONDON DAY, 

Bank Street. 



79 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



i\'cu) ioiidon Dniln (TMobc 



New London is Credited with 
having exceptionally able newspapers, 
a distinction that by 
common consent is 
deserved. and which, 
no doubt, the city 
will continue to 
merit. Ten years 
ago The New Lon- 
don Globe began 
its existence here, 
and has prospered 
to a degree that is 
the best possible 
evidence that its 
worth is appreciated 
and that it will go 
on to greater suc- 
cess. It is a bright 
four-page afternoon 
paper that gives the 
news in compact 
form, and all the 
news that is worth 
printing. It has shown its enterprise 
in marked degree on many occasions, 

Walter H. Richards, Engineer 
of the Sewer and Water departments 
of the city of New London, is a native 
of this city. He attended 
the district schools and 
the Bartlett High School. 
and after graduation from 
the latter, studied engi- 
neering with the eminent 
hydraulic engineer, J. T. 
Fanning, and as liis assist- 
ant, made the preliminary 
surveys in 1871 for the 
New London Water 
Works, of which he was 
appointc d Constructing 
Engineer. < )n tlie com- 
pletion of this work, in 
1872, he was appointed 
Superintendent of the 
Water Works, a position 
wliicli he has tilled to the satisfaction 
of the Board of Water Commissioners 
and the public, from that date, with 
the exception of a period of two years. 



and keeps in the front rank among 
progressive newspapers of the day. 
It is independent in 
its political views 
and does not liesitat e 
to freely express its 
opinion on matters 
(if public policy. It 
is owned, edited and 
managed by Samuel 
T. Adams and 
(ieorge A. Sturdy, 
both jjractical news- 
paper men of long 
experience andthor- 
ougldy familiar with 
tlie field in whicii 
their newspaper 
rirculates. 

The Globe has ad- 
hered to the one 
cent price from its 

start and will stick 

to it even though it 
enlarges its size. It has had excep- 
tional success as an advertising medium. 

In 1886. on the organization of the 
Sewer Department, Mr. Richards was 
elected Engineer for the Board of 
Sewer Commissioners. 
The entire system of the 
city sewers has been de- 
signed and constructed 
under his supervision. The 
design of the higk service 
water system and the sub- 
merged sewer outfall, 
which are Mr. Richards', 
arc unique, and have 
attracted the attention of 
engineers interested in 
water and sewer work in 
many places. Mr. Richards 
was for many j-ears Editor 
of the .Journal of the New 
l-:ngland Water Works 
Association, of wliich lie 
is a prominent member. He is also a 
member of the Boston Society of Civil 
Engineers, and of the Connecticut So- 
I'iety of Civil Engineers and Surveyors. 

80 




WALTER H. RICHARDS, 

Superintendent New London City 

Water Works, and Engineer 

of the Sewer Department. 



]I>tcturesque 1Rew ILondon* 



AisEL P. Tanner 
member of the New 
Bar. He first stud- 
ied law at Mystic, 
with Colonel Hiram 
Appleman, and for 
a few years practiced 
there. After a 
course in the public 
scliools at Mystic, 
he entered Brown 
University, from 
which he graduated 
in 1874 with the 
degree of B. A. He 
was born at Mystic, 
July 7th, 1850. 

Mr. Tanner 
man of strong 
victions, with 
power to express 
and stand for them; 
and on the stump 
or in council is a 



IS a conspicuous 
London County 



IS a 

con- 

the 




ABEL P. TANNER, 
Advocate and Counsellor at Law 



valued memlier of tiie Democratic 
party. As a speaker he is forceful; 
what he says carries 
the weight of honest 
conviction. He has 
been prominent in 
political affairs for 
seveial years, and 
was once elected to 
represent his dis- 
trict in the State 
Senate, but owing 
to an irregularity in 
the count did not 
take his seat. 

In 18'.Hj he was a 
Presidential elector 
on the Democratic 
ticket. 

His law offices 
are located in the 
Neptune Building, 
State Street. 



The Profession of Dentistry is 
well and ably rejaresented in New Lon- 
don. Wallace B. Keeney, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, is 
one of the city's lead- 
ing dentists. He was 
born in New London 
October 31st, ISoO, 
son of John M. and 
Louisa Young Keen- 
ey, and secured Jiis 
early education in tlie 
public schools of his 
native c i t y , after 
which he entered the 
employ of the Wilson 
Foundry Company, 
of New London. He 
w^as later employed 
by the Hopkins & 
Allen Manufacturing 
Company, of Nor- 
wich, Connecticut. 
Becoming convinced 
that the dental field offered unusual 
opportunities for advancement and 
success, Mr. Keeney entered the New 




DOCTOR WALLACE B. KEENEY, 
One of New London's Leading Dentists. 



York College of Dentistry, and in 
June, 1876, estaljlished an office in 
New London for the practice of his 
chosen profession, in 
which he has achieved 
a reputation for thor- 
ough and excellent 
work. His dental 
jjarlors are located at 
140 State Street. 

Dr. Keeney's poli- 
tics are Republican. 
He is a member of 
the Nameaug Engine 
Company ; of the Jib- 
boom Clul): and of 
the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of 
Elks, of which he is 
Treasurer. 

On Septemlior ?>d, 
1877, Dr. Keeney 
was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Fanny 
B. Whiting, daughter of ^Ir. Charles 
Whiting, of Mystic, Connecticut. 
They have two children living. 



81 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon* 



George Curtis Morgan, a lineal 
descendant of Richard Morgan, one of 
the seventy-seven original patentees 
of the town of New London, and son 
of Elias F. ^lorgan of New London, 
was born in New London, Novendier 
5th, 1870. After graduating from the 
public schools of his native city, he 
attended Harvard University, pursu- 
ing special courses in tlie academic 
department in connection with the 
law studies, and graduating from 
the law school of 
that institution 
in 1894. InFeb- 
ruarj', 1893, lie 
was admitted tn 
the practice of 
law before tiie 
courts of Massa- 
chusetts at Bos- 
ton, S u if o 1 k 
County, and was 
admitted to the 
courts of Connec- 
ticut Januar\ 
5th, 1895. 

Acting upon the 
suggestion of 
Walter S. Cartel, 
of New York, 
senior member of 
the firm of Car- 
ter, Hughes anil 
D wight of New 
Y o "i- k C i t y , 
whose counsel 
and advice to the 
younger members 
of the profession have made his assist- 
ance in this direction a matter of 
national repute, he commenced the 
practice of his profession in New Lon- 
don, and from the first has met witli 
deserved success. 

In January, 1897, he was married 
to Nanc>' Lee Brown, daughter of 
Edward T. Brown, President and 
Treasurer of the Brown Cotton (Jin 
Company. 

In politics Mr. Morgan is of the 
Repuliliciin faith. l)Ut at all times has 




GEORGE CURTIS MORGAN, 

Counsellor and Attorney at Law. 



manifested strong independent tenden- 
cies when the welfare of the city and 
the best interests of his party demand- 
ed such a course. The exercise of 
tliis predominant characteristic has 
called forth at times a certain amount 
of criticism from a small coterie of his 
party, but has never failed to win for 
him the respect and commendation of 
the citizens at large, regardless of 
party athliations, as has been amply 
attested Iw the popular vote on at 
least three differ- 
ent occasions. In 
1895 he was 
elected a council- 
man for three 
vears, and again, 
in 1898, he" was 
chosen to serve 
the citv for a like 
term, "in 1899 he 
projected and 
carried to a suc- 
cessful issue the 
division of the 
city into wards. 
This m e a s u r e 
met with the 
usual opposition 
which is wont to 
assert itself upon 
the agitation of 
any innovation, 
but the general 
favor with which 
the proposition 
was received is 
demonstrated bj' 
the fact that l)ut seventy votes out of 
eleven hundred were recorded against 
it. The bill has stood the test of 
practical utility, and stands as a testi- 
monial to the disinterestedness of Mr. 
Morgan's public service. In 1897 he 
was elected alderman under the new 
system, to represent the third ward 
for the term of three years. 

^Ir. Morgan's suite of offices are in 
the Neptune Building, located on 
State Street. His clientage is a large 
and rapidly increasing one. 




RESIDENCE OF WALTER LEARNED— BROAD STREET. 



Chapter l?1f1I. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

SOME ELEGANT AND SUBSTANTIAL RESIDENCES OF THE CITY AND ITS 
SUBURBS -PUBLIC PARKS AND OUTING SPOTS-PLACES OF AMUSE- 
MENT. 



New London has many, a'^eey 

MANY, PLEASANT FEATUKES. The 

city and its suburbs are in numerous 
ways greatly favored. Her old, his- 
toric spots, renowned in history, and 
dear to the hearts of all who love to 
tliink of the part the olil town played 
in the early struggles of tlie country; 
her peaceful harbor and excellent 
bathing beach, the delightful scenery 
round-about, are some of the advan- 
tages that make New London a 
popular and much sought city. 
Popular not only as a place of summer 
recreation, but as a favorite residential 
city as well. The broad, shaded 



streets of those sections in which the 
better class of residences may be 
found, are ideal for the purpose. And 
it is noteworthy that New London is 
eminently a city in which fine streets 
and comfortable, roomy residences 
al)Ound. 

Many of the old homesteads S2:)eak 
eloquently of the magnificence of their 
architecture in the period in which 
they had their l)eginning. They are 
silent witnesses, too, to the city's 
earlier enterprise and thrift, and to 
the fact that for many years New 
London has possessed rather more 
than her share of citizens of liberal 



83 



Iptcturcsciue 1Rcw ILondon. 



and independent fortune. This is 
especially true of many of the inhabi- 
tants of to-day, some of them descen- 
dants from the fine old families that 
in past generations made New London 
famous. But not a few are more or 
less recent acquisitions ; people of 
refinement and wealth, wlio, appre- 
ciating the city's desii'ability as a 
place of aliode, have estalJished here 
permanent residences. The result is 
that both the son of tlie old New 



London called •• the Pequot Colony," 
has its location in the southern por- 
tion of the city, near that famous 
summer hotel, the Pequot House, and 
Ocean Beacli. Here manj- wealthy 
people from New York City make 
their residence ; some for the warm 
season only, and some during the 
entire year, travelling to and fro 
between New London and the Metro- 
polis, as duty or pleasure calls. 

Many of the residences in the 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. MARTHA 5. HARRIS, 
Broad Street. 



Londoner, and the newcomer, appear 
to have vied with one another in erect- 
ing elegant and modern dwellings. 

In New London the observer is 
impressed Ijy the amount of breathing 
space, as it were, allotted to each 
residence. Nearly every one has a 
generous front, side, and rear yard ; 
and in the summer season their green 
and well kept lawns present a beau- 
tiful appearance. In very truth. New 
London might be aptlj' called the Cit}^ 
of Delightful Residences. 

The charming suburb of New 



Pequot section are very fine, and 
bespeak wealth and culture. It is 
the yearly custom of not a few celebri- 
ties and generally notable people to 
spend at least a portion of the sum- 
mer here. And then, with their 
handsome e([uipages on the smooth 
drives, and the magnificent steam 
yachts in the otfing, the scene is a 
gala one indeed. 

To drive or saunter about New 
London on a pleasant day, and to 
observe, among other points of in- 
terest, its homes, some of them possess- 



S4 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon* 




WILLIAMS MEMORIAL PARK, 
Broad and Hempstead Streets. 



ing an air of roomy comfortableness 
that telis of a past g'eiieration, and 
some very fine in their triumpli of 
modern architecture, is to derive much 
of profit and pleasure. Following, 
are noted a few of the more preten- 



tious, substantial, and commodious 
residences that would atti-act the eye 
on such a tour of the city: On Hemp- 
stead Street, near "Ye Antieutest 
Buriall Ground," a spot to which 
attaches much that is of Revolutionary 




WILLIAMS PARK, 
Broad. Williams, and Channing Streets. 



85 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



^r''^ ■ «.. 



■j^ 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. WILLIAM E. FAITOUTE OCEAN AVENUE. 

The Residence of Mrs. William E. Faitoiite. Daugliter of D. W. Gardner, adjoins tlie Old Homestead ol the Family. 

vicinity is made memorable by the capture of Mrs. Faitoute's Grandfather, who was taken Prisoner by the 

British, and Conveyed to Halifax, where for months he Languished in Prison. In Mrs. Faitoute's 

Possession are the Portraits of Three Generations, the Oldest dating its Existence 

from a Period more than One Hundred and Fifty Years Remote. These Portraits 

Impress the Beholder with the awe of a Dignified and By-gone Age. 



Its 



interest, is the fine Colonial mansion, 
with its spacious grounds, owned and 
occupied hy Hon. Augustus Bran- 
degee. 

Nortlieast 
from here, 
on Main 
Street, and 
hard by the 
•' Old Towne 
Mill," is the 
residence of 
Gilbert 
Bishop, a re- 
tired mer- 
chant of >i'ew 
L o n d n . 
Leaving the 
old mill, and 
following 
Main Street 
to the nortli, 
and then 
Willi a, in s 
Street to the 




THE GARDNER HOMESTEAD. 

The House Known as the Gardner Homestead is a Relic of a Past Genera- 
tion. It was re-built after the original model by the Late Owner, 
Douglass W. Gardner, in 1870. Several Relics of Historic Interest 
Connected with this Old Place are a Bell Buckle. Bearing the 
Initials of King George and the British Coat of Arms, 
and Indian Arrow Heads and Banner Stones used 
by the Various Tribes as Signals. 



south, one soon comes to the large 
modern residence of James Hislop, the 
dry-goods merchant, at the corner of 

Williams and 
\' a u X h a 1 1 
streets. Near 
Mr. Hislop's 
residence is 
that of F. S. 
N e w c o m b, 
which is one 
of the largest 
and most 
noteworthy 
ill this vicin- 
i t y . J u s t 
noi'th of Mr. 
Newcomb's 
residence is 
Post Hill, a 
section whicli 
c o m prises 
many lieauti- 
ful \\ wel 1- 
iiiLTs. Notable 




87 




RESIDENCE OF HON. GEORGE F. TINKER, 

Franklin Street. 




RESIDENCE OF FANNY M. JEROME, 



Ocean Avenue. 



88 



(picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 



ainoag these, particularly for its 
uuinue and striking architecture, 
is that of Louis R. Hazeltine, of 
the firm of Donnelly & Hazeltine, 
architects. 

On the corner of Channing and 
Vauxhall streets one observes with 
interest the fine grounds and man- 
sion of Ex-Governor Thomas M. 
Waller. Further soutli on Chan- 
ning Street are the modern and 
noticeable residences of John B. 
Leahy and Morris W. Bacon, and 
to the east, on (iranite Street, is 
the large, conspicuous residence of 
James H. Newcomb. At the 
junction of Broad and Channing 
streets, well back in its extensive 
grounds, is one of the largest 
residences in the city, that of Annie 
R., widow of the late Elias F. 
IVIorgan ; and nearly opposite, on 
Broad Street, are the fine resi- 
dences of Mrs. W. W. Sheffield, 
Arthur Keefe, Henry C. Weaver, 
C. D. Boss, and Captain Samuel 
Belden. These liouses are repre- 
sentatives of the better class of 
New London dwellings. 

To the eastward, on a command- 
ing eminence, is the palatial resi- 
dence of Mrs. Martha S. Harris, 
widow of the late Jonathan Newton 
Harris. With its spacious grounds, 
sloping lawns, and beautiful con- 
servatories, it is one of the finest 
residential estates in Eastern 
Connecticut. Following Broad 
Street westward, past the Second 
Congregational Church, one will 
note with interest its fine par- 
sonage, the residence of Rev. J. 
W. Bixler, Pastor of the cluirch. 
Just east of the parsonage, on 
Broad Street, is "Mt. Vernon,'" 
the residence of Elisha Palmer, 
so called from its resemblance to 
General Washington's famous 
manor house. In the immediate 
vicinity, also on Broad Street, are 
the substantial residences of Frank 
L. Palmer and Walter T^earned. 



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RESIDENCE OF GILBERT BISHOP-- 152 MAIN STREET. 




RESIDENCE OF THOMAS F. FORAN- CORNER OF HUNTINGTON 
AND HILL STREETS. 



90 




PARSONAGE OF THE SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 

5 BROAD STREET. 

Erected by Mrs. Martha S. Harris as a Memorial to Her Husband, the Late Jonathan Newton Harris, in 1897. 




RESIDENCE OF EX -GOVERNOR THOMAS M. WALLER - CHANNING STREET, 

CORNER OF VAUXHALL. 



91 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




RESIDENCE OF MORRIS W. BACON — 2 CHANNING STREET. 



Hard l)}-, on Huntington Street, at 
the head of State, stands one of the 
finest mansions in New London, tlie 
residence of Mrs. Elizabeth Williams, 
widow of the Late Hon. C'hai-les 
Augustus Williams. 

North of State Street, on Hunting- 
ton, is a noteworthy brown stone 
house, the residence of Dr. J. G. Stan- 
ton ; and nearly opposite, on the 
western side of Huntington Street. 
are the spacious lawns and large 
modern dwellings of Messrs F. IL 
and A. H. Chappell. Further north, 
nearly opposite the Bulkeley High 
Scliool, is the residence of Thomas F. 
Foran, of the Foran Furniture Com- 
pany. Returning southward on 
Huntington Street, and thence east- 
ward on Federal, one observes the 
residence of Rev. S. Leroy Blake, D. D.: 
the tine edihee of the St. James Epis- 
copal Church : the residence of its 
Rector, Rev. Alfred Poole Grint, 
Ph. I)., and opposite the church, the 
fine estate of Dr. Fi'ederick Fariis- 



worth. The lot on which Dr. Farns- 
worth"s house stands underwent an 
historic realty transfer in the year 
1795, when it was purchased from 
Richard W. Carkin by Nathaniel 
Ledyard, for £120. In this house, in 
1829, was born the late Mayor Charles 
Augustus Williams. 

Following Federal Street eastward, 
to its junction with Main, the obsever 
cannot fail to notice the large, siib- 
stantial residence of Sebastian D. Law- 
rence, and just north, on Main Street, 
that of Sidney H. Miner. To the 
northward, on North Main Street, are 
tlie well kept grounds and elegant 
residence of Mrs. Harriet Allen, 
widow of the late James Allen : and a 
sliort distance beyond is ■•Hillside," 
which comprises the fine residence, 
liuildings, and farm of Ray LeM'is. 

Uiversiije Park, on Mohegan Ave- 
nue, is a short distance beyond on the 
line of "The Norwich Trolley." The 
views from the high lands along this 
section are superb. 



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RESIDENCE OF JOHN B. LEAHY— 4 CHANNING STREET. 




RESIDENCE OF ALTON T. MINER— 38 CRYSTAL AVENUE, 
EAST NEW LONDON. 



94 




THE PEQUOT CASINO — PEQUOT AVENUE. 

Home of the Pequot Casino Association, Organized July 12. 1890. and one of the Leading and Most Exclusive 

Social Organizations of New London. President. W. Appleton: Treasurer. 0. Banks. Jr.: 

Secretary, E. T. Kirkland: Superintendent of Casino. G. T. Salter. 



II 11 II II 








RESIDENCE OF STEPHEN GARDNER — OCEAN AVENUE. 



95 




SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT. 

ON THE PARADE. NEAR THE UNION DEPOT. 

The Monument is a Fine Tribute to the Brave IVIen Who on Land and Sea Have Represented New London 

in Our Country's Battles. It was Generously Presented to the City in 1896 

by Sebastian D. Lawrence. Esq. 



96 



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STATION OF THE NEW YORK YACHT CLUB, 

Showing in the Bacl<ground the Residence of Colonel A. C. Tyler. Peqiiot Avenue. 

Chapter I^1l1f1l« 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

SOME FINE RESIDENCES ON MAIN, HUNTINGTON, JAY. FRANKLIN, AND 
BLACKHALL STREETS, OCEAN, AND OTHER AVENUES— THE PEQUOT 
COLONY RECREATIONS AND AMUSEMENTS. 



proper, in which are several 
residence.s that will attract 
attention, among them being- 
those of A. T. Miner, and the 
Misses Antoinette A. and Jen- 
nie E. Williams. Returning 
to that portion of the city 
about Huntington, Jay, Frank- 
lin, Hempstead and Blackball 
streets, one is impressed by 
the numl)er of remarkal>ly 
comfortable dwellings and 
finely kept lawns and grounds. 
Near the Pul)lic I..ibrary and 
old Court House, on Hunting- 
ton Street, is the residence of 
Charles B. Jennings, Acting 
School Visitor of New Lon- 
don. At the corner of Hunt- 
ington and Jay streets is the 
residence of Dr. C. F. Ferrin, 
at number 16 Jay Street, that 
of John McGinley, Postmaster of New 
London, and on Franklin Street, corner 
of Cottage, that of Hon. George F. 
Tinker. The residences of I. U. Lyon 




JAMES H. NEWCOMB. 
One of the Former Merchants of New London. 

