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Full text of "Picturesque New London and its environs, Groton, Mystic, Montville, Waterford, at the commencement of the twentieth century; notable features of interest .."






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^ICTURESOUE 

NEW LONDON 

AND ITS ENVIRONS 

— (Broton == miystic == imontvUle == llUatcrford — 

At the Commencement of the Twentieth Century 





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•(Rotable ^features of IFntcrest 

OLD LANDMARKS AND FAMOUS PLACES — THE WHALING INDUSTRY — EARLY 
COMMERCE— A FINE MILITARY AND NAVAL RECORD — HOMES — BEAUTIFUL 
SCENERY — PARKS AND OUTING SPOTS — CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS — HOTELS — 
TRANSIT SYSTEMS — MANUFACTORIES AND BUSINESS HOUSES — ADVANTAGES 
AS A COMMERCIAL, MANUFACTURIN'G AND RESIDENTIAL CENTER 

ILLUSTRATED 

With Views of the Citv and Its Environs and Portraits of Some of 
the Representative Men of the Past and Present 

NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT 
PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN BOOK EXCHANGE 

1901 

Printed hy The Joi'Rnai. or Commerce Company, Providence, R. I. 
Copyrighted, 1901, by The American Book Exchange, Hartford, Connecticut. 




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THE GREAT RAILROAD DRAWBRIDGE SPANNING THE RIVER THAMES. 

The Drawbridge Across the River Thames. Between Groton and New London, is Just North of the City. 

and is One of the Largest Bridges of Uke Character in the World. 



Untroduction^ 




New Lon- 
don is one of 
the most ro- 
mantic and 
p leasing 
cities on the 
New E ng- 
land coast. 
Its location is 
fine, and its 
harbor mag- 
nificent. Its 
history is a 
fascinating 
storj% and it 
is one of the most delightful of sum- 
mer resorts. 

The manufacturing establishments 
in the city are doing a large and profit- 
al)le Ijusiness, imparting vitality and 
strength to the community, adding to 
its wealth and fame. With the impetus 
given to all l)usiness, and to local and 
foreign commerce especially, l)y the 
present policy of tlie government at 
Washington, the increase in population 
during the last ten years has been 
about four thousand — in the next de- 



JOHN WINTHROP, 

Founder and Governor. 



cade it will probably be from eight to ten. 

"Picturesque New London and its 
Environs"' presents in acceptable style 
the claims of the city and its neighbors 
to the favorable consideration of home 
seekers and progressive business enter- 
prises. No point of interest has Ijeen 
negrlected in either text or illustration 
that will help to give a correct im- 
pression of life hereabout. 

The thanks of the public and of the 
publishers are due to Messrs. Eugene 
L. Bailey, Charles E. Pratt, F. C. 
Washburn and F. L. Kenyon, of New 
London, and to George E. Tingley, of 
]\Iystic, Connecticut, photographers, 
and to John McGinley, President of 
the New London Board of Trade, for 
courteous and able assistance in pub- 
lishing the work. 

Without the aid of the business 
men and the liberal subscriptions re- 
ceived for books and illustrations, so 
large and creditalile a publication 
could not have been made. We thank 
the pulilic-spirited citizens sincerely 
for their faith and support. 

The PlBLISHEKS. 



ERKAT.t : Paj;e 10, Old Natlian Hale School liuilding has been removed to Ye Anticntest Buriall Oround, 
and restored to its original stvle of arohiti-cture. Page 43. first date in title should read 1773: not 1873. On 
page 46. the name Kev. Edward Brown, should read Kev. Edward W. Bacon. Page .58, Cliarles F. Edney, 
formerly mana'^er for F A. Rogers & Co., is now wroprietor of the brokerage business in the offices previ- 
ously occupied by the Rogers Co. Pages 89 ami 'J7. the name James H. Newcomb, should read James 
Newx'omb. 

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M. WILSON DART, 

Present Ma^or of New London. 




AUGUSTUS BRANDECiEE. ROBERT COIT. 

CYRUS G. BECKWTTH. 
RALPH WHEELER. GEORGE F. TINKER. 



EX-MAYORS OF NEW LONDON. 
5 




GEORGE E. STARR. JAMES L. JOHNSTON. 

THOMAS M. WALLER. 
HIRAM WIl.I.VS. I!. S. WILLIANLS. 



EX-MAYORS OF NEW LONDON. 
G 




VIEW AT BROAD AND HUNTINGTON STREETS. 

At the Left of the Engraving is the Residence of Walter Learned. Broad Street, and at the Right, at the Junction of 
Broad and Huntington Streets. " Mount Vernon." Residence of Ellsha S. Palmer. 



Contents* 



CHAPTER I— The Old Nkw London — .Sketch of New London From the Early Days to the 
Present — Story of a Famous Shipping Port of the Oltlen Times — (ioUlen Epoi.-h of the 
Whaling Days— How the old Town Displayed Her Patriotism in the War for Independence 

— The Bright Record of Her .Sons in All the Nation's Wars 9-26 

CHAPTER II — New Londox of To-Dav — Advantages of Location as a Port ami Railroad Center 

— New London Harbor — General and Local Transportation Lines — Revival of Shipbuilding 
Interests 27-32 

CHAPTER III — New London of To-Day -New London's First Educational Bequest — More 
Recent Endowments- Brief Sketch of the Public School System of To-Day — Its EfHoacy 
and Evolutioa— Introduction of New and Beneficial Features — Modern School Buildings- 
Special Incentives to Pupils — The Churches of a Community Indicative of Its Moral Tone 
-Outline of the History of the Oldest Religious Society in the City — Reference to Other 
Churches and Sacred Organizations — Some Eminent Divines Who Have Been Identified With 
New London — Portraits of the Present Pastors — The City's Fine Church Edifices o-M'> 

CHAPTER IV — New London of To-Dav — Financial Institutions — Savings and National Banks 

— Bankers and Brokers- Postal, Telegraph, and Telephone Facilities 51-58 

CHAPTER V — New London of To-Day — The Manufactories of New London — Manufacturers 
Whose Ability, Courage, and Industrv Have Aided in Building Up and Maintaining the City 
of To-Day * "... 59-72 

CHAPTER VI — New Loni>on op To-Day — City Government- The New London Board of Trade 

— Distinguished Men of the Past and Present — The New London Press 73-82 

CHAPTER VII — New London ofTo-Dav- Some Elegant and Substantial Residences of the 

City and its Suburbs — Public Parks and Outing Spots — Places of Amusement 83-95 

CHAPTER Vlll— New London of To-Day — Some Fine Residences on Main, Huntington, Jay, 
Franklin and Blai-khall Streets, Ocean, and Other Avenues — The Pequot Colony — Recrea- 
tions and Amusements 97-107 

CHAPTER IX — Ne\v London of To-Day — Commercial Interests — New London as a Trade 
Center — Building Activity — Mercantile Enterprise — Principal Bu.siness Men and Promi- 
nent Concerns lOH-122 

CHAPTER X — Principal Business Streets of New Lontlon- The Citj-'s Bright Commercial Outlook 

— Commercial and Mercantile Progress — Enterprising Concerns 123*132 

CHAPTER XI — Favorable Trade Influences— A Popular Summer Resort and Successful Com- 
mercial Center— Principal Hotels —Some Progressive Business Enterprises 13.'{-144 

CHAPTER XII— Historic Groton — Revolutionary Interest— Ruins of Fort Griswold and the 
Spot Where Ledyard Fell -The (iroton Monument and Monument House — Noted Men of 
Groton's Past — Brief Sketch of C(d<uiel Ledyard, and of Anna Warner Bailey— Modern * 

Groton — Villages Within the Townsliip — Churches and Schools ' 145-15(> 

( HAPTKR XIIl — (tRoion of To-Dav — c<uitcmplateil Improvements — Noteworthy Residences 

— Mercantile Enterprises an<l Mercantile and I'nifessional Men * 157-1G2 

CHAPTER XIV — Enviuoxs of Nkw London— Waterford — Montville— Norwich — Allyn's Point 

— Gale's Ferry — Navy Yard— (iroton Station — Noank It*>3-I71 

CHAPTER XV — Environs of New Lond<»n — Mystic — The Beautiful Scenerv of a Charming 
American Coast Town— The Delightful Land and Water Views — Noteworthy Churches — 
Homes an<l Points nf General Interest - Portraits of Men Prominent in the Seafaring and 
Commercial Life of .Mystic 173-lSG 

CHAPTER XVI— Waterford, South —Jordan Village — Oswegatchie — Millstone— Pleasure Beach 

— East Lyme and Niantic — ( rescent Beach — lUackhaU — Lyme— Saybrook Junction— The 
Connecticut Valley to Middletown anrl Hartford ' 187-l;>2. 




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THE SHAW-PERKINS MANSION— BANK STREET. 

BUILT IN 1755. BY THE ARCADIANS. OR HUGUENOTS. FOR CAPTAIN NATHANIEL SHAW. 

Washington. After the Siege of Boston, by Appointment, and on Invitation from Nathaniel Shaw. Jr.. an Officer of the United 

Colonies. Holding Commission Under the Certificate of iohn Hancocit. Met Here Commodore Esel< Hopkins, 

First Commander of the American Navy, to Consider Naval Interests. John Paul Jones and 

Nathan Hale Have Been Guests Within Its Hospitable Walls. In 1824 LaFayette. 

on His Return Visit to America. Was Entertained in the Mansion. 

Ipicturesque 1Rew 5London. 

Chapter 1I* 

THE OLD NEW LONDON. 

SKETCH OF NEW LONDON FROM THE EARLY DAYS TO THE PRESENT- 
STORY OF A FAMOUS SHIPPING PORT OF THE OLDEN TIMES- 
GOLDEN EPOCH OF THE WHALING DAYS— HOW THE OLD TOWN DIS- 
PLAYED HER PATRIOTISM IN THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE— THE 
BRIGHT RECORD OF HER SONS IN ALL THE NATION'S WARS. 



New LoNnf)N, founded by John 
Winthrop in 1G46, is an old town, 
old even for New England, and com- 
pared witi) tlie towns and cities of the 
newer civilization of the Western 
Hemisphere, moss-grown in antiquity. 
In the early days of the colonies the 
site of tlie city attracted tlie Pilgrims 
Ijy its rugged heauty, olivious advan- 
tages, and promise of future growth 
and greatness in commerce. At everj' 
stage of its development- the city has 
fulfilled the promise of tliose early 
days, thougli growth has been slow in 
outward and visible signs of prosperity. 



Great wealth, however, has been 
brought into the town by the adven- 
turous sailors who carried the flag of 
their country to the farthest ends of 
the earth and made the names and 
private signals of vessels, owners, and 
agents known on the coasts of all 
countries. The manifest destiny of 
New London has been towards com- 
merce and the various industries con- 
nected with its pursuit, and the peo- 
ple of New London have looked for 
many yeai-s with steadfast hope and 
belief that the day would come when 
the city should take the place which 



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(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Natuiu eviik'iitly ilestiiu'd it to occupy 
iiinoiig the ports of the countr}-. In 
our (lay it is ilillicuit to reaiizc tlie 
olistacles that coiifroutfil tht' early 
si'ttlers, the haidy haiul that canu- to 
the shores of the Tliaines to huilcl a 
city, estiihlisii homes, and found a 
government in keeping with the tradi- 
tions and customs of the I-".nglish home 
they had so lately left in order to 
enjoy the 
hlessings 
of lilierty 
w ii i c li 
have ever 
l>een pur- 
chasahle 
only hy 
great sac- 
rifice. 

.1 () TI N 

W I N r 1 1 - 
uiH", the 
founder, 
was the 
son of 
JohnWin- 
throp wild 
1 e d from 
England 
the sec- 
ond Puri- 
tan emi- 
g ra t i on 
and after- 
wards he- 
came governor of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony. His paternal grandfather was 
Adam Winthrop, of Suffolk. England. 
To the younger Winthrop undisput- 
ahly helongs the title of founder of 
New London, for he determined the 
location of the town and promoted its 
inception with fervor and confidence, 
even to the extent of investing his 
entire fortune in tlic enterprise. He 
was horn in England, February- 12th, 
1605. When only 16 years of age 
he entered the Cniversity of Dublin, 
where he remained for three years. 
Two years later he eidisted under the 
banner of the Duke of Buckingham 




OLD SCHOOL BUILDING— UNION STREET. 

AS IT APPEARS TODAY. 

The Old Union School, in Which Nathan Hale Once Taught, is One ot the City's 

Interesting Objects. It Still Remains, a Reminder of New London's 

Heroic Part in the Stirring Times When All Other Interests 

Were Sacrificed to the "Spirit of '76. " 



in the useless attciniit to succor the 
Protestants of Hoehelle, France. He 
tirst arrived in America, NovemlKT 
•2nd. lt'):50, later returning to England, 
where he remained for about one 
year. In October, l(i85, he again came 
to America and at once interested 
himself in the affaii's of the colonists. 
The name first given to New Eou- 
(ton--its Indian name — was Nameaug. 

I n d i a n 

II a m e s 
were de- 
scriptive, 
and Nam- 
eaug was 
supposed 
to refer to 
fish, im- 
p 1 y i n g 
that the 
w a t e r s 
aliout the 
I o w n a f- 
forded 
L.;()od fish- 
i 1 1 g . It 
w a s also 
known as 
Pequot, 
after the 
tribe of 
I n d i a n s 
of that 
name,who 
under the 

Sachem Sassacus. or Tatobam, as 
he was often called, iniiabited the 
region which lay to the southeast 
of the Connecticut River settlements. 
By these names the ]ilantation was 
known until March 24th, ltj.")8, when 
legislative permission was granted the 
inhabitants to call the town New Lon- 
don. For ten years j)revious to that 
time they had wished to show their 
affection for the land of their birth by 
naming their new place of abode 
London, in honor of England's prin- 
cipal city: aiul no doubt they were 
highly gratified by this concession of 
tiie Legislature. It was then in order 



10 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



to name " the fair river of the Mohe- 
gans " the Thames, but at just wliat 
date it derived the name, bestowed in 
honor of its famous prototype in Eng- 
h\nd, is not certain. 

The earliest inhabitants of New 
London came from Cape Ann, Massa- 
chusetts — Gloucester people to whom 
the sea furnished a living, and to 
whom New London seemed homelike 
in that respect at least. Parson Rich- 
ard Blinman, who, previous to liis im- 



tliis time something about the Indians 
whom they were to dispossess, but 
with whom they had little trouble, for 
the natives were in the main well dis- 
posed toward the palefaces when 
treated with any degree of fairness. 
Breaking ground for dwellings and 
for agricultural purposes was a heart- 
breaking task, as one may readily un- 
derstand who is at all fanuliar with 
the rocky country whicli stretches 
back from the waterside to the bor- 




THE HEMPSTEAD HOUSE -OLDEST BUILDING IN NEW LONDON. 

HEMPSTEAD STREET. NEAR JAY. 

Built in 1678. by Sir Robert Hempstead. Wtio Came from England, and Was One of the Founders of Hempstead, 

Long Island. He Came to New London About 1643. The House Has Been in Possession of the 

Family and Descendants for Two Generations. It is Still Owned b> One of the Family. 



migration to this country, occupied 
the pastorate in Chepstow, Monmouth- 
shire, England, was the spiritual and 
temporal head of the pioneers. The 
rule in early colonial days was obedi- 
ence to ecclesiastical authority, and it 
was cheerfully rendered as a matter of 
right in all things. 

The settlers came prepared for 
liardships and privations. They were 
.iccustomed to the rigors of the New 
England cliuuite. and thev knew bv 



ders of the State of Connecticut. The 
early settler, however, was not a man 
to be dismayed by olistacles. The 
pioneers of that day were made of 
sterner stuff than that which gives in 
easily, and with a fixed jiurpose and 
an unalterable determination, they set 
about their work, aud in compara- 
tively few years great headway had 
been made. In li5(3.5, within the first 
(juarter of a century of the life of the 
settlement, the home iroverninent was 



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(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




VIEW OF " THE TOWNE'S ANTIENTEST BURIALL GROUND." 

In the Left Background of the Picture is the Slight Elevation Formed by the Tomb of Jonathan Brooks. On September 

6th. 1781. Benedict Arnold, the Traitor. From This Spot. Watched and Directed the 

Destruction of the Town and the Homes of His Friends. 



pt'titioneil tonuikf New Lmuloii a jiort 
of entn-, Imt for some reason tlie peti- 
tion was never [^ranted, nor were snl)- 
setjtietit ones to the same end deemed 
wortliy of consideration by the rulers 
over the sea, who seemed early to hiive 
laid aside all consideration for the col- 
onists, and planted the seed that about 
a century later grew to rel)ellion and 
successful revolution. New London 
persevered and began to build and 
employ small vessels for coasting to 
near-by ports, and soon the field of 
operations was extended, and Boston, 
Newport and New York — Maidiattan 
then, as now — exchanged products 
with New London. X'irginia later 
came into commercial connection with 
New London, and as years went by a 
more aniJ)itious spirit took possession 
of the people, and New I^ondon ves- 
sels became known in the West Indies, 
in Spain, France and Great Britain. 
It was not all plain sailing. Of coui-se 
there were difhculties to be overcome, 
losses to l)e met, such as alwavs attend 



commerce on the sea, and the financial 
condition of the colonies hampered 
even the Ixildest spirits, for money 
was powerful in those days, as it is in 
ours. 

The people were not permitted to 
pursue uninterruptedly the paths of 
{)eace. Tliere were wars with the 
Indians, war with the French, and 
trouble of various kinds that l)eset all 
of the colonists in New England : and 
New Lcmdon bore its full siiaie in 
them all. As became the inhabitants 
of a seaport town, to whom danger 
was a part of their dail}' life, and to 
wliom the adage, " nothing venture, 
iKithing have,"" had more than com- 
mon significance, they were brave 
and venturesome. In all the wars, 
from the earliest times down to the 
Spanisli war of 1898. New London 
men iiave borne more than their pro- 
portion of tiie burden in filling the 
ranks of the army and manning the 
ships of war. To the War of the {'evo- 
lution Connecticut sent more men pro 



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[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



rata than any other state, and New 
Loudon was represented Ijy more men 
proportionately tlian any other town in 
the State. It was the same in the Civil 
War, when New London made j)rompt 
and patriotic response to President Lin- 
coln's callfor volunteers in April, 1861. 
TJie city sent a full company of men 
with the Second Connecticut Volun- 
teers, who went to the front under 
the command of Col. Alfred H. Terry. 
It was the color-) tearing company of 
the regiment, and participated in the 
first battle of Bull Run. Many of the 
members of this compau}- afterwards 
distinguished themselves as officers of 
other regiments in the United States 
service. For the three years" period 
New London furnished full companies 
for the Fourth — afterwards the First 
Heavy Artillery— the Fifth, the Tenth. 
Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth and 
Twenty-Fii-st ; and two companies for 
the Twenty-Sixth Connecticut, a nine 
months' regiment. In addition to 
these troops, a great many recruits 



were enlisted from the town and for- 
warded to the front to fill the ranks of 
depleted regiments. Aside from her 
officers and men who served in the 
nav\-, New London must be credited 
with nearly twelve hundred as her 
contribution to the great Union armies 

of "ei-'eo. 

The Spanish-American War of 1898 
also gave opportunitj^ for New London 
to show that the present generation is 
as ardent in its patriotism and love of 
country and liljerty as were those gal- 
lant men of the past. Three compan- 
ies, A, D, and I, Third Regiment, Con- 
necticut Volunteers, responded to the 
call of President Melvinley formen to go 
to Cuba and Porto Rico : and a numlier 
of the members of the United States 
Signal Corps were also New Lon- 
donere. 

These evidences of patriotism may 
be regarded as tokens that the 
spirit of the early settlers, as to fight- 
ing at least, has survived to the pres- 
ent day. 




THE GROTON SHORE-LOOKING ACROSS THE HARBOR FROM NEW LONDON. 

Showing the Fort Griswold Monument on Groton Heights in the Right Bacl<ground. and in the Foreground 
the Ferryboat. Colonel Ledyard. which Plies Between New London and Groton. 

13 



picturesque 1Hew 5LorKlon. 



Tlu" town jMissessed " I'liarat-tcrs " 
in it.s fiirly davs, anil of many anil 
varied kinds they were, the Hogennes, 
for instance, who were eontinuaily in 
troiihle with the constituted autlior- 
ities, an<l no sooner out of f)ne conflict 
witii tiie courts tiian tiiey were in- 
volved in another. That sort of peo- 
ple, liowever, are inseparaltle from a 
conmnmity in which strength and 
firmness are necessities, and it was 
fioni such fulk that sjnant,' the uh-m 



liritisli Islands, who were not consid- 
ered foreigners in those days. French 
names particularly continue to tliis 
day. and will jjrohahly lie identilied 
with New I^ondon until the end of 
time. The commerce of this city hore 
no small pioportion to that of New 
England up to the U'ginning of our 
troubles with the mother country, and 
it was not long after the struggle for 
liherty and independence had ended 
in luir faxor. that the restless spirit of 




UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE-BANK STREET. 

THE CUSTOM HOUSE WAS BUILT IN 1833. 



who dared resist oppression from the 
Old Country, and later furnished the 
pioneers who penetrated the great 
West and laid the foundations, liroad 
and deep, for the phenomenal growtii 
and prosperity of that section of the 
United States. 

Tiie city prospered as time went on. 
Its natural advantages as a seaport at- 
tracted foreignei-s of condition, who 
came here to engage in trade with the 
countries of Europe, among them lieing 
many French, Spanish and Portuguese : 
but a greater proportion were from the 



New London was again engaged in 
making a new connection with the 
jiorts of the world. There were, at 
one time, aliout the opening of the 
present century, a fleet of about 100 
brigs — " jockeys " they were called 
from the nature of their trade — plying 
between this port and those of the 
West Indies. Tlicy took out horees 
and mules, and returned with rum, the 
material for its manufacture, and mo- 
lasses. New England rum was an im- 
portant factor in those days at all 
social gatherings, and in the various 



14 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw Uondon, 



mechanical pursuits of the time, 
for nothing could be begun or 
properly ended without its due 
proportion of rum. The vessels 
were not all owned in this city, 
nor indeed the larger share of 
them, for New Haven, Middle- 
town, Hartford, Fairfield, and 
other places, used the port of 
New London, and were repre- 
sented here by agents in the 
" jockey " trade. The business 
tlius paid toll here, and coopers, 
ship carpenters, riggers, and men 
of kindred trades made their 
profits from the business. 

As the "jockey" trade lan- 
guished, the wlialing industry 
took its place. The earliest 
mention of whaling in Connecti- 
cut appears to reach as far back 
as 1647, when the General 
Court at Hartford granted to 
one Whiting the privilege of 
catching whales within Connec- 
ticut waters. This privilege, 
which embraced a term of seven 
years, may be construed as the 
granting of a monopoly, for 
such permission was necessary, 
and there is no record to show 
that a like grant was at that 
time conceded to any other than 
Mr. Whiting. 

Whales were at that date 
numerous near the Connecticut 
coast and off the Banks of New- 
foundland. As the colonies grew 
in capital and pojjulation. whal- 
ing voyages of considerable 
length were made, and by 1750 
the business had assumed gen- 
erous and profitable proportions. 
The War of the Revolution, 
however, paralyzed the industry, 
until, in 1785, it was revived by 
special incentive from the Leg- 
islature. Immediately subse- 
(juent to this time there dawned 
what may be termed the golden 
era of the whaling days. Ships 
were thoroughly appointed, and 



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(picturesque 1Rcw Uondon, 




THE HUGUENOT HOUSE. 

BUILT ABOUT THE YEAR 1760. 

A Quaint Old Dwelling Place, at the Corner of Hempstead and Truman Streets. Built b> the Huguenots for Nathaniel 
Hempstead, a Descendant of Sir Robert Hempstead. 



manned liy picked crews fordaiitjeioiis 
but iviniiiienitive voyaj^e.s lo di.staut 
seas : and tlie only contingency then 
likely to j)iit a damper upon the calling 
was tiie possilile exlinction of the 
\\ hales. 

As a whaling port. New London 
rivalled New Bedford. Tliere seemed 
no end to the money that was l)eing 
hrought into the town hy tlie whalers 
as they were called, and llie general 
prosperity was great. Many were the 
New London ships which emhai'ked on 
these perilous voyages, and many were 
the fortunes that were made. In 
sooth, the industry niaj- be deemed the 
keystone to much of New T>oiidon's 
success and thrift. 

An incentive to the faithfulness and 
vigorous energy of the whaling crews 
was the method of dividing the profits 
of a voyage. Not only the agents, 
hut the oHicers and crew as well, came 
in for a share of the sj)oils. These 
shares were, of course, jjraded accord- 



ing to station and responsihility, hut 
the division, always conducted with 
honesty and promptness, exerted a 
salutary influence u[)oii the men. 

From 1s20 to ISol. inclusive, there 
were engaged in the capture of whales 
from the port of New London GT7 
vessels. And during this jK-riod there 
were l)rought into tlie jiort 111.1.")8 
hari'els of S[)erm and 77"), 432 barrels 
of whale oil. While this does not 
represent the total results bj- any 
means, it conve3's some idea of the 
magiiitiiilc and im])oitance of the in- 
dustry. Had it not been for tiie finan- 
cial stringency of 1857 and the break- 
ing out of the War of tiie Rel>ellion 
ill ISIU, all would ])robably have been 
to the good. About this time tliere 
was a decline in the whaling industry, 
and after the war theie was little done 
in this line. About the year 1870 
came a brief revival of interest, caused 
liy the discovery of the repopulation of 
the seal rookeries in the South Geor- 



16 



Ipicturesquc 1Rcw Uondon* 



gias which created a husiness of the 
same nature and the prosecution of the 
sea-elephant fishing at Desolation 
Island. 

From the very earliest days fishing- 
has naturally employed New London- 
ers, and for more than two centuries 
was an extremely important industry. 
Fifty years ago tliere were prol)ably 
70 or 80 fishing smacks engaged in 
"hanking" and in fishing up and 
down the coast, principally for cod and 
haliliut. And to-day there is a large 
amount of capital invested and a 
great many men engaged in catching 
menhaden, which furnish oil and fer- 
tilizer to the amount of many millions 
of dollars. 

From the settlement of the town of 
New London in 1646, down to our day, 
there has been much of romance and 
adventure, light and shadow, and 
much that is quaint and cuiious in 
the lives of the men engaged in what 
in most communities is Ijut the dull 
and humdrum routine of earning a 
living. Xiiturallv the atnios])liere 



characteristic of New London pro- 
duced men of a different stamp from 
those of many other cities, and these 
indomitable souls were ready at hand 
when the California fever struck the 
Atlantic States. To such men the 
news that gold had been discovered in 
California acted like wine upon the 
imagination. To fit out a schooner 
and crowd her with daring spirits was 
no sooner thought of than accom- 
plished ; and in such frail cockle- 
shells many a "Forty-niner'" set out 
from this port to brave the dangers of 
the long trip around Cape Horn to 
that Mecca of the adventurer, San 
Francisco. Ships followed as soon as 
tliey could ecjuip, and tliere were few 
men in New London who had not 
something at risk in the many ven- 
tures connected with the California 
voyages of those stirring days. The 
Klondike craze was nothing to the 
California fever, nor has there l)een 
any popular excitement to compare 
with it except the enlistment fever of 
1861. JLmv fortunes were made. 




THE ARMORY COIT AND WASHINGTON STREETS. 
Headquarters of the Third Regiment. National Guard of Connecticut. 



17 



picturesque 1Rew 5London» 




o 

Q 

a 

o 
z 

o 






more were lust, ami as a rule tlie 
New LdiuIuii Aigniiaiils of "4Sl 
gained more in experience tiian 
tlifv aci|nirf'(i in pocket. Out 
til the Lrr<'at nmuhci' of adsni- 
turci-s wlio left for California in 
'4!' and tlu- few years succeed- 
ing, some by sea and others hy 
the route across the Isthmus of 
Panama — after the shorter sea 
route was adopted — some re- 
mained. Othcis returned, and 
still others sought various quar- 
ters of the glohc in search of 
adventure, for adventure was 
about all that most of them 
obtained for their laljor and 
their pains. In San Francisco, 
to this day, even, are many 
New Londoners and their de- 
scendants. Indeed, the same 
mav be said of all the cities of 
the Initcd States. 

In the old days there was 
iiiuili that was quaint and curi- 
inis in the life of New London. 
The Mride Brook marriage, fa- 
mous in her history, was an 
instance of the peculiarities of 
the laws governing the jurisdic- 
tion of officials of the different 
ciiloiiies. Ill the winter of lt!4(i 
and '47 a young couple living 
in Saybrook elected to become 
united in the holy bonds of wed- 
loek. Saybrook possessed no 
one capable of performing the 
ceremony, so a magistrate from 
one of the upper towns on the 
Connecticut was engaged to 
olliciatc. rnfortuiiatcly, how- 
ever, there came at the time 
apjiointed for the marriage, a 
prodigious fall of snow, which 
made it impossible for the magis- 
trate to reach Saybrook. I'liless 
absolutely unavoidable the nuji- 
tials must not be postponed, 
and fiovernor Winthrop was 
called upon to go to Saybrook 
and perform the marriage rite. 
But Saybrook was beyond his 



18 



picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




A SATURDAY MORNING SCENE ON STATE STREET. 

The Diversity of Interests Centering in New London Presents a Pleasant Phase in this Picture 
Taken Near the Union Bank. 



magisterial province, his authority 
being vested by the Massachusetts 
Colony. The little stream, after- 
wards and by reason of this episode, 
called Bride Brook, marked, more or 
less certainly, the boundarA' between 
Pequot (New London) and Sayl)rnok, 
and it was Winthrop's suggestion that 
if the pair would meet him at this 
brooklet, he would accommodate them. 
His proposition was eagerly accepted, 
and on that winter's day, beneath the 
blue vault of heaven and the swaying 
branches of the trees, .John Winthrop 
j)erformed one of the most uniijue 
marriage ceremonies on record. 

We, of to-day. necessarily realize 
that the customs of the early times 
differed very materially from those in 
vogue at present. In just what way they 
differed we do not all know. About the 
dead of that early period centered an 
interest vivid, sympathetic, and even 
personal. The settlers were few, and 
the loss of one of them was regarded 
as a calamity and common misfortune. 



Not alone that, but a funeral was an 
event of moment and importance. To 
the bedside of the dying came the 
town fathers, the minister, and the 
magistrate, to take down and witness 
his last testament, words and admoni- 
tions. The entire community attended 
the funeral. Tliose who. while he 
was in life, had stood nearest to the 
deceased, bore him on their shoulders 
to the grave. Not frequently, and 
never unless the distance were great, 
was a horse litter used. Around the 
last resting place of the departed the 
rites were solemn. He was not at 
once forgotten : the void he left was 
acutely felt. By many he was missed, 
by many sincerely mourned. His 
monument was in the hearts of those 
he left behind. 

With the conveniences of modern 
times at our disposal, it is well-nigh 
impossible to appreciate the disadvan- 
tages under which our early forelwars 
struggled, nor is it easy for us to real- 
ize the actual extent of their poverty. 



19 



jpicturcsque 1Rcw Uondon. 



Tlu'ir dwell ings were not only rude, 
but often unconiforUihle iind inade- 
quate for tlu'ir needs. Crevices ad- 
niitteil the wind and cold. The tini- 
bere were rough-hewn and the boards 
unphined. Kach methanic was his 
own tool-maker; tlie metal at his 
command was of inferior ((Uality and 
his implements crude, fott'ee and t*';i 
were luxuries too 

C OS t 1 V to 1)1' 

thought of, and 
even molasses 
and sugar were 
rarities at first. 

It is a far cr\ 
to thase days ol 
trials and huft'et- 
ingsin the wilder- 
ness — more than 
25<l yeai-s. Tlif 
colonists, with 
Winthrop at their 
head, were as 
keen of eye. 
Strong of limli, 
and hardy and 
fearless of soul as 
the Vikings of 
old. Wintlirop's 
fore si gilt was 
akin to prophecy. 
He looked into 
the future and 
saw the possibili- 
ties in store for 
the Indian-iidiali- 
ited region which 
he proposed to 
develop along the 
lines of civilization. Not only did lie 
look, he acted : and upon the knowlc<lge 
born of insight, secured Fisher's Island 
and as much of the mainland as possi- 
ble. Sulisequent results have proved 
the cilmost infallibility of his judgment. 
A wise man in all things, he treated 
the Indians with equity and considera- 
tion ; and, although there was often 
cause for difference, retained the 
balance of power and gained the good 
will of the Alohegans and their allies. 




TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT MONUMENT. 

Erected by the State of Connecticut, and Located in the 

Section of Memorial Park Bordering on Broad 

and Hempstead Streets. 



Hut U'fore this alliance could lie ac- 
complished with any surety of perman- 
ence, it was necessary to con(|Uer and 
sulxlue the tierce and hastile Pequots, 
that warlike tril)e in whose veins ran 
the aboriginal blood royal. 

In 1637 Captain .lolm .Mason, ni 
connnand of a body of men from the 
towns (111 till- Connecticut and under 
the guidance of 
the Narragan- 
sctts and Mf)he- 
gans, entered 
u])on a war of 
s 11 1) j u g a t i o n 
against the Pe- 
(juots that practi- 
cally resulted in 
a war of exter- 
niiiiiition. The 
\ arrag a n setts 
.iiid Mohegans 
welcomed with 
jiiy the opportun- 
ity atbinlcd l)y 
the strained rela- 
tions between the 
whites and the 
! ' e q 11 o t s , to 
I V e n g e them- 
selves upon a 
common foe. And 
while, from a hu- 
manitarian stand- 
jiniiit. their re- 
venge may ap- 
pear to have Ijeen 
almost too com- 
plete, their 
friendliness to 
the palefaces remained unbroken ; and 
with the reign of peace wliich lasted 
for nearly 40 yeare, came a period of 
securitj' and comparative prosperity. 

The growth and occurrences in the 
plantation from the time of the Pequot 
war and the days of Winthrop, to the 
breaking out of the Revolution are 
matters of exhaustive history. Dur- 
ing the revolutionary period New 
London was a depot of supplies, a 
place from which to <li-aft men for the 



20 



« m ; 



o 

r 
D 
w 

H 
O 



M 



P 

r 

I 
eg 



H 




{picturesque 1Rew london. 



iinin- and navy, and, later on, tlie ol>- 
ject of attac k, and very nearly of com- 
plete destnu'tion. The town did all 
and more tlianeould have l)een asked 
of it. Its sons went forth to Iiattle for 
liln-rty and independenee, and did their 
duty well. Menediet Arnold, who had 
been a resident of Norwich, and who 
wa.s well aciiuainted in New London, 
liore the town a jj^riidLie wliieh he paid 
in full when he signalized his treachery 
to his country by planning a descent 
upon Xew London and leading against 
her the military forei-s of the Mritish. 
The story of that fell day of September 
nth, 1781, is known to eveiy New 
Londoner and to all patriotic Ameri- 
cans, for the burning of the town was 
as niark<-d an instauci; cf wanton bru- 
tality and cold-blooded cruelty as was 
the heroic defence of Fort Oris wold 
one of the most sublime and wonder- 
inspiring acts of heroism on record in 



the annals of the world's warfare. An 
eminent Italian, in writing of the de- 
fence of the fort, compares it to the 
defence of the Pass of Thermopyhe by 
the Spartans. On that day Arnold sat 
upon his horse near the house of a 
^Irs. Minman. wife of a naval ollicer. 
Mrs. Hinnian. it is said, seized a mus- 
ket, and aiming it at the arch traitor. 
snappi'(l the lock. The flint failed in 
its ollice, and "missed fire," making a 
noise which alarmed Arnold, who lost 
no time in escaping beyond range. He 
was watching the work of the Mritish 
and, no iloubt, gloating over the ter- 
rible predicament of his former friends, 
whose homes, at his instigation, were 
being destroyed. 

The town in those days did not pos- 
sess mail}' fine houses, as houses were 
then rated, for there were no wealthy 
people in New London. Yet they 
were superior to those which it was 




A GROUP OF MEMBERS OF THE JIBBOOM CLUB AT ONE OF ITS 
ANNUAL OUTINGS. 

The Jibboom Club was Organize!^ January 29th. 1891. It Has a Membership of Over Three Hundred. The Commodore 
ol the Club is William H. Allen : Captain. E. Holloway : First Officer. E. D. Moxley : Second Officer. Charles Gray: 
Pilot. J. Luther: Purser. C. H. Niles : Boatswain. D. W. Holloway : S. Q. N. H. Newburv : P. p.. George T. Geer. 
Jr. The Club Meets the First and Third Saturdays in Each Month. October to April, at 7.30 p. m.: April to 
October. First Saturday Only, at 8 o'clock, p. m.. at 88 Bank Street. 



Ipicturesque 1Rew !!Lonclon. 




THE CITY HALL-STATE AND UNION STREETS. 
The Mayor's Office, the Office of the City Clerk, and the Council Chamber are Located in this Building. 



po.ssible for the .sufferers from tlie con- 
fliigration to re-build, impoverished as 
they were. Much of the irreguhiiity 
of the town is due to the haste in 
which it was then re-constructed ; this 
irregularit}-, liowever, is one of 
the chief charms of the city of 
to-day. 

Tlie effects of tlie War of the Revo- 
lution were keenly felt by New Lon- 
don. Unlike other towns further in- 
land, she had not the unhazardous and 
healthy resource of manufacturing to 
which to turn her attention. Essen- 
tially a seaport, dependent upon the 
sea for her commerce, she must at 
that perturbed period wrest from the 
sea the wherewithal necessary to her 
existence. The navy was in embryo, 
and was powerfully augmented by 
privateers. These privateers were not 
deserving of the opprobrium which fre- 
(piently attached to them. Indeed, 
their occupation was as legitimate as 
that of the ships of the line, for they 
operated under what were known as 
letters of marque; that is to say, their 



cruises were prosecuted under the un- 
written laws which then governed the 
conduct of armed vessels of belligerent 
nations. Credit for brave deeds, for 
acts of heroism and loyalty are due 
them more than censure for the so- 
called acts of piracy which they are 
said, by some, to have perjictrated. 
They were no more pirateers than 
were the regularly commissionedives- 
sels of the navy. They were a neces- 
sity of the times. As the British 
men-of-war depleted the merchant- 
marine of the colonists, some measure 
was necessary for the effective re- 
straint of their depredations : so priv- 
ate ships, formerly peaceful merchant- 
men, were armed and manned, and 
under letters of marque would swoop 
down upon the British vessels man- 
oeuvering in the Sound, and, what- 
ever the odds against them, bring a 
prize into port. The risk was enor- 
mous, but supreme contempt of fear, 
begotten of entire ignorance of its 
meaning, nearly always residted in 
victorv. 



23 



(picturesque IRew Uondon. 




MASONIC TEMPLE- GREEN STREET, CORNER STARR. 

Home of Brainard Lodge. Number 102. F. and A. M. 



Miiny were the stout ln-arts and 
strong arms that enlisted in this free- 
for-all navy, whieli partook of the 
nature of a fraternity, and a ship that 
stniek its colors while a sound man 
remained to tigiit, \\()idd have lieen 
out of fellowship. Hailing from New 
London were many ships helonging to 
hoth the commissioned and privateer 
service that won ghiry. honor, and 
treasure in contliets with tiie ISritish. 
Among these were the hrig Defence, 
fourteen guns. Captain Samuel Smed- 
lev, commander: the Oliver Cromwell, 
a ship of twenty guns, commanded hy 
Captain William Coit; the hrig Resist- 
ance, ten guns. Captain Sanmel Chew; 
the Governor TrumhuU. twenty guns, 
Ca])tain Samuel Hillings: the Confed- 
eracy, thirty-two guns. Captain Sctii 
Harding : the Dean, twenty-nine guns. 
C^aptain Klisha Hinman : and the Put- 
nam, twenty-nine guns, commande<l 
hv Captain .loim Harmon, and later 
hy Captain Natiianiel Saltonstall. 

During the second war with Great 
I'.ritain. tlie war of 1H12. the ])ort of 



New London was hlockaded uninter- 
ruptedly for nearl\' two years. The 
hlockade at first had a more or less 
terrifying effect upon the inhahitants 
of the town, for they anti(ii)ated an 
attack from the Hritish vessels in the 
harhor. Had New London licen hom- 
barded by the hostile fleet, it nnist of 
necessity have suffered anothei' con- 
flagration and conseipient demolition. 
Preparations of defence and removal 
were effeete<l. and for a time the town 
was in a state of fi-iincnt and anxiety. 
Rut it early became apparent tiiat no 
lioiiibardment was intended, and 
(juiet was soon restored. Commodore 
Decatur, on the fourth day of Decem- 
ber, 1812, sailed into New London 
Haibor in the frigate Fnited States, 
and in the harbor and the waters of 
the Thames River he was compelled 
to remain until the raising of the 
blockade in February, 181;1. 