From the section of Main Street, 
near the residence of Sebastian D. Law- 
rence, one may easily reach East New 
London, a pleasant suburb of the city 



97 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon* 



and H. O. Burch, on Blackball Street, 
and that of J. J. Ryan, on McDonald 
Street, are wit- 
nesses to the com- 
pleteness of the 
Guilder's art. 

From this section 
of the city, to 
the southward, 
stretches Ocean 
Avenue, one of the 
li n e s t of New 
Ijondon's thorougii- 
fares. It is wide, 
smooth and hard, 
and is lined on 
either side by many 
attractive dwell- 
ings and invitiny' 
grounds. Among 
them will be 
noticed some that 
possess more than 
ordinarv interest. 
Tluit of Mrs. Wil- 
liam E. Faitoute, 
and in the grounds 
surrounding it, the 
old (iardncr Home- 
stead; the resi- 
dence of Stephen Gardner, and that of 
Fannj' M. Jerome, further south on 
Ocean Avenue, 
are among those 
to elicit more 
than a cursory 
glance. Adjacent 
to this part of the 
Avenue is the 
"Pequot Colony" 
the sunnner resi- 
<lence of many 
people of wealth 
and fashion. 
Here are numer- 
ous homes of 
taste and culture, 
and several tliat 
are really sump- 
tuous, and in size 

and fnrnishings, veritable palaces. Tlie 
residence of Colonel A. C. Tyler, on 




RESIDENCE OF CAPTAIN FRANK H. 
BECKWITH— 26 WILLETTS AVENUE. 




RESIDENCE OF IRVIN U. LYON 
64 BLACKHALL STREET. 



Pequot Avenue, is one of tlie most 
elaborate in the State. The summer 
residence of R. T. 
McCabe, which is 
located on an emi- 
nence commanding 
a fine view of the 
ocean, is a modern 
structure of great 
size and beauty. 
The mansion of E. 
Francis Riggs, of 
Washington, D. C, 
recently construct- 
ed after plans by 
the New London 
firm of architects, 
Messrs Donnelly & 
Hazeltine, is well- 
nigh a marvel in 
immensity of de- 
sign and complete- 
ness of construc- 
tion. It is a notable 
addition to the most 
ornate residences 
of New London 
and the " Pequot 
Colony." 
From this district 
the return to the center of the city 
may be made through Ocean, Pequot, 
or ]\Iontank Ave- 
nue. Sliould the 
latter or, in fact, 
either of the 
others be the 
route chosen, one 
would have yet 
another oppor- 
tunity for the 
oliservation of 
man}' commod- 
ious dwellings, 
indicative of 
prosperity and 
rcfiiuMuent. On 
several of the 
minor streets, 
also, may be seen 
such residences. Siiould one pass 
tliro)igh Willetts Avenue, a natural 



98 



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110 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Hondon, 



and much used highway {connecting 
Pe(iuot and ]\Iontauk avenues, he 
wouhl be (j^uite certain to note the 
residences of Charles F. Edney and 
Captain Frank H. Beckwith, two 
liouses conspicuous for their location 
and for the iidnnral)leness of their 
general appearance. 

Such a round of the residential 
portions of New London would l)e 
sure to result in enthnsiatic approval 
of its fine residences and pleasant 
homes ; hut more than one inspection 



Granite, and Channing streets, is 
Williams Park, presented to tlie city 
in 1858 by (ieneral William Williams, 
of Norwich, as a memorial to his son. 
Thomas W. Williams, a former mer- 
chant of New London. 

•lust beyond the Pequot section is 
Ocean Lieach — one of the finest on 
the coast — and Ocean Beach Park, 
city property witli a large private 
ownersliip in handsome cottages. This 
outing spot is constantly growing in 
importance. 'I'hus the city is well 




RESIDENCE OF ARTHUR KEEFE -- 40 BROAD STREET. 



should be made in order to adequately 
appreciate the city's advantages and 
opportunities as a place of charming 
dwellings and elegant residences. 

It is the good fortune of New Ldu- 
don to possess several delightful out- 
ing spots and breathing places. On 
Broad Street, bounded on its western 
margin liy Hempstead Street, is 
Williams Memorial Park, which owes 
its existence as a public playground 
to the late Hon. Charles Augustus 
Williams. Further north on Broad 
Street, surrounded liy Broad, Williams, 



provided with advantages for summer 
recreation and diversion. 

For opportunities of annisement dur- 
ing the winter season. New London 
has the Lyceum Theatre, the New 
Jjondon Opera House, and the various 
entertainments held in Lyric Hall, 
State Street, and in Lawrence Hall, 
Bank Street. The Lyceum Theatre, 
of which Ira W. Jackson is l^essee 
and Manager, is the principal play- 
house of the city, and one of the best in 
Connecticut. In all its appointments it 
is thoroughly convenient and modern. 



100 



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101 




RESIDENCE OF J. J. RYAN — McDONALD STREET. 




'HILLSIDE," RESIDENCE OF RAY LEWIS — NORTH MAIN STREET. 



102 




LYCEUM THE ATRE — WASHINGTON STREET. 
Ira W. Jackson. Lessee and Manager. 



103 




LYRIC HALL- 241 STATE STREET. 
C. M. Brocksieper. Lessee and Manager. 




INTERIOR OF LYRIC HALL — 241 STATE STREET. 

Lyric Hall is Under the Management of Charles M. Brocksieper. 24) State Street, to Whom All Inquiries 

as to Rental Should be Addressed. It is an Admirable Place in which to Hold Dances. 

Parties, or Entertainments of Any Description. 

104 




RESIDENCE OF ROBERT COIT- FEDERAL STREET. 




RESIDENCE OF DR. FREDERICK FARNSWORTH - 25 FEDERAL STREET. 



(9) 



105 




RESIDENCE OF LOUIS R. HAZELTINE, ARCHITECT POST HILL. 

This Attractive Home was Designed by Mr. Hazeltine. ot the Firm of Donnelly & Hazeltine. Architects, and Although of 
Modest Proportions. Reflects Credit upon His Professional Skill. Mr. Hazeltine has Designed Some of the Finest Residences 
in the Country for Men of National Reputation. Among Whom are the Following : R. A. McCurdy. President of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New York : R. A. Granniss. Vice-President of the Same Company : D. H. McAlpin. W. B. Skidmore. 
Julius Catlin. W. B. Deming and Henry D. Noyes. all of New York City : and Dudley Duyckinck, of Riverside. California. 





RESIDENCE OF J. E. ST. JOHN, 



Montauk Avenue. 



HEADQUARTERS OF NAMEAUG 

FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, 

Masonic Street. Near City Hall. 



106 



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MORRIS W. BACON'S MARBLE BLOCK— 126 STATE STREET. 

Chapter 1IX. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

COMMERCIAL INTERESTS — NEW LONDON AS A TRADE CENTER— BUILDING 
ACTIVITY — MERCANTILE ENTERPRISE — PRINCIPAL BUSINESS MEN AND 
PROMINENT CONCERNS. 



The Commercial Spirit of New 
LoxDoN is indicative of energy, pro- 
gress, a n d 
justifiable 
faith in the 
city's evolu- 
t i o n and 
lively fu- 
ture. Year 
)y year the 
firmness of 
the busi- 
ness tone 
increases. 
P rope rty 
values have 
lately been 
greatly 
enhance (1, 
ni u c h pro- 
(1 u e t i v e 
property created, and the population 
added to by the recent and almost 
unprecedented access of building 




CHARLES B. WARE, 

A Prominent Clothing Merchant of 

New London. 



activity. Realizing this, appreciative of 
the bright prospects and healthy 
growth of the city, new trade concerns 
liave located here, and others will 
follow. As a trade center New London 
is favorably situated. The city's popu- 
lation by no means represents the 
entirety of its resource. One of the 
county-seats of New London County, it 
draws from the country districts, ham- 
lets and townships for miles in each 
direction. During the recreation period 
of the sunniier season, when the majority 
of cities throughout the country are in 
a greater or less state of business 
inertia. New London, even more than 
customarily, enjoys a liveliness in trade 
and commercial jjursuits. This is due to 
tlie proximity of the ''Pequot Colony," 
one of its suburbs, and a delightful and 
popular warm weather resort, and 
to the surpassing excellence of Ocean 
Beach for bathing and summer outing 
privileges. 



109 



]p)icture8C)uc 1Rew ^London, 



Chaeles B. Wake, dealer in 
clothing, hats and furnishing.s, at 52- 
56 State Street, New London, was 
born in Worcester, Massachusetts. He 
is a descendant of General Nathaniel 
Greene, of Revolutionary fame, who 
was instrumental in saving Washing- 
ton's army at the Battle of Brandywine. 
xMr. Ware is one of the oldest and 
most successful merchants in New 
London. His success has been fully 
earned, as he commenced active life 
entirely without means, and with no 
other assistance than a clear brain, 
ujjrightness and firmness of purpose, 
and inflexible determination. In the 
sense indicated by these circumstances 
and qualifications, he is a self-made 
man. He estalJished his business in 
1870, at its present location, and has 
watched its continued growth with 
commendable pride and interest. His 
business methods and his attitude 
towards the public have ever been 
characterized by courtesy and fairness. 
The stock carried at his store is an 
immense and varied one, and the 
<[ualitv and prices satisfactory and 
right. From the adjacent country- 
sides and villages, as well as from the 
city itself, much of his trade is drawn. 
That he possesses the confidence and 
good will of his patrons is demonstrated 
by their successive dealings with him. 

Mr. Ware is prominent in the circles 
of both the Masons and Odd Fellows. 
In 1887-88 he was at the head of the 
Masonic Fraternity in Connecticut, as 
Grand Commander Knights Templar. 
In 1890 he was made Colonel of tlie 
Second Kegiment, Patriarchs Militant, 
of the I. O. O. F., and was Grand 
Master of the State in 1892. It was 
in that year that the property for 
"Fairview," the Odd Fellows' Home 
of Connecticut, of which he is Presi- 
dent, was purchased. He has served 
three terms in the Court of Common 
Council, was for two yeai's President 
of the New London Board of Trade, 
and for a number of years has been on 
the staff of the Governor's Foot Guards. 



GEOiuiii H. Holmes, Contkactou 
AND Builder, was born in New Lon- 
don in 1852, of good New London lin- 
eage, a descendant of the Comstocks. 
Since his birth his native city has been 
his home. His wife, Delia S. (Moore) 
Holmes, is also of New London parent- 
age. Her father. Perry Moore, was a 
well known newspaper man. and printer 
of "The Morning Chronicle" and "The 
Evening Star" during, and subsequent 
to, the Civil War. Among many credit- 
able buildings constructed by Mr. 
Holmes are the following: The new 
villa of E. Francis Riggs, coiner of 
Ocean and Glenwood avenues ; the 
home of A. C. Fuller, residence of 
Louis R. Hazeltine, the Johnston 
Block, the Armstrong double cottage, 
the cottage of Charles Y. Cornell, 
twelve of Ex-Mayor .Johnston's modern 
cottages, and a number of Mrs. S. 
Russell's flats on Huntington Street. 
Mr. Holmes has supervised the con- 
struction of about 100 New London 
Imildings. His residence, which is 
connected by telephone, is at number 
8 Front Street. 

The Bishop Lummer and Coal 
Company, located at 61, 63 and 65 
Water Street, is one of the oldest estab- 
lishments in the city. Its President, 
Mr. Gilliert Bishop, with his lirothers, 
organized the business in 1S47. The 
firm manufactures sash, doors, blinds, 
and outside finish, and deals in lumber, 
coal, and building materials. B}- ad- 
ditions to its force of skilled workmen, 
and of improved machinery to its facil- 
ities, this company is prepared to meet 
the increasing demands of a rapidly 
growing city. 

At 4:20 Bank Street, New London, 
is the office of L. A. Comstock, dealer 
in coal, wood and kindlings. Mr. 
Comstock's methods of square dealing 
and promptness have won for him the 
confidence of the community. His 
mercantile experience has been exten- 
sive. Seventeen years ago he estab- 
lished his coal business in New I^ondon. 
He pays strict attention to the tliorough 
screening, and to the expeditious and 
proper delivery of his coal. 



110 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE BISHOP LUMBER AND COAL COMPANY, 
61-65 WATER STREET. 



The Finest Business Block in 
Eastern Connecticut devoted exclu- 
sively to the 
f u r n i t u r e 
business, was 
built in 1891 
by the Put- 
nam Furni- 
ture Mfg. 
Company for 
the accommo- 
dation of its 
inc reasing 
business, 
which in less 
than two 
years had 
outgrown the 
premises in 
which it was 
estaljlished in 
18 8 9 by 
Nelson S. 
Putnam and 
George N. 
P u t n a m . 
The foremost 
position this 
h o u s e has 
always held 
in New Eng- 
land is due to its enterprising, 
ambitious, aggressive policy, which is 




THE BIG BLUE STORE, 

312 Bank Street. 



so well known to the wholesale trade 
that they always give this company 

the exclusive 
sale in New 
L o n d o n o f 
goods of 
superior 
merit in all 
lines, such, 
for example, 
as the Acorn 
Ranges and 
Eddy Refrig- 
erators. The 
Putnams sell 
either f o i' 
cash or on 
their own 
unsurpassed 
system of 
easy pay- 
ments, and 
their prices 
are always 
the lowest 
a t w h i c h 
f u r n i t u r e 
of genuine 
merit can 
possibly be 
sold. A visit 
extensive wareroonis is a gen- 



to their 

nine treat for lovers of tine fiu-niture 



picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 



In 1892 Thomas F. Foeax. of Cun- 
ningham iS: Foran, furniture dealers in 
Danbury, Connecticut, ilisposecl of his 
interest in that firm, and removed to 
New London, where he immediately 
established the FoRAX FrRXiTiRE 
CoMPAXY, with headquarters in tlie 
Day BuikUng, 244 to 250 Bank Street. 
The Foran Company is one of the 
most enterprising and linely equipped 
furniture and house furnishing empo- 
riums in the Slate. There is nothing 
desirable in the way of useful and beau- 
tiful home appointments that may not 
he found here. The stock carried is of 
the finest qualit}- : fresh, modern, and 
complete in every detail. In addition 
to its immense sales- and ware-rooms in 
the Day building, which occupy four 
floors and a basement, the company has 
possession of the old Trumbull House, 
on Bank Street, which it utilizes for 
storage purposes. Thus the amount of 
floor space requisite for the transaction 
of its large and growing business com- 



prises some 25,000 square feet. The 
popular and celelirated Magee Range, 
which for thirty-tive years has found 
in New London an appreciative held 
of sale, and the ever reliable "Glen- 
wood"" and "Household"' ranges, are 
lixtures of this company"s stock. The 
installment method of the Foran Com- 
panv is unrivalled, and it cordially 
invites the patronage of those about 
to commence housekeeping, or who are 
considering adding to or refurnishing 
the home. It carries a full line of 
carpets, oil cloths and linoleums, and 
emploj-s a competent man. ]\Ir. F. A. 
Beach, who has cliaige of the carpets, 
draperies and window shades. The 
company also employs two upholsterers 
and a cabinet maker. A department 
to which it gives particular attention 
is that of general funeral furnishing, 
undertaking and embalming. Mr. 
Foran is a graduate in embalming, and 
in 1888 was granted a diploma by the 
N. Y. Oriental School of Embalming. 





J. R. AVERY'S PROVISION STORE - 19 BROAD STREET. 

Mr. Avery Established His Business at its Present Location in April. 1886. A Veteran of the Civil War. He Enlisted 

in the 21st Regiment. Connecticut Volunteers in 1862. and Served Three Years 

112 



Iptcturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 




INTERIOR OF DABOLL & FREEMAN'S GROCERY STORE— 148 STATE STREET. 



Henry S. Dorsey, a native of New 
London, conducts a grocery and pro- 
vision business at tlie corner of Truman 
and Blinman streets. He carries the 
finest quality of goods at the lowest 
prices, and successfully endeavors, in 
every approved manner, to satisfy and 
retain his customers. His store is of 
generous size, and his stock complete. 
Mr. Dorsey is an Alderman from the 
Fourth Ward, and Major of tJie 
Third Regiment, Connecticut National 
Guard. His orders are promptly filled, 
and his patrons treated with fairness 
and consideration. 

A Reliaisle Dealer in groceries, 
provisions, and fine ales, wines and 
liquors for family use, is Thomas R. 
Murray. His store is at number 4 
Truman Street, where he carries an 
adequate stock, of good qualitj^ He 
delivers goods with promptness, and 
in first-class order, and is fair and 
honoralile in his dealings. ]Mr. Murray 
was liorn in New London. He estab- 
lished his present business in 1890. 
In politics he is Democratic, and repre- 
sents tiie Fourth Ward as an Alderman. 
He is courteous, obliging, and enjoys 
the good-will of the jjublic. 



G. M. L()X(; & Company embarked 
in the oyster l)usiness at the foot of State 
Street, near their jjresent location, in 
18G8. Oysters were then freighted in 
schooners by the cargo from the Chesa- 
peake, and were opened and distributed 
to different points in the New England 
States. In 1875 the firm established an 
oyster house in Crisfield, which was 
continued in connection with the New 
London business until 1888. In 188;') 
they bouglit the Henry Chapel whole- 
sale and retail fish business, then the 
largest in Connecticut. They also pur- 
chased fine wharf property, to whicii 
they moved their oyster business, 
where, in conjunction with the selling 
of fish, they carried it on until 1898, 
when the property was condennied for 
railroad purposes. They then removed 
to their present location. They are 
proprietors of the Rocky Point Oyster 
Company, largest wholesale oyster 
dealers in Providence. This company 
has over 300 acres of oyster ground 
under cultivation in Narragansett Bay 
and Kickemuit River, and operates 
two steamers in catching, and carrying 
the oysters to its oyster house. TOD 
Wickenden Street, Providence. 



113 



(picturesque 1Hew Uondon, 




TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT OF 

GEORGE S. GOLDIE, 

Crocker House Block. State Street. 

Nkat;i.v Fifty Yeaks Atio, M. S. 
Daniels established a wholesale grocery, 
provision and flour business on Canal 
St., Providence, R. I. In 1860 James 
Cornell became associated with him 
under the firm name of M. S. Daniels iV 
Co. Later Mr. Daniels liuilt the Daniels 
Building on Custom House Street, to 
which the business was moved, and the 
name changed to Daniels A: Cornell. 
In 1884 Charles B. Humphre}' and 
Howard P. Cornell were admitted to 
partnership, and the name became 
Daniels. Cornell & Co. This concern, 
in iSSii, with William F. Whipple, 
established the house of the Daniels, 
Cornell Co., Worcester, Mass. In 
1890, with George W. Barber, they 
organized the Daniels. Cornell Co., of 
Manchester, N. H. In May, 1892, 
Daniels, Cornell & Co. established the 
New London House, with A. B. 
Burdick. Manager. In IMay, 1899. the 
Providence estal)lishment became Hum- 
phrey & Cornell, and the New London 
House at this time adopted the same 
firm name, Mr. Burdick being retained 
as Business Manager. Humphrey iV 
Cornell carry a full line of groceries, 
provisions and flour, and are sole agents 
for the celebrated "Laurel,"' "B. M. C. 
Best,'' and "Colton Peerless'" flours. 



Thk Fik.m of Kfefe, Davis & 
Company, wholesale and retail dealers 
in staple and fancy groceries, canned 
fruit, fine wines and liquors, has its 
location at 125 Bank Street. Among 
the prosperous business houses that 
liave made New London well known as 
a trade center, this concern is one of the 
foremost and most progressive. The 
business was established by Hon. Cyrus 
G. Beckwith, ex-mayor of New London, 
in 1879. Mr. Beckwith was the sole 
proprietor until lS8-i, when Mr. Arthur 
Iveefe — now senior member of the firm 
— became associated with him. The 
original location was the first floor of 
a wooden building at the corner of 
Bank and Pearl streets, since razed to 
make room for a more pretentious brick 
structure. In 1888 the rapidly growing 
business of Beckwith iV Iveefe necessi- 
tated ampler quarters, which were 
secured in the building now utilized 
b}" the present firm. This situation is 
very central, and its occupation has 
been marked liy constantly increasing- 
trade. In 1894 Mr. Beckwith with- 
drew, and for about a year subsequent 
— when he admitted to partnership one 
of his oldest employes. 'Sir. Frederick 
H. Davis — the business was conducted 
solely by Mr. Arthur Iveefe. In Janu- 
ary, 1901, Messrs. Iveefe & Davis took 
Mr. Frederick J. Clancy, their head 
l)0ok-keeper into the firm, thus evidenc- 
ing their appreciation of his long and 
valuable service, and changing the firm 
name to Keefe, Davis & Company. In 
the four floors they occupy at 1 ir> Bank 
Street, and in the three flooi-s of a 
brick building they have erected in the 
rear, are comprised 38,082 square feet 
of floor space. Eighteen courteous and 
capable assistants are employed. This 
is the largest wliole^sale and retail 
grocery house in Eastern Connecticut. 
The goods are all carefully selected, 
and I)}' reason of the enormous Cjuanti- 
ties continually disposed of, are to be 
had at the very lowest prices. The 
firm's facilities for handling, storing, 
and delivering goods are admiral)le. 