New London was one of a small 
number of towns that eai'ly sought 
incorporation, and since 1789 has 
rejoiced in a citv charter. Tlius it 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Hondon. 



will be observed that it antedates New 
York City in the possession of a city 
fToveninient. The growth of the city 
after the Revolution was reasonably 
rapid. When Water, or Beach Street. 
as it was originally named, was tilled 
with hoo'sheads of whale oil, and the 
wharves of the merchants were loaded 
to the point of collapse with that 
commodity. New London was making- 
money rapidly, and people of all sorts 
and conditions liad their share in the 
general prosperity. In two buildings 
adjoining, one on the corner of Bank 
and State streets, and the other in the 
Granite Building, on Bank Street, 
was conducted a clothing, hat, and 
men's furnishing liusiness, under tlie 
firm name of Lyon & liobliins. 
Many other branches of mercantile 
trade flourished at that time, and all 
wiio were willing to work had little 
difficulty in securing employment. 

New London was not rated as a 
manufacturing city, yet there were 
some notable concerns here at what 



seems to us an early dale. There 
were sucii firms as the Wilson Works 
— located where are now the l^uildings 
that make up the great K. T. Palmer 
Quilt Plant — engaged in the manu- 
facture of a large and far famed 
variety of brass and iron goods; the 
Albertson & Douglass Machine Com- 
pany, located on the site now occupied 
l)y the round-house of the Stonington 
r3ivisi<)n of the New York, New 
Haven and ILxrtford Paihoad: the 
woolen mill on Water Street — still in 
existence — a manufacturing jeweler's 
shop on Jay Street, conducted by the 
late William P)Utler: and at one time, 
located on Fort Neck, was a glass 
factoiy. On Fort Neck also, and in 
the buildings now occupied hy the 
Hopson & Chapin Company, the Nay- 
lor Company had its existence. 

In 1SS,5 New London began to take 
on a new form, and during tlie term of 
ottice of the late Mayor Charles 
Augustus Williams, a new era com- 
menced. The prosperity of the town 




SMITH MEMORIAL HOME-MASONIC STREET. 

The Smith Memorial Home tor Aged. Indigent Ladies who have Resided in New London, was Founded by the Late Seth 

Smith, who Bequeathed the Greater Part of His Fortune lor this Purpose. The Home 

Possesses Accommodations for Twenty-Five Inmates. 



C3) 



25 



picturesque 1Hcvv Uondon. 



received ;i fiesli iiupetus. owiiii,' 
liriiieipiilly to a new s|)irit of enter- 
prise and pr<>i,'ressiveness in its citizens 
and in its inunieipal government. A 
Hoard of Trade was organized, wliiili 
lias aeeoniplislied a great deal that lias 
heen for the good of the city. Ideas orig- 
inated hy the Hoard of Trade were sure 
of respectful consideration hy the City 



during the past tifteen years under a 
huilding inijiulse that shows no ahate- 
nient. 

Any old resident who lias heen aln 
sent from the city for no more than ten 
years even will he impressed hy the 
changes it has undergone the moment 
he alights from the cars or leaves the 
linat. lie must fed iiniLTrcssinn in the 




HOME OF THE THAMES CLUB — 284 STATE STREET. 

The Thames Club is the Principal Gentlemen's Social Organization in the Cit>. The Officers of the Club are; 

C. Royce Boss. President: James R. Lindsley. First Vice-President: F. E. Parker. Second 

Vice-President: George T. Brown. Secretary: Edward T. Brown. Treasurer. 



Government. The latter ijody heing 
hound to proceed with due care and 
delilienition, were, nevertheless, nnich 
stinnilated hy the unauthorized hody, 
and the results have proven mutually 
l)eneficial. New and better streets 
have succeeded the old ; splendid 
sehiiol huildings liave su]iplanted 
those of ancient design. Streets liy the 
score have been opened, and entire sec- 
tions of the city have grown up 



very atmosphere as he views the 
Parade, with its nohle monument to 
the soldiers antl sailors of New Lon- 
don, the park ahout the monu- 
ment, the Neptune Building in jdace 
of the structure which formerly occu- 
pied its site, and tlie stone jiavement 
in place of the mud or dust of the old 
street. And throughout the entire 
cit}' agreeable change ami improve- 
ment meets the eye. 



2G 




THE UNION DEPOT — FOOT OF STATE STREET. 



Chapter 1111. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION AS A PORT AND RAILROAD CENTER — NEW 
LONDON HARBOR - GENERAL AND LOCAL TRANSPORTATION LINES — 
REVIVAL OF SHIPBUILDING INTERESTS. 



New Loxdox is one of the 
>[ost fortuxately situated cities 
in New P2ngland. It is very near!}- 
equi-distant between New York and 
Boston, and is a railroad center of im- 
portance. Its harbor is one of the 
best in the world. l)eing three miles in 
length, very wide, and possessing an 
average depth of aliout five fathoms. 
It is admirably sheltered and is an ab- 
solutely safe haven for vessels of every 
draught and description, even in the 
roughest weather. It never freezes. 

The city is located upon the west 
shore of the harbor, and extends in a 
northerly direction up the west bank 
of the River Thames, which for the 
lartjest vessels is navio'al)le to Norwich. 
The population of New London is 
about twenty thousand, and is steadily 
increasing. 



Its general and local transportation 
facilities are unsurpassed. The New 
York. New Haven and Hartford Rail- 
road, and the Central Vermont, which 
operates the New London and North- 
ern, center in New London, and the city 
is also reached by various lines of pas- 
senger and freight steamers. 

One of THE MOST iNVKJORATINt; 

Sails from New London in the sum- 
mer season is to Block Island and 
Watch Hill, on the fine steamer 
"Block Island" of the New London 
Stea.muoat Company. A visit to 
either of these famous resorts is sure 
to prove a delight to the seeker after 
recreation. 

New London itself is one of the 
most delightful of summer resorts, and 
is easily accessible from all points 
reached bv the Central \'erniont and 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



New York, New Haven and Hartford 
railroads and the Norwich l.ine of 
steaniere and oonnections, and tlie 
steamer '• lUock Ishind." 

Watcli Hill is a charming and 
bracing sunmier retreat. Situated on 
a bhifV overh)oking the sea, it has the 
full benefit of the pure air of the 
ocean. The view is grand and varied. 
The hotels are very fine indeed, and 
in tiieir cuisine and appointments they 
excel. 

Block Island is a beautiful breeze- 
swept island fifteen miles from the 




STEAMER BLOCK ISLAND, 
01 The New London Steamboat Company. 



nearest mainland. Its climate is that 
of the Bermudas ; indeed, it has been 
called "The Bermuda of the North."' 
As a health-imparting summer resort 
it stands almost without a peer. The 
hotel accommodations are ample and 
excellent. 

The steamer "Block Island"' leaves 
Norwich and New London for Watch 
Hill and Block Island every morning 
dni-ing the season, and returns every 
afternoon. 

Tin-; Nkw London Stkamkoat 
Company was incorporated in 1882. 
Its oHicers are: President, A. Mc- 
A'ittie, Detroit, Michigan: Treasurer. 
Ivobert ("oit: General Manager, U. 



Mackenzie: (ieneral Passenger Agent, 
.\. A. Southard. 

Several steamboat lines operate 
l)etween New London ami the various 
points of interest and commerce upon 
the harbor, sound and river. The 
steamer " Munnatawket,'" of the Fish- 
er's Island Navigation {'omininy. has 
its wharf at the foot of State Street; 
it runs between New London and 
Fisher's Island. The •• .Manhansct."" 
of the New London and Long Island 
Steamboat Company, plies between 
New London. Grecnport, and Sag 

Harbor. 
Bet w e c n 
New Lon- 
don and New 
York, oper- 
a t i n g as 
freight lines, 
run the boats 
of tlie Nor- 
w i e h and 
New York 
1' r ope ller 
( ■ o m pany, 
and the 
••Mohawk" 
and "Mohe- 
L^an'" of the 
line c o n - 
trolled by 
the Central 
\' e r m o n t 
The steamer "Gypsy" 
Norwich and Fort 



Ivailroad. 
runs between 
(iriswold. touching at .Montville, 
(ialc's Ferry, the "Navy ^'aI■d,"' New- 
London, and Ocean Beach. The Foit 
Griswold and Pequot houses are easil}^ 
reached by the ••( )sprey." which makes 
several daily trips. New London is 
lirought into convenient access — by 
the steaud)oat ".Sunnner fiirl" — with 
liusliy Point, Noank and Mystic, 
(■rotrm and New London are con- 
nected by the ferr3--boat "Colonel 
Led\ard,"" of the Thames Ferry Com- 
pany, which makes trips of tw-enty- 
miiiute intervals betwe»"n the two 
places throughout the entire 3'ear. 



28 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 



The Railroad and Steam ihiat 
Lines governed by the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford Railroad 
are numerous and extensive. < )f these 
the Norwich Line of steamboats affords 
accoinmodations that are ade<juate and 
satisfying. The Norwich Line, by 
its elegant steamers, the "City of 
Lowell," and the "Citv nf Worcester,"* 



and business communities interven- 
ing, and points north and east, 
including Fitchburg, Gardner, Win- 
chendon,Keene, Bellows Falls, Nashua, 
Manchester, C'onconl. Rochester. Fort- 
lantl, and points in the Maritime 
Provinces. 

The "City of Lowell" and the "City 
of Worcester" of this line are cnn- 




VIEW OF NEW LONDON HARBOR ON REGATTA DAY. 

Showing the Steamer "City of Worcester." of the Norwich Line. 



furnishes ideal means of transporta- 
tion between New York City and 
New London, and forms a direct route 
from New York to the various im- 
portant points on and reached by the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford 
and the Central ^'ermont railroads 
from New London. It is also the 
most convenient water route between 
New York, New London, and Norwich, 
connecting by train with Plainticld. 
Putnam, Webster. Southbiidgc. Wor- 
cester,and the numerous manufacturing 



structcd of steel: they are last, 
connnodious, sumptuous in their ap- 
pointments, and a iiigh stainlard of 
service is maintained upon them in 
every dcjiartment. They steer by 
steam, and are lighted by electricity. 
Their trips between New l^ondon and 
New York are as follows: Steamers 
leave New London at 11 P. M., and 
are due at Pier o(>. North River, New 
York, at 7 A. ]\L Returning, leave 
Pier oi>. foot of Spring Street, at .t.30 
P. ^L Unless otherwise registered at 



2 it 



[picturesque 1Hew ILondon. 



tlie Purser's ollice, all pusseiigers are 
fallctl at New LuikIoii at 7 A. M. 
Those desiring to be tailed for early 
trains from New London should notify 
tiie Pui-ser. The fare between New 
i-oiidim antl New York, via the 
Norwich Line, is ><1.")0; staterooms. 
••?LtHj and >=2.00 adtlitional, according 
to location. 

An enterprise that will have con- 
siderable bearing upon the transporta- 
tion centering in New London Harbor 
is that being projected by the Thames 
Tow Boat Company, incorporated 
in istj.T. On the west shurc of the 
Thames River, about one and one- 
half miles north 
of the Great 
l)raw-l>ridge. this 
('■impaiiy is es- 
taljlisiiing two 
sets of Marine 
H a i I ways, the 
larger one beint; 
intended to haul 
out vessels of :25i> 
to :^00 feet length 
of keeh and the 
smaller one. ves- 
sels of about loO 
feet length of 
keel. This yard is 
intended in the lirst place tor hauling 
out and making repairs to tiic com- 
pany's vessels, tugs and barges, and 
incidentally, after lieing established, 
other business will be solicited. The 
Company own land enough, unoccu- 
pied l)y the Railways, to do such 
work as thev may think proper from 
time to time for themselves and 
others. The principal ollice of the 
Compan}- is rear of 240 Bank Street. 
New London, and branch otlice, 1 
Broadwa}', New York. The President 
and Treasurer of The Thames Tow 
Boat Company is F. H. Chappell. 

Two ELECTirif Trolley Roads 
afford the city comfortable and ade- 
(piate service: Tlie New London. 
Norwich and Montville street railway 
line, which runs between Norwich and 




STEAMER 
Captain A^er> 



New London, and the lines operated 
l)y the New Lonimin Sti;ekt Rail- 
way CoMi'ANV. The distance from 
New London to Norwich is about 
fourteen miles. The running time is 
one hour. The route is in a ncirtherly 
direction from New London, via .Main 
and -North .Main streets and Mohegan 
Avenue, and extends through a 
delightful stretch of country. The 
starting points for the cai's of this line 
are Franklin Square. Norwich, and the 
Parade, near the corner of State ^ind 
Bank streets, in New London. 

The New London Street Railway 
Company was incorporated in \SXi]. 
It was chartered 
as a horse railway. 
By an amendment 
to its constitution 
tiie use of electri- 
city as a motor 
p o w e r was ap- 
j)lied in 18i>3. 
The service ren- 
dered the public 
by its lines is reli- 
able and efHcient. 
Its cars are of 
the modern vesti- 
' GYPSY." bulcd type, easy- 

c. Smith. riding and com- 

fortalile. Open cai's are used as early 
in the summer and as late in the 
autumn as is consistent with health 
and safety. 

Two belts, or loops, represent the 
routes travei-sed by the cars in the 
central and upper sections of the city. 
One of these is from the Parade, via 
Williams, State and Broad streets to 
the starting point. This is one jjortion 
of the route of the .Montauk Aveinie 
and Post Hill line. The other, the 
course of the Washington Street and 
Lewis Lane car. is from the Parade 
to Lewis Lane via State and Broad 
street*. The direction taken by the 
cars of these lines alternate, and the 
alternate trip of the Washington 
Street and Lewis I.,ane car is 
through State, Washington, Truman 



30 



Ipicturesquc IRew ^London, 



and Ulackliall streets. Tlie 
portion of the city adjacent 
to Bank Street, Lower P.ank 
Street and Montauk Ave- 
nue is accommodated Ijy the 
Montauk Avenue line. On 
this line the cai-s run from 
the Parade, via Bank Street 
and Montauk Avenue, to 
the corner of Montauk Ave- 
n u e and t h e L o w e r 
Boulevard in winter, and in 
the summer season — from 
June to October — to Ocean 
Beach. 

The New London Street 
Railway is well managed, 
and its corps of conductors 
and motormen are consider- 
ably above the average in 
j)oint of efficiency, courtesv. 
and neatness of personal 
appearance. Its transfer sys- 
tem is convenient. One may 
secure a transfer check from 
either distinct line to the 
other. The transfer point is 
the Parade, near the Union 
Bank. 

( )wiiig to the carefulness 
of its employes, and the ca- 
pability of its management, 
it possesses a record singu- 
larly free fmm accidents and 
untipward features. Tlieofti- 
cers of the C'ompanv are : 
President a n d Secretary. 
Walter Learned: Treasurer. 
W. A. Tucker, of Tucker 
and Anthony, Boston : Su- 
perintendent, Lorenzo Bent- 
ley. Directors : Walter 
I^earned, W. A. Tucker, 
Jolin F. Perry, Hillings 
Learned, James Hislop, antl 
H. C. Learned. 

SHTi'r.uu.niNf;. ix r h k 
Closfnc; Yi;ai:s of the 
EicHTKKNTH Ckntlkv and 
in the early part of the nine- 
teenth, was reckoned one of 
the important industries of 




31 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



Nfw London. Uul of late it lias not 
entered i-onsj)ieuoiisly into the luisiness 
life of the eity, a]thont,di it has heen 
earrietl on in a nioii- oi- k-ss desultoiv 
manner. 

The recent cstalilishnient. Iiowever. 
of the Kastkun Siiiriu ii.iunc; Com- 
pany's Plant on tiie (Jroton side of 
the hariior, marks for this section a 
new era in marine architecture. The 
location chosen hy this Company could 
not lie more admiralily suited to its re- 
(juireinents. The great and luiiform 
<lei)th of the liari)or affords excellent 
iloekins' and launchini^ facilities, and 
tile laiye area of the yards every ojipor 
tunity for ship construction on an im- 
mense scale. The ground of the shiji- 
vard, too, is ideal fur the puriKise, 
heing firm and solid. ."The railroad 
facilities are ade([Uatc, and the situa- 
tion, while sulliciently close to the 
Metropolis, is yet far enough distant 
to eliminate its detrimental features. 
Tlie land adjacent to the siiipyard is 
elevated, and affords liealthful places 
and opportunity of aliode for many of 
the Company's enqiloyes. 

The workshojis are located close to 
tiie water front: and near them, iiut 
further inland, are the executive ollices 
and draughting rooms, where the great 
iihips are all plaiuied out on paper lie- 
fore the work of actual construction is 
commenced. 

Invested in this vast enterprise are 
aiiout half a million dollars. Tins 
amount will he steadily increased as the 
busine.ss of the plant pidgrcsses. 

The scope of operations contem- 
plated by the Eastern Shiplmilding 
Company is second to that of no con- 
cern of like nature in the world. It 
will contract for and build all classes 
of merchant and war vessels, of what- 
ever magnitude and complexity of 
spociHcations. No vessel that can be 
floated will be too large f<ir the plant 
to handle exiieditiously and well. 
Contracts for all grailes of craft will 
receive attention, from the finest of 
steam yachts and high class, speedy 



passenger vessels, to tramp steamers 
antl barges. 

Two sets of building ways are 
already constructed, TOO feet in 
length, and capable of accommodating 
ships of SO foot beam. 'I"he keels are 
laid for two vessels that, when com- 
jilctcd, will be tlie largest in tiie world, 
and will have a displacement of :{•{. 000 
tons each. They are being built for 
the (iicat Northern Steanishi[i Cum- 

l'ii'i.y- 

The Eastern Siiipliuilding (ompany 
was incorporatetl in -March, IHUO, and 
conunenced active operations on the 
construction of its jilanl tlie latter 
part of tlie .\pril follow iiig. For foui- 
months jirevious the Company occu- 
pied oflices in the Neptune Huilding, 
where the work of draughting the 
shi[)s was begun. 

In .April, IMOO. A. (). (ioddard, the 
New London builder, was given the 
conti'act for the erection of the Com- 
pany's buildings on the (iroton side. 
'J'he three largest of these were com- 
pleted in July. The structure con- 
taining the joiner shop and mold loft 
is '2'>() feet long, by 70 feet in width. 
It is two stories in height. In the 
liasement are the office of the yard 
superintendent, and a carpenter shop. 
The pipe, machine, and sheet iron 
workers' shops e(i\er ground space 170 
feet in length, by 00 feet wide. The 
shipyard plate shop is -40 feet long, 
by XO feet in wi<ltli. The lioiler house 
and blacksmith shop occupy a large 
iirick building, from the west side of 
wiiicli, onto an extensive cast iron 
beiuling floor, emerge the plate and 
angle furnaces. 

The various simjis are eipiippcd 
with the best and most moilern appur- 
tenances known to the art of ship- 
building. 

The Presiilent and (ieneral Mana- 
ger of tlie Ivistcni Shipbuilding Com- 
pany is Charles U. Ilaiiscom : Treas- 
urer, John Sherman Iloyt: Naval 
Architect and Engineer, William A. 
Fairburii. 



82 



■ 




■ 


1 








I^^^OBvv ^73|B 4HH^'"'^^^^ *--* »Ji — *' ""^B^fc ' 



WILLIAMS MEMORL^L INSTITUTE BROAD STREET. 

HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

This School Was Founded and Endowed by the Late Mrs. Harriet P. Williams, a Resident of Norwich. Connecticut, in 

IMemoriam of Her Son. Thomas W. Williams, a Prominent Citizen of New London. Who Died in 1855. The Building 

Occupies the Lot on Which He Was Contemplating Erecting a Private Residence. The Principal of the 

Institute is Colin S. Buel, A. M. Teachers : Mary Jane Turner. Mary F. Crofton. Marietta Jackson. 

A. B.. Madeline P. Freeman. A. B.. Mary E. Smith, and Alpha W. Barlow. 



Chapter 1I1I1I. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

NEW LONDON'S FIRST EDUCATIONAL BEQUEST - MORE RECENT ENDOW- 
MENTS-BRIEF SKETCH OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM OF TO- 
DAY—ITS EFFICACY AND EVOLUTION — INTRODUCTION OF NEW AND 
BENEFICIAL FEATURES — MODERN SCHOOL BUILDINGS -SPECIAL IN- 
CENTIVES TO PUPILS THE CHURCHES OF A COMMUNITY INDICA- 
TIVE OF ITS MORAL TONE - OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF THE 
OLDEST RELIGIOUS SOCIETY IN THE CITY-REFERENCE TO OTHER 
CHURCHES AND SACRED ORGANIZATIONS SOME EMINENT DIVINES 
WHO HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED WITH NEW LONDON— PORTRAITS OF 
THE PRESENT PASTORS — THE CITY'S FINE CHURCH EDIFICES. 



T H o i; ( ; H T 1-' L L L V regarded, the 
growth of our country in tlie com- 
paratively short time that has inter- 
vened since its independence was 
acknowledged, seems almost phenom- 
enal. In less than a century and a 
half, from a dependent English colony 
on American soil, has evolved a re- 

(4) 33 



public which stands to-day among the 
greatest of the earth's great powers. 

In the evolution of her institutions, 
both civic and militar3-, the nation 
has forged ahead with rapid strides. 
Particular attention has been paid to 
education. The public schools of the 
United States are admittedly progres- 



[picturesque IRew TLondon. 



sive in thoroughness and efficacy of 
method ; and in the erection of school 
buildings, labor and expense are of 
secondary considenition when weighed 
in the balance with good sanitation, 
ventilation, convenience, and modern- 
ness of arrangement and architecture. 
In matters educational New London 
is but a type of the average American 
city. Yet even where all are good, 
some must excel, and the assertion 



died in ItiTS, left a verbal will stipu- 
lating that his entire property should 
be devoted to the cause of public edu- 
cation. The lirst school to bear his 
name was tlie Bartlett Granuiiar 
School, so called until IHA"), when it 
became the Bartlett High School. 
The present Robert Bartlett School 
on Broad Street, is so named in honor 
of that pioneer in the endowment of 
Amcriraii educational institutions. 




BULKELEY HIGH SCHOOL- HUNTINGTON STREET, BETWEEN RICHARDS 
STREET AND BULKELEY PLACE. 

HIGH SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

The Bulkeley High School Was Founded and Endowed by the Late Leonard H Bulkeley. Who Died in 1849. and Lett the 

Greater Portion of His Estate tor that Purpose. Principal. Walter A. Towne. A. M. Teachers : Eugene 

B. Lawrence. A. B.. Robert T. Elliot, and Hcrve> F. Houghton. A. B. 



that New London's public school sys- 
tem possesses extraordinary merit, and 
that many of her school buildings are 
pei-uliarly well adapted to the pur- 
pose which they serve, is well sus- 
tained and warrantable. The New 
London (then Nameaug) of more than 
two centuries ago appears in some 
measure to have had at heart the 
scholastic interests of the community. 
And it is on record that one Robert 
Bartlett, a resident of the town who 



With this early evidence of public 
spirit to emulate, it is then no marvel 
that New London numbers education 
among her many excellent fiualities. 

The public schools of the city 
are eight in number. The Nathan 
Hale Grammar School, the Win- 
throp, the Robert Bartlett, the 
Coit Street, the Nameaug. and 
the Harl)or School are under the 
jurisdiction of the municipal Board of 
Education. The I'ulkeley High 



u 




NATHAN HALE GRAMMAR SCHOOL— WILLIAMS STREET, NEAR WALLER. 

The Principal of tlie Nathan Hale Grammar School is Charles 6. Jennings. A. M.. Acting School Visitor of New London. 

The Teachers are: Grade Eight. Teresa C. Croflon. Minnie G. Harris, and Minnie E. L. Caulkins. 

Grade Seven. Nettie J. Bishop. Irene P. Bindloss. and Adellna S. Povey. 




WINTHROP SCHOOL, INTERMEDIATE AND PRIMARY— NEAR YE OLDE 

TOWNE MILL. 

Helen Bingham. Principal. Grade Six. Teachers: Grade Five. Alice L. Baker and Minnie G. Barker. Grade Four. 

Elizabeth F. Stark and Anna M. Crofton. Grade Three. Franc E. Barker and Louise R. Jeffery. 

Grade Two. Frances M. Shea and Anna M. Hewitt. Grade One. Gertrude Dakin. 

Gertrude S. MacNear. Pearl M. Rowland, and Clara Firth. 



35 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon. 




ROBERT BARTLETT SCHOOL BROAD STREET, NEAR CENTER. 

INTERMEDIATE AND PRIMARY. 

Maria F. Starr. Principal. Grade Six. Teachers: Grade Six, Mary E. Butler. Grade Five. Anna H. Ducy and Helen M. 

Champion. Grade Four. Charlotte P. Comstock and Susan P. Boss. Grade Three. Nellie P. Fuller and 

Ethel A. Kellogg. Grade Two. Julia A. Fitch and Agnes F. Allen. Grade One. Ruth May Jennings 

and Ethel A. Clark. Kindergarten. Grace H. Bowers and Mabel E. Greene. 



School for l>oys and the Williams Me- 
morial Institute — the latter a high 
school for girls — are especially en- 
dowed institutions, whose affaii'S are 
managed by trustees and corporators. 
In addition to the principals of the 
different schools, an<l the special in- 
structors in music, drawing, phj-sical 
and voice culture, there are 1S4 regular 
and four substitute teachers engaged 
in teaching the youth of New London. 
The principal of the Hulkeley High 
School is Walter A. Towne, A. M.: 
of the Williams Memorial Institute, 
Colin S. Buell, A. M. ; and of the 
Nathan Hale GraniTuar School, 
Charles B. .lennings, A. M. The 
principals of the minor grades are as 
follows: Winthrop School, Helen 
Bingham: Robert Bartlett School. 
Maria F. Starr : Coit Street School, 
Teresa A. Brown; Nameaug School, 
Josephine S. Kice; Harbor School, 
Frances E. Strickland. The special 



instructors are: Music, James A. 
\'anKuren; drawing and sloyd — 
wood carving — Martha W. Stearns; 
physical and voice culture. M. Isa- 
phene Ives. Free kindergartens have 
recently been introduced into the 
Robert Bartlett, the Coit Street, and 
the Hai])or schools. 

The Bulkeley High School for lioys 
is a fine stone building of generous 
and substantial architecture. It was 
erected in 1871 at a cost of about 
$40,000. Its founder, Leonard H. 
Bulkeley, was bom in New London in 
1791. He died in 1849 and deviseil 
the greater portion of his property for 
the founding and maintenance of a 
free high school for boys, to be called 
the Bulkeley School. 'I'he fund at 
the time of the death of the legator 
was about •'^21,000, which was allowed 
to accumulate until 1871. when it had 
increased to the very considerable 
sum of *70,000, a sullicient amount 



36 





REV. WALTER S. McINTYRE, 
Pastor Federal Street Methodist Episcopal Church. 



REV. ALFRED POOLE GRINT, PH. D. 
Rector St. James Episcopal Church. 





REV. THOMAS P. JOYNT, 
Pastor St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. 



REV. S. LEROY BLAKE, D. D„ 
Pastor First Church of Christ. 



Ipicturcsquc IRcw Uondon, 



to warniut carrying into active effert 
the wishes of the testator. There 
have been two additional legacies, one 
from the estate of the late Asa ( )tis 
of *10,000. and one of *o,000 from 
that of the late Henry P. Haven. 
Through the generosity of Hon. 
George !•". Tinker of New l-ondon, an 
assembly room and completely ap- 
pointed laboratories were added to the 
liuilding in 1S99. Mr. 'I'inker con- 
tributed a fund of more than 811,000 
for the purpose. The Hoard of Trus- 
tees of the Uulke- 
ley School is 
comprised of the 
following gentle- 
men: President, 
Nathaniel S. Per- 
kins; Secretary. 
Trac}- Waller: 
Treasurer, Hon. 
William Belcher: 
.I.Lawrence Chew 
and Charles i>. 
(i raves. 

The Williams 
Memorial Insti- 
tute is another 
monument to the 
noble spirit of 
generosity and the 
desire to mate- 
rially assist in 
furthering the 
cause of educa- 
tion. It is an im- 
posing structure of rough stone, with 
brown-stone trimmings, its style of 
architecture is pleasing, and b}'^ reason 
of this and its commanding site, 
it forms one of the conspicuous 
landmarks of New London. The 
cost of construction was about ^fSo, 000. 
The late Mrs. Harriet P. Williams, 
of Norwich, Connecticut, the founder 
and endower of the Institute, caused 
it to be erected in memoriam of her 
son, the late Thomas W. Williams, 
who was a prominent citizen of New 
London. 'I'he intent of the endow- 
ment fund is to provide a course 



of free high school training for girls 
residing in the city and adjacent 
townships. This privilege is not 
restricted to permanent residents: 
tliose of temporary residence within 
the prescrii)ed territory may enjoy tlie 
full lienelits of the institution. Tiie 
President of the Kndowmciit Fuu<l is 
Mr. 1>. P. Learned: tiie ( 'orporatoi's 
are II. 1!. liond, Charles Barns, 
Augustus Brandegee. !5illings !'. 
Learned, Thomas W. Williams, Frank 



L. Palmer, and 




REV. JOHN F. TUCKER. 
Minister Unitarian Societ>. 

cation to the 
Possiblj' it is 
these ten years 



William Williams. 

While the pro- 
,'ress shown by 
I lie public schools 
111' New London 
has ever been 
along the lines of 
distinctevolution, 
the results of the 
j)ast decade are 
especially gratify- 
ing, gratif3'ing to 
the ]iublic, to the 
Board of Lduca- 
tion, to the princi- 
pals and teachers, 
to the parents of 
cbildien. and, as 
liiey have out- 
grown their school 
ilays and assumed 
their resjjective 
positions in the 
busy life of the 
world, of gratiti- 
pupils themselves. 
)ut coincident that 



of good work have 
been passed under one Acting School 
Visitor. Yet, without favor and 
without adulation, it seems incum- 
bent upon us to note the zeal 
and ethciencv of Charles B. Jennings, 
A. M.; the hearty co-operation, too, of 
the School Board, and the earnest 
faithfulness of the teacheis under his 
charsre is to be commended. And 
therein lies the admirableness of it 
all, for it is this co-effort, this 
"team-work,"' as it were, that is 



38 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




largely respon- 
sible for the 
laudable out- 
come. 

Since 1890 
the attendance 
of pupils at the 
puljlic schools 
has increased 
nearly 8 0. 
Ten years ago 
there were but 
47 teachers: 
now the num- 
ber employed is 
nearly double 
that figure. 
Several new 
and valuable 
features have 
1) e e n inaugu- 
rate d, two of 
which (so far 
as concerned their introduction into 



. REV. JAMES W. BIXLER, 
Pastor Second Congregational Church 



ing popularity 
of the kinder- 
garten — or 
child garden 
— among those 
who once con- 
sidered it fri- 
volity, but who 
now realize its 
great impor- 
tance in the 
earliest train- 
ing of the 
mind, is a sign 
positive of the 
e du c ational 
progression of 
the age. 

The Nathan 
Hale Orches- 
tra, composed 
of past and 
present mem- 
bers of the Nathan Hale Grammar 



public schools), originated in New School, is an organization which has 
London. The Ling system of physi- been accorded considerable notice and 



cal culture, and 
the method of 
interestingly illus- 
trating lessons in 
geography by the 
use of the stereop- 
ticon, are innova- 
tions of especial 
worth and agree- 
ableness. Kinder- 
garten work also, 
that incomparable 
method devised bv 
a great philosopher 
who could appreci- 
ate the value of 
rightly teaching 
little children how 
to think while at 
play, and without 
weariness to their 
unformed minds, 
has gained a firm 
foothold in the 
schools of New 
London. Thegrow- 




REV. JOSEPH P. BROWN, 

Pastor of Second Baptist Church of New London 

From 1871 to 1877. 



flattering attention. 
Its effect is benefi- 
cial, and it is well 
calculated to stim- 
ulate b\- example. 
A sj'stem, too, 
productive of very 
siilutar}- results is 
tliiit of prize giving 
tor excellence at- 
tained in the vari- 
ous branches of 
school work. The 
prize in English, a 
■?5 gold piece, 
offered several 
years ago by the 
late Hon. C. A. 
Williams, is con- 
tinued by his 
daughter, Miss 
Mary Williams. .\ 
perpetual annual 
prize of ¥o for ex- 
cellence in penman- 
ship has been 



o'.l 



[picturesque 1Hew Uondon. 



ottered by a former graduate of the 



Nathan Hale Grammar Scliool, 
liar- 



Mr. 



beck, I'lesident, and several private 
schools. Tlu- heiieficial influence ex- 
erted by such 




institutions is 
generally 
recognized, 
and when the 
various oppor- 
tunities for 
learning pos- 
sessed by New 
Loudon are 
cons id e re d, 
there remains 
small room for 
wonder at 
the position 
it occupies 
among cities 
noted for excel- 
lence of their 
educational 
advantages. 



Lero}' I 
wood. Mr. 
Herbert Cran- 
dall has prof- 
fered a prize of 
like amount 
for the best 
example of 
book-keeping. 
The lienjamin 
Armstrong 
prize of S'Ki 
for pre-emi- 
nence in gener- 
al scholarship, 
and one of ^-'t 
for superiority 
in reading, 
recently con- 
ferred by llev. 
J. W. Hixler, 
comijletes the 
list. That the ^V- JOSEPH A. ELDER, -j-,,,. ^^,,,,. 

J r , Pastor Huntington Street Baptist Churcti. . ... ,, ,. , ,. ,, 

award ot such .\( i i, i: A n i> 

very practical rewards of merit is pro- Numhei: i>f ('Hritcii Edikicks of a 
ductive of superlative effort, wlio community are in great degree indica- 
can doubt? The tive of its religious 

and moral tone. The 
churches of New 
London are many, 
and in the variety of 
their architectural 
style, and in the 
dates of their organi- 
zation, denote the 
early attention i)ai(l 
to religion by the 
town, and its subse- 
quent rapid growth. 
Approaching the 
city through the 
waters of the har- 
bor, the observant 
stranger is sure to 
he iniprt'ssed by the 
towering spires of 
several of its more 
modern temples of 
worship. And after a tour of inspection 
about its streets he may vouchsafe 



Board of Education 
consists of John (t. 
Stanton, ^Ll)., Presi- 
dent: IMIall Shuits. 
Secretary: Frank E. 
Barker, Treasurer: 
M. Wilson Dart, 
Mayor, ex-o^ 67", Har- 
old H. Hyer, I\L I)., 
Charles J. Hewitt, 
Colin S. Buell, Henry 
P. Bullard, Frederick 
S. Newcomb, and 
Arthur Eggleston. 
The Acting .School 
\'isitor is Charles B. 
•Jennings, A. M., 
Principal of the 
Nathan Hale (iram- 
mar School. 

In addition to her 
public schools, the city has the New 
London Business College, R. A. Bru- 




REV. FRANKLIN G. McKEEVER, 

Pastor First Baptist Church. 



40 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST CORNER STATE AND UNION ST REE IS. 

The First Church of Christ is Congregational in Denomination, and is the Oldest Religious Society in the City. Organized in 

Gloucester, IVIassachusetts. in 1642. Removed to New London in 1651. The Present House of Worship was First 

Used in 1851. Sunday Services : Preaching at 10.45 A. M.; Sunday School at 12.15 : IMeeting of the 

Junior Endeavor Society at 3.30 P. M.: Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor 

IVIeeting at 6.15 P. M.: Preaching at 7.30. Weel<ly Meeting. Friday 

Evening at 7.30 o'clocli. Pastor. Rev. S. Leroy Blal<e. D. D. 



expression to the 



thought 



London should 1)6 a good town: and so 
it should, if an abundance of churches 
is to be regarded as a criterion. 

Some of the church organizations 
are of exceeding early origin. The 



that New First Church of Christ (Congrega- 
tional) is the oldest. Its inception is 
directly attributable to the Puritan 
desire for freetlom of worship, that 
fundamental principle from which 
sprang the very being and existence 



41 



{picturesque 1Rcw Uondon. 




ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH — HUNTINGTON STREET. 

Organized In 1725. First Church Completed In 1732 : the Second Consecrated 1787: the Third and Present Edifice 

was Consecrated June nth. 1850. Rector. Rev. Alfred Poole Grinl. Sunday Services: 8 A. M.. Holy 

Communion: 10.45 A. M.. Preaching: 12.30. Sunday School: 7.30. Evening Service. 

Holy Day Services at 10 A. M. Friday Morning Service. 10 o'clock. 



of our nation. This society was or- 
ganized in Gloucester, Massachusetts, 
in 1642. and removed to New London 
under the guidance of its first pastor. 



Richard i>liniiuin, in 1651. Its first 
place of worship in New London was 
in a large barn wliich stood on what i.s 
now Hempstead Street, near the south 



42 



l^icturesquc 1Rew Uondon, 




FEDERAL STREET METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH— FEDERAL STREET, 

NEAR UNION. 

Organized 1793. Present Edifice Erected in 1855. Pastor. Rev. Walter S. IVIclntyre. Public Services : Sunday. 10.45 A. M. 

and 7.30 P. M.. Public Service with Sermon; 12.15 P. M.. Bible School: 4.30 P. M.. Junior League 

Meeting ; 6 P. M.. Meeting of the Epworth League. Wednesday Evening, at 7.30 P. M.. Midweek 

Service of Prayer. Song, and Testimony ; Friday Evening. Class Meeting. 



corner of Granite. We of to-day little 
realize what the privilege of worshiii 
in their accepted belief meant to 
those (xod-loving pioneers: their re- 
ligion was their life. Those residing 
at a distance were glad of the oppor- 



tunity to rise early and walk miles, 
even, to hear the Word of God freely 
expounded. The members of the 
settlement within hearing distance of 
the meeting - house were called to 
service by beat of drum. Few of the 



43 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH-STATE STREET, CORNER OF WASHINGTON. 

Pastor. Rev. Franklin G. McKeever Church Organized in 1804. Present Building Dedicated March 13. 1856. Society 

Incorporated in 1885. Services as follows : Sunday. 10.45 A. M.. Morning Worship : 12 M.. Sunday School : 

3.15 P. M.. Junior Christian Endeavor Meeting : 6.15 P. M.. Christian Endeavor Meeting. 

7.30 P. M.. Evening Worship. Week Day Meeting. Friday Evening. 



settlers possessed horses: those who 
(lid would on Sahbath days share the 
blessing with others less fortunate 
than they, after the unique method 
known as "the ride and tie system." 
The ^oodman would mount and set 
out for the meeting-iK)use with his 
wife and perchance another member 
of the family -up l)ehind." After 
having accomplished, perhaps, half 
the journey, tliej- would dismount 
and tie the animal by the roadside for 
the benefit of some other worshiper, 
foot-wean' and belated. But even 



the luxury of this method of church 
going was far from universally en- 
joyed. 

Parson Blinman's flock continued 
to worship in the old barn until 1655, 
when it removed to a meeting-house of 
its own, located on the site now occu- 
pied by the Bulkeley High School. 
Three years were consumed in build- 
ing this church, which was commenced 
in lt).")2. There were no regular 
craftsmen, and the inhabitants were 
obliged to take turns in carry- 
ing forward the work of con- 



44 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



struction, which progressed slowly 
in consetjuence of tlie press t)f 
individual duties. On the north side 
of this meeting-house was the lot re- 
served for burial purposes. A town 
ordinance of ItiJoo decreed that it 
should never be disturbed, and it is to- 
day known as "The Towne's Antient- 
est Buriall Ground,"" and is the oldest 
graveyard in New London County. 
One Cumstock was sexton of the first 
meeting-house, as this old record 
shows : " Old Goodman Cumstock is 
chosen sexton, whose work is to order 
youth in the meeting-house, sweep the 
meeting-house, and beat out dogs, for 
which he is to have 40 shillings a 
year : he is also to make all graves : 
for a man or woman he is to have 4 



shillings, for children. 2 shillings a 
grave, to be paid by survivors.'" 

Three subsequent edifices occupied 
the same site on Bulkeley Square. 
The present elegant structure opposite 
the Post OlHce was first used in 18.J1. 
Located on an eminence, which lends 
additional height to its lofty spire, con- 
structed of gray granite, and on a 
generous scale, it is one of the finest 
examples of church architecture in the 
State. 

The historj- of the occupation oftlie 
pastorate of the society is as follows : 
Its first Pastor — and until 16.58 — 
Richard Blinman : IGtJl to li>ti.5, Ger- 
shom Bulkelej': then Simon Brad- 
street, who died in office in lt>8o, 
and during whose occupancy of the 




SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - BROAD, HEMPSTEAD AND 

FEDERAL STREETS. 

The Pastor of the Second Congregational Church is Rev. James W. Bixler. The Church Dates Its Organization From 

April 1835. Services as Follows: Sunda>. 10.45 A. M.. Preaching b) the Pastor: Sunday School at 12 M.: 3.30 P. M.. 

Meeting of the Junior Society of Young Peoples Christian Endeavor: at 6.30 P. M.. Meeting of the Endeavor 

Society Proper: 7 30 P. M.. Regular Sunday Evening Service: Friday Evening Meeting at 7.30. 



■4.") 



(picturesque 1Revv Uondon. 



pastorate it was that the famous sect 
known as " IJogerenes " was in evi- 
dence, (iurdon Saltonstall was the 
next Pastor, from lii'.'l tolTOs, when 
he was elected (iovernor of the State. 
Then in 1700 Eliphalet Adams, whose 
work in connection with tlie ciiurch 
was terminated by death in 1 "•")•!. In 
17.57 the Rev. Mather Hyles, .Ir., was 
called to till the jmljiit, his term of 



duty. Dr. McEwen dieil September 
7th. 18t)0. at the venerable age of 80 
years. This was his only parish, as 
he came to Xew London immediately 
after liaving completed his theological 
studies. Dr. Field was Pastor until 
187t'(, and was followed by Hev. VA- 
ward \V. Prown, under whose juris- 
diction the church remained until the 
autumn of Isstii. In the spring of 




ST. MARY'S STAR OF THE SEA ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, 

HUNTINGTON STREET. 

The First House of Worship Occupied by This Church was a Small Chapel. Erected by the Society in 1843. It Then 

Worshipped in a Larger Church. St. Patrick's, on Truman Street. Which Was Consecrated in March. 1855. 

The Structure Shown in the Engraving Was Dedicated in May. 1876. Services; Sunday Masses 

at 8. 9.15. and 10.30 A. M.; Vespers at 3 P. M Weeli Day Masses Every Morning at 8 o'clocii. 

Pastor. Rev. Thomas P. Joynl: Assistants. Rev. David O'Donnell. and Rev. John F. Quinn. 



service extending to 17t>8. The next 
Pastor was Ephraim Woodbridge, who 
otficiated until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1770. There was then an 
interim of eleven 3'ears, in which the 
pastorate was vacant, after which 
Henry Channing was Pastor — 1787 
until 1800 — when Rev. Dr. Abel 
McEwen, D. D.. was installed. Dr. 
.McEwen's pastorship was of remark- 
able duration. In 1850 Rev. Thomas 
P. Field was chosen as his Associate 
Pastor, and he was released from active 



1887 the present I'astor, Rev. S. Leroy 
Hlake, D. I)., accepted a call to the 
church. The Deacons are Jesse H. 
Wilcox, George E. Starr, Henry 
Luller, William Belcher, Charles W. 
Chapin, and Pliny .M. Harwnod. The 
Superintendent of the Sunday School 
is Cteorge F. Tinker. Bethany Chapel, 
located on lower Bank Street, is an 
auxiliary to the church. Its services 
are Sabbath School at A. M., and 
a Sunday evening meeting at 7.30 
o'clock. 



40 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



The Second Congregational Church 
of New London was organized in 
April, 1835. Its inauguration was 
the result of a colonizing from the 
First Church of Christ. The first 
meeting house was a white wooden 
building with square belfry and front 
porticoes. Its cost was about ^12,000. 
It occupied the southwest corner 
of Huntington and .Jay streets, and 



is built of rough granite, and is one 
of the finest buildings in the city ; its 
architecture is unique, and it presents 
a most substantial and solid appear- 
ance. In size it is commodious and 
generous. It occupies a conspicuous 
position on the crest of the liill op- 
posite the Park, on Broad Street. The 
present Pastor of the church is Rev. 
.James W. Bixler. who commenced his 




HUNTINGTON STREET BAPTIST CHURCH - HUNTINGTON STREET, 

NEAR JAY. 

The Huntington Street Baptist Church was Organized in 1849. Pastor. Rev. Joseph A. Elder. Sunday Services: 

10.45 A. M.. Preaching by the Pastor: Meeting of the Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor at 6 P. M.: 

Evening Meeting at 7.30 o'clock. Prayer Meetings on Wednesday and Saturday Evenings. 



was dedicated in April, ISo-"). ()n 
March loth, 18(^8. it was burned to 
the ground, and that soon after the 
expenditure upon it of ¥10,000 for 
repairs. The corner stone of the 
present structure was laid in October, 
1808. The editice was completed and 
dedicated in .June, 1870. Its entire 
cost was more than $110,000. It 



pastorate in October, ISUI. The 
Deacons are William H. Chapman. 
Newton Fuller. Francis N. Braman. 
and P. Hall Shurts. 

In 1897 a new parsonage was erected 
at No. -T Broad Street by Mrs. Martha 
S. Harris, in memory of her late hus- 
band. Hon. .Jonathan Newton Harris, 
who was a deacon of the t-hurch. It 



47 



[picturesque IRew london. 



is a tine residence of I'onipeiiiin brick, 
and forms a fitting memorial to Mr. 
Harris — whose beneficence was wide- 
spread — besides being an ornament to 
the city. 

The Society of the St. James I'.pis- 
copal Cliurch was organized in \~2^. 
Its first church building was erected in 
lT8:i, on the Parade, foot of State 
Street. It was burned by Benedict 
Arnold on the ;")th of Septemljer, 1781. 
In 17.ST the next house of woisliip was 
cnnstructed: it stooii on Main Street, 
at the corner of Church, and served 
tlie Society until IH^O. The present 
edifice, located at the corner of Hunt- 
ington and Federal Streets, was con- 
secrated in .lune, 185<>. It is a line 
brown-stone building of ornate archi- 
tecture, with minarets and a lofty 
spire. 

Tiie St. .lames I'lpiscopal Churcii in 
New London has numbered among its 
pastors such eminent divines as Jtev. 
.lauies McSparren, I). I)., and tlie Ht. 
Ivev. Samuel Seal)ury, I). D., one-time 
liishop of Connecticut and Rhode 
Island. Beneath the shelter of the 
north wall of St. James Church is a 
stone tablet to his memory, which re- 
cords that beneatli it his body once 
rested for a time, and that he was a 
man of good deeds and many sacrifices. 

The Hector of St. James Church is 
Rev. Alfred i'oole (irint, Ph. I). ; 
Senior Warden. Thomas P. Bindloss ; 
Junior Warden. John Mc(iinley; Ves- 
trymen, Elisha 1^. Palmer, Daniel J. 
McAdams, Charles II. (loss. Fitch I). 
Crandall. Charles B. Ware. W. I-'. M. 
Rogers, and A. C. Woodruff. 

The First Baptist Church of New 
London was organized in 1804, by a 
colony from tlie Baptist Church of 
Waterford. It was incorporated in 
18S;3. The first meeting-liouse was 
erected in 180t5, on Pearl Street, near 
I'nion. Prior to tliat time services 
were held in tlie Court House. The 
present structure, a fine brick building 
with two towers of unequal height, is 
located at the corner of State and 



Washington streets. It was dedicated 
March PUh, 1S.")(5. Tiie Pastor is 
Rev. Franklin (i. McKeever: Deacons, 
James Newcomb. Leonard F. Lester, 
Charles A. Benjamin. Hiram Hold- 
ridge, Joseph Starr, and H. i). 
Stanton. 

The Second Baptist Cliurch, Union 
Street, opposite (iolden. was organized 
in 1840. Its pastorate is at present 
unoccupied. 

The Huntington Street Baptist 
Church, located on Huntington Street, 
near .hiy, dates its organization from 
March' 12th, 1849. The building 
occupied by the Society is a commodi- 
ous one, fashioned somewhat after the 
Colonial style, with large pillars and a 
broad portico. Within the past year 
it lias undergone important repairs, at 
an outlay of alxiut •'?1."JOO. Tiie 
Pastor is Rev. Joseph A. Elder: 
Deacons, J. Coleman Williams, Her- 
bert L. Avery, George Crandall, 
William K. Greene, John Winslow, 
Henry B. I)w3'er, and Ciiarlcs F. 
Potter. 

The Shiloh Baptist Ciiurcli (color- 
ed) on High Street, has been in ex- 
istence since 18'.i4. Its Pastor is 
Rev. T. L. Crocker; Deacon, A. 
Moseley. 

Methodism was introduced into 
New London Septendier l2nd, 178'.i, 
b}- a sermon preached by Rev. Jesse 
Lee at the Court House. In Octoljer, 
1793, the first Methodist class was 
formed. In 17!i8 the first Methodist 
Ejjiscopal Church was erected on the 
nortliwest corner of Fnion and 
Methodist streets. In 1855 the build- 
ing now in use on Federal Street was 
constructed. It is a large and credit- 
able edific^e, and has just binm le- 
paired and completel}' renovated at an 
expense of about ■'i'4,'200. The jircs- 
ent parsonage, ()7 Hempstead Street, 
was purchased by the Ladies' Aid 
Society in 1882. The Pastor of the 
Federal Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church is Rev. Walter S. Mclntyre: 
Trustees, F. E. Barker, D. E. Whiton, 



48 



(picturesque IRew Uondon. 



B. F. Starr, H. F. Rogers. J. A. 
Southard, J. H. Root, H. B. Smith, 
(ieorge H. Holmes, and G. A. Ed- 
gerton. 

The home of St. Mary's Star of the 
Sea Roman Catholic Church is an 
elegant and ample granite structure, 
located on Huntington Street, near 
Washington. It was completed in 
187ti, to replace St. Patrick's Church, 
on Truman Street, which had become 



Church is Kev. Thomas I'. .Jo^nt. 
The A.ssistant Pastors are Rev. David 
O'Donnell and Rev. John F. (juinn. 

The T'liitarian Society, Minister, 
Rev. John Foster Tucker : President, 
freorge P. Fenner. conducts a service 
of preaching every Sunday evening at 
7.30 o'clock in Lyric Hall. No. 241 
State Street. 

lu addition to New London's active 
churches, whose pastorates are regu- 




HOME OF THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION — STATE STREET. 

The Young Mens Christian Association in New London Was Organized in 1867. In the Rear of the Building Shown in the 

Accompanying Illustration is the Gymnasium, a Fine Brick Structure, the Gift to the Association of Hon. George 

F. Tinker. It is Well Equipped With Gymnasium Apparatus, and By Reason of Its Si;c and Arrangement 

Forms an Excellent Place in Which to Hold Socials and Entertainments. The President of the 

Association is Hon. George F. Tinker : Vice-Presidents. A C. Woodruff. H. D. Stanton. 

and George C. Strong: Secretary. P. Leroy Harwood : General Secretary. 

Richard W. Mansfield : Treasurer. Frank E. Barker. 



inadequate to the demand made upon 
it by the increasing congregation. 
Just south of the church is tiie house 
occupied by the I'astor and his assist- 
ants; on its northern side is the fine 
brick building of the Sisters of Mercy. 
At the west of the latter institution 
is the school building of the parish, a 
modern structure of commodious de- 
sign. The Pastor of St. Mary's 

(5) 40 



larly supplied, are several cliurch and 
religious bodies. The People's Chris- 
tian Church, the Central Mission 
School, the Bradley Street Mission, 
the Yoiuig Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, aii<l otliei-s, are local organiza- 
tions wlidse efforts along the lines of 
Christiiin work are productive of 
much that is for the common good 
and welfare of the city. 




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O ^ 

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50 




NEW LONDON POST OFFICE— STATE STREET, CORNER UNION. 
Postmaster. John McGinley : Assistant Postmaster. Franklin W. Dow. 

Chapter 1It). 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS — SAVINGS AND NATIONAL BANKS — BANKERS 
AND BROKERS — POSTAL, TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE FACILITIES. 



Upon its Financial Institutions 
a city or town dejjends largely for much 
of its prosperity, growth, and desir- 
ability as a business or manufacturing 
center. The healthy condition of its 
financial organizations, and its ade- 
quate banking facilities are frequently 
demonstrative of the general prosperity 
and business status. 

In her banks and other monetary in- 
stitutions, New London, the banking 
center of the adjacent towns and 
countrysides, is particularly fortunate. 
Her bank officers are in most instances 
representatives of the first and best 
known New London families. The 
facilities offered the various business 
concerns and manufacturing industries 
are extensive, and the accommodations 



and privileges as liberal as is compati- 
ble with consistent banking. The 
bank buildings are of either stone or 
brick, substantial and secure ; and their 
vaults are strong, impervious to fire, 
and supplied witli modern appliances 
for convenience and absolute security. 
Their boards of directors are composed 
of business men and manufacturei-s 
who have at heart the cit)''s best in- 
terests of business prosperity, enter- 
prise and progression ; men wlio stand 
ready to serve the reliable firms of the 
present, and to further the establisii- 
ment of future reputable and wide 
awake concerns. 

Tiie history of New London's banks, 
as compared with those of other cities, 
is unique. New London was among 



51 



[picturesque IRew ILondon, 



the tii-st six cities in tlie couiitrv to 
iiuiuluT a lianlcini^ liousc anioii*^ tiii'ir 
otiier business enterprises. Witii tlie 
birth of the whaling industry as a 
prominent factor in tlie city's Imsiness 
life, came tlie necessity of liiianriaily 
assisting many of the whaling agents 
and captains. Then to the fore came 
the banks of New London, and tiie 
\\isdom of extending such assistance, 
and the great benehl it has been totiie 
community, is attested bj' the import- 
ance to which the city attained as a 
whaling port, and by the wealth and 
conse([uent jirosperity brougiit into it 
by those engaged in the industry. 

While none of the banks of the city 
are of more recent origin tlian ISliT. 
the Union iJank, and the New London 
City National Hank, are the two oldest. 
The l^nion I>ank, with a like institu- 
tion in Hartford and \ew Haven, 
chartered at the same session of the 
Legislature, is the ohlest in the State. 
It is credited, however, with having 
secured possession of its charter some- 
what earlier tlian (>ither the Hartford 
or New Haven IJank. Its lirst Presi- 
dent was .ledediali iluiilington: its 
first Cashier, .lulm Ilallaiii. 

The New London City National, 
next in point of age, was incorporated 
in May. 1807. Its tirst President was 
Elias Perkins: first C^ashier, Anthony 
Thatcher. Then followed the Savings 
Hank of New I>ondon. winch dates its 
existence from 18'27, with Ezra C'hap- 
pell its first President; the National 
Whaling Hank, 1883, with Coddington 
Hillings President, and Peter C. Tur- 
ner Cashier ; the National Bank of 
Commerce, September, 18r)2, lirst Pre- 
sident Acors Barns, firet Cashier, 
Charles Butler, present President, 
Charles Barns, j)resent Cashier, 
George B. Prest ; and in 18G7. the 
Mariners' Savings Bank of New Lon- 
don, first President, Captain Daniel 
Latham, first and present Treasurer, 
John E. Darrow. 

The Connecticut Building and Loan 
Association, of Hartford, the Co- 



operative Building Hank, of New 
York, V. H. Parmelee. Secretary and 
'I'reasurer ; the brokerage firm of F. A. 
Rogers & Company — C. F. Edney, 

local manager' — and the general in.sur- 
aiice agencies of James IL Hill & 
Company, J. C. Learned & Sf>ns, 
James l{. May and others, together 
with many insurance companies of 
local rej)rescntation, aild materially to 
the city's financial atmosphere and 
activity. 

TiiK Postal. Telegraph, and 
Telki'monk Faiii.itii:s of New Lon- 
don are sullicient anil connnendable. 
The Post Office Building, at the cor- 
ner of State and Union streets, is com- 
modious and well appointed, and the 
clerical and carriers" force elficient 
and courteous. The Postmaster is 
John McCiinley ; A.ssistant Postmaster, 
Franklin W. I)f)\\ . 

New London's {if)sition as a pro- 
minent railroad center affords super- 
lative advantages in the matter of 
prompt and effective telegraphic com- 
munication. This city was among those 
early to avail themselves of the tele- 
graph. In 1847, shortly after the suc- 
cessful completion of the invention, a 
company, formed of New London itnd 
Nor\vi(-h citizens, connected the two 
cities b}' wire. The telegraph com- 
j)anies now operating in New London 
are the Western Union, which has its 
ollices in the Union Depot, and a sum- 
mer ofiice at the Pequot House, and 
the Postal Telegraph Cable Company, 
with ollices at 5 Bank and 174 State 
Street. 

New London is furnished with local 
and long distance telephone conveni- 
ences by the Southem New England 
Teh'jihoiie Company, which has its 
division headquarters in the Neptune 
Building, i'.t State Street. Other public 
telephone stations in New London 
have their locations as follows: Hotel 
Winthrop, 10 State Street; Crocker 
House, 1 74 State Street : and the State 
Armory, 41 Washington Street. 



52 



Ipicturescjue 1Rew Uondon. 



Thus it is apparent that in lier 
financial institutions and in her oppor- 
tunities of local and outside communi- 
cation, as well as hy reason of her nu- 
merous other municipal privileges and 
accommodations, New London stands 
well to the front with cities of similar 
population and advantages. 



Union Bank is one of the 
financial institutions in the 



Thi< 
oldest 

country. At 
the time of its 
incorporation 
but five banks 
were in exist- 
ence in the 
United States: 
one each in the 
cities of New 
York, Boston, 
Philadelphia, 
Baltimore and 
Providence. As 
early as Feb- 
ruary 10, 1792, 
a meeting was 
held at Miners 
Tavern on 
Bank Street, 
when a com- 
mittee CO m- 
posed of men of 
property inter- 
ests and l)usi- 
ness standing- 
was appointed to 
institute a bank 
in New London 
and obtain sul)- 

scriptions to the stock. At the May 
session of the Connecticut legislature 
in 1792, a cliarter was obtained, pro- 
viding for a capital of !|1 00,000, and 
an authorized capital of «oOO,000. 
The bank at once began business in a 
brick building on the upper part of 
Water Street, owned at the time l)y 
Edw. Hallam & Company. During 
the year, seven other banks in various 
parts of the country obtained their 
charters. 




THE UNION BANK— 61 STATE STREET. 

Established in 1792. 



In l«ll-! tiie bank built the stone 
building it now occupies on State 
Street. On March 28, 1865, it was 
voted to convert the bank into a 
National Hanking Association, under 
the general banking law of tlie I'nited 
States, but later, on January 10, 1882, 
it liquidated as a National institution, 
and the business since tliat period has 
l)een conducted as a State bank by 
tlie resumption of its charter of 1792. 

Up to the pres- 
ent time, 1901, 
tlie l)ank has 
iiad but seven 
presidents and 
seven cashiers.' 
Mr. Robert 
Coit, the jDres- 
ent incumbent, 
assumed the 
{'residency in 
189:5. J.Law- 
rence Chew, the 
present Cashier, 
was elected to 
that ottice in 
ISS;"). 

Tliis old insti- 
t u t i o n, the 
Inion Bank, 
(• u j o y s in a 
marked degree 
tlie (onlidence 
of the public on 
the ground of 
present useful- 
ness alone, 
apart from any 
consideration 
wliicli may be due to its extreme age 
or the services it lias rendered tlie 
business connnunity in the past. 

New London in 1807 was the only 
city in Connecticut that had two banks 
— the New London B.xnk, incor- 
porated in May of that year, and the 
Tnion. incorporated in 1792 — Hart- 
ford. New Haven, Middletowu, Nor- 
wich and Bridgeport being each served 
bv one bank only. The population of 



53 



(picturesque 1Rew TLondon. 



New London was then less than 3,300 : 
and the tlesire of the coninmnity for 
greater hanking facilities tiian tiie 
Union liank couUl afford must have 
grown out of tiie fact tiiat tiiis eitv 
was tlien just fairly l)eginning to eii- 
srage in whale lishing, and the future 
importance and magnitude of that 
trade could even then he foreseen. 
The huildiiig and litting out of wliale 
ships reipiired the use of large sums of 
money ; and, during the long voyages 
of one, two or three 3'ears, the hanks 
had often virtually to carry some of 
tiie ship owners and some of the local 
merchants. It is not easy to over- 
estimate the value of the assistance 
rendered hy the hanks of New London, 
not only in the whaling ventures, hut 
in other enter[)rises that have tended 
to promote the steady, healthy growth 
which Xe\v London has enjoyed during 
the last hundred years. 

The record of the New LoihIoh 
Bank has heen an excellent one during 
tiie 93 yeai-s of its existence. Within 
tiuit period it has weathered many 
financial storms, and its management 
lias licen proved to he wise and ca[)a- 
ble in a ver}- marked degree. A list 
of those who have iieen oBicers of this 
hank would include many of New 
London's most ])rominent and success- 
ful citizens. Henry P. Haven, Presi- 
dent of the hank in 1876, J. N. Harris, 
its President from 187fi to 1896, and 
Asa < )tis. a Director from 1834 to 1859 
are allwidelyknown forthe manypuhlic 
henefactions that have come from tlieir 
large fortunes. Elias Perkins, Elisha 
Denison, .Tacoh B. (Jnrlcv. Ezra Clui])- 
pell, Elijah F. Dutton^ Alhcrt N. 
Ramsdell and Richard N. Belden each 
occupied the olHce of President of the 
hank : and the Cashiei-s have been 
Anthony Tiiatclier. Elijah F. Dutton, 
Richard N. Belden, Edwin R. Belden 
and William H. Rowe. Of these, four 
have served in that capacity for twenty 
years or more. 

Among otliers. who have been 
dirpctors of this l)aiik. mav be men- 



tioned Edward Hallam. William 
Williams. William P. Cleveland, 
Isaac Thompson, Coddington Billings, 
Thomas W. Williams, Noyes Barber, 
Jonathan Coit, N. S. Perkins. Noyes 
Iiilliiigs. William II. Chapman, Eras- 
mus D. Avery anil Richard II. Chapell. 
To one familiar with the old New 
London families, names like these in- 
dicate how fully our foremost business 
men iiave been identified witli the 
bank. 

In 1865 this institution was re-or- 
ganized under the United States laws 
and became the New London City 
National Bank. Its most recent state- 
ment shows its capital, surplus and 
profits to be about 8160,000 and its 
deposits about 8350,000. Its present 
otiicers are William Belcher, I 'resi- 
dent; Herbert L. Crandall, N'ice- 
President: William H. Rowe, Cashier; 
and, associated with these as Directoi's, 
Walter Learned, Philip C. Dunford, 
George C. Strong, S. A. Goldsmith, 
F. .S. Neweomb, Samuel Belden, 
Arthur Keefe. The other officei-s are 
Frank E. Barker, Assistant Cashier ; 
{•"rank S. Greene, Teller : John R. 
Latham. Clerk. 

The stone building on Bank Street, 
occupied by the New London City 
National Bank, has perhaps been 
longer used for banking purposes than 
any other in the State. Erected in 
1820. of native granite, it stands tfv 
(lav as sturdy and strong as wiien first 
completed, and presents now prol)abl}- 
nnich the same outward appearance 
that it did then. It is indeed one of 
the ([uaint features of Picturesque 
New London. Very characteristic it 
is of the old town — the building and 
the way in which it has been dealt with 
by its owners. In every part it shows 
its age : and vet it is not thrown aside 
and discarded. It has been kept in 
use and made comfortable and con- 
venient for the needs of to-tlay. Its 
vaidt is the original structure, built of 
inunense granite slate — top and sides 
and floor, but brought up to all modern 



54 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon, 



requirements bj- the best steel lining, 
liy massive doors, a time lock iind nn 
electric burglar alarm. And the man- 
agement of the bank, too, is typical of 
the New London business man: jiru- 
dent, conservative, slow to change, 
proud of the city's jjast and of all 
that has been good and creditable in 
her history, and yet alive to the 
opportunities of the present, and reach- 
ing out to get a share of the prosper- 
ity that has of late been coming to 
New London in the rapid growth of 
her popula- 
tion and the 
extension of 
her Indus- 
tries. 

The Sav- 
ings Bank 
OP New Lon- 
don was in- 
corporated in 
May, 18 27. 
There were 
at this time 
but three 
Savings 
Banks in the 
State of Con- 
necticut : 
The Society 
for Savings, 
in Hartford : 
The Middle- 
town Savings 
Bank : and The Norwich Savings 
Society. The incorporators met in 
June of that year, and Ebenezer 
Learned was chosen President of the 
Bank and Robert Coit Treasurer. 
The business of the Bank was tran- 
sacted in the banking room of The 
Union Bank. 

In 185'2. the Bank having outgrown 
the limited aecouunodations which 
could be afforded by the I'nion Bank, 
the Trustees Imilt on Main Street, on 
the site now occupied by the Bank. 
The new building proving inade(|uatt'. 
in 18!'."> one addition was made and in 




WILLIAM BELCHER, 
President New London City National Banli 



1898 tlie capacity of the Bank was 
doubled by another addition. The 
Bank's growth has overtaken this in- 
creased capacity, and witliin a year or 
two another addition will be put on. 

Tiie financial growth of the Savings 
Bank of New London has l)een steady 
and rapid. Its gain during the past 
fiscal year was $445,954. Its deposit- 
ors niunlier aljout 98()5. 

Fr(jm the outset the Directors of 
the Bank have l)een citizens of New 
London conspicuous for their business 

ability, and 
to that fact 
much of the 
success of the 
Bank is due. 
Tiic Presi- 
dents of the 
Bank have 
been Ezra 
(' h a pp e 1 1. 
1 ■". 1 1 e n e 7. e r 
1 - e a r n e d , 
Robert Coit, 
and the pres- 
ent incum- 
bent. William 
H. Chapman. 
Tiie Treas- 
urers have 
been Rol>ert 
Coit, Joseph 
C. Sistare. 
Francis C. 
Learned, 
Joshua C. Learned, and the present 
Treasurer. Walter Learned. The de- 
posits of the Hank are now over 
*ti, 500.000. 

It is worthy of note that the present 
Assistant Treasurer. George Whitney, 
is the great grandson of the second 
President of the Bank. 

It has been conservative in its 
management, and even in times of 
panic it has promptly paid to its de- 
positors, on demand. 

It is now seventh in size among the 
banks of the State, and is second to 
none in its financial stabilitv. 



55 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



Captain William H. Allkn, who 
resides (in Tliaines Street, in Ciroton, 
is ii familiar tignre in tliis seetion of 
Coniu'i'ticiit. He unassuniiiiLjly liears 
tlie fame of having made tlie must sne- 
cessful V03'age on record in tiic annals 
of the whaling indnstiy. This was in 
18<i3, when, in command (if the good 
ship " Onward," he iruiscd in the 
Eastern Sea, aiul liie Wdlow, Japan, 
and Okhotsk seas, and off the Cali- 
fornia coast. On 
this vovase he 
captured 134 
whales, the catdi 
netting (i,83 7 
barrels of oil. and 
t)2,000 ponnds uf 
whalebone. This 
cargo sold for the 
princeh' snni of 
.«417,'000, of 
which Captain 
.Mien's share 
was *3!t.S8<;. 
Many of Captain 
Al 1 e n "s V oy - 
ages have been 
. fraught w i t ii 
a d vent n r e s 
strange and thril- 
ling, but about 
these he is mod- 
est and reticent. 
Of his 45 years 
of active sea- 
faring life, he 
was 2o years a 
commander. And 
through many a. tinnpestuous gale, 
through many imminent and unforseen 
perils of tlie deep, he has piloted his 
ship with the instinct of the true sailor 
and the kiu)wledge of the experienced 
navigator. 

T\n' Captain has made whaling 
cruises from New Bedford and New- 
London. He speaks very highly of 
the firms in whose interests he made 
his voyages. Of the light in which 
they regarded him he modestly refrains 
from speaking. But his worth and 




sterling qualities could not be hidden. 
They have been jiartiindarly manifest 
since his leaving the sea a number of 
years ago, ami settling down to a less 
hazardous, but (pute as nsefid life 
ashore. 

Captain Allen is the son of (Jris- 
wojd and Betsey .Vllcii. He was liorn 
in Lebanon. Connecticut, October lUli, 
lH2t). In his early boyhood days he 
worked at farming until 14 or 15 
years of age, 
when he em- 
barkeil as cook 
aboard a lishing 
smack. This fos- 
tere(l \\ itliin him 
such a fondni-ss 
for the sea, that 
at 1 1> years of 
age he shi])])cd 
in the whaler 
"Robert i^owne" 
and his first 



step in a 



life 



o 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM H. ALLEN, 
President Mariners' Savings Banl< of New London 



successful sea- 
Ill a 11 s li i p was 
taken. Ill Aug- 
ust, 1 S,",,S, he 
niaiiie(l (Jeoigi- 
aiia daughter of 
Olando Bailey, of 
(irolon. They 
have two sons 
and one daughter 
living: one son 
died in infancy. 
In matters af- 
fecting the good 
of his community, Cajitain Allen is 
zealous and faithfid. He has represent- 
ed his town in the General Assembly, 
and foi- 1 '2 years has served on the (iro- 
ton Board of Selectmen. He is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, a member of the 
Order of the Mystic Shrine of Bridge- 
jiort, Connecticut, and Commodore of 
the famous Jibljoom Club of New 
London, whicdi numbers on its rolls 
32.3 members. Since retiring from 
the sea he has shown the same integrity 
and foresight in business alfairs that 



56 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



characterized his iiuuitime pursuits. 
He is President of tlie Mariners' Sav- 
ings Bank, of New Lon(h)n, one of the 
strongest financial institutions in tiie 
State ; and, for the matter of tiiat, one 
of the strongest in many states. 

The Mariners' Bank was estahlished 
in 1867, and derived its name fi'om 
the fact that it was originally intended 
to benefit seafaring men, although, of 
coui-se, the intention was not that its 
deposits should be exclusively con- 
fined to mar- 
iners. Since 
its estab- 
lishment, 
nearly, this 
Bank h a s 
had for its 
S ecr etary 
and Treas- 
virer, ;\I r. 
John E. Dar- 
r o w . T h e 
Bank's con- 
dition and 
the facts sur- 
rounding i t 
are remark- 
able. Its de- 
posits, No- 
vember 1st, 
1900, were 
f 2,4 9 0,0 00. 
Its surplus 
at that date, 
f 139,60 0. 

Recorded on its Iwoks are 4.195 open 
accounts. The average individual de- 
posit is §585. It has less tlian 90 
accounts that exceed ¥8,000, and but 
one that is in excess of -'110,000. These 
facts speak for themselves. The Direct- 
ors of the Mariners" Savings Bank are 
William H. Allen, W. L. Pcckham, 
Charles W. Strickland, Thomas A. 
Miner, Fredericks. Newcomb, George 
C. Strong, John Hopson. Richard C". 
Morris, James P. Johnston. Horace C. 
Lamphere, Albert R. Darrow, Isaac 
W. Thompson, Frederick S. Parmelee, 
and George E. Starr. 




SEBASTIAN D. LAWRENCE, 
President of the National Wtialing Banl<. 



(Jnk of Till-: ()Li)i:.sT and Be.st 
Known of New London's financial in- 
stitutions is the National Wh.vlin<; 
Bank, located on i5ank Street, near 
State. It dates its existence from 
1883, when it was chartered as a 
State bank. In 1865 it was changed 
from a State to a National liaiik. 

At the time of the organization cjf 
the National Whaling Bank in 1833, 
and for some years sid)seqiient to that 
time. New London figured prominently 

as a whaling 
port, and as 
the industry 
called for 
increased 
banking fa- 
cilities and 
grew in im- 
portance, it 
seemed ap- 
propriate to 
name in its 
honor one of 
the principal 
li a n k i n g 
houses of the 
citv. 

the Whal- 
i n g 15 a n k 
occupies its 
own btiilil- 
ing. a sul)- 
s t a n t i a 1 
strnc 1 11 r e, 
w h i c h in 
point of solidity and security typi- 
fies tiie qualities possessed by the 
institution pruper. Some conception 
of its sound status, and of its success- 
ful past may be gathered by a con- 
sideration of the following statement. 
Capital. 8150.000 : surplus. w40.000 : 
undivided [irotits, ••<114.0C(I: annual 
dividends for the past 40 years. 10 per 
cent. 'l"he President of the National 
Whaling Hank is Sebastian D. Law- 
rence; Cashier. Helton A. Copp. The 
Directoi-s are S. D. Lawrence, S. H. 
Miner, B. A. Copp, C. J. Viets, and 
D. N. Copp. 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Mr. C'liAUi.ics l-'i:i;i>i;iti(K Ij>m;\. 
inaiKiLjer for F. A. l{()t,^i'rs \ ( '(HiiiiiUiy, 
loiiiiuission stoi'k brokers, IS mid 11' 
Neptune Building, New Ivondoii, is a 
native of Weyliridgc. Surrey County, 
iMigland, wliere lie was liorn in ISTo. 
He is the son of Tiiomas Randall 
Edney, of the old Somerset family of 
that name. 

In 1884, with his parents, he loeated 
in Canada, and received liis education 
in tlic pulilic schools of Sherlnddkc. 
(Juelieu. At an 
early age he was 
in theSherhrooke 
Works of the 
Eldison Electric 
Company. 

lie entered tlic 
employ of tlic 
Great Nortii- 
western Tele- 
graph Company 
in 188 8. anil 
t li f re lea nuMl 
telegraph y . 
rapidly master- 
ing that profes- 
sion. He is an 
operator of great 
speed and accu- 
racy, and lias 
held many re- 
sponsible posit- 
ions. His first 
position in the 
L'nited States 
was with t li e 
Western In ion 

Telegrapli Company, at White River 
Junction, X'crmont, where he was 
employed for tliree years. In 1S1I2 
he was in the service of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad as ticket ag(Mit 
at Lakeport, New Hampshire, and 
later as station agent at West Leb- 
anon. He was with the Postal 
Telegraph Company in Boston, in 
189-5. and on the Boston Glolie staff 
in 1894, operating their sjiecial New 
York wire. Sulisequently he accepted 
a position with the Associated Press, 



CHARLES 
Manager for F. A. 



iiis tiisl location with liicm iicing 
Ilarllurd, ( niinccticut. He soon ac- 
([uircd a national reputation as an 
expert telegrapher. 

In 189S he again entered tiie em- 
ploy of the Associated I'ress, and 
worked their iieaviest circuit out of 
New York. In the same year, at the 
national teh'grapiiic contest held at 
iMadisdU S(|uare (iardeii. New York 
City, he was awardi'd the lirst prize 
fur rajiiii sending. 

.Mr. Edney lie- 
came connected 
with the lirok- 
eiage linn of F. 
A. Rogers & 
C o m p a n y in 
1S'.I9. and opened 
their New Lon- 
d () n oilic e i n 
.1 u n e o f that 
\('ar. Tiiis iirm's 
leased wire sys- 
tem is the most 
extensive of that 
in operation b}- 
any similar con- 
c e r n in New 
England. Their 
. y , (illii'es connected 

^^ / ''J pi'ivate wires 

are about fifty in 
nunilier. They 
iiave also numer- 
ous correspond- 
F. EDNEY, cuts at various 

Rogers & Company. ]loints in the 

I'nited States 
Their advices on cotton are largely 
iiuoted by ^lajiers in the cotton belt. 
Tlie New ^'ork offii'es of the firm are 
at 38 Wall street, and their Boston 
offices are located in the Ames Building. 
In October, 1900, Mr. Edney was 
married to Miss Cora Esther Palmer, 
daughter of Frank Hazen Palmer, a 
well known manufacturer of Brooklyn, 
New Y'ork. Their residence is on 
Willetts Avenue. He is a member of 
the Thames and Entre Nous clubs, of 
New London. 

58 




Chapter \D. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 



THE MANUFACTORIES OF NEW LONDON — MANUFACTURERS WHOSE 
ABILITY, COURAGE AND INDUSTRY HAVE AIDED IN BUILDING UP 
AND MAINTAINING THE QTY OF TO-DAY. 

does both, and in her exten- 
sive, well equipped larger fac- 
tories, in the husy, ambitious 
enterprise of her smaller 
manufacturing plants, as well 
as by lier admirable location as 
a port and watering place, her 
pf)siti<)n is extremely fortun- 
ate and congratulatory. 

C'losel\- identilied with 
manufacturing in New Lon- 
don are men of public spirit, 
energy, progressiveness and 
foresight. Men who are 
anxious to place their city 
on a plane with others, whose 
industrial activity and scope 
have won for them renown 
and wealth. And it is safe 
to say that most of them en- 
tertain solicitude regarding 
iS'ew London's standing as a 
commercially productive 
community, as well as for the con- 
dition of their business and per- 
sonal bank accounts. Because of this 
desire to see the city grow in import- 
ance and in touch with the various 
trade channels of the world, and by 
reason of the growing tendency to 
liberality eviiued by the Municipal 
(iovcrnmetit. and by the praiseworthy 
efforts of Tlie New London Board of 
Trade along the lines of modern busi- 
ness progression. New T^ondon is in- 
dustrially advancing. Slowly it may 
be, but surely and with certainty, 
nevertheless, the growth goes on. To 
the unobservant eye this progress may 
not be particularly apparent. The 




ISRAEL F. BROWN, 
Founder of the Brown Cotton Gin Company. 

New London, from the days of its 
early history a seaport, and in the 
summer season of the present a resort 
of the pleasure-seeker, has not the 
fame as a manufacturing center that 
attaches to many of the inland cities 
of New England. But it does not 
follow that the city is without valu- 
able mauufacturiug industries ; indeed, 
manufactories it has of variety and 
magnitude. It is with municipalities 
as with individuals: to few may be 
ascribed all the attributes. Not often 
does a city enjoy a wide reputation as 
a summer outing place, and at the 
same time stand for a manufacturing 
center of importance. New London 



.Ml 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rcw Uondon. 



erection, in rapid se<iueiice. of iiiaiui- 
faotorv alter inaiiiifactorv is not tin- 
necessary ininu'diale etlecl ol lieallliy, 
steady growth, altliough additional 
factory buildings nnist be the ulti- 
mate result. Tlie present increase is 
cliielly in the additional facilities, ex- 
tent and business of the concerns 
already active here. It is true also 
that firms from abroad have reeentl}' 
located in New i^ondon and its envi- 
rons. They are of great importance 
and will play a strong part in the 
manufacturing evolution of the city. 
. Others will come, and will be wel- 
come, more than welcome: and on 
them nuich will depend. IJut tlie 
foundations laid by tiie manufacturers 
of the past, the additions to and re- 
erections on those foundations by their 
earnest successors of the present, must 
be regarded as the "backbone," as 
the assurance of jiermanence, and as 
the sure and liealtliy basis on wiiieii 
shall rest the manufacturing future of 
New London. 

Compared with other lines of manu- 
facture, that of modern printing press 
construction is represented by very few 
cities. Prominent among these is New 
London. The fine presses manufac- 
tured here bear a world-wide i-eputa- 
tion. and carry the name of New 
London, as a city of manufaitures, to 
many quartei-s of the globe. 

Many large manufactories, whose 
products are widely sold and well 
known for their excellence, have their 
offices and plants in New London. 
The factories of the Brainerd & Arm- 
strong Company, silk manufacturers, 
have tlieir location on Church and 
Union streets, nearly in the center of 
the cit}-, and at the junction of Coit 
and Canal streets. This company was 
esta])lisiied in 18(57. Its ofiicers are : 
Ira Dimock, President ; L. O. Smith, 
Vice-President; Benjamin A. Arm- 
strong, Treasurer, and Benjamin L. 
Armstrong. Secretary. Its manufac- 
tures comprise wash embroidery silks, 
spool sewing, stamped linens, knitting 



and crochet silks, common embroidery 
silk, niaidiine and buttdu-hole twist, 
skein sewings. silk serges, Mcrveilleux, 
Satin de Chines, and plain and change- 
able Taffetas. The company has sales- 
rooms in New York City, Piiiladel- 
phia, Boston and Baltimore, and selling 
agents in Chicago, St. Louis, Cincin- 
nati, San P^rancisco, and St. Johns, 
Province of Quebec, Canada. In its 
employ are miu'e than SflO faetorv 
hand.s". Its capital is *t;40.0n(). 