114 



{picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 



Dk. J. Eugene Uxdeiihill was 
born ill Orange Countj-, Vermont, in 
1851, and went 
with his parents 
six years later ti:i 
Illinois, where he 
subsequently en- 
gaged with his 
father in stock 
raising. Later he 
went to Iowa in 
the same business 
and for ten years 
was engaged in 
stock raising in 
Southwestern 
Kansas. He is 
thus thoroughly 
conversant with 
animals and theii' 
ailments. He went 
to New York State 
in 1888 and was 
engaged in selling 
and handling 
imported horses. 




DR. J. EUGENE UNDERHILL, 

Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist. Howe's Stable. 
Green and Golden Streets. 



In 1890 he l)egan his I'rotection, and of 
studies as a veterinarian at the (;)ntario gregational Church. 



Veterinary College at Toronto. After 
graduating witli honors he located in 
New London. His 
real worth was 
soon recognized 
and his services 
are now in much 
demand, his pat- 
rons knowino- that 
the Doctor is a per- 
fectly reliable man 
and skilled in his 
profession. Dr. 
LT n d e r h i 1 1 was 
married to Miss 
Jennie E. Barnes 
at Burdette, Kan- 
sas, in 1880, and 
has a son now 1-3 
years of age. The 
Doctor is a mem- 
ber of Mohegan 
Lodge of Odd 
Fellows, the New 
England Order of 
the Second Con- 




SCHWANER'S CITY MARKET, 20 MAIN STREET - 
C. HENRY SCHWANER, PROPRIETOR. 



11.5 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




BALER'S BAKERY-4b8 BANK STREET- 

Established in 1895. Franit A. Baier. Proprietor. Mr. Baier's Home-Made Bread is the Best in the City. From his Store 

or Wagons may be Procured the Finest and Freshest of Everything in Bakery. 



' «4 






At the Ocean Beach PA^'lLluN 
one may enjoy an appetizing repast. 
Mr. A. H. Wilkinson .serves every day 
excellent sliore dinners, steamed clams, 
broiled live lobsters, confectionery, ice 
cream and soda water. Ocean Beach 
furnishes the best bathing on the coast. 
Mr. I. L. Diox, recently of Nor- 
wich, purchased, a few months ago, the 
shaving and hair 
dressing business 
at 2 4 i State 
Street, New Lon- 
don, which is con- 
ducted under his 
personal super- 
vision. Mr. Dion 
is a skillful ton- 
sorial artist, who 
adopts every pos- 
sible means tend- 
ing toward the 
satisfaction of his customers. 

E. D. Steele's Ceothixi; Estab- 
lishment in the Neptune Building, is a 
true representation of a modern metro- 
politan store. Occupying a fire-proof, 
centrally located block, and e(iuipped 
with every appliance for display, and 
for comfort of patrons.it offers unusual 
opportunities in the clothing line. 



^L 



I. 

24' 



L. DION. 
, State Street. 



THECi.ixvEXiEXCEof being directly 
served with staple commodities is a 
universally appreciated one. Thomas 
Fastovsky, dealer in kerosene oil, 
regulai'ly supplies his customers at 
their homes. His residence is at 19 
Hempstead Street, where a postal 
will reach him and elicit a prompt 
response. 

The New Loxdon Haxd axd 
Stea3I Laundey, Harvey H. Daniels, 
Proprietor, does first class work at 
popular prices. It gives particular at- 
tention to hand work, which man}' pre- 
fer to the steam process. Its teams 
call for and return the work at regu- 
lar and frequent intervals. At this 
lauudrv one may have his linen laun- 
dered in either gloss or domestic finish, 
as desired. The launihy office is at 
470 Bank Street. 

The Crvst.-vl Candy Kitchen, 82 
State Street, is under the proprietor- 
ship of Mr. S. Patterson. Here are 
manufactured daily, and sold at whole- 
sale and retail, the finest quality of 
confectionery and ice cream. Mr. 
Patterson makes a specialty of cater- 
ing for weddings, parties, and recep- 
tions. 



116 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew ILondon. 



mc: 



The Troy Steam Laundry enjoys 
an enviable reputation for its fine qual- 
ity of work, and for its ready and 

courteous service. Its 

present location is at 1S8 
Bank Street. It will ere 
long, however, lie install- 
ed in a fine new building 
nearly opposite, now in 
process of erection by 
Mr. Alex. Fournier, its 
proprietor. The policy of 
this laundry is superior 
work in whiteness and 
finish imparted, yet with 
an extraordinary min- 
imum of wear and tear. 
Fi'om an economic stand- 
point this means nuich. 
And this quality, un- 
doubtedly, has done a 
great deal to enhance tlie 
success of Mr. Fournier's 
business. 



E" 



U-- 



ofiice is 87-t5 ; that of the Norwich 

laundry, 29-5. 

The new l)uilding undergoing con- 
struction on Bank Street, 
for occupancy by the 
Troy Laundry, is from 
plans by the architect, 
Mr. C. E. Fournier, who 
is second cousin to Mr. 
Alex. Fournier, and was 
born in Canada, in 1861. 
His education was com- 
pleted in the Seminary 
of Ste. Marie de Monnoir, 
Province of Quebec. The 
first years subsequent 
to his seminary life were 
devoted to the dry goods 
business, which upon the 
death of his wife in 1891, 
he abandoned for the 
study of architecture. 
He is a meml)er of tiie 
Association of Architects 




*S53I5S;»=^ 



Alex. Fournierwas born NEW BUILDING OF THE of the Province of Que- 
in Montreal. His educa- TROY STEAM LA.UN- i,ec. It is his intention, 
tion was secured in West DRY-BANK STREET. after the completion of the 

Alex. Fournier. Proprietor. C.E, Fournier. „„ i„, „i i -i t 

lu- .„u:.„. new laundry building, 

which exacts most of his 
time as supervising architect, to estab- 
lish in New London, offices for the 
pursuit of his chosen profession of 



Springfield, MaSSacl— Alex. Fournier. Proprietor. C.E.Fournier. 



lad 



setts. He has 

vast amount of experience in the 
laundry business. His first esta))lish- 
raent in this line was in Troy, New 
York, and he has 
also conducted 
similar entei- 
prises in the 
cities of Spring- 
field, Meriden, 
and Hartford. 
The Troy 
Laundry of 
Norwich, Con- 
necticut, is alsi> 
his property. 
Each of his con- 
cerns f)ossesst's 
its teams for the 
collection and 
delivery of the 
laundry pack- 



Architect. 




ONE OF THE DELIVERY WAGONS 
THE TROY STEAM LAUNDRY. 



OF 



ages of its patrons. The tele- 
phone call of the New London 



will be a handsome 
city's buildings. 



arc hitecture. 
The 1 a u n d ry 
building is to be 
a four-story edi- 
fice of fine ap- 
pearance. The 
architecture will 
be pleasing, and 
altogether the 
structure will 
be well built, 
and adequate to 
its purpose. It 
will reflect cre- 
dit upon those 
having its con- 
st ru c tion in 
c barge, a n d 
addition to the 



117 



Ip^icturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 



The Name of Thomas Howe is 
inseparably connected with the busi- 
ness of dealing in horses, carriages, 
etc., as well as with the general livery 
business in Xew London. Mr. Howe, 
at first as a member of the firm of 
Frank Howe & Son, and later under 
his own name, has conducted very 
large and successful dealings in 
this line for years. He keeps the 
best in horses, carriages, harness. 
and horse goods. He is noted for 
fair transactions. In the business 
community Mr. 
Howe has always 
taken a leading 
part, and secures 
whatever comes 
into the market 
that is new and 
modern. Early 
in 1880, with hi's 
father, the late 
Frank Howe, he 
began business in 
the old Edgcomb 
property, (iolden 
Street, later re- 
moving to his 
present stand at 
the corner of 
Green and 
Golden streets. 

A livery, with 
the purchase and 
sale of horses, 
was the sole 
business for 
several years, un- 
til Mr. Howe, realizing that there 
existed a demand for the best in 
wagons and carriages, and also for 
the styles of vehicles that are manu- 
factured only for first-class trade b}' 
large factories, added this branch, and 
has prospered in that department from 
the beginning. Success in his under- 
taking in the sale of carriages stimu- 
lated Mr. Howe to make still further 
extension of his business ; and to that 
end he began the purchase of horses 
in large numbers from many sections 




THOMAS HOWE, 

Proprietor of Livery Stable and Carriage Repository 
Green and Golden Streets. 



of the country in which they are bred 
extensively. Weekly and special sales 
at certain seasons of the year, princi- 
pally by auction, have now been a 
feature for several years, and farmers, 
teamsters, drivers, and in fact all 
who use horses for business or pleasure, 
have become accustomed to regard his 
repository as the source of supply. 
yii: Howe is an auctioneer of much 
ability and wit, and his sales constitute 
an entertaining phase of his business. 
At his stal)le one may secure a first- 
class turnout 
or stylish equip- 
age with which 
to e n j o y the 
m a n )• pleasant 
drives in which 
New L o n d o n 
aliounds. At re- 
(piest a driver 
will be furnished 
who is thorough- 
ly familiar with 
the most inter- 
esting and charm- 
ing sections. 

The horses and 
ca,rriages of this 
stable are the 
best obtainable. 
The facilities for 
the acconnnoda- 
tion of the public 
are extensive. 
The stable office 
is connected l)y 
telephone, a n d 
calls for carriages of any description 
are promptly answered, and immedi- 
ately and satisfactorily filled. 

In addition to his finely equipped 
stable and repository at the corner of 
Green and Golden streets, Mr. Howe 
has a sale-stable on Bank Street, be- 
low ]\Iontauk Avenue. His sales are 
conducted in a manner to inspire the 
confidence of all who deal with him, 
and he exerts remarkable energy in 
securing the finest horses, and in look- 
ing after the interest of his patrons. 



118 




119 



[picturesque 1Rew London, 



Di;. Chaules H. Lami:, veterinary 
surgeon and dentist, has his office at 
T. B. Earle's liver- 
a r y stable, 15 
Golden Street, 
New London. He 
was born in Mystic, 
August 28 th, 
1859. In 1885 he 
moved to Groton, 
and began the 
study of medicine 
and the practice of 
veterinary surgery. 
Subsequently he 
studied under an 
eminent ^'eterinar- 
ian in New York 
City. In 1888 he 
commenced actual 
practice as a veter- 
inary surgeon and 
dentist. He was 
in 188!t appointed 




DR. CHARLES H. LAMB, 
Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist. 15 Golden Street. 

President of the application are 



Connecticut Humane Society, and is 
its State Agent. He ranks with the 
most satisfactory 
and efficient of the 
Society's represen- 
tatives. Dr. Lamb 
i s a n expert in 
the examination 
of stock for traces 
of the dread tuber- 
culosis. He has 
been credited 
by the New Lon- 
don press with 
lieing one of the 
best veterinarians 
in the State. In 
metliods and in- 
struments he keeps 
abreast of the 
times, and his 
ideas and man- 
ner of their 
distinctly modern. 



Ray Lewis, proprietor of ''Hillside," 
is well known to the people of New 
London, having conducted the milk 
business here for over twenty years. 
He is a native of Rockville, R. I. In 
1897 he purchased "Hillside," where 
he erected a handsome dwelling house 
and modern barns. He was a select- 
man of the Town of Waterford from 
1897 to 1898, and is a member of 
Pequot Lodge, No. 85, I. O. O. F.: 
Relief Lodge, No. 37, A.O.U.W., and 
Ledyard Council, No. 31, O. U. A. M. 

Joseph Bradford, blank book man- 
ufacturer, paper ruler and book l)inder, 
conducts business at 85 Main Street, 
Norwich, Connecticut. He makes 
blank Ijooks to order, rules paper to 
any given pattern, aiul numbers in any 
colored ink desired, checks, notes, 
drafts, coupons. and tickets of all kinds. 
He makes a specialty of liiuding peri- 
odicals and newspapers in all styles, 
andfurnishes backnumbers forthe com- 
pletion of volumes. He also repairs 
and rebinds old and mutilated books. 




FRANCIS P. D'AVIGNON, 

MARBLE AND GRANITE 

WORKS — 508 BANK ST., 

Agent lor and Dealer in Cemetery Vases. 



120 



jpicturesquc 1Rew Uondon* 



Geoege G. Avery, projirietor of 
the livery, hack and boarding stal)le 
at the corner of Main and Chnrch 
streets, New London, was born in 
Montville, Connecticut, July 4th, 
1861. He is a descendant from the 
Avery family of Groton, famous for 
the part they played in the troublous 
times coeval with the War of the 
Revolution. He is the son of Gris- 
wold G. and Cornelia Chappell Avery. 
He received 
his earl}' edu- 
cation in the 
schools of 
New London. 
His present 
business, at 
the corner of 
Main an d 
Church 
streets, dates 
its inception 
from 1874. 
The building 
it occupies is 
one of the 
historic land- 
m arks of 
New London. 
It v/as erect- 
ed to serve as 
a house of 
worship for 
the Episco- 
pal Society in 
New London 
during the days of its early exist- 
ence, and as such was consecrated 
September 20th, 1787. It was after- 
wards leased to the Congregational 
Society, and subsequently purchased 
by the LTniversalists, who eventuallj^ 
sold it to Mr. Avery, its present 
owner. 

In the introduction of electric lights 
in carriages in New London, Mr. 
Avery was the pioneer. He is a lead- 
ing liveryman of tlie city, and carries 




GEORGE G. AVERY. 



the most extensive line of rubber-tired 
vehicles. He makes a point of having 
on hand at all seasons of the year a 
fine assortment of carriages and 
horses. He has some very comfort- 
able and stylish equipages, which are 
always kept in the liest condition, and 
in readiness for immediate response to 
urgent or hurried calls. He maintains 
first-class turnouts and hacks for all 
occasions, furnishes careful drivers 

who are thor- 
oughly com- 
petent, and 
familiar with 
the varied 
points of 
interest in 
and a li o u t 
New London. 
His stable is 
a d m i r a 1) 1 y 
equipped for 
affording 
every possi- 
ble attention 
to lioth ])er- 
manent and 
trans lent 
lustomers. 

At the "Pe- 
([uot Colony" 
h e conducts 
the Pequot 
House Liv- 
ery, and the 
hotel baggage 
service. Both of his stal)les are con- 
nected by telephone; the Pequot call 
is 194-3, and the uptown nundjer 59-5. 
Mr. Avery is a prominent represen- 
tative of the competitive life of the 
city, and is possessed of a generous 
share of business acumen, coupled 
with a spirit of fairness and honor in 
all his transactions that inspires con- 
fidence and respect. He was married 
to .Jennie C. Crosl)ie, of New London, 
on the 5th of October, 1898. 



(10) 



121 




ALBERT N. FETHERSON^S LIVERY STABLE- II BREWER STREET. 

At Any Hour of the Day or Night One May Secure from the Livery Stable of A. N. Fetherson. Any Kind of Turnout Desired. 

This Stable is One of the Finest in the City, and is Completely Appointed in 

Every Particular. It is Connected by Telephone. 




ONE OF A. N. FETHERSON'S MODERN EQUIPAGES. 

122 









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jlyin 


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/^Ai^^L.. 


■ IL. .i^^ 


'^^^^^^^^^^iiiRA^mp 


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K 





MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AND CITY FARM — GARFIELD AVENUE. 
The Memorial Hospital was Erected From a Fund Furnished by the Late Hon. Jonathan Newton Harris 



Chapter X. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

PRINOPAL BUSINESS STREETS OF NEW LONDON MERCANTILE PROGRESS 
— THE CITY'S BRIGHT COMMERQAL OUTLOOK — 
ENTERPRISING CONCERNS. 

representing various trade and com- 
mercial pursuits, but tlie foregoing are 
by far the laisiest. 

The mercantile spirit in New London 
has within the past few years shown 
an nnusual increase in activity. As 
the city has grown in population, it 
has received an added commercial 
impetus, and many of the business 
houses that have been for years situ- 
ated here, have branched out, and are 
conducting their interests on a con- 
siderably larger scale than heretofore. 
New and enterprising concerns, — 
not only among the manufacturers, 
but of the merchants and tradesmen — 
considering the future of the city to 
be a bright one, have wisely located' 
within its precincts. Of the likelihood' 
of its increasing in trade prosperity 
year-by-year, there is very little doubt,, 
and the public-spirited New Londoner 
will, unquestionably, do all within liis 
power towards the accomplishment of 
so desirable an outcome. 




GILBERT BISHOP, 
A Retired Merchant of New London. 

The Princii'al Busine.ss 
Thopioughfares of New London 
are Bank, State, and Main streets. 
There are, of course, many others 



123 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw ILondon, 



Ix A Port oi" SrcH Lmpoktaxce 
AS New Loxdox, ship chandlerv is a 
prosperous and representative industry. 
Then)em1)ers 
of the tirni of 
the D a r r o \v 
&: Comstook 
Company, in- 
corporated in 
19 01, are 
Courtland S. 
D a r r o w , 
President, 
and William 
M. Darrow, 
Sec re tary 
and Treasur- 
er, both resi- 
dents of New 
London. 
Their busi- 
ness was 
established 
in l:^7tl. at 
1-2 Bank 
Street. I n 
188fithetirm 
purchased THE DARROW & COMSTOCK COMPANY BUILDING, 

and moved '"*-"6 Bank street. 

into the substantial and commodious 
1 )uilding which they now occupy. This 
step was made necessary by the 

The New ExciLAXD Exgixeering 
CoMi»ANY has its liome office at Water- 
bury, Connecticut 




constantly increasing volume of busi- 
ness. The Darrow & Comstock 
Company are wholesale dealers in 

ship chand- 
lers' galvan- 
ize d hard- 
ware. They 
have con- 
stantly on 
hand j'acht, 
engineers', 
and mill sup- 
plies : These 
include oils 
and packing 
waste, and 
Ijrass and 
iron steam 
pipe with fit- 
tings a n d 
valves. This 
lirm has re- 
i-ently instal- 
led power 
and machin- 
rry for cut- 
t i n g and 
threading up 
to. and in- 
and carries 



eluding, six inch pipe 

a full line of pipe and fittings up 

to that size. 



and branches estal)- 
lished in most of 
the principal cities 
in the surrounding 
states, with its New 
York office at 100 
Broadway. The 
New London office 
is at 23 ^Llin Street 
under the manage- 
ment of Mr. J. P. 
Gillette who has 
had twelve yeai-s of 
practical experience 
in electric light and 
railway work. The 
company was incor- 
porated for the pur- 
pose of electrical 



ff 


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[BWillWIBBBBBWWW • ^ ^ 


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fi 


iii 


m 


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mf^ 


ilMi 


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— = 



number of central stations for light and 
power than any other engineering com- 
pany in America, 
and their experience 
and advice are of 
value. They study 
the requirements in 
every specific case, 
and adapt the ma- 
chinery and equip- 
ment which is sure 
to produce results 
most economically 
a n d satisfactorily. 
The local l)ranches 
cover all hranches 
of engineering, and 
make a specialty of 
isolated plants, elec- 
tric light wiring, 
niotcirs. repairing. 



a n d mechanical OFFICE OF THE N. E. ENGINEERING CO. \^^^ \orVspond 

. ,, Waterbury. Connecticut. -ji ,i ii 

engineenng of all with tliem and learn 

kinds. They have installed a greater about some of their modern work. 



> 

« 2 

f 00 

i H 

s o 

M 

3- O 

X "^ 

3. X 

i M 

(A 

I 2 



H 



O 

w 
m 

I 



f H 

■ W 

m 

H 




125 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Sajiuel W. Malloey was for sev- 
ei'al 3'ears associated with his father, 
the hite Leonard 
Mallory. in the 
pi ami )ing business, 
and upon the death 
of the latter 
became sole pro- 
p ri e t o r. He is 
thoroughly conver- 
sant with the 
details of the 
trade, and ranks 
with the most effi- 
cient in that line 
of enterprise. 
His business 
experience is com- 
prehensive. He 
commenced active 
life in New Lon- 
don as a represen- SAMUEL W. 
tative of the clothing trade, 
and afterwards continued to devote 




his energies to the same line in other 
and larger cities. He is a man of varied 
accomplishments, 
possessing a 
marked penchant, 
and no little abil- 
ity, for music. He 
was for several 
years leader of 
the Third Regi- 
ment Band, and 
lias acted as con- 
ductor of various 
p o p u 1 a r orches- 
tras. As a soloist 
and leader he is 
well known 
throughout the 
State, and has 
had many induce- 
ments to devote 
MALLORY. his time entirely 

to music, in which direction his great- 
est talent lies. 




INTERIOR OF THE PLUMBING ESTABLISHMENT OF JORDAN & CLEARY, 

39 MAIN STREET. 

Jordan & Cleary are First Class Plumbers. Steam and Gas Fitters. The> Carry a Full Line of Plumbing Accessories. 
Gas and Steam Fixtures, and Heating Apparatus. Ttie> Make a Specialty of Jobbing and Repairing. 



126 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew 3Lonclon« 




B. H. HiLLiAR is sole agent for the 
Richmond Stoves, Ranges, Steam and 
Hot Air Heat- 
ers, which are 
manufactured 
in the neigh- 
boring city of 
Norwich. The 
Richmond 
Manufactur- 
ing Company 
has been con- 
t i n u o u s 1 y 
repi'esented by 
the firms that 
have occupied 
the store at 49 
Bank Street 
since 1869. A 
long record, 
and one that 
eloquently be- 
speaks the 
Richmond 
Company's es- 
timate of Mr. Hilliar and his prede- 
cessors. About thirty 3'ears ago the 

Jordan & Cleary 
are agents for the 
William H. Page 
I! oiler Company of 
Norwich, manufac- 
turers of the Volun- 
teer and other 
celebrated steam and 
hot water lieaters. 
The firm is located 
at 39 Main Street, 
J|and comprises Joseph 
ss**" - \^. Jordan a n d 
-Thomas P. Cleary. 
A Pro^hnent Builder of New 
London is Asa O. Goddard, whose shop 
is located in the rear of 248 Bank 
Street. Mr. Goddard has erected many 
of the city's fine residences and Ijuild- 
ings. He pays particular attention to 
carpentering and jobbing in all its 
branches, and his work is always 
thoroughly and expeditiously executed. 
He solicits estimates, which he fur- 
nishes with promptness and accuracy. 
His residence is on Broad Street, 
above the city line. 



HILLIAR'S— 49 BANK STREET, 




Richmond Stove Company placed upon 
the market the first range to success- 
fully supersede 
the old fash- 
ioned cook 
stove. The 
construction of 
its essential 
parts are now 
very nearly 
perfect. Va- 
rious experi- 
ments have 
produced very 
g r a t i f y i n g 
results. In ad- 
dition to his 
large stock of 
stoves and 
ranges, Mr. 
Hilliar carries 
a tine line of 
plumbing sup- 
plies, and at- 
tends to orders 
for plumbing, steam and gas fitting, 
with promptness and efliciency. 

That Beautiful Section of New 
London, the Pequot District, contains 
many residences that lietoken wealth 
and refinement. The grounds of many 
of these charming estates owe much of 
tlieir loveliness and symmetry of land- 
scape to the civil engineering, taste and 
skill of Elisha Post, one of New Lon- 
don's foremost contractors. Other of 
the city's localities as well, bear eviden- 
ces of his handiwork. Mr. Post is the 
son of John and Nancy M. Rogers Post, 
and was born in Bozrah, Connecticut, 
July 11th, 1853. His early education 
was secured in the public schools of his 
native town. Like many others who are 
successful in the competitive strife of 
our cities, Mr. Post commenced liis ca- 
reer as a young agriculturalist, and 
afterwards liecame largely interested in 
the milk business on his own account. 
In 1888 he established in New London 
liis first enterprise, which was that of 
teaming and jol>l)ing, later engaging in 
his present business of stone mason 
work, grading, roofing, concreting and 
buildino- movinar. 



127 



lptcturesc)uc 1Rcw Uondon. 



The Faculty uf thk 
Hartford Consekv a- 
TORY OF Music, 315 Pearl 
Street, (Y. M. C. A. Build- 
ing) Hartford. Connecticut, 
comprises some of the best 
New York artists and teach- 
ers, such as Richard Bur- 
meister, pianist; Theodore 
Van Yorx, tenor ; William 
Davol Sanders, violinist ; 
and Frederick Blair, vio- 
lincellist: alsoN. H. Allen, 
organist; W. V. Abell, 
voice culture and piano, and 
eleven other instructors. 

The establishment of the 
Hartford Conservatory of 
jNIusii; Summer School at 
New London, Connecticut, 
affords the public of that 
vicinity, for a part of the 
year, the very best musical 
advantages to l)e obtained 
l)etween New York and 
Boston. The Hartford 




W. V. ABELL, 

Musical Director. 




THEOUORH VAN , uKX, 
Tenor. 



Conservatory offers oppor- 
tunity for study with the 
very best New York 
artists and teachers, with- 
out the additional expense 
of going to a larger city 
for a musical education. 
All branches of music are 
taught, and certificates 
awarded in the teachers' 
and artists" courses. Ar- 
rangements can be made 
witli W. V. Al>ell, Director, 
for lessons with the in- 
structors at the heads of the 
different departments. As- 
sistants, teaching the same 
methods, are employed; 
thus the Conservatory fur- 
nishes good instruction at 
all prices. Those desiring 
circulars or detailed infor- 
mation concerning the Con- 
servatorv, should write to 
W.V. Abell. Musical Direc- 
tor, Hartford, Connecticut. 



Patrick W. Ru.ssell, plumber, 
steam and gas fitter, at 224 Bank 
Street, established his first business 
enterprise in that 
line in 1S72, as suc- 
cessor to Leonard 
W. Dart. He deals 
in gas fixtures and 
I all appurtenances 
' p e c u 1 i a r to the 
trade. The plumb- 
ing and gas fitting 
in many of New 
London's principal 




PATRICK W. 
RUSSELL. 



ijuildings is his 



work. He was 
awarded the con- 
tract over many competitors for the 
steam piping in St. Mary's Star of the 
Sea Roman Catholii^ Church. Mr. 
Russell is a member of St. John's 
Literary Society, and a charter member 
of the Knights of Cohunbus. He is 
also a member of St. Mary's Church, 
and for the past twenty-five years has 
sung in its choir. 



William L. Rok, carpenter and 
builder, was born in Patchogue, L. I., 
in 1851. In 1864 he came to New 
I^ondon. He first embarked in business 
on his own account in 1876, witli a 
Mr. Bingham, under the firm name of 
Roe & Bingham. This firm erected a 
number of notable New London resi- 
dences, among them those of James 
Hislop, and A. G. (iriffin. In 1880 
Mr. Roe dissolved partnership with 
]\Ir. Bingham. Since then he has con- 
strut'ted more than 120 residences and 
stores. The Ocean Beach cottages of 
F. H. Chappell, Ex-Governor T. M. 
Waller, and W. A. Appleb}-; the car 
station at ( )cean Beacii, and the car 
barn of tlie New London Street Rail- 
way Comjjan}', were built b}' him. He 
lias been a mend)er of the New London 
Fire Department for twenty-seven 
years. Inspector of Buildings for three 
years, and is a member of the New 
London Board of Trade, and of the 
Board of Relief. His residence and 
office is at 6 Belden Street. 



128 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE H. O. BURCH CONTRACTING AND MANUFAC- 
TURING COMPANY — HEMPSTEAD STREET. 

Mr. H. 0. Burch Has Been in Business in New London for 25 Years. Tlie Specialty in the Manufacturing Department of 

the H. 0. Burch Contracting and Manufacturing Company is the Production of the H. 0. Burch Chimney Tops. 

and Artificial Stone, the Process for the Manufacture of Which is Mr. Burch's Own. These Products 

are Endorsed by the Leading Architects and Builders. Who Have Used 

Them Constantly for the Past Fifteen Years. 



Building Enteki'KISk, and substan- 
tial appreciation in real estate values 
in New London is unequivocally trace- 
able to the city's geographical situation, 
and to the progressive spirit of its 
staunch citizens. The attitude, taste, 
and ability of its architects and con- 
tractors, however, liave undouljtedly 
exercised a favorable influence upon 
the intentions of many contemplative 
home-builders. Dennis J. Murphy, one 
of New London's leading contractors, 
is an enterprising representative of the 
local builders' trade. He was l)orn in 
Ireland July 24th, 1864. In 1885 he 
located in New London. He became 
associated with A. L. Dean & Co., 
masons and builders, in 18n2, subse- 
quently withdrawing from that firm, 
and engaging in the same line of busi- 
ness on liis own account in 189.5. 
Among notable buildings erected by 
liim are tlie following : The Goldsmith 
Building, Y. M. C. A. Gymnasium, the 
Catholic School and Convent, and the 
Fournier Building, in New London, 
and the Allyn Block, Groton. His 
residence and office are at 17 Tilley 
Street, and are connected by teleplione. 




Wfislev Chimney 
Cats liave been in 
use for more than 
twenty years, and 
have given uni- 
versal satisfaction. 
They are made of 
cast iron and afford 
absolute protection. 
They are for sale by 
Luke Martin, of 4 
Lee Avenue, New London, a chimney 
expert of thirty years' experience. 

Many Principal Streets of New 
London bear evidences of the construc- 
tive skill of William .J. Cullen, carpen- 
ter and builder, who lias his office and 
residence at 830 Bank Street. The 
residence of Miss Mary F. Brown, on 
Waller Street, several modern houses 
on Blackball Street, John Collins' com- 
fortable Bank Street cottage, tliree fine 
houses on Coleman Street — the prop- 
erty of Messrs. Francis Bracken, Julian 
and Edward Cook, respectively — and 
tnany other structures, some preten- 
tious, others modest in design, were 
erected by Mr. Cullen. 



(picturesque 1Rew ^London. 

The Oldest, and 
one of the largest 
and best known 
wall paper and dec- 
orating houses in 
Eastern Connecti- 
cut is the New 
London Decor- 
ating Company, 
(t. R. Sweeney, 
Proprietor, located 
;i t n u m Ij e r 12 
I'.ank Street. It 
transacts a whole- 
sale and retail busi- 
ness in wall papers, 
paints, leads, oils, 
varnishes, and 
window glass, and 
accepts contracts 
INTERIOR OF THE NEW LONDON DECORATING COMPANY'S for exterior and 
STORE -J2 BANK STREET. interior painting 

and decoratiu"'. 




New London Harbok, than which 
the world has few that surpass it in 
excellence and beaut_y, is the frequent 
rendezvous of many 
sailing parties and yacht 
club fleets. In summer 
its waters are almost 
constantly dotted with 
the white sails of busi- 
ness and i)leasure craft. 
The boats of the fisher- 
men, too, add not a little 
to the scene. For so long 
as there is wind to l)e 
utilized for motive pow- 
er, the sail will have its 
place; it is too neces- 
sary and picturesque 
ever to be entirely dis- 
carded for the more 
modern methods of 
aquatic propulsion. Sailmaking is an 
important New London industry, and 
for the fine quality, cut, and workman- 
ship embodied in its sails, it is famous. 
Benjamin F. Bailey, its most prominent 
sailmaker, and dealer in sail stock at 
286 Bank Street, was born in Groton, 
Connecticut, sixty years ago, son of 
Henry and Susan Franklin Bailey, and 
received his education in the puV)lic 




BENJAMIN F. BAILEY 



schools of Groton. He established his 
present business about forty years 
ago, and has conducted it with 
marked success. He 
pays particular atten- 
tion to the finest of 
sailmaking for yachts, 
and whether — by choice 
of the customer — his 
j-acht or boat sails are 
manufactured by hand 
or machine, they are 
made in the best possi- 
l)le manner. He also 
makes tents and awn- 
ings, has on hand tents 
to rent, and sells and 
p u re li a s e s old and 
second-hand sails. Mr. 
Bailey is a veteran of 
the Civil War 
and served in 
the 21st Con- 
necticut Beg- 
iuient. He is 
a member of 
the Odd Fel- 
lows, Ancient 
( )rder of L^ni- 
tedWorkmen 
and the Jiblioom Club of New London. 




130 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw ILondon* 




RECENT BUILDING ACQUISITIONS — COIT AND JAY STREETS — ERECTED BY 

PERRY BROTHERS, CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 
Messrs. Perry Brothers are New London Contractors: Their P. 0. Address is Box 108. Uncasville. Connecticut. The 
Architects of the Structures. Corner of Coit and Jay Streets Shown in the Illustration, are IVIessrs. Donnelly & Hazeltine. 

The Firm of Hobkon iV- Root, H. lioot was l)oin in Moiitville,Coiiiiec- 
painters and decorators, consists of 
Andrew J. Hobron and John H. Root. 
It was established in 1873, under the 
same firm name l)y wliich it is now 
known. Messrs. Hol)ron & Root have 
been in continuous partnersliip for tlie 
past twenty-eiglit jears. Andrew J. 
Hobron is a native of New London, 
son of Captain William Hobron. .John 



ticut, February 1st, 1855. His father 
was Joseph P. Root. The Inisiness 
location of Hobron & Root is at 
24 Church Street. The}' are contract- 
ors for all kinds of painting and paper 
hanging, and for glazing and hardwood 
finishing, and always keep in stock a 
full line of painters' supplies. 




INTERIOR OF THE BICYCLE AND SPORTING GOODS STORE OF CHARLES L. 

HOLMES 217 BANK STREET. 

Charles L. Holmes. Dealer in Bicycles. Bicycle Sundries, and Sporting Goods. Does Bicycle Repairing in All Its Branches. 

Rents Bicycles, and is Local Agent for the White Sewing Machine. 



(picturesque 1Hew Uondon. 




INTERIOR OF W. W. WINCHESTER'S WALL PAPER AND DECORATING STORE, 
5 MAIN STREET, NEW LONDON. 



William W. AV'inchestee is the 
owner and manager of the business 
conducted in the store at number 5 
Main Street. He carries tlie hirgest 
and most varied 
stock of wall 
papers in the 
city, and an ele- 
g a n t line of 
window shades. 
His assortment 
of varnishes, 
glass, brushes, 
and painters" 
supplies is com- 
plete. He holds 
the agency for 
the famous 
Devoe and Ray- 
nolds lead and 
zinc paints, the only ready-mixed 
paints now on the market carrying the 
makers" guarantee for durability. Mr. 
Winchester has been identified with 




FRONT OF W. W. WINCHESTER'S STORE, 

5 Main Street. 



the painting business for the past 
twenty-three years, and possesses a 
thorough knowledge of its require- 
ments. This <]uality makes his service 
o f incalculable 
value to the 
host of pleased 
customers, who 
have been his 
patrons for a 
number of years. 
One has but to 
leave his order 
at n u m b e r .5 
Main Street to 
have this valu- 
able experience 
placed wIidII}' at 
his disposal. 
Mr. Winches- 



ter"s place of business is open from 
• >.4.5 a. m. to ti p. m., and on Satur- 
days and Mondays is open evenings 
until tt.30 o"clock. 



132 




LABORATORY OF THE SHEFFIELD DENTIFRICE COMPANY. 

Since Dr. Sheffield's Creme Dentifrice was Placed on the Market in 1881. its Sales Have Increased to an Enormous 

Degree, the Daily Output Now Being Over a Ton in Weight. It Has Been Advertised Only by Free Distribution. 

and its Quality Has Made a Market for it in Every Part of the World. The Company Now Claims 

to Have the Most Extensive Dentifrice Business in Existence. 

Ch apter X 1l« 

NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

FAVORABLE TRADE INFLUENCES — A POPULAR SUMMER RESORT AND 
SUCCESSFUL COMMERCIAL CENTER — PRINCIPAL HOTELS — SOME PRO- 
GRESSIVE BUSINESS ENTERPRISES. 

London, after the decline in 
the proHts to lie derived from 
those pursuits, commenced 
for its commercial benefits to 
avail itself of its admirable 
location. To this and to the 
inherent progressiveness of 
its inhabitants, is due the 
fact that it is famed as a 
healthfully growing man- 
ufacturing and mercantile 
center, as well as a summer 
resort. In that it combines 
these characteristics, it is an 
exception, and a notable 
and delightful exception, 
too. It is seldom that a 
popular sum ni e r water- 
ing-place preserves at the 
same time a healtliy and pro- 
gressive business and manu- 
facturing tone. A railroad 
junction of importance, and reached 
by a most direct water highway, its 
facilities for freight transjjortation are 
unexcelled. 




WILLIAM H. ROWE, 
Cashier New London City National Bank. 

A City That in the Past had long 
been accustomed to depend largely for 
its prosperity upon its self-projecting 
maritime commerce and ventures. New 



133 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw Hondon. 




CROCKER HOUSE — STATE STREET, NEW LONDON. 




A. E. 
Proprietor "Gem " 



BECK WITH, 
Restaurant. 3 State Street. 



The Hotkl Koval ociupifs, on 
Bank Street, an older hotel site than 
any other hostelr}' now extant in New- 
London. Its proprietor is Frederick 
H. Gavitt. For twenty years previous 



to his assuming the proprietorship of 
the hotel in 1898, it was conducted liy 
his father, a Civil War veteran, who 
died aliout three years ago. The elder 
Mr. Gavitt was one of the unfortunate 
Union soldiers to endure confinement 
in Liliby Prison. The Hotel Rojal is 
adniiraljly conducted, and its service 
and cuisine are excellent. It offers 
special rates to commercial travellers. 
Its proprietor, who was born in Ston- 
ington, Connecticut, in 1868. is a 
inendier of the Masons, of the Knights 
of Pythias, the 
Elks, the Forest- 
ers, and of the 
Nameaug Fire 
Engine Com- 
pany of New 
L o n d o n . In 
1 8!i2 he was 
united in mar- 
riage to Mary A. 
Rogers, of Low- 
ell, daughter of a 
well known vet- 
eran of the War FREDERICK H. GAVITT, 

of the Rebellion. Proprietor Hotel Royal. 




134 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Mr. James P. Sullivan was born 
in New Britain, Connecticut, August 
29th, 1873. His father, who died about 
twenty-four years ago, was James P. 
Sullivan. Mary Gorman Sullivan, his 
mother, is still living, and resides with 
her son. When but nine years of age 
Mr. Sullivan commenced his career 
as a self-supporting young man. In 
1889 he began as laundryman in the 
Hotel Russwin, New Britain. From 
laundryman lie 
beeaine night por- 
ter, and from night 
porter he was 
p r o m o t e d to 
a clerkship in 
the same hotel. 
As a clerk in the 
Russwin Mr. Sul- 
livan served three 
years. He was 
then called upon 
to assume the 
management of 
the Hotel Colum- 
bia, one of New 
Britain's leading- 
hotels. He has 
also represented 
the New Britain 
Machine Com- 
pany, and spent 
fifteen months 
travelling in their 




employ, selling- 
engines and wood 
working machin- 
ery. In June, J^MES P. SULLIVAN. 

1 q'aa -yf Snl- '"'■'•'"''*''"'''' "'^ ^'o'*' *'""!''<'?• State Street, Near Union Depot 

livan secured the proprietorshii) of The 
Winthrop, in New London. This hotel 
was in his hands but a short time when 
its furnishings and interior appoint- 
ments were entirely destroyed by tire. 
At first thought this occurrence may 
be deemed a very unfortunate one. 
From an immediate pecuniary stand- 
point it certainly was a misfortune ; 
but eventually it will revert to a gain 
for the proprietor, for the house is now 
completely refurnished and refitted, 



and is doing a prosjierous business. It 
is the present proprietor's determination 
that The Winthrop shall Vie maintained 
on a business status as enterprising and 
upright as that of any hotel in the city. 
As a commercial house The Winthrop 
of to-day is a first-class hostelry. New 
London possesses a number of fine 
hotels, yet the addition of one more of 
a high character will be of great 
l)enefit to the city. Mr. Sullivan has 
evidently grasped 
the knowledge 
that a good com- 
mercial house, 
located near the 
Fnion Depot and 
the various steam- 
boat lines, will 
fill a long felt 
demand. The 
Winthrop is so 
situated, Ijeing 
1) u t a stone' s 
throw from the 
depot and the 
wharves. The 
push and determi- 
nation of its 
young proprietor 
will win for it a 
place among the 
best commercial 
hotels of New 
England. The ap- 
pointments of 
The Winthrop are 
of a high grade. 
The cuisine is 
excellent, and the 
service courteous and efficient. The 
house is lighted throughout by both 
electricity and gas, and thoroughly 
heated by steam. It is a reputable, up- 
to-date house, and deserves generous 
patronage. In personal appearance Mr. 
Sullivan is very pleasing. He is 
extremely courteous, and sincerely 
cordial, and enjoys the distinction of 
being one of the youngest and most 
enterprising hotel proprietors in the 



country. He has made his own way in 



135 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




NEW LONDON POLICE HEADQUAR- 
TERS—BRADLEY STREET. 

the world, and is very ambitious. His 
principles of business equity and integ- 
rity are firmly rooted in tlie right. In 
religious persuasion he is a Roman Cath- 
olic, and a member of St. Mary's Star 
of the Sea Roman Catholic Church, of 
New London. He is a member of Mer- 
iden Lodge of Elks, Number Thirty 
Five, and Past Chancellor of the 
Knights of Columbus, Carmody Coun- 
cil, of New Britain, Connecticut. 