Located on Pequot ^V venue, south 
of the junction of Willett's Avenue, 
Shaw and Howard streets, are the 
works of the llrown Cotton Gin Com- 
pan}-, iron founders, machinists and 
woodworkers. President and Treas- 
urei', Edward T. Brown : Secretary, 
(ieorge T. Brown. The Brown Cot- 
ton Gin Company was incorporated in 
May, 1865, by Israel F. Brown, Dr. 
(vharles Osgood of Michigan, Gilbert 
()sg()iid and John L. Devotion. It 
luanufactures cotton gins and linting 
iiiaeliines for oil mills. It is one of 
tlie principal concerns of its kind in 
the United States and employs about 
3(10 skilled met-hanics. 

The R. T. Palmer Company, largest 
manufacturers of bed comfortables in 
the world, was incorporated in 1888. 
Its innnense j)lant, bordering on Wash- 
ington and Methodist streets, com- 
prises eight large l>rick liuildings. 
The President of The K. T. Palmer 
Company is Tyler R. Palmer, of New 
York; Treasurer and Secretary, ]\eu- 
ben T. Palmer, Jr., of New London. 
The Directors are: Tyler R. Palmer, 
Reuben T. Palmer, Sr., Reuben T. 
Palmer, Jr.. and Iv II. Hamilton. 

.lust south of Shaw's Cove, on Ham- 
ilton, Oak and Howard streets, are 
the offices, foundry and machine works 
of the Hopson & Cliapin Manufactur- 
ing Company, established in 1878. It 
is engaged in founding, and in the 
manufacture of boilers and radiators 
for heating by the hot water system. 
The shops of The Hopson \- Chajiin 
Company are extensive. Its products 



60 




Gl 



(picturesque 1Hew Uondon. 



are liigli giiulc, and widely and most 
favorably known. Thf I'rt'sidcnl and 
Treasurer of the eonipany is John 
Hopson; Secretary, Chas. W. Cluipin; 
Superintendent, William T. Hopson. 

'i'lie D. E. Whitou Mathinc Com- 
pany, ")[! Howard Street, was founded 
ill West Stafford, Connectieut, in 1856, 
by David E. Whiton. The concern 
removed to New London in 18S(5, and 
was incorporateil in the same year. 
Its fine offices and shops on Howard 
Street were erected in 1880, and by 
their extent and admirable neatness 
of appearance, reflect credit upon the 
Company. The Whiton Company 
manufactures gear cutting and center- 
ing machines, and drill and lathe 
chucks, for which it tinds a market 
throughout the entii'c country. Its 
President is David E. Whiton: Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, L. E. Whiton. 

In 185o The New London Gas Com- 
pany, now The New London (ias and 
Electric Company, was incorporated, 
with the privilege, granted by the 
Municipal Government, of exclusivel}' 
supplying the city with gas for fifteen 
years from the date of its incorpora- 
tion. The results attained to by the 
compan3% however, were so gratifying 
as to secure to it the entire subsequent 
lighting. As successors to the Oneco 
Manufacturing Company, it also oper- 
ates as engine builders, and in general 
machine work and engine repairing. 
Its offices an; at 2!l Main Street; its 
gas and electric plant, and machine 
shop and docks are located on Water 
Street. Robert Coit is President of 
the Company: Vice-President, Au- 
gustus Brandegee ; Treasurer, A.M. 
Young: General Manager, A. G. B. 
Hunt. 

In nearly any grocery, provision 
store or bakery (h'aler's establishment 
— in whatever section of the country — 
one may happen to enter, if he be a 
New Londoner, he is almost certain 
to be reminded of home by some box 
or barrel bearing the legend "C. I). 
Boss & Son, New London, Conn."" 



The goods of this tirni of rrackcr 
manufacturers arc known from New 
Brunswick to Key West, and clear lo 
the Pacific coast. The business was 
established in 1831 by the late C. D. 
Boss, father of C. D. Boss, the present 
sole proprietor. The buildings it oc- 
cupies have a frontage on W a 1 e r 
Street, and cover in extent an entire 
block. Everything in the line of 
crackers, biscuit, bread and cake is 
manufactured here, of a ([uality and 
excellence unsurpassed. 

After a long experience with lead- 
ing granite lirms in the wholesale and 
retail trade, and realizing that New 
London demanded, and afforded par- 
ticular advantages for, the establish- 
ment of a marble and granite concern, 
Frank M. Ladd founded in June, 
1900, an industry' of that nature at 
204 Bank Street. Mr. Ladd has had 
under his supervision some of the 
finest granite and marble construction 
in the country. He has installed in 
his present works special, improved 
machinery. Competent designers and 
workmen arc employed to bring the 
product manufactured up to the liigli- 
est standard. That this is being ac- 
complished is evidenced by the large 
amount of ornamental stcme work that 
has been turned out and erected since 
the iiureplion of the Imsincss. 

The Morgan Iron Works, incorpor- 
ated in 1893, has its plant and sliij)- 
yard at Fort Neck. The President of 
the Company is Ricardo R. Morgan: 
Secretary, Elias F. Morgan. 

The manufacture in New London 
of artificial ice on a large scale is car- 
ried on by the New London Brewing 
Company — which was incorporated 
October' 4th, 1899— at its Winthrop 
Spring Hygeia Ice Plant, incorporated 
and in oi)eration one year previous. 
The officers of the Company are: 
Rudolph l'\ Haffenreffer, Jr., Presi- 
dent : Henry Stender. Vice-President : 
Charles II. Leinert, Treasurer and 
(ieneral Manager, and frank L. 
George, Secretary. 



62 




63 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



As IINK riMNI'INC .Ma(1iinki;v as 
<AN HE lU'iLT is iiiailc in Nt-w Lon- 
don. l)y The Biibfock I'rinting Press 
Miinufacturing Conipany, located on 
Pequot Avenue. Organized in 1882, 
liy men tliorouglily conversant witli 
tile husiness. tlieir products liave lieen 
of such excellent (luality. so accurate 
in luechanical construction and so 
complete in original design, that they 
have forced tiiemsclves into tlie front 
rank of Press Builders, and their nia- 
<'hincs are found in many of the best 
printing ollices in tiic United States, 
C'anada. Mexico, 
South America, 
England, Scandi- 
n a V i a . Russia, 
China. Australia 
and tiic Saiidwicli 
Islands. 
The name of the 
Babcock Com- 
pany has become 
a synonym for 
the highest giacle 
of printing ma- 
chinery, honestly 
built and fairly 
sold. 

They build 
many kinds and 
.sizes of cylinder 
presses, for all 
grades of print- 
ing, from their 
smallest press, 

weighing two and one-half tons, to the 
big web newspaper machine, weighing 
sixteen tons. There is no clearness of 
tj-pe, delicacy of tint or strength of 
color known to the ]irinter's art that 
cannot be produced with the Babcock 
Presses. 

Trade names, which are known 
wherever good printing is done, have 
been given to the different presses. 

The illustration represents a section 
of the press room of Harper & Bros., 
New York, showing a line of " Opti- 
mus "' presses. The "Optimus" is 
one of the most popular machines 



made liy tiie Habco(dv ('ompany, and 
is the i)est t wo-rcvolutinii ])r('ss built. 
Some of the tincst printing done liy 
Harper & Bros., who are noted for 
fine work, is done upon the Babcock 
"Optimus" presses. This Press was 
exhibited at the i'aris Ex])iisiti()n in 
HMJO, and awarded a gold medal. The 
Company also received the highest 
award for their exhibit at the World's 
Fair, Chicago, in lis'.i-'!. 

The President of the Conipany is 
Mr. (ieorge P. Fenner, of New Lon- 
don. Mr. Nathan Babcock, of West- 




SECTION OF THE PRESS-ROOM OF HARPER & BROTHERS. 

NEW YORK. 



erly, is the Secretary and Treasurer. 
The New York office of the Conipany 
is at 38 Park Row. Bamhart Bros. 
iS: Spindler, Chicago, General Western 
Agents. John Haildon & Co., Lon- 
don, England, Agents for Great lirit- 
ain. Agents for Scandinavia, Finland 
and Russia, Aktiebolaget Mekanikus, 
Stockholm, Sweden. Mexican Agents. 
Fuiidicion Mcxicana de Tipos, City of 
Mexico. Tiie results obtained from 
this comijany's presses are such that 
for firmness of impression, accuracy in 
register, and excellence of distribution, 
they leave nothing to l)e desired. 

64 





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A SPECIMEN OF GRANITE CARVING DONE WITH PNEUMATIC TOOLS. 

FRANK M. LADD. 204 BANK STREET. NEW LONDON. CONNECTICUT. 

MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF GRANITE. 

MARBLE AND FREESTONE. 



66 



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(picturesque 1Rew Uondon* 



Tlie Hiiigliani l^lpel• Box Conipany. 
12 Mountain Avenue, was cstal)lislie(l 
in 1887. It m^ufactures all kinds 
of paper hnxes. and operates a print- 
ing department, in wliieh is carried 
on an extensive business in ever}- 
variety of hook and job printing. 
The President and Treasurer is A. 
Kingsbury, of South Coventry, (dn- 



iiieorporated in .Inly, 1^08. Its Presi- 
dent is Henry Lewis, of Piiiladeli)hia; 
Treasurer, Robert McLean, of New 
York; Secretary. Jides A. Montant, 
of Xew York : Agent and Superin- 
teiulent, Alnnzo W. Sholes. of Xew 
London. 

The New London Wash Silk Coni- 
]iaiiy. :>0 Hempstead Street, dates its 




PLANT OF THE BINGHAM PAPER BOX COMPANY- 12 MOUNTAIN AVENUE. 

Printers, and Manufacturers of Paper Boxes. 



necticut ; General Manager, ^Villianl 
Kingsbury, of New London. 

In the Harris lUiilding, .59 State 
Street, are the offices of The Palmer 
Brothers Company, incorporated in 
1899. President,^ Frank L. Palmer: 
Vice-President. Elisha L. Palmer: 
Secretary and Treasurer, George S. 
Palmer. The Palmer Brothers are large 
manufacturers of quilts, with mills at 
Montville. Oakdale and Fitcliville. 

The Xew London Steam Woolen 
.Mill Company. Water Street, was 



incorporation from .laiiuary, 18 94. 
President and Treasurer, C. C. Knowl- 
ton. of Biooklyn, Xew York: Vice- 
President and ]\Ianager, Robert Smith, 
of New London : Secretary. George 
A. Hammond, of Putnam, Conn. 

The i-yon linbrelhi Comjiany was 
incorporated in January. I'.ini). Its 
President is Frank A. Munsey; 
\'ice-President, Amasa Lyon, of New 
York : Secretary, Bernard C. Lyon of 
New York: Treasurer. .Fohii Fogler of 
New London. 



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69 




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72 



Chapter IDA. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

CITY GOVERNMENT-THE NEW LONDON BOARD OF TRADE- DISTINGUISHED 
MEN OF THE PAST AND PRESENT-THE NEW LONDON PRESS. 

with the City Goveniiuent. and takes 
a sincere interest in everthing which 
will advance the welfare of this 
growing city. 

The Senior Alderman, who presides 
over the Board in the Mayor's absence, 
and who would succeed him in case of 
death, is elected annually by the 
Aldermen. Alfred II. Chappell. one 
of the progressive and most expe- 
rienced members of the Board, was 
elected to the position in ( )ctober. U'OO. 

The meniliers of the Board are: 
U. H. (iunn, E. M. Sweeney and H. 
P. Bulhird from the First Ward; 
C. H. Morris, C. Royce Boss and A. 
H. Chappell from the Second; P. C. 
Eggleston, G. C. Morgan and James 
R. May from the Third: W. P. 
McBride. T. R. Murray and H. S. 
Dorsey from the Fourth: F. M. Ladd, 
C. D. Twomey and (ieorge H.Tliomas 
from the Fifth Ward, antl Charles 
Prentis. Kdwin L. DaSilva and Chaun- 
cey B. McCreery, Aldermen-at-Large. 
The Nkw Li intx )N Boakd ok Tkahe 
was organized in 1885. The progres- 
sive men of New London very generally 
joined it, and its officers have been 
chosen from the class favoring an 
enterprising policy in public and busi- 
ness affairs. The origin of many 
favorable changes are attributal)le to 
the Board. Its ollicei's are: .lohn 
McGinlcy. President: Edward S. 
Xeilan, Fii-st Vice-President: Francis 
X. Braman, Second Vice-President: 
Walter Fitzmauriee, Secretary; George 
B. Prest, Treasurer. 

To the country's roll of distin- 
guished, eminent, and able men New 
I.ondon has added her quota. Among 
them have been .John Winthrop, Jr., 
the founder of the town of New 




JOHN McGINLEY, 

Journalist. Editor. Postmaster of New London, and 

President of the New London Board of Trade. 

Xkw London is an independent city 
in politics. One party carries the mu- 
nicipal election about as frequently as 
the other. City officers are elected 
.annually the tirst Monday in October. 
The Mayor, City Clerk, and Treasurer, 
and the members of the Board of 
Aldermen, hold office three years. 
One-third of the Board is elected 
yearly, the others holding over. There 
.are five wards, each entitled to three 
Aldermen. ~ In addition, to cover a 
State law, three Selectmen are elected 
annually. Under the city charter they 
are, e.r-offieio, members of the Board, 
.and are known as Aldermen-at-Large. 

The present Mayor. Hon. M. Wilson 
Dart, was elected in October. li'OO. 
Jle has l)een for some veai-s connected 



(i) 



7:i 



(picturesque 1Rew london. 



Liiiulou, and (iovciiior ol llie Culoiiy: 
Guidon Saltonstall, who was also 
(ioveniorin 1708: Hislioji Saiinicl Sca- 
bui'v. Bisliiip of Coiiiiectii'iit and Kliodc 
Island, tlie Hist American Hisliop; Cap- 
tain Nathan Halo, the patriot: (ieneral 
Jedediah Iluntint^ton, livst Collector 
of the Port of New London, a soldier 
of the Revolution and Aid to (ieneral 
Washington. Gen. Joseph A. Mower, 
one of the bravest of Sherman's coiii- 
manders on "The 
March to the 
Sea," and a noted 
Indian lighter, 
was of New Lon- 
don birth, (ien- 
eraKirant ranked 
him second onlv 
to General Sher- 
man in fiLjhtinn- 
a 1) i 1 it y and in- 
trepidity. Hon. 
Henry P. Haven, 
to whom the city 
is indebted foi' 
its tine Public 
]>ibrary, was a 
merchant whose 
ships had saile<l 
over many a sea, 
e a rry i ng the 
name of New 
London into all 
ports of the 
world. Jonathan 
Newton Harris, 
another success- 
ful New l>ondon 

merchant, by the gift of .flO,000 
the founding of Memorial Hospital, 
large becjuests tfi the Second Congre- 
gational Churcii, placing the income 
from the Harris Building in the hands 
of trustees to be distributed l)y them for 
beneficent purposes; Jonathan Coit, 
by his gifts, amounting to •'i!42,000, 
to the poor and to the churches : 
Ezra Chappell, by many acts of benev- 
olence; Asa Otis, in generously 
bequeathing -vl.l oO.OOO to the Ameri- 
can Board of Foreign Missions, in 




a(hlilion to several local Ipcquests. and 
Dr. Seth Smith, a wealthy ilruggist, 
who left *:2")(l.000 to endow the Old 
Ladies" Home, have won a huge niche 
in the Temjtle of Fame, Kindly I{e- 
mendirance and Gratitude. The late 
diaries Augustus Williams, Mayor of 
New London from 188') to 1888, whose 
personal elfoi'ts in effecting the lenioval 
of tlie graves from the old cemetery 
wiiiih once occupied the ground at 
the corner of 
Broad and Hemp- 
stead streets — 
n o w Williams 
Memorial Park — 
ivsultcd in giving 
t h e p u i 1 1 i c a 
charming outing 
spot, was a l)ene- 
factor who cannot 
lie forgotten. 

The name of 
Sebastian 1). 
Lawrence repre- 
sents a line of 
r e n o w n e d and 
h o n o re d mer- 
chants whose 
enterprises have 
added much to 
the wealth of 
New London. 
His public gifts 
show his love for 
the city: The 
S o 1 d i e rs' and 
Sailors' Monu- 
ment, on the 



THE LATE HENRY P. HAVEN, 

Founder of the New London Public Library. 

Reproduced from a Bronze Relief. Executed by Augustus 

St. Gaudens. and Inserted in a Panel of the 

Porch, near the Library Entrance. 



or 



Parade, and tlie Firemen's Monument, 
at the head of State Street, are fine 
tributes to the heroic men of the past, 
and objects of special interest to 
everyone. 'i'lie beciuests of Hon. 
(ieorge F. Tinker to the Bulkeley 
School, Memorial Hospital, and Young 
Men's Christian Association, entitle 
him to tlie warm corner he holds in 
the affection of the people of New 
Ivondon. Miss Frances Manwaring 
Caulkins. in writing and publishing 
her ailiniral)lc "Historv of New 



picturesque fRew ILondon. 



London," honored the eity iind lier- 
self. Mr. J. Lawrence Chew has given 
tlie public much pleasure in sharing 
witli them the fruits of liis research 
among the romantic traditions and 
memories of old New London. Mr. 
Walter Learned, President of the 
New London Street Railway Company 
and Treas- 
urer of the 
Savings 
Bank of 
New Lon- 
don, is a 
writer of 
considerable 
distinction. 
His histori- 
cal address, 
delivered on 
the occasion 
of the Two 
H u n d r e d 
and Fiftieth 
A n n i V e r - 
sary of New 
London, in 
18;h_;, was a 
s c h o 1 a r 1 y 
oration. 
Rev. S. Le- 
Roy Blake, 
D.D., pastor 
of the First 
Church of 
Christ, is 
also entitled 
to honoral)le 
mention 
among local 
historic a 1 
writers. 
He now has 




THE LATE HON. JONATHAN NEWTON HARRIS. 

Mr. Harris was One of New London's Foremost Business 
Men and Philanthropists. 



in press an exhaustive 
history of the First Church of Christ. 
Ex-(iovernor Tiiomas M. Waller, and 
the Hon. Augustus Brandegee, by 
reason of the positions they have 
attained in the community and the 
country at large, through tlieir legal 
abilities, statesmanlike qualities and 
strong personalities, may also be men- 
tioned with pride by New l^ondoners. 



HoNOItAJiLE .IdNATHAN NeWTON 

Harhls died in October, 189ti. He 
was for many years a distinguished 
citizen of New London. His belief in 
the high destiny of the city was 
evinced by the numeroiis charities he 
generously endowed, in the substan- 
tial business block on State Street, 

which l)ears 
his name, in 
the elegant 
residence he 
( ) c c u p i e d 
on B road 
Street, and 
ill liie many 
b a II k in g, 
commercial, 
and manu- 
facturing 
i n te rests 
w h i c h li e 
aided with 
lioth means 
and counsel. 
He was 
born in Sa- 
lem, Conn., 
Nov. 18th, 
1815, and 
w a s t li 6 
sixth in de- 
scent from 
James Har- 
ris wlio re- 
sided ill Bos- 
ton, Mass., 
inl()(it!,and 
wiio after- 
wa rds lo- 
cated in 
New Lon- 
don aliout the year l(iilO with his wife 
and three sons, James, Asa, and 
Epiiraim, dying here in 171.") at the 
age of 74 years. 

Mr. Harris came to New London in 
1 8:)0 when about twenty years of age. 
lie had received a thorough meri'an- 
tile training, and after two years' 
further experience here Avith the 
leading business house of that day, 



75 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew Uondon. 



coinmi'iici'tl liis career as a incicli.iiit. 
The original linn name was J. N. 
Harris, cliangiiig in after yeai-s to 
Harris iV Brown, Harris, Ames & Cd., 
and Harris. Williams & Co. In 18()') 
Mr. Harris relireil, to he at liherly to 
care for otlier and larger linaneial 
interests. In 184S he founded the 
lirni of J. N. Harris & Co., of Cincin- 
nati, and, associated with other gentle- 
men, did a large hnsincss with the 
merchants of the Sdiitli and West. 

In 1S(52, and the years fdllnwiiig, 
in conjunction with Mr. Hill, of I'hila- 
ilelphia, he operated very successfully 
the Hill & Harris Coal Mines at 
Mahoney C'ity, Penn. He was also 
one of the organizers, and for several 
years President, of The Medical .Man- 
ufacturing Co. at Montreal, and a 
director in the Davis >S: Lawrence Co. 
of that city. For over twenty yeare 
he was President of the New London 
City National Hank, a memher of the 
Board of Directors of the Bank of 
Commerce of this city for several 
vears, and an active director of the 
New London iS; Northern Railroad, 
the New London Steamboat Company, 
and of several other important enter- 
prises. While engaged in the duties 
connected with these varied industries 
he yet found time to serve the public 
interest as a membei- of the city gov- 
ernment for a number of years, as a 
popular Mayor of New London from 
]8;j() to Ls()2, as Representative to 
the State Legislature in 185.5, and as 
Senator in the I'pjiei' House in 1804. 
He served as Chairman of the Joint 
Standinjf Connnittee on Banks during 
this session. An act was passed en- 
abling the State l)anks to organize 
under the National baidving law while 
still retaining their rights under their 
old cliarters, so that they might at any 
time thereafter, without further legis- 
lation, withdraw from the National 
organization and return to their i)re- 
vious methods. His wide financial 
experience was of inestimable value 
at this particular juncture, in shap- 



ing the legislation ol the period. 

While Mr. Harris was Mayor of the 
City, in 18tH, the Civil War broke out 
between the North and South. He 
was enabled by virtue of his position 
to render the most valuable assistance 
to the Government, and more particn- 
larlv to Ciovernor William A. Buck- 
ingliam. and the State of Connecticut. 

He was a man of strong religious 
nature, and took a deep interest in 
everything tending to uplift and benefit 
the fallen and down-trodden. During 
the Rebellion, when Fort 'i'rundiull 
was the rendezvous for recruits gath- 
ered for the United States Army, Mr. 
Harris gave his best thoughts and 
efforts to the Sunday services which 
were held at this fortiiication. He 
was an earnest friend to the Young 
Men's Christian As.sociation, and 
Chairman of the Connecticut State 
Executive Committee in ls75. He- 
was an early friend and artlent sup- 
porter of the late Dwight L. Moody, 
and aided substantially in founding 
the Mount ilermon .School and the 
Xorthlield Seminary. In 18'.t:^ he was 
President of the school. His zeal 
found field for further expression in 
helping religion and education in 
.lapan. In 188!t he founded and 
endowed the Harris School of Science 
at Kioto, Japan, with a munificent 
gift of one hundred thousand dollars. 

His church home was the Second 
Congregational, where he was one of 
the deacons. The help which he gave 
privately to many people in their 
times of need was almost unbounded. 
The Memorial Hospital, (m Garfield 
Avenue, the Harris Building, on State 
Street — the net income from which is 
devoted to educational, charitable, and 
religious pur{)Oses — are enduring 
monuments to his thoughtful care 
for others. 

Mr. Harris was a man of exception- 
allv j)i-epossessing personal appearance', 
blessed with a strong, intellectual 
face, a fine physique, and a dignified 
and courtly bearing. 



70 



Ipicturesque 1Rew 3London. 



Dk. W. W. Sheffield, son of Rev. He stood at the heud of his piofess- 

John Sheffield, was horn in North ion in New England, and in time, as 

Stonington on April 23d, 1827. He his name and skill hecame known in 

Ciune to New London in 1852, and ;i wider field, he took rank with the 

began his career as a dentist in the most prominent dentists in the United 

office and under the tutelage of Dr. J. States. ( )f his practice it may he 

A. G. Comstock of this city, and later said' that it embraced the entire 

on was in the offices of and received country, his patients coming from all 



1 n s t r u c- 
tion from 
Dr. Char- 
les Allen 
and Dr. 
D.H.Por- 
t e r of 
New York 
City, two 
of the 
most emi- 
nent men 
i n t h e 
dental 
profession 
at that 
period, 
a 11 d u n - 
question- 
ably the 
best au- 
thority at 
that time. 
He was 
a f t e r - 
wards 
graduated 




THE LATE DOCTOR WASHINGTON W. SHEFFIELD. 



sections. 
H e pos- 
sessed 
inventive 
uenius of 
a high or- 
der, and 
with his 
natural 
al)ilities, 
trained 
andbroad- 
e n e d Ijy 
scientific 
study, hi.s 
great use- 
fulness 
\\ as much 
augment- 
ed: and 
to him the 
dental 
profession 
is greatly 
indebted. 
lie was 
a man of 



from the Ohio College of Dentistry, striking appearance, distinguished 

the first dental college established in manners, and genial kindness. He 

the United States. His success as a carried his j'cars lightly until stricken 

practitioner is too M'ell known to need with paralysis, from which he never 

comment: his name and fame were recovered. 

national, and his practice grew to large He di('(l full of years, loved and 

proportions. honored by all who knew him. 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



Nkw I.iiMxiN IS 1'a\ iii:i;i) with 
rt'iiiiirkiihly gmni iiewspiipers. One of 
I he IcMdiiis,'' iiistitutioii.s of till' city is 
THI'. DA^'. printed each fveiiing. 
whifli wiis fdimdcd in .Inly, 1S81, l)y 




THEODORE BODENWEIN, 
Proprietor of the New London Day. 

the lute .(oliii A. Tibbets. The l);iy 
originally was a iiiorninjT paper and saw 
many changes and viscissitudes in the 
early part of its life, always, however, 
extending its reputation. 

In IS'.tl it was [lurchased by Theo- 
dore Hodenwcin, and since then lias 
made stead}- progress in business, 
circulation and influence. The Day 
is equipped with one of tlie best 
mechanical plants to he found in the 
State, and is thoroughl}- up-to-date in 
every way. It has a specially leased 
wire of the Associated Press and 
covers Kastern Connecticut very thor- 
oughly with a large staff of reporters. 

Few papers are as thoroughly read 
in their field as The Day. It is esti- 
mated that one of ever}' seven of the 
inhabitants of the section which it 
legitimately can claim as its field. l)uys 
the paper each evening. 

It is Repuljlican in ])olitics and 
wields considerable political influence. 

The business of The Day estal)lisli- 
ment is located at 240 Bank Street, 



in a building especially erected fur its 
accommodation by the Chappell Com- 
pany. It occupies three floors of this 

structure. 

Till-; .MiiKMNc FiKi.n of New Lon- 
don and aiijacent territniy is success- 
fully catered to by TllK ".MORNING 
TKLKGRAPH, which was founded 
in \HHo. 

The Telegraph has always iiccii 
Democratic in its politics, in fact it is 
the only Democratic paper that has 
been successfully maintained in East- 
ern (\)nnecticut in the past quarter of 
a centur}-. 

The Held for a morning ])aper in 
New London and surrounding towns 
is an excellent one. and recent changes 
in the management of the papei' denote 
that this iielil will 1)6 carefidly looked 
after in the future. 

The Telegraph receives the complete 
report of the Associated Press over its 
own leased wires and prints all the 
world's news while it is fresh, and 
frequently in advance of the big 
metropolitan papers. 

Its otiices and editorial rooms are 
very conveniently located at 8 Green 
Street, a few doors from State Street, 
the main thoroughfare of the city. 

Since the recent inauguration of 
new metho<ls and the use of modern 
mechanical facilities, the circulation 
of The Telegraph has been increasing 
very rapidly, and it is evident that the 
lield of the paper's influence and value 
is being greatl}' extended. 

TiiK New ExtiLANi) Ai.m.vnac .\m» 
F.MniKKs" FuiKNi), commonly known 
as "Daboll's Almanac," is compiled by 
David A. Daboll. of Center (iroton, 
and published by L. K. Daboll, 94 
State Street. New London. It has 
been published annually for over one 
hundred years by some d(^scendant of 
the original publisher, Nathan Daboll. 
It is widely used and relied upon by 
the mariners and farmers of Soutliern 
New England. 




THE DAY BUILDING HOME OF THE NEW LONDON DAY, 

Bank Street. 



70 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



Nkw London is CuKDiTKn with 
liiivinn' I'xocptionally able nowspapcis. 
It distinction that hy 
iiiniinon consent is 
deserved. and which, 
no donlit, tlie city 
will continne to 
merit. Ten \-ears 
iigo The New Lon- 
don Globe began 
its existence here, 
and has prospered 
lo a degree tiiat is 
the best possible 
evidence that its 
wortii is appreciated 
and that it will go 
on to greater suc- 
cess. It is a bright 
four-page afternoon 
paper that gives tiie 
news in cdiiipact 
form, and all the 
news that is worth 
])rinting. It has shown its enterprise 
in marked degree on niiiny occasions, 

\VAin'i-;i; H. Kichauds, Engineer 
of the Sewer and Water departments 
of the city of New London, is a native 
of this city. He attended 
the district schools and 
the Hartlett High School. 
and after gratluation from 
the latter, studied engi- 
neering with the eminent 
hydraulic engineer. J. T. 
Fanning, and as his assist- 
ant, made the preliminary 
surveys in 1871 for the 
New L o 11 d o n W a t e r 
Works, of wliieh lie was 
ai)pointed ("onstrueting 
Lngineer. ( )n the com- 
pletion of this work, ill 
1872, he was appointed 
Superintendent of the 
Water Works, a position 
which he has tilled to the satisfaction 
of the Board of Water Commissioners 
and the public, from that date, with 
the exception of a period of two years. 



and kee|is in 

])rngl'cssive IK 



iXcui toniion Dnihi Cilobc. 






enlarges its si/,( 
tional success as 



tlie front rank anifnig 
wsj)a]iers of the day. 
it is independent in 
its ])olitical views 
and does not hesitate 
lo freely express its 
iipinion on matters 
of public policy. It 
is owned, edited and 
managi'd by Samuel 

r . A (1 a 111 s a 11 d 
(ieorge .\. Sturdy, 
l)oth practical news- 
paper men of long 
experience and thor- 
"iigiily familiar with 
liie tield in whicii 
iheir n e w s jia pe r 
circulates. 

The (ilobe has ad- 
hered to the one 
cent price from its 
start and will stick 
t(i it cNcn though it 

It has had excep- 
ui advertising medium. 




WALTER H. RICHARDS, 

Superintendent New London City 

Water Works, and Engineer 

of the Sewer Department. 



In ISSG, on the organi/ation of the 
Sewer Department, .Mr. {{iciiards was 
eh'ited l-'.ngineer for the Board of 
Sewer Conimissioners. 
Tlie entire system of the 
city sewers has been de- 
signed and constructed 
under his supervision. The 
design of the high sc-rvice 
water sj^stem and the suIh 
merged sewer outfall, 
which are Mr. Kiciiards", 
are unique, and have 
attracted the attention of 
engineers interested in 
water and sewer work in 
many places. ,Mr. {{iciiards 
was for many years Lditor 
of the .Journal of the New 
l-^ngland Water Works 
Association, of which he 
is a prominent member. He is also a 
memlier of the Boston Society of Civil 
Kngineers, and of the Connecticut So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers and Surveyors. 



80 



[picturesque 1Rew 3London» 



A I! EL 1'. Tanner 
member of the New 
Bar. He first stud- 
ied law at Mystic, 
witli Colonel Hiram 
Appleman, and for 
a few years practiced 
there. After a 
course in the pulilic 
schools at Mystic, 
he entered Brown 
University, fron 
which he graduated 
in 1874 with the 
degree of B. A. He 
was born at Mystic, 
July 7th, 18.50. 

Mr. Tanner is a 
man of strong con- 
victions, with the 
power to express 
and stand for them ; 
and on tlie stump 
or in council is a 



IS a conspicuous 
Lniidon Comitv 



valued member of the Democratic 
party. As a speaker he is forceful; 
what he says carries^ 
tiie weight of Iionest 
conviction. He has 
been prominent in 
political affairs for 
several years, and 
was once elected to 
represent his dis- 
trict in the State 
Senate, but owing 
to an irregularity in 
the count flid not 
take his seat. 

In 1896 he was a 
Presidential elector 
on the Democratic 
ticket. 

His law offices 
are located in the 
ABEL P. TANNER, Neptune Buildings 

Advocate and Counsellor at Law. State Street. 




The Profession of Dentistry is 
well and ably represented in New Lon- 
don. Wallace B. Keeney, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, is 
one of the city's lead- 
ing dentists. He was 
born in New London 
Octol)er 31st, 1<S.50, 
son of John M. and 
Louisa Young Keen- 
ey, and secured liis 
early education in the 
public schools of his 
native cit}-. after 
T> iiich he entered the 
employ of the Wilson 
Foundry Company, 
of New London. He 
was later employed 
by the Hopkins & 
Allen Manufacturing 
Company, of Nor- 
wich, Connecticut. 
Becoming convinced 
that the dental field offered unusual 
opportunities for advancement and 
siiccess, Mr. Keenev entered the New 




DOCTOR WALLACE B. KEENEY, 
One of New London's Leading Dentists. 



York College of Dentistrj'. and in 
June, l.s7f), estaUished an oflice in 
New London for the practice of his 
chosen profession, in 
\\ hich he has achieved 
a reputation for thor- 
ough and excellent 
work. His dental 
parlors are located at 
140 State Street. 

Dr. Iveeney's poli- 
tics are Republican. 
He is a member of 
the Nameaug Engine 
Company: of tlie Jib- 
boom Club; and of 
the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of 
Elks, of wliich he is- 
Treasurer. 

On September 3d, 
1877, Dr. Keeney 
was united in mar- 
riage to ^liss Fanny 
B. Whiting, daughter of Mr. Charles 
Whiting, of Mystic, Connecticut, 
i'hev have two children livinsr. 



81 



[picturesque 1Rew ILondon* 



George Curtis Mokcian, a liiu-iil 
tU'seeiulant of Riclianl Mori^an, one of 
tlie si'veuty-si'Vi'ii original patciitees 
of the town of New LoikIoii. ami son 
of Elias F. Morgaii of New LiPiidon, 
was liorii ill New Loiiiloii, Xoveiiilier 
r>t\u 1870. After Lfnuluating from tiie 
public schools of his native city, he 
attended Harvard Fniversit}-, pureii- 
iiig special courses in the academic 
department in connection with the 
law studies, and graduating from 
the law school of 
t h a t institution 
in 1S;>4. In Feh- 
ruary, 18!t8, he 
was admitted to 
the practice of 
law before tiic 
courts of .Massa- 
chusetts at Bos- 
ton, S u ft' o 1 k 
County, and was 
admitted to the 
courts of Connec- 
t i c u t J a n u a r \- 
5th, 1895. 

.\ctingupon the 
suggestion of 
Walter S. Cartel-, 
of New York, 
.senior memher of 
the firm of ('al- 
ter, Hughes and 
Dwight of New 
York C i t y , 
whose counsel 
and advice to the 
younger members 
of the profession have niadc his assist- 
ance in this direction a matter of 
national repute, he commenced the 
practice of his profession in New Lon- 
don, and from the first has met with 
deserved success. 

In January, IS'.'T, he was married 
to Nancy Lee Brown, daughter of 
Ivlward T. Brown, President and 
Treasurer of the llrown Cotton Cin 
Company. 

In politics Mr. Morgan is of the 
Kcpublican faith, l)Ut at all times has 




GEORGE CURTIS MORGAN, 

Counsellor and Attorney at Law. 



manifested strong independent tenden- 
cies \\lien the welfare of the city and 
tile best interests of his part}' demand- 
ed such a course. The exercise of 
this predominant characteristic has 
called forth at times a certain amount 
of criticism from a small coterie of his 
party, but has never failed to win for 
iiim tlie respect and commendation of 
tlie citizens at large, regardless of 
party aililiations, as has been amply 
attested liy the popular vote on at 
least three dift'er- 
ent occasions. In 
1 8 9 5 he was 
elected a council- 
man for t h re e 
years, and again, 
in 1898, he was 
ciiosen to serve 
the city for a like 
term, "in 1899 he 
projected and 
carried to a suc- 
cessful issue the 
division of the 
city into wards. 
Til is measure 
met with the 
usual opposition 
which is wont to 
assert itself upon 
till' agitation of 
any innovation, 
liiit the general 
favor with which 
the proposition 
was received is 
demonstrated by 
the fact that Imt seventy votes out of 
eleven hundred were recorded against 
it. The bill has stood the test of 
practical utility, and stands as a testi- 
monial to the disinterestedness of Mr. 
Morgan's pulilic service. In 1897 he 
was elected alderman under the new 
systein, to represent the third ward 
for the term of three years. 

Ml'. Morgan's suite of oflices are in 
the Neiitime l>iiildiiig, located on 
State Street. His clientage is a large 
and rapidly increasing one. 



S2 




RESIDENCE OF WALTER LEARNED-BROAD STREET. 



Chapter t>1l1I. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

SOME ELEGANT AND SUBSTANTIAL RESIDENCES OF THE CITY AND ITS 
SUBURBS — PUBLIC PARKS AND OUTING SPOTS-PLACES OF AMUSE- 
MENT. 



New London has many, vp:i:v 

MANY, PLEASANT KEATUEES. The 

city and its suburbs are in numerous 
ways greatly favored. Her old, his- 
toric spots, renowned in history, and 
dear to the hearts of all who love to 
think of the part the old town played 
in the early struggles of the country: 
her peaceful harbor and excellent 
bathing beach, the delightful scenery 
round-about, are some of the advan- 
tages that make New London a 
popular and much sought city. 
Popular not only as a place of summer 
recreation, but as a favorite residential 
citv as well. Tlie broad, shaded 



streets of those sections in which the 
better class of residences may be 
found, are ideal for the purpose. And 
it is uoteworlhj- that New London is 
eminently a city in which fine streets 
and comfortable, roomj- residences 
abound. 

ALiny of the old homesteads sj)eak 
eloquently of the magnificence of their 
architecture in the period in which 
they had tlieir beginning. They are 
silent witnesses, too, to the city's 
earlier enterprise and thrift, and to 
the fact that for many jears New 
London has possessed rather more 
than her share of citizens of liberal 



83 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



and iinlepi'iidcnt forUiiif. This is 
especially true of many of the inhabi- 
tants of to-day, some of them descen- 
dants from the fine old families that 
in past generations made New !>ondon 
famous. But not a few are more or 
less recent acquisitions ; people of 
refinement and wealth, who, appre- 
ciating the city's desirability as a 
place of abode, have estal>lislied here 
permanent residences. The result is 
that both the son of the olil New 



Ldiidon c;illi'(i ••the Pe(iuot ('olony," 
has its locatit)n in the southern por- 
tion of the city, near ^hat famous 
summer hotel, the Pequot House, and 
Ocean Heach. Here many wealthy 
people from New ^'ork City make 
their residence ; some for the warm 
season only, and some during the 
entire year, travelling to and fro 
between New London and the Metro- 
polis, as duty or pleasure calls. 

Many of the residences in the 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. MARTHA S. HARRIS, 
Broad Street. 



Londoner, and the newcomer, appiar 
to have vied with one another in erect- 
ing elegant and modern dwellings. 

In New London the oljserver is 
impressed by the amount of breathing 
space, as it were, allotted to each 
residence. Nearly every one has a 
generous front, side, and rear yard ; 
and in the summer season their green 
and well kept lawns present a beau- 
tiful appearance. In vei-y truth. New 
Lonilon might be aptly called the City 
of Delightful iiesidences. 

The charniintj snlnirb of New 



I'cquot section are very fine, and 
bespeak wealth and culture. It is 
the yearly custom of not a few celebri- 
ties and generally notable people to 
spend at least a portion of the sum- 
mer here. And then, with their 
handsome equipages on the smooth 
drives, and the magnificent ste'am 
yachts in the offing, the scene is a 
gala one indeed. 

To drive or saunter about New 
London on a pleasant day, and to 
observe, among other points of in- 
terest, its homes, some of them possess- 



84 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw ILondon. 




WILLIAMS MEMORIAL PARK, 
Broad and Hempstead Streets. 



ing an air of roomy comfortableness 
that tells of a past generation, and 
some very fine in their triumph of 
modern architecture, is to derive much 
of profit and pleasure. Following, 
are noted a few of the more preten- 



tious, substantial, and commodious 
residences that would attract the eye 
on such a tour of the city: On Hemp- 
stead Street, near " Ye Antientest 
Buriall Ground," a spot to which 
attaches much that is of Revolutionary 




WILLIAMS PARK, 
Broad. Williams, and Channing Streets. 



85 



Ipicturesquc 1Rcw Uondon. 



' !• ..' 



OLi 



I'! 