Captain Daniel R. Loosley, the 
well known State Street periodical, 
book, and stationery dealer, has had a 
reniarkal)le career. He joined the 
United States Army in 1855, and saw 
service in the Indian Wars near Puget 
Sound in 1855-58, in the San Juan 
Island boundary disi)ute, and on the 
"Star of the West," in its attempt to 
relieve the garrison of Fort Sumter. 
He has filled every rank from sergeant 
to captain, and has been twice brevet- 
ted. With tiie Army of the Potomac 
he was in more than forty battles. 
Subsequent to the close of the Civil 
War, he was active in fighting Apache 
Indians. He resigned from the Arniv 
in 1867. 



The New London Directory is 
issued annually by the Price & Lee 
Company, the well-known New Haven 
directory publishers. This firm merits 
the cordial and libei-al support of every 
enterprising citizen and business man 
in New London and adjacent towns. 
Its directories are models of convenient 
classification and compilation, are well 
printed on good paper, and are dur- 
aV)lv bound. 




PRINTING HOUSE OF CLARKE & 
KEACH — 20 GREEN STREET. 

Artistic Printing is a result of pro- 
gression. It is necessary, too, in the 
attaiinnent of good commercial results. 
Clarke & Keacli, printers, at 20 Green 
Street, produce nothing but the finest 
of printing. They have the reputation 
of being among the best printers in 
Eastern Connecticut. Tiiej- make a 
specialty of fine society engraving. 

Modern Photography is so dis- 
tinctly evolutionary that the e(iuipment 
of the up-to-date professional or ama- 
teur nuist be in conformity if he would 
keep al)reast of the spirit of the times. 
To secure ambitious results, the most 
reliable of plates, paper, and other ac- 
cessories should be used. A responsible 
dealer in everything in photographic 
supplies is W. Edwin Hobi'on, whose 
store is at 231 Bank Street. Mr. 
Hobron also sells the (iramojihone, one 
of the most perfect of talking machines. 



136 



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137 



Ipicturesque 1Rew ^London. 







INTERIOR OF THE 

MILLINERY PARLORS OF 

MISS CHARLOTTE M. MALLORY, 

24 GREEN STREET, 

NEW LONDON. CONNECTICUT. 

The Accompanying Picture pre- 
sents one of many magnificent views 
obtained from that section of the city 
known as "Hill Crest." This tract of 
land was developed recently for Imild- 
ing sites: 
the une- 
qualled 
advan- 
tages of 
location 
make it 
the most 
desirable 
residen- 
tial part 
of the 
city. It 
is bound- 
ed on the 
east and 
west 1 )y 
the two 
m a i n 
highways 

that enter the city from the north. 
Three parallel sti-eets, fifty feet wide, 
will cross the property, intersecting 
North Main Street, a nnich traveled. 





"HILL CREST" — LAND BELONGING TO PELEG WILLIAMS. 



ADAM F. BISHOP, 
A Prominent Dentist of New London. 

macadamized road on the west, and 
Mohegan Avenue, through whose cen- 
ter runs the Montville trolley road, on 
the east. Thus all lots offered for sale 
are made easily accessible, and as they 

conuuand 
a superb 
\- i e w 
of the 
Thames 
1\ i V e r 
from Ma- 
in a coke 
t ( ) i t s 
m o nth, 
and of the 
S o u n d 
f r (1 m 
r> 1 a (■ k 
Point to 
the east- 
ern end of 
V i s h e r s 
Island, 
they are 
unequalled for beauty of scenery. For 
full particulars address all inquiries to 
Pc]egA\'illian)s or Arthur H. l-",ggleston, 
SI State Street. New London. Coini. 



i;i8 




GUY'S MILLINERY PARLORS -235 STATE STREET. 
NEW LONDON, CONN. 



139 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew Uondon, 




CONSERVATORIES OF HERMAN H. APPLEDORN, FLORIST, 
Sherman Street, near Montauk Avenue. 



It Has Been Remarked that "one 
ma}' as well be dead as out of style." 
Wliile this may act be literally true, 
under some conditions the metaphor 
.seems not too strong. She who would 
comply with this well-nioh inexorable 
law of fashion, could hardly do better 
than to call upon Mrs. A. F. Strick- 
land, one of New London's most 
fashionable dress-makers, at 20 Golden 
Street. Mrs. Strickland also pays 
attention to the altering and repairing 
of furs. 

A Satisfactokv Place To Go for 
either a lady's or gentleman's tailor- 
made garment, or to have one's clothes 
renovated, is the tailoring establisli- 
ment of A. Plotis,. 62 Main Street. 
Here may be secured good work at 
reasonable prices ; and tlie proprietor 
guarantees clothes that fit. When 
this is taken into consideration, with 
the fact that onh- good materials ai'e 
used, these prices will be of interest: 
Ladies' suits, .14. .50 upward ; men's 
suits, from -HO, and men's trousers 
from $-i up. 



Axel F. Andersox, jeweler and 
real estate dealer, was born in Norr- 
koping, Sweden, in 1841. There his 
early education was secured. Soon 
after leaving school he learned watch- 
making, which 
was then much 
more difficult 
thannovv.asone 
was obliged to 
serve six years" 
apprenticeship, 
and pay for the 
i list ru c tioii . 
Kxtraordinary 
ability and re- 
sults, also, were 
exacted. In 
1 S () i}, after 
travelling ex- 
te n s ively in 
Europe, Mr. Anderson located in New 
London, engaging in the jewelry busi- 
ness under tlie firm name of Hustice & 
Anderson, at oT I>auk Street. Since 
1894, when .Mi. Hustice retired, he has 
been the sole pro[irietor. He also con- 
ducts a prosperous real estate business. 




AXEL F. ANDERSON, 
Jeweler and Real Estate Dealer. 



140 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



The Si'Acious and Admirably 
Equipped Greenhouses of Mr. John 
Spalding are located on Main Street, 
hard by his residence, and with it, 
are his iirojierty. Mr. 
Spalding's business in 
New London was es- 
tablished in 1868, on 
the site which it now 
occupies. From t li e 
time of its inception 
it has j^rogressed rapid- 
ly, and now the hot- 
houses cover nearly 
twenty thousand feet 
of ground. The busi- 
ness has grown, entirely 
by its owner's persist- 
ent efforts, from almost 
nothing to very con- 
siderable proportions, 
and attracts patronage from a wide 
circle of outlying territory. It is the 
largest permanently successful 
florist business in New London. 
Mr. Spalding has always been the 




JOHN SPALDING, 
One of New London's Leading Florists 



ployees he is liberal and considerate. 
John Spalding is the son of Thomas 
and Jennie Johnston Spalding, and 
was born in Perthshire, Scotland, 
December 25th, 1814. 
His earl}' education 
was secured in the pub- 
lic schools of his native 
town. He commenced 
to earn his own liveli- 
hood when only fifteen 
years of age. With the 
instincts of gardening 
inculcated strong witli- 
in him, he chose it for 
his life vocation. Sev- 
eral fine positions in 
Scotland and in Ireland 
were tilled by him, un- 
til, in 1860, he came to 
America, locating in 
New London in 1868. He has always 
been given to thoughtful reading, and 
is remarkably well informed on many 
subjects of interest and importance. 
]Mr. Spalding married in Scotland 




CONSERVATORIES, GARDENS, AND RESIDENCE OF JOHN SPALDING — 

MAIN STREET. 

his first wife, who died shortly after 
coming to New London. He was 
married to his present wife, then Julia 
Scofield, of Poughkeepsie, New York, 
in August, 1871. 



sole proprietor, and his transactions 
have ever been conducted fairly and 
honorably. He has the respect and 
confidence of the solid and influental 
rhen of the community. To his em- 



141 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon, 



Staiui BROTHiiR.s' Phaiimacv, loca- 
ted at 108 State Street, is one of the best 
and most reliable drug stores in New Lon- 
don. It is a prescription pharnracA', and 
enjo_vs the confidence of the best pln-si- 
cians. Many of its prescriptions come 
from members of the medical profession 
in Groton, Mystic. Niantic, Montville 
and Norwich, as well as from those in 
New London. An important consider- 
ation in the compounding of prescriptions 
is that a competent druggist be in charge 
to see that all goes well. < >ne of the 
proprietors of Starr Brothers" pharmacy 
is always in the store. Both have had 
admirable business training in their spe- 
cial lines, and with them absolute safety 
and pure (juality are matters of certainty. 
They are watchful for their patrons' 
every interest, and their prices are very 
reasonable. They are sole agents for 
Ha\-ler"s celebrated chocolates and bon- 
bons. When desired by their custom- 
ers they furnish them with trading 
and discount stamps. 

William B. Smith, art dealer, Ttj 
Main Street, was born in New London 
in 1833. When six months of age his 
parents moved to 
Po(iuonnock. His 
father died when he 
was three years old, 
and his mother when 
he was fifteen. At 
twelve he was work- 
ing on a farm for 
his livelihood. Later 
he learned the Brit- 
annia ware trade.buc 
owing to an accident 
to one of his hands, 
was obliged to dis- 
continue it. He was 
married at tweutv 
yeai-s of age. In 18.5.") 
he went to Wiscon- 
sin, expecting to lo- 
cate there, but not 
liking the West, he 
opening a restaurant, 
fectionerv store in 




WILLIAM B. SMITH, 
Art Dealer. 



returned Last. 

fruit and con- 

Meriden, where 



.\ Wkll .Arn UN iKD Dure .Sti)i;i". 
is that of Charles M. Rogers, Ph. G., at 
9 Main Street. Mr. Rogers has had a 
wide experience in the drug business. 
In 1878 he entered the employ of R. E. 
Willard, leading pharmacist of Pittsfield. 
In 1885 he graduated from tlie Albany 
College of Pliarmacy. He is licensed in 
New York City and in the states of New 
York, Connecticut and Massachusetts. 
In 1892 he purchased his jjresent busi- 
ness from L. I). Kellogg. Embarking 
in the enterprise under adverse circum- 
stances, he has evolved a very gratifying 
patronage. He manufactures many 
special preparations, among them "Tube- 
rose Toothpaste" and "Ozol,"" a corn 
cure. When he first entered the busi- 
ness, the apothecary was required to 
manufacture his own drugs. At his store 
the purest drugs are used, and the most 
competent prescri[)ti()nists employed. 
On the same reliable, enterprising lines 
will be conducted his new store at 
11 Broad Street. 

he erected a large store- and otfice- 
buildiug. He served in the Civil 
War as sutler of the 29th Color- 
ed Regiment. In 
1875 he came to New 
London and opened 
a •' 99 cent store, " 
one of the first in 
the city, and contin- 
ued its operation 
many years. Mr. 
Smith manufactures 
an ointment with 
which he cured him- 
self of eczema, after 
physicians had pro- 
nounced his recov- 
ery impossible. It 
is called " Sure 
Cure Ointment," 
and is a certain cure 
for e c 7. e m a, sore 
eyes, insect bites, 
and any cutaneous or suli-cutaneous 
irritation of inflammation. It is for 
sale by all druggists. 



142 



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143 




ENSIGN EBENEZER AVERY'S HOUSE, 

Corner of Thames and Latham Streets. Grolon. After the Battle of Groton Heights, the British Soldiery Left the 
American Wounded in this House. Which To-day Exists, a Memorial of the Storming of Fort Griswold. 



Chapter X1I1I. 



HISTORIC GROTON. 

REVOLUTIONARY INTEREST RUINS OF FORT GRISWOLD AND THE SPOT 
WHERE LEDYARD FELL- THE GROTON MONUMENT AND MONUMENT 
HOUSE — NOTED MEN OF GROTON'S PAST — BRIEF SKETCH OF COLONEL 
LEDYARD. AND OF ANNA WARNER BAILEY - MODERN GROTON - 
VILLAGES WITHIN THE TOWNSHIP — CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS. 

In Pu] NT OF R E \' (I Lf T 1 O N A K V 

Fame and Lmi'()v;tance the town of 
Gi'oton, Connecticut, takes rank wilh 
Concord, Lexington, Boston, and other 
places of notable influence in the war 
which resulted in the birth of the 
United States as an independent 
nation. Of the part she played in 
that epoch-marking period, and of her 
share in the making of its history, she 
has reason to be proud. 

The Battle of Groton Heights, 
which occurred on September 6th, 
1781, and the heroic defense of Fort 
Griswold on that day, have cast over 
Groton a halo of romantic liistory 
which will remain forever. Aery 
interesting indeed is it to visit the 




ANNA WARNER BAILEY, 

■• Mother" Bailey. 

Anna Warner Bailey was Noted for Her Patriotic Sentiments 

and Acts During Both the Revolutionary 

Period and the War of 1812. 



ruins of the old fort, and speculate 
upon the events of the day when a 



145 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw ILondon. 



liaiiiltul of men, all patriotic lieroes, 
held it with Spartan-like disregard for 
the numerical superioritj' of the be- 
sieging forces. The embankments 
and ground plan of the fort are still 
quite plainly marked, and a sally-port 
through the south glacis j"et remains 
intact. Within the fort, surrounded 
bv an iron fence, is a granite tablet 
which marks the spot where Colonel 



monument in memory of the brave 
men who fell at the Battle of Groton 
Heights. On September 6, 1826, the 
corner stone was laid. The monu- 
ment was dedicated Septemlier 6. 
18-SO. Ill 1881 its height was increased 
from 1"2T feet to 135 feet. The shaft 
is an obelisk in form, and is of 
granite quarried from the ground on 
wliich the patriots whose heroism it 




VIEW WITHIN THE RUINS OF HISTORIC FORT GRISWOLD, 

Showing the Spot, Enclosed by Iron Palings. Where Fell Colonel William Ledyard: the Old Wall and North Gate: 

the Groton Monument and Monument House, and the School House and Bill Memorial Library. 

To Stand Within the Ruins of the Old Fort. Upon the Ground Made Sacred by the 

Blood of Martyr-Patriots, is to Marvel at that Spirit. Courage, and Loyalty 

to High Conviction Which Accomplished Our 

/ Independence as a Nation. 



William Ledyard fell, maliciousl}' 
murdered by a l>i-itish officer, to whom 
he had surrendered the fort and his 
sword. The Groton ^lonument and 
Monument House, and the Bill Mem- 
orial Library are witliin view of and 
near the fort. From the ramparts 
may be had a beautiful view of New 
London Harbor, the city of New 
London, and the Thames River. 

In 182(5 an association was organ- 
ized for the purpose of erecting a 



perpetuates yielded up their lives. B}^ 
a circular stairway of 166 steps, one 
may ascend to the apex, from which 
is secured an extensive view of great 
charm and beauty. From adults a 
small fee of ten cents is required for 
the privilege of making the ascent: 
from children but iialf price is asked. 
The season during whicii tlie monu- 
ment is regidarlj' open to the publir 
is troni .luiie to October, but IMr. 
•himes M. Baion. a vetei'an of the 



i4i; 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Civil XVar, resides nearhy, and, upon 
call, escorts visitors to the top at any 
time of the year. For fifteen cents 
his "Battle of Groton Heights," a 
very interesting booklet, may l)e pro- 
cured. The 
President of 
the M o n u - 
ment Asso- 
c i a t i o n 
is John ( ) . 
Spicer. 

The Anna 
Warner 
Bailey Chap- 
t e r of the 
D augliters 
of the Ameri- 
can Revolu- 
tion have the 
nse of the 
stone house 
near the mcm- 
ument. Here 
ai-e kept for 
preservation 
and public 
i nspection 
such Revolu- 
tionary relics 
as they have, 
or may in 
future have, 
possession of. 
Tlie collec- 
tion on exhib- 
ition is very 
fine and in- 
teresting. 

Groton lias 
given to his- 
tory several 
distinguished 
men. Silas 
Dean, Envoj^ 
to France at 
tlie time of 




the Revolutionary War; Colonel Wil- 
liam Ledyard, the heroic commander 
of Fort Griswold; the noted traveller, 
John Ledyard, and Rev. Samuel 
Seabury, Bishop of Connecticut and 



Rhode Island, were sons of Groton 
whose careers reflect lionor upon the 
town. 

Colonel William Ledyard was liorn in 
Groton, near the site on which stands 

the Groton 
iNIonument. 
His parents 
were Isaac 
and Elizabeth 
Saltonstall 
Ledyard. 
He was, in 
ever}- respect, 
one of the 
noblest char- 
acters of his 
day; brave, 
eihcient in 
command, and 
an indomita- 
ble hgliter, lie 
was, withal, 
modest and 
unassuming. 
On July 3rd, 
17 76, soon 
after the con- 
struction of 
Fort G r i s - 
wold, he was 
commissioned 
captain of 
artillery and 
com mander 
of that forti- 
iication. His 
jurisdiction 
was made to 
end )i ace New 
London, Gro- 
ton and Ston- 
i n g t n in 
March, 1778, 
and the rank 
of major was 
at that time 
conferred upon him. He perished, a 
victim of one of the most treacherous 
foes, September 6, 1781, after a re- 
markable and gallant defense of Fort 
firiswold against superior numliers and 



THE GROTON MONUMENT. 

The Grbton Monument was Dedicated September 6th. 1830. It is of 

Granite Quarried from the Soil on which the Brave Men Whom 

it Commemorates Yielded up their Lives in the Defense of 

Liberty. In 1881 its Height was Increased from 127 

Feet to 135 Feet. The Shaft is an Obelisk in Form. 

Us Apex, from which is to be Obtained a 

Charming View, is Reached by a Circular 

Stairway of 166 Steps. 



147 



[picturesque 1Rew Uoncton* 



discijiline, He was content to sutler 
all, and to lose all, that his country 
might be. thereby, the gainer. One 
liundred yards to the southeast of 
the old fort is his grave. Over it is a 
handsome monument erected from an 
appropriation by the State in 1854, 
as a tribute to his brave deeds and 
sacrifices. 

Anna Warner Bailey ("Mother" 
Bailej') was a heroic daughter of 
Groton, who, at the time of the battle 



country. The garrison at the fort 
was reinforced by a company of volun- 
teers from New London, who found 
their supply of flannel for making 
cartridges dangerously depleted. The 
inhal>itants, fearful of a re-occurrence 
of the horrors of 1781, had removed 
many of their effects, and no flannel 
was obtainable. "Mother"' Bailey \\as 
appealed to by an American oflicer. 
Her bhinkets she had disposed of, but 
she unhesitatingly solved the difficulty. 




VIEW OF THE LOWER RAMPARTS OF FORT GRISWOLD, 

Showing Some Antiquated Munitions of Warfare in the Foreground, and in the Background the New London Shore. 

With the Harbor in the IVIiddle Distance. 



of Groton Heights, rendered loxing 
service and tender ministrations to 
the wounded, and to her uncle, 
Edward Mills, in whose family she 
made her home. Mr. Mills was one 
of the defenders of the fort, and was 
fatally wounded during the conflict. 
Thirty-one years later, when Admiral 
Decatur was blockaded in New Lon- 
don Harbor, and a land attack was 
anticipated, occurred ''the petticoat 
incident" which made "Mother'" 
Bailey"s name famous tliroughout the 



Deftly she removed her flannel petti- 
coat, and handed it to the oflicer with 
a patriotic expression of her iiope that 
it would prove of service. She died 
in 1851, at the ripe age of ninety- 
two j-ears. 

Groton has an estimated population 
of from 7,500 to 8,000 inhabitants, a 
very creditable gain, since 1890, of 
about 2.500. It comprises in area 40 
square miles. On its northern bound- 
ary is Ledyard. which was set off from 
firoton and incorporated a separate 



14.^ 




INTERIOR VIEW OF THE MONUMENT HOUSE — GROTON HEIGHTS. 




INTERIOR VIEW OF THE MONUMENT HOUSE - GROTON HEIGHTS. 

The Monument House. Located Hard by the Grolon Monument, is Maintained by the Anna Warner Bailey Chapter of the 

Daughters of the American Revolution, of which Mrs. A. D. Slocomb is Regent. It Contains Many Curios, and 

Interesting Relics of the Revolution. From its Curator One May Obtain Souvenirs of "Mother" Bailey. 

Colonel Ledyard. and Nathan Hale. The House Contains a Visiting Register on which were 

Recorded Last Year, in August Alone. About 1200 Names. During the Year From 

5000 to 6000 People Visited the Monument. It is Open to the Public 

from May 1st to November 1st of Each Year. 



140 



Ipicturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



town in lS36. On the east is tlie 
Mystic River and the town of Stoning- 
ton: on the west the River Tiiames 
and New London Harbor, and on tlie 
south, Long- Island Sound. 

The recent location in (Jroton of the 
Eastern Sliipbuilding Company marks 
a revival of shipbuilding interests that 
is sure to be of great benefit to the 
town. Indeed, its influence is already 
manifest. Real estate values are 



New London has at some time been 
variously known as "Groton Bank." 
"(Troton Landing," and ••Grotiin 
Ferry." To the south, fronting on 
New London Har1)or and the Sound, 
is Eastern Point. 

The school system of Grotun is 
excellent. It embodies ten districts, 
as follows: Groton, Pleasant Yallej", 
Centre Groton, Burnet's. Mystic, 
l^pper Xoank. Poquonnock Bridge, 




VIEW OF MONUMENT STREET — GROTON. 

Looking North from Near the Groton Monument, and Showing on the Left the Residence of Mrs. A. D. Slocomb. 
and on the Right, the Bill Memorial Library. 



good, and are increasing, there is con- 
sideral)le building in progress, and the 
general tone is one of prosperity and 
enterprise. 

The township of Groton includes 
several villages. To the southeast of 
Groton proper are the divisions of 
Poquonnock Bridge, Poquonnock, 
Noank, West Mystic, and Mystic. To 
the northeast is the Navy Yard, a 
station on the Norwich division of 
the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad. To the east is Old 
]\Iystic. Tiiat portion directly opposite 



Eastern Point, West Mystic, and 
Noank. The High School of the town 
is located at Mystic, where is also a 
first and second primary, an interme- 
diate, and a grammar school. The 
capacity of the schodi building in 
District Number One, located near 
the Groton Monument, has been taxed 
to the utmost during the past year. 
T(i remedy this condition the State 
Legislature has just granted the town 
authority to issue bonds to the amount 
of $40,000, for the purpose of erecting 
a new school building in this district. 



150 






PASTORS OF THE CHURCHES — GROTON. 



REV. PAUL F. HOFFMAN, 
Bishop Seaburv Memorial. 



REV. FREDERICK S. HYDE. 
Congregational. 



REV. LANGLEY B. SEARS. 
Groton Heights Baptist. 



Ipicturesque 1Rew ILondon. 




THE GROTON HEIGHTS BAPTIST CHURCH, 

BROAD AND CHURCH STREETS. GROTON. 

Society Organized March 8.1843. First Ciiurch of Worstiip Dedicated as " Tiie Groton Bank Baptist Church. " June 4. 

1845. Present Church was Dedicated July 11. 1872. and Name Changed by Act of Legislature 

April 11. 1887. to 'The Groton Heights Baptist Church." Sunday School 

Organized in 1845. Pastor. Rev. Langley B. Sears. 



In connection with District N^umber 
One is a free kindergarten. 

Groton has three churches, tlie 
Groton Heights Baptist. Rev. Langley 
B. Sears, Pastoi'; the Groton Congre- 
gational Church, Rev. Frederick S. 
Hyde, Pastor: and the Bishop Sealiury 
Memorial Church (Epistopal). Rev. 
Paul F. Hoffman. Rectoi'. The erec- 
tion of a new Congregational church 
is receiving favorable consideration, 
and will, witlioiit doulit. soon lie an 
actuality. 

The Bill Memorial Lilirai-y. located 
on Monument Street, near the Groton 



Monument, was founded by Frederic 
liill. in commemoration of his sisters, 
Eliza and Haiiiet. It is a fine build- 
ing of Stony Creek granite, with 
Ma^'Uard freestone trimmings. It was 
dedicated June 18th, 1890. It is 
maintained by a fund of more than 
><li),0(Hi, which was also the gift of 
Mr. Bill. Its volumes, of which there 
are upward of live thousand, are 
issued free to card holders. In the 
upper portion of the building is a 
iiiom used as a museum, which con- 
tains many relics and articles of 
interest, among them the historic 



152 




THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF GROTON - THAMES STREET. 

The Congregational Church of Groton is an Off-shoot from the First Church of New London. Permission for the Separation 

being Secured from the Hartford General Court in 1702. Since Then There Have Been Several Changes of Site. It is 

Anticipated that a New Edifice Will. Ere Long, be Erected on the Society's Newly Acquired Property. Corner of 

Monument and Meridian Streets. The Regular Church Services are as Follows: Sunday Morning Service. 

10.45: Sabbath School. 12 M.: Sunday Endeavor Meeting. 6.30 P. M.: Sunday Evening Service. 

7.30 P. M.: Week Day Meeting. 7.30. Friday P. M. Pastor. Rev. Frederick S. Hyde. 



s:TTr 




■■■''?VI-v.% 



SEABURY MEMORIAL CHURCH - FORT STREET, GROTON. 

The Seabury Memorial Church was Completed in 1876. It was Consecrated by Bishop Williams September 13th. 1881. 

Under the Name of Seabury Memorial Church, in Honor of the Memory of the Rt. Rev. Samuel Seabury. First Bishop of 

the American Church, and of the Diocese of Connecticut, and who was Born in Groton. November 30th. 1729. 

Services: Sundays. Holy Eucharist, 9 A. M.: Matinsand Litany.10.30 A. M.: Holy Eucharist. 11.00 A. M.: Vespers. 

5 P. M.: Holy Days. Holy Eucharist. 7 A. M.: Vespers. 5 P. M. Priest in Charge. Rev. Paul F. Hoffman. 



(12) 



153 



picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



sword of Colonel Ledyard, 
carried b}' hiiu on the fate- 
ful ilth of September, 1781. 
In Groton is located the 
Odd Fellows" Home of 
Connecticut. It is situat- 
ed OQ the east bank of, 
and overlooks, the Thames 
River. It is aptly named 
"Fairview," for from its 
site majr be obtained a 
view of dive rs i t y and 
beauty. The Home was 
founded and is supported 
by, contributions from the 
various lodges of the Inde- 




JAMES BISHOP. 

Secretar> Odd Fellows' Home of 
Connecticut. 



Smith, of Waterbury : Sec- 
rftary. James Bishop, of 
New Haven : Treasurer, 
Frederick S. Hunt, of 
Bridgeport. 

There are before the 
Legislature petitions for 
electric road privileges. 
()ne road contemplated 
will extend from Norwich 
to (xroton, and one from 
(iroton to Westerly, via 
Noank. 

Another matter of great 
interest has been brought 
before the Legislature, 




"FAIRVIEW," ODD FELLOWS' HOME OF CONNECTICUT — GROTON. 



pendent ( )rder of Odd 
Fellows of Connecticut. 
Its purpose is to provide 
a home for aged, infirm, 
crippled, and indigent 
members of the Order. 
The property contains 
about fifty acres of land. 
and is one mile north of 
Groton Village. Its officers 
are. Charles B. Ware, P. 
G. M., New London. Presi- 
dent; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Frederick Botsford, 
of New Haven; Second 
Vice-President, John W. 




FREDERICK S. HUNT, 

Treasurer Odd Fellows' Home 

of Connecticut. 



and sanctioned by it, viz., 
to giunt a certain section 
of the town the borough 
form of government. The 
Legislative body having 
acted favorably upon this 
petition, it will then l)e 
balloted upon by the vot- 
ers of Groton. There ex- 
ists a difference of opin- 
ion regarding the advisa- 
bility of this change in 
form of government: but 
there is unanimity as to 
the desirability of the im- 
provements proposed. 




RESIDENCE OF THOMAS A. MINER. 

The Residence of Thomas A. Miner. President of the Groton Grain Company. 105 Thames Street, 
is Located on Meridian Street. Corner of Monument. 




RESIDENCE OF CAPTAIN JASON L. RANDALL — RAMSDELL STREET. 



155 




FIVE MODERN GROTON RESIDENCES. 



HIRAM M. HODGOON — RAMSOELL STREET. HENRY L BAILEY - RAMSDELL STREET. 

WALTER R. DENISON — RAMSDELL STREET, 
ALBERT L. SAUNDERS -ALLEN STREET. NELSON S. HOLDRIDGE — PLEASANT STREET. 

156 




BILL MEMORIAL LIBRARY GROTON. 

The Bill Memorial Library was Dedicated June I8th. 1890. It was Presented to Groton by Frederic Bill, a Resident 

of the Town. It Is Constructed of Stony Creek Granite and Trimmed with Maynard Freestone, is Fifty Feet 

Long and Forty Wide. It Contains About Four Thousand Volumes. Issued Free to Card Holders, and Is 

Maintained by an Endowment Fund of More than Ten Thousand Dollars, also the Gift 

of Frederic Bill. In the Upper Portion of the Library is a Historical Room in 

which are Many Relics of Historic and Local Interest. 

Chapter X1I1I1I. 



GROTON OF TO-DAY. 

CONTEMPLATED IMPROVEMENTS - NOTEWORTHY RESIDENCES — MERCAN- 
TILE ENTERPRISES AND BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN. 



The KdADs of Gukton are usually 
kept in good condition, and the section 
south, to Eastern Point, is traversed 
l)y an exceptionally fine road of hard, 
smooth macadam. Here the highway 
extends along the harbor to that 
charming summer hotel, the Fort 
Griswold House, and the water views 
from the roatl-way are very Ijeautiful. 

The present selectmen of the town 
of Groton are, S. G. Fish, J. F. Bailey, 
and A. F. Hewett. The Town Clerk 
is Nelson Morgan, whose office is at 
Poquonnock Bridge. The Town 
Treasurer is John O. Fish. 

Groton is a growing town, and in it 



are well represented the customary 
branches of professional, trade, and 
mercantile pursuits. The business 
portion of the connnunity centres about 
that section of Thames Street adjacent 
to the landing-place of the ferry which 
connects Groton with New I^on<lon. 
The concerns located here are enter- 
prising and reliable, and represent the 
progressive men of Groton. Many of 
them are of long standing. 

Ali'.ert L. Sainders, carriage 
painter, has his place of business in the 
upper part of the building, corner of 
Thames and School streets. His work is 
uniforndy excellent, properly executed. 



ir^" 



picturesque 1Rew Uondon« 




RESIDENCE OF CLINTON D. HANOVER, CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

Baker Avenue. Groton. 



A Max's Duty to Himself, pro- 
vided, always, that lie can afford it, is 
to be well dressed. While it is true 
that "clothes do not make the man," 
they go far towards so doing. At the 
tailoring establishment and furnishintf 
store of H. A. EdgcomVi one can find 
almost anything in the line of up-to- 
date, dressy fabrics and accessories. 
The worknianshi[i \yhich Mr. Edgconib 
puts into garments of his manufacture 
is excellent, while the trimmings and fit 
are unsurpassed. His store is located on 
Thames Street, near the Post ( )ffice. 




STORE OF HOWARD A. EDGCOMB, 
GROTON. 



WdODHURNE R. Ayi.s, M. D., was 
born in New Brunswick, N. J., in 
18i)6. He was educated privately 
until he entered Yale Medical College. 
He graduated from the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore 
in 1894, after a three years' college, and 
a two years" hospital course. He is a 
member of the I. O. O. F., Foresters of 
America, I'nited Order Golden Cross, 
Heptasophs, and of the A. O. I'. W., 
of all of which, excepting the Odd 
Fellows, he is medical examiner. 
His oflice is at the corner of Thames 
and Latham streets. 

Ei>WAKi> W. J.viivi.s, D. D. S., is a 
surgeon-dentist of thoroughness and 
skill. His location in Groton is re- 
tent, and of importance to those of its 
inhabitants wlio realize how essential 
to their comfort and appearance is the 
care of the teeth. Dr Jarvis is a grad- 
uate of the Pennsylvania College of 
Dental Surgery, one of the oldest in- 
stitutions of like character in the 
I'nited States. On its faculty are 
some of the most widely known men 
ill the dental profession. 



158 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




OFFICE AND SHOP OF MARQUARDT BROTHERS, CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS, 

THAMES STREET. NEAR FERRY LANDING. GROTON. 

The Firm of Marquardt Brothers. Carpenters and Builders, and Dealers in Lumber and Building Materials. 
Consists of Christian G.. George, and Charles A. Marquardt. 



H. E. MAi!(,)rAi;i)T, Dealer in (Gro- 
ceries and Provisions, Thames Street, 
Groton, was born in Groton, June 25th, 
1874. His education was obtained in 
the schools of Groton. He established 
his grocery business in 1895, and carries 
a full line of canned goods, teas, coffees, 
fruit and staple provisions. It is worth 
while to inspect his fine stock. In 
June, 1897, Mr. Marquardt was united 
in marriage to Miss Emma A. Chap- 
man. His residence is on Monument 
Street, Groton. 

Charles C. Bloesei;, Tonsorial 
Artist, has for the past fifteen years 
occupied his present location at number 
2 Si'liool Street, directly opposite the 
Groton Ferry Landing. The expression 
"tonsorial artist" is not, in Mr. Bloe- 
ser's case, a misnomer, for in any of 
his chairs one is sure of a good "hair- 
cut" or comfortaljle "shave": and to 
perform either, surely a certain art is 
requisite. Mr. Bloeser is also agent 
for the New London Steam and Hand 
T>aundrv. 



On Thames Street, Groton, is 
the Market of Jud.son F. Bailey, 
Dealer in Meats, Poultry, Game and 
Vegetables. Mr. Bailey was born in 
Groton February IH, 18t)5, and was 
educated in its public schools. His 
politics are Republican. In 1895 he 
was elected a member of the Legisla- 
ture, and at present is one of the 
Selectmen of Groton. He is a member 
of the Odd Fellows: A. O. U. W.; of 
the Jil)boom Club, of New London, and 
of the Ridgley Protective Association. 

(iEOKCES. AvERV, Dealer in Choice 
Groceries, Flour, Grain and Feed, was 
l)orn in Groton April 19th, 183G. His 
father was the Rev. J. R. Avery. 
His place of business is located on 
Thames Street, Groton, and was estab- 
lished in 188G. He is a member of 
the Groton Congregational Church, 
of the Association of Master Mechan- 
ics, and of Fairview Lodge of Odd 
Fellows. His politics are Republican. 
In September, 1886, he married Miss 
Lucy A. Larkin, of Groton. 



150 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




FIN BOAT "SPORT," 

Built b> Charles F. Ferguson. Builder of All Kinds of Yachts and Launches. 65 Thames Street. Grolon. 
Where Boats May be Hired, as Well as Orders Given for Their Construction. 



If Causln'g Two Blades of Gka.ss 
TO Grow in place of one be a benefac- 
tion, sureh^ those appreciating land 
values from ■'915 to vSo per acre on the 
tax list, to ifoOO and §1000 per 
acre, are benefactors. The Gkotox 
Real Estate CoitPANY, Thojlvs 
HA>nLTOX and WaltePv R. D?:xis()X, 
]*r;oPEiET<)i;s, liave accomplished 
this. With the advent of the Eastern 
Shipbuilding Company, arose the 
necessity for more houses in Groton. 
Messrs. Hamilton and Denison met 
this demand. They purchased land, 
made streets and built houses. 
( )verlooking the sliipbuilding plant, 
they laid out the plat called "Harbor 
Mew," where they erected the Hotel 
Harbor A'iew, and many cottages and 
two-family houses. They have here 
besides, fifty building lots for sale, 
most of them 50x110 feet, some larger. 
These are the most desirable lots in 
the borough. With another fine tract 
further south, they are able to meet 
anyone's means. To manufacturers 
seeking sites. lil)cral terms will be made. 



(iEolKiE R. Hf.MPSTEAD, PlLMBEU 

axd TLX.s.AnTH, was born in Groton 
May 27th, 1862, son of William F. 
and Welthin Dart Hempstead. As a 
farmer he l)egantobe self-supporting; 
afterwards he became an artesian well- 
driller, and yet later embarked in his 
present Vmsinessof pluml)ing. tinsmith- 
ing, repairing, and stove dealing, which 
he conducts at 92 Thames Street, op- 
posite the Ferry Landing. He deals 
in Tinware of every description. 
Pumps, Pipes, Heaters of all kinds. 
Stoves and Ranges, and in Horse 
Goods, Harness, etc. His telephone 
numl)er is 193-2. His Stoves, Heaters, 
and Ranges, and, in fact, all of the 
goods in which he deals, are of a ijual- 
ity that gives the best satisfaction and 
money-worth. His jobbing is always 
executed promptly and well. Mr. 
Hempstead is a meml)er of the Union 
Lodge of Masons, of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient 
Order of Fnited Workmen, and of the 
Improved Order of Heptaso|)hs. 




HEADQUARTERS OF ROBERT D. DENISON, PAINTER AND 
PAPER HANGER -FERRY LANDING, GROTON. 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew !aLonclon» 




FERRY LANDING AND ALLYN BLOCK — GROTON. 

In the Allyn Block, Recently Erected by Him. is the Grocery of Carlos W. Allyn. 



Caislus W. Allyn, Gkocei;, was 
born in Groton, .son of Wilson and 
Ella E. Ghapman Allyn. His early 
education was secured in a district 
school, which he attended winters. 
After acting as clerk for John S. ]\Ior- 
gan, and for W. J. Starr, respectively, 
he entered business for himself, suc- 
ceeding Mr. Starr in 1892. In 189,s 
he purchased the corner feed store of 
B. M. O'Brien, operating it successful- 
ly, until recently, when he erecteil the 
brick block which he now occupies on 
Thames Street, near the ferry landing. 
At his store may be found the very 
best of everything in groceries. Mr. 
Allyn's politics are Republican. For 
eighteen years he has been a member 
of the Groton Congregational Church. 
He is also a member of the Fairview 
Lodge of Odd Fellows — of which he 
is Treasurer, and Charter Member 
from Mohegan Lodge — and of the 
Union Lodge of Masons. In 1895 he 
married Miss S. Elizabeth Throop, 
niece of Peleg Williams of New 
London. 



W. L. MoKGAN, Watch JiAKER axb 
Jeweler, and Repairer of and Dealer 
in Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, is 
located at 89 Thames Street, Groton. 
He makes a specialty of thorough, first- 
class repairing. He is the local agent 
for the Rochester, Eagle, and Monarch 
bicycles, three of the best produced in 
this country. They are strictly high- 
grade, up-to-date wheels. Mr. Morgan 
deals in l)icycle sundries, repairs bicy- 
cles and handles in Groton the Zon-o- 
phone Talking Machine. 

A Good Place to Hire a Team 
for business or pleasure, is the Gr(:)TON 
Liverv and Boarding Stable, of 
which William H. Hawkey is manager. 
The stable office is located on Fort 
Street, Groton. This livery furnishes 
first-class turn-outs at all hours, and 
gives prompt attention to customers. 
It is connected with New London by 
telephone, and a call over the wire 
will elicit a ready response, and cour- 
teous and efficient service. 



161 




RESIDENCE OF C M. SHAY, — MERIDIAN STREET, GROTON. 









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ANCIENT ORDER UNITED WORKMEN'S HALL -SCHOOL STREET, 
GROTON, CONNECTICUT. 

Owned b> the Thames Lodge Corporation, Erected in 1895, 



162 




FORT TRUMBULL — NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 

Fort Trumbull Received its Name in Honor of Governor Jonathan Trumbull. Governor of Connecticut during the Revolution. 

It is Located on Fort Neck, a Point of Land Extending into the Harbor from the West Side, about a Mile and a Half 

North of the Lighthouse and Nearly a Mile from the Center of the City. It is of Granite from the Quarry 

on Millstone Point. It was Completed in 1849. at a Cost of about $250,000. The Fort 

is Garrisoned by United States Troops, and is a Recruiting Station. 



Chapter Xflt). 



ENVIRONS OF NEW LONDON. 

WATERFORD — MONTVILLE — NORWICH — ALLYN'S POINT — GALE'S FERRY- 
NAVY YARD-GROTON STATION — NOANK. 




ROBERT PALMER, 

President of the Robert Palmer & Son Shipbuilding and Marine 
Railway Company. Noank. Connecticut. 

103 



Nkw London, advantage- 
ouslj' located as a seaport, 
is no less fortunately situated 
in regard to lier environment 
and neiglihoring towns. The 
rity"s connection by trolley 
with that portion of Water- 
ford immediately north; with 
Montville and Norwich; and 
its easy access to Noank, l)y 
the local trains of the Consoli- 
dated llailroad, is of benefit 
to those places, and to New 
London as well. 

North of New London, on 
the Central N'ermont Railway, 
is Waterford Station. The 
village of Waterford proper 
is south of New London, on 
the Shore Line Division of 
the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroad. And 
surrounding New London on 



Iptcturesquc 1Rcw 5Lonclon» 




RESIDENCE OF GEORGE F. HEWITT, BUILDER, 9 MAIN STREET, NEW LONDON. 

Waterford. Near Uncasville. 

the north, west and south, i.s the tiitire Quakt-r Hill, a post ol'lic-e and vilhige on 
townsliip of Waterford. numbering the Norwich and New l>ondon trolley 




THE UNCASVILLE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 
Uncasville (Montville> Connecticut. 

about 3,000 in population. Adjacent line. Its principal industries are agri- 
to Waterford Station, on the nortli, is culture and the manufacture of paper. 

1(54 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 




RESIDENCE OF HENRY C. JOHNSON, PRESIDENT OF THE WILLIAM G. 
JOHNSON COMPANY — MONTVILLE, CONNECTICUT. 

North of Quaker Hill is the town- Norwich and New London trolley line; 
ship of Montville, which comprises Pabnertown, Massapea.fr, Oakdale and 




DYEWOOD AND DYEWOOD EXTRACT FACTORY OF THE WILLIAM G. 