'/^ 



'^''tJ^ . -•-'■■■ 



•St' 4«^ 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. WILLIAM E. FAITOUTE-OCEAN AVENUE. 

The Residence ol Mrs. William E. Faitoute. Daughter ol D. W. Gardner, adjoins the Old Homestead of the Family. Its 

vicinit) is made memorable by the capture ol Mrs. Faitoutes Grandfather, who >vas taken Prisoner by the 

British, and Conveyed to Halifax, where for months he Languished in Prison. In Mrs. Faitoute's 

Possession are the Portraits of Three Generations, the Oldest dating its Existence 

from a Period more than One Hundred and Fifty Years Remote. These Portraits 

Impress the Beholder with the awe of a Dignified and By-gone Age. 



interest, is the fine Colonial mansion, 
witli its spacious grounds, owned and 
occupied by Hon. Augustus Bran- 
ilegee. 

Northeast 
from here, 
o n M a i n 
Street, and 
hard hv the 
-Old towiie 
Mill," is the 
residence of 
Gill) e r t 
Bisliop, a rc- 
tired mer- 
chant of New 
L o n d o n . 
I^eaving the 
old null, and 
following 
Main Street 
to the north, 
and then 
W i 1 1 i a m s 
Street to the 





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SUHIE 



THE GARDNER HOMESTEAD. 

The House Known as the Gardner Homestead is a Relic of a Rast Genera. 

tion. It was re-built after the original model by the Late Owner. 

Douglass W. Gardner, in 1870. Several Relics of Historic Interest 

Connected with this Old Place are a Bell Bucltle. Bearing the 

Initials of King George and the British Coat of Arms. 

and Indian Arrow Heads and Banner Stones used 

by the Various Tribes as Signals. 

SG 



south, one soon conies to the large 
modern residence of James Hislop. the 
drv-goods merchant, at the corner of 

Williams and 
\' a u X h a 1 1 
streets. Near 
Mr. Ilislop"s 
rcsi(huice is 
that of F. S. 
N e wc o m h. 
which is one 
of the largest 
and most 
noteworthy 
in this vicin- 
i t y . .1 u s t 
iioitli of Mr. 
N e weomh's 
residence is 
Tost Hill, a 
section which 
c m prises 
man\- beauti- 
ful "dwell- 
ings. Notalile 



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87 




RESIDENCE OF HON. GEORGE F. TINKER, 
Franklin Street. 




RESIDENCE OF FANNY M. JEROME. 



Ocean Avenue. 



88 



[picturesque 1Rew TLondon. 



among tlicse, particularly for its 
unicnie and striking architecture, 
is that of Louis R. Hazeltine, of 
the firm of Donnelly tV Hazeltine, 
architects. 

|5!i,On the comer of Channiug and 
Vauxhall streets one observes with 
interest the fine grounds and man- 
sion of Ex-Goveinor Thomas M. 
Waller. Further south on Chan- 
ning Street are the modern and 
noticeable residences of John B. 
Leahy and Morris W. Bacon, and 
to the east, on Granite .Street, is 
the large, conspicuous residence of 
.Tames H. Newcomb. At the 
junction of Broad and Channing 
streets, well back in its extensive 
grounds, is one of the largest 
residences in the city, that of Annie 
K., widow of the late Elias F. 
Morgan : and nearly opposite, on 
Broad Street, are the fine resi- 
dences of :\Irs. W. W. Sheffield, 
Arthur Keefe, Heniy C. Weaver, 
(". D. Boss, and Captain Samuel 
Bclden. These houses are repre- 
sentatives of the better class of 
New London dwellings. 

To the eastward, on a command- 
ing eminence, is tlie palatial resi- 
dence of Mrs. Martha S. Harris, 
widow of the late Jonathan Newton 
Harris. With its spacious grounds, 
sloping lawns, and l)eautiful con- 
servatories, it is one of the finest 
residential estates in Eastern 
Connecticut. Following Broad 
Street westward, past the Second 
Congregational Church, one will 
note with interest its fine par- 
sonage, the residence of Rev. J. 
W. Hixler, Pastor of the chunh. 
.Inst east of the 
Broad Street, is 
the residence of 
so called from its 
General Wa 
manor house. 



parsonage, on 
"Mt. Vernon,'" 
Elislia Palmer, 
resemblance to 
lington's famous 
In the immediate 






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vicinity, also on Broad Street, are 
the substantial residences of Frank 
I,. Palmer and Walter Learned. 




i8) 



89 




RESIDENCE OF GILBERT BISHOP- 152 MAIN STREET. 




RESIDENCE OF THOMAS F. FORAN - CORNER OF HUNTINGTON 
AND HILL STREETS. 



90 




'St-*.. * 



m^r—' 




PARSONAGE OF THE SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 

3 BROAD STREET. 

Erected by Mrs. Martha S. Harris as a Memorial to Her Husband, the Late Jonathan Newton Harris, in 1897. 




RESIDENCE OF EX -GOVERNOR THOMAS M. WALLER - CHANNING STREET. 

CORNER OF VAUXHALL. 



91 



{picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




RESIDENCE Ob MORRIS W. BACON - 2 CHANNING STREET. 



Hani 1)V. (Ill 1 luiitiiii^tiiii Street, at 
the liead of State, stands one of tlie 
finest mansions in New London, tlie 
residence of Mrs. Elizaljetli Williams, 
widow of tlie Late TTon. Cliarles 
AuEfiistus Williams. 

North of State Street, on Hunting- 
ton, is a noteworthy brown stone 
house, the residence of Dr. J. G. Stan- 
ton ; and nearly opposite, on the 
western side of Huntington Street, 
are the spacious lawns and large 
modern dwellings of Messrs F. H. 
and A. H. Chappell. Further north, 
nearly opposite the Bulkeley High 
School, is the residence of 'J'homas !•". 
Foran, of the Foran Furniture t'oni- 
jiany. Returning southwaid on 
Huntington Street, and thence east- 
ward on Federal, one observes the 
residence of Rev.S. Leroy Blake, D. D.; 
the line edifice of the St. James Epis- 
copal Church: the residence of its 
Rector. Rev. .\ If red Poole Cirint, 
Ph. D., and opposite the church, the 
fine estate of Dr. Frederick Fanis- 



wortli. 'riie lot on whicii Dr. Farns- 
wortii's house stands underwent an 
historic realty transfer in the year 
ITHf), when it was purchased from 
Richard W. Carkin by Nathaniel 
Lcihard, for I'l'iO. In this house, in 
1S2!', was born tlic late Mayor ("harles 
Augustus Williams. 

Following Federal Street eastward, 
to its junction with !\rain, the obscver 
cannot fail to notice the large, sub- 
stantial residence of Sebastian I). Law- 
rence, and just north, on Main Street, 
that of Sidney H. Miner. To the 
niirtliward. on North Main Street, are 
the well kept grounds and elegant 
residence of Mrs. Harriet Allen, 
widow of the late James Allen : and a 
short distance beyond is "Hillside," 
wliich comprises the tine residence, 
buildings, and farm of Ray Lewis. 

Rivei-side Park, on Mohegan Ave- 
nue, is a short distance beyond on the 
line of "The Norwich Trolley." 'i'lic 
views from the high lands along tiiis 
section are superb. 



92 



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03 




RESIDENCE OF JOHN B. LEAHY— 4 CHANNING STREET. 




RESIDENCE OF ALTON T. MINER— 38 CRYSTAL AVENUE, 
EAST NEW LONDON. 



94 




THE PEQUOT CASINO - PEQUOT AVENUE. 

Home of the Pequot Casino Association. Organized Jul) 12. 1890. and one of the Leading and IMost Exclusive 

Social Organizations of New London. President. W. Applelon: Treasurer. D. Banks. Jr.: 

Secretary. E. T. Kirkland: Superintendent of Casino. G. T. Salter. 



I 



I ^ lls»l|»||siu| i 




RESIDENCE OF STEPHEN GARDNER — OCEAN AVENUE. 



95 




SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT. 

ON THE PARADE. NEAR THE UNION DEPOT. 

The Monument is a Fine Tribute to the Brave Men Who on Land and Sea Have Represented New London 

in Our Countr)S Battles. It was Generously Presented to the City in 1896 

by Sebastian D. Lawrence. Esq. 



96 



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fTTf 
1 



STATION OF THE NEW YORK YACHT CLUB, 
Showing in the Background the Residence ot Colonel A. C. Tyler. Pequot Avenue. 

Chapter ID1I1I1I. 

NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

SOME FINE RESIDENCES ON MAIN, HUNTINGTON, JAY. FRANKLIN, AND 
BLACKHALL STREETS, OCEAN, AND OTHER AVENUES-THE PEQUOT 
COLONY— RECREATIONS AND AMUSEMENTS. 




JAMES H. NEWCOMB. 
One of the Former Merchants of New London. 

l-'rom the section of Main Street, 
near the re.sidence of Sebastian D. Law- 
rence, one may easily reai'li East New 
London, a pleasant subnrh of tlie city 



proper, in wiiich are several 
residences that will attract 
attention, among them being 
those of A. T. Miner, and the 
Misses Antoinette A. and Jen- 
nie E. Williams. Returning 
to that portion of the cit}- 
about Huntington, Jay, Frank- 
lin. Hempstead and Blackball 
streets, one is impressed by 
the numl)er of remarkal)ly 
comfortable dwellings and 
finely kept lawns and grounds. 
Near the Public Library and 
old Court House, on Hunting- 
ton Street, is the residence of 
Charles B. Jennings. .Viting 
School Visitor of New Lon- 
don. At the corner of Hunt- 
ington and Jay streets is the 
residence of Dr. C. F. Ferrin, 
at number 1() Jay Street, that 
of John McGinley, Postmaster of New 
London, and on Franklin Street, comer 
of Cottage, that of Hon. George F. 
Tinker. Tlie residences of L U. Lvon 



97 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



and II. (). I'.uivh. on Hhukliall Suet-L. 
ami that (if J. J. Ryan, on McDonaM 
Street, are wit- 
nesses to the eoni- 
pleteness of the 
huihlers art. 

Kroni tliis section 
ol' tiie eily. to 
tlie soutlnva id. 
stretches Oeean 
Avenue, one of the 
fi nest of N e \v 
liOndnii's thorougii- 
fares. ll is wide 
sniootli and hard, 
an<l is lined on 
either side hy many 
attractive dweli- 
insrs and invitinij- 
fjrnnnds. Among 
t ll e m w ill h c 
noticed some that 
possess more than 
ordinary interest. 
That of 'Mrs. Wil- 
liam E. Faitonte. 
and in tlie gronnds 
surronndin;,;' it, the 
old (iardner Home- 
stead; the resi- 
dence of Steiihen Gardner, and that of 
Fanny M. Jerome, further south on 
Ocean Avenue, 
are among tliose 
to elicit more 
til an a cursory 
glance. Adjacent 
to this part of the 
Avenue is the 
'•Pequot Colony"" 
the summer resi- 
dence of many 
people of wealth 
and fashion. 
Here are numer- 
ous homes of 
taste and eultnie, 
and several that 
are really sump- 
tuous, and in size 

and furnishings, veritable palaces. The 
residence of Colonel A, C. Tyler, on 




RESIDENCE OF CAPTAIN FRANK H 
BECKWITH-2b WILLETTS AVENUE. 




RESIDENCE OF IRVIN U. LYON- 
64 BLACKHALL STREET. 



l'e(luot Avenue, is one of the most 
claliorate in the State, The sununei- 
residence of H. T. 
.McCain', which is 
located on an emi- 
nence commanding 
a tine view of the 
ocean, is a modern 
structure of great 
size and heauty. 
'J'he mansion of E. 
Fiancis Higgs, of 
Waslungton, D.C, 
recently construct- 
ed after plans hy 
the New London 
liim of architects, 
Messrs Donnelly iV- 
liazeltine, is well- 
nigh a marvel in 
inunensity of de- 
sign and complete- 
ness of construc- 
tion. It is a notable 
addition to the most 
ornate residences 
of New London 
and the " I'equot 
Colony,"" 
From this district 
tlie return to the center of the city 
may l)e made through Ocean. I'equot, 
or Montaiik Ave- 
nue. Sliould"the 
latter or, in fact, 
e i t h e r of the 
others be the 
route chosen, one 
would have yet 
a 11 oth e r oppor- 
tunity for the 
oliservation of 
mall}- commod- 
ious dwellings, 
i n d i c a t i ve of 
jirosperity and 
re tin em cut. On 
several of the 
minor streets, 
also, may lie seen 
such residences. Should one pass 
Willetts Avenue, a natural 







through 



98 



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itO 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon» 



:iii(l miii'li used liigliway connecting 
Pcqiiol and Alontauk avenues, lie 
would Ik- (juilc ii'itain to note tlie 
residences of f'iiarles F". Edney and 
Captain Frank H. Bcckwith, two 
houses conspicuous for their location 
and for the adiiiiralileness of their 
general appearance. 

Such a round of the residential 
portions of New I.ondon woidd be 
sure to result in cntliusiatic approval 
of its line residences and pleasant 
homes: Init more than one inspection 



(iiaiiilc. and ( liaiining streets, is 
Williams I'aik. presented to the city 
in 1858 l)y(lciieral William Williams, 
of Norwich, as a memorial to ids son, 
Thomas W. Williams, a former mer- 
chant of New I^ondon. 

•lust Iteyond the Pe(|\n)t section is 
Ocean Heacli — one of the linest on 
the coast — and Ocean Heach I'ark, 
city j)ropertv with a large [irivate 
ownership in handsome cottages. This 
outing sj)ot is constantly growing in 
imj)orlaMcc. Thus the cit\ is well 




RESIDENCE OF ARTHUR KEEFE-40 BROAD STREET. 



should be made in order to adequately 
appreciate the city's advantages and 
opi)ortnnities as a place of charming 
dwellings and elegant residences. 

It is the good fortune of New Lon- 
don to possess several delightful out- 
ing spots and breathing jilaces. On 
Broad Street, bounded on its western 
margin l)y Hempstead Street, is 
Williams Memorial I'ark. which owes 
its existence as a public playground 
to the late Hon. Charles Augustus 
Williams. Further north on Broad 
Street, surronndeil by Broad, Williams, 



provided with advantages for summer 
recreation and diveision. 

For opportunities of amusement dur- 
ing the winter season. New F.,ondon 
has the Lyceum Theatre, the New 
London Opera House, and the various 
entertainments held in f^yric Hall. 
State Street, and in Lawrence Hall, 
P>ank Street. The Lyceum Theatre, 
of which L'a W. .Jackson is I>essee 
and Manager, is the piincipal play- 
house of the city, and one of the best in 
Connecticut. In all its a))]iointmcnts it 
is thorouy;hl\- convenient and modern. 



100 



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101 




RESIDENCE OF J. J. RYAN McDONALD STREET. 




•HILLSroE," RESIDENCE OF RAY LEWIS -NORTH MAIN STREET. 



102 




LYCEUM THEATRE -WASHINGTON STREET. 
Ira W. Jackson. Lessee and Manager. 



IM 




LYRIC HALL- 241 STATE STREET. 
C. M. Brocksieper. Lessee and Manager. 




INTERIOR OF LYRIC HALL — 241 STATE STREET. 

Lyric Hall is Under the Management of Charles M. Brocksieper, 241 State Street, to Whom All Inquiries 

as to Rental Should be Addressed. It is an Admirable Place in which to Hold Dances. 

Parties, or Entertainments of Any Description. 

104 




RESIDENCE OF ROBERT COIT FEDERAL STREET. 




RESIDENCE OF DR. FREDERICK FARNSWORTH - 25 FEDERAL STREET. 



(9) 



105 




RESIDENCE OF LOUIS R. HAZELTINE, ARCHITECT POST HILL. 

This Attractive Home was Designed by Mr. Hazeltine. of the Firm o\ Donnelly & Hazeltine. Architects, and Although of 
Modest Proportions. Reflects Credit upon His Professional Skill. Mr. Hazeltine has Designed Some of the Finest Residences 
in the Country for Men of National Reputation. Among Whom are the Following : R. A. McCurdy. President of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New York : R. A. Granniss. Vice-President of the Same Company : 0. H. McAlpin. W. B. Skidmore. 
Julius Catlln. W. B. Deming and Henry D. Noyes. all of New York City : and Dudley Duyckinck. of Riverside. California. 





RESIDENCE OF J. E. ST. JOHN, 
Montauk Avenue. 



HEADQUARTERS OF NAMEAUG 

FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, 

Masonic Street. Near City Hall. 



106 



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103 




MORRIS W. BACON'S MARBLE BLOCK - 126 STATE STREET. 

Chapter 1IX. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

COMMERCIAL INTERESTS NEW LONDON AS A TRADE CENTER - BUILDING 
ACTIVITY — MERCANTILE ENTERPRISE — PRINCIPAL BUSINESS MEN AND 
PROMINENT CONCERNS. 



The Commercial Spikit uk New 
London* is indicative of eiicrgy, pro- 
gress, a n d 
j u s t i ti a b 1 e 
faith in the 
city's evolu- 
t i () n and 
lively fu- 
ture. Year 
by year the 
firnniess of 
tiie busi- 
ness tone 
increases. 
P rope rty 
\alues liave 
lately been 
g r e a t 1 y 
CHARLES B. WARE, enhanced, 

A Prominent Clothing MerctianI of ''^ " ^ " pTO- 

New London. (| n c t i V e 

property created, and the population 
added to by the recent and almost 
unprecedented access of building 




activity. Realizing this, appreciative of 
the bright prospects and liealthy 
growtli of the city, new trade concerns 
have located here, and others will 
follow. As a trade center New London 
is favorably situated. The city's popu- 
lation by no means represents the 
entiret\- of its resource. One of the 
county-seats of New London County, it 
draws from tlie country districts, ham- 
lets and townships for miles in each 
direction. During the recreation period 
of the sununer season, when the majority 
of cities throughout the country are in 
a greater or less state of business 
inertia. New London, even more than 
customarily, enjoys a liveliness in trade 
and eonnuercial pursuits. This is due to 
tlie proximity of the "Pequot Colony," 
one of its suburbs, and a delightful and 
popular warm weather resort, and 
to the sur]iassing excellence of Ocean 
Beach for batliing and suunner outing 
privileges. 



109 



[picturesque 1Rcw Uondon. 



C'liAKi.Ks 15. Wakk, dealer in 
clothing, hats ami furnishings, at .'rl- 
5t5 State Street, New London, was 
born in Worcester, Massaehusetts. He 
is a descendant of General Nathaniel 
Greene, of Kevolutionarv fame, who 
was instrumental in saving Washing- 
ton's army at the Battle of Brandywine. 
Mr. Ware is one of the oldest and 
most successful merchants in New 
London. His success has been fully 
earned, as he commenced active life 
entirely without means, and with no 
other assistance than a clear brain, 
uprightness and firmness of purpose. 
and inflexible determination. In the 
sense indicated by these circumstances 
and qualifications, he is a self-made 
man. He established his business in 
1870, at its present location, and has 
watche(l its continued growth with 
commendable pride and interest. His 
business methods and liis attitude 
towards the public have ever been 
characterized by courtesy and fairness. 
The stock carried at his store is an 
immense and varied one. and the 
([uality and prices satisfactory and 
right. From the adjacent country- 
sides and villages, as well as from the 
cit\- itself, much of his trade is drawn. 
That he j)0ssesses the confidence and 
good will of his patrons is demonstrated 
by their successive dealings with him. 

Mr. Ware is prominent in the circles 
of both the Masons and Odd Fellows. 
In ISST-S.s he was at the head of the 
Masonic Fraternitv in Connecticut, as 
Grand Commander Knights Templar. 
In 18'.»0 he was made Colonel of the 
Second Regiment. Patriarchs .Militant, 
of the L^O. O. F., and was Grand 
Master of the State in 1892. It was 
in that year that the property for 
"Fairview," the Odd Fellows' Home 
of Connecticut, of whieh he is Presi- 
dent, was purchased. He has served 
three terras in the Court of Common 
Council, was for two years President 
of the New London Board of Trade, 
and for a number of years has been on 
the staff of the Governor's Foot Guards. 



( iKol;i,l-; H. HoI.MKS. ('(INTKACTOK 

.\NI) Buii.DKK, was born in New Lon- 
don in 1><52, of good New London lin- 
eage, a descendant of the Comstocks. 
Since his birth his native city has been 
his home. His wife, Delia S. (^Moore) 
Holmes, is also of New London parent- 
age. Her father. Perry Moore, was a 
well knownnewspaper man. and printer 
of "The .Morning Chronicle"' and "The 
Evening Star" during, and subsequent 
to, the Civil War. Among many credit- 
able buildings constructed by Mr. 
Holmes are the following: 'I'lie new 
villa of E. Francis Kiggs, corner of 
Ocean and Glenwood avenues: the 
home of A. C. {-"idler, residence of 
Louis R. Ha/eltine, the .lohnston 
Block, the Armstrong double cottage, 
the cottage of Charles V. Cornell, 
twelve of Ex-Ma\or Johnston's modern 
cottages, and a number of Mrs. S. 
IvusseiTs fiats on Huntington Street. 
Mr. Holmes has supervi-sed the con- 
struction of about 100 New London 
buildings. His residence, which is 
connected bj- telephone, is at number 
8 Front Street. 

The BisHoi' Limbkr and Coal 
Company, located at HI, fi8 and 65 
Water Street, is one of the oldest estal> 
lishments in the city. Its President, 
Mr. Gilbert Bisliop, with his brothers, 
organized the business in 1S47. The 
firm manufactures sash, doors, blinds, 
and outside finish, and deals in lumber, 
coal, and building materials. By ad- 
ditions to its force of skilled workmen, 
and of improved machinery to its facil- 
ities, this company is prepared to meet 
the increasing demands of a rapidly 
growing city. 

At 420 liAN K Street, New London, 
is the office of L. A. Comstock. dealer 
in coal, wood and kiiuUings. Mr. 
Comstock's methods of square dealing 
and [iromptness have won for him the 
confidence of the comnuuiity. His 
mercantile experience has been exten- 
sive. Seventeen years ago he estab- 
lisheil his coal business in New London. 
He pays strict attention to the thorough 
screening, and to the expeditious and 
proper delivery of his coal. 



110 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE BISHOP LUMBER AND COAL COMPANY, 
61-65 WATER STREET. 



The Finest Business Block in 
Eastern Connecticut devoted exclu- 
sively to the 
furniture 
business, was 
l.uilt in IS'.H 
by the Put- 
nam Furni- 
ture Mfc. 
Company for 
the acconnno- 
dation of its 
inc reasing 
business, 
which in less 
than t w o 
years had 
outgrown tin' 
premises in 
whicii il was 
established in 
18 8 9 by 
Nelson S. 
I'utnam and 
George N . 
P u t n a in . 
The foremost 
position til is 
house has 
always held 
in New Eng- 
land is due 
ambitions 



so well known to the w 
that they always give 




THE BIG BLUE STORE, 
312 Bank Street. 



Iiolesale trade 
this company 
the exclusive 
sale in New 
London of 
goods of 
superior 
merit in all 
lines, such. 
tor example, 
as the Acorn 
Kanges and 
Eddy Hefrig- 
eiatoi's. The 
Putnams sell 
I- i t h e r for 
cash or on 
I h e i r own 
unsurpassed 
system of 
easy pay- 
ment s, and 
their prices 
are a 1 w ays 
the lowest 
a t which 
furniture 
of genuine 
merit can 
possibly be 
sold. A visit 



to its enterprising, 
iggressive policy, which is 



to their extensive warerc 

nine treat for lovers of tine furniture. 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



In 1892 Thomas F. Foran, of Cun- 
niiifjhain iS: Foran, furniture dealers in 
Uanl)ury, Connecticut, disposetl of iiis 
interest in that firm, and removed to 
New London, where he immediately 
estalilished the FoRAN Fuknitike 
C'oMi'ANY, with headquarters in the 
Day Building, 244 to 250 Bank Street. 
The Foran Company is one of the 
most enterprising and finely equipped 
t'urniturt' and house furnishing empo- 
riums in the State. There is nothing 
desirahle in the way of useful and heau- 
tiful home appointments that may not 
he found here. The stock carried is of 
the linest qualit}- ; fresh, m<Mh'rn. and 
complete in every detail. In aildilion 
to its immense sales- and ware-rooms in 
the Day huilding, which occupy four 
floors and a hasement, the company has 
possession of the old Trumbull House, 
<m Bank Street, which it utilizes for 
storage purposes. Thus tlie amount of 
Hoor space requisite for the transaction 
(if its large and growing business com- 



prises some 25.000 scjuare feet. The 
popular and celebrated Magt-e Hange. 
which for thirty-live years has found 
in New London an appreciative tield 
of sale, and the ever reliable "(ilen- 
wood'" and "Househohl"' ranges, are 
fixtures of this compaiiys stock. The 
installment methoil of the Foran Com- 
pany- is unrivalled, and it cordially 
invites the patronage of those about 
to commence housekeeping, or who are 
considering ailding to or refurnishing 
the home. It carries a full line of 
carpets, oil cloths and linoleums, and 
employs a competent man. Mr. F. A. 
Beach, who has charge of the carpets, 
draperies and window shades. The 
company also employs two upholsterers 
and a cabinet maker. A department 
to which it gives particular attention 
is tliat of general funeral furnishing, 
undertaking and embalming. .Mi. 
Foran is a graduate in embalming, and 
in ISSS was granted a dijiloma liy the 
N. ^■. ( )iiciital School of Kmbalming. 





J. R. AVERY'S PROVISION STORE— 19 BROAD STREET. 

Mr. Avery Established His Business at its Present Location in April. 1886. A Veteran of the Civil War, He Enlisted 

in the 21st Regiment. Connecticut Volunteers in 1862. and Served Three Years 

112 



{picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




INTERIOR OF DABOLL & FREEMAN'S GROCERY STORE— 148 STATE STREET. 



IIknkv S. Dorsev, a iiiitive of New- 
London, conducts a grocery and pro- 
vision business at the corner of Truman 
and Blinman streets. He carries the 
finest (|uality of goods at the lowest 
prices, and successfully endeavors, in 
every approved manner, to satisfy and 
retain his customers. His store is of 
generous size, and his stock complete. 
Mr. Dorsey is an Alderman from „he 
Fourth Ward, and Major of the 
Third Regiment, Connecticut National 
(iuard. His orders are promptly tilled, 
and his j^atrons treated with fairness 
and consideration. 

A Reliable Dealei: in groceries, 
provisions, and fine ales, wines and 
li([Uors for family use, is Thomas R. 
Murray. His store is at number 4 
Truman Street, where he carries an 
adequate stock, of good (luality. He 
delivers goods with promptness, and 
in firet-class order, and is fair and 
honorable in his dealings. .Mr. Murray 
was born in New London. He estab- 
lished his present l)usiness in 1890. 
In politics he is Democratic, and repre- 
sents tiie Fourth Ward as an .Vlderman. 
He is courteous, obliging, and enjoys 
the good-will of the public. 



G. M. L()N(; \- CiiMi'ANV emljarkcd 
in the oyster business at the foot of State 
Street, near their present location, in 
18G8. Oysters were then freighted in 
schooners by the cargo from the Chesa- 
peake, and were opened and distributeil 
to different points in the New England 
States. In 1875 the firm established an 
oyster house in Crisfield, which was 
continued in connection with the New 
London business until 1888. In 18So 
they bought the Henry Chapel whole- 
sale and retail fish business, then the 
largest in Connecticut. They also pur- 
chased tine wharf projiert}-, to which 
they moved their oyster business, 
where, in conjunction with the selling 
of fish, they carried it on until 18'.t8, 
when the property was condenuied for 
railroad purposes. They then nmioved 
to their present location. They are 
proprietors of the Rockj- I'oint Oyster 
Company, largest wholesale oyster 
dealeiv! in Provi<lence. This company 
has over 800 acres of oyster ground 
under cultivation in Narragansett Bay 
and Kickemuit River, and operates 
two steamers in catching, and carrying 
the oystei-s to its oyster house, TOO 
Wickenden Street. Providence. 



IKf 



(picturesque fRew Uondon. 




TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT OF 

GEORGE S. GOLDIE, 

Crocker House Block. Stale Street. 

Nkaki.v Fiitv Vk.vks Acn. M. S. 
Daniels estiililishfd a wholesiile grocery, 
provision and llour Imsiness on Canal 
St.. Providence, R. 1. In 1860 James 
Cornell became associated with him 
under the lirn) name of M. S. Daniels iV- 
Co. Later Mr. Daniels liuilt the Daniels 
iiiiildini^ nn Custom House Street, to 
wiiicli the business was moved, and the 
name changed to Daniels <S; Cornell. 
In 18S4 Charles H. Iliimplirey and 
Howard P. Cornell were admitted to 
partnershij). and the name became 
Daniels. Cornell & Co. This concern, 
in ISSil, with William F. Whipple, 
established the house of the Daniels, 
Cornell Co., Worcester, Mass. In 
1890, with George W. Barber, they 
organized the Daniels, Cornell Co., of 
Manchester, X. H. In May, 189-2, 
Daniels. Cornell & Co. established the 
Xew London House, with A. B. 
P.iirdick. Manager. In May, 1899. the 
Providence esttiblishment became Hum- 
phrey &: Cornell, and the New London 
House at this time adopted the same 
tirm name. Mr. Burdick being retained 
as l)iisiness Manager. Humphrey iK: 
Cornell carry a full line of groceries, 
provisions and Hour, and are sole agents 
for the celebrated "Laurel," "B. M. C. 
Best," and '■Colton Peerless'" flours. 



I'ln. J'lii.M i>F Kkki'k. D.wis A: 
( 'c).Mi'.\NV. wholesale and retail dealers 
in staple and fancy groceries, canned 
fruit, tine wiiu-s and liijuors, has its 
location at 12") Bank Street. Among 
the prosperous business houses that 
bave made New London well known as 
a trade center, this concern is one of the 
fiircmost and most progressive. liie 
business was established by Hon. Cyrus 
(i. Beikwitb. ex-mayor of New London, 
in IsT'.'. Mr. Beckwith was the sole 
j)roprietor until 1S84, wben Mr. Arthur 
Keefe — now senior member of the lirni 
— became associated with him. The 
original location was the lirst Hoor of 
a wooden building at the corner of 
Bank and Pearl streets, since razed to 
make room for a more pretentious brick 
structure. In 1 S88 the rapidly growing 
business of Beckwith \- Keefe necessi- 
tated ampler quarters, which were 
secured in the building now utilized 
by the present firm. This situation is 
very central, and its occupation has 
Ijeen marked by constantly increasing 
trade. In 1894 Mr. Beckwith witli- 
drcw, and for about a year subsequent 
— when he admitted to partnership one 
of bis oldest employes, Mr. Frederick 
H. Davis — the business was condiicteil 
solely by Mr. Arthur Keefe. In .lanu- 
ary, 1901, Messrs. Keefe A: Davis took 
Mr. Frederick J. Clancy, their head 
book-keeper into the firm, thus evidenc- 
ing their appreciation of his long and 
valual)le service, and changing the firm 
name to Keefe, Davis & Company. In 
the four floors they occupy at 1 '2h B;ink 
Street, and in the three floors of a 
brick building they have erected in the 
rear, are comprised 38,082 square feet 
of floor space. Eighteen courteous and 
capable assistants are employe<l. This 
is the largest wholesale and retail 
grocery house in Eastern Connecticut. 
The goods are all carefully selected, 
and by reason of the enormous quanti- 
ties continually disposed of, are to be 
bad at the very lowest jirices. Tiie 
firm's facilities for handling, storing, 
and delivering goods are adnnrable. 



114 



Ipicturesquc 1Rcw Uondon, 



Dk. J. ICufiENE Undkuhill was 
l)orn in Orange County. Verinont. in 
ISol, and went 
witii his parents 
six years later tn 
Illinois, where he 
subsequently en- 
.i,^aged with his 
lather in stock- 
raising. Later he 
went to Iowa in 
tiie same business 
and for ten years 
was engaged in 
stock raising in 
Southwestern 
Kansas. H e is 
thus thorougldy 
conversant w i t li 
animals and theii- 
ailments. He went 
to New York State 
in 1888 and was 
engaged in selling 
and ha ndl i ntr 




DR. J. EUGENE UNDERHILL, 

Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist. Howe's Stable. 

Green and Golden Streets. 



imported horses. In ISIM) lie began his 
stu<lies as a veterinarian at the Ontario 



N'eteriiiary College at Toronto. After 
graduating with honors he located in 
New London. His 
real wortli was 
s o o n recognized 
and his services 
are now in much 
demand, hjs pat- 
rons knowing that 
the Doctor is a per- 
fectly reliabh' man 
and skilled in his 
profession. Dr. 
('nderhill was 
married to Miss 
.Jennie E. Barnes 
at liurdette. Kan- 
sas, in 1880, and 
has a son now 1:^» 
years of age. The 
Doctor is a mem- 
ber of Mohegan 
Lodge of Odd 
Kelliiws, the New 
England Order of 
Protection, and of the Second Con- 
gregational Church. 




SCHWANER'S CITY MARKET, 20 MAIN STREET 
C. HENRY SCHWANER. PROPRIETOR. 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




BAER'S BAKERY— 468 BANK STREET. 
Established in 1895 Frank A. Baier. Proprietor. Mr. Baier's Home-Made Bread is the Best in the City, 
or Wagons may be Procured the Finest and Freshest of Everything in Bakery. 



From his Store 



At the ()( KAN I>i:a(h Pavilion 
one may enjoy an appetizing repast. 
Mr. A. H. Wilkinson serves every tlay 
excellent shore dinners, steamed clams, 
liroileil live lol)sters, confectionerv. ice 
cream and soda water. ( >cean Beach 
furnishes the best bathing on the coast. 
Mr. I. L. Diox, recently of Nor- 
Avich. purchased, a few months ago, the 
shaving and hair 
dressing business 
at 24i State 
Street, New Lon- 
don, which is con- 
ducted under his 
personal super- 
vision. Mr. Dion 
is a skillfid ton- 
sorial artist, who 
adopts every pos- 
sible means tend- 
ing toward the 




I. L. DION. 

24-.. State Street. 



satisfaction of his customers. 

E. I). StKKI.K's CLOTHINt; EsTAI!- 

i.isH.MKNTinthe Neptune Building, is a 
true representation of a modern metro- 
politan store. ( )ccupying a fire-proof, 
centrally located block, and equipped 
with every appliance for display, and 
for comfort of patrons.it oilers unustuil 
opportunities in the ( lothing line. 



Tm; Convenience of being directly 
served with staple commodities is a 
tuiiversally appreciated one. Thomas 
Fastovsky, <lcalcr in kerosene oil, 
regularly supplies his customers at 
their homes. His residence is at li* 
IIcm[)stca(l Street, where a postal 
will reaiii him and elicit a prompt 
response. 

TiiK Nkw Lonhon Hank ani> 
Stka.m L.mniuiv. Harvey H. Daniels, 
I'ropricloi', does first class work at 
popular prices. It gives particular at- 
tention to hand work, which many pre- 
fer to the steam process. Its teams 
call for and return the work at regu- 
lar and frequent intervals. At this 
laundry one may have his linen laun- 
dered in either gloss or domestic finish, 
as dcsiied. The laundry olhce is at 
470 Bank Street. 

The Crystal Cani>v Kitchen, 82 
State Street, is nnder the proprietor- 
ship of Mr. S. Patterson. Here are 
manufactured daily, and sold at whole- 
sale and retail, the finest quality of 
confectionery and ice cream. Mr. 
Patterson makes a special t}- of cater- 
ing for weddings, parties, and recep- 
tions. 



116 



(picturesque IRew TLondon, 



The Ti:(jv Stkam Lainduv enjoys 
an enviable reputation for its fine qual- 
ity of work, and for its ready and 

courteous ser\'ice. Its 

present location is at 1 88 
Bank Street. It will ere 
long, however, be install- 
ed in a fine new building 
nearly opposite, now in 
process of erection Ijy 
Mr. Alex. Fournier, its 
proprietor. TIjc jiolicy of 
this laundry is superior 
work in wliiteness and 
finish imparted, yet with 
an extraordinary min- 
imum of wear and tear. 
From an economic stand- 
point this means much. 
And this quality, un- 
doubtedly, has done a 
great deal to eniiance the 
success of Mr. Fournier's 
business. 

Alex. Fournierwas born 
in Montreal. His educa- 
tion was secured in West 
Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. He has had a 
vast amount of experience in the 
laundry business. His first estal)lish- 
ment in this line was in Trov. New 
York, and he has 
also conducted 
similar enter- 
prises in the 
cities of Sjjring- 
field, Meriden, 
and Hartford. 
The Troy 
Laundr}- of 
Norwich, Con- 
necticut, is also 
his property. 
Each of his con- 
cerns possesses 
its teams for the 
collection and 
delivery of the 
laundry pack- 
ages of its patrons. The tele- 
phone call of the New Lon<lon 




NEW BUILDING OF THE 
TROY STEAM LAUN- 
DRY—BANK STREET. 

Alex. Fournier. Proprietor, C.E. Fournier. 
Architect. 




ONE OF THE DELIVERY WAGONS OF 
THE TROY STEAM LAUNDRY. 



ollice is 8T-t) ; that of the Norwich 
laundry, 29-5. 

Tlic new building undergoing con- 
struction on Bank Street, 
for occupancy by the 
Troy Launtlry, is from 
plans by tlie architect. 
Mr. C. E. Founder, who 
is second cousin to Mr. 
Alex. Fournier, and was 
liorn in Canada, in 1861. 
His education was com- 
pleted in tlie Seminai-y 
of Ste. ^larie de Monnoii'. 
Province of (Quebec. The 
first years subse(iuent 
to his seminar}- life were 
devoted to the drj- goods 
business, whicli upon the 
death of his wife in 1891, 
he abandoned for the 
study of architecture. 
He is a memljer of the 
Association of Architects 
of the Province of (Que- 
bec. It is his intention, 
after the completion of the 
new laundry liuilding, 
which exacts most of his 
time as supervising architect, to estal)- 
lish in New London, ofiices for the 
pursuit of his chosen profession of 
arc hi tec tare. 
Tlie 1 a u n d ry 
building is to be 
a four-story edi- 
lice of fine aji- 
]iearance. The 
architecture will 
be {deasing, and 
altogether the 
structure will 
be well built, 
and ade(iuate tn 
its purpose. It 
will reriect cre- 
dit u[(on those 
having its con- 
st ru c tion in 
charge, a n d 
addition to the 



will lie a handsome 

citv's 



luildings. 



117 



(picturesque IRew Uondon. 



Tmi; Namk oi" Tiio.MAs Huwk is 
insepanihly fonnected witli tlie busi- 
ness of dealing in horses, curriages, 
etc., as well as witli the general livery 
business in New Ldudon. .Mr. Howe, 
at first as a member of the linn of 
Frank Howe & Son, and later under 
his own name, has conducted very 
large and successful dealings in 
this line for years. He keeps tiie 
best in iiorses, carriages, harness, 
and horse goods. He is noted for 
fair transactions. In the business 
connnunity Mr. 
Howe has always 
taken a lea<ling 
part, aiul secures 
whatever comes 
into the market 
that is new and 
modern. Eaily 
in ISSO, witii his 
father, the late 
Frank Howe, he 
besran business in 
tiie oltl ICdgcoinli 
property, (iolden 
Street, later re- 
moving to his 
present stand at 
the corner of 
Green and 
Golden streets. 

A livery, with 
the purciiase and 
sale of horses, 
was the sole 
business for 
several years, un- 
til Mr. Howe, realizing that there 
existed a demand for the best in 
wagons and carriages, and also for 
the styles of vehicles that are manu- 
factured only for first-class trade by 
large factories, added this branch, and 
has prospered in that department from 
the beginning. Success in his under- 
taking in the sale of carriages stinui- 
lated .Mr. Howe to make still further 
extension of his business ; and to that 
end he began the purchase of horses 
in larsre numbers from manv sections 




THOMAS HOWE, 

Proprietor of Liver> Stable and Carriage Repository. 

Green and Golden Streets. 



of the country in whicli they are Itred 
extensively-. Weekly and special sales 
at certain seasons of the 3-ear, princi- 
pally by auction, have now been a 
feature for several years, and farmers, 
teamsters, drivers, and in fact all 
who use horses forbusiiu^ss or pleasure, 
have become accustomed to regard his 
ic[)ository as the source of supply. 
.Mr. Howe is an auctioneer of much 
ability and wit, and Ids sales constitute 
an entertaining phase of his bvisiness. 
.At liis stable one may secure a tirst- 
class turnout 
or stylish ecpiip- 
age with wliich 
to e n j o y the 
m a n y pleasant 
drives in wiiich 
New I., o n d o n 
abounds. .\t re- 
ipicst a driver 
will be furnished 
who is thorough- 
ly familiar with 
till' most inter- 
esting andcharm- 
ing sections. 

The horses and 
larriages of this 
stalile a re the 
best obtainable. 
The facilities for 
the accommoda- 
tion of the judilic 
are extcnsi\e. 
The stable office 
is connected by 
telei)lione, a n d 
calls for carriages of any description 
are ])romptly answered, and immedi- 
ately and satisfactorily filled. 

In addition to his finely e<iuipi)ed 
stable and repository at the corner of 
(ireeii and Golden streets, .Mr. Howe 
has a sale-stable on liank Street, be- 
low .Montauk .\veune. His sales are 
eondueted in a maniu'r to inspire the 
iiinlidenc-e of all who deal with him. 
and he exerts remarkable energy in 
securing the finest horses, and in look- 
ing after the interest of his patrons. 



118 



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D 
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M 

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m 

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H 

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to 

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119 



(picturesque 1Rew Xondon. 



Di:. Ch.\i;i.i;s il. I. amis, veteriiiarv 
siirgeini and ileiitist, has liis ollice at 
T. H. Earle's liver- 
a r V stable, 15 
<i olden Street, 
New London. He 
was liorn in Mystie, 
A no; list 28 th, 
ISo'.t. In lK8ohe 
moved to (i rot on, 
and hei^an the 
stndy of medicine 
and the practice of 
veterinary surgery. 
Subsecjuently he 
studied under an 
eminent veterinar- 
ian in New York 
City. In ISSS he 
commenced actual 
practice as a veter- 
inary surgeon and 
dentist. H e w as 
in l8X!i appointed President of tlie 




DR. CHARLES H. LAMB, 
Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist. 15 Golden Street. 



Connecticut Humane Society, and is 
its State .\gent. lie raidxs with tlie 
most satisfactory 
and eilicient of the 
Society's re](iesen- 
tatives. Dr. Lamb 
i s a II expert i n 
tiie examination 
of stock for traces 
of tlie dread tiiiier- 
(■ u 1 osis. He has 
lie en credited 
\)\ the New Lon- 
tlon press with 
being one of the 
best veterinarians 
in the State. In 
methods and in- 
struments lie keeps 
abreast of tlie 
times, and his 
ideas and man- 
ner of t il e i r 
distinctly modern. 



appliratidll are 



i;.\v Lkwks, proprietor of '-Hillside," 
is well known to the people of New 
London, having conducted the milk 
business here for over twenty years. 
He is a native of Rockville, R. 1. In 
IS'.tT he purchased '•Hillside." where 
he erected a handsome dwelling house 
and modern barns. He \\ as a select- 
man of the Town of Waterford from 
ISHT to 18'.I8, and is a memljer of 
l'e(iu()t Lodge. No. 85, I. (). (). F.; 
Relief Lodge", No. 87, A.O. U. W., and 
Ledyard Council, No. 31. O. U. A. M. 

JosEi'H Brai)Koi:d, l)lank book man- 
ufacturer, paper ruler and book binder, 
conducts business at 85 Main Street, 
Norwich, Connecticut. He makes 
blaid< books to order, rules paper to 
any given pattern, and numbers in any 
colored ink desired, checks, notes, 
drafts, coupons. and tickets of all kinds. 
He makes a specialty of binding i)eri- 
odicals and newspapers in all styles, 
and furnishes back numbers for the com- 
pletion of volumes. He also repairs 
and rebinds old and mutilated books. 




FRANCIS P. D'AVIGNON, 

MARBLE AND GRANITE 

WORKS -508 BANK ST., 

Agent for and Dealer in Cemetery Vases. 



120 



Ipicturesque fRew Uondon. 



George G. Aveky, proprietor of 
the livery, hack and boarding stalJe 
at the corner of Main and Cliurch 
streets, New London, was Ijorn in 
Montville, Connecticut, July 4th, 
1861. He is a descendant from the 
Avery family of Groton, famous for 
the part they played in the troublous 
times coeval with tlie War of the 
Revolution. He is the son of Gris- 
wold G. anil Cornelia Chappell Avery. 
He received 
his early edu- 
cation in the 
schools of 
New London. 
His present 
l)nsiness, at 
the corner of 
Main and 
Church 
streets, dates 
its inception 
from 1874. 
The building 
it occupies is 
one of th e 
historic land- 
m arks of 
New London. 
It was erect- 
ed to serve as 
a house of 
worship for 
the Episco- 
pal Society in 
New London 

during the days of its early exist- 
ence, and as such was consecrated 
September 20th, 1787. It was after- 
wards leased to the Conoresrational 
Society, and suljseipiently purchased 
by the Universalists, who eventually 
sold it to Mr. Avery, its present 
owner. 

In the introduction of I'lectric lights 
in carriages in New London, Mr. 
Avery was the ])ioneer. He is a lead- 
ing liveryman of the city, and carries 




GEORGE G. AVERY. 



the most extensive line of rubber-tired 
vehicles. He makes a point of having 
on hand at all seasons of the year a 
fine assortment of carriages and 
horses. He has some very comfort- 
able and stylish equipages, wldch are 
always kept in the best condition, and 
in readiness for immediate response to 
urgent or hurried calls. He maintains 
first-class turnouts and hacks for all 
occasions, furnishes careful drivers 

who are thor- 
oughly com- 
petent, and 
familiar with 
the varied 
points of 
interest in 
and a I) out 
New London. 
His stable is 
admirably 
equipped for 
affording 
every possi- 
ble attention 
to both per- 
manent a 11 d 
trans lent 
customers. 

At the "Pe- 
quot Colony"' 
be conducts 
t h e Pequot 
House Liv- 
ery, and the 
hotel baggage 
service. Both of his stables are con- 
nected by telephone: the Pequot call 
is 194-3, and the uptown number ;)9-,o. 
Mr. Avery is a prominent represen- 
tative of the competitive life of the 
city, and is possessed of a generous 
share of business acumen, coupled 
with a spirit of fairness and honor in 
all his transactions that inspires con- 
fidence and respect. He was married 
to .lennie C. Crosbie. of New London, 
on tiic .")th of October. 18;tS. 



(10) 



121 




ALBERT N. FETHERSON'S LIVERY STABLE- 11 BREWER STREET. 

At Any Hour of the Day or Night One May Secure from the Livery Stable ol A. N. Fetherson. Any Kind ot Turnout Desired. 

This Stable is One of the Finest in the City, and is Completely Appointed in 

Every Particular. It is Connected by Telephone 




ONE OF A. N. FETHERSON'S MODERN EQUIPAGES. 

122 



>9 ir^^^^^^^^^H 


HHP^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Hill 





MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AND CITY FARM — GARFIELD AVENUE. 
The Memorial Hospital was Erected From a Fund Furnished by the Late Hon. Jonathan Newton Harris. 



Chapter X, 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

PRINQPAL BUSINESS STREETS OF NEW LONDON - MERCANTILE PROGRESS 
-THE CITY'S BRIGHT COMMERQAL OUTLOOK - 
ENTERPRISING CONCERNS. 

representing various trade and com- 
mercial pursuits, but tlie foregoing are 
l)y far tlie liusiest. 

The mercantile spirit in New London 
has within the past few years shown 
an unusual increase in activity. As- 
tlie city has grown in population, it 
has received an added commercial 
impetus, and many of the business 
houses that have been for yeare situ- 
ated here, have branched out, and are 
conducting their interests on a con- 
siderably larger scale than heretofore. 
New and enterprising concerns, — 
not only among the manufacturers, 
but of the merchants and tradesmen — 
considering tlic future of tlie city to 
1)6 a bright one, have wisely located 
within its precincts. Of the likelihood 
of its increasing in trade jirosperity 
year-by-ycar, there is very little doubt, 
and tlie public-spiriteil New Londoner 
will, unquestionably, do all within liis 
power towards the accomplislmient of 
so desirable an outcome. 




GILBERT BISHOP, 

A Retired Merchant of New London. 

TiiK Principal Hr sin ess 

TuOIiOlGHFAKES OK NeW LoNDON 

are Hank, State, and Main streets. 
Tiiere are, of course, manv otliers 



123 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




td t: 




constantly iiureii.siiig \oluiii(' of l)\isi- 
iiess. Tlic Darrow" iV Coiiistoek 
('oiii])aiiy arc wliolcsalc dealers in 

slii]) chand- 
lers" jralvan- 
i /. e (1 lia rd- 
ware. They 
have c o n - 
sliintly on 
hand 3-aclit, 
en j^inee is", 
and mill sup- 
plies: These 
include oils 
anil packing 
waste, and 
lirass and 
i rnii si ea ni 
pipe with lit- 
lings a n d 
valves. This 
lirm has re- 
cently instal- 
leil p () w e r 
and uKichin- 
ery for cut- 
t i II <r and 



In a Poi;r ok 8i <ii I.mi'i)I!Tan( k 
AS Nkw lyDXDiiN', ship chandlery is a 
prosperous and representative industry. 
The mend )ers 
of the lirm of 
the Darrow 
iS; Comstock 
Company, in- 
corporated in 
1 ; I 1 , a r e 
< Durtland S. 
Darrow. 
Preside n t. 
and William 
M. Dari-ow, 
Sec re tary 
and Treasur- 
er, holh resi- 
dents of New 
]., o n d o n . 
Their busi- 
ness was 
established 
in 187<), at 
120 Bank 
Street. I n 
ISSO the firm 

pure h ased THE DARROW & COMSTOCK COMPANY BUILDING, threading u\> 
and moved lu-ne Bank street. to. and in- 

iuto the substantial and commodious 
buildint; which they now occupy. This 
step was made necessary by the 

The New Knci.and ICncinekimni; 
('i)Ml'ANV has its home office at Watci- 
burv, Connecticut 
and branches estal>- 
lished in most of 
the principal cities 
in the surroundiuL; 
states, with its New 
York ofliee at 100 
li road way. The 
New London ofliee 
is at 23 Main Street 
under the manage- 
ment of Mr. J. V. 
(iillette who has 
had twelve years of 
practical experience 
in electric light and 
railway work. The 
company was incor- 
porated for the pur- 
pose of electrical 



eluding, six inch pipe and carries 
a full line of pipe and fittings up 
to that size. 

number of central stations foi' light and 
|iiiwer than any other engineering com- 
pany in America, 
and their experience 
and advice are of 
value. They study 
the requirements in 
every specific case, 
and adai)t the nia- 
cliinery and equip- 
ment whi(di is sure 
to |)roduce results 
most economically 
a n d satisfactorily. 
The local branches 
cover all braiudies 
of engineering, and 
make a specialty of 
isolateil plants. (dec- 
trie light wiring, 
motors, repairing, 
etc. You can at 
and mechanical OFFICE OF THE N. E. ENGINEERING CO. j^.^,^^ .-orrespond 

- ,, Waterbury, Connecticut. • i , i , 

engineering of all with them and learn 

kinds. They have installed a greater al)out some of their modern work. 




X 

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5 on 

i H 

5 O 

3- O 

X -^ 
u 

ro Z 

I ^ 

S- H 

6) l-j 

n. W 

° 2 

s o 

m * 

J I 



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■ w 




125 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Samuel W. Mai.i.ohv was fur sev- 
enil years associated with his lather. 
the hite Leonard 
MaUorv, in thi- 
plumhing Inisiness, 
and upon the (h'atli 
of t li e 1 a t tf r 
became sole pro- 
p r i (• t o r . H c i s 
thoroughly conver- 
san t with the 
details of the 
trade, and ranks 
witii till- most clh- 
cient in that line 
of enterprise. 
His liusiness 
experienee is coin- 
prehensive. He 
eommeneed active 
life in New Lon- 
don as a represen- 
t a t i ve of t ii e 
and afterwards e()ntinue( 




SAMUEL W. 
clothing trade, 



his energies to the sanu' line in ntiier 
and larger cities. He is a man of varied 
accomplisiiments. 
possessing a 
marked penchant, 
and no little abil- 
ity, for music. He 
was for several 
years leader of 
the Third Kegi- 
uieut 15and, and 
has acted as con- 
ductor of various 
po p u 1 a r orches- 
tras. As a soloist 
and leader he is 
well known 
thronyiiout the 
State, and has 
had many induce- 
ments to devote 
MALLORY. iiis time entirely 

to music, in which direction his great- 



to devote est talent lies. 




INTERIOR OF THE PLUMBING ESTABLISHMENT OF JORDAN & CLEARY, 

39 MAIN STREET. 

Jordan & Cleary are First Class Plumbers. Steam and Gas Fitters. They Carry a Full Line of Plumbing Accessories, 

Gas and Steam Fixtures, and Heating Apparatus. They Make a Specialty of Jobbing and Repairing. 



126 



]picture5quc 1Rcw Uondon^ 




B. H. Hflliar is sole agent for the 
Kichmond Stoves. Ranges, Steam and 
Hot Air Heat- 
ers, whieli are 
manufactured 
in tlie neigh- 
boring city of 
Norwicli. Thf 
R i c h m o n d 
Manufactur- 
ing Company 
has been con- 
t i 11 u o u s 1 y 
represented by 
tlie firms that 
have occupied 
the store at 4'J 
Bank Street 
since 1869. A 
long record, 
and one that 
eloquently be- 
speaks the 
R i c h m o n d 
Company's es- 
timate of Mr. Hilliar and his prede- 
cessors. Aliout thirty years ago the 

Jordan & Cleai;v 
are agents for the 
William H. Page 
1 toiler Company of 
Norwich, manufac- 
b---^'ll B ' turers of the Volun- 
' ^^ ' teer and other 

celeljrated steam and 
hot water heaters. 
The firm is located 
at 8 '.I Main Street, 
md comprises Joseph 
v. J o r d a n an d 
>— -^^ ^>-~^^ -—Thomas P. Clear}-. 
A PRo^nxEXT Builder of New 
London is Asa ( ). Goddard. whose shop 
is located in the rear of 248 Bank 
Street. Mr. Goddard has erected many 
of the city's fine residences and build- 
ings. He pays i)articular attention to 
carpentering and jobl)ing in all its 
branches, and his work is always 
thoroughly and expeditiously executed. 
He solicits estimates, which he fur- 
nishes with promptness and accuracy. 
His residence is on I? road Street, 
above the city line. 



HILLIAR'S— 49 BANK STREET. 




Richmond Stove Company placed upon 
tiie market the first range to success- 

fiillysupersede 
the old fash- 
ioned cook 
stove. T h e 
construction of 
its essential 
parts are now 
very nearly 
perfect. Va- 
rious experi- 
ments have 
produced verj- 
g r a t i f y i 11 g 
results. In ad- 
dition to liis 
large stock of 
stoves and 
ranges, Mr. 
Hilliar carries 
a fine line of 
plumbing sup- 
plies, and at- 
tends to orders 
for plumbing, steam and gas fitting, 
with promptness and efficiency. 

That Beautiful Section of New 
London, the Pequot District, contains 
many residences that betoken wealth 
and refinement. The grounds of many 
of these charming estates owe much of 
their loveliness and symmetry of land- 
scape to the civil engineering, taste and 
skill of Elisha Post, one of New Lon- 
don's foremost contractors. Other of 
the city's localities as well, bear eviden- 
ces of his handiwork. Mr. Post is tlie 
son of John and Nancy 1\L Rogei-s Post, 
and was born in Boziaii. Connecticut. 
July lltli, 185o. His early education 
was secured in the public schools of his 
native town. Like many othei-s who are 
successful in the competitive strife of 
our cities, Mr. Post commenced his ca- 
reer as a young agriculturalist, and 
afterwards became largely interested in 
the milk business on his own account. 
In 18S8 lie established in New London 
ids first enterprise, which was that of 
teaming and jobbing, later engaging in 
his present business of stone mason 
work, grading, roofing, concreting and 
buildin>r movinor. 



VZl 



[picturesque 1Hew Uondon. 



Thk FAcn/rv of thi; 

II A i; I' I'll l; II CiiNSKKVA- 

nii;v OK Mrsic, ol") I'carl 
Street. (Y. M.C. A. I'.iiiM- 
iiiLi: ) Hartford. CoiiiuHticnt. 
cnmjirisfS soiiii' (if the liest 
New York artists and teach- 
ers, siu-li as |{icliard Bur- 
nieister, pianist: Tlieodore 
\'aii Y<ir\. tenor : William 
Davul Sanders, violinist ; 
and Frederick Blair, vio- 
lineellist: also N. II. Allen, 
organist: \V. \'. Aliell, 
voice eultni-e and piano, and 
eleven other instrnctors. 

Tile estahlishnient of the 
Hartford Conservatorv of 
Music SuMinier School at 
New London, ("onnecticut, 
affords the {)ul)lic of that 
vicinity, for a part of tin- 
year, the very liest nmsii-al 
advantages to he olitained 
hetween New York ami 
Boston. 'I'lic iiartfdiil 




W. V. ABELL, 

Musical Director. 



< 'Onservatory offeis ojipor- 
tunit}- for study with the 
\cry best Mew York 
irtists and teachers, with- 
out the additional expense 
"f going to a larger cil\- 
lor a musical eilucation. 
All hranehes of nnisie are 
taught, and certitieates 
awarded in the teacliei-s" 
and artists" courses. Ar- 
rangements can be made 
with W. V. Al)ell, Director, 
for lessons with tlie in- 
structors at the heads of the 
different departments. As- 
sistants, teaciiing the same 
methods, are emjiloyed : 
thus the Conservatory fur- 
nishes good instruction at 
all prices. Those desiring 
lirculars or detailed infor- 
mation concerning the Con- 
servatory, should write to 
THEODORE VAN YORX, W. V.Al'iell, Musical Direc- 
tor. Hartford, Connecticut. 




Tenor. 



PATiiicK W. RrssELL. jilundier, 
steam and gas fitter, at 2'2i Bank 
Street, established his first business 
enterprise in that 
line in 1S72, as suc- 
i-cssoi- to Leonard 
VV. Dart. He deals 
in gas fixtures and 
all appurtenances 
|i e c u li a r to the 
trade. The plumb- 
ing and gas lilting 
in many of New 
jjondon's j)rincipal 
buildings is his 
w o r k . He was 
awarded the con- 
tract over many competitors for the 
steam piping in St. Mary"s Star of the 
Sea Roman Catholic Church. Mr. 
Russell is a member of St. John's 
Literary Society, and a charter member 
of the Knights of Columbus. He is 
also a member of St. Mary's Church, 
and for the past twenty-five years has 
sung in its choir. 




PATRICK W. 
RUSSELL. 



Wii.MAM L. l\(ii:. carjienter and 
budder, was born in I'atchogiie, L. i., 
in I.S51. In 1864 he came to New 
London. He first embarked in business 
on his own account in 187t), with a 
Mr. Bingham, under the firm name of 
Koe iV Bingham. This firm erected a 
number of notable New London resi- 
dences, among them those of James 
Hislop, and A. G. (irillin. In ISHO 
Mr. Koe dissolved partnership with 
Mr. Bingham. Since then he has con- 
structed more than 120 residences and 
stores. The Ocean Beach cottiiges of 
F. H. Chappell, Kx-Covernor T. M. 
Waller, and W. A. Appleby: the car 
station at ( )cean Beach, and the car 
barn of the New London -Street Rail- 
way Company, were built by him. He 
has been a memberof the New London 
Fire Department I'or twentj'-seven 
years. Inspector of i'.uildings for three 
years, and is a mciidier of the New 
London Board of Trade, and of the 
Board of Relief. His residence and 
office is at 6 Belden Street. 



128 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon* 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE H. O. BURCH CONTRACTING AND MANUFAC- 
TURING COMPANY - HEMPSTEAD STREET. 

Mr. H. 0. Burch Has Been in Business in New London for 25 Years. The Specialty in the Manufacturing Department of 

the H. 0. Burch Contracting and IVIanufacturing Company is the Production of the H. 0. Burch Chimney Tops. 

and Artificial Stone, the Process for the Manufacture of Which is Mr. Burchs Own. These Products 

are Endorsed by the Leading Architects and Builders. Who Have Used 

Them Constantly for the Past Fifteen Years. 



Bi'lU>iX(; Enteui'RISe, and .substan- 
tial appreciation in real estate values 
in New London is unequivocally trace- 
able to the city's geographical situation, 
and to the progressive spirit of its 
staunch citizens. The attitude, taste, 
and ability i>i its architects and con- 
tractors, however, have undoubted 1\ 
exercised a favorable influence upon 
tlie intentions of many contemplative 
iiome-buildcrs. Dennis J. .Murjihy, one 
of New London's leading contractors, 
is an enterprising representative of the 
local Iiuildcis' trade. He was l)orn in 
Ireland .July 24tii. 1864. In ISS.") he 
located in New London. He became 
associated with A. L. Dean & Co., 
masons and builders, in LSii2, subse- 
([uciitlv withdrawing from that lirm, 
and engaging in the same line of busi- 
ness on his own account in 180"). 
Among notable buildings erected by 
him are the following : Tiie (ioldsmith 
Building, Y. M. C. A. (iymnasium, the 
Catholic School and Convent, and the 
Fournier Building, in New London, 
and the Allyn Block. Groton. His 
residence and otlice are at 17 Tilley 
Street, and are connected by teleplione. 




Wri.si.ev Chimnkv 
C.vr.s have lieen in 
Tise for more than 
twenty years, and 
have given luii- 
versal satisfaction. 
They are made of 
cast iron and afford 
absolute protection. 
They are for sale l)v 
Luke .Martin, of 4 
Lee Avenue, New London, a chiniue}- 
expert of thirty years' experience. 

M.\NY PuiNCii'Ai. Sti:i:kt.s of New 
London bear evidences of the cunstruc- 
tive skill of William J. Cullen. carpen- 
ter and builder, wiio has his ofKce and 
residence at 830 Bank Street. The 
residence of Miss .Mary K. lirown, on 
Waller .Street, several modern houses 
on Blackball Street, John Collins' com- 
fortable Mank Street cottage, tliree fine 
houses on Coleman Street — the pro|i- 
ertv of Messrs. Francis Bracken, .luiian 
and Edward Cook, respectively — and 
many other structures, some preten- 
tious, others modest in design, were 
erected b\- Mr. Cullen. 



(picturesque 1Rew london. 

TiiKOlJ>EST,and 

one of tlie largest 
;iii(l hest known 
wall paper and (lee- 
orating lioiises in 
l-",usttTn Connecti- 
cut is tlie Nkw 
LoNi)ON Dkiim;- 
ATiNG Company, 
(i. R. Sweeney, 
i'ropi'ietor. located 
,1 1 II II m lie r 1 2 
Hank Street. It 
transacts a whole- 
sale and retail Idisi- 
iiess in wall papers, 
j>aints, leads, oils, 
varnishes, and 
window glass, and 
accepts contracts 
INTERIOR OF THE NEW LONDON DECORATING COMPANY'S for exterior and 
STORE -12 BANK STREET. interior painting 

and decorating. 




Nkw Londun Haumuk, than which 
the world has few that surpass it in 
excellence and beauty, is the frequent 
rendezvous of many 
sailing parties and j-aclit 
club fleets. In summer 
its waters are almost 
constantly dotted with 
the white sails of busi- 
ness and pleasure craft. 
The boats of the fisher- 
men, too. add not a little 
to the scene. For so long 
as there is wind to be 
utilized for motive pow- 
er, the sail will have its 
place; it is too neces- 
sary and picturesque 
ever to be entirely dis- 
carded for the more 
modern methods of 
aquatic propulsion. Sailmaking is an 
important New London industry, and 
for the line quality, cut, and workman- 
ship embodied in its sails, it is famous. 
Benjamin F. Bailey, its most promiiu'ut 
sailmaker. and dealer in sail stock at 
2H6 Bank Street, was bom in Groton, 
Connecticut, sixty years ago. son of 
Henry and Susan Franklin Bailey, and 
received his education in the public 



He establislied his 
a])OUt forty years 




BENJAMIN F. BAILEY. 



schools of (iroton 
present business 

ago, and has conducted it with 
marked success. He 
pays particular atten- 
tion to the finest of 
^ailmaking for yaclits, 
and whether — b}- choice 
I if the customer — Jiis 
yacht or l)oat sails are 
manufactured l)y hand 
or machine, tliey are 
made in the best possi- 
ble manner. He also 
makes tents and awn- 
ings, has on hand tents 
to rent, and sells and 
purchases old and 
second-hand sails. Mr. 
IJailey is a veteran of 
the Civil War 
and served in 
the 21st Con- 
necticut Reg- 
iment. He is 
a member of 
the Odd Fel- 
low8,Ancient 
Order of Igni- 
ted Workmen 
and the Jibl)Oom Club of New London. 




130 



Ipicturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 




RECENT BUILDING ACQUISITIONS — COIT AND JAY STREETS - ERECTED BY 

PERRY BROTHERS, CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 
Messrs. Perry Brothers are New London Contractors: Thei 
Architects of the Structures. Corner of Colt and Jay Streets 



The Fik.m of Houiiox & Root, 
painters and decorators, consists of 
Andrew J. Hobron and Jolin H. Root. 
It was establi^lied in 1873. under the 
.same tirni name by which it is now 
known. Messrs. Hobron & Root have 
been in continuous partnersliip for the 
past twenty-eight years. Andrew J. 
Hobron is a native of New London, 
son of Captain William Hobron. John 



r P. 0. Address is Box 108. Uncasvllle. Connecticut. The 
Shown in the Illustration, are Messrs. Donnelly & Hazeltine. 

H. Root was born in Montville, Connec- 
ticut, February 1st, 18.5-5. His father 
was Joseph P. Root. The business 
location of Hobron l^" Root is at 
24 Church Street, 'i'liey are contract- 
ors for all kinds of painting and paper 
hanging, and for glazing and liard wood 
finishing, and always keep in stock a 
full line of painters' supplies. 




INTERIOR OF THE BICYCLE AND SPORTING GOODS STORE OF CHARLES L. 

HOLMES -217 BANK STREET. 

Charles L. Holmes. Dealer in Bicycles. Bicycle Sundries, and Sporting Goods. Does Bicycle Repairing in All Its Branches. 

Rents Bicycles, and is Local Agent for the White Sewing Machine. 

131 



{picturesque 1Rew Uondori, 







INTERIOR OF W. W. WINCHESTER'S WALL PAPER AND DECORATING STORE, 
5 MAIN STREET, NEW LONDON. 

Wn.i.iAM \V. WiNcHEsTEit is the the painting- business for the past 
owner and manager of the business twenty-tliree years, and possesses a 
conducted in the store at number 5 thorougli knowledge of its require- 
carries tiie hir£fest ments. Tliis (|Uality makes his service 

o f incalcuhible 
V a 1 u (' t o tlie 
liost of ]iicased 
customers, wlio 
liave ]ieen his 
I >a Irons for a 
iiiimlKTof years. 
( )iie lias lint to 
leave his order 
at number o 
Main Street to 
have this valu- 
able experience 
placed will illy at 
h i s disposal . 
^Ir. Winches- 



Main Street. Ht 
and most varie<l 
stock of wall 
papers in the 
city, and an ele- 
g a n t line of 
window shades. 
His assortment 
of varnishes, 
glass, brushes, 
and painters" 
supplies is com- 
plete. He holds 
the agency for 
the f a in o u s 
Devoe and Ha\-- 
nolds lead and 

zinc paints, the only ready-mixed ters place of business is open from 
paints now on the market carrying the 11.4.5 a. m. to (i p. m., and on Satur- 
makers" guarantee for durability. Mr. days and Mondays is ojicn evenings 
Winchester has been identified with until \'^.'M) o'clock. 




FRONT OF W. W. WINCHESTER'S STORE, 

5 Main Street. 



1.32 



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LABORATORY OF THE SHEFFIELD DENTIFRICE COMPANY. 

Since Dr. Sheffield's Creme Dentifrice was Placed on the Market in 1881. its Sales Have Increased to an Enormous 

Degree, the Daily Output Now Being Over a Ton in Weight, It Has Been Advertised Only by Free Distribution. 

and its Quality Has Made a Market for it in Every Part of the World. The Company Now Claims 

to Have the Most Extensive Dentifrice Business in Existence. 



Chapter X1I. 



NEW LONDON OF TO-DAY. 

FAVORABLE TRADE INFLUENCES - A POPULAR SUMMER RESORT AND 
SUCCESSFUL COMMERCIAL CENTER - PRINCIPAL HOTELS -SOME PRO- 
GRESSIVE BUSINESS ENTERPRISES. 

London, after the decline in 
the protits to he derived from 
those pursuits, commenced 
for its commercial henetits to 
avail itself of its admirable 
location. To this and to the 
inherent progressiveness of 
its inhabitants, is due the 
fact that it is famed as a 
healthfully growing man- 
ufacturing and mercantile 
center, as well as a sununci 
resort. Li that it condiines 
these characteristics, it is an 
exception, and a notable 
and delightful exi'e])tion. 
too. It is seldom thai a 
popular summer water- 
ing-place preserves at the 
same time a healthy and pro- 
gressive business and manu- 
facturing tone. A railroad 
junction of importance, and reached 
by a most direct water highway, its 
facilities for freight transportation are 
luicxcelled. 




WILLIAM H. ROWE, 

Cashier New London City National Bank. 

A City That in the Past had long 
been accustomed to depend largelv for 
its prosperity upon its self-projecting 
maritime commerce and ventures. New 



133 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rcw "London, 




CROCKER HOUSE — STATE STREET, NEW LONDON. 




A. E. BECKWITH, 

Proprietor ••Gem" Restaurant, 3 State Street. 

'1'he IIotki. Kuval occupies, on 
Bank Street, an older hotel site than 
any other hostelry now extant in New 
London. Its proprietor is Frederick 
H. Gavitt. For twenty years previous 



t(i his assuming the proprietorsiiip of 
the hotel in 1898, it was conducted liy 
his father, a Civil War veteran, who 
died aliout three years ago. Tlic elder 
Mr. (iavitt was one of the unfortunate 
Uiuon soldiers to endure confinement 
ill Liliiiy I'risoii. The Hotel Koyal is 
admiralily conducted, and its service 
and cuisine are excellent. It offers 
special rates to commercial travellers. 
Its proprietor, who was born in Stoii- 
iiigton, Connecticut, in 18t!8. is a 
meiidier of the Masons, of the Knights 
of I'ythias, the 
Elks, the Forest- 
ers, and of tiie 
Nameaug Fire 
Engine Com- 
pany of New 
I>on(lon. In 
18 it 2 he was 
united in mar- 
riage to Mary A. 
Rogers, of Lf)W- 
ell. daughter of a 
well known vet- 
eran of the War FREDERICK H. GAVITT. 

of the Itebellion. Proprietor Hotel Royal. 




134 



Ipicturesque 1Rcw Uondon. 



Mr. JAiiES P. SuLLiVAX was born 
in New Britain, Connecticut, August 
29th, 187:3. His father, wlio died about 
twenty-four years ago, was James P. 
Sullivan. Alary Gorman Sullivan, his 
motiier, is still living, and resides with 
her son. When Imt nine years of age 
Mr. Sullivan commenced his career 
as a self-supporting young man. In 
1889 he began as laundryman in the 
Hotel Ru.sswin, New Britain. F'roni 
laundryman he 
became night por- 
ter,and from night 
porter he was 
promoted to 
a clerkship in 
the same hotel. 
As a clerk in the 
Russwin Mr. Sul- 
livan served three 
years. He was 
then called ujjon 
to assume the 
management of 
the Hotel Colum- 
bia, one of New 
Britain's leading 
hotels. He has 
also represented 
the New Britain 
Machine Com- 
pany, and spent 
fifteen months 
travelling in their 
employ, selling 
engines and wood 
working machin- 
ery. In June. 




JAMES P. SULLIVAN, 
1900 Mr Sul- '*™'"''*''"' "'"" •^o'^' *'"""'0P- S'3'e S'fee'- Near Union Depot 

livan secured the proprietorsliip of The 
Winthrop, in New London. Tliis hotel 
was in his hands but a short time when 
its furnishings and interior appoint- 
ments were entirely destroj'ed by fire. 
At first thought this occurrence may 
be deemed a very unfortunate one. 
From an immediate pecuniary stand- 
point it certainly was a misfortune : 
but eventually it will revert to a gain 
for the proprietiir, for the house is now 
completely refurnished and refitted, country. He has made his own wav in 



and is doing a prosjjerous business. It 
is the jircsent proprietor's determination 
that The Winthrop shall be maintained 
on a business status as enterprising and 
ujiright as that of any hotel in tiie city. 
As a commercial house The Wintiirop 
of to-day is a first-class hostelry. New 
London possesses a number of fine 
hotels, yet the addition of one more of 
a high character will lie of great 
benefit tn the city. Mr. Sullivan has 
evidently grasped 
the knowledge 
that a good com- 
mercial house, 
located near the 
Union Depot and 
the various steam- 
boat lines, will 
fill a long felt 
demand. The 
Winthrop is so 
situated, being 
but a stone's 
throw from the 
depot and the 
wharves. The 
push and determi- 
nation of its 
young proprietor 
will win for it a 
place among the 
best commercial 
hotels of New 
England. The ap- 
point me nts of 
The Winthrop are 
of a high grade. 
The cuisine is 
excellent, and the 
service courteous and etficient. The 
house is lighted throughout by both 
electricity and gas, and thoroughly 
heated by steam. It is a reputable, uji- 
to-date house, and deserves generous 
patronage. In persoiuxl appearance Mr. 
Sullivan is very pleasing. He is 
extremely courteous, and sincerely 
cordial, and enjoys the distinction of 
being one of the youngest and most 
enterprising hotel proprietors in the 



135 



Iptcturcsque 1Rew Uondon. 




NEW LONDON POLICE HEADQUAR- 
TERS-BRADLEY STREET. 

till- woiKl, luid is vi-ry lunbitious. His 
jirinciples of business equity and integ- 
rity are lirinly rooted in tlie ritjlit. In 
religious jjersuasion he is a UonianCalii- 
olie, and a member of St. Mary's Star 
of the Sea lloman Catholic Chureh, of 
New London. He is a member of Mer- 
iden Lodsjje of Elks, Numlier Thirty 
Five, and Past Chancellor of the 
Knights of Columl)us, Carmody Coun- 
cil, of New Britain, Connecticut. 

Cai'tain Daniel R. Looslev. the 
well known State Street periodical, 
book, and stationery dealer, has had a 
remarkable career. He joined the 
I'nited States Army in 1855, and saw 
service in the Indian Wars near Puget 
Sound in l8o')-.")8. in the San Juan 
Islanil boundary dispute, and on the 
"Star of the West," in its attemjit to 
relieve the garrison of Fort Sumter. 
He has tilled every rank from si-rgeant 
to captain, and has been twice lirevet- 
ted. With the Army of the Potomac 
he was in more than forty battles. 
Subsequent to the close of the Civil 
War, he was active in fighting Apache 
Indians. He resigned from the Armv 
in 1867. 



The New London DiitErTOHv is 
issued annually by the Price & Lee 
Company, the well-known New Haven 
dlrcrtniy publishers. This tirm m(>rits 
tile fordial and liberal sujjport of every 
enterprising citizen and laisiness man 
in New London and adjacent towns. 
Us directories arc models of convenient 
tlassitication and compilation, are well 
piintcd on good paper, and are dur- 
ably bound. 




PRINTING HOUSE OF CLARKE & 
KEACH-20 GREEN STREET. 

Artistic Printinc is a result of pro- 
gression. It is necessary, too, in the 
attainment of good commercial results. 
Clarke & Kcacli, printers, at 20 (ireen 
Street, produce nothing but the finest 
of printing. They have the reputation 
of being among the best priuteis in 
Eastern Connecticut. They make a 
specialty of fine societ}- engraving. 

MiiDEUN Ph<iti)CtI:.\I"HV is so dis- 
tinctly evolutionary that the eciuijiment 
of the up-to-date jirofessional or ama- 
teur must be in conforinit}- if he would 
keep abreast of the spirit of the times. 
To secure ambitious results, the most 
reliable of plates, paper, and other ac- 
cessories should be used. A responsible 
dealer in everything in photographic 
supplies is W. Edwin Hobron, whose 
store is at 2-31 Bank Street. Mr. 
Hobron also sells the Gramophone, one 
of the most perfect of talking machines. 



1 30 



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137 



(picturesque 1Rew ILondon, 




INTERIOR OF THE 

MILLINERY PARLORS OF 

MISS CHARLOTTE M. MALLORY, 

24 GREEN STREET, 

NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 

TiiK All iiMi'ANViMi l'i( TiKK pre- 
sents one of many magnificent views 
obtained from that section of tlie city 
known as '•Hill Crest." This tract of 
land was developed recently fof Imild- 
ing sites: 
the nne- 
f] nailed 
a d V a n - 
tages of 
location 
make it 
the most 
desirable 
residen- 
tial part 
111 the 
city. It 
is iiuiind- 
ed on the 
cast and 
west liy 
the t\\(i 
m a i n 
highways 

tliat enter the city from the north. 
Tliree parallel streets, fifty feet wide, 
will cross the property, intei-secting 
North Main Street, a much traveled. 




ADAM F. BISHOP, 
A Prominent Dentist of New London. 

macadami/.cd road un the west, ami 
Mohegan Avenue, through whose cen- 
ter runs the Montville trolley road, on 
the east. Thus all lots offered for sale 
are made easily accessible, and as they 

connnand 




— ^ 



, ^-^-..^^.-^.^.M.amCT*,. 



HILL CREST "-LAND BhLONGING TO PELEG WILLIAMS, 



a super!) 
\ i e w 
of the 
T h am es 
1! i V e r 
I'nim Ma- 
m a e o kc 
to its 
m on t h , 
and of the 
Sound 
f r i< m 
I! 1 a e k 
Point to 
the east- 
emend of 
I"" i s h c r s 
I s 1 a n d , 
they are 
I'oi- lieantv of si'cncrv. For 
iddress all in(|uiries to 




unei|nalle( 

full particulai> 

Peleg Williams or Arthur H.Hggleston, 

81 .State Street. New London. T'orni. 



138 




GUY'S MILLINERY PARLORS -235 STATE STREET, 
NEW LONDON, CONN. 



139 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon* 




CONSERVATORIES OF HERMAN H. APPLEDORN, FLORIST, 

Sherman Street, near Montauk Avenue. 



It Has Been Remauked iliat '-one 
may as well be dead as out of style." 
While this may not he literally true, 
under some eonditions the metaphor 
seems not too strong. She who woidd 
eomply with thi.s well-nigh inexorable 
law of fashion, could hardly do better 
than to call upon ;\lis. A. F. Strick- 
land, one of New London's most 
fashionable dress-makers, at 20 Golden 
Street. Mrs. Strickland also pays 
attention to the altering and repairing 
of furs. 

A Satiseactokv l'i..\tETo Go for 
either a lady's or gentleman's tailor- 
made garment, or to have one's clothes 
renovated, is the tailoring establish- 
ment of A. Plotis, 62 Main Street. 
Here niaj' l)e secured good A\ork at 
reasonable jjrices ; and the pro{irietor 
guarantees clothes that ht. When 
this is taken into consideration, with 
the fact that only good materials are 
used, these prices will be of interest: 
Ladies' suits. 84.50 upward ; men's 
suits, from •'^In. and men's trousers 
from 88 up. 



.\xi;i. I-". .\niiKI;s(in. jeweler and 
real estate dealer, was born in Norr- 
koping, Sweden, in 1S41. 'J'here his 
early education was secured. Soon 
after h'aving school he learned watch-, 
making, which 
w as then mucii 
more dilliciilt 
thannow.asone 
was obliged to 
serve six years' 
apprenticeshi]), 
and [)ay for the 
i nstruction. 
l-'-xtraordinarv 
ability and re- 
sults.also.were 
exacted. In 
1 H6.5, after 
travelling ex- 
te II s i vely in 
Europe, Mr. Anderson located in New 
London, engaging in the jewelry busi- 
ness under the iiiiii name of Hustice & 
Anderson, at r>~ I>ank Street. Since 
18m. when .Mr. Hustice retired, he has 
been the sole proprietor. He also con- 
ducts a prosperous real estate business. 




AXEL F. ANDERSON. 
Jeweler and Real Estate Dealer. 



140 



Ipicturesque fRcw Uondon. 