JOHNSON COMPANY -UNCASVILLE (MONTVILLE) CONNECTICUT, 

Montville Station, on the Central Mohegan. Uncasville, situated six 

Vermont Railway; Uncasville, on the miles north of New London, is the 



165 




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166 




THE BOSTON STORE, THE SHOPPING CENTER OF NORWICH - THE GREAT 

DEPARTMENT STORE OF THE REID & HUGHES COMPANY, 

MAIN STREET. 



1C7 



Ipicturesquc 1Rcw ILondon* 



home of the Uneasville Manufacturing 
Company, cotton manufacturers, of 
which Mr. Charles D. White is Man- 
ager. Here are also located the works 
of the William G. Johnson Companj-, 
manufacturers of dyewoods and pure 
dyewood extracts and liijuors. This 
company has had a long and successful 
existence; it was established in 1H34. 
To the northwest of Montville is 
Palmertown, one of the sites of the 
manufactories of the Palmer Brothers 
Company, manufacturers of lied com- 
fortables. The Palmer Brothers have, 
also, mills in Oakdale and Fitchville, 
Connecticut. Palmertown has, as well, 
manufactures of paper — by the mills 
l)elonging to the estate of the C. M. 
Robertson Company — and of cotton 
and wool. It is two miles from Mont- 
ville Station. From Palmertown. to 
the northward, lies Massapeag, a station 
on the Central \'ermont Kailwav. 



And still further north, but three 
miles soutli of Norwich, is the village 
of Mohegan, situated on the same 
railroad line. 

Montville, once the North Parish of 
New London, is very nearly equi-distant 
between Norwich and that t'ity, on the 
west ])ank of the River Thames. It 
is intersected by the Central Vermont 
Railroad and the Norwich and New 
London trolley line, and in population 
numbers close to 3,000. Between 
Montville and Norwich, one mile south 
of the latter, is Thamesville, also a 
station on the Central Vermont. 

Fourteen miles north of New Lon- 
don, approximately, is Norwich, one 
of the county seats of New London 
County, and a prominent trade center 
for Eastern Connecticut. This busy 
city is charmingly situated at the head 
of navigation on the Thames, which 
is formed here bv the confluence of 




GENERAL OFFICE OF THE NEW LONDON COUNTY MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE 

COMPANY, OF NORWICH. CONNECTICUT - OVER CHELSEA 

SAVINGS BANK, SHETUCKET STREET. 

The Policies of the New London County Mutual Fire Insurance Company Cover Damage by Lightning. Whether Fire 

Ensues or not Officers: C. J. Winters. President: J. F. Williams. Secretary; 

L, H. Williams. Assistant Secretary: I. L. Peck. Treasurer. 



1U8 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon* 




RESIDENCE OF ROBERT PALMER - NO A NK, CONNECTICUT. 



the Yantic and Shetucket rivers. It 
is connected with New London by 
trolley and steam railways, and hy 
steamboat. It has direct railroad con- 
nections with the nortli and northwest 
as well. For its beautiful residences, its 
broad, shaded avenues and fine streets, 
and for its important manufactures, 
Norwich is justly famed. In popula- 
tion it has between twenty-seven and 
twenty-eight thousand. 

Tlie foregoing places lietween New 
Loudon and Norwicli are immediately 
west of the Thames river, and such of 
them as are railroad stations, are on 
the line of the Central Vermont Rail- 
way. Skirting the eastern bank of 
the Thames, and yet another link con- 
necting Norwich and New London, 
are the tracks of the Norwich and 
Worcester Division of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 
The noteworthy stations along this 
line, from Norwich to New London, 
are Allyn's Point, Gale's Ferry, the 
Navy Yard, and Groton Station. 

In the township of Groton, about 
seven miles from New London in an 



easterly direction is Noank, a charm- 
ing rural coast town, located on a de- 
lightful section of the Atlantic shore 
at the mouth of the Mystic river. Its 
shady streets and comfortable homes 
with their well kept lawns and 
grounds, lend an atmosphere of thrift, 
orderliness and peace. The chief 
supporting industries of Noank are 
shipbuilding and fishing. It is the 
home of The Robert Palmer & Son 
Shipbuilding and Marine Railway 
Company, one of the foremost con- 
cerns in the country engaged in the 
construction of maritime craft. 

Noank is on the Sliore Line Division 
of the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad. Of churches it 
has two, Baptist and Methodist in de- 
nomination. The school facilities are 
good, and are represented by a cen- 
trally located school edifice, in which 
the grades range inclusively from Pri- 
mary to High. 

The hotel acconunodations are un- 
usually good, and summer visitors to 
the village find it a delightful place of 
recreation. 



(13) 



169 



Iptcturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



The water views about Noank are 
fine, and the sea air is healtliful and 
bracing. 

The town numbers in popuh\tion 
about fifteen hundred, ^hiny of its 
working inhaliitants 
are employed in the 
shipyard, many are 
engaged in fishing, 
and some have 
achieved success in 
mercantile pui-suits. 

RoswellBi'rrows 
Fitch, of Xoank, was 
born in Groton, Con- 
necticut, April 19th, 
1833. His parents 
were El is ha and 
Mary P. Fitch. At 
twelve years of age 
he commenced to 
be self-sujjporting, and from then until 
he was fourteen, occupied a clerkship 
in a general store. Later his summers 
were spent in fishing for a livelihood, 
and his winters in attending school. 
Subsequently he again l)ecame clerk 




ROSWELL B. FITCH. 



in a store, anil was afterwards engaged 
to assume the management of a union 
store which was erected for the special 
purpose of being placed under his 
charge. In 18.51 he became an active 
partner in the busi- 
ness, and bought out, 
o n e - b y - o n e , the 
twelve other ownere, 
until he possessed al> 
solute control. In 
May. 18 90, he sold his 
business, and closed 
an active commercial 
career of thirty-five 
years' duration. 

In (Jctober, 1854, 
Mr. Fitch married 
Ellen Elizal)eth Wil- 
bur, who died Fel> 
ruary 13th, 1874, 
leavinga son, Walter Wilbur Fitch, who 
was born in 1859, and died December 
ititli, 1888. Mr. Fitch married again, in 
1875. Olive Elizabeth Wilmot. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fitch have a daughter. Elizabeth 
Wilbur Fitch, born April 10th, 1884. 




RESIDENCE OF ROSWELL B. FITCH — NOANK, CONNECTICUT. 

170 




DOCK AND YARD VIEW IN THE SHIPYARD OF THE ROBERT PALMER & SON 

SHIPBUILDING AND MARINE RAILWAY COMPANY, 

NOANK, CONNECTICUT. 

The Officers of The Robert Palmer & Son Shipbuilding and Marine Railway Company are. Robert Palmer. President : 

Robert P. Wilbur. Vice-President: Robert Palmer. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer: and John E. McDonald. Superintendent. 

Robert Palmer, the President, was Born in Noanl<. May 26. 1825. At the Age of Twenty. With His Father. He Engaged in. 

the Shipbuilding Industry. Succeeding His Father More Than Fifty Years Ago. and Establishing From Small Beginnings. One 

of the Largest Modern Shipbuilding Enterprises in the Country. The Plant Has Turned Out Over 500 Vessels. Varying in Size 

From the Ordinary Fishing Vessel to the Large. Palatial Sound Steamers. Mr. Palmers Politics are Republican. He Has 

Served Two Terms in the State Legislature. Has Been Deacon of the Noank Baptist Church for 48 Years. Superintendent 

of Its Sunday School for 55 Years, and is President of the Mystic and Noank Library. 




VIEW IN THE ROBERT PALMER & SON SHIPBUILDING AND MARINE RAIL- 
WAY COMPANY'S YARD-SHOWING WORK UNDER CONSTRUCTION 
AND VESSELS ON THE WAYS. 

171 




DANIEL F. PACKER, INVENTOR, AND FOUNDER OF THE PACKER 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF NEW YORK. 

Mr. Packer was Born in Groton. April 6th. 1825. In His Early Days He Followed His Predeliction for the Sea. Crossing 
the Atlantic a Number of limes, and at Twenty-One Became Captain and Part Owner of a Vessel. In 1851-52 He Spent 
Most of His Time in California. Looking After the Interests He Had Acquired in the Gold Mines. 

The First Pine Tar Soap Ever Made was Originated and Manufactured by Daniel F. Packer — the Soap Which is Now 
Commonly Known in the Business World, and in About All American Households, as Well as in Those of Nearly All 
Civilized Countries, as "Packers Tar Soap." For the Last Twenty-Five Years He Has Been Engaged Principally in the 
Manufacture of this Celebrated Soap. 

Mr. Packer Resides in Mystic. His Elegant Home. "Grand View Cottage." is On the Banks of the Mystic River. 



172 




SOLDIERS' MONUMENT - JUNCTION OF EAST MAIN STREET AND 
BROADWAY, MYSTIC. 

Chapter Xlt), 



ENVIRONS OF NEW LONDON — MYSTIC. 

THE BEAUTIFUL SCENERY OF A CHARMING AMERICAN COAST TOWN — 
ITS DELIGHTFUL LAND AND WATER VIEWS-NOTEWORTHY CHURCHES 
— HOMES AND POINTS OF GENERAL INTEREST— PORTRAITS OF MEN 
PROMINENT IN THE PROFESSIONAL, SEAFARING, COMMERCIAL, AND 
ARTISTIC LIFE OF MYSTIC. 

of ( )lcl Ocean's breezes, saline and in- 
vigorating I Favored with such a 
combination of charming characterist- 
ics is Mystic, Connecticut, once aptly 
termed by an enthusiastic writer, "The 
Gem of New England." It attracts, l>y 
reason of its incomparable scenery, 
many artists of note. Mr. Charles II. 
Davis, a i-esident of the village, is a 
painter of widespread fame. 

East of the village is a commanding 
eminence from which may be had a 
view that in comprehensiveness and 
beauty is almost bewildering. In Ihe 
dim distance far to the southward is 
Montauk Point, in the middle distance 
is Fisher's Island, and near the river's 
union with the sea are Mystic and 
^lason's islands, all surrounded by 
dancing waves that glint and shimmer 
in the sunlight. To the westward — 
molten silver between emerald banks 
— flows the jNIystic River. Below is 
the village, peaceful, yet unidle, its 
cozy homes discernible between vistas 
of green foliage. To the northward 
are the winding rivei', valleys and 




CAPTAIN JOSEPH W. HOLMES. 

Many are the Beautifil Coast 
Towns of New England ; many the 
enchanting inland rural villages: less 
numerous are those possessing the two- 
fold charm of water view and verdant, 
wooded hill and dale. The country 
by the sea; the sea reaching to the 
country! How fine to experience at 
once the delights of green meadows, 
rugged hillsides, dark, deep-recessed 
forest, and the exhilaration and coolness 



173 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



forest, orchards ami farm lands, and 
picturesque houses. The spires of (Jld 
Mystic can be seen, and at the valley's 
head, ten miles distant, may lie dis- 
cerned the outlines of Lantern Mill. 

As a field for the exercise of photo- 
graphic study. Mystic and its immediate 
vicinity are remarkably prolific, and 
rife with subjects that delight the 
artistic e3'e. 
And in Mr. 
George E. 
Tinglej', a 
resident of 
the town, it 
possesses a 
photographist 
of rare talent 
and discrim- 
ination, who. 
Avitli his cam- 
era, secures 
w o n d e r f u 1 
scenic effects. 
Mr. Tingley 
was born in 
Mystic Sep- 
tember 1 7 th, 
1864. For 
nearly twenty 
years he has 
given his at- 
tention to the 
study of pho- 
tography in 
its diverse 
forms, look- 
ing always to 
tiie possibili- 
ties of super- 
lative artistic 
a 1 1 a i n m e n t. 
Truly, one is ready to believe that the 
environment has made the man. Mr. 
Tingleys enthusiasm in his profession 
is unbounded. That his zeal and talent 
have borne abundant fruit is demon- 
strated by liis universal fame and 
recognition. His work is knuwn far 
and wide for beauty and uniqueness of 
subject, and his collection of landscape 
and outdoor scenes is a revelation in 




GEORGE E. TINGLEY, 

Photographist. 



photography. While he excels in por- 
traiture and character studies, his chief 
delight is to roam a-field with his 
camera, and reproduce the lovely views 
in which his locality abounds. A cita- 
tion of his work is really more within 
the province of a dissertation upon 
art than that of a mere untechnical 
description. However, in connection 

with the vil- 
lage of Mys- 
tic, his name 
and profes- 
sional attri- 
u t e s and 
repute con- 
stitute more 
than a simple 
matter of 
relevance. 
Within the 
past f o u r 
years Mr. 
Tingley has 

I "'en awarded 
light medals 

or the excel- 

c n c e and 

artistic merit 

II f his pic- 
tures, by the 
Phot ogra- 
phers' Asso- 
elation of 
America, the 
I'll o t ogra- 
phers' Asso- 
elation of 
New England 
and by the 
P hotogra- 
phers' Asso- 
ciation of Ohio. He has also frequently 
received honorable mention and va- 
rious diplomas. 

The history of M3-stic, like that of 
many similarly located villages, pos- 
sesses peculiar fascination. On the 
summit of the hill west of the river 
Captain John Mason, in June, 1637, 
with less than one hundred men under 
his comntand. waited a fierce and 



174 



Ipicturcsque 1Rcw Uondon* 



victorious battle against the Pequot 
Indians. Near the spot where the 
battle raged has been erected to Captain 
Mason a monument commemorating 
the sanguinary occurrence and his brav- 
er}-. The town's earliest inluibitants 
were men of pioneer spirit and 
determination. And into subsequent 
generations these qualities were in- 
fused. In 
the Revo- 
1 u t i on , 
Mj'stic's 
sons took 
active 
part. T o 
the War 
of 1S12, 
and to the 
Civil War 
also, went 
brave men 
from with- 
in its con- 
fines, and 
a good 
ac count 
they gave 
of them- 
selves. In 
August, 
18 14, 
when the 
British 
fleet made 
an attack 
upon 
Stoning- 
ton, vol- 
vm te ers 
from Mys- 
tic aided 
in the 
town's defence. Mystic is in New 
London county, on the Mystic River, 
nearly equally distant from New York 
and Boston. It is east by northeast in 
its direction from New London, with 
wliieh it has direct communication by 
l)oth trains and steamers. The village 
is within easy accessibility from New 
York, Boston, Providence, New Haven, 
and intermediate stations. Its river. 




DR. CHARLES VOORHEES BUTTLER 



from the Sound, is an admirable water 
highway, navigable in all seasons of the 
year, and by means of whicli products 
possible of coastwise shipment can 
be inexpensively transported to its 
wharves. 

Of shipbuilding. Mystic has had her 
share — the industry is now extant — 
and from her shores many a gallant 

vessel has 

l)een wed- 
ded to the 
sea, to ac- 
quit her- 
self ad- 
mirably in 
the com- 
merce of 
the world. 
Of her in- 
t r e p i d 
sailor-men 
t li e vil- 
lage has 
reason to 
be proud. 
In ven- 
turesome 
voyages 
and suc- 
cessful, in 
1 oyalty, 
honor, 
and i n - 
(1 u s t r y , 
they liave 
ever been 
amongthe 
foremost. 
Mystic 
sends to 
the marts 
of trade 

many products of her own. With- 
in her boundaries are located 
velvet and woolen mills, a spool 
factory, a brancli manufactory of a 
prominent printing press company, 
and machine shops and gasoline 
engine works. It also has a num- 
ber of builders of first-class steam 
launches and small craft, and a 
ship-yard where larger vessels are 



175 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



It has, besides, a printing 
weekly newspaper. Its 
four thousand. 



constructed. 
office and a 
population is about 
five hundred. The 
town is busy as well 
as beautiful. From 
its precincts men 
have gone forth to 
battle with the world, 
and have inscribed 
their names high 
upon the monument 
to human endeavor, 
and Mystic and the 
world are better for 
their lives. 

Mystic is tlie home 
of a goodly number 
of retired sea cap- 
tains, hale and hearty, 
who could, were they 
so disposed, tell many 
a stirring tale of ad- 
ventures experienced 
by those who go down 
to the sea in ships. 

About as thrilling 
and perilous occur- 
rences as any outside of yellow-covered 
literature have fallen to the lot of 
Albert Crary Burrows, during his long 
maritime career. The 
Captain was connect- 
ed with the Mallory 
Line of Steamships 
for over twenty 
years, and it was 
while in command of 
one of the steamers 
of this company, 
("The Rio Grande") 
that, when at sea, 
ninety miles from the 
Delaware Break- 
water, fire was dis- 
covered in her hold. 
There was but one 
avenue of safety. 
Coolly, and with a 
remarkable display of 
judgment the intrepid 
izcd and seized tlie 




EBEN P. COUCH, 
Postmaster at Mystic. 




CAPTAIN ALBERT CRARY 
BURROWS. 

•'nerve" and In recognitiim 

captain real- owners of the 

opportunity. Williams with 



Overhauling an Italian barque, he 
transferred to her his passengers — 
ninetv-seven in numlier — and runninsf 
liis flaming ship upon 
the shoals, sank iier 
to the decks, com- 
pletely extinguishing 
the fire. With the aid 
of his dauntless crew 
he pumped the vessel 
out, Hoated her, and 
within fifty-one hours 
from the disco veiy of 
the flames, had again 
overtaken the Italian 
and re-transferred his 
passengers. Captain 
Burrows was born in 
Colchester, Connecti- 
cut, June 7th, 1837, 
son of Brutus and 
Julia West Burrows. 
He went to sea when 
Ijut fourteen years of 
age, and has made 
more than one hun- 
dred trips across the 
Atlantic, and sailed 
on many a whaling expedition. 

To Mystic belongs the honor of hav- 
ing produced the ship that made the 
shortest voyage be- 
tween New York and 
San Francisco ever 
credited to a sailing 
vessel. This was ac- 
complished by the 
late Captain John E. 
Williams in 1860. 
The ship in which he 
achieved the feat was 
tlie "Andrew Jack- 
son,'" l)uilt in Mystic 
in 1853-54. The rec- 
iird time was eighty- 
nine days and four 
hours, exceeding the 
closest previous 
record by nine hours, 
f the achievement the 
lip presented Captain 



an elegant chronometer 



no 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



watch. C!aptaiii Williams was promi- 
nent in Masonic circles, a fine type of 
the intelligent, trustworthy sea-captain, 
and his death was a loss to Mystic. 

Captain Joseph Warren Holmes, 
another of Mystic's retired sailing mas- 
ters, was born in Mystic April 7th, 
1824. His parents were Jeremiah and 
Ann Bordell Denison Holmes, both of 
Mjstic. Jeremiah Holmes was one of 
the soldiers who repelled the British 
fleet in its attack upon Stonington in 
1814. Previous to this time he had foi 
tliree years been impressed into service 
in the British Navy, where he had 
acquired much skill in gun practice, 
which, as lie was in eonnnand of the 
battery at Stonington, he turned to 
good account against the invading 
ships. Captain J. W. Holmes became 
commander of a vessel when but 
twenty-one years of age. He has 
made during his seafaring career, 
eighty-three voyages around Cape 
Horn, and fourteen around the Cape 
of Good Hope. For a period covering 
fourteen years of his life he has at 
various times commanded prosperously 
conducted whaling voyages. 

Mystic is an ideal residential town ; 
peaceful, balmy of air, and healthful. 





RESIDENCE OF DR. JOHN K. BUCKLYN, 
East Main Street. Mystic. 

The residence and olilices of Dr. Jolni 
Knight Bucklyn, Jr., one of its ablest 



CAPTAIN JOHN E. WILLIAMS. 

physicians, are located on East Main 
Street, M3'stic, and are connected by 
telephone. Dr. Bucklyn is a graduate 
of the New York Medical College, 
class of 1887, and of the Mystic Valley 

English and Classical 

Institute, J. K. Buck- 
lyn, L. L. D., Princi- 
pal. He has a huge 
practice in Mystic, 
Stonington, Old 
Mystic, Noank, Po- 
quonnock, and New 
London. H e i s a 
member of the ( >dd 
Fellows, and Medical 
Examiner for the Pru- 
dential Life Insurance 
Company, of Newark, 
New Jersey, and for 
the Knights of Pyth- 
ias. His office hours 
are from 2 to 3, and 
7 to 8 P. M. Dr. 
Bucklyn was born in Mystic July 31st, 
18(io, son of Professor John K. Bucklyn 



177 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon^ 




EAST VIEW HOUSE, MYSTIC. CONNECTICUT— RESIDENCE OF ELI GLEDHILL. 

and Mary M. Young Buckhn. On professional men are exceptionally 

June 25th, 1891, he was united in al)le and conscientious. The medical 

marriage to Mary Emma Hall, of profession is represented by several 

Mystic. physicians of experience and skill, 

The village is admirably governed jirominent among whom are Dr. J. K. 

and maintained. Its business and Buckhn, Jr., and Dr. Charles Voor- 




THE MYSTIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY— MANUFACTURERS OF WOOLENS. 