The Si'Aciors and Admikaulv 
Et^uiPPED Grekxhou.ses of Mr. Jolni 
Spalding ai'e located on .Main Street, 
hard liy liis residence, and witli it, 
are lii.s property. Mr. 
Spalding's busine.ss in 
New London wa.s es- 
tablished in 18t!8. on 
the site wbicii it now 
occupies. From t b e 
time of its inception 
it has progressed rapid- 
ly, and now the hot- 
bouses cover nearl\ 
twenty thousand feet 
of ground. The busi- 
ness has grown, entirely 
by its owner's persist- 
ent efforts, from almost 
nothing to very con- 
siderable proportions, 
and attracts pationage iroin a wide 
circle of outlying territory. It is the 
largest permanently successful 
florist business in New London. 
Mr. Spalding has always been the 



was 




JOHN SPALDING, 
One of New London's Leading Florists 



ployees he is liberal and considerate. 
John Spalding is the son of Thomas 
and J(>nnie Jobnston S[)alding. and 
born in Perthshire. Scotland. 
December 25th. 1x14. 
His early education 
was secured in the pul^ 
lie schools of bis native 
town. He commenced 
to earn his own liveli- 
hood wlien only fifteen 
years of age. With the 
instincts of trardeningf 
inculcated strong with- 
in him, he chose it for 
bis life vocation. Sev- 
eral fine positions in 
Scotland and in Ireland 
were tilled by him, un- 
til, in 1S60, he came to 
America, locating in 
.Nctt" Ldiidon in lS(j8. He has al\\a\s 
been given to thoughtful reading, and 
is remarkably well informed on many 
subjects of interest and importance. 
Mr. Spalding mari-ied in Scotland 




CONSERVATORIES, GARDENS, AND RESIDENCE OF JOHN SPALDING — 

MAIN STREET. 

his tlrst wife, w]\o died shortlv after 
coining to New London. He was 
married to his present wife, then Julia 
Scofield, of Poughkeepsie. New York, 
in .\uL;ust. 1871. 



sole proprietor, and his transactions 
have ever been conducted fairly and 
honorably. He has the respect and 
confidence of the solid and influental 
ni(Mi of the conimunitv. To his eni- 



141 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rcw Uondon. 



St.vi;i; IJitoTHKRs" I'ii.\i;.\i acv. loca- 
tfd ;ii 108 St;iU' Street, is one of tlii' best 
and most veliabU- drug stores in New I^on- 
dou. It is a prescription pharmacy, and 
enjoys tlie confidence of tlie best pbysi- 
ciaas. Many of its prescriptions come 
from members of the medical profession 
in (irroton. Mystic, Niantic, Montville 
and Norwich, as well as from those in 
Xew Lindon. An im[)ortant consider- 
ation in the comiJDundingof [jrescriptions 
is that a competent druggist be in charge 
to see that all goes well. One of the 
proprietors of Starr Brothers" pharmacy 
is always in the store. Both liave had 
admirable business tr.iining in their spe- 
cial lines, and with them absolute safety 
and [)nre ([Ualily are matters of certainty. 
Tiiey are watchful for their patrons' 
e%'ery interest, and tlieir prices are very 
reasonable. Tiiey are sole agents for 
Huyler's celebrated chocolates and bon- 
bons. When desirecl by their custom- 
ers the\' furnisli them with trading 
and discount stamps. 



Wii.i.iAM P). Smiiii 
.Main Street, was born 
in 1H33. When six u 
parents moved to 
Po(|uonnock. His 
father died when he 
was three years old, 
and his mother when 
he was fifteen. At 
twelve he was work- 
ing on a farm for 
his livelihood, lyater 
he learned the Brit- 
annia ware trade,but 
owing to an accident 
to one of liis hands, 
was obliged to di.s- 
continue it. He was 
married at twenty 
years of age. In 185') 
he went to Wiscon- 
sin, expecting to lo- 
cate there, but not 
liking the West, he 
oi)ening a restaurant, 
fectioncry store in 



. art dealer, T'i 

in New London 

lontlis of age his 



A Wf.1.1. Ai-I'<iimi:i> Dun; Sruui; 
is that of Charles .M. Uogers, Ph. (J., at 
'•• Main Street. .Mr. Uogers has had a 
wide experience in the drug l)usiness. 
In 1878 he entered the employ of 15. K. 
Willard, leading pharmacist of I'ittslicld. 
in 188.5 he giaduated from tlie Albany 
College of Pharmacy. He is licensed in 
New York City and in the states of New 
York. Connecticut and .Massachusetts. 
In \S\\-2 he purchased his present busi- 
ne.ss from !.. 1). K(llogg. Embarking 
in the enterprise under adverse circum- 
stances, he lias evolved a very gratifying 
patronage. He manufactures many 
special preparations, among them "Tube- 
rose Toothpaste" and -Ozol," a ccprii 
cure. When he first entered the busi- 
ness, the apothecary was re((uired to 
manufacture his own drugs. At his store 
the purest drugs are used, and the most 
competent prescriptionists employed. 
On the same reliable. eiiteri)rising lines 
will be conducted his new store at 
14 Broad Street. 



erected a large store- 



building. 
War as 



He 

sutler 




WILLIAM B. SMITH 
Arl Dealer. 



returned East. 

fruit and con- 

-Meriden, where 



iiid nllice- 
served in the Civil 
of the -i'.tth Color- 
ed Regiment. In 
1875 he came to New 
London and opened 
a •• 99 cent store, "' 
one of the fii'st in 
the city, and contin- 
ued its operation 
iiuiny years. Mr. 
.Smith manufactures 
an ointment with 
which he cured liini- 
self of eczema, after 
physicians had pro- 
nounced his recov- 
ery impossible. It 
is called " Sure 
C u re ( )intment,'" 
and is a certain cure 
for e c z e m a, sore 
eyes, insect bites, 
and anv cutaneous or sub-cutaneous 
irritation of inllammation. It is for 
sale liy all druggists. 



142 



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II 



IS 




ENSIGN EBENEZER AVERY'S HOUSE, 

Corner of Thames and Latham Streets. Groton. After the Battle of Groton Heights, the British Soldiery Left the 
American Wounded in this House. Which To-day Exists, a Memorial of the Storming ol Fort Griswold. 



Chapter X1I1I. 



HISTORIC GROTON. 

REVOLUTIONARY INTEREST — RUINS OF FORT GRISWOLD AND THE SPOT 
WHERE LEDYARD FELL -THE GROTON MONUMENT AND MONUMENT 
HOUSE- NOTED MEN OF GROTON'S PAST BRIEF SKETCH OF COLONEL 
LEDYARD, AND OF ANNA WARNER BAILEY - MODERN GROTON — 
VILLAGES WITHIN THE TOWNSHIP — CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS. 

Ix Point ok Revolvtionar y 
Fame and Imi'oiitanoe the town of 
(xroton, Connecticut, takes rank with 
Concord, Lexington. Boston, and other 
jilaces of notalile influence in the war 
which resulted in the birth of the 
I'nited States as an independent 
nation. Of the part she phived in 
that epoch-marking [lerioth and of her 
share in the making of its history, she 
lias reason to be proud. 

The Rattle of Groton Heights, 
wliich occurred on Sejitember (Uh, 
1781, and the heroic defense of Fort 
Griswold on that day, httve cast over 
Groton a halo of romantic history 
wliich will remain forever. A'erv 
interesting indeed is it to visit the 
ruins of the old fort, and speculate 
upon the events of the day when a 




ANNA WARNER BAILEY, 

■ IVIother" Bailey. 

Anna Warner Bailey was Noted for Her Patriotic Sentiments 

and Acts During Both the Revolutionary 

Period and the War of 1812. 



145 



picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



liaiiill'iil of inni. Jill ])atriolic Iutocs. 
lield it willi SiKii'taii-like disregard tor 
tlic numerical supi'iioiity of tin- bi-- 
sieging forces. The emlMinkinents 
and gi'dund plan of the fort are still 
quite plainly marked, and a sally-port 
through the south glacis yet remains 
intact. Within the fort, surrounded 
by an iron fence, is a granite tablet 
which marks the spot where Colonel 



MHiiiuiiifiit in incuiiirv til the hra\e 
men who fell at the Battle of (iroton 
Ueiglits. On September tl, lM:iti, tiie 
corner stone was laid. The monu- 
ment was dedicated September li, 
ls:>U. In IMSI its height was increased 
from liiT feet to 1:5.t feet. The shaft 
is an obelisk in form, and is of 
granite quarried from the ground on 
which the patriots whose heroism it 




VIEW WITHIN THE RUINS OF HISTORIC FORT GRISWOLD, 

Showing the Spot. Enclosed b> Iron Palings. Where Fell Colonel William Lcdyard; the Old Wall and North Gate: 

the Groton Monument and Monument House, and the School House and Bill Memorial Library. 

To Stand Within the Ruins ol the Old Fort. Upon the Ground Made Sacred by the 

Blood ol Martyr-Patriots, is to Marvel at that Spirit. Courage, and Loyalty 

to High Conviction Which Accomplished Our 

Independence as a Nation. 



William Ledyard fell, maliciously 
murdered l)y a British officer, to whom 
he had surrendered the fort and his 
.sword. The Groton Monument and 
Monument House, and the liill .Mem- 
orial Library are within view of and 
near the fort. From the ramparts 
may be ha<l a beautiful view of New 
London Harbor, the city of New 
London, and the Tlianies River. 

In 182t! an association was organ- 
ized for the purpose of erecting a 



perpetuates yielded uji their lives. By 
a circular stairway of liJO steps, one 
may ascend to the apex, from which 
is secured an extensive view of great 
charm and beauty. From adults a 
small fee of ten cents is re(piired for 
the privilege of making the ascent; 
from children but half price is asked. 
Tiie seasrm during which the monu- 
ment is regularly o])en to the public 
is from .lune to October, but Mr. 
.lames AL Bacon, a veteran of the 



14f. 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 



Civil War, resides near liy, and, upuu 
call, escorts visitors to the top at au}' 
time of the year. For fifteen cents 
his "Battle of Groton Heights," a 
very interesting booklet, may he pro- 
cured. The 
President of 
the Monu- 
ment Asso- 
c i a t i o n 
is John ( ). 
Spicer. 

The Anna 
Warner 
Bailey Cliap- 
t e r of the 
I) aughters 
of the Aineii- 
can lie volu- 
tion have the 
use of the 
stone house 
near the ni(m- 
ument. Here 
are kept for 
preservation 
and public 
i ns paction 
such Revolu- 
tionary relics 
as the}' have, 
o r m a y i n 
future have, 
possession of. 
The collec- 
tion on exhilj- 
ition is very 
fine and in- 
teresting. 

(iroton has 
given to his- 
tory several 
distinguished 
men. Silas 
Dean. Envoy 
to France at 
the time of 
the lievolutionary War: Colonel Wil- 
liam Ledvanl, the heroic commander 
of Fort (iriswold: the noted traveller, 
John Ledyard, and Uev. Samuel 
Seaburv. Bishoti of Connecticut and 



Kiiodc Island, were sons of (iroton 

whose careers reflect honor upon the 

town. 

Colonel William Ledj'anl was Ijom in 

Groton, near the site on which stands 

the C rot on 

M ipii iimcnt. 
H i s parents 
were I s a a c 
and iClizabeth 
Saltonstall 
Ledyard. 
He was, in 
every respect, 
one of the 
noblest char- 
acters of his 
day: I) rave. 
e IH c lent in 
command,and 
an indomita- 
lih' liniiter. he 
was, withal, 
modest and 
unassuming. 
( )ii July :^rd, 
1 7 7 1 i , soon 
after the con- 
st ruction of 
Fort G r i s - 
wold, he was 
commissioned 
captain of 
artillery and 
com mander 
of that forti- 
licalion. His 
jurisdiction 
was made to 
endirace New 
London, (iro- 
ton and Ston- 
i n g t o n in 
March, 177S. 
and the rank 
of major was 
at that time 
He perished, a 




THE GROTON MONUMENT. 

The Groton Monument was Dedicated September 6th. 1830. It is of 

Granite Quarried from the Soil on which the Brave Men Whom 

it Commemorates Yielded up their Lives in the Defense of 

Liberty. In t88l its Height was increased from 127 

Feet to 135 Feet. The Shaft is an Obelisk in Form. 

Its Apex, from which is to be Obtained a 

Charming View, is Reached by a Circular 

Stairway of 166 Steps. 



conferred upon him. 
victim of one of the most treacherous 
foe.s. September li, 17S1, after a re- 
markable and gallant defense of Fort 
( ; lis wold against superior numbers and 



147 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew TLondon. 



discipline. He was lonteiit to suffer 
all, and to lose all, that his count ly 
nii<,'ht be, tlu'iebv, the gainer. ( )ne 
hundred yards to the southeast of 
the old fort is his grave. Over it is a 
handsome monument erected from an 
appropriation by the State in 18.")4, 
as a tribute to his brave deeds and 
sacrifices. 

Anna Warner liailey ("Mother" 
Bailey) was a heroic daughter of 
Groton, who, at the time of the battle 



conntry. The garrison at the fort 
\\as reinforced by acom])any of vulun- 
leers from New London, wiio found 
their supply of flannel for making 
cartridges dangerouslv depleted. The 
iidialiilants, I'carlnl of a re-occurrence 
of the horrors of 17sl, liaii removed 
many of their effects, and no flannel 
was obtainable. "Mother" Bailey was 
appealed to l)y an American oflicei'. 
Ilcr lilankets slie had dis|)osed of. lint 
she unhesitatingly solved tlie dilliiulty. 




VIEW OF THE LOWER RAMPARTS OF FORT GRISWOLD. 

Showing Some Antiquated Munitions of Warfare in tlie Foreground, and in tfie Background tlie New London Shore, 

Witli the Harbor in the Middle Distance. 



of Groton Heights, rendered loving 
service and tender ministrations to 
the wounded, and to her uncle, 
Edward Mills, in whose family she 
made her home. Mr. Mills was one 
of the defenders of the fort, and was 
fatally wounded during the conflict. 
Thirty-one years later, when Admiral 
Decatur was blockaded in New Lon- 
don Harbor, and a land attack was 
anticipated, occurred '-the petticoat 
incident" which made "Motiier" 
Bailee's name famous throughout the 



Deftly she removed her flannel petti- 
coat, and handed it to the ofliccr with 
a jjatriotic expression of her hope that 
it would prove of service. She died 
in 1851, at the ripe age of ninety- 
two years. 

Groton has an estimated jmimlation 
of from T.oOO to S.OOO inhaliilaiits, a 
very creditable gain, since 1800, of 
aliout 2..50O. It comprises in area 40 
square miles. On its northern bound- 
ary is Ledyard. which was set off from 
(imtiin and incorporated a sepanile 



14s 




INTERIOR VIEW OF THE MONUMENT HOUSE -GROTON HEIGHTS. 




INTERIOR VIEW OF THE MONUMENT HOUSE -GROTON HEIGHTS. 

The Monument House. Located Hard by the Groton Monument, is Maintained b, the Anna Warner Baile) Chapter of the 

Daughters ol the American Revolution, of which Mrs. A. 0. Slocomb is Regent. It Contains Many Curios, and 

Interesting Relics of the Revolution. From its Curator One May Obtain Souvenirs of -Mother Bailey. 

Colonel Ledyard. and Nathan Hale. The House Contains a Visiting Register on which were 

Recorded Last Year, in August Alone. About 1200 Names. During the Year From 

5000 to 6000 People Visited the Monument. It is Open to the Public 

from May 1st to November 1st of Each Year. 



1411 



Ipicturcsque 1Rcw Uondon. 



iDWii ill iS-'itl. ( )n thf cast is tlic 
-Mystic liiver ami tiu' town nf Stoning- 
toii: on tlie west tlie River 'I'iiaiiics 
and New London Haihor, and mi tlie 
soutli, Lony Island Sound. 

The recent location in (iroton of tlie 
Eastern Sliiplmildiny; Company marks 
a revival of shiphuilding interests that 
is sure to he of great benefit to the 
town. Indeed, its influence is already 
manifest. Keal estate values are 



New London has at some time hceii 
variously known as '-(iroton Bank."" 
••(iroton Landing."" and -(iroton 
l-'crry." To tlie south, fronting on 
New London Ilarhor and the Sound, 
is Hastern Point. 

The school system of (iroton is 
excellent. It embodies ten districts, 
as follows: Groton, Pleasant \'alley. 
Centre Tiroton. P>uriiet's. Alvstic, 
rpper Noank. l'o(|iioiiniMk Hiid'4i\ 




VIEW OF MONUMENT STREET -GROTON. 

Looking North from Near the Groton Monument, and Showing on the Left the Residence of Mrs. A. D. Slocomb. 
and on the Right, the Bill Memorial Library. 



good, and are increasing, there is con- 
siderable building in progress, and the 
general tone is one of prosiiciity and 
enterprise. 

The township of Groton includes 
several villages. To the southeast of 
Groton j)roper are the divisions of 
Po<]Uonnock Bridge. Po(|uonnock, 
Xoank, West Mystic, and Mystic. To 
the northeast is the Navy Yard, a 
station on the Norwich division of 
the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad. To the east is Old 
^lystic. That portion directly opposite 



Kaslern Point. West .Mystic, and 
Noank. The High School of the town 
is located at ]\Iystic, where is also ;i 
^tUt and second primary, an interme- 
diate, and a grammar school. The 
capacity of the school building in 
District Nunilu'r One. located near 
the (iroton Monument, has been taxed 
to the utmost during the past year. 
To remedy this condition the State 
Legislature has just granted the town 
autliority to issue bonds to the amount 
of 840,000, for the purpose of erecting 
a new school building in this district. 



150 






PASTORS OF THE CHURCHES— GROTON. 



REV. PAUL F. HOFFMAN. 
Bishop Seabury Memorial. 



REV. LANGLEY B. SEARS. 
Groton Heights Baptist. 



REV. FREDERICK S. HYDE. 
Congregational. 



Ipicturcsquc 1Hcw Uondon* 




THE GROTON HEIGHTS BAPTIST CHURCH, 

BROAD AND CHURCH STREETS. GROTON. 

Society Organized March 8. 1843. First Church of Worship Dedicated as " The Groton Bank Baptist Church." June 4, 

1845. Present Church was Dedicated Jul) 11. 1872. and Name Changed by Act ol Legislature 

April 11. 1887. to "The Groton Heights Baptist Church." Sunday School 

Organized in 1845. Pastor. Rev. Langley B. Sears. 



Ill connection witli Di.strict Miuiilier 
One i.s a free kindergarten. 

(iroton has three churches, the 
Groton Heights Baptist, Rev. Langle}' 
B. Sears, Pastor; the Groton Congre- 
gational Church, Rev. Frederick S. 
Hyde, Pastor: and the Bisliop Sealiuiy 
Memorial Church (Episcopal). Rev. 
Paul V. Hoffman, Rector. The erec- 
tion of a new Congregational church 
is receiving favorable consideration, 
and will, without doubt, soon he an 
actuality. 

The Bill ]\Ieiiiorial Library, located 
on Mouument Street, near the Groton 



.Moimiiient. was founded by Frederic 
1)111. in coiiiiiiciiK nation of liis sisters, 
Kliza and Harriet. It is a fine build- 
ing of Stony Creek granite, with 
Maynard freestone trimmings. It was 
dedicated .June iSth. 1890. It is 
maintained by a fund of more than 
■'5'10,000, which was also the gift of 
Mr. Bill. Its volumes, of which there 
are upward of live thousand, are 
issued free to card holders. In the 
upper portion of the building is a 
room used as a mixseum, which con- 
tains many relics and articles of 
interest, among them the historic 



152 




THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF GROl ON THAMES STREET. 

The Congregational Church of Groton is an OH-shoot from the First Church of New London, Permission for the Separation 

being Secured from the Hartford General Court in 1702. Since Then There Have Been Several Changes of Site. It is 

Anticipated that a New Edifice Will. Ere Long, be Erected on the Society's Newly Acquired Property. Corner of 

Monument and Meridian Streets. The Regular Church Services are as Follows: Sunday Morning Service. 

10 45- Sabbath School. 12 M.: Sunday Endeavor Meeting, 6,30 P. M.; Sunday Evening Service, 

7 30 P M Week Day Meeting. 7.30, Friday P. M. Pastor. Rev. Frederick S. Hyde. 




"^'f>^<^?^ 



SEABURY MEMORIAL CHURCH -FORT STREET, GROTON. 

TheSeabury Memorial Church was Completed in 1876. It was Consecrated by Bishop Williams Seple">ber I3thj881. 

Under the Name of Seabury Memorial Church, in Honor of the Memory of the Rt. Rev. Samuel Seabury. F'" B'shop ol 

the American Church, and of the Diocese of Connecticut, and who was Born in Groton. November 30th. 1729. 

Services Sundays, Holy Eucharist. 9 A. M.: Matins and Litany, 10 30 A. M Holy Eucharist. 11.00 A. M^- Vespers. 

5PM: Holy Days. Holy Eucharist, 7 A. M.: Vespers, 5 P. M. Priest in Charge. Rev. Paul F. HoHman. 



Ipjcturesquc 1Rew Uondon. 



sword of Colonel Ledyard. 
iMiiied liy liiiii on tlie fate- 
ful litli of Septeniher. 17^1. 
In (i niton is loeated the 
Odd Fellows" Home of 
Connecticut. It is situat- 
ed I in the east bank of, 
and overlooks, the Thames 
l\iver. It is aptly named 
■• Fairview," for from its 
site may be obtained a 
view of dive rs i t y and 
beauty. The Home was 
founded and is supported 
by, contributions from the 
vai'ious lodges of tiic Inde- 




JAMES BISHOP, 

Secretary Odd Fellows' Home of 
Connecticut. 



Smith, of Waterbury ; .Sec- 
rctaiy, .lanics Bisiiop. of 
New Haven: Treasurer, 
Frederick S. Hunt, of 
Bridgeport. 

There are before tiie 
i/cgislature petitions for 
electric road privileges. 
< )ne road contemplated 
will extend from Norwicli 
to (iroton, and one from 
(irotun to Westerly, \ ia 
Noank. 

Anotiier matter of great 
interest lias lieen brought 
before the Legislature, 




•'FAIRVIEW," ODD FELLOWS' HOME OF CONNECTICUT.— GROTON. 



pendent ( )r(ler of Odd 
Fellows of Connecticut. 
Its purpose is to provide 
a home for aged, infirm, 
crippled, and indigent 
mend)ers of the Order. 
The property contains 
about fifty acres of land. 
and is one mile north of 
Groton N'illage. ItsofKcers 
are. Charles 15. Ware, P. 
G. M., New London, Presi- 
dent; First \' ice -Presi- 
dent, Frederick Botsford, 
of New Haven; Second 
Vice-President, John W. 




FREDERICK S. HUNT, 

Treasurer Odd Fellows' Home 

of Connecticut. 



ami sanctioned by it, viz., 
to grant a certain section 
of tlie town the borough 
form of government. The 
Legislative body having 
acted favorably upon this 
petition, it will then be 
balloted upon liy the vot- 
ers of Groton. Tliere ex- 
ists a difference of opin- 
ion reffardinsT the advisa- 
liility of this change in 
form of government: but 
there is unanimity as to 
the desirability of the im- 
provements proposed. 




RESIDENCE OF THOMAS A. MINER. 

The Residence of Thomas A. Miner. President of the Groton Grain Company. 105 Thames Street. 
is Located on Meridian Street. Corner of Monument. 




RESIDENCE OF CAPTAIN JASON L. RANDALL — RAMSDELL STREET. 



155 




FIVE MODERN GROTON RESIDENCES. 

HIRAM M. HODGDON-RAMSDELL STREET. HENRY L BAILEY - RAMSOELL STREET. 

WALTER R. DENISON — RAMSDELL STREET 
ALBERT L. SAUNDERS -ALLEN STREET. NELSON S. HOLDRIDGE- PLEASANT STREET. 

156 




BILL MEMORIAL LIBRARY - GROTON. 

The Bill Memorial Library was Dedicated June 18th. 1890. It was Presented to Groton by Frederic Bill, a Resident 

ot the Town. It is Constructed of Stony Creek Granite and Trimmed with Maynard Freestone, is Fifty Feet 

Long and Forty Wide. It Contains About Four Thousand Volumes. Issued Free to Card Holders, and is 

Maintained by an Endowment Fund of More than Ten Thousand Dollars, also the Gift 

of Frederic Bill. In the Upper Portion of the Library is a Historical Room in 

which are Many Relics of Historic and Local Interest. 

Chapter X1l1l1f. 



GROTON OF TO-DAY. 

CONTEMPLATED IMPROVEMENTS NOTEWORTHY RESIDENCES - MERCAN- 
TILE ENTERPRISES AND BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN. 



Thk RdAD.s (IF Gkhton are usually 
kept in good condition, and the section 
south, to Eastern Point, is traversed 
hy an exceptionally fine road of hard, 
smooth maiadain. Here the highway 
extends along the harbor to that 
eliarming summer hotel, the Fort 
Griswold House, and the water views 
from the road-way are very heautiful. 
The present seleetmeii of the town 
of Groton are, S. G. Fish. ,1. F. Bailey, 
and A. F. Hewett. The Town Clerk 
is Nelson ^lorgan, whose ollice is at 
Poquonnock Bridge. The Town 
Treasurer is John O. Fish. 

Groton is a growing town, and in it 



are well represented tiie customary 
branches of professional, trade, and 
mercantile pursuits. The business 
portion of the community centres about 
that section of Thames Street adjacent 
to the landing-place of the ferry which 
connects Groton with New London. 
Tiie concerns located here are enter- 
prising and reliable, and represent the 
progressive men of (i rot on. Many of 
them arc of long standing. 

Aluert L. S-MNDkks, carriage 
painter, has his place of business in the 
iqiper part of the building, corner of 
Thames and School streets. His work is 
uniformly excellent, properly executed. 



I.-)" 



[picturesque 1Rew 3London^ 




RESIDENCE OF CLINTON 



A Man's Drrv to Himsklf, pm- 
vided, always, that lie oaii afford it, is 
to be well dressed. While it is true 
tliat "clntlies do not make tlie man," 
they go far towards so doing. .\t the 
tailoring estahlishnu-nt and t'urnisiiing 
store of 11. A. Ivlgeomli one can find 
almost anything in the line of up-to- 
date, dress}' falirics and accessories. 
Tiie workmansliip wliicli Mr. Edgcond) 
puts into garments of his manufacture 
is excellent, while the trimmings and fit 
are unsurpassed. His store is located on 
Tliiimes Street, near the Post ( >fli(e. 




STORE OF HOWARD A. EDGCOMB, 
GROTON. 



D. HANOVER, CA.RPENTER AND BUILDER, 

Baker Avenue. Groton. 

Wci()I)IUm;xk R. Avis, M. D., was 
l)orn in New Brunswick, X. .1., in 
18(i6. lie was educated privately 
until he entered Yale Medical College. 
He graduated from the CJollege of 
I'hj'sicians and Surgeons of Baltimore 
in 18!)4, after a three years' college, and 
a two years' hospital course. He is a 
meml)er of the I. ().(). F., F'oresters of 
America, I'nited Order (iolden Cross, 
IIeptaso])lis, and of the A. (). l'. W., 
of all of which, excepting the Odd 
Fellows, he is medical examiner. 
His ollice is at the corner of Thames 
and Latham streets. 

Edwaki) W. .Iai;\'1s, D. 1). S., is a 
surgeon-dentist of thoroughness and 
skill. His location in (Jroton is re- 
cent, and of ini[)()rtance to those of its 
iidialiitants who realize how essential 
to their comfort and appearance is the 
care of the teeth. l)r Jarvis is a grad- 
uate of the Pennsylvania College of 
Dental Surgery, one of the oldest in- 
stitutions of like character in the 
riiiteii States. ( )n its faculty are 
some of the most widely known men 
in the dental profession. 



158 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon, 
T 




OFFICE AND SHOP OF MARQUARDT BROTHERS, CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS, 

THAMES STREET. NEAR FERRY LANDING. GROTON. 

The Firm of Marquardl Brothers. Carpenters and Builders, and Dealers in Lumber and Building Materials. 

Consists of Christian G.. George, and Charles A. Marquardt. 



H. E. iV[Ai:(,)rAi;i>T, Dealer in (im- 
cerie.s and Piovision.s, Thames Street, 
Griitoii, was bom in Groton, June 25th, 
1874. His education was obtained in 
the schools of Groton. Reestablished 
his grocery business in 18M5,and carries 
a full line of canned goods, teas, coffees, 
fruit and staple provisions. It is wortii 
wliile to inspect his fine stock. In 
June. 1897, Mr. Marquardt was united 
in marriage to Miss Kmma A. Chap- 
man. His residence is on Monument 
Street, Groton. 

Chaui.ks C. Bloksei:, Tonsorial 
Artist, has for the past fifteen years 
occupied his present location at numl)er 
2 School Street, directly opposite tlie 
(irotoii Ferry Landing. The exjiressioii 
"tonsorial artist" is not, in Mr. Bloe- 
ser's case, a misnomer, for in any of 
his chairs one is sure of a good "hair- 
cut" or comfortable "shave": and to 
perform eitiier, surely a certain art is 
requisite. Mi-. Bloeser is also agent 
for the New London Steam and Hand 
Laumlrv. 



< )N Thames Street, Gkotox, is 
the Market of JiD.sox V. Bah.ey, 
Dealer in Meats, Poultry, Game and 
Vegetables. Mi-. Bailey was bf>rn in 
Groton February ItJ, IBtl;"), and was 
educated in its public scliools. His 
politics are Republican. In 181>o he 
was elected a member of the Legisla- 
ture, and at present is one of the 
Selectmen of (iroton. He is a meml)er 
of the Odd B'ellows: A. ( ). V. \\ .: of 
the Jibboom Club, of New London, and 
of tlie Ridgley Protective .\ssociation. 

GkoimjeS. A\ ei;v, Dealer in Choice 
(iroceries. Flour, (train and Feed, was 
born in Groton April 19th, 188t5. His 
father was the Rev. J. R. Avery. 
I lis place of business is located on 
Thames Street, (iroton, and was estab- 
lished in 188(5. He is a memlier of 
the (iroton Congregational Church, 
of the Association of Master Mechan- 
ics, and of Fairview Lodge of Odd 
Fellows. His politics are Republican. 
In .September, 1S8(5. he married Miss 
Lucv A. Larkin, of Groton. 



15!l 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew TLondon. 




FIN BOAT "SPORT." 

Built by Charles F. Ferguson. Builder of All Kinds ot Yachts and Launches. 65 Thames Street, Groton, 

Where Boats May be Hired, as Well as Orders Given lor Their Construction. 



IfCaI'SIM, I'wd l')l,AI>ES ()!•■ Git.AS.S 

TO Gitow ill place of one be a lieiiefac- 
tion, surely those appreciating land 
values from #15 to fSO per acre on the 
tax list, to ffSOO and $1000 per 
acre, are benefactors. Thk Gkoton 
He.VI. K.STA'I'K Co>n*ANY, THOMA.S 

H.v.Mii/rox and Walter R. Denison, 
i'lKU'KiEToit.s, liave accomplished 
tills. With tlie advent of the Ivistern 
Siiipbuiltliiig ('oinj)any, arose the 
necessity for more houses in Groton. 
Jlessrs. Hamilton and Denison met 
this demand. They purchased land, 
made streets and built liduses. 
()vcrlookin<r the siiipbuilding plaid, 
they laid out the plat called "Harbor 
View," where they erected the Hotel 
Harbor \"i('w, and many cottages and 
two-faiiuly houses. They have here 
besides, fifty building lots for sale, 
most of them 50x140 feet, some larger. 
Tliese are the most desirable lots in 
tlie borough. With another line tract 
further south, they are able to meet 
anyone'.s means. 'J'o manufacturers 
seeking sites, liberal terms will be made. 



(iEnlICK l{. He.MI'.STEAI). I'I.I MIlKIt 

AN'ii riNSMirii. was lioiii in (iroton 
.May 27tii. 1SH2. son of William F. 
and W'eltliin Dart Hempstead. As a 
laiMicf he licgan t(i be self-supporting: 
afterwards he became an artesian well- 
driller, and yet later embarked in his 
present business of phnnl)ing, tinsmith- 
ing, repairing.and stove dealing, which 
he conducts at U2 Thames Street, op- 
posite the Ferry Landing. He deals 
ill Tinware of every description, 
I'liiiips. Pipes, Heaters of all kinds. 
Stoves and Kanges, and in Horse 
(ioods. Harness, etc. His telephone 
number is 193-2. His Stoves, Heaters, 
anil Ranges, and. in fact, all of the 
goods in which he deals, are of a qual- 
ity that gives the l)cst satisfaction and 
money-worth. His jobbing is always 
executed promptly and well. Air. 
Fleiiipstcad is a memlier of the I'liion 
Lodge of Masons, of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient 
Order of I'nited Workmen, and of the 
Improved Order of Heptasophs. 




HEADQUARTERS OF ROBERT D. DENISON, PAINTER AND 
PAPER HANGER -FERRY LANDING, GROTON. 



Ipicturcsque 1Rew TLondon. 




FERRY LANDING AND ALLYN BLOCK — GROTON. 

In the Allyn Block, Recently Erected by Him. is the Grocery of Carlos W. Allyn. 



Caklos W. Ai.LYX, Gkucek, \v;is 
born in Groton, son of Wilson and 
Ella E. Chapman All3-n. His early 
education was secured in a district 
school, which he attended winters. 
After acting as clerk for John S. Mor- 
gan, and for W. J. Starr, respectively, 
he entered business for himself, suc- 
ceeding Mr. Starr in 1892. In 189S 
he purchased the corner feed store of 
B. M. O'Brien, operating it successful- 
ly, until recently, when he erected the 
brick block which he now occupies on 
Thames Street, near the ferry landing. 
At his store may be found the very 
best of everything in groceries. Mr. 
Allyn's politics are Republican. For 
eighteen years he has been a member 
of the Groton Congregational Church. 
He is also a member of the Fairview 
Lodge of Odd Fellows — of which he 
is Treasurer, and Charter Member 
from Mohegan Lodge — and of the 
Union Lodge of Masons. In 189.T he 
married Miss S. Elizabeth Throop, 
niece of Feleg Williams of New 
London. 



W. 1>. Moi;(;ax. Watih.mai\i;i; axi> 
•Jkwelek, and Repairer of and Dealer 
in Watches, Clocks and .Jewelry, is 
located at 89 Thames Street. Groton. 
He makes a specialty of thorough, first- 
class repairing. He is the local agent 
for the Rochester. Eagle, and Monarch 
bicycles, three of the best produced in 
this country. Thej' are strictly high- 
grade, up-to-date wheels. .Mr. Morgan 
deals in bicycle sundries, repairs liicy- 
cles and iiandles in (iroton the Zon-o- 
phone Talking Machine. 

A (iiioD Place lo Hii;e a Team 
for business or pleasure, is the Giioton 

LlVEIiV AND Bo.VUDINc; S'l'.VlU.E. of 

which William H. Hawkey is manager. 
The stable office is located on Fort 
Street. Groton. This livery furnishes 
first-class turn-outs at all houi-s. and 
gives prompt attention to customers. 
It is connected with New i^ondon by 
telephone, and a call over the wire 
will elicit a ready response, and cour- 
teous and efficient service. 



lei 




KliSlDiiNCE OF C. M. SHAY, - MERIDIAN STREET, OROION. 




ANQENT ORDER UNITED WORKMEN'S HALL — SCHOOL STREET, 
GROTON, CONNECTICUT. 

Owned by the Thames Lodge Corporation. Erected in 1895. 



162 




FORT TRUMBULL — NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 

Fort Trumbull Received its Name in Honor of Governor Jonathan Trumbull. Governor of Connecticut during ttie Revolution. 

It Is Located on Fort Neck, a Point of Land Extending into the Harbor from the West Side, about a Mile and a Halt 

North of the Lighthouse and Nearly a Mile from the Center of the Cit>. It is of Granite from the Qua^r) 

on Millstone Point. It was Completed in 1849. at a Cost of about S250.000. The Fort 

is Garrisoned b> United States Troops, and is a Recruiting Station. 



Chapter X1It>. 



ENVIRONS OF NEW LONDON. 

WATERFORD — MONT VILLE — NORWICH — ALLYN'S POINT — GALE'S FERRY- 
NAVY YARD — GROTON STATION — NOANK. 




ROBERT PALMER, 

President ol the Robert Palmer & Son Shipbuilding and Marine 
Railway Company. Noank. Connecticut 



Nkw Lonuox, advantage- 
ously located as a seaport, 
is no less fortunately situated 
in regard to her environment 
and neighhoring towns. The 
city's connection l>y trolley 
with that ])ortii>n of Water- 
ford innneiliatel}' north: with 
Montville and Norwich: and 
its easy access to Xoank, hj- 
the local trains of the Consoli- 
dated ivailroad, is of benefit 
to tliDse places, and to New 
London as well. 

North of New London, on 
the Central N'ermont iJailway. 
is Waterford StiUion. The 
village of Waterford proper 
is soutli of New London, on 
the Shore Line Division of 
the New York. New ILiven 
and Hartford Uailroatl. And 
surroiindino- New London on 



H53 



picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




RESIDENCE OF GEORGE F. HEWITT, BUILDER, 9 MAIN STREET, NEW LONDON. 

Waterlord. Near Uncasville. 

tlie iiortli. west and south, is thecutiiv (jjuakt-i- Hill, a post office and village on 
lownslii]) of Waterford. nund)ering tlie Norwich and New London trolley 




THE UNCASVILLE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 
Uncasville Montville Connecticut. 

about 3,000 in population. Adjacent line. Its principal industries are agri- 
to \VatertV)r<l Station, on tlie nortli, is culture and the manul'acture of paper. 

164 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




RESIDENCE OF HENRY C. JOHNSON, PRESIDENT OF THE WILLIAM G. 

JOHNSON COMPANY- MONT VILLE, CONNECTICUT. 
North of (Quaker Hill is the town- Norwich and New London trolley line; 
ship of Montville. which comprises Palmertown. Massapeag, Oakdale and 




DYEWOOD AND DYEWOOD EXTRACT FACTORY OF THE WILLIAM G. 

JOHNSON COMPANY -UNCASVILLE MONTVILLE CONNECTICUT. 

Montville Station, on the Central Mohegan. Uncasville, situated six 

Vermont Kailwav; Uncasville, on the miles north of New London, is the 



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THE BOSTON STORE, THE SHOPPING CENTER OF NORWICH THE GREAT 

DEPARTMENT STORE OF THE REID & HUGHES COMPANY, 

MAIN STREET. 



1G7 



picturesque IRew Uondon. 



home cif till' Uiicasville Manufacturiiiij 
Coinpaiiy. cotton inaiiut'actun'is. of 
wliuh Mr. C'liark's D. Whiti' is Man- 
ager. Here are also located the works 
of tlio William (J. Johnson Company, 
manufacturers of dyewoods and pure 
dycwood I'xtracts and li(|uors. This 
company has had a long and successful 
existence: it was estal)lished in ls:54. 
To the northwest of Montville is 
Palmertown, one of the sites of the 
manufactories of the Palmer Brothers 
Company, manufacturers of l»ed com- 
fortaliles. Tlie Palmer Brothers have, 
also, mills in ( )aicdale and Fitchville. 
( 'onnecticut. Palmertown has, as well, 
manufactures of paper — by the mills 
helonging to the estate of the C. M. 
ivohertson Company — and of cotton 
and wool. It is two miles from Mont- 
ville Station. From Palmertown. to 
the northward, lies Massapeag.a station 
on the Cential \'ermont liailway. 



And still further nDitli, hut three 
)uiles south of Norwich, is tin- village 
of .Molicgan, situated on the same 
railroad line. 

Montville. once the North Parish of 
New Lonilon, is very nearly etpii-distant 
between Norwich and that city, on the 
west bank of the River Thames. It 
is intersected by the Central Vermont 
{{ailniad and the Norwich and New- 
London trolley line, and in population 
numbers close to :!,0()0. Between 
Montville and Norwich, one mile south 
of the latter, is Thaniesville, also a 
station on the Central ^'el■mont. 

Fourteen miles north of New Lon- 
don, approximately, is Norwicii, one 
of the county seats of New London 
County, and a prominent trade center 
for Fastern Connecticut, 'i'his busy 
city is charmingly situated at the head 
of navigation on the Thames, which 
is formed here bv the coniluence of 




GENERAL OFFICE OF THE NEW LONDON COUNTY MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE 

COMPANY, OF NORWICH, CONNECTICUT - OVER CHELSEA 

SAVINGS BANK, SHETUCKET STREET. 

The Policies of the New London County Mutual Fire Insurance Company Cover Damage by Lightning, Whether Fire 

Ensues or not Officers: C. J. Winters. President: J. F. Williams. Secretary; 

L, H. Williams. Assistant Secretary; I. L. Peck. Treasurer. 



ItiS 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon, 




RESIDENCE OF ROBERT PALMER ~ NOANK, CONNECTICXJT. 



the Yantic and Shetucket rivers. It 
is connected with New London liy 
trolley and steam railways, and by 
steamboat. It has direct railroad con- 
nections with the nortii and northwest 
as well. For its beautiful residences, its 
broad, shaded avenues and fine streets, 
and for its important manufactures, 
Norwich is justly famed. In popula- 
tion it has between twenty-seven and 
twenty-eight thousand. 

The foregoing places between New 
London and Norwich are innnediately 
west of the Thames river, and such of 
them as are railroad stations, are on 
the line of the Central \'ermont Rail- 
way. Skirting the eastern bank of 
the Thames, and yet another link con- 
necting Norwich and New London, 
are the tracks of the Norwich and 
Worcester Division of the New York. 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 
The noteworthy stations along this 
line, from Norwich to New London, 
are Allyn's Point. Gale's Ferry, the 
Navy Yard, and Groton Station. 

In the townsliip of Groton, about 
seven miles from New London in an 



easterh- direction is Noank, a charm- 
ing rural coast town, located on a de- 
lightful section of the Atlantic shore 
at the mouth of the Mystic river. Its 
shady streets and comfortable homes 
with their well kept lawns and 
grounds, lend an atmosi)here of thrift, 
orderliness and peace. The chief 
supporting industries of Noank are 
shipbuilding and fishing. It is the 
home of The Robert Palmer & Son 
Shipl)uilding and Marine Railway 
Company, one of the foremost con- 
cerns in the country engaged in the 
construction of maritime craft. 

Noank is on the Shore Line Division 
of the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad. Of churches it 
has two, Baptist and Methodist in de- 
nomination. The school facilities are 
good, and are represented by a cen- 
trally located school edifice, in whicii 
the grades range inclusively from Pri- 
mary to High. 

Tlie hotel accommodations arc un- 
usually good, and summer visitors to 
the village find it a delightful place of 
recreation. 



(IS) 



169 



Ipicturesque 1Rew ILondon^ 



in population 
Man\' of its 



Tlie water views about Noank are 
fine, and the sea air is healthful ami 
hraeinir. 

The town nuniliers 
aliont fifteen iiundred 
workiiii,^ inhaliitaiils 
are employed in the 
shipyard, many are 
engaged in fishing, 
a n d some have 
aehieved success in 
mercantile pursuits. 

RoswEiJ-Hiiinows 
Fitch, of Noank, was 
horn in (iroton, Con- 
necticut, April liUli. 
1833. His parents 
were Elisha and 
Mary P. Fitch. At 
twelve years of age 
he commenced to 
be self-supporting, and from then until 
he was fourteen, occupied a clerkship 
in a jjeneral store. Later his sununers 
were spent in fishing for a livelihood, 
and his winters in attending school. 
Subsequently he again became clerk 




ROSWELL B. FITCH 



in a store, and was afterwards engaged 
to assume the management of a union 
store which was erei'ted for the special 
purj)Ose of being placed under his 
charge. In 18.")! he becanu- an active 
partner in the busi- 
ness, and bought out. 
o n e - b y - o n e , the 
twelve other owners, 
until he possessed al>- 
s o lute control. In 
.May,lS90,he sold his 
liusiness, and closed 
an active commercial 
career of thirty-five 
years" duration. 

In October, 1854, 
Mr. Fitch married 
Ellen Elizabeth Wil- 
bur, who died Feb- 
ruary l;5th, 1874, 
leaving a son, Walter VVilbur Fitch, who 
was born in 1850, and died DeccMuber 
2iitii, 18S,S. ;\Ir. Fitch married again, in 
1.ST5, Olive Elizabeth Wilmot. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fitch have a daughter, Elizabeth 
Wilbur Fitch, born April 10th. 1884. 




RESIDENCE OF ROSWELL B. FITCH- NOANK, CONNECTICUT. 

170 




DOCK AND YARD VIEW IN THE SHIPYARD OF THE ROBERT PALMER & SON 

SHIPBUILDING AND MARINE RAILWAY COMPANY, 

NOANK, CONNECTICUT. 

The Officers of The Robert Palmer & Son Shipbuilding and Marine Railway Company are. Robert Palmer. President: 

Robert P. Wilbur. Vice-President : Robert Palmer. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer; and John E. McDonald. Superintendent. 

Robert Palmer, the President, was Born in Noank. May 26. t825. At the Age of Twenty. With His Father. He Engaged ir> 

the Shipbuilding Industry. Succeeding His Father More Than Fifty Years Ago. and Establishing From Small Beginnings. One 

of the Largest Modern Shipbuilding Enterprises in the Country. The Plant Has Turned Out Over 500 Vessels. Varying in Size 

From the Ordinary Fishing Vessel to the Large. Palatial Sound Steamers. Mr. Palmer's Politics are Republican. He Has. 

Served Two Terms in the State Legislature. Has Been Deacon of the Noank Baptist Church for 48 Years. Superintendent 

of Its Sunday School for 55 Years, and is President of the Mystic and Noank Library. 




VIEW IN THE ROBERT PALMER & SON SHIPBUILDING AND MARINE RAIL- 
WAY COMPANY'S YARD-SHOWING WORK UNDER CONSTRUCTION 
AND VESSELS ON THE WAYS. 
171 




DANIEL F. PACKER, INVENTOR. AND FOUNDER OF THE PACKER 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF NEW YORK. 

Mr. Packer was Born in Groton. April 6th. 1825 In His Early Days He Followed His Predeliction tor the Sea. Crossing 
the Atlantic a Number of Times, and at Twenty-One Became Captain and Part Owner ol a Vessel In 1851-52 He Spent 
Most ol His Time in Calitornia. Looking After the Interests He Had Acquired in the Gold Mines. 

The First Pine Tar Soap Ever Made was Originated and Manufactured by Daniel F. Packer — the Soap Which is Now 
Commonly Known in the Business World, and in About All American Households, as Well as in Those of Nearly All 
Civilized Countries, as 'Packer's Tar Soap." For the Last Twenty-Five Years He Has Been Engaged Principally in the 
Manufacture ot this Celebrated Soap. 

Mr Packer Resides in Mystic. His Elegant Home. "Grand View Cottage. " is On the Banks of the Mystic River. 



172 




SOLDIERS- MONUMEM JL'.NCl ION OF EAST MAIN S IREET a: 
BROADWAY, MYSTIC. 



Chapter X\D. 



ENVIRONS OF NEW LONDON MYSTIC. 

THE BEAUTIFUL SCENERY OF A CHARMING AMERICAN COAST TOWN — 
ITS DELIGHTFUL LAND AND WATER VIEWS-NOTEWORTHY CHURCHES 
—HOMES AND POINTS OF GENERAL INTEREST — PORTRAITS OF MEN 
PROMINENT IN THE PROFESSIONAL. SEAFARING, COMMERCIAL, AND 
ARTISTIC LIFE OF MYSTIC. 

of ( )lcl ( )eean's breezes, saline and in- 
vigorating I Favored with sutli a 
combination of charming characterist- 
ics is Mystic, Connecticut, once aptlv 
termed liy an enthusiastic writer, "The 
Gem of New England." It attracts, by 
reason of its incomparable scenery, 
many artists of note. Mr. Charles 11. 
Davis, a resident of tlie village, is a 
[lainter of widespread fame. 

East of the village is a commanding 
eminence from which may be had a 
view that in comprehensiveness and 
beauty is almost bewildering. In the 
dim distance far to the southward is 
Montauk Point, in the middle distance 
is Fisher's Island, and near the river's 
union with the sea are Mystic and 
Mason's islands, all suiTounde<l by 
dancing waves that glint and shimmer 
in the sunlight. To the westward — 
molten silver lietween emerald banks 
— Hows the Mystic Hiver. Below is 
the village, peaceful, yet unidle, its 
cozy homes discernible between vistas 
of green foliage. To the northward 
are the winding river, valleys and 

173 




CAPTAIN JOSEPH W. HOLMES. 

Maxy auk the Beaitii -tl Coast 
Towx's OF New Enclaxd: many the 
enclianting inland rural villages: less 
numerous are those possessing the two- 
fold charm of water view and verdant, 
wooded hill and dale. Tiie country 
by the sea: the sea reaching to the 
country! How fine to experience at 
once the delights of green meadows, 
rugged hillsides, dark, deep-recessed 
forest, and the exhilaration and coolness 



[picturesque 1Rcw Uondon. 



forest, orchards and farm lands, and 
pictures(]ue liouscs. Tlie spires of ( Hd 
Mystii' can be seen, and at the valleys 
head, ten miles distant, may he dis- 
cerned the outlines of Lantern Hill. 

As a field for the exercise of photo- 
•ifraphic study. Mystic and its immediate 
vicinity are remarkably prolitic, antl 
rife with subjects that delight the 
artistic eye. 
And in Mr. 
George E. 
Tingley, a 
resilient of 
the town, it 
possesses a 
photographist 
of rare talent 
and discrim- 
ination, who, 
with his cam- 
era, secures 
w o n d e r f n 1 
scenic effects. 
Mr. 'rin<,f]iy 
was born in 
Mystic Sep- 
tember 1 7 th, 
1st; 4. For 
nearly twenty 
years he has 
given his at- 
tention to tiie 
study of pho- 
tography in 
its diverse 
forms, look- 
ing always to 
the possil)ili- 
ties of super- 
lative artistic 
attainment. 
Truly, one is ready to believe that the 
environment has made the man. Mr. 
Tingley's enthusiasm in his profession 
is unl)Ounded. That his zeal and talent 
have borne abundant fruit is demon- 
strated by his universal fame and 
recognition. His work is knciwn far 
and wide for beauty and uniqueness of 
subject, and his collection of landscape 
and outdoor scenes is a revelation in 



GEORGE E. TINGLEY, 
Photographist. 



photography. While he excels in por- 
traiture and character studies, his chief 
delight is to roam a-tield with his 
camera, and reproduce the lovel}- views 
in which his locality al)Ounds. A cita- 
tion of his work is really more witliin 
the province of a dissertation upon 
art than tliat of a mere untechiiical 
description. However, in coiuiection 

with the vil- 
lage of Mys- 
tic, his name 
and profes- 
sional attri- 
butes and 
•epute con- 
stitute more 
than a simple 
m a t t e r o f 
r e 1 e \' a n c e . 
Witiiin the 
[)a s t t o u r 
y ears M r . 
Tingley has 
leen awarded 
^.ht medals 
for the excel- 
e n c e a n d 
artistic merit 
of his pic- 
tures, by the 
P h ot ogra- 
phers' Asso- 
elation of 
America, the 
Phot og ra- 
phe rs' i\sso- 
elation of 
New England 
and by the 
Photog ra- 
phers' Asso- 
ciation of Ohio. He has also frequently 
received honorable mention and va- 
rious diplomas. 

The history of Mystic, like that of 
many similarly located villages, pos- 
sesses peculiar fascination. On tlie 
summit of the hill west of the river 
Captain John Mason, in June, IG^T, 
with less than one hundred men under 
his command, waged a fierce and 




174 



Ipicturesque 1Rew Uondon, 



victorious ])attle against the Pequot 
Indians. Near the spot where the 
battle raged has l)een erected to Captain 
Mason a monument conniiemoiating 
the sanguinarj- occurrence and his Imiv- 
erv. The town's earliest inhabitants 
were men of pioneer spirit and 
determination. And into subsecjuent 
generations these qualities were in- 
fused. In 
the Revo- 
1 u t i on, 
Mystic's 
sons took 
active 
part. T o 
the War 
of 1812, 
and to the 
Civil War 
also, went 
brave men 
from with- 
in its con- 
fines, and 
a good 
EC count 
they gave 
of them- 
selves. In 
August, 
18 14, 
when the 
British 
fleet made 
an attack 
upon 
Stoning- 
ton, vol- 
unteers 
from Mys- 
tic aided 
i n t h e 

town's defence. Mystii- is in New 
London county, on the Mystic River, 
nearly equally distant from New York 
and Roston. " It is east by northeast in 
its direction from New London, with 
which it has direct communication by 
both trains and steamei's. The village 
is within easy accessibility from New 
York, Boston, "Providence, New Haven, 
and intermediate stations. Its river. 



from the Sound, is an admirable water 
highway, navigable in all seasons of the 
year, and by means of which products 
possible of coastwise shipment can 
be inexpensively transported to its 
wharves. 

Of shipbuilding. Mystic has had her 
share^the industry is now extant — 
and fmni lier shores many a gallant 

vessel has 
Ijeen wed- 
ded to the 
sea. to ac- 
quit her- 
self ad- 
mirably in 
the com- 
merce of 
tlie world. 
I »f her in- 
l r e p i d 
sailor-men 
the vil- 
lage has 
leason to 
be proud. 
In v e n - 
turesome 
voyages 
and suc- 
cessful, in 
1 oyalty, 
honor, 
and i n- 
d u s t ry, 
tliey have 
ever been 
amongthe 
foremost. 
Mystic 
sends to 
the marts 
of trade 
manv products of her own. With- 
in her boundaries are located 
velvet and woolen mills, a spool 
factorv, a branch manufactory of a 
prominent printing press company, 
and machine shops and gasoline 
engine works. It also has a num- 
ber of builders of lirst-class steam 
launches and small craft, and a 
, ship-yard where larger vessels are 

175 




DR. CHARLES VOORHEES BUTTLER 



picturesque 1Rew TLondon. 



constructed. It lias, besides, a printing 



newspaper. Its 
four thousaiid. 



otHce and a weekly 
population is about 
live hundred. Tlie 
town is busy as well 
as beautiful. From 
its precincts men 
have gone forth to 
battle with the world. 
and have inscribeil 
their names high 
upon the nioiHiiiient 
to human endeavor, 
and Mystic and the 
world are better f(ir 
their lives. 

Mystic is the home 
of a gotxlly nunibci 
of retired sea cap- 
tains, hale and hearty, 
wliociiuld, were they 
so disposed, tell many 
a stirring tale of ad- 
ventures experienced 
by those who go down 
to the sea in ships. 

About as thrilling 
and perilous occur- 
rences as any outside of yellow-covereil on 
literature have fallen to the lot of 
Alljert Crary Burrows, during his long 
maritime career. The 
Captain was connect- 
ed with the Mallory 
Line of Steamships 
for over twen ty 
years, and it was 
while in command of 
one of the steamers 
of this comijany. 
("The Rio Grande'' ) 
that, when at sea. 
ninety miles from the 
Delaware Break- 
water, fire was dis- 
covered in her hold. 
There was l)ut one 
avenue of safety. 
CooUv, and with a 




EBEN P. COUCH, 
Postmaster at Mystic. 




remarkable display of 
jiidsjment the intrepid 



Overhauling an Italian hiiiciur, he 
transferred to her his passengers — 
iiinety-se\en in number— and running 
his tlaiiiing sliip upnn 
the shoals, said< her 
to the decks, coni- 
I)lelely extinguishing 
liietire. With the aid 
of his dauntless crew 
he pumped the vessel 
out, lloatcd her, and 
within lifty-onc hours 
from the discovei}- of 
the llames, had again 
overtaken the Italian 
ami re-transferred his 
)assengers. Captain 
Burrows was born in 
CJolchester, Connecti- 
cut, June 7th. ls:{7, 
son of Brutus and 
.Julia West Burrows. 
He went to sea when 
but fourteen years of 
age, and has made 
more than one hun- 
dred trips across the 
Atlantic, and sailed 
many a whaling expedition. 
To Mystic belongs the honor of hav- 
the ship that made the 
shortest voyage be- 
tween New York and 
San Francisco ever 
credited to a sailing 
vessel. This was ac- 
complished by the 
late ( 'aptain John E. 
Williams in LSfiH. 
The ship in which he 
achieved the feat was 
the "Andrew Jack- 
son," built in Mystic 
in lS.");')-")4. The rec- 
ird time was eighty- 
nine days and four 
hours, exceeding the 
closest previous 
record bvnine Iiouts. 



llltr nroiluced 



CAPTAIN ALBERT CRARY 
BURROWS. 

"nerve" and In recognition of the achievement the 
captain real- owners of the ship presented Cajitain 



ized and seized the opportunity. Williams with an elegant chronometer 



I7(i 



picturesque 1Rew London. 



watch. Captain Williams was promi- 
nent in Masonic circles, a fine type of 
tlie intelligent, trustworthy sea-captain, 
and his deatii was a loss to Mystic. 

Captain .Joseph Warren Holmes, 
another of Mystic's retired sailing mas- 
ters, was born in Mystic April 7th, 
1824. His parents were .Jeremiah and 
Ann liordell Denison Holmes, both of 
Mystic. Jeremiaii Holmes was one of 
the soldiers who repelled the Britisli 
fleet in its attack upon Stonington in 
181-1. Previous to this time he had foi 
three years been impressed into service 
in the Britisli Navy, where he had 
acquired much skill in gun practice, 
whicli, as he was in command of the 
battery at Stonington, he turned to 
good account against tiie uivading 
ships. Captain J. W. Holmes became 
commander of a vessel when but 
twenty-one years of age. He has 
made during ids seafaring career, 
eighty-three voyages around Cape 
Horn, and fourteen around the Cape 
of Good Hope. For a period covering 
fourteen years of his life lie has at 
various times commanded prosperously 
conducted whaling voyages. 

Mystic is an ideal residential town : 
peaceful, balmy of air, and healthful. 





RESIDENCE OF DR. JOHN K. BUCKLYN, JR. 
East Main Street. Mystic. 

The residence and offices of Dr. .John 
Ivnight Bucklvn. .Jr.. one of its ablest 



CAPTAIN JOHN E. WILLIAMS, 
physicians, are located on East Main 
Street, Mystic, and are connected by 
telephone. Dr. Bucklyn is a graduate 
of the New York Medical College, 
class of 1887. and of tlie Mystic \'allcy 
Englisli and Classical 
Institute, J. K. Buck- 
lyn. L. L. D.. Princi- 
pal. He has a huge 
practice in ]\Iystic, 
Stonington. Old 
Mystic, Noank, Po- 
quoniiock. and New 
London. He is a 
member of tlie ( >dd 
Fellows, and Medical 
Examiner for the Pru- 
dential Life Insurance 
Company, of Newark, 
New Jersey, and for 
the Knights of Pyth- 
ias. His othce hours 
are from 2 to 3, and 
7 to 8 P. .^L Dr. 
Bucklyn was born in Mystic July 31st, 
18(!."), son of Professor John K. Biiikh n 



(picturesque 1Rew london. 




EAST VIEW HOUSE, MYSTIC, CONNECTICUT-RESIDENCE OF ELI GLEDHILL. 



and Mary M. Young Bucklyn. On 
June 25th, 1891, he was united in 
marriage to Marv Emma Hall, ol' 
Mystic. 

The village is admirably governed 
and maintained. Its business and 



professional men are exceptionally 
able and conscientious. The medical 
jjrot'ession is represented by several 
physicians of experience and skill, 
jjroniinent among whom are Dr. J. K. 
Rucklvii, Jr., and Dr. Charles Voor- 




THE MYSTIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY- MANUFACTURERS OF WOOLENS. 



1 Its 



(picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 




RESIDENCE OF CHRISTOPHER MORGAN -CORNER OF BROADWAY AND EAST 

MAIN STREET, MYSTIC 

Buttler has studied under Dr. Storer. 



hees Buttler. During the Spanish- 
American War, Dr. Buttler was Acting 
Assistant Surgeon in tlie United States 
Army, serving in typhoid fever hos- 
pitals at Camp Alger, Jacksonville, 
Florida, and Savannah, Georgia. Dr. 



the eminent gynecologist, of New 
York, and has been ^'isiting Physician 
at the William W. liaokus Hospital, 
of Norwich, Connecticut. 

Enchanting, with the magic of the 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. H. E. G. STILLMAN-GREENMANVILLE AVENUE, MYSTIC. 



17'.' 



(picturesque IHew Uondon, 




" RIVER VIEW," OLD MYSTIC RESIDENCE OF CHARLES Q. ELDREDGE, 
At the Head ol the Beautiful Mystic River. 



countiy and of the ocean : peaceful, 
witli tlie peace of a well conducted, 
law-aliiding village ; dear to the hearts 
of all her children, and enshrined in 
the memories of those who have appre- 



ciatively enjoyed her dainty, yet 
withal inspiring cliarnis. Mystic is the 
ideal home, and tiie ideal recreation 
place of the sojourner and seeker after 
the beautiful in nature. 



• -iM '■■'rt- - ■'' • 




ONE OF THE FINE RESIDENCES OF MYSTIC-PEARL STREET. 



isu 




ISl 




ST. PATRICKS ROMAN CATHOLIC CHIIRCH-MYSTIC. 

Church Street. 

Rev. P. P. Shahan. Rector. 



METHODIST CHURCH-MYSTIC 

Corner Willow and Church Streets. 

Rev. John McVey. Pastor. 



ST. MARKS EPISCOPAL CHURCH-MYSTIC. 
Pearl Street. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH-MYSTIC. 

High and Library Streets. 
Rev. Byron U. Hatfield. Pastor. 



MYSTIC CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

East Main Street and Broadway. 

Rev. Clair F. Luther. Pastor. 



182 




MYSTIC AND NOANK LIBRARY— LIBRARY STREET, MYSTIC. 

The Mystic and Noank Library Building was Erected in 1892. The Library was Incorporated in 1893. The Con- 
struction of the Mystic and Noank Library was Made Possible Through the Generosity o( the Late Captain Elihu Spicer. 
Who Provided a Fund for that Purpose. Captain Spicer was Born in Noank. and Spent a Considerable Portion of 
his Life in Mystic. He Died in Brooklyn. N. Y.. February 15th. 1893. The Library Building is Beautiful in Construc- 
tion and Design, and is Located in the Midst of Spacious and Charming Grounds. 




MYSTIC'S PRINaPAL BUSINESS STREET-MAIN STREET, LCX3KING WEST. 

183 



picturesque 1Rew ILondon. 



I'liK Dkivks is and AisouT Mys- 
tic are licautit'ul. Skirting the shores, 
tlirougli green tieUls, and by wooded 
or rock}' slopes, wind the roads, af- 
fording hind and water views of sur- 
prising l)eauty. To Stonington, Wes- 
terly, Wateli Hill. Norwicli. Xew 
Lonilon, and to Lantern Hill and the 
Old lload Chiuvh, are drives fraught 
with loveliness and historic interest. 
Around the river, from Mystic to Old 
Mystic on the north, and through Pequot 
Avenue to the John Mason Monument 
are also drives of varietv and chartn. 



about Mystic, and with its various 
j)oints of interest and beauty. His 
stables are well appointeil in every 
detail, and no item essential to the 
safety, convenience, or pleasure of his 
patrons is permitted liv him to remain 
overlooked. Telephone calls during 
either the day or night are responded 
to promptly, and receive ready and 
cf)urtc()us attention. Carriages from 
his stable meet all trains at the Mys- 
tic depot. Mr. Brown was born in 
Mystic thirty-eight years ago. His 
parents were Hoswell and ("atherine 




THE BANK SQUARE LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLES — 
JAMES E. F. BROWN, PROPRIETOR. 



For the enjoyment of the pleasures 
ottered by these delightful highways, 
the village affords ample facilities. 
Its public stables are of the usual 
lush order maintained at warm 
•weather resorts frequented by visitors 
of wealth and refinement. Note- 
worthy among the liveries of Mystic 
are the Bank Square Stables on Water 
Street, of which Mr. James E. F. 
Brown is the proprietor. Mr. Brown 
has many comfortable and stylish 
turnouts. His horses are all well 
groomed animals of fine fettle and re- 
liable disposition. When desired, he 
furnishes efiicient drivers, who are 
thoroughly conversant with the roads 



W. Chesebrough Brown, of well known 
North Stonington and Groton families 
respectively. His wife, who was 
formerly Mary S. Logee, daughter of 
James Logee, of Danielson, Connecti- 
cut, is of estimable Connecticut line- 
age. Koswell Brown, his father, in 
earlier days operated a stage route Ije- 
tween Mystic and Stonington, con- 
necting at the latter place with the 
New York boats. The livery busi- 
ness — until the demise of the elder 
Mr. Brown, about six years ago — 
was conducted by the father and 
son. Since then Mr. J. E. F. Brown 
has been the proprietor of the estab- 
lishment. 



picturesque 1Rew ILondon* 




THE MYSTIC RIVER NATIONAL BANK — MYSTIC. 

The Mystic River Banl< was Organized and Commenced Business in November. 1851. Charles IMaliory was its First 
President, and George W. Noyes its Earliest Cashier. In 1860 Nathan G. Fish was Elected President. In 1864 it was 
Changed From a State Bank to a National Banking Association. The Present Officers of the Bank are F. M. Manning, 
President: and Henry B. Noyes. Cashier Since its Inception the Bank Has Had Four Presidents. 



On River Avenue, Mystic, are the 
granite, marble, and monument works 
of John Trevena, wlio manufacture.s 
and deals in every variety of this 



character of product. Mr. Trevena 
gives particular attention to designing, 
and makes a specialty of lettering and 
cleaning monuments in cemeteries. 




SHOE AND FURNISHING STORE OF J. W. PHILLIPS -MAIN STREET, MYSTIC. 

The Stock of Fine Shoes and Mens Furnishings at J. W. Phillips' Store is Complete in Every Detail. 

It is the Principal Shoe House in Mystic. 



(14) 



1S5 




MYSTIC MONUMENTAL WORKS, RIVER AVENUE — JOHN TREVENA, PROP'R. 

|)i:. A. 1{. I'AiMv, 
located over the 
Mystic Phamiacy, 
.M iiin Street is an 
expert specialist in 
licrnia cases. His 
trusses are of his 



N K < I I' r 1 1 !•: 
Largest silk spool 
ni a n u f a c t u r i n jj 
plants in this coun- 
try is tiiat of till- 
Allen Spool and 
Printing Company, 
manufacturers and 
printers of spool and 
hraid rolls, Mystic, 
Connecticut. It is 
the only concern of 
like character fully 
equipped witli auto- 
matic spool-ma kiuL; 
machinery, which is 
manufactured from 
the company's own 
patents. The com- 
pany was established 
in 1878. 




H. N. WHEELER'S DRUG STORE, 
MAIN STREET, MYSTIC. 



own manufacture. 
I lis extensive study 
(il hernia, and his 
wide experience 
cnahle him to so 
use the plastic con- 
foiining (lualities of 
his st'ientifically 
constructed trusses, 
that they perma- 
nently reduce the 
hernia, and it event- 
u a 1 1 \' 1) e c o m e s 
curi'il. 




PRINTING OFFICE OF C. I. BARSTOW - BUCKLEY BLOCK, MYSTIC. 



isij 







>^r^A^ 



MILLSTONE GRANITE QUARRIES -MILLSTONE, CONNECTICUT. 

A View ol the Yard. Showing Where the Best New England Granite is Produced and 
Manufactured for Monumental and Building Work. 

Cha pter X VD1I- 

ENVIRONS OF NEW LONDON. 

WATERFORD, SOUTH — JORDAN VILLAGE — OSWEGATCHIE — MILLSTONE — 
PLEASURE BEACH — EAST LYME AND NIANTIC — CRESCENT BEACH — 
SOUTH LYME -BLACKHALL- LYME- SAYBROOK JUNCTION -THE CON- 
NECTICUT VALLEY TO MIDDLETOWN AND HARTFORD. 

On the South New London is 
closely allied, in business and social 
interests, by the passenger service of 
the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad principally, with a num- 
ber of towns and villages of importance. 

A part of the Town of Waterford 
lies next the City of New London. 
Jordan, the central village of this town, 
is reached bv team. It is an interesting 
hamlet, with pleasant homes, its church 
and schoolhouse, and a picturesque old 
mill, almost rivalling in anti(|uity the 
Olil Mill at New London. 

In the same way. bv tram. ( )swe- 
gatchie, a poptilar summer colony with 
a good hotel, is also reached. The 
settlement is on the borders of the 
Niantic River, and affords tine water 
views, charming drives, and excellent 
opportunities for boating and out-door 
games. 

Waterford proper, aiul Millstone, 
the tirst stations on the Shore Line 



Division of the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroad, furnish conven- 
ient access to the famous tjuarries of 
this section : the Booth Brothers and 
Hurricane Isle (Quarry, near the Great 
Neck Highway, and the (iardiner 
(^)iiarry, at Millstone Roint. Rleastire 
Reach, one of the favorite outing-places 
of the town, is on Niantic Bay. It is 
the summer home of a number of fam- 
ilies, auil has a comfortable hotel for 
the accommodation of other sojournere. 
Niantic is the next jilace of import- 
ance on this line. The facilities for 
boating, bathing, and lisliing here are 
excellent. On the Niantic River, in 
the olden days, many a good vessel for 
the coast trade was built. On the 
shores of the Bay many a feast of 
clams and fish was enjoyed by the 
inlander on his annual shore trip. 
Niantic is now one of the most attrac- 
tive resting places in summer, and a 
l)usv tisiiing village in the season. The 



187 



Iplcturcsque 1Rcw 1London» 



works of the Niantic Shoe Company 
arc lorated here, furiiisliing eniploy- 
ineiit to a niinil)er of Niantic and 
East Lyme people in a new local in- 
dustry. Good hotel accommodations 
can be found near the station. 

Crescent Heach, the next station, is 
the bright and livelj- home of a large 
number of cottagers, with three or 
four hotels of fair style and capacity. 
Tlie batliing. boating, and fisliiug. the 
delightful sea air, and the water views, 
are the special 
points of attraction 
here. South Lyme 
and Blackhall are 
small places on the 
same road ; Lyme, 
with its population 
of about seven hun- 
dred and fifty souls, 
coming next, before 
crossing the Con- 
necticut River and 
arriving at Saybrook 
.Junction. This 
junction has a wide 

T H K M I L L S T O N E G R A S I T E 

QuAinuKs, located at Millstone. Con- 
necticut, were established prior to 1834 
by Benajah Gardiner. Its present 
management, under the proprietorship 
of Henry (iardiner. dates its control 
from 18S8. The Gardiner Quarry is 
one of the busiest and most productive 
in the world, and annually turns out 
enormous quantities of granite, which 
it ships to nearly every portion of the 
civilized globe. Its product is used 
in all instances where the finest 
quality of material is exacted. The 
stone is a "true granite," and is free 
from foreign and deteriorative qualities. 
Many famous structures and memor- 
ials throughout the country have 
Millstone granite incorporated in their 
constructive elements. Among them 
are the following : The Custom House 
facade, New London; the City Hall. 
Norwich, Connecticut: the inscriptions 
on the Saratoga Monument, at Sara- 
toga, New York: the Mausoleum of 




OLD JORDAN MILL. 

ESTABLISHED 1712. 

Situated at ttic Head of Jordan Cove. Jordan i Watertord ) 

Connecticut. Where the Celebrated Jordan Table 

Meal is Manufactured by C. H. Brooks. 



celebrit}". Here is the best known 
portion of a little town of about sixteen 
hundred and fifty people. Its front is 
not particularly fascinating, but back 
of it will l)e found a pleasant and 
interesting village. From this place 
I-'enwick Point can Ije reached, by 
transfer. New Haven, New York, 
and the world beyond, can be gotten 
at by the main tlirougli line — the 
Sliore I^ine Division. 

The \'a]ley iiranch of the main line 
introduces one to 
the pleasant towns 
and villages of the 
Connecticut N'alley 
to Middletown, a 
beautiful old city — 
the seat of Wesleyan 
University,thc lioiiic 
of the I. E. Palmer 
Company, and a 
number of important 
m a n u f a c t u ring 
estalilislinieiits — and 
to Hartford, the 
Capital of the State. 

George W. Childs, Philadelphia: and 
the nionuinent to the memory of the 
late P. T. liarnuni, in IJiverside I'ark, 
liridgeport, Connecticut. 

The Millstone plant is modern in 
every particular, and operates the finest 
of u[)-to-date machinerj- and general 
appurtenances available. Its advan- 
tages of location add materially to its 
transportation conveniences, as it is 
situateil on the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Hailinad, and lias a tine 
frontage on tlie ocean, which proviiies 
excellent dock facilities. 

The \Vki.l Know.v Cokporatiox 
ov Booth Bkotiiki:s and Hurricane 
Isle Granite Company have been 
identified with the granite trade in all 
its phases for nearly thirt}- years. 
Wherever the stone interests are 
known, the prominence of this com- 
pany has been extended, for no other 
corporation has had more to do with 
National. State, and Municipal govern- 
ments. Examples of the corporation's 



188 



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189 



Ipicturcsquc 1Rew Uondon. 



iiuliistrv, capacity and progressiveiiess 
are shown in the tine l)uildings whicli 
they liave constructed in many cities 
all over the land, as well as the monu- 
mental work of the highest order of 
artistic skill, which adorns many of 
the cemeteries in the New England 
and MidiUe Western States. Besides 
their Waterford (Quarry the company 
have large interests in the State of 
Maine, in the following localities: 
Hurricane Isle, Waldolioro, Joncsport, 
Long ("ove. State I'oint, Pe([Uoit, and 
A'inal Haven, where hundreds of men 
are employed, and stone of any dimen- 
sions can be quarried and handlt'd, as 
the most improved machinery is in 
use, both in mining the stone and in 
its conversion to the finished product. 
From the quarries as enumerated, 
dressed stone for pul)lic buildings, 
vaults and tombs, is transported to all 
parts of the country-. 

The granite of this company stands 
for the highest order of cemetery work, 
it being especially adapted for sculp- 
tural designs, on account of its fine 
texture and the uniformity of its 
appearance. The elements which make 
up its physical composition are so well 
distributed that the ravages of the 



weather and atmospheric conditions 
have less effect upon it than on many 
other granites. The tincst cemeteries 
of the Ivistcrn and Middle States con- 
tain many meyiorials produced at this 
quarry, exhibiting the grandest concep- 
tion of art that genius has imparted to 
man. In Cedar (irove Cemetery, too, 
ma}- l)e seen the products of this 
famous quarry. 

A Nicki.v-Lktteked M(i|)Ki:n Sicn 
gives a business firm a certain amount 
of prestige. Mr. L. Stoddard, 50 State 
Street, over !?arker iS: May, is an artist 
in sign \\riting whose specialty is the 
making of signs for advertising pur- 
poses. He also makes original designs 
for trade-marks, emblems, etc. He 
treats all subjects in an artistic manner, 
adapting them to the advertisers' use. 
In mural work of all kinds for house 
or church decoration he is a master. 

Antikjnv (S: Tkaogi.s, wholesale and 
retail manufacturers of confectionery, 
at 18(5 State Street, established their 
lousiness in 1889. Their goods are of 
superior quality, and always fresh. 
For the unsurpassed deliciousness of 
their ice cream and soda water, they 
possess a reputation all their own. 




THE AVERY MEMORIAL - AVERY MEMORIAL PARK, GROTON. 

The Avery Memorial Marks the Site of the Old " Hive of the Averys." Built in 1656 by Captain James Avery and 
Occupied by Him and Seven Generations of His Descendants Until it was Burned, on the Night of July 20th. 1894. Avery 
Memorial Park is Two Miles From New London, on the Shore Line Railroad, and May Be Seen From the Passing Trains. 
The Secretary of the Avery Memorial Association is Miss Helen M. Avery, of Number 6. North Main Street. New London. 

190 



i>icturesque 1Rcw ILondon, 



Cvi'TAiN Thomas A. Scott, a l';i- and a working force of nearly one hun- 
moLis diver, wrecker aiirl contractor of dred men. Thus iiis equipment is 




New London, 
Connecticut, 
was b o rn at 
Snow Hill, Wor- 
cester County, 
Maryland, Aug- 
ust lOth, 1830. 
the son of Wil- 
liam and Eliza- 
beth Scott. 

In 1873 he 
became a resi- 
dent of N e w 
London, under- 
taking at that 
time a govern- 
ment contract 
to build Race 
Rock Light- 
house, besides 
many other im- 
j) o r t a n t c o n - 
tracts in wharf 
and sea-wall 
construction, 
among which 
was Pier No. 1, 
North River, New York. He also en- 
joys the distinction of I)eing the first 
man to work on the Brooklyn Brido'e. 
having made all the preliminary exam- 
inations of the river bottom, and 
superintended the work of laying the 
foundations of 
the spans. His 
wharf on I'e- 
quot avenue ex- 
tends two hun- 
dred feet into 
the harbor and 
has a frontagre 
of two hundred 
and fifty feet. 
His extensive 
1) u s i n e s s r e - 
quires four tugs, 
five lighters, 
two floating 
j)iledri vers, a 
dredge with five scows, besides pumps, 
boilers and heavy gear of every kind. 




equal to any 
emergency. 
Captain Scott's 
presence of 
mind, added to 
his (juickness of 
thou g h t and 
prompt, decisive 
action, makes 
him admirably 
successful in his 
chosen line of 
work. In poli- 
tics the Captain 
is a Republican. 
He has served 
as Alderman one 
term. 

On Septem- 
ber 5, IBoo, he 
was married 
to Harriet 
Whitbeck, of 
Port Jefferson, 
L. I., a native 
of C a t s k i 1 1 . 
N. Y. 

Captain Scott has a beautiful 
residence at 88 Pcquot avenue, 
surrounded by finely laid out and 
well kept lawns. It commands a 
fine view of the harbor and 
Fort Trumbull. He also owns 
White Rock 
Island, which 
is valuable 
I' or its large 
quantity of ex- 
c e 1 1 ent stone. 
I' e rs ona 1 ly , 
Captain Scott 
is a man of 
large physiiiue, 
weighing three 
hundred 
jiounds. He is 
held in high re- 
gard, his portly 
frame being 
typical of the generous heart and soul 
within. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS A. SCOTT 



VIEW OF CAPTAIN SCOTT'S DOCK. 



liU 



^— 'vjj v:i o \ 



[picturesque 1Rew Uondon. 







T UK A i: A - 
WANA Mills. 
I. E. 1'al.meu, 
Pi-(iprietor. — 
In 18t)4, on the 
bank of the 
Arawana stream 
at Mi(hlleto\vn, 
Conn., there was 
i\ modest 
t'acturi 

for the manufac- 
ture of combs, 
which building- 
is well illus- •>\ii>*'^ 
trated at the upper left hand of 
the accompanying factory sketch. It 
was at that time purchased by I. E. 
Palmer and fitted up for the manufac- 
ture of picture cord and allied articles. 




UTOPIA. 

During the successful progress of years 
this modest plant has grown to com- 
parative proportions as further illus- 
trated in the sketch, and at present 
embodies a series of buildings contain- 
ing all told about one hundred and 
forty thousand s(juare feet of floor 
space, with all the latest fac-tory con- 
struction recjuirements, including 
steam heat, automatic sprinklers, elec- 
tric lights, etc. Steam and water 
power is in use, having a capacity of 
about seven hundred horse power, and 
water power about seventy-five horse 
power. There are over three hundred 
machines all told (comprising over 
lifty different varieties), required for 
the various lines of manufacture. The 
nature of the business enlarged rapidly 
from one line of cotton industry to 
another until at present it includes 
the latest improved machinery for spin- 
ning cotton yarns, for warps and fillings 
and in plies, maclnnery for weaving. 



dyeing and finishing crinoline dress 
linings, mosquito nettings, window 
screen cloth, horse netting, minnow 
netting, and many varieties of cotton 
tissues : also machinery for completely 
manufacturing hanunocks from the 
raw cotton to the finished product, 
hammock supports and many hammock 
accessories, moscjuito canopies and 
accessories : also extensive wood-work- 
ing and iron working departments. It 
is doubtful whether many other man- 
ufacturing enterprises can exhibit as 
greatly a diversified line of products 




ARAWANA. 

as are included in the present plant, 
employing on an average from two 
hundred and seventy-five to three hun- 
dred hands. 

Over one hundred and fifty designs 
and mechanical patents furnish protec- 
tion to the line of manufactures and 
make possii)le the leading position which 
they hold. The plant possesses facili- 
ties for the comi)lcte finishing of ham- 
mocks not possessed by any other similar 
factory in existence. This remarkable 
growth is entirely the result of the con- 
tinuous labors of the present and sole 
proprietor, covering a period of forty- 
two years. 




S 000662129 6 



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