178 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




RESIDENCE OF CHRISTOPHER MORGAN -CORNER OF BROADWAY AND EAST 

MAIN STREET, MYSTIC. 



hees Buttler. Daring the Spanish- 
American War, Dr. Buttler was Acting 
Assistant Surgeon in the United States 
Army, serving in typhoid fever hos- 
pitals at Camp Alg£r, Jacksonville, 
Florida, and Savannah, Georgia. Dr. 



Buttler has studied under Dr. Storer, 
the eminent gynecologist, of New 
York, and has been Visiting Physician 
at the William W. Backus Hospital, 
of Norwich, Connecticut. 

Enchanting, with the magic of the 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. H. E. G. STILLMAN— GREENMANVILLE AVENUE, MYSTIC. 



179 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




" RIVER VIEW," OLD MYSTIC— RESIDENCE OF CHARLES Q. ELDREDGE, 
At the Head of the Beautiful Mystic River. 

country and of the ocean ; peaceful, ciatively enjoyed her dainty, yet 

with the .peace of a well conducted, withal inspiring charms, Mj'stic is the 

law-abiding village ; dear to the hearts ideal home, and the ideal recreation 

of all her children, and enshrined in place of the sojourner and seeker after 

the memories of those who have appre- the beautiful in nature. 




ONE OF THE FEME RESIDENCES OF MYSTIC— PEARL STREET. 

180 




ISl 




ST. PATRICKS ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH-MYSTIC. 

Church Street. 

Rev. P. P. Shahan. Rector. 



METHODIST CHURCH- MYSTIC 

Corner Willow and Church Streets. 

Rev. John McVey. Pastor. 



ST. MARKS EPISCOPAL CHURCH-MYSTIC. 
Pearl Street. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH— MYSTIC. 

High and Library Streets. 
Rev. Byron U. Hatfield. Pastor. 



MYSTIC CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

East Main Street and Broadway. 

Rev. Clair F. Luther. Pastor 



182 




MYSTIC AND NOANK LIBRARY— LIBRARY STREET, MYSTIC. 

The Mystic and Noank Library Building was Erected in 1892. Tiie Library was Incorporated in 1893. The Con- 
struction of the Mystic and Noanli Library was Made Possible Through the Generosity of the Late Captain Elihu Spicer, 
Who Provided a Fund for that Purpose. Captain Spicer was Born in Noank. and Spent a Considerable Portion of 
his Life in Mystic. He Died in Brooklyn. N. Y., February 15th, 1893. The Library Building is Beautiful in Construc- 
tion and Design, and is Located in the Midst of Spacious and Charming Grounds. 




MYSTIC'S PRINCIPAL BUSINESS STREET— MAIN STREET, LOOKING WEST. 

183 



picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 



The Drives ix and Ahoit Mvs- 
Trc are lieautiful. Skirting the shores, 
through green tieUls, and by wooded 
or rocky slopes, wind the roads, af- 
fording land and water views of sur- 
prising beauty. To Stonington, Wes- 
terly, Wateli Hill, Norwich, New 
London, and to Lantern Hill and the 
Old Road Church, are drives fraught 
with loveliness and historic interest. 
Around the river, from ^Mystic to Old 
Mystic on the north, and through Pequot 
Avenue to the John Mason Monument 
are also drives of variet}^ and charm. 



about Mj^stic, and with its various 
points of interest and beauty. His 
stables are well appointed in every 
detail, and no item essential to the 
safety, convenience, or pleasure of his 
patrons is permitted by him to remain 
overlooked. Telephone calls during 
either the day or night are responded 
to promptly, and receive ready and 
courteous attention. Carriages from 
his stable meet all trains at the ^lys- 
tic depot. Mr. Brown was born in 
^lystic thirty-eight years ago. His 
parents were Roswell and Catherine 




THE BANK SQUARE LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLES - 
JAMES E. F. BROWN, PROPRIETOR. 



For the enjoyment of the pleasures 
offered by these delightful highways, 
the village affords amjile facilities. 
Its public stables are of the usual 
high order maintained at warm 
weather resorts frequented by visitors 
of wealth and refinement. Note- 
worthy among the liveries of Mystic 
are the Bank Square Stables on Water 
Street, of which Mr. James E. F. 
Brown is the proprietor. Mr. Brown 
has many comfortable and stylish 
turnouts. His horses are all well 
groomed animals of fine fettle and re- 
liable disposition. When desired, lie 
furnislies efficient drivers, who are 
thoroughly conversant with the roads 



W. Chesebrough Brown, of well known 
North Stonington and Groton families 
respectively. His wife, who was 
formerly Marj- S. Logee, daughter of 
James Logee, of Danielson, Connecti- 
cut, is of estimal)le Connecticut line- 
age. Roswell Brown, hi.s father, in 
earlier days operated a stage route be- 
tween Mystic and Stonington, con- 
necting at the latter place with the 
New York boats. The livery busi- 
ne.s.s — until the demise of the elder 
Mr. Brown, about six years ago — 
was conducted b}^ the father and 
son. Since then Mr. J. E. F. Brown 
has Ijeen the proprietor of the estab- 
lishment. 



Ipjcturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




THE MYSTIC RIVER NATIONAL BANK — MYSTIC. 

The Mystic River Banl< was Organized and Commenced Business in November. 1851. Ciiarles Mallory was its First 
President, and George W. Noyes its Earliest Casliier, In 1860 Nattian G. Fish was Elected President. In 1864 it was 
Changed From a State Bank to a National Banking Association. The Present Officers of the Bank are F. IVI. IVIanning. 
President: and Henry B. Noyes, Cashier. Since its Inception the Bank Has Had Four Presidents. 

Ox FavKi: Avknte, Mystic, aiv the 
granite, marble, and moniiinent works 
of John Trevena, who manufactures 
and deals in every variety of this 



cliaraeter of product. Mr. Trevena 
gives particular attention to designing, 
and makes a specialty of lettering and 
cleaning monuments in cemeteries. 




SHOE AND FURNISHING STORE OF J. W. PHILLIPS -MAIN STREET, MYSTIC. 

The Stock of Fine Shoes and Men's Furnishings at J. W. Phillips' Store is Complete in Every Detail. 

It is the Principal Shoe House in Mystic. 



(U) 



185 




MYSTIC MONUMENTAL WORKS, RIVER AVENUE — JOHN TREVENA, PROP'R. 



One of the 
Largest silk spool 
manufacturing 
plants in this coun- 
tiy is that of the 
Allen Spool and 
Printing Company, 
manufacturers and 
printers of spool and 
braid rolls, Mystic, 
Connecticut. It is 
the only concern of 
like character fully 
equipped with auto- 
matic spool-making 
machinery, which is 
manufactured from 
the company's own 
patents. The com- 
pany was established 
in 1878. 




H. N. WHEELER'S DRUG STORE, 
MAIN STREET, MYSTIC. 



Di;. A. R. Park, 
located over the 
Mj-stic Pharmacy, 
Main Street is an 
expert specialist in 
hernia cases. His 
trusses are of his 
o w n manufacture. 
His extensive study 
of hernia, and his 
wide experience 
enable him to so 
use the plastic con- 
forming ([ualities of 
his scientifically 
constructed trusses, 
that tliey perma- 
nently reduce the 
hernia, and it event- 
u a 1 1 y becomes 
cured. 




PRINTING OFnCE OF C. I. BARSTOW — BUCKLEY BLOCK, MYSTIC. 







MELLSTONE GRANITE QUARRIES -MILLSTONE, CONNECTICUT. 

A View of the Yard. Showing Where the Best New England Granite is Produced and 
Manufactured for Monumental and Building Work. 

Chapter X\P1I, 



ENVIRONS OF NEW LONDON. 

WATERFORD, SOUTH — JORDAN VILLAGE — OSWEGATCHIE — MILLSTONE — 
PLEASURE BEACH — EAST LYME AND NIANTIC — CRESCENT BEACH — 
SOUTH LYME — BLACKHALL LYME- SAYBROOK JUNCTION — THE CON- 
NECTICUT VALLEY TO MIDDLETOWN AND HARTFORD. 



On the South New London is 
closelj' allied, in business and social 
interests, by the passenger service of 
the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad principally, with a num- 
ber of towns and villages of importance. 

A part of the Town of Waterford 
lies next the City of New London. 
Jordan, the central village of this town, 
is reached by team. It is an interesting 
hamlet, with pleasant homes, its church 
and schoolhouse, and a picturesque old 
mill, almost rivalling in antiipiity the 
Old Mill at New London. 

In the same way, by team, Oswe- 
gatchie, a popular summer colony with 
a good hotel, is also reached. The 
settlement is on the borders of the 
Niantic River, and affords fine water 
views, charming drives, and excellent 
opportunities for boating and out-door 
games. 

Waterford proper, and Millstone, 
the first stations on the Shore Line 



Division of the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroad, furnish conven- 
ient access to the famous quarries of 
this section : the Booth Brothers and 
Hurricane Isle Quarry, near the Great 
Neck Highway, and the Gardiner 
Quarry, at Millstone Point. Pleasure 
Beach, one of the favorite outing-places 
of the town, is on Niantic Bay. It is 
the summer home of a number of fam- 
ilies, and has a comfortable hotel for 
the accommodation of other sojourners. 
Niantic is the next place of import- 
ance on this line. The facilities for 
boating, bathing, and fishing here are 
excellent. On the Niantic River, in 
the olden days, many a good vessel for 
the coast trade was built. (!)n the 
shores of the Bay many a feast of 
clams and fish was enjoyed by the 
inlander on liis annual shore trip. 
Niantic is now one of the most attrac- 
tive resting places in summer, and a 
bus}' fishing village in the season. The 



187 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



works of the Niantic Shoe Company 
are located here, furnishing employ- 



ment to a number of Niantic and 
Kast Lyme jieople in a new local in- 
dustry. Good hotel accommodations 
can be found near the station. 

Crescent Beach, tlie next station, is 
the briglit and livel}' home of a large 
nuud)er of cottagers, with three or 
four hotels of fair style and capacity. 
The bathing, boating, and fishing, the 
delightful sea air, and the water views, 
are the special 
points of attraction 
here. South Lyme 
and Blackhall are 
small places on the 
same road; Lyme, 
with its population 
of about seven hun- 
dred and fifty souls, 
coming next, before 
crossing the Con- 
necticut River and 
arriving at Saybrook 
Junction. This 
junction has a wide 

The Millstone Granite 
Quarries, located at Millstone, Con- 
necticut, were established prior to 183-t 
by Benajah Gardiner. Its present 
management, under the proprietorship 
of Henry Gardiner, dates its control 
from 18S8. The Gardiner Quarry is 
one of the busiest and most protluctive 
in the world, and annually turns out 
enormous quantities of gi-anite, which 
it sliips to nearly every portion of the 
civilized globe. Its product is used 
in all instances where the finest 
quality of material is exacted. The 
stone is a "true granite," and is free 
from foreign and deteriorative qualities. 

Many famous structures and memor- 
ials throughout the country have 
Millstone granite incorporated in their 
constructive elements. Among them 
are the following : The Custom House 
facade. New London; the City Hall, 
Norwich, Connecticut: the inscriptions 
on the Saratoga Monument, at Sara- 
toga, New Vork: the Mausoleum of 



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celebrity. Here is the best known 
portion of a little town of about sixteen 
hundred and fifty people. Its front is 
not ijarticularly fascinating, but back 
of it will be found a pleasant and 
interesting village. From this place 
Fenwick Point can l>e reached, by 
transfer. New Haven, New York, 
and the world beyond, can be gotten 
at by the main through line — the 
Shore Line Division. 

The Valle}'^ Branch of the main line 
introduces one to 
the pleasant towns 
and villages of the 
Connecticut ^'alley 
to Middlctown, a 
beautiful old cit}- — 
the seat of Wesleyan 
University,the home 
of the I. E. Palmer 
C o m p a n y , and a 
number of important 
manufacturing 
establishments — and 
to Hartford, the 
Capital of the State. 

George W. Childs, Philadelphia: and 
the monument to the memory of the 
late P. T. Barnum, in Riverside Park, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

The Millstone plant is modern in 
every particular, and operates the finest 
of up-to-date machinery and general 
appurtenances available. Its advan- 
tages of location add materially to its 
transportation conveniences, as it is 
situated on the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroad, and has a fine 
frontage on tlie ocean, which provides 
excellent dock facilities. 

The Well Kxowx Corporation 
OF Booth Bkotmeiis and Hurricane 
Isle Granite Company have been 
identified with the granite trade in all 
its phases for nearly thirty years. 
Wherever the stone interests are 
known, the prominence of this com- 
pany has been extended, for no other 
corporation has had more to do with 
National, State, and Municipal govern- 
ments. Examples of the corporation's 



OLD JORDAN MILL. 

ESTABLISHED 1712. 

Situated at the Head of Jordan Cove. Jordan i Waterford ) 

Connecticut. Wtiere the Celebrated Jordan Table 

Meal is Manufactured by C. H. Brooks. 



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189 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uonclon^ 



inclustrv, capacity and progressiveness 
are shown in the fine buildings which 
they have constructed in many cities 
all over the land, as well as the monu- 
mental work of the highest order of 
artistic skill, which adorns many of 
the cemeteries in the New England 
and .Middle Western States. Besides 
their Waterford (Quarry the companj- 
have large interests in the State of 
Maine, in the following localities: 
Hurricane Isle, Waldoboro. Jonesport, 
Long Cove, State Point, Pequoit, and 
Vinal Haven, where hundreds of men 
are employed, and stone of any dimen- 
sions can be quarried and handled, as 
the most improved machinery is in 
use, both in mining the stone and in 
its conversion to the finished product. 
From the quarries as enumerated, 
dressed stone for public buildings, 
vaults and tombs, is transported to all 
parts of the country-. 

The granite of this company stands 
for the highest order of cemetery work, 
it lieing especially adapted for sculp- 
tural designs, on account of its fine 
texture and the uniformity of its 
appearance. The elements which make 
up its physical composition are so well 
distributed that the rava<jes of the 



weather and atmosjiheric conditions 
have less effect upon it than on manj- 
other granites. The finest cemeteries 
of the Eastern and Middle States con- 
tain manj" memorials produced at this 
quarrj-, exhibiting the grandest concep- 
tion of art that genius has imparted to 
man. In Cedar Grove Cemetery, too, 
may be seen the products of this 
famous quarry. 

A Nuei.v-Letteked Moderx Sicx 
o-ives a business firm a certain amount 
of pi'estige. Mr. L. Stoddard, 50 State 
Street, over Barker & May, is an artist 
in sign writing whose specialty is the 
making of signs for advertising pur- 
poses. He also makes original designs 
for trade -marks, emblems, etc. He 
treats all subjects in an artistic manner, 
adapting them to the advertiser" use. 
In mural work of all kinds for house 
or church decoration he is a master. 

AxTHOXY & Tkaggis, wholesale and 
retail manufacturers of confectionery, 
at 186 State Street, established their 
business in 1889. Their goods are of 
superior quality, and always fresh. 
For the unsurpassed deliciousness of 
their ice cream and soda water, they 
possess a reputation all their own. 




..'^>»r~rr--.-"<**' -."^^-r ■". 



'.■•rr-'^X -^"^ ' ~ -, "^^-r. .^-^ -•'-^J'i^J^^ ^ =*^ _— ■-' - -^-. ■ 



:-■ :vj,^— AV.r,><v..-v.g 



THE AVERY MEMORIAL - AVERY MEMORIAL PARK, GROTON. 

The Avery Memorial Marks the Site ot the Old "Hive of the Aver>s," Built in 1656 b> Captain James Aver> and 
Occupied by Him and Seven Generations of His Descendants Until it Mas Burned, on the Night of July 20th. 1894. Avery 
Memorial Park is Two Miles From New London, on the Shore Line Railroad, and May Be Seen From the Passing Trains. 
The Secretary of the Avery Memorial Association is Miss Helen M. Avery, of Number 6. North Main Street. New London. 

190 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 



Captain Thomas A. Suott, a fa- 
mous diver, wrecker and contractor of 
New London, 
C on n eeticut, 
was born at 
Snow Hill, Wor- 
cester County, 
Maryland, Aug- 
ust lOth, 1830, 
the son of Wil- 
liam and Eliza- 
beth Scott. 

In 1873 he 
l)ecame a resi- 
dent of New 
London, under- 
taking at that 
time a govern- 
ment contract 
to build Race 
Rock Light- 
house, besides 
many other im- 
portant con- 
tracts in wharf 
and sea-wall 
construction, 
among which 
was Pier No. 1, 
North River, New York. He also en- 
joys the distinction of Iteing tlie first 
man to work on the Brooklyn Bridge, 
having made all the preliminary exam- 
inations of the river bottom, and 
superintended tlie work of laying the 
foundations of 
the spans. His 
wharf on Pe- 
(juot avenue ex- 
tends two hun- 
dred feet into 
the harbor and 
lias a frontage 
of two hundred 
and fifty feet. 
His extensive 
business re- 
quires four tugs, 
five ligliters, 
two floating 
piledrivers, a 
dredge with five scows, besides pumps, 
boilers and heavy gear of every kind. 




CAPTAIN THOMAS A. SCOTT. 



and a working force of nearly one hun- 
dred men. Thus his equipment is 
equal to any 
emergency. 
Captain Scott's 
presence of 
mind, added to 
his quickness of 
thought and 
prompt, decisive 
action, makes 
him admirably 
successful in his 
chosen line of 
work. In poli- 
tics the Captain 
is a Republican. 
He has served 
as Alderman one 
term. 

On Septem- 
ber 5, 18.55. he 
was married 
to Harriet 
Whitbeck, of 
Port Jefferson, 
L. I., a native 
of C a t s k i 1 1 , 
N. Y. 





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VIEW OF CAPTAIN SCOTT'S DOCK. 



Captain Scott has a beautiful 
residence at 88 Pequot avenue, 
surrounded by finely laid out and 
well kept lawns. It commands a 
fine view of the harbor and 
Fort Trumbull. He also owns 
White Rock 
Island, which 
is valuable 
for its large 
quantity of ex- 
c e 1 1 ent stone. 
Personally, 
Captain Scott 
is a man of 
large physique, 
weighing three 
h u n d r e d 
pounds. He is 
liekl in high re- 
gard, his portly 
frame being 
typical of the generous heart and soul 
witliin. 



191 



(picturesque 1Rew ILondon* 



The a 11 a - 
WANA Mills, 
I. E. Palmee, 
Proprietor. — 
In 1864, on the 
bank of the 
Arawana stream 
at ]\Iiddletown, 
Conn., there was 
a modest manu- 
facturing phmt 
for the manufac- 
ture of combs, 
which building 
is well illus- 
trated at the 







upper left hand of 
the accompanying factory sketch. It 
was at that time purchased l^y I. E. 
Palmer and fitted up for the manufac- 
ture of picture cord and allied articles. 




UTOPIA. 

During the successful progress of years 
this modest plant has grown to com- 
parative proportions as further illus- 
trated in the sketch, and at present 
embodies a series of buildings contain- 
ing all told about one hundred and 
forty thousand square feet of floor 
space, with all the latest factory con- 
struction requirements, including 
steam heat, automatic sprinklers, elec- 
tric lights, etc. vSteam and water 
power is in use, having a capacity of 
about seven hundred horse power, and 
water power about seventy-five horse 
power. There are over three hundred 
machines all told (comprising over 
fifty different varieties), required for 
the various lines of manufacture. The 
nature of the business enlarged rapidly 
from one line of cotton industry to 
another until at present it includes 
the latest improved machinery for spin- 
ning cotton yarns, for warps and fillings 
and in plies, machinery for weaving. 



dyeing and finishing crinoline dress 
linings, mosquito nettings, window 
screen cloth, horse netting, minnow 
netting, and many varieties of cotton 
tissues : also machinery for completel}- 
manufacturing hammocks from the 
raw cotton to the finished product, 
hammock supports and many hammock 
accessories, mosquito cauojiies and 
accessories ; also extensive wood-work- 
ing and iron working departments. It 
is doubtful whether many other man- 
ufacturing enterprises can exhibit as 
greatly a diversified line of products 




ARAWANA. 

as are included in the present plant, 
employing on an average from two 
hundred and seventy-five to three hun- 
dred liands. 

Over one hundred and fifty designs 
and mechanical patents furnish protec- 
tion to the line of manufactures and 
make possible the leading position which 
they hold. The plant possesses facili- 
ties for the comjilete finisliing of ham- 
mocks not possessed by any other similar 
factory in existence. This remarkable 
growth is entirely the result of the con- 
tinuous labors of the present and sole 
proprietor, covering a period of forty- 
two years. 



University of California 

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305 De Neve Drive - Parking Lot 17 • Box 951388 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90095-1388 



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